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Sample records for meet future energy

  1. U.S. Workforce and Educational Facilities' Readiness to Meet the Future Challenges of Nuclear Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mtingwa, Sekazi

    2008-04-01

    Using nuclear energy to generate electricity continues to be a topic of considerable debate. Currently, 20% of the electricity in the U.S. comes from its fleet of 104 commercial nuclear reactors, and they annually displace on the order of one hundred million metric tons of carbon emissions. These reactors currently account for 70% of the non-carbon emitting electricity production in the United States. Due to the recent interest by the Federal government and others in expanding the nuclear energy option, the American Physical Society's Panel on Public Affairs sponsored a study of the U.S. workforce and educational facilities' readiness for three scenarios out to the year 2050. They range from maintaining the current number of nuclear reactors, although some may be retired and replaced by new ones; significantly increasing the number of reactors, to perhaps as high as 200 or more; up to significantly increasing the number of reactors while closing the fuel cycle by reprocessing and recycling spent fuel. This talk reports on the results of that study.

  2. Nuclear energy acceptance and potential role to meet future energy demand. Which technical/scientific achievements are needed?

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, Roland

    2012-06-19

    25 years after Chernobyl, the Fukushima disaster has changed the perspectives of nuclear power. The disaster has shed a negative light on the independence, reliability and rigor of the national nuclear regulator and plant operator and the usefulness of the international IAEA guidelines on nuclear safety. It has become clear that, in the light of the most severe earthquake in the history of Japan, the plants at Fukushima Daiichi were not adequately protected against tsunamis. Nuclear acceptance has suffered enormously and has changed the perspectives of nuclear energy dramatically in countries that have a very risk-sensitive population, Germany is an example. The paper analyses the reactions in major countries and the expected impact on future deployment of reactors and on R and D activities. On the positive side, the disaster has demonstrated a remarkable robustness of most of the 14 reactors closest to the epicentre of the Tohoku Seaquake although not designed to an event of level 9.0. Public acceptance can only be regained with a rigorous and worldwide approach towards inherent reactor safety and design objectives that limit the impact of severe accidents to the plant itself (like many of the new Gen III reactors). A widespread release of radioactivity and the evacuation (temporary or permanent) of the population up to 30 km around a facility are simply not acceptable. Several countries have announced to request more stringent international standards for reactor safety. The IAEA should take this move forward and intensify and strengthen the different peer review mission schemes. The safety guidelines and peer reviews should in fact become legally binding for IAEA members. The paper gives examples of the new safety features developed over the last 20 years and which yield much safer reactors with lesser burden to the environment under severe accident conditions. The compatibility of these safety systems with the current concepts for fusion-fission hybrids, which

  3. Nuclear energy acceptance and potential role to meet future energy demand. Which technical/scientific achievements are needed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenkel, Roland

    2012-06-01

    25 years after Chernobyl, the Fukushima disaster has changed the perspectives of nuclear power. The disaster has shed a negative light on the independence, reliability and rigor of the national nuclear regulator and plant operator and the usefulness of the international IAEA guidelines on nuclear safety. It has become clear that, in the light of the most severe earthquake in the history of Japan, the plants at Fukushima Daiichi were not adequately protected against tsunamis. Nuclear acceptance has suffered enormously and has changed the perspectives of nuclear energy dramatically in countries that have a very risk-sensitive population, Germany is an example. The paper analyses the reactions in major countries and the expected impact on future deployment of reactors and on R&D activities. On the positive side, the disaster has demonstrated a remarkable robustness of most of the 14 reactors closest to the epicentre of the Tohoku Seaquake although not designed to an event of level 9.0. Public acceptance can only be regained with a rigorous and worldwide approach towards inherent reactor safety and design objectives that limit the impact of severe accidents to the plant itself (like many of the new Gen III reactors). A widespread release of radioactivity and the evacuation (temporary or permanent) of the population up to 30 km around a facility are simply not acceptable. Several countries have announced to request more stringent international standards for reactor safety. The IAEA should take this move forward and intensify and strengthen the different peer review mission schemes. The safety guidelines and peer reviews should in fact become legally binding for IAEA members. The paper gives examples of the new safety features developed over the last 20 years and which yield much safer reactors with lesser burden to the environment under severe accident conditions. The compatibility of these safety systems with the current concepts for fusion-fission hybrids, which have

  4. The possible share of soft/decentralized renewables in meeting the future energy demands of developing regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, A. M.

    1981-09-01

    The contribution of soft/decentralized renewables to energy supply in market economy developing regions is discussed. Investment requirements and fuel production costs are compared with conventional supply schemes. Difficulties associated with these technologies are analyzed. The most promising soft/decentralized renewables are: windmills and small hydropower units for use in irrigation and for supplying electricity to rural households and small towns; charcoal for meeting thermal energy requirements of industry, households, and the service sector; biogas for use in rural households; and solar heat for supplying hot water/steam to industry, households, and services.

  5. Energy Options for the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, John; Obenschain, Stephen; Conover, David; Bajura, Rita; Greene, David; Brown, Marilyn; Boes, Eldon; McCarthy, Kathyrn; Christian, David; Dean, Stephen; Kulcinski, Gerald; Denholm, P. L.

    2004-06-01

    This paper summarizes the presentations and discussion at the Energy Options for the Future meeting held at the Naval Research Laboratory in March of 2004. The presentations covered the present status and future potential for coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear, wind, solar, geothermal, and biomass energy sources and the effect of measures for energy conservation. The longevity of current major energy sources, means for resolving or mitigating environmental issues, and the role to be played by yet to be deployed sources, like fusion, were major topics of presentation and discussion.

  6. Space Technology To Meet Future Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board.

    The thrust of this book is to indicate relative priorities of technology and the rationale for investment in United States space technology to meet future needs as assessed by the Committee on Advanced Space Technology. In part one, a discussion of potential mission sets is given, including: (1) "Mission Requirements for Space Transportation; (2)…

  7. Future American energy policy

    SciTech Connect

    Crist, M.S.; Laffer, A.B.

    1982-01-01

    People from businesses, public life, public advocacy groups, and experts on international energy met in February 1980 to explore the complex issues of energy policy at a conference entitled Energy Future: Policies and Consequences. The book begins with Crist's overview of current options. David Stockman then examines damaging energy myths and their effects in producing misguided energy policies. Other authors explore the social implications of energy policy, the failure of oil-company management and government to keep energy prices in line with costs, the economic implications of domestic energy policy, international attitudes toward US policy, and the implications of alternative energy sources and conservation. Laffer describes how American presidential economic policies differ from public perceptions. The book concludes with the hope of achieving a future balance of environmental concerns and increased production.

  8. Energy for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McReynold, Mildred

    This collection of lessons is designed to be presented to sixth-grade students in a sequence of 10 class days. Using reading and language skills, the lessons are intended to help students become interested in the energy future and to develop personal values. Special attention is given to conservation and development of alternative energy sources.…

  9. Projecting America's Energy Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukert, Joseph M.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses elements to be considered in planning for the future of American energy policy: new ways of applying energy, availability, sources, population growth, effects on agriculture, synthetic fuel, possibility of new technology, government involvement, worldwide events (political and natural), and capital investment. (CT)

  10. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future

    ScienceCinema

    Nelson, Bruce; Volz, Sara; Male, Johnathan; Wolfson, Johnathan; Pray, Todd; Mayfield, Stephen; Atherton, Scott; Weaver, Brandon

    2016-07-12

    Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. This outreach product supports media initiatives to expand the public's understanding of the bioenergy industry and sustainable transportation and was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Green Focus Films, and BCS, Incorporated.

  11. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Bruce; Volz, Sara; Male, Johnathan; Wolfson, Johnathan; Pray, Todd; Mayfield, Stephen; Atherton, Scott; Weaver, Brandon

    2014-07-31

    Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. This outreach product supports media initiatives to expand the public's understanding of the bioenergy industry and sustainable transportation and was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Green Focus Films, and BCS, Incorporated.

  12. Global Energy Futures Model

    2004-01-01

    The Global Energy Futures Model (GEFM) is a demand-based, gross domestic product (GDP)-driven, dynamic simulation tool that provides an integrated framework to model key aspects of energy, nuclear-materials storage and disposition, environmental effluents from fossil and non fossil energy and global nuclear-materials management. Based entirely on public source data, it links oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear and renewable energy dynamically to greenhouse-gas emissions and 13 other measures of environmental impact. It includes historical data frommore » 1990 to 2000, is benchmarked to the DOE/EIA/IEO 2002 [5] Reference Case for 2000 to 2020, and extrapolates energy demand through the year 2050. The GEFM is globally integrated, and breaks out five regions of the world: United States of America (USA), the Peoples Republic of China (China), the former Soviet Union (FSU), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) nations excluding the USA (other industrialized countries), and the rest of the world (ROW) (essentially the developing world). The GEFM allows the user to examine a very wide range of what ir scenarios through 2050 and to view the potential effects across widely dispersed, but interrelated areas. The authors believe that this high-level learning tool will help to stimulate public policy debate on energy, environment, economic and national security issues.« less

  13. 76 FR 4146 - Future Systems Technology Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Future Systems Technology Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA... provide the Commissioner of Social Security independent advice and recommendations on the future...

  14. Wind Energy Status and Future Wind Engineering Challenges: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Thresher, R.; Schreck, S.; Robinson, M.; Veers, P.

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes the current status of wind energy technology, the potential for future wind energy development and the science and engineering challenges that must be overcome for the technology to meet its potential.

  15. Space technology to meet future needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Key technologies were identified where contemporary investments might have large payoffs in technological options for the future. The future needs were considered for space transportation, space science, national security, and manned missions. Eight areas were selected as being vital for the national future in space. Findings regarding representative mission and the recommendations concerning high priority technologies are summarized.

  16. 75 FR 1446 - Future Systems Technology Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... ADMINISTRATION Future Systems Technology Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA... independent advice and recommendations on the future of systems technology and electronic services at the... what future systems technologies may be developed to assist in carrying out its statutory...

  17. 75 FR 67804 - Future Systems Technology Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... ADMINISTRATION Future Systems Technology Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA... Security independent advice and recommendations on the future of systems technology and electronic services... determining what future systems technologies may be developed to assist in carrying out its statutory...

  18. 75 FR 12532 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY International Energy Agency Meetings AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency (IEA) will meet on March 23, 2010, at...

  19. 76 FR 35869 - International Energy Agency meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY International Energy Agency meetings AGENCY: Department of Energy, DOE. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency (IEA) will meet on June 28, 2011, at...

  20. 77 FR 61583 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY International Energy Agency Meetings AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency (IEA) will meet on October 17 and 18,...

  1. 77 FR 69613 - International Energy Agency Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY International Energy Agency Meeting AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: A meeting involving members of the Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency (IEA)...

  2. 76 FR 69714 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY International Energy Agency Meetings AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Meetings. SUMMARY: The Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency (IEA) will meet on November 16-17,...

  3. 77 FR 16826 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY International Energy Agency Meetings AGENCY: Department of Energy, DoE. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency (IEA) will meet on March 28 and 29,...

  4. 78 FR 36542 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY International Energy Agency Meetings AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency (IEA) will meet on June 24, 2013, at...

  5. 78 FR 16665 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY International Energy Agency Meetings AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency (IEA) will meet on March 25 and 26,...

  6. 77 FR 36271 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY International Energy Agency Meetings AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency (IEA) will meet on June 26, 2012, at...

  7. 76 FR 14003 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY International Energy Agency Meetings AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency (IEA) will meet on March 22, 2011, at...

  8. 75 FR 34724 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY International Energy Agency Meetings AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Meetings. SUMMARY: The Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency (IEA) will meet on June 29, 2010, at...

  9. 75 FR 67711 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY International Energy Agency Meetings AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency (IEA) will meet on November 16, 2010,...

  10. 75 FR 38861 - Future Systems Technology Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Future Systems Technology Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Notice of Eighth Panel Meeting. DATES: August 3, 2010, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Location: Park Hyatt Washington DC, Hyde Park Room. ADDRESSES: 24 &...

  11. 75 FR 18566 - Future Systems Technology Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Future Systems Technology Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Notice of Seventh Panel Meeting. DATES: May 4, 2010, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Location: Hotel Palomar, Bumham Ballroom. ADDRESSES: 117 South 17th...

  12. 76 FR 27143 - Future Systems Technology Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Future Systems Technology Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Notice of Eleventh Panel Meeting. DATES: May 24, 2011, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Location: Hyatt Regency Crystal City, Arlington, VA, Regency B....

  13. Energy and the future

    SciTech Connect

    MacLean, D.; Brown, P.G.

    1983-01-01

    This volume attempts to address issues in in energy policy from many disciplinary perspectives in ways that relate to one another. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 11 individual presentations.

  14. Futures for energy cooperatives

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    A listing of Federal agencies and programs with potential funding for community-scale cooperatives using conservation measures and solar technologies is presented in Section 1. Section 2 presents profiles of existing community energy cooperatives describing their location, history, membership, services, sources of finance and technical assistance. A condensed summary from a recent conference on Energy Cooperatives featuring notes on co-op members' experiences, problems, and opportunities is presented in Section 3. Section 4 lists contacts for additional information. A National Consumer Cooperative Bank Load Application is shown in the appendix.

  15. FUTURE OF ENERGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A complete Scientific American issue of nine specialist articles was devoted to the concern of powering the global economy and addressing the effects of global warming. Control of atmospheric carbon, transportation fuel, efficient use of energy, the disposition of coal, opportuni...

  16. Energy, Technology, and Our Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenyon, Richard L.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the strength in research and development and the technological leadership as factors dominating "postindustrial" country economy. Indicates that the United States future welfare will depend heavily upon technology, rather than an energy glut. (CC)

  17. Electromagnetic DM technology meets future AO demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamelinck, Roger; Rosielle, Nick; Steinbuch, Maarten; Doelman, Niek

    New deformable mirror technology is developed by the Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Delft University of Technology and TNO Science and Industry. Several prototype adaptive deformable mirrors are realized mirrors, up to 427 actuators and ∅150mm diameter, with characteristics suitable for future AO systems. The prototypes consist of a 100µm thick, continuous facesheet on which low voltage, electromagnetic, push-pull actuators impose out-of-plane displacements. The variable reluctance actuators with ±10µm stroke and nanometer resolution are located in a standard actuator module. Each module with 61 actuators connects to a single PCB with dedicated, 16 bit, PWM based, drivers. A LVDS multi-drop cable connects up to 32 actuator modules. With the actuator module, accompanying PCB and multi-drop system the deformable mirror technology is made modular in its mechanics and electronics. An Ethernet-LVDS bridge enables any commercial PC to control the mirror using the UDP standard. Latest results of the deformable mirror technology development are presented.

  18. Energy structures and environmental futures

    SciTech Connect

    Haugland, T.; Bergesen, H.O.; Roland, K.

    1998-11-01

    Energy is not only a basis for modern society, but also a product of it. This book is a study of the close and ever-changing relationship between the energy sector and the society that surrounds it. At the end of the twentieth century this relationship faces two fundamental challenges: First, the national confinement of modern energy systems is undermined by technological progress, making long-distance trade increasingly attractive, and by the broad trend towards economic internationalization in general and political integration in Europe in particular. Second, the risk of climate change may lead governments and publics to demand a profound restructuring of the entire energy sector. The purpose is to analyze how these two fundamental challenges, and the connection between them, can affect future energy developments in Europe. The analysis must be rooted in a firm understanding of the past. The first part of the book is therefore devoted to a systematic description and analysis of the energy sector in Europe as it has developed over the past twenty-five years, by major subsectors and with examples from the most important countries. Part 1 discusses trends and policies related to energy demand, energy sector developments in oil, coal, natural gas, and electricity, achievements and challenges in the environment, and the role of international policy bodies. Part 2 forecasts future developments in 1995--2020, by discussing the following: Paths for future developments; National rebound scenario; Liberalization and trade; Liberalization versus national rebound; and Environmental futures.

  19. Essentials for the energy future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassl, H.

    2003-04-01

    Projections of today's energy use urge industrialized and industrializing countries alike to change their energy patterns. One third of mankind has no access to modern energy use and emissions from burning fossil fuels, mainly from another third of mankind, trigger global climate change. Classic climate and energy scenarios (i.e. TAR IPCC) elaborate mainly on the second part. We present a number of semiquantitive biospheric as well as socio-economic guard rails which - if overrun - bring intolerable consequences for mankind. Any sustainable energy future must develop within an area designated by these guard rails. One quantitative example building on the phase-out of nuclear energy, moderate increase in hydropower and biomass use, moderate use of carbon sequestration and massive investment into solar and wind power shows that a switch from fossil to renewable energy sources is possible within a century - but the window of opportunity for political measures is closing. Decisions have to be taken now.

  20. Toward an energy surety future.

    SciTech Connect

    Tatro, Marjorie L.; Jones, Scott A.; Covan, John Morgan; Kuswa, Glenn W.; Menicucci, David F.; Robinett, Rush D. III

    2005-10-01

    Because of the inevitable depletion of fossil fuels and the corresponding release of carbon to the environment, the global energy future is complex. Some of the consequences may be politically and economically disruptive, and expensive to remedy. For the next several centuries, fuel requirements will increase with population, land use, and ecosystem degradation. Current or projected levels of aggregated energy resource use will not sustain civilization as we know it beyond a few more generations. At the same time, issues of energy security, reliability, sustainability, recoverability, and safety need attention. We supply a top-down, qualitative model--the surety model--to balance expenditures of limited resources to assure success while at the same time avoiding catastrophic failure. Looking at U.S. energy challenges from a surety perspective offers new insights on possible strategies for developing solutions to challenges. The energy surety model with its focus on the attributes of security and sustainability could be extrapolated into a global energy system using a more comprehensive energy surety model than that used here. In fact, the success of the energy surety strategy ultimately requires a more global perspective. We use a 200 year time frame for sustainability because extending farther into the future would almost certainly miss the advent and perfection of new technologies or changing needs of society.

  1. Options for Kentucky's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Demick

    2012-11-01

    Three important imperatives are being pursued by the Commonwealth of Kentucky: ? Developing a viable economic future for the highly trained and experienced workforce and for the Paducah area that today supports, and is supported by, the operations of the US Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Currently, the PGDP is scheduled to be taken out of service in May, 2013. ? Restructuring the economic future for Kentucky’s most abundant indigenous resource and an important industry – the extraction and utilization of coal. The future of coal is being challenged by evolving and increasing requirements for its extraction and use, primarily from the perspective of environmental restrictions. Further, it is important that the economic value derived from this important resource for the Commonwealth, its people and its economy is commensurate with the risks involved. Over 70% of the extracted coal is exported from the Commonwealth and hence not used to directly expand the Commonwealth’s economy beyond the severance taxes on coal production. ? Ensuring a viable energy future for Kentucky to guarantee a continued reliable and affordable source of energy for its industries and people. Today, over 90% of Kentucky’s electricity is generated by burning coal with a delivered electric power price that is among the lowest in the United States. Anticipated increased environmental requirements necessitate looking at alternative forms of energy production, and in particular electricity generation.

  2. Future of high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Panofsky, W.K.H.

    1984-06-01

    A rough overview is given of the expectations for the extension of high energy colliders and accelerators into the xtremely high energy range. It appears likely that the SSC or something like it will be the last gasp of the conventional method of producing high energy proton-proton collisions using synchrotron rings with superconducting magnets. It is likely that LEP will be the highest energy e+e/sup -/ colliding beam storage ring built. The future beyond that depends on the successful demonstrations of new technologies. The linear collider offers hope in this respect for some extension in energy for electrons, and maybe even for protons, but is too early to judge whether, by how much, or when such an extension will indeed take place.

  3. Meets or Exceeds Applicable to Future Space Cooperations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Teresa A. J.

    2002-01-01

    The term "Meets or Exceeds" is synonymous with an understanding of equivalency. During the period 1990-1993, "meets or exceeds" agreements were negotiated and baselined in the Space Station Freedom Program. Today, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the European Space Agency (ESA), the Italian Space Agency (ASI), the National Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Russian Space Agency (RAKA) are successfully building the most complex vehicle of the 21st century in space. In order to integrate these initial efforts successfully, the Space Station Freedom Program technical communities developed an understanding, and subsequently, performed "meets or exceeds" analyses of each countries standard practice. The first Space Station Freedom Program "meets or exceeds" documents were approved after months of negotiations between NASA, CSA, ESA, and NASDA engineering, materials science, product assurance and other science areas. For the personnel responsible, these negotiations led to reinforced teams set up for the routine maintenance of "meets or exceeds" negotiations. Eventually, the International Space Station (ISS) inherited these agreements. From 1993 - 1995, equivalency negotiations were commenced with RAKA. This paper will discuss the "meets-or-exceeds" agreements in place, the organizations, the lessons learned, the formats, the methodology, and the transition from the Space Station Freedom Program to the International Space Station. Additionally, this paper will discuss where these negotiations served well, where they were unnecessary, and how these agreements were upgraded. The paper concludes with observations and recommendations for future "meets or exceeds," how these standards and guidelines can be improved as they may apply to future Space Stations.

  4. Coal: the cornerstone of America's energy future

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, R.A.

    2006-06-15

    In April 2005, US Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman asked the National Coal Council to develop a 'report identifying the challenges and opportunities of more fully exploring our domestic coal resources to meet the nation's future energy needs'. The Council has responded with eight specific recommendations for developing and implementing advanced coal processing and combustion technologies to satisfy our unquenchable thirst for energy. These are: Use coal-to-liquids technologies to produce 2.6 million barrels/day; Use coal-to-natural gas technologies to produce 4 trillion ft{sup 3}/yr; Build 100 GW of clean coal plants by 2025; Produce ethanol from coal; Develop coal-to-hydrogen technologies; Use CO{sub 2} to enhance recovery of oil and coal-bed methane; Increase the capacity of US coal mines and railroads; and Invest in technology development and implementation. 1 ref.; 4 figs.; 1 tab.

  5. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David

    2011-06-15

    used to evaluate the energy and emission impact of two pathways of alternative energy development. The results show that China can only meets its 2015 and 2020 targets for non-fossil penetration if it successfully achieves all of its capacity targets for 2020 with continued expansion through 2030. To achieve this level of alternative generation, significant amounts of raw materials including 235 Mt of concrete, 54 Mt of steel, 5 Mt of copper along with 3 billion tons of water and 64 thousand square kilometers of land are needed. China’s alternative energy supply will likely have relatively high average energy output to fossil fuel input ratio of 42 declining to 26 over time, but this ratio is largely skewed by nuclear and hydropower capacity. With successful alternative energy development, 32% of China’s electricity and 21% of its total primary energy will be supplied by alternative energy by 2030. Compared to the counterfactual baseline in which alternative energy development stumbles and China does not meet its capacity targets until 2030, alternative energy development can displace 175 Mtce of coal inputs per year and 2080 Mtce cumulatively from power generation by 2030. In carbon terms, this translates into 5520 Mt of displaced CO2 emissions over the twenty year period, with more than half coming from expanded nuclear and wind power generation. These results illustrate the critical role that alternative energy development can play alongside energy efficiency in reducing China’s energy-related carbon emissions.

  6. Coal: Energy for the future

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This report was prepared in response to a request by the US Department of energy (DOE). The principal objectives of the study were to assess the current DOE coal program vis-a-vis the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), and to recommend the emphasis and priorities that DOE should consider in updating its strategic plan for coal. A strategic plan for research, development, demonstration, and commercialization (RDD and C) activities for coal should be based on assumptions regarding the future supply and price of competing energy sources, the demand for products manufactured from these sources, technological opportunities, and the need to control the environmental impact of waste streams. These factors change with time. Accordingly, the committee generated strategic planning scenarios for three time periods: near-term, 1995--2005; mid-term, 2006--2020; and, long-term, 2021--2040. The report is divided into the following chapters: executive summary; introduction and scope of the study; overview of US DOE programs and planning; trends and issues for future coal use; the strategic planning framework; coal preparation, coal liquid mixtures, and coal bed methane recovery; clean fuels and specialty products from coal; electric power generation; technology demonstration and commercialization; advanced research programs; conclusions and recommendations; appendices; and glossary. 174 refs.

  7. The future of energy gases

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, D.G.

    1995-04-01

    Natural gas, mainly methane, produces lower CO {sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x}, SO {sub 2} and particulate emissions than either oil or coal; thus further substitutions of methane for these fuels could help mitigate air pollution. Methane is, however, a potent greenhouse gas and the domestication of ruminants, cultivation of rice, mining of coal, drilling for oil, and transportation of natural gas have all contributed to a doubling of the amount of atmospheric methane since 1800. Today nearly 300,000 wells yearly produce each 21 trillion cubic feet of methane. Known reserves suggest about a 10 year supply at the above rates of recovery; and the potential for undiscovered resources is obscured by uncertainty involving price, new technologies, and environmental restrictions stemming from the need to drill an enormous number of wells, many in ecologically sensitive areas. The atomic simplicity of methane, composed of one carbon and four hydrogen atoms, may mask the complexity of this, the most basic of organic molecules. Within the Earth, methane is produced through thermochemical alteration of organic materials, and by biochemical reactions mediated by metabolic processes of archaebacteria; some methane may even be primordial, a residue of planetary accretion. Methane is known to exist in the mantle and lower crust. Near the Earth`s surface, methane occurs in enormous oil and/or gas reservoirs in rock, and is absorbed in coal, dissolved in water, and trapped in a latticework of ice-like material called gas hydrate. Methane also occurs in smaller volumes in landfills, rice paddies, termite complexes, ruminants, and even many humans. As an energy source, methane accounts for roughly 25 percent of current U.S. consumption, but its full energy potential is controversial. Methane is touted by some as a viable bridge to future energy systems, fueled by the sun and uranium and carried by electricity and hydrogen.

  8. Trends in catalysis research to meet future refining needs

    SciTech Connect

    Absi-Halabi, M.; Stanislaus, A.; Qabazard, H.

    1997-02-01

    The main emphasis of petroleum refining during the `70s and early `80s was to maximize conversion of heavy oils to gasoline and middle distillate products. While this objective is still important, the current focus that began in the late `80s is to develop cleaner products. This is a result of strict environmental constraints to reduce emissions from both the products and refineries. Developing catalysts with improved activity, selectivity and stability for use in processes producing such environmentally acceptable fuels is the most economical and effective route for refiners. Novel technologies such as biocatalysis and catalytic membranes are examples of current successful laboratory-scale attempts to resolve anticipated future industry problems. Since catalysts play a key role in refining processes, it is important to examine the challenges facing catalysis research to meet future refining developments. The paper discusses the factors influencing refining, advancements in refining technology and catalysis, short-term future trends in refining catalysts research, and long-term trends in refining catalysts. 56 refs.

  9. Coal: America's energy future. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    2006-03-15

    Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman requested the National Coal Council in April 2005 a report identifying the challenges and opportunities of more fully exploring the USA's domestic coal resources to meet the nations' future energy needs. This resultant report addresses the Secretary's request in the context of the President's focus, with eight findings and recommendations that would use technology to leverage the USA's extensive coal assets and reduce dependence on imported energy. Volume I outlines these findings and recommendations. Volume II provides technical data and case histories to support the findings and recommendations. Chapter headings of Volume I are: Coal-to-Liquids to Produce 2.6 MMbbl/d; Coal-to-Natural Gas to Produce 4.0 Tcf Per Year; Coal-to-Clean Electricity; Coal to Produce Ethanol; Coal-to-Hydrogen; Enhanced Oil and Gas (Coalbed Methane); Recovery as Carbon Management Strategies; Delineate U.S. Coal Reserves and Transportation Constraints as Part of an Effort to Maximize U.S. Coal Production; and Penn State Study, 'Economic Benefits of Coal Conversion Investments'.

  10. Space facilities: Meeting future needs for research, development, and operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The National Facilities Study (NFS) represents an interagency effort to develop a comprehensive and integrated long-term plan for world-class aeronautical and space facilities that meet current and projected needs for commercial and government aerospace research and development and space operations. At the request of NASA and the DOD, the National Research Council's Committee on Space Facilities has reviewed the space related findings of the NFS. The inventory of more than 2800 facilities will be an important resource, especially if it continues to be updated and maintained as the NFS report recommends. The data in the inventory provide the basis for a much better understanding of the resources available in the national facilities infrastructure, as well as extensive information on which to base rational decisions about current and future facilities needs. The working groups have used the inventory data and other information to make a set of recommendations that include estimates of cast savings and steps for implementation. While it is natural that the NFS focused on cost reduction and consolidations, such a study is most useful to future planning if it gives equal weight to guiding the direction of future facilities needed to satisfy legitimate national aspirations. Even in the context of cost reduction through facilities closures and consolidations, the study is timid about recognizing and proposing program changes and realignments of roles and missions to capture what could be significant savings and increased effectiveness. The recommendations of the Committee on Space Facilities are driven by the clear need to be more realistic and precise both in recognizing current incentives and disincentives in the aerospace industry and in forecasting future conditions for U.S. space activities.

  11. Energy, helium, and the future: II

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, M.C.; Hammel, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    The importance of helium as a critical resource material has been recognized specifically by the scientific community and more generally by the 1960 Congressional mandate to institute a long-range conservation program. A major study mandated by the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 resulted in the publication in 1975 of the document, The Energy-Related Applications of Helium, ERDA-13. This document contained a comprehensive review and analysis relating to helium resources and present and future supply/demand relationships with particular emphasis upon those helium-dependent energy-related technologies projected to be implemented in the post-2000 year time period, e.g., fusion. An updated overview of the helium situation as it exists today is presented. Since publication of ERDA-13, important changes in the data base underlying that document have occurred. The data have since been reexamined, revised, and new information included. Potential supplies of helium from both conventional and unconventional natural gas resources, projected supply/demand relationships to the year 2030 based upon a given power-generation scenario, projected helium demand for specific energy-related technologies, and the supply options (national and international) available to meet that demand are discussed. An updated review will be given of the energy requirements for the extraction of helium from natural gas as they relate to the concentration of helium. A discussion is given concerning the technical and economic feasibility of several methods available both now and conceptually possible, to extract helium from helium-lean natural gas, the atmosphere, and outer space. Finally, a brief review is given of the 1980 Congressional activities with respect to the introduction and possible passage of new helium conservation legislation.

  12. 78 FR 20311 - State Energy Advisory Board; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... Efficiency and Renewable Energy State Energy Advisory Board; Meeting AGENCY: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a Board meeting of the State Energy Advisory Board (STEAB). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-...

  13. Efficient use of land to meet sustainable energy needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Rebecca R.; Hoffacker, Madison K.; Field, Christopher B.

    2015-04-01

    The deployment of renewable energy systems, such as solar energy, to achieve universal access to electricity, heat and transportation, and to mitigate climate change is arguably the most exigent challenge facing humans today. However, the goal of rapidly developing solar energy systems is complicated by land and environmental constraints, increasing uncertainty about the future of the global energy landscape. Here, we test the hypothesis that land, energy and environmental compatibility can be achieved with small- and utility-scale solar energy within existing developed areas in the state of California (USA), a global solar energy hotspot. We found that the quantity of accessible energy potentially produced from photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) within the built environment (`compatible’) exceeds current statewide demand. We identify additional sites beyond the built environment (`potentially compatible’) that further augment this potential. Areas for small- and utility-scale solar energy development within the built environment comprise 11,000-15,000 and 6,000 TWh yr-1 of PV and CSP generation-based potential, respectively, and could meet the state of California’s energy consumptive demand three to five times over. Solar energy within the built environment may be an overlooked opportunity for meeting sustainable energy needs in places with land and environmental constraints.

  14. A realizable renewable energy future

    PubMed

    Turner

    1999-07-30

    The ability of renewable resources to provide all of society's energy needs is shown by using the United States as an example. Various renewable systems are presented, and the issues of energy payback, carbon dioxide abatement, and energy storage are addressed. Pathways for renewable hydrogen generation are shown, and the implementation of hydrogen technologies into the energy infrastructure is presented. The question is asked, Should money and energy be spent on carbon dioxide sequestration, or should renewable resources be implemented instead.

  15. 75 FR 82002 - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces an open meeting of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB). SEAB was... provide an overview to the Board. Tentative Agenda: The meeting will start at 9 a.m. on January 20th...

  16. 76 FR 23798 - Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Office of Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Nuclear Energy Advisory...

  17. 77 FR 55201 - State Energy Advisory Board (STEAB); Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY State Energy Advisory Board (STEAB); Meeting AGENCY: Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a live open meeting of the...

  18. The Economics of America's Energy Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Henry

    This is an Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) pamphlet which reviews economic and technical considerations for the future development of energy sources. Included are sections on petroleum, synthetic fuels, oil shale, nuclear power, geothermal power, and solar energy. Also presented are data pertaining to U.S. energy production…

  19. The Future of Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kubik, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of enhanced, or engineered, geothermal systems was carried out by an 18-member panel assembled by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to evaluate the potential of geothermal energy becoming a major energy source for the United States.

  20. Hydrogen: the future energy carrier.

    PubMed

    Züttel, Andreas; Remhof, Arndt; Borgschulte, Andreas; Friedrichs, Oliver

    2010-07-28

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century the limitations of the fossil age with regard to the continuing growth of energy demand, the peaking mining rate of oil, the growing impact of CO2 emissions on the environment and the dependency of the economy in the industrialized world on the availability of fossil fuels became very obvious. A major change in the energy economy from fossil energy carriers to renewable energy fluxes is necessary. The main challenge is to efficiently convert renewable energy into electricity and the storage of electricity or the production of a synthetic fuel. Hydrogen is produced from water by electricity through an electrolyser. The storage of hydrogen in its molecular or atomic form is a materials challenge. Some hydrides are known to exhibit a hydrogen density comparable to oil; however, these hydrides require a sophisticated storage system. The system energy density is significantly smaller than the energy density of fossil fuels. An interesting alternative to the direct storage of hydrogen are synthetic hydrocarbons produced from hydrogen and CO2 extracted from the atmosphere. They are CO2 neutral and stored like fossil fuels. Conventional combustion engines and turbines can be used in order to convert the stored energy into work and heat.

  1. Nuclear energy: basics, present, future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricotti, M. E.

    2013-06-01

    The contribution is conceived for non-nuclear experts, intended as a synthetic and simplified overview of the technology related to energy by nuclear fission. At the end of the paper, the Reader will find a minimal set of references, several of them on internet, useful to start deepening the knowledge on this challenging, complex, debated albeit engaging energy source.

  2. The Future of Energy from Nuclear Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Son H.; Taiwo, Temitope

    2013-04-13

    Nuclear energy is an important part of our current global energy system, and contributes to supplying the significant demand for electricity for many nations around the world. There are 433 commercial nuclear power reactors operating in 30 countries with an installed capacity of 367 GWe as of October 2011 (IAEA PRIS, 2011). Nuclear electricity generation totaled 2630 TWh in 2010 representing 14% the world’s electricity generation. The top five countries of total installed nuclear capacity are the US, France, Japan, Russia and South Korea at 102, 63, 45, 24, and 21 GWe, respectively (WNA, 2012a). The nuclear capacity of these five countries represents more than half, 68%, of the total global nuclear capacity. The role of nuclear power in the global energy system today has been motivated by several factors including the growing demand for electric power, the regional availability of fossil resources and energy security concerns, and the relative competitiveness of nuclear power as a source of base-load electricity. There is additional motivation for the use of nuclear power because it does not produce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or local air pollutants during its operation and contributes to low levels of emissions throughout the lifecycle of the nuclear energy system (Beerten, J. et. al., 2009). Energy from nuclear fission primarily in the form of electric power and potentially as a source of industrial heat could play a greater role for meeting the long-term growing demand for energy worldwide while addressing the concern for climate change from rising GHG emissions. However, the nature of nuclear fission as a tremendously compact and dense form of energy production with associated high concentrations of radioactive materials has particular and unique challenges as well as benefits. These challenges include not only the safety and cost of nuclear reactors, but proliferation concerns, safeguard and storage of nuclear materials associated with nuclear fuel

  3. Solar Energy - An Option for Future Energy Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Peter E.

    1972-01-01

    Discusses the exponential growth of energy consumption and future consequences. Possible methods of converting solar energy to power such as direct energy conversion, focusing collectors, selective rediation absorbers, ocean thermal gradient, and space solar power are considered. (DF)

  4. Future of Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Nuckolls, J H; Wood, L L

    2002-09-04

    In the past 50 years, fusion R&D programs have made enormous technical progress. Projected billion-dollar scale research facilities are designed to approach net energy production. In this century, scientific and engineering progress must continue until the economics of fusion power plants improves sufficiently to win large scale private funding in competition with fission and non-nuclear energy systems. This economic advantage must be sustained: trillion dollar investments will be required to build enough fusion power plants to generate ten percent of the world's energy. For Inertial Fusion Energy, multi-billion dollar driver costs must be reduced by up to an order of magnitude, to a small fraction of the total cost of the power plant. Major cost reductions could be achieved via substantial improvements in target performance-both higher gain and reduced ignition energy. Large target performance improvements may be feasible through a combination of design innovations, e.g., ''fast ignition,'' propagation down density gradients, and compression of fusion fuel with a combination of driver and chemical energy. The assumptions that limit projected performance of fusion targets should be carefully examined. The National Ignition Facility will enable development and testing of revolutionary targets designed to make possible economically competitive fusion power plants.

  5. FIRST STEPS INTO AN ENERGY EFFECIENT FUTURE

    SciTech Connect

    BARRETT, JANE L.

    2009-04-02

    Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians proposes to develop a more sustainable, affordable and autonomous energy future for Tribal Members. The Band will develop the capacity to conduct energy audits, to implement energy efficiency measures in tribal homes, and to build more energy efficient housing. This will be done by providing direct classroom and on the job training for Tribal members to conduct the energy audits and the installation of insulation.

  6. Green nanotechnology of trends in future energy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kelvii Wei

    2011-06-01

    It is well known that current fossil fuel usage is unsustainable and associated with greenhouse gas production. The amount of the world's primary energy supply provided by renewable energy technologies is required urgently. Therefore, the relevant technologies such as hydrogen fuel, solar cell, biotechnology based on nanotechnology and the relevant patents for exploiting the future energy for the friendly environment are reviewed. At the same time, it is pointed out that the significantly feasible world's eco-energy for the foreseeable future should not only be realized, but also methods for using the current energy and their by-products more efficiently should be found correspondingly to ensure the minimal environmental impact.

  7. Energy Education: Teaching for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierke, C. David

    1978-01-01

    A major challenge to education for the future involves energy attitude modification, and industrial arts is best prepared to institute energy education, says the author. He outlines the energy technology curriculum at East Senior High School, West Seneca, New York, and includes photographs from the solar and wind power course. (MF)

  8. Hydrogen: A Future Energy Mediator?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Hydrogen may be the fuel to help the United States to a non fossil energy source. Although hydrogen may not be widely used as a fuel until after the turn of the century, special applications may become feasible in the short term. Costs, uses, safety, and production methods are discussed. (BT)

  9. Nuclear Energy Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, I. H.

    2006-10-01

    Nuclear power plants currently generate about 20% of US and 17% of world electricity, which makes nuclear the largest non-emitting energy source in current use. Concerns about global climate change have led to a remarkable transformation of attitudes towards nuclear energy. There remain key challenges that must be faced when considering expansion of its contribution. In summary they are: Economics, Safety, Waste Disposal, and Proliferation. Electricity from legacy fission plants is highly competitive with fossil, but perceived financial risks make the large capital cost fraction a key hurdle to new-construction, and costs of 2 per installed Watt electrical are currently considered only just economically attractive. Proliferation of nuclear-weapons-enabling technology is a major concern for global stability, in which fusion may have significant technical advantages over fission. But proliferation control requires a combination of both technical and political initiatives. The feasibility of supplying process heat or hydrogen from nuclear energy inspires additional research into novel reactor concepts and associated technologies. The presentation will lay out this overall context of the nuclear energy renaissance.

  10. 75 FR 61227 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ..., General Electric--Hitachi Nuclear Energy (GEH), and their contractors, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552b(c)(4... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant...

  11. Futures and Education. Report of a Regional Meeting (Bangkok, Thailand, November 2-8, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    A meeting report on education within the context of futures studies is divided into four chapters. Chapter One discusses the background of the meeting. Chapter Two outlines the studies presented by each of the eight Asian and Pacific nations represented at the meeting: Australia, India, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, the Philippines, Korea, and…

  12. Hydrogen and OUr Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Tidball; Stu Knoke

    2009-03-01

    In 2003, President George W. Bush announced the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative to accelerate the research and development of hydrogen, fuel cell, and infrastructure technologies that would enable hydrogen fuel cell vehicles to reach the commercial market in the 2020 timeframe. The widespread use of hydrogen can reduce our dependence on imported oil and benefit the environment by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and criteria pollutant emissions that affect our air quality. The Energy Policy Act of 2005, passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bush on August 8, 2005, reinforces Federal government support for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Title VIII, also called the 'Spark M. Matsunaga Hydrogen Act of 2005' authorizes more than $3.2 billion for hydrogen and fuel cell activities intended to enable the commercial introduction of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles by 2020, consistent with the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. Numerous other titles in the Act call for related tax and market incentives, new studies, collaboration with alternative fuels and renewable energy programs, and broadened demonstrations--clearly demonstrating the strong support among members of Congress for the development and use of hydrogen fuel cell technologies. In 2006, the President announced the Advanced Energy Initiative (AEI) to accelerate research on technologies with the potential to reduce near-term oil use in the transportation sector--batteries for hybrid vehicles and cellulosic ethanol--and advance activities under the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. The AEI also supports research to reduce the cost of electricity production technologies in the stationary sector such as clean coal, nuclear energy, solar photovoltaics, and wind energy.

