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Sample records for meeting atlanta ga

  1. 75 FR 2582 - Proposed Modification of the Atlanta, GA, Class B Airspace Area; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ..., in Covington, GA, as published in the Federal Register on Friday, December 4, 2009 (74 FR 63818), FR... Federal Aviation Administration Proposed Modification of the Atlanta, GA, Class B Airspace Area; Public... Friday, December 4, 2009, concerning a proposal to revise Class B airspace at Atlanta, GA, (74 FR...

  2. American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (ASCPT)-111th annual meeting. 17-20 March 2010, Atlanta, GA, USA.

    PubMed

    Veryard, Claire

    2010-05-01

    The 111th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, held in Atlanta, included topics covering disclosures of new data in the field of pharmacokinetics and drug interactions. This conference report highlights selected presentations on pharmacokinetic studies of several investigational drugs, including evatanepag (Pfizer Inc), AEG-33773 (Aegera Therapeutics Inc), JNJ-16269110 (Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development LLC), PF-3716539 (ViiV Healthcare), MK-0736 (Merck & Co Inc), a combination of Ginkgo biloba and cilostazol (Renexin SK Chemicals Co Ltd), PP-101 (Pacific Pharmaceuticals Co Ltd), ACT-178882 (Acetlion Ltd/Merck & Co Inc) and edoxaban (Daiichi Sankyo Co Ltd).

  3. RadNet Air Data From Atlanta, GA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Atlanta, GA from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  4. EPA Hosts Environmental Justice Interagency Working Group Meeting in Atlanta to address Concerns in North Birmingham Communities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (ATLANTA - February 17, 2016) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will host a Federal Interagency Working Group on Environmental Justice Meeting (EJ IWG) on Thursday, February 18, 2016 in the Sam Nunn Federal Building in Atlanta, GA. The EJ IWG

  5. EPA Awards Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Ga. with Grant to Develop Innovative Sustainable Projects

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) awarded the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Ga. with a People, Prosperity and the Planet (P3) grants. Nationally, the grants were awarded to 38 university student teams for p

  6. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy to speak at the 1st International Environmental Youth Symposium 2015 in Atlanta, Ga.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its Global Partners will host the first International Youth Environmental Symposium at the Sam Nunn Atlanta Federal Center in Atlanta, Ga. on October 2, 2015. The theme for the symposium i

  7. 77 FR 8255 - Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site, Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... AGENCY Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site, Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... entered into a settlement for past response costs concerning the Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site... available from Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site...

  8. 77 FR 2981 - Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site; Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), the United States Environmental Protection Agency has entered into a settlement for past response costs concerning the Constitution Road Drum... AGENCY Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site; Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement...

  9. 76 FR 45771 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, GA; Application for Manufacturing Authority; Makita Corporation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 26--Atlanta, GA; Application for Manufacturing Authority... Manufacturing); Buford, GA An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones Board (the Board) by Georgia Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 26, requesting manufacturing authority on behalf...

  10. 77 FR 75406 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, GA; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Perkins Shibaura...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 26--Atlanta, GA; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Perkins Shibaura Engines LLC, (Diesel Engines), Griffin, GA Perkins Shibaura Engines LLC (Perkins Shibaura), an operator of FTZ 26, submitted a...

  11. Summary of Needs and Opportunities from the 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting: Atlanta, Georgia -- March 16-18, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-05-01

    This summary report outlines needs and issues for increasing energy efficiency of new and existing U.S homes, as identified at the U.S Department of Energy Building America program Spring 2011 stakeholder meeting in Atlanta, Georgia.

  12. 77 FR 52310 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, GA, Application for Reorganization (Expansion of Service Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 26--Atlanta, GA, Application for Reorganization (Expansion of Service Area), Under the Alternative Site Framework, Amendment of Application A request has been submitted...

  13. EPA Awards Environmental Education Grant to Captain Planet Foundation in Atlanta, GA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA --- Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the Captain Planet Foundation as a recipient of an Environmental Education Grant. The Atlanta-based non-profit was selected in the latest round of awards

  14. Destination Station Atlanta

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Destination Station was recently in Atlanta from April 15 through April 21. During the week, NASA visited schools, hospitals, museums, and the city’s well known Atlanta Science Tavern Meet Up gro...

  15. Understanding the emission impacts of HOV to HOT lane conversions: Experience from Atlanta, GA.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanzhi Ann; Liu, Haobing; Rodgers, Michael O; Guin, Angshuman; Hunter, Michael; Sheikh, Adnan; Guensler, Randall L

    2017-03-27

    Converting a congested High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane into a High Occupancy Toll (HOT) lane is a viable option for improving travel time reliability for carpools and buses that use the managed lane. However, the emission impacts of HOV-to-HOT-conversions are not well understood. The lack of emissions impact quantification for HOT conversions creates a policy challenge for agencies making transportation funding choices. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the case study before-and-after changes in vehicle emissions for the Atlanta, GA I-85 HOV/HOT lane conversion project, implemented in October, 2011. The analyses employed the Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) for project-level analysis with monitored changes in vehicle activity data collected by Georgia Tech researchers for the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT). During the quarterly field data collection from 2010 to 2012, more than 1.5 million license plates were observed and matched to vehicle class and age information using the vehicle registration database. The study also utilized the 20-second, lane-specific traffic operations data from the Georgia NaviGAtor intelligent transportation system, as well as a direct feed of HOT lane usage data from the State Road and Tollway Authority (SRTA) managed lane system. As such, the analyses in this paper simultaneously assessed the impacts associated with changes in traffic volumes, onroad operating conditions, and fleet composition before-and-after the conversion. Both greenhouse gases and criteria pollutants were examined. Implications A straight before-after analysis showed about 5% decrease in air pollutants and CO2. However, when the before-after calendar year of analysis was held constant (to account for the effect of one-year of fleet turnover), mass emissions at the analysis site during peak hours increased by as much as 17%, with little change in CO2. Further investigation revealed that a large percentage decrease in criteria pollutants in

  16. The motion of floating and submerged objects in the Chattahoochee River, Atlanta, GA.

    PubMed

    Dilen, D R

    1984-10-01

    Two mannikins, one designed to float and one designed to sink, were used to examine the ways in which human bodies move in a river. The floating mannikin was used to examine the movement of a body floating downstream on the surface and to determined the flow patterns of surface currents through bends in the Chattahoochee River in Atlanta, GA. The submerged mannikin was constructed to have a specific gravity of a deceased person (over a range of specific gravities) and was used to examine the motion of a body immediately upon entering the water. The submerged mannikin also was used to examine motion along the bottom of the river. Floating objects near each bank of the Chattahoochee River were found to remain along their respective banks as they moved downstream through the bends in the river. No mechanisms of transport from one bank to the other in the bends was found. The movement of a submerged dummy only occurred at very high river flows. The dummy remained stationary at the place where it reached the bottom for tests over a wide range of specific gravities and a moderate range of flow levels. A discussion of the river conditions (for example, bottom topography, bottom composition, flow rates, and hydraulics) is included. The results of the experiments offer initial guidelines and principles that can be used by officials and agencies involved in the search, rescue, and recovery of bodies in most rivers.

  17. Characterization of CCN and IN activity of bacterial isolates collected in Atlanta, GA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdue, Sara; Waters, Samantha; Karthikeyan, Smruthi; Konstantinidis, Kostas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    Characterization of CCN activity of bacteria, other than a few select types such as Pseudomonas syringae, is limited, especially when looked at in conjunction with corresponding IN activity. The link between these two points is especially important for bacteria as those that have high CCN activity are likely to form an aqueous phase required for immersion freezing. Given the high ice nucleation temperature of bacterial cells, especially in immersion mode, it is important to characterize the CCN and IN activity of many different bacterial strains. To this effect, we developed a droplet freezing assay (DFA) which consists of an aluminum cold plate, cooled by a continuous flow of an ethylene glycol-water mixture, in order to observe immersion freezing of the collected bacteria. Here, we present the initial results on the CCN and IN activities of bacterial samples we have collected in Atlanta, GA. Bacterial strains were collected and isolated from rainwater samples taken from different storms throughout the year. We then characterized the CCN activity of each strain using a DMT Continuous Flow Streamwise Thermal Gradient CCN Counter by exposing the aerosolized bacteria to supersaturations ranging from 0.05% to 0.6%. Additionally, using our new DFA, we characterized the IN activity of each bacterial strain at temperatures ranging from -20oC to 0oC. The combined CCN and IN activity gives us valuable information on how some uncharacterized bacteria contribute to warm and mixed-phase cloud formation in the atmosphere.

  18. Major subtypes of invasive Haemophilus influenzae from 1983 to 1985 in Atlanta, Ga.

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, J A; Pigott, N; Cochi, S L; Facklam, R R

    1990-01-01

    We compared outer membrane protein (OMP) patterns of Haemophilus influenzae isolated in metropolitan Atlanta, Ga., from July 1983 to June 1985. Of 74 randomly selected H. influenzae serotype b, biotype I, isolates (24% of the total number of H. influenzae, and 32% of the total number of H. influenzae serotype b, biotype I, isolates), 66 (89.2%) had the same OMP pattern. Of the remaining eight, five (6.7%) had an identical OMP pattern. The other three isolates had separate and distinct patterns. A greater diversity of OMP patterns was found with H. influenzae serotype b, biotype II, and nonserotypeable H. influenzae. Of the 18 H. influenzae serotype b, biotype II, isolates (5.8% of the total number of H. influenzae isolates), 1 had an OMP pattern similar to that of the predominate biotype I OMP type, 6 (33% of the biotype II) had the same pattern, and 11 had heterogeneous patterns. Of the 19 recoverable, nonserotypeable biotype II isolates (6.8% of the total number of H. influenzae), 18 had different OMP patterns, and no pattern was similar to those observed with serotype b. These findings indicate that most H. influenzae strains isolated during this 2-year period were indistinguishable by serotype, biotype, or OMP patterns. Images PMID:2191007

  19. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. VIEW OF APARTMENT INTERIOR. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  20. 75 FR 41884 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Georgia Department of Transportation, Atlanta, GA; University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ...; University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA; and University of Georgia, Athens, GA AGENCY: National Park... Georgia, Athens, GA. The human remains were removed from Richmond County, GA. This notice is published as...

  1. 77 FR 5429 - Proposed Modification of the Atlanta Class B Airspace Area; GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Proposed Rulemaking Distribution System, which describes the application procedure. Background The primary... tailored to fit the operational needs of the primary airport. Atlanta's airspace system could not be set up... proposed ``wings'' in the four quadrants ] should be retained because eliminating the wings exposes...

  2. 75 FR 62323 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Atlanta, GA; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... Completeness Determination for the Purpose of Stopping Sanctions Clock AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of Letter to Governor Regarding Completeness and Stopping of Sanctions Clock... Plan (SIP) revision complete and stop the sanctions clocks associated with the Atlanta, Georgia,...

  3. ANALYSIS OF COMPONENTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) FOR AN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT STUDY OF TWO SENSITIVE COHORTS IN ATLANTA, GA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction
    An exposure assessment study was conducted in Atlanta, GA during fall 1999 and spring 2000 to examine the short-term effects of exposure to particulate matter and gaseous air pollutants on heart rate variability (HRV). Characterization of particulate matter (PM...

  4. ANALYSIS OF COMPONENTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) FOR AN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT STUDY OF TWO SENSITIVE COHORTS IN ATLANTA, GA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction
    An exposure assessment study was conducted in Atlanta, GA during fall 1999 and spring 2000 to examine the short-term effects of exposure to particulate matter and gaseous air pollutants on heart rate variability (HRV). Characterization of particulate matter (PM...

  5. Impacts of cool cities on air quality: A preliminary modeling assessment for Nashville TN, Dallas TX and Atlanta GA

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, Haider

    1998-06-15

    Previous atmospheric modeling efforts that concentrated on the Los Angeles Basin suggested beneficial and significant air quality impacts from cool cities strategies. This paper discusses an extension of similar modeling efforts to three regions, Atlanta GA, Dallas - Ft. Worth TX, and Nashville TN, that experience smog and air quality problems. According to the older ozone air quality standard (120 ppb), these regions were classified as serious, moderate, and marginal, respectively, but may be out of compliance with respect to the newer, 80-ppb/8-hours standard. Results from this exploratory modeling work suggest a range of possible impacts on meteorological and air quality conditions. For example, peak ozone concentrations during each region's respective episode could be decreased by 1-6 ppb (conservative and optimistic scenarios, respectively) in Nashville, 5-15 ppb in Dallas - Fort Worth, and 5-12 ppb in Atlanta following implementation of cool cities. The reductions are generally smaller than those obtained from simulating the Los Angeles Basin but are still significant. In all regions, the simulations suggest, the net, domain-wide effects of cool cities are reductions in ozone mass and improvements in air quality. In Atlanta, Nashville, and Dallas, urban areas benefiting from reduced smog reach up to 8460, 7350, and 12870 km{sup 2} in area, respectively. Results presented in this paper should be taken as exploratory and preliminary. These will most likely change during a more comprehensive modeling study to be started soon with the support of the US Environmental Protection Agency. The main purpose of the present project was to obtain the initial data (emission inventories) for these regions, simulate meteorological conditions, and perform preliminary sensitivity analysis. In the future, additional regions will be simulated to assess the potential of cool cities in improving urban air quality.

  6. Technical report. Graduate Student Focus on Diversity Workshop, 1999 SIAM Annual Meeting, Atlanta, Georgia, May 12, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-12

    The Third SIAM Graduate Student Focus on Diversity workshop was held May 12 at the Sheraton Atlanta Hotel on the first day of the 1999 SIAM Annual Meeting. The day-long workshop consisted of several different activities: eight technical talks by under-represented minority graduate students, a lively panel discussion concerning the benefits of undergraduate summer research programs, informal luncheon and pizza breaks to foster social interaction, and an evening forum with candid discussions of graduate school experiences from a minority graduate student perspective. These sessions were open to the entire SIAM community and served to highlight the progress, achievements, and aspirations of the workshop participants.

  7. Road Dust Lead (Pb) in Two Neighborhoods of Urban Atlanta, (GA, USA)

    PubMed Central

    Deocampo, Daniel M.; Reed, Jack; Kalenuik, Alexander P.

    2012-01-01

    Road dust continues to be a major potential reservoir of Pb in the urban environment, and an important potential component of child Pb exposure. This study presents ICP-AES analyses of metals in 72 samples of road dust (<250 µm) collected in the urban core of Atlanta, Georgia. In the Downtown area, median Pb concentrations are ~63 mg/kg Pb, with high values of 278 mg/kg. For comparison, median Pb values in a nearby residential neighborhood (also in the urban core) were ~93 mg/kg, with a high of 972 mg/kg. Geospatial variability is high, with significant variation observed over tens to hundreds of meters. Spearman Rank Correlation tests suggest that Pb and other metals (Cu, Ni, V, Zn) are associated with iron and manganese oxide phases in the residential area, as reported in other cities. However, Pb in the Downtown area is not correlated with the others, suggesting a difference in source or transport history. Given these complexities and the expected differences between road dust and soil Pb, future efforts to assess exposure risk should therefore be based on spatially distributed sampling at very high spatial resolution. PMID:22829787

  8. Custodial Homes, Therapeutic Homes, and Parental Acceptance: Parental Experiences of Autism in Kerala, India and Atlanta, GA USA.

    PubMed

    Sarrett, Jennifer C

    2015-06-01

    The home is a critical place to learn about cultural values of childhood disability, including autism and intellectual disabilities. The current article describes how the introduction of autism into a home and the availability of intervention options change the structure and meaning of a home and reflect parental acceptance of a child's autistic traits. Using ethnographic data from Kerala, India and Atlanta, GA USA, a description of two types of homes are developed: the custodial home, which is primarily focused on caring for basic needs, and the therapeutic home, which is focused on changing a child's autistic traits. The type of home environment is respondent to cultural practices of child rearing in the home and influences daily activities, management, and care in the home. Further, these homes differ in parental acceptance of their autistic children's disabilities, which is critical to understand when engaging in international work related to autism and intellectual disability. It is proposed that parental acceptance can be fostered through the use of neurodiverse notions that encourage autism acceptance.

  9. Advancing Residential Retrofits in Atlanta

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Roderick K; Kim, Eyu-Jin; Roberts, Sydney; Stephenson, Robert

    2012-07-01

    This report will summarize the home energy improvements performed in the Atlanta, GA area. In total, nine homes were retrofitted with eight of the homes having predicted source energy savings of approximately 30% or greater based on simulated energy consumption.

  10. EPA Awards Undergraduate Fellowship to Clark Atlanta University Student to Further the Environmental Workforce

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that Sederra Ross, at Clark Atlanta University in Atlanta, Ga. received one of 34 fellowships awarded to undergraduate students studying environmental science and related fields

  11. 1. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. Aerial view, Clark Howell Homes, left, Techwood Homes, right, Georgia Institute of Technology, top, right. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  12. 2. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. Aerial view of Clark Howell Homes, center, Techwood Homes, left, Georgia Institute of Technology, bottom. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  13. 12. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1945. View across park and playground between Techwood Homes and Clark Howell Homes, facing west with Clark Howell Homes in background. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  14. 10. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. View of east end and north side of Building E-1, from east side of Venable Street facing west. Luckie Street visible in background. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  15. 4. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. Clark Howell Homes, 219 Mills Street, left, 199 Mills Street, center, 404 Lovejoy Street, right, under construction. From west facing east. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  16. 8. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. Contextual view of Building E-7 (left), Building E-5 (center), and Building E-6 right), from west side of Luckie Street facing northeast. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  17. 13. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. View of apartment interior, kitchen, living room, and bedrooms. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  18. 5. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa July, 1940. Public opening, Clark Howell Homes. 411 Luckie Street, left. From east facing west. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  19. 11. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1945. View of rear entrances and yards of Building A-5, from northwest facing southeast. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  20. 3. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1945. Typical streetscape view, Clark Howell Homes. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  1. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. VIEW OF BUILDING 16, FROM NORTHEAST FACING SOUTHWEST ACROSS TECHWOOD DRIVE. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  2. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, June, 1940. VIEW OF STORE AND ADMINISTRATION BUILDING (RIGHT), BUILDING 4 (CENTER) AND BUILDING 5 RIGHT, FROM NORTH FACING SOUTH ALONG TECHWOOD DRIVE. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. VIEW OF WADING POOL, BUILDING 12 IN BACKGROUND (LEFT), FROM SOUTHEAST FACING NORTHWEST. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. VIEW OF PLAYGROUND BEHIND BUILDING X, FROM WEST FACING EAST. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  5. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, 1981. AERIAL VIEW IN CONTEXT, TECHWOOD HOMES, FROM SOUTHEAST FACING NORTHWEST. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  6. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, June, 1940. VIEW OF BUILDING 19, FROM EAST FACING WEST, ACROSS TECHWOOD DRIVE. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  7. 77 FR 4541 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the South Carolina Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ..., Atlanta, GA 30303. Persons wishing to email their comments, or to present their comments verbally at the... Office, as they become available, both before and after the meeting. Persons interested in the work...

  8. Impact of personal preference and motivation on fruit and vegetable consumption of WIC-participating mothers and children in Atlanta, GA.

    PubMed

    Chen, David Y; Gazmararian, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effect of psychosocial and sociodemographic factors on consumption of fruits and vegetables (F&V) for women and children participating in the Atlanta Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children. Participants (n = 249) were selected from 2 Atlanta Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children agencies. Data from this analysis were collected from in-person interviews. The dichotomous dependent variable was whether participants met recommended intakes for F&V. Independent variables were personal preference and motivation factors of F&V consumption, and sociodemographic factors. Bivariate analysis determined significant factors to include in logistic models. Only 27.7% of mothers and 44.2% of their oldest child consumed > 5 servings of F&V daily. Not knowing how to prepare F&Vs and spoilage of F&V before eating them were significantly related to F&V consumption of mothers. Food storage and preparation resulted in significant differences in meeting criteria for F&V consumption. Future initiatives should include cooking classes and emphasize food preparation techniques. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. American Uveitis Society Meeting October 30, 1995 Marriott Marquis Hotel, Atlanta, GA, USA.

    PubMed

    Meisler, D M; Chern, K C

    1996-01-01

    1 Retinal vascular occlusion and scleroderma. Tessler H, Flores-Guevara J, Goldstein D, Chicago, IL, USA. 2 MHC Class II antigen expression in ciliary body in spontaneous and experimental uveitis. Kalsow C, Zhavoronkova M, Dwyer A, Rochester, NY & Scottsville, NY, USA. 3 IL-10 in the vitreous of patients with intraocular lymphoma. Whitcup S, Solomon D, Nussenblatt R, Chan C-C, Bethesda, MD, USA 4 Iris juvenile xanthogranuloma studied by immunohistochemistry. Shields J, Shields C, Eagle R, DePotter P, Collins M, Philadelphia, PA, USA. 5 Outcomes analysis in with JRA-associated uveitis. Dana M-R, Merayo-Lloves J, Foster C, Boston MA, USA. 6 Persistent glaucoma secondary to periocular steroids. Akduman L, Conway M, Burchfield J, Kolker A, Black D, DelPriore L, Kaplan H, St. Louis, MO, USA 7 The use of itraconazole in ocular histoplasmosis Callanan D, Fish G, Dallas, TX, USA 8 Succesful treatment of macular hole secondary to sympathetic ophthalmia. Cano J, Diaz M, Navea A, Ruiz C, Castilla M. Barcelona, Spain. 9 HLA-DR2+ intermediate uveitis. Pulido J, Tang W, Han D, Mieler W. Milwaukee, WI, USA. 10 Vein occlusion in AIDS misdiagnosed as CMV retinitis. Park K, Marx J, Rao N. Los Angeles, CA, USA. 11 HIV-associated foveal hemorrhage. Crews K, Zimmerman P, Lohner S. Salt Lake City, UT, USA. 12 Cytomegalovirus papillitis in patients with AIDS. Patel S, Rutzen A, Marx J, Thach A, Chong L, Rao N, Los Angeles, CA, USA. 13 Recurrence rate of CMV retinitis following the ganciclovir implant and pars plans vitrectomy and silicone oil. Marx J, Thach A, Rao N, Chong L. Los Angeles, CA, USA.

  10. 75 FR 56943 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Extension of Attainment Date for the Atlanta...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... the Atlanta, GA 1997 8-Hour Ozone Moderate Nonattainment Area AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The State of Georgia, through the Georgia Department of Natural... the Atlanta, Georgia Area (hereafter referred to as the ``Atlanta Area''). The Atlanta Area consists...

  11. 7. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1939. Typical dwellings demolished for construction of Clark Howell Homes. View of west side of McAfee Street, from intersection with Gresham Street (now Clark Howell Place) facing northwest. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  12. 9. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. View of Hunnicutt Street under construction, from Venable Street facing east. Buildings A-2, D-4, C-5, and A-5 at left, Building J-12 at right. W.W. Orr Medical Building visible in background at center. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  13. HIV sexual transmission risks in the context of clinical care: a prospective study of behavioural correlates of HIV suppression in a community sample, Atlanta, GA, USA

    PubMed Central

    Kalichman, Seth C; Cherry, Chauncey; Kalichman, Moira O; Washington, Christopher; Grebler, Tamar; Merely, Cindy; Welles, Brandi; Pellowski, Jennifer; Kegler, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral therapy (ART) improves the health of people living with HIV and has the potential to reduce HIV infectiousness, thereby preventing HIV transmission. However, the success of ART for HIV prevention hinges on sustained ART adherence and avoiding sexually transmitted infections (STI). Objectives To determine the sexual behaviours and HIV transmission risks of individuals with suppressed and unsuppressed HIV replication (i.e., viral load). Methods Assessed HIV sexual transmission risks among individuals with clinically determined suppressed and unsuppressed HIV. Participants were 760 men and 280 women living with HIV in Atlanta, GA, USA, who completed behavioural assessments, 28-daily prospective sexual behaviour diaries, one-month prospective unannounced pill counts for ART adherence, urine screening for illicit drug use and medical record chart abstraction for HIV viral load. Results Individuals with unsuppressed HIV demonstrated a constellation of behavioural risks for transmitting HIV to uninfected sex partners that included symptoms of STI and substance use. In addition, 15% of participants with suppressed HIV had recent STI symptoms/diagnoses, indicating significant risks for sexual infectiousness despite their HIV suppression in blood plasma. Overall, 38% of participants were at risk for elevated sexual infectiousness and just as many engaged in unprotected sexual intercourse with non-HIV-infected partners. Conclusions Implementation strategies for using HIV treatments as HIV prevention requires enhanced behavioural interventions that extend beyond ART to address substance use and sexual health that will otherwise undermine the potential preventive impact of early ART. PMID:26249127

  14. Disparities in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection between black and white men who have sex with men in Atlanta, GA.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Netochukwu; Rosenberg, Eli S; Luisi, Nicole; Sanchez, Travis; del Rio, Carlos; Sullivan, Patrick S; Kelley, Colleen F

    2015-09-01

    HIV disproportionately affects black men who have sex with men, and herpes simplex virus type 2 is known to increase acquisition of HIV. However, data on racial disparities in herpes simplex virus type 2 prevalence and risk factors are limited among men who have sex with men in the United States. InvolveMENt was a cohort study of black and white HIV-negative men who have sex with men in Atlanta, GA. Univariate and multivariate cross-sectional associations with herpes simplex virus type 2 seroprevalence were assessed among 455 HIV-negative men who have sex with men for demographic, behavioural and social determinant risk factors using logistic regression. Seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 was 23% (48/211) for black and 16% (38/244) for white men who have sex with men (p = 0.05). Education, poverty, drug/alcohol use, incarceration, circumcision, unprotected anal intercourse, and condom use were not associated with herpes simplex virus type 2. In multivariate analyses, black race for those ≤25 years, but not >25 years, and number of sexual partners were significantly associated. Young black men who have sex with men are disproportionately affected by herpes simplex virus type 2, which may contribute to disparities in HIV acquisition. An extensive assessment of risk factors did not explain this disparity in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection suggesting differences in susceptibility or partner characteristics.

  15. Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Coinfection Among Adults With Candidemia in Atlanta, GA, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Reno, Jessica; Doshi, Saumil; Tunali, Amy K; Stein, Betsy; Farley, Monica M; Ray, Susan M; Jacob, Jesse T

    2015-11-01

    Patients with candidemia are at risk for other invasive infections, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream infection (BSI). To identify the risk factors for, and outcomes of, BSI in adults with Candida spp. and MRSA at the same time or nearly the same time. Population-based cohort study. Metropolitan Atlanta, March 1, 2008, through November 30, 2012. All residents with Candida spp. or MRSA isolated from blood. The Georgia Emerging Infections Program conducts active, population-based surveillance for candidemia and invasive MRSA. Medical records for patients with incident candidemia were reviewed to identify cases of MRSA coinfection, defined as incident MRSA BSI 30 days before or after candidemia. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with coinfection in patients with candidemia. Among 2,070 adult candidemia cases, 110 (5.3%) had coinfection within 30 days. Among these 110 coinfections, MRSA BSI usually preceded candidemia (60.9%; n=67) or occurred on the same day (20.0%; n=22). The incidence of coinfection per 100,000 population decreased from 1.12 to 0.53 between 2009 and 2012, paralleling the decreased incidence of all MRSA BSIs and candidemia. Thirty-day mortality was similarly high between coinfection cases and candidemia alone (45.2% vs 36.0%, P=.10). Only nursing home residence (odds ratio, 1.72 [95% CI, 1.03-2.86]) predicted coinfection. A small but important proportion of patients with candidemia have MRSA coinfection, suggesting that heightened awareness is warranted after 1 major BSI pathogen is identified. Nursing home residents should be targeted in BSI prevention efforts.

  16. Bright Meteor Lights Up Atlanta Skies

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This video shows a very bright meteor that streaked over the skies of Atlanta, Ga., on the night of Aug. 28, 2011. The view is from an all sky camera in Cartersville, Ga., operated by NASA’s Mars...

  17. Sources of racial disparities in HIV prevalence in men who have sex with men in Atlanta, GA, USA: a modelling study.

    PubMed

    Goodreau, Steven M; Rosenberg, Eli S; Jenness, Samuel M; Luisi, Nicole; Stansfield, Sarah E; Millett, Gregorio A; Sullivan, Patrick S

    2017-07-01

    In the USA, men who have sex men (MSM) are at high risk for HIV, and black MSM have a substantially higher prevalence of infection than white MSM. We created a simulation model to assess the strength of existing hypotheses and data that account for these disparities. We built a dynamic, stochastic, agent-based network model of black and white MSM aged 18-39 years in Atlanta, GA, USA, that incorporated race-specific individual and dyadic-level prevention and risk behaviours, network attributes, and care patterns. We estimated parameters from two Atlanta-based studies in this population (n=1117), supplemented by other published work. We modelled the ability for racial assortativity to generate or sustain disparities in the prevalence of HIV infection, alone or in conjunction with scenarios of observed racial patterns in behavioural, care, and susceptibility parameters. Race-assortative mixing alone could not sustain a pre-existing disparity in prevalence of HIV between black and white MSM. Differences in care cascade, stigma-related behaviours, and CCR5 genotype each contributed substantially to the disparity (explaining 10·0%, 12·7%, and 19·1% of the disparity, respectively), but nearly half (44·5%) could not be explained by the factors investigated. A scenario assessing race-specific reporting differences in risk behaviour was the only one to yield a prevalence in black MSM (44·1%) similar to that observed (43·4%). Racial assortativity is an inadequate explanation for observed disparities. Work to close the gap in the care cascade by race is imperative, as are efforts to increase serodiscussion and strengthen relationships among black MSM particularly. Further work is urgently needed to identify other sources of, and pathways for, this disparity, to integrate concomitant epidemics into models, and to understand reasons for racial differences in behavioural reporting. The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Development, the National

  18. International Symposium on the Growth of III-Nitrides (ISGN), May 18-22, 2014, Atlanta GA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-31

    U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Growth of III-Nitrides, epitaxial growth techniques , ternary and...latest work in the technical areas shown below. ISGN-5 Symposium topics • III-N Bulk growth: AlN, GaN, InN • Epitaxial growth techniques ...Tokuyama Corporation, Japan Yoshinao Kumagai, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan Robert Leute, University of Ulm, Germany Wsevolod

  19. Proceedings of the State Directors of Correctional Education Annual Meeting (4th, Atlanta, Georgia, July 14, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Vocational and Adult Education (ED), Washington, DC.

    This document contains the proceedings of an annual meeting of state directors of correctional education on the topic of "special needs of the female offender." Dianne Carter of the U.S. Department of Education's Correction Education Program opened the meeting with welcoming comments and reported on many activities of the corrections education…

  20. Proceedings of Annual Meeting, Natural Resources Research Program (15th) Held in Atlanta, Georgia on 18-19 April 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    Management Plans by Linda D. Peyman-Dove, Michael R. Waring, and John P. Titre ...... .. 59 Developing a Manager-Oriented Water-Based Recreation...USAE Waterways Experiment Station Lake Sidney Lanier 3909 Halls Ferry Rd. P.O. Box 567 Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199 Buford, GA 30518 Linda Peyman-Dove Dan...Gerald Purvis Phil Turner USAE Division, South Atlantic USAE District, South Pacific Room 313 630 Sansome St. 77 Forsyth St. S.W. San Francisco, CA

  1. 78 FR 28940 - Environmental Impact Statement for the Atlanta to Charlotte Portion of the Southeast High Speed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... between Atlanta, GA and Charlotte, NC, along the Southeast High-Speed Rail Corridor (SEHSR) as designated... site: www.dot.ga.gov/AtlantaCharlotteHSR . ADDRESSES: Comments related to the scope of the study may be mailed to Glenn Bowman, PE, State Environmental Administrator, 600 West Peachtree Street NW., Atlanta,...

  2. 75 FR 73969 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Extension of Attainment Date for the Atlanta...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... the Atlanta, GA 1997 8-Hour Ozone Moderate Nonattainment Area AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... Georgia, through the Georgia Department of Natural Resources' Environmental Protection Division (EPD), to... standards (NAAQS) for the Atlanta, Georgia Area (hereafter referred to as the ``Atlanta Area''). This...

  3. Summary of Needs and Opportunities from the 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Meeting: Atlanta, Georgia, March 16-18, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-05-01

    This meeting brought together more than 200 professionals representing organizations with vested interest in energy efficiency improvements in residential buildings. Participants identified or reinforced a wide variety of needs and issues associated with delivering high-performance homes in both new and existing home scenarios,

  4. The New Women's Network. Annual Meeting (Atlanta, Georgia, February 15-16, 1978). "Wanted: More Women" Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of Administrative Women in Education, Washington, DC.

    The five speeches in this publication were presented in 1978 at the 63rd annual meeting of the National Council of Administrative Women in Education. Men and women whose speeches appear here touch on key issues involved in the struggle for sexual equality in management jobs. They focus on a new women's network that is gaining popularity as an…

  5. Modeling the Effect of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems on Nitrate Load Using SWAT in an Urban Watershed of Metropolitan Atlanta, GA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (OWTSs) can be a source of nitrate (NO3-) contamination in both surface and ground waters as a result of failing or high density systems. In metropolitan Atlanta, more than 26% of homes are on OWTS and this percentage is expected to increase wi...

  6. Historically Black Colleges and Universities of Higher Education. Hearing before the Committee on the Budget. United States Senate, One Hundred First Congress, First Session (Atlanta, GA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on the Budget.

    This document contains the testimonies of witnesses at a November 13, 1989 hearing on the status of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), as well as additional statements and a report by the Congressional Research Service. Witnesses included: the presidents of Spelman College (Georgia), Clark Atlanta University, Virginia State…

  7. Modeling the Effect of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems on Nitrate Load Using SWAT in an Urban Watershed of Metropolitan Atlanta, GA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (OWTSs) can be a source of nitrate (NO3-) contamination in both surface and ground waters as a result of failing or high density systems. In metropolitan Atlanta, more than 26% of homes are on OWTS and this percentage is expected to increase wi...

  8. Selected papers from the 12th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2012) (Atlanta, GA, USA, 2-5 December 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Mark G.; Lang, Jeffrey

    2013-11-01

    Welcome to this special section of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering (JMM). This section, co-edited by myself and by Professor Jeffrey Lang of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, contains expanded versions of selected papers presented at the Power MEMS meeting held in Atlanta, GA, USA, in December of 2012. Professor Lang and I had the privilege of co-chairing Power MEMS 2012, the 12th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications. The scope of the PowerMEMS series of workshops ranges from basic principles, to materials and fabrication, to devices and systems, to applications. The many applications of power MEMS (microelectromehcanical systems) range from MEMS-enabled energy harvesting, storage, conversion and conditioning, to integrated systems that manage these processes. Why is the power MEMS field growing in importance? Smaller-scale power and power supplies (microwatts to tens of watts) are gaining in prominence due to many factors, including the ubiquity of low power portable electronic equipment and the proliferation of wireless sensor nodes that require extraction of energy from their embedding environment in order to function. MEMS manufacturing methods can be utilized to improve the performance of traditional power supply elements, such as allowing batteries to charge faster or shrinking the physical size of passive elements in small-scale power supplies. MEMS technologies can be used to fabricate energy harvesters that extract energy from an embedding environment to power wireless sensor nodes, in-body medical implants and other devices, in which the harvesters are on the small scales that are appropriately matched to the overall size of these microsystems. MEMS can enable the manufacturing of energy storage elements from nontraditional materials by bringing appropriate structure and surface morphology to these materials as well as fabricating the electrical interfaces

  9. Evaluation of individual and area-level factors as modifiers of the association between warm-season temperature and pediatric asthma morbidity in Atlanta, GA.

    PubMed

    O'Lenick, Cassandra R; Winquist, Andrea; Chang, Howard H; Kramer, Michael R; Mulholland, James A; Grundstein, Andrew; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt

    2017-07-01

    Previous studies have found associations between respiratory morbidity and high temperatures; however, few studies have explored associations in potentially sensitive sub-populations. We evaluated individual and area-level factors as modifiers of the association between warm-season (May-Sept.) temperature and pediatric respiratory morbidity in Atlanta. Emergency department (ED) visit data were obtained for children, 5-18 years old, with primary diagnoses of asthma or respiratory disease (diagnoses of upper respiratory infections, bronchiolitis, pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, or wheeze) in 20-county Atlanta during 1993-2012. Daily maximum temperature (Tmax) was acquired from the automated surface observing station at Atlanta Hartsfield International Airport. Poisson generalized linear models were used to estimate rate ratios (RR) between daily Tmax and asthma or respiratory disease ED visits, controlling for time and meteorology. Tmax effects were estimated for single-day lags of 0-6 days, for 3-, 5-, and 7-day moving averages and modeled with cubic terms to allow for non-linear relationships. Effect modification by individual factors (sex, race, insurance status) and area-level socioeconomic status (SES; ZIP code levels of poverty, education, and the neighborhood deprivation index) was examined via stratification. Estimated RRs for Tmax and pediatric asthma ED visits were positive and significant for lag days 1-5, with the strongest single day association observed on lag day 2 (RR=1.06, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.09) for a change in Tmax from 27°C to 32°C (25th to 75th percentile). For the moving average exposure periods, associations increased as moving average periods increased. We observed stronger RRs between Tmax and asthma among males compared to females, non-white children compared to white children, children with private insurance compared to children with Medicaid, and among children living in high compared to low SES areas. Associations

  10. Explaining racial disparities in HIV incidence in black and white men who have sex with men in Atlanta, GA: a prospective observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Patrick S; Rosenberg, Eli S; Sanchez, Travis H; Kelley, Colleen F; Luisi, Nicole; Cooper, Hannah L; Diclemente, Ralph J; Wingood, Gina M; Frew, Paula M; Salazar, Laura F; Del Rio, Carlos; Mulligan, Mark J; Peterson, John L

    2015-06-01

    To describe factors associated with racial disparities in HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) incidence among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States. In a longitudinal cohort of black and white HIV-negative MSM in Atlanta, HIV incidence rates were compared by race. Incidence hazard ratios (HRs) between black and white MSM were estimated with an age-scaled Cox proportional hazards model. A change-in-estimate approach was used to understand mediating time-independent and -dependent factors that accounted for the elevated HR. Thirty-two incident HIV infections occurred among 260 black and 302 white MSM during 843 person-years (PY) of follow-up. HIV incidence was higher among black MSM (6.5/100 PY; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.2-9.7) than white MSM (1.7/100 PY; CI: 0.7-3.3) and highest among young (18-24 years) black MSM (10.9/100 PY; CI: 6.2-17.6). The unadjusted hazard of HIV infection for black MSM was 2.9 (CI: 1.3-6.4) times that of white MSM; adjustment for health insurance status and partner race explained effectively all of the racial disparity. Relative to white MSM in Atlanta, black MSM, particularly young black MSM, experienced higher HIV incidence that was not attributable to individual risk behaviors. In a setting where partner pool risk is a driver of disparities, it is also important to maximize care and treatment for HIV-positive MSM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Explaining Racial Disparities in HIV Incidence in a Prospective Cohort of Black and White Men Who Have Sex With Men in Atlanta, GA: A Prospective Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Patrick S; Rosenberg, Eli S; Sanchez, Travis H; Kelley, Colleen; Luisi, Nicole; Cooper, Hannah; Diclemente, Ralph; Frew, Paula; Salazar, Laura F; del Rio, Carlos; Mulligan, Mark J; Peterson, John

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe factors associated with racial disparities in HIV incidence among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States. Methods In a longitudinal cohort of black and white HIV-negative MSM in Atlanta, HIV incidence rates were compared by race. Incidence hazard ratios (HR) between black and white MSM were estimated with an age-scaled Cox proportional hazards model. A change-in-estimate approach was used to understand mediating time-independent and -dependent factors that accounted for the elevated HR. Results Thirty-two incident HIV infections occurred among 260 black and 302 white MSM during 823 person-years (PY) of followup. HIV incidence was higher among black MSM (6.5/100PY; 95% CI: 4.2, 9.7) than white MSM (1.7/100PY; CI: 0.7, 3.3), and highest among young (18–24 years) black MSM (10.9/100PY; CI: 6.2, 17.6). The unadjusted hazard of HIV infection for black MSM was 2.9 (CI: 1.3–6.4) times that of white MSM; adjustment for health insurance status and partner race explained effectively all of the racial disparity. Conclusions Relative to white MSM in Atlanta, black MSM, particularly young black MSM, experienced higher HIV incidence that was not attributable to individual risk behaviors. In a setting where partner pool risk is a driver of disparities, it is also important to maximize care and treatment for HIV-positive MSM. PMID:25911980

  12. SEMI-CONTINUOUS AEROSOL CARBON MEASUREMENTS: COMPARISON OF ATLANTA SUPERSITE MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An intensive field campaign of the Atlanta Supersite Experiment was carried out at a ground-based measurement site on Jefferson Street in midtown Atlanta, GA, from 3 August to 1 September, 1999. This paper examines the semi-continuous particulate organic and elemental measureme...

  13. Urban tree cover change in Detroit and Atlanta, USA, 1951-2010

    Treesearch

    Krista Merry; Jacek Siry; Pete Bettinger; J.M. Bowker

    2014-01-01

    We assessed tree cover using random points and polygons distributed within the administrative boundaries of Detroit, MI and Atlanta, GA. Two approaches were tested, a point-based approach using 1000 randomly located sample points, and polygon-based approach using 250 circular areas, 200 m in radius (12.56 ha). In the case of Atlanta, both approaches arrived at similar...

  14. SEMI-CONTINUOUS AEROSOL CARBON MEASUREMENTS: COMPARISON OF ATLANTA SUPERSITE MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An intensive field campaign of the Atlanta Supersite Experiment was carried out at a ground-based measurement site on Jefferson Street in midtown Atlanta, GA, from 3 August to 1 September, 1999. This paper examines the semi-continuous particulate organic and elemental measureme...

  15. Atlanta Conference Highlights How College Students are Helping Underserved Communities Address Environmental Problems

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 4 office in Atlanta, Ga., hosted a day-long conference about the College/Underserved Community Partnership Program (CUPP) at the Sam Nunn Federal Center. EPA's Senior Advisor to

  16. 75 FR 5353 - Proposal Review Panel for Chemistry; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... Proposal Review Panel for Chemistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee... and The University of Massachusetts, Proposal Review Panel for Chemistry ( 1191). Dates and Times...: Department of Chemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332. Department of Chemistry, The...

  17. 77 FR 1051 - General Conference Committee of the National Poultry Improvement Plan; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service General Conference Committee of the National Poultry.... SUMMARY: We are giving notice of a meeting of the General Conference Committee of the National Poultry...., Atlanta, GA. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. C. Stephen Roney, Senior Coordinator, National Poultry...

  18. 77 FR 3438 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Georgia Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-24

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2012-1291] COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Georgia....S. Commission on Civil Rights (Commission) and the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) that a.... Commission on Civil Rights, 61 Forsyth Street, Suite 16T126, Atlanta, GA 30303. Persons wishing to email...

  19. THE ATLANTA SUPERSITE PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atlanta Supersites project is the first of two Supersites projects to be established during Phase I of EPA's Supersites Program; Phase 11 is being established through a Request for Assistance. The other initial project is in Fresno, California. The Supersites Program is par...

  20. THE ATLANTA SUPERSITE PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atlanta Supersites project is the first of two Supersites projects to be established during Phase I of EPA's Supersites Program; Phase 11 is being established through a Request for Assistance. The other initial project is in Fresno, California. The Supersites Program is par...

  1. Long term impacts of combined sewer overflow remediation on water quality and population dynamics of Culex quinquefasciatus, the main urban West Nile virus vector in Atlanta, GA.

    PubMed

    Lund, Andrea; McMillan, Joseph; Kelly, Rosmarie; Jabbarzadeh, Shirin; Mead, Daniel G; Burkot, Thomas R; Kitron, Uriel; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M

    2014-02-01

    Combined sewers are a significant source of urban water pollution due to periodic discharges into natural streams. Such events (called combined sewer overflows, or CSOs) contribute to the impairment of natural waterways and are associated with increased mosquito productivity and elevated risk of West Nile virus transmission. We investigated the impact of CSOs on water quality and immature mosquito productivity in the city of Atlanta, Georgia, one year before and four years after CSO facility remediation. Water quality (ammonia, phosphate, nitrate and dissolved oxygen concentrations), immature mosquitoes (larvae and pupae), water temperature and rainfall were quantified biweekly between June-October at two urban creeks during 2008-2012. A before-after control-intervention design tested the impact of remediation on mosquito productivity and water quality, whereas generalized linear mixed-effect models quantified the factors explaining the long term impacts of remediation on mosquito productivity. Ammonia and phosphate concentrations and late immature (fourth-instar and pupae) mosquito populations were significantly higher in CSO than in non-CSO creeks, while dissolved oxygen concentrations were lower. Remediation significantly improved water quality estimates (particularly ammonia and dissolved oxygen) and reduced the number of overflows, mosquito productivity and the overall contribution of CSO-affected streams as sources of vectors of West Nile virus. The quality of water in CSOs provided a suitable habitat for immature mosquitoes. Remediation of the CSO facility through the construction of a deep storage tunnel improved water quality indices and reduced the productivity of mosquito species that can serve as vectors of West Nile virus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Confirmation of the Impact of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems on Stream Base-Flow Nitrogen Concentrations in Urban Watersheds of Metropolitan Atlanta, GA.

    PubMed

    Hoghooghi, Nahal; Radcliffe, David E; Habteselassie, Mussie Y; Clarke, John S

    2016-09-01

    Wastewater and lawn fertilizer potentially contribute to degraded water quality in urban watersheds. Previously we described a study from 2011 to 2012 in which we examined the effect of the density of onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS) on nitrogen concentrations in 24 small streams in metropolitan Atlanta. Our objective in this study was to confirm that the impact on water quality that we observed was due to OWTS and not lawn fertilizer. We sampled the same 24 streams again in 2013 and 2014, representing watersheds ranging in area from 0.18 to 8.8 km. We conducted regression analysis of the effect of OWTS and season, used dual-isotope analysis (nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate) to identify sources and determine the effect of denitrification and mixing, and conducted stream walks to identify areas where animals had access to the streams. Twelve streams were characterized as high-density (HD, more than 75 systems km) OWTS and 12 as low-density (LD, less than 75 systems km) OWTS. Water samples were collected three times a year under base-flow conditions, from November 2011 to July 2014, and analyzed for nitrate (NO-N), ammonium (NH-N), and total Kjeldahl nitrogen. Total nitrogen and NO-N concentrations increased linearly with increasing OWTS density above a threshold of about 75 OWTS km. Dual-isotope analysis of NO showed that stream NO originated predominantly from OWTS in HD watersheds and from a combination of animal waste and perhaps organic N in LD watersheds. Stream walks showed that livestock had access to some of the LD streams with high N concentrations. Our results confirm that HD OWTS can significantly degrade water quality at the watershed scale.

  3. Simulation of Urban Heat Island Mitigation Strategies in Atlanta, GA Using High-Resolution Land Use/Land Cover Data Set to Enhance Meteorological Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosson, William L.; Dembek, Scott; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Lapenta, William; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Johnson, Hoyt; Khan, Maudood

    2006-01-01

    The specification of land use/land cover (LULC) and associated land surface parameters in meteorological models at all scales has a major influence on modeled surface energy fluxes and boundary layer states. In urban areas, accurate representation of the land surface may be even more important than in undeveloped regions due to the large heterogeneity within the urban area. Deficiencies in the characterization of the land surface related to the spatial or temporal resolution of the data, the number of LULC classes defined, the accuracy with which they are defined, or the degree of heterogeneity of the land surface properties within each class may degrade the performance of the models. In this study, an experiment was conducted to test a new high-resolution LULC data set for meteorological simulations for the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area using a mesoscale meteorological model and to evaluate the effects of urban heat island (UHI) mitigation strategies on modeled meteorology for 2030. Simulation results showed that use of the new LULC data set reduced a major deficiency of the land use data used previously, specifically the poor representation of urban and suburban land use. Performance of the meteorological model improved substantially, with the overall daytime cold bias reduced by over 30%. UHI mitigation strategies were projected to offset much of a predicted urban warming between 2000 and 2030. In fact, for the urban core, the cooling due to UHI mitigation strategies was slightly greater than the warming associated with urbanization over this period. For the larger metropolitan area, cooling only partially offset the projected warming trend.

  4. Racial differences in the validity of self-reported drug use among men who have sex with men in Atlanta, GA

    PubMed Central

    White, Darcy; Rosenberg, Eli S.; Cooper, Hannah L.F.; del Rio, Carlos; Sanchez, Travis H.; Salazar, Laura F.; Sullivan, Patrick S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Men who have sex with men (MSM), particularly young black MSM, are disproportionately affected in the United States’ HIV epidemic. Drug use may contribute to these disparities, yet previous studies have failed to provide evidence of elevated use among black MSM, relying exclusively on self-reported usage. This study uses biological assays to validate self-reports of drug use and explore the potential for misclassification to distort findings on racial patterns of use in this population. Methods From an Atlanta-based cohort study of 454 black and 349 white MSM from 2010 to 2012, participants’ self-reported drug use was compared to urine drug screening findings. The sensitivity of self-report was calculated as the proportion reporting recent usage among those who screened positive. Multivariable regression models were constructed to examine racial patterns in self-report, urine-detection, and self-report sensitivity of marijuana and cocaine usage, adjusted for socio-demographic factors. Results In analyses that adjusted for age, education, income, sexual orientation, and history of arrest, black MSM were less likely to report recent use of marijuana (P<0.001) and cocaine (P=0.02), but equally likely to screen positive for either drug. This discrepancy between self-reported and urine-detected drug use was explained by significantly lower sensitivity of self-report for black participants (P<0.001 for marijuana, P<0.05 for cocaine). Conclusions The contribution of individual drug-related risk behaviors to the HIV disparities between black and white MSM should be revisited with methods that validate self-reports of illegal drug use. PMID:24629628

  5. Simulation of Urban Heat Island Mitigation Strategies in Atlanta, GA Using High-Resolution Land Use/Land Cover Data Set to Enhance Meteorological Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosson, William L.; Dembek, Scott; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Lapenta, William; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Johnson, Hoyt; Khan, Maudood

    2006-01-01

    The specification of land use/land cover (LULC) and associated land surface parameters in meteorological models at all scales has a major influence on modeled surface energy fluxes and boundary layer states. In urban areas, accurate representation of the land surface may be even more important than in undeveloped regions due to the large heterogeneity within the urban area. Deficiencies in the characterization of the land surface related to the spatial or temporal resolution of the data, the number of LULC classes defined, the accuracy with which they are defined, or the degree of heterogeneity of the land surface properties within each class may degrade the performance of the models. In this study, an experiment was conducted to test a new high-resolution LULC data set for meteorological simulations for the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area using a mesoscale meteorological model and to evaluate the effects of urban heat island (UHI) mitigation strategies on modeled meteorology for 2030. Simulation results showed that use of the new LULC data set reduced a major deficiency of the land use data used previously, specifically the poor representation of urban and suburban land use. Performance of the meteorological model improved substantially, with the overall daytime cold bias reduced by over 30%. UHI mitigation strategies were projected to offset much of a predicted urban warming between 2000 and 2030. In fact, for the urban core, the cooling due to UHI mitigation strategies was slightly greater than the warming associated with urbanization over this period. For the larger metropolitan area, cooling only partially offset the projected warming trend.

  6. People and places: Relocating to neighborhoods with better economic and social conditions is associated with less risky drug/alcohol network characteristics among African American adults in Atlanta, GA.

    PubMed

    Linton, Sabriya L; Cooper, Hannah L F; Luo, Ruiyan; Karnes, Conny; Renneker, Kristen; Haley, Danielle F; Hunter-Jones, Josalin; Ross, Zev; Bonney, Loida; Rothenberg, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Few studies assess whether place characteristics are associated with social network characteristics that create vulnerability to substance use. This longitudinal study analyzed 7 waves of data (2009-2014) from a predominantly substance-using cohort of 172 African American adults relocated from public housing complexes in Atlanta, GA, to determine whether post-relocation changes in exposure to neighborhood conditions were associated with four network characteristics related to substance use: number of social network members who used illicit drugs or alcohol in excess in the past six months ("drug/alcohol network"), drug/alcohol network stability, and turnover into and out of drug/alcohol networks. Individual- and network-level characteristics were captured via survey and administrative data were used to describe census tracts where participants lived. Multilevel models were used to assess relationships of census tract-level characteristics to network outcomes over time. On average, participants relocated to census tracts that had less economic disadvantage, social disorder, and renter-occupied housing. Post-relocation reductions in exposure to economic disadvantage were associated with fewer drug/alcohol network members and less turnover into drug/alcohol networks. Post-relocation improvements in exposure to multiple census tract-level social conditions and reductions in perceived community violence were associated with fewer drug/alcohol network members, less turnover into drug/alcohol networks, less drug/alcohol network stability, and more turnover out of drug/alcohol networks. Relocating to neighborhoods with less economic disadvantage and better social conditions may weaken relationships with substance-using individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. CAIRSENSE-Atlanta

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Short time interval comparisons of low cost sensor response and corresponding Federal Reference or Federal Equivalent Monitors at an NCOR site located in proximity to Atlanta, GeorgiaThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Jiao, W., G. Hagler, R. Williams, R. Sharpe, R. Brown, D. Garver, R. Judge, M. Caudill, J. Rickard, M. Davis, L. Weinstock, S. Zimmer-Dauphinee, and K. Buckley. Community Air Sensor Network (CAIRSENSE) project: Evaluation of low-cost sensor performance in a suburban environment in the southeastern United States. Atmospheric Measurement Techniques. Copernicus Publications, Katlenburg-Lindau, GERMANY, 9: 5282-5292, (2016).

  8. The Atlanta Dropout Prevention Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonas, Edward D., Jr.

    The Atlanta (Georgia) Public School System (APS) has many existing dropout prevention programs, but they have been operating primarily independently, with limited information sharing or coordination. In 1986 these programs were linked through the formation of the Atlanta Dropout Prevention Collaborative, which unites the public school system with…

  9. Atlanta's Own "Hall" of Famer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesil A.

    2008-01-01

    This article features Beverly L. Hall, poised to become one of the longest-serving superintendents of the Atlanta schools. When she came to Atlanta in 1999, student achievement was sliding downward, teacher morale was dismal, and enrollment was falling as parents pulled their children out of the school system. Under the superintendent's driving…

  10. US EPA Administrator Delivers Remarks at Atlanta Conference on College Students Helping Underserved Communities Address Environmental Problems

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today, U.S. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy provided opening remarks at the EPA Region 4 conference about the College/Underserved Community Partnership Program (CUPP) at the Sam Nunn Federal Center in Atlanta, Ga. Through CUPP, college and

  11. Rural Sociology in the South, 1977. Proceedings of 1977 Annual Meeting of the Southern Association of Agricultural Scientists, Rural Sociology Section (Atlanta, Georgia, February 6-9, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mookherjee, Harsha N., Ed.

