Science.gov

Sample records for medium temperature application

  1. Metal glass vacuum tube solar collectors are approaching lower-medium temperature heat application.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinian

    2010-04-26

    Solar thermal collectors are widely used worldwide mainly for hot water preparation at a low temperature (less than 80 degrees C). Applications including many industrial processes and central air conditioning with absorption chillers, instead require lower-medium temperature heat (between 90 degrees C and 150 degrees C) to be driven when using solar thermal energy. The metal absorber glass vacuum tube collectors (MGVT) are developed for this type of applications. Current state-of-art and possible future technology development of MGVT are presented.

  2. Metal glass vacuum tube solar collectors are approaching lower-medium temperature heat application.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinian

    2010-04-26

    Solar thermal collectors are widely used worldwide mainly for hot water preparation at a low temperature (less than 80?C). Applications including many industrial processes and central air conditioning with absorption chillers, instead require lower-medium temperature heat (between 90 degrees C and 150 degrees C) to be driven when using solar thermal energy. The metal absorber glass vacuum tube collectors (MGVT) are developed for this type of applications. Current state-of-art and possible future technology development of MGVT are presented.

  3. Design principle and calculations of a Scheffler fixed focus concentrator for medium temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Munir, A.; Hensel, O.; Scheffler, W.

    2010-08-15

    Scheffler fixed focus concentrators are successfully used for medium temperature applications in different parts of the world. These concentrators are taken as lateral sections of paraboloids and provide fixed focus away from the path of incident beam radiations throughout the year. The paper presents a complete description about the design principle and construction details of an 8 m{sup 2} surface area Scheffler concentrator. The first part of the paper presents the mathematical calculations to design the reflector parabola curve and reflector elliptical frame with respect to equinox (solar declination = 0) by selecting a specific lateral part of a paraboloid. Crossbar equations and their ellipses, arc lengths and their radii are also calculated to form the required lateral section of the paraboloid. Thereafter, the seasonal parabola equations are calculated for two extreme positions of summer and winter in the northern hemisphere (standing reflectors). The slopes of the parabola equations for equinox (solar declination = 0), summer (solar declination = +23.5) and winter (solar declination = -23.5) for the Scheffler reflector (8 m{sup 2} surface area) are calculated to be 0.17, 0.28, and 0.13 respectively. The y-intercepts of the parabola equations for equinox, summer and winter are calculated as 0, 0.54, and -0.53 respectively. By comparing with the equinox parabola curve, the summer parabola is found to be smaller in size and uses the top part of the parabola curve while the winter parabola is bigger in size and uses the lower part of the parabola curve to give the fixed focus. For this purpose, the reflector assembly is composed of flexible crossbars and a frame to induce the required change of the parabola curves with the changing solar declination. The paper also presents the calculation procedure of seasonal parabola equations for standing reflectors in the southern hemisphere as well as for laying reflectors in the northern and southern hemispheres. Highly

  4. Kinetic studies of dry sorent for medium temperature applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Keener, T.C.; Wang, Z.

    1996-07-12

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the fundamental nature of sorbent reactivity and reaction kinetics in the medium temperature range from 600{degrees}F (316{degrees}C) to 1200{degrees}F (649{degrees}C) available in the convective pass of a boiler upstream of the economizer, where dry sorbents are injected to remove SO{sub 2} from the flue gas. Research focuses on the mechanisms of sorbent- flue gas interaction under economizer and hot baghouse conditions utilizing the experimental setup and the results of the first four years of research.

  5. Comprehensive Compressor Calorimeter Testing of Lower-GWP Alternative Refrigerants for Heat Pump and Medium Temperature Refrigeration Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Som S; Sharma, Vishaldeep; Abdelaziz, Omar

    2014-01-01

    In response to environmental concerns raised by the use of refrigerants with high Global Warming Potential (GWP), the Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) has launched an industry-wide cooperative research program, referred to as the Low-GWP Alternative Refrigerants Evaluation Program (AREP), to identify and evaluate promising alternative refrigerants for major product categories. This paper reports one of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributions to AREP. It compares performance of alternative refrigerants to that of R-410A and R-404A for heat pump and medium temperature applications, respectively. The alternatives reported in this paper are: R-32, DR-5, and L-41a for R-410A and ARM-31a, D2Y-65, L-40, and a mixture of R-32 and R-134a for R-404A. All performance comparison tests were conducted using scroll compressors of ~1.85 tons (6.5 kW) cooling capacity. Tests were conducted over a range of combinations of saturation suction and saturation discharge temperatures for both compressors. The tests showed that, in general, energy efficiency ratio (EER) and cooling capacity of R-410A alternative refrigerants were slightly lower than that of the baseline refrigerant with a moderate increases in discharge temperature. On the other hand, R-404A alternative refrigerants showed relative performance dependence on saturation suction and saturation discharge temperatures and larger increases in discharge temperature than for the R-410A alternatives. This paper summarizes the relative performance of all alternative refrigerants compared to their respective baseline.

  6. Temperature Distribution in a Uniformly Moving Medium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Joseph D.; Petrov, Nikola P.

    2009-01-01

    We apply several physical ideas to determine the steady temperature distribution in a medium moving with uniform velocity between two infinite parallel plates. We compute it in the coordinate frame moving with the medium by integration over the "past" to account for the influence of an infinite set of instantaneous point sources of heat in past…

  7. Kinetic studies of dry sorbents for medium temperature application. Final report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Khang, Soon-Jai; Keener, T.C.; Wang, Zhenwei

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of this project is to study the fundamental nature of the sorbent reactivity and reaction kinetics in the medium temperature range from 600{degrees}F to 1200{degrees}F available in the convective pass of a boiler upstream of the economizer, where dry sorbents are injected to remove SO{sub 2} from the flue gas. Research focus is on the fundamental mechanisms of sorbent-flue gas interaction under economizer and hot baghouse conditions utilizing the experimental setup and the results of the first three years of research. During the fourth year, the interference of carbonation reaction to sulfation reaction was studied as well as the concentration dependency of the sulfation reaction. The data to date showed that the carbonation did not interfere the sulfation reaction rate for reactions taking place less than 1 second. However, there was significant decrease in carbonation conversion when the sulfation reaction took place simultaneously. The levels of SO{sub 2} concentration had negligible effects on reaction rates when the concentration was maintained above 3000 ppM. An n-th order deactivation kinetic model was also developed during the fourth year to model the kinetics of various reactions. This model is particularly useful for the dry sorbent reactions, since the apparent rate constants rapidly decrease during the first 1 second of exposure to various gaseous reactants.

  8. Simplified modeling of liquid sodium medium with temperature and velocity gradient using real thermal-hydraulic data. Application to ultrasonic thermometry in sodium fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massacret, N.; Moysan, J.; Ploix, M. A.; Jeannot, J. P.; Corneloup, G.

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the French R&D program for the Generation IV reactors and specifically for the sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR), studies are carried out on innovative instrumentation methods in order to improve safety and to simplify the monitoring of fundamental physical parameters during reactor operation. The aim of the present work is to develop an acoustic thermometry method to follow up the sodium temperature at the outlet of subassemblies. The medium is a turbulent flow of liquid sodium at 550 °C with temperature inhomogeneities. To understand the effect of disturbance created by this medium, numerical simulations are proposed. A ray tracing code has been developed with Matlabin order to predict acoustic paths in this medium. This complex medium is accurately described by thermal-hydraulic data which are issued from a simulation of a real experiment in Japan. The analysis of these results allows understanding the effects of medium inhomogeneities on the further thermometric acoustic measurement.

  9. Medium Deep High Temperature Heat Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bär, Kristian; Rühaak, Wolfram; Schulte, Daniel; Welsch, Bastian; Chauhan, Swarup; Homuth, Sebastian; Sass, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    Heating of buildings requires more than 25 % of the total end energy consumption in Germany. Shallow geothermal systems for indirect use as well as shallow geothermal heat storage systems like aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) or borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) typically provide low exergy heat. The temperature levels and ranges typically require a coupling with heat pumps. By storing hot water from solar panels or thermal power stations with temperatures of up to 110 °C a medium deep high temperature heat storage (MDHTS) can be operated on relatively high temperature levels of more than 45 °C. Storage depths of 500 m to 1,500 m below surface avoid conflicts with groundwater use for drinking water or other purposes. Permeability is typically also decreasing with greater depth; especially in the crystalline basement therefore conduction becomes the dominant heat transport process. Solar-thermal charging of a MDHTS is a very beneficial option for supplying heat in urban and rural systems. Feasibility and design criteria of different system configurations (depth, distance and number of BHE) are discussed. One system is designed to store and supply heat (300 kW) for an office building. The required boreholes are located in granodioritic bedrock. Resulting from this setup several challenges have to be addressed. The drilling and completion has to be planned carefully under consideration of the geological and tectonical situation at the specific site.

  10. Simplified modeling of liquid sodium medium with temperature and velocity gradient using real thermal-hydraulic data. Application to ultrasonic thermometry in sodium fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Massacret, N.; Jeannot, J. P.

    2013-01-25

    In the framework of the French R and D program for the Generation IV reactors and specifically for the sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR), studies are carried out on innovative instrumentation methods in order to improve safety and to simplify the monitoring of fundamental physical parameters during reactor operation. The aim of the present work is to develop an acoustic thermometry method to follow up the sodium temperature at the outlet of subassemblies. The medium is a turbulent flow of liquid sodium at 550 Degree-Sign C with temperature inhomogeneities. To understand the effect of disturbance created by this medium, numerical simulations are proposed. A ray tracing code has been developed with Matlab Copyright-Sign in order to predict acoustic paths in this medium. This complex medium is accurately described by thermal-hydraulic data which are issued from a simulation of a real experiment in Japan. The analysis of these results allows understanding the effects of medium inhomogeneities on the further thermometric acoustic measurement.

  11. 27 CFR 19.675 - Medium plant permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medium plant permit... Obtaining A Permit § 19.675 Medium plant permit applications. (a) General. Any person wishing to establish a medium plant must file form TTB F 5110.74, Application and Permit for an Alcohol Fuel Producer Under 26...

  12. 27 CFR 19.675 - Medium plant permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medium plant permit... Obtaining A Permit § 19.675 Medium plant permit applications. (a) General. Any person wishing to establish a medium plant must file form TTB F 5110.74, Application and Permit for an Alcohol Fuel Producer Under 26...

  13. 27 CFR 19.675 - Medium plant permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medium plant permit... Obtaining A Permit § 19.675 Medium plant permit applications. (a) General. Any person wishing to establish a medium plant must file form TTB F 5110.74, Application and Permit for an Alcohol Fuel Producer Under 26...

  14. 27 CFR 19.675 - Medium plant permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medium plant permit... Obtaining A Permit § 19.675 Medium plant permit applications. (a) General. Any person wishing to establish a medium plant must file form TTB F 5110.74, Application and Permit for an Alcohol Fuel Producer Under 26...

  15. Corrosion Resistant Coatings for High Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Besman, T.M.; Cooley, K.M.; Haynes, J.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Vaubert, V.M.

    1998-12-01

    Efforts to increase efficiency of energy conversion devices have required their operation at ever higher temperatures. This will force the substitution of higher-temperature structural ceramics for lower temperature materials, largely metals. Yet, many of these ceramics will require protection from high temperature corrosion caused by combustion gases, atmospheric contaminants, or the operating medium. This paper discusses examples of the initial development of such coatings and materials for potential application in combustion, aluminum smelting, and other harsh environments.

  16. Conversion of medium and low temperature heat to power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Johann; Wendland, Martin; Lai, Ngoc Anh

    2013-04-01

    Presently most electricity is produced in power plants which use high temperature heat supplied by coal, oil, gas or nuclear fission and Clausius-Rankine cycles (CRC) with water as working fluid (WF). On the other hand, geo-, solar-, ocean-, and biogenic-heat have medium and low temperatures. At these temperatures, however, the use of other WF and/or other cycles can yield higher efficiencies than those of the water-CRC. For an assessment of the efficiency we model systems which include the heat transfer to and from the WF and the cycle. Optimization criterion is the exergy efficiency defined as the ratio of the net power output to the incoming exergy flow of the heat carrier. First, for a better understanding we discuss some thermodynamic properties of the WFs: 1) the critical point parameters, 2) the shape of the vapour- liquid coexistence curve in the temperature vs entropy (T,s)-diagram which may be either bell-shaped or overhanging [1,2], and 3) the shape of sub- and supercritical isobars for pure fluids and fluid mixtures. Second, we show that the problems of a CRC with water at lower temperatures are 1) the shape of the T,s-diagram and 2) the exergy loss during heat transfer to the WF. The first problem can be overcome by using an organic working fluid in the CRC which then is called organic Rankine cycle (ORC). The second problem is reduced by supercritical organic Rankine cycles (sORC) [1,2], trilateral cycles (TLC) and the more general power-flash cycles (PFC) [2], and organic flash cycles (OFC) [3]. Next, selected results for systems with the above mentioned cycles will be presented. The heat carrier inlet temperatures THC range from 120°C to 350°C.The pure working fluids are water, refrigerants, alkanes, aromates and siloxanes and have to be selected to match with THC. It is found that TLC with water have the highest efficiencies but show very large volume flows at lower temperatures. Moreover, expansion machines for TLC and PFC are still under

  17. Room temperature molten salt as medium for lithium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. S.; Zhou, R. Q.

    Due to the wide electrochemical window and high ionic conductivity, the 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (MeEtImCl) room temperature molten salt (RTMS) was investigated as the medium for lithium battery in the present work. The addition of C 6H 5SO 2Cl to the RTMS was shown to improve its chemical stability and the reversibility of the lithium electrode because of the removal of Al 2Cl 7- from the melt. Electrochemical reaction which occurred at the LiCoO 2 was studied and the carbon current collector was found to interact with the melt. Out of the various carbon materials studied, graphite was found to be the best material. A LiAl/LiCoO 2 battery using RTMS as the electrolyte was assembled for battery test. Satisfactory results were obtained in preliminary cycling, showing a cell voltage of 3.45 V with better than 90% coulombic efficiency and a discharging capacity of 112 mA h/g LiCoO 2 at current density of 1 mA/cm 2.

  18. New medium wave infrared stimulable phosphor for image intensifier applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Peter K.; Pierce, Gregory; Storti, George M.; Wrigley, Charles Y.

    1990-07-01

    A great deal of effort is presently being focused on developing high resolution, high sensitivity medium wavelength IR (MWIR) imaging systems for a variety of applications. These range from thermal imaging for industrial applications to military applications for detecting vehicles, missiles, etc. The present state-of-the-art method for MWIR imaging consists of fabricating linear and two-dimensional arrays of semiconductor detectors, such as HgCdTe, InSb, etc., and incorporating these into an appropriate optical imaging system. However, such devices are difficult to make and are very expensive. A new detector medium is described which can be fabricated at low cost for use in MWIR imaging. Specifically, the new medium is an electron trapping material capable of up-converting MWIR to visible wavelengths, which can be easily detected with a commercial camera system. This paper will describe the specific performance characteristics of the new phosphor material and its application in MWIR imaging.

  19. Effect of medium temperature on the characteristics of closed cryogenic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rura, V.N.

    1985-05-01

    The author analyzes the effect of medium temperature on the characteristics of a gaseous cryogenic system consisting of an engine driven by compressed gas with a regenerator in the dead space and piston-drive compressor. He concludes that, having determined the relationship between the total losses and the temperature of the medium in the volume being cryosated, it is possible to select a volume ratio for the pressure and suction lines so as to reduce the effect of medium temperature on the useful cold production of the system.

  20. Measurements of the gain medium temperature in an operating Cs DPAL.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, B V; Rotondaro, M D; Shaffer, M K; Knize, R J

    2016-08-22

    A Mach-Zehnder interferometer was used for contactless measurement of the temperature of the gain medium within a static cell of Cs DPAL. The maximum temperature recorded approached 700° C leading to a significant degradation of laser performance. This work also examined lasing and non-lasing heat deposition and has shown that as much as 85% of the heating in a DPAL gain medium can be attributed to quenching. PMID:27557208

  1. Measurements of the gain medium temperature in an operating Cs DPAL.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, B V; Rotondaro, M D; Shaffer, M K; Knize, R J

    2016-08-22

    A Mach-Zehnder interferometer was used for contactless measurement of the temperature of the gain medium within a static cell of Cs DPAL. The maximum temperature recorded approached 700° C leading to a significant degradation of laser performance. This work also examined lasing and non-lasing heat deposition and has shown that as much as 85% of the heating in a DPAL gain medium can be attributed to quenching.

  2. Investigation of medium and high temperature phase change materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heine, D.; Kraehling, H.

    1979-01-01

    A detailed description of the programs for acquisition and analysis of the test results is given. Basically it concerns three programs. The TEST program controls the recording of the test data. With the THELLI program it is possible to follow the temperature curve recorded for each individual thermoelement during the test. With the AUSW program the test data can be analyzed, to determine, for example, the melting point and the start of melting. The first results of the service life tests are discussed. From these it is attempted to draw inferences for the subsequent tests. An attempt is made to focus on the determination of the area-related mass loss, the reduction in thickness and the corrosion rate as well as optical and scanning electron microscope evaluation.

  3. Energy cost based design optimization method for medium temperature CPC collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horta, Pedro; Osório, Tiago; Collares-Pereira, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    CPC collectors, approaching the ideal concentration limits established by non-imaging optics, can be designed to have such acceptance angles enabling fully stationary designs, useful for applications in the low temperature range (T < 100°C). Their use in the medium temperature range (100°C < T < 250°C) typically requires higher concentration factors in turn requiring seasonal tracking strategies. Considering the CPC design options in terms of effective concentration factor, truncation, concentrator height, mirror perimeter, seasonal tracking, trough spacing, etc., an energy cost function based design optimization method is presented in this article. Accounting for the impact of the design on its optical (optical efficiency, Incidence Angle Modifier, diffuse acceptance) and thermal performances (dependent on the concentration factor), the optimization function integrates design (e.g. mirror area, frame length, trough spacing/shading), concept (e.g. rotating/stationary components, materials) and operation (e.g. O&M, tilt shifts and tracking strategy) costs into a collector specific energy cost function, in €/(kWh.m2). The use of such function stands for a location and operating temperature dependent design optimization procedure, aiming at the lowest solar energy cost. Illustrating this approach, optimization results will be presented for a (tubular) evacuated absorber CPC design operating in Morocco.

  4. Compact superferric FFAG accelerators for medium energy hadron applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, B.; Mori, Y.

    2011-08-01

    Medium energy hadron beams are desirable in various applications such as accelerator-driven subcritical systems (ADSR), high intensity neutron sources and carbon therapy. Compactness and easy operation characters are important for this energy region, especially in the case of medical use purposes. This paper introduces a novel superferric scheme with scaling fixed-field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerators, which can provide 400 MeV/u carbon ions for cancer therapy. By employing a maximum field of 5 T with a high field index, 8.5 m diameter with 85 cm radius excursion is achieved in a single FFAG ring. The lattice configuration and design of superferric magnet sectors with high permeability materials were described in detail. This scheme can also be extended to other hadron applications.

  5. Solid Medium for Culturing Black Smoker Bacteria at Temperatures to 120°C

    PubMed Central

    Deming, Jody W.; Baross, John A.

    1986-01-01

    A solid, highly thermostable medium, based on the new gelling agent GELRITE, was devised to facilitate the culturing of extremely thermophilic microorganisms from submarine hydrothermal vents. The medium remained solid at temperatures to 120°C at vapor pressures and hydrostatic pressures to 265 atm. It proved useful to its maximum tested limits in isolating colonies of black smoker bacteria from hydrothermal fluids recently collected at the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean. Images PMID:16346981

  6. Influence of temperature of incubation and type of growth medium on pigmentation in Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Williams, R P; Gott, C L; Qadri, S M; Scott, R H

    1971-05-01

    Maximal amounts of prodigiosin were synthesized in either minimal or complete medium after incubation of cultures at 27 C for 7 days. Biosynthesis of prodigiosin began earlier and the range of temperature for formation was greater in complete medium. No prodigiosin was formed in either medium when cultures were incubated at 38 C; however, after a shift to 27 C, pigmentation ensued, provided the period of incubation at 38 C was not longer than 36 hr for minimal medium or 48 hr for complete medium. Washed, nonpigmented cells grown in either medium at 38 C for 72 hr could synthesize prodigiosin when suspended in saline at 27 C when casein hydrolysate was added. These suspensions produced less prodigiosin at a slower rate than did cultures growing in casein hydrolysate at 27 C without prior incubation at 38 C. Optimal concentration of casein hydrolysate for pigment formation by suspensions was 0.4%; optimal temperature was 27 C. Anaerobic incubation, shift back to 38 C, killing cells by heating, or chloramphenicol (25 mug/ml) inhibited pigmentation. Suspensions of washed cells forming pigment reached pH 8.0 to 8.3 rapidly and maintained this pH throughout incubation for 7 days. Measurements of viable count and of protein, plus other data, indicated that cellular multiplication did not occur in suspensions of washed cells during pigment formation. By this procedure utilizing a shift down in temperature, biosynthesis of prodigiosin by washed cells could be separated from multiplication of bacteria.

  7. Formation of bubbly horizon in liquid-saturated porous medium by surface temperature oscillation.

    PubMed

    Goldobin, Denis S; Krauzin, Pavel V

    2015-12-01

    We study nonisothermal diffusion transport of a weakly soluble substance in a liquid-saturated porous medium in contact with a reservoir of this substance. The surface temperature of the porous medium half-space oscillates in time, which results in a decaying solubility wave propagating deep into the porous medium. In this system, zones of saturated solution and nondissolved phase coexist with ones of undersaturated solution. The effect is first considered for the case of annual oscillation of the surface temperature of water-saturated ground in contact with the atmosphere. We reveal the phenomenon of formation of a near-surface bubbly horizon due to temperature oscillation. An analytical theory of the phenomenon is developed. Further, the treatment is extended to the case of higher frequency oscillations and the case of weakly soluble solids and liquids. PMID:26764828

  8. Medium Range Ensembles Flood Forecasts for Community Level Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhruddin, S.; Kawasaki, A.; Babel, M. S.; AIT

    2013-05-01

    Early warning is a key element for disaster risk reduction. In recent decades, there has been a major advancement in medium range and seasonal forecasting. These could provide a great opportunity to improve early warning systems and advisories for early action for strategic and long term planning. This could result in increasing emphasis on proactive rather than reactive management of adverse consequences of flood events. This can be also very helpful for the agricultural sector by providing a diversity of options to farmers (e.g. changing cropping pattern, planting timing, etc.). An experimental medium range (1-10 days) flood forecasting model has been developed for Bangladesh which provides 51 set of discharge ensembles forecasts of one to ten days with significant persistence and high certainty. This could help communities (i.e. farmer) for gain/lost estimation as well as crop savings. This paper describe the application of ensembles probabilistic flood forecast at the community level for differential decision making focused on agriculture. The framework allows users to interactively specify the objectives and criteria that are germane to a particular situation, and obtain the management options that are possible, and the exogenous influences that should be taken into account before planning and decision making. risk and vulnerability assessment was conducted through community consultation. The forecast lead time requirement, users' needs, impact and management options for crops, livestock and fisheries sectors were identified through focus group discussions, informal interviews and questionnaire survey.

  9. Biophotonic applications of eigenchannels in a scattering medium (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moonseok; Choi, Wonjun; Choi, Youngwoon; Yoon, Changhyeong; Choi, Wonshik

    2016-03-01

    When waves travel through disordered media such as ground glass and skin tissues, they are scattered multiple times. Most of the incoming energy bounces back at the superficial layers and only a small fraction can penetrate deep inside. This has been a limiting factor for the working depth of various optical techniques. We present a systematic method to enhance wave penetration to the scattering media. Specifically, we measured the reflection matrix of a disordered medium with wide angular coverage for each orthogonal polarization states. From the reflection matrix, we identified reflection eigenchannels of the medium, and shaped the incident wave into the reflection eigenchannel with smallest eigenvalue, which we call anti-reflection mode. This makes reflectance reduced and wave penetration increased as a result of the energy conservation. We demonstrated transmission enhancement by more than a factor of 3 by the coupling of the incident waves to the anti-reflection modes. Based on the uneven distribution of eigenvalues of reflection eigenchannels, we further developed an iterative feedback control method for finding and coupling light to anti-reflection modes. Since this adaptive control method can keep up with sample perturbation, it promotes the applicability of exploiting reflection eigenchannels. Our approach of delivering light deep into the scattering media will contribute to enhancing the sensitivity of detecting objects hidden under scattering layers, which is universal problem ranging from geology to life science.

  10. Temperature sensors for OTEC applications

    SciTech Connect

    Seren, L.; Panchal, C.B.; Rote, D.M.

    1984-05-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) applications require accurate measurement of temperatures in the 0 to 30/sup 0/C range. This report documents an experimental examination of commercially available quartz-crystal thermometers and thermistors. Three fixed-point baths were used for temperature measurements: the distilled-water/distilled-ice-water slurry, the triple-point-of-water cell, and the gallium melting-point cell. The temperature of carefully prepared ice-water slurries was verified routinely as 0.001 +- 0.003/sup 0/C. Quartz-crystal probes proved accurate to about 1 to 2 mK, with drift errors of the same order over a few days. Bead- and disk-type thermistor probes were found to be about equally stable with time in the 0 to 30/sup 0/C range. The overall probable error of using thermistors was found to be +-4 mK. A solid-block temperature bath suitable for on-site calibrations in OTEC work was used in the temperature-sweeping mode. Various polynomial fits were examined for the purpose of thermistor calibration; fits of order two and higher yielded about equally accurate calculated temperatures.

  11. Temperature sensors for OTEC applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seren, L.; Panchal, C. B.; Rote, D. M.

    1984-05-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) applications require accurate measurement of temperatures in the 0 to 30 C range. Commercially available quartz-crystal thermometers and thermistors were examined. Three fixed-point baths were used for temperature measurements: the distilled-water/distilled-ice-water slurry, the triple-point-of-water cell, and the gallium melting-point cell. The temperature of carefully prepared ice-water slurries was verified routinely as 0.001 + or - 0.003 C. Quartz-crystal probes proved accurate to about 1 to 2 mK, with drift errors of the same order over a few days. Bead and disk-type thermistor probes were found to be about equally stable with time in the 0 to 30 C range. The overall probable error of using thermistors was found to be + or -4 mK. A solid-block temperature bath suitable for on-site calibrations in OTEC work was used in the temperature-sweeping mode. Various polynomial fits were examined for thermistor calibration; fits of order two and higher yielded about equally accurate calculated temperatures.

  12. Temperature fields of an absorptive medium in a radiating system of arbitrary configuration (the spatial problem)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surinov, Y. A.

    1975-01-01

    A generalized zonal method based on systems of linear algebraic equations is used to determine the temperature fields in an absorptive grey medium filling a closed radiation system that consists of three boundary zones, of which one is adiabatic and the other two are isothermal. The example calculation considers the case of a solenoidal radiation field of local radiative equilibrium.

  13. Auroral origin of medium scale gravity waves in neutral composition and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, S.; Spencer, N. W.; Krankowsky, D.; Laemmerzahl, P.

    1979-01-01

    The kinetic temperature and neutral composition data obtained from the Aeros B neutral atmosphere temperature experiment and the neutral and ion mass spectrometer show spatial structures characteristic of medium scale gravity waves with a wavelength in the range of several hundred kilometers. These waves are associated with auroral activity, and their spatial structure reflects the time history of the auroral electrojet. The medium scale gravity waves tend to propagate to mid-latitudes on the nightside. On the dayside their range is limited to high latitudes. Gravity waves are carriers of auroral energy to middle and low latitudes where they may cause irreversible changes in temperature via viscous dissipation. Since auroral activity occurs frequently, it is suggested that this energy reaches the mid-latitude region of the thermosphere much more frequently than is indicated by planetary magnetic indices.

  14. Analysis of shape of porous cooled medium for an imposed surface heat flux and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1973-01-01

    The surface of a porous cooled medium is to be maintained at a specified design temperature while being subjected to uniform heating by an external source. An analytical method is given for determining the shape of the medium surface that will satisfy these boundary conditions. The analysis accounts for temperature dependent variations of fluid density and viscosity and for temperature dependent matrix thermal conductivity. The energy equation is combined with Darcy's law in such a way that a potential can be defined that satisfies Laplace's equation. All of the heat-transfer and flow quantities are expressed in terms of this potential. The determination of the shape of the porous cooled region is thereby reduced to a free-boundary problem such as in inviscid free jet theory. Two illustrative examples are carried out: a porous leading edge with coolant supplied through a slot and a porous cooled duct with a rectangular outer boundary.

  15. D* and B* mesons in strange hadronic medium at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabra, Rahul; Kumar, Arvind

    2016-03-01

    We calculate the effect of density and temperature of isospin symmetric strange medium on the shift in masses and decay constants of vector D and B mesons using chiral SU(3) model and QCD sum rule approach. In the present investigation the values of quark and gluon condensates are calculated from the chiral SU(3) model and these condensatesare further used as input in the QCD Sum rule framework to calculate the in-medium masses and decay constants of vector D and B mesons. These in medium properties of vector D and B mesons may be helpful to understand the experimental observables of the experiments like CBM and PANDA under FAIR project at GSI, Germany. The results which are observed in present work are also compared with the previous predictions.

  16. Inverse coefficient problems for one-dimensional heat transfer with a preservation of medium temperature condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oralsyn, Gulaym

    2016-08-01

    We study an inverse coefficient problem for a model equation for one-dimensional heat transfer with a preservation of medium temperature. It is needed (together with finding its solution) to find time dependent unknown coefficient of the equation. So, for this inverse problem, existence of an unique generalized solution is proved. The main difficulty of the considered problems is that the eigenfunction system of the corresponding boundary value problems does not have the basis property.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTIONS OF 62 GALAXY CLUSTERS WITH XMM-NEWTON

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, K. A.; Peterson, J. R.; Andersson, K.; Fabian, A. C.; Sanders, J. S.

    2013-02-10

    We measure the intracluster medium (ICM) temperature distributions for 62 galaxy clusters in the HIFLUGCS, an X-ray flux-limited sample, with available X-ray data from XMM-Newton. We search for correlations between the width of the temperature distributions and other cluster properties, including median cluster temperature, luminosity, size, presence of a cool core, active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity, and dynamical state. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis, which models the ICM as a collection of X-ray emitting smoothed particles of plasma. Each smoothed particle is given its own set of parameters, including temperature, spatial position, redshift, size, and emission measure. This allows us to measure the width of the temperature distribution, median temperature, and total emission measure of each cluster. We find that none of the clusters have a temperature width consistent with isothermality. Counterintuitively, we also find that the temperature distribution widths of disturbed, non-cool-core, and AGN-free clusters tend to be wider than in other clusters. A linear fit to {sigma} {sub kT}-kT {sub med} finds {sigma} {sub kT} {approx} 0.20kT {sub med} + 1.08, with an estimated intrinsic scatter of {approx}0.55 keV, demonstrating a large range in ICM thermal histories.

  18. Sensors for low temperature application

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, Timothy M.; Wuttke, Gilbert H.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus for low temperature sensing which uses gas filled micro-size hollow glass spheres that are exposed in a confined observation area to a low temperature range (Kelvin) and observed microscopically to determine change of state, i.e., change from gaseous state of the contained gas to condensed state. By suitable indicia and classification of the spheres in the observation area, the temperature can be determined very accurately.

  19. Unsteady magnetohydrodynamic free convection flow of a second grade fluid in a porous medium with ramped wall temperature.

    PubMed

    Samiulhaq; Ahmad, Sohail; Vieru, Dumitru; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic field influence on unsteady free convection flow of a second grade fluid near an infinite vertical flat plate with ramped wall temperature embedded in a porous medium is studied. It has been observed that magnitude of velocity as well as skin friction in case of ramped temperature is quite less than the isothermal temperature. Some special cases namely: (i) second grade fluid in the absence of magnetic field and porous medium and (ii) Newtonian fluid in the presence of magnetic field and porous medium, performing the same motion are obtained. Finally, the influence of various parameters is graphically shown. PMID:24785147

  20. Unsteady magnetohydrodynamic free convection flow of a second grade fluid in a porous medium with ramped wall temperature.

    PubMed

    Samiulhaq; Ahmad, Sohail; Vieru, Dumitru; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic field influence on unsteady free convection flow of a second grade fluid near an infinite vertical flat plate with ramped wall temperature embedded in a porous medium is studied. It has been observed that magnitude of velocity as well as skin friction in case of ramped temperature is quite less than the isothermal temperature. Some special cases namely: (i) second grade fluid in the absence of magnetic field and porous medium and (ii) Newtonian fluid in the presence of magnetic field and porous medium, performing the same motion are obtained. Finally, the influence of various parameters is graphically shown.

  1. Unsteady Magnetohydrodynamic Free Convection Flow of a Second Grade Fluid in a Porous Medium with Ramped Wall Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Samiulhaq; Ahmad, Sohail; Vieru, Dumitru; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic field influence on unsteady free convection flow of a second grade fluid near an infinite vertical flat plate with ramped wall temperature embedded in a porous medium is studied. It has been observed that magnitude of velocity as well as skin friction in case of ramped temperature is quite less than the isothermal temperature. Some special cases namely: (i) second grade fluid in the absence of magnetic field and porous medium and (ii) Newtonian fluid in the presence of magnetic field and porous medium, performing the same motion are obtained. Finally, the influence of various parameters is graphically shown. PMID:24785147

  2. Temperature and relative humidity distributions in a medium-size administrative town in southwest Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akinbode, O M; Eludoyin, A O; Fashae, O A

    2008-04-01

    This study was carried out in one of the medium-sized public administrative towns in the southwestern part of Nigeria. Its aim is to highlight the effect of spatial distribution of settlements, population, and socio-economic activities on urban air temperature and humidity in the town. Temperature and relative humidity data from 1992 to 2001 were obtained from three meteorological stations in Akure, the Administrative Capital of Ondo State, Nigeria. The stations are located within the Federal Ministry of Aviation, Akure Airport (FMA), Federal University of Technology, Akure (FUTA) and Federal School of Agriculture (SOA). Air temperature and relative humidity measurements were also obtained from 27 points, which were cited to include road junctions, markets, built up areas, etc., using sling psychrometer. The data were subsequently analysed for spatial and temporal variations using statistical packages (SPSS and Microsoft Excel) and isolines. Actual vapour pressure and dew point temperature were computed using Magnus conversion formulae. The results obtained showed that spatial variation was insignificant, in terms of the temperature and humidity variables. The annual mean temperature (Tmean) ranged between 21.9 and 30.4 degrees C while minimum (Tmin) and maximum (Tmax) temperatures varied from 13 to 26 and 21.5-39.6 degrees C, respectively. Relative humidity (RH), actual vapour pressure (Es) and dew point temperature (Td) values also varied from 39.1% to 98.2%, 19.7-20.8 gm(-3), and 17.3-17.8 degrees C, respectively. A significant relationship (p>0.6; r<0.05) between Tmin, Es and Td was observed while the daytime 'urban heat island' intensity (UHI) ranged between 0.5 and 2.5 degrees C within the study period. The study concluded that there is influence of urban canopy on the microclimate of Akure, and hypothesizes that the urban dwellers may be subjected to some levels of weather related physiological disorderliness.

  3. Analysis of medium-term temperature changes in Europe for the last millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Dirk; Glaser, Rüdiger; Friedrich, Michael; van Engelen, Aryan

    2010-05-01

    A comparison of seasonally resolved temperature reconstructions from various regions in Europe shows a high coherence for medium term changes, despite the fact that these reconstructions are derived from different proxies, such as historical documentary data, tree ring parameters and speleotherms, each with different temporal and spatial resolution. Deviations from this coherence do not necessarily reflect errors but can be interpreted as regional climatic signals. In this article temperature series from different regions in Europe are analyzed to identify periods of coherence or aberration. Coherence is interpreted as primarily climatically triggered and therefore valid. Aberrations were analyzed for climatic consistency, i.e their agreement with observable patterns. This was checked by searching for modern instances of similar temperature patterns using reanalysis temperature fields and instrumental temperature series. Possible reconstruction errors were also taken into account. By means of statistical up-scaling, regional signals were linked to larger scale patterns and subsequently to patterns of planetary circulation. Periods of divergent and climatically inconsistent regional signals had to be analyzed. In some such cases historical documentary data, with their high temporal and spatial resolution, could be used to explain the differences or the behavior of particular proxies. In cases where no explanations could be found, periods from some series were excluded.

  4. Importance of temperature and anodic medium composition on microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance.

    PubMed

    Min, Booki; Román, Oscar Benito; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-07-01

    The performance of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) was investigated at different temperatures and anodic media. A lag phase of 30 h occurred at 30 degrees C which was half that at room temperature (22 degrees C). The maximum power density at 30 degrees C was 70 mW/m(2) and at 22 degrees C was 43 mW/m(2). At 15 degrees C, no successful operation was observed even after several loadings for a long period of operation. Maximum power density of 320 mW/m(2) was obtained with wastewater medium containing phosphate buffer (conductivity: 11.8 mS/cm), which was approx. 4 times higher than the value without phosphate additions (2.89 mS/cm).

  5. Thermodynamics of Micellization of n-Alkyl Sulfates in an Alkaline Medium at Different Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Ruso; Taboada; Mosquera; Sarmiento

    1999-06-15

    Critical micelle concentrations (cmc) have been calculated from conductivity measurements at 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, and 313.15 K for sodium n-decyl sulfate (SDES), sodium n-undecyl sulfate (SUNDS), and sodium n-dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in a medium of pH 10.0 and ionic strength 0.0312. Thermodynamic parameters of micellization, standard Gibbs energies (), standard enthalpies (), and standard entropies (), have been obtained by application of the model of Evans and Ninham in terms of hydrophobic and surface contributions. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  6. A rift-related origin for regional medium-pressure, high-temperature metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Naomi M.; Hand, Martin; Payne, Justin L.

    2015-07-01

    Crustal-scale exhumation during the Alice Springs Orogeny (c. 450-320 Ma) in central Australia has exposed a region of medium-pressure, high-temperature metasedimentary and metabasic rocks that comprise the Harts Range Group (HRG). Similarities in the detrital zircon age spectra between the HRG and surrounding unmetamorphosed, intraplate late Neoproterozoic-Cambrian basin sequences suggest that the HRG is a highly metamorphosed equivalent of these successions. Calculated phase equilibria modelling and thermobarometry constrain peak metamorphic conditions to ˜ 880 °C and 10.5 kbar, and ˜ 680 °C and 5.5-8.0 kbar, in the structurally lowest and highest parts of the HRG, respectively. Metamorphic conditions also indicate that burial occurred along a near-linear moderately-high apparent thermal gradient, recorded by the prograde development of andalusite-bearing mineral assemblages at shallower structural levels. Prograde and peak metamorphism was associated with voluminous intrusive and extrusive mafic magmatism, the development of a coarse layer-parallel fabric and north-directed normal shear-sense kinematics. Collectively, these point to an extensional regime. Furthermore, burial and metamorphism at c. 480-460 Ma was concurrent with a shallow epicontinental marine environment and ongoing sedimentation in central Australia. Accordingly, the deep burial, metamorphism and deformation of the HRG to mid-lower crustal depths (˜ 20- 35 km) must be justified in the context of the broader intraplate basin evolution at this time. It is difficult to reconcile medium-pressure, high-temperature metamorphism of the HRG with deep burial by tectonic overthickening which is commonly assumed to be the case. In contrast, metamorphism of the HRG seems more compatible with burial within a deep rift-style basin driven by high heat flow and mafic magmatism, suggesting that regional medium-pressure metamorphic terranes are not necessarily reflective of compressional thickening of the

  7. Influence of medium and temperature on the hydrolysis kinetics of propacetamol hydrochloride: determination using derivative spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Barcia, Emilia; Martin, Alicia; Azuara, Ma Luz; Negro, Sofia

    2005-03-01

    Propacetamol hydrochloride (PRO) is a water-soluble prodrug of paracetamol (PA) which can be parenterally administered as analgesic for the treatment of postoperative pain, acute trauma, and gastric and/or intestinal disorders where oral administration is not possible. In these circumstances, PRO can be administered in physiologic or glucose solutions since it is rapidly and quantitatively hydrolyzed into PA by plasma estearases. We have studied the degradation kinetics of PRO in 5% glucose and 0.9% saline solutions at 4 degrees C and 25 degrees C (storage and room temperatures, respectively). The analytic technique used to determine PRO and PA quantitatively was first-derivative spectrophotometry. The degradation process of PRO can be best fitted to a second-order kinetics with independence of the medium used (saline or glucose solution). The hydrolysis kinetics of PRO conversion into PA depends on the temperature but not on the assay medium (saline or glucose solution). The degradation rate constants obtained for PRO were approximately 4.5 times higher at 25 degrees C than at 4 degrees C. The values of t(90%) for PRO were 3.17 h and 3.61 h at 25 degrees C, and 13.42 h and 12.36 h at 4 degrees C when the tests were performed in 5% glucose and 0.9% saline solutions, respectively. PMID:15744097

  8. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Optimization of the δ-doped layer in P-HFETs at medium/high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, B.; Hernández, A.; García, J.; del Pino, J.; Sendra, J. R.; Nunez, A.

    2000-04-01

    The use of icons/Journals/Common/delta" ALT="delta" ALIGN="TOP"/> -doping in HFET processes has made the development of transistor circuits and logic gates possible, for very high-frequency/speed or low-power applications. This behaviour of the PHFET device is due to fast quantum well conduction. However, the effect of the operating temperature range is critical. This range depends on the transistor and circuit activity, the packaging technique, and the external operating conditions. Temperature strongly affects the device ability to confine the current flow into the quantum well channel. In this paper the effect of temperature and icons/Journals/Common/delta" ALT="delta" ALIGN="TOP"/> -doping concentration on the performance of the device is investigated by means of simulated experiments. The results are analytically and qualitatively discussed, showing how to fine tune the icons/Journals/Common/delta" ALT="delta" ALIGN="TOP"/> -doping concentration in order to optimize the P-HFET behaviour from medium- to high-temperature conditions, [300, 500] K.

  9. Water activity and temperature effects on growth of Alternaria arborescens on tomato medium.

    PubMed

    Vaquera, Sandra; Patriarca, Andrea; Fernández Pinto, Virginia

    2014-08-18

    Alternaria arborescens is the causal agent of tomato stem canker, a disease frequently responsible of substantial economic losses. A. arborescens can produce several mycotoxins, such as alternariol, alternariol monomethyl ether and tenuazonic acid and phytotoxins such as the AAL toxins. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of water activity (aw, 0.950, 0.975, 0.995) and temperature (6, 15, 20, 25 and 30°C) on the germination and radial growth rate of A. arborescens on a synthetic tomato medium. Germination followed by growth was observed at all temperatures and aw levels analyzed. The shortest germination time (0.5 days) was observed at 0.995 aw, both at 25°C and at 30°C. The germination time increased with a reduction of aw and temperature. The highest growth rate was registered at 0.995 aw and 30°C (7.21 mm/day) while the lowest occurred at 0.950 aw and 6°C (0.52 mm/day), conditions at which the longest lag phase was observed (8 days). Growth rates increased with aw and temperature. Knowledge of the ecophysiology of the fungus in this substrate is necessary to formulate future strategies to prevent its development and evaluate the consumer health risk posed by potential exposure to the toxins. PMID:24964391

  10. Fractography of the high temperature hydrogen attack of a medium carbon steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melson, H. G.; Moorhead, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    Microscopic fracture processes were studied which are associated with hydrogen attack of a medium carbon steel in a well-controlled, high-temperature, high-purity hydrogen environment. Exposure to a hydrogen pressure and temperature of 3.5 MN/m2 and 575 C was found to degrade room temperature tensile properties with increasing exposure time. After 408 hr, yield and ultimate strengths were reduced by more than 40 percent and elongation was reduced to less than 2 percent. Initial fissure formation was found to be associated with manganese rich particles, most probably manganese oxide, aligned in the microstructure during the rolling operation. Fissure growth was found to be associated with a reduction in carbide content of the microstructure and was inhibited by the depletion of carbon. The interior surfaces of sectioned fissures or bubbles exhibit both primary and secondary cracking by intergranular separation. The grain surfaces were rough and rounded, suggesting a diffusion-associated separation process. Specimens that failed at room temperature after exposure to hydrogen were found to exhibit mixed mode fracture having varying amounts of intergranular separation, dimple formation, and cleavage, depending on exposure time.

  11. Aeronautical applications of high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turney, George E.; Luidens, Roger W.; Uherka, Kenneth; Hull, John

    1989-01-01

    The successful development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) could have a major impact on future aeronautical propulsion and aeronautical flight vehicle systems. A preliminary examination of the potential application of HTS for aeronautics indicates that significant benefits may be realized through the development and implementation of these newly discovered materials. Applications of high-temperature superconductors (currently substantiated at 95 K) were envisioned for several classes of aeronautical systems, including subsonic and supersonic transports, hypersonic aircraft, V/STOL aircraft, rotorcraft, and solar, microwave and laser powered aircraft. Introduced and described are the particular applications and potential benefits of high-temperature superconductors as related to aeronautics and/or aeronautical systems.

  12. Motor for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roopnarine (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A high temperature motor has a stator with poles formed by wire windings, and a rotor with magnetic poles on a rotor shaft positioned coaxially within the stator. The stator and rotor are built up from stacks of magnetic-alloy laminations. The stator windings are made of high temperature magnet wire insulated with a vitreous enamel film, and the wire windings are bonded together with ceramic binder. A thin-walled cylinder is positioned coaxially between the rotor and the stator to prevent debris from the stator windings from reaching the rotor. The stator windings are wound on wire spools made of ceramic, thereby avoiding need for mica insulation and epoxy/adhesive. The stator and rotor are encased in a stator housing with rear and front end caps, and rear and front bearings for the rotor shaft are mounted on external sides of the end caps to keep debris from the motor migrating into the bearings' races.

  13. Supercritical Water Reactor Cycle for Medium Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    BD Middleton; J Buongiorno

    2007-04-25

    Scoping studies for a power conversion system based on a direct-cycle supercritical water reactor have been conducted. The electric power range of interest is 5-30 MWe with a design point of 20 MWe. The overall design objective is to develop a system that has minimized physical size and performs satisfactorily over a broad range of operating conditions. The design constraints are as follows: Net cycle thermal efficiency {ge}20%; Steam turbine outlet quality {ge}90%; and Pumping power {le}2500 kW (at nominal conditions). Three basic cycle configurations were analyzed. Listed in order of increased plant complexity, they are: (1) Simple supercritical Rankine cycle; (2) All-supercritical Brayton cycle; and (3) Supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating. The sensitivity of these three configurations to various parameters, such as reactor exit temperature, reactor pressure, condenser pressure, etc., was assessed. The Thermoflex software package was used for this task. The results are as follows: (a) The simple supercritical Rankine cycle offers the greatest hardware simplification, but its high reactor temperature rise and reactor outlet temperature may pose serious problems from the viewpoint of thermal stresses, stability and materials in the core. (b) The all-supercritical Brayton cycle is not a contender, due to its poor thermal efficiency. (c) The supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating affords acceptable thermal efficiency with lower reactor temperature rise and outlet temperature. (d) The use of a moisture separator improves the performance of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and allows for a further reduction of the reactor outlet temperature, thus it was selected for the next step. Preliminary engineering design of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and moisture separation was performed. All major components including the turbine, feedwater heater, feedwater pump, condenser, condenser pump

  14. Hybrid solar receiver as a source of high-temperature medium for an absorption chiller supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przenzak, Estera; Filipowicz, Mariusz

    2016-03-01

    This article discusses the problems related with the cold production, i.e. energy efficiency of the process. The idea of solar cooling systems has been presented as the solution of the problem of big electricity demand. The paper discusses the principle of the operation of absorption chillers. Disadvantages and advantages of the solar cooling systems were discussed. The installation for manufacturing high-temperature heat based on solar collectors and concentrator of solar radiation constructed in AGH in Cracow has been presented. This installation is a first stage of projected, complete solar cooling system. The special attention is paid to the dedicated solar high-temperature heat receiver as a most important element of the system. The achieved values of temperature, power and efficiency depending on the working medium flow has been presented and discussed. The intensity of solar radiation during the measurements has been taken into account. Two versions of heat receiver were investigated: non-insulated and insulated with mineral wool. The obtained efficiency of the heat receiver (less than 30%) is not satisfactory but possibility of improvements exist.

  15. Joining of ceramics for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilpas, Martti

    1987-01-01

    Summarized is a literature survey of the methods for joining ceramics to ceramics or ceramics to metals for high temperature applications. Also mechanical properties and potential applications of the joints are considered. The joining of ceramics is usually carried out by brazing or diffusion bonding. Especially the latter has been found useful, increasing the application of bonded ceramics. The possibility of using electron beam and laser beam welding for joining ceramics has also recently been investigated. The bonding of ceramics has found numerous applications typical for high operating temperatures, i.e., sensors and thermocouples.

  16. Thermally activated decomposition of (Ga,Mn)As thin layer at medium temperature post growth annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikhov, Y.; Konstantynov, P.; Domagala, J.; Sadowski, J.; Chernyshova, M.; Wojciechowski, T.; Syryanyy, Y.; Demchenko, I. N.

    2016-05-01

    The redistribution of Mn atoms in Ga1-xMnxAs layer during medium-temperature annealing, 250-450 oC, by Mn K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) recorded at ALBA facility, was studied. For this purpose Ga1-xMnxAs thin layer with x=0.01 was grown on AlAs buffer layer deposited on GaAs(100) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) followed by annealing. The examined layer was detached from the substrate using a “lift-off” procedure in order to eliminate elastic scattering in XAFS spectra. Fourier transform analysis of experimentally obtained EXAFS spectra allowed to propose a model which describes a redistribution/diffusion of Mn atoms in the host matrix. Theoretical XANES spectra, simulated using multiple scattering formalism (FEFF code) with the support of density functional theory (WIEN2k code), qualitatively describe the features observed in the experimental fine structure.

  17. PAPER-64 CONSTRAINTS ON REIONIZATION. II. THE TEMPERATURE OF THE z = 8.4 INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Pober, Jonathan C.; Ali, Zaki S.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Cheng, Carina; Liu, Adrian; McQuinn, Matthew; Aguirre, James E.; Kohn, Saul A.; Bernardi, Gianni; Grobbelaar, Jasper; Horrell, Jasper; Maree, Matthys; Bradley, Richard F.; Carilli, Chris L.; DeBoer, David R.; Dexter, Matthew R.; MacMahon, David H. E.; Furlanetto, Steven R.; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Klima, Patricia J.; and others

    2015-08-10

    We present constraints on both the kinetic temperature of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z = 8.4, and on models for heating the IGM at high-redshift with X-ray emission from the first collapsed objects. These constraints are derived using a semi-analytic method to explore the new measurements of the 21 cm power spectrum from the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER), which were presented in a companion paper, Ali et al. Twenty-one cm power spectra with amplitudes of hundreds of mK{sup 2} can be generically produced if the kinetic temperature of the IGM is significantly below the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB); as such, the new results from PAPER place lower limits on the IGM temperature at z = 8.4. Allowing for the unknown ionization state of the IGM, our measurements find the IGM temperature to be above ≈5 K for neutral fractions between 10% and 85%, above ≈7 K for neutral fractions between 15% and 80%, or above ≈10 K for neutral fractions between 30% and 70%. We also calculate the heating of the IGM that would be provided by the observed high redshift galaxy population, and find that for most models, these galaxies are sufficient to bring the IGM temperature above our lower limits. However, there are significant ranges of parameter space that could produce a signal ruled out by the PAPER measurements; models with a steep drop-off in the star formation rate density at high redshifts or with relatively low values for the X-ray to star formation rate efficiency of high redshift galaxies are generally disfavored. The PAPER measurements are consistent with (but do not constrain) a hydrogen spin temperature above the CMB temperature, a situation which we find to be generally predicted if galaxies fainter than the current detection limits of optical/NIR surveys are included in calculations of X-ray heating.

  18. High temperature superconductor materials and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, George B., III.; Banks, Curtis; Golben, John

    1990-01-01

    Research on processing methods leading to a significant enhancement in the critical current densities (Jc) and the critical temperature (Tc) of high temperature superconducting in thin bulk and thin film forms. The fabrication of important devices for NASA unique applications (sensors) is investigated.

  19. Application of vigilance research - Rare, medium, or well done?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L.

    1987-01-01

    In the years since Mackworth (1950) initiated research into problems of human vigilance, automated systems have become more complex and costly, with greater repercussions upon failure; this has led to a paradoxical enhancement of human monitoring's importance. Applications of vigilance research to well-designed systems that take human monitoring into account are rare, although the outlook for future systems is improving. Attention is presently given to problems encountered in considerations of signal rate, length of vigil, time decrements, and two examples of implementation from commercial aviation.

  20. Highly flexible, proton-conductive silicate glass electrolytes for medium-temperature/low-humidity proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeon-Ji; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Won, Ji-Hye; Lim, Jun-Muk; Hong, Young Taik; Lee, Sang-Young

    2013-06-12

    We demonstrate highly flexible, proton-conductive silicate glass electrolytes integrated with polyimide (PI) nonwoven fabrics (referred to as "b-SS glass electrolytes") for potential use in medium-temperature/low-humidity proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The b-SS glass electrolytes are fabricated via in situ sol-gel synthesis of 3-trihydroxysilyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (THPSA)/3-glycidyloxypropyl trimethoxysilane (GPTMS) mixtures inside PI nonwoven substrates that serve as a porous reinforcing framework. Owing to this structural uniqueness, the b-SS glass electrolytes provide noticeable improvements in mechanical bendability and membrane thickness, in comparison to typical bulk silicate glass electrolytes that are thick and easily fragile. Another salient feature of the b-SS glass electrolytes is the excellent proton conductivity at harsh measurement conditions of medium temperature/low humidity, which is highly important for PEMFC-powered electric vehicle applications. This beneficial performance is attributed to the presence of a highly interconnected, proton-conductive (THPSA/GPTMS-based) silicate glass matrix in the PI reinforcing framework. Notably, the b-SS glass electrolyte synthesized from THPSA/GPTMS = 9/1 (mol/mol) exhibits a higher proton conductivity than water-swollen sulfonated polymer electrolyte membranes (here, sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) and Nafion are chosen as control samples). This intriguing behavior in the proton conductivity of the b-SS glass electrolytes is discussed in great detail by considering its structural novelty and Grotthuss mechanism-driven proton migration that is strongly affected by ion exchange capacity (IEC) values and also state of water.

  1. Space applications of high temperature superconductivity technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, D. J.; Aron, P. R.; Leonard, R. F.; Wintucky, E. G.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of the present status of high temperature superconductivity (HTS) technology and related areas of potential space application. Attention is given to areas of application that include microwave communications, cryogenic systems, remote sensing, and space propulsion and power. Consideration is given to HTS phase shifters, miniaturization of microwave filters, far-IR bolometers, and magnetic refrigeration using flux compression.

  2. Industrial Applications of Low Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bardsley, J N

    2001-03-15

    The use of low temperature plasmas in industry is illustrated by the discussion of four applications, to lighting, displays, semiconductor manufacturing and pollution control. The type of plasma required for each application is described and typical materials are identified. The need to understand radical formation, ionization and metastable excitation within the discharge and the importance of surface reactions are stressed.

  3. Layering from anticyclonic vortices in a rotating stratified medium with combined salinity and temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommeria, Joel; Burin, Michael; Viboud, Samuel

    2015-11-01

    We generate anticyclonic vortices by a fluid source in a rotating and uniformly stratified medium, a laboratory model of long lived vortex lenses in the ocean. Experiments are performed in the large `Coriolis' rotating platform at Grenoble, 13 m in diameter, providing previously unaccessible turbulent regimes. The other novelty is to combine temperature and salinity effects, like in `meddies', vortices formed by intrusion in the Atlantic ocean of warm and salty water from the Mediterranean Sea. For both heated an unheated cases, we observe shear driven instability at the vortex periphery, leading to the emission of material filament from a large-scale m=2 instability. Heated vortices behave much the same way but with two key additions. One, prominent at early times, is that the vortex edge appears serrated around most of its circumference in the upper part of the lens. Two, clearer for later times, a staircase density profile develops above the eddy. We explain this small scale turbulence as thermal convection in the statically unstable density profile resulting from selective vertical diffusion of temperature (while salinity is less diffusive). The resulting turbulent mixing generates horizontal intrusions at the upper part of the vortex, unlike the double-diffusive instability. This work has been funded by Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR), project `OLA'.

  4. Three-dimensionally ordered macroporous iron oxide for removal of H2S at medium temperatures.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hui-Ling; Sun, Ting; Zhao, Yan-Peng; Shangguan, Ju; Lin, Jian-Ying

    2013-05-01

    A series of iron oxide sorbents with novel structures of three-dimensionally ordered macropores (3DOM), ranging in size from 60 to 550 nm, were fabricated and creatively used as sorbents for the removal of H2S at medium temperatures of 300-350 °C. Evaluation tests using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and a fixed-bed reactor showed that, in comparison to the iron oxide sorbent prepared by a conventional mixing method, the fabricated iron oxide sorbent with a 3DOM structure exhibited much higher reactivity and efficiency, as well as high sorbent utilization with low regeneration temperature. The excellent performance of 3DOM iron oxide as a sulfur sorbent is attributed to its special texture, i.e., the open and interconnected macroporous, large surface area, and nanoparticles of iron oxide, which are revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nitrogen adsorption techniques. The investigation results of the pore effect on the performance of the sorbent show that sorbents with pores size around 150 nm in diameter revealed the best performance. The reason is that pores of this size are large enough to allow gas to pass through even if the channel is partially blocked during the reaction process while remaining a large surface area that can provide more active sites for the reaction.

  5. Three-dimensionally ordered macroporous iron oxide for removal of H2S at medium temperatures.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hui-Ling; Sun, Ting; Zhao, Yan-Peng; Shangguan, Ju; Lin, Jian-Ying

    2013-05-01

    A series of iron oxide sorbents with novel structures of three-dimensionally ordered macropores (3DOM), ranging in size from 60 to 550 nm, were fabricated and creatively used as sorbents for the removal of H2S at medium temperatures of 300-350 °C. Evaluation tests using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and a fixed-bed reactor showed that, in comparison to the iron oxide sorbent prepared by a conventional mixing method, the fabricated iron oxide sorbent with a 3DOM structure exhibited much higher reactivity and efficiency, as well as high sorbent utilization with low regeneration temperature. The excellent performance of 3DOM iron oxide as a sulfur sorbent is attributed to its special texture, i.e., the open and interconnected macroporous, large surface area, and nanoparticles of iron oxide, which are revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nitrogen adsorption techniques. The investigation results of the pore effect on the performance of the sorbent show that sorbents with pores size around 150 nm in diameter revealed the best performance. The reason is that pores of this size are large enough to allow gas to pass through even if the channel is partially blocked during the reaction process while remaining a large surface area that can provide more active sites for the reaction. PMID:23528010

  6. Skin temperatures generated following plaster splint application.

    PubMed

    Lindeque, Bennie G P; Shuler, Franklin D; Bates, Christopher M

    2013-05-01

    Heat is generated during the exothermic reaction associated with plaster splint application. The amount of heat generated is affected by the plaster thickness, dipping water temperature, and extremity elevation method. The authors assessed the effect of these variables on skin and plaster temperatures. Short-leg posterior splints were applied to noninjured extremities on a volunteer using 2 protocols. Following splint application, the splinted leg was elevated in 4 ways: on plastic-covered urethane pillows in cotton pillowcases, on cotton blankets, on ice packs (short-term cryotherapy) placed on top of cotton blankets, or with heel elevation to promote free air circulation. Skin and plaster temperatures were monitored at 1-minute intervals. The maximum skin temperature generated and the average time that skin temperature was 40 °C or higher were recorded. PMID:23672893

  7. Geochemical survey of medium temperature geothermal resources from the Baja California Peninsula and Sonora, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragán R, R. M.; Birkle, P.; Portugal M, E.; Arellano G, V. M.; Alvarez R, J.

