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Sample records for medium frequency repeats

  1. (Efficient identification and analysis of low and medium frequency repeats)

    SciTech Connect

    Jurka, J.

    1991-08-28

    The effective starting date of this grant was May 15. In the first three months of this project we focused primarily on organizational and technical aspects of our research which included: organization of the database of repeats in primates; preparation of software for rapid and sensitive search of novel repetitive elements in GenBank; purchase and installation of the Sun workstation; and research on the mammal-specific MAR1 family of repetitive elements (to be communicated in October).

  2. [Efficient identification and analysis of low and medium frequency repeats]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Jurka, J.

    1991-08-28

    The effective starting date of this grant was May 15. In the first three months of this project we focused primarily on organizational and technical aspects of our research which included: organization of the database of repeats in primates; preparation of software for rapid and sensitive search of novel repetitive elements in GenBank; purchase and installation of the Sun workstation; and research on the mammal-specific MAR1 family of repetitive elements (to be communicated in October).

  3. Medium-Frequency Pseudonoise Georadar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, G. Dickey; Carl, J. R.; Byerly, Kent A.; Amini, B. Jon

    2005-01-01

    Ground-probing radar systems featuring medium-frequency carrier signals phase-modulated by binary pseudonoise codes have been proposed. These systems would be used to locate and detect movements of subterranean surfaces; the primary intended application is in warning of the movement of underground water toward oil-well intake ports in time to shut down those ports to avoid pumping of water. Other potential applications include oil-well logging and monitoring of underground reservoirs. A typical prior georadar system operates at a carrier frequency of at least 50 MHz in order to provide useable range resolution. This frequency is too high for adequate penetration of many underground layers of interest. On the other hand, if the carrier frequency were to be reduced greatly to increase penetration, then bandwidth and thus range resolution would also have to be reduced, thereby rendering the system less useful. The proposed medium-frequency pseudonoise georadar systems would offer the advantage of greater penetration at lower carrier frequencies, but without the loss of resolution that would be incurred by operating typical prior georadar systems at lower frequencies.

  4. Using repeated sources to quantitatively determine temporal change of medium properties: Theory and an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Hui; Wen, Lianxing

    2012-09-01

    We develop a theory of using difference wavefields of repeated sources to locate and quantify temporal medium change and apply the theory to locate temporal change of seismic properties beneath the Japan subduction zone using repeated earthquakes. Our theory states the difference wavefields of two repeated sources in a temporally changed medium can be equivalently treated as wavefields propagating from conceptual sources, with their location at the place of temporal change and their strengths equal to the product of magnitude of medium property change and magnitude of the initial wavefields from the repeated sources. When the medium change extends to a finite region, the conceptual sources become volumetric sources distributed over the region of the medium change and propagating in the direction of the initial wave. The conceptualization establishes a theoretical framework for possible applications of using difference wavefields to locate and quantify temporal medium changes in geological sciences, ultrasonic experiments, civil engineering and medical imaging. We search repeating earthquakes occurring in the Japan subduction zone, formulate an empirical procedure to extract the difference wavefields between repeating earthquakes and determine temporal change of seismic properties using a back-projection method. We locate the temporal change of seismic properties beneath the Japan subduction zone to be at (37.2°N, 142°E), and estimate the magnitude of the conceptual body force associated with the temporal change to be 1.15 × 1010N, or as a reference, a 0.87% density change for an assumed volume of temporal change of 103 km3.

  5. Recombination frequency in plasmid DNA containing direct repeats--predictive correlation with repeat and intervening sequence length.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pedro H; Lemos, Francisco; Monteiro, Gabriel A; Prazeres, Duarte M F

    2008-09-01

    In this study, a simple non-linear mathematical function is proposed to accurately predict recombination frequencies in bacterial plasmid DNA harbouring directly repeated sequences. The mathematical function, which was developed on the basis of published data on deletion-formation in multicopy plasmids containing direct-repeats (14-856 bp) and intervening sequences (0-3872 bp), also accounts for the strain genotype in terms of its recA function. A bootstrap resampling technique was used to estimate confidence intervals for the correlation parameters. More than 92% of the predicted values were found to be within a pre-established +/-5-fold interval of deviation from experimental data. The correlation does not only provide a way to predict, with good accuracy, the recombination frequency, but also opens the way to improve insight into these processes.

  6. Extended gene expression by medium exchange and repeated transient transfection for recombinant protein production enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Laura; Gutiérrez-Granados, Sonia; Berrow, Nicholas Simon; Segura, Maria Mercedes; Gòdia, Francesc

    2015-05-01

    Production of recombinant products in mammalian cell cultures can be achieved by stable gene expression (SGE) or transient gene expression (TGE). The former is based on the integration of a plasmid DNA into the host cell genome allowing continuous gene expression. The latter is based on episomal plasmid DNA expression. Conventional TGE is limited to a short production period of usually about 96 h, therefore limiting productivity. A novel gene expression approach termed extended gene expression (EGE) is explored in this study. The aim of EGE is to prolong the production period by the combination of medium exchange and repeated transfection of cell cultures with plasmid DNA to improve overall protein production. The benefit of this methodology was evaluated for the production of three model recombinant products: intracellular GFP, secreted GFP, and a Gag-GFP virus-like particles (VLPs). Productions were carried out in HEK 293 cell suspension cultures grown in animal-derived component free media using polyethylenimine (PEI) as transfection reagent. Transfections were repeated throughout the production process using different plasmid DNA concentrations, intervals of time, and culture feeding conditions in order to identify the best approach to achieve sustained high-level gene expression. Using this novel EGE strategy, the production period was prolonged between 192 and 240 h with a 4-12-fold increase in production levels, depending on the product type considered.

  7. In situ observations of medium frequency auroral radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broughton, M.; Labelle, J. W.; Pfaff, R. F.; Parrot, M.; Yan, X.; Burchill, J. K.

    2013-12-01

    The auroral ionosphere is a region rich with plasma waves that can be studied both in space and on the ground. These waves may mediate energy exchange between particle populations and provide information about the local plasma properties and boundaries. Auroral medium frequency (MF) burst is an impulsive radio emission observed at ground-level from 1.3-4.5 MHz that is associated with local substorm onset. There have been two recent reports of impulsive, broadband, MF waves at high latitudes. Burchill and Pfaff [2005] reported observations from the FAST satellite of impulsive, broadband, MF and low frequency (LF) radio waves. Using data from the DEMETER satellite, Parrot et al. [2009] surveyed MF waves caused by lightning. This study did show a high-latitude population of MF waves. We investigate whether the waves observed by these two satellites are related to auroral MF burst. Using FAST satellite burst mode electric field data from high-latitude (> 60 degrees magnetic), low-altitude (< 1000 km) intervals of moderate to large geomagnetic activity (Kp > 3) from 1996-2002, we have found forty-four examples of impulsive MF waves, all of which are associated with impulsive LF waves. Although MF burst and the waves observed by FAST have similar spectral signatures, they have different magnetic local time dependencies, which suggests that they may be unrelated. A study of MF waves observed at high latitude by DEMETER is ongoing. In situ observations of MF burst could provide crucial information about this heretofore unexplained natural radio emission.

  8. Frequency of Repeated Courses Its Relation to Persistence and Performance in Lebanon's Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasser, Ramzi; Nauffal, Diane

    2012-01-01

    This study assesses the relationship between the frequency of repeating courses and students' performance in college. The study uses cohort data from academic years 2000/2001, 2001/2002, 2002/2003 and 2003/2004. We compared those who had repeated one, two and three courses on GPA and whether a relation exists of those who graduated/did not…

  9. Repeatability and heritability of divergent recombination frequencies in the Iowa Stiff Stalk Synthetic (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Hadad, R G; Pfeiffer, T W; Poneleit, C G

    1996-10-01

    Variability in recombination frequency was reported in the Iowa Stiff Stalk Synthetic. The objectives of the present research were to verify the differences in recombination frequency among individuals in the Iowa Stiff Stalk Synthetic maize population and to determine if the recombination frequency differences persisted among the S1 progeny. Testcrosses to measure male recombination frequency on three chromosomes (4, su1-c2; 5, a2-bt1-pr1; 9, sh1-bz1-wx1) were repeated for eight S0 individuals. Recombination frequencies were repeatably divergent among those individuals which were selected based on high or low recombination frequencies on specific chromosomes. Individuals which had been selected for long and short total map distances across the three chromosome regions produced repeatably divergent recombination frequencies only at the su1-c2 region. The recombination frequencies of the S1 lines, derived from the S0 individuals which had the most divergent recombination frequencies on a single chromosome, were significantly different. The broadsense heritability estimates derived from the regression of six S1 lines on six S0 individuals ranged from 0.69 to 0.20 for the five chromosome regions. We conclude that genetic differences for recombination frequency exist in this population and that modification by selection should be possible.

  10. Simulation of polarizer based on chiral medium for terahertz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolenko, S. Yu; Grebenchukov, A. N.; Masyukov, M. S.; Vozianova, A. V.; Khodzitsky, M. K.

    2016-08-01

    The work is devoted to development of the polarizer for terahertz frequency range. Chiral medium was simulated using the software package CST Microwave Studio by the method of Finite-Differences in Frequency Domain. The influence of geometry of chiral unit cell on the polarization of incident plane wave was investigated.

  11. FIRST VERY LOW FREQUENCY DETECTION OF SHORT REPEATED BURSTS FROM MAGNETAR SGR J1550-5418

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Y. T.; Takahashi, T.; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Bertoni, Fernando C. P.; Fagundes, P. R.; Chau, J.; Schuch, N. J.; Hayakawa, M.; Hobara, Y.; Terasawa, T.

    2010-09-20

    We report on the first detection of ionospheric disturbances caused by short repeated gamma-ray bursts from the magnetar SGR J1550-5418. Very low frequency (VLF) radio wave data obtained in South America clearly show sudden amplitude and phase changes at the corresponding times of eight soft gamma-ray repeater bursts. Maximum amplitude and phase changes of the VLF signals appear to be correlated with the gamma-ray fluence. On the other hand, VLF recovery timescales do not show any significant correlation with the fluence, possibly suggesting that the bursts' spectra are not similar to each other. In summary, Earth's ionosphere can be used as a very large gamma-ray detector and the VLF observations provide us with a new method to monitor high-energy astrophysical phenomena without interruption such as Earth occultation.

  12. Repeatability and relative validity of a quantitative food-frequency questionnaire among French adults

    PubMed Central

    Barrat, Emmanuel; Aubineau, Nicolas; Maillot, Matthieu; Derbord, Élodie; Barthes, Pauline; Lescuyer, Jean-François; Boisseau, Nathalie; Peltier, Sébastien L.

    2012-01-01

    Background A 50-item self-administered food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was developed for French adults, to assess the intake of energy, 10 macronutrients, 11 vitamins, and 11 minerals, and to be used in the context of a medical consultation. Objective To assess the repeatability and relative validity of this FFQ compared to a 7-day diet record (7-DR). Design A total of 54 and 100 French adults were included in the repeatability and validation studies, respectively. Repeatability was assessed using two FFQs, the second carried out 3 weeks after the first. In the validation study, subjects first completed the FFQ, then the 7-DR the following week. Energy and nutrient intakes were compared using Pearson correlation. The degree of misclassification by the FFQ, compared to the 7-DR, was calculated by a contingency table of quintiles. Bland–Altman plots assessed the correlation between FFQ and 7-DR across the intake range. Results Repeatability for intake, explored by Pearson correlation, was 0.62–0.90 (median: 0.81). Relative validity, as determined by Pearson correlation for the nutrient intake derived from the FFQ and 7-DR, was 0.36–0.80 (0.64). The FFQ tended to report higher fiber and micronutrient intake than 7-DR. Misclassification into opposite quintiles ranged 0–6% (1%), whereas classification into same or adjacent quintiles ranged 59–83% (74%). Bland–Altman plots showed good agreement for most nutrients across the range of intake. Conclusion This new FFQ showed a high repeatability and good relative validity, and thanks to its short length, should be a useful tool for rapidly evaluating the nutrient intake of French adults. PMID:23118710

  13. Populations of striatal medium spiny neurons encode vibrotactile frequency in rats: modulation by slow wave oscillations.

    PubMed

    Hawking, Thomas G; Gerdjikov, Todor V

    2013-01-01

    Dorsolateral striatum (DLS) is implicated in tactile perception and receives strong projections from somatosensory cortex. However, the sensory representations encoded by striatal projection neurons are not well understood. Here we characterized the contribution of DLS to the encoding of vibrotactile information in rats by assessing striatal responses to precise frequency stimuli delivered to a single vibrissa. We applied stimuli in a frequency range (45-90 Hz) that evokes discriminable percepts and carries most of the power of vibrissa vibration elicited by a range of complex fine textures. Both medium spiny neurons and evoked potentials showed tactile responses that were modulated by slow wave oscillations. Furthermore, medium spiny neuron population responses represented stimulus frequency on par with previously reported behavioral benchmarks. Our results suggest that striatum encodes frequency information of vibrotactile stimuli which is dynamically modulated by ongoing brain state.

  14. Threshold frequency of an electrically induced cramp increases following a repeated, localized fatiguing exercise.

    PubMed

    Stone, Marcus B; Edwards, Jeffrey E; Huxel, Kellie C; Cordova, Mitchell L; Ingersoll, Christopher D; Babington, J Patrick

    2010-02-01

    Though clinical observations and laboratory data provide some support for the neuromuscular imbalance theory of the genesis of exercise-associated muscle cramps, no direct evidence has been published. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of local muscle fatigue on the threshold frequency of an electrically induced muscle cramp. To determine baseline threshold frequency, a cramp was electrically induced in the flexor hallucis brevis of 16 apparently healthy participants (7 males, 9 females; age 25.1 +/- 4.8 years). The testing order of control and fatigue conditions was counterbalanced. In the control condition, participants rested in a supine position for 30 min followed by another cramp induction to determine post-threshold frequency. In the fatigue condition, participants performed five bouts of great toe curls at 60% one-repetition maximum to failure with 1 min rest between bouts followed immediately by a post-threshold frequency measurement. Repeated-measures analysis of variance and simple main effects testing showed post-fatigue threshold frequency (32.9 +/- 11.7 Hz) was greater (P < 0.001) than pre-fatigue threshold frequency (20.0 +/- 7.7 Hz). An increase in threshold frequency seems to demonstrate a decrease in one's propensity to cramp following the fatigue exercise regimen used. These results contradict the proposed theory that suggests cramp propensity should increase following fatigue. However, differences in laboratory versus clinical fatiguing exercise and contributions from other sources, as well as the notion of a graded response to fatiguing exercise, on exercise-associated muscle cramp and electrically induced muscle cramp should be considered.

  15. Envelope, phase, and frequency of ultrabroadband signal in a transparent medium

    SciTech Connect

    Shpolyanskiy, Yu. A.

    2010-10-15

    Analytical signal formalism is used for derivation of expressions for a complex envelope of radiation with ultrabroadband spectrum and an arbitrary waveform, which occur rarely in modern texts on nonlinear optics. It is demonstrated that the envelope, phase, and instantaneous frequency of femtosecond radiation pulses with an ultrabroad spectrum in a transparent medium can exhibit oscillations with a characteristic time scale considerably shorter than one field cycle at the central frequency. The interference of pulses and the generation of multiple frequencies are among phenomena giving rise to such features. It is marked that the violation of conditions imposed by the theory of analytical signal leads to ambiguity of the complex envelope.

  16. Unraveling the Intricacies of Cascadia Slow-Slip Rupture Using Repeating Low-Frequency Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creager, K. C.; Sweet, J. R.; Chestler, S.; Houston, H.; Vidale, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Using data from the 2-year Array of Arrays and the 6-year CAFE seismic experiments on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington, we have identified and located nine groups (families) of repeating Low-Frequency Earthquakes (LFEs). Each family locates within a few km of the plate interface as estimated by active-source wide-angle reflections (Preston et al., Science, 2003) and repeats 100s to 10,000 times in intriguing temporal patterns. At the down-dip end they light up every 1-2 weeks, each with 10s to 100s of LFE repeats, during typical time scales of about one hour. Double-difference locations indicate the LFEs are constrained to a linear patch 2 km long, on the plate interface elongated in the direction of relative plate motion. In contrast, the up-dip-most LFE family lights up primarily during the big 14-month Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events. It repeatedly exhibits a pattern of being quiet for 14 months, then lighting up with hundreds of repeats during a few hour period, which we interpret as the main ETS rupture front passing the location of the LFE family. This is followed by a five-day period of quiescence punctuated by about a dozen short-duration episodes of frenzied LFE activity. Monitoring LFE families within 20 km of each other, we find their bursts of activity correlate roughly with each other, but with time lags of 10s of minutes to hours. We interpret this activity as the passage of streaks and Rapid Tremor Reversals that occur during the 5 days after the main rupture front passes. After this time, either the stress is relieved, or the fault has healed and the LFE family is quiet for another 14 months. The magnitudes of the down-dip LFEs, based on S-wave amplitudes, range from -1 to 1. In the limited magnitude range over which our LFE catalog is complete (0.6 magnitude units) they appear to follow a Gutenberg-Richter distribution with a very large b-value of 4. There is a systematic pattern of short-duration LFE activity happening often (every 1

  17. Improvement in medium long-term frequency stability of the integrating sphere cold atom clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Cheng, Huadong; Meng, Yanling; Wan, Jinyin; Xiao, Ling; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Yaning; Liu, Liang

    2016-07-01

    The medium-long term frequency stability of the integrating sphere cold atom clock was improved.During the clock operation, Rb atoms were cooled and manipulated using cooling light diffusely reflected by the inner surface of a microwave cavity in the clock. This light heated the cavity and caused a frequency drift from the resonant frequency of the cavity. Power fluctuations of the cooling light led to atomic density variations in the cavity's central area, which increased the clock frequency instability through a cavity pulling effect. We overcame these limitations with appropriate solutions. A frequency stability of 3.5E-15 was achieved when the integrating time ? increased to 2E4 s.

  18. Time-domain electromagnetic energy in a frequency-dispersive left-handed medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Tie Jun; Kong, Jin Au

    2004-11-01

    From Maxwell’s equations and the Poynting theorem, the time-domain electric and magnetic energy densities are generally defined in the frequency-dispersive media based on the conservation of energy. As a consequence, a general definition of electric and magnetic energy is proposed. Comparing with existing formulations of electric and magnetic energy in frequency-dispersive media, the new definition is more reasonable and is valid in any case. Using the new definition and staring from the equation of motion, we have shown rigorously that the total energy density and the individual electric and magnetic energy densities are always positive in a realistic artificial left-handed medium (LHM) [

    R. A. Shelby, D. R. Smith, and S. Schultz, Science 292, 77 (2001)
    ], which obeys actually the Lorentz medium model, although such a LHM has negative permittivity and negative permeability simultaneously in a certain frequency range. We have also shown that the conservation of energy is not violated in LHM. The earlier conclusions can be easily extended to the Drude medium model and the cold plasma medium model. Through an exact analysis of a one-dimensional transient current source radiating in LHM, numerical results are given to demonstrate that the work done by source, the power flowing outwards a surface, and the electric and magnetic energy stored in a volume are all positive in the time domain.

  19. Low-frequency asymptotic analysis of seismic reflection from afluid-saturated medium

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, D.B.; Korneev, V.A.; Goloshubin, G.M.; Patzek, T.W.

    2004-04-14

    Reflection of a seismic wave from a plane interface betweentwo elastic media does not depend on the frequency. If one of the mediais poroelastic and fluid-saturated, then the reflection becomesfrequency-dependent. This paper presents a low-frequency asymptoticformula for the reflection of seismic plane p-wave from a fluid-saturatedporous medium. The obtained asymptotic scaling of the frequency-dependentcomponent of the reflection coefficient shows that it is asymptoticallyproportional to the square root of the product of the reservoir fluidmobility and the frequency of the signal. The dependence of this scalingon the dynamic Darcy's law relaxation time is investigated as well.Derivation of the main equations of the theory of poroelasticity from thedynamic filtration theory reveals that this relaxation time isproportional to Biot's tortuosity parameter.

  20. Low-frequency Carbon Radio Recombination Lines. II. The Diffuse Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, F.; Morabito, L. K.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Salas, P.; Toribio, M. C.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2017-03-01

    In the second paper of the series, we have modeled low-frequency carbon radio recombination lines (CRRLs) from the interstellar medium. Anticipating the Low Frequency Array survey of Galactic CRRLs, we focus our study on the physical conditions of the diffuse, cold neutral medium. We have used the improved departure coefficients computed in the first paper of the series to calculate line-to-continuum ratios. The results show that the line width and integrated optical depths of CRRLs are sensitive probes of the electron density, gas temperature, and emission measure of the cloud. Furthermore, the ratio of CRRL to the [C ii] at the 158 μm line is a strong function of the temperature and density of diffuse clouds. Guided by our calculations, we analyze CRRL observations and illustrate their use with data from the literature.

  1. Variation in high-frequency wave radiation from small repeating earthquakes as revealed by cross-spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, Norishige; Uchida, Naoki; Matsuzawa, Toru; Okada, Tomomi; Nakajima, Junichi; Matsushima, Takeshi; Kono, Toshio; Hirahara, Satoshi; Nakayama, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    We examined the variation in the high-frequency wave radiation for three repeating earthquake sequences (M = 3.1-4.1) in the northeastern Japan subduction zone by waveform analyses. Earthquakes in each repeating sequence are located at almost the same place and show low-angle thrust type focal mechanisms, indicating that they represent repeated ruptures of a seismic patch on the plate boundary. We calculated cross-spectra of the waveforms and obtained the phases and coherences for pairs of events in the respective repeating sequences in order to investigate the waveform differences. We used waveform data sampled at 1 kHz that were obtained from temporary seismic observations we conducted immediately after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake near the source area. For two repeating sequences, we found that the interevent delay times for the two waveforms in a frequency band higher than the corner frequencies are different from those in a lower frequency band for particular event pairs. The phases and coherences show that there are coherent high-frequency waves for almost all the repeaters regardless of the high-frequency delays. These results indicate that high-frequency waves are always radiated from the same vicinity (subpatch) for these events but the time intervals between the ruptures of the subpatch and the centroid times can vary. We classified events in the sequence into two subgroups according to the high-frequency band interevent delays relative to the low-frequency band. For one sequence, we found that all the events that occurred just after (within 11 days) larger nearby earthquakes belong to one subgroup while other events belong to the other subgroup. This suggests that the high-frequency wave differences were caused by stress perturbations due to the nearby earthquakes. In summary, our observations suggest that high-frequency waves from the repeating sequence are radiated not from everywhere but from a long-duration subpatch within the seismic slip area. The

  2. Mesospheric wind measurements using a medium-frequency imaging Doppler interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, G. W.; scatterers.

    1986-01-01

    Wind results from a medium-frequency radar operated as an imaging Doppler interferometer are presented. Ten independent antennas, together with mesospheric wind motions, were used to Doppler-sort and then echo-locate individual scattering points. The three-dimensional location and radial velocity of each discrete scattering point was determined. Mean winds were then determined by a least squares fit to the radial velocities of the ensemble of scatterers.

  3. Improving Ambiguity Resolution for Medium Baselines Using Combined GPS and BDS Dual/Triple-Frequency Observations.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wang; Gao, Chengfa; Pan, Shuguo; Wang, Denghui; Deng, Jiadong

    2015-10-30

    The regional constellation of the BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS) has been providing continuous positioning, navigation and timing services since 27 December 2012, covering China and the surrounding area. Real-time kinematic (RTK) positioning with combined BDS and GPS observations is feasible. Besides, all satellites of BDS can transmit triple-frequency signals. Using the advantages of multi-pseudorange and carrier observations from multi-systems and multi-frequencies is expected to be of much benefit for ambiguity resolution (AR). We propose an integrated AR strategy for medium baselines by using the combined GPS and BDS dual/triple-frequency observations. In the method, firstly the extra-wide-lane (EWL) ambiguities of triple-frequency system, i.e., BDS, are determined first. Then the dual-frequency WL ambiguities of BDS and GPS were resolved with the geometry-based model by using the BDS ambiguity-fixed EWL observations. After that, basic (i.e., L1/L2 or B1/B2) ambiguities of BDS and GPS are estimated together with the so-called ionosphere-constrained model, where the ambiguity-fixed WL observations are added to enhance the model strength. During both of the WL and basic AR, a partial ambiguity fixing (PAF) strategy is adopted to weaken the negative influence of new-rising or low-elevation satellites. Experiments were conducted and presented, in which the GPS/BDS dual/triple-frequency data were collected in Nanjing and Zhengzhou of China, with the baseline distance varying from about 28.6 to 51.9 km. The results indicate that, compared to the single triple-frequency BDS system, the combined system can significantly enhance the AR model strength, and thus improve AR performance for medium baselines with a 75.7% reduction of initialization time on average. Besides, more accurate and stable positioning results can also be derived by using the combined GPS/BDS system.

  4. Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate) Production in Repeated fed-Batch with Cell Recycle Using a Medium with low Carbon Source Concentration.

    PubMed

    Ienczak, Jaciane Lutz; Schmidt, Mélodi; Quines, Luci Kelin; Zanfonato, Kellen; da Cruz Pradella, José Geraldo; Schmidell, Willibaldo; de Aragao, Glaucia Maria Falcao

    2016-01-01

    Among approaches applied to obtain high productivity and low production costs in bioprocesses are high cell density and the use of low cost substrates. Usually low cost substrates, as waste/agroindustrial residues, have low carbon concentration, which leads to a difficulty in operating bioprocesses. Real time control of process for intracellular products is also difficult. The present study proposes a strategy of repeated fed-batch with cell recycle to attain high cell density of Cupriavidus necator and high poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (P(3HB)) productivity, using a substrate with low carbon source concentration (90 g l(-1)). Also, the use of the oxygen uptake rate data was pointed out as an on line solution for process control, once P(3HB) is an intracellular product. The results showed that total biomass (X), residual biomass (Xr) and P(3HB) values at the end of the culture were 61.6 g l(-1), 19.3 g l(-1) and 42.4 g l(-1) respectively, equivalent to 68.8 % of P(3HB) in the cells, and P(3HB) productivity of 1.0 g l(-1) h(-1). Therefore, the strategy proposed was efficient to achieve high productivity and high polymer content from a medium with low carbon source concentration.

  5. Trinucleotide repeats at the FRAXF locus: Frequency and distribution in the general population

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, J.J.A.; Walker, M.

    1996-08-09

    FRAXF the third X-chromosomal fragile site to be cloned, has been shown to harbor a polymorphic compound triplet array: (GC-CGTC){sub n} (GCC){sub n}. Expansion and methylation of the GCC-repeat and the neighboring CpG-rich region result in chromosomal fragility. DNAs from 500 anonymous consecutive newborn males were examined to determine the incidence of various repeat numbers. The range of repeats was from 10-38, with the most common alleles having 14 (52.7%), 12 (16.6%), 21 (9.0%), and 22 (5.2%) triplets. Based on the distribution of repeat numbers, we suggest that the 21-repeat allele resulted from hairpin formation involving 7 GCC-repeats in a 14-repeat allele, accompanied by polymerase slippage. Examination of dinucleotide repeats near the FRAXF repeat will be important in testing this hypothesis. Since the clinical phenotype, if any, of FRAXF is unknown, this database will also be valuable for comparisons with repeat numbers in individuals from special populations. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Determination of medium electrical properties through full-wave modelling of frequency domain reflectrometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Frédéric; Lambot, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    Accurate knowledge of the shallow soil properties is of prime importance in agricultural, hydrological and environmental engineering. During the last decade, numerous geophysical techniques, either invasive or resorting to proximal or remote sensing, have been developed and applied for quantitative characterization of soil properties. Amongst them, time domain reflectrometry (TDR) and frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) are recognized as standard techniques for the determination of soil dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity, based on the reflected electromagnetic waves from a probe inserted into the soil. TDR data were first commonly analyzed in the time domain using methods considering only a part of the waveform information. Later, advancements have led to the possibility of analyzing the TDR signal through full-wave inverse modeling either in the time or the frequency domains. A major advantage of FDR compared to TDR is the possibility to increase the bandwidth, thereby increasing the information content of the data and providing more detailed characterization of the medium. Amongst the recent works in this field, Minet et al. (2010) developed a modeling procedure for processing FDR data based on an exact solution of Maxwell's equations for wave propagation in one-dimensional multilayered media. In this approach, the probe head is decoupled from the medium and is fully described by characteristic transfer functions. The authors successfully validated the method for homogeneous sand subject to a range of water contents. In the present study, we further validated the modelling approach using reference liquids with well-characterized frequency-dependent electrical properties. In addition, the FDR model was coupled with a dielectric mixing model to investigate the ability of retrieving water content, pore water electrical conductivity and sand porosity from inversion of FDR data acquired in sand subject to different water content levels. Finally, the

  7. Development of a practical and cost-effective medium for bioethanol production from the seaweed hydrolysate in surface-aerated fermentor by repeated-batch operation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Eun; Lee, Ji-Eun; Shin, Ga-Young; Choi, Woon Yong; Kang, Do Hyung; Lee, Hyeon-Yong; Jung, Kyung-Hwan

    2012-01-01

    To develop a practical and cost-effective medium for bioethanol production from the hydrolysate of seaweed Sargassum sagamianum, we investigated the feasibility and performance of bioethanol production in CSL (cornsteep liquor)-containing medium, where yeast Pichia stipitis was used and the repeated batch was carried out in a surface-aerated fermentor. The optimal medium replacement time during the repeated operation was determined to be 36 h, and the surface aeration rates were 30 and 100 ml/min. Under these conditions, the repeatedbatch operation was successfully carried out for 6 runs (216 h), in which the maximum bioethanol concentrations reached about 11-12 g/l at each batch operation. These results demonstrated that bioethanol production could be carried out repeatedly and steadily for 216 h. In these experiments, the total cumulative bioethanol production was 57.9 g and 58.0 g when the surface aeration rates were 30 ml/min and 100 ml/min, respectively. In addition, the bioethanol yields were 0.43 (about 84% of theoretical value) and 0.44 (about 86% of theoretical value) when the surface aeration rates were 30 ml/min and 100 ml/min, respectively. CSL was successfully used as a medium ingredient for the bioethanol production from the hydrolysate of seaweed Sargassum sagamianum, indicating that this medium may be practical and cost-effective for bioethanol production.

  8. A family of repeating low-frequency earthquakes at the downdip edge of tremor and slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, Justin R.; Creager, Kenneth C.; Houston, Heidi

    2014-09-01

    analyze an isolated low-frequency earthquake (LFE) family located at the downdip edge of the main episodic tremor and slip (ETS) zone beneath western Washington State. The 9000 individual LFEs from this repeating family cluster into 198 swarms that recur roughly every week. Cumulative LFE seismic moment for each swarm correlates strongly with the time until the next swarm, suggesting that these LFE swarms are time predictable. Precise double-difference relative locations for 700 individual LFEs within this family show a distribution that is approximately 2 km long and 500 m wide, elongated parallel to the relative plate convergence direction. The distribution of locations (<300 m vertical spread) lies within a few hundred meters of two different plate interface models and has a similar dip. Peak-to-peak LFE S wave amplitudes range from 0.2 to 18 nm. Individual LFEs exhibit a trend of increasing magnitude during swarms, with smaller events at the beginning and the largest events toward the end. The largest LFEs cluster in a small area (300 m radius) coincident with maximum LFE density. We propose that the less-concentrated smaller LFEs act to unlock this patch core, allowing it to fully rupture in the largest LFEs, usually toward the end of a swarm. We interpret the patch responsible for producing these LFEs as a subducted seamount on the downgoing Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate. LFE locking efficiency (slip estimated during 5 years from summing LFE seismic moment divided by plate-rate-determined slip) is at most 20% and is highly concentrated in two ˜50 m radius locations in the larger patch core. Estimated individual LFE stress drops range from 1 to 20 kPa, but could also be significantly larger.

  9. Improving Ambiguity Resolution for Medium Baselines Using Combined GPS and BDS Dual/Triple-Frequency Observations

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wang; Gao, Chengfa; Pan, Shuguo; Wang, Denghui; Deng, Jiadong

    2015-01-01

    The regional constellation of the BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS) has been providing continuous positioning, navigation and timing services since 27 December 2012, covering China and the surrounding area. Real-time kinematic (RTK) positioning with combined BDS and GPS observations is feasible. Besides, all satellites of BDS can transmit triple-frequency signals. Using the advantages of multi-pseudorange and carrier observations from multi-systems and multi-frequencies is expected to be of much benefit for ambiguity resolution (AR). We propose an integrated AR strategy for medium baselines by using the combined GPS and BDS dual/triple-frequency observations. In the method, firstly the extra-wide-lane (EWL) ambiguities of triple-frequency system, i.e., BDS, are determined first. Then the dual-frequency WL ambiguities of BDS and GPS were resolved with the geometry-based model by using the BDS ambiguity-fixed EWL observations. After that, basic (i.e., L1/L2 or B1/B2) ambiguities of BDS and GPS are estimated together with the so-called ionosphere-constrained model, where the ambiguity-fixed WL observations are added to enhance the model strength. During both of the WL and basic AR, a partial ambiguity fixing (PAF) strategy is adopted to weaken the negative influence of new-rising or low-elevation satellites. Experiments were conducted and presented, in which the GPS/BDS dual/triple-frequency data were collected in Nanjing and Zhengzhou of China, with the baseline distance varying from about 28.6 to 51.9 km. The results indicate that, compared to the single triple-frequency BDS system, the combined system can significantly enhance the AR model strength, and thus improve AR performance for medium baselines with a 75.7% reduction of initialization time on average. Besides, more accurate and stable positioning results can also be derived by using the combined GPS/BDS system. PMID:26528977

  10. Repeatability of frequency of corrective foot pressure during balance control in children aged between 2 and 7.

    PubMed

    Sobera, Małgorzata; Siedlecka, Bożena

    2010-01-01

    The frequency of corrective signal (the centre of corrective (COC) signal), which is the decomposition of COP (centre of pressure) and estimated COM (centre of mass) time series, is one of the indicators reflecting the quality of postural control during stance. Young children, in the period of intensive development, gradually improve the quality of postural control in a daily life. The purpose of this paper was to describe the time series of corrective centre of foot pressure repeatability in young children aged between 2 and 7 during body stability in natural stance position. 272 healthy children aged between 2 and 7 were divided into 6 age groups. Two AccuSway force platforms were used (one foot of the subject was on one platform, the second foot, on the other). The COP trajectories were the basis for the calculation of the frequency stability indices in frontal and sagittal planes for the left leg and right leg separately. The COC signals were collected by the method based on the Kuczyński viscoelastic model. In order to assess the repeatability, the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) was used between the 1st and the 2nd trials, the 2nd and the 3rd trials, and the 1st and the 3rd trials. The maturation of postural control system goes rather slowly in two youngest groups which showed the poor repeatability in COC frequency between the 2nd and the 3rd years of life. From the 4th to the 7th year of life the inter-session repeatability rapidly increases in three consecutive trials. Poor difference of frequency concordance was found between the left and right lower limbs. It is concluded that the frequency of corrective foot pressure is the reliable indicator of postural control for children aged between 4 and 7, but not for younger ones.

  11. Theoretical study of the infrared frequencies of crystalline methyl acetate under interstellar medium conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Radhika; Inomata, Kensuke; Gopakumar, Geetha; Sivaraman, Bhalamurugan; Zempo, Yasunari; Hada, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Identification of methyl acetate in the interstellar medium (ISM) and its spectroscopic studies have prompted us to investigate the structure of crystalline methyl acetate using numerical calculations. Here, we present a theoretical study of the structure of crystalline methyl acetate and its isotopologues and compare the calculated infrared (IR) spectra with the available experimental data. The optimized structure and vibrational properties were calculated using SIESTA software at 0 K. In the optimization process, the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional and conjugate gradient methods were used with double zeta polarization basis functions. After optimization of the periodic structure, the vibrational frequencies and normal modes were calculated within the harmonic approximation. Using the calculated results, we refine the mode assignments of experimental work on crystalline methyl acetate and determine the low frequency modes (below 650 cm- 1). To investigate the accuracy of the pseudopotential and confirm the IR frequencies, we performed molecular calculations using a periodic model of methyl acetate and its isotopologues using SIESTA and compared them with results obtained from Gaussian 09 (all electron method) calculations. Finally, we assigned the vibrational modes of crystalline CD3-COO-CH3 and CH3-COO-CD3, for which experimental data are not available in the crystalline phase under ISM conditions. For all of the calculation methods, the IR vibrational modes of molecular and crystalline methyl acetate and its isotopologues were in good agreement with the available experimental data and predict the unavailable values.

  12. Theoretical study of the infrared frequencies of crystalline methyl acetate under interstellar medium conditions.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Radhika; Inomata, Kensuke; Gopakumar, Geetha; Sivaraman, Bhalamurugan; Zempo, Yasunari; Hada, Masahiko

    2016-01-15

    Identification of methyl acetate in the interstellar medium (ISM) and its spectroscopic studies have prompted us to investigate the structure of crystalline methyl acetate using numerical calculations. Here, we present a theoretical study of the structure of crystalline methyl acetate and its isotopologues and compare the calculated infrared (IR) spectra with the available experimental data. The optimized structure and vibrational properties were calculated using SIESTA software at 0 K. In the optimization process, the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional and conjugate gradient methods were used with double zeta polarization basis functions. After optimization of the periodic structure, the vibrational frequencies and normal modes were calculated within the harmonic approximation. Using the calculated results, we refine the mode assignments of experimental work on crystalline methyl acetate and determine the low frequency modes (below 650 cm(-1)). To investigate the accuracy of the pseudopotential and confirm the IR frequencies, we performed molecular calculations using a periodic model of methyl acetate and its isotopologues using SIESTA and compared them with results obtained from Gaussian 09 (all electron method) calculations. Finally, we assigned the vibrational modes of crystalline CD3-COO-CH3 and CH3-COO-CD3, for which experimental data are not available in the crystalline phase under ISM conditions. For all of the calculation methods, the IR vibrational modes of molecular and crystalline methyl acetate and its isotopologues were in good agreement with the available experimental data and predict the unavailable values.

  13. A Hybrid Approach for Efficient Modeling of Medium-Frequency Propagation in Coal Mines

    PubMed Central

    Brocker, Donovan E.; Sieber, Peter E.; Waynert, Joseph A.; Li, Jingcheng; Werner, Pingjuan L.; Werner, Douglas H.

    2015-01-01

    An efficient procedure for modeling medium frequency (MF) communications in coal mines is introduced. In particular, a hybrid approach is formulated and demonstrated utilizing ideal transmission line equations to model MF propagation in combination with full-wave sections used for accurate simulation of local antenna-line coupling and other near-field effects. This work confirms that the hybrid method accurately models signal propagation from a source to a load for various system geometries and material compositions, while significantly reducing computation time. With such dramatic improvement to solution times, it becomes feasible to perform large-scale optimizations with the primary motivation of improving communications in coal mines both for daily operations and emergency response. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the hybrid approach is suitable for modeling and optimizing large communication networks in coal mines that may otherwise be intractable to simulate using traditional full-wave techniques such as moment methods or finite-element analysis. PMID:26478686

  14. Medium frequency propagation characteristics of different transmission lines in an underground coal mine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingcheng; Waynert, Joseph A.; Whisner, Bruce G.

    2015-01-01

    A medium frequency (MF) communication system operating in an underground coal mine couples its signals to a long conductor, which acts as an MF transmission line (TL) in a tunnel to permit communications among transceivers along the line. The TL is generally the longest signal path for the system, and its propagation characteristics will have a major impact on the performance of the MF communication system. In this study, the propagation characteristics of three types of MF TLs in two layouts—on the roof and on the floor of a coal mine tunnel—were obtained in an effort to understand the propagation characteristics of different TLs in different locations. The study confirmed a low MF signal loss on all of these TLs. The study also found that the TLs in different layouts had substantially different propagation characteristics. The propagation characteristics of these different TLs in different layouts are presented in the paper. PMID:26203349

  15. Medium frequency propagation characteristics of different transmission lines in an underground coal mine.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingcheng; Waynert, Joseph A; Whisner, Bruce G

    A medium frequency (MF) communication system operating in an underground coal mine couples its signals to a long conductor, which acts as an MF transmission line (TL) in a tunnel to permit communications among transceivers along the line. The TL is generally the longest signal path for the system, and its propagation characteristics will have a major impact on the performance of the MF communication system. In this study, the propagation characteristics of three types of MF TLs in two layouts-on the roof and on the floor of a coal mine tunnel-were obtained in an effort to understand the propagation characteristics of different TLs in different locations. The study confirmed a low MF signal loss on all of these TLs. The study also found that the TLs in different layouts had substantially different propagation characteristics. The propagation characteristics of these different TLs in different layouts are presented in the paper.

  16. On the propagation and mode conversion of auroral medium frequency bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broughton, M. C.; LaBelle, J.; Kim, E.-H.; Yoon, P. H.; Johnson, J. R.; Cairns, I. H.

    2016-02-01

    Auroral medium frequency (MF) bursts are broadband, impulsive radio emissions associated with local substorm onsets. MF bursts consist of a characteristic fine structure whereby the higher frequencies arrive 10-100 ms before the lower frequencies. LaBelle (2011a) proposed that MF bursts originate as Langmuir/Z mode waves on the topside of the ionosphere that mode-convert to LO mode waves and propagate to ground level, with the fine structure resulting by propagation delays due to the topside ionospheric density profile. We investigate three aspects of this mechanism. First, full-wave calculations are used to simulate the MF burst fine structure using a realistic ionospheric density profile. The delay between the highest and lowest frequencies is 21 ms. This value is smaller than the experimentally determined delays of ˜100 ms presented in Bunch and LaBelle (2009), but differences between the topside electron number density profile used in the simulations and the number density profile during disturbed conditions make comparisons only approximate. Second, the Landau damping of Langmuir/Z mode waves on the topside ionosphere is calculated, assuming the electron distribution function consists of a cold background population (ne0) and a warm secondary population (nse). The Landau damping is small when nse/ne0 = 0.04% (consistent with Maggs and Lotko (1981)) but is significant when nse/ne0 > 0.4%. Finally, full-wave calculations are used to determine the mode conversion efficiency from Langmuir/Z mode waves to LO mode waves. These imply that waves would suffer an attenuation of wave energy density of approximately 5-10% if they are generated with their wave vectors in a narrow cone centered around the local magnetic field. Taken together, these calculations suggest that for small values of nse/ne0 <0.4%, the mechanism proposed by LaBelle (2011a) is a plausible explanation for the origin of MF bursts.

  17. Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made from medium and low-purity niobium ingots

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2016-04-07

    Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made of ingot niobium with residual resistivity ratio (RRR) greater than 250 have proven to have similar or better performance than fine-grain Nb cavities of the same purity, after standard processing. The high purity requirement contributes to the high cost of the material. As superconducting accelerators operating in continuous-wave typically require cavities to operate at moderate accelerating gradients, using lower purity material could be advantageous not only to reduce cost but also to achieve higher Q0-values. In this contribution we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of 1.3–1.5 GHz single-cell cavities made of ingot Nb of medium (RRR = 100–150) and low (RRR = 60) purity from different suppliers. Cavities made of medium-purity ingots routinely achieved peak surface magnetic field values greater than 70 mT with an average Q0-value of 2 × 1010 at 2 K after standard processing treatments. As a result, the performances of cavities made of low-purity ingots were affected by significant pitting of the surface after chemical etching.

  18. Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made from medium and low-purity niobium ingots

    DOE PAGES

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2016-04-07

    Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made of ingot niobium with residual resistivity ratio (RRR) greater than 250 have proven to have similar or better performance than fine-grain Nb cavities of the same purity, after standard processing. The high purity requirement contributes to the high cost of the material. As superconducting accelerators operating in continuous-wave typically require cavities to operate at moderate accelerating gradients, using lower purity material could be advantageous not only to reduce cost but also to achieve higher Q0-values. In this contribution we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of 1.3–1.5 GHz single-cell cavities made of ingot Nb ofmore » medium (RRR = 100–150) and low (RRR = 60) purity from different suppliers. Cavities made of medium-purity ingots routinely achieved peak surface magnetic field values greater than 70 mT with an average Q0-value of 2 × 1010 at 2 K after standard processing treatments. As a result, the performances of cavities made of low-purity ingots were affected by significant pitting of the surface after chemical etching.« less

  19. Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made from medium and low-purity niobium ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made of ingot niobium with residual resistivity ratio (RRR) greater than 250 have proven to have similar or better performance than fine-grain Nb cavities of the same purity, after standard processing. The high purity requirement contributes to the high cost of the material. As superconducting accelerators operating in continuous-wave typically require cavities to operate at moderate accelerating gradients, using lower purity material could be advantageous not only to reduce cost but also to achieve higher Q 0-values. In this contribution we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of 1.3-1.5 GHz single-cell cavities made of ingot Nb of medium (RRR = 100-150) and low (RRR = 60) purity from different suppliers. Cavities made of medium-purity ingots routinely achieved peak surface magnetic field values greater than 70 mT with an average Q 0-value of 2 × 1010 at 2 K after standard processing treatments. The performances of cavities made of low-purity ingots were affected by significant pitting of the surface after chemical etching.

  20. Repeatability of Layered Corneal Pachymetry With the Artemis Very High-frequency Digital Ultrasound Arc-Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Reinstein, Dan Z.; Archer, Timothy J.; Gobbe, Marine; Silverman, Ronald H.; Coleman, D. Jackson

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the three-dimensional repeatability of thickness measurements for epithelium, stroma, cornea, flap, and residual stromal bed using the Artemis very high-frequency (VHF) digital ultrasound arc-scanner (ArcScan Inc). Methods Five consecutive measurements were obtained for 10 eyes of 10 patients 1 year after LASIK using the Artemis VHF digital ultrasound arc-scanner across the central 10-mm diameter of the cornea. Repeatability analysis was performed for thickness measurements for each corneal layer—epithelium, stroma, cornea, flap, and residual stromal bed. The standard deviation of repeated measurements (point-repeatability) was calculated for each measurement location in 0.1-mm steps for the 10 × 10-mm matrix. The pooled standard deviation of the point-repeatability for each measurement location within the central 1-, 2-, and 3-mm radius was calculated (region-repeatability). The corneal thickness of the baseline scan set was compared to that of subsequent scan sets within the same session and plotted over time to assess any possible hydration effects of the immersion technique. Results The repeatability at the corneal vertex was 0.58 μm for epithelium, 1.78 μm for stroma, 1.68 μm for cornea, 1.68 μm for flap, and 2.27 μm for residual stromal bed. The region-repeatability within the central 1-mm radius was 1.01 μm for epithelium, 3.44 μm for stroma, 3.35 μm for cornea, 2.81 μm for flap, and 3.97 μm for residual stromal bed. The mean difference in corneal thickness from the baseline value was within 1.25 μm for each of the subsequent four scan sets over a 5-minute immersion period. Conclusions Layered pachymetry of the epithelium, stroma, cornea, flap, and residual stromal bed showed high repeatability with the Artemis VHF digital ultrasound arc-scanner. The high repeatability validates the use of the Artemis for in vivo layered pachymetry. PMID:19928698

  1. Simulation and Measurement of Medium-Frequency Signals Coupling From a Line to a Loop Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Nicholas W.; Li, Jingcheng; Zhou, Chenming; Brocker, Donovan E.; Qin, Yifeng; Werner, Douglas H.; Werner, Pingjuan L.

    2016-01-01

    The underground-mining environment can affect radio-signal propagation in various ways. Understanding these effects is especially critical in evaluating communications systems used during normal mining operations and during mine emergencies. One of these types of communications systems relies on medium-frequency (MF) radio frequencies. This paper presents the simulation and measurement results of recent National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) research aimed at investigating MF coupling between a transmission line (TL) and a loop antenna in an underground coal mine. Two different types of measurements were completed: 1) line-current distribution and 2) line-to-antenna coupling. Measurements were taken underground in an experimental coal mine and on a specially designed surface test area. The results of these tests are characterized by current along a TL and voltage induced in the loop from a line. This paper concludes with a discussion of issues for MF TLs. These include electromagnetic fields at the ends of the TL, connection of the ends of the TL, the effect of other conductors underground, and the proximity of coal or earth. These results could help operators by providing examples of these challenges that may be experienced underground and a method by which to measure voltage induced by a line. PMID:27784954

  2. Medium-high frequency ultrasound and ozone based advanced oxidation for amoxicillin removal in water.

    PubMed

    Kıdak, Rana; Doğan, Şifa

    2017-01-28

    In this study, treatment of an antibiotic compound amoxicillin by medium-high frequency ultrasonic irradiation and/or ozonation has been studied. Ultrasonic irradiation process was carried out in a batch reactor for aqueous amoxicillin solutions at three different frequencies (575, 861 and 1141kHz). The applied ultrasonic power was 75W and the diffused power was calculated as 14.6W/L. The highest removal was achieved at 575kHz ultrasonic frequency (>99%) with the highest pseudo first order reaction rate constant 0.04min(-1) at pH 10 but the mineralization achieved was around 10%. Presence of alkalinity and humic acid species had negative effect on the removal efficiency (50% decrease). To improve the poor outcomes, ozonation had been applied with or without ultrasound. Ozone removed the amoxicillin at a rate 50 times faster than ultrasound. Moreover, due to the synergistic effect, coupling of ozone and ultrasound gave rise to rate constant of 2.5min(-1) (625 times higher than ultrasound). In the processes where ozone was used, humic acid did not show any significant effect because the rate constant was so high that ozone has easily overcome the scavenging effects of natural water constituents. Furthermore, the intermediate compounds, after the incomplete oxidation mechanisms, has been analyzed to reveal the possible degradation pathways of amoxicillin through ultrasonic irradiation and ozonation applications. The outcomes of the intermediate compounds experiments and the toxicity was investigated to give a clear explanation about the safety of the resulting solution. The relevance of all the results concluded that hybrid advanced oxidation system was the best option for amoxicillin removal.

  3. Forest canopy height estimation using double-frequency repeat pass interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamvasis, Kleanthis; Karathanassi, Vassilia

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, many efforts have been made in order to assess forest stand parameters from remote sensing data, as a mean to estimate the above-ground carbon stock of forests in the context of the Kyoto protocol. Synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) techniques have gained traction in last decade as a viable technology for vegetation parameter estimation. Many works have shown that forest canopy height, which is a critical parameter for quantifying the terrestrial carbon cycle, can be estimated with InSAR. However, research is still needed to understand further the interaction of SAR signals with forest canopy and to develop an operational method for forestry applications. This work discusses the use of repeat pass interferometry with ALOS PALSAR (L band) HH polarized and COSMO Skymed (X band) HH polarized acquisitions over the Taxiarchis forest (Chalkidiki, Greece), in order to produce accurate digital elevation models (DEMs) and estimate canopy height with interferometric processing. The effect of wavelength-dependent penetration depth into the canopy is known to be strong, and could potentially lead to forest canopy height mapping using dual-wavelength SAR interferometry at X- and L-band. The method is based on scattering phase center separation at different wavelengths. It involves the generation of a terrain elevation model underneath the forest canopy from repeat-pass L-band InSAR data as well as the generation of a canopy surface elevation model from repeat pass X-band InSAR data. The terrain model is then used to remove the terrain component from the repeat pass interferometric X-band elevation model, so as to enable the forest canopy height estimation. The canopy height results were compared to a field survey with 6.9 m root mean square error (RMSE). The effects of vegetation characteristics, SAR incidence angle and view geometry, and terrain slope on the accuracy of the results have also been studied in this work.

  4. Auroral medium frequency burst radio emission associated with the 23 March 2007 THEMIS study substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunch, N. L.; Labelle, J.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Hughes, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Auroral medium frequency (MF) burst is an impulsive auroral radio emission associated with substorm onset detected by ground-based instruments between 1.3 and 4.5 MHz. On 23 March 2007 an MF burst emission was detected by the Dartmouth radio interferometer located near Toolik Lake, Alaska. This emission temporally coincides with the onset of the 23 March 2007 Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) study substorm. Directions of arrival computed using the Dartmouth radio interferometer for this event also coincide spatially with the location of the expanding auroral arcs to the south observed by the all-sky imager at Fort Yukon, Alaska. This observation represents the first example of a direction of arrival measurement for MF burst. It strongly supports the association of MF burst with intense auroral arcs accompanying substorm onset. The direction of arrival of the MF burst is consistent with the direction to the eastern edge of the substorm onset location determined by multiple data sets during this substorm and suggests that location of MF burst radio emissions may be an effective method of locating substorm onsets, much as radio atmospherics are used to locate lightning.

  5. Frequency-dependent entrainment of neocortical slow oscillation to repeated optogenetic stimulation in the anesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Kuki, Toshinobu; Ohshiro, Tomokazu; Ito, Shin; Ji, Zhi-Gang; Fukazawa, Yugo; Matsuzaka, Yoshiya; Yawo, Hiromu; Mushiake, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    Local field potential (LFP) slow oscillation (<1Hz) is typically observed in the cortex during sleep or while under anesthesia and reflects synchronous activation/inactivation of the cortical neuron population. The oscillation can be entrained to repeated external sensory stimuli. To better understand the neural mechanism underlying slow-oscillation generation and its entrainment to external stimuli, we delivered optical stimulation to the cortex of anesthetized rats that exogenously expressed the light-sensitive cation channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and simultaneously monitored LFPs across cortical layers. We found that the LFPs could be effectively entrained to repeated optical stimulation at 1Hz in deep layers. A stimulus-triggered current-source density (CSD) analysis showed that the evoked oscillation had the same depth and temporal profile as the slow oscillations, indicating that both oscillations have the same neural mechanism. Optical stimulation primarily induced the transition from the cortical up to down state. These results suggest that the anesthetized rat cortex has an intrinsic mechanism that leads to oscillation near 1Hz; effective entrainment to the 1Hz stimulation reflects the resonated state of the cortex to that stimulus. Our study is the first to demonstrate optogenetic manipulation of cortical slow oscillation and provides a mechanistic explanation for slow-oscillation entrainment.

  6. Impact of batch, repeated-batch (with cell recycle and medium replacement) and continuous processes on the course and efficiency of aerobic thermophilic biodegradation of potato processing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lasik, Małgorzata; Nowak, Jacek; Krzywonos, Małgorzata; Cibis, Edmund

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the course and efficiency of aerobic thermophilic treatment of a high-strength (COD=35gO(2)/l) effluent from potato processing. A comparative analysis was conducted of the treatment effects achieved using batch, repeated-batch (with cell recycle and medium replacement) and continuous treatment operations. The analysis consisted in (1) examining the extent of removal for the major parameters of the wastewater: COD, TOC, TN and TP (chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, total nitrogen and total phosphorus), and (2) determining the impact of oxygen deficit on the formation and assimilation of organic acids in the course of the three treatment operations. When use was made of the repeated-batch operation, the values of the COD and TOC removal rates were more than twice as high as those obtained with the continuous process, and more than five times as high as those obtained with the batch process.

  7. Using An Extensive Catalogue of Repeatable Strombolian Eruptions to Monitor Small Medium Changes at Mount Erebus Volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, B.; Aster, R. C.; Kyle, P.

    2005-12-01

    A recent study by Gret et al. (2005) reconfirmed earlier work demonstrating remarkable, though variable, repeatability of short-period seismic signals produced by characteristic Strombolian eruptions of Mount Erebus. The eruptions originate as impulsive explosions of large simple gas bubbles from the surface of a long-lived, actively convecting phonolitic lava lake that rapidly refills afterwards. This self-reconstructing eruptive system lends itself to highly repeatable seismic sources. Gret et al. further noted that these repeatable seismograms (extending many 10s of seconds into the coda) and associated seismic energy scattered within the low-velocity waveguide of the volcano conduit might facilitate the novel tracking of small temporal changes in seismic velocity and/or impedance contrast within the near summit magma body and more general conduit system. We expand on this suggestive work using comprehensive correlation-based similar seismogram analysis of an extensive database of over 3000 candidate Strombolian eruptions occurring between Jan 1992 and July 2005, and recorded at up to 9 different seismic stations situated around the volcano. To obviate potential complications caused by nonlinear response (e.g., clipping) at short-period instruments, we incorporate data from broadband, high-dynamic range sensors and digital telemetry installed since 2001, and take advantage of a new period of prolific eruptions, especially since early 2005, Gret, A., Snieder, R., Aster, R., Kyle, P., Monitoring rapid temporal change in a volcano with coda wave interferometry, Geop. Res. Lett., 32, L06304, doi:10.1029/2004GL021143, 2005.

  8. Medium- and long-term effects of repeated bicuculline-induced seizures in developing rats on local cerebral energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Doriat, J F; Koziel, V; Humbert, A C; Daval, J L

    1998-07-27

    To assess long-term metabolic consequences of recurrent ictal events arising during development, seizures were repeatedly generated in rats at different stages of cerebral maturation. Seizures were induced by i.p. injections of bicuculline for three consecutive days, starting from postnatal day 5 (P5), when the brain is very immature, or from P15, a period at which the brain is more structurally organized. Local cerebral metabolic rates for glucose were measured in 74 structures at P15, P25 and in adults (P60), by the autoradiographic method using 2-D-[14C]deoxyglucose. Repeated seizures in P5 to P7 pups led to a reduction (16-34%) of glucose consumption at P15, mainly significant in sensory, motor and functionally non-specific areas as well as in cerebellar nuclei. Selective decreases in metabolic activity were still recorded in adults, mostly in auditory system (20%) and cerebellar nuclei (27%). Seizures generated from P15 to P17 led to an overall mortality rate of 62% (versus 22% at P5 to P7). Surviving animals exhibited reduced metabolic rates for glucose (by 7-27%) at P25, significant in 23 structures, and depicting pronounced changes in limbic, hypothalamic, sensory and white matter areas, whereas brain functional activity finally returned to basal values at P60. Therefore, while younger rats seemed to better tolerate repeated bicuculline-induced seizures than older animals, the reverse was true for long-term metabolic effects, and the more immature the brain when seizures arise, the more persistent the functional consequences.

  9. Gene conversion and deletion frequencies during double-strand break repair in human cells are controlled by the distance between direct repeats.

    PubMed

    Schildkraut, Ezra; Miller, Cheryl A; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2005-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) repairs DNA double-strand breaks and maintains genome stability. HR between linked, direct repeats can occur by gene conversion without an associated crossover that maintains the gross repeat structure. Alternatively, direct repeat HR can occur by gene conversion with a crossover, or by single-strand annealing (SSA), both of which delete one repeat and the sequences between the repeats. Prior studies of different repeat structures in yeast and mammalian cells revealed disparate conversion:deletion ratios. Here, we show that a key factor controlling this ratio is the distance between the repeats, with conversion frequency increasing linearly with the distances from 850 to 3800 bp. Deletions are thought to arise primarily by SSA, which involves extensive end-processing to reveal complementary single-strands in each repeat. The results can be explained by a model in which strand-invasion leading to gene conversion competes more effectively with SSA as more extensive end-processing is required for SSA. We hypothesized that a transcription unit between repeats would inhibit end-processing and SSA, thereby increasing the fraction of conversions. However, conversion frequencies were identical for direct repeats separated by 3800 bp of transcriptionally silent or active DNA, indicating that end-processing and SSA are not affected by transcription.

  10. Isomaltulose production using free cells: optimisation of a culture medium containing agricultural wastes and conversion in repeated-batch processes.

    PubMed

    Kawaguti, Haroldo Y; Buzzato, Michele F; Sato, Hélia H

    2007-04-01

    The enzyme glucosyltransferase is an industrially important enzyme since it produces non-cariogenic isomaltulose (6-O-alpha-D-glucopyronosyl-1-6-D-fructofuranose) from sucrose by intramolecular transglucosylation. The experimental designs and response surface methodology (RSM) were applied for the optimisation of the nutrient concentrations in the culture medium for the production of glucosyltransferase by Erwinia sp. D12 in shaken flasks at 200 rpm and 30 degrees C. A statistical analysis of the results showed that, in the range studied, the factors had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on glucosyltransferase production and the highest enzyme activity (10.84 U/ml) was observed in culture medium containing sugar cane molasses (150 g l(-1)), corn steep liquor (20 g l(-1)), yeast extract Prodex Lac SD (15 g l(-1)) and K2HPO4 (0.5 g l(-1)) after 8 h at 30 degrees C. The production of cell biomass by the strain of Erwinia sp. D12 was carried out in a 6.6-l fermenter with a mixing rate of 200 rpm and an aeration rate of 1 vvm. Fermentation time, cellular growth, medium pH and glucosyltransferase production were observed. The greatest glucosyltransferase activity was 22.49 U/ml, obtained after 8 h of fermentation. The isomaltulose production from sucrose was performed using free Erwinia sp. D12 cells in a batch process using an orbital shaker. The influence of the parameters sucrose concentration, temperature, pH, and cell concentration on the conversion of sucrose into isomaltulose was studied. The free cells showed a high conversion rate of sucrose into isomaltulose using batch fermentation, obtaining an isomaltulose yield of 72.11% from sucrose solution 35% at 35 degrees C.