    "Rural Sociology: A Field of Basic and Applied Research" was the theme of the 1977 annual meeting. Participants at the convention heard 50 reports in 14 sessions, as well as five special panels and two special sessions. Most of the papers, research reports and essays presented in the sessions are included in this document and serve as…

  12. Research Reporting Sections, Annual Meeting of National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (54th, Atlanta, Georgia, April 21-24, 1976). Mathematics Education Information Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Jon L., Ed.

    Abstracts of 28 research reports are provided. The reports were prepared by investigators for presentation at the 54th annual meeting of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. A broad range of topics related to mathematics education are covered. Three reports concern the effects of differing presentations of mathematics, four are related…

  13. 77 FR 46685 - In the Matter of: Steven Neal Greenoe, Currently Incarcerated at: Inmate #54450-056, USP Atlanta...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-06

    ...: 8933 Windjammer Drive, Raleigh, NC 27615; Order Denying Export Privileges On January 10, 2012, in the U....S. Penitentiary, P.O. Box 1150160, Atlanta, GA, and 8933 Windjammer Drive, Raleigh, NC 27615,...

  14. Environmental Public Health Surveillance for Exposure to Respiratory Health Hazards: A Joint NASA/CDC Project to Use Remote Sensing Data for Estimating Airborne Particulate Matter Over the Atlanta, Georgia Metropolitan Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad; Estes, Maurice; Crosson, William

    2007-01-01

    As part of the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN) the National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is leading a project called Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange (HELiX-Atlanta). The goal of developing the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network is to improve the health of communities. Currently, few systems exist at the state or national level to concurrently track many of the exposures and health effects that might be associated with environmental hazards. An additional challenge is estimating exposure to environmental hazards such as particulate matter whose aerodynamic diameter is less than or equal to 2.5 micrometers (PM2.5). HELIX-Atlanta's goal is to examine the feasibility of building an integrated electronic health and environmental data network in five counties of Metropolitan Atlanta, GA. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC) is collaborating with CDC to combine NASA earth science satellite observations related to air quality and environmental monitoring data to model surface estimates of PM2.5 concentrations that can be linked with clinic visits for asthma. While use of the Air Quality System (AQS) PM2.5 data alone could meet HELIX-Atlanta specifications, there are only five AQS sites in the Atlanta area, thus the spatial coverage is not ideal. We are using NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) data for estimating daily ground level PM2.5 at 10 km resolution over the metropolitan Atlanta area supplementing the AQS ground observations and filling their spatial and temporal gaps.

  15. Environmental Public Health Surveillance for Exposure to Respiratory Health Hazards: A Joint NASA/CDC Project to Use Remote Sensing Data for Estimating Airborne Particulate Matter Over the Atlanta, Georgia Metropolitan Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad; Estes, Maurice; Crosson, William

    2007-01-01

    As part of the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN) the National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is leading a project called Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange (HELiX-Atlanta). The goal of developing the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network is to improve the health of communities. Currently, few systems exist at the state or national level to concurrently track many of the exposures and health effects that might be associated with environmental hazards. An additional challenge is estimating exposure to environmental hazards such as particulate matter whose aerodynamic diameter is less than or equal to 2.5 micrometers (PM2.5). HELIX-Atlanta's goal is to examine the feasibility of building an integrated electronic health and environmental data network in five counties of Metropolitan Atlanta, GA. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC) is collaborating with CDC to combine NASA earth science satellite observations related to air quality and environmental monitoring data to model surface estimates of PM2.5 concentrations that can be linked with clinic visits for asthma. While use of the Air Quality System (AQS) PM2.5 data alone could meet HELIX-Atlanta specifications, there are only five AQS sites in the Atlanta area, thus the spatial coverage is not ideal. We are using NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) data for estimating daily ground level PM2.5 at 10 km resolution over the metropolitan Atlanta area supplementing the AQS ground observations and filling their spatial and temporal gaps.

  16. Atlanta, Georgia as seen from STS-62

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport is visible to the south of Atlanta, situated near the center of the photograph. Dobbins Air Force Base and the city of Marietta can also be seen to the north of Atlanta in this south-looking low-oblique view. The complex system of transportation routes and interstate highways surrounding and traversing Atlanta can also be seen in the photograph. The white dot near the center of the photograph is the Georgia Dome, a major sports and entertainment complex in downtown Atlanta. The Stone Mountain Memorial, with its enormous relief carvings of Confederate figures, is located east of Atlanta and is visible on the photograph.

  17. [Molecular diagnostic and targeted therapy--"Barking dogs are going to bite": presentations from the 42nd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Atlanta 2006].

    PubMed

    Rody, A; Loibl, S; Kaufmann, M

    2006-10-01

    This years ASCO-meeting reinforced the trend of the recent years to get off from empirical treatment concepts to tailored and individualized diagnostics and therapy. However, the basis for an individual therapy is a specific molecular diagnostic which can be reflected in the analysis of hormonal receptor, HER-1, HER-2 and topoisomerase IIalpha in breast cancer. All these markers are not only able to prognosticate the course of disease but they also can predict the success of specific treatment approaches. Trastuzumab is standard therapy in HER-2 positive breast cancer both in the adjuvant and palliative setting. But new therapeutic agents, as e. g. lapatinib, are promising in the treatment of HER-2 positive breast cancer even if trastuzumab is failing. Otherwise it might possibly be an alternative option but adequate clinical results have to be awaited. The targeted inactivation of EGFR-related signal transduction pathways by e. g. gefitinib did not show a substantial improvement neither as a single agent nor in combination with endocrine treatment. However, the appropriate subgroup which might benefit from this therapy has to be defined even if molecular data suggest that patients with ER positive and PR negative breast cancer might be such a group. The increasing knowledge in terms of the biology of bone metastasis led to the development of new treatment options as e. g. denosumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody for RANK ligand. Two adjuvant cytotoxic treatment trials revealed that taxanes improve the prognosis of node positive breast cancer and should be administered sequentially. The advantage of switching to an aromatase inhibitor after two to three years of tamoxifen in endocrine treatment of postmenopausal patients is proved by two clinical trials (IES, ARNO) which could demonstrate a survival benefit. In conclusion it seems to be evident that new targeted therapy options are effective and will set new standards for the treatment of breast cancer patients

  18. NARSTO EPA SS ATLANTA RAPID SPMS DATA

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-25

    NARSTO EPA SS ATLANTA RAPID SPMS DATA Project Title:  NARSTO ... Mass Spectrometer Location:  Altanta, Georgia Spatial Resolution:  Point Measurements ...   Order Data Guide Documents:  Atlanta SPMS Guide EPA Sites Get Google Earth ...

  19. Atlanta, Georgia as seen from STS-62

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-03-05

    STS062-85-147 (4-18 March 1994) --- Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport is visible to the south of Atlanta, situated near the center of the photograph. Dobbins Air Force Base and the city of Marietta can also be seen to the north of Atlanta in this south-looking low-oblique view. The complex system of transportation routes and interstate highways surrounding and traversing Atlanta can also be seen in the photograph. The white dot near the center of the photograph is the Georgia Dome, a major sports and entertainment complex in downtown Atlanta. Atlanta is the cultural, industrial, transportation, financial and commercial center of the South. It has one of the busies air traffic hubs in the United States. A major aircraft assembly plant is located north of Atlanta in Marietta. The Stone Mountain Memorial, with its enormous relief carvings of Confederate figures, is located east of Atlanta and is visible on the photograph.

  20. 75 FR 4876 - Proposal Review Panel for Materials Research; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... a.m.-4:45 p.m. Place: Georgia Tech University, Atlanta, GA. Type of Meeting: Part-open. Contact... concerning progress of the MRSEC at Georgia Tech. Agenda Tuesday March 2, 2010 7:30 a.m.-9:15 a.m. Closed--Executive Session. 9:15 a.m.-3:45 a.m. Open--Review of Georgia Tech MRSEC. 3:45 a.m.-4:45 a.m....

  1. Processing and manufacturing of composite materials; Proceedings of the Symposium, 112th ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA, Dec. 1-6, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Srivatsan, T.S.; Chandrashekhar, S.

    1991-01-01

    Papers are presented on the machining of fiber reinforced composites, the milling of continuous carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy, advances in composite machining with abrasive water jets, delamination in surface plies of graphite/epoxy caused by the edge-trimming process, and cryogenic machining of Kevlar composites. Consideration is given to a thermodynamic evaluation of ceramic-composite cutting tools for machining titanium, microstructural changes in carbon fibers during high-temperature processing, synthesis of particulate-reinforced metal matrix composites using spray techniques, and on-line monitoring of composite prepreg fabrication. Attention is also given to the effects of postannealing on fatigue behavior in PEEK and its short fiber-reinforced composites, the effect of fabrication parameters on void content for filament-wound composites, and the fabrication of a W-1 percent ThO2-reinforced Fe-25Cr-8Al-0.5Y superalloy matrix composite.

  2. Processing and manufacturing of composite materials; Proceedings of the Symposium, 112th ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA, Dec. 1-6, 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivatsan, T. S.; Chandrashekhar, S.

    Papers are presented on the machining of fiber reinforced composites, the milling of continuous carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy, advances in composite machining with abrasive water jets, delamination in surface plies of graphite/epoxy caused by the edge-trimming process, and cryogenic machining of Kevlar composites. Consideration is given to a thermodynamic evaluation of ceramic-composite cutting tools for machining titanium, microstructural changes in carbon fibers during high-temperature processing, synthesis of particulate-reinforced metal matrix composites using spray techniques, and on-line monitoring of composite prepreg fabrication. Attention is also given to the effects of postannealing on fatigue behavior in PEEK and its short fiber-reinforced composites, the effect of fabrication parameters on void content for filament-wound composites, and the fabrication of a W-1 percent ThO2-reinforced Fe-25Cr-8Al-0.5Y superalloy matrix composite.

  3. Enhancement of quality through environmental technology. Proceedings of the Twenty-eighth Annual Technical Meeting, Atlanta, GA, April 21-23, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Environmental issues are discussed under the following headings: environmental engineering methods, environmental stress impact, contamination control, and energy and environment. Papers are presented on an assessment of external stores reliability testing, optimization of classical shock waveforms, the development and production of advanced cooling techniques for hybrid microcircuits, and the isolation and molecular identification of ultramicro contaminants by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Other topics discussed include features and testing of clean room apparel, the hazards from large spills of liquefied gaseous fuels, and a solar pond potential site survey for electrical power generation.

  4. Atlanta Public Schools French Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlanta Public Schools, GA.

    This teacher's guide specifies language skills and related areas of knowledge needed for communicating in the target language. Discussion of the philosophy governing the Atlanta language program includes an examination of student eligibility, program articulation, teaching methods, testing, teaching materials, resources, and equipment for use in…

  5. COMPARISON OF INTEGRATED SAMPLERS FOR MASS AND COMPOSITION DURING THE 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITES PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The first of EPA's Particulate Matter (PM) Supersites projects was established in Atlanta, GA during the summer of 1999 in conjunction with the Southern Oxidants Study. The short-term primary focus was a one month intensive field campaign to evaluate advanced PM measurement me...

  6. COMPARISON OF INTEGRATED SAMPLERS FOR MASS AND COMPOSITION DURING THE 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITES PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The first of EPA's Particulate Matter (PM) Supersites projects was established in Atlanta, GA during the summer of 1999 in conjunction with the Southern Oxidants Study. The short-term primary focus was a one month intensive field campaign to evaluate advanced PM measurement me...

  7. Satellites monitor Atlanta regional development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, William J.; Blackmon, C.C.; Rudasill, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    Since the adoption of a Regional Development Plan in 1975, the Atlanta Regional Commission has investigated methods for monitoring regional development patterns in a periodic, efficient manner. A promising approach appears to be the use of Landsat satellite data. In cooperation with the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center, the commission used machine processing of digital temporal overlays of Landsat data collected in 1972, 1974 and 1976 to detect land use and land cover changes in the Atlanta metropolitan area. Results of the analysis revealed the conversion of forested and open space areas to residential, commercial and industrial land use in the urban-rural fringe zone from 1972 to 1974 and from 1974 to 1976. The study indicated that a land use and land cover change-detection program may be used to revise small-area forecasts of land use, population and employment made by planning models.

  8. Assessing the Impacts of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport on Particulate Matter and Ozone in Atlanta Metropolitan Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Alper; Odman, M. Talat; Russell, Armistead G.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine, through modeling, the impact of aircraft emissions on regional air quality, especially in regard to fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) as well as ozone and other pollutants. For this, we focused on Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport which is the busiest airport in the world based on passenger traffic (AIC, 2003). Hartsfield-Jackson serves the metropolitan Atlanta area where air quality does not meet national standards. Emissions from mobile and industrial sources (including several large electric power generating utilities) are the major contributors to the area's air pollution. In this study, we assessed the impact of Hartsfield-Jackson Airport on air quality around Atlanta, Georgia, and compared it to the impacts of other emission sources in the area. The assessment was built upon other, related air quality studies involving both field and modeling components. To achieve the objectives, first a detailed inventory was developed for aircraft and other emissions at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Then, air quality simulations were performed to relate these emissions to regional air quality around Atlanta. The Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) was used as the modeling platform. The period of August 11-20 2000 was selected as the episode to be modeled in this study. Prior modeling of this episode during the Fall Line Air Quality Study (FAQS) and availability of additional PM(2.5) measurements for evaluation played a major role in this selection. Meteorological data for this episode as well as emission data for sources other than aircrafts were already available from FAQS.

  9. Assessing the Impacts of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport on Particulate Matter and Ozone in Atlanta Metropolitan Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Alper; Odman, M. Talat; Russell, Armistead G.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine, through modeling, the impact of aircraft emissions on regional air quality, especially in regard to fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) as well as ozone and other pollutants. For this, we focused on Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport which is the busiest airport in the world based on passenger traffic (AIC, 2003). Hartsfield-Jackson serves the metropolitan Atlanta area where air quality does not meet national standards. Emissions from mobile and industrial sources (including several large electric power generating utilities) are the major contributors to the area's air pollution. In this study, we assessed the impact of Hartsfield-Jackson Airport on air quality around Atlanta, Georgia, and compared it to the impacts of other emission sources in the area. The assessment was built upon other, related air quality studies involving both field and modeling components. To achieve the objectives, first a detailed inventory was developed for aircraft and other emissions at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Then, air quality simulations were performed to relate these emissions to regional air quality around Atlanta. The Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) was used as the modeling platform. The period of August 11-20 2000 was selected as the episode to be modeled in this study. Prior modeling of this episode during the Fall Line Air Quality Study (FAQS) and availability of additional PM(2.5) measurements for evaluation played a major role in this selection. Meteorological data for this episode as well as emission data for sources other than aircrafts were already available from FAQS.

  10. The Atlanta tornado of 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greneker, E. F.; Wilson, C. S.; Metcalf, J. I.

    1976-01-01

    Joint observations by radar and high-frequency sferics detectors at Georgia Institute of Technology provided unique data on the Atlanta tornado of Mar. 24, 1975. The classic hook echo was detected by radar at a range of about 26 km, 15 min before the tornado touched down. While the tornado was on the ground the sferics burst rate was very low, despite very high values recorded immediately before and after this interval. This observation, together with visual reports of a strong cloud-to-ground discharge at the time of tornado touchdown, suggests an interaction of the tornado with the electric field of the storm.

  11. The Atlanta tornado of 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greneker, E. F.; Wilson, C. S.; Metcalf, J. I.

    1976-01-01

    Joint observations by radar and high-frequency sferics detectors at Georgia Institute of Technology provided unique data on the Atlanta tornado of Mar. 24, 1975. The classic hook echo was detected by radar at a range of about 26 km, 15 min before the tornado touched down. While the tornado was on the ground the sferics burst rate was very low, despite very high values recorded immediately before and after this interval. This observation, together with visual reports of a strong cloud-to-ground discharge at the time of tornado touchdown, suggests an interaction of the tornado with the electric field of the storm.

  12. 34th Atlanta Executive Seminar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-23

    Viggato i r. i i t APEO Corporate Information Mr. Don Papke r rate I f r ati r. on apke WarrenarrenKEY PicatinnyPicatinny APEO Systems Engineering...itzer P r. J. Shields DP r. K. ooding APEO Business Management Mr. Art White si ess a a e e t r. rt hite APEO Operations Management Ms. Kristi...retchen c oy Acting APEO Logistics Mr. Ken Seibel cti istics r. en eibel GCS Programs 3NDIA Atlanta Symposium – 23Apr09 – BG Ogg Heavy Brigade Combat

  13. Analysis of Atlanta Compromise School Desegregation Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Atlanta, Inc., GA.

    On February 22, 1973, attorneys for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the Atlanta Board of Education filed a compromise desegregation plan with the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia. If the Court approves, this compromise will constitute the final desegregation plan for the Atlanta Public…

  14. Limited spillover to humans from West Nile Virus viremic birds in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Levine, Rebecca S; Mead, Daniel G; Kitron, Uriel D

    2013-11-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne pathogen that impacts the health of its passerine bird hosts as well as incidentally infected humans in the United States. Intensive enzootic activity among the hosts and vectors does not always lead to human outbreaks, as is the situation throughout much of the southeastern United States. In Georgia, substantial yearly evidence of WNV in the mosquito vectors and avian hosts since 2001 has only led to 324 human cases. Although virus has been consistently isolated from mosquitoes trapped in Atlanta, GA, little is known about viral activity among the passerine hosts. A possible reason for the suppression of WNV spillover to humans is that viremic birds are absent from high human-use areas of the city. To test this hypothesis, multiseason, multihabitat, longitudinal WNV surveillance for active WNV viremia was conducted within the avian host community of urban Atlanta by collection of blood samples from wild passerine birds in five urban microhabitats. WNV was isolated from the serum of six blood samples collected from 630 (0.95%) wild passerine birds in Atlanta during 2010-2012, a proportion similar to that found in the Chicago, IL, area in 2005, when over 200 human cases were reported. Most of the viremic birds were Northern Cardinals, suggesting they may be of particular importance to the WNV transmission cycle in Georgia. Results indicated active WNV transmission in all microhabitats of urban Atlanta, except in the old-growth forest patches. The number of viremic birds was highest in Zoo Atlanta, where 3.5% of samples were viremic. Although not significant, these observations may suggest a possible transmission reduction effect of urban old-growth forests and a potential role in WNV amplification for Zoo Atlanta. Overall, spillover to humans remains a rare occurrence in urban Atlanta settings despite active WNV transmission in the avian population.

  15. Limited Spillover to Humans from West Nile Virus Viremic Birds in Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Daniel G.; Kitron, Uriel D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract West Nile Virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne pathogen that impacts the health of its passerine bird hosts as well as incidentally infected humans in the United States. Intensive enzootic activity among the hosts and vectors does not always lead to human outbreaks, as is the situation throughout much of the southeastern United States. In Georgia, substantial yearly evidence of WNV in the mosquito vectors and avian hosts since 2001 has only led to 324 human cases. Although virus has been consistently isolated from mosquitoes trapped in Atlanta, GA, little is known about viral activity among the passerine hosts. A possible reason for the suppression of WNV spillover to humans is that viremic birds are absent from high human-use areas of the city. To test this hypothesis, multiseason, multihabitat, longitudinal WNV surveillance for active WNV viremia was conducted within the avian host community of urban Atlanta by collection of blood samples from wild passerine birds in five urban microhabitats. WNV was isolated from the serum of six blood samples collected from 630 (0.95%) wild passerine birds in Atlanta during 2010–2012, a proportion similar to that found in the Chicago, IL, area in 2005, when over 200 human cases were reported. Most of the viremic birds were Northern Cardinals, suggesting they may be of particular importance to the WNV transmission cycle in Georgia. Results indicated active WNV transmission in all microhabitats of urban Atlanta, except in the old-growth forest patches. The number of viremic birds was highest in Zoo Atlanta, where 3.5% of samples were viremic. Although not significant, these observations may suggest a possible transmission reduction effect of urban old-growth forests and a potential role in WNV amplification for Zoo Atlanta. Overall, spillover to humans remains a rare occurrence in urban Atlanta settings despite active WNV transmission in the avian population. PMID:24107200

  16. Proctor Creek Watershed/Atlanta (Georgia)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Proctor Creek Watershed/Atlanta (Georgia) of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating with community-led efforts.

  17. The Distribution of Segregation in Atlanta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Anthony

    1972-01-01

    A prediction from ecological theory relating the distribution of residential segregation between inner and outer zones of a metropolitan area to conditions of population growth, expansion, etc. was tested using 1960 data on the Atlanta standard metropolitan statistical area. (JM)

  18. The Distribution of Segregation in Atlanta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Anthony

    1972-01-01

    A prediction from ecological theory relating the distribution of residential segregation between inner and outer zones of a metropolitan area to conditions of population growth, expansion, etc. was tested using 1960 data on the Atlanta standard metropolitan statistical area. (JM)

  19. Climatic, ecological, and socioeconomic factors associated with West Nile virus incidence in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A.

    Treesearch

    Graeme Lockaby; Navideh Noori; Wayde Morse; Wayne Zipperer; Latif Kalin; Robin Governo; Rajesh Sawant; Matthew Ricker

    2016-01-01

    The integrated effects of the many risk factors associated with West Nile virus (WNV) incidence are complex and not well understood. We studied an array of risk factors in and around Atlanta, GA, that have been shown to be linked with WNV inother locations. This array was comprehensive and included climate and meteorological metrics, vegetation...

  20. The Atlanta Classification of acute pancreatitis revisited.

    PubMed

    Bollen, T L; van Santvoort, H C; Besselink, M G; van Leeuwen, M S; Horvath, K D; Freeny, P C; Gooszen, H G

    2008-01-01

    In a complex disease such as acute pancreatitis, correct terminology and clear definitions are important. The clinically based Atlanta Classification was formulated in 1992, but in recent years it has been increasingly criticized. No formal evaluation of the use of the Atlanta definitions in the literature has ever been performed. A Medline literature search sought studies published after 1993. Guidelines, review articles and their cross-references were reviewed to assess whether the Atlanta or alternative definitions were used. A total of 447 articles was assessed, including 12 guidelines and 82 reviews. Alternative definitions of predicted severity of acute pancreatitis, actual severity and organ failure were used in more than half of the studies. There was a large variation in the interpretation of the Atlanta definitions of local complications, especially relating to the content of peripancreatic collections. The Atlanta definitions for acute pancreatitis are often used inappropriately, and alternative definitions are frequently applied. Such lack of consensus illustrates the need for a revision of the Atlanta Classification. Copyright (c) 2007 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd.

  1. The Use of GIS and Remotely Sensed Data in Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT): The HELIX-Atlanta Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Hamdan, Mohammad Z.; Crosson, William L.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Watts, Carol; Rickman, Douglas L.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Qualters, Judith R.; Sinclair, Amber H.; Tolsma, Dennis D.; hide

    2007-01-01

    As part of the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN), the National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is leading a project in collaboration with the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC) called Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange (HELIX-Atlanta). HELIX-Atlanta's goal is to examine the feasibility of building an integrated electronic health and environmental data network in five counties of metropolitan Atlanta, GA. Under HELIX-Atlanta, pilot projects are being conducted to develop methods to characterize exposure; link health and environmental data; analyze the relationship between health and environmental factors; and communicate findings. There is evidence in the research literature that asthmatic persons are at increased risk of developing asthma exacerbations with exposure to environmental factors, including PM(sub 2.5). Thus, HELIX-Atlanta is focusing on methods for characterizing population exposure to PM(sub 2.5) for the Atlanta metropolitan area that could be used in ongoing surveillance. NASA/MSFC is working with CDC to combine NASA earth science satellite observations related to air quality and environmental monitoring data to model surface estimates of fine particulate matter (PM(sub 2.5)) concentrations in a Geographic Information System (GIS) that can be linked with clinic visits for asthma on the aggregated grid level as well as the individual level at the geographic locations of the patients' residences.

  2. The Use of GIS and Remotely Sensed Data in Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT): The HELIX-Atlanta Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Hamdan, Mohammad Z.; Crosson, William L.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Watts, Carol; Rickman, Douglas L.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Qualters, Judith R.; Sinclair, Amber H.; Tolsma, Dennis D.; Adeniyi, Kafayat A.

    2007-01-01

    As part of the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN), the National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is leading a project in collaboration with the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC) called Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange (HELIX-Atlanta). HELIX-Atlanta's goal is to examine the feasibility of building an integrated electronic health and environmental data network in five counties of metropolitan Atlanta, GA. Under HELIX-Atlanta, pilot projects are being conducted to develop methods to characterize exposure; link health and environmental data; analyze the relationship between health and environmental factors; and communicate findings. There is evidence in the research literature that asthmatic persons are at increased risk of developing asthma exacerbations with exposure to environmental factors, including PM(sub 2.5). Thus, HELIX-Atlanta is focusing on methods for characterizing population exposure to PM(sub 2.5) for the Atlanta metropolitan area that could be used in ongoing surveillance. NASA/MSFC is working with CDC to combine NASA earth science satellite observations related to air quality and environmental monitoring data to model surface estimates of fine particulate matter (PM(sub 2.5)) concentrations in a Geographic Information System (GIS) that can be linked with clinic visits for asthma on the aggregated grid level as well as the individual level at the geographic locations of the patients' residences.

  3. The Atlanta Motor Speech Disorders Corpus: Motivation, Development, and Utility.

    PubMed

    Laures-Gore, Jacqueline; Russell, Scott; Patel, Rupal; Frankel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and collection of a comprehensive spoken language dataset from speakers with motor speech disorders in Atlanta, Ga., USA. This collaborative project aimed to gather a spoken database consisting of nonmainstream American English speakers residing in the Southeastern US in order to provide a more diverse perspective of motor speech disorders. Ninety-nine adults with an acquired neurogenic disorder resulting in a motor speech disorder were recruited. Stimuli include isolated vowels, single words, sentences with contrastive focus, sentences with emotional content and prosody, sentences with acoustic and perceptual sensitivity to motor speech disorders, as well as 'The Caterpillar' and 'The Grandfather' passages. Utility of this data in understanding the potential interplay of dialect and dysarthria was demonstrated with a subset of the speech samples existing in the database. The Atlanta Motor Speech Disorders Corpus will enrich our understanding of motor speech disorders through the examination of speech from a diverse group of speakers. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Hydroclimatology of flash flooding in Atlanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Daniel B.; Smith, James A.; Villarini, Gabriele; Baeck, Mary Lynn

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize the climatology of extreme rainfall and flash flooding in Atlanta, Georgia using high-resolution land surface, rainfall, and discharge datasets. We examine nine urban watersheds in the Atlanta area that range in size from 3.7 to 225 km2 and exhibit a range of urban development and land-use characteristics. We develop a high-resolution 15 min, 1 km2 radar rainfall data set for the 2002-2010 period using the Hydro-NEXRAD system with volume scan reflectivity observations from the Atlanta WSR-88D radar and rainfall observations from a dense network of 72 U.S. Geological Survey rain gauges. Bias-corrected radar rainfall fields accurately capture the spatial and temporal structure of heavy rainfall. There is enhancement of heavy rainfall within and east of the urban core, and a rainfall minimum north and northwest of the city. There has been an increase in variability of annual flood peaks in Atlanta since the 1960s associated with urban impacts on runoff production. Flood response is dependent on a combination of basin size, drainage network structure, spatial distribution of land use, and basin storage in urban soils and storm water detention ponds. Future studies of urban rainfall modification in Atlanta and elsewhere should consider the influence of regional topography and other geographic features on the storm environment.

  5. Agricultural Instruction in Secondary Schools: Papers Read at the Third Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Agricultural Teaching, Atlanta, Georgia November 12 1912. Bulletin, 1913, No. 14. Whole Number 522

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United States Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 1913

    1913-01-01

    Interest in agricultural education continues to increase. The attempt to teach agriculture is no longer confined to the agricultural college and special agricultural school. Methods of teaching the most important facts and the elementary principles of agriculture are discussed in the meetings of most of our educational associations. There is a…

  6. NARSTO EPA SS ATLANTA 1999 UAH MIPS DATA

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-25

    NARSTO EPA SS ATLANTA 1999 UAH MIPS DATA Project Title:  NARSTO ... - Radio Acoustic Sounding System Location:  Atlanta, Georgia Spatial Resolution:  Point Measurements ...   Order Data Guide Documents:  Atlanta UAH MIPS Guide Readme Files:  EPA Sites ...

  7. Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange in Atlanta (HELIX-Atlanta): A Pilot Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Shire, J.; Qualters, J.; Mitchell, K.; Pollard, S.; Rao, R.; Kajumba, N.; Quattrochi, D.; Estes, M., Jr.; Meyer, P.; Crosson, W.; Limaye, A.; Al-Hamdan, M.; Khan, M.; Bayakly, R.; Staley, F.; Hallisey, E.; Young, J.; Ward, K.; Tolbert, P.; Tolsma, D.; Sinclair, A.; Strickland, M.; Adeniyi, K.; Rainisch, G.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. To provide an overview of four environmental public health surveillance projects developed by CDC and its partners for the Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange, Atlanta (HELIX-Atlanta) and to illustrate common issues and challenges encountered in developing an environmental public health tracking system. Methods. HELIX-Atlanta, initiated in October 2003 to develop data linkage and analysis methods that can be used by the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (Tracking Network), conducted four projects. We highlight the projects' work, assess attainment of the HELIX-Atlanta goals and discuss three surveillance attributes. Results. Among the major challenges was the complexity of analytic issues which required multidiscipline teams with technical expertise. This expertise and the data resided across multiple organizations. Conclusions:Establishing formal procedures for sharing data, defining data analysis standards and automating analyses, and committing staff with appropriate expertise is needed to support wide implementation of environmental public health tracking.

  8. Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange in Atlanta (HELIX-Atlanta): A Pilot Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Shire, J.; Qualters, J.; Mitchell, K.; Pollard, S.; Rao, R.; Kajumba, N.; Quattrochi, D.; Estes, M., Jr.; Meyer, P.; hide

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. To provide an overview of four environmental public health surveillance projects developed by CDC and its partners for the Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange, Atlanta (HELIX-Atlanta) and to illustrate common issues and challenges encountered in developing an environmental public health tracking system. Methods. HELIX-Atlanta, initiated in October 2003 to develop data linkage and analysis methods that can be used by the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (Tracking Network), conducted four projects. We highlight the projects' work, assess attainment of the HELIX-Atlanta goals and discuss three surveillance attributes. Results. Among the major challenges was the complexity of analytic issues which required multidiscipline teams with technical expertise. This expertise and the data resided across multiple organizations. Conclusions:Establishing formal procedures for sharing data, defining data analysis standards and automating analyses, and committing staff with appropriate expertise is needed to support wide implementation of environmental public health tracking.

  9. OVERVIEW OF THE 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITE PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an overview of the 1999 Atlanta Supersite Project coordinated through the Southern Oxidants Study and the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT) and funded by the US EPA along with other sponsors who provided in-kind support primarily through existing studies. ...

  10. Playground Hazards in Atlanta Child Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Jeffrey J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examines 71 of the 605 licensed child care centers in Atlanta for playground hazards and school accidents. Finds 684 hazards in 66 centers, including climbing equipment over 6 feet high with inadequate impact-absorbing undersurfacing that had over twice the rate of fall injuries as climbing equipment under 6 feet high. (FMW)

  11. OVERVIEW OF THE 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITE PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an overview of the 1999 Atlanta Supersite Project coordinated through the Southern Oxidants Study and the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT) and funded by the US EPA along with other sponsors who provided in-kind support primarily through existing studies. ...

  12. 78 FR 1742 - Amendment to Class B Airspace; Atlanta, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... to increase safety and aid pilots in gaining situational awareness within or around the Class B area... Evaluation Summary Changes to Federal regulations must undergo several economic analyses. First, Executive... summarizes the FAA's analysis of the economic impacts of this final rule. Department of Transportation Order...

  13. EPA Recognizes CEMEX in Clinchfield, Ga. for Achieving 2015 Energy Star Certification

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that CEMEX, in Clinchfield, Ga. is among 70 manufacturing plants nationally that have achieved Energy Star certification for their superior energy performance in 2015. Togethe

  14. EPA Sampling Results announced for Macon Naval Ordnance Plant Superfund site in Macon, Ga.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the status of its vapor intrusion sampling conducted at the Macon Naval Ordnance Plant Superfund site in Macon, Ga. Funded by EPA, the sampling focused on the Freudenberg Texb

  15. Magnitudes, nature, and effects of point and nonpoint discharges in the Chattahoochee River basin, Atlanta to West Point Dam, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamer, J.K.; Cherry, R.N.; Faye, R.E.; Kleckner, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    On an average annual basis and during the storm period of March 12-15, 1976, nonpoint-source loads for most constituents were larger than point-source loads at the Whitesburg station, located on the Chattahoochee River about 40 miles downstream from Atlanta, GA. Most of the nonpoint-source constituent loads in the Atlanta to Whitesburg reach were from urban areas. Average annual point-source discharges accounted for about 50 percent of the dissolved nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus loads and about 70 percent of the dissolved phosphorus loads at Whitesburg. During a low-flow period, June 1-2, 1977, five municipal point-sources contributed 63 percent of the ultimate biochemical oxygen demand, and 97 percent of the ammonium nitrogen loads at the Franklin station, at the upstream end of West Point Lake. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations of 4.1 to 5.0 milligrams per liter occurred in a 22-mile reach of the river downstream from Atlanta due about equally to nitrogenous and carbonaceous oxygen demands. The heat load from two thermoelectric powerplants caused a decrease in dissolved-oxygen concentration of about 0.2 milligrams per liter. Phytoplankton concentrations in West Point Lake, about 70 miles downstream from Atlanta, could exceed three million cells per millimeter during extended low-flow periods in the summer with present point-source phosphorus loads. (Woodard-USGS)

  16. BACKGROUND--ATLANTA, A HANDBOOK FOR REPORTERS COVERING THE DESEGREGATION OF ATLANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HANNER, MRS. PHILIP; AND OTHERS

    A HANDBOOK HAS BEEN PREPARED FOR REPORTERS WHO ARE COVERING THE DESEGREGATION OF ATLANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN ORDER TO INFORM THE PRESS OF THE EFFORTS MADE BY CITIZENS IN THE FIGHT TO KEEP PUBLIC SCHOOLS OPEN. A MAJOR PORTION OF THE GUIDE IS DEVOTED TO A DETAILED, CHRONOLOGICAL ACCOUNT OF THE BACKGROUND PERIOD (1954-61) LEADING TO SCHOOL…

  17. BACKGROUND--ATLANTA, A HANDBOOK FOR REPORTERS COVERING THE DESEGREGATION OF ATLANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HANNER, MRS. PHILIP; AND OTHERS

    A HANDBOOK HAS BEEN PREPARED FOR REPORTERS WHO ARE COVERING THE DESEGREGATION OF ATLANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN ORDER TO INFORM THE PRESS OF THE EFFORTS MADE BY CITIZENS IN THE FIGHT TO KEEP PUBLIC SCHOOLS OPEN. A MAJOR PORTION OF THE GUIDE IS DEVOTED TO A DETAILED, CHRONOLOGICAL ACCOUNT OF THE BACKGROUND PERIOD (1954-61) LEADING TO SCHOOL…

  18. What Works in In-service Education Programs for Teachers? [Papers and Discussions Presented at a Meeting Sponsored by the Southern Regional Education Board (Atlanta, GA, December 6-7, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galambos, Eva C., Ed.

    Papers presented at a conference on major inservice issues are reprinted along with summaries of discussions following the presentations. A decription is given by C.B. Garrison of the Arkansas Program for Effective Teaching, which exemplifies an inservice program wherein all districts in one state are using one highly structured, research-based…

  19. Test-Tampering Found Rampant in Atlanta System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    The author reports on a state investigation into Atlanta's impressive gains on state tests which finds that test-tampering was rampant in the much-praised school system. The report unveiled by the Georgia governor's office states that Atlanta teachers and principals for years methodically altered answer sheets for students taking state tests,…

  20. An Examination of Green School Practices in Atlanta Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Tak Cheung

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of this study is to examine green environmental practices exercised in maintaining healthy schools in Atlanta. A forty-item researcher-developed instrument was used to survey 30 randomly sampled schools in the Atlanta area. Five schools particularly strong in green environment implementation were visited to observe their green…

  1. Test-Tampering Found Rampant in Atlanta System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    The author reports on a state investigation into Atlanta's impressive gains on state tests which finds that test-tampering was rampant in the much-praised school system. The report unveiled by the Georgia governor's office states that Atlanta teachers and principals for years methodically altered answer sheets for students taking state tests,…

  2. 76 FR 28971 - Atlanta Gas Light Company; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Atlanta Gas Light Company; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval Take notice that on May 9, 2011, as supplemented on May 11, 2011, Atlanta Gas Light Company (Atlanta Gas Light... for transportation service. Atlanta Gas Light states the rate election consists of the maximum...

  3. EPA, the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability in Atlanta, Atlanta Workforce Development Agency and Local Partners Announce the Proctor Creek Trash Free Waters Community Workforce Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA News Release: EPA, the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability in Atlanta, Atlanta Workforce Development Agency and Local Partners Announce the Proctor Creek Trash Free Waters Community Workforce Program

  4. EPA to Recognize Macon-Bibb County, Ga. for Receiving $400,000 to Assess Contaminated Sites and Revitalize the Community

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - On Thursday, June 18, 2015, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regional Administrator Heather McTeer Toney will recognize Macon-Bibb County, Ga. as the recipient of Brownfields grant investments totaling $400,000 for contamination

  5. Evaluation of a Pilot Surveillance System: Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange in Atlanta (HELIX-Atlanta)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, P.; Shire, J.; Qualters, Judy; Daley, Randolph; Fiero, Leslie Todorov; Autry, Andy; Avchen, Rachel; Stock, Allison; Correa, Adolofo; Siffel, Csaba; hide

    2007-01-01

    CDC and its partners established the Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange, Atlanta (HELIX-Atlanta) demonstration project, to develop linking and analysis methods that could be used by the National Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) Network. Initiated in October 2003, the Metropolitan Atlanta-based collaborative conducted four projects: asthma and particulate air pollution, birth defects and ozone and particulate air pollution, childhood leukemia and traffic emissions, and children's blood lead testing and neighborhood risk factors for lead poisoning. This report provides an overview of the HELIX-Atlanta projects' goals, methods and outcomes. We discuss priority attributes and common issues and challenges and offer recommendations for implementation of the nascent national environmental public health tracking network.

  6. Evaluation of a Pilot Surveillance System: Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange in Atlanta (HELIX-Atlanta)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, P.; Shire, J.; Qualters, Judy; Daley, Randolph; Fiero, Leslie Todorov; Autry, Andy; Avchen, Rachel; Stock, Allison; Correa, Adolofo; Siffel, Csaba; Devine, Owen; Gotway, Carol; Crawford; Mitchell, Ken; Pollard, Solomon; Rao, Ravi; Kajumba, Ntale; Rickman, Doug; Quattrochi, Dale; Estes, Maury; Meyer, Paul; Crosson, Bill; Limaye, Ashutosh; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad; Khan, Maudood

    2007-01-01

    CDC and its partners established the Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange, Atlanta (HELIX-Atlanta) demonstration project, to develop linking and analysis methods that could be used by the National Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) Network. Initiated in October 2003, the Metropolitan Atlanta-based collaborative conducted four projects: asthma and particulate air pollution, birth defects and ozone and particulate air pollution, childhood leukemia and traffic emissions, and children's blood lead testing and neighborhood risk factors for lead poisoning. This report provides an overview of the HELIX-Atlanta projects' goals, methods and outcomes. We discuss priority attributes and common issues and challenges and offer recommendations for implementation of the nascent national environmental public health tracking network.

  7. Increasing Walking in the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport: The Walk to Fly Study.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Janet E; Frederick, Ginny M; Paul, Prabasaj; Omura, John D; Carlson, Susan A; Dorn, Joan M

    2017-07-01

    To test the effectiveness of a point-of-decision intervention to prompt walking, versus motorized transport, in a large metropolitan airport. We installed point-of-decision prompt signage at 4 locations in the airport transportation mall at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (Atlanta, GA) at the connecting corridor between airport concourses. Six ceiling-mounted infrared sensors counted travelers entering and exiting the study location. We collected traveler counts from June 2013 to May 2016 when construction was present and absent (preintervention period: June 2013-September 2014; postintervention period: September 2014-May 2016). We used a model that incorporated weekly walking variation to estimate the intervention effect on walking. There was an 11.0% to 16.7% relative increase in walking in the absence of airport construction where 580 to 810 more travelers per day chose to walk. Through May 2016, travelers completed 390 000 additional walking trips. The Walk to Fly study demonstrated a significant and sustained increase in the number of airport travelers choosing to walk. Providing signage about options to walk in busy locations where reasonable walking options are available may improve population levels of physical activity and therefore improve public health.

  8. 75 FR 71123 - Notice of Commissioners and Staff Attendance at FERC/NARUC Collaborative on Smart Response Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... Smart Response Meeting November 12, 2010. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC or Commission... meeting: FERC/NARUC Collaborative on Smart Response: Omni Hotel at CNN Center, 100 CNN Center, Atlanta,...

  9. Airport Surface Movement Technologies: Atlanta Demonstrations Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Young, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    A flight demonstration was conducted in August 1997 at the Hartsfield Atlanta (ATL) International Airport as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. This research was aimed at investigating technology to improve the safety and efficiency of aircraft movements on the surface during the operational phases of roll-out, turnoff, and taxi in any weather condition down to a runway visual range of 300 feet. The system tested at ATL was composed of airborne and ground-based components that were integrated to provide both the flight crew and controllers with supplemental information to enable safe, expedient surface operations. Experimental displays were installed on a Boeing 757-200 research aircraft in both headup and head-down formats. On the ground, an integrated system maintained surveillance of the airport surface and a controller interface provided routing and control instructions. While at ATL, the research aircraft performed a series of flight and taxi operations to show the validity of the operational concept at a major airport facility, to validate simulation findings, and to assess each of the individual technologies performance in an airport environment. The concept was demonstrated to over 100 visitors from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the aviation community. This paper gives an overview of the LVLASO system and ATL test activities.

  10. Falling Through the Cracks: Unmet Heath Service Needs among People Living with HIV in Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Cherry, Charsey; White, Denise; Jones, Mich'l; Kalichman, Moira O.; Amaral, Christina; Swetzes, Connie

    2011-01-01

    Despite growing numbers of people living with HIV (PLWH), the landscape of related services is shrinking. This study investigated health and social service needs of men (N = 489) and women (N = 165) living with HIV in Atlanta, GA. Participants completed confidential measures asking about the health and social services they needed and accessed. Results showed an array of health and social service needs among PLWH; failure to access services was prevalent. Hunger was among the most common basic needs, reported by greater than 60% of men and women. For men, unmet service needs were associated with fewer years since testing positive for HIV, higher CD4+ T cell values, experiencing more stressors and depression, and greater quantity of alcohol use. For women, failure to access services was associated with experiencing depression and not receiving HIV medications. Providing basic services to PLWH remains a public health priority and moral imperative. PMID:21497110

  11. Atlanta NAVIGATOR case study. Final report, May 1996--Jun 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Amodei, R.; Bard, E.; Brong, B.; Cahoon, F.; Jasper, K.

    1998-11-01

    The Atlanta metropolitan region was the location of one of the most ambitious Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) deployments in the United States. This deployment included several individual projects--a Central Transportation Management Center (TMC), six Traffic Control Centers (TCC), one Transit Information Center (TIC), the Travel Information Showcase (TIS), and the extension of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) rail network and the new high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes on I-85 and I-75. The Atlanta Centennial Olympic Games and Paralympic Games created a focus for these projects. All of these systems were to be brought on line in time for the Olympic Games. This report presents the findings of the NAVIGATOR Case Study and documents the lessons learned from the Atlanta ITS deployment experience in order to improve other ITS deployments in the future. The Case Study focuses on the institutional, programmatic, and technical issues and opportunities from planning and implementing the ITS deployment in Atlanta. The Case Study collected data and information from interviews, observations, focus groups, and documentation reviews. It presents a series of lessons learned and recommendations for enabling successful ITS deployments nationwide.

  12. The State of Youth at Risk and the Juvenile Justice System: Prevention and Intervention. Hearing on Support for State Law Enforcement Efforts and for State Juvenile Justice Systems To Help Address the Wave of Violent Crimes among Youthful Offenders before the Subcommittee on Juvenile Justice of the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session (Atlanta, GA, October 21, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

    This document presents witness testimonies and prepared statements from a Senate hearing held in Atlanta, Georgia to examine the problem of crime among youth and to discuss the reauthorization of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974. In his opening statement, Senator Fowler notes that the reauthorization puts greater…

  13. EPA to Sign Memorandum of Understanding with Atlanta Metropolitan State College

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - On Wednesday, April 22, 2015, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will enter into agreement with Atlanta Metropolitan State College (AMSC) to promote environmental sustainability. The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) will provi

  14. Chemlink Laboratories in Kennesaw, Ga. Among 21 Partners to be Recognized for Creating and Using Safer Choice Products / June 22 is the first annual awards ceremony for 2015 Safer Choice Partner of the Year Award Winners

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is announcing that Chemlink Laboratories in Kennesaw, Ga. is among 21 Safer Choice Partner of the Year winners across 15 states. The awards are for outstanding achievement in the design, manufa

  15. The Atlanta Urban Debate League: Exploring the Making of a Critical Literacy Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cridland-Hughes, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The Atlanta Urban Debate League was established in 1985 as an after school program focused on providing debate outreach to high school students in the Atlanta public schools. Still in operation today, volunteers work with current students in public middle and high schools in Atlanta, supporting students as they practice reading, writing, speaking…

  16. 77 FR 24440 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Atlanta; Ozone 2002 Base Year...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Atlanta; Ozone 2002.... SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve the ozone 2002 base year emissions inventory portion of the state... is part of the Atlanta, Georgia (hereafter referred to as ``the Atlanta Area'' or ``Area''),...

  17. 78 FR 32222 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour..., 2009, to address the reasonable further progress (RFP) plan requirements for the Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) nonattainment area. The Atlanta,...

  18. 78 FR 44439 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans: Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans: Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour... Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) nonattainment area. EPA... Planning Branch, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 4, 61 Forsyth Street SW., Atlanta,...

  19. The Emergency Medical Services Survey of Metro Atlanta Employers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKalb Tech. Inst., Clarkston, GA.

    A survey was conducted in the Atlanta, Georgia, metropolitan area to determine emergency medical services (EMS) employer needs for persons with basic emergency medical technician (EMT) skills and higher paramedic skills. Information was gathered through a telephone survey to which 24 (60 percent) of the 40 EMS employers in the area responded. The…

  20. Student Financial Aid Issues Hearing Report (Atlanta, Georgia,

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance, Washington, DC.

    This paper summarizes results of a hearing by the Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance in Atlanta, Georgia, on the delivery and disposition of higher education student financial assistance funds. Seventeen individuals offered testimony. They included representatives of guarantee agencies, the lending community, the financial aid…

  1. The diurnal and semidiurnal oscillations in meteor winds over Atlanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. I.; Roper, R. G.

    The wind data collected over Atlanta during the period August 1974-February 1978 using the Georgia Tech Radio Meteor Wind Facility, is analyzed to yield an average picture of the seasonal behavior of its diurnal tides. Both the zonal and meridional components are studied. The vertical structures of these oscillations over Atlanta are compared with similar studies over Garchy, Urbana and Adelaide. For the semidiurnal tide: the vertical structure during winter appears to have a strong latitude dependence, with vertical wavelength increasing with decreasing latitude; in spring, the (2, 4) and (2, 6) modes appear to dominate at all stations; in summer, the behavior is the same at all four locations, characterized by the apparent domination of the (2,2) mode; in autumn, both the Garchy and Atlanta results indicate the presence of a (2,2) mode, while the (2,4) mode appears to dominate over Urbana. The behavior of the diurnal tide is less well defined: during winter, as latitude decreases from Garchy to Atlanta, evanescent and higher order propagating modes seem to dominate; both spring and summer are characterized by a gradual decrease in observed vertical wavelengths as latitude decreases; in northern hemisphere autumn, the fundamental (1, 1) mode appears to dominate, but at Adelaide in southern hemisphere autumn, predominatly evanescent modes are observed.

  2. OBJECTIVES, DESIGN, AND PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE ATLANTA SUPERSITE PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atlanta Supersites project is the first of two Supersites projects to be established during Phase I of EPA's Supersites Program; Phase II is being established through a Request for Assistance. The other initial project is in Fresno, California. The Supersite Program is part o...

  3. Notification: Review of Atlanta Combined Sewer Overflow Consent Decree

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project #OPE-FY17-0014, March 30, 2017. The EPA OIG plans to begin a review of EPA Region 4’s oversight of the Atlanta combined sewer overflow consent decree. For more information, please click on the link above.

  4. Changing the Odds: The Race for Results in Atlanta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Janelle; Torian, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Casey has invested in several southwest Atlanta communities for more than 10 years. This report explores how race and community of residence continue to create barriers that keep the city's kids, particularly those of color, from reaching their full potential. The report highlights three key areas that support or thwart children's healthy…

  5. OBJECTIVES, DESIGN, AND PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE ATLANTA SUPERSITE PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atlanta Supersites project is the first of two Supersites projects to be established during Phase I of EPA's Supersites Program; Phase II is being established through a Request for Assistance. The other initial project is in Fresno, California. The Supersite Program is part o...

  6. What Can We Learn from the Atlanta Cheating Scandal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saultz, Andrew; Murphy, Kristin M.; Aronson, Brittany

    2016-01-01

    In April 2015, 11 educators were convicted for their roles in the cheating scandal in the Atlanta Public Schools. The authors examine the lessons that teachers, administrators, and policy makers can learn from the cheating scandal: Teachers and school leaders were not adequately prepared to navigate the school district's environment; there were…

  7. The Emergency Medical Services Survey of Metro Atlanta Employers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKalb Tech. Inst., Clarkston, GA.

    A survey was conducted in the Atlanta, Georgia, metropolitan area to determine emergency medical services (EMS) employer needs for persons with basic emergency medical technician (EMT) skills and higher paramedic skills. Information was gathered through a telephone survey to which 24 (60 percent) of the 40 EMS employers in the area responded. The…

  8. Environmental Public Health Tracking: Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange-Atlanta (HEXIX-Atlanta: A cooperative Program Between CDC and NASA for Development of an Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Niskar, Amanda Sue

    2005-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is coordinating HELIX- Atlanta to provide information regarding the five-county Metropolitan Atlanta Area (Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinett) via a network of integrated environmental monitoring and public health data systems so that all sectors can take action to prevent and control environmentally related health effects. The HELIX-Atlanta Network is a tool to access interoperable information systems with optional information technology linkage functionality driven by scientific rationale. HELIX-Atlanta is a collaborative effort with local, state, federal, and academic partners, including the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The HELIX-Atlanta Partners identified the following HELIX-Atlanta initial focus areas: childhood lead poisoning, short-latency cancers, developmental disabilities, birth defects, vital records, respiratory health, age of housing, remote sensing data, and environmental monitoring, HELIX-Atlanta Partners identified and evaluated information systems containing information on the above focus areas. The information system evaluations resulted in recommendations for what resources would be needed to interoperate selected information systems in compliance with the CDC Public Health Information Network (PHIN). This presentation will discuss the collaborative process of building a network that links health and environment data for information exchange, including NASA remote sensing data, for use in HELIX-Atlanta.

  9. Environmental Public Health Tracking: Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange-Atlanta (HEXIX-Atlanta: A cooperative Program Between CDC and NASA for Development of an Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Niskar, Amanda Sue

    2005-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is coordinating HELIX- Atlanta to provide information regarding the five-county Metropolitan Atlanta Area (Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinett) via a network of integrated environmental monitoring and public health data systems so that all sectors can take action to prevent and control environmentally related health effects. The HELIX-Atlanta Network is a tool to access interoperable information systems with optional information technology linkage functionality driven by scientific rationale. HELIX-Atlanta is a collaborative effort with local, state, federal, and academic partners, including the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The HELIX-Atlanta Partners identified the following HELIX-Atlanta initial focus areas: childhood lead poisoning, short-latency cancers, developmental disabilities, birth defects, vital records, respiratory health, age of housing, remote sensing data, and environmental monitoring, HELIX-Atlanta Partners identified and evaluated information systems containing information on the above focus areas. The information system evaluations resulted in recommendations for what resources would be needed to interoperate selected information systems in compliance with the CDC Public Health Information Network (PHIN). This presentation will discuss the collaborative process of building a network that links health and environment data for information exchange, including NASA remote sensing data, for use in HELIX-Atlanta.

  10. Project ATLANTA (ATlanta Land-use ANalysis: Temperature and Air quality): A Study of how the Urban Landscape Affects Meteorology and Air Quality Through Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G.; Lo, C. P.; Kidder, Stanley Q.; Hafner, Jan; Taha, Haider; Bornstein, Robert D.; Gillies, Robert R.; Gallo, Kevin P.

    1998-01-01

    It is our intent through this investigation to help facilitate measures that can be Project ATLANTA (ATlanta Land-use ANalysis: applied to mitigate climatological or air quality Temperature and Air-quality) is a NASA Earth degradation, or to design alternate measures to sustain Observing System (EOS) Interdisciplinary Science or improve the overall urban environment in the future. investigation that seeks to observe, measure, model, and analyze how the rapid growth of the Atlanta. The primary objectives for this research effort are: 1) To In the last half of the 20th century, Atlanta, investigate and model the relationship between Atlanta Georgia has risen as the premier commercial, urban growth, land cover change, and the development industrial, and transportation urban area of the of the urban heat island phenomenon through time at southeastern United States. The rapid growth of the nested spatial scales from local to regional; 2) To Atlanta area, particularly within the last 25 years, has investigate and model the relationship between Atlanta made Atlanta one of the fastest growing metropolitan urban growth and land cover change on air quality areas in the United States. The population of the through time at nested spatial scales from local to Atlanta metropolitan area increased 27% between 1970 regional; and 3) To model the overall effects of urban and 1980, and 33% between 1980-1990 (Research development on surface energy budget characteristics Atlanta, Inc., 1993). Concomitant with this high rate of across the Atlanta urban landscape through time at population growth, has been an explosive growth in nested spatial scales from local to regional. Our key retail, industrial, commercial, and transportation goal is to derive a better scientific understanding of how services within the Atlanta region. This has resulted in land cover changes associated with urbanization in the tremendous land cover change dynamics within the Atlanta area, principally in transforming

  11. Climate change adaptation through urban heat management in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Stone, Brian; Vargo, Jason; Liu, Peng; Hu, Yongtao; Russell, Armistead

    2013-07-16

    This study explores the potential effectiveness of metropolitan land cover change as a climate change adaptation strategy for managing rising temperatures in a large and rapidly warming metropolitan region of the United States. Through the integration of a mesoscale meteorological model with estimated land cover data for the Atlanta, Georgia region in 2010, this study quantifies the influence of extensive land cover change at the periphery of a large metropolitan region on temperature within the city center. The first study to directly model a metropolitan scale heat transfer mechanism, we find both enhanced tree canopy and impervious cover in the suburban zones of the Atlanta region to produce statistically significant cooling and warming effects in the urban core. Based on these findings, we conclude that urban heat island management both within and beyond the central developed core of large cities may provide an effective climate change adaptation strategy for large metropolitan regions.

