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Sample records for meiotic spatial chromosome

  1. Recombination Proteins Mediate Meiotic Spatial Chromosome Organization and Pairing

    PubMed Central

    Storlazzi, Aurora; Gargano, Silvana; Ruprich-Robert, Gwenael; Falque, Matthieu; David, Michelle; Kleckner, Nancy; Zickler, Denise

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Meiotic chromosome pairing involves not only recognition of homology but also juxtaposition of entire chromosomes in a topologically regular way. Analysis of filamentous fungus Sordaria macrospora reveals that recombination proteins Mer3, Msh4 and Mlh1 play direct roles in all of these aspects, in advance of their known roles in recombination. Absence of Mer3 helicase results in interwoven chromosomes, thereby revealing the existence of features that specifically ensure “entanglement avoidance”. Entanglements that remain at zygotene, i.e. “interlockings”, require Mlh1 for resolution, likely to eliminate constraining recombinational connections. Patterns of Mer3 and Msh4 foci along aligned chromosomes show that the double-strand breaks mediating homologous alignment have spatially separated ends, one localized to each partner axis, and that pairing involves interference among developing interhomolog interactions. We propose that Mer3, Msh4 and Mlh1 execute all of these roles during pairing by modulating the state of nascent double-strand break/partner DNA contacts within axis-associated recombination complexes. PMID:20371348

  2. Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Turner, James M A

    2007-05-01

    X chromosome inactivation is most commonly studied in the context of female mammalian development, where it performs an essential role in dosage compensation. However, another form of X-inactivation takes place in the male, during spermatogenesis, as germ cells enter meiosis. This second form of X-inactivation, called meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) has emerged as a novel paradigm for studying the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. New studies have revealed that MSCI is a special example of a more general mechanism called meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC), which silences chromosomes that fail to pair with their homologous partners and, in doing so, may protect against aneuploidy in subsequent generations. Furthermore, failure in MSCI is emerging as an important etiological factor in meiotic sterility.

  3. Chromosome choreography: the meiotic ballet.

    PubMed

    Page, Scott L; Hawley, R Scott

    2003-08-08

    The separation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis in eukaryotes is the physical basis of Mendelian inheritance. The core of the meiotic process is a specialized nuclear division (meiosis I) in which homologs pair with each other, recombine, and then segregate from each other. The processes of chromosome alignment and pairing allow for homolog recognition. Reciprocal meiotic recombination ensures meiotic chromosome segregation by converting sister chromatid cohesion into mechanisms that hold homologous chromosomes together. Finally, the ability of sister kinetochores to orient to a single pole at metaphase I allows the separation of homologs to two different daughter cells. Failures to properly accomplish this elegant chromosome dance result in aneuploidy, a major cause of miscarriage and birth defects in human beings.

  4. Female meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in chicken.

    PubMed

    Schoenmakers, Sam; Wassenaar, Evelyne; Hoogerbrugge, Jos W; Laven, Joop S E; Grootegoed, J Anton; Baarends, Willy M

    2009-05-01

    During meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (ZW), whereas males have the homogametic ZZ constitution. During chicken oogenesis, the heterologous ZW pair reaches a state of complete heterologous synapsis, and this might enable maintenance of transcription of Z- and W chromosomal genes during meiotic prophase. Herein, we show that the ZW pair is transiently silenced, from early pachytene to early diplotene using immunocytochemistry and gene expression analyses. We propose that ZW inactivation is most likely achieved via spreading of heterochromatin from the W on the Z chromosome. Also, persistent meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) may contribute to silencing of Z. Surprisingly, gammaH2AX, a marker of DSBs, and also the earliest histone modification that is associated with XY body formation in mammalian and marsupial spermatocytes, does not cover the ZW during the synapsed stage. However, when the ZW pair starts to desynapse, a second wave of gammaH2AX accumulates on the unsynapsed regions of Z, which also show a reappearance of the DSB repair protein RAD51. This indicates that repair of meiotic DSBs on the heterologous part of Z is postponed until late pachytene/diplotene, possibly to avoid recombination with regions on the heterologously synapsed W chromosome. Two days after entering diplotene, the Z looses gammaH2AX and shows reactivation. This is the first report of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in a species with female heterogamety, providing evidence that this mechanism is not specific to spermatogenesis. It also indicates the presence of an evolutionary force that drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation independent of the final achievement of synapsis.

  5. Analysis of plant meiotic chromosomes by chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    Lysak, Martin A; Mandáková, Terezie

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome painting (CP) refers to visualization of large chromosome regions, entire chromosome arms, or entire chromosomes via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). For CP in plants, contigs of chromosome-specific bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) from the target species or from a closely related species (comparative chromosome painting, CCP) are typically applied as painting probes. Extended pachytene chromosomes provide the highest resolution of CP in plants. CP enables identification and tracing of particular chromosome regions and/or entire chromosomes throughout all meiotic stages as well as corresponding chromosome territories in premeiotic interphase nuclei. Meiotic pairing and structural chromosome rearrangements (typically inversions and translocations) can be identified by CP. Here, we describe step-by-step protocols of CP and CCP in plant species including chromosome preparation, BAC DNA labeling, and multicolor FISH.

  6. Centromere Associations in Meiotic Chromosome Pairing.

    PubMed

    Da Ines, Olivier; White, Charles I

    2015-01-01

    Production of gametes of halved ploidy for sexual reproduction requires a specialized cell division called meiosis. The fusion of two gametes restores the original ploidy in the new generation, and meiosis thus stabilizes ploidy across generations. To ensure balanced distribution of chromosomes, pairs of homologous chromosomes (homologs) must recognize each other and pair in the first meiotic division. Recombination plays a key role in this in most studied species, but it is not the only actor and particular chromosomal regions are known to facilitate the meiotic pairing of homologs. In this review, we focus on the roles of centromeres and in particular on the clustering and pairwise associations of nonhomologous centromeres that precede stable pairing between homologs. Although details vary from species to species, it is becoming increasingly clear that these associations play active roles in the meiotic chromosome pairing process, analogous to those of the telomere bouquet.

  7. Meiotic chromosome abnormalities in human spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Renée H

    2006-08-01

    The last few years have witnessed an explosion in the information about chromosome abnormalities in human sperm and the meiotic events that predispose to these abnormalities. We have determined that all chromosomes are susceptible to nondisjunction, but chromosomes 21 and 22 and, especially, the sex chromosomes have an increased frequency of aneuploidy. Studies are just beginning on the effects of potential mutagens on the chromosomal constitution of human sperm. The effects of pesticides and cancer therapeutic agents have been reviewed. In the last decade, there has been a great impetus to study chromosome abnormalities in sperm from infertile men because the advent of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) made it possible for these men to father pregnancies. A large number of studies have demonstrated that infertile men have an increased frequency of chromosomally abnormal sperm and children, even when they have a normal somatic karyotype. Meiotic studies on the pachytene stage of spermatogenesis have demonstrated that infertile men have impaired chromosome synapsis, a significantly decreased frequency of recombination, and an increased frequency of chromosomes completely lacking a recombination site. Such errors make these cells susceptible to meiotic arrest and the production of aneuploid gametes.

  8. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Homolka, David; Ivanek, Robert; Capkova, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiri

    2007-10-01

    Heterozygosity for certain mouse and human chromosomal rearrangements is characterized by the incomplete meiotic synapsis of rearranged chromosomes, by their colocalization with the XY body in primary spermatocytes, and by male-limited sterility. Previously, we argued that such X-autosomal associations could interfere with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation. Recently, supporting evidence has reported modifications of histones in rearranged chromosomes by a process called the meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC). Here, we report on the transcriptional down-regulation of genes within the unsynapsed region of the rearranged mouse chromosome 17, and on the subsequent disturbance of X chromosome inactivation. The partial transcriptional suppression of genes in the unsynapsed chromatin was most prominent prior to the mid-pachytene stage of primary spermatocytes. Later, during the mid-late pachytene, the rearranged autosomes colocalized with the XY body, and the X chromosome failed to undergo proper transcriptional silencing. Our findings provide direct evidence on the MSUC acting at the mRNA level, and implicate that autosomal asynapsis in meiosis may cause male sterility by interfering with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

  9. Human Male Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Marieke; Vosters, Sanne; Merkx, Gerard; D'Hauwers, Kathleen; Wansink, Derick G.; Ramos, Liliana; de Boer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian male gametogenesis the sex chromosomes are distinctive in both gene activity and epigenetic strategy. At first meiotic prophase the heteromorphic X and Y chromosomes are placed in a separate chromatin domain called the XY body. In this process, X,Y chromatin becomes highly phosphorylated at S139 of H2AX leading to the repression of gonosomal genes, a process known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), which has been studied best in mice. Post-meiotically this repression is largely maintained. Disturbance of MSCI in mice leads to harmful X,Y gene expression, eventuating in spermatocyte death and sperm heterogeneity. Sperm heterogeneity is a characteristic of the human male. For this reason we were interested in the efficiency of MSCI in human primary spermatocytes. We investigated MSCI in pachytene spermatocytes of seven probands: four infertile men and three fertile controls, using direct and indirect in situ methods. A considerable degree of variation in the degree of MSCI was detected, both between and within probands. Moreover, in post-meiotic stages this variation was observed as well, indicating survival of spermatocytes with incompletely inactivated sex chromosomes. Furthermore, we investigated the presence of H3K9me3 posttranslational modifications on the X and Y chromatin. Contrary to constitutive centromeric heterochromatin, this heterochromatin marker did not specifically accumulate on the XY body, with the exception of the heterochromatic part of the Y chromosome. This may reflect the lower degree of MSCI in man compared to mouse. These results point at relaxation of MSCI, which can be explained by genetic changes in sex chromosome composition during evolution and candidates as a mechanism behind human sperm heterogeneity. PMID:22355370

  10. Human male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Marieke; Vosters, Sanne; Merkx, Gerard; D'Hauwers, Kathleen; Wansink, Derick G; Ramos, Liliana; de Boer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian male gametogenesis the sex chromosomes are distinctive in both gene activity and epigenetic strategy. At first meiotic prophase the heteromorphic X and Y chromosomes are placed in a separate chromatin domain called the XY body. In this process, X,Y chromatin becomes highly phosphorylated at S139 of H2AX leading to the repression of gonosomal genes, a process known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), which has been studied best in mice. Post-meiotically this repression is largely maintained. Disturbance of MSCI in mice leads to harmful X,Y gene expression, eventuating in spermatocyte death and sperm heterogeneity. Sperm heterogeneity is a characteristic of the human male. For this reason we were interested in the efficiency of MSCI in human primary spermatocytes. We investigated MSCI in pachytene spermatocytes of seven probands: four infertile men and three fertile controls, using direct and indirect in situ methods. A considerable degree of variation in the degree of MSCI was detected, both between and within probands. Moreover, in post-meiotic stages this variation was observed as well, indicating survival of spermatocytes with incompletely inactivated sex chromosomes. Furthermore, we investigated the presence of H3K9me3 posttranslational modifications on the X and Y chromatin. Contrary to constitutive centromeric heterochromatin, this heterochromatin marker did not specifically accumulate on the XY body, with the exception of the heterochromatic part of the Y chromosome. This may reflect the lower degree of MSCI in man compared to mouse. These results point at relaxation of MSCI, which can be explained by genetic changes in sex chromosome composition during evolution and candidates as a mechanism behind human sperm heterogeneity.

