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Sample records for meeting atlanta ga

  1. 75 FR 2582 - Proposed Modification of the Atlanta, GA, Class B Airspace Area; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ..., in Covington, GA, as published in the Federal Register on Friday, December 4, 2009 (74 FR 63818), FR... Federal Aviation Administration Proposed Modification of the Atlanta, GA, Class B Airspace Area; Public... Friday, December 4, 2009, concerning a proposal to revise Class B airspace at Atlanta, GA, (74 FR...

  2. American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (ASCPT)-111th annual meeting. 17-20 March 2010, Atlanta, GA, USA.

    PubMed

    Veryard, Claire

    2010-05-01

    The 111th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, held in Atlanta, included topics covering disclosures of new data in the field of pharmacokinetics and drug interactions. This conference report highlights selected presentations on pharmacokinetic studies of several investigational drugs, including evatanepag (Pfizer Inc), AEG-33773 (Aegera Therapeutics Inc), JNJ-16269110 (Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development LLC), PF-3716539 (ViiV Healthcare), MK-0736 (Merck & Co Inc), a combination of Ginkgo biloba and cilostazol (Renexin SK Chemicals Co Ltd), PP-101 (Pacific Pharmaceuticals Co Ltd), ACT-178882 (Acetlion Ltd/Merck & Co Inc) and edoxaban (Daiichi Sankyo Co Ltd).

  3. RadNet Air Data From Atlanta, GA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Atlanta, GA from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  4. EPA Hosts Environmental Justice Interagency Working Group Meeting in Atlanta to address Concerns in North Birmingham Communities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (ATLANTA - February 17, 2016) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will host a Federal Interagency Working Group on Environmental Justice Meeting (EJ IWG) on Thursday, February 18, 2016 in the Sam Nunn Federal Building in Atlanta, GA. The EJ IWG

  5. 78 FR 68777 - Proposed Establishment of Area Navigation (RNAV) Routes; Atlanta, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 RIN 2120-AA66 Proposed Establishment of Area Navigation...-routes) in the Atlanta, GA area. The new routes would support the Atlanta Optimization of Airspace and..., GA area. Since there are no published routes currently available for aircraft to use...

  6. EPA Awards Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Ga. with Grant to Develop Innovative Sustainable Projects

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) awarded the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Ga. with a People, Prosperity and the Planet (P3) grants. Nationally, the grants were awarded to 38 university student teams for p

  7. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy to speak at the 1st International Environmental Youth Symposium 2015 in Atlanta, Ga.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its Global Partners will host the first International Youth Environmental Symposium at the Sam Nunn Atlanta Federal Center in Atlanta, Ga. on October 2, 2015. The theme for the symposium i

  8. 78 FR 70895 - Proposed Establishment and Modification of Area Navigation (RNAV) Routes; Atlanta, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... Area Navigation (RNAV) Routes; Atlanta, GA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY: This action proposes to establish 14 RNAV Q-routes and modify 4 Q-routes in support of the Optimization of Airspace and Procedures in a Metroplex (OAPM)...

  9. 77 FR 8255 - Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site, Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), the United States Environmental Protection Agency has entered into a settlement for past response costs concerning the Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site... AGENCY Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site, Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement...

  10. 77 FR 2981 - Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site; Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), the United States Environmental Protection Agency has entered into a settlement for past response costs concerning the Constitution Road Drum... AGENCY Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site; Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement...

  11. 76 FR 45771 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, GA; Application for Manufacturing Authority; Makita Corporation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 26--Atlanta, GA; Application for Manufacturing Authority... Manufacturing); Buford, GA An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones Board (the Board) by Georgia Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 26, requesting manufacturing authority on behalf...

  12. 77 FR 75406 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, GA; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Perkins Shibaura...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 26--Atlanta, GA; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Perkins Shibaura Engines LLC, (Diesel Engines), Griffin, GA Perkins Shibaura Engines LLC (Perkins Shibaura), an operator of FTZ 26, submitted...

  13. Summary of Needs and Opportunities from the 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting: Atlanta, Georgia -- March 16-18, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-05-01

    This summary report outlines needs and issues for increasing energy efficiency of new and existing U.S homes, as identified at the U.S Department of Energy Building America program Spring 2011 stakeholder meeting in Atlanta, Georgia.

  14. Destination Station Atlanta

    NASA Video Gallery

    Destination Station was recently in Atlanta from April 15 through April 21. During the week, NASA visited schools, hospitals, museums, and the city’s well known Atlanta Science Tavern Meet Up gro...

  15. EPA Awards Environmental Education Grant to Captain Planet Foundation in Atlanta, GA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA --- Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the Captain Planet Foundation as a recipient of an Environmental Education Grant. The Atlanta-based non-profit was selected in the latest round of awards

  16. Understanding the emission impacts of HOV to HOT lane conversions: Experience from Atlanta, GA.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanzhi Ann; Liu, Haobing; Rodgers, Michael O; Guin, Angshuman; Hunter, Michael; Sheikh, Adnan; Guensler, Randall L

    2017-03-27

    Converting a congested High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane into a High Occupancy Toll (HOT) lane is a viable option for improving travel time reliability for carpools and buses that use the managed lane. However, the emission impacts of HOV-to-HOT-conversions are not well understood. The lack of emissions impact quantification for HOT conversions creates a policy challenge for agencies making transportation funding choices. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the case study before-and-after changes in vehicle emissions for the Atlanta, GA I-85 HOV/HOT lane conversion project, implemented in October, 2011. The analyses employed the Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) for project-level analysis with monitored changes in vehicle activity data collected by Georgia Tech researchers for the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT). During the quarterly field data collection from 2010 to 2012, more than 1.5 million license plates were observed and matched to vehicle class and age information using the vehicle registration database. The study also utilized the 20-second, lane-specific traffic operations data from the Georgia NaviGAtor intelligent transportation system, as well as a direct feed of HOT lane usage data from the State Road and Tollway Authority (SRTA) managed lane system. As such, the analyses in this paper simultaneously assessed the impacts associated with changes in traffic volumes, onroad operating conditions, and fleet composition before-and-after the conversion. Both greenhouse gases and criteria pollutants were examined. Implications A straight before-after analysis showed about 5% decrease in air pollutants and CO2. However, when the before-after calendar year of analysis was held constant (to account for the effect of one-year of fleet turnover), mass emissions at the analysis site during peak hours increased by as much as 17%, with little change in CO2. Further investigation revealed that a large percentage decrease in criteria pollutants in

  17. Characterization of CCN and IN activity of bacterial isolates collected in Atlanta, GA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdue, Sara; Waters, Samantha; Karthikeyan, Smruthi; Konstantinidis, Kostas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    Characterization of CCN activity of bacteria, other than a few select types such as Pseudomonas syringae, is limited, especially when looked at in conjunction with corresponding IN activity. The link between these two points is especially important for bacteria as those that have high CCN activity are likely to form an aqueous phase required for immersion freezing. Given the high ice nucleation temperature of bacterial cells, especially in immersion mode, it is important to characterize the CCN and IN activity of many different bacterial strains. To this effect, we developed a droplet freezing assay (DFA) which consists of an aluminum cold plate, cooled by a continuous flow of an ethylene glycol-water mixture, in order to observe immersion freezing of the collected bacteria. Here, we present the initial results on the CCN and IN activities of bacterial samples we have collected in Atlanta, GA. Bacterial strains were collected and isolated from rainwater samples taken from different storms throughout the year. We then characterized the CCN activity of each strain using a DMT Continuous Flow Streamwise Thermal Gradient CCN Counter by exposing the aerosolized bacteria to supersaturations ranging from 0.05% to 0.6%. Additionally, using our new DFA, we characterized the IN activity of each bacterial strain at temperatures ranging from -20oC to 0oC. The combined CCN and IN activity gives us valuable information on how some uncharacterized bacteria contribute to warm and mixed-phase cloud formation in the atmosphere.

  18. The motion of floating and submerged objects in the Chattahoochee River, Atlanta, GA.

    PubMed

    Dilen, D R

    1984-10-01

    Two mannikins, one designed to float and one designed to sink, were used to examine the ways in which human bodies move in a river. The floating mannikin was used to examine the movement of a body floating downstream on the surface and to determined the flow patterns of surface currents through bends in the Chattahoochee River in Atlanta, GA. The submerged mannikin was constructed to have a specific gravity of a deceased person (over a range of specific gravities) and was used to examine the motion of a body immediately upon entering the water. The submerged mannikin also was used to examine motion along the bottom of the river. Floating objects near each bank of the Chattahoochee River were found to remain along their respective banks as they moved downstream through the bends in the river. No mechanisms of transport from one bank to the other in the bends was found. The movement of a submerged dummy only occurred at very high river flows. The dummy remained stationary at the place where it reached the bottom for tests over a wide range of specific gravities and a moderate range of flow levels. A discussion of the river conditions (for example, bottom topography, bottom composition, flow rates, and hydraulics) is included. The results of the experiments offer initial guidelines and principles that can be used by officials and agencies involved in the search, rescue, and recovery of bodies in most rivers.

  19. Major subtypes of invasive Haemophilus influenzae from 1983 to 1985 in Atlanta, Ga.

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, J A; Pigott, N; Cochi, S L; Facklam, R R

    1990-01-01

    We compared outer membrane protein (OMP) patterns of Haemophilus influenzae isolated in metropolitan Atlanta, Ga., from July 1983 to June 1985. Of 74 randomly selected H. influenzae serotype b, biotype I, isolates (24% of the total number of H. influenzae, and 32% of the total number of H. influenzae serotype b, biotype I, isolates), 66 (89.2%) had the same OMP pattern. Of the remaining eight, five (6.7%) had an identical OMP pattern. The other three isolates had separate and distinct patterns. A greater diversity of OMP patterns was found with H. influenzae serotype b, biotype II, and nonserotypeable H. influenzae. Of the 18 H. influenzae serotype b, biotype II, isolates (5.8% of the total number of H. influenzae isolates), 1 had an OMP pattern similar to that of the predominate biotype I OMP type, 6 (33% of the biotype II) had the same pattern, and 11 had heterogeneous patterns. Of the 19 recoverable, nonserotypeable biotype II isolates (6.8% of the total number of H. influenzae), 18 had different OMP patterns, and no pattern was similar to those observed with serotype b. These findings indicate that most H. influenzae strains isolated during this 2-year period were indistinguishable by serotype, biotype, or OMP patterns. Images PMID:2191007

  20. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. VIEW OF APARTMENT INTERIOR. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  1. 78 FR 76810 - Information Collection; Environmental Justice and the Urban Forest in Atlanta, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ...In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Forest Service is seeking comments from all interested individuals and organizations on the new information collection, Environmental Justice and the Urban Forest in Atlanta,...

  2. 75 FR 62323 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Atlanta, GA; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... Completeness Determination for the Purpose of Stopping Sanctions Clock AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of Letter to Governor Regarding Completeness and Stopping of Sanctions Clock... Plan (SIP) revision complete and stop the sanctions clocks associated with the Atlanta, Georgia,...

  3. ANALYSIS OF COMPONENTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) FOR AN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT STUDY OF TWO SENSITIVE COHORTS IN ATLANTA, GA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction
    An exposure assessment study was conducted in Atlanta, GA during fall 1999 and spring 2000 to examine the short-term effects of exposure to particulate matter and gaseous air pollutants on heart rate variability (HRV). Characterization of particulate matter (PM...

  4. Impacts of cool cities on air quality: A preliminary modeling assessment for Nashville TN, Dallas TX and Atlanta GA

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, Haider

    1998-06-15

    Previous atmospheric modeling efforts that concentrated on the Los Angeles Basin suggested beneficial and significant air quality impacts from cool cities strategies. This paper discusses an extension of similar modeling efforts to three regions, Atlanta GA, Dallas - Ft. Worth TX, and Nashville TN, that experience smog and air quality problems. According to the older ozone air quality standard (120 ppb), these regions were classified as serious, moderate, and marginal, respectively, but may be out of compliance with respect to the newer, 80-ppb/8-hours standard. Results from this exploratory modeling work suggest a range of possible impacts on meteorological and air quality conditions. For example, peak ozone concentrations during each region's respective episode could be decreased by 1-6 ppb (conservative and optimistic scenarios, respectively) in Nashville, 5-15 ppb in Dallas - Fort Worth, and 5-12 ppb in Atlanta following implementation of cool cities. The reductions are generally smaller than those obtained from simulating the Los Angeles Basin but are still significant. In all regions, the simulations suggest, the net, domain-wide effects of cool cities are reductions in ozone mass and improvements in air quality. In Atlanta, Nashville, and Dallas, urban areas benefiting from reduced smog reach up to 8460, 7350, and 12870 km{sup 2} in area, respectively. Results presented in this paper should be taken as exploratory and preliminary. These will most likely change during a more comprehensive modeling study to be started soon with the support of the US Environmental Protection Agency. The main purpose of the present project was to obtain the initial data (emission inventories) for these regions, simulate meteorological conditions, and perform preliminary sensitivity analysis. In the future, additional regions will be simulated to assess the potential of cool cities in improving urban air quality.

  5. Technical report. Graduate Student Focus on Diversity Workshop, 1999 SIAM Annual Meeting, Atlanta, Georgia, May 12, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-12

    The Third SIAM Graduate Student Focus on Diversity workshop was held May 12 at the Sheraton Atlanta Hotel on the first day of the 1999 SIAM Annual Meeting. The day-long workshop consisted of several different activities: eight technical talks by under-represented minority graduate students, a lively panel discussion concerning the benefits of undergraduate summer research programs, informal luncheon and pizza breaks to foster social interaction, and an evening forum with candid discussions of graduate school experiences from a minority graduate student perspective. These sessions were open to the entire SIAM community and served to highlight the progress, achievements, and aspirations of the workshop participants.

  6. Advancing Residential Retrofits in Atlanta

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Roderick K; Kim, Eyu-Jin; Roberts, Sydney; Stephenson, Robert

    2012-07-01

    This report will summarize the home energy improvements performed in the Atlanta, GA area. In total, nine homes were retrofitted with eight of the homes having predicted source energy savings of approximately 30% or greater based on simulated energy consumption.

  7. EPA Awards Undergraduate Fellowship to Clark Atlanta University Student to Further the Environmental Workforce

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that Sederra Ross, at Clark Atlanta University in Atlanta, Ga. received one of 34 fellowships awarded to undergraduate students studying environmental science and related fields

  8. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. VIEW OF BUILDING 16, FROM NORTHEAST FACING SOUTHWEST ACROSS TECHWOOD DRIVE. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  9. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, June, 1940. VIEW OF STORE AND ADMINISTRATION BUILDING (RIGHT), BUILDING 4 (CENTER) AND BUILDING 5 RIGHT, FROM NORTH FACING SOUTH ALONG TECHWOOD DRIVE. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  10. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. VIEW OF WADING POOL, BUILDING 12 IN BACKGROUND (LEFT), FROM SOUTHEAST FACING NORTHWEST. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  11. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. VIEW OF PLAYGROUND BEHIND BUILDING X, FROM WEST FACING EAST. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  12. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, 1981. AERIAL VIEW IN CONTEXT, TECHWOOD HOMES, FROM SOUTHEAST FACING NORTHWEST. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  13. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, June, 1940. VIEW OF BUILDING 19, FROM EAST FACING WEST, ACROSS TECHWOOD DRIVE. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  14. 12. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1945. View across park and playground between Techwood Homes and Clark Howell Homes, facing west with Clark Howell Homes in background. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  15. 10. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. View of east end and north side of Building E-1, from east side of Venable Street facing west. Luckie Street visible in background. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  16. 4. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. Clark Howell Homes, 219 Mills Street, left, 199 Mills Street, center, 404 Lovejoy Street, right, under construction. From west facing east. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  17. 8. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. Contextual view of Building E-7 (left), Building E-5 (center), and Building E-6 right), from west side of Luckie Street facing northeast. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  18. 13. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. View of apartment interior, kitchen, living room, and bedrooms. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  19. 5. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa July, 1940. Public opening, Clark Howell Homes. 411 Luckie Street, left. From east facing west. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  20. 11. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1945. View of rear entrances and yards of Building A-5, from northwest facing southeast. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  1. 3. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1945. Typical streetscape view, Clark Howell Homes. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  2. 1. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. Aerial view, Clark Howell Homes, left, Techwood Homes, right, Georgia Institute of Technology, top, right. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  3. 2. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. Aerial view of Clark Howell Homes, center, Techwood Homes, left, Georgia Institute of Technology, bottom. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  4. 78 FR 7393 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Florida Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ..., U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, 61 Forsyth St. SW., Suite 16T126, Atlanta, GA 30303. They may also... Southern Regional Office, as they become available, both before and after the meeting. Persons...

  5. 77 FR 4541 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the South Carolina Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ..., Atlanta, GA 30303. Persons wishing to email their comments, or to present their comments verbally at the... Office, as they become available, both before and after the meeting. Persons interested in the work...

  6. American Uveitis Society Meeting October 30, 1995 Marriott Marquis Hotel, Atlanta, GA, USA.

    PubMed

    Meisler, D M; Chern, K C

    1996-01-01

    1 Retinal vascular occlusion and scleroderma. Tessler H, Flores-Guevara J, Goldstein D, Chicago, IL, USA. 2 MHC Class II antigen expression in ciliary body in spontaneous and experimental uveitis. Kalsow C, Zhavoronkova M, Dwyer A, Rochester, NY & Scottsville, NY, USA. 3 IL-10 in the vitreous of patients with intraocular lymphoma. Whitcup S, Solomon D, Nussenblatt R, Chan C-C, Bethesda, MD, USA 4 Iris juvenile xanthogranuloma studied by immunohistochemistry. Shields J, Shields C, Eagle R, DePotter P, Collins M, Philadelphia, PA, USA. 5 Outcomes analysis in with JRA-associated uveitis. Dana M-R, Merayo-Lloves J, Foster C, Boston MA, USA. 6 Persistent glaucoma secondary to periocular steroids. Akduman L, Conway M, Burchfield J, Kolker A, Black D, DelPriore L, Kaplan H, St. Louis, MO, USA 7 The use of itraconazole in ocular histoplasmosis Callanan D, Fish G, Dallas, TX, USA 8 Succesful treatment of macular hole secondary to sympathetic ophthalmia. Cano J, Diaz M, Navea A, Ruiz C, Castilla M. Barcelona, Spain. 9 HLA-DR2+ intermediate uveitis. Pulido J, Tang W, Han D, Mieler W. Milwaukee, WI, USA. 10 Vein occlusion in AIDS misdiagnosed as CMV retinitis. Park K, Marx J, Rao N. Los Angeles, CA, USA. 11 HIV-associated foveal hemorrhage. Crews K, Zimmerman P, Lohner S. Salt Lake City, UT, USA. 12 Cytomegalovirus papillitis in patients with AIDS. Patel S, Rutzen A, Marx J, Thach A, Chong L, Rao N, Los Angeles, CA, USA. 13 Recurrence rate of CMV retinitis following the ganciclovir implant and pars plans vitrectomy and silicone oil. Marx J, Thach A, Rao N, Chong L. Los Angeles, CA, USA.

  7. 7. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1939. Typical dwellings demolished for construction of Clark Howell Homes. View of west side of McAfee Street, from intersection with Gresham Street (now Clark Howell Place) facing northwest. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  8. 9. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. View of Hunnicutt Street under construction, from Venable Street facing east. Buildings A-2, D-4, C-5, and A-5 at left, Building J-12 at right. W.W. Orr Medical Building visible in background at center. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  9. 76 FR 37781 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26; Atlanta, GA; Application for Temporary/Interim Manufacturing Authority...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... Manufacturing Authority; Makita Corporation of America; (Hand- Held Power Tool and Gasoline/Electric-Powered Garden Product Manufacturing); Buford, GA An application has been submitted to the Executive Secretary of..., requesting temporary/interim manufacturing (T/IM) authority within FTZ 26 at the Makita Corporation...

  10. HIV sexual transmission risks in the context of clinical care: a prospective study of behavioural correlates of HIV suppression in a community sample, Atlanta, GA, USA

    PubMed Central

    Kalichman, Seth C; Cherry, Chauncey; Kalichman, Moira O; Washington, Christopher; Grebler, Tamar; Merely, Cindy; Welles, Brandi; Pellowski, Jennifer; Kegler, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral therapy (ART) improves the health of people living with HIV and has the potential to reduce HIV infectiousness, thereby preventing HIV transmission. However, the success of ART for HIV prevention hinges on sustained ART adherence and avoiding sexually transmitted infections (STI). Objectives To determine the sexual behaviours and HIV transmission risks of individuals with suppressed and unsuppressed HIV replication (i.e., viral load). Methods Assessed HIV sexual transmission risks among individuals with clinically determined suppressed and unsuppressed HIV. Participants were 760 men and 280 women living with HIV in Atlanta, GA, USA, who completed behavioural assessments, 28-daily prospective sexual behaviour diaries, one-month prospective unannounced pill counts for ART adherence, urine screening for illicit drug use and medical record chart abstraction for HIV viral load. Results Individuals with unsuppressed HIV demonstrated a constellation of behavioural risks for transmitting HIV to uninfected sex partners that included symptoms of STI and substance use. In addition, 15% of participants with suppressed HIV had recent STI symptoms/diagnoses, indicating significant risks for sexual infectiousness despite their HIV suppression in blood plasma. Overall, 38% of participants were at risk for elevated sexual infectiousness and just as many engaged in unprotected sexual intercourse with non-HIV-infected partners. Conclusions Implementation strategies for using HIV treatments as HIV prevention requires enhanced behavioural interventions that extend beyond ART to address substance use and sexual health that will otherwise undermine the potential preventive impact of early ART. PMID:26249127

  11. Disparities in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection between black and white men who have sex with men in Atlanta, GA.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Netochukwu; Rosenberg, Eli S; Luisi, Nicole; Sanchez, Travis; del Rio, Carlos; Sullivan, Patrick S; Kelley, Colleen F

    2015-09-01

    HIV disproportionately affects black men who have sex with men, and herpes simplex virus type 2 is known to increase acquisition of HIV. However, data on racial disparities in herpes simplex virus type 2 prevalence and risk factors are limited among men who have sex with men in the United States. InvolveMENt was a cohort study of black and white HIV-negative men who have sex with men in Atlanta, GA. Univariate and multivariate cross-sectional associations with herpes simplex virus type 2 seroprevalence were assessed among 455 HIV-negative men who have sex with men for demographic, behavioural and social determinant risk factors using logistic regression. Seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 was 23% (48/211) for black and 16% (38/244) for white men who have sex with men (p = 0.05). Education, poverty, drug/alcohol use, incarceration, circumcision, unprotected anal intercourse, and condom use were not associated with herpes simplex virus type 2. In multivariate analyses, black race for those ≤25 years, but not >25 years, and number of sexual partners were significantly associated. Young black men who have sex with men are disproportionately affected by herpes simplex virus type 2, which may contribute to disparities in HIV acquisition. An extensive assessment of risk factors did not explain this disparity in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection suggesting differences in susceptibility or partner characteristics.

  12. Bright Meteor Lights Up Atlanta Skies

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows a very bright meteor that streaked over the skies of Atlanta, Ga., on the night of Aug. 28, 2011. The view is from an all sky camera in Cartersville, Ga., operated by NASA’s Mars...

  13. 78 FR 28940 - Environmental Impact Statement for the Atlanta to Charlotte Portion of the Southeast High Speed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... between Atlanta, GA and Charlotte, NC, along the Southeast High-Speed Rail Corridor (SEHSR) as designated... site: www.dot.ga.gov/AtlantaCharlotteHSR . ADDRESSES: Comments related to the scope of the study may be mailed to Glenn Bowman, PE, State Environmental Administrator, 600 West Peachtree Street NW., Atlanta,...

  14. Proceedings of Annual Meeting, Natural Resources Research Program (15th) Held in Atlanta, Georgia on 18-19 April 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    Management Plans by Linda D. Peyman-Dove, Michael R. Waring, and John P. Titre ...... .. 59 Developing a Manager-Oriented Water-Based Recreation...USAE Waterways Experiment Station Lake Sidney Lanier 3909 Halls Ferry Rd. P.O. Box 567 Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199 Buford, GA 30518 Linda Peyman-Dove Dan...Gerald Purvis Phil Turner USAE Division, South Atlantic USAE District, South Pacific Room 313 630 Sansome St. 77 Forsyth St. S.W. San Francisco, CA

  15. Summary of Needs and Opportunities from the 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Meeting: Atlanta, Georgia, March 16-18, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-05-01

    This meeting brought together more than 200 professionals representing organizations with vested interest in energy efficiency improvements in residential buildings. Participants identified or reinforced a wide variety of needs and issues associated with delivering high-performance homes in both new and existing home scenarios,

  16. Historically Black Colleges and Universities of Higher Education. Hearing before the Committee on the Budget. United States Senate, One Hundred First Congress, First Session (Atlanta, GA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on the Budget.

    This document contains the testimonies of witnesses at a November 13, 1989 hearing on the status of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), as well as additional statements and a report by the Congressional Research Service. Witnesses included: the presidents of Spelman College (Georgia), Clark Atlanta University, Virginia State…

  17. Modeling the Effect of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems on Nitrate Load Using SWAT in an Urban Watershed of Metropolitan Atlanta, GA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (OWTSs) can be a source of nitrate (NO3-) contamination in both surface and ground waters as a result of failing or high density systems. In metropolitan Atlanta, more than 26% of homes are on OWTS and this percentage is expected to increase wi...

  18. 78 FR 6807 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Georgia Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... be held at the Gwinnett Center, 6400 Sugarloaf Parkway, Duluth, GA 30097. Members of the public are... Forsyth St. SW., Suite 16T126, Atlanta, GA 30303. They may also be faxed to the Commission at (404) 562... from this meeting may be inspected and reproduced at the Southern Regional Office, as they...

  19. Selected papers from the 12th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2012) (Atlanta, GA, USA, 2-5 December 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Mark G.; Lang, Jeffrey

    2013-11-01

    Welcome to this special section of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering (JMM). This section, co-edited by myself and by Professor Jeffrey Lang of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, contains expanded versions of selected papers presented at the Power MEMS meeting held in Atlanta, GA, USA, in December of 2012. Professor Lang and I had the privilege of co-chairing Power MEMS 2012, the 12th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications. The scope of the PowerMEMS series of workshops ranges from basic principles, to materials and fabrication, to devices and systems, to applications. The many applications of power MEMS (microelectromehcanical systems) range from MEMS-enabled energy harvesting, storage, conversion and conditioning, to integrated systems that manage these processes. Why is the power MEMS field growing in importance? Smaller-scale power and power supplies (microwatts to tens of watts) are gaining in prominence due to many factors, including the ubiquity of low power portable electronic equipment and the proliferation of wireless sensor nodes that require extraction of energy from their embedding environment in order to function. MEMS manufacturing methods can be utilized to improve the performance of traditional power supply elements, such as allowing batteries to charge faster or shrinking the physical size of passive elements in small-scale power supplies. MEMS technologies can be used to fabricate energy harvesters that extract energy from an embedding environment to power wireless sensor nodes, in-body medical implants and other devices, in which the harvesters are on the small scales that are appropriately matched to the overall size of these microsystems. MEMS can enable the manufacturing of energy storage elements from nontraditional materials by bringing appropriate structure and surface morphology to these materials as well as fabricating the electrical interfaces

  20. Explaining Racial Disparities in HIV Incidence in a Prospective Cohort of Black and White Men Who Have Sex With Men in Atlanta, GA: A Prospective Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Patrick S; Rosenberg, Eli S; Sanchez, Travis H; Kelley, Colleen; Luisi, Nicole; Cooper, Hannah; Diclemente, Ralph; Frew, Paula; Salazar, Laura F; del Rio, Carlos; Mulligan, Mark J; Peterson, John

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe factors associated with racial disparities in HIV incidence among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States. Methods In a longitudinal cohort of black and white HIV-negative MSM in Atlanta, HIV incidence rates were compared by race. Incidence hazard ratios (HR) between black and white MSM were estimated with an age-scaled Cox proportional hazards model. A change-in-estimate approach was used to understand mediating time-independent and -dependent factors that accounted for the elevated HR. Results Thirty-two incident HIV infections occurred among 260 black and 302 white MSM during 823 person-years (PY) of followup. HIV incidence was higher among black MSM (6.5/100PY; 95% CI: 4.2, 9.7) than white MSM (1.7/100PY; CI: 0.7, 3.3), and highest among young (18–24 years) black MSM (10.9/100PY; CI: 6.2, 17.6). The unadjusted hazard of HIV infection for black MSM was 2.9 (CI: 1.3–6.4) times that of white MSM; adjustment for health insurance status and partner race explained effectively all of the racial disparity. Conclusions Relative to white MSM in Atlanta, black MSM, particularly young black MSM, experienced higher HIV incidence that was not attributable to individual risk behaviors. In a setting where partner pool risk is a driver of disparities, it is also important to maximize care and treatment for HIV-positive MSM. PMID:25911980

  1. SEMI-CONTINUOUS AEROSOL CARBON MEASUREMENTS: COMPARISON OF ATLANTA SUPERSITE MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An intensive field campaign of the Atlanta Supersite Experiment was carried out at a ground-based measurement site on Jefferson Street in midtown Atlanta, GA, from 3 August to 1 September, 1999. This paper examines the semi-continuous particulate organic and elemental measureme...

  2. Atlanta Conference Highlights How College Students are Helping Underserved Communities Address Environmental Problems

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 4 office in Atlanta, Ga., hosted a day-long conference about the College/Underserved Community Partnership Program (CUPP) at the Sam Nunn Federal Center. EPA's Senior Advisor to

  3. THE ATLANTA SUPERSITE PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atlanta Supersites project is the first of two Supersites projects to be established during Phase I of EPA's Supersites Program; Phase 11 is being established through a Request for Assistance. The other initial project is in Fresno, California. The Supersites Program is par...

  4. Simulation of Urban Heat Island Mitigation Strategies in Atlanta, GA Using High-Resolution Land Use/Land Cover Data Set to Enhance Meteorological Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosson, William L.; Dembek, Scott; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Lapenta, William; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Johnson, Hoyt; Khan, Maudood

    2006-01-01

    The specification of land use/land cover (LULC) and associated land surface parameters in meteorological models at all scales has a major influence on modeled surface energy fluxes and boundary layer states. In urban areas, accurate representation of the land surface may be even more important than in undeveloped regions due to the large heterogeneity within the urban area. Deficiencies in the characterization of the land surface related to the spatial or temporal resolution of the data, the number of LULC classes defined, the accuracy with which they are defined, or the degree of heterogeneity of the land surface properties within each class may degrade the performance of the models. In this study, an experiment was conducted to test a new high-resolution LULC data set for meteorological simulations for the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area using a mesoscale meteorological model and to evaluate the effects of urban heat island (UHI) mitigation strategies on modeled meteorology for 2030. Simulation results showed that use of the new LULC data set reduced a major deficiency of the land use data used previously, specifically the poor representation of urban and suburban land use. Performance of the meteorological model improved substantially, with the overall daytime cold bias reduced by over 30%. UHI mitigation strategies were projected to offset much of a predicted urban warming between 2000 and 2030. In fact, for the urban core, the cooling due to UHI mitigation strategies was slightly greater than the warming associated with urbanization over this period. For the larger metropolitan area, cooling only partially offset the projected warming trend.

  5. Confirmation of the Impact of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems on Stream Base-Flow Nitrogen Concentrations in Urban Watersheds of Metropolitan Atlanta, GA.

    PubMed

    Hoghooghi, Nahal; Radcliffe, David E; Habteselassie, Mussie Y; Clarke, John S

    2016-09-01

    Wastewater and lawn fertilizer potentially contribute to degraded water quality in urban watersheds. Previously we described a study from 2011 to 2012 in which we examined the effect of the density of onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS) on nitrogen concentrations in 24 small streams in metropolitan Atlanta. Our objective in this study was to confirm that the impact on water quality that we observed was due to OWTS and not lawn fertilizer. We sampled the same 24 streams again in 2013 and 2014, representing watersheds ranging in area from 0.18 to 8.8 km. We conducted regression analysis of the effect of OWTS and season, used dual-isotope analysis (nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate) to identify sources and determine the effect of denitrification and mixing, and conducted stream walks to identify areas where animals had access to the streams. Twelve streams were characterized as high-density (HD, more than 75 systems km) OWTS and 12 as low-density (LD, less than 75 systems km) OWTS. Water samples were collected three times a year under base-flow conditions, from November 2011 to July 2014, and analyzed for nitrate (NO-N), ammonium (NH-N), and total Kjeldahl nitrogen. Total nitrogen and NO-N concentrations increased linearly with increasing OWTS density above a threshold of about 75 OWTS km. Dual-isotope analysis of NO showed that stream NO originated predominantly from OWTS in HD watersheds and from a combination of animal waste and perhaps organic N in LD watersheds. Stream walks showed that livestock had access to some of the LD streams with high N concentrations. Our results confirm that HD OWTS can significantly degrade water quality at the watershed scale.

  6. 77 FR 1051 - General Conference Committee of the National Poultry Improvement Plan; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service General Conference Committee of the National Poultry.... SUMMARY: We are giving notice of a meeting of the General Conference Committee of the National Poultry...., Atlanta, GA. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. C. Stephen Roney, Senior Coordinator, National...

  7. 75 FR 5353 - Proposal Review Panel for Chemistry; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... Proposal Review Panel for Chemistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee... and The University of Massachusetts, Proposal Review Panel for Chemistry ( 1191). Dates and Times...: Department of Chemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332. Department of Chemistry,...

  8. The Atlanta Dropout Prevention Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonas, Edward D., Jr.

    The Atlanta (Georgia) Public School System (APS) has many existing dropout prevention programs, but they have been operating primarily independently, with limited information sharing or coordination. In 1986 these programs were linked through the formation of the Atlanta Dropout Prevention Collaborative, which unites the public school system with…

  9. US EPA Administrator Delivers Remarks at Atlanta Conference on College Students Helping Underserved Communities Address Environmental Problems

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today, U.S. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy provided opening remarks at the EPA Region 4 conference about the College/Underserved Community Partnership Program (CUPP) at the Sam Nunn Federal Center in Atlanta, Ga. Through CUPP, college and

  10. Research Reporting Sections, Annual Meeting of National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (54th, Atlanta, Georgia, April 21-24, 1976). Mathematics Education Information Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Jon L., Ed.

    Abstracts of 28 research reports are provided. The reports were prepared by investigators for presentation at the 54th annual meeting of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. A broad range of topics related to mathematics education are covered. Three reports concern the effects of differing presentations of mathematics, four are related…

  11. Rural Sociology in the South, 1977. Proceedings of 1977 Annual Meeting of the Southern Association of Agricultural Scientists, Rural Sociology Section (Atlanta, Georgia, February 6-9, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mookherjee, Harsha N., Ed.

    "Rural Sociology: A Field of Basic and Applied Research" was the theme of the 1977 annual meeting. Participants at the convention heard 50 reports in 14 sessions, as well as five special panels and two special sessions. Most of the papers, research reports and essays presented in the sessions are included in this document and serve as…

  12. 77 FR 46685 - In the Matter of: Steven Neal Greenoe, Currently Incarcerated at: Inmate #54450-056, USP Atlanta...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-06

    ...: 8933 Windjammer Drive, Raleigh, NC 27615; Order Denying Export Privileges On January 10, 2012, in the U....S. Penitentiary, P.O. Box 1150160, Atlanta, GA, and 8933 Windjammer Drive, Raleigh, NC 27615,...

  13. Atlanta, Georgia as seen from STS-62

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport is visible to the south of Atlanta, situated near the center of the photograph. Dobbins Air Force Base and the city of Marietta can also be seen to the north of Atlanta in this south-looking low-oblique view. The complex system of transportation routes and interstate highways surrounding and traversing Atlanta can also be seen in the photograph. The white dot near the center of the photograph is the Georgia Dome, a major sports and entertainment complex in downtown Atlanta. The Stone Mountain Memorial, with its enormous relief carvings of Confederate figures, is located east of Atlanta and is visible on the photograph.

  14. Environmental Public Health Surveillance for Exposure to Respiratory Health Hazards: A Joint NASA/CDC Project to Use Remote Sensing Data for Estimating Airborne Particulate Matter Over the Atlanta, Georgia Metropolitan Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad; Estes, Maurice; Crosson, William

    2007-01-01

    As part of the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN) the National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is leading a project called Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange (HELiX-Atlanta). The goal of developing the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network is to improve the health of communities. Currently, few systems exist at the state or national level to concurrently track many of the exposures and health effects that might be associated with environmental hazards. An additional challenge is estimating exposure to environmental hazards such as particulate matter whose aerodynamic diameter is less than or equal to 2.5 micrometers (PM2.5). HELIX-Atlanta's goal is to examine the feasibility of building an integrated electronic health and environmental data network in five counties of Metropolitan Atlanta, GA. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC) is collaborating with CDC to combine NASA earth science satellite observations related to air quality and environmental monitoring data to model surface estimates of PM2.5 concentrations that can be linked with clinic visits for asthma. While use of the Air Quality System (AQS) PM2.5 data alone could meet HELIX-Atlanta specifications, there are only five AQS sites in the Atlanta area, thus the spatial coverage is not ideal. We are using NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) data for estimating daily ground level PM2.5 at 10 km resolution over the metropolitan Atlanta area supplementing the AQS ground observations and filling their spatial and temporal gaps.

  15. NARSTO EPA SS ATLANTA RAPID SPMS DATA

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-25

    NARSTO EPA SS ATLANTA RAPID SPMS DATA Project Title:  NARSTO ... Mass Spectrometer Location:  Altanta, Georgia Spatial Resolution:  Point Measurements ...   Order Data Guide Documents:  Atlanta SPMS Guide EPA Sites Get Google Earth ...

  16. [Molecular diagnostic and targeted therapy--"Barking dogs are going to bite": presentations from the 42nd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Atlanta 2006].

    PubMed

    Rody, A; Loibl, S; Kaufmann, M

    2006-10-01

    This years ASCO-meeting reinforced the trend of the recent years to get off from empirical treatment concepts to tailored and individualized diagnostics and therapy. However, the basis for an individual therapy is a specific molecular diagnostic which can be reflected in the analysis of hormonal receptor, HER-1, HER-2 and topoisomerase IIalpha in breast cancer. All these markers are not only able to prognosticate the course of disease but they also can predict the success of specific treatment approaches. Trastuzumab is standard therapy in HER-2 positive breast cancer both in the adjuvant and palliative setting. But new therapeutic agents, as e. g. lapatinib, are promising in the treatment of HER-2 positive breast cancer even if trastuzumab is failing. Otherwise it might possibly be an alternative option but adequate clinical results have to be awaited. The targeted inactivation of EGFR-related signal transduction pathways by e. g. gefitinib did not show a substantial improvement neither as a single agent nor in combination with endocrine treatment. However, the appropriate subgroup which might benefit from this therapy has to be defined even if molecular data suggest that patients with ER positive and PR negative breast cancer might be such a group. The increasing knowledge in terms of the biology of bone metastasis led to the development of new treatment options as e. g. denosumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody for RANK ligand. Two adjuvant cytotoxic treatment trials revealed that taxanes improve the prognosis of node positive breast cancer and should be administered sequentially. The advantage of switching to an aromatase inhibitor after two to three years of tamoxifen in endocrine treatment of postmenopausal patients is proved by two clinical trials (IES, ARNO) which could demonstrate a survival benefit. In conclusion it seems to be evident that new targeted therapy options are effective and will set new standards for the treatment of breast cancer patients

  17. 78 FR 76812 - In the Matter of: Andrew Vincent O'Donnell, Inmate Number-62355-019, USP Atlanta, U.S...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security In the Matter of: Andrew Vincent O'Donnell, Inmate Number--62355- 019, USP Atlanta, U.S. Penitentiary, P.O. Box 15060, Atlanta, GA 30315; Order Denying Export Privileges On August 1, 2011, in the U.S. District...

  18. Atlanta Public Schools French Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlanta Public Schools, GA.

    This teacher's guide specifies language skills and related areas of knowledge needed for communicating in the target language. Discussion of the philosophy governing the Atlanta language program includes an examination of student eligibility, program articulation, teaching methods, testing, teaching materials, resources, and equipment for use in…

  19. 75 FR 4876 - Proposal Review Panel for Materials Research; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... a.m.-4:45 p.m. Place: Georgia Tech University, Atlanta, GA. Type of Meeting: Part-open. Contact... concerning progress of the MRSEC at Georgia Tech. Agenda Tuesday March 2, 2010 7:30 a.m.-9:15 a.m. Closed--Executive Session. 9:15 a.m.-3:45 a.m. Open--Review of Georgia Tech MRSEC. 3:45 a.m.-4:45 a.m....

  20. Processing and manufacturing of composite materials; Proceedings of the Symposium, 112th ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA, Dec. 1-6, 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivatsan, T. S.; Chandrashekhar, S.

    Papers are presented on the machining of fiber reinforced composites, the milling of continuous carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy, advances in composite machining with abrasive water jets, delamination in surface plies of graphite/epoxy caused by the edge-trimming process, and cryogenic machining of Kevlar composites. Consideration is given to a thermodynamic evaluation of ceramic-composite cutting tools for machining titanium, microstructural changes in carbon fibers during high-temperature processing, synthesis of particulate-reinforced metal matrix composites using spray techniques, and on-line monitoring of composite prepreg fabrication. Attention is also given to the effects of postannealing on fatigue behavior in PEEK and its short fiber-reinforced composites, the effect of fabrication parameters on void content for filament-wound composites, and the fabrication of a W-1 percent ThO2-reinforced Fe-25Cr-8Al-0.5Y superalloy matrix composite.

  1. Processing and manufacturing of composite materials; Proceedings of the Symposium, 112th ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA, Dec. 1-6, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Srivatsan, T.S.; Chandrashekhar, S.

    1991-01-01

    Papers are presented on the machining of fiber reinforced composites, the milling of continuous carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy, advances in composite machining with abrasive water jets, delamination in surface plies of graphite/epoxy caused by the edge-trimming process, and cryogenic machining of Kevlar composites. Consideration is given to a thermodynamic evaluation of ceramic-composite cutting tools for machining titanium, microstructural changes in carbon fibers during high-temperature processing, synthesis of particulate-reinforced metal matrix composites using spray techniques, and on-line monitoring of composite prepreg fabrication. Attention is also given to the effects of postannealing on fatigue behavior in PEEK and its short fiber-reinforced composites, the effect of fabrication parameters on void content for filament-wound composites, and the fabrication of a W-1 percent ThO2-reinforced Fe-25Cr-8Al-0.5Y superalloy matrix composite.

  2. Enhancement of quality through environmental technology. Proceedings of the Twenty-eighth Annual Technical Meeting, Atlanta, GA, April 21-23, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Environmental issues are discussed under the following headings: environmental engineering methods, environmental stress impact, contamination control, and energy and environment. Papers are presented on an assessment of external stores reliability testing, optimization of classical shock waveforms, the development and production of advanced cooling techniques for hybrid microcircuits, and the isolation and molecular identification of ultramicro contaminants by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Other topics discussed include features and testing of clean room apparel, the hazards from large spills of liquefied gaseous fuels, and a solar pond potential site survey for electrical power generation.

  3. Satellites monitor Atlanta regional development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, William J.; Blackmon, C.C.; Rudasill, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    Since the adoption of a Regional Development Plan in 1975, the Atlanta Regional Commission has investigated methods for monitoring regional development patterns in a periodic, efficient manner. A promising approach appears to be the use of Landsat satellite data. In cooperation with the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center, the commission used machine processing of digital temporal overlays of Landsat data collected in 1972, 1974 and 1976 to detect land use and land cover changes in the Atlanta metropolitan area. Results of the analysis revealed the conversion of forested and open space areas to residential, commercial and industrial land use in the urban-rural fringe zone from 1972 to 1974 and from 1974 to 1976. The study indicated that a land use and land cover change-detection program may be used to revise small-area forecasts of land use, population and employment made by planning models.

  4. 78 FR 32135 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ...EPA is taking direct final action to approve a state implementation plan (SIP) revision, submitted by the State of Georgia, through the Georgia Environmental Protection Division (GA EPD), on October 21, 2009, to address the reasonable further progress (RFP) plan requirements for the Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) nonattainment area. The......

  5. 75 FR 73969 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Extension of Attainment Date for the Atlanta...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ..., Carroll, Cherokee, Clayton, Cobb, Coweta, DeKalb, Douglas, Fayette, Forsyth, Fulton, Gwinnett, Hall, Henry... amended under ``Atlanta, GA'' by revising the entries for ``Barrow County,'' ``Bartow County,'' ``Carroll... effective. \\4\\. November 30, 2010. Carroll County This action is Nonattainment..... April 7,...

  6. COMPARISON OF INTEGRATED SAMPLERS FOR MASS AND COMPOSITION DURING THE 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITES PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The first of EPA's Particulate Matter (PM) Supersites projects was established in Atlanta, GA during the summer of 1999 in conjunction with the Southern Oxidants Study. The short-term primary focus was a one month intensive field campaign to evaluate advanced PM measurement me...

  7. Assessing the Impacts of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport on Particulate Matter and Ozone in Atlanta Metropolitan Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Alper; Odman, M. Talat; Russell, Armistead G.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine, through modeling, the impact of aircraft emissions on regional air quality, especially in regard to fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) as well as ozone and other pollutants. For this, we focused on Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport which is the busiest airport in the world based on passenger traffic (AIC, 2003). Hartsfield-Jackson serves the metropolitan Atlanta area where air quality does not meet national standards. Emissions from mobile and industrial sources (including several large electric power generating utilities) are the major contributors to the area's air pollution. In this study, we assessed the impact of Hartsfield-Jackson Airport on air quality around Atlanta, Georgia, and compared it to the impacts of other emission sources in the area. The assessment was built upon other, related air quality studies involving both field and modeling components. To achieve the objectives, first a detailed inventory was developed for aircraft and other emissions at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Then, air quality simulations were performed to relate these emissions to regional air quality around Atlanta. The Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) was used as the modeling platform. The period of August 11-20 2000 was selected as the episode to be modeled in this study. Prior modeling of this episode during the Fall Line Air Quality Study (FAQS) and availability of additional PM(2.5) measurements for evaluation played a major role in this selection. Meteorological data for this episode as well as emission data for sources other than aircrafts were already available from FAQS.

  8. The Atlanta tornado of 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greneker, E. F.; Wilson, C. S.; Metcalf, J. I.

    1976-01-01

    Joint observations by radar and high-frequency sferics detectors at Georgia Institute of Technology provided unique data on the Atlanta tornado of Mar. 24, 1975. The classic hook echo was detected by radar at a range of about 26 km, 15 min before the tornado touched down. While the tornado was on the ground the sferics burst rate was very low, despite very high values recorded immediately before and after this interval. This observation, together with visual reports of a strong cloud-to-ground discharge at the time of tornado touchdown, suggests an interaction of the tornado with the electric field of the storm.

  9. Limited spillover to humans from West Nile Virus viremic birds in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Levine, Rebecca S; Mead, Daniel G; Kitron, Uriel D

    2013-11-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne pathogen that impacts the health of its passerine bird hosts as well as incidentally infected humans in the United States. Intensive enzootic activity among the hosts and vectors does not always lead to human outbreaks, as is the situation throughout much of the southeastern United States. In Georgia, substantial yearly evidence of WNV in the mosquito vectors and avian hosts since 2001 has only led to 324 human cases. Although virus has been consistently isolated from mosquitoes trapped in Atlanta, GA, little is known about viral activity among the passerine hosts. A possible reason for the suppression of WNV spillover to humans is that viremic birds are absent from high human-use areas of the city. To test this hypothesis, multiseason, multihabitat, longitudinal WNV surveillance for active WNV viremia was conducted within the avian host community of urban Atlanta by collection of blood samples from wild passerine birds in five urban microhabitats. WNV was isolated from the serum of six blood samples collected from 630 (0.95%) wild passerine birds in Atlanta during 2010-2012, a proportion similar to that found in the Chicago, IL, area in 2005, when over 200 human cases were reported. Most of the viremic birds were Northern Cardinals, suggesting they may be of particular importance to the WNV transmission cycle in Georgia. Results indicated active WNV transmission in all microhabitats of urban Atlanta, except in the old-growth forest patches. The number of viremic birds was highest in Zoo Atlanta, where 3.5% of samples were viremic. Although not significant, these observations may suggest a possible transmission reduction effect of urban old-growth forests and a potential role in WNV amplification for Zoo Atlanta. Overall, spillover to humans remains a rare occurrence in urban Atlanta settings despite active WNV transmission in the avian population.

  10. The Distribution of Segregation in Atlanta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Anthony

    1972-01-01

    A prediction from ecological theory relating the distribution of residential segregation between inner and outer zones of a metropolitan area to conditions of population growth, expansion, etc. was tested using 1960 data on the Atlanta standard metropolitan statistical area. (JM)

  11. Proctor Creek Watershed/Atlanta (Georgia)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Proctor Creek Watershed/Atlanta (Georgia) of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating with community-led efforts.

  12. The Use of GIS and Remotely Sensed Data in Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT): The HELIX-Atlanta Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Hamdan, Mohammad Z.; Crosson, William L.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Watts, Carol; Rickman, Douglas L.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Qualters, Judith R.; Sinclair, Amber H.; Tolsma, Dennis D.; Adeniyi, Kafayat A.

    2007-01-01

    As part of the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN), the National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is leading a project in collaboration with the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC) called Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange (HELIX-Atlanta). HELIX-Atlanta's goal is to examine the feasibility of building an integrated electronic health and environmental data network in five counties of metropolitan Atlanta, GA. Under HELIX-Atlanta, pilot projects are being conducted to develop methods to characterize exposure; link health and environmental data; analyze the relationship between health and environmental factors; and communicate findings. There is evidence in the research literature that asthmatic persons are at increased risk of developing asthma exacerbations with exposure to environmental factors, including PM(sub 2.5). Thus, HELIX-Atlanta is focusing on methods for characterizing population exposure to PM(sub 2.5) for the Atlanta metropolitan area that could be used in ongoing surveillance. NASA/MSFC is working with CDC to combine NASA earth science satellite observations related to air quality and environmental monitoring data to model surface estimates of fine particulate matter (PM(sub 2.5)) concentrations in a Geographic Information System (GIS) that can be linked with clinic visits for asthma on the aggregated grid level as well as the individual level at the geographic locations of the patients' residences.