  12. NEOPLASIA IN SNAKES AT ZOO ATLANTA DURING 1992-2012.

    PubMed

    Page-Karjian, Annie; Hahne, Megan; Leach, Kate; Murphy, Hayley; Lock, Brad; Rivera, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to review neoplasia of captive snakes in the Zoo Atlanta collection from 1992 to 2012. Of 255 snakes that underwent necropsy and histopathologic examination at Zoo Atlanta during the study period, 37 were observed with neoplasia at necropsy. In those 37 snakes, 42 neoplastic lesions of 18 primary cell types were diagnosed. Thirty-five of those neoplasms (83.3%) were malignant, and of those, 19 were of mesenchymal origin, whereas 14 were of epithelial origin. The median annual rate of neoplasia at necropsy was 12.5% (interquartile range = 2.8-19.5%) over the 21-yr study period. The mean estimated age at death for snakes with neoplasia was 13.2 yr (range, 1-24 yr). Investigating the incidence and clinical significance of neoplasia in captive snakes is vital for developing effective preventative and treatment regimes.

  13. Trends in pyloric stenosis incidence, Atlanta, 1968 to 1982.

    PubMed Central

    Lammer, E J; Edmonds, L D

    1987-01-01

    Four studies reported an increasing incidence of pyloric stenosis during the late 1970s from geographically diverse areas of the United Kingdom. It was suggested that the increased incidence might be related to changes in infant feeding practices. We used data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, a population based birth defects registry, to examine the secular trends and descriptive epidemiology of pyloric stenosis in a North American city. For the period 1968 to 1982, the incidence of pyloric stenosis was 1.33 per 1000 live births; there was no evidence of an increasing trend for either race or sex specific rates of pyloric stenosis. The descriptive epidemiology of the pyloric stenosis cases showed higher rates for males, whites, and infants of higher birth weight. We found no increasing trend in pyloric stenosis incidence in Atlanta, despite well documented changes in US infant feeding practices (an increased prevalence of breast feeding) during the 1970s. PMID:3656370

  14. Imaging lexicon for acute pancreatitis: 2012 Atlanta Classification revisited.

    PubMed

    Sureka, Binit; Bansal, Kalpana; Patidar, Yashwant; Arora, Ankur

    2016-02-01

    The original 1992 Atlanta Classification System for acute pancreatitis was revised in 2012 by the Atlanta Working Group, assisted by various national and international societies, through web-based consensus. This revised classification identifies two phases of acute pancreatitis: early and late. Acute pancreatitis can be either oedematous interstitial pancreatitis or necrotizing pancreatitis. Severity of the disease is categorized into three levels: mild, moderately severe and severe, depending upon organ failure and local/systemic complications. According to the type of pancreatitis, collections are further divided into acute peripancreatic fluid collection, pseudocyst, acute necrotic collection, and walled-off necrosis. Insight into the revised terminology is essential for accurate communication of imaging findings. In this review article, we will summarize the updated nomenclature and illustrate corresponding imaging findings using examples. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press and the Digestive Science Publishing Co. Limited.

  15. The Role of Union Cavalry during the Atlanta Campaign

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    forced Major General Joseph Hooker to operate blind against Confederate Generals Lee and Jackson. Chancellorsville was Lee’s greatest battle, and... Joseph E. Johnston took command of the Army of Tennessee, which had been pushed south into Georgia following the Battle of Missionary Ridge. The strategic...Union effort. 5 The Union cavalry efforts there were eclipsed by Confederate cavalry under Forrest and Major General Joseph Wheeler. 7 Atlanta

  16. Operation Heli-STAR - Atlanta Communications Experiment (ACE). Volume 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Operation Heli-STAR (Helicopter Short-Haul Transportation and Aviation Research) was established and operated in Atlanta, Georgia, during the period of the 1996 Centennial Olympic Games. Heli-STAR had three major thrusts: (1) the establishment and operation of a helicopter-based cargo transportation system, (2) the management of low-altitude air traffic in the airspace of an urban area, and (3) the collection and analysis of research and development data associated with items 1 and 2. Heli-STAR was a cooperative industry/government program that included parcel package shippers and couriers in the Atlanta area, the helicopter industry, aviation electronics manufacturers, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and support contractors. Several detailed reports have been produced as a result of Operation Heli-STAR. These include four reports on acoustic measurements and associated analyses, and reports on the Heli-STAR tracking data including the data processing and retrieval system, the Heli-STAR cargo simulation, and the community response system. In addition, NASA's Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments (AGATE) program has produced a report describing the Atlanta Communications Experiment (ACE) which produced the avionics and ground equipment using automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) technology. This latter report is restricted to organizations belonging to NASA's AGATE industry consortium. A complete list of these reports is shown on the following page.

  17. Operation Heli-STAR - Atlanta Communications Experiment (ACE). Volume 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Operation Heli-STAR (Helicopter Short-Haul Transportation and Aviation Research) was established and operated in Atlanta, Georgia, during the period of the 1996 Centennial Olympic Games. Heli-STAR had three major thrusts: (1) the establishment and operation of a helicopter-based cargo transportation system, (2) the management of low-altitude air traffic in the airspace of an urban area, and (3) the collection and analysis of research and development data associated with items 1 and 2. Heli-STAR was a cooperative industry/government program that included parcel package shippers and couriers in the Atlanta area, the helicopter industry, aviation electronics manufacturers, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and support contractors. Several detailed reports have been produced as a result of Operation Heli-STAR. These include four reports on acoustic measurements and associated analyses, and reports on the Heli-STAR tracking data including the data processing and retrieval system, the Heli-STAR cargo simulation, and the community response system. In addition, NASA's Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments (AGATE) program has produced a report describing the Atlanta Communications Experiment (ACE) which produced the avionics and ground equipment using automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) technology. This latter report is restricted to organizations belonging to NASA's AGATE industry consortium. A complete list of these reports is shown on the following page.

  18. Atlanta, revised Atlanta, and Determinant-based classification--application in a cohort of Portuguese patients with acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Samuel R; Carvalho, Joana; Santos, Patrícia; Moura, Carlos M; Antunes, Teresa; Velosa, José

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) represents a complex and potentially fatal disease with a highly variable clinical course. Three classification systems for assessing the severity in AP have been validated for clinical use. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance of the Atlanta and Determinant-based classifications in predicting severe clinical outcomes in patients with AP. In this retrospective study we reviewed the treatment and follow-up records of 525 patients with AP admitted to our unit between the years of 2003 and 2014. Outcomes included mortality, admission to the ICU, need for interventional procedures or nutritional support, and duration of hospital and ICU stay. The prevalence of organ failure and persistent organ failure in our cohort was 23.0 and 10.7%, respectively, and the mortality rate was 5.9%. Higher grades of severity were associated with worse outcomes in all classification systems. The revised Atlanta and Determinant-based classifications performed similarly in predicting outcomes, and both proved to be superior to the former classic Atlanta classification. Recent classifications proved to be more accurate in predicting important clinical outcomes in patients with AP.

  19. Commercial mosquito trap and gravid trap oviposition media evaluation, Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Burkett, Douglas A; Kelly, Rosmarie; Porter, Charles H; Wirtz, Robert A

    2004-09-01

    Field trials evaluating the effectiveness of selected gravid trap oviposition media and commercially available mosquito traps were conducted in southern Fulton County (Atlanta), GA, from June 9 to June 18 and June 24 to July 4, 2002, respectively. Total number of mosquitoes and number of each species captured during the tests were compared using a Latin square design. For the gravid trap infusion media, significant differences were found for total number of mosquitoes collected where sod > or = hay > or = hay side-by-side diluted hay > dilute hay side-by-side hay > or = oak > diluted hay. Only Aedes albopictus (oak), Culex quinquefasciatus (sod and both concentrated hay infusions), and Culex restuans (sod) were captured in significantly greater numbers using a particular infusion. Significant differences for the total number of mosquitoes collected were also observed in the commercial mosquito traps such that the gravid trap > ultra violet up-draft > or = Mosquito Magnet Pro > or = omnidirectional Fay-Prince trap with CO2 > up-draft CDC-style with CO2 > or = CDC-style with CO2. Significant differences in numbers collected among traps were noted for several species, including Aedes vexans, Aedes albopictus, Cx. quinquefasciatus, Cx. restuans, and Culex salinarius. Results from these field trap and infusion evaluations can enhance current surveillance efforts, especially for the primary vectors of West Nile virus and other arboviruses.

  20. Falling through the cracks: unmet health service needs among people living with HIV in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Cherry, Charsey; White, Denise; Jones, Mich'l; Kalichman, Moira O; Amaral, Christina; Swetzes, Connie

    2012-01-01

    Despite growing numbers of people living with HIV (PLWH), the landscape of related services is shrinking. This study investigated health and social service needs of men (N = 489) and women (N = 165) living with HIV in Atlanta, GA. Participants completed confidential measures asking about the health and social services they needed and accessed. Results showed an array of health and social service needs among PLWH; failure to access services was prevalent. Hunger was among the most common basic needs, reported by greater than 60% of men and women. For men, unmet service needs were associated with fewer years since testing positive for HIV, higher CD4+ T cell values, experiencing more stressors and depression, and greater quantity of alcohol use. For women, failure to access services was associated with experiencing depression and not receiving HIV medications. Providing basic services to PLWH remains a public health priority and a moral imperative. Copyright © 2012 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Atlanta Rail Yard Study: Evaluation of local-scale air pollution ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Intermodal rail yards are important nodes in the freight transportation network, where freight is organized and moved from one mode of transport to another, critical equipment is serviced, and freight is routed to its next destination. Rail yard environments are also areas with multiple sources of air pollutant emissions (e.g., heavy-duty vehicles, locomotives, cranes), which may affect local air quality in residential areas nearby. In order to understand emissions and related air quality impacts, two field studies took place over the time span of 2010-2012 to measure air pollution trends in close proximity to the Inman and Tilford rail yard complex in Atlanta, GA. One field study involved long-term stationary monitoring of black carbon, fine particles, and carbon dioxide at two stations nearby the rail yard. In addition, a second field study performed intensive mobile air monitoring for a one month period in the summer of 2012 at a roadway network surrounding the rail yard complex and measured a comprehensive array of pollutants. Real-time mobile particulate measurements included particle counts, extinction coefficient, black carbon via light-absorption and particle incandescence, and particle composition derived by aerosol mass spectrometry. Gas-phase measurements included oxides of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and air toxics (e.g., benzene). Both sets of measurements determined detectable local influence from rail yard-related emissions.

  2. Oral Health Intervention for Low-Income African American Men in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, LaShawn M; Rollins, Latrice; Henry Akintobi, Tabia; Erwin, Katherine; Lewis, Kimberly; Hernandez, Natalie; Miller, Assia

    2017-05-01

    To describe the Minority Men's Oral Health Dental Access Program (MOHDAP) intervention and report participants' outcomes and satisfaction. MOHDAP was designed to increase the oral health knowledge of low-income, African American men in Atlanta, GA, in 2013. A community-based participatory approach and needs assessment guided the intervention development, which consisted of 3 educational modules delivered over a 2-day period. All participants (n = 45; mean age = 50 years) were African American men. We assessed changes in oral health knowledge and attitudes at baseline and postintervention via survey. After the intervention, the percentage of correct responses to questions about gingivitis increased by 24.2% (P = .01), about use of a hard (instead of a soft) toothbrush increased by 42.2% (P < .01), and knowledge of ways to prevent gum diseases increased by 16.0% (P = .03). The percentage agreeing with erroneous statements decreased 11.3% (P = .02) regarding oral health-related fatalism and oral health self-care and 17.4% (P = .05) regarding saving front versus back teeth. Community-based oral health educational interventions designed for African American men may reduce oral health disparities among this population.

  3. Pediatric malaria: 8 year case series in Atlanta, Georgia, and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, Julie; Guarner, Jeanette

    2010-01-01

    Background Although malaria is frequent in travelers, it is often misdiagnosed on initial presentation, especially in children. The objective of this study is to describe epidemiology, clinical and laboratory presentation, and treatment of children with malaria in the United States. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 50 confirmed cases of malaria from 2 pediatric metropolitan hospitals in Atlanta, GA from 2000 – 2008. Results Malaria smears were performed in 385 unique patients; 50 (12.6%) were positive. American children who had visited family and friends in malaria endemic countries comprised 62% of our cases. Most cases visited Nigeria or Cameroon; all but 3 travelled to Africa. Three patients presented 8 – 12 months following travel. Plasmodium falciparum was diagnosed most frequently (72%). Most patients had low level parasitemia (<1%). Gametocytes were rarely identified. Treatment was primarily with quinine and either doxycycline or clindamycin, transfusion was rare. All patients responded rapidly to treatment. Although 7 (14%) had hyperparasitemia (>5%), no fatalities or long-term sequelae were seen. Conclusions Malaria diagnosis can be difficult in children because parasitemia is usually below 1%. A high index of suspicion is required in patients who have travelled to Africa. PMID:20920055

  4. Oral Health Intervention for Low-Income African American Men in Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, LaShawn M.; Rollins, Latrice; Henry Akintobi, Tabia; Erwin, Katherine; Lewis, Kimberly; Hernandez, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To describe the Minority Men’s Oral Health Dental Access Program (MOHDAP) intervention and report participants’ outcomes and satisfaction. Methods. MOHDAP was designed to increase the oral health knowledge of low-income, African American men in Atlanta, GA, in 2013. A community-based participatory approach and needs assessment guided the intervention development, which consisted of 3 educational modules delivered over a 2-day period. All participants (n = 45; mean age = 50 years) were African American men. We assessed changes in oral health knowledge and attitudes at baseline and postintervention via survey. Results. After the intervention, the percentage of correct responses to questions about gingivitis increased by 24.2% (P = .01), about use of a hard (instead of a soft) toothbrush increased by 42.2% (P < .01), and knowledge of ways to prevent gum diseases increased by 16.0% (P = .03). The percentage agreeing with erroneous statements decreased 11.3% (P = .02) regarding oral health–related fatalism and oral health self-care and 17.4% (P = .05) regarding saving front versus back teeth. Conclusions. Community-based oral health educational interventions designed for African American men may reduce oral health disparities among this population. PMID:28661811

  5. TODAY: EPA and City of Atlanta will Hold the 3rd Annual Earth Day Rally at the Sam Nunn Atlanta Federal Center Courtyard/Egypt Sherrod, Star of HGTVs highly rated Property Virgins, will Host the Rally

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - In celebration of the 45 th Anniversary of Earth Day, EPA Regional Administrator Heather McTeer Toney will join Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed and Egypt Sherrod, the star of HGTV's highly rated Property Virgins and author of Keep

  6. EPA and City of Atlanta to Hold the 3rd Annual Earth Day Rally at the Sam Nunn Atlanta Federal Center Courtyard/ Egypt Sherrod, Star of HGTVs highly rated Property Virgins, will Host the Rally

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - In celebration of the 45 th Anniversary of Earth Day, EPA Regional Administrator Heather McTeer Toney will join Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed and Egypt Sherrod, the star of HGTV's highly rated Property Virgins and author of Keep

  7. Revised Atlanta and determinant-based classification: application in a prospective cohort of acute pancreatitis patients.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Haq; Mounzer, Rawad; Yadav, Dhiraj; Yabes, Jonathan G; Slivka, Adam; Whitcomb, David C; Papachristou, Georgios I

    2013-12-01

    Atlanta classification (Atlanta 1992) of acute pancreatitis (AP) has several limitations. Two new classification systems were recently proposed: the Atlanta reclassification (Atlanta 2012) and the determinant-based classification (DBC). The aim of our study was to: (i) determine the association between different severity categories and clinical outcomes and (ii) perform a head-to-head comparison between Atlanta 1992, Atlanta 2012, and DBC in predicting these clinical outcomes. A total of 256 prospectively enrolled patients were assigned a severity category for all three classifications. Five clinical outcomes were evaluated: mortality, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and length of stay (LOS), need for interventions, and hospital LOS. Pairwise testing between severity grades within a classification system was performed using Fisher's exact and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Predictive accuracies were evaluated using area under the ROC curve (AUC) and Somer's D co-efficient. Overall, higher grades of severity were associated with worse clinical outcomes for all three classification systems. Atlanta 2012 and DBC performed better than Atlanta 1992 and were comparable in predicting mortality (AUC 0.89 for both vs. 0.76, P<0.001), ICU admission (AUC 0.91 for both vs. 0.80, P<0.001), and ICU LOS (Somer's D 0.21 and 0.28 vs. 0.07, P<0.05). DBC performed better in predicting need for interventions (AUC 0.93 vs. 0.85, P<0.001), whereas Atlanta 2012 performed better in predicting hospital LOS (Somer's D 0.43 vs. 0.37, P=0.04). Atlanta 2012 and DBC severity categories accurately reflected clinical outcomes in our cohort and were superior to Atlanta 1992. These novel classification systems can guide the selection of homogeneous patient populations for clinical research and provide an accurate spectrum of disease severity categories in the clinical setting.

  8. Revised Atlanta Classification for Acute Pancreatitis: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Foster, Bryan R; Jensen, Kyle K; Bakis, Gene; Shaaban, Akram M; Coakley, Fergus V

    2016-01-01

    The 2012 revised Atlanta classification is an update of the original 1992 Atlanta classification, a standardized clinical and radiologic nomenclature for acute pancreatitis and associated complications based on research advances made over the past 2 decades. Acute pancreatitis is now divided into two distinct subtypes, necrotizing pancreatitis and interstitial edematous pancreatitis (IEP), based on the presence or absence of necrosis, respectively. The revised classification system also updates confusing and sometimes inaccurate terminology that was previously used to describe pancreatic and peripancreatic collections. As such, use of the terms acute pseudocyst and pancreatic abscess is now discouraged. Instead, four distinct collection subtypes are identified on the basis of the presence of pancreatic necrosis and time elapsed since the onset of pancreatitis. Acute peripancreatic fluid collections (APFCs) and pseudocysts occur in IEP and contain fluid only. Acute necrotic collections (ANCs) and walled-off necrosis (WON) occur only in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis and contain variable amounts of fluid and necrotic debris. APFCs and ANCs occur within 4 weeks of disease onset. After this time, APFCs or ANCs may either resolve or persist, developing a mature wall to become a pseudocyst or a WON, respectively. Any collection subtype may become infected and manifest as internal gas, though this occurs most commonly in necrotic collections. In this review, the authors present a practical image-rich guide to the revised Atlanta classification system, with the goal of fostering implementation of the revised system into radiology practice, thereby facilitating accurate communication among clinicians and reinforcing the radiologist's role as a key member of a multidisciplinary team in treating patients with acute pancreatitis. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  9. Why, Where, and How to Infuse the Atlanta Sociological Laboratory into the Sociology Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Earl, II

    2012-01-01

    The Atlanta Sociological Laboratory is the moniker bestowed on scholars engaged in sociological research at Atlanta University between 1895 and 1924. Under the leadership of W. E. B. Du Bois, 1897-1914, this school made substantive yet marginalized contributions to the discipline. Its accomplishments include, but are not limited to, its…

  10. AN OVERVIEW OF THE OBJECTIVES AND DESIGN OF THE '99 ATLANTA SUPERSITE EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the Summer of 1999, a 4-week intensive field campaign was conducted at a site on Jefferson Street in Midtown Atlanta. The campaign, the 1999 Atlanta Supersites Experiment, was carried out under the direction of the Southern Oxidants Study and represented the first of U....

  11. 40 CFR 81.45 - Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.45 Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Georgia) has been revised to consist of the...

  12. 40 CFR 81.45 - Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.45 Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Georgia) has been revised to consist of the...

  13. 40 CFR 81.45 - Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.45 Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Georgia) has been revised to consist of the...

  14. 40 CFR 81.45 - Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.45 Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Georgia) has been revised to consist of the...

  15. 40 CFR 81.45 - Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.45 Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Georgia) has been revised to consist of the...

  16. 76 FR 66713 - Atlanta Gas Light Company; Notice of Compliance Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Atlanta Gas Light Company; Notice of Compliance Filing Take notice that on October 19, 2011, Atlanta Gas Light Company filed a revised Statement of Operating Conditions...

  17. A New Definition in Atlanta: Q&A with Beverly Hall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy

    2010-01-01

    Beverly Hall has been superintendent of Atlanta Public Schools since 1999. Before coming to Atlanta, Hall was state district superintendent of Newark Public Schools, deputy chancellor for instruction of New York City Public Schools, superintendent of Community School District 27 in New York City, and a principal in Brooklyn. Hall chairs Harvard…

  18. A New Definition in Atlanta: Q&A with Beverly Hall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy

    2010-01-01

    Beverly Hall has been superintendent of Atlanta Public Schools since 1999. Before coming to Atlanta, Hall was state district superintendent of Newark Public Schools, deputy chancellor for instruction of New York City Public Schools, superintendent of Community School District 27 in New York City, and a principal in Brooklyn. Hall chairs Harvard…

  19. AN OVERVIEW OF THE OBJECTIVES AND DESIGN OF THE '99 ATLANTA SUPERSITE EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the Summer of 1999, a 4-week intensive field campaign was conducted at a site on Jefferson Street in Midtown Atlanta. The campaign, the 1999 Atlanta Supersites Experiment, was carried out under the direction of the Southern Oxidants Study and represented the first of U....

  20. The Social Studies Curriculum in Atlanta Public Schools during the Desegregation Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohan, Chara Haeussler; Randolph, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This historical investigation explores how teachers, students, and education officials viewed the social studies curriculum in the local context of Atlanta, and the broader state of Georgia, during the post-Civil Rights era, when integration was a court-ordered reality in the public schools. During the desegregation era, Atlanta schools were led…

  1. The Social Studies Curriculum in Atlanta Public Schools during the Desegregation Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohan, Chara Haeussler; Randolph, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This historical investigation explores how teachers, students, and education officials viewed the social studies curriculum in the local context of Atlanta, and the broader state of Georgia, during the post-Civil Rights era, when integration was a court-ordered reality in the public schools. During the desegregation era, Atlanta schools were led…

  2. Falsification, Annual Targets, and Errant Leadership: Media Portrayal of the Atlanta Test-Cheating Scandal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This analysis of the Atlanta test-cheating scandal differs markedly from the version reported in the press. Using discourse analysis, I examined over 50 articles published in the "Atlanta Journal-Constitution" ("AJC"), the hometown newspaper at the center of the investigation. Because newspapers are a primary source of…

  3. Why, Where, and How to Infuse the Atlanta Sociological Laboratory into the Sociology Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Earl, II

    2012-01-01

    The Atlanta Sociological Laboratory is the moniker bestowed on scholars engaged in sociological research at Atlanta University between 1895 and 1924. Under the leadership of W. E. B. Du Bois, 1897-1914, this school made substantive yet marginalized contributions to the discipline. Its accomplishments include, but are not limited to, its…

  4. Falsification, Annual Targets, and Errant Leadership: Media Portrayal of the Atlanta Test-Cheating Scandal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This analysis of the Atlanta test-cheating scandal differs markedly from the version reported in the press. Using discourse analysis, I examined over 50 articles published in the "Atlanta Journal-Constitution" ("AJC"), the hometown newspaper at the center of the investigation. Because newspapers are a primary source of…

  5. Ozone trends in Atlanta, Georgia - Have emission controls been effective?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, Ronald W.; Richardson, Jennifer L.; Chameldes, William L.

    1989-01-01

    Nine years of summertime ozone data from the Atlanta metropolitan area are analyzed and compared to local emissions of volatile organic carbon and nitrogen oxides. Trends from 1979 to 1987 were studied for the number of days per year ozone exceeded the NAAQS standard, the second-highest ozone level observed per year, and the first quartile summertime average ozone observed, as well as the mean difference between the ozone level observed downwind and upwind of the city. Because this last parameter is sensitive to chemical factors but relatively insensitive to the number of days each year with meteorological conditions conducive to ozone formation, its trend may be best suited for determining how effective emission controls have been in reducing O3 in the Atlanta area. In spite of the fact that sizeable reductions have been claimed for volatile organic carbon emissions over the past several years, the data give no indication that ozone levels have decreased and in fact, imply that summertime ozone production may have increased. The results imply that either emissions have not decreased as much as has been claimed or that ozone is not sensitive to anthropogenic volatile organic carbon emissions.

  6. Healthy beginnings: a system of care for children in Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ryan; Bertonaschi, Susan; Gazmararian, Julie

    2014-12-01

    For more than a decade the Annie E. Casey Foundation's Atlanta Civic Site has invested in a comprehensive community change strategy in five neighborhoods near downtown Atlanta. The foundation pursues a three-prong strategy focused on improving educational outcomes for children, encouraging family economic success for adults, and positively transforming the community's physical environment. The foundation recently integrated a focus on health into its community and family strengthening strategies. In this article we review the foundation's Healthy Beginnings System of Care. Healthy Beginnings seeks to prevent or reduce health disparities through a community-based, coordinated care approach based in a high-quality early learning center. An initial evaluation found that in 2013 the program exceeded all of its performance requirements for the 279 enrolled children. Ninety-seven percent of the children had health insurance, 92 percent were up to date with immunizations, and 98 percent were current with developmental screenings. By building upon the partnerships formed through the foundation's community change effort, Healthy Beginnings has dramatically increased neighborhood children's access to health care and forms the basis for a cost-effective approach that can be replicated in other communities. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  7. Semicontinuous aerosol carbon measurements: Comparison of Atlanta Supersite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ho-Jin; Turpin, Barbara J.; Edgerton, Eric; Hering, Susanne V.; Allen, George; Maring, Hal; Solomon, Paul

    2003-04-01

    An intensive field campaign of the Atlanta Supersite Experiment was carried out at a ground-based measurement site on Jefferson Street in midtown Atlanta, Georgia, from 3 August to 1 September 1999. This paper examines the semicontinuous particulate organic and elemental measurements that were made as a part of the experiment. Measurements were made using a Rutgers University/Oregon Graduate Institute in situ thermal-optical carbon analyzer, Rupprecht and Patashnick 5400 ambient carbon particulate monitor, Radiance Research particle soot absorption photometer, Aerosol Dynamics flash vaporization carbon analyzer, and Magee Scientific AE-16 Aethalometer. The "intersampler precision" with which semicontinuous particulate total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), and elemental carbon (EC) were measured is 7, 13, and 26%, expressed as pooled coefficients of variation of 2, 3, and 4 instruments, respectively. Correlations between pairs of OC measurements are moderate (R2 = 54-73%), and correlations between pairs of EC measurements are high (R2 = 74-97%). Differences in reported OC concentrations are small compared to differences in EC concentrations; intersampler EC concentration differences result from differences (1) in the operational definitions of OC and EC, (2) in the calibration of optical instruments, and (3) because EC values are closer to limits of detection. This agreement between semicontinuous samplers is quite good, especially in light of previous particulate carbon comparisons. Reasons for measurement differences and benefits of automated time-resolved measurements are discussed.

  8. Food group intake patterns and nutrient intake vary across low-income Hispanic and African American preschool children in Atlanta: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The food group intake patterns of low income Hispanic and African American preschool children are not well documented. The aim of this study was to perform a food group intake analysis of low income minority preschool children and evaluate how macronutrient and micronutrient intake compares to Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI). Methods A cross sectional study design using three-day food diaries analyzed by dietary analysis software (Nutrient Database System for Research) was used. Children were recruited from well-child clinics at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Hughes Spalding and North Dekalb Grady Satellite Clinic, Atlanta, GA. Low-income, African American and Hispanic preschool age children (n = 291) were enrolled. A total of 105 completed and returned the 3-day food diaries. Chi-squared tests were used to assess demographic variables. The mean percentage of intake per day of specific food groups and sub-groups were obtained (servings of given food group/total daily servings). Food intake data and proportion of children meeting DRIs for macro- and micronutrients were stratified by race/ethnicity, nutritional status, and caloric intake, and were compared using t-tests. Regression models controlling for age, BMI and sex were obtained to assess the effect of total caloric intake upon the proportional intake of each studied food group. Results The mean age of African American children was 2.24 ± 1.07 years and Hispanic children 2.84 ± 1.12 years. African Americans consumed more kcal/kg/day than Hispanics (124.7 ± 51 vs. 96.9 ± 33, p < 0.05). Hispanics consumed more fruits (22.0 ± 10.7% vs. 14.7 ± 13.7%, p < 0.05), while African Americans consumed more grains (25.7 ± 7.8% vs. 18.1 ± 6.4%, p < 0.05), meats (20.7 ± 9.0% vs. 15.4 ± 6.1%, p < 0.05), fats (9.8 ± 5.4% vs. 7.0 ± 5.8%, p < 0.05), sweet drinks (58.7 ± 17.1% vs. 41.3 ± 14.8%, p < 0.05) and low

  9. 75 FR 65624 - Notice of Attendance at North American Electric Reliability Corporation Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Attendance at North American Electric Reliability Corporation... Commission and Commission staff may attend the following North American Electric Reliability Corporation... Road, NE., Atlanta, GA 30305. Further information may be found at http://www.nerc.com . The above...

  10. 75 FR 47770 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Tennessee Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS... to the provisions of the rules and regulations of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights (Commission.... Commission on Civil Rights, 61 Forsyth St., SW., Suite 16T126, Atlanta, GA, 30303. They may also be faxed to...

  11. 78 FR 50373 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Kentucky Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS... to the provisions of the rules and regulations of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights (Commission... Civil Rights, 61 Forsyth St. SW., Suite 16T126, Atlanta, GA 30303. Persons wishing to email their...

  12. 75 FR 22737 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Kentucky Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS... to the provisions of the rules and regulations of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights (Commission..., U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, 61 Forsyth Street, Suite 18T40, Atlanta, GA 30301. Persons...

  13. 77 FR 24683 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Florida Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS... the provisions of the rules and regulations of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights (Commission) and..., U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, 61 Forsyth St., SW., Suite 16T126, Atlanta, GA, 30303. They...

  14. EPA Public Availability Session to be held for the Terry Creek Operable Unit 1 Superfund Site, Brunswick, Ga.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will hold a Public Availability Session from 3:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. on Tuesday, December 8, 2015 at Brunswick Historic City Hall on 1229 Newcastle Street in Downtown Brunswick, Ga. Representat

  15. McDuffie County Schools in Thomson Ga. Awarded $85,000 in EPA Rebates to Fund Cleaner School Buses

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA --- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced today that McDuffie County Schools in Thomson Ga. i s one of 85 school bus fleets in 35 states to receive rebates through EPA's Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) funding.

  16. Describing computed tomography findings in acute necrotizing pancreatitis with the Atlanta classification: an interobserver agreement study.

    PubMed

    Besselink, Marc G H; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Bollen, Thomas L; van Leeuwen, Maarten S; Laméris, Jan S; van der Jagt, Eric J; Strijk, Simon P; Buskens, Erik; Freeny, Patrick C; Gooszen, Hein G

    2006-11-01

    The 1992 Atlanta classification is a clinically based classification system that defines the severity and complications of acute pancreatitis. A study was undertaken to assess the interobserver agreement of categorizing peripancreatic collections on computed tomography (CT) using the Atlanta classification. Preoperative contrast-enhanced CTs from 70 consecutive patients (49 men; median age, 59 years; range, 29-79 years) operated for acute necrotizing pancreatitis (2000-2003) in 11 hospitals were reviewed. Five abdominal radiologists independently categorized the peripancreatic collections according to the Atlanta classification. Radiologists were aware of the timing of the CT and the clinical condition of the patient. Interobserver agreement was determined. Interobserver agreement among the radiologists was poor (kappa, 0.144; SD, 0.095). In 3 (4%) of 70 cases, the same Atlanta definition was chosen. In 13 (19%) of 70 cases, 4 radiologists agreed, and in 42 (60%) of 70 cases, 3 radiologists agreed on the definition. In 21 cases (30%), 1 or more of the radiologists classified a collection as "pancreatic abscess," whereas 1 or more radiologist used another Atlanta definition. The interobserver agreement of the Atlanta classification for categorizing peripancreatic collections in acute pancreatitis on CT is poor. The Atlanta classification should not be used to describe complications of acute pancreatitis on CT.

  17. Impact of changes in transportation and commuting behaviors during the 1996 Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta on air quality and childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M S; Powell, K E; Hutwagner, L; Graham, L M; Teague, W G

    2001-02-21

    Vehicle exhaust is a major source of ozone and other air pollutants. Although high ground-level ozone pollution is associated with transient increases in asthma morbidity, the impact of citywide transportation changes on air quality and childhood asthma has not been studied. The alternative transportation strategy implemented during the 1996 Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta, Ga, provided such an opportunity. To describe traffic changes in Atlanta, Ga, during the 1996 Summer Olympic Games and concomitant changes in air quality and childhood asthma events. Ecological study comparing the 17 days of the Olympic Games (July 19-August 4, 1996) to a baseline period consisting of the 4 weeks before and 4 weeks after the Olympic Games. Children aged 1 to 16 years who resided in the 5 central counties of metropolitan Atlanta and whose data were captured in 1 of 4 databases. Citywide acute care visits and hospitalizations for asthma (asthma events) and nonasthma events, concentrations of major air pollutants, meteorological variables, and traffic counts. During the Olympic Games, the number of asthma acute care events decreased 41.6% (4.23 vs 2.47 daily events) in the Georgia Medicaid claims file, 44.1% (1.36 vs 0.76 daily events) in a health maintenance organization database, 11.1% (4.77 vs 4.24 daily events) in 2 pediatric emergency departments, and 19.1% (2.04 vs 1.65 daily hospitalizations) in the Georgia Hospital Discharge Database. The number of nonasthma acute care events in the 4 databases changed -3.1%, +1.3%, -2.1%, and +1.0%, respectively. In multivariate regression analysis, only the reduction in asthma events recorded in the Medicaid database was significant (relative risk, 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.44-0.86). Peak daily ozone concentrations decreased 27.9%, from 81.3 ppb during the baseline period to 58.6 ppb during the Olympic Games (P<.001). Peak weekday morning traffic counts dropped 22.5% (P<.001). Traffic counts were significantly correlated with that

  18. Trans-Metal-Trapping Meets Frustrated-Lewis-Pair Chemistry: Ga(CH2SiMe3)3-Induced C–H Functionalizations

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Merging two topical themes in main-group chemistry, namely, cooperative bimetallics and frustrated-Lewis-pair (FLP) activity, this Forum Article focuses on the cooperativity-induced outcomes observed when the tris(alkyl)gallium compound GaR3 (R = CH2SiMe3) is paired with the lithium amide LiTMP (TMP = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidide) or the sterically hindered N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) 1,3-bis(tert-butyl)imidazol-2-ylidene (ItBu). When some previously published work are drawn together with new results, unique tandem reactivities are presented that are driven by the steric mismatch between the individual reagents of these multicomponent reagents. Thus, the LiTMP/GaR3 combination, which on its own fails to form a cocomplex, functions as a highly regioselective base (LiTMP)/trap (GaR3) partnership for the metalation of N-heterocycles such as diazines, 1,3-benzoazoles, and 2-picolines in a trans-metal-trapping (TMT) process that stabilizes the emerging sensitive carbanions. Taking advantage of related steric incompatibility, a novel monometallic FLP system pairing GaR3 with ItBu has been developed for the activation of carbonyl compounds (via C=O insertion) and other molecules with acidic hydrogen atoms such as phenol and phenylacetylene. Shedding new light on how these non-cocomplexing partnerships operate and showcasing the potential of gallium reagents to engage in metalation reactions or FLP activations, areas where the use of this group 13 metal is scant, this Forum Article aims to stimulate more interest and activity toward the advancement of organogallium chemistry. PMID:28485929

  19. Classification of acute pancreatitis--2012: revision of the Atlanta classification and definitions by international consensus.

    PubMed

    Banks, Peter A; Bollen, Thomas L; Dervenis, Christos; Gooszen, Hein G; Johnson, Colin D; Sarr, Michael G; Tsiotos, Gregory G; Vege, Santhi Swaroop

    2013-01-01

    The Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis enabled standardised reporting of research and aided communication between clinicians. Deficiencies identified and improved understanding of the disease make a revision necessary. A web-based consultation was undertaken in 2007 to ensure wide participation of pancreatologists. After an initial meeting, the Working Group sent a draft document to 11 national and international pancreatic associations. This working draft was forwarded to all members. Revisions were made in response to comments, and the web-based consultation was repeated three times. The final consensus was reviewed, and only statements based on published evidence were retained. The revised classification of acute pancreatitis identified two phases of the disease: early and late. Severity is classified as mild, moderate or severe. Mild acute pancreatitis, the most common form, has no organ failure, local or systemic complications and usually resolves in the first week. Moderately severe acute pancreatitis is defined by the presence of transient organ failure, local complications or exacerbation of co-morbid disease. Severe acute pancreatitis is defined by persistent organ failure, that is, organ failure >48 h. Local complications are peripancreatic fluid collections, pancreatic and peripancreatic necrosis (sterile or infected), pseudocyst and walled-off necrosis (sterile or infected). We present a standardised template for reporting CT images. This international, web-based consensus provides clear definitions to classify acute pancreatitis using easily identified clinical and radiologic criteria. The wide consultation among pancreatologists to reach this consensus should encourage widespread adoption.

  20. Modeling the Effects of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems on Nitrate Loads Using SWAT in an Urban Watershed of Metropolitan Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Hoghooghi, Nahal; Radcliffe, David E; Habteselassie, Mussie Y; Jeong, Jaehak

    2017-05-01

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) can be a source of nitrogen (N) pollution in both surface and ground waters. In metropolitan Atlanta, GA, >26% of homes are on OWTSs. In a previous article, we used the Soil Water Assessment Tool to model the effect of OWTSs on stream flow in the Big Haynes Creek Watershed in metropolitan Atlanta. The objective of this study was to estimate the effect of OWTSs, including failing systems, on nitrate as N (NO-N) load in the same watershed. Big Haynes Creek has a drainage area of 44 km with mainly urban land use (67%), and most of the homes use OWTSs. A USGS gauge station where stream flow was measured daily and NO-N concentrations were measured monthly was used as the outlet. The model was simulated for 12 yr. Overall, the model showed satisfactory daily stream flow and NO-N loads with Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients of 0.62 and 0.58 for the calibration period and 0.67 and 0.33 for the validation period at the outlet of the Big Haynes Watershed. Onsite wastewater treatment systems caused an average increase in NO-N load of 23% at the watershed scale and 29% at the outlet of a subbasin with the highest density of OWTSs. Failing OWTSs were estimated to be 1% of the total systems and did not have a large impact on stream flow or NO-N load. The NO-N load was 74% of the total N load in the watershed, indicating the important effect of OWTSs on stream loads in this urban watershed. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  1. Investigation into the use of satellite data in aiding characterization of particulate air quality in the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Alston, Erica J; Sokolik, Irina N; Doddridge, Bruce G

    2011-02-01

    Poor air quality episodes occur often in metropolitan Atlanta, GA. The primary focus of this research is to assess the capability of satellites as a tool in characterizing air quality in Atlanta. Results indicate that intracity PM2.5 (particulate matter < or = 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter) concentrations show similar patterns as other U.S. urban areas, with the highest concentrations occurring within the city. PM2.5 and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) aerosol optical depth (AOD) have higher values in the summer than spring, yet MODIS AOD doubles in the summer unlike PM2.5. Most (80%) of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument aerosol index (AI) is below 0.5 with little differences between spring and summer. Using this value as a constraint of the carbonaceous aerosol signal in the urban area, aerosol transport events such as wildfire smoke associated with higher positive AI values can be identified. The results indicate that MODIS AOD is well correlated with PM2.5 on a yearly and seasonal basis with correlation coefficients as high as 0.8 for Terra and 0.7 for Aqua. A possible alternative view of the PM2.5 and AOD relationship is seen through the use of AOD thresholds. These probabilistic thresholds provide a means to describe the air quality index (AQI) through the use of multiyear AOD records for a specific area. The National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) are used to classify the AOD into different AQI codes and probabilistically determine thresholds of AOD that represent most of a specific AQI category. For example, 80% of cases of moderate AQI days have AOD values between 0.5 and 0.6. The development of AOD thresholds provides a useful tool for evaluating air quality from the use of satellites in regions where there are sparse ground-based measurements of PM2.5.

  2. Willingness to use pre-exposure prophylaxis among Black and White men who have sex with men in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Rolle, Charlotte-Paige; Rosenberg, Eli S; Luisi, Nicole; Grey, Jeremy; Sanchez, Travis; Del Rio, Carlos; Peterson, John L; Frew, Paula M; Sullivan, Patrick S; Kelley, Colleen F

    2017-08-01

    PrEP willingness may be different among black and white men who have sex with men (MSM) given known disparities in HIV incidence, sociodemographic factors, and healthcare access between these groups. We surveyed 482 black and white HIV-negative MSM in Atlanta, GA about their willingness to use pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and facilitators and barriers to PrEP willingness. Overall, 45% (215/482) of men indicated interest in using PrEP. Engaging in recent unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) was the only factor significantly associated with PrEP willingness in multivariate analyses (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.13, 2.65). Willing men identified "extra protection" against HIV as the most common reason for interest in using PrEP, whereas unwilling men most commonly cited not wanting to take medication daily, and this reason was more common among white MSM (42.3% of white MSM vs. 28.9% of black MSM, p = 0.04). Most men indicated willingness to use PrEP if cost was <50 dollars/month; however, more black MSM indicated willingness to use PrEP only if cost were free (17.9% of white MSM vs. 25.9% of black MSM, p = 0.03). Overall, these data are useful to scale up PrEP interventions targeting at-risk MSM in Atlanta and highlight the need for implementation of low cost-programs, which will be especially important for black MSM.

  3. Building America Case Study: Ground Source Heat Pump Research, TaC Studios Residence, Atlanta, Georigia (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    As part of the NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Southface partnered with TaC Studios, an Atlanta based architecture firm specializing in residential and light commercial design, on the construction of a new test home in Atlanta, GA in the mixed-humid climate. This home serves as a residence and home office for the firm's owners, as well as a demonstration of their design approach to potential and current clients. Southface believes the home demonstrates current best practices for the mixed-humid climate, including a building envelope featuring advanced air sealing details and low density spray foam insulation, glazing that exceeds ENERGY STAR requirements, and a high performance heating and cooling system. Construction quality and execution was a high priority for TaC Studios and was ensured by a third party review process. Post construction testing showed that the project met stated goals for envelope performance, an air infiltration rate of 2.15 ACH50. The homeowner's wished to further validate whole house energy savings through the project's involvement with Building America and this long-term monitoring effort. As a Building America test home, this home was evaluated to detail whole house energy use, end use loads, and the efficiency and operation of the ground source heat pump and associated systems. Given that the home includes many non-typical end use loads including a home office, pool, landscape water feature, and other luxury features not accounted for in Building America modeling tools, these end uses were separately monitored to determine their impact on overall energy consumption.

  4. Solar hot water system installed at Day's Lodge, Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., Atlanta, Georgia is described. This system provides for 81 percent of the total hot water demand. There are two separate systems, each serving one building of the lodge (total of 65 suites). The entire system contains only potable city water. The 1024 square feet of Grumman Sunstream Model 332 liquid flat plate collectors and the outside piping drain whenever the collector plates approach freezing or when power is interrupted. Solar heated water from the two above ground cement lined steel tanks (1000 gallon tank) is drawn into the electric Domestic Hot Water (DHW) tanks as hot water is drawn. Electric resistance units in the DHW tanks top off the solar heated water, if needed, to reach thermostat setting.

  5. STS-56 ESC Earth observation of Atlanta, Georgia at night

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-56 electronic still camera (ESC) Earth observation image shows metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia at night as recorded on the 64th orbit of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. The image was recorded using an image intensifier on the Hand-held, Earth-oriented, Real-time, Cooperative, User-friendly, Location-targeting and Environmental System (HERCULES). HERCULES is a device that makes it simple for shuttle crewmembers to take pictures of Earth as they merely point a modified 35mm camera and shoot any interesting feature, whose latitude and longitude are automatically determined in real-time. Center coordinates on this image are 33.738 degrees north latitude and 84.414 degrees west longitude. Digital file name is ESC04030.IMG.

  6. Association between severity and the determinant-based classification, Atlanta 2012 and Atlanta 1992, in acute pancreatitis: a clinical retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuhui; Ke, Lu; Tong, Zhihui; Li, Weiqin; Li, Jieshou

    2015-04-01

    Recently, the determinant-based classification (DBC) and the Atlanta 2012 have been proposed to provide a basis for study and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP). The present study aimed to evaluate the association between severity and the DBC, the Atlanta 2012 and the Atlanta 1992, in AP. Patients admitted to our center with AP from January 2007 to July 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Patients were assigned to severity categories for all the 3 classification systems. The primary outcomes include long-term clinical prognosis (mortality and length-of-hospital stay), major complications (intraabdominal hemorrhage, multiple-organ dysfunction, single organ failure [OF], and sepsis) and clinical interventions (surgical drainage, continuous renal replace therapy [CRRT] lasting time, and mechanical ventilation [MV] lasting time). The classification systems were validated and compared in terms of these abovementioned primary outcomes. A total of 395 patients were enrolled in this retrospective study with an overall 8.86% in-hospital mortality. Intraabdominal hemorrhage was present in 27 (6.84%) of the patients, multiple-organ dysfunction in 73(18.48%), single OF in 67 (16.96%), and sepsis in 73(18.48%). For each classification system, different categories regarding severity were associated with statistically different clinical mortality, major complications, and clinical interventions (P < 0.05). However, the Atlanta 2012 and the DBC performed better than the Atlanta 1992, and they were comparable in predicting mortality (area under curve [AUC] 0.899 and 0.955 vs 0.585, P < 0.05); intraabdominal hemorrhage (AUC 0.930 and 0.961 vs 0.583, P < 0.05), multiple-organ dysfunction (AUC 0.858 and 0.881 vs 0.595, P < 0.05), sepsis (AUC 0.826 and 0.879 vs 0.590, P < 0.05), and surgical drainage (AUC 0.900 and 0.847 vs 0.606, P < 0.05). For continuous variables, the Atlanta 2012 and the DBC were also better than the Atlanta 1992, and they were similar in

  7. Risk Factors for HIV Transmission and Barriers to HIV Disclosure: Metropolitan Atlanta Youth Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wallins, Amy; Toledo, Lauren; Murray, Ashley; Gaul, Zaneta; Sutton, Madeline Y.; Gillespie, Scott; Leong, Traci; Graves, Chanda; Chakraborty, Rana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Youth carry the highest incidence of HIV infection in the United States. Understanding adolescent and young adult (AYA) perspectives on HIV transmission risk is important for targeted HIV prevention. We conducted a mixed methods study with HIV-infected and uninfected youth, ages 18–24 years, from Atlanta, GA. We provided self-administered surveys to HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected AYAs to identify risk factors for HIV acquisition. By means of computer-assisted thematic analyses, we examined transcribed focus group responses on HIV education, contributors to HIV transmission, and pre-sex HIV status disclosure. The 68 participants had the following characteristics: mean age 21.5 years (standard deviation: 1.8 years), 85% male, 90% black, 68% HIV-infected. HIV risk behaviors included the perception of condomless sex (Likert scale mean: 8.0) and transactional sex (88% of participants); no differences were noted by HIV status. Qualitative analyses revealed two main themes: (1) HIV risk factors among AYAs, and (2) barriers to discussing HIV status before sex. Participants felt the use of social media, need for immediate gratification, and lack of concern about HIV disease were risk factors for AYAs. Discussing HIV status with sex partners was uncommon. Key reasons included: fear of rejection, lack of confidentiality, discussion was unnecessary in temporary relationships, and disclosure negatively affecting the mood. HIV prevention strategies for AYAs should include improving condom use frequency and HIV disclosure skills, responsible utilization of social media, and education addressing HIV prevention including the risks of transactional sex. PMID:26588663

  8. Risk Factors for HIV Transmission and Barriers to HIV Disclosure: Metropolitan Atlanta Youth Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres F; Wallins, Amy; Toledo, Lauren; Murray, Ashley; Gaul, Zaneta; Sutton, Madeline Y; Gillespie, Scott; Leong, Traci; Graves, Chanda; Chakraborty, Rana

    2016-01-01

    Youth carry the highest incidence of HIV infection in the United States. Understanding adolescent and young adult (AYA) perspectives on HIV transmission risk is important for targeted HIV prevention. We conducted a mixed methods study with HIV-infected and uninfected youth, ages 18-24 years, from Atlanta, GA. We provided self-administered surveys to HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected AYAs to identify risk factors for HIV acquisition. By means of computer-assisted thematic analyses, we examined transcribed focus group responses on HIV education, contributors to HIV transmission, and pre-sex HIV status disclosure. The 68 participants had the following characteristics: mean age 21.5 years (standard deviation: 1.8 years), 85% male, 90% black, 68% HIV-infected. HIV risk behaviors included the perception of condomless sex (Likert scale mean: 8.0) and transactional sex (88% of participants); no differences were noted by HIV status. Qualitative analyses revealed two main themes: (1) HIV risk factors among AYAs, and (2) barriers to discussing HIV status before sex. Participants felt the use of social media, need for immediate gratification, and lack of concern about HIV disease were risk factors for AYAs. Discussing HIV status with sex partners was uncommon. Key reasons included: fear of rejection, lack of confidentiality, discussion was unnecessary in temporary relationships, and disclosure negatively affecting the mood. HIV prevention strategies for AYAs should include improving condom use frequency and HIV disclosure skills, responsible utilization of social media, and education addressing HIV prevention including the risks of transactional sex.

  9. 78 FR 76810 - Information Collection; Environmental Justice and the Urban Forest in Atlanta, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ...), Recommendation 6.4, which stresses the need to connect urban residents with community green spaces http..., partnered with others, that advocate to increase the amount of green space in cities across the country. The... federal government to find innovative ways to engage urban residents, with both public and private green...

  10. DOE ZERH Case Study: Heirloom Design Build, Euclid Avenue, Atlanta, GA

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the mixed-humid climate that got a HERS 50 without PV, with 2x6 16” on center walls with R-19 ocsf; basement with R-28 ccsf, R-5 rigid foam under slab; sealed attic with R-28 ocsf under roof deck; 22.8 SEER; 12.5 HSPF heat pump.

  11. 75 FR 76953 - Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 26 Under Alternative Site Framework, Atlanta, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... under the ASF with a service area that includes the Georgia counties of Haralson, Paulding, Polk, Floyd..., Coweta, Heard, Troup, Meriwether, Pike, Spalding, Butts, Lamar, Upson, Jasper, Newton, Morgan, Greene... and Muscogee in their entirety and portions of White, Franklin, Peach, Houston, and Twiggs...

  12. GLOBECOM '84 - Global Telecommunications Conference, Atlanta, GA, November 26-29, 1984, Conference Record. Volume 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attention is given to aspects of quality assurance methodologies in development life cycles, optical intercity transmission systems, multiaccess protocols, system and technology aspects in the case of regional/domestic satellites, advances in SSB-AM radio transmission over terrestrial and satellite network, and development environments for telecommunications systems. Other subjects studied are concerned with business communication networks for voice and data, VLSI in local network and communication protocol, product evaluation and support, an update regarding Videotex, topics in communication theory, topics in radio propagation, a status report regarding societal effects of technology in the workplace, digital image processing, and adaptive signal processing for communications. The management of the reliability function in the development process is considered along with Giga-bit technologies for long distance large capacity optical transmission equipment. The application of gallium arsenide analog and digital integrated circuits for high-speed fiber optical communications, and a simple algorithm for image data coding.

  13. UPS in Atlanta, Ga. Among 16 Organizations Across the Country Recognized for Action on Climate Change

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    · Individual Leadership Award: Mayor Bill Finch, City of Bridgeport, Conn. , is being recognized for demonstrating extraordinary leadership in driving meaningful climate action within the Greater Bridgeport community and throughout t

  14. 78 FR 68777 - Proposed Establishment of Area Navigation (RNAV) Routes; Atlanta, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 RIN 2120-AA66 Proposed Establishment of Area Navigation... affect air traffic procedures and air navigation, it is certified that this proposed rule, when... Part 71 Airspace, Incorporation by reference, Navigation (air). The Proposed Amendment In consideration...

  15. 78 FR 70895 - Proposed Establishment and Modification of Area Navigation (RNAV) Routes; Atlanta, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ..., departures from conflicting high altitude flows headed towards the Louisville, KY area. Q-52: Q-52 is a... into Chicago O'Hare International Airport (ORD). High altitude RNAV routes are published in paragraph...

  16. The Atlanta Classification, Revised Atlanta Classification, and Determinant-Based Classification of Acute Pancreatitis: Which Is Best at Stratifying Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Kadiyala, Vivek; Suleiman, Shadeah L; McNabb-Baltar, Julia; Wu, Bechien U; Banks, Peter A; Singh, Vikesh K

    2016-04-01

    To determine which classification is more accurate in stratifying severity. The study used a retrospective analysis of a prospective acute pancreatitis database (June 2005-December 2007). Acute pancreatitis severity was stratified according to the Atlanta classification (AC) 1992, the revised Atlanta classification (RAC) 2012, and the determinant-based classification (DBC) 2012. Receiver operating characteristic analysis (area under the curve) compared the accuracy of each classification. Logistic regression identified predictors of mortality. 338 patients were analyzed: 13% had persistent organ failure (POF) (>48 hours), of whom 37% had multisystem POF, and 11% had pancreatic necrosis, of whom 19% had infected necrosis. Mortality was 4.1%. For predicting mortality (area under the curve), the RAC (0.91) and DBC (0.92) were comparable (P = 0.404); both outperformed the AC (0.81) (P < 0.001). For intensive care unit admission, the RAC (0.85) and DBC (0.85) were comparable (P = 0.949); both outperformed the AC (0.79) (P < 0.05). There were 2 patients in the critical category of the DBC. Multisystem POF was an independent predictor of mortality (odds ratio, 75.0; 95% confidence interval, 13.7-410.6; P < 0.001), whereas single-system POF, sterile necrosis, and infected necrosis were not. The RAC and DBC were generally comparable in stratifying severity. The paucity of patients in the critical category in the DBC limits its utility. Neither classification accounts for the impact of multisystem POF, which was the strongest predictor of mortality.