  11. Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Vibranovski, Maria D

    2014-01-01

    In several different taxa, there is indubitable evidence of transcriptional silencing of the X and Y chromosomes in male meiotic cells of spermatogenesis. However, the so called meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) has been recently a hot bed for debate in Drosophila melanogaster. This review covers cytological and genetic observations, data from transgenic constructs with testis-specific promoters, global expression profiles obtained from mutant, wild-type, larvae and adult testes as well as from cells of different stages of spermatogenesis. There is no dispute on that D. melanogaster spermatogenesis presents a down-regulation of X chromosome that does not result from the lack of dosage compensation. However, the issue is currently focused on the level of reduction of X-linked expression, the precise time it occurs and how many genes are affected. The deep examination of data and experiments in this review exposes the limitations intrinsic to the methods of studying MSCI in D. melanogaster. The current methods do not allow us to affirm anything else than the X chromosome down-regulation in meiosis (MSCI). Therefore, conclusion about level, degree or precise timing is inadequate until new approaches are implemented to know the details of MSCI or other processes involved for D. melanogaster model.

  12. Meiotic drive of chromosomal knobs reshaped the maize genome.

    PubMed Central

    Buckler, E S; Phelps-Durr, T L; Buckler, C S; Dawe, R K; Doebley, J F; Holtsford, T P

    1999-01-01

    Meiotic drive is the subversion of meiosis so that particular genes are preferentially transmitted to the progeny. Meiotic drive generally causes the preferential segregation of small regions of the genome; however, in maize we propose that meiotic drive is responsible for the evolution of large repetitive DNA arrays on all chromosomes. A maize meiotic drive locus found on an uncommon form of chromosome 10 [abnormal 10 (Ab10)] may be largely responsible for the evolution of heterochromatic chromosomal knobs, which can confer meiotic drive potential to every maize chromosome. Simulations were used to illustrate the dynamics of this meiotic drive model and suggest knobs might be deleterious in the absence of Ab10. Chromosomal knob data from maize's wild relatives (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis and mexicana) and phylogenetic comparisons demonstrated that the evolution of knob size, frequency, and chromosomal position agreed with the meiotic drive hypothesis. Knob chromosomal position was incompatible with the hypothesis that knob repetitive DNA is neutral or slightly deleterious to the genome. We also show that environmental factors and transposition may play a role in the evolution of knobs. Because knobs occur at multiple locations on all maize chromosomes, the combined effects of meiotic drive and genetic linkage may have reshaped genetic diversity throughout the maize genome in response to the presence of Ab10. Meiotic drive may be a major force of genome evolution, allowing revolutionary changes in genome structure and diversity over short evolutionary periods. PMID:10471723

  13. Extensive meiotic asynapsis in mice antagonises meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin and consequently disrupts meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Bourc'his, Déborah; de Rooij, Dirk G; Bestor, Timothy H; Turner, James M A; Burgoyne, Paul S

    2008-07-28

    Chromosome synapsis during zygotene is a prerequisite for the timely homologous recombinational repair of meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Unrepaired DSBs are thought to trigger apoptosis during midpachytene of male meiosis if synapsis fails. An early pachytene response to asynapsis is meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC), which, in normal males, silences the X and Y chromosomes (meiotic sex chromosome inactivation [MSCI]). In this study, we show that MSUC occurs in Spo11-null mouse spermatocytes with extensive asynapsis but lacking meiotic DSBs. In contrast, three mutants (Dnmt3l, Msh5, and Dmc1) with high levels of asynapsis and numerous persistent unrepaired DSBs have a severely impaired MSUC response. We suggest that MSUC-related proteins, including the MSUC initiator BRCA1, are sequestered at unrepaired DSBs. All four mutants fail to silence the X and Y chromosomes (MSCI failure), which is sufficient to explain the midpachytene apoptosis. Apoptosis does not occur in mice with a single additional asynapsed chromosome with unrepaired meiotic DSBs and no disturbance of MSCI.

  14. [Meiotic chromosomes of the tree frog Smilisca baudinii (Anura: Hylidae)].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Guzmán, Javier; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Indy, Jeane Rimber

    2011-03-01

    The Mexican tree frog Smilisca baudinii, is a very common frog in Central America. In spite their importance to keep the ecological equilibrium of the rainforest, its biology and genetics are poorly known. In order to contribute with its biological knowledge, we described the typical meiotic karyotype based in standard cytogenetic protocols to specimens collected in Tabasco, Mexico. The study was centered in the analysis of 131 chromosome spreads at meiotic stage from two adults of the species (one female and one male). The metaphase analysis allowed the establishment of the modal haploid number of 1n = 12 bivalent chromosomes. The chromosomic formulae from the haploid bivalent karyotype was integrated by 12 biarmed chromosomes characterized by twelve pairs of metacentric-submetacentric (msm) chromosomes. The meiotic counting gives the idea that diploid chromosome number is integrated by a complement of 2n = 24 biarmed chromosomes. The presence of sex chromosomes from female and male meiotic spreads was not observed. Current results suggest that S. baudinii chromosome structure is well shared among Hylidae family and "B" chromosomes are particular structures that have very important evolutionary consequences in species diversification.

  15. Chromosomal abnormalities, meiotic behavior and fertility in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Villagómez, D A F; Pinton, A

    2008-01-01

    Since the advent of the surface microspreading technique for synaptonemal complex analysis, increasing interest in describing the synapsis patterns of chromosome abnormalities associated with fertility of domestic animals has been noticed during the past three decades. In spite of the number of scientific reports describing the occurrence of structural chromosome abnormalities, their meiotic behavior and gametic products, little is known in domestic animal species about the functional effects of such chromosome aberrations in the germ cell line of carriers. However, some interesting facts gained from recent and previous studies on the meiotic behavior of chromosome abnormalities of domestic animals permit us to discuss, in the frame of recent knowledge emerging from mouse and human investigations, the possible mechanism implicated in the well known association between meiotic disruption and chromosome pairing failure. New cytogenetic techniques, based on molecular and immunofluorescent analyses, are allowing a better description of meiotic processes, including gamete production. The present communication reviews the knowledge of the meiotic consequences of chromosome abnormalities in domestic animals.

  16. Meiotic recombination, synapsis, meiotic inactivation and sperm aneuploidy in a chromosome 1 inversion carrier.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Gordon; Chow, Victor; Ma, Sai

    2012-01-01

    Disrupted meiotic behaviour of inversion carriers may be responsible for suboptimal sperm parameters in these carriers. This study investigated meiotic recombination, synapsis, transcriptional silencing and chromosome segregation effects in a pericentric inv(1) carrier. Recombination (MLH1), synapsis (SYCP1, SYCP3) and transcriptional inactivation (γH2AX, BRCA1) were examined by fluorescence immunostaining. Chromosome specific rates of recombination were determined by fluorescence in-situ hybridization. Furthermore, testicular sperm was examined for aneuploidy and segregation of the inv(1). Our findings showed that global recombination rates were similar to controls. Recombination on the inv(1) and the sex chromosomes were reduced. The inv(1) associated with the XY body in 43.4% of cells, in which XY recombination was disproportionately absent, and 94.3% of cells displayed asynapsed regions which displayed meiotic silencing regardless of their association with the XY body. Furthermore, a low frequency of chromosomal imbalance was observed in spermatozoa (3.4%). Our results suggest that certain inversion carriers may display unimpaired global recombination and impaired recombination on the involved and the sex chromosomes during meiosis. Asynapsis or inversion-loop formation in the inverted region may be responsible for impaired spermatogenesis and may prevent sperm-chromosome imbalance.