    2001-09-01

    Waters from hot springs and deep wells from Cerritos in the northern Baja California Peninsula and deep wells from the Riı´to zone (Sonora state) were studied in order to classify medium temperature geothermal resources to be exploited in NW-Mexico. Geochemical characteristics of San Felipe and Punta Estrella coastal springs indicate the mixing of seawater and meteoric components with secondary leaching of evaporates. Reservoir temperatures for both zones were estimated up to 225°C. Mixing of high portions of seawater (>80 wt%) with local waters could be the origin for the Puertecitos coastal spring, with a reservoir temperature estimation of 195°C. The El Coloradito coastal spring is composed of meteoric water with a reservoir temperature of 127°C. The formation of thermal manifestations along the Baja California coast could be related to the heating up of convecting seawater along extensional tectonic structures, as observed for submarine hydrothermal vents at the Gulf of California and along the East Pacific Rise. Volcanic steam-heated waters with a reservoir temperature of 135°C were found at the Valle Chico inland springs from the Baja California Peninsula. Deep fluids from the Riı´to zone originated by evaporation of infiltrated waters with similar characteristics to those located in the Mexicali Valley. Reservoir temperature of 192 and 126°C are estimated for the Riı´to deep wells ER-1B (ER) and R-1, respectively. The Riı´to artesian wells M-1, M-2 and M-4 indicate reservoir temperatures from 109 to 118°C. Isotopic data define the artesian wells as typical surface water or shallow groundwater from the Mexicali Valley. The Cerritos deep fluids of the Mexicali Valley show a close chemical and isotopic relationship to the adjacent Cerro Prieto reservoir fluids suggesting a similar origin and a possible connection of both aquifer systems. Conductive cooling of Cerro Prieto discharge fluids could originate the cooler Cerritos system (130

  8. A Chandra Study of Temperature Distributions of the Intracluster Medium in 50 Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhenghao; Xu, Haiguang; Wang, Jingying; Gu, Junhua; Li, Weitian; Hu, Dan; Zhang, Chenhao; Gu, Liyi; An, Tao; Liu, Chengze; Zhang, Zhongli; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Xiang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the spatial distribution of the intracluster medium temperature in galaxy clusters in a quantitative way and probe the physics behind it, we analyze the X-ray spectra from a sample of 50 clusters that were observed with the Chandra ACIS instrument over the past 15 years and measure the radial temperature profiles out to 0.45r500. We construct a physical model that takes into consideration the effects of gravitational heating, thermal history (such as radiative cooling, active galactic nucleus feedback, and thermal conduction), and work done via gas compression, and use it to fit the observed temperature profiles by running Bayesian regressions. The results show that in all cases our model provides an acceptable fit at the 68% confidence level. For further validation, we select nine clusters that have been observed with both Chandra (out to ≳0.3r500) and Suzaku (out to ≳1.5r500) and fit their Chandra spectra with our model. We then compare the extrapolation of the best fits with the Suzaku measurements and find that the model profiles agree with the Suzaku results very well in seven clusters. In the remaining two clusters the difference between the model and the observation is possibly caused by local thermal substructures. Our study also implies that for most of the clusters the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium is safe out to at least 0.5r500 and the non-gravitational interactions between dark matter and its luminous counterparts is consistent with zero.

  9. Piezoelectric accelerometers for ultrahigh temperature application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shujun; Jiang, Xiaoning; Lapsley, Michael; Moses, Paul; Shrout, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    High temperature sensors are of major importance to aerospace and energy related industries. In this letter, a high temperature monolithic compression-mode piezoelectric accelerometer was fabricated using YCa4O(BO3)3 (YCOB) single crystals. The performance of the sensor was tested as function of temperature up to 1000 °C and over a frequency range of 100-600 Hz. The accelerometer prototype was found to possess sensitivity of 2.4±0.4 pC/g, across the measured temperature and frequency range, indicating a low temperature coefficient. Furthermore, the sensor exhibited good stability over an extended dwell time at 900 °C, demonstrating that YCOB piezoelectric accelerometers are promising candidates for high temperature sensing applications.

  10. Piezoelectric accelerometers for ultrahigh temperature application

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shujun; Moses, Paul; Shrout, Thomas R.; Jiang Xiaoning; Lapsley, Michael

    2010-01-04

    High temperature sensors are of major importance to aerospace and energy related industries. In this letter, a high temperature monolithic compression-mode piezoelectric accelerometer was fabricated using YCa{sub 4}O(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} (YCOB) single crystals. The performance of the sensor was tested as function of temperature up to 1000 deg. C and over a frequency range of 100-600 Hz. The accelerometer prototype was found to possess sensitivity of 2.4+-0.4 pC/g, across the measured temperature and frequency range, indicating a low temperature coefficient. Furthermore, the sensor exhibited good stability over an extended dwell time at 900 deg. C, demonstrating that YCOB piezoelectric accelerometers are promising candidates for high temperature sensing applications.

  11. Temperature compensated silicon resonators for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rais-Zadeh, Mina; Thakar, Vikram A.; Wu, Zhengzheng; Peczalski, Adam

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents piezoelectric transduction and frequency trimming of silicon-based resonators with a center frequency in the low megahertz regime. The temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) of the resonators is reduced using both passive and active compensation schemes. Specifically, a novel technique utilizing oxide-refilled trenches is implemented to achieve efficient temperature compensation while maintaining compatibility with wet release processes. Using this method, we demonstrate high-Q resonators having a first-order TCF as low as 3 ppm/°C and a turnover temperature of around 90 °C, ideally suited for use in ovenized platforms. Using active tuning, the temperature sensitivity of the resonator is further compensated around the turnover temperature, demonstrating frequency instability of less than 400 ppb. Such devices are ideally suited as timing units in space applications where size, power consumption, and temperature stability are of critical importance.

  12. MEMS temperature scanner: principles, advances, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Thomas; Saupe, Ray; Stock, Volker; Gessner, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Contactless measurement of temperatures has gained enormous significance in many application fields, ranging from climate protection over quality control to object recognition in public places or military objects. Thereby measurement of linear or spatially temperature distribution is often necessary. For this purposes mostly thermographic cameras or motor driven temperature scanners are used today. Both are relatively expensive and the motor drive devices are limited regarding to the scanning rate additionally. An economic alternative are temperature scanner devices based on micro mirrors. The micro mirror, attached in a simple optical setup, reflects the emitted radiation from the observed heat onto an adapted detector. A line scan of the target object is obtained by periodic deflection of the micro scanner. Planar temperature distribution will be achieved by perpendicularly moving the target object or the scanner device. Using Planck radiation law the temperature of the object is calculated. The device can be adapted to different temperature ranges and resolution by using different detectors - cooled or uncooled - and parameterized scanner parameters. With the basic configuration 40 spatially distributed measuring points can be determined with temperatures in a range from 350°C - 1000°C. The achieved miniaturization of such scanners permits the employment in complex plants with high building density or in direct proximity to the measuring point. The price advantage enables a lot of applications, especially new application in the low-price market segment This paper shows principle, setup and application of a temperature measurement system based on micro scanners working in the near infrared range. Packaging issues and measurement results will be discussed as well.

  13. Aerospace applications of high temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinen, V. O.; Connolly, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Space application of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials may occur before most terrestrial applications because of the passive cooling possibilities in space and because of the economic feasibility of introducing an expensive new technology which has a significant system benefit in space. NASA Lewis Research Center has an ongoing program to develop space technology capitalizing on the potential benefit of HTS materials. The applications being pursued include space communications, power and propulsion systems, and magnetic bearings. In addition, NASA Lewis is pursuing materials research to improve the performance of HTS materials for space applications.

  14. Strain sensing technology for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, W. Dan

    1993-01-01

    This review discusses the status of strain sensing technology for high temperature applications. Technologies covered are those supported by NASA such as required for applications in hypersonic vehicles and engines, advanced subsonic engines, as well as material and structure development. The applications may be at temperatures of 540 C (1000 F) to temperatures in excess of 1400 C (2500 F). The most promising technologies at present are the resistance strain gage and remote sensing schemes. Resistance strain gages discussed include the BCL gage, the LaRC compensated gage, and the PdCr gage. Remote sensing schemes such as laser based speckle strain measurement, phase-shifling interferometry, and x-ray extensometry are discussed. Present status and limitations of these technologies are presented.

  15. THE TEMPERATURE-DENSITY RELATION IN THE INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM AT REDSHIFT (z) = 2.4

    SciTech Connect

    Rudie, Gwen C.; Steidel, Charles C.; Pettini, Max

    2012-10-01

    We present new measurements of the temperature-density (T-{rho}) relation for neutral hydrogen in the 2.0 < z < 2.8 intergalactic medium (IGM) using a sample of {approx}6000 individual H I absorbers fitted with Voigt profiles constrained in all cases by multiple Lyman series transitions. We find model-independent evidence for a positive correlation between the column density of H I (N{sub HI}) and the minimum observed velocity width of absorbers (b{sub min}). With minimal interpretation, this implies that the T-{rho} relation in the IGM is not 'inverted', contrary to many recent studies. Fitting b{sub min} as a function of N{sub HI} results in line-width-column-density dependence of the form b{sub min} = b{sub 0}(N{sub HI}/N{sub HI,0}){sup {Gamma}-1} with a minimum line width at mean density ({rho}/{rho}-bar = 1, N{sub HI,0} = 10{sup 13.6} cm{sup -2}) of b{sub 0} = 17.9 {+-} 0.2 km s{sup -1} and a power-law index of ({Gamma} - 1) = 0.15 {+-} 0.02. Using analytic arguments, these measurements imply an 'equation of state' for the IGM at (z) = 2.4 of the form T=T{sub 0} ({rho}/{rho}-bar){sup {gamma}-1} with a temperature at mean density of T{sub 0} = [1.94 {+-} 0.05] Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} K and a power-law index ({gamma} - 1) = 0.46 {+-} 0.05.

  16. Limits on the ion temperature anisotropy in the turbulent intracluster medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Lima, R.; Yan, H.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Lazarian, A.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulence in the weakly collisional intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxies is able to generate strong thermal velocity anisotropies in the ions (with respect to the local magnetic field direction), if the magnetic moment of the particles is conserved in the absence of Coulomb collisions. In this scenario, the anisotropic pressure magnetohydrodynamic (AMHD) turbulence shows a very different statistical behaviour from the standard MHD one and is unable to amplify seed magnetic fields. This is in contrast to previous cosmological MHD simulations that are successful in explaining the observed magnetic fields in the ICM. On the other hand, temperature anisotropies can also drive plasma instabilities that can relax the anisotropy. This work aims to compare the relaxation rate with the growth rate of the anisotropies driven by the turbulence. We employ quasi-linear theory to estimate the ion scattering rate resulting from the parallel firehose, mirror and ion-cyclotron instabilities, for a set of plasma parameters resulting from AMHD simulations of the turbulent ICM. We show that the ICM turbulence can sustain only anisotropy levels very close to the instability thresholds. We argue that the AMHD model that bounds the anisotropies at the marginal stability levels can describe the Alfvénic turbulence cascade in the ICM.

  17. A boron phosphate-phosphoric acid composite membrane for medium temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamlouk, M.; Scott, K.

    2015-07-01

    A composite membrane based on a non-stoichiometric composition of BPO4 with excess of PO4 (BPOx) was synthesised and characterised for medium temperature fuel cell use (120-180 °C). The electrolyte was characterised by FTIR, SS-NMR, TGA and XRD and showed that the B-O is tetrahedral, in agreement with reports in the literature that boron phosphorus oxide compounds at B:P < 1 are exclusively built of borate and phosphate tetrahedra. Platinum micro electrodes were used to study the electrolyte compatibility and stability towards oxygen reduction at 150 °C and to obtain kinetic and mass transport parameters. The conductivities of the pure BPOx membrane electrolyte and a Polybenzimidazole (PBI)-4BPOx composite membrane were 7.9 × 10-2 S cm-1 and 4.5 × 10-2 S cm-1 respectively at 150 °C, 5%RH. Fuel cell tests showed a significant enhancement in performance of BPOx over that of typical 5.6H3PO4-PBI membrane electrolyte. The enhancement is due to the improved ionic conductivity (3×), a higher exchange current density of the oxygen reduction (30×) and a lower membrane gas permeability (10×). Fuel cell current densities at 0.6 V were 706 and 425 mA cm-2 for BPOx and 5.6H3PO4-PBI, respectively, at 150 °C with O2 (atm).

  18. High temperature superconductors for magnetic suspension applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmichael, C. K.; Cooley, R. S.; Chen, Q. Y.; Ma, K. B.; Lamb, M. A.; Meng, R. L.; Chu, C. W.; Chu, W. K.

    1994-01-01

    High temperature superconductors (HTS) hold the promise for applications in magnetic levitation bearings, vibration damping, and torque coupling. Traditional magnetic suspension systems require active feedback and vibration controls in which power consumption and low frequency vibration are among the major engineering concerns. HTS materials have been demonstrated to be an enabling approach towards such problems due to their flux trapping properties. In our laboratory at TCSUH, we have been conducting a series of experiments to explore various mechanical applications using HTS. We have constructed a 30 lb. model flywheel levitated by a hybrid superconducting magnetic bearing (HSMB). We are also developing a levitated and vibration-dampled platform for high precision instrumentation. These applications would be ideal for space usages where ambient temperature is adequate for HTS to operate properly under greatly reduced cryogenic requirements. We will give a general overview of these potential applications and discuss the operating principles of the HTS devices we have developed.

  19. EXCITATION TEMPERATURE OF THE WARM NEUTRAL MEDIUM AS A NEW PROBE OF THE Lyα RADIATION FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Claire E.; Lindner, Robert R.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Pingel, Nickolas M.; Lawrence, Allen; Babler, Brian L.; Goss, W. M.; Jencson, Jacob; Heiles, Carl; Dickey, John; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2014-02-01

    We use the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to conduct a high-sensitivity survey of neutral hydrogen (H I) absorption in the Milky Way. In combination with corresponding H I emission spectra obtained mostly with the Arecibo Observatory, we detect a widespread warm neutral medium component with excitation temperature 〈T{sub s}〉=7200{sub −1200}{sup +1800} K (68% confidence). This temperature lies above theoretical predictions based on collisional excitation alone, implying that Lyα scattering, the most probable additional source of excitation, is more important in the interstellar medium (ISM) than previously assumed. Our results demonstrate that H I absorption can be used to constrain the Lyα radiation field, a critical quantity for studying the energy balance in the ISM and intergalactic medium yet notoriously difficult to model because of its complicated radiative transfer, in and around galaxies nearby and at high redshift.

  20. WRF-simulated sensitivity to land surface schemes in short and medium ranges for a high-temperature event in East China: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xin-Min; Wang, Ning; Wang, Yang; Zheng, Yiqun; Zhou, Zugang; Wang, Guiling; Chen, Chaohui; Liu, Huaqiang

    2015-09-01

    We designed simulations for the high-temperature event that occurred on 23 July 2003 in East China using a series of forecast lead times, from short-range to medium-range, and four land surface schemes (LSSs) (i.e., SLAB, NOAH, RUC, and PX) in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF), Version 3. The sensitivities of short and medium-range simulations to the LSSs systematically varied with the lead times. In general, the model reproduced short-range, high-temperature distributions. The simulated weather was sensitive to the LSSs, and the LSS-induced sensitivity was higher in the medium range than in the short-range. Furthermore, the LSS performances were complex, i.e., the PX errors apparently increased in the medium range (longer than 6 days), RUC produced the maximum errors, and SLAB and NOAH had approximately equivalent errors that slightly increased. Additional sensitivity simulations revealed that the WRF modeling system assigns relatively low initial soil moisture for RUC and that soil moisture initialization plays an important role that is comparable to the LSS choice in the simulations. LSS-induced negative feedback between surface air temperature (SAT) and atmospheric circulation in the lower atmosphere was found in the medium range. These sensitivities were mainly caused by the LSS-induced differences in surface sensible heat flux and by errors associated with the lead times. Using the SAT equation, further diagnostic analyses revealed LSS deficiencies in simulating surface fluxes and physical processes that modify the SAT and indicated the main reasons for these deficiencies. These results have implications for model improvement and application.

  1. Novel iron titanate catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 in the medium temperature range.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fudong; He, Hong; Zhang, Changbin

    2008-05-01

    An iron titanate catalyst with a crystallite phase, prepared by a co-precipitation method, showed excellent activity, stability, selectivity and SO(2)/H(2)O durability in the selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH(3) in the medium temperature range.

  2. 40 CFR 141.81 - Applicability of corrosion control treatment steps to small, medium-size and large water systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... treatment steps to small, medium-size and large water systems. 141.81 Section 141.81 Protection of... to small, medium-size and large water systems. (a) Systems shall complete the applicable corrosion...) or (b)(3) of this section. (2) A small system (serving ≤3300 persons) and a medium-size...

  3. 40 CFR 428.60 - Applicability; description of the medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.60 Section 428.60... RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Medium-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber Plants Subcategory § 428.60 Applicability; description of the medium-sized general molded, extruded,...

  4. 40 CFR 428.60 - Applicability; description of the medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.60 Section 428.60... (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Medium-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber Plants Subcategory § 428.60 Applicability; description of the medium-sized general...

  5. 40 CFR 428.60 - Applicability; description of the medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.60 Section 428.60... (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Medium-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber Plants Subcategory § 428.60 Applicability; description of the medium-sized general...

  6. 40 CFR 141.81 - Applicability of corrosion control treatment steps to small, medium-size and large water systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... treatment steps to small, medium-size and large water systems. 141.81 Section 141.81 Protection of... to small, medium-size and large water systems. (a) Systems shall complete the applicable corrosion...) or (b)(3) of this section. (2) A small system (serving ≤3300 persons) and a medium-size...

  7. 40 CFR 141.81 - Applicability of corrosion control treatment steps to small, medium-size and large water systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... treatment steps to small, medium-size and large water systems. 141.81 Section 141.81 Protection of... to small, medium-size and large water systems. (a) Systems shall complete the applicable corrosion...) or (b)(3) of this section. (2) A small system (serving ≤3300 persons) and a medium-size...

  8. 40 CFR 141.81 - Applicability of corrosion control treatment steps to small, medium-size and large water systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... treatment steps to small, medium-size and large water systems. 141.81 Section 141.81 Protection of... to small, medium-size and large water systems. (a) Systems shall complete the applicable corrosion...) or (b)(3) of this section. (2) A small system (serving ≤3300 persons) and a medium-size...

  9. 40 CFR 428.60 - Applicability; description of the medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.60 Section 428.60... RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Medium-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber Plants Subcategory § 428.60 Applicability; description of the medium-sized general molded, extruded,...

  10. 40 CFR 141.81 - Applicability of corrosion control treatment steps to small, medium-size and large water systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... treatment steps to small, medium-size and large water systems. 141.81 Section 141.81 Protection of... to small, medium-size and large water systems. (a) Systems shall complete the applicable corrosion...) or (b)(3) of this section. (2) A small system (serving ≤3300 persons) and a medium-size...

  11. 40 CFR 428.60 - Applicability; description of the medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.60 Section 428.60... (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Medium-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber Plants Subcategory § 428.60 Applicability; description of the medium-sized general...

  12. Aerospace applications of high temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, D. J.; Heinen, V. O.; Aron, P. R.; Lazar, J.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    A review is presented of all the applications that are part of the NASA program to develop space technology capitalizing on the potential benefit of high temperature superconducting materials. The applications in three major areas are being pursued: sensors and cryogenic systems, space communications, and propulsion and power systems. This review places emphasis on space communications applications and the propulsion and power applications. It is concluded that the power and propulsion applications will eventually be limited by structural considerations rather than by the availability of suitable superconductors. A cursory examination of structural limitations implied by the virial theorem suggested that there is an upper limit to the size of high field magnetic systems that are feasible in space.

  13. Influence of the Refractivity and Temperature of the Ambient Medium on the Eigenfrequencies of Quasioptical Cylindrical Dielectric Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormidontov, A. V.; Prokopenko, Yu. V.

    2013-11-01

    We attempt for the first time to separate the influences of the temperature and refractivity of the ambient air space on the spectral and energy characteristics of cylindrical Teflon and leucosapphire resonators with the whispering gallery modes in the millimeter-wave range. It is found that under conditions of natural fluctuations of the above-mentioned factors of the studied ambient medium, the degree of temperature influence on the resonator eigenfrequencies is more significant. We demonstrate that quasioptical cylindrical dielectric resonators can be used as sensors of the temperature of the ambient air medium and ensure an accuracy of 10-4°C when their resonant frequencies are measured with an accuracy of 100 Hz. A method for determination of the air refractivity has been developed, which uses the considered resonator as a temperature sensor and a measuring cell of the microwave resonator refractometer. A refractometer sensor has been developed on the basis of two identical resonators with whispering gallery modes. The differential two-resonator refractometer compensates for the influence of changes in the temperature of the ambient medium on the measured difference of the eigenfrequencies of resonators with identical modes. It is found that the accuracy of determination of the air refractivity is ensured at a level of 10-2 if the frequency difference is measured with an accuracy of 10 Hz.

  14. Effects of fluid medium flow and spatial temperature variation on acoustophoretic motion of microparticles in microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongzheng; Kim, Yong-Joe; Wang, Han; Han, Arum

    2016-01-01

    A numerical modeling method for accurately predicting the acoustophoretic motion of compressible microparticles in microfluidic devices is presented to consider the effects of fluid medium flow and spatial temperature variation that can significantly influence the acoustophoretic motion. In the proposed method, zeroth-order fluid medium flow and temperature, and first- and second-order acoustic fields in the microfluidic devices are first calculated by applying quadratic mapping functions and a second-order finite difference method (FDM) to perturbed mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations and state equation. Then, the acoustic radiation force is obtained based on the Gorkov's acoustic radiation force equation and applied to the Newton's Equation of Motion to calculate the microparticle motion. The proposed method was validated by comparing its results to a commercial software package, COMSOL Multiphysics results, one-dimensional, analytical modeling results, and experimental results. It is shown that the fluid medium flow affects the acoustic radiation force and streaming significantly, resulting in the acoustic radiation force and streaming prediction errors of 10.9% and 67.4%, respectively, when the fluid medium flow speed is increased from 0 to 1 m/s. A local temperature elevation from 20 °C to 22 °C also results in the prediction errors of 88.4% and 73.4%. PMID:26827029

  15. Effects of fluid medium flow and spatial temperature variation on acoustophoretic motion of microparticles in microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongzheng; Kim, Yong-Joe; Wang, Han; Han, Arum

    2016-01-01

    A numerical modeling method for accurately predicting the acoustophoretic motion of compressible microparticles in microfluidic devices is presented to consider the effects of fluid medium flow and spatial temperature variation that can significantly influence the acoustophoretic motion. In the proposed method, zeroth-order fluid medium flow and temperature, and first- and second-order acoustic fields in the microfluidic devices are first calculated by applying quadratic mapping functions and a second-order finite difference method (FDM) to perturbed mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations and state equation. Then, the acoustic radiation force is obtained based on the Gorkov's acoustic radiation force equation and applied to the Newton's Equation of Motion to calculate the microparticle motion. The proposed method was validated by comparing its results to a commercial software package, COMSOL Multiphysics results, one-dimensional, analytical modeling results, and experimental results. It is shown that the fluid medium flow affects the acoustic radiation force and streaming significantly, resulting in the acoustic radiation force and streaming prediction errors of 10.9% and 67.4%, respectively, when the fluid medium flow speed is increased from 0 to 1 m/s. A local temperature elevation from 20 °C to 22 °C also results in the prediction errors of 88.4% and 73.4%.

  16. Application of thermal model for pan evaporation to the hydrology of a defined medium, the sponge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trenchard, M. H.; Artley, J. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    A technique is presented which estimates pan evaporation from the commonly observed values of daily maximum and minimum air temperatures. These two variables are transformed to saturation vapor pressure equivalents which are used in a simple linear regression model. The model provides reasonably accurate estimates of pan evaporation rates over a large geographic area. The derived evaporation algorithm is combined with precipitation to obtain a simple moisture variable. A hypothetical medium with a capacity of 8 inches of water is initialized at 4 inches. The medium behaves like a sponge: it absorbs all incident precipitation, with runoff or drainage occurring only after it is saturated. Water is lost from this simple system through evaporation just as from a Class A pan, but at a rate proportional to its degree of saturation. The contents of the sponge is a moisture index calculated from only the maximum and minium temperatures and precipitation.

  17. Medium factors on anaerobic production of rhamnolipids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa SG and a simplifying medium for in situ microbial enhanced oil recovery applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Zhou, Jidong; Han, Siqin; Ma, Fang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Aerobic production of rhamnolipid by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was extensively studied. But effect of medium composition on anaerobic production of rhamnolipid by P. aeruginosa was unknown. A simplifying medium facilitating anaerobic production of rhamnolipid is urgently needed for in situ microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). Medium factors affecting anaerobic production of rhamnolipid were investigated using P. aeruginosa SG (Genbank accession number KJ995745). Medium composition for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid by P. aeruginosa is different from that for aerobic production of rhamnolipid. Both hydrophobic substrate and organic nitrogen inhibited rhamnolipid production under anaerobic conditions. Glycerol and nitrate were the best carbon and nitrogen source. The commonly used N limitation under aerobic conditions was not conducive to rhamnolipid production under anaerobic conditions because the initial cell growth demanded enough nitrate for anaerobic respiration. But rhamnolipid was also fast accumulated under nitrogen starvation conditions. Sufficient phosphate was needed for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. SO4(2-) and Mg(2+) are required for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. Results will contribute to isolation bacteria strains which can anaerobically produce rhamnolipid and medium optimization for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. Based on medium optimization by response surface methodology and ions composition of reservoir formation water, a simplifying medium containing 70.3 g/l glycerol, 5.25 g/l NaNO3, 5.49 g/l KH2PO4, 6.9 g/l K2HPO4·3H2O and 0.40 g/l MgSO4 was designed. Using the simplifying medium, 630 mg/l of rhamnolipid was produced by SG, and the anaerobic culture emulsified crude oil to EI24 = 82.5 %. The simplifying medium was promising for in situ MEOR applications.

  18. Medium factors on anaerobic production of rhamnolipids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa SG and a simplifying medium for in situ microbial enhanced oil recovery applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Zhou, Jidong; Han, Siqin; Ma, Fang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Aerobic production of rhamnolipid by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was extensively studied. But effect of medium composition on anaerobic production of rhamnolipid by P. aeruginosa was unknown. A simplifying medium facilitating anaerobic production of rhamnolipid is urgently needed for in situ microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). Medium factors affecting anaerobic production of rhamnolipid were investigated using P. aeruginosa SG (Genbank accession number KJ995745). Medium composition for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid by P. aeruginosa is different from that for aerobic production of rhamnolipid. Both hydrophobic substrate and organic nitrogen inhibited rhamnolipid production under anaerobic conditions. Glycerol and nitrate were the best carbon and nitrogen source. The commonly used N limitation under aerobic conditions was not conducive to rhamnolipid production under anaerobic conditions because the initial cell growth demanded enough nitrate for anaerobic respiration. But rhamnolipid was also fast accumulated under nitrogen starvation conditions. Sufficient phosphate was needed for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. SO4(2-) and Mg(2+) are required for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. Results will contribute to isolation bacteria strains which can anaerobically produce rhamnolipid and medium optimization for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. Based on medium optimization by response surface methodology and ions composition of reservoir formation water, a simplifying medium containing 70.3 g/l glycerol, 5.25 g/l NaNO3, 5.49 g/l KH2PO4, 6.9 g/l K2HPO4·3H2O and 0.40 g/l MgSO4 was designed. Using the simplifying medium, 630 mg/l of rhamnolipid was produced by SG, and the anaerobic culture emulsified crude oil to EI24 = 82.5 %. The simplifying medium was promising for in situ MEOR applications. PMID:26925616

  19. High temperature application of retrievable MWD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, R.; Saito, S.

    1995-12-31

    MWD systems are currently used to monitor the direction of wellbores. MWD systems with higher temperature capabilities are required to meet the needs of deep and geothermal drilling. A technique has been developed for geothermal drilling that allows a fully retrievable MWD system to be used in wells with formation temperatures in excess of 350{degrees}C. This operational technique involves use of the MWD system in combination with operational procedures adapted to cope with the need for continuous directional control while drilling. Descriptions of the drilling environment are given in areas of Japan where high temperature drilling is performed. Possible future requirements are reviewed. The MWD system is described giving current technical specifications and capabilities. The operational method for utilizing the MWD is detailed. A summary of successful applications is discussed and specific case studies given. The efficiency of using the technique is reviewed.

  20. Aluminum nanocomposites for elevated temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgonovo, C.; Apelian, D.; Makhlouf, M. M.

    2011-02-01

    Aluminum casting alloys conventionally used in the automotive and aerospace industries (i.e., Al-Zn-Mg, and Al-Cu-Mg systems) are able to achieve excellent tensile strength at room temperature. At high temperatures, such alloys lose dimensional stability and their mechanical properties rapidly degrade. Aluminum-based nanocomposites show the potential for enhanced performance at high temperatures. The manufacturing process, however, is difficult; a viable and effective method for large-scale applications has not been developed. In the current study, an innovative and cost-effective approach has been adopted to manufacture Al/AlN composites. A nitrogen-bearing gas is injected into the melt and AlN particles synthesize in-situ via chemical reaction. In a preliminary stage, a model able to predict the amount of reinforcement formed has been developed. AlN dispersoids have been succesfully synthesized in the matrix and the model has been experimentally validated.

  1. Application of a medium-range global hydrologic probabilistic forecast scheme to the Ohio River Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Voisin, Nathalie; Pappenberger, Florian; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Buizza, Roberto; Schaake, John

    2011-08-15

    A 10-day globally applicable flood prediction scheme was evaluated using the Ohio River basin as a test site for the period 2003-2007. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrology model was initialized with the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analysis temperatures and wind, and Tropical Rainfall Monitoring Mission Multi Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) precipitation up to the day of forecast. In forecast mode, the VIC model was then forced with a calibrated and statistically downscaled ECMWF ensemble prediction system (EPS) 10-day ensemble forecast. A parallel set up was used where ECMWF EPS forecasts were interpolated to the spatial scale of the hydrology model. Each set of forecasts was extended by 5 days using monthly mean climatological variables and zero precipitation in order to account for the effect of initial conditions. The 15-day spatially distributed ensemble runoff forecasts were then routed to four locations in the basin, each with different drainage areas. Surrogates for observed daily runoff and flow were provided by the reference run, specifically VIC simulation forced with ECMWF analysis fields and TMPA precipitation fields. The flood prediction scheme using the calibrated and downscaled ECMWF EPS forecasts was shown to be more accurate and reliable than interpolated forecasts for both daily distributed runoff forecasts and daily flow forecasts. Initial and antecedent conditions dominated the flow forecasts for lead times shorter than the time of concentration depending on the flow forecast amounts and the drainage area sizes. The flood prediction scheme had useful skill for the 10 following days at all sites.

  2. Comparison of synthetic medium and wastewater used as dilution medium to design scalable microbial anodes: Application to food waste treatment.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Elise; Desmond, Elie; Erable, Benjamin; Bridier, Arnaud; Bouchez, Théodore; Bergel, Alain

    2015-06-01

    The objective was to replace synthetic medium by wastewater as a strategy to design low-cost scalable bioanodes. The addition of activated sludge was necessary to form primary bioanodes that were then used as the inoculum to form the secondary bioanodes. Bioanodes formed in synthetic medium with acetate 10mM provided current densities of 21.9±2.1A/m(2), while bioanodes formed in wastewater gave 10.3±0.1A/m(2). The difference was explained in terms of biofilm structure, electrochemical kinetics and redox charge content of the biofilms. In both media, current densities were straightforwardly correlated with the biofilm enrichment in Geobacteraceae but, inside this family, Geobacter sulfurreducens and an uncultured Geobacter sp. were dominant in the synthetic medium, while growth of another Geobacter sp. was favoured in wastewater. Finally, the primary/secondary procedure succeeded in designing bioanodes to treat food wastes by using wastewater as dilution medium, with current densities of 7±1.1A/m(2).

  3. High temperature superconductors applications in telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A. Anil; Li, Jiang; Zhang, Ming Fang

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to discuss high temperature superconductors with specific reference to their employment in telecommunications applications; and (2) to discuss a few of the limitations of the normally employed two-fluid model. While the debate on the actual usage of high temperature superconductors in the design of electronic and telecommunications devices - obvious advantages versus practical difficulties - needs to be settled in the near future, it is of great interest to investigate the parameters and the assumptions that will be employed in such designs. This paper deals with the issue of providing the microwave design engineer with performance data for such superconducting waveguides. The values of conductivity and surface resistance, which are the primary determining factors of a waveguide performance, are computed based on the two-fluid model. A comparison between two models - a theoretical one in terms of microscopic parameters (termed Model A) and an experimental fit in terms of macroscopic parameters (termed Model B) - shows the limitations and the resulting ambiguities of the two-fluid model at high frequencies and at temperatures close to the transition temperature. The validity of the two-fluid model is then discussed. Our preliminary results show that the electrical transport description in the normal and superconducting phases as they are formulated in the two-fluid model needs to be modified to incorporate the new and special features of high temperature superconductors. Parameters describing the waveguide performance - conductivity, surface resistance and attenuation constant - will be computed. Potential applications in communications networks and large scale integrated circuits will be discussed. Some of the ongoing work will be reported. In particular, a brief proposal is made to investigate of the effects of electromagnetic interference and the concomitant notion of electromagnetic compatibility (EMI/EMC) of high T

  4. High temperature superconductors applications in telecommunications

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.A.; Li, J.; Zhang, M.F.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: to discuss high temperature superconductors with specific reference to their employment in telecommunications applications; and to discuss a few of the limitations of the normally employed two-fluid model. While the debate on the actual usage of high temperature superconductors in the design of electronic and telecommunications devices-obvious advantages versus practical difficulties-needs to be settled in the near future, it is of great interest to investigate the parameters and the assumptions that will be employed in such designs. This paper deals with the issue of providing the microwave design engineer with performance data for such superconducting waveguides. The values of conductivity and surface resistance, which are the primary determining factors of a waveguide performance, are computed based on the two-fluid model. A comparison between two models-a theoretical one in terms of microscopic parameters (termed Model A) and an experimental fit in terms of macroscopic parameters (termed Model B)-shows the limitations and the resulting ambiguities of the two-fluid model at high frequencies and at temperatures close to the transition temperature. The validity of the two-fluid model is then discussed. Our preliminary results show that the electrical transport description in the normal and superconducting phases as they are formulated in the two-fluid model needs to be modified to incorporate the new and special features of high temperature superconductors. Parameters describing the waveguide performance-conductivity, surface resistance and attenuation constant-will be computed. Potential applications in communications networks and large scale integrated circuits will be discussed. Some of the ongoing work will be reported. In particular, a brief proposal is made to investigate of the effects of electromagnetic interference and the concomitant notion of electromagnetic compatibility (EMI/EMC) of high T{sub c} superconductors.

  5. Atmospheric aerosol impacts on sea surface temperatures and medium range forecast.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyola, M. I.; Joseph, E.; Lu, C. H.; Nalli, N. R.

    2014-12-01

    This work proposes a series of experiments to analyze the impact of dust aerosols on numerical weather prediction (NWP) and the global data assimilation system. We strive to accomplish this by the application of the NOAA Environmental Modeling System/Global Forecasting System (NEMS/GFS) aerosol component (NGAC), which corresponds to the first global interactive atmosphere-aerosol forecast system ever implemented at NOAA's National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and which has been operational since September 2012. Specifically, our approach will include the implementation of an improved satellite sea surface temperature (SST) retrieval methodology, that allows for better representation of the atmospheric state under dust-laden conditions. Specifically, the new algorithm will be included within the NGAC aerosol product to improve the accuracy of the SST analysis and examine the impact on NWP, particularly in tropical cyclone genesis regions in the eastern Atlantic. The results of these corrections are validated against observed measurements from the eastern Atlantic Ocean, which is dominated by Saharan dust throughout most of the year and that is also a genesis region for Atlantic tropical cyclones. These observations are obtained from the NOAA Aerosols and Ocean Science Expeditions (AEROSE) and PIRATA Northeast Extension (PNE) buoys network. We believe that the improved physical SST methodology has the potential to allow for improved representation of the geophysical state under dust-laden conditions

  6. High Temperature Battery for Drilling Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Josip Caja

    2009-12-31

    In this project rechargeable cells based on the high temperature electrochemical system Na/beta''-alumina/S(IV) in AlCl3/NaCl were developed for application as an autonomous power source in oil/gas deep drilling wells. The cells operate in the temperature range from 150 C to 250 C. A prototype DD size cell was designed and built based on the results of finite element analysis and vibration testing. The cell consisted of stainless steel case serving as anode compartment with cathode compartment installed in it and a seal closing the cell. Critical element in cell design and fabrication was hermetically sealing the cell. The seal had to be leak tight, thermally and vibration stable and compatible with electrode materials. Cathode compartment was built of beta''-alumina tube which served as an electrolyte, separator and cathode compartment.

  7. Potential aerospace applications of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selim, Raouf

    1994-01-01

    The recent discovery of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) with superconducting transition temperature, T(sub c), above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen has opened the door for using these materials in new and practical applications. These materials have zero resistance to electric current, have the capability of carrying large currents and as such have the potential to be used in high magnetic field applications. One of the space applications that can use superconductors is electromagnetic launch of payloads to low-earth-orbit. An electromagnetic gun-type launcher can be used in small payload systems that are launched at very high velocity, while sled-type magnetically levitated launcher can be used to launch larger payloads at smaller velocities. Both types of launchers are being studied by NASA and the aerospace industry. The use of superconductors will be essential in any of these types of launchers in order to produce the large magnetic fields required to obtain large thrust forces. Low Temperature Superconductor (LTS) technology is mature enough and can be easily integrated in such systems. As for the HTS, many leading companies are currently producing HTS coils and magnets that potentially can be mass-produced for these launchers. It seems that designing and building a small-scale electromagnetic launcher is the next logical step toward seriously considering this method for launching payloads into low-earth-orbit. A second potential application is the use of HTS to build sensitive portable devices for the use in Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE). Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUID's) are the most sensitive instruments for measuring changes in magnetic flux. By using HTS in SQUID's, one will be able to design a portable unit that uses liquid nitrogen or a cryocooler pump to explore the use of gradiometers or magnetometers to detect deep cracks or corrosion in structures. A third use is the replacement of Infra-Red (IR) sensor leads on

  8. Effects of Wall Shear Stress on Unsteady MHD Conjugate Flow in a Porous Medium with Ramped Wall Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arshad; Khan, Ilyas; Ali, Farhad; ulhaq, Sami; Shafie, Sharidan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of an arbitrary wall shear stress on unsteady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of a Newtonian fluid with conjugate effects of heat and mass transfer. The fluid is considered in a porous medium over a vertical plate with ramped temperature. The influence of thermal radiation in the energy equations is also considered. The coupled partial differential equations governing the flow are solved by using the Laplace transform technique. Exact solutions for velocity and temperature in case of both ramped and constant wall temperature as well as for concentration are obtained. It is found that velocity solutions are more general and can produce a huge number of exact solutions correlative to various fluid motions. Graphical results are provided for various embedded flow parameters and discussed in details. PMID:24621775

  9. Ultrasonic tomography for in-process measurements of temperature in a multi-phase medium

    DOEpatents

    Beller, L.S.

    1993-01-26

    A method and apparatus are described for the in-process measurement of internal particulate temperature utilizing ultrasonic tomography techniques to determine the speed of sound through a specimen material. Ultrasonic pulses are transmitted through a material, which can be a multi-phase material, over known flight paths and the ultrasonic pulse transit times through all sectors of the specimen are measured to determine the speed of sound. The speed of sound being a function of temperature, it is possible to establish the correlation between speed of sound and temperature, throughout a cross-section of the material, which correlation is programmed into a computer to provide for a continuous in-process measurement of temperature throughout the specimen.

  10. Ultrasonic tomography for in-process measurements of temperature in a multi-phase medium

    DOEpatents

    Beller, Laurence S.

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the in-process measurement of internal particulate temperature utilizing ultrasonic tomography techniques to determine the speed of sound through a specimen material. Ultrasonic pulses are transmitted through a material, which can be a multi-phase material, over known flight paths and the ultrasonic pulse transit times through all sectors of the specimen are measured to determine the speed of sound. The speed of sound being a function of temperature, it is possible to establish the correlation between speed of sound and temperature, throughout a cross-section of the material, which correlation is programmed into a computer to provide for a continuous in-process measurement of temperature throughout the specimen.

  11. Applicability of the effective-medium approximation to heterogeneous aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Liu, Li

    2016-07-01

    The effective-medium approximation (EMA) is based on the assumption that a heterogeneous particle can have a homogeneous counterpart possessing similar scattering and absorption properties. We analyze the numerical accuracy of the EMA by comparing superposition T-matrix computations for spherical aerosol particles filled with numerous randomly distributed small inclusions and Lorenz-Mie computations based on the Maxwell-Garnett mixing rule. We verify numerically that the EMA can indeed be realized for inclusion size parameters smaller than a threshold value. The threshold size parameter depends on the refractive-index contrast between the host and inclusion materials and quite often does not exceed several tenths, especially in calculations of the scattering matrix and the absorption cross section. As the inclusion size parameter approaches the threshold value, the scattering-matrix errors of the EMA start to grow with increasing the host size parameter and/or the number of inclusions. We confirm, in particular, the existence of the effective-medium regime in the important case of dust aerosols with hematite or air-bubble inclusions, but then the large refractive-index contrast necessitates inclusion size parameters of the order of a few tenths. Irrespective of the highly restricted conditions of applicability of the EMA, our results provide further evidence that the effective-medium regime must be a direct corollary of the macroscopic Maxwell equations under specific assumptions.

  12. Low temperature formation of naphthalene and its role in the synthesis of PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) in the interstellar medium.

    PubMed

    Parker, Dorian S N; Zhang, Fangtong; Kim, Y Seol; Kaiser, Ralf I; Landera, Alexander; Kislov, Vadim V; Mebel, Alexander M; Tielens, A G G M

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are regarded as key molecules in the astrochemical evolution of the interstellar medium, but the formation mechanism of even their simplest prototype-naphthalene (C(10)H(8))-has remained an open question. Here, we show in a combined crossed beam and theoretical study that naphthalene can be formed in the gas phase via a barrierless and exoergic reaction between the phenyl radical (C(6)H(5)) and vinylacetylene (CH(2) = CH-C ≡ CH) involving a van-der-Waals complex and submerged barrier in the entrance channel. Our finding challenges conventional wisdom that PAH-formation only occurs at high temperatures such as in combustion systems and implies that low temperature chemistry can initiate the synthesis of the very first PAH in the interstellar medium. In cold molecular clouds, barrierless phenyl-type radical reactions could propagate the vinylacetylene-mediated formation of PAHs leading to more complex structures like phenanthrene and anthracene at temperatures down to 10 K.

  13. Low temperature formation of naphthalene and its role in the synthesis of PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons) in the interstellar medium

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fangtong; Kim, Y. Seol; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Landera, Alexander; Kislov, Vadim V.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are regarded as key molecules in the astrochemical evolution of the interstellar medium, but the formation mechanism of even their simplest prototype—naphthalene (C10H8)—has remained an open question. Here, we show in a combined crossed beam and theoretical study that naphthalene can be formed in the gas phase via a barrierless and exoergic reaction between the phenyl radical (C6H5) and vinylacetylene (CH2 = CH-C ≡ CH) involving a van-der-Waals complex and submerged barrier in the entrance channel. Our finding challenges conventional wisdom that PAH-formation only occurs at high temperatures such as in combustion systems and implies that low temperature chemistry can initiate the synthesis of the very first PAH in the interstellar medium. In cold molecular clouds, barrierless phenyl-type radical reactions could propagate the vinylacetylene-mediated formation of PAHs leading to more complex structures like phenanthrene and anthracene at temperatures down to 10 K. PMID:22198769

  14. Peculiarities of the current-voltage characteristics of a Josephson medium in a YBCO high-temperature superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyutin, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    The influence of a weak magnetic field ( H < 150 Oe) on the current-voltage ( I- U) characteristic of a YBa2Cu3O7 - x (YBCO) high-temperature superconductor (HTSC) near the superconducting transition temperature has been studied. It is established that there exist narrow (<0.2 K) temperature regions where the I- U curve exhibits sharp bending for H < 30 Oe and the ohmic behavior changes to a quadratic dependence of the voltage on current in a region of several milliamperes. At higher temperatures, the I- U curve bending exhibits smearing. This behavior is observed at a temperature below that corresponding to a zero critical current. Above a certain current, the temperature and magnetic field exhibit equivalent effects on the I- U curve of YBCO. Experimental results are explained by a sharp decrease in the critical currents of intergranular Josephson junctions under the action of magnetic field and by the current-induced formation of uncoupled (with respect to the order parameter) superconducting grains. Characteristic currents for the transition of the intergranular Josephson medium into an incoherent state are determined and the first critical fields in YBCO are evaluated.

  15. Temperature Structure of the Intracluster Medium from Smoothed-particle Hydrodynamics and Adaptive-mesh Refinement Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasia, Elena; Lau, Erwin T.; Borgani, Stefano; Nagai, Daisuke; Dolag, Klaus; Avestruz, Camille; Granato, Gian Luigi; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Murante, Giuseppe; Nelson, Kaylea; Ragone-Figueroa, Cinthia

    2014-08-01

    Analyses of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy clusters suggest that X-ray masses can be underestimated by 10%-30%. The largest bias originates from both violation of hydrostatic equilibrium (HE) and an additional temperature bias caused by inhomogeneities in the X-ray-emitting intracluster medium (ICM). To elucidate this large dispersion among theoretical predictions, we evaluate the degree of temperature structures in cluster sets simulated either with smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) or adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR) codes. We find that the SPH simulations produce larger temperature variations connected to the persistence of both substructures and their stripped cold gas. This difference is more evident in nonradiative simulations, whereas it is reduced in the presence of radiative cooling. We also find that the temperature variation in radiative cluster simulations is generally in agreement with that observed in the central regions of clusters. Around R 500 the temperature inhomogeneities of the SPH simulations can generate twice the typical HE mass bias of the AMR sample. We emphasize that a detailed understanding of the physical processes responsible for the complex thermal structure in ICM requires improved resolution and high-sensitivity observations in order to extend the analysis to higher temperature systems and larger cluster-centric radii.

  16. Temperature structure of the intracluster medium from smoothed-particle hydrodynamics and adaptive-mesh refinement simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rasia, Elena; Lau, Erwin T.; Nagai, Daisuke; Avestruz, Camille; Borgani, Stefano; Dolag, Klaus; Granato, Gian Luigi; Murante, Giuseppe; Ragone-Figueroa, Cinthia; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Nelson, Kaylea

    2014-08-20

    Analyses of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy clusters suggest that X-ray masses can be underestimated by 10%-30%. The largest bias originates from both violation of hydrostatic equilibrium (HE) and an additional temperature bias caused by inhomogeneities in the X-ray-emitting intracluster medium (ICM). To elucidate this large dispersion among theoretical predictions, we evaluate the degree of temperature structures in cluster sets simulated either with smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) or adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR) codes. We find that the SPH simulations produce larger temperature variations connected to the persistence of both substructures and their stripped cold gas. This difference is more evident in nonradiative simulations, whereas it is reduced in the presence of radiative cooling. We also find that the temperature variation in radiative cluster simulations is generally in agreement with that observed in the central regions of clusters. Around R {sub 500} the temperature inhomogeneities of the SPH simulations can generate twice the typical HE mass bias of the AMR sample. We emphasize that a detailed understanding of the physical processes responsible for the complex thermal structure in ICM requires improved resolution and high-sensitivity observations in order to extend the analysis to higher temperature systems and larger cluster-centric radii.

  17. Magnetic refrigeration for low-temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The application of refrigeration at low temperatures ranging from production of liquid helium for medical imaging systems to cooling of infrared sensors on surveillance satellites is discussed. Cooling below about 15 K with regenerative refrigerators is difficult because of the decreasing thermal mass of the regenerator compared to that of the working material. In order to overcome this difficulty with helium gas as the working material, a heat exchanger plus a Joule-Thomson or other exponder is used. Regenerative magnetic refrigerators with magnetic solids as the working material have the same regenerator problem as gas refrigerators. This problem provides motivation for the development of nonregenerative magnetic refrigerators that span approximately 1 K to approximately 0 K. Particular emphasis is placed on high reliability and high efficiency. Calculations indicate considerable promise in this area. The principles, the potential, the problems, and the progress towards development of successful 4 to 20 K magnetic refrigerators are discussed.

  18. Cast Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    Originally developed by NASA as high performance piston alloys to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low exhaust emission, the novel NASA alloys now offer dramatic increase in tensile strength for many other applications at elevated temperatures from 450 F (232 C) to about 750 F (400 C). It is an ideal low cost material for cast automotive components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. It can be very economically produced from conventional permanent mold, sand casting or investment casting, with silicon content ranging from 6% to 18%. At high silicon levels, the alloy exhibits excellent dimensional stability, surface hardness and wear resistant properties.

  19. High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating for High Temperature Wear Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher (Inventor); Edmonds, Brian J (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A self-lubricating, friction and wear reducing composite useful over a wide temperature range is described herein. The composite includes metal bonded chromium oxide dispersed in a metal binder having a substantial amount of nickel. The composite contains a fluoride of at least one Group I, Group II, or rare earth metal, and optionally a low temperature lubricant metal.

  20. Statistical medium optimization of an alkaline protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 10501, its characterization and application in leather processing.

    PubMed

    Boopathy, Naidu Ramachandra; Indhuja, Devadas; Srinivasan, Krishnan; Uthirappan, Mani; Gupta, Rishikesh; Ramudu, Kamini Numbi; Chellan, Rose

    2013-04-01

    Proteases are shown to have greener mode of application in leather processing for dehairing of goat skins and cow hides. Production of protease by submerged fermentation with potent activity is reported using a new isolate P. aeruginosa MTCC 10501. The production parameters were optimized by statistical methods such as Plackett-Burman and response surface methodology. The optimized production medium contained (g/L); tryptone, 2.5; yeast extract, 3.0; skim milk 30.0; dextrose 1.0; inoculum concentration 4%: initial pH 6.0; incubation temperature 30 degrees C and optimum production at 48 h with protease activity of 7.6 U/mL. The protease had the following characteristics: pH optima, 9.0; temperature optima 50 degrees C; pH stability between 5.0-10.0 and temperature stability between 10-40 degrees C. The protease was observed to have high potential for dehairing of goat skins in the pre- tanning process comparable to that of the chemical process as evidenced by histology. The method offers cleaner processing using enzyme only instead of toxic chemicals in the pre-tanning process of leather manufacture.

  1. Temperature and hydration effects on absorbance spectra and radiation sensitivity of a radiochromic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Rink, Alexandra; Lewis, David F.; Varma, Sangya; Vitkin, I. Alex; Jaffray, David A.

    2008-10-15

    The effects of temperature on real time changes in optical density ({Delta}OD) of GAFCHROMIC EBT film were investigated. The spectral peak of maximum change in absorbance ({lambda}{sub max}) was shown to downshift linearly when the temperature of the film was increased from 22 to 38 degree sign C. The {Delta}OD values were also shown to decrease linearly with temperature, and this decrease could not be attributed to the shift in {lambda}{sub max}. A compensation scheme using {lambda}{sub max} and a temperature-dependent correction factor was investigated, but provided limited improvement. Part of the reason may be the fluctuations in hydration of the active component, which were found to affect both position of absorbance peaks and the sensitivity of the film. To test the effect of hydration, laminated and unlaminated films were desiccated. This shifted both the major and minor absorbance peaks in the opposite direction to the change observed with temperature. The desiccated film also exhibited reduced sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Rehydration of the desiccated films did not reverse the effects, but rather gave rise to another form of the polymer with absorbance maxima upshifted further 20 nm. Hence, the spectral characteristics and sensitivity of the film can be dependent on its history, potentially complicating both real-time and conventional radiation dosimetry.

  2. Temperature and hydration effects on absorbance spectra and radiation sensitivity of a radiochromic medium

    PubMed Central

    Rink, Alexandra; Lewis, David F.; Varma, Sangya; Vitkin, I. Alex; Jaffray, David A.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of temperature on real time changes in optical density (ΔOD) of GAFCHROMIC® EBT film were investigated. The spectral peak of maximum change in absorbance (λmax) was shown to downshift linearly when the temperature of the film was increased from 22 to 38 °C. The ΔOD values were also shown to decrease linearly with temperature, and this decrease could not be attributed to the shift in λmax. A compensation scheme using λmax and a temperature-dependent correction factor was investigated, but provided limited improvement. Part of the reason may be the fluctuations in hydration of the active component, which were found to affect both position of absorbance peaks and the sensitivity of the film. To test the effect of hydration, laminated and unlaminated films were desiccated. This shifted both the major and minor absorbance peaks in the opposite direction to the change observed with temperature. The desiccated film also exhibited reduced sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Rehydration of the desiccated films did not reverse the effects, but rather gave rise to another form of the polymer with absorbance maxima upshifted further 20 nm. Hence, the spectral characteristics and sensitivity of the film can be dependent on its history, potentially complicating both real-time and conventional radiation dosimetry. PMID:18975701

  3. Behavior of a hammerhead ribozyme in aqueous solution at medium to high temperatures.

    PubMed

    El-Murr, Nizar; Maurel, Marie-Christine; Rihova, Martina; Vergne, Jacques; Hervé, Guy; Kato, Mikio; Kawamura, Kunio

    2012-09-01

    The "RNA world" hypothesis proposes that--early in the evolution of life--RNA molecules played important roles both in information storage and in enzymatic functions. However, this hypothesis seems to be inconsistent with the concept that life may have emerged under hydrothermal conditions since RNA molecules are considered to be labile under such extreme conditions. Presently, the possibility that the last common ancestor of the present organisms was a hyperthermophilic organism which is important to support the hypothesis of the hydrothermal origin of life has been subject of strong discussions. Consequently, it is of importance to study the behavior of RNA molecules under hydrothermal conditions from the viewpoints of stability, catalytic functions, and storage of genetic information of RNA molecules and determination of the upper limit of temperature where life could have emerged. In the present work, self-cleavage of a natural hammerhead ribozyme was examined at temperatures 10-200 °C. Self-cleavage was investigated in the presence of Mg(2+), which facilitates and accelerates this reaction. Self-cleavage of the hammerhead ribozyme was clearly observed at temperatures up to 60 °C, but at higher temperatures self-cleavage occurs together with hydrolysis and with increasing temperature hydrolysis becomes dominant. The influence of the amount of Mg(2+) on the reaction rate was also investigated. In addition, we discovered that the reaction proceeds in the presence of high concentrations of monovalent cations (Na(+) or K(+)), although very slowly. Furthermore, at high temperatures (above 60 °C), monovalent cations protect the ribozyme against degradation.

  4. Behavior of a hammerhead ribozyme in aqueous solution at medium to high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Murr, Nizar; Maurel, Marie-Christine; Rihova, Martina; Vergne, Jacques; Hervé, Guy; Kato, Mikio; Kawamura, Kunio

    2012-09-01

    The "RNA world" hypothesis proposes that—early in the evolution of life—RNA molecules played important roles both in information storage and in enzymatic functions. However, this hypothesis seems to be inconsistent with the concept that life may have emerged under hydrothermal conditions since RNA molecules are considered to be labile under such extreme conditions. Presently, the possibility that the last common ancestor of the present organisms was a hyperthermophilic organism which is important to support the hypothesis of the hydrothermal origin of life has been subject of strong discussions. Consequently, it is of importance to study the behavior of RNA molecules under hydrothermal conditions from the viewpoints of stability, catalytic functions, and storage of genetic information of RNA molecules and determination of the upper limit of temperature where life could have emerged. In the present work, self-cleavage of a natural hammerhead ribozyme was examined at temperatures 10-200 °C. Self-cleavage was investigated in the presence of Mg2+, which facilitates and accelerates this reaction. Self-cleavage of the hammerhead ribozyme was clearly observed at temperatures up to 60 °C, but at higher temperatures self-cleavage occurs together with hydrolysis and with increasing temperature hydrolysis becomes dominant. The influence of the amount of Mg2+ on the reaction rate was also investigated. In addition, we discovered that the reaction proceeds in the presence of high concentrations of monovalent cations (Na+ or K+), although very slowly. Furthermore, at high temperatures (above 60 °C), monovalent cations protect the ribozyme against degradation.

  5. Problems of applications of high power IR radiation in aquatic medium under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, Yurii V.; Kuzyakov, Boris A.

    2004-06-01

    In this work the effects that appear in the optical breakdown are analyzed in water and the time dependences received also for the velocities and pressures at the wave fronts. The application of acoustic waves, generated by high power laser pulses in the aqueous medium, has quite serious perspectives for sounding. It is shown in the work that under comparatively low power density of radiation, as a result of a surface layer heating, the thermoelastic sresses arise, leading to the excitation of the acoustic waves. The analysis showed that the prognostic evaluations of the values of a light deflagration area are possible for a clear aqueous medium with the pressures up to 400 kg/cm2. With the presence of microinhomogeneities, it is necessary to know their total physical and chemical properties and detailed trustworthy data by their spatial distribution. A principally new approach was developed to the problem of videoinformation transmission from the object surfaces by the fiber-optic channel. The application of a precision measuring TV-camera with a color format in the range 0.3 - 0.98 μm allows to raise the information capacity of the transmitted information. The optimization of vision module choice are considered also.

  6. Capturing medium scale heterogeneity in surface water-groundwater interactions: challenges and advantages of high resolution temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanafield, M.; Cook, P. G.; McCallum, J.; Noorduijn, S.

    2013-12-01

    Although heat is now a commonly-used tracer for quantifying the movement of water between streams and streambed sediments, the measurements are commonly collected as vertical profiles. This results in point measurements that are often difficult to scale up. However, for understanding contaminant transport, nutrient cycling, and ecosystem use, it is important to capture streambed dynamics at a larger scale. In this study, over 1000 meters of fiber optic cable was installed at three depths in five parallel, longitudinal transects within the shallow subsurface of a large, intermittent channel in southeastern Australia. A fiber optic distributed temperature system was then used to collected time variable temperature measurements at each meter along the cable, giving high spatial resolution within the 20 meter by 20 meter by 0.5 meter deep study plot. At this resolution, the raw temperature data itself was useful for examining preferential flow pathways beneath the subsurface. While some areas responded to daily fluctuations in water temperature from the surface, other areas retained the initial temperature, allowing the observation of regions of increased and decreased flux, respectively. Complementing the temperature data, Guelph permeameter measurements for a range of depths at the study site also revealed a highly heterogeneous subsurface, with measured field saturation hydraulic conductivity values ranging from less than 0.006 to 3.1 meters per day. Given a limited amount of head information to parameterize the boundary conditions, the objective was to see how well the patterns observed in the raw data could be quantified using numerical models. Using inverse methods, we therefore used the temperature data to parameterize both one-dimensional and a three-dimensional heat and temperature transport models to quantify differences in flux rates within the study plot. Comparison of the advantages and limitations of these models provides insight into the challenges of

  7. Fuzzy Logic Controller for Low Temperature Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Gonzalez, A.; Barmatz, M.

    1996-01-01

    The most common temperature controller used in low temperature experiments is the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller due to its simplicity and robustness. However, the performance of temperature regulation using the PID controller depends on initial parameter setup, which often requires operator's expert knowledge on the system. In this paper, we present a computer-assisted temperature controller based on the well known.

  8. 46 CFR 56.60-5 - Steel (High temperature applications).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Steel (High temperature applications). 56.60-5 Section... SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Materials § 56.60-5 Steel (High temperature applications). (a) (Reproduces 124.2.A.) Upon prolonged exposure to temperatures above 775 °F (412 °C), the carbide phase of plain...

  9. 46 CFR 56.60-5 - Steel (High temperature applications).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Steel (High temperature applications). 56.60-5 Section... SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Materials § 56.60-5 Steel (High temperature applications). (a) (Reproduces 124.2.A.) Upon prolonged exposure to temperatures above 775 °F (412 °C), the carbide phase of plain...

  10. 46 CFR 56.60-5 - Steel (High temperature applications).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Steel (High temperature applications). 56.60-5 Section... SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Materials § 56.60-5 Steel (High temperature applications). (a) (Reproduces 124.2.A.) Upon prolonged exposure to temperatures above 775 °F (412 °C), the carbide phase of plain...

  11. 46 CFR 56.60-5 - Steel (High temperature applications).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Materials § 56.60-5 Steel (High temperature applications). (a) (Reproduces 124.2... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Steel (High temperature applications). 56.60-5 Section... design temperature of a piping system employing one or more of the materials listed in paragraphs (a),...

  12. 46 CFR 56.60-5 - Steel (High temperature applications).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Materials § 56.60-5 Steel (High temperature applications). (a) (Reproduces 124.2... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Steel (High temperature applications). 56.60-5 Section... design temperature of a piping system employing one or more of the materials listed in paragraphs (a),...

  13. LCOE reduction for parabolic trough CSP: Innovative solar receiver with improved performance at medium temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stollo, A.; Chiarappa, T.; D'Angelo, A.; Maccari, A.; Matino, F.

    2016-05-01

    Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) applications represent an effective possibility to gain energy from the Sun; however, the lasting CSP market crisis compels continuous improvements in terms of cost reduction and performance increase. Focused on parabolic trough technology, this paper describes the innovation studied and realized on solar receivers to gain optimized optical performance while increasing the production versatility, hence boosting the solar plant efficiency and finally reducing the estimated LCOE.