  13. Hydroclimatology of flash flooding in Atlanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Daniel B.; Smith, James A.; Villarini, Gabriele; Baeck, Mary Lynn

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize the climatology of extreme rainfall and flash flooding in Atlanta, Georgia using high-resolution land surface, rainfall, and discharge datasets. We examine nine urban watersheds in the Atlanta area that range in size from 3.7 to 225 km2 and exhibit a range of urban development and land-use characteristics. We develop a high-resolution 15 min, 1 km2 radar rainfall data set for the 2002-2010 period using the Hydro-NEXRAD system with volume scan reflectivity observations from the Atlanta WSR-88D radar and rainfall observations from a dense network of 72 U.S. Geological Survey rain gauges. Bias-corrected radar rainfall fields accurately capture the spatial and temporal structure of heavy rainfall. There is enhancement of heavy rainfall within and east of the urban core, and a rainfall minimum north and northwest of the city. There has been an increase in variability of annual flood peaks in Atlanta since the 1960s associated with urban impacts on runoff production. Flood response is dependent on a combination of basin size, drainage network structure, spatial distribution of land use, and basin storage in urban soils and storm water detention ponds. Future studies of urban rainfall modification in Atlanta and elsewhere should consider the influence of regional topography and other geographic features on the storm environment.

  14. NARSTO EPA SS ATLANTA 1999 CHEM PM MET DATA

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-25

    NARSTO EPA SS ATLANTA 1999 CHEM PM MET DATA Note: The negative sign is ... the longitude in the following data files: NARSTO_EPA_SS_ATLANTA_GAS_GAS_DATA_1_KB_V1.csv and ... transmission Location:  Atlanta, Georgia Spatial Resolution:  Point Measurements ...

  15. Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange in Atlanta (HELIX-Atlanta): A Pilot Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Shire, J.; Qualters, J.; Mitchell, K.; Pollard, S.; Rao, R.; Kajumba, N.; Quattrochi, D.; Estes, M., Jr.; Meyer, P.; Crosson, W.; Limaye, A.; Al-Hamdan, M.; Khan, M.; Bayakly, R.; Staley, F.; Hallisey, E.; Young, J.; Ward, K.; Tolbert, P.; Tolsma, D.; Sinclair, A.; Strickland, M.; Adeniyi, K.; Rainisch, G.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. To provide an overview of four environmental public health surveillance projects developed by CDC and its partners for the Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange, Atlanta (HELIX-Atlanta) and to illustrate common issues and challenges encountered in developing an environmental public health tracking system. Methods. HELIX-Atlanta, initiated in October 2003 to develop data linkage and analysis methods that can be used by the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (Tracking Network), conducted four projects. We highlight the projects' work, assess attainment of the HELIX-Atlanta goals and discuss three surveillance attributes. Results. Among the major challenges was the complexity of analytic issues which required multidiscipline teams with technical expertise. This expertise and the data resided across multiple organizations. Conclusions:Establishing formal procedures for sharing data, defining data analysis standards and automating analyses, and committing staff with appropriate expertise is needed to support wide implementation of environmental public health tracking.

  16. Agricultural Instruction in Secondary Schools: Papers Read at the Third Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Agricultural Teaching, Atlanta, Georgia November 12 1912. Bulletin, 1913, No. 14. Whole Number 522

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United States Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 1913

    1913-01-01

    Interest in agricultural education continues to increase. The attempt to teach agriculture is no longer confined to the agricultural college and special agricultural school. Methods of teaching the most important facts and the elementary principles of agriculture are discussed in the meetings of most of our educational associations. There is a…

  17. OVERVIEW OF THE 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITE PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an overview of the 1999 Atlanta Supersite Project coordinated through the Southern Oxidants Study and the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT) and funded by the US EPA along with other sponsors who provided in-kind support primarily through existing studies. ...

  18. Playground Hazards in Atlanta Child Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Jeffrey J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examines 71 of the 605 licensed child care centers in Atlanta for playground hazards and school accidents. Finds 684 hazards in 66 centers, including climbing equipment over 6 feet high with inadequate impact-absorbing undersurfacing that had over twice the rate of fall injuries as climbing equipment under 6 feet high. (FMW)

  19. 78 FR 1742 - Amendment to Class B Airspace; Atlanta, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... to increase safety and aid pilots in gaining situational awareness within or around the Class B area... airspace. The FAA finds that the new 6,000-floor still provides sufficient space for safe operations...

  20. EPA Recognizes CEMEX in Clinchfield, Ga. for Achieving 2015 Energy Star Certification

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that CEMEX, in Clinchfield, Ga. is among 70 manufacturing plants nationally that have achieved Energy Star certification for their superior energy performance in 2015. Togethe

  1. BACKGROUND--ATLANTA, A HANDBOOK FOR REPORTERS COVERING THE DESEGREGATION OF ATLANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HANNER, MRS. PHILIP; AND OTHERS

    A HANDBOOK HAS BEEN PREPARED FOR REPORTERS WHO ARE COVERING THE DESEGREGATION OF ATLANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN ORDER TO INFORM THE PRESS OF THE EFFORTS MADE BY CITIZENS IN THE FIGHT TO KEEP PUBLIC SCHOOLS OPEN. A MAJOR PORTION OF THE GUIDE IS DEVOTED TO A DETAILED, CHRONOLOGICAL ACCOUNT OF THE BACKGROUND PERIOD (1954-61) LEADING TO SCHOOL…

  2. Magnitudes, nature, and effects of point and nonpoint discharges in the Chattahoochee River basin, Atlanta to West Point Dam, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamer, J.K.; Cherry, R.N.; Faye, R.E.; Kleckner, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    On an average annual basis and during the storm period of March 12-15, 1976, nonpoint-source loads for most constituents were larger than point-source loads at the Whitesburg station, located on the Chattahoochee River about 40 miles downstream from Atlanta, GA. Most of the nonpoint-source constituent loads in the Atlanta to Whitesburg reach were from urban areas. Average annual point-source discharges accounted for about 50 percent of the dissolved nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus loads and about 70 percent of the dissolved phosphorus loads at Whitesburg. During a low-flow period, June 1-2, 1977, five municipal point-sources contributed 63 percent of the ultimate biochemical oxygen demand, and 97 percent of the ammonium nitrogen loads at the Franklin station, at the upstream end of West Point Lake. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations of 4.1 to 5.0 milligrams per liter occurred in a 22-mile reach of the river downstream from Atlanta due about equally to nitrogenous and carbonaceous oxygen demands. The heat load from two thermoelectric powerplants caused a decrease in dissolved-oxygen concentration of about 0.2 milligrams per liter. Phytoplankton concentrations in West Point Lake, about 70 miles downstream from Atlanta, could exceed three million cells per millimeter during extended low-flow periods in the summer with present point-source phosphorus loads. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. An Examination of Green School Practices in Atlanta Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Tak Cheung

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of this study is to examine green environmental practices exercised in maintaining healthy schools in Atlanta. A forty-item researcher-developed instrument was used to survey 30 randomly sampled schools in the Atlanta area. Five schools particularly strong in green environment implementation were visited to observe their green…

  4. Test-Tampering Found Rampant in Atlanta System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    The author reports on a state investigation into Atlanta's impressive gains on state tests which finds that test-tampering was rampant in the much-praised school system. The report unveiled by the Georgia governor's office states that Atlanta teachers and principals for years methodically altered answer sheets for students taking state tests,…

  5. 76 FR 28971 - Atlanta Gas Light Company; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Atlanta Gas Light Company; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval Take notice that on May 9, 2011, as supplemented on May 11, 2011, Atlanta Gas Light Company (Atlanta Gas Light... for transportation service. Atlanta Gas Light states the rate election consists of the maximum...

  6. EPA, the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability in Atlanta, Atlanta Workforce Development Agency and Local Partners Announce the Proctor Creek Trash Free Waters Community Workforce Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA News Release: EPA, the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability in Atlanta, Atlanta Workforce Development Agency and Local Partners Announce the Proctor Creek Trash Free Waters Community Workforce Program

  7. Evaluation of a Pilot Surveillance System: Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange in Atlanta (HELIX-Atlanta)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, P.; Shire, J.; Qualters, Judy; Daley, Randolph; Fiero, Leslie Todorov; Autry, Andy; Avchen, Rachel; Stock, Allison; Correa, Adolofo; Siffel, Csaba; Devine, Owen; Gotway, Carol; Crawford; Mitchell, Ken; Pollard, Solomon; Rao, Ravi; Kajumba, Ntale; Rickman, Doug; Quattrochi, Dale; Estes, Maury; Meyer, Paul; Crosson, Bill; Limaye, Ashutosh; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad; Khan, Maudood

    2007-01-01

    CDC and its partners established the Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange, Atlanta (HELIX-Atlanta) demonstration project, to develop linking and analysis methods that could be used by the National Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) Network. Initiated in October 2003, the Metropolitan Atlanta-based collaborative conducted four projects: asthma and particulate air pollution, birth defects and ozone and particulate air pollution, childhood leukemia and traffic emissions, and children's blood lead testing and neighborhood risk factors for lead poisoning. This report provides an overview of the HELIX-Atlanta projects' goals, methods and outcomes. We discuss priority attributes and common issues and challenges and offer recommendations for implementation of the nascent national environmental public health tracking network.

  8. Airport Surface Movement Technologies: Atlanta Demonstrations Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Young, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    A flight demonstration was conducted in August 1997 at the Hartsfield Atlanta (ATL) International Airport as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. This research was aimed at investigating technology to improve the safety and efficiency of aircraft movements on the surface during the operational phases of roll-out, turnoff, and taxi in any weather condition down to a runway visual range of 300 feet. The system tested at ATL was composed of airborne and ground-based components that were integrated to provide both the flight crew and controllers with supplemental information to enable safe, expedient surface operations. Experimental displays were installed on a Boeing 757-200 research aircraft in both headup and head-down formats. On the ground, an integrated system maintained surveillance of the airport surface and a controller interface provided routing and control instructions. While at ATL, the research aircraft performed a series of flight and taxi operations to show the validity of the operational concept at a major airport facility, to validate simulation findings, and to assess each of the individual technologies performance in an airport environment. The concept was demonstrated to over 100 visitors from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the aviation community. This paper gives an overview of the LVLASO system and ATL test activities.

  9. Falling through the cracks: unmet health service needs among people living with HIV in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Cherry, Charsey; White, Denise; Jones, Mich'l; Kalichman, Moira O; Amaral, Christina; Swetzes, Connie

    2012-01-01

    Despite growing numbers of people living with HIV (PLWH), the landscape of related services is shrinking. This study investigated health and social service needs of men (N = 489) and women (N = 165) living with HIV in Atlanta, GA. Participants completed confidential measures asking about the health and social services they needed and accessed. Results showed an array of health and social service needs among PLWH; failure to access services was prevalent. Hunger was among the most common basic needs, reported by greater than 60% of men and women. For men, unmet service needs were associated with fewer years since testing positive for HIV, higher CD4+ T cell values, experiencing more stressors and depression, and greater quantity of alcohol use. For women, failure to access services was associated with experiencing depression and not receiving HIV medications. Providing basic services to PLWH remains a public health priority and a moral imperative.

  10. 75 FR 71123 - Notice of Commissioners and Staff Attendance at FERC/NARUC Collaborative on Smart Response Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... Smart Response Meeting November 12, 2010. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC or Commission... meeting: FERC/NARUC Collaborative on Smart Response: Omni Hotel at CNN Center, 100 CNN Center, Atlanta,...

  11. Atlanta NAVIGATOR case study. Final report, May 1996--Jun 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Amodei, R.; Bard, E.; Brong, B.; Cahoon, F.; Jasper, K.

    1998-11-01

    The Atlanta metropolitan region was the location of one of the most ambitious Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) deployments in the United States. This deployment included several individual projects--a Central Transportation Management Center (TMC), six Traffic Control Centers (TCC), one Transit Information Center (TIC), the Travel Information Showcase (TIS), and the extension of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) rail network and the new high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes on I-85 and I-75. The Atlanta Centennial Olympic Games and Paralympic Games created a focus for these projects. All of these systems were to be brought on line in time for the Olympic Games. This report presents the findings of the NAVIGATOR Case Study and documents the lessons learned from the Atlanta ITS deployment experience in order to improve other ITS deployments in the future. The Case Study focuses on the institutional, programmatic, and technical issues and opportunities from planning and implementing the ITS deployment in Atlanta. The Case Study collected data and information from interviews, observations, focus groups, and documentation reviews. It presents a series of lessons learned and recommendations for enabling successful ITS deployments nationwide.

  12. EPA to Sign Memorandum of Understanding with Atlanta Metropolitan State College

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - On Wednesday, April 22, 2015, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will enter into agreement with Atlanta Metropolitan State College (AMSC) to promote environmental sustainability. The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) will provi

  13. The State of Youth at Risk and the Juvenile Justice System: Prevention and Intervention. Hearing on Support for State Law Enforcement Efforts and for State Juvenile Justice Systems To Help Address the Wave of Violent Crimes among Youthful Offenders before the Subcommittee on Juvenile Justice of the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session (Atlanta, GA, October 21, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

    This document presents witness testimonies and prepared statements from a Senate hearing held in Atlanta, Georgia to examine the problem of crime among youth and to discuss the reauthorization of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974. In his opening statement, Senator Fowler notes that the reauthorization puts greater…

  14. 77 FR 24440 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Atlanta; Ozone 2002 Base Year...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Atlanta; Ozone 2002.... SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve the ozone 2002 base year emissions inventory portion of the state... is part of the Atlanta, Georgia (hereafter referred to as ``the Atlanta Area'' or ``Area''),...

  15. 78 FR 32222 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour..., 2009, to address the reasonable further progress (RFP) plan requirements for the Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) nonattainment area. The Atlanta,...

  16. 78 FR 44439 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans: Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans: Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour... Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) nonattainment area. EPA... Planning Branch, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 4, 61 Forsyth Street SW., Atlanta,...

  17. Chemlink Laboratories in Kennesaw, Ga. Among 21 Partners to be Recognized for Creating and Using Safer Choice Products / June 22 is the first annual awards ceremony for 2015 Safer Choice Partner of the Year Award Winners

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is announcing that Chemlink Laboratories in Kennesaw, Ga. is among 21 Safer Choice Partner of the Year winners across 15 states. The awards are for outstanding achievement in the design, manufa

  18. OBJECTIVES, DESIGN, AND PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE ATLANTA SUPERSITE PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atlanta Supersites project is the first of two Supersites projects to be established during Phase I of EPA's Supersites Program; Phase II is being established through a Request for Assistance. The other initial project is in Fresno, California. The Supersite Program is part o...

  19. Student Financial Aid Issues Hearing Report (Atlanta, Georgia,

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance, Washington, DC.

    This paper summarizes results of a hearing by the Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance in Atlanta, Georgia, on the delivery and disposition of higher education student financial assistance funds. Seventeen individuals offered testimony. They included representatives of guarantee agencies, the lending community, the financial aid…

  20. The diurnal and semidiurnal oscillations in meteor winds over Atlanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. I.; Roper, R. G.

    The wind data collected over Atlanta during the period August 1974-February 1978 using the Georgia Tech Radio Meteor Wind Facility, is analyzed to yield an average picture of the seasonal behavior of its diurnal tides. Both the zonal and meridional components are studied. The vertical structures of these oscillations over Atlanta are compared with similar studies over Garchy, Urbana and Adelaide. For the semidiurnal tide: the vertical structure during winter appears to have a strong latitude dependence, with vertical wavelength increasing with decreasing latitude; in spring, the (2, 4) and (2, 6) modes appear to dominate at all stations; in summer, the behavior is the same at all four locations, characterized by the apparent domination of the (2,2) mode; in autumn, both the Garchy and Atlanta results indicate the presence of a (2,2) mode, while the (2,4) mode appears to dominate over Urbana. The behavior of the diurnal tide is less well defined: during winter, as latitude decreases from Garchy to Atlanta, evanescent and higher order propagating modes seem to dominate; both spring and summer are characterized by a gradual decrease in observed vertical wavelengths as latitude decreases; in northern hemisphere autumn, the fundamental (1, 1) mode appears to dominate, but at Adelaide in southern hemisphere autumn, predominatly evanescent modes are observed.

  1. Changing the Odds: The Race for Results in Atlanta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Janelle; Torian, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Casey has invested in several southwest Atlanta communities for more than 10 years. This report explores how race and community of residence continue to create barriers that keep the city's kids, particularly those of color, from reaching their full potential. The report highlights three key areas that support or thwart children's healthy…

  2. The Emergency Medical Services Survey of Metro Atlanta Employers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKalb Tech. Inst., Clarkston, GA.

    A survey was conducted in the Atlanta, Georgia, metropolitan area to determine emergency medical services (EMS) employer needs for persons with basic emergency medical technician (EMT) skills and higher paramedic skills. Information was gathered through a telephone survey to which 24 (60 percent) of the 40 EMS employers in the area responded. The…

  3. Environmental Public Health Tracking: Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange-Atlanta (HEXIX-Atlanta: A cooperative Program Between CDC and NASA for Development of an Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Niskar, Amanda Sue

    2005-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is coordinating HELIX- Atlanta to provide information regarding the five-county Metropolitan Atlanta Area (Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinett) via a network of integrated environmental monitoring and public health data systems so that all sectors can take action to prevent and control environmentally related health effects. The HELIX-Atlanta Network is a tool to access interoperable information systems with optional information technology linkage functionality driven by scientific rationale. HELIX-Atlanta is a collaborative effort with local, state, federal, and academic partners, including the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The HELIX-Atlanta Partners identified the following HELIX-Atlanta initial focus areas: childhood lead poisoning, short-latency cancers, developmental disabilities, birth defects, vital records, respiratory health, age of housing, remote sensing data, and environmental monitoring, HELIX-Atlanta Partners identified and evaluated information systems containing information on the above focus areas. The information system evaluations resulted in recommendations for what resources would be needed to interoperate selected information systems in compliance with the CDC Public Health Information Network (PHIN). This presentation will discuss the collaborative process of building a network that links health and environment data for information exchange, including NASA remote sensing data, for use in HELIX-Atlanta.

  4. Project ATLANTA (ATlanta Land-use ANalysis: Temperature and Air quality): A Study of how the Urban Landscape Affects Meteorology and Air Quality Through Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G.; Lo, C. P.; Kidder, Stanley Q.; Hafner, Jan; Taha, Haider; Bornstein, Robert D.; Gillies, Robert R.; Gallo, Kevin P.

    1998-01-01

    It is our intent through this investigation to help facilitate measures that can be Project ATLANTA (ATlanta Land-use ANalysis: applied to mitigate climatological or air quality Temperature and Air-quality) is a NASA Earth degradation, or to design alternate measures to sustain Observing System (EOS) Interdisciplinary Science or improve the overall urban environment in the future. investigation that seeks to observe, measure, model, and analyze how the rapid growth of the Atlanta. The primary objectives for this research effort are: 1) To In the last half of the 20th century, Atlanta, investigate and model the relationship between Atlanta Georgia has risen as the premier commercial, urban growth, land cover change, and the development industrial, and transportation urban area of the of the urban heat island phenomenon through time at southeastern United States. The rapid growth of the nested spatial scales from local to regional; 2) To Atlanta area, particularly within the last 25 years, has investigate and model the relationship between Atlanta made Atlanta one of the fastest growing metropolitan urban growth and land cover change on air quality areas in the United States. The population of the through time at nested spatial scales from local to Atlanta metropolitan area increased 27% between 1970 regional; and 3) To model the overall effects of urban and 1980, and 33% between 1980-1990 (Research development on surface energy budget characteristics Atlanta, Inc., 1993). Concomitant with this high rate of across the Atlanta urban landscape through time at population growth, has been an explosive growth in nested spatial scales from local to regional. Our key retail, industrial, commercial, and transportation goal is to derive a better scientific understanding of how services within the Atlanta region. This has resulted in land cover changes associated with urbanization in the tremendous land cover change dynamics within the Atlanta area, principally in transforming

  5. Climate change adaptation through urban heat management in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Stone, Brian; Vargo, Jason; Liu, Peng; Hu, Yongtao; Russell, Armistead

    2013-07-16

    This study explores the potential effectiveness of metropolitan land cover change as a climate change adaptation strategy for managing rising temperatures in a large and rapidly warming metropolitan region of the United States. Through the integration of a mesoscale meteorological model with estimated land cover data for the Atlanta, Georgia region in 2010, this study quantifies the influence of extensive land cover change at the periphery of a large metropolitan region on temperature within the city center. The first study to directly model a metropolitan scale heat transfer mechanism, we find both enhanced tree canopy and impervious cover in the suburban zones of the Atlanta region to produce statistically significant cooling and warming effects in the urban core. Based on these findings, we conclude that urban heat island management both within and beyond the central developed core of large cities may provide an effective climate change adaptation strategy for large metropolitan regions.

  6. Trends in pyloric stenosis incidence, Atlanta, 1968 to 1982.

    PubMed Central

    Lammer, E J; Edmonds, L D

    1987-01-01

    Four studies reported an increasing incidence of pyloric stenosis during the late 1970s from geographically diverse areas of the United Kingdom. It was suggested that the increased incidence might be related to changes in infant feeding practices. We used data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, a population based birth defects registry, to examine the secular trends and descriptive epidemiology of pyloric stenosis in a North American city. For the period 1968 to 1982, the incidence of pyloric stenosis was 1.33 per 1000 live births; there was no evidence of an increasing trend for either race or sex specific rates of pyloric stenosis. The descriptive epidemiology of the pyloric stenosis cases showed higher rates for males, whites, and infants of higher birth weight. We found no increasing trend in pyloric stenosis incidence in Atlanta, despite well documented changes in US infant feeding practices (an increased prevalence of breast feeding) during the 1970s. PMID:3656370

  7. The Role of Union Cavalry during the Atlanta Campaign

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    forced Major General Joseph Hooker to operate blind against Confederate Generals Lee and Jackson. Chancellorsville was Lee’s greatest battle, and... Joseph E. Johnston took command of the Army of Tennessee, which had been pushed south into Georgia following the Battle of Missionary Ridge. The strategic...Union effort. 5 The Union cavalry efforts there were eclipsed by Confederate cavalry under Forrest and Major General Joseph Wheeler. 7 Atlanta

  8. Operation Heli-STAR - Atlanta Communications Experiment (ACE). Volume 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Operation Heli-STAR (Helicopter Short-Haul Transportation and Aviation Research) was established and operated in Atlanta, Georgia, during the period of the 1996 Centennial Olympic Games. Heli-STAR had three major thrusts: (1) the establishment and operation of a helicopter-based cargo transportation system, (2) the management of low-altitude air traffic in the airspace of an urban area, and (3) the collection and analysis of research and development data associated with items 1 and 2. Heli-STAR was a cooperative industry/government program that included parcel package shippers and couriers in the Atlanta area, the helicopter industry, aviation electronics manufacturers, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and support contractors. Several detailed reports have been produced as a result of Operation Heli-STAR. These include four reports on acoustic measurements and associated analyses, and reports on the Heli-STAR tracking data including the data processing and retrieval system, the Heli-STAR cargo simulation, and the community response system. In addition, NASA's Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments (AGATE) program has produced a report describing the Atlanta Communications Experiment (ACE) which produced the avionics and ground equipment using automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) technology. This latter report is restricted to organizations belonging to NASA's AGATE industry consortium. A complete list of these reports is shown on the following page.

  9. Commercial mosquito trap and gravid trap oviposition media evaluation, Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Burkett, Douglas A; Kelly, Rosmarie; Porter, Charles H; Wirtz, Robert A

    2004-09-01

    Field trials evaluating the effectiveness of selected gravid trap oviposition media and commercially available mosquito traps were conducted in southern Fulton County (Atlanta), GA, from June 9 to June 18 and June 24 to July 4, 2002, respectively. Total number of mosquitoes and number of each species captured during the tests were compared using a Latin square design. For the gravid trap infusion media, significant differences were found for total number of mosquitoes collected where sod > or = hay > or = hay side-by-side diluted hay > dilute hay side-by-side hay > or = oak > diluted hay. Only Aedes albopictus (oak), Culex quinquefasciatus (sod and both concentrated hay infusions), and Culex restuans (sod) were captured in significantly greater numbers using a particular infusion. Significant differences for the total number of mosquitoes collected were also observed in the commercial mosquito traps such that the gravid trap > ultra violet up-draft > or = Mosquito Magnet Pro > or = omnidirectional Fay-Prince trap with CO2 > up-draft CDC-style with CO2 > or = CDC-style with CO2. Significant differences in numbers collected among traps were noted for several species, including Aedes vexans, Aedes albopictus, Cx. quinquefasciatus, Cx. restuans, and Culex salinarius. Results from these field trap and infusion evaluations can enhance current surveillance efforts, especially for the primary vectors of West Nile virus and other arboviruses.

  10. Atlanta Rail Yard Study: Evaluation of local-scale air pollution ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Intermodal rail yards are important nodes in the freight transportation network, where freight is organized and moved from one mode of transport to another, critical equipment is serviced, and freight is routed to its next destination. Rail yard environments are also areas with multiple sources of air pollutant emissions (e.g., heavy-duty vehicles, locomotives, cranes), which may affect local air quality in residential areas nearby. In order to understand emissions and related air quality impacts, two field studies took place over the time span of 2010-2012 to measure air pollution trends in close proximity to the Inman and Tilford rail yard complex in Atlanta, GA. One field study involved long-term stationary monitoring of black carbon, fine particles, and carbon dioxide at two stations nearby the rail yard. In addition, a second field study performed intensive mobile air monitoring for a one month period in the summer of 2012 at a roadway network surrounding the rail yard complex and measured a comprehensive array of pollutants. Real-time mobile particulate measurements included particle counts, extinction coefficient, black carbon via light-absorption and particle incandescence, and particle composition derived by aerosol mass spectrometry. Gas-phase measurements included oxides of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and air toxics (e.g., benzene). Both sets of measurements determined detectable local influence from rail yard-related emissions.

  11. Pediatric malaria: 8 year case series in Atlanta, Georgia, and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, Julie; Guarner, Jeanette

    2010-01-01

    Background Although malaria is frequent in travelers, it is often misdiagnosed on initial presentation, especially in children. The objective of this study is to describe epidemiology, clinical and laboratory presentation, and treatment of children with malaria in the United States. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 50 confirmed cases of malaria from 2 pediatric metropolitan hospitals in Atlanta, GA from 2000 – 2008. Results Malaria smears were performed in 385 unique patients; 50 (12.6%) were positive. American children who had visited family and friends in malaria endemic countries comprised 62% of our cases. Most cases visited Nigeria or Cameroon; all but 3 travelled to Africa. Three patients presented 8 – 12 months following travel. Plasmodium falciparum was diagnosed most frequently (72%). Most patients had low level parasitemia (<1%). Gametocytes were rarely identified. Treatment was primarily with quinine and either doxycycline or clindamycin, transfusion was rare. All patients responded rapidly to treatment. Although 7 (14%) had hyperparasitemia (>5%), no fatalities or long-term sequelae were seen. Conclusions Malaria diagnosis can be difficult in children because parasitemia is usually below 1%. A high index of suspicion is required in patients who have travelled to Africa. PMID:20920055

  12. EPA and City of Atlanta to Hold the 3rd Annual Earth Day Rally at the Sam Nunn Atlanta Federal Center Courtyard/ Egypt Sherrod, Star of HGTVs highly rated Property Virgins, will Host the Rally

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - In celebration of the 45 th Anniversary of Earth Day, EPA Regional Administrator Heather McTeer Toney will join Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed and Egypt Sherrod, the star of HGTV's highly rated Property Virgins and author of Keep

  13. TODAY: EPA and City of Atlanta will Hold the 3rd Annual Earth Day Rally at the Sam Nunn Atlanta Federal Center Courtyard/Egypt Sherrod, Star of HGTVs highly rated Property Virgins, will Host the Rally

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - In celebration of the 45 th Anniversary of Earth Day, EPA Regional Administrator Heather McTeer Toney will join Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed and Egypt Sherrod, the star of HGTV's highly rated Property Virgins and author of Keep

  14. 40 CFR 81.45 - Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.45 Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Georgia) has been revised to consist of...

  15. 40 CFR 81.45 - Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.45 Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Georgia) has been revised to consist of...

  16. 76 FR 66713 - Atlanta Gas Light Company; Notice of Compliance Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Atlanta Gas Light Company; Notice of Compliance Filing Take notice that on October 19, 2011, Atlanta Gas Light Company filed a revised Statement of Operating Conditions...

  17. Falsification, Annual Targets, and Errant Leadership: Media Portrayal of the Atlanta Test-Cheating Scandal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This analysis of the Atlanta test-cheating scandal differs markedly from the version reported in the press. Using discourse analysis, I examined over 50 articles published in the "Atlanta Journal-Constitution" ("AJC"), the hometown newspaper at the center of the investigation. Because newspapers are a primary source of…

  18. 78 FR 65877 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Area. Signal preemption for MARTA Atlanta 6/17/96 4/26/99. routes 15 and 23. Improve and expand service... for Control Atlanta 1997 8- 10/21/2009........ 09/28/2013. of VOC Emissions from Reactor Hour Ozone Processes and Distillation Nonattainment Operations in Synthetic Organic Area. Chemical...

  19. A New Definition in Atlanta: Q&A with Beverly Hall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy

    2010-01-01

    Beverly Hall has been superintendent of Atlanta Public Schools since 1999. Before coming to Atlanta, Hall was state district superintendent of Newark Public Schools, deputy chancellor for instruction of New York City Public Schools, superintendent of Community School District 27 in New York City, and a principal in Brooklyn. Hall chairs Harvard…

  20. Why, Where, and How to Infuse the Atlanta Sociological Laboratory into the Sociology Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Earl, II

    2012-01-01

    The Atlanta Sociological Laboratory is the moniker bestowed on scholars engaged in sociological research at Atlanta University between 1895 and 1924. Under the leadership of W. E. B. Du Bois, 1897-1914, this school made substantive yet marginalized contributions to the discipline. Its accomplishments include, but are not limited to, its…

  1. The Social Studies Curriculum in Atlanta Public Schools during the Desegregation Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohan, Chara Haeussler; Randolph, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This historical investigation explores how teachers, students, and education officials viewed the social studies curriculum in the local context of Atlanta, and the broader state of Georgia, during the post-Civil Rights era, when integration was a court-ordered reality in the public schools. During the desegregation era, Atlanta schools were led…

  2. AN OVERVIEW OF THE OBJECTIVES AND DESIGN OF THE '99 ATLANTA SUPERSITE EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the Summer of 1999, a 4-week intensive field campaign was conducted at a site on Jefferson Street in Midtown Atlanta. The campaign, the 1999 Atlanta Supersites Experiment, was carried out under the direction of the Southern Oxidants Study and represented the first of U....

  3. 40 CFR 81.45 - Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.45 Section 81.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.45 Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Georgia) has been revised to consist of...

  4. 40 CFR 81.45 - Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.45 Section 81.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.45 Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Georgia) has been revised to consist of...

  5. 40 CFR 81.45 - Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.45 Section 81.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.45 Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Georgia) has been revised to consist of...

  6. Ozone trends in Atlanta, Georgia - Have emission controls been effective?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, Ronald W.; Richardson, Jennifer L.; Chameldes, William L.

    1989-01-01

    Nine years of summertime ozone data from the Atlanta metropolitan area are analyzed and compared to local emissions of volatile organic carbon and nitrogen oxides. Trends from 1979 to 1987 were studied for the number of days per year ozone exceeded the NAAQS standard, the second-highest ozone level observed per year, and the first quartile summertime average ozone observed, as well as the mean difference between the ozone level observed downwind and upwind of the city. Because this last parameter is sensitive to chemical factors but relatively insensitive to the number of days each year with meteorological conditions conducive to ozone formation, its trend may be best suited for determining how effective emission controls have been in reducing O3 in the Atlanta area. In spite of the fact that sizeable reductions have been claimed for volatile organic carbon emissions over the past several years, the data give no indication that ozone levels have decreased and in fact, imply that summertime ozone production may have increased. The results imply that either emissions have not decreased as much as has been claimed or that ozone is not sensitive to anthropogenic volatile organic carbon emissions.

  7. Food group intake patterns and nutrient intake vary across low-income Hispanic and African American preschool children in Atlanta: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The food group intake patterns of low income Hispanic and African American preschool children are not well documented. The aim of this study was to perform a food group intake analysis of low income minority preschool children and evaluate how macronutrient and micronutrient intake compares to Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI). Methods A cross sectional study design using three-day food diaries analyzed by dietary analysis software (Nutrient Database System for Research) was used. Children were recruited from well-child clinics at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Hughes Spalding and North Dekalb Grady Satellite Clinic, Atlanta, GA. Low-income, African American and Hispanic preschool age children (n = 291) were enrolled. A total of 105 completed and returned the 3-day food diaries. Chi-squared tests were used to assess demographic variables. The mean percentage of intake per day of specific food groups and sub-groups were obtained (servings of given food group/total daily servings). Food intake data and proportion of children meeting DRIs for macro- and micronutrients were stratified by race/ethnicity, nutritional status, and caloric intake, and were compared using t-tests. Regression models controlling for age, BMI and sex were obtained to assess the effect of total caloric intake upon the proportional intake of each studied food group. Results The mean age of African American children was 2.24 ± 1.07 years and Hispanic children 2.84 ± 1.12 years. African Americans consumed more kcal/kg/day than Hispanics (124.7 ± 51 vs. 96.9 ± 33, p < 0.05). Hispanics consumed more fruits (22.0 ± 10.7% vs. 14.7 ± 13.7%, p < 0.05), while African Americans consumed more grains (25.7 ± 7.8% vs. 18.1 ± 6.4%, p < 0.05), meats (20.7 ± 9.0% vs. 15.4 ± 6.1%, p < 0.05), fats (9.8 ± 5.4% vs. 7.0 ± 5.8%, p < 0.05), sweet drinks (58.7 ± 17.1% vs. 41.3 ± 14.8%, p < 0.05) and low

  8. Solar hot water system installed at Day's Lodge, Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., Atlanta, Georgia is described. This system provides for 81 percent of the total hot water demand. There are two separate systems, each serving one building of the lodge (total of 65 suites). The entire system contains only potable city water. The 1024 square feet of Grumman Sunstream Model 332 liquid flat plate collectors and the outside piping drain whenever the collector plates approach freezing or when power is interrupted. Solar heated water from the two above ground cement lined steel tanks (1000 gallon tank) is drawn into the electric Domestic Hot Water (DHW) tanks as hot water is drawn. Electric resistance units in the DHW tanks top off the solar heated water, if needed, to reach thermostat setting.

  9. STS-56 ESC Earth observation of Atlanta, Georgia at night

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-56 electronic still camera (ESC) Earth observation image shows metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia at night as recorded on the 64th orbit of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. The image was recorded using an image intensifier on the Hand-held, Earth-oriented, Real-time, Cooperative, User-friendly, Location-targeting and Environmental System (HERCULES). HERCULES is a device that makes it simple for shuttle crewmembers to take pictures of Earth as they merely point a modified 35mm camera and shoot any interesting feature, whose latitude and longitude are automatically determined in real-time. Center coordinates on this image are 33.738 degrees north latitude and 84.414 degrees west longitude. Digital file name is ESC04030.IMG.

  10. Investigation into the use of satellite data in aiding characterization of particulate air quality in the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Alston, Erica J; Sokolik, Irina N; Doddridge, Bruce G

    2011-02-01

    Poor air quality episodes occur often in metropolitan Atlanta, GA. The primary focus of this research is to assess the capability of satellites as a tool in characterizing air quality in Atlanta. Results indicate that intracity PM2.5 (particulate matter < or = 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter) concentrations show similar patterns as other U.S. urban areas, with the highest concentrations occurring within the city. PM2.5 and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) aerosol optical depth (AOD) have higher values in the summer than spring, yet MODIS AOD doubles in the summer unlike PM2.5. Most (80%) of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument aerosol index (AI) is below 0.5 with little differences between spring and summer. Using this value as a constraint of the carbonaceous aerosol signal in the urban area, aerosol transport events such as wildfire smoke associated with higher positive AI values can be identified. The results indicate that MODIS AOD is well correlated with PM2.5 on a yearly and seasonal basis with correlation coefficients as high as 0.8 for Terra and 0.7 for Aqua. A possible alternative view of the PM2.5 and AOD relationship is seen through the use of AOD thresholds. These probabilistic thresholds provide a means to describe the air quality index (AQI) through the use of multiyear AOD records for a specific area. The National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) are used to classify the AOD into different AQI codes and probabilistically determine thresholds of AOD that represent most of a specific AQI category. For example, 80% of cases of moderate AQI days have AOD values between 0.5 and 0.6. The development of AOD thresholds provides a useful tool for evaluating air quality from the use of satellites in regions where there are sparse ground-based measurements of PM2.5.

  11. Building America Case Study: Ground Source Heat Pump Research, TaC Studios Residence, Atlanta, Georigia (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    As part of the NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Southface partnered with TaC Studios, an Atlanta based architecture firm specializing in residential and light commercial design, on the construction of a new test home in Atlanta, GA in the mixed-humid climate. This home serves as a residence and home office for the firm's owners, as well as a demonstration of their design approach to potential and current clients. Southface believes the home demonstrates current best practices for the mixed-humid climate, including a building envelope featuring advanced air sealing details and low density spray foam insulation, glazing that exceeds ENERGY STAR requirements, and a high performance heating and cooling system. Construction quality and execution was a high priority for TaC Studios and was ensured by a third party review process. Post construction testing showed that the project met stated goals for envelope performance, an air infiltration rate of 2.15 ACH50. The homeowner's wished to further validate whole house energy savings through the project's involvement with Building America and this long-term monitoring effort. As a Building America test home, this home was evaluated to detail whole house energy use, end use loads, and the efficiency and operation of the ground source heat pump and associated systems. Given that the home includes many non-typical end use loads including a home office, pool, landscape water feature, and other luxury features not accounted for in Building America modeling tools, these end uses were separately monitored to determine their impact on overall energy consumption.

  12. McDuffie County Schools in Thomson Ga. Awarded $85,000 in EPA Rebates to Fund Cleaner School Buses

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA --- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced today that McDuffie County Schools in Thomson Ga. i s one of 85 school bus fleets in 35 states to receive rebates through EPA's Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) funding.

  13. 78 FR 50373 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Kentucky Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS... to the provisions of the rules and regulations of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights (Commission... Civil Rights, 61 Forsyth St. SW., Suite 16T126, Atlanta, GA 30303. Persons wishing to email...

  14. 75 FR 47770 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Tennessee Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS... to the provisions of the rules and regulations of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights (Commission.... Commission on Civil Rights, 61 Forsyth St., SW., Suite 16T126, Atlanta, GA, 30303. They may also be faxed...

  15. 77 FR 24683 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Florida Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS... the provisions of the rules and regulations of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights (Commission) and..., U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, 61 Forsyth St., SW., Suite 16T126, Atlanta, GA, 30303. They...

  16. 75 FR 22737 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Kentucky Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS... to the provisions of the rules and regulations of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights (Commission..., U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, 61 Forsyth Street, Suite 18T40, Atlanta, GA 30301. Persons...

  17. Risk Factors for HIV Transmission and Barriers to HIV Disclosure: Metropolitan Atlanta Youth Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wallins, Amy; Toledo, Lauren; Murray, Ashley; Gaul, Zaneta; Sutton, Madeline Y.; Gillespie, Scott; Leong, Traci; Graves, Chanda; Chakraborty, Rana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Youth carry the highest incidence of HIV infection in the United States. Understanding adolescent and young adult (AYA) perspectives on HIV transmission risk is important for targeted HIV prevention. We conducted a mixed methods study with HIV-infected and uninfected youth, ages 18–24 years, from Atlanta, GA. We provided self-administered surveys to HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected AYAs to identify risk factors for HIV acquisition. By means of computer-assisted thematic analyses, we examined transcribed focus group responses on HIV education, contributors to HIV transmission, and pre-sex HIV status disclosure. The 68 participants had the following characteristics: mean age 21.5 years (standard deviation: 1.8 years), 85% male, 90% black, 68% HIV-infected. HIV risk behaviors included the perception of condomless sex (Likert scale mean: 8.0) and transactional sex (88% of participants); no differences were noted by HIV status. Qualitative analyses revealed two main themes: (1) HIV risk factors among AYAs, and (2) barriers to discussing HIV status before sex. Participants felt the use of social media, need for immediate gratification, and lack of concern about HIV disease were risk factors for AYAs. Discussing HIV status with sex partners was uncommon. Key reasons included: fear of rejection, lack of confidentiality, discussion was unnecessary in temporary relationships, and disclosure negatively affecting the mood. HIV prevention strategies for AYAs should include improving condom use frequency and HIV disclosure skills, responsible utilization of social media, and education addressing HIV prevention including the risks of transactional sex. PMID:26588663

  18. 75 FR 41884 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Georgia Department of Transportation, Atlanta, GA; University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... cremations, although the human remains were not removed and are not found in the collection. These funerary... funerary objects include recognized Late Archaic ceramics and projectile points. In addition, cremations... Southeast. In the Northeast, however, Late Archaic cremations are slightly more common and date to...

  19. UPS in Atlanta, Ga. Among 16 Organizations Across the Country Recognized for Action on Climate Change

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    · Individual Leadership Award: Mayor Bill Finch, City of Bridgeport, Conn. , is being recognized for demonstrating extraordinary leadership in driving meaningful climate action within the Greater Bridgeport community and throughout t

  20. 75 FR 76953 - Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 26 Under Alternative Site Framework, Atlanta, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... under the ASF with a service area that includes the Georgia counties of Haralson, Paulding, Polk, Floyd..., Coweta, Heard, Troup, Meriwether, Pike, Spalding, Butts, Lamar, Upson, Jasper, Newton, Morgan, Greene... and Muscogee in their entirety and portions of White, Franklin, Peach, Houston, and Twiggs...

  1. GLOBECOM '84 - Global Telecommunications Conference, Atlanta, GA, November 26-29, 1984, Conference Record. Volume 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attention is given to aspects of quality assurance methodologies in development life cycles, optical intercity transmission systems, multiaccess protocols, system and technology aspects in the case of regional/domestic satellites, advances in SSB-AM radio transmission over terrestrial and satellite network, and development environments for telecommunications systems. Other subjects studied are concerned with business communication networks for voice and data, VLSI in local network and communication protocol, product evaluation and support, an update regarding Videotex, topics in communication theory, topics in radio propagation, a status report regarding societal effects of technology in the workplace, digital image processing, and adaptive signal processing for communications. The management of the reliability function in the development process is considered along with Giga-bit technologies for long distance large capacity optical transmission equipment. The application of gallium arsenide analog and digital integrated circuits for high-speed fiber optical communications, and a simple algorithm for image data coding.

  2. 77 FR 5429 - Proposed Modification of the Atlanta Class B Airspace Area; GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... flight through Class B airspace without an ATC clearance or radio communications requirements, the idea... aspects of the proposal. Communications should identify both docket numbers (FAA Docket No. FAA-2011-1237... postcard will be date/time stamped and returned to the commenter. All communications received on or...

  3. DOE ZERH Case Study: Heirloom Design Build, Euclid Avenue, Atlanta, GA

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the mixed-humid climate that got a HERS 50 without PV, with 2x6 16” on center walls with R-19 ocsf; basement with R-28 ccsf, R-5 rigid foam under slab; sealed attic with R-28 ocsf under roof deck; 22.8 SEER; 12.5 HSPF heat pump.

  4. TUESDAY: EPA Division Director to Highlight the New Norfolk Southern Eco Locomotives in Atlanta

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regional Air, Pesticides, and Toxics Management Division Director Beverly Banister will speak at the Norfolk Southern Inman Yard during the unveiling of the nation's first 'Eco' locomotives.

  5. Fecal-coliform bacteria concentrations in streams of the Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area, Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, May-October 1994 and 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregory, M. Brian; Frick, Elizabeth A.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: The Metropolitan Atlanta area has been undergoing a period of rapid growth and development. The population in the 10-county metropolitan area almost doubled from about 1.5 million people in 1970 to 2.9 million people in 1995 (Atlanta Regional Commission, written commun., 2000). Residential, commercial, and other urban land uses more than tripled during the same period (Frick and others, 1998). The Chattahoochee River is the most utilized water resource in Georgia. The rapid growth of Metropolitan Atlanta and its location downstream of the headwaters of the drainage basin make the Chattahoochee River a vital resource for drinking-water supplies, recreational opportunities, and wastewater assimilation. In 1978, the U.S. Congress declared the natural, scenic, recreation, and other values of 48 miles of the Chattahoochee River from Buford Dam to Peachtree Creek to be of special national significance. To preserve this reach of the Chattahoochee River, the U.S. Congress created the Chattahoochee River National Recreational Area (CRNRA), which includes the Chattahoochee River downstream from Buford Dam to the mouth of Peachtree Creek and a series of park areas adjacent to the river in northern Metropolitan Atlanta Even with this protection, waters of the Chattahoochee River and many of its tributaries in Metropolitan Atlanta did not meet water-quality standards set for designated uses during 1994 and 1995 (fig. 1 and table 1). Much of the degradation of water quality has been associated with areas undergoing rapid urban growth and sprawling suburban development. The resulting conversion of mostly forested land to urban land has multiple adverse effects on water quality. Degradation of water quality may be caused by a number of factors including an increase in nutrient concentrations, sediment and sedimentbound contaminant concentrations (e.g., metals and pesticides) (Frick and others, 1998), and fecal-coliform bacteria concentrations (Center for Watershed

  6. Inspection/maintenance program evaluation: replicating the Denver Step Method for an Atlanta fleet.

    PubMed

    Corley, Elizabeth A; Dehart-Davis, Leisha; Lindner, Jim; Rodgers, Michael O

    2003-06-15

    The research presented in this paper employs the Step Method of Inspection/Maintenance (I/M) program evaluation to estimate the emissions reduction for an Atlanta I/M program. Stedman et al. (Stedman, D. H.; Bishop, G. A.; Aldrete, P.; Slott, R. S. Environ. Sci. Technol. 1997, 31, 927-931) introduced the Step Method of evaluation when they presented the results of a 1995 Denver I/M program evaluation. The research presented here replicates the original Denver Step Method analysis for a 1997 Atlanta I/M program. This evaluation was conducted separately for the nine outlying Atlanta counties and the four counties that are closest to the center of the city. The results of the analysis are similar to those found by Stedman et al. in Denver. While the Denver carbon monoxide (CO) weighted program benefit was 6.9%, the Atlanta area CO weighted program benefit is found to be 11.5% and 4.9% for the nine-county and four-county Atlanta areas, respectively. We conclude that the 1997 I/M program change in Atlanta yielded a noteworthy and observable change in fleet emissions.

  7. Outcomes among Asylum Seekers in Atlanta, Georgia, 2003--2012.

    PubMed

    Evans, Dabney P; Donato, Caitlin E; Malewezi, Bridget A; Li, Anyie J; Corea, Mario J; Mitchell, Andrew B

    2015-10-01

    INTRODUCTION Asylum seekers face a wide array of challenges, including the need for a fair and just adjudication process. In the state of Georgia, the Atlanta Asylum Network addresses the needs of such individuals by providing them physical, psychological and gynecological assessments, the results of which are presented to the courts in the asylum appeal process. OBJECTIVE As a component of the Network's program evaluation, assess outcomes among asylum seekers using its services, as well as relation of outcomes to type of service provided, the individual's geographic origin and English language proficiency. METHODS A retrospective examination was conducted of program data gathered by the Network between 2003 and 2012. Subjects included asylum seekers who received assessments by the Network during this period. The primary variable of interest was the final case outcome, defined as determination of asylum status: granted, withholding of removal, administrative closure and prosecutorial discretion, denied or voluntary departure. Outcomes were subsequently collapsed into a single positive or negative outcome variable. Positive outcomes included asylum granted, removal withheld, administrative closure and prosecutorial discretion. Negative outcomes included asylum denied and voluntary departure. We conducted bivariate and multivariate analyses, relating final case outcomes to Network services, geographic origin and English language proficiency, among the key variables. RESULTS A total of 69 of 120 asylum seekers in the study had a known final case outcome, and of those, 63.8% (44) had a positive outcome; or 37% of the total number of asylum seekers (n = 120). Among the 20 who received 2 of the 3 types of assessment (physical, psychological, gynecological), 16 (80%) received a positive case outcome. Most persons with a known final outcome came from Africa (41), where 78% (32) of cases resulted positive. Asylum seekers not proficient in English were 2.4 times more likely

  8. Effects of instrument precision and spatial variability on the assessment of the temporal variation of ambient air pollution in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Wade, Katherine S; Mulholland, James A; Marmur, Amit; Russell, Armistead G; Hartsell, Ben; Edgerton, Eric; Klein, Mitch; Waller, Lance; Peel, Jennifer L; Tolbert, Paige E

    2006-06-01

    Data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Air Quality System, the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization database, and the Assessment of Spatial Aerosol Composition in Atlanta database for 1999 through 2002 have been used to characterize error associated with instrument precision and spatial variability on the assessment of the temporal variation of ambient air pollution in Atlanta, GA. These data are being used in time series epidemiologic studies in which associations of acute respiratory and cardiovascular health outcomes and daily ambient air pollutant levels are assessed. Modified semivariograms are used to quantify the effects of instrument precision and spatial variability on the assessment of daily metrics of ambient gaseous pollutants (SO2, CO, NOx, and O3) and fine particulate matter ([PM2.5] PM2.5 mass, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, elemental carbon [EC], and organic carbon [OC]). Variation because of instrument imprecision represented 7-40% of the temporal variation in the daily pollutant measures and was largest for the PM2.5 EC and OC. Spatial variability was greatest for primary pollutants (SO2, CO, NOx, and EC). Population-weighted variation in daily ambient air pollutant levels because of both instrument imprecision and spatial variability ranged from 20% of the temporal variation for O3 to 70% of the temporal variation for SO2 and EC. Wind

  9. Evaluation of streamwater quality in the Atlanta region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Norman E.; Kandell, Stephen J.; Hatcher, Kathryn J.