  13. U.S. Energy Demand: Some Low Energy Futures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Described is a study in which energy demands were analyzed and several plausable future energy scenarios were developed. The article attempts to illustrate the dynamics of energy demand and supply in the United States in order to aid future planning. (MDR)

  14. Future of energy demand in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Elshayal, I.M.; Al-Zakri, A.S.

    1981-01-01

    In this study, the most recent papers on this topic were reviewed to examine the future use of nuclear energy in seawater desalination and electric power generation, as well as its impact on the environment in Saudi Arabia. 14 refs.

  15. THE FUTURE OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Renner

    2006-11-01

    Recent national focus on the value of increasing our supply of indigenous, renewable energy underscores the need for reevaluating all alternatives, particularly those that are large and welldistributed nationally. This analysis will help determine how we can enlarge and diversify the portfolio of options we should be vigorously pursuing. One such option that is often ignored is geothermal energy, produced from both conventional hydrothermal and Enhanced (or engineered) Geothermal Systems (EGS). An 18-member assessment panel was assembled in September 2005 to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of EGS becoming a major supplier of primary energy for U.S. base-load generation capacity by 2050. This report documents the work of the panel at three separate levels of detail. The first is a Synopsis, which provides a brief overview of the scope, motivation, approach, major findings, and recommendations of the panel. At the second level, an Executive Summary reviews each component of the study, providing major results and findings. The third level provides full documentation in eight chapters, with each detailing the scope, approach, and results of the analysis and modeling conducted in each area.

  16. Dark matter and dark energy: summary and future directions.

    PubMed

    Ellis, John

    2003-11-15

    This paper reviews the progress reported at the Discussion Meeting and advertises some possible future directions in our drive to understand dark matter and dark energy. Additionally, a first attempt is made to place in context the exciting new results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe satellite, which were published shortly after this meeting. In the first part of this paper, pieces of observational evidence shown here that bear on the amounts of dark matter and dark energy are reviewed. Subsequently, particle candidates for dark matter are mentioned, and detection strategies are discussed. Finally, ideas are presented for calculating the amounts of dark matter and dark energy, and possibly relating them to laboratory data.

  17. 76 FR 64123 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs will hold a meeting on November 2..., (75 FR 65038-65039). Detailed meeting agendas and meeting transcripts are available on the NRC...

  18. Scientific STAFF and MALT meetings - past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Pahlm, Olle; Swenne, Cees A; Ugander, Martin; Warren, Stafford G; Wagner, Galen S

    2016-01-01

    The scientific STAFF and MALT meetings were created around the turn of the century for scientists engaged in enhancing the role of the 12-lead ECG for detection and quantification of involved myocardium in patients with acute coronary syndrome. These meetings were initially focused on computer processing of data from two single-center databases. The STAFF database was collected in the mid-nineties on patients with prolonged total coronary occlusion; high-resolution 12-lead ECGs were collected before, during, and after 5 minutes of occlusion. The MALT database was created in the early years of this century on consecutive patients with chest pain admitted to a large teaching hospital. Delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging and electrocardiograms were recorded in these acutely ill patients. The paper highlights the first 2 decades of the STAFF and MALT meetings and details the meeting format. PMID:26987617

  19. Modeling global and regional energy futures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rethinaraj, T. S. Gopi

    A rigorous econometric calibration of a model of energy consumption is presented using a comprehensive time series database on energy consumption and other socioeconomic indicators. The future of nuclear power in the evolving distribution of various energy sources is also examined. An important consideration for the long-term future of nuclear power concerns the rate of decline of the fraction of energy that comes from coal, which has historically declined on a global basis about linearly as a function of the cumulative use of coal. The use of fluid fossil fuels is also expected to eventually decline as the more readily extractable deposits are depleted. The investigation here is restricted to examining a comparatively simple model of the dynamics of competition between nuclear and other competing energy sources. Using a defined tropical/temperate disaggregation of the world, region-specific modeling results are presented for population growth, GDP growth, energy use, and carbon use compatible with a gradual transition to energy sustainability. Results for the fractions of energy use from various sources by grouping nine commercial primary energy sources into pairs of competing fuel categories are presented in combination with the idea of experiential learning and resource depletion. Analysis based on this division provides estimates for future evolution of the fractional shares, annual use rates, cumulative use of individual energy sources, and the economic attractiveness of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. This unified approach helps to conceptualize and understand the dynamics of evolution of importance of various energy resources over time.

  20. Exploring Future Energy Choices with Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGarry, Ann

    2014-01-01

    The article outlines a couple of the most recent resources developed by the Centre for Alternative Technology for teaching about energy. The key elements are providing sound information on all the significant sources and inspiring pupils to make their own decisions about energy futures based on evidence. Our experience is that engaging pupils in…

  1. Trade-offs in Our Energy Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canipe, Stephen L.

    The purpose of this activity is to make students aware that there is no free energy source for the present or the future and that all technologies are potential threats to the environment. The activity consists of a short reading (discussing basic trade-offs, issues, and decisions related to petroleum, coal, and nuclear energy sources) and student…

  2. Current and future industrial energy service characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

    1980-10-01

    Current and future energy demands, end uses, and cost used to characterize typical applications and resultant services in the industrial sector of the United States and 15 selected states are examined. A review and evaluation of existing industrial energy data bases was undertaken to assess their potential for supporting SERI research on: (1) market suitability analysis, (2) market development, (3) end-use matching, (3) industrial applications case studies, and (4) identification of cost and performance goals for solar systems and typical information requirements for industrial energy end use. In reviewing existing industrial energy data bases, the level of detail, disaggregation, and primary sources of information were examined. The focus was on fuels and electric energy used for heat and power purchased by the manufacturing subsector and listed by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC, primary fuel, and end use. Projections of state level energy prices to 1990 are developed using the energy intensity approach. The effects of federal and state industrial energy conservation programs on future industrial sector demands were assessed. Future end-use energy requirements were developed for each 4-digit SIC industry and were grouped as follows: (1) hot water, (2) steam (212 to 300/sup 0/F, each 100/sup 0/F interval from 300 to 1000/sup 0/F, and greater than 1000/sup 0/F), and (3) hot air (100/sup 0/F intervals). Volume I details the activities performed in this effort.

  3. Should Nuclear Energy Form Part of the UK's Energy Future?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Energy policies are under review everywhere, as the world tries to meet targets for reducing climate change despite continuing population growth. A major change in energy patterns is needed, with the critical period for transition predictably happening when young people currently at school are in their middle years of their lives. This article…

  4. Future high energy colliders symposium. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z. |

    1996-12-31

    A `Future High Energy Colliders` Symposium was held October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was one of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor, the National Science Foundation, as part of a 5 month program on `New Ideas for Particle Accelerators`. The long term program and symposia were organized and coordinated by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of Brookhaven National Laboratory/ITP. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the future direction of high energy physics by bringing together leaders from the theoretical, experimental and accelerator physics communities. Their talks provided personal perspectives on the physics objectives and the technology demands of future high energy colliders. Collectively, they formed a vision for where the field should be heading and how it might best reach its objectives.

  5. 78 FR 53740 - State Energy Advisory Board; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... Energy Advisory Board; Meeting AGENCY: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy... Designated Federal Officer, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, 1000... recommendations to the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable......

  6. 76 FR 9339 - State Energy Advisory Board (STEAB); Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ...This notice announces a Board meeting of the State Energy Advisory Board (STEAB). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92- 463; 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of these meetings be announced in the Federal...

  7. Basic Science for a Secure Energy Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Linda

    2010-03-01

    Anticipating a doubling in the world's energy use by the year 2050 coupled with an increasing focus on clean energy technologies, there is a national imperative for new energy technologies and improved energy efficiency. The Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) supports fundamental research that provides the foundations for new energy technologies and supports DOE missions in energy, environment, and national security. The research crosses the full spectrum of materials and chemical sciences, as well as aspects of biosciences and geosciences, with a focus on understanding, predicting, and ultimately controlling matter and energy at electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. In addition, BES is the home for national user facilities for x-ray, neutron, nanoscale sciences, and electron beam characterization that serve over 10,000 users annually. To provide a strategic focus for these programs, BES has held a series of ``Basic Research Needs'' workshops on a number of energy topics over the past 6 years. These workshops have defined a number of research priorities in areas related to renewable, fossil, and nuclear energy -- as well as cross-cutting scientific grand challenges. These directions have helped to define the research for the recently established Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) and are foundational for the newly announced Energy Innovation Hubs. This overview will review the current BES research portfolio, including the EFRCs and user facilities, will highlight past research that has had an impact on energy technologies, and will discuss future directions as defined through the BES workshops and research opportunities.

  8. The future of energy and climate

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The talk will review some of the basic facts about the history and present status of the use of energy and its climatic consequences. It is clear that the world will have to change its way of energy production, the sooner the better. Because of the difficulty of storing electric energy, by far the best energy source for the future is thermal solar from the deserts, with overnight thermal storage. I will give some description of the present status of the technologies involved and end up with a pilot project for Europe and North Africa.

  9. How a future energy world could look?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewert, M.

    2012-10-01

    The future energy system will change significantly within the next years as a result of the following Mega Trends: de-carbonization, urbanization, fast technology development, individualization, glocalization (globalization and localization) and changing demographics. Increasing fluctuating renewable production will change the role of non-renewable generation. Distributed energy from renewables and micro generation will change the direction of the energy flow in the electricity grids. Production will not follow demand but demand has to follow production. This future system is enabled by the fast technical development of information and communication technologies which will be present in the entire system. In this paper the results of a comprehensive analysis with different scenarios is summarized. Tools were used like the analysis of policy trends in the European countries, modelling of the European power grid, modelling of the European power markets and the analysis of technology developments with cost reduction potentials. With these tools the interaction of the main actors in the energy markets like conventional generation and renewable generation, grid transport, electricity storage including new storage options from E-Mobility, Power to Gas, Compressed Air Energy storage and demand side management were considered. The potential application of technologies and investments in new energy technologies were analyzed within existing frameworks and markets as well as new business models in new markets with different frameworks. In the paper the over all trend of this analysis is presented by describing a potential future energy world. This world represents only one of numerous options with comparable characteristics.

  10. India' energy scene: Options for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This book provides a concise yet thorough and up-to-date survey of the Indian energy scene, focusing on its major features, current problems, and future prospects. India's renewable and nonrenewable energy reserves are described and compared with those of a number of other countries. Trends in energy consumption and production over the 1970-1985 period are examined. Energy conservation methods are discussed. A detailed review is given on the renewable energy resources. Indias nuclear resourecs are assessed and it is recommended that nuclear energy be emphasized because of the nations ample thorium ores. How R and D can help alleviate Indias energy problems is discussed and specific recommendations are made on which a national agenda for action can be based. Information is provided on the contribution of nuclear power to electricity production in developing industrialized countries.

  11. Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Ben

    2012-06-01

    Ben McMahon of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) presents "Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  12. Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    McMahon, Ben [LANL

    2016-07-12

    Ben McMahon of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) presents "Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  13. Extending NASA's SPICE ancillary information system to meet future mission needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, C.; Bachman, N.; Elson, L.; Semenov, B.; Turner, F.; Wright, E.

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarizes the architecture, capabilities, characteristics and uses of the current SPICE ancillary information system, and then outlines plans and ideas for how this system can be extended to meet future space mission requirements.

  14. 75 FR 57546 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Environment Subcommittee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ...) Environment Subcommittee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Department of Transportation, Office of the Secretary of Transportation. ACTION: The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Environment Subcommittee... the Secretary of Transportation, announces a meeting of the FAAC Environment Subcommittee, which...

  15. 75 FR 34519 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Subcommittee on Environment; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... on Environment; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Department of Transportation, Office of the Secretary of Transportation. ACTION: The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Environment Subcommittee... Transportation, announces a meeting of the FAAC Environment Subcommittee, which will be held at the office of...

  16. Institutional Strain and Precarious Values in Meeting Future Nuclear Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Matthews; Todd R. LaPorte

    1998-11-01

    This paper explores the implications of moderately expanding plutonium "pit" production capability within the strongly R&D culture of Los Alamos National Laboratory, especially in terms of the lab's current capacity or "fitness for the future" in which institutional stewardship of the nation's nuclear deterrent capability becomes a primary objective. The institutional properties needed to assure "future fitness" includes the organizational requisites highly reliable operations and sustained institutional constancy in a manner that evokes deep public trust and confidence. Estimates are made of the degree to which the key Division and most relevant Program office in this evolution already exhibits them.

  17. 76 FR 25683 - State Energy Advisory Board (STEAB); Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... Efficiency and Renewable Energy State Energy Advisory Board (STEAB); Meeting AGENCY: Energy Efficiency and... Federal Officer, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, 1000... Efficiency and Renewable Energy regarding goals and objectives, programmatic and administrative policies,...

  18. 78 FR 11167 - Meetings: State Energy Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... Efficiency and Renewable Energy Meetings: State Energy Advisory Board AGENCY: Energy Efficiency and Renewable.... Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue SW... recommendations to the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable......

  19. The Hurst exponent in energy futures prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serletis, Apostolos; Rosenberg, Aryeh Adam

    2007-07-01

    This paper extends the work in Elder and Serletis [Long memory in energy futures prices, Rev. Financial Econ., forthcoming, 2007] and Serletis et al. [Detrended fluctuation analysis of the US stock market, Int. J. Bifurcation Chaos, forthcoming, 2007] by re-examining the empirical evidence for random walk type behavior in energy futures prices. In doing so, it uses daily data on energy futures traded on the New York Mercantile Exchange, over the period from July 2, 1990 to November 1, 2006, and a statistical physics approach-the ‘detrending moving average’ technique-providing a reliable framework for testing the information efficiency in financial markets as shown by Alessio et al. [Second-order moving average and scaling of stochastic time series, Eur. Phys. J. B 27 (2002) 197-200] and Carbone et al. [Time-dependent hurst exponent in financial time series. Physica A 344 (2004) 267-271; Analysis of clusters formed by the moving average of a long-range correlated time series. Phys. Rev. E 69 (2004) 026105]. The results show that energy futures returns display long memory and that the particular form of long memory is anti-persistence.

  20. Energy infrastructure: Mapping future electricity demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janetos, Anthony C.

    2016-08-01

    Electricity distribution system planners rely on estimations of future energy demand to build adequate supply, but these are complicated to achieve. An approach that combines spatially resolved projections of population movement and climate change offers a method for building better demand maps to mid-century.

  1. Energy plantations: a future source of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, D.J.; Williford, M.

    1980-01-01

    Woody biomass can furnish a significant portion of alternative energy sources in the future. Mill and logging residues and biomass derived from existing forests will supply most of this wood energy in the next decade. Energy plantations have good potential for providing a dependable and sustained supply of woody biomass in the long term. The U.S. Department of Energy is supporting a substantial research effort to develop fuels and chemical foodstocks from woody biomass. Seventeen projects are currently active and encompass four major research areas: species selection; stand establishment; cultural treatments and management alternatives;, and harvest, collection, transport, and storage. Research at N.C. State University shows loblolly pine, numerous indigeneous hardwoods, and the exotics: European black alder and numerous Eucalyptus species to have good potential for energy plantation culture on selected sites. Major consideration in evaluating energy plantations are land availability, site impacts, and competion for alternative land uses.

  2. On the Future High Energy Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-09-28

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of the next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium and far-future of accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance potential and cost range.

  3. 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-11-01

    This report provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Building America program's Summer 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting. This meeting was held on August 9-11, 2011, in Denver, Colorado, and brought together more than 290 professionals representing organizations with a vested interest in energy efficiency improvements in residential buildings.

  4. World energy: Building a sustainable future

    SciTech Connect

    Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.

    1992-04-01

    As the 20th century draws to a close, both individual countries and the world community face challenging problems related to the supply and use energy. These include local and regional environmental impacts, the prospect of global climate and sea level change associated with the greenhouse effect, and threats to international relations in connection with oil supply or nuclear proliferation. For developing countries, the financial cost of providing energy to provide basic needs and fuel economic development pose an additional burden. To assess the magnitude of future problems and the potential effectiveness of response strategies, it is important to understand how and why energy use has changed in the post and where it is heading. This requires study of the activities for which energy is used, and of how people and technology interact to provide the energy services that are desired. The authors and their colleagues have analyzed trends in energy use by sector for most of the world`s major energy-consuming countries. The approach we use considers three key elements in each sector: the level of activity, structural change, and energy intensity, which expresses the amount of energy used for various activities. At a disaggregated level, energy intensity is indicative of energy efficiency. But other factors besides technical efficiency also shape intensity.

  5. World energy: Building a sustainable future

    SciTech Connect

    Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.

    1992-04-01

    As the 20th century draws to a close, both individual countries and the world community face challenging problems related to the supply and use energy. These include local and regional environmental impacts, the prospect of global climate and sea level change associated with the greenhouse effect, and threats to international relations in connection with oil supply or nuclear proliferation. For developing countries, the financial cost of providing energy to provide basic needs and fuel economic development pose an additional burden. To assess the magnitude of future problems and the potential effectiveness of response strategies, it is important to understand how and why energy use has changed in the post and where it is heading. This requires study of the activities for which energy is used, and of how people and technology interact to provide the energy services that are desired. The authors and their colleagues have analyzed trends in energy use by sector for most of the world's major energy-consuming countries. The approach we use considers three key elements in each sector: the level of activity, structural change, and energy intensity, which expresses the amount of energy used for various activities. At a disaggregated level, energy intensity is indicative of energy efficiency. But other factors besides technical efficiency also shape intensity.

  6. Inkjet Printing Meets Electrochemical Energy Conversion.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Andreas; Cortés-Salazar, Fernando; Bassetto, Victor Costa; Amstutz, Véronique; Girault, Hubert H

    2015-01-01

    Inkjet printing is a very powerful digital and mask-less microfabrication technique that has attracted the attention of several research groups working on electrochemical energy conversion concepts. In this short review, an overview is given about recent efforts to employ inkjet printing for the search of new electrocatalyst materials and for the preparation of catalyst layers for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell applications. Recent approaches of the Laboratory of Physical and Analytical Electrochemistry (LEPA) at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne for the inkjet printing of catalyst layers and membrane electrode assemblies are presented and future energy research directions of LEPA based on inkjet printing in the new Energypolis campus in the Canton of Valais are summarized. PMID:26507347

  7. 75 FR 44303 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Environment Subcommittee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... Office of the Secretary of Transportation The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Environment... Transportation. ACTION: The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Environment Subcommittee; Notice of... Secretary of Transportation, announces a meeting of the FAAC Environment Subcommittee, which will be held...

  8. 75 FR 68017 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Environment Subcommittee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... Office of the Secretary of Transportation The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Environment... Transportation. ACTION: The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Environment Subcommittee; Notice of... Secretary of Transportation, announces a meeting of the FAAC Environment Subcommittee, which will be held...

  9. 75 FR 60163 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Aviation Safety Subcommittee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... Office of the Secretary of Transportation The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Aviation... of Transportation. ACTION: The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC): Aviation Safety... Transportation, announces a meeting of the FAAC Aviation Safety Subcommittee, which will be held October 19,...

  10. 75 FR 44998 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Aviation Safety Subcommittee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ... Office of the Secretary of Transportation The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Aviation... of Transportation. ACTION: The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC): Aviation Safety... Transportation, announces a meeting of the FAAC Aviation Safety Subcommittee, which will be held August 24,...

  11. 75 FR 57103 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Aviation Safety Subcommittee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... Office of the Secretary of Transportation The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Aviation... of Transportation. ACTION: The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC): Aviation Safety... Transportation, announces a meeting of the FAAC Aviation Safety Subcommittee, which will be held September...

  12. Coal: America' energy future. Volume II. A technical overview

    SciTech Connect

    2006-03-15

    Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman requested the national Coal Council in April 2005 a report identifying the challenges and opportunities of more fully exploring our domestic coal resources to meet the nations' future energy needs. This resultant report addresses the Secretary's request in the context of the President's focus, with eight findings and recommendations that would use technology to leverage the USA's extensive coal assets and reduce dependence on imported energy. Volume I outlines these findings and recommendations. Volume II provides technical data and case histories to support the findings and recommendations. Chapter headings of Volume II are: Electricity Generation; Coal-to-Liquids; An Overview of the Natural Gas Situation; and Economic Benefits of Coal Conversion Investments. 8 apps.

  13. Coal and nuclear power: Illinois' energy future

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    This conference was sponsored by the Energy Resources Center, University of Illinois at Chicago; the US Department of Energy; the Illinois Energy Resources Commission; and the Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources. The theme for the conference, Coal and Nuclear Power: Illinois' Energy Future, was based on two major observations: (1) Illinois has the largest reserves of bituminous coal of any state and is surpassed in total reserves only by North Dakota, and Montana; and (2) Illinois has made a heavy commitment to the use of nuclear power as a source of electrical power generation. Currently, nuclear power represents 30% of the electrical energy produced in the State. The primary objective of the 1982 conference was to review these two energy sources in view of the current energy policy of the Reagan Administration, and to examine the impact these policies have on the Midwest energy scene. The conference dealt with issues unique to Illinois as well as those facing the entire nation. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 30 individual presentations.

  14. Extending helicopter operations to meet future integrated transportation needs.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Neville A; Plant, Katherine L; Roberts, Aaron P; Harvey, Catherine; Thomas, T Glyn

    2016-03-01

    Helicopters have the potential to be an integral part of the future transport system. They offer a means of rapid transit in an overly populated transport environment. However, one of the biggest limitations on rotary wing flight is their inability to fly in degraded visual conditions in the critical phases of approach and landing. This paper presents a study that developed and evaluated a Head up Display (HUD) to assist rotary wing pilots by extending landing to degraded visual conditions. The HUD was developed with the assistance of the Cognitive Work Analysis method as an approach for analysing the cognitive work of landing the helicopter. The HUD was tested in a fixed based flight simulator with qualified helicopter pilots. A qualitative analysis to assess situation awareness and workload found that the HUD enabled safe landing in degraded conditions whilst simultaneously enhancing situation awareness and reducing workload. Continued development in this area has the potential to extend the operational capability of helicopters in the future.

  15. Extending helicopter operations to meet future integrated transportation needs.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Neville A; Plant, Katherine L; Roberts, Aaron P; Harvey, Catherine; Thomas, T Glyn

    2016-03-01

    Helicopters have the potential to be an integral part of the future transport system. They offer a means of rapid transit in an overly populated transport environment. However, one of the biggest limitations on rotary wing flight is their inability to fly in degraded visual conditions in the critical phases of approach and landing. This paper presents a study that developed and evaluated a Head up Display (HUD) to assist rotary wing pilots by extending landing to degraded visual conditions. The HUD was developed with the assistance of the Cognitive Work Analysis method as an approach for analysing the cognitive work of landing the helicopter. The HUD was tested in a fixed based flight simulator with qualified helicopter pilots. A qualitative analysis to assess situation awareness and workload found that the HUD enabled safe landing in degraded conditions whilst simultaneously enhancing situation awareness and reducing workload. Continued development in this area has the potential to extend the operational capability of helicopters in the future. PMID:26228719

  16. NASA super-pressure balloons - designing to meet the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathey, Henry M., Jr.

    2001-08-01

    The NASA Ultra Long Duration Balloon project presents a new challenge in balloon design by extending flight duration for large heavy payloads. The pumpkin balloon design is innovative and presents many new challenges. This paper encapsulates the NASA Ultra Long Duration Balloon Vehicle developments, presents them to the Science Community, and shows points of interaction with the users. The capabilities and limitations are presented to allow potential users to make informed choices in the development of balloon class payloads. Brief summaries of test flights and the cause and effect relationship between suspended load and float altitude are presented. A focus on innovation and the future using the Ultra Long Duration Balloon super-pressure balloon technology is also presented.

  17. Renewable Energy Education for Future Generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, R.

    2015-12-01

    Considering the constantly growing use of technology, modern society requires increasing amounts of electrical power. Acknowledging the global efforts to increase the use of renewable energy sources, the Independent Schools Foundation Academy, a school in Hong Kong, plans to provide the opportunity for students to explore the applications of various forms of renewable energy through a Renewable Energy Education Centre (REEC). Two students are involved in the designing and construction of the Renewable Energy Education Centre to understand the technologies, processes, and provide insight from the students' perspective. The REEC will incorporate various uses of renewable energy, including a solar photovoltaic system, hybrid photovoltaic/thermal system, vertical windmill, hot water heater, and heat pump. As a means to enrich students' learning experiences, the REEC will be open to access by science students for a wide range of investigations, such as science experiments related to renewable energy and energy efficiency, providing opportunities for student led research projects, Personal Projects and IB Extended Essays. In short, the Independent Schools Foundation Academy aims to allow students to familiarize themselves with various forms of renewable energy from a young age, and develop a deeper understanding of technologies that will become primary sources of electrical power in the near future.

  18. Perspectives on future high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Samios, N.P.

    1996-12-31

    The author states two general ways in which one must proceed in an attempt to forecast the future of high energy physics. The first is to utilize the state of knowledge in the field and thereby provide theoretical and experimental guidance on future directions. The second approach is technical, namely, how well can one do in going to higher energies with present techniques or new accelerator principles. He concludes that the future strategy is straightforward. The present accelerator facilities must be upgraded and run to produce exciting and forefront research. At the same time, the theoretical tools should be sharpened both extrapolating from lower energies (100 GeV) to high (multi TeV) and vice versa. The US should be involved in the LHC, both in the accelerator and experimental areas. There should be an extensive R and D program on accelerators for a multi-TeV capability, emphasizing e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders. Finally, the international cooperative activities should be strengthened and maintained.

  19. Residential Energy Efficiency Research Planning Meeting Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-02-01

    This report summarizes key findings and outcomes from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Research Planning meeting, held on October 28-29, 2011, in Washington, D.C.

  20. U.S. energy outlook and future energy impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburger, Randolph John

    2011-12-01

    Energy markets were not immune to the 2007 financial crisis. Growth in the Indian and Chinese economies is placing strains on global energy supplies that could force a repeat of the 2008 price spike of $145/bbl for crude oil. Emerging market growth coupled with inefficiencies, frictions, and speculation in the energy markets has the potential to create drastic economic shocks throughout the world. The 2007 economic crisis has pushed back investment in energy projects where a low-growth scenario in world GDP could create drastic price increases in world energy prices. Without a long-term energy supply plan, the U.S. is destined to see growth reduced and its trade imbalances continue to deteriorate with increasing energy costs. Analysis of the U.S. natural gas futures markets and the impact of financial speculation on natural gas market pricing determined that financial speculation adds to price movements in the energy markets, which could cause violent swings in energy prices.

  1. Expert Meeting Report. Energy Savings You Can Bank On

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Mark; Springer, Jeremy; Smith, Pepper; Porse, Erik

    2013-02-01

    In October 2011, ARBI organized and conducted an Experts’ Meeting on the topic of performance guarantees and financing vehicles for Energy Efficiency Upgrades. The meeting brought together technical, policy, and financial experts, including researchers, experienced installation contractors, and innovative energy business leaders, in order to discuss the opportunities and challenges for the energy efficiency upgrade industry to increase market uptake of Home Energy Upgrades (HEUs) through innovative offerings, such as performance guarantees.

  2. Tour Brookhaven Lab's Future Hub for Energy Research: The Interdisciplinary Science Building

    ScienceCinema

    Gerry Stokes; Jim Misewich

    2016-07-12

    Construction is under way for the Interdisciplinary Science Building (ISB), a future world-class facility for energy research at Brookhaven Lab. Meet two scientists who will develop solutions at the ISB to tackle some of the nation's energy challenges, and tour the construction site.

  3. Nanoparticles meet electrospinning: recent advances and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuan-Ling; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2014-07-01

    Nanofibres can be fabricated by various methods and perhaps electrospinning is the most facile route. In past years, electrospinning has been used as a synthesis technique and the fibres have been prepared from a variety of starting materials and show various properties. Recently, incorporating functional nanoparticles (NPs) with electrospun fibres has emerged as one of most exciting research topics in the field of electrospinning. When NPs are incorporated, on the one hand the NPs endow the electrospun fibres/mats novel or better performance, on the other hand the electrospun fibres/mats could preserve the NPs from corrosion and/or oxidation, especially for NPs with anisotropic structures. More importantly, electrospinning shows potential applications in self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks for generating new functions, and has some obvious advantages that are not available by other self-assembly methods, i.e., the obtained free-standing hybrid mats are usually flexible and with large area, which is favourable for their commercial applications. In this critical review, we will focus on the fabrication and applications of NPs-electrospun fibre composites and give an overview on this emerging field combining nanoparticles and electrospinning. Firstly, two main strategies for producing NPs-electrospun fibres will be discussed, i.e., one is preparing the NPs-electrospun fibres after electrospinning process that is usually combined with other post-processing methods, and the other is fabricating the composite nanofibres during the electrospinning process. In particular, the NPs in the latter method will be classified and introduced to show the assembling effect of electrospinning on NPs with different anisotropic structures. The subsequent section describes the applications of these NPs-electrospun fibre mats and nanocomposites, and finally a conclusion and perspectives of the future research in this emerging field is given.

  4. Recapitalizing EMSL: Meeting Future Science and Technology Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.

    2008-07-01

    EMSL, located in Richland, Washington, is a national scientific user facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The vision that directed the development of EMSL as a problem-solving environment for environmental molecular science has led to significant scientific progress in many areas ranging from subsurface science to atmospheric sciences, and from biochemistry to catalysis. Our scientific staff and users are recognized nationally and internationally for their significant contributions to solving challenging scientific problems. We have explored new scientific frontiers and organized a vibrant and diverse user community in support of our mission as a national scientific user facility that provides integrated experimental and computational resources in the environmental molecular sciences. Users from around the world - from academia to industry and national laboratories to international research organizations - use the resources of EMSL because of the quality of science that we enable.

  5. ARPA-E: Transforming Our Energy Future

    ScienceCinema

    Williams, Ellen; Raman, Aaswath

    2016-07-12

    ARPA-E helps to translate cutting-edge inventions into technological innovations that could change how we use, generate and store energy. In just seven years, ARPA-E technologies are demonstrating technical and commercial progress, surpassing $1.25 billion in private sector follow on funding. In this video, ARPA-E Director Dr. Ellen D. Williams highlights an exciting project from Stanford University that is developing a radiative cooling technology that could enable buildings, power plants, solar cells and even clothing to cool without using electric power or loss of water. This project is just one example among ARPA-E’s 400+ innovative technologies that are reimagining energy and helping to create a more secure, affordable and sustainable American energy future.

  6. 77 FR 74698 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-17

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs will hold a meeting on January 17... were published in the Federal Register on October 18, 2012, (77 FR 64146-64147). Detailed...

  7. 78 FR 17945 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs will hold a meeting on April 9... were published in the Federal Register on October 18, 2012, (77 FR 64146-64147). Detailed...

  8. Air quality and future energy system planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobral Mourao, Zenaida; Konadu, Dennis; Lupton, Rick

    2016-04-01

    Ambient air pollution has been linked to an increasing number of premature deaths throughout the world. Projected increases in demand for food, energy resources and manufactured products will likely contribute to exacerbate air pollution with an increasing impact on human health, agricultural productivity and climate change. Current events such as tampering emissions tests by VW car manufacturers, failure to comply with EU Air Quality directives and WHO guidelines by many EU countries, the problem of smog in Chinese cities and new industrial emissions regulations represent unique challenges but also opportunities for regulators, local authorities and industry. However current models and practices of energy and resource use do not consider ambient air impacts as an integral part of the planing process. Furthermore the analysis of drivers, sources and impacts of air pollution is often fragmented, difficult to understand and lacks effective visualization tools that bring all of these components together. This work aims to develop a model that links impacts of air quality on human health and ecosystems to current and future developments in the energy system, industrial and agricultural activity and patterns of land use. The model will be added to the ForeseerTM tool, which is an integrated resource analysis platform that has been developed at the University of Cambridge initially with funding from BP and more recently through the EPSRC funded Whole Systems Energy Modeling (WholeSEM) project. The basis of the tool is a set of linked physical models for energy, water and land, including the technologies that are used to transform these resources into final services such as housing, food, transport and household goods. The new air quality model will explore different feedback effects between energy, land and atmospheric systems with the overarching goal of supporting better communication about the drivers of air quality and to incorporate concerns about air quality into

  9. New Science for a Secure and Sustainable Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-01

    Over the past five years, the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences has engaged thousands of scientists around the world to study the current status, limiting factors and specific fundamental scientific bottlenecks blocking the widespread implementation of alternate energy technologies. The reports from the foundational BESAC workshop, the ten 'Basic Research Needs' workshops and the panel on Grand Challenge science detail the necessary research steps (http://www.sc.doe.gov/bes/reports/list.html). This report responds to a charge from the Director of the Office of Science to the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee to conduct a study with two primary goals: (1) to assimilate the scientific research directions that emerged from these workshop reports into a comprehensive set of science themes, and (2) to identify the new implementation strategies and tools required to accomplish the science. From these efforts it becomes clear that the magnitude of the challenge is so immense that existing approaches - even with improvements from advanced engineering and improved technology based on known concepts - will not be enough to secure our energy future. Instead, meeting the challenge will require fundamental understanding and scientific breakthroughs in new materials and chemical processes to make possible new energy technologies and performance levels far beyond what is now possible.

  10. Future Technologies to Enhance Geothermal Energy Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J J; Kaahaaina, N; Aines, R; Zucca, J; Foxall, B; Atkins-Duffin, C

    2008-07-25

    Geothermal power is a renewable, low-carbon option for producing base-load (i.e., low-intermittency) electricity. Improved technologies have the potential to access untapped geothermal energy sources, which experts estimate to be greater than 100,000 MWe. However, many technical challenges in areas such as exploration, drilling, reservoir engineering, and energy conversion must be addressed if the United States is to unlock the full potential of Earth's geothermal energy and displace fossil fuels. (For example, see Tester et al., 2006; Green and Nix, 2006; and Western Governors Association, 2006.) Achieving next-generation geothermal power requires both basic science and applied technology to identify prospective resources and effective extraction strategies. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a long history of research and development work in support of geothermal power. Key technologies include advances in scaling and brine chemistry, economic and resource assessment, direct use, exploration, geophysics, and geochemistry. For example, a high temperature, multi-spacing, multi-frequency downhole EM induction logging tool (GeoBILT) was developed jointly by LLNL and EMI to enable the detection and orientation of fractures and conductive zones within the reservoir (Figure 1). Livermore researchers also conducted studies to determine how best to stave off increased salinity in the Salton Sea, an important aquatic ecosystem in California. Since 1995, funding for LLNL's geothermal research has decreased, but the program continues to make important contributions to sustain the nation's energy future. The current efforts, which are highlighted in this report, focus on developing an Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) and on improving technologies for exploration, monitoring, characterization, and geochemistry. Future research will also focus on these areas.

  11. Energy: What About the Future? Easy Energy Reader, Book IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Planning Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    Four articles about future energy technologies and problems comprise this collection of readings intended for the junior high school language arts curriculum. Each entry has been scored for readability according to the Gunning Fog Index. By referring to these ratings, a teacher can provide students with increasingly more challenging reading…

  12. Primary energy: Present status and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielheim, K. O.

    A survey of the base-load energy sources available to humans is presented, starting from the point of view that all energy used is ultimately derived from nuclear processes within the sun. Specific note is made of European energy options, noting the large dependence on imported oil. Detailed exploration of available nuclear fuel resources is carried out, with attention given to fission, fusion, and breeder reactor plants and to the state-of-the-art and technology for each. The problems of nuclear waste disposal are discussed, and long term burial in salt domes is outlined as a satisfactory method of containing the materials for acceptable periods of time. The CO2-greenhouse effect hazards caused by increased usage of coal-derived fuels are considered and precautions to be taken on a global scale to ameliorate the warming effects are recommended. The limitations to hydropower are examined, as are those of tidal power. Solar cells are projected to be produced in GW quantities by the year 2000, while wind-derived electricity is predicted to provide a minimum of 5% of the world energy needs in the future.

  13. Carbonless Transportation and Energy Storage in Future Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, G. D.; Lamont, A. D.

    2001-01-01

    Electricity is the highest quality energy carrier, increasingly dominant throughout the world's energy infrastructure. Ultimately electricity use can expand to efficiently meet virtually all stationary energy applications, eliminating stationary end-use carbon emissions. This approach is unlikely to work in transportation, however, due to the high cost and low energy density of electricity storage. Chemical energy carriers, such as hydrogen, can more effectively serve transportation fuel and energy storage applications, offering much higher energy density at lower cost. Electrolytic hydrogen, extracted from steam with renewable energy, stored as a high pressure gas or cryogenic liquid, and reconverted to electricity in fuel cells and or used to power hydrogen vehicles, will reduce emissions from both transportation and electric generation. Renewable resources and modular electrolytic technology also permit decentralized hydrogen production, circumventing distribution issues and barriers to market entry. In contrast, sequestration-based fossil-fueled systems must achieve economies of scale by relying on centralized production and hierarchical transmission and distribution of electricity, hydrogen fuel, and carbon (dioxide).

  14. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program's water power research activities. Water power is the nation's largest source of clean, domestic, renewable energy. Harnessing energy from rivers, manmade waterways, and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses can help secure America's energy future. Water power technologies fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower facilities include run-of-the-river, storage, and pumped storage. Most conventional hydropower plants use a diversion structure, such as a dam, to capture water's potential energy via a turbine for electricity generation. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies obtain energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams and ocean thermal gradients to generate electricity. The United States has abundant water power resources, enough to meet a large portion of the nation's electricity demand. Conventional hydropower generated 257 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity in 2010 and provides 6-7% of all electricity in the United States. According to preliminary estimates from the Electric Power Resource Institute (EPRI), the United States has additional water power resource potential of more than 85,000 megawatts (MW). This resource potential includes making efficiency upgrades to existing hydroelectric facilities, developing new low-impact facilities, and using abundant marine and hydrokinetic energy resources. EPRI research suggests that ocean wave and in-stream tidal energy production potential is equal to about 10% of present U.S. electricity consumption (about 400 terrawatt-hours per year). The greatest of these resources is wave energy, with the most potential in Hawaii, Alaska, and the Pacific Northwest. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Water Power Program works with industry, universities, other federal agencies, and DOE

  15. 76 FR 71312 - Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... International Trade Administration Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY... Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Advisory Committee (RE&EEAC) will hold a meeting to review... administration of programs and policies to support the competitiveness of the U.S. renewable energy and...

  16. Expert Meeting Report: Energy Savings You Can Bank On

    SciTech Connect

    Beman, M.; Springer, J.; Smith, P.; Porse, E.

    2013-02-01

    In October 2011, ARBI organized and conducted an Experts' Meeting on the topic of performance guarantees and financing vehicles for Energy Efficiency Upgrades. The meeting brought together technical, policy, and financial experts, including researchers, experienced installation contractors, and innovative energy business leaders, in order to discuss the opportunities and challenges for the energy efficiency upgrade industry to increase market uptake of Home Energy Upgrades (HEUs) through innovative offerings, such as performance guarantees. The meeting had several primary goals. First, it sought to understand how other industries have developed successful models for financing renewable energy installations while providing performance guarantees. This has been most recently demonstrated by the solar leasing industry. Second, the meeting explored the applicability of such business models to the energy efficiency upgrade industry. Third, the meeting sought to identify technical impediments to performance guarantees for energy efficiency retrofits. Fourth, the meeting sought to provide a common framework for these goals within the context of current financing mechanisms for energy efficiency upgrades.

  17. The Future of Teaching and Learning: Challenging Standards and High Expectations. Satellite Town Meeting #73. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamber of Commerce of the United States, Washington, DC.

    This 60-minute VHS videotape of a U.S. Department of Education Satellite Town Meeting focuses on the future of learning in U.S. schools and what it will take to create challenging, exciting, high performing schools. It explains that there cannot be excellent learning without excellent teaching. The 1985 National Teacher of the Year co-hosts this…

  18. Agenda [to the Workshop Meeting on the Commission on Innovation's Report, "Choosing the Future."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

    This document provides the agenda for the California Community College Board of Governors (BOG) meeting for December 10, 1993, held to inform, explain, and gain a meaningful understanding of the recommendations of the Commission on Innovation (COI) report titled "Choosing the Future." The COI report was prepared in November 1993 and presented 13…

  19. Is Academic Nursing Preparing Practitioners to Meet Present and Future Societal Needs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felton, Geraldene

    The adequacy of nursing education programs in preparing nurses to meet current and future societal needs is addressed, with attention directed to baccalaureate programs, faculty, and graduates. It is suggested that research findings and anecdotal reports have validated the dysfunction phenomena between baccalaureate nursing education, the practice…

  20. 76 FR 58523 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Town Hall Meeting on the Future of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... Hall Meeting on the Future of the Regional Centers of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious... Regional Centers of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases (RCE) Program (...

  1. Thermal Energy Storage: Fourth Annual Review Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The development of low cost thermal energy storage technologies is discussed in terms of near term oil savings, solar energy applications, and dispersed energy systems for energy conservation policies. Program definition and assessment and research and technology development are considered along with industrial storage, solar thermal power storage, building heating and cooling, and seasonal thermal storage. A bibliography on seasonal thermal energy storage emphasizing aquifer thermal energy is included.

  2. Meeting the challenge: a survey of capabilities planned to meet future space biology research needs.

    PubMed

    Yost, B; Souza, K; Wade, C; Davies, P

    1999-07-01

    NASA/Ames Research Center Life Sciences has supported a large number of experiments and observations directed at understanding how biological systems perform or change in the microgravity space environment. These campaigns have been accomplished on a wide range of space-based platforms beginning with the Bion/Cosmos unmanned satellites and including the Space Shuttle middeck, Spacelab, SpaceHab, the Russian Space Station Mir and in the near future, the International Space Station (ISS). To further build upon this past experience, and to continue to make contributions towards the goals of the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) enterprise, a number of experiment systems and infrastructure are in development in an attempt to provide a comprehensive set of opportunities and capabilities to enable research into biological systems in space. Life support systems, or habitats are geared towards the maintenance of a wide range of biological specimens onboard ISS. Augmented with a set of ancillary equipment and sufficient expendable resources and crew time, researchers will have a robust set of tools to continue biological and physiological experiments in space.