  11. Learning to recognize letters in the periphery: Effects of repeated exposure, letter frequency, and letter complexity

    PubMed Central

    Husk, Jesse S.; Yu, Deyue

    2017-01-01

    Patients with central vision loss must rely on their peripheral vision for reading. Unfortunately, limitations of peripheral vision, such as crowding, pose significant challenges to letter recognition. As a result, there is a need for developing effective training methods for improving crowded letter recognition in the periphery. Several studies have shown that extensive practice with letter stimuli is beneficial to peripheral letter recognition. Here, we explore stimulus-related factors that might influence the effectiveness of peripheral letter recognition training. Specifically, we examined letter exposure (number of letter occurrences), frequency of letter use in English print, and letter complexity and evaluated their contributions to the amount of improvement observed in crowded letter recognition following training. We analyzed data collected across a range of training protocols. Using linear regression, we identified the best-fitting model and observed that all three stimulus-related factors contributed to improvement in peripheral letter recognition with letter exposure being the most important factor. As an important explanatory variable, pretest accuracy was included in the model as well to avoid estimate biases and was shown to have influence on the relationship between training improvement and letter exposure. When developing training protocols for peripheral letter recognition, it may be beneficial to not only consider the overall length of training, but also to tailor the number of stimulus occurrences for each letter according to its initial performance level, frequency, and complexity. PMID:28265651

  12. [The effects of electromagnetic radiation of extremely high frequency and low intensity on the growth rate of bacteria Escherichia coli and the role of medium pH].

    PubMed

    Tadevosian, A; Kalantarian, V; Trchunian, A

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown that coherent electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of extremely high frequency (45-53 GHz) or millimeter waves (wavelength 5.6-6.7 mm) of low intensity (flux capacity 0.06 mW/cm2) of Escherichia coli K12, grown under anaerobic conditions during the fermentation of sugar (glucose) for 30 min or 1 h, caused a decrease in their growth rate, the maximum inhibitory effect being achieved at a frequency of 51.8 or 53 GHz. This effect depended on medium pH when the maximal action was determined at pH 7.5. In addition, separate 30-min of 1-h irradiation (frequency 51.8 or 53 GHz) of doubly distilled water or some inorganic ions contained in Tris-phosphate buffer where the cells were transferred induced oppositely directed changes in further growth of these bacteria under anaerobic conditions; irradiation of water caused a decrease in the growth rate of bacteria. A significant change in pH of water (0.5-1.5 unit) was induced by a 30-irradiation at a frequency of 49, 50.3, 51.8, or 53 GHz, when the initial pH value was 6.0 or 8.0, but not 7.5. These results indicate the changes in the properties of water and its role in the effects of EMI of extremely high frequency. The marked effect of EMI on bacteria disappeared upon repeated irradiation for 1 h at a frequency of 51.8 or 53 GHz with an interval of 2 hours. This result indicates some compensatory mechanisms in bacteria.

  13. Algebraic processing technique for extracting frequency-dependent shear-wave splitting parameters in an anisotropic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kai-Feng; Zeng, Xin-Wu

    2011-06-01

    Based on the dual source cumulative rotation technique in the time-domain proposed by Zeng and MacBeth (1993), a new algebraic processing technique for extracting shear-wave splitting parameters from multi-component VSP data in frequency-dependent medium has been developed. By using this dual source cumulative rotation technique in the frequency-domain (DCTF), anisotropic parameters, including polarization direction of the shear-waves and timedelay between the fast and slow shear-waves, can be estimated for each frequency component in the frequency domain. It avoids the possible error which comes from using a narrow-band filter in the current commonly used method. By using synthetic seismograms, the feasibility and validity of the technique was tested and a comparison with the currently used method was also given. The results demonstrate that the shear-wave splitting parameters frequency dependence can be extracted directly from four-component seismic data using the DCTF. In the presence of larger scale fractures, substantial frequency dependence would be found in the seismic frequency range, which implies that dispersion would occur at seismic frequencies. Our study shows that shear-wave anisotropy decreases as frequency increases.

  14. Repeated exposure to high-frequency spanking and child externalizing behavior across the first decade: A moderating role for cumulative risk

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, Michael J.; Nicklas, Eric; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Waldfogel, Jane

    2016-01-01

    This study used the Fragile Families and Child Well-being study to examine the effects of repeated exposure to harsh parenting on child externalizing behavior across the first decade of life, and a moderating role for cumulative ecological risk. Maternal report of harsh parenting, defined as high frequency spanking, was assessed at age 1, 3, 5, and 9, along with child externalizing at age 9 (N=2768). Controlling for gender, race, maternal nativity, and city of residence, we found a cumulative risk index to significantly moderate the effects of repeated harsh parenting on child behavior, with the effects of repeated high-frequency spanking being amplified for those experiencing greater levels of cumulative risk. Harsh parenting, in the form of high frequency spanking, remains a too common experience for children, and results demonstrate that the effects of repeated exposure to harsh parenting across the first decade are amplified for those children already facing the most burden. PMID:25465318

  15. Repeated exposure to high-frequency spanking and child externalizing behavior across the first decade: a moderating role for cumulative risk.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Michael J; Nicklas, Eric; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Waldfogel, Jane

    2014-12-01

    This study used the Fragile Families and Child Well-Being Study to examine the effects of repeated exposure to harsh parenting on child externalizing behavior across the first decade of life, and a moderating role for cumulative ecological risk. Maternal report of harsh parenting, defined as high frequency spanking, was assessed at age 1, 3, 5, and 9, along with child externalizing at age 9 (N=2,768). Controlling for gender, race, maternal nativity, and city of residence, we found a cumulative risk index to significantly moderate the effects of repeated harsh parenting on child behavior, with the effects of repeated high-frequency spanking being amplified for those experiencing greater levels of cumulative risk. Harsh parenting, in the form of high frequency spanking, remains a too common experience for children, and results demonstrate that the effects of repeated exposure to harsh parenting across the first decade are amplified for those children already facing the most burden.

  16. Numerical Analysis of Stochastic Dynamical Systems in the Medium-Frequency Range

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-02-01

    frequency vibration analysis such as the statistical energy analysis (SEA), the traditional modal analysis (well-suited for high and low: frequency...that the first few structural normal modes primarily constitute the total response. In the higher frequency range, the statistical energy analysis (SEA

  17. Reported frequency of physical activity in a large epidemiological study: relationship to specific activities and repeatability over time

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background How overall physical activity relates to specific activities and how reported activity changes over time may influence interpretation of observed associations between physical activity and health. We examine the relationships between various physical activities self-reported at different times in a large cohort study of middle-aged UK women. Methods At recruitment, Million Women Study participants completed a baseline questionnaire including questions on frequency of strenuous and of any physical activity. About 3 years later 589,896 women also completed a follow-up questionnaire reporting the hours they spent on a range of specific activities. Time spent on each activity was used to estimate the associated excess metabolic equivalent hours (MET-hours) and this value was compared across categories of physical activity reported at recruitment. Additionally, 18,655 women completed the baseline questionnaire twice, at intervals of up to 4 years; repeatability over time was assessed using the weighted kappa coefficient (κweighted) and absolute percentage agreement. Results The average number of hours per week women reported doing specific activities was 14.0 for housework, 4.5 for walking, 3.0 for gardening, 0.2 for cycling, and 1.4 for all strenuous activity. Time spent and the estimated excess MET-hours associated with each activity increased with increasing frequency of any or strenuous physical activity reported at baseline (tests for trend, P < 0.003), although the associations for housework were by far the weakest (Spearman correlations, 0.01 and -0.03 respectively for housework, and 0.11-0.37 for all other activities). Repeatability of responses to physical activity questions on the baseline questionnaire declined significantly over time. For strenuous activity, absolute agreement was 64% (κweighted = 0.71) for questionnaires administered less than 6 months apart, and 52% (κweighted = 0.51) for questionnaires more than 2 years apart. Corresponding

  18. Magnification of subwavelength field distributions at microwave frequencies using a wire medium slab operating in the canalization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikonen, Pekka; Simovski, Constantin; Tretyakov, Sergei; Belov, Pavel; Hao, Yang

    2007-09-01

    Authors demonstrate numerically the magnification of subwavelength field pattern using a wire medium slab operating in the canalization regime. The magnifying slab is implemented by radially enlarging the distance between adjacent wires, and the operational frequency is tuned to coincide with the Fabry-Pérot resonance condition. The near-field pattern of a complex-shaped source is canalized over an electrical distance corresponding roughly to three wavelengths (3λ), and the pattern details are magnified by a factor of 3. The performance is also studied at several frequencies deviating from the one of the Fabry-Pérot resonance.

  19. Instantaneous Real-Time Kinematic Decimeter-Level Positioning with BeiDou Triple-Frequency Signals over Medium Baselines

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiyang; Zhang, Xiaohong; Tang, Long; Liu, Wanke

    2015-01-01

    Many applications, such as marine navigation, land vehicles location, etc., require real time precise positioning under medium or long baseline conditions. In this contribution, we develop a model of real-time kinematic decimeter-level positioning with BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) triple-frequency signals over medium distances. The ambiguities of two extra-wide-lane (EWL) combinations are fixed first, and then a wide lane (WL) combination is reformed based on the two EWL combinations for positioning. Theoretical analysis and empirical analysis is given of the ambiguity fixing rate and the positioning accuracy of the presented method. The results indicate that the ambiguity fixing rate can be up to more than 98% when using BDS medium baseline observations, which is much higher than that of dual-frequency Hatch-Melbourne-Wübbena (HMW) method. As for positioning accuracy, decimeter level accuracy can be achieved with this method, which is comparable to that of carrier-smoothed code differential positioning method. Signal interruption simulation experiment indicates that the proposed method can realize fast high-precision positioning whereas the carrier-smoothed code differential positioning method needs several hundreds of seconds for obtaining high precision results. We can conclude that a relatively high accuracy and high fixing rate can be achieved for triple-frequency WL method with single-epoch observations, displaying significant advantage comparing to traditional carrier-smoothed code differential positioning method. PMID:26703614

  20. Rogue wave triggered at a critical frequency of a nonlinear resonant medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jingsong; Xu, Shuwei; Porsezian, K.; Cheng, Yi; Dinda, P. Tchofo

    2016-06-01

    We consider a two-level atomic system interacting with an electromagnetic field controlled in amplitude and frequency by a high intensity laser. We show that the amplitude of the induced electric field admits an envelope profile corresponding to a breather soliton. We demonstrate that this soliton can propagate with any frequency shift with respect to that of the control laser, except a critical frequency, at which the system undergoes a structural discontinuity that transforms the breather in a rogue wave. A mechanism of generation of rogue waves by means of an intense laser field is thus revealed.

  1. Rogue wave triggered at a critical frequency of a nonlinear resonant medium.

    PubMed

    He, Jingsong; Xu, Shuwei; Porsezian, K; Cheng, Yi; Dinda, P Tchofo

    2016-06-01

    We consider a two-level atomic system interacting with an electromagnetic field controlled in amplitude and frequency by a high intensity laser. We show that the amplitude of the induced electric field admits an envelope profile corresponding to a breather soliton. We demonstrate that this soliton can propagate with any frequency shift with respect to that of the control laser, except a critical frequency, at which the system undergoes a structural discontinuity that transforms the breather in a rogue wave. A mechanism of generation of rogue waves by means of an intense laser field is thus revealed.

  2. Medium-frequency impulsive-thrust-activated liquid hydrogen reorientation with Geyser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Efficient technique are studied for accomplishing propellant resettling through the minimization of propellant usage through impulsive thrust. A comparison between the use of constant-thrust and impulsive-thrust accelerations for the activation of propellant resettlement shows that impulsive thrust is superior to constant thrust for liquid reorientation in a reduced-gravity environment. This study shows that when impulsive thrust with 0.1-1.0-, and 10-Hz frequencies for liquid-fill levels in the range between 30-80 percent is considered, the selection of 1.0-Hz-frequency impulsive thrust over the other frequency ranges of impulsive thrust is the optimum. Characteristics of the slosh waves excited during the course of 1.0-Hz-frequency impulsive-thrust liquid reorientation were also analyzed.

  3. Relative Slowness Estimates for Locations of Repeating Low-Frequency Earthquakes and Narrow-Band Tremor at Fuego Volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, G. P.; Lyons, J. J.

    2009-12-01

    Fuego volcano, Guatemala, is an open-vent basaltic stratovolcano characterized by nearly constant, but low-level eruptive activity since 1999. In January 2008, we deployed small antennas of six broadband seismic and five acoustic sensors 0.9 km north of the active vent to investigate the source of explosions and low-frequency seismicity. The seismic array had stations spaced 30 m apart and a total aperture of ~140 m. The infrasound sensors were deployed in a similar array, but with average station spacing of 50 m. There was no lava effusion during the deployment, but explosions were recorded approximately once per hour, with varied amounts of ash, and with durations from 20-150 s. In addition to the explosions, our seismic array recorded narrow band tremor with dominant frequencies of 1.6 and 1.9 Hz and discrete events that were not generally detected by the acoustic array. The dominant class of these events, which repeated approximately 10-15 times per hour, had an impulsive onset with first motion toward the vent, a short duration of <5 s, and dominant frequencies from 1-3 Hz. Their similarity suggests a nondestructive source process. While waveforms are similar from event to event when viewed on the same channel, the large variation in waveforms across the array yields a large uncertainty in slowness parameter estimates. We take advantage of the high degree of similarity between events to determine relative slowness estimates. After determining the best-fit slowness parameters for a master event, we measured the relative slowness parameters for 203 similar events. The results indicate a stationary source, although subtle variations in waveforms suggest that the source mechanism or source location varied slightly with time. The low-frequency events were located by computing slowness parameters from synthetic waveforms for a volume of sources beneath the summit region. The source is ~150 m directly beneath the active vent, but not associated with explosions. Full

  4. Antioxidant responses in estuarine invertebrates exposed to repeated oil spills: Effects of frequency and dosage in a field manipulative experiment.

    PubMed

    Sandrini-Neto, Leonardo; Pereira, Letícia; Martins, César C; Silva de Assis, Helena C; Camus, Lionel; Lana, Paulo C

    2016-08-01

    We have experimentally investigated the effects of repeated diesel spills on the bivalve Anomalocardia brasiliana, the gastropod Neritina virginea and the polychaete Laeonereis culveri, by monitoring the responses of oxidative stress biomarkers in a subtropical estuary. Three frequencies of exposure events were compared against two dosages of oil in a factorial experiment with asymmetrical controls. Hypotheses were tested to distinguish between (i) the overall effect of oil spills, (ii) the effect of diesel dosage via different exposure regimes, and (iii) the effect of time since last spill. Antioxidant defense responses and oxidative damage in the bivalve A. brasiliana and the polychaete L. culveri were overall significantly affected by frequent oil spills compared to undisturbed controls. The main effects of diesel spills on both species were the induction of SOD and GST activities, a significant increase in LPO levels and a decrease in GSH concentration. N. virginea was particularly tolerant to oil exposure, with the exception of a significant GSH depletion. Overall, enzymatic activities and oxidative damage in A. brasiliana and L. culveri were induced by frequent low-dosage spills compared to infrequent high-dosage spills, although the opposite pattern was observed for N. virginea antioxidant responses. Antioxidant responses in A. brasiliana and L. culveri were not affected by timing of exposure events. However, our results revealed that N. virginea might have a delayed response to acute high-dosage exposure. Experimental in situ simulations of oil exposure events with varying frequencies and intensities provide a useful tool for detecting and quantifying environmental impacts. In general, antioxidant biomarkers were induced by frequent low-dosage exposures compared to infrequent high-dosage ones. The bivalve A. brasiliana and the polychaete L. culveri are more suitable sentinels due to their greater responsiveness to oil and also to their wider geographical

  5. Non-repeatable science: assessing the frequency of voucher specimen deposition reveals that most arthropod research cannot be verified

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Scientific findings need to be verifiable and grounded in repeatability. With specimen-level research this is in part achieved with the deposition of voucher specimens. These are labeled, curated, data-based specimens that have been deposited in a collection or museum, available for verification of the work and to ensure researchers are calling the same taxa by the same names. Voucher specimens themselves are the subject of research, from the discovery of new species by taxonomists to ecologists documenting historical records of invasive species. Our objective was to quantify the frequency of voucher specimen deposition in biodiversity and community ecology research through a survey of the peer-reviewed literature about arthropods, from 1989 until 2014. Overall rates of voucher deposition were alarmingly low, at under 25%. This rate increased significantly over time, with 35% of papers reporting on vouchers in 2014. Relative to the global mean, entomological research had a significantly higher rate of voucher deposition (46%), whereas researchers studying crustaceans deposited vouchers less than 6% of the time, significantly less than the mean. Researchers working in museums had a significantly higher frequency of voucher deposition. Our results suggest a significant culture shift about the process of vouchering specimens is required. There must be more education and mentoring about voucher specimens within laboratories and across different fields of study. Principal investigators and granting agencies need a proactive approach to ensuring specimen-level data are properly, long-term curated. Editorial boards and journals can also adopt policies to ensure papers are published only if explicit statements about the deposition of voucher specimens is provided. Although the gap is significant, achieving a higher rate of voucher specimen deposition is a worthy goal to ensure all research efforts are preserved for future generations. PMID:26339546

  6. Direction of Arrival Studies of Medium Frequency Burst Radio Emissions at Toolik Lake, AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunch, N.; Labelle, J.; Weatherwax, A.; Lummerzheim, D.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.

    2008-05-01

    MF burst is an impulsive radio emission of auroral origin, which can be detected by ground-based instruments at frequencies between 1,300 and 4,500kHz. MF burst has been shown to be associated with substorm onset, but its exact generation mechanism remains unknown, although it is thought to arise from mode conversion radiation [see review by LaBelle and Treumann, 2002] . In search of the generation mechanism of this emission, Dartmouth College has deployed radio interferometers in Alaska, Northern Canada, Greenland, and Antarctica, including a three-element interferometer deployed to Toolik Field Station in Alaska during the summer of 2006. This instrument measured spectra, amplitudes and directions of arrival (DOA's) of over 47 MF burst events between November 30, 2006 and May 26, 2007. These data represent the first DOA measurements of impulsive MF burst, of which selected case studies were presented at the Fall 2007 AGU conference. Here we present a statistical survey of all 47 events as well as detailed analysis of three events occurring on: Mar 5, Mar 23, and Nov 20, 2007. For the statistical survey, we present distributions of DOA as a function of local time and frequency. In each case study we analyze the direction of arrival of the emissions as a function of both time and frequency within each event. The time variations will be compared with the time variations of optical auroral forms simultaneously measured with all-sky cameras. The dependence of the arrival direction on frequency enables a significant test of the generation mechanism whereby the waves are emitted at the local plasma or upper hybrid frequency in the topside ionosphere, predicting that higher frequencies should originate at lower altitudes. These three events have been selected because All-Sky camera data are available at these times from Toolik Lake and Fort Yukon, Alaska. These are critical both for identifying which optical features are associated with the radio emissions as well as for

  7. Nonlinear Stress/Strain Behavior of a Synthetic Porous Medium at Seismic Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, P. M.; Ibrahim, R. H.

    2008-12-01

    Laboratory experiments on porous core samples have shown that seismic-band (100 Hz or less) mechanical, axial stress/strain cycling of the porous matrix can influence the transport behavior of fluids and suspended particles during steady-state fluid flow through the cores. In conjunction with these stimulated transport experiments, measurements of the applied dynamic axial stress/strain were made to investigate the nonlinear mechanical response of porous media for a poorly explored range of frequencies from 1 to 40 Hz. A unique core-holder apparatus that applies low-frequency mechanical stress/strain to 2.54-cm-diameter porous samples during constant-rate fluid flow was used for these experiments. Applied stress was measured with a load cell in series with the source and porous sample, and the resulting strain was measured with an LVDT attached to the core face. A synthetic porous system consisting of packed 1-mm-diameter glass beads was used to investigate both stress/strain and stimulated mass-transport behavior under idealized conditions. The bead pack was placed in a rubber sleeve and static confining stresses of 2.4 MPa radial and 1.7 MPa axial were applied to the sample. Sinusoidal stress oscillations were applied to the sample at 1 to 40 Hz over a range of RMS stress amplitude from 37 to 275 kPa. Dynamic stress/strain was measured before and after the core was saturated with deionized water. The slope of the linear portion of each stress/strain hysteresis loop was used to estimate Young's modulus as a function of frequency and amplitude for both the dry and wet sample. The modulus was observed to increase after the dry sample was saturated. For both dry and wet cases, the modulus decreased with increasing dynamic RMS stress amplitude at a constant frequency of 23 Hz. At constant RMS stress amplitude, the modulus increased with increasing frequency for the wet sample but remained constant for the dry sample. The observed nonlinear behavior of Young's modulus

  8. Comparison of medium frequency pulsed radar interferometer and correlation analysis winds, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meek, C. E.; Reid, I. M.; Manson, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    In principle, the interferometer analysis determines the radial velocity and direction of single scatterers provided that each has a sufficiently different Doppler frequency to permit separation by spectral analysis. In fact, scatterers will not have constant radial velocity, and their Doppler frequencies as well as their directions will be modulated by their horizontal motion. Thus, there is a tradeoff between the poorer resolution but less smeared scatterers on shorter records and the higher resolution (longer) records. Three or more non-collinear scatterers are sufficient to determine the wind. It appears that the velocity found from the combined interferometer peaks agrees well with the apparent velocity from correlation methods, but the true velocity is a factor of 2 smaller. This difference might be resolved by searching for scatters showing regular movement between adjacent records.

  9. Ultra-thin Low-Frequency Broadband Microwave Absorber Based on Magnetic Medium and Metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yongzhi; He, Bo; Zhao, Jingcheng; Gong, Rongzhou

    2017-02-01

    An ultra-thin low-frequency broadband microwave absorber (MWA) based on a magnetic rubber plate (MRP) and cross-shaped structure (CSS) metamaterial (MM) was presented numerically and experimentally. The designed composite MWA is consisted of the MRP, CSS resonator, dielectric substrate and metallic background plane. The low-frequency absorption can be easily adjusted by tuning the geometric parameter of the CSS MM and the thickness of MPR. A bandwidth (i.e. the reflectance is below -10 dB) from 2.5 GHz to 5 GHz can be achieved with the total thickness of about 2 mm in experiments. The broadband absorption is attributed to the overlap of two resonant absorption peaks originated from MRP and CSS MM, respectively. More importantly, the thickness of the composite WMA is much thinner ( λ/40; λ is the operation center frequency), which could operate well at wide incidence angles for both transverse electric and transverse magnetic waves. Thus, it can be expected that our design will be applicable in the area of eliminating microwave energy and electromagnetic stealth.

  10. [Research on Time-frequency Characteristics of Magneto-acoustic Signal of Different Thickness Medium Based on Wave Summing Method].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shunqi; Yin, Tao; Ma, Ren; Liu, Zhipeng

    2015-08-01

    Functional imaging method of biological electrical characteristics based on magneto-acoustic effect gives valuable information of tissue in early tumor diagnosis, therein time and frequency characteristics analysis of magneto-acoustic signal is important in image reconstruction. This paper proposes wave summing method based on Green function solution for acoustic source of magneto-acoustic effect. Simulations and analysis under quasi 1D transmission condition are carried out to time and frequency characteristics of magneto-acoustic signal of models with different thickness. Simulation results of magneto-acoustic signal were verified through experiments. Results of the simulation with different thickness showed that time-frequency characteristics of magneto-acoustic signal reflected thickness of sample. Thin sample, which is less than one wavelength of pulse, and thick sample, which is larger than one wavelength, showed different summed waveform and frequency characteristics, due to difference of summing thickness. Experimental results verified theoretical analysis and simulation results. This research has laid a foundation for acoustic source and conductivity reconstruction to the medium with different thickness in magneto-acoustic imaging.

  11. Effects of Three Different Resistance Training Frequencies on Jump, Sprint, and Repeated Sprint Ability Performance in Professional Futsal Players.

    PubMed

    Paz-Franco, Adrián; Rey, Ezequiel; Barcala-Furelos, Roberto

    2017-02-21

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of 3 different resistance training frequencies (one strength training session per week (1W), two strength training sessions per week (2W) or one strength training session every second week (0.5W)) on jump, sprint and repeated sprint performance (RSA) in professional futsal players. Thirty-five futsal players were randomized into 1 of 3 groups, the 1W group (n= 12), 2W group (n= 12), or the 0.5W group (n= 11). The players performed the same resistance training during 6 weeks and only training frequency differed between the groups. Within-group analysis showed significant improvements in jump (p≤0.001, Effect Size (ES)= 0.13-0.35), sprint (p≤0.001, ES= 0.48-0.71), and RSA (p≤0.01, ES= 0.22-0.63) from pretest to posttest in 1W and 2W. However, no significant (p>0.05) pre-post changes were observed for the 0.5W in any variable. In the between-groups analysis, significant better results were found in jump (p≤0.01), sprint (p≤0.01), and RSA performance (p≤0.01) in the 1W group and 2W group in comparison with 0.5W group. Also, jump (p≤0.05) and 5 m sprint (p≤0.05) performances was significantly better in the 2W group in comparison with 1W group. In conclusion, the current study showed that 6 weeks of RT one or two times per week in addition to typical futsal training, produced significant improvements in jump, sprint and RSA performance. Additionally, RT one every second week may be sufficient to maintain physical fitness in professional futsal players. This information may be useful for coaches when planning training contents during congested fixture schedules or in periods where the emphasis need to be put on other qualities and spend as little time as possible on maintaining or increasing physical performance.

  12. Medium-frequency impulsive-thrust-excited slosh waves during propellant reorientation with a geyser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.; Lee, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    Slosh wave excitation induced by a resettling flowfield activated by 1.0-Hz impulsive thrust during the course of liquid reorientation with the initiation of geyser for liquid-fill levels of 30, 50, 65, 70, and 80 percent has been studied. Characteristics of slosh waves of various frequencies excited by the resettling flowfield are discussed. Slosh wave excitations shift the fluid mass distribution in the container which imposes time-dependent variations in spacecraft moment of inertia. This information is important for spacecraft control during the course of liquid reorientation.

  13. Detection of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances by Medium Frequency Doppler Sounding Using AM Radio Transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilcote, M. A.; Labelle, J. W.; Lind, F. D.; Coster, A. J.; Galkin, I. A.; Miller, E.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2013-12-01

    Nighttime traveling ionosphere disturbances (TIDs) propagating in the lower F region of the ionosphere were detected from time variations in the Doppler shifts of commercial AM radio broadcast stations. Three separately deployed receivers, components of the Intercepted Signals for Ionospheric Science (ISIS) Array software radio instrumentation network, recorded signals from two radio stations during eleven nights in March-April, 2012. Combining these measurements established that variations in the frequencies of the received signals, with amplitudes up to a few tenths of a Hertz, resulted from Doppler shifts produced by the ionosphere. At times, TIDs were detected as large amplitude variations in the Doppler shift with approximately 40-minute period correlated across the array. For one study interval, 0000-0400 UT on April 13, 2012, simultaneous GPS-TEC, digisonde, and superDARN coherent backscatter radar measurements confirmed the detection of TIDs with the same period. Detection of the AM signals at widely spaced receivers allowed the phase velocity and wavelength of the TIDs to be inferred, with some limitations due to differing reflection heights for the different frequencies. These measurements will be compared to phase velocities and wavelengths determined from combining an array of GPS receivers; discrepancies due to the altitude sensitivity of the techniques or other effects will be discussed. These results demonstrate that AM radio signals can be used for detection of nighttime TIDs.

  14. The frequency of different CGG-repeat alleles in the FMR-1 gene in the general population and special populations

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, J.J.A. |; Chalifoux, M.; Wing, M.

    1994-09-01

    The fragile X (FRAXA) syndrome is the most common inherited form of developmental disability and was the first genetic disorder in which the mechanism of mutation is triplet repeat expansion. The normal fragile X mental retardation-1 gene has 6-52 copies of the CGG-repeat; affected males have extensive amplification, coupled with methylation and gene inactivation; and carriers have between about 55 and 200 copies. There is some overlap in the 45-55 repeat range, with some alleles showing stable and othres unstable transmission. There have been several estimates of the incidence of the FRAXA syndrome, based on testing of special populations using chromosome analysis and the range is 1/750-1/2000. Because of the high burden associated with this syndrome, and in the face of discussions about population screening, it is important to know the actual incidence of mutations in this gene, as well as the distribution of unstable repeats above 45 copes. We have initiated a general population screening to examine 50,000 newborn samples using PCR, and have developed a rapid, inexpensive and reliable method for amplifying the CGG-repeat from Guthrie spots. In the first 1600 samples examined, we found 15 alleles with greater than 45 CGG-repeats, with the highest being 61 repeats.

  15. Detection of traveling ionospheric disturbances by medium-frequency Doppler sounding using AM radio transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilcote, M.; LaBelle, J.; Lind, F. D.; Coster, A. J.; Miller, E. S.; Galkin, I. A.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2015-03-01

    Nighttime traveling ionosphere disturbances (TIDs) propagating in the lower F region of the ionosphere have been detected by measuring time variations in the Doppler shifts of commercial AM radio broadcast signals. Three receivers, components of the Intercepted Signals for Ionospheric Science (ISIS) Array software radio instrumentation network in the northeastern United States, recorded signals from two radio stations during 11 nights in March-April, 2012. By combining these measurements, TIDs were detected as approximately 40min periodic variations in the frequencies of the received signals resulting from Doppler shifts produced by the ionosphere. The variations had amplitudes of up to a few tenths of a hertz and were correlated across the array. For one study interval, 0000-0400 UT on 13 April 2012, simultaneous GPS total electron content, Digisonde®, and Super Dual-Auroral Radar Network coherent backscatter radar measurements confirmed the detection of TIDs with the same characteristics. Besides TIDs, the receiver network often detected large (nearly 1 Hz) upward (downward) Doppler shifts of the AM broadcast signals at the dawn (dusk) terminator. These results demonstrate that AM radio signals can be used for detection and monitoring of nighttime TIDs and related effects.

  16. Low-frequency wiggler modes in the free-electron laser with a dusty magnetoplasma medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, S.

    2015-07-01

    An advanced incremental scheme for generating tunable coherent radiation in a free-electron laser has been presented: the basic concept is the use of a relativistic electron beam propagating through a magnetized dusty plasma channel where dust helicon, dust Alfven and coupled dust cyclotron-Alfven waves can play a role as a low-frequency wiggler, triggering coherent emissions. The wiggler wavelength at the sub-mm level allows one to reach the wavelength range from a few nm down to a few Å with moderately relativistic electrons of kinetic energies of a few tens/hundreds of MeV. The laser gain and the effects of beam self-electric and self-magnetic fields on the gain have been estimated and compared with findings of the helical magnetic and electromagnetic wigglers in vacuum. To study the chaotic regions of the electron motion in the dusty plasma wave wiggler, a time independent Hamiltonian has been obtained. The Poincare surface of a section map has been used numerically to analyze the nonintegrable system where chaotic regions in phase-space emerge. This concept opens a path toward a new generation of synchrotron sources based on compact plasma structures.

  17. Development of a new medium frequency EM device: Mapping soil water content variations using electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessouri, P.; Buvat, S.; Tabbagh, A.

    2012-12-01

    Both electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of soil are influenced by its water content. Dielectric permittivity is usually measured in the high frequency range, using GPR or TDR, where the sensitivity to water content is high. However, its evaluation is limited by a low investigation depth, especially for clay rich soils. Electrical conductivity is closely related not only to soil water content, but also to clay content and soil structure. A simultaneous estimation of these electrical parameters can allow the mapping of soil water content variations for an investigation depth close to 1m. In order to estimate simultaneously both soil electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity, an electromagnetic device working in the medium frequency range (between 100 kHz and 10 MHz) has been designed. We adopted Slingram geometry for the EM prototype: its PERP configuration (vertical transmission loop Tx and horizontal measuring loop Rx) was defined using 1D ground models. As the required investigation depth is around 1m, the coil spacing was fixed to 1.2m. This prototype works in a frequency range between 1 and 5 MHz. After calibration, we tested the response of prototype to objects with known properties. The first in situ measurements were led on experimental sites with different types of soils and different water content variations (artificially created or natural): sandy alluvium on a plot of INRA (French National Institute for Agricultural Research) in Orléans (Centre, France), a clay-loam soil on an experimental site in Estrée-Mons (Picardie, France) and fractured limestone at the vicinity of Grand (Vosges, France). In the case of the sandy alluvium, the values of dielectric permittivity measured are close to those of HF permittivity and allow the use of existing theoretical models to determine the soil water content. For soils containing higher amount of clay, the coupled information brought by the electrical conductivity and the dielectric

  18. Multi-frequency based location search algorithm of small electromagnetic inhomogeneities embedded in two-layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Won-Kwang; Park, Taehoon

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we consider a problem for finding the locations of electromagnetic inhomogeneities completely embedded in homogeneous two layered medium. For this purpose, we present a filter function operated at several frequencies and design an algorithm for finding the locations of such inhomogeneities. It is based on the fact that, the collected Multi-Static Response (MSR) matrix can be modeled via a rigorous asymptotic expansion formula of the scattering amplitude due to the presence of such inhomogeneities. In order to show the effectiveness, we compare the proposed algorithm with traditional MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm and Kirchhoff migration. Various numerical results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is robust with respect to random noise and yields more accurate location than the MUSIC algorithm and Kirchhoff migration.

  19. Accurate reconstruction of the optical parameter distribution in participating medium based on the frequency-domain radiative transfer equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yao-Bin; Qi, Hong; Zhao, Fang-Zhou; Ruan, Li-Ming

    2016-12-01

    Reconstructing the distribution of optical parameters in the participating medium based on the frequency-domain radiative transfer equation (FD-RTE) to probe the internal structure of the medium is investigated in the present work. The forward model of FD-RTE is solved via the finite volume method (FVM). The regularization term formatted by the generalized Gaussian Markov random field model is used in the objective function to overcome the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem. The multi-start conjugate gradient (MCG) method is employed to search the minimum of the objective function and increase the efficiency of convergence. A modified adjoint differentiation technique using the collimated radiative intensity is developed to calculate the gradient of the objective function with respect to the optical parameters. All simulation results show that the proposed reconstruction algorithm based on FD-RTE can obtain the accurate distributions of absorption and scattering coefficients. The reconstructed images of the scattering coefficient have less errors than those of the absorption coefficient, which indicates the former are more suitable to probing the inner structure. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51476043), the Major National Scientific Instruments and Equipment Development Special Foundation of China (Grant No. 51327803), and the Foundation for Innovative Research Groups of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51121004).

  20. The effects of sampling frequency on the climate statistics of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T.J.; Gates, W.L. ); Arpe, K. )

    1992-12-20

    The effects of sampling frequency on the first- and second-moment statistics of selected European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model variables are investigated in a simulation of perpetual July' with a diurnal cycle included and with surface and atmospheric fields saved at hourly intervals. The shortest characteristic time scales are those of ground heat fluxes and temperatures, precipitation and runoff, convective processes, cloud properties, and atmospheric vertical motion, while the longest time scales are exhibited by soil temperature and moisture, surface pressure, and atmospheric specific humidity, temperature, and wind. The time scales of surface heat and momentum fluxes and of convective processes are substantially shorter over land than over oceans. An appropriate sampling frequency for each model variable is obtained by comparing the estimates of first- and second-moment statistics determined at intervals ranging from 2 to 24 hours with the best' estimates obtained from hourly sampling. Relatively accurate estimation of first- and second-moment climate statistics can be achieved by sampling a model variable at intervals that usually are longer than the bandwidth of its time series but that often are shorter than its characteristic time scale. The superior estimates of first-moment statistics are accompanied by inferior estimates of the variance of the daily means due to the presence of systematic biases, but these probably can be avoided by defining a different measure of low-frequency variability. Estimates of the intradiurnal variance of accumulated precipitation and surface runoff also are strongly impacted by the length of the storage interval. In light of these results, several alternative strategies for storage of the EMWF model variables are recommended. 20 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  1. High frequencies of short frameshifts in poly-CA/TG tandem repeats borne by bacteriophage M13 in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, G; Gutman, G A

    1987-01-01

    Slipped-strand mispairing (SSM) may play an major role in repetitive DNA sequence evolution by generating large numbers of short frameshift mutations within simple tandem repeats. Here we examine the frequency and size spectrum of frameshifts generated within poly-CA/TG sequences inserted into bacteriophage M13 in Escherichia coli hosts. The frequency of detectable frameshifts within a 40 bp tract of poly-CA/TG is greater than one percent and increases more than linearly with length, being lower by a factor of four in a 22 bp target sequence. The frequency increases more than 13-fold in mutL and mutS host cells, suggesting that a high proportion of frameshift events are normally repaired by methyl-directed mismatch repair. Of the 87 sequenced frameshifts in this study, 96% result from deletion or insertion of only or two 2 bp repeat units. The most frequent events are 2 bp deletions, 2 bp insertions, and 4 bp deletions, the relative frequencies of these events being about 18:6:1. PMID:3299269

  2. The effects of sampling frequency on the climate statistics of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Thomas J.; Gates, W. Lawrence; Arpe, Klaus

    1992-12-01

    The effects of sampling frequency on the first- and second-moment statistics of selected European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model variables are investigated in a simulation of "perpetual July" with a diurnal cycle included and with surface and atmospheric fields saved at hourly intervals. The shortest characteristic time scales (as determined by the e-folding time of lagged autocorrelation functions) are those of ground heat fluxes and temperatures, precipitation and runoff, convective processes, cloud properties, and atmospheric vertical motion, while the longest time scales are exhibited by soil temperature and moisture, surface pressure, and atmospheric specific humidity, temperature, and wind. The time scales of surface heat and momentum fluxes and of convective processes are substantially shorter over land than over oceans. An appropriate sampling frequency for each model variable is obtained by comparing the estimates of first- and second-moment statistics determined at intervals ranging from 2 to 24 hours with the "best" estimates obtained from hourly sampling. Relatively accurate estimation of first- and second-moment climate statistics (10% errors in means, 20% errors in variances) can be achieved by sampling a model variable at intervals that usually are longer than the bandwidth of its time series but that often are shorter than its characteristic time scale. For the surface variables, sampling at intervals that are nonintegral divisors of a 24-hour day yields relatively more accurate time-mean statistics because of a reduction in errors associated with aliasing of the diurnal cycle and higher-frequency harmonics. The superior estimates of first-moment statistics are accompanied by inferior estimates of the variance of the daily means due to the presence of systematic biases, but these probably can be avoided by defining a different measure of low-frequency variability. Estimates of the intradiurnal variance of accumulated

  3. Rapid ambiguity resolution over medium-to-long baselines based on GPS/BDS multi-frequency observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiaopeng; Lou, Yidong; Liu, Wanke; Zheng, Fu; Gu, Shengfeng; Wang, Hua

    2017-02-01

    Medium-long baseline RTK positioning generally needs a long initial time to find an accurate position due to non-negligible atmospheric delay residual. In order to shorten the initial or re-convergence time, a rapid phase ambiguity resolution method is employed based on GPS/BDS multi-frequency observables in this paper. This method is realized by two steps. First, double-differenced un-combined observables (i.e., L1/L2 and B1/B2/B3 observables) are used to obtain a float solution with atmospheric delay estimated as random walk parameter by using Kalman filter. This model enables an easy and consistent implementation for different systems and different frequency observables and can readily be extended to use more satellite navigation systems (e.g., Galileo, QZSS). Additional prior constraints for atmospheric information can be quickly added as well, because atmospheric delay is parameterized. Second, in order to fix ambiguity rapidly and reliably, ambiguities are divided into three types (extra-wide-lane (EWL), wide-lane (WL) and narrow-lane (NL)) according to their wavelengths and are to be fixed sequentially by using the LAMBDA method. Several baselines ranging from 61 km to 232 km collected by Trimble and Panda receivers are used to validate the method. The results illustrate that it only takes approximately 1, 2 and 6 epochs (30 s intervals) to fix EWL, WL and NL ambiguities, respectively. More epochs' observables are needed to fix WL and NL ambiguity around local time 14:00 than other time mainly due to more active ionosphere activity. As for the re-convergence time, the simulated results show that 90% of epochs can be fixed within 2 epochs by using prior atmospheric delay information obtained from previously 5 min. Finally, as for positioning accuracy, meter, decimeter and centimeter level positioning results are obtained according to different ambiguity resolution performances, i.e., EWL, WL and NL fixed solutions.

  4. Mitochondrial D-loop (CA)n repeat length heteroplasmy: frequency in a German population sample and inheritance studies in two pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Szibor, Reinhard; Plate, Ines; Heinrich, Marielle; Michael, Mathias; Schöning, Rüdiger; Wittig, Holger; Lutz-Bonengel, Sabine

    2007-05-01

    Sequence analysis of the human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) has proven to be a valuable tool in forensic identity testing and the analysis of crime scene stains. In contrast to the very expensive sequencing technique, typing of different length variants can greatly facilitate screening of a large number of traces for their relevance during casework. Within the mitochondrial control region, a dinucleotide (CA)( n ) repeat locus is present. To assess the discrimination power of this marker, we have determined (CA)( n ) allele distribution and the frequency of heteroplasmy in a population sample of 2,458 Germans. The inclination to develop heteroplasmic mixtures (CA)( n )/(CA)( n-1) was positively correlated with the number of CA repeats in the mtDNA. In addition, we have studied the inheritance patterns of (CA)( n ) repeat sequence heteroplasmy in two pedigrees. In one pedigree, we also found a length heteroplasmy in the homopolymeric C-tract (nt 303-309). Our data show stable inheritance of heteroplasmy within the homopolymeric C-stretch, but rather unstable inheritance regarding the (CA)( n ) repeat locus.

  5. High-order boundary integral equation solution of high frequency wave scattering from obstacles in an unbounded linearly stratified medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Alex H.; Nelson, Bradley J.; Mahoney, J. Matthew

    2015-09-01

    We apply boundary integral equations for the first time to the two-dimensional scattering of time-harmonic waves from a smooth obstacle embedded in a continuously-graded unbounded medium. In the case we solve, the square of the wavenumber (refractive index) varies linearly in one coordinate, i.e. (Δ + E +x2) u (x1 ,x2) = 0 where E is a constant; this models quantum particles of fixed energy in a uniform gravitational field, and has broader applications to stratified media in acoustics, optics and seismology. We evaluate the fundamental solution efficiently with exponential accuracy via numerical saddle-point integration, using the truncated trapezoid rule with typically 102 nodes, with an effort that is independent of the frequency parameter E. By combining with a high-order Nyström quadrature, we are able to solve the scattering from obstacles 50 wavelengths across to 11 digits of accuracy in under a minute on a desktop or laptop.

  6. Complete sequencing and comparative analyses of the pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) plastome revealed high frequency of tandem repeats and large insertion/deletions on pepper plastome.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yeong Deuk; Park, Jongsun; Kim, Jungeun; Song, Wonho; Hur, Cheol-Goo; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2011-02-01

    Plants in the family Solanaceae are used as model systems in comparative and evolutionary genomics. The complete chloroplast genomes of seven solanaceous species have been sequenced, including tobacco, potato and tomato, but not peppers. We analyzed the complete chloroplast genome sequence of the hot pepper, Capsicum annuum. The pepper chloroplast genome was 156,781 bp in length, including a pair of inverted repeats (IR) of 25,783 bp. The content and the order of 133 genes in the pepper chloroplast genome were identical to those of other solanaceous plastomes. To characterize pepper plastome sequence, we performed comparative analysis using complete plastome sequences of pepper and seven solanaceous plastomes. Frequency and contents of large indels and tandem repeat sequences and distribution pattern of genome-wide sequence variations were investigated. In addition, a phylogenetic analysis using concatenated alignments of coding sequences was performed to determine evolutionary position of pepper in Solanaceae. Our results revealed two distinct features of pepper plastome compared to other solanaceous plastomes. Firstly, large indels, including insertions on accD and rpl20 gene sequences, were predominantly detected in the pepper plastome compared to other solanaceous plastomes. Secondly, tandem repeat sequences were particularly frequent in the pepper plastome. Taken together, our study represents unique features of evolution of pepper plastome among solanaceous plastomes.

  7. Measuring postural-related changes of spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity after repeated long-duration diving: frequency domain approaches.

    PubMed

    Faes, Luca; Masè, Michela; Nollo, Giandomenico; Chon, Ki H; Florian, John P

    2013-11-01

    Sustained water immersion is thought to modulate orthostatic tolerance to an extent dependent on the duration and repetition over consecutive days of the diving sessions. We tested this hypothesis investigating in ten healthy subjects the potential changes in the cardiovascular response to head-up tilt induced by single and multiple resting air dives. Parametric cross-spectral analysis of spontaneous RR interval and systolic arterial pressure variability was performed in three experimental sessions: before diving (BD), after single 6-hour dive (ASD), and after multiple 6-hour dives (AMD, 5 consecutive days with 18-hour surface interval). From this analysis, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was computed as spectral power ratio (αBRS), non-causal transfer function gain (tfBRS) and causal transfer function gain (γBRS) evaluated at low frequency (0.04-0.14Hz) in the supine position (su) as well as in the standing upright position in the early tilt (et) and late tilt (lt) epochs. We found that, while αBRS decreased significantly in et and lt compared to su during all sessions, tfBRS and γBRS decreased during ASD and AMD but not during BD; moreover γBRS evidenced a progressive decrease from BD to ASD and to AMD in both et and lt epochs. These results indicate the necessity of following a causal approach for the estimation of BRS in the frequency domain, and suggest a progressive impairment of the baroreflex response to postural stress after single and multiple dives, which may reflect symptoms of increasing orthostatic intolerance.

  8. Comparison of the Frequency of Y-short Tandem Repeats Markers between Sadat and Non-Sadat Populations in Isfahan Province of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Seyedebrahimi, Reihaneh; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Rashidi, Bahman; Salehi, Rasoul; Dahghi, Ali Gholami; Dabiri, Shahriar; Kheirollahi, Majid

    2017-01-01

    Background: Y chromosome is one of the two sex chromosomes and is male specific. Due to limited genetic exchange, the main part of that is passed virtually unchanged from one generation to next generation. The short tandem repeats (STRs) are almost constant on chromosomes that make them as an appropriate factor for use in population genetic studies. In this study, we used the STRs of Y chromosome markers in Sadat families and comparison with other families was investigated. Materials and Methods: In this study, sampling was done from fifty unrelated males of Sadat families and fifty unrelated males of non-Sadat families. After the extraction of DNA from blood samples and primer design, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed for each primer pairs separately. The PCR products were run on agarose gel that followed by running on polyacrylamide gel for better resolution. In addition, some sequenced samples were used as identified markers to determine the length of other alleles in polyacrylamide gel. Results: The survey of six STR in two case and control groups was carried out, and analysis revealed that the frequency of some alleles is different in case group compared to control group. Allele frequency of the markers DYS392, DYS393, DYS19, DYS390, DYS388, and DYS437 on the Y chromosome in Sadat families was quite different in comparison with other families. Conclusions: The reason for these differences in allele frequencies of the Sadat family in comparison with other families is having a common ancestor.

  9. Recommendations of the DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) on quality control of autosomal Short Tandem Repeat allele frequency databasing (STRidER).

    PubMed

    Bodner, Martin; Bastisch, Ingo; Butler, John M; Fimmers, Rolf; Gill, Peter; Gusmão, Leonor; Morling, Niels; Phillips, Christopher; Prinz, Mechthild; Schneider, Peter M; Parson, Walther

    2016-09-01

    The statistical evaluation of autosomal Short Tandem Repeat (STR) genotypes is based on allele frequencies. These are empirically determined from sets of randomly selected human samples, compiled into STR databases that have been established in the course of population genetic studies. There is currently no agreed procedure of performing quality control of STR allele frequency databases, and the reliability and accuracy of the data are largely based on the responsibility of the individual contributing research groups. It has been demonstrated with databases of haploid markers (EMPOP for mitochondrial mtDNA, and YHRD for Y-chromosomal loci) that centralized quality control and data curation is essential to minimize error. The concepts employed for quality control involve software-aided likelihood-of-genotype, phylogenetic, and population genetic checks that allow the researchers to compare novel data to established datasets and, thus, maintain the high quality required in forensic genetics. Here, we present STRidER (http://strider.online), a publicly available, centrally curated online allele frequency database and quality control platform for autosomal STRs. STRidER expands on the previously established ENFSI DNA WG STRbASE and applies standard concepts established for haploid and autosomal markers as well as novel tools to reduce error and increase the quality of autosomal STR data. The platform constitutes a significant improvement and innovation for the scientific community, offering autosomal STR data quality control and reliable STR genotype estimates.

  10. Variable Frequency of Plastid RNA Editing among Ferns and Repeated Loss of Uridine-to-Cytidine Editing from Vascular Plants

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenhu; Grewe, Felix; Mower, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    The distinct distribution and abundance of C-to-U and U-to-C RNA editing among land plants suggest that these two processes originated and evolve independently, but the paucity of information from several key lineages limits our understanding of their evolution. To examine the evolutionary diversity of RNA editing among ferns, we sequenced the plastid transcriptomes from two early diverging species, Ophioglossum californicum and Psilotum nudum. Using a relaxed automated approach to minimize false negatives combined with manual inspection to eliminate false positives, we identified 297 C-to-U and three U-to-C edit sites in the O. californicum plastid transcriptome but only 27 C-to-U and no U-to-C edit sites in the P. nudum plastid transcriptome. A broader comparison of editing content with the leptosporangiate fern Adiantum capillus-veneris and the hornwort Anthoceros formosae uncovered large variance in the abundance of plastid editing, indicating that the frequency and type of RNA editing is highly labile in ferns. Edit sites that increase protein conservation among species are more abundant and more efficiently edited than silent and non-conservative sites, suggesting that selection maintains functionally important editing. The absence of U-to-C editing from P. nudum plastid transcripts and other vascular plants demonstrates that U-to-C editing loss is a recurrent phenomenon in vascular plant evolution. PMID:25568947

  11. Variable frequency of plastid RNA editing among ferns and repeated loss of uridine-to-cytidine editing from vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenhu; Grewe, Felix; Mower, Jeffrey P

    2015-01-01

    The distinct distribution and abundance of C-to-U and U-to-C RNA editing among land plants suggest that these two processes originated and evolve independently, but the paucity of information from several key lineages limits our understanding of their evolution. To examine the evolutionary diversity of RNA editing among ferns, we sequenced the plastid transcriptomes from two early diverging species, Ophioglossum californicum and Psilotum nudum. Using a relaxed automated approach to minimize false negatives combined with manual inspection to eliminate false positives, we identified 297 C-to-U and three U-to-C edit sites in the O. californicum plastid transcriptome but only 27 C-to-U and no U-to-C edit sites in the P. nudum plastid transcriptome. A broader comparison of editing content with the leptosporangiate fern Adiantum capillus-veneris and the hornwort Anthoceros formosae uncovered large variance in the abundance of plastid editing, indicating that the frequency and type of RNA editing is highly labile in ferns. Edit sites that increase protein conservation among species are more abundant and more efficiently edited than silent and non-conservative sites, suggesting that selection maintains functionally important editing. The absence of U-to-C editing from P. nudum plastid transcripts and other vascular plants demonstrates that U-to-C editing loss is a recurrent phenomenon in vascular plant evolution.

  12. Signature of 3-4 day planetary waves in the equatorial ionospheric F layer height and medium frequency radar winds over Tirunelveli (8.7oN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararaman, Sathishkumar

    Signature of 3-4 day planetary waves in the equatorial ionospheric F layer height and medium frequency radar winds over Tirunelveli (8.7oN) S. Sathishkumar1, R. Dhanya1, K. Emperumal1, D. Tiwari2, S. Gurubaran1 and A. Bhattacharyya2 1. Equatorial Geophysical Research Laboratory, Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Tirunelveli, India 2. Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai, India Email: sathishmaths@gmail.com Abstract The equatorial atmosphere-ionosphere system has been studied theoretically and observationally in the past. In the equatorial atmosphere, oscillations with periods of 3-4 days are often observed in the medium frequency (MF) radar over Tirunelveli (8.7oN, 77.8oE, 1.34oN geomag. lat.). Earlier observations show the clear evidence that these waves can propagate from the stratosphere to ionosphere. A digital ionosonde has been providing useful information on several ionospheric parameters from the same site. Simultaneous observations of mesospheric winds using medium frequency radar and F-layer height (h'F) from ionosonde reveal that the 3-4 day wave was evident in both the component during the 01 June 2007 and 31 July 2007. The 3-4 day wave could have an important role in the day to day variability of the equatorial ionosphere evening uplift. Results from an extensive analysis that is being carried out in the direction of 3-4 day wave present in the ionosphere will be presented.

  13. 78 FR 65594 - Vehicular Repeaters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... changes, and on whether current mobile repeater filter technologies can support reduced frequency... feasibility of adapting SAW filters, or other filter technology, for mobile repeater use. We particularly... mobile repeaters by public safety licensees on certain frequencies in the VHF band. DATES:...

  14. Generation of optical frequency combs via four-wave mixing processes for low- and medium-resolution astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajnulina, M.; Boggio, J. M. Chavez; Böhm, M.; Rieznik, A. A.; Fremberg, T.; Haynes, R.; Roth, M. M.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the generation of optical frequency combs through a cascade of four-wave mixing processes in nonlinear fibres with optimised parameters. The initial optical field consists of two continuous-wave lasers with frequency separation larger than 40 GHz (312.7 pm at 1531 nm). It propagates through three nonlinear fibres. The first fibre serves to pulse shape the initial sinusoidal-square pulse, while a strong pulse compression down to sub-100 fs takes place in the second fibre which is an amplifying erbium-doped fibre. The last stage is a low-dispersion highly nonlinear fibre where the frequency comb bandwidth is increased and the line intensity is equalised. We model this system using the generalised nonlinear Schrödinger equation and investigate it in terms of fibre lengths, fibre dispersion, laser frequency separation and input powers with the aim to minimise the frequency comb noise. With the support of the numerical results, a frequency comb is experimentally generated, first in the near infra-red and then it is frequency-doubled into the visible spectral range. Using a MUSE-type spectrograph, we evaluate the comb performance for astronomical wavelength calibration in terms of equidistancy of the comb lines and their stability.

  15. Numerical solution of Maxwell equations by a finite-difference time-domain method in a medium with frequency and spatial dispersion.

    PubMed

    Potravkin, N N; Perezhogin, I A; Makarov, V A

    2012-11-01

    We propose an alternative method of integration of Maxwell equations. This method is the generalization of a finite-difference time-domain method with an auxiliary differential equation for the case of a linear optical medium with a frequency dispersion and an arbitrary source of spatial dispersion. We apply this method to the problem of the propagation of short plane-wave linearly polarized light pulses in such a medium. It is shown that some features of their propagation are completely different from those that are generally recognized for the linear optical activity phenomenon. For example, in some cases an initially linearly polarized light pulse becomes elliptically polarized during the propagation. This effect is more prominent in the front part of the pulse.

  16. MiniJFil®: A New Safe and Effective Stent for Well-Tolerated Repeated Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy or Ureteroscopy for Medium-to-Large Kidney Stones?

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Benoit; Desfemmes, Francois-Noel; Desgrippes, Arnaud; Ponsot, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Background Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is recommended for treating staghorn stones or stones measuring > 20 mm. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) or flexible ureteroscopy (URS) may be used as a complement. However, PCNL can cause trauma to the kidney parenchyma, and patients may find a noninvasive procedure, such as ESWL, to be more attractive. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficiency of MiniJFil® stenting associated with ESWL or second-line URS for the treatment of medium-to-large kidney stones. The MiniJFil® is a stent reduced to a suture of 0.3F attached to a renal pigtail. The entire ureter is occupied only by the suture of the stent. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the data of 28 patients. Twenty-four patients had kidney stones measuring > 15 mm (group 1) and four patients had staghorn stones (group 2). All of the patients were fitted with MiniJFil® 2 - 3 weeks before any treatment. ESWL was always our first-line therapy. Stone-free (SF) status was defined as no evidence of stones. Results In group 1, the mean largest and cumulative stone diameters, respectively, were 18.7 ± 5.7 mm and 45.0 ± 12.0 mm. In group 2, the mean volume was 6,288.4 ± 2,733.0 mm3. The overall SF was 96.4% (100% for group 1 and 75% for group 2). The mean number of sessions of ESWL and URS, respectively, was 1.4 ± 0.7 and 0.8 ± 0.9 in group 1 and 4.0 ± 2.0 and 1.5 ± 1.3 in group 2. The mean times to achieve these rates were 3.2 ± 1.7 months and 5.6 ± 2.3 months for groups 1 and 2, respectively. One patient in group 2 was treated with only three sessions of ESWL. Renal colic was observed in only five patients (17.9%). Conclusions MiniJFil® stenting is safe and may be an alternative for the treatment of kidney stones during minimally invasive procedures. PMID:27878116

  17. Monte carlo diffusion hybrid model for photon migration in a two-layer turbid medium in the frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Alexandrakis, G; Farrell, T J; Patterson, M S

    2000-05-01

    We propose a hybrid Monte Carlo (MC) diffusion model for calculating the spatially resolved reflectance amplitude and phase delay resulting from an intensity-modulated pencil beam vertically incident on a two-layer turbid medium. The model combines the accuracy of MC at radial distances near the incident beam with the computational efficiency afforded by a diffusion calculation at further distances. This results in a single forward calculation several hundred times faster than pure MC, depending primarily on model parameters. Model predictions are compared with MC data for two cases that span the extremes of physiologically relevant optical properties: skin overlying fat and skin overlying muscle, both in the presence of an exogenous absorber. It is shown that good agreement can be achieved for radial distances from 0.5 to 20 mm in both cases. However, in the skin-on-muscle case the choice of model parameters and the definition of the diffusion coefficient can lead to some interesting discrepancies.

  18. High-frequency and time resolution rocket observations of structured low- and medium-frequency whistler mode emissions in the auroral ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBelle, J.; McAdams, K. L.; Trimpi, M. L.

    High bandwidth electric field waveform measurements on a recent auroral sounding rocket reveal structured whistler mode signals at 400-800 kHz. These are observed intermittently between 300 and 500 km with spectral densities 0-10 dB above the detection threshold of 1.5×10-11V2/m2Hz. The lack of correlation with local particle measurements suggests a remote source. The signals are composed of discrete structures, in one case having bandwidths of about 10 kHz and exhibiting rapid frequency variations of the order of 200 kHz per 100 ms. In one case, emissions near the harmonic of the whistler mode signals are detected simultaneously. Current theories of auroral zone whistler mode emissions have not been applied to explain quantitatively the fine structure of these signals, which resemble auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) rather than auroral hiss.

  19. Spatial and seasonal variability of medium- and high-frequency gravity waves in the lower atmosphere revealed by US radiosonde data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. D.; Huang, C. M.; Huang, K. M.; Yi, F.; Zhang, Y. H.; Gong, Y.; Gan, Q.

    2014-09-01

    We extended the broad spectral method proposed by Zhang et al. (2013) for the extraction of medium- and high-frequency gravity waves (MHGWs). This method was applied to 11 years (1998-2008) of radiosonde data from 92 stations in the Northern Hemisphere to investigate latitudinal, continuous vertical and seasonal variability of MHGW parameters in the lower atmosphere (2-25 km). The latitudinal and vertical distributions of the wave energy density and horizontal momentum fluxes as well as their seasonal variations exhibit considerable consistency with those of inertial gravity waves. Despite the consistency, the MHGWs have much larger energy density, horizontal momentum fluxes and wave force, indicating the more important role of MHGWs in energy and momentum transportation and acceleration of the background. For the observed MHGWs, the vertical wavelengths are usually larger than 8 km; the horizontal wavelengths peak in the middle troposphere at middle-high latitudes. These characteristics are obviously different from inertial gravity waves. The energy density and horizontal momentum fluxes have similar latitude-dependent seasonality: both of them are dominated by a semiannual variation at low latitudes and an annual variation at middle latitudes; however at high latitudes, they often exhibit more than two peaks per year in the troposphere. Compared with the inertial GWs, the derived intrinsic frequencies are more sensitive to the spatiotemporal variation of the buoyancy frequency, and at all latitudinal regions they are higher in summer. The wavelengths have a weaker seasonal variation; an evident annual cycle can be observed only at middle latitudes.

  20. Repeated nightmares

    MedlinePlus

    ... different from night terrors . Alternative Names Nightmares - repeated; Dream anxiety disorder References American Academy of Family Physicians. Information from your family doctor. Nightmares and night terrors in children. ...

  1. Low-frequency Observations of Linearly Polarized Structures in the Interstellar Medium near the South Galactic Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenc, E.; Gaensler, B. M.; Sun, X. H.; Sadler, E. M.; Willis, A. G.; Barry, N.; Beardsley, A. P.; Bell, M. E.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Callingham, J. R.; Cappallo, R. J.; Carroll, P.; Corey, B. E.; de Oliveira-Costa, A.; Deshpande, A. A.; Dillon, J. S.; Dwarkanath, K. S.; Emrich, D.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; For, B.-Q.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hancock, P.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hewitt, J. N.; Hindson, L.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Jacobs, D. C.; Kapińska, A. D.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kim, H.-S.; Kratzenberg, E.; Line, J.; Loeb, A.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Morgan, J.; Murphy, T.; Neben, A. R.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A. R.; Ord, S. M.; Paul, S.; Pindor, B.; Pober, J. C.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Sethi, S. K.; Srivani, K. S.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Sullivan, I. S.; Tegmark, M.; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Tingay, S. J.; Trott, C.; Waterson, M.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Wyithe, J. S. B.; Zheng, Q.