  14. Composite Materials for Low-Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Composite materials with improved thermal conductivity and good mechanical strength properties should allow for the design and construction of more thermally efficient components (such as pipes and valves) for use in fluid-processing systems. These materials should have wide application in any number of systems, including ground support equipment (GSE), lunar systems, and flight hardware that need reduced heat transfer. Researchers from the Polymer Science and Technology Laboratory and the Cryogenics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center were able to develop a new series of composite materials that can meet NASA's needs for lightweight materials/composites for use in fluid systems and also expand the plastic-additive markets. With respect to thermal conductivity and physical properties, these materials are excellent alternatives to prior composite materials and can be used in the aerospace, automotive, military, electronics, food-packaging, and textile markets. One specific application of the polymeric composition is for use in tanks, pipes, valves, structural supports, and components for hot or cold fluid-processing systems where heat flow through materials is a problem to be avoided. These materials can also substitute for metals in cryogenic and other low-temperature applications. These organic/inorganic polymeric composite materials were invented with significant reduction in heat transfer properties. Decreases of 20 to 50 percent in thermal conductivity versus that of the unmodified polymer matrix were measured. These novel composite materials also maintain mechanical properties of the unmodified polymer matrix. These composite materials consist of an inorganic additive combined with a thermoplastic polymer material. The intrinsic, low thermal conductivity of the additive is imparted into the thermoplastic, resulting in a significant reduction in heat transfer over that of the base polymer itself, yet maintaining most of the polymer's original properties. Normal

  15. Fractography of the high temperature hydrogen attack of a medium carbon steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.; Moorhead, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for an experimental study of the microscopic fracture processes associated with hydrogen attack of a commercially produced plain carbon steel in a well-controlled high-temperature hydrogen environment of high purity. In the experiments, sheet samples were exposed to laboratory-grade hydrogen at a pressure of 3.5 MN/sq m and a temperature of 575 C. The fractography of gas-filled fissures and failed tension specimens is analyzed in an effort to identify any predominant microstructural defect associated with fissure formation, the prevalent modes of fracture, and the contribution of gas-filled fissures to the overall failure process. It is found that the tensile properties of the examined steel were significantly degraded after as few as 136 hr of exposure to a high-purity hydrogen atmosphere at 575 C; that the yield strength, ultimate strength, and elongation at fracture were all reduced progressively with increasing exposure time; and that the yield and ultimate strengths were reduced more than 40% after 408 hr while elongation was reduced to less than 2%.

  16. On the penetration of a hot diapir through a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daly, S. F.; Raefsky, A.

    1985-01-01

    The ascent of a hot spherical body through a fluid with a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity has been studied using an axisymmetric finite element method. Numerical solutions range over Peclet numbers of 0.1 - 1000 from constant viscosity up to viscosity variations of 100,000. Both rigid and stress-free boundary conditions were applied at the surface of the sphere. The dependence of drag on viscosity variation was shown to have no dependence on the stress boundary condition except for a Stokes flow scaling factor. A Nusselt number parameterization based on the stress-free constant viscosity functional dependence on the Peclet number scaled by a parameter depending on the viscosity structure fits both stress-free and rigid boundary condition data above viscosity variations of 100. The temperature scale height was determined as a function of sphere radius. For the simple physical model studied in this paper pre-heating is required to reduce the ambient viscosity of the country rock to less than 10 to the 22nd sq cm/s in order for a 10 km diapir to penetrate a distance of several radii.

  17. Market Assessment of Biomass Gasification and Combustion Technology for Small- and Medium-Scale Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.; Haase, S.

    2009-07-01

    This report provides a market assessment of gasification and direct combustion technologies that use wood and agricultural resources to generate heat, power, or combined heat and power (CHP) for small- to medium-scale applications. It contains a brief overview of wood and agricultural resources in the U.S.; a description and discussion of gasification and combustion conversion technologies that utilize solid biomass to generate heat, power, and CHP; an assessment of the commercial status of gasification and combustion technologies; a summary of gasification and combustion system economics; a discussion of the market potential for small- to medium-scale gasification and combustion systems; and an inventory of direct combustion system suppliers and gasification technology companies. The report indicates that while direct combustion and close-coupled gasification boiler systems used to generate heat, power, or CHP are commercially available from a number of manufacturers, two-stage gasification systems are largely in development, with a number of technologies currently in demonstration. The report also cites the need for a searchable, comprehensive database of operating combustion and gasification systems that generate heat, power, or CHP built in the U.S., as well as a national assessment of the market potential for the systems.

  18. Analysis of mixed micellar behavior of cationic gemini alkanediyl-α,ω-bis(dimethylcetylammonium bromide) series with ionic and nonionic hydrotropes in aqueous medium at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Khan, Iqrar Ahmad; Khanam, Ahmad Jahan; Sheikh, Mohmad Shafi; Kabir-ud-Din

    2011-12-29

    The interaction between cationic symmetrical gemini alkanediyl-α,ω-bis(dimethylcetylammonium bromide) series (16-s-16, s = 5, 6, abbreviated as G5 and G6) with hydrotropes (cationic: aniline hydrochloride, para-toluidine hydrochloride, and ortho-toluidine hydrochloride; nonionic: phenol, resorcinol, and pyrogallol) in aqueous medium has been investigated at four different temperatures ranging from 298.15 to 313.15 K. Different physicochemical parameters such as critical micelle concentration (cmc), interaction parameter (β(m), an energetic parameter that represents the excess Gibbs free energy of mixing), activity coefficients (f(i)), mole fraction of hydrotrope in mixed micelles at ideal mixing conditions (X(1)(ideal))(,) excess free energy of mixing (Δ(mix)G(E)), standard enthalpy (Δ(mic)H°), entropy (Δ(mic)S°), and Gibbs free energy (Δ(mic)G°) of micellization were evaluated and then intracompared. For further understanding, similar studies were carried out with their conventional counterpart cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and then compared. The bulk behaviors were explored using different theoretical models of Clint, Rubingh, and Motomura for justification and comparison of results of different binary combinations of hydrotropes with the gemini series and CTAB. Synergistic interaction was observed in all binary combinations at all temperatures in the micelles which decreases slightly with increasing temperature. This study will give insight into the selection of surfactants in different applications as their properties get modified by interaction with hydrotropes, thus influencing their solution behavior which, in turn, modifying the phase-forming behavior, microemulsion, liquid crystal forming systems, clouding phenomenon, cleaning, and laundry processes besides solubilization. The ability of hydrotropes to dramatically alter the solubility of other molecules in a medium can be exploited for the purpose of selective encapsulation and release

  19. Proton content and nature in perovskite ceramic membranes for medium temperature fuel cells and electrolysers.

    PubMed

    Colomban, Philippe; Zaafrani, Oumaya; Slodczyk, Aneta

    2012-07-25

    Recent interest in environmentally friendly technology has promoted research on green house gas-free devices such as water steam electrolyzers, fuel cells and CO2/syngas converters. In such applications, proton conducting perovskite ceramics appear especially promising as electrolyte membranes. Prior to a successful industrial application, it is necessary to determine/understand their complex physical and chemical behavior, especially that related to proton incorporation mechanism, content and nature of bulk protonic species. Based on the results of quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QNS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman and IR measurements we will show the complexity of the protonation process and the importance of differentiation between the protonic species adsorbed on a membrane surface and the bulk protons. The bulk proton content is very low, with a doping limit (~1-5 × 10-3 mole/mole), but sufficient to guarantee proton conduction below 600 °C. The bulk protons posses an ionic, covalent bond free nature and may occupy an interstitial site in the host perovskite structure.

  20. A Cloud-Assisted Random Linear Network Coding Medium Access Control Protocol for Healthcare Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kartsakli, Elli; Antonopoulos, Angelos; Alonso, Luis; Verikoukis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Relay sensor networks are often employed in end-to-end healthcare applications to facilitate the information flow between patient worn sensors and the medical data center. Medium access control (MAC) protocols, based on random linear network coding (RLNC), are a novel and suitable approach to efficiently handle data dissemination. However, several challenges arise, such as additional delays introduced by the intermediate relay nodes and decoding failures, due to channel errors. In this paper, we tackle these issues by adopting a cloud architecture where the set of relays is connected to a coordinating entity, called cloud manager. We propose a cloud-assisted RLNC-based MAC protocol (CLNC-MAC) and develop a mathematical model for the calculation of the key performance metrics, namely the system throughput, the mean completion time for data delivery and the energy efficiency. We show the importance of central coordination in fully exploiting the gain of RLNC under error-prone channels. PMID:24618727

  1. Viability of plant hairy roots is sustained without propagation in low sugar medium kept at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Nagatome; Yamamoto; Taya; Tanaka

    2000-08-01

    The effect of sucrose concentration in the medium on the growth and resumption ability to form lateral roots was investigated using the hairy roots of pak-bung and tobacco. It was found that the growth evaluated by root tip elongation of pak-bung and tobacco hairy roots was suppressed in the medium having an initial sucrose concentration of <2.5kg/m(3), and that the resumption abilities of both the hairy roots could be preserved when the hairy roots were kept at an initial sucrose concentration of 2.5kg/m(3) under ambient temperature conditions. The values of maintenance energy for pak-bung and tobacco hairy roots were determined to be 0.11 and 0.12 per day, respectively, from the total sugar consumption rates. Under the oligotrophic condition of the sucrose concentration of 2.5kg/m(3), the hairy roots were considered to exist as resting cells with maintenance metabolism, and the minimum demand for the energy source to ensure survival of the cells was met because the cells hardly multiplied and sugar consumption was not significant. In addition, long-term storage of pak-bung hairy roots in the liquid medium with 2.5kg/m(3) sucrose was performed at 25 degrees C. It was demonstrated that the hairy roots could maintain their resumption abilities without a serious loss of viability over 600 days and that the number of budding lateral roots per unit length of the main roots remained a value of 72 roots/m after the 600-day storage.

  2. NASA space applications of high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinen, Vernon O.; Sokoloski, Martin M.; Aron, Paul R.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1992-01-01

    The application of superconducting technology in space has been limited by the requirement of cooling to near liquid helium temperatures. The only means of attaining these temperatures has been with cryogenic fluids which severely limits mission lifetime. The development of materials with superconducting transition temperatures (T sub c) above 77 K has made superconducting technology more attractive and feasible for employment in aerospace systems. Potential applications of high-temperature superconducting technology in cryocoolers and remote sensing, communications, and power systems are discussed.

  3. NASA Space applications of high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinen, Vernon O.; Sokoloski, Martin M.; Aron, Paul R.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Connolly, Denis J.

    1992-01-01

    The application of superconducting technology in space has been limited by the requirement of cooling to near liquid helium temperatures. The only means of obtaining these temperatures has been with cryogenic fluids which severely limit mission lifetime. The development of materials with superconducting transition temperatures above 77 K has made superconducting technology more attractive and feasible for employment in aerospace systems. Here, potential applications of high temperature superconducting technology in cryocoolers, remote sensing, communications, and power systems are discussed.

  4. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO{sub 2} or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures.

  5. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-08-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO{sub 2} or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures.

  6. Evaluation of microstructure anisotropy on room and medium temperature ECAP deformed F138 steel

    SciTech Connect

    De Vincentis, N.S.; Kliauga, A.; Ferrante, M.; Avalos, M.; Brokmeier, H.-G.; Bolmaro, R.E.

    2015-09-15

    The microstructure developed during severe plastic deformation results in improved mechanical properties because of the decrease in domain sizes and accumulation of defects, mainly dislocation arrays. The characteristic deformation stages observed in low stacking fault energy (SFE) face centered cubic (FCC) materials are highly influenced by the development of the primary and secondary twinning that compete with dislocation glide. In this paper, a low SFE F138 stainless steel is deformed by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) up to 4 passes at room temperature (RT) and at 300 °C to compare the grain refinement and twin boundary development with increasing deformation. Tensile tests were performed to determine the deformation stages reached by the material before and after ECAP deformation, and the resulting microstructure was observed by TEM. X-ray diffraction and EBSD, average technique the first and local the second one, were used to quantify the microstructural changes, allowing the determination of diffraction domain sizes, dislocation and stacking fault densities and misorientation indices, which lead to a complete analysis of the deformation introduced in the material, with comparative correlations between various microstructural parameters. - Highlights: • The microstructure of ECAP pressed F138 steel was studied using TEM, EBSD and XRD. • Increasing deformation reduced domain sizes and increased dislocation densities. • Dislocation array compactness and misorientation increased with higher deformation. • Largest dislocation densities, mostly screw, match with simultaneous activation of twins. • Several correlations among microstructural features and parameters have been disclosed.

  7. Composite S-PEEK membranes for medium temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, A.; Pedicini, R.; Saccà, A.; Gatto, I.; Passalacqua, E.

    Sulphonated-PEEK polymers with two different sulphonation degrees (DS) were obtained by varying the sulphonation parameters. Ionomeric membranes were prepared as a reference. Composite membranes were obtained by mixing different percentage of 3-aminopropyl functionalised silica to the polymers dissolved in DMAc. The resulting membranes were characterised in terms of water uptake, IEC and proton conductivity in different conditions of temperature and relative humidity. The introduction of amino-functionalised silica in the lowest DS polymer slightly increases the water uptake, because it retains the water and in this case the hydrophilic property of the material is predominant. In the highest DS polymer the presence of SiO-NH 2 decreases the water uptake and swelling, probably due to a major interaction between the amino groups of silica and the sulphonic groups of polymer. The proton conductivity of the highly sulphonated polymer does not change even if the swelling decreases, while in the poorly sulphonated polymer a slight increases of water retention increases the conductivity. A composite membrane was tested in PEFC at 120 °C reaching a maximum power density of 246 mW cm -2.

  8. High-temperature superconductor applications development at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.R.; Poeppel, R.B.

    1992-02-09

    Developments at Argonne National Laboratory of near and intermediate term applications using high-temperature superconductors are discussed. Near-term applications of liquid-nitrogen depth sensors, current leads, and magnetic bearings are discussed in detail.

  9. The impact of background radiation, illumination and temperature on EMF-induced changes of aqua medium properties.

    PubMed

    Naira, Baghdasaryan; Yerazik, Mikayelyan; Anna, Nikoghosyan; Sinerik, Ayrapetyan

    2013-09-01

    The effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF) on physicochemical properties of physiological solution at different environmental media were studied. The existence of frequency "windows" at 4 and 8 Hz frequencies of ELF EMF having effects on heat fusion period, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) formation and oxygen (O2) content of water solution and different dependency on temperature, background radiation and illumination was shown. Obtained data allow us to suggest that EMF-induced effect on water physicochemical properties depends on abovementioned environmental factors. As cell bathing medium is a target for biological effects of ELF EMF, the variability of experimental data on biological effects of EMF, obtained in different laboratories, can be explained by different environmental conditions of experiments, which very often are not considered adequately.

  10. Method of dispensing droplets to penetration-resistive mediums. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, V.L.; Ryon, A.D.; Haas, P.A.

    1982-06-10

    Uniform, monosized microspheroids are produced in a gelation medium characterized by a high resistance to surface penetration by reducing the effect of impact on entry of the droplets into the medium by contacting the droplet with a stream of medium and by introducing the resulting stream into a gelation column.

  11. Application of vaginal temperature measurement in bitches.

    PubMed

    Maeder, B; Arlt, S; Burfeind, O; Heuwieser, W

    2012-12-01

    Finding innovative, non-invasive methods for continuously measuring body temperature minimizing human interference is important for accurate data collection. The objective of this study was to assess feasibility and accuracy of continuous body temperature measurements with loggers placed in the vaginal cavity of bitches. First, an in vitro experiment was performed to compare values obtained by temperature loggers (n = 26) to a calibrated liquid-in-glass thermometer. The mean differences between the two methods were low. Next, an in vivo experiment was performed using five healthy bitches, and values obtained by the vaginal loggers were compared to measurements collected rectally with digital thermometers. The results show that rectal and vaginal temperatures were correlated. The mean differences between rectal and vaginal temperatures were negligible. We conclude that the utilized temperature loggers provide accurate and reliable data.

  12. Ligninolytic peroxidase gene expression by Pleurotus ostreatus: differential regulation in lignocellulose medium and effect of temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Castanera, Raul; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; López-Lucendo, María F; Ramírez, Lucía; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Martínez, Angel T

    2014-11-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is an important edible mushroom and a model lignin degrading organism, whose genome contains nine genes of ligninolytic peroxidases, characteristic of white-rot fungi. These genes encode six manganese peroxidase (MnP) and three versatile peroxidase (VP) isoenzymes. Using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, secretion of four of these peroxidase isoenzymes (VP1, VP2, MnP2 and MnP6) was confirmed when P. ostreatus grows in a lignocellulose medium at 25°C (three more isoenzymes were identified by only one unique peptide). Then, the effect of environmental parameters on the expression of the above nine genes was studied by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR by changing the incubation temperature and medium pH of P. ostreatus cultures pre-grown under the above conditions (using specific primers and two reference genes for result normalization). The cultures maintained at 25°C (without pH adjustment) provided the highest levels of peroxidase transcripts and the highest total activity on Mn(2+) (a substrate of both MnP and VP) and Reactive Black 5 (a VP specific substrate). The global analysis of the expression patterns divides peroxidase genes into three main groups according to the level of expression at optimal conditions (vp1/mnp3>vp2/vp3/mnp1/mnp2/mnp6>mnp4/mnp5). Decreasing or increasing the incubation temperature (to 10°C or 37°C) and adjusting the culture pH to acidic or alkaline conditions (pH 3 and 8) generally led to downregulation of most of the peroxidase genes (and decrease of the enzymatic activity), as shown when the transcription levels were referred to those found in the cultures maintained at the initial conditions. Temperature modification produced less dramatic effects than pH modification, with most genes being downregulated during the whole 10°C treatment, while many of them were alternatively upregulated (often 6h after the thermal shock) and downregulated (12h) at 37°C. Interestingly, mnp4 and

  13. Ligninolytic peroxidase gene expression by Pleurotus ostreatus: differential regulation in lignocellulose medium and effect of temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Castanera, Raul; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; López-Lucendo, María F; Ramírez, Lucía; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Martínez, Angel T

    2014-11-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is an important edible mushroom and a model lignin degrading organism, whose genome contains nine genes of ligninolytic peroxidases, characteristic of white-rot fungi. These genes encode six manganese peroxidase (MnP) and three versatile peroxidase (VP) isoenzymes. Using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, secretion of four of these peroxidase isoenzymes (VP1, VP2, MnP2 and MnP6) was confirmed when P. ostreatus grows in a lignocellulose medium at 25°C (three more isoenzymes were identified by only one unique peptide). Then, the effect of environmental parameters on the expression of the above nine genes was studied by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR by changing the incubation temperature and medium pH of P. ostreatus cultures pre-grown under the above conditions (using specific primers and two reference genes for result normalization). The cultures maintained at 25°C (without pH adjustment) provided the highest levels of peroxidase transcripts and the highest total activity on Mn(2+) (a substrate of both MnP and VP) and Reactive Black 5 (a VP specific substrate). The global analysis of the expression patterns divides peroxidase genes into three main groups according to the level of expression at optimal conditions (vp1/mnp3>vp2/vp3/mnp1/mnp2/mnp6>mnp4/mnp5). Decreasing or increasing the incubation temperature (to 10°C or 37°C) and adjusting the culture pH to acidic or alkaline conditions (pH 3 and 8) generally led to downregulation of most of the peroxidase genes (and decrease of the enzymatic activity), as shown when the transcription levels were referred to those found in the cultures maintained at the initial conditions. Temperature modification produced less dramatic effects than pH modification, with most genes being downregulated during the whole 10°C treatment, while many of them were alternatively upregulated (often 6h after the thermal shock) and downregulated (12h) at 37°C. Interestingly, mnp4 and

  14. High temperature heat exchange: nuclear process heat applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vrable, D.L.

    1980-09-01

    The unique element of the HTGR system is the high-temperature operation and the need for heat exchanger equipment to transfer nuclear heat from the reactor to the process application. This paper discusses the potential applications of the HTGR in both synthetic fuel production and nuclear steel making and presents the design considerations for the high-temperature heat exchanger equipment.

  15. Nonlinear Constitutive Relations for High Temperature Application, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Nonlinear constitutive relations for high temperature applications were discussed. The state of the art in nonlinear constitutive modeling of high temperature materials was reviewed and the need for future research and development efforts in this area was identified. Considerable research efforts are urgently needed in the development of nonlinear constitutive relations for high temperature applications prompted by recent advances in high temperature materials technology and new demands on material and component performance. Topics discussed include: constitutive modeling, numerical methods, material testing, and structural applications.

  16. Exceptional damage-tolerance of a medium-entropy alloy CrCoNi at cryogenic temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Gludovatz, Bernd; Hohenwarter, Anton; Thurston, Keli V. S.; Bei, Hongbin; Wu, Zhenggang; George, Easo P.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2016-01-01

    High-entropy alloys are an intriguing new class of metallic materials that derive their properties from being multi-element systems that can crystallize as a single phase, despite containing high concentrations of five or more elements with different crystal structures. Here we examine an equiatomic medium-entropy alloy containing only three elements, CrCoNi, as a single-phase face-centred cubic solid solution, which displays strength-toughness properties that exceed those of all high-entropy alloys and most multi-phase alloys. At room temperature, the alloy shows tensile strengths of almost 1 GPa, failure strains of ∼70% and KJIc fracture-toughness values above 200 MPa  m1/2; at cryogenic temperatures strength, ductility and toughness of the CrCoNi alloy improve to strength levels above 1.3 GPa, failure strains up to 90% and KJIc values of 275 MPa  m1/2. Such properties appear to result from continuous steady strain hardening, which acts to suppress plastic instability, resulting from pronounced dislocation activity and deformation-induced nano-twinning. PMID:26830651

  17. Exceptional damage-tolerance of a medium-entropy alloy CrCoNi at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Gludovatz, Bernd; Hohenwarter, Anton; Thurston, Keli V S; Bei, Hongbin; Wu, Zhenggang; George, Easo P; Ritchie, Robert O

    2016-02-02

    High-entropy alloys are an intriguing new class of metallic materials that derive their properties from being multi-element systems that can crystallize as a single phase, despite containing high concentrations of five or more elements with different crystal structures. Here we examine an equiatomic medium-entropy alloy containing only three elements, CrCoNi, as a single-phase face-centred cubic solid solution, which displays strength-toughness properties that exceed those of all high-entropy alloys and most multi-phase alloys. At room temperature, the alloy shows tensile strengths of almost 1 GPa, failure strains of ∼70% and KJIc fracture-toughness values above 200 MPa  m(1/2); at cryogenic temperatures strength, ductility and toughness of the CrCoNi alloy improve to strength levels above 1.3 GPa, failure strains up to 90% and KJIc values of 275 MPa  m(1/2). Such properties appear to result from continuous steady strain hardening, which acts to suppress plastic instability, resulting from pronounced dislocation activity and deformation-induced nano-twinning.

  18. High temperature superconductors for computer interconnect applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, B.J.L.

    1994-12-31

    High temperature superconductors, because of their extremely low loss at high frequencies and their high current handling capability, have the potential for use in computer interconnect boards. They offer the potential advantages of high interconnect density, reduced interconnect delays, and higher data rate. Because silicon CMOS circuits dramatically improve in performance at low temperatures, cooled computers may become attractive in the future to capture both the improved interconnect and circuit benefits.

  19. Electrical transport anisotropy of uniaxial polycrystalline samples and the effective medium approximation: An application to HTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-García, A.; Muné, P.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we have applied the effective medium approximation (EMA) to a polycrystalline sample made up of uniaxial crystallites with similar behavior to the high critical temperature superconductors (HTS) at the normal state (σab ≫ σc). As a result the dependence of the anisotropy parameter at the level of the sample, μ =σx /σz , on orientation probability of the grains' a-axes along a certain preferential direction, γxa is obtained. The intrinsic and shape anisotropy parameters of the crystallites constitute input data. In addition, the dependence of the orientation factor, f, which has been introduced in current models on the transport properties of HTS, is calculated as a function of γxa. These results offer a tool to interpret electrical transport measurements at normal state in granular uniaxial superconducting materials with certain texture degree, by means of the correlation between microstructure and electrical transport properties. Moreover, the comparison between the model and some experimental data suggests the presence of intragranular planar defects in the polycrystalline superconductors. They may affect the measurement of paracoherent resistivity and consequently the determination of f mainly in Bi based samples.

  20. Bimetallic nanostructures. II. Finite temperature and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montejano-Carrizales, J. M.; Morán-López, J. L.

    1990-12-01

    A systematic study of ordering and segregation at finite temperatures in bimetallic nanoclusters is presented. Icosahedral and cubo-octahedral clusters, with a total number of atoms, N = 13, 55 and 147, are studied. The equilibrium configuration is obtained by calculating the free energy within the regular solution model. The theory is applied to CuPd, NiPt and CuNi nanoclusters. We present results for the temperature dependence of the concentrations at the different shells around the central atom. In most of the cases a strong segregation is found.

  1. Towards smart energy systems: application of kernel machine regression for medium term electricity load forecasting.

    PubMed

    Alamaniotis, Miltiadis; Bargiotas, Dimitrios; Tsoukalas, Lefteri H

    2016-01-01

    Integration of energy systems with information technologies has facilitated the realization of smart energy systems that utilize information to optimize system operation. To that end, crucial in optimizing energy system operation is the accurate, ahead-of-time forecasting of load demand. In particular, load forecasting allows planning of system expansion, and decision making for enhancing system safety and reliability. In this paper, the application of two types of kernel machines for medium term load forecasting (MTLF) is presented and their performance is recorded based on a set of historical electricity load demand data. The two kernel machine models and more specifically Gaussian process regression (GPR) and relevance vector regression (RVR) are utilized for making predictions over future load demand. Both models, i.e., GPR and RVR, are equipped with a Gaussian kernel and are tested on daily predictions for a 30-day-ahead horizon taken from the New England Area. Furthermore, their performance is compared to the ARMA(2,2) model with respect to mean average percentage error and squared correlation coefficient. Results demonstrate the superiority of RVR over the other forecasting models in performing MTLF.

  2. Towards smart energy systems: application of kernel machine regression for medium term electricity load forecasting.

    PubMed

    Alamaniotis, Miltiadis; Bargiotas, Dimitrios; Tsoukalas, Lefteri H

    2016-01-01

    Integration of energy systems with information technologies has facilitated the realization of smart energy systems that utilize information to optimize system operation. To that end, crucial in optimizing energy system operation is the accurate, ahead-of-time forecasting of load demand. In particular, load forecasting allows planning of system expansion, and decision making for enhancing system safety and reliability. In this paper, the application of two types of kernel machines for medium term load forecasting (MTLF) is presented and their performance is recorded based on a set of historical electricity load demand data. The two kernel machine models and more specifically Gaussian process regression (GPR) and relevance vector regression (RVR) are utilized for making predictions over future load demand. Both models, i.e., GPR and RVR, are equipped with a Gaussian kernel and are tested on daily predictions for a 30-day-ahead horizon taken from the New England Area. Furthermore, their performance is compared to the ARMA(2,2) model with respect to mean average percentage error and squared correlation coefficient. Results demonstrate the superiority of RVR over the other forecasting models in performing MTLF. PMID:26835237

  3. Modeling relative permeability of water in soil: Application of effective-medium approximation and percolation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Behzad; Sahimi, Muhammad; Daigle, Hugh

    2016-07-01

    Accurate prediction of the relative permeability to water under partially saturated condition has broad applications and has been studied intensively since the 1940s by petroleum, chemical, and civil engineers, as well as hydrologists and soil scientists. Many models have been developed for this purpose, ranging from those that represent the pore space as a bundle of capillary tubes, to those that utilize complex networks of interconnected pore bodies and pore throats with various cross-section shapes. In this paper, we propose an approach based on the effective-medium approximation (EMA) and percolation theory in order to predict the water relative permeability. The approach is general and applicable to any type of porous media. We use the method to compute the water relative permeability in porous media whose pore-size distribution follows a power law. The EMA is invoked to predict the relative permeability from the fully saturated pore space to some intermediate water saturation that represents a crossover from the EMA to what we refer to as the "critical region." In the critical region below the crossover water saturation Swx, but still above the critical water saturation Swc (the residual saturation or the percolation threshold of the water phase), the universal power law predicted by percolation theory is used to compute the relative permeability. To evaluate the accuracy of the approach, data for 21 sets of undisturbed laboratory samples were selected from the UNSODA database. For 14 cases, the predicted relative permeabilities are in good agreement with the data. For the remaining seven samples, however, the theory underestimates the relative permeabilities. Some plausible sources of the discrepancy are discussed.

  4. Improved Seals for High Temperature Airframe Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Dunlap, Patrick H.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2006-01-01

    Current thermal barrier seals, such as those used on the Space Shuttle, are insufficient to fully meet the demands of future hypersonic vehicles and reentry spacecraft. Previous investigations have demonstrated limited usage temperatures, as evidenced by a decreased ability to maintain sealing effectiveness at high temperatures (i.e., inadequate resiliency). In order to improve resiliency at elevated temperatures, Rene 41 (Allvac) was substituted for Inconel X-750 (Special Metals Corp.) as the spring tube material in the existing seal design. A seal construction incorporating the Rene 41 spring tube was fabricated and tested against the baseline Inconel X-750 spring tube seal. Although resiliency improvements were not as dramatic as in previous tests with the spring tubes alone, seals incorporating the Rene 41 spring tube exhibited an average 20 percent resiliency enhancement up to 1750 F when compared to seals containing the Inconel spring tube. In addition, the seals with the Rene 41 spring tubes showed less reduction in resiliency as temperatures increased above 1200 F. Results also indicated the Saffil (Saffil Ltd.) insulation in the core of the seal contributed more to resiliency than previously thought. Leakage data did not demonstrate an improvement with the seal containing the Rene 41 spring tube. However, based upon resiliency results, one could reasonably expect the Rene 41 version of the seal to track gap openings over a wider range. Therefore it would exhibit lower leakage than the Inconel X-750 version as the seal gap opens during a typical mission.

  5. High Temperature Materials for Chemical Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Sandra; Hickman, Robert; O'Dell, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Radiation or passively cooled thrust chambers are used for a variety of chemical propulsion functions including apogee insertion, reaction control for launch vehicles, and primary propulsion for planetary spacecraft. The performance of these thrust chambers is limited by the operating temperature of available materials. Improved oxidation resistance and increased operating temperatures can be achieved with the use of thermal barrier coatings such as zirconium oxide (ZrO2) and hafnium oxide (HfO2). However, previous attempts to include these materials showed cracking and spalling of the oxide layer due to poor bonding. Current research at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has generated unique, high temperature material options for in-space thruster designs that are capable of up to 2500 C operating temperatures. The research is focused on fabrication technologies to form low cost Iridium,qF_.henium (Ir/Re) components with a ceramic hot wall created as an integral, functionally graded material (FGM). The goal of this effort is to further de?celop proven technologies for embedding a protective ceramic coating within the Ir/Re liner to form a robust functional gradient material. Current work includes the fabrication and testing of subscale samples to evaluate tensile, creep, thermal cyclic/oxidation, and thermophysical material properties. Larger test articles have also being fabricated and hot-fire tested to demonstrate the materials in prototype thrusters at 1O0 lbf thrust levels.

  6. Estimation of Random Medium Parameters from 2D Post-Stack Seismic Data and Its Application in Seismic Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Zhu, P.; Gu, Y.; Xu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Small scale heterogeneities of subsurface medium can be characterized conveniently and effectively using a few simple random medium parameters (RMP), such as autocorrelation length, angle and roughness factor, etc. The estimation of these parameters is significant in both oil reservoir prediction and metallic mine exploration. Poor accuracy and low stability existed in current estimation approaches limit the application of random medium theory in seismic exploration. This study focuses on improving the accuracy and stability of RMP estimation from post-stacked seismic data and its application in the seismic inversion. Experiment and theory analysis indicate that, although the autocorrelation of random medium is related to those of corresponding post-stacked seismic data, the relationship is obviously affected by the seismic dominant frequency, the autocorrelation length, roughness factor and so on. Also the error of calculation of autocorrelation in the case of finite and discrete model decreases the accuracy. In order to improve the precision of estimation of RMP, we design two improved approaches. Firstly, we apply region growing algorithm, which often used in image processing, to reduce the influence of noise in the autocorrelation calculated by the power spectrum method. Secondly, the orientation of autocorrelation is used as a new constraint in the estimation algorithm. The numerical experiments proved that it is feasible. In addition, in post-stack seismic inversion of random medium, the estimated RMP may be used to constrain inverse procedure and to construct the initial model. The experiment results indicate that taking inversed model as random medium and using relatively accurate estimated RMP to construct initial model can get better inversion result, which contained more details conformed to the actual underground medium.

  7. Simulations on shifting medium and its application in wireless power transfer system to enhance magnetic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenwen; Zhang, Yingyi; Yao, Chen; Tang, Houjun

    2016-05-01

    Shifting medium is a kind of an anisotropic but homogeneous metamaterial designed by transformation optics. An object or free space enclosed by the shifting medium could be moved to a certain distance away from the original position. In this paper, we propose a cone-shaped shifting medium shell to move an internal coil to the given position. In this way, the two coils in a wireless power transfer system could be equivalently moved closer; thus, their magnetic coupling is enhanced. The theoretical models and numerical simulations are presented and analyzed to validate the effects of the shifting medium shell. Both ohmic loss and magnetic loss are also considered for practical concerns. Finally, we discuss the simplification of such a shifting medium to facilitate its fabrication.

  8. Constraints on the temperature of the intergalactic medium at z = 8.4 with 21-cm observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greig, Bradley; Mesinger, Andrei; Pober, Jonathan C.

    2016-02-01

    We compute robust lower limits on the spin temperature, TS, of the z = 8.4 intergalactic medium (IGM), implied by the upper limits on the 21-cm power spectrum recently measured by PAPER-64. Unlike previous studies which used a single epoch of reionization (EoR) model, our approach samples a large parameter space of EoR models: the dominant uncertainty when estimating constraints on TS. Allowing TS to be a free parameter and marginalizing over EoR parameters in our Markov Chain Monte Carlo code 21CMMC, we infer TS ≥ 3 K (corresponding approximately to 1σ) for a mean IGM neutral fraction of bar{x}_{HI}≳ 0.1. We further improve on these limits by folding-in additional EoR constraints based on: (i) the dark fraction in QSO spectra, which implies a strict upper limit of bar{x}_{HI}[z=5.9]≤ 0.06+0.05 (1σ ); and (ii) the electron scattering optical depth, τe = 0.066 ± 0.016 (1σ) measured by the Planck satellite. By restricting the allowed EoR models, these additional observations tighten the approximate 1σ lower limits on the spin temperature to TS ≥ 6 K. Thus, even such preliminary 21-cm observations begin to rule out extreme scenarios such as `cold reionization', implying at least some prior heating of the IGM. The analysis framework developed here can be applied to upcoming 21-cm observations, thereby providing unique insights into the sources which heated and subsequently reionized the very early Universe.

  9. Low Temperature SQUID for NDE Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz (Technical Monitor); Selim, Raouf

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a low temperature SuperConducting Quantum Interference Device - SQUID measurement system for detection of defects deep under the surface of aluminum structures using eddy current techniques. The system uses a two dimensional planar inducer with two different excitation frequencies to induce a current in the sample. We have developed a data analysis software program that enabled us to distinguish between round defects (holes), straight defects (slots) and slots close to holes simulating cracks starting from rivets in aluminum structures. We were able to detect defects that are 8mm below the surface. We have also measured the change in phase of the detected signal as a function of depth of the defect. This relationship can be used to determine the depth of hidden flaws. Using this analysis software with the high temperature SQUID system at NASA Langley we were able to detect slots close to holes in layered aluminum sample.

  10. High temperature superconductor materials and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, George B., III. (Editor); Banks, Curtis; Golben, John

    1991-01-01

    One of the areas concerned itself with the investigation of the phenomena involved in formulating and making in the laboratory new and better superconductor material with enhanced values of critical current and temperature. Of special interest were the chemistry, physical processes, and environment required to attain these enhanced desirable characteristics. The other area concerned itself with producing high temperature superconducting thin films by pulsed laser deposition techniques. Such films are potentially very useful in the detection of very low power signals. To perform this research high vacuum is required. In the course of this effort, older vacuum chambers were maintained and used. In addition, a new facility is being brought on line. This latter activity has been replete with the usual problems of bringing a new facility into service. Some of the problems are covered in the main body of this report.

  11. Understanding Electrocatalytic Pathways in Low and Medium Temperature Fuel Cells: Synchrotron-based In Situ X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mukerjee, S.; Ziegelbauer, J; Arruda, T; Ramaker, D; Shyam, B

    2008-01-01

    Over the last few decades, researchers have made significant developments in producing more advanced electrocatalytic materials for power generation applications. For example, traditional fuel cell catalysts often involve high-priced precious metals such as Pt. However, in order for fuel cells to become commercially viable, there is a need to reduce or completely remove precious metal altogether. As a result, a myriad of novel, unconventional materials have been explored such as chalcogenides, porphyrins, and organic-metal-macrocycles for low/medium temperature fuel cells as well as enzymatic and microbial fuel cells. As these materials increasingly become more complex, researchers often find themselves in search of new characterization methods, especially those which are allow in situ and operando measurements with element specificity. One such method that has received much attention for analysis of electrocatalytic materials is X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). XAS is an element specific, core level absorption technique which yields structural and electronic information. As a core electron method, XAS requires an extremely bright source, hence a synchrotron. The resulting intensity of synchrotron radiation allow for experiments to be conducted in situ, under electrochemically relevant conditions. Although a bulk-averaging technique requiring rigorous mathematical manipulation, XAS has the added benefit that it can probe materials which possess no long range order. This makes it ideal to characterize nano-scale electrocatalysts. XAS experiments are conducted by ramping the X-ray photon energy while measuring absorption of the incident beam the sample or by counting fluorescent photons released from a sample due to subsequent relaxation. Absorption mode XAS follows the Beer-Lambert Law, {mu}x = log(I{sub 0}/I{sub t}) (1) where {mu} is the absorption coefficient, x is the sample thickness and I{sub 0} and I{sub t} are the intensities of the incident and

  12. Effects of room temperature aging on two cryogenic temperature sensor models used in aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courts, S. Scott; Krause, John

    2012-06-01

    Cryogenic temperature sensors used in aerospace applications are typically procured far in advance of the mission launch date. Depending upon the program, the temperature sensors may be stored at room temperature for extended periods as installation and groundbased testing can take years before the actual flight. The effects of long term storage at room temperature are sometimes approximated by the use of accelerated aging at temperatures well above room temperature, but this practice can yield invalid results as the sensing material and/or electrical contacting method can be increasingly unstable with higher temperature exposure. To date, little data are available on the effects of extended room temperature aging on sensors commonly used in aerospace applications. This research examines two such temperature sensors models - the Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. model CernoxTM and DT-670-SD temperature sensors. Sample groups of each model type have been maintained for ten years or longer with room temperature storage between calibrations. Over an eighteen year period, the CernoxTM temperature sensors exhibited a stability of better than ±20 mK for T<30 K and better than ±0.1% of temperature for T>30 K. Over a ten year period the model DT-670-SD sensors exhibited a stability of better than ±140 mK for T<25 K and better than ±75 mK for T>25 K.

  13. Use of ethyl lactate to extract bioactive compounds from Cytisus scoparius: Comparison of pressurized liquid extraction and medium scale ambient temperature systems.

    PubMed

    Lores, Marta; Pájaro, Marta; Álvarez-Casas, Marta; Domínguez, Jorge; García-Jares, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    An important trend in the extraction of chemical compounds is the application of new environmentally friendly, food grade solvents. Ethyl lactate (ethyl 2-hydroxypropanoate), produced by fermentation of carbohydrates, is miscible with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds being a potentially good solvent for bioactive compounds. Despite its relatively wide use as a general solvent, the utilization of ethyl lactate as an extraction solvent has only recently been considered. Here, we evaluate the possible use of ethyl lactate to extract phenolic compounds from wild plants belonging to Cytisus scoparius, and we compare the characteristics of the extracts obtained by Pressurized Solvent Extraction (the total phenolics content, the antioxidant activity and the concentration of the major polyphenols) with those of other extracts obtained with methanol. In order to explore the industrial production of the ethyl lactate Cytisus extract, we also evaluate medium scale ambient temperature setups. The whole plant and the different parts (flowers, branches, and seed pods) were evaluated separately as potential sources of polyphenols. All extracts were analyzed by LC-MS/MS for accurate identification of the major polyphenols. Similar phenolic profiles were obtained when using ethyl lactate or methanol. The main bioactives found in the Cytisus extract were the non-flavonoid phenolic compounds caffeic and protocatechuic acids and 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde; the flavonoids rutin, kaempferol and quercetin; the flavones chrysin, orientin and apigenin; and the alkaloid lupanine. Regarding the comparison of the extraction systems, although the performance of the PLE was much better than that of the ambient-temperature columns, the energy consumption was also much higher. Ethyl lactate has resulted an efficient extraction solvent for polyphenols from C. scoparius, yielding extracts with high levels of plant phenolics and antioxidant activity. The antimicrobial activity of these

  14. Comparison of Local Scale Measured and Modeled Brightness Temperatures and Snow Parameters from the CLPX 2003 by Means of a Dense Medium Radiative Transfer Theory Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedescol, Marco; Kim, Edward J.; Cline, Don; Graf, Tobias; Koike, Toshio; Armstrong, Richard; Brodzik, Mary J.; Hardy, Janet

    2004-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing offers distinct advantages for observing the cryosphere. Solar illumination is not required, and spatial and temporal coverage are excellent from polar-orbiting satellites. Passive microwave measurements are sensitive to the two most useful physical quantities for many hydrological applications: physical temperature and water content/state. Sensitivity to the latter is a direct result of the microwave sensitivity to the dielectric properties of natural media, including snow, ice, soil (frozen or thawed), and vegetation. These considerations are factors motivating the development of future cryospheric satellite remote sensing missions, continuing and improving on a 26-year microwave measurement legacy. Perhaps the biggest issues regarding the use of such satellite measurements involve how to relate parameter values at spatial scales as small as a hectare to observations with sensor footprints that may be up to 25 x 25 km. The NASA Cold-land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX) generated a dataset designed to enhance understanding of such scaling issues. CLPX observations were made in February (dry snow) and March (wet snow), 2003 in Colorado, USA, at scales ranging from plot scale to 25 x 25 km satellite footprints. Of interest here are passive microwave observations from ground-based, airborne, and satellite sensors, as well as meteorological and snowpack measurements that will enable studies of the effects of spatial heterogeneity of surface conditions on the observations. Prior to performing such scaling studies, an evaluation of snowpack forward modelling at the plot scale (least heterogeneous scale) is in order. This is the focus of this paper. Many forward models of snow signatures (brightness temperatures) have been developed over the years. It is now recognized that a dense medium radiative transfer (DMRT) treatment represents a high degree of physical fidelity for snow modeling, yet dense medium models are particularly sensitive to

  15. Effect of temperature and water activity on gene expression and aflatoxin biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus on almond medium.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Antonia; Solfrizzo, Michele; Epifani, Filomena; Panzarini, Giuseppe; Perrone, Giancarlo

    2016-01-18

    Almonds are among the commodities at risk of aflatoxin contamination by Aspergillus flavus. Temperature and water activity are the two key determinants in pre and post-harvest environments influencing both the rate of fungal spoilage and aflatoxin production. Varying the combination of these parameters can completely inhibit or fully activate the biosynthesis of aflatoxin, so it is fundamental to know which combinations can control or be conducive to aflatoxin contamination. Little information is available about the influence of these parameters on aflatoxin production on almonds. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of different combinations of temperature (20 °C, 28 °C, and 37 °C) and water activity (0.90, 0.93, 0.96, 0.99 aw) on growth, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) production and expression of the two regulatory genes, aflR and aflS, and two structural genes, aflD and aflO, of the aflatoxin biosynthetic cluster in A. flavus grown on an almond medium solidified with agar. Maximum accumulation of fungal biomass and AFB1 production was obtained at 28 °C and 0.96 aw; no fungal growth and AFB1 production were observed at 20 °C at the driest tested conditions (0.90 and 0.93 aw). At 20° and 37 °C AFB1 production was 70-90% lower or completely suppressed, depending on aw. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR showed that the two regulatory genes (aflR and aflS) were highly expressed at maximum (28 °C) and minimum (20 °C and 37 °C) AFB1 production. Conversely the two structural genes (aflD and aflO) were highly expressed only at maximum AFB1 production (28 °C and 0.96-0.99 aw). It seems that temperature acts as a key factor influencing aflatoxin production which is strictly correlated to the induction of expression of structural biosynthesis genes (aflD and aflO), but not to that of aflatoxin regulatory genes (aflR and aflS), whose functional products are most likely subordinated to other regulatory processes acting at post-translational level

  16. Effect of temperature and water activity on gene expression and aflatoxin biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus on almond medium.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Antonia; Solfrizzo, Michele; Epifani, Filomena; Panzarini, Giuseppe; Perrone, Giancarlo

    2016-01-18

    Almonds are among the commodities at risk of aflatoxin contamination by Aspergillus flavus. Temperature and water activity are the two key determinants in pre and post-harvest environments influencing both the rate of fungal spoilage and aflatoxin production. Varying the combination of these parameters can completely inhibit or fully activate the biosynthesis of aflatoxin, so it is fundamental to know which combinations can control or be conducive to aflatoxin contamination. Little information is available about the influence of these parameters on aflatoxin production on almonds. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of different combinations of temperature (20 °C, 28 °C, and 37 °C) and water activity (0.90, 0.93, 0.96, 0.99 aw) on growth, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) production and expression of the two regulatory genes, aflR and aflS, and two structural genes, aflD and aflO, of the aflatoxin biosynthetic cluster in A. flavus grown on an almond medium solidified with agar. Maximum accumulation of fungal biomass and AFB1 production was obtained at 28 °C and 0.96 aw; no fungal growth and AFB1 production were observed at 20 °C at the driest tested conditions (0.90 and 0.93 aw). At 20° and 37 °C AFB1 production was 70-90% lower or completely suppressed, depending on aw. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR showed that the two regulatory genes (aflR and aflS) were highly expressed at maximum (28 °C) and minimum (20 °C and 37 °C) AFB1 production. Conversely the two structural genes (aflD and aflO) were highly expressed only at maximum AFB1 production (28 °C and 0.96-0.99 aw). It seems that temperature acts as a key factor influencing aflatoxin production which is strictly correlated to the induction of expression of structural biosynthesis genes (aflD and aflO), but not to that of aflatoxin regulatory genes (aflR and aflS), whose functional products are most likely subordinated to other regulatory processes acting at post-translational level

  17. DIY soundcard based temperature logging system. Part II: applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, John

    2016-11-01

    This paper demonstrates some simple applications of how temperature logging systems may be used to monitor simple heat experiments, and how the data obtained can be analysed to get some additional insight into the physical processes.

  18. Application of inverse heat conduction problem on temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Zhou, G.; Dong, B.; Li, Q.; Liu, L. Q.

    2013-09-01

    For regenerative cooling devices, such as G-M refrigerator, pulse tube cooler or thermoacoustic cooler, the gas oscillating bring about temperature fluctuations inevitably, which is harmful in many applications requiring high stable temperatures. To find out the oscillating mechanism of the cooling temperature and improve the temperature stability of cooler, the inner temperature of the cold head has to be measured. However, it is difficult to measure the inner oscillating temperature of the cold head directly because the invasive temperature detectors may disturb the oscillating flow. Fortunately, the outer surface temperature of the cold head can be measured accurately by invasive temperature measurement techniques. In this paper, a mathematical model of inverse heat conduction problem is presented to identify the inner surface oscillating temperature of cold head according to the measured temperature of the outer surface in a GM cryocooler. Inverse heat conduction problem will be solved using control volume approach. Outer surface oscillating temperature could be used as input conditions of inverse problem and the inner surface oscillating temperature of cold head can be inversely obtained. A simple uncertainty analysis of the oscillating temperature measurement also will be provided.

  19. DIY Soundcard Based Temperature Logging System. Part II: Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunn, John

    2016-01-01

    This paper demonstrates some simple applications of how temperature logging systems may be used to monitor simple heat experiments, and how the data obtained can be analysed to get some additional insight into the physical processes. [For "DIY Soundcard Based Temperature Logging System. Part I: Design," see EJ1114124.

  20. Pore structure effects on Ca-based sorbent sulfation capacity at medium temperatures: activated carbon as sorbent/catalyst support.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hui-Hsin; Wey, Ming-Yen; Lin, Chiou-Liang; Chang, Yu-Chen

    2002-11-01

    The reaction between three different Ca-based sorbents and SO2 were studied in a medium temperature range (473-773 K). The largest SO2 capture was found with Ca(OH)2 at 773 K, 126.31 mg SO2 x g Ca(OH)2(-1), and the influence of SO2 concentration on the sorbent utilization was observed. Investigations of the internal porous structure of Ca-based sorbents showed that the initial reaction rate was controlled by the surface area, and once the sulfated products were produced, pore structure dominated. To increase the surface area of Ca-based sorbents available to interact with and retain SO2, one kind of CaO/ activated carbon (AC) sorbent/catalyst was prepared to study the effect of AC on the dispersion of Ca-based materials. The results indicated that the Ca-based material dispersed on high-surface-area AC had more capacities for SO2 than unsupported Ca-based sorbents. The initial reaction rates of the reaction between SO2 and Ca-based sorbents and the prepared CaO/AC sorbents/catalysts were measured. Results showed that the reaction rate apparently increased with the presence of AC. It was concluded that CaO/AC was the active material in the desulfurization reaction. AC acting as the support can play a role to supply O2 to increase the affinity to SO2. Moreover, when AC is acting as a support, the surface oxygen functional group formed on the surface of AC can serve as a new site for SO2 adsorption.

  1. Austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Gerald D.; Powell, Roger W.

    1985-01-01

    This invention describes a composition for an austenitic stainless steel which has been found to exhibit improved high temperature stress rupture properties. The composition of this alloy is about (in wt. %): 12.5 to 14.5 Cr; 14.5 to 16.5 Ni; 1.5 to 2.5 Mo; 1.5 to 2.5 Mn; 0.1 to 0.4 Ti; 0.02 to 0.08 C; 0.5 to 1.0 Si; 0.01 maximum, N; 0.02 to 0.08 P; 0.002 to 0.008 B; 0.004-0.010 S; 0.02-0.05 Nb; 0.01-0.05 V; 0.005-0.02 Ta; 0.02-0.05 Al; 0.01-0.04 Cu; 0.02-0.05 Co; 0.03 maximum, As; 0.01 maximum, O; 0.01 maximum, Zr; and with the balance of the alloy being essentially iron. The carbon content of the alloy is adjusted such that wt. % Ti/(wt. % C+wt. % N) is between 4 and 6, and most preferably about 5. In addition the sum of the wt. % P+wt. % B+wt. % S is at least 0.03 wt. %. This alloy is believed to be particularly well suited for use as fast breeder reactor fuel element cladding.

  2. Determination of radial growth rate of colonies of Sclerotium rolfsii F-6656 for the evaluation of culture medium, optimum incubation temperature, osmo- and halotolerance.

    PubMed

    Fariña, J I; Siñeriz, F; Molina, O E; Perotti, N I

    1996-01-01

    The measurement of the colony radial growth rate (Kr) on solid medium of colonies of Sclerotium rolfsii Proimi F-6656 for the evaluation of scleroglucan production medium and other different media, incubation temperature and tolerance to diverse concentrations of sucrose and NaCl were studied. The optimum growth temperature observed was 30 degrees C. The Kr value reached on the Production Medium used (0.66 mm.h-1) showed no differences compared with those of the other media tested, indicating that all the requirements for growth were provided. Poor growth was only observed on Soil Extract Agar. The fungus tolerated concentrations of sucrose from 0.15 to 1.17 M, on both Czapek and production medium. Growth was limited by the highest concentrations of sucrose tested (0.88 and 1.17 M), as indicated by a slower increase in colony size. Addition of 0.86 M NaCl to the production medium and YM agar did not inhibit growth completely, but decreased the radial growth rate considerably (80 and 70% respectively). PMID:9017854

  3. Engineered carbon foam for temperature control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almajali, Mohammad Rajab

    pressure within the foam matrix were investigated. These factors lowered the heat transfer rate considerably and the melting area was reduced by more than 23%. Two samples, coated and uncoated carbon foam, were infiltrated with PCM and subjected to a uniform heat load test in a vacuum. The coated foam showed excellent performance compared to the uncoated foam. (iii) Finally, the new engineered carbon foam was used as a heat sink and heat exchanger in a thermoelectric cooler for a cooling vest application. Using carbon foam as the core material for this application, the effective transfer of heat was significantly increased while reducing the size and weight of the heat exchanger.

  4. Potential Applications of an Integrated Seismic, Tilt, and Temperature Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bainbridge, Geoffrey; Parker, Tim; Karimi, Sepideh; Devanney, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Force feedback seismometers provide mass position outputs which represent the time-averaged feedback force applied to each inertial mass, in order to cancel external forces and keep it balanced at its center point. These external forces are primarily due to tilt and temperature. In a symmetric triaxial seismometer, tilt and temperature effects can be distinguished because temperature affects all 3 axes equally whereas tilt causes a different force on each axis. This study analyzes the resolution of tilt and temperature signals that can be obtained from a force-feedback seismometer, and the potential applicability of this data to applications such as volcano monitoring and cap rock integrity monitoring. Also the synergy of a combined seismic, tilt, and temperature instrument is considered.

  5. A standardized diode cryogenic temperature sensor for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courts, Samuel Scott

    2016-03-01

    The model DT-670-SD cryogenic diode temperature sensor, manufactured by Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. has been used on numerous aerospace space missions since its introduction nearly 15 years ago. While the sensing element is a diode, it is operated in a non-standard manner when used as a temperature sensor over the 1.4-500 K temperature range. For this reason, the NASA and MIL-type test and performance standards designed to ensure high reliability of diode aerospace parts don't properly define the inspection and test protocol for the DT-670-SD temperature sensor as written. This requires each aerospace application to develop unique test and inspection protocols for the project, typically for a small number of sensors, resulting in expensive sensors with a long lead time. With over 30 years of experience in supplying cryogenic temperature sensors for aerospace applications, Lake Shore has developed screening and qualification inspection and test protocols to provide "commercial off-the-shelf (COTS)" DT-670-SD temperature sensors that should meet the requirements of most high-reliability applications including aerospace. Parts from acceptance and qualified lots will be available at a base sensor level with the ability to specify an interchangeability tolerance, calibration range, mounting adaptor, and/or lead extension for final configuration. This work presents details of this acceptance and qualification inspection and test protocol as well as performance characteristics of the DT-670-SD cryogenic temperature sensors when inspected and tested to this protocol.

  6. Application for temperature and humidity monitoring of data center environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Ş.; Truşcǎ, M. R. C.; Soran, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    The technology and computer science registered a large development in the last years. Most systems that use high technologies require special working conditions. The monitoring and the controlling are very important. The temperature and the humidity are important parameters in the operation of computer systems, industrial and research, maintaining it between certain values to ensure their proper functioning being important. Usually, the temperature is maintained in the established range using an air conditioning system, but the humidity is affected. In the present work we developed an application based on a board with own firmware called "AVR_NET_IO" using a microcontroller ATmega32 type for temperature and humidity monitoring in Data Center of INCDTIM. On this board, temperature sensors were connected to measure the temperature in different points of the Data Center and outside of this. Humidity monitoring is performed using data from integrated sensors of the air conditioning system, thus achieving a correlation between humidity and temperature variation. It was developed a software application (CM-1) together with the hardware, which allows temperature monitoring and register inside Data Center and trigger an alarm when variations are greater with 3°C than established limits of the temperature.

  7. Industrial applications of MHD high temperature air heater technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saari, D. P.; Fenstermacher, J. E.; White, L. R.; Marksberry, C. L.

    1981-12-01

    The MHD high temperature air heater (HTAH) requires technology beyond the current state-of-the-art of industrial regenerative heaters. Specific aspects of HTAH technology which may find other application include refractory materials and valves resistant to the high temperature, corrosive, slag-bearing gas, materials resistant to cyclic thermal stresses, high temperature support structures for the cored brick bed, regenerative heater operating techniques for preventing accumulation of slag in the heater, and analytical tools for computing regenerative heater size, cost, and performance. Areas where HTAH technology may find application include acetylene/ethylene production processes, flash pyrolysis of coal, high temperature gas reactors, coal gasification processes, various metallurgical processes, waste incineration, and improvements to existing regenerator technology such as blast furnace stoves and glass tank regenerators.

  8. Development of silicon carbide semiconductor devices for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony; Petit, Jeremy B.

    1991-01-01

    The semiconducting properties of electronic grade silicon carbide crystals, such as wide energy bandgap, make it particularly attractive for high temperature applications. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include instrumentation for engines under development, engine control and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Discrete prototype SiC devices were fabricated and tested at elevated temperatures. Grown p-n junction diodes demonstrated very good rectification characteristics at 870 K. A depletion-mode metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor was also successfully fabricated and tested at 770 K. While optimization of SiC fabrication processes remain, it is believed that SiC is an enabling high temperature electronic technology.

  9. Alloys based on NiAl for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedula, K. M.; Pathare, V.; Aslanidis, I.; Titran, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The NiAl alloys for potential high temperature applications were studied. Alloys were prepared by powder metallurgy techniques. Flow stress values at slow strain rates and high temperatures were measured. Some ternary alloying additions (Hf, Ta and Nb) were identified. The mechanism of strengthening in alloys containing these additions appears to be a form of particle dislocation interaction. The effects of grain size and stoichiometry in binary alloys are also presented.

  10. Cryocooler applications for high-temperature superconductor magnetic bearings.

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R. C.

    1998-05-22

    The efficiency and stability of rotational magnetic suspension systems are enhanced by the use of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) magnetic bearings. Fundamental aspects of the HTS magnetic bearings and rotational magnetic suspension are presented. HTS cooling can be by liquid cryogen bath immersion or by direct conduction, and thus there are various applications and integration issues for cryocoolers. Among the numerous cryocooler aspects to be considered are installation; operating temperature; losses; and vacuum pumping.

  11. A standardized Cernox™ cryogenic temperature sensor for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courts, Samuel Scott

    2014-11-01

    The success of any aerospace mission depends upon the reliability of the discrete components comprising the instrument. To this end, many test standards have been developed to define test protocols and methods for the parts used in these missions. To date, no recognized MIL-type standard exists for cryogenic temperature sensors that are used from room temperature to 20 K or below. The aerospace applications utilizing these sensors require the procuring entity to develop a specification which the sensor manufacturer uses to screen and qualify a single build lot for flight use. The individual applications often require only a small number of sensors with the end result being a relatively high cost and long delivery time. Over the past two decades, Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. has worked with many aerospace companies to supply Cernox™ cryogenic temperature sensors for numerous missions. The experience gained from this work has led to the development of a manufacturing and test protocol resulting in 'off-the-shelf' cryogenic temperature sensors that should meet the requirements for many aerospace applications. Sensors will be available at the base part level with the ability to configure the delivered part with regard to lead wire material, package adapter, lead wire extensions, and calibration as appropriate or necessary for the application. This work presents details of this manufacturing, inspection, and test protocol as well as performance characteristics of Cernox™ temperature sensors when inspected and tested to this protocol.

  12. Effect of the solution temperature in a singlet-oxygen generator on the formation of active medium in an ejector oxygen - iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zagidullin, M V; Nikolaev, V D; Svistun, M I; Khvatov, N A; Palina, N Yu

    2002-02-28

    The influence of the solution temperature in a singlet-oxygen generator on the formation of the active medium in the ejector oxygen - iodine laser is investigated. The following parameters of the active medium at the solution temperature -20{sup 0}C are obtained: the gain is 7.2 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup -1}, the Mach number is M=2, the temperature is 205 K, and the static pressure is 9.3 mmHg. As the solution temperature is increased to -4{sup 0}C, the gain decreases to 5 x 10{sup 3} cm{sup -1}, the Mach number decreases to 1.78, while the temperature and the static pressure increase to 241 K and 10.7 mmHg, respectively. As the solution temperature increases from -20 to -4{sup 0}C, the losses in O{sub 2}({sup 1}{Delta}) increase by less than 20%, while the dissociation efficiency of molecular iodine decreases by less than 21%. (lasers, active media)

  13. Emerging applications of high temperature superconductors for space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinen, Vernon O.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Long, Kenwyn J.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed space missions require longevity of communications system components, high input power levels, and high speed digital logic devices. The complexity of these missions calls for a high data bandwidth capacity. Incorporation of high temperature superconducting (HTS) thin films into some of these communications system components may provide a means of meeting these requirements. Space applications of superconducting technology has previously been limited by the requirement of cooling to near liquid helium temperatures. Development of HTS materials with transition temperatures above 77 K along with the natural cooling ability of space suggest that space applications may lead the way in the applications of high temperature superconductivity. In order for HTS materials to be incorporated into microwave and millimeter wave devices, the material properties such as electrical conductivity, current density, surface resistivity and others as a function of temperature and frequency must be well characterized and understood. The millimeter wave conductivity and surface resistivity were well characterized, and at 77 K are better than copper. Basic microwave circuits such as ring resonators were used to determine transmission line losses. Higher Q values than those of gold resonator circuits were observed below the transition temperature. Several key HTS circuits including filters, oscillators, phase shifters and phased array antenna feeds are feasible in the near future. For technology to improve further, good quality, large area films must be reproducibly grown on low dielectric constant, low loss microwave substrates.

  14. Space applications for high temperature superconductivity - Brief review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar

    1990-01-01

    An overview is presented of materials and devices based on high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) that could have useful space-oriented applications. Of specific interest are applications of HTS technologies to mm and microwave systems, spaceborne and planet-surface sensors, and to magnetic subsystems for robotic, rescue, and docking maneuvers. HTS technologies can be used in optoelectronics, magnetic-field detectors, antennae, transmission/delay lines, and launch/payload coils.