  3. Transformative optimisation of agricultural land use to meet future food demands.

    PubMed

    Koh, Lian Pin; Koellner, Thomas; Ghazoul, Jaboury

    2013-01-01

    The human population is expected to reach ∼9 billion by 2050. The ensuing demands for water, food and energy would intensify land-use conflicts and exacerbate environmental impacts. Therefore we urgently need to reconcile our growing consumptive needs with environmental protection. Here, we explore the potential of a land-use optimisation strategy to increase global agricultural production on two major groups of crops: cereals and oilseeds. We implemented a spatially-explicit computer simulation model across 173 countries based on the following algorithm: on any cropland, always produce the most productive crop given all other crops currently being produced locally and the site-specific biophysical, economic and technological constraints to production. Globally, this strategy resulted in net increases in annual production of cereal and oilseed crops from 1.9 billion to 2.9 billion tons (46%), and from 427 million to 481 million tons (13%), respectively, without any change in total land area harvested for cereals or oilseeds. This thought experiment demonstrates that, in theory, more optimal use of existing farmlands could help meet future crop demands. In practice there might be cultural, social and institutional barriers that limit the full realisation of this theoretical potential. Nevertheless, these constraints have to be weighed against the consequences of not producing enough food, particularly in regions already facing food shortages.

  4. NRAO Salutes Past, Looks to Future In 50th-Anniversary Science Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-06-01

    Radio telescopes now in operation or under construction will be indispensible to scientists wrestling with the big, unanswered questions of 21st-Century astrophysics. That was the conclusion of a wide-ranging scientific meeting held in Charlottesville, Virginia, June 18-21, to mark the 50th anniversary of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). 1957 Dedication Dedication of NRAO, 17 October 1957. Left to right: R.M. Emberson, L.V. Berkner, G.A. Nay, J.W. Findlay (seated in front of 140ft telescope model), N.L. Ashton, D.S. Heeschen, H. Hockenberry. CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on Image for Larger File ALMA Artist's conception of completed ALMA. CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/ESO Click on Image for Larger File (2.4 MB) Nearly 200 scientists from around the world heard presentations about the frontiers of astrophysics and how the challenges at those frontiers will be met. In specialties as disparate as seeking the nature of the mysterious Dark Energy that is speeding the Universe's expansion to unraveling the details of how stars and planets are formed, more than 70 presenters looked toward future research breakthroughs. "NRAO's telescopes have made landmark contributions to the vast explosion of astronomical knowledge of the past half- century, and we look eagerly to making even more important contributions in the coming decades," said Fred K.Y. Lo, NRAO's director. Over the four days of the meeting, discussions ranged from recollections of radio astronomy's pioneering days of vacuum-tube equipment and paper chart recorders to the design of telescopes that will produce amounts of data that will strain today's computers. Presenters pointed out that, in the coming decades, radio telescope observations will advance not only astronomy but also fields of basic physics such as gravitational radiation, particle physics, and the fundamental physical constants. "This meeting provided a great overview of where astrophysics stands today and where the challenges and opportunities of

  5. Key Assets for a Sustainable Low Carbon Energy Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carre, Frank

    2011-10-01

    Since the beginning of the 21st century, concerns of energy security and climate change gave rise to energy policies focused on energy conservation and diversified low-carbon energy sources. Provided lessons of Fukushima accident are evidently accounted for, nuclear energy will probably be confirmed in most of today's nuclear countries as a low carbon energy source needed to limit imports of oil and gas and to meet fast growing energy needs. Future challenges of nuclear energy are then in three directions: i) enhancing safety performance so as to preclude any long term impact of severe accident outside the site of the plant, even in case of hypothetical external events, ii) full use of Uranium and minimization long lived radioactive waste burden for sustainability, and iii) extension to non-electricity energy products for maximizing the share of low carbon energy source in transportation fuels, industrial process heat and district heating. Advanced LWRs (Gen-III) are today's best available technologies and can somewhat advance nuclear energy in these three directions. However, breakthroughs in sustainability call for fast neutron reactors and closed fuel cycles, and non-electric applications prompt a revival of interest in high temperature reactors for exceeding cogeneration performances achievable with LWRs. Both types of Gen-IV nuclear systems by nature call for technology breakthroughs to surpass LWRs capabilities. Current resumption in France of research on sodium cooled fast neutron reactors (SFRs) definitely aims at significant progress in safety and economic competitiveness compared to earlier reactors of this type in order to progress towards a new generation of commercially viable sodium cooled fast reactor. Along with advancing a new generation of sodium cooled fast reactor, research and development on alternative fast reactor types such as gas or lead-alloy cooled systems (GFR & LFR) is strategic to overcome technical difficulties and/or political

  6. 75 FR 31323 - Energy Efficiency Program: Energy Conservation Standards Furnace Fans: Public Meeting and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ... Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J, 1000...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 430 RIN 1904-AC22 Energy Efficiency Program: Energy Conservation Standards... Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of public meeting and......

  7. Energy: Can We Meet the Increasing Demand?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2006-01-01

    Energy is the lifeblood of the United States. It powers its industries and keeps its economy humming. The nation's progress has relied on making energy abundantly available to support the growth of new ideas and products, and the issue of renewable energy is an increasingly important one. In this article, the author discusses some of the basics of…

  8. A Carbon-Free Energy Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linden, H. R.; Singer, S. F.

    2001-12-01

    desirable for other economic uses. A hydrogen-based energy future is inevitable as low-cost sources of petroleum and natural gas become depleted with time. However, such fundamental changes in energy systems will take time to accomplish. Coal may survive for a longer time but may not be able to compete as the century draws to a close.

  9. Renewable: A key component of our global energy future

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, D.

    1995-12-31

    Inclusion of renewable energy sources in national and international energy strategies is a key component of a viable global energy future. The global energy balance is going to shift radically in the near future brought about by significant increases in population in China and India, and increases in the energy intensity of developing countries. To better understand the consequences of such global shifts in energy requirements and to develop appropriate energy strategies to respond to these shifts, we need to look at the factors driving choices among supply options by geopolitical consumers and the impact these factors can have on the future energy mix.

  10. 75 FR 58448 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee On Future Plant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee On Future Plant Designs The ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs will hold a meeting on October 21, 2010, at 11545... Subcommittee will review current Design Acceptance Criteria associated with Digital Instrumentation and...

  11. 76 FR 5220 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs The ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs will hold a meeting on February 9, 2011, at 11545... small modular reactor applications. The Subcommittee will hear presentations by and hold...

  12. 76 FR 16016 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs The ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs will hold a meeting on April 5, 2011, at 11545..., 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. The Subcommittee will review the NRC Staff's High Temperature Gas Cooled...

  13. Future petroleum energy resources of the world

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahlbrandt, T.S.

    2002-01-01

    and gas endowment estimates. Whereas petroleum resources in the world appear to be significant, certain countries such as the United States may run into import deficits, particularly oil imports from Mexico and natural gas from both Canada and Mexico. The new assessment has been used as the reference supply case in energy supply models by the International Energy Agency and the Energy Information Agency of the Department of Energy. Climate energy modeling groups such as those at Stanford University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and others have also used USGS estimates in global climate models. Many of these models using the USGS estimates converge on potential oil shortfalls in 2036-2040. However, recent articles using the USGS (2000) estimates suggest peaking of oil in 2020-2035 and peaking of non-OPEC (Organization of Petroleum-Exporting Countries) oil in 2015-2020. Such a short time framework places greater emphasis on a transition to increased use of natural gas; i.e., a methane economy. Natural gas in turn may experience similar supply concerns in the 2050-2060 time frame according to some authors. Coal resources are considerable and provide significant petroleum potential either by extracting natural gas from them, by directly converting them into petroleum products, or by utilizing them to generate electricity, thereby reducing natural gas and oil requirements by fuel substitution. Non-conventional oil and gas are quite common in petroleum provinces of the world and represent a significant resources yet to be fully studied and developed. Seventeen non-conventional AU including coal-bed methane, basin-center gas, continuous oil, and gas hydrate occurrences have been preliminarily identified for future assessment. Initial efforts to assess heavy oil deposits and other non-conventional oil and gas deposits also are under way.

  14. Materials, Chemistry, and Simulation for Future Energy Technology.

    PubMed

    Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois; Wang, Da-Wei; Su, Dang-Sheng

    2015-09-01

    Special Issue: The Future of Energy. The science and engineering of clean energy now is becoming a multidisciplinary area, typically when new materials, chemistry, or mechanisms are met. "Trial and error" is the past. Exploration of new concepts for future clean energy can be accomplished through computer-aided materials design and reaction simulation, thanks to innovations in information technologies. This special issue, a fruit of the Energy Future Conference organized by UNSW Australia, has compiled some excellent examples of such approaches.

  15. Is one technology best? Control strategies to meet current and future regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Altin, C.A.; Bustard, C.J.; Gelfand, P.; Sloat, D.G.; Belba, V.H.

    1994-12-31

    A slide presentation is given that discusses control strategies to meet current and future regulations. Most new regulations will require incremental reductions in specific emissions creating a market for technologies that can be retrofitted to existing systems. Since most metals are associated with particulate matter, improving particle collection will lead to reduced metal emissions and the disposal of sorbents used for capturing vapor phase pollutants, e.g., SO{sub 2} and Hg, can dominate the economics of the process.

  16. Charting our energy future: progress or prudence

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, E.

    1980-04-01

    Dr. Cook says the US must decide whether to pursue the progress option of continued reliance on oil and gas to maintain its technological and social leadership or whether to adopt the prudent option of conservation and fuel substitutions to buy time for future needs. The progress option requires control of energy resources that will become increasingly difficult. Although the US is rich in resources, the problems of cost, demand uncertainty, environmental protection, social stability, safety, and the possibility that renewable resouces will be inadequate when non-renewables are depleted makes this a dangerous strategy. A steadier state of resource planning and conservation could be developing alternative domestic supplies which are free from external political control - the prudence option. This is the hard option, however, because it requires sacrifices of individual choice, a long-term commitment to real conservation through controls and possibly rationing, and a realistic assessment of the social and environmental costs of burning more coal and pushing ahead with nuclear power. Dr. Cook discusses briefly five reasons why a national decision for the prudence option appears unlikely. (DCK)

  17. Renewable Energy: Ready to Meet Its Promise?

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, S. R.; Billman, L. L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper will briefly review the technical status, cost, and applications of major renewable energy technologies in 1998, and also discuss some of the socioeconomic impacts of wide-scale adoption of renewables.

  18. Using Genomics to Dissect Seed Development (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Robert

    2012-03-21

    Robert Goldberg of UCLA presents "Using Genomics to Dissect Seed Development" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  19. Using Genomics to Dissect Seed Development (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Goldberg, Robert [UCLA

    2016-07-12

    Robert Goldberg of UCLA presents "Using Genomics to Dissect Seed Development" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  20. 76 FR 34684 - Offshore Renewable Energy; Public Meeting on Information Needs for Resource Assessment and Design...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Offshore Renewable Energy; Public Meeting on Information Needs for Resource Assessment and Design Conditions AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable... public meeting for interested parties to provide DOE information on existing needs for...

  1. The future of intersite networking. [Office of Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    Copies of viewgraphs and summaries of three discussion groups are presented. The purpose of the workshop was to identify strategies for meeting the computer networking needs to the scientists under the Office of Energy Research. (WRF)

  2. Solar Energy in America's Future, A Preliminary Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Energy Research and Development Administration, Washington, DC. Div. of Solar Energy.

    This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. The report documents a Stanford Research Institute study of the potential roles that solar energy technologies could have for meeting U.S. energy needs over the next 45 years. Computer simulations of different energy supply projections were developed by…

  3. 75 FR 39678 - Meeting of Energy Services Companies and the Federal Energy Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ... Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY... Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy on the use of high-end technologies in energy savings... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF...

  4. Roadmap for the Future of Commercial Energy Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Michael I.; Hart, Philip R.; Zhang, Jian; Athalye, Rahul A.

    2015-01-26

    Building energy codes have significantly increased building efficiency over the last 38 years, since the first national energy code was published in 1975. The most commonly used path in energy codes, the prescriptive path, appears to be reaching a point of diminishing returns. The current focus on prescriptive codes has limitations including significant variation in actual energy performance depending on which prescriptive options are chosen, a lack of flexibility for designers and developers, the inability to handle optimization that is specific to building type and use, the inability to account for project-specific energy costs, and the lack of follow-through or accountability after a certificate of occupancy is granted. It is likely that an approach that considers the building as an integrated system will be necessary to achieve the next real gains in building efficiency. This report provides a high-level review of different formats for commercial building energy codes, including prescriptive, prescriptive packages, capacity constrained, outcome based, and predictive performance approaches. This report also explores a next generation commercial energy code approach that places a greater emphasis on performance-based criteria. For commercial building energy codes to continue to progress as they have over the last 40 years, the next generation of building codes will need to provide a path that is led by energy performance, ensuring a measurable trajectory toward net zero energy buildings. This report outlines a vision to serve as a roadmap for future commercial code development. That vision is based on code development being led by a specific approach to predictive energy performance combined with building-specific prescriptive packages that are designed both to be cost-effective and to achieve a desired level of performance. Compliance with this new approach can be achieved by either meeting the performance target, as demonstrated by whole building energy

  5. Current Renewable Energy Technologies and Future Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Stephen W; Lapsa, Melissa Voss; Ward, Christina D; Smith, Barton; Grubb, Kimberly R; Lee, Russell

    2007-05-01

    The generally acknowledged sources of renewable energy are wind, geothermal, biomass, solar, hydropower, and hydrogen. Renewable energy technologies are crucial to the production and utilization of energy from these regenerative and virtually inexhaustible sources. Furthermore, renewable energy technologies provide benefits beyond the establishment of sustainable energy resources. For example, these technologies produce negligible amounts of greenhouse gases and other pollutants in providing energy, and they exploit domestically available energy sources, thereby reducing our dependence on both the importation of fossil fuels and the use of nuclear fuels. The market price of renewable energy technologies does not reflect the economic value of these added benefits.

  6. Future scientific applications for high-energy lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.W.

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses future applications for high-energy lasers in the areas of astrophysics and space physics; hydrodynamics; material properties; plasma physics; radiation sources; and radiative properties.

  7. China's sustainable energy future: Scenarios of energy and carbonemissions (Summary)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dadi; Levine, Mark; Dai, Yande; Yu, Cong; Guo, Yuan; Sinton, Jonathan E.; Lewis, Joanna I.; Zhu, Yuezhong

    2004-03-10

    China has ambitious goals for economic development, and mustfind ways to power the achievement of those goals that are bothenvironmentally and socially sustainable. Integration into the globaleconomy presents opportunities for technological improvement and accessto energy resources. China also has options for innovative policies andmeasures that could significantly alter the way energy is acquired andused. These opportunities andoptions, along with long-term social,demographic, and economic trends, will shape China s future energysystem, and consequently its contribution to emissions of greenhousegases, particularly carbon dioxide (CO2). In this study, entitled China sSustainable Energy Future: Scenarios of Energy and Carbon Emissions, theEnergy Research Institute (ERI), an independent analytic organizationunder China's Na tional Development and Reform Commission (NDRC), soughtto explore in detail how China could achieve the goals of the TenthFive-Year Plan and its longer term aims through a sustainable developmentstrategy. China's ability to forge a sustainable energy path has globalconsequences. China's annual emissions of greenhouse gases comprisenearly half of those from developing countries, and 12 percent of globalemissions. Most of China's greenhouse gas emissions are in the form ofCO2, 87 percent of which came from energy use in 2000. In that year,China's carbon emissions from energy use and cement production were 760million metric tons (Mt-C), second only to the 1,500 Mt-C emitted by theUS (CDIAC, 2003). As China's energy consumption continues to increase,greenhouse gas emissions are expected to inevitably increase into thefuture. However, the rate at which energy consumption and emissions willincrease can vary significantly depending on whether sustainabledevelopment is recognized as an important policy goal. If the ChineseGovernment chooses to adopt measures to enhance energy efficiency andimprove the overall structure of energy supply, it is possible

  8. Arizona's energy future: making the transition to a new mix

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    This report looks at Arizona's energy future in light of knowledge gained since 1976. It emphasizes conservation, cogeneration, solar, geothermal, and biomass energy promise. An interdisciplinary approach is used. (PSB)

  9. Is Solar Energy the Fuel of the Future?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetincelik, Mauammer

    1974-01-01

    Describes the present distribution of solar energy, traces its use through history, explores its potential utilization in the future, and presents the effects of the use of solar energy on pollution. (GS)

  10. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    2013-04-12

    This document describes some of the accomplishments of the Department of Energy Water Power Program, and how those accomplishments are supporting the advancement of renewable energy generated using hydropower technologies and marine and hydrokinetic technologies.

  11. Our energy future: crisis or complacency

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Complacency over the current energy situation is unwarranted because energy is still vital to the nation and its economy. The energy crisis continues because many domestic policies are flawed. The US should develop a comprehensive approach to reducing its energy vulnerability. Policies must be market oriented, rely on a minimum of government intervention, and promote a balanced and varied energy mix. The author examines how these principles apply to petroleum, natural gas, electricity, nuclear, coal, renewable resources, and synthetic fuels. He notes progress since the first oil embargo, but outlines what remains to be done. 3 references, 3 figures.

  12. Two Energy Futures: A National Choice for the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Petroleum Inst., Washington, DC.

    Examined in this American Petroleum Institute (API) publication on energy technology and energy policy, is the future potential of oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear energy, synthetic fuels, and renewable energy resources. Among the related issues emphasized are environmental protection, access to federal lands, government policies, and the national…

  13. Extending DART to meet the data acquisition needs of future experiments at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Oleynik, G.; Pordes, R.; Barsotti, E.

    1995-10-01

    The DART project at Fermilab is a major collaboration to develop a data acquisition system for multiple experiments. The initial implementation of DART has concentrated on providing working data acquisition systems for the (now eight) collaborating experiments in the next Fixed Target Run. In this paper we discuss aspects of the architecture of DART and how these will allow it to be extended to meet the expected needs of future experiments at Fermilab. We also discuss some ongoing developments within the Fermilab Computing Division towards these new implementations.

  14. RETHINKING THE FUTURE GRID: INTEGRATED NUCLEAR-RENEWABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    S.M. Bragg-Sitton; R. Boardman

    2014-12-01

    The 2013 electricity generation mix in the United States consisted of ~13% renewables (hydropower, wind, solar, geothermal), 19% nuclear, 27% natural gas, and 39% coal. In the 2011 State of the Union Address, President Obama set a clean energy goal for the nation: “By 2035, 80 percent of America’s electricity will come from clean energy sources. Some folks want wind and solar. Others want nuclear, clean coal and natural gas. To meet this goal we will need them all.” The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offices of Nuclear Energy (NE) and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) recognize that “all of the above” means that we are called to best utilize all available clean energy sources. To meet the stated environmental goals for electricity generation and for the broader energy sector, there is a need to transform the energy infrastructure of the U.S. and elsewhere. New energy systems must be capable of significantly reducing environmental impacts in an efficient and economically viable manner while utilizing both hydrocarbon resources and clean energy generation sources. The U.S. DOE is supporting research and development that could lead to more efficient utilization of clean energy generation sources, including renewable and nuclear options, to meet both grid demand and thermal energy needs in the industrial sector. A concept being advanced by the DOE-NE and DOE-EERE is tighter coupling of nuclear and renewable energy sources in a manner that better optimizes energy use for the combined electricity, industrial manufacturing, and the transportation sectors. This integration concept has been referred to as a “hybrid system” that is capable of apportioning thermal and electrical energy to first meet the grid demand (with appropriate power conversion systems), then utilizing excess thermal and, in some cases, electrical energy to drive a process that results in an additional product. For the purposes of the present work, the hybrid system would

  15. Mercury: Next-gen Data Analysis and Annotation Pipeline (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, David

    2012-06-01

    David Sexton (Baylor) gives a talk titled "Mercury: Next-gen Data Analysis and Annotation Pipeline" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  16. Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Fitzsimmons, Michael [LANL

    2016-07-12

    Michael Fitzsimmons from Los Alamos National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  17. The PerkinElmer Omics Laboratory (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Smith, Todd [PerkinElmer Omics Laboratory

    2016-07-12

    Todd Smith of the PerkinElmer Omics Laboratory gives a talk about his lab and its work at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  18. High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Athavale, Ajay [Monsanto

    2016-07-12

    Ajay Athavale (Monsanto) presents "High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  19. Introducing National Center for Genome Resources (NCGR) Informatics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Crow, John [National Center for Genome Resources

    2016-07-12

    John Crow from the National Center for Genome Resources discusses his organization's informatics at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  20. Introducing National Center for Genome Resources (NCGR) Informatics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Crow, John

    2012-06-01

    John Crow from the National Center for Genome Resources discusses his organization's informatics at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  1. Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzsimmons, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Michael Fitzsimmons from Los Alamos National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  2. The PerkinElmer Omics Laboratory (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Todd

    2012-06-01

    Todd Smith of the PerkinElmer Omics Laboratory gives a talk about his lab and its work at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  3. Mercury: Next-gen Data Analysis and Annotation Pipeline (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Sexton, David [Baylor

    2016-07-12

    David Sexton (Baylor) gives a talk titled "Mercury: Next-gen Data Analysis and Annotation Pipeline" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  4. High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Athavale, Ajay

    2012-06-01

    Ajay Athavale (Monsanto) presents "High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  5. Present and Future Energy Scenario in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Gupta, V. K.

    2014-09-01

    India's energy sector is one of the most critical components of an infrastructure that affects India's economic growth and therefore is also one of the largest industries in India. India has the 5th largest electricity generating capacity and is the 6th largest energy consumer amounting for around 3.4 % of global energy consumption. India's energy demand has grown at 3.6 % pa over the past 30 years. The consumption of the energy is directly proportional to the progress of manpower with ever growing population, improvement in the living standard of the humanity and industrialization of the developing countries. Very recently smart grid technology can attribute important role in energy scenario. Smart grid refers to electric power system that enhances grid reliability and efficiency by automatically responding to system disturbances. This paper discusses the new communication infrastructure and scheme designed to integrate data.

  6. Materials, Chemistry, and Simulation for Future Energy Technology.

    PubMed

    Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois; Wang, Da-Wei; Su, Dang-Sheng

    2015-09-01

    Special Issue: The Future of Energy. The science and engineering of clean energy now is becoming a multidisciplinary area, typically when new materials, chemistry, or mechanisms are met. "Trial and error" is the past. Exploration of new concepts for future clean energy can be accomplished through computer-aided materials design and reaction simulation, thanks to innovations in information technologies. This special issue, a fruit of the Energy Future Conference organized by UNSW Australia, has compiled some excellent examples of such approaches. PMID:26331374

  7. Workshops of the Fifth International Brain-Computer Interface Meeting: Defining the Future.

    PubMed

    Huggins, Jane E; Guger, Christoph; Allison, Brendan; Anderson, Charles W; Batista, Aaron; Brouwer, Anne-Marie A-M; Brunner, Clemens; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Fried-Oken, Melanie; Gunduz, Aysegul; Gupta, Disha; Kübler, Andrea; Leeb, Robert; Lotte, Fabien; Miller, Lee E; Müller-Putz, Gernot; Rutkowski, Tomasz; Tangermann, Michael; Thompson, David Edward

    2014-01-01

    The Fifth International Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) Meeting met June 3-7(th), 2013 at the Asilomar Conference Grounds, Pacific Grove, California. The conference included 19 workshops covering topics in brain-computer interface and brain-machine interface research. Topics included translation of BCIs into clinical use, standardization and certification, types of brain activity to use for BCI, recording methods, the effects of plasticity, special interest topics in BCIs applications, and future BCI directions. BCI research is well established and transitioning to practical use to benefit people with physical impairments. At the same time, new applications are being explored, both for people with physical impairments and beyond. Here we provide summaries of each workshop, illustrating the breadth and depth of BCI research and high-lighting important issues for future research and development.

  8. Workshops of the Fifth International Brain-Computer Interface Meeting: Defining the Future

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Jane E.; Guger, Christoph; Allison, Brendan; Anderson, Charles W.; Batista, Aaron; Brouwer, Anne-Marie (A.-M.); Brunner, Clemens; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Fried-Oken, Melanie; Gunduz, Aysegul; Gupta, Disha; Kübler, Andrea; Leeb, Robert; Lotte, Fabien; Miller, Lee E.; Müller-Putz, Gernot; Rutkowski, Tomasz; Tangermann, Michael; Thompson, David Edward

    2014-01-01

    The Fifth International Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) Meeting met June 3–7th, 2013 at the Asilomar Conference Grounds, Pacific Grove, California. The conference included 19 workshops covering topics in brain-computer interface and brain-machine interface research. Topics included translation of BCIs into clinical use, standardization and certification, types of brain activity to use for BCI, recording methods, the effects of plasticity, special interest topics in BCIs applications, and future BCI directions. BCI research is well established and transitioning to practical use to benefit people with physical impairments. At the same time, new applications are being explored, both for people with physical impairments and beyond. Here we provide summaries of each workshop, illustrating the breadth and depth of BCI research and high-lighting important issues for future research and development. PMID:25485284

  9. Future of health care dominates meeting as CMA urges governments to fix “system in crisis”

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Patrick

    1996-01-01

    Despite some media predictions that the CMA would endorse a parallel private health care system for Canadians during its August annual meeting, General Council in fact defeated motions favouring a move to privatized health care delivery. Sixteen resolutions on the future of health and health care were passed at the meeting, and most dealt with ways to improve the existing system.

  10. 75 FR 67805 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Subcommittee on Aviation Safety; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... Office of the Secretary of Transportation The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Subcommittee on Aviation Safety; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Department of Transportation, Office of the... the Secretary of Transportation, announces a meeting of the FAAC Subcommittee on Aviation...

  11. Solar energy to meet the nation's energy needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rom, F. E.; Thomas, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the possibilities afforded by solar energy as one of the alternative energy sources capable to take the place of the dwindling oil and gas reserves. Solar energy, being a nondepleting clean source of energy, is shown to be capable of providing energy in all the forms in which it is used today. Steps taken toward providing innovative solutions that are economically competitive with other systems are briefly reviewed.

  12. Energy Options: Challenge for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Allen L.

    1972-01-01

    Summarizes alternative technological possibilities for ensuring a supply of energy for the United States, including nuclear technology, solar energy, shale oil and coal gassification, low pollutant techniques for burning coal, and a fuel cell suitable for commercial use. Reports the extent of existing research and development efforts. (AL)

  13. Rethinking the Future Grid: Integrated Nuclear Renewable Energy Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg-Sitton, S. M.; Boardman, R.; Ruth, M.; Zinaman, O.; Forsberg, C.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. DOE is supporting research and development that could lead to more efficient utilization of clean energy generation sources, including renewable and nuclear options, to meet both grid demand and thermal energy needs in the industrial sector. One concept under consideration by the DOE-NE and DOE-EERE is tighter coupling of nuclear and renewable energy sources in a manner that better optimizes energy use for the combined electricity, industrial manufacturing, and transportation sectors. This integration concept has been referred to as a 'hybrid system' that is capable of apportioning thermal and electrical energy to first meet the grid demand (with appropriate power conversion systems), then utilizing excess thermal and, in some cases, electrical energy to drive a process that results in an additional product.

  14. Sustainability of least cost policies for meeting Mexico City's future water demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, Timothy J.; Mazari-Hiriart, Marisa; DomíNguez-Mora, Ramón; Suffet, I. H.

    2000-08-01

    Meeting future water demand without degrading ecosystems is one important indicator of sustainable development. Using simulations, we showed that compared to existing policy, more sustainable water supply options are similar or cheaper in cost. We probabilistically forecasted the Mexico City metropolitan zone population for the year 2015 to be 23.5 million and total required water supply to be 106 m3 s-1. We optimized existing and potential supply sources from aquifers, surface water, treatment/reuse, and efficiency/demand management by cost to meet future supply needs; the applied source supply limits determined the degree of sustainability. In two scenarios to supply 106 m3 s-1, the business-as-usual scenario (zero sustainability) had an average relative unit cost of 1.133; while for the most sustainable scenario (it includes reducing potential supply basins' exploitation limits by 50%), the value was 1.121. One extreme scenario to supply the forecast's 95% confidence value (124 m3 s-1) showed little unit cost change (1.106). The simulation shows sustainable policies can be cost-effective.

  15. Solar energy to meet the nation's energy needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rom, F. E.; Thomas, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Solar energy, being a non-depleting clean source of energy, is shown to be capable of providing energy in all the forms in which it is used today. It can be used to generate electricity, for heating and cooling buildings, and for producing clean renewable gaseous, liquid and solid fuel. There is little question of the technical feasibility for utilizing solar energy. The chief problem is rapidly providing innovative solutions that are economically competititive with other systems.

  16. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    Water power technologies harness energy from rivers and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses, and can help the United States meet its pressing energy, environmental, and economic challenges. Water power technologies; fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower uses dams or impoundments to store river water in a reservoir. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients.

  17. Energy and the Future: Research Priorities and National Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Allen L.

    1973-01-01

    Article provides an account of alternatives for solving energy shortage problems in future years. A national policy is needed. More concerted effort should be made to develop technologies for conversion of energy from conventional and non-conventional resources so that energy is cheaper, available for use and without environmental hazards. (PS)

  18. Thermionic energy conversion technology - Present and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.; Morris, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    Aerospace and terrestrial applications of thermionic direct energy conversion and advances in direct energy conversion (DEC) technology are surveyed. Electrode materials, the cesium plasma drop (the difference between the barrier index and the collector work function), DEC voltage/current characteristics, conversion efficiency, and operating temperatures are discussed. Attention is centered on nuclear reactor system thermionic DEC devices, for in-core or out-of-core operation. Thermionic fuel elements, the radiation shield, power conditions, and a waste heat rejection system are considered among the thermionic DEC system components. Terrestrial applications include topping power systems in fossil fuel and solar power generation.

  19. PREFACE: PAGES 1st Young Scientists Meeting (YSM) - 'Retrospective views on our planet's future'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margrethe Basse, Ellen

    2010-03-01

    'Retrospective views on our planet's future' - This was the theme of a tandem of meetings held by Past Global Changes (PAGES; http://www.pages-igbp.org), a project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP). It reflects the philosophy of PAGES and its community of scientists that the past holds the key to better projections of the future. Climatic and environmental evidence from the past can be used to sharpen future projections of global change, thereby informing political and societal decisions on mitigation and adaptation. Young scientists are critical to the future of this endeavour, which we call 'paleoscience'. Their scientific knowledge, interdisciplinarity, international collaboration, and leadership skills will be required if this field is to continue to thrive. Meanwhile, it is also important to remember that science develops not only by applying new strategies and new tools to make new observations, but also by building upon existing knowledge. Modern research in paleoscience began around fifty years ago, and one could say that the third generation of researchers is now emerging. It is a wise investment to ensure that existing skills and knowledge are transferred to this generation. This will enable them to lead the science towards new accomplishments, and to make important contributions towards the wider field of global change science. Motivated by such considerations, PAGES organized its first Young Scientists Meeting (YSM), held in Corvallis (Oregon, USA) in July 2009 (http://www.pages-osm.org/ysm/index.html). The meeting took place immediately before the much larger 3rd PAGES Open Science Meeting (OSM; http://www.pages-osm.org/osm/index.html). The YSM brought together 91 early-career scientists from 21 different nations. During the two-day meeting, PhD students, postdoctoral researchers, and new faculty met to present their work and build networks across geographical and disciplinary borders. Several experienced and well

  20. Embracing a clean-energy future.

    PubMed

    Sebelius, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    The former governor of Kansas describes how her state is greening. The Blue Green Alliance has estimated that in a renewable-energy economy, Kansas stands to gain more than 11,000 jobs and almost $2 billion in new economic investments. PMID:19608503

  1. Embracing a clean-energy future.

    PubMed

    Sebelius, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    The former governor of Kansas describes how her state is greening. The Blue Green Alliance has estimated that in a renewable-energy economy, Kansas stands to gain more than 11,000 jobs and almost $2 billion in new economic investments.

  2. Energy education: Reaching out to the future

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, L.M.

    1990-07-05

    This article discusses what is being done to encourage students (particularly women and minorities) to enter science and engineering fields and to improve the quality of secondary education in core subjects for these fields. Topics covered include efforts by national energy education organizations, DOE and other federal efforts, community and school-based activities by local utilities, and activities sponsored by various industry associations.

  3. 76 FR 4645 - Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... Fusion Nuclear Sciences Pathways Assessment Activities Public Comments Public Participation: The meeting... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Fusion... Science. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee....

  4. Could Building Energy Codes Mandate Rooftop Solar in the Future?

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, Heather E.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Solana, Amy E.; Russo, Bryan J.; Williams, Jeremiah

    2012-08-01

    This paper explores existing requirements and compliance options for both commercial and residential code structures. Common alternative compliance options are discussed including Renewable Energy Credits (RECs), green-power purchasing programs, shared solar programs and other community-based renewable energy investments. Compliance options are analyzed to consider building lifespan, cost-effectiveness, energy trade-offs, enforcement concerns and future code development. Existing onsite renewable energy codes are highlighted as case studies for the code development process.

  5. Fossil fuels in a sustainable energy future

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, T.F.

    1995-12-01

    The coal industry in the United States has become a world leader in safety, productivity, and environmental protection in the mining of coal. The {open_quotes}pick-and-shovel{close_quotes} miner with mangled limbs and black lung disease has been replaced by the highly skilled technicians that lead the world in tons per man-hour. The gob piles, polluted streams, and scared land are a thing of the past. The complementary efforts of the DOE and EPRI-funded programs in coal utilization R&D and the Clean Coal Technology Program commercial demonstrations, have positioned the power generation industry to utilize coal in a way that doesn`t pollute the air or water, keeps electrical power costs low, and avoids the mountains of waste material. This paper reviews the potential for advanced coal utilization technologies in new power generation applications as well as the repowering of existing plants to increase their output, raise their efficiency, and reduce pollution. It demonstrates the potential for these advanced coal-fueled plants to play a complementary role in future planning with the natural gas and oil fired units currently favored in the market place. The status of the US program to demonstrate these technologies at commercial scale is reviewed in some detail.

  6. Hydrogen - Energy carrier of the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsch, Joachim; Steeb, Hartmut

    1986-11-01

    The potential of hydrogen as an energy carrier - in conventional burners, in internal-combustion or turbine engines, in fuel cells, in catalytic burners, or in steam generators - is discussed, and the current status of the Hysolar program is reviewed. Hysolar is a cooperative project of the University of Stuttgart, DFVLR, and Saudi Arabia to develop industrial-scale hydrogen-production facilities employing solar-cell arrays and electrolysis. Hysolar calls for basic research in photoelectrochemistry, electrolysis, and fuel-cell technology; studies of hydrogen production systems and application technology; training of personnel; and construction of a 2-kW laboratory installation at Jiddah, a 10-kW experimental installation at Stuttgart, and a 100-kW demonstration installation at Riad (producing about 44,000 N cu m of hydrogen per year). Diagrams, drawings, and tables are provided.

  7. Present and future evidence for evolving dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Liddle, Andrew R.; Mukherjee, Pia; Parkinson, David; Wang Yun

    2006-12-15

    We compute the Bayesian evidences for one- and two-parameter models of evolving dark energy, and compare them to the evidence for a cosmological constant, using current data from Type Ia supernova, baryon acoustic oscillations, and the cosmic microwave background. We use only distance information, ignoring dark energy perturbations. We find that, under various priors on the dark energy parameters, {lambda}CDM is currently favored as compared to the dark energy models. We consider the parameter constraints that arise under Bayesian model averaging, and discuss the implication of our results for future dark energy projects seeking to detect dark energy evolution. The model selection approach complements and extends the figure-of-merit approach of the Dark Energy Task Force in assessing future experiments, and suggests a significantly-modified interpretation of that statistic.

  8. Community Energy: A Social Architecture for an Alternative Energy Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Steven M.; High-Pippert, Angela

    2005-01-01

    Community energy based on a mix of distributed technologies offers a serious alternative to the current energy system. The nature of community energy and the role that such initiatives might play in the general fabric of civic life is not, however, well understood. Community energy initiatives might involve only those citizens who prefer to be…

  9. The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite: Extending the BUV Technique to Meet Future Ozone Measurement Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seftor, C. J.; Larsen, J. C.; Remund, Q.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Flynn, L. E.; Hilsenrath, E.

    2003-12-01

    /LORE, OSIRIS, and SCIAMACHY to provide ozone profile measurements within the NPOESS-required accuracy and precision. In this presentation we will provide an overview of the OMPS sensors and algorithms, both in terms of their links to the past and improvements designed to meet the performance requirements of the future.

  10. Two Energy Futures: A National Choice for the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Petroleum Inst., Washington, DC.

    In 1980, the American Petroleum Institute published the first edition of "Two Energy Futures." It described the U.S. energy experience of the 1970s and prospects for the 1980s, concluding that the nation could drastically reduce its dependence on uncertain sources of imported oil if the right choices were made by individuals and the government.…

  11. Steel industry of the future: Meeting the material challenges of the 21. century

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    For over a century, the US steel industry has led the global market with advances in technology, product development, and marketing. Industry leaders recognize both the opportunities and challenges they face as they head into the 21st century, and that cooperative R and D is key to their success. In a unique partnership, steel industry leaders have teamed with the US Department of Energy`s Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) to focus on innovative technologies that will help to strengthen the competitive position of the US steel industry and, at the same time, further important national goals. This industry-led partnership, the Steel Industry of the Future, promotes technologies that optimize the use of energy and materials in operation and reduce wastes and energy-related emissions. Led by the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) and the Steel Manufacturers Association (SMA), industry leaders began by developing a unified vision for the next 20 years: to provide high-quality, value-added products to a wide array of customers in an environmentally friendly, cost-effective manner, while leading the world in innovation and technology. Continued global leadership in materials markets will require the combined resources of industry, universities, and government laboratories. The steel industry vision provided a framework for the next step in the Industries of the Future process, the development of a technology roadmap designed to facilitate collaborative R and D on advanced processes and technologies for the steel industry.

  12. Potential impacts of energy efficiency policies in the U.S. industry: Results from the clean energy futures study

    SciTech Connect

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

    2001-07-24

    Scenarios for a Clean Energy Future (CEF) studied the role that efficient clean energy technologies can play in meeting the economic and environmental challenges for our future energy supply. The study describes a portfolio of policies that would motivate energy users and businesses to invest in innovative energy efficient technologies. On the basis of the portfolios, two policy scenarios have been developed, i.e. a moderate scenario and an advanced scenario. We focus on the industrial part of the CEF-study. The studied policies include a wide scope of activities, which are organized under the umbrella of voluntary industrial sector agreements. The policies for the policy scenarios have been modeled using the National Energy Modeling System (CEF-NEMS). Under the reference scenario industrial energy use would grow to 41 Quads in 2020, compared to 34.8 Quads in 1997, with an average improvement of the energy intensity by 1.1% per year. In the Moderate scenario the annual improvement is a bout 1.5%/year, leading to primary energy use of 37.8 Quads in 2020, resulting in 10% lower CO2 emissions by 2020 compared to the reference scenario. In the Advanced scenario the annual improvement increases to 1.8% per year, leading to primary energy use of 34.3 Quads in 2020, and 29% lower CO2 emissions. We report on the policies, assumptions and results for industry.

  13. Future Energy Technology. A Basic Teaching Unit on Energy. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Hugh, Ed.; Scharmann, Larry, Ed.

    Recommended for grades 7-12 language arts, science, and social studies classes, this 5-7 day unit encourages students to investigate alternative energy sources through research. Focusing on geothermal energy, tide and ocean, fusion, wind, biomass, and solar energy as possible areas of consideration, the unit attempts to create an awareness of the…

  14. Fuels and energy for the future: The role of catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rostrup-Nielsen, J.R.; Nielsen, R.

    2004-07-01

    There are many reasons to decrease the dependency on oil and to increase the use of other energy sources than fossil fuels. The wish for energy security is balanced by a wish for sustainable growth. Catalysis plays an important role in creating new routes and flexibility in the network of energy sources, energy carriers, and energy conversion. The process technologies resemble those applied in the large scale manufacture of commodities. This is illustrated by examples from refinery fuels, synfuels, and hydrogen and the future role of fossil fuels is discussed.

  15. Transportation Energy Futures: Project Overview and Findings (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examines how combining multiple strategies could reduce both GHG emissions and petroleum use by 80%. The project's primary objective was to help inform domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments, with an emphasis on previously underexplored opportunities related to energy efficiency and renewable energy in light-duty vehicles, non-light-duty vehicles, fuels, and transportation demand. This PowerPoint provides an overview of the project and its findings.

  16. Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    As the first Meeting Chairman for the Spring and Fall meetings, Martin Walt has achieved notable success in realizing the many goals set forth by the Union for its annual meetings. Under his guidance, the Meeting Program Committee has been able to reduce the number of conflicting sessions and provide for the presentation of well-organized and effectively displayed poster sessions. The early planning of Union sessions and the introduction of ‘mini-frontiers,’ along with careful scheduling, has provided an increased opportunity for participation. A record high of 2785 registrants was recorded during the 1981 Fall Meeting, topping very slightly the old record of 2775 for the 1974 Spring Meeting.