    2016-10-01

    We present deep polarimetric observations at 154 MHz with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), covering 625 deg2 centered on α = 0hand δ = -27°. The sensitivity available in our deep observations allows an in-band, frequency-dependent analysis of polarized structure for the first time at long wavelengths. Our analysis suggests that the polarized structures are dominated by intrinsic emission but may also have a foreground Faraday screen component. At these wavelengths, the compactness of the MWA baseline distribution provides excellent snapshot sensitivity to large-scale structure. The observations are sensitive to diffuse polarized emission at ˜54‧ resolution with a sensitivity of 5.9 mJy beam-1 and compact polarized sources at ˜2.‧4 resolution with a sensitivity of 2.3 mJy beam-1 for a subset (400 deg2) of this field. The sensitivity allows the effect of ionospheric Faraday rotation to be spatially and temporally measured directly from the diffuse polarized background. Our observations reveal large-scale structures (˜1°-8° in extent) in linear polarization clearly detectable in ˜2 minute snapshots, which would remain undetectable by interferometers with minimum baseline lengths of >110 m at 154 MHz. The brightness temperature of these structures is on average 4 K in polarized intensity, peaking at 11 K. Rotation measure synthesis reveals that the structures have Faraday depths ranging from -2 to 10 rad m-2 with a large fraction peaking at approximately +1 rad m-2. We estimate a distance of 51 ± 20 pc to the polarized emission based on measurements of the in-field pulsar J2330-2005. We detect four extragalactic linearly polarized point sources within the field in our compact source survey. Based on the known polarized source population at 1.4 GHz and non-detections at 154 MHz, we estimate an upper limit on the depolarization ratio of 0.08 from 1.4 GHz to 154 MHz.

  2. Biomarkers of Dietary Intake Are Correlated with Corresponding Measures from Repeated Dietary Recalls and Food-Frequency Questionnaires in the Adventist Health Study-2123

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jing; Knutsen, Synnove F; Sabaté, Joan; Bennett, Hannelore

    2016-01-01

    Background: Accurate assessment of diet in study populations is still a challenge. Some statistical strategies that use biomarkers of dietary intake attempt to compensate for the biasing effects of reporting errors. Objective: The objective was to correlate biomarkers of dietary intake with 2 direct measures of dietary intake. Methods: Subjects provided repeated 24-h dietary recalls and 2 food-frequency questionnaires (FFQs) separated by ∼3 y. Correlations between biomarkers and reported dietary intakes as measured by the recalls and FFQs were de-attenuated for within-person variability. The Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2) has a large database of biomarkers of dietary intake (blood, urine, adipose tissue) from a calibration study (909 analytic subjects) representing the cohort. Participants were black and non-black Adventists in the United States and Canada. Results: Dietary items with higher-valued de-attenuated correlations (≥0.50) between biomarkers and recalls included some fatty acids (FAs), the non-fish meats, fruit (non-black subjects), some carotenoids, vitamin B-12 (non-black subjects), and vitamin E. Moderately valued correlations (0.30–0.49) were found for very long chain ω-3 (n–3) FAs, some carotenoids, folate, isoflavones, cruciferous vegetables, fruit (black subjects), and calcium. The highest correlation values in non-black and black subjects were 0.69 (urinary 1-methyl-histidine and meat consumption) and 0.72 (adipose and dietary 18:2 ω-6), respectively. Correlations comparing biomarkers with recalls were generally similar for black and non-black subjects, but correlations between biomarkers and the FFQ were slightly lower than corresponding recall correlations. Correlations between biomarkers and a single FFQ estimate (the usual cohort situation) were generally much lower. Conclusions: Many biomarkers that have relatively high-valued correlations with dietary intake were identified and were usually of similar value in black and non

  3. Optimization of short tandem repeats (STR) typing method and allele frequency of 8 STR markers in referring to forensic medicine of Semnan Province.

    PubMed

    Eskandarion, M; Najafi, M; Akbari Eidgahi, M; Alipour Tabrizi, A; Golmohamadi, T

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Short Tandem Repeats (STR) show considerable differences among individuals in the population from which they used for identification. There are various methods for analysis of these STR loci, and capillary electrophoresis method already used as an international standard. Due to the high costs of this process, this study aimed to set up a Multiplex PCR method in some standard STR loci so that we can use its PCR product in STR analysis with different methods of HPLC, GC-Mass, and Capillary Electrophoresis. Materials and Methods: 8 typical STR loci in the identification selected according to their size in the two groups of four (CSF1PO, VWA, D18S51, PentaD and TPOX, Amelogenin, FGA, SE33) from NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology). The above SSR primers prepared from Genbank and Monoplex PCR was designed based on their size. Then, with the changes in temperature conditions, magnesium ion, primers concentration, and setting-up, Hot Start Multiplex PCR of four markers was carried out. PCR product investigated on the agarose gel electrophoresis (3%) and the results of genotyping analyzed by Genetic Analyzer. Results: The Results showed that all STR loci under study are detectable as Monoplex PCR at a temperature of 62°-66° and 1.5 mM magnesium ion. Moreover, Multiplex PCR results showed that when the concentration of primer and temperature measured by the fixed concentration of magnesium, CSF1PO, and D18S51 loci bands are weaker than desired. Using a standard buffer and set Magnesium conditions against changes in the primer concentration and temperature, when Taq polymerase enzyme is added to test tubes at a temperature of 94°, Multiplex PCR bands are visible desirably. Capillary electrophoresis genotyping results obtained in all eight loci and the Locus FGA had the most allelic diversity and the loci TPOX and CSF1PO had the lowest allelic diversity. TPOX and CSF1PO loci had the lowest allelic frequencies, and FGA locus had

  4. Optimization of short tandem repeats (STR) typing method and allele frequency of 8 STR markers in referring to forensic medicine of Semnan Province

    PubMed Central

    Eskandarion, M; Najafi, M; Akbari Eidgahi, M; Alipour Tabrizi, A; Golmohamadi, T

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Short Tandem Repeats (STR) show considerable differences among individuals in the population from which they used for identification. There are various methods for analysis of these STR loci, and capillary electrophoresis method already used as an international standard. Due to the high costs of this process, this study aimed to set up a Multiplex PCR method in some standard STR loci so that we can use its PCR product in STR analysis with different methods of HPLC, GC-Mass, and Capillary Electrophoresis. Materials and Methods: 8 typical STR loci in the identification selected according to their size in the two groups of four (CSF1PO, VWA, D18S51, PentaD and TPOX, Amelogenin, FGA, SE33) from NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology). The above SSR primers prepared from Genbank and Monoplex PCR was designed based on their size. Then, with the changes in temperature conditions, magnesium ion, primers concentration, and setting-up, Hot Start Multiplex PCR of four markers was carried out. PCR product investigated on the agarose gel electrophoresis (3%) and the results of genotyping analyzed by Genetic Analyzer. Results: The Results showed that all STR loci under study are detectable as Monoplex PCR at a temperature of 62°-66° and 1.5 mM magnesium ion. Moreover, Multiplex PCR results showed that when the concentration of primer and temperature measured by the fixed concentration of magnesium, CSF1PO, and D18S51 loci bands are weaker than desired. Using a standard buffer and set Magnesium conditions against changes in the primer concentration and temperature, when Taq polymerase enzyme is added to test tubes at a temperature of 94°, Multiplex PCR bands are visible desirably. Capillary electrophoresis genotyping results obtained in all eight loci and the Locus FGA had the most allelic diversity and the loci TPOX and CSF1PO had the lowest allelic diversity. TPOX and CSF1PO loci had the lowest allelic frequencies, and FGA locus had

  5. Exploration of multi-fold symmetry element-loaded superconducting radio frequency structure for reliable acceleration of low- & medium-beta ion species

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shichun; Geng, Rongli

    2015-09-01

    Reliable acceleration of low- to medium-beta proton or heavy ion species is needed for future high-current superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerators. Due to the high-Q nature of an SRF resonator, it is sensitive to many factors such as electron loading (from either the accelerated beam or from parasitic field emitted electrons), mechanical vibration, and liquid helium bath pressure fluctuation etc. To increase the stability against those factors, a mechanically strong and stable RF structure is desirable. Guided by this consideration, multi-fold symmetry element-loaded SRF structures (MFSEL), cylindrical tanks with multiple (n>=3) rod-shaped radial elements, are being explored. The top goal of its optimization is to improve mechanical stability. A natural consequence of this structure is a lowered ratio of the peak surface electromagnetic field to the acceleration gradient as compared to the traditional spoke cavity. A disadvantage of this new structure is an increased size for a fixed resonant frequency and optimal beta. This paper describes the optimization of the electro-magnetic (EM) design and preliminary mechanical analysis for such structures.

  6. Sources and characteristics of medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances observed by high-frequency radars in the North American sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frissell, N. A.; Baker, J. B. H.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Greenwald, R. A.; Gerrard, A. J.; Miller, E. S.; West, M. L.

    2016-04-01

    Medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) are wave-like ionospheric perturbations routinely observed by high-frequency radars. We focus on a class of MSTIDs observed during the winter daytime at high latitudes and midlatitudes. The source of these MSTIDs remains uncertain, with the two primary candidates being space weather and lower atmospheric processes. We surveyed observations from four high-latitude and six midlatitude Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radars in the North American sector from November to May 2012 to 2015. The MSTIDs observed have horizontal wavelengths between ˜150 and 650 km and horizontal velocities between ˜75 and 325 m s-1. In local fall and winter seasons the majority of MSTIDs propagated equatorward, with bearings ranging from ˜125° to 225° geographic azimuth. No clear correlation with space weather activity as parameterized by AE and SYM-H could be identified. Rather, MSTID observations were found to have a strong correlation with polar vortex dynamics on two timescales. First, a seasonal timescale follows the annual development and decay of the polar vortex. Second, a shorter 2-4 week timescale again corresponds to synoptic polar vortex variability, including stratospheric warmings. Additionally, statistical analysis shows that MSTIDs are more likely during periods of strong polar vortex. Direct comparison of the MSTID observations with stratospheric zonal winds suggests that a wind filtering mechanism may be responsible for the strong correlation. Collectively, these observations suggest that polar atmospheric processes, rather than space weather activity, are primarily responsible for controlling the occurrence of high-latitude and midlatitude winter daytime MSTIDs.

  7. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-04-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories.

  8. Medium-Sized Mammals around a Radioactive Liquid Waste Lagoon at Los Alamos National Laboratory: Uptake of Contaminants and Evaluation of Radio-Frequency Identification Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie A. Hansen; Phil R. Fresquez; Rhonda J. Robinson; John D. Huchton; Teralene S. Foxx

    1999-11-01

    Use of a radioactive liquid waste lagoon by medium-sized mammals and levels of tritium, other selected radionuclides, and metals in biological tissues of the animals were documented at Technical Area 53 (TA-53) of Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1997 and 1998. Rock squirrel (Spermophilus variegates), raccoon (Procyon lotor), striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis), and bobcat (Lynx rufus) were captured at TA-53 and at a control site on the Santa Fe National Forest. Captured animals were anesthetized and marked with radio-frequency identification (RFD) tags and/or ear tags. We collected urine and hair samples for tritium and metals (aluminum, antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, silver, and thallium) analyses, respectively. In addition, muscle and bone samples from two rock squirrels collected from each of TA-53, perimeter, and regional background sites were tested for tritium, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and total uranium. Animals at TA-53 were monitored entering and leaving the lagoon area using a RFID monitor to read identification numbers from the RFID tags of marked animals and a separate camera system to photograph all animals passing through the monitor. Cottontail rabbit (Sylvilagus spp.), rock squirrel, and raccoon were the species most frequently photographed going through the RFID monitor. Less than half of all marked animals in the lagoon area were detected using the lagoon. Male and female rock squirrels from the lagoon area had significantly higher tritium concentrations compared to rock squirrels from the control area. Metals tested were not significantly higher in rock squirrels from TA-53, although there was a trend toward increased levels of lead in some individuals at TA-53. Muscle and bone samples from squirrels in the lagoon area appeared to have higher levels of tritium, total uranium, and {sup 137}Cs than samples collected from perimeter and

  9. Allele frequencies of combined DNA index system (CODIS) and non-CODIS short tandem repeat loci in Goiás, Central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rodovalho, R G; Santos, G S; Cavalcanti, L M; Moura, B F S M; Rodrigues, E L; Lima, P R; Gigonzac, M A D; Vieira, T C

    2015-07-03

    In studies of human identification, obtaining a high standard of outcomes and satisfactory conclusions are directly related to the use of highly polymorphic molecular markers. In addition to the combined DNA index system (CODIS) group, it is also important to implement non-CODIS markers into the analysis, as they increase the power of discrimination. During the identification process, it is essential to consider the genetic variation among distinct groups of populations, as the allele frequencies are directly associated with the power of discrimination. However, the population of Goiás, a State located in Central Brazil, is characterized by a highly mixed population due to its diverse ethnic origins. In this study, a survey of the allelic frequencies in the Goiás population was carried out using a molecular assembly composed of 21 autosomal loci both from and external to the CODIS group. The new data, for some of the markers used, were statistically similar to those from previous studies. This consistency means that the use of these markers might serve as a parameter for future population comparisons. The results from these analyses further our knowledge of the study of human identification.

  10. Repeating LP events and increases in high-frequency seismic energy preceding the December 1999 eruption of the quiescently active Telica Volcano, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, M.; Roman, D. C.; Geirsson, H.; Lafemina, P.; Muñoz, A.; Guzman, C.; Tenorio, V.

    2010-12-01

    Telica volcano, Nicaragua, is a ‘quiescently active’ basaltic andesite stratovolcano located in the Central American volcanic front. A high rate of long-period (LP) seismicity has been recorded at Telica since the installation of a single vertical-component 1 Hz seismic sensor (TELN) near its summit in 1993 by the Instituto Nicaragüense de Estudios Territoriales (INETER). Due to the continuously high rate of LPs at Telica, traditional methods of forecasting volcanic activity may not be applicable; therefore an understanding of the nature of precursory changes in Telica’s seismicity is necessary to accurately forecast future volcanic activity. A VEI 2 eruption of Telica occurred on the 29th December 1999, preceded by a series of small explosions between the 3rd-15th October 1999. Here we analyse an eight-month period of seismicity bracketing this activity, in an attempt to identify precursory changes with respect to background seismicity. Between August 1999 and March 2000 over 18,000 seismic events were recorded on TELN. We first calculated the dominant frequencies (i.e. frequency with dominant spectral energy) for all events recorded during this period. A time series of the dominant event frequencies between August 1999 and March 2000 shows a significant increase in the number of high frequency (> 5 Hz) events and, in LP events, a shift in the two dominant spectral energy peaks from 2 Hz and 4 Hz to 2 Hz and 3 Hz in the month before the October 1999 explosions. Next, we selected six representative eight-day periods, three from before the explosions and three from after, for multiplet analysis using waveform cross-correlation. Multiplet analysis of the six selected time periods reveal significant changes in behaviour. In period 1 (more than one month before the explosions) events are poorly correlated. In periods 2 and 3 (less than one month before the explosions) we identified several unique families of LP events, each having high cross-correlation values

  11. Low-Frequency Observations of Galactic Supernova Remnants and the Distribution of Low-Density Ionized Gas in the Interstellar Medium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-15

    New long-wavelength observations of Galactic supernova remnants ( SNRs ) at 30.9 and 57.5 MHz are used to derive detailed low-frequency radio spectra...for 32 SNRs . Of these, approximately two-thirds show turnovers at low frequencies, implying the presence of a widespread, but inhomogeneous, ionized... SNRs and to constrain the physical properties of the ionized gas responsible for the absorption. Three generally accepted ionized components of the

  12. Review of rigorous coupled-wave analysis and of homogeneous effective medium approximations for high spatial-frequency surface-relief gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glytsis, Elias N.; Brundrett, David L.; Gaylord, Thomas K.

    1993-01-01

    A review of the rigorous coupled-wave analysis as applied to the diffraction of electro-magnetic waves by gratings is presented. The analysis is valid for any polarization, angle of incidence, and conical diffraction. Cascaded and/or multiplexed gratings as well as material anisotropy can be incorporated under the same formalism. Small period rectangular groove gratings can also be modeled using approximately equivalent uniaxial homogeneous layers (effective media). The ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices of these layers depend on the gratings filling factor, the refractive indices of the substrate and superstrate, and the ratio of the freespace wavelength to grating period. Comparisons of the homogeneous effective medium approximations with the rigorous coupled-wave analysis are presented. Antireflection designs (single-layer or multilayer) using the effective medium models are presented and compared. These ultra-short period antireflection gratings can also be used to produce soft x-rays. Comparisons of the rigorous coupled-wave analysis with experimental results on soft x-ray generation by gratings are also included.

  13. Low and then high frequency oscillations of distinct right cortical networks are progressively enhanced by medium and long term Satyananda Yoga meditation practice

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, John; Jamieson, Graham; Cohen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Meditation proficiency is related to trait-like (learned) effects on brain function, developed over time. Previous studies show increases in EEG power in lower frequency bands (theta, alpha) in experienced meditators in both meditation states and baseline conditions. Higher gamma band power has been found in advanced Buddhist meditators, yet it is not known if this occurs in Yoga meditation practices. This study used eLORETA to compare differences in cortical source activity underlying scalp EEG from intermediate (mean experience 4 years) and advanced (mean experience 30 years) Australian meditators from the Satyananda Yoga tradition during a body-steadiness meditation, mantra meditation, and non-meditation mental calculation condition. Intermediate Yoga meditators showed greater source activity in low frequencies (particularly theta and alpha1) during mental calculation, body-steadiness and mantra meditation. A similar spatial pattern of significant differences was found in all conditions but the number of significant voxels was double during body-steadiness and mantra meditation than in the non-meditation (calculation) condition. These differences were greatest in right (R) superior frontal and R precentral gyri and extended back to include the R parietal and occipital lobes. Advanced Yoga meditators showed greater activity in high frequencies (beta and especially gamma) in all conditions but greatly expanded during meditation practice. Across all conditions (meditation and non-meditation) differences were greatest in the same regions: R insula, R inferior frontal gyrus and R anterior temporal lobe. Distinct R core networks were identified in alpha1 (8–10 Hz) and gamma (25–42 Hz) bands, respectively. The voxels recruited to these networks greatly expanded during meditation practice to include homologous regions of the left hemisphere. Functional interpretation parallels traditionally described stages of development in Yoga proficiency. PMID:24959124

  14. Reduced supplementation frequency increased insulin-like growth factor 1 in beef steers fed medium quality hay and supplemented with a soybean hull and corn gluten feed blend.

    PubMed

    Drewnoski, M E; Huntington, G B; Poore, M H

    2014-06-01

    Reducing supplementation frequency in calf growing programs can reduce labor and equipment operation costs. However, little is understood about the metabolic response of ruminants to large fluctuations in nutrient intake. Eighteen Angus or Angus × Simmental cross steers (287 ± 20 kg and 310 ± 3.6 d of age) were individually fed 1 of 3 dietary treatments using Calan gates. Dietary treatments consisted of ad libitum hay and no supplement (NS), ad libitum hay and 1% BW (as-fed basis) of supplement daily (DS), or ad libitum hay and 2% BW (as-fed basis) of supplement every other day (SA). The supplement was 90% DM and contained (as-fed basis) 47% corn gluten feed, 47% soybean hulls, 2% feed grade limestone, and 4% molasses. Hay intake and ADG was measured over a 52-d period. Steers were then moved to individual tie stalls. Steers were fed at 0800 h and blood samples were collected every hour from 0600 to 1400 h and at 1800, 2200, and 0200 h over a 2-d period. Gains were increased (P < 0.01) by supplementation but did not differ (P = 0.68) due to supplementation frequency. Average daily gain was 0.45, 0.90, and 0.87 kg ·hd(-1)·d(-1) (SEM ± 0.05) for steers NS, DS, and SA, respectively. Across the 2-d supplementation cycle area under the concentration time curve (AUC) for plasma glucose was increased (P < 0.01) by supplementation but did not differ (P = 0.41) due to supplementation frequency. The AUC for plasma insulin was increased by supplementation (P < 0.01) but did not differ (P = 0.67) due to supplementation frequency. Plasma IGF-1 was increased (P = 0.01) by supplementation and was greater (P = 0.04) for steers supplemented SA than DS. Gains of steers supplemented with a soybean hull and corn gluten feed blend on alternate days did not differ from those supplemented daily suggesting the steers were able to efficiently utilize large boluses of nutrients fed every other day. The effect of less frequent supplementation on IGF-1 deserves further examination as

  15. POLARIZED LINE TRANSFER WITH F-STATE INTERFERENCE IN A NON-MAGNETIC MEDIUM: PARTIAL FREQUENCY REDISTRIBUTION EFFECTS IN THE COLLISIONLESS REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    Smitha, H. N.; Sowmya, K.; Nagendra, K. N.; Sampoorna, M.; Stenflo, J. O. E-mail: ksowmya@iiap.res.in E-mail: sampoorna@iiap.res.in

    2012-10-20

    Quantum interference phenomena manifest themselves in several ways in the polarized solar spectrum formed due to coherent scattering processes. One such effect arises due to interference between the fine structure (J) states giving rise to multiplets. Another effect is that which arises due to interference between the hyperfine structure (F) states. We extend the redistribution matrix derived for the J-state interference to the case of F-state interference. We then incorporate it into the polarized radiative transfer equation and solve it for isothermal constant property slab atmospheres. The relevant transfer equation is solved using a polarized approximate lambda iteration (PALI) technique based on operator perturbation. An alternative method derived from the Neumann series expansion is also proposed and is found to be relatively more efficient than the PALI method. The effects of partial frequency redistribution and the F-state interference on the shapes of the linearly polarized Stokes profiles are discussed. The emergent Stokes profiles are computed for hypothetical line transitions arising due to hyperfine structure splitting of the upper J = 3/2 and lower J = 1/2 levels of a two-level atom model with nuclear spin I{sub s} = 3/2. We confine our attention to the non-magnetic scattering in the collisionless regime.

  16. Lambda Exonuclease Digestion of CGG Trinucleotide Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, R.S.; Koretsky, A.P.; Moreland, J.

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome and other triplet repeat diseases are characterized by an elongation of a repeating DNA triplet. The ensemble-averaged lambda exonuclease digestion rate of different substrates, including one with an elongated FMR1 gene containing 120 CGG repeats, was measured using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Using magnetic tweezers sequence-dependent digestion rates and pausing was measured for individual lambda exonucleases. Within the triplet repeats a lower average and narrower distribution of rates and a higher frequency of pausing was observed. PMID:19562332

  17. Unfolding a linker between helical repeats.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Vanessa; Nielsen, Steven O; Klein, Michael L; Discher, Dennis E

    2005-06-10

    In many multi-repeat proteins, linkers between repeats have little secondary structure and place few constraints on folding or unfolding. However, the large family of spectrin-like proteins, including alpha-actinin, spectrin, and dystrophin, share three-helix bundle, spectrin repeats that appear in crystal structures to be linked by long helices. All of these proteins are regularly subjected to mechanical stress. Recent single molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments demonstrate not only forced unfolding but also simultaneous unfolding of tandem repeats at finite frequency, which suggests that the contiguous helix between spectrin repeats can propagate a cooperative helix-to-coil transition. Here, we address what happens atomistically to the linker under stress by steered molecular dynamics simulations of tandem spectrin repeats in explicit water. The results for alpha-actinin repeats reveal rate-dependent pathways, with one pathway showing that the linker between repeats unfolds, which may explain the single-repeat unfolding pathway observed in AFM experiments. A second pathway preserves the structural integrity of the linker, which explains the tandem-repeat unfolding event. Unfolding of the linker begins with a splay distortion of proximal loops away from hydrophobic contacts with the linker. This is followed by linker destabilization and unwinding with increased hydration of the backbone. The end result is an unfolded helix that mechanically decouples tandem repeats. Molecularly detailed insights obtained here aid in understanding the mechanical coupling of domain stability in spectrin family proteins.

  18. Validation of soy protein estimates from a food-frequency questionnaire with repeated 24-h recalls and isoflavonoid excretion in overnight urine in a Western population with a wide range of soy intakes2

    PubMed Central

    Jaceldo-Siegl, Karen; Fraser, Gary E; Chan, Jacqueline; Franke, Adrian; Sabaté, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence of the benefits of soy on cancer risk in Western populations is inconsistent, in part because of the low intake of soy in these groups. Objective We assessed the validity of soy protein estimates from food-frequency questionnaires (FFQs) in a sample of Adventist Health Study-2 participants with a wide range of soy intakes. Design We obtained dietary intake data from 100 men and women (43 blacks and 57 nonblacks). Soy protein estimates from FFQs were compared against repeated 24-h recalls and urinary excretion of daidzein, genistein, total isoflavonoids (TIFLs), and equol (measured by HPLC/photodiode array/mass spectrometry) as reference criteria. We calculated Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients (with 95% CIs) for FFQ–24-h recall, 24 h-recall–urinary excretion, and FFQ–urinary excretion pairs. Results Among soy users, mean (± SD) soy protein values were 12.12 ± 10.80 g/d from 24-h recalls and 9.43 ± 7.83 g/d from FFQs. The unattenuated correlation (95% CI) between soy protein estimates from 24-h recalls and FFQs was 0.57 (0.32, 0.75). Correlation coefficients between soy protein intake from 24-h recalls and urinary isoflavonoids were 0.72 (0.43, 0.96) for daidzein, 0.67 (0.43, 0.91) for genistein, and 0.72 (0.47, 0.98) for TIFLs. Between FFQs and urinary excretion, these were 0.50 (0.32, 0.65), 0.48 (0.29, 0.61), and 0.50 (0.32, 0.64) for daidzein, genistein, and TIFLs, respectively. Conclusions Soy protein estimates from questionnaire were significantly correlated with soy protein from 24-h recalls and urinary excretion of daidzein, genistein, and TIFLs. The Adventist Health Study-2 FFQ is a valid instrument for assessing soy protein in a population with a wide range of soy intakes. PMID:18469267

  19. The new Adelaide medium frequency Doppler radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, I. M.; Vandepeer, B. G. W.; Dillon, S.; Fuller, B.

    1993-08-01

    The Buckland Park Aerial Array (35 deg S, 138 deg E) is situated about 40 km north of Adelaide on a flat coastal plain. It was designed by Basil Briggs and Graham Elford, and constructed between 1965 and 1968. The first results were published in the late 1960's. Some aspects of the history of the array are described in Briggs (1993). A new MF Doppler Radar utilizing the array has been developed. This paper describes some of the technical details of this new facility.

  20. Towards Quantum Repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisin, Nicolas

    2009-05-01

    The ultimate limit of direct point to point quantum key distribution is around 300-500 km. Longer distances fiber-based quantum communication will require both high-fidelity entanglement swapping and multi-mode quantum memories. A new protocol for an efficient multimode quantum memory based on atomic ensembles has been developed and demonstrated. The rare-earth ions ensemble is ``frozen'' in a crystal inside a cryostat. The protocol, named AFC (Atomic Frequency Comb) is inspired from photon echoes, but avoids any control light pulse after the single-photon(s) is (are) stored in the medium, thus avoiding any noise due to fluorescence. First results on the new protocol for quantum memories in Nd:YVO4 doped crystals demonstrate a quantum light-matter interface at the single-photon level. The coherence of the re-emitted photons is investigated in an interference experiment showing net visibilities above 95%. Further results in Nd:YSO (Geneva), Tm:YAG (Paris) and Pr:YSO (Lund) shall also be presented. Many hundreds of km long quantum communication is a long term objective. Many of the necessary building blocks have been demonstrated, but usually in independent experiments and with insufficient fidelities and specifications to meet the goal. Still, today's the roadmap is relatively clear and a lot of interesting physics shall be found along the journey.

  1. Generation of Coherent Light by a Moving Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinsky, Anatoly A.; Li, Fu; Zhang, Xiwen

    2017-03-01

    We show that steady nonuniform motion of a medium through an optical resonator can yield light amplification at the resonator frequency. High gain can be achieved if at the generated frequency the medium refractive index is close to zero or the medium has a very strong frequency dispersion. We also discuss an analogy between light amplification by a moving medium and the generation of sound waves when gas flows along a tube with acoustically closed-open boundaries.

  2. Germ-line CAG repeat instability causes extreme CAG repeat expansion with infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Ek, Jakob; Duno, Morten; Skovby, Flemming; Hjermind, Lena E; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup

    2013-06-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by dominant inheritance, progressive cerebellar ataxia and diverse extracerebellar symptoms. A subgroup of the ataxias is caused by unstable CAG-repeat expansions in their respective genes leading to pathogenic expansions of polyglutamine stretches in the encoded proteins. In general, unstable CAG repeats have an uninterrupted CAG repeat, whereas stable CAG repeats are either short or interrupted by CAA codons, which - like CAG codons - code for glutamine. Here we report on an infantile SCA2 patient who, due to germ-line CAG repeat instability in her father, inherited an extremely expanded CAG repeat in the SCA2 locus. Surprisingly, the expanded allele of the father was an interrupted CAG repeat sequence. Furthermore, analyses of single spermatozoa showed a high frequency of paternal germ-line repeat sequence instability of the expanded SCA2 locus.

  3. Frequency Tunable Wire Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Qing (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides frequency tunable solid-state radiation-generating devices, such as lasers and amplifiers, whose active medium has a size in at least one transverse dimension (e.g., its width) that is much smaller than the wavelength of radiation generated and/or amplified within the active medium. In such devices, a fraction of radiation travels as an evanescent propagating mode outside the active medium. It has been discovered that in such devices the radiation frequency can be tuned by the interaction of a tuning mechanism with the propagating evanescent mode.

  4. Repeating the Past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    1998-05-01

    As part of the celebration of the Journal 's 75th year, we are scanning each Journal issue from 25, 50, and 74 years ago. Many of the ideas and practices described are so similar to present-day "innovations" that George Santayana's adage (1) "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" comes to mind. But perhaps "condemned" is too strong - sometimes it may be valuable to repeat something that was done long ago. One example comes from the earliest days of the Division of Chemical Education and of the Journal.

  5. Acoustic resonance frequency locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-09-09

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell, the acoustic source having a source frequency; repeatedly and continuously sweeping the source frequency across the resonance frequency at a sweep rate; and employing an odd-harmonic of the source frequency sweep rate to maintain the source frequency sweep centered on the resonance frequency.

  6. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  7. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  8. Some characteristics of repeated sickness absence

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, David

    1972-01-01

    Ferguson, D. (1972).Brit. J. industr. Med.,29, 420-431. Some characteristics of repeated sickness absence. Several studies have shown that frequency of absence attributed to sickness is not distributed randomly but tends to follow the negative binomial distribution, and this has been taken to support the concept of `proneness' to such absence. Thus, the distribution of sickness absence resembles that of minor injury at work demonstrated over 50 years ago. Because the investigation of proneness to absence does not appear to have been reported by others in Australia, the opportunity was taken, during a wider study of health among telegraphists in a large communications undertaking, to analyse some characteristics of repeated sickness absence. The records of medically certified and uncertified sickness absence of all 769 telegraphists continuously employed in all State capitals over a two-and-a-half-year period were compared with those of 411 clerks and 415 mechanics and, in Sydney, 380 mail sorters and 80 of their supervisors. All telegraphists in Sydney, Melbourne, and Brisbane, and all mail sorters in Sydney, who were available and willing were later medically examined. From their absence pattern repeaters (employees who had had eight or more certified absences in two and a half years) were separated into three types based on a presumptive origin in chance, recurrent disease and symptomatic non-specific disorder. The observed distribution of individual frequency of certified absence over the full two-and-a-half-year period of study followed that expected from the univariate negative binomial, using maximum likelihood estimators, rather than the poisson distribution, in three of the four occupational groups in Sydney. Limited correlational and bivariate analysis supported the interpretation of proneness ascribed to the univariate fit. In the two groups studied, frequency of uncertified absence could not be fitted by the negative binomial, although the numbers of

  9. Repeated administration of imipramine modifies GABAergic transmission in rat frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Wabno, Joanna; Hess, Grzegorz

    2013-05-01

    Alterations in the functions of brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inhibitory system and a distortion in the balance between excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission have been hypothesized to be possible causes of mood disorders. Experimental evidence points to modifications of GABAergic transmission as a result of prolonged treatment with antidepressant drugs, however, the influence of the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine on inhibitory synaptic transmission in the rat cerebral cortex has not yet been investigated. Therefore, in the present study the effects of single and repeated administration of imipramine were evaluated ex vivo in slices of the rat frontal cortex using electrophysiological approach. In slices prepared 2 days after the last drug administration from animals receiving imipramine for 14 days (dose 10 mg/kg p.o., twice daily) the mean frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) recorded from layer II/III pyramidal neurons was decreased, while the mean amplitude of sIPSCs was increased. These effects were absent in slices obtained from rats which received imipramine once. Application of N,N'-dibenzhydrylethane-1,2-diamine dihydrochloride (AMN 082), a selective mGluR7 allosteric agonist, to the slice incubation medium resulted in a decrease in the mean frequency of sIPSCs in preparations obtained from repeated imipramine-treated animals, in contrast to slices originating from control rats where no AMN 082-induced effects were observed. Repeated imipramine treatment reduced protein density levels of the three tested GABAA receptor subunits: α 1, β 2 and γ 2. These data indicate that repeated treatment of normal rats with imipramine results in a modification of the release mechanism of GABA from presynaptic terminals and its modulation by mGluR7 receptors as well as in an alteration in GABAA receptor subunit protein levels in the rat cerebral cortex.

  10. Coexistence of 3G repeaters with LTE base stations.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Woon-Young; Lee, Sang-Min; Hwang, Gyung-Ho; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Repeaters have been an attractive solution for mobile operators to upgrade their wireless networks at low cost and to extend network coverage effectively. Since the first LTE commercial deployment in 2009, many mobile operators have launched LTE networks by upgrading their 3G and legacy networks. Because all 3G frequency bands are shared with the frequency bands for LTE deployment and 3G mobile operators have an enormous number of repeaters, reusing 3G repeaters in LTE networks is definitely a practical and cost-efficient solution. However, 3G repeaters usually do not support spatial multiplexing with multiple antennas, and thus it is difficult to reuse them directly in LTE networks. In order to support spatial multiplexing of LTE, the role of 3G repeaters should be replaced with small LTE base stations or MIMO-capable repeaters. In this paper, a repeater network is proposed to reuse 3G repeaters in LTE deployment while still supporting multilayer transmission of LTE. Interestingly, the proposed network has a higher cluster throughput than an LTE network with MIMO-capable repeaters.

  11. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques for duct leakage using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards. The three duct leak measurement methods assessed in this report are the two duct pressurization methods that are commonly used by many practitioners and the DeltaQ technique. These are methods B, C and A, respectively of the ASTM E1554 standard. Although it would be useful to evaluate other duct leak test methods, this study focused on those test methods that are commonly used and are required in various test standards, such as BPI (2010), RESNET (2014), ASHRAE 62.2 (2013), California Title 24 (CEC 2012), DOE Weatherization and many other energy efficiency programs.

  12. Survey of simple sequence repeats in woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca).

    PubMed

    Guan, L; Huang, J F; Feng, G Q; Wang, X W; Wang, Y; Chen, B Y; Qiao, Y S

    2013-07-30

    The use of simple sequence repeats (SSRs), or microsatellites, as genetic markers has become popular due to their abundance and variation in length among individuals. In this study, we investigated linkage groups (LGs) in the woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) and demonstrated variation in the abundances, densities, and relative densities of mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats. Mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats were more common than longer repeats in all LGs examined. Perfect SSRs were the predominant SSR type found and their abundance was extremely stable among LGs and chloroplasts. Abundances of mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats were positively correlated with LG size, whereas those of tetranucleotide and hexanucleotide SSRs were not. Generally, in each LG, the abundance, relative abundance, relative density, and the proportion of each unique SSR all declined rapidly as the repeated unit increased. Furthermore, the lengths and frequencies of SSRs varied among different LGs.

  13. Repeat Customer Success in Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, Melissa M.; Traub, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Four multi-session research-based programs were offered by two Extension specialist in one rural Missouri county. Eleven participants who came to multiple Extension programs could be called "repeat customers." Based on the total number of participants for all four programs, 25% could be deemed as repeat customers. Repeat customers had…

  14. Electrocatalytic H2 production with a turnover frequency >107 s-1: the medium provides an increase in rate but not overpotential

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Jianbo; Fang, Ming; Cardenas, Allan Jay P.; Shaw, Wendy J.; Helm, Monte L.; Bullock, R. Morris; Roberts, John A. S.; O'Hagan, Molly

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, rapid proton movement results in exceptionally fast electrocatalytic H2 production (up to 3 × 107 s-1) at overpotentials of ~400 mV when catalysed by [Ni(PPh2NC6H4x2)2]2+ complexes in an acidic ionic liquid–water medium ([(DMF)H]NTf2–H2O, χH2O = 0.71).

  15. RepeatsDB: a database of tandem repeat protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Tomás; Potenza, Emilio; Walsh, Ian; Gonzalo Parra, R.; Giollo, Manuel; Minervini, Giovanni; Piovesan, Damiano; Ihsan, Awais; Ferrari, Carlo; Kajava, Andrey V.; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.

    2014-01-01

    RepeatsDB (http://repeatsdb.bio.unipd.it/) is a database of annotated tandem repeat protein structures. Tandem repeats pose a difficult problem for the analysis of protein structures, as the underlying sequence can be highly degenerate. Several repeat types haven been studied over the years, but their annotation was done in a case-by-case basis, thus making large-scale analysis difficult. We developed RepeatsDB to fill this gap. Using state-of-the-art repeat detection methods and manual curation, we systematically annotated the Protein Data Bank, predicting 10 745 repeat structures. In all, 2797 structures were classified according to a recently proposed classification schema, which was expanded to accommodate new findings. In addition, detailed annotations were performed in a subset of 321 proteins. These annotations feature information on start and end positions for the repeat regions and units. RepeatsDB is an ongoing effort to systematically classify and annotate structural protein repeats in a consistent way. It provides users with the possibility to access and download high-quality datasets either interactively or programmatically through web services. PMID:24311564

  16. Effect of off-frequency sampling in magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Curtis L; Chen, Danchin D; Olivero, William C; Sutton, Bradley P; Georgiadis, John G

    2012-02-01

    In magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), shear waves at a certain frequency are encoded through bipolar gradients that switch polarity at a controlled encoding frequency and are offset in time to capture wave propagation using a controlled sampling frequency. In brain MRE, there is a possibility that the mechanical actuation frequency is different from the vibration frequency, leading to a mismatch with encoding and sampling frequencies. This mismatch can occur in brain MRE from causes both extrinsic and intrinsic to the brain, such as scanner bed vibrations or active damping in the head. The purpose of this work was to investigate how frequency mismatch can affect MRE shear stiffness measurements. Experiments were performed on a dual-medium agarose gel phantom, and the results were compared with numerical simulations to quantify these effects. It is known that off-frequency encoding alone results in a scaling of wave amplitude, and it is shown here that off-frequency sampling can result in two main effects: (1) errors in the overall shear stiffness estimate of the material on the global scale and (2) local variations appearing as stiffer and softer structures in the material. For small differences in frequency, it was found that measured global stiffness of the brain could theoretically vary by up to 12.5% relative to actual stiffness with local variations of up to 3.7% of the mean stiffness. It was demonstrated that performing MRE experiments at a frequency other than that of tissue vibration can lead to artifacts in the MRE stiffness images, and this mismatch could explain some of the large-scale scatter of stiffness data or lack of repeatability reported in the brain MRE literature.

  17. Mutagenic inverted repeat assisted genome engineering (MIRAGE).

    PubMed

    Nair, Nikhil U; Zhao, Huimin

    2009-01-01

    Here we describe a one-step method to create precise modifications in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a tool for synthetic biology, metabolic engineering, systems biology and genetic studies. Through homologous recombination, a mutagenesis cassette containing an inverted repeat of selection marker(s) is integrated into the genome. Due to its inherent instability in genomic DNA, the inverted repeat catalyzes spontaneous self-excision, resulting in precise genome modification. Since this excision occurs at very high frequencies, selection for the integration event can be followed immediately by counterselection, without the need for growth in permissive conditions. This is the first time a truly one-step method has been described for genome modification in any organism.

  18. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Schipper, J.F.

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a T configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  19. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Schipper, John F.

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a "T" configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  20. To Repeat or Not to Repeat a Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Michael J.; Biktimirov, Ernest N.

    2013-01-01

    The difficult transition from high school to university means that many students need to repeat (retake) 1 or more of their university courses. The authors examine the performance of students repeating first-year core courses in an undergraduate business program. They used data from university records for 116 students who took a total of 232…

  1. Synthetic laser medium

    DOEpatents

    Stokowski, S.E.

    1987-10-20

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chromium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  2. Synthetic laser medium

    DOEpatents

    Stokowski, Stanley E.

    1989-01-01

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chormium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  3. Study of repeater technology for advanced multifunctional communications satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Investigations are presented concerning design concepts and implementation approaches for the satellite communication repeater subsystems of advanced multifunctional satellites. In such systems the important concepts are the use of multiple antenna beams, repeater switching (routing), and efficient spectrum utilization through frequency reuse. An information base on these techniques was developed and tradeoff analyses were made of repeater design concepts, with the work design taken in a broad sense to include modulation beam coverage patterns. There were five major areas of study: requirements analysis and processing; study of interbeam interference in multibeam systems; characterization of multiple-beam switching repeaters; estimation of repeater weight and power for a number of alternatives; and tradeoff analyses based on these weight and power data.

  4. ACOUSTIC WAVES GENERATED BY IMPULSIVE DISTURBANCES IN A GRAVITATIONALLY STRATIFIED MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Jongchul; Goode, Philip R.

    2015-08-01

    Even though it is well-known from observations of the Sun that three-minute period chromospheric oscillations persist in the internetwork quiet regions and sunspot umbrae, until now their origin and persistence has defied clear explanation. Here we provide a clear and simple explanation for it with a demonstration of how such oscillations at the chromosphere's cutoff frequency naturally arise in a gravitationally stratified medium when it is disturbed. The largest-wavenumber vertical components of a chromospheric disturbance produce the highest-frequency wave packets, which propagate out of the disturbed region at group speeds that are close to the sound speed. Meanwhile, the smallest-wavenumber components develop into wave packets of frequencies close to the acoustic cutoff frequency that propagate at group speeds that are much lower than the sound speed. Because of their low propagation speed, these low-frequency wave packets linger in the disturbed region and nearby, and thus, are the ones that an observer would identify as the persistent, chromospheric three-minute oscillations. We emphasize that we can account for the power of the persistent chromospheric oscillations as coming from the repeated occurrence of disturbances with length scales greater than twice the pressure scale height in the upper photosphere.

  5. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  6. Redshift and Blueshift are due to the Medium Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2017-01-01

    The redshift is the shift from shorter wavelengths towards longer wavelengths [or from higher wave frequency to lower wave frequency]. And, reciprocally, the blueshift is the shift from longer wavelengths towards shorter wavelengths [or from lower wave frequency towards higher wave frequency]. The General Theory of Relativity asserts that the redshift and blueshift are entirely due to the Doppler's Effect, which is caused by the motion of light source: if the source is moving away from the observer the frequency received is lower [redshift], but if the source is moving towards the observer the frequency received is higher [blueshift]. But Doppler's Effect itself is actually an appearance to a Subjective Observer, because the frequency is the same all over (if one considers the Absolute Observer). We believe that the redshift and blueshift are not entirely due to the Doppler's Effect, but also due (as in the light bending) to the medium composition (medium that could be formed by waves, particles, plasma, dust, gaseous, fluids, solids, etc.), to the medium density, to the medium heterogeneity, to the medium structure, and to the electromagnetic and gravitational fields contained in that medium that may interfere with the light that passes through.

  7. Quantum repeaters: fundamental and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Hua, Sha; Liu, Yu; Ye, Jun; Zhou, Quan

    2007-04-01

    An overview of the Quantum Repeater techniques based on Entanglement Distillation and Swapping is provided. Beginning with a brief history and the basic concepts of the quantum repeaters, the article primarily focuses on the communication model based on the quantum repeater techniques, which mainly consists of two fundamental modules --- the Entanglement Distillation module and the Swapping module. The realizations of Entanglement Distillation are discussed, including the Bernstein's Procrustean method, the Entanglement Concentration and the CNOT-purification method, etc. The schemes of implementing Swapping, which include the Swapping based on Bell-state measurement and the Swapping in Cavity QED, are also introduced. Then a comparison between these realizations and evaluations on them are presented. At last, the article discusses the experimental schemes of quantum repeaters at present, documents some remaining problems and emerging trends in this field.

  8. Repeatability in redundant manipulator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Ranjan

    1994-02-01

    Terrestrial manipulators with more DOF than the dimension of the workspace and space manipulators with as many manipulator DOF as the dimension of the workspace are both redundant systems. An interesting problem of such redundant systems has been the repeatability problem due to the presence of nonholonomic constraints. We show, contrary to the existing belief, that integrability of the nonholonomic constraints is not a necessary condition for the repeatability of the configuration variables. There exist certain trajectories in the independent configuration variable space that are like 'holonomic loops' along which the redundant manipulators exhibit repeatable motion. We present a simple method based on optimization techniques for designing repeatable trajectories for free-flying space manipulators and terrestrial manipulators under pseudoinverse control.

  9. Protein Repeats from First Principles.

    PubMed

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U

    2016-04-05

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family.

  10. Protein Repeats from First Principles

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2016-01-01

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family. PMID:27044676

  11. Composite acoustic medium with simultaneously negative density and modulus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sam Hyeon; Park, Choon Mahn; Seo, Yong Mun; Wang, Zhi Guo; Kim, Chul Koo

    2010-02-05

    We fabricated an acoustic composite structure consisting of a periodic array of interspaced membranes and side holes. Experimental data on the transmission, effective density, and phase velocity are presented. The system exhibits two critical frequencies, omega{SH} and omega{c}. Our metamaterial is double negative and transparent for frequencies lower than omega{SH}. For the frequencies omega{SH}medium is opaque and only the density is negative. For the frequencies above omega{c}, the system is double positive and transparent. The present medium exhibits a very wide double negative spectral range that opens the possibility of the application of metamaterials for "white lights."

  12. Nanospring behaviour of ankyrin repeats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gwangrog; Abdi, Khadar; Jiang, Yong; Michaely, Peter; Bennett, Vann; Marszalek, Piotr E

    2006-03-09

    Ankyrin repeats are an amino-acid motif believed to function in protein recognition; they are present in tandem copies in diverse proteins in nearly all phyla. Ankyrin repeats contain antiparallel alpha-helices that can stack to form a superhelical spiral. Visual inspection of the extrapolated structure of 24 ankyrin-R repeats indicates the possibility of spring-like behaviour of the putative superhelix. Moreover, stacks of 17-29 ankyrin repeats in the cytoplasmic domains of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been identified as candidates for a spring that gates mechanoreceptors in hair cells as well as in Drosophila bristles. Here we report that tandem ankyrin repeats exhibit tertiary-structure-based elasticity and behave as a linear and fully reversible spring in single-molecule measurements by atomic force microscopy. We also observe an unexpected ability of unfolded repeats to generate force during refolding, and report the first direct measurement of the refolding force of a protein domain. Thus, we show that one of the most common amino-acid motifs has spring properties that could be important in mechanotransduction and in the design of nanodevices.

  13. Gravitational lensing in plasmic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S. Tsupko, O. Yu.

    2015-07-15

    The influence of plasma on different effects of gravitational lensing is reviewed. Using the Hamiltonian approach for geometrical optics in a medium in the presence of gravity, an exact formula for the photon deflection angle by a black hole (or another body with a Schwarzschild metric) embedded in plasma with a spherically symmetric density distribution is derived. The deflection angle in this case is determined by the mutual combination of different factors: gravity, dispersion, and refraction. While the effects of deflection by the gravity in vacuum and the refractive deflection in a nonhomogeneous medium are well known, the new effect is that, in the case of a homogeneous plasma, in the absence of refractive deflection, the gravitational deflection differs from the vacuum deflection and depends on the photon frequency. In the presence of a plasma nonhomogeneity, the chromatic refractive deflection also occurs, so the presence of plasma always makes gravitational lensing chromatic. In particular, the presence of plasma leads to different angular positions of the same image if it is observed at different wavelengths. It is discussed in detail how to apply the presented formulas for the calculation of the deflection angle in different situations. Gravitational lensing in plasma beyond the weak deflection approximation is also considered.

  14. Gravitational lensing in plasmic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Tsupko, O. Yu.

    2015-07-01

    The influence of plasma on different effects of gravitational lensing is reviewed. Using the Hamiltonian approach for geometrical optics in a medium in the presence of gravity, an exact formula for the photon deflection angle by a black hole (or another body with a Schwarzschild metric) embedded in plasma with a spherically symmetric density distribution is derived. The deflection angle in this case is determined by the mutual combination of different factors: gravity, dispersion, and refraction. While the effects of deflection by the gravity in vacuum and the refractive deflection in a nonhomogeneous medium are well known, the new effect is that, in the case of a homogeneous plasma, in the absence of refractive deflection, the gravitational deflection differs from the vacuum deflection and depends on the photon frequency. In the presence of a plasma nonhomogeneity, the chromatic refractive deflection also occurs, so the presence of plasma always makes gravitational lensing chromatic. In particular, the presence of plasma leads to different angular positions of the same image if it is observed at different wavelengths. It is discussed in detail how to apply the presented formulas for the calculation of the deflection angle in different situations. Gravitational lensing in plasma beyond the weak deflection approximation is also considered.

  15. 47 CFR 90.247 - Mobile repeater stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... repeater to extend the communications range of hand-carried units subject to the following: (a) Mobile... same frequency is also used by the same station for direct communication with vehicular mobile units or... of the mobile unit and an automatic time-delay device that de-activates the transmitter after...

  16. 47 CFR 90.247 - Mobile repeater stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... repeaters and/or associated hand-carried transmitters may be assigned separate base/mobile frequencies for... with one or more base stations. (f) When automatically retransmitting messages originated by or... access signal can be achieved by use of digital or analog methods....

  17. 47 CFR 90.247 - Mobile repeater stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... repeaters and/or associated hand-carried transmitters may be assigned separate base/mobile frequencies for... with one or more base stations. (f) When automatically retransmitting messages originated by or... access signal can be achieved by use of digital or analog methods....

  18. 47 CFR 90.247 - Mobile repeater stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... repeaters and/or associated hand-carried transmitters may be assigned separate base/mobile frequencies for... with one or more base stations. (f) When automatically retransmitting messages originated by or... access signal can be achieved by use of digital or analog methods....

  19. 47 CFR 90.247 - Mobile repeater stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... repeaters and/or associated hand-carried transmitters may be assigned separate base/mobile frequencies for... with one or more base stations. (f) When automatically retransmitting messages originated by or... access signal can be achieved by use of digital or analog methods....

  20. Signal Hill solar-powered repeater report and recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G. R.

    1984-08-01

    The parially active repeater (PAR) discussed is the GTE Lenkurt 700C1 repeater. The 700C1 repeater is the first radio of its kind to operate in the 7/8 GHz frequency band. The 700C1's low power consumption makes it ideal to be powered by solar voltaic cells. A new PAR site costs substantially less to develop than a fully active repeater since less support equipment is needed, no a-c power has to be brought to the site, and the building can be as small as 6' x 6'. A prototype 700C1 solar powered repeater was installed to eventually replace the existing poor microwave path between Big Eddy Substation and Wasco Radio Station. The repeater's RF performance is better than BPA's original specifications. The solar panels did not generate power during the winter months, so additional solar panels were added in May 1982. The new microwave path between Wasco and Big Eddy, via Signal Hill, is a large improvement over the previous path, which was via a double passive repeater; noise levels were reduced and signal strength improved.

  1. Hypermedia as medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dede, Christopher J.

    1990-01-01

    Claims and rebuttals that hypermedia (the associative, nonlinear interconnection of multimedia materials) is a fundamentally innovative means of thinking and communicating are described. This representational architecture has many advantages that make it a major advance over other media; however, it also has several intrinsic problems that severly limits its effectiveness as a medium. These advantages and limits in applications are discussed.

  2. Holographic recording medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gange, Robert Allen (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A holographic recording medium comprising a conductive substrate, a photoconductive layer and an electrically alterable layer of a linear, low molecular weight hydrocarbon polymer has improved fatigue resistance. An acrylic barrier layer can be interposed between the photoconductive and electrically alterable layers.

  3. High-Speed Digital Signal Processing Method for Detection of Repeating Earthquakes Using GPGPU-Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Taiki; Okubo, Kan; Uchida, Naoki; Takeuchi, Nobunao; Matsuzawa, Toru

    2013-04-01

    Repeating earthquakes are occurring on the similar asperity at the plate boundary. These earthquakes have an important property; the seismic waveforms observed at the identical observation site are very similar regardless of their occurrence time. The slip histories of repeating earthquakes could reveal the existence of asperities: The Analysis of repeating earthquakes can detect the characteristics of the asperities and realize the temporal and spatial monitoring of the slip in the plate boundary. Moreover, we are expecting the medium-term predictions of earthquake at the plate boundary by means of analysis of repeating earthquakes. Although the previous works mostly clarified the existence of asperity and repeating earthquake, and relationship between asperity and quasi-static slip area, the stable and robust method for automatic detection of repeating earthquakes has not been established yet. Furthermore, in order to process the enormous data (so-called big data) the speedup of the signal processing is an important issue. Recently, GPU (Graphic Processing Unit) is used as an acceleration tool for the signal processing in various study fields. This movement is called GPGPU (General Purpose computing on GPUs). In the last few years the performance of GPU keeps on improving rapidly. That is, a PC (personal computer) with GPUs might be a personal supercomputer. GPU computing gives us the high-performance computing environment at a lower cost than before. Therefore, the use of GPUs contributes to a significant reduction of the execution time in signal processing of the huge seismic data. In this study, first, we applied the band-limited Fourier phase correlation as a fast method of detecting repeating earthquake. This method utilizes only band-limited phase information and yields the correlation values between two seismic signals. Secondly, we employ coherence function using three orthogonal components (East-West, North-South, and Up-Down) of seismic data as a

  4. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    PubMed

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-04-23

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol.

  5. Magnetars as soft gamma repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Meara, Karen

    1999-05-01

    The source of non-periodic, repeating, gamma-ray bursts located within our galaxy and near supernova remnants has been a mystery. A new theory by Christopher Thompson and Robert Duncan, postulating the existence of young neutron stars with intense magnetic fields (1E14 Gauss or more) offers an explanation. The intense magnetic fields of these "magnetars" suffice to create the phenomena detected from soft gamma-ray repeaters. The poles of a magnetar are hot enough to emit steady, low level x-ray emissions. Stresses on the star's crust due to the drifting of the magnetic field through the superfluid core create seismic activity and "starquakes," which release enormous bursts of energy. Data collected from recent soft gamma-ray repeater bursts appear to be strong evidence in support of this exciting new theory.

  6. Limitations on quantum key repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol.

  7. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provenzano, Virgil; Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H.; ElBidweihy, Hatem

    2014-02-01

    The Gd5Ge2Si2 alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni50Mn35In15 Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd5Ge2Si2 and Ni50Mn35In15 alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis.

  8. Systematic exchanges between nucleotides: Genomic swinger repeats and swinger transcription in human mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2015-11-07

    Chargaff׳s second parity rule, quasi-equal single strand frequencies for complementary nucleotides, presumably results from insertion of repeats and inverted repeats during sequence genesis. Vertebrate mitogenomes escape this rule because repeats are counterselected: their hybridization produces loop bulges whose deletion is deleterious. Some DNA/RNA sequences match mitogenomes only after assuming one among 23 systematic nucleotide exchanges (swinger DNA/RNA: nine symmetric, e.g. A ↔ C; and 14 asymmetric, e.g. A → C → G → A). Swinger-transformed repeats do not hybridize, escaping selection against deletions due to bulge formation. Blast analyses of the human mitogenome detect swinger repeats for all 23 swinger types, more than in randomized sequences with identical length and nucleotide contents. Mean genomic swinger repeat lengths increase with observed human swinger RNA frequencies: swinger repeat and swinger RNA productions appear linked, perhaps by swinger RNA retrotranscription. Mean swinger repeat lengths are proportional to reading frame retrievability, post-swinger transformation, by the natural circular code. Genomic swinger repeats confirm at genomic level, independently of swinger RNA detection, occurrence of swinger polymerizations. They suggest that repeats, and swinger repeats in particular, contribute to genome genesis.

  9. [Prolonging the vase life of carnation "Mabel" through integrating repeated ACC oxidase genes into its genome].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi-Xun; Bao, Man-Zhu

    2004-10-01

    Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) is one of the most important cut flowers. The cultivar "Mabel" of carnation was transformed with direct repeat gene of ACC oxidase, the key enzyme in ethylene synthesis, driven by the CaMV35S promoter mediated by Agrobacterium tumefacien. Hygromycin phosphotransferase (HPT) gene was used as selection marker. Leaf explants were pre-cultured on shoot-inducing medium for 2 d, then immersed in Agrobacterium suspension for 8-12 min. Co-cultivation was carried out on the medium (MS+BA 1.0 mg/L+NAA 0.3 mg/L +Acetosyringone 100 micromol/L, pH 5.8-6.0) for 3 d. After that transformants were obtained by transferring explants to selection medium supplemented with 5 mg/L hygromycin (Hyg) and 400 mg/L cefotaxime (Cef). Southern blotting detection showed that a foreign gene was integrated into the carnation genome and 3 transgenic lines (T257, T299 and T273 line) obtained. Addition of acetosyringone and the time of co-culture were the main factors that influenced transformation frequency. After being transplanted to soil, transgenic plants were grew normally in greenhouse. Ethylene production of cut flower of transgenic T257 line was 95% lower than that of the control, and that of T299 line was reduced by 90% than that of the control, while that of transgenic T273 line has no of significantly different from control. Vase life of transgenic T257 line was 5 d longer than that of the control line at 25 degrees C.

  10. Analysing two dinucleotide repeats of FVIII gene in Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, B; Rezaeian, A; Khanahmad, H; Bagheri, R; Kamali, E; Zeinali, S

    2007-11-01

    Using dinucleotide repeats for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis of haemophilia A patients, led us to find different alleles and their frequencies in Iranian population. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of two short tandem repeat (STR) loci of factor VIII (FVIII) gene was performed, and the PCR products were resolved on 10% native polyacrylamide gel, and samples were analysed with sequenced DNA markers made of PCR cloning of the dinucleotide FVIII gene fragments. Seven different alleles were observed for intron 13 STR, having 18-24 (CA) repeating units and five alleles for intron 22 STR having 24-28 repeating units of (CACT). Bands produced during dinucleotide study were defined in detail so this could improve the genotyping of heterozygotes and homozygotes. Conformational band produced were characterized to specify the dinucleotide pattern. Our results confirm the Hardy-Weinberg proportions of the heterozygosity rate of the 85 analysed individuals. The observed heterozygosity rate for intron 13 and 22 was 52% and 59% respectively. Our data also indicate that our population is closer to caucasians than to any other populations. Finding different dinucleotide repeat alleles and their frequencies has made it possible to identify carriers and provide prenatal diagnosis with more confidence. This allows antenatal diagnosis to be performed in the vast majority of carriers.

  11. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-13

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

  12. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  13. Do Twelfths Terminate or Repeat?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Rebecca; Burnison, Erica

    2015-01-01

    When finding the decimal equivalent of a fraction with 12 in the denominator, will it terminate or repeat? This question came from a seventh grader in author Erica Burnison's class as the student was pondering a poster generated by one of her classmates. Not only was the question intriguing, but it also affirmed the belief in the power of…

  14. Mechanical Anisotropy of Ankyrin Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Whasil; Zeng, Xiancheng; Rotolo, Kristina; Yang, Ming; Schofield, Christopher J.; Bennett, Vann; Yang, Weitao; Marszalek, Piotr E.

    2012-01-01

    Red blood cells are frequently deformed and their cytoskeletal proteins such as spectrin and ankyrin-R are repeatedly subjected to mechanical forces. While the mechanics of spectrin was thoroughly investigated in vitro and in vivo, little is known about the mechanical behavior of ankyrin-R. In this study, we combine coarse-grained steered molecular dynamics simulations and atomic force spectroscopy to examine the mechanical response of ankyrin repeats (ARs) in a model synthetic AR protein NI6C, and in the D34 fragment of native ankyrin-R when these proteins are subjected to various stretching geometry conditions. Our steered molecular dynamics results, supported by AFM measurements, reveal an unusual mechanical anisotropy of ARs: their mechanical stability is greater when their unfolding is forced to propagate from the N-terminus toward the C-terminus (repeats unfold at ∼60 pN), as compared to the unfolding in the opposite direction (unfolding force ∼ 30 pN). This anisotropy is also reflected in the complex refolding behavior of ARs. The origin of this unfolding and refolding anisotropy is in the various numbers of native contacts that are broken and formed at the interfaces between neighboring repeats depending on the unfolding/refolding propagation directions. Finally, we discuss how these complex mechanical properties of ARs in D34 may affect its behavior in vivo. PMID:22404934

  15. Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins and Cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.