  17. Genetic analysis of sex chromosomal meiotic mutants in Drosophilia melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Baker, B S; Carpenter, A T

    1972-06-01

    A total of 209 ethyl methanesulfonate-treated X chromosomes were screened for meiotic mutants that either (1) increased sex or fourth chromosome nondisjunction at either meiotic division in males; (2) allowed recombination in such males; (3) increased nondisjunction of the X chromosome at either meiotic division in females; or (4) caused such females, when mated to males heterozygous for Segregation-Distorter (SD) and a sensitive homolog to alter the strength of meiotic drive in males.-Twenty male-specific meiotic mutants were found. Though the rates of nondisjunction differed, all twenty mutants were qualitatively similar in that (1) they alter the disjunction of the X chromosome from the Y chromosome; (2) among the recovered sex-chromosome exceptional progeny, there is a large excess of those derived from nullo-XY as compared to XY gametes; (3) there is a negative correlation between the frequency of sex-chromosome exceptional progeny and the frequency of males among the regular progeny. In their effects on meiosis these mutants are similar to In(1)sc(4L)sc(8R), which is deleted for the basal heterochromatin. These mutants, however, have normal phenotypes and viabilities when examined as X/0 males, and furthermore, a mapping of two of the mutants places them in the euchromatin of the X chromosome. It is suggested that these mutants are in genes whose products are involved in insuring the proper functioning of the basal pairing sites which are deleted in In(1)sc(4L)sc(8R), and in addition that there is a close connection, perhaps causal, between the disruption of normal X-Y pairing (and, therefore, disjunction) and the occurrence of meiotic drive in the male.-Eleven mutants were found which increased nondisjunction in females. These mutants were characterized as to (1) the division at which they acted; (2) their effect on recombination; (3) their dominance; (4) their effects on disjunction of all four chromosome pairs. Five female mutants caused a nonuniform

  18. Regulation of meiotic chromatin loop size by chromosomal position.

    PubMed Central

    Heng, H H; Chamberlain, J W; Shi, X M; Spyropoulos, B; Tsui, L C; Moens, P B

    1996-01-01

    At meiotic prophase, chromatin loops around a proteinaceous core, with the sizes of these loops varying between species. Comparison of the morphology of sequence-related inserts at different sites in transgenic mice demonstrates that loop size also varies with chromosomal geography. Similarly, chromatin loop lengths differ dramatically for interstitially and terminally located hamster telomeric sequences. Sequences, telomeric or otherwise, located at chromosome termini, closely associate with the meiotic proteinaceous core, forming shorter loops than identical interstitial sequences. Thus, we present evidence that different chromatin packaging mechanisms exist for interstitial versus terminal chromosomal regions, which act separately from those operating at the level of the DNA sequence. Chromosomal position plays the dominant role in chromatin packaging. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8610120

  19. Meiotic chromosomal variation resulting from irradiation of pollen in maize.

    PubMed

    Viccini, Lyderson F; De Carvalho, Carlos R

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to standardize an induction strategy of chromosome aberrations in maize inbred line L-869. Pollen grains irradiated with 0, 36 and 72 Gy were used for fertilization. Resulting seeds were planted in a greenhouse to assess the number of abnormal meiotic cells. Germination, height, sterility and mortality were verified. Cells with delayed separation of chromosomes, translocation, deficiency, abnormal pairing, later condensation and anaphase bridges were observed. The number of abnormalities increased as the dosage increased but chromosome aberration types were the same regardless of the dosages used. Various chromosome-altered plants were obtained without viability loss

  20. Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the marsupial Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Hornecker, Jacey L; Samollow, Paul B; Robinson, Edward S; Vandeberg, John L; McCarrey, John R

    2007-11-01

    In eutherian mammals, the X and Y chromosomes undergo meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during spermatogenesis in males. However, following fertilization, both the paternally (Xp) and maternally (Xm) inherited X chromosomes are active in the inner cell mass of the female blastocyst, and then random inactivation of one X chromosome occurs in each cell, leading to a mosaic pattern of X-chromosome activity in adult female tissues. In contrast, marsupial females show a nonrandom pattern of X chromosome activity, with repression of the Xp in all somatic tissues. Here, we show that MSCI also occurs during spermatogenesis in marsupials in a manner similar to, but more stable than that in eutherians. These findings support the suggestion that MSCI may have provided the basis for an early dosage compensation mechanism in mammals based solely on gametogenic events, and that random X-chromosome inactivation during embryogenesis may have evolved subsequently in eutherian mammals.

  1. Sex Chromosome Meiotic Drive in Stalk-Eyed Flies

    PubMed Central

    Presgraves, D. C.; Severance, E.; Wilkinson, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    Meiotically driven sex chromosomes can quickly spread to fixation and cause population extinction unless balanced by selection or suppressed by genetic modifiers. We report results of genetic analyses that demonstrate that extreme female-biased sex ratios in two sister species of stalk-eyed flies, Cyrtodiopsis dalmanni and C. whitei, are due to a meiotic drive element on the X chromosome (X(d)). Relatively high frequencies of X(d) in C. dalmanni and C. whitei (13-17% and 29%, respectively) cause female-biased sex ratios in natural populations of both species. Sex ratio distortion is associated with spermatid degeneration in male carriers of X(d). Variation in sex ratios is caused by Y-linked and autosomal factors that decrease the intensity of meiotic drive. Y-linked polymorphism for resistance to drive exists in C. dalmanni in which a resistant Y chromosome reduces the intensity and reverses the direction of meiotic drive. When paired with X(d), modifying Y chromosomes (Y(m)) cause the transmission of predominantly Y-bearing sperm, and on average, production of 63% male progeny. The absence of sex ratio distortion in closely related monomorphic outgroup species suggests that this meiotic drive system may predate the origin of C. whitei and C. dalmanni. We discuss factors likely to be involved in the persistence of these sex-linked polymorphisms and consider the impact of X(d) on the operational sex ratio and the intensity of sexual selection in these extremely sexually dimorphic flies. PMID:9383060

  2. Actin-mediated motion of meiotic chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Koszul, R.; Kim, K. P.; Prentiss, M.; Kleckner, N.; Kameoka, S.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Chromosome movement is prominent during meiosis. Here, using a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches, we elucidate the basis for dynamic mid-prophase chromosome movement in budding yeast. Diverse finding reveal a process in which, at the pachytene stage, individual telomere/nuclear envelope (NE) ensembles attach passively to, and then move in concert with, nucleus-hugging actin cables that are continuous with the global cytoskeletal actin network. Other chromosomes move in concert with lead chromosome(s). The same process, in modulated form, explains the zygotene "bouquet" configuration in which, immediately preceding pachytene, chromosome ends colocalize dynamically in a restricted region of the NE. Mechanical properties of the system and biological roles of mid-prophase movement for meiosis, including recombination, are discussed. PMID:18585353

  3. Direct visualization reveals kinetics of meiotic chromosome synapsis

    SciTech Connect

    Rog, Ofer; Dernburg, Abby  F.

    2015-03-17

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a conserved protein complex that stabilizes interactions along homologous chromosomes (homologs) during meiosis. The SC regulates genetic exchanges between homologs, thereby enabling reductional division and the production of haploid gametes. Here, we directly observe SC assembly (synapsis) by optimizing methods for long-term fluorescence recording in C. elegans. We report that synapsis initiates independently on each chromosome pair at or near pairing centers—specialized regions required for homolog associations. Once initiated, the SC extends rapidly and mostly irreversibly to chromosome ends. Quantitation of SC initiation frequencies and extension rates reveals that initiation is a rate-limiting step in homolog interactions. Eliminating the dynein-driven chromosome movements that accompany synapsis severely retards SC extension, revealing a new role for these conserved motions. This work provides the first opportunity to directly observe and quantify key aspects of meiotic chromosome interactions and will enable future in vivo analysis of germline processes.

  4. Meiotic behaviour of individual chromosomes in allotriploid Alstroemeria hybrids.

    PubMed

    Kamstra, S A; de Jong, J H; Jacobsen, E; Ramanna, M S; Kuipers, A G J

    2004-07-01

    Chromosome association and chiasma formation were studied in pollen mother cells at metaphase I of four allotriplod BC1 plants (2n=3x=24) obtained from the backcross of the hybrid Alstroemeria aurea x A. inodora with its parent A. inodora. We distinguished the chromosomes of both parental species by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), whereas the individual chromosomes were identified on the basis of their multicolour FISH banding patterns obtained after a second hybridization with two species-specific satellite repeats as probes. All the four BC1 plants possessed two genomes of A. inodora and one of A. aurea. Variable numbers of recombinant chromosomes, resulting from meiotic recombination in the interspecific hybrid, were present in these plants. The homologous A. inodora chromosomes generally formed bivalents, leaving the homoeologous A. aurea chromosomes unassociated. High frequencies of trivalents were observed for the chromosome sets that contained recombinant chromosomes, even when the recombinant segments were small. Chromosome associations in the trivalents were restricted to homologous segments. The implications of the absence of homoeologous chromosome pairing on gamete constitution and prospects for introgression in Alstroemeria are discussed.

  5. Meiotic Chromosome Pairing in Triploid and Tetraploid Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Loidl, J.

    1995-01-01

    Meiotic chromosome pairing in isogenic triploid and tetraploid strains of yeast and the consequences of polyploidy on meiotic chromosome segregation are studied. Synaptonemal complex formation at pachytene was found to be different in the triploid and in the tetraploid. In the triploid, triple-synapsis, that is, the connection of three homologues at a given site, is common. It can even extend all the way along the chromosomes. In the tetraploid, homologous chromosomes mostly come in pairs of synapsed bivalents. Multiple synapsis, that is, synapsis of more than two homologues in one and the same region, was virtually absent in the tetraploid. About five quadrivalents per cell occurred due to the switching of pairing partners. From the frequency of pairing partner switches it can be deduced that in most chromosomes synapsis is initiated primarily at one end, occasionally at both ends and rarely at an additional intercalary position. In contrast to a considerably reduced spore viability (~40%) in the triploid, spore viability is only mildly affected in the tetraploid. The good spore viability is presumably due to the low frequency of quadrivalents and to the highly regular 2:2 segregation of the few quadrivalents that do occur. Occasionally, however, quadrivalents appear to be subject to 3:1 nondisjunction that leads to spore death in the second generation. PMID:7789756

  6. Meiotic chromosome pairing in triploid and tetraploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Loidl, J.

    1995-04-01

    Meiotic chromosome pairing in isogenic triploid and tetraploid strains of yeast and the consequences of polyploidy on meiotic chromosome segregation are studied. Synaptonemal complex formation at pachytene was found to be different in the triploid and in the tetraploid. In the triploid, triple-synapsis, that is, the connection of three homologues at a given site, is common. It can even extend all the way along the chromosomes. In the tetraploid, homologous chromosomes mostly come in pairs of synapsed bivalents. Multiple synapsis, that is, synapsis of more than two homologues in one and the same region, was virtually absent in the tetraploid. About five quadrivalents per cell occurred due to the switching of pairing partners. From the frequency of pairing partner switches it can be deduced that in most chromosomes synapsis is initiated primarily at one end, occasionally at both ends and rarely at an additional intercalary position. In contrast to a considerably reduced spore viability ({approximately}40%) in the triploid, spore viability is only mildly affected in the tetraploid. The good spore viability is presumably due to the low frequency of quadrivalents and to the highly regular 2:2 segregation of the few quadrivalents that do occur. Occasionally, however, quadrivalents appear to be subject to 3:1 nondisjunction that leads to spore death in the second generation. 29 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Multiple roles of Spo11 in meiotic chromosome behavior.