  17. Future U.S. water consumption : The role of energy production.

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-06-01

    This study investigates how meeting domestic energy production targets for both fossil and renewable fuels may affect future water demand. It combines projections of energy production developed by the U.S. Department of Energy with estimates of water consumption on a per-unit basis (water-consumption coefficients) for coal, oil, gas, and biofuels production, to estimate and compare the domestic freshwater consumed. Although total domestic freshwater consumption is expected to increase by nearly 7% between 2005 and 2030, water consumed for energy production is expected to increase by nearly 70%, and water consumed for biofuels (biodiesel and ethanol) production is expected to increase by almost 250%. By 2030, water consumed in the production of biofuels is projected to account for nearly half of the total amount of water consumed in the production of all energy fuels. Most of this is for irrigation, and the West North Central Region is projected to consume most of this water in 2030. These findings identify an important potential future conflict between renewable energy production and water availability that warrants further investigation and action to ensure that future domestic energy demand can be met in an economically efficient and environmentally sustainable manner.

  18. Energy Transformation: Teaching Youth about Energy Efficiency while Meeting Science Essential Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Sarah D.; Chilcote, Amy G.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the Energy Transformation 4-H school enrichment curriculum. The curriculum addresses energy efficiency and conservation while meeting sixth-grade science essential standards requirements. Through experiential learning, including building and testing a model home, youth learn the relationship between various technologies and…

  19. PREFACE: PAGES 1st Young Scientists Meeting (YSM) - 'Retrospective views on our planet's future'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margrethe Basse, Ellen

    2010-03-01

    'Retrospective views on our planet's future' - This was the theme of a tandem of meetings held by Past Global Changes (PAGES; http://www.pages-igbp.org), a project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP). It reflects the philosophy of PAGES and its community of scientists that the past holds the key to better projections of the future. Climatic and environmental evidence from the past can be used to sharpen future projections of global change, thereby informing political and societal decisions on mitigation and adaptation. Young scientists are critical to the future of this endeavour, which we call 'paleoscience'. Their scientific knowledge, interdisciplinarity, international collaboration, and leadership skills will be required if this field is to continue to thrive. Meanwhile, it is also important to remember that science develops not only by applying new strategies and new tools to make new observations, but also by building upon existing knowledge. Modern research in paleoscience began around fifty years ago, and one could say that the third generation of researchers is now emerging. It is a wise investment to ensure that existing skills and knowledge are transferred to this generation. This will enable them to lead the science towards new accomplishments, and to make important contributions towards the wider field of global change science. Motivated by such considerations, PAGES organized its first Young Scientists Meeting (YSM), held in Corvallis (Oregon, USA) in July 2009 (http://www.pages-osm.org/ysm/index.html). The meeting took place immediately before the much larger 3rd PAGES Open Science Meeting (OSM; http://www.pages-osm.org/osm/index.html). The YSM brought together 91 early-career scientists from 21 different nations. During the two-day meeting, PhD students, postdoctoral researchers, and new faculty met to present their work and build networks across geographical and disciplinary borders. Several experienced and well

  20. 75 FR 53374 - Notice of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Surface Transportation Board Notice of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Notice of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory Committee meeting... this meeting may be announced through the Board's Web site at www.stb.dot.gov . This action will...

  1. Meeting local energy needs: resources for self-sufficiency. [Monograph

    SciTech Connect

    Freedburg, M.

    1981-01-01

    The private sector, state and local governments, agencies, and the community itself will be the arenas for energy fund raising in the 1980s. This report surveys and describes these arenas, with references and key contacts accompanying each section. It explores two basic types of funding: (1) grants for community energy ventures of all kinds and (2) financing for consumers, both renters and homeowners, to purchase conservation measures. Grants are not going to be available in sufficient amounts to meet the need, but conservation loans are cost-effective in most parts of the country because they can be paid back through savings. Access to loans for low-income groups can be made available by grassroots funding, pension funds, bond financing, community-development funds, and other mechanisms. 59 references.

  2. Carbonless Transportation and Energy Storage in Future Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lamont, A.D.; Berry, G.D.

    2001-01-17

    By 2050 world population is projected to stabilize near 10 billion. Global economic development will outpace this growth, achieving present European per capita living standards by quintupling the size of the global economy--and increasing energy use, especially electricity, substantially. Even with aggressive efficiency improvements, global electricity use will at least triple to 30 trillion kWh/yr in 2050. Direct use of fuels, with greater potential for efficiency improvement, may be held to 80 trillion kWh (289 EJ) annually, 50% above present levels (IPCC, 1996). Sustaining energy use at these or higher rates, while simultaneously stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gas levels, will require massive deployment of carbon-conscious energy systems for electricity generation and transportation by the mid 21st Century. These systems will either involve a shift to non-fossil primary energy sources (such as solar, wind, biomass, nuclear, and hydroelectric) or continue to rely on fossil primary energy sources and sequester carbon emissions (Halmann, 1999). Both approaches share the need to convert, transmit, store and deliver energy to end-users through carbonless energy carriers.

  3. Multidimensional materials and device architectures for future hybrid energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Dunn, Bruce; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-09-01

    Electrical energy storage plays a vital role in daily life due to our dependence on numerous portable electronic devices. Moreover, with the continued miniaturization of electronics, integration of wireless devices into our homes and clothes and the widely anticipated `Internet of Things', there are intensive efforts to develop miniature yet powerful electrical energy storage devices. This review addresses the cutting edge of electrical energy storage technology, outlining approaches to overcome current limitations and providing future research directions towards the next generation of electrical energy storage devices whose characteristics represent a true hybridization of batteries and electrochemical capacitors.

  4. Multidimensional materials and device architectures for future hybrid energy storage

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Dunn, Bruce; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-09-07

    Electrical energy storage plays a vital role in daily life due to our dependence on numerous portable electronic devices. Moreover, with the continued miniaturization of electronics, integration of wireless devices into our homes and clothes and the widely anticipated ‘Internet of Things’, there are intensive efforts to develop miniature yet powerful electrical energy storage devices. Here, this review addresses the cutting edge of electrical energy storage technology, outlining approaches to overcome current limitations and providing future research directions towards the next generation of electrical energy storage devices whose characteristics represent a true hybridization of batteries and electrochemical capacitors.

  5. Energy supplies and future engines for land, sea, and air.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David Gordon

    2012-06-01

    The years 2012 and beyond seem likely to record major changes in energy use and power generation. The Japanese tsunami has resulted in large countries either scaling back or abolishing the future use of nuclear energy. The discovery of what seems like vast amounts of economically deliverable natural gas has many forecasting a rapid switch from coal- to gas-fired generating plants. On the other hand, environmentalists have strong objections to the production of natural gas and of petroleum by hydraulic fracturing from shale, or by extraction of heavy oil. They believe that global warming from the use of fossil fuels is now established beyond question. There has been rapid progress in the development of alternative energy supplies, particularly from on-shore and off-shore wind. Progress toward a viable future energy mix has been slowed by a U.S. energy policy that seems to many to be driven by politics. The author will review the history of power and energy to put all of the above in context and will look at possible future developments. He will propose what he believes to be an idealized energy policy that could result in an optimum system that would be arrived at democratically. PMID:22788100

  6. Energy supplies and future engines for land, sea, and air.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David Gordon

    2012-06-01

    The years 2012 and beyond seem likely to record major changes in energy use and power generation. The Japanese tsunami has resulted in large countries either scaling back or abolishing the future use of nuclear energy. The discovery of what seems like vast amounts of economically deliverable natural gas has many forecasting a rapid switch from coal- to gas-fired generating plants. On the other hand, environmentalists have strong objections to the production of natural gas and of petroleum by hydraulic fracturing from shale, or by extraction of heavy oil. They believe that global warming from the use of fossil fuels is now established beyond question. There has been rapid progress in the development of alternative energy supplies, particularly from on-shore and off-shore wind. Progress toward a viable future energy mix has been slowed by a U.S. energy policy that seems to many to be driven by politics. The author will review the history of power and energy to put all of the above in context and will look at possible future developments. He will propose what he believes to be an idealized energy policy that could result in an optimum system that would be arrived at democratically.

  7. Mapping Future Research in Disabilities--Research Initiatives in Intellectual Disabilities in India: Report of a National Interdisciplinary Meeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Libby; Brown, Roy I.

    2012-01-01

    A meeting organized under the auspices of the International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disabilities (IASSID) Academy on Education, Teaching and Research was held in March 2011 at the India International Centre in New Delhi, India, with the explicit purpose of helping establish a road map for future research in…

  8. The modular helium reactor for future energy needs

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Matthew B.; Shenoy, Arkal S.; Venneri, Francesco; LaBar, Malcolm P.; Schultz, Kenneth R.; Brown, Lloyd C.

    2006-07-01

    The Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) is one of the advanced reactor concepts within the internationally-supported Generation IV program. Because of its design features and design maturity, the MHR was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as the U.S. Generation IV design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Other countries, including Russia, Japan, South Korea, China, South Africa, and France are also developing this technology, and large-scale deployment of MHR technology is a realistic element of future energy-growth scenarios. In this paper, we discuss MHR conceptual designs for electricity and hydrogen production and their role in a sustainable energy future with significant growth in nuclear energy. For hydrogen production, two conceptual designs are described; one coupling the MHR to thermochemical water splitting using the sulfur-iodine (SI) process and the other coupling the MHR to high-temperature electrolysis (HTE). (authors)

  9. Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Options for Compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, Heather E.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Solana, Amy E.; Russo, Bryan J.

    2011-09-30

    As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, use of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including envelope, mechanical and lighting, have been pressed to the end of reasonable limits. Research has been conducted to determine the mechanism for implementing this requirement (Kaufman 2011). Kaufmann et al. determined that the most appropriate way to structure an on-site renewable requirement for commercial buildings is to define the requirement in terms of an installed power density per unit of roof area. This provides a mechanism that is suitable for the installation of photovoltaic (PV) systems on future buildings to offset electricity and reduce the total building energy load. Kaufmann et al. suggested that an appropriate maximum for the requirement in the commercial sector would be 4 W/ft{sup 2} of roof area or 0.5 W/ft{sup 2} of conditioned floor area. As with all code requirements, there must be an alternative compliance path for buildings that may not reasonably meet the renewables requirement. This might include conditions like shading (which makes rooftop PV arrays less effective), unusual architecture, undesirable roof pitch, unsuitable building orientation, or other issues. In the short term, alternative compliance paths including high performance mechanical equipment, dramatic envelope changes, or controls changes may be feasible. These options may be less expensive than many renewable systems, which will require careful balance of energy measures when setting the code requirement levels. As the stringency of the code continues to increase however, efficiency trade-offs will be maximized, requiring alternative compliance options to be focused solely on renewable electricity trade-offs or equivalent programs. One alternate compliance path includes purchase of Renewable Energy

  10. Geothermal Energy and the Eastern US: Fifth technical information interchange meeting, Minutes

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    The technical interchange meeting documented here is the fifth meeting where people interested in geothermal energy in the Eastern US have met to interchange technical information. These meetings are intended to assist all in the difficult task of balancing time and effort in doing their assigned jobs and keeping track of what others are doing in similar or related tasks. All of the aforementioned meetings have served their intended purpose and further regional and national meetings are sure to follow.

  11. Status and future directions of the ENERGY STAR program

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Richard E.; Webber, Carrie A.; Koomey, Jonathan G.

    2000-06-19

    In 1992 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) introduced ENERGY STAR (registered trademark), a voluntary labeling program designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, in order to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. Since then EPA, now in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has expanded the program to cover nearly the entire buildings sector, spanning new homes, commercial buildings, residential heating and cooling equipment, major appliances, office equipment, commercial and residential lighting, and home electronics. This paper provides a snapshot of the ENERGY STAR program in the year 2000, including a general overview of the program, its accomplishments, and the possibilities for future development. First, we describe the products that are currently eligible for the ENERGY STAR label and the program mechanisms that EPA and DOE are using to promote these products. Second, we illustrate selected milestones achieved in some markets, and ways that EPA and DOE are responding to challenges or changes in certain markets. Third, we discuss the evolving ENERGY STAR brand strategy. Next, we explore ways in which ENERGY STAR interacts with and enhances other policies, such as appliance standards and regional market transformation collaboratives. We then discuss evaluation studies that EPA and DOE are undertaking to quantify the impact of the ENERGY STAR program. Finally, we discuss future areas of expansion for the ENERGY STAR program, including labeling of new products and integrated programs for commercial and existing residential buildings.

  12. Energy efficiency in passenger transportation: What the future may hold

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, S.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation very briefly projects future impacts of energy efficiency in passenger transportation. Continuing expansion of the U.S. transportation sector, with a corresponding increased dependency on imported oil, is noted. Freight trucks and air fleets are targeted as having the greatest potential for increased energy efficiency. The light duty vehicle is identified as the only technology option for major efficiency increases. 4 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. The utilization of solar energy to help meet our nation's energy needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The nation's energy needs, domestic energy resources, and possible future energy resources are briefly discussed in this paper. Three potential solutions, coal, nuclear and solar are compared as to benefits and problems. The paper primarily discusses the options available in using solar energy as a natural energy resource. These options are discussed under the generation of electricity, heating and cooling of buildings, and the production of clean fuel.

  14. Innovating a Sustainable Energy Future (2011 EFRC Summit)

    ScienceCinema

    Little, Mark (GE Global Research)

    2016-07-12

    The second speaker in the 2011 EFRC Summit session titled "Leading Perspectives in Energy Research" was Mark Little, Senior Vice President and Director of GE Global Research. He discussed the role that industry and in particular GE is playing as a partner in innovative energy research. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  15. Innovating a Sustainable Energy Future (2011 EFRC Summit)

    SciTech Connect

    Little, Mark

    2011-05-25

    The second speaker in the 2011 EFRC Summit session titled "Leading Perspectives in Energy Research" was Mark Little, Senior Vice President and Director of GE Global Research. He discussed the role that industry and in particular GE is playing as a partner in innovative energy research. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  16. Inventing the future: Energy and the CO2 "greenhouse" effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, E. E., Jr.

    Dennis Gabor, A winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics, once remarked that man cannot predict the future, but he can invent it. The point is that while we do not know with certainty how things will turn out, our own actions can play a powerful role in shaping the future. Naturally, Gabor had in mind the power of science and technology, and the model includes that of correction or feedback. It is an important: Man does not have the gift of prophecy. Any manager or government planner would err seriously by masterminding a plan based unalterably on some vision of the future, without provision for mid-course correction. It is also a comforting thought. With man's notorious inability to create reliable predictions about such matters as elections, stock markets, energy supply and demand, and, of course, the weather, it is a great consolation to feel that we can still retain some control of the future.

  17. Energy technologies at Sandia National Laboratories: Past, Present, Future

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    We at Sandia first became involved with developing energy technology when the nation initiated its push toward energy independence in the early 1970s. That involvement continues to be strong. In shaping Sandia's energy programs for the 1990s, we will build on our track record from the 70s and 80s, a record outlined in this publication. It contains reprints of three issues of Sandia's Lab News that were devoted to our non-nuclear energy programs. Together, they summarize the history, current activities, and future of Sandia's diverse energy concerns; hence my desire to see them in one volume. Written in the fall of 1988, the articles cover Sandia's extremely broad range of energy technologies -- coal, oil and gas, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaics, wind, rechargeable batteries, and combustion.

  18. AVESTAR Center for clean energy plant operators of the future

    SciTech Connect

    Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    Clean energy plants in the modern grid era will increasingly exploit carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS), fuel/product flexibility, and load following. Integrated power/process plants will require next generation of well-trained engineering and operations professionals. High-fidelity dynamic simulators are well suited for training, education, and R&D on clean energy plant operations. Combining Operator Training System (OTS) with 3D virtual Immersive Training System (ITS) enables simultaneous training of control room and plant field operators of the future. Strong collaboration between industry, academia, and government is required to address advanced R&D challenges. AVESTAR Center brings together simulation technology and world-class expertise focused on accelerating development of clean energy plants and operators of the future.

  19. When and What Meteorological Stresses Will Maize Crops Meet in the future in France?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caubel, J.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change is expected to modify overall climatic conditions and therefore, suitability for cropping. Assessment of when and what meteorological stresses will crops meet in the future is highly useful for planners and land managers who can apply adaptation strategies to improve agricultural potentialities. We propose to evaluate the impacts of climate change on suitability for maize cropping in terms of ecophysiology (e.g., heat stress during grain filling), yield quality (e.g., thermal conditions on protein content) and cultural practices performance (e.g., days available for harvest according to risk of waterlogged soil compaction) in two French areas. The Midi-Pyrénées (southern) and Ile-de-France (northern) regions were chosen as representing the two distinct climates when dividing France into southern and northern parts. The Midi-Pyrénées region is a major irrigated maize producer but could become penalizing in the future because of heat and water stress. By contrast, northern France could become a more suitable area thanks to the expected increasing temperature. To confirm our assumptions, we used the method assessment for crop-climate suitability developed in Caubel et al. (2015) and based on the sub-annual analysis of agroclimatic indicators calculated over phenological periods. Indicators have been calculated using climatic data from 1950 to 2100 simulated by the global climate ARPEGE at the meso-scale SAFRAN (8 km resolution) for the two areas and forced by a greenhouse effect corresponding to the SRES A1B scenario (similar to RCP 6.0). The evaluation was done for two distinct varieties in terms of precocity. Agroclimatic indicators characterizing water deficit and water excess impacts on crop were calculated for three soils with contrasting soil water reserves and depths. Finally, the evaluation was performed with a unique sowing date (the current one), and with an optimized sowing date according to water and thermal requirements for emergence

  20. America's Energy Future: Technology and Transformation-Summary Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Committee On America's Energy Future,

    2009-12-31

    The National Academy of Sciences' America's Energy Future study began in 2007. The security and sustainability of the nation's energy system have been perennial concerns since World War II. The concerns have focused on energy-supply, especially a growing dependence on imported petroleum, and the environmental impact of fossil fuel combustion--particularly direct effects of pollutant emissions on human health, greenhouse gasses and the carbon dioxide impact on climate change. The United States needs to lower its dependence on fragile supply chains for some energy sources, particularly petroleum at present and possibly natural gas in the future, to avoid the impacts of dependence on the nation's economy and national security. The nation must fundamentally transform the ways in which it produces, distributes, and consumes useful energy. The size and complexity of the U.S. energy system with its reach into all aspects of American life, necessitates a transformation of tremendous undertaking to protect the nation's energy transmission and distribution systems with fundamental changes both structural and behavioral among producers and consumers alike. The challenge is great and cannot be met overnight. A meaningful and timely transformation to a more sustainable and secure energy system will likely entail a generation or more of sustained efforts by both the public and private sectors. Additionally, it is clear that the country’s economic, security, and environmental goals as pertains to energy consumption and sustainability cannot be achieved without collective international action. U.S. prosperity and security is tied to global prosperity and security. U.S. environmental goals depend on environmental protection actions taken globally. The full realization of goals of the United States for transforming its energy sector requires effectively working with other nations, many facing similar challenges. The key to U.S. success in protecting, sustaining, and achieving

  1. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Freight Transportation Modal Shares: Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future

    SciTech Connect

    Brogan, J. J.; Aeppli, A. E.; Beagan, D. F.; Brown, A.; Fischer, M. J.; Grenzeback, L. R.; McKenzie, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Vyas, A. D.; Witzke, E.

    2013-03-01

    Truck, rail, water, air, and pipeline modes each serve a distinct share of the freight transportation market. The current allocation of freight by mode is the product of technologic, economic, and regulatory frameworks, and a variety of factors -- price, speed, reliability, accessibility, visibility, security, and safety -- influence mode. Based on a comprehensive literature review, this report considers how analytical methods can be used to project future modal shares and offers insights on federal policy decisions with the potential to prompt shifts to energy-efficient, low-emission modes. There are substantial opportunities to reduce the energy used for freight transportation, but it will be difficult to shift large volumes from one mode to another without imposing considerable additional costs on businesses and consumers. This report explores federal government actions that could help trigger the shifts in modal shares needed to reduce energy consumption and emissions. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  2. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Freight Transportation Demand: Energy-Efficient Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future

    SciTech Connect

    Grenzeback, L. R.; Brown, A.; Fischer, M. J.; Hutson, N.; Lamm, C. R.; Pei, Y. L.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Vyas, A. D.; Winebrake, J. J.

    2013-03-01

    Freight transportation demand is projected to grow to 27.5 billion tons in 2040, and to nearly 30.2 billion tons in 2050. This report describes the current and future demand for freight transportation in terms of tons and ton-miles of commodities moved by truck, rail, water, pipeline, and air freight carriers. It outlines the economic, logistics, transportation, and policy and regulatory factors that shape freight demand, the trends and 2050 outlook for these factors, and their anticipated effect on freight demand. After describing federal policy actions that could influence future freight demand, the report then summarizes the capabilities of available analytical models for forecasting freight demand. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  3. Future for Offshore Wind Energy in the United States: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Musial, W.; Butterfield, S.

    2004-06-01

    Until recently, the offshore wind energy potential in the United States was ignored because vast onshore wind resources have the potential to fulfill the electrical energy needs for the entire country. However, the challenge of transmitting the electricity to the large load centers may limit wind grid penetration for land-based turbines. Offshore wind turbines can generate power much closer to higher value coastal load centers. Reduced transmission constraints, steadier and more energetic winds, and recent European success, have made offshore wind energy more attractive for the United States. However, U.S. waters are generally deeper than those on the European coast, and will require new technology. This paper presents an overview of U.S. coastal resources, explores promising deepwater wind technology, and predicts long-term cost-of-energy (COE) trends. COE estimates are based on generic 5-MW wind turbines in a hypothetical 500-MW wind power plant. Technology improvements and volume production are expected to lower costs to meet the U.S. Department of Energy target range of $0.06/kWh for deployment of deepwater offshore wind turbines by 2015, and $0.05/kWh by 2012 for shallow water. Offshore wind systems can diversify the U.S. electric energy supply and provide a new market for wind energy that is complementary to onshore development.

  4. Alternative futures for the Department of Energy National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This Task Force was asked to propose alternate futures for the Department of Energy laboratories noted in the report. The authors` intensive ten months` study revealed multiple missions and sub-missions--traditional missions and new missions--programs and projects--each with factors of merit. They respectively suggest that the essence of what the Department, and particularly the laboratories, should and do stand for: the energy agenda. Under the overarching energy agenda--the labs serving the energy opportunities--they comment on their national security role, the all important energy role, all related environmental roles, the science and engineering underpinning for all the above, a focused economic role, and conclude with governance/organization change recommendations.

  5. Status and Future Directions of the ENERGY STAR Program

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Richard; Webber, Carrie; Koomey, Jonathan

    2001-12-04

    In 1992 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) introduced ENERGY STAR (registered trademark) a voluntary labeling program designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, in order to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. Since then, the EPA, now in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has expanded the program to cover nearly the entire buildings sector, spanning new homes, commercial buildings, residential heating and cooling equipment, major appliances, office equipment, commercial and residential lighting, and home electronics. This paper is based on our experience since 1993 in providing technical support to the ENERGY STAR program. We provide a snapshot of the ENERGY STAR program in the year 2000, including a general overview of the program, its accomplishments, and the possibilities for future development.

  6. Opportunities and challenges for a sustainable energy future.

    PubMed

    Chu, Steven; Majumdar, Arun

    2012-08-16

    Access to clean, affordable and reliable energy has been a cornerstone of the world's increasing prosperity and economic growth since the beginning of the industrial revolution. Our use of energy in the twenty-first century must also be sustainable. Solar and water-based energy generation, and engineering of microbes to produce biofuels are a few examples of the alternatives. This Perspective puts these opportunities into a larger context by relating them to a number of aspects in the transportation and electricity generation sectors. It also provides a snapshot of the current energy landscape and discusses several research and development opportunities and pathways that could lead to a prosperous, sustainable and secure energy future for the world.

  7. 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting Summary Report: Denver, Colorado - August 9-11, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    This report provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Building America program's Summer 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting. This meeting was held on August 9-11, 2011, in Denver, Colorado, and brought together more than 290 professionals representing organizations with a vested interest in energy efficiency improvements in residential buildings.

  8. Operational Benefits of Meeting California's Energy Storage Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Eichman, Josh; Denholm, Paul; Jorgenson, Jennie; Helman, Udi

    2015-12-18

    In October 2013, the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) finalized procurement targets and other requirements to its jurisdictional utilities for a minimum of 1,325 MW of 'viable and cost-effective' energy storage systems by 2020. The goal of this study is to explore several aspects of grid operations in California and the Western Interconnection resulting from meeting the CPUC storage targets. We perform this analysis using a set of databases and grid simulation tools developed and implemented by the CPUC, the California Independent System Operator (CAISO), and the California Energy Commission (CEC) for the CPUC's Long-term Procurement Plan (LTPP). The 2014 version of this database contains information about generators, storage, transmission, and electrical demand, for California in the year 2024 for both 33% and 40% renewable energy portfolios. We examine the value of various services provided by energy storage in these scenarios. Sensitivities were performed relating to the services energy storage can provide, the capacity and duration of storage devices, export limitations, and negative price floor variations. Results show that a storage portfolio, as outlined by the CPUC, can reduce curtailment and system-wide production costs for 33% and 40% renewable scenarios. A storage device that can participate in energy and ancillary service markets provides the grid with the greatest benefit; the mandated storage requirement of 1,325 MW was estimated to reduce the total cost of production by about 78 million per year in the 33% scenario and 144 million per year in the 40% scenario. Much of this value is derived from the avoided start and stop costs of thermal generators and provision of ancillary services. A device on the 2024 California grid and participating in only ancillary service markets can provide the system with over 90% of the value as the energy and ancillary service device. The analysis points to the challenge of new storage providing regulation

  9. Energy landscapes’: Meeting energy demands and human aspirations

    PubMed Central

    Blaschke, Thomas; Biberacher, Markus; Gadocha, Sabine; Schardinger, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Renewable energy will play a crucial role in the future society of the 21st century. The various renewable energy sources need to be balanced and their use carefully planned since they are characterized by high temporal and spatial variability that will pose challenges to maintaining a well balanced supply and to the stability of the grid. This article examines the ways that futureenergy landscapes’ can be modelled in time and space. Biomass needs a great deal of space per unit of energy produced but it is an energy carrier that may be strategically useful in circumstances where other renewable energy carriers are likely to deliver less. A critical question considered in this article is whether a massive expansion in the use of biomass will allow us to construct future scenarios while repositioning the ‘energy landscape’ as an object of study. A second important issue is the utilization of heat from biomass energy plants. Biomass energy also has a larger spatial footprint than other carriers such as, for example, solar energy. This article seeks to provide a bridge between energy modelling and spatial planning while integrating research and techniques in energy modelling with Geographic Information Science. This encompasses GIS, remote sensing, spatial disaggregation techniques and geovisualization. Several case studies in Austria and Germany demonstrate a top-down methodology and some results while stepwise calculating potentials from theoretical to technically feasible potentials and setting the scene for the definition of economic potentials based on scenarios and assumptions. PMID:26109751

  10. The future of sleep technology: report from an American Association of Sleep Technologists summit meeting.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Rita; Trimble, Melinda

    2014-05-15

    The American Association of Sleep Technologists (AAST) Board of Directors hosted a Sleep Technology Summit on September 21, 2013 with the goals of identifying changes in the delivery of diagnostic and treatment services to sleep disorders patients, predicting the impact on sleep technologists, identifying new roles for sleep technologists, and determining appropriate education to prepare technologists for the future. A carefully chosen panel of speakers focused on the business skills necessary to provide care cost effectively and the clinical skills that will be essential for the technologist of the future to help care for patients with sleep disorders. A group of selected leaders, educators, and industry professionals reviewed the current state of affairs and examined opportunities to sustain the profession and define the role of the sleep technologist of the future. Facilitated group discussions of these critical topics followed each session. There was a clear consensus that regulatory and economic pressures are changing the way sleep disorders patients are diagnosed and treated. Private insurers are requiring pre-authorization for laboratory sleep studies and are incentivizing home sleep testing for most patients suspected of obstructive sleep apnea. Reimbursement for home testing will be lower than for laboratory testing, and further reductions in overall reimbursement are anticipated. These factors will almost certainly reduce the need for technologists to perform laboratory diagnostic studies and pressure sleep centers to reduce payrolls. Remaining laboratory patients will have more complicated sleep disorders, have more comorbidity, and require a higher level of care than most of the patients currently tested in sleep centers. Testing these patients will require technologists with a higher level of training, experience, and sophistication. A second area of consensus was that the focus in medicine is changing from diagnosis to outcomes. New models of

  11. Wind Plant Cost of Energy: Past and Future (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M.

    2013-03-01

    This presentation examines trends in wind plant cost of energy over the last several decades and discusses methods and examples of projections for future cost trends. First, the presentation explores cost trends for wind energy from the 1980s, where there had been an overall downward trend in wind plant energy costs. Underlying factors that influenced these trends, including turbine technology innovation for lower wind speed sites, are explored. Next, the presentation looks at projections for the future development of wind energy costs and discusses a variety of methods for establishing these projections including the use of learning curves, qualitative assessment using expert elicitation, and engineering-based analysis. A comparison of the methods is provided to explore their relative merits. Finally, a brief introduction is provided for the U.S. Department of Energy program-wide shift towards an integrative use of qualitative and quantitative methods for assessing the potential impacts of wind plant technology innovations on reducing the wind plant cost of energy.

  12. 75 FR 34202 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Subcommittee on Financing; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... on Financing; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Department of Transportation, Office of the Secretary of... Transportation, announces a meeting of the FAAC Financing Subcommittee, which will be held at the offices of the... of the global economy. The Financing Subcommittee will address the need for a stable, secure,...

  13. 75 FR 47344 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Subcommittee on Financing; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... on Financing; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Department of Transportation, Office of the Secretary of... Transportation, announces a meeting of the FAAC Subcommittee on Financing, which will be held at the offices of..., challenges, and opportunities of the global economy. The Subcommittee on Financing will address the need...

  14. 75 FR 66184 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Subcommittee on Financing; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... on Financing; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the Secretary of Transportation, U.S. Department of... Transportation, announces a meeting of the FAAC Subcommittee on Financing, which will be held at the offices of..., challenges, and ] opportunities of the global economy. The Subcommittee on Financing will address the...

  15. 75 FR 60491 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Subcommittee on Financing; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... on Financing; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Department of Transportation, Office of the Secretary of... Transportation, announces a meeting of the FAAC Subcommittee on Financing, which will be held in the New Press... Financing will address the need for a stable, secure, and sufficient level of funding for our...

  16. Search for a bridge to the energy future: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Saluja, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    The alarming effects, concerns, and even the insights into long-range energy planning that grew out of the OPEC oil embargo of 1973 are fading from the view of a shortsighted public. The enthusiastic initiatives taken in many countries for the development of alternative energy sources have withered due to lack of economic and/or ideological incentive. The events since December 1985, when the members of OPEC decided to increase production in an effort to capture their share of market, have brought down the prices of a barrel of crude to less than US $11 and have made any rational analysis very complex. This has made even the proponents of the alternative energy sources pause and think. The US has, as usual, oscillated from panic to complacency. The Libyan crisis, however, has brought the dangers of complacency into sharp focus. The first commercial coal gasification plant, constructed with a capital investment of over US $2 billion, was abandoned by the owners and is being operated by the US Department of Energy temporarily. In their effort to find a private owner, the US Department of Energy has set the date of auction of this prestigious plant for May 28, 1986. And if an appropriate bid is not forthcoming, the plant faces a very uncertain future. Coal, considered by the World Coal Study (WOCOL) at MIT in 1980, to be a bridge to a global energy future, seems to have lost its luster due to the oil glut which we all know is temporary. This was evident when the bill to grant the Right of Eminent Domain for transportation of coal was defeated. This conference was organized to bring together experts in different areas from various countries to discuss the state of the art and the rate of progress in different alternative energy forms. The recent accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in USSR has brought home the need of diversification of the alternative energy sources.

  17. Energy for a sustainable future. Summary report and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-04-15

    This year, in September, world leaders will meet at the United Nations to assess progress on the Millennium Development Goals and to chart a course of action for the period leading up to the agreed MDG deadline of 2015. Later in the year, government delegations will gather in Mexico to continue the process of working towards a comprehensive, robust and ambitious climate change agreement. Energy lies at the heart of both of these efforts. The decisions we take today on how we produce, consume and distribute energy will profoundly influence our ability to eradicate poverty and respond effectively to climate change. Addressing these challenges is beyond the reach of governments alone. It will take the active engagement of all sectors of society: the private sector; local communities and civil society; international organizations and the world of academia and research. To that end, in 2009 a high-level Advisory Group on Energy and Climate Change was established, chaired by Kandeh Yumkella, Director-General of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO). Comprising representatives from business, the United Nations system and research institutions, its mandate was to provide recommendations on energy issues in the context of climate change and sustainable development. The Group also examined the role the United Nations system could play in achieving internationally-agreed climate goals. The Advisory Group has identified two priorities - improving energy access and strengthening energy efficiency - as key areas for enhanced effort and international cooperation. Expanding access to affordable, clean energy is critical for realizing the MDGs and enabling sustainable development across much of the globe. Improving energy efficiency is paramount if we are to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It can also support market competitiveness and green innovation. (LN)

  18. 75 FR 37752 - Measuring Progress on Food Safety: Current Status and Future Directions; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ..., in Washington, DC (75 FR 9232). The public meetings announced in this notice are extensions of that... stakeholders' understanding and perceptions of metrics currently being used by the Federal Agencies....

  19. Future World Energy Constraints and the Direction for Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lightfoot, H.D.

    2004-09-12

    This paper was originally written in response to the concern that rising levels of CO2 in the atmosphere caused by burning of fossil fuels will ultimately contribute to global warming. Now we are beginning to see evidence of coming problems in the supply of fuels for transportation. This paper describes the benefits of adequate energy supply and the problems of future energy supply. Partial solutions are suggested for immediate application as well as longer term solutions to address both of these concerns. To evaluate the situation and solutions we must understand: (1) how much primary energy is currently used world-wide and might be needed in 2100, (2) how important energy is to the welfare of people, (3) the forms of energy sources and end uses and (4) where new sources may come from. The major portion of world primary energy demand is provided by fossil fuels. This portion dropped from 93% in 1970 to 85% in 1995, mainly because of the increased use of nuclear energy. How ever, since the mid-1990s fossil fuels have maintained their 85% share of world energy supply. The importance of the relationship between per capita energy consumption and per capita income for the world is discussed. The limits of conservation, energy efficiency and renewable energies are examined. The contribution of renewable energies is compared to 41 different views of world energy demand in 2100. Without new technology for large scale storage of intermittent electricity from wind and solar the contribution of renewable energies is not likely to grow significantly beyond the current level of 7-8%. The paper offers conclusions and partial solutions that we can work on immediately. Examination of the forms of energy supplied by the sun, which is powered by nuclear fusion, and the way in which nuclear fission currently supplies energy to the world sets the research framework for longer term solutions. This framework points towards two possible longer term complementary res earch projects which

  20. Innovative Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site to Meet Its Low-Level Waste Generators' Future Disposal Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Di Sanza, E.F.; Carilli, J.T.

    2006-07-01

    Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) streams which have a clear, defined pathway to disposal are becoming less common as U.S. Department of Energy accelerated cleanup sites enters their closure phase. These commonly disposed LLW waste streams are rapidly being disposed and the LLW inventory awaiting disposal is dwindling. However, more complex waste streams that have no path for disposal are now requiring attention. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NSO) Environmental Management Program is charged with the responsibility of carrying out the disposal of onsite and off-site defense-generated and research-related LLW at the Nevada. Test Site (NTS). The NSO and its generator community are constantly pursuing new LLW disposal techniques while meeting the core mission of safe and cost-effective disposal that protects the worker, the public and the environment. From trenches to present-day super-cells, the NTS disposal techniques must change to meet the LLW generator's disposal needs. One of the many ways the NTS is addressing complex waste streams is by designing waste specific pits and trenches. This ensures unusual waste streams with high-activity or large packaging have a disposal path. Another option the NTS offers is disposal of classified low-level radioactive-contaminated material. In order to perform this function, the NTS has a safety plan in place as well as a secure facility. By doing this, the NTS can accept DOE generated classified low-level radioactive-contaminated material that would be equivalent to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Class B, C, and Greater than Class C waste. In fiscal year 2006, the NTS will be the only federal disposal facility that will be able to dispose mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) streams. This is an activity that is highly anticipated by waste generators. In order for the NTS to accept MLLW, generators will have to meet the stringent requirements of the NTS

  1. Crystal Ball: On the Future High Energy Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-09-20

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium- and far-future of the accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance reach and cost range. We briefly review such post-LHC options as linear e+e- colliders in Japan (ILC) or at CERN (CLIC), muon collider, and circular lepton or hadron colliders in China (CepC/SppC) and Europe (FCC). We conclude with a look into ultimate energy reach accelerators based on plasmas and crystals, and some perspectives for the far future of accelerator-based particle physics.

  2. Our U.S. Energy Future, Student Guide. Computer Technology Program Environmental Education Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    This is the student guide in a set of five computer-oriented environmental/energy education units. Contents are organized into the following parts or lessons: (1) Introduction to the U.S. Energy Future; (2) Description of the "FUTURE" programs; (3) Effects of "FUTURE" decisions; and (4) Exercises on the U.S. energy future. This guide supplements a…

  3. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Tillemann, Levi; Beck, Fredric; Brodrick, James; Brown, Austin; Feldman, David; Nguyen, Tien; Ward, Jacob

    2013-09-17

    For decades, America has anticipated the transformational impact of clean energy technologies. But even as costs fell and technology matured, a clean energy revolution always seemed just out of reach. Critics often said a clean energy future would "always be five years away." This report focuses on four technology revolutions that are here today. In the last five years they have achieved dramatic reductions in cost and this has been accompanied by a surge in consumer, industrial and commercial deployment. Although these four technologies still represent a small percentage of their total market, they are growing rapidly. The four key technologies this report focuses on are: onshore wind power, polysilicon photovoltaic modules, LED lighting, and electric vehicles.

  4. The GLIMPSE project: Exploring strategies for meeting energy, environmental and climate objectives

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many of Chinas cities are struggling with high levels of air pollution. At the same time, Chinese planners are seeking to meet growing demands for energy in a manner that meets climate goals. In this presentation, Dr. Loughlin describes the linkages between energy, the environmen...

  5. 78 FR 13156 - Notice of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... Surface Transportation Board Notice of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, Transportation. ACTION: Notice of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory... communications about this meeting may be announced through the Board's Web site at WWW.STB.DOT.GOV. This...

  6. 77 FR 43280 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Meeting With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... Management Act and the Federal Power Act), on the Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project. e. All... Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Meeting With the Bureau of Land Management a. Date and Time of Meeting: Wednesday, August...

  7. Expert elicitation survey on future wind energy costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiser, Ryan; Jenni, Karen; Seel, Joachim; Baker, Erin; Hand, Maureen; Lantz, Eric; Smith, Aaron

    2016-10-01

    Wind energy supply has grown rapidly over the last decade. However, the long-term contribution of wind to future energy supply, and the degree to which policy support is necessary to motivate higher levels of deployment, depends—in part—on the future costs of both onshore and offshore wind. Here, we summarize the results of an expert elicitation survey of 163 of the world’s foremost wind experts, aimed at better understanding future costs and technology advancement possibilities. Results suggest significant opportunities for cost reductions, but also underlying uncertainties. Under the median scenario, experts anticipate 24–30% reductions by 2030 and 35–41% reductions by 2050 across the three wind applications studied. Costs could be even lower: experts predict a 10% chance that reductions will be more than 40% by 2030 and more than 50% by 2050. Insights gained through expert elicitation complement other tools for evaluating cost-reduction potential, and help inform policy and planning, R&D and industry strategy.

  8. 76 FR 56678 - Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Public Meeting and Availability of the Framework...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies, EE-2J, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC... Edwards, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building... Part 430 RIN 1904-AC43 Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Public Meeting and...

  9. Micro-CHP Technologies Roadmap: Meeting 21st Century Residential Energy Needs

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2003-12-01

    On June 11-12, 2003, at Greenbelt, Maryland, key stakeholders from industry, government agencies, universities, and others involved in combined heat and power and the residential buildings industry explores solutions to technical, institutional, and market barriers facing micro-combined heat and power systems (mCHP). Participants outlined a desired future for mCHP systems, identified specific interim technology cost and performance targets, and developed actions to achieve the interim targets and vision. This document, The Micro-CHP Technologies Roadmap, is a result of their deliberations. It outlines a set of actions that can be pursued by both the government and industry to develop mCHP appliances for creating a new approach for households to meet their energy needs.

  10. Consultative meeting considers past successes and future programmes for subregional network.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    This article presents the proceedings of the consultative meeting held in Beijing during October 18-19, 1999. Representatives from the population information (POPIN) centers in China, Indonesia, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam participated in the meeting. The major objectives were to exchange and share experiences among the network members and to draw up a cooperative work plan for carrying out information activities more effectively in the coming year and beyond. Highlights of the meeting include the presentation of the results of an Asia-Pacific POPIN survey, which evaluated information technology (IT) capabilities among members and evaluation of the 1999 IT-focused training workshop; a review of POPIN activities conducted by the subregional network's members in the past year; and a discussion of major topics for cooperative activities. Moreover, a work plan was formulated for the East and South-East Asia POPIN subregional network for October 1999-October 2000. PMID:12349810

  11. Nuclear Energy - Hydrogen Production - Fuel Cell: A Road Towards Future China's Sustainable Energy Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhiwei Zhou

    2006-07-01

    Sustainable development of Chinese economy in 21. century will mainly rely on self-supply of clean energy with indigenous natural resources. The burden of current coal-dominant energy mix and the environmental stress due to energy consumptions has led nuclear power to be an indispensable choice for further expanding electricity generation capacity in China and for reducing greenhouse effect gases emission. The application of nuclear energy in producing substitutive fuels for road transportation vehicles will also be of importance in future China's sustainable energy strategy. This paper illustrates the current status of China's energy supply and the energy demand required for establishing a harmonic and prosperous society in China. In fact China's energy market faces following three major challenges, namely (1) gaps between energy supply and demand; (2) low efficiency in energy utilization, and (3) severe environmental pollution. This study emphasizes that China should implement sustainable energy development policy and pay great attention to the construction of energy saving recycle economy. Based on current forecast, the nuclear energy development in China will encounter a high-speed track. The demand for crude oil will reach 400-450 million tons in 2020 in which Chinese indigenous production will remain 180 million tons. The increase of the expected crude oil will be about 150 million tons on the basis of 117 million tons of imported oil in 2004 with the time span of 15 years. This demand increase of crude oil certainly will influence China's energy supply security and to find the substitution will be a big challenge to Chinese energy industry. This study illustrates an analysis of the market demands to future hydrogen economy of China. Based on current status of technology development of HTGR in China, this study describes a road of hydrogen production with nuclear energy. The possible technology choices in relation to a number of types of nuclear reactors are

  12. A future very-high-energy view of our Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; Hinton, J. A.; Hermann, G.; Digel, S.