    2009-10-16

    Cyanobacteria are unique in many ways and one unusual feature is the presence of a suite of proteins that contain at least one domain with a minimum of eight tandem repeated five-residues (Rfr) of the general consensus sequence A[N/D]LXX. The function of such pentapeptide repeat proteins (PRPs) are still unknown, however, their prevalence in cyanobacteria suggests that they may play some role in the unique biological activities of cyanobacteria. As part of an inter-disciplinary Membrane Biology Grand Challenge at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) and Washington University in St. Louis, the genome of Cyanothece 51142 was sequenced and its molecular biology studied with relation to circadian rhythms. The genome of Cyanothece encodes for 35 proteins that contain at least one PRP domain. These proteins range in size from 105 (Cce_3102) to 930 (Cce_2929) kDa with the PRP domains ranging in predicted size from 12 (Cce_1545) to 62 (cce_3979) tandem pentapeptide repeats. Transcriptomic studies with 29 out of the 35 genes showed that at least three of the PRPs in Cyanothece 51142 (cce_0029, cce_3083, and cce_3272) oscillated with repeated periods of light and dark, further supporting a biological function for PRPs. Using X-ray diffraction crystallography, the structure for two pentapeptide repeat proteins from Cyanothece 51142 were determined, cce_1272 (aka Rfr32) and cce_4529 (aka Rfr23). Analysis of their molecular structures suggests that all PRP may share the same structural motif, a novel type of right-handed quadrilateral β-helix, or Rfr-fold, reminiscent of a square tower with four distinct faces. Each pentapeptide repeat occupies one face of the Rfr-fold with four consecutive pentapeptide repeats completing a coil that, in turn, stack upon each other to form “protein skyscrapers”. Details of the structural features of the Rfr-fold are reviewed here together with a discussion for the possible role of end

  16. Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    Much of modern research in the field of atomic, molecular, and optical science relies on lasers, which were invented some 50 years ago and perfected in five decades of intense research and development. Today, lasers and photonic technologies impact most fields of science and they have become indispensible in our daily lives. Laser frequency combs were conceived a decade ago as tools for the precision spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen. Through the development of optical frequency comb techniques, technique a setup of the size 1 ×1 m2, good for precision measurements of any frequency, and even commercially available, has replaced the elaborate previous frequency-chain schemes for optical frequency measurements, which only worked for selected frequencies. A true revolution in optical frequency measurements has occurred, paving the way for the creation of all-optical clocks clock with a precision that might approach 10-18. A decade later, frequency combs are now common equipment in all frequency metrology-oriented laboratories. They are also becoming enabling tools for an increasing number of applications, from the calibration of astronomical spectrographs to molecular spectroscopy. This chapter first describes the principle of an optical frequency comb synthesizer. Some of the key technologies to generate such a frequency comb are then presented. Finally, a non-exhaustive overview of the growing applications is given.

  17. Light beam frequency comb generator

    DOEpatents

    Priatko, G.J.; Kaskey, J.A.

    1992-11-24

    A light beam frequency comb generator uses an acousto-optic modulator to generate a plurality of light beams with frequencies which are uniformly separated and possess common noise and drift characteristics. A well collimated monochromatic input light beam is passed through this modulator to produce a set of both frequency shifted and unshifted optical beams. An optical system directs one or more frequency shifted beams along a path which is parallel to the path of the input light beam such that the frequency shifted beams are made incident on the modulator proximate to but separated from the point of incidence of the input light beam. After the beam is thus returned to and passed through the modulator repeatedly, a plurality of mutually parallel beams are generated which are frequency-shifted different numbers of times and possess common noise and drift characteristics. 2 figs.

  18. Light beam frequency comb generator

    DOEpatents

    Priatko, Gordon J.; Kaskey, Jeffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    A light beam frequency comb generator uses an acousto-optic modulator to generate a plurality of light beams with frequencies which are uniformly separated and possess common noise and drift characteristics. A well collimated monochromatic input light beam is passed through this modulator to produce a set of both frequency shifted and unshifted optical beams. An optical system directs one or more frequency shifted beams along a path which is parallel to the path of the input light beam such that the frequency shifted beams are made incident on the modulator proximate to but separated from the point of incidence of the input light beam. After the beam is thus returned to and passed through the modulator repeatedly, a plurality of mutually parallel beams are generated which are frequency-shifted different numbers of times and possess common noise and drift characteristics.

  19. Dominant short repeated sequences in bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Avershina, Ekaterina; Rudi, Knut

    2015-03-01

    We use a novel multidimensional searching approach to present the first exhaustive search for all possible repeated sequences in 166 genomes selected to cover the bacterial domain. We found an overrepresentation of repeated sequences in all but one of the genomes. The most prevalent repeats by far were related to interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs)—conferring bacterial adaptive immunity. We identified a deep branching clade of thermophilic Firmicutes containing the highest number of CRISPR repeats. We also identified a high prevalence of tandem repeated heptamers. In addition, we identified GC-rich repeats that could potentially be involved in recombination events. Finally, we identified repeats in a 16322 amino acid mega protein (involved in biofilm formation) and inverted repeats flanking miniature transposable elements (MITEs). In conclusion, the exhaustive search for repeated sequences identified new elements and distribution of these, which has implications for understanding both the ecology and evolution of bacteria.

  20. Observations of Soft Gamma Repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2004-01-01

    Magnetars (Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars) are a subclass of neutron stars characterized by their recurrent X-ray bursts. While in an active (bursting) state (lasting anywhere between days and years), they are emit&ng hundreds of predominantly soft (kT=30 kev), short (0.1-100 ms long) events. Their quiescent source x-ray light ewes exhibit puhlions rotational period rate changes (spin-down) indicate that their magnetic fields are extremely high, of the order of 10^14- 10^l5 G. Such high B-field objects, dubbed "magnetars", had been predicted to exist in 1992, but the first concrete observational evidence were obtained in 1998 for two of these sources. I will discuss here the history of Soft Gamma Repeaters, and their spectral, timing and flux characteristics both in the persistent and their burst emission.

  1. [An improved differential medium, CA medium, for differentiating Shigella].

    PubMed

    Tokoro, M; Nagano, I; Goto, K; Nakamura, A

    1990-07-01

    We devised a Citrate-Acetate (CA) medium for rapidly differentiating Shigella. The medium consisted of 3.0 g of sodium citrate, 2.0 g of sodium acetate, 0.2 g of glucose, 1.0 g of dipotassium phosphate, 1.0 g of mono ammonium phosphate, 0.2 g of magnesium sulfate, 5.0 g of sodium chloride, 0.08 g of brom thymol blue, 15.0 g of agar, and 1000 ml of distilled water. An evaluation was made of the CA medium, for the rapid differentiation of 23 Shigella strains, 129 Escherichia coli strains and 130 isolates, that formed colourless colonies suspected to be Shigella on SS agar plate, from feces of healthy people. The results obtained were as follows 1) On the CA medium, all Shigella strains did not grow and there was no change in colour. 2) Positive growth rates of E. coli strains after incubation for 24 hr at 37 degrees C on CA medium, sodium acetate medium (Acet) and Christensen citrate medium (C-Cit) were 96.0%, 95.2% and 28.0%, respectively. Therefore, the positive growth rate of E. coli strains after incubation for 24 hr on CA medium was significantly higher (p less than 0.01) than that on C-Cit medium. 3) Positive growth rates of isolates after incubation for 24 hr at 37 degrees C on CA medium, Acet medium and C-Cit medium were 95.4%, 83.1% and 71.5%, respectively. Therefore, the positive growth rates of isolates after incubation for 24 hr on CA medium was significantly higher (p less than 0.01) than that on Acet medium and C-Cit medium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. A repeating fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  3. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  4. DENSE MEDIUM CYCLONE OPTIMIZATON

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald H. Luttrell; Chris J. Barbee; Peter J. Bethell; Chris J. Wood

    2005-06-30

    Dense medium cyclones (DMCs) are known to be efficient, high-tonnage devices suitable for upgrading particles in the 50 to 0.5 mm size range. This versatile separator, which uses centrifugal forces to enhance the separation of fine particles that cannot be upgraded in static dense medium separators, can be found in most modern coal plants and in a variety of mineral plants treating iron ore, dolomite, diamonds, potash and lead-zinc ores. Due to the high tonnage, a small increase in DMC efficiency can have a large impact on plant profitability. Unfortunately, the knowledge base required to properly design and operate DMCs has been seriously eroded during the past several decades. In an attempt to correct this problem, a set of engineering tools have been developed to allow producers to improve the efficiency of their DMC circuits. These tools include (1) low-cost density tracers that can be used by plant operators to rapidly assess DMC performance, (2) mathematical process models that can be used to predict the influence of changes in operating and design variables on DMC performance, and (3) an expert advisor system that provides plant operators with a user-friendly interface for evaluating, optimizing and trouble-shooting DMC circuits. The field data required to develop these tools was collected by conducting detailed sampling and evaluation programs at several industrial plant sites. These data were used to demonstrate the technical, economic and environmental benefits that can be realized through the application of these engineering tools.

  5. Medium wave exposure characterisation using exposure quotients.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Jesús M; Rufo, Montaña; Jiménez, Antonio; Antolín, Alicia; Pinar, Iván

    2010-06-01

    One of the aspects considered in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection guidelines is that, in situations of simultaneous exposure to fields of different frequencies, exposure quotients for thermal and electrical stimulation effects should be examined. The aim of the present work was to analyse the electromagnetic radiation levels and exposure quotients for exposure to multiple-frequency sources in the vicinity of medium wave radio broadcasting antennas. The measurements were made with a spectrum analyser and a monopole antenna. Kriging interpolation was used to prepare contour maps and to estimate the levels in the towns and villages of the zone. The results showed that the exposure quotient criterion based on electrical stimulation effects to be more stringent than those based on thermal effects or power density levels. Improvement of dosimetry evaluations requires the spectral components of the radiation to be quantified, followed by application of the criteria for exposure to multiple-frequency sources.

  6. A PLL Synthesizer with Learning Repeatable Fluctuation of Input Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Hiroyuki

    This paper describes a high frequency PLL (Phase Locked Loop) synthesizer with a function of learning then eliminating repeatable fluctuation of timing intervals on series input pulses. Typical spindle encoder generates digital pulses according to the revolution speed. The intervals of each pulse have repeatable fluctuation every revolution by eccentricity or warpage of the encoder scale disk. This method provides a programmable counter for the loop counter of PLL circuit and an interval counter with memory in order to learn the repeatable fluctuation. After the learning process, the PLL generates very pure tone clock signal based on the real flutter components of the spindle revolution speed without influenced by encoder errors. This method has been applied to a hard disk test system in order to generate 3GHz read/write clock.

  7. Low intensity electromagnetic irradiation with 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies affects Escherichia coli growth and changes water properties.

    PubMed

    Torgomyan, Heghine; Kalantaryan, Vitaly; Trchounian, Armen

    2011-07-01

    The low intensity electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of the 70.6 and 73 GHz frequency is resonant for Escherichia coli but not for water. In this study, E. coli irradiation with this EMI during 1 h directly and in bi-distilled water or in the assay buffer with those frequencies resulted with noticeable changes in bacterial growth parameters. Furthermore, after EMI, 2 h rest of bacteria renewed their growth in 1.2-fold, but repeated EMI--had no significant action. Moreover, water absorbance, pH, and electric conductance were changed markedly after such irradiation. The results point out that EMI of the 70.6 and 73 GHz frequency can interact with bacteria affecting growth and in the same time with the surrounding medium (water) as well.

  8. Experimentally Induced Repeated Anhydrobiosis in the Eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Tardigrades represent one of the main animal groups with anhydrobiotic capacity at any stage of their life cycle. The ability of tardigrades to survive repeated cycles of anhydrobiosis has rarely been studied but is of interest to understand the factors constraining anhydrobiotic survival. The main objective of this study was to investigate the patterns of survival of the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer under repeated cycles of desiccation, and the potential effect of repeated desiccation on size, shape and number of storage cells. We also analyzed potential change in body size, gut content and frequency of mitotic storage cells. Specimens were kept under non-cultured conditions and desiccated under controlled relative humidity. After each desiccation cycle 10 specimens were selected for analysis of morphometric characteristics and mitosis. The study demonstrates that tardigrades may survive up to 6 repeated desiccations, with declining survival rates with increased number of desiccations. We found a significantly higher proportion of animals that were unable to contract properly into a tun stage during the desiccation process at the 5th and 6th desiccations. Also total number of storage cells declined at the 5th and 6th desiccations, while no effect on storage cell size was observed. The frequency of mitotic storage cells tended to decline with higher number of desiccation cycles. Our study shows that the number of consecutive cycles of anhydrobiosis that R. coronifer may undergo is limited, with increased inability for tun formation and energetic constraints as possible causal factors. PMID:27828978

  9. Ring laser having an output at a single frequency

    DOEpatents

    Hackell, Lloyd A.

    1991-01-01

    A ring laser is disclosed that produces a single frequency of laser radiation in either the pulsed mode of operation or the continuous waveform (cw) mode of operation. The laser comprises a ring laser in a bowtie configuration, a birefringent gain material such as Nd:YLF, an improved optical diode that supports laser oscillation having a desired direction of travel and linear polarization, and a Q-switch. An output coupler (mirror) having a high reflectivity, such as 94%, is disclosed. Also disclosed is a self-seeded method of operation in which the laser can provide a pulse or a series of pulses of high power laser radiation at a consistent single frequency with a high degree of amplitude stability and temporal stability. In operation, the laser is operated in continuous waveform (cw) at a low power output with the Q-switch introducing a loss into the resonating cavity. Pumping is continued at a high level, causing the gain material to store energy. When a pulse is desired, the Q-switch is actuated to substantially reduce the losses so that a pulse can build up based on the low level cw oscillation. The pulse quickly builds, using the stored energy in the gain medium to provide a high power output pulse. The process may be repeated to provide a series of high power pulses of a consistent single frequency.

  10. Polymorphism of CAG repeats in androgen receptor of carnivores.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Xiuyue; Wang, Xiaofang; Zeng, Bo; Jia, Xiaodong; Hou, Rong; Yue, Bisong

    2012-03-01

    Androgen effect is mediated by the androgen receptor (AR). The polymorphism of CAG triplet repeat (polyCAG), in the N-terminal transactivation domain of the AR protein, has been involved either in endocrine or neurological disorders in human. We obtained partial sequence of AR exon 1 in 10 carnivore species. In most carnivore species, polyglutamine length polymorphism presented in all three CAG repeat regions of AR, in contrast, only CAG-I site polymorphism presented in primate species, and CAG-I and CAG-III sites polymorphism presented in Canidae. Therefore, studies focusing on disease-associated polymorphism of poly(CAG) in carnivore species AR should investigate all three CAG repeats sites, and should not only consider CAG-I sites as the human disease studies. The trinucleotide repeat length in carnivore AR exon 1 had undergone from expansions to contractions during carnivores evolution, unlike a linear increase in primate species. Furthermore, the polymorphisms of the triplet-repeats in the same tissue (somatic mosaicism) were demonstrated in Moutain weasel, Eurasian lynx, Clouded leopard, Chinese tiger, Black leopard and Leopard AR. And, the abnormal stop codon was found in the exon 1 of three carnivore species AR (Moutain weasel, Eurasian lynx and Black leopard). It seemed to have a high frequency presence of tissue-specific somatic in carnivores AR genes. Thus the in vivo mechanism leading to such highly variable phenotypes of the described mutations, and their impact on these animals, are worthwhile to be further elucidated.

  11. Repeated high-intensity exercise in professional rugby union.

    PubMed

    Austin, Damien; Gabbett, Tim; Jenkins, David

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the frequency, duration, and nature of repeated high-intensity exercise in Super 14 rugby union. Time-motion analysis was used during seven competition matches over the 2008 and 2009 Super 14 seasons; five players from each of four positional groups (front row forwards, back row forwards, inside backs, and outside backs) were assessed (20 players in total). A repeated high-intensity exercise bout was considered to involve three or more sprints, and/or tackles and/or scrum/ruck/maul activities within 21 s during the same passage of play. The range of repeated high-intensity exercise bouts for each group in a match was as follows: 11-18 for front row forwards, 11-21 for back row forwards, 13-18 for inside backs, and 2-11 for outside backs. The durations of the most intense repeated high-intensity exercise bouts for each position ranged from 53 s to 165 s and the minimum recovery periods between repeated high-intensity exercise bouts ranged from 25 s for the back row forwards to 64 s for the front row forwards. The present results show that repeated high-intensity exercise bouts vary in duration and activities relative to position but all players in a game will average at least 10 changes in activity in the most demanding bouts and complete at least one tackle and two sprints. The most intense periods of activity are likely to last as long as 120 s and as little as 25 s recovery may separate consecutive repeated high-intensity exercise bouts. The present findings can be used by coaches to prepare their players for the most demanding passages of play likely to be experienced in elite rugby union.

  12. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  13. Optoelectronic Instrument Monitors pH in a Culture Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Melody M.; Pellis, Neal; Jeevarajan, Anthony S.; Taylor, Thomas D.

    2004-01-01

    An optoelectronic instrument monitors the pH of an aqueous cell-culture medium in a perfused rotating-wall-vessel bioreactor. The instrument is designed to satisfy the following requirements: It should be able to measure the pH of the medium continuously with an accuracy of 0.1 in the range from 6.5 to 7.5. It should be noninvasive. Any material in contact with the culture medium should be sterilizable as well as nontoxic to the cells to be grown in the medium. The biofilm that inevitably grows on any surface in contact with the medium should not affect the accuracy of the pH measurement. It should be possible to obtain accurate measurements after only one calibration performed prior to a bioreactor cell run. The instrument should be small and lightweight. The instrument includes a quartz cuvette through which the culture medium flows as it is circulated through the bioreactor. The cuvette is sandwiched between light source on one side and a photodetector on the other side. The light source comprises a red and a green light-emitting diode (LED) that are repeatedly flashed in alternation with a cycle time of 5 s. The responses of the photodiode to the green and red LEDs are processed electronically to obtain a quantity proportional to the ratio between the amounts of green and red light transmitted through the medium.

  14. Remote measurements of electro-physical parameters of layer mediums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobach, Vladimir T.; Dmitriev, Vladimir A.; Lobatch, Yaroslav V.

    1999-07-01

    The paper deals with the problem of measuring electrical and geometrical parameters of the layer medium. The measurements are based on the control of radio wave reflection coefficient as a function of frequency. Based on solution of the system of transcendental equations for reflection coefficient such parameters of the homogeneous layer medium as complex dielectric permeability, depth of the layer and complex dielectric permeability of the lower homogeneous hemispace.

  15. Effect of trinucleotide repeat length and parental sex on phenotypic variation in spinocerebellar ataxia I

    SciTech Connect

    Jodice, C.; Malaspina, P.; Persichetti, F.; Novelletto, A.; Terrenato, L. ); Spadaro, M.; Morocutti, C. ); Giunti, P. Institute of Neurology, London ); Harding, A.E. ); Frontali, M. )

    1994-06-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansion has been found in 64 subjects from 19 families: 57 patients with SCA1 and 7 subjects predicted, by haplotype analysis, to carry the mutation. Comparison with a large set of normal chromosomes shows two distinct distributions, with a much wider variation among expanded chromosomes. The sex of transmitting parent plays a major role in the size distribution of expanded alleles, those with >54 repeats being transmitted by affected fathers exclusively. The data suggest that alleles with >54 repeats have a reduced chance of survival; these appear to be replaced in each generation by further expansion of alleles in the low- to medium-expanded repeat range, preferentially in male transmission. Detailed clinical follow-up of a subset of patients demonstrates significant relationships between increasing repeat number on expanded chromosomes and earlier age at onset, faster progression of the disease, and earlier age at death.

  16. Modeling Excitable Systems Coupled Through External Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorbakhsh, Javad; Mehta, Pankaj

    2013-03-01

    Excitable systems are stable dynamical systems in which any input beyond a threshold results in a significant output. This behavior is ubiquitous in nature and is seen in biological systems such as Dictyostelium discoideum amoeba and neurons to oscillatory chemical reactions. In this work we will focus on transition to oscillation in populations of excitable systems coupled through an external medium and will study their synchronization. We will describe a mechanism to tune the frequency of oscillations using an external input and will study the effects of stochasticity and inhomogeneity on the collective behavior of the system. Furthermore we will include diffusion into the dynamics of the external medium and will study formation of spatial patterns, their characteristics and their robustness to different factors.

  17. Crowding by a repeating pattern

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Sarah; Pelli, Denis G.

    2015-01-01

    Theinability to recognize a peripheral target among flankers is called crowding. For a foveal target, crowding can be distinguished from overlap masking by its sparing of detection, linear scaling with eccentricity, and invariance with target size.Crowding depends on the proximity and similarity of the flankers to the target. Flankers that are far from or dissimilar to the target do not crowd it. On a gray page, text whose neighboring letters have different colors, alternately black and white, has enough dissimilarity that it might escape crowding. Since reading speed is normally limited by crowding, escape from crowding should allow faster reading. Yet reading speed is unchanged (Chung & Mansfield, 2009). Why? A recent vernier study found that using alternating-color flankers produces strong crowding (Manassi, Sayim, & Herzog, 2012). Might that effect occur with letters and reading? Critical spacing is the minimum center-to-center target–flanker spacing needed to correctly identify the target. We measure it for a target letter surrounded by several equidistant flanker letters of the same polarity, opposite polarity, or mixed polarity: alternately white and black. We find strong crowding in the alternating condition, even though each flanker letter is beyond its own critical spacing (as measured in a separate condition). Thus a periodic repeating pattern can produce crowding even when the individual elements do not. Further, in all conditions we find that, once a periodic pattern repeats (two cycles), further repetition does not affect critical spacing of the innermost flanker. PMID:26024457

  18. Crowding by a repeating pattern.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Sarah; Pelli, Denis G

    2015-01-01

    Theinability to recognize a peripheral target among flankers is called crowding. For a foveal target, crowding can be distinguished from overlap masking by its sparing of detection, linear scaling with eccentricity, and invariance with target size.Crowding depends on the proximity and similarity of the flankers to the target. Flankers that are far from or dissimilar to the target do not crowd it. On a gray page, text whose neighboring letters have different colors, alternately black and white, has enough dissimilarity that it might escape crowding. Since reading speed is normally limited by crowding, escape from crowding should allow faster reading. Yet reading speed is unchanged (Chung & Mansfield, 2009). Why? A recent vernier study found that using alternating-color flankers produces strong crowding (Manassi, Sayim, & Herzog, 2012). Might that effect occur with letters and reading? Critical spacing is the minimum center-to-center target-flanker spacing needed to correctly identify the target. We measure it for a target letter surrounded by several equidistant flanker letters of the same polarity, opposite polarity, or mixed polarity: alternately white and black. We find strong crowding in the alternating condition, even though each flanker letter is beyond its own critical spacing (as measured in a separate condition). Thus a periodic repeating pattern can produce crowding even when the individual elements do not. Further, in all conditions we find that, once a periodic pattern repeats (two cycles), further repetition does not affect critical spacing of the innermost flanker.

  19. Analytic descriptions of cylindrical electromagnetic waves in a nonlinear medium

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hao; Si, Liu-Gang; Yang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    A simple but highly efficient approach for dealing with the problem of cylindrical electromagnetic waves propagation in a nonlinear medium is proposed based on an exact solution proposed recently. We derive an analytical explicit formula, which exhibiting rich interesting nonlinear effects, to describe the propagation of any amount of cylindrical electromagnetic waves in a nonlinear medium. The results obtained by using the present method are accurately concordant with the results of using traditional coupled-wave equations. As an example of application, we discuss how a third wave affects the sum- and difference-frequency generation of two waves propagation in the nonlinear medium. PMID:26073066

  20. Frequency modulation drive for a piezoelectric motor

    DOEpatents

    Mittas, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    A piezoelectric motor has peak performance at a specific frequency f.sub.1 that may vary over a range of frequencies. A drive system is disclosed for operating such a motor at peak performance without feedback. The drive system consists of the motor and an ac source connected to power the motor, the ac source repeatedly generating a frequency over a range from f.sub.1 -.DELTA.x to f.sub.1 +.DELTA.y.

  1. Evolution of Protein Domain Repeats in Metazoa

    PubMed Central

    Schüler, Andreas; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Repeats are ubiquitous elements of proteins and they play important roles for cellular function and during evolution. Repeats are, however, also notoriously difficult to capture computationally and large scale studies so far had difficulties in linking genetic causes, structural properties and evolutionary trajectories of protein repeats. Here we apply recently developed methods for repeat detection and analysis to a large dataset comprising over hundred metazoan genomes. We find that repeats in larger protein families experience generally very few insertions or deletions (indels) of repeat units but there is also a significant fraction of noteworthy volatile outliers with very high indel rates. Analysis of structural data indicates that repeats with an open structure and independently folding units are more volatile and more likely to be intrinsically disordered. Such disordered repeats are also significantly enriched in sites with a high functional potential such as linear motifs. Furthermore, the most volatile repeats have a high sequence similarity between their units. Since many volatile repeats also show signs of recombination, we conclude they are often shaped by concerted evolution. Intriguingly, many of these conserved yet volatile repeats are involved in host-pathogen interactions where they might foster fast but subtle adaptation in biological arms races. Key Words: protein evolution, domain rearrangements, protein repeats, concerted evolution. PMID:27671125

  2. Repeated Reading. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Repeated reading" is an academic practice that aims to increase oral reading fluency. "Repeated reading" can be used with students who have developed initial word reading skills but demonstrate inadequate reading fluency for their grade level. During "repeated reading," a student sits in a quiet location with a…

  3. Radiation of a relativistic electron in a periodically inhomogeneous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorgian, Lekdar A.

    2005-08-01

    The problem of hard transition radiation (HTR) produced by relativistic charged particle passing through periodically inhomogeneous medium with uniform velocity has been solved. Due to the medium inhomogeneities the phase of radiation vector potential varies periodically with amplitude growing. The application of approximation methods for solving the given problem shows that this amplitude is constant; the existing resonance condition between the radiation frequency and angle undergoes essential changes. This, in turn, changes the spectral distribution characteristics. The principle of harmonics equivalence in HTR is revealed. This principle says that the frequency distribution of radiation intensity is the same for different harnionics. For strongly inhomogenous medium frequency intervals of harmonics are overlapped. Consequently the HTR total intensity does not depend upon frequency up to the critical frequency. It is several orders higher as it was assume in former conceptions. The frequency distribution varies inversely with particle energy squared. On the other side the energy of photons at the critical frequency grows quadratically with the particle energy. Therefore, the energy losses do not depend on the particle energy, but under certain conditions can be of the same order as its energy.

  4. Repeated binge-like ethanol drinking alters ethanol drinking patterns and depresses striatal GABAergic transmission.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Mark V; Cuzon Carlson, Verginia C; Sherazee, Nyssa; Sprow, Gretchen M; Bock, Roland; Thiele, Todd E; Lovinger, David M; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2014-02-01

    Repeated cycles of binge alcohol drinking and abstinence are key components in the development of dependence. However, the precise behavioral mechanisms underlying binge-like drinking and its consequences on striatal synaptic physiology remain unclear. In the present study, ethanol and water drinking patterns were recorded with high temporal resolution over 6 weeks of binge-like ethanol drinking using the 'drinking in the dark' (DID) protocol. The bottle exchange occurring at the beginning of each session prompted a transient increase in the drinking rate that might facilitate the acquisition of ethanol binge-like drinking. Ethanol drinking mice also displayed a 'front-loading' behavior, in which the highest rate of drinking was recorded during the first 15 min. This rate increased over weeks and paralleled the mild escalation of blood ethanol concentrations. GABAergic and glutamatergic transmission in the dorsal striatum were examined following DID. Spontaneous glutamatergic transmission and the density of dendritic spines were unchanged after ethanol drinking. However, the frequency of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents was depressed in medium spiny neurons of ethanol drinking mice. A history of ethanol drinking also increased ethanol preference and altered the acute ethanol effects on GABAergic transmission differentially in dorsolateral and dorsomedial striatum. Together, the study shows that the bottle exchange during DID promotes fast, voluntary ethanol drinking and that this intermittent pattern of ethanol drinking causes a depression of GABAergic transmission in the dorsal striatum.

  5. Source Parameters for Repeating Earthquakes along the Middle America Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilek, S. L.; Phillips, W. S.; Walter, J. I.; Peng, Z.; Schwartz, S. Y.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Yao, D.

    2015-12-01

    Repeating earthquakes, with their similar locations and similar waveforms, are often thought to represent slip along the same patch of fault. Analysis of these earthquake clusters can provide useful information about the nature of the fault and earthquake interaction. Here we focus on sequences of repeating earthquakes along both the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica and along the Oaxaca segment of Mexico, as both megathrust faults have been well instrumented in recent years with local seismic networks able to record the small magnitude earthquakes. These regions have also experienced large megathrust earthquakes as well as non-volcanic tremor and slow slip, suggesting a complex fault system that allows a wide spectrum of slip. We can use source characteristics of the repeating earthquakes to probe this fault complexity. Along the Nicoya Peninsula, there are over 370 repeating earthquakes (M 0.5-3.3) in the 3 months following the 2012 Mw 7.6 megathrust earthquake grouped into 55 distinct clusters. Along Oaxaca, the earthquake clusters or swarms (M 1.5-5.5) span a wider spatial and temporal range. For our source parameter calculations, we form narrow-frequency band envelopes for pairs of earthquakes within the earthquake clusters to compute spectral ratios for each pair. We determine seismic moment, corner frequency, and earthquake stress drop for each earthquake from these spectral ratios. We compare the source parameters for events within the clusters to examine temporal variations and compare between clusters to explore spatial variations that could be linked to other slip heterogeneity. Preliminary results for the Nicoya region suggest nearly identical stress drop for repeating events within clusters located near the 2012 mainshock, and more variability in stress drops for earthquakes in clusters located updip and to the northwest of the mainshock.

  6. Triplet repeat RNA structure and its role as pathogenic agent and therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J.; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Wojciechowska, Marzena; Fiszer, Agnieszka; Mykowska, Agnieszka; Kozlowski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    This review presents detailed information about the structure of triplet repeat RNA and addresses the simple sequence repeats of normal and expanded lengths in the context of the physiological and pathogenic roles played in human cells. First, we discuss the occurrence and frequency of various trinucleotide repeats in transcripts and classify them according to the propensity to form RNA structures of different architectures and stabilities. We show that repeats capable of forming hairpin structures are overrepresented in exons, which implies that they may have important functions. We further describe long triplet repeat RNA as a pathogenic agent by presenting human neurological diseases caused by triplet repeat expansions in which mutant RNA gains a toxic function. Prominent examples of these diseases include myotonic dystrophy type 1 and fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome, which are triggered by mutant CUG and CGG repeats, respectively. In addition, we discuss RNA-mediated pathogenesis in polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's disease and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, in which expanded CAG repeats may act as an auxiliary toxic agent. Finally, triplet repeat RNA is presented as a therapeutic target. We describe various concepts and approaches aimed at the selective inhibition of mutant transcript activity in experimental therapies developed for repeat-associated diseases. PMID:21908410

  7. Two-dimensional quantum repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallnöfer, J.; Zwerger, M.; Muschik, C.; Sangouard, N.; Dür, W.

    2016-11-01

    The endeavor to develop quantum networks gave rise to a rapidly developing field with far-reaching applications such as secure communication and the realization of distributed computing tasks. This ultimately calls for the creation of flexible multiuser structures that allow for quantum communication between arbitrary pairs of parties in the network and facilitate also multiuser applications. To address this challenge, we propose a two-dimensional quantum repeater architecture to establish long-distance entanglement shared between multiple communication partners in the presence of channel noise and imperfect local control operations. The scheme is based on the creation of self-similar multiqubit entanglement structures at growing scale, where variants of entanglement swapping and multiparty entanglement purification are combined to create high-fidelity entangled states. We show how such networks can be implemented using trapped ions in cavities.

  8. Linear Synchronous Motor Repeatability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.R.

    2002-10-18

    A cart system using linear synchronous motors was being considered for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). One of the applications in the PIP was the movement of a stack of furnace trays, filled with the waste form (pucks) from a stacking/unstacking station to several bottom loaded furnaces. A system was ordered to perform this function in the PIP Ceramic Prototype Test Facility (CPTF). This system was installed and started up in SRTC prior to being installed in the CPTF. The PIP was suspended and then canceled after the linear synchronous motor system was started up. This system was used to determine repeatability of a linear synchronous motor cart system for the Modern Pit Facility.

  9. Does Repeating a Year Improve Performance? The Case of Teaching English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Keith; No, Anna Ieong On

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines whether having school students repeat a year improves their performance, focusing on learning English as a foreign language. It takes students' English examination results from five years from a Chinese-medium school, together with data on their learning styles and learning strategies. Drawing on local cultural and pedagogic…

  10. Repeat instability: mechanisms of dynamic mutations.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Christopher E; Nichol Edamura, Kerrie; Cleary, John D

    2005-10-01

    Disease-causing repeat instability is an important and unique form of mutation that is linked to more than 40 neurological, neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders. DNA repeat expansion mutations are dynamic and ongoing within tissues and across generations. The patterns of inherited and tissue-specific instability are determined by both gene-specific cis-elements and trans-acting DNA metabolic proteins. Repeat instability probably involves the formation of unusual DNA structures during DNA replication, repair and recombination. Experimental advances towards explaining the mechanisms of repeat instability have broadened our understanding of this mutational process. They have revealed surprising ways in which metabolic pathways can drive or protect from repeat instability.

  11. Large Torque Variations in Two Soft Gamma Repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Peter M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Gogus, Ersin; Finger, Mark H.; Swank, Jean; Markwardt, Craig B.; Hurley, Kevin; vanderKlis, Michiel

    2002-01-01

    We have monitored the pulse frequencies of the two soft gamma repeaters SGR 1806-20 and SGR 1900+14 through the beginning of year 2001 using primarily Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array observations. In both sources, we observe large changes in the spin-down torque up to a factor of approximately 4, which persist for several months. Using long-baseline phase-connected timing solutions as well as the overall frequency histories, we construct torque noise power spectra for each SGR (Soft Gamma Repeater). The power spectrum of each source is very red (power-law slope is approximately -3.5). The torque noise power levels are consistent with some accreting systems on timescales of approximately 1 yr, yet the full power spectrum is much steeper in frequency than any known accreting source. To the best of our knowledge, torque noise power spectra with a comparably steep frequency dependence have been seen only in young, glitching radio pulsars (e.g., Vela). The observed changes in spin-down rate do not correlate with burst activity; therefore, the physical mechanisms behind each phenomenon are also likely unrelated. Within the context of the magnetar model, seismic activity can not account for both the bursts and the long-term torque changes unless the seismically active regions are decoupled from one another.

  12. Wave propagation in a random medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. W.; Harp, J. C.

    1969-01-01

    A simple technique is used to derive statistical characterizations of the perturbations imposed upon a wave (plane, spherical or beamed) propagating through a random medium. The method is essentially physical rather than mathematical, and is probably equivalent to the Rytov method. The limitations of the method are discussed in some detail; in general they are restrictive only for optical paths longer than a few hundred meters, and for paths at the lower microwave frequencies. Situations treated include arbitrary path geometries, finite transmitting and receiving apertures, and anisotropic media. Results include, in addition to the usual statistical quantities, time-lagged functions, mixed functions involving amplitude and phase fluctuations, angle-of-arrival covariances, frequency covariances, and other higher-order quantities.

  13. A Semiparametric Bayesian Model for Repeatedly Repeated Binary Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Fernando A.; Müller, Peter; Rosner, Gary L.; Relling, Mary V.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We discuss the analysis of data from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays comparing tumor and normal tissues. The data consist of sequences of indicators for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and involve three nested levels of repetition: chromosomes for a given patient, regions within chromosomes, and SNPs nested within regions. We propose to analyze these data using a semiparametric model for multi-level repeated binary data. At the top level of the hierarchy we assume a sampling model for the observed binary LOH sequences that arises from a partial exchangeability argument. This implies a mixture of Markov chains model. The mixture is defined with respect to the Markov transition probabilities. We assume a nonparametric prior for the random mixing measure. The resulting model takes the form of a semiparametric random effects model with the matrix of transition probabilities being the random effects. The model includes appropriate dependence assumptions for the two remaining levels of the hierarchy, i.e., for regions within chromosomes and for chromosomes within patient. We use the model to identify regions of increased LOH in a dataset coming from a study of treatment-related leukemia in children with an initial cancer diagnostic. The model successfully identifies the desired regions and performs well compared to other available alternatives. PMID:19746193

  14. Genetic Contributors to Intergenerational CAG Repeat Instability in Huntington’s Disease Knock-In Mice

    PubMed Central

    Neto, João Luís; Lee, Jong-Min; Afridi, Ali; Gillis, Tammy; Guide, Jolene R.; Dempsey, Stephani; Lager, Brenda; Alonso, Isabel; Wheeler, Vanessa C.; Pinto, Ricardo Mouro

    2017-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in exon 1 of the HTT gene. Longer repeat sizes are associated with increased disease penetrance and earlier ages of onset. Intergenerationally unstable transmissions are common in HD families, partly underlying the genetic anticipation seen in this disorder. HD CAG knock-in mouse models also exhibit a propensity for intergenerational repeat size changes. In this work, we examine intergenerational instability of the CAG repeat in over 20,000 transmissions in the largest HD knock-in mouse model breeding datasets reported to date. We confirmed previous observations that parental sex drives the relative ratio of expansions and contractions. The large datasets further allowed us to distinguish effects of paternal CAG repeat length on the magnitude and frequency of expansions and contractions, as well as the identification of large repeat size jumps in the knock-in models. Distinct degrees of intergenerational instability were observed between knock-in mice of six background strains, indicating the occurrence of trans-acting genetic modifiers. We also found that lines harboring a neomycin resistance cassette upstream of Htt showed reduced expansion frequency, indicative of a contributing role for sequences in cis, with the expanded repeat as modifiers of intergenerational instability. These results provide a basis for further understanding of the mechanisms underlying intergenerational repeat instability. PMID:27913616

  15. Genetic Contributors to Intergenerational CAG Repeat Instability in Huntington's Disease Knock-In Mice.

    PubMed

    Neto, João Luís; Lee, Jong-Min; Afridi, Ali; Gillis, Tammy; Guide, Jolene R; Dempsey, Stephani; Lager, Brenda; Alonso, Isabel; Wheeler, Vanessa C; Pinto, Ricardo Mouro

    2017-02-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in exon 1 of the HTT gene. Longer repeat sizes are associated with increased disease penetrance and earlier ages of onset. Intergenerationally unstable transmissions are common in HD families, partly underlying the genetic anticipation seen in this disorder. HD CAG knock-in mouse models also exhibit a propensity for intergenerational repeat size changes. In this work, we examine intergenerational instability of the CAG repeat in over 20,000 transmissions in the largest HD knock-in mouse model breeding datasets reported to date. We confirmed previous observations that parental sex drives the relative ratio of expansions and contractions. The large datasets further allowed us to distinguish effects of paternal CAG repeat length on the magnitude and frequency of expansions and contractions, as well as the identification of large repeat size jumps in the knock-in models. Distinct degrees of intergenerational instability were observed between knock-in mice of six background strains, indicating the occurrence of trans-acting genetic modifiers. We also found that lines harboring a neomycin resistance cassette upstream of Htt showed reduced expansion frequency, indicative of a contributing role for sequences in cis, with the expanded repeat as modifiers of intergenerational instability. These results provide a basis for further understanding of the mechanisms underlying intergenerational repeat instability.

  16. New medium licensed for campylobacter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A medium, “Campy-Cefex”, has been licensed by the ARS Office of Technology Transfer with Becton Dickinson (No. 1412-002) and Neogen (No. 1412-001) based on patent No. 5,891,709, “Campy-Cefex Selective and Differential Medium for Campylobacter” by Dr. Norman Stern of the Poultry Microbiological Safet...

  17. Trinucleotide repeat expansion in the FRAXE locus is not common among institutionalized individuals with non-specific developmental disabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, J.J.A.; Julien-Inalsingh, C.; Fidler, K.

    1996-08-09

    Expansion of a polymorphic GCC-repeat at the FRAXE locus has been associated with expression of chromosome fragility at this site and cognitive impairment in some individuals previously testing negative for CGG-repeat expansion in the fragile X mental retardation-1 (FMR1) gene. To determine the frequency of FRAXE triplet repeat expansion among persons with developmental disability, 396 individuals from two institutions were studied, all of whom were negative for FMR1 repeat expansion. Clinically, there was a wide range of mental impairment, with the majority (61.1%) being severely to profoundly affected. The distribution of FRAXE GCC-repeat numbers in the study population was 5-38:28 (5.6%) with 10-14 repeats; 366 (73.8%) with 15-19 repeats; 74 (14.9%) with 20-24 repeats; 20 (4.0%) with 25-29 repeats; and 5 (1.0%) with 30-38 repeats, with no individuals demonstrating repeat expansion. One profoundly retarded male was found to have a deletion of about 40 bp. Southern blots of HindIII-digested DNAs from individuals with {ge}26 repeats all showed normal patterns. These results suggest that FRAXE GCC-repeat expansion is not a common cause of developmental disability in institutionalized persons with mild to profound mental retardation. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Modeling Repeatedly Flaring δ Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-03-01

    Active regions (ARs) appearing on the surface of the Sun are classified into α , β , γ , and δ by the rules of the Mount Wilson Observatory, California on the basis of their topological complexity. Amongst these, the δ sunspots are known to be superactive and produce the most x-ray flares. Here, we present results from a simulation of the Sun by mimicking the upper layers and the corona, but starting at a more primitive stage than any earlier treatment. We find that this initial state consisting of only a thin subphotospheric magnetic sheet breaks into multiple flux tubes which evolve into a colliding-merging system of spots of opposite polarity upon surface emergence, similar to those often seen on the Sun. The simulation goes on to produce many exotic δ sunspot associated phenomena: repeated flaring in the range of typical solar flare energy release and ejective helical flux ropes with embedded cool-dense plasma filaments resembling solar coronal mass ejections.

  19. Modeling Repeatedly Flaring δ Sunspots.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-03-11

    Active regions (ARs) appearing on the surface of the Sun are classified into α, β, γ, and δ by the rules of the Mount Wilson Observatory, California on the basis of their topological complexity. Amongst these, the δ sunspots are known to be superactive and produce the most x-ray flares. Here, we present results from a simulation of the Sun by mimicking the upper layers and the corona, but starting at a more primitive stage than any earlier treatment. We find that this initial state consisting of only a thin subphotospheric magnetic sheet breaks into multiple flux tubes which evolve into a colliding-merging system of spots of opposite polarity upon surface emergence, similar to those often seen on the Sun. The simulation goes on to produce many exotic δ sunspot associated phenomena: repeated flaring in the range of typical solar flare energy release and ejective helical flux ropes with embedded cool-dense plasma filaments resembling solar coronal mass ejections.

  20. Trinucleotide Repeats: A Structural Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Bruno; Fernandes, Sara; Abreu, Isabel A.; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansions are present in a wide range of genes involved in several neurological disorders, being directly involved in the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogenesis through modulation of gene expression and/or the function of the RNA or protein it encodes. Structural and functional information on the role of TNR sequences in RNA and protein is crucial to understand the effect of TNR expansions in neurodegeneration. Therefore, this review intends to provide to the reader a structural and functional view of TNR and encoded homopeptide expansions, with a particular emphasis on polyQ expansions and its role at inducing the self-assembly, aggregation and functional alterations of the carrier protein, which culminates in neuronal toxicity and cell death. Detail will be given to the Machado-Joseph Disease-causative and polyQ-containing protein, ataxin-3, providing clues for the impact of polyQ expansion and its flanking regions in the modulation of ataxin-3 molecular interactions, function, and aggregation. PMID:23801983

  1. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. |; Edlarov, M. |; Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A.

    1993-12-31

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation in that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RADS2, RADI and the RNCI genes,

  2. TRDB—The Tandem Repeats Database

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Yevgeniy; Rodriguez, Alfredo; Benson, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Tandem repeats in DNA have been under intensive study for many years, first, as a consequence of their usefulness as genomic markers and DNA fingerprints and more recently as their role in human disease and regulatory processes has become apparent. The Tandem Repeats Database (TRDB) is a public repository of information on tandem repeats in genomic DNA. It contains a variety of tools for repeat analysis, including the Tandem Repeats Finder program, query and filtering capabilities, repeat clustering, polymorphism prediction, PCR primer selection, data visualization and data download in a variety of formats. In addition, TRDB serves as a centralized research workbench. It provides user storage space and permits collaborators to privately share their data and analysis. TRDB is available at . PMID:17175540

  3. SGR-like behaviour of the repeating FRB 121102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F. Y.; Yu, H.

    2017-03-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration radio signals occurring at cosmological distances. However the physical model of FRBs is mystery, many models have been proposed. Here we study the frequency distributions of peak flux, fluence, duration and waiting time for the repeating FRB 121102. The cumulative distributions of peak flux, fluence and duration show power-law forms. The waiting time distribution also shows power-law distribution, and is consistent with a non-stationary Poisson process. These distributions are similar as those of soft gamma repeaters (SGRs). We also use the statistical results to test the proposed models for FRBs. These distributions are consistent with the predictions from avalanche models of slowly driven nonlinear dissipative systems.

  4. Repeated Witnessing of Conspecifics in Pain: Effects on Emotional Contagion

    PubMed Central

    Bruls, Rune; Han, Yingying; Heinemans, Mirjam; Pruis, Ilanah; Gazzola, Valeria; Keysers, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Witnessing of conspecifics in pain has been shown to elicit socially triggered freezing in rodents. It is unknown how robust this response is to repeated exposure to a cage-mate experiencing painful stimulation. To address this question, shock-experienced Observer rats repeatedly witnessed familiar Demonstrators receive painful footshocks (six sessions). Results confirm that Observers freeze during the first testing session. The occurrence of this behaviour however gradually diminished as the experimental sessions progressed, reaching minimal freezing levels by the end of the experiments. In contrast, the appearance and continuous increase in the frequency of yawning, a behavior that was inhibited by metyrapone (i.e,. a glucocorticoid synthesis blocker), might represent an alternative coping strategy, suggesting that the observer’s reduced freezing does not necessarily indicate a disappearance in the affective response to the Demonstrator’s distress. PMID:26356506

  5. Visual Scan Adaptation During Repeated Visual Search

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    repeated distractor –target configurations both require environmental stability. For stable distractor – target configurations, Chun and Jiang (1998) have...demon- strated search time savings from repeating distractor –target configurations, and Song and Jiang (2005) demonstrated that as little as 25% of the...search environment (i.e., two distractor locations and the target location out of 12 total locations per trial) repeated from trial to trial resulted

  6. Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 130 Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database (Web, free access)   Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database is intended to benefit research and application of short tandem repeat DNA markers for human identity testing. Facts and sequence information on each STR system, population data, commonly used multiplex STR systems, PCR primers and conditions, and a review of various technologies for analysis of STR alleles have been included.

  7. Short-Sequence DNA Repeats in Prokaryotic Genomes

    PubMed Central

    van Belkum, Alex; Scherer, Stewart; van Alphen, Loek; Verbrugh, Henri

    1998-01-01

    Short-sequence DNA repeat (SSR) loci can be identified in all eukaryotic and many prokaryotic genomes. These loci harbor short or long stretches of repeated nucleotide sequence motifs. DNA sequence motifs in a single locus can be identical and/or heterogeneous. SSRs are encountered in many different branches of the prokaryote kingdom. They are found in genes encoding products as diverse as microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules and specific bacterial virulence factors such as lipopolysaccharide-modifying enzymes or adhesins. SSRs enable genetic and consequently phenotypic flexibility. SSRs function at various levels of gene expression regulation. Variations in the number of repeat units per locus or changes in the nature of the individual repeat sequences may result from recombination processes or polymerase inadequacy such as slipped-strand mispairing (SSM), either alone or in combination with DNA repair deficiencies. These rather complex phenomena can occur with relative ease, with SSM approaching a frequency of 10−4 per bacterial cell division and allowing high-frequency genetic switching. Bacteria use this random strategy to adapt their genetic repertoire in response to selective environmental pressure. SSR-mediated variation has important implications for bacterial pathogenesis and evolutionary fitness. Molecular analysis of changes in SSRs allows epidemiological studies on the spread of pathogenic bacteria. The occurrence, evolution and function of SSRs, and the molecular methods used to analyze them are discussed in the context of responsiveness to environmental factors, bacterial pathogenicity, epidemiology, and the availability of full-genome sequences for increasing numbers of microorganisms, especially those that are medically relevant. PMID:9618442

  8. The Influence of Primary and Secondary DNA Structure in Deletion and Duplication between Direct Repeats in Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, T. Q.; Sinden, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a system to measure the frequency of both deletions and duplications between direct repeats. Short 17- and 18-bp palindromic and nonpalindromic DNA sequences were cloned into the EcoRI site within the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene of plasmids pBR325 and pJT7. This creates an insert between direct repeated EcoRI sites and results in a chloramphenicol-sensitive phenotype. Selection for chloramphenicol resistance was utilized to select chloramphenicol resistant revertants that included those with precise deletion of the insert from plasmid pBR325 and duplication of the insert in plasmid pJT7. The frequency of deletion or duplication varied more than 500-fold depending on the sequence of the short sequence inserted into the EcoRI site. For the nonpalindromic inserts, multiple internal direct repeats and the length of the direct repeats appear to influence the frequency of deletion. Certain palindromic DNA sequences with the potential to form DNA hairpin structures that might stabilize the misalignment of direct repeats had a high frequency of deletion. Other DNA sequences with the potential to form structures that might destabilize misalignment of direct repeats had a very low frequency of deletion. Duplication mutations occurred at the highest frequency when the DNA between the direct repeats contained no direct or inverted repeats. The presence of inverted repeats dramatically reduced the frequency of duplications. The results support the slippage-misalignment model, suggesting that misalignment occurring during DNA replication leads to deletion and duplication mutations. The results also support the idea that the formation of DNA secondary structures during DNA replication can facilitate and direct specific mutagenic events. PMID:8325478

  9. Power enhanced frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A frequency conversion system includes at least one source providing a first near-IR wavelength output including a gain medium for providing high power amplification, such as double clad fiber amplifier, a double clad fiber laser or a semiconductor tapered amplifier to enhance the power output level of the near-IR wavelength output. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Ra-man/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device.

  10. Fluctuation-dissipation relation in a resonantly driven quantum medium.

    PubMed

    Erukhimova, Maria; Tokman, Mikhail

    2015-06-15

    Noise associated with the spontaneous emission in a coherently driven medium is calculated. The significant field-induced modification of relation between the noise power and damping constant in a thermal reservoir is obtained. The nonlinear noise exchange between different atomic frequencies leads to violation of standard relations dictated by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. The developed general method is applied to the EIT system, attractive for realization of different quantum-information processing devices. It is shown that there is a significant factor defining the thermal noise at operating frequency in the EIT system. It is the averaged number of thermal photons at low frequency of ground state splitting.

  11. The effect of an official match on repeated sprint ability in junior basketball players.

    PubMed

    Caprino, Davide; Clarke, Neil David; Delextrat, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an official basketball match on repeated sprint ability indices in male junior players. Ten (16 ± 1 years old; 183.6 ± 7.0 cm; 76.6 ± 8.0 kg) starting players for their teams performed three repeated sprint ability tests, before, at half-time and immediately after an official match. Each repeated sprint ability test consisted of 10 shuttle-run sprints of 30 m (15 + 15 m) separated by 30 seconds of passive recovery. The matches were video-taped to determine the frequency of eight types of movement patterns, and blood lactate concentration was measured before and immediately after each repeated sprint ability test. Differences in total time, ideal time and percentage decrement between tests was assessed by a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures, while a two-way ANOVA with repeated measures was used to identify differences in blood lactate concentration. The main results indicated a significant decrease in total movement frequency (-9.9%), high-intensity activity frequency (-13.3%), run frequency (-13.0%) and sprint frequency (-23.3%) in the second compared to the first half, and significantly worse total time and ideal time at the end of the match, compared to the start and half-time (differences ranging from -2.1% to -2.9%, P < 0.05). The practical implications of these findings suggest that regional basketball players should participate in conditioning sessions that focus on the improvement of repeated sprint ability.

  12. Meiotic stability and polymorphism of CAG repeat in normal chromosome at SCA1 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Limprasert, P.; Nouri, N.; Keats, B.J.B.

    1994-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder associated with an unstable and expanded CAG repeat. We analyzed the CAG repeat in normal chromosomes from various sources including SCA1 and nonSCA1 families, and Caucasian, African American, Eskimo, South American Indian and Acadian populations. The range of CAG repeats is 10-37 in normal alleles while the disease allele contains 45-65 repeats in our studies. To determine unbiased normal allelic frequencies, we analyzed data from unrelated individuals in each group. The significance of differences in allelic frequencies among the groups was determined by a chi-square test. Caucasian and Acadian frequencies were similar (p = 0.23), but highly significant differences were found among the Caucasians, African Americans, Eskimos, and South American Indians (p < 0.0005), and the range of allele sizes was much narrower in Eskimos and South American Indians. To determine if the normal chromosome is susceptible to meiotic instability, we examined members of 19 Caucasian and 24 Acadian families. Normal sized CAG repeats were faithfully transmitted from parents to offspring without any alteration in CAG number in 236 meioses. Transmission of CAG repeats in normal alleles were also stable in our SCA1 family. However, the disease allele was associated with a significant degree of instability. Some patients showed 2 expanded bands in DNA prepared from untransformed blood cells. This finding suggest mitotic instability of the disease allele.

  13. All repeats are not equal: a module-based approach to guide repeat protein design.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Nicholas; Chen, Jieming; Regan, Lynne

    2013-05-27

    Repeat proteins composed of tandem arrays of a short structural motif often mediate protein-protein interactions. Past efforts to design repeat protein-based molecular recognition tools have focused on the creation of templates from the consensus of individual repeats, regardless of their natural context. Such an approach assumes that all repeats are essentially equivalent. In this study, we present the results of a "module-based" approach in which modules composed of tandem repeats are aligned to identify repeat-specific features. Using this approach to analyze tetratricopeptide repeat modules that contain three tandem repeats (3TPRs), we identify two classes of 3TPR modules with distinct structural signatures that are correlated with different sets of functional residues. Our analyses also reveal a high degree of correlation between positions across the entire ligand-binding surface, indicative of a coordinated, coevolving binding surface. Extension of our analyses to different repeat protein modules reveals more examples of repeat-specific features, especially in armadillo repeat modules. In summary, the module-based analyses that we present effectively capture key repeat-specific features that will be important to include in future repeat protein design templates.

  14. Medium for presumptive identification of Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Weagant, S D

    1983-02-01

    A medium, lysine-arginine-iron agar, was developed for the presumptive identification of Yersinia enterocolitica isolates. This medium was a modification of lysine-iron agar and allowed for the testing of five biochemical characteristics in a single tube medium. The reactions of Y. enterocolitica on this medium were reliable and distinctive. The medium significantly simplified the identification of Y. enterocolitica isolates.

  15. Experimental measurements of the coherent field resulting from the interaction of an ultrasonic shock wave with a multiple scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viard, Nicolas; Gianmarinaro, Bruno; Derode, Arnaud; Barrière, Christophe

    2014-04-01

    Whereas multiple scattering and shock wave formation are known to be antagonistic phenomena, this work concentrates on the interaction of an ultrasonic shock wave with a random multiple scattering medium. The shock wave is generated by long distance propagation of a short pulse (4 periods at a 3.5 MHz central frequency) in water before it encounters the scattering medium (a slab-shaped random set of parallel metallic rods). Transmitted waves are recorded over hundreds of positions along the lateral dimension of the slab to estimate the ensemble-averaged transmitted field langlephi(t)rangle, also known as the coherent wave. Experiments are repeated for different thicknesses L of the slab and different emission amplitudes. The elastic mean free path le (i.e the typical distance for the decreasing of the coherent intensity |langlephi(t)rangle|2 due to scattering) is determined as well as the harmonic rate of the averaged transmitted wave. Experimental results are discussed and compared to the linear case.

  16. A Comparison of DWI Repeaters and Non-repeaters Who Attended a Level I Rehabilitation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landrum, James W.; Windham, Gerald O.

    1981-01-01

    Compares behavioral and demographic characteristics of drunk drivers with repeated arrests and drivers not having repeated arrests, after attending an alcohol education program. Previous public drunkeness and previous drunk driving arrests were strong predictors of repeat arrests and were judged useful in screening offenders for rehabilitation…

  17. Repeated Testing Produces Superior Transfer of Learning Relative to Repeated Studying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    The present research investigated whether test-enhanced learning can be used to promote transfer. More specifically, 4 experiments examined how repeated testing and repeated studying affected retention and transfer of facts and concepts. Subjects studied prose passages and then either repeatedly restudied or took tests on the material. One week…

  18. Effects of Velocity on Electromyographic, Mechanomyographic, and Torque Responses to Repeated Eccentric Muscle Actions.

    PubMed

    Hill, Ethan C; Housh, Terry J; Camic, Clayton L; Smith, Cory M; Cochrane, Kristen C; Jenkins, Nathaniel D M; Cramer, Joel T; Schmidt, Richard J; Johnson, Glen O

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the effects of the velocity of repeated eccentric muscle actions on the torque and neuromuscular responses during maximal isometric and eccentric muscle actions. Twelve resistance-trained men performed 30 repeated, maximal, eccentric, isokinetic muscle actions at randomly ordered velocities of 60, 120, or 180°·s on separate days. Maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVICs) were performed before (pretest) and after (posttest) the repeated eccentric muscle actions on each day. Eccentric isokinetic peak torque (EIPT) values were the averages of the first 3 and last 3 repetitions of the 30 repeated eccentric muscle actions. During the EIPT and MVIC muscle actions, electromyographic (EMG) and mechanomyographic (MMG) amplitude (EMG AMP and MMG AMP) and mean power frequency (EMG MPF and MMG MPF) values were assessed. These results indicated that the repeated eccentric muscle actions had no effects on EIPT, or the EMG AMP, EMG MPF, or MMG MPF values assessed during the EIPT muscle actions, but decreased MMG AMP. The repeated eccentric muscle actions, however, decreased MVIC torque, and also the EMG AMP and MMG MPF values assessed during the MVIC muscle actions, but increased MMG AMP. The results indicated that the velocity of the repeated eccentric muscle actions affected the MVIC torque responses, but not EIPT or any of the neuromuscular parameters. Furthermore, there are differences in the torque and neuromuscular responses for isometric vs. eccentric muscle actions after repeated eccentric muscle actions.

  19. C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansions in clinical Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Matthew; Benitez, Bruno; Cairns, Nigel; Cooper, Breanna; Cooper, Paul; Mayo, Kevin; Carrell, David; Faber, Kelley; Williamson, Jennifer; Bird, Tom; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Mayeux, Richard; Chakraverty, Sumitra; Goate, Alison M.; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9ORF72 underlie a significant fraction of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This study investigates the frequency of C9ORF72 repeat expansions in clinically diagnosed late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Design, setting and patients This case-control study genotyped the C9ORF72 repeat expansion in 872 unrelated familial AD cases and 888 controls recruited as part of the NIA-LOAD cohort, a multi-site collaboration studying 1000 families with two or more individuals clinically diagnosed with late-onset-AD. Main Outcome Measure We determined the presence or absence of the C9ORF72 repeat expansion by repeat-primed PCR, the length of the longest non-expanded allele, segregation of the genotype with disease, and clinical features of repeat expansion carriers. Results Three families showed large C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansions. Two additional families carried more than 30 repeats. Segregation with disease could be demonstrated in 3 families. One affected expansion carrier had neuropathology compatible with AD. In the NIA-LOAD series, the C9ORF72 repeat expansions constituted the second most common pathogenic mutation, just behind the PSEN1 A79V mutation, highlighting the heterogeneity of clinical presentations associated with repeat expansions. Interpretation C9ORF72 repeat expansions explain a small proportion of patients with a clinical presentation indistinguishable from AD, and highlight the necessity of screening “FTD genes” in clinical AD cases with strong family history. PMID:23588422

  20. Slow convergence to effective medium in finite discrete metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapine, M.; McPhedran, R. C.; Poulton, C. G.

    2016-06-01

    It is known that metamaterial properties may differ significantly from the predictions of effective-medium theory. In many cases this is due to the finite size and discrete structure, which cannot be neglected in practical samples with a relatively small amount of elements. We analyze the response of finite discrete metamaterial objects of a spherical shape and demonstrate the role of boundary effects in these structures, pointing out an interplay between the size of the structure and the dissipation. We conclude that the discrepancy between the actual resonance frequency of a sphere and the effective-medium prediction is inversely proportional to the size of the sphere.

  1. Characteristics of Intergenerational Contractions of the CTG Repeat in Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ashizawa, T.; Anvret, M.; Baiget, M.; Barceló, J. M.; Brunner, H.; Cobo, A. M.; Dallapiccola, B.; Fenwick, R. G.; Grandell, U.; Harley, H.; Junien, C.; Koch, M. C.; Korneluk, R. G.; Lavedan, C.; Miki, T.; Mulley, J. C.; de Munain, A. López; Novelli, G.; Roses, A. D.; Seltzer, W. K.; Shaw, D. J.; Smeets, H.; Sutherland, G. R.; Yamagata, H.; Harper, P. S.

    1994-01-01

    In myotonic dystrophy (DM), the size of a CTG repeat in the DM kinase gene generally increases in successive generations with clinical evidence of anticipation. However, there have also been cases with an intergenerational contraction of the repeat. We examined 1,489 DM parent-offspring pairs, of which 95 (6.4%) showed such contractions in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). In 56 of the 95 pairs, clinical data allowed an analysis of their anticipation status. It is surprising that anticipation occurred in 27 (48%) of these 56 pairs, while none clearly showed a later onset of DM in the symptomatic offspring. The contraction occurred in 76 (10%) of 753 paternal transmissions and in 19 (3%) of 736 maternal transmissions. Anticipation was observed more frequently in maternal (85%) than in paternal (37%) transmissions (P < .001). The parental repeat size correlated with the size of intergenerational contraction (r2 = .50, P « .001), and the slope of linear regression was steeper in paternal (–.62) than in maternal (–.30) transmissions (P « .001). Sixteen DM parents had multiple DM offspring with the CTG repeat contractions. This frequency was higher than the frequency expected from the probability of the repeat contractions (6.4%) and the size of DM sib population (1.54 DM offspring per DM parent, in 968 DM parents). We conclude that (1) intergenerational contraction of the CTG repeat in leukocyte DNA frequently accompanies apparent anticipation, especially when DM is maternally transmitted, and (2) the paternal origin of the repeat and the presence of the repeat contraction in a sibling increase the probability of the CTG repeat contraction. PMID:8116611

  2. Energy loss by resonance line photons in an absorbing medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummer, D. G.; Kunasz, P. B.