    1997-01-01

    A water-quality index (WQI) was developed from historical data for streams in the Atlanta region. The WQI was derived from percentile ranks of individual water-quality parameter values at each stream by normalizing the constituent ranks for values from all sites in the area for the period from 1990 to 1995. WQIs were developed primarily for nutrients and nutrient-related parameters, because data for metals, organics (pesticides and herbicides), biological conditions, and suspended sediment generally were unavailable. Average WQI of the individual parameter WQIs for sites in the region ranged from 0.26 (good quality) to 0.86 (poor quality), and increased downstream of known nutrient sources. Annual average site WQI decreased at most long-term monitoring sites from 1986 to 1995. Temporal trends, in part, reflect effects of a drought in the late 1980's and normal to higher-than-normal rainfall and runoff in the 1990's. For several sites, particularly in the northern part of the region where major development is ongoing, WQI increased dramatically from 1994 to 1995. Interannual WQI variability typically was less than spatial variability. Average annual site WQI for individual parameters correlated with annual hydrologic characteristics, particularly precipitation amount and water yield, reflecting the effect of dilution on individual water-quality parameter values.

  10. Project ATLANTA (Atlanta Land use Analysis: Temperature and Air Quality): Use of Remote Sensing and Modeling to Analyze How Urban Land Use Change Affects Meteorology and Air Quality Through Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of Project ATLANTA (ATlanta Land use ANalysis: Temperature and Air-quality) which is an investigation that seeks to observe, measure, model, and analyze how the rapid growth of the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area since the early 1970's has impacted the region's climate and air quality. The primary objectives for this research effort are: (1) To investigate and model the relationships between land cover change in the Atlanta metropolitan, and the development of the urban heat island phenomenon through time; (2) To investigate and model the temporal relationships between Atlanta urban growth and land cover change on air quality; and (3) To model the overall effects of urban development on surface energy budget characteristics across the Atlanta urban landscape through time. Our key goal is to derive a better scientific understanding of how land cover changes associated with urbanization in the Atlanta area, principally in transforming forest lands to urban land covers through time, has, and will, effect local and regional climate, surface energy flux, and air quality characteristics. Allied with this goal is the prospect that the results from this research can be applied by urban planners, environmental managers and other decision-makers, for determining how urbanization has impacted the climate and overall environment of the Atlanta area. Multiscaled remote sensing data, particularly high resolution thermal infrared data, are integral to this study for the analysis of thermal energy fluxes across the Atlanta urban landscape.

  11. EPA Recognizes Cobb County, Ga. Water System as a WaterSense 2015 Partner of the Year for Making a Difference Every Day

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - The Cobb County, Ga. Water System in Georgia was among those recognized today by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a 2015 WaterSense Partner of the Year. The Partner of the Year awards program the commitment of WaterSense p

  12. Meteorology Of The Clark Atlanta University Local Energy Balance Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandock, R. L.; Mills, I.; Paxton, J. N.

    2005-05-01

    The Earth System Science Program (ESSP) at Clark Atlanta University has developed an instructional module to study energy balance at the air/land and air/sea interfaces. A graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed which is used to model each of the components (net radiation, sensible and latent heat fluxes, ground heat flux, storage, anthropomorphic, and residual) necessary to understand the partitioning of energy at the air/land and air/water interfaces. The energy balance diagram consists of sky elements (sun, moon, clouds), a line representing the air/land or water/land interface, and arrows which indicate magnitude and direction of each of the energy fluxes. The storage component is represented as a box when present. The energy balance model has been applied to numerous (33 at present) scenarios which vary by (1) climate or microclimate, (2) day and night, (2) cloudiness and sunshine, (3) windy and calm, (4) land or water surface, and (5) freezing and non-freezing temperatures. The model is available in 2 levels of rigor: (1) an elementary level (Level I), and (2) and advanced level (Level II). In the Level I model only fixed arrow lengths (e.g., zero, 1/4, 1/2, 3/4, 1) are available to express flux magnitude. This allows a qualitative illustration of the energy balance components. The Level II model requires the student to calculate arrow magnitudes and directions from diffusion, evaporation, radiative transfer, and energy storage equations. The module incorporates not only the energy balance model, but also a protocol by which meteorological observations from the ESSP's rooftop laboratory, the AEMN (Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network), and other online resources. The completed module is designed to serve two audiences: (1) undergraduate introductory science classes and grades 8-12, and (2) upper-division science and engineering classes.

  13. Urbanization effects on the hydrology of the Atlanta, Georgia (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Rose, S.

    2001-01-01

    For the period from 1958 to 1996, streamflow and rainfall characteristics of a highly urbanized watershed were compared with less-urbanized and non-urbanized watersheds in the vicinity of Atlanta, Georgia (USA). Water levels in several wells completed in surficial and crystalline-rock aquifers also were evaluated. Annual runoff coefficients (runoff as a fractional percentage of precipitation) ranged from 0.31 to 0.34 and were not significantly different for the urban stream (Peachtree Creek). Peak flows for the largest 25 stormflows at Peachtree Creek were 30% to 80% greater than peak flows for the other streams. A 2-day storm recession constant for Peachtree Creek was much larger, that is streamflow decreased more rapidly than for the other streams. Average low flow of Peachtree Creek was 25 to 35% less than the other streams, possibly the result of decreased infiltration caused by the more efficient routing of storm water and the paving of groundwater recharge areas. The timing of groundwater level variations was similar annually in each well, reflecting the seasonal recharge. Although water level monitoring only began during the late 1970s and early 1980s for the two urban wells, water levels in these wells have been declining compared to non-urban wells since then. The water level decline is attributed to decreased groundwater recharge in the urban watersheds due to increased imperviousness and related rapid storm runoff. Likewise, the increased urbanization from the 1960s to the 1990s of the Peachtree Creek watershed produced more runoff than urbanization in the less urbanized Big Creek and Sweetwater Creek watersheds.

  14. Application of the Urban Airshed Model to forecasting next-day peak ozone concentrations in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Chang, M E; Cardelino, C

    2000-11-01

    Twenty-four to forty-eight-hour ozone air quality forecasts are increasingly being used in metropolitan areas to inform the public about potentially harmful air quality conditions. The forecasts are also behind "ozone action day" programs in which the public and private sectors are encouraged or mandated to alter activities that contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone. Presented here is a low-cost application of the Urban Airshed Model (UAM), an Eulerian 3-dimensional photochemical-transport grid model for generating next-day peak ozone concentration forecasts. During the summer of 1997, next-day peak ozone concentrations in Atlanta, GA, were predicted both by a team of eight forecasters and by the Urban Airshed Model in Forecast Mode (UAM-FM). Results are presented that compare the accuracy of the team and the UAM-FM. The results for the summer of 1997 indicate that the UAM-FM may be a better predictor of peak ozone concentrations when concentrations are high (> 0.095 ppmv), and the team may be a better predictor of ozone concentrations when concentrations are low (< or = 0.095 ppmv). The UAM-FM is also discussed in the context of other forecasting tools, primarily linear regression models and a no-skill, persistence-based technique.

  15. Green roof adoption in atlanta, georgia: the effects of building characteristics and subsidies on net private, public, and social benefits.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Jeffrey D; Lamsal, Madhur; Colson, Greg

    2013-10-01

    This research draws on and expands previous studies that have quantified the costs and benefits associated with conventional roofs versus green roofs. Using parameters from those studies to define alternative scenarios, we estimate from a private, public, and social perspective the costs and benefits of installing and maintaining an extensive green roof in Atlanta, GA. Results indicate net private benefits are a decreasing function of roof size and vary considerably across scenarios. In contrast, net public benefits are highly stable across scenarios, ranging from $32.49 to $32.90 m(-2). In addition, we evaluate two alternative subsidy regimes: (i) a general subsidy provided to every building that adopts a green roof and (ii) a targeted subsidy provided only to buildings for which net private benefits are negative but net public benefits are positive. In 6 of the 12 general subsidy scenarios the optimal public policy is not to offer a subsidy; in 5 scenarios the optimal subsidy rate is between $20 and $27 m(-2); and in 1 scenario the optimal rate is $5 m(-2). The optimal rate with a targeted subsidy is between $20 and $27 m(-2) in 11 scenarios and no subsidy is optimal in the twelfth. In most scenarios, a significant portion of net public benefits are generated by buildings for which net private benefits are positive. This suggests a policy focused on information dissemination and technical assistance may be more cost-effective than direct subsidy payments.

  16. The U.S. Geological Survey and City of Atlanta water-quality and water-quantity monitoring network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, Arthur J.; Hughes, W. Brian

    2006-01-01

    Population growth and urbanization affect the landscape, and the quality and quantity of water in nearby rivers and streams, as well as downstream receiving waters (Ellis, 1999). Typical impacts include: (1) disruption of the hydrologic cycle through increases in the extent of impervious surfaces (e.g., roads, roofs, sidewalks) that increase the velocity and volume of surface-water runoff; (2) increased chemical loads to local and downstream receiving waters from industrial sources, nonpoint-source runoff, leaking sewer systems, and sewer overflows; (3) direct or indirect soil contamination from industrial sources, power-generating facilities, and landfills; and (4) reduction in the quantity and quality of aquatic habitats. The City of Atlanta's monitoring network consists of 21 long-term sites. Eleven of these are 'fully instrumented' to provide real-time data on water temperature, pH, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, turbidity (intended as a surrogate for suspended sediment concentration), water level (gage height, intended as a surrogate for discharge), and precipitation. Data are transmitted hourly and are available on a public Web site (http://ga.water.usgs.gov/). Two sites only measure water level and rainfall as an aid to stormwater monitoring. The eight remaining sites are used to assess water quality.

  17. New Horizons at Pluto: An Overview of Educational Activities / Outreach at Fernbank Science Center, Atlanta, Georgia (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, Edward F.; Harris, R. Scott

    2015-11-01

    We report on educational activities and associated outreach at Fernbank Science Center (Atlanta, GA) in conjunction with the July 2015 New Horizons spacecraft encounter at Pluto. On encounter day, a public lecture about the dwarf planet was presented by Georgia’s NASA Solar System ambassador to kick off the arrival of the space probe at Pluto. In the months following the flyby, we presented a program called “Exploring New Horizons” in the Science Center’s Zeiss planetarium. This program is a digital full-dome presentation about the discovery of Pluto and its subsequent exploration - including an overview of the New Horizons mission. Since NASA continues to receive data from the probe, a brief update (tribute) is included at the end of each planetarium program that features the latest imagery and data from the dwarf planet. We anticipate running the planetarium program throughout the fall semester of 2015. With Pluto visible in the early evening autumn sky, observations are possible with Center’s 0.9 m telescope, which is open for public viewing on clear Thursday and Friday nights following the planetarium program. Although Pluto is somewhat faint through the telescope's eyepiece, it is visible and clearly identified within the surrounding starfield. Intermittent post-encounter lectures ("Messages from the Outer Solar System") have been given on Friday evenings as well. Finally, due to the continued interest in Pluto, we have developed a new outreach program about dwarf planets in general, geared towards 4th - 6th students.

  18. Climatic, ecological, and socioeconomic factors associated with West Nile virus incidence in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Lockaby, Graeme; Noori, Navideh; Morse, Wayde; Zipperer, Wayne; Kalin, Latif; Governo, Robin; Sawant, Rajesh; Ricker, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    The integrated effects of the many risk factors associated with West Nile virus (WNV) incidence are complex and not well understood. We studied an array of risk factors in and around Atlanta, GA, that have been shown to be linked with WNV in other locations. This array was comprehensive and included climate and meteorological metrics, vegetation characteristics, land use / land cover analyses, and socioeconomic factors. Data on mosquito abundance and WNV mosquito infection rates were obtained for 58 sites and covered 2009-2011, a period following the combined storm water - sewer overflow remediation in that city. Risk factors were compared to mosquito abundance and the WNV vector index (VI) using regression analyses individually and in combination. Lagged climate variables, including soil moisture and temperature, were significantly correlated (positively) with vector index as were forest patch size and percent pine composition of patches (both negatively). Socioeconomic factors that were most highly correlated (positively) with the VI included the proportion of low income households and homes built before 1960 and housing density. The model selected through stepwise regression that related risk factors to the VI included (in the order of decreasing influence) proportion of houses built before 1960, percent of pine in patches, and proportion of low income households.

  19. Racial Differences in Partnership Attributes, Typologies, and Risk Behaviors Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    White, Darcy; Grey, Jeremy A; Gorbach, Pamina M; Rothenberg, Richard B; Sullivan, Patrick S; Rosenberg, Eli S

    2016-05-11

    The role of main partnerships in shaping HIV transmission dynamics among men who have sex with men (MSM) has gained recognition in recent studies, but there is little evidence that existing definitions of partnership type are accurate or have consistent meaning for all men. Using data collected from 2011 to 2013 on 693 partnerships described by 193 Black and White MSM in Atlanta, GA, partnership attributes and risk behaviors were examined and compared by race, stratified in two ways: (1) by commonly used definitions of partnerships as "main" or "casual" and (2) by a new data-driven partnership typology identified through latent class analysis (LCA). Racial differences were analyzed using chi-square, Fisher's exact, and Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests. Black participants were less likely to report condomless anal sex (CAS) within partnerships they labeled as main, yet they were also less likely to describe these partnerships as "primary" on a parallel question. In contrast, within strata defined by the LCA-derived typology, most partnership attributes were comparable and the likelihood of CAS was equivalent by race. These findings suggest that classification of partnerships as main or casual does not accurately capture the partnership patterns of MSM, resulting in differential misclassification by race. Future studies and interventions should refine and utilize more evidence-based typologies.

  20. Evidence for different SOA formation mechanisms in Los Angeles and Atlanta with contrasting emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Liu, J.; Parker, E. T.; Weber, R.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the gas/particle partitioning of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and formation of secondary organic constituents using in-situ measurements of chemical composition and optical properties of PM2.5 liquid extracts at two urban regions, Los Angeles, California and Atlanta, Georgia. Distinct and different diurnal patterns of gaseous and particulate WSOC, oxalate (and other organic acids), and soluble brown carbon were observed at the two sites. In Los Angeles, measured species followed identical diurnal profiles, reaching maximum levels in the early afternoon, suggestive of simultaneous local photochemical production of SOA and their light-absorbing components. In Atlanta, particulate WSOC and other SOA components exhibited moderate daytime enhancements relative to a large regional background, and the fresh WSOC was 4 to 6 times less light absorbing compared to Los Angeles. Different WSOC partitioning behaviors between gas/particle phases were also observed. In Atlanta, the fraction of particulate WSOC relative to the total WSOC (FP) was linked to inferred particle water content. In contrast, FP in Los Angeles had no correlation with RH, but was instead related to organic carbon mass, consistent with partition to the organic fraction as observed in environmental chambers. Overall, multiple forms of evidence suggest very different SOA formation processes in Los Angeles and Atlanta. The results are consistent with a dominant role in SOA formation played by anthropogenic VOCs in Los Angles and biogenic VOCs within Atlanta.

  1. Proceedings of the Annual National Agricultural Education Research Meeting (12th, Atlanta, Georgia, December 6, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Association, Arlington, VA. Agricultural Education Div.

    These proceedings include the following papers: "An Assessment of the National FFA Public Service Announcement Program" (Sutphin, Dillon, and Rush); "Educational Objectives and Administrative Criteria for the National FFA Contest Program" (Smith and Kahler); "A National Profile of Agricultural Teacher Educators and State Supervisors of Vocational…

  2. Ohmic contact to GaAs semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovel, H. J.; Woodall, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Multimetallic layers produce stable, low-resistance contacts for p-type GaAs and p-type GaAlAs devices. Contacts present no leakage problems, and their series resistance is too small to measure at 1 Sun intensity. Ohmic contacts are stable and should meet 20-year-life requirement at 150 C for GaAs combined photothermal/photovoltaic concentrators.

  3. Development and evaluation of alternative approaches for exposure assessment of multiple air pollutants in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Dionisio, Kathie L; Isakov, Vlad; Baxter, Lisa K; Sarnat, Jeremy A; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt; Burke, Janet; Rosenbaum, Arlene; Graham, Stephen E; Cook, Rich; Mulholland, James; Özkaynak, Halûk

    2013-01-01

    Measurements from central site (CS) monitors are often used as estimates of exposure in air pollution epidemiological studies. As these measurements are typically limited in their spatiotemporal resolution, true exposure variability within a population is often obscured, leading to potential measurement errors. To fully examine this limitation, we developed a set of alternative daily exposure metrics for each of the 169 ZIP codes in the Atlanta, GA, metropolitan area, from 1999 to 2002, for PM(2.5) and its components (elemental carbon (EC), SO(4)), O(3), carbon monoxide (CO), and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Metrics were applied in a study investigating the respiratory health effects of these pollutants. The metrics included: (i) CS measurements (one CS per pollutant); (ii) air quality model results for regional background pollution; (iii) local-scale AERMOD air quality model results; (iv) hybrid air quality model estimates (a combination of (ii) and (iii)); and (iv) population exposure model predictions (SHEDS and APEX). Differences in estimated spatial and temporal variability were compared by exposure metric and pollutant. Comparisons showed that: (i) both hybrid and exposure model estimates exhibited high spatial variability for traffic-related pollutants (CO, NO(x), and EC), but little spatial variability among ZIP code centroids for regional pollutants (PM(2.5), SO(4), and O(3)); (ii) for all pollutants except NO(x), temporal variability was consistent across metrics; (iii) daily hybrid-to-exposure model correlations were strong (r>0.82) for all pollutants, suggesting that when temporal variability of pollutant concentrations is of main interest in an epidemiological application, the use of estimates from either model may yield similar results; (iv) exposure models incorporating infiltration parameters, time-location-activity budgets, and other exposure factors affect the magnitude and spatiotemporal distribution of exposure, especially for local pollutants. The

  4. A Dynamic Optimization Technique for Siting the NASA-Clark Atlanta Urban Rain Gauge Network (NCURN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Taylor, Layi

    2003-01-01

    NASA satellites and ground instruments have indicated that cities like Atlanta, Georgia may create or alter rainfall. Scientists speculate that the urban heat island caused by man-made surfaces in cities impact the heat and wind patterns that form clouds and rainfall. However, more conclusive evidence is required to substantiate findings from satellites. NASA, along with scientists at Clark Atlanta University, are implementing a dense, urban rain gauge network in the metropolitan Atlanta area to support a satellite validation program called Studies of PRecipitation Anomalies from Widespread Urban Landuse (SPRAWL). SPRAWL will be conducted during the summer of 2003 to further identify and understand the impact of urban Atlanta on precipitation variability. The paper provides an. overview of SPRAWL, which represents one of the more comprehensive efforts in recent years to focus exclusively on urban-impacted rainfall. The paper also introduces a novel technique for deploying rain gauges for SPRAWL. The deployment of the dense Atlanta network is unique because it utilizes Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Decision Support Systems (DSS) to optimize deployment of the rain gauges. These computer aided systems consider access to roads, drainage systems, tree cover, and other factors in guiding the deployment of the gauge network. GIS and DSS also provide decision-makers with additional resources and flexibility to make informed decisions while considering numerous factors. Also, the new Atlanta network and SPRAWL provide a unique opportunity to merge the high-resolution, urban rain gauge network with satellite-derived rainfall products to understand how cities are changing rainfall patterns, and possibly climate.

  5. EPA Approves Redesignation of Atlanta Area to Attainment for the 1997 Annual Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5) Standard

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced that it is taking final action to approve the state of Georgia's request to redesignate the Atlanta Area to attainment for the 1997 Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5) standard. This fi

  6. Atlanta Ranks 3rd on EPAs Energy Star Top Cities List of Most Buildings in the U.S.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released its seventh-annual list of the top 25 U.S. metropolitan areas with the most Energy Star certified buildings in 2014 and the city of Atlanta ranks third. EPA's Energy Star Top C

  7. INTERCOMPARISION OF SEMI-CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENTS OF NITRATE AND SULFATE AT THE EPA ATLANTA SUPERSITE, AUGUST 1999

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atlanta Supersite was one of the first Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Supersites dedicated to the study of fine particles (PM2.5). The study involved intensive measurements during the month of August 1999, at a site situated near the center of Atlanta. One of the s...

  8. SHORT-TERM TEMPORAL VARIATION IN PM2.5 MASS AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION DURING THE ATLANTA SUPERSITE EXPERIMENT, 1999

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements in urban Atlanta of transient aerosol events in which PM2.5 mass concentrations rapidly rise and fall over a period of 3-6 hr are reported. The data are based on new measurement techniques demonstrated at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Atlanta Supe...

  9. Task Force Delay Study. William B. Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    experimal Desain Srigfildsirgniai216 Ai Poriel Siagmulato Model T- 4 ’rgAenyCd omT F r 700.7 contain Repprtcion d cmetiod for thee i led anaysi DATA...Atlanta Simulation Model Calibration and Annual Delay Baseline Experiment Dear Ray: Enclosed are some data materials for use during the second Task...that should be reviewed, revised, and approved by the Atlanta Task Force prior to use in model runs. Sincerely, Stephen-L. M. Hockaday Manager S- n

  10. Status and trends in atmospheric deposition and emissions near Atlanta, Georgia, 1986-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Meyers, T.P.; Aulenbach, Brent T.

    2002-01-01

    Wet and dry atmospheric deposition were investigated from weekly data, 1986-99 (1986-97 for dry deposition) at the Panola Mountain Research Watershed (PMRW), a forested research site 25 km, southeast of Atlanta, Georgia. Furthermore, the wet deposition was compared to that at three adjacent National Atmospheric Deposition Program's National Trends Network (NTN) sites (GA41, 50 km south of PMRW; AL99, 175 km northwest; NC25, 175 km north-northeast) and dry deposition was compared to that at adjacent Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET) sites, co-located at the NTN sites. The pH of precipitation is acidic and the dominant acid anion is SO4; the pH (derived from the volume-weighted mean H concentration) averages 4.44 for 1986-99, and varies seasonally with average lowest values in summer (4.19) and highest in winter (4.63). From 1986-99, the annual wet deposition of sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) averaged 400 and 300 eq ha-1 (6.4 and 4.2 kg ha-1), respectively. Inferential model estimates of annual dry S and N deposition from 1986-97 averaged 130 and 150 eq ha-1 (2.1 and 2.1 kg ha-1), respectively. From 1993-99, net S deposition (dry deposition plus canopy interactions) for coniferous and deciduous throughfall (throughfall minus wet-only deposition) averaged 400 and 150 eq ha-1 (6.4 and 2.1 kg ha-1), respectively. The annual wet deposition of S and N species at PMRW was comparable to that at NTN sites, with the exception of higher N species deposition at AL99 and relatively lower H, SO4 and NO3 deposition at GA41. Dry S deposition at PMRW differed markedly from the CASTNET sites despite similarity in S concentrations for all but NC25; the differences are attributed to differences in model parameters associated with the landscape and vegetation characteristics at the sites. At PMRW, atmospheric deposition trends were not detected for the entire sampling period, but were detected for shorter periods (4-5yr). Annual S and N deposition increased from 1986 to 1991

  11. Energy in Agriculture: Proceedings of a Conference-Workshop, Atlanta, Georgia, October 1-3, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This publication is the proceedings of a conference-workshop held in Atlanta, Georgia in October 1975. At this conference 13 papers were presented on various aspects of energy use in agriculture. Also included are the final reports of the extension, the teaching, and the research workshop groups. Title of papers include Energy in Agriculture and…

  12. Mixed Messages in Media Coverage of Bilingual Education: The Case of Atlanta, Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarasawa, Beth

    2008-01-01

    As the increasing number of Latino and Asian immigrants to the Atlanta area has escalated tensions over occupational, residential, and educational resources, research has begun to examine opposition to bilingual education as an extension of anti-immigrant prejudice and as a measure of perceived threat. This study uses content analysis to compare…

  13. Bi-Regional Educational Improvement Forum (Atlanta, Georgia, November 19-20, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachia Educational Lab., Charleston, WV.

    The Bi-Regional Educational Improvement Forum in Atlanta, Georgia (November 1979) considered three areas of school improvement, including State Department of Education (SEA) delivery systems and the use of technology to improve schooling. The three forum articles concerned with delivery systems treat the transformation of policies emanating from…

  14. A COMPARISON OF PARTICLE MASS SPECTROMETERS DURING THE 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITES EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the Atlanta SuperSite Experiment, four particle mass spectrometers were operated together for the first time: NOAA's PALMS (Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry), U. C. Riverside's ATOFMS (Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry), U. Delaware's RSMS-II (Rapid Si...

  15. Under Pressure in Atlanta: School Accountability and Special Education Practices during the Cheating Scandal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Brittany; Murphy, Kristin M.; Saultz, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    A 2011 report by the Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI) confirmed a widespread cheating scandal among teachers, principals, and administrators in the Atlanta Public School system (APS) from 2009-2011. To date, it is the largest cheating scandal of its kind in the United States. The vast public investigation of this scandal provides an…

  16. Social Support and Social Network Ties among the Homeless in a Downtown Atlanta Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reitzes, Donald C.; Crimmins, Timothy J.; Yarbrough, Johanna; Parker, Josie

    2011-01-01

    This study applies a typology of social support with 3 categories of social networks to investigate social ties and their benefits for homeless people. Data were derived from a 2-year long series of participant observations of homeless or precariously housed people who came regularly to a downtown Atlanta public park. The findings are as follows:…

  17. Declining Black Access to College in Metropolitan Atlanta. Working Paper No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Faith

    Examination of college enrollment in Atlanta, Georgia, showed the starkest contrasts between White gains and Black declines of any of the five metropolitan regions studied by the University of Chicago's Metropolitan Opportunity Project: while there were no declines in enrollment for White or Hispanic students, there were substantial declines for…

  18. 77 FR 12526 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Atlanta; Fine Particulate Matter 2002...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... Particulate Matter 2002 Base Year Emissions Inventory AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... emissions inventory, portion of the State Implementation Plan (SIP) revision submitted by the State of Georgia on July 6, 2010. The emissions inventory is part of the Atlanta, Georgia PM 2.5...

  19. Fine Art at the Cotton States and International Exposition, Atlanta, 1895. Learning Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Kate; Peckham, Kathleen

    With the end of the Civil War just 30 years past, the organizers of the Atlanta (Georgia) 1895 Cotton States and International Exposition sought to demonstrate the South's national patriotism and progressivism. While the exhibits at the exposition widely varied, among the most ambitious undertakings were the displays of fine arts found in the Fine…

  20. 75 FR 15415 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 26, Atlanta, Georgia, Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 26, Atlanta, Georgia, Area Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as amended (19 U.S.C. 81a-81u), the...

  1. Changing Land Use: Peachtree Street, Atlanta. A Case Study in Sequent Occupance [And] Student Work Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laws, Kevin

    A social studies unit and student workbook explore the historical geography of the area of Peachtree Street in Atlanta, Georgia. The unit deals with sequent occupance, a type of historical geography in which students study the same area, the changes in culture, and the changing land use in the area during certain time periods. For each period,…

  2. 75 FR 9781 - Determination of Nonattainment and Reclassification of the Atlanta, Georgia, 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Ozone Nonattainment Area; Correction AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule..., area from marginal to moderate for the 1997 8-hour ozone nonattainment area by operation of law. This....311. The reclassification of the Atlanta Area from marginal to moderate for the 1997 8-hour...

  3. Three Georgias in Atlanta: Lessons from Business Schools about Finding Your Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolverton, Mimi

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to look into how universities identify themselves and the audiences they choose to serve, taking into account three specific universities in Atlanta, Georgia. Design/methodology/approach: The paper gives brief overviews of the literature on differentiation and sustainability and the study, followed by…

  4. Dietary intake and overweight and obesity among persons living with HIV in Atlanta Georgia.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Dominica; Kalichman, Seth; Cherry, Chauncey; Kalichman, Moira; Washington, Christopher; Grebler, Tamar

    2016-10-10

    In the U.S., there has been a rise in overweight and obesity among persons living with HIV (PLWH). The aim of this study was to examine dietary intake and body mass index (BMI) in PLWH in Atlanta Georgia relative to the U.S.

  5. Women's Voluntarism, Special Education, and the Junior League: 'Social Motherhood' in Atlanta, 1916-1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Barry M.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the Atlanta (Georgia) Junior League, a women's volunteer organization, that chose to address education and welfare of disabled children. Explores the League's role in the education of children that have speech impairments, addressing the establishment of the School for Speech Correction. Reports on the League's role in social mothering.…

  6. Newcastle disease B1 vaccine strain in wild rock pigeons in Atlanta, Georgia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    From June to October of 2012, samples were collected from wild Rock Pigeons (Columba livia) in urban neighborhoods of Atlanta, Georgia to ascertain the prevalence of pigeon paramyxovirus serotype-1 (PPMV-1). PPMV-1 strains are a subset of avian paramyxovirus serotype-1 (APMV-1) commonly isolated fro...

  7. Counseling Psychology from Greyston to Atlanta: On the Road to Armageddon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprinthall, Norman A.

    1990-01-01

    Briefly describes the model for counseling psychology developed during the Greyston Conference of 1964 and compares it with the current view from the Atlanta Conference. Suggests that the shift of counseling psychology from schools, colleges, and career development toward a medical model of clinical treatment may eliminate an independent…

  8. PREFACE TO SPECIAL SECTION: SOUTHERN OXIDANTS STUDY 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITE PROJECT (SOS3)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atlanta Supersites Project consisted of a one-month intensive field program to compare advanced methods for measurement of PM2.5 mass, chemical composition, including single particle composition in real-time, and aerosol precursor species. The project was the first of EPA's ...

  9. An Overview of Synoptic and Mesoscale Factors Contributing to the Disastrous Atlanta Flood of 2009

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this short communication is to present a brief overview of the hydrometeorological conditions leading to the historic Atlanta area flooding, present multiple observational perspectives on cumulative rainfall totals for the event, and consider a hypothesis for he prefe...

  10. Solar Heating and Cooling Experiment for a School in Atlanta. Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Falls Church, VA.

    This report documents the performance and conclusions of a 13-month period of monitoring the performance of the experimental solar heating and cooling system installed in the George A. Towns Elementary School, Atlanta, Georgia. The objectives of the project were to (1) make a significant contribution to solar design, technology, and acceptability;…

  11. Fight or Flight? Immigration, Competition, and Language Assistance Resources in Metropolitan Atlanta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarasawa, Beth

    2013-01-01

    As the Latino/a immigrant population increases, racial conflict historically understood in terms of Black and White in the U.S. South has expanded to include new contestants in metro-Atlanta public schools. By examining market and sociological competition theoretical perspectives, this study investigates how language assistance resource…

  12. Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel meeting July 9--1, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.

    1992-04-01

    The fifth meeting of the Tank Waste Science Panel was held July 9--11, 1991, in Atlanta, Georgia. The subject areas included the generation, retention, and release of gases from Tank 241-SY-101 and the chemistry of ferrocyanide wastes.

  13. EPA to Hold a Public Meeting About Proposed Plan to Clean Up Soil Contamination at Benfield Industries, Inc. Superfund Site in Waynesville, N.C.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - On Tuesday, Jan. 13, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will hold a public meeting about plans to clean up residual soil contamination at the Benfield Industries, Inc. Superfund Site in Waynesville, N.C. The meeting will be hel

  14. Meteorological detrending of primary and secondary pollutant concentrations: Method application and evaluation using long-term (2000-2012) data in Atlanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henneman, Lucas R. F.; Holmes, Heather A.; Mulholland, James A.; Russell, Armistead G.

    2015-10-01

    The effectiveness of air pollution regulations and controls are evaluated based on measured air pollutant concentrations. Air pollution levels, however, are highly sensitive to both emissions and meteorological fluctuations. Therefore, an assessment of the change in air pollutant levels due to emissions controls must account for these meteorological fluctuations. Two empirical methods to quantify the impact of meteorology on pollutant levels are discussed and applied to the 13-year time period between 2000 and 2012 in Atlanta, GA. The methods employ Kolmogorov-Zurbenko filters and linear regressions to detrended pollutant signals into long-term, seasonal, weekly, short-term, and white-noise components. The methods differ in how changes in weekly and holiday emissions are accounted for. Both can provide meteorological adjustments on a daily basis for future use in acute health analyses. The meteorological impact on daily signals of ozone, NOx, CO, SO2, PM2.5, and PM species are quantified. Analyses show that the substantial decreases in seasonal averages of NOx and SO2 correspond with controls implemented in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Detrending allows for the impacts of some controls to be observed with averaging times of as little as 3 months. Annual average concentrations of NOx, SO2, and CO have all fallen by at least 50% since 2000. Reductions in NOx levels, however, do not lead to uniform reductions in ozone. While average detrended summer average maximum daily average 8 h ozone (MDA8h O3) levels fell by 4% (2.2 ± 2 ppb) between 2000 and 2012, winter averages have increased by 12% (3.8 ± 1.4 ppb), providing further evidence that high ozone levels are NOx-limited and lower ozone concentrations are NOx-inhibited. High ozone days (with MDA8h O3 greater than 60 ppb) decreased both in number and in magnitude over the study period.

  15. Intercomparison of an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) with ambient fine aerosol measurements in downtown Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Croteau, P. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; Kollman, M. S.; Ng, N. L.; Verma, V.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Weber, R. J.; Surratt, J. D.

    2014-07-01

    Currently, there are a limited number of field studies that evaluate the long-term performance of the Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) against established monitoring networks. In this study, we present seasonal intercomparisons of the ACSM with collocated fine aerosol (PM2.5) measurements at the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) Jefferson Street (JST) site near downtown Atlanta, GA, during 2011-2012. Intercomparison of two collocated ACSMs resulted in strong correlations (r2 > 0.8) for all chemical species, except chloride (r2 = 0.21) indicating that ACSM instruments are capable of stable and reproducible operation. In general, speciated ACSM mass concentrations correlate well (r2 > 0.7) with the filter-adjusted continuous measurements from JST, although the correlation for nitrate is weaker (r2 = 0.55) in summer. Correlations of the ACSM NR-PM1 (non-refractory particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 1 μm) plus elemental carbon (EC) with tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) PM2.5 and Federal Reference Method (FRM) PM1 mass are strong with r2 > 0.7 and r2 > 0.8, respectively. Discrepancies might be attributed to evaporative losses of semi-volatile species from the filter measurements used to adjust the collocated continuous measurements. This suggests that adjusting the ambient aerosol continuous measurements with results from filter analysis introduced additional bias to the measurements. We also recommend to calibrate the ambient aerosol monitoring instruments using aerosol standards rather than gas-phase standards. The fitting approach for ACSM relative ionization for sulfate was shown to improve the comparisons between ACSM and collocated measurements in the absence of calibrated values, suggesting the importance of adding sulfate calibration into the ACSM calibration routine.

  16. Contraceptive use among clients of the Atlanta Feminist Women's Health Center at three to five weeks post-abortion.

    PubMed

    Moslin, Trisha A; Rochat, Roger W

    2011-08-01

    Little is known about women's contraceptive use and sexual activity in the immediate post-abortion period although effective contraceptive use is paramount during this time because fertility returns almost immediately. This study sought to learn more about women's contraceptive use and sexual behaviors to inform abortion providers and help them serve their clients better, potentially leading to a decline in the rates of unintended pregnancy and repeat abortion. Abortion clients of an Atlanta, GA clinic were surveyed over the telephone 3-5 weeks post-abortion. Background information was collected from clinic medical charts. Simple and stratified frequencies and logistic regression were used to describe women's sexual activity and contraceptive use in the immediate post-abortion period and to determine if variables known at the time of the abortion could predict contraceptive use 3-5 weeks post-abortion. 54.2% (n = 39) of women had engaged in sexual intercourse in the immediate post-abortion period. Of these, 30.8% (n = 12) were not using a contraceptive method or were not using it effectively. Women who said they did not want or need information about birth control on their medical history form were less likely to be using contraception 3-5 weeks post abortion. Emphasizing the rapid return of fertility and risk of conception in pre-abortion counseling sessions could prevent future unintended pregnancies among abortion clients. Further research could explore the interaction between a willingness to talk about contraceptive methods at the time of abortion and method use post-abortion.

  17. Classification of the PALMS single particle mass spectral data from Atlanta by regression tree analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlebrook, A. M.; Murphy, D. M.; Lee, S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S.; Thomson, D. S.; Thomson, D. S.

    2001-12-01

    During the Atlanta Supersites project in August 1999, the PALMS (Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry) instrument collected over 500,000 individual particle spectra. The Atlanta data were originally analyzed by examining combinations of peaks and relative peak areas [Lee et al., 2001a,b], and a wide range of particle components such as sulfate, nitrate, mineral species, metals, organic species, and elemental carbon were detected. To further study the dataset, a classification program using regression tree analysis was developed and applied. Spectral data were compressed into a lower resolution spectrum (every 0.25 mass units) of the raw data and a list of peak areas (every mass unit). Each spectrum started as a normalized classification vector by itself. If the dot product of two classification vectors was within a certain threshold, they were combined into a new classification. The new classification vector was a normalized running average of the classifications being combined. In subsequent steps, the threshold for combining classifications was continuously lowered until a reasonable number of classifications remained. After the final iteration, each spectrum was compared individually with the entire set of classification vectors. Classifications were also combined manually. The classification results from the Atlanta data are generally consistent with those determined by peak identification. However, the classification program identified specific patterns in the mass spectra that were not found by peak identification and generated new particle types. Furthermore, rare particle types that may affect human health were studied in more detail. A description of the classification program as well as the results for the Atlanta data will be presented. Lee, S.-H., D. M. Murphy, D. S. Thomson, and A. M. Middlebrook, Chemical components of single particles measured with particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry (PALMS) during the Atlanta Supersites Project

  18. EPA Provides $2.3 Million to Two Universities in Atlanta to Protect Air Quality in a Changing Climate

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced $8.5 million in research funding to 12 universities to protect air quality from the current and future challenges associated with the impacts of climate change.

  19. ATLANTA COMMUTE VEHICLE SOAK AND START DISTRIBUTIONS AND ENGINE STARTS PER DAY: IMPACT ON MOBILE SOURCE EMISSION RATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Georgia Institute of Technology School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researchers analyzed the 2004 vehicle activity data obtained from vehicles in the Atlanta Commuter Choice Value Pricing Initiative. The onboard monitoring equipment installed in each participating vehi...

  20. Ground-water resources of the south metropolitan Atlanta region, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, John S.; Peck, Michael F.

    1991-01-01

    Ground-water resources of the nine county south metropolitan Atlanta region were evaluated in response to an increased demand for water supplies and concern that existing surface water supplies may not be able to meet future supply demands. Previous investigations have suggested that crystalline rock in the study area has low permeability and can not sustain well yields suitable for public supply. However, the reported yield for 406 wells drilled into crystalIine rock units in this area ranged from less than 1 to about 700 gallons per minute, and averaged 43 gallons per minute. The reported flow from 13 springs ranged from 0.5 to 679 gallons per minute. The yield of 43 wells and flow from five springs was reported to exceed 100 gallons per minute. Most of the high-yielding wells and springs were near contact zones between rocks of contrasting lithologic and weathering properties. The high-yielding wells and springs are located in a variety of topographic settings: hillsides, upland draws, and hilltops were most prevalent. The study area, which includes Henry, Fayette, Coweta, Spalding, Lamar, Pike, Meriwether, Upson and Talbot Counties, is within the Piedmont physiographic province except for the southernmost part of Talbot County, which is in the Coastal Plain physiographic province. In the Piedmont, ground-water storage occurs in joints, fractures and other secondary openings in the bedrock, and in pore spaces in the regolith. The most favorable geologic settings for siting highyielding wells are along contact zones between rocks of contrasting lithology and permeability, major zones of fracturing such as the Towaliga and Auchumpkee fault zones, and other numerous shear and microbreccia zones. Although most wells in the study area are from 101 to 300 feet deep, the highest average yields were obtained from wells 51 to 100 feet deep, and 301 to 500 feet deep. Of the wells inventoried, the average diameter of well casing was largest for wells located on hills and

  1. Urban Heat Islands and Summertime Convective Thunderstorms in Atlanta: Three Case Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornstein, Robert; Lin, Qinglu; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Data from both 27 sites in the Atlanta mesonet surface meteorological network and eight National Weather Service sites were analyzed for the period from 26 July to 3 August 1996. Analysis of the six precipitation events over the city during the period (each on a different day) showed that its urban heat island (UHI) induced a convergence zone that initiated three of the storms at different times of the day, i.e., 0630,0845, and 1445 EDT. Previous analysis has shown that New York City (NYC) effects summer daytime thunderstorm formation and/or movement. That study found that during nearly calm regional flow conditions the NYC UHI initiates convective activity. Moving thunderstorms, however, tended to bifurcate and to move around the city, due to its building barrier effect. The current Atlanta results thus agree with the NYC results with respect to thunderstorm initiation.

  2. Spatial clustering of HIV prevalence in Atlanta, Georgia and population characteristics associated with case concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hixson, Brooke A; Omer, Saad B; del Rio, Carlos; Frew, Paula M

    2011-02-01

    We assessed prevalent HIV cases in Atlanta to examine case distribution trends and population characteristics at the census tract level that may be associated with clustering effects. We calculated cluster characteristics (area and internal HIV prevalence) via Kuldorff's spatial scan method. Subsequent logistic regression analyses were performed to analyze sociodemographics associated with inclusion in a cluster. Organizations offering voluntary HIV testing and counseling services were identified and we assessed average travel time to access these services. One large cluster centralized in downtown Atlanta was identified that contains 60% of prevalent HIV cases. The prevalence rate within the cluster was 1.34% compared to 0.32% outside the cluster. Clustered tracts were associated with higher levels of poverty (OR = 1.19), lower density of multi-racial residents (OR = 1.85), injection drug use (OR = 1.99), men having sex with men (OR = 3.01), and men having sex with men and IV drug use (OR = 1.6). Forty-two percent (N = 11) of identified HIV service providers in Atlanta are located in the cluster with an average travel time of 13 minutes via car to access these services (SD = 9.24). The HIV epidemic in Atlanta is concentrated in one large cluster characterized by poverty, men who have sex with men (MSM), and IV drug usage. Prevention efforts targeted to the population living in this area as well as efforts to address the specific needs of these populations may be most beneficial in curtailing the epidemic within the identified cluster.

  3. A Remote Sensing Approach for Urban Environmental Decision-Making: An Atlanta, Georgia Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Laymon, Charles A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Howell, Burgess F.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Unquestionably, urbanization causes tremendous changes in land cover and land use, as well as impacting a host of environmental characteristics. For example, unlike natural surfaces, urban surfaces have very different thermal energy properties whereby they store solar energy throughout the day and continue to release it as heat well after sunset. This effect, known as the 'Urban Heat Island', serves as a catalyst for chemical reactions from vehicular exhaust and industrial activities leading to the deterioration in air quality, especially exacerbating the production of ground level ozone. 'Cool Community' strategies that utilize remote sensing data, are now being implemented as a way to reduce the impacts of the urban heat island and its subsequent environmental impacts. This presentation focuses on how remote sensing data have been used to provide descriptive and quantitative data for characterizing the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area - particularly for measuring surface energy fluxes, such as the thermal or "heat" energy that emanates from different land cover types across the Atlanta urban landscape. In turn, this information is useful for developing a better understanding of how the thermal characteristics of the city surface affect the urban heat island phenomena and, ultimately, air quality and other environmental parameters over the Atlanta metropolitan region. Additionally, this paper also provides insight on how remote sensing, with its synoptic approach, can be used to provide urban planners, local, state, and federal government officials, and other decision-makers, as well as the general public, with information to better manage urban areas as sustainable environments.

  4. Food insufficiency among HIV-infected crack-cocaine users in Atlanta and Miami

    PubMed Central

    Vogenthaler, Nicholas S; Hadley, Craig; Lewis, Sarah J; Rodriguez, Allan E; Metsch, Lisa R; del Rio, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Objective To measure the occurrence and correlates of food insufficiency among HIV-infected crack-cocaine users in Atlanta and Miami, USA. Design Non-probability cross-sectional sample. Setting Inner-city hospitals in Atlanta and Miami. Subjects Two hundred and eighty-seven HIV-infected crack users. Results One-third (34 %) of respondents experienced food insufficiency within 30 d of interview. Increased odds of food insufficiency was associated with current homelessness (adjusted OR = 3·78, 95% CI 1·70, 8·41), living alone (adjusted OR = 2·85, 95% CI 1·36, 5·98), religious service attendance (adjusted OR = 2·34, 95% CI 1·02, 5·38) and presence of health insurance (adjusted OR = 2·41, 95% CI 1·06, 5·54). Monthly income greater than $US 600 (adjusted OR = 0·19, 95% CI 0·06, 0·58) was associated with decreased odds of food insufficiency, and less than weekly crack use was marginally associated with decreased odds of food insufficiency (adjusted OR = 0·39, 95 % CI 0·13, 1·08). Conclusions Food insufficiency is very prevalent among HIV-infected urban crack-cocaine users in Atlanta and Miami. Correlates of food insufficiency confirm the social vulnerability of these individuals. Routine assessment for food insecurity should become a routine component of treatment and prevention programmes in at-risk populations. PMID:20074395

  5. Increasing spatiotemporal resolution of several major pollutant species in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosius, A. L.; Luong, K. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The American Lung Association cited Atlanta, Georgia, as one of the top 20 most polluted U.S. cities in 2014. Heavy air and ground transportation traffic contribute to the production of carbon dioxide (CO2), particulate matter (PM), and tropospheric ozone (O3) for the Atlanta Metropolitan Area (AMA). Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport contributes significantly to the emission of these pollutants and their precursors. This study focuses on enhancing spatiotemporal resolution of CO2, PM, and O3in near-surface (ground to 50m) air columns by using Arduino-based sensors. The city of Decatur, due to its proximity to the airport, is the study site for the investigation of target pollutant concentrations. The results of this study, combined with other metropolitan air quality data sets, can be used to verify projected trends and append seasonal data. An understanding of the pollutant concentration distributions throughout the near-surface air column is vital to providing insight into the fluctuation of urban area pollutants.

  6. Preliminary flood-frequency relations for urban streams, Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golden, Harold G.

    1977-01-01

    A method is presented for estimating the magnitude and frequency of floods for urban streams in metropolitan Atlanta. The method is based on adjustments to the natural stream flood-frequency and rainfall-frequency characteristics of the local area as defined by urban flood studies in other areas. The effects of urbanization on flood-peak runoff are estimated from the percentage of drainage basin that is impervious and the percentage of drainage area served by storm sewers. Equation are presented for estimating the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year flood peak discharges for basin sizes from 0.5 to 100 square miles in the Atlanta metro area. Data from 12 urban streams in the Atlanta area were used to obtain a qualitative verification of the 2- and 100-year estimating equations. Hydrologic data are presently being collected for a study that will provide a data base for use in hydrologic models to develop more reliable urban flood-frequency relations. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. Atlanta Centennial Olympic Games and Paralympic Games event study, 1996. Final report, July 1996--August 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Amodei, R.; Bard, E.; Brong, B.; Cahoon, F.; Jasper, K.

    1998-11-01

    The Atlanta metropolitan region was the location of one of the most ambitious Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) deployments in the United States. This deployment included several individual projects--a Central Transportation Management Center (TMC), six Traffic Control Centers (TCCs), one Transit Information Center (TIC), The Travel Information Showcase (TIS), and the extension of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) Rail network and the new high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes on I-85 and I-75. The 1996 Atlanta Centennial Olympic Games and Paralympic Games created a focus for these projects. All of these systems were to be brought on-line in time for the Olympic Games. This report presents the findings of the 1996 Olympic and Paralympic Games Events Study--a compilation of findings of system performance, the benefits realized, and the lessons learned during their operations over the event period. The study assessed the performance of the various Travel Demand Management (TDM) plans employed for Olympic Games traffic management.

  8. UNDERSTANDING THE INTERNATIONAL CONSENSUS FOR ACUTE PANCREATITIS: CLASSIFICATION OF ATLANTA 2012

    PubMed Central

    de SOUZA, Gleim Dias; SOUZA, Luciana Rodrigues Queiroz; CUENCA, Ronaldo Máfia; JERÔNIMO, Bárbara Stephane de Medeiros; de SOUZA, Guilherme Medeiros; VILELA, Vinícius Martins

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Contrast computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are widely used due to its image quality and ability to study pancreatic and peripancreatic morphology. The understanding of the various subtypes of the disease and identification of possible complications requires a familiarity with the terminology, which allows effective communication between the different members of the multidisciplinary team. Aim: Demonstrate the terminology and parameters to identify the different classifications and findings of the disease based on the international consensus for acute pancreatitis ( Atlanta Classification 2012). Methods: Search and analysis of articles in the "CAPES Portal de Periódicos with headings "acute pancreatitis" and "Atlanta Review". Results: Were selected 23 articles containing radiological descriptions, management or statistical data related to pathology. Additional statistical data were obtained from Datasus and Population Census 2010. The radiological diagnostic criterion adopted was the Radiology American College system. The "acute pancreatitis - 2012 Rating: Review Atlanta classification and definitions for international consensus" tries to eliminate inconsistency and divergence from the determination of uniformity to the radiological findings, especially the terminology related to fluid collections. More broadly as "pancreatic abscess" and "phlegmon" went into disuse and the evolution of the collection of patient fluids can be described as "acute peripancreatic collections", "acute necrotic collections", "pseudocyst" and "necrosis pancreatic walled or isolated". Conclusion: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance represent the best techniques with sequential images available for diagnosis. Standardization of the terminology is critical and should improve the management of patients with multiple professionals care, risk stratification and adequate treatment. PMID:27759788

  9. Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel meeting July 9--1, 1991. Hanford Tank Safety Project

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.

    1992-04-01

    The fifth meeting of the Tank Waste Science Panel was held July 9--11, 1991, in Atlanta, Georgia. The subject areas included the generation, retention, and release of gases from Tank 241-SY-101 and the chemistry of ferrocyanide wastes.