    2008-12-24

    The survey of the inner Galaxy with H.E.S.S. [1, 2] was remarkably successful in detecting a wide range of new very-high-energy gamma-ray sources. New TeV gamma-ray emitting source classes were established, although several of the sources remain unidentified, and progress has been made in understanding particle acceleration in astrophysical sources. In this work, we constructed a model of a population of such very-high-energy gamma-ray emitters and normalised the flux and size distribution of this population model to the H.E.S.S.-discovered sources. Extrapolating that population of objects to lower flux levels we investigate what a future array of imaging atmospheric telescopes (IACTs) such as AGIS or CTA might detect in a survey of the Inner Galaxy with an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity. The sheer number of sources detected together with the improved resolving power will likely result in a huge improvement in our understanding of the populations of galactic gamma-ray sources. A deep survey of the inner Milky Way would also support studies of the interstellar diffuse gamma-ray emission in regions of high cosmic-ray density. In the final section of this paper we investigate the science potential for the Galactic Centre region for studying energy-dependent diffusion with such a future array.

  13. Probing dark energy dynamics from current and future cosmological observations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Gongbo; Zhang Xinmin

    2010-02-15

    We report the constraints on the dark energy equation-of-state w(z) using the latest 'Constitution' SNe sample combined with the WMAP5 and Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. Assuming a flat Universe, and utilizing the localized principal component analysis and the model selection criteria, we find that the {Lambda}CDM model is generally consistent with the current data, yet there exists a weak hint of the possible dynamics of dark energy. In particular, a model predicting w(z)<-1 at z is an element of [0.25,0.5) and w(z)>-1 at z is an element of [0.5,0.75), which means that w(z) crosses -1 in the range of z is an element of [0.25,0.75), is mildly favored at 95% confidence level. Given the best fit model for current data as a fiducial model, we make future forecast from the joint data sets of Joint Dark Energy Mission, Planck, and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, and we find that the future surveys can reduce the error bars on the w bins by roughly a factor of 10 for a 5-w-bin model.

  14. 78 FR 60366 - Meeting of the Regional Energy Resource Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... 23, 2013, from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. c.d.t. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Tennessee Valley....C. App. 2. The meeting agenda includes the following: 1. Introductions. 2. Presentation(s) and... the Integrated Resource Plan process. ] 3. Public Comments. 4. Council Discussion. The RERC will...

  15. New energy saving system for future LNG carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Kahara, Susumu; Suetake, Yoshihiro; Ishimaru, Junshiro; Hiraoka, Kazuyoshi

    1994-12-31

    Steam turbine plant, which burns BOG (Boil-Off Gas) as fuel, has bene installed for LNG carriers with the necessity of disposing BOG safely. Are other plants unpractical for LNG carriers? To answer to this question, this paper evaluates (1) dual fuel diesel, (2) diesel with reliquefaction plant, (3) diesel with auxiliary boiler and power assist motor, (4) gas turbine/steam turbine and (5) steam turbine with CRP (Contra Rotating Propeller) from several aspects, such as safety and reliability, maintainability and operability, economy and effect on environment. Based on the above studies, this paper proposes Steam turbine with CRP plant as a new energy saving system for future LNG carriers.

  16. Innovative thermal energy harvesting for future autonomous applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfray, Stephane

    2013-12-01

    As communicating autonomous systems market is booming, the role of energy harvesting will be a key enabler. As example, heat is one of the most abundant energy sources that can be converted into electricity in order to power circuits. Harvesting systems that use wasted heat open new ways to power autonomous sensors when the energy consumption is low, or to create systems of power generators when the conversion efficiency is high. The combination of different technologies (low power μ-processors, μ-batteries, radio, sensors...) with new energy harvesters compatible with large varieties of use-cases with allow to address this booming market. Thanks to the conjunction of ultra-low power electronic development, 3D technologies & Systems in Package approaches, the integration of autonomous sensors and electronics with ambient energy harvesting will be achievable. The applications are very wide, from environment and industrial sensors to medical portable applications, and the Internet of things may also represent in the future a several billions units market.

  17. Future US energy supply: constraints by nonfuel mineral resources

    SciTech Connect

    Goeller, H.E.

    1980-12-01

    A continuing supply of energy for the domestic scene is of vital concern to our nation and is determined to a significant extent by the availability of sufficient nonfuel resources used in the production and utilization of various forms of energy. This report, taking a very comprehensive view, first establishes the current energy-related requirements for the various elements and mineral products. It then assesses domestic and world reserves and resources for each nonrenewable resource and determines a ranking of impending domestic scarcities by using resource-to-demand ratios. Special problems on by-products production are noted, followed by a discussion on import dependency. The roles of recycle and substitution are then assessed, and the possibilities for synthesis of nonelement commodities are reviewed. Detailed requirements for the more widely used materials in a large number of energy supply systems are then provided, followed by newer future requirements for more advanced energy systems anticipated to be in widespread use in the next century. Finally, the various problems associated with 16 elements deemed most likely to become scarce within the next 50 years are resummarized, and the general conclusions of this study are provided.

  18. Future Physics Opportunities in Beam Energy Scan at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Nu

    2015-10-01

    In the first phase of the beam energy scan program (BES-I) at RHIC, we have collected data from Au +Au collisions at the center of mass energy range from 7.7 GeV to 39 GeV, corresponding to the baryonic chemical potential of 420 MeV to 120 MeV, respectively. We have observed the disappearance of the suppression of leading hadrons at large pT, break down of the quark scaling in the identified particle elliptic flow, the net-proton directed flow slope dv1/dy shows a minimum with negative sign, and a non-monotonical behavior of the net-proton correlation function (the fourth order) at the energy less than 20 GeV. All of these observations indicate that the property of the medium at high baryon density is dramatically different from that created at the RHIC top energy where the baryon density is small and partonic interactions are dominant. In this talk I will first review what we have learned in RHIC BES-I. Then I will discuss the opportunities in the future bean energy scan program in order to address key questions regarding the QCD phase structure including the illusive critical point. I will stress that adequate detector upgrades, focused at the large baryon density region, are essential for the physics program.

  19. 75 FR 26317 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC); Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... Building Atrium located across the street from the Navy Yard (Green Line) Metro station. Public Access: The...'', ``Environment'', ``workforce'', ``Competition'', and/or ``General comment''. Comments for the May 25 meeting... recommend use of public transportation. The Navy Yard metro stop on the Green Line (at M Street and...

  20. Back to the Future: The Practicality of Using Microsoft NetMeeting for Effective Distance Tutoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legutko, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The idea for attempting a distance tutoring project between university tutors and elementary school students using Microsoft NetMeeting was conceived: (a) to provide a new experience mentoring children for university students pursuing a teaching certificate, (b) for university students to utilize technology in pedagogy, (c) as an…

  1. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Fridley, David; Lin, Jiang; Price,Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Sathaye, Jayant; Levine, Mark

    2007-10-04

    This report provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis ofenergy consumption in China. It recalibrates official Chinese governmentstatistics by reallocating primary energy into categories more commonlyused in international comparisons. It also provides an analysis of trendsin sectoral energy consumption over the past decades. Finally, itassesses the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020,based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity,availability of energy services, and energy intensities. The followingare some highlights of the study's findings: * A reallocation of sectorenergy consumption from the 2000 official Chinese government statisticsfinds that: * Buildings account for 25 percent of primary energy, insteadof 19 percent * Industry accounts for 61 percent of energy instead of 69percent * Industrial energy made a large and unexpected leap between2000-2005, growing by an astonishing 50 percent in the 3 years between2002 and 2005. * Energy consumption in the iron and steel industry was 40percent higher than predicted * Energy consumption in the cement industrywas 54 percent higher than predicted * Overall energy intensity in theindustrial sector grew between 2000 and 2003. This is largely due tointernal shifts towards the most energy-intensive sub-sectors, an effectwhich more than counterbalances the impact of efficiency increases. *Industry accounted for 63 percent of total primary energy consumption in2005 - it is expected to continue to dominate energy consumption through2020, dropping only to 60 percent by that year. * Even assuming thatgrowth rates in 2005-2020 will return to the levels of 2000-2003,industrial energy will grow from 42 EJ in 2005 to 72 EJ in 2020. * Thepercentage of transport energy used to carry passengers (instead offreight) will double from 37 percent to 52 percent between 2000 to 2020,.Much of this increase is due to private car ownership, which willincrease by a factor of 15 from 5.1 million in 2000 to 77

  2. The future of seawater desalination: energy, technology, and the environment.

    PubMed

    Elimelech, Menachem; Phillip, William A

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, numerous large-scale seawater desalination plants have been built in water-stressed countries to augment available water resources, and construction of new desalination plants is expected to increase in the near future. Despite major advancements in desalination technologies, seawater desalination is still more energy intensive compared to conventional technologies for the treatment of fresh water. There are also concerns about the potential environmental impacts of large-scale seawater desalination plants. Here, we review the possible reductions in energy demand by state-of-the-art seawater desalination technologies, the potential role of advanced materials and innovative technologies in improving performance, and the sustainability of desalination as a technological solution to global water shortages.

  3. Meeting the Demand for Future Dental School Faculty: Trends, Challenges, and Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haden, N. Karl; Weaver, Richard G.; Valachovic, Richard W.

    2002-01-01

    Presents data from the American Dental Education Association's 2001-02 survey of vacant budgeted faculty positions and examines challenges likely to exacerbate faculty shortages in the immediate future. (EV)

  4. Hydrogen: Its Future Role in the Nation's Energy Economy.

    PubMed

    Winsche, W E; Hoffman, K C; Salzano, F J

    1973-06-29

    In examining the potential role of hydrogen in the energy economy of the future, we take an optimistic view. All the technology required for implementation is feasible but a great deal of development and refinement is necessary. A pessimistic approach would obviously discourage further thinking about an important and perhaps the most reasonable alternative for the future. We have considered a limited number of alternative energy systems involving hydrogen and have shown that hydrogen could be a viable secondary source of energy derived from nuclear power; for the immediate future, hydrogen could be derived from coal. A hydrogen supply system could have greater flexibility and be competitive with a more conventional all-electric delivery system. Technological improvements could make hydrogen as an energy source an economic reality. The systems examined in this article show how hydrogen can serve as a general-purpose fuel for residential and automotive applications. Aside from being a source of heat and motive power, hydrogen could also supply the electrical needs of the household via fuel cells (19), turbines, or conventional "total energy systems." The total cost of energy to a residence supplied with hydrogen fuel depends on the ratio of the requirements for direct fuel use to the requirements for electrical use. A greater direct use of hydrogen as a fuel without conversion to electricity reduces the overall cost of energy supplied to the household because of the greater expense of electrical transmission and distribution. Hydrogen fuel is especially attractive for use in domestic residential applications where the bulk of the energy requirement is for thermal energy. Although a considerable amount of research is required before any hydrogen energy delivery system can be implemented, the necessary developments are within the capability of present-day technology and the system could be made attractive economically .Techniques for producing hydrogen from water by

  5. Hydrogen: Its Future Role in the Nation's Energy Economy.

    PubMed

    Winsche, W E; Hoffman, K C; Salzano, F J

    1973-06-29

    In examining the potential role of hydrogen in the energy economy of the future, we take an optimistic view. All the technology required for implementation is feasible but a great deal of development and refinement is necessary. A pessimistic approach would obviously discourage further thinking about an important and perhaps the most reasonable alternative for the future. We have considered a limited number of alternative energy systems involving hydrogen and have shown that hydrogen could be a viable secondary source of energy derived from nuclear power; for the immediate future, hydrogen could be derived from coal. A hydrogen supply system could have greater flexibility and be competitive with a more conventional all-electric delivery system. Technological improvements could make hydrogen as an energy source an economic reality. The systems examined in this article show how hydrogen can serve as a general-purpose fuel for residential and automotive applications. Aside from being a source of heat and motive power, hydrogen could also supply the electrical needs of the household via fuel cells (19), turbines, or conventional "total energy systems." The total cost of energy to a residence supplied with hydrogen fuel depends on the ratio of the requirements for direct fuel use to the requirements for electrical use. A greater direct use of hydrogen as a fuel without conversion to electricity reduces the overall cost of energy supplied to the household because of the greater expense of electrical transmission and distribution. Hydrogen fuel is especially attractive for use in domestic residential applications where the bulk of the energy requirement is for thermal energy. Although a considerable amount of research is required before any hydrogen energy delivery system can be implemented, the necessary developments are within the capability of present-day technology and the system could be made attractive economically .Techniques for producing hydrogen from water by

  6. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, A. D.; Patel, D. M.; Bertram, K. M.

    2013-03-01

    Considerable research has focused on energy efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future energy efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement potential to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  7. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, A. D.; Patel, D. M.; Bertram, K. M.

    2013-02-01

    Considerable research has focused on energy efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future energy efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement potential to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  8. The leader's challenge: meetings, spiritual energy, and sneaker ratio.

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, Karlene

    2004-01-01

    Leaders who inspire are affirming to everyone in the meeting. They create the environment that meets the needs of the people first, not the leaders. People yearn to be heard, and to be engaged with their soul in genuine dialogue and engagement. If that doesn't happen in the meeting, then they search for meaning and support of their soul elsewhere and sneaker time increases. Leaders get from people what they give to them. If people in a meeting are given nothing, they in turn have nothing to give. If they truly feel they are served by the leader, they will give back much more than they receive. As Martin Luther King, Jr. so aptly said: "Everyone can be great because everyone can serve.

  9. 76 FR 34071 - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board, Natural Gas Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... dependence, save consumers money, and to make our country the leader in clean energy industries. Purpose of... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Secretary of Energy Advisory Board, Natural Gas Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: Department of Energy,...

  10. Building a sustainable clinical academic workforce to meet the future healthcare needs of Australia and New Zealand: report from the first summit meeting.

    PubMed

    Windsor, J; Searle, J; Hanney, R; Chapman, A; Grigg, M; Choong, P; Mackay, A; Smithers, B M; Churchill, J A; Carney, S; Smith, J A; Wainer, Z; Talley, N J; Gladman, M A

    2015-09-01

    The delivery of healthcare that meets the requirements for quality, safety and cost-effectiveness relies on a well-trained medical workforce, including clinical academics whose career includes a specific commitment to research, education and/or leadership. In 2011, the Medical Deans of Australia and New Zealand published a review on the clinical academic workforce and recommended the development of an integrated training pathway for clinical academics. A bi-national Summit on Clinical Academic Training was recently convened to bring together all relevant stakeholders to determine how best to do this. An important part understood the lessons learnt from the UK experience after 10 years since the introduction of an integrated training pathway. The outcome of the summit was to endorse strongly the recommendations of the medical deans. A steering committee has been established to identify further stakeholders, solicit more information from stakeholder organisations, convene a follow-up summit meeting in late 2015, recruit pilot host institutions and engage the government and future funders.

  11. Building a sustainable clinical academic workforce to meet the future healthcare needs of Australia and New Zealand: report from the first summit meeting.

    PubMed

    Windsor, J; Searle, J; Hanney, R; Chapman, A; Grigg, M; Choong, P; Mackay, A; Smithers, B M; Churchill, J A; Carney, S; Smith, J A; Wainer, Z; Talley, N J; Gladman, M A

    2015-09-01

    The delivery of healthcare that meets the requirements for quality, safety and cost-effectiveness relies on a well-trained medical workforce, including clinical academics whose career includes a specific commitment to research, education and/or leadership. In 2011, the Medical Deans of Australia and New Zealand published a review on the clinical academic workforce and recommended the development of an integrated training pathway for clinical academics. A bi-national Summit on Clinical Academic Training was recently convened to bring together all relevant stakeholders to determine how best to do this. An important part understood the lessons learnt from the UK experience after 10 years since the introduction of an integrated training pathway. The outcome of the summit was to endorse strongly the recommendations of the medical deans. A steering committee has been established to identify further stakeholders, solicit more information from stakeholder organisations, convene a follow-up summit meeting in late 2015, recruit pilot host institutions and engage the government and future funders. PMID:26332622

  12. Applications of Genome-based Science in Shaping Citrus Industries of the World (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting, 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Gmitter Jr, Fred

    2012-03-21

    Fred Gmitter from the University of Florida on "Applications of Genome-based Science in Shaping the Future of the World's Citrus Industries" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  13. Applications of Genome-based Science in Shaping Citrus Industries of the World (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting, 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema

    Gmitter Jr, Fred [University of Florida

    2016-07-12

    Fred Gmitter from the University of Florida on "Applications of Genome-based Science in Shaping the Future of the World's Citrus Industries" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  14. Evaluating Programs That Promote Climate and Energy Education-Meeting Teacher Needs for Online Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynds, S. E.; Buhr, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) Pathway, is a National Science Digital Library (NSDL) Pathways project that was begun in 2010. The main goal of CLEAN is to generate a reviewed collection of educational resources that are aligned with the Essential Principles of Climate Science (EPCS). Another goal of the project is to support a community that will assist students, teachers, and citizens in climate literacy. A complementary program begun in 2010 is the ICEE (Inspiring Climate Education Excellence) program, which is developing online modules and courses designed around the climate literacy principles for use by teachers and other interested citizens. In these projects, we learn about teacher needs through a variety of evaluation mechanisms. The programs use evaluation to assist in the process of providing easy access to high quality climate and energy learning resources that meet classroom requirements. The internal evaluation of the CLEAN program is multidimensional. At the CLEAN resource review camps, teachers and scientists work together in small groups to assess the value of online resources for use in the classroom. The review camps are evaluated using observation and feedback surveys; the resulting evaluation reports provide information to managers to fine-tune future camps. In this way, a model for effective climate resource development meetings has been refined. Evaluation methods used in ICEE and CLEAN include teacher needs assessment surveys, teacher feedback at professional development opportunities, scientist feedback at resource review workshops, and regular analysis of online usage of resources, forums, and education modules. This paper will review the most successful strategies for evaluating the effectiveness of online climate and energy education resources and their use by educators and the general public.

  15. Finished Prokaryotic Genome Assemblies from a Low-cost Combination of Short and Long Reads (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Yin, Shuangye (Broad Institute)

    2016-07-12

    Shuangye Yin on "Finished prokaryotic genome assemblies from a low-cost combination of short and long reads" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  16. Finished Prokaryotic Genome Assemblies from a Low-cost Combination of Short and Long Reads (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Shuangye

    2012-06-01

    Shuangye Yin on "Finished prokaryotic genome assemblies from a low-cost combination of short and long reads" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  17. Onshore wind energy potential over Iberia: present and future projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochinha, Carlos A.; Santos, João A.; Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2014-05-01

    Onshore grid-connected wind power generation has been explored for more than three decades in the Iberian Peninsula. Further, increasing attention has been devoted to renewable energy sources in a climate change context. While advantages of wind energy are widely recognized, its distribution is not spatially homogeneous and not uniform throughout the year. Hence, understanding these spatial-temporal distributions is critical in power system planning. The present study aims at assessing the potential power output estimated from 10 m wind components simulated by a regional climate model (CCLM), driven by ERA40 reanalysis. Datasets are available on a grid with a high spatial resolution (approximately 20 km) and over a 40-yr period (1961-2000). Furthermore, several target sites, located in areas with high installed wind generation capacity, are selected for local-to-regional scale assessments. The results show that potential wind power is higher over northern Iberia, mostly in Cantabria and Galicia, while Andalucía and Cataluña record the lowest values. With respect to the intra-annual variability, summer is by far the season with the lowest potential energy outputs. Furthermore, the inter-annual variability reveals an overall downward long-term trend over the 40-yr period, particularly in the winter time series. A CCLM transient experiment, forced by the SRES A1B emission scenario, is also discussed for a future period (2041-2070), after a model validation/calibration process (bias corrections). Significant changes in the wind power potential are projected for the future throughout Iberia, but their magnitude largely depends on the locations. This work was partially supported by FEDER (Fundo Europeu de Desenvolvimento Regional) funds through the COMPETE (Programa Operacional Factores de Competitividade) and by national funds through FCT (Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, Portugal) under project STORMEx FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER- 019524 (PTDC/AAC-CLI/121339/2010).

  18. High-energy photoelectron diffraction: model calculations and future possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, Aimo; Fadley, Charles S.; Garcia de Abajo, F. Javier

    2008-11-01

    We discuss the theoretical modeling of x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) with hard x-ray excitation at up to 20 keV, using the dynamical theory of electron diffraction to illustrate the characteristic aspects of the diffraction patterns resulting from such localized emission sources in a multilayer crystal. We show via dynamical calculations for diamond, Si and Fe that the dynamical theory predicts well the available current data for lower energies around 1 keV, and that the patterns for energies above about 1 keV are dominated by Kikuchi bands, which are created by the dynamical scattering of electrons from lattice planes. The origin of the fine structure in such bands is discussed from the point of view of atomic positions in the unit cell. The profiles and positions of the element-specific photoelectron Kikuchi bands are found to be sensitive to lattice distortions (e.g. a 1% tetragonal distortion) and the position of impurities or dopants with respect to lattice sites. We also compare the dynamical calculations with results from a cluster model that is more often used to describe lower energy XPD. We conclude that hard XPD (HXPD) should be capable of providing unique bulk-sensitive structural information for a wide variety of complex materials in future experiments.

  19. The Global Climate and Energy Project at Stanford University: Fundamental Research Towards Future Energy Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Jennifer L.; Sassoon, Richard E.; Hung, Emilie; Bosshard, Paolo; Benson, Sally M.

    The Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP), at Stanford University, invests in research with the potential to lead to energy technologies with lower greenhouse gas emissions than current energy technologies. GCEP is sponsored by four international companies, ExxonMobil, GE, Schlumberger, and Toyota and supports research programs in academic institutions worldwide. Research falls into the broad areas of carbon based energy systems, renewables, electrochemistry, and the electric grid. Within these areas research efforts are underway that are aimed at achieving break-throughs and innovations that greatly improve efficiency, performance, functionality and cost of many potential energy technologies of the future including solar, batteries, fuel cells, biofuels, hydrogen storage and carbon capture and storage. This paper presents a summary of some of GCEP's activities over the past 7 years with current research areas of interest and potential research directions in the near future.

  20. Meeting of Minds and Futures: The Nature of Knowledge in Diverse Global Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odora Hoppers, Catherine A.; Sandgren, Björn

    2014-01-01

    When we think of communities of the future, we have to think of new social contracts between universities and society with a different ecology, and an intense compatibility towards transdisciplinarity. We know that today there is a need for truly fundamental reflections and questions on knowledge as the building block of global societies…

  1. Design of a modular digital computer system, DRL 4. [for meeting future requirements of spaceborne computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design is reported of an advanced modular computer system designated the Automatically Reconfigurable Modular Multiprocessor System, which anticipates requirements for higher computing capacity and reliability for future spaceborne computers. Subjects discussed include: an overview of the architecture, mission analysis, synchronous and nonsynchronous scheduling control, reliability, and data transmission.

  2. 77 FR 32916 - Energy Conservation Standards for Distribution Transformers: Public Meeting and Availability of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... distribution transformers (77 FR 7282). On February 23, 2012, DOE held a public meeting to present the amended... Transformers: Public Meeting and Availability of Supplementary Analysis AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and... additional information that it is making available about the liquid-immersed distribution...

  3. 78 FR 14024 - Energy Efficiency Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Public Meeting and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... Federal Register on February 22, 2013 (78 FR 12252), concerning an announcement of a public meeting and... Equipment: Public Meeting and Availability of the Framework Document for Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners and Packaged Terminal Heat Pumps; Correction AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable...

  4. Meeting report: Ocean 'omics science, technology and cyberinfrastructure: current challenges and future requirements (August 20-23, 2013).

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jack A; Dick, Gregory J; Jenkins, Bethany; Heidelberg, John; Allen, Eric; Mackey, Katherine R M; DeLong, Edward F

    2014-06-15

    The National Science Foundation's EarthCube End User Workshop was held at USC Wrigley Marine Science Center on Catalina Island, California in August 2013. The workshop was designed to explore and characterize the needs and tools available to the community that is focusing on microbial and physical oceanography research with a particular emphasis on 'omic research. The assembled researchers outlined the existing concerns regarding the vast data resources that are being generated, and how we will deal with these resources as their volume and diversity increases. Particular attention was focused on the tools for handling and analyzing the existing data, on the need for the construction and curation of diverse federated databases, as well as development of shared, interoperable, "big-data capable" analytical tools. The key outputs from this workshop include (i) critical scientific challenges and cyber infrastructure constraints, (ii) the current and future ocean 'omics science grand challenges and questions, and (iii) data management, analytical and associated and cyber-infrastructure capabilities required to meet critical current and future scientific challenges. The main thrust of the meeting and the outcome of this report is a definition of the 'omics tools, technologies and infrastructures that facilitate continued advance in ocean science biology, marine biogeochemistry, and biological oceanography.

  5. Keynote Presentation: Genome Beat (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, Carl

    2012-03-20

    Carl Zimmer, a reporter for the New York Times, speaks on "The Genome Beat," the opening keynote presentation at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  6. Keynote Presentation: Genome Beat (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema

    Zimmer, Carl [New York Times

    2016-07-12

    Carl Zimmer, a reporter for the New York Times, speaks on "The Genome Beat," the opening keynote presentation at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  7. United States of America Department of Energy Environmental Management Advisory Committee Public Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This reports contains documentation of presentations given at the United States of America Department of Energy Environmental Management Advisory Committee Public Meeting held December 14--15, 1993 in Alexandria, Virginia.

  8. 78 FR 78466 - Meeting of the Regional Energy Resource Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ...:00 a.m. EST, on January 23. Persons wishing to speak are requested to register at the door by 9:00 a.... and Thursday, January 23 from 8:00 a.m. to noon EST. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at...

  9. US Department of Energy environmental management advisory board public meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    Contents of this publication include: list of participants; March 14, 1994--opening of public meeting and subcommittee reports, and public comment session; March 15, 1994--presentation by Thomas P. Grumbly, assistant secretary for environmental management, presentations by senior environmental management officials, and committee business.

  10. Meeting the Energy Needs--Solar Technician Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panitz, Theodore

    1980-01-01

    Differentiates between solar technicians and energy technicians; points out that, with the energy crisis, there has been much activity in the solar energy field, with the result that it could become saturated. Describes a program to train energy technicians that was developed at Cape Cod Community College. (JOW)

  11. 78 FR 17890 - Energy Efficiency Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Public Meeting and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... standards for packaged terminal air conditioners and packaged terminal heat pumps. 78 FR 12252. The document... Meeting and Availability of the Framework Document for Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners and Packaged Terminal Heat Pumps AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy....

  12. Meeting notes of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) futures group

    SciTech Connect

    Houser, M.M.

    1995-08-01

    This report is a compilation of the notes from the ten meetings. The group charter is: (1) to identify and characterize the range of possibilities and necessities for keeping the HFIR operating for at least the next 15 years; (2) to identify and characterize the range of possibilities for enhancing the scientific and technical utility of the HFIR; (3) to evaluate the benefits or impacts of these possibilities on the various scientific fields that use the HFIR or its products; (4) to evaluate the benefits or impacts on the operation and maintenance of the HFIR facility and the regulatory requirements; (5) to estimate the costs, including operating costs, and the schedules, including downtime, for these various possibilities; and one possible impact of proposed changes may be to stimulate increased pressure for a reduced enrichment fuel for HFIR.

  13. Expert Meeting Report: Key Innovations for Adding Energy Efficiency to Maintenance Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A.; Wiehagen, J.

    2012-09-01

    This report describes an expert meeting hosted by the Building America research team NAHB Research Center, which was held on February 8, 2012, in Orlando, Florida. The topic, Key Innovations for Adding Energy Efficiency to Maintenance Projects, was intended to provide direction to more focused efforts to increase the efficiency of existing homes; in this meeting, the focus was specifically for re-roofing and the opportunities for adding energy efficiency upgrades during this major home repair activity.

  14. Hydrogen and the materials of a sustainable energy future

    SciTech Connect

    Zalbowitz, M.

    1997-02-01

    The National Educator`s Workshop (NEW): Update 96 was held October 27--30, 1996, and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This was the 11th annual conference aimed at improving the teaching of material science, engineering and technology by updating educators and providing laboratory experiments on emerging technology for teaching fundamental and newly evolving materials concepts. The Hydrogen Education Outreach Activity at Los Alamos National Laboratory organized a special conference theme: Hydrogen and the Materials of a Sustainable Energy Future. The hydrogen component of the NEW:Update 96 offered the opportunity for educators to have direct communication with scientists in laboratory settings, develop mentor relationship with laboratory staff, and bring leading edge materials/technologies into the classroom to upgrade educational curricula. Lack of public education and understanding about hydrogen is a major barrier for initial implementation of hydrogen energy technologies and is an important prerequisite for acceptance of hydrogen outside the scientific/technical research communities. The following materials contain the papers and view graphs from the conference presentations. In addition, supplemental reference articles are also included: a general overview of hydrogen and an article on handling hydrogen safely. A resource list containing a curriculum outline, bibliography, Internet resources, and a list of periodicals often publishing relevant research articles can be found in the last section.

  15. The future of energy security in the 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rajan

    2006-10-01

    Energy is essential for modern life and is a critical resource that we take for granted. Economies and security of nations depend on reliable and cost-effective access. As the world transitions from conventional oil and natural gas to nuclear, renewables, and unconventional sources we are increasingly confronted by many unsettling questions. Will there be enough cheap oil and gas for preserve the standard of living in the developed world and allow the industrializing world to develop? Will renewable sources provide a significant fraction of our energy needs in the near future? Is global warming already happening as a result of our consumption of fossil fuels? If there is a resource crunch before new sources come on line, will there be conflict or global cooperation? This talk will attempt to answer these questions by examining the global oil and gas resources, geopolitics, and key science and technology issues that need to be addressed by the global community with cooperation and a sense of urgency.

  16. Future electricity production methods. Part 1: Nuclear energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nifenecker, Hervé

    2011-02-01

    The global warming challenge aims at stabilizing the concentrations of Green House Gas (GHG) in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is the most effective of the anthropogenic GHG and is essentially produced by consumption of fossil fuels. Electricity production is the dominant cause of CO2 emissions. It is, therefore, crucial that the share of 'carbon less' electricity production techniques increases at a fast pace. This is the more so, that 'clean' electricity would be useful to displace 'dirty' techniques in other fields such as heat production and transportation. Here we examine the extent to which nuclear energy could be operational in providing 'clean' electricity. A nuclear intensive scenario is shown to give the possibility to divide CO2 emissions by a factor of 2 worldwide, within 50 years. However, the corresponding sharp increase in nuclear power will put a heavy burden on uranium reserves and will necessitate the development of breeding reactors as soon as possible. A review of present and future reactors is given with special attention to the safety issues. The delicate question of nuclear fuel cycle is discussed concerning uranium reserves and management of used fuels. It is shown that dealing with nuclear wastes is more a socio-political problem than a technical one. The third difficult question associated with the development of nuclear energy is the proliferation risk. It is advocated that, while this is, indeed, a very important question, it is only weakly related to nuclear power development. Finally, the possibilities of nuclear fusion are discussed and it is asserted that, under no circumstances, could nuclear fusion give a significant contribution to the solution of the energy problem before 50 years, too late for dealing with the global warming challenge.

  17. Financing Graduate Medical Education to Meet the Needs of Children and the Future Pediatrician Workforce.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) believes that an appropriately financed graduate medical education (GME) system is critical to ensuring that sufficient numbers of trained pediatricians are available to provide optimal health care to all children. A shortage of pediatric medical subspecialists and pediatric surgical specialists currently exists in the United States, and this shortage is likely to intensify because of the growing numbers of children with chronic health problems and special health care needs. It is equally important to maintain the supply of primary care pediatricians. The AAP, therefore, recommends that children's hospital GME positions funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration be increased to address this escalating demand for pediatric health services. The AAP also recommends that GME funding for pediatric physician training provide full financial support for all years of training necessary to meet program requirements. In addition, all other entities that gain from GME training should participate in its funding in a manner that does not influence curriculum, requirements, or outcomes. Furthermore, the AAP supports funding for training innovations that improve the health of children. Finally, the AAP recommends that all institutional recipients of GME funding allocate these funds directly to the settings where training occurs in a transparent manner. PMID:27020794

  18. Financing Graduate Medical Education to Meet the Needs of Children and the Future Pediatrician Workforce.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) believes that an appropriately financed graduate medical education (GME) system is critical to ensuring that sufficient numbers of trained pediatricians are available to provide optimal health care to all children. A shortage of pediatric medical subspecialists and pediatric surgical specialists currently exists in the United States, and this shortage is likely to intensify because of the growing numbers of children with chronic health problems and special health care needs. It is equally important to maintain the supply of primary care pediatricians. The AAP, therefore, recommends that children's hospital GME positions funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration be increased to address this escalating demand for pediatric health services. The AAP also recommends that GME funding for pediatric physician training provide full financial support for all years of training necessary to meet program requirements. In addition, all other entities that gain from GME training should participate in its funding in a manner that does not influence curriculum, requirements, or outcomes. Furthermore, the AAP supports funding for training innovations that improve the health of children. Finally, the AAP recommends that all institutional recipients of GME funding allocate these funds directly to the settings where training occurs in a transparent manner.

  19. Basic research needs to assure a secure energy future. A report from the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    This report has highlighted many of the possible fundamental research areas that will help our country avoid a future energy crisis. The report may not have adequately captured the atmosphere of concern that permeated the discussions at the workshop. The difficulties facing our nation and the world in meeting our energy needs over the next several decades are very challenging. It was generally felt that traditional solutions and approaches will not solve the total energy problem. Knowledge that does not exist must be obtained to address both the quantity of energy needed to increase the standard of living world-wide and the quality of energy generation needed to preserve the environment. In terms of investments, it was clear that there is no single research area that will secure the future energy supply. A diverse range of economic energy sources will be required--and a broad range of fundamental research is needed to enable these. Many of the issues fall into the traditional materials and chemical sciences research areas, but with specific emphasis on understanding mechanisms, energy related phenomena, and pursuing novel directions in, for example, nanoscience and integrated modeling. An important result from the discussions, which is hopefully apparent from the brief presentations above, is that the problems that must be dealt with are truly multidisciplinary. This means that they require the participation of investigators with different skill sets. Basic science skills have to be complemented by awareness of the overall nature of the problem in a national and world context, and with knowledge of the engineering, design, and control issues in any eventual solution. It is necessary to find ways in which this can be done while still preserving the ability to do first-class basic science. The traditional structure of research, with specific disciplinary groupings, will not be sufficient. This presents great challenges and opportunities for the funders of the

  20. Meeting the challenges of the digital medical enterprise of the future by reusing enterprise software components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shani, Uri; Kol, Tomer; Shachor, Gal

    2004-04-01

    Managing medical digital information objects, and in particular medical images is an enterprise-grade problem. Firstly, there is the sheer amount of digital data that is generated in the proliferation of digital (and film-free) medical imaging. Secondly, the managing software ought to enjoy high availability, recoverability and manageability that are found only in the most business-critical systems. Indeed, such requirements are borrowed from the business enterprise world. Moreover, the solution for the medical information management problem should too employ the same software tools, middlewares and architectures. It is safe to say that all first-line medical PACS products strive to provide a solution for all these challenging requirements. The DICOM standard has been a prime enabler of such solutions. DICOM created the interconnectivity, which made it possible for a PACS service to manage millions of exams consisting of trillions of images. With the more comprehensive IHE architecture, the enterprise is expanded into a multi-facility regional conglomerate, which presents extreme demands from the data management system. HIPPA legislations add considerable challenges per security, privacy and other legal issues, which aggravate the situation. In this paper, we firstly present what in our view should be the general requirements for a first-line medical PACS, taken from an enterprise medical imaging storage and management solution perspective. While these requirements can be met by homegrown implementations, we suggest looking at the existing technologies, which have emerged in the recent years to meet exactly these challenges in the business world. We present an evolutionary process, which led to the design and implementation of a medical object management subsystem. This is indeed an enterprise medical imaging solution that is built upon respective technological components. The system answers all these challenges simply by not reinventing wheels, but rather reusing

  1. Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future: Report to the Secretary of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    Preamble The Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future (BRC) was formed by the Secretary of Energy at the request of the President to conduct a comprehensive review of policies for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle and recommend a new strategy. It was co-chaired by Rep. Lee H. Hamilton and Gen. Brent Scowcroft. Other Commissioners are Mr. Mark H. Ayers, the Hon. Vicky A. Bailey, Dr. Albert Carnesale, Sen. Pete Domenici, Ms. Susan Eisenhower, Sen. Chuck Hagel, Mr. Jonathan Lash, Dr. Allison M. Macfarlane, Dr. Richard A. Meserve, Dr. Ernest J. Moniz, Dr. Per Peterson, Mr. John Rowe, and Rep. Phil Sharp. The Commission and its subcommittees met more than two dozen times between March 2010 and January 2012 to hear testimony from experts and stakeholders, to visit nuclear waste management facilities in the United States and abroad, and to discuss the issues identified in its Charter. Additionally, in September and October 2011, the Commission held five public meetings, in different regions of the country, to hear feedback on its draft report. A wide variety of organizations, interest groups, and individuals provided input to the Commission at these meetings and through the submission of written materials. Copies of all of these submissions, along with records and transcripts of past meetings, are available at the BRC website (www.brc.gov). This report highlights the Commission’s findings and conclusions and presents recommendations for consideration by the Administration and Congress, as well as interested state, tribal and local governments, other stakeholders, and the public.

  2. Effects of China's Energy Policy on Future Air Quality in China and the U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Selin, N. E.; Karplus, V. J.; Li, C. T.; Zhang, D.; Luo, X.; Zhang, X.

    2014-12-01

    We examine the effects of recently announced energy policies in mainland China on air quality in both China and the U.S. in 2030. China is the largest contributor to global anthropogenic emissions of air pollutants, especially the precursors to ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) such as nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). Efforts to limit coal use in China under the country's National Air Pollution Action Plan will reduce these air pollutants. Control efforts are expected to not only decrease the concentration of ozone and PM2.5 locally in China, but also reduce the trans-Pacific transport of air pollutants to the U.S. We couple an energy-economic model with sub-national detail for China (the China Regional Energy Model, or C-REM) to a global atmospheric chemistry model (GEOS-Chem) to assess air pollution reductions under an energy policy scenario relative to a no policy baseline scenario. Future Chinese anthropogenic emissions are predicted by C-REM under a national energy policy scenario which achieves a 20% reduction in energy intensity from 2012 to 2017 by targeting fossil fuel use nationwide as specified in the National Air Pollution Action Plan and also meets the Plan's sub-national constraint that coal use must not increase above present levels in three largest urban regions (the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Area, Yangtze River Delta, and Pearl River Delta) through 2030. Using GEOS-Chem, we project changes in the surface concentration of ozone and PM2.5 over China and the U.S. in 2030. We find that air pollutants decrease substantially over both China and the U.S. under the national targets set by the Air Pollution Action Plan.

  3. Public participation in energy facility siting. Part 2; Future directions

    SciTech Connect

    Whitlatch, E.E. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1990-08-01

    The first planning era for energy facility siting was typified by technological decision making in a climate of eminent domain. The second planning era, from 1970 to present, involves regulatory/adjudicatory decision making in a climate of adversarial proceedings. However, outcomes are not much different than in the first: Decisions are still largely made on technological grounds, sites are secretly selected and anonymously secured, and public participation has little effect on decisions. The result has been endgame litigation that delays needed projects increases cost, and polarizes participants. Utilities are understandably reluctant to plan large base-load plants, yet almost all projections of electricity use indicate that such plants will be needed after 1996, if not before. The author discusses how it is in the self-interest of all three principal actors---industry, environmental groups, and state and local government---to move beyond confrontation to a third planning era based on negotiation. Unassisted negotiation (open siting or open planning) and assisted negotiation (facilitation and mediation) promise to produce mutual gain for all parties through cooperative and creative problem solving. Most importantly, they lay the groundwork for future productive interaction.

  4. Energy storage devices for future hybrid electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karden, Eckhard; Ploumen, Servé; Fricke, Birger; Miller, Ted; Snyder, Kent

    Powertrain hybridization as well as electrical energy management are imposing new requirements on electrical storage systems in vehicles. This paper characterizes the associated vehicle attributes and, in particular, the various levels of hybrids. New requirements for the electrical storage system are derived, including: shallow-cycle life, high dynamic charge acceptance particularly for regenerative braking and robust service life in sustained partial-state-of-charge usage. Lead/acid, either with liquid or absorptive glass-fibre mat electrolyte, is expected to remain the predominant battery technology for 14 V systems, including micro-hybrids, and with a cost-effective battery monitoring system for demanding applications. Advanced AGM batteries may be considered for mild or even medium hybrids once they have proven robustness under real-world conditions, particularly with respect to cycle life at partial-states-of-charge and dynamic charge acceptance. For the foreseeable future, NiMH and Li-ion are the dominating current and potential battery technologies for higher-functionality HEVs. Li-ion, currently at development and demonstration stages, offers attractive opportunities for improvements in performance and cost. Supercapacitors may be considered for pulse power applications. Aside from cell technologies, attention to the issue of system integration of the battery into the powertrain and vehicle is growing. Opportunities and challenges for potential "battery pack" system suppliers are discussed.