    1980-01-01

    The mean path length of photons undergoing repeated scatterings in media of large optical thickness is calculated from accurate numerical solutions of the transfer equation including the effect of frequency redistribution characteristic of combined Doppler and natural broadening. Energy loss by continuous absorption processes, such as ionization or dust absorption, is discussed, and asymptotic scaling laws for the energy loss, the mean path length, and the mean number of scatterings are inferred from the numerical data.

  3. Sterile Culture of Rotylenchulus reniformis on Tomato Root with Gellan Gum as a Supporting Medium

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, Melissa J.; Caswell, Edward P.

    1991-01-01

    Rotylenchulus reniformis was repeatedly propagated in sterile excised tomato roots growing on modified White's medium with gellan gum as the support. Gellan gum provided an optically clear support medium that could be liquified by adding 5 mM disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) to facilitate nematode extraction. Liquefaction of the gellan-gum medium by EDTA allowed efficient recovery of eggs and vermiform stages of R. reniformis. Extraction efficiency was quantified with Radopholus similis as a test organism. The efficiency of extracting R. similis from the gellan gum did not vary with the concentrations of EDTA tested. PMID:19283117

  4. Sterile Culture of Rotylenchulus reniformis on Tomato Root with Gellan Gum as a Supporting Medium.

    PubMed

    Eyre, M J; Caswell, E P

    1991-04-01

    Rotylenchulus reniformis was repeatedly propagated in sterile excised tomato roots growing on modified White's medium with gellan gum as the support. Gellan gum provided an optically clear support medium that could be liquified by adding 5 mM disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) to facilitate nematode extraction. Liquefaction of the gellan-gum medium by EDTA allowed efficient recovery of eggs and vermiform stages of R. reniformis. Extraction efficiency was quantified with Radopholus similis as a test organism. The efficiency of extracting R. similis from the gellan gum did not vary with the concentrations of EDTA tested.

  5. About wave field modeling in hierarchic medium with fractal inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachay, Olga; Khachay, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    The processes of oil gaseous deposits outworking are linked with moving of polyphase multicomponent media, which are characterized by no equilibrium and nonlinear rheological features. The real behavior of layered systems is defined as complicated rheology moving liquids and structural morphology of porous media. It is eargently needed to account those factors for substantial description of the filtration processes. Additionally we must account also the synergetic effects. That allows suggesting new methods of control and managing of complicated natural systems, which can research these effects. Thus our research is directed to the layered system, from which we have to outwork oil and which is a complicated hierarchic dynamical system with fractal inclusions. In that paper we suggest the algorithm of modeling of 2-d seismic field distribution in the heterogeneous medium with hierarchic inclusions. Also we can compare the integral 2-D for seismic field in a frame of local hierarchic heterogeneity with a porous inclusion and pure elastic inclusion for the case when the parameter Lame is equal to zero for the inclusions and the layered structure. For that case we can regard the problem for the latitude and longitudinal waves independently. Here we shall analyze the first case. The received results can be used for choosing criterions of joined seismic methods for high complicated media research.If the boundaries of the inclusion of the k rank are fractals, the surface and contour integrals in the integral equations must be changed to repeated fractional integrals of Riman-Liuvill type .Using the developed earlier 3-d method of induction electromagnetic frequency geometric monitoring we showed the opportunity of defining of physical and structural features of hierarchic oil layer structure and estimating of water saturating by crack inclusions. For visualization we had elaborated some algorithms and programs for constructing cross sections for two hierarchic structural

  6. Properties of the nuclear medium.

    PubMed

    Baldo, M; Burgio, G F

    2012-02-01

    We review our knowledge on the properties of the nuclear medium that have been studied, over many years, on the basis of many-body theory, laboratory experiments and astrophysical observations. Throughout the presentation particular emphasis is placed on the possible relationship and links between the nuclear medium and the structure of nuclei, including the limitations of such an approach. First we consider the realm of phenomenological laboratory data and astrophysical observations and the hints they can give on the characteristics that the nuclear medium should possess. The analysis is based on phenomenological models, that however have a strong basis on physical intuition and an impressive success. More microscopic models are also considered, and it is shown that they are able to give invaluable information on the nuclear medium, in particular on its equation of state. The interplay between laboratory experiments and astrophysical observations is particularly stressed, and it is shown how their complementarity enormously enriches our insights into the structure of the nuclear medium. We then introduce the nucleon-nucleon interaction and the microscopic many-body theory of nuclear matter, with a critical discussion about the different approaches and their results. The Landau-Fermi liquid theory is introduced and briefly discussed, and it is shown how fruitful it can be in discussing the macroscopic and low-energy properties of the nuclear medium. As an illustrative example, we discuss neutron matter at very low density, and it is shown how it can be treated within the many-body theory. The general bulk properties of the nuclear medium are reviewed to indicate at which stage of our knowledge we stand, taking into account the most recent developments both in theory and experiments. A section is dedicated to the pairing problem. The connection with nuclear structure is then discussed, on the basis of the energy density functional method. The possibility of linking

  7. A pan-European study of the C9orf72 repeat associated with FTLD: geographic prevalence, genomic instability, and intermediate repeats.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Julie; Gijselinck, Ilse; Dillen, Lubina; Van Langenhove, Tim; Theuns, Jessie; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Philtjens, Stéphanie; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Sleegers, Kristel; Sieben, Anne; Bäumer, Veerle; Maes, Githa; Corsmit, Ellen; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Archetti, Silvana; Perneczky, Robert; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Miltenberger-Miltenyi, Gabriel; Pereira, Sónia; Pimentel, José; Nacmias, Benedetta; Bagnoli, Silvia; Sorbi, Sandro; Graff, Caroline; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Westerlund, Marie; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Llado, Albert; Gelpi, Ellen; Santana, Isabel; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Santiago, Beatriz; Frisoni, Giovanni; Zanetti, Orazio; Bonvicini, Cristian; Synofzik, Matthis; Maetzler, Walter; Vom Hagen, Jennifer Müller; Schöls, Ludger; Heneka, Michael T; Jessen, Frank; Matej, Radoslav; Parobkova, Eva; Kovacs, Gabor G; Ströbel, Thomas; Sarafov, Stayko; Tournev, Ivailo; Jordanova, Albena; Danek, Adrian; Arzberger, Thomas; Fabrizi, Gian Maria; Testi, Silvia; Salmon, Eric; Santens, Patrick; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Cras, Patrick; Vandenberghe, Rik; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; van der Zee, Julie; Gijselinck, Ilse; Dillen, Lubina; Van Langenhove, Tim; Theuns, Jessie; Philtjens, Stéphanie; Sleegers, Kristel; Bäumer, Veerle; Maes, Githa; Corsmit, Ellen; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; van der Zee, Julie; Gijselinck, Ilse; Dillen, Lubina; Van Langenhove, Tim; Philtjens, Stéphanie; Theuns, Jessie; Sleegers, Kristel; Bäumer, Veerle; Maes, Githa; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P; Cras, Patrick; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Archetti, Silvana; Perneczky, Robert; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Synofzik, Matthis; Maetzler, Walter; Müller Vom Hagen, Jennifer; Schöls, Ludger; Synofzik, Matthis; Maetzler, Walter; Müller Vom Hagen, Jennifer; Schöls, Ludger; Heneka, Michael T; Jessen, Frank; Ramirez, Alfredo; Kurzwelly, Delia; Sachtleben, Carmen; Mairer, Wolfgang; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Miltenberger-Miltenyi, Gabriel; Pereira, Sónia; Firmo, Clara; Pimentel, José; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Llado, Albert; Antonell, Anna; Molinuevo, Jose; Gelpi, Ellen; Graff, Caroline; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Westerlund, Marie; Graff, Caroline; Kinhult Ståhlbom, Anne; Thonberg, Håkan; Nennesmo, Inger; Börjesson-Hanson, Anne; Nacmias, Benedetta; Bagnoli, Silvia; Sorbi, Sandro; Bessi, Valentina; Piaceri, Irene; Santana, Isabel; Santiago, Beatriz; Santana, Isabel; Helena Ribeiro, Maria; Rosário Almeida, Maria; Oliveira, Catarina; Massano, João; Garret, Carolina; Pires, Paula; Frisoni, Giovanni; Zanetti, Orazio; Bonvicini, Cristian; Sarafov, Stayko; Tournev, Ivailo; Jordanova, Albena; Tournev, Ivailo; Kovacs, Gabor G; Ströbel, Thomas; Heneka, Michael T; Jessen, Frank; Ramirez, Alfredo; Kurzwelly, Delia; Sachtleben, Carmen; Mairer, Wolfgang; Jessen, Frank; Matej, Radoslav; Parobkova, Eva; Danel, Adrian; Arzberger, Thomas; Maria Fabrizi, Gian; Testi, Silvia; Ferrari, Sergio; Cavallaro, Tiziana; Salmon, Eric; Santens, Patrick; Cras, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    We assessed the geographical distribution of C9orf72 G(4) C(2) expansions in a pan-European frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) cohort (n = 1,205), ascertained by the European Early-Onset Dementia (EOD) consortium. Next, we performed a meta-analysis of our data and that of other European studies, together 2,668 patients from 15 Western European countries. The frequency of the C9orf72 expansions in Western Europe was 9.98% in overall FTLD, with 18.52% in familial, and 6.26% in sporadic FTLD patients. Outliers were Finland and Sweden with overall frequencies of respectively 29.33% and 20.73%, but also Spain with 25.49%. In contrast, prevalence in Germany was limited to 4.82%. In addition, we studied the role of intermediate repeats (7-24 repeat units), which are strongly correlated with the risk haplotype, on disease and C9orf72 expression. In vitro reporter gene expression studies demonstrated significantly decreased transcriptional activity of C9orf72 with increasing number of normal repeat units, indicating that intermediate repeats might act as predisposing alleles and in favor of the loss-of-function disease mechanism. Further, we observed a significantly increased frequency of short indels in the GC-rich low complexity sequence adjacent to the G(4) C(2) repeat in C9orf72 expansion carriers (P < 0.001) with the most common indel creating one long contiguous imperfect G(4) C(2) repeat, which is likely more prone to replication slippage and pathological expansion.

  8. Hepcidin level predicts hemoglobin concentration in individuals undergoing repeated phlebotomy.

    PubMed

    Mast, Alan E; Schlumpf, Karen S; Wright, David J; Johnson, Bryce; Glynn, Simone A; Busch, Michael P; Olbina, Gordana; Westerman, Mark; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2013-08-01

    Dietary iron absorption is regulated by hepcidin, an iron regulatory protein produced by the liver. Hepcidin production is regulated by iron stores, erythropoiesis and inflammation, but its physiology when repeated blood loss occurs has not been characterized. Hepcidin was assayed in plasma samples obtained from 114 first-time/reactivated (no blood donations in preceding 2 years) female donors and 34 frequent (≥3 red blood cell donations in preceding 12 months) male donors as they were phlebotomized ≥4 times over 18-24 months. Hepcidin levels were compared to ferritin and hemoglobin levels using multivariable repeated measures regression models. Hepcidin, ferritin and hemoglobin levels declined with increasing frequency of donation in the first-time/reactivated females. Hepcidin and ferritin levels correlated well with each other (Spearman's correlation of 0.74), but on average hepcidin varied more between donations for a given donor relative to ferritin. In a multivariable repeated measures regression model the predicted inter-donation decline in hemoglobin varied as a function of hepcidin and ferritin; hemoglobin was 0.51 g/dL lower for subjects with low (>45.7 ng/mL) or decreasing hepcidin and low ferritin (>26 ng/mL), and was essentially zero for other subjects including those with high (>45.7 ng/mL) or increasing hepcidin and low ferritin (>26 ng/mL) levels (P<0.001). In conclusion, hepcidin levels change rapidly in response to dietary iron needed for erythropoiesis. The dynamic regulation of hepcidin in the presence of a low levels of ferritin suggests that plasma hepcidin concentration may provide clinically useful information about an individual's iron status (and hence capacity to tolerate repeated blood donations) beyond that of ferritin alone. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00097006.

  9. Epigenetics and Triplet-Repeat Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Nageshwaran, Sathiji; Festenstein, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The term "junk DNA" has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterochromatinized resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions frequently exist as dinucleotide, trinucleotide, and tetranucleotide repeats. The association between repetitive regions and disease was emphasized following the discovery of abnormal trinucleotide repeats underlying spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease) and fragile X syndrome of mental retardation (FRAXA) in 1991. In this review, we provide a brief overview of epigenetic mechanisms and then focus on several diseases caused by DNA triplet-repeat expansions, which exhibit diverse epigenetic effects. It is clear that the emerging field of epigenetics is already generating novel potential therapeutic avenues for this group of largely incurable diseases.

  10. DNA Triplet Repeat Expansion and Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pluciennik, Anna; Napierala, Marek; Wells, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a conserved antimutagenic pathway that maintains genomic stability through rectification of DNA replication errors and attenuation of chromosomal rearrangements. Paradoxically, mutagenic action of mismatch repair has been implicated as a cause of triplet repeat expansions that cause neurological diseases such as Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy. This mutagenic process requires the mismatch recognition factor MutSβ and the MutLα (and/or possibly MutLγ) endonuclease, and is thought to be triggered by the transient formation of unusual DNA structures within the expanded triplet repeat element. This review summarizes the current knowledge of DNA mismatch repair involvement in triplet repeat expansion, which encompasses in vitro biochemical findings, cellular studies, and various in vivo transgenic animal model experiments. We present current mechanistic hypotheses regarding mismatch repair protein function in mediating triplet repeat expansions and discuss potential therapeutic approaches targeting the mismatch repair pathway. PMID:25580529

  11. Frequency doubled, cavity dumped feedback laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sipes, Jr., Donald L. (Inventor); Robinson, Deborah L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Higher efficiency in cavity dumping and frequency doubling in a laser used to produce modulated output beam pulses is achieved by deflecting light out of the resonant cavity to a third mirror through a frequency doubler using an electro-optic modulator and a polarizing beamsplitter in the resonant cavity, or using just an acousto-optic modulator to deflect light out of the laser cavity in response to a control signal (electric or acoustic). The frequency doubler in front of the third mirror rotates the frequency doubled light so that it will pass out of the laser cavity through the polarizing beamsplitter, while undoubled frequency light is reflected by the polarizing beamsplitter back into the gain medium of the laser. In the case of using a type-II frequency doubler, a dichroic beamsplitter deflects out the frequency doubled light and passes the undoubled frequency light to the polarizing beamsplitter for return to the laser gain medium. If an acousto-optic modulator is used, it deflects light out of the primary laser cavity, so a polarizing beamsplitter is not needed, and only a dichroic beamsplitter is needed to separate frequency doubled light out of the path from the third mirror.

  12. Cumulative Effect of Repeated Brief Cerebral Ischemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-31

    KL, Pohost GM and Conger KA, Correlating EEG and Lactate Kinetics During Repeated Brief Cerebral Ischemia, Proceedings of the American Heart Association 1993...Cornelating EEG and Lactate Kinetics During Repeated Brief Cerebral Ischemia, Proceedings of the American Heart Association 1993. 4) HP Hetherington...thes Bernhard Foundation. ass- 134 󈧑&.1 n5. 9# American Heart Association 026085 66th Scientific Sessions Abstract Form Medical Research Nursing

  13. Newly arisen DNA repeats in primate phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Ryan, S C; Dugaiczyk, A

    1989-12-01

    We discovered the presence of an Alu and an Xba repetitive DNA element within introns 4 and 7, respectively, of the human alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) gene; these elements are absent from the same gene in the gorilla. The Alu element is flanked by 12-base-pair direct repeats, AGGATGTTGTGG ... (Alu) ... AGGATGTTGTGG, which presumably arose by way of duplication of the intronic target site AGGATGTTGTGG at the time of the Alu insertion. In the gorilla, only a single copy of the unoccupied target site is present, which is identical to the terminal repeat flanking the human Alu element. There are two copies of an Xba repeat in the human AFP gene, apparently the only two in the genome. Xba1 and Xba2, located within introns 8 and 7, respectively, differ from each other at 3 of 303 positions. Xba1 is referred to as the old (ancestral) repeat because it lacks direct repeats. The new (derived) Xba2 is flanked by direct repeats, TTTCTTTTT ... (Xba) ... TTTCTTCTT, and is thought to have arisen as a result of transposition of Xba1. The ancestral Xba1 and a single copy of the Xba2 target site are present at orthologous positions in the gorilla, but the new Xba2 is absent. We conclude that the Alu and Xba DNA repeats emerged in the human genome at a time postdating the human-gorilla divergence and became established as genetic novelties in the human lineage. We submit that the chronology of divergence of primate lines of evolution can be correlated with the timing of insertion of new DNA repeats into the genomes of those primates.

  14. Repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Christopher J.; Ding, Dale; Leed, Cheng-Chia; Loeffler, Jay S.

    2015-01-01

    We perform a systematic review of repeated radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) with an emphasis on lesion obliteration rates and complications. Radiosurgery is an accepted treatment modality for AVM located in eloquent cortex or deep brain structures. For residual or persistent lesions, repeated radiosurgery can be considered if sufficient time has passed to allow for a full appreciation of treatment effects, usually at least 3 years. A systematic review was performed in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. References for this review were identified by searches of MEDLINE, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases. A total of 14 studies comprising 733 patients met the review criteria and were included. For series that reported target dose at both first and repeat treatments, the weighted means were 19.42 Gy and 19.06 Gy, respectively. The mean and median obliteration rate for the repeat radiosurgery treatments were 61% (95% confidence interval 51.9–71.7%) and 61.5%, respectively. The median follow up following radiosurgery ranged from 19.5 to 80 months. Time to complete obliteration after the repeat treatment ranged from 21 to 40.8 months. The most common complications of repeated radiosurgery for AVM included hemorrhage (7.6%) and radiation-induced changes (7.4%). Repeat radiosurgery can be used to treat incompletely obliterated AVM with an obliteration rate of 61%. Complications are related to treatment effect latency (hemorrhage risk) as well as radiation-induced changes. Repeat radiosurgery can be performed at three years following the initial treatment, allowing for full realization of effects from the initial treatment prior to commencing therapy. PMID:25913746

  15. Review of hadrons in medium

    SciTech Connect

    Krein, Gastão

    2016-01-22

    I review the present status in the theoretical and phenomenological understanding of hadron properties in strongly interacting matter. The topics covered are the EMC effect, nucleon structure functions in cold nuclear matter, spectral properties of light vector mesons in hot and cold nuclear matter, and in-medium properties of heavy flavored hadrons.

  16. Digital repeat analysis; setup and operation.

    PubMed

    Nol, J; Isouard, G; Mirecki, J

    2006-06-01

    Since the emergence of digital imaging, there have been questions about the necessity of continuing reject analysis programs in imaging departments to evaluate performance and quality. As a marketing strategy, most suppliers of digital technology focus on the supremacy of the technology and its ability to reduce the number of repeats, resulting in less radiation doses given to patients and increased productivity in the department. On the other hand, quality assurance radiographers and radiologists believe that repeats are mainly related to positioning skills, and repeat analysis is the main tool to plan training needs to up-skill radiographers. A comparative study between conventional and digital imaging was undertaken to compare outcomes and evaluate the need for reject analysis. However, digital technology still being at its early development stages, setting a credible reject analysis program became the major task of the study. It took the department, with the help of the suppliers of the computed radiography reader and the picture archiving and communication system, over 2 years of software enhancement to build a reliable digital repeat analysis system. The results were supportive of both philosophies; the number of repeats as a result of exposure factors was reduced dramatically; however, the percentage of repeats as a result of positioning skills was slightly on the increase for the simple reason that some rejects in the conventional system qualifying for both exposure and positioning errors were classified as exposure error. The ability of digitally adjusting dark or light images reclassified some of those images as positioning errors.

  17. Dynamic combinatorial libraries of artificial repeat proteins.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Margarita; Shumacher, Inbal; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2013-06-15

    Repeat proteins are found in almost all cellular systems, where they are involved in diverse molecular recognition processes. Recent studies have suggested that de novo designed repeat proteins may serve as universal binders, and might potentially be used as practical alternative to antibodies. We describe here a novel chemical methodology for producing small libraries of repeat proteins, and screening in parallel the ligand binding of library members. The first stage of this research involved the total synthesis of a consensus-based three-repeat tetratricopeptide (TPR) protein (~14 kDa), via sequential attachment of the respective peptides. Despite the effectiveness of the synthesis and ligation steps, this method was found to be too demanding for the production of proteins containing variable number of repeats. Additionally, the analysis of binding of the individual proteins was time consuming. Therefore, we designed and prepared novel dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs), and show that their equilibration can facilitate the formation of TPR proteins containing up to eight repeating units. Interestingly, equilibration of the library building blocks in the presence of the biologically relevant ligands, Hsp90 and Hsp70, induced their oligomerization into forming more of the proteins with large recognition surfaces. We suggest that this work presents a novel simple and rapid tool for the simultaneous screening of protein mixtures with variable binding surfaces, and for identifying new binders for ligands of interest.

  18. Relationship of social support and social burden to repeated breast cancer screening in the women's health initiative.

    PubMed

    Messina, Catherine R; Lane, Dorothy S; Glanz, Karen; West, Delia Smith; Taylor, Vicky; Frishman, William; Powell, Lynda

    2004-11-01

    Direct and interactive effects of social support, social burden (caregiving, negative life events, and social strain), education, and income on repeated use of breast cancer screening among a large (N=55,278), national sample of postmenopausal women participating in the Women's Health Initiative observational study were examined. Repeated screening decreased as emotional/informational support and positive social interactions decreased (ps<.01). Repeated mammography decreased with frequent caregiving (p<.01). Less social strain reduced the frequency of repeated breast self-examinations (BSEs; ps<.01), but frequent caregiving and more negative life events increased repeated use of BSE (ps<.01). Interactive effects suggested that emotional/informational but not tangible support is associated with repeated mammography and clinical breast examinations (ps<.01) and may be particularly important among low-income older women, especially those burdened by caregiving.

  19. Medium- to long-term outcomes of botulinum toxin A for idiopathic overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Eldred-Evans, David; Sahai, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) has become an important therapeutic tool in the management of refractory overactive bladder (OAB). Over the last decade, there have been growing numbers of patients receiving repeat injections and these outcomes have begun to be reported in large, high-quality cohorts. This article reviews the current evidence for the medium- to long-term use of BoNT-A in adults with idiopathic detrusor overactivity (IDO) receiving repeat injections. We find that medium-term outcomes are encouraging but long-term outcomes are not as extensively reported. There is high-quality evidence that efficacy following the first injection persists across multiple treatment cycles. There are no additional safety concerns from repeat injections up to six treatment cycles. However, there is a need for further data to confirm the efficacy and safety of BoNT-A beyond the follow-up period in the current literature. PMID:28042308

  20. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen prevents trinucleotide repeat expansions by promoting repeat deletion and hairpin removal

    PubMed Central

    Beaver, Jill M.; Lai, Yanhao; Rolle, Shantell J.; Liu, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    DNA base lesions and base excision repair (BER) within trinucleotide repeat (TNR) tracts modulate repeat instability through the coordination among the key BER enzymes DNA polymerase β, flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and DNA ligase I (LIG I). However, it remains unknown whether BER cofactors can also alter TNR stability. In this study, we discovered that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a cofactor of BER, promoted CAG repeat deletion and removal of a CAG repeat hairpin during BER in a duplex CAG repeat tract and CAG hairpin loop, respectively. We showed that PCNA stimulated LIG I activity on a nick across a small template loop during BER in a duplex (CAG)20 repeat tract promoting small repeat deletions. Surprisingly, we found that during BER in a hairpin loop, PCNA promoted reannealing of the upstream flap of a double-flap intermediate, thereby facilitating the formation of a downstream flap and stimulating FEN1 cleavage activity and hairpin removal. Our results indicate that PCNA plays a critical role in preventing CAG repeat expansions by modulating the structures of dynamic DNA via cooperation with BER enzymes. We provide the first evidence that PCNA prevents CAG repeat expansions during BER by promoting CAG repeat deletion and removal of a TNR hairpin. PMID:27793507

  1. Repeatability of electrically-evoked myoelectric signals in the human tibialis anterior muscle.

    PubMed

    Merletti, R; Lo Conte, L R; Sathyan, D

    1995-06-01

    The reproducibility of surface myoelectric signal measurements is of paramount importance for clinical applications of electromyography (EMG) techniques. The repeatability of electrically-evoked myoelectric signal shape (M-wave) as well as spectral and amplitude parameters, conduction velocity and elicited torque was tested, in isometric conditions, on the tibialis anterior muscle of 10 normal subjects. Contractions were elicited by stimulation of the main muscle motor point and repeated after removal and replacement of the stimulation and detection electrodes in the same carefully marked locations. This protocol was repeated five times on each subject on five different days. The test-retest Pearson correlation coefficient, the paired t test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to quantify repeatability and estimate the fraction of variance due to repeated trials within experiments, repeated experiments within subjects and inter-subject variability. Results indicate that parameters of spectral variables are more repeatable than those of amplitude variables. Elicited torque and conduction velocity show the lowest repeatability. The intra-class correlation coefficient ranged from 87.9% for the initial value of median frequency to 11.5% for the initial value of conduction velocity. Fatigue indices based on the time course of the myoelectric signal variables showed even lower values of this coefficient. It is concluded that: (a) initial values and fatigue indices based on spectral variables are more repeatable than those based on amplitude variables; (b) the repeatability of conduction velocity and torque is very poor; (c) M-wave shape, rather than amplitude or width, seems to be a characteristic of individual muscles; and (d) electrode location is a critical issue in the study of M-waves elicited by stimulation of a muscle motor point. The methodology for estimation of muscle fibre conduction velocity must be refined and the characterization of evoked responses

  2. Low abundance of microsatellite repeats in the genome of the Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longmire, J.L.; Hahn, D.C.; Roach, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    A cosmid library made from brown-headed cowbird (Molothrus ater) DNA was examined for representation of 17 distinct microsatellite motifs including all possible mono-, di-, and trinucleotide microsatellites, and the tetranucleotide repeat (GATA)n. The overall density of microsatellites within cowbird DNA was found to be one repeat per 89 kb and the frequency of the most abundant motif, (AGC)n, was once every 382 kb. The abundance of microsatellites within the cowbird genome is estimated to be reduced approximately 15-fold compared to humans. The reduced frequency of microsatellites seen in this study is consistent with previous observations indicating reduced numbers of microsatellites and other interspersed repeats in avian DNA. In addition to providing new information concerning the abundance of microsatellites within an avian genome, these results provide useful insights for selecting cloning strategies that might be used in the development of locus-specific microsatellite markers for avian studies.

  3. An alternative bacteriological medium for the isolation of Aeromonas spp.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, J.A.; Taylor, P.W.

    1995-01-01

    Two solid bacteriologic media were compared for cultivating Aeromonas spp. from piscine sources: the Rimler-Shotts (RS) medium and a starch-glutamate-ampicillin-penicillin-based medium (SGAP-10C) used for the recovery of Aeromonas spp. from water samples. The selective and differential capacities of the media were assessed March through October 1992 by recovery rate and phenotype of 99 isolates representing 15 genera of bacteria. Recovery frequency of Aeromonas spp. (n = 62) was similar at 97% on RS and 95% on SGAP-10C. The SGAP-10C medium proved to be more specific than RS toward Aeromonas species (P ≤ 0.005). Use of SGAP-10C at 24 C for 48 hr offers a better choice for the laboratory recovery of Aeromonas spp. from clinical fish specimens.

  4. Turkish population data with the CODIS multiplex short tandem repeat loci.

    PubMed

    Akbasak, B S; Budowle, B; Reeder, D J; Redman, J; Kline, M C

    2001-12-01

    Allele frequencies for 13 tetrameric short tandem repeat (STR) loci, CSF1PO, D18S51, D3S1358, D21S11, D5S818, FGA, D7S820, HUMTH01, D8S1179, TPOX, D13S317, VWA, and D16S539 were determined on 198 Turkish blood samples.

  5. Improving cellulase productivity of Penicillium oxalicum RE-10 by repeated fed-batch fermentation strategy.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaolong; Song, Wenxia; Liu, Guodong; Li, Zhonghai; Yang, Piao; Qu, Yinbo

    2017-03-01

    Medium optimization and repeated fed-batch fermentation were performed to improve the cellulase productivity by P. oxalicum RE-10 in submerged fermentation. First, Plackett-Burman design (PBD) and central composite design (CCD) were used to optimize the medium for cellulase production. PBD demonstrated wheat bran and NaNO3 had significant influences on cellulase production. The CCD results showed the maximum filter paper activity (FPA) production of 8.61U/mL could be achieved in Erlenmeyer flasks. The maximal FPA reached 12.69U/mL by submerged batch fermentation in a 7.5-L stirred tank, 1.76-fold higher than that on the original medium. Then, the repeated fed-batch fermentation strategy was performed successfully for increasing the cellulase productivity from 105.75U/L/h in batch fermentation to 158.38U/L/h. The cellulase activity and the glucan conversion of delignined corn cob residue hydrolysis had no significant difference between the enzymes sampled from different cycles of the repeated fed-batch fermentation and that from batch culture.

  6. Genetic variation and evolutionary stability of the FMR1 CGG repeat in six closed human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, E.E.; Nelson, D.L.

    1996-07-12

    In an attempt to understand the allelic diversity and mutability of the human FMR1 CGG repeat, we have analyzed the AGG substructure of this locus within six genetically-closed populations (Mbuti pygmy, Baka pygmy, R. surui, Karitiana, Mayan, and Hutterite). Most alleles (61/92 or 66%) possessed two AGG interspersions occurring with a periodicity of one AGG every nine or ten CGG repeats, indicating that this pattern is highly conserved in all human populations. Significant differences in allele distribution were observed among the populations for rare variants possessing fewer or more AGG interruptions than the canonical FMR1 CGG repeat sequence. Comparisons of expected heterozygosity of the FMR1 CGG repeat locus with 30 other microsatellite loci, demonstrated remarkably similar levels of polymorphism within each population, suggesting that most FMR1 CGG repeat alleles mutate at rates indistinguishable from other microsatellite loci. A single allele (1 out of 92) was identified with a large uninterrupted tract of pure repeats (42 pure CGG triplets). Retrospective pedigree analysis indicated that this allele had been transmitted unstably. Although such alleles mutate rapidly and likely represent evolving premutations, our analysis suggests that in spite of the estimated frequency of their occurrence, these unstable alleles do not significantly alter the expected heterozygosity of the FMR1 CGG repeat in the human population. 45 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Most meiotic CAG repeat tract-length alterations in yeast are SPO11 dependent.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, C; Nag, Dilip K

    2002-03-01

    The expansion of trinucleotide repeat sequences associated with hereditary neurological diseases is believed from earlier studies to be due to errors in DNA replication. However, more recent studies have indicated that recombination may play a significant role in triplet repeat expansion. CAG repeat tracts have been shown to induce double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiosis in yeast, and DSB formation is dependent on the meiotic recombination machinery. The rate of meiotic instability is several fold higher than mitotic instability. To determine whether DSB repair is responsible for the high rate of repeat tract-length alterations, the frequencies of meiotic repeat-tract instability were compared in wild-type and spo11 mutant strains. In the spo11 background, the rate of meiotic repeat-tract instability remained at the mitotic level, suggesting that meiotic alterations of CAG repeat tracts in yeast occur by the recombination mechanism. Several of these meiotic tract-length alterations are due to DSB repair involving use of the sister chromatid as a template.

  8. Low- to medium-β cavities for heavy ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facco, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    Acceleration of low- and medium-β heavy ions by means of superconducting (SC) linear accelerators (linacs) was made possible by the development, during four decades, of a particular class of cavities characterized by low operation frequency, several different shapes and different electromagnetic modes of operation. Their performance, initially rather poor in operating accelerators, have steadily increased along with the technological progress and nowadays the gap with the high-β, elliptical cavities is close to be filled. Initially confined to a very small number of applications, this family of cavities evolved in many directions becoming one of the most widespread in linacs. Nowadays it is present in the majority of superconducting radio-frequency ion linac projects worldwide. An overview of low- and medium-β SC cavities for heavy ions, focused on their recent evolution and achievements, will be given.

  9. Genetically-directed Sparse Neuronal Labeling in BAC Transgenic Mice through Mononucleotide Repeat Frameshift

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiao-Hong; Yang, X. William

    2017-01-01

    Mosaicism with Repeat Frameshift (MORF) allows a single Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) transgene to direct sparse labeling of genetically-defined neuronal populations in mice. The BAC transgene drives cell-type-specific transcription of an out-of-frame mononucleotide repeat that is placed between a translational start codon and a membrane-bound fluorescent protein lacking its start codon. The stochastic frameshift of the unstable repeat DNA in a subset of BAC-expressing neurons results in the in-frame translation of the reporter protein hence the sparse neuronal labeling. As a proof-of-concept, we generated D1-dopamine receptor (D1) BAC MORF mice that label about 1% striatal D1-expressing medium spiny neurons and allow visualization of their dendrites. These mice enable the study of D1-MSN dendrite development in wildtype mice, and its degeneration in a mouse model of Huntington’s disease. PMID:28272512

  10. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    SciTech Connect

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. |

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  11. Thermal emission from a metamaterial wire medium slab.

    PubMed

    D'Aguanno, G; Mattiucci, N; Alù, A; Argyropoulos, C; Foreman, J V; Bloemer, M J

    2012-04-23

    We investigate thermal emission from a metamaterial wire medium embedded in a dielectric host and highlight two different regimes for efficient emission, respectively characterized by broadband emission near the effective plasma frequency of the metamaterial, and by narrow-band resonant emission at the band-edge in the Bragg scattering regime. We discuss how to control the spectral position and relative strength of these two emission mechanisms by varying the geometrical parameters of the proposed metamaterial and its temperature.

  12. Explaining the gender difference in nightmare frequency.

    PubMed

    Schredl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A recent meta-analysis showed a robust gender difference in nightmare frequency of medium effect size in adolescents and young adults: Women tend to report nightmares more frequently than men. The present study, carried out in an unselected student sample, indicates that 2 factors mediate the gender difference in nightmare frequency: neuroticism and overall dream recall frequency. The effect of neuroticism on the gender difference and the finding that the gender difference in nightmare frequency emerges at an age of about 10 years suggest that gender-specific socialization processes may play an important role in explaining the gender differences in nightmare frequency in adolescents and young to middle-aged adults. This idea is supported by the previous finding that nightmare frequency is related to sex role orientation. However, longitudinal studies are necessary to validate these hypotheses.

  13. Shared selective pressure and local genomic landscape lead to repeatable patterns of genomic divergence in sunflowers.

    PubMed

    Renaut, Sebastien; Owens, Gregory L; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2014-02-01

    The repeated evolution of traits in organisms facing similar environmental conditions is considered to be fundamental evidence for the role of natural selection in moulding phenotypes. Yet, aside from case studies of parallel evolution and its genetic basis, the repeatability of evolution at the level of the whole genome remains poorly characterized. Here, through the use of transcriptome sequencing, we examined genomic divergence for three pairs of sister species of sunflowers. Two of the pairs (Helianthus petiolaris - H. debilis and H. annuus - H. argophyllus) have diverged along a similar latitudinal gradient and presumably experienced similar selective pressure. In contrast, a third species pair (H. exilis - H. bolanderi) diverged along a longitudinal gradient. Analyses of divergence, as measured in terms of FST, indicated little repeatability across the three pairs of species for individual genetic markers (SNPs), modest repeatability at the level of individual genes and the highest repeatability when large regions of the genome were compared. As expected, higher repeatability was observed for the two species pairs that have diverged along a similar latitudinal gradient, with genes involved in flowering time among the most divergent genes. Genes showing extreme low or high differentiation were more similar than genes showing medium levels of divergence, implying that both purifying and divergent selection contributed to repeatable patterns of divergence. The location of a gene along the chromosome also predicted divergence levels, presumably because of shared heterogeneity in both recombination and mutation rates. In conclusion, repeated genome evolution appeared to result from both similar selective pressures and shared local genomic landscapes.

  14. Mechanical Alterations Associated with Repeated Treadmill Sprinting under Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Brocherie, Franck; Morin, Jean-Benoit; Racinais, Sébastien; Millet, Grégoire P.; Périard, Julien D.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Examine the mechanical alterations associated with repeated treadmill sprinting performed in HOT (38°C) and CON (25°C) conditions. Methods Eleven recreationally active males performed a 30-min warm-up followed by three sets of five 5-s sprints with 25-s recovery and 3-min between sets in each environment. Constant-velocity running for 1-min at 10 and 20 km.h-1 was also performed prior to and following sprinting. Results Mean skin (37.2±0.7 vs. 32.7±0.8°C; P<0.001) and core (38.9±0.2 vs. 38.8±0.3°C; P<0.05) temperatures, together with thermal comfort (P<0.001) were higher following repeated sprinting in HOT vs. CON. Step frequency and vertical stiffness were lower (-2.6±1.6% and -5.5±5.5%; both P<0.001) and contact time (+3.2±2.4%; P<0.01) higher in HOT for the mean of sets 1–3 compared to CON. Running distance per sprint decreased from set 1 to 3 (-7.0±6.4%; P<0.001), with a tendency for shorter distance covered in HOT vs. CON (-2.7±3.4%; P = 0.06). Mean vertical (-2.6±5.5%; P<0.01), horizontal (-9.1±4.4%; P<0.001) and resultant ground reaction forces (-3.0±2.8%; P<0.01) along with vertical stiffness (-12.9±2.3%; P<0.001) and leg stiffness (-8.4±2.7%; P<0.01) decreased from set 1 to 3, independently of conditions. Propulsive power decreased from set 1 to 3 (-16.9±2.4%; P<0.001), with lower propulsive power values in set 2 (-6.6%; P<0.05) in HOT vs. CON. No changes in constant-velocity running patterns occurred between conditions, or from pre-to-post repeated-sprint exercise. Conclusions Thermal strain alters step frequency and vertical stiffness during repeated sprinting; however without exacerbating mechanical alterations. The absence of changes in constant-velocity running patterns suggests a strong link between fatigue-induced velocity decrements during sprinting and mechanical alterations. PMID:28146582

  15. Medium modifications with recoil polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, J.F.J. van den; Ent, R.

    1994-04-01

    The authors show that the virtual Compton scattering process allows for a precise study of the off-shell electron-nucleon vertex. In a separable model, they show the sensitivity to new unconstrained structure functions of the nucleon, beyond the usual Dirac and Pauli form factors. In addition, they show the sensitivity to bound nucleon form factors using the reaction 4He({rvec e},e{prime},{rvec p}){sup 3}H. A nucleon embedded in a nucleus represents a complex system. Firstly, the bound nucleon is necessarily off-shell and in principle a complete understanding of the dynamical structure of the nucleon is required in order to calculate its off-shell electromagnetic interaction. Secondly, one faces the possibility of genuine medium effects, such as for example quark-exchange contributions. Furthermore, the electromagnetic coupling to the bound nucleon is dependent on the nuclear dynamics through the self-energy of the nucleon in the nuclear medium.

  16. Medium Modification of Vector Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Chaden Djalali, Michael Paolone, Dennis Weygand, Michael H. Wood, Rakhsha Nasseripour

    2011-03-01

    The theory of the strong interaction, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), has been remarkably successful in describing high-energy and short-distance-scale experiments involving quarks and gluons. However, applying QCD to low energy and large-distance scale experiments has been a major challenge. Various QCD-inspired models predict a partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclear matter with modifications of the properties of hadrons from their free-space values. Measurable changes such as a shift in mass and/or a change of width are predicted at normal nuclear density. Photoproduction of vector mesons off nuclei have been performed at different laboratories. The properties of the ρ, ω and φ mesons are investigated either directly by measuring their mass spectra or indirectly through transparency ratios. The latest results regarding medium modifications of the vector mesons in the nuclear medium will be discussed.

  17. Measurement of soil water content with dielectric dispersion frequency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) is an inexpensive and attractive methodology for repeated measurements of soil water content (SWC). Although there are some known measurement limitations for dry soil and sand, a fixed-frequency method is commonly employed using commercially available FDR probes....

  18. Role of memory errors in quantum repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, L.; Kraus, B.; Briegel, H.-J.; Dür, W.

    2007-03-01

    We investigate the influence of memory errors in the quantum repeater scheme for long-range quantum communication. We show that the communication distance is limited in standard operation mode due to memory errors resulting from unavoidable waiting times for classical signals. We show how to overcome these limitations by (i) improving local memory and (ii) introducing two operational modes of the quantum repeater. In both operational modes, the repeater is run blindly, i.e., without waiting for classical signals to arrive. In the first scheme, entanglement purification protocols based on one-way classical communication are used allowing to communicate over arbitrary distances. However, the error thresholds for noise in local control operations are very stringent. The second scheme makes use of entanglement purification protocols with two-way classical communication and inherits the favorable error thresholds of the repeater run in standard mode. One can increase the possible communication distance by an order of magnitude with reasonable overhead in physical resources. We outline the architecture of a quantum repeater that can possibly ensure intercontinental quantum communication.

  19. Spectrin repeat proteins in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Young, Kevin G; Kothary, Rashmi

    2005-02-01

    Spectrin repeat sequences are among the more common repeat elements identified in proteins, typically occurring in large structural proteins. Examples of spectrin repeat-containing proteins include dystrophin, alpha-actinin and spectrin itself--all proteins with well-demonstrated roles of establishing and maintaining cell structure. Over the past decade, it has become clear that, although these proteins display a cytoplasmic and plasma membrane distribution, several are also found both at the nuclear envelope, and within the intranuclear space. In this review, we provide an overview of recent work regarding various spectrin repeat-containing structural proteins in the nucleus. As well, we hypothesize about the regulation of their nuclear localization and possible nuclear functions based on domain architecture, known interacting proteins and evolutionary relationships. Given their large size, and their potential for interacting with multiple proteins and with chromatin, spectrin repeat-containing proteins represent strong candidates for important organizational proteins within the nucleus. Supplementary material for this article can be found on the BioEssays website (http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0265-9247/suppmat/index.html).

  20. The word frequency effect during sentence reading: A linear or nonlinear effect of log frequency?

    PubMed

    White, Sarah J; Drieghe, Denis; Liversedge, Simon P; Staub, Adrian

    2016-10-20

    The effect of word frequency on eye movement behaviour during reading has been reported in many experimental studies. However, the vast majority of these studies compared only two levels of word frequency (high and low). Here we assess whether the effect of log word frequency on eye movement measures is linear, in an experiment in which a critical target word in each sentence was at one of three approximately equally spaced log frequency levels. Separate analyses treated log frequency as a categorical or a continuous predictor. Both analyses showed only a linear effect of log frequency on the likelihood of skipping a word, and on first fixation duration. Ex-Gaussian analyses of first fixation duration showed similar effects on distributional parameters in comparing high- and medium-frequency words, and medium- and low-frequency words. Analyses of gaze duration and the probability of a refixation suggested a nonlinear pattern, with a larger effect at the lower end of the log frequency scale. However, the nonlinear effects were small, and Bayes Factor analyses favoured the simpler linear models for all measures. The possible roles of lexical and post-lexical factors in producing nonlinear effects of log word frequency during sentence reading are discussed.

  1. Quantum Cascade Laser Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faist, Jérôme; Villares, Gustavo; Scalari, Giacomo; Rösch, Markus; Bonzon, Christopher; Hugi, Andreas; Beck, Mattias

    2016-06-01

    It was recently demonstrated that broadband quantum cascade lasers can operate as frequency combs. As such, they operate under direct electrical pumping at both mid-infrared and THz frequencies, making them very attractive for dual-comb spectroscopy. Performance levels are continuously improving, with average powers over 100mW and frequency coverage of 100 cm-1 in the mid-infrared region. In the THz range, 10mW of average power and 600 GHz of frequency coverage are reported. As a result of the very short upper state lifetime of the gain medium, the mode proliferation in these sources arises from four-wave mixing rather than saturable absorption. As a result, their optical output is characterized by the tendency of small intensity modulation of the output power, and the relative phases of the modes to be similar to the ones of a frequency modulated laser. Recent results include the proof of comb operation down to a metrological level, the observation of a Schawlow-Townes broadened linewidth, as well as the first dual-comb spectroscopy measurements. The capability of the structure to integrate monothically nonlinear optical elements as well as to operate as a detector shows great promise for future chip integration of dual-comb systems.

  2. Rate analysis for a hybrid quantum repeater

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardes, Nadja K.; Loock, Peter van

    2011-01-15

    We present a detailed rate analysis for a hybrid quantum repeater assuming perfect memories and using optimal probabilistic entanglement generation and deterministic swapping routines. The hybrid quantum repeater protocol is based on atomic qubit-entanglement distribution through optical coherent-state communication. An exact, analytical formula for the rates of entanglement generation in quantum repeaters is derived, including a study on the impacts of entanglement purification and multiplexing strategies. More specifically, we consider scenarios with as little purification as possible and we show that for sufficiently low local losses, such purifications are still more powerful than multiplexing. In a possible experimental scenario, our hybrid system can create near-maximally entangled (F=0.98) pairs over a distance of 1280 km at rates of the order of 100 Hz.

  3. Hematuria home screening: repeat testing results.

    PubMed

    Messing, E M; Young, T B; Hunt, V B; Newton, M A; Bram, L L; Vaillancourt, A; Hisgen, W J; Greenberg, E B; Kuglitsch, M E; Wegenke, J D

    1995-07-01

    To determine at what interval screening should be repeated to detect bladder cancer before it becomes muscle invasive 856 men who had 14 negative daily home tests for hematuria with a chemical reagent strip 9 months previously performed repeat tests. Of these men 50 (5.8%) had at least 1 positive test during the second 14-day screening period and 38 were evaluated, 15 of whom (39.5%) had significant urological pathological conditions, including 8 with malignancies. Bladder cancer was noted in 7 men, with no tumor invading the muscularis propria. The finding of 7 bladder cancers in 856 men (0.82%) who had a negative test 9 months previously indicates that bladder cancer has a brief preclinical duration and that testing must be repeated at least annually for screening to detect bladder cancer consistently before invasion occurs.

  4. Do gamma-ray burst sources repeat?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald; Blumenthal, George; Brock, Martin

    1995-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports (Quashnock and Lamb, 1993; Wang and Lingenfelter, 1993) of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al., 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic and the two-point angular correlation function. We find the data to be consistent with the hypothesis that burst sources do not repeat; however, a repeater fraction of up to about 20% of the observed bursts cannot be excluded.

  5. Large Torque Variations in Two Soft Gamma Repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Peter M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Gogus, Ersin; Finger, Mark H.; Swank, Jean; Markwardt, Craig B.; Hurley, Kevin; vanderKlis, Michiel; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have monitored the pulse frequencies of the two soft gamma repeaters SGR 1806-20 and SGR 1900+14 through the beginning of year 2001 using primarily Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array observations. In both sources, we observe large changes in the spin-down torque up to a factor of approximately 4, which persist for several months. Using long baseline phase-connected timing solutions as well as the overall frequency histories, we construct torque noise power spectra for each SGR. The power spectrum of each source is very red (power-law slope approximately -3.5). These power spectra are consistent in normalization with some accreting systems, yet much steeper in slope than any known accreting source. To the best of our knowledge, torque noise power spectra with a comparably steep frequency dependence have only been seen in young, glitching radio pulsars (e.g. Vela). The observed changes in spin-down rate do not correlate with burst activity, therefore, the physical mechanisms behind each phenomenon are also likely unrelated. Within the context of the magnetar model, seismic activity cannot account for both the bursts and the long-term torque changes unless the seismically active regions are decoupled from one another.

  6. Repeated bout effect is absent in resistance trained men

    PubMed Central

    Falvo, Michael J.; Schilling, Brian K.; Bloomer, Richard J.; Smith, Webb A.

    2009-01-01

    A prior bout of exercise is well known to confer protection from subsequent eccentric bouts (i.e. repeated bout effect; RBE), which may be fostered through neural adaptations, specifically a shift in the frequency content of the surface electromyogram (EMG). It is currently not clear whether chronically resistance trained men are capable of a RBE driven by neural adaptations. Eleven resistance trained men (23.5 ± 3.4 yrs) performed 100 eccentric actions of the barbell bench press exercise, followed by an equivalent bout 14 days later. Indirect markers of muscle damage (i.e. force production, soreness) along with surface EMG were measured before and through 48 h of recovery. Median frequency and maximal isometric force demonstrated time main effects (p > 0.05), but no RBE. A prior bout of eccentric exercise does not confer a RBE for indirect markers of muscle injury or elicit changes in the frequency content of the EMG signal in resistance trained men. PMID:19059793

  7. Formation of the Arabidopsis pentatricopeptide repeat family.

    PubMed

    Rivals, Eric; Bruyère, Clémence; Toffano-Nioche, Claire; Lecharny, Alain

    2006-07-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) the 466 pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are putative RNA-binding proteins with essential roles in organelles. Roughly half of the PPR proteins form the plant combinatorial and modular protein (PCMP) subfamily, which is land-plant specific. PCMPs exhibit a large and variable tandem repeat of a standard pattern of three PPR variant motifs. The association or not of this repeat with three non-PPR motifs at their C terminus defines four distinct classes of PCMPs. The highly structured arrangement of these motifs and the similar repartition of these arrangements in the four classes suggest precise relationships between motif organization and substrate specificity. This study is an attempt to reconstruct an evolutionary scenario of the PCMP family. We developed an innovative approach based on comparisons of the proteins at two levels: namely the succession of motifs along the protein and the amino acid sequence of the motifs. It enabled us to infer evolutionary relationships between proteins as well as between the inter- and intraprotein repeats. First, we observed a polarized elongation of the repeat from the C terminus toward the N-terminal region, suggesting local recombinations of motifs. Second, the most N-terminal PPR triple motif proved to evolve under different constraints than the remaining repeat. Altogether, the evidence indicates different evolution for the PPR region and the C-terminal one in PCMPs, which points to distinct functions for these regions. Moreover, local sequence homogeneity observed across PCMP classes may be due to interclass shuffling of motifs, or to deletions/insertions of non-PPR motifs at the C terminus.

  8. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Aubuchon, Adam C.; Chan, Michael D.; Lovato, James F.; Balamucki, Christopher J.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80-90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60-90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  9. The puzzle of the triple repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Morell, V.

    1993-06-04

    Two years ago, when researchers discovered the gene that causes a hereditary form of mental retardation known as fragile-X syndrome, they also turned up a mutation so unexpected geneticists are still scratching their heads over it. The defect, which makes genes balloon in size by adding extra copies of a three base-pair repeated sequence of DNA, was the first of its kind. Despite decades of study, nothing like it had ever been seen in any of the species that laid the foundations for modern genetics: bacteria, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, and the mouse. The mutations caused by these expanding trinucleotide repeats turned out be common causes of human disease. In the past 2 years, they have been fingered as the culprits in three hereditary disorders besides fragile-X syndrome: myotronic dystrophy, spinobullar muscular atrophy (also known as Kennedy's disease), and just this March-Huntington's disease. The FMR-1 gene, which is the one at fault in fragile-X syndrome, shows just how much the trinucleotide repeats can expand. The normal gene carries at most 50 copies of the CGG trinucleotide. But in children who inherit the gene from these carriers and actually develop mental retardation and the other fragile-X symptoms, the FMR-1 gene may have hundreds to thousands of CGG repeats. Huge expansions of another trinucleotide repeat (CTG) can also occur from one generation to the next in the gene that causes myotonic dystrophy (DM), while smaller, although no less devastating, expansions in the CAG trinucleotide repeat lead to Huntington's and Kennedy's diseases.

  10. Safety of Repeated Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Louie, John D.; Iagaru, Andrei H.; Goris, Michael L.; Sze, Daniel Y.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Repeated radioembolization (RE) treatments carry theoretically higher risk of radiation-induced hepatic injury because of the liver's cumulative memory of previous exposure. We performed a retrospective safety analysis on patients who underwent repeated RE. Methods: From 2004 to 2011, a total of 247 patients were treated by RE. Eight patients (5 men, 3 women, age range 51-71 years) underwent repeated treatment of a targeted territory, all with resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres; Sirtex, Lane Cove, Australia). Adverse events were graded during a standardized follow-up. In addition, the correlation between the occurrence of RE-induced liver disease (REILD) and multiple variables was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses in all 247 patients who received RE. Results: Two patients died shortly after the second treatment (at 84 and 107 days) with signs and symptoms of REILD. Both patients underwent whole liver treatment twice (cumulative doses 3.08 and 2.66 GBq). The other 6 patients demonstrated only minor toxicities after receiving cumulative doses ranging from 2.41 to 3.88 GBq. All patients experienced objective tumor responses. In the whole population, multifactorial analysis identified three risk factors associated with REILD: repeated RE (p = 0.036), baseline serum total bilirubin (p = 0.048), and baseline serum aspartate aminotransferase (p = 0.043). Repeated RE proved to be the only independent risk factor for REILD in multivariate analysis (odds ratio 9.6; p = 0.002). Additionally, the administered activity per target volume (in GBq/L) was found to be an independent risk factor for REILD, but only in whole liver treatments (p = 0.033). Conclusion: The risk of REILD appears to be elevated for repeated RE. Objective tumor responses were observed, but establishment of safety limits will require improvement in dosimetric measurement and prediction.

  11. Epigenetic Repeat-Induced Gene Silencing in the Chromosomal and Extrachromosomal Contexts in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuda, Sho-hei; Shimizu, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    A plasmid bearing both a replication initiation region and a matrix attachment region is spontaneously amplified in transfected mammalian cells and generates plasmid repeats in the extrachromosomal double minutes (DMs) or the chromosomal homogeneously staining region (HSR). Generally, the repeat sequences are subject to repeat-induced gene silencing, the mechanism of which remains to be elucidated. Previous research showed that gene expression from the same plasmid repeat was higher from repeats located at DMs than at the HSR, which may reflect the extrachromosomal environment of the DMs. In the current study, plasmid repeats in both DMs and HSR were associated with repressive histone modifications (H3K9me3, H3K9me2), and the levels of repressive chromatin markers were higher in HSR than in DMs. Inactive chromatin is known to spread to neighboring regions in chromosome arm. Here, we found that such spreading also occurs in extrachromosomal DMs. Higher levels of active histone modifications (H3K9Ac, H3K4me3, and H3K79me2) were detected at plasmid repeats in DMs than in HSR. The level of DNA CpG methylation was generally low in both DMs and HSR; however, there were some hypermethylated copies within the population of repeated sequences, and the frequency of such copies was higher in DMs than in HSR. Together, these data suggest a “DNA methylation-core and chromatin-spread” model for repeat-induced gene silencing. The unique histone modifications at the extrachromosomal context are discussed with regard to the model. PMID:27525955

  12. Surface NMR measurement of proton relaxation times in medium to coarse-grained sand aquifer.

    PubMed

    Shushakov, O A

    1996-01-01

    A surface NMR investigation of groundwater in the geomagnetic field is under study. To detect the surface NMR a wire loop with a diameter of about 100 m, being an antenna for both an exciting field source and the NMR signal receiver, is laid out on the ground. A sinusoidal current pulse with a rectangular envelope is passed through the loop to excite the NMR signal. The carrier frequency of the oscillating current in this pulse is equal to the Larmor frequency of protons in the Earth's magnetic field. The current amplitude is changed up to 200 amps and the pulse duration is fixed and is equal to 40 ms. The exciting pulse is followed by an induction emf signal caused by the Larmor nuclear precession in geomagnetic field. The relaxation times T1, T2, and T2* were measured by the surface NMR for both groundwater in medium to coarse-grained sand at borehole and for bulk water under the ice surface of frozen lake. To determine T1, a longitudinal interference in experiments with repeated pulses was measured. A sequence with equal period between equal excitation pulses was used. The relaxation times T1, T2, measured for bulk water under the ice of the Ob reservoir were 1.0 s and 0.7 s, respectively. To estimate an influence of dissolved oxygen T1 of the same water at the same temperature was measured by lab NMR with and without pumping of oxygen. The relaxation time T1 measured for water in the medium to coarse-grained sand is 0.65 s. The relaxation time T2 estimated by spin echo sequence is found to be equal to 0.15 s. The relaxation time T2* is found to be about 80 ms. This result contradicts published earlier phenomenological correlation between relaxation time T2* and grain size of water-bearing rock. This could be as a result of unsound approach based on grain size or influence of paramagnetic impurities.

  13. Therapeutics development for triplet repeat expansion diseases.

    PubMed

    Di Prospero, Nicholas A; Fischbeck, Kenneth H

    2005-10-01

    The underlying genetic mutations for many inherited neurodegenerative disorders have been identified in recent years. One frequent type of mutation is trinucleotide repeat expansion. Depending on the location of the repeat expansion, the mutation might result in a loss of function of the disease gene, a toxic gain of function or both. Disease gene identification has led to the development of model systems for investigating disease mechanisms and evaluating treatments. Examination of experimental findings reveals similarities in disease mechanisms as well as possibilities for treatment.

  14. Effect of Repeated Evaluation and Repeated Exposure on Acceptability Ratings of Sentences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zervakis, Jennifer; Mazuka, Reiko

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of repeated evaluation and repeated exposure on grammatical acceptability ratings for both acceptable and unacceptable sentence types. In Experiment 1, subjects in the Experimental group rated multiple examples of two ungrammatical sentence types (ungrammatical binding and double object with dative-only verb),…

  15. Frequency synchronization of blue whale calls near Pioneer Seamount.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Michael D; Garfield, Newell; Bland, Roger W

    2010-07-01

    Vocalizations of blue whales were recorded with a cabled hydrophone array at Pioneer Seamount, 50 miles off the California coast. Most calls occurred in repeated sequences of two-call pairs (A, then B). The B call is a frequency-modulated tone highly repeatable in form and pitch. A model of this sound is described which permits detecting very small frequency shifts. B calls are found to be aligned in frequency to about one part in 180. This requires very fine pitch discrimination and control over calling frequency, and suggests that synchronizing to a common frequency pattern carries some adaptive advantage. Some possibilities for acoustic sensing by whales requiring this fine frequency resolution are discussed.

  16. The effect of seed electrons on the repeatability of atmospheric pressure plasma plume propagation: I. Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, L.; Chang, L.; Xian, Y.; Lu, X.

    2016-09-01

    One of the significant differences between the traditional streamers and the plasma jets is the repeatability of their propagation. In this paper, the effect of the seed electron density on the repeatability of the plasma jets is investigated. The seed electron density plays an essential role in the propagation of plasma plume which is in either repeatable mode or random mode depending on the frequency of the applied voltage and the mixture percentage of the working gas. By measuring the propagation velocities and the ignition delay time, it is found that the propagation velocities of the plasma plume are independent of the seed electron density. However, the jitter of the ignition delay time strongly depends on the frequency of the applied voltage and the mixture percentage of the working gas. After detailed analyzing of the experiment results, it is concluded that the minimum seed electron density required for the plasma bullet to propagate in repeatable mode is on the order of 108 cm-3 for gas pressure of 2 × 104 Pa. The minimum required seed electron density for the gas pressure of 4 × 103 Pa is on the order of 107 cm-3. Further analysis shows that, at one atmospheric pressure, the required minimum seed electron density for repeatable mode is on the order of 109 cm-3.

  17. Relationship between brief and prolonged repeated sprint ability.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Jonathan L; Armstrong, Neil; Williams, Craig A

    2009-01-01

    Repeated sprint ability (RSA) is often assessed over a brief time period with limited recovery between sprints; however, it is not known how performance in such tests is related to the ability to perform repeated sprints over a more prolonged duration. Eighteen boys aged 15.3+/-0.5 years completed both a brief and prolonged RSA test on a non-motorised treadmill. The brief RSA test consisted of seven 5s sprints with 20s of recovery between sprints and the prolonged RSA test lasted for 42min and included a 5s sprint every 2min. There was a moderate but significant relationship between the mean speed in both tests (r=0.51, p<0.05). The maximal speed achieved in a single sprint provided strong relationships with both brief RSA speed (r> or =0.72, p<0.001) and prolonged RSA speed (r> or =0.77, p<0.001). Total work done during the brief protocol was significantly correlated to both total work (r=0.81, p<0.001) and total sprint distance (r=0.79, p<0.001) during the prolonged test. There were no significant relationships between percentage decrement scores across the two protocols (r< or =0.33, p>0.05). Maximal speed in a single sprint and total work done during repeated sprints represent general qualities related to RSA that are independent of the test protocol. The mean speed and decrements in performance represent specific RSA qualities, which are dependent on the frequency of sprints and duration of the test protocol.

  18. Preferred frequencies for SETI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerman, B.

    1983-10-01

    The proper radio bands for observing and transmitting signals to and from other star systems in a search for extraterrestrial intelligence. It is assumed that other civilizations will have developed the energies and other resources of their solar systems, and that they will use electromagnetic radiation as a communications medium. The sizes of the space based antennas that other civilizations might have built are discussed in terms of the resulting interferometers, the possible wavelengths used, and the technological bases assumed. It is suggested that transmissions might be most effective if confined to a few microns bandwidth to which the galaxy is largely transparent. However, no universal, 'magic' frequency can presently be identified, although nondirectional emissions may congregate around the 'water hole' of radio frequencies in the universe.