  15. Metal-Coated Optical Fibers for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeakes, Jason; Murphy, Kent; Claus, Richard; Greene, Jonathan; Tran, Tuan

    1996-01-01

    This poster will highlight on-going research at the Virginia Tech Fiber & Electro-Optics Research Center (FEORC) in the area of thin films on optical fibers. Topics will include the sputter deposition of metals and metal; alloys onto optical fiber and fiber optic sensors for innovative applications. Specific information will be available on thin film fiber optic hydrogen sensors, corrosion sensors, and metal-coated optical fiber for high temperature aerospace applications.

  16. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 13 percent thick medium speed airfoil designed for general aviation applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcghee, R. J.; Beasley, W. D.

    1979-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to determine the low speed, two dimensional aerodynamic characteristics of a 13percent thick medium speed airfoil designed for general aviation applications. The results were compared with data for the 13 percent thick low speed airfoil. The tests were conducted over a Mach number range from 0.10 to 0.32, a chord Reynolds number range from 2.0 x 10 to the 6th power to 12.0 x 10 to the 6th power, and an angle of attack frange from about -8 deg to 10 deg. The objective of retaining good high-lift low speed characteristics for an airfoil designed to have good medium speed cruise performance was achieved.

  17. Fiber Bragg Grating Temperature Sensor for Defence and Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebru, Haftay Abadi; Padhy, B. B.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents the design and development of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensor suitable for naval applications like temperature monitoring of onboard ships. The Bragg gratings used here have a reflection Bragg wavelength of 1550 nm and are inscribed by phase mask technique using ultraviolet (UV) laser beam at 255.3 nm. The high-resolution temperature sensor has been designed and developed based on the principle of converting the strain to temperature. This is achieved by using bimetallic configuration. Here lead and tungsten metals are used. The expansion of lead is concentrated on the Bragg grating, thus imparting strain on it. The wavelength shift with change of temperature is recorded with optical spectrum analyzer. The minimum temperature that could be measured accurately by the sensor with repeatability is of the order of 10-2. We have achieved thermal sensitivity of 46 pm/°C and 72 pm/°C for sensor lengths (length of the metallic strips) of 60 mm and 100 mm respectively. The thermal sensitivity achieved is approximately 3.5 times and 5.5 times that of bare FBG with thermal sensitivity of 13 pm/°C for the respective sensor lengths. This type of sensor can play vital role in defence and industrial applications like monitoring fresh water/lubricating oil temperatures of machinery in onboard ships, temperature monitoring of airframe of the aircraft, aircraft engine control system sensors, temperature measurement of hot gases from propellant combustion to protect the rocket motor casing, monitoring and control of temperature of copper bars of the power generators etc.

  18. Characterization of composite high temperature superconductors for magnetic bearing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, B.R.; Lynds, L.; VanValzah, J.; Eaton, H. . Research Center); Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Basinger, S.A. )

    1990-01-01

    A study of high temperature superconductor composites for use in magnetic bearings applications is presented. Fabrication and characterization techniques are described. Magnetometry and mechanical force measurements are correlated with a particular emphasis on the role of superconductor particle size. Results are discussed in terms of fundamental limits of Meissner effect levitation. 21 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  19. 46 CFR 57.05-5 - Low temperature application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Low temperature application. 57.05-5 Section 57.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING... accordance with § 57.03-1(b). Manual welding shall be qualified in the position prescribed by the procedure....

  20. 46 CFR 57.05-5 - Low temperature application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Low temperature application. 57.05-5 Section 57.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING... accordance with § 57.03-1(b). Manual welding shall be qualified in the position prescribed by the procedure....

  1. 46 CFR 57.05-5 - Low temperature application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Low temperature application. 57.05-5 Section 57.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING... accordance with § 57.03-1(b). Manual welding shall be qualified in the position prescribed by the procedure....

  2. 46 CFR 57.05-5 - Low temperature application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Low temperature application. 57.05-5 Section 57.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING... accordance with § 57.03-1(b). Manual welding shall be qualified in the position prescribed by the procedure....

  3. 46 CFR 57.05-5 - Low temperature application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Low temperature application. 57.05-5 Section 57.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING... accordance with § 57.03-1(b). Manual welding shall be qualified in the position prescribed by the procedure....

  4. Ultra-High Temperature Materials Characterization for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan; Hyers, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Propulsion system efficiency increases as operating temperatures are increased. Some very high-temperature materials are being developed, including refractory metal alloys, carbides, borides, and silicides. System design requires data for materials properties at operating temperatures. Materials property data are not available for many materials of interest at the desired operating temperatures (up to approx. 3000 K). The objective of this work is to provide important physical property data at ultra-high temperatures. The MSFC Electrostatic levitation (ESL) facility can provide measurements of thermophysical properties which include: creep strength, density and thermal expansion for materials being developed for propulsion applications. The ESL facility uses electrostatic fields to position samples between electrodes during processing and characterization studies. Because the samples float between the electrodes during studies, they are free from any contact with a container or test apparatus. This provides a high purity environment for the study of high-temperature, reactive materials. ESL can be used to process a wide variety of materials including metals, alloys, ceramics, glasses and semiconductors. The MSFC ESL has provided non-contact measurements of properties of materials up to 3400 C. Density and thermal expansion are measured by analyzing digital images of the sample at different temperatures. Our novel, non-contact method for measuring creep uses rapid rotation to deform the sample. Digital images of the deformed samples are analyzed to obtain the creep properties, which match those obtained using ASTM Standard E-139 for Nb at 1985 C. Data from selected ESL-based characterization studies will be presented. The ESL technique could support numerous propulsion technologies by advancing the knowledge base and the technology readiness level for ultra-high temperature materials. Applications include non-eroding nozzle materials and lightweight, high-temperature

  5. Optical fiber temperature sensors: applications in heat treatments for foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa-Morales, María Elena; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; López-Malo, Aurelio

    2010-10-01

    Heat treatments are important methods to provide safe foods. Conventional heat treatments involve the application of steam and recently microwave treatments have been studied and applied as they are considered as fast, clean and efficient. Optical fiber sensing is an excellent tool to measure the temperature during microwave treatments. This paper shows the application of optical fiber temperature sensing during the heat treatment of different foods such as vegetables (jalapeño pepper and cilantro), cheese and ostrich meat. Reaching the target temperature, important bacteria were inactivated: Salmonella, Listeria and Escherichia coli. Thus, the use of optical fiber sensors has resulted be a useful way to develop protocols to inactivate microorganisms and to propose new methods for food processing.

  6. NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

    2004-04-01

    Accomplishments during the first six months of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers.

  7. Applicability of effective medium description to photonic crystals in higher bands: Theory and numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markel, Vadim A.; Tsukerman, Igor

    2016-06-01

    We consider conditions under which photonic crystals (PCs) can be homogenized in the higher photonic bands and, in particular, near the Γ point. By homogenization we mean introducing some effective local parameters ɛeff and μeff that describe reflection, refraction, and propagation of electromagnetic waves in the PC adequately. The parameters ɛeff and μeff can be associated with a hypothetical homogeneous effective medium. In particular, if the PC is homogenizable, the dispersion relations and isofrequency lines in the effective medium and in the PC should coincide to some level of approximation. We can view this requirement as a necessary condition of homogenizability. In the vicinity of a Γ point, real isofrequency lines of two-dimensional PCs can be close to mathematical circles, just like in the case of isotropic homogeneous materials. Thus, one may be tempted to conclude that introduction of an effective medium is possible and, at least, the necessary condition of homogenizability holds in this case. We, however, show that this conclusion is incorrect: complex dispersion points must be included into consideration even in the case of strictly nonabsorbing materials. By analyzing the complex dispersion relations and the corresponding isofrequency lines, we have found that two-dimensional PCs with C4 and C6 symmetries are not homogenizable in the higher photonic bands. We also draw a distinction between spurious Γ -point frequencies that are due to Brillouin-zone folding of Bloch bands and "true" Γ -point frequencies that are due to multiple scattering. Understanding of the physically different phenomena that lead to the appearance of spurious and "true" Γ -point frequencies is important for the theory of homogenization.

  8. Coal liquefaction in an inorganic-organic medium. [DOE patent application

    DOEpatents

    Vermeulen, T.; Grens, E.A. II; Holten, R.R.

    Improved process for liquefaction of coal by contacting pulverized coal in an inorganic-organic medium solvent system containing a ZnCl/sub 2/ catalyst, a polar solvent with the structure RX where X is one of the elements O, N, S, or P, and R is hydrogen or a lower hydrocarbon radical; the solvent system can contain a hydrogen donor solvent (and must when RX is water) which is immiscible in the ZnCl/sub 2/ and is a hydroaromatic hydrocarbon selected from tetralin, dihydrophenanthrene, dihydroanthracene or a hydrogenated coal derived hydroaromatic hydrocarbon distillate fraction.

  9. Status and future perspective of applications of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    The material research on the high temperature superconductivity for the past ten years gave us sufficient information on the new phenomena of these new materials. It seems that new applications in a very wide range of industries are increasing rapidly. In this report three main topics of the applications are given ; [a] progress of the superconducting bulk materials and their applications to the flywheel electricity storage system and others, [b] progress in the development of superconducting tapes and their applications to power cables, the high field superconducting magnet for the SMES and for the pulling system of large silicon single crystal, and [c] development of new superconducting electronic devices (SFQ) and the possiblity of the application to next generation supercomputers. These examples show the great capability of the superconductivity technology and it is expected that the real superconductivity industry will take off around the year of 2005.

  10. Effects of root medium pH on water transport in paper birch (Betula papyrifera) seedlings in relation to root temperature and abscisic acid treatments.

    PubMed

    Kamaluddin, M; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2004-10-01

    We investigated the effects of root medium pH on water transport in whole-plant and detached roots of paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.). Exposure of seedling roots to pH 4 and 8 significantly decreased root hydraulic conductivity (Lp) and stomatal conductance (gs), compared with pH 6. When roots of solution-culture-grown (pH 6) seedlings were transferred to pH 4 or 8, their steady-state water flow (Qv) declined within minutes, followed by a decline in gs. The root oxygen uptake rates were not significantly affected by the pH treatments. Treatment of roots with mercuric chloride resulted in a large decrease in Qv at pH 6; the extent of this decrease was similar to that brought about by pH 4 and 8. Lowering root temperature from 21 to 4 degrees C decreased Qv irrespective of medium pH. Low root temperatures did not offset the effects of medium pH 4 on Qv and the roots in this treatment had a high activation energy for water flow. Conversely, roots exposed to pH 8 had a low activation energy, similar to that at pH 6. When 2 micro M abscisic acid, (+/-)-cis-trans-ABA, was added to the root medium, Qv increased in roots that were incubated at pH 6. It also increased slightly in roots incubated at pH 4, but not at pH 8. The increase at pH 4 and 6 was temperature-dependent, occurring at 21 degrees C, but not 4 degrees C. We suggest that the pH treatments are responsible for altering root water flow properties through their effects on the activity of water channels. These results support the concept that ABA effects on water channels are modulated by other, possibly metabolic- and pH-dependent factors.

  11. Application of an effective medium theory for modeling ultrasound wave propagation in healing long bones.

    PubMed

    Potsika, Vassiliki T; Grivas, Konstantinos N; Protopappas, Vasilios C; Vavva, Maria G; Raum, Kay; Rohrbach, Daniel; Polyzos, Demosthenes; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2014-07-01

    Quantitative ultrasound has recently drawn significant interest in the monitoring of the bone healing process. Several research groups have studied ultrasound propagation in healing bones numerically, assuming callus to be a homogeneous and isotropic medium, thus neglecting the multiple scattering phenomena that occur due to the porous nature of callus. In this study, we model ultrasound wave propagation in healing long bones using an iterative effective medium approximation (IEMA), which has been shown to be significantly accurate for highly concentrated elastic mixtures. First, the effectiveness of IEMA in bone characterization is examined: (a) by comparing the theoretical phase velocities with experimental measurements in cancellous bone mimicking phantoms, and (b) by simulating wave propagation in complex healing bone geometries by using IEMA. The original material properties of cortical bone and callus were derived using serial scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) images from previous animal studies. Guided wave analysis is performed for different healing stages and the results clearly indicate that IEMA predictions could provide supplementary information for bone assessment during the healing process. This methodology could potentially be applied in numerical studies dealing with wave propagation in composite media such as healing or osteoporotic bones in order to reduce the simulation time and simplify the study of complicated geometries with a significant porous nature.

  12. Surface response of a viscoelastic medium to subsurface acoustic sources with application to medical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royston, Thomas J.; Yazicioglu, Yigit; Loth, Francis

    2003-02-01

    The response at the surface of an isotropic viscoelastic medium to buried fundamental acoustic sources is studied theoretically, computationally and experimentally. Finite and infinitesimal monopole and dipole sources within the low audible frequency range (40-400 Hz) are considered. Analytical and numerical integral solutions that account for compression, shear and surface wave response to the buried sources are formulated and compared with numerical finite element simulations and experimental studies on finite dimension phantom models. It is found that at low audible frequencies, compression and shear wave propagation from point sources can both be significant, with shear wave effects becoming less significant as frequency increases. Additionally, it is shown that simple closed-form analytical approximations based on an infinite medium model agree well with numerically obtained ``exact'' half-space solutions for the frequency range and material of interest in this study. The focus here is on developing a better understanding of how biological soft tissue affects the transmission of vibro-acoustic energy from biological acoustic sources below the skin surface, whose typical spectral content is in the low audible frequency range. Examples include sound radiated from pulmonary, gastro-intestinal and cardiovascular system functions, such as breath sounds, bowel sounds and vascular bruits, respectively.

  13. Evaluation of Capacitors at Cryogenic Temperatures for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott S.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced electronic systems designed for use in planetary exploration missions must operate efficiently and reliably under the extreme cold temperatures of deep space environment. In addition, spacecraft power electronics capable of cold temperature operation will greatly simplify the thermal management system by eliminating the need for heating units and associated equipment and thereby reduce the size and weight of the overall power system. In this study, film, mica, solid tantalum and electric double layer capacitors were evaluated as a function of temperature from room to liquid nitrogen in terms of their dielectric properties. These properties included capacitance stability and dielectric loss in the frequency range of 50 Hz to 100 kHz. DC leakage current measurements were also performed on the capacitors. The results obtained are discussed and conclusions are made concerning the suitability of the capacitors investigated for low temperature applications.

  14. Applications of Thin Film Thermocouples for Surface Temperature Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Lisa C.; Holanda, Raymond

    1994-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples provide a minimally intrusive means of measuring surface temperature in hostile, high temperature environments. Unlike wire thermocouples, thin films do not necessitate any machining of the surface, therefore leaving intact its structural integrity. Thin films are many orders of magnitude thinner than wire, resulting in less disruption to the gas flow and thermal patterns that exist in the operating environment. Thin film thermocouples have been developed for surface temperature measurement on a variety of engine materials. The sensors are fabricated in the NASA Lewis Research Center's Thin Film Sensor Lab, which is a class 1000 clean room. The thermocouples are platinum-13 percent rhodium versus platinum and are fabricated by the sputtering process. Thin film-to-leadwire connections are made using the parallel-gap welding process. Thermocouples have been developed for use on superalloys, ceramics and ceramic composites, and intermetallics. Some applications of thin film thermocouples are: temperature measurement of space shuttle main engine turbine blade materials, temperature measurement in gas turbine engine testing of advanced materials, and temperature and heat flux measurements in a diesel engine. Fabrication of thin film thermocouples is described. Sensor durability, drift rate, and maximum temperature capabilities are addressed.

  15. Differential effects of sporulation temperature on the high pressure resistance of Clostridium botulinum type E spores and the interconnection with sporulation medium cation contents.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Christian A; Vogel, Rudi F

    2015-04-01

    High pressure thermal (HPT) processing can be used to improve traditional preservation methods and increase food safety and durability, whereas quality related characteristics can be largely maintained. Clostridium (C.) botulinum type E is a non-proteolytic, psychrotrophic, toxin-producing spore former, commonly associated with aquatic environments in temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. Sporulation in nature is likely to occur under varying conditions including temperature and nutrient availability, which might affect resistance properties of resulting spores. In our study, we determined the effect of sporulation temperature (13-38 °C) on the resistance of three Clostridium botulinum type E strains to differently intense HPT treatments (200 MPa at 40 and 80 °C, and 800 MPa at 40 and 80 °C). Furthermore, the effect of cations on sporulation temperature-mediated alterations in HHP resistance was investigated. Results indicate that low and high sporulation temperatures can increase and decrease sporal HPT resistance, respectively, in a treatment-dependent (pressure level, treatment temperature) manner, whereas the trends observed are largely unaffected by pressure dwells (1 s-10 min). Furthermore, results show that the cation content of the sporulation medium (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+)) marginally influences and partially counteracts effects on the HPT resistance of spores grown at low and elevated temperatures, respectively. This suggests that sporulation temperature and medium cations provoke changes in some common spore resistance structures. Sporulation conditions can markedly affect spore resistance properties and, thus, should be considered for the experimental setup of worst case studies aiming to evaluate the effectiveness of food processes in terms of the inactivation of C. botulinum type E spores.

  16. SiC Die Attach for High-Temperature Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drevin-Bazin, A.; Lacroix, F.; Barbot, J.-F.

    2013-11-01

    Eutectic solders AuIn19 and AuGe12 and nanosilver paste were investigated for SiC die attach in high-temperature (300°C) applications. The soldering or sintering conditions were optimized through die shear tests performed at room temperature. In particular, application of static pressure (3.5 MPa) during sintering resulted in greatly improved mechanical behavior of the nanosilver-based joint. Microstructural study of the eutectic solders showed formation of Au-rich grains in AuGe die attach and significant diffusion of Au and In through the Ni layer in AuIn19 die attach, which could lead to formation of intermetallic compounds. Die shear tests versus temperature showed that the behaviors of the studied die attaches are different; nevertheless they present suitable shear strengths required for high-temperature applications. The mechanical behavior of joints under various levels of thermal and mechanical stress was also studied. Creep experiments were carried out on the eutectic solders to describe the thermomechanical behavior of the complete module; only one creep mechanism was observed in the working range.

  17. High-temperature electronics applications in space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurgens, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    One of the most exciting applications of high-temperature electronics is related to the exploration of the planet Venus. On this planet the atmospheric temperatures range from about 170 K at elevations of 100 km to a searing 730 K near the surface. Mechanisms for exploring the atmosphere might include balloons, airplanes, surface landers, and surface-launched probes. Balloons, for example, could fly in the region from 20 (320 C at 22 bars) to 60 km (-20 C at 0.2 bar). Suitable balloon fabrics presently exclude excursions to lower altitudes; however, adequate electronic systems could survive to 325 C. Small airplanes would require more sophisticated electronics for guidance and control. Long life surface landers would most likely be developed first, as these could be used to measure long-term variations in weather. Ranging transponders would be important for ephemeris development, measurement of spin state, and studies of general relativity. Surface temperatures of 460 C and pressures of 90 bars present a challenge to the developers of such instruments. Other space applications for high-temperature electronics include transponders for the surface of Mercury, near solar drag-free orbiters, and deep atmospheric penetrators for Jupiter and Saturn. Each of these has its own particular problems with respect to instrumentation adequate to meet the desired scientific goals. This paper is primarily concerned with defining possible mission applications, the required electronic systems, and the approaches that are currently being studied for their development.

  18. Development of a turbine cryocooler for high temperature superconductor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Hirokawa, M.; Kobayashi, H.; Kamioka, Y.; Iwakuma, M.; Shiohara, Y.

    2009-10-01

    For high temperature superconductor (HTS) applications such as a power cable, a motor, and a transformer, a refrigerator enough to cool them below liquid nitrogen temperature is required to attain the HTS system stable operation. Since no refrigerator matched for the HTS application both in temperature and in cooling power is available up to now, a neon turbo-Brayton cycle refrigerator of 2 kW at 70 K was developed. Neon gas was used as the working fluid in the refrigerator. Although hydrogen and helium could be selected as a working fluid for the refrigerator, neon is better energy carrier since it has higher heat capacity and larger molecular weight than hydrogen and helium at a temperature around 70 K in order to make a refrigerator smaller in size. Neon has an advantage in using a small turbo-expander with an impeller of 25 mm in diameter. The turbine rotated at a maximum speed of 100,000 rpm. The information for developing a suitable refrigerator for HTS applications was collected and a new type of neon refrigerator was proposed.

  19. A Theory for H/V Spectral Ratio: Application for a Layered Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Kawase, H.; Matsushima, S.; Rodriguez, M.; Iturraran-Viveros, U.; Luzon, F.; Margerin, L.; Campillo, M.

    2010-12-01

    Both microtremors and the coda of earthquake motions are produced by multiple random sources, typically close to the surface of the Earth. They include the effects of multiple scattering. These motions are governed by diffusion-like equations. In this circumstance the average autocorrelation at a given receiver, in the frequency domain, measure average energy density and it is proportional to the imaginary part of Green function when both source and receiver are the same. On the other hand, the imaginary part of Green function at the loading point is also proportional to the power injected into the medium by a unit harmonic load at that point. Such power will vary if the motions are affected by waves that are reflected back to the source location. Therefore, it represents reflection events. In fact, the average autocorrelations in time domain are called pseudo-reflection seismograms. These properties of diffuse fields can be used to imaging the mechanical and geometrical characteristics of an elastic domain. Assuming the seismic field is diffuse, we compute the H/V ratio for a horizontally layered medium overlaying a half space in terms of the imaginary part the Green function tensor components at the surface. The theory herein presented links average energy densities with Green function. Our theory allows computing the ratio H/V as an intrinsic property of the medium. Two extreme cases are of interest: The fields and the Green’s function can be either 1D or 3D. In 3D our approach naturally allows for the inversion of H/V, the well known Nakamura’s ratio without using Rayleigh wave ellipticity but including the contributions of Rayleigh, Love and body waves. Broad band noise records at Texcoco, a soft soil site near Mexico City, are studied and they are interpreted using the theoretical results herein presented. On the other hand, for relatively deep earthquake sources the H/V spectral ratio can be interpreted in terms of 1D Green’s functions at the site

  20. [Application of health questionnaires for health management in small- and medium-sized enterprises].

    PubMed

    Kishida, K; Saito, M; Hasegawa, T; Aoki, S; Suzuki, S

    1986-01-01

    Two kinds of health questionnaires, the Todai Health Index (THI) and Cumulative Fatigue Index (CFI), were applied as a screening device for health management of workers belonging to small-medium sized enterprises. A total of 495 workers composed of 452 male workers of a glass-bottle manufacturing factory and 43 male workers of a soft-drink bottling factory were the subjects of the present study. It was found that the two kinds of health questionnaires were different from each other and have their own characteristics. Twelve scales of THI were grouped into two, the first consisting of ten scales (SUSY, RESP, EYSK, MOUT, DIGE, IMPU, MENT, DEPR, NERV, and LIFE) and the second consisting of two scales (AGGR and LISC). Nine categories of CFI were grouped into one by using principal factor analysis. It was confirmed that the twelve scale scores of THI obtained at small-medium sized factories differed from those scale scores of a reference group investigated at a large-sized enterprise. It is on the basis of the scales of aggressiveness and lies and also of the scale of mental unstability which characterizes workers, locality, job (clerical or field work), and size of industry (large or small sized) that the difference could be evaluated. Urban life characterized by a life style of staying up late at night and waking up late in the morning has been reflected on the scale of life irregularity. Irregularity of life induced by transformation of working schedule, such as two or three shifts of work and overtime, was also reflected on this scale. Two scales of THI test, i.e., many subjective symptoms and digestive organ complaints, seemed to be the representative scales indicating a close relation between work load and health level. The discriminant score for diagnosis of psychosomatic diseases is considered to be one of the most useful assessments of the individual's health condition. As mentioned above, THI is recommended as a convenient assessment method for health

  1. Analysis of Low Temperature Organic Rankine Cycles for Solar Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunfei

    The present work focuses on Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) systems and their application to low temperature waste heat recovery, combined heat and power as well as off-grid solar power generation applications. As CO_2 issues come to the fore front and fossil fuels become more expensive, interest in low grade heat recovery has grown dramatically in the past few years. Solar energy, as a clean, renewable, pollution-free and sustainable energy has great potential for the use of ORC systems. Several ORC solutions have been proposed to generate electricity from low temperature sources. The ORC systems discussed here can be applied to fields such as solar thermal, biological waste heat, engine exhaust gases, small-scale cogeneration, domestic boilers, etc. The current work presents a thermodynamic and economic analysis for the use of ORC systems to convert solar energy or low exergy energy to generate electrical power. The organic working fluids investigated here were selected to investigate the effect of the fluid saturation temperature on the performance of ORCs. The working fluids under investigation are R113, R245fa, R123, with boiling points between 40°C and 200°C at pressures from 10 kPa to 10 MPa. Ambient temperature air at 20oC to 30oC is utilized as cooling resource, and allowing for a temperature difference 10°C for effective heat transfer. Consequently, the working fluids are condensed at 40°C. A combined first- and second-law analysis is performed by varying some system independent parameters at various reference temperatures. The present work shows that ORC systems can be viable and economical for the applications such as waste heat use and off-grid power generation even though they are likely to be more expensive than grid power.

  2. Long term application of bus monitoring system to short and medium span bridges and damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Ayaho; Lúcio, Válter J. G.; Emoto, Hisao; Tanaka, Hideaki

    2015-07-01

    In this study, as one solution to the problem for condition assessment of existing short and medium span reinforced/prestressed concrete bridges, a new monitoring method using a public bus as part of a public transit system (bus monitoring system) is proposed, along with safety indices, namely, characteristic deflection, which is relatively free from the influence of dynamic disturbances due to such factors as the roughness of the road surface, and a structural anomaly parameter. A basic study was conducted by using the results of technical verification experiments and numerical analysis simulation. This paper describes the details of not only how to assess the bridge condition by public bus vibration measured in operating on Ube City bus network as a specific example for verify the system but also what kind of consideration we need to apply the system to existing bridges in overseas country.

  3. Application of MSOR iteration with Newton scheme for solutions of 1D nonlinear porous medium equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, J. V. L.; Sulaiman, J.

    2016-06-01

    This paper considers Newton-MSOR iterative method for solving 1D nonlinear porous medium equation (PME). The basic concept of proposed iterative method is derived from a combination of one step nonlinear iterative method which known as Newton method with Modified Successive Over Relaxation (MSOR) method. The reliability of Newton-MSOR to obtain approximate solution for several PME problems is compared with Newton-Gauss-Seidel (Newton-GS) and Newton-Successive Over Relaxation (Newton-SOR). In this paper, the formulation and implementation of these three iterative methods have also been presented. From four examples of PME problems, numerical results showed that Newton-MSOR method requires lesser number of iterations and computational time as compared with Newton-GS and Newton-SOR methods.

  4. Lauric acid-rich medium-chain triglycerides can substitute for other oils in cooking applications and may have limited pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Mark F; DiNicolantonio, James J

    2016-01-01

    Recently, medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) containing a large fraction of lauric acid (LA) (C12)—about 30%—have been introduced commercially for use in salad oils and in cooking applications. As compared to the long-chain fatty acids found in other cooking oils, the medium-chain fats in MCTs are far less likely to be stored in adipose tissue, do not give rise to ‘ectopic fat’ metabolites that promote insulin resistance and inflammation, and may be less likely to activate macrophages. When ingested, medium-chain fatty acids are rapidly oxidised in hepatic mitochondria; the resulting glut of acetyl-coenzyme A drives ketone body production and also provokes a thermogenic response. Hence, studies in animals and humans indicate that MCT ingestion is less obesogenic than comparable intakes of longer chain oils. Although LA tends to raise serum cholesterol, it has a more substantial impact on high density lipoprotein (HDL) than low density lipoprotein (LDL) in this regard, such that the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol decreases. LA constitutes about 50% of the fatty acid content of coconut oil; south Asian and Oceanic societies which use coconut oil as their primary source of dietary fat tend to be at low cardiovascular risk. Since ketone bodies can exert neuroprotective effects, the moderate ketosis induced by regular MCT ingestion may have neuroprotective potential. As compared to traditional MCTs featuring C6–C10, laurate-rich MCTs are more feasible for use in moderate-temperature frying and tend to produce a lower but more sustained pattern of blood ketone elevation owing to the more gradual hepatic oxidation of ingested laurate. PMID:27547436

  5. Lauric acid-rich medium-chain triglycerides can substitute for other oils in cooking applications and may have limited pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; DiNicolantonio, James J

    2016-01-01

    Recently, medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) containing a large fraction of lauric acid (LA) (C12)-about 30%-have been introduced commercially for use in salad oils and in cooking applications. As compared to the long-chain fatty acids found in other cooking oils, the medium-chain fats in MCTs are far less likely to be stored in adipose tissue, do not give rise to 'ectopic fat' metabolites that promote insulin resistance and inflammation, and may be less likely to activate macrophages. When ingested, medium-chain fatty acids are rapidly oxidised in hepatic mitochondria; the resulting glut of acetyl-coenzyme A drives ketone body production and also provokes a thermogenic response. Hence, studies in animals and humans indicate that MCT ingestion is less obesogenic than comparable intakes of longer chain oils. Although LA tends to raise serum cholesterol, it has a more substantial impact on high density lipoprotein (HDL) than low density lipoprotein (LDL) in this regard, such that the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol decreases. LA constitutes about 50% of the fatty acid content of coconut oil; south Asian and Oceanic societies which use coconut oil as their primary source of dietary fat tend to be at low cardiovascular risk. Since ketone bodies can exert neuroprotective effects, the moderate ketosis induced by regular MCT ingestion may have neuroprotective potential. As compared to traditional MCTs featuring C6-C10, laurate-rich MCTs are more feasible for use in moderate-temperature frying and tend to produce a lower but more sustained pattern of blood ketone elevation owing to the more gradual hepatic oxidation of ingested laurate. PMID:27547436

  6. Application of Effective Medium Theory to the Three-Dimensional Heterogeneity of Mantle Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X.; Jordan, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    A self-consistent theory for the effective elastic parameters of stochastic media with small-scale 3D heterogeneities has been developed using a 2nd-order Born approximation to the scattered wavefield (T. H. Jordan, GJI, in press). Here we apply the theory to assess how small-scale variations in the local anisotropy of the upper mantle affect seismic wave propagation. We formulate a anisotropic model in which the local elastic properties are specified by a constant stiffness tensor with hexagonal symmetry of arbitrary orientation. This orientation is guided by a Gaussian random vector field with transversely isotropic (TI) statistics. If the outer scale of the statistical variability is small compared to a wavelength, then the effective seismic velocities are TI and depend on two parameters, a horizontal-to-vertical orientation ratio ξ and a horizontal-to-vertical aspect ratio, η. If ξ = 1, the symmetry axis is isotropically distributed; if ξ < 1, it is vertical biased (bipolar distribution), and if ξ > 1, it is horizontally biased (girdle distribution). If η = 1, the heterogeneity is geometrically isotropic; as η à∞, the medium becomes a horizontal stochastic laminate; as η à0, the medium becomes a vertical stochastic bundle. Using stiffness tensors constrained by laboratory measurements of mantle xenoliths, we explore the dependence of the effective P and S velocities on ξ and η. The effective velocities are strongly controlled by the orientation ratio ξ; e.g., if the hexagonal symmetry axis of the local anisotropy is the fast direction of propagation, then vPH > vPV and vSH > vSV for ξ > 1. A more surprising result is the 2nd-order insensitivity of the velocities to the heterogeneity aspect ratio η. Consequently, the geometrical anisotropy of upper-mantle heterogeneity significantly enhances seismic-wave anisotropy only through local variations in the Voigt-averaged velocities, which depend primarily on rock composition and not deformation

  7. Low Temperature Plasma Physics: Fundamental Aspects and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippler, Rainer; Pfau, Sigismund; Schmidt, Martin; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2001-06-01

    Low-temperature plasma physics is a very active area of research located on the boundaries between physics, chemistry and materials science. Recent technological developments, e.g. in plasma etching or plasma deposition, have led to a revived interest in plasma physics and technology. This volume describes in detail fundamentals and applications of low-temperature plasma physics including newest achievements. The authors of this volume are top scientists from the USA and Europe who present most recent successes in our understanding of how plasmas behave and put a strong focus on the links between theory and experiment or technological process.

  8. NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

    2004-12-01

    Accomplishments during the Phase I of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. A matrix of potential fiber optic sensor approaches was derived, and a data set of specifications for high-temperature optical fiber was produced. Several fiber optic sensor configurations, including interferometric (extrinsic and intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer), gratings (fiber Bragg gratings and long period gratings), and microbend sensors, were evaluated in the laboratory. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers. Numerical aperture measurements of both clad and unclad sapphire fibers were obtained and used to estimate the reduction in mode volume afforded by the cladding. High-temperature sensors based on sapphire fibers were also investigated. The fabrication of an intrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity within sapphire fibers was attempted by the bulk diffusion of magnesium oxide into short localized segments of longer sapphire fibers. Fourier analysis of the fringes that resulted when the treated fiber was interrogated by a swept laser spectrometer suggested that an intrinsic cavity had been formed in the fiber. Also

  9. Technique for anisotropic extension of organic crystals: Application to temperature dependence of electrical resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Kato, Reizo; Yamamoto, Hiroshi M.; Fukaya, Atsuko; Yamasawa, Kenji; Takahashi, Ichiro; Akutsu, Hiroki; Akutsu-Sato, Akane; Day, Peter

    2007-08-01

    We have developed a technique for the anisotropic extension of fragile molecular crystals. The pressure medium and the instrument, which extends the pressure medium, are both made from epoxy resin. Since the thermal contraction of our instrument is identical to that of the pressure medium, the strain applied to the pressure medium has no temperature dependence down to 2K. Therefore, the degree of extension applied to the single crystal at low temperatures is uniquely determined from the degree of extension in the pressure medium and thermal contractions of the epoxy resin and the single crystal at ambient pressure. Using this novel instrument, we have measured the temperature dependence of the electrical resistance of metallic, superconducting, and insulating materials. The experimental results are discussed from the viewpoint of the extension (compression) of the lattice constants along the parallel (perpendicular) direction.

  10. Effect of mechanical force, rotation and moving internal heat source on a two-temperature fiber-reinforced thermoelastic medium with two theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Samia M.; Othman, Mohamed I. A.

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, the three-phase-lag model and Green-Naghdi theory without energy dissipation are used to study the effect of a mechanical force and a rotation on the wave propagation in a two-temperature fiber-reinforced thermoelastic problem for a medium with an internal heat source that is moving with a constant speed. The methodology applied here is the use of the normal mode analysis to solve the problem of a thermal shock problem to obtain the exact expressions of the displacement components, force stresses, thermal temperature, and conductivity temperature. Numerical results for the considered variables are given and illustrated graphically in the absence and presence of a rotation as well as a mechanical force. A comparison is made with the results in the context of the two theories in the absence and presence of a moving internal heat source.

  11. Evaluation of Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics for Propulsion Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Stanley R.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Halbig, Michael C.; Kiser, James D.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2002-01-01

    Ultra-high temperature ceramic (UHTC) materials consisting of zirconium diboride or hafnium diboride plus silicon carbide offer a combination of properties that make them candidates for airframe leading edges on sharp-bodied reentry vehicles. These UHTC perform well in the environment for such applications, i.e. low pressure air. The purpose of this study was to examine three of these materials under conditions more representative of a propulsion environment, i.e. higher oxygen and total pressure. Results of stren$h and fracture toughness measurements, furnace oxidation, and thermal shock exposures are presented. The poor oxidation resistance of UHTCs is the predominant factor limiting their applicability to propulsion.

  12. Non-graphite crucible for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Pfeiler, W.A.

    1996-01-09

    A multi-piece crucible for high temperature applications comprises a tubular side wall member having a lip on the inside surface and a bottom member or members forming a container for containing a melt of a material during a high temperature melt-casting operations. The multi-piece design prevents cracking of the crucible or leakage of the melt from the crucible during the melt-casting operation. The lip of the tubular member supports the bottom member. The contacting surfaces where the lip of the tubular side wall member contacts the bottom member of the multi-piece crucible contains a ceramic sealing material. The ceramic sealing material forms a seal sufficient to prevent the melt of the material from leaking out of the multi-piece crucible during the melt-casting process. The multi-piece crucible is made of a material which is chemically inert to the melt and has structural integrity at the melting point temperature of the melt, or of a material coated with such a material. The multi-piece crucible is contained in a thermal can assembly of a high temperature induction furnace during a high temperature melt-casting operation. One embodiment of the multi-piece crucible comprises a tubular member having a vertical slot filled with a ceramic sealing material to provide expansion of the tubular member without cracking during the high temperature melt-casting operation. 9 figs.

  13. Non-graphite crucible for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Pfeiler, William A.

    1996-01-01

    A multi-piece crucible for high temperature applications comprises a tubular side wall member having a lip on the inside surface and a bottom member or members forming a container for containing a melt of a material during a high temperature melt-casting operations. The multi-piece design prevents cracking of the crucible or leakage of the melt from the crucible during the melt-casting operation. The lip of the tubular member supports the bottom member. The contacting surfaces where the lip of the tubular side wall member contacts the bottom member of the multi-piece crucible contains a ceramic sealing material. The ceramic sealing material forms a seal sufficient to prevent the melt of the material from leaking out of the multi-piece crucible during the melt-casting process. The multi-piece crucible is made of a material which is chemically inert to the melt and has structural integrity at the melting point temperature of the melt, or of a material coated with such a material. The multi-piece crucible is contained in a thermal can assembly of a high temperature induction furnace during a high temperature melt-casting operation. One embodiment of the multi-piece crucible comprises a tubular member having a vertical slot filled with a ceramic sealing material to provide expansion of the tubular member without cracking during the high temperature melt-casting operation.

  14. High temperature braided rope seals for static sealing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Michael L.; Olsen, Andrew; Darolia, Ram; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Bartolotta, Paul A.

    1996-01-01

    Achieving efficiency and performance goals of advanced aircraft and industrial systems are leading designers to implement high temperature materials such as ceramics and intermetallics. Generally these advanced materials are applied selectively in the highest temperature sections of the engine system including the combustor and high pressure turbine, amongst others. Thermal strains that result in attaching the low expansion-rate components to high expansion rate superalloy structures can cause significant life reduction in the components. Seals are being designed to both seal and to serve as compliant mounts allowing for relative thermal growths between high temperature but brittle primary structures and the surrounding support structures. Designers require high temperature, low-leakage, compliant seals to mitigate thermal stresses and control parasitic and cooling airflow between structures. NASA is developing high temperature braided rope seals in a variety of configurations to help solve these problems. This paper will describe the types of seals being developed, describe unique test techniques used to assess seal performance, and present leakage flow data under representative pressure, temperature and scrubbing conditions. Feasibility of the braided rope seals for both an industrial tube seal and a turbine vane seal application is also demonstrated.

  15. A shape-memory alloy for high-temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Duerig, T.W.; Albrecht, J.; Gessinger, G.H.

    1982-12-01

    An alloy based on the Cu-Al-Ni ternary system has been developed at the research center of Brown, Boveri and Co., Baden, Switzerland, which provides a fully reversible (two-way) shape memory effect at significantly higher temperatures than those afforded by commercial memory alloys such as NiTi and Cu-Zn-Al. The higher temperature capability of this alloy could open new fields for the application of the shape memory effect, particularly in thermal switching and protection devices. After suitable deformation and processing, a shape change is observed while heating the alloy through the temperature interval from 175 to 190/sup 0/C. This shape change can be completely reversed during subsequent cooling from 155 to 125/sup 0/C. The magnitude of the reversible strain produced by this alloy is 1.5%; somewhat higher strains can be achieved if lower memory temperatures can be accepted, and conversely, better high temperature capabilities can be achieved by accepting smaller reversible strains. The memory effects in this alloy have been found to be unaffected by short overheatings to temperatures as high as 300/sup 0/C.

  16. Industrial applications of low-temperature plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.F.

    1995-06-01

    The application of plasma physics to the manufacturing and processing of materials may be the new frontier of our discipline. Already partially ionized discharges are used in industry, and the performance of plasmas has a large commercial and technological impact. However, the science of low-temperature plasmas is not as well developed as that of high-temperature, collisionless plasmas. In this paper several major areas of application are described and examples of forefront problems in each are given. The underlying thesis is that gas discharges have evolved beyond a black art, and that intellectually challenging problems with elegant solutions can be found. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  17. A homogenized model for solute dispersion in unsaturated double-porosity medium: numerical and experimental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran Ngoc, T.; Lewandowska, J.; Vauclin, M.; Bertin, H.; Gentier, S.

    2009-12-01

    The complex processes of water flow and solute transport occurring in subsurface environment have to be well modeled in order to be able to protect the water aquifers against contamination, for security of nuclear waste depositories or CO2 sequestration, in the problem of extraction of geothermal energy. Since natural geological formations are often heterogeneous at different scales, it leads to preferential flow and transport observed in the breakthrough curves which is difficult to model. In such a case the concept of “double-porosity medium” originally introduced by Barenblatt et al. (1960), can be used. In this paper it was applied to a class of heterogeneous media (aggregated soils, fractured porous rocks) in which a strong contrast in the local pore size characteristics is manifested. It was assumed that the interactions/exchanges between the macro- and micro-porosity are responsible for solute spreading in the local non equilibrium conditions and contribute to the non Fickian behaviour. This study presents a macroscopic dispersion model associated with the unsaturated water flow, which was developped using the asymptotic homogenization method. This model consists of two equations describing the processes of solute transfer in the macro- and micro-porosity domains. A coupling between two concentration fields can be seen in the model, which gives an early breakthrough and a long tail effect. In order to enable the two-scale computations, the model was implemented using the commercial code COMSOL Multiphysics®. A particular strategy was proposed to take into account the micro-macro coupling. Finally, a series of experiments of tracer dispersion in a double-porosity physical model was performed under unsaturated steady-state flow conditions. The double-porosity medium presenting the periodic microstructure was composed of a regular assemblage between sintered clayey spheres and a fine sand. The model validation was carried out in two different stages. In

  18. Laser ultrasonic probe for industrial or high-temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopko, Sandra Nowland

    1998-12-01

    Ultrasonic nondestructive testing is typically used for location and sizing of internal and surface defects or for measuring material properties. Traditional techniques use contacting transducers, which are difficult to implement for on-line quality control or high temperature applications. Because laser ultrasonic (LU) systems are non-contacting, they can be used for testing moving specimens or for operation in hazardous environments. One of the most promising applications for LU inspection systems is high temperature testing. Fundamental LU research was performed to investigate the effects of specimen temperature on the generation and propagation of ultrasound. Results include ambient and elevated temperature measurements of on-epicenter sound pressures and directivity patterns. Numerical modeling for refraction through a temperature gradient is also included. In order to enhance bulk wave generation, a phased array was designed and constructed using optical fiber bundles. Because the fibers are fragile, a fiber containment ring was developed. The phased array can be used with a focusing objective to obtain a variety of beam steering angles. Depending on the application, the system can be calibrated to use either thermoelastic or ablative sources. This work includes the first implementation of an ablative phased array. Results include theoretical analysis of ablative phased arrays and experimentally obtained directivity patterns for thermoelastic, transition and ablation sources. LU inspection systems using optical fiber delivery are highly versatile. Introduction of a distal-end, focusing objective into the optical fiber delivery system increases the allowable working distance between the optical fiber(s) and test specimen. The focusing objective permits strong generation, using material ablation as the generating mechanism. This work includes the design and testing of two focusing objectives. Results include experimentally obtained directivity patterns

  19. A facility for precise temperature control applications in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Lograsso, T. A.; Tirmizi, S. H.; Hahn, R. C.; Winsa, E.

    The general design, main components, and operation of the isothermal dendritic growth apparatus (IDGA) designed for microgravity experimentation are described. The four major subsystems of the IDGA are a temperature controlled thermostatic bath capable of milli-kelvin stability, a photographic data collection system, a crystal growth chamber, and a growth detection system to initiate data collection. Some of the specific experiments that could utilize the capabilities of the IDGA are dendritic growth in alloys, monotectic systems, life science experiments, and technological applications.

  20. Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application

    DOEpatents

    Chan, Kwai S.; Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry; Liang, Wuwei

    2012-07-31

    The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

  1. Development of high temperature superconductors for electric power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schiff, N.

    1995-09-01

    The Nobel Prize-winning discovery in 1986 of a new family of superconductors that exhibited the property of no resistance at temperatures more than ten times greater than the traditional low temperature superconductors (LTS) currently used in MRI and high field magnets, made it possible to foresee a new era for the production, transmission and distribution of electrical power. Smaller, more efficient motors, generators, power cables, transformers, inductors, and superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) for power quality were applications immediately envisioned for these high temperature superconductors (HTS), promising enhanced capabilities and lower costs. Work also began on new product concepts, such as more effective fault current limiters for both transmission and distribution systems that could protect expensive hardware and avoid the cost of upgrading circuit breakers as system capacity is increased. The interest of industry and utilities has been increased by successful demonstrations of small-scale prototypes. Recent demonstrations include a one meter conductor for an underground transmission cable produced by American Superconductor which carried over 4,200 amps, a 5 hp synchronous motor produced by Reliance Electric Company, magnet systems which generated over 2 Tesla at temperatures over 20 Kelvin (K) by both American Superconductor Corporation (ASC) and Sumitomo Electric Industries. The Department of Energy, under the Superconductivity Partnership Initiative Program (SPI), recently funded four application development projects: a 100 hp HTS motor demonstration, design of a generator rotor, a fault current limiter for distribution systems, and a 30 meter HTS power transmission cable. This paper will review the progress in application development of HTS products. The specific benefits and costs associated with this technology in power applications will be examined.

  2. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Crystals for Acoustic Wave Sensor Applications.

    PubMed

    Zu, Hongfei; Wu, Huiyan; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2016-03-01

    In this review paper, nine different types of high-temperature piezoelectric crystals and their sensor applications are overviewed. The important materials' properties of these piezoelectric crystals including dielectric constant, elastic coefficients, piezoelectric coefficients, electromechanical coupling coefficients, and mechanical quality factor are discussed in detail. The determination methods of these physical properties are also presented. Moreover, the growth methods, structures, and properties of these piezoelectric crystals are summarized and compared. Of particular interest are langasite and oxyborate crystals, which exhibit no phase transitions prior to their melting points ∼ 1500 °C and possess high electrical resistivity, piezoelectric coefficients, and mechanical quality factor at ultrahigh temperature ( ∼ 1000 °C). Finally, some research results on surface acoustic wave (SAW) and bulk acoustic wave (BAW) sensors developed using this high-temperature piezoelectric crystals are discussed.

  3. Recent advances in high temperature instrumentation for hot section applications

    SciTech Connect

    Englund, D.R.; Seasholtz, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Programs to develop research instrumentation for use in turbine engine hot sections are described. These programs were initiated to provide improved measurements capability as support for a multidisciplinary effort to establish technolgy leading to improved hot section durability. Specific measurement systems described here include heat flux sensors, a dynamic gas temperature measuring system, laser anemometry for hot section applications, an optical system for viewing the interior of a combustor during operation, thin film sensors for surface temperature and strain measurements, and high temperature strain measuring systems. The paper describes the state of the development of these sensors and measuring systems and, in some cases, will show examples of measurements made with this instrumentation.The paper covers work done at the NASA Lewis Research Center and at various contract and grant facilities.

  4. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Crystals for Acoustic Wave Sensor Applications.

    PubMed

    Zu, Hongfei; Wu, Huiyan; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2016-03-01

    In this review paper, nine different types of high-temperature piezoelectric crystals and their sensor applications are overviewed. The important materials' properties of these piezoelectric crystals including dielectric constant, elastic coefficients, piezoelectric coefficients, electromechanical coupling coefficients, and mechanical quality factor are discussed in detail. The determination methods of these physical properties are also presented. Moreover, the growth methods, structures, and properties of these piezoelectric crystals are summarized and compared. Of particular interest are langasite and oxyborate crystals, which exhibit no phase transitions prior to their melting points ∼ 1500 °C and possess high electrical resistivity, piezoelectric coefficients, and mechanical quality factor at ultrahigh temperature ( ∼ 1000 °C). Finally, some research results on surface acoustic wave (SAW) and bulk acoustic wave (BAW) sensors developed using this high-temperature piezoelectric crystals are discussed. PMID:26886982

  5. Ultra-miniature wireless temperature sensor for thermal medicine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairi, Ahmad; Hung, Shih-Chang; Paramesh, Jeyanandh; Fedder, Gary; Rabin, Yoed

    2011-03-01

    This study presents a prototype design of an ultra-miniature, wireless, battery-less, and implantable temperature-sensor, with applications to thermal medicine such as cryosurgery, hyperthermia, and thermal ablation. The design aims at a sensory device smaller than 1.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length, to enable minimally invasive deployment through a hypodermic needle. While the new device may be used for local temperature monitoring, simultaneous data collection from an array of such sensors can be used to reconstruct the 3D temperature field in the treated area, offering a unique capability in thermal medicine. The new sensory device consists of three major subsystems: a temperature-sensing core, a wireless data-communication unit, and a wireless power reception and management unit. Power is delivered wirelessly to the implant from an external source using an inductive link. To meet size requirements while enhancing reliability and minimizing cost, the implant is fully integrated in a regular foundry CMOS technology (0.15 μm in the current study), including the implant-side inductor of the power link. A temperature-sensing core that consists of a proportional-to-absolute-temperature (PTAT) circuit has been designed and characterized. It employs a microwatt chopper stabilized op-amp and dynamic element-matched current sources to achieve high absolute accuracy. A second order sigma-delta (Σ-Δ) analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is designed to convert the temperature reading to a digital code, which is transmitted by backscatter through the same antenna used for receiving power. A high-efficiency multi-stage differential CMOS rectifier has been designed to provide a DC supply to the sensing and communication subsystems. This paper focuses on the development of the all-CMOS temperature sensing core circuitry part of the device, and briefly reviews the wireless power delivery and communication subsystems.

  6. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project.

  7. Wave propagation in anisotropic medium due to an oscillatory point source with application to unidirectional composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Marques, E. R. C.; Lee, S. S.

    1986-01-01

    The far-field displacements in an infinite transversely isotropic elastic medium subjected to an oscillatory concentrated force are derived. The concepts of velocity surface, slowness surface and wave surface are used to describe the geometry of the wave propagation process. It is shown that the decay of the wave amplitudes depends not only on the distance from the source (as in isotropic media) but also depends on the direction of the point of interest from the source. As an example, the displacement field is computed for a laboratory fabricated unidirectional fiberglass epoxy composite. The solution for the displacements is expressed as an amplitude distribution and is presented in polar diagrams. This analysis has potential usefulness in the acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of composite materials. For example, the transient localized disturbances which are generally associated with AE sources can be modeled via this analysis. In which case, knowledge of the displacement field which arrives at a receiving transducer allows inferences regarding the strength and orientation of the source, and consequently perhaps the degree of damage within the composite.

  8. Development, Application, and Validation of Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory Models of Porous Medium Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. T.; Gray, W. G.; McClure, J. E.; Dye, A. L.; Weigand, T. M.; Hauswirth, S.; Schultz, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    The thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) has been developed over the last decade as a rigorous, formal method of deriving mechanistic mathematical models that describe a wide range of porous medium systems. TCAT models are consistent across length scales and provide explicit linkages between important physics known to be operative at the microscale and larger scale models. This produces a straightforward mechanism to evaluate macroscale quantities based on information generated from microscale simulations or experiments as way to inform model development. TCAT models inherently include interface, common curve, and common point properties in models that admit such entities. Elements of the TCAT theory are discussed, model hierarchies are derived and summarized, and specific aspects of TCAT models are examined in detail. Comparisons of TCAT model constructs with both experimental data and high-resolution microscale simulations illustrate that, contrary to common belief, virtually all capillary pressure vs. saturation data that is available for two-fluid-phase systems is not equilibrium data. Agreement between theory and observation for TCAT models is demonstrated, and aspects of the models posed are validated.

  9. Response of methanotrophic activity and community structure to temperature changes in a diffusive CH/O counter gradient in an unsaturated porous medium.

    PubMed

    Urmann, Karina; Lazzaro, Anna; Gandolfi, Isabella; Schroth, Martin H; Zeyer, Josef

    2009-08-01

    Microbial methane oxidation is a key process in the global methane cycle. In the context of global warming, it is important to understand the responses of the methane-oxidizing microbial community to temperature changes in terms of community structure and activity. We studied microbial methane oxidation in a laboratory-column system in which a diffusive CH(4)/O(2) counter gradient was maintained in an unsaturated porous medium at temperatures between 4 and 20 degrees C. Methane oxidation was highly efficient at all temperatures, as on average 99 +/- 0.5% of methane supplied to the system was oxidized. The methanotrophic community that established in the model system after initial inoculation appeared to be able to adapt quickly to different temperatures, as methane emissions remained low even after the system was subjected to abrupt temperature changes. FISH showed that Type I as well as Type II methanotrophs were probably responsible for the observed activity in the column system, with a dominance of Type I methanotrophs. Cloning and sequencing suggested that Type I methanotrophs were represented by the genus Methylobacter while Type II were represented by Methylocystis. The results suggest that in an unsaturated system with diffusive substrate supply, direct effects of temperature on apparent methanotrophic activity and community may be of minor importance. However, this remains to be verified in the field.

  10. Microstructure Evolution and Corrosion Property of Medium-Carbon Alloy Steel after High-Temperature Carburization Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewei, Deng; Tingting, Niu; Haiying, Liu; Lin, Zhang; Qi, Sun

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the effects of carburization treatment on the microstructure and corrosion property of medium-carbon steels (40Cr) were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe analyzer (EMPA), optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and electrochemical corrosion, respectively. It was found that the microstructures beneath the surface were refined and a smooth transition microstructure from the surface to the core was observed in carburized samples. The fine plate-like but not granular carbide precipitation (Cr7C3) was observed in carburized sample by heat-treatment. The carburized specimens exhibited some effectiveness in the improvement of hardness and a smooth transition hardness profile. Corrosion resistance of 40Cr was improved by carburization treatment, resulting in the higher self-corrosion potential and the lower self-corrosion current density.

  11. Ultrasonic thermometry simulation in a random fluctuating medium: Evidence of the acoustic signature of a one-percent temperature difference.

    PubMed

    Nagaso, M; Moysan, J; Benjeddou, S; Massacret, N; Ploix, M A; Komatitsch, D; Lhuillier, C

    2016-05-01

    We study the development potential of ultrasonic thermometry in a liquid fluctuating sodium environment similar to that present in a Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor, and thus investigate if and how ultrasonic thermometry could be used to monitor the sodium flow at the outlet of the reactor core. In particular we study if small temperature variations in the sodium flow of e.g. about 1% of the sodium temperature, i.e., about 5°C, can have a reliably-measurable acoustic signature. Since to our knowledge no experimental setups are available for such a study, and considering the practical difficulties of experimentation in sodium, we resort to a numerical technique for full wave propagation called the spectral-element method, which is a highly accurate finite-element method owing to the high-degree basis functions it uses. We obtain clear time-of-flight variations in the case of a small temperature difference of one percent in the case of a static temperature gradient as well as in the presence of a random fluctuation of the temperature field in the turbulent flow. The numerical simulations underline the potential of ultrasonic thermometry in such a context. PMID:26921558

  12. Improvement of Surface Temperature Prediction Using SVR with MOGREPS Data for Short and Medium range over South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S. J.; Choi, R. K.; Ahn, K. D.; Ha, J. C.; Cho, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    As the Korea Meteorology Administration (KMA) has operated Met Office Global and Regional Ensemble Prediction System (MOGREPS) with introduction of Unified Model (UM), many attempts have been made to improve predictability in temperature forecast in last years. In this study, post-processing method of MOGREPS for surface temperature prediction is developed with machine learning over 52 locations in South Korea. Past 60-day lag time was used as a training phase of Support Vector Regression (SVR) method for surface temperature forecast model. The selected inputs for SVR are followings: date and surface temperatures from Numerical Weather prediction (NWP), such as GDAPS, individual 24 ensemble members, mean and median of ensemble members for every 3hours for 12 days.To verify the reliability of SVR-based ensemble prediction (SVR-EP), 93 days are used (from March 1 to May 31, 2014). The result yielded improvement of SVR-EP by RMSE value of 16 % throughout entire prediction period against conventional ensemble prediction (EP). In particular, short range predictability of SVR-EP resulted in 18.7% better RMSE for 1~3 day forecast. The mean temperature bias between SVR-EP and EP at all test locations showed around 0.36°C and 1.36°C, respectively. SVR-EP is currently extending for more vigorous sensitivity test, such as increasing training phase and optimizing machine learning model.

  13. Magnetic field amplification and evolution in turbulent collisionless magnetohydrodynamics: An application to the intracluster medium

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Lima, R.; De Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Kowal, G.; Falceta-Gonçalves, D.; Lazarian, A.; Nakwacki, M. S.

    2014-02-01

    The amplification of magnetic fields (MFs) in the intracluster medium (ICM) is attributed to turbulent dynamo (TD) action, which is generally derived in the collisional-MHD framework. However, this assumption is poorly justified a priori, since in the ICM the ion mean free path between collisions is of the order of the dynamical scales, thus requiring a collisionless MHD description. The present study uses an anisotropic plasma pressure that brings the plasma within a parametric space where collisionless instabilities take place. In this model, a relaxation term of the pressure anisotropy simulates the feedback of the mirror and firehose instabilities, in consistency with empirical studies. Our three-dimensional numerical simulations of forced transonic turbulence, aiming the modeling of the turbulent ICM, were performed for different initial values of the MF intensity and different relaxation rates of the pressure anisotropy. We found that in the high-β plasma regime corresponding to the ICM conditions, a fast anisotropy relaxation rate gives results that are similar to the collisional-MHD model, as far as the statistical properties of the turbulence are concerned. Also, the TD amplification of seed MFs was found to be similar to the collisional-MHD model. The simulations that do not employ the anisotropy relaxation deviate significantly from the collisional-MHD results and show more power at the small-scale fluctuations of both density and velocity as a result of the action of the instabilities. For these simulations, the large-scale fluctuations in the MF are mostly suppressed and the TD fails in amplifying seed MFs.

  14. Turbine-engine applications of thermographic-phosphor temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, B.W.; Turley, W.D.; Allison, S.W.

    1995-12-31

    The thermographic-phosphor (TP) method can measure temperature, heat flux, strain, and other physical quantities remotely in hostile and/or inaccessible environments such as the first-stage turbine components in turbine engines. It is especially useful in situations in which no other known method works well. This paper is a brief review of engine tests that demonstrated the utility of the TP method. For the most part, the results presented here are discussed only qualitatively. The papers in the bibliography describe these and other experiments and results in detail. The first viewgraph summarizes the many desirable features of the TP method. The second viewgraph describes TPs, and the third summarizes how the TP method works. To measure single-point temperatures in turbine-engine applications, we use the decay-time method, which depends on the fact that the luminescence following an impulse of ultraviolet excitation decays, with a characteristic decay time that. Is a monotonically decreasing function of temperature over some range of temperatures. The viewgraph is a set of calibration curves showing the behavior of some useful emission lines for ten important TPs. Consider Lu PO{sub 4}:Eu as an example. Below the {open_quotes}quenching{close_quotes} temperature near 900 Y, the decay time is nearly constant. Above it, the decay time decreases exponentially with the temperature. This strong functional dependence means that one can have a fairly large error in the lifetime measurement, as in environments with poor signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), yet still obtain high accuracy in the temperature measurement. Our more-recent data up to 1900 K show the same behavior.

  15. Applicability of sediment transport models to evaluate medium term evolution of tidal inlet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, A.; Williams, J. J.; Ferreira, Ó.; Garel, E.; Reynolds, S.

    2011-11-01

    This paper derives local formulae to estimate bed roughness and suspended transport and present a method to calculate net sediment transport at tidal inlet systems, combining field data and a range of well established empirical formulations. To accomplish this, measurements spanning a spring-tidal cycle of mean water levels, waves, near-bed flow turbulence and bed forms were obtained from the Ancão Inlet, Ria Formosa lagoon system, Portugal. High-resolution hydrodynamic data were gathered using acoustic equipments and by measuring sediment properties (grain-size diameter and bed form dimensions) under fair-weather conditions. The results compared favourably with available direct and indirect field observations of sediment transport rates. The approach appears to be robust and widely applicable and so can be applied to the same conditions in any tidal inlet system. This is of particular importance when attempting to understand sediment transport at inlet mouths, and has practical applications in a range of coastal engineering and coastal management areas concerned with navigation safety, coastal erosion, ecosystem health and water quality. The study discusses the applicability of the method on evaluating system flushing capacity, giving important insights on multiple inlet evolution, particularly with regard to their persistence through time. The methodological framework can be applied to assess the long-term stability of single- and multiple-inlet systems, provided that estimates of sediment storage at ebb-tidal deltas are available and sediment transport estimates during storm events are statistically considered.

  16. Assessment of microelectronics packaging for high temperature, high reliability applications

    SciTech Connect

    Uribe, F.