  5. Modeling the current and future capacity of water resources to meet water demands in the Ebro basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milano, Marianne; Ruelland, Denis; Dezetter, Alain; Fabre, Julie; Ardoin-Bardin, Sandra; Servat, Eric

    2013-09-01

    Worldwide studies have shown that the Mediterranean region is one of the most vulnerable areas to water crisis. The region is characterized by limited and unequally distributed water resources and increasing water demands. The Ebro catchment (85,000 km2, Spain) is representative of this context. Since the late 1970s, a negative trend in river discharge has been observed, attributed to a decrease in mean precipitation, and a rise in mean temperature and in water consumption. Finally, over 230 storage dams regulate river discharge. In this context, an integrated water resources modeling framework was developed to evaluate the current and future capacity of water resources to meet domestic and agricultural water demands as well as environmental flow requirements. The approach was driven by a conceptual rainfall-runoff model generating water supplies and by a demand driven storage dam model. The approach defines current pressures on water resources and evaluates future changes in water allocation in the medium term under climatic and water use scenarios, considering changes in population and in irrigated areas. Currently, water demands in the Ebro catchment are satisfied. In 2050, water resources are projected to decrease by 15-35% during spring and summer, leading to growing competition among users and severe water shortages for irrigated agriculture. This study provides an original approach to identify the most vulnerable regions to water use conflicts. It also highlights the interest of integrated modeling for complete analysis of the ability of water resources to meet water demands in complex change scenarios as a support for decision making.

  6. Transportation Energy Futures: Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-03-01

    This fact sheet summarizes actions in the areas of light-duty vehicle, non-light-duty vehicle, fuel, and transportation demand that show promise for deep reductions in energy use. Energy efficient transportation strategies have the potential to simultaneously reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examined how the combination of multiple strategies could achieve deep reductions in GHG emissions and petroleum use on the order of 80%. Led by NREL, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, the project's primary goal was to help inform domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments, with an emphasis on underexplored opportunities. TEF findings reveal three strategies with the potential to displace most transportation-related petroleum use and GHG emissions: 1) Stabilizing energy use in the transportation sector through efficiency and demand-side approaches. 2) Using additional advanced biofuels. 3) Expanding electric drivetrain technologies.

  7. Developing the Malaysian health system to meet the challenges of the future.

    PubMed

    Merican, M I; Rohaizat, Y; Haniza, S

    2004-03-01

    The Malaysian health care system is a success story among countries of equivalent socio-economic status. However there are numerous challenges faced by the nation, which create the need for changes and reform. There is rising consumer demands and expectations for high technology and high cost medical care due to improved standards of living, changing disease patterns and demographic changes, inadequate integration of health services, maldistribution of resources and the threats as well as opportunities of globalisation and liberalisation. The changes in health policy, priorities and planning for the country are guided by the country's development policies, objectives and the challenges of Vision 2020, Vision for Health and the goals of the health system in ensuring universal access, improving equity and efficiency and the quality of life of the population. The essential services in the health system of the future are information and education of individuals to empower support for the wellness paradigm. There is also a need to restructure the national health care financing and the health care delivery system. The present roles and responsibilities of MOH also need to be reviewed. PMID:15535341

  8. Developing the Malaysian health system to meet the challenges of the future.

    PubMed

    Merican, M I; Rohaizat, Y; Haniza, S

    2004-03-01

    The Malaysian health care system is a success story among countries of equivalent socio-economic status. However there are numerous challenges faced by the nation, which create the need for changes and reform. There is rising consumer demands and expectations for high technology and high cost medical care due to improved standards of living, changing disease patterns and demographic changes, inadequate integration of health services, maldistribution of resources and the threats as well as opportunities of globalisation and liberalisation. The changes in health policy, priorities and planning for the country are guided by the country's development policies, objectives and the challenges of Vision 2020, Vision for Health and the goals of the health system in ensuring universal access, improving equity and efficiency and the quality of life of the population. The essential services in the health system of the future are information and education of individuals to empower support for the wellness paradigm. There is also a need to restructure the national health care financing and the health care delivery system. The present roles and responsibilities of MOH also need to be reviewed.

  9. Meeting report: suggestions for studies on future health risks following the Fukushima accident.

    PubMed

    Inamasu, Tomoko; Schonfeld, Sara J; Abe, Masafumi; Bidstrup, Pernille E; Deltour, Isabelle; Ishida, Takashi; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Ohira, Tetsuya; Ohto, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Shinichi; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Yabe, Hirooki; Yasumura, Seiji; Schüz, Joachim; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    In October 2013, the Radiation Medical Science Center of the Fukushima Medical University and the Section of Environment and Radiation of the International Agency for Research on Cancer held a joint workshop in Fukushima, Japan to discuss opportunities and challenges for long-term studies of the health effects following the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident. This report describes four key areas of discussion -- thyroid screening, dosimetry, mental health, and non-radiation risk factors -- and summarizes recommendations resulting from the workshop. Four recommendations given at the workshop were to: 1) build-up a population-based cancer registry for long-term monitoring of the cancer burden in the prefecture; 2) enable future linkage of data from the various independent activities, particularly those related to dose reconstruction and health status ascertainment; 3) establish long-term observational studies with repeated measurements of lifestyle and behavioural factors to disentangle radiation and non-radiation factors; and 4) implement primary prevention strategies targeted for populations affected by natural disasters, including measures to better understand and address health risk concerns in the affected population. The workshop concluded that coordinated data collection between researchers from different institutes and disciplines can both reduce the burden on the population and facilitate efforts to examine the inter-relationships between the many factors at play. PMID:25889395

  10. The Role of Solar Technology Programs In Meeting Our Energy Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Ivan E.; Larson, Milton E.

    1978-01-01

    Elements to be included in a solar energy technology training program offered in postsecondary institutions are listed. The article examines various present and future energy sources and describes the solar energy system, stressing the immediate need for training programs for solar energy technicians. (MF)

  11. MHD--Developing New Technology to Meet the Energy Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Sandra S.

    1978-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics is a technology that could utilize the nation's most abundant fossil fuel and produce electrical energy more efficiently and cleanly than present-day turbines. A national research and development program is ongoing in Butte, Montana at the Montana Energy and MHD Research and Development Institute (MERDI). (Author/RK)

  12. California Hospital Leaders’ Views of Hospitalists: Meeting Needs of the Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Knebel, R. Justin; Wachter, Robert M.; Auerbach, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospital medicine has grown rapidly, but hospital leaders’ perceptions of current and future drivers of hospitalist growth are unknown. Objective To determine hospital executives’ perceptions of factors leading to hospitalist implementation and their vision for hospitalists’ work roles. Setting Non-federal, acute care hospitals in California. Participants California hospital leaders (e.g., chief executive officers). Intervention Cross-sectional survey from 2006-07. Measurements We asked California hospital leaders whether their hospitals had a hospitalist service and the prospects for growth. In addition, we examined factors responsible for implementation, scope of hospitalists’ practices, and need for additional certification as perceived by hospital leaders. Results We received surveys from 179 of 334 hospitals (response rate of 54%). Of the 64% of respondents that reported the use of hospitalists, none intended to decrease the size of their hospitalist group, and 57% expected growth over 2 years. The most common reasons for implementing a hospitalist program were to care for uncovered patients (68%) and improve cost/length of stay (63%). Respondents also indicated that demand from other physicians was an important factor. Leaders reported that hospitalists provide a wide range of services, with a majority involved in quality improvement projects (72%) and medical co-management of surgical patients (66%). Most leaders favor additional certification for hospitalists. Conclusions There is widespread adoption of hospitalists in California hospitals, with an expectation of continued growth. The drivers of the field’s growth are evolving and dynamic. In particular, attentiveness to quality performance and demand from other physicians are increasingly important reasons for implementation. PMID:20013852

  13. 78 FR 16849 - Alaska Energy Authority; Notice of Dispute Resolution Panel Meeting and Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Alaska Energy Authority; Notice of Dispute Resolution Panel Meeting and..., 2013. The studies in dispute are: (1) Glacier and Runoff Changes Study (Study 7.7); (2) Salmon.... Loussac Public Library, 3600 Denali Street, Anchorage, Alaska 99503. Dated: March 12, 2013. Kimberly...

  14. 75 FR 70852 - Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Public Meeting and Availability of the Framework...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ...The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is initiating a rulemaking and data collection process to consider amended energy conservation standards for automatic commercial ice-makers. DOE will hold a public meeting to discuss and receive comments on its planned analytical approach and issues it will address in this rulemaking proceeding. DOE welcomes written comments and relevant data from the......

  15. 75 FR 14319 - Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts: Public Meeting and Availability of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... cycle to amend energy conservation standards for fluorescent lamp ballasts. 65 FR 56740, 56740-56749... Part 430 RIN 1904-AB50 Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts: Public Meeting and... conservation standards for fluorescent lamp ballasts; the analytical framework, models, and tools that DOE...

  16. Meeting the future challenges of air quality management in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Clean Air Act (CAA, or the Act) and its amendments has achieved substantial progress in cleaning up the nation's air. Over the past 30 years, the CAA reduced emissions of the 6 principal ("criteria") pollutants by over 25%, even while gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over 150% and population and energy consumption rose by nearly 40%. However, despite the tremendous gains the Act has brought, the country's air quality management (AQM) system still faces substantial challenges. In response to a congressional request for an independent evaluation of the overall effectiveness of the CAA, the National Research Council formed the Committee on Air Quality Management. Composed of 25 members with diverse areas of air quality expertise, the committee was charged with developing scientific and technical recommendations for strengthening the nation's AQM system. In 2004, the National Academies published their recommendations in a text entitled Air Quality Management in the United States (National Research Council, 2004).

  17. US energy policies: Will they be responsive to future needs?

    SciTech Connect

    Hemphill, J.G.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reviews the history of early US energy policy as a prescription for failure, the evolution of national goals in energy, and the basic principles of energy policy (market based, clean energy alternatives should receive recognition; energy and environment planning coordinated; progress measured and adjustments made; technology transfer encouraged; government assistance should support economic and environmental objectives).

  18. Energy futures, human values, and lifestyles: a new look at the energy crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.C.; Harman, W.W.; Schwartz, P.

    1982-01-01

    A group of SRI International scholars looks beyond the technical difficulties of the energy crisis to determine the basic reasons for the severity of our energy and environmental problems, and finds them in our individual choices of life style. The authors depict two detailed energy-use scenarios for the year 2050, using California as a model. One scenario portrays a future that is a result of our present habits in which we have squandered nearly all of the world's nonrenewable energy resources and neither conserved nor developed renewable resources. The other envisions a slower economic progress that serves long-range human goals and values. As a pacesetter, California illustrates what is possible for the entire country. 82 references, 11 figures, 64 tables.

  19. Proceedings of the Chinese-American symposium on energy markets and the future of energy demand

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, S.

    1988-11-01

    The Symposium was organized by the Energy Research Institute of the State Economic Commission of China, and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Johns Hopkins University from the United States. It was held at the Johns Hopkins University Nanjing Center in late June 1988. It was attended by about 15 Chinese and an equal number of US experts on various topics related to energy demand and supply. Each presenter is one of the best observers of the energy situation in their field. A Chinese and US speaker presented papers on each topic. In all, about 30 papers were presented over a period of two and one half days. Each paper was translated into English and Chinese. The Chinese papers provide an excellent overview of the emerging energy demand and supply situation in China and the obstacles the Chinese planners face in managing the expected increase in demand for energy. These are matched by papers that discuss the energy situation in the US and worldwide, and the implications of the changes in the world energy situation on both countries. The papers in Part 1 provide historical background and discuss future directions. The papers in Part 2 focus on the historical development of energy planning and policy in each country and the methodologies and tools used for projecting energy demand and supply. The papers in Part 3 examine the pattern of energy demand, the forces driving demand, and opportunities for energy conservation in each of the major sectors in China and the US. The papers in Part 4 deal with the outlook for global and Pacific region energy markets and the development of the oil and natural gas sector in China.

  20. Key Factors in Planning a Sustainable Energy Future Including Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedstrom, Lars; Saxe, Maria; Folkesson, Anders; Wallmark, Cecilia; Haraldsson, Kristina; Bryngelsson, Marten; Alvfors, Per

    2006-01-01

    In this article, a number of future energy visions, especially those basing the energy systems on hydrogen, are discussed. Some often missing comparisons between alternatives, from a sustainability perspective, are identified and then performed for energy storage, energy transportation, and energy use in vehicles. It is shown that it is important…

  1. Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.; Hand, M.; Wiser, R.

    2012-08-01

    The future of wind power will depend on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost reductions. To better understand the potential for cost reductions, this report provides a review of historical costs, evaluates near-term market trends, and summarizes the range of projected costs. It also notes potential sources of future cost reductions.

  2. World Energy Supplies: The Present Use and Future Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, John; Osborne, Jonathan

    1978-01-01

    Presents Unit Nine Change and Chance of the Nuffield Advanced Physics, dealing with energy conservation, and a novel statistical approach to diffusion, thermal equilibrium and thermodynamics. Information about energy resources, alternative sources of energy, and energy-cost of materials are also presented. (HM)

  3. REPORT OF RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND FUTURE GOALS HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Mark B.; Kapustin, Anton N.; Schwarz, John Henry; Carroll, Sean; Ooguri, Hirosi; Gukov, Sergei; Preskill, John; Hitlin, David G.; Porter, Frank C.; Patterson, Ryan B.; Newman, Harvey B.; Spiropulu, Maria; Golwala, Sunil; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2014-08-26

    Caltech High Energy Physics (HEP) has a broad program in both experimental and theoretical physics. We are known for our creativity and leadership. The future is uncertain and we strive to be involved in all the major areas of experimental and theoretical HEP physics so no matter where the important discoveries occur we are well positioned to play an important role. An outstanding group of postdoctoral scholars, graduate students, staff scientists, and technical and administrative personnel support our efforts in experimental and theoretical physics. The PI’s on this grant are involved in the following program of experimental and theoretical activities: I) EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS Our CMS group, led by Harvey Newman and Maria Spiropulu, has played a key role in the discovery and interpretation of the Higgs boson and in searches for new physics. They have important hardware responsibilities in both ECAL and HCAL and are also involved in the upgrades needed for the High Luminosity LHC. Newman's group also develops and operates Grid-based computing, networking, and collaborative systems for CMS and the US HEP community. The charged lepton (Mu2e) and quark BaBar flavor physics group is led by David Hitlin and Frank Porter. On Mu2e they have been instrumental in the design of the calorimeter. Construction responsibilities include one third of the crystals and associated readout as well as the calibration system. They also will have responsibility for a major part of the online system software. Although data taking ceased in 2008 the Caltech BaBar group is active on several new forefront analyses. The neutrino group is led by Ryan Patterson. They are central to NOvA's core oscillation physics program, to calibration, and to detector readiness being responsible for the production and installation of 12,000 APD arrays. They have key roles in neutrino appearance and disappearance analysis in MINOS and MINOS+. Sunil Golwala leads the dark matter direct detection effort. Areas

  4. Pollutant emissions and energy efficiency of Chinese gasifier cooking stoves and implications for future intervention studies.

    PubMed

    Carter, Ellison M; Shan, Ming; Yang, Xudong; Li, Jiarong; Baumgartner, Jill

    2014-06-01

    Household air pollution from solid fuel combustion is the leading environmental health risk factor globally. In China, almost half of all homes use solid fuel to meet their household energy demands. Gasifier cookstoves offer a potentially affordable, efficient, and low-polluting alternative to current solid fuel combustion technology, but pollutant emissions and energy efficiency performance of this class of stoves are poorly characterized. In this study, four Chinese gasifier cookstoves were evaluated for their pollutant emissions and efficiency using the internationally recognized water boiling test (WBT), version 4.1.2. WBT performance indicators included PM2.5, CO, and CO2 emissions and overall thermal efficiency. Laboratory investigation also included evaluation of pollutant emissions (PM2.5 and CO) under stove operating conditions designed to simulate common Chinese cooking practices. High power average overall thermal efficiencies ranged from 22 to 33%. High power average PM2.5 emissions ranged from 120 to 430 mg/MJ of useful energy, and CO emissions ranged from 1 to 30 g/MJ of useful energy. Compared with several widely disseminated "improved" cookstoves selected from the literature, on average, the four Chinese gasifier cookstoves had lower PM2.5 emissions and higher CO emissions. The recent International Organization for Standardization (ISO) International Workshop Agreement on tiered cookstove ranking was developed to help classify stove performance and identify the best-performing stoves. The results from this study highlight potential ways to further improve this approach. Medium power stove operation emitted nearly twice as much PM2.5 as was emitted during high power stove operation, and the lighting phase of a cooking event contributed 45% and 34% of total PM2.5 emissions (combined lighting and cooking). Future approaches to laboratory-based testing of advanced cookstoves could improve to include greater differentiation between different modes of

  5. Pollutant emissions and energy efficiency of Chinese gasifier cooking stoves and implications for future intervention studies.

    PubMed

    Carter, Ellison M; Shan, Ming; Yang, Xudong; Li, Jiarong; Baumgartner, Jill

    2014-06-01

    Household air pollution from solid fuel combustion is the leading environmental health risk factor globally. In China, almost half of all homes use solid fuel to meet their household energy demands. Gasifier cookstoves offer a potentially affordable, efficient, and low-polluting alternative to current solid fuel combustion technology, but pollutant emissions and energy efficiency performance of this class of stoves are poorly characterized. In this study, four Chinese gasifier cookstoves were evaluated for their pollutant emissions and efficiency using the internationally recognized water boiling test (WBT), version 4.1.2. WBT performance indicators included PM2.5, CO, and CO2 emissions and overall thermal efficiency. Laboratory investigation also included evaluation of pollutant emissions (PM2.5 and CO) under stove operating conditions designed to simulate common Chinese cooking practices. High power average overall thermal efficiencies ranged from 22 to 33%. High power average PM2.5 emissions ranged from 120 to 430 mg/MJ of useful energy, and CO emissions ranged from 1 to 30 g/MJ of useful energy. Compared with several widely disseminated "improved" cookstoves selected from the literature, on average, the four Chinese gasifier cookstoves had lower PM2.5 emissions and higher CO emissions. The recent International Organization for Standardization (ISO) International Workshop Agreement on tiered cookstove ranking was developed to help classify stove performance and identify the best-performing stoves. The results from this study highlight potential ways to further improve this approach. Medium power stove operation emitted nearly twice as much PM2.5 as was emitted during high power stove operation, and the lighting phase of a cooking event contributed 45% and 34% of total PM2.5 emissions (combined lighting and cooking). Future approaches to laboratory-based testing of advanced cookstoves could improve to include greater differentiation between different modes of

  6. Future energy system in environment, economy, and energy problems (2) various nuclear energy system evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Kazuaki; Ujita, Hiroshi; Tashimo, Masanori

    2006-07-01

    Role and potentials of nuclear energy system in the energy options are discussed from the viewpoint of sustainable development with protecting from global warming by using the energy module structure of GRAPE model. They change and are affected dramatically by different sets of energy characteristics, nuclear behavior and energy policy even under the moderate set of presumptions. Introduction of thousands of reactors in the end of the century seems inevitable for better life and cleaner earth, but it will not come without efforts and cost. The analysis suggests the need of long term planning and R and D efforts under the wisdom. (authors)

  7. 76 FR 60015 - FirstEnergy Generation Corporation; Seneca Nation of Indians; Notice of Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FirstEnergy Generation Corporation; Seneca Nation of Indians; Notice of... meeting on September 28, 2011, at 9:30 a.m. The meeting will be held at the following location:...

  8. Realizing a Clean Energy Future: Highlights of NREL Analysis (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-12-01

    Profound energy system transformation is underway. In Hawaiian mythology, Maui set out to lasso the sun in order to capture its energy. He succeeded. That may have been the most dramatic leap forward in clean energy systems that the world has known. Until now. Today, another profound transformation is underway. A combination of forces is taking us from a carbon-centric, inefficient energy system to one that draws from diverse energy sources - including the sun. NREL analysis is helping guide energy systems policy and investment decisions through this transformation. This brochure highlights NREL analysis accomplishments in the context of four thematic storylines.

  9. Characterization of energy-efficient and colorless ONUs for future TWDM-PONs.

    PubMed

    Wong, Elaine; Mueller, Michael; Amann, Markus C

    2013-09-01

    The Full Services Access Network group has recently selected the time and wavelength division multiplexed passive optical network (TWDM-PON) as the base technology solution for next-generation PON stage-2 (NG-PON2). Meeting the core requirements of NG-PON2 necessitates the following additional features in the transceivers of the optical network unit (ONU) that is located at subscriber premises: (a) legacy system compliant; (b) wavelength tunable; (c) cost-efficient; and (d) energy-efficient. To address these features, we investigate the properties of short-cavity vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (SC-VCSELs) for implementation as colorless ONU transmitters in future TWDM-PONs. Specifically, we investigate the tunability and transmission performance of the SC-VCSEL across the C-minus wavelength band for legacy system compliance. We report on error-free transmission across a 800 GHz tuning range with a potential aggregate upstream capacity of 80 Gbps over a system reach of 40 km and with a split ratio of 1:128 per wavelength channel. Results were achieved without dispersion compensation and electronic equalization. We also evaluate the energy efficiency of the SC-VCSEL in active, doze, and sleep mode. When in active mode, the SC-VCSEL transmitter block consumes 91.7% less power than a distributed feedback (DFB) laser transmitter block. When transitioning between doze and active modes, the transmitter block has a short settling time of only 205 ns, thus increasing the power-saving duration and consequently reducing the overall power consumption of the ONU. Through numerical analysis, evaluation of the energy-savings of the SC-VCSEL ONU over the DFB ONU under various modes of operation, demonstrates up to 84% of energy-savings. The capacity, tuning range, split ratio, system reach, and energy-savings arising from SC-VCSEL ONU implementation as reported in this work, exceed the minimum requirements of NG-PON2 for future TWDM-PON deployments.

  10. Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate (CSSEFARMBE)

    SciTech Connect

    Riihimaki, Laura D.; Gaustad, Krista L.; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2012-09-28

    The Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) project is working to improve the representation of the hydrological cycle in global climate models, critical information necessary for decision-makers to respond appropriately to predictions of future climate. In order to accomplish this objective, CSSEF is building testbeds to implement uncertainty quantification (UQ) techniques to objectively calibrate and diagnose climate model parameterizations and predictions with respect to local, process-scale observations. In order to quantify the agreement between models and observations accurately, uncertainty estimates on these observations are needed. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program takes atmospheric and climate related measurements at three permanent locations worldwide. The ARM VAP called the ARM Best Estimate (ARMBE) [Xie et al., 2010] collects a subset of ARM observations, performs quality control checks, averages them to one hour temporal resolution, and puts them in a standard format for ease of use by climate modelers. ARMBE has been widely used by the climate modeling community as a summary product of many of the ARM observations. However, the ARMBE product does not include uncertainty estimates on the data values. Thus, to meet the objectives of the CSSEF project and enable better use of this data with UQ techniques, we created the CSSEFARMBE data set. Only a subset of the variables contained in ARMBE is included in CSSEFARMBE. Currently only surface meteorological observations are included, though this may be expanded to include other variables in the future. The CSSEFARMBE VAP is produced for all extended facilities at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site that contain surface meteorological equipment. This extension of the ARMBE data set to multiple facilities at SGP allows for better comparison between model grid boxes and the ARM point observations. In the future, CSSEFARMBE may also be created for other ARM sites. As

  11. National Hydrogen Vision Meeting Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    2001-11-01

    This document provides presentations and summaries of the notes from the National Hydrogen Vision Meeting''s facilitated breakout sessions. The Vision Meeting, which took place November 15-16, 2001, kicked off the public-private partnership that will pave the way to a more secure and cleaner energy future for America. These proceedings were compiled into a formal report, A National Vision of America''s Transition to a Hydrogen Economy - To 2030 and Beyond, which is also available online.

  12. Energy supplies and future engines for land, sea, and air.

    PubMed

    Hidy, George M; Chow, Judith C; England, Glen C; Legge, Alan H; Lloyd, Alan C; Watson, John G

    2012-11-01

    The 2012 Critical Review Discussion complements Wilson, (2012), provides pointers to more detailed treatments of different topics and adds additional dimensions to the area of "energy". These include broader aspects of technologies driven by fuel resources and environmental issues, the concept of energy technology innovation, evolution in transportation resources, and complexities of energy policies addressing carbon taxes or carbon trading. National and global energy data bases are identified and evaluated and conversion factors are given to allow their comparability.

  13. High temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage for future NASA missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faymon, Karl A.; Rudnick, Stanley J.

    1988-01-01

    Several NASA sponsored studies based on 'conventional' liquid helium temperature level superconductivity technology have concluded that superconducting magnetic energy storage has considerable potential for space applications. The advent of high temperature superconductivity (HTSC) may provide additional benefits over conventional superconductivity technology, making magnetic energy storage even more attractive. The proposed NASA space station is a possible candidate for the application of HTSC energy storage. Alternative energy storage technologies for this and other low Earth orbit missions are compared.

  14. Future perspectives in melanoma research: meeting report from the "Melanoma Bridge", Napoli, December 5th-8th 2013.

    PubMed

    Ascierto, Paolo A; Grimaldi, Antonio M; Anderson, Ana Carrizosa; Bifulco, Carlo; Cochran, Alistair; Garbe, Claus; Eggermont, Alexander M; Faries, Mark; Ferrone, Soldano; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Gajewski, Thomas F; Halaban, Ruth; Hodi, F Stephen; Kefford, Richard; Kirkwood, John M; Larkin, James; Leachman, Sancy; Maio, Michele; Marais, Richard; Masucci, Giuseppe; Melero, Ignacio; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Puzanov, Igor; Ribas, Antoni; Saenger, Yvonne; Schilling, Bastian; Seliger, Barbara; Stroncek, David; Sullivan, Ryan; Testori, Alessandro; Wang, Ena; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Mozzillo, Nicola; Marincola, Francesco M; Thurin, Magdalena

    2014-10-28

    The fourth "Melanoma Bridge Meeting" took place in Naples, December 5 to 8th, 2013. The four topics discussed at this meeting were: Diagnosis and New Procedures, Molecular Advances and Combination Therapies, News in Immunotherapy, and Tumor Microenvironment and Biomarkers.

  15. The Energy-Water Nexus: Managing the Links between Energy and Water for a Sustainable Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussey, Karen; Petit, Carine

    2010-05-01

    preliminary list of recommendations on how best to account for and integrate these impacts into policy and decision-making processes at various institutional levels was prepared and future research needs in the energy-water nexus were suggested as main outcomes. This presentation draws on the contributions to the COST water-energy-links exploratory workshops and the development of 12 case studies undertaken by researchers from Europe, the United States, Australia and China, which will be published in a Special Feature of Ecology and Society, mid-2010.

  16. A National Plan for Energy Research, Development & Demonstration: Creating Energy Choices for the Future, 1976. Volume 1: The Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Energy Research and Development Administration, Washington, DC.

    This report presents a plan developed by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) concerning future energy sources. The plan summarizes ERDA's current views on the energy technologies the U.S. will need to achieve long-term energy independence. The role of the private sector in the development and commercialization of new energy…

  17. The role of energy efficiency and renewable energies in the future world energy market

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.

    1996-05-01

    The world population is rising rapidly, notably in the developing countries. Historical trends suggest that increased annual energy use per capita is a good surrogate for the standard of living factors which promote a decrease in population growth rate. If these trends continue, stabilization of the world`s population will require the increased use of all sources of energy as cheap oil and gas are depleted. Improved efficiency of energy use and renewable energy sources will be essential to stabilizing population,while providing a decent standard all over the world.

  18. Preliminary assessment of the availability of U.S. natural gas resources to meet U.S. transportation energy demand.

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M. K.; Moore, J. S.

    2002-03-04

    Recent studies have indicated that substitutes for conventional petroleum resources will be needed to meet U.S. transportation energy demand in the first half of this century. One possible substitute is natural gas which can be used as a transportation fuel directly in compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas vehicles or as resource fuel for the production of hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles. This paper contains a preliminary assessment of the availability of U.S. natural gas resources to meet future U.S. transportation fuel demand. Several scenarios of natural gas demand, including transportation demand, in the U.S. to 2050 are developed. Natural gas resource estimates for the U. S. are discussed. Potential Canadian and Mexican exports to the U.S. are estimated. Two scenarios of potential imports from outside North America are also developed. Considering all these potential imports, U.S. natural gas production requirements to 2050 to meet the demand scenarios are developed and compared with the estimates of U.S. natural gas resources. The comparison results in a conclusion that (1) given the assumptions made, there are likely to be supply constraints on the availability of U.S. natural gas supply post-2020 and (2) if natural gas use in transportation grows substantially, it will have to compete with other sectors of the economy for that supply-constrained natural gas.

  19. Development of Critical Profilometers to Meet Current and Future NASA Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Inspection Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry, Regor; Nichols, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This project is part of a multi-center effort to develop and validate critical NDE techniques which can be implemented into current and future NASA spacecraft COPV manufacturing processes. After decades of COPV development, manufacturing variance is still high and has necessitated higher safety factors and additional mass to be flown on spacecraft (reducing overall performance). Additionally, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) indicated that nondestructive evaluation (NDE) was not adequately implemented during Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) COPV manufacturing and provisions were not made for on-going structural integrity and health checks during the various spacecraft programs. This project helps to provide additional data needed to help address these issues. This project seeks to develop and install internal and external laser profilometers at COPV manufacturing facilities to provide data needed to improve COPV quality and consistency. This project also investigates other scanning techniques that will enhance the system to more completely meet manufacturing needs, thus transforming the profilometer into what has been termed the "Universal Manufacturing COPV Scanner".

  20. Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platform (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Tremblay, Julien [DOE JGI

    2016-07-12

    Julien Tremblay from DOE JGI presents "Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platorm" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  1. PanFunPro: Bacterial Pan-Genome Analysis Based on the Functional Profiles (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Lukjancenko, Oksana [Technical University of Denmark

    2016-07-12

    Julien Tremblay from DOE JGI presents "Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platorm" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  2. Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Patel, Kamlesh D [Ken; SNL,

    2016-07-12

    Kamlesh (Ken) Patel from Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, California) presents "Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology " at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  3. PanFunPro: Bacterial Pan-Genome Analysis Based on the Functional Profiles (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Lukjancenko, Oksana

    2012-06-01

    Julien Tremblay from DOE JGI presents "Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platorm" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  4. Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Kamlesh D; SNL,

    2012-06-01

    Kamlesh (Ken) Patel from Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, California) presents "Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology " at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  5. Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platform (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, Julien

    2012-06-01

    Julien Tremblay from DOE JGI presents "Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platorm" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  6. Feedbacks from Focus Group Meeting on Training and Implementation of Building Energy Codes in China

    SciTech Connect

    Shui, Bin; Lin , Haiyan; Song, Bo; Halverson, Mark A.; Evans, Meredydd; Zhu, Xiaojiao

    2011-01-01

    A focus group meeting is a very effective quality research approach to collect information on a specific project. Through focus group meetings at both Changchun and Ningbo in August 2010, the project team gained a more complete understandings of key stakeholders (such as their education level), their training needs and expectations, key factors influencing their decision making, and incurred implementation difficulties. In addition, the meeting helped the project team (especially PNNL) improve its understanding of the implementation status of building energy codes in other regions (such as small cities and counties neighboring to urban areas, small townships and rural areas distant from urban areas). The collected feedbacks will serve as important input not only for better design of training materials and the development of an on-line training website, but also for development of follow-up projects to promote building energy codes in China.

  7. Residential energy demand models: Current status and future improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peabody, G.

    1980-12-01

    Two models currently used to analyze energy use by the residential sector are described. The ORNL model is used to forecast energy use by fuel type for various end uses on a yearly basis. The MATH/CHRDS model analyzes variations in energy expenditures by households of various socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. The essential features of the ORNL and MATH/CHRDS models are retained in a proposed model and integrated into a framework that is more flexible than either model. The important determinants of energy use by households are reviewed.

  8. Expert Meeting Report. Key Innovations for Adding Energy Efficiency to Maintenance Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A.; Wiehagen, J.

    2012-09-01

    This report describes an expert meeting hosted by the Building America research team NAHB Research Center, which was held on February 8, 2012, in Orlando, Florida. The topic focused on efforts to increase the efficiency of existing homes, specifically for re-roofing and the opportunities for adding energy efficiency upgrades during this major home repair activity.

  9. 77 FR 11785 - Energy Conservation Program: Public Meeting and Availability of the Framework Document for High...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    .... Code. DOE published a positive final determination for specified HID lamps on July 1, 2010. 75 FR 37975.... 76 FR 77914 (December 15, 2011). DOE must also complete the HID lamps energy conservation standards... also note that those wishing to bring laptops to the meeting will be required to obtain a property...

  10. 77 FR 49739 - Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Dehumidifiers: Public Meeting and Availability of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... dehumidifiers. DOE also encourages written comments on potential amended standards, including comments on the... stakeholders and facilitate the rulemaking process, is available at http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings... given at the public meeting before 4 p.m., September 10, 2012. Written comments are welcome,...

  11. Symposium on the Physical Chemistry of Solar Energy Conversion, Indianapolis American Chemical Society Meetings, Fall 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Tianquan

    2013-09-20

    The Symposium on the Physical Chemistry of Solar Energy Conversion at the Fall ACS Meeting in Indianapolis, IN (Sept. 8-12) featured the following sessions (approx. 6 speakers per session): (1) Quantum Dots and Nanorods for Solar Energy Conversion (2 half-day sessions); (2) Artificial Photosynthesis: Water Oxidation; (3) Artificial Photosynthesis: Solar Fuels (2 half-day sessions); (4) Organic Solar Cells; (5) Novel Concepts for Solar Energy Conversion (2 half-day sessions); (6) Emerging Techniques for Solar Energy Conversion; (7) Interfacial Electron Transfer

  12. Present and future high-energy accelerators for neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, I.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    There is an active neutrino program making use of the high-energy (larger than 50 GeV) accelerators both in USA at Fermilab with NuMI and at CERN in Europe with CNGS. In this paper we will review the prospects for high intensity high energy beams in those two locations during the next decade.

  13. Climate change, renewable energy and population impact on future energy demand for Burkina Faso build environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouedraogo, B. I.

    This research addresses the dual challenge faced by Burkina Faso engineers to design sustainable low-energy cost public buildings and domestic dwellings while still providing the required thermal comfort under warmer temperature conditions caused by climate change. It was found base don climate change SRES scenario A2 that predicted mean temperature in Burkina Faso will increase by 2oC between 2010 and 2050. Therefore, in order to maintain a thermally comfortable 25oC inside public buildings, the projected annual energy consumption for cooling load will increase by 15%, 36% and 100% respectively for the period between 2020 to 2039, 2040 to 2059 and 2070 to 2089 when compared to the control case. It has also been found that a 1% increase in population growth will result in a 1.38% and 2.03% increase in carbon emission from primary energy consumption and future electricity consumption respectively. Furthermore, this research has investigated possible solutions for adaptation to the severe climate change and population growth impact on energy demand in Burkina Faso. Shading devices could potentially reduce the cooling load by up to 40%. Computer simulation programming of building energy consumption and a field study has shown that adobe houses have the potential of significantly reducing energy demand for cooling and offer a formidable method for climate change adaptation. Based on the Net Present Cost, hybrid photovoltaic (PV) and Diesel generator energy production configuration is the most cost effective local electricity supply system, for areas without electricity at present, with a payback time of 8 years when compared to diesel generator stand-alone configuration. It is therefore a viable solution to increase electricity access to the majority of the population.

  14. Past, present and future low energy antiproton facilities at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartmann, W.; Belochitskii, P.; Breuker, H.; Butin, F.; Carli, C.; Eriksson, T.; Maury, S.; Oelert, W.; Pasinelli, S.; Tranquille, G.

    2014-05-01

    Low energy antiprotons are available for physics experiments at CERN since the 1980s and have been used by a large variety of experiments. The Low Energy Antiproton Ring LEAR has been constructed as a complementary use of antiprotons available at that time for high energy physics and delivered beam to experiments mainly using slow extraction. After completion of LEAR exploitation, the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) was constructed (adaptation of the existing Antiproton Collector, AC) to allow for a simpler low energy antiproton scheme (only one accelerator operated with Antiprotons) with fast extraction well suited for trap experiments. The Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring ELENA is a small synchrotron presently constructed to further decelerate antiprotons from the AD in a controlled manner, and to reduce emittances with the help of an electron cooler to improve the capture efficiencies of existing experiments and allow for additional ones.

  15. An Overview of strategic measures to assess workforce needs and ensure technology transfer to meet current and future nuclear power operations

    SciTech Connect

    Vincenti, J.R.; Stigers, R.A.

    2007-07-01

    Between 1956 and 1989, the number of operating commercial nuclear power plants in the United States increased from none to 109. With the exception of a few plants that were still in final construction, no new nuclear power plants were ordered in the United States as the new millennium began. In 2005, the federal government pronounced the need for new electric power generating systems during the first quarter of the 21. century. The need comes from a desire to curb our reliance on fossil fuels, as well as to provide for a cleaner environment. One of those fuel systems noted was nuclear energy. Given the time between the last active period of nuclear power plant development and construction, there is a need to supply a talented and well-prepared workforce to operate the new plants. It will also be necessary to assess the needs of our current fleet of operating nuclear power plants, of which many are in the process of re-licensing, yet also facing an aging plant workforce. This paper will review and discuss measures to assess diverse workforce needs and technology transfer to meet current licensing requirements as that of future nuclear power plant development in the United States. (authors)

  16. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    NREL,; Wiser, Ryan; Lantz, Eric; Hand, Maureen

    2012-03-26

    The future of wind power will depend on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost reductions. To better understand the potential for cost reductions, this report provides a review of historical costs, evaluates near-term market trends, and summarizes the range of projected costs. It also notes potential sources of future cost reductions. Our findings indicate that steady cost reductions were interrupted between 2004 and 2010, but falling turbine prices and improved turbine performance are expected to drive a historically low LCOE for current installations. In addition, the majority of studies indicate continued cost reductions on the order of 20%-30% through 2030. Moreover, useful cost projections are likely to benefit from stronger consideration of the interactions between capital cost and performance as well as trends in the quality of the wind resource where projects are located, transmission, grid integration, and other cost variables.

  17. Big coal: the dirty secret behind America's energy future

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Goodell

    2006-06-08

    Veteran journalist Jeff Goodell argues that coal is bad for the economy, bad for public health and especially bad for the environment, yet its future looks quite bright. It is relatively cheap. It is plentiful, and Americans, who get half their electric power from coal-burning generators, are addicted to it. As of 2005, more than 120 new coal-burning plants were either planned or under construction in the United States.

  18. Improving biofuel feedstocks by modifying xylan biosynthesis (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Jane

    2013-03-01

    Jane Lau of the Joint BioEnergy Institute on "Improving biofuel feedstocks by modifying xylan biosynthesis" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  19. Summary of Needs and Opportunities from the 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting: Atlanta, Georgia -- March 16-18, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-05-01

    This summary report outlines needs and issues for increasing energy efficiency of new and existing U.S homes, as identified at the U.S Department of Energy Building America program Spring 2011 stakeholder meeting in Atlanta, Georgia.

  20. Residential Energy Efficiency Research Planning Meeting Summary Report: Washington, D.C. - October 27-28, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-02-01

    This report summarizes key findings and outcomes from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Research Planning meeting, held on October 28-29, 2011, in Washington, D.C.

  1. Our national energy future - The role of remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of problems and opportunities in remote sensing of resources. The need for independence from foreign and precarious energy sources, availability of fossil fuel materials for other purposes (petrochemicals, fertilizer), environmental conservation, and new energy sources are singled out as the main topics. Phases of response include: (1) crisis, with reduced use of petroleum and tapping of on-shore and off-shore resources combined; (2) a transition phase involving a shift from petroleum to coal and oil shale; and (3) exploitation of renewable (inexhaustible and clean) energy. Opportunities for remote sensing in fuel production and energy conservation are discussed along with problems in identifying the spectral signatures of productive and unproductive regions. Mapping of water resources, waste heat, byproducts, and wastes is considered in addition to opportunities for international collaboration.

  2. Star Power on Earth: Path to Clean Energy Future

    ScienceCinema

    Ed Moses

    2016-07-12

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's "Science on Saturday" lecture series presents Ed Moses, Director of the National Ignition Facility, discussing the world's largest laser system and its potential impact on society's upcoming energy needs.

  3. Star Power on Earth: Path to Clean Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    Ed Moses

    2009-10-09

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's "Science on Saturday" lecture series presents Ed Moses, Director of the National Ignition Facility, discussing the world's largest laser system and its potential impact on society's upcoming energy needs.

  4. Capturing the Sun, Creating a Clean Energy Future (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program

    2011-07-20

    Through partnerships with industry academia, and national laboratories, the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program sponsors research and development (R&D) in addition to activities designed to accelerate solar market development and reduce the cost of solar power.

  5. Capturing the Sun, Creating a Clean Energy Future (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    Through partnerships with industry academia, and national laboratories, the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program sponsors research and development (R&D) in addition to activities designed to accelerate solar market development and reduce the cost of solar power.

  6. High energy physics advisory panel`s subpanel on vision for the future of high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This report was requested by the Secretary of Energy to (1) define a long-term program for pursuing the most important high-energy physics goals since the termination of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project, (2) assess the current US high-energy physics program, and (3) make recommendations regarding the future of the field. Subjects on which recommendations were sought and which the report addresses were: high-energy physics funding priorities; facilitating international collaboration for future construction of large high-energy physics facilities; optimizing uses of the investment made in the SSC; how to encourage displaced scientists and engineers to remain in high-energy physics and to attract young scientists to enter the field in the future. The report includes a description of the state of high-energy physics research in the context of history, a summary of the SSC project, and documentation of the report`s own origins and development.