  19. Relationship between the transition frequency of local fluid flow and the peak frequency of attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Cheng-Hao; Zhang, Hong-Bing; Pan, Yi-Xin; Teng, Xin-Bao

    2016-03-01

    Local fluid flow (LFF) at the mesoscopic scale is the main dissipation mechanism of seismic waves in heterogeneous porous media within the seismic frequency band. LFF is easily influenced by the structure and boundary conditions of the porous media, which leads to different behaviors of the peak frequency of attenuation. The associated transition frequency can provide detailed information about the trend of LFF; therefore, research on the transition frequency of LFF and its relationship with the peak frequency of the corresponding attenuation (i.e., inverse of quality factor) facilitates the detailed understanding of the effect of inner structures and boundary conditions in porous media. In this study, we firstly obtain the transition frequency of fluid flux based on Biot's theory of poroelasticity and the fast Fourier transform algorithm in a sample containing one repeating unit cell (RUC). We then analyze changes of these two frequencies in porous media with different porous properties. Finally, we extend our analysis to the influence of the undrained boundary condition on the transition frequency and peak frequency in porous media with multiple RUCs. This setup can facilitate the understanding of the effect from the undrained boundary condition. Results demonstrate that these two frequencies have the same trend at low water saturation, but amplitude variations differ between the frequencies as the amount of saturation increases. However, for cases of high water saturation, both the trend and the amplitude variation of these two frequencies fit well with each other.

  20. AGG interspersions within the FMR1 CGG repeat: Mechanisms and models of triplet repeat instability

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, E.E.; Nelson, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome CGG repeat alleles are typically classified as normal, premutation, or full mutation based on the length of the repeat in the 5{prime} UTR of the FMR1 gene. The distinction between high-end normals and low-end premutation alleles, however, is not always clear since repeats of similar size differ markedly in their intergenerational stability. This fact suggest that differences in sequence content may play a key role in determining an allele`s predisposition to instability. It has been postulated that the loss of AGG interruptions within the CGG tract may trigger this instability. To test this model, we have developed a simple indirect method to determine the presence or absence of internal AGGs within the FMR1 CGG repeat tract. Analysis of 84 human X chromosomes for the presence of interrupting AGG trinucleotides revealed that most alleles possess two interspersed AGGs at a periodicity of 9 or 10 CGGs. The longest tract of uninterrupted CGG repeats is usually found at the 3{prime} end indicating that variation in the length of the repeat is polar. Alleles containing between 34 and 55 repeats, with documented unstable transmissions, were shown to have lost one or both AGG interruptions when compared to stable alleles of similar length. These comparisons define an instability threshold between 34 and 38 uninterrupted CGG repeats. Analysis of premutation alleles in fragile X syndrome carriers reveals that 70% of these alleles contain a single AGG interruption. Population studies confirm that such highly punctuated FMR1 CGG repeats are virtually static in terms of length variation. These data suggest that the loss of an AGG is an important mutational event in the generation of unstable alleles predisposed to the fragile X syndrome. Loss of AGG trinucleotides and polarized variability support Okazaki fragment slippage as a model for CGG repeat instability and hyperexpansion.

  1. Structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins show propagation of inter-repeat interface effects

    PubMed Central

    Reichen, Christian; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Hansen, Simon; Grütter, Markus G.; Plückthun, Andreas; Mittl, Peer R. E.

    2016-01-01

    The armadillo repeat serves as a scaffold for the development of modular peptide-recognition modules. In order to develop such a system, three crystal structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins with third-generation N-caps (YIII-type), four or five internal repeats (M-type) and second-generation C-caps (AII-type) were determined at 1.8 Å (His-YIIIM4AII), 2.0 Å (His-YIIIM5AII) and 1.95 Å (YIIIM5AII) resolution and compared with those of variants with third-generation C-caps. All constructs are full consensus designs in which the internal repeats have exactly the same sequence, and hence identical conformations of the internal repeats are expected. The N-cap and internal repeats M1 to M3 are indeed extremely similar, but the comparison reveals structural differences in internal repeats M4 and M5 and the C-cap. These differences are caused by long-range effects of the C-cap, contacting molecules in the crystal, and the intrinsic design of the repeat. Unfortunately, the rigid-body movement of the C-terminal part impairs the regular arrangement of internal repeats that forms the putative peptide-binding site. The second-generation C-cap improves the packing of buried residues and thereby the stability of the protein. These considerations are useful for future improvements of an armadillo-repeat-based peptide-recognition system. PMID:26894544

  2. A Heterogeneous Medium Analytical Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapol, B.D.

    1999-09-27

    A benchmark, called benchmark BLUE, has been developed for one-group neutral particle (neutron or photon) transport in a one-dimensional sub-critical heterogeneous plane parallel medium with surface illumination. General anisotropic scattering is accommodated through the Green's Function Method (GFM). Numerical Fourier transform inversion is used to generate the required Green's functions which are kernels to coupled integral equations that give the exiting angular fluxes. The interior scalar flux is then obtained through quadrature. A compound iterative procedure for quadrature order and slab surface source convergence provides highly accurate benchmark qualities (4- to 5- places of accuracy) results.

  3. Medium Effects in Parton Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Huey-Wen Lin

    2011-12-01

    A defining experiment of high-energy physics in the 1980s was that of the EMC collaboration where it was first observed that parton distributions in nuclei are non-trivially related to those in the proton. This result implies that the presence of the nuclear medium plays an important role and an understanding of this from QCD has been an important goal ever since Here we investigate analogous, but technically simpler, effects in QCD and examine how the lowest moment of the pion parton distribution is modified by the presence of a Bose-condensed gas of pions or kaons.

  4. Precision orbit determination for the GEOSAT exact repeat mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. C.; Ries, J. C.; Shum, C. K.; Schutz, B. E.; Tapley, B. D.

    The Navy's Geodetic Satellite (GEOSAT) was launched on March 12, 1985, carrying a single-frequency microwave altimeter which measures the height of the satellite above the ocean surface to a precision of a few centimeters. The GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM), which was initiated in November of 1986, placed the spacecraft in an exact 17 day repeat orbit. The Geophysical Data Records (GDR) for the ERM are available to the scientific community. GEOSAT is tracked by the Navy's OPNET and the Defense Mapping Agency's TRANET doppler tracking systems. The GDR orbits are computed using the OPNET tracking data and have an rms radial accuracy of one to two meters. The initial eighty days of the TRANET data during the ERM were made available for the assessment of the TRANET tracking system to perform precision orbit determination for the Topex/Poseidon Mission. This data was used to compute GEOSAT orbits using an improved gravity model which has been developed as part of the Topex gravity model improvement effort. Accuracy of the orbit was evaluated using altimeter crossover data. For a continuous 17 day GEOSAT orbit, the global crossover rms is at the 35 cm level, which suggests a radial orbit accuracy also on the order of 35 cm.

  5. Triggering of repeating earthquakes in central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Chunquan; Gomberg, Joan; Ben-Naim, Eli; Johnson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic stresses carried by transient seismic waves have been found capable of triggering earthquakes instantly in various tectonic settings. Delayed triggering may be even more common, but the mechanisms are not well understood. Catalogs of repeating earthquakes, earthquakes that recur repeatedly at the same location, provide ideal data sets to test the effects of transient dynamic perturbations on the timing of earthquake occurrence. Here we employ a catalog of 165 families containing ~2500 total repeating earthquakes to test whether dynamic perturbations from local, regional, and teleseismic earthquakes change recurrence intervals. The distance to the earthquake generating the perturbing waves is a proxy for the relative potential contributions of static and dynamic deformations, because static deformations decay more rapidly with distance. Clear changes followed the nearby 2004 Mw6 Parkfield earthquake, so we study only repeaters prior to its origin time. We apply a Monte Carlo approach to compare the observed number of shortened recurrence intervals following dynamic perturbations with the distribution of this number estimated for randomized perturbation times. We examine the comparison for a series of dynamic stress peak amplitude and distance thresholds. The results suggest a weak correlation between dynamic perturbations in excess of ~20 kPa and shortened recurrence intervals, for both nearby and remote perturbations.

  6. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in women with repeated miscarriages.

    PubMed Central

    Gerhard, I; Daniel, V; Link, S; Monga, B; Runnebaum, B

    1998-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate a possible etiological role of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the pathogenesis of repeated miscarriages. The blood levels of chlorinated hydrocarbons [CHCs: pentachlorophenol, hexachlorocyclohexane, hexachlorobenzene, the dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) group, polychlorinated biphenyls] were determined in 89 women with repeated miscarriages, who were referred to the University Hospital of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Heidelberg for investigations between 1989 and 1993, and compared to a previously investigated reference population. In more than 20% of the women, at least one of the CHC levels exceeded the reference range. CHC levels did not differ significantly between women with primary or secondary and early or late miscarriages; neither did they differ between women with hormonal or immunological disorders as causes of repeated miscarriages or women with idiopathic repeated miscarriages. No significant associations were detected between CHC levels and further conceptions or the outcome of further pregnancies. As significant associations were found between increasing CHC blood concentrations and immunological and hormonal changes, CHCs may have an impact on the pregnancy course in certain cases. PMID:9755145

  7. Is Retrieval Mediated after Repeated Testing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kole, James A.; Healy, Alice F.

    2013-01-01

    In 2 main experiments, the mediated priming effect was used to determine whether retrieval continues to be mediated after repeated testing. In each experiment, participants used the keyword method to learn French vocabulary, then completed a modified lexical decision task in which they first translated a French word, and then made a lexical…

  8. Repeater For A Digital-Communication Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Guzman, Esteban; Olson, Stephen; Heaps, Tim

    1993-01-01

    Digital repeater circuit designed to extend range of communication on MIL-STD-1553 bus beyond original maximum allowable length of 300 ft. Circuit provides two-way communication, one way at time, and conforms to specifications of MIL-STD-1553. Crosstalk and instability eliminated.

  9. Rectourethral fistula after repeat transrectal prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Loran, Oleg B; Veliev, Evgeny I; Sokolov, Egor A; Dadashev, Elmar O; Guspanov, Renat I

    2013-09-01

    Transrectal prostate biopsy is considered a relatively safe procedure, with a quite small number of complications. We report a patient with a rectourethral fistula after a repeat transrectal prostate biopsy. To our knowledge, this is the first incident in the published literature.

  10. Repeated Random Sampling in Year 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jane M.; English, Lyn D.

    2016-01-01

    As an extension to an activity introducing Year 5 students to the practice of statistics, the software "TinkerPlots" made it possible to collect repeated random samples from a finite population to informally explore students' capacity to begin reasoning with a distribution of sample statistics. This article provides background for the…

  11. [Preventive maintenance of repeated ischemic insults].

    PubMed

    Gavrilenko, A V; Kuklin, A V; Kravchenko, A A; Agafonov, I N

    2008-01-01

    In the review we offer analysis of the effectiveness of carotid endarterectomy in treatment of post-functional apoplexy or stroke patients. Published results of the researches specify possible efficiency of carotid endarterectomy in preventive maintenance against repeated apoplectic attack or strokes. Yet the criteria of usage and execution of the carotid endarterectomy are still to be discussed.

  12. Epigenetics and Triplet-Repeat Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nageshwaran, Sathiji; Festenstein, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The term “junk DNA” has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterochromatinized resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions frequently exist as dinucleotide, trinucleotide, and tetranucleotide repeats. The association between repetitive regions and disease was emphasized following the discovery of abnormal trinucleotide repeats underlying spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy’s disease) and fragile X syndrome of mental retardation (FRAXA) in 1991. In this review, we provide a brief overview of epigenetic mechanisms and then focus on several diseases caused by DNA triplet-repeat expansions, which exhibit diverse epigenetic effects. It is clear that the emerging field of epigenetics is already generating novel potential therapeutic avenues for this group of largely incurable diseases. PMID:26733936

  13. Testing Multiple Outcomes in Repeated Measures Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lix, Lisa M.; Sajobi, Tolulope

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates procedures for controlling the familywise error rate (FWR) when testing hypotheses about multiple, correlated outcome variables in repeated measures (RM) designs. A content analysis of RM research articles published in 4 psychology journals revealed that 3 quarters of studies tested hypotheses about 2 or more outcome…

  14. Y Se Repite = And It Repeats Itself

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzew, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses Y Se Repite [And It Repeats Itself], a project she conceptualized due to the growing number of Latino/a Mexican migrant workers in dairy farms in the state of Vermont. In 2006, approximately 2,000 Latinos/as--most of them undocumented Mexican migrant workers--worked throughout the state's dairy farms, yet…

  15. Longer-baseline telescopes using quantum repeaters.

    PubMed

    Gottesman, Daniel; Jennewein, Thomas; Croke, Sarah

    2012-08-17

    We present an approach to building interferometric telescopes using ideas of quantum information. Current optical interferometers have limited baseline lengths, and thus limited resolution, because of noise and loss of signal due to the transmission of photons between the telescopes. The technology of quantum repeaters has the potential to eliminate this limit, allowing in principle interferometers with arbitrarily long baselines.

  16. The Effect of Repeaters on Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, HeeKyoung; Kolen, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Test equating might be affected by including in the equating analyses examinees who have taken the test previously. This study evaluated the effect of including such repeaters on Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) equating using a population invariance approach. Three-parameter logistic (3-PL) item response theory (IRT) true score and…

  17. Repeated sprint training in normobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Galvin, Harvey M; Cooke, Karl; Sumners, David P; Mileva, Katya N; Bowtell, Joanna L

    2013-12-01

    Repeated sprint ability (RSA) is a critical success factor for intermittent sport performance. Repeated sprint training has been shown to improve RSA, we hypothesised that hypoxia would augment these training adaptations. Thirty male well-trained academy rugby union and rugby league players (18.4 ± 1.5 years, 1.83 ± 0.07 m, 88.1 ± 8.9 kg) participated in this single-blind repeated sprint training study. Participants completed 12 sessions of repeated sprint training (10 × 6 s, 30 s recovery) over 4 weeks in either hypoxia (13% FiO₂) or normoxia (21% FiO₂). Pretraining and post-training, participants completed sports specific endurance and sprint field tests and a 10 × 6 s RSA test on a non-motorised treadmill while measuring speed, heart rate, capillary blood lactate, muscle and cerebral deoxygenation and respiratory measures. Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 test performance improved after RS training in both groups, but gains were significantly greater in the hypoxic (33 ± 12%) than the normoxic group (14 ± 10%, p<0.05). During the 10 × 6 s RS test there was a tendency for greater increases in oxygen consumption in the hypoxic group (hypoxic 6.9 ± 9%, normoxic (-0.3 ± 8.8%, p=0.06) and reductions in cerebral deoxygenation (% changes for both groups, p=0.09) after hypoxic than normoxic training. Twelve RS training sessions in hypoxia resulted in twofold greater improvements in capacity to perform repeated aerobic high intensity workout than an equivalent normoxic training. Performance gains are evident in the short term (4 weeks), a period similar to a preseason training block.

  18. Repeated sprint training in normobaric hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, Harvey M; Cooke, Karl; Sumners, David P; Mileva, Katya N; Bowtell, Joanna L

    2013-01-01

    Repeated sprint ability (RSA) is a critical success factor for intermittent sport performance. Repeated sprint training has been shown to improve RSA, we hypothesised that hypoxia would augment these training adaptations. Thirty male well-trained academy rugby union and rugby league players (18.4±1.5 years, 1.83±0.07 m, 88.1±8.9 kg) participated in this single-blind repeated sprint training study. Participants completed 12 sessions of repeated sprint training (10×6 s, 30 s recovery) over 4 weeks in either hypoxia (13% FiO2) or normoxia (21% FiO2). Pretraining and post-training, participants completed sports specific endurance and sprint field tests and a 10×6 s RSA test on a non-motorised treadmill while measuring speed, heart rate, capillary blood lactate, muscle and cerebral deoxygenation and respiratory measures. Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 test performance improved after RS training in both groups, but gains were significantly greater in the hypoxic (33±12%) than the normoxic group (14±10%, p<0.05). During the 10×6 s RS test there was a tendency for greater increases in oxygen consumption in the hypoxic group (hypoxic 6.9±9%, normoxic (−0.3±8.8%, p=0.06) and reductions in cerebral deoxygenation (% changes for both groups, p=0.09) after hypoxic than normoxic training. Twelve RS training sessions in hypoxia resulted in twofold greater improvements in capacity to perform repeated aerobic high intensity workout than an equivalent normoxic training. Performance gains are evident in the short term (4 weeks), a period similar to a preseason training block. PMID:24282212

  19. Wave propagation in a strongly heterogeneous elastic porous medium: Homogenization of Biot medium with double porosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohan, Eduard; Naili, Salah; Nguyen, Vu-Hieu

    2016-08-01

    We study wave propagation in an elastic porous medium saturated with a compressible Newtonian fluid. The porous network is interconnected whereby the pores are characterized by two very different characteristic sizes. At the mesoscopic scale, the medium is described using the Biot model, characterized by a high contrast in the hydraulic permeability and anisotropic elasticity, whereas the contrast in the Biot coupling coefficient is only moderate. Fluid motion is governed by the Darcy flow model extended by inertia terms and by the mass conservation equation. The homogenization method based on the asymptotic analysis is used to obtain a macroscopic model. To respect the high contrast in the material properties, they are scaled by the small parameter, which is involved in the asymptotic analysis and characterized by the size of the heterogeneities. Using the estimates of wavelengths in the double-porosity networks, it is shown that the macroscopic descriptions depend on the contrast in the static permeability associated with pores and micropores and on the frequency. Moreover, the microflow in the double porosity is responsible for fading memory effects via the macroscopic poroviscoelastic constitutive law. xml:lang="fr"

  20. How Does the Medium Affect the Message?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dommermuth, William P.

    1974-01-01

    This experimental comparison of the advertising effectiveness of television, movies, radio, and print finds no support for McLuhan's idea that television is a "cool" medium and movies are a "hot" medium. (RB)

  1. RepeatsDB 2.0: improved annotation, classification, search and visualization of repeat protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Paladin, Lisanna; Hirsh, Layla; Piovesan, Damiano; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Kajava, Andrey V.; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.

    2017-01-01

    RepeatsDB 2.0 (URL: http://repeatsdb.bio.unipd.it/) is an update of the database of annotated tandem repeat protein structures. Repeat proteins are a widespread class of non-globular proteins carrying heterogeneous functions involved in several diseases. Here we provide a new version of RepeatsDB with an improved classification schema including high quality annotations for ∼5400 protein structures. RepeatsDB 2.0 features information on start and end positions for the repeat regions and units for all entries. The extensive growth of repeat unit characterization was possible by applying the novel ReUPred annotation method over the entire Protein Data Bank, with data quality is guaranteed by an extensive manual validation for >60% of the entries. The updated web interface includes a new search engine for complex queries and a fully re-designed entry page for a better overview of structural data. It is now possible to compare unit positions, together with secondary structure, fold information and Pfam domains. Moreover, a new classification level has been introduced on top of the existing scheme as an independent layer for sequence similarity relationships at 40%, 60% and 90% identity. PMID:27899671

  2. Frequency noise in frequency swept fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    This Letter presents a measurement of the spectral content of frequency shifted pulses generated by a lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper. We found that each pulse is shifted in frequency with very high accuracy. We also discovered that noise originating from light leaking through the acousto- optical modulators and forward propagating Brillouin scattering appear in the spectrum.

  3. 49 CFR 195.306 - Test medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Test medium. 195.306 Section 195.306... PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.306 Test medium. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section, water must be used as the test medium. (b) Except for offshore pipelines,...

  4. 27 CFR 19.914 - Medium plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medium plants. 19.914... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Distilled Spirits For Fuel Use Permits § 19.914 Medium plants. Any person wishing to establish a medium plant shall make application for and obtain...

  5. Particle dynamics in an active medium

    SciTech Connect

    Schaechter, L.

    1997-03-01

    When a point-charge moves in an active medium it can gain energy at the expense of that stored in the medium. The maximum gradient is evaluated and its relation to the energy stored in the medium is established. The dynamics of a distribution of electrons was also examined and it is reported here. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. 49 CFR 195.306 - Test medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Test medium. 195.306 Section 195.306... PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.306 Test medium. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section, water must be used as the test medium. (b) Except for offshore pipelines,...

  7. 49 CFR 195.306 - Test medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Test medium. 195.306 Section 195.306... PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.306 Test medium. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section, water must be used as the test medium. (b) Except for offshore pipelines,...

  8. Disruption of Higher Order DNA Structures in Friedreich’s Ataxia (GAA)n Repeats by PNA or LNA Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Bergquist, Helen; Rocha, Cristina S. J.; Álvarez-Asencio, Rubén; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Rutland, Mark. W.; Smith, C. I. Edvard; Good, Liam; Nielsen, Peter E.; Zain, Rula

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of (GAA)n repeats in the first intron of the Frataxin gene is associated with reduced mRNA and protein levels and the development of Friedreich’s ataxia. (GAA)n expansions form non-canonical structures, including intramolecular triplex (H-DNA), and R-loops and are associated with epigenetic modifications. With the aim of interfering with higher order H-DNA (like) DNA structures within pathological (GAA)n expansions, we examined sequence-specific interaction of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) with (GAA)n repeats of different lengths (short: n=9, medium: n=75 or long: n=115) by chemical probing of triple helical and single stranded regions. We found that a triplex structure (H-DNA) forms at GAA repeats of different lengths; however, single stranded regions were not detected within the medium size pathological repeat, suggesting the presence of a more complex structure. Furthermore, (GAA)4-PNA binding of the repeat abolished all detectable triplex DNA structures, whereas (CTT)5-PNA did not. We present evidence that (GAA)4-PNA can invade the DNA at the repeat region by binding the DNA CTT strand, thereby preventing non-canonical-DNA formation, and that triplex invasion complexes by (CTT)5-PNA form at the GAA repeats. Locked nucleic acid (LNA) oligonucleotides also inhibited triplex formation at GAA repeat expansions, and atomic force microscopy analysis showed significant relaxation of plasmid morphology in the presence of GAA-LNA. Thus, by inhibiting disease related higher order DNA structures in the Frataxin gene, such PNA and LNA oligomers may have potential for discovery of drugs aiming at recovering Frataxin expression. PMID:27846236

  9. Vectorette PCR isolation of microsatellite repeat sequences using anchored dinucleotide repeat primers.

    PubMed Central

    Lench, N J; Norris, A; Bailey, A; Booth, A; Markham, A F

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a vectorette PCR approach to provide an improved method for isolation of microsatellite repeats. The modified procedure relies on PCR amplification using a vectorette-specific primer in combination with one of a panel of anchored dinucleotide repeat primers. The target DNA to be screened for microsatellite sequences can be from YAC, P1, cosmid, bacteriophage or plasmid clones. We have used this technique to isolate novel, polymorphic microsatellite repeats from clones containing the amelogenin gene (AMGX) located on human chromosome Xp22.3. PMID:8668553

  10. The detection of inherent homologous recombination between repeat sequences in H. pylori 26695 by the PCR-based method.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yajuan; Zepeda-Gurrola, Reyna Cristina; Aguilar-Gutiérrez, Germán Rubén; Lara-Ramírez, Edgar E; De Luna-Santillana, Erick J; Rodríguez-Luna, Isabel Cristina; Sánchez-Varela, Alejandro; Carreño-López, Ricardo; Moreno-Medina, Víctor Ricardo; Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A; López-Vidal, Yolanda; Guo, Xianwu

    2014-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects more than half of the world's population, making it the most widespread infection of bacteria. It has high genetic diversity and has been considered as one of the most variable bacterial species. In the present study, a PCR-based method was used to detect the presence and the relative frequency of homologous recombination between repeat sequences (>500 bp) in H. pylori 26695. All the recombinant structures have been confirmed by sequencing. The inversion generated between inverted repeats showed distinct features from the recombination for duplication or deletion between direct repeats. Meanwhile, we gave the mathematic reasoning of a general formula for the calculation of relative recombination frequency and indicated the conditions for its application. This formula could be extensively applied to detect the frequency of homologous recombination, site-specific recombination, and other types of predictable recombination. Our results should be helpful for better understanding the genome evolution and adaptation of bacteria.

  11. C9ORF72 repeat expansion in Australian and Spanish frontotemporal dementia patients.

    PubMed

    Dobson-Stone, Carol; Hallupp, Marianne; Loy, Clement T; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Haan, Eric; Sue, Carolyn M; Panegyres, Peter K; Razquin, Cristina; Seijo-Martínez, Manuel; Rene, Ramon; Gascon, Jordi; Campdelacreu, Jaume; Schmoll, Birgit; Volk, Alexander E; Brooks, William S; Schofield, Peter R; Pastor, Pau; Kwok, John B J

    2013-01-01

    A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 has been established as a common cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). However, the minimum repeat number necessary for disease pathogenesis is not known. The aims of our study were to determine the frequency of the C9ORF72 repeat expansion in two FTD patient collections (one Australian and one Spanish, combined n = 190), to examine C9ORF72 expansion allele length in a subset of FTD patients, and to examine C9ORF72 allele length in 'non-expansion' patients (those with <30 repeats). The C9ORF72 repeat expansion was detected in 5-17% of patients (21-41% of familial FTD patients). For one family, the expansion was present in the proband but absent in the mother, who was diagnosed with dementia at age 68. No association was found between C9ORF72 non-expanded allele length and age of onset and in the Spanish sample mean allele length was shorter in cases than in controls. Southern blotting analysis revealed that one of the nine 'expansion-positive' patients examined, who had neuropathologically confirmed frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 pathology, harboured an 'intermediate' allele with a mean size of only ∼65 repeats. Our study indicates that the C9ORF72 repeat expansion accounts for a significant proportion of Australian and Spanish FTD cases. However, C9ORF72 allele length does not influence the age at onset of 'non-expansion' FTD patients in the series examined. Expansion of the C9ORF72 allele to as little as ∼65 repeats may be sufficient to cause disease.

  12. Milder phenotype in facioscapulohumeral dystrophy with 7–10 residual D4Z4 repeats

    PubMed Central

    Donlin-Smith, Colleen M.; Tapscott, Stephen J.; Lemmers, Richard J.L.F.; van der Maarel, Silvère M.; Tawil, Rabi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship of clinical and genetic features of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) with 7–10 residual D4Z4 repeats in a large genetically defined FSHD1 cohort. Methods: We performed a prospective cross-sectional observational study of 74 clinically affected patients with FSHD1. Measures of clinical severity were compared between patients with 1–6 D4Z4 repeats and 7–10 repeats, and included D4Z4 CpG methylation, age at diagnosis, age-adjusted clinical severity score, a muscle pathology grade of quadriceps biopsies (0 = normal, 12 = severe dystrophic changes), quantitative myometry of biopsied muscles, global manual muscle testing scores, and frequency of wheelchair use. Results: Twenty-eight (37.8%) participants had 7–10 D4Z4 repeats, and compared to participants with 1–6 repeats, were diagnosed 6.6 years older (p = 0.17); had lower CpG methylation than would be predicted by D4Z4 repeat size (p = 0.04); had age-adjusted clinical severity 39.8 points lower (p = 0.004); had muscle pathology grades that were 2.4 points less severe (p < 0.0001); had quantitative myometry 28.3% predicted of normal higher (p = 0.002); had global manual muscle testing scores 0.6 higher (p = 0.005); and did not require wheelchairs. Conclusion: Patients with FSHD with 7–10 D4Z4 repeats have milder disease than other genetically defined patients with FSHD1. The lower than predicted methylation in the 7–10 residual repeat group may suggest that additional epigenetic factors play a role in the severity of disease expression. PMID:26561289

  13. Frequency-Dependent Attenuation of Blasting Vibration Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Junru; Lu, Wenbo; Yan, Peng; Chen, Ming; Wang, Gaohui

    2016-10-01

    The dominant frequency, in addition to the peak particle velocity, is a critical factor for assessing adverse effects of the blasting vibration on surrounding structures; however, it has not been fully considered in blasting design. Therefore, the dominant frequency-dependent attenuation mechanism of blast-induced vibration is investigated in the present research. Starting with blasting vibration induced by a spherical charge propagating in an infinite viscoelastic medium, a modified expression of the vibration amplitude spectrum was derived to reveal the frequency dependency of attenuation. Then, ground vibration induced by more complex and more commonly used cylindrical charge that propagates in a semi-infinite viscoelastic medium was analyzed by numerical simulation. Results demonstrate that the absorptive property of the medium results in the frequency attenuation versus distance, whereas a rapid drop or fluctuation occurs during the attenuation of ground vibration. Fluctuation usually appears at moderate to far field, and the dominant frequency generally decreases to half the original value when rapid drop occurs. The decay rate discrepancy between different frequency components and the multimodal structure of vibration spectrum lead to the unsmooth frequency-dependent attenuation. The above research is verified by two field experiments. Furthermore, according to frequency-based vibration standards, frequency drop and fluctuation should be considered when evaluating blast safety. An optimized piecewise assessment is proposed for more accurate evaluation: With the frequency drop point as the breakpoint, the assessment is divided into two independent sections along the propagating path.

  14. Sintered composite medium and filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1987-01-01

    A particulate filter medium is formed of a sintered composite of 0.5 micron diameter quartz fibers and 2 micron diameter stainless steel fibers. A preferred composition is about 40 vol. % quartz and about 60 vol. % stainless steel fibers. The media is sintered at about 1100.degree. C. to bond the stainless steel fibers into a cage network which holds the quartz fibers. High filter efficiency and low flow resistance are provided by the smaller quartz fibers. High strength is provided by the stainless steel fibers. The resulting media has a high efficiency and low pressure drop similar to the standard HEPA media, with tensile strength at least four times greater, and a maximum operating temperature of about 550.degree. C. The invention also includes methods to form the composite media and a HEPA filter utilizing the composite media. The filter media can be used to filter particles in both liquids and gases.

  15. Intraspecific variation in flight metabolic rate in the bumblebee Bombus impatiens: repeatability and functional determinants in workers and drones.

    PubMed

    Darveau, Charles-A; Billardon, Fannie; Bélanger, Kasandra

    2014-02-15

    The evolution of flight energetics requires that phenotypes be variable, repeatable and heritable. We studied intraspecific variation in flight energetics in order to assess the repeatability of flight metabolic rate and wingbeat frequency, as well as the functional basis of phenotypic variation in workers and drones of the bumblebee species Bombus impatiens. We showed that flight metabolic rate and wingbeat frequency were highly repeatable in workers, even when controlling for body mass variation using residual analysis. We did not detect significant repeatability in drones, but a smaller range of variation might have prevented us from finding significant values in our sample. Based on our results and previous findings, we associated the high repeatability of flight phenotypes in workers to the functional links between body mass, thorax mass, wing size, wingbeat frequency and metabolic rate. Moreover, differences between workers and drones were as predicted from these functional associations, where drones had larger wings for their size, lower wingbeat frequency and lower flight metabolic rate. We also investigated thoracic muscle metabolic phenotypes by measuring the activity of carbohydrate metabolism enzymes, and we found positive correlations between mass-independent metabolic rate and the activity of all enzymes measured, but in workers only. When comparing workers and drones that differ in flight metabolic rate, only the activity of the enzymes hexokinase and trehalase showed the predicted differences. Overall, our study indicates that there should be correlated evolution among physiological phenotypes at multiple levels of organization and morphological traits associated with flight.

  16. Stability of dental waxes following repeated heatings.

    PubMed

    Kotsiomiti, E; McCabe, J F

    1995-02-01

    The flow and strength properties of dental waxes were examined following excessive and repeated heatings of the materials. For one product, the flow at 40 +/- 0.5 degrees C was reduced by 25.3% following heating above 200 degrees C. A decrease of the elastic modulus at 20 +/- 1 degree C by approximately 66% was observed in some cases after the heating temperature had been increased to 300 degrees C. Property variations were related to compositional changes, which were investigated by infrared spectoscopy and thermal analysis. Exposure of dental waxes to temperatures higher than 200 degrees C, particularly if it is repeated, may affect the composition and properties, resulting in inferior materials.

  17. Overcoming fixation with repeated memory suppression.

    PubMed

    Angello, Genna; Storm, Benjamin C; Smith, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Fixation (blocks to memories or ideas) can be alleviated not only by encouraging productive work towards a solution, but, as the present experiments show, by reducing counterproductive work. Two experiments examined relief from fixation in a word-fragment completion task. Blockers, orthographically similar negative primes (e.g., ANALOGY), blocked solutions to word fragments (e.g., A_L_ _GY) in both experiments. After priming, but before the fragment completion test, participants repeatedly suppressed half of the blockers using the Think/No-Think paradigm, which results in memory inhibition. Inhibiting blockers did not alleviate fixation in Experiment 1 when conscious recollection of negative primes was not encouraged on the fragment completion test. In Experiment 2, however, when participants were encouraged to remember negative primes at fragment completion, relief from fixation was observed. Repeated suppression may nullify fixation effects, and promote creative thinking, particularly when fixation is caused by conscious recollection of counterproductive information.

  18. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Accumulate-repeat-accumulate-accumulate (ARAA) codes have been proposed, inspired by the recently proposed accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes. These are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. ARAA codes can be regarded as serial turbolike codes or as a subclass of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, and, like ARA codes they have projected graph or protograph representations; these characteristics make it possible to design high-speed iterative decoders that utilize belief-propagation algorithms. The objective in proposing ARAA codes as a subclass of ARA codes was to enhance the error-floor performance of ARA codes while maintaining simple encoding structures and low maximum variable node degree.

  19. Repeat-PPM Super-Symbol Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, J.

    2016-11-01

    To attain a wider range of data rates in pulse position modulation (PPM) schemes with constrained pulse durations, the sender can repeat a PPM symbol multiple times, forming a super-symbol. In addition to the slot and symbol synchronization typically required for PPM, the receiver must also properly align the noisy super-symbols. We present a low-complexity approximation of the maximum-likelihood method for performing super-symbol synchronization without use of synchronization sequences. We provide simulation results demonstrating performance advantage when PPM symbols are spread by a pseudo-noise sequence, as opposed to simply repeating. Additionally, the results suggest that this super-symbol synchronization technique requires signal levels below those required for reliable communication. This validates that the PPM spreading approach proposed to CCSDS can work properly as part of the overall scheme.

  20. Repeated interactions in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bruneau, Laurent; Joye, Alain; Merkli, Marco

    2014-07-15

    Analyzing the dynamics of open quantum systems has a long history in mathematics and physics. Depending on the system at hand, basic physical phenomena that one would like to explain are, for example, convergence to equilibrium, the dynamics of quantum coherences (decoherence) and quantum correlations (entanglement), or the emergence of heat and particle fluxes in non-equilibrium situations. From the mathematical physics perspective, one of the main challenges is to derive the irreversible dynamics of the open system, starting from a unitary dynamics of the system and its environment. The repeated interactions systems considered in these notes are models of non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics. They are relevant in quantum optics, and more generally, serve as a relatively well treatable approximation of a more difficult quantum dynamics. In particular, the repeated interaction models allow to determine the large time (stationary) asymptotics of quantum systems out of equilibrium.

  1. Nucleosome repeat lengths and columnar chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Trifonov, Edward N

    2016-06-01

    Thorough quantitative study of nucleosome repeat length (NRL) distributions, conducted in 1992 by J. Widom, resulted in a striking observation that the linker lengths between the nucleosomes are quantized. Comparison of the NRL average values with the MNase cut distances predicted from the hypothetical columnar structure of chromatin (this work) shows a close correspondence between the two. This strongly suggests that the NRL distribution, actually, reflects the dominant role of columnar chromatin structure common for all eukaryotes.

  2. Identical repeated backbone of the human genome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Identical sequences with a minimal length of about 300 base pairs (bp) have been involved in the generation of various meiotic/mitotic genomic rearrangements through non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) events. Genomic disorders and structural variation, together with gene remodelling processes have been associated with many of these rearrangements. Based on these observations, we identified and integrated all the 100% identical repeats of at least 300 bp in the NCBI version 36.2 human genome reference assembly into non-overlapping regions, thus defining the Identical Repeated Backbone (IRB) of the reference human genome. Results The IRB sequences are distributed all over the genome in 66,600 regions, which correspond to ~2% of the total NCBI human genome reference assembly. Important structural and functional elements such as common repeats, segmental duplications, and genes are contained in the IRB. About 80% of the IRB bp overlap with known copy-number variants (CNVs). By analyzing the genes embedded in the IRB, we were able to detect some identical genes not previously included in the Ensembl release 50 annotation of human genes. In addition, we found evidence of IRB gene copy-number polymorphisms in raw sequence reads of two diploid sequenced genomes. Conclusions In general, the IRB offers new insight into the complex organization of the identical repeated sequences of the human genome. It provides an accurate map of potential NAHR sites which could be used in targeting the study of novel CNVs, predicting DNA copy-number variation in newly sequenced genomes, and improve genome annotation. PMID:20096123

  3. Repeatability of Response to Asthma Medications

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ann; Tantisira, Kelan; Li, Lingling; Schuemann, Brooke; Weiss, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Background Pharmacogenetic studies of drug response in asthma assume that patients respond consistently to a treatment but that treatment response varies across patients, however, no formal studies have demonstrated this. Objective To determine the repeatability of commonly used outcomes for treatment response to asthma medications: bronchodilator response, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and provocative concentration of methacholine producing a 20% decline in FEV1 (PC20). Methods The Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) was a multi-center clinical trial of children randomized to receiving budesonide, nedocromil, or placebo. We determined the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for each outcome over repeated visits over four years in CAMP using mixed effects regression models. We adjusted for the covariates: age, race/ethnicity, height, family income, parental education, and symptom score. We incorporated each outcome for each child as repeated outcome measurements and stratified by treatment group. Results The ICC for bronchodilator response was 0.31 in the budesonide group, 0.35 in the nedocromil group, and 0.40 in the placebo group, after adjusting for covariates. The ICC for FEV1 was 0.71 in the budesonide group, 0.60 in the nedocromil group, and 0.69 in the placebo group, after adjusting for covariates. The ICC for PC20 was 0.67 in the budesonide and placebo groups and 0.73 in the nedocromil group, after adjusting for covariates. Conclusion The within treatment group repeatability of FEV1 and PC20 are high; thus these phenotypes are heritable. FEV1 and PC20 may be better phenotypes than bronchodilator response for studies of treatment response in asthma. PMID:19064281

  4. 2D Metals by Repeated Size Reduction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanwen; Tang, Hao; Fang, Minghao; Si, Wenjie; Zhang, Qinghua; Huang, Zhaohui; Gu, Lin; Pan, Wei; Yao, Jie; Nan, Cewen; Wu, Hui

    2016-10-01

    A general and convenient strategy for manufacturing freestanding metal nanolayers is developed on large scale. By the simple process of repeatedly folding and calendering stacked metal sheets followed by chemical etching, free-standing 2D metal (e.g., Ag, Au, Fe, Cu, and Ni) nanosheets are obtained with thicknesses as small as 1 nm and with sizes of the order of several micrometers.

  5. Automatic-repeat-request error control schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S.; Costello, D. J., Jr.; Miller, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    Error detection incorporated with automatic-repeat-request (ARQ) is widely used for error control in data communication systems. This method of error control is simple and provides high system reliability. If a properly chosen code is used for error detection, virtually error-free data transmission can be attained. Various types of ARQ and hybrid ARQ schemes, and error detection using linear block codes are surveyed.

  6. Genomic Repeat Abundances Contain Phylogenetic Signal

    PubMed Central

    Dodsworth, Steven; Chase, Mark W.; Kelly, Laura J.; Leitch, Ilia J.; Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Piednoël, Mathieu; Weiss-Schneeweiss, Hanna; Leitch, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    A large proportion of genomic information, particularly repetitive elements, is usually ignored when researchers are using next-generation sequencing. Here we demonstrate the usefulness of this repetitive fraction in phylogenetic analyses, utilizing comparative graph-based clustering of next-generation sequence reads, which results in abundance estimates of different classes of genomic repeats. Phylogenetic trees are then inferred based on the genome-wide abundance of different repeat types treated as continuously varying characters; such repeats are scattered across chromosomes and in angiosperms can constitute a majority of nuclear genomic DNA. In six diverse examples, five angiosperms and one insect, this method provides generally well-supported relationships at interspecific and intergeneric levels that agree with results from more standard phylogenetic analyses of commonly used markers. We propose that this methodology may prove especially useful in groups where there is little genetic differentiation in standard phylogenetic markers. At the same time as providing data for phylogenetic inference, this method additionally yields a wealth of data for comparative studies of genome evolution. PMID:25261464

  7. Landauer's Principle in Repeated Interaction Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Eric P.; Joye, Alain; Pautrat, Yan; Raquépas, Renaud

    2017-01-01

    We study Landauer's Principle for Repeated Interaction Systems (RIS) consisting of a reference quantum system S in contact with a structured environment E made of a chain of independent quantum probes; S interacts with each probe, for a fixed duration, in sequence. We first adapt Landauer's lower bound, which relates the energy variation of the environment E to a decrease of entropy of the system S during the evolution, to the peculiar discrete time dynamics of RIS. Then we consider RIS with a structured environment E displaying small variations of order {T^{-1}} between the successive probes encountered by S, after {n ˜eq T} interactions, in keeping with adiabatic scaling. We establish a discrete time non-unitary adiabatic theorem to approximate the reduced dynamics of S in this regime, in order to tackle the adiabatic limit of Landauer's bound. We find that saturation of Landauer's bound is related to a detailed balance condition on the repeated interaction system, reflecting the non-equilibrium nature of the repeated interaction system dynamics. This is to be contrasted with the generic saturation of Landauer's bound known to hold for continuous time evolution of an open quantum system interacting with a single thermal reservoir in the adiabatic regime.

  8. Agreement and repeatability of an infrared thermometer.

    PubMed

    Kelechi, Teresa J; Good, Angela; Mueller, Martina

    2011-01-01

    Recently, manufacturers have devised thermometers for home use by patients, such as the TempTouch Infrared Thermometer (TTIR; Diabetica Solutions, San Antonio, TX), which is designed with a long handle that can be used for self-monitoring localized skin temperature of the feet and legs. This study assessed the level of agreement and repeatability of the TTIR compared to a thermistor-type thermometer (TT; PeriFlux, 5020 Temperature Unit, Perimed, Stockholm, Sweden), the reference standard. In 17 healthy subjects, localized skin temperature was measured 8 cm above the right medial malleolus at baseline (Time 1), after a 10-minute rest period (Time 2), and after 10 minutes of cold provocation (Time 3) with a cryotherapy gel wrap placed around the lower legs using the TTIR and TT for temperature measurement. Scatter plots and correlation coefficients showed strong positive relationships between the two measurement methods at all three time points (Time 1: r = 0.95; Time 2: r = 0.97; and, Time 3: r = 0.87). Results showed a reasonable level of agreement between the two methods at Times 1 and 2 but not after cold provocation. Agreement between the methods appears to be better than repeatability within each method. Results for repeatability from both the TT and TTIR were very similar suggesting that there was a systematic bias with increasing temperatures between Time 1 and Time 2.

  9. Repeated-sprint ability: where are we?

    PubMed

    Dawson, Brian

    2012-09-01

    Repeated-sprint ability (RSA) is now well accepted as an important fitness component in team-sport performance. It is broadly described as the ability to perform repeated short (~3-4 s, 20-30 m) sprints with only brief (~10-30 s) recovery between bouts. Over the past 25 y a plethora of RSA tests have been trialed and reported in the literature. These range from a single set of ~6-10 short sprints, departing every 20-30 s, to team-sport game simulations involving repeating cycles of walk-jog-stride-sprint movements over 45-90 min. Such a wide range of RSA tests has not assisted the synthesis of research findings in this area, and questions remain regarding the optimal methods of training to best improve RSA. In addition, how RSA test scores relate to player "work rate," match performance, or both requires further investigation to improve the application of RSA testing and training to elite team-sport athletes.

  10. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate-Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by recently proposed Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) codes [15], in this paper we propose a channel coding scheme called Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate (ARAA) codes. These codes can be seen as serial turbo-like codes or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, and they have a projected graph or protograph representation; this allows for a high-speed iterative decoder implementation using belief propagation. An ARAA code can be viewed as a precoded Repeat-and-Accumulate (RA) code with puncturing in concatenation with another accumulator, where simply an accumulator is chosen as the precoder; thus ARAA codes have a very fast encoder structure. Using density evolution on their associated protographs, we find examples of rate-lJ2 ARAA codes with maximum variable node degree 4 for which a minimum bit-SNR as low as 0.21 dB from the channel capacity limit can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Such a low threshold cannot be achieved by RA or Irregular RA (IRA) or unstructured irregular LDPC codes with the same constraint on the maximum variable node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators we can construct families of higher rate ARAA codes with thresholds that stay close to their respective channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results show comparable performance with the best-known LDPC codes but with very low error floor even at moderate block sizes.

  11. Orthologous repeats and mammalian phylogenetic inference

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Ali; Ye, Chun; Price, Alkes L.; Bafna, Vineet

    2005-01-01

    Determining phylogenetic relationships between species is a difficult problem, and many phylogenetic relationships remain unresolved, even among eutherian mammals. Repetitive elements provide excellent markers for phylogenetic analysis, because their mode of evolution is predominantly homoplasy-free and unidirectional. Historically, phylogenetic studies using repetitive elements have relied on biological methods such as PCR analysis, and computational inference is limited to a few isolated repeats. Here, we present a novel computational method for inferring phylogenetic relationships from partial sequence data using orthologous repeats. We apply our method to reconstructing the phylogeny of 28 mammals, using more than 1000 orthologous repeats obtained from sequence data available from the NISC Comparative Sequencing Program. The resulting phylogeny has robust bootstrap numbers, and broadly matches results from previous studies which were obtained using entirely different data and methods. In addition, we shed light on some of the debatable aspects of the phylogeny. With rapid expansion of available partial sequence data, computational analysis of repetitive elements holds great promise for the future of phylogenetic inference. PMID:15998912

  12. Repeat Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuromas

    SciTech Connect

    Kano, Hideyuki; Kondziolka, Douglas; Niranjan, Ajay M.Ch.; Flannery, Thomas J.; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for acoustic neuromas, we assessed tumor control, clinical outcomes, and the risk of adverse radiation effects in patients whose tumors progressed after initial management. Methods and Materials: During a 21-year experience at our center, 1,352 patients underwent SRS as management for their acoustic neuromas. We retrospectively identified 6 patients who underwent SRS twice for the same tumor. The median patient age was 47 years (range, 35-71 years). All patients had imaging evidence of tumor progression despite initial SRS. One patient also had incomplete surgical resection after initial SRS. All patients were deaf at the time of the second SRS. The median radiosurgery target volume at the time of the initial SRS was 0.5 cc and was 2.1 cc at the time of the second SRS. The median margin dose at the time of the initial SRS was 13 Gy and was 11 Gy at the time of the second SRS. The median interval between initial SRS and repeat SRS was 63 months (range, 25-169 months). Results: At a median follow-up of 29 months after the second SRS (range, 13-71 months), tumor control or regression was achieved in all 6 patients. No patient developed symptomatic adverse radiation effects or new neurological symptoms after the second SRS. Conclusions: With this limited experience, we found that repeat SRS for a persistently enlarging acoustic neuroma can be performed safely and effectively.

  13. A Unified Model for Repeating and Non-repeating Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Manjari

    2017-04-01

    The model that fast radio bursts (FRBs) are caused by plunges of asteroids onto neutron stars can explain both repeating and non-repeating bursts. If a neutron star passes through an asteroid belt around another star, there would be a series of bursts caused by a series of asteroid impacts. Moreover, the neutron star would cross the same belt repetitively if it were in a binary with the star hosting the asteroid belt, leading to a repeated series of bursts. I explore the properties of neutron star binaries that could lead to the only known repeating FRB so far (FRB121102). In this model, the next two epochs of bursts are expected around 2017 February 27 and 2017 December 18. On the other hand, if the asteroid belt is located around the neutron star itself, then a chance fall of an asteroid from that belt onto the neutron star would lead to a non-repeating burst. Even a neutron star grazing an asteroid belt can lead to a non-repeating burst caused by just one asteroid plunge during the grazing. This is possible even when the neutron star is in a binary with the asteroid-hosting star, if the belt and the neutron star orbit are non-coplanar.

  14. Intensification: A Resource for Amplifying Population-Genetic Signals with Protein Repeats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jieming; Wang, Bo; Regan, Lynne; Gerstein, Mark

    2017-02-03

    Large-scale genome sequencing holds great promise for the interpretation of protein structures through the discovery of many, rare functional variants in the human population. However, because protein-coding regions are under high selective constraints, these variants occur at low frequencies, such that there is often insufficient statistics for downstream calculations. To address this problem, we develop the Intensification approach, which uses the modular structure of repeat protein domains to amplify signals of selection from population genetics and traditional interspecies conservation. In particular, we are able to aggregate variants at the codon level to identify important positions in repeat domains that show strong conservation signals. This allows us to compare conservation over different evolutionary timescales. It also enables us to visualize population-genetic measures on protein structures. We make available the Intensification results as an online resource (http://intensification.gersteinlab.org) and illustrate the approach through a case study on the tetratricopeptide repeat.

  15. Poly: a quantitative analysis tool for simple sequence repeat (SSR) tracts in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Bizzaro, Jeff W; Marx, Kenneth A

    2003-01-01

    Background Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), microsatellites or polymeric sequences are common in DNA and are important biologically. From mononucleotide to trinucleotide repeats and beyond, they can be found in long (> 6 repeating units) tracts and may be characterized by quantifying the frequencies in which they are found and their tract lengths. However, most of the existing computer programs that find SSR tracts do not include these methods. Results A computer program named Poly has been written not only to find SSR tracts but to analyze the results quantitatively. Conclusions Poly is significant in its use of non-standard, quantitative methods of analysis. And, with its flexible object model and data structure, Poly and its generated data can be used for even more sophisticated analyses. PMID:12791171

  16. Repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay: an investigation with 2-nitropropane, a hepatocarcinogen.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Satoru; Araki, Tetsuro; Nakajima, Mikio; Kusuoka, Osamu; Uchida, Keisuke; Sato, Norihiro; Tanabe, Yoko; Takahashi, Kaori; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Tsurui, Kazuyuki

    2015-03-01

    The utility of the repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay in the detection of a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen was evaluated. In this paper, a rat hepatocarcinogen, 2-nitropropane (2-NP), was administered orally to young adult rats for 14 and 28 days without a partial hepatectomy or a mitogen, and the micronucleus induction in liver was examined using a simple method to isolate hepatocytes. In addition, a bone marrow micronucleus assay was conducted concomitantly. The frequency of micronucleated hepatocytes induced by 2-NP increased significantly in both the 14- and 28-day repeated-dose studies, while the bone marrow micronucleus assays were negative in each study. These results indicate that the RDLMN assay is useful for detecting a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen that is negative in bone marrow micronucleus assays and is a suitable in vivo genotoxicity test method for integration into a repeated-dose general toxicity study.

  17. Induction of homologous recombination between sequence repeats by the activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) protein.

    PubMed

    Buerstedde, Jean-Marie; Lowndes, Noel; Schatz, David G

    2014-07-08

    The activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) protein is known to initiate somatic hypermutation, gene conversion or switch recombination by cytidine deamination within the immunoglobulin loci. Using chromosomally integrated fluorescence reporter transgenes, we demonstrate a new recombinogenic activity of AID leading to intra- and intergenic deletions via homologous recombination of sequence repeats. Repeat recombination occurs at high frequencies even when the homologous sequences are hundreds of bases away from the positions of AID-mediated cytidine deamination, suggesting DNA end resection before strand invasion. Analysis of recombinants between homeologous repeats yielded evidence for heteroduplex formation and preferential migration of the Holliday junctions to the boundaries of sequence homology. These findings broaden the target and off-target mutagenic potential of AID and establish a novel system to study induced homologous recombination in vertebrate cells.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03110.001.

  18. CAG repeat size correlates to electrophysiological motor and sensory phenotypes in SBMA.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Katsuno, Masahisa; Banno, Haruhiko; Takeuchi, Yu; Atsuta, Naoki; Ito, Mizuki; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Yamashita, Fumitada; Hori, Norio; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Hirayama, Masaaki; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Sobue, Gen

    2008-01-01

    decreased in patients with a shorter CAG repeat (<47). In addition, we found that the frequency of aggregation in the sensory neuron cytoplasm tended to inversely correlate with the CAG repeat size in the autopsy study, supporting the view that the CAG repeat size differentially correlates with motor- and sensory-dominant phenotypes. In conclusion, our results suggest that there are unequivocal electrophysiological phenotypes influenced by CAG repeat size in SBMA.

  19. Radar Detection Performance in Medium Grazing Angle X-band Sea-clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Radar Detection Performance in Medium Grazing Angle X-band Sea-clutter Luke Rosenberg 1 and Stephen Bocquet 2 1 National Security and...detection performance of an airborne surface surveillance radar in the presence of medium grazing angle sea-clutter. In the absence of frequency...interference ratio for a given probability of detection, Pd, will be incorrect by several dB, resulting in over-estimated performance . This report describes a

  20. Oscillatory motion of a viscous fluid in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siraev, R. R.

    2015-08-01

    An oscillatory flow of an incompressible fluid in a saturated porous medium in the presence of a solid inclusion has been theoretically studied. Unsteady filtration has been described by the Brinkman-Forchheimer equation, where inertial effects and terms with acceleration characteristic of high filtration rates and the presence of pulsations are taken into account. The convective part of the acceleration is responsible for nonlinear effects near macroinhomogeneities. These effects can play a noticeable role in unsteady flows in the porous medium, as is shown for the problem of a solid ball streamed by an oscillatory flow having a given velocity at infinity. The results indicate that a secondary averaged flow appears in the case of high frequencies and cannot be described by Darcy's or Forchheimer's filtration laws.

  1. Applicaton of radiative transfer theory to microwave transmission medium calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stelzried, C. T.

    1982-01-01

    Precise determinations of the transmission medium loss and noise temperature contribution which are important to the performance characterization of low noise microwave receiving systems and thermal noise standards are discussed. Tropospheric loss is frequently inferred from microwave radiometer noise temperature measurements. Interpretation of these measurements requires an inversion of the radiative transfer integral equation. This is inconvenient even with computer techniques. Solutions of a rapidly convergent power series of the radiative transfer equations are presented. This solution is applicable to a low loss medium with either uniform or nonuniform loss distributions. A four layer atmosphere model is investigated to demonstrate the accuracy of the solution relative to the model. Applications include thermal noise standards and single- and dual-frequency water radiometers.

  2. Effective medium theory of thin-plate acoustic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Li, Pei; Yao, Shanshan; Zhou, Xiaoming; Huang, Guoliang; Hu, Gengkai

    2014-04-01

    Effective dynamic properties of acoustic metamaterials made of multilayered flexible thin-plates with periodically attached mass-spring resonators are studied. By using the transfer matrix method, the thin-plate acoustic metamaterial under the plane wave incidence is characterized by a homogeneous effective medium with anisotropic mass density. An approximate analytic expression of effective mass density is derived for a single-layer metamaterial in the normally incident case, and it is shown that the effective mass density can follow either Lorentz or Drude medium models. For the obliquely incident case, it is found that effective mass density is dependent on the lateral wave number of incident waves. Such spatial dispersion comes from the coincidence effect between the incident acoustic wave and flexural wave in the thin plate, and it occurs at much lower frequencies than that for a uniform plate without resonators. Based on the observed spatial dispersion, an acoustic device made of thin-plate metamaterials is designed for frequency-controlled acoustic directive radiation in the low-frequency regime.

  3. 47 CFR 97.205 - Repeater station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... geographical coordinates of the antenna (NAD-83 datum), antenna height above mean sea level (AMSL), antenna center of radiation above ground level (AGL), antenna directivity and gain, proposed frequency and...

  4. 47 CFR 97.205 - Repeater station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... geographical coordinates of the antenna (NAD-83 datum), antenna height above mean sea level (AMSL), antenna center of radiation above ground level (AGL), antenna directivity and gain, proposed frequency and...

  5. Enriching the hot circumgalactic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crain, Robert A.; McCarthy, Ian G.; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom; Frenk, Carlos S.

    2013-07-01

    Simple models of galaxy formation in a cold dark matter universe predict that massive galaxies are surrounded by a hot, quasi-hydrostatic circumgalactic corona of slowly cooling gas, predominantly accreted from the intergalactic medium (IGM). This prediction is borne out by the recent cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of Crain et al., which reproduce observed scaling relations between the X-ray and optical properties of nearby disc galaxies. Such coronae are metal poor, but observations of the X-ray emitting circumgalactic medium (CGM) of local galaxies typically indicate enrichment to near-solar iron abundance, potentially signalling a shortcoming in current models of galaxy formation. We show here that, while the hot CGM of galaxies formed in the simulations is typically metal poor in a mass-weighted sense, its X-ray luminosity-weighted metallicity is often close to solar. This bias arises because the soft X-ray emissivity of a typical ˜0.1 keV corona is dominated by collisionally excited metal ions that are synthesized in stars and recycled into the hot CGM. We find that these metals are ejected primarily by stars that form in situ to the main progenitor of the galaxy, rather than in satellites or external galaxies. The enrichment of the hot CGM therefore proceeds in an `inside-out' fashion throughout the assembly of the galaxy: metals are transported from the central galaxy by supernova-driven winds and convection over several Gyr, establishing a strong negative radial metallicity gradient. Whilst metal ions synthesized by stars are necessary to produce the X-ray emissivity that enables the hot CGM of isolated galaxies to be detected with current instrumentation, the electrons that collisionally excite them are equally important. Since our simulations indicate that the electron density of hot coronae is dominated by the metal-poor gas accreted from the IGM, we infer that the hot CGM observed via X-ray emission is the outcome of both hierarchical

  6. Thermal heat-balance mode flow-to-frequency converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlowski, Eligiusz

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents new type of thermal flow converter with the pulse frequency output. The integrating properties of the temperature sensor have been used, which allowed for realization of pulse frequency modulator with thermal feedback loop, stabilizing temperature of sensor placed in the flowing medium. The system assures balancing of heat amount supplied in impulses to the sensor and heat given up by the sensor in a continuous way to the flowing medium. Therefore the frequency of output impulses is proportional to the heat transfer coefficient from sensor to environment. According to the King's law, the frequency of those impulses is a function of medium flow velocity around the sensor. The special feature of presented solution is total integration of thermal sensor with the measurement signal conditioning system. Sensor and conditioning system are not the separate elements of the measurement circuit, but constitute a whole in form of thermal heat-balance mode flow-to-frequency converter. The advantage of such system is easiness of converting the frequency signal to the digital form, without using any additional analogue-to-digital converters. The frequency signal from the converter may be directly connected to the microprocessor input, which with use of standard built-in counters may convert the frequency into numerical value of high precision. Moreover, the frequency signal has higher resistance to interference than the voltage signal and may be transmitted to remote locations without the information loss.

  7. Analysis of operational requirements for medium density air transportation. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The medium density air travel market was studied to determine the aircraft design and operational requirements. The impact of operational characteristics on the air travel system and the economic viability of the study aircraft were also evaluated. Medium density is defined in terms of numbers of people transported (20 to 500 passengers per day on round trip routes), and frequency of service ( a minumium of two and maximum of eight round trips per day) for 10 regional carriers. The operational characteristics of aircraft best suited to serve the medium density air transportation market are determined and a basepoint aircraft is designed from which tradeoff studies and parametric variations could be conducted. The impact of selected aircraft on the medium density market, economics, and operations is ascertained. Research and technology objectives for future programs in medium density air transportation are identified and ranked.

  8. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. |; Eldarov, M. |; Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A.

    1994-10-01

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic-growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation In that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RAD52, RAD1 and the RNC1 genes.

  9. Smart repeater system for communications interoperability during multiagency law enforcement operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutcher, Richard I.; Jones, R. W.; Moore, Michael R.; Smith, S. F.; Tolley, Alan L.; Rochelle, Robert W.

    1997-02-01

    A prototype 'smart' repeater that provides interoperability capabilities for radio communication systems in multi-agency and multi-user scenarios is being developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The smart repeater functions as a deployable communications platform that can be dynamically reconfigured to cross-link the radios of participating federal, state, and local government agencies. This interconnection capability improves the coordination and execution of multi-agency operations, including coordinated law enforcement activities and general emergency or disaster response scenarios. The repeater provides multiple channels of operation in the 30-50, 118-136, 138-174, and 403-512 MHz land mobile communications and aircraft bands while providing the ability to cross-connect among multiple frequencies, bands, modulation types, and encryption formats. Additionally, two telephone interconnects provide links to the fixed and cellular telephone networks. The 800- and 900-MHz bands are not supported by the prototype, but the modular design of the system accommodates future retrofits to extend frequency capabilities with minimal impact to the system. Configuration of the repeater is through a portable personal computer with a Windows-based graphical interface control screen that provides dynamic reconfiguration of network interconnections and formats.

  10. Smart repeater system for communications interoperability during multi-agency law enforcement operations

    SciTech Connect

    Crutcher, R.I.; Jones, R.W.; Moore, M.R.; Smith, S.F.; Tolley, A.L.; Rochelle, R.W.

    1996-12-31

    A prototype smart repeater that provides interoperability capabilities for radio communication systems in multi-agency and multi-user scenarios is being developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The smart repeater functions as a deployable communications platform that can be dynamically reconfigured to cross-link the radios of participating federal, state, and local government agencies. This interconnection capability improves the coordination and execution of multi-agency operations, including coordinated law enforcement activities and general emergency or disaster response scenarios. The repeater provides multiple channels of operation in the 30--50, 118--136, 138--174, and 403--512 MHz land mobile communications and aircraft bands while providing the ability to cross-connect among multiple frequencies, bands, modulation types, and encryption formats. Additionally, two telephone interconnects provide links to the fixed and cellular telephone networks. The 800- and 900-MHz bands are not supported by the prototype, but the modular design of the system accommodates future retrofits to extend frequency capabilities with minimal impact to the system. Configuration of the repeater is through a portable personal computer with a Windows-based graphical interface control screen that provides dynamic reconfiguration of network interconnections and formats.