  17. TUESDAY: EPA Division Director to Highlight the New Norfolk Southern Eco Locomotives in Atlanta

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regional Air, Pesticides, and Toxics Management Division Director Beverly Banister will speak at the Norfolk Southern Inman Yard during the unveiling of the nation's first 'Eco' locomotives.

  18. EPA and Partners to Participate in Proctor Creek Community Showcase in Atlanta

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has joined the Proctor Creek community and a variety of partners to participate in a showcase event to share the many environmental activities and services going on in the Proctor Creek watershe

  19. The revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis: a CT imaging guide for radiologists.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Y; Furlan, A; Almusa, O; Papachristou, G; Bae, K T

    2012-06-01

    Accurate diagnosis and description of the various findings in acute pancreatitis is important for treatment. The original Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis sought to create a uniform system for classifying the severity of acute pancreatitis as well as common language to describe the various events that can occur in acute pancreatitis. The goal was to allow accurate communication between physicians using standardized language so correct treatment options could be used. Since that time, advances in the understanding of acute pancreatitis as well as improvements in both interventions and imaging have led to criticisms of the system and its abandonment by physicians. A 2007 revision of the Atlanta classifications sought to address many of these issues. This article will explain the changes to the Atlanta classification system and provide pictorial examples of the findings in acute pancreatitis as described by the Atlanta classification system.

  20. Fecal-coliform bacteria concentrations in streams of the Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area, Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, May-October 1994 and 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregory, M. Brian; Frick, Elizabeth A.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: The Metropolitan Atlanta area has been undergoing a period of rapid growth and development. The population in the 10-county metropolitan area almost doubled from about 1.5 million people in 1970 to 2.9 million people in 1995 (Atlanta Regional Commission, written commun., 2000). Residential, commercial, and other urban land uses more than tripled during the same period (Frick and others, 1998). The Chattahoochee River is the most utilized water resource in Georgia. The rapid growth of Metropolitan Atlanta and its location downstream of the headwaters of the drainage basin make the Chattahoochee River a vital resource for drinking-water supplies, recreational opportunities, and wastewater assimilation. In 1978, the U.S. Congress declared the natural, scenic, recreation, and other values of 48 miles of the Chattahoochee River from Buford Dam to Peachtree Creek to be of special national significance. To preserve this reach of the Chattahoochee River, the U.S. Congress created the Chattahoochee River National Recreational Area (CRNRA), which includes the Chattahoochee River downstream from Buford Dam to the mouth of Peachtree Creek and a series of park areas adjacent to the river in northern Metropolitan Atlanta Even with this protection, waters of the Chattahoochee River and many of its tributaries in Metropolitan Atlanta did not meet water-quality standards set for designated uses during 1994 and 1995 (fig. 1 and table 1). Much of the degradation of water quality has been associated with areas undergoing rapid urban growth and sprawling suburban development. The resulting conversion of mostly forested land to urban land has multiple adverse effects on water quality. Degradation of water quality may be caused by a number of factors including an increase in nutrient concentrations, sediment and sedimentbound contaminant concentrations (e.g., metals and pesticides) (Frick and others, 1998), and fecal-coliform bacteria concentrations (Center for Watershed

  1. The Successes and Failures of Military Occupation in Atlanta, Georgia, 1865-1871

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-09

    Hood in July 1864 after Johnston suggested abandoning Atlanta without a fight.14 Hood assured President Davis that he would go on the offensive and...quickly defeat Sherman. He attempted to fulfill this promise at the hard-fought battles of Peachtree Creek and Atlanta in late July 1864. Not only was...65 Kirkland, 14. 66 Sefton, 65. 67 Kirkland, 63-66. 68 Digital Library of Georgia, The Daily Intelligencer, April 1865-January 1866, accessed July

  2. Performance of the revised Atlanta and determinant-based classifications for severity in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bansal, S S; Hodson, J; Sutcliffe, R S; Marudanayagam, R; Muiesan, P; Mirza, D F; Isaac, J; Roberts, K J

    2016-03-01

    Severity classification systems aim to stratify patients with acute pancreatitis reliably into coherent risk groups. Recently, the Atlanta 1992 classification has been revised (Atlanta 2012) and a novel determinant-based classification (DBC) system developed. This study assessed the ability of the three systems to stratify disease severity among patients with acute pancreatitis. This was an observational cohort study of patients with acute pancreatitis identified from an institutional database. Cohort characteristics, investigations, interventions and outcomes were identified. Systems were compared using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and Spearman's correlation coefficients. The in-hospital mortality rate was 6·6 per cent (15 of 228 patients). All of the outcomes considered correlated significantly with the three systems, with the exception of the need for surgery in Atlanta 1992. Atlanta 2012 and the DBC had higher area under the curve (AUC) values than Atlanta 1992 for all outcomes. The revised Atlanta and DBC systems both performed similarly with regard to ICU admission (AUC 0·927 and 0·917 respectively; both P < 0·001), need for percutaneous drainage (AUC 0·879 and 0·891; both P < 0·001), need for surgery (AUC 0·827 and 0·845; P = 0·006 and P = 0·004 respectively) and in-hospital mortality (0·955 and 0·931; both P < 0·001). However, the critical category in the DBC system identified patients with the most severe disease; seven of eight patients in this group died in hospital, compared with 15 of 34 with severe pancreatitis according to Atlanta 2012. The Atlanta 2012 and DBC perform equally well for classification of disease severity in acute pancreatitis. The addition of a critical category in the DBC identifies patients with the most severe disease. © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Inspection/maintenance program evaluation: replicating the Denver Step Method for an Atlanta fleet.

    PubMed

    Corley, Elizabeth A; Dehart-Davis, Leisha; Lindner, Jim; Rodgers, Michael O

    2003-06-15

    The research presented in this paper employs the Step Method of Inspection/Maintenance (I/M) program evaluation to estimate the emissions reduction for an Atlanta I/M program. Stedman et al. (Stedman, D. H.; Bishop, G. A.; Aldrete, P.; Slott, R. S. Environ. Sci. Technol. 1997, 31, 927-931) introduced the Step Method of evaluation when they presented the results of a 1995 Denver I/M program evaluation. The research presented here replicates the original Denver Step Method analysis for a 1997 Atlanta I/M program. This evaluation was conducted separately for the nine outlying Atlanta counties and the four counties that are closest to the center of the city. The results of the analysis are similar to those found by Stedman et al. in Denver. While the Denver carbon monoxide (CO) weighted program benefit was 6.9%, the Atlanta area CO weighted program benefit is found to be 11.5% and 4.9% for the nine-county and four-county Atlanta areas, respectively. We conclude that the 1997 I/M program change in Atlanta yielded a noteworthy and observable change in fleet emissions.

  4. Toward an update of the atlanta classification on acute pancreatitis: review of new and abandoned terms.

    PubMed

    Bollen, Thomas L; Besselink, Marc G H; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Gooszen, Hein G; van Leeuwen, Maarten S

    2007-08-01

    The 1992 Atlanta classification is a clinically based classification system that defines the severity and complications of acute pancreatitis. The purpose of this review was to assess whether the terms abandoned by the Atlanta classification are really discarded in the literature. The second objective was to review what new terms have appeared in the literature since the Atlanta symposium. We followed a Medline search strategy in review and guideline articles after the publication of the Atlanta classification. This search included the abandoned terms: "phlegmon," "infected pseudocyst," "hemorrhagic pancreatitis," and "persistent pancreatitis." A total of 239 publications were reviewed, including 10 guideline articles and 42 reviews. The abandoned terms "hemorrhagic pancreatitis" and "persistent pancreatitis" are hardly encountered, in contrast, both "infected pseudocyst" and "phlegmon" are frequently used, and several authors question their abandonment. New terminology in acute pancreatitis consists of "organized pancreatic necrosis," "necroma," "extrapancreatic necrosis," and "central gland necrosis." This review demonstrates that the Atlanta classification is still not universally accepted. Several abandoned terms are frequently used, and new terms have emerged that describe manifestations in acute pancreatitis that were not specifically addressed during the Atlanta symposium.

  5. Outcomes among Asylum Seekers in Atlanta, Georgia, 2003--2012.

    PubMed

    Evans, Dabney P; Donato, Caitlin E; Malewezi, Bridget A; Li, Anyie J; Corea, Mario J; Mitchell, Andrew B

    2015-10-01

    INTRODUCTION Asylum seekers face a wide array of challenges, including the need for a fair and just adjudication process. In the state of Georgia, the Atlanta Asylum Network addresses the needs of such individuals by providing them physical, psychological and gynecological assessments, the results of which are presented to the courts in the asylum appeal process. OBJECTIVE As a component of the Network's program evaluation, assess outcomes among asylum seekers using its services, as well as relation of outcomes to type of service provided, the individual's geographic origin and English language proficiency. METHODS A retrospective examination was conducted of program data gathered by the Network between 2003 and 2012. Subjects included asylum seekers who received assessments by the Network during this period. The primary variable of interest was the final case outcome, defined as determination of asylum status: granted, withholding of removal, administrative closure and prosecutorial discretion, denied or voluntary departure. Outcomes were subsequently collapsed into a single positive or negative outcome variable. Positive outcomes included asylum granted, removal withheld, administrative closure and prosecutorial discretion. Negative outcomes included asylum denied and voluntary departure. We conducted bivariate and multivariate analyses, relating final case outcomes to Network services, geographic origin and English language proficiency, among the key variables. RESULTS A total of 69 of 120 asylum seekers in the study had a known final case outcome, and of those, 63.8% (44) had a positive outcome; or 37% of the total number of asylum seekers (n = 120). Among the 20 who received 2 of the 3 types of assessment (physical, psychological, gynecological), 16 (80%) received a positive case outcome. Most persons with a known final outcome came from Africa (41), where 78% (32) of cases resulted positive. Asylum seekers not proficient in English were 2.4 times more likely

  6. Effects of instrument precision and spatial variability on the assessment of the temporal variation of ambient air pollution in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Wade, Katherine S; Mulholland, James A; Marmur, Amit; Russell, Armistead G; Hartsell, Ben; Edgerton, Eric; Klein, Mitch; Waller, Lance; Peel, Jennifer L; Tolbert, Paige E

    2006-06-01

    Data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Air Quality System, the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization database, and the Assessment of Spatial Aerosol Composition in Atlanta database for 1999 through 2002 have been used to characterize error associated with instrument precision and spatial variability on the assessment of the temporal variation of ambient air pollution in Atlanta, GA. These data are being used in time series epidemiologic studies in which associations of acute respiratory and cardiovascular health outcomes and daily ambient air pollutant levels are assessed. Modified semivariograms are used to quantify the effects of instrument precision and spatial variability on the assessment of daily metrics of ambient gaseous pollutants (SO2, CO, NOx, and O3) and fine particulate matter ([PM2.5] PM2.5 mass, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, elemental carbon [EC], and organic carbon [OC]). Variation because of instrument imprecision represented 7-40% of the temporal variation in the daily pollutant measures and was largest for the PM2.5 EC and OC. Spatial variability was greatest for primary pollutants (SO2, CO, NOx, and EC). Population-weighted variation in daily ambient air pollutant levels because of both instrument imprecision and spatial variability ranged from 20% of the temporal variation for O3 to 70% of the temporal variation for SO2 and EC. Wind

  7. Project ATLANTA (Atlanta Land use Analysis: Temperature and Air Quality): Use of Remote Sensing and Modeling to Analyze How Urban Land Use Change Affects Meteorology and Air Quality Through Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of Project ATLANTA (ATlanta Land use ANalysis: Temperature and Air-quality) which is an investigation that seeks to observe, measure, model, and analyze how the rapid growth of the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area since the early 1970's has impacted the region's climate and air quality. The primary objectives for this research effort are: (1) To investigate and model the relationships between land cover change in the Atlanta metropolitan, and the development of the urban heat island phenomenon through time; (2) To investigate and model the temporal relationships between Atlanta urban growth and land cover change on air quality; and (3) To model the overall effects of urban development on surface energy budget characteristics across the Atlanta urban landscape through time. Our key goal is to derive a better scientific understanding of how land cover changes associated with urbanization in the Atlanta area, principally in transforming forest lands to urban land covers through time, has, and will, effect local and regional climate, surface energy flux, and air quality characteristics. Allied with this goal is the prospect that the results from this research can be applied by urban planners, environmental managers and other decision-makers, for determining how urbanization has impacted the climate and overall environment of the Atlanta area. Multiscaled remote sensing data, particularly high resolution thermal infrared data, are integral to this study for the analysis of thermal energy fluxes across the Atlanta urban landscape.

  8. Project ATLANTA (Atlanta Land use Analysis: Temperature and Air Quality): Use of Remote Sensing and Modeling to Analyze How Urban Land Use Change Affects Meteorology and Air Quality Through Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of Project ATLANTA (ATlanta Land use ANalysis: Temperature and Air-quality) which is an investigation that seeks to observe, measure, model, and analyze how the rapid growth of the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area since the early 1970's has impacted the region's climate and air quality. The primary objectives for this research effort are: (1) To investigate and model the relationships between land cover change in the Atlanta metropolitan, and the development of the urban heat island phenomenon through time; (2) To investigate and model the temporal relationships between Atlanta urban growth and land cover change on air quality; and (3) To model the overall effects of urban development on surface energy budget characteristics across the Atlanta urban landscape through time. Our key goal is to derive a better scientific understanding of how land cover changes associated with urbanization in the Atlanta area, principally in transforming forest lands to urban land covers through time, has, and will, effect local and regional climate, surface energy flux, and air quality characteristics. Allied with this goal is the prospect that the results from this research can be applied by urban planners, environmental managers and other decision-makers, for determining how urbanization has impacted the climate and overall environment of the Atlanta area. Multiscaled remote sensing data, particularly high resolution thermal infrared data, are integral to this study for the analysis of thermal energy fluxes across the Atlanta urban landscape.

  9. Evaluation of streamwater quality in the Atlanta region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Norman E.; Kandell, Stephen J.; Hatcher, Kathryn J.

    1997-01-01

    A water-quality index (WQI) was developed from historical data for streams in the Atlanta region. The WQI was derived from percentile ranks of individual water-quality parameter values at each stream by normalizing the constituent ranks for values from all sites in the area for the period from 1990 to 1995. WQIs were developed primarily for nutrients and nutrient-related parameters, because data for metals, organics (pesticides and herbicides), biological conditions, and suspended sediment generally were unavailable. Average WQI of the individual parameter WQIs for sites in the region ranged from 0.26 (good quality) to 0.86 (poor quality), and increased downstream of known nutrient sources. Annual average site WQI decreased at most long-term monitoring sites from 1986 to 1995. Temporal trends, in part, reflect effects of a drought in the late 1980's and normal to higher-than-normal rainfall and runoff in the 1990's. For several sites, particularly in the northern part of the region where major development is ongoing, WQI increased dramatically from 1994 to 1995. Interannual WQI variability typically was less than spatial variability. Average annual site WQI for individual parameters correlated with annual hydrologic characteristics, particularly precipitation amount and water yield, reflecting the effect of dilution on individual water-quality parameter values.

  10. Solar hot water system installed at Day's Lodge, Atlanta, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    The solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., Day's Lodge I-85 and Shallowford Road, NE Atlanta, Georgia is described. This system is one of eleven systems planned under this grant and was designed to provide for 81% of the total hot water demand. There are two separate systems, each serving one building of the lodge (total of 65 suites). The entire system contains only potable city water. The 1024 square feet of Grumman Sunstream Model 332 liquid flat plate collectors and the outside piping drains whenever the collector plates approach freezing or when power is interrupted. Solar heated water from the two above ground cement lined steel tanks (1000 gallon tank) is drawn into the electric domestic hot water (DHW) tanks as hot water is drawn. Electric resistance units in the DHW tanks top off the solar heated water, if needed, to reach thermostat setting. Operation of this system was begun in August, 1979. The solar components were partly funded ($18,042 of $36,084 cost) by the Department of Energy.

  11. Comparison of integrated samplers for mass and composition during the 1999 Atlanta Supersites project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Paul; Baumann, Karsten; Edgerton, Eric; Tanner, Roger; Eatough, Delbert; Modey, William; Maring, Hal; Savoie, Dennis; Natarajan, Sanjay; Meyer, Michael B.; Norris, Gary

    2003-04-01

    The first of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Particulate Matter (PM) Supersites projects was established in Atlanta, GA, during the summer of 1999 in conjunction with the Southern Oxidants Study. The short-term primary focus was a one month intensive field campaign to evaluate advanced PM measurement methods for measuring PM mass and the chemical and physical properties of PM. Long-term objectives are being met through coordination and cooperation with existing programs in Atlanta and the southeastern United States. Three categories of PM instruments were deployed during August 1999: time-integrated or discrete filter-based methods like those used in EPA's PM2.5 Chemical Speciation Network; continuous or semicontinuous species specific methods, most of which are still in development; and single particle mass spectrometers, the most advanced methods looking at the chemical composition of single particles. The focus of this paper is on comparison of the discrete filter-based methods. Samples were collected by 12 discrete filter-based samplers on an every other day basis during the study period at the Jefferson Street Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) study site. Samples were analyzed for PM2.5 mass, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, organic carbon, elemental carbon, and trace elements, the latter by XRF. Samplers used a variety of filters; denuder-filter combinations in the case of nitrate and organic carbon, particle size fractionating devices, and flow rates. Ambient concentrations for most species were sufficiently above detection limits for testing comparability among samplers, with nitrate being the most notable exception for the major components having an average reported value of 0.5 μg/m3. Several trace species, e.g., As and Pb, also were often below limits of detection of the analysis method. Results indicate that real differences exist among the samplers tested for most species, with sulfate and ammonium being the

  12. EPA Recognizes Cobb County, Ga. Water System as a WaterSense 2015 Partner of the Year for Making a Difference Every Day

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - The Cobb County, Ga. Water System in Georgia was among those recognized today by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a 2015 WaterSense Partner of the Year. The Partner of the Year awards program the commitment of WaterSense p

  13. Ohmic contact to GaAs semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovel, H. J.; Woodall, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Multimetallic layers produce stable, low-resistance contacts for p-type GaAs and p-type GaAlAs devices. Contacts present no leakage problems, and their series resistance is too small to measure at 1 Sun intensity. Ohmic contacts are stable and should meet 20-year-life requirement at 150 C for GaAs combined photothermal/photovoltaic concentrators.

  14. Proceedings of the Annual National Agricultural Education Research Meeting (12th, Atlanta, Georgia, December 6, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Association, Arlington, VA. Agricultural Education Div.

    These proceedings include the following papers: "An Assessment of the National FFA Public Service Announcement Program" (Sutphin, Dillon, and Rush); "Educational Objectives and Administrative Criteria for the National FFA Contest Program" (Smith and Kahler); "A National Profile of Agricultural Teacher Educators and State Supervisors of Vocational…

  15. Proceedings of the Annual National Agricultural Education Research Meeting (12th, Atlanta, Georgia, December 6, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Association, Arlington, VA. Agricultural Education Div.

    These proceedings include the following papers: "An Assessment of the National FFA Public Service Announcement Program" (Sutphin, Dillon, and Rush); "Educational Objectives and Administrative Criteria for the National FFA Contest Program" (Smith and Kahler); "A National Profile of Agricultural Teacher Educators and State Supervisors of Vocational…

  16. The U.S. Geological Survey and City of Atlanta water-quality and water-quantity monitoring network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, Arthur J.; Hughes, W. Brian

    2006-01-01

    Population growth and urbanization affect the landscape, and the quality and quantity of water in nearby rivers and streams, as well as downstream receiving waters (Ellis, 1999). Typical impacts include: (1) disruption of the hydrologic cycle through increases in the extent of impervious surfaces (e.g., roads, roofs, sidewalks) that increase the velocity and volume of surface-water runoff; (2) increased chemical loads to local and downstream receiving waters from industrial sources, nonpoint-source runoff, leaking sewer systems, and sewer overflows; (3) direct or indirect soil contamination from industrial sources, power-generating facilities, and landfills; and (4) reduction in the quantity and quality of aquatic habitats. The City of Atlanta's monitoring network consists of 21 long-term sites. Eleven of these are 'fully instrumented' to provide real-time data on water temperature, pH, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, turbidity (intended as a surrogate for suspended sediment concentration), water level (gage height, intended as a surrogate for discharge), and precipitation. Data are transmitted hourly and are available on a public Web site (http://ga.water.usgs.gov/). Two sites only measure water level and rainfall as an aid to stormwater monitoring. The eight remaining sites are used to assess water quality.

  17. Application of the Urban Airshed Model to forecasting next-day peak ozone concentrations in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Chang, M E; Cardelino, C

    2000-11-01

    Twenty-four to forty-eight-hour ozone air quality forecasts are increasingly being used in metropolitan areas to inform the public about potentially harmful air quality conditions. The forecasts are also behind "ozone action day" programs in which the public and private sectors are encouraged or mandated to alter activities that contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone. Presented here is a low-cost application of the Urban Airshed Model (UAM), an Eulerian 3-dimensional photochemical-transport grid model for generating next-day peak ozone concentration forecasts. During the summer of 1997, next-day peak ozone concentrations in Atlanta, GA, were predicted both by a team of eight forecasters and by the Urban Airshed Model in Forecast Mode (UAM-FM). Results are presented that compare the accuracy of the team and the UAM-FM. The results for the summer of 1997 indicate that the UAM-FM may be a better predictor of peak ozone concentrations when concentrations are high (> 0.095 ppmv), and the team may be a better predictor of ozone concentrations when concentrations are low (< or = 0.095 ppmv). The UAM-FM is also discussed in the context of other forecasting tools, primarily linear regression models and a no-skill, persistence-based technique.

  18. Racial Differences in Partnership Attributes, Typologies, and Risk Behaviors Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    White, Darcy; Grey, Jeremy A; Gorbach, Pamina M; Rothenberg, Richard B; Sullivan, Patrick S; Rosenberg, Eli S

    2017-05-01

    The role of main partnerships in shaping HIV transmission dynamics among men who have sex with men (MSM) has gained recognition in recent studies, but there is little evidence that existing definitions of partnership type are accurate or have consistent meaning for all men. Using data collected from 2011 to 2013 on 693 partnerships described by 193 Black and White MSM in Atlanta, GA, partnership attributes and risk behaviors were examined and compared by race, stratified in two ways: (1) by commonly used definitions of partnerships as "main" or "casual" and (2) by a new data-driven partnership typology identified through latent class analysis (LCA). Racial differences were analyzed using chi-square, Fisher's exact, and Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests. Black participants were less likely to report condomless anal sex (CAS) within partnerships they labeled as main, yet they were also less likely to describe these partnerships as "primary" on a parallel question. In contrast, within strata defined by the LCA-derived typology, most partnership attributes were comparable and the likelihood of CAS was equivalent by race. These findings suggest that classification of partnerships as main or casual does not accurately capture the partnership patterns of MSM, resulting in differential misclassification by race. Future studies and interventions should refine and utilize more evidence-based typologies.

  19. Climatic, ecological, and socioeconomic factors associated with West Nile virus incidence in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Lockaby, Graeme; Noori, Navideh; Morse, Wayde; Zipperer, Wayne; Kalin, Latif; Governo, Robin; Sawant, Rajesh; Ricker, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    The integrated effects of the many risk factors associated with West Nile virus (WNV) incidence are complex and not well understood. We studied an array of risk factors in and around Atlanta, GA, that have been shown to be linked with WNV in other locations. This array was comprehensive and included climate and meteorological metrics, vegetation characteristics, land use / land cover analyses, and socioeconomic factors. Data on mosquito abundance and WNV mosquito infection rates were obtained for 58 sites and covered 2009-2011, a period following the combined storm water - sewer overflow remediation in that city. Risk factors were compared to mosquito abundance and the WNV vector index (VI) using regression analyses individually and in combination. Lagged climate variables, including soil moisture and temperature, were significantly correlated (positively) with vector index as were forest patch size and percent pine composition of patches (both negatively). Socioeconomic factors that were most highly correlated (positively) with the VI included the proportion of low income households and homes built before 1960 and housing density. The model selected through stepwise regression that related risk factors to the VI included (in the order of decreasing influence) proportion of houses built before 1960, percent of pine in patches, and proportion of low income households.

  20. New Horizons at Pluto: An Overview of Educational Activities / Outreach at Fernbank Science Center, Atlanta, Georgia (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, Edward F.; Harris, R. Scott

    2015-11-01

    We report on educational activities and associated outreach at Fernbank Science Center (Atlanta, GA) in conjunction with the July 2015 New Horizons spacecraft encounter at Pluto. On encounter day, a public lecture about the dwarf planet was presented by Georgia’s NASA Solar System ambassador to kick off the arrival of the space probe at Pluto. In the months following the flyby, we presented a program called “Exploring New Horizons” in the Science Center’s Zeiss planetarium. This program is a digital full-dome presentation about the discovery of Pluto and its subsequent exploration - including an overview of the New Horizons mission. Since NASA continues to receive data from the probe, a brief update (tribute) is included at the end of each planetarium program that features the latest imagery and data from the dwarf planet. We anticipate running the planetarium program throughout the fall semester of 2015. With Pluto visible in the early evening autumn sky, observations are possible with Center’s 0.9 m telescope, which is open for public viewing on clear Thursday and Friday nights following the planetarium program. Although Pluto is somewhat faint through the telescope's eyepiece, it is visible and clearly identified within the surrounding starfield. Intermittent post-encounter lectures ("Messages from the Outer Solar System") have been given on Friday evenings as well. Finally, due to the continued interest in Pluto, we have developed a new outreach program about dwarf planets in general, geared towards 4th - 6th students.

  1. Factors associated with utilization of HAART amongst hard-to-reach HIV-infected individuals in Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Rebolledo, Paulina; Kourbatova, Ekaterina; Rothenberg, Richard; del Rio, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The study is aimed at identifying clinical, demographic and behavioral factors, including participation in HIV care, associated with the utilization of antiretroviral therapy (ART), among hard-to-reach HIV-positive individuals in Atlanta, GA. The study included 184 HIV-positive participants of the Infectious Disease Program (IDP) of the Grady Health System between February 1999 to March 2001. Individuals were categorized as regular attendees (those who consistently kept their outpatient appointments, n = 65), irregular (those who inconsistently kept their appointments, n = 60) or non-attendees (those who failed routinely to keep their appointments, n = 59). Univariate and multivariate analyses using log-binomial regression modeling were done. HIV-infected individuals who consistently kept their appointments at the IDP received ART at a frequency (86%) that is twice that of those who missed some appointments (42%) and four times that of those who routinely failed to keep appointments (20%). In multivariate analysis, category of clinic attendance (regular, irregular or non-attendee) was the only risk factor independently associated with utilization of ART: Regular attendees (RR = 3.59, 95% CI 2.12 to 6.08) and irregular attendees (RR = 2.26, 95% CI 1.28 to 4.01) compared to non-attendees. The positive association between routine clinic attendance and use of antiretroviral therapy observed in this study should encourage the development of strategies to retain patients in outpatient HIV care. PMID:21866279

  2. Green roof adoption in atlanta, georgia: the effects of building characteristics and subsidies on net private, public, and social benefits.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Jeffrey D; Lamsal, Madhur; Colson, Greg

    2013-10-01

    This research draws on and expands previous studies that have quantified the costs and benefits associated with conventional roofs versus green roofs. Using parameters from those studies to define alternative scenarios, we estimate from a private, public, and social perspective the costs and benefits of installing and maintaining an extensive green roof in Atlanta, GA. Results indicate net private benefits are a decreasing function of roof size and vary considerably across scenarios. In contrast, net public benefits are highly stable across scenarios, ranging from $32.49 to $32.90 m(-2). In addition, we evaluate two alternative subsidy regimes: (i) a general subsidy provided to every building that adopts a green roof and (ii) a targeted subsidy provided only to buildings for which net private benefits are negative but net public benefits are positive. In 6 of the 12 general subsidy scenarios the optimal public policy is not to offer a subsidy; in 5 scenarios the optimal subsidy rate is between $20 and $27 m(-2); and in 1 scenario the optimal rate is $5 m(-2). The optimal rate with a targeted subsidy is between $20 and $27 m(-2) in 11 scenarios and no subsidy is optimal in the twelfth. In most scenarios, a significant portion of net public benefits are generated by buildings for which net private benefits are positive. This suggests a policy focused on information dissemination and technical assistance may be more cost-effective than direct subsidy payments.

  3. Meteorology Of The Clark Atlanta University Local Energy Balance Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandock, R. L.; Mills, I.; Paxton, J. N.

    2005-05-01

    The Earth System Science Program (ESSP) at Clark Atlanta University has developed an instructional module to study energy balance at the air/land and air/sea interfaces. A graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed which is used to model each of the components (net radiation, sensible and latent heat fluxes, ground heat flux, storage, anthropomorphic, and residual) necessary to understand the partitioning of energy at the air/land and air/water interfaces. The energy balance diagram consists of sky elements (sun, moon, clouds), a line representing the air/land or water/land interface, and arrows which indicate magnitude and direction of each of the energy fluxes. The storage component is represented as a box when present. The energy balance model has been applied to numerous (33 at present) scenarios which vary by (1) climate or microclimate, (2) day and night, (2) cloudiness and sunshine, (3) windy and calm, (4) land or water surface, and (5) freezing and non-freezing temperatures. The model is available in 2 levels of rigor: (1) an elementary level (Level I), and (2) and advanced level (Level II). In the Level I model only fixed arrow lengths (e.g., zero, 1/4, 1/2, 3/4, 1) are available to express flux magnitude. This allows a qualitative illustration of the energy balance components. The Level II model requires the student to calculate arrow magnitudes and directions from diffusion, evaporation, radiative transfer, and energy storage equations. The module incorporates not only the energy balance model, but also a protocol by which meteorological observations from the ESSP's rooftop laboratory, the AEMN (Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network), and other online resources. The completed module is designed to serve two audiences: (1) undergraduate introductory science classes and grades 8-12, and (2) upper-division science and engineering classes.

  4. Urbanization effects on the hydrology of the Atlanta, Georgia (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Rose, S.

    2001-01-01

    For the period from 1958 to 1996, streamflow and rainfall characteristics of a highly urbanized watershed were compared with less-urbanized and non-urbanized watersheds in the vicinity of Atlanta, Georgia (USA). Water levels in several wells completed in surficial and crystalline-rock aquifers also were evaluated. Annual runoff coefficients (runoff as a fractional percentage of precipitation) ranged from 0.31 to 0.34 and were not significantly different for the urban stream (Peachtree Creek). Peak flows for the largest 25 stormflows at Peachtree Creek were 30% to 80% greater than peak flows for the other streams. A 2-day storm recession constant for Peachtree Creek was much larger, that is streamflow decreased more rapidly than for the other streams. Average low flow of Peachtree Creek was 25 to 35% less than the other streams, possibly the result of decreased infiltration caused by the more efficient routing of storm water and the paving of groundwater recharge areas. The timing of groundwater level variations was similar annually in each well, reflecting the seasonal recharge. Although water level monitoring only began during the late 1970s and early 1980s for the two urban wells, water levels in these wells have been declining compared to non-urban wells since then. The water level decline is attributed to decreased groundwater recharge in the urban watersheds due to increased imperviousness and related rapid storm runoff. Likewise, the increased urbanization from the 1960s to the 1990s of the Peachtree Creek watershed produced more runoff than urbanization in the less urbanized Big Creek and Sweetwater Creek watersheds.

  5. Warm Season Temperatures and Emergency Department Visits in Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Winquist, Andrea; Grundstein, Andrew; Chang, Howard H.; Hess, Jeremy; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Extreme heat events will likely increase in frequency with climate change. Heat-related health effects are better documented among the elderly than among younger age groups. We assessed associations between warm-season ambient temperature and emergency department (ED) visits across ages in Atlanta during 1993-2012. Methods We examined daily counts of ED visits with primary diagnoses of heat illness, fluid/electrolyte imbalances, renal disease, cardiorespiratory diseases, and intestinal infections by age group (0-4, 5-18, 19-64, 65+ years) in relation to daily maximum temperature (TMX) using Poisson time series models that included cubic terms for TMX at single-day lags of 0-6 days, controlling for maximum dew-point temperature, time trends, week day, holidays, and hospital participation periods. We estimated rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for TMX changes from 27 °C to 32 °C (25th to 75th percentile) and conducted extensive sensitivity analyses. Results We observed associations between TMX and ED visits for all internal causes, heat illness, fluid/electrolyte imbalances, renal diseases, asthma/wheeze, diabetes, and intestinal infections. Age groups with the strongest observed associations were 65+ years for all internal causes [lag 0 RR (CI)=1.022 (1.016-1.028)] and diabetes [lag 0 RR=1.050 (1.008-1.095)]; 19-64 years for fluid/electrolyte imbalances [lag 0 RR=1.170 (1.136-1.205)] and renal disease [lag 1 RR=1.082 (1.065-1.099)]; and 5-18 years for asthma/wheeze [lag 2 RR=1.059 (1.030-1.088)] and intestinal infections [lag 1 RR=1.120 (1.041-1.205)]. Conclusions Varying strengths of associations between TMX and ED visits by age suggest that optimal interventions and health-impact projections would account for varying heat health impacts across ages. PMID:26922412

  6. Early prediction of organ failure under the revised Atlanta classification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Cao, Feng; Dong, Xiao Min; Li, Peng Yu; Li, Hai Chao; Qi, Bao Ju; Li, Fei

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the ability of conventional laboratory markers and scoring systems to early predict organ failure (OF) and to differentiate between transient and persistent OF in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) using the revised Atlanta classification. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 214 patients with AP between January 2014 and July 2015. The predictive values of laboratory markers were analyzed. The predictive accuracy of individual markers, extrapancreatic inflammation on computed tomography (EPIC), acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II), and bedside index for severity in acute pancreatitis (BISAP) scores were measured using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). OF was diagnosed in 32 (15%) patients and persistent OF in 14 (6.5%). There were statistically significant differences between patients with and without OF with respect to white blood cell count, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, lactate dehydrogenase, C-reactive protein, calcium (Ca), arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), base excess (BE), APACHE II, BISAP scores, and EPIC scores. Logistic regression analysis identified Ca, PaO2, and BE as independent predictors of OF. Using AUROC, the EPIC score had the highest accuracy for the early prediction of OF, which was 0.82. No significant differences were detected between patients with transient and persistent OF. Several laboratory markers and score systems were useful for the early prediction of OF in patients with AP, of which Ca, PaO2, and BE had highest predicting value, and EPIC score had the highest accuracy. We could not predict the duration of OF using laboratory markers.

  7. Evidence for different SOA formation mechanisms in Los Angeles and Atlanta with contrasting emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Liu, J.; Parker, E. T.; Weber, R.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the gas/particle partitioning of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and formation of secondary organic constituents using in-situ measurements of chemical composition and optical properties of PM2.5 liquid extracts at two urban regions, Los Angeles, California and Atlanta, Georgia. Distinct and different diurnal patterns of gaseous and particulate WSOC, oxalate (and other organic acids), and soluble brown carbon were observed at the two sites. In Los Angeles, measured species followed identical diurnal profiles, reaching maximum levels in the early afternoon, suggestive of simultaneous local photochemical production of SOA and their light-absorbing components. In Atlanta, particulate WSOC and other SOA components exhibited moderate daytime enhancements relative to a large regional background, and the fresh WSOC was 4 to 6 times less light absorbing compared to Los Angeles. Different WSOC partitioning behaviors between gas/particle phases were also observed. In Atlanta, the fraction of particulate WSOC relative to the total WSOC (FP) was linked to inferred particle water content. In contrast, FP in Los Angeles had no correlation with RH, but was instead related to organic carbon mass, consistent with partition to the organic fraction as observed in environmental chambers. Overall, multiple forms of evidence suggest very different SOA formation processes in Los Angeles and Atlanta. The results are consistent with a dominant role in SOA formation played by anthropogenic VOCs in Los Angles and biogenic VOCs within Atlanta.

  8. Development and evaluation of alternative approaches for exposure assessment of multiple air pollutants in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Dionisio, Kathie L; Isakov, Vlad; Baxter, Lisa K; Sarnat, Jeremy A; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt; Burke, Janet; Rosenbaum, Arlene; Graham, Stephen E; Cook, Rich; Mulholland, James; Özkaynak, Halûk

    2013-01-01

    Measurements from central site (CS) monitors are often used as estimates of exposure in air pollution epidemiological studies. As these measurements are typically limited in their spatiotemporal resolution, true exposure variability within a population is often obscured, leading to potential measurement errors. To fully examine this limitation, we developed a set of alternative daily exposure metrics for each of the 169 ZIP codes in the Atlanta, GA, metropolitan area, from 1999 to 2002, for PM(2.5) and its components (elemental carbon (EC), SO(4)), O(3), carbon monoxide (CO), and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Metrics were applied in a study investigating the respiratory health effects of these pollutants. The metrics included: (i) CS measurements (one CS per pollutant); (ii) air quality model results for regional background pollution; (iii) local-scale AERMOD air quality model results; (iv) hybrid air quality model estimates (a combination of (ii) and (iii)); and (iv) population exposure model predictions (SHEDS and APEX). Differences in estimated spatial and temporal variability were compared by exposure metric and pollutant. Comparisons showed that: (i) both hybrid and exposure model estimates exhibited high spatial variability for traffic-related pollutants (CO, NO(x), and EC), but little spatial variability among ZIP code centroids for regional pollutants (PM(2.5), SO(4), and O(3)); (ii) for all pollutants except NO(x), temporal variability was consistent across metrics; (iii) daily hybrid-to-exposure model correlations were strong (r>0.82) for all pollutants, suggesting that when temporal variability of pollutant concentrations is of main interest in an epidemiological application, the use of estimates from either model may yield similar results; (iv) exposure models incorporating infiltration parameters, time-location-activity budgets, and other exposure factors affect the magnitude and spatiotemporal distribution of exposure, especially for local pollutants. The

  9. EPA Approves Redesignation of Atlanta Area to Attainment for the 1997 Annual Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5) Standard

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced that it is taking final action to approve the state of Georgia's request to redesignate the Atlanta Area to attainment for the 1997 Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5) standard. This fi

  10. SHORT-TERM TEMPORAL VARIATION IN PM2.5 MASS AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION DURING THE ATLANTA SUPERSITE EXPERIMENT, 1999

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements in urban Atlanta of transient aerosol events in which PM2.5 mass concentrations rapidly rise and fall over a period of 3-6 hr are reported. The data are based on new measurement techniques demonstrated at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Atlanta Supe...

  11. INTERCOMPARISION OF SEMI-CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENTS OF NITRATE AND SULFATE AT THE EPA ATLANTA SUPERSITE, AUGUST 1999

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atlanta Supersite was one of the first Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Supersites dedicated to the study of fine particles (PM2.5). The study involved intensive measurements during the month of August 1999, at a site situated near the center of Atlanta. One of the s...

  12. SHORT-TERM TEMPORAL VARIATION IN PM2.5 MASS AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION DURING THE ATLANTA SUPERSITE EXPERIMENT, 1999

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements in urban Atlanta of transient aerosol events in which PM2.5 mass concentrations rapidly rise and fall over a period of 3-6 hr are reported. The data are based on new measurement techniques demonstrated at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Atlanta Supe...

  13. Atlanta Ranks 3rd on EPAs Energy Star Top Cities List of Most Buildings in the U.S.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released its seventh-annual list of the top 25 U.S. metropolitan areas with the most Energy Star certified buildings in 2014 and the city of Atlanta ranks third. EPA's Energy Star Top C

  14. INTERCOMPARISION OF SEMI-CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENTS OF NITRATE AND SULFATE AT THE EPA ATLANTA SUPERSITE, AUGUST 1999

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atlanta Supersite was one of the first Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Supersites dedicated to the study of fine particles (PM2.5). The study involved intensive measurements during the month of August 1999, at a site situated near the center of Atlanta. One of the s...

  15. A Dynamic Optimization Technique for Siting the NASA-Clark Atlanta Urban Rain Gauge Network (NCURN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Taylor, Layi

    2003-01-01

    NASA satellites and ground instruments have indicated that cities like Atlanta, Georgia may create or alter rainfall. Scientists speculate that the urban heat island caused by man-made surfaces in cities impact the heat and wind patterns that form clouds and rainfall. However, more conclusive evidence is required to substantiate findings from satellites. NASA, along with scientists at Clark Atlanta University, are implementing a dense, urban rain gauge network in the metropolitan Atlanta area to support a satellite validation program called Studies of PRecipitation Anomalies from Widespread Urban Landuse (SPRAWL). SPRAWL will be conducted during the summer of 2003 to further identify and understand the impact of urban Atlanta on precipitation variability. The paper provides an. overview of SPRAWL, which represents one of the more comprehensive efforts in recent years to focus exclusively on urban-impacted rainfall. The paper also introduces a novel technique for deploying rain gauges for SPRAWL. The deployment of the dense Atlanta network is unique because it utilizes Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Decision Support Systems (DSS) to optimize deployment of the rain gauges. These computer aided systems consider access to roads, drainage systems, tree cover, and other factors in guiding the deployment of the gauge network. GIS and DSS also provide decision-makers with additional resources and flexibility to make informed decisions while considering numerous factors. Also, the new Atlanta network and SPRAWL provide a unique opportunity to merge the high-resolution, urban rain gauge network with satellite-derived rainfall products to understand how cities are changing rainfall patterns, and possibly climate.

  16. Clinical relevance of the revised Atlanta classification focusing on severity stratification system.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Oh, Dongwook; Paik, Woo Hyun; Park, Do Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Lee, Sung Koo

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the limitation of the Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis (AP), two international classifications have been recently proposed; the revised Atlanta classification and the determinant-based classification. There is an inconsistency between the two international classifications on whether infected necrosis (IN) is the major determinant of severity in AP. The aim of the current study was to validate the revised Atlanta classification and to determine the association of this new classification system with relevant clinical outcome in patients with AP. Data have been collected on 553 patients with AP admitted to a single center during the 7-year period commencing January 2006. Primary outcomes included the need for interventions, the need for intensive care unit (ICU) care, length of ICU stay, total hospital stay, and mortality. The different grades of severity for revised Atlanta classification system were associated with statistically significant differences in terms of clinical outcomes. Patients with severe AP that had IN, compared to those without IN, were associated with worse clinical outcomes. Having stratified patients with severe AP category according to the presence or absence of IN, the mortality rate increased fourfold to 32.3% for the presence of infected necrosis. Overall, the revised Atlanta classification seems to be valid, since it correlates well with clinical outcome. To more accurately assess clinical outcome of patients with severe AP defined by the revised Atlanta classification, however, severe AP patients with IN should be considered separately from those without IN in classification system. Copyright © 2014 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Task Force Delay Study. William B. Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    experimal Desain Srigfildsirgniai216 Ai Poriel Siagmulato Model T- 4 ’rgAenyCd omT F r 700.7 contain Repprtcion d cmetiod for thee i led anaysi DATA...Atlanta Simulation Model Calibration and Annual Delay Baseline Experiment Dear Ray: Enclosed are some data materials for use during the second Task...that should be reviewed, revised, and approved by the Atlanta Task Force prior to use in model runs. Sincerely, Stephen-L. M. Hockaday Manager S- n

  18. Warm season temperatures and emergency department visits in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Winquist, Andrea; Grundstein, Andrew; Chang, Howard H; Hess, Jeremy; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt

    2016-05-01

    Extreme heat events will likely increase in frequency with climate change. Heat-related health effects are better documented among the elderly than among younger age groups. We assessed associations between warm-season ambient temperature and emergency department (ED) visits across ages in Atlanta during 1993-2012. We examined daily counts of ED visits with primary diagnoses of heat illness, fluid/electrolyte imbalances, renal disease, cardiorespiratory diseases, and intestinal infections by age group (0-4, 5-18, 19-64, 65+years) in relation to daily maximum temperature (TMX) using Poisson time series models that included cubic terms for TMX at single-day lags of 0-6 days, controlling for maximum dew-point temperature, time trends, week day, holidays, and hospital participation periods. We estimated rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for TMX changes from 27°C to 32°C (25th to 75th percentile) and conducted extensive sensitivity analyses. We observed associations between TMX and ED visits for all internal causes, heat illness, fluid/electrolyte imbalances, renal diseases, asthma/wheeze, diabetes, and intestinal infections. Age groups with the strongest observed associations were 65+years for all internal causes [lag 0 RR (CI)=1.022 (1.016-1.028)] and diabetes [lag 0 RR=1.050 (1.008-1.095)]; 19-64 years for fluid/electrolyte imbalances [lag 0 RR=1.170 (1.136-1.205)] and renal disease [lag 1 RR=1.082 (1.065-1.099)]; and 5-18 years for asthma/wheeze [lag 2 RR=1.059 (1.030-1.088)] and intestinal infections [lag 1 RR=1.120 (1.041-1.205)]. Varying strengths of associations between TMX and ED visits by age suggest that optimal interventions and health-impact projections would account for varying heat health impacts across ages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel meeting July 9--1, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.

    1992-04-01

    The fifth meeting of the Tank Waste Science Panel was held July 9--11, 1991, in Atlanta, Georgia. The subject areas included the generation, retention, and release of gases from Tank 241-SY-101 and the chemistry of ferrocyanide wastes.

  20. Status and trends in atmospheric deposition and emissions near Atlanta, Georgia, 1986-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Meyers, T.P.; Aulenbach, Brent T.

    2002-01-01

    Wet and dry atmospheric deposition were investigated from weekly data, 1986-99 (1986-97 for dry deposition) at the Panola Mountain Research Watershed (PMRW), a forested research site 25 km, southeast of Atlanta, Georgia. Furthermore, the wet deposition was compared to that at three adjacent National Atmospheric Deposition Program's National Trends Network (NTN) sites (GA41, 50 km south of PMRW; AL99, 175 km northwest; NC25, 175 km north-northeast) and dry deposition was compared to that at adjacent Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET) sites, co-located at the NTN sites. The pH of precipitation is acidic and the dominant acid anion is SO4; the pH (derived from the volume-weighted mean H concentration) averages 4.44 for 1986-99, and varies seasonally with average lowest values in summer (4.19) and highest in winter (4.63). From 1986-99, the annual wet deposition of sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) averaged 400 and 300 eq ha-1 (6.4 and 4.2 kg ha-1), respectively. Inferential model estimates of annual dry S and N deposition from 1986-97 averaged 130 and 150 eq ha-1 (2.1 and 2.1 kg ha-1), respectively. From 1993-99, net S deposition (dry deposition plus canopy interactions) for coniferous and deciduous throughfall (throughfall minus wet-only deposition) averaged 400 and 150 eq ha-1 (6.4 and 2.1 kg ha-1), respectively. The annual wet deposition of S and N species at PMRW was comparable to that at NTN sites, with the exception of higher N species deposition at AL99 and relatively lower H, SO4 and NO3 deposition at GA41. Dry S deposition at PMRW differed markedly from the CASTNET sites despite similarity in S concentrations for all but NC25; the differences are attributed to differences in model parameters associated with the landscape and vegetation characteristics at the sites. At PMRW, atmospheric deposition trends were not detected for the entire sampling period, but were detected for shorter periods (4-5yr). Annual S and N deposition increased from 1986 to 1991

  1. EPA to Hold a Public Meeting About Proposed Plan to Clean Up Soil Contamination at Benfield Industries, Inc. Superfund Site in Waynesville, N.C.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - On Tuesday, Jan. 13, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will hold a public meeting about plans to clean up residual soil contamination at the Benfield Industries, Inc. Superfund Site in Waynesville, N.C. The meeting will be hel

  2. The use of dietary supplements and medications by Canadian athletes at the Atlanta and Sydney Olympic Games.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Han Susan; Johnson, Karin; Pipe, Andrew L

    2006-01-01

    To learn more about the prevalence of dietary supplement and medication use by Canadian athletes in the Olympic Games in Atlanta 1996 and Sydney 2000. Data were collected from personal interviews with Canadian athletes who participated at the 1996 Atlanta and 2000 Sydney Olympic Games. The athletes were interviewed by Canadian physicians regarding the use of vitamins, minerals, nutritional supplements, and prescribed and over-the-counter medications. Of the 271 Canadian athletes who participated at the Atlanta Olympics, 257 athletes were interviewed; at the Sydney Olympics, 300 of 304 Canadian athletes were interviewed. A quantitative and qualitative description of the use of dietary supplements by Canadian athletes at the Atlanta and Sydney Olympics. At the Atlanta Games, 69% of the athletes used some form of dietary supplements, whereas 74% of the athletes used dietary supplements at the Sydney Games. Vitamins were taken by 59% of men and 66% of women in Atlanta, and 65% of men and 58% women in Sydney. Mineral supplements were used by 16% of men and 45% of women in Atlanta, and 30% of men and 21% of women in Sydney. Nutritional supplements were used by 35% of men and 43% of women in Atlanta, and 43% of men and 51% of women in Sydney. The most popular vitamins were multivitamins in both Olympics. The most popular mineral supplements were iron supplements. The most commonly used nutritional supplement in Atlanta was creatine (14%), but amino acids (15%) were the most commonly used nutritional supplement in Sydney. In Atlanta, 61% of the athletes were using some form of medication, 54% of the athletes were using medications in Sydney. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) were the most commonly used medications at both Olympic Games. Among all sports, the highest prevalence of vitamin use occurred in boxing (91%) in Atlanta and swimming (76%) in Sydney. Rowers (56%) and cyclists (73%) demonstrated the highest use of mineral supplements. Nutritional supplement

  3. Energy in Agriculture: Proceedings of a Conference-Workshop, Atlanta, Georgia, October 1-3, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This publication is the proceedings of a conference-workshop held in Atlanta, Georgia in October 1975. At this conference 13 papers were presented on various aspects of energy use in agriculture. Also included are the final reports of the extension, the teaching, and the research workshop groups. Title of papers include Energy in Agriculture and…

  4. Mixed Messages in Media Coverage of Bilingual Education: The Case of Atlanta, Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarasawa, Beth

    2008-01-01

    As the increasing number of Latino and Asian immigrants to the Atlanta area has escalated tensions over occupational, residential, and educational resources, research has begun to examine opposition to bilingual education as an extension of anti-immigrant prejudice and as a measure of perceived threat. This study uses content analysis to compare…

  5. Social Support and Social Network Ties among the Homeless in a Downtown Atlanta Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reitzes, Donald C.; Crimmins, Timothy J.; Yarbrough, Johanna; Parker, Josie

    2011-01-01

    This study applies a typology of social support with 3 categories of social networks to investigate social ties and their benefits for homeless people. Data were derived from a 2-year long series of participant observations of homeless or precariously housed people who came regularly to a downtown Atlanta public park. The findings are as follows:…

  6. Fight or Flight? Immigration, Competition, and Language Assistance Resources in Metropolitan Atlanta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarasawa, Beth

    2013-01-01

    As the Latino/a immigrant population increases, racial conflict historically understood in terms of Black and White in the U.S. South has expanded to include new contestants in metro-Atlanta public schools. By examining market and sociological competition theoretical perspectives, this study investigates how language assistance resource…

  7. 75 FR 9781 - Determination of Nonattainment and Reclassification of the Atlanta, Georgia, 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Ozone Nonattainment Area; Correction AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule..., area from marginal to moderate for the 1997 8-hour ozone nonattainment area by operation of law. This....311. The reclassification of the Atlanta Area from marginal to moderate for the 1997 8-hour...

  8. A COMPARISON OF PARTICLE MASS SPECTROMETERS DURING THE 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITES EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the Atlanta SuperSite Experiment, four particle mass spectrometers were operated together for the first time: NOAA's PALMS (Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry), U. C. Riverside's ATOFMS (Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry), U. Delaware's RSMS-II (Rapid Si...

  9. Changing Land Use: Peachtree Street, Atlanta. A Case Study in Sequent Occupance [And] Student Work Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laws, Kevin

    A social studies unit and student workbook explore the historical geography of the area of Peachtree Street in Atlanta, Georgia. The unit deals with sequent occupance, a type of historical geography in which students study the same area, the changes in culture, and the changing land use in the area during certain time periods. For each period,…

  10. Women's Voluntarism, Special Education, and the Junior League: 'Social Motherhood' in Atlanta, 1916-1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Barry M.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the Atlanta (Georgia) Junior League, a women's volunteer organization, that chose to address education and welfare of disabled children. Explores the League's role in the education of children that have speech impairments, addressing the establishment of the School for Speech Correction. Reports on the League's role in social mothering.…

  11. Fine Art at the Cotton States and International Exposition, Atlanta, 1895. Learning Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Kate; Peckham, Kathleen

    With the end of the Civil War just 30 years past, the organizers of the Atlanta (Georgia) 1895 Cotton States and International Exposition sought to demonstrate the South's national patriotism and progressivism. While the exhibits at the exposition widely varied, among the most ambitious undertakings were the displays of fine arts found in the Fine…

  12. 75 FR 15415 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 26, Atlanta, Georgia, Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 26, Atlanta, Georgia, Area Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as amended (19 U.S.C. 81a-81u), the Foreign...

  13. 75 FR 17126 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, Georgia, Application for Expansion and Reorganization under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 26--Atlanta, Georgia, Application for Expansion and Reorganization under Alternative Site Framework An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ...

  14. Declining Black Access to College in Metropolitan Atlanta. Working Paper No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Faith

    Examination of college enrollment in Atlanta, Georgia, showed the starkest contrasts between White gains and Black declines of any of the five metropolitan regions studied by the University of Chicago's Metropolitan Opportunity Project: while there were no declines in enrollment for White or Hispanic students, there were substantial declines for…

  15. A Study of Reference Services and Reference Users in the Metropolitan Atlanta Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Ruth W., Ed.

    A project team was commissioned to gather information which could be used by the Reference Standards Committee of the American Library Association in their development of standards for library reference services. The metropolitan Atlanta area was selected because it includes in an accessible geographical area the entire range of types of…

  16. Under Pressure in Atlanta: School Accountability and Special Education Practices during the Cheating Scandal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Brittany; Murphy, Kristin M.; Saultz, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    A 2011 report by the Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI) confirmed a widespread cheating scandal among teachers, principals, and administrators in the Atlanta Public School system (APS) from 2009-2011. To date, it is the largest cheating scandal of its kind in the United States. The vast public investigation of this scandal provides an…

  17. A COMPARISON OF PARTICLE MASS SPECTROMETERS DURING THE 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITES EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the Atlanta SuperSite Experiment, four particle mass spectrometers were operated together for the first time: NOAA's PALMS (Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry), U. C. Riverside's ATOFMS (Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry), U. Delaware's RSMS-II (Rapid Si...