  7. Herbaceous energy crop development: recent progress and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Emily A; Flavell, Richard B; Mascia, Peter N; Thomas, Steven R; Dohleman, Frank G; Long, Stephen P

    2008-06-01

    Oil prices and government mandates have catalyzed rapid growth of nonfossil transportation fuels in recent years, with a large focus on ethanol from energy crops, but the food crops used as first-generation energy crops today are not optimized for this purpose. We show that the theoretical efficiency of conversion of whole spectrum solar energy into biomass is 4.6-6%, depending on plant type, and the best year-long efficiencies realized are about 3%. The average leaf is as effective as the best PV solar cells in transducing solar energy to charge separation (ca. 37%). In photosynthesis, most of the energy that is lost is dissipated as heat during synthesis of biomass. Unlike photovoltaic (PV) cells this energetic cost supports the construction, maintenance, and replacement of the system, which is achieved autonomously as the plant grows and re-grows. Advances in plant genomics are being applied to plant breeding, thereby enabling rapid development of next-generation energy crops that capitalize on theoretical efficiencies while maintaining environmental and economic integrity. PMID:18513940

  8. Environmental Stewardship: How Semiconductor Suppliers Help toMeet Energy-Efficiency Regulations and Voluntary Specifications inChina

    SciTech Connect

    Aizhen, Li; Fanara, Andrew; Fridley, David; Merriman, Louise; Ju,Jeff

    2007-01-15

    Recognizing the role that semiconductor suppliers can playin meeting energy-efficiency regulations and voluntary specifications,this paper provides an overview of Chinese policies and implementingbodies; a discussion of current programs, their goals, and effectiveness;and possible steps that can be taken tomeet these energy-efficiencyrequirements while also meeting products' high performance and costgoals.

  9. Current status and future potential of energy derived from Chinese agricultural land: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Ningning; Mao, Chunlan; Feng, Yongzhong; Zhang, Tong; Xing, Zhenjie; Wang, Yanhong; Zou, Shuzhen; Yin, Dongxue; Han, Xinhui; Ren, Guangxin; Yang, Gaihe

    2015-01-01

    Energy crisis is receiving attention with regard to the global economy and environmental sustainable development. Developing new energy resources to optimize the energy supply structure has become an important measure to prevent energy shortage as well as achieving energy conservation and emission reduction in China. This study proposed the concept of energy agriculture and constructed an energy agricultural technical support system based on the analysis of energy supply and demand and China's foreign dependence on energy resources, combined with the function of agriculture in the energy field. Manufacturing technology equipment and agricultural and forestry energy, including crop or forestry plants and animal feces, were used in the system. The current status and future potential of China's marginal land resources, energy crop germplasm resources, and agricultural and forestry waste energy-oriented resources were analyzed. Developing the function of traditional agriculture in food production may promote China's social, economic, and environmental sustainable development and achieve energy saving and emission reduction. PMID:25874229

  10. Current Status and Future Potential of Energy Derived from Chinese Agricultural Land: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Chunlan; Feng, Yongzhong; Zhang, Tong; Xing, Zhenjie; Wang, Yanhong; Zou, Shuzhen; Yin, Dongxue; Han, Xinhui; Ren, Guangxin; Yang, Gaihe

    2015-01-01

    Energy crisis is receiving attention with regard to the global economy and environmental sustainable development. Developing new energy resources to optimize the energy supply structure has become an important measure to prevent energy shortage as well as achieving energy conservation and emission reduction in China. This study proposed the concept of energy agriculture and constructed an energy agricultural technical support system based on the analysis of energy supply and demand and China's foreign dependence on energy resources, combined with the function of agriculture in the energy field. Manufacturing technology equipment and agricultural and forestry energy, including crop or forestry plants and animal feces, were used in the system. The current status and future potential of China's marginal land resources, energy crop germplasm resources, and agricultural and forestry waste energy-oriented resources were analyzed. Developing the function of traditional agriculture in food production may promote China's social, economic, and environmental sustainable development and achieve energy saving and emission reduction. PMID:25874229

  11. Current status and future potential of energy derived from Chinese agricultural land: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Ningning; Mao, Chunlan; Feng, Yongzhong; Zhang, Tong; Xing, Zhenjie; Wang, Yanhong; Zou, Shuzhen; Yin, Dongxue; Han, Xinhui; Ren, Guangxin; Yang, Gaihe

    2015-01-01

    Energy crisis is receiving attention with regard to the global economy and environmental sustainable development. Developing new energy resources to optimize the energy supply structure has become an important measure to prevent energy shortage as well as achieving energy conservation and emission reduction in China. This study proposed the concept of energy agriculture and constructed an energy agricultural technical support system based on the analysis of energy supply and demand and China's foreign dependence on energy resources, combined with the function of agriculture in the energy field. Manufacturing technology equipment and agricultural and forestry energy, including crop or forestry plants and animal feces, were used in the system. The current status and future potential of China's marginal land resources, energy crop germplasm resources, and agricultural and forestry waste energy-oriented resources were analyzed. Developing the function of traditional agriculture in food production may promote China's social, economic, and environmental sustainable development and achieve energy saving and emission reduction.

  12. Small and Shaping the Future Energy Eco-house System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Ryuzo; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Sato, Yoshinori; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Isu, Norifumi; Ohtsuka, Masuo; Tohji, Kazuyuki

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this research is to develop the elemental technology of the small and thin energy collection system from water, wind, and others in the house, and examine them at the eco-house which will be built at Tohoku University on March 2010. This small energy storage system will contribute to reduce 10% of greenhouse gas emission from household electricity. This project is done by three following groups. 1st group (NEC-Tokin Co. Ltd.) will develop the technologies on the accumulation of electric power pressured from low electric power in which electricity is generated and on the cooperation with AC power supply used for domestic use for this eco-house system. 2nd group (INAX Co. Ltd.) will develop the elemental technology of the slight energy collection system from tap water in the home using a small hydroelectric generator for this eco-house system. 3rd group (Shoei Co. Ltd.) will develop the technologies on existent magnetic gear device, health appliances (Exercise bike), wind power generator, for this eco-house system. Tokoku University compiles these groups. Furthermore, I develop a search of unused small energy and the use technology, and propose a new energy supply system using solar cell and Li ion secondary battery.

  13. The Decline of the Atom and the Rise of the Sun as Future Energy Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockris, J. O'M.

    1973-01-01

    Examines the various energy sources likely to be developed in the near future, and suggests that the only satisfactory solution lies in the development of solar energy and an associated non-polluting "hydrogen economy." Concludes that Australia has ideal conditions and the technical expertise to lead in solar energy research. (JR)

  14. Future Directions, Challenges and Opportunities in Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Andy; Lance, Jack

    2007-03-21

    The renaissance of nuclear energy for electricity and hydrogen production and process heat for other potential applications is moving ahead rapidly. Both near- and far-term roles are envisioned for this important energy technology, and each of these roles will have its own particular technical challenges and opportunities. Numerous power producers world-wide are actively considering the construction of new nuclear power plants for the production of electricity in the near-term. The U.S. Department of Energy has announced plans to develop both the next generation of nuclear power plants and the technology necessary to recycle used nuclear fuel. These exciting technologies will bring novel challenges to their developers and designers as they push the knowledge base in materials utilization, high temperatures and pressures, extended operating cycles, and extreme operating environments. Development of the techniques and methods to interrogate, understand, manage and control these devices will be crucial to enabling the full extension of these technologies.

  15. Future Directions, Challenges and Opportunities in Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Andy Klein; Jack Lance

    2006-07-01

    The renaissance of nuclear energy for electricity and hydrogen production and process heat for other potential applications is moving ahead rapidly. Both near- and far-term roles are envisioned for this important energy technology, and each of these roles will have its own particular technical challenges and opportunities. Numerous power producers world-wide are actively considering the construction of new nuclear power plants for the production of electricity in the near-term. The U.S. Department of Energy has announced plans to develop both the next generation of nuclear power plants and the technology necessary to recycle used nuclear fuel. These exciting technologies will bring novel challenges to their developers and designers as they push the knowledge base in materials utilization, high temperatures and pressures, extended operating cycles, and extreme operating environments. Development of the techniques and methods to interrogate, understand, manage and control these devices will be crucial to enabling the full extension of these technologies.

  16. High energy neutrino astronomy; past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Learned, John G.

    1993-04-01

    The nascent field of high energy neutrino astronomy seems to be near to blossoming in the next few years, after decades of speculation and preliminary experimental work. The motivation for the endeavor, anticipated types of sources, consideration of energy regime for first attempts, scale size needed, and techniques are qualitatively reviewed. A summary of relevant current projects is presented with emphasis on the new initiatives with detectors of the 10,000m2 class. It seems that by the end of the decade there may be a few such new generation instruments in operation, and that with luck the business of high energy neutrino astrophysics will be underway by the turn of the century.

  17. Global energy shifts: Future possibilities in historical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podobnik, Bruce Michael

    2000-11-01

    This study adopts a macro-comparative, world-systems perspective in order to shed light on the dynamics that led to a global shift away from primary reliance on coal and towards over-reliance on petroleum. It is argued that the interaction of three global dynamics, those of geopolitical rivalry, commercial competition, and social unrest, undermined the nineteenth-century international coal system and paved the way for the consolidation of an international petroleum system in the twentieth century. Specifically, the historical analysis presented in this dissertation shows that: (1) intervention by state agents was absolutely crucial in the early development and later expansion of the international petroleum system; (2) private coal companies attempted to prevent the consolidation of an oil-based energy system, but these older companies were out-competed by newer, multinational petroleum corporations; and (3) waves of labor unrest in established coal industries played a key role in prompting a relatively rapid shift away from coal and towards petroleum. Indeed, a key conclusion of this study is that pressures exerted by such social movements as labor unions, nationalist movements, and environmental coalitions have played as important a role in influencing energy trajectories as the more commonly-recognized actions of governmental and corporate actors. By examining contemporary patterns of state and private investments in a cluster of new energy technologies, as well as the growing influence of environmental regulations it is argued that global dynamics are beginning to favor a shift towards new, more environmentally sustainable energy technologies. The fuel cell is highlighted as one new energy technology that is poised to enter into widespread diffusion in the coming decades, though potentials for expansions in wind, solar, small-scale hydro-electric, and modern biomass systems are also examined. Although significant hurdles must be overcome, this study concludes by

  18. Energy efficiency standards for eight consumer products: public meeting clarification, questions and answers

    SciTech Connect

    1980-08-01

    Eighteen corporations and manufacturers provided answers to many questions posed at a public meeting on energy efficiency standards for eight consumer products. Questions on the regulations concerning the manufacturing standards, performance standards, and testing standards are included. Questions were posed about air conditioners, refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, stoves (ranges), ovens, clothes dryers, oil fired burners, water heaters, furnaces, etc. A presentation containing information pertaining to the values of average annual energy consumption per unit used by DOE in its analysis leading to proposed energy efficiency standards for nine types of consumer products is included. (MCW)

  19. Dark energy properties from large future galaxy surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Basse, Tobias; Bjælde, Ole Eggers; Hannestad, Steen; Hamann, Jan; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y. E-mail: oeb@phys.au.dk E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk

    2014-05-01

    We perform a detailed forecast on how well a Euclid-like survey will be able to constrain dark energy and neutrino parameters from a combination of its cosmic shear power spectrum, galaxy power spectrum, and cluster mass function measurements. We find that the combination of these three probes vastly improves the survey's potential to measure the time evolution of dark energy. In terms of a dark energy figure-of-merit defined as (σ(w{sub p})σ(w{sub a})){sup −1}, we find a value of 690 for Euclid-like data combined with Planck-like measurements of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies in a 10-dimensional cosmological parameter space, assuming a ΛCDM fiducial cosmology. For the more commonly used 7-parameter model, we find a figure-of-merit of 1900 for the same data combination. We consider also the survey's potential to measure dark energy perturbations in models wherein the dark energy is parameterised as a fluid with a nonstandard non-adiabatic sound speed, and find that in an optimistic scenario in which w{sub 0} deviates from -1 by as much as is currently observationally allowed, models with c-circumflex {sub s}{sup 2} = 10{sup −6} and c-circumflex {sub s}{sup 2} = 1 can be distinguished from one another at more than 2σ significance. We emphasise that constraints on the dark energy sound speed from cluster measurements are strongly dependent on the modelling of the cluster mass function; significantly weaker sensitivities ensue if we modify our model to include fewer features of nonlinear dark energy clustering. Finally, we find that the sum of neutrino masses can be measured with a 1σ precision of 0.015 eV, even in complex cosmological models in which the dark energy equation of state varies with time. The 1σ sensitivity to the effective number of relativistic species N{sub eff}{sup ml} is approximately 0.03, meaning that the small deviation of 0.046 from 3 in the standard value of N{sub eff}{sup ml} due to non-instantaneous decoupling and

  20. Future singularity avoidance in phantom dark energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Haro, Jaume de

    2012-07-01

    Different approaches to quantum cosmology are studied in order to deal with the future singularity avoidance problem. Our results show that these future singularities will persist but could take different forms. As an example we have studied the big rip which appear when one considers the state equation P = ωρ with ω < −1, showing that it does not disappear in modified gravity. On the other hand, it is well-known that quantum geometric effects (holonomy corrections) in loop quantum cosmology introduce a quadratic modification, namely proportional to ρ{sup 2}, in Friedmann's equation that replace the big rip by a non-singular bounce. However this modified Friedmann equation could have been obtained in an inconsistent way, what means that the obtained results from this equation, in particular singularity avoidance, would be incorrect. In fact, we will show that instead of a non-singular bounce, the big rip singularity would be replaced, in loop quantum cosmology, by other kind of singularity.

  1. Future of the Beam Energy Scan program at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Odyniec, Grazyna; Bravina, L.; Foka, Y.; Kabana, S.

    2015-05-29

    The first exploratory phase of a very successful Beam Energy Scan Program at RHIC was completed in 2014 with Au+Au collisions at energies ranging from 7 to 39 GeV. Data sets taken earlier extended the upper limit of energy range to the √sNN of 200 GeV. This provided an initial look into the uncharted territory of the QCD phase diagram, which is considered to be the single most important graph of our field. The main results from BES phase I, although effected by large statistical errors (steeply increasing with decreasing energy), suggest that the highest potential for discovery of the QCD Critical Point lies bellow √sNN 20 GeV. Here, we discuss the plans and the preparation for phase II of the BES program, with an order of magnitude larger statistics, which is planned for 2018-2019. The BES II will focus on Au+Au collisions at √sNN from 20 to 7 GeV in collider mode, and from √sNN 7 to 3.5 GeV in the fixed target mode, which will be run concurrently with the collider mode operation.

  2. Future of the Beam Energy Scan program at RHIC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Odyniec, Grazyna; Bravina, L.; Foka, Y.; Kabana, S.

    2015-05-29

    The first exploratory phase of a very successful Beam Energy Scan Program at RHIC was completed in 2014 with Au+Au collisions at energies ranging from 7 to 39 GeV. Data sets taken earlier extended the upper limit of energy range to the √sNN of 200 GeV. This provided an initial look into the uncharted territory of the QCD phase diagram, which is considered to be the single most important graph of our field. The main results from BES phase I, although effected by large statistical errors (steeply increasing with decreasing energy), suggest that the highest potential for discovery of themore » QCD Critical Point lies bellow √sNN 20 GeV. Here, we discuss the plans and the preparation for phase II of the BES program, with an order of magnitude larger statistics, which is planned for 2018-2019. The BES II will focus on Au+Au collisions at √sNN from 20 to 7 GeV in collider mode, and from √sNN 7 to 3.5 GeV in the fixed target mode, which will be run concurrently with the collider mode operation.« less

  3. Future Energy: The Use of Hydrogen May Be Inevitable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockris, John O'M.

    2006-01-01

    The predictions by the Department of Energy indicate the maximum of the rate of supply of oil will be reached around 2021, but this neglects the effect of the rapid growth of China and India. It will be necessary to use coal, natural gas, nuclear power, or renewables to supplement, and, after 2021, to replace oil. If coal is used, it can be…

  4. Hydropower: Setting a Course for Our Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-07-01

    Hydropower is an annual publication that provides an overview of the Department of Energy's Hydropower Program. The mission of the program is to conduct research and development that will increase the technical, societal, and environmental benefits of hydropower and provide cost-competitive technologies that enable the development of new and incremental hydropower capacity.

  5. Education: the key to the future of solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hamos, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Industry-approved educational programs in solar technology (especially domestic hot water) can ensure the growth of the solar industry. Effective solar training should include a variety of training aids such as a student manual, solar trainer, actual equipment, overhead transparencies and 35 mm slides. Without such educational programs, misconceptions and misunderstandings may doom solar to be permanently branded as an alternate energy source.

  6. Employment from Solar Energy: A Bright but Partly Cloudy Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeltzer, K. K.; Santini, D. J.

    A comparison of quantitative and qualitative employment effects of solar and conventional systems can prove the increased employment postulated as one of the significant secondary benefits of a shift from conventional to solar energy use. Current quantitative employment estimates show solar technology-induced employment to be generally greater…

  7. Geothermal Energy Market in Southern California Past, Present and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Budhraja, Vikram S.

    1992-03-24

    I'm pleased to be here as your keynote speaker from the utility industry. Today is fitting to discuss the role of an alternative/renewable energy resource such as geothermal. Three years ago today, the Exxon Valdez oil tanker spilled 11 million gallons of oil into Prince William Sound, Alaska. This ecological catastrophe was another of those periodic jolts that underscores the importance of lessening our nation's dependence on oil and increasing the use of cost-effective, environmentally benign alternative/renewable energy sources. Alternative/renewables have come a long way since the first oil crisis in 1973. Today, they provide 9 percent of electric power used in the United States. That's nearly double the figure of just two years ago. And since 1985, one-third of a new capacity has come from geothermal, solar, wind and biomass facilities. Nevertheless, geothermal supplies only about three-tenths of a percent of the country's electric power, or roughly 2,800 megawatts (MW). And most of that is in California. In fact, geothermal is California's second-largest source of renewable energy, supplying more than 5 percent of the power generated in the state. Today, I'd like to discuss the outlook for the geothermal industry, framing it within Southern California Edison's experience with geothermal and other alternative/renewable energy sources.

  8. Hydrogen: Its Future Role in the Nation's Energy Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winsche, W. E.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Advocates the development of a hydrogen fuel economy as an alternative to the predominately electric economy based upon nuclear plants and depleting fossil fuel supplies. Evaluates the economic and environmental benefits of hydrogen energy delivery systems in the residential and transportation sectors. (JR)

  9. Energy Futures... [Project ECOLogy ELE Pak, Parr Pak].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parr, Donald

    This is one of a series of units for environmental education developed by the Highline Public Schools. This unit on energy is designed for junior high school science students. The 11 concepts of the unit have been developed into 11 lessons that should take from two to three weeks to complete. Each lesson includes the concept of the lesson,…

  10. Affordable comfort 95 - investing in our energy future

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This report describes the topics from the conference on Affordable Comfort, held March 26-31, 1995. Topics are concerned with energy efficiency in homes, retrofitting, weatherization, and monitoring of appliances, heating, and air conditioning systems for performance, as well as topics on electric utilities.

  11. [Analysis of China's energy consumption and its impact on the environment in the future].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bo-fu; Deng, Hong-bing; Yan, Yan; Zhao, Jing-zhu

    2005-05-01

    With the development of economy and urbanization, energy consumption and its impact on the environment in the future have become a focal point in China. Based on briefly reviewing energy consumption during 1980-2000 and analyzing its impact, three scenarios are assumed to forecast energy consumption status and analyze its impact on the environment in the future. The results indicate that the emissions of SO2, NOx, CO2 and soot dust caused by energy consumption would keep a high level in the future, and there are significant differences among the three scenarios' estimates. Improving energy efficiency and strengthening the exploitation and utilization of clean and renewable energy are suggested to mitigate the environmental pollution.

  12. Technical challenges for the future of high energy lasers

    SciTech Connect

    LaFortune, K N; Hurd, R L; Fochs, S N; Rotter, M D; Pax, P H; Combs, R L; Olivier, S S; Brase, J M; Yamamoto, R M

    2007-01-10

    The Solid-State, Heat-Capacity Laser (SSHCL) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a multi-generation laser development effort scalable to the megawatt power levels with current performance approaching 100 kilowatts. This program is one of many designed to harness the power of lasers for use as directed energy weapons. There are many hurdles common to all of these programs that must be overcome to make the technology viable. There will be a in-depth discussion of the general issues facing state-of-the-art high energy lasers and paths to their resolution. Despite the relative simplicity of the SSHCL design, many challenges have been uncovered in the implementation of this particular system. An overview of these and their resolution are discussed. The overall system design of the SSHCL, technological strengths and weaknesses, and most recent experimental results will be presented.

  13. Thermoelectric Energy Conversion: Future Directions and Technology Development Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleurial, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the process of thermoelectric energy conversion along with key technology needs and challenges. The topics include: 1) The Case for Thermoelectrics; 2) Advances in Thermoelectrics: Investment Needed; 3) Current U.S. Investment (FY07); 4) Increasing Thermoelectric Materials Conversion Efficiency Key Science Needs and Challenges; 5) Developing Advanced TE Components & Systems Key Technology Needs and Challenges; 6) Thermoelectrics; 7) 200W Class Lightweight Portable Thermoelectric Generator; 8) Hybrid Absorption Cooling/TE Power Cogeneration System; 9) Major Opportunities in Energy Industry; 10) Automobile Waste Heat Recovery; 11) Thermoelectrics at JPL; 12) Recent Advances at JPL in Thermoelectric Converter Component Technologies; 13) Thermoelectrics Background on Power Generation and Cooling Operational Modes; 14) Thermoelectric Power Generation; and 15) Thermoelectric Cooling.

  14. Energy from garbage loses promise as wave of future

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    A front-page article in The Wall Street Journal (June 16, 1988) reports on the rising troubles of waste-to-energy projects. The garbage crisis has promoted the construction of 73 waste-to-energy plants around the country, with hundreds more planned at a combined cost of more than $18 billion, writes Bill Richards. Critics profess to feel an eerie sense of deja vu in the trend toward burning. In the 1990s, they say, this could become for municipalities what the nuclear plant building binge was to electric utilities in the 1970s. It plunged many into an economic and environmental swamp in which a few are still mired, their huge cost over-runs unrecoverable from customers, their shareholder dividends shrunken or ended.

  15. Energy forecasting: the troubled past of looking the future

    SciTech Connect

    Kutler, E.

    1986-01-01

    Energy forecasts have hardly been distinguished by their accuracy. Why forecasts go awry, and the impact these prominent tools have, is explored. A brief review of the record is given. Because of their allure, their popularity in he media, and their usefulness as tools in political battles, forecasts have played a significant role so far. The danger is that they represent and enhance a fix 'em up, tinkering approach, to the detriment of more efficient free-market policies.

  16. Larger Turbines and the Future Cost of Wind Energy (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.; Hand, M.

    2011-03-01

    The move to larger turbines has been observed in the United States and around the world. Turbine scaling increases energy capture while reducing general project infrastructure costs and landscape impacts, each of which of can reduce the cost of wind energy. However, scaling in the absence of innovation, can increase turbine costs. The ability of turbine designers and manufacturers to continue to scale turbines, while simultaneously reducing costs, is an important factor in long-term viability of the industry. This research seeks to better understand how technology innovation can allow the continued development of larger turbines on taller towers while also achieving lower cost of energy. Modeling incremental technology improvements identified over the past decade demonstrates that cost reductions on the order of 10%, and capacity factor improvements on the order of 5% (for sites with annual mean wind speed of 7.25 m/s at 50m), are achievable for turbines up to 3.5 MW. However, to achieve a 10% cost reduction and a 10% capacity factor improvement for turbines up to 5 MW, additional technology innovations must be developed and implemented.

  17. Future Accelerator Challenges in Support of High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.; Zisman, M.S.

    2008-05-03

    Historically, progress in high-energy physics has largely been determined by development of more capable particle accelerators. This trend continues today with the imminent commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and the worldwide development effort toward the International Linear Collider. Looking ahead, there are two scientific areas ripe for further exploration--the energy frontier and the precision frontier. To explore the energy frontier, two approaches toward multi-TeV beams are being studied, an electron-positron linear collider based on a novel two-beam powering system (CLIC), and a Muon Collider. Work on the precision frontier involves accelerators with very high intensity, including a Super-BFactory and a muon-based Neutrino Factory. Without question, one of the most promising approaches is the development of muon-beam accelerators. Such machines have very high scientific potential, and would substantially advance the state-of-the-art in accelerator design. The challenges of the new generation of accelerators, and how these can be accommodated in the accelerator design, are described. To reap their scientific benefits, all of these frontier accelerators will require sophisticated instrumentation to characterize the beam and control it with unprecedented precision.

  18. Fuel cells for future transportation: The Department of Energy OTT/OUT partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, P.G.; Milliken, J.; Gronich, S.; Rossmeissl, N.; Ohi, J.

    1997-12-31

    The DOE Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT) is currently engaged in the development and integration R and D activities which will make it possible to reduce oil imports, and move toward a sustainable transportation future. Within OTT, the Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies is supporting development of highly efficient, low or zero emission fuel cell power systems as an alternative to internal combustion engines. The objectives of the program are: By 2000, develop and validate fuel cell stack system technologies that are greater than 51% energy efficient at 40 kW (maximum net power); more than 100 times cleaner than EPA Tier II emissions; and capable of operating on gasoline, methanol, ethanol, natural gas, and hydrogen gas or liquid. By 2004, develop and validate fuel cell power system technologies that meet vehicle requirements in terms of: cost--competitive with internal combustion engines; and performance, range, safety and reliability. The research, development, and validation of fuel cell technology is integrally linked to the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) and other major US policy objectives, such as the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Established in 1993, PNGV is a research and development initiative involving seven Federal agencies and the three US automobile manufacturers to strengthen US competitiveness. The PNGV will develop technologies for vehicles with a fuel efficiency of 80 miles per gallon, while maintaining such attributes as size, performance, safety, and cost. To help address the critical issue of fuel and fuel infrastructure development for advanced vehicles, the DOE Office of Utility Technologies (OUT) has directed the Hydrogen Program to provide national leadership in the research, development, and validation of advanced technologies to produce, store, and use hydrogen. An objective of the Program is to work in partnership with industry to advance hydrogen systems to the point where they are cost effective and

  19. Nanotechnology for Material Development on Future Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamura, Kiyoshi; Munakata, Hirokazu; Dokko, Kaoru

    Various kinds of energy devices have been developed as power sources for portable electronic devices and electric vehicles. Fuel cell, rechargeable lithium ion battery, and super capacitor are the most interesting devices, and they have been extensively studied to improve their electrochemical performance around the world [1, 2]. In these electrochemical devices, chemical energy is directly converted to electric energy through charge transfer process occurring at an interface between electrode and electrolyte. The electrochemical reactions take place at the interface and their reaction rates strongly depend on the nature of interface consisting of electrode and electrolyte materials. In some case, the electrode reaction is so slow that the electrode reaction kinetics should be carefully investigated in order to improve charge transfer reaction rate. On the other hand, the slow electrode reaction can be technically overcome by a large interface area for the electrode reaction, leading to an improvement of apparent reaction rate. For example, the true surface area of the porous electrode used in practical battery and fuel cell is much larger than that of flat electrode. When the surface area is 100 times larger than that of flat electrode, the apparent electrode reaction rate is also 100 times. However, this is too simple to estimate the advantage of the porous electrode. The porous electrode has so many problems that the reaction rate may not become 100 times [3]. Figure 4.1 shows the electrode reaction occurring on flat electrode and porous electrode. In the case of the flat electrode, the electrode reaction takes place uniformly on an entire electrode surface. On the other hand, the electrode reaction taking place on the porous electrode surface has a distribution of electrode reaction rate depending on its porous nature and a kind of electrode material. For example, both electronic and ionic conductivities of porous electrode are very important properties to

  20. An assessment of future energy use and carbon emissions from US residences

    SciTech Connect

    Koomey, J.G.; Johnson, F.X.; McMahon, J.E.; Orland, M.C.; Levine, M.D.; Chan, P.; Krause, F.

    1993-12-01

    This paper explores residential energy futures and their associated carbon emissions using an engineering-economic end-use model. The authors present detailed input assumptions and output results for twenty-four cases, each representing a different combination of electricity supply mix, demand-side policy case, and carbon tax. They describe current and projected future energy use by end-use and fuel, and assess which end-uses are growing most rapidly in importance over time.

  1. Attaining the Photometric Precision Required by Future Dark Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, Christopher

    2013-01-21

    This report outlines our progress towards achieving the high-precision astronomical measurements needed to derive improved constraints on the nature of the Dark Energy. Our approach to obtaining higher precision flux measurements has two basic components: 1) determination of the optical transmission of the atmosphere, and 2) mapping out the instrumental photon sensitivity function vs. wavelength, calibrated by referencing the measurements to the known sensitivity curve of a high precision silicon photodiode, and 3) using the self-consistency of the spectrum of stars to achieve precise color calibrations.

  2. Future of photovoltaic energy conversion in developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, S.

    1980-04-01

    Recent studies reveal that photovoltaic energy conversion will be economically viable for usage in developing countries. An overview of programs designed to lower the costs of such conversion systems is presented. Government goals are reviewed, as well as application projects relative to rural usage. A summary of the state-of-the-art in both advanced research and commercially available technology is presented. It is concluded that with the range of the work being done, such systems will be viable for many rural applications within 5 years.

  3. The role of electrification in a sustainable energy future

    SciTech Connect

    Gellings, C.

    1993-04-01

    Recent natural disasters such as the Loma Prieta earthquake, hurricanes Andrew and Iniki, and the recent hurricane-snowstorm that [open quotes]ate the East[close quotes] have reminded all Americans of their dependence on energy service, particularly electricity. Within seconds, tens of thousands of people suddenly could not turn on lights or television sets, refrigerate perishable food, cook a meal, or get from automatic teller machines to pay for batteries and supplies. At its most basic, this loss of electricity service disrupted residents' familiar patterns of life: people flipped often-used switches and nothing happened.

  4. The future of energy efficiency services in a competitive environment

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, J.

    1994-12-31

    The competitive restructuring of the electric power industry raises fundamental strategic questions about how energy efficiency services can best be delivered. While some utilities believe that the ``commoditization`` of electric power will extinguish their role in providing efficiency services, others are committed to developing new ways of profitably delivering highly integrated service packages in a more competitive environment. In other industries that have undergone similar transitions, leading companies have prospered by developing new ``reintegration`` strategies to provide enhanced customer value. In the electric power sector, these strategies will bring to the fore finance and marketing skills, giving rise to far-reaching changes in the provision of energy services. Using market-based forward prices for electricity, power merchants may soon be able to ``monetize`` electricity savings and arbitrate against kilowatt-hour prices. Providers of efficiency services will be forced to develop new techniques for ``mass customization`` of service packages, incorporating features such as power quality management, innovative pricing, billing, and financial risk management. Technology integration will be a central task for these companies. As the transmission and distribution grid is permeated with real-time price information, the optimal technical solutions for the customer, including distributed generation, storage, and efficiency options, will become increasingly site-specific and time-dependent.

  5. 1980: Prologue to the Future. Minutes of the Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (96th, Salt Lake City, Utah, May 15-16, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC.

    This report on the proceedings of the 1980 meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) contains the following papers: "On the Need for a New Energy Consciousness," by James L. Clayton; "Video: Information Technology of the 80's," by Kenneth Winslow; "Linking Bibliographic Utilities," by Donald A. Smalley; "Preservation," by Pamela W.…

  6. Refuse to energy - its place in the future

    SciTech Connect

    Hamill, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The use of municipal solid waste to generate power helps communities extend the lives of existing landfills, stabilize solid waste disposal costs, and avoid the expensive complications of siting additional landfills or building incineration facilities. The three basic techniques used to convert solid waste into electricity are the gasification, pyrolysis, or anaerobic digestion of landfill materials to produce a gaseous product; co-firing a high-quality, refuse-derived fuel (RDF) with coal or oil in retrofitted power boilers; and burning raw solid waste of RDF in dedicated boilers. Industry experts predict that half of the nation's trash will be converted to energy by the end of the century. The utility industry plays an important role in this trend. 2 figures.

  7. Evaluation of alternative future energy scenarios for Brazil using an energy mix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Maysa Joppert

    The purpose of this study is to model and assess the performance and the emissions impacts of electric energy technologies in Brazil, based on selected economic scenarios, for a time frame of 40 years, taking the year of 1995 as a base year. A Base scenario has been developed, for each of three economic development projections, based upon a sectoral analysis. Data regarding the characteristics of over 300 end-use technologies and 400 energy conversion technologies have been collected. The stand-alone MARKAL technology-based energy-mix model, first developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, was applied to a base case study and five alternative case studies, for each economic scenario. The alternative case studies are: (1) minimum increase in the thermoelectric contribution to the power production system of 20 percent after 2010; (2) extreme values for crude oil price; (3) minimum increase in the renewable technologies contribution to the power production system of 20 percent after 2010; (4) uncertainty on the cost of future renewable conversion technologies; and (5) model is forced to use the natural gas plants committed to be built in the country. Results such as the distribution of fuel used for power generation, electricity demand across economy sectors, total CO2 emissions from burning fossil fuels for power generation, shadow price (marginal cost) of technologies, and others, are evaluated and compared to the Base scenarios previous established. Among some key findings regarding the Brazilian energy system it may be inferred that: (1) diesel technologies are estimated to be the most cost-effective thermal technology in the country; (2) wind technology is estimated to be the most cost-effective technology to be used when a minimum share of renewables is imposed to the system; and (3) hydroelectric technologies present the highest cost/benefit relation among all conversion technologies considered. These results are subject to the limitations of key input

  8. A hydrogen energy carrier. Volume 1: Summary. [for meeting energy requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, R. L. (Editor); Blank, L. (Editor); Cady, T. (Editor); Cox, K. E. (Editor); Murray, R. (Editor); Williams, R. D. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The production, technology, transportation, and implementation of hydrogen into the energy system are discussed along with the fossil fuel cycle, hydrogen fuel cycle, and the demands for energy. The cost of hydrogen production by coal gasification; electrolysis by nuclear energy, and solar energy are presented. The legal aspects of a hydrogen economy are also discussed.

  9. Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David

    2010-09-01

    The past decade has seen the development of various scenarios describing long-term patterns of future Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, with each new approach adding insights to our understanding of the changing dynamics of energy consumption and aggregate future energy trends. With the recent growing focus on China's energy use and emission mitigation potential, a range of Chinese outlook models have been developed across different institutions including in China's Energy Research Institute's 2050 China Energy and CO2 Emissions Report, McKinsey & Co's China's Green Revolution report, the UK Sussex Energy Group and Tyndall Centre's China's Energy Transition report, and the China-specific section of the IEA World Energy Outlook 2009. At the same time, the China Energy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed a bottom-up, end-use energy model for China with scenario analysis of energy and emission pathways out to 2050. A robust and credible energy and emission model will play a key role in informing policymakers by assessing efficiency policy impacts and understanding the dynamics of future energy consumption and energy saving and emission reduction potential. This is especially true for developing countries such as China, where uncertainties are greater while the economy continues to undergo rapid growth and industrialization. A slightly different assumption or storyline could result in significant discrepancies among different model results. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the key models in terms of their scope, methodologies, key driver assumptions and the associated findings. A comparative analysis of LBNL's energy end-use model scenarios with the five above studies was thus conducted to examine similarities and divergences in methodologies, scenario storylines, macroeconomic drivers and assumptions as well as aggregate energy and emission scenario results. Besides directly tracing different energy and CO{sub 2} savings potential

  10. Electric automobiles: energy, environmental, and economic prospects for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, W.

    1980-01-01

    The book discusses the pros and cons of electric cars for the motorist as well as for the nation as a whole. For the motorist, it compares the prospective performance and costs of electric cars with those of conventional cars. For the nation, it projects the changes in energy use, petroleum use, air pollution, and traffic noise that would result from substituting electric cars for conventional cars. Specific projections are advanced for the years 1980, 1990, and 2000. Beginning with the reasons for the current interest in electric cars and why they have not yet come into widespread use, the book offers useful information on: prospective propulsion batteries, with projections of battery performance and capabilities; patterns for urban driving, which serve as a basis for determining the applicability of electric cars with different driving ranges and passenger capabilities; comprehensive projections of electric utility capacity and generation by fuel type, both with and without electric cars; the number of electric cars that may be recharged without adding utility capacity beyond that already planned; the requirements of electric cars for battery materials; and the impact of electric cars on urban air quality and traffic noise.

  11. Future directions for probing two and three nucleon short-range correlations at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Frankfurt, Leonid; Sargsian, Misak; Strikman, Mark

    2008-10-13

    We summarize recent progress in the studies of the short-rang correlations (SRC) in nuclei in high energy electron and hadron nucleus scattering and suggest directions for the future high energy studies aimed at establishing detailed structure of two-nucleon SRCs, revealing structure of three nucleon SRC correlations and discovering non-nucleonic degrees of freedom in nuclei.

  12. Tapping the Molecular Potential of Microalgae to Produce Biomass (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, Richard

    2012-03-22

    Richard Sayre, from Los Alamos National Laboratory, presents a talk titled "Tapping the Molecular Potential of Microalgae to Produce Biomass" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  13. Getting to the Root of Things: Spatiotemporal Regulatory Networks (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Siobhan

    2012-03-22

    Siobhan Brady from University of California, Davis, gives a talk titled "tGetting to the Root of things: Spatiotemporal Regulatory Networks" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  14. Tapping the Molecular Potential of Microalgae to Produce Biomass (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema

    Sayre, Richard [LANL

    2016-07-12

    Richard Sayre, from Los Alamos National Laboratory, presents a talk titled "Tapping the Molecular Potential of Microalgae to Produce Biomass" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  15. Getting to the Root of Things: Spatiotemporal Regulatory Networks (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema

    Brady, Siobhan [UC Davis

    2016-07-12

    Siobhan Brady from University of California, Davis, gives a talk titled "tGetting to the Root of things: Spatiotemporal Regulatory Networks" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  16. Promising future energy storage systems: Nanomaterial based systems, Zn-air, and electromechanical batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopman, R.; Richardson, J.

    1993-10-01

    Future energy storage systems will require longer shelf life, higher duty cycles, higher efficiency, higher energy and power densities, and be fabricated in an environmentally conscious process. This paper describes several possible future systems which have the potential of providing stored energy for future electric and hybrid vehicles. Three of the systems have their origin in the control of material structure at the molecular level and the subsequent nanoengineering into useful device and components: aerocapacitors, nanostructure multilayer capacitors, and the lithium ion battery. The zinc-air battery is a high energy density battery which can provide vehicles with long range (400 km in autos) and be rapidly refueled with a slurry of zinc particles and electrolyte. The electromechanical battery is a battery-sized module containing a high-speed rotor integrated with an iron-less generator mounted on magnetic bearings and housed in an evacuated chamber.

  17. Promising future energy storage systems: Nanomaterial based systems, Zn-air and electromechanical batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, R.; Richardson, J.

    1993-10-01

    Future energy storage systems will require longer shelf life, higher duty cycles, higher efficiency, higher energy and power densities, and be fabricated in an environmentally conscious process. This paper describes several possible future systems which have the potential of providing stored energy for future electric and hybrid vehicles. Three of the systems have their origin in the control of material structure at the molecular level and the subsequent nanoengineering into useful device and components: aerocapacitors, nanostructure multilayer capacitors, and the lithium ion battery. The zinc-air battery is a high energy density battery which can provide vehicles with long range (400 km in autos) and be rapidly refueled with a slurry of zinc particles and electrolyte. The electromechanical battery is a battery-sized module containing a high-speed rotor integrated with an iron-less generator mounted on magnetic bearings and housed in an evacuated chamber.

  18. Planning the Future of U.S. Particle Physics (Snowmass 2013): Chapter 3: Energy Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, R.; et al.

    2014-01-23

    These reports present the results of the 2013 Community Summer Study of the APS Division of Particles and Fields ("Snowmass 2013") on the future program of particle physics in the U.S. Chapter 3, on the Energy Frontier, discusses the program of research with high-energy colliders. This area includes experiments on the Higgs boson, the electroweak and strong interactions, and the top quark. It also encompasses direct searches for new particles and interactions at high energy.

  19. Battery Monitoring and Electrical Energy Management. Precondition for future vehicle electric power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Eberhard; Richter, Gerolf

    New vehicle electric systems are promoted by the needs of fuel economy and ecology as well as by new functions for the improvement of safety and comfort, reliability, and the availability of the vehicle. Electrically controlled and powered systems for braking, steering and stabilisation need a reliable supply of electrical energy. The planned generation of electrical energy (only when it is economically beneficial meaningful), an adequate storage, and thrifty energy housekeeping with an intelligent integration of the battery as the storage medium into the overall concept of the vehicle Energy Management, and early detection of possible restrictions of reliability by Battery Monitoring allows for actions by the Energy Management well in advance, while the driver need not be involved at all. To meet today's requirements for Battery Monitoring and Energy Management, solutions have been developed for series vehicles launched in years 2001-2003, operating at the 14 V level.

  20. Models for residential-and commercial-sector energy conservation analysis: Applications, limitations, and future potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, H. E.; Fuller, R. E.

    1980-09-01

    Four of the major models used by DOE for energy conservation analyses in the residential and commercial building sectors are reviewed and critically analyzed to determine how these models can serve as tools for DOE and its Conservation Policy Office in evaluating and quantifying their policy and program requirements. The most effective role for each model in addressing future issues of buildings energy conservation policy and analysis is assessed. The four models covered are: Oak Ridge Residential Energy Model; Micro Analysis of Transfers to Households/Comprehensive Human Resources Data System (MATH/CHRDS) Model; Oak Ridge Commercial Energy Model; and Brookhaven Buildings Energy Conservation Optimization Model (BECOM).