    PubMed

    Celerin, M; Merino, S T; Stone, J E; Menzie, A M; Zolan, M E

    2000-06-01

    Spo11, a type II topoisomerase, is likely to be required universally for initiation of meiotic recombination. However, a dichotomy exists between budding yeast and the animals Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster with respect to additional roles of Spo11 in meiosis. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Spo11 is required for homolog pairing, as well as axial element (AE) and synaptonemal complex (SC) formation. All of these functions are Spo11 independent in C.elegans and D.melanogaster. We examined Spo11 function in a multicellular fungus, Coprinus cinereus. The C.cinereus spo11-1 mutant shows high levels of homolog pairing and occasionally forms full-length AEs, but no SC. In C.cinereus, Spo11 is also required for maintenance of meiotic chromosome condensation and proper spindle formation. Meiotic progression in spo11-1 is aberrant; late in meiosis basidia undergo programmed cell death (PCD). To our knowledge, this is the first example of meiotic PCD outside the animal kingdom. Ionizing radiation can partially rescue spo11-1 for both AE and SC formation and viable spore production, suggesting that the double-strand break function of Spo11 is conserved and is required for these functions.

  8. Meiotic recombination cold spots in chromosomal cohesion sites.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masaru; Kugou, Kazuto; Fawcett, Jeffrey A; Mura, Sachiko; Ikeda, Sho; Innan, Hideki; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2014-05-01

    Meiotic chromosome architecture called 'axis-loop structures' and histone modifications have been shown to regulate the Spo11-dependent formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that trigger meiotic recombination. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses followed by deep sequencing, we compared the genome-wide distribution of the axis protein Rec8 (the kleisin subunit of meiotic cohesin) with that of oligomeric DNA covalently bound to Spo11, indicative of DSB sites. The frequency of DSB sites is overall constant between Rec8 binding sites. However, DSB cold spots are observed in regions spanning ±0.8 kb around Rec8 binding sites. The axis-associated cold spots are not due to the exclusion of Spo11 localization from the axis, because ChIP experiments showed that substantial Spo11 persists at Rec8 binding sites during DSB formation. Spo11 fused with Gal4 DNA binding domain (Gal4BD-Spo11) tethered in close proximity (≤0.8 kb) to Rec8 binding sites hardly forms meiotic DSBs, in contrast with other regions. In addition, H3K4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) remarkably decreases at Rec8 binding sites. These results suggest that reduced histone H3K4me3 in combination with inactivation of Spo11 activity on the axis discourages DSB hot spot formation.

  9. Rec8 guides canonical Spo11 distribution along yeast meiotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Kugou, Kazuto; Fukuda, Tomoyuki; Yamada, Shintaro; Ito, Masaru; Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Mori, Saori; Katou, Yuki; Itoh, Takehiko; Matsumoto, Kouji; Shibata, Takehiko; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2009-07-01

    Spo11-mediated DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination are temporally and spatially controlled. The meiotic cohesin Rec8 has been implicated in regulating DSB formation, but little is known about the features of their interplay. To elucidate this point, we investigated the genome-wide localization of Spo11 in budding yeast during early meiosis by chromatin immunoprecipitation using high-density tiling arrays. We found that Spo11 is dynamically localized to meiotic chromosomes. Spo11 initially accumulated around centromeres and thereafter localized to arm regions as premeiotic S phase proceeded. During this stage, a substantial proportion of Spo11 bound to Rec8 binding sites. Eventually, some of Spo11 further bound to both DSB and Rec8 sites. We also showed that such a change in a distribution of Spo11 is affected by hydroxyurea treatment. Interestingly, deletion of REC8 influences the localization of Spo11 to centromeres and in some of the intervals of the chromosomal arms. Thus, we observed a lack of DSB formation in a region-specific manner. These observations suggest that Rec8 would prearrange the distribution of Spo11 along chromosomes and will provide clues to understanding temporal and spatial regulation of DSB formation.

  10. On the origin of sex chromosomes from meiotic drive.

    PubMed

    Úbeda, Francisco; Patten, Manus M; Wild, Geoff

    2015-01-07

    Most animals and many plants make use of specialized chromosomes (sex chromosomes) to determine an individual's sex. Best known are the XY and ZW sex-determination systems. Despite having evolved numerous times, sex chromosomes present something of an evolutionary puzzle. At their origin, alleles that dictate development as one sex or the other (primitive sex chromosomes) face a selective penalty, as they will be found more often in the more abundant sex. How is it possible that primitive sex chromosomes overcome this disadvantage? Any theory for the origin of sex chromosomes must identify the benefit that outweighs this cost and enables a sex-determining mutation to establish in the population. Here we show that a new sex-determining allele succeeds when linked to a sex-specific meiotic driver. The new sex-determining allele benefits from confining the driving allele to the sex in which it gains the benefit of drive. Our model requires few special assumptions and is sufficiently general to apply to the evolution of sex chromosomes in outbreeding cosexual or dioecious species. We highlight predictions of the model that can discriminate between this and previous theories of sex-chromosome origins.

  11. Meiotic chromosome behavior in spread preparations of yeast

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Chromosome behavior in meiosis is well characterized from cytological and genetic descriptions but little is known of the underlying molecular mechanisms, largely because no one experimental system has been developed to support an integrated application of modern cytological, genetic, and molecular biological methods. To combine efficient analyses of meiotic chromosome structure and function in a single organism, we have extended to yeast methods for making spread preparations of nuclei. Features of yeast meiosis that parallel meiosis in large eukaryotes, such as bouquet formation and prophase chromosome condensation that occurs in concert with synaptonemal complex formation, are evident for the first time. The ability to analyze large numbers of nuclei at the light and electron microscopes in preparations amenable to a variety of cytological and immunocytological techniques will facilitate the description of meiosis at the molecular level in yeast. PMID:2450094

  12. Modeling Meiotic Chromosomes Indicates a Size Dependent Contribution of Telomere Clustering and Chromosome Rigidity to Homologue Juxtaposition

    PubMed Central

    Penfold, Christopher A.; Brown, Paul E.; Lawrence, Neil D.; Goldman, Alastair S. H.

    2012-01-01

    Meiosis is the cell division that halves the genetic component of diploid cells to form gametes or spores. To achieve this, meiotic cells undergo a radical spatial reorganisation of chromosomes. This reorganisation is a prerequisite for the pairing of parental homologous chromosomes and the reductional division, which halves the number of chromosomes in daughter cells. Of particular note is the change from a centromere clustered layout (Rabl configuration) to a telomere clustered conformation (bouquet stage). The contribution of the bouquet structure to homologous chromosome pairing is uncertain. We have developed a new in silico model to represent the chromosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in space, based on a worm-like chain model constrained by attachment to the nuclear envelope and clustering forces. We have asked how these constraints could influence chromosome layout, with particular regard to the juxtaposition of homologous chromosomes and potential nonallelic, ectopic, interactions. The data support the view that the bouquet may be sufficient to bring short chromosomes together, but the contribution to long chromosomes is less. We also find that persistence length is critical to how much influence the bouquet structure could have, both on pairing of homologues and avoiding contacts with heterologues. This work represents an important development in computer modeling of chromosomes, and suggests new explanations for why elucidating the functional significance of the bouquet by genetics has been so difficult. PMID:22570605

  13. Modeling meiotic chromosomes indicates a size dependent contribution of telomere clustering and chromosome rigidity to homologue juxtaposition.

    PubMed

    Penfold, Christopher A; Brown, Paul E; Lawrence, Neil D; Goldman, Alastair S H

    2012-01-01

    Meiosis is the cell division that halves the genetic component of diploid cells to form gametes or spores. To achieve this, meiotic cells undergo a radical spatial reorganisation of chromosomes. This reorganisation is a prerequisite for the pairing of parental homologous chromosomes and the reductional division, which halves the number of chromosomes in daughter cells. Of particular note is the change from a centromere clustered layout (Rabl configuration) to a telomere clustered conformation (bouquet stage). The contribution of the bouquet structure to homologous chromosome pairing is uncertain. We have developed a new in silico model to represent the chromosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in space, based on a worm-like chain model constrained by attachment to the nuclear envelope and clustering forces. We have asked how these constraints could influence chromosome layout, with particular regard to the juxtaposition of homologous chromosomes and potential nonallelic, ectopic, interactions. The data support the view that the bouquet may be sufficient to bring short chromosomes together, but the contribution to long chromosomes is less. We also find that persistence length is critical to how much influence the bouquet structure could have, both on pairing of homologues and avoiding contacts with heterologues. This work represents an important development in computer modeling of chromosomes, and suggests new explanations for why elucidating the functional significance of the bouquet by genetics has been so difficult.