    1997-04-01

    This report details characterization and development activities in electronic packaging for high temperature applications. This project was conducted through a Department of Energy sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between Sandia National Laboratories and General Motors. Even though the target application of this collaborative effort is an automotive electronic throttle control system which would be located in the engine compartment, results of this work are directly applicable to Sandia`s national security mission. The component count associated with the throttle control dictates the use of high density packaging not offered by conventional surface mount. An enabling packaging technology was selected and thermal models defined which characterized the thermal and mechanical response of the throttle control module. These models were used to optimize thick film multichip module design, characterize the thermal signatures of the electronic components inside the module, and to determine the temperature field and resulting thermal stresses under conditions that may be encountered during the operational life of the throttle control module. Because the need to use unpackaged devices limits the level of testing that can be performed either at the wafer level or as individual dice, an approach to assure a high level of reliability of the unpackaged components was formulated. Component assembly and interconnect technologies were also evaluated and characterized for high temperature applications. Electrical, mechanical and chemical characterizations of enabling die and component attach technologies were performed. Additionally, studies were conducted to assess the performance and reliability of gold and aluminum wire bonding to thick film conductor inks. Kinetic models were developed and validated to estimate wire bond reliability.

  17. GREENER AND RAPID ACCESS TO BIO-ACTIVE HETEROCYCLES: ROOM TEMPERATURE SYNTHESIS OF PYRAZOLES AND DIAZEPINES IN AQUEOUS MEDIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    An expeditious room temperature synthesis of pyrazoles and diazepines by condensation of hydrazines/hydrazides and diamines with various 1,3-diketones is described. This greener protocol was catalyzed by polystyrene supported sulfonic acid (PSSA) and proceeded efficiently in wate...

  18. Long-Term Formaldehyde Emissions from Medium-Density Fiberboard in a Full-Scale Experimental Room: Emission Characteristics and the Effects of Temperature and Humidity.

    PubMed

    Liang, Weihui; Yang, Shen; Yang, Xudong

    2015-09-01

    We studied formaldehyde emissions from the medium-density fiberboard (MDF) in a full-scale experimental room to approximate emissions in actual buildings. Detailed indoor formaldehyde concentrations and temperature and humidity data were obtained for about 29 months. Temperature, relative humidity (RH), and absolute humidity (AH) ranged over -10.9-31.4 °C, 46.5-83.6%, and 1.1-23.1 g/kgair, respectively. Annual cyclical seasonal variations were observed for indoor formaldehyde concentrations and emission rates, exhibiting entirely different characteristics than those in an environmental chamber under constant environmental conditions. The maximum concentration occurred in summer rather than at initial introduction of the material. The concentrations in summer could be a few up to 20 times higher than that in winter, depending on the indoor temperature and humidity conditions. Concentrations decreased by 20-65% in corresponding months of the second year. Indoor formaldehyde concentrations were positively correlated with temperature and AH but were poorly correlated with RH. The combined effects of temperature and AH on formaldehyde emissions from MDF in actual buildings were verified. These detailed long-term experimental results could be used with environmental chamber measurement data to scale up and validate emission models from chambers held at constant conditions to actual buildings.

  19. Effect of temperature on the shape of spatial quasi-periodic oscillations of the refractive index of alkali atoms in an optically dense medium with a closed excitation contour of Δ type

    SciTech Connect

    Barantsev, K A; Litvinov, A N

    2014-10-31

    A theory of a closed excitation contour (Δ system) of a three-level atom in an optically dense medium is constructed with allowance for temperature. The spatial quasi-periodic oscillations of the refractive index in the system under study are shown to damp with increasing temperature. The range of temperatures at which these oscillations are most pronounced is found. (quantum optics)

  20. Oxidation of Palladium-Chromium Alloys for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piltch, Nancy D.; Jih-Fen, Lei; Zeller, Mary V.

    1994-01-01

    An alloy consisting of Pd with 13 wt % Cr is a promising material for high temperature applications. High temperature performance is degraded by the oxidation of the material, which is more severe in the fine wires and thin films used for sensor applications than in the bulk. The present study was undertaken to improve our understanding of the physical and chemical changes occurring at these temperatures and to identify approaches to limit oxidation of the alloy. The alloy was studied in both ribbon and wire forms. Ribbon samples were chosen to examine the role of grain boundaries in the oxidation process because of the convenience of handling for the oxidation studies. Wire samples 25 microns in diameter which are used in resistance strain gages were studied to correlate chemical properties with observed electrical, physical, and structural properties. Overcoating the material with a metallic Cr film did prevent the segregation of Pd to the surface; however, it did not eliminate the oxidation of the alloy.

  1. Comparative study of LiMn 2O 4 thin film cathode grown at high, medium and low temperatures by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, S. B.; Lai, M. O.; Lu, L.; Tripathy, S.

    2006-12-01

    LiMn 2O 4 thin films with different crystallizations were respectively grown at high, medium and low temperatures by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Structures, morphologies and electrochemical properties of these three types of thin films were comparatively studied. Films grown at high temperature (⩾873 K) possessed flat and smooth surfaces and were highly crystallized with different textures and crystal sizes depending on the deposition pressure of oxygen. However, films deposited at low temperature (473 K) had rough surfaces with amorphous characteristics. At medium temperature (673 K), the film was found to consist mainly of nano-crystals less than 100 nm with relatively loose and rough surfaces, but very dense as observed from the cross-section. The film deposited at 873 K and 100 mTorr of oxygen showed an initial discharge capacity of 54.3 μAh/cm 2 μm and decayed at 0.28% per cycle, while the amorphous film had an initial discharge capacity of 20.2 μAh/cm 2 μm and a loss rate of 0.29% per cycle. Compared with the highly crystallized and the amorphous films, nano-crystalline film exhibited higher potential, more capacity and much better cycling stability. As high as 61 μAh/cm 2 μm of discharge capacity can be achieved with an average decaying rate of only 0.032% per cycle up to 500 cycles. The excellent performance of nano-crystalline film was correlated to its microstructures in the present study.

  2. Accelerated Stress Testing of Hydrocarbon-Based Encapsulants for Medium-Concentration CPV Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M. D.; Moricone, T. J.; Kilkenny, M.; Zhang, J. Z.

    2011-02-01

    Concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems have great potential to reduce photovoltaic (PV) electricity costs because of the relatively low cost of optical components as compared to PV cells. A transparent polymeric material is used to optically couple the PV cell to optical components and is thus exposed to the concentrated light source at elevated temperatures. In this work polymeric encapsulant materials are positioned close to a Xenon arc lamp to expose them to ultraviolet radiation (UV) that is about 42 times as intense as sunlight. Furthermore, different glass types are used as filters to modify the spectral distribution of light in the UV range. A strong sensitivity of non-silicone-based encapsulants to light below ~350 nm is demonstrated. Of all the materials examined in this study, the polydimethyl silicone samples performed the best. The next best material was an ionomer which maintained optical transmission but became photo-oxidized where exposed to the atmosphere.

  3. Electronic Components for use in Extreme Temperature Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Electrical power management and control systems designed for use in planetary exploration missions and deep space probes require electronics that are capable of efficient and reliable operation under extreme temperature conditions. Space-based infra-red satellites, all-electric ships, jet engines, electromagnetic launchers, magnetic levitation transport systems, and power facilities are also typical examples where the electronics are expected to be exposed to harsh temperatures and to operate under severe thermal swings. Most commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) devices are not designed to function under such extreme conditions and, therefore, new parts must be developed or the conventional devices need to be modified. For example, spacecraft operating in the cold environment of deep space carry a large number of radioisotope heating units in order to maintain the surrounding temperature of the on-board electronics at approximately 20 C. At the other end, built-in radiators and coolers render the operation of electronics possible under hot conditions. These thermal measures lead to design complexity, affect development costs, and increase size and weight. Electronics capable of operation at extreme temperatures, thus, will not only tolerate the hostile operational environment, but also make the overall system efficient, more reliable, and less expensive. The Extreme Temperature Electronics Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on research and development of electronics suitable for applications in the aerospace environment and deep space exploration missions. Research is being conducted on devices, including COTS parts, for potential use under extreme temperatures. These components include semiconductor switching devices, passive devices, DC/DC converters, operational amplifiers, and oscillators. An overview of the program will be presented along with some experimental findings.

  4. Temperature-compensated miniature cylinder pressure sensor for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlodarczyk, Marek T.

    2004-03-01

    The 1.7 mm diameter pressure sensor utilizes the principle of light intensity changes, transmitted by two optical fibers, upon reflection from a specially shaped, metal diaphragm deflecting under the effect of pressure. In an ultra low-cost and durable design suitable for automotive applications the sensor compensates for all major temperature effects encountered in combustion engines. The auto-referencing function performed by the sensor"s signal conditioner compensates for the temperature induced LED, photodiode, and fiber-to-opto-electronics coupling errors, sensor thermal drift, as well as fiber bending related light intensity changes. The direct bonding of optical fibers to the photodiode and LED chips results in minimum thermal errors and high part-to-part consistency. Sensor head materials and dimensions are optimized to compensate for the sensitivity changes associated with the diaphragm"s Young"s modulus temperature dependence. The miniature signal conditioner, based on an LED-photodiode transceiver and an ASIC, can be integrated within an automotive connector or a package small enough to fit inside the engine head. Over the signal conditioner temperature range of -40°C to 150°C and the sensor head continuous range of -40°C to 300°C a typical total accuracy of 1-2% is achieved.

  5. Self-lubricating coatings for high-temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1987-01-01

    Some present-day aeropropulsion systems impose severe demands on the thermal and oxidative stability of lubricant, bearing, and seal materials. These demands will be much more severe for operational systems around the turn of the century. Solid lubricants with maximum temperature capabilities of about 1100 C are known. Unfortunately, none of the solid lubricants with the highest temperature capabilities are effective below approximately 400 C. However, research shows that silver and stable fluorides, such as calcium and barium fluoride act synergistically to provide lubrication from below room temperature to approximately 900 C. Plasma-sprayed, self-lubricating composite coatings that were developed at Lewis are described. Background information is given on coatings, designed as PS100 and PS101, that contain the solid lubricants in a Nichrome matrix. These coatings have low friction coefficients over a wide temperature range, but they have inadequate wear resistance for some long-duration applications. Wear resistance was dramatically improved in a recently developed coating PS200, by replacing the Nichrome matrix material with metal-bonded chromium carbide containing dispersed silver and calcium fluoride/barium fluoride eutectic (CaF2/BaF2). The lubricants control friction and the carbide matrix provides excellent wear resistance. Successful tests of these coatings are discussed.

  6. Temperature and heat flux measurements: Challenges for high temperature aerospace application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Richard D.

    1992-01-01

    The measurement of high temperatures and the influence of heat transfer data is not strictly a problem of either the high temperatures involved or the level of the heating rates to be measured at those high temperatures. It is a problem of duration during which measurements are made and the nature of the materials in which the measurements are made. Thermal measurement techniques for each application must respect and work with the unique features of that application. Six challenges in the development of measurement technology are discussed: (1) to capture the character and localized peak values within highly nonuniform heating regions; (2) to manage large volumes of thermal instrumentation in order to efficiently derive critical information; (3) to accommodate thermal sensors into practical flight structures; (4) to broaden the capabilities of thermal survey techniques to replace discrete gages in flight and on the ground; (5) to provide supporting instrumentation conduits which connect the measurement points to the thermally controlled data acquisition system; and (6) to develop a class of 'vehicle tending' thermal sensors to assure the integrity of flight vehicles in an efficient manner.

  7. High-Temperature Strain Sensing for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piazza, Anthony; Richards, Lance W.; Hudson, Larry D.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal protection systems (TPS) and hot structures are utilizing advanced materials that operate at temperatures that exceed abilities to measure structural performance. Robust strain sensors that operate accurately and reliably beyond 1800 F are needed but do not exist. These shortcomings hinder the ability to validate analysis and modeling techniques and hinders the ability to optimize structural designs. This presentation examines high-temperature strain sensing for aerospace applications and, more specifically, seeks to provide strain data for validating finite element models and thermal-structural analyses. Efforts have been made to develop sensor attachment techniques for relevant structural materials at the small test specimen level and to perform laboratory tests to characterize sensor and generate corrections to apply to indicated strains. Areas highlighted in this presentation include sensors, sensor attachment techniques, laboratory evaluation/characterization of strain measurement, and sensor use in large-scale structures.

  8. Unified constitutive models for high-temperature structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, U. S.; Chan, K. S.; Bodner, S. R.; Weber, R. M.; Walker, K. P.

    1988-01-01

    Unified constitutive models are characterized by the use of a single inelastic strain rate term for treating all aspects of inelastic deformation, including plasticity, creep, and stress relaxation under monotonic or cyclic loading. The structure of this class of constitutive theory pertinent for high temperature structural applications is first outlined and discussed. The effectiveness of the unified approach for representing high temperature deformation of Ni-base alloys is then evaluated by extensive comparison of experimental data and predictions of the Bodner-Partom and the Walker models. The use of the unified approach for hot section structural component analyses is demonstrated by applying the Walker model in finite element analyses of a benchmark notch problem and a turbine blade problem.

  9. Design and application of feedback-sustained target waves in excitable medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ningjie; Chen, Jiangxing; Gao, Hongjun; Ying, Heping

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a formulas of rational ratios between the frequency of external stimulus and its paced target waves, considering the existence of the absolute refractory period and the relative refractory period. Based on this, we design a self-sustained high-frequency target waves by feeding back few periphery field points to the center to responsibly play the role of source for pacemaker. Such constructed target waves, to all appearances, are shown as a repetition of their initial condition. We explore further in application that those feedback-sustained targets can eliminate both a freely rotating spiral waves and a pinned ones only if frequencies, feedback lengths and radius of obstacles are appropriately chosen. After feedback stimuli are removed, the system eventually returns to the rest state.

  10. Fast high-temperature superconductor switch for high current applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav F.; Li, Qiang

    2013-07-01

    Reversible operation of a high current superconductor switch based on the quench of high-resistance second generation high temperature superconducting wire is demonstrated. The quench is induced by a burst of an ac field generated by an inductively coupled radio-frequency coil. The switch makes a superconducting-to-normal transition within 5 ms and also has a rapid recovery to the superconducting state. The device has potential applications as an active current limiter or as a storage switch for superconducting magnetic energy storage systems. Operation in a full flux penetration/flow regime can effectively minimize the detrimental effects of the intrinsic conductor non-uniformity.

  11. Dust Accelerators And Their Applications In High-Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ticos, Catalin M.; Wang Zhehui

    2011-06-01

    The perennial presence of dust in high-temperature plasma and fusion devices has been firmly established. Dust inventory must be controlled, in particular in the next-generation steady-state fusion machines like ITER, as it can pose significant safety hazards and potentially interfere with fusion energy production. Although much effort has been devoted to getting rid of the dust nuisance, there are instances where a controlled use of dust can be beneficial. We have recognized a number of dust-accelerators applications in magnetic fusion, including in plasma diagnostics, in studying dust-plasma interactions, and more recently in edge localized mode (ELM)'s pacing. With the applications in mind, we will compare various acceleration methods, including electrostatic, gas-drag, and plasma-drag acceleration. We will also describe laboratory experiments and results on dust acceleration.

  12. The Low-temperature Ion Sulfurizing Technology and its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, G. Z.; Xu, B. S.; Wang, H. D.; Li, G. L.; Zhang, S.

    A solid lubrication film mainly consists of FeS, which has excellent tribology properties, can be formed on the sulfurized iron or steel surface. The sulfurizing technology has aroused intense attention from the day it appeared. However, the widespread industrial application of sulfurizing technology was promoted by the low-temperature ion sulfurizing (LTIS) process. This paper summarized the phylogeny and sorts of sulfurizing technology firstly; then, the process flow of LTIS technology, the forming mechanism, microstructure and tribological properties of ion sulfurized layer were introduced detailedly; and then, the technological, economic and environmental merits of LTIS technology were generalized; finally, the industrial applications of LTIS technology in various typical rolling, sliding and heavy duty parts were reviewed briefly. LTIS technology, with the advantages of high sulfurizing speed, good performance of sulfurized layer and without sideeffect, has played an important role in the tribology modification of ferrous parts, and the LTIS process will become more green, simple and efficient in the future.

  13. Dust accelerators and their applications in high-temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Ticos, Catakin M

    2010-01-01

    The perennial presence of dust in high-temperature plasma and fusion devices has been firmly established. Dust inventory must be controlled, in particular in the next-generation steady-state fusion machines like ITER, as it can pose significant safety hazards and potentially interfere with fusion energy production. Much effort has been devoted to gening rid of the dust nuisance. We have recognized a number of dust-accelerators applications in magnetic fusion, including in plasma diagnostics, in studying dust-plasma interactions, and more recently in edge localized mode (ELM)'s pacing. With the applications in mind, we will compare various acceleration methods, including electrostatic, gas-drag, and plasma-drag acceleration. We will also describe laboratory experiments and results on dust acceleration.

  14. Difference in the conditions and characteristics of evaporation of inhomogeneous water drops in a high-temperature gaseous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskunov, M. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2016-09-01

    The evaporation of water drops of initial mass 5-15 mg on a stationary graphite substrate, as well as inhomogeneous drops with solitary solid inclusions, during heating by high-temperature combustion products has been investigated experimentally. Experiments have also been carried out with analogous inhomogeneous drops moving through combustion products. The possibility of two mechanisms of phase transformations of inhomogeneous liquid drops has been established. The scales of the effect of the area of the inclusion surface (up to 20%) and the initial mass of water (up to 90%) on the characteristics of the evaporation of inhomogeneous drops have been determined.

  15. Electrodeposition of Sn-Ni Alloy Coatings for Water-Splitting Application from Alkaline Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Sandhya; Hegde, A. Chitharanjan

    2016-09-01

    In this work, Sn-Ni alloy coatings were developed onto the surface of copper from a newly formulated electrolytic bath by a simple and cost-effective electrodeposition technique using gelatin as an additive. The electrocatalytic behavior of coatings deposited at different current densities (c.d.'s) for water-splitting applications, in terms of hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER), has been researched. The experimental results showed that the electrocatalytic activity of Sn-Ni coatings has a close relationship with its composition, surface morphology, and phase structure depending on the c.d. used, supported by scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. Cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiometry techniques have demonstrated that Sn-Ni alloy deposited at 4.0 A dm-2 (having 37.6 wt pct Ni) and 1.0 A dm-2 (having 19.6 wt pct Ni) exhibit, respectively, the highest electrocatalytic behavior for HER and OER in 1.0-M KOH solution. Sn-Ni alloy coatings were found to be stable under working conditions of electrolysis, confirmed by electrochemical corrosion tests. High electrocatalytic activity of Sn-Ni alloy coatings for both HER and OER is specific to their composition, surface morphology, and active surface area.

  16. Implementation Challenges for Ceramic Matrix Composites in High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are leading candidate materials for a number of applications in aeronautics, space, energy, electronics, nuclear, and transportation industries. In the aeronautics and space exploration systems, these materials are being considered for applications in hot sections of jet engines such as the combustor liner, nozzle components, nose cones, leading edges of reentry vehicles and space propulsion components. Applications in the energy and environmental industries include radiant heater tubes, heat exchangers, heat recuperators, gas and diesel particulate filters (DPFs), and components for land based turbines for power generation. These materials are also being considered for use in the first wall and blanket components of fusion reactors. There are a number of critical issues and challenges related to successful implementation of composite materials. Fabrication of net and complex shape components with high density and tailorable matrix properties is quite expensive, and even then various desirable properties are not achievable. In this presentation, microstructure and thermomechanical properties of composites fabricated by two techniques (chemical vapor infiltration and melt infiltration), will be presented. In addition, critical need for robust joining and assembly technologies in successful implementation of these systems will be discussed. Other implementation issues will be discussed along with advantages and benefits of using these materials for various components in high temperature applications.

  17. Exceptional damage-tolerance of a medium-entropy alloy CrCoNi at cryogenic temperatures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gludovatz, Bernd; Hohenwarter, Anton; Thurston, Keli V. S.; Bei, Hongbin; Wu, Zhenggang; George, Easo P.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2016-02-02

    The high-entropy alloys are an intriguing new class of metallic materials that derive their properties not from a single dominant constituent, such as iron in steels, nor from the presence of a second phase, such as in nickel-base superalloys, but rather comprise multi-element systems that crystallize as a single phase, despite containing high concentrations (~20 at.%) of five or more elements with different crystal structures. Indeed, we have recently reported on one such single-phase high-entropy alloy, NiCoCrFeMn, which displays exceptional strength and toughness at cryogenic temperatures. Here which displays unprecedented strength-toughness properties that exceed those of all high-entropy alloys andmore » most multi-phase alloys. With roomtemperature tensile strengths of almost 1 GPa and KJIc fracture-toughness values above 200 MPa.m 1/2 (with crack-growth toughnesses exceeding 300 MPa.m 1/2), the strength, ductility and toughness of the NiCoCr alloy actually improve at cryogenic temperatures to unprecedented levels of strengths above 1.3 GPa, failure strains up to 90% and KJIc values of 275 MPa.m 1/2 (with crackgrowth toughnesses above 400 MPa.m 1/2). These properties appear to result from continuous steady strain hardening, which acts to suppress plastic instability, resulting from pronounced dislocation activity and deformation-induced nano-twinning.« less

  18. High Temperature Wireless Communication And Electronics For Harsh Environment Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Beheim, G. M.; Ponchak, G. E.; Chen, L.-Y

    2007-01-01

    In order for future aerospace propulsion systems to meet the increasing requirements for decreased maintenance, improved capability, and increased safety, the inclusion of intelligence into the propulsion system design and operation becomes necessary. These propulsion systems will have to incorporate technology that will monitor propulsion component conditions, analyze the incoming data, and modify operating parameters to optimize propulsion system operations. This implies the development of sensors, actuators, and electronics, with associated packaging, that will be able to operate under the harsh environments present in an engine. However, given the harsh environments inherent in propulsion systems, the development of engine-compatible electronics and sensors is not straightforward. The ability of a sensor system to operate in a given environment often depends as much on the technologies supporting the sensor element as the element itself. If the supporting technology cannot handle the application, then no matter how good the sensor is itself, the sensor system will fail. An example is high temperature environments where supporting technologies are often not capable of operation in engine conditions. Further, for every sensor going into an engine environment, i.e., for every new piece of hardware that improves the in-situ intelligence of the components, communication wires almost always must follow. The communication wires may be within or between parts, or from the engine to the controller. As more hardware is added, more wires, weight, complexity, and potential for unreliability is also introduced. Thus, wireless communication combined with in-situ processing of data would significantly improve the ability to include sensors into high temperature systems and thus lead toward more intelligent engine systems. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is presently leading the development of electronics, communication systems, and sensors capable of prolonged stable

  19. Small and medium-sized high-temperature reactors for generation of electricity, process steam and district heat

    SciTech Connect

    Schoening, J.

    1988-01-01

    The HTR reactor line of BBC/HRB has been designed to cover the requirements in the market of nuclear power energy of the time being and in the future. Cornerstones of the group's future HTR line are the HTR 500 (550 MWe) and the HTR 100 (100 MWe) for the generation of electricity and process steam, with the possibility of heat extraction for district heating. The HTR 500 design characteristics, reasons for choice of a 500 MW design, economics of the HTR 500, the HTR 100 design characteristics, process heat application, and small heating reactors are discussed in the paper.

  20. White tea as a promising antioxidant medium additive for sperm storage at room temperature: a comparative study with green tea.

    PubMed

    Dias, Tânia R; Alves, Marco G; Tomás, Gonçalo D; Socorro, Sílvia; Silva, Branca M; Oliveira, Pedro F

    2014-01-22

    Storage of sperm under refrigeration reduces its viability, due to oxidative unbalance. Unfermented teas present high levels of catechin derivatives, known to reduce oxidative stress. This study investigated the effect of white tea (WTEA) on epididymal spermatozoa survival at room temperature (RT), using green tea (GTEA) for comparative purposes. The chemical profiles of WTEA and GTEA aqueous extracts were evaluated by (1)H NMR. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate was the most abundant catechin, being twice as abundant in WTEA extract. The antioxidant power of storage media was evaluated. Spermatozoa antioxidant potential, lipid peroxidation, and viability were assessed. The media antioxidant potential increased the most with WTEA supplementation, which was concomitant with the highest increase in sperm antioxidant potential and lipid peroxidation decrease. WTEA supplementation restored spermatozoa viability to values similar to those obtained at collection time. These findings provide evidence that WTEA extract is an excellent media additive for RT sperm storage, to facilitate transport and avoid the deleterious effects of refrigeration.

  1. Alcohol from whey permeate: strain selection, temperature, and medium optimization. [Candida pseudotropicalis, Kluyveromyces fragilis, and K. lactis

    SciTech Connect

    Vienne, P.; Von Stockar, U.

    1983-01-01

    A comparative study of shaken flask cultures of some yeast strains capable of fermenting lactose showed no significant differences in alcohol yield among the four best strains. Use of whey permeate concentrated three times did not affect the yields. An optimal growth temperature of 38/sup 0/C was determined for K. fragilis NRRL 665. Elemental analysis of both the permeate and the dry cell mass of two strains indicated the possibility of a stoichiometric limitation by nitrogen. Batch cultures in laboratory fermentors confirmed this finding and revealed in addition the presence of a limitation due to growth factors. Both types of limitations could be overcome by adding yeast extract. The maximum productivity of continuous cultures could thus be improved to 5.1 g/l-h. The maximum specific growth rate was of the order of 0.310 h/sup -1/. 15 references, 10 figures, 9 tables.

  2. White tea as a promising antioxidant medium additive for sperm storage at room temperature: a comparative study with green tea.

    PubMed

    Dias, Tânia R; Alves, Marco G; Tomás, Gonçalo D; Socorro, Sílvia; Silva, Branca M; Oliveira, Pedro F

    2014-01-22

    Storage of sperm under refrigeration reduces its viability, due to oxidative unbalance. Unfermented teas present high levels of catechin derivatives, known to reduce oxidative stress. This study investigated the effect of white tea (WTEA) on epididymal spermatozoa survival at room temperature (RT), using green tea (GTEA) for comparative purposes. The chemical profiles of WTEA and GTEA aqueous extracts were evaluated by (1)H NMR. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate was the most abundant catechin, being twice as abundant in WTEA extract. The antioxidant power of storage media was evaluated. Spermatozoa antioxidant potential, lipid peroxidation, and viability were assessed. The media antioxidant potential increased the most with WTEA supplementation, which was concomitant with the highest increase in sperm antioxidant potential and lipid peroxidation decrease. WTEA supplementation restored spermatozoa viability to values similar to those obtained at collection time. These findings provide evidence that WTEA extract is an excellent media additive for RT sperm storage, to facilitate transport and avoid the deleterious effects of refrigeration. PMID:24372402

  3. Non-graphite crucible for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Pfeiler, William A.

    1994-01-01

    A multi-piece crucible for high temperature applications comprises a tubular side wall member having a lip on the inside surface and a bottom member or members forming a container for containing a melt of a material during a high temperature melt-casting operations. The multi-piece design prevents cracking of the crucible or leakage of the melt from the crucible during the melt-casting operation. The lip of the tubular member supports the bottom member. The contacting surfaces where the lip of the tubular side wall member contacts the bottom member of the multi-piece crucible contains a ceramic sealing material. The ceramic sealing material forms a seal sufficient to prevent the melt of the material from leaking out of the multi-piece crucible during the melt-casting process. The multi-piece crucible is made of a material which is chemically inert to the melt and has structural integrity at the melting point temperature of the melt, or of a material coated with such a material.

  4. Second-generation functionalized medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates: the gateway to high-value bioplastic applications.

    PubMed

    Tortajada, Marta; da Silva, Luiziana Ferreira; Prieto, María Auxiliadora

    2013-03-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biodegradable biocompatible polyesters, which accumulate as granules in the cytoplasm of many bacteria under unbalanced growth conditions. Medium-chain-length PHAs (mcl-PHAs), characterized by C6-C14 branched monomer chains and typically produced by Pseudomonas species, are promising thermoelastomers, as they can be further modified by introducing functional groups in the side chains. Functionalized PHAs are obtained either by feeding structurally related substrates processed through the beta-oxidation pathway, or using specific strains able to transform sugars or glycerol into unsaturated PHA by de novo fatty-acid biosynthesis. Functionalized mcl-PHAs provide modified mechanical and thermal properties, and consequently have new processing requirements and highly diverse potential applications in emergent fields such as biomedicine. However, process development and sample availability are limited due to the toxicity of some precursors and still low productivity, which hinder investigation. Conversely, improved mutant strains designed through systems biology approaches and cofeeding with low-cost substrates may contribute to the widespread application of these biopolymers. This review focuses on recent developments in the production of functionalized mcl-PHAs, placing particular emphasis on strain and bioprocess design for cost-effective production.

  5. Second-generation functionalized medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates: the gateway to high-value bioplastic applications.

    PubMed

    Tortajada, Marta; da Silva, Luiziana Ferreira; Prieto, María Auxiliadora

    2013-03-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biodegradable biocompatible polyesters, which accumulate as granules in the cytoplasm of many bacteria under unbalanced growth conditions. Medium-chain-length PHAs (mcl-PHAs), characterized by C6-C14 branched monomer chains and typically produced by Pseudomonas species, are promising thermoelastomers, as they can be further modified by introducing functional groups in the side chains. Functionalized PHAs are obtained either by feeding structurally related substrates processed through the beta-oxidation pathway, or using specific strains able to transform sugars or glycerol into unsaturated PHA by de novo fatty-acid biosynthesis. Functionalized mcl-PHAs provide modified mechanical and thermal properties, and consequently have new processing requirements and highly diverse potential applications in emergent fields such as biomedicine. However, process development and sample availability are limited due to the toxicity of some precursors and still low productivity, which hinder investigation. Conversely, improved mutant strains designed through systems biology approaches and cofeeding with low-cost substrates may contribute to the widespread application of these biopolymers. This review focuses on recent developments in the production of functionalized mcl-PHAs, placing particular emphasis on strain and bioprocess design for cost-effective production. PMID:24151777

  6. Corrosion Behaviour of Ni{sub 78}Si{sub 8}B{sub 14} Alloy in 1 M NaCl Aqueous Medium at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Shubhra; Vyas, Rishi; Sachdev, K.; Sharma, S. K.

    2010-06-29

    Potentiodynamic polarization studies were performed on the air side and wheel side of the specimen Ni{sub 78}Si{sub 8}B{sub 14} in 1 M NaCl aqueous medium at room temperature. It was observed that the corrosion current density on the air side of the specimen was less than that of the wheel side of the specimen in 1 M NaCl aqueous medium. The amorphous nature of the air side and wheel side of the specimen Ni{sub 78}Si{sub 8}B{sub 14} was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The observed behaviour can be related to the surface morphology due to processing of the ribbons. It is suggested that the inferior corrosion resistance of the wheel side surface is attributed to higher concentration of quenched-in defects due to higher cooling rate. Weight loss studies were also carried out in order to corroborate the polarization results. The results are discussed in the paper in the light of data reported in the literature.

  7. Rapid growth of nanocrystalline CuInS 2 thin films in alkaline medium at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Seung Jae; Mane, Rajaram S.; Pathan, Habib M.; Joo, Oh-Shim; Han, Sung-Hwan

    2005-12-01

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of CuInS 2 (CIS) thin films at room temperature (25 °C) from alkaline CuSO 4 + In 2(SO 4) 3 and Na 2S precursor solutions was reported. The method allowed self-limited growth of CIS films with nanocrystalline structure and composed of densely packed nanometer-sized grains. The as-deposited CIS film was 250 nm thick and composed of closely packed particles of 20-30 nm in diameter. The alkaline cationic precursor solution was obtained by dissolving CuSO 4 and InSO 4 in deionized water with a appropriate amount of hydrazine monohydrate (H-H) and 2,2',2″-nitrilotriethanol (TEA). CIS films were annealed at 200 °C for 2 h and effect of annealing on structural, optical, and surface morphological properties was thoroughly investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, UV-vis spectrometer, C-V, and water contact angle techniques, respectively.

  8. Unsteady MHD convective flow of Second grade fluid through a porous medium in a Rotating parallel plate channel with temperature dependent source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VeeraKrishna, M.; Subba Reddy, G.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we make an initial vale investigation of hydromagnetic convective flow of a viscous electrically conducting second grade fluid through a porous medium in a rotating parallel plate channel in the presence of a temperature dependent heat source. The perturbations in the flow are created by a constant pressure gradient along the plates in addition to non-torsional oscillations of the lower plate. The exact solutions of the velocity and the temperature fields consist of the steady state and the transient components using Laplace transform technique. The time required for the transient effects to decay is discussed in detail and the ultimate steady state consists of boundary layers on the plates and an interior. Attention is focused on the physical nature of the solutions, and the structure of the various kinds of boundary layers formed on the plates. The final steady state velocity and temperature fields are numerically discussed for different values of the governing parameters. The shear stresses and the Nusselt number are tabulated. Particular case when both the plates are at rest has also been computed and analyzed.

  9. Freezing transition of the directed polymer in a 1 + d random medium: location of the critical temperature and unusual critical properties.

    PubMed

    Monthus, Cécile; Garel, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    In dimension d > or =3, the directed polymer in a random medium undergoes a phase transition between a free phase at high temperature and a low-temperature disorder-dominated phase. For the latter phase, Fisher and Huse have proposed a droplet theory based on the scaling of the free-energy fluctuations Delta F(l) approximately l theta at scale l. On the other hand, in related growth models belonging to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class, Forrest and Tang have found that the height-height correlation function is logarithmic at the transition. For the directed polymer model at criticality, this translates into logarithmic free-energy fluctuations Delta FTc(l) approximately (lnl)sigma with sigma = 1/2. In this paper, we propose a droplet scaling analysis exactly at criticality based on this logarithmic scaling. Our main conclusion is that the typical correlation length xi(T) of the low-temperature phase diverges as ln xi(t) approximately [-ln(Tc-T)]1/sigma approximately [-ln(Tc-T)]2, instead of the usual power law xi(T) approximately (Tc-T)-v. Furthermore, the logarithmic dependence of Delta FTc(l) leads to the conclusion that the critical temperature Tc actually coincides with the explicit upper bound T2 derived by Derrida and co-workers, where T2 corresponds to the temperature below which the ratio Z 2 L/(ZL)2 diverges exponentially in L. Finally, since the Fisher-Huse droplet theory was initially introduced for the spin-glass phase, we briefly mention the similarities with and differences from the directed polymer model. If one speculates that the free energy of droplet excitations for spin glasses is also logarithmic at Tc, one obtains a logarithmic decay for the mean square correlation function at criticality, C2(r) approximately 1/(ln r)sigma, instead of the usual power law l/rd-2+eta. PMID:16907055

  10. Freezing transition of the directed polymer in a 1+d random medium: Location of the critical temperature and unusual critical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monthus, Cécile; Garel, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    In dimension d⩾3 , the directed polymer in a random medium undergoes a phase transition between a free phase at high temperature and a low-temperature disorder-dominated phase. For the latter phase, Fisher and Huse have proposed a droplet theory based on the scaling of the free-energy fluctuations ΔF(l)˜lθ at scale l . On the other hand, in related growth models belonging to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class, Forrest and Tang have found that the height-height correlation function is logarithmic at the transition. For the directed polymer model at criticality, this translates into logarithmic free-energy fluctuations ΔFTc(l)˜(lnl)σ with σ=1/2 . In this paper, we propose a droplet scaling analysis exactly at criticality based on this logarithmic scaling. Our main conclusion is that the typical correlation length ξ(T) of the low-temperature phase diverges as lnξ(T)˜[-ln(Tc-T)]1/σ˜[-ln(Tc-T)]2 , instead of the usual power law ξ(T)˜(Tc-T)-ν . Furthermore, the logarithmic dependence of ΔFTc(l) leads to the conclusion that the critical temperature Tc actually coincides with the explicit upper bound T2 derived by Derrida and co-workers, where T2 corresponds to the temperature below which the ratio ZL2¯/(ZL¯)2 diverges exponentially in L . Finally, since the Fisher-Huse droplet theory was initially introduced for the spin-glass phase, we briefly mention the similarities with and differences from the directed polymer model. If one speculates that the free energy of droplet excitations for spin glasses is also logarithmic at Tc , one obtains a logarithmic decay for the mean square correlation function at criticality, C2(r)¯˜1/(lnr)σ , instead of the usual power law 1/rd-2+η .

  11. Development of a high-efficiency, high-performance air filter medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, W.; Sawyer, S. R.

    1988-08-01

    A unique high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter medium has been developed for applications in high temperature and high pressure environments. This filter medium is a composite made from quartz and stainless-steel fibers that have been sintered together. The composite medium has the same efficiency and pressure drop as standard HEPA glass media, but has four times the tensile strength and can operate continuously at temperatures up to 500 C. In a conventional HEPA, the binder burns out above 250 C and the medium loses its strength; our composite filter medium has no comparable loss of strength even at 500 C.

  12. Metal hydride temperature amplifiers for high temperature (260 C) applications: A parametric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ally, M. R.

    1986-12-01

    The viability of hydriding alloys as working media in heat pumps to achieve temperature boosts up to 260 C or better is investigated on the basis of the mass transfer zone concept of absorption bed design and a return on capital investment of two years. The Van't Hoff curves of various metals in the temperature and pressure ranges of interest were found in the open literature. An integrated form of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation was used to describe the equilibrium hydrogen pressure temperature relationship. Design equations pertaining to overall material and heat balances are presented. An assumption in the development of these equations is that of steady state operation. Other, more stringent assumptions pertain to cycling stability, resistance to poisoning, constant absorption capacity and durability of the metal over a two year period. The design equations along with the necessary thermodynamic data are incorporated in an interactive FORTRAN computer program called HYDRIDE which determines the quantity of metal required per bed for an 8.79 x 10 W (30 x 10 Btu/h) temperature amplifier. The computer results show that even under the optimistic assumptions of the model, the estimated metal required per bed would be between 15,900 and 22,700 kg, depending on the particular metals chosen. Based on a metal cost of $33.07/kg and cost of energy at $5/10 Btu, the maximum permissible metal in each bed for a two year payback works out to be 4535 kg. It is therefore concluded that even under very optimistic conditions, hydriding alloys is economically unattractive for heat pump applications.

  13. Self potential generated by two-phase flow in a porous medium: Experimental study and volcanological applications

    SciTech Connect

    Antraygues, P.; Aubert, M.

    1993-12-01

    In order to characterize the relationships between self-potential generation and hydrothermal convection, laboratory measurements of electric potential and temperature are made along a vertical cylindrical column of porous material where a two-phase flow (wet steam) occurs. For steady state convection, the vertical distributions of vapor and water flow rates are calculated from thermal balance. At the initiation of convection, a positive electrical charge flux is related to the convective front. For isothermal and steady state columns, a positive electric potential gradient is observed along the vapor flow direction. These electric potentials are mainly a function of the vapor flow rates and of the medium permeability. A sudden and large increase in the vapor flow rate and in the volume fraction of vapor can induce a large and long-lived increase in the potential differences along the vapor flow direction. An electrokinetic effect related to the saturated vapor flow is the best candidate for this electric potential generation. The experimental resutls obtained in the present study are applied to self-potential generation in rising two-phase convective cells on active volcanoes. The observed positive self-potential anomalies close to active fissures depend on the electrical charge flux related to the upward saturated vapor flow. These results also demonstrate the value of self-potential monitoring in the early stages preceding a volcanic eruption.

  14. NASA PS400: A New Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating for High Temperature Wear Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.; Edmonds, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    A new solid lubricant coating, NASA PS400, has been developed for high temperature tribological applications. This plasma sprayed coating is a variant of the patented PS304 coating and has been formulated to provide higher density, smoother surface finish and better dimensional stability than PS304. PS400 is comprised of a nickel-molybdenum binder that provides strength, creep resistance and extreme oxidative and dimensional stability. Chromium oxide, silver and barium-calcium fluoride eutectic are added to the binder to form PS400.Tribological properties were evaluated with a pin-on-disk test rig in sliding contact to 650 C. Coating material samples were exposed to air, argon and vacuum at 760 C followed by cross section microscopic analysis to assess microstructure stability. Oil-Free microturbine engine hot section foil bearing tests were undertaken to assess PS400 s suitability for hot foil gas bearing applications. The preliminary results indicate that PS400 exhibits tribological characteristics comparable to the PS304 coating but with enhanced creep resistance and dimensional stability suitable for demanding, dynamic applications.

  15. Catalytic dehydrogenation of propane by carbon dioxide: a medium-temperature thermochemical process for carbon dioxide utilisation.

    PubMed

    Du, X; Yao, B; Gonzalez-Cortes, S; Kuznetsov, V L; AlMegren, Hamid; Xiao, T; Edwards, P P

    2015-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of C3H8 in the presence of CO2 is an attractive catalytic route for C3H6 production. In studying the various possibilities to utilise CO2 to convert hydrocarbons using the sustainable energy source of solar thermal energy, thermodynamic calculations were carried out for the dehydrogenation of C3H8 using CO2for the process operating in the temperature range of 300-500 °C. Importantly, the results highlight the enhanced potential of C3H8 as compared to its lighter and heavier homologues (C2H6 and C4H10, respectively). To be utilised in this CO2 utilisation reaction the Gibbs free energy (ΔrGθm) of each reaction in the modelled, complete reacting system of the dehydrogenation of C3H8 in the presence of CO2 also indicate that further cracking of C3H6 will affect the ultimate yield and selectivity of the final products. In a parallel experimental study, catalytic tests of the dehydrogenation of C3H8 in the presence of CO2 over 5 wt%-Cr2O3/ZrO2 catalysts operating at 500 °C, atmospheric pressure, and for various C3H8 partial pressures and various overall GHSV (Gas Hourly Space Velocity) values. The results showed that an increase in the C3H8 partial pressure produced an inhibition of C3H8 conversion but, importantly, a promising enhancement of C3H6 selectivity. This phenomenon can be attributed to competitive adsorption on the catalyst between the generated C3H6 and inactivated C3H8, which inhibits any further cracking effect on C3H6 to produce by-products. As a comparison, the increase of the overall GHSV can also decrease the C3H8 conversion to a similar extent, but the further cracking of C3H6 cannot be limited. PMID:26392020

  16. Fast high-temperature superconductor switch for high current applications

    SciTech Connect

    Solovyov, VF; Li, Q

    2013-07-15

    Reversible operation of a high current superconductor switch based on the quench of high-resistance second generation high temperature superconducting wire is demonstrated. The quench is induced by a burst of an ac field generated by an inductively coupled radio-frequency coil. The switch makes a superconducting-to-normal transition within 5 ms and also has a rapid recovery to the superconducting state. The device has potential applications as an active current limiter or as a storage switch for superconducting magnetic energy storage systems. Operation in a full flux penetration/flow regime can effectively minimize the detrimental effects of the intrinsic conductor non-uniformity. (C) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  17. High temperature solder alloys for underhood applications. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Drewien, C.A.; Yost, F.G.; Sackinger, S.; Kern, J.; Weiser, M.W.

    1995-02-01

    Under a cooperative research and development agreement with General Motors Corporation, lead-free solder systems including the flux, metallization, and solder are being developed for high temperature, underhood applications. Six tin-rich solders, five silver-rich metallizations, and four fluxes were screened using an experimental matrix whereby every combination was used to make sessile drops via hot plate or Heller oven processing. The contact angle, sessile drop appearance, and in some instances the microstructure was evaluated to determine combinations that would yield contact angles of less than 30{degrees}, well-formed sessile drops, and fine, uniform microstructures. Four solders, one metallization, and one flux were selected and will be used for further aging and mechanical property studies.

  18. New Optimal Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Applications

    SciTech Connect

    John Coggin; Jonas Ivasauskas; Russell G. May; Michael B. Miller; Rena Wilson

    2006-09-30

    Accomplishments during Phase II of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring. During this program work period, major progress has been experienced in the development of the sensor hardware, and the planning of the system installation and operation. The major focus of the next work period will be the installation of sensors in the Hamilton, Ohio power plant, and demonstration of high-temperature strain gages during mechanical testing of SOFC components.

  19. Developments in TurboBrayton Technology for Low Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, W. L.; Zagarola, M. V.; Nellis, G. F.; McCormick, J. A.; Gibbon, Judy

    1999-01-01

    A single stage reverse Brayton cryocooler using miniature high-speed turbomachines recently completed a successful space shuttle test flight demonstrating its capabilities for use in cooling the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The NICMOS CryoCooler (NCC) is designed for a cooling load of about 8 W at 65 K, and comprises a closed loop cryocooler coupled to an independent cryogenic circulating loop. Future space applications involve instruments that will require 5 mW to 200 mW of cooling at temperatures between 4 K and 10 K. This paper discusses the extension of Turbo-Brayton technology to meet these requirements.

  20. Low temperature aluminum nitride thin films for sensory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarar, E.; Hrkac, V.; Zamponi, C.; Piorra, A.; Kienle, L.; Quandt, E.

    2016-07-01

    A low-temperature sputter deposition process for the synthesis of aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films that is attractive for applications with a limited temperature budget is presented. Influence of the reactive gas concentration, plasma treatment of the nucleation surface and film thickness on the microstructural, piezoelectric and dielectric properties of AlN is investigated. An improved crystal quality with respect to the increased film thickness was observed; where full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the AlN films decreased from 2.88 ± 0.16° down to 1.25 ± 0.07° and the effective longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient (d33,f) increased from 2.30 ± 0.32 pm/V up to 5.57 ± 0.34 pm/V for film thicknesses in the range of 30 nm to 2 μm. Dielectric loss angle (tan δ) decreased from 0.626% ± 0.005% to 0.025% ± 0.011% for the same thickness range. The average relative permittivity (ɛr) was calculated as 10.4 ± 0.05. An almost constant transversal piezoelectric coefficient (|e31,f|) of 1.39 ± 0.01 C/m2 was measured for samples in the range of 0.5 μm to 2 μm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations performed on thin (100 nm) and thick (1.6 μm) films revealed an (002) oriented AlN nucleation and growth starting directly from the AlN-Pt interface independent of the film thickness and exhibit comparable quality with the state-of-the-art AlN thin films sputtered at much higher substrate temperatures.

  1. Pyrolyzed feather fibers for adsorbent and high temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senoz, Erman

    used in applications such as adsorption, storage, and separation of small gas molecules. The maximum excess H2 storage capacity was 1.5 wt% at 77 K and at pressures below 2 MPa. The notable H2 adsorption of PCFF below 1 MPa can be justified by the abundance of microporosity and the nanopores available for H2 penetration. In the second step of the pyrolysis the protein matrix went through a series of transformations including cyclization and aromatization reactions above the melting point. A partially cyclic carbon-nitrogen framework (carbon/nitrogen ratio=2.38) supported by double and triple bonds and oxygen functionalities is the suggested structural model for the PCFF. The useful fibers and adsorbents produced from CFF in this dissertation can encourage researchers to use high temperature heat treatments on keratin-based fibers. Also, the identified pyrolysis mechanisms can serve as a guide for producing materials with desired properties from protein-based materials, particularly in textile, high performance composite and catalyst industries.

  2. High Temperature Gas Reactors: Assessment of Applicable Codes and Standards

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, Bruce K.; Nickolaus, James R.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Swearingen, Gary L.; Pugh, Ray

    2011-10-31

    Current interest expressed by industry in HTGR plants, particularly modular plants with power up to about 600 MW(e) per unit, has prompted NRC to task PNNL with assessing the currently available literature related to codes and standards applicable to HTGR plants, the operating history of past and present HTGR plants, and with evaluating the proposed designs of RPV and associated piping for future plants. Considering these topics in the order they are arranged in the text, first the operational histories of five shut-down and two currently operating HTGR plants are reviewed, leading the authors to conclude that while small, simple prototype HTGR plants operated reliably, some of the larger plants, particularly Fort St. Vrain, had poor availability. Safety and radiological performance of these plants has been considerably better than LWR plants. Petroleum processing plants provide some applicable experience with materials similar to those proposed for HTGR piping and vessels. At least one currently operating plant - HTR-10 - has performed and documented a leak before break analysis that appears to be applicable to proposed future US HTGR designs. Current codes and standards cover some HTGR materials, but not all materials are covered to the high temperatures envisioned for HTGR use. Codes and standards, particularly ASME Codes, are under development for proposed future US HTGR designs. A 'roadmap' document has been prepared for ASME Code development; a new subsection to section III of the ASME Code, ASME BPVC III-5, is scheduled to be published in October 2011. The question of terminology for the cross-duct structure between the RPV and power conversion vessel is discussed, considering the differences in regulatory requirements that apply depending on whether this structure is designated as a 'vessel' or as a 'pipe'. We conclude that designing this component as a 'pipe' is the more appropriate choice, but that the ASME BPVC allows the owner of the facility to select

  3. Modelling of heat and mass transfer in a granular medium during high-temperature air drying. Effect of the internal gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othmani, Hammouda; Hassini, Lamine; Lamloumi, Raja; El Cafsi, Mohamed Afif

    2016-02-01

    A comprehensive internal heat and water transfer model including the gas pressure effect has been proposed in order to improve the industrial high-temperature air drying of inserts made of agglomerated sand. In this model, the internal gas phase pressure effect was made perfectly explicit, by considering the liquid and vapour transfer by filtration and the liquid expulsion at the surface. Wet sand enclosed in a tight cylindrical glass bottle dried convectively at a high temperature was chosen as an application case. The model was validated on the basis of the experimental average water content and core temperature curves for drying trials at different operating conditions. The simulations of the spatio-temporal distribution of internal gas pressure were performed and interpreted in terms of product potential damage. Based on a compromise between the drying time and the pressure increase, a simple drying cycle was implemented in order to optimize the drying process.

  4. Bacterial Community Dynamics During the Application of a Myxococcus xanthus-Inoculated Culture Medium Used for Consolidation of Ornamental Limestone

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Sterflinger, Katja; Ettenauer, Jörg; Jroundi, Fadwa; Fernandez-Vivas, Antonia; Gonzalez-Muñoz, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigated under laboratory conditions the bacterial communities inhabiting quarry and decayed ornamental carbonate stones before and after the application of a Myxococcus xanthus-inoculated culture medium used for consolidation of the stones. The dynamics of the community structure and the prevalence of the inoculated bacterium, M. xanthus, were monitored during the time course of the consolidation treatment (30 days). For this purpose, we selected a molecular strategy combining fingerprinting by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) with the screening of eubacterial 16S rDNA clone libraries by DGGE and sequencing. Quantification of the inoculated strain was performed by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using M. xanthus-specific primers designed in this work. Results derived from DGGE and sequencing analysis showed that, irrespective of the origin of the stone, the same carbonatogenic microorganisms were activated by the application of a M. xanthus culture. Those microorganisms were Pseudomonas sp., Bacillus sp., and Brevibacillus sp. The monitoring of M. xanthus in the culture media of treated stones during the time course experiment showed disparate results depending on the applied technique. By culture-dependent methods, the detection of this bacterium was only possible in the first day of the treatment, showing the limitation of these conventional techniques. By PCR-DGGE analysis, M. xanthus was detected during the first 3–6 days of the experiment. At this time, the population of this bacterium in the culture media varied between 108–106 cells ml−1, as showed by qPCR analyses. Thereafter, DGGE analyses showed to be not suitable for the detection of M. xanthus in a mixed culture. Nevertheless, qPCR analysis using specific primers for M. xanthus showed to be a more sensitive technique for the detection of this bacterium, revealing a population of 104 cells ml−1 in the culture media of both treated stones at the end of

  5. Physiological responses and scope for growth upon medium-term exposure to the combined effects of ocean acidification and temperature in a subtidal scavenger Nassarius conoidalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haoyu; Shin, Paul K S; Cheung, S G

    2015-05-01

    Physiological responses (ingestion rate, absorption rate and efficiency, respiration, rate, excretion rate) and scope for growth of a subtidal scavenging gastropod Nassarius conoidalis under the combined effects of ocean acidification (pCO2 levels: 380, 950, 1250 μatm) and temperature (15, 30 °C) were investigated for 31 days. There was a significant reduction in all the physiological rates and scope for growth following short-term exposure (1-3 days) to elevated pCO2 except absorption efficiency at 15 °C and 30 °C, and respiration rate and excretion rate at 15 °C. The percentage change in the physiological rates ranged from 0% to 90% at 15 °C and from 0% to 73% at 30 °C when pCO2 was increased from 380 μatm to 1250 μatm. The effect of pCO2 on the physiological rates was enhanced at high temperature for ingestion, absorption, respiration and excretion. When the exposure period was extended to 31 days, the effect of pCO2 was significant on the ingestion rate only. All the physiological rates remained unchanged when temperature increased from 24 °C to 30 °C but the rates at 15 °C were significantly lower, irrespective of the duration of exposure. Our data suggested that a medium-term exposure to ocean acidification has no effect on the energetics of N. conoidalis. Nevertheless, the situation may be complicated by a longer term of exposure and/or a reduction in salinity in a warming world.

  6. Niobium Oxide-Metal Based Seals for High Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ivar Reimanis

    2006-08-14

    The present final report describes technical progress made in regards to evaluating niobium oxide/alumina as a high temperature seal material. Fabrication and characterization of specimens comprising niobium oxide and alumina composites of various compositions was performed. The goal was to identify regions where a glass formed. There were no experimental conditions where a glassy phase was unequivocally identified. However, the results led to the formation of an interesting class of fibrous composites which may have applications where high compliance and high toughness are needed. It is clear that vapor phase sintering is an active mass transport mechanism in Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites (Figure 1), and it may be possible to design porous materials by utilizing vapor phase sintering. The compositions evaluated in the present work are 52, 60, 73, 82 and 95 mol. % Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} with the remainder Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. These were chosen so that some eutectic composition was present during cooling, in an attempt to encourage glass formation. However, the presence of large, elongated crystals, both in the slow cool and the quench experiments indicates that the driving force for crystallization is very high. Several joints were formed between high purity alumina with two compositions (60 and 82 mol. %) forming the joint. These were created by grinding and polishing alumina surfaces and stacking them end-to-end with the powdered Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} material in between. Joining was accomplished in air at temperatures between 1400 C and 1450 C. The joints failed during subsequent machining for strength bars, indicating low strength. It may be possible to use the compositions evaluated here as a joint material, but it seems unlikely that a glassy phase could be produced while joining.

  7. Application of statistical experimental design for optimisation of bioinsecticides production by sporeless Bacillus thuringiensis strain on cheap medium.

    PubMed

    Ben Khedher, Saoussen; Jaoua, Samir; Zouari, Nabil

    2013-01-01

    In order to overproduce bioinsecticides production by a sporeless Bacillus thuringiensis strain, an optimal composition of a cheap medium was defined using a response surface methodology. In a first step, a Plackett-Burman design used to evaluate the effects of eight medium components on delta-endotoxin production showed that starch, soya bean and sodium chloride exhibited significant effects on bioinsecticides production. In a second step, these parameters were selected for further optimisation by central composite design. The obtained results revealed that the optimum culture medium for delta-endotoxin production consists of 30 g L(-1) starch, 30 g L(-1) soya bean and 9 g L(-1) sodium chloride. When compared to the basal production medium, an improvement in delta-endotoxin production up to 50% was noted. Moreover, relative toxin yield of sporeless Bacillus thuringiensis S22 was improved markedly by using optimised cheap medium (148.5 mg delta-endotoxins per g starch) when compared to the yield obtained in the basal medium (94.46 mg delta-endotoxins per g starch). Therefore, the use of optimised culture cheap medium appeared to be a good alternative for a low cost production of sporeless Bacillus thuringiensis bioinsecticides at industrial scale which is of great importance in practical point of view.

  8. Development of high temperature superconductors for magnetic field applications

    SciTech Connect

    Larbalestier, D.C.

    1991-12-31

    The key requirement for magnetic field applications of high temperature superconductor (HTS) materials is to have conductors with high transport critical current density available for magnet builders. After 3 or 4 years of being without any such object, conductor makers have had recent success in producing simple conductor prototypes. These have permitted the construction of simple HTS magnets having self fields exceeding 1 tesla at 4K. Thus the scientific feasibility of making powerful HTS magnets has been demonstrated. Attention to the technological aspects of making HTS conductors for magnets with strong flux pinning and reduced superconducting granularity is now sensible and attractive. However, extrinsic defects such as filament sausaging, cracking, misaligned grains and other perturbation to long range current flow must be controlled at a low level if the benefit of intrinsic improvements to the critical current density is to be maintained in the conductor form. Due to the great complexity of the HTS materials, there is sometimes confusion as to whether a given sample has an intrinsically or extrinsically limited critical current density. Systematic microstructure variation experiments and resistive transition analysis are shown to be particularly helpful in this phase of conductor development.

  9. Development of high temperature superconductors for magnetic field applications

    SciTech Connect

    Larbalestier, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The key requirement for magnetic field applications of high temperature superconductor (HTS) materials is to have conductors with high transport critical current density available for magnet builders. After 3 or 4 years of being without any such object, conductor makers have had recent success in producing simple conductor prototypes. These have permitted the construction of simple HTS magnets having self fields exceeding 1 tesla at 4K. Thus the scientific feasibility of making powerful HTS magnets has been demonstrated. Attention to the technological aspects of making HTS conductors for magnets with strong flux pinning and reduced superconducting granularity is now sensible and attractive. However, extrinsic defects such as filament sausaging, cracking, misaligned grains and other perturbation to long range current flow must be controlled at a low level if the benefit of intrinsic improvements to the critical current density is to be maintained in the conductor form. Due to the great complexity of the HTS materials, there is sometimes confusion as to whether a given sample has an intrinsically or extrinsically limited critical current density. Systematic microstructure variation experiments and resistive transition analysis are shown to be particularly helpful in this phase of conductor development.

  10. Downscaling MODIS Land Surface Temperature for Urban Public Health Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Hamdan, Mohammad; Crosson, William; Estes, Maurice, Jr.; Estes, Sue; Quattrochi, Dale; Johnson, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This study is part of a project funded by the NASA Applied Sciences Public Health Program, which focuses on Earth science applications of remote sensing data for enhancing public health decision-making. Heat related death is currently the number one weather-related killer in the United States. Mortality from these events is expected to increase as a function of climate change. This activity sought to augment current Heat Watch/Warning Systems (HWWS) with NASA remotely sensed data, and models used in conjunction with socioeconomic and heatrelated mortality data. The current HWWS do not take into account intra-urban spatial variation in risk assessment. The purpose of this effort is to evaluate a potential method to improve spatial delineation of risk from extreme heat events in urban environments by integrating sociodemographic risk factors with estimates of land surface temperature (LST) derived from thermal remote sensing data. In order to further improve the consideration of intra-urban variations in risk from extreme heat, we also developed and evaluated a number of spatial statistical techniques for downscaling the 1-km daily MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LST data to 60 m using Landsat-derived LST data, which have finer spatial but coarser temporal resolution than MODIS. In this paper, we will present these techniques, which have been demonstrated and validated for Phoenix, AZ using data from the summers of 2000-2006.

  11. Application of hard coatings to substrates at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sproul, William D.

    1993-01-01

    BIRL, the industrial research laboratory of Northwestern University, has conducted unique and innovative research, under sponsorship from the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), in the application of hard, wear resistant coatings to bearing steels using the high-rate reactive sputtering (HRRS) process that was pioneered by Dr. William Sproul, the principal investigator on this program. Prior to this program, Dr. Sproul had demonstrated that it is possible to apply hard coatings such as titanium nitride (TiN) to alloy steels at low temperatures via the HRRS process without changing the metallurgical properties of the steel. The NASA MSFC program at BIRL had the specific objectives to: apply TiN to 440C stainless steel without changing the metallurgical properties of the steel; prepare rolling contact fatigue (RCF) test samples coated with binary hard coatings of TiN, zirconium nitride (ZrN), hafnium nitride (HfN), chromium nitride (CrN), and molybdenum nitride (MoN), and metal coatings of copper (Cu) and gold (Au); and develop new alloyed hard coatings of titanium aluminum nitride (Ti(0.5)Al(0.5)N), titanium zirconium nitride (Ti(0.5)Zr(0.5)N), and titanium aluminum vanadium nitride.

  12. Applications of a universal thermal index: physiological equivalent temperature.

    PubMed

    Matzarakis, A; Mayer, H; Iziomon, M G

    1999-10-01

    The physiological equivalent temperature, PET, is a thermal index derived from the human energy balance. It is well suited to the evaluation of the thermal component of different climates. As well as having a detailed physiological basis, PET is preferable to other thermal indexes like the predicted mean vote because of its unit ( degrees C), which makes results more comprehensible to urban or regional planners, for example, who are not so familiar with modern human-biometeorological terminology. PET results can be presented graphically or as bioclimatic maps. Graphs mostly display the temporal behaviour of PET, whereas spatial distribution is specified in bioclimatic maps. In this article, some applications of PET are discussed. They relate to the evaluation of the urban heat island in cities in both temperate climates and warm climates at high altitude. The thermal component of the microclimate in the trunk space of a deciduous forest is also evaluated by PET. As an example of the spatial distribution of PET, a bioclimatic map for Greece in July (Mediterranean climate) is presented.