  1. Regulation of Flowering in Brachypodium distachyon (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Amasino, Rick

    2013-03-01

    Rick Amasino of the University of Wisconsin on "Regulation of Flowering in Brachypodium distachyon" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  2. Reprogramming Bacteria to Seek and Destroy Small Molecules (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Gallivan, Justin

    2012-03-21

    Justin Gallivan, of Emory University presents a talk titled "Reprogramming Bacteria to Seek and Destroy Small Molecules" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  3. PMI: Plant-Microbe Interfaces (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Schadt, Christopher

    2013-03-01

    Christopher Schadt of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Plant-Microbe Interactions" in the context of poplar trees at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 held in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  4. The Sunflower Genome and its Evolution (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Rieseberg, Loren

    2012-03-21

    Loren Rieseberg from the University of British Columbia on "The Sunflower Genome and its Evolution" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  5. Genomics on the Half Shell: So, What do Oysters Have to do with Energy? (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Hedgecock, Dennis

    2016-07-12

    Dennis Hedgecock from the University of Southern California answers the question, "Genomics on the Half Shell: So, What Do Oysters Have to Do with Energy?" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  6. Reprogramming Bacteria to Seek and Destroy Small Molecules (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema

    Gallivan, Justin [Emory University

    2016-07-12

    Justin Gallivan, of Emory University presents a talk titled "Reprogramming Bacteria to Seek and Destroy Small Molecules" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  7. The Sunflower Genome and its Evolution (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema

    Rieseberg, Loren [University of British Columbia

    2016-07-12

    Loren Rieseberg from the University of British Columbia on "The Sunflower Genome and its Evolution" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  8. Genomics of Climate Resilience (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    2013-03-27

    Eldredge Bermingham of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute-Panama on "Genomics of climate resilience" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  9. Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun

    2008-12-01

    China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it into the ranks of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. Even though the rapid growth is largely attributable to heavy industry, this in turn is driven by rapid urbanization process, by construction materials and equipment produced for use in buildings. Residential energy is mostly used in urban areas, where rising incomes have allowed acquisition of home appliances, as well as increased use of heating in southern China. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modeling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities.

  10. Role of non-fossil energy in meeting China's energy and climate target for 2020

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Sheng; Tong, Qing; Yu, Sha; Wang, Yu; Chai, Qimin; Zhang, Xiliang

    2012-12-01

    China is the largest energy consumer and CO2 emitter in the world. The Chinese government faces growing challenges of ensuring energy security and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. To address these two issues, the Chinese government has announced two ambitious domestic indicative autonomous mitigation targets for 2020: increasing the ratio of non-fossil energy to 15% and reducing carbon dioxide emissions per unit of GDP by 40-45% from 2005 levels. To explore the role of non-fossil energy in achieving these two targets, this paper first provides an overview of current status of non-fossil energy development in China; then gives a brief review of GDP and primary energy consumption; next assesses in detail the role of the non fossil energy in 2020, including the installed capacity and electricity generation of non-fossil energy sources, the share and role of non-fossil energy in the electricity structure, emissions reduction resulting from the shift to non-fossil energy, and challenges for accomplishing the mitigation targets in 2020 ; finally, conclusions and policy measures for non-fossil energy development are proposed.

  11. 76 FR 62804 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Notice of Meetings To Discuss Resource Issues Related to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Notice of Meetings To Discuss Resource Issues Related to the Relicensing of the Keowee-Toxaway Hydroelectric Project a. Dates and Times...

  12. 76 FR 2095 - Notice of Public Scoping Meetings for the Hawai'i Interisland Renewable Energy Program: ’Wind...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ... of Public Scoping Meetings for the Hawai'i Interisland Renewable Energy Program: 'Wind Programmatic... Islands to receive comments on the scope of the Hawai`i Interisland Renewable Energy Program: Wind... under the Hawai`i Interisland Renewable Energy Program (HIREP) and the range of reasonable...

  13. IEA Wind Task 26: The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy, Work Package 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.; Wiser, R.; Hand, M.

    2012-05-01

    Over the past 30 years, wind power has become a mainstream source of electricity generation around the world. However, the future of wind power will depend a great deal on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost of energy reductions. In this summary report, developed as part of the International Energy Agency Wind Implementing Agreement Task 26, titled 'The Cost of Wind Energy,' we provide a review of historical costs, evaluate near-term market trends, review the methods used to estimate long-term cost trajectories, and summarize the range of costs projected for onshore wind energy across an array of forward-looking studies and scenarios. We also highlight the influence of high-level market variables on both past and future wind energy costs.

  14. Future climate-driven glacier energy balance change in the Canadian Rockies using the CMIP5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Samaneh

    2016-04-01

    A fundamental understanding of the climate and the Earth's system is necessary to interpret the short- and long-term impacts of climate change. The interaction between glaciers and climate is a sensitive relationship and and calculating variations in glacier energy is key to estimating future change. It is difficult, however, to accurately project future glacier change due to the complexity in the dynamics controlling glacier response to climate. The primary goal of this paper is to illustrate the future climate-driven glacier change on Haig Glacier, located in the Canadian Rockies. Therefore, the CM3 physical model of the GFDL center for the CMIP5 set of experiments was used to examine the future surface energy balance change. Daily meteorological variables from the historical and future projections under four radiative forcing pathways of RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP6.0 and RCP8.6 were used to conduct the full energy balance modeling for Haig Glacier. These scenarios range in complexity and reflect long-term trends (decades to centuries). Hence, changes in the different incoming and outgoing energy from the glacier surface were examined during different decades for different pathways. The data used for these calculations was limited to the summer melt season, May through September (MJJAS), in both the historical and future experiments, from 1975-2100. The results shows that, relative to the control baseline period (1975 to 2005), the glacier's mass balance will be in a moderately stable condition with only a slight increase in melt energy until about mid-century. This relatively stable period will be followed by a sudden acceleration in melt energy around 2050 which increases more than 100% of the baseline amount by the end of 21st century, depending on different pathways.

  15. FutureGen: Pathway to Near-Zero Emissions and Sustainable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Zitney, S E; Sarkus, T A

    2007-11-04

    This presentation will highlight the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) FutureGen project - a $1 billion government-industry partnership to design, build, and operate a near-zero emissions coal-fueled power plant. The lead organization for the FutureGen initiative is the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), a multi-purpose laboratory operated by the U.S. DOE’s Office of Fossil Energy. NETL has a mission to conduct R&D from fundamental science to technology demonstration for resolving the environmental, supply, and reliability constraints of producing and using fossil energy resources. The commercial-scale FutureGen R&D facility is a pathway toward future fossil-energy power plants that will produce hydrogen and electricity while nearly eliminating emissions, including carbon dioxide. The 275-megawatt FutureGen plant will initiate operations around 2012 and employ advanced coal gasification technology integrated with combined cycle electricity generation, hydrogen production, and carbon capture and sequestration. Low carbon emissions would be achieved by integrating CO2 capture and sequestration operations with the power plant.

  16. Closing Keynote Presentation on the Genomics of Energy and the Environment (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, Stephen

    2012-03-22

    Steve Benner, a distinguished chemist at the Foundation for Applied Molecular Evolution, Westheimer Institute of Science and Technology, provides the closing keynote address for the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  17. Closing Keynote Presentation on the Genomics of Energy and the Environment (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema

    Benner, Stephen [Foundation for Applied Molecular Evolution, Westheimer Institute of Science and Technology

    2016-07-12

    Steve Benner, a distinguished chemist at the Foundation for Applied Molecular Evolution, Westheimer Institute of Science and Technology, provides the closing keynote address for the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  18. Final Expert Meeting Report: Simplified Space Conditioning Strategies for Energy Efficient Houses

    SciTech Connect

    Stecher, D.

    2011-07-01

    More research is needed to evaluate the level of energy efficiency and the conditions where simplified space conditioning systems will work in new and retrofitted houses. Guidance is needed on the design and installation of these systems to support a wider adoption throughout the new construction and retrofit market. The purpose of this expert meeting was to recap the current state of knowledge in this area and to provide a peer review of IBACOS's research plan for new and existing unoccupied test houses with minimized space conditioning systems.

  19. Meeting Asia's future gas import demand with stranded natural gas from central Asia, Russia, Southeast Asia, and Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; Freeman, P.A.

    2013-01-01

    This analysis shows the important contribution that stranded gas from central Asia, Russia, Southeast Asia, and Australia can make in meeting the projected demand for gas imports of China, India, Japan, and South Korea from 2020 to 2040. The estimated delivered costs of pipeline gas from stranded fields in Russia and central Asia at Shanghai, China, are generally less than delivered costs of liquefied natural gas (LNG). Australia and Malaysia are initially the lowest-cost LNG suppliers. In the concluding section, it is argued that Asian LNG demand is price sensitive, and that current Asian LNG pricing procedures are unlikely to be sustainable for gas import demand to attain maximum potential growth. Resource volumes in stranded fields evaluated can nearly meet projected import demands.

  20. 35 Years of Innovation - Leading the Way to a Clean Energy Future (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is at the forefront of energy innovation. For more than three decades, our researchers have built unparalleled expertise in renewable energy technologies while supporting the nation's vision that wind and water can provide clean, reliable, and cost-effective electricity. The NWTC strives to be an essential partner to companies, other DOE laboratories, government agencies, and universities around the world seeking to create a better, more sustainable future.

  1. Thorium Deposits of the United States - Energy Resources for the Future?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Gillerman, Virginia S.; Armbrustmacher, Theodore J.

    2009-01-01

    Many nations are exploring new ways to meet their growing energy supply needs, with a particular focus upon methods that produce lower carbon dioxide emissions compared to traditional oil, natural gas, and coal power plants. As a result, thorium-based nuclear power has experienced renewed attention as a potential energy source. Thus, it benefits the United States and other countries to identify and evaluate their indigenous thorium resources. This report describes the geology and resources of the principal thorium districts of the United States.

  2. Industrial Technologies Program - A Clean, Secure Energy Future via Industrial Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-01

    The Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) leads the national effort to save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the largest energy-using sector of the U.S. economy. ITP drives energy efficiency improvements and carbon dioxide reductions throughout the manufacturing supply chain, helping develop and deploy innovative technologies that transform the way industry uses energy.

  3. Simulation studies of the high-energy component of a future imaging Cherenkov telescope array

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; Hinton, J. A.

    2008-12-24

    The current generation of Imaging Atmospheric telescopes (IACTs) has demonstrated the power of the technique in an energy range between {approx}100 GeV up to several tens of TeV. At the high-energy end, these instruments are limited by photon statistics. Future arrays of IACTs such as CTA or AGIS are planned to push into the energy range beyond 100 TeV. Scientifically, this region is very promising, providing a probe of particles up to the 'knee' in the cosmic ray spectrum and access to an unexplored region in the spectra of nearby extragalactic sources. We present first results from our simulation studies of the high-energy part of a future IACT array and discuss the design parameters of such an array.

  4. Simulation studies of the high-energy component of a future imaging Cherenkov telescope array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, S.; Hinton, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    The current generation of Imaging Atmospheric telescopes (IACTs) has demonstrated the power of the technique in an energy range between ~100 GeV up to several tens of TeV. At the high-energy end, these instruments are limited by photon statistics. Future arrays of IACTs such as CTA or AGIS are planned to push into the energy range beyond 100 TeV. Scientifically, this region is very promising, providing a probe of particles up to the `knee' in the cosmic ray spectrum and access to an unexplored region in the spectra of nearby extragalactic sources. We present first results from our simulation studies of the high-energy part of a future IACT array and discuss the design parameters of such an array.

  5. Energy use in the U.S. steel industry: An historical perspective and future opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbles, John

    2000-09-01

    Renowned industry expert Dr. John Stubbles has projected the energy savings that the U.S. steel industry could reasonably expect to achieve in the report, Energy Use in the U.S. Steel Industry: Historical Perspective and Future Opportunities (PDF 432 KB). The report examines the potential impacts of state-of-the-art technologies and operating practices, as well as structural changes in the industry itself.

  6. Recent development and future perspectives of low energy laser shock peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalainathan, S.; Prabhakaran, S.

    2016-07-01

    The first part of the review involves the parameters controlling and optimization of low energy laser shock peening process. The second part presents the effect of laser peening without coating on ferrous, aluminum and titanium alloys. Therefore, the recently developed techniques and challenges on it are discussed. Opportunities to tackle the current challenges are overviewed. Finally, in the third part, the future perspectives of low energy laser peening on metal matrix composites and single crystals for several typical applications are deliberated.

  7. Choosing an electrical energy future for the Pacific Northwest: an alternative scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Beers, J.R.; Cavanagh, R.C.; Lash, T.R.; Mott, L.

    1980-05-19

    A strategy is presented for averting the short-term energy supply uncertainties that undermine prospects for stable economic development in the Pacific Northwest. This strategy is based on: an analysis of the present electric power consumption by various end-use sectors; comparison of incentives to promote energy conservation and lower demand growth; analysis of alternatives to current dependency on hydro power; and a study of the cost of planning and implementing future power supply programs. (LCL)

  8. Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West; Report and Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Hurlbut, D. J.; McLaren, J.; Gelman, R.

    2013-08-01

    This study assesses the outlook for utility-scale renewable energy development in the West once states have met their renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements. In the West, the last state RPS culminates in 2025, so the analysis uses 2025 as a transition point on the timeline of RE development. Most western states appear to be on track to meet their final requirements, relying primarily on renewable resources located relatively close to the customers being served. What happens next depends on several factors including trends in the supply and price of natural gas, greenhouse gas and other environmental regulations, consumer preferences, technological breakthroughs, and future public policies and regulations. Changes in any one of these factors could make future renewable energy options more or less attractive.

  9. Proceedings of the workshop on nuclear and particle physics at energies up to 31 GeV: new and future aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J.D.; Kisslinger, L.S.; Silbar, R.R.

    1981-03-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Workshop on Nuclear and Particle Physics at Energies up to 31 GeV, New and Future Aspects, held in Los Alamos, January 5 to 8, 1981. Included are invited talks and contributed papers covering recent developments in (a) weak and unified interactions (including discussions of neutrino oscillations), (b) the hadronic description of strong interactions, (c) the quark description of strong interactions, (d) hypernuclei, and (e) new facilities and proposed experiments. One of the motivations for the Workshop was to explore physics justifications for a future high-intensity proton accelerator in this energy regime. Separate abstracts were prepared for papers from this meeting. Six papers were previously included in the data base.

  10. Prospects of Renewable Energy for Meeting Growing Electricity Demand in Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uqaili, Mohammad Aslam; Harijan, Khanji; Memon, Mujeebuddin

    2007-10-01

    Pakistan is an energy deficit country. About half of the country's population has access to electricity and per capita supply is only 520 kWh. Majority of the country's population resides in rural areas and most of them are yet without electricity. Conventional electricity generation includes 66.8% thermal, 30% hydel and 3.3% nuclear. It has been projected that electricity demand in Pakistan will increase in the range of 12 MTOE to 17 MTOE by the year 2018, at an average growth rate of about 5% to 7% and will require installed capacity of about 35 GW to 50 GW. Indigenous reserves of oil and gas are limited and the country heavily depends on imported oil. Thermal power generation on the other hand also pollutes the environment. This paper presents the availability of renewables such as hydel, solar, wind and biomass energy, and their prospects for meeting growing electricity demand in Pakistan and subsequent contribution in air pollution abatement. The study concludes that there is substantial potential of these renewables and they have also bright prospects for meeting growing electricity demand in Pakistan.

  11. Will fusion be ready to meet the energy challenge for the 21st century?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bréchet, Yves; Massard, Thierry

    2016-05-01

    Finite amount of fossil fuel, global warming, increasing demand of energies in emerging countries tend to promote new sources of energies to meet the needs of the coming centuries. Despite their attractiveness, renewable energies will not be sufficient both because of intermittency but also because of the pressure they would put on conventional materials. Thus nuclear energy with both fission and fusion reactors remain the main potential source of clean energy for the coming centuries. France has made a strong commitment to fusion reactor through ITER program. But following and sharing Euratom vision on fusion, France supports the academic program on Inertial Fusion Confinement with direct drive and especially the shock ignition scheme which is heavily studied among the French academic community. LMJ a defense facility for nuclear deterrence is also open to academic community along with a unique PW class laser PETAL. Research on fusion at LMJ-PETAL is one of the designated topics for experiments on the facility. Pairing with other smaller European facilities such as Orion, PALS or LULI2000, LMJ-PETAL will bring new and exciting results and contribution in fusion science in the coming years.

  12. ARM Best Estimate Data (ARMBE) Products for Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Riihimaki, Laura; Gaustad, Krista; McFarlane, Sally

    2014-06-12

    This data set was created for the Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) model testbed project and is an extension of the hourly average ARMBE dataset to other extended facility sites and to include uncertainty estimates. Uncertainty estimates were needed in order to use uncertainty quantification (UQ) techniques with the data.

  13. Energy and the Transformation of a Metropolitan Landscape: Contrasting Contemporary and Future Settlement Geographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeigler, Donald J.

    Because of the rising real cost of energy, geographic patterns that have dominated the contemporary metropolitan landscape are in a state of change. A conceptual model of the contemporary and future metropolitan landscape is presented to stimulate thought about the changes which may evolve in the spatial organization of urban regions as the real…

  14. The implications of future building scenarios for long-term building energy research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, W.T.

    1986-12-01

    This report presents a discussion of alternative future scenarios of the building environment to the year 2010 and assesses the implications these scenarios present for long-term building energy R and D. The scenarios and energy R and D implications derived from them are intended to serve as the basis from which a strategic plan can be developed for the management of R and D programs conducted by the Office of Buildings and Community Systems, US Department of Energy. The scenarios and analysis presented here have relevance not only for government R and D programs; on the contrary, it is hoped that the results of this effort will be of interest and useful to researchers in both private and public sector organizations that deal with building energy R and D. Making R and D decisions today based on an analysis that attempts to delineate the nexus of events 25 years in the future are clearly decisions made in the face of uncertainty. Yet, the effective management of R and D programs requires a future-directed understanding of markets, technological developments, and environmental factors, as well as their interactions. The analysis presented in this report is designed to serve that need. Although the probability of any particular scenario actually occurring is uncertain, the scenarios to be presented are sufficiently robust to set bounds within which to examine the interaction of forces that will shape the future building environment.

  15. Energy and Cost Optimized Technology Options to Meet Energy Needs of Food Processors

    SciTech Connect

    Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Srivastava, Viraj; Hoffman, Michael G.; Wagner, Anne W.; Thornton, John

    2015-05-01

    Full Paper Submission for: Combined cooling, heating and electric power (CCHP) distributed generation (DG) systems can provide electric power and, heating and cooling capability to commercial and industrial facilities directly onsite, while increasing energy efficiency, security of energy supply, grid independence and enhancing the environmental and economic situation for the site. Food processing industries often have simultaneous requirements for heat, steam, chilling and electricity making them well suited for the use of such systems to supply base-load or as peak reducing generators enabling reduction of overall energy use intensity. This paper documents analysis from a project evaluating opportunities enabled by CCHPDG for emission and cost reductions and energy storage systems installed onsite at food processing facilities. In addition, this distributed generation coupled with energy storage demonstrates a non-wires solution to delay or eliminate the need for upgrades to electric distribution systems. It was found that a dairy processing plant in the Pacific Northwest currently purchasing 15,000 MWh/yr of electricity and 190,000 MMBtu/yr of gas could be provided with a 1.1 MW CCHP system reducing the amount of electric power purchased to 450 MWh/yr while increasing the gas demand to 255,000 MMBtu/yr. The high percentage of hydro-power in this region resulted in CO2 emissions from CCHP to be higher than that attributed to the electric utility/regional energy mix. The value of this work is in documenting a real-world example demonstrating the value of CCHP to facility owners and financial decision makers to encourage them to more seriously consider CCHP systems when building or upgrading facilities.

  16. Genome-Scale Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Muchero, Wellington

    2012-03-22

    Wellington Muchero from Oak Ridge National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  17. Genome-Scale Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema

    Muchero, Wellington [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2016-07-12

    Wellington Muchero from Oak Ridge National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  18. Future perspectives in melanoma research: meeting report from the "Melanoma Bridge": Napoli, December 3rd-6th 2014.

    PubMed

    Ascierto, Paolo A; Atkins, Michael; Bifulco, Carlo; Botti, Gerardo; Cochran, Alistair; Davies, Michael; Demaria, Sandra; Dummer, Reinhard; Ferrone, Soldano; Formenti, Silvia; Gajewski, Thomas F; Garbe, Claus; Khleif, Samir; Kiessling, Rolf; Lo, Roger; Lorigan, Paul; Arthur, Grant Mc; Masucci, Giuseppe; Melero, Ignacio; Mihm, Martin; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Parmiani, Giorgio; Puzanov, Igor; Romero, Pedro; Schilling, Bastian; Seliger, Barbara; Stroncek, David; Taube, Janis; Tomei, Sara; Zarour, Hassane M; Testori, Alessandro; Wang, Ena; Galon, Jérôme; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Mozzillo, Nicola; Marincola, Francesco M; Thurin, Magdalena

    2015-11-30

    The fourth "Melanoma Bridge Meeting" took place in Naples, December 3-6th, 2014. The four topics discussed at this meeting were: Molecular and Immunological Advances, Combination Therapies, News in Immunotherapy, and Tumor Microenvironment and Biomarkers. Until recently systemic therapy for metastatic melanoma patients was ineffective, but recent advances in tumor biology and immunology have led to the development of new targeted and immunotherapeutic agents that prolong progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). New therapies, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway inhibitors as well as other signaling pathway inhibitors, are being tested in patients with metastatic melanoma either as monotherapy or in combination, and all have yielded promising results. These include inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinases (BRAF, MEK, and VEGFR), the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) pathway [PI3K, AKT, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)], activators of apoptotic pathway, and the cell cycle inhibitors (CDK4/6). Various locoregional interventions including radiotherapy and surgery are still valid approaches in treatment of advanced melanoma that can be integrated with novel therapies. Intrinsic, adaptive and acquired resistance occur with targeted therapy such as BRAF inhibitors, where most responses are short-lived. Given that the reactivation of the MAPK pathway through several distinct mechanisms is responsible for the majority of acquired resistance, it is logical to combine BRAF inhibitors with inhibitors of targets downstream in the MAPK pathway. For example, combination of BRAF/MEK inhibitors (e.g., dabrafenib/trametinib) have been demonstrated to improve survival compared to monotherapy. Application of novel technologies such sequencing have proven useful as a tool for identification of MAPK pathway-alternative resistance mechanism and designing other combinatorial therapies such as those between BRAF and AKT inhibitors. Improved

  19. Future perspectives in melanoma research: meeting report from the "Melanoma Bridge": Napoli, December 3rd-6th 2014.

    PubMed

    Ascierto, Paolo A; Atkins, Michael; Bifulco, Carlo; Botti, Gerardo; Cochran, Alistair; Davies, Michael; Demaria, Sandra; Dummer, Reinhard; Ferrone, Soldano; Formenti, Silvia; Gajewski, Thomas F; Garbe, Claus; Khleif, Samir; Kiessling, Rolf; Lo, Roger; Lorigan, Paul; Arthur, Grant Mc; Masucci, Giuseppe; Melero, Ignacio; Mihm, Martin; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Parmiani, Giorgio; Puzanov, Igor; Romero, Pedro; Schilling, Bastian; Seliger, Barbara; Stroncek, David; Taube, Janis; Tomei, Sara; Zarour, Hassane M; Testori, Alessandro; Wang, Ena; Galon, Jérôme; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Mozzillo, Nicola; Marincola, Francesco M; Thurin, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    The fourth "Melanoma Bridge Meeting" took place in Naples, December 3-6th, 2014. The four topics discussed at this meeting were: Molecular and Immunological Advances, Combination Therapies, News in Immunotherapy, and Tumor Microenvironment and Biomarkers. Until recently systemic therapy for metastatic melanoma patients was ineffective, but recent advances in tumor biology and immunology have led to the development of new targeted and immunotherapeutic agents that prolong progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). New therapies, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway inhibitors as well as other signaling pathway inhibitors, are being tested in patients with metastatic melanoma either as monotherapy or in combination, and all have yielded promising results. These include inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinases (BRAF, MEK, and VEGFR), the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) pathway [PI3K, AKT, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)], activators of apoptotic pathway, and the cell cycle inhibitors (CDK4/6). Various locoregional interventions including radiotherapy and surgery are still valid approaches in treatment of advanced melanoma that can be integrated with novel therapies. Intrinsic, adaptive and acquired resistance occur with targeted therapy such as BRAF inhibitors, where most responses are short-lived. Given that the reactivation of the MAPK pathway through several distinct mechanisms is responsible for the majority of acquired resistance, it is logical to combine BRAF inhibitors with inhibitors of targets downstream in the MAPK pathway. For example, combination of BRAF/MEK inhibitors (e.g., dabrafenib/trametinib) have been demonstrated to improve survival compared to monotherapy. Application of novel technologies such sequencing have proven useful as a tool for identification of MAPK pathway-alternative resistance mechanism and designing other combinatorial therapies such as those between BRAF and AKT inhibitors. Improved

  20. Energy and Cost Optimized Technology Options to Meet Energy Needs of Food Processors

    SciTech Connect

    Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Srivastava, Viraj; Hoffman, Michael G.; Wagner, Anne W.; Thornton, John

    2015-04-02

    ABSTRACT Combined cooling, heating and electric power (CCHP) distributed generation (DG) systems can provide electricity, heat, and cooling power to buildings and industrial processes directly onsite, while significantly increasing energy efficiency, security of energy supply, and grid independence. Fruit, vegetable, dairy and meat processing industries with simultaneous requirements for heat, steam, chilling and electricity, are well suited for the use of such systems to supply base-load electrical demand or as peak reducing generators with heat recovery in the forms of hot water, steam and/or chilled water. This paper documents results and analysis from a pilot project to evaluate opportunities for energy, emission, and cost for CCHP-DG and energy storage systems installed onsite at food processing facilities. It was found that a dairy processing plant purchasing 15,000 MWh of electricity will need to purchase 450 MWh with the integration of a 1.1 MW CCHP system. Here, the natural gas to be purchased increased from 190,000 MMBtu to 255,000 MMBtu given the fuel requirements of the CCHP system. CCHP systems lower emissions, however, in the Pacific Northwest the high percentage of hydro-power results in CO2 emissions from CCHP were higher than that attributed to the electric utility/regional energy mix. The value of this paper is in promoting and educating financial decision makers to seriously consider CCHP systems when building or upgrading facilities. The distributed generation aspect can reduce utility costs for industrial facilities and show non-wires solution benefits to delay or eliminate the need for upgrades to local electric transmission and distribution systems.

  1. Modelling the energy future of Switzerland after the phase out of nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Paula; Van Vliet, Oscar

    2015-04-01

    In September 2013, the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) published the final report of the proposed measures in the context of the Energy Strategy 2050 (ES2050). The ES2050 draws an energy scenario where the nuclear must be substituted by alternative sources. This implies a fundamental change in the energy system that has already been questioned by experts, e.g. [Piot, 2014]. Therefore, we must analyse in depth the technical implications of change in the Swiss energy mix from a robust baseload power such as nuclear, to an electricity mix where intermittent sources account for higher rates. Accomplishing the ES2050 imply difficult challenges, since nowadays nuclear power is the second most consumed energy source in Switzerland. According to the SFOE, nuclear accounts for a 23.3% of the gross production, only surpassed by crude oil products (43.3%). Hydropower is the third source more consumed, representing approximately the half of the nuclear (12.2%). Considering that Switzerland has almost reached the maximum of its hydropower capacity, renewables are more likely to be the alternative when the nuclear phase out takes place. Hence, solar and wind power will play an important role in the future Swiss energy mix, even though currently new renewables account for only 1.9% of the gross energy consumption. In this study we look for realistic and efficient combinations of energy resources to substitute nuclear power. Energy modelling is a powerful tool to design an energy system with high energy security that avoids problems of intermittency [Mathiesen & Lund, 2009]. In Switzerland, energy modelling has been used by the government [Abt et. al., 2012] and also has significant relevance in academia [Mathys, 2012]. Nevertheless, we detected a gap in the study of the security in energy scenarios [Busser, 2013]. This study examines the future electricity production of Switzerland using Calliope, a multi-scale energy systems model, developed at Imperial College, London and

  2. Assessment of arid lands plants as future energy crops for the electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.E.; Brooks, W.H.

    1981-12-01

    This technical report has been prepared to assess and estimate the prospects of utilizing selected native arid lands plant species (terpene- and nonterpene-containing species) as future renewable energy resources, especially by US electric utilities, and to familiarize nonspecialists with some major problems that must be resolved before these energy sources can become dependable supplies. The assessment includes descriptions of the processing and production technologies associated with the various plant species as well as recommendations for research procedures and development programs specific to arid lands. Suggestions about the agronomic and economic parameters of growing these plants as energy-source crops are also included.

  3. Energy sources for the future dismounted soldier, the total integration of the energy consumption within the soldier system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raadschelders, Jillis W.; Jansen, Tiny

    At present, the energy supply for the electronic equipment of the soldier is problematic. Each component has its own battery pack. These battery packs are not interchangeable and each requires its own charger. Furthermore, because they are all dimensioned to deliver the peak power for each item of equipment, this leads to a higher battery weight than necessary. It is expected that the system of the future soldier will use a central power source to supply the energy for all the different components. An energy bus will be integrated within the soldier's system for this. The different components will generate their required voltages from the bus voltage by using high efficiency dc/dc converters. The use of an energy bus with local voltage conversion will facilitate inter-operability between different forces. The energy sources can easily be exchanged. For the near future, batteries are still considered to be the best option for the energy source. Rechargeable batteries are preferred above non-rechargeable ones due to logistic and environmental problems. For the long-term replacement of batteries, the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is considered a viable option. Several different battery packs were tested for their capability to supply both the required energy and power during a 24 h mission. The tests were carried out with a controlled power method, as maximum power should be deliverable during 10% of the operation time.

  4. Episodic future thinking reduces delay discounting and energy intake in children.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Tinuke Oluyomi; Said, Michele; Stanton, Christina M; Epstein, Leonard H

    2015-08-01

    Discounting of larger future rewards in favor of smaller immediate rewards is known as delay discounting. High delay discounting or a bias towards immediate gratification impedes self-regulation and is associated with maladaptive eating behaviors. Children in general show greater delay discounting than adults. Obese children in particular, have greater difficulty delaying gratification for edible rewards. Episodic future thinking (EFT) which is mental self-projection to pre-experience future events reduces delay discounting and reduces energy intake in overweight/obese adults. However, these EFT effects have not been examined in children. We evaluated the effects of EFT versus control episodic recent thinking (ERT) on delay discounting and ad libitum energy intake while thinking about episodic cues in 42 overweight/obese 9 to 14year olds. Results showed that EFT led to less delay discounting and lowered energy intake, and EFT had the greatest effect on reducing energy intake in children with a higher desire to restrict food intake. This suggests that EFT may be useful in pediatric obesity treatment programs to help children regulate energy intake.

  5. The first meeting of the Advisory Committee on the Future of the US Space Program (C-FUSSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    These are minutes of the Advisory Committee on the Future of the U.S. Space Program (C-FUSSP). From September 13-15, 1990, presentations were made by the major leaders at NASA as well as industry leaders. The presentations draw on previous studies of the future of NASA space programs. Allowance was made for plenty of questions. The minutes reflect the views of governmental units such as the National Space Council, the NASA Administrators Office, Office of Space Science and Applications, Office of Space Flight, Office of Space Operations, Office of Aeronautics, Exploration, and Technology as well as other pertinent units and outside organizations. Members of the committee are listed at the conclusion of the minutes.

  6. Meeting today's challenges to supply tomorrow's energy. Clean fossil energy technical and policy seminar

    SciTech Connect

    2005-07-01

    Papers discussed the coal policy of China, Russia, Indonesia and Vietnam; clean coal technology (small-scale coal power plants, carbon capture and sequestration, new coking process SCOPE21, coal gasification (HyPr-RING), CO{sub 2} reduction technology, Supercritical coal-fired units and CFB boilers, EAGLE project, coal liquefaction), the coal consumer's view of clean fossil energy policy, and natural gas policy and technology. Some of the papers only consist of the presentation overheads/viewgraphs.

  7. More than meets the eye: Using cognitive work analysis to identify design requirements for future rail level crossing systems.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Paul M; Lenné, Michael G; Read, Gemma J M; Mulvihill, Christine M; Cornelissen, Miranda; Walker, Guy H; Young, Kristie L; Stevens, Nicholas; Stanton, Neville A

    2016-03-01

    An increasing intensity of operations means that the longstanding safety issue of rail level crossings is likely to become worse in the transport systems of the future. It has been suggested that the failure to prevent collisions may be, in part, due to a lack of systems thinking during design, crash analysis, and countermeasure development. This paper presents a systems analysis of current active rail level crossing systems in Victoria, Australia that was undertaken to identify design requirements to improve safety in future rail level crossing environments. Cognitive work analysis was used to analyse rail level crossing systems using data derived from a range of activities. Overall the analysis identified a range of instances where modification or redesign in line with systems thinking could potentially improve behaviour and safety. A notable finding is that there are opportunities for redesign outside of the physical rail level crossing infrastructure, including improved data systems, in-vehicle warnings and modifications to design processes, standards and guidelines. The implications for future rail level crossing systems are discussed. PMID:26143077

  8. More than meets the eye: Using cognitive work analysis to identify design requirements for future rail level crossing systems.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Paul M; Lenné, Michael G; Read, Gemma J M; Mulvihill, Christine M; Cornelissen, Miranda; Walker, Guy H; Young, Kristie L; Stevens, Nicholas; Stanton, Neville A

    2016-03-01

    An increasing intensity of operations means that the longstanding safety issue of rail level crossings is likely to become worse in the transport systems of the future. It has been suggested that the failure to prevent collisions may be, in part, due to a lack of systems thinking during design, crash analysis, and countermeasure development. This paper presents a systems analysis of current active rail level crossing systems in Victoria, Australia that was undertaken to identify design requirements to improve safety in future rail level crossing environments. Cognitive work analysis was used to analyse rail level crossing systems using data derived from a range of activities. Overall the analysis identified a range of instances where modification or redesign in line with systems thinking could potentially improve behaviour and safety. A notable finding is that there are opportunities for redesign outside of the physical rail level crossing infrastructure, including improved data systems, in-vehicle warnings and modifications to design processes, standards and guidelines. The implications for future rail level crossing systems are discussed.

  9. Design of pharmaceutical products to meet future patient needs requires modification of current development paradigms and business models.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, S; Baeyens, J-P; Becker, R; Maio, M; Bresciani, M; Shreeves, T; Ecker, F; Gogol, M

    2014-06-01

    Drugs represent the most common intervention strategy for managing acute and chronic medical conditions. In light of demographic change and the increasing age of patients, the classic model of drug research and development by the pharmaceutical industry and drug prescription by physicians is reaching its limits. Different stakeholders, e.g. industry, regulatory authorities, health insurance systems, physicians etc., have at least partially differing interests regarding the process of healthcare provision. The primary responsibility for the correct handling of medication and adherence to treatment schedules lies with the recipient of a drug-based therapy, i.e. the patient. It is thus necessary to interactively involve elderly patients, as well as the other stakeholders, in the development of medication and medication application devices, and in clinical trials. This approach will provide the basis for developing a strategy that better meets patients' needs, thus resulting in improved adherence to treatment schedules and better therapeutic outcomes.

  10. Homeland security: safeguarding America's future with energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2002-08-01

    The State Energy Advisory Board (STEAB) presents this 10th annual report following the one-year anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. This event has had profound impacts on all segments of American society, not the least of which is this country’s energy sector. Long before September 11, a number of energy issues grabbed the nation’s attention, including opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and natural gas exploration, the power crisis in California, nationwide natural gas and gasoline price increases, and the administration’s May 2001 National Energy Policy. However, the events of September 11 refocused attention on the prominent role energy plays in the country’s homeland security. For the most part, the energy aspects of homeland security have focused on the physical security of critical energy emergency planning and energy infrastructure, such as power plants, refineries, and power and fuel transmission systems. While STEAB recognizes the importance of protecting our existing energy infrastructure, this should not be the sole focus of homeland security as it relates to energy.

  11. Current and future industrial energy service characterizations. Volume II. Energy data on the US manufacturing subsector

    SciTech Connect

    Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

    1980-10-01

    In order to characterize industrial energy service, current energy demand, its end uses, and cost of typical energy applications and resultant services in the industrial sector were examined and a projection of state industrial energy demands and prices to 1990 was developed. Volume II presents in Section 2 data on the US manufacturing subsector energy demand, intensity, growth rates, and cost for 1971, 1974, and 1976. These energy data are disaggregated not only by fuel type but also by user classifications, including the 2-digit SIC industry groups, 3-digit subgroups, and 4-digit SIC individual industries. These data characterize typical energy applications and the resultant services in this subsector. The quantities of fuel and electric energy purchased by the US manufacturing subsector were converted to British thermal units and reported in billions of Btu. The conversion factors are presented in Table 4-1 of Volume I. To facilitate the descriptive analysis, all energy cost and intensity data were expressed in constant 1976 dollars. The specific US industrial energy service characteristics developed and used in the descriptive analysis are presented in Volume I. Section 3 presents the computer program used to produce the tabulated data.

  12. Transportation Energy Futures: Key Opportunities and Tools for Decision Makers (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examines underexplored greenhouse gas-abatement and oil-savings opportunities by consolidating transportation energy knowledge, conducting advanced analysis, and exploring additional opportunities for sound strategic action. Led by NREL, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, the project's primary goal is to provide analysis to accompany DOE-EERE's long-term transportation energy planning by addressing high-priority questions, informing domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments. Research and analysis were conducted with an eye toward short-term actions that support long-term energy goals The project looks beyond technology to examine each key question in the context of the marketplace, consumer behavior, industry capabilities, and infrastructure. This updated fact sheet includes a new section on initial project findings.

  13. The Futures of Adult Educator(s): Agency, Identity and Ethos. Joint Conference Proceedings of the 2nd ESREA/ReNAdET Meeting and the 4th TQF Seminar (Tallinn, Estonia, November 9-11, 2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heikkinen, Anja, Ed.; Jogi, Larissa, Ed.; Jutte, Wolfgang, Ed.; Zarifis, Georgios K., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This edited volume contains the papers presented in the 2nd ESREA|ReNAdet meeting that was jointly organised with the VET & CULTURE Network in the University of Tallinn (Estonia), 9-11 November 2011. The papers that appear in the volume discuss the future (or the futures) of adult educators in respect to issues of developing their identities and…

  14. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2013-03-01

    Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  15. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation. Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2013-03-15

    Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  16. Interacting holographic dark energy, cosmic coincidence and the future singularity of the closed FRW universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have considered the closed FRW universe filled with two interacting fluids; dark matter and holographic dark energy components. Under certain conditions, this dark energy model is characterised by a big rip type future singularity and therefore a finite life time of the universe (Cruz et al., 2008). As the universe passes through a significant time when the matter and the dark energy densities are roughly comparable between the matter and the dark energy dominated era. So, we calculated the fraction of total life time of the universe when the universe passes through the coincidental stage for this future singularity by considering 1/ro future singularity ts is very large when the value of the constant c is much closed to zero and the fraction is smaller for smaller values of r0. Comparison of the results with the observational data and its importance has also been discussed.

  17. Current demographics suggest future energy supplies will be inadequate to slow human population growth.

    PubMed

    DeLong, John P; Burger, Oskar; Hamilton, Marcus J

    2010-10-05

    Influential demographic projections suggest that the global human population will stabilize at about 9-10 billion people by mid-century. These projections rest on two fundamental assumptions. The first is that the energy needed to fuel development and the associated decline in fertility will keep pace with energy demand far into the future. The second is that the demographic transition is irreversible such that once countries start down the path to lower fertility they cannot reverse to higher fertility. Both of these assumptions are problematic and may have an effect on population projections. Here we examine these assumptions explicitly. Specifically, given the theoretical and empirical relation between energy-use and population growth rates, we ask how the availability of energy is likely to affect population growth through 2050. Using a cross-country data set, we show that human population growth rates are negatively related to per-capita energy consumption, with zero growth occurring at ∼13 kW, suggesting that the global human population will stop growing only if individuals have access to this amount of power. Further, we find that current projected future energy supply rates are far below the supply needed to fuel a global demographic transition to zero growth, suggesting that the predicted leveling-off of the global population by mid-century is unlikely to occur, in the absence of a transition to an alternative energy source. Direct consideration of the energetic constraints underlying the demographic transition results in a qualitatively different population projection than produced when the energetic constraints are ignored. We suggest that energetic constraints be incorporated into future population projections.

  18. Energy, Key to the Future. Teaching Techniques for the Understanding and Conservation of Energy, K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mengel, Wayne

    The teaching techniques presented in this booklet are designed to provide students with concepts which relate to the energy crisis and energy conservation. The techniques are not presented in the form of completed lesson plans, but rather are intended to act as starting points for further development by the teacher. General activities for students…

  19. Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Energy Generation and Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Dillon, Heather E.

    2011-09-30

    As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, installation of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including the building envelope, mechanical systems, and lighting, have been maximized at the most cost-effective limit.

  20. USVI Energy Road Map: Charting the Course to a Clean Energy Future (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the integrated clean energy deployment process and progress of the Energy Development in Island Nations U.S. Virgin Islands pilot project road map, including over-arching goals, organization, strategy, technology-specific goals and accomplishments, challenges, solutions, and upcoming milestones.