  18. Changing Land Use: Peachtree Street, Atlanta. A Case Study in Sequent Occupance [And] Student Work Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laws, Kevin

    A social studies unit and student workbook explore the historical geography of the area of Peachtree Street in Atlanta, Georgia. The unit deals with sequent occupance, a type of historical geography in which students study the same area, the changes in culture, and the changing land use in the area during certain time periods. For each period,…

  19. Counseling Psychology from Greyston to Atlanta: On the Road to Armageddon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprinthall, Norman A.

    1990-01-01

    Briefly describes the model for counseling psychology developed during the Greyston Conference of 1964 and compares it with the current view from the Atlanta Conference. Suggests that the shift of counseling psychology from schools, colleges, and career development toward a medical model of clinical treatment may eliminate an independent…

  20. Newcastle disease B1 vaccine strain in wild rock pigeons in Atlanta, Georgia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    From June to October of 2012, samples were collected from wild Rock Pigeons (Columba livia) in urban neighborhoods of Atlanta, Georgia to ascertain the prevalence of pigeon paramyxovirus serotype-1 (PPMV-1). PPMV-1 strains are a subset of avian paramyxovirus serotype-1 (APMV-1) commonly isolated fro...

  1. Computing Potential Assessment in Atlanta Public Schools Education. Report Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobbs, Henry L., Jr.; Wilmoth, James Noel

    The Computing Potential in Atlanta Public School Education (CPAPSE) was developed to determine teacher attitudes about computing potential as an instructional tool and to compare current practice with potential computing applications to determine the degree to which computer resources are being used in grades 2, 3, and 4. During the last week of…

  2. An Overview of Synoptic and Mesoscale Factors Contributing to the Disastrous Atlanta Flood of 2009

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this short communication is to present a brief overview of the hydrometeorological conditions leading to the historic Atlanta area flooding, present multiple observational perspectives on cumulative rainfall totals for the event, and consider a hypothesis for he prefe...

  3. Three Georgias in Atlanta: Lessons from Business Schools about Finding Your Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolverton, Mimi

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to look into how universities identify themselves and the audiences they choose to serve, taking into account three specific universities in Atlanta, Georgia. Design/methodology/approach: The paper gives brief overviews of the literature on differentiation and sustainability and the study, followed by…

  4. Dietary intake and overweight and obesity among persons living with HIV in Atlanta Georgia.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Dominica; Kalichman, Seth; Cherry, Chauncey; Kalichman, Moira; Washington, Christopher; Grebler, Tamar

    2016-10-10

    In the U.S., there has been a rise in overweight and obesity among persons living with HIV (PLWH). The aim of this study was to examine dietary intake and body mass index (BMI) in PLWH in Atlanta Georgia relative to the U.S.

  5. Women's Voluntarism, Special Education, and the Junior League: 'Social Motherhood' in Atlanta, 1916-1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Barry M.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the Atlanta (Georgia) Junior League, a women's volunteer organization, that chose to address education and welfare of disabled children. Explores the League's role in the education of children that have speech impairments, addressing the establishment of the School for Speech Correction. Reports on the League's role in social mothering.…

  6. PREFACE TO SPECIAL SECTION: SOUTHERN OXIDANTS STUDY 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITE PROJECT (SOS3)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atlanta Supersites Project consisted of a one-month intensive field program to compare advanced methods for measurement of PM2.5 mass, chemical composition, including single particle composition in real-time, and aerosol precursor species. The project was the first of EPA's ...

  7. Under Pressure in Atlanta: School Accountability and Special Education Practices during the Cheating Scandal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Brittany; Murphy, Kristin M.; Saultz, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    A 2011 report by the Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI) confirmed a widespread cheating scandal among teachers, principals, and administrators in the Atlanta Public School system (APS) from 2009-2011. To date, it is the largest cheating scandal of its kind in the United States. The vast public investigation of this scandal provides an…

  8. Social Support and Social Network Ties among the Homeless in a Downtown Atlanta Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reitzes, Donald C.; Crimmins, Timothy J.; Yarbrough, Johanna; Parker, Josie

    2011-01-01

    This study applies a typology of social support with 3 categories of social networks to investigate social ties and their benefits for homeless people. Data were derived from a 2-year long series of participant observations of homeless or precariously housed people who came regularly to a downtown Atlanta public park. The findings are as follows:…

  9. Bi-Regional Educational Improvement Forum (Atlanta, Georgia, November 19-20, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachia Educational Lab., Charleston, WV.

    The Bi-Regional Educational Improvement Forum in Atlanta, Georgia (November 1979) considered three areas of school improvement, including State Department of Education (SEA) delivery systems and the use of technology to improve schooling. The three forum articles concerned with delivery systems treat the transformation of policies emanating from…

  10. PREFACE TO SPECIAL SECTION: SOUTHERN OXIDANTS STUDY 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITE PROJECT (SOS3)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atlanta Supersites Project consisted of a one-month intensive field program to compare advanced methods for measurement of PM2.5 mass, chemical composition, including single particle composition in real-time, and aerosol precursor species. The project was the first of EPA's ...

  11. Mixed Messages in Media Coverage of Bilingual Education: The Case of Atlanta, Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarasawa, Beth

    2008-01-01

    As the increasing number of Latino and Asian immigrants to the Atlanta area has escalated tensions over occupational, residential, and educational resources, research has begun to examine opposition to bilingual education as an extension of anti-immigrant prejudice and as a measure of perceived threat. This study uses content analysis to compare…

  12. Fine Art at the Cotton States and International Exposition, Atlanta, 1895. Learning Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Kate; Peckham, Kathleen

    With the end of the Civil War just 30 years past, the organizers of the Atlanta (Georgia) 1895 Cotton States and International Exposition sought to demonstrate the South's national patriotism and progressivism. While the exhibits at the exposition widely varied, among the most ambitious undertakings were the displays of fine arts found in the Fine…

  13. [Acute pancreatitis - validation of revised Atlanta classification on 159 patients and prognostic factors].

    PubMed

    Floreánová, Katarína; Dítě, Petr; Kianička, Bohuslav; Dovrtělová, Lenka; Přecechtělová, Marie

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years the Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis (AP) have been revised. However prognostic markers of AP are still being searched for. The aim of this study is to validate the 3 severity categories proposed by the revised Atlanta classification. We also tried to reevaluate the association between two laboratory markers (leucocyte count and RDW - red cell distribution width) on admission and prognosis of the patients with AP. 159 patients were included into the study. The patients were classified according to revised Atlanta criteria and the subgroups evaluated according to mortality, length of hospital stay and need for interventions. Leucocyte count and RDW on admission was evaluated in the patients. All the subgroups of patients were associated with significantly relevant differences in mortality, length of hospital stay and need for operations on pancreas. Leucocyte count and RDW were identified as significant predictors for severe AP and RDW was also identified as significant predictor for mortality in patients with AP. New categories of severity as defined by Revised Atlanta classification are describing well the mortality, length of hospital stay and need for interventions in the patients with AP. Leucocyte count and RDW on admission are needed to be confirmed as potential prognostic markers of severity and mortality in AP.

  14. Underlying Factors Related to the Atlanta Cheating Scandal: An Autoethnographic Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beal, Emma Mumphery

    2012-01-01

    In this study I used autoethnography to analyze fifty years of African-American educational history in Georgia. The impetus for the study was the Atlanta cheating scandal, widely interpreted as a character problem for individual teachers and administrators. As a lifelong resident of Georgia, a student, a public school teacher, and a parent, it…

  15. The Atlanta University Center: A Consortium-Based Dual Degree Engineering Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Marilyn T.

    2007-01-01

    The Atlanta University Center (AUC) comprises five historically black colleges and a centralized library. All are separate institutions, each having its own board of directors, president, infrastructure, students, faculty, staff, and traditions. To encourage coordination of effort and resources, the AUC was formed and the first formal cooperative…

  16. Climbing the Ladder of Reading Proficiency: The First Two Years of Atlanta's Dunbar Learning Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Every weekday morning, Director Steve White and 40 teachers welcome 206 children to the Early Learning and Literacy Resource Center (ELLRC) in Atlanta. Upstairs in the same building, Principal Karen Brown-Collier and 30 full-time teachers welcome 385 students to Dunbar Elementary School. These children and their parents are benefiting from an…

  17. Solar Heating and Cooling Experiment for a School in Atlanta. Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Falls Church, VA.

    This report documents the performance and conclusions of a 13-month period of monitoring the performance of the experimental solar heating and cooling system installed in the George A. Towns Elementary School, Atlanta, Georgia. The objectives of the project were to (1) make a significant contribution to solar design, technology, and acceptability;…

  18. Fight or Flight? Immigration, Competition, and Language Assistance Resources in Metropolitan Atlanta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarasawa, Beth

    2013-01-01

    As the Latino/a immigrant population increases, racial conflict historically understood in terms of Black and White in the U.S. South has expanded to include new contestants in metro-Atlanta public schools. By examining market and sociological competition theoretical perspectives, this study investigates how language assistance resource…

  19. 78 FR 20091 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, Georgia, Authorization of Production Activity, Perkins Shibaura...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 26--Atlanta, Georgia, Authorization of Production Activity, Perkins Shibaura Engines, LLC (Diesel Engines), Griffin, Georgia On November 29, 2012, Georgia Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 26, submitted...

  20. Solar Heating and Cooling Experiment for a School in Atlanta. Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Falls Church, VA.

    This report documents the performance and conclusions of a 13-month period of monitoring the performance of the experimental solar heating and cooling system installed in the George A. Towns Elementary School, Atlanta, Georgia. The objectives of the project were to (1) make a significant contribution to solar design, technology, and acceptability;…

  1. An Overview of Synoptic and Mesoscale Factors Contributing to the Disastrous Atlanta Flood of 2009

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this short communication is to present a brief overview of the hydrometeorological conditions leading to the historic Atlanta area flooding, present multiple observational perspectives on cumulative rainfall totals for the event, and consider a hypothesis for he prefe...

  2. Meteorological detrending of primary and secondary pollutant concentrations: Method application and evaluation using long-term (2000-2012) data in Atlanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henneman, Lucas R. F.; Holmes, Heather A.; Mulholland, James A.; Russell, Armistead G.

    2015-10-01

    The effectiveness of air pollution regulations and controls are evaluated based on measured air pollutant concentrations. Air pollution levels, however, are highly sensitive to both emissions and meteorological fluctuations. Therefore, an assessment of the change in air pollutant levels due to emissions controls must account for these meteorological fluctuations. Two empirical methods to quantify the impact of meteorology on pollutant levels are discussed and applied to the 13-year time period between 2000 and 2012 in Atlanta, GA. The methods employ Kolmogorov-Zurbenko filters and linear regressions to detrended pollutant signals into long-term, seasonal, weekly, short-term, and white-noise components. The methods differ in how changes in weekly and holiday emissions are accounted for. Both can provide meteorological adjustments on a daily basis for future use in acute health analyses. The meteorological impact on daily signals of ozone, NOx, CO, SO2, PM2.5, and PM species are quantified. Analyses show that the substantial decreases in seasonal averages of NOx and SO2 correspond with controls implemented in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Detrending allows for the impacts of some controls to be observed with averaging times of as little as 3 months. Annual average concentrations of NOx, SO2, and CO have all fallen by at least 50% since 2000. Reductions in NOx levels, however, do not lead to uniform reductions in ozone. While average detrended summer average maximum daily average 8 h ozone (MDA8h O3) levels fell by 4% (2.2 ± 2 ppb) between 2000 and 2012, winter averages have increased by 12% (3.8 ± 1.4 ppb), providing further evidence that high ozone levels are NOx-limited and lower ozone concentrations are NOx-inhibited. High ozone days (with MDA8h O3 greater than 60 ppb) decreased both in number and in magnitude over the study period.

  3. Modeling the Effect of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems on Nitrate Load Using SWAT in an Urban Watershed of Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoghooghi, N.; Radcliffe, D. E.; Habteselassie, M.; Jeong, J.

    2016-12-01

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) can be a source of nitrogen (N) pollution in both surface and ground waters. In Metropolitan Atlanta, GA more than 26% of homes are on OWTSs. The objective of this study was to estimate the effect of OWTS, including failing systems, on NO3- load in an urban watershed in Metropolitan Atlanta using the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. Big Haynes Creek watershed has a drainage area of 44-km2 with mainly urban land use (67%) and most of the homes use OWTS. A USGS gage station where stream flow was measured daily and nitrate (NO3-) concentrations were measured approximately monthly was selected as the outlet. The model was simulated from 1 January 2003 to 31 December 2014. Overall, the model showed satisfactory daily stream flow and NO3- loads with Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients of 0.62 and 0.58 for the calibration period, and 0.67 and 0.33 for the validation period, respectively at the outlet of the Big Haynes watershed. OWTS caused an average increase in NO3- load of about 23% at the watershed scale and 29% at the sub-basin outlet with the highest density of OWTS. Failing OWTS were estimated to be 1% of the total systems and did not have a large impact on stream flow or NO3- load. The NO3- load was 74% of the total N load in the watershed, suggesting the important effect of OWTS on stream loads in urban watersheds.

  4. Contraceptive use among clients of the Atlanta Feminist Women's Health Center at three to five weeks post-abortion.

    PubMed

    Moslin, Trisha A; Rochat, Roger W

    2011-08-01

    Little is known about women's contraceptive use and sexual activity in the immediate post-abortion period although effective contraceptive use is paramount during this time because fertility returns almost immediately. This study sought to learn more about women's contraceptive use and sexual behaviors to inform abortion providers and help them serve their clients better, potentially leading to a decline in the rates of unintended pregnancy and repeat abortion. Abortion clients of an Atlanta, GA clinic were surveyed over the telephone 3-5 weeks post-abortion. Background information was collected from clinic medical charts. Simple and stratified frequencies and logistic regression were used to describe women's sexual activity and contraceptive use in the immediate post-abortion period and to determine if variables known at the time of the abortion could predict contraceptive use 3-5 weeks post-abortion. 54.2% (n = 39) of women had engaged in sexual intercourse in the immediate post-abortion period. Of these, 30.8% (n = 12) were not using a contraceptive method or were not using it effectively. Women who said they did not want or need information about birth control on their medical history form were less likely to be using contraception 3-5 weeks post abortion. Emphasizing the rapid return of fertility and risk of conception in pre-abortion counseling sessions could prevent future unintended pregnancies among abortion clients. Further research could explore the interaction between a willingness to talk about contraceptive methods at the time of abortion and method use post-abortion.

  5. Intercomparison of an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) with ambient fine aerosol measurements in downtown Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Croteau, P. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; Kollman, M. S.; Ng, N. L.; Verma, V.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Weber, R. J.; Surratt, J. D.

    2014-07-01

    Currently, there are a limited number of field studies that evaluate the long-term performance of the Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) against established monitoring networks. In this study, we present seasonal intercomparisons of the ACSM with collocated fine aerosol (PM2.5) measurements at the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) Jefferson Street (JST) site near downtown Atlanta, GA, during 2011-2012. Intercomparison of two collocated ACSMs resulted in strong correlations (r2 > 0.8) for all chemical species, except chloride (r2 = 0.21) indicating that ACSM instruments are capable of stable and reproducible operation. In general, speciated ACSM mass concentrations correlate well (r2 > 0.7) with the filter-adjusted continuous measurements from JST, although the correlation for nitrate is weaker (r2 = 0.55) in summer. Correlations of the ACSM NR-PM1 (non-refractory particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 1 μm) plus elemental carbon (EC) with tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) PM2.5 and Federal Reference Method (FRM) PM1 mass are strong with r2 > 0.7 and r2 > 0.8, respectively. Discrepancies might be attributed to evaporative losses of semi-volatile species from the filter measurements used to adjust the collocated continuous measurements. This suggests that adjusting the ambient aerosol continuous measurements with results from filter analysis introduced additional bias to the measurements. We also recommend to calibrate the ambient aerosol monitoring instruments using aerosol standards rather than gas-phase standards. The fitting approach for ACSM relative ionization for sulfate was shown to improve the comparisons between ACSM and collocated measurements in the absence of calibrated values, suggesting the importance of adding sulfate calibration into the ACSM calibration routine.

  6. Classification of the PALMS single particle mass spectral data from Atlanta by regression tree analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlebrook, A. M.; Murphy, D. M.; Lee, S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S.; Thomson, D. S.; Thomson, D. S.

    2001-12-01

    During the Atlanta Supersites project in August 1999, the PALMS (Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry) instrument collected over 500,000 individual particle spectra. The Atlanta data were originally analyzed by examining combinations of peaks and relative peak areas [Lee et al., 2001a,b], and a wide range of particle components such as sulfate, nitrate, mineral species, metals, organic species, and elemental carbon were detected. To further study the dataset, a classification program using regression tree analysis was developed and applied. Spectral data were compressed into a lower resolution spectrum (every 0.25 mass units) of the raw data and a list of peak areas (every mass unit). Each spectrum started as a normalized classification vector by itself. If the dot product of two classification vectors was within a certain threshold, they were combined into a new classification. The new classification vector was a normalized running average of the classifications being combined. In subsequent steps, the threshold for combining classifications was continuously lowered until a reasonable number of classifications remained. After the final iteration, each spectrum was compared individually with the entire set of classification vectors. Classifications were also combined manually. The classification results from the Atlanta data are generally consistent with those determined by peak identification. However, the classification program identified specific patterns in the mass spectra that were not found by peak identification and generated new particle types. Furthermore, rare particle types that may affect human health were studied in more detail. A description of the classification program as well as the results for the Atlanta data will be presented. Lee, S.-H., D. M. Murphy, D. S. Thomson, and A. M. Middlebrook, Chemical components of single particles measured with particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry (PALMS) during the Atlanta Supersites Project

  7. EPA Provides $2.3 Million to Two Universities in Atlanta to Protect Air Quality in a Changing Climate

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced $8.5 million in research funding to 12 universities to protect air quality from the current and future challenges associated with the impacts of climate change.

  8. ATLANTA COMMUTE VEHICLE SOAK AND START DISTRIBUTIONS AND ENGINE STARTS PER DAY: IMPACT ON MOBILE SOURCE EMISSION RATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Georgia Institute of Technology School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researchers analyzed the 2004 vehicle activity data obtained from vehicles in the Atlanta Commuter Choice Value Pricing Initiative. The onboard monitoring equipment installed in each participating vehi...

  9. ATLANTA COMMUTE VEHICLE SOAK AND START DISTRIBUTIONS AND ENGINE STARTS PER DAY: IMPACT ON MOBILE SOURCE EMISSION RATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Georgia Institute of Technology School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researchers analyzed the 2004 vehicle activity data obtained from vehicles in the Atlanta Commuter Choice Value Pricing Initiative. The onboard monitoring equipment installed in each participating vehi...

  10. "Bala ga lili": Meeting Indigenous Learners Halfway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissett, Susan Zela

    2012-01-01

    The author's experience of the day-to-day issues faced as an educator in an Aboriginal school are recounted, along with perspectives gained as part of a research project. The proposition is argued that an Education for Sustainability approach, where learning is structured around a negotiated environmental issue within local community, represents a…

  11. Ground-water resources of the south metropolitan Atlanta region, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, John S.; Peck, Michael F.

    1991-01-01

    Ground-water resources of the nine county south metropolitan Atlanta region were evaluated in response to an increased demand for water supplies and concern that existing surface water supplies may not be able to meet future supply demands. Previous investigations have suggested that crystalline rock in the study area has low permeability and can not sustain well yields suitable for public supply. However, the reported yield for 406 wells drilled into crystalIine rock units in this area ranged from less than 1 to about 700 gallons per minute, and averaged 43 gallons per minute. The reported flow from 13 springs ranged from 0.5 to 679 gallons per minute. The yield of 43 wells and flow from five springs was reported to exceed 100 gallons per minute. Most of the high-yielding wells and springs were near contact zones between rocks of contrasting lithologic and weathering properties. The high-yielding wells and springs are located in a variety of topographic settings: hillsides, upland draws, and hilltops were most prevalent. The study area, which includes Henry, Fayette, Coweta, Spalding, Lamar, Pike, Meriwether, Upson and Talbot Counties, is within the Piedmont physiographic province except for the southernmost part of Talbot County, which is in the Coastal Plain physiographic province. In the Piedmont, ground-water storage occurs in joints, fractures and other secondary openings in the bedrock, and in pore spaces in the regolith. The most favorable geologic settings for siting highyielding wells are along contact zones between rocks of contrasting lithology and permeability, major zones of fracturing such as the Towaliga and Auchumpkee fault zones, and other numerous shear and microbreccia zones. Although most wells in the study area are from 101 to 300 feet deep, the highest average yields were obtained from wells 51 to 100 feet deep, and 301 to 500 feet deep. Of the wells inventoried, the average diameter of well casing was largest for wells located on hills and

  12. TUESDAY: EPA to Hold Public Meeting about Proposed Interim Cleanup of CTS of Asheville Inc. Superfund Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Asheville, N.C., residents are invited to attend a public meeting about the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed plan to address contamination beneath the former plant at the CTS of Asheville Inc. Superfund Site. A key ste

  13. Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel meeting July 9--1, 1991. Hanford Tank Safety Project

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.

    1992-04-01

    The fifth meeting of the Tank Waste Science Panel was held July 9--11, 1991, in Atlanta, Georgia. The subject areas included the generation, retention, and release of gases from Tank 241-SY-101 and the chemistry of ferrocyanide wastes.

  14. THURSDAY: EPA to Hold a Public Meeting About the Cleanup of Cavenham Forest Industries Site in Gulfport

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Gulfport residents are invited to attend a public meeting about the ongoing cleanup of the Cavenham Forest Industries (CFI) facility. CFI is a former wood treating plant that closed in 1987 after operating for over 80 years at 9502 Creosot

  15. Analysis of Ozone Levels from 2006 to 2016 in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, E.

    2016-12-01

    Ozone is a significant component of smog that persists in many large urban areas. Ozone is regulated by the U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a criteria pollutant, and can lead to a variety of respiratory problems in sensitive groups. This study examines ozone concentrations in Atlanta-Sandy Springs- Roswell (Atlanta) metropolitan area, one of the largest urban areas in the Southeastern United States. Photochemical reactions involving oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) lead to ozone formation. The rate of ozone formation is exacerbated by Atlanta's hot and humid climate during the summers. Using data from EPA's Air Quality Systems database, this study analyzes ozone concentration data from regulatory monitoring sites in several counties that are in the metropolitan statistical area of Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, over a ten-year period (2006-2016). The study also looks at the meteorological conditions (such as temperature, wind speed, and humidity) over the same ten-year period (2006-2016) using data from the National Weather Service's Regional Airport Observations at Hartsfield-Jackson Airport in Atlanta. Based on a preliminary analysis of the ozone data, there is a downward trend in maximum daily 8-hour ozone concentration at all Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell sites from 2006-2016. The decrease of ozone concentrations corresponds to three successively stricter National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone (1997, 2008, and 2015) during the ten-year period of this study. The Atlanta area will be classified based on the 2015 ozone NAAQS, of 70 parts per billion, in the next few years. With EPA's upcoming attainment determination, this study looks at the recent trends in ozone concentrations and meteorology in the Atlanta area.

  16. Urban Heat Islands and Summertime Convective Thunderstorms in Atlanta: Three Case Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornstein, Robert; Lin, Qinglu; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Data from both 27 sites in the Atlanta mesonet surface meteorological network and eight National Weather Service sites were analyzed for the period from 26 July to 3 August 1996. Analysis of the six precipitation events over the city during the period (each on a different day) showed that its urban heat island (UHI) induced a convergence zone that initiated three of the storms at different times of the day, i.e., 0630,0845, and 1445 EDT. Previous analysis has shown that New York City (NYC) effects summer daytime thunderstorm formation and/or movement. That study found that during nearly calm regional flow conditions the NYC UHI initiates convective activity. Moving thunderstorms, however, tended to bifurcate and to move around the city, due to its building barrier effect. The current Atlanta results thus agree with the NYC results with respect to thunderstorm initiation.

  17. Summary of Proceedings and After Action Report DARCOM - Industry Executive Seminar Atlanta IX. Spring 1983.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-02

    all. 16. ATLANTA IX PANEL REPORT PANEL II - RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PANELISTS: THE HONORABLE WALTER B. LABERGE !z VICE PRESIDENT, LOC L’EED MISSILES... STEVENS , USA COMMANDING GENERAL, US ARMY AVIATION RESEAFc?’ AND DEVELOPMENT CO NTNAND MGEN JOHN B. OBLINGERJ USA DEPUTY CHIEF OF STAFF FOR COMBAT...34Research and Development and the Tech- nology Base was co-chaired by Dr. W.B. LaBerge as industry leader and Lt. Gen. Robert J. Lunn, USA as DARCOM

  18. Spatial clustering of HIV prevalence in Atlanta, Georgia and population characteristics associated with case concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hixson, Brooke A; Omer, Saad B; del Rio, Carlos; Frew, Paula M

    2011-02-01

    We assessed prevalent HIV cases in Atlanta to examine case distribution trends and population characteristics at the census tract level that may be associated with clustering effects. We calculated cluster characteristics (area and internal HIV prevalence) via Kuldorff's spatial scan method. Subsequent logistic regression analyses were performed to analyze sociodemographics associated with inclusion in a cluster. Organizations offering voluntary HIV testing and counseling services were identified and we assessed average travel time to access these services. One large cluster centralized in downtown Atlanta was identified that contains 60% of prevalent HIV cases. The prevalence rate within the cluster was 1.34% compared to 0.32% outside the cluster. Clustered tracts were associated with higher levels of poverty (OR = 1.19), lower density of multi-racial residents (OR = 1.85), injection drug use (OR = 1.99), men having sex with men (OR = 3.01), and men having sex with men and IV drug use (OR = 1.6). Forty-two percent (N = 11) of identified HIV service providers in Atlanta are located in the cluster with an average travel time of 13 minutes via car to access these services (SD = 9.24). The HIV epidemic in Atlanta is concentrated in one large cluster characterized by poverty, men who have sex with men (MSM), and IV drug usage. Prevention efforts targeted to the population living in this area as well as efforts to address the specific needs of these populations may be most beneficial in curtailing the epidemic within the identified cluster.

  19. Acute Pancreatitis: Revised Atlanta Classification and the Role of Cross-Sectional Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ken; Adam, Sharon Z; Keswani, Rajesh N; Horowitz, Jeanne M; Miller, Frank H

    2015-07-01

    The 2012 revision of the Atlanta Classification emphasizes accurate characterization of collections that complicate acute pancreatitis: acute peripancreatic fluid collections, pseudocysts, acute necrotic collections, and walled-off necroses. As a result, the role of imaging in the management of acute pancreatitis has substantially increased. This article reviews the imaging findings associated with acute pancreatitis and its complications on cross-sectional imaging and discusses the role of imaging in light of this revision.

  20. Medical Surge Capacity in Atlanta-Area Hospitals in Response to Tanker Truck Chemical Releases.

    PubMed

    Harris, Curtis; Bell, William; Rollor, Edward; Waltz, Tawny; Blackwell, Pam; Dallas, Cham

    2015-12-01

    We designed and conducted a regional full-scale exercise in 2007 to test the ability of Atlanta-area hospitals and community partners to respond to a terrorist attack involving the coordinated release of 2 dangerous chemicals (toluene diisocyanate and parathion) that were being transported through the area by tanker truck. The exercise was designed to facilitate the activation of hospital emergency response plans and to test applicable triage, decontamination, and communications protocols. Plume modeling was conducted by using the Defense Threat Reduction Agency's (DTRA) Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability (HPAC) V4 program. The scenario went through multiple iterations as exercise planners sought to reduce total injuries to a manageable, but stressful, level for Atlanta's health care infrastructure. Atlanta-area hospitals rapidly performed multiple casualty triage and were able to take in a surge of victims from the simulated attack. However, health care facilities were reticent to push the perceived manageable numbers of victims, and scenarios were modified significantly to lower the magnitude of the simulated attack. Additional coordination with community response partners and incident command training is recommended. Security at health care facilities and decontamination of arriving victims are two areas that will require continued review. Atlanta-area hospitals participated in an innovative regional exercise that pushed facilities beyond traditional scopes of practice and brought together numerous health care community response partners. Using lessons learned from this exercise coupled with subsequent real-world events and training exercises, participants have significantly enhanced preparedness levels and increased the metropolitan region's medical surge capacity in the case of a multiple casualty disaster.

  1. Atlanta Centennial Olympic Games and Paralympic Games event study, 1996. Final report, July 1996--August 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Amodei, R.; Bard, E.; Brong, B.; Cahoon, F.; Jasper, K.

    1998-11-01

    The Atlanta metropolitan region was the location of one of the most ambitious Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) deployments in the United States. This deployment included several individual projects--a Central Transportation Management Center (TMC), six Traffic Control Centers (TCCs), one Transit Information Center (TIC), The Travel Information Showcase (TIS), and the extension of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) Rail network and the new high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes on I-85 and I-75. The 1996 Atlanta Centennial Olympic Games and Paralympic Games created a focus for these projects. All of these systems were to be brought on-line in time for the Olympic Games. This report presents the findings of the 1996 Olympic and Paralympic Games Events Study--a compilation of findings of system performance, the benefits realized, and the lessons learned during their operations over the event period. The study assessed the performance of the various Travel Demand Management (TDM) plans employed for Olympic Games traffic management.

  2. Preliminary flood-frequency relations for urban streams, Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golden, Harold G.

    1977-01-01

    A method is presented for estimating the magnitude and frequency of floods for urban streams in metropolitan Atlanta. The method is based on adjustments to the natural stream flood-frequency and rainfall-frequency characteristics of the local area as defined by urban flood studies in other areas. The effects of urbanization on flood-peak runoff are estimated from the percentage of drainage basin that is impervious and the percentage of drainage area served by storm sewers. Equation are presented for estimating the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year flood peak discharges for basin sizes from 0.5 to 100 square miles in the Atlanta metro area. Data from 12 urban streams in the Atlanta area were used to obtain a qualitative verification of the 2- and 100-year estimating equations. Hydrologic data are presently being collected for a study that will provide a data base for use in hydrologic models to develop more reliable urban flood-frequency relations. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. A Remote Sensing Approach for Urban Environmental Decision-Making: An Atlanta, Georgia Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Laymon, Charles A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Howell, Burgess F.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Unquestionably, urbanization causes tremendous changes in land cover and land use, as well as impacting a host of environmental characteristics. For example, unlike natural surfaces, urban surfaces have very different thermal energy properties whereby they store solar energy throughout the day and continue to release it as heat well after sunset. This effect, known as the 'Urban Heat Island', serves as a catalyst for chemical reactions from vehicular exhaust and industrial activities leading to the deterioration in air quality, especially exacerbating the production of ground level ozone. 'Cool Community' strategies that utilize remote sensing data, are now being implemented as a way to reduce the impacts of the urban heat island and its subsequent environmental impacts. This presentation focuses on how remote sensing data have been used to provide descriptive and quantitative data for characterizing the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area - particularly for measuring surface energy fluxes, such as the thermal or "heat" energy that emanates from different land cover types across the Atlanta urban landscape. In turn, this information is useful for developing a better understanding of how the thermal characteristics of the city surface affect the urban heat island phenomena and, ultimately, air quality and other environmental parameters over the Atlanta metropolitan region. Additionally, this paper also provides insight on how remote sensing, with its synoptic approach, can be used to provide urban planners, local, state, and federal government officials, and other decision-makers, as well as the general public, with information to better manage urban areas as sustainable environments.

  4. Food insufficiency among HIV-infected crack-cocaine users in Atlanta and Miami

    PubMed Central

    Vogenthaler, Nicholas S; Hadley, Craig; Lewis, Sarah J; Rodriguez, Allan E; Metsch, Lisa R; del Rio, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Objective To measure the occurrence and correlates of food insufficiency among HIV-infected crack-cocaine users in Atlanta and Miami, USA. Design Non-probability cross-sectional sample. Setting Inner-city hospitals in Atlanta and Miami. Subjects Two hundred and eighty-seven HIV-infected crack users. Results One-third (34 %) of respondents experienced food insufficiency within 30 d of interview. Increased odds of food insufficiency was associated with current homelessness (adjusted OR = 3·78, 95% CI 1·70, 8·41), living alone (adjusted OR = 2·85, 95% CI 1·36, 5·98), religious service attendance (adjusted OR = 2·34, 95% CI 1·02, 5·38) and presence of health insurance (adjusted OR = 2·41, 95% CI 1·06, 5·54). Monthly income greater than $US 600 (adjusted OR = 0·19, 95% CI 0·06, 0·58) was associated with decreased odds of food insufficiency, and less than weekly crack use was marginally associated with decreased odds of food insufficiency (adjusted OR = 0·39, 95 % CI 0·13, 1·08). Conclusions Food insufficiency is very prevalent among HIV-infected urban crack-cocaine users in Atlanta and Miami. Correlates of food insufficiency confirm the social vulnerability of these individuals. Routine assessment for food insecurity should become a routine component of treatment and prevention programmes in at-risk populations. PMID:20074395

  5. Food insufficiency among HIV-infected crack-cocaine users in Atlanta and Miami.

    PubMed

    Vogenthaler, Nicholas S; Hadley, Craig; Lewis, Sarah J; Rodriguez, Allan E; Metsch, Lisa R; del Rio, Carlos

    2010-09-01

    To measure the occurrence and correlates of food insufficiency among HIV-infected crack-cocaine users in Atlanta and Miami, USA. Non-probability cross-sectional sample. Inner-city hospitals in Atlanta and Miami. Two hundred and eighty-seven HIV-infected crack users. One-third (34 %) of respondents experienced food insufficiency within 30 d of interview. Increased odds of food insufficiency was associated with current homelessness (adjusted OR = 3.78, 95 % CI 1.70, 8.41), living alone (adjusted OR = 2.85, 95 % CI 1.36, 5.98), religious service attendance (adjusted OR = 2.34, 95 % CI 1.02, 5.38) and presence of health insurance (adjusted OR = 2.41, 95 % CI 1.06, 5.54). Monthly income greater than $US 600 (adjusted OR = 0.19, 95 % CI 0.06, 0.58) was associated with decreased odds of food insufficiency, and less than weekly crack use was marginally associated with decreased odds of food insufficiency (adjusted OR = 0.39, 95 % CI 0.13, 1.08). Food insufficiency is very prevalent among HIV-infected urban crack-cocaine users in Atlanta and Miami. Correlates of food insufficiency confirm the social vulnerability of these individuals. Routine assessment for food insecurity should become a routine component of treatment and prevention programmes in at-risk populations.

  6. Increasing spatiotemporal resolution of several major pollutant species in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosius, A. L.; Luong, K. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The American Lung Association cited Atlanta, Georgia, as one of the top 20 most polluted U.S. cities in 2014. Heavy air and ground transportation traffic contribute to the production of carbon dioxide (CO2), particulate matter (PM), and tropospheric ozone (O3) for the Atlanta Metropolitan Area (AMA). Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport contributes significantly to the emission of these pollutants and their precursors. This study focuses on enhancing spatiotemporal resolution of CO2, PM, and O3in near-surface (ground to 50m) air columns by using Arduino-based sensors. The city of Decatur, due to its proximity to the airport, is the study site for the investigation of target pollutant concentrations. The results of this study, combined with other metropolitan air quality data sets, can be used to verify projected trends and append seasonal data. An understanding of the pollutant concentration distributions throughout the near-surface air column is vital to providing insight into the fluctuation of urban area pollutants.

  7. UNDERSTANDING THE INTERNATIONAL CONSENSUS FOR ACUTE PANCREATITIS: CLASSIFICATION OF ATLANTA 2012

    PubMed Central

    de SOUZA, Gleim Dias; SOUZA, Luciana Rodrigues Queiroz; CUENCA, Ronaldo Máfia; JERÔNIMO, Bárbara Stephane de Medeiros; de SOUZA, Guilherme Medeiros; VILELA, Vinícius Martins

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Contrast computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are widely used due to its image quality and ability to study pancreatic and peripancreatic morphology. The understanding of the various subtypes of the disease and identification of possible complications requires a familiarity with the terminology, which allows effective communication between the different members of the multidisciplinary team. Aim: Demonstrate the terminology and parameters to identify the different classifications and findings of the disease based on the international consensus for acute pancreatitis ( Atlanta Classification 2012). Methods: Search and analysis of articles in the "CAPES Portal de Periódicos with headings "acute pancreatitis" and "Atlanta Review". Results: Were selected 23 articles containing radiological descriptions, management or statistical data related to pathology. Additional statistical data were obtained from Datasus and Population Census 2010. The radiological diagnostic criterion adopted was the Radiology American College system. The "acute pancreatitis - 2012 Rating: Review Atlanta classification and definitions for international consensus" tries to eliminate inconsistency and divergence from the determination of uniformity to the radiological findings, especially the terminology related to fluid collections. More broadly as "pancreatic abscess" and "phlegmon" went into disuse and the evolution of the collection of patient fluids can be described as "acute peripancreatic collections", "acute necrotic collections", "pseudocyst" and "necrosis pancreatic walled or isolated". Conclusion: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance represent the best techniques with sequential images available for diagnosis. Standardization of the terminology is critical and should improve the management of patients with multiple professionals care, risk stratification and adequate treatment. PMID:27759788

  8. Urban aerosol radiative properties: Measurements during the 1999 Atlanta Supersite Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrico, Christian M.; Bergin, Michael H.; Xu, Jin; Baumann, Karsten; Maring, Hal

    2003-04-01

    As part of the Atlanta Supersite 1999 study, aerosol radiative and related physical and chemical properties are examined on the basis of measurements of PM2.5 (aerosol particles with aerodynamic diameters, Dp, less than 2.5 μm) in urban Atlanta. In addition to potential compliance issues with proposed regulatory standards, PM2.5 concentrations in Atlanta and the surrounding region are large enough to have an important impact on atmospheric radiative transfer and hence visibility and potentially regional climate. Arithmetic means and standard deviations of the light scattering by PM2.5 (σsp at 530 nm) and absorption coefficients (σap at 550 nm) measured at a controlled relative humidity of 49 ± 5% are 121 ± 48 and 16 ± 12 Mm-1, respectively. Though the mean light extinction coefficient (σep) in Atlanta is much larger than background sites, it is comparable to nonurban areas in the interior southeast United States highlighting the contribution of a regional haze here. The single scattering albedo (ωo) in Atlanta is 0.87 ± 0.08 and is ˜10% lower than reported in nonurban polluted sites, likely a result of the emission of elemental carbon (EC) from mobile sources. A pronounced diel pattern in aerosol properties is observed with clear influences from mobile sources (morning rush hour maxima in concentrations, particularly soot-related indicators) and atmospheric mixing (afternoon minima). A strong linear relationship between σsp and PM2.5 is observed, and using several techniques, gives a range of mean mass scattering efficiencies (Esp) from = 3.5 to 4.4 m2 g-1. EC and σap are observed to have a relationship though less strongly correlated than σsp and PM2.5. Four methods of determining the mass absorption efficiency of EC give Eap ranging from 5.3 to 18.3 m2 g-1. This wide range of values is a result of the variability in aerosol properties, uncertainties in the light absorption method, and in particular, differences in the EC measurement techniques. Best

  9. Ligand "Brackets" for Ga-Ga Bond.

    PubMed

    Fedushkin, Igor L; Skatova, Alexandra A; Dodonov, Vladimir A; Yang, Xiao-Juan; Chudakova, Valentina A; Piskunov, Alexander V; Demeshko, Serhiy; Baranov, Evgeny V

    2016-09-06

    The reactivity of digallane (dpp-Bian)Ga-Ga(dpp-Bian) (1) (dpp-Bian = 1,2-bis[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]acenaphthene) toward acenaphthenequinone (AcQ), sulfur dioxide, and azobenzene was investigated. The reaction of 1 with AcQ in 1:1 molar ratio proceeds via two-electron reduction of AcQ to give (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)Ga(dpp-Bian) (2), in which diolate [AcQ](2-) acts as "bracket" for the Ga-Ga bond. The interaction of 1 with AcQ in 1:2 molar ratio proceeds with an oxidation of the both dpp-Bian ligands as well as of the Ga-Ga bond to give (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (3). At 330 K in toluene complex 2 decomposes to give compounds 3 and 1. The reaction of complex 2 with atmospheric oxygen results in oxidation of a Ga-Ga bond and affords (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)(μ2-O)Ga(dpp-Bian) (4). The reaction of digallane 1 with SO2 produces, depending on the ratio (1:2 or 1:4), dithionites (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-O2S-SO2)Ga(dpp-Bian) (5) and (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-O2S-SO2)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (6). In compound 5 the Ga-Ga bond is preserved and supported by dithionite dianionic bracket. In compound 6 the gallium centers are bridged by two dithionite ligands. Both 5 and 6 consist of dpp-Bian radical anionic ligands. Four-electron reduction of azobenzene with 1 mol equiv of digallane 1 leads to complex (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-NPh)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (7). Paramagnetic compounds 2-7 were characterized by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, and their molecular structures were established by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Magnetic behavior of compounds 2, 5, and 6 was investigated by superconducting quantum interference device technique in the range of 2-295 K.

  10. Baseline Prevalence of Birth Defects Associated with Congenital Zika Virus Infection - Massachusetts, North Carolina, and Atlanta, Georgia, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Cragan, Janet D; Mai, Cara T; Petersen, Emily E; Liberman, Rebecca F; Forestieri, Nina E; Stevens, Alissa C; Delaney, Augustina; Dawson, April L; Ellington, Sascha R; Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K; Dunn, Julie E; Higgins, Cathleen A; Meyer, Robert E; Williams, Tonya; Polen, Kara N D; Newsome, Kim; Reynolds, Megan; Isenburg, Jennifer; Gilboa, Suzanne M; Meaney-Delman, Dana M; Moore, Cynthia A; Boyle, Coleen A; Honein, Margaret A

    2017-03-03

    Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause serious brain abnormalities, but the full range of adverse outcomes is unknown (1). To better understand the impact of birth defects resulting from Zika virus infection, the CDC surveillance case definition established in 2016 for birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection* (2) was retrospectively applied to population-based birth defects surveillance data collected during 2013-2014 in three areas before the introduction of Zika virus (the pre-Zika years) into the World Health Organization's Region of the Americas (Americas) (3). These data, from Massachusetts (2013), North Carolina (2013), and Atlanta, Georgia (2013-2014), included 747 infants and fetuses with one or more of the birth defects meeting the case definition (pre-Zika prevalence = 2.86 per 1,000 live births). Brain abnormalities or microcephaly were the most frequently recorded (1.50 per 1,000), followed by neural tube defects and other early brain malformations(†) (0.88), eye abnormalities without mention of a brain abnormality (0.31), and other consequences of central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction without mention of brain or eye abnormalities (0.17). During January 15-September 22, 2016, the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR) reported 26 infants and fetuses with these same defects among 442 completed pregnancies (58.8 per 1,000) born to mothers with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy (2). Although the ascertainment methods differed, this finding was approximately 20 times higher than the proportion of one or more of the same birth defects among pregnancies during the pre-Zika years. These data demonstrate the importance of population-based surveillance for interpreting data about birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection.

  11. Measurements of isoprene-derived organosulfates in ambient aerosols by aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry - part 1: single particle atmospheric observations in Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Lindsay E; Creamean, Jessie M; Ault, Andrew P; Surratt, Jason D; Chan, Man Nin; Seinfeld, John H; Edgerton, Eric S; Su, Yongxuan; Prather, Kimberly A

    2011-06-15

    Organosulfate species have recently been identified as a potentially significant class of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) species, yet little is known about their behavior in the atmosphere. In this work, organosulfates were observed in individual ambient aerosols using single particle mass spectrometry in Atlanta, GA during the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) and the 2008 August Mini-Intensive Gas and Aerosol Study (AMIGAS). Organosulfates derived from biogenically produced isoprene were detected as deprotonated molecular ions in negative-ion spectra measured by aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry; comparison to high-resolution mass spectrometry data obtained from filter samples corroborated the peak assignments. The size-resolved chemical composition measurements revealed that organosulfate species were mostly detected in submicrometer aerosols and across a range of aerosols from different sources, consistent with secondary reaction products. Detection of organosulfates in a large fraction of negative-ion ambient spectra - ca. 90-95% during ANARChE and ~65% of submicrometer particles in AMIGAS - highlights the ubiquity of organosulfate species in the ambient aerosols of biogenically influenced urban environments.

  12. The Metropolitan Atlanta community adolescent rapid testing initiative study: closing the gaps in HIV care among youth in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres F; Gillespie, Scott E; Thomas-Seaton, LaTeshia; Frieson, Krystal; Hussen, Sophia A; Murray, Ashley; Gaul, Zaneta; Leong, Traci; Graves, Chanda; Sutton, Madeline Y; Chakraborty, Rana

    2017-07-01

    To determine the effectiveness of the Metropolitan Atlanta community adolescent rapid testing initiative (MACARTI) intervention relative to standard of care (SOC), in achieving early diagnosis, linkage, and retention among HIV-infected youth ages 18-24 years. MACARTI was a pilot single-center, prospective, nonrandomized study. MACARTI combined nontraditional venue HIV testing, motivational interviewing, and case management. We collected demographic, clinical variables and calculated linkage and appointment adherence rates. We obtained SOC data from an adolescent HIV clinic. Longitudinal data were analyzed using inverse propensity treatment-weighted linear growth models; medians, interquartile ranges (IQR), means, and 95% confidence intervals are provided. MACARTI screened 435 participants and identified 49 (11.3%) HIV infections. The SOC arm enrolled 49 new HIV-infected individuals. The 98 participants, (49 in each arm) were: 85% men; 91% Black; mean age = 21 years (SD : 1.8). Overall, 63% were linked within 3 months of diagnosis; linkage was higher for MACARTI compared to SOC (96 vs. 57%, P < 0.001). Median linkage time for MACARTI participants compared to SOC was 0.39 (IQR : 0.20-0.72) vs. 1.77 (IQR : 1.12-12.65) months (P < 0.001). MACARTI appointment adherence was higher than SOC (86.1 vs. 77.2%, P = 0.018). In weight-adjusted models, mean CD4 T-cell counts increased and mean HIV-1 RNA levels decreased in both arms over 12 months, but the differences were more pronounced in the MACARTI arm. MACARTI successfully identified and linked HIV-infected youth in Atlanta, USA. MACARTI may serve as an effective linkage and care model for clinics serving HIV-infected youth.

  13. The Metropolitan Atlanta community adolescent rapid testing initiative study: closing the gaps in HIV care among youth in Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres F.; Gillespie, Scott E.; Thomas-Seaton, LaTeshia; Frieson, Krystal; Hussen, Sophia A.; Murray, Ashley; Gaul, Zaneta; Leong, Traci; Graves, Chanda; Sutton, Madeline Y.; Chakraborty, Rana

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of the Metropolitan Atlanta community adolescent rapid testing initiative (MACARTI) intervention relative to standard of care (SOC), in achieving early diagnosis, linkage, and retention among HIV-infected youth ages 18–24 years. Design: MACARTI was a pilot single-center, prospective, nonrandomized study. Methods: MACARTI combined nontraditional venue HIV testing, motivational interviewing, and case management. We collected demographic, clinical variables and calculated linkage and appointment adherence rates. We obtained SOC data from an adolescent HIV clinic. Longitudinal data were analyzed using inverse propensity treatment-weighted linear growth models; medians, interquartile ranges (IQR), means, and 95% confidence intervals are provided. Results: MACARTI screened 435 participants and identified 49 (11.3%) HIV infections. The SOC arm enrolled 49 new HIV-infected individuals. The 98 participants, (49 in each arm) were: 85% men; 91% Black; mean age = 21 years (SD : 1.8). Overall, 63% were linked within 3 months of diagnosis; linkage was higher for MACARTI compared to SOC (96 vs. 57%, P < 0.001). Median linkage time for MACARTI participants compared to SOC was 0.39 (IQR : 0.20–0.72) vs. 1.77 (IQR : 1.12–12.65) months (P < 0.001). MACARTI appointment adherence was higher than SOC (86.1 vs. 77.2%, P = 0.018). In weight-adjusted models, mean CD4+ T-cell counts increased and mean HIV-1 RNA levels decreased in both arms over 12 months, but the differences were more pronounced in the MACARTI arm. Conclusion: MACARTI successfully identified and linked HIV-infected youth in Atlanta, USA. MACARTI may serve as an effective linkage and care model for clinics serving HIV-infected youth. PMID:28665885

  14. The Risk Factors for Moderately Severe and Severe Post-Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography Pancreatitis According to the Revised Atlanta Classification.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eui Joo; Cho, Jae Hee; Oh, Kyong Yong; Kim, Su Young; Kim, Yeon Suk

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to confirm the value of the revised Atlanta classification for predicting the severity of post-endoscopic retrograde choloangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP) and to validate the risk factors for moderately severe and severe PEP. Among 2672 patients, 86 with PEP and 172 randomly selected control patients were included in this study. Post-endoscopic retrograde choloangiopancreatography pancreatitis was evaluated according to Cotton criteria and the revised Atlanta classification. The agreements between the 2 sets of criteria were compared, and the risk factors for moderately severe and severe PEP were identified. According to the revised Atlanta classification, 72 patients (83.7%) had mild, 11 (12.8%) had moderately severe, and 3 (3.5%) had severe disease. The agreement between the revised Atlanta classification and Cotton criteria was fair (κ = 0.285). Statistically significant risk factors for PEP were difficult cannulation and dye injection in the pancreatic duct, including acinarization. For moderately severe or severe PEP, obesity (hazard ratio, 3.384 [95% confidence interval, 1.023-11.191]) was the only statistically significant risk factor. The revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis is an effective and feasible classification system for predicting PEP severity. Obesity was identified as an important risk factor predicting moderately severe and severe PEP.

  15. 76 FR 37781 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26; Atlanta, GA; Application for Temporary/Interim Manufacturing Authority...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... engine blowers (HTSUS 8414.59, duty-free-2.3%); table, slide and compound miter saws (HTSUS 8465.91, 3.0%); drills and drill kits (HTSUS 8467.21, 1.7%); drill and saw kits (HTSUS 8467.22, duty-free);...

  16. 77 FR 43806 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, GA; Application for Reorganization (Expansion of Service Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... that includes the Georgia counties of Haralson, Paulding, Polk, Floyd, Bartow, Chattooga, Gordon..., Meriwether, Pike, Spalding, Butts, Lamar, Upson, Jasper, Newton, Morgan, Greene, Walton, Oconee, Clarke... entirety and portions of White, Franklin, Peach, Houston, and Twiggs Counties, in and adjacent to...

  17. A Working Conference on Cooperative Programs Among Universities and Predominantly Negro Colleges (Atlanta, Ga., August 20-21, 1965).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisbane, Robert H., Jr., Ed.

    The proceedings reported are of a working conference designed to provide (1) an opportunity for the universities and predominantly Negro colleges engaged in cooperative programs for the remediation of inequalities in educational opportunities to share their experiences with a view toward increasing the effectiveness of such programs, and (2) a…

  18. Fracture mechanics; Proceedings of the 22nd National Symposium, Atlanta, GA, June 26-28, 1990. Vols. 1 & 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Hugo A. (Editor); Saxena, Ashok (Editor); Mcdowell, David L. (Editor); Atluri, Satya N. (Editor); Newman, James C., Jr. (Editor); Raju, Ivatury S. (Editor); Epstein, Jonathan S. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Current research on fracture mechanics is reviewed, focusing on ductile fracture; high-temperature and time-dependent fracture; 3D problems; interface fracture; microstructural aspects of fatigue and fracture; and fracture predictions and applications. Particular attention is given to the determination and comparison of crack resistance curves from wide plates and fracture mechanics specimens; a relationship between R-curves in contained and uncontained yield; the creep crack growth behavior of titanium alloy Ti-6242; a crack growth response in three heat resistant materials at elevated temperature; a crack-surface-contact model for determining effective-stress-intensity factors; interfacial dislocations in anisotropic bimaterials; an effect of intergranular crack branching on fracture toughness evaluation; the fracture toughness behavior of exservice chromium-molybdenum steels; the application of fracture mechanics to assess the significance of proof loading; and a load ratio method for estimating crack extension.

  19. Symposium on Uranium Plasmas: Research and Applications, 2nd, Atlanta, Ga., November 15-17, 1971, Collection of Technical Papers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Results of theoretical and applied research related to fissioning uranium plasmas. Topics examined include uranium plasma instabilities, diagnostic techniques, radiant heat transfer characteristics, nuclear pumping of lasers, and various fission engine concepts. Engineering aspects considered for open-cycle gas core engines include effects of buoyancy on fuel containment, flow and criticality problems, effects of injection conditions, and radiation hazards. The nuclear light bulb engine, the mini-cavity reactor, the dust-bed reactor, and the colloid core reactor are also examined in terms of design and control considerations. Individual items are abstracted in this issue.

  20. Fracture mechanics; Proceedings of the 22nd National Symposium, Atlanta, GA, June 26-28, 1990. Vols. 1 & 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Hugo A. (Editor); Saxena, Ashok (Editor); Mcdowell, David L. (Editor); Atluri, Satya N. (Editor); Newman, James C., Jr. (Editor); Raju, Ivatury S. (Editor); Epstein, Jonathan S. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Current research on fracture mechanics is reviewed, focusing on ductile fracture; high-temperature and time-dependent fracture; 3D problems; interface fracture; microstructural aspects of fatigue and fracture; and fracture predictions and applications. Particular attention is given to the determination and comparison of crack resistance curves from wide plates and fracture mechanics specimens; a relationship between R-curves in contained and uncontained yield; the creep crack growth behavior of titanium alloy Ti-6242; a crack growth response in three heat resistant materials at elevated temperature; a crack-surface-contact model for determining effective-stress-intensity factors; interfacial dislocations in anisotropic bimaterials; an effect of intergranular crack branching on fracture toughness evaluation; the fracture toughness behavior of exservice chromium-molybdenum steels; the application of fracture mechanics to assess the significance of proof loading; and a load ratio method for estimating crack extension.

  1. Ensemble simulations to study the impact of land use change of Atlanta to regional climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Hu, Y.; Stone, B.; Vargo, J.; Nenes, A.; Russell, A.; Trail, M.; Tsimpidi, A.