  10. TUESDAY: EPA to Hold Public Meeting about Proposed Interim Cleanup of CTS of Asheville Inc. Superfund Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Asheville, N.C., residents are invited to attend a public meeting about the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed plan to address contamination beneath the former plant at the CTS of Asheville Inc. Superfund Site. A key ste

  11. Urban aerosol radiative properties: Measurements during the 1999 Atlanta Supersite Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrico, Christian M.; Bergin, Michael H.; Xu, Jin; Baumann, Karsten; Maring, Hal

    2003-04-01

    As part of the Atlanta Supersite 1999 study, aerosol radiative and related physical and chemical properties are examined on the basis of measurements of PM2.5 (aerosol particles with aerodynamic diameters, Dp, less than 2.5 μm) in urban Atlanta. In addition to potential compliance issues with proposed regulatory standards, PM2.5 concentrations in Atlanta and the surrounding region are large enough to have an important impact on atmospheric radiative transfer and hence visibility and potentially regional climate. Arithmetic means and standard deviations of the light scattering by PM2.5 (σsp at 530 nm) and absorption coefficients (σap at 550 nm) measured at a controlled relative humidity of 49 ± 5% are 121 ± 48 and 16 ± 12 Mm-1, respectively. Though the mean light extinction coefficient (σep) in Atlanta is much larger than background sites, it is comparable to nonurban areas in the interior southeast United States highlighting the contribution of a regional haze here. The single scattering albedo (ωo) in Atlanta is 0.87 ± 0.08 and is ˜10% lower than reported in nonurban polluted sites, likely a result of the emission of elemental carbon (EC) from mobile sources. A pronounced diel pattern in aerosol properties is observed with clear influences from mobile sources (morning rush hour maxima in concentrations, particularly soot-related indicators) and atmospheric mixing (afternoon minima). A strong linear relationship between σsp and PM2.5 is observed, and using several techniques, gives a range of mean mass scattering efficiencies (Esp) from = 3.5 to 4.4 m2 g-1. EC and σap are observed to have a relationship though less strongly correlated than σsp and PM2.5. Four methods of determining the mass absorption efficiency of EC give Eap ranging from 5.3 to 18.3 m2 g-1. This wide range of values is a result of the variability in aerosol properties, uncertainties in the light absorption method, and in particular, differences in the EC measurement techniques. Best

  12. Baseline Prevalence of Birth Defects Associated with Congenital Zika Virus Infection - Massachusetts, North Carolina, and Atlanta, Georgia, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Cragan, Janet D; Mai, Cara T; Petersen, Emily E; Liberman, Rebecca F; Forestieri, Nina E; Stevens, Alissa C; Delaney, Augustina; Dawson, April L; Ellington, Sascha R; Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K; Dunn, Julie E; Higgins, Cathleen A; Meyer, Robert E; Williams, Tonya; Polen, Kara N D; Newsome, Kim; Reynolds, Megan; Isenburg, Jennifer; Gilboa, Suzanne M; Meaney-Delman, Dana M; Moore, Cynthia A; Boyle, Coleen A; Honein, Margaret A

    2017-03-03

    Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause serious brain abnormalities, but the full range of adverse outcomes is unknown (1). To better understand the impact of birth defects resulting from Zika virus infection, the CDC surveillance case definition established in 2016 for birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection* (2) was retrospectively applied to population-based birth defects surveillance data collected during 2013-2014 in three areas before the introduction of Zika virus (the pre-Zika years) into the World Health Organization's Region of the Americas (Americas) (3). These data, from Massachusetts (2013), North Carolina (2013), and Atlanta, Georgia (2013-2014), included 747 infants and fetuses with one or more of the birth defects meeting the case definition (pre-Zika prevalence = 2.86 per 1,000 live births). Brain abnormalities or microcephaly were the most frequently recorded (1.50 per 1,000), followed by neural tube defects and other early brain malformations(†) (0.88), eye abnormalities without mention of a brain abnormality (0.31), and other consequences of central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction without mention of brain or eye abnormalities (0.17). During January 15-September 22, 2016, the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR) reported 26 infants and fetuses with these same defects among 442 completed pregnancies (58.8 per 1,000) born to mothers with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy (2). Although the ascertainment methods differed, this finding was approximately 20 times higher than the proportion of one or more of the same birth defects among pregnancies during the pre-Zika years. These data demonstrate the importance of population-based surveillance for interpreting data about birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection.

  13. Ensemble simulations to study the impact of land use change of Atlanta to regional climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Hu, Y.; Stone, B.; Vargo, J.; Nenes, A.; Russell, A.; Trail, M.; Tsimpidi, A.

    2012-12-01

    Studies show that urban areas may be the "first responders" to climate change (Rosenzweig et al., 2010). Of particular interest is the potential increased temperatures in urban areas, due to use of structures and surfaces that increase local heating, and how that may impact health, air quality and other environmental factors. In response, interest has grown as to how the modification of land use in urban areas, in order to mitigate the adverse effects of urbanization can serve to reduce local temperatures, and how climate is impacted more regionally. Studies have been conducted to investigate the impact of land use change on local or regional climate by dynamic downscaling using regional climate models (RCMs), the boundary conditions (BCs) and initial conditions (ICs) of which result from coarser-resolution reanalysis data or general circulation models (GCMs). However, few studies have focused on demonstrating whether the land use change in local areas significantly impacts the climate of the larger region of the domain, and the spatial scale of the impact from urban-scale changes. This work investigated the significance of the impact of land use change in the Atlanta city area on different scales, using a range of modeling resolutions, including the contiguous US (with 36km resolution), the southeastern US (with 12km resolution) and the state of Georgia (with 4km resolution). We used WRF version 3.1.1 with and ran continuous from June to August of a simulated year 2050, driven by GISS ModelE with inputs corresponding to RCP4.5. During the simulation, spectral nudging is used in the 36km resolution domain to maintain the climate patterns with scales larger than 2000km. Two-way nesting is also used in order to take into account the feedback of nesting domains across model domains. Two land use cases over the Atlanta city are chosen. For the base case, most of the urban area of Atlanta is covered with forest; while for the second, "impervious" case, all the urban

  14. Symposium on Uranium Plasmas: Research and Applications, 2nd, Atlanta, Ga., November 15-17, 1971, Collection of Technical Papers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Results of theoretical and applied research related to fissioning uranium plasmas. Topics examined include uranium plasma instabilities, diagnostic techniques, radiant heat transfer characteristics, nuclear pumping of lasers, and various fission engine concepts. Engineering aspects considered for open-cycle gas core engines include effects of buoyancy on fuel containment, flow and criticality problems, effects of injection conditions, and radiation hazards. The nuclear light bulb engine, the mini-cavity reactor, the dust-bed reactor, and the colloid core reactor are also examined in terms of design and control considerations. Individual items are abstracted in this issue.

  15. 77 FR 43806 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, GA; Application for Reorganization (Expansion of Service Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... that includes the Georgia counties of Haralson, Paulding, Polk, Floyd, Bartow, Chattooga, Gordon..., Meriwether, Pike, Spalding, Butts, Lamar, Upson, Jasper, Newton, Morgan, Greene, Walton, Oconee, Clarke... entirety and portions of White, Franklin, Peach, Houston, and Twiggs Counties, in and adjacent to...

  16. International Symposium on the Growth of III-Nitrides (ISGN), May 18-22, 2014, Atlanta GA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-31

    today’s most advanced high- performance devices such as LEDs, laser diodes , and transistors, which are becoming an essential part of the solution of...materials underlie many of today’s most advanced high-performance devices such as LEDs, laser diodes , and transistors, which are becoming an essential...devices such as LEDs, laser diodes , and transistors, which are becoming an essential part of the solution of many global problems. In the future

  17. A Working Conference on Cooperative Programs Among Universities and Predominantly Negro Colleges (Atlanta, Ga., August 20-21, 1965).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisbane, Robert H., Jr., Ed.

    The proceedings reported are of a working conference designed to provide (1) an opportunity for the universities and predominantly Negro colleges engaged in cooperative programs for the remediation of inequalities in educational opportunities to share their experiences with a view toward increasing the effectiveness of such programs, and (2) a…

  18. Fracture mechanics; Proceedings of the 22nd National Symposium, Atlanta, GA, June 26-28, 1990. Vols. 1 & 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Hugo A. (Editor); Saxena, Ashok (Editor); Mcdowell, David L. (Editor); Atluri, Satya N. (Editor); Newman, James C., Jr. (Editor); Raju, Ivatury S. (Editor); Epstein, Jonathan S. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Current research on fracture mechanics is reviewed, focusing on ductile fracture; high-temperature and time-dependent fracture; 3D problems; interface fracture; microstructural aspects of fatigue and fracture; and fracture predictions and applications. Particular attention is given to the determination and comparison of crack resistance curves from wide plates and fracture mechanics specimens; a relationship between R-curves in contained and uncontained yield; the creep crack growth behavior of titanium alloy Ti-6242; a crack growth response in three heat resistant materials at elevated temperature; a crack-surface-contact model for determining effective-stress-intensity factors; interfacial dislocations in anisotropic bimaterials; an effect of intergranular crack branching on fracture toughness evaluation; the fracture toughness behavior of exservice chromium-molybdenum steels; the application of fracture mechanics to assess the significance of proof loading; and a load ratio method for estimating crack extension.

  19. Comparative magnetic and thermoanalytical study of two enstatite chondrites: Adhi Kot and Atlanta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krol, Elizabeth; Lang, Bruno

    1993-01-01

    With allowance for the discussion of classification of enstatite chondrites and their relation to aubrites, the obtained magnetic and thermoanalytical data is submitted to be considered as additive arguments. Our study covered the Adhi Kot (EH4) and Atlanta (EL6). meteorites belonging to two distinct groups of enstatite chondrites. Applying AF demagnetization the intensity of natural remanent magnetization (NRM) was measured and the mean magnetic susceptibility of the samples was determined. The differential thermal (DTA) and thermogravimetric (TG) curves were obtained for meteorites under study. For measurements of the intensity of NRM, a superconducting cryomagnetometer SQUID (2 G Enterprise, USA), while magnetic susceptibility Kappabridge KLY-2 (Czechoslovakia) were used. The abbreviated magnetic data sheets are given. The values 786 x 10(exp -4)A/mkg and 196.1 x 10(exp -4)A/mkg were obtained as NRM intensities for Atlanta and Adhi Kot respectively, while 17.4 x 10(exp -6) SIu/kg and 43.4 x 10(exp -6) SIu/kg for their susceptibilities. Both meteorites proved to be strongly magnetized. The demagnetization down to 3.2 percent of NMR was received for Atlanta at AF field intensity of 250 Oe. For Adhi Kot at this level rested 13.2 percent of NRM intensity, this sample being demagnetized without change of direction till 750 Oe field. The demagnetization curves are similar to those obtained for Abee (EL4) chondrite by Sugiura and Strangway. Against Abee the Adhi Kot exhibited a little bit steeper downfall, and in both cases dominate one component of magnetization. The DTA and TG curves were obtained with Rigaku-Denki thermoanalytical instrument. The DTA curves exhibit striking similarity in their shape and relatively close temperature values for various features. The same is valid for TG curves. The higher values for TG for Adhi Kot express its higher content of oxydable (Fe, Ni) whose oxidation in air is reached at 1000-1200 C.

  20. Size-resolved, real-time measurement of water-insoluble aerosols in metropolitan Atlanta during the summer of 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Roby; Bergin, Michael H.; Weber, Rodney; Sullivan, Amy

    During the month of August 2004, the size-resolved number concentration of water-insoluble aerosols (WIA) from 0.25 to 2.0 μm was measured in real-time in the urban center of Atlanta, GA. Simultaneous measurements were performed for the total aerosol size distribution from 0.1 to 2.0 μm, the elemental and organic carbon mass concentration, the aerosol absorption coefficient, and the aerosol scattering coefficient at a dry (RH=30%) humidity. The mean aerosol number concentration in the size range 0.1-2.0 μm was found to be 360±175 cm -3, but this quantity fluctuated significantly on time scales of less than one hour and ranged from 25 to 1400 cm -3 during the sample period. The mean WIA concentration (0.25-2.0 μm) was 13±7 cm -3 and ranged from 1 to 60 cm -3. The average insoluble fraction in the size range 0.25-2.0 μm was found to be 4±2.5% with a range of 0.3-38%. The WIA population was found to follow a consistent diurnal pattern throughout the month with concentration maxima concurring with peaks in vehicular traffic flow. WIA concentration also responded to changes in meteorological conditions such as boundary layer depth and precipitation events. The temporal variability of the absorption coefficient followed an identical pattern to that of WIA and ranged from below the detection limit to 55 Mm -1 with a mean of 8±6 Mm -1. The WIA concentration was highly correlated with both the absorption coefficient and the elemental carbon mass concentration, suggesting that WIA measurements are dominated by fresh emissions of elemental carbon. For both the total aerosol and the WIA size distributions, the maximum number concentration was observed at the smallest sizes; however the WIA size distribution also exhibited a peak at 0.45 μm which was not observed in the total population. Over 60% of the particles greater than 1.0 μm were observed to be insoluble in the water sampling stream used by this instrumentation. Due to the refractive properties of black

  1. Ligand "Brackets" for Ga-Ga Bond.

    PubMed

    Fedushkin, Igor L; Skatova, Alexandra A; Dodonov, Vladimir A; Yang, Xiao-Juan; Chudakova, Valentina A; Piskunov, Alexander V; Demeshko, Serhiy; Baranov, Evgeny V

    2016-09-06

    The reactivity of digallane (dpp-Bian)Ga-Ga(dpp-Bian) (1) (dpp-Bian = 1,2-bis[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]acenaphthene) toward acenaphthenequinone (AcQ), sulfur dioxide, and azobenzene was investigated. The reaction of 1 with AcQ in 1:1 molar ratio proceeds via two-electron reduction of AcQ to give (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)Ga(dpp-Bian) (2), in which diolate [AcQ](2-) acts as "bracket" for the Ga-Ga bond. The interaction of 1 with AcQ in 1:2 molar ratio proceeds with an oxidation of the both dpp-Bian ligands as well as of the Ga-Ga bond to give (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (3). At 330 K in toluene complex 2 decomposes to give compounds 3 and 1. The reaction of complex 2 with atmospheric oxygen results in oxidation of a Ga-Ga bond and affords (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)(μ2-O)Ga(dpp-Bian) (4). The reaction of digallane 1 with SO2 produces, depending on the ratio (1:2 or 1:4), dithionites (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-O2S-SO2)Ga(dpp-Bian) (5) and (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-O2S-SO2)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (6). In compound 5 the Ga-Ga bond is preserved and supported by dithionite dianionic bracket. In compound 6 the gallium centers are bridged by two dithionite ligands. Both 5 and 6 consist of dpp-Bian radical anionic ligands. Four-electron reduction of azobenzene with 1 mol equiv of digallane 1 leads to complex (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-NPh)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (7). Paramagnetic compounds 2-7 were characterized by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, and their molecular structures were established by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Magnetic behavior of compounds 2, 5, and 6 was investigated by superconducting quantum interference device technique in the range of 2-295 K.

  2. 77 FR 24399 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Atlanta; Ozone 2002 Base Year...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS). The Atlanta Area is comprised of Barrow, Bartow, Carroll... 5.69 4.30 1.41 0.75 Bartow 69.92 1.31 1.30 8.05 15.76 10.56 3.89 2.54 Carroll 0.06 0.85 1.30 9.54 10... Ozone 2002 Barrow, Bartow, Carroll, 10/21/2009 4/24/2012 [Insert Base-Year Emissions Inventory....

  3. Design, implementation, and initial results from a water-quality monitoring network for Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, A.J.; Elrick, K.A.; Smith, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    In cooperation with the City of Atlanta, Georgia, the US Geological Survey has designed and implemented a water-quantity and quality monitoring network that measures a variety of biological and chemical constituents in water and suspended sediment. The network consists of 20 long-term monitoring sites and is intended to assess water-quality trends in response to planned infrastructural improvements. Initial results from the network indicate that nonpoint-source contributions may be more significant than point-source contributions for selected sediment associated trace elements and nutrients. There also are indications of short-term discontinuous point-source contributions of these same constituents during baseflow.

  4. Characterization of aerosol composition and sources in the greater Atlanta area by aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, N. L.; Xu, L.; Suresh, S.; Weber, R. J. J.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    An important and uncertain aspect of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation is that it is often associated with anthropogenic pollution tracers. Prior studies in Atlanta suggested that 70-80% of the carbon in water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) is modern, yet it is well-correlated with the anthropogenic CO. In this study, we deployed a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at multiple sites in different seasons (May 2012-February 2013) to characterize the sources and chemical composition of aerosols in the greater Atlanta area. This area in the SE US is ideal to investigate anthropogenic-biogenic interactions due to high natural and anthropogenic emissions. These extensive field studies are part of the Southeastern Center for Air Pollution and Epidemiology study (SCAPE). The HR-ToF-AMS is deployed at four sites (~ 3 weeks each) in rotation: Jefferson Street (urban), Yorkville (rural), roadside site (near Highway 75/85), and Georgia Tech site (campus), with the urban and rural sites being part of the SEARCH network. We obtained seven HR-ToF-AMS datasets in total. During the entire measurement period, the ACSM is stationary at the GIT site and samples continuously. We perform positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis on the HR-ToF-AMS and ACSM data to deconvolve the OA into different components. While the diurnal cycle of the total OA is flat as what have been previously observed, the OA factors resolved by PMF analysis show distinctively different diurnal trends. We find that the "more-oxidized oxygenated OA" (MO-OOA) constitutes a major fraction of OA at all sites. In summer, OA is dominated by SOA, e.g., isoprene-OA and OOA with different degrees of oxidation. In contrary, biomass burning OA is more prominent in winter data. By comparing HR-ToF-AMS and ACSM data during the same sampling periods, we find that the aerosol time series are highly correlated, indicating the

  5. Light-absorbing soluble organic aerosol in Los Angeles and Atlanta: A contrast in secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Surratt, Jason D.; Zotter, Peter; Prévôt, Andre S. H.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2011-11-01

    Light absorption spectra and carbon mass of fine particle water-soluble components were measured during the summer of 2010 in the Los Angeles (LA) basin, California, and Atlanta, Georgia. Fresh LA secondary organic carbon had a consistent brown color and a bulk absorption per soluble carbon mass at 365 nm that was 4 to 6 times higher than freshly-formed Atlanta soluble organic carbon. Radiocarbon measurements of filter samples show that LA secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was mainly from fossil carbon and chemical analysis of aqueous filter extracts identified nitro-aromatics as one component of LA brown SOA. Interpreting soluble brown carbon as a property of freshly-formed anthropogenic SOA, the difference in absorption per carbon mass between these two cities suggests most fresh secondary water-soluble organic carbon formed within Atlanta is not from an anthropogenic process similar to LA. Contrasting emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds may account for these differences.

  6. City of Atlanta and the Development Authority of DeKalb County to each Receive $300,000 to Clean up and Redevelop Contaminated Brownfields Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that the city of Atlanta and the Development Authority of DeKalb County will each receive $300,000 to clean up and redevelop contaminated brownfields sites in Georgia. Na

  7. Socio-demographic Differences in Toxic Release Inventory Siting and Emissions in Metro Atlanta

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ryan; Ramsey-White, Kim; Fuller, Christina H.

    2016-01-01

    Prior research has found that low socioeconomic status (SES) populations and minorities in some areas reside in communities with disproportionate exposure to hazardous chemicals. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the relevance of socio-demographic characteristics on the presence of Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) facilities, air releases, and prevalence and resolution of air quality complaints in the 20-county Atlanta Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). We found that there were 4.7% more minority residents in census tracts where TRI facilities were located. The odds ratio (OR) for the presence of a TRI facility was 0.89 (p < 0.01) for each 1% increase of females with a college degree and 2.4 (p < 0.01) for households with an income of $22,000–$55,000. The estimated reduction in the amount of chemicals emitted per release associated with population of females with a college degree was 18.53 pounds (p < 0.01). Complaints took longer to resolve in census tracts with higher Hispanic populations (OR = 1.031, 95% CI: 1.010–1.054). Overall, results indicate that SES and race/ethnicity are related to TRI facility siting, releases, and complaints in the Atlanta area. These findings have not been documented previously and suggest that lower SES and non-White communities may be disproportionately exposed. PMID:27455302

  8. Using synoptic weather types to predict visitor attendance at Atlanta and Indianapolis zoological parks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, David R.

    2016-02-01

    Defining an ideal "tourism climate" has been an often-visited research topic where explanations have evolved from global- to location-specific indices tailored to tourists' recreational behavior. Unfortunately, as indices become increasingly specific, they are less translatable across geographies because they may only apply to specific activities, locales, climates, or populations. A key need in the future development of weather and climate indices for tourism has been a translatable, meteorologically based index capturing the generalized ambient atmospheric conditions yet considering local climatology. To address this need, this paper tests the applicability of the spatial synoptic classification (SSC) as a tool to predict visitor attendance response in the tourism, recreation, and leisure (TRL) sector across different climate regimes. Daily attendance data is paired with the prevailing synoptic weather condition at Atlanta and Indianapolis zoological parks from September 2001 to June 2011, to review potential impacts ambient atmospheric conditions may have on visitor attendances. Results indicate that "dry moderate" conditions are most associated with high levels of attendance and "moist polar" synoptic conditions are most associated with low levels of attendance at both zoological parks. Comparing visitor response at these zoo locations, visitors in Indianapolis showed lower levels of tolerance to synoptic conditions which were not "ideal." Visitors in Indianapolis also displayed more aversion to "polar" synoptic regimes while visitors in Atlanta displayed more tolerance to "moist tropical" synoptic regimes. Using a comprehensive atmospheric measure such as the SSC may be a key to broadening application when assessing tourism climates across diverse geographies.

  9. Ambient Air Pollution and Cardiovascular Malformations in Atlanta, Georgia, 1986–2003

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Mitchel; Correa, Adolfo; Reller, Mark D.; Mahle, William T.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany J.; Botto, Lorenzo D.; Flanders, W. Dana; Mulholland, James A.; Siffel, Csaba; Marcus, Michele; Tolbert, Paige E.

    2009-01-01

    Associations between ambient air pollution levels during weeks 3–7 of pregnancy and risks of cardiovascular malformations were investigated among the cohort of pregnancies reaching at least 20 weeks’ gestation that were conceived during January 1, 1986–March 12, 2003, in Atlanta, Georgia. Surveillance records obtained from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, which conducts active, population-based surveillance on this cohort, were reviewed to classify cardiovascular malformations. Ambient 8-hour maximum ozone and 24-hour average carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter with an average aerodynamic diameter of <10 μm (PM10), and sulfur dioxide measurements were obtained from centrally located stationary monitors. Temporal associations between these pollutants and daily risks of secundum atrial septal defect, aortic coarctation, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, patent ductus arteriosus, valvar pulmonary stenosis, tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, muscular ventricular septal defect, perimembranous ventricular septal defect, conotruncal defects, left ventricular outflow tract defect, and right ventricular outflow defect were modeled by using Poisson generalized linear models. A statistically significant association was observed between PM10 and patent ductus arteriosus (for an interquartile range increase in PM10 levels, risk ratio = 1.60, 95% confidence interval: 1.11, 2.31). Of the 60 associations examined in the primary analysis, no other significant associations were observed. PMID:19258486

  10. Atlanta ariejansseni, a new species of shelled heteropod from the Southern Subtropical Convergence Zone (Gastropoda, Pterotracheoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Wall-Palmer, Deborah; Burridge, Alice K.; Peijnenburg, Katja T.C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Atlantidae (shelled heteropods) is a family of microscopic aragonite shelled holoplanktonic gastropods with a wide biogeographical distribution in tropical, sub-tropical and temperate waters. The aragonite shell and surface ocean habitat of the atlantids makes them particularly susceptible to ocean acidification and ocean warming, and atlantids are likely to be useful indicators of these changes. However, we still lack fundamental information on their taxonomy and biogeography, which is essential for monitoring the effects of a changing ocean. Integrated morphological and molecular approaches to taxonomy have been employed to improve the assessment of species boundaries, which give a more accurate picture of species distributions. Here a new species of atlantid heteropod is described based on shell morphology, DNA barcoding of the Cytochrome Oxidase I gene, and biogeography. All specimens of Atlanta ariejansseni sp. n. were collected from the Southern Subtropical Convergence Zone of the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific oceans suggesting that this species has a very narrow latitudinal distribution (37–48°S). Atlanta ariejansseni sp. n. was found to be relatively abundant (up to 2.3 specimens per 1000 m3 water) within this narrow latitudinal range, implying that this species has adapted to the specific conditions of the Southern Subtropical Convergence Zone and has a high tolerance to the varying ocean parameters in this region. PMID:27551204

  11. Evaluating vehicle inspection/maintenance programs using on-road emissions data. The Atlanta Reference Method.

    PubMed

    DeHart-Davis, Leisha; Corley, Elizabeth; Rodgers, Michael O

    2002-04-01

    On-road remote sensing data is an increasingly popular source of evaluation information for vehicle inspection/maintenance (I/M) programs. This article conducts one such remote sensing data evaluation for the Atlanta, Georgia, I/M program. The reference method involves comparing emissions differences in I/M and non-I/M fleet vehicles with those predicted by a regulatory computer model. Assuming that on-road emissions differences represent observed effectiveness and model-predicted emissions differences represent effectiveness goals, the Atlanta enhanced I/M program appears to be achieving 83% of its targeted emissions reductions. The method compares favorably with other remote sensing evaluation methods in its ability to be applied over time and its relatively small sample size requirement. The chief limitation to the approach is its reliance on a representative non-I/M fleet, which may differ in characteristics for which controls are difficult to locate. Such potential confounding factors include discrepancies in maintenance trends, socioeconomic conditions, and vehicle quality.

  12. Ambient air pollution and cardiovascular malformations in Atlanta, Georgia, 1986-2003.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Matthew J; Klein, Mitchel; Correa, Adolfo; Reller, Mark D; Mahle, William T; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany J; Botto, Lorenzo D; Flanders, W Dana; Mulholland, James A; Siffel, Csaba; Marcus, Michele; Tolbert, Paige E

    2009-04-15

    Associations between ambient air pollution levels during weeks 3-7 of pregnancy and risks of cardiovascular malformations were investigated among the cohort of pregnancies reaching at least 20 weeks' gestation that were conceived during January 1, 1986-March 12, 2003, in Atlanta, Georgia. Surveillance records obtained from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, which conducts active, population-based surveillance on this cohort, were reviewed to classify cardiovascular malformations. Ambient 8-hour maximum ozone and 24-hour average carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter with an average aerodynamic diameter of <10 microm (PM(10)), and sulfur dioxide measurements were obtained from centrally located stationary monitors. Temporal associations between these pollutants and daily risks of secundum atrial septal defect, aortic coarctation, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, patent ductus arteriosus, valvar pulmonary stenosis, tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, muscular ventricular septal defect, perimembranous ventricular septal defect, conotruncal defects, left ventricular outflow tract defect, and right ventricular outflow defect were modeled by using Poisson generalized linear models. A statistically significant association was observed between PM(10) and patent ductus arteriosus (for an interquartile range increase in PM(10) levels, risk ratio = 1.60, 95% confidence interval: 1.11, 2.31). Of the 60 associations examined in the primary analysis, no other significant associations were observed.

  13. Current and historically used pesticides in residential soil from 11 homes in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    Riederer, Anne M; Smith, Kimberly D; Barr, Dana B; Hayden, Steven W; Hunter, Ronald E; Ryan, P Barry

    2010-05-01

    We used a multiresidue, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-based method to measure seven pyrethroid, five organophosphorus (OP), and six organochlorine pesticides in soil collected from 11 Atlanta homes in 2006. Our objective was to collect preliminary data for a larger study of pesticide exposures among Atlanta children. The pyrethroid insecticides (cis- and trans-permethrin, bioallethrin) were the most commonly detected analytes, giving evidence of widespread outdoor use among our study homes. Our pyrethroid insecticide detection frequencies were higher than those reported in a recent study of Ohio and North Carolina homes; however, our maximum values were approximately half of those reported. We detected the target OP pesticides in only a few samples, but we found two restricted-use OP pesticides--methyl parathion and terbufos--and thus possible evidence of illegal residential use or environmental persistence in soil. We also detected dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDE) in samples from six homes. Although our small sample size limits comparison to other studies, our results provide evidence that residential soil is a potential source of human exposure to both current and historically used pesticides.

  14. Socio-demographic Differences in Toxic Release Inventory Siting and Emissions in Metro Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ryan; Ramsey-White, Kim; Fuller, Christina H

    2016-07-23

    Prior research has found that low socioeconomic status (SES) populations and minorities in some areas reside in communities with disproportionate exposure to hazardous chemicals. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the relevance of socio-demographic characteristics on the presence of Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) facilities, air releases, and prevalence and resolution of air quality complaints in the 20-county Atlanta Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). We found that there were 4.7% more minority residents in census tracts where TRI facilities were located. The odds ratio (OR) for the presence of a TRI facility was 0.89 (p < 0.01) for each 1% increase of females with a college degree and 2.4 (p < 0.01) for households with an income of $22,000-$55,000. The estimated reduction in the amount of chemicals emitted per release associated with population of females with a college degree was 18.53 pounds (p < 0.01). Complaints took longer to resolve in census tracts with higher Hispanic populations (OR = 1.031, 95% CI: 1.010-1.054). Overall, results indicate that SES and race/ethnicity are related to TRI facility siting, releases, and complaints in the Atlanta area. These findings have not been documented previously and suggest that lower SES and non-White communities may be disproportionately exposed.

  15. Update on overall prevalence of major birth defects--Atlanta, Georgia, 1978-2005.

    PubMed

    2008-01-11

    Major structural or genetic birth defects affect approximately 3% of births in the United States, are a major contributor to infant mortality, and result in billions of dollars in costs for care. Although the causes of most major birth defects are unknown, concerns have been raised that certain factors, such as an increase in the prevalence of diabetes among women, might result in increased prevalence of birth defects over time. This report updates previously published data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program (MACDP), the oldest population-based birth defects surveillance system in the United States with active case ascertainment. For the period 1978-2005, CDC assessed the overall prevalence of major birth defects and their frequency relative to selected maternal and infant characteristics. The MACDP results indicated that the prevalence of major birth defects in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, remained stable during 1978-2005 but varied by maternal age and race/ethnicity, birthweight, and gestational age. Tracking the overall prevalence of major birth defects can identify subgroups that are affected disproportionately; additional measures focused on these subgroups might improve preconception care and care during pregnancy to prevent birth defects.

  16. Using synoptic weather types to predict visitor attendance at Atlanta and Indianapolis zoological parks.

    PubMed

    Perkins, David R

    2016-02-23

    Defining an ideal "tourism climate" has been an often-visited research topic where explanations have evolved from global- to location-specific indices tailored to tourists' recreational behavior. Unfortunately, as indices become increasingly specific, they are less translatable across geographies because they may only apply to specific activities, locales, climates, or populations. A key need in the future development of weather and climate indices for tourism has been a translatable, meteorologically based index capturing the generalized ambient atmospheric conditions yet considering local climatology. To address this need, this paper tests the applicability of the spatial synoptic classification (SSC) as a tool to predict visitor attendance response in the tourism, recreation, and leisure (TRL) sector across different climate regimes. Daily attendance data is paired with the prevailing synoptic weather condition at Atlanta and Indianapolis zoological parks from September 2001 to June 2011, to review potential impacts ambient atmospheric conditions may have on visitor attendances. Results indicate that "dry moderate" conditions are most associated with high levels of attendance and "moist polar" synoptic conditions are most associated with low levels of attendance at both zoological parks. Comparing visitor response at these zoo locations, visitors in Indianapolis showed lower levels of tolerance to synoptic conditions which were not "ideal." Visitors in Indianapolis also displayed more aversion to "polar" synoptic regimes while visitors in Atlanta displayed more tolerance to "moist tropical" synoptic regimes. Using a comprehensive atmospheric measure such as the SSC may be a key to broadening application when assessing tourism climates across diverse geographies.

  17. 78 FR 25253 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 26-Atlanta, Georgia; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; PBR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 26--Atlanta, Georgia; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; PBR, Inc. d/b/a SKAPS Industries (Polypropylene Geotextiles); Athens, Georgia Georgia Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ...

  18. BACKGROUND MATERIALS FOR WATERSHED CENTRAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP HELD JANUARY 8-10, 2007, IN ATLANTA, GEORGIA (CD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A development workshop for Watershed Central was held in Atlanta, Georgia, January 8-10, 2007. Participants in the workshop included representatives of EPA’s Office of Water, Office of Environmental Information, Office of Research and Development, and several Regional Offices. ...

  19. 78 FR 54234 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, Georgia, Authorization of Production Activity PBR, Inc. d/b/a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 26--Atlanta, Georgia, Authorization of Production Activity PBR, Inc. d/b/a SKAPS Industries (Polypropylene Geotextiles), Athens, Georgia On April 8, 2013, Georgia Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 26, submitted a notification of proposed...

  20. Program and Abstracts of the 40th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Held in Boston, Massachusetts on 1-5 December 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Mexico City, Mexico Dr. Claudio Ribeiro Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Dr. Lucia Braga Charlottesville, Virginia Dr. Hassan El Bushra Los Angeles, California...RADIOLOGIC AND EPIDEMIOLOGIC CORRELATIONS OF ELISA AND IMMUNOBLOT ASSAYS FOR TAENIA SOLIUM CYSTICERCOSIS IN TWO POPULATIONS IN MEXICO . Schantz PM*, Sarti...Atlanta, GA; Direccion General De Epidemiologia, Secretaria de Salud, Mexico D.F., Mexico ; Departamento de Immunologia, Instituto de Investigaciones

  1. Status of GaAs solar cell production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Milton; Ho, Frank; Iles, Peter A.

    1989-01-01

    Recent experience in producing GaAs solar cells, to meet the full requirements of space-array manufacturers is reviewed. The main problems have been in extending MOCVD technology to provide high throughput of high quality epitaxial layers, and to integrate the other important factors needed to meet the full range of user requirements. Some discussion of evolutionary changes is also given.

  2. Efficiency of star-like graphs and the Atlanta subway network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ek, Bryan; VerSchneider, Caitlin; Narayan, Darren A.

    2013-11-01

    The distance d(i,j) between any two vertices i and j in a graph is the number of edges in a shortest path between i and j. If there is no path connecting i and j, then d(i,j)=∞. In 2001, Latora and Marchiori introduced the measure of efficiency between vertices in a graph (Latora and Marchiori, 2001) [1]. The efficiency between two vertices i and j is defined to be ∈i,j=j. In this paper, we investigate the efficiency of star-like networks, and show that networks of this type have a high level of efficiency. We apply these ideas to an analysis of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) Subway system, and show this network is 82% as efficient as a network where there is a direct line between every pair of stations.

  3. A survey of U.S. Atlanta and Nagano Olympians: variables perceived to influence performance.

    PubMed

    Gould, Daniel; Greenleaf, Christy; Chung, Yongchul; Guinan, Diane

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and magnitude of specific variables perceived to have affected U.S. Olympic athlete performance. Participants included 296 Atlanta Olympians and 83 Nagano Olympians. Olympians rated how they perceived specific variables influenced their Olympic performance. Results revealed that numerous variables, including performance influences, such as preparation for distractions and loss of composure; team variables, such as strong cohesion and positive coach-athlete relationships; coaching variables, including coach's ability to deal with crises and coaching expectations; family-friend variables, including general social support and getting event tickets for family and friends; and environmental concerns, such as venue transportation difficulties and Olympic village distractions; were perceived to influence performance. Findings verified the results of qualitative interviews conducted with Olympic athletes and coaches.

  4. Comparison of nonmethane organic compound concentration data collected by two methods in Atlanta

    SciTech Connect

    Shreffler, J.H.

    1993-12-01

    Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 calls for 'enhanced monitoring' of ozone, which is planned to include measurements of atmospheric non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs). NMOC concentration data gathered by two methods in Atlanta, Georgia during July and August 1990 are compared in order to assess the reliability of such measurements in an operational setting. During that period, automated gas chromatography (GC) systems (Field systems) were used to collect NMOC continuously as one-hour averages. In addition, canister samples of ambient air were collected on an intermittent schedule for quality control purposes and analyzed by laboratory GC (the Lab system). Data from the six-site network included concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone, total NMOC (TNMOVC), and 47 identified NMOCs. (Copyright (c) 1993-Air Waste Management Association.)

  5. History of the Georgia Baptist/Atlanta Medical Center surgical residency.

    PubMed

    Fuhrman, George M; Humphries, Timothy

    2010-07-01

    The Georgia Baptist Hospital established itself as a premier healthcare facility during the first 50 years of the 20th century. The surgical residency started in the 1940s, became accredited in 1958, and has grown into one of the most respected independent programs in the country. The development and growth of the program was a result of the commitment and dedication of the Program Directors in Surgery over the past 50 years. These key leaders included A. Hamblin Letton, John P. Wilson, Paul Stanton, and George Lucas. The hospital's name has changed to Atlanta Medical Center with the sale of the hospital to Tenet in 1997. The same old school approach to surgical training that characterized the residency when it was known as Georgia Baptist persists and provides outstanding training for future surgeons interested in a broadly based surgical education and experience.

  6. High-ozone events in Atlanta, Georgia, in 1983 and 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, Ronald W.; Chameides, William L.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of ozone levels and meterological parameters were analyzed to determine the relative importance of transport-related processes and photochemical production in causing high-ozone events in and around the Atlanta metropolitan area. Back-trajectories calculated by the Branching Air Trajectory Model indicate that the air associated with high-ozone events had often traveled a significant distance within the previous 3 days: for days with ozone levels above 100 ppbv, half of the calculated trajectories showed that the air had traveled over 600 km, with half of those coming from the northwest quadrant. Six-hour vector-averaged winds were used to find that the concentrations of ozone in the air leaving the metropolitan area averaged 20-40 ppbv more than that entering the area.

  7. Flood-flow characteristics of Nancy Creek at Georgia Highway 400 extension near Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, McGlone; Hess, Glen W.

    1987-01-01

    The Highway Division, Georgia Department of Transportation, plans the extension of Georgia Highway 400 from Interstate 285 southward to Interstate 85. As part of this extension, the Highway Division plans construction of a bridge crossing Nancy Creek near Atlanta, Georgia. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Highway Division, determined the flood flow characteristics of Nancy Creek near the bridge crossing. The flood frequency, elevation discharge relation, flood profiles, floodway, and flood flow effects were determined. The maximum backwater effect for the proposed bridge and relocated channel was 0.2 ft for the 100-yr flood. The relocated channel will drastically shorten flow length near the proposed State Highway 400 extension and reduce the 100-yr flood elevation between one and two ft from existing conditions between the proposed site and Windsor Parkway. (Author 's abstract)

  8. HIV Risk Behaviors, Perceptions, and Testing and Preexposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Awareness/Use in Grindr-Using Men Who Have Sex With Men in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Goedel, William C; Halkitis, Perry N; Greene, Richard E; Hickson, DeMarc A; Duncan, Dustin T

    2016-01-01

    Geosocial-networking smartphone applications such as Grindr can help men who have sex with men (MSM) meet sexual partners. Given the high incidence of HIV in the Deep South, the purpose of our study was to assess HIV risk and preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) awareness and use in a sample of HIV-uninfected, Grindr-using MSM residing in Atlanta, Georgia (n = 84). Most (n = 71; 84.6%) reported being somewhat or very concerned about becoming HIV infected. Most (n = 74; 88.1%) had been tested for HIV in their lifetimes. About three fourths (n = 65; 77.4%) were aware of PrEP, but only 11.9% currently used the medication. HIV continues to disproportionately impact MSM and represents a significant source of concern. As the number of new infections continues to rise, it is important to decrease risks associated with acquisition and transmission of HIV by increasing rates of HIV testing and the use of biobehavioral interventions such as PrEP.

  9. Proceedings, Annual Meeting, Aquatic Plant Control Research Program (20th) Held at Atlanta, Georgia on 18-21 November 1985.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    the turnip . The expansion of the technical breadth of the Program brought an awareness of the potential conflict inherent in such an endeavor. The... turnip . So the mechanism’s there is what I am saying. Mr. Rawson: I have read yours, and I do associate that more with the formal research programs

  10. Remote Sensing of Atlanta's Urban Sprawl and the Distribution of Land Cover and Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, Charles A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Between 1973 and 1992, an average of 20 ha of forest was lost each day to urban expansion of Atlanta, Georgia. Urban surfaces have very different thermal properties than natural surfaces-storing solar energy throughout the day and continuing to release it as sensible heat well after sunset. The resulting heat island effect serves as catalysts for chemical reactions from vehicular exhaust and industrialization leading to a deterioration in air quality. In this study, high spatial resolution multispectral remote sensing data has been used to characterize the type, thermal properties, and distribution of land surface materials throughout the Atlanta metropolitan area. Ten-meter data were acquired with the Advanced Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) on May 11 and 12, 1997. ATLAS is a 15-channel multispectral scanner that incorporates the Landsat TM bands with additional bands in the middle reflective infrared and thermal infrared range. The high spatial resolution permitted discrimination of discrete surface types (e.g., concrete, asphalt), individual structures (e.g., buildings, houses) and their associated thermal characteristics. There is a strong temperature contrast between vegetation and anthropomorphic features. Vegetation has a modal temperature at about 20 C, whereas asphalt shingles, pavement, and buildings have a modal temperature of about 39 C. Broad-leaf vegetation classes are indistinguishable on a thermal basis alone. There is slightly more variability (+/-5 C) among the urban surfaces. Grasses, mixed vegetation and mixed urban surfaces are intermediate in temperature and are characterized by broader temperature distributions with modes of about 29 C. Thermal maps serve as a basis for understanding the distribution of "hotspots", i.e., how landscape features and urban fabric contribute the most heat to the lower atmosphere.

  11. Remote Sensing of Atlanta's Urban Sprawl and the Distribution of Land Cover and Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, Charles A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Between 1973 and 1992, an average of 20 ha of forest was lost each day to urban expansion of Atlanta, Georgia. Urban surfaces have very different thermal properties than natural surfaces-storing solar energy throughout the day and continuing to release it as sensible heat well after sunset. The resulting heat island effect serves as catalysts for chemical reactions from vehicular exhaust and industrialization leading to a deterioration in air quality. In this study, high spatial resolution multispectral remote sensing data has been used to characterize the type, thermal properties, and distribution of land surface materials throughout the Atlanta metropolitan area. Ten-meter data were acquired with the Advanced Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) on May 11 and 12, 1997. ATLAS is a 15-channel multispectral scanner that incorporates the Landsat TM bands with additional bands in the middle reflective infrared and thermal infrared range. The high spatial resolution permitted discrimination of discrete surface types (e.g., concrete, asphalt), individual structures (e.g., buildings, houses) and their associated thermal characteristics. There is a strong temperature contrast between vegetation and anthropomorphic features. Vegetation has a modal temperature at about 20 C, whereas asphalt shingles, pavement, and buildings have a modal temperature of about 39 C. Broad-leaf vegetation classes are indistinguishable on a thermal basis alone. There is slightly more variability (plus or minus 5 C) among the urban surfaces. Grasses, mixed vegetation and mixed urban surfaces are intermediate in temperature and are characterized by broader temperature distributions with modes of about 29 C. Thermal maps serve as a basis for understanding the distribution of "hotspots", i.e., how landscape features and urban fabric contribute the most heat to the lower atmosphere.

  12. Evaluation of an Active Surveillance System for Stillbirths in Metropolitan Atlanta

    PubMed Central

    Azofeifa, Alejandro; Yeung, Lorraine F.; Duke, C. Wes; Gilboa, Suzanne M.; Correa, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Background In 2005, a pilot project was started at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to expand an existing birth defects surveillance program, the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program (MACDP), to conduct active surveillance of stillbirth. This pilot project was evaluated using CDC’s current guidelines for evaluating surveillance systems. Methods We conducted stakeholder interviews with the staff of MACDP’s stillbirth surveillance system. We reviewed the published literature on stillbirth ascertainment including 4 previous publications about the MACDP stillbirth surveillance system. Using fetal death certificates (FDC) as a second, independent data source, we estimated the total number and prevalence of stillbirths in metropolitan Atlanta using capture-recapture methods, and calculated the sensitivity of the MACDP stillbirth surveillance system. Results The MACDP stillbirth surveillance system is useful, flexible, acceptable, and stable. The system’s data quality is improved because it uses multiple sources for case ascertainment. Based on 2006 data, estimated sensitivities of FDCs, MACDP, and both sources combined for identifying a stillbirth were 78.5%, 76.8%, and 95.0%, respectively. The prevalence of stillbirths per 1,000 live births and stillbirths was 8.2 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.5-9.0) based on FDC data alone and 9.9 (95% CI: 9.1-10.8) when combined with MACDP data. Conclusion Use of MACDP as an additional data source for stillbirth surveillance resulted in higher levels of case ascertainment, better data quality, and a higher estimate of stillbirth prevalence than using FDC data alone. MACDP could be considered as a model to enhance stillbirth surveillance by other active birth defects surveillance programs. PMID:23270086

  13. Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange (HELIX)-Atlanta: A CDC-NASA Joint Environmental Public Health Tracking Collaborative Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Hamdan, Mohammad; Luvall, Jeff; Crosson, Bill; Estes, Maury; Limaye, Ashutosh; Quattrochi, Dale; Rickman, Doug

    2008-01-01

    HELIX-Atlanta was developed to support current and future state and local EPHT programs to implement data linking demonstration projects which could be part of the CDC EPHT Network. HELIX-Atlanta is a pilot linking project in Atlanta for CDC to learn about the challenges the states will encounter. NASA/MSFC and the CDC are partners in linking environmental and health data to enhance public health surveillance. The use of NASA technology creates value added geospatial products from existing environmental data sources to facilitate public health linkages. Proving the feasibility of the approach is the main objective

  14. 75 FR 73014 - Notice of Public Meeting: Updating the Flight Instructor Renewal Process To Enhance Safety of Flight

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ...: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA announces a public meeting to receive industry input as to how... flight in the General Aviation (GA) community. This is an information gathering meeting. DATES: The... data in the general aviation (GA) community over the last ten years. Even with the advent of...

  15. High Spatial Resolution Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data for Analysis of the Atlanta, Georgia, Urban Heat Island Effect and Its Impacts on the Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2007-01-01

    The twenty-first century is the first "urban century" according to the United Nations Development Program. The focus of cities reflects awareness of the growing percentage of the world's population that lives in urban areas. In environmental terms, cities are the original producers of many of the global problems related to waste disposal, air and water pollution, and associated environmental and ecological challenges. Expansion of cities, both in population and areal extent, is a relentless process. In 2000, approximately 3 billion people representing about 40% of the global population, resided in urban areas. Urban population will continue to rise substantially over the next several decades according to UN estimates, and most of this growth will Occur in developing countries. The UN estimates that by 2025, 60% of the world's population will live in urban areas. As a consequence, the number of"megacities" (those cities with populations of 10 million inhabitants or more) will increase by 100 by 2025. Thus, there is a critical need to understand urban areas and what their impacts are on environmental, ecological and hydrologic resources, as well as on the local, regional, and even global climate. One of the more egregious side effects of urbanization is the increase in surface and air temperatures that lead to deterioration in air quality. In the United States, under the more stringent air quality guidelines established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1997, nearly 300 counties in 34 states will not meet these new air quality standards for ground level ozone. Mitigation of the urban heat island (UHI) effect is actively being evaluated as a possible way to reduce ground ozone levels in cities and assist states in improving air quality. Foremost in the analysis of how the UHI affects air quality and other environmental factors is the use of remote sensing technology and data to characterize urban land covers in sufficient detail to quantifiably measure

  16. Libraries in Georgia: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Atlanta @Scottish Rite Fran Golding Medical Library 1001 Johnson Ferry Road NE Atlanta, GA 30342-1605 404- ... Hospital Northside Hospital-Atlanta Health Resource Center 1000 Johnson Ferry Road, NE Atlanta, GA 30342-1611 404- ...

  17. Intercomparison of an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) with ambient fine aerosol measurements in Downtown Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Croteau, P. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; Kollman, M. S.; Ng, N. L.; Verma, V.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Weber, R. J.; Surratt, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) was recently developed to provide long-term real-time continuous measurements of ambient non-refractory (i.e., organic, sulfate, ammonium, nitrate, and chloride) submicron particulate matter (NR-PM1). Currently, there are a limited number of field studies that evaluate the long-term performance of the ACSM against established monitoring networks. In this study, we present seasonal intercomparisons of the ACSM with collocated fine aerosol (PM2.5) measurements at the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) Jefferson Street (JST) site near downtown Atlanta, GA, during 2011-2012. The collocated measurements included a second ACSM, continuous and integrated sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium measurements, as well as a semi-continuous Sunset organic carbon/elemental carbon (OC/EC) analyzer, continuous tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM), 24 h integrated Federal Reference Method (FRM) filters, and continuous scanning electrical mobility system-mixing condensation particle counter (SEMS-MCPC). Intercomparison of the two collocated ACSMs resulted in strong correlations (r2 > 0.8) for all chemical species, except chloride (r2 = 0.21); mass concentration for all chemical species agreed within ±27%, indicating that ACSM instruments are capable of stable and reproducible operation. Chemical constituents measured by the ACSM are also compared with those obtained from the continuous measurements from JST. Since the continuous measurement concentrations are adjusted to match the integrated filter measurements, these comparisons reflect the combined uncertainties of the ACSM, continuous, and filter measurements. In general, speciated ACSM mass concentrations correlate well (r2 > 0.7) with the continuous measurements from JST, although the correlation for nitrate is weaker (r2 = 0.55) in summer. Differences between ACSM mass concentrations and the filter-adjusted JST continuous data are 5-27%, 4

  18. Gibberellin Biosynthesis in Maize. Metabolic Studies with GA15, GA24, GA25, GA7, and 2,3-Dehydro-GA91

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Gordon; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Phinney, Bernard O.; Lange, Theo; Croker, Steve J.; Gaskin, Paul; MacMillan, Jake

    1999-01-01

    [17-14C]-Labeled GA15, GA24, GA25, GA7, and 2,3-dehydro-GA9 were separately injected into normal, dwarf-1 (d1), and dwarf-5 (d5) seedlings of maize (Zea mays L.). Purified radioactive metabolites from the plant tissues were identified by full-scan gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and Kovats retention index data. The metabolites from GA15 were GA44, GA19, GA20, GA113, and GA15-15,16-ene (artifact?). GA24 was metabolized to GA19, GA20, and GA17. The metabolites from GA25 were GA17, GA25 16α,17-H2-17-OH, and HO-GA25 (hydroxyl position not determined). GA7 was metabolized to GA30, GA3, isoGA3 (artifact?), and trace amounts of GA7-diene-diacid (artifact?). 2,3-Dehydro-GA9 was metabolized to GA5, GA7 (trace amounts), 2,3-dehydro-GA10 (artifact?), GA31, and GA62. Our results provide additional in vivo evidence of a metabolic grid in maize (i.e. pathway convergence). The grid connects members of a putative, non-early 3,13-hydroxylation branch pathway to the corresponding members of the previously documented early 13-hydroxylation branch pathway. The inability to detect the sequence GA12 → GA15 → GA24 → GA9 indicates that the non-early 3,13-hydroxylation pathway probably plays a minor role in the origin of bioactive gibberellins in maize. PMID:10557253

  19. Preventing the repetition: Or, what Los Angeles' experience in water management can teach Atlanta about urban water disputes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, David L.