  14. Meiotic Chromosome Analysis of the Giant Water Bug, Lethocerus indicus

    PubMed Central

    Wisoram, Wijit; Saengthong, Pradit; Ngernsiri, Lertluk

    2013-01-01

    The giant water bug, Lethocerus indicus (Lepeletier and Serville) (Heteroptera: Belostomatidae), a native species of Southeast Asia, is one of the largest insects belonging to suborder Heteroptera. In this study, the meiotic chromosome of L. indicus was studied in insect samples collected from Thailand, Myanmar, Loas, and Cambodia. Testicular cells stained with lacto-acetic orcein, Giemsa, DAPI, and silver nitrate were analyzed. The results revealed that the chromosome complement of L. indicus was 2n = 22A + neo-XY + 2m, which differed from that of previous reports. Each individual male contained testicular cells with three univalent patterns. The frequency of cells containing neo-XY chromosome univalent (∼5%) was a bit higher than that of cells with autosomal univalents (∼3%). Some cells (∼0.5%) had both sex chromosome univalents and a pair of autosomal univalents. None of the m-chromosome univalents were observed during prophase I. In addition, this report presents clear evidence about the existence of m-chromosomes in Belostomatidae. PMID:23895100

  15. Meiotic chromosome pairing in Actinidia chinensis var. deliciosa.

    PubMed

    Mertten, D; Tsang, G K; Manako, K I; McNeilage, M A; Datson, P M

    2012-12-01

    Polyploids are defined as either autopolyploids or allopolyploids, depending on their mode of origin and/or chromosome pairing behaviour. Autopolyploids have chromosome sets that are the result of the duplication or combination of related genomes (e.g., AAAA), while allopolyploids result from the combination of sets of chromosomes from two or more different taxa (e.g., AABB, AABBCC). Allopolyploids are expected to show preferential pairing of homologous chromosomes from within each parental sub-genome, leading to disomic inheritance. In contrast, autopolyploids are expected to show random pairing of chromosomes (non-preferential pairing), potentially leading to polysomic inheritance. The two main cultivated taxa of Actinidia (kiwifruit) are A. chinensis (2x and 4x) and A. chinensis var. deliciosa (6x). There is debate whether A. chinensis var. deliciosa is an autopolyploid derived solely from A. chinensis or whether it is an allopolyploid derived from A. chinensis and one or two other Actinidia taxa. To investigate whether preferential or non-preferential chromosome pairing occurs in A. chinensis var. deliciosa, the inheritance of microsatellite alleles was analysed in the tetraploid progeny of a cross between A. chinensis var. deliciosa and the distantly related Actinidia eriantha Benth. (2x). The frequencies of inherited microsatellite allelic combinations in the hybrids suggested that non-preferential chromosome pairing had occurred in the A. chinensis var. deliciosa parent. Meiotic chromosome analysis showed predominantly bivalent formation in A. chinensis var. deliciosa, but a low frequency of quadrivalent chromosome formations was observed (1 observed in 20 pollen mother cells).

  16. Chromosome numbers and meiotic analysis in the pre-breeding of Brachiaria decumbens (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Ricci, Gléia Cristina Laverde; De Souza-Kaneshima, Alice Maria; Felismino, Mariana Ferrari; Mendes-Bonato, Andrea Beatriz; Pagliarini, Maria Suely; Do Valle, Cacilda Borges

    2011-08-01

    A total of 44 accessions of Brachiaria decumbens were analysed for chromosome count and meiotic behaviour in order to identify potential progenitors for crosses. Among them, 15 accessions presented 2n = 18; 27 accessions, 2n = 36; and 2 accessions, 2n = 45 chromosomes. Among the diploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities was low, ranging from 0.82% to 7.93%. In the 27 tetraploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities ranged from 18.41% to 65.83%. The most common meiotic abnormalities were related to irregular chromosome segregation, but chromosome stickiness and abnormal cytokinesis were observed in low frequency. All abnormalities can compromise pollen viability by generating unbalanced gametes. Based on the chromosome number and meiotic stability, the present study indicates the apomictic tetraploid accessions that can act as male genitor to produce interspecific hybrids with B. ruziziensis or intraspecific hybrids with recently artificially tetraploidized accessions.

  17. Direct visualization reveals kinetics of meiotic chromosome synapsis

    DOE PAGES

    Rog, Ofer; Dernburg, Abby  F.

    2015-03-17

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a conserved protein complex that stabilizes interactions along homologous chromosomes (homologs) during meiosis. The SC regulates genetic exchanges between homologs, thereby enabling reductional division and the production of haploid gametes. Here, we directly observe SC assembly (synapsis) by optimizing methods for long-term fluorescence recording in C. elegans. We report that synapsis initiates independently on each chromosome pair at or near pairing centers—specialized regions required for homolog associations. Once initiated, the SC extends rapidly and mostly irreversibly to chromosome ends. Quantitation of SC initiation frequencies and extension rates reveals that initiation is a rate-limiting step inmore » homolog interactions. Eliminating the dynein-driven chromosome movements that accompany synapsis severely retards SC extension, revealing a new role for these conserved motions. This work provides the first opportunity to directly observe and quantify key aspects of meiotic chromosome interactions and will enable future in vivo analysis of germline processes.« less

  18. Meiotic chromosomes and stages of sex chromosome evolution in fish: zebrafish, platyfish and guppy.

    PubMed

    Traut, W; Winking, H

    2001-01-01

    We describe SC complements and results from comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) on mitotic and meiotic chromosomes of the zebrafish Danio rerio, the platyfish Xiphophorus maculatus and the guppy Poecilia reticulata. The three fish species represent basic steps of sex chromosome differentiation: (1) the zebrafish with an all-autosome karyotype; (2) the platyfish with genetically defined sex chromosomes but no differentiation between X and Y visible in the SC or with CGH in meiotic and mitotic chromosomes; (3) the guppy with genetically and cytogenetically differentiated sex chromosomes. The acrocentric Y chromosomes of the guppy consists of a proximal homologous and a distal differential segment. The proximal segment pairs in early pachytene with the respective X chromosome segment. The differential segment is unpaired in early pachytene but synapses later in an 'adjustment' or 'equalization' process. The segment includes a postulated sex determining region and a conspicuous variable heterochromatic region whose structure depends on the particular Y chromosome line. CGH differentiates a large block of predominantly male-specific repetitive DNA and a block of common repetitive DNA in that region.

  19. A mammalian KASH domain protein coupling meiotic chromosomes to the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Henning F.; Kim, Dae In; Wright, Graham D.; Wong, Esther Sook Miin; Roux, Kyle J.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome pairing is an essential meiotic event that ensures faithful haploidization and recombination of the genome. Pairing of homologous chromosomes is facilitated by telomere-led chromosome movements and formation of a meiotic bouquet, where telomeres cluster to one pole of the nucleus. In metazoans, telomere clustering is dynein and microtubule dependent and requires Sun1, an inner nuclear membrane protein. Here we provide a functional analysis of KASH5, a mammalian dynein-binding protein of the outer nuclear membrane that forms a meiotic complex with Sun1. This protein is related to zebrafish futile cycle (Fue), a nuclear envelope (NE) constituent required for pronuclear migration. Mice deficient in this Fue homologue are infertile. Males display meiotic arrest in which pairing of homologous chromosomes fails. These findings demonstrate that telomere attachment to the NE is insufficient to promote pairing and that telomere attachment sites must be coupled to cytoplasmic dynein and the microtubule system to ensure meiotic progression. PMID:24062341

  20. Superresolution microscopy reveals the three-dimensional organization of meiotic chromosome axes in intact Caenorhabditis elegans tissue

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Simone; Wojcik, Michal; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2017-01-01

    When cells enter meiosis, their chromosomes reorganize as linear arrays of chromatin loops anchored to a central axis. Meiotic chromosome axes form a platform for the assembly of the synaptonemal complex (SC) and play central roles in other meiotic processes, including homologous pairing, recombination, and chromosome segregation. However, little is known about the 3D organization of components within the axes, which include cohesin complexes and additional meiosis-specific proteins. Here, we investigate the molecular organization of meiotic chromosome axes in Caenorhabditis elegans through STORM (stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy) and PALM (photo-activated localization microscopy) superresolution imaging of intact germ-line tissue. By tagging one axis protein (HIM-3) with a photoconvertible fluorescent protein, we established a spatial reference for other components, which were localized using antibodies against epitope tags inserted by CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing. Using 3D averaging, we determined the position of all known components within synapsed chromosome axes to high spatial precision in three dimensions. We find that meiosis-specific HORMA domain proteins span a gap between cohesin complexes and the central region of the SC, consistent with their essential roles in SC assembly. Our data further suggest that the two different meiotic cohesin complexes are distinctly arranged within the axes: Although cohesin complexes containing the kleisin REC-8 protrude above and below the plane defined by the SC, complexes containing COH-3 or -4 kleisins form a central core, which may physically separate sister chromatids. This organization may help to explain the role of the chromosome axes in promoting interhomolog repair of meiotic double-strand breaks by inhibiting intersister repair. PMID:28559338

  1. Superresolution microscopy reveals the three-dimensional organization of meiotic chromosome axes in intact Caenorhabditis elegans tissue.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Simone; Wojcik, Michal; Xu, Ke; Dernburg, Abby F

    2017-06-13

    When cells enter meiosis, their chromosomes reorganize as linear arrays of chromatin loops anchored to a central axis. Meiotic chromosome axes form a platform for the assembly of the synaptonemal complex (SC) and play central roles in other meiotic processes, including homologous pairing, recombination, and chromosome segregation. However, little is known about the 3D organization of components within the axes, which include cohesin complexes and additional meiosis-specific proteins. Here, we investigate the molecular organization of meiotic chromosome axes in Caenorhabditis elegans through STORM (stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy) and PALM (photo-activated localization microscopy) superresolution imaging of intact germ-line tissue. By tagging one axis protein (HIM-3) with a photoconvertible fluorescent protein, we established a spatial reference for other components, which were localized using antibodies against epitope tags inserted by CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing. Using 3D averaging, we determined the position of all known components within synapsed chromosome axes to high spatial precision in three dimensions. We find that meiosis-specific HORMA domain proteins span a gap between cohesin complexes and the central region of the SC, consistent with their essential roles in SC assembly. Our data further suggest that the two different meiotic cohesin complexes are distinctly arranged within the axes: Although cohesin complexes containing the kleisin REC-8 protrude above and below the plane defined by the SC, complexes containing COH-3 or -4 kleisins form a central core, which may physically separate sister chromatids. This organization may help to explain the role of the chromosome axes in promoting interhomolog repair of meiotic double-strand breaks by inhibiting intersister repair.