    2012-12-01

    Studies show that urban areas may be the "first responders" to climate change (Rosenzweig et al., 2010). Of particular interest is the potential increased temperatures in urban areas, due to use of structures and surfaces that increase local heating, and how that may impact health, air quality and other environmental factors. In response, interest has grown as to how the modification of land use in urban areas, in order to mitigate the adverse effects of urbanization can serve to reduce local temperatures, and how climate is impacted more regionally. Studies have been conducted to investigate the impact of land use change on local or regional climate by dynamic downscaling using regional climate models (RCMs), the boundary conditions (BCs) and initial conditions (ICs) of which result from coarser-resolution reanalysis data or general circulation models (GCMs). However, few studies have focused on demonstrating whether the land use change in local areas significantly impacts the climate of the larger region of the domain, and the spatial scale of the impact from urban-scale changes. This work investigated the significance of the impact of land use change in the Atlanta city area on different scales, using a range of modeling resolutions, including the contiguous US (with 36km resolution), the southeastern US (with 12km resolution) and the state of Georgia (with 4km resolution). We used WRF version 3.1.1 with and ran continuous from June to August of a simulated year 2050, driven by GISS ModelE with inputs corresponding to RCP4.5. During the simulation, spectral nudging is used in the 36km resolution domain to maintain the climate patterns with scales larger than 2000km. Two-way nesting is also used in order to take into account the feedback of nesting domains across model domains. Two land use cases over the Atlanta city are chosen. For the base case, most of the urban area of Atlanta is covered with forest; while for the second, "impervious" case, all the urban

  2. Size-resolved, real-time measurement of water-insoluble aerosols in metropolitan Atlanta during the summer of 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Roby; Bergin, Michael H.; Weber, Rodney; Sullivan, Amy

    During the month of August 2004, the size-resolved number concentration of water-insoluble aerosols (WIA) from 0.25 to 2.0 μm was measured in real-time in the urban center of Atlanta, GA. Simultaneous measurements were performed for the total aerosol size distribution from 0.1 to 2.0 μm, the elemental and organic carbon mass concentration, the aerosol absorption coefficient, and the aerosol scattering coefficient at a dry (RH=30%) humidity. The mean aerosol number concentration in the size range 0.1-2.0 μm was found to be 360±175 cm -3, but this quantity fluctuated significantly on time scales of less than one hour and ranged from 25 to 1400 cm -3 during the sample period. The mean WIA concentration (0.25-2.0 μm) was 13±7 cm -3 and ranged from 1 to 60 cm -3. The average insoluble fraction in the size range 0.25-2.0 μm was found to be 4±2.5% with a range of 0.3-38%. The WIA population was found to follow a consistent diurnal pattern throughout the month with concentration maxima concurring with peaks in vehicular traffic flow. WIA concentration also responded to changes in meteorological conditions such as boundary layer depth and precipitation events. The temporal variability of the absorption coefficient followed an identical pattern to that of WIA and ranged from below the detection limit to 55 Mm -1 with a mean of 8±6 Mm -1. The WIA concentration was highly correlated with both the absorption coefficient and the elemental carbon mass concentration, suggesting that WIA measurements are dominated by fresh emissions of elemental carbon. For both the total aerosol and the WIA size distributions, the maximum number concentration was observed at the smallest sizes; however the WIA size distribution also exhibited a peak at 0.45 μm which was not observed in the total population. Over 60% of the particles greater than 1.0 μm were observed to be insoluble in the water sampling stream used by this instrumentation. Due to the refractive properties of black

  3. Evidence for West Nile virus spillover into the squirrel population in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Bisanzio, Donal; McMillan, Joseph R; Barreto, Josafá Gonçalves; Blitvich, Bradley J; Mead, Daniel G; O'Connor, Josh; Kitron, Uriel

    2015-05-01

    In the United States, spillover of West Nile virus (WNV) into wild mammal populations has been reported since the introduction of the virus into the New World in 1999. Eastern gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) exhibit a high seroprevalence for WNV in urban settings where high virus circulation and human spillover have been reported. In Atlanta, Georgia, human cases of WNV are uncommon despite high infection rates in birds and mosquitoes. In this study, we evaluated WNV exposure of eastern gray squirrels in a WNV hot spot in Atlanta. Gray squirrels were live-trapped in Grant Park, Atlanta, during July-October, 2012, and a census was conducted to estimate squirrel density in the study site. Sera from trapped animals were tested for circulating virus-by-virus isolation in cell culture and for WNV-specific antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and plaque reduction neutralization test. Mosquitoes were collected at the same location and tested for virus isolation. Among the 69 collected squirrels, 25 (36.2%) tested positive for WNV antibodies, although none were viremic. Seroprevalence was lower in juveniles (18.8%) than in adults (37.5%), but this difference was not statistically significant. Gender and squirrel density had no effect on seroprevalence. Seasonality of squirrel seroprevalence and of mosquito infection were significantly associated, both peaking in August. No difference in squirrel exposure was detected across the collection sites. We report a high degree of WNV exposure in squirrels in Grant Park that was correlated with seasonality of mosquito infection. The detection of antibodies in juveniles suggests that circulation of WNV in the surveyed population is ongoing. Eastern gray squirrels may be suitable indicators for virus amplification and for risk of human spillover on a local scale in urban settings.

  4. Comparative magnetic and thermoanalytical study of two enstatite chondrites: Adhi Kot and Atlanta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krol, Elizabeth; Lang, Bruno

    1993-01-01

    With allowance for the discussion of classification of enstatite chondrites and their relation to aubrites, the obtained magnetic and thermoanalytical data is submitted to be considered as additive arguments. Our study covered the Adhi Kot (EH4) and Atlanta (EL6). meteorites belonging to two distinct groups of enstatite chondrites. Applying AF demagnetization the intensity of natural remanent magnetization (NRM) was measured and the mean magnetic susceptibility of the samples was determined. The differential thermal (DTA) and thermogravimetric (TG) curves were obtained for meteorites under study. For measurements of the intensity of NRM, a superconducting cryomagnetometer SQUID (2 G Enterprise, USA), while magnetic susceptibility Kappabridge KLY-2 (Czechoslovakia) were used. The abbreviated magnetic data sheets are given. The values 786 x 10(exp -4)A/mkg and 196.1 x 10(exp -4)A/mkg were obtained as NRM intensities for Atlanta and Adhi Kot respectively, while 17.4 x 10(exp -6) SIu/kg and 43.4 x 10(exp -6) SIu/kg for their susceptibilities. Both meteorites proved to be strongly magnetized. The demagnetization down to 3.2 percent of NMR was received for Atlanta at AF field intensity of 250 Oe. For Adhi Kot at this level rested 13.2 percent of NRM intensity, this sample being demagnetized without change of direction till 750 Oe field. The demagnetization curves are similar to those obtained for Abee (EL4) chondrite by Sugiura and Strangway. Against Abee the Adhi Kot exhibited a little bit steeper downfall, and in both cases dominate one component of magnetization. The DTA and TG curves were obtained with Rigaku-Denki thermoanalytical instrument. The DTA curves exhibit striking similarity in their shape and relatively close temperature values for various features. The same is valid for TG curves. The higher values for TG for Adhi Kot express its higher content of oxydable (Fe, Ni) whose oxidation in air is reached at 1000-1200 C.

  5. The revised Atlanta criteria 2012 altered the classification, severity assessment and management of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Qu, Hong-Ping; Zheng, Yun-Feng; Song, Xu-Wei; Li, Lei; Xu, Zhi-Wei; Mao, En-Qiang; Chen, Er-Zhen

    2016-06-01

    The Atlanta criteria for acute pancreatitis (AP) has been revised recently. This study was to evaluate its practical value in classification of AP, the severity assessment and management. The clinical features, severity classification, outcome and risk factors for mortality of 3212 AP patients who had been admitted in Ruijin Hospital from 2004 to 2011 were analyzed based on the revised Atlanta criteria (RAC) and the original Atlanta criteria (OAC). Compared to the OAC group, the incidence of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) was decreased by approximately one half (13.9% vs 28.2%) in the RAC group. The RAC presented a lower sensitivity but higher specificity, and its predictive value for severity and poor outcome was higher than those of the OAC. The proportion of SAP diagnosis and ICU admission in the early phase in the RAC group was significantly lower than that in the OAC group (P<0.05). Based on the RAC, the risk factors for death among SAP patients were older age, high CT severity index (CTSI), renal failure, cardiovascular failure, acute necrotic collection and walled-off necrosis. Compared to the OAC, the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score, Ranson score, idiopathic etiology, respiratory failure and laparotomy debridement were not risk factors of death in contrast to walled-off necrosis. Interestingly, hypertriglyceridemia-related SAP had good outcomes in both groups. The RAC showed a higher predictive value for severity and poorer outcome than the OAC. However, the RAC resulted in fewer ICU admissions in the early phase due to its lower sensitivity for diagnosis of SAP. Among SAP cases, older age, high CTSI, renal and cardiovascular failure, complications of acute necrotic collection and walled-off necrosis were independent risk factors for mortality.

  6. Design, implementation, and initial results from a water-quality monitoring network for Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, A.J.; Elrick, K.A.; Smith, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    In cooperation with the City of Atlanta, Georgia, the US Geological Survey has designed and implemented a water-quantity and quality monitoring network that measures a variety of biological and chemical constituents in water and suspended sediment. The network consists of 20 long-term monitoring sites and is intended to assess water-quality trends in response to planned infrastructural improvements. Initial results from the network indicate that nonpoint-source contributions may be more significant than point-source contributions for selected sediment associated trace elements and nutrients. There also are indications of short-term discontinuous point-source contributions of these same constituents during baseflow.

  7. Characterization of aerosol composition and sources in the greater Atlanta area by aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, N. L.; Xu, L.; Suresh, S.; Weber, R. J. J.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    An important and uncertain aspect of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation is that it is often associated with anthropogenic pollution tracers. Prior studies in Atlanta suggested that 70-80% of the carbon in water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) is modern, yet it is well-correlated with the anthropogenic CO. In this study, we deployed a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at multiple sites in different seasons (May 2012-February 2013) to characterize the sources and chemical composition of aerosols in the greater Atlanta area. This area in the SE US is ideal to investigate anthropogenic-biogenic interactions due to high natural and anthropogenic emissions. These extensive field studies are part of the Southeastern Center for Air Pollution and Epidemiology study (SCAPE). The HR-ToF-AMS is deployed at four sites (~ 3 weeks each) in rotation: Jefferson Street (urban), Yorkville (rural), roadside site (near Highway 75/85), and Georgia Tech site (campus), with the urban and rural sites being part of the SEARCH network. We obtained seven HR-ToF-AMS datasets in total. During the entire measurement period, the ACSM is stationary at the GIT site and samples continuously. We perform positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis on the HR-ToF-AMS and ACSM data to deconvolve the OA into different components. While the diurnal cycle of the total OA is flat as what have been previously observed, the OA factors resolved by PMF analysis show distinctively different diurnal trends. We find that the "more-oxidized oxygenated OA" (MO-OOA) constitutes a major fraction of OA at all sites. In summer, OA is dominated by SOA, e.g., isoprene-OA and OOA with different degrees of oxidation. In contrary, biomass burning OA is more prominent in winter data. By comparing HR-ToF-AMS and ACSM data during the same sampling periods, we find that the aerosol time series are highly correlated, indicating the

  8. 77 FR 24399 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Atlanta; Ozone 2002 Base Year...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS). The Atlanta Area is comprised of Barrow, Bartow, Carroll... 5.69 4.30 1.41 0.75 Bartow 69.92 1.31 1.30 8.05 15.76 10.56 3.89 2.54 Carroll 0.06 0.85 1.30 9.54 10... Ozone 2002 Barrow, Bartow, Carroll, 10/21/2009 4/24/2012 [Insert Base-Year Emissions Inventory....

  9. Light-absorbing soluble organic aerosol in Los Angeles and Atlanta: A contrast in secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Surratt, Jason D.; Zotter, Peter; Prévôt, Andre S. H.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2011-11-01

    Light absorption spectra and carbon mass of fine particle water-soluble components were measured during the summer of 2010 in the Los Angeles (LA) basin, California, and Atlanta, Georgia. Fresh LA secondary organic carbon had a consistent brown color and a bulk absorption per soluble carbon mass at 365 nm that was 4 to 6 times higher than freshly-formed Atlanta soluble organic carbon. Radiocarbon measurements of filter samples show that LA secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was mainly from fossil carbon and chemical analysis of aqueous filter extracts identified nitro-aromatics as one component of LA brown SOA. Interpreting soluble brown carbon as a property of freshly-formed anthropogenic SOA, the difference in absorption per carbon mass between these two cities suggests most fresh secondary water-soluble organic carbon formed within Atlanta is not from an anthropogenic process similar to LA. Contrasting emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds may account for these differences.

  10. City of Atlanta and the Development Authority of DeKalb County to each Receive $300,000 to Clean up and Redevelop Contaminated Brownfields Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that the city of Atlanta and the Development Authority of DeKalb County will each receive $300,000 to clean up and redevelop contaminated brownfields sites in Georgia. Na

  11. Update on overall prevalence of major birth defects--Atlanta, Georgia, 1978-2005.

    PubMed

    2008-01-11

    Major structural or genetic birth defects affect approximately 3% of births in the United States, are a major contributor to infant mortality, and result in billions of dollars in costs for care. Although the causes of most major birth defects are unknown, concerns have been raised that certain factors, such as an increase in the prevalence of diabetes among women, might result in increased prevalence of birth defects over time. This report updates previously published data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program (MACDP), the oldest population-based birth defects surveillance system in the United States with active case ascertainment. For the period 1978-2005, CDC assessed the overall prevalence of major birth defects and their frequency relative to selected maternal and infant characteristics. The MACDP results indicated that the prevalence of major birth defects in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, remained stable during 1978-2005 but varied by maternal age and race/ethnicity, birthweight, and gestational age. Tracking the overall prevalence of major birth defects can identify subgroups that are affected disproportionately; additional measures focused on these subgroups might improve preconception care and care during pregnancy to prevent birth defects.

  12. Using synoptic weather types to predict visitor attendance at Atlanta and Indianapolis zoological parks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, David R.

    2016-02-01

    Defining an ideal "tourism climate" has been an often-visited research topic where explanations have evolved from global- to location-specific indices tailored to tourists' recreational behavior. Unfortunately, as indices become increasingly specific, they are less translatable across geographies because they may only apply to specific activities, locales, climates, or populations. A key need in the future development of weather and climate indices for tourism has been a translatable, meteorologically based index capturing the generalized ambient atmospheric conditions yet considering local climatology. To address this need, this paper tests the applicability of the spatial synoptic classification (SSC) as a tool to predict visitor attendance response in the tourism, recreation, and leisure (TRL) sector across different climate regimes. Daily attendance data is paired with the prevailing synoptic weather condition at Atlanta and Indianapolis zoological parks from September 2001 to June 2011, to review potential impacts ambient atmospheric conditions may have on visitor attendances. Results indicate that "dry moderate" conditions are most associated with high levels of attendance and "moist polar" synoptic conditions are most associated with low levels of attendance at both zoological parks. Comparing visitor response at these zoo locations, visitors in Indianapolis showed lower levels of tolerance to synoptic conditions which were not "ideal." Visitors in Indianapolis also displayed more aversion to "polar" synoptic regimes while visitors in Atlanta displayed more tolerance to "moist tropical" synoptic regimes. Using a comprehensive atmospheric measure such as the SSC may be a key to broadening application when assessing tourism climates across diverse geographies.

  13. Socio-demographic Differences in Toxic Release Inventory Siting and Emissions in Metro Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ryan; Ramsey-White, Kim; Fuller, Christina H

    2016-07-23

    Prior research has found that low socioeconomic status (SES) populations and minorities in some areas reside in communities with disproportionate exposure to hazardous chemicals. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the relevance of socio-demographic characteristics on the presence of Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) facilities, air releases, and prevalence and resolution of air quality complaints in the 20-county Atlanta Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). We found that there were 4.7% more minority residents in census tracts where TRI facilities were located. The odds ratio (OR) for the presence of a TRI facility was 0.89 (p < 0.01) for each 1% increase of females with a college degree and 2.4 (p < 0.01) for households with an income of $22,000-$55,000. The estimated reduction in the amount of chemicals emitted per release associated with population of females with a college degree was 18.53 pounds (p < 0.01). Complaints took longer to resolve in census tracts with higher Hispanic populations (OR = 1.031, 95% CI: 1.010-1.054). Overall, results indicate that SES and race/ethnicity are related to TRI facility siting, releases, and complaints in the Atlanta area. These findings have not been documented previously and suggest that lower SES and non-White communities may be disproportionately exposed.

  14. Socio-demographic Differences in Toxic Release Inventory Siting and Emissions in Metro Atlanta

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ryan; Ramsey-White, Kim; Fuller, Christina H.

    2016-01-01

    Prior research has found that low socioeconomic status (SES) populations and minorities in some areas reside in communities with disproportionate exposure to hazardous chemicals. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the relevance of socio-demographic characteristics on the presence of Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) facilities, air releases, and prevalence and resolution of air quality complaints in the 20-county Atlanta Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). We found that there were 4.7% more minority residents in census tracts where TRI facilities were located. The odds ratio (OR) for the presence of a TRI facility was 0.89 (p < 0.01) for each 1% increase of females with a college degree and 2.4 (p < 0.01) for households with an income of $22,000–$55,000. The estimated reduction in the amount of chemicals emitted per release associated with population of females with a college degree was 18.53 pounds (p < 0.01). Complaints took longer to resolve in census tracts with higher Hispanic populations (OR = 1.031, 95% CI: 1.010–1.054). Overall, results indicate that SES and race/ethnicity are related to TRI facility siting, releases, and complaints in the Atlanta area. These findings have not been documented previously and suggest that lower SES and non-White communities may be disproportionately exposed. PMID:27455302

  15. Evaluating vehicle inspection/maintenance programs using on-road emissions data. The Atlanta Reference Method.

    PubMed

    DeHart-Davis, Leisha; Corley, Elizabeth; Rodgers, Michael O

    2002-04-01

    On-road remote sensing data is an increasingly popular source of evaluation information for vehicle inspection/maintenance (I/M) programs. This article conducts one such remote sensing data evaluation for the Atlanta, Georgia, I/M program. The reference method involves comparing emissions differences in I/M and non-I/M fleet vehicles with those predicted by a regulatory computer model. Assuming that on-road emissions differences represent observed effectiveness and model-predicted emissions differences represent effectiveness goals, the Atlanta enhanced I/M program appears to be achieving 83% of its targeted emissions reductions. The method compares favorably with other remote sensing evaluation methods in its ability to be applied over time and its relatively small sample size requirement. The chief limitation to the approach is its reliance on a representative non-I/M fleet, which may differ in characteristics for which controls are difficult to locate. Such potential confounding factors include discrepancies in maintenance trends, socioeconomic conditions, and vehicle quality.

  16. Ambient air pollution and cardiovascular malformations in Atlanta, Georgia, 1986-2003.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Matthew J; Klein, Mitchel; Correa, Adolfo; Reller, Mark D; Mahle, William T; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany J; Botto, Lorenzo D; Flanders, W Dana; Mulholland, James A; Siffel, Csaba; Marcus, Michele; Tolbert, Paige E

    2009-04-15

    Associations between ambient air pollution levels during weeks 3-7 of pregnancy and risks of cardiovascular malformations were investigated among the cohort of pregnancies reaching at least 20 weeks' gestation that were conceived during January 1, 1986-March 12, 2003, in Atlanta, Georgia. Surveillance records obtained from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, which conducts active, population-based surveillance on this cohort, were reviewed to classify cardiovascular malformations. Ambient 8-hour maximum ozone and 24-hour average carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter with an average aerodynamic diameter of <10 microm (PM(10)), and sulfur dioxide measurements were obtained from centrally located stationary monitors. Temporal associations between these pollutants and daily risks of secundum atrial septal defect, aortic coarctation, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, patent ductus arteriosus, valvar pulmonary stenosis, tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, muscular ventricular septal defect, perimembranous ventricular septal defect, conotruncal defects, left ventricular outflow tract defect, and right ventricular outflow defect were modeled by using Poisson generalized linear models. A statistically significant association was observed between PM(10) and patent ductus arteriosus (for an interquartile range increase in PM(10) levels, risk ratio = 1.60, 95% confidence interval: 1.11, 2.31). Of the 60 associations examined in the primary analysis, no other significant associations were observed.

  17. Current and historically used pesticides in residential soil from 11 homes in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    Riederer, Anne M; Smith, Kimberly D; Barr, Dana B; Hayden, Steven W; Hunter, Ronald E; Ryan, P Barry

    2010-05-01

    We used a multiresidue, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-based method to measure seven pyrethroid, five organophosphorus (OP), and six organochlorine pesticides in soil collected from 11 Atlanta homes in 2006. Our objective was to collect preliminary data for a larger study of pesticide exposures among Atlanta children. The pyrethroid insecticides (cis- and trans-permethrin, bioallethrin) were the most commonly detected analytes, giving evidence of widespread outdoor use among our study homes. Our pyrethroid insecticide detection frequencies were higher than those reported in a recent study of Ohio and North Carolina homes; however, our maximum values were approximately half of those reported. We detected the target OP pesticides in only a few samples, but we found two restricted-use OP pesticides--methyl parathion and terbufos--and thus possible evidence of illegal residential use or environmental persistence in soil. We also detected dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDE) in samples from six homes. Although our small sample size limits comparison to other studies, our results provide evidence that residential soil is a potential source of human exposure to both current and historically used pesticides.

  18. Atlanta ariejansseni, a new species of shelled heteropod from the Southern Subtropical Convergence Zone (Gastropoda, Pterotracheoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Wall-Palmer, Deborah; Burridge, Alice K.; Peijnenburg, Katja T.C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Atlantidae (shelled heteropods) is a family of microscopic aragonite shelled holoplanktonic gastropods with a wide biogeographical distribution in tropical, sub-tropical and temperate waters. The aragonite shell and surface ocean habitat of the atlantids makes them particularly susceptible to ocean acidification and ocean warming, and atlantids are likely to be useful indicators of these changes. However, we still lack fundamental information on their taxonomy and biogeography, which is essential for monitoring the effects of a changing ocean. Integrated morphological and molecular approaches to taxonomy have been employed to improve the assessment of species boundaries, which give a more accurate picture of species distributions. Here a new species of atlantid heteropod is described based on shell morphology, DNA barcoding of the Cytochrome Oxidase I gene, and biogeography. All specimens of Atlanta ariejansseni sp. n. were collected from the Southern Subtropical Convergence Zone of the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific oceans suggesting that this species has a very narrow latitudinal distribution (37–48°S). Atlanta ariejansseni sp. n. was found to be relatively abundant (up to 2.3 specimens per 1000 m3 water) within this narrow latitudinal range, implying that this species has adapted to the specific conditions of the Southern Subtropical Convergence Zone and has a high tolerance to the varying ocean parameters in this region. PMID:27551204

  19. Ambient Air Pollution and Cardiovascular Malformations in Atlanta, Georgia, 1986–2003

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Mitchel; Correa, Adolfo; Reller, Mark D.; Mahle, William T.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany J.; Botto, Lorenzo D.; Flanders, W. Dana; Mulholland, James A.; Siffel, Csaba; Marcus, Michele; Tolbert, Paige E.

    2009-01-01

    Associations between ambient air pollution levels during weeks 3–7 of pregnancy and risks of cardiovascular malformations were investigated among the cohort of pregnancies reaching at least 20 weeks’ gestation that were conceived during January 1, 1986–March 12, 2003, in Atlanta, Georgia. Surveillance records obtained from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, which conducts active, population-based surveillance on this cohort, were reviewed to classify cardiovascular malformations. Ambient 8-hour maximum ozone and 24-hour average carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter with an average aerodynamic diameter of <10 μm (PM10), and sulfur dioxide measurements were obtained from centrally located stationary monitors. Temporal associations between these pollutants and daily risks of secundum atrial septal defect, aortic coarctation, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, patent ductus arteriosus, valvar pulmonary stenosis, tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, muscular ventricular septal defect, perimembranous ventricular septal defect, conotruncal defects, left ventricular outflow tract defect, and right ventricular outflow defect were modeled by using Poisson generalized linear models. A statistically significant association was observed between PM10 and patent ductus arteriosus (for an interquartile range increase in PM10 levels, risk ratio = 1.60, 95% confidence interval: 1.11, 2.31). Of the 60 associations examined in the primary analysis, no other significant associations were observed. PMID:19258486

  20. Atlanta Streets Alive: A Movement Building a Culture of Health in an Urban Environment.

    PubMed

    Torres, Andrea; Steward, John; Strasser, Sheryl; Lyn, Rodney; Serna, Rebecca; Stauber, Christine

    2016-02-01

    Open Streets are community-based programs that promote the use of public space for physical activity (PA), recreation and socialization by closing streets temporarily to motorized vehicles, allowing access to pedestrians. The city of Atlanta hosted its first Open Streets event, Atlanta Streets Alive (ASA), in May 2010. An evaluation of the first 5 ASA events from May 2010 to May 2012 was conducted. The purpose was to learn about the characteristics of ASA participants, the influence of the event on their PA, and perceptions of safety and neighborhood social capital. ASA's evaluation had 2 components: participant counts and a participant survey. Characteristics of participation were compared among the 3 different events in which surveys were conducted using the Pearson χ2 test and F test as appropriate. The estimated participation at ASA increased from nearly 3,500 (ASA 1 to 4) to 12,520 (ASA 5). The number of events increased to 3 per year for a total of 10 events until 2014. Overall, 19.4% of participants met the weekly PA recommendation during 1 event. The expanding diversity of routes, participants, and sponsorships highlights the potential promise such programming offers in terms of establishing an urban culture of health.

  1. Atlanta ariejansseni, a new species of shelled heteropod from the Southern Subtropical Convergence Zone (Gastropoda, Pterotracheoidea).

    PubMed

    Wall-Palmer, Deborah; Burridge, Alice K; Peijnenburg, Katja T C A

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantidae (shelled heteropods) is a family of microscopic aragonite shelled holoplanktonic gastropods with a wide biogeographical distribution in tropical, sub-tropical and temperate waters. The aragonite shell and surface ocean habitat of the atlantids makes them particularly susceptible to ocean acidification and ocean warming, and atlantids are likely to be useful indicators of these changes. However, we still lack fundamental information on their taxonomy and biogeography, which is essential for monitoring the effects of a changing ocean. Integrated morphological and molecular approaches to taxonomy have been employed to improve the assessment of species boundaries, which give a more accurate picture of species distributions. Here a new species of atlantid heteropod is described based on shell morphology, DNA barcoding of the Cytochrome Oxidase I gene, and biogeography. All specimens of Atlanta ariejansseni sp. n. were collected from the Southern Subtropical Convergence Zone of the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific oceans suggesting that this species has a very narrow latitudinal distribution (37-48°S). Atlanta ariejansseni sp. n. was found to be relatively abundant (up to 2.3 specimens per 1000 m(3) water) within this narrow latitudinal range, implying that this species has adapted to the specific conditions of the Southern Subtropical Convergence Zone and has a high tolerance to the varying ocean parameters in this region.

  2. Using synoptic weather types to predict visitor attendance at Atlanta and Indianapolis zoological parks.

    PubMed

    Perkins, David R

    2016-02-23

    Defining an ideal "tourism climate" has been an often-visited research topic where explanations have evolved from global- to location-specific indices tailored to tourists' recreational behavior. Unfortunately, as indices become increasingly specific, they are less translatable across geographies because they may only apply to specific activities, locales, climates, or populations. A key need in the future development of weather and climate indices for tourism has been a translatable, meteorologically based index capturing the generalized ambient atmospheric conditions yet considering local climatology. To address this need, this paper tests the applicability of the spatial synoptic classification (SSC) as a tool to predict visitor attendance response in the tourism, recreation, and leisure (TRL) sector across different climate regimes. Daily attendance data is paired with the prevailing synoptic weather condition at Atlanta and Indianapolis zoological parks from September 2001 to June 2011, to review potential impacts ambient atmospheric conditions may have on visitor attendances. Results indicate that "dry moderate" conditions are most associated with high levels of attendance and "moist polar" synoptic conditions are most associated with low levels of attendance at both zoological parks. Comparing visitor response at these zoo locations, visitors in Indianapolis showed lower levels of tolerance to synoptic conditions which were not "ideal." Visitors in Indianapolis also displayed more aversion to "polar" synoptic regimes while visitors in Atlanta displayed more tolerance to "moist tropical" synoptic regimes. Using a comprehensive atmospheric measure such as the SSC may be a key to broadening application when assessing tourism climates across diverse geographies.

  3. Status of GaAs solar cell production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Milton; Ho, Frank; Iles, Peter A.

    1989-01-01

    Recent experience in producing GaAs solar cells, to meet the full requirements of space-array manufacturers is reviewed. The main problems have been in extending MOCVD technology to provide high throughput of high quality epitaxial layers, and to integrate the other important factors needed to meet the full range of user requirements. Some discussion of evolutionary changes is also given.

  4. Leading Meetings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindelow, John; Heynderickx, James

    Chapter 13 of a revised volume on school leadership, this chapter offers suggestions to help educators improve their performance in meetings, both as group leaders and as participants. Well-run meetings can rejuvenate an organization, leading to improved teamwork, communication, and morale. A poor meeting, on the other hand, can have a…

  5. Managing Meetings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Meetings are a means of giving people a chance to contribute. Meetings are also the nursery where the people's skills of listening, speaking, and building good working relationships are honed. They are where people practice being courteously challenging and confident, and they are where people are fascinated and fascinating. Meetings are where…

  6. 78 FR 25253 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 26-Atlanta, Georgia; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; PBR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 26--Atlanta, Georgia; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; PBR, Inc. d/b/a SKAPS Industries (Polypropylene Geotextiles); Athens, Georgia Georgia Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ...

  7. Describing Peripancreatic Collections According to the Revised Atlanta Classification of Acute Pancreatitis: An International Interobserver Agreement Study.

    PubMed

    Bouwense, Stefan A; van Brunschot, Sandra; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Besselink, Marc G; Bollen, Thomas L; Bakker, Olaf J; Banks, Peter A; Boermeester, Marja A; Cappendijk, Vincent C; Carter, Ross; Charnley, Richard; van Eijck, Casper H; Freeny, Patrick C; Hermans, John J; Hough, David M; Johnson, Colin D; Laméris, Johan S; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Mortele, Koenraad J; Sarr, Michael G; Stedman, Brian; Vege, Santhi Swaroop; Werner, Jens; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G; Gooszen, Hein G; Horvath, Karen D

    2017-08-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis is associated with peripancreatic morphologic changes as seen on imaging. Uniform communication regarding these morphologic findings is crucial for accurate diagnosis and treatment. For the original 1992 Atlanta classification, interobserver agreement is poor. We hypothesized that for the revised Atlanta classification, interobserver agreement will be better. An international, interobserver agreement study was performed among expert and nonexpert radiologists (n = 14), surgeons (n = 15), and gastroenterologists (n = 8). Representative computed tomographies of all stages of acute pancreatitis were selected from 55 patients and were assessed according to the revised Atlanta classification. The interobserver agreement was calculated among all reviewers and subgroups, that is, expert and nonexpert reviewers; interobserver agreement was defined as poor (≤0.20), fair (0.21-0.40), moderate (0.41-0.60), good (0.61-0.80), or very good (0.81-1.00). Interobserver agreement among all reviewers was good (0.75 [standard deviation, 0.21]) for describing the type of acute pancreatitis and good (0.62 [standard deviation, 0.19]) for the type of peripancreatic collection. Expert radiologists showed the best and nonexpert clinicians the lowest interobserver agreement. Interobserver agreement was good for the revised Atlanta classification, supporting the importance for widespread adaption of this revised classification for clinical and research communications.

  8. BACKGROUND MATERIALS FOR WATERSHED CENTRAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP HELD JANUARY 8-10, 2007, IN ATLANTA, GEORGIA (CD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A development workshop for Watershed Central was held in Atlanta, Georgia, January 8-10, 2007. Participants in the workshop included representatives of EPA’s Office of Water, Office of Environmental Information, Office of Research and Development, and several Regional Offices. ...

  9. 78 FR 54234 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, Georgia, Authorization of Production Activity PBR, Inc. d/b/a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 26--Atlanta, Georgia, Authorization of Production Activity PBR, Inc. d/b/a SKAPS Industries (Polypropylene Geotextiles), Athens, Georgia On April 8, 2013, Georgia Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 26, submitted a notification of proposed...

  10. BACKGROUND MATERIALS FOR WATERSHED CENTRAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP HELD JANUARY 8-10, 2007, IN ATLANTA, GEORGIA (CD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A development workshop for Watershed Central was held in Atlanta, Georgia, January 8-10, 2007. Participants in the workshop included representatives of EPA’s Office of Water, Office of Environmental Information, Office of Research and Development, and several Regional Offices. ...

  11. Georgia State University Spending Patterns and the Atlanta Economy, 1983. Institutional Research Report No. 84-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posey, Ellen I.

    The economic impact of Georgia State University on Atlanta was assessed. The survey methodology of Salley (1976) was employed, and the differential expenditure multiplier was recomputed using local value added data. Attention was directed to: university enrollment, payroll, and spending; estimated student and staff spending; calculation of the…

  12. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Atlanta Public Schools. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each district that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 Trial Urban District Assessment in reading receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. This report presents the results for Atlanta Public Schools' student achievement in reading. In 2009, the average…

  13. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Atlanta Public Schools. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each district that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 Trial Urban District Assessment in reading receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. This report presents the results for Atlanta Public Schools' student achievement in reading. In 2009, the average…

  14. Proceedings, Annual Meeting, Aquatic Plant Control Research Program (20th) Held at Atlanta, Georgia on 18-21 November 1985.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    the turnip . The expansion of the technical breadth of the Program brought an awareness of the potential conflict inherent in such an endeavor. The... turnip . So the mechanism’s there is what I am saying. Mr. Rawson: I have read yours, and I do associate that more with the formal research programs

  15. HIV Risk Behaviors, Perceptions, and Testing and Preexposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Awareness/Use in Grindr-Using Men Who Have Sex With Men in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Goedel, William C; Halkitis, Perry N; Greene, Richard E; Hickson, DeMarc A; Duncan, Dustin T

    2016-01-01

    Geosocial-networking smartphone applications such as Grindr can help men who have sex with men (MSM) meet sexual partners. Given the high incidence of HIV in the Deep South, the purpose of our study was to assess HIV risk and preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) awareness and use in a sample of HIV-uninfected, Grindr-using MSM residing in Atlanta, Georgia (n = 84). Most (n = 71; 84.6%) reported being somewhat or very concerned about becoming HIV infected. Most (n = 74; 88.1%) had been tested for HIV in their lifetimes. About three fourths (n = 65; 77.4%) were aware of PrEP, but only 11.9% currently used the medication. HIV continues to disproportionately impact MSM and represents a significant source of concern. As the number of new infections continues to rise, it is important to decrease risks associated with acquisition and transmission of HIV by increasing rates of HIV testing and the use of biobehavioral interventions such as PrEP.

  16. HIV Risk Behaviors, Perceptions, and Testing and Preexposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Awareness/Use in Grindr-Using Men Who Have Sex With Men in Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Goedel, William C.; Halkitis, Perry N.; Greene, Richard E.; Hickson, DeMarc A.; Duncan, Dustin T.

    2017-01-01

    Geosocial-networking smartphone applications such as Grindr can help men who have sex with men (MSM) meet sexual partners. Given the high incidence of HIV in the Deep South, the purpose of our study was to assess HIV risk and preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) awareness and use in a sample of HIV-uninfected, Grindr-using MSM residing in Atlanta, Georgia (n = 84). Most (n = 71; 84.6%) reported being somewhat or very concerned about becoming HIV infected. Most (n = 74; 88.1%) had been tested for HIV in their lifetimes. About three fourths (n = 65; 77.4%) were aware of PrEP, but only 11.9% currently used the medication. HIV continues to disproportionately impact MSM and represents a significant source of concern. As the number of new infections continues to rise, it is important to decrease risks associated with acquisition and transmission of HIV by increasing rates of HIV testing and the use of biobehavioral interventions such as PrEP. PMID:26708834

  17. Baseball caps of the Atlanta Braves and Cleveland Indians in the flight deck

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-10-25

    STS073-E-5135 (26 Oct. 1995) --- Baseball caps from the two 1995 World Series representative franchises float near the cabin windows of the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Columbia, with the Earth in the background. The American League champion Cleveland Indians and their National League counterpart Atlanta Braves were engaged in a scheduled best-of-seven World Series throughout the first portion of the scheduled 16-day mission in space. Off-duty crewmembers came out of a rest period to set up the scene in tribute to the October classic. The crew will continue working in shifts around the clock on a diverse assortment of United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-2) experiments located in the science module. Fields of study include fluid physics, materials science, biotechnology, combustion science and commercial space processing technologies. The frame was exposed with an Electronic Still Camera (ESC).

  18. A survey of U.S. Atlanta and Nagano Olympians: variables perceived to influence performance.

    PubMed

    Gould, Daniel; Greenleaf, Christy; Chung, Yongchul; Guinan, Diane

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and magnitude of specific variables perceived to have affected U.S. Olympic athlete performance. Participants included 296 Atlanta Olympians and 83 Nagano Olympians. Olympians rated how they perceived specific variables influenced their Olympic performance. Results revealed that numerous variables, including performance influences, such as preparation for distractions and loss of composure; team variables, such as strong cohesion and positive coach-athlete relationships; coaching variables, including coach's ability to deal with crises and coaching expectations; family-friend variables, including general social support and getting event tickets for family and friends; and environmental concerns, such as venue transportation difficulties and Olympic village distractions; were perceived to influence performance. Findings verified the results of qualitative interviews conducted with Olympic athletes and coaches.

  19. Comparison of nonmethane organic compound concentration data collected by two methods in Atlanta

    SciTech Connect

    Shreffler, J.H.

    1993-12-01

    Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 calls for 'enhanced monitoring' of ozone, which is planned to include measurements of atmospheric non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs). NMOC concentration data gathered by two methods in Atlanta, Georgia during July and August 1990 are compared in order to assess the reliability of such measurements in an operational setting. During that period, automated gas chromatography (GC) systems (Field systems) were used to collect NMOC continuously as one-hour averages. In addition, canister samples of ambient air were collected on an intermittent schedule for quality control purposes and analyzed by laboratory GC (the Lab system). Data from the six-site network included concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone, total NMOC (TNMOVC), and 47 identified NMOCs. (Copyright (c) 1993-Air Waste Management Association.)

  20. History of the Georgia Baptist/Atlanta Medical Center surgical residency.

    PubMed

    Fuhrman, George M; Humphries, Timothy

    2010-07-01

    The Georgia Baptist Hospital established itself as a premier healthcare facility during the first 50 years of the 20th century. The surgical residency started in the 1940s, became accredited in 1958, and has grown into one of the most respected independent programs in the country. The development and growth of the program was a result of the commitment and dedication of the Program Directors in Surgery over the past 50 years. These key leaders included A. Hamblin Letton, John P. Wilson, Paul Stanton, and George Lucas. The hospital's name has changed to Atlanta Medical Center with the sale of the hospital to Tenet in 1997. The same old school approach to surgical training that characterized the residency when it was known as Georgia Baptist persists and provides outstanding training for future surgeons interested in a broadly based surgical education and experience.

  1. High-ozone events in Atlanta, Georgia, in 1983 and 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, Ronald W.; Chameides, William L.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of ozone levels and meterological parameters were analyzed to determine the relative importance of transport-related processes and photochemical production in causing high-ozone events in and around the Atlanta metropolitan area. Back-trajectories calculated by the Branching Air Trajectory Model indicate that the air associated with high-ozone events had often traveled a significant distance within the previous 3 days: for days with ozone levels above 100 ppbv, half of the calculated trajectories showed that the air had traveled over 600 km, with half of those coming from the northwest quadrant. Six-hour vector-averaged winds were used to find that the concentrations of ozone in the air leaving the metropolitan area averaged 20-40 ppbv more than that entering the area.

  2. Flood-flow characteristics of Nancy Creek at Georgia Highway 400 extension near Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, McGlone; Hess, Glen W.

    1987-01-01

    The Highway Division, Georgia Department of Transportation, plans the extension of Georgia Highway 400 from Interstate 285 southward to Interstate 85. As part of this extension, the Highway Division plans construction of a bridge crossing Nancy Creek near Atlanta, Georgia. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Highway Division, determined the flood flow characteristics of Nancy Creek near the bridge crossing. The flood frequency, elevation discharge relation, flood profiles, floodway, and flood flow effects were determined. The maximum backwater effect for the proposed bridge and relocated channel was 0.2 ft for the 100-yr flood. The relocated channel will drastically shorten flow length near the proposed State Highway 400 extension and reduce the 100-yr flood elevation between one and two ft from existing conditions between the proposed site and Windsor Parkway. (Author 's abstract)

  3. Efficiency of star-like graphs and the Atlanta subway network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ek, Bryan; VerSchneider, Caitlin; Narayan, Darren A.

    2013-11-01

    The distance d(i,j) between any two vertices i and j in a graph is the number of edges in a shortest path between i and j. If there is no path connecting i and j, then d(i,j)=∞. In 2001, Latora and Marchiori introduced the measure of efficiency between vertices in a graph (Latora and Marchiori, 2001) [1]. The efficiency between two vertices i and j is defined to be ∈i,j=j. In this paper, we investigate the efficiency of star-like networks, and show that networks of this type have a high level of efficiency. We apply these ideas to an analysis of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) Subway system, and show this network is 82% as efficient as a network where there is a direct line between every pair of stations.

  4. Minority Stress and Intimate Partner Violence Among Gay and Bisexual Men in Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Rob; Finneran, Catherine

    2017-07-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) rates are disproportionately high among sexual minority populations. Few studies have examined the plausible relationship between minority stress and IPV among men who have sex with men. This study examines the associations between IPV and three indicators of minority stress: internalized homophobia, sexuality-based discrimination, and racism, in a large venue-based sample of gay and bisexual men from Atlanta, USA. Each of the minority stress measures was found to be significantly associated with increased odds of self-reporting any form of receipt of IPV. Significant associations were also identified between perpetration of IPV and minority stressors, with most types of IPV perpetration linked to internalized homophobia. This study confirms findings in a growing body of research supporting the relationship between minority stress and increased prevalence of IPV among men who have sex with men, and points to the need to address structural factors in IPV prevention programs for male-male couples.

  5. High-ozone events in Atlanta, Georgia, in 1983 and 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, Ronald W.; Chameides, William L.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of ozone levels and meterological parameters were analyzed to determine the relative importance of transport-related processes and photochemical production in causing high-ozone events in and around the Atlanta metropolitan area. Back-trajectories calculated by the Branching Air Trajectory Model indicate that the air associated with high-ozone events had often traveled a significant distance within the previous 3 days: for days with ozone levels above 100 ppbv, half of the calculated trajectories showed that the air had traveled over 600 km, with half of those coming from the northwest quadrant. Six-hour vector-averaged winds were used to find that the concentrations of ozone in the air leaving the metropolitan area averaged 20-40 ppbv more than that entering the area.

  6. Remote Sensing of Atlanta's Urban Sprawl and the Distribution of Land Cover and Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, Charles A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Between 1973 and 1992, an average of 20 ha of forest was lost each day to urban expansion of Atlanta, Georgia. Urban surfaces have very different thermal properties than natural surfaces-storing solar energy throughout the day and continuing to release it as sensible heat well after sunset. The resulting heat island effect serves as catalysts for chemical reactions from vehicular exhaust and industrialization leading to a deterioration in air quality. In this study, high spatial resolution multispectral remote sensing data has been used to characterize the type, thermal properties, and distribution of land surface materials throughout the Atlanta metropolitan area. Ten-meter data were acquired with the Advanced Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) on May 11 and 12, 1997. ATLAS is a 15-channel multispectral scanner that incorporates the Landsat TM bands with additional bands in the middle reflective infrared and thermal infrared range. The high spatial resolution permitted discrimination of discrete surface types (e.g., concrete, asphalt), individual structures (e.g., buildings, houses) and their associated thermal characteristics. There is a strong temperature contrast between vegetation and anthropomorphic features. Vegetation has a modal temperature at about 20 C, whereas asphalt shingles, pavement, and buildings have a modal temperature of about 39 C. Broad-leaf vegetation classes are indistinguishable on a thermal basis alone. There is slightly more variability (plus or minus 5 C) among the urban surfaces. Grasses, mixed vegetation and mixed urban surfaces are intermediate in temperature and are characterized by broader temperature distributions with modes of about 29 C. Thermal maps serve as a basis for understanding the distribution of "hotspots", i.e., how landscape features and urban fabric contribute the most heat to the lower atmosphere.

  7. Predictors of emergency department use in children with persistent asthma in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Jeffery M; Grunwell, Jocelyn R; Bruce, Alice C; Smith, Robin C; Fitzpatrick, Anne M

    2017-08-01

    Racial disparities are evident among children with asthma in the United States, with non-Hispanic black children at particularly high risk for poor asthma outcomes, including frequent emergency department (ED) use for asthma exacerbations. To compare asthma features in non-Hispanic black vs white children in Atlanta, Georgia, and determine what clinical features predict future ED use for asthma. Self-reported black and white children 6 to 17 years of age with persistent asthma treated with controller medications completed medical history questionnaires, lung function testing, aeroallergen sensitization testing, and venipuncture. Medical records were reviewed for asthma-related ED visits for 12 months after the initial study visit. A total of 276 children were enrolled. Black children, compared with white children, resided in more disadvantaged zip code areas and were more likely to have public insurance. Black children also had more features of asthma severity and more ED visits during the study period. Predictors of ED use, aside from a previous ED visit, differed by race. After adjustment for socioeconomic status, predictors of ED use in white children included an ED visit in the previous year and sensitization to pets and dust; in black children, predictors included ED use in the previous year, the number of asthma controller medications, forced expiratory volume in 1 second less than 80% predicted, blood eosinophil count greater than 4%, and mold sensitization. Asthma features and ED use differ between black and white children in metropolitan Atlanta. Strategies to eliminate allergen exposure in the home and improve asthma control in these children may require tailoring for different racial groups. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Remote Sensing of Atlanta's Urban Sprawl and the Distribution of Land Cover and Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, Charles A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Between 1973 and 1992, an average of 20 ha of forest was lost each day to urban expansion of Atlanta, Georgia. Urban surfaces have very different thermal properties than natural surfaces-storing solar energy throughout the day and continuing to release it as sensible heat well after sunset. The resulting heat island effect serves as catalysts for chemical reactions from vehicular exhaust and industrialization leading to a deterioration in air quality. In this study, high spatial resolution multispectral remote sensing data has been used to characterize the type, thermal properties, and distribution of land surface materials throughout the Atlanta metropolitan area. Ten-meter data were acquired with the Advanced Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) on May 11 and 12, 1997. ATLAS is a 15-channel multispectral scanner that incorporates the Landsat TM bands with additional bands in the middle reflective infrared and thermal infrared range. The high spatial resolution permitted discrimination of discrete surface types (e.g., concrete, asphalt), individual structures (e.g., buildings, houses) and their associated thermal characteristics. There is a strong temperature contrast between vegetation and anthropomorphic features. Vegetation has a modal temperature at about 20 C, whereas asphalt shingles, pavement, and buildings have a modal temperature of about 39 C. Broad-leaf vegetation classes are indistinguishable on a thermal basis alone. There is slightly more variability (+/-5 C) among the urban surfaces. Grasses, mixed vegetation and mixed urban surfaces are intermediate in temperature and are characterized by broader temperature distributions with modes of about 29 C. Thermal maps serve as a basis for understanding the distribution of "hotspots", i.e., how landscape features and urban fabric contribute the most heat to the lower atmosphere.

  9. Remote Sensing of Atlanta's Urban Sprawl and the Distribution of Land Cover and Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, Charles A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Between 1973 and 1992, an average of 20 ha of forest was lost each day to urban expansion of Atlanta, Georgia. Urban surfaces have very different thermal properties than natural surfaces-storing solar energy throughout the day and continuing to release it as sensible heat well after sunset. The resulting heat island effect serves as catalysts for chemical reactions from vehicular exhaust and industrialization leading to a deterioration in air quality. In this study, high spatial resolution multispectral remote sensing data has been used to characterize the type, thermal properties, and distribution of land surface materials throughout the Atlanta metropolitan area. Ten-meter data were acquired with the Advanced Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) on May 11 and 12, 1997. ATLAS is a 15-channel multispectral scanner that incorporates the Landsat TM bands with additional bands in the middle reflective infrared and thermal infrared range. The high spatial resolution permitted discrimination of discrete surface types (e.g., concrete, asphalt), individual structures (e.g., buildings, houses) and their associated thermal characteristics. There is a strong temperature contrast between vegetation and anthropomorphic features. Vegetation has a modal temperature at about 20 C, whereas asphalt shingles, pavement, and buildings have a modal temperature of about 39 C. Broad-leaf vegetation classes are indistinguishable on a thermal basis alone. There is slightly more variability (+/-5 C) among the urban surfaces. Grasses, mixed vegetation and mixed urban surfaces are intermediate in temperature and are characterized by broader temperature distributions with modes of about 29 C. Thermal maps serve as a basis for understanding the distribution of "hotspots", i.e., how landscape features and urban fabric contribute the most heat to the lower atmosphere.

  10. Avian species diversity and transmission of West Nile virus in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Levine, Rebecca S; Hedeen, David L; Hedeen, Meghan W; Hamer, Gabriel L; Mead, Daniel G; Kitron, Uriel D

    2017-02-03

    The dilution effect is the reduction in vector-borne pathogen transmission associated with the presence of diverse potential host species, some of which are incompetent. It is popularized as the notion that increased biodiversity leads to decreased rates of disease. West Nile virus (WNV) is an endemic mosquito-borne virus in the United States that is maintained in a zoonotic cycle involving various avian host species. In Atlanta, Georgia, substantial WNV presence in the vector and host species has not translated into a high number of human cases. To determine whether a dilution effect was contributing to this reduced transmission, we characterized the host species community composition and performed WNV surveillance of hosts and vectors in urban Atlanta between 2010 and 2011. We tested the relationship between host diversity and both host seroprevalence and vector infection rates using a negative binomial generalized linear mixed model. Regardless of how we measured host diversity or whether we considered host seroprevalence and vector infection rates as predictor variables or outcome variables, we did not detect a dilution effect. Rather, we detected an amplification effect, in which increased host diversity resulted in increased seroprevalence or infection rates; this is the first empirical evidence for this effect in a mosquito-borne system. We suggest that this effect may be driven by an over-abundance of moderately- to poorly-competent host species, such as northern cardinals and members of the Mimid family, which cause optimal hosts to become rarer and present primarily in species-rich areas. Our results support the notion that dilution or amplification effects depend more on the identities of the species comprising the host community than on the absolute diversity of hosts.