    2009-04-01

    Southern California's water history is an epic story with larger-than-life characters and ambitions and abundant hubris. Students of water policy might reasonably ask: Does this story, while unique to greater Los Angeles, hold lessons for other metropolises experiencing water conflict caused by explosive growth? We examine this question by considering similarities between the challenges facing Atlanta, Georgia, one of the nation's fastest growing cities in the 21st century, with those of Los Angeles. We focus on junctures where important decisions regarding water were made and how these decisions continue to challenge both cities' futures. Atlanta's financial, cultural, and environmental imprint on its surrounding region share remarkable similarities with Los Angeles' influence trajectory: it is the largest city in the southeast, a principal transportation and business hub, and it is embroiled in water conflict with nearby communities and adjoining states.

  20. Convention Proceedings Digest: American Vocational Association (Atlanta, Georgia, November 30-December 5, 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Association, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The document is the fifth volume in an annual series of American Vocational Association (AVA) proceedings digests. It contains the reports of professional meetings, workshops, educational tours, speeches, and discussions, as well as the resolutions, elections, and other activities undertaken at the various meetings. The proceedings of meetings of…

  1. Georgia State University Spending Patterns and the Atlanta Economy, 1978. Institutional Research Report No. 79-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salley, Charles D.

    The level of economic stimulus provided to the Atlanta area by Georgia State University was examined and found to be 5,432 full-time jobs and $140.2 million in income. It is shown that the figures are conservative since spending by part-time employees and most part-time students was omitted. A calculated multiplier of 1.48 was used, and the study…

  2. Effects of urbanization on streamflow in the Atlanta area (Georgia, USA): A comparative hydrological approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, S.; Peters, N.E.

    2001-01-01

    For the period from 1958 to 1996, streamflow characteristics of a highly urbanized watershed were compared with less-urbanized and non-urbanized watersheds within a 20 000 km2 region in the vicinity of Atlanta, Georgia: In the Piedmont and Blue Ridge physiographic provinces of the southeastern USA. Water levels in several wells completed in surficial and crystalline-rock aquifers were also evaluated. Data were analysed for seven US Geological Survey (USGS) stream gauges, 17 National Weather Service rain gauges, and five USGS monitoring wells. Annual runoff coefficients (RCs; runoff as a fractional percentage of precipitation) for the urban stream (Peachtree Creek) were not significantly greater than for the less-urbanized watersheds. The RCs for some streams were similar to others and the similar streams were grouped according to location. The RCs decreased from the higher elevation and higher relief watersheds to the lower elevation and lower relief watersheds: Values were 0.54 for the two Blue Ridge streams. 0.37 for the four middle Piedmont streams (near Atlanta), and 0.28 for a southern Piedmont stream. For the 25 largest stormflows, the peak flows for Peachtree Creek were 30% to 100% greater then peak flows for the other stream. The storm recession period for the urban stream was 1-2 days less than that for the other streams and the recession was characterized by a 2-day storm recession constant that was, on average, 40 to 100% greater, i.e. streamflow decreased more rapidly than for the other streams. Baseflow recession constants ranged from 35 to 40% lower for Peachtree Creek than for the other streams; this is attributed to lower evapotranspiration losses, which result in a smaller change in groundwater storage than in the less-urbanized watersheds. Low flow of Peachtree Creek ranged from 25 to 35% less than the other streams, possibly the result of decreased infiltration caused by the more efficient routing of stormwater and the paving of groundwater

  3. Multipollutant modeling issues in a study of ambient air quality and emergency department visits in Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, Paige E; Klein, Mitchel; Peel, Jennifer L; Sarnat, Stefanie E; Sarnat, Jeremy A

    2007-12-01

    Multipollutant models are frequently used to differentiate roles of multiple pollutants in epidemiologic studies of ambient air pollution. In the presence of differing levels of measurement error across pollutants under consideration, however, they can be biased and as misleading as single-pollutant models. Their appropriate interpretation depends on the relationships among the pollutant measurements and the outcomes in question. In situations where two or more pollutant variables may be acting as surrogates for the etiologic agent(s), multipollutant models can help identify the best surrogate, but the risk estimates may be influenced by inclusion of a second variable that is not itself an independent risk factor for the outcome in question. In this paper, these issues will be illustrated in the context of an ongoing study of emergency visits in Atlanta. Emergency department visits from 41 of 42 hospitals serving the 20-county Atlanta metropolitan area for the period 1993-2004 (n=10,206,389 visits) were studied in relation to ambient pollutant levels, including speciated particle measurements from an intensive monitoring campaign at a downtown station starting in 1998. Relative to our earlier publications, reporting results through 2000, the period for which the speciated data are available is now tripled (6 years in length). Poisson generalized linear models were used to examine outcome counts in relation to 3-day moving average concentrations of pollutants of a priori interest (ozone, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, oxygenated hydrocarbons, PM10, coarse PM, PM2.5, and the following components of PM2.5: elemental carbon, organic carbon, sulfate, and water-soluble transition metals). In the present analysis, we report results for two outcome groups: a respiratory outcomes group and a cardiovascular outcomes group. For cardiovascular visits, associations were observed with CO, NO2, and PM2.5 elemental carbon and organic carbon. In multipollutant

  4. Feasibility study of social media to reduce intimate partner violence among gay men in metro atlanta, georgia.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Sheryl M; Smith, Megan; Pendrick-Denney, Danielle; Boos-Beddington, Sarah; Chen, Ken; McCarty, Frances

    2012-08-01

    Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a major public health issue occurring in the United States and globally. While little is known in general about IPV, understanding about the prevalence of physical IPV among gay men is even more obscure. There is a clear disparity in violence research attention focused on this vulnerable segment of society. This cross-sectional survey study was conducted to examine the feasibility of enrolling 100 gay men from Atlanta into an IPV survey study. The survey was administered via Facebook. Ninety-nine usable surveys were collected. Chi-square tests reveal that minority ethnic status, illicit drug use, and non-disclosed orientation status were all significantly associated with positive IPV reports--in terms of both victimization as well as perpetration. Overall, the majority of the study sample indicated that they believe IPV is a health problem in the Atlanta gay community. These findings bear importance for the Atlanta gay community and public health professionals who must address this nearly invisible yet increasing public health issue.

  5. PAHs and PM2.5 emissions and female breast cancer incidence in metro Atlanta and rural Georgia.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Puja Vijay; Wei, Yudan

    2016-08-01

    Environmental chemical exposure could be an important etiologic factor for geographic differences in breast cancer incidence. In this study, we examined emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and PM2.5 in relation to breast cancer incidence in metro Atlanta and rural Georgia by analyzing data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program and the Environmental Protection Agency. The results showed that metro Atlanta had a significantly higher age-adjusted annual incidence rate of female breast cancer than rural Georgia (132.6 vs. 113.7 per 100,000) for 1992-2011. Emissions of both PAHs [adjusted β = 0.568 (95 % CI: 0.209, 0.927); p = 0.004] and PM2.5 [adjusted β = 2.964 (95 % CI: 0.468, 5.459); p = 0.023] were significantly associated with breast cancer incidence in metro Atlanta area. This study suggests that ambient air pollution, especially PAHs and PM2.5, could have a significant impact on the increased incidence of female breast cancer in urban areas.

  6. Applying a PrEP Continuum of Care for Men Who Have Sex With Men in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Colleen F; Kahle, Erin; Siegler, Aaron; Sanchez, Travis; Del Rio, Carlos; Sullivan, Patrick S; Rosenberg, Eli S

    2015-11-15

    Reductions in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) incidence with pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for men who have sex with men (MSM) will require significant coverage of those at risk. We propose a simplified framework, similar to the HIV care continuum, to achieve protection with PrEP as follows: 1. At-risk MSM; 2. Awareness of and willingness to take PrEP; 3. Access to healthcare; 4. Receiving a prescription; and 5. Adhering to effective PrEP. We evaluated the PrEP care continuum on an Atlanta cohort of MSM and projected how many MSM might achieve protection from HIV. Even with optimistic estimates, few Atlanta MSM (15%) are projected to achieve protection from HIV with PrEP given the significant barriers described. Each continuum step represents an important point for intervention that could substantially increase the overall effectiveness of PrEP. In addition, novel strategies for PrEP delivery are needed to achieve the necessary effectiveness for Atlanta MSM at risk of HIV.

  7. Susceptibility to Heat-Related Fluid and Electrolyte Imbalance Emergency Department Visits in Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Leila; Winquist, Andrea; Klein, Mitchel; O’Lenick, Cassandra; Grundstein, Andrew; Ebelt Sarnat, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Identification of populations susceptible to heat effects is critical for targeted prevention and more accurate risk assessment. Fluid and electrolyte imbalance (FEI) may provide an objective indicator of heat morbidity. Data on daily ambient temperature and FEI emergency department (ED) visits were collected in Atlanta, Georgia, USA during 1993–2012. Associations of warm-season same-day temperatures and FEI ED visits were estimated using Poisson generalized linear models. Analyses explored associations between FEI ED visits and various temperature metrics (maximum, minimum, average, and diurnal change in ambient temperature, apparent temperature, and heat index) modeled using linear, quadratic, and cubic terms to allow for non-linear associations. Effect modification by potential determinants of heat susceptibility (sex; race; comorbid congestive heart failure, kidney disease, and diabetes; and neighborhood poverty and education levels) was assessed via stratification. Higher warm-season ambient temperature was significantly associated with FEI ED visits, regardless of temperature metric used. Stratified analyses suggested heat-related risks for all populations, but particularly for males. This work highlights the utility of FEI as an indicator of heat morbidity, the health threat posed by warm-season temperatures, and the importance of considering susceptible populations in heat-health research. PMID:27706089

  8. Prevalence of Congenital Heart Defects in Metropolitan Atlanta, 1998–2005

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Mark D.; Strickland, Matthew J.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Mahle, William T.; Correa, Adolfo

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine an accurate estimate of the prevalence of congenital heart defects (CHD) using current standard diagnostic modalities. Study design We obtained data on infants with CHD delivered during 1998–2005 identified by the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, an active, population-based birth defects surveillance system. Physiologic shunts in infancy and shunts associated with prematurity were excluded. Selected infant and maternal characteristics of the cases were compared with those of the overall birth cohort. Results From 1998–2005 there were 398 140 births, of which 3240 infants had CHD, for an overall prevalence of 81.4/10 000 births. The most common CHD were muscular ventricular septal defect, perimembranous ventricular septal defect, and secundum atrial septal defect, with prevalence of 27.5, 10.6, and 10.3/10 000 births, respectively. The prevalence of tetralogy of Fallot, the most common cyanotic CHD, was twice that of transposition of the great arteries (4.7 vs. 2.3/10 000 births). Many common CHD were associated with older maternal age and multiple-gestation pregnancy; several were found to vary by sex. Conclusion This study, using a standardized cardiac nomenclature and classification, provides current prevalence estimates of the various CHD subtypes. These estimates can be used to assess variations in prevalence across populations, time or space. PMID:18657826

  9. Time and distance barriers to mammography facilities in the Atlanta metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Peipins, Lucy A; Graham, Shannon; Young, Randall; Lewis, Brian; Foster, Stephanie; Flanagan, Barry; Dent, Andrew

    2011-08-01

    To a great extent, research on geographic accessibility to mammography facilities has focused on urban-rural differences. Spatial accessibility within urban areas can nonetheless pose a challenge, especially for minorities and low-income urban residents who are more likely to depend on public transportation. To examine spatial and temporal accessibility to mammography facilities in the Atlanta metropolitan area by public and private transportation, we built a multimodal transportation network model including bus and rail routes, bus and rail stops, transfers, walk times, and wait times. Our analysis of travel times from the population-weighted centroids of the 282 census tracts in the 2-county area to the nearest facility found that the median public transportation time was almost 51 minutes. We further examined public transportation travel times by levels of household access to a private vehicle. Residents in tracts with the lowest household access to a private vehicle had the shortest travel times, suggesting that facilities were favorably located for women who have to use public transportation. However, census tracts with majority non-Hispanic black populations had the longest travel times for all levels of vehicle availability. Time to the nearest mammography facility would not pose a barrier to women who had access to a private vehicle. This study adds to the literature demonstrating differences in spatial accessibility to health services by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic characteristics. Ameliorating spatial inaccessibility represents an opportunity for intervention that operates at the population level.

  10. Susceptibility to Heat-Related Fluid and Electrolyte Imbalance Emergency Department Visits in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Leila; Winquist, Andrea; Klein, Mitchel; O'Lenick, Cassandra; Grundstein, Andrew; Ebelt Sarnat, Stefanie

    2016-10-02

    Identification of populations susceptible to heat effects is critical for targeted prevention and more accurate risk assessment. Fluid and electrolyte imbalance (FEI) may provide an objective indicator of heat morbidity. Data on daily ambient temperature and FEI emergency department (ED) visits were collected in Atlanta, Georgia, USA during 1993-2012. Associations of warm-season same-day temperatures and FEI ED visits were estimated using Poisson generalized linear models. Analyses explored associations between FEI ED visits and various temperature metrics (maximum, minimum, average, and diurnal change in ambient temperature, apparent temperature, and heat index) modeled using linear, quadratic, and cubic terms to allow for non-linear associations. Effect modification by potential determinants of heat susceptibility (sex; race; comorbid congestive heart failure, kidney disease, and diabetes; and neighborhood poverty and education levels) was assessed via stratification. Higher warm-season ambient temperature was significantly associated with FEI ED visits, regardless of temperature metric used. Stratified analyses suggested heat-related risks for all populations, but particularly for males. This work highlights the utility of FEI as an indicator of heat morbidity, the health threat posed by warm-season temperatures, and the importance of considering susceptible populations in heat-health research.

  11. Molecular epidemiology of norovirus in children and the elderly in Atlanta, Georgia, United States.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jumi; Wahl, Kelly; Sederdahl, Bethany K; Jerris, Robert R; Kraft, Colleen S; McCracken, Courtney; Gillespie, Scott; Anderson, Evan J; Kirby, Amy E; Shane, Andi L; Moe, Christine L

    2016-06-01

    Noroviruses are an important cause of gastroenteritis, which can be severe at the extremes of ages. Data documenting the endemic burden of norovirus among children and elderly adults are lacking. Stool specimens submitted for clinical testing were collected from elderly (≥ 65 years) adults and children (<18 years) with acute vomiting and/or diarrhea seeking care at several metropolitan Atlanta adult and pediatric hospitals from January 2013-June 2013. Specimens were tested for norovirus with real-time RT-PCR and sequenced if norovirus was detected. Corresponding clinical and demographic data were abstracted from retrospective chart review. Norovirus was detected in 11% (11/104) of elderly specimens and 11% (67/628) of pediatric, with GII.4 Sydney_2012 detected in 64% (7/11) of elderly norovirus-positive and 11% (8/67) of pediatric specimens, P < 0.001. In comparison to hospitalized children, hospitalized elderly with norovirus were more commonly admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) (36% vs. 7%, P = 0.02). Norovirus in the elderly can be associated with severe illness requiring ICU admissions. The pediatric group demonstrated greater variability in genotype distribution. Ongoing surveillance of norovirus genotypes is crucial for norovirus vaccine development in understanding circulating and emerging genotypes.

  12. Multilevel factors influencing hepatitis B screening and vaccination among Vietnamese Americans in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Frew, Paula M; Alhanti, Brooke; Vo-Green, Linda; Zhang, Siyu; Liu, Chang; Nguyen, Tranh; Schamel, Jay; Saint-Victor, Diane S; Nguyen, Minh Ly

    2014-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection may lead to liver cirrhosis, chronic liver disease, and liver cancer. Immunization rates are suboptimal among Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders (AAPIs), who remain disproportionately affected by these illnesses. We investigated socioecological factors affecting HBV prevention among 316 Vietnamese Americans in Atlanta, Georgia. Social and community support of HBV vaccination was associated with screening (OR=1.69, 95% CI [1.21,2.38]), vaccination (OR=1.89, [1.27,2.81]), and intent to vaccinate (OR=1.77, [1.13,2.78]). Misconceptions decreased screening likelihood (OR=0.67, [0.46,0.99]) and vaccination (OR=0.55, [0.35,0.86]). Those able to pay for medical treatment (OR=1.23, [1.01,1.50]) were also more likely immunized, and greater transportation access (OR=1.42, [1.07,1.87]) was associated with greater intention to vaccinate. Multi-level factors facilitated HBV vaccination in this population. Tailored, culturally appropriate communication strategies will positively influence immunization uptake.

  13. Increase in pilus islet 2-encoded pili among Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    Zähner, Dorothea; Gudlavalleti, Aditya; Stephens, David S

    2010-06-01

    To define the prevalence of pilus islet 2 (PI-2)-encoded pili in Streptococcus pneumoniae in a geographically defined area, we examined 590 S. pneumoniae isolates from population-based surveillance of invasive pneumococcal disease in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 1994-2006. In 2006, PI-2 was present in 21% of all invasive isolates, including serotypes 1 (100%), 7F (89%), 11A (21%), 19A (40%), and 19F (75%). Only serotype 19F is included in the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine that is in use worldwide. In 1999, PI-2-containing isolates were of the same serotypes but accounted for only 3.6% of all invasive isolates. The increase of PI-2 in 2006 resulted predominantly from the emergence of serotype 19A isolates of sequence type 320 and the expansion of serotype 7F isolates. The increase in PI-2-containing isolates and the finding that isolates of all identified serotypes expressed highly conserved PI-2 pili supports their potential as a vaccine candidate.

  14. Health and treatment implications of food insufficiency among people living with HIV/AIDS, Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Cherry, Chauncey; Amaral, Christina; White, Denise; Kalichman, Moira O; Pope, Howard; Swetsze, Connie; Jones, Michel; Macy, Rene

    2010-07-01

    HIV/AIDS is concentrated among the inner-city poor and poverty may directly interfere with HIV treatment. This study examined food insufficiency in relation to HIV-related health and treatment. A sample of 344 men and women living with HIV/AIDS in Atlanta, Georgia completed measures of food security, health, and HIV disease progression and treatment. HIV treatment adherence was monitored using unannounced pill counts. Results showed that half of people living with HIV/AIDS in this study lacked sufficient food, and food insufficiency was associated with multiple indicators of poor health, including higher HIV viral loads, lower CD4 cell counts, and poorer treatment adherence. Adjusted analyses showed that food insufficiency predicted HIV treatment non-adherence over and above years of education, employment status, income, housing, depression, social support, and non-alcohol substance use. Hunger and food insecurity are prevalent among people living with HIV/AIDS, and food insufficiency is closely related to multiple HIV-related health indicators, particularly medication adherence. Interventions that provide consistent and sustained meals to people living with HIV/AIDS are urgently needed.

  15. Future desire for children among women living with HIV in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Lisa B; Machen, Leah Kathleen; Cordes, Sarah; Huylebroeck, Brian; Delaney, Augustina; Ofotokun, Igho; Nguyen, Minh Ly; Jamieson, Denise J

    2016-01-01

    Little is known regarding family planning desires among women living with HIV in the United States. This study aimed to identify factors influencing desire for children in the future among HIV-infected women in Atlanta, Georgia. HIV-infected women ages 18-45 completed an ACASI (audio computer-assisted self-interview) questionnaire. Chi-square, t-tests, and multivariate logistic regression evaluated factors associated with desire for future children. Of 181 participants, 62 (34.3%) expressed desire for children in the future, with increased desire among younger women (age <26) and those with seronegative partners. Concerns for horizontal and vertical HIV transmission were deterrents to future childbearing. Condom use and overall knowledge of transmission risk was low. Over a third of women desiring a child never discussed their desire with a physician. Misinformation regarding HIV transmission risks persists and is a notable concern influencing desire for children. Providers should reassess family planning desires regularly through integrated HIV care.

  16. NASA Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations (LVLASO) Atlanta Demonstration: Surveillance Systems Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Rick; Evers, Carl; Hicok, Dan; Lee, Derrick

    1999-01-01

    NASA conducted a series of flight experiments at Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport as part of the Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations (LVLASO) Program. LVLASO is one of the subelements of the NASA Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) Program, which is focused on providing technology and operating procedures for achieving clear-weather airport capacity in instrument-weather conditions, while also improving safety. LVLASO is investigating various technologies to be applied to airport surface operations, including advanced flight deck displays and surveillance systems. The purpose of this report is to document the performance of the surveillance systems tested as part of the LVLASO flight experiment. There were three surveillance sensors tested: primary radar using Airport Surface Detection Equipment (ASDE-3) and the Airport Movement Area Safety System (AMASS), Multilateration using the Airport Surface Target Identification System (ATIDS), and Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) operating at 1090 MHz. The performance was compared to the draft requirements of the ICAO Advanced Surface Movement Guidance and Control System (A-SMGCS). Performance parameters evaluated included coverage, position accuracy, and update rate. Each of the sensors was evaluated as a stand alone surveillance system.

  17. Racial differences in mortality from cardiovascular disease in Atlanta, 1979-1985.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, J. F.; Harris-Hooker, S. A.; Schmid, G.; Ford, E.; Simmons, B.; Reed, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    Mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) for the period 1979 to 1985 in the Atlanta metropolitan population was reviewed for racial differences. About 28% of the population was black in 1980. Of 22,585 deaths from hypertension, stroke, ischemic heart disease, and atherosclerosis, 78.7% occurred among whites and 21.3% among blacks. Overall, ischemic heart disease accounted for 47.7% of these four types of CVD deaths for both races and sexes. Age-specific and age-adjusted rates were compared. Among these four causes of death, blacks have the greatest excess of deaths from hypertension over whites for both males and females; the excesses were more than 200% when the rates were age-adjusted. The excess risk of death from hypertension occurred for all ages in blacks, with an excess of about 10 times in 30- to 49-year-olds. An excess risk from stroke also occurred in blacks below the age of 75; the risk reversed afterward. The age-specific mortality rates revealed an excess from ischemic heart disease only between the ages of 30 and 59 years and from atherosclerosis between 40 and 59 years of age for black men. This age-related crossover in females did not occur until the age of 75 years for deaths attributed to these causes. These data suggest that blacks were at highest risk for all four causes at younger age groups. PMID:1578501

  18. Microvascular free-tissue transfer. The Atlanta Veterans Administration Medical Center experience.

    PubMed

    Carlson, G W; Coleman, J J

    1989-04-01

    The entire microvascular tissue transfer experience from 1977 through 1987 at the Atlanta Veterans Administration Medical Center has been reviewed. Seventy-four free flaps were done in 68 patients. Assessable records were available in 52 patients who had 58 reconstructive procedures. The most frequently used flaps were jejunum in 15 patients (25.8%), latissimus dorsi in 11 patients (18.9%), rectus abdominis in eight patients (13.8%), and gracilis in seven patients (12.1%). Major complications occurred in 43.1% of the cases. Total flap loss occurred in eight patients (13.8%); from 1977 through 1982, four (28.6%) of 14 patients had total flap loss, and from 1983 through 1987, four (9.1%) had total flap loss. Partial flap loss occurred in four cases (6.9%). Of the 52 patients, 43 had their problems resolved expeditiously by free-tissue transfer. We conclude that in a university-affiliated Veterans Administration medical center, microvascular reconstruction is an important and necessary surgical tool. Failure rates have decreased markedly with time and increasing experience. Definition of new anatomic microvascular units for transfer has increased the number of reconstructive choices.

  19. High-capacity, high-strength trailer designs for the GA-4/GA-9 Casks

    SciTech Connect

    Kissinger, J.A.; Rickard, N.D.; Taylor, C.; Zimmer, A.

    1991-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) is developing final designs for two dedicated legal-weight trailers to transport the GA-4 and GA-9 Spent-Fuel Casks. The basic designs for these high-capacity, high-strength trailers are essentially identical except for small modifications to account for the differences in cask geometry. We are designing both trailers to carry a 55,000 lb (24,900 kg) payload and to withstand a 2.5 g vertical design load. The GA-4 and GA-9 trailers are designed for significantly higher loads than are typical commercial semitrailers, which are designed to loads in the range of 1.7 to 2.0 g. To meet the federal gross vehicle weight limit for legal-weight trucks, GA has set a target design weight for the trailers of 9000 lb (4080 kg). This weight includes the personnel barrier, cask tiedowns, and impact limiter removal and storage system. Based on the preliminary trailer designs, the final design weight is expected to be very close to this target weight. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Magnitudes, nature, and effects of point and nonpoint discharges in the Chattahoochee River Basin, Atlanta to West Point Dam, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamer, J.K.; Cherry, Rodney N.; Faye, R.E.; Kleckner, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    During the period April 1975 to June 1978, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a river-quality assessment of the Upper Chattahoochee River basin in Georgia. One objective of the study was to assess the magnitudes, nature, and effects of point and non-point discharges in the Chattahoochee River basin from Atlanta to the West Point Dam. On an average annual basis and during the storm period of March 1215, 1976, non-point-source loads for most constituents analyzed were larger than point-source loads at the Whitesburg station, located on the Chattahoochee River about 40 river miles downstream of Atlanta. Most of the non-point-source constituent loads in the Atlanta-to-Whitesburg reach were from urban areas. Average annual point-source discharges accounted for about 50 percent of the dissolved nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus loads, and about 70 percent of the dissolved phosphorus loads at Whitesburg. During weekends, power generation at the upstream Buford Dam hydroelectric facility is minimal. Streamflow at the Atlanta station during dry-weather weekends is estimated to be about 1,200 ft3/s (cubic feet per second). Average daily dissolved-oxygen concentrations of less than 5.0 mg/L (milligrams per liter) occurred often in the river, about 20 river miles downstream from Atlanta during these periods from May to November. During a low-flow period, June 1-2, 1977, five municipal point sources contributed 63 percent of the ultimate biochemical oxygen demand, 97 percent of the ammonium nitrogen, 78 percent of the total nitrogen, and 90 percent of the total phosphorus loads at the Franklin station, at the upstream end of West Point Lake. Average daily concentrations of 13 mg/L of ultimate biochemical oxygen demand and 1.8 mg/L of ammonium nitrogen were observed about 2 river miles downstream from two of the municipal point sources. Carbonaceous and nitrogenous oxygen demands caused dissolved-oxygen concentrations between 4.1 and 5.0 mg/L to occur in a 22-mile

  1. The 1996 meeting of the national technical workgroup on mixed waste thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The National Technical Workgroup on Mixed Waste Thermal Treatment held its annual meeting in Atlanta Georgia on March 12-14, 1996. The National Technical Workgroup (NTW) and this meeting were sponsored under an interagency agreement between EPA and DOE. The 1996 Annual Meeting was hosted by US DOE Oak Ridge Operations in conjunction with Lockheed Martin Energy Systems - Center for Waste Management. A new feature of the annual meeting was the Permit Writer Panel Session which provided an opportunity for the state and federal permit writers to discuss issues and potential solutions to permitting mixed waste treatment systems. In addition, there was substantial discussion on the impacts of the Waste Combustion Performance Standards on mixed waste thermal treatment which are expected to proposed very soon. The 1996 meeting also focussed on two draft technical resource documents produced by NTW on Waste Analysis Plans and Compliance Test Procedures. Issues discussed included public involvement, waste characterization, and emission issues.

  2. Effects of urbanization on stream water quality in the city of Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.

    2009-01-01

    A long-term stream water quality monitoring network was established in the city of Atlanta, Georgia during 2003 to assess baseline water quality conditions and the effects of urbanization on stream water quality. Routine hydrologically based manual stream sampling, including several concurrent manual point and equal width increment sampling, was conducted ???12 times annually at 21 stations, with drainage areas ranging from 3.7 to 232 km2. Eleven of the stations are real-time (RT) stations having continuous measures of stream stage/ discharge, pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature and turbidity, and automatic samplers for stormwater collection. Samples were analyzed for field parameters, and a broad suite of water quality and sediment-related constituents. Field parameters and concentrations of major ions, metals, nutrient species and coliform bacteria among stations were evaluated and with respect to watershed characteristics and plausible sources from 2003 through September 2007. Most constituent concentrations are much higher than nearby reference streams. Concentrations are statistically different among stations for several constituents, despite high variability both within and among stations. Routine manual sampling, automatic sampling during stormflows and RT water quality monitoring provided sufficient information about urban stream water quality variability to evaluate causes of water quality differences among streams. Fecal coliform bacteria concentrations of most samples exceeded Georgia's water quality standard for any water-usage class. High chloride concentrations occur at three stations and are hypothesized to be associated with discharges of chlorinated combined sewer overflows, drainage of swimming pool(s) and dissolution and transport during rainstorms of CaCl2, a deicing salt applied to roads during winter storms. One stream was affected by dissolution and transport of ammonium alum [NH4Al(SO4)2] from an alum

  3. Racial disparities in travel time to radiotherapy facilities in the Atlanta metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Peipins, Lucy A; Graham, Shannon; Young, Randall; Lewis, Brian; Flanagan, Barry

    2013-07-01

    Low-income women with breast cancer who rely on public transportation may have difficulty in completing recommended radiation therapy due to inadequate access to radiation facilities. Using a geographic information system (GIS) and network analysis we quantified spatial accessibility to radiation treatment facilities in the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area. We built a transportation network model that included all bus and rail routes and stops, system transfers and walk and wait times experienced by public transportation system travelers. We also built a private transportation network to model travel times by automobile. We calculated travel times to radiation therapy facilities via public and private transportation from a population-weighted center of each census tract located within the study area. We broadly grouped the tracts by low, medium and high household access to a private vehicle and by race. Facility service areas were created using the network model to map the extent of areal coverage at specified travel times (30, 45 and 60 min) for both public and private modes of transportation. The median public transportation travel time to the nearest radiotherapy facility was 56 min vs. approximately 8 min by private vehicle. We found that majority black census tracts had longer public transportation travel times than white tracts across all categories of vehicle access and that 39% of women in the study area had longer than 1 h of public transportation travel time to the nearest facility. In addition, service area analyses identified locations where the travel time barriers are the greatest. Spatial inaccessibility, especially for women who must use public transportation, is one of the barriers they face in receiving optimal treatment.

  4. Drinking water turbidity and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness in Atlanta, 1993-2004.

    PubMed

    Tinker, Sarah C; Moe, Christine L; Klein, Mitchel; Flanders, W Dana; Uber, Jim; Amirtharajah, Appiah; Singer, Philip; Tolbert, Paige E

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which drinking water turbidity measurements indicate the risk of gastrointestinal illness is not well understood. Despite major advances in drinking water treatment and delivery, infectious disease can still be transmitted through drinking water in the United States, and it is important to have reliable indicators of microbial water quality to inform public health decisions. The objective of our study was to assess the relationship between gastrointestinal illness, quantified through emergency department visits, and drinking water quality, quantified as raw water and filtered water turbidity measured at the treatment plant. We examined the relationship between turbidity levels of raw and filtered surface water measured at eight major drinking water treatment plants in the metropolitan area of Atlanta, Georgia, and over 240,000 emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness during 1993-2004 among the population served by these plants. We fit Poisson time-series statistical regression models that included turbidity in a 21-day distributed lag and that controlled for meteorological factors and long-term time trends. For filtered water turbidity, the results were consistent with no association with emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness. We observed a modest association between raw water turbidity and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness. Our results suggest that source water quality may contribute modestly to endemic gastrointestinal illness in the study area. The association between turbidity and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness was only observed when raw water turbidity was considered; filtered water turbidity may not serve as a reliable indicator of modest pathogen risk at all treatment plants.

  5. From Olympia to Atlanta: a cultural-historical perspective on diet and athletic training.

    PubMed

    Grivetti, L E; Applegate, E A

    1997-05-01

    Greek and Roman writers described diet and training of Olympic athletes. Lucian (A.D. 120-ca. 180) described distance and speed work in runners; Galen (A.D. 131-201) recommended ball-related exercises to train vision and the body; Philostratos (A.D. 170-249) suggested cross training by endurance running, weight training, and wrestling with animals. The ancient Greek training system, the tetrad (eta tau epsilon tau rho alpha sigma), was a four-day cycle with each day devoted to a different activity. Diogenes Laertius (died A.D. 222) wrote that Greek athletes trained on dried figs, moist cheese and wheat; then the pattern changed and focused on meat. Epictetus (2nd century A.D.) wrote that Olympic victors avoided desserts and cold water and took wine sparingly. Philostratos deprecated athletic diet in his era, a pattern based on white bread sprinkled with poppy seeds, fish and pork. Americans at the XIth Olympiad in Berlin (1936) consumed beefsteak with average daily intake of 125 grams of butter or cotton oil, three eggs, custard for dessert and 1.5 L of milk. The American pattern at Berlin was characterized by ad libitum intake of white bread, dinner rolls, fresh vegetables and salads. At Atlanta, more than 5 million meals will be served during the Olympic festival. The highly varied menu will include fresh vegetables and dips; fruits, cheeses and breads; salads; pasta, rice and fruit salads; soups; meat and seafood entrees; hot vegetables; desserts; and beverages. American Southern specialties will be served.

  6. Scaling animal to human biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Pamela Ochoa; Veloza, Stella

    2016-07-01

    The radiotracer called 68Ga-labelled Glu-urea-Lys(Ahx)-HBED-CC ([68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC) is a novel radiophar-maceutical for the detection of prostate cancer lesions by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Setting up a cost-effective manual synthesis of this radiotracer and making its clinical translation in Colombia will require two important elements: the evaluation of the procedure to yield a consistent product, meeting standards of radio-chemical purity and low toxicity and then, the evaluation of the radiation dosimetry. In this paper a protocol to extrapolate the biokinetic model made in normal mice to humans by using the computer software for internal dose assessment OLINDA/EXM® is presented as an accurate and standardized method for the calculation of radiation dosimetry estimates.

  7. Modeling the spatial differentiation in cloud-to-ground lightning: A case study in Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strikas, Ona

    Urban cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning enhancement has been well documented for Atlanta, Georgia. This study builds on those investigations using modeling techniques. Numerous styles of analyses and regressions were conducted to establish patterns of CG lightning over the North Georgia region. CG lightning demonstrated clustering for all years of data: 1995--2008. However, the first strike of each day with lightning was randomly distributed according to a Poisson distribution, demonstrating the clustering is not due to permanent features. Attempts were unsuccessful to model CG lightning clusters as either a Matern or Thomas Poisson point process. Regressions of CG lightning with built environment covariates---FAA aviation obstacle locations and heights, population density, road length density, distance to the center of Atlanta, PM10 emissions data, distance to highways, and coal plant locations---as well as natural variables such as projected coordinate easting, northing, and NWS severe thunderstorm status were executed at resolutions of 1km, 2km, 4km, and 8km. Analyses demonstrated significantly higher flash frequency near FAA aviation obstacles. With an R2 value of 0.22, taller obstacles are struck more frequently than shorter obstacles. Regressions with road length density revealed little explanatory power (maximum R2=0.19), but demonstrated a positive correlation independent of scale. A multi-level visualization technique demonstrates the road length density correlation loses accuracy within dense urban corridors. Distance from Atlanta shows a negative correlation, but only at larger scales. Subsetting both regressions by direction reveals a significant difference on the Eastern and Western sides of Atlanta. Subsetting both regressions only to Gwinnett County, Georgia illustrates road length density has no correlation with flash frequency, and distance to Atlanta is still a scale dependent process. PM10 emissions analysis suggests that CG amplification is most

  8. Changes in healthcare access and utilization among participants in a public housing relocation program in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Janet R; Allen, Lindsay; Ko, Michelle; Bonney, Loida; Hunter-Jones, Josalin; Cooper, Hannah

    2016-11-01

    Using survey data from participants in a public housing relocation program in Atlanta, Georgia, we examine post-relocation changes in healthcare access (having a usual source of care, having an unmet need) and utilization (receiving a medical exam). Although participants moved to safer, less impoverished neighborhoods, some participants experienced improvements in access and utilization whereas others experienced declines. The supply of healthcare providers in the new neighborhood and having health insurance were associated with improvements in access for this population. Future relocation efforts may seek to assist individuals with choosing a new neighborhood that has accessible healthcare resources for low-income populations.

  9. The Atlanta Urban Heat Island Mitigation and Air Quality Modeling Project: How High-Resoution Remote Sensing Data Can Improve Air Quality Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Crosson, William L.; Khan, Maudood N.

    2006-01-01

    The Atlanta Urban Heat Island and Air Quality Project had its genesis in Project ATLANTA (ATlanta Land use Analysis: Temperature and Air quality) that began in 1996. Project ATLANTA examined how high-spatial resolution thermal remote sensing data could be used to derive better measurements of the Urban Heat Island effect over Atlanta. We have explored how these thermal remote sensing, as well as other imaged datasets, can be used to better characterize the urban landscape for improved air quality modeling over the Atlanta area. For the air quality modeling project, the National Land Cover Dataset and the local scale Landpro99 dataset at 30m spatial resolutions have been used to derive land use/land cover characteristics for input into the MM5 mesoscale meteorological model that is one of the foundations for the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to assess how these data can improve output from CMAQ. Additionally, land use changes to 2030 have been predicted using a Spatial Growth Model (SGM). SGM simulates growth around a region using population, employment and travel demand forecasts. Air quality modeling simulations were conducted using both current and future land cover. Meteorological modeling simulations indicate a 0.5 C increase in daily maximum air temperatures by 2030. Air quality modeling simulations show substantial differences in relative contributions of individual atmospheric pollutant constituents as a result of land cover change. Enhanced boundary layer mixing over the city tends to offset the increase in ozone concentration expected due to higher surface temperatures as a result of urbanization.

  10. Microwave GaAs Integrated Circuits On Quartz Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Peter H.; Mehdi, Imran; Wilson, Barbara

    1994-01-01

    Integrated circuits for use in detecting electromagnetic radiation at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths constructed by bonding GaAs-based integrated circuits onto quartz-substrate-based stripline circuits. Approach offers combined advantages of high-speed semiconductor active devices made only on epitaxially deposited GaAs substrates with low-dielectric-loss, mechanically rugged quartz substrates. Other potential applications include integration of antenna elements with active devices, using carrier substrates other than quartz to meet particular requirements using lifted-off GaAs layer in membrane configuration with quartz substrate supporting edges only, and using lift-off technique to fabricate ultrathin discrete devices diced separately and inserted into predefined larger circuits. In different device concept, quartz substrate utilized as transparent support for GaAs devices excited from back side by optical radiation.

  11. The Rare Bone Disease Working Group: report from the 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research Annual Meeting.

    PubMed

    Drake, Matthew T; Collins, Michael T; Hsiao, Edward C

    2017-01-20

    A working group on rare bone diseases was held in Atlanta, Georgia as part of the 2016 annual meeting of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. The meeting was organized by Matthew Drake. Given recent advances in our understanding of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), the initial portion of the program was devoted to basic, translational, and clinical aspects of FOP. The remainder of the program was divided into updates on an array of rare bone diseases as detailed below. In total, there were more than 120 scientists from academia and industry in attendance.

  12. Fuel-based fine particulate and black carbon emission factors from a railyard area in Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Galvis, Boris; Bergin, Mike; Russell, Armistead

    2013-06-01

    Railyards have the potential to influence localfine particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter < or = 2.5 microm; PM2.5) concentrations through emissions from diesel locomotives and supporting activities. This is of concern in urban regions where railyards are in proximity to residential areas. Northwest of Atlanta, Georgia, Inman and Tilford railyards are located beside residential neighborhoods, industries, and schools. The PM2.5 concentrations near the railyards is the highest measured amongst the state-run monitoring sites (Georgia Environmental Protection Division, 2012; http://www.georgiaair.org/amp/report.php). The authors estimated fuel-based black carbon (BC) and PM2.5 emission factors for these railyards in order to help determine the impact of railyard activities on PM2.5 concentrations, and for assessing the potential benefits of replacing current locomotive engines with cleaner technologies. High-time-resolution measurements of BC, PM2.5, CO2, and wind speed and direction were made at two locations, north and south of the railyards. Emissions factors (i.e., the mass of BC or PM2.5 per gallon of fuel burned) were estimated by using the downwind/upwind difference in concentrations, wavelet analysis, and an event-based approach. By the authors' estimates, diesel-electric engines used in the railyards have average emission factors of 2.8 +/- 0.2 g of BC and 6.0 +/- 0.5 g of PM2.5 per gallon of diesel fuel burned. A broader mix of railyard supporting activities appear to lead to average emission factors of 0.7 +/- 0.03 g of BC and 1.5 +/- 0.1 g of PM2.5 per gallon of diesel fuel burned. Railyard emissions appear to lead to average enhancements of approximately 1.7 +/- 0.1 microg/m3 of PM2.5 and approximately 0.8 +/- 0.01 microg/m3 of BC in neighboring areas on an annual average basis. Uncertainty not quantified in these results could arise mainly from variability in downwind/upwind differences, differences in emissions of the diverse zones within the

  13. Effects of Urbanization on Stream Water Quality in the City of Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, N. E.

    2009-05-01

    A long-term stream water-quality monitoring network was established in the City of Atlanta (COA) during 2003 to assess baseline water-quality conditions and the effects of urbanization on stream water quality. Routine hydrologically-based manual stream sampling, including several concurrent manual point and equal width increment sampling, was conducted approximately 12 times per year at 21 stations, with drainage areas ranging from 3.7 to 232 km2. Eleven of the stations are real-time (RT) water-quality stations having continuous measures of stream stage/discharge, pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, and turbidity, and automatic samplers for stormwater collection. Samples were analyzed for field parameters, and a broad suite of water-quality and sediment-related constituents. This paper summarizes an evaluation of field parameters and concentrations of major ions, minor and trace metals, nutrient species (nitrogen and phosphorus), and coliform bacteria among stations and with respect to watershed characteristics and plausible sources from 2003 through September 2007. The concentrations of most constituents in the COA streams are statistically higher than those of two nearby reference streams. Concentrations are statistically different among stations for several constituents, despite high variability both within and among stations. The combination of routine manual sampling, automatic sampling during stormflows, and real-time water-quality monitoring provided sufficient information about the variability of urban stream water quality to develop hypotheses for causes of water-quality differences among COA streams. Fecal coliform bacteria concentrations of most individual samples at each station exceeded Georgia's water-quality standard for any water-usage class. High chloride concentrations occur at three stations and are hypothesized to be associated with discharges of chlorinated combined sewer overflows, drainage of swimming pool(s), and

  14. Evaluation of stream water quality in Atlanta, Georgia, and the surrounding region (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Kandell, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    A water-quality index (WQI) was developed from historical data (1986-1995) for streams in the Atlanta Region and augmented with 'new' and generally more comprehensive biweekly data on four small urban streams, representing an industrial area, a developed medium-density residential area and developing and developed low-density residential areas. Parameter WQIs were derived from percentile ranks of individual water-quality parameter values for each site by normalizing the constituent ranks for values from all sites in the area for a base period, i.e. 1990-1995. WQIs were developed primarily for nutrient-related parameters due to data availability. Site WQIs, which were computed by averaging the parameter WQIs, range from 0.2 (good quality) to 0.8 (poor quality), and increased downstream of known nutrient sources. Also, annual site WQI decreases from 1986 to 1995 at most long-term monitoring sites. Annual site WQI for individual parameters correlated with annual hydrological characteristics, particularly runoff, precipitation quantity, and water yield, reflecting the effect of dilution on parameter values. The WQIs of the four small urban streams were evaluated for the core-nutrient-related parameters, parameters for specific dissolved trace metal concentrations and sediment characteristics, and a species diversity index for the macro-invertebrate taxa. The site WQI for the core-nutrient-related parameters used in the retrospective analysis was, as expected, the worst for the industrial area and the best for the low-density residential areas. However, macro-invertebrate data indicate that although the species at the medium-density residential site were diverse, the taxa at the site were for species tolerant of degraded water quality. Furthermore, although a species-diversity index indicates no substantial difference between the two low-density residential areas, the number for macro-invertebrates for the developing area was much less than that for the developed area

  15. Prediction of Severe Acute Pancreatitis Using a Decision Tree Model Based on the Revised Atlanta Classification of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yushun; Yang, Chong; Gou, Shanmiao; Li, Yongfeng; Xiong, Jiongxin; Wu, Heshui; Wang, Chunyou

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a model for the early prediction of severe acute pancreatitis based on the revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis. Methods Clinical data of 1308 patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) were included in the retrospective study. A total of 603 patients who were admitted to the hospital within 36 hours of the onset of the disease were included at last according to the inclusion criteria. The clinical data were collected within 12 hours after admission. All the patients were classified as having mild acute pancreatitis (MAP), moderately severe acute pancreatitis (MSAP) and severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) based on the revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis. All the 603 patients were randomly divided into training group (402 cases) and test group (201 cases). Univariate and multiple regression analyses were used to identify the independent risk factors for the development of SAP in the training group. Then the prediction model was constructed using the decision tree method, and this model was applied to the test group to evaluate its validity. Results The decision tree model was developed using creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase, and oxygenation index to predict SAP. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of SAP in the training group were 80.9% and 90.0%, respectively, and the sensitivity and specificity in the test group were 88.6% and 90.4%, respectively. Conclusions The decision tree model based on creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase, and oxygenation index is more likely to predict the occurrence of SAP. PMID:26580397

  16. GaN HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jonathan W.; Lee, Kyoung-Keun; Piner, Edwin L.

    2012-03-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) has enormous potential for applications in high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) used in RF and power devices. Intrinsic device properties such as high electron mobility, high breakdown voltage, very high current density, electron confinement in a narrow channel, and high electron velocity in the 2-dimensional electron gas of the HEMT structure are due in large part to the wide band gap of this novel semiconductor material system. This presentation discusses the properties of GaN that make it superior to other semiconductor materials, and outlines the research that will be undertaken in a new program at Texas State University to advance GaN HEMT technology. This program's aim is to further innovate the exceptional performance of GaN through improved material growth processes and epitaxial structure design.

  17. GaN-based green laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingrong, Jiang; Jianping, Liu; Aiqin, Tian; Yang, Cheng; Zengcheng, Li; Liqun, Zhang; Shuming, Zhang; Deyao, Li; Ikeda, M.; Hui, Yang

    2016-11-01

    Recently, many groups have focused on the development of GaN-based green LDs to meet the demand for laser display. Great progresses have been achieved in the past few years even that many challenges exist. In this article, we analysis the challenges to develop GaN-based green LDs, and then the approaches to improve the green LD structure in the aspect of crystalline quality, electrical properties, and epitaxial layer structure are reviewed, especially the work we have done. Project supported by the National Key Research and Development Progress of China (Nos. 2016YFB0401803, 2016YFB0402002), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61574160, 61334005), the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Science (No. XDA09020401), and the Science and Technology Support Project of Jiangsu Province (No. BE2013007).

  18. From Competence to Efficiency: A Tale of GA Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, David E.

    1996-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) - search procedures based on the mechanics of natural selection and genetics - have grown in popularity for the solution of difficult optimization problems. Concomitant with this growth has been a rising cacaphony of complaint asserting that too much time must be spent by the GA practitioner diddling with codes, operators, and GA parameters; and even then these GA cassandras continue, and the user is still unsure that the effort will meet with success. At the same time, there has been a rising interest in GA theory by a growing community - a theorocracy - of mathematicians and theoretical computer scientists, and these individuals have turned their efforts increasingly toward elegant abstract theorems and proofs that seem to the practitioner to offer little in the way of answers for GA design or practice. What both groups seem to have missed is the largely unheralded 1993 assembly of integrated, applicable theory and its experimental confirmation. This theory has done two key things. First, it has predicted that simple GAs are severely limited in the difficulty of problems they can solve, and these limitations have been confirmed experimentally. Second, it has shown the path to circumventing these limitations in nontraditional GA designs such as the fast messy GA. This talk surveys the history, methodology, and accomplishment of the 1993 applicable theory revolution. After arguing that these accomplishments open the door to universal GA competence, the paper shifts the discussion to the possibility of universal GA efficiency in the utilization of time and real estate through effective parallelization, temporal decomposition, hybridization, and relaxed function evaluation. The presentation concludes by suggesting that these research directions are quickly taking us to a golden age of adaptation.

  19. A Study of the Role of Clouds in the Relationship Between Land Use/Land Cover and the Climate and Air Quality of the Atlanta Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidder, Stanley Q.; Hafner, Jan

    2001-01-01

    The goal of Project ATLANTA is to derive a better scientific understanding of how land cover changes associated with urbanization affect climate and air quality. In this project the role that clouds play in this relationship was studied. Through GOES satellite observations and RAMS modeling of the Atlanta area, we found that in Atlanta (1) clouds are more frequent than in the surrounding rural areas; (2) clouds cool the surface by shading and thus tend to counteract the warming effect of urbanization; (3) clouds reflect sunlight, which might other wise be used to produce ozone; and (4) clouds decrease biogenic emission of ozone precursors, and they probably decrease ozone concentration. We also found that mesoscale modeling of clouds, especially of small, summertime clouds, needs to be improved and that coupled mesoscale and air quality models are needed to completely understand the mediating role that clouds play in the relationship between land use/land cover change and the climate and air quality of Atlanta. It is strongly recommended that more cities be studied to strengthen and extend these results.

  20. A Reply to Diem et al.'s Commentary on a Recent Literature Contribution Focused on Urban-Induced Rainfall in Atlanta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall

    2004-01-01

    A response is provided to Diem and colleagues discussion on the whether urbanization-enhanced precipitation should be maximized in the South-Southeast of Atlanta, Georgia as documented in Shepherd et al. (2003). Diem and colleagues have offered a critical response to Shepherd et al. (2002). The response herein offers both general and specific responses to issues raised by Diem and colleagues.

  1. Atlanta Ranks 4th on EPAs List of Cities with the Most Energy Star Certified Buildings/Energy efficiency leads to a stronger economy and healthier environmen

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced its eighth-annual Top Cities list, which ranks the 25 U.S. metropolitan areas with the most Energy Star certified commercial buildings in the preceding calendar year with Atlan

  2. INTERCOMPARISON OF NEAR REAL-TIME MONITORS OF PM2.5 NITRATE AND SULFATE AT THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ATLANTA SUPERSITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five new instruments for semi-continuous measurements of fine particle (PM2.5) nitrate and sulfate were deployed at the Atlanta Supersite Experiment during an intensive study in August 1999. The instruments measured bulk aerosol chemical composition at rates ranging from every...

  3. AN ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA ON THE SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF RESIDENTS OF "VINE CITY"--A NEGRO SLUM GHETTO WITHIN THE CITY OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HALVORSEN, MARCIA L.