  11. A repeater type biotelemetry system for use on wild big game animals.

    PubMed

    Cupal, J J; Ward, A L; Weeks, R W

    1975-01-01

    A repeater type telemetry system was developed and field tested on a wild elk near laramie, Wyoming, in the summer of 1973. The telemetry system consisted of the following: (a) a heat flow rate sensing implanted transmitter, (b) a repeater type neck collar and (c) a portable receiving station consisting of a receiver, decoding circuitry and analog chart recorder. The transmitter in (a) produced relatively low frequency rf pulses whose repetition rate was directly proportional to heat flow rate through the hide of the animal. In (b), the pulses from the implant are sensed and retransmitted using a relatively high power, high frequency transmitter. A second rf pulse was generated whose pulse spacing was related to animal activity. Details of circuit design and performance are given. Field experience has shown that this method is extremely useful for the monitoring of biological data from secretive big game animals such as elk.

  12. Maximum Likelihood Detection of Low Rate Repeat Codes in Frequency Hopped Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    QPSK , 5+9 Es/No B E R a t t he in pu t t o de co de r Traditional method Individual ML Joint...1 Figure 3. Comparison of BERs for 4 copies, QPSK , 2+12 Es/No B E R a t t he in pu t t o de co de r Traditional method Individual ML Joint ML...1 Figure 5. Comparison of BERs for 4 copies, QPSK , 3+54 Es/No B E R a t t he in pu t t o de co de r Traditional method Individual ML Joint

  13. Fresnel drag of light by a moving nonlinear and nanostructured dielectric medium

    SciTech Connect

    Peiponen, Kai-Erik; Gornov, Evgeny

    2007-12-15

    The Fresnel drag is viewed in the frame of nonlinear and/or nanostructured uniformly moving media. It is shown that in the case of intense light pulse interaction with an optically nonlinear medium the relativistic frequency chirp due to self-phase modulation is smaller than in the rest frame. In the case of light interaction with optically linear or nonlinear nanostructured medium the Fresnel drag depends on the effective refractive index of the medium. While the nanostructures are in a liquid matrix the drag can be controlled by the fill fraction of the inclusions. As an example the Fresnel drag for optically linear Bruggeman liquid is considered.

  14. The Circumgalactic Medium of Andromeda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Nicolas; Project AMIGA team

    2017-03-01

    Our view of galaxies has been transformed in recent years with diffuse halo gas surrounding galaxies that contains at least as many metals and baryons as their disks. While single sight lines through galaxy halos seen in absorption have provided key new constraints, they provide only average properties. Our massive neighbor, the Andromeda (M31) galaxy, provides an unique way to study its circumgalactic medium whereby we can study it using not one or two, but ~36 sightlines thanks to its proximity. With our Large HST program - Project AMIGA (Absorption Maps In the Gas of Andromeda), our goals are to determine the spatial distribution of the halo properties of a L* galaxy using 36 background targets at different radii and azimuths. In this brief paper, I discuss briefly the scientific rationale of Project AMIGA and some early science results. In particular, for the first time we have demonstrated that M31 has a gaseous halo that extends to R vir with as much as metal and baryonic masses than in its disk and has substantial change in its ionization properties with more highly ionized gas found at R ~ R vir than cooler gas found near the disk.

  15. Studies in medium energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Green, A.; Hoffmann, G.W.; McDonough, J.; Purcell, M.J.; Ray, R.L.; Read, D.E.; Worn, S.D.

    1991-12-01

    This document constitutes the (1991--1992) technical progress report and continuation proposal for the ongoing medium energy nuclear physics research program supported by the US Department of Energy through special Research Grant DE-FG05-88ER40444. The experiments discussed are conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The overall motivation for the work discussed in this document is driven by three main objectives: (1) provide hadron-nucleon and hadron-nucleus scattering data which serve to facilitate the study of effective two-body interactions, test (and possibly determine) nuclear structure, and help study reaction mechanisms and dynamics; (2) provide unique, first-of-a-kind exploratory'' hadron-nucleus scattering data in the hope that such data will lead to discovery of new phenomena and new physics; and (3) perform precision tests of fundamental interactions, such as rare decay searches, whose observation would imply fundamental new physics.

  16. Fragile X mental retardation protein regulates synaptic and behavioral plasticity to repeated cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laura N; Jedynak, Jakub P; Fontenot, Miles R; Hale, Carly F; Dietz, Karen C; Taniguchi, Makoto; Thomas, Feba S; Zirlin, Benjamin C; Birnbaum, Shari G; Huber, Kimberly M; Thomas, Mark J; Cowan, Christopher W

    2014-05-07

    Repeated cocaine exposure causes persistent, maladaptive alterations in brain and behavior, and hope for effective therapeutics lies in understanding these processes. We describe here an essential role for fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein and regulator of dendritic protein synthesis, in cocaine conditioned place preference, behavioral sensitization, and motor stereotypy. Cocaine reward deficits in FMRP-deficient mice stem from elevated mGluR5 (or GRM5) function, similar to a subset of fragile X symptoms, and do not extend to natural reward. We find that FMRP functions in the adult nucleus accumbens (NAc), a critical addiction-related brain region, to mediate behavioral sensitization but not cocaine reward. FMRP-deficient mice also exhibit several abnormalities in NAc medium spiny neurons, including reduced presynaptic function and premature changes in dendritic morphology and glutamatergic neurotransmission following repeated cocaine treatment. Together, our findings reveal FMRP as a critical mediator of cocaine-induced behavioral and synaptic plasticity.

  17. Transient radiation from a ring resonant medium excited by an ultrashort superluminal pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipov, R M; Arkhipov, M V; Tolmachev, Yu A; Babushkin, I V

    2015-06-30

    We report some specific features of transient radiation from a periodic spatially modulated one-dimensional medium with a resonant response upon excitation by an ultrashort pulse. The case of ring geometry (with particle density distributed along the ring according to the harmonic law) is considered. It is shown that the spectrum of scattered radiation contains (under both linear and nonlinear interaction), along with the frequency of intrinsic resonance of the medium, a new frequency, which depends on the pulse velocity and the spatial modulation period. The case of superluminal motion of excitation, when the Cherenkov effect manifests itself, is also analysed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  18. Repeated electrical stimulation of reward-related brain regions affects cocaine but not "natural" reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Levy, Dino; Shabat-Simon, Maytal; Shalev, Uri; Barnea-Ygael, Noam; Cooper, Ayelet; Zangen, Abraham

    2007-12-19

    Drug addiction is associated with long-lasting neuronal adaptations including alterations in dopamine and glutamate receptors in the brain reward system. Treatment strategies for cocaine addiction and especially the prevention of craving and relapse are limited, and their effectiveness is still questionable. We hypothesized that repeated stimulation of the brain reward system can induce localized neuronal adaptations that may either potentiate or reduce addictive behaviors. The present study was designed to test how repeated interference with the brain reward system using localized electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle at the lateral hypothalamus (LH) or the prefrontal cortex (PFC) affects cocaine addiction-associated behaviors and some of the neuronal adaptations induced by repeated exposure to cocaine. Repeated high-frequency stimulation in either site influenced cocaine, but not sucrose reward-related behaviors. Stimulation of the LH reduced cue-induced seeking behavior, whereas stimulation of the PFC reduced both cocaine-seeking behavior and the motivation for its consumption. The behavioral findings were accompanied by glutamate receptor subtype alterations in the nucleus accumbens and the ventral tegmental area, both key structures of the reward system. It is therefore suggested that repeated electrical stimulation of the PFC can become a novel strategy for treating addiction.

  19. [Data mining of simple sequence repeats in transcriptome sequences of Tibetan medicinal plant Zangyinchen Swertia mussotii].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue; Yue Chun-Jiang; Wang, Yi; Ma, Jia-qiang; Sun, Hong-bo; Luo, Min; Ma, Peng-ju; Zhang, Lin-xia; Ma, Xu; Chen, Chuan-chuan; Li, Hua; Tang, Li

    2015-06-01

    MISA (MicroSAtelite) software was employed to screen SSRs in 68 787 contigs of Swertia mussotii transcriptome sequences. 5 610 SSRs were distributed in 5 099 contigs which accounted for 7.41% of 68 787 contigs. There are 220 kinds of SSR motifs existing in S. mussotii transcriptome. On average, SSRs occurred every 12.60 kb in length. In the SSRs, the tri-nucleotide repeat motif was the most abundant (45.99%), followed by the di-nucleotide (41.62%). AT/TA and AAT/TTA were the main types of motif in di-, tri-nucleotide repeats. The repeat numbers of SSRs which from S. mussotii transcriptome SSRs were mainly from 5 to 10 and motif length of them mostly ranged from 12 bp to 30 bp. A total of 30 651 contigs were annotated, and only 1 447 SSRs were occurred in protein-coding regions. In the six repeat motifs, tri-nucleotide repeats were the most abundant in coding regions (928). There are abundant SSRs in S. mussotii transcriptome with high frequency and various types, indicating their usefulness in theory. This research may lay the foundation for designing the targeted SSR primers and developing SSR molecular markers by mining the information of SSRs loci in S. mussotii transcriptome sequences data.

  20. Imprints of superfluidity on magnetoelastic quasiperiodic oscillations of soft gamma-ray repeaters.

    PubMed

    Gabler, Michael; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; Stergioulas, Nikolaos; Font, José A; Müller, Ewald

    2013-11-22

    Our numerical simulations show that axisymmetric, torsional, magnetoelastic oscillations of magnetars with a superfluid core can explain the whole range of observed quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) in the giant flares of soft gamma-ray repeaters. There exist constant phase QPOs at f is < or approximately equal to 150 Hz and resonantly excited high-frequency QPOs (f>500 Hz), in good agreement with observations. The range of magnetic field strengths required to match the observed QPO frequencies agrees with that from spin-down estimates. These results suggest that there is at least one superfluid species in magnetar cores.

  1. Repeatability of a running heat tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Mee, Jessica A; Doust, Jo; Maxwell, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    At present there is no standardised heat tolerance test (HTT) procedure adopting a running mode of exercise. Current HTTs may misdiagnose a runner's susceptibility to a hyperthermic state due to differences in exercise intensity. The current study aimed to establish the repeatability of a practical running test to evaluate individual's ability to tolerate exercise heat stress. Sixteen (8M, 8F) participants performed the running HTT (RHTT) (30 min, 9 km h(-1), 2% elevation) on two separate occasions in a hot environment (40 °C and 40% relative humidity). There were no differences in peak rectal temperature (RHTT1: 38.82 ± 0.47 °C, RHTT2: 38.86 ± 0.49 °C, Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.93, typical error of measure (TEM) = 0.13 °C), peak skin temperature (RHTT1: 38.12 ± 0.45, RHTT2: 38.11 ± 0.45 °C, ICC = 0.79, TEM = 0.30 °C), peak heart rate (RHTT1: 182 ± 15 beats min(-1), RHTT2: 183 ± 15 beats min(-1), ICC = 0.99, TEM = 2 beats min(-1)), nor sweat rate (1721 ± 675 g h(-1), 1716 ± 745 g h(-1), ICC = 0.95, TEM = 162 g h(-1)) between RHTT1 and RHTT2 (p>0.05). Results demonstrate good agreement, strong correlations and small differences between repeated trials, and the TEM values suggest low within-participant variability. The RHTT was effective in differentiating between individuals physiological responses; supporting a heat tolerance continuum. The findings suggest the RHTT is a repeatable measure of physiological strain in the heat and may be used to assess the effectiveness of acute and chronic heat alleviating procedures.

  2. Multiphase Turbulent Interstellar Medium: Some Recent Results from Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Nirupam

    2015-06-01

    The radio frequency 1.4 GHz transition of the atomic hydrogen is one of the important tracers of the diffuse neutral interstellar medium. Radio astronomical observations of this transition, using either a single dish telescope or an array interferometer, reveal different properties of the interstellar medium. Such observations are particularly useful to study the multiphase nature and turbulence in the interstellar gas. Observations with multiple radio telescopes have recently been used to study these two closely related aspects in greater detail. This review article presents a brief outline of some of the basic ideas of radio astronomical observations and data analysis, summarizes the results from these recent observations, and discusses possible implications of the results. Using various observational techniques, the density and the velocity fluctuations in the Galactic interstellar medium was found to have a Kolmogorov-like power law power spectra. The observed power law scaling of the turbulent velocity dispersion with the length scale can be used to derive the true temperature distribution of the medium. Observations from a large ongoing atomic hydrogen absorption line survey have also been used to study the distribution of gas at different temperature. The thermal steady state model predicts that the multiphase neutral gas will exist in cold and warm phase with temperature below 200 K and above 5000 K respectively. However, these observations clearly show the presence of a large fraction of gas in the intermediate unstable phase. These results raise serious doubt about the validity of the standard model, and highlight the necessity of alternative theoretical models. Interestingly, numerical simulations suggest that some of the observational results can be explained consistently by including the effects of turbulence in the models of the multiphase medium.

  3. Predictive cytogenetic biomarkers for colorectal neoplasia in medium risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, EM; Nicolaie, T; Ionescu, MA; Becheanu, G; Andrei, F; Diculescu, M; Ciocirlan, M

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: DNA damage and chromosomal alterations in peripheral lymphocytes parallels DNA mutations in tumor tissues. Objective: The aim of our study was to predict the presence of neoplastic colorectal lesions by specific biomarkers in “medium risk” individuals (age 50 to 75, with no personal or family of any colorectal neoplasia). Methods and Results: We designed a prospective cohort observational study including patients undergoing diagnostic or opportunistic screening colonoscopy. Specific biomarkers were analyzed for each patient in peripheral lymphocytes - presence of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) and the Nuclear Division Index (NDI) by the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay (CBMN). Of 98 patients included, 57 were “medium risk” individuals. MN frequency and NPB presence were not significantly different in patients with neoplastic lesions compared to controls. In “medium risk” individuals, mean NDI was significantly lower for patients with any neoplastic lesions (adenomas and adenocarcinomas, AUROC 0.668, p 00.5), for patients with advanced neoplasia (advanced adenoma and adenocarcinoma, AUROC 0.636 p 0.029) as well as for patients with adenocarcinoma (AUROC 0.650, p 0.048), for each comparison with the rest of the population. For a cut-off of 1.8, in “medium risk” individuals, an NDI inferior to that value may predict any neoplastic lesion with a sensitivity of 97.7%, an advanced neoplastic lesion with a sensitivity of 97% and adenocarcinoma with a sensitivity of 94.4%. Discussion: NDI score may have a role as a colorectal cancer-screening test in “medium risk” individuals. Abbreviations: DNA = deoxyribonucleic acid; CRC = colorectal cancer; EU = European Union; WHO = World Health Organization; FOBT = fecal occult blood test; CBMN = cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay; MN = micronuclei; NPB = nucleoplasmic bridges; NDI = Nuclear Division Index; FAP = familial adenomatous polyposis; HNPCC = hereditary non

  4. Medium of Instruction in Thai Science Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanjavanakul, Natpat

    The goal of this study is to compare classroom discourse in Thai 9th grade science lessons with English or Thai as a medium of instruction. This is a cross-sectional study of video recordings from five lessons in an English-medium instruction class and five lessons in a Thai- medium instruction class from a Thai secondary school. The study involved two teachers and two groups of students. The findings show the use of both English and Thai in English-medium lessons. Students tend to be more responsive to teacher questions in Thai than in English. The findings suggest the use of students' native language during English-medium lessons to help facilitate learning in certain situations. Additionally, the study provides implications for research, practice and policy for using English as a medium of instruction.

  5. Cliff Collapse Hazard from Repeated Multicopter Uav Acquisitions: Return on Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewez, T. J. B.; Leroux, J.; Morelli, S.

    2016-06-01

    Cliff collapse poses a serious hazard to infrastructure and passers-by. Obtaining information such as magnitude-frequency relationship for a specific site is of great help to adapt appropriate mitigation measures. While it is possible to monitor hundreds-of-meter-long cliff sites with ground based techniques (e.g. lidar or photogrammetry), it is both time consuming and scientifically limiting to focus on short cliff sections. In the project SUAVE, we sought to investigate whether an octocopter UAV photogrammetric survey would perform sufficiently well in order to repeatedly survey cliff face geometry and derive rock fall inventories amenable to probabilistic rock fall hazard computation. An experiment was therefore run on a well-studied site of the chalk coast of Normandy, in Mesnil Val, along the English Channel (Northern France). Two campaigns were organized in January and June 2015 which surveyed about 60 ha of coastline, including the 80-m-high cliff face, the chalk platform at its foot, and the hinterland in a matter of 4 hours from start to finish. To conform with UAV regulations, the flight was flown in 3 legs for a total of about 30 minutes in the air. A total of 868 and 1106 photos were respectively shot with a Sony NEX 7 with fixed focal 16mm. Three lines of sight were combined: horizontal shots for cliff face imaging, 45°-oblique views to tie plateau/platform photos with cliff face images, and regular vertical shots. Photogrammetrically derived dense point clouds were produced with Agisoft Photoscan at ultra-high density (median density is 1 point every 1.7cm). Point cloud density proved a critical parameter to reproduce faithfully the chalk face's geometry. Tuning down the density parameter to "high" or "medium", though efficient from a computational point of view, generated artefacts along chalk bed edges (i.e. smoothing the sharp gradient) and ultimately creating ghost volumes when computing cloud to cloud differences. Yet, from a hazard point of

  6. Tunneling properties of nonplanar molecules in a gas medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bahrami, Mohammad; Bassi, Angelo

    2011-12-15

    We propose a simple, general, and accurate formula for analyzing the tunneling between classical configurations of a nonplanar molecule in a gas medium, as a function of the thermodynamic parameters of the gas. We apply it to two interesting cases: (i) the shift to zero frequency of the inversion line of ammonia, upon an increase in the pressure of the gas; and (ii) the destruction of the coherent tunneling of D{sub 2}S{sub 2} molecules in a He gas. In both cases, we compare our analysis with previous theoretical and experimental results.

  7. Shallow repeating seismic events under an alpine glacier at Mount Rainier, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thelen, Weston A.; Allstadt, Kate; De Angelis, Silvio; Malone, Stephen D.; Moran, Seth C.; Vidale, John

    2013-01-01

    We observed several swarms of repeating low-frequency (1–5 Hz) seismic events during a 3 week period in May–June 2010, near the summit of Mount Rainier, Washington, USA, that likely were a result of stick–slip motion at the base of alpine glaciers. The dominant set of repeating events ('multiplets') featured >4000 individual events and did not exhibit daytime variations in recurrence interval or amplitude. Volcanoes and glaciers around the world are known to produce seismic signals with great variability in both frequency content and size. The low-frequency character and periodic recurrence of the Mount Rainier multiplets mimic long-period seismicity often seen at volcanoes, particularly during periods of unrest. However, their near-surface location, lack of common spectral peaks across the recording network, rapid attenuation of amplitudes with distance, and temporal correlation with weather systems all indicate that ice-related source mechanisms are the most likely explanation. We interpret the low-frequency character of these multiplets to be the result of trapping of seismic energy under glacial ice as it propagates through the highly heterogeneous and attenuating volcanic material. The Mount Rainier multiplet sequences underscore the difficulties in differentiating low-frequency signals due to glacial processes from those caused by volcanic processes on glacier-clad volcanoes.

  8. Are all repeats created equal? Understanding DNA repeats at an individual level.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinpu; Li, Fei

    2017-02-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences, comprising up to 50 % of the genome in all eukaryotes, play important roles in a wide range of cellular functions, such as transcriptional regulation, genome stability, and cellular differentiation. However, due to technical difficulties in differentiating their sequences, DNA repeats remain one of the most mysterious parts of eukaryotic genomes. Key questions, such as how repetitive entities behave at individual level and how the internal architecture of these repeats is organized, are still poorly understood. Recent advances from our group reveal unexpected position-dependent variation within tandem DNA repeats in fission yeast. Despite sharing identical DNA sequences, the peri-centromeric repeats are organized into diverse epigenetic states and chromatin structures. We demonstrate that this position-dependent variation requires key heterochromatin factors and condensin. Our works further suggest that the peri-centromeric repeats are organized into distinct higher order structures that ensure a proper positioning of CENP-A, the centromere-specific histone H3 variant, to centromeres. These most recent developments offer insights into the mechanisms underlying the position effect within tandem DNA arrays, and have broad implications in the field of epigenetics and chromatin biology.

  9. Repeats identification using improved suffix trees.

    PubMed

    Huo, Hongwei; Wang, Xiaowu; Stojkovic, Vojislav

    2009-01-01

    The suffix tree data structure plays an important role in the efficient implementations of some querying algorithms. This paper presents the fast Rep(eats)Seeker algorithm for repeats identification based on the improvements of suffix tree construction. The leaf nodes and the branch nodes are numbered in different ways during the construction of a suffix tree and extra information is added to the branch nodes. The experimental results show that improvements reduce the running time of the RepSeeker algorithm without losing the accuracy. The experimental results coincide with the theoretical expectations.

  10. Distillation by repeated measurements: Continuous spectrum case

    SciTech Connect

    Bellomo, Bruno; Compagno, Giuseppe; Nakazato, Hiromichi; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2010-12-15

    Repeated measurements on one part of a bipartite system strongly affect the other part that is not measured, the dynamics of which is regulated by an effective contracted evolution operator. When the spectrum of this operator is discrete, the nonmeasured system is driven into a pure state, irrespective of the initial state, provided that the spectrum satisfies certain conditions. We show here that, even in the case of continuous spectrum, an effective distillation can occur under rather general conditions. We confirm it by applying our formalism to a simple model.

  11. Platelet peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in repeated stress

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, D.E.; Bidder, M.; Gavish, M. ); Weizman, A.; Karp, L.; Tyano, S. ); Grinshpoon, A.; Bleich, A.

    1991-01-01

    ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding to platelet membranes and plasma stress hormones were studied in soldiers at the beginning of a parachute training course, following 6 days of preparatory exercises, and after the fourth actual parachute jump. A slight reduction (15%; NS) in the number of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) was detected at the end of the exercise period, prior to the first jump. Reduced density of PBR was observed immediately after the repeated actual jumps. Equilibrium dissociation constants were not affected by the stressful situation. Plasma cortisol and prolactin levels remained unaltered during the entire study period.

  12. Platelet peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in repeated stress.

    PubMed

    Dar, D E; Weizman, A; Karp, L; Grinshpoon, A; Bidder, M; Kotler, M; Tyano, S; Bleich, A; Gavish, M

    1991-01-01

    [3H]PK 11195 binding to platelet membranes and plasma stress hormones were studied in soldiers at the beginning of a parachute training course, following 6 days of preparatory exercises, and after the fourth actual parachute jump. A slight reduction (15%; NS) in the number of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) was detected at the end of the exercise period, prior to the first jump. Reduced (26%; P less than 0.05) density of PBR was observed immediately after the repeated actual jumps. Equilibrium dissociation constants were not affected by the stressful situation. Plasma cortisol and prolactin levels remained unaltered during the entire study period.

  13. Frequency Comb Cooling Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-18

    frequency combs ). Recently the power and spectral coverage of frequency combs have grown considerably with projected 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE...Aug-2011 18-May-2012 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final report on frequency comb cooling project The views, opinions and/or... frequency combs ). Recently the power and spectral coverage of frequency combs have grown considerably with projected average powers above 10 kW. We

  14. Medium chain triglycerides and hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, M. Hilary; Bolton, C. H.; Morris, J. S.; Read, A. E.

    1974-01-01

    The oral administration of short (C6) and medium (C8 and (C10) chain triglycerides produced no clinical or electroencephalographic changes in patients with cirrhosis of the liver. Arterial ammonia levels were also monitored in these patients and showed no significant change after medium chain triglycerides. It was concluded that medium chain triglycerides, known to be of potential value in the treatment of malabsorption in patients with cirrhosis, are not clinically contraindicated, even in patients with evidence of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:4841275

  15. The performance of dense medium processes

    SciTech Connect

    Horsfall, D.W.

    1993-12-31

    Dense medium washing in baths and cyclones is widely carried out in South Africa. The paper shows the reason for the preferred use of dense medium processes rather than gravity concentrators such as jigs. The factors leading to efficient separation in baths are listed and an indication given of the extent to which these factors may be controlled and embodied in the deployment of baths and dense medium cyclones in the planning stages of a plant.

  16. High Frequency Guided Wave Virtual Array SAFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R.; Pardini, A.; Diaz, A.

    2003-03-01

    The principles of the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) are generalized for application to high frequency plate wave signals. It is shown that a flaw signal received in long-range plate wave propagation can be analyzed as if the signals were measured by an infinite array of transducers in an unbounded medium. It is shown that SAFT-based flaw sizing can be performed with as few as three or less actual measurement positions.

  17. In-Medium Pion Valence Distribution Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsushima, K.; de Melo, J. P. B. C.

    2017-03-01

    After a brief review of the quark-based model for nuclear matter, and some pion properties in medium presented in our previous works, we report new results for the pion valence wave function as well as the valence distribution amplitude in medium, which are presented in our recent article. We find that both the in-medium pion valence distribution and the in-medium pion valence wave function, are substantially modified at normal nuclear matter density, due to the reduction in the pion decay constant.

  18. Chemically defined medium and Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; Kozak, Elena; Conley, Catharine A.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C. elegans has been established as a powerful genetic system. Use of a chemically defined medium (C. elegans Maintenance Medium (CeMM)) now allows standardization and systematic manipulation of the nutrients that animals receive. Liquid cultivation allows automated culturing and experimentation and should be of use in large-scale growth and screening of animals. RESULTS: We find that CeMM is versatile and culturing is simple. CeMM can be used in a solid or liquid state, it can be stored unused for at least a year, unattended actively growing cultures may be maintained longer than with standard techniques, and standard C. elegans protocols work well with animals grown in defined medium. We also find that there are caveats to using defined medium. Animals in defined medium grow more slowly than on standard medium, appear to display adaptation to the defined medium, and display altered growth rates as they change the composition of the defined medium. CONCLUSIONS: As was suggested with the introduction of C. elegans as a potential genetic system, use of defined medium with C. elegans should prove a powerful tool.

  19. Metals in the intracluster medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Kyoko; Sato, Kosuke; Sakuma, Eri; Tamura, Takayuki

    2012-03-01

    We derived radial abundance profiles of O, Mg, Si, S and Fe in the intracluster medium (ICM) of several clusters and groups of galaxies up to about 0.3 r180 with Suzaku and those of Fe in 28 nearby brightest clusters of galaxies up to 0.3-0.5 r180 with XMM. Within 0.05 r180, Fe abundance scatters from 0.5 to 1 solar. The scatter may be caused by a difference in recent metal supplies with supernovae Ia and stellar mass loss from cD galaxies. In these regions and also in ISM in giant elliptical galaxies, the abundance patterns of O, Mg, Si, S and Fe are close to the solar ratio adopting the new solar abundance defined by Lodders [1]. At 0.1-0.5 r180, relaxed clusters with a cD galaxy at their X-ray peak have flat Fe abundance profiles at 0.4-0.5 solar, with a small scatter. In these clusters, the ratio of Fe mass in the ICM to the light from galaxies have similar profiles, and increases toward outer regions. In addition, several systems show a hint of enhancement of O/Fe and Mg/Fe ratios. These results indicate that the metal-enrichment process in these clusters has been universal, and a significant amount of Fe is synthesized at a very early stage in cluster formation. Scatter in the metal-mass-to-light ratios and similarity in the abundances in the ICM of groups and clusters of galaxies also indicate early metal synthesis.

  20. Spin-exchange frequency shift in alkali-metal-vapor cell frequency standards

    SciTech Connect

    Micalizio, Salvatore; Godone, Aldo; Levi, Filippo; Vanier, Jacques

    2006-03-15

    In this paper we calculate the effect of spin-exchange collisions in alkali-metal vapors. In the framework of the high-energy approximation, we evaluate the spin-exchange cross sections related to the line broadening and to the frequency shift of the ground state hyperfine transition. We do the calculation for the four isotopes, {sup 23}Na, {sup 39}K, {sup 87}Rb, and {sup 133}Cs. The results are used in particular to evaluate the spin-exchange frequency shift in Rb vapor cell frequency standards used in many applications. It turns out that, due to possible fluctuations in the atomic density, spin exchange may affect significantly the medium and long term frequency stability of the frequency standard.

  1. CW dual-frequency MOPA laser with frequency separation of 45 GHz.

    PubMed

    Hu, Miao; Zheng, Yaoyuan; Cai, Ju; Zhang, Guiju; Li, Qiliang; Zhou, Xuefang; Wei, Yizhen; Lu, Yang

    2015-04-20

    A CW dual-frequency master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) laser system with dozens of gigahertz (GHz) frequency separation is presented. The MOPA system consists of a monolithic microchip seed laser and a double-end pumped traveling wave power amplifier. The short length of seed laser cavity guarantees the seed signal with a large frequency separation (above 53 GHz) but low output power (below 247.8 mW). By adding a long and low-doped active medium laser amplifier stage, a significant increase in laser power and an improvement in beam quality are obtained. After fine temperature tuning of seed laser cavity for "spectra matching", a 2.40 W dual-frequency laser signal with 45 GHz frequency separation is achieved.

  2. Repeatable assessment protocol for electromagnetic trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidegger, Tamas; Sirokai, Beáta; Fenyvesi, Gábor; Kovács, Levente; Benyó, Balázs; Benyó, Zoltán

    2012-02-01

    In the past decades, many new trends appeared in interventional medicine. One of the most groundbreaking ones is Image-Guided Surgery (IGS). The main benefit of IGS procedures is the reduction of the patient's pain and collateral damage through improved accuracy and targeting. Electromagnetic Tracking (EMT) has been introduced to medical applications as an effective tool for navigation. However, magnetic fields can be severely distorted by ferromagnetic materials and electronic equipment, which is a major barrier towards their wider application. The focus of the study is to determine and compensate the inherent errors of the different types of EMTs, in order to improve their accuracy. Our aim is to develop a standardized, simple and repeatable assessment protocol; to determine tracking errors with sub-millimeter accuracy, hence increasing the measurement precision and reliability. For initial experiments, the NDI Aurora and the Ascension medSAFE systems were used in a standard laboratory environment. We aim to advance to the state-of-the art by describing and disseminating an easily reproducible calibration method, publishing the CAD files of the accuracy phantom and the source of the evaluation data. This should allow the wider spread of the technique, and eventually lead to the repeatable and comparable assessment of EMT systems.

  3. Distributed parameter modeling of repeated truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Han-Ching

    1994-01-01

    A new approach to find homogeneous models for beam-like repeated flexible structures is proposed which conceptually involves two steps. The first step involves the approximation of 3-D non-homogeneous model by a 1-D periodic beam model. The structure is modeled as a 3-D non-homogeneous continuum. The displacement field is approximated by Taylor series expansion. Then, the cross sectional mass and stiffness matrices are obtained by energy equivalence using their additive properties. Due to the repeated nature of the flexible bodies, the mass, and stiffness matrices are also periodic. This procedure is systematic and requires less dynamics detail. The first step involves the homogenization from a 1-D periodic beam model to a 1-D homogeneous beam model. The periodic beam model is homogenized into an equivalent homogeneous beam model using the additive property of compliance along the generic axis. The major departure from previous approaches in literature is using compliance instead of stiffness in homogenization. An obvious justification is that the stiffness is additive at each cross section but not along the generic axis. The homogenized model preserves many properties of the original periodic model.

  4. Analysis of a random repeated impact process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, L. A.; Byrne, K. P.

    1981-10-01

    A simple random repeated impact process similar to the classical random walk process is analyzed. The process, which consists of a ball bouncing on a randomly vibrating surface, is analogous to loss-of-contact situations which can occur in linkages and vibrating tools. It also has relevance to rolling contact where the rolling element may separate from the surface and sustain repeated impacts. A coefficient of restitution is used to describe impact, and some important assumptions limit the analysis to values of this coefficient greater than 0°8. The Markov nature of the process is demonstrated by its one-step "memory". It may be regarded as a discrete Markov process "imbedded" in continuous time. A difference equation governing the process is developed and analyzed for the case where the vibrating surface has a Gaussian distribution of velocities. With the one-step transition probability density function a linear weighting function is used to account for the weighting effect of the ball's velocity on the distribution of table velocities at impact. The resulting integral equation is solved iteratively to yield the probability density function of ball velocities after impact. This information may then be used to predict the magnitudes of the impacts and the time between them.

  5. Repeated proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Takayuki |. E-mail: hashimoto@pmrc.tsukuba.ac.jp; Tokuuye, Koichi |; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi |; Igaki, Hiroshi |; Hata, Masaharu |; Kagei, Kenji |; Sugahara, Shinji; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Akine, Yasuyuki |

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the safety and effectiveness of repeated proton beam therapy for newly developed or recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: From June 1989 through July 2000, 225 patients with HCC underwent their first course of proton beam therapy at University of Tsukuba. Of them, 27 with 68 lesions who had undergone two or more courses were retrospectively reviewed in this study. Median interval between the first and second course was 24.5 months (range 3.3-79.8 months). Median total dose of 72 Gy in 16 fractions and 66 Gy in 16 fractions were given for the first course and the rest of the courses, respectively. Results: The 5-year survival rate and median survival period from the beginning of the first course for the 27 patients were 55.6% and 62.2 months, respectively. Five-year local control rate for the 68 lesions was 87.8%. Of the patients, 1 with Child-Pugh class B and another with class C before the last course suffered from acute hepatic failure. Conclusions: Repeated proton beam therapy for HCC is safe when the patient has a target in the peripheral region of the liver and liver function is Child-Pugh class A.

  6. Airborne Radar Interferometric Repeat-Pass Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Michel, Thierry R.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Chapman, Bruce D.; Fore, Alexander; Simard, Marc; Zebker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Earth science research often requires crustal deformation measurements at a variety of time scales, from seconds to decades. Although satellites have been used for repeat-track interferometric (RTI) synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) mapping for close to 20 years, RTI is much more difficult to implement from an airborne platform owing to the irregular trajectory of the aircraft compared with microwave imaging radar wavelengths. Two basic requirements for robust airborne repeat-pass radar interferometry include the ability to fly the platform to a desired trajectory within a narrow tube and the ability to have the radar beam pointed in a desired direction to a fraction of a beam width. Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is equipped with a precision auto pilot developed by NASA Dryden that allows the platform, a Gulfstream III, to nominally fly within a 5 m diameter tube and with an electronically scanned antenna to position the radar beam to a fraction of a beam width based on INU (inertial navigation unit) attitude angle measurements.

  7. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  8. Nonlinear site response in medium magnitude earthquakes near Parkfield, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubinstein, Justin L.

    2011-01-01

    Careful analysis of strong-motion recordings of 13 medium magnitude earthquakes (3.7 ≤ M ≤ 6.5) in the Parkfield, California, area shows that very modest levels of shaking (approximately 3.5% of the acceleration of gravity) can produce observable changes in site response. Specifically, I observe a drop and subsequent recovery of the resonant frequency at sites that are part of the USGS Parkfield dense seismograph array (UPSAR) and Turkey Flat array. While further work is necessary to fully eliminate other models, given that these frequency shifts correlate with the strength of shaking at the Turkey Flat array and only appear for the strongest shaking levels at UPSAR, the most plausible explanation for them is that they are a result of nonlinear site response. Assuming this to be true, the observation of nonlinear site response in small (M M 6.5 San Simeon earthquake and the 2004 M 6 Parkfield earthquake).

  9. Analysis of LRRK2 accessory repeat domains: prediction of repeat length, number and sites of Parkinson's disease mutations.

    PubMed

    Mills, Ryan D; Mulhern, Terrence D; Cheng, Heung-Chin; Culvenor, Janetta G

    2012-10-01

    Various investigators have identified the major domain organization of LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase 2), which includes a GTPase ROC (Ras of complex proteins) domain followed by a COR (C-terminal of ROC) domain and a protein kinase domain. In addition, there are four domains composed of structural repeat motifs likely to be involved in regulation and localization of this complex protein. In the present paper, we report our bioinformatic analyses of the human LRRK2 amino acid sequence to predict the repeat size, number and likely boundaries for the armadillo repeat, ankyrin repeat, the leucine-rich repeat and WD40 repeat regions of LRRK2. Homology modelling using known protein structures with similar domains was used to predict structures, exposed residues and location of mutations for these repeat regions. We predict that the armadillo repeats, ankyrin repeats and leucine-rich repeats together form an extended N-terminal flexible 'solenoid'-like structure composed of tandem repeat modules likely to be important in anchoring to the membrane and cytoskeletal structures as well as binding to other protein ligands. Near the C-terminus of LRRK2, the WD40 repeat region is predicted to form a closed propeller structure that is important for protein complex formation.

  10. Nonlocal vibration and biaxial buckling of double-viscoelastic-FGM-nanoplate system with viscoelastic Pasternak medium in between

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. C.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Fan, L. F.

    2017-04-01

    The general equation for transverse vibration of double-viscoelastic-FGM-nanoplate system with viscoelastic Pasternak medium in between and each nanoplate subjected to in-plane edge loads is formulated on the basis of the Eringen's nonlocal elastic theory and the Kelvin model. The factors of the structural damping, medium damping, small size effect, loading ratio, and Winkler modulus and shear modulus of the medium are incorporated in the formulation. Based on the Navier's method, the analytical solutions for vibrational frequency and buckling load of the system with simply supported boundary conditions are obtained. The influences of these factors on vibrational frequency and buckling load of the system are discussed. It is demonstrated that the vibrational frequency of the system for the out-of-phase vibration is dependent upon the structural damping, small size effect and viscoelastic Pasternak medium, whereas the vibrational frequency for the in-phase vibration is independent of the viscoelastic Pasternak medium. While the buckling load of the system for the in-phase buckling case has nothing to do with the viscoelastic Pasternak medium, the buckling load for the out-of-phase case is related to the small size effect, loading ratio and Pasternak medium.

  11. Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, Periasamy K.; Joshi, Bhal Chandra; Naidu, Arun Kumar

    High temporal and frequency resolution observations of solar generated disturbances below 15 MHz in the near-Sun region and at Sun-Earth distances in conjunction with optical and high energy observations of Sun are essential to understand the structure and evolution of eruptions, such as, flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and their associated solar wind disturbances at heights above the photosphere and their consequences in the interplanetary medium. This talk presents a case study of Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE) payload to probe the corona and the solar disturbances at solar offsets greater than 2 solar radii below 30 MHz. The LORE, although not part of Aditya-L1 mission, can be complimentary to planned Aditya-L1 coronagraph and its other on-board payloads as well as synergistic to ground based observations, which are routinely carried out by Ooty Radio Telescope. We discuss the baseline design and technical details of the proposed LORE and it is particularly suitable for providing data on the detailed time and frequency structure of fast drifting Type-III and slow drifting Type-II radio bursts with unprecedented time and frequency resolution as well as goniopolarimetry, made possible with better designed antennas and state-of-art electronics, employing FPGAs and an intelligent data management system. This would enable wide ranging studies such as studies of nonlinear plasma processes, CME in-situ radio emission, CME driven phenomena, interplanetary CME driven shocks, ICMEs driven by decelerating IP shocks and space weather effects of Solar Wind interaction regions. The talk will highlight the science objectives as well as the proposed technical design features.

  12. Erroneous Memories Arising from Repeated Attempts to Remember

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkel, Linda A.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of repeated and prolonged attempts at remembering on false memory rates was assessed in three experiments. Participants saw and imagined pictures and then made repeated recall attempts before taking a source memory test. Although the number of items recalled increased with repeated tests, the net gains were associated with more source…

  13. AUTOMATIC FREQUENCY CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, C.F.; Salisbury, J.D.

    1961-01-10

    A control is described for automatically matching the frequency of a resonant cavity to that of a driving oscillator. The driving oscillator is disconnected from the cavity and a secondary oscillator is actuated in which the cavity is the frequency determining element. A low frequency is mixed with the output of the driving oscillator and the resultant lower and upper sidebands are separately derived. The frequencies of the sidebands are compared with the secondary oscillator frequency. deriving a servo control signal to adjust a tuning element in the cavity and matching the cavity frequency to that of the driving oscillator. The driving oscillator may then be connected to the cavity.

  14. Are intertidal soft sediment assemblages affected by repeated oil spill events? A field-based experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Sandrini-Neto, Leonardo; Martins, César C; Lana, Paulo C

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the impact of repeated diesel spills on the structure of intertidal macrofaunal assemblages of a subtropical estuary. Three frequencies of exposure events were compared against two dosages of oil in a factorial experiment with asymmetrical controls. Hypotheses were tested to distinguish between (i) the overall effect of oil spills, (ii) the effect of diesel dosage via different exposure regimes, and (iii) the effect of time since last spill. Repeated oil spills dramatically altered the overall structure of assemblages and reduced the total density of macrofauna and densities of dominant taxa. Increasing the frequency of oil spills negatively affected macrofauna. In general, frequent low-dosage oil spills were more deleterious than infrequent high-dosage ones. However, increases in densities of some taxa, mainly the gastropod Heleobia australis, were observed in response to infrequent spills. Our results highlight the importance of repeated exposure events in determining the extent of oil impacts.

  15. Impact of depressive symptoms, self-esteem and neuroticism on trajectories of overgeneral autobiographical memory over repeated trials.

    PubMed

    Kashdan, Todd B; Roberts, John E; Carlos, Erica L

    2006-04-01

    The present study examined trajectories of change in the frequency of overgeneral autobiographical memory (OGM) over the course of repeated trials, and tested whether particular dimensions of depressive symptomatology (somatic and cognitive-affective distress), self-esteem, and neuroticism account for individual differences in these trajectories. Given that depression is associated with impairments in effortful processing, we predicted that over repeated trials depression would be associated with increasingly OGM. Generalised Linear Mixed Models with Penalised Quasi-Likelihood demonstrated significant linear and quadratic trends in OGM over repeated trials, and somatic distress and self-esteem moderated these slopes. The form of these interactions suggested that somatic distress and low self-esteem primarily contribute to OGM during the second half of the trial sequence. The present findings demonstrate the value of a novel analytical approach to OGM that estimates individual trajectories of change over repeated trials.

  16. Next generation sequencing (NGS) database for tandem repeats with multiple pattern 2°-shaft multicore string matching

    PubMed Central

    Someswara Rao, Chinta; Raju, S. Viswanadha

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been rapidly applied in biomedical and biological research in recent years. To provide the comprehensive NGS resource for the research, in this paper , we have considered 10 loci/codi/repeats TAGA, TCAT, GAAT, AGAT, AGAA, GATA, TATC, CTTT, TCTG and TCTA. Then we developed the NGS Tandem Repeat Database (TandemRepeatDB) for all the chromosomes of Homo sapiens, Callithrix jacchus, Chlorocebus sabaeus, Gorilla gorilla, Macaca fascicularis, Macaca mulatta, Nomascus leucogenys, Pan troglodytes, Papio anubis and Pongo abelii genome data sets for all those locis. We find the successive occurence frequency for all the above 10 SSR (simple sequence repeats) in the above genome data sets on a chromosome-by-chromosome basis with multiple pattern 2° shaft multicore string matching. PMID:26981434

  17. Automatic detection of regularly repeating vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellinger, David

    2005-09-01

    Many animal species produce repetitive sounds at regular intervals. This regularity can be used for automatic recognition of the sounds, providing improved detection at a given signal-to-noise ratio. Here, the detection of sperm whale sounds is examined. Sperm whales produce highly repetitive ``regular clicks'' at periods of about 0.2-2 s, and faster click trains in certain behavioral contexts. The following detection procedure was tested: a spectrogram was computed; values within a certain frequency band were summed; time windowing was applied; each windowed segment was autocorrelated; and the maximum of the autocorrelation within a certain periodicity range was chosen. This procedure was tested on sets of recordings containing sperm whale sounds and interfering sounds, both low-frequency recordings from autonomous hydrophones and high-frequency ones from towed hydrophone arrays. An optimization procedure iteratively varies detection parameters (spectrogram frame length and frequency range, window length, periodicity range, etc.). Performance of various sets of parameters was measured by setting a standard level of allowable missed calls, and the resulting optimium parameters are described. Performance is also compared to that of a neural network trained using the data sets. The method is also demonstrated for sounds of blue whales, minke whales, and seismic airguns. [Funding from ONR.

  18. 47 CFR 97.205 - Repeater station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... km (10 miles) of the Arecibo Observatory or before changing the transmitting frequency, transmitter... notification thereof to the Interference Office, Arecibo Observatory, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, Puerto Rico 00612... the proposed operation is received by the FCC from the Arecibo Observatory, Arecibo, Puerto...

  19. 47 CFR 97.205 - Repeater station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... km (10 miles) of the Arecibo Observatory or before changing the transmitting frequency, transmitter... notification thereof to the Interference Office, Arecibo Observatory, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, Puerto Rico 00612... the proposed operation is received by the FCC from the Arecibo Observatory, Arecibo, Puerto...

  20. 47 CFR 97.205 - Repeater station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... km (10 miles) of the Arecibo Observatory or before changing the transmitting frequency, transmitter... notification thereof to the Interference Office, Arecibo Observatory, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, Puerto Rico 00612... the proposed operation is received by the FCC from the Arecibo Observatory, Arecibo, Puerto...

  1. Effect of repeated burning on plant and soil carbon and nitrogen in cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) dominated ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and Aims Fire has profound effects on ecosystem properties, but few studies have addressed the effect of repeated burns on soil nutrients, and none have been conducted in cold desert ecosystems where invasion by exotic annual grasses is resulting in greater fire frequency. In a 5 year stu...

  2. 49 CFR 236.811 - Speed, medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Speed, medium. 236.811 Section 236.811 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, medium. A speed not exceeding 40 miles per hour....

  3. 49 CFR 236.811 - Speed, medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Speed, medium. 236.811 Section 236.811 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, medium. A speed not exceeding 40 miles per hour....

  4. Rethinking English in Maori-Medium Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Richard

    2011-01-01

    English language instruction in New Zealand's Maori-medium schools is controversial, with many schools either excluding it from their curriculum or adopting a tokenistic approach. Yet, how Maori-medium educators can best support their students' academic English language growth is still an under-researched and unresolved question. This paper…

  5. 49 CFR 236.811 - Speed, medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Speed, medium. 236.811 Section 236.811 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, medium. A speed not exceeding 40 miles per hour....

  6. 49 CFR 236.811 - Speed, medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Speed, medium. 236.811 Section 236.811 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, medium. A speed not exceeding 40 miles per hour....

  7. 49 CFR 236.811 - Speed, medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Speed, medium. 236.811 Section 236.811 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, medium. A speed not exceeding 40 miles per hour....

  8. Effects of repeated fires on ecosystem C and N stocks along a fire induced forest/grassland gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chih-Hsin; Chen, Yung-Sheng; Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Chiou, Chyi-Rong; Lin, Chau-Chih; Menyailo, Oleg V.

    2013-03-01

    Repeated fires might have different effect on ecosystem carbon storage than a single fire event, but information on repeated fires and their effects on forest ecosystems and carbon storage is scarce. However, changes in climate, vegetation composition, and human activities are expected to make forests more susceptible to fires that recur with relatively high frequency. In this study, the effects of repeated fires on ecosystem carbon and nitrogen stocks were examined along a fire-induced forest/grassland gradient wherein the fire events varied from an unburned forest to repeatedly burned grassland. Results from the study show repeated fires drastically decreased ecosystem carbon and nitrogen stocks along the forest/grassland gradient. The reduction began with the disappearance of living tree biomass, and followed by the loss of soil carbon and nitrogen. Within 4 years of the onset of repeated fires on the unburned forest, the original ecosystem carbon and nitrogen stocks were reduced by 42% and 21%, respectively. Subsequent fires caused cumulative reductions in ecosystem carbon and nitrogen stocks by 68% and 44% from the original ecosystem carbon and nitrogen stocks, respectively. The analyses of carbon budgets calculated by vegetation composition and stable isotopic δ13C values indicate that 84% of forest-derived carbon is lost at grassland, whereas the gain of grass-derived carbon only compensates 18% for this loss. Such significant losses in ecosystem carbon and nitrogen stocks suggest that the effects of repeated fires have substantial impacts on ecosystem and soil carbon and nitrogen cycling.

  9. Heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters in one-dimensional waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Guo-Zhu; Zhang, Mei; Ai, Qing; Yang, Guo-Jian; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Hobiny, Aatef; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2017-03-01

    We propose a heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters in one-dimensional waveguides. We show the details by implementing nonlocal entanglement generation, entanglement swapping, and entanglement purification modules with atoms in waveguides, and discuss the feasibility of the repeater with currently achievable technology. In our scheme, the faulty events can be discarded by detecting the polarization of the photons. That is, our protocols are accomplished with a fidelity of 100% in principle, which is advantageous for implementing realistic long-distance quantum communication. Moreover, additional atomic qubits are not required, but only a single-photon medium. Our scheme is scalable and attractive since it can be realized in solid-state quantum systems. With the great progress on controlling atom-waveguide systems, the repeater may be very useful in quantum information processing in the future.

  10. Who Repeats Algebra, and How Does Initial Performance Relate to Improvement When the Course Is Repeated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Anthony; Jaquet, Karina; Finkelstein, Neal

    2016-01-01

    The information provided in this report shows how students perform when they repeat algebra I and how the level of improvement varies depending on initial course performance and the academic measure (course grades or CST scores). This information can help inform decisions and policies regarding whether and under what circumstances students should…

  11. Tandemly repeated exons encode 81-base repeats in multiple, developmentally regulated Schistosoma mansoni transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R E; Davis, A H; Carroll, S M; Rajkovic, A; Rottman, F M

    1988-01-01

    The adult Schistosoma mansoni cDNA clone 10-3 encodes an antigen that is recognized by sera from infected humans. We characterized multiple developmentally regulated transcripts homologous to the 10-3 cDNA and portions of the complex genomic loci encoding those transcripts. Transcripts of approximately 950, 870, and 780 nucleotides were expressed in adults, whereas only the 780-nucleotide transcript was observed in the larval stage. These transcripts were highly similar, containing variable numbers of identical direct tandem repeats of 81 bases. Although the sequence of the repeating elements and sequences 3' to them were identical in all the transcripts, sequences 5' of the repeating elements exhibited variations, including a 27-base insertion, alternative start sites for transcription, and alternate 5' exon usage. These transcripts appeared to be derived in part by the developmentally controlled alternative splicing of small exons and the use of alternative transcription initiation sites from the one or two complex loci of at least 40 kilobase pairs. Each 81-base repeat in the transcripts was encoded by three dispersed 27-base-pair exons. These 27-base-pair exons were contained within highly conserved, reiterated 3-kilobase-pair genomic tandem arrays. Images PMID:3211127

  12. Repeat Testing Effects on Credentialing Exams: Are Repeaters Misinformed or Uninformed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Richard A.; Raymond, Mark R.; Haist, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    To mitigate security concerns and unfair score gains, credentialing programs routinely administer new test material to examinees retesting after an initial failing attempt. Counterintuitively, a small but growing body of recent research suggests that repeating the identical form does not create an unfair advantage. This study builds upon and…

  13. Interpretations of Frequency Domain Analyses of Neural Entrainment: Periodicity, Fundamental Frequency, and Harmonics

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong; Melloni, Lucia; Poeppel, David; Ding, Nai

    2016-01-01

    Brain activity can follow the rhythms of dynamic sensory stimuli, such as speech and music, a phenomenon called neural entrainment. It has been hypothesized that low-frequency neural entrainment in the neural delta and theta bands provides a potential mechanism to represent and integrate temporal information. Low-frequency neural entrainment is often studied using periodically changing stimuli and is analyzed in the frequency domain using the Fourier analysis. The Fourier analysis decomposes a periodic signal into harmonically related sinusoids. However, it is not intuitive how these harmonically related components are related to the response waveform. Here, we explain the interpretation of response harmonics, with a special focus on very low-frequency neural entrainment near 1 Hz. It is illustrated why neural responses repeating at f Hz do not necessarily generate any neural response at f Hz in the Fourier spectrum. A strong neural response at f Hz indicates that the time scales of the neural response waveform within each cycle match the time scales of the stimulus rhythm. Therefore, neural entrainment at very low frequency implies not only that the neural response repeats at f Hz but also that each period of the neural response is a slow wave matching the time scale of a f Hz sinusoid. PMID:27375465

  14. Interpretations of Frequency Domain Analyses of Neural Entrainment: Periodicity, Fundamental Frequency, and Harmonics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Melloni, Lucia; Poeppel, David; Ding, Nai

    2016-01-01

    Brain activity can follow the rhythms of dynamic sensory stimuli, such as speech and music, a phenomenon called neural entrainment. It has been hypothesized that low-frequency neural entrainment in the neural delta and theta bands provides a potential mechanism to represent and integrate temporal information. Low-frequency neural entrainment is often studied using periodically changing stimuli and is analyzed in the frequency domain using the Fourier analysis. The Fourier analysis decomposes a periodic signal into harmonically related sinusoids. However, it is not intuitive how these harmonically related components are related to the response waveform. Here, we explain the interpretation of response harmonics, with a special focus on very low-frequency neural entrainment near 1 Hz. It is illustrated why neural responses repeating at f Hz do not necessarily generate any neural response at f Hz in the Fourier spectrum. A strong neural response at f Hz indicates that the time scales of the neural response waveform within each cycle match the time scales of the stimulus rhythm. Therefore, neural entrainment at very low frequency implies not only that the neural response repeats at f Hz but also that each period of the neural response is a slow wave matching the time scale of a f Hz sinusoid.

  15. Quantum repeaters using continuous-variable teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Josephine; Ralph, T. C.

    2017-02-01

    Quantum optical states are fragile and can become corrupted when passed through a lossy communication channel. Unlike for classical signals, optical amplifiers cannot be used to recover quantum signals. Quantum repeaters have been proposed as a way of reducing errors and hence increasing the range of quantum communications. Current protocols target specific discrete encodings, for example quantum bits encoded on the polarization of single photons. We introduce a more general approach that can reduce the effect of loss on any quantum optical encoding, including those based on continuous variables such as the field amplitudes. We show that in principle the protocol incurs a resource cost that scales polynomially with distance. We analyze the simplest implementation and find that while its range is limited it can still achieve useful improvements in the distance over which quantum entanglement of field amplitudes can be distributed.

  16. Simple sequence repeats in bryophyte mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chao-Xian; Zhu, Rui-Liang; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are thought to be common in plant mitochondrial (mt) genomes, but have yet to be fully described for bryophytes. We screened the mt genomes of two liverworts (Marchantia polymorpha and Pleurozia purpurea), two mosses (Physcomitrella patens and Anomodon rugelii) and two hornworts (Phaeoceros laevis and Nothoceros aenigmaticus), and detected 475 SSRs. Some SSRs are found conserved during the evolution, among which except one exists in both liverworts and mosses, all others are shared only by the two liverworts, mosses or hornworts. SSRs are known as DNA tracts having high mutation rates; however, according to our observations, they still can evolve slowly. The conservativeness of these SSRs suggests that they are under strong selection and could play critical roles in maintaining the gene functions.

  17. Design principles for efficient, repeated jumpgliding.

    PubMed

    Desbiens, Alexis Lussier; Pope, Morgan T; Christensen, David L; Hawkes, Elliot W; Cutkosky, Mark R

    2014-06-01

    Combined jumping and gliding locomotion, or 'jumpgliding', can be an efficient way for small robots or animals to travel over cluttered terrain. This paper presents functional requirements and models for a simple jumpglider which formalize the benefits and limitations of using aerodynamic surfaces to augment jumping ability. Analysis of the model gives insight into design choices and control strategies for higher performance and to accommodate special conditions such as a slippery launching surface. The model informs the design of a robotic platform that can perform repeated jumps using a carbon fiber spring and a pivoting wing. Experiments with two different versions of the platform agree with predictions from the model and demonstrate a significantly greater range, and lower cost-of-transport, than a comparable ballistic jumper.

  18. Safety of repeated transplantations of neurotrophic factors-secreting human mesenchymal stromal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Therapies based on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been shown to have potential benefit in several clinical studies. We have shown that, using a medium-based approach, MSC can be induced to secrete elevated levels of neurotropic factors, which have been shown to have protective effects in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases. These cells, designated MSC-NTF cells (Neurotrophic factor-secreting MSC, also known as NurOwn™) derived from the patient's own bone marrow, have been recently used for Phase I/II and Phase IIa clinical studies in patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). In these studies, ALS patients were subjected to a single administration of autologous MSC-NTF cells. The data from these studies indicate that the single administration of MSC-NTF cells is safe and well tolerated. In a recently published case report, it was shown that repeated MSC-NTF injections in an ALS patient treated on a compassionate basis were safe and well tolerated [Muscle Nerve 49:455-457, 2014]. Methods In the current study we studied the toxicity and tolerability of three consecutive intramuscular injections (IM) of cryopreserved human MSC-NTF cells in C57BL/B6 mice to investigate the effect of repeated administration of these cells. Results Monitoring of clinical signs and immune reactions showed that repeated injections of the cells did not lead to any serious adverse events. Pathology, histology and blood biochemistry parameters tested were found to be within normal ranges with no sign of tumor formation. Conclusions Based on these results we conclude that repeated injections of human MSC-NTF are well tolerated in mice. The results of this study suggest that if the outcomes of additional clinical studies point to the need for repeated treatments, such option can be considered safe. PMID:25097724

  19. Validity and repeatability of three in-shoe pressure measurement systems.

    PubMed

    Price, Carina; Parker, Daniel; Nester, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    In-shoe pressure measurement devices are used in research and clinic to quantify plantar foot pressures. Various devices are available, differing in size, sensor number and type; therefore accuracy and repeatability. Three devices (Medilogic, Tekscan and Pedar) were examined in a 2 day×3 trial design, quantifying insole response to regional and whole insole loading. The whole insole protocol applied an even pressure (50-600kPa) to the insole surface for 0-30s in the Novel TruBlue™ device. The regional protocol utilised cylinders with contact surfaces of 3.14 and 15.9cm(2) to apply pressures of 50 and 200kPa. The validity (% difference and Root Mean Square Error: RMSE) and repeatability (Intra-Class Correlation Coefficient: ICC) of the applied pressures (whole insole) and contact area (regional) were outcome variables. Validity of the Pedar system was highest (RMSE 2.6kPa; difference 3.9%), with the Medilogic (RMSE 27.0kPa; difference 13.4%) and Tekscan (RMSE 27.0kPa; difference 5.9%) systems displaying reduced validity. The average and peak pressures demonstrated high between-day repeatability for all three systems and each insole size (ICC≥0.859). The regional contact area % difference ranged from -97 to +249%, but the ICC demonstrated medium to high between-day repeatability (ICC≥0.797). Due to the varying responses of the systems, the choice of an appropriate pressure measurement device must be based on the loading characteristics and the outcome variables sought. Medilogic and Tekscan were most effective between 200 and 300kPa; Pedar performed well across all pressures. Contact area was less precise, but relatively repeatable for all systems.

  20. Reproducibility with repeat CT in radiomics study for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Panpan; Wang, Jiazhou; Zhong, Haoyu; Zhou, Zhen; Shen, Lijun; Hu, Weigang; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the reproducibility of radiomics features by repeating computed tomographic (CT) scans in rectal cancer. To choose stable radiomics features for rectal cancer. Results Volume normalized features are much more reproducible than unnormalized features. The average value of all slices is the most reproducible feature type in rectal cancer. Different filters have little effect for the reproducibility of radiomics features. For the average type features, 496 out of 775 features showed high reproducibility (ICC ≥ 0.8), 225 out of 775 features showed medium reproducibility (0.8 > ICC ≥ 0.5) and 54 out of 775 features showed low reproducibility (ICC < 0.5). Methods 40 rectal cancer patients with stage II were enrolled in this study, each of whom underwent two CT scans within average 8.7 days. 775 radiomics features were defined in this study. For each features, five different values (value from the largest slice, maximum value, minimum value, average value of all slices and value from superposed intermediate matrix) were extracted. Meanwhile a LOG filter with different parameters was applied to these images to find stable filter value. Concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) and inter-class correlation coefficients (ICC) of two CT scans were calculated to assess the reproducibility, based on original features and volume normalized features. Conclusions Features are recommended to be normalized to volume in radiomics analysis. The average type radiomics features are the most stable features in rectal cancer. Further analysis of these features of rectal cancer can be warranted for treatment monitoring and prognosis prediction. PMID:27669756

  1. Characterization and compilation of polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers of peanut from public database

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are several reports describing thousands of SSR markers in the peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) genome. There is a need to integrate various research reports of peanut DNA polymorphism into a single platform. Further, because of lack of uniformity in the labeling of these markers across the publications, there is some confusion on the identities of many markers. We describe below an effort to develop a central comprehensive database of polymorphic SSR markers in peanut. Findings We compiled 1,343 SSR markers as detecting polymorphism (14.5%) within a total of 9,274 markers. Amongst all polymorphic SSRs examined, we found that AG motif (36.5%) was the most abundant followed by AAG (12.1%), AAT (10.9%), and AT (10.3%).The mean length of SSR repeats in dinucleotide SSRs was significantly longer than that in trinucleotide SSRs. Dinucleotide SSRs showed higher polymorphism frequency for genomic SSRs when compared to trinucleotide SSRs, while for EST-SSRs, the frequency of polymorphic SSRs was higher in trinucleotide SSRs than in dinucleotide SSRs. The correlation of the length of SSR and the frequency of polymorphism revealed that the frequency of polymorphism was decreased as motif repeat number increased. Conclusions The assembled polymorphic SSRs would enhance the density of the existing genetic maps of peanut, which could also be a useful source of DNA markers suitable for high-throughput QTL mapping and marker-assisted selection in peanut improvement and thus would be of value to breeders. PMID:22818284

  2. The generation of Continuous-Variable Entanglement Frequency Comb

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Youbin; Cheng, Xiaomin; Wang, Huaijun; Shi, Zhongtao; Zhao, Junwei; Ji, Fengmin; Yin, Zhi; Wang, Yajuan

    2015-01-01

    Continuous-variable (CV) entanglement frequency comb can be produced by enhanced Raman scattering in an above-threshold optical oscillator cavity in which a hexagonally-poled LiTaO3 crystal resides as a Raman gain medium. The Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman signals are enhanced by a coupled quasi-phase-matching optical parametric process and the entanglement natures among these Raman signals and pump are demonstrated by applying a sufficient inseparability criterion for CV entanglement. Such entanglement frequency comb source with different frequencies and continuously tunable frequency interval may be very significant for the applications in quantum communication and networks. PMID:25600617

  3. DDC Descriptor Frequencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingbiel, Paul H.; Jacobs, Charles R.

    This report summarizes the frequency of use of the 7144 descriptors used for indexing technical reports in the Defense Documentation Center (DDC) collection. The descriptors are arranged alphabetically in the first section and by frequency in the second section. The frequency data cover about 427,000 AD documents spanning the interval from March…

  4. Eastern Frequency Response Study

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

    2013-05-01

    This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

  5. Making Sense of Frequency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen-Freeman, Diane

    2002-01-01

    Responds to Ellis (2002), which focuses on frequency in language processing, language use, and language acquisition. Contextualizes the frequency factor in terms of the evolution of second language acquisition (SLA) research. Suggests that although relevant and important, the frequency factor requires greater definition and qualification.…

  6. Frequency Response Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Etingov, Pavel; Chassin, PNNL David; Zhang, PNNL Yu; PNNL,

    2014-03-13

    According to the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) definition: “Frequency response is a measure of an Interconnection’s ability to stabilize frequency immediately following the sudden loss of generation or load, and is a critical component of the reliable operation of the Bulk-Power System, particularly during disturbances and recoveries. Failure to maintain frequency can disrupt the operation of equipment and initiate disconnection of power plant equipment to prevent it from being damaged, which could lead to wide-spread blackouts.” Frequency Response Tool automates the power system frequency response analysis process. The tool performs initial estimation of the system frequency parameters (initial frequency, minimum frequency, settling point). User can visually inspect and adjust these parameters. The tool also calculates the frequency response performance metrics of the system, archives the historic events and baselines the system performance. Frequency response performance characteristics of the system are calculated using phasor measurement unit (PMU) information. Methodology of the frequency response performance assessment implemented in the tool complies with the NERC Frequency response standard.