  13. Brachial arterial temperature as an indicator of core temperature: proof of concept and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Pawley, Matthew D M; Martinsen, Paul; Mitchell, Simon J; Cheeseman, James F; Merry, Alan F; Willcox, Timothy; Grieve, Robert; Nand, Parma; Davies, Elaine; Warman, Guy R

    2013-06-01

    There is potential for heat loss and hypothermia during anesthesia and also for hyperthermia if heat conservation and active warming measures are not accurately titrated. Accurate temperature monitoring is particularly important in procedures in which the patient is actively cooled and then rewarmed such as during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery (CPB). We simultaneously measured core, nasopharyngeal, and brachial artery temperatures to investigate the last named as a potential peripheral temperature monitoring site. Ten patients undergoing hypothermic CPB were instrumented for simultaneous monitoring of temperatures in the pulmonary artery (PA), aortic arterial inflow (AI), nasopharynx (NP), and brachial artery (BA). Core temperature was defined as PA temperature before and after CPB and the AI temperature during CPB. Mean deviations of BA and NP temperatures from core temperature were calculated for three steady-state periods (before, during, and after CPB). Mean deviation of BA and NP temperatures from AI temperature was also calculated during active rewarming. A total of 1862 measurements were obtained and logged from eight patients. Mean BA and NP deviations from core temperature across the steady-state periods (before, during, and after CBP) were, respectively: .23 +/- .25, -.26 +/- .3, and -.09 +/- .05 degrees C (BA), and .11 +/- .19, -.1 +/- .47, and -.04 +/- .3 degrees C (NP). During steady-state periods, there was no evidence of a difference between the mean BA and NP deviation. During active rewarming, the mean difference between the BA and AI temperatures was .14 +/- .36 degrees C. During this period, NP temperature lagged behind AI and BA temperatures by up to 41 minutes and was up to 5.3 degres C lower than BA (mean difference between BA and NP temperatures was 1.22 +/- .58 degrees C). The BA temperature is an adequate surrogate for core temperature. It also accurately tracks the changing AI temperature during rewarming and is therefore potentially

  14. X-Aerogels for Structural Components and High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Future NASA missions and space explorations rely on the use of materials that are strong ultra lightweight and able to withstand extreme temperatures. Aerogels are low density (0.01-0.5 g/cu cm) high porosity materials that contain a glass like structure formed through standard sol-gel chemistry. As a result of these structural properties, aerogels are excellent thermal insulators and are able to withstand temperatures in excess of l,000 C. The open structure of aerogels, however, renders these materials extremely fragile (fracturing at stress forces less than 0.5 N/sq cm). The goal of NASA Glenn Research Center is to increase the strength of these materials by templating polymers and metals onto the surface of an aerogel network facilitating the use of this material for practical applications such as structural components of space vehicles used in exploration. The work this past year focused on two areas; (1) the research and development of new templated aerogels materials and (2) process development for future manufacturing of structural components. Research and development occurred on the production and characterization of new templating materials onto the standard silica aerogel. Materials examined included polymers such as polyimides, fluorinated isocyanates and epoxies, and, metals such as silver, gold and platinum. The final properties indicated that the density of the material formed using an isocyanate is around 0.50 g/cc with a strength greater than that of steel and has low thermal conductivity. The process used to construct these materials is extremely time consuming and labor intensive. One aspect of the project involved investigating the feasibility of shortening the process time by preparing the aerogels in the templating solvent. Traditionally the polymerization used THF as the solvent and after several washes to remove any residual monomers and water, the solvent around the aerogels was changed to acetonitrile for the templating step. This process

  15. [Development and application of new temperature control moxibustion device].

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Jiang, Hao; Wang, Lifang; Ma, Haili

    2015-07-01

    To develop a new temperature control moxibustion device so as to improve the clinical therapeutic effect of moxibustion. According to the thermal effect of moxibustion, with the designs such as the modern electronic equipment (temperature control system) adopted and in combination of smoke filtration device and oxygen mask device, a new temperature control moxibustion device was developed. The new temperature control moxibustion device may achieve the automatic regulation of temperature and distance and avoid the pollution and irritation of smoke and flavor, etc. As a result, the traditional moxibustion therapy can better play its efficacy and display its safety and convenience in practice.

  16. Li-Ion Cell Development for Low Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C.-K.; Sakamoto, J. S.; Surampudi, S.; Wolfenstine, J.

    2000-01-01

    JPL is involved in the development of rechargeable Li-ion cells for future Mars Exploration Missions. The specific objectives are to improve the Li-ion cell cycle life performance and rate capability at low temperature (<<-20 C) in order to enhance survivability of the Mars lander and rover batteries. Poor Li-ion rate capability at low temperature has been attributed to: (1) the electrolytes becoming viscous or freezing and/or (2) reduced electrode capacity that results from decreased Li diffusivity. Our efforts focus on increasing the rate capability at low temperature for Li-ion cells. In order to improve the rate capability we evaluated the following: (1) cathode performance at low temperatures, (2) electrode active material particle size on low temperature performance and (3) Li diffusivity at room temperature and low temperatures. In this paper, we will discuss the results of our study.

  17. High transition-temperature SQUID magnetometers and practical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dantsker, E

    1997-05-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of SQUID magnetometers based on thin films of the high-transition temperature superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} (YBCO) are described. Essential to the achieving high magnetic field resolution at low frequencies is the elimination of 1/f flux noise due to thermally activated hopping of flux vortices between pinning sites in the superconducting films. Through improvements in processing, 1/f noise in single layer YBCO thin films and YBCO-SrTiO{sub 3}-YBCO trilayers was systematically reduced to allow fabrication of sensitive SQUID magnetometers. Both single-layer directly coupled SQUID magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers were fabricated, based on the dc SQUID with bicrystal grain boundary Josephson junctions. Multilayer magnetometers had a lower magnetic field noise for a given physical size due to greater effective sensing areas. A magnetometer consisting of a SQUID inductively coupled to the multiturn input coil of a flux transformer in a flip-chip arrangement had a field noise of 27 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz and 8.5 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 kHz. A multiloop multilayer SQUID magnetometer had a field noise of 37 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz and 18 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 kHz. A three-axis SQUID magnetometer for geophysical applications was constructed and operated in the field in the presence of 60 Hz and radiofrequency noise. Clinical quality magnetocardiograms were measured using multilayer SQUID magnetometers in a magnetically shielded room.

  18. Application of Satellite-Derived Land Surface Temperature to Minimum Temperature Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, P. R.; Jedlovec, G. J.; Suggs, R. J.; Haines, S. L.

    2004-01-01

    Satellite-derived land surface temperature (LST) is studied for the purpose of understanding regional skin temperature dependency and variability, and its relationship to corresponding, site-specific air temperature. Skin temperature is highly correlated with surface-air temperature although it differs depending on land surface characteristics, terrain, and atmospheric conditions on a diurnal and seasonal scale. The high temporal resolution of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) -12 sounder is used to compare the diurnal cycles of LST and surface-air temperature. The minimum for both temperatures occurs near sunrise and LST is found to agree closely with surface-air temperatures a period of hours before sunrise on clear sky nights. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived LST renders more horizontal temperature structure - with its high spatial resolution (1 km at nadir) compared to the GOES-12 sounder (10 km). Nighttime MODIS-derived LST is extrapolated to the time of minimum temperature for a number of case study days and these are grouped by season and atmospheric conditions. These composites show that the variation in LST mirror the variation in minimum surface-air temperature under similar conditions.

  19. Application of the artificial neural network for reconstructing the internal-structure image of a random medium by spatial characteristics of backscattered optical radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Veksler, B A; Meglinskii, I V

    2008-06-30

    The feasibility of using an artificial neural network (ANN), which is the standard Matlab tool, for non-invasive (based on the data of backscattering) diagnostics of macro-inhomogeneities, localised at subsurface layers of the turbid strongly scattering medium was shown. The spatial and angle distribution of the backscattered optical radiation was calculated by using the Monte-Carlo method combining the modelling of effective optical paths and the use of statistical weights. It was shown that application of the backscattering method together with the ANN allows solving inverse problems for determining the average radius of the scattering particles and for reconstructing the images of structural elements within the medium with a high accuracy. (special issue devoted to application of laser technologies in biophotonics and biomedical studies)

  20. Development of integrated thermionic circuits for high-temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, J. B.; Wilde, D.; Depp, S.; Hamilton, D. J.; Kerwin, W.; Derouin, C.; Roybal, L.; Wooley, R.

    1981-01-01

    Integrated thermionic circuits (ITC) capable of extended operation in ambient temperatures up to 500 C are studied. A set of practical design and performance equations is demonstrated. Experimental results are discussed in which both devices and simple circuits were successfully operated in 5000 C environments for extended periods. It is suggested that ITC's may become an important technology for high temperature instrumentation and control systems in geothermal and other high temperature environments.

  1. Electrical Devices and Circuits for Low Temperature Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, R. L.; Hammond, A.; Dickman, J. E.; Gerber, S.; Overton, E.; Elbuluk, M.

    2003-01-01

    The environmental temperature in many NASA missions, such as deep space probes and outer planetary exploration, is significantly below the range for which conventional commercial-off-the-shelf electronics is designed. Presently, spacecraft operating in the cold environment of such deep space missions carry a large number of radioisotope or other heating units in order to maintain the surrounding temperature of the on-board electronics at approximately 20 C. Electronic devices and circuits capable of operation at cryogenic temperatures will not only tolerate the harsh environment of deep space but also will reduce system size and weight by eliminating or reducing the heating units and their associate structures; thereby reducing system development cost as well as launch costs. In addition, power electronic circuits designed for operation at low temperatures are expected to result in more efficient systems than those at room temperature. This improvement results from better behavior in the electrical and thermal properties of some semiconductor and dielectric materials at low temperatures. An on-going research and development program on low temperature electronics at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on the development of efficient electrical systems and circuits capable of surviving and exploiting the advantages of low temperature environments. An overview of the program will be presented in this paper. A description of the low temperature test facilities along with selected data obtained from in-house component testing will also be discussed. On-going research activities that are being performed in collaboration with various organizations will also be presented.

  2. Application of Phosphor Thermometry to a Galvanneal Temperature Measurement System

    SciTech Connect

    Beshears, D.L.; Allison, S.W.; Andrews, W.H.; Cates, M.R.; Grann, E.B.; Manges, W.W.; McIntyre, T.J.; Scudiere, M.B.; Simpson, M.L.; Childs, R.M.; Vehec, J.; Zhang, L.

    1999-06-01

    The Galvanneal Temperature Measurement System (GTMS) was developed for the American Iron and Steel Institute by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through a partnership with the National Steel Midwest Division in Portage, Indiana. The GTMS provides crucial on-line thermal process control information during the manufacturing of galvanneal steel. The system has been used with the induction furnaces to measure temperatures ranging from 840 to 1292 F with an accuracy of better than {+-}9 F. The GTMS provides accurate, reliable temperature information thus ensuring a high quality product, reducing waste, and saving energy. The production of uniform, high-quality galvanneal steel is only possible through strict temperature control.

  3. Ultrasonic level and temperature sensor for power reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.: Miller, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    An ultrasonic waveguide employing torsional and extensional acoustic waves has been developed for use as a level and temperature sensor in pressurized and boiling water nuclear power reactors. Features of the device include continuous measurement of level, density, and temperature producing a real-time profile of these parameters along a chosen path through the reactor vessel.

  4. High Temperature Thermocouples For In-pile Applications

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe; S. C. Wilkins

    2005-10-01

    Traditional methods for measuring temperature in-pile degrade at temperatures above 1080 degrees C. Hence, a project has been initiated to explore the use of specialized thermocouples that are composed of materials that are able to withstand higher temperature, in-pile test conditions. Results from efforts to develop, fabricate and evaluate the performance of these specialized thermocouples are reported in this paper. Candidate materials were evaluated for their ability to withstand irradiation, to resit material interactions and to remain ductile at high temperatures. In addition, candidate thermocouples were evaluated based on their resolution over the temperature ranges of interest. Results from these evaluations are reported, and additional on-going development activities are summarized.

  5. Characterizations of atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma jets and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakas, Erdinc

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma jets (APLTPJs) driven by short pulses have recently received great attention because of their potential in biomedical and environmental applications. This potential is due to their user-friendly features, such as low temperature, low risk of arcing, operation at atmospheric pressure, easy handheld operation, and low concentration of ozone generation. Recent experimental observations indicate that an ionization wave exists and propagates along the plasma jet. The plasma jet created by this ionization wave is not a continuous medium but rather consists of a bullet-like-structure known as "Plasma Bullet". More interestingly, these plasma bullets actually have a donut-shaped makeup. The nature of the plasma bullet is especially interesting because it propagates in the ambient air at supersonic velocities without any externally applied electric field. In this dissertation, experimental insights are reported regarding the physical and chemical characteristics of the APLTPJs. The dynamics of the plasma bullet are investigated by means of a high-speed ICCD camera. A plasma bullet propagation model based on the streamer theory is confirmed with adequate explanations. It is also found that a secondary discharge, ignited by the charge accumulation on the dielectric electrode surfaces at the end of the applied voltage, interrupts the plasma bullet propagation due to an opposing current along the ionization channel. The reason for this interesting phenomenon is explained in detail. The plasma bullet comes to an end when the helium mole fraction along the ionization channel, or applied voltage, or both, are less than some critical values. The presence of an inert gas channel in the surrounding air, such as helium or argon, has a critical role in plasma bullet formation and propagation. For this reason, a fluid dynamics study is employed by a commercially available simulation software, COMSOL, based on finite element method. Spatio

  6. [Removal of substances with low and medium molecular weight by repeated application of C-DAK-capillary dialysers].

    PubMed

    Gál, G; Gróf, J

    1979-01-01

    The capillary dialysator type C-DAK (Cordis Dow Mod. 4) can according to the regeneration method described be used three times as valid membrane for the elimination of the small as well as of the medium-sized molecules from the serum in the same patient.

  7. Application of low-cost algal nitrogen source feeding in fuel ethanol production using high gravity sweet potato medium.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu; Guo, Jin-Song; Chen, You-Peng; Zhang, Hai-Dong; Zheng, Xu-Xu; Zhang, Xian-Ming; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2012-08-31

    Protein-rich bloom algae biomass was employed as nitrogen source in fuel ethanol fermentation using high gravity sweet potato medium containing 210.0 g l(-1) glucose. In batch mode, the fermentation could not accomplish even in 120 h without any feeding of nitrogen source. While, the feeding of acid-hydrolyzed bloom algae powder (AHBAP) notably promoted fermentation process but untreated bloom algae powder (UBAP) was less effective than AHBAP. The fermentation times were reduced to 96, 72, and 72 h if 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 g l(-1) AHBAP were added into medium, respectively, and the ethanol yields and productivities increased with increasing amount of feeding AHBAP. The continuous fermentations were performed in a three-stage reactor system. Final concentrations of ethanol up to 103.2 and 104.3 g l(-1) with 4.4 and 5.3 g l(-1) residual glucose were obtained using the previously mentioned medium feeding with 20.0 and 30.0 g l(-1) AHBAP, at dilution rate of 0.02 h(-1). Notably, only 78.5 g l(-1) ethanol and 41.6 g l(-1) residual glucose were obtained in the comparative test without any nitrogen source feeding. Amino acids analysis showed that approximately 67% of the protein in the algal biomass was hydrolyzed and released into the medium, serving as the available nitrogen nutrition for yeast growth and metabolism. Both batch and continuous fermentations showed similar fermentation parameters when 20.0 and 30.0 g l(-1) AHBAP were fed, indicating that the level of available nitrogen in the medium should be limited, and an algal nitrogen source feeding amount higher than 20.0 g l(-1) did not further improve the fermentation performance.

  8. Mechanisms of Low-Temperature Nitridation Technology on a TaN Thin Film Resistor for Temperature Sensor Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huey-Ru; Chen, Ying-Chung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Chu, Tian-Jian; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Chuang, Nai-Chuan; Wang, Kao-Yuan

    2016-06-01

    In this letter, we propose a novel low-temperature nitridation technology on a tantalum nitride (TaN) thin film resistor (TFR) through supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) treatment for temperature sensor applications. We also found that the sensitivity of temperature of the TaN TFR was improved about 10.2 %, which can be demonstrated from measurement of temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). In order to understand the mechanism of SCCO2 nitridation on the TaN TFR, the carrier conduction mechanism of the device was analyzed through current fitting. The current conduction mechanism of the TaN TFR changes from hopping to a Schottky emission after the low-temperature SCCO2 nitridation treatment. A model of vacancy passivation in TaN grains with nitrogen and by SCCO2 nitridation treatment is eventually proposed to increase the isolation ability in TaN TFR, which causes the transfer of current conduction mechanisms.

  9. Mechanisms of Low-Temperature Nitridation Technology on a TaN Thin Film Resistor for Temperature Sensor Applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huey-Ru; Chen, Ying-Chung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Chu, Tian-Jian; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Chuang, Nai-Chuan; Wang, Kao-Yuan

    2016-12-01

    In this letter, we propose a novel low-temperature nitridation technology on a tantalum nitride (TaN) thin film resistor (TFR) through supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) treatment for temperature sensor applications. We also found that the sensitivity of temperature of the TaN TFR was improved about 10.2 %, which can be demonstrated from measurement of temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). In order to understand the mechanism of SCCO2 nitridation on the TaN TFR, the carrier conduction mechanism of the device was analyzed through current fitting. The current conduction mechanism of the TaN TFR changes from hopping to a Schottky emission after the low-temperature SCCO2 nitridation treatment. A model of vacancy passivation in TaN grains with nitrogen and by SCCO2 nitridation treatment is eventually proposed to increase the isolation ability in TaN TFR, which causes the transfer of current conduction mechanisms.

  10. Mechanisms of Low-Temperature Nitridation Technology on a TaN Thin Film Resistor for Temperature Sensor Applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huey-Ru; Chen, Ying-Chung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Chu, Tian-Jian; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Chuang, Nai-Chuan; Wang, Kao-Yuan

    2016-12-01

    In this letter, we propose a novel low-temperature nitridation technology on a tantalum nitride (TaN) thin film resistor (TFR) through supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) treatment for temperature sensor applications. We also found that the sensitivity of temperature of the TaN TFR was improved about 10.2 %, which can be demonstrated from measurement of temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). In order to understand the mechanism of SCCO2 nitridation on the TaN TFR, the carrier conduction mechanism of the device was analyzed through current fitting. The current conduction mechanism of the TaN TFR changes from hopping to a Schottky emission after the low-temperature SCCO2 nitridation treatment. A model of vacancy passivation in TaN grains with nitrogen and by SCCO2 nitridation treatment is eventually proposed to increase the isolation ability in TaN TFR, which causes the transfer of current conduction mechanisms. PMID:27251325

  11. New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell

    2005-10-31

    Development of practical, high-temperature optical claddings for improved waveguiding in sapphire fibers continued during the reporting period. A set of designed experiments using the Taguchi method was undertaken to efficiently determine the optimal set of processing variables to yield clad fibers with good optical and mechanical properties. Eighteen samples of sapphire fibers were prepared with spinel claddings, each with a unique set of variables. Statistical analyses of the results were then used to predict the set of factors that would result in a spinel cladding with the optimal geometrical, mechanical, and optical properties. To confirm the predictions of the Taguchi analysis, sapphire fibers were clad with the magnesium aluminate spinel coating using the predicted optimal set of factors. In general, the clad fibers demonstrated high quality, exceeding the best results obtained during the Phase I effort. Tests of the high-temperature stability of the clad fibers were also conducted. The results indicated that the clad fibers were stable at temperatures up to 1300 C for the duration of the three day test. At the higher temperatures, some changes in the geometry of the fibers were observed. The design, fabrication, and testing of a sapphire sensor for measurement of temperature was undertaken. The specific sensor configuration uses a polished sapphire wafer as the temperature-sensitive element. The wafer is attached to a sapphire fiber (clad or unclad), and interrogated as a Fabry-Perot sensor. Methods for assembling the sensor were investigated. A prototype sensor was fabricated and tested at room temperature and elevated temperatures. Results were difficult to interpret, due to the presence of modal noise which was found to result from the use of a spectrometer that was not designed for use with multimode fibers. A spectrometer optimized for use of multimode fiber has been obtained, and further evaluation of the sapphire temperature sensor is continuing.

  12. Battery pack/controller for high temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfenbarger, F. M.

    At temperatures in excess of 300 C, standard conductive wirelines cannot be used for signal or power transmission in geothermal wells. At such temperatures, a mechanical slickline can be used to raise and lower instrumentation, but the instrumentation control and power must then be self contained. This paper reviews the development of a battery and timing circuit to control a motor in a Los Alamos National Laboratory sampling tool. The battery pack-controller circuitry enclosed in a dewar was used in the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project (SSSDP) for temperatures approaching 400 C.

  13. High Temperature Metallic Seal Development For Aero Propulsion and Gas Turbine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    More, Greg; Datta, Amit

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on metallic high temperature static seal development at NASA for gas turbine applications is shown. The topics include: 1) High Temperature Static Seal Development; 2) Program Review; 3) Phase IV Innovative Seal with Blade Alloy Spring; 4) Spring Design; 5) Phase IV: Innovative Seal with Blade Alloy Spring; 6) PHase IV: Testing Results; 7) Seal Seating Load; 8) Spring Seal Manufacturing; and 9) Other Applications for HIgh Temperature Spring Design

  14. Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill for High Temperature Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Scott, James; Sherrit, Stewart; Widholm, Scott; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom; Jones, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Venus is one of the many significant scientific targets for NASA. New rock sampling tools with the ability to be operated at high temperatures of the order of 460 deg C are required for surface in-situ sampling/analysis missions. Piezoelectric materials such as LiNbO? crystals and Bismuth Titanate are potentially operational at the temperature range found on the surface of Venus. A study of the feasibility of producing piezoelectric drills for a temperature up to 500 deg C was conducted. The study includes investigation of the high temperature properties of piezoelectric crystals and ceramics with different formulas and doping. Several prototypes of Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corers (USDC) driven by transducers using the high temperate piezoelectric ceramics and single LiNbO? crystal were fabricated. The transducers were analyzed by scanning the impedance at room temperature and 500 deg C under both low and high voltages. The drilling performances were tested at temperature up to 500 deg C. Preliminary results were previously reported [Bao et al, 2009]. In this paper, the progress is presented and the future works for performance improvements are discussed.

  15. Conductivity Analysis of Membranes for High-Temperature PEMFC Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.; Turner, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Low-temperature operation requirements for per-fluorinated membranes are one factor that limits the viability of current fuel cell technology for transportation and other uses. Because of this, high-temperature membrane materials are being researched. The protonic conductivity of organic/inorganic hybrid composites, Nafion® analog material, and heteropoly acid doped Nafion membranes were studied using a BekkTech® conductivity test cell as a hydrogen pump. The goal was to find a high-temperature membrane with sufficient enough conductive properties to replace the currently implemented low-temperature membranes, such as Nafion. Four-point conductivity measurements were taken using a hydrogen pump experiment. Results showed that one of the organic/inorganic membranes that we tested had similar protonic conductivity to Nafion. Nafion analog membranes were shown to have similar to slightly better conductivity than Nafion at high-temperatures. However, like Nafion, performance dropped upon dehydration of the membrane at higher temperatures. Of the heteropoly acid doped Nafion membranes studied, silicotungstic acid was found to be, overall, the most promising for use as a dopant.

  16. Temperature sensitivity of surface tension-driven flows: Application to time-temperature integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, John; Hunter, Lawrence; Boyle, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The effects of time-dependent temperature fluctuations on surface-tension driven fluid flow inside a capillary are modeled using classical hydrodynamics. To begin, we use Newton's second law to derive a non-dimensional equation of motion that describes capillary flow as a function of system geometry, fluid properties, and fluid temperature. We use this model to examine how temperature excursions affect the instantaneous and long-term position and velocity of the fluid front inside the capillary. Next, we examine the combined effects of orientation change and temperature change on fluid movement through the capillary. Using this data, we show how to design a non-powered time-temperature integration device for recording the cumulative temperature exposure history of an asset or local environment. By selecting an appropriate fluid and capillary geometry, we show how such devices can be designed to exhibit arbitrary temperature sensitivities, operate over arbitrary monitoring periods (months to decades), and operate in a manner that does not depend on orientation.

  17. Hypermedia as medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dede, Christopher J.

    1990-01-01

    Claims and rebuttals that hypermedia (the associative, nonlinear interconnection of multimedia materials) is a fundamentally innovative means of thinking and communicating are described. This representational architecture has many advantages that make it a major advance over other media; however, it also has several intrinsic problems that severly limits its effectiveness as a medium. These advantages and limits in applications are discussed.

  18. Novel, fiber optic, hybrid pressure and temperature sensor designed for high-temperature gen-IV reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, M. E.; Fielder, R. S.; Davis, M. A.

    2006-07-01

    A novel, fiber optic, hybrid pressure-temperature sensor is presented. The sensor is designed for reliable operation up to 1050 C, and is based on the high-temperature fiber optic sensors already demonstrated during previous work. The novelty of the sensors presented here lies in the fact that pressure and temperature are measured simultaneously with a single fiber and a single transducer. This hybrid approach will enable highly accurate active temperature compensation and sensor self-diagnostics not possible with other platforms. Hybrid pressure and temperature sensors were calibrated by varying both pressure and temperature. Implementing active temperature compensation resulted in a ten-fold reduction in the temperature-dependence of the pressure measurement. Sensors were also tested for operability in a relatively high neutron radiation environment up to 6.9x10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2}. In addition to harsh environment survivability, fiber optic sensors offer a number of intrinsic advantages for nuclear power applications including small size, immunity to electromagnetic interference, self diagnostics / prognostics, and smart sensor capability. Deploying fiber optic sensors on future nuclear power plant designs would provide a substantial improvement in system health monitoring and safety instrumentation. Additional development is needed, however, before these advantages can be realized. This paper will highlight recent demonstrations of fiber optic sensors in environments relevant to emerging nuclear power plants. Successes and lessons learned will be highlighted. (authors)

  19. Application of strong fluctuation random medium theory to scattering of electromagnetic waves from a half-space of dielectric mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, L.; Newton, R. W.; Kong, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The strong fluctuation random medium theory is applied to calculate scattering from a half-space of dielectric mixture. The first and second moments of the fields are calculated, respectively, by using the bilocal and the distorted Born approximations, and the low frequency limit is taken. The singularity of the dyadic Green's function is taken into account. Expressions for the effective permittivity for the full space case are derived. It is shown that the derived result of the effect permittivity is identical to that of the Polder and van Santern mixing formula. The correlation function of the random medium is obtained by using simple physical arguments and is expressed in terms of the fractional volumes and particle sizes of the constituents of the mixture. Backscattering coefficients of a half-space dielectric mixture are also calculated. Numerical results of the effective permittivity and backscattering coefficients are illustrated using typical parameters encountered in microwave remote sensing of dry and wet snow. It is also shown that experimental data can be matched with the theory by using physical parameters of the medium as obtained from ground truth measurements.

  20. Structural application of high strength, high temperature ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    The operation of rocket engine turbine pumps is limited by the temperature restrictions of metallic components used in the systems. Mechanical strength and stability of these metallic components decrease drastically at elevated temperatures. Ceramic materials that retain high strength at high temperatures appear to be a feasible alternate material for use in the hot end of the turbopumps. This project identified and defined the processing parameters that affected the properties of Si3N4, one of candidate ceramic materials. Apparatus was assembled and put into operation to hot press Si3N4 powders into bulk material for in house evaluation. A work statement was completed to seek outside contract services to design, manufacture, and evaluate Si3N4 components in the service environments that exists in SSME turbopumps.

  1. Self-lubricating coatings for high-temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1990-01-01

    Solid lubricants with maximum temperature capabilities of about 1100 C are known. Unfortunately, none of the solid lubricants with the highest temperature capabilities are effective below 400 C. However, research at NASA's Lewis Research Center shows that silver and stable fluorides such as calcium and barium fluorides act synergistically to provide lubrication from below room temperature to about 900 C. This paper describes plasma-sprayed composite coatings that contain these solid lubricants in combination with a metal-bonded chromium carbide. The lubricants control friction, and the carbide matrix provides wear resistance. Successful tests of these coatings as backup lubricants for compliant gas bearings in turbomachinery and as self-lubricating liners in a four-cylinder Stirling engine are discussed.

  2. Electrochemical corrosion rate probes for high temperature energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Cayard, M.S.; Eden, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Electrochemical corrosion rate (ECR) probes were constructed and exposed along with mass loss coupons in a N2/O2/CO2/H2O environment to determine ECR probe operating characteristics. Temperatures ranged from 450 to 800 C and both ECR probes and mass loss coupons were coated with ash. Results are presented in terms of the probe response to temperature, the measured zero baseline, and the quantitative nature of the probes. The effect of Stern-Geary constant and the choice of electrochemical technique used to measure the corrosion rate are also discussed. ECR probe corrosion rates were a function of time, temperature, and process environment and were found to be quantitative for some test conditions. Measured Stern-Geary constants averaged 0.0141 V/decade and the linear polarization technique was found to be more quantitative than the electrochemical noise technique.

  3. 1-3 piezoelectric composites for high temperature transducer applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lili; Zhang, Shujun; Xu, Zhuo; Wen, Fei; Geng, Xuecang; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Shrout, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    High temperature Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 /epoxy 1-3 composites were fabricated using the dice and fill method. The epoxy filler was modified with glass spheres in order to improve the thermal reliability of the composites at elevated temperatures. Temperature dependent dielectric and electromechanical properties of the composites were measured after aging at 250°C with different dwelling times. Obvious cracks were observed and the electrodes were damaged in the composite with unmodified epoxy after 200 hours, leading to the failure of the composite. In contrast, composites with >12 vol% glass sphere loaded epoxies were found to exhibit minimal electrical property variation after aging for 500 hours, with dielectric permittivity, piezoelectric coefficient and electromechanical coupling being on the order of 940, 310pC/N and 57%, respectively. This is due to the improved thermal expansion behavior of the modified filler. PMID:23729863

  4. 1-3 piezoelectric composites for high temperature transducer applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Lili; Zhang, Shujun; Xu, Zhuo; Wen, Fei; Geng, Xuecang; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Shrout, Thomas R

    2013-04-24

    High temperature Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 /epoxy 1-3 composites were fabricated using the dice and fill method. The epoxy filler was modified with glass spheres in order to improve the thermal reliability of the composites at elevated temperatures. Temperature dependent dielectric and electromechanical properties of the composites were measured after aging at 250°C with different dwelling times. Obvious cracks were observed and the electrodes were damaged in the composite with unmodified epoxy after 200 hours, leading to the failure of the composite. In contrast, composites with >12 vol% glass sphere loaded epoxies were found to exhibit minimal electrical property variation after aging for 500 hours, with dielectric permittivity, piezoelectric coefficient and electromechanical coupling being on the order of 940, 310pC/N and 57%, respectively. This is due to the improved thermal expansion behavior of the modified filler.

  5. 9 Cr-- 1 Mo steel material for high temperature application

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Paul D; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

    2012-11-27

    One or more embodiments relates to a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel has a tempered martensite microstructure and is comprised of both large (0.5-3 .mu.m) primary titanium carbides and small (5-50 nm) secondary titanium carbides in a ratio of. from about 1:1.5 to about 1.5:1. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel may be fabricated using exemplary austenizing, rapid cooling, and tempering steps without subsequent hot working requirements. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibits improvements in total mass gain, yield strength, and time-to-rupture over ASTM P91 and ASTM P92 at the temperature and time conditions examined.

  6. Room-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroic thin films and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Katiyar, Ram S; Kuman, Ashok; Scott, James F.

    2014-08-12

    The invention provides a novel class of room-temperature, single-phase, magnetoelectric multiferroic (PbFe.sub.0.67W.sub.0.33O.sub.3).sub.x (PbZr.sub.0.53Ti.sub.0.47O.sub.3).sub.1-x (0.2.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.8) (PFW.sub.x-PZT.sub.1-x) thin films that exhibit high dielectric constants, high polarization, weak saturation magnetization, broad dielectric temperature peak, high-frequency dispersion, low dielectric loss and low leakage current. These properties render them to be suitable candidates for room-temperature multiferroic devices. Methods of preparation are also provided.

  7. Electrolytes for Li-Ion Cells in Low Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Surampudi, S.

    2000-01-01

    Prototype AA-size lithium-ion cells have been demonstrated to operate effectively at temperatures as low as -30 to -40 C. These improvements in low temperature cell performance have been realized by the incorporation of ethylene carbonate-based electrolytes which possess low melting, low viscosity cosolvents, such as methyl acetate, ethyl acetate, gamma-butyrolactone, and ethyl methyl carbonate. The cells containing a 0.75M LiPF6 EC+DEC+DMC+EMC (1:1:1:1) electrolyte displayed the best performance at -30 C (> 90% of the room temperature capacity at approximately C/15 rate), whereas, at -40 C the cells with the 0.75M LiPF6 EC+DEC+DMC+MA (1:1:1:1) and 0.75M LiPF6 EC+DEC+DMC+EA (1:1:1:1) electrolytes showed superior performance.

  8. Metals Technology for Aerospace Applications in 2020: Development of High Temperature Aluminum Alloys For Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicus, Dennis (Technical Monitor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The role of trace additions on the nucleation and stability of the primary strengthening phase, omega, is of paramount importance for the enhancement of mechanical properties for moderate temperature application of Al-Cu-Mg-(Ag) alloys. In order to better understand the competition for solute, which governs the microstructural evolution of these alloys, a series of Al-Cu-Mg-Si quaternary alloys were prepared to investigate the role of trace Si additions on the nucleation of the omega phase. Si additions were found to quell omega nucleation in conjunction with the enhanced matrix precipitation of competing phases. These initial results indicate that it is necessary to overcome a critical Mg/Si ratio for omega precipitation, rather than a particular Si content.

  9. Metal-metal laminar composites for high-temperature applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, C. A.; Weeton, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The potentialities of composites consisting of multiple layers of tungsten alternated by layers of Nichrome V (a ductile, weaker than tungsten, but oxidation resistant alloy) at temperatures on the order of 2000 F are studied experimentally. The highest tensile strengths obtained for the composites were 600 MN/sq m (87,000 psi) at 1600 F and 448 MN/sq m (65,000 psi) at 2000 F. Highest 100-hr stress-rupture strengths at these temperatures were 387 MN/sq m (56,000 psi) and 121 MN/sq m (17,500 psi), respectively.

  10. High temperature strain gage technology for hypersonic aircraft development applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. L.; Grant, H. P.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of Pd 13 percent Cr and of BCL-3 alloy wire strain gages was conducted on IN100 and Cu 0.15 percent Zr alloy substrates. Testing included apparent strain, drift, gage factor, and creep. Maximum test temperature was 1144 K (1600 F). The PdCr gages incorporated Pt temperature compensation elements. The PdCr gages were found to have good resistance stability below 866 K (1100 F). The BCL 3 gages were found to have good resistance stability above 800 K (981 F), but high drift around 700 K (800 F).

  11. An application of fractional integration to a long temperature series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Alana, L. A.

    2003-11-01

    Some recently proposed techniques of fractional integration are applied to a long UK temperature series. The tests are valid under general forms of serial correlation and do not require estimation of the fractional differencing parameter. The results show that central England temperatures have increased about 0.23 °C per 100 years in recent history. Attempting to summarize the conclusions for each of the months, we are left with the impression that the highest increase has occurred during the months from October to March.

  12. Stability of Materials in High Temperature Water Vapor: SOFC Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, E. J.; Jacobson, N. S.

    2010-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell material systems require long term stability in environments containing high-temperature water vapor. Many materials in fuel cell systems react with high-temperature water vapor to form volatile hydroxides which can degrade cell performance. In this paper, experimental methods to characterize these volatility reactions including the transpiration technique, thermogravimetric analysis, and high pressure mass spectrometry are reviewed. Experimentally determined data for chromia, silica, and alumina volatility are presented. In addition, data from the literature for the stability of other materials important in fuel cell systems are reviewed. Finally, methods for predicting material recession due to volatilization reactions are described.

  13. A polytetrafluorethylene insulated cable for high temperature oxygen aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, A. T.; Webber, R. G.

    For electrical cables to function and survive in the severe high temperature oxygen environment that will be experienced in the external tanks of the space shuttle, extreme cleanliness and material purity is required. A flexible light weight cable has been developed for use in pure oxygen at worst case temperatures of -190 to +260 degrees Centigrade and pressures as high as 44 pounds per square inch absolute. A comprehensive series of tests were performed on cables manufactured to the best commercial practices in order to establish the basic guidelines for control of build configuration as well as each material used in construction of the cable.

  14. A Silicon Carbide Wireless Temperature Sensing System for High Temperature Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    In this article, an extreme environment-capable temperature sensing system based on state-of-art silicon carbide (SiC) wireless electronics is presented. In conjunction with a Pt-Pb thermocouple, the SiC wireless sensor suite is operable at 450 °C while under centrifugal load greater than 1,000 g. This SiC wireless temperature sensing system is designed to be non-intrusively embedded inside the gas turbine generators, acquiring the temperature information of critical components such as turbine blades, and wirelessly transmitting the information to the receiver located outside the turbine engine. A prototype system was developed and verified up to 450 °C through high temperature lab testing. The combination of the extreme temperature SiC wireless telemetry technology and integrated harsh environment sensors will allow for condition-based in-situ maintenance of power generators and aircraft turbines in field operation, and can be applied in many other industries requiring extreme environment monitoring and maintenance. PMID:23377189

  15. A silicon carbide wireless temperature sensing system for high temperature applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie

    2013-02-01

    In this article, an extreme environment-capable temperature sensing system based on state-of-art silicon carbide (SiC) wireless electronics is presented. In conjunction with a Pt-Pb thermocouple, the SiC wireless sensor suite is operable at 450 °C while under centrifugal load greater than 1,000 g. This SiC wireless temperature sensing system is designed to be non-intrusively embedded inside the gas turbine generators, acquiring the temperature information of critical components such as turbine blades, and wirelessly transmitting the information to the receiver located outside the turbine engine. A prototype system was developed and verified up to 450 °C through high temperature lab testing. The combination of the extreme temperature SiC wireless telemetry technology and integrated harsh environment sensors will allow for condition-based in-situ maintenance of power generators and aircraft turbines in field operation, and can be applied in many other industries requiring extreme environment monitoring and maintenance.

  16. A silicon carbide wireless temperature sensing system for high temperature applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    In this article, an extreme environment-capable temperature sensing system based on state-of-art silicon carbide (SiC) wireless electronics is presented. In conjunction with a Pt-Pb thermocouple, the SiC wireless sensor suite is operable at 450 °C while under centrifugal load greater than 1,000 g. This SiC wireless temperature sensing system is designed to be non-intrusively embedded inside the gas turbine generators, acquiring the temperature information of critical components such as turbine blades, and wirelessly transmitting the information to the receiver located outside the turbine engine. A prototype system was developed and verified up to 450 °C through high temperature lab testing. The combination of the extreme temperature SiC wireless telemetry technology and integrated harsh environment sensors will allow for condition-based in-situ maintenance of power generators and aircraft turbines in field operation, and can be applied in many other industries requiring extreme environment monitoring and maintenance. PMID:23377189

  17. STREAM TEMPERATURE SIMULATION OF FORESTED RIPARIAN AREAS: II. MODEL APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SHADE-HSPF modeling system described in a companion paper has been tested and applied to the Upper Grande Ronde (UGR) watershed in northeast Oregon. Sensitivities of stream temperature to the heat balance parameters in Hydrologic Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) and the ripa...

  18. Kamacite blocking temperatures and applications to lunar magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrick-Bethell, Ian; Weiss, Benjamin P.

    2010-05-01

    The long-term stability of remanent magnetization is a requirement for paleomagnetic studies. Here we present calculations that predict the magnetic relaxation times of single domain crystals of the iron-nickel mineral kamacite as a function of their time-temperature history. Kamacite is one of the most abundant ferromagnetic minerals in the solar system and is the dominant remanence carrier on the Moon. We perform these calculations for a variety of grain sizes, times, and temperatures to derive a broad view of the remanence stability of kamacite over geologic timescales. Previously, such blocking temperature calculations were only available for the common Earth minerals magnetite, hematite, and pyrrhotite. Our results show that remanence in kamacite-bearing lunar samples is stable against typical thermal perturbations during the last several billion years of lunar history and residence on Earth. Our findings indicate that lunar paleomagnetism cannot be entirely an artifact due to sample storage in the Earth's magnetic field. Future paleomagnetic studies of iron-bearing samples can use our blocking temperature diagram to determine the effects of geologic heating events on magnetic remanence.

  19. Applications of Land Surface Temperature from Microwave Observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a key input for physically-based retrieval algorithms of hydrological states and fluxes. Yet, it remains a poorly constrained parameter for global scale studies. The main two observational methods to remotely measure T are based on thermal infrared (TIR) observation...

  20. Advances in processing of NiAl intermetallic alloys and composites for high temperature aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochenek, Kamil; Basista, Michal

    2015-11-01

    Over the last few decades intermetallic compounds such as NiAl have been considered as potential high temperature structural materials for aerospace industry. A large number of investigations have been reported describing complex fabrication routes, introducing various reinforcing/alloying elements along with theoretical analyses. These research works were mainly focused on the overcoming of main disadvantage of nickel aluminides that still restricts their application range, i.e. brittleness at room temperature. In this paper we present an overview of research on NiAl processing and indicate methods that are promising in solving the low fracture toughness issue at room temperature. Other material properties relevant for high temperature applications are also addressed. The analysis is primarily done from the perspective of NiAl application in aero engines in temperature regimes from room up to the operating temperature (over 1150 °C) of turbine blades.

  1. Application of the discrete generalized multigroup method to ultra-fine energy mesh in infinite medium calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, N. A.; Forget, B.

    2012-07-01

    The Discrete Generalized Multigroup (DGM) method uses discrete Legendre orthogonal polynomials to expand the energy dependence of the multigroup neutron transport equation. This allows a solution on a fine energy mesh to be approximated for a cost comparable to a solution on a coarse energy mesh. The DGM method is applied to an ultra-fine energy mesh (14,767 groups) to avoid using self-shielding methodologies without introducing the cost usually associated with such energy discretization. Results show DGM to converge to the reference ultra-fine solution after a small number of recondensation steps for multiple infinite medium compositions. (authors)

  2. High-temperature spectroscopy for nuclear waste applications

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, P.M.; Robouch, P.; Torres, R.A.; Silva, R.J.

    1991-10-01

    Instrumentation has been developed to perform uv-vis-nir absorbance measurements remotely and at elevated temperatures and pressures. Fiber-optic spectroscopy permits the interrogation of radioactive species within a glovebox enclosure at temperatures ranging from ambient to >100{degree}C. Spectral shifts as a function of metal- ligand coordination are used to compute thermodynamic free energies of reaction by matrix regression analysis. Pr{sup 3+} serves as a convenient analog for trivalent actinides without attendant radioactivity hazards, and recent results obtained from 20{degree}--95{degree}C with the Pr-acetate complexation system are presented. Preliminary experimentation on Am(3) hydrolysis is also described. 16 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Iron aluminide alloys with improved properties for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    McKamey, Claudette G.; Liu, Chain T.

    1990-01-01

    An improved iron aluminide alloy of the DO.sub.3 type that has increased room temperature ductility and improved high elevated temperature strength. The alloy system further is resistant to corrosive attack in the environments of advanced energy corrosion systems such as those using fossil fuels. The resultant alloy is relatively inexpensive as contrasted to nickel based and high nickel steels currently utilized for structural components. The alloy system consists essentially of 26-30 at. % aluminum, 0.5-10 at. % chromium, 0.02-0.3 at. % boron plus carbon, up to 2 at. % molybdenum, up to 1 at. % niobium, up to 0.5 at. % zirconium, up to 0.1 at. % yttrium, up to 0.5 at. % vanadium and the balance iron.

  4. Iron aluminide alloys with improved properties for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    McKamey, C.G.; Liu, C.T.

    1990-10-09

    An improved iron aluminide alloy of the DO[sub 3] type is described that has increased room temperature ductility and improved high elevated temperature strength. The alloy system further is resistant to corrosive attack in the environments of advanced energy conversion systems such as those using fossil fuels. The resultant alloy is relatively inexpensive as contrasted to nickel based and high nickel steels currently utilized for structural components. The alloy system consists essentially of 26--30 at. % aluminum, 0.5--10 at. % chromium, 0.02--0.3 at. % boron plus carbon, up to 2 at. % molybdenum, up to 1 at. % niobium, up to 0.5 at. % zirconium, up to 0.1 at. % yttrium, up to 0.5 at. % vanadium and the balance iron. 3 figs.

  5. Metal-metal laminar composites for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, C. A.; Weeton, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A study was conducted to obtain indications of the potentialities of laminar metal-metal composites for elevated temperature use. Most of the composites consisted of multiple layers or laminae of tungsten alternated with laminae of Nichrome V, a ductile, weaker but oxidation-resistant alloy. Composites with 50 volume percent of each phase were tested in tension and stress rupture at temperatures of 871 and 1093 C (1600 and 2000 F) and in impact at 23 and 524 C (73 and 975 F). A tension and a short time stress-rupture test was conducted on specimens of 77 v/o W-Re-Hf-C/23 v/o Inconel alloy 600 at 1093 C (2000 F).

  6. Thermal Barrier/Seal for Extreme Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Phelps, Jack; Bauer, Paul; Bond, Bruce; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large solid rocket motors, as found on the Space Shuttle, are fabricated in segments for manufacturing considerations, bolted together, and sealed using conventional Viton O-ring seals. Similarly the nine large solid rocket motor nozzles are assembled from several different segments, bolted together, and sealed at six joint locations using conventional O-ring seals. The 5500 F combustion gases are generally kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of phenolic or rubber insulation. Joint-fill compounds, including RTV (room temperature vulcanized compound) and polysulfide filler, are used to fill the joints in the insulation to prevent a direct flow-path to the O-rings. Normally these two stages of protection are enough to prevent a direct flow-path of the 900-psi hot gases from reaching the temperature-sensitive O-ring seals. However, in the current design 1 out of 15 Space Shuttle solid rocket motors experience hot gas effects on the Joint 6 wiper (sacrificial) O-rings. Also worrisome is the fact that joints have experienced heat effects on materials between the RTV and the O-rings, and in two cases O-rings have experienced heat effects. These conditions lead to extensive reviews of the post-flight conditions as part of the effort to monitor flight safety. We have developed a braided carbon fiber thermal barrier to replace the joint fill compounds in the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor nozzles to reduce the incoming 5500 F combustion gas temperature and permit only cool (approximately 100 F) gas to reach the temperature-sensitive O-ring seals. Implementation of this thermal barrier provides more robust, consistent operation with shorter turn around times between Shuttle launches.

  7. Development of integrated thermionic circuits for high-temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, J.B.; Wilde, D.; Depp, S.; Hamilton, D.J.; Kerwin, W.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes a class of microminiature, thin film devices known as integrated thermionic circuits (ITC) capable of extended operation in ambient temperatures up to 500/sup 0/C. The evolution of the ITC concept is discussed. A set of practical design and performance equations is demonstrated. Recent experimental results are discussed in which both devices and simple circuits have successfully operated in 500/sup 0/C environments for extended periods of time (greater than 11,000 hours).

  8. Real-Time Finite-Temperature Holography and its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chaolun

    This dissertation begins with a brief review of basic concepts of holography (AdS/CFT correspondence, Chapter 1). A complete prescription for computing real-time correlators in strongly-coupled conformal field theories at finite-temperature using holography is proposed and checked, and all scalar real-time 3-point correlators of the relativistic conformal field theory are computed at the tree level of dual gravity theory (Chapter 2). The causal 3-point correlators are found to have a simple structure which can be easily generalized to higher n-point correlators and higher spin operators. Then the same prescription is applied to non-relativistic holography (Chapter 3). All scalar real-time 2-point correlators and time-ordered and causal 3-point correlators of finite-temperature Schrödinger field theory are computed there. In the last two chapters, the prescription for relativistic real-time finite-temperature holography and in particular the causal 3-point correlators derived earlier, are used to study various properties of a strongly-coupled plasma, specifically that of N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills field theory. By computing causal energy-stress tensor 3-point correlators analytically in the hydrodynamic regime and matching them with the holographic result, and through the use of newly developed second order Kubo formulae, all five second order transport coefficients of the relativistic conformal hydrodynamics are systematically and consistently computed (Chapter 4). Jet quenching in a strongly-coupled plasma at finite-temperature and finite-chemical potential is also studied by an analytic computation of causal R-current 3-point correlators in large momentum regime. A more detailed and comprehensive picture than previously known emerges (Chapter 5). The dependence of typical jet stopping distance on its initial energy has an exponent 1/4, rather than the 1/3 which was widely known, and the jet quenching is enhanced by introducing a chemical potential to the

  9. Low Temperature Atmospheric Argon Plasma: Diagnostics and Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolaeva, Svetlana; Petrov, Oleg; Zigangirova, Nailya; Vasiliev, Mikhail; Sysolyatina, Elena; Antipov, Sergei; Alyapyshev, Maxim; Kolkova, Natalia; Mukhachev, Andrei; Naroditsky, Boris; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Grigoriev, Anatoly; Morfill, Gregor; Fortov, Vladimir; Gintsburg, Alexander

    This study was devoted to diagnostic of low temperature plasma produced by microwave generator and investigation of its bactericidal effect against bacteria in biofilms and within eukaryotic cells. The profile of gas temperature near the torch outlet was measured. The spectrum in a wide range of wavelengths was derived by the method of optical emission spec-troscopy. Probe measurements of the floating potential of plasma were car-ried out. The estimation and adaptation of parameters of plasma flow (tem-perature, velocity, ion number density) according to medico-technical requirements were produced. The model of immersed surface-associated biofilms formed by Gram-negative bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia, and Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, was used to assess bactericidal effects of plasma treatment. Reduction in the concentration of live bacteria in biofilms treated with plasma for 5 min was demonstrated by measuring Live/Dead fluorescent labeling and using direct plating. The intracellular infection model with the pathogenic bacterium, Chlamydia trachomatis, was used to study the efficacy of microwave argon plasma against intracellular parasites. A 2 min plasma treatment of mouse cells infected with C. trachomatis reduced infectious bacteria by a factor of 2×106. Plasma treatment diminished the number of viable host cells by about 20%. When the samples were covered with MgF2 glass to obstruct active particles and UV alone was applied, the bactericidal effect was re-duced by 5×104 fold compared to the whole plasma.

  10. Low temperature high frequency coaxial pulse tube for space application

    SciTech Connect

    Charrier, Aurelia; Charles, Ivan; Rousset, Bernard; Duval, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-29

    The 4K stage is a critical step for space missions. The Hershel mission is using a helium bath, which is consumed day by day (after depletion, the space mission is over) while the Plank mission is equipped with one He4 Joule-Thomson cooler. Cryogenic chain without helium bath is a challenge for space missions and 4.2K Pulse-Tube working at high frequency (around 30Hz) is one option to take it up. A low temperature Pulse-Tube would be suitable for the ESA space mission EChO (Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory, expected launch in 2022), which requires around 30mW cooling power at 6K; and for the ESA space mission ATHENA (Advanced Telescope for High ENergy Astrophysics), to pre-cool the sub-kelvin cooler (few hundreds of mW at 15K). The test bench described in this paper combines a Gifford-McMahon with a coaxial Pulse-Tube. A thermal link is joining the intercept of the Pulse-Tube and the second stage of the Gifford-McMahon. This intercept is a separator between the hot and the cold regenerators of the Pulse-Tube. The work has been focused on the cold part of this cold finger. Coupled with an active phase shifter, this Pulse-Tube has been tested and optimized and temperatures as low as 6K have been obtained at 30Hz with an intercept temperature at 20K.

  11. Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are enabling materials for a number of demanding applications in aerospace, energy, and nuclear industries. In the aerospace systems, these materials are being considered for applications in hot sections of jet engines such as the combustor liner, vanes, nozzle components, nose cones, leading edges of reentry vehicles, and space propulsion components. Applications in the energy and environmental industries include radiant heater tubes, heat exchangers, heat recuperators, gas and diesel particulate filters, and components for land based turbines for power generation. These materials are also being considered for use in the first wall and blanket components of fusion reactors. In the last few years, a number of CMC components have been developed and successfully tested for various aerospace and ground based applications. However, a number of challenges still remain slowing the wide scale implementation of these materials. They include robust fabrication and manufacturing, assembly and integration, coatings, property modeling and life prediction, design codes and databases, repair and refurbishment, and cost. Fabrication of net and complex shape components with high density and tailorable matrix properties is quite expensive, and even then various desirable properties are not achievable. In this presentation, a number of examples of successful CMC component development and testing will be provided. In addition, critical need for robust manufacturing, joining and assembly technologies in successful implementation of these systems will be discussed.

  12. Potential power sources for high-temperature geothermal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, R.A.; Dobranich, D

    1996-05-01

    The thermal response under geothermal-borehole conditions of a conventional thermal battery was evaluated for various designs by numerical simulations using a finite-element thermal model. This technology, which is based on molten salts, may be suitable as a power source for geothermal borehole applications for data logging. Several promising candidate electrolytes were identified for further study.

  13. High temperature superconductive microwave technology for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, R. F.; Connolly, D. J.; Bhasin, K. B.; Warner, J. D.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    Progress being made on space application technology research on film fabrication, passive microwave circuits, and semiconductor devices for cryogenic circuits is reviewed. Achievements in YBCO and TCBCO films are addressed along with circuit evaluations of microstrip resonators, phase shifters, microstrip filters, dielectric resonator filters, and superconducting antennas.

  14. Application of Principal Component Analysis to Large-Scale Spectral Line Imaging Studies of the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, Mark H.; Peter Schloerb, F.

    1997-01-01

    The multivariate statistical technique of principal component analysis (PCA) is described and demonstrated to be a valuable tool to consolidate the large amount of information obtained with spectroscopic imaging observations of the interstellar medium. Simple interstellar cloud models with varying degrees of complexity and Gaussian noise are constructed and analyzed to demonstrate the ability of PCA to statistically extract physical features and phenomena from the data and to gauge the effects of random noise upon the analysis. Principal components are calculated for high spatial dynamic range 12CO and 13CO data cubes of the Sh 155 (Cep OB3) cloud complex. These identify the three major emission components within the cloud and the spatial differences between 12CO and 13CO emissions. Higher order eigenimages identify small velocity fluctuations and therefore provide spatial information to the turbulent velocity field within the cloud. A size line width relationship δv ~ Rα is derived from spatial and kinematic characterizations of the principal components of 12CO emission from the Sh 155, Sh 235, Sh 140, and Gem OB1 cloud complexes. The power-law indices for these clouds range from 0.42 to 0.55 and are similar to those derived from an ensemble of clouds within the Galaxy found by Larson (1981) and Solomon et al. (1987). The size-line width relationship within a given cloud provides an important diagnostic to the variation of kinetic energy with size scale within turbulent flows of the interstellar medium.

  15. [The medium chain fat acids. Content in food. Physiology, characteristics of metabolism and application in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Arkhipovskiĭ, A V; Titov, V N

    2013-06-01

    It is rational, according to biology laws and purposes for which cells use fatty acids, to distinguish between saturated (without double bonds in chain), monoene (with one bond), unsaturated (with 2 and 3 double bonds) and polyene (with 4, 5 and 6 double bonds) acids. The saturated and monoene fatty acids are mainly the substratum for oxygenation and working out of energy by cells. The unsaturated fatty acids are the substratum for formation of membranes. The polyene fatty acids are the predecessors of synthesis of eicosanoids and aminophosphotides. With subject to characteristics of metabolism and transfer in vivo, the fatty acids are subdivided into short chain C4 - C8 and medium chain C-10 - C-14 fatty acids. The etherification occurs with glycerin into "short" triglycerides which are not bounded with apoproteins. The long chain fatty acids form "long" triglycerides which in enterocytes are structured by apoprotein B-48 into composition of chylomicrons. It is possible to validly consider that difference in outflow from enterocytes to veins of portal system (which includes veins of omentum) of medium chain fatty acids in the form of short triglycerides can directly input into pathogenesis of syndrome of isolated omental obesity and metabolic syndrome. The another input into the mentioned conditions is the secretion through ductus thoracicus into large veins of greater systemic circulation of long chain fatty acids in the form of triglycerides in the content of chylomicrons. The omental obesity is the only specific symptom of metabolic syndrome.

  16. Enhanced conjugation of Candida rugosa lipase onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes using reverse micelles as attachment medium and application in nonaqueous biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, Tripti; Vahora, Uzma; Shah, Amita R; Madamwar, Datta

    2014-01-01

    Three liquid phases (viz. aqueous, nonaqueous, and reverse micelles) were scrutinized as medium for attachment of the enzyme Candida rugosa lipase (CRL) onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The nanotubes were functionalized to attain carboxyl and amino groups on their surfaces before enzyme conjugation. Transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopic studies were used for characterization of the nanotubes during the course of functionalization. High enzyme loadings associated with the functionalized CNTs were observed when reverse micelles were used as the attachment medium. In addition, high activity in terms of ester synthesis in organic solvents was also observed while using those preparations. The nanobioconjugates prepared using reverse micelles were found to be highly sturdy and exhibited appreciable operational stability of around 95 ± 3% at 20th cycle (in case of carboxylated nanotubes) and 90 ± 5% at 10th cycle (in case of aminated nanotubes) for esterification. This shows the potential application of reverse micelles as the attachment medium for surface active enzymes such as CRL onto CNTs.

  17. Electrical properties of materials for high temperature strain gage applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brittain, John O.

    1989-01-01

    A study was done on the electrical resistance of materials that are potentially useful as resistance strain gages at high temperatures under static strain conditions. Initially a number of binary alloys were investigated. Later, third elements were added to these alloys, all of which were prepared by arc melting. Several transition metals were selected for experimentation, most prepared as thin films. Difficulties with electrical contacts thwarted efforts to extend measurements to the targeted 1000 C, but results obtained did suggest ways of improving the electrical resistance characteristics of certain materials.

  18. New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Application

    SciTech Connect

    John Coggin; Tom Flynn; Jonas Ivasauskas; Daniel Kominsky; Carrie Kozikowski; Russell May; Michael Miller; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell; Raymond Rumpf; Kelly Stinson-Bagby; Dan Thorsen; Rena Wilson

    2007-12-31

    Accomplishments of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants and solid oxide fuel cells are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring.

  19. Development of Low Temperature Li-Ion Electrolytes for NASA and DoD Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, M.; Ratnakumar, B.; Surampudi, S.; Plichta, E.; Hendrickson, M.; Thompson, R.; Au, G.; Behl, W.

    1999-01-01

    Both NASA and the U.S. Army have interest in developing secondary energy storage devices with improved low temperature performance to meet the demanding requirements of space missions and man-portable applications.

  20. Superalloy for high-temperature hydrogen environmental applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKannan, Eugene C. (Inventor); McPherson, William B. (Inventor); Ahmed, Shaffiq (Inventor); Chandler, Shirley S. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A nickel-based superalloy is provided which is resistant to deterioration in hydrogen at high operating temperatures and pressures, and which thus can be used in hydrogen-fueled spacecraft such as the Space Shuttle. The superalloy is characterized by a two-phase microstructure and consists of a gamma-prime precipitated phase in a gamma matrix. The gamma matrix phase is a primary solid solution and the gamma precipitated phase will be an intermetallic compound of the type A.sub.3 B, such as nickel aluminide or titanide. Both phases are coherent, ordered, and compatible, and thus will retain most of their strength at elevated temperatures. The alloy consists essentially of (by weight): Ni 50-60%, Cr 10-20%, Al 2-6%, Co 2-5%, Ti 3-8%, W 5-12%, Mo 5-10%, Nb 1-3%, wherein the ratio W/MO is approximately equal to 1, and Ti/Al ranges from about 1 to about 2.

  1. Nonparametric Spatial Models for Extremes: Application to Extreme Temperature Data.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Montserrat; Henry, John; Reich, Brian

    2013-03-01

    Estimating the probability of extreme temperature events is difficult because of limited records across time and the need to extrapolate the distributions of these events, as opposed to just the mean, to locations where observations are not available. Another related issue is the need to characterize the uncertainty in the estimated probability of extreme events at different locations. Although the tools for statistical modeling of univariate extremes are well-developed, extending these tools to model spatial extreme data is an active area of research. In this paper, in order to make inference about spatial extreme events, we introduce a new nonparametric model for extremes. We present a Dirichlet-based copula model that is a flexible alternative to parametric copula models such as the normal and t-copula. The proposed modelling approach is fitted using a Bayesian framework that allow us to take into account different sources of uncertainty in the data and models. We apply our methods to annual maximum temperature values in the east-south-central United States. PMID:24058280

  2. High temperature solder alloys for underhood applications: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, J.A.; Drewien, C.A.; Yost, F.G.; Sackinger, S.; Weiser, M.W.

    1996-06-01

    In this continued study, the microstructural evolution and peel strength as a function of thermal aging were evaluated for four Sn-Ag solders deposited on double layered Ag-Pt metallization. Additionally, activation energies for intermetallic growth over the temperature range of 134 to 190{degrees}C were obtained through thickness measurements of the Ag-Sn intermetallic that formed at the solder-metallization interface. It was found that Bi-containing solders yielded higher activation energies for the intermetallic growth, leading to thicker intermetallic layers at 175 and 190{degrees}C for times of 542 and 20.5 hrs, respectively, than the solders free of Bi. Complete reaction of the solder with the metallization occurred and lower peel strengths were measured on the Bi-containing solders. In all solder systems, a Ag-Sn intermetallic thickness of greater than {approximately}7 {mu}m contributed to lower peel strength values. The Ag-Sn binary eutectic composition and the Ag-Sn-Cu ternary eutectic composition solders yielded lower activation energies for intermetallic formation, less microstructural change with time, and higher peel strengths; these solder systems were resilient to the effects of temperatures up to 175{degrees}C. Accelerated isothermal aging studies provide useful criteria for recommendation of materials systems. The Sn-Ag and Sn-Ag-Cu eutectic compositions should be considered for future service life and reliability studies based upon their performance in this study.