  2. Non-meiotic chromosome instability in human immature oocytes.

    PubMed

    Daina, Gemma; Ramos, Laia; Rius, Mariona; Obradors, Albert; Del Rey, Javier; Giralt, Magda; Campillo, Mercedes; Velilla, Esther; Pujol, Aïda; Martinez-Pasarell, Olga; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-02-01

    Aneuploidy has been a major issue in human gametes and is closely related to fertility problems, as it is known to be present in cleavage stage embryos and gestational losses. Pre-meiotic chromosome abnormalities in women have been previously described. The aim of this study is to assess the whole-chromosome complement in immature oocytes to find those abnormalities caused by mitotic instability. For this purpose, a total of 157 oocytes at the germinal vesicle or metaphase I stage, and discarded from IVF cycles, were analysed by CGH. Fifty-six women, between 18 and 45 years old (mean 32.5 years), including 32 IVF patients (25-45 years of age) and 24 IVF oocyte donors (18-33 years of age), were included in the study. A total of 25/157 (15.9%) of the oocytes analysed, obtained from three IVF clinics, contained chromosome abnormalities, including both aneuploidy (24/157) and structural aberrations (9/157). Independently of the maternal age, the incidence of abnormal oocytes which originated before meiosis is 15.9%, and these imbalances were found in 33.9% of the females studied. This work sheds light on the relevance of mitotic instability responsible for the generation of the abnormalities present in human oocytes.

  3. Non-meiotic chromosome instability in human immature oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Daina, Gemma; Ramos, Laia; Rius, Mariona; Obradors, Albert; del Rey, Javier; Giralt, Magda; Campillo, Mercedes; Velilla, Esther; Pujol, Aïda; Martinez-Pasarell, Olga; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Aneuploidy has been a major issue in human gametes and is closely related to fertility problems, as it is known to be present in cleavage stage embryos and gestational losses. Pre-meiotic chromosome abnormalities in women have been previously described. The aim of this study is to assess the whole-chromosome complement in immature oocytes to find those abnormalities caused by mitotic instability. For this purpose, a total of 157 oocytes at the germinal vesicle or metaphase I stage, and discarded from IVF cycles, were analysed by CGH. Fifty-six women, between 18 and 45 years old (mean 32.5 years), including 32 IVF patients (25–45 years of age) and 24 IVF oocyte donors (18–33 years of age), were included in the study. A total of 25/157 (15.9%) of the oocytes analysed, obtained from three IVF clinics, contained chromosome abnormalities, including both aneuploidy (24/157) and structural aberrations (9/157). Independently of the maternal age, the incidence of abnormal oocytes which originated before meiosis is 15.9%, and these imbalances were found in 33.9% of the females studied. This work sheds light on the relevance of mitotic instability responsible for the generation of the abnormalities present in human oocytes. PMID:23695274

  4. THE CONTRIBUTION OF FEMALE MEIOTIC DRIVE TO THE EVOLUTION OF NEO-SEX CHROMOSOMES

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kohta; Kitano, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Sex chromosomes undergo rapid turnover in certain taxonomic groups. One of the mechanisms of sex chromosome turnover involves fusions between sex chromosomes and autosomes. Sexual antagonism, heterozygote advantage, and genetic drift have been proposed as the drivers for the fixation of this evolutionary event. However, all empirical patterns of the prevalence of multiple sex chromosome systems across different taxa cannot be simply explained by these three mechanisms. In this study, we propose that female meiotic drive may contribute to the evolution of neo-sex chromosomes. The results of this study showed that in mammals, the XY1Y2 sex chromosome system is more prevalent in species with karyotypes of more biarmed chromosomes, whereas the X1X2Y sex chromosome system is more prevalent in species with predominantly acrocentric chromosomes. In species where biarmed chromosomes are favored by female meiotic drive, X-autosome fusions (XY1Y2 sex chromosome system) will be also favored by female meiotic drive. In contrast, in species with more acrocentric chromosomes, Y-autosome fusions (X1X2Y sex chromosome system) will be favored just because of the biased mutation rate toward chromosomal fusions. Further consideration should be given to female meiotic drive as a mechanism in the fixation of neo-sex chromosomes. PMID:23025609

  5. The contribution of female meiotic drive to the evolution of neo-sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kohta; Kitano, Jun

    2012-10-01

    Sex chromosomes undergo rapid turnover in certain taxonomic groups. One of the mechanisms of sex chromosome turnover involves fusions between sex chromosomes and autosomes. Sexual antagonism, heterozygote advantage, and genetic drift have been proposed as the drivers for the fixation of this evolutionary event. However, all empirical patterns of the prevalence of multiple sex chromosome systems across different taxa cannot be simply explained by these three mechanisms. In this study, we propose that female meiotic drive may contribute to the evolution of neo-sex chromosomes. The results of this study showed that in mammals, the XY(1) Y(2) sex chromosome system is more prevalent in species with karyotypes of more biarmed chromosomes, whereas the X(1) X(2) Y sex chromosome system is more prevalent in species with predominantly acrocentric chromosomes. In species where biarmed chromosomes are favored by female meiotic drive, X-autosome fusions (XY(1) Y(2) sex chromosome system) will be also favored by female meiotic drive. In contrast, in species with more acrocentric chromosomes, Y-autosome fusions (X(1) X(2) Y sex chromosome system) will be favored just because of the biased mutation rate toward chromosomal fusions. Further consideration should be given to female meiotic drive as a mechanism in the fixation of neo-sex chromosomes.

  6. X chromosome effect on maternal recombination and meiotic drive in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    de La Casa-Esperón, Elena; Loredo-Osti, J Concepción; Pardo-Manuel de Villena, Fernando; Briscoe, Tammi L; Malette, Jan Michel; Vaughan, Joe E; Morgan, Kenneth; Sapienza, Carmen

    2002-01-01

    We observed that maternal meiotic drive favoring the inheritance of DDK alleles at the Om locus on mouse chromosome 11 was correlated with the X chromosome inactivation phenotype of (C57BL/6-Pgk1(a) x DDK)F(1) mothers. The basis for this unexpected observation appears to lie in the well-documented effect of recombination on meiotic drive that results from nonrandom segregation of chromosomes. Our analysis of genome-wide levels of meiotic recombination in females that vary in their X-inactivation phenotype indicates that an allelic difference at an X-linked locus is responsible for modulating levels of recombination in oocytes. PMID:12196408

  7. Meiotic silencing and fragmentation of the male germline restricted chromosome in zebra finch.

    PubMed

    Schoenmakers, Sam; Wassenaar, Evelyne; Laven, Joop S E; Grootegoed, J Anton; Baarends, Willy M

    2010-06-01

    During male meiotic prophase in mammals, X and Y are in a largely unsynapsed configuration, which is thought to trigger meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). In avian species, females are ZW, and males ZZ. Although Z and W in chicken oocytes show complete, largely heterologous synapsis, they too undergo MSCI, albeit only transiently. The W chromosome is already inactive in early meiotic prophase, and inactive chromatin marks may spread on to the Z upon synapsis. Mammalian MSCI is considered as a specialised form of the general meiotic silencing mechanism, named meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC). Herein, we studied the avian form of MSUC, by analysing the behaviour of the peculiar germline restricted chromosome (GRC) that is present as a single copy in zebra finch spermatocytes. In the female germline, this chromosome is present in two copies, which normally synapse and recombine. In contrast, during male meiosis, the single GRC is always eliminated. We found that the GRC in the male germline is silenced from early leptotene onwards, similar to the W chromosome in avian oocytes. The GRC remains largely unsynapsed throughout meiotic prophase I, although patches of SYCP1 staining indicate that part of the GRC may self-synapse. In addition, the GRC is largely devoid of meiotic double strand breaks. We observed a lack of the inner centromere protein INCENP on the GRC and elimination of the GRC following metaphase I. Subsequently, the GRC forms a micronucleus in which the DNA is fragmented. We conclude that in contrast to MSUC in mammals, meiotic silencing of this single chromosome in the avian germline occurs prior to, and independent of DNA double strand breaks and chromosome pairing, hence we have named this phenomenon meiotic silencing prior to synapsis (MSPS).

  8. Meiotic double-strand breaks at the interface of chromosome movement, chromosome remodeling, and reductional division.

    PubMed

    Storlazzi, Aurora; Tessé, Sophie; Gargano, Silvana; James, Françoise; Kleckner, Nancy; Zickler, Denise

    2003-11-01

    Chromosomal processes related to formation and function of meiotic chiasmata have been analyzed in Sordaria macrospora. Double-strand breaks (DSBs), programmed or gamma-rays-induced, are found to promote four major events beyond recombination and accompanying synaptonemal complex formation: (1) juxtaposition of homologs from long-distance interactions to close presynaptic coalignment at midleptotene; (2) structural destabilization of chromosomes at leptotene/zygotene, including sister axis separation and fracturing, as revealed in a mutant altered in the conserved, axis-associated cohesin-related protein Spo76/Pds5p; (3) exit from the bouquet stage, with accompanying global chromosome movements, at zygotene/pachytene (bouquet stage exit is further found to be a cell-wide regulatory transition and DSB transesterase Spo11p is suggested to have a new noncatalytic role in this transition); (4) normal occurrence of both meiotic divisions, including normal sister separation. Functional interactions between DSBs and the spo76-1 mutation suggest that Spo76/Pds5p opposes local destabilization of axes at developing chiasma sites and raise the possibility of a regulatory mechanism that directly monitors the presence of chiasmata at metaphase I. Local chromosome remodeling at DSB sites appears to trigger an entire cascade of chromosome movements, morphogenetic changes, and regulatory effects that are superimposed upon a foundation of DSB-independent processes.