  7. How Soft Gamma Repeaters Might Make Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J. I.

    2016-08-01

    There are several phenomenological similarities between soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) and fast radio bursts (FRBs), including duty factors, timescales, and repetition. The sudden release of magnetic energy in a neutron star magnetosphere, as in popular models of SGRs, can meet the energy requirements of FRBs, but requires both the presence of magnetospheric plasma, in order for dissipation to occur in a transparent region, and a mechanism for releasing much of that energy quickly. FRB sources and SGRs are distinguished by long-lived (up to thousands of years) current-carrying coronal arches remaining from the formation of the young neutron star, and their decay ends the phase of SGR/AXP/FRB activity even though “magnetar” fields may persist. Runaway increases in resistance when the current density exceeds a threshold, releases magnetostatic energy in a sudden burst, and produces high brightness GHz emission of FRB by a coherent process. SGRs are produced when released energy thermalizes as an equlibrium pair plasma. The failures of some alternative FRB models and the non-detection of SGR 1806-20 at radio frequencies are discussed in the appendices.

  8. Building icelandic igneous crust by repeated melt injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, Tim; White, Robert S.

    2015-11-01

    Observations of microseismicity provide a powerful tool for mapping the movement of melt in the crust. Here we record remarkable sequences of earthquakes 20 km below the surface in the normally ductile crust in the vicinity of Askja Volcano, in northeast Iceland. The earthquakes occur in swarms consisting of identical waveforms repeating as frequently as every 8 s for up to 3 h. We use template waveforms from each swarm to detect and locate earthquakes with an automated cross-correlation technique. Events are located in the lower crust and are inferred to be the result of melt being injected into the crust. During melt intrusion high strain rates are produced in conjunction with high pore fluid pressures from the melt or exsolved carbon dioxide. These cause brittle failure on high-angle fault planes located at the tips of sills. Moment tensor solutions show that most of the earthquakes are opening cracks accompanied by volumetric increases. This is consistent with the failure causing the earthquakes by melt injection opening new tensile cracks. Analysis of the magnitude distribution of earthquakes within a swarm reveals a complicated relationship between the imposed strain rates and the fluids that cause brittle failure. The magnitude of the earthquakes is controlled by the distance fluids can migrate along a fault, whereas the frequency of the events is controlled by the strain rate. Faults at the tips of sills act to focus melt transport between sills and so must be an important method of transporting melt through the lower crust.

  9. C9ORF72 repeat expansions in cases with previously identified pathogenic mutations

    PubMed Central

    van Blitterswijk, Marka; Baker, Matthew C.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Ghidoni, Roberta; Benussi, Luisa; Finger, Elizabeth; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R.; Kelley, Brendan J.; Murray, Melissa E.; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Brown, Patricia E.; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Mullen, Bianca; Ash, Peter E.A.; Bieniek, Kevin F.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Karydas, Anna; Wood, Elisabeth McCarty; Coppola, Giovanni; Bigio, Eileen H.; Lippa, Carol; Strong, Michael J.; Beach, Thomas G.; Knopman, David S.; Huey, Edward D.; Mesulam, Marsel; Bird, Thomas; White, Charles L.; Kertesz, Andrew; Geschwind, Dan H.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Binetti, Giuliano; Miller, Bruce L.; Petrucelli, Leonard; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Boylan, Kevin B.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify potential genetic modifiers contributing to the phenotypic variability that is detected in patients with repeat expansions in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72), we investigated the frequency of these expansions in a cohort of 334 subjects previously found to carry mutations in genes known to be associated with a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases. Methods: A 2-step protocol, with a fluorescent PCR and a repeat-primed PCR, was used to determine the presence of hexanucleotide expansions in C9ORF72. For one double mutant, we performed Southern blots to assess expansion sizes, and immunohistochemistry to characterize neuropathology. Results: We detected C9ORF72 repeat expansions in 4 of 334 subjects (1.2% [or 1.8% of 217 families]). All these subjects had behavioral phenotypes and also harbored well-known pathogenic mutations in either progranulin (GRN: p.C466LfsX46, p.R493X, p.C31LfsX35) or microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT: p.P301L). Southern blotting of one double mutant with a p.C466LfsX46 GRN mutation demonstrated a long repeat expansion in brain (>3,000 repeats), and immunohistochemistry showed mixed neuropathology with characteristics of both C9ORF72 expansions and GRN mutations. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that co-occurrence of 2 evidently pathogenic mutations could contribute to the pleiotropy that is detected in patients with C9ORF72 repeat expansions. These findings suggest that patients with known mutations should not be excluded from further studies, and that genetic counselors should be aware of this phenomenon when advising patients and their family members. PMID:24027057

  10. Effects of repeated bouts of squatting exercise on sub-maximal endurance running performance.

    PubMed

    Burt, Dean; Lamb, Kevin; Nicholas, Ceri; Twist, Craig

    2013-02-01

    It is well established that exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) has a detrimental effect on endurance exercise performed in the days that follow. However, it is unknown whether such effects remain after a repeated bout of EIMD. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of repeated bouts of muscle-damaging exercise on sub-maximal running exercise. Nine male participants completed baseline measurements associated with a sub-maximal running bout at lactate turn point. These measurements were repeated 24-48 h after EIMD, comprising 100 squats (10 sets of 10 at 80 % body mass). Two weeks later, when symptoms from the first bout of EIMD had dissipated, all procedures performed at baseline were repeated. Results revealed significant increases in muscle soreness and creatine kinase activity and decreases in peak knee extensor torque and vertical jump performance at 24-48 h after the initial bout of EIMD. However, after the repeated bout, symptoms of EIMD were reduced from baseline at 24-48 h. Significant increases in oxygen uptake (.VO2), minute ventilation (.VE), blood lactate ([BLa]), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), stride frequency and decreases in stride length were observed during sub-maximal running at 24-48 h following the initial bout of EIMD. However, following the repeated bout of EIMD, .VO2, .VE, [BLa], RPE and stride pattern responses during sub-maximal running remained unchanged from baseline at all time points. These findings confirm that a single resistance session protects skeletal muscle against the detrimental effects of EIMD on sub-maximal running endurance exercise.

  11. Transcription-Associated R-Loop Formation across the Human FMR1 CGG-Repeat Region

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, Erick W.; Sanz, Lionel A.; Chédin, Frédéric; Hagerman, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Expansion of a trinucleotide (CGG) repeat element within the 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) of the human FMR1 gene is responsible for a number of heritable disorders operating through distinct pathogenic mechanisms: gene silencing for fragile X syndrome (>200 CGG) and RNA toxic gain-of-function for FXTAS (∼55–200 CGG). Existing models have focused almost exclusively on post-transcriptional mechanisms, but co-transcriptional processes could also contribute to the molecular dysfunction of FMR1. We have observed that transcription through the GC-rich FMR1 5′UTR region favors R-loop formation, with the nascent (G-rich) RNA forming a stable RNA:DNA hybrid with the template DNA strand, thereby displacing the non-template DNA strand. Using DNA:RNA (hybrid) immunoprecipitation (DRIP) of genomic DNA from cultured human dermal fibroblasts with both normal (∼30 CGG repeats) and premutation (55repeats) alleles, we provide evidence for FMR1 R-loop formation in human genomic DNA. Using a doxycycline (DOX)-inducible episomal system in which both the CGG-repeat and transcription frequency can be varied, we further show that R-loop formation increases with higher expression levels. Finally, non-denaturing bisulfite mapping of the displaced single-stranded DNA confirmed R-loop formation at the endogenous FMR1 locus and further indicated that R-loops formed over CGG repeats may be prone to structural complexities, including hairpin formation, not commonly associated with other R-loops. These observations introduce a new molecular feature of the FMR1 gene that is directly affected by CGG-repeat expansion and is likely to be involved in the associated cellular dysfunction. PMID:24743386

  12. Repeat retail clinic visits: impact of insurance coverage and age of patient.

    PubMed

    Angstman, Kurt B; Bernard, Matthew E; Rohrer, James E; Garrison, Gregory M; Maclaughlin, Kathy L

    2012-12-01

    As retail clinics provide a less costly alternative for health care, it would be reasonable to expect an increase in multiple (repeat) retail visits by those patients who may have expenses for receiving primary care. If costs were not a significant factor, then repeat visits should not be significantly different between these patients and those with coverage for primary care visits. The hypothesis for this study was that patients with the potential for out-of-pocket expenses would have a higher frequency of repeat retail clinic visits within 180 days compared to those with primary care coverage. A retrospective chart review was conducted of 5703 patients utilizing a retail clinic in Rochester, Minnesota from January 1, 2009 through June 30, 2009. The first visit to the retail clinic was considered the index visit and the chart was reviewed for repeat retail clinic visits within the next 180 days. Using a multiple logistic regression model, the odds of a pediatric patient (N=2344) having a repeat retail visit within 180 days of the index visit were not significantly impacted by insurance coverage (P=0.4209). Of the 3359 adult patients, those with unknown coverage had a 25.6% higher odds ratio of repeat retail clinic visits than those with insurance coverage (odds ratio 1.2557, confidence interval 1.0421-1.5131). This study suggested that when cost is an issue, the adult patient may favor retail clinics for episodic, low-acuity health care. In contrast, the pediatric population did not, suggesting that other factors, such as convenience, may play more of a role in the choice of episodic health care for this age group.

  13. Safety of Repeated Injections of Sodium Hyaluronate (SUPARTZ) for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bannuru, Raveendhara R.; Brodie, Christopher R.; Sullivan, Matthew C.; McAlindon, Timothy E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Though there is no consensus on its efficacy, knee osteoarthritis is symptomatically managed with intra-articular hyaluronic acid (IAHA). Recent reports suggest that IAHA may delay the need for total knee replacement, with the magnitude of delay proportional to the number of injection series. However, the safety of repeated injection series is reported to vary between commercial products. This report describes a systematic review of safety data on repeated treatment courses of SUPARTZ. Design We performed a systematic search of MEDLINE, Cochrane database, EMBASE, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and unpublished data. We included all human randomized controlled trials or observational studies with adverse event (AE) data for SUPARTZ in knee osteoarthritis. Two independent reviewers extracted data and evaluated study quality. Data were analyzed separately for the first and subsequent series of injections. Results The primary sources for repeated-injection data on SUPARTZ were a postmarket registry (N = 7404), 4 prospective studies (N = 127 total), and a retrospective study (N = 220). None of the sources reported increased frequency or severity of AEs with repeated injections. In the registry, 95% of multiple-injection-series patients who reported an AE did so during the first series. None of the AEs was serious, and most resolved spontaneously without medical intervention. The overall adverse event rate after repeat courses of SUPARTZ was 0.008 (95% confidence interval: 0.001-0.055). Conclusions Multiple courses of SUPARTZ injections appear to be at least as safe, and probably safer, than the first course. This study supports the safety of repeat courses of SUPARTZ injections for knee osteoarthritis. PMID:27688841

  14. On the validity of a generalized Kirchhoff's Law for a nonisothermal scattering and absorptive medium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.; Mount, G. H.

    1972-01-01

    The relationship of directional hemispherical reflectivity to emissivity is investigated for a nonisothermal medium with isotropic coherent scattering and absorption. Departures from a generalized Kirchhoff's Law occur due to the long range nature of the scattering process. Such departures occur in lunar thermal emission at microwave but not at infrared frequencies.

  15. On the spectral-spatial instability of a light wave in a medium with cubic nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Afanas'ev, Anatolii A; Volkov, V M

    2003-11-30

    Based on the analysis of frequency-nondegenerate four-photon parametric scattering, the spectral-angular dependences of the increments of perturbing modes are obtained in the field of an intense light wave propagating in a medium with cubic nonlinearity. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  16. Spatial distribution of the interacting Waves' amplitudes under third harmonic generation in a negative-positive refractive medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroukhova, E. I.; Maimistov, A. I.

    2013-09-01

    The process of third harmonic generation in a cubically nonlinear medium that is negatively refractive at the fundamental frequency and positively refractive at the third harmonic frequency is considered. For the stationary case, the amplitude distribution was obtained for waves interacting inside a sample for different values of phase mismatch. In the periodic regime of generation, it is shown that the amplitude of the fundamental wave inside the medium can exceed its value at the input, which is impossible in the standard case of harmonic generation in a medium positively refractive at both frequencies. The influence of energy losses in the sample on the spatial distribution of waves' amplitudes of both frequencies has been studied.

  17. Solute transport through a deforming porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Glen P.; Smith, David W.

    2002-06-01

    Solute transport through a porous medium is typically modelled assuming the porous medium is rigid. However, many applications exist where the porous medium is deforming, including, municipal landfill liners, mine tailings dams, and land subsidence. In this paper, mass balance laws are used to derive the flow and transport equations for a deforming porous medium. The equations are derived in both spatial and material co-ordinate systems. Solute transport through an engineered landfill liner is used as an illustrative example to show the differences between the theory for a rigid porous medium, and small and large deformation analysis of a deforming porous medium. It is found that the large deformation model produces shorter solute breakthrough times, followed by the small deformation model, and then the rigid porous medium model. It is also found that it is important to include spatial and temporal void ratio variations in the large deformation analysis. It is shown that a non-linear large deformation model may greatly reduce the solute breakthrough time, compared to a standard transport analysis typically employed by environmental engineers.

  18. Collaborative Manufacturing for Small-Medium Enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irianto, D.

    2016-02-01

    Manufacturing systems involve decisions concerning production processes, capacity, planning, and control. In a MTO manufacturing systems, strategic decisions concerning fulfilment of customer requirement, manufacturing cost, and due date of delivery are the most important. In order to accelerate the decision making process, research on decision making structure when receiving order and sequencing activities under limited capacity is required. An effective decision making process is typically required by small-medium components and tools maker as supporting industries to large industries. On one side, metal small-medium enterprises are expected to produce parts, components or tools (i.e. jigs, fixture, mold, and dies) with high precision, low cost, and exact delivery time. On the other side, a metal small- medium enterprise may have weak bargaining position due to aspects such as low production capacity, limited budget for material procurement, and limited high precision machine and equipment. Instead of receiving order exclusively, a small-medium enterprise can collaborate with other small-medium enterprise in order to fulfill requirements high quality, low manufacturing cost, and just in time delivery. Small-medium enterprises can share their best capabilities to form effective supporting industries. Independent body such as community service at university can take a role as a collaboration manager. The Laboratory of Production Systems at Bandung Institute of Technology has implemented shared manufacturing systems for small-medium enterprise collaboration.

  19. Frequency selective infrared sensors

    DOEpatents

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2013-05-28

    A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

  20. Frequency selective infrared sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2014-11-25

    A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

  1. Harmonic Frequency Lowering

    PubMed Central

    Kirchberger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A novel algorithm for frequency lowering in music was developed and experimentally tested in hearing-impaired listeners. Harmonic frequency lowering (HFL) combines frequency transposition and frequency compression to preserve the harmonic content of music stimuli. Listeners were asked to make judgments regarding detail and sound quality in music stimuli. Stimuli were presented under different signal processing conditions: original, low-pass filtered, HFL, and nonlinear frequency compressed. Results showed that participants reported perceiving the most detail in the HFL condition. In addition, there was no difference in sound quality across conditions. PMID:26834122

  2. Propagation of transients in a random medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, A. R.

    1975-01-01

    The propagation of transient scalar waves in a three-dimensional random medium is considered. The analysis is based on the smoothing method. An integro-differential equation for the coherent (or average) wave is derived and solved for the case of a statistically homogeneous and isotropic medium and a delta-function source. This yields the coherent Green's function of the medium. It is found that the waveform of the coherent wave depends generally on the distance from the source measured in terms of a certain dimensionless parameter. Based on the magnitude of this parameter, three propagation zones, called the near zone, the far zone, and the intermediate zone, are defined.

  3. Method to prepare nanoparticles on porous mediums

    DOEpatents

    Vieth, Gabriel M [Knoxville, TN; Dudney, Nancy J [Oak Ridge, TN; Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN

    2010-08-10

    A method to prepare porous medium decorated with nanoparticles involves contacting a suspension of nanoparticles in an ionic liquid with a porous medium such that the particles diffuse into the pores of the medium followed by heating the resulting composition to a temperature equal to or greater than the thermal decomposition temperature of the ionic liquid resulting in the removal of the liquid portion of the suspension. The nanoparticles can be a metal, an alloy, or a metal compound. The resulting compositions can be used as catalysts, sensors, or separators.

  4. Radio frequency spectrum management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujdak, E. J., Jr.

    1980-03-01

    This thesis is a study of radio frequency spectrum management as practiced by agencies and departments of the Federal Government. After a brief introduction to the international agency involved in radio frequency spectrum management, the author concentrates on Federal agencies engaged in frequency management. These agencies include the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), the Interdepartment Radio Advisory Committee (IRAC), and the Department of Defense (DoD). Based on an analysis of Department of Defense frequency assignment procedures, recommendations are given concerning decentralizing military frequency assignment by delegating broader authority to unified commanders. This proposal includes a recommendation to colocate the individual Service frequency management offices at the Washington level. This would result in reduced travel costs, lower manpower requirements, and a common tri-Service frequency management data base.

  5. Changes in spring-mass model characteristics during repeated running sprints.

    PubMed

    Girard, Olivier; Micallef, Jean-Paul; Millet, Grégoire P

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated fatigue-induced changes in spring-mass model characteristics during repeated running sprints. Sixteen active subjects performed 12 × 40 m sprints interspersed with 30 s of passive recovery. Vertical and anterior-posterior ground reaction forces were measured at 5-10 m and 30-35 m and used to determine spring-mass model characteristics. Contact (P < 0.001), flight (P < 0.05) and swing times (P < 0.001) together with braking, push-off and total stride durations (P < 0.001) lengthened across repetitions. Stride frequency (P < 0.001) and push-off forces (P < 0.05) decreased with fatigue, whereas stride length (P = 0.06), braking (P = 0.08) and peak vertical forces (P = 0.17) changes approached significance. Center of mass vertical displacement (P < 0.001) but not leg compression (P > 0.05) increased with time. As a result, vertical stiffness decreased (P < 0.001) from the first to the last repetition, whereas leg stiffness changes across sprint trials were not significant (P > 0.05). Changes in vertical stiffness were correlated (r > 0.7; P < 0.001) with changes in stride frequency. When compared to 5-10 m, most of ground reaction force-related parameters were higher (P < 0.05) at 30-35 m, whereas contact time, stride frequency, vertical and leg stiffness were lower (P < 0.05). Vertical stiffness deteriorates when 40 m run-based sprints are repeated, which alters impact parameters. Maintaining faster stride frequencies through retaining higher vertical stiffness is a prerequisite to improve performance during repeated sprinting.

  6. Aquatic flower-inspired cell culture platform with simplified medium exchange process for facilitating cell-surface interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyeonjun; Park, Sung Jea; Han, Seon Jin; Lim, Jiwon; Kim, Dong Sung

    2016-02-01

    Establishing fundamentals for regulating cell behavior with engineered physical environments, such as topography and stiffness, requires a large number of cell culture experiments. However, cell culture experiments in cell-surface interaction studies are generally labor-intensive and time-consuming due to many experimental tasks, such as multiple fabrication processes in sample preparation and repetitive medium exchange in cell culture. In this work, a novel aquatic flower-inspired cell culture platform (AFIP) is presented. AFIP aims to facilitate the experiments on the cell-surface interaction studies, especially the medium exchange process. AFIP was devised to capture and dispense cell culture medium based on interactions between an elastic polymer substrate and a liquid medium. Thus, the medium exchange can be performed easily and without the need of other instruments, such as a vacuum suction and pipette. An appropriate design window of AFIP, based on scaling analysis, was identified to provide a criterion for achieving stability in medium exchange as well as various surface characteristics of the petal substrates. The developed AFIP, with physically engineered petal substrates, was also verified to exchange medium reliably and repeatedly. A closed structure capturing the medium was sustained stably during cell culture experiments. NIH3T3 proliferation results also demonstrated that AFIP can be applied to the cell-surface interaction studies as an alternative to the conventional method.

  7. CCTTT-repeat polymorphism of the inducible nitric oxide synthase is not associated with HIV pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    HERSBERGER, M; BONHOEFFER, S; RAMPINI, S K; OPRAVIL, M; MARTI-JAUN, J; TELENTI, A; HÄNSELER, E; LEDERGERBER, B; Speck, R F

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) has bactericidal and virocidal effects. Although NO synthesis and iNOS expression in macrophages affect several aspects of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type-1 pathogenesis, their role in HIV disease remains largely unknown. In humans, the expression of iNOS is influenced by a functional CCTTT-repeat polymorphism in the promoter region of the gene. We investigated the association of this polymorphism with HIV pathogenesis in naive HIV-infected patients before the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. The allele frequencies of the iNOS CCTTT-repeat polymorphism were assessed by PCR in 857 patients from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study, including rapid progressors and long-term nonprogressors, and in 240 healthy volunteers. In HIV-infected patients, the initial viral load and the decline in total CD4 cells was calculated to estimate disease progression. Allele frequencies of the iNOS CCTTT-repeat polymorphism were similar between the HIV-infected and noninfected blood donors. In treatment-naive HIV-positive patients, there was no association of the iNOS polymorphism with viral load or with the course of CD4 cells. Regulation of iNOS expression by the functional CCTTT-polymorphism does not modify HIV pathogenesis. PMID:15320907

  8. Exploring bacterial community structure and function associated with atrazine biodegradation in repeatedly treated soils.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hua; Lian, Jianjun; Wang, Huifang; Cai, Lin; Yu, Yunlong

    2015-04-09

    Substantial application of the herbicide atrazine in agriculture leads to persistent contamination, which may damage the succeeding crops and pose potential threats to soil ecology and environmental health. Here, the degradation characteristics of atrazine and dynamic change of soil bacterial community structure and function as well as their relations were studied during three repeated treatments at the recommended, double, and five-fold doses. The results showed that the degradation half-life of atrazine obviously decreased with increased treatment frequency. Soil microbial functional diversity displayed a variation trend of suppression-recovery-stimulation, which was associated with increased degradation rate of atrazine. 16S amplicon sequencing was conducted to explore bacterial community structure and correlate the genus to potential atrazine degradation. A total of seven potentially atrazine-degrading bacterial genera were found including Nocardioides, Arthrobacter, Bradyrhizobium, Burkholderia, Methylobacterium, Mycobacterium, and Clostridium. These bacterial genera showed almost complete atrazine degradation pathways including dechlorination, dealkylation, hydroxylation, and ring cleavage. Furthermore, the relative abundance of four of them (i.e., Nocardioides, Arthrobacter, Methylobacterium, and Bradyrhizobium) increased with treatment frequency and atrazine concentration, suggesting that they may participate in atrazine degradation during repeated treatments. Our findings reveal the potential relationship between atrazine degradation and soil bacterial community structure in repeatedly treated soils.

  9. In- silico exploration of thirty alphavirus genomes for analysis of the simple sequence repeats

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Chaudhary Mashhood; Singh, Avadhesh Kumar; Sharfuddin, Choudhary; Ali, Safdar

    2014-01-01

    The compilation of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in viruses and its analysis with reference to incidence, distribution and variation would be instrumental in understanding the functional and evolutionary aspects of repeat sequences. Present study encompasses the analysis of SSRs across 30 species of alphaviruses. The full length genome sequences, assessed from NCBI were used for extraction and analysis of repeat sequences using IMEx software. The repeats of different motif sizes (mono- to penta-nucleotide) observed therein exhibited variable incidence across the species. Expectedly, mononucleotide A/T was the most prevalent followed by dinucleotide AG/GA and trinucleotide AAG/GAA in these genomes. The conversion of SSRs to imperfect microsatellite or compound microsatellite (cSSR) is low. cSSR, primarily constituted by variant motifs accounted for up to 12.5% of the SSRs. Interestingly, seven species lacked cSSR in their genomes. However, the SSR and cSSR are predominantly localized to the coding region ORFs for non structural protein and structural proteins. The relative frequencies of different classes of simple and compound microsatellites within and across genomes have been highlighted. PMID:25606453

  10. Propagation Characteristics of Rectangular Waveguides at Terahertz Frequencies with Finite-Difference Frequency-Domain Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Binke; Zhao, Chongfeng

    2014-01-01

    The 2-D finite-difference frequency-domain method (FDFD) combined with the surface impedance boundary condition (SIBC) was employed to analyze the propagation characteristics of hollow rectangular waveguides at Terahertz (THz) frequencies. The electromagnetic field components, in the interior of the waveguide, were discretized using central finite-difference schemes. Considering the hollow rectangular waveguide surrounded by a medium of finite conductivity, the electric and magnetic tangential field components on the metal surface were related by the SIBC. The surface impedance was calculated by the Drude dispersion model at THz frequencies, which was used to characterize the conductivity of the metal. By solving the Eigen equations, the propagation constants, including the attenuation constant and the phase constant, were obtained for a given frequency. The proposed method shows good applicability for full-wave analysis of THz waveguides with complex boundaries.

  11. Detection of repeating and "anti-repeating" earthquakes in the Bucaramanga Nest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, S. A.; Prieto, G.; Beroza, G. C.

    2011-12-01

    The Bucaramanga Nest, beneath northern Colombia represents the densest concentration of intermediate-depth earthquakes in the world. The roughly 11 km3 volume produces approximately 15 events per day, yielding an active catalog of seismicity well separated from surrounding seismic activity. We correlate template-event waveforms from known earthquakes to continuous records from the Colombian National (RSNC) seismic network. Typical repeating events are identified as well as the more curious "anti-repeat" events for which seismograms show reversed polarity and nearly perfect anti-correlation. These events are of particular interest as they are not known for shallow, crustal earthquake populations. By compiling a more complete catalog of earthquakes, and by developing precise relative locations, we seek to understand the temporal and size variations of these recurring events in the Bucaramanga Nest.

  12. Evolution of subterminal satellite (StSat) repeats in hominids.

    PubMed

    Koga, Akihiko; Notohara, Morihiro; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2011-02-01

    Subterminal satellite (StSat) repeats, consisting of 32-bp-long AT-rich units (GATATTTCCATGTT(T/C)ATACAGATAGCGGTGTA), were first found in chimpanzee and gorilla (African great apes) as one of the major components of heterochromatic regions located proximal to telomeres of chromosomes. StSat repeats have not been found in orangutan (Asian great ape) or human. This patchy distribution among species suggested that the StSat repeats were present in the common ancestor of African great apes and subsequently lost in the lineage leading to human. An alternative explanation is that the StSat repeats in chimpanzee and gorilla have different origins and the repeats did not occur in human. The purpose of the present study was quantitative evaluation of the above alternative possibilities by analyzing the nucleotide variation contained in the repeats. We collected large numbers of sequences of repeat units from genome sequence databases of chimpanzee and gorilla, and also bonobo (an African great ape phylogenetically closer to chimpanzee). We then compared the base composition of the repeat units among the 3 species, and found statistically significant similarities in the base composition. These results support the view that the StSat repeats had already formed multiple arrays in the common ancestor of African great apes. It is thus suggested that humans lost StSat repeats which had once grown to multiple arrays.

  13. Comparison of simple sequence repeats in 19 Archaea.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, S

    2006-12-05

    All organisms that have been studied until now have been found to have differential distribution of simple sequence repeats (SSRs), with more SSRs in intergenic than in coding sequences. SSR distribution was investigated in Archaea genomes where complete chromosome sequences of 19 Archaea were analyzed with the program SPUTNIK to find di- to penta-nucleotide repeats. The number of repeats was determined for the complete chromosome sequences and for the coding and non-coding sequences. Different from what has been found for other groups of organisms, there is an abundance of SSRs in coding regions of the genome of some Archaea. Dinucleotide repeats were rare and CG repeats were found in only two Archaea. In general, trinucleotide repeats are the most abundant SSR motifs; however, pentanucleotide repeats are abundant in some Archaea. Some of the tetranucleotide and pentanucleotide repeat motifs are organism specific. In general, repeats are short and CG-rich repeats are present in Archaea having a CG-rich genome. Among the 19 Archaea, SSR density was not correlated with genome size or with optimum growth temperature. Pentanucleotide density had an inverse correlation with the CG content of the genome.

  14. ATXN2 trinucleotide repeat length correlates with risk of ALS.

    PubMed

    Sproviero, William; Shatunov, Aleksey; Stahl, Daniel; Shoai, Maryam; van Rheenen, Wouter; Jones, Ashley R; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Andersen, Peter M; Bonini, Nancy M; Conforti, Francesca L; Van Damme, Philip; Daoud, Hussein; Del Mar Amador, Maria; Fogh, Isabella; Forzan, Monica; Gaastra, Ben; Gellera, Cinzia; Gitler, Aaron D; Hardy, John; Fratta, Pietro; La Bella, Vincenzo; Le Ber, Isabelle; Van Langenhove, Tim; Lattante, Serena; Lee, Yi-Chung; Malaspina, Andrea; Meininger, Vincent; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Orrell, Richard; Rademakers, Rosa; Robberecht, Wim; Rouleau, Guy; Ross, Owen A; Salachas, Francois; Sidle, Katie; Smith, Bradley N; Soong, Bing-Wen; Sorarù, Gianni; Stevanin, Giovanni; Kabashi, Edor; Troakes, Claire; van Broeckhoven, Christine; Veldink, Jan H; van den Berg, Leonard H; Shaw, Christopher E; Powell, John F; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2017-03-01

    We investigated a CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion in the ATXN2 gene in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Two new case-control studies, a British dataset of 1474 ALS cases and 567 controls, and a Dutch dataset of 1328 ALS cases and 691 controls were analyzed. In addition, to increase power, we systematically searched PubMed for case-control studies published after 1 August 2010 that investigated the association between ATXN2 intermediate repeats and ALS. We conducted a meta-analysis of the new and existing studies for the relative risks of ATXN2 intermediate repeat alleles of between 24 and 34 CAG trinucleotide repeats and ALS. There was an overall increased risk of ALS for those carrying intermediate sized trinucleotide repeat alleles (odds ratio 3.06 [95% confidence interval 2.37-3.94]; p = 6 × 10(-18)), with an exponential relationship between repeat length and ALS risk for alleles of 29-32 repeats (R(2) = 0.91, p = 0.0002). No relationship was seen for repeat length and age of onset or survival. In contrast to trinucleotide repeat diseases, intermediate ATXN2 trinucleotide repeat expansion in ALS does not predict age of onset but does predict disease risk.

  15. PRIGSA: protein repeat identification by graph spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Broto; Parekh, Nita

    2014-12-01

    Repetition of a structural motif within protein is associated with a wide range of structural and functional roles. In most cases the repeating units are well conserved at the structural level while at the sequence level, they are mostly undetectable suggesting the need for structure-based methods. Since most known methods require a training dataset, de novo approach is desirable. Here, we propose an efficient graph-based approach for detecting structural repeats in proteins. In a protein structure represented as a graph, interactions between inter- and intra-repeat units are well captured by the eigen spectra of adjacency matrix of the graph. These conserved interactions give rise to similar connections and a unique profile of the principal eigen spectra for each repeating unit. The efficacy of the approach is shown on eight repeat families annotated in UniProt, comprising of both solenoid and nonsolenoid repeats with varied secondary structure architecture and repeat lengths. The performance of the approach is also tested on other known benchmark datasets and the performance compared with two repeat identification methods. For a known repeat type, the algorithm also identifies the type of repeat present in the protein. A web tool implementing the algorithm is available at the URL http://bioinf.iiit.ac.in/PRIGSA/.

  16. Fracture Interface Waves in an Anisotropic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Shao, S.; Abell, B.

    2011-12-01

    The detection of fractures in an anisotropic medium is complicated by discreet modes that are guided or confined by fractures and that travel with velocities close (~92%) to the shear wave velocity. For instance, fractures can mask the presence of textural anisotropy in a rock, and can increase the apparent shear wave velocity anisotropy. In this study, we examine how fracture interface waves affect the interpretation of shear wave velocities for two orthogonal polarizations propagating parallel to the layers. Samples with textural anisotropy measuring 100 x 100 x 100 mm were fabricated from garolite, an epoxy - cloth laminate, with layer thickness on the order of 0.5 mm. Three fracture samples were created with: (1) a fracture oriented parallel to layering, (2) a fracture oriented perpendicular to layering, and (3) two intersecting orthogonal fractures. An intact sample without fractures was used a standard. A seismic array, consisting of source and receiver arrays, was used to perform full waveform measurements. Each array contained two compressional and five shear wave piezoelectric contact transducers with a central frequency of 1 MHz. Shear wave transducers were polarized both perpendicular and parallel to the layering as well as to the fracture. Measurements were made for a range of stresses (0.4 - 4MPa). When the shear wave was polarized parallel to a fracture, the shear wave traveled at the bulk shear velocity respective to the layering. However, when the shear wave was polarized perpendicular to a fracture, the measured velocity ranged between the Rayleigh wave velocity at low stress and the bulk shear wave at high stress. The shear wave velocities perpendicular and parallel to the layering (propagation direction parallel to the layers) were ~1500 m/s and ~1600 m/s, respectively, in the intact sample. However, in the fractured samples, the observed shear wave anisotropy depended on the stress and fracture orientation relative to the layering. When the

  17. Ataxin-2 repeat-length variation and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Owen A.; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Baker, Matt; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Adamson, Jennifer; Li, Ma; Volkening, Kathryn; Finger, Elizabeth; Seeley, William W.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Kertesz, Andrew; Bigio, Eileen H.; Lippa, Carol; Woodruff, Bryan K.; Knopman, David S.; White, Charles L.; Van Gerpen, Jay A.; Meschia, James F.; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Boylan, Kevin; Boeve, Bradley F.; Miller, Bruce L.; Strong, Michael J.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Younkin, Steven G.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Rademakers, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    Expanded glutamine repeats of the ataxin-2 (ATXN2) protein cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), a rare neurodegenerative disorder. More recent studies have suggested that expanded ATXN2 repeats are a genetic risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) via an RNA-dependent interaction with TDP-43. Given the phenotypic diversity observed in SCA2 patients, we set out to determine the polymorphic nature of the ATXN2 repeat length across a spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we genotyped the ATXN2 repeat in 3919 neurodegenerative disease patients and 4877 healthy controls and performed logistic regression analysis to determine the association of repeat length with the risk of disease. We confirmed the presence of a significantly higher number of expanded ATXN2 repeat carriers in ALS patients compared with healthy controls (OR = 5.57; P= 0.001; repeat length >30 units). Furthermore, we observed significant association of expanded ATXN2 repeats with the development of progressive supranuclear palsy (OR = 5.83; P= 0.004; repeat length >30 units). Although expanded repeat carriers were also identified in frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease patients, these were not significantly more frequent than in controls. Of note, our study identified a number of healthy control individuals who harbor expanded repeat alleles (31–33 units), which suggests caution should be taken when attributing specific disease phenotypes to these repeat lengths. In conclusion, our findings confirm the role of ATXN2 as an important risk factor for ALS and support the hypothesis that expanded ATXN2 repeats may predispose to other neurodegenerative diseases, including progressive supranuclear palsy. PMID:21610160

  18. Repeated-sprint and effort ability in rugby league players.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Rich D; Gabbett, Tim J

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to (a) investigate the influence of tackling on repeated-sprint performance; (b) determine whether repeated-sprint ability (RSA) and repeated-effort ability (REA) are 2 distinct qualities; and (c) assess the test-retest reliability of repeated-sprint and repeated-effort tests in rugby league. Twelve rugby league players performed a repeated-sprint (12 × 20-m sprints performed on a 20-second cycle) and a repeated-effort (12 × 20-m sprints with intermittent tackling, performed on a 20-second cycle) test 7 days apart. The test-retest reliability of these tests was also established. Heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were recorded throughout the tests. There was a significantly greater (p ≤ 0.05) and large effect size (ES) differences for total sprint time (ES = 1.19), average heart rate (ES = 1.64), peak heart rate (ES = 1.35), and perceived exertion (ES = 3.39) for the repeated-effort test compared with the repeated-sprint test. A large difference (ES = 1.02, p = 0.06) was detected for percentage decrement between the 2 tests. No significant relationship was found between the repeated-sprint and repeated-effort tests for any of the dependent variables. Both tests proved reliable, with total sprint time being the most reliable method of assessing performance. This study demonstrates that the addition of tackling significantly increases the physiological response to repeated-sprint exercise and reduces repeated-sprint performance in rugby league players. Furthermore, RSA and REA appear to be 2 distinct qualities that can be reliably assessed with total time being the most reliable measure of performance.

  19. A critical window of CAG repeat-length correlates with phenotype severity in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Damian M.; Alaghband, Yasaman; Hickey, Miriam A.; Joshi, Prasad R.; Hong, S. Candice; Zhu, Chunni; Ando, Timothy K.; André, Véronique M.; Cepeda, Carlos; Watson, Joseph B.

    2012-01-01

    The R6/2 mouse is the most frequently used model for experimental and preclinical drug trials in Huntington's disease (HD). When the R6/2 mouse was first developed, it carried exon 1 of the huntingtin gene with ∼150 cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) repeats. The model presented with a rapid and aggressive phenotype that shared many features with the human condition and was particularly similar to juvenile HD. However, instability in the CAG repeat length due to different breeding practices has led to both decreases and increases in average CAG repeat lengths among colonies. Given the inverse relationship in human HD between CAG repeat length and age at onset and to a degree, the direct relationship with severity of disease, we have investigated the effect of altered CAG repeat length. Four lines, carrying ∼110, ∼160, ∼210, and ∼310 CAG repeats, were examined using a battery of tests designed to assess the basic R6/2 phenotype. These included electrophysiological properties of striatal medium-sized spiny neurons, motor activity, inclusion formation, and protein expression. The results showed an unpredicted, inverted “U-shaped” relationship between CAG repeat length and phenotype; increasing the CAG repeat length from 110 to 160 exacerbated the R6/2 phenotype, whereas further increases to 210 and 310 CAG repeats greatly ameliorated the phenotype. These findings demonstrate that the expected relationship between CAG repeat length and disease severity observed in humans is lost in the R6/2 mouse model and highlight the importance of CAG repeat-length determination in preclinical drug trials that use this model. PMID:22072510

  20. Selective medium for isolation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Slots, J

    1982-01-01

    A selective medium, TSBV (tryptic soy-serum-bacitracin-vancomycin) agar, was developed for the isolation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, TSBV agar contained (per liter) 40 g of tryptic soy agar, 1 g of yeast extract, 100 ml of horse serum. 75 mg of bacitracin, and 5 mg of vancomycin. The TSBV medium suppressed most oral species and permitted significantly higher recovery of A. actinomycetemcomitans than nonselective blood agar medium. The distinct colonial morphology and positive catalase reaction of A. actinomycetemcomitans easily distinguished this bacterium from Haemophilus aphrophilus, Capnocytophaga species, and a few other contaminating organisms. With the TSBV medium, even modestly equipped laboratories will be able to isolate and identify A. actinomycetemcomitans from clinical specimens. Images PMID:7068837

  1. Acoustics of a Nonhomogeneous Moving Medium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blokhintsev, D I

    1956-01-01

    Theoretical basis of the acoustics of a moving nonhomogeneous medium is considered in this report. Experiments that illustrate or confirm some of the theoretical explanation or derivation of these acoustics are also included.

  2. Incompatibility of Contrast Medium and Trisodium Citrate

    SciTech Connect

    Delcour, Christian Bruninx, Guy

    2013-02-15

    To test the compatibility of trisodium citrate, a catheter lock solution, with iodinated contrast medium. Iohexol, iobitridol, iodixanol, ioxaglate, ioxithalamate, iomeprol, and iopromide were tested. In all tests, 2 ml of contrast medium were mixed with 2 ml of trisodium citrate solution. Iodixanol and ioxaglate provoked a highly viscous gluelike precipitation when mixed with trisodium citrate. A brief transient precipitate was observed with iohexol, iomeprol, and ioxithalamate. Permanent precipitation occurred with iobitridol and iopromide. One must be aware of the potential for precipitation when contrast medium is mixed with trisodium citrate solution. Before trisodium citrate solution is injected, the catheter should be thoroughly flushed with saline if a contrast medium has previously been injected through it.

  3. Regeneration of Human Liver After Hepatic Lobectomy Studied by Repeated Liver Scanning and Repeated Needle Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tien-Yu; Lee, Chue-Shue; Chen, Chiou-Chiang; Liau, Kuong-Yi; Lin, Wen-Shih-Jen

    1979-01-01

    Regeneration of the residual lobe of the liver after hepatic lobectomy in humans was studied by repeated liver scanning in seven noncirrhotic and three cirrhotic patients. Each patient was studied for several months during the study which lasted from 1-12 years. Regeneration was apparent in noncirrhotic liver remnants following hepatic lobectomy. In the case of a long standing, space occupying lesions such as benign giant cysts, the liver remnant would complete its regeneration process rather early, usually within a few months of hepatic lobectomy. In hepatoma cases, however, regeneration of the residual lobe after hepatic resection usually took five or six months for completion. On the contrary, no definite increase in the size of the liver remnant was seen on repeated liver scanning in cirrhotic patients. Histologic study of the residual lobe was repeated on needle biopsy specimens in two noncirrhotic and four cirrhotic patients. Regenerative hyperplasia of liver cells with large hyperchromatic, or double nuclei never seen in the preresection liver appeared in the liver remnant five, 11, and 27 days after hepatic lobectomy in noncirrhotic patients. In cirrhotics, however, there were no histologic changes between the preresection liver and the postresection remnant studied three, five, 15, 40 days or even two years and 8 months after hepatic lobectomy. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:464678

  4. Hydrological Modeling and Repeatability with Brokering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easton, Z. M.; Collick, A.; Srinivasan, R.; Braeckel, A.; Nativi, S.; McAlister, C.; Wright, D. J.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Fuka, D.

    2014-12-01

    Data brokering aims to provide those in the hydrological sciences with access to relevant data to represent physical, biological, and chemical characteristics researchers need to accelerate discovery in their domain. Environmental models are useful tools to understand the behavior of hydrological systems. Unfortunately, parameterization of these models requires many different data sources from different disciplines (e.g., atmospheric, geoscience, ecology). In hydrological modeling, the traditional procedure for model initialization starts with obtaining elevation models, land-use characterizations, soils maps, and weather data. It is often the researcher's past experience with these datasets that determines which datasets will be used in a study, and often newer, more suitable data products exist. An added complexity is that various science communities have differing data formats, storage protocols and manipulation methods, which makes use by a non domain scientist difficult and time consuming. We propose data brokering as a means to address several of these challenges. We present two test case scenarios in which researchers attempt to reproduce hydrological model results using 1) general internet based data gathering techniques, and 2) a scientific data brokering interface. We show that data brokering increases the efficiency with which data are collected, models are initialized, and results are analyzed. As an added benefit, it appears brokering significantly increases the repeatability of a study.

  5. Superfamily of ankyrin repeat proteins in tomato.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaowei; Zhang, Shizhong; Qing, Xiaohe; Sun, Meihong; Liu, Shiyang; Su, Hongyan; Shu, Huairui; Li, Xinzheng

    2013-07-10

    The ankyrin repeat (ANK) protein family plays a crucial role in plant growth and development and in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, no detailed information concerning this family is available for tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) due to the limited information on whole genome sequences. In this study, we identified a total of 130 ANK genes in tomato genome (SlANK), and these genes were distributed across all 12 chromosomes at various densities. And chromosomal localizations of SlANK genes indicated 25 SlANK genes were involved in tandem duplications. Based on their domain composition, all of the SlANK proteins were grouped into 13 subgroups. A combined phylogenetic tree was constructed with the aligned SlANK protein sequences. This tree revealed that the SlANK proteins comprise five major groups. An analysis of the expression profiles of SlANK genes in tomato in different tissues and in response to stresses showed that the SlANK proteins play roles in plant growth, development and stress responses. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a genome-wide analysis of the tomato ANK gene family. This study provides valuable information regarding the classification and putative functions of SlANK genes in tomato.

  6. Repeat mitral valve replacement: 30-years' experience.

    PubMed

    Expósito, Víctor; García-Camarero, Tamara; Bernal, José M; Arnáiz, Elena; Sarralde, Aurelio; García, Iván; Berrazueta, José R; Revuelta, José M

    2009-08-01

    Prosthetic heart valve dysfunction is an acquired condition that carries a significant risk of emergency surgery. However, the long-term natural history of the condition is not well understood. Between 1974 and 2006, 1535 isolated mitral valve replacements were performed at our hospital (in-hospital mortality 5%). In total, 369 patients needed a second operation (in-hospital mortality 8.1%), while 80 (age 59.8+/-11.4 years) needed a third. The reasons for the third intervention were structural deterioration (67.5%), paravalvular leak (20%) and endocarditis (6.3%). Some 15 patients died in hospital (18.8%). After a mean follow-up period of 17.8 years, 21 patients needed another intervention (i.e., a fourth intervention). The actuarial reoperation-free rate at 20 years was 40.1+/-13.8%. The late mortality rate was 58.5% (18-year survival rate 15.4+/-5.4%). Indications for repeat mitral valve replacement must be judged on an individual basis given the high risk associated with surgery.

  7. Information coding with frequency of oscillations in Belousov-Zhabotinsky encapsulated disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorecki, J.; Gorecka, J. N.; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2014-04-01

    Information processing with an excitable chemical medium, like the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction, is typically based on information coding in the presence or absence of excitation pulses. Here we present a new concept of Boolean coding that can be applied to an oscillatory medium. A medium represents the logical TRUE state if a selected region oscillates with a high frequency. If the frequency fails below a specified value, it represents the logical FALSE state. We consider a medium composed of disks encapsulating an oscillatory mixture of reagents, as related to our recent experiments with lipid-coated BZ droplets. We demonstrate that by using specific geometrical arrangements of disks containing the oscillatory medium one can perform logical operations on variables coded in oscillation frequency. Realizations of a chemical signal diode and of a single-bit memory with oscillatory disks are also discussed.

  8. Dynamic equations of a prestressed magnetoelectroelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyankova, T. I.; Kalinchuk, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    The constitutive relations of nonlinear mechanics of a magnetoelectroelastic medium subjected to initial mechanical stresses are linearized in the framework of material (Lagrangian) coordinates. The final expressions are constructed independently of the choice of curvilinear coordinates and are represented in a form convenient for theoretical and applied studies. The constitutive relations for the motion of a prestressed magnetoelectroelastic medium are given in rectangular Cartesian coordinates. The influence of the initial mechanical stresses on piezomagnetoelectric materials of the class 6mm is studied.

  9. Motility-indole-lysine-sulfide medium.

    PubMed

    Ederer, G M; Lund, M E; Blazevic, D J; Reller, L B; Mirrett, S

    1975-09-01

    A medium designed for the detection of motility, indole, lysine decarboxylase and deaminase reactions, and H2S production was devised and evaluated. Results, using 157 strains of enteric pathogens, were in agreement with reference methods. When 300 isolates from fecal cultures were screened using this medium, Shigella was easily differentiated from Escherichia and more of the Proteus species, especially P. morganii, could be eliminated from further study.

  10. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Cown, Steven H.; Derr, Kurt Warren

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  11. New Medium for Pharmaceutical Grade Arthrospira

    PubMed Central

    Amara, Amro A.; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to produce a pharmaceutical grade single cell product of Arthrospira from a mixed culture. We have designed a medium derived from a combination between George's and Zarrouk's media. Our new medium has the ability to inhibit different forms of cyanobacterium and microalgae except the Chlorella. The medium and the cultivation conditions have been investigated to map the points where only Arthrospira could survive. For that, a mixed culture of pure Chlorella and Arthrospira (~90 : 10) has been used to develop the best medium composition that can lead to the enrichment of the Arthrospira growth and the inhibition of the Chlorella growth. To enable better control and to study its growth, an 80 l photobioreactor has been used. We have used high saline (2xA-St) medium which has been followed by in fermentor reducing its concentration to 1.5x. The investigation proves that Chlorella has completely disappeared. A method and a new saline medium have been established using a photobioreactor for in fermentor production of single cell Arthrospira. Such method enables the production of pure pharmaceutical grade Arthrospira for medicinal and pharmaceutical applications or as a single cell protein. PMID:26904724

  12. Selective medium for culture of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Cook, Beth S; Beddow, Jessica G; Manso-Silván, Lucía; Maglennon, Gareth A; Rycroft, Andrew N

    2016-11-15

    The fastidious porcine respiratory pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae has proven difficult to culture since it was first isolated in 1965. A reliable solid medium has been particularly challenging. Moreover, clinical and pathological samples often contain the fast-growing M. hyorhinis which contaminates and overgrows M. hyopneumoniae in primary culture. The aim of this study was to optimise the culture medium for recovery of M. hyopneumoniae and to devise a medium for selection of M. hyopneumoniae from clinical samples also containing M. hyorhinis. The solid medium devised by Niels Friis was improved by use of Purified agar and incorporation of DEAE-dextran. Addition of glucose or neutralization of acidity in liquid medium with NaOH did not improve the final yield of viable organisms or alter the timing of peak viability. Analysis of the relative susceptibility of M. hyopneumoniae and M. hyorhinis strains to four antimicrobials showed that M. hyopneumoniae is less susceptible than M. hyorhinis to kanamycin. This was consistent in all UK and Danish strains tested. A concentration of 2μg/ml of kanamycin selectively inhibited the growth of all M. hyorhinis tested, while M. hyopneumoniae was able to grow. This forms the basis of an effective selective culture medium for M. hyopneumoniae.

  13. On the third harmonic generation in a medium with negative pump wave refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elyutin, S. O.; Maimistov, A. I.; Gabitov, I. R.

    2010-07-01

    The propagation of the pump and its third harmonic pulses in a cubically nonlinear medium is considered theoretically, provided that the linear properties of the medium are characterized by a negative refractive index at the pump frequency and a positive refractive index at the harmonic frequency. For low-intensity interacting waves, the pump and third harmonic pulses propagate in opposite directions, but sufficiently intense pulses can produce a simulton—a solitary two-frequency wave that propagates in a certain direction as a single whole. The system of equations is investigated numerically for a model that, apart from the harmonic generation, includes the second-order group velocity dispersion and the nonlinear self- and cross-phase modulations of the interacting waves. The separation of the pump and harmonic pulses due to the difference in the directions of their group velocities and peculiarities of the Manley-Rowe relation for parametric processes in metamedia are discussed.

  14. Hypoxic Repeat Sprint Training Improves Rugby Player's Repeated Sprint but Not Endurance Performance.

    PubMed

    Hamlin, Michael J; Olsen, Peter D; Marshall, Helen C; Lizamore, Catherine A; Elliot, Catherine A

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the performance changes in 19 well-trained male rugby players after repeat-sprint training (six sessions of four sets of 5 × 5 s sprints with 25 s and 5 min of active recovery between reps and sets, respectively) in either normobaric hypoxia (HYP; n = 9; FIO2 = 14.5%) or normobaric normoxia (NORM; n = 10; FIO2 = 20.9%). Three weeks after the intervention, 2 additional repeat-sprint training sessions in hypoxia (FIO2 = 14.5%) was investigated in both groups to gauge the efficacy of using "top-up" sessions for previously hypoxic-trained subjects and whether a small hypoxic dose would be beneficial for the previously normoxic-trained group. Repeated sprint (8 × 20 m) and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 (YYIR1) performances were tested twice at baseline (Pre 1 and Pre 2) and weekly after (Post 1-3) the initial intervention (intervention 1) and again weekly after the second "top-up" intervention (Post 4-5). After each training set, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and rate of perceived exertion were recorded. Compared to baseline (mean of Pre 1 and Pre 2), both the hypoxic and normoxic groups similarly lowered fatigue over the 8 sprints 1 week after the intervention (Post 1: -1.8 ± 1.6%, -1.5 ± 1.4%, mean change ± 90% CI in HYP and NORM groups, respectively). However, from Post 2 onwards, only the hypoxic group maintained the performance improvement compared to baseline (Post 2: -2.1 ± 1.8%, Post 3: -2.3 ± 1.7%, Post 4: -1.9 ± 1.8%, and Post 5: -1.2 ± 1.7%). Compared to the normoxic group, the hypoxic group was likely to have substantially less fatigue at Post 3-5 (-2.0 ± 2.4%, -2.2 ± 2.4%, -1.6 ± 2.4% Post 3, Post 4, Post 5, respectively). YYIR1 performances improved throughout the recovery period in both groups (13-37% compared to baseline) with unclear differences found between groups. The addition of two sessions of "top-up" training after intervention 1, had little effect on either group. Repeat-sprint training in

  15. Hypoxic Repeat Sprint Training Improves Rugby Player's Repeated Sprint but Not Endurance Performance

    PubMed Central

    Hamlin, Michael J.; Olsen, Peter D.; Marshall, Helen C.; Lizamore, Catherine A.; Elliot, Catherine A.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the performance changes in 19 well-trained male rugby players after repeat-sprint training (six sessions of four sets of 5 × 5 s sprints with 25 s and 5 min of active recovery between reps and sets, respectively) in either normobaric hypoxia (HYP; n = 9; FIO2 = 14.5%) or normobaric normoxia (NORM; n = 10; FIO2 = 20.9%). Three weeks after the intervention, 2 additional repeat-sprint training sessions in hypoxia (FIO2 = 14.5%) was investigated in both groups to gauge the efficacy of using “top-up” sessions for previously hypoxic-trained subjects and whether a small hypoxic dose would be beneficial for the previously normoxic-trained group. Repeated sprint (8 × 20 m) and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 (YYIR1) performances were tested twice at baseline (Pre 1 and Pre 2) and weekly after (Post 1–3) the initial intervention (intervention 1) and again weekly after the second “top-up” intervention (Post 4–5). After each training set, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and rate of perceived exertion were recorded. Compared to baseline (mean of Pre 1 and Pre 2), both the hypoxic and normoxic groups similarly lowered fatigue over the 8 sprints 1 week after the intervention (Post 1: −1.8 ± 1.6%, −1.5 ± 1.4%, mean change ± 90% CI in HYP and NORM groups, respectively). However, from Post 2 onwards, only the hypoxic group maintained the performance improvement compared to baseline (Post 2: −2.1 ± 1.8%, Post 3: −2.3 ± 1.7%, Post 4: −1.9 ± 1.8%, and Post 5: −1.2 ± 1.7%). Compared to the normoxic group, the hypoxic group was likely to have substantially less fatigue at Post 3–5 (−2.0 ± 2.4%, −2.2 ± 2.4%, −1.6 ± 2.4% Post 3, Post 4, Post 5, respectively). YYIR1 performances improved throughout the recovery period in both groups (13–37% compared to baseline) with unclear differences found between groups. The addition of two sessions of “top-up” training after intervention 1, had little effect on either

  16. Power spectrum of small-scale density irregularities in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Rickett, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of the interstellar scintillation of radiation from 17 pulsars are reported which are used to place limits on the power spectrum of small-scale electron density irregularities in the interstellar medium. Measurements made at 340, 408, and 450 MHz in the dispersion measure range 3-57/cu cm pc of the time-dependent radio frequency spectrum of interstellar scintillations were analyzed to determine the scintillation index and a scintillation frequency-correlation scale based on the autocorrelation function in radio frequency of the fluctuations in scintillation. The dispersion-measure dependence of the scintillation frequency correlation scale is found to be consistent with both Gaussian model interstellar medium spectra and power-law spectra with indices between 3.0 and 4, while the radio-frequency scaling of the frequency correlation scale is consistent with power law indices between 2.8 and 3.9. However comparison of the shape of the radio-frequency autocorrelation function with model calculations indicates power law models with indices greater than 3.6 are possible. Data are also consistent with a local three-dimensional density spectrum at a wave number of 10 to the -9th/m of 3 x 10 to the 28th to 3 x 10 to the 29th/cu m.

  17. Repeating microearthquake sequences interact predominantly through postseismic slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, Semechah K. Y.; Lapusta, Nadia

    2016-10-01

    Studying small repeating earthquakes enables better understanding of fault physics and characterization of fault friction properties. Some of the nearby repeating sequences appear to interact, such as the `San Francisco' and `Los Angeles' repeaters on the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault. It is typically assumed that such interactions are induced by static stress changes due to coseismic slip. Here we present a study of the interaction of repeating earthquakes in the framework of rate-and-state fault models using state-of-the-art simulation methods that reproduce both realistic seismic events and long-term earthquake sequences. Our simulations enable comparison among several types of stress transfer that occur between the repeating events. Our major finding is that postseismic creep dominates the interaction, with earthquake triggering occurring at distances much larger than typically assumed. Our results open a possibility of using interaction of repeating sequences to constrain friction properties of creeping segments.

  18. Repeats in transforming acidic coiled-coil (TACC) genes.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Seema

    2013-06-01

    Transforming acidic coiled-coil proteins (TACC1, 2, and 3) are essential proteins associated with the assembly of spindle microtubules and maintenance of bipolarity. Dysregulation of TACCs is associated with tumorigenesis, but studies of microsatellite instability in TACC genes have not been extensive. Microsatellite or simple sequence repeat instability is known to cause many types of cancer. The present in silico analysis of SSRs in human TACC gene sequences shows the presence of mono- to hexa-nucleotide repeats, with the highest densities found for mono- and di-nucleotide repeats. Density of repeats is higher in introns than in exons. Some of the repeats are present in regulatory regions and retained introns. Human TACC genes show conservation of many repeat classes. Microsatellites in TACC genes could be valuable markers for monitoring numerical chromosomal aberrations and or cancer.

  19. Quasimonomorphic mononucleotide repeats for high-level microsatellite instability analysis.

    PubMed

    Buhard, Olivier; Suraweera, Nirosha; Lectard, Aude; Duval, Alex; Hamelin, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) analysis is becoming more and more important to detect sporadic primary tumors of the MSI phenotype as well as in helping to determine Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) cases. After some years of conflicting data due to the absence of consensus markers for the MSI phenotype, a meeting held in Bethesda to clarify the situation proposed a set of 5 microsatellites (2 mononucleotide repeats and 3 dinucleotide repeats) to determine MSI tumors. A second Bethesda consensus meeting was held at the end of 2002. It was discussed here that the 1998 microsatellite panel could underestimate high-level MSI tumors and overestimate low-level MSI tumors. Amongst the suggested changes was the exclusive use of mononucleotide repeats in place of dinucleotide repeats. We have already proposed a pentaplex MSI screening test comprising 5 quasimonomorphic mononucleotide repeats. This article compares the advantages of mono or dinucleotide repeats in determining microsatellite instability.

  20. Quasimonomorphic Mononucleotide Repeats for High-Level Microsatellite Instability Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Buhard, Olivier; Suraweera, Nirosha; Lectard, Aude; Duval, Alex; Hamelin, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) analysis is becoming more and more important to detect sporadic primary tumors of the MSI phenotype as well as in helping to determine Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) cases. After some years of conflicting data due to the absence of consensus markers for the MSI phenotype, a meeting held in Bethesda to clarify the situation proposed a set of 5 microsatellites (2 mononucleotide repeats and 3 dinucleotide repeats) to determine MSI tumors. A second Bethesda consensus meeting was held at the end of 2002. It was discussed here that the 1998 microsatellite panel could underestimate high-level MSI tumors and overestimate low-level MSI tumors. Amongst the suggested changes was the exclusive use of mononucleotide repeats in place of dinucleotide repeats. We have already proposed a pentaplex MSI screening test comprising 5 quasimonomorphic mononucleotide repeats. This article compares the advantages of mono or dinucleotide repeats in determining microsatellite instability. PMID:15528790