  11. Evaluation of an Active Surveillance System for Stillbirths in Metropolitan Atlanta

    PubMed Central

    Azofeifa, Alejandro; Yeung, Lorraine F.; Duke, C. Wes; Gilboa, Suzanne M.; Correa, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Background In 2005, a pilot project was started at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to expand an existing birth defects surveillance program, the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program (MACDP), to conduct active surveillance of stillbirth. This pilot project was evaluated using CDC’s current guidelines for evaluating surveillance systems. Methods We conducted stakeholder interviews with the staff of MACDP’s stillbirth surveillance system. We reviewed the published literature on stillbirth ascertainment including 4 previous publications about the MACDP stillbirth surveillance system. Using fetal death certificates (FDC) as a second, independent data source, we estimated the total number and prevalence of stillbirths in metropolitan Atlanta using capture-recapture methods, and calculated the sensitivity of the MACDP stillbirth surveillance system. Results The MACDP stillbirth surveillance system is useful, flexible, acceptable, and stable. The system’s data quality is improved because it uses multiple sources for case ascertainment. Based on 2006 data, estimated sensitivities of FDCs, MACDP, and both sources combined for identifying a stillbirth were 78.5%, 76.8%, and 95.0%, respectively. The prevalence of stillbirths per 1,000 live births and stillbirths was 8.2 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.5-9.0) based on FDC data alone and 9.9 (95% CI: 9.1-10.8) when combined with MACDP data. Conclusion Use of MACDP as an additional data source for stillbirth surveillance resulted in higher levels of case ascertainment, better data quality, and a higher estimate of stillbirth prevalence than using FDC data alone. MACDP could be considered as a model to enhance stillbirth surveillance by other active birth defects surveillance programs. PMID:23270086

  12. Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange (HELIX)-Atlanta: A CDC-NASA Joint Environmental Public Health Tracking Collaborative Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Hamdan, Mohammad; Luvall, Jeff; Crosson, Bill; Estes, Maury; Limaye, Ashutosh; Quattrochi, Dale; Rickman, Doug

    2008-01-01

    HELIX-Atlanta was developed to support current and future state and local EPHT programs to implement data linking demonstration projects which could be part of the CDC EPHT Network. HELIX-Atlanta is a pilot linking project in Atlanta for CDC to learn about the challenges the states will encounter. NASA/MSFC and the CDC are partners in linking environmental and health data to enhance public health surveillance. The use of NASA technology creates value added geospatial products from existing environmental data sources to facilitate public health linkages. Proving the feasibility of the approach is the main objective

  13. Gibberellin Biosynthesis in Maize. Metabolic Studies with GA15, GA24, GA25, GA7, and 2,3-Dehydro-GA91

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Gordon; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Phinney, Bernard O.; Lange, Theo; Croker, Steve J.; Gaskin, Paul; MacMillan, Jake

    1999-01-01

    [17-14C]-Labeled GA15, GA24, GA25, GA7, and 2,3-dehydro-GA9 were separately injected into normal, dwarf-1 (d1), and dwarf-5 (d5) seedlings of maize (Zea mays L.). Purified radioactive metabolites from the plant tissues were identified by full-scan gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and Kovats retention index data. The metabolites from GA15 were GA44, GA19, GA20, GA113, and GA15-15,16-ene (artifact?). GA24 was metabolized to GA19, GA20, and GA17. The metabolites from GA25 were GA17, GA25 16α,17-H2-17-OH, and HO-GA25 (hydroxyl position not determined). GA7 was metabolized to GA30, GA3, isoGA3 (artifact?), and trace amounts of GA7-diene-diacid (artifact?). 2,3-Dehydro-GA9 was metabolized to GA5, GA7 (trace amounts), 2,3-dehydro-GA10 (artifact?), GA31, and GA62. Our results provide additional in vivo evidence of a metabolic grid in maize (i.e. pathway convergence). The grid connects members of a putative, non-early 3,13-hydroxylation branch pathway to the corresponding members of the previously documented early 13-hydroxylation branch pathway. The inability to detect the sequence GA12 → GA15 → GA24 → GA9 indicates that the non-early 3,13-hydroxylation pathway probably plays a minor role in the origin of bioactive gibberellins in maize. PMID:10557253

  14. High Spatial Resolution Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data for Analysis of the Atlanta, Georgia, Urban Heat Island Effect and Its Impacts on the Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2007-01-01

    The twenty-first century is the first "urban century" according to the United Nations Development Program. The focus of cities reflects awareness of the growing percentage of the world's population that lives in urban areas. In environmental terms, cities are the original producers of many of the global problems related to waste disposal, air and water pollution, and associated environmental and ecological challenges. Expansion of cities, both in population and areal extent, is a relentless process. In 2000, approximately 3 billion people representing about 40% of the global population, resided in urban areas. Urban population will continue to rise substantially over the next several decades according to UN estimates, and most of this growth will Occur in developing countries. The UN estimates that by 2025, 60% of the world's population will live in urban areas. As a consequence, the number of"megacities" (those cities with populations of 10 million inhabitants or more) will increase by 100 by 2025. Thus, there is a critical need to understand urban areas and what their impacts are on environmental, ecological and hydrologic resources, as well as on the local, regional, and even global climate. One of the more egregious side effects of urbanization is the increase in surface and air temperatures that lead to deterioration in air quality. In the United States, under the more stringent air quality guidelines established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1997, nearly 300 counties in 34 states will not meet these new air quality standards for ground level ozone. Mitigation of the urban heat island (UHI) effect is actively being evaluated as a possible way to reduce ground ozone levels in cities and assist states in improving air quality. Foremost in the analysis of how the UHI affects air quality and other environmental factors is the use of remote sensing technology and data to characterize urban land covers in sufficient detail to quantifiably measure

  15. High Spatial Resolution Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data for Analysis of the Atlanta, Georgia, Urban Heat Island Effect and Its Impacts on the Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2007-01-01

    The twenty-first century is the first "urban century" according to the United Nations Development Program. The focus of cities reflects awareness of the growing percentage of the world's population that lives in urban areas. In environmental terms, cities are the original producers of many of the global problems related to waste disposal, air and water pollution, and associated environmental and ecological challenges. Expansion of cities, both in population and areal extent, is a relentless process. In 2000, approximately 3 billion people representing about 40% of the global population, resided in urban areas. Urban population will continue to rise substantially over the next several decades according to UN estimates, and most of this growth will Occur in developing countries. The UN estimates that by 2025, 60% of the world's population will live in urban areas. As a consequence, the number of"megacities" (those cities with populations of 10 million inhabitants or more) will increase by 100 by 2025. Thus, there is a critical need to understand urban areas and what their impacts are on environmental, ecological and hydrologic resources, as well as on the local, regional, and even global climate. One of the more egregious side effects of urbanization is the increase in surface and air temperatures that lead to deterioration in air quality. In the United States, under the more stringent air quality guidelines established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1997, nearly 300 counties in 34 states will not meet these new air quality standards for ground level ozone. Mitigation of the urban heat island (UHI) effect is actively being evaluated as a possible way to reduce ground ozone levels in cities and assist states in improving air quality. Foremost in the analysis of how the UHI affects air quality and other environmental factors is the use of remote sensing technology and data to characterize urban land covers in sufficient detail to quantifiably measure

  16. UNDERSTANDING THE INTERNATIONAL CONSENSUS FOR ACUTE PANCREATITIS: CLASSIFICATION OF ATLANTA 2012.

    PubMed

    Souza, Gleim Dias de; Souza, Luciana Rodrigues Queiroz; Cuenca, Ronaldo Máfia; Jerônimo, Bárbara Stephane de Medeiros; Souza, Guilherme Medeiros de; Vilela, Vinícius Martins

    2016-01-01

    Contrast computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are widely used due to its image quality and ability to study pancreatic and peripancreatic morphology. The understanding of the various subtypes of the disease and identification of possible complications requires a familiarity with the terminology, which allows effective communication between the different members of the multidisciplinary team. Demonstrate the terminology and parameters to identify the different classifications and findings of the disease based on the international consensus for acute pancreatitis ( Atlanta Classification 2012). Search and analysis of articles in the "CAPES Portal de Periódicos with headings "acute pancreatitis" and "Atlanta Review". Were selected 23 articles containing radiological descriptions, management or statistical data related to pathology. Additional statistical data were obtained from Datasus and Population Census 2010. The radiological diagnostic criterion adopted was the Radiology American College system. The "acute pancreatitis - 2012 Rating: Review Atlanta classification and definitions for international consensus" tries to eliminate inconsistency and divergence from the determination of uniformity to the radiological findings, especially the terminology related to fluid collections. More broadly as "pancreatic abscess" and "phlegmon" went into disuse and the evolution of the collection of patient fluids can be described as "acute peripancreatic collections", "acute necrotic collections", "pseudocyst" and "necrosis pancreatic walled or isolated". Computed tomography and magnetic resonance represent the best techniques with sequential images available for diagnosis. Standardization of the terminology is critical and should improve the management of patients with multiple professionals care, risk stratification and adequate treatment. A tomografia computadorizada contrastada e a ressonância magnética são exames amplamente utilizados no estudo da

  17. 76 FR 3134 - Environmental Laboratory Advisory Board (ELAB) Meeting Dates and Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of teleconference and face-to-face meetings. SUMMARY: The... teleconference meetings the third Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. ET and two face- to-face meetings each... hosting their two face-to-face meetings on January 31, 2011 at the Hyatt Regency Savannah in Savannah, GA...

  18. Libraries in Georgia: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Atlanta @Scottish Rite Fran Golding Medical Library 1001 Johnson Ferry Road NE Atlanta, GA 30342-1605 404- ... Hospital Northside Hospital-Atlanta Health Resource Center 1000 Johnson Ferry Road, NE Atlanta, GA 30342-1611 404- ...

  19. Intercomparison of an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) with ambient fine aerosol measurements in Downtown Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Croteau, P. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; Kollman, M. S.; Ng, N. L.; Verma, V.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Weber, R. J.; Surratt, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) was recently developed to provide long-term real-time continuous measurements of ambient non-refractory (i.e., organic, sulfate, ammonium, nitrate, and chloride) submicron particulate matter (NR-PM1). Currently, there are a limited number of field studies that evaluate the long-term performance of the ACSM against established monitoring networks. In this study, we present seasonal intercomparisons of the ACSM with collocated fine aerosol (PM2.5) measurements at the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) Jefferson Street (JST) site near downtown Atlanta, GA, during 2011-2012. The collocated measurements included a second ACSM, continuous and integrated sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium measurements, as well as a semi-continuous Sunset organic carbon/elemental carbon (OC/EC) analyzer, continuous tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM), 24 h integrated Federal Reference Method (FRM) filters, and continuous scanning electrical mobility system-mixing condensation particle counter (SEMS-MCPC). Intercomparison of the two collocated ACSMs resulted in strong correlations (r2 > 0.8) for all chemical species, except chloride (r2 = 0.21); mass concentration for all chemical species agreed within ±27%, indicating that ACSM instruments are capable of stable and reproducible operation. Chemical constituents measured by the ACSM are also compared with those obtained from the continuous measurements from JST. Since the continuous measurement concentrations are adjusted to match the integrated filter measurements, these comparisons reflect the combined uncertainties of the ACSM, continuous, and filter measurements. In general, speciated ACSM mass concentrations correlate well (r2 > 0.7) with the continuous measurements from JST, although the correlation for nitrate is weaker (r2 = 0.55) in summer. Differences between ACSM mass concentrations and the filter-adjusted JST continuous data are 5-27%, 4

  20. [The comparison of the 1992 and 2012 Atlanta classifications for assessing disease severity in patients with acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    He, Wenhua; Zhu, Yin; Liu, Pi; Xia, Liang; Zhu, Yong; Zeng, Hao; Lyu, Nonghua

    2016-01-01

    To compare the discrepancy between the new(2012) and the old (1992) Atlanta classification criteria for defining severity, organ failure and local complications in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). Demographic, clinical and laboratory data of 2,305 consecutive AP patients with onset less than 3 days, were collected between January 2005 to December 2013 in the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University. Severity, organ failure and pancreatic local complications were respectively classified by the old Atlanta classification and the new revised Atlanta classification. Multi-factor scoring system and single serum marker were recorded and calculated using the acute pancreatitis database. In 2,305 patients with AP, there were 301 cases (13.1%) diagnosed with acute respiratory failure, 136 cases (5.9%) with shock, 105 cases (4.6%) with acute renal failure, 296 cases (12.8%) with gastrointestinal bleeding, based on the old Atlanta classification criteria. According to the severity, 900 cases (39.0%) were classified as mild acute pancreatitis (MAP), 1,405 cases (61.0%) as severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). However, based on the new Atlanta classification criteria, there were 686 cases (29.8%) with acute respiratory failure, 129 cases (5.6%) with acute renal failure, 107 cases (4.6%) with circulatory failure. Consequently, 998 cases (43.3%) were classified as MAP, 937 cases (40.7%) as moderately severe acute pancreatitis (MSAP), 370 cases (16.1%) as SAP. The incidence of respiratory failure was lower than that of the old standard. In SAP patients by new criteria, the discharge rate in critical condition and mortality were not only higher than those in MSAP patients (17.0% vs 4.1%, 4.1% vs 1.5%, respectively, all P < 0.001), but also higher than those in SAP patients by the old classification (17.0% vs 7.2%, 4.1% vs 2.1%, all P < 0.001). The diagnostic criteria of organ failure are different between the new and old Atlanta classification. The SAP patients classified

  1. High-capacity, high-strength trailer designs for the GA-4/GA-9 Casks

    SciTech Connect

    Kissinger, J.A.; Rickard, N.D.; Taylor, C.; Zimmer, A.

    1991-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) is developing final designs for two dedicated legal-weight trailers to transport the GA-4 and GA-9 Spent-Fuel Casks. The basic designs for these high-capacity, high-strength trailers are essentially identical except for small modifications to account for the differences in cask geometry. We are designing both trailers to carry a 55,000 lb (24,900 kg) payload and to withstand a 2.5 g vertical design load. The GA-4 and GA-9 trailers are designed for significantly higher loads than are typical commercial semitrailers, which are designed to loads in the range of 1.7 to 2.0 g. To meet the federal gross vehicle weight limit for legal-weight trucks, GA has set a target design weight for the trailers of 9000 lb (4080 kg). This weight includes the personnel barrier, cask tiedowns, and impact limiter removal and storage system. Based on the preliminary trailer designs, the final design weight is expected to be very close to this target weight. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  2. The 1996 meeting of the national technical workgroup on mixed waste thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The National Technical Workgroup on Mixed Waste Thermal Treatment held its annual meeting in Atlanta Georgia on March 12-14, 1996. The National Technical Workgroup (NTW) and this meeting were sponsored under an interagency agreement between EPA and DOE. The 1996 Annual Meeting was hosted by US DOE Oak Ridge Operations in conjunction with Lockheed Martin Energy Systems - Center for Waste Management. A new feature of the annual meeting was the Permit Writer Panel Session which provided an opportunity for the state and federal permit writers to discuss issues and potential solutions to permitting mixed waste treatment systems. In addition, there was substantial discussion on the impacts of the Waste Combustion Performance Standards on mixed waste thermal treatment which are expected to proposed very soon. The 1996 meeting also focussed on two draft technical resource documents produced by NTW on Waste Analysis Plans and Compliance Test Procedures. Issues discussed included public involvement, waste characterization, and emission issues.

  3. Convention Proceedings Digest: American Vocational Association (Atlanta, Georgia, November 30-December 5, 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Association, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The document is the fifth volume in an annual series of American Vocational Association (AVA) proceedings digests. It contains the reports of professional meetings, workshops, educational tours, speeches, and discussions, as well as the resolutions, elections, and other activities undertaken at the various meetings. The proceedings of meetings of…

  4. Preventing the repetition: Or, what Los Angeles' experience in water management can teach Atlanta about urban water disputes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, David L.

    2009-04-01

    Southern California's water history is an epic story with larger-than-life characters and ambitions and abundant hubris. Students of water policy might reasonably ask: Does this story, while unique to greater Los Angeles, hold lessons for other metropolises experiencing water conflict caused by explosive growth? We examine this question by considering similarities between the challenges facing Atlanta, Georgia, one of the nation's fastest growing cities in the 21st century, with those of Los Angeles. We focus on junctures where important decisions regarding water were made and how these decisions continue to challenge both cities' futures. Atlanta's financial, cultural, and environmental imprint on its surrounding region share remarkable similarities with Los Angeles' influence trajectory: it is the largest city in the southeast, a principal transportation and business hub, and it is embroiled in water conflict with nearby communities and adjoining states.

  5. Proceedings of the Management Information Systems October 1973 In-Service Session (Atlanta, Georgia, October 18-19, 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Services to Education, Inc., Washington, DC. TACTICS Management Information Systems Directorate.

    The October 1973 in-service session held in Atlanta, Georgia was the first of two in-service sessions held as a follow-up to the Summer 1973 Information Management Training Institute held in Nashville, Tennessee in June 1973. The purpose of the in-service sessions was to ascertain the progress made as a result of the summer programs by the various…

  6. Georgia State University Spending Patterns and the Atlanta Economy, 1978. Institutional Research Report No. 79-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salley, Charles D.

    The level of economic stimulus provided to the Atlanta area by Georgia State University was examined and found to be 5,432 full-time jobs and $140.2 million in income. It is shown that the figures are conservative since spending by part-time employees and most part-time students was omitted. A calculated multiplier of 1.48 was used, and the study…

  7. Development of a comprehensive measure of spatial access to HIV provider services, with application to Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Sharoda; Kramer, Michael R; Rosenberg, Eli S; Sanchez, Travis H; Sullivan, Patrick S

    2016-01-01

    No existing measures of HIV care access consider both spatial proximity to services and provider-related characteristics in a single measure. We developed and applied a tool to: (1) quantify spatial access to HIV care services (supply) and (2) identify underserved areas with respect to HIV cases (demand), by travel mode, in Atlanta. Building on a study of HIV care engagement, data from an HIV care provider database, and HIV case counts by zip code tabulation area (ZCTA) from AIDSVu.org, we fit a discrete choice model to estimate practice characteristics most salient in defining patient care access. Modified spatial gravity modeling quantified supply access based on discrete choice model results separately for travel by car and by public transportation. Relative access scores were calculated by ZCTA, and underserved areas (defined as having low supply access and high HIV case count) were identified for each travel mode. Characteristics retained in the final model included: travel distance, available provider-hours, availability of ancillary services, and whether Ryan White patients were accepted. HIV provider supply was higher in urban versus suburban/rural areas for both travel modes, with lower supply access if traveling by public transportation. Underserved areas were concentrated in south and east Atlanta if traveling by public transportation, overlapping with many areas of high poverty. Approximately 7.7 %, if traveling by car, and 64.3 %, if traveling by public transportation, of Atlanta-based persons with diagnosed HIV infection resided in underserved areas. These findings highlight underserved areas in south and east Atlanta if traveling by public transit. Conceptualizing access to medical services spatially and by travel mode may help bridge gaps between patient needs and service availability and improve HIV outcomes.

  8. The Effect of Commuting Patterns on HIV Care Attendance Among Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM) in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Sharoda; Kramer, Michael R; Rosenberg, Eli S; Sanchez, Travis H; Reed, Landon; Sullivan, Patrick S

    2015-01-01

    Travel-related barriers to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care, such as commute time and mode of transportation, have been reported in the United States. The objective of the study was to investigate the association between public transportation use and HIV care attendance among a convenience sample of Atlanta-based, HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), evaluate differences across regions of residence, and estimate the relationship between travel distance and time by mode of transportation taken to attend appointments. We used Poisson regression to estimate the association between use of public transportation to attend HIV-related medical visits and frequency of care attendance over the previous 12 months. The relationship between travel distance and commute time was estimated using linear regression. Kriging was used to interpolate commute time to visually examine geographic differences in commuting patterns in relation to access to public transportation and population-based estimates of household vehicle ownership. Using public transportation was associated with lower rates of HIV care attendance compared to using private transportation, but only in south Atlanta (south: aRR: 0.75, 95% CI 0.56, 1.0, north: aRR: 0.90, 95% CI 0.71, 1.1). Participants living in south Atlanta were more likely to have longer commute times associated with attending HIV visits, have greater access to public transportation, and may live in areas with low vehicle ownership. A majority of attended HIV providers were located in north and central Atlanta, despite there being participants living all across the city. Estimated commute times per mile traveled were three times as high among public transit users compared to private transportation users. Improving local public transit and implementing use of mobile clinics could help address travel-related barriers to HIV care.

  9. Effects of urbanization on streamflow in the Atlanta area (Georgia, USA): A comparative hydrological approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, S.; Peters, N.E.

    2001-01-01

    For the period from 1958 to 1996, streamflow characteristics of a highly urbanized watershed were compared with less-urbanized and non-urbanized watersheds within a 20 000 km2 region in the vicinity of Atlanta, Georgia: In the Piedmont and Blue Ridge physiographic provinces of the southeastern USA. Water levels in several wells completed in surficial and crystalline-rock aquifers were also evaluated. Data were analysed for seven US Geological Survey (USGS) stream gauges, 17 National Weather Service rain gauges, and five USGS monitoring wells. Annual runoff coefficients (RCs; runoff as a fractional percentage of precipitation) for the urban stream (Peachtree Creek) were not significantly greater than for the less-urbanized watersheds. The RCs for some streams were similar to others and the similar streams were grouped according to location. The RCs decreased from the higher elevation and higher relief watersheds to the lower elevation and lower relief watersheds: Values were 0.54 for the two Blue Ridge streams. 0.37 for the four middle Piedmont streams (near Atlanta), and 0.28 for a southern Piedmont stream. For the 25 largest stormflows, the peak flows for Peachtree Creek were 30% to 100% greater then peak flows for the other stream. The storm recession period for the urban stream was 1-2 days less than that for the other streams and the recession was characterized by a 2-day storm recession constant that was, on average, 40 to 100% greater, i.e. streamflow decreased more rapidly than for the other streams. Baseflow recession constants ranged from 35 to 40% lower for Peachtree Creek than for the other streams; this is attributed to lower evapotranspiration losses, which result in a smaller change in groundwater storage than in the less-urbanized watersheds. Low flow of Peachtree Creek ranged from 25 to 35% less than the other streams, possibly the result of decreased infiltration caused by the more efficient routing of stormwater and the paving of groundwater

  10. Socioeconomic Status and Non-Fatal Adult Injuries in Selected Atlanta (Georgia USA) Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hulland, Erin; Chowdhury, Ritam; Sarnat, Stefanie; Chang, Howard H; Steenland, Kyle

    2017-08-01

    Injury mortality data for adults in the United States and other countries consistently show higher mortality for those with lower socioeconomic status (SES). Data are sparse regarding the role of SES among adult, non-fatal US injuries. The current study estimated non-fatal injury risk by household income using hospital emergency department (ED) visits. A total of 1,308,892 ED visits at 10 Atlanta (Georgia USA) hospitals from 2001-2004 (347,866 injuries) were studied. The SES was based on US census-block group income, with subjects assigned to census blocks based on reported residence. Logistic regression was used to determine risk by SES for injuries versus all other ED visits, adjusting for demographics, hospital, and weather. Supplemental analyses using hospital data from 2010-2013, without data on SES, were conducted to determine whether earlier patterns by race, age, and gender persisted. Risk for many injury categories increased with higher income. Odds ratio by quartiles of increasing income (lowest quartile as referent, 95% confidence interval [CI] given for upper most quartile) were 1.00, 1.23, 1.34, 1.40 (95% CI 1.36-1.45) for motor vehicle accidents; 1.00, 1.03, 1.11, 1.24 (95% CI 1.20-1.29) for being struck by objects; 1.00. 0.99, 1.04, 1.12 (95% CI 1.00-1.25) for suicide; and 1.00, 1.03, 1.05, 1.12 (95% CI 1.09-1.15) for falls. In contrast, decreased injury risk with increased household income was seen for assaults (1.00, 0.83, 0.73, 0.67 [95% CI 0.63-0.72], by increasing quartiles). These trends by income did not differ markedly by race and gender. Whites generally had less risk of injuries, with the exception of assaults and motor vehicle accidents. Males had higher risk of injury than females, with the exception of falls and suicide attempts. Patterns of risk for race, age, and gender were consistent between 2001-2004 and 2010-2013. For most non-fatal injuries, those with higher income had more risk of ED visits, although the opposite was true for

  11. CHARACTERIZING THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF MULTIPLE POLLUTANTS AND POPULATIONS AT RISK IN ATLANTA, GEORGIA

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, John L.; Waller, Lance A.; Sarnat, Stefanie E.; Chang, Howard H.; Klein, Mitch; Mulholland, James A.; Tolbert, Paige E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Development of exposure metrics that identify contrasts in multipollutant air quality across space are needed to better understand multipollutant geographies and health effects from air pollution. Objective Our aim is to improve understanding of: 1) long-term spatial distributions of multiple pollutants across urban environments; and 2) demographic characteristics of populations residing within areas that experience differing long-term air quality in order to assist in the development of future epidemiologic studies. Methods Data available for this study included seven years of spatiotemporally resolved concentrations for ten ambient air pollutants across the Atlanta metropolitan area. To analyze, we first distinguish the long-term behavior of air pollution at each grid location (n=253) by calculating study period means for each pollutant (n=10). Then, we apply the self-organizing map (SOM) technique to derive patterns in the multipollutant combinations observed among grid cells, i.e., multipollutant spatial types (MSTs), project results onto an ‘organized map’, and classify each grid cell under its most similar MST. Finally, we geographically map grid cell classifications to delineate regions of similar multipollutant characteristics and characterize associated population demographics using geographic information systems. Results We found six MSTs well describe the nature of multipollutant combinations experienced at locations in our study area. MST profiles highlighted a range of combinations, from locations experiencing generally clean air quality (all pollutants low) to locations experiencing conditions that were relatively dirty (high long-term concentrations of several pollutants). Mapping the spatial distribution of MSTs revealed strong within-class contiguity and highlighted that downtown areas were dominated by primary pollution and that suburban areas experienced relatively higher levels of secondary pollution. Demographics show that the

  12. Multipollutant modeling issues in a study of ambient air quality and emergency department visits in Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, Paige E; Klein, Mitchel; Peel, Jennifer L; Sarnat, Stefanie E; Sarnat, Jeremy A

    2007-12-01

    Multipollutant models are frequently used to differentiate roles of multiple pollutants in epidemiologic studies of ambient air pollution. In the presence of differing levels of measurement error across pollutants under consideration, however, they can be biased and as misleading as single-pollutant models. Their appropriate interpretation depends on the relationships among the pollutant measurements and the outcomes in question. In situations where two or more pollutant variables may be acting as surrogates for the etiologic agent(s), multipollutant models can help identify the best surrogate, but the risk estimates may be influenced by inclusion of a second variable that is not itself an independent risk factor for the outcome in question. In this paper, these issues will be illustrated in the context of an ongoing study of emergency visits in Atlanta. Emergency department visits from 41 of 42 hospitals serving the 20-county Atlanta metropolitan area for the period 1993-2004 (n=10,206,389 visits) were studied in relation to ambient pollutant levels, including speciated particle measurements from an intensive monitoring campaign at a downtown station starting in 1998. Relative to our earlier publications, reporting results through 2000, the period for which the speciated data are available is now tripled (6 years in length). Poisson generalized linear models were used to examine outcome counts in relation to 3-day moving average concentrations of pollutants of a priori interest (ozone, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, oxygenated hydrocarbons, PM10, coarse PM, PM2.5, and the following components of PM2.5: elemental carbon, organic carbon, sulfate, and water-soluble transition metals). In the present analysis, we report results for two outcome groups: a respiratory outcomes group and a cardiovascular outcomes group. For cardiovascular visits, associations were observed with CO, NO2, and PM2.5 elemental carbon and organic carbon. In multipollutant

  13. Feasibility study of social media to reduce intimate partner violence among gay men in metro atlanta, georgia.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Sheryl M; Smith, Megan; Pendrick-Denney, Danielle; Boos-Beddington, Sarah; Chen, Ken; McCarty, Frances

    2012-08-01

    Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a major public health issue occurring in the United States and globally. While little is known in general about IPV, understanding about the prevalence of physical IPV among gay men is even more obscure. There is a clear disparity in violence research attention focused on this vulnerable segment of society. This cross-sectional survey study was conducted to examine the feasibility of enrolling 100 gay men from Atlanta into an IPV survey study. The survey was administered via Facebook. Ninety-nine usable surveys were collected. Chi-square tests reveal that minority ethnic status, illicit drug use, and non-disclosed orientation status were all significantly associated with positive IPV reports--in terms of both victimization as well as perpetration. Overall, the majority of the study sample indicated that they believe IPV is a health problem in the Atlanta gay community. These findings bear importance for the Atlanta gay community and public health professionals who must address this nearly invisible yet increasing public health issue.

  14. PAHs and PM2.5 emissions and female breast cancer incidence in metro Atlanta and rural Georgia.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Puja Vijay; Wei, Yudan

    2016-08-01

    Environmental chemical exposure could be an important etiologic factor for geographic differences in breast cancer incidence. In this study, we examined emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and PM2.5 in relation to breast cancer incidence in metro Atlanta and rural Georgia by analyzing data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program and the Environmental Protection Agency. The results showed that metro Atlanta had a significantly higher age-adjusted annual incidence rate of female breast cancer than rural Georgia (132.6 vs. 113.7 per 100,000) for 1992-2011. Emissions of both PAHs [adjusted β = 0.568 (95 % CI: 0.209, 0.927); p = 0.004] and PM2.5 [adjusted β = 2.964 (95 % CI: 0.468, 5.459); p = 0.023] were significantly associated with breast cancer incidence in metro Atlanta area. This study suggests that ambient air pollution, especially PAHs and PM2.5, could have a significant impact on the increased incidence of female breast cancer in urban areas.

  15. Applying a PrEP Continuum of Care for Men Who Have Sex With Men in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Colleen F; Kahle, Erin; Siegler, Aaron; Sanchez, Travis; Del Rio, Carlos; Sullivan, Patrick S; Rosenberg, Eli S

    2015-11-15

    Reductions in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) incidence with pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for men who have sex with men (MSM) will require significant coverage of those at risk. We propose a simplified framework, similar to the HIV care continuum, to achieve protection with PrEP as follows: 1. At-risk MSM; 2. Awareness of and willingness to take PrEP; 3. Access to healthcare; 4. Receiving a prescription; and 5. Adhering to effective PrEP. We evaluated the PrEP care continuum on an Atlanta cohort of MSM and projected how many MSM might achieve protection from HIV. Even with optimistic estimates, few Atlanta MSM (15%) are projected to achieve protection from HIV with PrEP given the significant barriers described. Each continuum step represents an important point for intervention that could substantially increase the overall effectiveness of PrEP. In addition, novel strategies for PrEP delivery are needed to achieve the necessary effectiveness for Atlanta MSM at risk of HIV.

  16. Feasibility Study of Social Media to Reduce Intimate Partner Violence Among Gay Men in Metro Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Sheryl M; Smith, Megan; Pendrick-Denney, Danielle; Boos-Beddington, Sarah; Chen, Ken; McCarty, Frances

    2012-01-01

    Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a major public health issue occurring in the United States and globally. While little is known in general about IPV, understanding about the prevalence of physical IPV among gay men is even more obscure. There is a clear disparity in violence research attention focused on this vulnerable segment of society. This cross-sectional survey study was conducted to examine the feasibility of enrolling 100 gay men from Atlanta into an IPV survey study. The survey was administered via Facebook. Ninety-nine usable surveys were collected. Chi-square tests reveal that minority ethnic status, illicit drug use, and non-disclosed orientation status were all significantly associated with positive IPV reports--in terms of both victimization as well as perpetration. Overall, the majority of the study sample indicated that they believe IPV is a health problem in the Atlanta gay community. These findings bear importance for the Atlanta gay community and public health professionals who must address this nearly invisible yet increasing public health issue. PMID:22928060

  17. Applying a PrEP Continuum of Care for Men Who Have Sex With Men in Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Colleen F.; Kahle, Erin; Siegler, Aaron; Sanchez, Travis; del Rio, Carlos; Sullivan, Patrick S.; Rosenberg, Eli S.

    2015-01-01

    Reductions in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) incidence with pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for men who have sex with men (MSM) will require significant coverage of those at risk. We propose a simplified framework, similar to the HIV care continuum, to achieve protection with PrEP as follows: 1. At-risk MSM; 2. Awareness of and willingness to take PrEP; 3. Access to healthcare; 4. Receiving a prescription; and 5. Adhering to effective PrEP. We evaluated the PrEP care continuum on an Atlanta cohort of MSM and projected how many MSM might achieve protection from HIV. Even with optimistic estimates, few Atlanta MSM (15%) are projected to achieve protection from HIV with PrEP given the significant barriers described. Each continuum step represents an important point for intervention that could substantially increase the overall effectiveness of PrEP. In addition, novel strategies for PrEP delivery are needed to achieve the necessary effectiveness for Atlanta MSM at risk of HIV. PMID:26270691

  18. NASA Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations (LVLASO) Atlanta Demonstration: Surveillance Systems Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Rick; Evers, Carl; Hicok, Dan; Lee, Derrick

    1999-01-01

    NASA conducted a series of flight experiments at Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport as part of the Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations (LVLASO) Program. LVLASO is one of the subelements of the NASA Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) Program, which is focused on providing technology and operating procedures for achieving clear-weather airport capacity in instrument-weather conditions, while also improving safety. LVLASO is investigating various technologies to be applied to airport surface operations, including advanced flight deck displays and surveillance systems. The purpose of this report is to document the performance of the surveillance systems tested as part of the LVLASO flight experiment. There were three surveillance sensors tested: primary radar using Airport Surface Detection Equipment (ASDE-3) and the Airport Movement Area Safety System (AMASS), Multilateration using the Airport Surface Target Identification System (ATIDS), and Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) operating at 1090 MHz. The performance was compared to the draft requirements of the ICAO Advanced Surface Movement Guidance and Control System (A-SMGCS). Performance parameters evaluated included coverage, position accuracy, and update rate. Each of the sensors was evaluated as a stand alone surveillance system.

  19. The "Sherman effect": decreased ambulatory care volumes in Atlanta during the 1996 Summer Olympic Games.

    PubMed

    Pitts, S R; Kolla, I S

    2000-09-18

    To estimate the effect of the 1996 Atlanta Summer Olympic Games on visits to local ambulatory healthcare facilities. Comparison of median visit rates by time period, obtained from retrospective review of administrative data. The emergency department of the designated athletes' hospital, the public hospital's adult emergency department and adult walk-in clinics, and the adult and paediatric outpatient facilities of a large health maintenance organisation. All 132,826 visitors to the designated facilities during the study interval. Daily visit frequencies at each facility. Our informal observations had suggested that volumes were not as high as expected. In all but the athletes' designated hospital, there was a decrease in average volumes the week before the opening ceremonies, ranging from zero to 8.4% of baseline. Average daily volumes in these non-venue facilities varied from 3.2% above to 16.1% below baseline during the two weeks of the Games, but all experienced an increase in volumes the week after the closing ceremonies, ranging from 3.0% to 13.7% of baseline. Unlike the venue-related facility, community ambulatory care sites did not encounter a significant rise in volumes until after the closing ceremonies. Although confirmation from other events is needed, our data suggest that, in addition to increased preparedness for sudden volume surges, overtime staffing of local facilities during planned mass gatherings should occur not during, but immediately after, the event.

  20. Time and distance barriers to mammography facilities in the Atlanta metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Peipins, Lucy A; Graham, Shannon; Young, Randall; Lewis, Brian; Foster, Stephanie; Flanagan, Barry; Dent, Andrew

    2011-08-01

    To a great extent, research on geographic accessibility to mammography facilities has focused on urban-rural differences. Spatial accessibility within urban areas can nonetheless pose a challenge, especially for minorities and low-income urban residents who are more likely to depend on public transportation. To examine spatial and temporal accessibility to mammography facilities in the Atlanta metropolitan area by public and private transportation, we built a multimodal transportation network model including bus and rail routes, bus and rail stops, transfers, walk times, and wait times. Our analysis of travel times from the population-weighted centroids of the 282 census tracts in the 2-county area to the nearest facility found that the median public transportation time was almost 51 minutes. We further examined public transportation travel times by levels of household access to a private vehicle. Residents in tracts with the lowest household access to a private vehicle had the shortest travel times, suggesting that facilities were favorably located for women who have to use public transportation. However, census tracts with majority non-Hispanic black populations had the longest travel times for all levels of vehicle availability. Time to the nearest mammography facility would not pose a barrier to women who had access to a private vehicle. This study adds to the literature demonstrating differences in spatial accessibility to health services by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic characteristics. Ameliorating spatial inaccessibility represents an opportunity for intervention that operates at the population level.

  1. Susceptibility to Heat-Related Fluid and Electrolyte Imbalance Emergency Department Visits in Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Leila; Winquist, Andrea; Klein, Mitchel; O’Lenick, Cassandra; Grundstein, Andrew; Ebelt Sarnat, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Identification of populations susceptible to heat effects is critical for targeted prevention and more accurate risk assessment. Fluid and electrolyte imbalance (FEI) may provide an objective indicator of heat morbidity. Data on daily ambient temperature and FEI emergency department (ED) visits were collected in Atlanta, Georgia, USA during 1993–2012. Associations of warm-season same-day temperatures and FEI ED visits were estimated using Poisson generalized linear models. Analyses explored associations between FEI ED visits and various temperature metrics (maximum, minimum, average, and diurnal change in ambient temperature, apparent temperature, and heat index) modeled using linear, quadratic, and cubic terms to allow for non-linear associations. Effect modification by potential determinants of heat susceptibility (sex; race; comorbid congestive heart failure, kidney disease, and diabetes; and neighborhood poverty and education levels) was assessed via stratification. Higher warm-season ambient temperature was significantly associated with FEI ED visits, regardless of temperature metric used. Stratified analyses suggested heat-related risks for all populations, but particularly for males. This work highlights the utility of FEI as an indicator of heat morbidity, the health threat posed by warm-season temperatures, and the importance of considering susceptible populations in heat-health research. PMID:27706089

  2. Health and treatment implications of food insufficiency among people living with HIV/AIDS, Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Cherry, Chauncey; Amaral, Christina; White, Denise; Kalichman, Moira O; Pope, Howard; Swetsze, Connie; Jones, Michel; Macy, Rene

    2010-07-01

    HIV/AIDS is concentrated among the inner-city poor and poverty may directly interfere with HIV treatment. This study examined food insufficiency in relation to HIV-related health and treatment. A sample of 344 men and women living with HIV/AIDS in Atlanta, Georgia completed measures of food security, health, and HIV disease progression and treatment. HIV treatment adherence was monitored using unannounced pill counts. Results showed that half of people living with HIV/AIDS in this study lacked sufficient food, and food insufficiency was associated with multiple indicators of poor health, including higher HIV viral loads, lower CD4 cell counts, and poorer treatment adherence. Adjusted analyses showed that food insufficiency predicted HIV treatment non-adherence over and above years of education, employment status, income, housing, depression, social support, and non-alcohol substance use. Hunger and food insecurity are prevalent among people living with HIV/AIDS, and food insufficiency is closely related to multiple HIV-related health indicators, particularly medication adherence. Interventions that provide consistent and sustained meals to people living with HIV/AIDS are urgently needed.

  3. Susceptibility to Heat-Related Fluid and Electrolyte Imbalance Emergency Department Visits in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Leila; Winquist, Andrea; Klein, Mitchel; O'Lenick, Cassandra; Grundstein, Andrew; Ebelt Sarnat, Stefanie

    2016-10-02

    Identification of populations susceptible to heat effects is critical for targeted prevention and more accurate risk assessment. Fluid and electrolyte imbalance (FEI) may provide an objective indicator of heat morbidity. Data on daily ambient temperature and FEI emergency department (ED) visits were collected in Atlanta, Georgia, USA during 1993-2012. Associations of warm-season same-day temperatures and FEI ED visits were estimated using Poisson generalized linear models. Analyses explored associations between FEI ED visits and various temperature metrics (maximum, minimum, average, and diurnal change in ambient temperature, apparent temperature, and heat index) modeled using linear, quadratic, and cubic terms to allow for non-linear associations. Effect modification by potential determinants of heat susceptibility (sex; race; comorbid congestive heart failure, kidney disease, and diabetes; and neighborhood poverty and education levels) was assessed via stratification. Higher warm-season ambient temperature was significantly associated with FEI ED visits, regardless of temperature metric used. Stratified analyses suggested heat-related risks for all populations, but particularly for males. This work highlights the utility of FEI as an indicator of heat morbidity, the health threat posed by warm-season temperatures, and the importance of considering susceptible populations in heat-health research.

  4. Molecular epidemiology of norovirus in children and the elderly in Atlanta, Georgia, United States.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jumi; Wahl, Kelly; Sederdahl, Bethany K; Jerris, Robert R; Kraft, Colleen S; McCracken, Courtney; Gillespie, Scott; Anderson, Evan J; Kirby, Amy E; Shane, Andi L; Moe, Christine L

    2016-06-01

    Noroviruses are an important cause of gastroenteritis, which can be severe at the extremes of ages. Data documenting the endemic burden of norovirus among children and elderly adults are lacking. Stool specimens submitted for clinical testing were collected from elderly (≥ 65 years) adults and children (<18 years) with acute vomiting and/or diarrhea seeking care at several metropolitan Atlanta adult and pediatric hospitals from January 2013-June 2013. Specimens were tested for norovirus with real-time RT-PCR and sequenced if norovirus was detected. Corresponding clinical and demographic data were abstracted from retrospective chart review. Norovirus was detected in 11% (11/104) of elderly specimens and 11% (67/628) of pediatric, with GII.4 Sydney_2012 detected in 64% (7/11) of elderly norovirus-positive and 11% (8/67) of pediatric specimens, P < 0.001. In comparison to hospitalized children, hospitalized elderly with norovirus were more commonly admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) (36% vs. 7%, P = 0.02). Norovirus in the elderly can be associated with severe illness requiring ICU admissions. The pediatric group demonstrated greater variability in genotype distribution. Ongoing surveillance of norovirus genotypes is crucial for norovirus vaccine development in understanding circulating and emerging genotypes.

  5. Multilevel factors influencing hepatitis B screening and vaccination among Vietnamese Americans in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Frew, Paula M; Alhanti, Brooke; Vo-Green, Linda; Zhang, Siyu; Liu, Chang; Nguyen, Tranh; Schamel, Jay; Saint-Victor, Diane S; Nguyen, Minh Ly

    2014-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection may lead to liver cirrhosis, chronic liver disease, and liver cancer. Immunization rates are suboptimal among Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders (AAPIs), who remain disproportionately affected by these illnesses. We investigated socioecological factors affecting HBV prevention among 316 Vietnamese Americans in Atlanta, Georgia. Social and community support of HBV vaccination was associated with screening (OR=1.69, 95% CI [1.21,2.38]), vaccination (OR=1.89, [1.27,2.81]), and intent to vaccinate (OR=1.77, [1.13,2.78]). Misconceptions decreased screening likelihood (OR=0.67, [0.46,0.99]) and vaccination (OR=0.55, [0.35,0.86]). Those able to pay for medical treatment (OR=1.23, [1.01,1.50]) were also more likely immunized, and greater transportation access (OR=1.42, [1.07,1.87]) was associated with greater intention to vaccinate. Multi-level factors facilitated HBV vaccination in this population. Tailored, culturally appropriate communication strategies will positively influence immunization uptake.

  6. Increase in pilus islet 2-encoded pili among Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    Zähner, Dorothea; Gudlavalleti, Aditya; Stephens, David S

    2010-06-01

    To define the prevalence of pilus islet 2 (PI-2)-encoded pili in Streptococcus pneumoniae in a geographically defined area, we examined 590 S. pneumoniae isolates from population-based surveillance of invasive pneumococcal disease in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 1994-2006. In 2006, PI-2 was present in 21% of all invasive isolates, including serotypes 1 (100%), 7F (89%), 11A (21%), 19A (40%), and 19F (75%). Only serotype 19F is included in the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine that is in use worldwide. In 1999, PI-2-containing isolates were of the same serotypes but accounted for only 3.6% of all invasive isolates. The increase of PI-2 in 2006 resulted predominantly from the emergence of serotype 19A isolates of sequence type 320 and the expansion of serotype 7F isolates. The increase in PI-2-containing isolates and the finding that isolates of all identified serotypes expressed highly conserved PI-2 pili supports their potential as a vaccine candidate.

  7. Future desire for children among women living with HIV in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Lisa B; Machen, Leah Kathleen; Cordes, Sarah; Huylebroeck, Brian; Delaney, Augustina; Ofotokun, Igho; Nguyen, Minh Ly; Jamieson, Denise J

    2016-01-01

    Little is known regarding family planning desires among women living with HIV in the United States. This study aimed to identify factors influencing desire for children in the future among HIV-infected women in Atlanta, Georgia. HIV-infected women ages 18-45 completed an ACASI (audio computer-assisted self-interview) questionnaire. Chi-square, t-tests, and multivariate logistic regression evaluated factors associated with desire for future children. Of 181 participants, 62 (34.3%) expressed desire for children in the future, with increased desire among younger women (age <26) and those with seronegative partners. Concerns for horizontal and vertical HIV transmission were deterrents to future childbearing. Condom use and overall knowledge of transmission risk was low. Over a third of women desiring a child never discussed their desire with a physician. Misinformation regarding HIV transmission risks persists and is a notable concern influencing desire for children. Providers should reassess family planning desires regularly through integrated HIV care.

  8. “Everyone called me grandma”: Public housing demolition and relocation among older adults in Atlanta

    PubMed Central

    Keene, Danya E; Ruel, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few decades public and political dissatisfaction with public housing projects and an increasing emphasis on poverty deconcentration has led to the demolition of public housing in cities across the country. A significant body of literature has examined experiences of relocation from public housing and their implications for the well-being of individuals and communities. While much of this literature has focused on young or middle-aged adults and children, older adults have also been affected by demolition and relocation. The displacement of older adults raises a new set of age and life-course specific concerns for the well-being of this population. In this paper, we analyze the relocation narratives of 25 former public housing residents in Atlanta, Georgia. Our analysis focuses on the loss of geographically rooted communities of kinship, support and belonging that many participants, particularly those who have aged in place, attribute to their former developments. Participants describe many material and psychosocial benefits associated with living in communities that were “like families” and where they often held important roles as respected elders. While some were satisfied with their moves, others describe the dispersal of these “families” as a deeply felt loss. While some were able to draw on support from children and grandchildren in their new homes, others describe experiences of profound isolation after relocation. PMID:24187415

  9. Prevalence of Congenital Heart Defects in Metropolitan Atlanta, 1998–2005

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Mark D.; Strickland, Matthew J.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Mahle, William T.; Correa, Adolfo

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine an accurate estimate of the prevalence of congenital heart defects (CHD) using current standard diagnostic modalities. Study design We obtained data on infants with CHD delivered during 1998–2005 identified by the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, an active, population-based birth defects surveillance system. Physiologic shunts in infancy and shunts associated with prematurity were excluded. Selected infant and maternal characteristics of the cases were compared with those of the overall birth cohort. Results From 1998–2005 there were 398 140 births, of which 3240 infants had CHD, for an overall prevalence of 81.4/10 000 births. The most common CHD were muscular ventricular septal defect, perimembranous ventricular septal defect, and secundum atrial septal defect, with prevalence of 27.5, 10.6, and 10.3/10 000 births, respectively. The prevalence of tetralogy of Fallot, the most common cyanotic CHD, was twice that of transposition of the great arteries (4.7 vs. 2.3/10 000 births). Many common CHD were associated with older maternal age and multiple-gestation pregnancy; several were found to vary by sex. Conclusion This study, using a standardized cardiac nomenclature and classification, provides current prevalence estimates of the various CHD subtypes. These estimates can be used to assess variations in prevalence across populations, time or space. PMID:18657826

  10. "Everyone called me grandma": Public housing demolition and relocation among older adults in Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Keene, Danya E; Ruel, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades public and political dissatisfaction with public housing projects and an increasing emphasis on poverty deconcentration has led to the demolition of public housing in cities across the country. A significant body of literature has examined experiences of relocation from public housing and their implications for the well-being of individuals and communities. While much of this literature has focused on young or middle-aged adults and children, older adults have also been affected by demolition and relocation. The displacement of older adults raises a new set of age and life-course specific concerns for the well-being of this population. In this paper, we analyze the relocation narratives of 25 former public housing residents in Atlanta, Georgia. Our analysis focuses on the loss of geographically rooted communities of kinship, support and belonging that many participants, particularly those who have aged in place, attribute to their former developments. Participants describe many material and psychosocial benefits associated with living in communities that were "like families" and where they often held important roles as respected elders. While some were satisfied with their moves, others describe the dispersal of these "families" as a deeply felt loss. While some were able to draw on support from children and grandchildren in their new homes, others describe experiences of profound isolation after relocation.

  11. Health and Treatment Implications of Food Insufficiency among People Living with HIV/AIDS, Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Chauncey; Amaral, Christina; White, Denise; Kalichman, Moira O.; Pope, Howard; Swetsze, Connie; Jones, Michel; Macy, Rene

    2010-01-01

    HIV/AIDS is concentrated among the inner-city poor and poverty may directly interfere with HIV treatment. This study examined food insufficiency in relation to HIV-related health and treatment. A sample of 344 men and women living with HIV/AIDS in Atlanta, Georgia completed measures of food security, health, and HIV disease progression and treatment. HIV treatment adherence was monitored using unannounced pill counts. Results showed that half of people living with HIV/AIDS in this study lacked sufficient food, and food insufficiency was associated with multiple indicators of poor health, including higher HIV viral loads, lower CD4 cell counts, and poorer treatment adherence. Adjusted analyses showed that food insufficiency predicted HIV treatment non-adherence over and above years of education, employment status, income, housing, depression, social support, and non-alcohol substance use. Hunger and food insecurity are prevalent among people living with HIV/AIDS, and food insufficiency is closely related to multiple HIV-related health indicators, particularly medication adherence. Interventions that provide consistent and sustained meals to people living with HIV/AIDS are urgently needed. PMID:20419478

  12. Racial differences in mortality from cardiovascular disease in Atlanta, 1979-1985.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, J. F.; Harris-Hooker, S. A.; Schmid, G.; Ford, E.; Simmons, B.; Reed, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    Mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) for the period 1979 to 1985 in the Atlanta metropolitan population was reviewed for racial differences. About 28% of the population was black in 1980. Of 22,585 deaths from hypertension, stroke, ischemic heart disease, and atherosclerosis, 78.7% occurred among whites and 21.3% among blacks. Overall, ischemic heart disease accounted for 47.7% of these four types of CVD deaths for both races and sexes. Age-specific and age-adjusted rates were compared. Among these four causes of death, blacks have the greatest excess of deaths from hypertension over whites for both males and females; the excesses were more than 200% when the rates were age-adjusted. The excess risk of death from hypertension occurred for all ages in blacks, with an excess of about 10 times in 30- to 49-year-olds. An excess risk from stroke also occurred in blacks below the age of 75; the risk reversed afterward. The age-specific mortality rates revealed an excess from ischemic heart disease only between the ages of 30 and 59 years and from atherosclerosis between 40 and 59 years of age for black men. This age-related crossover in females did not occur until the age of 75 years for deaths attributed to these causes. These data suggest that blacks were at highest risk for all four causes at younger age groups. PMID:1578501

  13. Microvascular free-tissue transfer. The Atlanta Veterans Administration Medical Center experience.

    PubMed

    Carlson, G W; Coleman, J J

    1989-04-01

    The entire microvascular tissue transfer experience from 1977 through 1987 at the Atlanta Veterans Administration Medical Center has been reviewed. Seventy-four free flaps were done in 68 patients. Assessable records were available in 52 patients who had 58 reconstructive procedures. The most frequently used flaps were jejunum in 15 patients (25.8%), latissimus dorsi in 11 patients (18.9%), rectus abdominis in eight patients (13.8%), and gracilis in seven patients (12.1%). Major complications occurred in 43.1% of the cases. Total flap loss occurred in eight patients (13.8%); from 1977 through 1982, four (28.6%) of 14 patients had total flap loss, and from 1983 through 1987, four (9.1%) had total flap loss. Partial flap loss occurred in four cases (6.9%). Of the 52 patients, 43 had their problems resolved expeditiously by free-tissue transfer. We conclude that in a university-affiliated Veterans Administration medical center, microvascular reconstruction is an important and necessary surgical tool. Failure rates have decreased markedly with time and increasing experience. Definition of new anatomic microvascular units for transfer has increased the number of reconstructive choices.

  14. Scaling animal to human biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, Pamela Ochoa Veloza, Stella

    2016-07-07

    The radiotracer called {sup 68}Ga-labelled Glu-urea-Lys(Ahx)-HBED-CC ([68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC) is a novel radiophar-maceutical for the detection of prostate cancer lesions by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Setting up a cost-effective manual synthesis of this radiotracer and making its clinical translation in Colombia will require two important elements: the evaluation of the procedure to yield a consistent product, meeting standards of radio-chemical purity and low toxicity and then, the evaluation of the radiation dosimetry. In this paper a protocol to extrapolate the biokinetic model made in normal mice to humans by using the computer software for internal dose assessment OLINDA/EXM® is presented as an accurate and standardized method for the calculation of radiation dosimetry estimates.

  15. Scaling animal to human biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Pamela Ochoa; Veloza, Stella

    2016-07-01

    The radiotracer called 68Ga-labelled Glu-urea-Lys(Ahx)-HBED-CC ([68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC) is a novel radiophar-maceutical for the detection of prostate cancer lesions by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Setting up a cost-effective manual synthesis of this radiotracer and making its clinical translation in Colombia will require two important elements: the evaluation of the procedure to yield a consistent product, meeting standards of radio-chemical purity and low toxicity and then, the evaluation of the radiation dosimetry. In this paper a protocol to extrapolate the biokinetic model made in normal mice to humans by using the computer software for internal dose assessment OLINDA/EXM® is presented as an accurate and standardized method for the calculation of radiation dosimetry estimates.

  16. Magnitudes, nature, and effects of point and nonpoint discharges in the Chattahoochee River Basin, Atlanta to West Point Dam, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamer, J.K.; Cherry, Rodney N.; Faye, R.E.; Kleckner, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    During the period April 1975 to June 1978, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a river-quality assessment of the Upper Chattahoochee River basin in Georgia. One objective of the study was to assess the magnitudes, nature, and effects of point and non-point discharges in the Chattahoochee River basin from Atlanta to the West Point Dam. On an average annual basis and during the storm period of March 1215, 1976, non-point-source loads for most constituents analyzed were larger than point-source loads at the Whitesburg station, located on the Chattahoochee River about 40 river miles downstream of Atlanta. Most of the non-point-source constituent loads in the Atlanta-to-Whitesburg reach were from urban areas. Average annual point-source discharges accounted for about 50 percent of the dissolved nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus loads, and about 70 percent of the dissolved phosphorus loads at Whitesburg. During weekends, power generation at the upstream Buford Dam hydroelectric facility is minimal. Streamflow at the Atlanta station during dry-weather weekends is estimated to be about 1,200 ft3/s (cubic feet per second). Average daily dissolved-oxygen concentrations of less than 5.0 mg/L (milligrams per liter) occurred often in the river, about 20 river miles downstream from Atlanta during these periods from May to November. During a low-flow period, June 1-2, 1977, five municipal point sources contributed 63 percent of the ultimate biochemical oxygen demand, 97 percent of the ammonium nitrogen, 78 percent of the total nitrogen, and 90 percent of the total phosphorus loads at the Franklin station, at the upstream end of West Point Lake. Average daily concentrations of 13 mg/L of ultimate biochemical oxygen demand and 1.8 mg/L of ammonium nitrogen were observed about 2 river miles downstream from two of the municipal point sources. Carbonaceous and nitrogenous oxygen demands caused dissolved-oxygen concentrations between 4.1 and 5.0 mg/L to occur in a 22-mile

  17. Improved InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes with a p-GaN/n-GaN/p-GaN/n-GaN/p-GaN current-spreading layer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Tan, Swee Tiam; Liu, Wei; Ju, Zhengang; Zheng, Ke; Kyaw, Zabu; Ji, Yun; Hasanov, Namig; Sun, Xiao Wei; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2013-02-25

    This work reports both experimental and theoretical studies on the InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with optical output power and external quantum efficiency (EQE) levels substantially enhanced by incorporating p-GaN/n-GaN/p-GaN/n-GaN/p-GaN (PNPNP-GaN) current spreading layers in p-GaN. Each thin n-GaN layer sandwiched in the PNPNP-GaN structure is completely depleted due to the built-in electric field in the PNPNP-GaN junctions, and the ionized donors in these n-GaN layers serve as the hole spreaders. As a result, the electrical performance of the proposed device is improved and the optical output power and EQE are enhanced.

  18. Meeting Demand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneman, Kathy

    1998-01-01

    Addresses how a school district can use temporary classroom space to meet increasing student enrollment while additional space is being built. Provides examples of using portable facilities to supplement educational sites, including how to protect students who are in portable classrooms when tornadoes appear. (GR)

  19. Daily mortality and air pollution in Atlanta: two years of data from ARIES.

    PubMed

    Klemm, R J; Lipfert, F W; Wyzga, R E; Gust, C

    2004-01-01

    Associations between daily mortality and air pollution were investigated in Fulton and DeKalb Counties, Georgia, for the 2-yr period beginning in August 1998, as part of the Aerosol Research and Inhalation Epidemiological Study (ARIES). Mortality data were obtained directly from county offices of vital records. Air quality data were obtained from a dedicated research site in central Atlanta; 15 separate air quality indicators (AQIs) were selected from the 70 particulate and gaseous air quality parameters archived in the ARIES ambient air quality database. Daily meteorological parameters, comprising 24-h average temperatures and dewpoints, were obtained from Atlanta's Hartsfield International Airport. Effects were estimated using Poisson regression with daily deaths as the response variable and time, meteorology, AQI, and days of the week as predictor variables. AQI variables entered the model in a linear fashion, while all other continuous predictor variables were smoothed via natural cubic splines using the generalized linear model (GLM) framework in S-PLUS. Knots were spaced either quarterly, monthly, or biweekly for temporal smoothing. A default model using monthly knots and AQIs averaged for lags 0 and 1 was postulated, with other models considered in sensitivity analyses. Lags up to 5 days were considered, and multipollutant models were evaluated, taking care to avoid overlapping (and thus collinear) AQIs. For this reason, PM(2.5) was partitioned into its three major constituents: SO(2-)(4), carbon (EC + 1.4 OC), and the remainder; sulfate was assumed to be (NH(4))(2)SO(4) for this purpose. Initial AQI screening was based on all-cause (ICD-9 codes <800) mortality for those aged 65 and over. For the (apparently) most important pollutants--PM(2.5) and its 3 major constituents, coarse PM mass [CM], 1-h maximum CO, 8-h maximum O(3)--we investigated 15 mortality categories in detail. (The 15 categories result from three age groups [all ages, <65, 65+] and five

  20. The Rare Bone Disease Working Group: report from the 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research Annual Meeting.