    IN THIS REPORT DATA DESCRIBING THE SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF RESIDENTS OF "VINE CITY," A NEGRO SLUM IN ATLANTA, GEORGIA, ARE STATISTICALLY SUMMARIZED AND ANALYZED. ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SIX PERSONS, MOSTLY WOMEN, REPRESENTING 11 PERCENT OF "VINE CITY'S" FAMILY POPULATION, WERE INTERVIEWED BY STUDENTS AT A NEARBY COLLEGE. THE…

  4. Atlanta's Successful Charles R. Drew Charter School: The Cornerstone of East Lake's Community Transformation. The Abell Report. Volume 27, No.1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberhart, Linda; Barnes, Tara

    2014-01-01

    The community of East Lake, home to Charles R. Drew Charter School (Drew), is 6 miles from downtown Atlanta. In 1995, crime in East Lake was 19 times higher than the national average. Now, violent crime is down 95 percent. In 1995, 88 percent of residents were unemployed. Now, only 5 percent receive welfare. In 1995, just 5 percent of fifth…

  5. Task Force on Women, Minorities and the Handicapped in Science and Technology: Executive Session. Report of the Proceedings (Atlanta, Georgia, March 3, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Task Force on Women, Minorities, and the Handicapped in Science and Technology, Washington, DC.

    The Task Force on Women, Minorities, and the Handicapped in Science and Technology was established by the U.S. Congress in Public Law 99-383 with the purpose of developing a long-range plan for broadening participation in science and engineering. Public hearings were held in Albuquerque (New Mexico), Atlanta (Georgia), Baltimore (Maryland), Boston…

  6. Health Impact Assessment of the Boone Boulevard Green Street Project in the Proctor Creek Watershed of Atlanta - Urban Waters National Training Workshop

    EPA Science Inventory

    Proctor Creek is one of the most impaired creeks in metro-Atlanta due to exceedance of state water quality standards for fecal coliforms. The topography, prevalence of impervious surfaces in the watershed, and a strained combined sewer system have contributed to pervasive floodin...

  7. Contemporary Elementary and Middle School Physical Education Conference Proceedings (Atlanta, Georgia, January 19-21, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Margaret A., Ed.

    Precis are presented of the meetings, workshops, and seminars at the 1984 Conference on Elementary and Middle School Physical Education. Papers were presented on the following subjects: suggestions for adapting physical education for handicapped children; ideas for discipline and classroom management; curriculum design in movement education for…

  8. Comparative investigation of InGaP/GaAs/GaAsBi and InGaP/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yi-Chen; Tsai, Jung-Hui; Chiang, Te-Kuang; Wang, Fu-Min

    2015-10-15

    In this article the characteristics of In{sub 0.49}Ga{sub 0.51}P/GaAs/GaAs{sub 0.975}Bi{sub 0.025} and In{sub 0.49}Ga{sub 0.51}P/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBTs) are demonstrated and compared by two-dimensional simulated analysis. As compared to the traditional InGaP/GaAs HBT, the studied InGaP/GaAs/GaAsBi HBT exhibits a higher collector current, a lower base-emitter (B–E) turn-on voltage, and a relatively lower collector-emitter offset voltage of only 7 mV. Because the more electrons stored in the base is further increased in the InGaP/GaAs/GaAsBi HBT, it introduces the collector current to increase and the B–E turn-on voltage to decrease for low input power applications. However, the current gain is slightly smaller than the traditional InGaP/GaAs HBT attributed to the increase of base current for the minority carriers stored in the GaAsBi base.

  9. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 91 - Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... following list. Atlanta, GA (The William B. Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport) Baltimore, MD... prohibited. The Special VFR weather minimums of § 91.157 do not apply to the following airports: Atlanta, GA... following airports. Atlanta, GA (The William B. Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport) Boston,...

  10. 77 FR 41385 - Notice of Public Meetings for the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... Proposed Modernization and Expansion of Townsend Bombing Range, GA AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD... Corps NEPA directives (Marine Corps Order P5090.2A), the U. S. Marine Corps (USMC)as prepared and filed..., GA 31305. (2) Thursday, August 9, 2012 at City Hall of Ludowici Meeting Room 469 North Macon...

  11. Modeling highly transient flow, mass, and heat transport in the Chattahoochee River near Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.; Keefer, Thomas N.

    1979-01-01

    A coupled flow-temperature model has been developed and verified for a 27.9-km reach of the Chattahoochee River between Buford Dam and Norcross, Ga. Flow in this reach of the Chattahoochee is continuous but highly regulated by Buford Dam, a flood-control and hydroelectric facility located near Buford, Ga. Calibration and verification utilized two sets of data collected under highly unsteady discharge conditions. Existing solution techniques, with certain minor improvements, were applied to verify the existing technology of flow and transport modeling. The linear, implicit finite-difference flow model was calibrated by use of a depth profile obtained at steady low flow and unsteady flow data obtained in March 1976. During the calibration period, the model was generally able to reproduce observed stages to within 0.15 m and discharges at less than 100 m 3 /s, to within 5 percent. Peak discharges of about 200 m 3 /s were under-estimated by about 20 percent. During the verification period, October 1975, the flow model reproduced observed stage changes to within about 0.15 m, and its timing and over-all performance was considered to be very good. Dye was added to the upstream end of the river reach at a constant rate while the river flow was highly unsteady. The numerical solution of either the conservative or nonconservative form of the mass-transport equation did an excellent job of simulating the observed concentrations of dye in the river. The temperature model was capable of predicting temperature changes through this reach of as large as 5.8?C with a RMS (root-mean-square) error of 0.32?C in October 1975 and 0.20?C in March 1976. Hydropulsation has a significant effect on the water temperature below Buford Dam. These effects are very complicated because they are quite dependent on the timing of the release with respect to both the time of day and past releases.

  12. Staff meeting

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Wednesday 16 January 2008 at 3:00 p.m. Main Auditorium (bldg 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year, to review CERN’s activities during 2007 and to present the perspectives for 2008, the year of the LHC start-up. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (Bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (Bldg. 30). Simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Best wishes for the festive season! Robert AYMAR

  13. Urban airshed modeling of air quality impacts of alternative transportation fuel use in Los Angeles and Atlanta

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    The main objective of NREL in supporting this study is to determine the relative air quality impact of the use of compressed natural gas (CNG) as an alternative transportation fuel when compared to low Reid vapor pressure (RVP) gasoline and reformulated gasoline (RFG). A table lists the criteria, air toxic, and greenhouse gas pollutants for which emissions were estimated for the alternative fuel scenarios. Air quality impacts were then estimated by performing photochemical modeling of the alternative fuel scenarios using the Urban Airshed Model Version 6.21 and the Carbon Bond Mechanism Version IV (CBM-IV) (Geary et al., 1988) Using this model, the authors examined the formation and transport of ozone under alternative fuel strategies for motor vehicle transportation sources for the year 2007. Photochemical modeling was performed for modeling domains in Los Angeles, California, and Atlanta, Georgia.

  14. Toward a Better Understanding of Non-Addicted, Methamphetamine-Using, Men who Have Sex with Men (MSM) in Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Dew, Brian J

    2010-05-14

    Methamphetamine use has increasingly become linked with sexual risk behaviors among men have sex with men (MSM). Yet, the majority of research has been done with methamphetamine dependent MSM or with samples in which addiction to the substance was not evaluated. Furthermore, research with methamphetamine-using MSM in the Southern U.S. is lacking. In this study, focus groups and in-depth interviews were conducted in order to understand the motives, context, and other facilitators and barriers of methamphetamine use among non-addicted MSM residing in Atlanta. Participants included 30 non-addicted, methamphetamine-using MSM and 16 local mental and public health officials. Findings from the first of this two-phase formative research project will result in the initial development of a community-tested, culturally-specific social marketing campaign and an individual-based intervention based in HIV-testing facilities.

  15. Meeting information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 1986 Ocean Sciences Meeting of the American Geophysical Union and the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) will be held January 13-17, 1986, in New Orleans, La., at the Fairmont Hotel. Co-sponsoring societies are the Acoustical Society of America (ASA), the American Meteorological Society (AMS), the Marine Technology Society (MTS), and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Oceanic Engineering Society (OES).

  16. Electrical detection of biomaterials using AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, B. S.; Wang, H. T.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.

    2008-08-01

    Chemical sensors can be used to analyze a wide variety of environmental and biological gases and liquids and may need to be able to selectively detect a target analyte. Different methods, including gas chromatography, chemiluminescence, selected ion flow tube, and mass spectroscopy, have been used to measure biomarkers. These methods show variable results in terms of sensitivity for some applications and may not meet the requirements for a handheld biosensor. A promising sensing technology utilizes AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). HEMT structures have been developed for use in microwave power amplifiers due to their high two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) mobility and saturation velocity. The conducting 2DEG channel of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs is very close to the surface and extremely sensitive to adsorption of analytes. HEMT sensors can be used for detecting gases, ions, pH values, proteins, and DNA. In this paper we review recent progress on functionalizing the surface of HEMTs for specific detection of glucose, kidney marker injury molecules, prostate cancer, and other common substances of interest in the biomedical field.

  17. Carrier spin relaxation in GaInNAsSb/GaNAsSb/GaAs quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Asami, T.; Nosho, H.; Tackeuchi, A.; Li, L. H.; Harmand, J. C.; Lu, S. L.

    2011-12-23

    We have investigated the carrier spin relaxation in GaInNAsSb/GaNAsSb/GaAs quantum well (QW) by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurement. The sample consists of an 8-nm-thick GaIn{sub 0.36}N{sub 0.006}AsSb{sub 0.015} well, 5-nm-thick GaN{sub 0.01}AsSb{sub 0.11} intermediate barriers and 100-nm-thick GaAs barriers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a GaAs(100) substrate. The spin relaxation time and recombination lifetime at 10 K are measured to be 228 ps and 151 ps, respectively. As a reference, we have also obtained a spin relaxation time of 125 ps and a recombination lifetime of 63 ps for GaInNAs/GaNAs/GaAs QW. This result shows that crystal quality is slightly improved by adding Sb, although these short carrier lifetimes mainly originate from a nonradiative recombination. These spin relaxation times are longer than the 36 ps spin relaxation time of InGaAs/InP QWs and shorter than the 2 ns spin relaxation time of GaInNAs/GaAs QW.

  18. Changes in Density of On-Premises Alcohol Outlets and Impact on Violent Crime, Atlanta, Georgia, 1997–2007

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Bonnie; Clarkson, Lydia; Holt, James; Bagchi, Suparna; Kanny, Dafna; Brewer, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Regulating alcohol outlet density is an evidence-based strategy for reducing excessive drinking. However, the effect of this strategy on violent crime has not been well characterized. A reduction in alcohol outlet density in the Buckhead neighborhood of Atlanta from 2003 through 2007 provided an opportunity to evaluate this effect. Methods We conducted a community-based longitudinal study to evaluate the impact of changes in alcohol outlet density on violent crime in Buckhead compared with 2 other cluster areas in Atlanta (Midtown and Downtown) with high densities of alcohol outlets, from 1997 through 2002 (preintervention) to 2003 through 2007 (postintervention). The relationship between exposures to on-premises retail alcohol outlets and violent crime were assessed by using annual spatially defined indices at the census block level. Multilevel regression models were used to evaluate the relationship between changes in exposure to on-premises alcohol outlets and violent crime while controlling for potential census block-level confounders. Results A 3% relative reduction in alcohol outlet density in Buckhead from 1997–2002 to 2003–2007 was associated with a 2-fold greater reduction in exposure to violent crime than occurred in Midtown or Downtown, where exposure to on-premises retail alcohol outlets increased. The magnitude of the association between exposure to alcohol outlets and violent crime was 2 to 5 times greater in Buckhead than in either Midtown or Downtown during the postintervention period. Conclusions A modest reduction in alcohol outlet density can substantially reduce exposure to violent crime in neighborhoods with high density of alcohol outlets. Routine monitoring of community exposure to alcohol outlets could also inform the regulation of alcohol outlet density, consistent with Guide to Community Preventive Services recommendations. PMID:26020548

  19. Investigation Into the Use of Satellite Data in Aiding Characterization of Particulate Air Quality in the Atlanta, Georgia Metropolitan Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Erica J.; Sokolik, Irina, N.; Doddridge, Bruce G.

    2011-01-01

    Poor air quality episodes occur often in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia. The primary focus of this research is to assess the capability of satellites as a tool in characterizing air quality in Atlanta. Results indicate that intra-city PM2.5 concentrations show similar patterns as other U.S. urban areas, with the highest concentrations occurring within the city. Both PM2.5 and MODIS AOD show more increases in the summer than spring, yet MODIS AOD doubles in the summer unlike PM2.5. A majority of OMI AI is below 0.5. Using this value as an ambient measure of carbonaceous aerosols in the urban area, aerosol transport events can be identified. Our results indicate that MODIS AOD is well correlated with PM2.5 on a yearly and seasonal basis with correlation coefficients as high as 0.8 for Terra and 0.7 for Aqua. A possible alternative view of the PM2.5 and AOD relationship is seen through the use of AOD thresholds. These probabilistic thresholds provide a means to describe the AQI through the use of past AOD for a specific area. We use the NAAQS to classify the AOD into different AQI codes, and probabilistically determine thresholds of AOD that represent the majority of a specific AQI category. For example, the majority 80% of moderate AQI days have AOD values between 0.5 - 0.6. The development of thresholds could be a tool used to evaluate air quality from the use of satellites in regions where there are sparse ground-based measurements of PM2.5.

  20. PM emissions measurements of in-service commercial aircraft engines during the Delta-Atlanta Hartsfield Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Prem; Hagen, Donald E.; Whitefield, Philip D.; Raper, David

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the results of the physical characterization of aircraft engine PM emission measurements conducted during the Delta-Atlanta Hartsfield Study at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Engine exit plane PM emissions were sampled from on-wing engines on several in-service commercial transport aircraft from the fleet of Delta Airlines. The size distributions were lognormal in nature with a single mode. The geometric mean diameter was found to increase with increasing engine thrust, ranging from 15 nm at idle to 40 nm at takeoff. PM number- and mass-based emission indices were observed to be higher at the idle conditions (4% and 7%), lowest at 15%-30% thrust, and then increase with increasing thrust. Emissions measurements were also conducted during an advected plume study where over 300 exhaust plumes generated by a broad mix of commercial transports were sampled 100-350 m downwind from aircraft operational runways during normal airport operations. The range of values measured at take-off for the different engine types in terms of PM number-based emission index was between 7 × 1015-9 × 1017 particles/kg fuel burned, and that for PM mass-based emission index was 0.1-0.6 g/kg fuel burned. PM characteristics of aircraft engine specific exhaust were found to evolve over time as the exhaust plume expands, dilutes with ambient air, and cools. The data from these measurements will enhance the emissions inventory development for a subset of engines operating in the commercial fleet and improve/validate current environmental impact predictive tools with real world aircraft engine specific PM emissions inputs.

  1. The Risk of West Nile Virus Infection Is Associated with Combined Sewer Overflow Streams in Urban Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M.; Vanden Eng, Jodi L.; Kelly, Rosmarie; Mead, Daniel G.; Kolhe, Priti; Howgate, James; Kitron, Uriel; Burkot, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    Background At present, the factors favoring transmission and amplification of West Nile Virus (WNV) within urban environments are poorly understood. In urban Atlanta, Georgia, the highly polluted waters of streams affected by combined sewer overflow (CSO) represent significant habitats for the WNV mosquito vector Culex quinquefasciatus. However, their contribution to the risk of WNV infection in humans and birds remains unclear. Objectives Our goals were to describe and quantify the spatial distribution of WNV infection in mosquitoes, humans, and corvids, such as blue jays and American crows that are particularly susceptible to WNV infection, and to assess the relationship between WNV infection and proximity to CSO-affected streams in the city of Atlanta, Georgia. Materials and methods We applied spatial statistics to human, corvid, and mosquito WNV surveillance data from 2001 through 2007. Multimodel analysis was used to estimate associations of WNV infection in Cx. quinquefasciatus, humans, and dead corvids with selected risk factors including distance to CSO streams and catch basins, land cover, median household income, and housing characteristics. Results We found that WNV infection in mosquitoes, corvids, and humans was spatially clustered and statistically associated with CSO-affected streams. WNV infection in Cx. quinquefasciatus was significantly higher in CSO compared with non-CSO streams, and WNV infection rates among humans and corvids were significantly associated with proximity to CSO-affected streams, the extent of tree cover, and median household income. Conclusions Our study strongly suggests that CSO-affected streams are significant sources of Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes that may facilitate WNV transmission to humans within urban environments. Our findings may have direct implications for the surveillance and control of WNV in other urban centers that continue to use CSO systems as a waste management practice. PMID:20529765

  2. Gas-solid flows - 1986; Proceedings of the Fourth Fluid Mechanics, Plasma Dynamics, and Lasers Conference, Atlanta, GA, May 11-14, 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurewicz, J. T.

    Papers are presented on deposition and resuspension of gas-borne particles in recirculating turbulent flows, particle dispersion in decaying isotropic homogeneous turbulence, turbulent dispersion of droplets for air flow in a pipe, a comparison between Lagrangian and Eulerian model approaches to turbulent particle dispersion, and the effect of turbulent electrohydrodynamics on electrostatic precipitator efficiency. Also considered are errors due to turbidity in particle sizing using laser Doppler velocimetry, particle motion in a fluidically oscillating jet, high pressure steam/water jet measurements using a portable particle sizing laser Doppler system, the effect of particle shape on pressure drop in a turbulent gas/solid suspension, and the experimental study of gas solid flows in pneumatic conveying. Other topics include entropy production and pressure loss in gas-solid flows, a computational study of turbulent gas-particle flow in a Venturi, a numerical analysis of confined recirculating gas-solid turbulent flows, nozzle and free jet flows of gas particle mixtures, and particle separation in pulsed airflow. Papers are also presented on sampling of solid particles in clouds, particle motion near the inlet of a sampling probe, the effects of slot injection on blade erosion in direct coal-fueled gas turbines, bed diameter effects and incipient slugging in gas fluidized beds, and sedimentation of air fluidized fine graphite particles by methanol vapor.

  3. [Pupil Performance in the Elementary Schools of Atlanta, Ga.] Research and Development Report, Volume VI, Numbers 24 and 34. April and May 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlanta Public Schools, GA.

    Part one of this two-part report focuses on the supplementary programs, partially funded under Titles I and IV of the 1965 Elementary Secondary Education Act, at Mary McLeod Bethune Elementary School. The faculty at Bethune chose to focus on the primary clusters--kindergarten, first, second, and third grades--for evaluation. Special emphasis was…

  4. ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN OUTDOOR PARTICULATE (PM2.5) CONCENTRATIONS AND GASEOUS CO-POLLUTANT EXPOSURE LEVELS FOR COPD AND MI COHORTS IN ATLANTA, GA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies indicate that daily ambient particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations are associated with increased mortality, hospital admissions, and respiratory and cardiovascular effects. It is possible that the observed significant associations are the result of c...

  5. Meeting Abstracts - Annual Meeting 2016.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    The AMCP Abstracts program provides a forum through which authors can share their insights and outcomes of advanced managed care practice through publication in AMCP's Journal of Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy (JMCP). Most of the reviewed and unreviewed abstracts are presented as posters so that interested AMCP meeting attendees can review findings and query authors. The Student/Resident/ Fellow poster presentation (unreviewed) is Wednesday, April 20, 2016, and the Professional poster presentation (reviewed) is Thursday, April 21. The Professional posters will also be displayed on Friday, April 22. The reviewed abstracts are published in the JMCP Meeting Abstracts supplement. The AMCP Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy Annual Meeting 2016 in San Francisco, California, is expected to attract more than 3,500 managed care pharmacists and other health care professionals who manage and evaluate drug therapies, develop and manage networks, and work with medical managers and information specialists to improve the care of all individuals enrolled in managed care programs. Abstracts were submitted in the following categories: Research Report: describe completed original research on managed care pharmacy services or health care interventions. Examples include (but are not limited to) observational studies using administrative claims, reports of the impact of unique benefit design strategies, and analyses of the effects of innovative administrative or clinical programs. Economic Model: describe models that predict the effect of various benefit design or clinical decisions on a population. For example, an economic model could be used to predict the budget impact of a new pharmaceutical product on a health care system. Solving Problems in Managed Care: describe the specific steps taken to introduce a needed change, develop and implement a new system or program, plan and organize an administrative function, or solve other types of problems in managed care settings. These

  6. Meeting Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, Christiaan; Aspaas, Per Pippin

    2013-06-01

    On 2-3 June 2012, the University of Tromsoe hosted a conference about the cultural and scientific history of the transits of Venus. The conference took place in Tromsoe for two very specific reasons. First and foremost, the last transit of Venus of this century lent itself to be observed on the disc of the Midnight Sun in this part of Europe during the night of 5 to 6 June 2012. Second, several Venus transit expeditions in this region were central in the global enterprise of measuring the scale of the solar system in the eighteenth century. The site of the conference was the Nordnorsk Vitensenter (Science Centre of Northern Norway), which is located at the campus of the University of Tromsoe. After the conference, participants were invited to either stay in Tromsoe until the midnight of 5-6 June, or take part in a Venus transit voyage in Finnmark, during which the historical sites Vardoe, Hammerfest, and the North Cape were to be visited. The post-conference program culminated with the participants observing the transit of Venus in or near Tromsoe, Vardoe and even from a plane near Alta. These Proceedings contain a selection of the lectures delivered on 2-3 June 2012, and also a narrative description of the transit viewing from Tromsoe, Vardoe and Alta. The title of the book, Meeting Venus, refers the title of a play by the Hungarian film director, screenwriter and opera director Istvan Szabo (1938-). The autobiographical movie Meeting Venus (1991) directed by him is based on his experience directing Tannhauser at the Paris Opera in 1984. The movie brings the story of an imaginary international opera company that encounters a never ending series of difficulties and pitfalls that symbolise the challenges of any multicultural and international endeavour. As is evident from the many papers presented in this book, Meeting Venus not only contains the epic tales of the transits of the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, it also covers the conference

  7. Reverse bias leakage current mechanism of AlGaN/InGaN/GaN heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Apurba; Ghosh, Saptarsi; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Jana, Sanjay K.; Dinara, Syed Mukulika; Bag, Ankush; Mahata, Mihir K.; Kumar, Rahul; Das, Subhashis; Das, Palash; Biswas, Dhrubes

    2016-03-01

    The reverse bias leakage current mechanism of AlGaN/InGaN/GaN heterostructure is investigated by current-voltage measurement in temperature range from 298 K to 423 K. The Higher electric field across the AlGaN barrier layer of AlGaN/InGaN/GaN double heterostructure due to higher polarization charge is found to be responsible for strong Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunnelling in the electric field higher than 3.66 MV/cm. For electric field less than 3.56 MV/cm, the reverse bias leakage current is also found to follow the trap assisted Frenkel-Poole (FP) emission in low negative bias region. Analysis of reverse FP emission yielded the barrier height of trap energy level of 0.34 eV with respect to Fermi level. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Moth eye antireflection coated GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAs solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aho, Arto; Tommila, Juha; Tukiainen, Antti; Polojärvi, Ville; Niemi, Tapio; Guina, Mircea

    2014-09-01

    The performance of a GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAs solar cell incorporating AlInP moth eye antireflection coating is reported and compared with the performance of a similar cell comprising TiO2/SiO2 antireflection coating. The moth eye coating exhibits an average reflectance of only 2% within the spectral range from 400 nm to 1600 nm. EQE measurements revealed absorption-related losses in the AlInP moth eye coating at wavelengths below 510 nm. Short wavelength absorption decreases the current generation in the top GaInP junction by 10%. Despite the absorption losses, the moth eye patterned GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAs solar cell exhibited higher current generation under AM1.5G real sun illumination.

  9. Investigation of the GaN-on-GaAs interface for vertical power device applications

    SciTech Connect

    Möreke, Janina Uren, Michael J.; Kuball, Martin; Novikov, Sergei V.; Foxon, C. Thomas; Hosseini Vajargah, Shahrzad; Wallis, David J.; Humphreys, Colin J.; Haigh, Sarah J.; Al-Khalidi, Abdullah; Wasige, Edward; Thayne, Iain

    2014-07-07

    GaN layers were grown onto (111) GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy. Minimal band offset between the conduction bands for GaN and GaAs materials has been suggested in the literature raising the possibility of using GaN-on-GaAs for vertical power device applications. I-V and C-V measurements of the GaN/GaAs heterostructures however yielded a rectifying junction, even when both sides of the junction were heavily doped with an n-type dopant. Transmission electron microscopy analysis further confirmed the challenge in creating a GaN/GaAs Ohmic interface by showing a large density of dislocations in the GaN layer and suggesting roughening of the GaN/GaAs interface due to etching of the GaAs by the nitrogen plasma, diffusion of nitrogen or melting of Ga into the GaAs substrate.

  10. A case study in collaborating with Atlanta-based African-American churches: a promising means for reaching inner-city substance users with rapid HIV testing.

    PubMed

    Whiters, David L; Santibanez, Scott; Dennison, David; Clark, H Westley

    2010-01-01

    This case study examined programmatic data from a federally funded faith-based rapid HIV testing initiative. In 2004, Recovery Consultants of Atlanta, Inc. (RCA, Inc.) began providing rapid HIV testing in collaboration with six Atlanta-based African-American churches. Of the 1,947 persons tested from January 2004 to July 2005, 1,872 (96.1%) were African-American, 1,247 (64%) were male, and 1,612 (82.8%) were between the age of 26 and 56. A total of 85 HIV-infected individuals were identified and 72 were identified as previously undiagnosed cases (positivity rate of 3.7%). This case study highlights and promotes rapid HIV testing offered in partnership with African American churches as a strategy for raising HIV awareness among inner-city substance users.

  11. On the dissolution properties of GaAs in Ga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, M. C.; Moynahan, A. H.

    1977-01-01

    The dissolution of GaAs in Ga was studied to determine the nature and cause of faceting effects. Ga was allowed to dissolve single crystalline faces under isothermal conditions. Of the crystalline planes with low number indices, only the (100) surface showed a direct correlation of dissolution sites to dislocations. The type of dissolution experienced depended on temperature, and there were three distinct types of behavior.

  12. Terahertz Generation in GaN/AlGaN Superlattices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-28

    Morkoc, hmorkoc@vcu.edu Organization: Title: Program manager: Virginia Commonwealth University Terahertz generation in GaN /AlGaN superlattices...Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 08/01/07-11/30/08 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE THZ-OSCILLATIONS IN GAN /ALUMINUM GAN SUPERLATTICES 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...that we learned in structures grown on GaN substrates which we believe will give way to tunneling dominated current at resonant states. Once we

  13. Trends in on-road vehicle emissions and ambient air quality in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, from the late 1990s through 2009

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraghavan, Krish; DenBleyker, Allison; Ma, Lan; Lindhjem, Chris; Yarwood, Greg

    2014-01-01

    On-road vehicle emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during 1995–2009 in the Atlanta Metropolitan Statistical Area were estimated using the Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) model and data from the National Emissions Inventories and the State of Georgia. Statistically significant downward trends (computed using the nonparametric Theil-Sen method) in annual on-road CO, NOx, and VOC emissions of 6.1%, 3.3%, and 6.0% per year, respectively, are noted during the 1995–2009 period despite an increase in total vehicle distance traveled. The CO and NOx emission trends are correlated with statistically significant downward trends in ambient air concentrations of CO and NOx in Atlanta ranging from 8.0% to 11.8% per year and from 5.8% to 8.7% per year, respectively, during similar time periods. Weather-adjusted summertime ozone concentrations in Atlanta exhibited a statistically significant declining trend of 2.3% per year during 2001– 2009. Although this trend coexists with the declining trends in on-road NOx, VOC, and CO emissions, identifying the cause of the downward trend in ozone is complicated by reductions in multiple precursors from different source sectors. Implications: Large reductions in on-road vehicle emissions of CO and NOx in Atlanta from the late 1990s to 2009, despite an increase in total vehicle distance traveled, contributed to a significant improvement in air quality through decreases in ambient air concentrations of CO and NOx during this time period. Emissions reductions in motor vehicles and other source sectors resulted in these improvements and the observed declining trend in ozone concentrations over the past decade. Although these historical trends cannot be extrapolated to the future because pollutant concentration contributions due to on-road vehicle emissions will likely become an increasingly smaller fraction of the atmospheric total, they provide an indication of the

  14. Proceedings of the Symposium on Electromagnetic Windows (17th) Held at Georgia Institute of Technology, Engineering Experiment Station, Atlanta, Georgia on 25-27 July 1984. Part 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    00 George H. Adams Department of Continuing Education September 1984 0-I U. S. Army Research Office P. 0. No. 84-M-0346 GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY...ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30332 r ) (ELEctEK D JN22 1985 APPROvED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE 91STRIBUTION UNLIMITED 7 .7 .7 7rr - COMPONENT PART NOTICE THIS PAPER IS...A COMPONENT PART OF THE FOLLOWING COMPILATION REPORT: (TITLE): Proceedingzs of the Symposium on Electromagnetic Windows (17th) Held at Georgia

  15. GaN High Power Devices

    SciTech Connect

    PEARTON,S.J.; REN,F.; ZHANG,A.P.; DANG,G.; CAO,X.A.; LEE,K.P.; CHO,H.; GILA,B.P.; JOHNSON,J.W.; MONIER,C.; ABERNATHY,C.R.; HAN,JUNG; BACA,ALBERT G.; CHYI,J.-I.; LEE,C.-M.; NEE,T.-E.; CHUO,C.-C.; CHI,G.C.; CHU,S.N.G.

    2000-07-17

    A brief review is given of recent progress in fabrication of high voltage GaN and AlGaN rectifiers, GaN/AlGaN heterojunction bipolar transistors, GaN heterostructure and metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors. Improvements in epitaxial layer quality and in fabrication techniques have led to significant advances in device performance.

  16. Spatial and temporal variability in nutrient concentrations in surface waters of the Chattahoochee River basin near Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Buell, G.R.; Frick, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    Nutrient concentrations from the early 1970s through 1995 were evaluated at several sites along the Chattahoochee River and its tributaries near Atlanta, to determine general patterns and processes controlling nutrient concentrations in the river. A spatial analysis was conducted on data collected in 1994 and 1995 from an intensive nutrient study of the Chattahoochee River and its tributaries by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Environmental Protection Division. The 1994-1995 data show step increases in ammonium (NH4-N), nitrite plus nitrate (NO2 + NO3-N), and total-phosphorus (Tot-P) concentrations in the river. The step increases occur downstream of two wastewater treatment facilities (WWTFs) and Peachtree Creek, a small tributary inflow with degraded water quality draining a predominantly urban and industrial area. Median NO2 + NO3-N and Tot-P concentrations in the mainstem increase downstream of these inputs from 0.5 to 1 mg 1-1 and from 0.04 to 0.13 mg 1-1, respectively. NH4-N concentrations were typically low with 95% of the 2575 observations less than 0.2 mg 1-1 throughout the river system, except some high values (>1 mg 1-1) in some tributaries, particularly near the central part of Atlanta. High NH4-N concentrations are attributed to sewage discharge as they also are associated with high biological oxygen demand and faecal coliform bacteria concentrations. Nutrient concentrations vary temporally. An assessment of four sites, two mainstem and two tributaries, from 1970 to 1995 indicates a progressive increase and variability in NO2 + NO3-N concentrations during the period. The progressive increase in NO2 + NO3-N concentrations and their variability is similar to that reported for surface waters throughout the world and for which increased fertilizer usage has been attributed. Tot-P concentrations increase at mainstem sites through the middle to late 1980s and decrease markedly thereafter, due to improvements to WWTFs and a 1990 phosphate

  17. (67)Ga and (68)Ga purification studies: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Costa, R F; Barboza, M F; Osso, J A

    2013-01-01

    The positron emission tomography technique is very useful for diagnosis of several diseases. (68)Ga is a positron emitter with half-life of 67.7 min. As it is available from (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator systems, it is not necessary to have a nearby cyclotron. However, the eluate from commercial generators contains high levels of metallic impurities, which compete with (68)Ga in biomolecular labeling. Thus, a subsequent purification step is needed after generator elution. Here we present the results of two different methods developed for handmade purification of (68)Ga and (67)Ga for subsequent radiolabeling of biomolecules. Two purification methods were employed. The first one uses a cation exchange resin, and (68)Ga is eluted with a solution of acetone/acid. The second method of purification is performed by column chromatography solvent extraction, with (68)Ga recovery in deionized water. The best result was achieved with cationic resin AG50W-X8 (>400 mesh). However, the resin is not commercially available. The extraction chromatography column based on absorption of diisopropyl ether in XAD-16 is the most promising purification method. Although the levels of (68)Ga recovery and purification were smaller with the cationic resin method, its advantage is the (68)Ga recovery in deionized water.

  18. Effect of the restricted use of phosphate detergent and upgraded wastewater-treatment facilities of water quality in the Chattahoochee River near Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wangsness, D.J.; Frick, E.A.; Buell, G.R.; DeVivo, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Data compiled for the six largest waste-water treatment facilities in Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, indicate about an 83-percent reduction in the phosphorus load discharged to the Chattahoochee River from 1988 to 1993 because of restricted use of phosphate detergents and upgraded treatment of municipal wastewater. This reduction resulted in about a 54-percent decrease in the phosphorus load in the Chattahoochee River downstream of Atlanta during this time period. Phosphorus loads in animal manure and fertilizers applied to the land (nonpoint sources) are greater than loads discharged to the Chattahoochee River from wastewater-treatment facilities (point sources). However, only a fraction of the phosphorus applied to the land enters the surface waters and is bioavailable. Even though nonpoint sources of land applied phosphorus potentially are important sources to surface waters, point-source inputs from wastewater effluent are far greater. Phosphorus concentrations in wastewater effluent from three cities of Atlanta waste-water treatment facilities need to be reduced by about an additional 31 percent by 1996 to comply with Georgia Department of Natural Resources Environmental Protection Division regulations.

  19. Controllable growth of Ga wires from Cr2GaC-Ga and its mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Liu, Y.; Ding, J.; Zhang, Y. M.; Yan, J. L.; An, B.; Iijima, T.; Sun, Z. M.

    2015-10-01

    The controllable growth behavior of Ga wires from Cr2GaC-Ga composite is presented and interpreted. The wire growth behavior was found to be modulated by forming pressure which tunes the connectivity between free Ga and Cr2GaC grains, the growth direction and the barrier force. Among the samples formed under 0 MPa to 900 MPa, the one (sample S4) formed under 500 MPa grew densest Ga wires, because the pressure of 500 MPa produced optimum connectivity between free Ga and Cr2GaC grains, aligned 53% of Cr2GaC basal planes near the surface of the sample parallel to its surface, and at the same time the barrier force was not too big to suppress wires to sprout. A Ga wire growth mechanism based on a catalysis model proposed in our prior work is employed and further developed herein to interpret the experimental observations of wires' size, morphologies and growth behavior.

  20. Hot Meetings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Mary

    2002-01-01

    A colleague walked by my office one time as I was conducting a meeting. There were about five or six members of my team present. The colleague, a man who had been with our institution (The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, a.k.a. APL) for many years, could not help eavesdropping. He said later it sounded like we we re having a raucous argument, and he wondered whether he should stand by the door in case things got out of hand and someone threw a punch. Our Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) team was a hot group, to invoke the language that is fashionable today, although we never thought of ourselves in those terms. It was just our modus operandi. The tenor of the discussion got loud and volatile at times, but I prefer to think of it as animated, robust, or just plain collaborative. Mary Chiu and her "hot" team from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory built the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft for NASA. Instruments on the spacecraft continue to collect data that inform us about what's happening on our most important star, the Sun.

  1. Refined assessment of associations between drinking water residence time and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness in Metro Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Levy, Karen; Klein, Mitchel; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt; Panwhar, Samina; Huttinger, Alexandra; Tolbert, Paige; Moe, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Recent outbreak investigations suggest that a substantial proportion of waterborne disease outbreaks are attributable to water distribution system issues. In this analysis, we examine the relationship between modeled water residence time (WRT), a proxy for probability of microorganism intrusion into the distribution system, and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal (GI) illness for two water utilities in Metro Atlanta, USA during 1993-2004. We also examine the association between proximity to the nearest distribution system node, based on patients' residential address, and GI illness using logistic regression models. Comparing long (≥90th percentile) with intermediate WRTs (11th to 89th percentile), we observed a modestly increased risk for GI illness for Utility 1 (OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 1.02-1.13), which had substantially higher average WRT than Utility 2, for which we found no increased risk (OR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.94-1.02). Examining finer, 12-hour increments of WRT, we found that exposures >48 h were associated with increased risk of GI illness, and exposures of >96 h had the strongest associations, although none of these associations was statistically significant. Our results suggest that utilities might consider reducing WRTs to <2-3 days or adding booster disinfection in areas with longer WRT, to minimize risk of GI illness from water consumption.

  2. Economic evaluation of the Annual Cycle Energy System. Volume I. Executive summary. Final report. [In Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the energy effectiveness and the economic viability of the ACES concept. Three different classes of building are investigated, namely: single-family residence; multi-family residence; and commercial office building. The application of ACES to each of these building types is studied in three different climatic regions: Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia. Computer programs - ACESIM for the residences and CACESS for the office building - were used, each comprised of four modules: loads; design; simulation; and economic. For each building type in each geographic location, the economic evaluation of the ACES is based on a comparison of the present worth of the ACES to the present worth of a number of conventional systems. The results of this analysis indicate that the economic viability of the ACES is very sensitive to the assumed value of the property tax, maintenace cost, and fuel-escalation rates, while it is relatively insensitive to the assumed values of other parameters. Fortunately, any conceivable change in the fuel-escalation rates would tend to increase the viability of the ACES concept. An increase in the assumed value of the maintenance cost or property tax would tend to make the ACES concept less viable; a decrease in either would tend to make the ACES concept more viable. The detailed results of this analysis are given in Section 5.4 of Volume II. 2 figures, 21 tables.

  3. Commercial aircraft engine emissions characterization of in-use aircraft at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Scott C; Jayne, John T; Lobo, Prem; Onasch, Timothy B; Fleming, Gregg; Hagen, Donald E; Whitefield, Philip D; Miake-Lye, Richard C

    2008-03-15

    The emissions from in-use commercial aircraft engines have been analyzed for selected gas-phase species and particulate characteristics using continuous extractive sampling 1-2 min downwind from operational taxi- and runways at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Using the aircraft tail numbers, 376 plumes were associated with specific engine models. In general, for takeoff plumes, the measured NOx emission index is lower (approximately 18%) than that predicted by engine certification data corrected for ambient conditions. These results are an in-service observation of the practice of "reduced thrust takeoff". The CO emission index observed in ground idle plumes was greater (up to 100%) than predicted by engine certification data for the 7% thrust condition. Significant differences are observed in the emissions of black carbon and particle number among different engine models/technologies. The presence of a mode at approximately 65 nm (mobility diameter) associated with takeoff plumes and a smaller mode at approximately 25 nm associated with idle plumes has been observed. An anticorrelation between particle mass loading and particle number concentration is observed.

  4. Organic compounds assessed in Chattahoochee River water used for public supply near Atlanta, Georgia, 2004-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, W. Brian; Younker, Cristal L.

    2011-01-01

    An investigation by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program characterized the occurrence of 266 organic compounds in source water and finished water from the Chattahoochee River, which is the main water-supply source for the Atlanta metropolitan area. Source water is stream water collected at a surface-water intake prior to water treatment, and finished water is water that has passed through treatment processes prior to distribution. Samples were collected approximately monthly during 2004-05 and included 15 paired source-water and finished-water samples. Samples were collected during winter-spring high flow and summer-fall low flow, but storm events were not targeted during this Source Water-Quality Assessment (SWQA) study. Samples were analyzed for pesticides and degradates, gasoline hydrocarbons, solvents, disinfection by-products, personal care and domestic-use products, and other organic compounds. Community water systems are required to monitor regulated organic compounds under the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1996 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1998); however, most compounds included in this study are not regulated by Federal drinking-water standards (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2007a). The Chattahoochee River study is part of an ongoing NAWQA investigation of community water systems across the United States. Additional details about the national study are given in Carter and others (2007).

  5. Drinking water residence time in distribution networks and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness in Metro Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Tinker, Sarah C; Moe, Christine L; Klein, Mitchel; Flanders, W Dana; Uber, Jim; Amirtharajah, Appiah; Singer, Philip; Tolbert, Paige E

    2009-06-01

    We examined whether the average water residence time, the time it takes water to travel from the treatment plant to the user, for a zip code was related to the proportion of emergency department (ED) visits for gastrointestinal (GI) illness among residents of that zip code. Individual-level ED data were collected from all hospitals located in the five-county metro Atlanta area from 1993 to 2004. Two of the largest water utilities in the area, together serving 1.7 million people, were considered. People served by these utilities had almost 3 million total ED visits, 164,937 of them for GI illness. The relationship between water residence time and risk for GI illness was assessed using logistic regression, controlling for potential confounding factors, including patient age and markers of socioeconomic status (SES). We observed a modestly increased risk for GI illness for residents of zip codes with the longest water residence times compared with intermediate residence times (odds ratio (OR) for Utility 1 = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.03, 1.10; OR for Utility 2 = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.02, 1.08). The results suggest that drinking water contamination in the distribution system may contribute to the burden of endemic GI illness.

  6. A cross-cultural comparison of psychological distress among individuals living with HIV in Atlanta, Georgia, and Eldoret, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Shacham, Enbal; Reece, Michael; Ong'or, Willis Owino; Omollo, Otieno; Basta, Tania B

    2010-01-01

    Elevated psychological distress during HIV infection has been consistently correlated with negative HIV-related health outcomes in studies conducted in various regions of the world. This study was conducted to compare the nature and range of psychological distress among HIV-infected individuals who had sought mental health care as part of their HIV care in Kenya and the United States. The Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) was completed by 234 individuals with HIV in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, and 284 in Eldoret, Kenya. The US-based sample expressed markedly higher levels of psychological distress symptoms on the anxiety, depression, interpersonal sensitivity, obsessive-compulsive, and psychoticism dimensions, as well as the overall global severity index. Substantial proportions of both the US and Kenya cohorts expressed higher levels of somatization and paranoid ideation that suggested further psychological evaluation. This study revealed psychological distress expression varied drastically among individuals who self-enrolled into HIV-related mental health care within two different care infrastructures.

  7. Microbes in pool filter backwash as evidence of the need for improved swimmer hygiene - metro-Atlanta, Georgia, 2012.

    PubMed

    2013-05-17

    Filters physically remove contaminants, including microbes, from water in treated recreational water venues, such as pools. Because contaminants accumulate in filters, filter concentrates typically have a higher density of contamination than pool water. During the 2012 summer swimming season, filter concentrate samples were collected at metro-Atlanta public pools. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays were conducted to detect microbial nucleic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected in 95 (59%) of 161 samples; detection indicates contamination from the environment (e.g., dirt), swimmers, or fomites (e.g., kickboards). P. aeruginosa detection underscores the need for vigilant pool cleaning, scrubbing, and water quality maintenance (e.g., disinfectant level and pH) to ensure that concentrations do not reach levels that negatively impact swimmer health. Escherichia coli, a fecal indicator, was detected in 93 (58%) samples; detection signifies that swimmers introduced fecal material into pool water. Fecal material can be introduced when it washes off of swimmers' bodies or through a formed or diarrheal fecal incident in the water. The risk for pathogen transmission increases if swimmers introduce diarrheal feces. Although this study focused on microbial DNA in filters (not on illnesses), these findings indicate the need for swimmers to help prevent introduction of pathogens (e.g., taking a pre-swim shower and not swimming when ill with diarrhea), aquatics staff to maintain disinfectant level and pH according to public health standards to inactivate pathogens, and state and local environmental health specialists to enforce such standards.

  8. The impact of implementing selected CBPR strategies to address disparities in urban Atlanta: a retrospective case study

    PubMed Central

    Kreuter, Marshall W.; Kegler, Michelle C.; Joseph, Karen T.; Redwood, Yanique A.

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the Institute of Public Health at Georgia State University (GSU) received a 3-year community-based participatory research (CBPR) grant from the National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities entitled Accountable Communities: Healthy Together (ACHT). Because urban health disparities result from complex interactions among social, economic and environmental factors, ACHT used specific CBPR strategies to engage residents, and promote the participation of community organizations serving, a low-income community in urban Atlanta to: (i) identify priority health and social or environmental problems and (ii) undertake actions to mitigate those problems. Three years after funding ended, a retrospective case study, using semi-structured, taped interviews was carried out to determine what impacts, if any, specific CBPR strategies had on: (i) eliciting resident input into the identification of priority problems and (ii) prompting actions by community organizations to address those problems. Results suggest that the CBPR strategies used were associated with changes that were supported and sustained after grant funding ended. Insights were also gained on the longer term impacts of ACHT on community health workers. Implications for future CBPR efforts, for researchers and for funders, are discussed. PMID:22717942

  9. Prevalence and Perspectives of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among University Students in Atlanta, Newcastle upon Tyne, and New Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Kritika; Midha, Inuka

    2016-01-01

    Objective. A cross-cultural comparative study was developed that surveyed university students in Atlanta (United States), New Delhi (India), and Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom) to understand the prevalence and perspectives of CAM in three urban societies with different healthcare systems. Design. Surveys were sent to students in the three aforementioned cities. Survey distribution occurred over 6 months from May to November 2015. A total of 314 surveys were received. Results. Dietary and vitamin supplements had the highest prevalence collectively (n = 203), followed by meditation, yoga, and massage. Commentary analysis showed the importance of science and evidence in justifying CAM practice. Conclusions. Matching the most prevalent practices with their designated NCCAM categories suggested that the students were attracted to biologically based, body-based, and mind-body practices as the central themes of attraction. Selected and prevalent CAM practices suggested the students' desire to maintain physical and mental fitness. Access to healthcare may have influence on the prevalence of CAM. Indian students were more likely to view CAM as a viable alternative to conventional medicine. PMID:27382643

  10. Influence of GaAs surface termination on GaSb/GaAs quantum dot structure and band offsets

    SciTech Connect

    Zech, E. S.; Chang, A. S.; Martin, A. J.; Canniff, J. C.; Millunchick, J. M.; Lin, Y. H.; Goldman, R. S.

    2013-08-19

    We have investigated the influence of GaAs surface termination on the nanoscale structure and band offsets of GaSb/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. Transmission electron microscopy reveals both coherent and semi-coherent clusters, as well as misfit dislocations, independent of surface termination. Cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy reveal clustered GaSb QDs with type I band offsets at the GaSb/GaAs interfaces. We discuss the relative influences of strain and QD clustering on the band offsets at GaSb/GaAs interfaces.

  11. Long-term trends and weekday-to-weekend differences in ozone, its precursors, and other secondary pollutants in Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; De Gouw, J. A.; Gilman, J.; Graus, M.; Holloway, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Neuman, J. A.; Roberts, J. M.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    In an environment rich in biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), decreasing concentrations of ozone (-1.3 % yr-1) and other secondary pollutants (-8.2 % yr-1 for nitric acid, HNO3; and -7.9 % yr-1 for peroxyacetyl nitrate, PAN) in Atlanta, Georgia over the past fifteen years are primarily attributed to decreases in local emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO2). Large reductions in abundances of NOx in the Southeast U.S. over the years (-8.0 % yr-1 for total reactive nitrogen, NOy) are the direct result of control strategies implemented to reduced emissions from electric-power generation plants and on-road motor vehicles. Here, we compile an extensive historical data set of trace gas measurements spanning fifteen years between 1998 and 2013 from a surface monitoring network site in downtown Atlanta (i.e. the SEARCH network Jefferson Street site) and research aircraft (e.g. the 2013 Southeast Atmosphere Study and 1999 Southern Oxidants Study aboard the NOAA P-3 aircraft). With this data set we confirm and extend long-term trends and weekday-to-weekend differences in ozone, its precursors, and other secondary pollutants during summertime in Atlanta. Long-term changes in abundances and enhancement ratios of secondary oxidation products indicate changes in pollutant formation chemistry in Atlanta resulting from the significant decrease in NOx precursor emissions over the past fifteen years. The most noteworthy changes include: 1) an increase in enhancement ratios of odd oxygen (Ox=O3+NO2) to (PAN+HNO3) of +5.5 % yr-1 indicating an increase in ozone production efficiency by a factor of 2 over the fifteen year period, 2) no significant change in the fraction of oxidized NOx out of NOy over time indicating little change in the extent of photochemical processing of the NOx emissions, and 3) a flip in observed ozone concentrations from higher average ozone on weekends to higher average ozone on weekdays after 2004. The observations for Atlanta will also be contrasted

  12. Gold-free GaAs/GaAsSb heterostructure nanowires grown on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plissard, S.; Dick, K. A.; Wallart, X.; Caroff, P.

    2010-03-01

    Growth of GaAs/GaAsSb heterostructure nanowires on silicon without the need for gold seed particles is presented. A high vertical yield of GaAs nanowires is first obtained, and then GaAsxSb1-x segments are successfully grown axially in these nanowires. GaAsSb can also be integrated as a shell around the GaAs core. Finally, two GaAsSb segments are grown inside a GaAs nanowire and passivated using an AlxGa1-xAs shell. It is found that no stacking faults or twin planes occur in the GaAsSb segments.

  13. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (77th, Atlanta, Georgia, August 10-13, 1994). Part I: Media History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Media History section of this collection of conference presentations contains the following 21 papers: "Social Class Advocacy Journalism: Prelude to Party Politics, 1892" (David J. Vergobbi); "Pilfering the News: A Quality Comparison of the World and Journal's Spanish-American War Coverage" (Randall S. Sumpter); "The…

  14. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (77th, Atlanta, Georgia, August 10-13, 1994). Part X: Miscellaneous Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Miscellaneous Studies section of this collection of conference presentations contains the following 22 papers: "Men and Women Journalists in the Movies: Exploration of Some Sexism and Gender Issues in Their Portrayals in Eleven Films" (Albert D. Talbott); "Female Archetypes in Late '80s Films" (Fakhri Haghani); "Chain…

  15. MEETING IN ATLANTA, GA - COMPARATIVE CYTOTOXICITY OF TRIHALOMETHANES (THMs) AND TRIHALONITROMETHANES (THNMs) IN CULTURED NORMAL HUMAN COLON CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have linked the consumption of chlorinated surface waters to an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The THMs [trichloromethane, TCM, bromodichloromethane, BDCM, dibromochloromethane, DBCM, and tribromomethane, TBM] comprise a major class of by-products (D...