  9. Meiotic double-strand breaks at the interface of chromosome movement, chromosome remodeling, and reductional division

    PubMed Central

    Storlazzi, Aurora; Tessé, Sophie; Gargano, Silvana; James, Françoise; Kleckner, Nancy; Zickler, Denise

    2003-01-01

    Chromosomal processes related to formation and function of meiotic chiasmata have been analyzed in Sordaria macrospora. Double-strand breaks (DSBs), programmed or γ-rays-induced, are found to promote four major events beyond recombination and accompanying synaptonemal complex formation: (1) juxtaposition of homologs from long-distance interactions to close presynaptic coalignment at midleptotene; (2) structural destabilization of chromosomes at leptotene/zygotene, including sister axis separation and fracturing, as revealed in a mutant altered in the conserved, axis-associated cohesin-related protein Spo76/Pds5p; (3) exit from the bouquet stage, with accompanying global chromosome movements, at zygotene/pachytene (bouquet stage exit is further found to be a cell-wide regulatory transition and DSB transesterase Spo11p is suggested to have a new noncatalytic role in this transition); (4) normal occurrence of both meiotic divisions, including normal sister separation. Functional interactions between DSBs and the spo76-1 mutation suggest that Spo76/Pds5p opposes local destabilization of axes at developing chiasma sites and raise the possibility of a regulatory mechanism that directly monitors the presence of chiasmata at metaphase I. Local chromosome remodeling at DSB sites appears to trigger an entire cascade of chromosome movements, morphogenetic changes, and regulatory effects that are superimposed upon a foundation of DSB-independent processes. PMID:14563680

  10. Initiation of meiotic chromosome synapsis at centromeres in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Tsubouchi, Tomomi; MacQueen, Amy J.; Roeder, G. Shirleen

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies of synaptonemal complex assembly in budding yeast have suggested that chromosome synapsis initiates at the sites of crossing over. The data presented here, however, indicate that centromeric regions are preferred sites for synapsis initiation. At early times during meiosis in wild type, the Zip1 protein (a major building block of the synaptonemal complex) localizes specifically to centromeric regions. As synapsis progresses and linear stretches of Zip1 are formed, the majority of stretches are associated with a centromere, as expected if the Zip1 protein present at the centromere polymerized outward along the chromosome arm. In many cases, the centromere is present at one end of a linear stretch, suggesting that synapsis is often unidirectional. Furthermore, the Zip2 protein, a protein that promotes Zip1 polymerization, is often present at the opposite end from the centromere, implying that Zip2 and associated proteins move at the leading edge of Zip1 polymerization. Surprisingly, synapsis initiation at centromeres is independent of the Zip3 protein, which plays a major role in synapsis initiation events at noncentromeric locations. Our data provide evidence for two classes of synapsis initiation events that differ in location, timing, genetic requirements, and relationship to meiotic recombination. PMID:19056898

  11. Mitotic and meiotic chromosome studies in silky anteater Cyclopes didactylus (Myrmecophagidae: Xenarthra).

    PubMed

    Jorge, W

    2000-01-01

    The karyotype of a male pigmy anteater, Cyclopes didactylus, an endangered species from the Amazon region, is described. The size and morphology of the X and Y chromosomes in mitotic and meiotic analyses is recorded and discussed.

  12. The mouse Spo11 gene is required for meiotic chromosome synapsis.

    PubMed

    Romanienko, P J; Camerini-Otero, R D

    2000-11-01

    The Spo11 protein initiates meiotic recombination by generating DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and is required for meiotic synapsis in S. cerevisiae. Surprisingly, Spo11 homologs are dispensable for synapsis in C. elegans and Drosophila yet required for meiotic recombination. Disruption of mouse Spo11 results in infertility. Spermatocytes arrest prior to pachytene with little or no synapsis and undergo apoptosis. We did not detect Rad51/Dmc1 foci in meiotic chromosome spreads, indicating DSBs are not formed. Cisplatin-induced DSBs restored Rad51/Dmc1 foci and promoted synapsis. Spo11 localizes to discrete foci during leptotene and to homologously synapsed chromosomes. Other mouse mutants that arrest during meiotic prophase (Atm -/-, Dmc1 -/-, mei1, and Morc(-/-)) showed altered Spo11 protein localization and expression. We speculate that there is an additional role for Spo11, after it generates DSBs, in synapsis.

  13. Double-strand break repair on sex chromosomes: challenges during male meiotic prophase

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lin-Yu; Yu, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    During meiotic prophase, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair-mediated homologous recombination (HR) occurs for exchange of genetic information between homologous chromosomes. Unlike autosomes or female sex chromosomes, human male sex chromosomes X and Y share little homology. Although DSBs are generated throughout male sex chromosomes, homologous recombination does not occur for most regions and DSB repair process is significantly prolonged. As a result, male sex chromosomes are coated with many DNA damage response proteins and form a unique chromatin structure known as the XY body. Interestingly, associated with the prolonged DSB repair, transcription is repressed in the XY body but not in autosomes, a phenomenon known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), which is critical for male meiosis. Here using mice as model organisms, we briefly summarize recent progress on DSB repair in meiotic prophase and focus on the mechanism and function of DNA damage response in the XY body. PMID:25565522

  14. Double-strand break repair on sex chromosomes: challenges during male meiotic prophase.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lin-Yu; Yu, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    During meiotic prophase, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair-mediated homologous recombination (HR) occurs for exchange of genetic information between homologous chromosomes. Unlike autosomes or female sex chromosomes, human male sex chromosomes X and Y share little homology. Although DSBs are generated throughout male sex chromosomes, homologous recombination does not occur for most regions and DSB repair process is significantly prolonged. As a result, male sex chromosomes are coated with many DNA damage response proteins and form a unique chromatin structure known as the XY body. Interestingly, associated with the prolonged DSB repair, transcription is repressed in the XY body but not in autosomes, a phenomenon known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), which is critical for male meiosis. Here using mice as model organisms, we briefly summarize recent progress on DSB repair in meiotic prophase and focus on the mechanism and function of DNA damage response in the XY body.

  15. Preferential accumulation of sex and Bs chromosomes in biarmed karyotypes by meiotic drive and rates of chromosomal changes in fishes.

    PubMed

    Molina, Wagner F; Martinez, Pablo A; Bertollo, Luiz A C; Bidau, Claudio J

    2014-12-01

    Mechanisms of accumulation based on typical centromeric drive or of chromosomes carrying pericentric inversions are adjusted to the general karyotype differentiation in the principal Actinopterygii orders. Here, we show that meiotic drive in fish is also supported by preferential establishment of sex chromosome systems and B chromosomes in orders with predominantly bi-brachial chromosomes. The mosaic of trends acting at an infra-familiar level in fish could be explained as the interaction of the directional process of meiotic drive as background, modulated on a smaller scale by adaptive factors or specific karyotypic properties of each group, as proposed for the orthoselection model.

  16. Rapid evolution of a Y-chromosome heterochromatin protein underlies sex chromosome meiotic drive.

    PubMed

    Helleu, Quentin; Gérard, Pierre R; Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Ogereau, David; Prud'homme, Benjamin; Loppin, Benjamin; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2016-04-12

    Sex chromosome meiotic drive, the non-Mendelian transmission of sex chromosomes, is the expression of an intragenomic conflict that can have extreme evolutionary consequences. However, the molecular bases of such conflicts remain poorly understood. Here, we show that a young and rapidly evolving X-linked heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) gene, HP1D2, plays a key role in the classical Paris sex-ratio (SR) meiotic drive occurring in Drosophila simulans Driver HP1D2 alleles prevent the segregation of the Y chromatids during meiosis II, causing female-biased sex ratio in progeny. HP1D2 accumulates on the heterochromatic Y chromosome in male germ cells, strongly suggesting that it controls the segregation of sister chromatids through heterochromatin modification. We show that Paris SR drive is a consequence of dysfunctional HP1D2 alleles that fail to prepare the Y chromosome for meiosis, thus providing evidence that the rapid evolution of genes controlling the heterochromatin structure can be a significant source of intragenomic conflicts.

  17. Rapid evolution of a Y-chromosome heterochromatin protein underlies sex chromosome meiotic drive

    PubMed Central

    Helleu, Quentin; Gérard, Pierre R.; Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Ogereau, David; Prud’homme, Benjamin; Loppin, Benjamin; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Sex chromosome meiotic drive, the non-Mendelian transmission of sex chromosomes, is the expression of an intragenomic conflict that can have extreme evolutionary consequences. However, the molecular bases of such conflicts remain poorly understood. Here, we show that a young and rapidly evolving X-linked heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) gene, HP1D2, plays a key role in the classical Paris sex-ratio (SR) meiotic drive occurring in Drosophila simulans. Driver HP1D2 alleles prevent the segregation of the Y chromatids during meiosis II, causing female-biased sex ratio in progeny. HP1D2 accumulates on the heterochromatic Y chromosome in male germ cells, strongly suggesting that it controls the segregation of sister chromatids through heterochromatin modification. We show that Paris SR drive is a consequence of dysfunctional HP1D2 alleles that fail to prepare the Y chromosome for meiosis, thus providing evidence that the rapid evolution of genes controlling the heterochromatin structure can be a significant source of intragenomic conflicts. PMID:26979956

  18. Meiotic behavior and chromosome number of Urochloa adspersa (Trin.) R. D. Webster from the Brazilian Chaco.

    PubMed

    Felismino, M F; Maior, R L S; Damasceno, G A; Pott, A; Pagliarini, M S

    2015-07-06

    This is the first report of meiotic division in Uro-chloa adspersa (Trin.) collected from the Brazilian Chaco. Meiotic analyses were performed on three specimens of U. adspersa named G10, G15, and G16. Inflorescences were collected and fixed in a mixture of ethanol and acetic acid (3:1, v/v) for 24 h and then stored in 70% alcohol. Diakinesis revealed different chromosome numbers and ploidy levels. All three plants were polyploids: G10 and G15 exhibited 2n = 6x = 54 chromosomes (arranged in 27 bivalents), while G16 exhibited 2n = 4x = 36 chromosomes (18 bivalents). Meiotic behavior was mainly normal in the hexaploid G15 and the tetraploid G16 (5.3 and 6.2% of the cells were abnormal, respective-ly), revealing only a few meiotic abnormalities that are common to polyploids, i.e., those related to irregular chromosome segregation. G10 exhibited other meiotic abnormalities during meiosis II, such as chromosome stickiness, irregular spindle orientation, and irregular cytokinesis, which led to the formation of a few triads, resulting in 16.9% of the cells being abnormal. The origin of these abnormalities is discussed, and we suggest that the genes that control meiotic steps may be present in the Urochloa gene pool.