    PubMed

    Drake, Matthew T; Collins, Michael T; Hsiao, Edward C

    2017-01-20

    A working group on rare bone diseases was held in Atlanta, Georgia as part of the 2016 annual meeting of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. The meeting was organized by Matthew Drake. Given recent advances in our understanding of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), the initial portion of the program was devoted to basic, translational, and clinical aspects of FOP. The remainder of the program was divided into updates on an array of rare bone diseases as detailed below. In total, there were more than 120 scientists from academia and industry in attendance.

  1. Microwave GaAs Integrated Circuits On Quartz Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Peter H.; Mehdi, Imran; Wilson, Barbara

    1994-01-01

    Integrated circuits for use in detecting electromagnetic radiation at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths constructed by bonding GaAs-based integrated circuits onto quartz-substrate-based stripline circuits. Approach offers combined advantages of high-speed semiconductor active devices made only on epitaxially deposited GaAs substrates with low-dielectric-loss, mechanically rugged quartz substrates. Other potential applications include integration of antenna elements with active devices, using carrier substrates other than quartz to meet particular requirements using lifted-off GaAs layer in membrane configuration with quartz substrate supporting edges only, and using lift-off technique to fabricate ultrathin discrete devices diced separately and inserted into predefined larger circuits. In different device concept, quartz substrate utilized as transparent support for GaAs devices excited from back side by optical radiation.

  2. Responses of urban heat island in Atlanta to different land-use scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Peng; Weng, Qihao

    2017-06-01

    The urban heat island (UHI) effect changes heat and water cycles in urban areas, and has been accused of elevating energy consumption, deteriorating living environment, and increasing mortality rates. Understanding various UHI effects necessitates a systematic modeling approach. A major problem in UHI simulations is that urban areas were either considered to have only one category of land use/cover or outdated in land use/cover patterns due to the lack of high resolution data. Therefore, this study aims at integrating up-to-date remotely sensed land use/cover data with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF/UCM)/Urban Canopy Model modeling systems to simulate surface temperature patterns in Atlanta, Georgia. In addition, three land-use scenarios, i.e., spontaneous scenario (SS), concentrated scenario (CS), and local policy scenario (LPS), were designed and incorporated into the modeling. Five numerical experiments were conducted by using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to explore the impact of urbanization-induced land-cover changes on temperature patterns. Land use and land-cover patterns under all three scenarios suggested that urban growth would continue through in-filling development and outward expansion. Compared to temperature simulations in 2011, temperature maps corresponding to the three urban growth scenarios showed warmer and cooler temperature patterns outside and inside the urban core, respectively. Analysis of the mean diurnal temperature cycle suggested that the highest temperature difference of 3.9 K was observed between 2011 and the LPS, and occurred around 22:00 local time. Overall, the simulations showed different UHI effects respond to the land-use scenarios in the summer. It is recommended for urban managers and policy makers to reflect on the potential impacts of alternative urban growth policies on thermal environment.

  3. Racial disparities in travel time to radiotherapy facilities in the Atlanta metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Peipins, Lucy A; Graham, Shannon; Young, Randall; Lewis, Brian; Flanagan, Barry

    2013-07-01

    Low-income women with breast cancer who rely on public transportation may have difficulty in completing recommended radiation therapy due to inadequate access to radiation facilities. Using a geographic information system (GIS) and network analysis we quantified spatial accessibility to radiation treatment facilities in the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area. We built a transportation network model that included all bus and rail routes and stops, system transfers and walk and wait times experienced by public transportation system travelers. We also built a private transportation network to model travel times by automobile. We calculated travel times to radiation therapy facilities via public and private transportation from a population-weighted center of each census tract located within the study area. We broadly grouped the tracts by low, medium and high household access to a private vehicle and by race. Facility service areas were created using the network model to map the extent of areal coverage at specified travel times (30, 45 and 60 min) for both public and private modes of transportation. The median public transportation travel time to the nearest radiotherapy facility was 56 min vs. approximately 8 min by private vehicle. We found that majority black census tracts had longer public transportation travel times than white tracts across all categories of vehicle access and that 39% of women in the study area had longer than 1 h of public transportation travel time to the nearest facility. In addition, service area analyses identified locations where the travel time barriers are the greatest. Spatial inaccessibility, especially for women who must use public transportation, is one of the barriers they face in receiving optimal treatment.

  4. Effects of urbanization on stream water quality in the city of Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.

    2009-01-01

    A long-term stream water quality monitoring network was established in the city of Atlanta, Georgia during 2003 to assess baseline water quality conditions and the effects of urbanization on stream water quality. Routine hydrologically based manual stream sampling, including several concurrent manual point and equal width increment sampling, was conducted ???12 times annually at 21 stations, with drainage areas ranging from 3.7 to 232 km2. Eleven of the stations are real-time (RT) stations having continuous measures of stream stage/ discharge, pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature and turbidity, and automatic samplers for stormwater collection. Samples were analyzed for field parameters, and a broad suite of water quality and sediment-related constituents. Field parameters and concentrations of major ions, metals, nutrient species and coliform bacteria among stations were evaluated and with respect to watershed characteristics and plausible sources from 2003 through September 2007. Most constituent concentrations are much higher than nearby reference streams. Concentrations are statistically different among stations for several constituents, despite high variability both within and among stations. Routine manual sampling, automatic sampling during stormflows and RT water quality monitoring provided sufficient information about urban stream water quality variability to evaluate causes of water quality differences among streams. Fecal coliform bacteria concentrations of most samples exceeded Georgia's water quality standard for any water-usage class. High chloride concentrations occur at three stations and are hypothesized to be associated with discharges of chlorinated combined sewer overflows, drainage of swimming pool(s) and dissolution and transport during rainstorms of CaCl2, a deicing salt applied to roads during winter storms. One stream was affected by dissolution and transport of ammonium alum [NH4Al(SO4)2] from an alum

  5. The Third Time's a Charm: Psychometric Testing and Update of the Atlanta Heart Failure Knowledge Test.

    PubMed

    Butts, Brittany; Higgins, Melinda; Dunbar, Sandra; Reilly, Carolyn

    2017-05-05

    Since first being published in 2009, the Atlanta Heart Failure Knowledge Test (AHFKT) has proven a reliable and valid instrument and has been used in multiple studies. Given advances in heart failure (HF) self-care, we proposed to reevaluate the psychometric properties of the AHFKTv2 across these recent studies and update the instrument. Demographic, clinical, and baseline AHFKTv2 data from 4 intervention studies in persons with HF were combined for this analysis (N = 284). The 30 questions of the AHFKT are focused on 5 HF self-care knowledge domains: pathophysiology, nutrition, behavior, medications, and symptoms. Characteristics of the sample were analyzed using descriptive statistics; validity testing with t tests and Mann-Whitney 2-group tests and Pearson r and Spearman ρ correlations; and reliability calculations and factor analysis were performed based on tetrachoric correlations. Participants were 22 to 84 years of age, 66% were African American, 63% were male, and 94% had New York Heart Association class II to III HF. Mean AHFKT score was 80.6% (±11%). Hypotheses that higher levels of knowledge would be associated with higher education level (t = -2.7, P < .01) and less sodium consumption (ρ = -0.22, P = .03) were validated. Factor analysis revealed 1 general knowledge factor with good reliability, Cronbach's α was .87. Item response analysis identified individual questions requiring review and revision. Comprehensive psychometric evaluation of the AHFKTv2 confirmed its internal consistency reliability and validity and provided direction for production of the AHFKTv3 available for use in research and clinical practice.

  6. DRINKING WATER TURBIDITY AND EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT VISITS FOR GASTROINTESTINAL ILLNESS IN ATLANTA, 1993 – 2004

    PubMed Central

    Tinker, Sarah C.; Moe, Christine L.; Klein, Mitchel; Flanders, W. Dana; Uber, Jim; Amirtharajah, Appiah; Singer, Philip; Tolbert, Paige E.

    2013-01-01

    Background The extent to which drinking water turbidity measurements indicate the risk of gastrointestinal illness is not well-understood. Despite major advances in drinking water treatment and delivery, infectious disease can still be transmitted through drinking water in the U.S., and it is important to have reliable indicators of microbial water quality to inform public health decisions. The objective of our study was to assess the relationship between gastrointestinal illness, quantified through emergency department visits, and drinking water quality, quantified as raw water and filtered water turbidity measured at the treatment plant. Methods We examined the relationship between turbidity levels of raw and filtered surface water measured at eight major drinking water treatment plants in the metropolitan area of Atlanta, Georgia, and over 240 000 emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness during 1993–2004 among the population served by these plants. We fit Poisson time-series statistical regression models that included turbidity in a 21-day distributed lag and that controlled for meteorological factors and long-term time trends. Results For filtered water turbidity, the results were consistent with no association with emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness. We observed a modest association between raw water turbidity and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness. This association was not observed for all treatment plants in plant-specific analyses. Conclusions Our results suggest that source water quality may contribute modestly to endemic gastrointestinal illness in the study area. The association between turbidity and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness was only observed when raw water turbidity was considered; filtered water turbidity may not serve as a reliable indicator of modest pathogen risk at all treatment plants. PMID:18941478

  7. Time-series Analysis of Heat Waves and Emergency Department Visits in Atlanta, 1993 to 2012.

    PubMed

    2017-05-31

    Heat waves are extreme weather events that have been associated with adverse health outcomes. However, there is limited knowledge of heat waves' impact on population morbidity, such as emergency department (ED) visits. We investigated associations between heat waves and ED visits for 17 outcomes in Atlanta over a 20-year period, 1993-2012. Associations were estimated using Poisson log-linear models controlling for continuous air temperature, dew-point temperature, day of week, holidays, and time trends. We defined heat waves as periods of consecutive days with temperatures beyond the 98th percentile of the temperature distribution over the period from 1945-2012. We considered six heat wave definitions using maximum, minimum, and average air temperatures and apparent temperatures. Associations by heat wave characteristics were examined. Among all outcome-heat wave combinations, associations were strongest between ED visits for acute renal failure and heat waves defined by maximum apparent temperature at lag 0 [relative risk (RR) = 1.15; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-1.29], ED visits for ischemic stroke and heat waves defined by minimum temperature at lag 0 (RR = 1.09; 95% CI: 1.02-1.17), and ED visits for intestinal infection and heat waves defined by average temperature at lag 1 (RR = 1.10; 95% CI: 1.00-1.21). ED visits for all internal causes were associated with heat waves defined by maximum temperature at lag 1 (RR = 1.02; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.04). Heat waves can confer additional risks of ED visits beyond those of daily air temperature, even in a region with high air-conditioning prevalence. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP44.

  8. Characterizing the spatial distribution of multiple pollutants and populations at risk in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Pearce, John L; Waller, Lance A; Sarnat, Stefanie E; Chang, Howard H; Klein, Mitch; Mulholland, James A; Tolbert, Paige E

    2016-08-01

    Exposure metrics that identify spatial contrasts in multipollutant air quality are needed to better understand multipollutant geographies and health effects from air pollution. Our aim is to improve understanding of: (1) long-term spatial distributions of multiple pollutants; and (2) demographic characteristics of populations residing within areas of differing air quality. We obtained average concentrations for ten air pollutants (p=10) across a 12 km grid (n=253) covering Atlanta, Georgia for 2002-2008. We apply a self-organizing map (SOM) to our data to derive multipollutant patterns observed across our grid and classify locations under their most similar pattern (i.e, multipollutant spatial type (MST)). Finally, we geographically map classifications to delineate regions of similar multipollutant characteristics and characterize associated demographics. We found six MSTs well describe our data, with profiles highlighting a range of combinations, from locations experiencing generally clean air to locations experiencing conditions that were relatively dirty. Mapping MSTs highlighted that downtown areas were dominated by primary pollution and that suburban areas experienced relatively higher levels of secondary pollution. Demographics show the largest proportion of the overall population resided in downtown locations experiencing higher levels of primary pollution. Moreover, higher proportions of nonwhites and children in poverty reside in these areas when compared to suburban populations that resided in areas exhibiting relatively lower pollution. Our approach reveals the nature and spatial distribution of differential pollutant combinations across urban environments and provides helpful insights for identifying spatial exposure and demographic contrasts for future health studies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Neighborhood Influences on Seasonal Influenza Vaccination among Older African Americans in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Niyibizi, N; Schamel, J; Frew, P M

    2016-06-01

    Influenza vaccination coverage in the US is lower than the recommended Healthy People 2020 threshold, especially among older African Americans. This analysis explores the complex relationship among neighborhood-level factors, socio behavioral influences, and influenza vaccination outcomes among older African Americans. We analyzed data from 221 Black/African American participants' age ≥50 years living in Atlanta, Georgia. Generalized Estimating Equations for linear and logistic models assessed associations among socio demographic factors, census-tract neighborhood characteristics, and reported 2012-2013 seasonal influenza vaccination receipt, controlling for correlations among individuals within the same census tracts. Evaluated environmental factors included neighborhood deprivation indicators such as vacant housing percentage, vehicle availability, area violent crimes, and racial/ethnic composition. Reported greater influenza immunization uptake was significantly associated with older age ≥65 years [OR=1.05, p=0.04], positive vaccination attitudes [OR=5.30, p<0.01], having health insurance [OR=14.37, p=0.03], lower perceived neighborhood security [OR=0.51, p=0.02], and lower neighborhood vehicle ownership [OR=1.07, p=0.04], a proxy for neighborhood affluence and transportation ease. Having a post-secondary education was significantly associated with both positive perceived neighborhood security [β=0.28, p=0.02] and positive vaccination attitudes [β=0.27, p=0.02]. The findings provide evidence for distal neighborhood-level influences on influenza vaccination uptake among older African Americans. Lower vehicle ownership and lower perceived neighborhood security influenced seasonal influenza immunizations. Those who perceived personal risk, based on reported neighborhood security, displayed intent to obtain the seasonal influenza vaccine. Further investigation of multilevel, socio geographic factors is therefore warranted to more effectively address suboptimal

  10. Ambient Air Pollution and Birth Weight in Full-Term Infants in Atlanta, 1994–2004

    PubMed Central

    Darrow, Lyndsey A.; Klein, Mitchel; Strickland, Matthew J.; Mulholland, James A.; Tolbert, Paige E.

    2011-01-01

    Background An emerging body of evidence suggests that ambient levels of air pollution during pregnancy are associated with fetal growth. Objectives We examined relationships between birth weight and temporal variation in ambient levels of carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), ozone, particulate matter ≤ 10 μm in diameter (PM10), ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5), 2.5 to 10 μm (PM2.5–10), and PM2.5 chemical component measurements for 406,627 full-term births occurring between 1994 and 2004 in five central counties of metropolitan Atlanta. Methods We assessed relationships between birth weight and pollutant concentrations during each infant’s first month of gestation and third trimester, as well as in each month of pregnancy using distributed lag models. We also conducted capture-area analyses limited to mothers residing within 4 miles (6.4 km) of each air quality monitoring station. Results In the five-county analysis, ambient levels of NO2, SO2, PM2.5 elemental carbon, and PM2.5 water-soluble metals during the third trimester were significantly associated with small reductions in birth weight (−4 to −16 g per interquartile range increase in pollutant concentrations). Third-trimester estimates were generally higher in Hispanic and non-Hispanic black infants relative to non-Hispanic white infants. Distributed lag models were also suggestive of associations between air pollutant concentrations in late pregnancy and reduced birth weight. The capture-area analyses provided little support for the associations observed in the five-county analysis. Conclusions Results provide some support for an effect of ambient air pollution in late pregnancy on birth weight in full-term infants. PMID:21156397

  11. Drinking water turbidity and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness in Atlanta, 1993-2004.

    PubMed

    Tinker, Sarah C; Moe, Christine L; Klein, Mitchel; Flanders, W Dana; Uber, Jim; Amirtharajah, Appiah; Singer, Philip; Tolbert, Paige E

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which drinking water turbidity measurements indicate the risk of gastrointestinal illness is not well understood. Despite major advances in drinking water treatment and delivery, infectious disease can still be transmitted through drinking water in the United States, and it is important to have reliable indicators of microbial water quality to inform public health decisions. The objective of our study was to assess the relationship between gastrointestinal illness, quantified through emergency department visits, and drinking water quality, quantified as raw water and filtered water turbidity measured at the treatment plant. We examined the relationship between turbidity levels of raw and filtered surface water measured at eight major drinking water treatment plants in the metropolitan area of Atlanta, Georgia, and over 240,000 emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness during 1993-2004 among the population served by these plants. We fit Poisson time-series statistical regression models that included turbidity in a 21-day distributed lag and that controlled for meteorological factors and long-term time trends. For filtered water turbidity, the results were consistent with no association with emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness. We observed a modest association between raw water turbidity and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness. Our results suggest that source water quality may contribute modestly to endemic gastrointestinal illness in the study area. The association between turbidity and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness was only observed when raw water turbidity was considered; filtered water turbidity may not serve as a reliable indicator of modest pathogen risk at all treatment plants.

  12. From Olympia to Atlanta: a cultural-historical perspective on diet and athletic training.

    PubMed

    Grivetti, L E; Applegate, E A

    1997-05-01

    Greek and Roman writers described diet and training of Olympic athletes. Lucian (A.D. 120-ca. 180) described distance and speed work in runners; Galen (A.D. 131-201) recommended ball-related exercises to train vision and the body; Philostratos (A.D. 170-249) suggested cross training by endurance running, weight training, and wrestling with animals. The ancient Greek training system, the tetrad (eta tau epsilon tau rho alpha sigma), was a four-day cycle with each day devoted to a different activity. Diogenes Laertius (died A.D. 222) wrote that Greek athletes trained on dried figs, moist cheese and wheat; then the pattern changed and focused on meat. Epictetus (2nd century A.D.) wrote that Olympic victors avoided desserts and cold water and took wine sparingly. Philostratos deprecated athletic diet in his era, a pattern based on white bread sprinkled with poppy seeds, fish and pork. Americans at the XIth Olympiad in Berlin (1936) consumed beefsteak with average daily intake of 125 grams of butter or cotton oil, three eggs, custard for dessert and 1.5 L of milk. The American pattern at Berlin was characterized by ad libitum intake of white bread, dinner rolls, fresh vegetables and salads. At Atlanta, more than 5 million meals will be served during the Olympic festival. The highly varied menu will include fresh vegetables and dips; fruits, cheeses and breads; salads; pasta, rice and fruit salads; soups; meat and seafood entrees; hot vegetables; desserts; and beverages. American Southern specialties will be served.

  13. Safety and effectiveness of the Catania Polyzene-F coated stent in real world clinical practice: 12-month results from the ATLANTA 2 registry.

    PubMed

    Tamburino, Corrado; Capodanno, Davide; Di Salvo, Maria Elena; Sanfilippo, Alessandra; Cascone, Irene; Incardona, Valentina; Longo, Giovanni; Giacoppo, Daniele; Capranzano, Piera; Sgroi, Carmelo; Ussia, Gianpaolo; Monaco, Alfio; La Manna, Alessio

    2012-01-01

    The pivotal ATLANTA first-in-man study showed the promising safety and efficacy profile of the novel Catania™ stent in a population with ~20% American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) type C coronary lesions. The ATLANTA 2 registry was designed to evaluate the 12-month safety and efficacy of the Catania stent in a broader real world scenario. The ATLANTA 2 registry was a prospective, non-randomised, single-arm study of patients with symptomatic ischaemic heart disease and de novo lesions of native coronary arteries. A total of 300 patients (396 lesions) were recruited and 482 Catania stents were implanted. At 12 months, major adverse cardiac events were 8.8%, mainly driven by target lesion revascularisation (6.5%). Cardiac death and non-fatal myocardial infarction occurred in 2.5% and 0.7% of patients, respectively. Subacute definite or probable stent thrombosis was 0.7%. No late stent thrombosis was recorded. Compared with patients treated with drug-eluting stents or bare metal stents in the study period, those treated with Catania stents experienced similar outcomes at one year. The 12-month results of the ATLANTA 2 registry confirmed the positive results of the ATLANTA first-in-man trial in a more complex population. A randomised trial is needed to assess the comparative value of the Catania stent over currently-used drug-eluting stents or bare metal stents.

  14. Modeling the spatial differentiation in cloud-to-ground lightning: A case study in Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strikas, Ona

    Urban cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning enhancement has been well documented for Atlanta, Georgia. This study builds on those investigations using modeling techniques. Numerous styles of analyses and regressions were conducted to establish patterns of CG lightning over the North Georgia region. CG lightning demonstrated clustering for all years of data: 1995--2008. However, the first strike of each day with lightning was randomly distributed according to a Poisson distribution, demonstrating the clustering is not due to permanent features. Attempts were unsuccessful to model CG lightning clusters as either a Matern or Thomas Poisson point process. Regressions of CG lightning with built environment covariates---FAA aviation obstacle locations and heights, population density, road length density, distance to the center of Atlanta, PM10 emissions data, distance to highways, and coal plant locations---as well as natural variables such as projected coordinate easting, northing, and NWS severe thunderstorm status were executed at resolutions of 1km, 2km, 4km, and 8km. Analyses demonstrated significantly higher flash frequency near FAA aviation obstacles. With an R2 value of 0.22, taller obstacles are struck more frequently than shorter obstacles. Regressions with road length density revealed little explanatory power (maximum R2=0.19), but demonstrated a positive correlation independent of scale. A multi-level visualization technique demonstrates the road length density correlation loses accuracy within dense urban corridors. Distance from Atlanta shows a negative correlation, but only at larger scales. Subsetting both regressions by direction reveals a significant difference on the Eastern and Western sides of Atlanta. Subsetting both regressions only to Gwinnett County, Georgia illustrates road length density has no correlation with flash frequency, and distance to Atlanta is still a scale dependent process. PM10 emissions analysis suggests that CG amplification is most

  15. Risk factors for AIDS-defining illnesses among a cohort of poorly adherent people living with HIV/AIDS in Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Jeremy Y.; Alsan, Marcella; Armstrong, Wendy; del Rio, Carlos; Marconi, Vincent C.

    2015-01-01

    In order to achieve the programmatic goals established in the National HIV/AIDS Strategy, virologic suppression remains the most important outcome within the HIV care continuum for individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therefore, clinicians have dedicated substantial resources to improve adherence and clinic retention for individuals on ART; however, these efforts should be focused first on those most at risk of morbidity and mortality related to AIDS. Our study aimed to characterize the factors that are associated with AIDS-defining illnesses (ADIs) amongst people living with HIV (PLHIV) who are poorly adherent or retained in care in order to identify those at highest risk for poor clinical outcomes. We recruited 99 adult PLHIV with a history of poor adherence to ART, poor clinic attendance, or unsuppressed viral load from the Infectious Disease Program (IDP) of the Grady Health System in Atlanta, GA between January and May of 2011 to participate in a survey investigating the acceptability of a financial incentive for improving adherence. Clinical outcomes including the number of ADI episodes in the last five years, viral loads, and CD4 counts were abstracted from medical records. Associations between survey items and number of ADIs were performed using Chi-square analysis. In our study, 36.4% of participants had ≥1 ADI in the last five years. The most common ADIs were Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, recurrent bacterial pneumonia, and esophageal candidiasis. Age <42.5 years (OR 2.52, 95%CI 1.08-5.86), Male gender (OR 3.51, 95%CI 1.08-11.34), CD4 nadir <200 cells/µL (OR 11.92, 95%CI 1.51-94.15), unemployment (OR 3.54, 95%CI 1.20-10.40), and travel time to clinic <30 minutes (OR 2.80, 95%CI 1.20-6.52) were all significantly associated with a history of ≥1 ADI in the last five years. Awareness of factors associated with ADIs may help clinicians identify which poorly adherent PLHIV are at highest risk for HIV-related morbidity. PMID:25660100

  16. Impact of improved air quality during the 1996 Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta on multiple cardiovascular and respiratory outcomes.

    PubMed

    Peel, Jennifer L; Klein, Mitchell; Flanders, W Dana; Mulholland, James A; Tolbert, Paige E

    2010-04-01

    Substantial evidence supports an association between ambient air pollution, especially particulate matter (PM*) and ozone (O3), and acute cardiovascular and respiratory morbidity. There is increasing interest in accountability research to evaluate whether actions taken to reduce air pollution will result in reduced morbidity. This study capitalized on a unique opportunity to evaluate the impact of a local, short-term intervention effort to reduce traffic in Atlanta during the 1996 Summer Olympic Games (July 19-August 4). Air pollutant concentrations both inside and outside of Atlanta were examined during the Olympic period and surrounding periods. Emergency department (ED) visits were examined to evaluate changes in usage patterns. ED visits for respiratory and cardiovascular conditions were examined in relation to the Olympic period using Poisson time-series analysis with adjustment for time trends and meteorologic conditions. O3 concentrations were approximately 30% lower during the Olympic Games compared with the four weeks before and after the Olympic Games (baseline periods); however, we observed similar reductions in O3 concentrations in several other cities in the Southeastern United States. We observed little or no evidence of reduced ED visits during the Olympic Games; the estimates were sensitive to choice of analytic model and to method of adjusting for temporal trends. The meteorologic conditions during the Olympic Games, along with the reductions in O3 observed in various cities not impacted by the Olympic Games, suggest that both meteorologic conditions-and reduced traffic may have played a role in the observed reduction in O3 concentration in Atlanta. Additionally, it is likely that this particular intervention strategy would not be sustainable as a pollution-reduction strategy. This study demonstrates some limitations of conducting retrospective accountability research.

  17. Assessment of neighbourhood-level socioeconomic status as a modifier of air pollution-asthma associations among children in Atlanta.

    PubMed

    O'Lenick, Cassandra R; Winquist, Andrea; Mulholland, James A; Friberg, Mariel D; Chang, Howard H; Kramer, Michael R; Darrow, Lyndsey A; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt

    2017-02-01

    A broad literature base provides evidence of association between air pollution and paediatric asthma. Socioeconomic status (SES) may modify these associations; however, previous studies have found inconsistent evidence regarding the role of SES. Effect modification of air pollution-paediatric asthma morbidity by multiple indicators of neighbourhood SES was examined in Atlanta, Georgia. Emergency department (ED) visit data were obtained for 5-18 years old with a diagnosis of asthma in 20-county Atlanta during 2002-2008. Daily ZIP Code Tabulation Area (ZCTA)-level concentrations of ozone, nitrogen dioxide, fine particulate matter and elemental carbon were estimated using ambient monitoring data and emissions-based chemical transport model simulations. Pollutant-asthma associations were estimated using a case-crossover approach, controlling for temporal trends and meteorology. Effect modification by ZCTA-level (neighbourhood) SES was examined via stratification. We observed stronger air pollution-paediatric asthma associations in 'deprivation areas' (eg, ≥20% of the ZCTA population living in poverty) compared with 'non-deprivation areas'. When stratifying analyses by quartiles of neighbourhood SES, ORs indicated stronger associations in the highest and lowest SES quartiles and weaker associations among the middle quartiles. Our results suggest that neighbourhood-level SES is a factor contributing vulnerability to air pollution-related paediatric asthma morbidity in Atlanta. Children living in low SES environments appear to be especially vulnerable given positive ORs and high underlying asthma ED rates. Inconsistent findings of effect modification among previous studies may be partially explained by choice of SES stratification criteria, and the use of multiplicative models combined with differing baseline risk across SES populations. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. GaN HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jonathan W.; Lee, Kyoung-Keun; Piner, Edwin L.

    2012-03-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) has enormous potential for applications in high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) used in RF and power devices. Intrinsic device properties such as high electron mobility, high breakdown voltage, very high current density, electron confinement in a narrow channel, and high electron velocity in the 2-dimensional electron gas of the HEMT structure are due in large part to the wide band gap of this novel semiconductor material system. This presentation discusses the properties of GaN that make it superior to other semiconductor materials, and outlines the research that will be undertaken in a new program at Texas State University to advance GaN HEMT technology. This program's aim is to further innovate the exceptional performance of GaN through improved material growth processes and epitaxial structure design.

  19. Modeling highly transient flow, mass, and heat transport in the Chattahoochee River near Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.; Keefer, Thomas N.

    1979-01-01

    A coupled flow-temperature model has been developed and verified for a 27.9-km reach of the Chattahoochee River between Buford Dam and Norcross, Ga. Flow in this reach of the Chattahoochee is continuous but highly regulated by Buford Dam, a flood-control and hydroelectric facility located near Buford, Ga. Calibration and verification utilized two sets of data collected under highly unsteady discharge conditions. Existing solution techniques, with certain minor improvements, were applied to verify the existing technology of flow and transport modeling. A linear, implicit finite-difference flow model was coupled with implicit, finite-difference transport and temperature models. Both the conservative and nonconservative forms of the transport equation were solved, and the difference in the predicted concentrations of dye were found to be insignificant. The temperature model, therefore, was based on the simpler nonconservative form of the transport equation. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. Automated synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation of [(68)Ga]Ga-AMBA, and the synthesis and characterization of (nat)Ga-AMBA and [(67)Ga]Ga-AMBA.

    PubMed

    Cagnolini, Aldo; Chen, Jianqing; Ramos, Kimberly; Skedzielewski, Tina Marie; Lantry, Laura E; Nunn, Adrian D; Swenson, Rolf E; Linder, Karen E

    2010-12-01

    Ga-AMBA (Ga-DO3A-CH(2)CO-G-[4-aminobenzoyl]-QWAVGHLM-NH(2)) is a bombesin-like agonist with high affinity for gastrin releasing peptide receptors (GRP-R). Syntheses for (nat)Ga-AMBA, [(67)Ga]Ga-AMBA and [(68)Ga]Ga-AMBA were developed. The preparation of HPLC-purified and Sep-Pak purified [(68)Ga]Ga-AMBA were fully automated, using the built-in radiodetector of the Tracerlab FX F-N synthesizer to monitor fractionated (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator elution and purification. The total synthesis time, including the fractional elution of the generator, was 20 min for Sep-Pak purified material and 40 min for HPLC-purified [(68)Ga]Ga-AMBA. Both [(67)Ga]Ga-AMBA and [(177)Lu]Lu-AMBA showed comparable high affinity for GRP-R in the human prostate cancer cell line PC-3 in vitro (k(D)=0.46+/-0.07; 0.44+/-0.08 nM), high internalization (78; 77%) and low efflux from cells at 2 h (2.4+/-0.7; 2.9+/-1.8%). Biodistribution results in PC-3 tumor-bearing male nude mice showed comparable uptake for [(177)Lu]Lu-, [(111)In]In-, [(67)Ga]Ga- and [(68)Ga]Ga-AMBA. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. GaN-based green laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingrong, Jiang; Jianping, Liu; Aiqin, Tian; Yang, Cheng; Zengcheng, Li; Liqun, Zhang; Shuming, Zhang; Deyao, Li; Ikeda, M.; Hui, Yang

    2016-11-01

    Recently, many groups have focused on the development of GaN-based green LDs to meet the demand for laser display. Great progresses have been achieved in the past few years even that many challenges exist. In this article, we analysis the challenges to develop GaN-based green LDs, and then the approaches to improve the green LD structure in the aspect of crystalline quality, electrical properties, and epitaxial layer structure are reviewed, especially the work we have done. Project supported by the National Key Research and Development Progress of China (Nos. 2016YFB0401803, 2016YFB0402002), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61574160, 61334005), the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Science (No. XDA09020401), and the Science and Technology Support Project of Jiangsu Province (No. BE2013007).

  2. Process in manufacturing high efficiency AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells by MO-CVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Y. C. M.; Chang, K. I.; Tandon, J.

    1984-01-01

    Manufacturing technology for mass producing high efficiency GaAs solar cells is discussed. A progress using a high throughput MO-CVD reactor to produce high efficiency GaAs solar cells is discussed. Thickness and doping concentration uniformity of metal oxide chemical vapor deposition (MO-CVD) GaAs and AlGaAs layer growth are discussed. In addition, new tooling designs are given which increase the throughput of solar cell processing. To date, 2cm x 2cm AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells with efficiency up to 16.5% were produced. In order to meet throughput goals for mass producing GaAs solar cells, a large MO-CVD system (Cambridge Instrument Model MR-200) with a susceptor which was initially capable of processing 20 wafers (up to 75 mm diameter) during a single growth run was installed. In the MR-200, the sequencing of the gases and the heating power are controlled by a microprocessor-based programmable control console. Hence, operator errors can be reduced, leading to a more reproducible production sequence.

  3. Changes in healthcare access and utilization among participants in a public housing relocation program in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Janet R; Allen, Lindsay; Ko, Michelle; Bonney, Loida; Hunter-Jones, Josalin; Cooper, Hannah

    2016-11-01

    Using survey data from participants in a public housing relocation program in Atlanta, Georgia, we examine post-relocation changes in healthcare access (having a usual source of care, having an unmet need) and utilization (receiving a medical exam). Although participants moved to safer, less impoverished neighborhoods, some participants experienced improvements in access and utilization whereas others experienced declines. The supply of healthcare providers in the new neighborhood and having health insurance were associated with improvements in access for this population. Future relocation efforts may seek to assist individuals with choosing a new neighborhood that has accessible healthcare resources for low-income populations.

  4. Staff meeting

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Wednesday 16 January 2008 at 3:00 p.m. Main Auditorium (bldg 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year, to review CERN’s activities during 2007 and to present the perspectives for 2008, the year of the LHC start-up. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (Bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (Bldg. 30). Simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Best wishes for the festive season! Robert AYMAR

  5. Meeting information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 1986 Ocean Sciences Meeting of the American Geophysical Union and the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) will be held January 13-17, 1986, in New Orleans, La., at the Fairmont Hotel. Co-sponsoring societies are the Acoustical Society of America (ASA), the American Meteorological Society (AMS), the Marine Technology Society (MTS), and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Oceanic Engineering Society (OES).

  6. GaSbBi/GaSb quantum well laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, O.; Cerutti, L.; Luna, E.; Narcy, G.; Trampert, A.; Tournié, E.; Rodriguez, J.-B.

    2017-05-01

    We report on the structural and optical properties of GaSbBi single layers and GaSbBi/GaSb quantum well heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaSb substrates. Excellent crystal quality and room-temperature photoluminescence are achieved in both cases. We demonstrate laser operation from laser diodes with an active zone composed of three GaSb0.885Bi0.115/GaSb quantum wells. These devices exhibit continuous-wave lasing at 2.5 μm at 80 K, and lasing under pulsed operation at room-temperature near 2.7 μm.

  7. Ga nanoparticle-enhanced photoluminescence of GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, M.; Al-Heji, A. A.; Jeon, S.; Wu, J. H.; Lee, J.-E.; Saucer, T. W.; Zhao, L.; Sih, V.; Katzenstein, A. L.; Sofferman, D. L.; Goldman, R. S.

    2013-09-02

    We have examined the influence of surface Ga nanoparticles (NPs) on the enhancement of GaAs photoluminescence (PL) efficiency. We have utilized off-normal focused-ion-beam irradiation of GaAs surfaces to fabricate close-packed Ga NP arrays. The enhancement in PL efficiency is inversely proportional to the Ga NP diameter. The maximum PL enhancement occurs for the Ga NP diameter predicted to maximize the incident electromagnetic (EM) field enhancement. The PL enhancement is driven by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-induced enhancement of the incident EM field which overwhelms the SPR-induced suppression of the light emission.

  8. Changes in Incidence and Antifungal Drug Resistance in Candidemia: Results From Population-Based Laboratory Surveillance in Atlanta and Baltimore, 2008–2011

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Angela Ahlquist; Farley, Monica M.; Harrison, Lee H.; Stein, Betsy; Hollick, Rosemary; Lockhart, Shawn R.; Magill, Shelley S.; Derado, Gordana; Park, Benjamin J.; Chiller, Tom M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Candidemia is common and associated with high morbidity and mortality; changes in population-based incidence rates have not been reported. Methods We conducted active, population-based surveillance in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, and Baltimore City/County, Maryland (combined population 5.2 million), during 2008–2011. We calculated candidemia incidence and antifungal drug resistance compared with prior surveillance (Atlanta, 1992–1993; Baltimore, 1998–2000). Results We identified 2675 cases of candidemia with 2329 isolates during 3 years of surveillance. Mean annual crude incidence per 100 000 person-years was 13.3 in Atlanta and 26.2 in Baltimore. Rates were highest among adults aged ≥65 years (Atlanta, 59.1; Baltimore, 72.4) and infants (aged <1 year; Atlanta, 34.3; Baltimore, 46.2). In both locations compared with prior surveillance, adjusted incidence significantly declined for infants of both black and white race (Atlanta: black risk ratio [RR], 0.26 [95% confidence interval {CI}, .17–.38]; white RR: 0.19 [95% CI, .12–.29]; Baltimore: black RR, 0.38 [95% CI, .22–.64]; white RR: 0.51 [95% CI: .29–.90]). Prevalence of fluconazole resistance (7%) was unchanged compared with prior surveillance; 32 (1%) isolates were echinocandin-resistant, and 9 (8 Candida glabrata) were multidrug resistant to both fluconazole and an echinocandin. Conclusions We describe marked shifts in candidemia epidemiology over the past 2 decades. Adults aged ≥65 years replaced infants as the highest incidence group; adjusted incidence has declined significantly in infants. Use of antifungal prophylaxis, improvements in infection control, or changes in catheter insertion practices may be contributing to these declines. Further surveillance for antifungal resistance and efforts to determine effective prevention strategies are needed. PMID:22893576

  9. The Atlanta Urban Heat Island Mitigation and Air Quality Modeling Project: How High-Resoution Remote Sensing Data Can Improve Air Quality Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Crosson, William L.; Khan, Maudood N.

    2006-01-01

    The Atlanta Urban Heat Island and Air Quality Project had its genesis in Project ATLANTA (ATlanta Land use Analysis: Temperature and Air quality) that began in 1996. Project ATLANTA examined how high-spatial resolution thermal remote sensing data could be used to derive better measurements of the Urban Heat Island effect over Atlanta. We have explored how these thermal remote sensing, as well as other imaged datasets, can be used to better characterize the urban landscape for improved air quality modeling over the Atlanta area. For the air quality modeling project, the National Land Cover Dataset and the local scale Landpro99 dataset at 30m spatial resolutions have been used to derive land use/land cover characteristics for input into the MM5 mesoscale meteorological model that is one of the foundations for the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to assess how these data can improve output from CMAQ. Additionally, land use changes to 2030 have been predicted using a Spatial Growth Model (SGM). SGM simulates growth around a region using population, employment and travel demand forecasts. Air quality modeling simulations were conducted using both current and future land cover. Meteorological modeling simulations indicate a 0.5 C increase in daily maximum air temperatures by 2030. Air quality modeling simulations show substantial differences in relative contributions of individual atmospheric pollutant constituents as a result of land cover change. Enhanced boundary layer mixing over the city tends to offset the increase in ozone concentration expected due to higher surface temperatures as a result of urbanization.

  10. Changes in incidence and antifungal drug resistance in candidemia: results from population-based laboratory surveillance in Atlanta and Baltimore, 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Angela Ahlquist; Farley, Monica M; Harrison, Lee H; Stein, Betsy; Hollick, Rosemary; Lockhart, Shawn R; Magill, Shelley S; Derado, Gordana; Park, Benjamin J; Chiller, Tom M

    2012-11-15

    Candidemia is common and associated with high morbidity and mortality; changes in population-based incidence rates have not been reported. We conducted active, population-based surveillance in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, and Baltimore City/County, Maryland (combined population 5.2 million), during 2008-2011. We calculated candidemia incidence and antifungal drug resistance compared with prior surveillance (Atlanta, 1992-1993; Baltimore, 1998-2000). We identified 2675 cases of candidemia with 2329 isolates during 3 years of surveillance. Mean annual crude incidence per 100 000 person-years was 13.3 in Atlanta and 26.2 in Baltimore. Rates were highest among adults aged ≥65 years (Atlanta, 59.1; Baltimore, 72.4) and infants (aged <1 year; Atlanta, 34.3; Baltimore, 46.2). In both locations compared with prior surveillance, adjusted incidence significantly declined for infants of both black and white race (Atlanta: black risk ratio [RR], 0.26 [95% confidence interval {CI}, .17-.38]; white RR: 0.19 [95% CI, .12-.29]; Baltimore: black RR, 0.38 [95% CI, .22-.64]; white RR: 0.51 [95% CI: .29-.90]). Prevalence of fluconazole resistance (7%) was unchanged compared with prior surveillance; 32 (1%) isolates were echinocandin-resistant, and 9 (8 Candida glabrata) were multidrug resistant to both fluconazole and an echinocandin. We describe marked shifts in candidemia epidemiology over the past 2 decades. Adults aged ≥65 years replaced infants as the highest incidence group; adjusted incidence has declined significantly in infants. Use of antifungal prophylaxis, improvements in infection control, or changes in catheter insertion practices may be contributing to these declines. Further surveillance for antifungal resistance and efforts to determine effective prevention strategies are needed.

  11. From Competence to Efficiency: A Tale of GA Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, David E.

    1996-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) - search procedures based on the mechanics of natural selection and genetics - have grown in popularity for the solution of difficult optimization problems. Concomitant with this growth has been a rising cacaphony of complaint asserting that too much time must be spent by the GA practitioner diddling with codes, operators, and GA parameters; and even then these GA cassandras continue, and the user is still unsure that the effort will meet with success. At the same time, there has been a rising interest in GA theory by a growing community - a theorocracy - of mathematicians and theoretical computer scientists, and these individuals have turned their efforts increasingly toward elegant abstract theorems and proofs that seem to the practitioner to offer little in the way of answers for GA design or practice. What both groups seem to have missed is the largely unheralded 1993 assembly of integrated, applicable theory and its experimental confirmation. This theory has done two key things. First, it has predicted that simple GAs are severely limited in the difficulty of problems they can solve, and these limitations have been confirmed experimentally. Second, it has shown the path to circumventing these limitations in nontraditional GA designs such as the fast messy GA. This talk surveys the history, methodology, and accomplishment of the 1993 applicable theory revolution. After arguing that these accomplishments open the door to universal GA competence, the paper shifts the discussion to the possibility of universal GA efficiency in the utilization of time and real estate through effective parallelization, temporal decomposition, hybridization, and relaxed function evaluation. The presentation concludes by suggesting that these research directions are quickly taking us to a golden age of adaptation.

  12. Fuel-based fine particulate and black carbon emission factors from a railyard area in Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Galvis, Boris; Bergin, Mike; Russell, Armistead

    2013-06-01

    Railyards have the potential to influence localfine particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter < or = 2.5 microm; PM2.5) concentrations through emissions from diesel locomotives and supporting activities. This is of concern in urban regions where railyards are in proximity to residential areas. Northwest of Atlanta, Georgia, Inman and Tilford railyards are located beside residential neighborhoods, industries, and schools. The PM2.5 concentrations near the railyards is the highest measured amongst the state-run monitoring sites (Georgia Environmental Protection Division, 2012; http://www.georgiaair.org/amp/report.php). The authors estimated fuel-based black carbon (BC) and PM2.5 emission factors for these railyards in order to help determine the impact of railyard activities on PM2.5 concentrations, and for assessing the potential benefits of replacing current locomotive engines with cleaner technologies. High-time-resolution measurements of BC, PM2.5, CO2, and wind speed and direction were made at two locations, north and south of the railyards. Emissions factors (i.e., the mass of BC or PM2.5 per gallon of fuel burned) were estimated by using the downwind/upwind difference in concentrations, wavelet analysis, and an event-based approach. By the authors' estimates, diesel-electric engines used in the railyards have average emission factors of 2.8 +/- 0.2 g of BC and 6.0 +/- 0.5 g of PM2.5 per gallon of diesel fuel burned. A broader mix of railyard supporting activities appear to lead to average emission factors of 0.7 +/- 0.03 g of BC and 1.5 +/- 0.1 g of PM2.5 per gallon of diesel fuel burned. Railyard emissions appear to lead to average enhancements of approximately 1.7 +/- 0.1 microg/m3 of PM2.5 and approximately 0.8 +/- 0.01 microg/m3 of BC in neighboring areas on an annual average basis. Uncertainty not quantified in these results could arise mainly from variability in downwind/upwind differences, differences in emissions of the diverse zones within the

  13. Summertime ambient formaldehyde in five U.S. metropolitan areas: Nashville, Atlanta, Houston, Philadelphia, and Tampa.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Li, Jianzhong; Zhang, Genfa; Luke, Winston T; McClenny, William A; Stutz, Jochen; Fried, Alan

    2005-07-01

    First, we briefly review the atmospheric chemistry and previous intercomparison measurements for HCHO, with special reference to the diffusion scrubber Hantzsch reaction based fluorescence instrument used in the field studies reported herein. Then we discuss summertime HCHO levels in five major U.S. cities measured over 1999-2002, primarily from ground-based measurements. Land-sea breeze circulations play a major role in observed concentrations in coastal cities. Very high HCHO peak mixing ratios were observed in Houston (>47 ppb) where the overall median mixing ratio was 3.3 ppb; the corresponding values in Atlanta were approximately >18 and 7.9 ppb, respectively. The peak and median mixing ratios (9.3 and 2.3 ppb) were the lowest for Tampa, where the land-sea breeze also played an important role. In several cities, replicate HCHO measurements were made by direct spectroscopic instruments; the instruments were located kilometers from each other and addressed very different heights (e.g., 106 vs 10 m). Even under these conditions, there was remarkable qualitative and often quantitative agreement between the different instruments, when they were all sampling the same air mass within a short period of each other. Local chemistry dominates how HCHO is formed and dissipated. The high concentrations in Houston resulted from emissions near the ship channel; the same formaldehyde plume was measured at two sites and clearly ranged over tens of kilometers. Local micrometeorology is another factor. HCHO patterns measured at a high-rise site in downtown Nashville were very much in synchrony with other ground sites 12 km away until July 4 celebrations whence HCHO concentrations at the downtown site remained elevated for several days and nights. The formation and dissipation of HCHO in the different cities are discussed in terms of other concurrently measured species and meteorological vectors. The vertical profiles of HCHO in and around Tampa under several different

  14. Effects of Urbanization on Stream Water Quality in the City of Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, N. E.

    2009-05-01

    A long-term stream water-quality monitoring network was established in the City of Atlanta (COA) during 2003 to assess baseline water-quality conditions and the effects of urbanization on stream water quality. Routine hydrologically-based manual stream sampling, including several concurrent manual point and equal width increment sampling, was conducted approximately 12 times per year at 21 stations, with drainage areas ranging from 3.7 to 232 km2. Eleven of the stations are real-time (RT) water-quality stations having continuous measures of stream stage/discharge, pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, and turbidity, and automatic samplers for stormwater collection. Samples were analyzed for field parameters, and a broad suite of water-quality and sediment-related constituents. This paper summarizes an evaluation of field parameters and concentrations of major ions, minor and trace metals, nutrient species (nitrogen and phosphorus), and coliform bacteria among stations and with respect to watershed characteristics and plausible sources from 2003 through September 2007. The concentrations of most constituents in the COA streams are statistically higher than those of two nearby reference streams. Concentrations are statistically different among stations for several constituents, despite high variability both within and among stations. The combination of routine manual sampling, automatic sampling during stormflows, and real-time water-quality monitoring provided sufficient information about the variability of urban stream water quality to develop hypotheses for causes of water-quality differences among COA streams. Fecal coliform bacteria concentrations of most individual samples at each station exceeded Georgia's water-quality standard for any water-usage class. High chloride concentrations occur at three stations and are hypothesized to be associated with discharges of chlorinated combined sewer overflows, drainage of swimming pool(s), and

  15. Evaluation of stream water quality in Atlanta, Georgia, and the surrounding region (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Kandell, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    A water-quality index (WQI) was developed from historical data (1986-1995) for streams in the Atlanta Region and augmented with 'new' and generally more comprehensive biweekly data on four small urban streams, representing an industrial area, a developed medium-density residential area and developing and developed low-density residential areas. Parameter WQIs were derived from percentile ranks of individual water-quality parameter values for each site by normalizing the constituent ranks for values from all sites in the area for a base period, i.e. 1990-1995. WQIs were developed primarily for nutrient-related parameters due to data availability. Site WQIs, which were computed by averaging the parameter WQIs, range from 0.2 (good quality) to 0.8 (poor quality), and increased downstream of known nutrient sources. Also, annual site WQI decreases from 1986 to 1995 at most long-term monitoring sites. Annual site WQI for individual parameters correlated with annual hydrological characteristics, particularly runoff, precipitation quantity, and water yield, reflecting the effect of dilution on parameter values. The WQIs of the four small urban streams were evaluated for the core-nutrient-related parameters, parameters for specific dissolved trace metal concentrations and sediment characteristics, and a species diversity index for the macro-invertebrate taxa. The site WQI for the core-nutrient-related parameters used in the retrospective analysis was, as expected, the worst for the industrial area and the best for the low-density residential areas. However, macro-invertebrate data indicate that although the species at the medium-density residential site were diverse, the taxa at the site were for species tolerant of degraded water quality. Furthermore, although a species-diversity index indicates no substantial difference between the two low-density residential areas, the number for macro-invertebrates for the developing area was much less than that for the developed area

  16. GaAs/InGaP/AlGaAs quantum-well infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Keshagupta, P.; Radpour, F.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, a new quantum-well infrared photodetector (QWIP) based on bound-to-miniband transitions in a GaAs/InGaP quantum well with GaAs/AlGaAs short superlattice barriers is presented and compared with the conventional GaAs/InGaP QWIPs. Results of the theoretical calculations of the detector parameters and the preliminary fabrication results of an embedded-well to miniband (EWTMB) GaAs/InGaP/AlGaAs quantum well/superlattice detector are presented. The advantages of the proposed design include improvement of the material quality, ability to adjust the peak wavelength in 8--12 {micro}m range, and in the lower dark current.

  17. Hydroclimatologic Analyses of Extreme Rainfall and Flooding in Atlanta, Georgia Using Long-Term Radar-Rainfall Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, D. B.; Smith, J. A.; Baeck, M. L.; Villarini, G.

    2010-12-01

    A 10-year radar rainfall dataset is being developed for the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area using the Hydro-NEXRAD algorithms. Radar rainfall fields are constructed at 15 minute time resolution and 1 km spatial resolution; observations from a dense network of rain gages are used for multiplicative bias correction. The high-resolution dataset will permit the investigation of urban effects on the initiation and evolution of heavy rainfall events. In addition, the climatology of extreme rainfall-runoff relationships will be examined with the aim of improving the understanding of the water balance and flood response of urban catchments during extreme rainfall events. Analyses relating the temporal and spatial distribution of rainfall to basin scale and land-use/land-cover characteristics will assist in developing urban flood frequency relationships. Events of particular interest are the floods of September 20-21, 2009 and May 3-4, 2010, which caused heavy damage and fatalities in portions of the southeastern US including Atlanta. Similar bias-corrected radar datasets in development for the Baltimore, Charlotte, and Milwaukee metropolitan areas will allow for the comparison of climatology of extreme rainfall and urban flooding in different regions of the United States and under different climate regimes.

  18. Prediction of Severe Acute Pancreatitis Using a Decision Tree Model Based on the Revised Atlanta Classification of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yushun; Yang, Chong; Gou, Shanmiao; Li, Yongfeng; Xiong, Jiongxin; Wu, Heshui; Wang, Chunyou

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a model for the early prediction of severe acute pancreatitis based on the revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis. Methods Clinical data of 1308 patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) were included in the retrospective study. A total of 603 patients who were admitted to the hospital within 36 hours of the onset of the disease were included at last according to the inclusion criteria. The clinical data were collected within 12 hours after admission. All the patients were classified as having mild acute pancreatitis (MAP), moderately severe acute pancreatitis (MSAP) and severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) based on the revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis. All the 603 patients were randomly divided into training group (402 cases) and test group (201 cases). Univariate and multiple regression analyses were used to identify the independent risk factors for the development of SAP in the training group. Then the prediction model was constructed using the decision tree method, and this model was applied to the test group to evaluate its validity. Results The decision tree model was developed using creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase, and oxygenation index to predict SAP. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of SAP in the training group were 80.9% and 90.0%, respectively, and the sensitivity and specificity in the test group were 88.6% and 90.4%, respectively. Conclusions The decision tree model based on creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase, and oxygenation index is more likely to predict the occurrence of SAP. PMID:26580397

  19. The administrative prevalence of mental retardation in 10-year-old children in metropolitan Atlanta, 1985 through 1987.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, C C; Yeargin-Allsopp, M; Decouflé, P; Drews, C D

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. In this study, data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Developmental Disabilities Study were used to determine the administrative prevalence (i.e., the number of children previously identified for service provision) of mental retardation among 10-year-old children during the years 1985 through 1987. METHODS. Children with mental retardation (intelligence quotient [IQ] of 70 or lower) were identified by review of records from multiple sources, with the public schools as the primary source. RESULTS. The overall administrative prevalence of mental retardation was 12.0 per 1000 children. The rate for mild mental retardation (IQ of 50 to 70) was 8.4 per 1000 and the rate for severe mental retardation (IQ lower than 50) was 3.6 per 1000. The prevalence was higher in Black children than in White children (prevalence odds ratio [POR] = 2.7) and in boys than in girls (POR = 1.4). Children with severe mental retardation had more coexisting disabilities than did children with mild mental retardation. CONCLUSIONS. The mental retardation prevalence rates reported here, especially the race-specific rates, may reflect social and demographic features unique to the metropolitan Atlanta area and therefore should be used with caution in making comparisons with other populations. PMID:7892912

  20. Prediction of Severe Acute Pancreatitis Using a Decision Tree Model Based on the Revised Atlanta Classification of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Dong, Liming; Zhang, Yushun; Yang, Chong; Gou, Shanmiao; Li, Yongfeng; Xiong, Jiongxin; Wu, Heshui; Wang, Chunyou

    2015-01-01

    To develop a model for the early prediction of severe acute pancreatitis based on the revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis. Clinical data of 1308 patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) were included in the retrospective study. A total of 603 patients who were admitted to the hospital within 36 hours of the onset of the disease were included at last according to the inclusion criteria. The clinical data were collected within 12 hours after admission. All the patients were classified as having mild acute pancreatitis (MAP), moderately severe acute pancreatitis (MSAP) and severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) based on the revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis. All the 603 patients were randomly divided into training group (402 cases) and test group (201 cases). Univariate and multiple regression analyses were used to identify the independent risk factors for the development of SAP in the training group. Then the prediction model was constructed using the decision tree method, and this model was applied to the test group to evaluate its validity. The decision tree model was developed using creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase, and oxygenation index to predict SAP. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of SAP in the training group were 80.9% and 90.0%, respectively, and the sensitivity and specificity in the test group were 88.6% and 90.4%, respectively. The decision tree model based on creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase, and oxygenation index is more likely to predict the occurrence of SAP.