  16. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (77th, Atlanta, Georgia, August 10-13, 1994). Part IX: Magazines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Magazines section of this collection of conference presentations contains the following 15 papers: "'National Geographic Magazine' and the Vietnam War: Did We Just Get Pretty Pictures?" (John W. Williams); "Free Speech at All Costs: A Short History of 'The Masses'" (Chris Lamb); "Newspapers Locally Edited Magazines…

  17. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (77th, Atlanta, Georgia, August 10-13, 1994). Part IV: International Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The International Media section of this collection of conference presentations contains the following 15 papers: "Testing the Interaction of the Third-Person Effect and Spiral of Silence in a Political Pressure Cooker: The Case of Hong Kong" (Lars Willnat); "The Use of Small State Variables in Research on Coverage of Foreign Policy:…

  18. 75 FR 80455 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ...; ] ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) plans to hold its regular committee and Board meetings...

  19. 78 FR 21239 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ...) RWY 30, Amdt 1 Atlanta, GA, Hartsfield--Jackson Atlanta Intl, ILS OR LOC RWY 8L, ILS RWY 8L (SA CAT I), ILS RWY 8L (CAT II), ILS RWY 8L (CAT III), Amdt 4 Atlanta, GA, Hartsfield--Jackson Atlanta Intl, ILS... Atlanta, GA, Hartsfield--Jackson Atlanta Intl, ILS OR LOC RWY 9R, ILS RWY 9R (SA CAT I), ILS RWY 9R...

  20. 30% Efficient InGaP/GaAs/GaSb Cell-Interconnected-Circuits For Line-Focus Concentrator Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraas, Lewis; Avery, James; Iles, Peter; Chu, Charlie; Piszczor, Mike

    2005-01-01

    In 1989, Fraas and Avery demonstrated a world-record 31% efficient AM0 GaAs/GaSb tandem solar cell. This record efficiency still holds today. However, the GaAs/GaSb mechanical-stacked cell was designed to work with concentrated sunlight and at that time, the space community had no experience with concentrated sunlight solar arrays.

  1. A comparison of traditional food and health strategies among Taiwanese and Chinese immigrants in Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethnobotanical studies on the use of plants amongst migrant populations are of great relevance to public health. Traditional health strategies, which incorporate plants as medicines, foods, or both – can play an important role in individual well-being. However, at the same time, migrant populations’ traditional knowledge of such practices may be under a state of greater threat of decline due to factors such as limited access to the plant materials and physical isolation from the homeland, which serves as the primary living reservoir for this knowledge. Methods In this study, we conducted a medical ethnobotanical survey focusing on a comparison of local medicinal food and health strategies with members of two Asian immigrant populations in metro-Atlanta: Chinese and Taiwanese. Snowball sampling techniques were employed to recruit 83 study participants, 57 of which were included in the final analysis. Semi-structured interview techniques were used to question participants about their beliefs and usage of the yin yang system, usage of Chinese herbs and medicinal foods, preference and usage of Eastern and Western medicines, and gardening for medicinal foods. Results and conclusion Comparison of the two groups demonstrated a remarkable difference in health strategies concerning medicinal plant use, including statistically significant differences in beliefs concerning yin and yang, uses of Eastern versus Western medicine, and gardening for medicinal foods. Domestic health strategies in the form of medicinal foods play an important role in local health practices, especially among the Taiwanese participants. The collective desire for the use of both Eastern and Western medicine by both groups highlights the important role that cultural competency training will play in preparing allopathic health practitioners to serve increasingly diverse patient populations in the US. PMID:23981857

  2. Evaluation of two-year Jewish genetic disease screening program in Atlanta: insight into community genetic screening approaches.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yunru; Liu, Shuling; Grinzaid, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Improvements in genetic testing technologies have led to the development of expanded carrier screening panels for the Ashkenazi Jewish population; however, there are major inconsistencies in current screening practices. A 2-year pilot program was launched in Atlanta in 2010 to promote and facilitate screening for 19 Jewish genetic diseases. We analyzed data from this program, including participant demographics and outreach efforts. This retrospective analysis is based on a de-identified dataset of 724 screenees. Data were obtained through medical chart review and questionnaires and included demographic information, screening results, response to outreach efforts, and follow-up behavior and preferences. We applied descriptive analysis, chi-square tests, and logistic regression to analyze the data and compare findings with published literature. The majority of participants indicated that they were not pregnant or did not have a partner who was pregnant were affiliated with Jewish organizations and reported 100 % AJ ancestry. Overall, carrier frequency was 1 in 3.9. Friends, rabbis, and family members were the most common influencers of the decision to receive screening. People who were older, had a history of pregnancy, and had been previously screened were more likely to educate others (all p < 0.05). Analysis of this 2-year program indicated that people who are ready to have children or expand their families are more likely to get screened and encourage others to be screened. The most effective outreach efforts targeted influencers who then encouraged screening in the target population. Educating influencers and increasing overall awareness were the most effective outreach strategies.

  3. “Because He Misses His Normal Life Back Home”: Masculinity and Sexual Behavior Among Mexican Migrants in Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Jennifer S.; Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Nyhus, Christina M.; Yount, Kathryn M.; Bauermeister, José A.

    2009-01-01

    Context Labor migration presents an important HIV risk context. Effective health promotion begins with understanding cultural and structural influences on sexual risk. Methods This paper presents the quantitative results from a mixed-methods study carried out in 1999 among Mexican migrant men (N=187) in Atlanta, Georgia. The instrument included questions on several domains: Demographic and sexual history, migration motivations, substance use, social support, leisure time practices, and ideas about masculinity, sexuality, and marriage. We created six multivariate regressions to test the association between each of these domains and men's number of partners. Results Greater number of partners was associated with being younger, having fewer years of formal education, and owning a home in Mexico (Model 1); taking more trips to Mexico (Model 2); feeling sex wasn't tied to emotional intimacy and power (Model 3); having a larger social network and fewer frequency of contact with network members (Model 4); having a sex worker as a partner (Model 5); and going out dancing and stripclubs on weekends (Model 6). Conclusion Emergent visions of marriage that include shared sexual intimacy and emotional intimacy and power imply a reorganization of marital sexuality; yet, only those men who emphasize emotional companionship and equity have fewer extramarital sexual partners. An individual-level intervention may be insufficient to transform men's ideas about manhood; programs must acknowledge and target migrant men's social networks and the spaces in which sexual risk may occur. Multilevel strategies, such as the development of more health-enhancing community spaces, active discussions regarding masculinity, and the promotion of safer sexual practices should form part of comprehensive efforts to reduce sexual risk among migrant men. PMID:19291125

  4. Simulating unsteady transport of nitrogen, biochemical oxygen demand, and dissolved oxygen in the Chattahoochee River downstream from Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.

    1985-01-01

    As part of an intensive water-quality assessment of the Chattahoochee River, repetitive water-quality measurements were made at 12 sites along a 69-kilometer reach of the river downstream of Atlanta, Georgia. Concentrations of seven constituents (temperature, dissolved oxygen, ultimate carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), organic nitrogen, ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate) were obtained during two periods of 36 hours, one starting on August 30, 1976, and the other starting on May 31, 1977. The study reach contains one large and several small sewage outfalls and receives the cooling water from two large powerplants. An unsteady water-quality model of the Lagrangian type was calibrated using the 1977 data and verified using the 1976 data. The model provided a good means of interpreting these data even though both the flow and the pollution loading rates were highly unsteady. A kinetic model of the cascade type accurately described the physical and biochemical processes occurring in the river. All rate coefficients, except reaeration coefficients and those describing the resuspension of BOD, were fitted to the 1977 data and verified using the 1976 data. The study showed that, at steady low flow, about 38 percent of the BOD settled without exerting an oxygen demand. At high flow, this settled BOD was resuspended and exerted an immediate oxygen demand. About 70 percent of the ammonia extracted from the water column was converted to nitrite, but the fate of the remaining 30 percent is unknown. Photosynthetic production was not an important factor in the oxygen balance during either run.

  5. Call a Meeting!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonsalves, Bronte B.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines appropriate content for meetings between parents and teachers of young children. Argues that effective meetings foster parent education, communication and ongoing parent support. Identifies objectives for the initial meeting during the application and registration process, for parent education meetings, and for parent conferences.…

  6. Comparison of Intersubband GaAs/AlGaAs Multiple Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors on GaAs and GaAs-on-Si Subtrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, D.; Gunapala, S.; George, T.; Bandara, S.; Chang-Chien, C. N.; Leon, R.; Kayali, S.; Kuo, H.; Fang, W.; Liu, H.; Stillman, G.

    1998-01-01

    We have successfully fabricated intersubband GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well infrared photodetectors grown on GaAs-on-Si substrate and evaluated their structural, electrical, and optical characteristics. We have found that the performance is comparable to a similar detector structure grown on a semi-insulating GaAs substrate.

  7. GaInNAs laser gain

    SciTech Connect

    CHOW,WENG W.; JONES,ERIC D.; MODINE,NORMAND A.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-05-23

    The optical gain spectra for GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells are computed using a microscopic laser theory. From these spectra, the peak gain and carrier radiative decay rate as functions of carrier density are determined. These dependences allow the study of the lasing threshold current density of GaInNAs/GaAs quantum well structures.

  8. Projecting Future Urbanization with Prescott College's Spatial Growth Model to Promote Environmental Sustainability and Smart Growth, A Case Study in Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Crosson, William; Limaye, Ashutosh; Johnson, Hoyt; Quattrochi, Dale; Lapenta, William; Khan, Maudood

    2006-01-01

    Planning is an integral element of good management and necessary to anticipate events not merely respond to them. Projecting the quantity and spatial distribution of urban growth is essential to effectively plan for the delivery of city services and to evaluate potential environmental impacts. The major drivers of growth in large urban areas are increasing population, employment opportunities, and quality of life attractors such as a favorable climate and recreation opportunities. The spatial distribution of urban growth is dictated by the amount and location of developable land, topography, energy and water resources, transportation network, climate change, and the existing land use configuration. The Atlanta region is growing very rapidly both in population and the consumption of forestland or low-density residential development. Air pollution and water availability are significant ongoing environmental issues. The Prescott Spatial Growth Model (SGM) was used to make growth projections for the metropolitan Atlanta region to 2010,2020 and 2030 and results used for environmental assessment in both business as usual and smart growth scenarios. The Prescott SGM is a tool that uses an ESRI ArcView extension and can be applied at the parcel level or more coarse spatial scales and can accommodate a wide range of user inputs to develop any number of growth rules each of which can be weighted depending on growth assumptions. These projections were used in conjunction with meteorological and air quality models to evaluate future environmental impacts. This presentation will focus on the application of the SGM to the 13-County Atlanta Regional Commission planning jurisdiction as a case study. The SGM will be described, including how rule sets are developed and the decision process for allocation of future development to available land use categories. Data inputs required to effectively run the model will be discussed. Spatial growth projections for ten, twenty, and thirty

  9. Monitoring urban impacts on suspended sediment, trace element, and nutrient fluxes within the City of Atlanta, Georgia, USA: Program design, methodological considerations, and initial results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, A.J.; Elrick, K.A.; Smith, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Atlanta, Georgia (City of Atlanta, COA), is one of the most rapidly growing urban areas in the US. Beginning in 2003, the US Geological Survey established a long-term water-quantity/quality monitoring network for the COA. The results obtained during the first 2 years have provided insights into the requirements needed to determine the extent of urban impacts on water quality, especially in terms of estimating the annual fluxes of suspended sediment, trace/major elements, and nutrients. During 2004/2005, suspended sediment fluxes from the City of Atlanta (COA) amounted to about 150 000 t year-1; ??? 94% of the transport occurred in conjunction with storm-flow, which also accounted for ??? 65% of the annual discharge. Typically, storm-flow averaged ??? 20% of theyear. Normally, annual suspended sediment fluxes are determined by summing daily loads based on a single calculation step using mean-daily discharge and a single rating curve-derived suspended sediment concentration. Due to the small and 'flashy' nature of the COAs streams, this approach could produce underestimates ranging from 25% to 64%. Accurate estimates (?? 15%) require calculation time-steps as short as every 2-3 h. Based on annual median base-flow/storm-flow chemical concentrations, the annual fluxes of ??? 75% of trace elements (e.g. Cu, Pb, Zn), major elements (e.g. Fe, Al), and total P occur in association with suspended sediment; in turn, ??? 90% of the transport of these constituents occur in conjunction with storm-flow. As such, base-flow sediment-associated and dissolved contributions represent relatively insignificant portions of the total annual load. An exception is total N, whose sediment-associated fluxes range from 50% to 60%; even so, storm-related transport typically exceeds 80%. Hence, in urban environments, non-point-source appear to be the dominant contributors to the fluxes of these constituents.

  10. NMOC, ozone, and organic aerosol in the southeastern United States, 1999-2007: 3. Origins of organic aerosol in Atlanta, Georgia, and surrounding areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, C. L.; Hidy, G. M.; Tanenbaum, S.; Edgerton, E. S.

    2011-02-01

    Carbonaceous compounds constitute a major fraction of the fine particle mass at locations throughout North America; much of the condensed-phase organic carbon (OC) is produced in the atmosphere from NMOC reactions as "secondary" OC (SOC). Ten years of particulate carbon and speciated non-methane organic compound (NMOC) data combined with other measurements from Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) and other sites provide insight into the association between elemental carbon (EC), OC and NMOCs. Data are analyzed to characterize the OC and SOC contrasts between urban Atlanta, Georgia, and nearby non-urban conditions in the Southeast. Analysis of the monitoring record indicates that the mean Atlanta urban excess of total carbon (TC) is 2.1-2.8 μg m -3. The OC/EC ratio of the Atlanta urban excess is in the range 1.3 to 1.8, consistent with OC/EC ratios observed in motor vehicle emissions and a fossil carbon source of urban excess TC. Carbon isotope analysis of a subset of particle samples demonstrates that the urban excess is mainly fossil in origin, even though the majority of the TC is modern at both urban and non-urban sites. Temperature-dependent partitioning of OC between gas and condensed phases cannot explain the observed diurnal and seasonal variations of OC/CO, EC/CO, and OC/EC ratios. Alternatively, a hypothesis involving vertical mixing of OC-enriched air from aloft is supported by the seasonal and diurnal OC, isopentane, aromatic and isoprene observations at the ground. A statistical model is applied to indicate the relative significance of aerometric factors affecting OC and EC concentrations, including meteorological and pollutant associations. The model results demonstrate strong linkages between fine particle carbon and pollutant indicators of source emissions compared with meteorological factors; the model results show weaker dependence of OC on meteorological factors than is the case for ozone (O 3) concentrations.

  11. AlGaAs/InGaAsN/GaAs PnP double heterojunction bipolar transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, P.C.; Baca, A.G.; Li, N.Y.; Sharps, P.R.; Hou, H.Q.; Laroche, J.R.; Ren, F.

    2000-01-04

    The authors demonstrated a functional PnP double heterojunction bipolar transistor (DHBT) using AlGaAs, InGaAsN, and GaAs. The band alignment between InGaAsN and GaAs has a large {triangle}E{sub c} and negligible {triangle}E{sub v}, this unique characteristic is very suitable for PnP DHBT applications. The metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOCVD) grown Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As/In{sub 0.03}Ga{sub 0.97}As{sub 0.99}N{sub 0.01}/GaAs PnP DHBT is lattice matched to GaAs and has a peak current gain of 25. Because of the smaller bandgap (E{sub g}=1.20eV) of In{sub 0.03}Ga{sub 0.97}As{sub 0.99}N{sub 0.01} used for the base layer, this device has a low V{sub ON} of 0.79 V, which is 0.25 V lower than in a comparable Pnp AlGaAs/GaAs HBT. And because GaAs is used for the collector, its BV{sub CEO} is 12 V, consistent with BV{sub CEO} of AlGaAs/GaAs HBTs.

  12. InGaN quantum dot formation mechanism on hexagonal GaN/InGaN/GaN pyramids.

    PubMed

    Lundskog, A; Palisaitis, J; Hsu, C W; Eriksson, M; Karlsson, K F; Hultman, L; Persson, P O Å; Forsberg, U; Holtz, P O; Janzén, E

    2012-08-03

    Growing InGaN quantum dots (QDs) at the apex of hexagonal GaN pyramids is an elegant approach to achieve a deterministic positioning of QDs. Despite similar synthesis procedures by metal organic chemical vapor deposition, the optical properties of the QDs reported in the literature vary drastically. The QDs tend to exhibit either narrow or broad emission lines in the micro-photoluminescence spectra. By coupled microstructural and optical investigations, the QDs giving rise to narrow emission lines were concluded to nucleate in association with a (0001) facet at the apex of the GaN pyramid.

  13. InGaP/GaAs Dual-Junction Solar Cell with AlGaAs/GaAs Tunnel Diode Grown on 10° off Misoriented GaAs Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hung Wei; Chung, Chen Chen; Te Wang, Chin; Nguyen, Hong Quan; Tinh Tran, Binh; Lin, Kung Liang; Dee, Chang Fu; Yeop Majlis, Burhanuddin; Chang, Edward Yi

    2012-08-01

    InGaP/GaAs dual-junction solar cells with different tunnel diodes (TDs) grown on misoriented GaAs substrates are investigated. It is demonstrated that the solar cells with P++-AlGaAs/N++-GaAs TDs grown on 10° off GaAs substrates not only show a higher external quantum efficiency (EQE) but also generate a higher peak current density (Jpeak) at higher concentration ratios (185×) than the solar cells with P++-GaAs/N++-InGaP TDs grown on 6° off GaAs substrates. Furthermore, the cell design with P++-AlGaAs/N++-GaAs TDs grown on 10° off GaAs substrates does not generate a disordered InGaP epitaxial layer during material growth, and thus shows superior current-voltage characteristics.

  14. Hydrogenation of GaSb/GaAs quantum rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, P. D. Hayne, M.; Zhuang, Q. D.; Ahmad Kamarudin, M.; Birindelli, S.; Capizzi, M.

    2014-08-25

    We present the results of photoluminescence measurements on hydrogenated type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dot/ring (QD/QR) samples at temperatures ranging from 4.2 K to 400 K. Hydrogenation is found to suppress optically induced charge depletion (associated with the presence of carbon acceptors in this system). A redshift of the QD\\QR emission energy of a few tens of meV is observed at temperatures ≥300 K, consistent with a reduction in average occupancy by ∼1 hole. These effects are accompanied by a reduction in PL intensity post-hydrogenation. We conclude that although hydrogenation may have neutralized the carbon acceptors, multiple hole occupancy of type-II GaSb/GaAs QD/QRs is very likely a precondition for intense emission, which would make extending the wavelength significantly beyond 1300 nm at room temperature difficult.

  15. Trends in on-road vehicle emissions and ambient air quality in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, from the late 1990s through 2009.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, Krish; DenBleyker, Allison; Ma, Lan; Lindhjem, Chris; Yarwood, Greg

    2014-07-01

    On-road vehicle emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO(x)), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during 1995-2009 in the Atlanta Metropolitan Statistical Area were estimated using the Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) model and data from the National Emissions Inventories and the State of Georgia. Statistically significant downward trends (computed using the nonparametric Theil-Sen method) in annual on-road CO, NO(x), and VOC emissions of 6.1%, 3.3%, and 6.0% per year, respectively, are noted during the 1995-2009 period despite an increase in total vehicle distance traveled. The CO and NO(x) emission trends are correlated with statistically significant downward trends in ambient air concentrations of CO and NO(x) in Atlanta ranging from 8.0% to 11.8% per year and from 5.8% to 8.7% per year, respectively, during similar time periods. Weather-adjusted summertime ozone concentrations in Atlanta exhibited a statistically significant declining trend of 2.3% per year during 2001-2009. Although this trend coexists with the declining trends in on-road NO(x), VOC, and CO emissions, identifying the cause of the downward trend in ozone is complicated by reductions in multiple precursors from different source sectors. Implications: Large reductions in on-road vehicle emissions of CO and NO(x) in Atlanta from the late 1990s to 2009, despite an increase in total vehicle distance traveled, contributed to a significant improvement in air quality through decreases in ambient air concentrations of CO and NO(x) during this time period. Emissions reductions in motor vehicles and other source sectors resulted in these improvements and the observed declining trend in ozone concentrations over the past decade. Although these historical trends cannot be extrapolated to the future because pollutant concentration contributions due to on-road vehicle emissions will likely become an increasingly smaller fraction of the atmospheric total, they provide an indication of

  16. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 91 - Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., GA (The William B. Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport) Baltimore, MD (Baltimore Washington... prohibited. The Special VFR weather minimums of § 91.157 do not apply to the following airports: Atlanta, GA... following airports. Atlanta, GA (The William B. Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport) Boston,...

  17. AlGaAs-GaAs cascade solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamorte, M. F.; Abbott, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Computer modeling studies are reported for a monolithic, two junction, cascade solar cell using the AlGaAs GaAs materials combination. An optimum design was obtained through a serial optimization procedure by which conversion efficiency is maximized for operation at 300 K, AM 0, and unity solar concentration. Under these conditions the upper limit on efficiency was shown to be in excess of 29 percent, provided surface recombination velocity did not exceed 10,000 cm/sec.

  18. A GaAs-AlGaAs Based Thyristor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    Levinshtein and V . E . Chelnokov , "Subnanosecond tum-on of gallium arsenide thyristors," Sov. Tech. Phys. Lett., vol. 12, pp. 383-384, 1986; and...Angeles, California 90024 Abstract: A study of bipolar junction thyristors based on GaAs and AlGaAs materials for pulsed power switching applications is...related III- V heterostructures can be made to exhibit subnanosecond current rise-times under pulse power conditions, and thus should be considered

  19. Vibrational properties of the gallium monohydrides SrGaGeH, BaGaSiH, BaGaGeH, and BaGaSnH

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Michael J.; Lee, Myeong H.; Holland, Gregory P.; Daemen, Luke L.; Sankey, Otto F.; Haeussermann, Ulrich

    2009-08-15

    Vibrational properties of the gallium monohydrides SrGaGeH, BaGaSiH, BaGaGeH, and BaGaSnH (AeGaTtH) have been investigated by means of inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and first principles calculations. The compounds contain separated Ga-H units being part of a two dimensional polyanionic layer, [TtGaH]{sup 2-} (Tt=Si, Ge, Sn). The INS spectra show internal Ga-H bending and stretching modes at frequencies around 900 and 1200 cm{sup -1}, respectively. While the stretching mode is virtually invariant with respect to the variable chemical environment of the Ga-H unit, the bending mode frequency varies and is highest for BaGaSiH and lowest for BaGaSnH. The stretching mode is a direct measure of the Ga-H bond strength, whereas the bending mode reflects indirectly the strength of alkaline earth metal-hydrogen interaction. Accordingly, the terminal Ga-H bond in solid state AeGaTtH is distinct, but-compared to molecular gallium hydrides-very weak. - Graphical abstract: Vibrational properties of the gallium monohydrides SrGaGeH, BaGaSiH, BaGaGeH, and BaGaSnH have been investigated and revealed Ga-H stretching mode frequencies around 1200 cm{sup -1}. This implies that the terminal Ga-H bond in solid state polyanionic gallium hydrides is very weak compared to molecular gallium hydride species.

  20. GaAs, AlGaAs and InGaP Tunnel Junctions for Multi-Junction Solar Cells Under Concentration: Resistance Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeldon, Jeffrey F.; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Walker, Alex; Kolhatkar, Gitanja; Hall, Trevor J.; Hinzer, Karin; Masson, Denis; Riel, Bruno; Fafard, Simon; Jaouad, Abdelatif; Turala, Artur; Ares, Richard; Aimez, Vincent

    2010-10-14

    The following four TJ designs, AlGaAs/AlGaAs, GaAs/GaAs, AlGaAs/InGaP and AlGaAs/GaAs are studied to determine minimum doping concentration to achieve a resistance of <10{sup -4} {omega}{center_dot}cm{sup 2} and a peak tunneling current suitable for MJ solar cells up to 1500-suns concentration (operating current of 21 A/cm{sup 2}). Experimentally calibrated numerical models are used to determine how the resistance changes as a function of doping concentration. The AlGaAs/GaAs TJ design is determined to require the least doping concentration to achieve the specified resistance and peak tunneling current, followed by the GaAs/GaAs, and AlGaAs/AlGaAs TJ designs. The AlGaAs/InGaP TJ design can only achieve resistances >5x10{sup -4} {omega}cm{sup 2}.

  1. 77 FR 42425 - Amendment of Air Traffic Service (ATS) Routes in the Vicinity of Vero Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-19

    ..., 183 radials; Ormond Beach; Craig, FL; Alma, GA; Macon, GA; Atlanta, GA; Nashville, TN; St Louis, MO..., FL, 183 radials; Ormond Beach; Craig, FL; Alma, GA; Dublin, GA; Athens, GA; INT Athens, GA, 340...

  2. Study on the etching process GaAs-based VCSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yuan; Liu, Guojun; Hao, Yongqin; Yan, Changling; Zhang, Jiabin; Li, Yang; Li, Zaijin

    2016-11-01

    Wet etching process is a key technology in fabrication of VCSEL and their array in order to improve opto-electric characteristics of high-power VCSEL, devices with multi-ring distribution hole VCSEL is fabricated. The H3PO4 etching solution was used in the wet etching progress and etching rate is studied by changing etching solution concentration and etching time. The optimum technological conditions were determined by studying the etching morphology and etching depth of the GaAs-VCSEL. The tested results show that the complete morphology and the appropriate depth can be obtained by using the concentration ratio of 1:1:10, which can meet the requirements of GaAs-based VCSEL micro- structure etching process.

  3. Adaptive and active materials: selected papers from the ASME 2012 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems (SMASIS 12) (Stone Mountain, GA, USA, 19-21 September 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelecke, Stefan; Erturk, Alper; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Naguib, Hani; Huber, John; Turner, Travis; Anderson, Iain; Philen, Michael; Baba Sundaresan, Vishnu

    2013-09-01

    The fifth annual meeting of the ASME/AIAA Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems Conference (SMASIS) was held in beautiful Stone Mountain near Atlanta, GA. It is the conference's objective to provide an up-to-date overview of research trends in the entire field of smart materials systems. This was reflected in keynote speeches by Professor Eduard Arzt (Institute of New Materials and Saarland University, Saarbrücken, Germany) on 'Micro-patterned artificial 'Gecko' surfaces: a path to switchable adhesive function', by Professor Ray H Baughman (The Alan G MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute, University of Texas at Dallas) on 'The diverse and growing family of carbon nanotube and related artificial muscles', and by Professor Richard James (University of Minnesota) on 'The direct conversion of heat to electricity using multiferroic materials with phase transformations'. SMASIS 2012 was divided into eight symposia which span basic research, applied technological design and development, and industrial and governmental integrated system and application demonstrations. • SYMP 1. Development and characterization of multifunctional materials. • SYMP 2. Mechanics and behavior of active materials. • SYMP 3. Modeling, simulation and control of adaptive systems. • SYMP 4. Integrated system design and implementation. • SYMP 5. Structural health monitoring/NDE. • SYMP 6. Bio-inspired materials and systems. • SYMP 7. Energy harvesting. • SYMP 8. Structural and materials logic. This year we were particularly excited to introduce a new symposium on energy harvesting, which has quickly matured from a special track in previous years to an independent symposium for the first time. The subject cuts across fields by studying different materials, ranging from piezoelectrics to electroactive polymers, as well as by emphasizing different energy sources from wind to waves and ambient vibrations. Modeling, experimental studies, and technology applications all

  4. Student cognitive growth and attitudinal changes through conducting authentic research in the Young Scientist Program at Zoo Atlanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, La Tanya Danielle

    This purpose of this study was to determine if authentic research conducted by students in the Young Scientist Program: (a) enhanced scientific research skills, (b) increased cognitive growth in the areas of animal behavior and characteristics, and (c) affected attitudes toward scientific research, science, and zoo-related issues. During the nine-week program, 18 students from Liberty High School completed program-related activities in their classrooms, and at Zoo Atlanta. Here, students completed authentic research in the form of animal behavior research projects. Research-based activities included forming hypotheses based on animal behavior, creating and maintaining ethograms, and making behavioral observations. This was a mixed method study, in which, both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed in an attempt to answer the following research questions: (1) How does conducting authentic research within the Young Scientist Program enhance student scientific research skills? (2) How does participation in the Young Scientist Program increase student knowledge of animal behavior and characteristics? (3) How does the Young Scientist Program affect student attitudes? Data were collected pre, mid, and post program. Data sources included: (a) surveys, (b) interviews, (c) student research papers, and (d) researcher field notes. The data were analyzed through a framework of four methodological lenses: (a) knowledge of scientific research, (b) knowledge of animals, (c) attitudes toward scientific research, and (d) attitudes toward science and zoo-related issues. Surveys included knowledge tests and attitude scales. Overall, knowledge test results implied that as students progressed through the Young Scientist Program, their research skills, knowledge of scientific research, and knowledge of their animal were enhanced. Attitudinal data obtained from the attitude scales suggested that students' attitudes toward scientific research, science, and zoo

  5. HVPE-GaN growth on GaN-based Advanced Substrates by Smart Cut™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwinska, M.; Amilusik, M.; Fijalkowski, M.; Sochacki, T.; Lucznik, B.; Grzanka, E.; Litwin-Staszewska, E.; Weyher, J. L.; Nowakowska-Siwinska, A.; Muziol, G.; Skierbiszewski, C.; Grzegory, I.; Guiot, E.; Caulmilone, R.; Bockowski, M.

    2016-12-01

    Advanced Substrates consist of a thin GaN layer bonded to a carrier wafer. The layer is separated from starting material by Smart Cut™ technology. GaN on sapphire Advanced Substrates were successfully used as seeds for HVPE-GaN growth. Unintentionally doped and silicon-doped thick GaN layers were crystallized. The results were compared to HVPE-GaN grown on standard MOCVD-GaN/sapphire templates. Free-standing HVPE-GaN with high free carrier concentration was obtained. A laser diode was built on the n-type doped HVPE-GaN grown on an Advanced Substrate.

  6. Characterisation of Ga-coated and Ga-brazed aluminium

    SciTech Connect

    Ferchaud, E.; Christien, F.; Barnier, V.; Paillard, P.

    2012-05-15

    This work is devoted to the brazing of aluminium using liquid gallium. Gallium was deposited on aluminium samples at {approx} 50 Degree-Sign C using a liquid gallium 'polishing' technique. Brazing was undertaken for 30 min at 500 Degree-Sign C in air. EDS (Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy) and AES (Auger Electron Spectroscopy) characterisation of Ga-coated samples has shown that the Ga surface layer thickness is of ten (or a few tens of) nanometres. Furthermore, aluminium oxide layer (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was shown to be 'descaled' during Ga deposition, which ensures good conditions for further brazing. Cross-section examination of Ga-coated samples shows that liquid gallium penetrates into the aluminium grain boundaries during deposition. The thickness of the grain boundary gallium film was measured using an original EDS technique and is found to be of a few tens of nanometres. The depth of gallium grain boundary penetration is about 300 {mu}m at the deposition temperature. The fracture stress of the brazed joints was measured from tensile tests and was determined to be 33 MPa. Cross-section examination of brazed joints shows that gallium has fully dissolved into the bulk and that the joint is really autogenous. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminium can be brazed using liquid gallium deposited by a 'polishing' technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The aluminium oxide layer is 'descaled' during liquid Ga 'polishing' deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EDS can be used for determination of surface and grain boundary Ga film thickness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The surface and grain boundary Ga film thickness is of a few tens of nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface and grain boundary gallium dissolves in the bulk during brazing.

  7. Real-time continuous characterization of secondary organic aerosol derived from isoprene epoxydiols in downtown Atlanta, Georgia, using the Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor.

    PubMed

    Budisulistiorini, Sri Hapsari; Canagaratna, Manjula R; Croteau, Philip L; Marth, Wendy J; Baumann, Karsten; Edgerton, Eric S; Shaw, Stephanie L; Knipping, Eladio M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Jayne, John T; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D

    2013-06-04

    Real-time continuous chemical measurements of fine aerosol were made using an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) during summer and fall 2011 in downtown Atlanta, Georgia. Organic mass spectra measured by the ACSM were analyzed by positive matrix factorization (PMF), yielding three conventional factors: hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), semivolatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA), and low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA). An additional OOA factor that contributed to 33 ± 10% of the organic mass was resolved in summer. This factor had a mass spectrum that strongly correlated (r(2) = 0.74) to that obtained from laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) derived from synthetic isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX). Time series of this additional factor is also well correlated (r(2) = 0.59) with IEPOX-derived SOA tracers from filters collected in Atlanta but less correlated (r(2) < 0.3) with a methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE)-derived SOA tracer, α-pinene SOA tracers, and a biomass burning tracer (i.e., levoglucosan), and primary emissions. Our analyses suggest IEPOX as the source of this additional factor, which has some correlation with aerosol acidity (r(2) = 0.3), measured as H(+) (nmol m(-3)), and sulfate mass loading (r(2) = 0.48), consistent with prior work showing that these two parameters promote heterogeneous chemistry of IEPOX to form SOA.

  8. AlGaN-Cladding-Free m-Plane InGaN/GaN Laser Diodes with p-Type AlGaN Etch Stop Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Robert M.; Haeger, Daniel A.; Hsu, Po Shan; Hardy, Matthew T.; Kelchner, Kathryn M.; Fujito, Kenji; Feezell, Daniel F.; Mishra, Umesh K.; DenBaars, Steven P.; Speck, James S.; Nakamura, Shuji

    2011-09-01

    We present a new method of improving the accuracy and reproducibility of dry etching processes for ridge waveguide InGaN/GaN laser diodes (LDs). A GaN:Al0.09Ga0.91N etch rate selectivity of 11:1 was demonstrated for an m-plane LD with a 40 nm p-Al0.09Ga0.91N etch stop layer (ESL) surrounded by Al-free cladding layers, establishing the effectiveness of AlGaN-based ESLs for controlling etch depth in ridge waveguide InGaN/GaN LDs. These results demonstrate the potential for integrating AlGaN ESLs into commercial device designs where accurate control of the etch depth of the ridge waveguide is necessary for stable, kink-free operation at high output powers.

  9. Influence of internal electric fields on band gaps in short period GaN/GaAlN and InGaN/GaN polar superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Gorczyca, I. Skrobas, K.; Suski, T.; Christensen, N. E.; Svane, A.

    2015-08-21

    The electronic structures of short period mGaN/nGa{sub y}Al{sub 1−y}N and mIn{sub y}Ga{sub 1-y}N/nGaN superlattices grown along the wurtzite c axis have been calculated for different alloy compositions y and various small numbers m of well- and n of barrier-monolayers. The general trends in gap behavior can, to a large extent, be related to the strength of the internal electric field, E, in the GaN and InGaN quantum wells. In the GaN/GaAlN superlattices, E reaches 4 MV/cm, while in the InGaN/GaN superlattices, values as high as E ≈ 6.5 MV/cm are found. The strong electric fields are caused by spontaneous and piezoelectric polarizations, the latter contribution dominating in InGaN/GaN superlattices. The influence of different arrangements of In atoms (indium clustering) on the band gap values in InGaN/GaN superlattices is examined.

  10. Flood-inundation maps for Peachtree Creek from the Norfolk Southern Railway bridge to the Moores Mill Road NW bridge, Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musser, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5.5-mile reach of the Peachtree Creek from the Norfolk Southern Railway bridge to the Moores Mill Road NW bridge, were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Atlanta, Georgia. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Peachtree Creek at Atlanta, Georgia (02336300) and the USGS streamgage at Chattahoochee River at Georgia 280, near Atlanta, Georgia (02336490). Current water level (stage) at these USGS streamgages may be obtained at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ and can be used in conjunction with these maps to estimate near real-time areas of inundation. The National Weather Service (NWS) is incorporating results from this study into the Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that commonly are collocated at USGS streamgages. The forecasted peak-stage information for the USGS streamgage at Peachtree Creek, which is available through the AHPS Web site, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. A one-dimensional step-backwater model was developed using the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers HEC–RAS software for a 6.5-mile reach of Peachtree Creek and was used to compute flood profiles for a 5.5-mile reach of the creek. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relations at the Peachtree Creek at Atlanta, Georgia, streamgage (02336300), and the Chattahoochee River at Georgia 280, near Atlanta, Georgia, streamgage (02336490) as well as high water marks collected during the 2010 annual peak flow event. The hydraulic model was then used to determine 50 water

  11. FOX-GA: a genetic algorithm for generating and analyzing battlefield courses of action.

    PubMed

    Schlabach, J L; Hayes, C C; Goldberg, D E

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes FOX-GA, a genetic algorithm (GA) that generates and evaluates plans in the complex domain of military maneuver planning. FOX-GA's contributions are to demonstrate an effective application of GA technology to a complex real world planning problem, and to provide an understanding of the properties needed in a GA solution to meet the challenges of decision support in complex domains. Previous obstacles to applying GA technology to maneuver planning include the lack of efficient algorithms for determining the fitness of plans. Detailed simulations would ideally be used to evaluate these plans, but most such simulations typically require several hours to assess a single plan. Since a GA needs to quickly generate and evaluate thousands of plans, these methods are too slow. To solve this problem we developed an efficient evaluator (wargamer) that uses course-grained representations of this problem domain to allow appropriate yet intelligent trade-offs between computational efficiency and accuracy. An additional challenge was that users needed a diverse set of significantly different plan options from which to choose. Typical GA's tend to develop a group of "best" solutions that may be very similar (or identical) to each other. This may not provide users with sufficient choice. We addressed this problem by adding a niching strategy to the selection mechanism to insure diversity in the solution set, providing users with a more satisfactory range of choices. FOX-GA's impact will be in providing decision support to time constrained and cognitively overloaded battlestaff to help them rapidly explore options, create plans, and better cope with the information demands of modern warfare.

  12. RAS Ordinary Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-08-01

    Here are summarized talks from the February and March RAS Ordinary Meetings. The February meeting also enjoyed the Eddington Lecture from Prof. Lisa Kewley (Australian National University) on galaxy evolution in 3D.

  13. 78 FR 38009 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  14. 75 FR 66061 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  15. 75 FR 13075 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  16. 76 FR 68127 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2011-28540] ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) plans to hold its regular...

  17. 76 FR 21702 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  18. 77 FR 51513 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  19. 75 FR 22100 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. ] SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  20. 76 FR 10557 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  1. 76 FR 78611 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  2. 75 FR 39205 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  3. 77 FR 7126 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  4. 77 FR 36479 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  5. 77 FR 74827 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  6. 78 FR 12715 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  7. 78 FR 76101 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. ] SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  8. InGaP/InGaAsN/GaAs NpN double-heterojunction bipolar transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, P. C.; Baca, A. G.; Li, N. Y.; Xie, X. M.; Hou, H. Q.; Armour, E.

    2000-04-01

    We have demonstrated a functional NpN double-heterojunction bipolar transistor (DHBT) using InGaAsN for the base layer. The InGaP/In0.03Ga0.97As0.99N0.01/GaAs DHBT has a low VON of 0.81 V, which is 0.13 V lower than in a InGaP/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT). The lower turn-on voltage is attributed to the smaller band gap (1.20 eV) of metalorganic chemical vapor deposition-grown In0.03Ga0.97As0.99N0.01 base layer. GaAs is used for the collector; thus the breakdown voltage (BVCEO) is 10 V, consistent with the BVCEO of InGaP/GaAs HBTs of comparable collector thickness and doping level. To alleviate the current blocking phenomenon caused by the larger conduction band discontinuity between InGaAsN and GaAs, a graded InGaAs layer with δ doping is inserted at the base-collector junction. The improved device has a peak current gain of seven with ideal current-voltage characteristics.

  9. InGaP/InGaAsN/GaAs NpN double heterojunction bipolar transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, P.C.; Baca, A.G.; Li, N.Y.; Xie, X.M.; Sharps, P.R.; Hou, H.Q.

    2000-01-10

    The authors have demonstrated a functional NpN double heterojunction bipolar transistor (DHBT) using InGaAsN for base layer. The InGaP/In{sub 0.03}Ga{sub 0.97}As{sub 0.99}N{sub 0.01}/GaAs DHBT has a low V{sub ON} of 0.81 V, which is 0.13 V lower than in a InGaP/GaAs HBT. The lower V{sub ON} is attributed to the smaller bandgap (E{sub g}=1.20eV) of MOCVD grown In{sub 0.03}Ga{sub 0.97}As{sub 0.99}N{sub 0.01} base layer. GaAs is used for the collector; thus the BV{sub CEO} is 10 V, consistent with the BV{sub CEO} of InGaP/GaAs Hbts of comparable collector thickness and doping level. To alleviate the current blocking phenomenon caused by the larger {triangle}E{sub C} between InGaAsN and GaAs, a graded InGaAs layer with {delta}-doping is inserted at the base-collector junction. The improved device has a peak current gain of 7 with ideal IV characteristics.

  10. InGaP/InGaAsN/GaAs NpN double-heterojunction bipolar transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, P. C.; Baca, A. G.; Li, N. Y.; Xie, X. M.; Hou, H. Q.; Armour, E.

    2000-04-17

    We have demonstrated a functional NpN double-heterojunction bipolar transistor (DHBT) using InGaAsN for the base layer. The InGaP/In{sub 0.03}Ga{sub 0.97}As{sub 0.99}N{sub 0.01}/GaAs DHBT has a low V{sub ON} of 0.81 V, which is 0.13 V lower than in a InGaP/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT). The lower turn-on voltage is attributed to the smaller band gap (1.20 eV) of metalorganic chemical vapor deposition-grown In{sub 0.03}Ga{sub 0.97}As{sub 0.99}N{sub 0.01} base layer. GaAs is used for the collector; thus the breakdown voltage (BV{sub CEO}) is 10 V, consistent with the BV{sub CEO} of InGaP/GaAs HBTs of comparable collector thickness and doping level. To alleviate the current blocking phenomenon caused by the larger conduction band discontinuity between InGaAsN and GaAs, a graded InGaAs layer with {delta} doping is inserted at the base-collector junction. The improved device has a peak current gain of seven with ideal current-voltage characteristics. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  11. Intense terahertz emission from molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaAs/GaSb(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Sadia, Cyril P.; Laganapan, Aleena Maria; Agatha Tumanguil, Mae; Estacio, Elmer; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel; Que, Christopher T.; Yamamoto, Kohji; Tani, Masahiko

    2012-12-15

    Intense terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave emission was observed in undoped GaAs thin films deposited on (100) n-GaSb substrates via molecular beam epitaxy. GaAs/n-GaSb heterostructures were found to be viable THz sources having signal amplitude 75% that of bulk p-InAs. The GaAs films were grown by interruption method during the growth initiation and using various metamorphic buffer layers. Reciprocal space maps revealed that the GaAs epilayers are tensile relaxed. Defects at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb interface were confirmed by scanning electron microscope images. Band calculations were performed to infer the depletion region and electric field at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb and the air-GaAs interfaces. However, the resulting band calculations were found to be insufficient to explain the THz emission. The enhanced THz emission is currently attributed to a piezoelectric field induced by incoherent strain and defects.

  12. 86. Photocopy of drawing (February 1994 architectural drawing by Stevens ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    86. Photocopy of drawing (February 1994 architectural drawing by Stevens & Wilkinson, original in possession of Stevens & Wilkinson, Atlanta, George). Rich's Department Store, Atlanta, Georgia, ground floor plan 1924 building. - Rich's Downtown Department Store, 45 Broad Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  13. Concentration of 68Ga via solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Bokhari, Tanveer Hussain; Mushtaq, A; Khan, Islam Ullah

    2009-01-01

    The metallic cation, (68)Ga (III) is suitable for complexation with chelators either naked or conjugated with biological macromolecules, however, such labeling procedure requires high chemical purity and concentrated solutions of (68)Ga (III), which cannot be sufficiently fulfilled by the presently available (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator eluate. A method to increase the concentration and purity of (68)Ga obtained from a commercial (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator has been developed. The (68)Ga eluate (1M HCl) is extracted in methyl ethyl ketone, which is evaporated and taken in a small volume of buffer.

  14. Effect of high density H 2 plasmas on InGaP/GaAs and AlGaAs/GaAs HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, F.; Kopf, R. F.; Kuo, J. M.; Lothian, J. R.; Lee, J. W.; Pearton, S. J.; Shul, R. J.; Constantine, C.; Johnson, D.

    1998-05-01

    InGaP/GaAs and AlGaAs/GaAs high electron mobility transistors have been exposed to inductively coupled plasma or electron cyclotron resonance H 2 plasmas as a function of pressure, source power and rf chuck power. The transconductance, gate ideality factor and saturated drain-source current are all degraded by the plasma treatment. Two mechanisms are identified: passivation of Si dopants in the InGaP or AlGaAs donor layers by H 0 and lattice disorder created by H + and H 2+ ion bombardment. HEMTs are found to be more susceptible to plasma-induced degradation than heterojunction bipolar transistors.

  15. 75 FR 58350 - Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... RESEARCH COMMISSION Meeting Notice is hereby given that the U.S. Arctic Research Commission will hold its... presentations concerning Arctic research activities. The focus of the meeting will be reports and updates on programs and research projects affecting the Arctic. If you plan to attend this meeting, please notify...

  16. 86(th) Annual Georgia Public Health Association Meeting & Conference Report.

    PubMed

    Smith, Selina A; Abbott, Regina; Sims, Christy

    2015-01-01

    The 86(th) annual meeting of the Georgia Public Health Association (GPHA) and joint conference with the Southern Health Association was held in Atlanta, Georgia, on April 13-14, 2015, with pre-conference (April 12(th)) and post-conference (April 14(th)) Executive Board meetings. As Georgia's leading forum for public health researchers, practitioners, and students, the annual meeting of the GPHA brings together participants from across the state to explore recent developments in the field and to exchange techniques, tools, and experiences. Historically, the GPHA conference has been held in Savannah (n=24); Jekyll Island (n=20); Atlanta (n=16); Augusta (n=4); and Gainesville (n=1). There was no annual meeting during the early years (1929-1936); during World War II (1941-1943 and 1945); and for four years during the 1980s. Between 2006 and 2010, GPHA held one-day annual meetings and business sessions with educational workshops. Several new initiatives were highlighted as part of this year's conference. These included a "move and groove" physical activity lounge, registration scholarships for students with a dedicated meet-and-greet reception, an expanded exhibit hall, presentation and approval of three resolutions (related to healthy foods at official activities and events; weapons at official activities and events; and memorials), and approval of the 2015 legislative policy positions and amended association bylaws. The theme for the conference was Advocacy in Action for Public Health. Specifically, the program addressed ensuring access to care; protecting funding for core programs, services, and infrastructure; eliminating health disparities; and addressing key public health issues important to the state of Georgia. One hundred and nine (109) abstracts were submitted for peer review; 36 were accepted for poster and 40 for workshop presentations. Four plenary sessions with keynote speakers covered the intersection between advocacy and policy, Georgia's response to the

  17. 86th Annual Georgia Public Health Association Meeting & Conference Report

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Selina A.; Abbott, Regina; Sims, Christy

    2015-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The 86th annual meeting of the Georgia Public Health Association (GPHA) and joint conference with the Southern Health Association was held in Atlanta, Georgia, on April 13–14, 2015, with pre-conference (April 12th) and post-conference (April 14th) Executive Board meetings. As Georgia’s leading forum for public health researchers, practitioners, and students, the annual meeting of the GPHA brings together participants from across the state to explore recent developments in the field and to exchange techniques, tools, and experiences. Historically, the GPHA conference has been held in Savannah (n=24); Jekyll Island (n=20); Atlanta (n=16); Augusta (n=4); and Gainesville (n=1). There was no annual meeting during the early years (1929–1936); during World War II (1941–1943 and 1945); and for four years during the 1980s. Between 2006 and 2010, GPHA held one-day annual meetings and business sessions with educational workshops. Several new initiatives were highlighted as part of this year’s conference. These included a “move and groove” physical activity lounge, registration scholarships for students with a dedicated meet-and-greet reception, an expanded exhibit hall, presentation and approval of three resolutions (related to healthy foods at official activities and events; weapons at official activities and events; and memorials), and approval of the 2015 legislative policy positions and amended association bylaws. The theme for the conference was Advocacy in Action for Public Health. Specifically, the program addressed ensuring access to care; protecting funding for core programs, services, and infrastructure; eliminating health disparities; and addressing key public health issues important to the state of Georgia. One hundred and nine (109) abstracts were submitted for peer review; 36 were accepted for poster and 40 for workshop presentations. Four plenary sessions with keynote speakers covered the intersection between advocacy and policy

  18. Recombination dynamics of type-II excitons in (Ga,In)As/GaAs/Ga(As,Sb) heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gies, S.; Holz, B.; Fuchs, C.; Stolz, W.; Heimbrodt, W.

    2017-01-01

    (Ga,In)As/GaAs/Ga(As,Sb) multi-quantum well heterostructures have been investigated using continuous wave and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy at various temperatures. A complex interplay was observed between the excitonic type-II transitions with electrons in the (Ga,In)As well and holes in the Ga(As,Sb) well and the type-I excitons in the (Ga,In)As and Ga(As,Sb) wells. The type-II luminescence exhibits a strongly non-exponential temporal behavior below a critical temperature of T c = 70 K. The transients were analyzed in the framework of a rate-equation model. It was found that the exciton relaxation and hopping in the localized states of the disordered ternary Ga(As,Sb) are the decisive processes to describe the dynamics of the type-II excitons correctly.

  19. Recombination dynamics of type-II excitons in (Ga,In)As/GaAs/Ga(As,Sb) heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Gies, S; Holz, B; Fuchs, C; Stolz, W; Heimbrodt, W

    2017-01-13

    (Ga,In)As/GaAs/Ga(As,Sb) multi-quantum well heterostructures have been investigated using continuous wave and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy at various temperatures. A complex interplay was observed between the excitonic type-II transitions with electrons in the (Ga,In)As well and holes in the Ga(As,Sb) well and the type-I excitons in the (Ga,In)As and Ga(As,Sb) wells. The type-II luminescence exhibits a strongly non-exponential temporal behavior below a critical temperature of T c = 70 K. The transients were analyzed in the framework of a rate-equation model. It was found that the exciton relaxation and hopping in the localized states of the disordered ternary Ga(As,Sb) are the decisive processes to describe the dynamics of the type-II excitons correctly.