  3. Application of an extended random-phase approximation to giant resonances in light-, medium-, and heavy-mass nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tselyaev, V.; Lyutorovich, N.; Speth, J.; Krewald, S.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2016-09-01

    We present results of the time blocking approximation (TBA) for giant resonances in light-, medium-, and heavy-mass nuclei. The TBA is an extension of the widely used random-phase approximation (RPA) adding complex configurations by coupling to phonon excitations. A new method for handling the single-particle continuum is developed and applied in the present calculations. We investigate in detail the dependence of the numerical results on the size of the single-particle space and the number of phonons as well as on nuclear matter properties. Our approach is self-consistent, based on an energy-density functional of Skyrme type where we used seven different parameter sets. The numerical results are compared with experimental data.

  4. Application of statistical experimental designs for the optimization of medium constituents for the production of citric acid from pineapple waste.

    PubMed

    Imandi, Sarat Babu; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Somalanka, Subba Rao; Bandaru, Sita Ramalakshmi; Garapati, Hanumantha Rao

    2008-07-01

    Statistical experimental designs were applied for the optimization of medium constituents for citric acid production by Yarrowia lipolytica NCIM 3589 in solid state fermentation (SSF) using pineapple waste as the sole substrate. Using Plackett-Burman design, yeast extract, moisture content of the substrate, KH(2)PO(4) and Na(2)HPO(4) were identified as significant variables which highly influenced citric acid production and these variables were subsequently optimized using a central composite design (CCD). The optimum conditions were found to be yeast extract 0.34 (%w/w), moisture content of the substrate 70.71 (%), KH(2)PO(4) 0.64 (%w/w) and Na(2)HPO(4) 0.69 (%w/w). Citric acid production at these optimum conditions was 202.35 g/kg ds (g citric acid produced/kg of dried pineapple waste as substrate).

  5. Application of FT-IR spectroscopy for control of the medium composition during the biodegradation of nitro aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Grube, Mara; Muter, Olga; Strikauska, Silvija; Gavare, Marita; Limane, Baiba

    2008-11-01

    Previous studies showed that cabbage leaf extract (CLE) added to the growth medium can noticeably promote the degradation of nitro aromatic compounds by specific consortium of bacteria upon their growth. For further development of the approach for contaminated soil remediation it was necessary to evaluate the qualitative and/or quantitative composition of different origin CLE and their relevance on the growth of explosives-degrading bacteria. Six CLE (different by species, cultivars and harvesting time) were tested and used as additives to the growth medium. It was shown that nitro aromatic compounds can be identified in the FT-IR absorption spectra by the characteristic band at 1,527 cm(-1), and in CLE by the characteristic band at 1,602 cm(-1). The intensity of the CLE band at 1,602 cm(-1) correlated with the concentration of total nitrogen (R2=0.87) and decreased upon the growth of bacteria. The content of nitrogen in CLE differed (0.22-1.00 vol.%) and significantly influenced the content of total carbohydrates (9.50-16.00% DW) and lipids [3.90-9.90% dry weight (DW)] accumulated in bacterial cells while the content of proteins was similar in all samples. Though this study showed quantitative differences in the composition of the studied CLE and the response of bacterial cells to the composition of the growth media, and proved the potential of this additive for remediation of contaminated soil. It was shown that analysis of CLE and monitoring of the conversion of nitro aromatic compounds can be investigated by FT-IR spectroscopy as well as by conventional chemical methods.

  6. Applications of Medium C-Band and High Resolution X-Band Multitemporal Interferometry in Landslide Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasowski, J.; Bovenga, F.; Nutricato, R.; Nitti, D. O.; Chiaradia, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    With the increasing quantity and quality of the imagery available from a growing number of SAR satellites and the improved processing algorithms, multi-temporal interferometry (MTI) is expected to be commonly applied in landslide studies. MTI can now provide long-term (years), regular (weekly-monthly), precise (mm) measurements of ground displacements over large areas (thousands of km2), at medium (~20 m) to high (up to 1-3 m) spatial resolutions, combined with the possibility of multi-scale (regional to local) investigations, using the same series of radar images. We focus on the benefits as well as challenges of multisensor and multi-scale investigations by discussing MTI results regarding two landslide prone regions with distinctly different topographic, climatic and vegetation conditions (mountains in Central Albania and Southern Gansu, China), for which C-band (ERS or ENVISAT) and X-band COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) imagery was available (all in Stripmap descending mode). In both cases X-band MTI outperformed C-band MTI by providing more valuable information for the regional to local scale detection of slope deformations and landslide hazard assessment. This is related to the better spatial-temporal resolutions and more suitable incidence angles (40°-30° versus 23°) of CSK data While the use of medium resolution imagery may be appropriate and more cost-effective in reconnaissance or regional scale investigations, high resolution data could be preferentially exploited when focusing on urbanized landslides or potentially unstable slopes in urban/peri-urban areas, and slopes traversed by lifelines and other engineering structures.

  7. Thermal and economic analysis of solar-assisted heat pumps for low-temperature IPH applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, S. K.; Murphy, L. M.

    1981-10-01

    The potential technical and economic merits of solar assisted heat pump (SAHP) systems (which are high temperature when compared with residential applications) for low-temperature IPH applications are considered. The system looks more promising as the weather becomes more severe, and thus appears to have significant benefit in the less clement industrial areas of the country and in areas where land contraints are a concern.

  8. Silicon carbide-based hydrogen gas sensors for high-temperature applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongjeen; Choi, Jehoon; Jung, Minsoo; Joo, Sungjae; Kim, Sangchoel

    2013-01-01

    We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC) was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures. PMID:24113685

  9. Application of TL dosemeters for dose distribution measurements at high temperatures in nuclear reactors.

    PubMed

    Osvay, M; Deme, S

    2006-01-01

    Al2O3:Mg,Y ceramic thermoluminescence dosemeters were developed at the Institute of Isotopes for high dose applications at room temperatures. The glow curve of Al2O3:Mg,Y exhibits two peaks--one at 250 degrees C (I) and another peak at approximately 400 degrees C (II). In order to extend the application of these dosemeters to high temperatures, the effect of irradiation temperature was investigated using temperature controlled heating system during high dose irradiation at various temperatures (20-100 degrees C). The new calibration and measuring method has been successfully applied for dose mapping within the hermetic zone of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant even at high temperature parts of blocks.

  10. Design and application of FBG strain experimental apparatus in high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zhongcheng; Liu, Yueming; Gao, Xiaoliang

    2014-09-01

    Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensing technology has many applications, and it's widely used in detection of temperature, strain and etc. Now the application of FBG sensor is limited to the temperature below 200°C owing to the so called High Temperature Erasing Phenomenon. Strain detection over 200°C is still an engineering challenge since high temperature has a bad influence on the sensor, testing equipment and test data, etc, thus effective measurement apparatus are needed to ensure the accuracy of the measurement over 200°C, but there are no suitable FBG strain experimental apparatus in high temperature to date. In this paper a high temperature FBG strain experimental apparatus has been designed to detect the strain in high temperature. In order to verify working condition of the high temperature FBG strain, an application of FBG strain sensing experiment was given in this paper. The high temperature FBG strain sensor was installed in the apparatus, the internal temperature of experimental apparatus was controlled from -20 to 300°C accurately, and strain loading was given by the counterweight, then the data was recorded through electrical resistance strain measurement and optical sensing interrogator. Experimental data result shows that the high temperature FBG strain experimental apparatus can work properly over 200°C. The design of the high temperature FBG strain experimental apparatus are demonstrated suitable for high temperature strain gauges and FBG strain sensors , etc, which can work under the temperature of -20 ~ 300°C, the strain of -1500 ~ +1500μepsilon and the wavelength resolution of 1pm.

  11. Characterisation of high temperature refractory ceramics for nuclear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottomley, P. D. W.; Wiss, Th; Janssen, A.; Cremer, B.; Thiele, H.; Manara, D.; Scheindlin, M.; Murray-Farthing, M.; Lajarge, P.; Menna, M.; Bouexière, D.; Rondinella, V. V.

    2012-03-01

    The ternary oxide ceramic system UO2-ZrO2-FeO is a refractory system that is of great relevance to the nuclear industry as it represents one of the main systems resulting from the interaction of the Zircaloy cladding, the UO2 fuel and the structural elements of a nuclear reactor. It is particularly the high temperature properties that require investigation; that is, when substantial overheating of the nuclear core occurs and interactions can lead to its degradation, melting and result in a severe nuclear accident. There has been much work on the UO2-ZrO2 system and also on the ternary system with FeO but there is still a need to examine 2 further aspects; firstly the effect of sub-oxidized systems, the UO2-Zr and FeO-Zr systems, and secondly the effect of Fe/Zr or Fe/U ratios on the melting point of the U-Zr-Fe oxide system. Samples of UO2-Zr and UO2-ZrO2-FeO were fabricated at ITU and then characterized by optical microscopy (OM) and X-ray diffraction to determine the ceramic's structure and verify the composition. Thereafter the samples are to be melted by laser flash heating and their liquidus and solidus temperatures determined by pyrometry. This programme is currently ongoing. The frozen samples, after testing, were then sectioned, polished and the molten zone micro-analytically examined by OM & SEM-EDS in order to determine its structure and composition and to compare with the existing phase diagrams. Examples of results from these systems will be given. Finally, a reacted Zr-FeO thermite mixture was examined, which had been used to generate high temperatures during tests of reactor melt-concrete interactions. The aim was to assess the reaction and estimate the heat generation from this novel technique. These results allow verification or improvement of the phase diagram and are of primary importance as input to models used to predict materials interactions in a severe nuclear accident.

  12. Metal-Coated Optical Fibers for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeakes, Jason; Murphy, Kent; Claus, Richard; Greene, Jonathan; Tran, Tuan

    1996-01-01

    A DC magnetron sputtering system has been used to actively coat optical fibers with hermetic metal coatings during the fiber draw process. Thin films of Inconel 625 have been deposited on optical fibers and annealed in air at 2000 F. Scanning electron microscopy and Auger electron microscopy have been used to investigate the morphology and composition of the films prior to and following thermal cycling. Issues to be addressed include film adhesion, other coating materials, and a discussion of additional applications for this novel technology.

  13. Application & testing of high temperature materials for solenoid coils

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.O.; Archer, W.E.; Zich, J.L.

    1997-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has designed and proven-in two new Solenoid coils for a highly-reliable electromechanical switch. Mil-Spec Magnetics Inc., Walnut CA manufactured the coils. The new design utilizes two new materials: Liquid Crystal Polymer (Vectra C130) for the bobbin and Thermal Barrier Silicone (VI-SIL V-658) for the encapsulant. The use of these two new materials solved most of the manufacturing problems inherent in the old Sandia design. The coils are easier to precision wind and more robust for handling, testing, and storage. The coils have some unique weapon related safety requirements. The most severe of these requirements is the 400{degrees}C, 1600 V test. The coils must not, and did not, produce any outgassing products to affect the voltage breakdown between contacts in the switch at these temperatures and voltages. Actual coils in switches were tested under these conditions. This paper covers the prove-in of this new coil design.

  14. High temperature metal hydrides as heat storage materials for solar and related applications.

    PubMed

    Felderhoff, Michael; Bogdanović, Borislav

    2009-01-01

    For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 degrees C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described.

  15. High Temperature Metal Hydrides as Heat Storage Materials for Solar and Related Applications

    PubMed Central

    Felderhoff, Michael; Bogdanović, Borislav

    2009-01-01

    For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 °C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described. PMID:19333448

  16. Development and application of nonflammable, high-temperature beta fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, Frederic S.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in fiber technology have contributed to the success of the U.S. space program. The inorganic fiber Beta, developed as a result of efforts begun in the early 1960's and heightened following the January 27, 1967 Apollo fire is unique among inorganic and organic fibers. It has been developed into woven, nonwoven, knitted, braided, coated and printed structures. All of these were used extensively for the Apollo, Skylab, Apollo-Soyuz test project, space shuttle, Spacelab, and satellite programs. In addition to being used successfully in the space program, Beta fibers are being used commercially as firesafe fabrics in homes, hospitals, institutions, public buildings, aircraft, and public transportation, wherever total nonflammability is required. One of the most unique applications of the Beta composite structure is the roofing material for the 80,000-seat Detroit Lion's Silverdome and 5 square miles of the Jeddah International Airport in Saudi Arabia. This fiber has been successfully incorporated into 165 major public construction projects around the globe. The United States alone has used more than 12 million square yards of the material. Beta fiber has been used successfully to date and has a promising future with unlimited potential for both space and commercial application. Efforts are currently underway to improve Beta fiber to meet the requirements of extended service life for the Space Station Freedom, lunar outpost, and Mars exploration missions.

  17. Ankle and Thigh Skin Surface Temperature Changes With Repeated Ice Pack Application

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Janice E.; Knight, Kenneth L.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Most of the research on cold applications has been performed on nonexercising supine subjects during a single cold pack application. Most athletic injuries occur during exercise, which increases skin temperature. Exercise before ice application will also increase ankle skin temperature during the rewarming phase. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of activity on subsequent ice pack applications and rewarming using standard immediate care procedures. Design and Setting: Three experimental conditions (20-, 30-, and 40-minute ice pack applications) were applied to 12 subjects in a repeated measures design. Subjects rode a bicycle ergometer for 15 minutes before ice application to the ankle and opposite thigh, and were active (walking with crutches, simulated showering and dressing) for 20 minutes following application. Subjects rested with the limb elevated for an additional 40 minutes. Ice packs were then reapplied for the appropriate time (20, 30, or 40 minutes) followed by 60 minutes of rest with the limb elevated. Subjects: Twelve (8 males, 4 females) college-aged volunteers. Only subjects with good-to-high fitness levels were accepted for this study. Measurements: Ankle skin, thigh skin, and atmospheric temperatures were measured every minute using an Isothermex (Columbus Instruments, Columbus, OH). Results: Thigh temperature changes during the first ice application were greater during the 30- and 40-minute conditions than the 20-minute condition. Ankle and thigh temperature changes during the first ice application and rewarming, and for the entire trial were greater during the 40-minute condition than the 20-or 30-minute conditions. Throughout the first ice application and rewarming, and the entire trial, thigh temperature changes were greater during the 30-minute condition than the 20-minute condition. Conclusions: During immediate care procedures following injury, ice packs should be reapplied immediately following showering

  18. Polymeric medium

    DOEpatents

    Klaehn, John R.; Peterson, Eric S.; Orme, Christopher J.; Jones, Michael G.; Wertsching, Alan K.; Luther, Thomas A.; Trowbridge, Tammy L.

    2012-03-06

    A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with a moiety containing a carbonyl group, the substituted imidazole nitrogens being bonded to carbon of the carbonyl group. At least 85% of the nitrogens may be substituted. The carbonyl-containing moiety may include RCO--, where R is alkoxy or haloalkyl. The PBI compound may exhibit a first temperature marking an onset of weight loss corresponding to reversion of the substituted PBI that is less than a second temperature marking an onset of decomposition of an otherwise identical PBI compound without the substituted moiety. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may use more than 5 equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted.

  19. Development of ultrasonic thermometry for high-temperature high-resolution temperature profiling applications in LMFBR safety research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, M. E.

    1986-05-01

    Ultrasonic thermometry was developed as a high temperature profiling diagnostic for use in the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Debris Coolability Program at Sandia National Laboratories. These instruments were used successfully in the DC series experiments and the D10 experiment. Temperatures approaching 3000 C with spatial resolution of 10 mm and indicated temperature gradients of 700 C/cm were measured. Instruments were operated in molten sodium, molten steel, and molten UO2 environments. Up to 14 measurement zones on a single instrument in molten sodium were used with 12 mm and 15 mm spatial resolution. Hermetically sealed units operating at elevated temperatures were used. Post-test examination revealed very little systematic calibration drifts (less than 10 C) with random drifts occuring with less than 40 C standard deviation in a 10 to 12 mm measured zone. The stability of the system varies from +/- 1 C to +/- 15 C depending on the sensor design constraints for a particular application. Doped tungsten sensors were developed to permit operation of total measurement zone length of 30 cm at temperatures above 2500 C.

  20. Processing of transition metal silicides for high-temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Deevi, S.C.; Sikka, V.K.

    1995-12-31

    The authors review and discuss recent developments in the processing and mechanical properties of MoSi{sub 2} and its composites. High-temperature creep rates of MoSi{sub 2} and its composites are compared to those of several intermetallics and discussed in relation to grain-size effects. Thermophysical properties of MoSi{sub 2} and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} are compared, and the need for functionally graded composites of MoSi{sub 2}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} is discussed. This is followed by a discussion of combustion synthesis, reaction synthesis and densification, in-situ composite development, and reactive hot extrusion of metal-silicon mixtures. In combustion synthesis, a heterogeneous reaction occurs between liquid Si and Mo powder to form MoSi{sub 2}. This technique can be applied to obtain composites and alloys of MoSi{sub 2} and various other transition-metal silicides. In-situ synthesis of a composite of MoSi{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was carried out by reacting a thermite mixture consisting of MoO{sub 3}, Al, and Si powders. X-ray characterization of the products obtained at various temperatures reveals that the mechanism consists of a reduction of MoO{sub 3} by Al to MoO{sub 2}, followed by a simultaneous oxidation of Al to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and a synthesis reaction between reduced Mo and Si to form MoSi{sub 2}. The rate-determining step is found to be reduction of MoO{sub 2} by Al and oxidation of Al to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The thermite reaction was moderated by adding Mo and Si to the mixture of MoO{sub 3}, Al, and Si, such that the ratio of MoSi{sub 2} to the thermite was in the range of 60:40 to 90:10. Reactive extrusion of metal-silicon mixtures of 3Ni-Si and Co-2Si results in a dense product with at least two phases.

  1. Evaluation of a low temperature hardening Inorganic Phosphate Cement for high-temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alshaaer, M.; Cuypers, H.; Mosselmans, G.; Rahier, H.; Wastiels, J.

    2011-01-15

    Phase and mechanical changes of Inorganic Phosphate Cement (IPC) are identified along with changes in macro properties as functions of temperature and time. In addition to amorphous phases, the presence of significant amounts of brushite and wollastonite in the reference IPC is confirmed using X-ray diffraction. The thermal behavior of IPC up to 1000 {sup o}C shows that contraction of the solid phase in IPC due to chemical transformations causes reduction in the volume of the material. Also the ongoing meta-stable calcium phosphate transformations and reactions over a long time contribute significantly to the phase instability of the material at ambient conditions. It is found that the strength of IPC increases with ageing at ambient conditions but the formation microcracks below 105 {sup o}C causes a sharp reduction in the mechanical performance of IPC. According to the results obtained by Mercury intrusion porosimetry, the pore system of the reference IPC is dominated by mesopores.

  2. Dust Particle Growth and Application in Low Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Boufendi, L.

    2008-09-23

    Dust particle nucleation and growth has been widely studied these last fifteen years in different chemistries and experimental conditions. This phenomenon is correlated with various electrical changes at electrodes, including self-bias voltage and amplitudes of the various harmonics of current and voltage [1]. Some of these changes, such as the appearance of more resistive plasma impedance, are correctly attributed to loss of electrons in the bulk plasma to form negative molecular ions (e.g. SiH{sub 3}{sup -}) and more precisely charged nanoparticles. These changes were studied and correlated to the different phases on the dust particle formation. It is well known now that, in silane argon gas mixture discharges, in the first step of this particle formation we have formation of nanometer sized crystallites. These small entities accumulate and when their number density reaches a critical value, about 10{sup 11} to 10{sup 12} cm{sup -1}, they start to aggregate to form bigger particles. The different phases are well defined and determined thanks to the time evolution of the different electrical parameter changes. The purpose of this contribution is to compare different chemistries to highlight similarities and/or differences in order to establish possible universal dust particle growth mechanisms. The chemistries we studied concern SiH{sub 4}-Ar, CH{sub 4}, CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2} and Sn(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}[2]. We also refer to works performed in other laboratories in different discharge configurations [3]. Different applications have already developed or are foreseen for these nanoparticles. The first application concerns the inclusion of nanosized dust crystallites in an amorphous matrix in order to modify the optoelectronic and mechanical properties [4-5]. At the present time a very active research programs are devoted towards single electron devises where nanometer sized crystallites play a role of quantum dots. These nanoparticles can be produced in low pressure cold

  3. Identification and redshift determination of quasi-stellar objects with medium-band photometry: application to Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeskens, J.-F.; Smette, A.; Vandenbulcke, L.; Surdej, J.

    2006-04-01

    All-sky, multicolour, medium deep (V~= 20) surveys have the potentiality of detecting several hundred thousands of quasi-stellar objects (QSOs). Spectroscopic confirmation is not possible for such a large number of objects, so that secure photometric identification and precise photometric determination of redshifts (and other spectral features) become mandatory. This is especially the case for the Gaia mission, in which QSOs play the crucial role of fixing the celestial referential frame, and in which more than 900 gravitationally lensed QSOs should be identified. We first built two independent libraries of synthetic QSO spectra reflecting the most important variations in the spectra of these objects. These libraries are publicly available for simulations with any instrument and photometric system. Traditional template fitting and artificial neural networks (ANNs) are compared to identify QSOs among the population of stars using broad- and medium-band photometry (BBP and MBP, respectively). Besides those two methods, a new one, based on the spectral principal components (SPCs), is also introduced to estimate the photometric redshifts. Generic trends as well as results specifically related to Gaia observations are given. We found that (i) ANNs can provide clean, uncontaminated QSO samples suitable for the determination of the reference frame, but with a level of completeness decreasing from ~=50 per cent at the Galactic pole at V= 18 to ~= 16 per cent at V= 20; (ii) the χ2 approach identifies about 90 per cent (60 per cent) of the observed QSOs at V= 18 (V= 20), at the expense of a higher stellar contamination rate, reaching ~=95 per cent in the galactic plane at V= 20. Extinction is a source of confusion and makes difficult the identification of QSOs in the galactic plane and (iii) the χ2 method is better than ANNs to estimate the photometric redshifts. Due to colour degeneracies, the largest median absolute error (|Δz|Median~= 0.2) is predicted in the range 0

  4. High Strength Aluminum Alloy For High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A cast article from an aluminum alloy has improved mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The cast article has the following composition in weight percent: Silicon 6.0-25.0, Copper 5.0-8.0, Iron 0.05-1.2, Magnesium 0.5-1.5, Nickel 0.05-0.9, Manganese 0.05-1.2, Titanium 0.05-1.2, Zirconium 0.05-1.2, Vanadium 0.05-1.2, Zinc 0.05-0.9, Strontium 0.001-0.1, Phosphorus 0.001-0.1, and the balance is Aluminum, wherein the silicon-to-magnesium ratio is 10-25, and the copper-to-magnesium ratio is 4-15. The aluminum alloy contains a simultaneous dispersion of three types of Al3X compound particles (X=Ti, V, Zr) having a LI2 crystal structure, and their lattice parameters are coherent to the aluminum matrix lattice. A process for producing this cast article is also disclosed, as well as a metal matrix composite, which includes the aluminum alloy serving as a matrix containing up to about 60% by volume of a secondary filler material.

  5. Ultra high temperature ceramics for hypersonic vehicle applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Tandon, Rajan; Dumm, Hans Peter; Corral, Erica L.; Loehman, Ronald E.; Kotula, Paul Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    HfB{sub 2} and ZrB{sub 2} are of interest for thermal protection materials because of favorable thermal stability, mechanical properties, and oxidation resistance. We have made dense diboride ceramics with 2 to 20 % SiC by hot pressing at 2000 C and 5000 psi. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows very thin grain boundary phases that suggest liquid phase sintering. Fracture toughness measurements give RT values of 4 to 6 MPam{sup 1/2}. Four-pt flexure strengths measured in air up to 1450 C were as high as 450-500 MPa. Thermal diffusivities were measured to 2000 C for ZrB{sub 2} and HfB{sub 2} ceramics with SiC contents from 2 to 20%. Thermal conductivities were calculated from thermal diffusivities and measured heat capacities. Thermal diffusivities were modeled using different two-phase composite models. These materials exhibit excellent high temperature properties and are attractive for further development for thermal protection systems.

  6. PV technology for low intensity, low temperature (LILT) applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stella, P.M.; Pool, F.S.; Nicolet, M.A.; Iles, P.A.

    1994-12-31

    As a result of the recent NASA emphasis on smaller, lower cost space missions, PV is now being considered for a number of missions operating at solar distances of 3 AU or greater. In the past, many of these missions would utilize an RTG (radioisotope thermo-electric generator). Historically, silicon solar cell behavior at these distances has been compromised by a number of mechanisms including shunting, non-ohmic back contacts, and the broken knee curve shape. The former two can usually be neglected for modern silicon cells, but the latter has not been eliminated. This problem has been identified with localized diffusion at the top contact/silicon interface which leads to structural changes in the local junction. This is believed to create a resistive metal-semiconductor-like (MSL) interface in parallel with the junction which results in the characteristic forms of the LILT (low intensity, low temperature) broken knee. This paper discusses a TaSiN contact barrier that will prevent the MSL structure in the junction.

  7. A Time-Temperature Transistor - An Application of Aging Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenning, Gregory

    Aging dynamics occur as systems far from thermodynamic equilibrium evolve towards equilibrium. We have produced a magnetic nanoparticle system composed of Co nanoparticles, which self-assemble during Co deposition on Sb. At a particular time in the formation of the nanoparticles, they are encased in a layer of Sb producing a system far from equilibrium. Magnetization vs. temperature measurements as well as Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM) indicates that the nanoparticles initially have a large magnetic moment. We observe, as a function of time, an approximately 80% decay in the sample magnetization and an approximately 50% decay in the DC electrical resistivity. MFM suggests that the magnetization decay proceeds from the magnetic nanoparticles losing their net moments possibly due to spin rearrangement. Evidence also suggests that the initial magnetic moments, drive the Sb layer semiconducting. As the net moments of the magnetic nanoparticles decrease, the Sb reverts back to its semi-metal behavior with the accompanying decrease in the electrical resistivity. The magnetization and resistance decays follow the same Arrhenius type behavior. By varying the Co layer thickness, the Arrhenius parameters can be tuned. We have been able to tune the parameters making these materials excellent candidates for sensors for electronically monitoring the age and lifetime of perishable foods.

  8. Study on the activation of styrene-based shape memory polymer by medium-infrared laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Leng Jinsong; Yu Kai; Lan Xin; Zhang Dawei; Liu Yanju

    2010-03-15

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of shape memory polymer (SMP) activation by medium-infrared laser light. Medium-infrared light is transmitted by an optical fiber embedded in the SMP matrix, and the shape recovery process and temperature distribution are recorded by an infrared camera. Light-induced SMP exhibits potential applications in biomedicines and flexible displays.

  9. Application of fishmeal wastewater as a potential low-cost medium for lipid production by Lipomyces starkeyi HL.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lihui; Zhang, Bo; Gao, Baoyu; Sun, Guopeng

    2011-12-01

    Due to the high organic compounds and high salinity of fishmeal wastewater (FW), it was firstly used as a novel medium to produce microbial lipid in this paper. Fermentation of FW without any additives adding showed that the broth was appropriate for the growth of strain Lipomyces starkeyi HL; however, production of 5.34 g l(-1) of biomass containing 20.8% of lipid was not satisfied. In order to enhance the accumulation of lipid and cell growth, FW was supplemented with various concentrations of glucose; meanwhile, the influence of initial pH was investigated. Biomass and lipid yield on FW were markedly affected by glucose concentration and initial pH. The addition of 20 g l(-1) glucose at initial pH 4.0 got the best results: 17.6 g l(-1) of biomass, 2.7 g l(-1) of lipid yield, 91.2% of protein removal and 43.4% of the chemical oxygen demand removal. The variation of fatty acid composition upon time course in the cellular lipid on FW or a mixture of glucose and FW was further studied. PMID:22439586

  10. Application of response surface methodology in medium optimization for protease production by the new strain of Serratia marcescens SB08.

    PubMed

    Venil, Chidambaram Kulandaisamy; Lakshmanaperumalsamy, Perumalsamy

    2009-01-01

    For production of protease by a new strain, Serratia marcescens SB08, optimization of the fermentation medium and environmental conditions, were carried out by applying factorial design and response surface methodology. The results of factorial design showed that pH, agitation, incubation time and yeast extract were the key factors affecting protease production. The optimal cultural conditions for protease production obtained with response surface methodology were pH 6.0, agitation 100 rpm, incubation time 51.0 h and yeast extract 3.0 g/l. This model was also validated by repeating the experiments under the optimized conditions, which resulted in the maximum protease production of 281.23 U/ml (Predicted response 275.66 U/ml), thus proving the validity of the model. Unexplored Serratia marcescens SB08 strain isolated from enteric gut of sulphur butterfly (Kricogonia lyside) was taken up for this study. This study demonstrates the ability of the new strain, Serratia marcescens SB08, for protease production and also that smaller and less time consuming statistical experimental designs are adequate for the optimization of fermentation processes for maximum protease production.

  11. Fluorimetric detection of Sn(2+) ion in aqueous medium using Salicylaldehyde based nanoparticles and application to natural samples analysis.

    PubMed

    Patil, Kishor S; Mahajan, Prasad G; Patil, Shivajirao R

    2017-01-01

    The fluorescent 2-[(E)-(2-phenylhydrazinylidene)methyl]phenol nanoparticles (PHPNPs) were prepared by a simple reprecipitation method. The prepared PHPNPs examined by Dynamic Light Scattering show narrower particle size distribution having an average particle size of 93.3nm. The Scanning Electron Microphotograph shows distinct spherical shaped morphology of nanoparticles. The blue shift in UV-absorption and fluorescence spectra of PHPNPs with respect to corresponding spectra of PHP in acetone solution indicates H- aggregates and Aggregation Induced Enhanced Emission (AIEE) for nanoparticles. The nanoparticles show selective tendency towards the recognition of Sn(2+) ions by enhancing the fluorescence intensity preference to Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Fe(2+), Ni(2+), NH4(+), Ca(2+), Pb(2+), Hg(2+) and Zn(2+) ions, which actually seem to quench the fluorescence of nanoparticles. The studies on Langmuir adsorption plot, fluorescence lifetime of PHPNPs, DLS-Zeta sizer, UV-visible and fluorescence titration with and without Sn(2+) helped to propose a suitable mechanism of fluorescence enhancement of nanoparticles by Sn(2+) and their binding ability during complexation. The fluorescence enhancement effect of PHPNPs induced by Sn(2+) is further used to develop an analytical method for detection of Sn(2+) from aqueous medium in environmental samples. PMID:27423468

  12. Development of Ceramic Matrix Composites For High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimann, Paula

    2004-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composites that incorporated molecular-level oxidation inhibitors designed to increase the material s high temperature durability were characterized. The viability of a fiber-level inhibitor incorporated as part of a layered interface system as well as a molecularly-integrated matrix-level oxidation inhibitor that is co-deposited with the SiC matrix during Chemical Vapor Infiltration (CVI) was determined. It was expected that the inhibitor would act as a glass former that will getter the oxygen and form a crack sealant to reduce further ingress of oxygen into the composite. Three composites were examined. Composite A was a baseline C(sub f)/SiC(sub m) composite that incorporated a approx. 0.4 micron pyrolytic carbon (PyC) fiber coating to promote strength and toughness, and a CVI-derived SiC matrix. Composite B was a C(sub f)/SiC(sub m) composite incorporating a approx 0.4 micron pyrolytic carbon (PyC) fiber coating to promote strength and toughness, a approx. 0.6 micron B4C fiber-level oxidation barrier coating, and a CVI-derived SiC matrix. Composite C was a C(sub f) /SiC(sub m) composite that incorporated a approx. 0.4 micron pyrolytic carbon (PyC) fiber coating to promote strength and toughness, a approx. 0.6 micron B4C fiber-level oxidation barrier coating, and a BxC-SiC oxidation-inhibited matrix produced by CVI co-deposition. All composites were reinforced with 10 plies of T-300 balanced plain weave carbon fabric with 3K tows at 12.5 ends per inch.

  13. Development of an advanced high-temperature fastener system for advanced aerospace vehicle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kull, F. R.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a program to develop a lightweight high temperature reusable fastening system for aerospace vehicle thermal protection system applications are documented. This feasibility program resulted in several fastener innovations which will meet the specific needs of the heat shield application. Three systems were designed from Hayes 188 alloy and tested by environmental exposure and residual mechanical properties. The designs include a clinch stud with a collar retainer, a weld stud with a split ring retainer, and a caged stud with a collar retainer. The results indicated that a lightweight, reusable, high temperature fastening system can be developed for aerospace vehicle application.

  14. Assessment of Various Low Temperature Electrolytes in Prototype Li-Ion Cells Developed for ESMD Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Whitcanack, L. D.

    2008-01-01

    Due to their attractive properties and proven success, Li-ion batteries have become identified as the battery chemistry of choice for a number of future NASA missions. A number of these applications would be greatly benefited by improved performance of Li-ion technology over a wider operating temperature range, especially at low temperatures, such as future ESMD missions. In many cases, these technology improvements may be mission enabling, and at the very least mission enhancing. In addition to aerospace applications, the DoE has interest in developing advanced Li-ion batteries that can operate over a wide temperature range to enable terrestrial HEV applications. Thus, our focus at JPL in recent years has been to extend the operating temperature range of Li-ion batteries, especially at low temperatures. To accomplish this, the main focus of the research has been devoted to developing improved lithium-ion conducting electrolytes. In the present paper, we would like to present some of the results we have obtained with six different ethylene carbonate-based electrolytes optimized for low temperature. In addition to investigating the behavior in experimental cells initially, the performance of these promising low temperature electrolytes was demonstrated in large capacity, aerospace quality Li-ion prototype cells, manufactured by Yardney Technical Products and Saft America, Inc. These cells were subjected to a number of performance tests, including discharge rate characterization, charge rate characterization, cycle life performance at various temperatures, and power characterization tests.

  15. Evaluation of ensemble forecast uncertainty using a new proper score: application to medium-range and seasonal forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Hannah; Moroz, Irene; Palmer, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Forecast verification is important across scientific disciplines as it provides a framework for evaluating the performance of a forecasting system. In the atmospheric sciences, probabilistic skill scores are often used for verification as they provide a way of unambiguously ranking the performance of different probabilistic forecasts. In order to be useful, a skill score must be proper -- it must encourage honesty in the forecaster, and reward forecasts which are reliable and which have good resolution. A new score, the Error-spread Score (ES), is proposed which is particularly suitable for evaluation of ensemble forecasts. It is formulated with respect to the moments of the forecast. The ES is confirmed to be a proper score, and is therefore sensitive to both resolution and reliability. The ES is tested on forecasts made using the Lorenz '96 system, and found to be useful for summarising the skill of the forecasts. The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ensemble prediction system (EPS) is evaluated using the ES. Its performance is compared to a perfect statistical probabilistic forecast -- the ECMWF high resolution deterministic forecast dressed with the observed error distribution. This generates a forecast that is perfectly reliable if considered over all time, but which does not vary from day to day with the predictability of the atmospheric flow. The ES distinguishes between the dynamically reliable EPS forecasts and the statically reliable dressed deterministic forecasts. Other skill scores are tested and found to be comparatively insensitive to this desirable forecast quality. The ES is used to evaluate seasonal range ensemble forecasts made with the ECMWF System 4. The ensemble forecasts are found to be skilful when compared with climatological or persistence forecasts, though this skill is dependent on region and time of year.

  16. Cellulose binding domain assisted immobilization of lipase (GSlip-CBD) onto cellulosic nanogel: characterization and application in organic medium.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Zhang, Shaowei; Wu, Gaobing; Wu, Cheng Chao; Chen, JunPeng; Baskaran, R; Liu, Ziduo

    2015-12-01

    A cbd gene was cloned into the C-terminal region of a lip gene from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. The native lipase (43.5 kDa) and CBD-Lip fusion protein (60.2 kDa) were purified to homogeneity by SDS-PAGE. A highly stable cellulosic nanogel was prepared by controlled hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose onto which the CBD-lip fusion protein was immobilized through bio-affinity based binding. The nanogel-bound lipase showed optimum activity at 55 °C, and it remains stable and active at pH 10-10.5. Furthermore, the immobilized lipase showed an over two-fold increase of relative activity in the presence of DMSO, isopropanol, isoamyl alcohol and n-butanol, but a mild activity decrease at a low concentration of methanol and ethanol. The immobilized biocatalyst retained ~50% activity after eight repetitive hydrolytic cycles. Enzyme kinetic studies of the immobilized lipase showed a 1.24 fold increase in Vmax and 5.25 fold increase in kcat towards p-NPP hydrolysis. Additionally, the nanogel bound lipase was tested to synthesize a biodiesel ester, ethyl oleate in DMSO. Kinetic analysis showed the km 100.5 ± 4.3 mmol and Vmax 0.19 ± 0.015 mmolmin(-1) at varied oleic acid concentration. Also, the values of km and Vmax at varying concentration of ethanol were observed to be 95.9 ± 13.9 mmol and 0.22 ± 0.013 mmolmin(-1) respectively. The maximum yield of ethyl oleate 111.2 ± 1.24 mM was obtained under optimized reaction conditions in organic medium. These results suggest that this immobilized biocatalyst can be used as an efficient tool for the biotransformation reactions on an industrial scale. PMID:26590897

  17. Modelling of hydrothermal fluid circulation in a heterogeneous medium: Application to the Rainbow Vent site (Mid-Atlantic-Ridge, 36°14N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, F.; Mügler, C.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Charlou, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrothermal activity at the axis of mid-ocean ridges is a key driver for energy and matter transfer from the interior of the Earth to the ocean floor. At mid-ocean ridges, seawater penetrates through the permeable young crust, warms at depth and exchanges chemicals with the surrounding rocks. This hot fluid focuses and flows upwards, then is expelled from the crust at hydrothermal vent sites in the form of black or white smokers completed by diffusive emissions. We developed a new numerical tool in the Cast3M software framework to model such hydrothermal circulations. Thermodynamic properties of one-phase pure water were calculated from the IAPWS formulation. This new numerical tool was validated on several test cases of convection in closed-top and open-top boxes. Simulations of hydrothermal circulation in a homogeneous-permeability porous medium also gave results in good agreement with already published simulations. We used this new numerical tool to construct a geometric and physical model configuration of the Rainbow Vent site at 36°14'N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In this presentation, several configurations will be discussed, showing that high temperatures and high mass fluxes measured at the Rainbow site cannot be modelled with hydrothermal circulation in a homogeneous-permeability porous medium. We will show that these high values require the presence of a fault or a preferential pathway right below the venting site. We will propose and discuss a 2-D one-path model that allows us to simulate both high temperatures and high mass fluxes. This modelling of the hydrothermal circulation at the Rainbow site constitutes a first but necessary step to understand the origin of high concentrations of hydrogen issued from this ultramafic-hosted vent field.

  18. Evaluation of Optimal Storage Temperature, Time, and Transport Medium for Detection of Group B Streptococcus in StrepB Carrot Broth

    PubMed Central

    Trotman-Grant, Ashton; Raney, Trisha

    2012-01-01

    The performances of the ESwab and Amies transport media were evaluated for optimal survival of group B streptococcus (GBS) in StrepB carrot broth. ESwab was superior to Amies at all temperatures evaluated but was optimal at 21°C and 24°C, whereas recovery in Amies was significantly decreased at these temperatures. PMID:22518853

  19. Spatio-temporal behavior of brightness temperature in Tel-Aviv and its application to air temperature monitoring.

    PubMed

    Pelta, Ran; Chudnovsky, A Alexandra; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This study applies remote sensing technology to assess and examine the spatial and temporal Brightness Temperature (BT) profile in the city of Tel-Aviv, Israel over the last 30 years using Landsat imagery. The location of warmest and coldest zones are constant over the studied period. Distinct diurnal and temporal BT behavior divide the city into four different segments. As an example of future application, we applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to correlate Landsat BT data with monitored air temperature (Tair) measurements using 14 images for 1989-2014. Our preliminary results show a good model performance with R(2) = 0.81. Furthermore, based on the model's results, we analyzed the spatial profile of Tair within the study domain for representative days. PMID:26499933

  20. Application of Combined Sustained and Cyclic Loading Test Results to Alloy 617 Elevated Temperature Design Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanli; Jetter, Robert I; Sham, Sam

    2014-08-25

    Alloy 617 is a reference structural material for very high temperature components of advanced-gas cooled reactors with outlet temperatures in the range of 900-950°C . In order for designers to be able to use Alloy 617 for these high temperature components, Alloy 617 has to be approved for use in Section III (the nuclear section) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. A plan has been developed to submit a draft code for Alloy 617 to ASME Section III by 2015. However, the current rules in Subsection NH for the evaluation of strain limits and creep-fatigue damage using simplified methods based on elastic analysis have been deemed inappropriate for Alloy 617 at temperatures above 1200°F (650°C). The rationale for this exclusion is that at higher temperatures it is not feasible to decouple plasticity and creep deformation, which is the basis for the current simplified rules. This temperature, 1200 °F, is well below the temperature range of interest for this material in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) applications. The only current alternative is, thus, a full inelastic analysis which requires sophisticated material models which have been formulated but not yet verified. To address this issue, proposed code rules have been developed which are based on the use of elastic-perfectly plastic (EPP) analysis methods and which are expected to be applicable to very high temperatures.

  1. Integrated hydrological modelling of small- and medium-sized water storages with application to the upper Fengman Reservoir Basin of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Peng, Y.; Chu, J.; Shoemaker, C. A.

    2012-03-01

    Hydrological simulation in regions with a large number of water storages is difficult due to the inaccurate water storage data, including both topologic parameters and operational rules. To address this issue, this paper presents an improved version of SWAT2005 (Soil and Water Assessment Tool, version 2005) using the satellite-based dataset Landsat, an empirical storage classification method, and some empirical relationships to estimate water storage and release from the various levels of flow regulation facilities. The improved SWAT2005 is characterised by three features: (1) a realistic representation of the relationships between the water surface area and volume of each type of water storage, ranging from small-sized ponds for water flow regulation to large-sized and medium-sized reservoirs for water supply and hydropower generation; (2) water balance and transport through a network combining both sequential and parallel streams and storage links; and (3) calibrations for the physical parameters and the human interference parameters. Both the original and improved SWAT2005 are applied to the upper Fengman Reservoir Basin, and the results of these applications are compared. The improved SWAT2005 accurately models small- and medium-sized storages, indicating a significantly improved performance from that of the original model in reproducing streamflows.

  2. Application of mucilage from Dicerocaryum eriocarpum plant as biosorption medium in the removal of selected heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bassey O; John, Odiyo O; Luke, Chimuka; Ochieng, Aoyi; Bassey, Bridget J

    2016-07-15

    The ability of mucilage from Dicerocaryum eriocarpum (DE) plant to act as biosorption medium in the removal of metals ions from aqueous solution was investigated. Functional groups present in the mucilage were identified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Mucilage was modified with sodium and potassium chlorides. This was aimed at assessing the biosorption efficiency of modified mucilage: potassium mucilage (PCE) and sodium mucilage (SCE) and comparing it with non-modified deionised water mucilage (DCE) in the uptake of metal ions. FTIR results showed that the functional groups providing the active sites in PCE and SCE and DCE include: carboxyl, hydroxyl and carbonyl groups. The chloride used in the modification of the mucilage did not introduce new functional groups but increased the intensity of the already existing functional groups in the mucilage. Results from biosorption experiment showed that DE mucilage displays good binding affinity with metals ions [Zn(II), Cd(II) Ni(II), Cr(III) and Fe(II)] in the aqueous solution. Increase in the aqueous solution pH, metal ions initial concentration and mucilage concentration increased the biosorption efficiency of DE mucilage. The maximum contact time varied with each species of metal ions. Optimum pH for [Zn(II), Cd(II) Ni(II) and Fe(II)] occurred at pH 4 and pH 6 for Cr(III). Kinetic models result fitted well to pseudo-second-order with a coefficient values of R(2) = 1 for Cd(II), Ni(II), Cr(III), Fe(II) and R(2) = 0.9974 for Zn(II). Biosorption isotherms conforms best with Freundlich model for all the metal ions with correlation factors of 0.9994, 0.9987, 0.9554, 0.9621 and 0.937 for Zn(II), Ni(II), Fe(II), Cr(III) and Cd(II), respectively. Biosorption capacity of DE mucilage was 0.010, 2.387, 4.902, 0688 and 0.125 for Zn(II), Cr(III), Fe(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II) respectively. The modified mucilage was found to be highly efficient in the removal of metal ions than the unmodified mucilage.

  3. Inclusion of potential vorticity uncertainties into a hydrometeorological forecasting chain: application to a medium size basin of Mediterranean Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amengual, A.; Romero, R.; Vich, M.; Alonso, S.

    2009-06-01

    The improvement of the short- and mid-range numerical runoff forecasts over the flood-prone Spanish Mediterranean area is a challenging issue. This work analyses four intense precipitation events which produced floods of different magnitude over the Llobregat river basin, a medium size catchment located in Catalonia, north-eastern Spain. One of them was a devasting flash flood - known as the "Montserrat" event - which produced 5 fatalities and material losses estimated at about 65 million euros. The characterization of the Llobregat basin's hydrological response to these floods is first assessed by using rain-gauge data and the Hydrologic Engineering Center's Hydrological Modeling System (HEC-HMS) runoff model. In second place, the non-hydrostatic fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University/NCAR mesoscale model (MM5) is nested within the ECMWF large-scale forecast fields in a set of 54 h period simulations to provide quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs) for each hydrometeorological episode. The hydrological model is forced with these QPFs to evaluate the reliability of the resulting discharge forecasts, while an ensemble prediction system (EPS) based on perturbed atmospheric initial and boundary conditions has been designed to test the value of a probabilistic strategy versus the previous deterministic approach. Specifically, a Potential Vorticity (PV) Inversion technique has been used to perturb the MM5 model initial and boundary states (i.e. ECMWF forecast fields). For that purpose, a PV error climatology has been previously derived in order to introduce realistic PV perturbations in the EPS. Results show the benefits of using a probabilistic approach in those cases where the deterministic QPF presents significant deficiencies over the Llobregat river basin in terms of the rainfall amounts, timing and localization. These deficiences in precipitation fields have a major impact on flood forecasts. Our ensemble strategy has been found useful to reduce the

  4. Inclusion of potential vorticity uncertainties into a hydrometeorological forecasting chain: application to a medium size basin of Mediterranean Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amengual, A.; Romero, R.; Vich, M.; Alonso, S.

    2009-01-01

    The improvement of the short- and mid-range numerical runoff forecasts over the flood-prone Spanish Mediterranean area is a challenging issue. This work analyses four intense precipitation events which produced floods of different magnitude over the Llobregat river basin, a medium size catchment located in Catalonia, north-eastern Spain. One of them was a devasting flash flood - known as the "Montserrat" event - which produced 5 fatalities and material losses estimated at about 65 million euros. The characterization of the Llobregat basin's hydrological response to these floods is first assessed by using rain-gauge data and the Hydrologic Engineering Center's Hydrological Modeling System (HEC-HMS) runoff model. In second place, the non-hydrostatic fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University/NCAR mesoscale model (MM5) is nested within the ECMWF large-scale forecast fields in a set of 54 h period simulations to provide quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs) for each hydrometeorological episode. The hydrological model is forced with these QPFs to evaluate the reliability of the resulting discharge forecasts, while an ensemble prediction system (EPS) based on perturbed atmospheric initial and boundary conditions has been designed to test the value of a probabilistic strategy versus the previous deterministic approach. Specifically, a Potential Vorticity (PV) Inversion technique has been used to perturb the MM5 model initial and boundary states (i.e. ECMWF forecast fields). For that purpose, a PV error climatology has been previously derived in order to introduce realistic PV perturbations in the EPS. Results show the benefits of using a probabilistic approach in those cases where the deterministic QPF presents significant deficiencies over the Llobregat river basin in terms of the rainfall amounts, timing and localization. These deficiences in precipitation fields have a major impact on flood forecasts. Our ensemble strategy has been found useful to reduce the

  5. Application of mucilage from Dicerocaryum eriocarpum plant as biosorption medium in the removal of selected heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bassey O; John, Odiyo O; Luke, Chimuka; Ochieng, Aoyi; Bassey, Bridget J

    2016-07-15

    The ability of mucilage from Dicerocaryum eriocarpum (DE) plant to act as biosorption medium in the removal of metals ions from aqueous solution was investigated. Functional groups present in the mucilage were identified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Mucilage was modified with sodium and potassium chlorides. This was aimed at assessing the biosorption efficiency of modified mucilage: potassium mucilage (PCE) and sodium mucilage (SCE) and comparing it with non-modified deionised water mucilage (DCE) in the uptake of metal ions. FTIR results showed that the functional groups providing the active sites in PCE and SCE and DCE include: carboxyl, hydroxyl and carbonyl groups. The chloride used in the modification of the mucilage did not introduce new functional groups but increased the intensity of the already existing functional groups in the mucilage. Results from biosorption experiment showed that DE mucilage displays good binding affinity with metals ions [Zn(II), Cd(II) Ni(II), Cr(III) and Fe(II)] in the aqueous solution. Increase in the aqueous solution pH, metal ions initial concentration and mucilage concentration increased the biosorption efficiency of DE mucilage. The maximum contact time varied with each species of metal ions. Optimum pH for [Zn(II), Cd(II) Ni(II) and Fe(II)] occurred at pH 4 and pH 6 for Cr(III). Kinetic models result fitted well to pseudo-second-order with a coefficient values of R(2) = 1 for Cd(II), Ni(II), Cr(III), Fe(II) and R(2) = 0.9974 for Zn(II). Biosorption isotherms conforms best with Freundlich model for all the metal ions with correlation factors of 0.9994, 0.9987, 0.9554, 0.9621 and 0.937 for Zn(II), Ni(II), Fe(II), Cr(III) and Cd(II), respectively. Biosorption capacity of DE mucilage was 0.010, 2.387, 4.902, 0688 and 0.125 for Zn(II), Cr(III), Fe(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II) respectively. The modified mucilage was found to be highly efficient in the removal of metal ions than the unmodified mucilage. PMID

  6. Electromagnetic induction in a conductive strip in a medium of contrasting conductivity: application to VLF and MT above molten dykes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Paul M.

    2014-11-01

    Very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic waves that penetrate conductive magma-filled dykes generate secondary fields on the surface that can be used to invert for dyke properties. The model used for the interpretation calculates currents induced in a conductive strip by an inducing field that decays exponentially with depth due to the conductivity of the surrounding medium. The differential equations are integrated to give an inhomogeneous Fredholm equation of the second kind with a kernel consisting of a modified Bessel function of the second kind. Numerical methods are typically used to solve for the induced currents in the strip. In this paper, we apply a modified Galerkin-Chebyshev method, which involves separating the kernel into source and field spectra and integrating the source terms to obtain a matrix equation for the unknown coefficients. The incident wave is expressed as a Chebyshev series. The modified Bessel function is separated into a logarithmic singularity and a non-singular remainder, both of which are expanded in complex Chebyshev polynomials. The Chebyshev coefficients for the remainder are evaluated using a fast Fourier transform, while the logarithmic term and incident field have analytic series. The deconvolution then involves a matrix inversion. The results depend on the ratio of strip-size to skin-depth. For infinite skin-depth and a singular conductivity distribution given by τ_0 a/√{a^2 - z^2 } (where τ0 is the conductance, a is the half-length and z the distance from the centre), Parker gives an analytic solution. We present a similar analytic series solution for the finite skin-depth case, where the size to skin depth ratio is small. Results are presented for different ratios of size to skin depth that can be compared with numerical solutions. We compare full-space and half-space solutions. A fit of the model to VLF data taken above a magma filled dykes in Hawaii and Mt Etna demonstrates that while properties such as depth to top

  7. High temperature characterization of SiC BJTs for power switching applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, K.; Yu, L. C.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, J. H.

    2006-06-01

    SiC as a wide bandgap semiconductor material has attracted great interest in high power density and high temperature applications. Development of SiC-based power semiconductor devices has made remarkable progress and specific on-resistance ˜100 times lower than the best available silicon-based has been experimentally demonstrated [Zhao JH, Tone K, Li X, Alexandrov P, Fursin L, Weiner M. 3.6 m cm 2, 1726 V 4H-SiC normally-off trenched-and-implanted vertical JFETs and circuit applications. IEE Proc - Circ, Dev Syst 2004;151(3):231-7]. However, progress in characterization and application of such devices in power electronics applications at a practically useful power level has so far been limited. In this paper, SiC BJTs with a blocking voltage of >1800 V are characterized in power switching applications for temperatures up to 275 °C. Inductive switching speeds under different load current and DC bus voltage conditions are studied. This is the first time a SiC switch has been characterized at a practically useful power level (300 V, 7 A) and a temperature substantially higher than any commercial power device is capable of. Current switching times of ˜10 ns have been demonstrated across the full temperature range. Switching speed of the SiC BJT has been found to remain virtually unchanged even at 275 °C. In addition, due to the lack of storage charge at even high temperature, switching storage time is negligible for the SiC BJT. The fast and stable switching speed of the SiC BJT at high temperature demonstrated in this paper makes the device an attractive candidate for high temperature, high frequency and high power density power electronics applications.

  8. Nanostructure-based proton exchange membrane for fuel cell applications at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Junsheng; Wang, Zhengbang; Li, Junrui; Pan, Mu; Tang, Haolin

    2014-02-01

    As a clean and highly efficient energy source, the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has been considered an ideal alternative to traditional fossil energy sources. Great efforts have been devoted to realizing the commercialization of the PEMFC in the past decade. To eliminate some technical problems that are associated with the low-temperature operation (such as catalyst poisoning and poor water management), PEMFCs are usually operated at elevated temperatures (e.g., > 100 degrees C). However, traditional proton exchange membrane (PEM) shows poor performance at elevated temperature. To achieve a high-performance PEM for high temperature fuel cell applications, novel PEMs, which are based on nanostructures, have been developed recently. In this review, we discuss and summarize the methods for fabricating the nanostructure-based PEMs for PEMFC operated at elevated temperatures and the high temperature performance of these PEMs. We also give an outlook on the rational design and development of the nanostructure-based PEMs.

  9. ENSYSTROB - Design, manufacturing and test of a 3-phase resistive fault current limiter based on coated conductors for medium voltage application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elschner, S.; Kudymow, A.; Brand, J.; Fink, S.; Goldacker, W.; Grilli, F.; Noe, M.; Vojenciak, M.; Hobl, A.; Bludau, M.; Jänke, C.; Krämer, S.; Bock, J.

    2012-11-01

    Within the German project ENSYSTROB a 3-phase resistive fault current limiter for medium voltage applications (12 kV, 533 Arms) was designed, built, tested and installed in the grid for a one year’s field test. The superconducting modules are made of YBCO coated conductors and replace the modules of an already successfully tested limiter on the basis of BSCCO 2212 bulk material. The components are multifilar spirals equipped with pairs of 12 mm wide YBCO tapes. The single components were characterized with respect to critical current, AC losses and limitation behavior under all possible operation conditions. The finally mounted limiter was successfully tested with respect to high voltage and limitation according to the standards of the customer. It is now installed and operating in its field test location. Finally we give a first comparison of both materials with respect to the different operational aspects.

  10. THE ATTENUATED RADON TRANSFORM: APPLICATION TO SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN THE PRESENCE OF A VARIABLE ATTENUATING MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Gullberg, Grant T.

    1980-03-01

    The properties of the attenuated Radon transform and its application to single-photon emission computed tomography (ECT) are analyzed in detail. In nuclear medicine and biological research, the objective of ECT is to describe quantitatively the position and strengths of internal sources of injected radiopharmaceuticals and radionuclides where the attenuation between the sources and detector is unknown. The problem is mathematically and practically quite different from well-known methods in transmission computed tomography (TCT) where only the attenuation is unknown. A mathematical structure using function theory and the theory of linear operators on Hilbert spaces is developed to better understand the spectral properties of the attenuated Radon transform. The continuous attenuated Radon transform is reduced to a matrix operator for discrete angular and lateral sampling, and the reconstruction problem reduces to a system of linear equations. For variable attenuation coefficients frequently found in imaging internal organs, the numerical methods developed in this paper involve iterative techniques of performing the generalized inverse. Its application to nuclear medicine is demonstrated by reconstructions of transverse sections of the brain, heart, and liver.

  11. A Chandra Study of the Lobe/Interstellar Medium Interactions around the Inner Radio Lobes of Centaurus A: Constraints on the Temperature Structure and Transport Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, R. P.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Birkinshaw, M.; Worrall, D. M.; Penna, R. F.; Forman, W. R.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Jones, C.; Murray, S. S.

    2007-08-01

    We present results from deeper Chandra observations of the southwest radio lobe of Centaurus A, first described by Kraft and coworkers. We find that the sharp X-ray surface brightness discontinuity extends around ~75% of the periphery of the radio lobe and detect significant temperature jumps in the brightest regions of this discontinuity nearest to the nucleus. This demonstrates that this discontinuity is indeed a strong shock that is the result of an overpressure that has built up in the entire lobe over time. In addition, we demonstrate that if the mean free path for ions to transfer energy and momentum to the electrons behind the shock is as large as the Spitzer value, the electron and proton temperatures will not have equilibrated along the southwest boundary of the radio lobe where the shock is strongest. Thus, the proton temperature of the shocked gas could be considerably larger than the observed electron temperature, and the total energy of the outburst correspondingly larger as well. We investigate this using a simple one-dimensional shock model for a two-fluid (proton/electron) plasma. We find that for the thermodynamic parameters of the Cen A shock the electron temperature rises rapidly from ~0.29 keV (the temperature of the ambient ISM) to ~3.5 keV, at which point heating from the protons is balanced by adiabatic losses. The proton and electron temperatures do not equilibrate in a timescale less than the age of the lobe. We note that the measured electron temperature of similar features in other nearby powerful radio galaxies in poor environments may considerably underestimate the strength and velocity of the shock.

  12. A new soil-temperature module for SWAT application in regions with seasonal snow cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Junyu; Li, Sheng; Li, Qiang; Xing, Zisheng; Bourque, Charles P.-A.; Meng, Fan-Rui

    2016-07-01

    Accurate estimates of soil temperature are important for quantifying hydrological and biological processes in hydrological models. Soil temperature predictions in the widely used Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) have large prediction errors when applied to regions with significant snow cover during winter. In this study, a new physically-based soil-temperature module is developed as an alternative to the empirical soil-temperature module currently used in SWAT. The physically-based module ​simulates soil temperature in different soil layers as a result of energy transfer between the atmosphere and soil (or snow) interface. The modified version of SWAT with the new soil-temperature module in place, introduces only three new parameters over the original soil-temperature module. Both the original and new soil-temperature modules are tested against field data from the Black Brook Watershed, a small watershed in Atlantic Canada. The results indicate that both versions of soil-temperature module ​are able to provide acceptable predictions of temperature in different layers of the soil during non-winter seasons. However, the original module severely underestimates soil temperatures in winter (within -10 to -20 °C), while the new module produces results that are more consistent with field measurements (within -2 to 2 °C). In addition, unlike its counterpart, the new module ​is able to simulate freeze-thaw cycles in the soil profile. Ice-water content variations in winter are reasonably simulated by the new module for different snow cover scenarios. In general, modified-SWAT improves prediction accuracy on baseflow discharge compared with the original-SWAT, due to improved estimates of soil temperature during winter. The new physically-based soil-temperature module has greatly improved the ability of SWAT to predict soil temperatures under seasonal snow cover, which is essential to the application of the model in regions like Atlantic Canada.

  13. Thermographic-phosphor temperature measurements: Commercial and defense-related applications

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, B.W.; Turley, W.D.; Allison, S.W.

    1994-06-01

    This paper is a review of a diverse set of applications of the thermographic-phosphor (TP) method for measuring temperatures remotely. The TP method is useful in hostile and/or inaccessible environments where no other known method works. It is highly accurate, nonintrusive, durable, conceptually simple, covers an unprecedented temperature range (0 K to >1200 K), can measure temperature at a single point or over an entire surface, and can make static, steady-state, or very high speed dynamic measurements. The TP method can also be used to make leadless, remotely interrogated heat-flux gauges that can nonintrusively measure spatial distributions of heat flux over arbitrarily large areas with high resolution. The applications described include measurements in gas centrifuges, motors, variable-area ejectors, rotors and stators in gas turbines, and others. The authors also briefly discuss heat-flux gauges and their applications.

  14. Perspectives of High-Temperature Thermoelectric Applications and p-type and n-type Aluminoborides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, T.

    2016-08-01

    A need exists to develop high-temperature thermoelectric materials which can utilize high-temperature unutilized/waste heat in thermal power plants, steelworks, factories, incinerators, etc., and also focused solar power. The thermal power plant topping application is of potential high impact since it can sizably increase the efficiency of power plants which are the major supply of electrical power for many countries. Higher borides are possible candidates for their particular high-temperature stability, generally large Seebeck coefficients, α, and intrinsic low thermal conductivity. Excellent (|α| > 200 μV/K) p-type or n-type behavior was recently achieved in the aluminoboride YAl x B14 by varying the occupancy of Al sites, x. Finding p-type and n-type counterparts has long been a difficulty of thermoelectric research not limited to borides. This paper reviews possible high-temperature thermoelectric applications, and recent developments and perspectives of thermoelectric aluminoborides.