  20. Nonlinear harmonic mixing in an InGaAs/InGaP/GaAs laser on a germanium substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Dikareva, N V; Nekorkin, S M; Zvonkov, B N; Aleshkin, V Ya; Dubinov, A A

    2015-03-31

    An InGaAs/InGaP/GaAs laser with quantum wells, grown on a lightly doped germanium substrate, is experimentally investigated. Generation on the second and sum harmonics is observed in this composite cavity laser, which confirms the possibility of efficient difference-harmonic generation. (lasers)

  1. 75 FR 52253 - Airworthiness Directives; GA 8 Airvan (Pty) Ltd Models GA8 and GA8-TC320 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA-2010-0847; Directorate Identifier 2010-CE-046-AD; Amendment 39-16419; AD 2010-18-06] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; GA 8 Airvan (Pty) Ltd Models GA8 and GA8-TC320.... SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for the products listed above that...

  2. New GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs, Triple-Bandgap, Tandem Solar Cell for High-Efficiency Terrestrial Concentrator Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Geisz, J.; Ward, S.; Duda, A.; Moriarty, T.; Carapella, J.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Emery. K.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Kibbler, A.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D.; McMahon, W.; Ptak, A.

    2005-11-01

    GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs three-junction cells are grown in an inverted configuration on GaAs, allowing high quality growth of the lattice matched GaInP and GaAs layers before a grade is used for the 1-eV GaInAs layer. Using this approach an efficiency of 37.9% was demonstrated.

  3. Third Year Continuation of a Research and Design Criteria for the Implementation and Establishment of a Neighborhood Information Center in Five Public Libraries: Atlanta, Cleveland, Detroit, Houston, and Queens Borough. Final Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childers, Thomas

    The 1972-1975 Neighborhood Information Center (NIC) Project was undertaken in Atlanta, Cleveland, Detroit, Houston, and Queens Borough to demonstrate the feasibility of using existing library branches as neighborhood information centers. This summary evaluation utilized data from site visits, interviews with staff and clients, a questionnaire…

  4. Public Hearing: Report of the Proceedings of a Public Hearing of the Task Force on Women, Minorities and the Handicapped in Science and Technology (Atlanta, Georgia, March 2, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Task Force on Women, Minorities, and the Handicapped in Science and Technology, Washington, DC.

    The Task Force on Women, Minorities, and the Handicapped in Science and Technology was established by the U.S. Congress in Public Law 99-383 with the purpose of developing a long-range plan for broadening participation in science and engineering. Public hearings were held in Albuquerque (New Mexico), Atlanta (Georgia), Baltimore (Maryland), Boston…

  5. Native point defects in GaSb

    SciTech Connect

    Kujala, J.; Segercrantz, N.; Tuomisto, F.; Slotte, J.

    2014-10-14

    We have applied positron annihilation spectroscopy to study native point defects in Te-doped n-type and nominally undoped p-type GaSb single crystals. The results show that the dominant vacancy defect trapping positrons in bulk GaSb is the gallium monovacancy. The temperature dependence of the average positron lifetime in both p- and n-type GaSb indicates that negative ion type defects with no associated open volume compete with the Ga vacancies. Based on comparison with theoretical predictions, these negative ions are identified as Ga antisites. The concentrations of these negatively charged defects exceed the Ga vacancy concentrations nearly by an order of magnitude. We conclude that the Ga antisite is the native defect responsible for p-type conductivity in GaSb single crystals.

  6. 46 CFR 7.80 - Tybee Island, GA to St. Simons Island, GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tybee Island, GA to St. Simons Island, GA. 7.80 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.80 Tybee Island, GA to St. Simons Island, GA. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Savannah Beach on Tybee Island 255° true across Tybee Inlet to the shore of...

  7. 46 CFR 7.80 - Tybee Island, GA to St. Simons Island, GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tybee Island, GA to St. Simons Island, GA. 7.80 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.80 Tybee Island, GA to St. Simons Island, GA. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Savannah Beach on Tybee Island 255° true across Tybee Inlet to the shore of...

  8. 46 CFR 7.80 - Tybee Island, GA to St. Simons Island, GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tybee Island, GA to St. Simons Island, GA. 7.80 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.80 Tybee Island, GA to St. Simons Island, GA. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Savannah Beach on Tybee Island 255° true across Tybee Inlet to the shore of...

  9. 46 CFR 7.80 - Tybee Island, GA to St. Simons Island, GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tybee Island, GA to St. Simons Island, GA. 7.80 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.80 Tybee Island, GA to St. Simons Island, GA. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Savannah Beach on Tybee Island 255° true across Tybee Inlet to the shore of...

  10. Identification of handwriting by using the genetic algorithm (GA) and support vector machine (SVM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qigui; Deng, Kai

    2016-12-01

    As portable digital camera and a camera phone comes more and more popular, and equally pressing is meeting the requirements of people to shoot at any time, to identify and storage handwritten character. In this paper, genetic algorithm(GA) and support vector machine(SVM)are used for identification of handwriting. Compare with parameters-optimized method, this technique overcomes two defects: first, it's easy to trap in the local optimum; second, finding the best parameters in the larger range will affects the efficiency of classification and prediction. As the experimental results suggest, GA-SVM has a higher recognition rate.

  11. The National Conference on Professional and Personal Renewal for Faculty (2nd, Atlanta, Georgia, April 13-15, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Office of Instructional Development.

    This document reports on the second of a projected series of conferences, for University of Georgia faculty, having the theme of "faculty renewal" (rather than the older "faculty development") as the major focus. Following a brief introduction, the proceedings open with the keynote speech, "Meeting the Challenge of…

  12. Exploiting Satellite Remote-Sensing Data in Fine Particulate Matter Characterization for Serving the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN): The HELIX-Atlanta Experience and NPOESS Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Hamdan, Mohammad Z.; Crosson, William L.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Estes, Maurice G.; Qualters, Judith R.; Sinclair, Amber H.; Tolsma, Dennis D.; Adeniyi, Kafayat A.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the U.S. National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN), the National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) led a project in collaboration with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) called Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange (HELIX-Atlanta). Under HELIX-Atlanta, pilot projects were conducted to develop methods to better characterize exposure; link health and environmental datasets; and analyze spatial/temporal relationships. This paper describes and demonstrates different techniques for surfacing daily environmental hazards data of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 2.5 micrometers (PM(sub 2.5) for the purpose of integrating respiratory health and environmental data for the CDC's pilot study of HELIX-Atlanta. It describes a methodology for estimating ground-level continuous PM(sub 2.5) concentrations using spatial surfacing techniques and leveraging NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) data to complement the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground observation data. The study used measurements of ambient PM(sub 2.5) from the EPA database for the year 2003 as well as PM(sub 2.5) estimates derived from NASA's MODIS data. Hazard data have been processed to derive the surrogate exposure PM(sub 2.5) estimates. The paper has shown that merging MODIS remote sensing data with surface observations of PM(sub 2.5), may provide a more complete daily representation of PM(sub 2.5), than either data set alone would allow, and can reduce the errors in the PM(sub 2.5) estimated surfaces. Future work in this area should focus on combining MODIS column measurements with profile information provided by satellites like the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). The Visible Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) and the Aerosol

  13. Formation and coarsening of Ga droplets on focused-ion-beam irradiated GaAs surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J. H.; Ye, W.; Cardozo, B. L.; Saltzman, D.; Sun, K.; Sun, H.; Mansfield, J. F.; Goldman, R. S.

    2009-10-12

    We have investigated the formation and coarsening of Ga droplets on focused-ion-beam (FIB) irradiated GaAs surfaces. To separately examine formation and coarsening, Ga droplets were fabricated by Ga{sup +} FIB irradiation of GaAs substrates with and without pre-patterned holes. We determined the droplet growth rate and size distribution as a function of FIB energy following irradiation. The data suggest a droplet formation mechanism that involves Ga precipitation from a Ga-rich layer, followed by droplet coarsening via a combination of diffusion and Ostwald ripening or coalescence via droplet migration (dynamic coalescence)

  14. 22 CFR Appendix A to Chapter Xiv - Current Addresses and Geographic Jurisdictions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Washington, DC Florida Atlanta Georgia Atlanta Hawaii and all land and water areas west of the continents of... (4) Atlanta Regional Office, 1776 Peachtree Street, NW., Suite 501, North Wing, Atlanta, GA 30309... Regional office Alabama Atlanta Alaska San Francisco Arizona Los Angeles Arkansas Dallas California...

  15. GaN and AlGaN/GaN heterostructures grown on two dimensional BN templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snure, Michael; Siegel, Gene; Look, David C.; Paduano, Qing

    2017-04-01

    Two dimension materials, like BN and graphene, have been shown to be excellent templates for the growth and fabrication of freestanding III-nitride materials. In this paper we study the effects of BN morphology on GaN and AlGaN/GaN heterostructures grown on these templates. The crystallinity, transport, and optical properties of the GaN layer are examined and found to be well correlated to the BN template. The self-separation of GaN from the BN/sapphire template is also connected to morphology, resulting in freestanding GaN layers. Transport properties of Si doped GaN and AlGaN/GaN heterostructures were examined for different BN templates. The bulk GaN mobility was closely linked to the morphology of the BN template resulting in room temperature mobility from 395 to 520 cm2/Vs. The range in 3D mobility can be linked to increased dislocation densities in GaN grown on rougher BN templates. High 2DEG mobility ( 2000 cm2/Vs at 300 K) is achieved in AlGaN/GaN grown on atomically smooth BN templates, with a sheet electron density of 1×1013 cm-2, comparable to values obtained on conventional substrates. Samples grown on BN/sapphire showed mobilities (at 9 K) from 33000 cm2/Vs to 15200 cm2/Vs depending on BN roughness. The differences are associated with variations in AlGaN/GaN interface-roughness scattering and dislocation density due to the BN template morphology.

  16. An Introductory Course in Ga. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Jack; Kotei, Nii Amon

    This course in Ga was designed for use by a teacher who is a professional linguist, perhaps with the assistance of a native speaker of Ga. In preparing the course, the authors had in mind that Ga has not yet been accorded the detailed description and analysis that some other Ghanian languages have received. This is especially true in matters of…

  17. Mechanical properties of monolayer GaS and GaSe crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagmurcukardes, M.; Senger, R. T.; Peeters, F. M.; Sahin, H.

    2016-12-01

    The mechanical properties of monolayer GaS and GaSe crystals are investigated in terms of their elastic constants: in-plane stiffness (C), Poisson ratio (ν ), and ultimate strength (σU) by means of first-principles calculations. The calculated elastic constants are compared with those of graphene and monolayer MoS2. Our results indicate that monolayer GaS is a stiffer material than monolayer GaSe crystals due to the more ionic character of the Ga-S bonds than the Ga-Se bonds. Although their Poisson ratio values are very close to each other, 0.26 and 0.25 for GaS and GaSe, respectively, monolayer GaS is a stronger material than monolayer GaSe due to its slightly higher σU value. However, GaS and GaSe crystals are found to be more ductile and flexible materials than graphene and MoS2. We have also analyzed the band-gap response of GaS and GaSe monolayers to biaxial tensile strain and predicted a semiconductor-metal crossover after 17 % and 14 % applied strain, respectively, for monolayer GaS and GaSe. In addition, we investigated how the mechanical properties are affected by charging. We found that the flexibility of single layer GaS and GaSe displays a sharp increase under 0.1 e /cell charging due to the repulsive interactions between extra charges located on chalcogen atoms. These charging-controllable mechanical properties of single layers of GaS and GaSe can be of potential use for electromechanical applications.

  18. Development of GaN/AlGaN Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-19

    AFOSR-Taiwan Nanoscience Initiative Project Final Report Project Title Development of GaN /AlGaN Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser...DATES COVERED 14-06-2007 to 13-06-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of GaN -Based Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...the GaN /AlGaN active region for terahertz quantum cascade lasers using MOCVD system based on the quantum cascade structure proposed by Prof. Greg Sun

  19. Utilisation of GaN and InGaN/GaN with nanoporous structures for water splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, J.; Bai, J.; Wang, T.

    2014-12-01

    We report a cost-effective approach to the fabrication of GaN based nanoporous structure for applications in renewable hydrogen production. Photoelectrochemical etching in a KOH solution has been employed to fabricate both GaN and InGaN/GaN nanoporous structures with pore sizes ranging from 25 to 60 nm, obtained by controlling both etchant concentration and applied voltage. Compared to as-grown planar devices the nanoporous structures have exhibited a significant increase of photocurrent with a factor of up to four times. An incident photon conversion efficiency of up to 46% around the band edge of GaN has been achieved.

  20. Temperature coefficients for GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Aho, Arto; Isoaho, Riku; Tukiainen, Antti; Polojärvi, Ville; Aho, Timo; Raappana, Marianna; Guina, Mircea

    2015-09-28

    We report the temperature coefficients for MBE-grown GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb multijunction solar cells and the corresponding single junction sub-cells. Temperature-dependent current-voltage measurements were carried out using a solar simulator equipped with a 1000 W Xenon lamp and a three-band AM1.5D simulator. The triple-junction cell exhibited an efficiency of 31% at AM1.5G illumination and an efficiency of 37–39% at 70x real sun concentration. The external quantum efficiency was also measured at different temperatures. The temperature coefficients up to 80°C, for the open circuit voltage, the short circuit current density, and the conversion efficiency were determined to be −7.5 mV/°C, 0.040 mA/cm{sup 2}/°C, and −0.09%/°C, respectively.

  1. Polarization-induced Zener tunnel diodes in GaN/InGaN/GaN heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Xiaodong; Li, Wenjun; Islam, S. M.; Pourang, Kasra; Fay, Patrick; Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep

    2015-10-19

    By the insertion of thin In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N layers into Nitrogen-polar GaN p-n junctions, polarization-induced Zener tunnel junctions are studied. The reverse-bias interband Zener tunneling current is found to be weakly temperature dependent, as opposed to the strongly temperature-dependent forward bias current. This indicates tunneling as the primary reverse-bias current transport mechanism. The Indium composition in the InGaN layer is systematically varied to demonstrate the increase in the interband tunneling current. Comparing the experimentally measured tunneling currents to a model helps identify the specific challenges in potentially taking such junctions towards nitride-based polarization-induced tunneling field-effect transistors.

  2. How to Run a Meeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jay, Antony

    1976-01-01

    Offers guidelines on how to correct things that go wrong in meetings. Discusses functions of a meeting, distinctions in size and type of meetings, the chairman's role, defining meeting objectives, making preparations, and conducting a meeting that will meet its objectives. (Author/JG)

  3. Transport imaging for contact-free measurements of minority carrier diffusion in GaN, GaN/AlGaN, and GaN/InGaN core-shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Lee; Ong, C. P.; Cole, R. Adam; Haegel, N. M.; Talin, A. Alec; Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.

    2011-03-28

    Minority carrier diffusion lengths Ld are calculated for GaN, GaN/AlGaN, and GaN/InGaN core-shell nanowires using a procedure based on imaging of recombination luminescence. The result of shell material on conveyance properties is recorded. An AlGaN shell produces Ld values in surplus of 1μm and a relative insensitivity to wire diameter. An InGaN shell reduces effective diffusion length, while a dependence of Ld on diameter is observed for unshielded nanowires.

  4. Raman Spectroscopy on GaAs/GaP Nanowire Axial Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuda; Montazari, Mohammad; Smith, Leigh; Jackson, Howard; Yarrison-Rice, Jan; Gao, Qiang; Kang, Jung-Hyun; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-03-01

    We use Raman scattering to study the spatially-resolved strain and stress in Zinc Blende GaAs/GaP axial heterostructure nanowires at room temperature. The nanowires are grown by Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition in the [111] direction with Au nano particles as catalysts. After initial growth of a 6 μm-long GaP wire, a short GaAs segment is grown. Since Raman scattering reflects the phonon energies that are in turn related to the stress, we control the polarization of the incident and scattered light to acquire and resolve the TO1 (Transverse Optical) and TO2 phonon modes of both GaAs and GaP. High spatial resolution Raman scans along the nanowires show that the GaAs/GaP interface is clearly identifiable. Within the GaP section of the wire, GaP TO modes are observed at lower energies compared to bulk GaP since it is under tension, while GaAs shell TO modes are at higher energies than bulk GaAs since it is under compression. A strain gradient exists across the interface so the GaP phonon energies shift to lower and GaAs phonon shift to higher energies as one approaches the interface. We acknowledge the NSF through DMR-1105362, 1105121 and ECCS-1100489, and the ARC.

  5. GaAsP/InGaP heterojunction bipolar transistors grown by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidelberger, Christopher; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.

    2017-01-01

    Heterojunction bipolar transistors with GaAsxP1-x bases and collectors and InyGa1-yP emitters were grown on GaAs substrates via metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, fabricated using conventional techniques, and electrically tested. Four different GaAsxP1-x compositions were used, ranging from x = 0.825 to x = 1 (GaAs), while the InyGa1-yP composition was adjusted to remain lattice-matched to the GaAsP. DC gain close to or exceeding 100 is measured for 60 μm diameter devices of all compositions. Physical mechanisms governing base current and therefore current gain are investigated. The collector current is determined not to be affected by the barrier caused by the conduction band offset between the InGaP emitter and GaAsP base. While the collector current for the GaAs/InGaP devices is well-predicted by diffusion of electrons across the quasi-neutral base, the collector current of the GaAsP/InGaP devices exceeds this estimate by an order of magnitude. This results in higher transconductance for GaAsP/InGaP than would be estimated from known material properties.

  6. Effect of buffer structures on AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Xi, Y. Y.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.; Laboutin, O.; Cao, Yu; Johnson, Wayne J.; Kravchenko, Ivan I

    2012-01-01

    AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) with three different types of buffer layers, including a GaN/AlGaN composite layer, or 1 or 2 lm GaN thick layers, were fabricated and their reliability compared. The HEMTs with the thick GaN buffer layer showed the lowest critical voltage (Vcri) during off-state drain step-stress, but this was increased by around 50% and 100% for devices with the composite AlGaN/GaN buffer layers or thinner GaN buffers, respectively. The Voff - state for HEMTs with thin GaN and composite buffers were 100 V, however, this degraded to 50 60V for devices with thick GaN buffers due to the difference in peak electric field near the gate edge. A similar trend was observed in the isolation breakdown voltage measurements, with the highest Viso achieved based on thin GaN or composite buffer designs (600 700 V), while a much smaller Viso of 200V was measured on HEMTs with the thick GaN buffer layers. These results demonstrate the strong influence of buffer structure and defect density on AlGaN/GaN HEMT performance and reliability.

  7. Spatial Growth Modeling and High Resolution Remote Sensing Data Coupled with Air Quality Modeling to Assess the Impact of Atlanta, Georgia on the Local and Regional Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Crosson, William; Johnson, Hoyt; Khan, Maudood

    2006-01-01

    The growth of cities, both in population and areal extent, appears as an inexorable process. Urbanization continues at a rapid rate, and it is estimated that by the year 2025, 60 percent of the world s population will live in cities. Urban expansion has profound impacts on a host of biophysical, environmental, and atmospheric processes within an urban ecosystems perspective. A reduction in air quality over cities is a major result of these impacts. Because of its complexity, the urban landscape is not adequately captured in air quality models such as the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model that is used to assess whether urban areas are in attainment of EPA air quality standards, primarily for ground level ozone. This inadequacy of the CMAQ model to sufficiently respond to the heterogeneous nature of the urban landscape can impact how well the model predicts ozone levels over metropolitan areas and ultimately, whether cities exceed EPA ozone air quality standards. We are exploring the utility of high-resolution remote sensing data and urban spatial growth modeling (SGM) projections as improved inputs to a meteorological/air quality modeling system focusing on the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area as a case study. These growth projections include business as usual and smart growth scenarios out to 2030. The growth projections illustrate the effects of employing urban heat island mitigation strategies, such as increasing tree canopy and albedo across the Atlanta metro area, which in turn, are used to model how air temperature can potentially be moderated as impacts on elevating ground-level ozone, as opposed to not utilizing heat island mitigation strategies. The National Land Cover Dataset at 30m resolution is being used as the land use/land cover input and aggregated to the 4km scale for the MM5 mesoscale meteorological model and the CMAQ modeling schemes. Use of these data has been found to better characterize low density/suburban development as compared

  8. Remote Sensing and Spatial Growth Modeling Coupled with Air Quality Modeling to Assess the Impact of Atlanta, Georgia on the Local and Regional Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Crosson, William; Khan, Maudood

    2006-01-01

    The growth of cities, both in population and areal extent, appears as an inexorable process. Urbanization continues at a rapid rate, and it is estimated that by the year 2025, 80 percent of the world s population will live in cities. Directly aligned with the expansion of cities is urban sprawl. Urban expansion has profound impacts on a host of biophysical, environmental, and atmospheric processes. A reduction in air quality over cities is a major result of these impacts. Strategies that can be directly or indirectly implemented to help remediate air quality problems in cities and that can be accepted by political decision makers and the general public are now being explored to help bring down air pollutants and improve air quality. The urban landscape is inherently complex and this complexity is not adequately captured in air quality models, particularly the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model that is used to assess whether urban areas are in attainment of EPA air quality standards, primarily for ground level ozone. This inadequacy of the CMAQ model to sufficiently respond to the heterogeneous nature of the urban landscape can impact how well the model predicts ozone pollutant levels over metropolitan areas and ultimately, whether cities exceed EPA ozone air quality standards. We are exploring the utility of high-resolution remote sensing data and urban spatial growth modeling (SGM) projections as improved inputs to the meteorology component of the CMAQ model focusing on the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area as a case study. These growth projections include "business as usual" and "smart growth" scenarios out to 2030. The growth projections illustrate the effects of employing urban heat island mitigation strategies, such as increasing tree canopy and albedo across the Atlanta metro area, which in turn, are used to model how ozone and air temperature can potentially be moderated as impacts on elevating ground-level ozone, as opposed to not utilizing heat

  9. Remote Sensing and Spatial Growth Modeling Coupled With Air Quality Modeling to Assess the Impact of Atlanta, Georgia on the Local and Regional Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quattrochi, D. A.; Estes, M. G.; Crosson, W. L.; Johnson, H.; Khan, M.

    2006-05-01

    The growth of cities, both in population and areal extent, appears as an inexorable process. Urbanization continues at a rapid rate, and it is estimated that by the year 2025, 60 percent of the world's population will live in cities. Urban expansion has profound impacts on a host of biophysical, environmental, and atmospheric processes within an urban ecosystems perspective. A reduction in air quality over cities is a major result of these impacts. Because of its complexity, the urban landscape is not adequately captured in air quality models such as the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model that is used to assess whether urban areas are in attainment of EPA air quality standards, primarily for ground level ozone. This inadequacy of the CMAQ model to sufficiently respond to the heterogeneous nature of the urban landscape can impact how well the model predicts ozone levels over metropolitan areas and ultimately, whether cities exceed EPA ozone air quality standards. We are exploring the utility of high-resolution remote sensing data and urban spatial growth modeling (SGM) projections as improved inputs to a meteorological/air quality modeling system focusing on the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area as a case study. These growth projections include "business as usual" and "smart growth" scenarios out to 2030. The growth projections illustrate the effects of employing urban heat island mitigation strategies, such as increasing tree canopy and albedo across the Atlanta metro area, which in turn, are used to model how air temperature can potentially be moderated as impacts on elevating ground-level ozone, as opposed to not utilizing heat island mitigation strategies. The National Land Cover Dataset at 30m resolution is being used as the land use/land cover input and aggregated to the 4km scale for the MM5 mesoscale meteorological model and the CMAQ modeling schemes. Use of these data has been found to better characterize low density/suburban development as

  10. Perceived stress following race-based discrimination at work is associated with hypertension in African-Americans. The metro Atlanta heart disease study, 1999-2001.

    PubMed

    Din-Dzietham, Rebecca; Nembhard, Wendy N; Collins, Rakale; Davis, Sharon K

    2004-02-01

    There is increasing evidence of an association between stress related to job strain and hypertension. However little data exist on stress from racism and race-based discrimination at work (RBDW). The objective of this study was to investigate whether blood pressure (BP) outcomes are positively associated with stressful racism towards African-Americans from non-African-Americans as well as RBDW from other African-Americans. The metro Atlanta heart disease study was a population-based study which included 356 African-American men and women, aged >/=21 years, residing in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia during 1999-2001. Perceived stress was self-reported by 197 participants for racism from non-African-Americans and 95 for RBDW from other African-Americans. Sitting systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) BP were taken at a clinic visit and was the average of the last two of three BP measures. Hypertension was self-reported as physician-diagnosed high BP on 2 or more visits. Logistic and least-squares linear regression models were fit accordingly and separately for each type of stress, adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, and coping abilities. The likelihood of hypertension significantly increased with higher levels of perceived stress following racism from non-African-Americans, but not from RBDW from other African-Americans; adjusted odd ratios (95% CI) were 1.4 (1.0, 1.9) and 1.2 (0.8, 1.5) per unit increment of stress. The adjusted magnitude of SBP and DBP increase between low and very high level of stress, conversely, was greater when RBDW originated from African-Americans than racism from non-African-Americans. Stressful racism and RBDW encounters are associated with increased SBP and DBP and increased likelihood of hypertension in African-Americans. Future studies with a larger sample size are warranted to further explore these findings for mechanistic understanding and occupational policy consideration regarding stress risk reduction.

  11. Reliability, failure modes, and degradation mechanisms in high power single- and multi-mode InGaAs-AlGaAs strained quantum well lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, Yongkun; Presser, Nathan; Lingley, Zachary; Brodie, Miles; Foran, Brendan; Moss, Steven C.

    2016-03-01

    High power single-mode (SM) and multi-mode (MM) InGaAs-AlGaAs strained quantum well (QW) lasers are critical components for both telecommunications and potential space satellite communications systems. However, little has been reported on failure modes of state-of-the-art SM InGaAs-AlGaAs strained QW lasers although it is crucial to understand failure modes and underlying degradation mechanisms in developing these lasers that meet lifetime requirements for space satellite systems, where extremely high reliability of these lasers is required. Our present study addresses the aforementioned issues by performing long-term life tests under different test conditions followed by failure mode analysis (FMA) and physics of failure investigation. We performed long-term accelerated life-tests on state-of-the-art SM and MM InGaAs-AlGaAs strained QW lasers under ACC (automatic current control) mode. Our life-tests have accumulated over 25,000 test hours for SM lasers and over 35,000 test hours for MM lasers. FMA was performed on failed SM lasers using electron beam induced current (EBIC). This technique allowed us to identify failure types by observing dark line defects. All the SM failures we studied showed catastrophic and sudden degradation and all of these failures were bulk failures. Our group previously reported that bulk failure or COBD (catastrophic optical bulk damage) is the dominant failure mode of MM InGaAs-AlGaAs strained QW lasers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that the dominant failure mode of both SM and MM InGaAs-AlGaAs strained QW lasers is the bulk failure. Since degradation mechanisms responsible for COBD are still not well understood, we also employed other techniques including focused ion beam (FIB) processing and high-resolution TEM to further study dark line defects and dislocations in post-aged SM and MM lasers. Our long-term life test results and FMA results are reported.

  12. 18 CFR 375.101 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Commission is at 888 First Street, NE., Washington, DC 20426. Regional offices are maintained at Atlanta, GA... the United States. The time and place of meetings of the Commission are announced in advance as... members or by such agents as it may designate, conduct any hearing, or other inquiry necessary...

  13. 18 CFR 375.101 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Commission is at 888 First Street, NE., Washington, DC 20426. Regional offices are maintained at Atlanta, GA... the United States. The time and place of meetings of the Commission are announced in advance as... members or by such agents as it may designate, conduct any hearing, or other inquiry necessary...

  14. 18 CFR 375.101 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Commission is at 888 First Street, NE., Washington, DC 20426. Regional offices are maintained at Atlanta, GA... the United States. The time and place of meetings of the Commission are announced in advance as... members or by such agents as it may designate, conduct any hearing, or other inquiry necessary...

  15. NASA In-Space Propulsion Technologies and Their Infusion Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pencil, Eric J.; Anderson, David

    2013-01-01

    This is an overview presentation of In Space Propulsion Technology products that have been developed under the sponsorship of the Planetary Science Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate. The materials have been prepared for Outer Planetary Assessment Group Meeting in Atlanta, GA in January 2013.

  16. 75 FR 7283 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ....P.H., Scientific Review Officer, CDC, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., Mailstop E60, Atlanta, GA 30333... Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned meeting: Time and Date: 12 p.m.-2 p.m... Control and Prevention. BILLING CODE 4163-18-P...

  17. 77 FR 59735 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... Intl, ILS OR LOC RWY 8L, ILS RWY 8L (CAT II), ILS RWY 8L (CAT III), Amdt 3D Atlanta, GA, Hartsfield... LOC RWY 9L, Amdt 8D Atlanta, GA, Hartsfield--Jackson Atlanta Intl, ILS OR LOC RWY 9R, ILS RWY 9R (CAT II), ILS RWY 9R (CAT III), Amdt 17E Atlanta, GA, Hartsfield--Jackson Atlanta Intl, ILS OR LOC RWY...

  18. (68)Ga-PSMA PET/MR with multimodality image analysis for primary prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Eiber, Matthias; Nekolla, Stephan G; Maurer, Tobias; Weirich, Gregor; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Current imaging procedures for prostate cancer including positron emission tomography (PET) exhibit considerable limitations and are not always able to meet the diagnostic needs. Recently, a (68)Gallium-labeled ligand of the prostate-specific membrane antigen ((68)Ga-PSMA) has been introduced in PET-imaging of prostate cancer with first promising results. Due to relatively exclusive expression of PSMA in prostatic tissue as well as increased expression in prostate cancer, 68 Ga-PSMA was reported to exhibit a favorable lesion to background ratio. Together with the novel development of combined PET/MRI, the combination of excellent morphological detail, multiparametric functional information, and molecular PET data might lead to a significant improvement in detection of prostate cancer. We present an exemplarily case of primary staging using multiparametric (68)Ga-PSMA PET/MR by combining molecular and structural information.

  19. InGaAsN/GaAs heterojunction for multi-junction solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Kurtz, Steven R.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Klem, John F.; Jones, Eric D.

    2001-01-01

    An InGaAsN/GaAs semiconductor p-n heterojunction is disclosed for use in forming a 0.95-1.2 eV bandgap photodetector with application for use in high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells. The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction is formed by epitaxially growing on a gallium arsenide (GaAs) or germanium (Ge) substrate an n-type indium gallium arsenide nitride (InGaAsN) layer having a semiconductor alloy composition In.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x As.sub.1-y N.sub.y with 0GaAs layer, with the InGaAsN and GaAs layers being lattice-matched to the substrate. The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction can be epitaxially grown by either molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) or metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction provides a high open-circuit voltage of up to 0.62 volts and an internal quantum efficiency of >70%.

  20. High-temperature investigation of ZnS:Ga and CdSe:Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lott, K.; Nirk, T.; Volobujeva, O.; Shinkarenko, S.; Türn, L.; Kallavus, U.; Grebennik, A.; Vishnjakov, A.

    2006-04-01

    High-temperature electrical conductivity (HTEC) as a function of temperature T and metal component vapour pressure pMe has been studied in ZnS:Ga and CdSe:Ga single crystals. The dependence of the concentration of free carriers n, on pMe and T may be expressed as n∼pMeα exp (-ΔE/kT). The activation energies Δ E from HTEC isobars and slope α values from HTEC isotherms were determined. CdSe:Ga HTEC isotherm is independent of pCd at temperatures lower than 850 °C. Ga acts in CdSe as a donor with electroneutrality condition (ENC) and Ga mass balance condition (MBC) approximation n=[GaCdrad ]≈[Ga]. ZnS:Ga isotherms characterize with α≈0.5 at temperatures higher than 1070 °C. ENC and Ga MBC approximation [GaZnrad ]=[(GaV)/]≈1/2[Ga] characterize Ga self-compensation in ZnS:Ga.

  1. MOVPE of GaSb/InGaAsSb Multilayers and Fabrication of Dual Band Photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiao, Ye-Gao; Bhat, Ishwara; Refaat, Tamer F.; Abedin, M. Nurul; Shao, Qing-Hui

    2005-01-01

    Metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) of GaSb/InGaAsSb multilayer thin films and fabrication of bias-selectable dual band photodetectors are reported. For the dual band photodetectors the short wavelength detector, or the upper p- GaSb/n-GaSb junction photodiode, is placed optically ahead of the long wavelength one, or the lower photodiode. The latter is based on latticed-matched In0.13Ga0.87As0.11Sb0.89 with bandgap near 0.6 eV. Specifically, high quality multilayer thin films are grown sequentially from top to bottom as p+-GaSb/p-GaSb/n-GaSb/n-InGaAsSb/p-InGaAsSb/p-GaSb on undoped p-type GaSb substrate, and as n-GaSb/p-GaSb/p-InGaAsSb/n-InGaAsSb/n-GaSb on Te-doped n-type GaSb substrate respectively. The multilayer thin films are characterized by optical microscope, atomic force microscope (AFM), electron microprobe analyses etc. The photodiode mesa steps are patterned by photolithography with wet chemical etching and the front metallization is carried out by e-beam evaporation with Pd/Ge/Au/Ti/Au to give ohmic contact on both n- and p-type Sb based layer surfaces. Dark I-V measurements show typical diode behavior for both the upper and lower photodiodes. The photoresponsivity measurements indicate that both the upper and lower photodiodes can sense the infrared illumination corresponding to their cutoff wavelengths respectively, comparable with the simulation results. More work is underway to bring the long wavelength band to the medium infrared wavelength region near 4 micrometers.

  2. Rapid thermal anneal in InP, GaAs and GaAs/GaAlAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descouts, B.; Duhamel, N.; Godefroy, S.; Krauz, P.

    Ion implantation in semiconductors provides a doping technique with several advantages over more conventional doping methods and is now extensively used for device applications, e.g. field effect transistors (MESFET GaAs, MIS (InP), GaAs/GaAlAs heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBT). Because of the lattice disorder produced by the implantation, the dopant must be made electrically active by a postimplant anneal. As the device performances are very dependent on its electrical characteristics, the anneal is a very important stage of the process. Rapid anneal is known to provide less exodiffusion and less induffusion of impurities compared to conventional furnace anneal, so this technique has been used in this work to activate an n-type dopant (Si) in InP and a p-type dopant (Mg) in GaAs and GaAs/GaAIAs. These two ions have been chosen to realize implanted MIS InP and the base contacts for GaAs/GaAlAs HBTs. The experimental conditions to obtain the maximum electrical activity in these two cases will be detailed. For example, although we have not been able to obtain a flat profile in Mg + implanted GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructure by conventional thermal anneal, rapid thermal anneal gives a flat hole profile over a depth of 0.5 μm with a concentration of 1 x 10 19 cm -3.

  3. AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with selective area grown p-GaN gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuliang, Huang; Lian, Zhang; Zhe, Cheng; Yun, Zhang; Yujie, Ai; Yongbing, Zhao; Hongxi, Lu; Junxi, Wang; Jinmin, Li

    2016-11-01

    We report a selective area growth (SAG) method to define the p-GaN gate of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Compared with Schottky gate HEMTs, the SAG p-GaN gate HEMTs show more positive threshold voltage (V th) and better gate control ability. The influence of Cp2Mg flux of SAG p-GaN gate on the AlGaN/GaN HEMTs has also been studied. With the increasing Cp2Mg from 0.16 μmol/min to 0.20 μmol/min, the V th raises from -0.67 V to -0.37 V. The maximum transconductance of the SAG HEMT at a drain voltage of 10 V is 113.9 mS/mm while that value of the Schottky HEMT is 51.6 mS/mm. The SAG method paves a promising way for achieving p-GaN gate normally-off AlGaN/GaN HEMTs without dry etching damage. Project supported by the National Natural Sciences Foundation of China (Nos. 61376090, 61306008) and the National High Technology Program of China (No. 2014AA032606).

  4. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of GaAs, GaAs +, and GaAs -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, K.

    1990-02-01

    Twenty electronic states of GaAs, 12 electronic states of GaAs +, and 13 electronic states of GaAs - are investigated using relativistic ab initio complete active space MCSCF (CASSCF) followed by large-scale configuration interaction calculations which included up to 700 000 configurations. Potential energy curves and spectroscopic constants of all these states of three radicals are obtained. Spectroscopic constants of low-lying states of GaAs are in very good agreement with both experiment and all-electron results. Two nearly-degenerate states of 2Σ +, 2Π ( 2Σ + lower) symmetries are found as candidates for the ground state of GaAs -. The GaAs - negative ion is found to be more stable compared to the neutral GaAs ( De(GaAs -) = 3 eV). The electron affinity of GaAs is computed as 0.89 and 1.3 eV at the FOCI and SOCI levels of theory, respectively. Calculated potential energy curves of GaAs are in accord with the experimentally observed predissociation in the 3Π( III) - X3Σ- system.

  5. InGaP-based InGaAs quantum dot solar cells with GaAs spacer layer fabricated using solid-source molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugaya, T.; Takeda, A.; Oshima, R.; Matsubara, K.; Niki, S.; Okano, Y.

    2012-09-01

    We report InGaP-based multistacked InGaAs quantum dot (QD) solar cells with GaAs spacer layers. We obtain a highly stacked and well-aligned InGaAs QD structure with GaAs spacer layers in an InGaP matrix grown by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. The photoluminescence intensity of the InGaAs QDs in the InGaP matrix increases as the number of QD layers increases, which indicates the growth of a high-quality InGaP-based multistacked InGaAs QD structure. The short-circuit current density and the conversion efficiency of the InGaP-based QD solar cells increase as the number of InGaAs QD layers increases.

  6. EDITORIAL: Nano Meets Spectroscopy Nano Meets Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David J. S.

    2012-08-01

    The multidisciplinary two-day Nano Meets Spectroscopy (NMS) event was held at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Teddington, UK, in September 2011. The event was planned from the outset to be at the interface of several areas—in particular, spectroscopy and nanoscience, and to bring together topics and people with different approaches to achieving common goals in biomolecular science. Hence the meeting cut across traditional boundaries and brought together researchers using diverse techniques, particularly fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. Despite engaging common problems, these techniques are frequently seen as mutually exclusive with the two communities rarely interacting at conferences. The meeting was widely seen to have lived up to its billing in good measure. It attracted the maximum capacity of ~120 participants, including 22 distinguished speakers (9 from outside the UK), over 50 posters and a vibrant corporate exhibition comprising 10 leading instrument companies and IOP Publishing. The organizers were Professor David Birch (Chair), Dr Karen Faulds and Professor Duncan Graham of the University of Strathclyde, Professor Cait MacPhee of the University of Edinburgh and Dr Alex Knight of NPL. The event was sponsored by the European Science Foundation, the Institute of Physics, the Royal Society of Chemistry, NPL and the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance. The full programme and abstracts are available at http://sensor.phys.strath.ac.uk/nms/program.php. The programme was quite ambitious in terms of the breadth and depth of scope. The interdisciplinary and synergistic concept of 'X meets Y' played well, cross-fertilization between different fields often being a source of inspiration and progress. Fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy provided the core, but the meeting had little repetition and also attracted contributions on more specialist techniques such as CARS, super-resolution, single molecule and chiral methods. In terms of application the

  7. Shape Engineering Driven by Selective Growth of SnO2 on Doped Ga2O3 Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Orts, Manuel; Sánchez, Ana M; Hindmarsh, Steven A; López, Iñaki; Nogales, Emilio; Piqueras, Javier; Méndez, Bianchi

    2017-01-11

    Tailoring the shape of complex nanostructures requires control of the growth process. In this work, we report on the selective growth of nanostructured tin oxide on gallium oxide nanowires leading to the formation of SnO2/Ga2O3 complex nanostructures. Ga2O3 nanowires decorated with either crossing SnO2 nanowires or SnO2 particles have been obtained in a single step treatment by thermal evaporation. The reason for this dual behavior is related to the growth direction of trunk Ga2O3 nanowires. Ga2O3 nanowires grown along the [001] direction favor the formation of crossing SnO2 nanowires. Alternatively, SnO2 forms rhombohedral particles on [110] Ga2O3 nanowires leading to skewer-like structures. These complex oxide structures were grown by a catalyst-free vapor-solid process. When pure Ga and tin oxide were used as source materials and compacted powders of Ga2O3 acted as substrates, [110] Ga2O3 nanowires grow preferentially. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis reveals epitaxial relationship lattice matching between the Ga2O3 axis and SnO2 particles, forming skewer-like structures. The addition of chromium oxide to the source materials modifies the growth direction of the trunk Ga2O3 nanowires, growing along the [001], with crossing SnO2 wires. The SnO2/Ga2O3 junctions does not meet the lattice matching condition, forming a grain boundary. The electronic and optical properties have been studied by XPS and CL with high spatial resolution, enabling us to get both local chemical and electronic information on the surface in both type of structures. The results will allow tuning optical and electronic properties of oxide complex nanostructures locally as a function of the orientation. In particular, we report a dependence of the visible CL emission of SnO2 on its particular shape. Orange emission dominates in SnO2/Ga2O3 crossing wires while green-blue emission is observed in SnO2 particles attached to Ga2O3 trunks. The results show that the Ga2O3-SnO2

  8. RAS Ordinary Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-02-01

    At the October 2013 meeting the President presented the Gold Medal to Prof. Chris Chapman, the Eddington Medal to Prof. James Binney, and Winton Capital Award to Dr Katherine Joy. Prof. Bob White gave the Harold Jeffreys Lecture on "Building the dynamic crust of Iceland by rifting and volcanism". At the November meeting, Prof. Eline Tolstoy gave the George Darwin Lecture on "Galactic palaeontology".

  9. Holding Effective Board Meetings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Administrators, Arlington, VA.

    Advice and tested methods for management of meetings from superintendents and board members are combined in this reference book on conducting effective school board meetings. Intended for a wide readership, it contains three chapters and an exhibit section comprising over one-third of the document. Following a brief introduction, chapter 1,…

  10. Progress in GaAs/CuInSe2 tandem junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, N. P.; Burgess, R. M.; Mickelsen, R. A.; Stanbery, B. J.; Mcclelland, R. W.; King, B. D.; Gale, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    Much more power is required for spacecraft of the future than current vehicles. To meet this increased demand for power while simultaneously meeting other requirements for launch, deployment, and maneuverability, the development of higher-efficiency, lighter-weight, and more radiation resistant photovoltaic cells is essential. Mechanically stacked tandem junction solar cells based on (AlGaAs)GaAs thin film CLEFT (Cleavage of Lateral Epitaxial Film for Transfer) top cells and CuInSe2(CIS) thin film bottom cells are being developed to meet these power needs. The mechanically stacked tandem configuration is chosen due to its interconnect flexibility allowing more efficient array level performance. It also eliminates cell fabrication processing constraints associated with monolithically integrated multi-junction approaches, thus producing higher cell fabrication yields. The GaAs cell is used as the top cell due to its demonstrated high efficiency, and good radiation resistance. Furthermore, it offers a future potential for bandgap tuning using AlGaAs as the absorber to maximize cell performance. The CuInSe2 cell is used as the bottom cell due to superb radiation resistance, stability, and optimal bandgap value in combination with an AlGaAs top cell. Since both cells are incorporated as thin films, this approach provides a potential for very high specific power. This high specific power (W/kg), combined with high power density (W/sq m) resulting from the high efficiency of this approach, makes these cells ideally suited for various space applications.

  11. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings Held in Boston, Massachusetts on 4-6 December 1991. Low Temperature (LT) GaAs and Related Materials. Volume 241.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-14

    1991, ISBN: 1-55899-118-2 Volume 225-Materials Reliability Issues in Microelectronics, J.R. Lloyd, P.S Ho, C.T. Sah, F. Yost, 1991, ISBN: 1-55899-119...sidegating is observed. Hewlett Packard has performed extensive reliability tests on LTG GaAs and has found that the material meets their stability...advantage for systems applications in which size, cost, reliability , and performance are factors. CONCLUSIONS The device applications of LTG GaAs

  12. Medium energy proton radiation damage to (AlGa)As-GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loo, R. Y.; Kamath, G. S.; Knechtli, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of (AlGa)As-GaAs solar cells irradiated by medium energy 2, 5, and 10 MeV protons was evaluated. The Si cells without coverglass and a number of GaAs solar cells with 12 mil coverglass were irradiated simultaneously with bare GaAs cells. The cell degradation is directly related to the penetration of depth of protons with GaAs. The influence of periodic and continuous thermal annealing on the GaAs solar cells was investigated.

  13. Indium Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride (InGaN/GaN) Nanorods Superlattice (SL)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-10

    of high-brightness and high-efficiency LEDs using dislocation-free InGaN /GaN SL NRAs by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The benefits of the... InGaN /GaN SL NRA LEDs are examined in this work, and their characteristics are compared to those of conventional broad area(BA) LEDs . The NRs SL were...demonstrates realization of high-brightness and high-efficiency LEDs using dislocation-free InGaN /GaN SL Nano rods arrays (NRAs) by hydride vapor

  14. Magnetism and transport properties of epitaxial Fe-Ga thin films on GaAs(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anh Tuan, Duong; Duc Dung, Dang; Thanh Son, Vo; Shin, Yooleemi; Cho, Sunglae

    2012-04-01

    Epitaxial Fe-Ga thin films in disordered bcc α-Fe crystal structure (A2) have been grown on GaAs(001) by molecular beam epitaxy. The saturated magnetization (MS) decreased from 1371 to 1105 kA/m with increasing Ga concentration from 10.5 to 24.3 % at room temperature. The lattice parameter increased with the increase in Ga content because of the larger atomic radius of Ga atom than that of Fe. The increase in carrier density with Ga content caused in lower resistivity.

  15. High-power UV InGaN/AlGaN double-heterostructure LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Takashi; Morita, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shuji

    1998-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) InGaN/AlGaN double-heterostructure (DH) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with an external quantum efficiency of 7.5%, an output power of 5 mW and an emission wavelength of 371 nm were developed. High-power UV LEDs are obtained using an InGaN active layer with a thickness of 400 Å instead of a GaN active layer. The localized energy states caused by In composition fluctuation in the InGaN active layer are related to the high efficiency of the InGaN-based LEDs.

  16. Engineering of electric field distribution in GaN(cap)/AlGaN/GaN heterostructures: theoretical and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladysiewicz, M.; Janicki, L.; Misiewicz, J.; Sobanska, M.; Klosek, K.; Zytkiewicz, Z. R.; Kudrawiec, R.

    2016-09-01

    Polarization engineering of GaN-based heterostructures opens a way to develop advanced transistor heterostructures, although measurement of the electric field in such heterostructures is not a simple task. In this work, contactless electroreflectance (CER) spectroscopy has been applied to measure the electric field in GaN-based heterostructures. For a set of GaN(d  =  0, 5, 15, and 30 nm)/AlGaN(20 nm)/GaN(buffer) heterostructures a decrease of electric field in the GaN(cap) layer from 0.66 MV cm-1 to 0.27 MV cm-1 and an increase of the electric field in the AlGaN layer from 0.57 MV cm-1 to 0.99 MV cm-1 have been observed with the increase in the GaN(cap) thickness from 5-30 nm. For a set of GaN(20 nm)/AlGaN(d  =  10, 20, 30, and 40 nm)/GaN(buffer) heterostructures a decrease of the electric field in the AlGaN layer from 1.77 MV cm-1 to 0.64 MV cm-1 and an increase of the electric field in the GaN layer from 0.57 MV cm-1 to 0.99 MV cm-1 were observed with the increase in the AlGaN thickness from 10-40 nm. To determine the distribution of the electric field in these heterostructures the Schrödinger and Poisson equations are solved in a self-consistent manner and matched with experimental data. It is shown that the built-in electric field in the GaN(cap) and AlGaN layers obtained from measurements does not reach values of electric field resulting only from polarization effects. The measured electric fields are smaller due to a screening of polarization effects by free carriers, which are inhomogeneously distributed across the heterostructure and accumulate at interfaces. The results clearly demonstrate that CER measurements supported by theoretical calculations are able to determine the electric field distribution in GaN-based heterostructures quantitatively, which is very important for polarization engineering in this material system.

  17. Knoxville Utilities Board Meets Major Consent Decree Milestones

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (05/27/15)- ATLANTA - The Knoxville Utilities Board (KUB) has completed a mix of sewer replacement, rehabilitation and ongoing maintenance work together with two supplemental environmental projects throughout Knoxville and Knox County, as required un

  18. Internal quantum efficiency in yellow-amber light emitting AlGaN-InGaN-GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, Thi Huong; Gil, Bernard; Valvin, Pierre; Damilano, Benjamin; Lekhal, Kaddour; De Mierry, Philippe

    2015-09-21

    We determine the internal quantum efficiency of strain-balanced AlGaN-InGaN-GaN hetero-structures designed for yellow-amber light emission, by using a recent model based on the kinetics of the photoluminescence decay initiated by Iwata et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 075701 (2015)]. Our results indicate that low temperature internal quantum efficiencies sit in the 50% range and we measure that adding an AlGaN layer increases the internal quantum efficiency from 50% up to 57% with respect to the GaN-InGaN case. More dramatic, it almost doubles from 2.5% up to 4.3% at room temperature.

  19. Meeting Report: Ordinary Meeting and Exhibition Meeting, 2006 June 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, H.; Mobberley, M.

    2007-06-01

    Prior to the Ordinary Meeting, the annual Exhibition was opened by Richard Miles, President, who said he was pleased to report that all but two of the Sections had display stands this year, and that most of the Directors had also been able to attend and were available for members who wished to discuss their work. Although we had almost a full day of talks to enjoy, members should not be shy of coming and going from the lecture theatre at will, and in particular must make sure they took sufficient time to do justice to the excellent Exhibition on offer.

  20. GaN Electronics For High Power, High Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect

    PEARTON,S.J.; REN,F.; ZHANG,A.P.; DANG,G.; CAO,X.A.; LEE,K.P.; CHO,H.; GILA,B.P.; JOHNSON,J.W.; MONIER,C.; ABERNATHY,C.R.; HAN,JUNG; BACA,ALBERT G.; CHYI,J.-I.; LEE,C.-M.; NEE,T.-E.; CHUO,C.-C.; CHU,S.N.G.

    2000-06-12

    A brief review is given of recent progress in fabrication of high voltage GaN and AlGaN rectifiers. GaN/AlGaN heterojunction bipolar transistors and GaN metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors. Improvements in epitaxial layer quality and in fabrication techniques have led to significant advances in device performance.