  15. Ceramic fibers for matrix composites in high-temperature engine applications

    PubMed

    Baldus; Jansen; Sporn

    1999-07-30

    High-temperature engine applications have been limited by the performance of metal alloys and carbide fiber composites at elevated temperatures. Random inorganic networks composed of silicon, boron, nitrogen, and carbon represent a novel class of ceramics with outstanding durability at elevated temperatures. SiBN(3)C was synthesized by pyrolysis of a preceramic N-methylpolyborosilazane made from the single-source precursor Cl(3)Si-NH-BCl(2). The polymer can be processed to a green fiber by melt-spinning, which then undergoes an intermediate curing step and successive pyrolysis. The ceramic fibers, which are presently produced on a semitechnical scale, combine several desired properties relevant for an application in fiber-reinforced ceramic composites: thermal stability, mechanical strength, high-temperature creep resistivity, low density, and stability against oxidation or molten silicon. PMID:10426985

  16. Characterization of piezoelectric materials for simultaneous strain and temperature sensing for ultra-low frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouroz Islam, Mohammad; Seethaler, Rudolf; Shahria Alam, M.

    2015-08-01

    Piezoelectric materials are used extensively in a number of sensing applications ranging from aerospace industries to medical diagnostics. Piezoelectric materials generate charge when they are subjected to strain. However, since measuring charge is difficult at low frequencies, traditional piezoelectric sensors are limited to dynamic applications. In this research an alternative technique is proposed to determine static strain that relies upon the measurement of piezoelectric capacitance and resistance using piezoelectric sensors. To demonstrate the validity of this approach, the capacitance and resistance of a piezoelectric patch sensor was characterized for a wide range of strain and temperature. The study shows that the piezoelectric capacitance is sensitive to both strain and temperature while the resistance is mostly dependent on the temperature variation. The findings can be implemented to obtain thermally compensated static strain from piezoelectric sensors, which does not require an additional temperature sensor.

  17. Perspectives of High-Temperature Thermoelectric Applications and p-type and n-type Aluminoborides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, T.

    2016-10-01

    A need exists to develop high-temperature thermoelectric materials which can utilize high-temperature unutilized/waste heat in thermal power plants, steelworks, factories, incinerators, etc., and also focused solar power. The thermal power plant topping application is of potential high impact since it can sizably increase the efficiency of power plants which are the major supply of electrical power for many countries. Higher borides are possible candidates for their particular high-temperature stability, generally large Seebeck coefficients, α, and intrinsic low thermal conductivity. Excellent (|α| > 200 μV/K) p-type or n-type behavior was recently achieved in the aluminoboride YAl x B14 by varying the occupancy of Al sites, x. Finding p-type and n-type counterparts has long been a difficulty of thermoelectric research not limited to borides. This paper reviews possible high-temperature thermoelectric applications, and recent developments and perspectives of thermoelectric aluminoborides.

  18. [The Clinical Application Status and Development Trends of Hydrogen Peroxide Low Temperature Plasma Sterilizers].

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Min; Zheng, Yunxin; Chen, Ying; Hou, Bin; Xu, Zitian

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen peroxide low temperature plasma sterilization technology solved the problems of thermo-sensitive materials' disinfection and sterilization based on its development and unique characteristics. This paper introduced the researches of clinical application quality control, and showed the hydrogen peroxide low temperature plasma sterilizers were being widely used in hospitals and highly recognized. According to the clinical data and the literatures of the domestic equipment in preliminary application, it could be concluded that the technology maturity of domestic hydrogen peroxide low temperature plasma sterilizers was in a high level. The advantages of using domestic hydrogen peroxide low temperature plasma sterilizers to do disinfection and sterilization included lower cost, safer, faster and non-toxic, etc. Also the management system should be improved and the clinical staff should master the technical essentials, obey the procedures strictly, verify periodically and offer full monitoring to upgrade the quality of sterilization. PMID:27197500

  19. Temperature feedback-controlled photothermal treatment with diffusing applicator: theoretical and experimental evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trung Hau; Park, Suhyun; Hlaing, Kyu Kyu; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-01-01

    To minimize thermal injury, the current study evaluated the real-time temperature monitoring with a proportional-integrative-derivative (PID) controller during 980-nm photothermal treatment with a radially-diffusing applicator. Both simulations and experiments demonstrated comparable thermal behaviors in temperature distribution and the degree of irreversible tissue denaturation. The PID-controlled application constantly maintained the pre-determined temperature of 353 K (steady-state error = < 1 K). Due to constant energy delivery, coagulation volumes linearly increased up to 1.04 ± 0.02 cm3 with irradiation time. Integration of temperature feedback with diffuser-assisted photothermal treatments can provide a feasible therapeutic modality to treat pancreatic tumors in an effective manner. PMID:27231632

  20. [The Clinical Application Status and Development Trends of Hydrogen Peroxide Low Temperature Plasma Sterilizers].

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Min; Zheng, Yunxin; Chen, Ying; Hou, Bin; Xu, Zitian

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen peroxide low temperature plasma sterilization technology solved the problems of thermo-sensitive materials' disinfection and sterilization based on its development and unique characteristics. This paper introduced the researches of clinical application quality control, and showed the hydrogen peroxide low temperature plasma sterilizers were being widely used in hospitals and highly recognized. According to the clinical data and the literatures of the domestic equipment in preliminary application, it could be concluded that the technology maturity of domestic hydrogen peroxide low temperature plasma sterilizers was in a high level. The advantages of using domestic hydrogen peroxide low temperature plasma sterilizers to do disinfection and sterilization included lower cost, safer, faster and non-toxic, etc. Also the management system should be improved and the clinical staff should master the technical essentials, obey the procedures strictly, verify periodically and offer full monitoring to upgrade the quality of sterilization.

  1. Temperature feedback-controlled photothermal treatment with diffusing applicator: theoretical and experimental evaluations.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trung Hau; Park, Suhyun; Hlaing, Kyu Kyu; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-05-01

    To minimize thermal injury, the current study evaluated the real-time temperature monitoring with a proportional-integrative-derivative (PID) controller during 980-nm photothermal treatment with a radially-diffusing applicator. Both simulations and experiments demonstrated comparable thermal behaviors in temperature distribution and the degree of irreversible tissue denaturation. The PID-controlled application constantly maintained the pre-determined temperature of 353 K (steady-state error = < 1 K). Due to constant energy delivery, coagulation volumes linearly increased up to 1.04 ± 0.02 cm(3) with irradiation time. Integration of temperature feedback with diffuser-assisted photothermal treatments can provide a feasible therapeutic modality to treat pancreatic tumors in an effective manner. PMID:27231632

  2. Non-obvious Problems in Clark Electrode Application at Elevated Temperature and Ways of Their Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Miniaev, M. V.; Belyakova, M. B.; Kostiuk, N. V.; Leshchenko, D. V.; Fedotova, T. A.

    2013-01-01

    Well-known cause of frequent failures of closed oxygen sensors is the appearance of gas bubbles in the electrolyte. The problem is traditionally associated with insufficient sealing of the sensor that is not always true. Study of a typical temperature regime of measurement system based on Clark sensor showed that spontaneous release of the gas phase is a natural effect caused by periodic warming of the sensor to a temperature of the test liquid. The warming of the sensor together with the incubation medium causes oversaturation of electrolyte by dissolved gases and the allocation of gas bubbles. The lower rate of sensor heating in comparison with the medium reduces but does not eliminate the manifestation of this effect. It is experimentally established, that with each cycle of heating of measuring system up to 37°C followed by cooling the volume of gas phase in the electrolyte (KCl; 60 g/L; 400 μL) increased by 0.6 μL approximately. Thus, during just several cycles it can dramatically degrade the characteristics of the sensor. A method was developed in which the oxygen sensor is heated in contact with the liquid, (depleted of dissolved gases), allowing complete exclusion of the above-mentioned effect. PMID:23984188

  3. Does exogenous application of salicylic acid through the rooting medium modulate growth and photosynthetic capacity in two differently adapted spring wheat cultivars under salt stress?

    PubMed

    Arfan, Muhammad; Athar, Habib R; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2007-06-01

    In order to assess whether exogenous application of salicylic acid (SA) through the rooting medium could modulate the photosynthetic capacity of two wheat cultivars differing in salinity tolerance, a hydroponic experiment was conducted under greenhouse conditions. Seeds of a salt tolerant (S-24) and a moderately salt sensitive (MH-97) cultivar were germinated at 0 or 150 mM NaCl in Hoagland's nutrient solution containing different levels of salicylic acid (SA) (0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00 mM) for 7d. Seven-day old wheat seedlings were transferred to hydroponics and grown at 0, or 150 mM NaCl for for further 30 d. Different levels of salicylic acid (SA) were also maintained in the solution culture. After 30 d, four plants out of six were harvested and the remaining plants were left for the estimation of yield attributes Salt stress reduced the growth and grain yield of both cultivars. However, cv. S-24 performed better than MH-97 under salt stress with respect to leaf area, and grain yield. Exogenous application of SA promoted growth and yield, and counteracted the salt stress-induced growth inhibition of salt tolerant S-24, whereas for MH-97 there was no improvement in growth or grain yield with SA application. Of the varying SA levels used, the most effective levels for promoting growth and grain yield were 0.75 and 0.25 mM under normal and saline conditions, respectively. The improvement in growth and grain yield of S-24 due to SA application was associated with improved photosynthetic capacity. Changes in photosynthetic rate due to SA application were not due to stomatal limitations, but were associated with metabolic factors, other than photosynthetic pigments and leaf carotenoids.

  4. Optoacoustic imaging of absorbing objects in a turbid medium: ultimate sensitivity and application to breast cancer diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Kozhushko, Victor V.; Zharinov, Alexei N.; Solomatin, Vladimir S.; Karabutov, Alexander A

    2007-01-10

    One of the major medical applications of optoacoustic (OA) tomography is in the diagnostics of early-stage breast cancer. A numerical approach was developed to characterize the following parameters of an OA imaging system: resolution, maximum depth at which the tumor can be detected, and image contrast. The parameters of the 64-element focused array transducer were obtained. The results of numerical modeling were compared with known analytical solutions and further validated by phantom experiments. The OA images of a3 mm piece of bovine liver immersed in diluted milk at various depths were obtained. Based on the results of modeling, a signal filtering algorithm for OA image contrast enhancement has been proposed.

  5. Microstructure and Corrosion Behavior of Hf-40 Wt Pct Ti Alloy in Nitric Acid Medium for Reprocessing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraj, J.; Ravi, K. R.; Mallika, C.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2016-09-01

    The Hf-40 wt pct Ti (Hf-Ti) alloy was developed for neutron poison application in the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. The furnace-cooled Hf-Ti sample exhibited the microstructure comprising equiaxed-α, lamellar-α, and feathery-α. The water-quenched Hf-Ti sample confirmed the presence of lath and internally twinned martensite. In comparison to the furnace-cooled sample, low corrosion current density and passivation current density values obtained for the water-quenched Hf-Ti in 6 M HNO3 at 298 K (25 °C) indicated better passivation ability. The martensitic structure exhibited high hardness (660 HV) and negligible corrosion rate in 6 M nitric acid at 298 K (25 °C). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analysis confirmed that passivation behavior of this alloy was due to the protective passive film composed of TiO2 and HfO2.

  6. Electrical Properties of Materials for Elevated Temperature Resistance Strain Gage Application. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    1987-01-01

    The objective was to study the electrical resistances of materials that are potentially useful as resistance strain gages at 1000 C. Transition metal carbides and nitrides, boron carbide and silicon carbide were selected for the experimental phase of this research. Due to their low temperature coefficient of resistance and good stability, TiC, ZrC, B sub 4 C and beta-SiC are suggested as good candidates for high temperature resistance strain gage applications.

  7. Thermal regime and temperature stresses in bodies during thermoradiational heating. [application of perturbation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chistopyanova, N. V.; Chumakov, V. L.

    1974-01-01

    An approach is developed to the application of the perturbation method for the solution of problems with essential external nonlinearities, based on identification in the boundary condition of a small nonlinear complex which is considered a perturbing function. The solutions obtained in the first approximation with error of 1 to 2% in calculating the unsteady temperature fields are then used to determine the temperature stresses and deformations in solid bodies of classical form.

  8. Development and application of ferrite materials for low temperature co-fired ceramic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huai-Wu; Li, Jie; Su, Hua; Zhou, Ting-Chuan; Long, Yang; Zheng, Zong-Liang

    2013-11-01

    Development and application of ferrite materials for low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology are discussed, specifically addressing several typical ferrite materials such as M-type barium ferrite, NiCuZn ferrite, YIG ferrite, and lithium ferrite. In order to permit co-firing with a silver internal electrode in LTCC process, the sintering temperature of ferrite materials should be less than 950 °C. These ferrite materials are research focuses and are applied in many ways in electronics.

  9. Isolation and purification of medium chain length poly(3-hydroxyalkanoates) (mcl-PHA) for medical applications using nonchlorinated solvents.

    PubMed

    Wampfler, B; Ramsauer, T; Rezzonico, S; Hischier, R; Köhling, R; Thöny-Meyer, L; Zinn, M

    2010-10-11

    A novel process was developed to isolate poly([R]-3-hydroxyoctanoate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHO) and poly([R]-3-hydroxy-ω-undecenoate-co-3-hydroxy-ω-nonenoate-co-3-hydroxy-ω-heptenoate) (PHUE) from Pseudomonas putida species. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), ethyl acetate, acetone, and methylene chloride efficiently extracted PHO from freeze-dried biomass. The ratio of solvent to biomass was 15:1 (vol/wt). The nonchlorinated solvents required 18 h of extraction to achieve methylene chloride's yield of 15 wt % within 60 min. In the case of PHUE, the yield was 15-17 wt % after 60 min of extraction at room temperature, independently of the solvent used. MTBE performed best in life cycle assessment (LCA) if contamination of the environment is avoided. Filtration of the extract containing 8 wt % of raw polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) through activated charcoal revealed colorless polymers with less than one endotoxin unit/g. The ratio (v/v) of the solution to activated charcoal was 2:1. The loss (impurities and polymers) amounted up to 50 wt %.

  10. 27 CFR 19.914 - Medium plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medium plants. 19.914 Section 19.914 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Medium plants. Any person wishing to establish a medium plant shall make application for and obtain...

  11. Applications of high-temperature powder metal aluminum alloys to small gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millan, P. P., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A program aimed at the development of advanced powder-metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys for high-temperature applications up to 650 F using the concepts of rapid solidification and mechanical alloying is discussed. In particular, application of rapidly solidified PM aluminum alloys to centrifugal compressor impellers, currently used in auxiliary power units for both military and commercial aircraft and potentially for advanced automotive gas turbine engines, is examined. It is shown that substitution of high-temperature aluminum for titanium alloy impellers operating in the 360-650 F range provides significant savings in material and machining costs and results in reduced component weight, and consequently, reduced rotating group inertia requirements.

  12. Biomedical Applications of Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas to Cancerous Cell Treatment and Tooth Bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Koo; Kim, Myoung Soo; Byun, June Ho; Kim, Kyong Tai; Kim, Gyoo Cheon; Park, Gan Young

    2011-08-01

    Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas have attracted great interests and they have been widely applied to biomedical applications to interact with living tissues, cells, and bacteria due to their non-thermal property. This paper reviews the biomedical applications of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas to cancerous cell treatment and tooth bleaching. Gold nanoparticles conjugated with cancer-specific antibodies have been introduced to cancerous cells to enhance selective killing of cells, and the mechanism of cell apoptosis induced by plasma has been investigated. Tooth exposed to helium plasma jet with hydrogen peroxide has become brighter and the productions of hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide have been enhanced by plasma exposure.

  13. Thick sputtered tantalum coatings for high-temperature energy conversion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stelmakh, Veronika Peykov, Daniel; Chan, Walker R.; Senkevich, Jay J.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Celanovic, Ivan; Castillo, Robert; Coulter, Kent; Wei, Ronghua

    2015-11-15

    Thick sputtered tantalum (Ta) coatings on polished Inconel were investigated as a potential replacement for bulk refractory metal substrates used for high-temperature emitters and absorbers in thermophotovoltaic energy conversion applications. In these applications, high-temperature stability and high reflectance of the surface in the infrared wavelength range are critical in order to sustain operational temperatures and reduce losses due to waste heat. The reflectance of the coatings (8 and 30 μm) was characterized with a conformal protective hafnia layer as-deposited and after one hour anneals at 700, 900, and 1100 °C. To further understand the high-temperature performance of the coatings, the microstructural evolution was investigated as a function of annealing temperature. X-ray diffraction was used to analyze the texture and residual stress in the coatings at four reflections (220, 310, 222, and 321), as-deposited and after anneal. No significant changes in roughness, reflectance, or stress were observed. No delamination or cracking occurred, even after annealing the coatings at 1100 °C. Overall, the results of this study suggest that the thick Ta coatings are a promising alternative to bulk substrates and pave the way for a relatively low-cost and easily integrated platform for nanostructured devices in high-temperature energy conversion applications.

  14. Estimation of effective temperatures in quantum annealers for sampling applications: A case study with possible applications in deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Marcello; Realpe-Gómez, John; Biswas, Rupak; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    An increase in the efficiency of sampling from Boltzmann distributions would have a significant impact on deep learning and other machine-learning applications. Recently, quantum annealers have been proposed as a potential candidate to speed up this task, but several limitations still bar these state-of-the-art technologies from being used effectively. One of the main limitations is that, while the device may indeed sample from a Boltzmann-like distribution, quantum dynamical arguments suggest it will do so with an instance-dependent effective temperature, different from its physical temperature. Unless this unknown temperature can be unveiled, it might not be possible to effectively use a quantum annealer for Boltzmann sampling. In this work, we propose a strategy to overcome this challenge with a simple effective-temperature estimation algorithm. We provide a systematic study assessing the impact of the effective temperatures in the learning of a special class of a restricted Boltzmann machine embedded on quantum hardware, which can serve as a building block for deep-learning architectures. We also provide a comparison to k -step contrastive divergence (CD-k ) with k up to 100. Although assuming a suitable fixed effective temperature also allows us to outperform one-step contrastive divergence (CD-1), only when using an instance-dependent effective temperature do we find a performance close to that of CD-100 for the case studied here.

  15. Stainless steel component with compressed fiber Bragg grating for high temperature sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinesh, Mathew; MacPherson, William N.; Hand, Duncan P.; Maier, Robert R. J.

    2016-05-01

    A smart metal component having the potential for high temperature strain sensing capability is reported. The stainless steel (SS316) structure is made by selective laser melting (SLM). A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is embedded in to a 3D printed U-groove by high temperature brazing using a silver based alloy, achieving an axial FBG compression of 13 millistrain at room temperature. Initial results shows that the test component can be used for up to 700°C for sensing applications.

  16. Mechanical Properties and Microstructural Characterization of Particulate Reinforced Diboride Composites for High Temperature Leading Edge Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerby, Donald T.; Johnson, Sylvia M.; Bull, Jeff; Laub, Bernie; Reuther, James; Kinney, David; Kontinos, Dean; Beckman, Sarah; Stuffle, Kevin; Cull, A. D.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Previous work on refractory diboride composites has shown that these systems have the potential for use in high temperature leading edge applications for reusable reentry vehicles. Experiments in reentry environments have shown that these materials have multiple use temperatures greater than 1900 C. The work to be discussed focuses on three compositions: HfB2/SiC, ZrB2/SiC, and ZrB2/C/SiC. These composites have been hot pressed and their mechanical properties measured at room and elevated temperatures. Extensive microstructural characterization has been conducted on polished cross sections and the fracture surfaces have been examined to determine their failure origins.

  17. AMSAHTS 1990: Advances in Materials Science and Applications of High Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Larry H. (Editor); Flom, Yury (Editor); Moorjani, Kishin (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    This publication is comprised of abstracts for oral and poster presentations scheduled for AMSAHTS '90. The conference focused on understanding high temperature superconductivity with special emphasis on materials issues and applications. AMSAHTS 90, highlighted the state of the art in fundamental understanding of the nature of high-Tc superconductivity (HTSC) as well as the chemistry, structure, properties, processing and stability of HTSC oxides. As a special feature of the conference, space applications of HTSC were discussed by NASA and Navy specialists.

  18. High-speed surface temperature measurements on plasma facing materials for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, M.; Kobayashi, M.

    1996-01-01

    For the lifetime evaluation of plasma facing materials in fusion experimental machines, it is essential to investigate their surface behavior and their temperature responses during an off-normal event such as the plasma disruptions. An infrared thermometer with a sampling speed as fast as 1{times}10{sup {minus}6} s/data, namely, the high-speed infrared thermometer (HSIR), has been developed by the National Research Laboratory of Metrology in Japan. To evaluate an applicability of the newly developed HSIR on the surface temperature measurement of plasma facing materials, high heat flux beam irradiation experiments have been performed with three different materials under the surface heat fluxes up to 170 MW/m{sup 2} for 0.04 s in a hydrogen ion beam test facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. As for the results, HSIR can be applicable for measuring the surface temperature responses of the armor tile materials with a little modification. It is also confirmed that surface temperatures measured with the HSIR thermometer show good agreement with the analytical results for stainless steel and carbon based materials at a temperature range of up to 2500{degree}C. However, for aluminum the HSIR could measure the temperature of the high dense vapor cloud which was produced during the heating due to lower melting temperature. Based on the result, a multichannel arrayed HSIR thermometer has been designed and fabricated. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. A Review of Heating and Temperature Control in Microfluidic Systems: Techniques and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Miralles, Vincent; Huerre, Axel; Malloggi, Florent; Jullien, Marie-Caroline

    2013-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the different techniques developed over the last decade to regulate the temperature within microfluidic systems. A variety of different approaches has been adopted, from external heating sources to Joule heating, microwaves or the use of lasers to cite just a few examples. The scope of the technical solutions developed to date is impressive and encompasses for instance temperature ramp rates ranging from 0.1 to 2,000 °C/s leading to homogeneous temperatures from −3 °C to 120 °C, and constant gradients from 6 to 40 °C/mm with a fair degree of accuracy. We also examine some recent strategies developed for applications such as digital microfluidics, where integration of a heating source to generate a temperature gradient offers control of a key parameter, without necessarily requiring great accuracy. Conversely, Temperature Gradient Focusing requires high accuracy in order to control both the concentration and separation of charged species. In addition, the Polymerase Chain Reaction requires both accuracy (homogeneous temperature) and integration to carry out demanding heating cycles. The spectrum of applications requiring temperature regulation is growing rapidly with increasingly important implications for the physical, chemical and biotechnological sectors, depending on the relevant heating technique. PMID:26835667

  20. Application of time-temperature-stress superposition on creep of wood-plastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Feng-Cheng; Lam, Frank; Kadla, John F.

    2013-08-01

    Time-temperature-stress superposition principle (TTSSP) was widely applied in studies of viscoelastic properties of materials. It involves shifting curves at various conditions to construct master curves. To extend the application of this principle, a temperature-stress hybrid shift factor and a modified Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) equation that incorporated variables of stress and temperature for the shift factor fitting were studied. A wood-plastic composite (WPC) was selected as the test subject to conduct a series of short-term creep tests. The results indicate that the WPC were rheologically simple materials and merely a horizontal shift was needed for the time-temperature superposition, whereas vertical shifting would be needed for time-stress superposition. The shift factor was independent of the stress for horizontal shifts in time-temperature superposition. In addition, the temperature- and stress-shift factors used to construct master curves were well fitted with the WLF equation. Furthermore, the parameters of the modified WLF equation were also successfully calibrated. The application of this method and equation can be extended to curve shifting that involves the effects of both temperature and stress simultaneously.

  1. Application of terrestrial 'structure-from-motion' photogrammetry on a medium-size Arctic valley glacier: potential, accuracy and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynek, Bernhard; Binder, Daniel; Boffi, Geo; Schöner, Wolfgang; Verhoeven, Geert

    2014-05-01

    Terrestrial photogrammetry was the standard method for mapping high mountain terrain in the early days of mountain cartography, until it was replaced by aerial photogrammetry and airborne laser scanning. Modern low-price digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) cameras and highly automatic and cheap digital computer vision software with automatic image matching and multiview-stereo routines suggest the rebirth of terrestrial photogrammetry, especially in remote regions, where airborne surveying methods are expensive due to high flight costs. Terrestrial photogrammetry and modern automated image matching is widely used in geodesy, however, its application in glaciology is still rare, especially for surveying ice bodies at the scale of some km², which is typical for valley glaciers. In August 2013 a terrestrial photogrammetric survey was carried out on Freya Glacier, a 6km² valley glacier next to Zackenberg Research Station in NE-Greenland, where a detailed glacier mass balance monitoring was initiated during the last IPY. Photos with a consumer grade digital camera (Nikon D7100) were taken from the ridges surrounding the glacier. To create a digital elevation model, the photos were processed with the software photoscan. A set of ~100 dGPS surveyed ground control points on the glacier surface was used to georeference and validate the final DEM. Aim of this study was to produce a high resolution and high accuracy DEM of the actual surface topography of the Freya glacier catchment with a novel approach and to explore the potential of modern low-cost terrestrial photogrammetry combined with state-of-the-art automated image matching and multiview-stereo routines for glacier monitoring and to communicate this powerful and cheap method within the environmental research and glacier monitoring community.

  2. Heat resistance of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in a nutrient medium and in ground beef patties as influenced by storage and holding temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jackson, T C; Hardin, M D; Acuff, G R

    1996-03-01

    Stationary-phase cultures of Escherichia coli O157:H7 were inoculated into tryptic soy broth, sealed in vials, and stored at -18 degrees C for 1, 8, and 15 days, or 3 or 15 degrees C for 3, 6, and 9 h. Thermal resistance was determined at 55 degrees C. Each storage treatment was repeated with additional holding at 23 or 30 degrees C for 1, 2, 3, or 4 h prior to heating to simulate potential temperature abuse during handling. Cultures under treatments enabling the growth of E. coli O157:H7 were generally more heat sensitive than those held at temperatures which restricted growth or enabled growth to stationary phase. Cultures stored frozen (-18 degrees C) without holding at elevated temperatures had greater heat resistance than those stored under refrigeration (3 degrees C) or at 15 degrees C. Subsequent holding of frozen cultures at 23 or 30 degrees C resulted in a decrease in heat resistance. To determine whether these responses would be observed under typical commercial preparation procedures, ground beef patties were inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 and stored at 3 or 15 degrees C for 9 h or at -18 degrees C for 8 d and then held at 21 or 30 degrees C for 0 or 4 h. Patties were grilled to an internal temperature of 54.4 degrees C (130 degrees F), 62.8 degrees C (145 degrees F), or 68.3 degrees C (155 degrees F). Cultures were most resistant in frozen patties, while cultures in patties stored at 15 degrees C were the most heat sensitive. Holding patties at 21 or 30 degrees C prior to grilling resulted in increased sensitivity. Storage and holding temperatures similar to those encountered in food service may influence the ability of E. coli O157:H7 to survive heat treatments. PMID:10463438

  3. Very high temperature measurements: Applications to nuclear reactor safety tests; Mesures des tres hautes temperatures: Applications a des essais de surete des reacteurs nucleaires

    SciTech Connect

    Parga, Clemente-Jose

    2013-09-27

    This PhD dissertation focuses on the improvement of very high temperature thermometry (1100 deg. C to 2480 deg. C), with special emphasis on the application to the field of nuclear reactor safety and severe accident research. Two main projects were undertaken to achieve this objective: - The development, testing and transposition of high-temperature fixed point (HTFP) metal-carbon eutectic cells, from metrology laboratory precision (±0.001 deg. C) to applied research with a reasonable degradation of uncertainties (±3-5 deg. C). - The corrosion study and metallurgical characterization of Type-C thermocouple (service temp. 2300 deg. C) prospective sheath material was undertaken to extend the survivability of TCs used for molten metallic/oxide corium thermometry (below 2000 deg. C)

  4. Application of Gamma code coupled with turbomachinery models for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh

    2008-02-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 9000C and operational fuel temperatures above 12500C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR’s higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of a toxic gas, CO, and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. GAMMA code is being developed to implement turbomachinery models in the power conversion unit (PCU) and ultimately models associated with the hydrogen plant. Some preliminary results will be described in this paper.

  5. The impact of water and temperature interactions on lag phase, growth and potential ochratoxin A production by two new species, Aspergillus aculeatinus and A. sclerotiicarbonarius, on a green coffee-based medium.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Asya; Magan, Naresh

    2014-10-01

    Two new species of Aspergillus (A. aculeatinus, A. sclerotiicarbonarius) were previously isolated from coffee in Thailand. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of interacting environmental factors of water availability (water activity, aw) and temperature on lag phases prior to growth, growth and potential for ochratoxin A (OTA) production by three strains of each species on a green coffee-based medium for the first time. This showed that overall the growth of the three strains of each species was similar over the 20-37°C and 0.85-0.99 aw ranges. The lag phase prior to growth was <1day at 0.95-0.98 aw and 25-37°C and increased to 2-3 days at marginal temperatures and aw levels. The growth of strains of the uniseriate species A. aculeatinus was optimum at 0.98 aw and 30-35°C. For the biseriate A. sclerotiicarbonarius strains this was 0.99 aw and 30°C. This species was not able to grow at 37°C. None of the strains of the two species grew at 0.85 aw, regardless of temperature. Integrated profiles based on the data from three strains of each species have been developed to show the optimum, maximum and marginal conditions of interacting aw and temperature conditions for growth. None of the strains produced OTA on a green coffee-based medium. This information is important as these species are part of the mycobiota of coffee and may influence OTA contamination by other ochratoxigenic species during coffee processing.

  6. Theoretical and experimental investigation of evanescent-wave absorption sensors for extreme temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buric, Michael P.; Ohodnicki, Paul; Chorpening, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    Recently, significant developments in evanescent wave absorption sensors have been demonstrated for high temperature sensing applications based upon the optical responses of advanced thin film materials. We will demonstrate how such sensors can be utilized in a mode that allows for chemical or temperature sensing starting from basic theoretical considerations. We will also present experimental high temperature sensing results for fabricated sensors. Potential applications of the sensors to be discussed include a range of high temperature systems relevant for fossil energy and combustion monitoring such as industrial combustors or reaction vessels, solid oxide fuel cells, and gas turbines. In these applications, even a small increase in operating efficiency realized via careful observation of in-process parameters and implementation of real-time process controls can result in dramatic savings across the energy industry, illustrating the necessity of pursuing such techniques. It is hoped that sensors of the type described here will allow for unprecedented measurement-access to processes which present challenging high-temperature and chemically reactive environments.

  7. Innovations in alloy metallurgy for furnace rolls and other high temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.C.; Brill, U.; Kettler, H.W.; Giersbach, G.

    1995-12-31

    For high temperature applications proper alloy selection is important for safety and economic reasons. Since all high temperature materials have certain limitations, the optimum choice is often a compromise between the mechanical property constraints (creep and stress-rupture strength), environmental constraints (resistance to various high temperature degradation phenomena), fabricability characteristics and cost. This paper presents the fundamentals of the role of various alloying elements and the utilization of this knowledge to develop a new high temperature alloy Nicrofer 6025HT, known as alloy 602CA (UNS N06025). This innovative development is characterized by superior creep and stress rupture strength properties up to 1,200 C with excellent resistance to cyclic oxidation, carburization, halogenization and nitridation type attack. This unique combination of strength and high temperature corrosion resistance has led to many applications such as furnace rolls in annealing furnaces, hangers in enamelling furnace, conveyor belts, muffles for bright annealing furnaces and other applications. This paper presents alloy 602CA`s various properties, and some design calculations along with long term experience with this alloy for uncooled furnace rolls and description of its technical and economical advantages over water cooled asbestos rolls currently used in industry.

  8. Critical crevice temperature for high-alloyed stainless steels in chlorinated seawater applications

    SciTech Connect

    Steinsmo, U.; Rogne, T.; Drugli, J.M.; Gartland, P.O.

    1997-01-01

    Eleven high-alloyed stainless steels (SS) were tested for application in chlorinated seawater. Critical crevice temperatures (CCT) were determined using a potentiostatic test method. Results were evaluated in terms of the critical crevice index (CCI) value of the alloys and compared to results of duplicate specimens in other tests.

  9. Microwave applications and characterization of the microwave properties of high temperature superconducting films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D. M.; Bautista, J. J.; Riley, A. L.; Dick, G. J.; Housley, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    The development by NASA JPL of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) for use in microwave circuit elements is discussed. The synthesis of HTS films and characterization of their microwave absorption are reviewed. Applications to cryogenic low-noise receivers, spacecraft microwave systems, and low-noise oscillators are considered.

  10. An Application of Trimethylsilyl Derivatives with Temperature Programmed Gas Chromatography to the Senior Analytical Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelter, Paul B.; Carr, James D.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to teach temperature programed gas chromatography (TPGC) techniques and importance of derivatizing many classes of substrated to be separated. Includes equipment needed, procedures for making trimethylsilyl derivatives, applications, sample calculations, and typical results. Procedure required one, three-hour…

  11. A high temperature Rankine binary cycle for ground and space solar engine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.; Lau, C.-V.

    1978-01-01

    A Rankine cycle covering the range of plasma temperatures possible from a solar radiation boiler is studied. The working fluid is potassium. A binary cycle with potassium as the topping cycle fluid and a conventional steam cycle as the bottoming cycle for earth-based applications is analyzed. Operation in conjunction with a wave energy exchanger is considered.

  12. Automation of temperature control for large-array microwave surface applicators.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Fessenden, P

    1993-01-01

    An adaptive temperature control system has been developed for the microstrip antenna array applicators used for large area superficial hyperthermia. A recursive algorithm which allows rapid power updating even for large antenna arrays and accounts for coupling between neighbouring antennas has been developed, based on a first-order difference equation model. Surface temperatures from the centre of each antenna element are the primary feedback information. Also used are temperatures from additional surface probes placed within the treatment field to protect locations vulnerable to excessive temperatures. In addition, temperatures at depth are observed by mappers and utilized to restrain power to reduce treatment-related complications. Experiments on a tissue-equivalent phantom capable of dynamic differential cooling have successfully verified this temperature control system. The results with the 25 (5 x 5) antenna array have demonstrated that during dynamic water cooling changes and other experimentally simulated disturbances, the controlled temperatures converge to desired temperature patterns with a precision close to the resolution of the thermometry system (0.1 degree C).

  13. Automation of temperature control for large-array microwave surface applicators.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Fessenden, P

    1993-01-01

    An adaptive temperature control system has been developed for the microstrip antenna array applicators used for large area superficial hyperthermia. A recursive algorithm which allows rapid power updating even for large antenna arrays and accounts for coupling between neighbouring antennas has been developed, based on a first-order difference equation model. Surface temperatures from the centre of each antenna element are the primary feedback information. Also used are temperatures from additional surface probes placed within the treatment field to protect locations vulnerable to excessive temperatures. In addition, temperatures at depth are observed by mappers and utilized to restrain power to reduce treatment-related complications. Experiments on a tissue-equivalent phantom capable of dynamic differential cooling have successfully verified this temperature control system. The results with the 25 (5 x 5) antenna array have demonstrated that during dynamic water cooling changes and other experimentally simulated disturbances, the controlled temperatures converge to desired temperature patterns with a precision close to the resolution of the thermometry system (0.1 degree C). PMID:8515149

  14. Use of a Multiwavelength Pyrometer in Several Elevated Temperature Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel; Fralick, Gustave

    2001-01-01

    A multiwavelength pyrometer was developed for applications unique to aerospace environments. It was shown to be a useful and versatile technique for measuring temperature, even when the emissivity is unknown. It has also been used to measure the surface temperatures of ceramic zircomia thermal barrier coatings and alumina. The close agreement between pyrometer and thin film thermocouple temperatures provided an independent check. Other applications of the multiwavelength pyrometer are simultaneous surface and bulk temperature measurements of a transparent material, and combustion gas temperature measurement using a special probe interfaced to the multiwavelength pyrometer via an optical fiber. The multiwavelength pyrometer determined temperature by transforming the radiation spectrum in a broad wavelength region to produce a straight line (in a certain spectral region), whose intercept in the vertical axis gives the temperature. Implicit in a two-color pyrometer is the assumption of wavelength independent emissivity. Though the two data points of a two-color pyrometer similarly processed would result immediately in a similar straight line to give the unknown temperature, the two-color pyrometer lacks the greater data redundancy of the multiwavelength pyrometer, which enables it to do so with improved accuracy. It also confirms that emissivity is indeed wavelength independent, as evidenced by a multitude of the data lying on a simple straight line. The multiwavelength pyrometer was also used to study the optical transmission properties of a nanostructured material from which a quadratic exponential functional frequency dependence of its spectral transmission was determined. Finally, by operating the multiwavelength pyrometer in a very wide field of view mode, the surface temperature distribution of a large hot surface was obtained through measurement of just a single radiation spectrum.

  15. Multiwavelength Pyrometer Developed for Use at Elevated Temperatures in Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel L.

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have developed a unique multiwavelength pyrometer for aerospace applications. It has been shown to be a useful and versatile instrument for measuring the surface temperatures of ceramic zirconia thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and alumina, even when their emissivity is unknown. The introduction of fiber optics into the pyrometer has greatly increased the ease of using this instrument. Direct comparison of measurements obtained using the pyrometer and thin film thermocouples on a sample provided independent verification of pyrometry temperature measurement. Application of the pyrometer has also included simultaneous surface and bulk temperature measurement in a transparent material, the measurement of combustion gas temperatures in the flames of an atmospheric burner, the measurement of the temperature distribution appearing on a large surface from the recording of just a single radiation spectrum emitted from this nonuniform temperature surface, and the measurement of some optical properties for special aeronautical materials-such as nanostructured layers. The multiwavelength pyrometer temperature is obtained from a radiation spectrum recorded over a broad wavelength region by transforming it into a straight line segment(s) in part or all of the spectral region. The intercept of the line segment(s) with the vertical axis at zero wavelength gives the inverse of the temperature. In a two-color pyrometer, the two data points are also amenable to this analysis to determine the unknown temperature. Implicit in a two-color pyrometer is the assumption of wavelength-independent emissivity. Its two (and minimum) pieces of data are sufficient to determine this straight line. However, a multiwavelength pyrometer not only has improved accuracy but also confirms that the wavelength-independent emissivity assumption is valid when a multitude of data points are shown to lie on a simple straight line.

  16. Comparative study of the pathogenicity of seabed isolates of Fusarium equiseti and the effect of the composition of the mineral salt medium and temperature on mycelial growth

    PubMed Central

    Palmero, D.; de Cara, M.; Iglesias, C.; Gálvez, L.; Tello, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenicity of seven strains of Fusarium equiseti isolated from seabed soil was evaluated on different host plants showing pre and post emergence damage. Radial growth of 27 strains was measured on culture media previously adjusted to different osmotic potentials with either KCl or NaCl (-1.50 to -144.54 bars) at 15°, 25° and 35° C. Significant differences and interactive effects were observed in the response of mycelia to osmotic potential and temperature. PMID:24031710

  17. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, which allows a shape to be formed prior to the cure, and is then pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Basalt fibers are used for the reinforcement in the composite system. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material.

  18. Application of fuzzy logic to the control of wind tunnel settling chamber temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Humphreys, Gregory L.

    1994-01-01

    The application of Fuzzy Logic Controllers (FLC's) to the control of nonlinear processes, typically controlled by a human operator, is a topic of much study. Recent application of a microprocessor-based FLC to the control of temperature processes in several wind tunnels has proven to be very successful. The control of temperature processes in the wind tunnels requires the ability to monitor temperature feedback from several points and to accommodate varying operating conditions in the wind tunnels. The FLC has an intuitive and easily configurable structure which incorporates the flexibility required to have such an ability. The design and implementation of the FLC is presented along with process data from the wind tunnels under automatic control.

  19. Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) Devices and Mixed-Signal Circuits for Extreme Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Electronic systems in planetary exploration missions and in aerospace applications are expected to encounter extreme temperatures and wide thermal swings in their operational environments. Electronics designed for such applications must, therefore, be able to withstand exposure to extreme temperatures and to perform properly for the duration of the missions. Electronic parts based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology are known, based on device structure, to provide faster switching, consume less power, and offer better radiation-tolerance compared to their silicon counterparts. They also exhibit reduced current leakage and are often tailored for high temperature operation. However, little is known about their performance at low temperature. The performance of several SOI devices and mixed-signal circuits was determined under extreme temperatures, cold-restart, and thermal cycling. The investigations were carried out to establish a baseline on the functionality and to determine suitability of these devices for use in space exploration missions under extreme temperatures. The experimental results obtained on selected SOI devices are presented and discussed in this paper.

  20. Summary of workshop on alloys for very high-temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    In current fossil energy systems, the maximum operating temperatures experienced by critical metal structures do not exceed approximately 732{degrees}C and the major limitation on the use of the alloys typically is corrosion resistance. In systems intended for higher performance and higher efficiency, increasingly higher working fluid temperatures will be employed, which will require materials with higher-temperature capabilities, in particular, higher creep strength and greater environmental resistance. There have been significant developments in alloys in recent years, from modifications of currently-used wrought ferritic and austenitic alloys with the intent of improving their high-temperature capabilities, to oxide dispersion-strengthened alloys targeted at extremely high-temperature applications. The aim of this workshop was to examine the temperature capability of these alloys compared to current alloys, and compared to the needs of advanced fossil fuel combustion or conversion systems, with the goals of identifying where modified/new alloys would be expected to find application, their limitations, and the information/actions required or that are being taken to qualify them for such use.

  1. Drying of porous materials in a medium with variable potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.Y. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper presents an application of the Luikov system of heat and mass transfer equations in dimensionless form to predict the temperature and moisture distributions in a slab of capillary-porous material during drying. The heat and mass potentials of the external medium in the boundary conditions are assumed to vary linearly with time. The method of solution is illustrated by considering the drying of a slab of lumber. Numerical results based on the estimated thermophysical properties of spruce are presented.

  2. The ingestible telemetric body core temperature sensor: a review of validity and exercise applications.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Christopher; Lim, Chin Leong

    2007-03-01

    An ingestible telemetric temperature sensor for measuring body core temperature (Tc) was first described 45 years ago, although the method has only recently gained widespread use for exercise applications. This review aims to (1) use Bland and Altman's limits of agreement (LoA) method as a basis for quantitatively reviewing the agreement between intestinal sensor temperature (Tintestinal), oesophageal temperature (Toesophageal) and rectal temperature (Trectal) across numerous previously published validation studies; (2) review factors that may affect agreement; and (3) review the application of this technology in field-based exercise studies. The agreement between Tintestinal and Toesophageal is suggested to meet our delimitation for an acceptable level of agreement (ie, systematic bias <0.1 degrees C and 95% LoA within +/-0.4 degrees C). The agreement between Tintestinal and Trectal shows a significant systematic bias >0.1 degrees C, although the 95% LoA is acceptable. Tintestinal responds less rapidly than Toesophageal at the start or cessation of exercise or to a change in exercise intensity, but more rapidly than Trectal. When using this technology, care should be taken to ensure adequate control over sensor calibration and data correction, timing of ingestion and electromagnetic interference. The ingestible sensor has been applied successfully in numerous sport and occupational applications such as the continuous measurement of Tc in deep sea saturation divers, distance runners and soldiers undertaking sustained military training exercises. It is concluded that the ingestible telemetric temperature sensor represents a valid index of Tc and shows excellent utility for ambulatory field-based applications.

  3. Commercialization of NASA's High Strength Cast Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the commercialization of a new high strength cast aluminum alloy, invented by NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, for high temperature applications will be presented. Originally developed to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low- exhaust emission, the novel NASA aluminum alloy offers dramatic improvement in tensile and fatigue strengths at elevated temperatures (450 F-750 F), which can lead to reducing part weight and cost as well as improving performance for automotive engine applications. It is an ideal low cost material for cast components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. NASA alloy also offers greater wear resistance, dimensional stability, and lower thermal expansion compared to conventional aluminum alloys, and the new alloy can be produced economically from sand, permanent mold and investment casting. Since 2001, this technology was licensed to several companies for automotive and marine internal combustion engines applications.

  4. Weakly intrusive optical fibre connector for composite materials applications: vibration and temperature validation tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinet, D.; Guerra, Bruno; Garray, D.; Caucheteur, C.; Mégret, P.

    2013-05-01

    Due to their high mechanical and corrosion resistance and their small dimension, optical fibre sensors and more particularly fibre Bragg gratings have demonstrated their high utility in the composite material field for monitoring purpose when there are placed under constrain, vibration or temperature variation. In this context the ingress or egress of optical fibre sensors is an important issue for their application in real applications. However, the optical fibre at these transition points is very fragile and an improper handling of the samples can lead to breakage. In this paper, we describe a new kind of "small form factor" optical fibre connectors well suited to be embedded in composite materials. This new connector, cleavable, allows to obtain a good finish of the composite components that can be used in real applications. We also assess its proper behavior (reflection losses evolution) when this embedded connector is tested under vibration and temperature.

  5. Fiber Bragg Grating Array as a Quasi Distributed Temperature Sensor for Furnace Boiler Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, P. Saidi; Prasad, R. L. N. Sai; Sengupta, D.; Shankar, M. Sai; Srimannarayana, K.; Kishore, P.; Rao, P. Vengal

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents the experimental work on distributed temperature sensing making use of Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) array sensor for possible applications in the monitoring of temperature profile in high temperature boilers. A special sensor has been designed for this purpose which consists of four FBGs (of wavelengths λB1 = 1547.28 nm, λB2 = 1555.72 nm, λB3 = 1550.84 nm, λB4 = 1545.92 nm) written in hydrogen loaded fiber in line with a spacing of 15 cm between them. All the FBGs are encapsulated inside a stainless steel tube for avoiding micro cracks using rigid probe technique. The spatial distribution of temperature profile inside a prototype boiler has been measured experimentally both in horizontal and vertical directions employing the above sensor and the results are presented.

  6. Development of slickline logging tools for very high-temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, C.C.; Wolfenbarger, F.M.

    1986-01-01

    Five logging tools were developed for collecting data in the DOE-sponsored Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project (SSSDP) well. The tools were designed to function at temperatures up to 400/sup 0/C (752/sup 0/F) and were successfully operated in the well at temperatures of 360/sup 0/C (680/sup 0/F). All of the tools--mechanical units for measuring and recording temperature, pressure, and flow rate; an electronic memory tool for measuring and recording temperature and pressure; and a special purpose battery pack for powering a downhole fluid sampler--are designed for slickline operation. In each, selected critical components are places inside a dewar that provides thermal protection for a limited time. This paper discusses the tools, their development and operation, the results from their use in the SSSDP well, and potential extensions to geothermal and gas well applications.

  7. Tribological Performance of PM300 Solid Lubricant Bushings for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Striebing, Donald R.; Stanford, Malcolm K.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Rossi, Anne M.

    2007-01-01

    PM300 is a high temperature solid lubricant material produced through conventional powder metallurgy processing. PM300 is a combination of metal binder (NiCr), hardener (Cr2O3) and lubricant (Ag and BaF2/CaF2) phases and is in commercial use in high temperature furnace conveyors. In this paper, the tribological characteristics of PM300 are evaluated using a newly developed bushing test rig in which PM300 bushings are loaded against rotating steel shafts at temperatures from 25 to 650 C. The data shows that friction and wear are low to moderate and that the lubrication performance (friction) improves with increasing temperature. Several alternative PM300 compositions are evaluated which do not contain silver and are targeted at aircraft gas turbine applications in which environmental compatibility of silver is a concern. It is expected that the data resulting from this research will further the commercialization of this technology.

  8. Magnetocaloric cycle with six stages: Possible application of graphene at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, M. S.

    2015-09-07

    The present work proposes a thermodynamic hexacycle based on the magnetocaloric oscillations of graphene, which has either a positive or negative adiabatic temperature change depending on the final value of the magnetic field change. For instance, for graphenes at 25 K, an applied field of 2.06 T/1.87 T promotes a temperature change of ca. −25 K/+3 K. The hexacycle is based on the Brayton cycle and instead of the usual four steps, it has six stages, taking advantage of the extra cooling provided by the inverse adiabatic temperature change. This proposal opens doors for magnetic cooling applications at low temperatures.

  9. Alumina Volatility in Water Vapor at Elevated Temperatures: Application to Combustion Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Myers, Dwight L.

    2003-01-01

    The volatility of alumina in high temperature water vapor was determined by measuring weight loss of sapphire coupons at temperatures between 1250 and 1500 C, water vapor partial pressures between 0.15 and 0.68 atm in oxygen, at one atmosphere total pressure, and a gas velocity of 4.4 centimeters per second. The variation of the volatility with water vapor partial pressure was consistent with Al(OH)3(g) formation. The enthalpy of reaction to form Al(OH)3(g) from alumina and water vapor was found to be 210 plus or minus 20 kJ/mol. Surface rearrangement of ground sapphire surfaces increased with water vapor partial pressure, temperature and volatility rate. Recession rates of alumina due to volatility were determined as a function of water vapor partial pressure and temperature to evaluate limits for use of alumina in long term applications in combustion environments.

  10. Characterization of modified tapioca starch solutions and their sprays for high temperature coating applications.

    PubMed

    Naz, M Y; Sulaiman, S A; Ariwahjoedi, B; Shaari, Ku Zilati Ku

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the research was to understand and improve the unusual physical and atomization properties of the complexes/adhesives derived from the tapioca starch by addition of borate and urea. The characterization of physical properties of the synthesized adhesives was carried out by determining the effect of temperature, shear rate, and mass concentration of thickener/stabilizer on the complex viscosity, density, and surface tension. In later stage, phenomenological analyses of spray jet breakup of heated complexes were performed in still air. Using a high speed digital camera, the jet breakup dynamics were visualized as a function of the system input parameters. The further analysis of the grabbed images confirmed the strong influence of the input processing parameters on full cone spray patternation. It was also predicted that the heated starch adhesive solutions generate a dispersed spray pattern by utilizing the partial evaporation of the spraying medium. Below 40°C of heating temperature, the radial spray cone width and angle did not vary significantly with increasing Reynolds and Weber numbers at early injection phases leading to increased macroscopic spray propagation. The discharge coefficient, mean flow rate, and mean flow velocity were significantly influenced by the load pressure but less affected by the temperature.

  11. Characterization of Modified Tapioca Starch Solutions and Their Sprays for High Temperature Coating Applications

    PubMed Central

    Naz, M. Y.; Sulaiman, S. A.; Ariwahjoedi, B.; Shaari, Ku Zilati Ku

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the research was to understand and improve the unusual physical and atomization properties of the complexes/adhesives derived from the tapioca starch by addition of borate and urea. The characterization of physical properties of the synthesized adhesives was carried out by determining the effect of temperature, shear rate, and mass concentration of thickener/stabilizer on the complex viscosity, density, and surface tension. In later stage, phenomenological analyses of spray jet breakup of heated complexes were performed in still air. Using a high speed digital camera, the jet breakup dynamics were visualized as a function of the system input parameters. The further analysis of the grabbed images confirmed the strong influence of the input processing parameters on full cone spray patternation. It was also predicted that the heated starch adhesive solutions generate a dispersed spray pattern by utilizing the partial evaporation of the spraying medium. Below 40°C of heating temperature, the radial spray cone width and angle did not vary significantly with increasing Reynolds and Weber numbers at early injection phases leading to increased macroscopic spray propagation. The discharge coefficient, mean flow rate, and mean flow velocity were significantly influenced by the load pressure but less affected by the temperature. PMID:24592165

  12. RETRACTION: Unsteady flow and heat transfer of viscous incompressible fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity due to a rotating disc in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, H. A.

    2007-04-01

    It has come to the attention of the Institute of Physics that this article should not have been submitted for publication owing to its plagiarism of an earlier paper (Hossain A, Hossain M A and Wilson M 2001 Unsteady flow of viscous incompressible fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity due to a rotating disc in presence of transverse magnetic field and heat transfer Int. J. Therm. Sci. 40 11-20). Therefore this article has been retracted by the Institute of Physics and by the author, Hazem Ali Attia.

  13. Ultra-High Temperature Materials Characterization for Space and Missile Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan; Hyers, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Numerous advanced space and missile technologies including propulsion systems require operations at high temperatures. Some very high-temperature materials are being developed to meet these needs, including refractory metal alloys, carbides, borides, and silicides. System design requires data for materials properties at operating temperatures. Materials property data are not available at the desired operating temperatures for many materials of interest. The objective of this work is to provide important physical property data at ultra-high temperatures. The MSFC Electrostatic Levitation (ESL) facility can provide measurements of thermophysical properties which include: creep strength, emissivity, density and thermal expansion. ESL uses electrostatic fields to position samples between electrodes during processing and characterization experiments. Samples float between the electrodes during studies and are free from any contact with a container or test apparatus. This provides a high purity environment for the study of high-temperature, reactive materials. ESL can be used to process a wide variety of materials including metals, alloys, ceramics, glasses and semiconductors. A system for the determination of total hemispherical emissivity is being developed for the MSFC ESL facility by AZ Technology Inc. The instrument has been designed to provide emissivity measurements for samples during ESL experiments over the temperature range 700-3400K. A novel non-contact technique for the determination of high-temperature creep strength has been developed. Data from selected ESL-based characterization studies will be presented. The ESL technique could advance space and missile technologies by advancing the knowledge base and the technology readiness level for ultra-high temperature materials. Applications include non-eroding nozzle materials and lightweight, high-temperature alloys for turbines and structures.

  14. Anaerobic treatment of a medium strength industrial wastewater at low-temperature and short hydraulic retention time: a pilot-scale experience.

    PubMed

    Esparza Soto, M; Solís Morelos, C; Hernández Torres, J J

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the performance of a pilot-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor during the treatment of cereal-processing industry wastewater under low-temperature conditions (17 degrees C) for more than 300 days. The applied organic loading rate (OLR(appl)) was gradually increased from 4 to 6 and 8 kg COD(sol)/m3d by increasing the influent soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD(sol)), while keeping the hydraulic retention time constant (5.2 h). The removal efficiency was high (82 to 92%) and slightly decreased after increasing the influent COD(sol) and the OLR(appl). The highest removed organic loading rate (OLR(rem)) was reached when the UASB reactor was operated at 8 kg COD(sol)/m3d and it was two times higher than that obtained for an OLR(appl) of 4 kg COD(sol)/m3d. Some disturbances were observed during the experimentation. The formation of biogas pockets in the sludge bed significantly complicated the biogas production quantification, but did not affect the reactor performance. The volatile fatty acids in the effluent were low, but increased as the OLR(appl) increased, which caused an increment of the effluent COD(sol). Anaerobic treatment at low temperature was a good option for the biological pre-treatment of cereal processing industry wastewater.

  15. High-Temperature Dielectric Properties of Aluminum Nitride Ceramic for Wireless Passive Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Yuan, Yukun; Ren, Zhong; Tan, Qiulin; Xiong, Jijun

    2015-01-01

    The accurate characterization of the temperature-dependent permittivity of aluminum nitride (AlN) ceramic is quite critical to the application of wireless passive sensors for harsh environments. Since the change of the temperature-dependent permittivity will vary the ceramic-based capacitance, which can be converted into the change of the resonant frequency, an LC resonator, based on AlN ceramic, is prepared by the thick film technology. The dielectric properties of AlN ceramic are measured by the wireless coupling method, and discussed within the temperature range of 12 °C (room temperature) to 600 °C. The results show that the extracted relative permittivity of ceramic at room temperature is 2.3% higher than the nominal value of 9, and increases from 9.21 to 10.79, and the quality factor Q is decreased from 29.77 at room temperature to 3.61 at 600 °C within the temperature range. PMID:26370999

  16. Ultraviolet digital image correlation (UV-DIC) for high temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berke, Ryan B.; Lambros, John

    2014-04-01

    A method is presented for extending two-dimensional digital image correlation (DIC) to a higher range of temperatures by using ultraviolet (UV) lights and UV optics to minimize the light emitted by specimens at those temperatures. The method, which we refer to as UV-DIC, is compared against DIC using unfiltered white light and DIC using filtered blue light which in the past have been used for high temperature applications. It is shown that at low temperatures for which sample glowing is not an issue all three methods produce the same results. At higher temperatures in our experiments, the unfiltered white light method showed significant glowing between 500 and 600 °C and the blue light between 800 and 900 °C, while the UV-DIC remained minimally affected until the material began nearing its melting point (about 1260 °C). The three methods were then used to obtain the coefficient of thermal expansion as a function of temperature for the nickel superalloy Hastelloy-X. All three methods give similar coefficients at temperatures below which glowing becomes significant, with the values also being comparable to the manufacturers specifications. Similar results were also seen in uniaxial tension tests.

  17. A Review of TiNiPdCu Alloy System for High Temperature Shape Memory Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. Imran; Kim, Hee Young; Miyazaki, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    High temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMAs) are important smart materials and possess a significant potential to improve many engineering systems. Many TiNi-based high temperature ternary alloy systems have been reported in literature including TiNiPd, TiNiPt, TiNiZr, TiNiAu, TiNiHf, etc. Some quaternary additions of certain elements in the above systems have been successful to further improve many important shape memory and mechanical properties. The success criteria for an HTSMA become strict in terms of its cyclic stability, maximum recoverable strain, creep resistance, and corrosion resistance at high temperatures. TiNiPdCu alloy system has been recently proposed as a promising HTSMA. Unique nanoscaled precipitates formed in TiNiPdCu-based HTSMAs are found to be stable at temperatures above 773 K, while keeping the benefits of ease of fabrication. It is expected that this alloy system possesses significant potential especially for the high temperature shape memory applications. Till now many research reports have been published on this alloy system. In the present work, a comprehensive review of the TiNiPdCu system is presented in terms of thermomechanical behavior, nanoscale precipitation mechanism, microstructural features, high temperature shape memory and mechanical properties, and the important parameters to control the high temperature performance of these alloys.

  18. Ultraviolet digital image correlation (UV-DIC) for high temperature applications.

    PubMed

    Berke, Ryan B; Lambros, John

    2014-04-01

    A method is presented for extending two-dimensional digital image correlation (DIC) to a higher range of temperatures by using ultraviolet (UV) lights and UV optics to minimize the light emitted by specimens at those temperatures. The method, which we refer to as UV-DIC, is compared against DIC using unfiltered white light and DIC using filtered blue light which in the past have been used for high temperature applications. It is shown that at low temperatures for which sample glowing is not an issue all three methods produce the same results. At higher temperatures in our experiments, the unfiltered white light method showed significant glowing between 500 and 600 °C and the blue light between 800 and 900 °C, while the UV-DIC remained minimally affected until the material began nearing its melting point (about 1260 °C). The three methods were then used to obtain the coefficient of thermal expansion as a function of temperature for the nickel superalloy Hastelloy-X. All three methods give similar coefficients at temperatures below which glowing becomes significant, with the values also being comparable to the manufacturers specifications. Similar results were also seen in uniaxial tension tests. PMID:24784673

  19. High-Temperature Dielectric Properties of Aluminum Nitride Ceramic for Wireless Passive Sensing Applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Yuan, Yukun; Ren, Zhong; Tan, Qiulin; Xiong, Jijun

    2015-09-08

    The accurate characterization of the temperature-dependent permittivity of aluminum nitride (AlN) ceramic is quite critical to the application of wireless passive sensors for harsh environments. Since the change of the temperature-dependent permittivity will vary the ceramic-based capacitance, which can be converted into the change of the resonant frequency, an LC resonator, based on AlN ceramic, is prepared by the thick film technology. The dielectric properties of AlN ceramic are measured by the wireless coupling method, and discussed within the temperature range of 12 °C (room temperature) to 600 °C. The results show that the extracted relative permittivity of ceramic at room temperature is 2.3% higher than the nominal value of 9, and increases from 9.21 to 10.79, and the quality factor Q is decreased from 29.77 at room temperature to 3.61 at 600 °C within the temperature range.

  20. Development of a HTSMA-Actuated Surge Control Rod for High-Temperature Turbomachinery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo, II; Noebe, Ronald; Bigelow, Glen; Culley, Dennis; Stevens, Mark; Penney, Nicholas; Gaydosh, Darrell; Quackenbush, Todd; Carpenter, Bernie

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, a demand for compact, lightweight, solid-state actuation systems has emerged, driven in part by the needs of the aeronautics industry. However, most actuation systems used in turbomachinery require not only elevated temperature but high-force capability. As a result, shape memory alloy (SMA) based systems have worked their way to the forefront of a short list of viable options to meet such a technological challenge. Most of the effort centered on shape memory systems to date has involved binary NiTi alloys but the working temperatures required in many aeronautics applications dictate significantly higher transformation temperatures than the binary systems can provide. Hence, a high temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA) based on NiTiPdPt, having a transformation temperature near 300 C, was developed. Various thermo-mechanical processing schemes were utilized to further improve the dimensional stability of the alloy and it was later extruded/drawn into wire form to be more compatible with envisioned applications. Mechanical testing on the finished wire form showed reasonable work output capability with excellent dimensional stability. Subsequently, the wire form of the alloy was incorporated into a benchtop system, which was shown to provide the necessary stroke requirements of approx.0.125 inches for the targeted surge-control application. Cycle times for the actuator were limited to 4 seconds due to control and cooling constraints but this cycle time was determined to be adequate for the surge control application targeted as the primary requirement was initial actuation of a surge control rod, which could be completed in approximately one second.