  19. Meiotic chromosome mobility in fission yeast is resistant to environmental stress

    PubMed Central

    Illner, Doris; Lorenz, Alexander; Scherthan, Harry

    2016-01-01

    The formation of healthy gametes requires pairing of homologous chromosomes (homologs) as a prerequisite for their correct segregation during meiosis. Initially, homolog alignment is promoted by meiotic chromosome movements feeding into intimate homolog pairing by homologous recombination and/or synaptonemal complex formation. Meiotic chromosome movements in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, depend on astral microtubule dynamics that drag the nucleus through the zygote; known as horsetail movement. The response of microtubule-led meiotic chromosome movements to environmental stresses such as ionizing irradiation (IR) and associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) is not known. Here, we show that, in contrast to budding yeast, the horsetail movement is largely radiation-resistant, which is likely mediated by a potent antioxidant defense. IR exposure of sporulating S. pombe cells induced misrepair and irreparable DNA double strand breaks causing chromosome fragmentation, missegregation and gamete death. Comparing radiation outcome in fission and budding yeast, and studying meiosis with poisoned microtubules indicates that the increased gamete death after IR is innate to fission yeast. Inhibition of meiotic chromosome mobility in the face of IR failed to influence the course of DSB repair, indicating that paralysis of meiotic chromosome mobility in a genotoxic environment is not a universal response among species. PMID:27074839

  20. Sororin is enriched at the central region of synapsed meiotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Philip W; Eyster, Craig; Chen, Jingrong; Pezza, Roberto J; Rankin, Susannah

    2017-06-01

    During meiotic prophase, cohesin complexes mediate cohesion between sister chromatids and promote pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes. Precisely how the activity of cohesin is controlled to promote these events is not fully understood. In metazoans, cohesion establishment between sister chromatids during mitotic divisions is accompanied by recruitment of the cohesion-stabilizing protein Sororin. During somatic cell division cycles, Sororin is recruited in response to DNA replication-dependent modification of the cohesin complex by ESCO acetyltransferases. How Sororin is recruited and acts in meiosis is less clear. Here, we have surveyed the chromosomal localization of Sororin and its relationship to the meiotic cohesins and other chromatin modifiers with the objective of determining how Sororin contributes to meiotic chromosome dynamics. We show that Sororin localizes to the cores of meiotic chromosomes in a manner that is dependent on synapsis and the synaptonemal complex protein SYCP1. In contrast, cohesin, with which Sororin interacts in mitotic cells, shows axial enrichment on meiotic chromosomes even in the absence of synapsis between homologs. Using high-resolution microscopy, we show that Sororin is localized to the central region of the synaptonemal complex. These results indicate that Sororin regulation during meiosis is distinct from its regulation in mitotic cells and may suggest that it interacts with a distinctly different partner to ensure proper chromosome dynamics in meiosis.

  1. Altered cohesin gene dosage affects Mammalian meiotic chromosome structure and behavior.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, Brenda; Owen, Nichole; Stevense, Michelle; Smith, Helen; Nagaoka, So; Hassold, Terry; McKay, Michael; Xu, Huiling; Fu, Jun; Revenkova, Ekaterina; Jessberger, Rolf; Hunt, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Based on studies in mice and humans, cohesin loss from chromosomes during the period of protracted meiotic arrest appears to play a major role in chromosome segregation errors during female meiosis. In mice, mutations in meiosis-specific cohesin genes cause meiotic disturbances and infertility. However, the more clinically relevant situation, heterozygosity for mutations in these genes, has not been evaluated. We report here evidence from the mouse that partial loss of gene function for either Smc1b or Rec8 causes perturbations in the formation of the synaptonemal complex (SC) and affects both synapsis and recombination between homologs during meiotic prophase. Importantly, these defects increase the frequency of chromosomally abnormal eggs in the adult female. These findings have important implications for humans: they suggest that women who carry mutations or variants that affect cohesin function have an elevated risk of aneuploid pregnancies and may even be at increased risk of transmitting structural chromosome abnormalities.

  2. Hybrid Sterility Locus on Chromosome X Controls Meiotic Recombination Rate in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Balcova, Maria; Faltusova, Barbora; Gergelits, Vaclav; Bhattacharyya, Tanmoy; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Knopf, Corinna; Fotopulosova, Vladana; Chvatalova, Irena; Gregorova, Sona; Forejt, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination safeguards proper segregation of homologous chromosomes into gametes, affects genetic variation within species, and contributes to meiotic chromosome recognition, pairing and synapsis. The Prdm9 gene has a dual role, it controls meiotic recombination by determining the genomic position of crossover hotspots and, in infertile hybrids of house mouse subspecies Mus m. musculus (Mmm) and Mus m. domesticus (Mmd), it further functions as the major hybrid sterility gene. In the latter role Prdm9 interacts with the hybrid sterility X 2 (Hstx2) genomic locus on Chromosome X (Chr X) by a still unknown mechanism. Here we investigated the meiotic recombination rate at the genome-wide level and its possible relation to hybrid sterility. Using immunofluorescence microscopy we quantified the foci of MLH1 DNA mismatch repair protein, the cytological counterparts of reciprocal crossovers, in a panel of inter-subspecific chromosome substitution strains. Two autosomes, Chr 7 and Chr 11, significantly modified the meiotic recombination rate, yet the strongest modifier, designated meiotic recombination 1, Meir1, emerged in the 4.7 Mb Hstx2 genomic locus on Chr X. The male-limited transgressive effect of Meir1 on recombination rate parallels the male-limited transgressive role of Hstx2 in hybrid male sterility. Thus, both genetic factors, the Prdm9 gene and the Hstx2/Meir1 genomic locus, indicate a link between meiotic recombination and hybrid sterility. A strong female-specific modifier of meiotic recombination rate with the effect opposite to Meir1 was localized on Chr X, distally to Meir1. Mapping Meir1 to a narrow candidate interval on Chr X is an important first step towards positional cloning of the respective gene(s) responsible for variation in the global recombination rate between closely related mouse subspecies. PMID:27104744

  3. Hybrid Sterility Locus on Chromosome X Controls Meiotic Recombination Rate in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Balcova, Maria; Faltusova, Barbora; Gergelits, Vaclav; Bhattacharyya, Tanmoy; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Knopf, Corinna; Fotopulosova, Vladana; Chvatalova, Irena; Gregorova, Sona; Forejt, Jiri

    2016-04-01

    Meiotic recombination safeguards proper segregation of homologous chromosomes into gametes, affects genetic variation within species, and contributes to meiotic chromosome recognition, pairing and synapsis. The Prdm9 gene has a dual role, it controls meiotic recombination by determining the genomic position of crossover hotspots and, in infertile hybrids of house mouse subspecies Mus m. musculus (Mmm) and Mus m. domesticus (Mmd), it further functions as the major hybrid sterility gene. In the latter role Prdm9 interacts with the hybrid sterility X 2 (Hstx2) genomic locus on Chromosome X (Chr X) by a still unknown mechanism. Here we investigated the meiotic recombination rate at the genome-wide level and its possible relation to hybrid sterility. Using immunofluorescence microscopy we quantified the foci of MLH1 DNA mismatch repair protein, the cytological counterparts of reciprocal crossovers, in a panel of inter-subspecific chromosome substitution strains. Two autosomes, Chr 7 and Chr 11, significantly modified the meiotic recombination rate, yet the strongest modifier, designated meiotic recombination 1, Meir1, emerged in the 4.7 Mb Hstx2 genomic locus on Chr X. The male-limited transgressive effect of Meir1 on recombination rate parallels the male-limited transgressive role of Hstx2 in hybrid male sterility. Thus, both genetic factors, the Prdm9 gene and the Hstx2/Meir1 genomic locus, indicate a link between meiotic recombination and hybrid sterility. A strong female-specific modifier of meiotic recombination rate with the effect opposite to Meir1 was localized on Chr X, distally to Meir1. Mapping Meir1 to a narrow candidate interval on Chr X is an important first step towards positional cloning of the respective gene(s) responsible for variation in the global recombination rate between closely related mouse subspecies.

  4. Multiple sex chromosomes in the light of female meiotic drive in amniote vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Pokorná, Martina; Altmanová, Marie; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2014-04-01

    It is notable that the occurrence of multiple sex chromosomes differs significantly between major lineages of amniote vertebrates. In this respect, birds are especially conspicuous, as multiple sex chromosomes have not been observed in this lineage so far. On the other hand, in mammals, multiple sex chromosomes have evolved many times independently. We hypothesize that this contrast can be related to the different involvement of sex-specific sex chromosomes in female meiosis subjected to the female meiotic drive under male versus female heterogamety. Essentially, the male-specific Y chromosome is not involved in female meiosis and is therefore sheltered against the effects of the female meiotic drive affecting the X chromosome and autosomes. Conversely, the Z and W sex chromosomes are both present in female meiosis. Nonrandom segregation of these sex chromosomes as a consequence of their rearrangements connected with the emergence of multiple sex chromosomes would result in a biased sex ratio, which should be penalized by selection. Therefore, the emergence of multiple sex chromosomes should be less constrained in the lineages with male rather than female heterogamety. Our broader phylogenetic comparison across amniotes supports this prediction. We suggest that our results are consistent with the widespread occurrence of female meiotic drive in amniotes.

  5. HIM-8 binds to the X chromosome pairing center and mediateschromosome-specific meiotic synapsis

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Carolyn M.; Wong, Chihunt; Bhalla, Needhi; Carlton,Peter M.; Weiser, Pinky; Meneely, Philip M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-06-05

    The him-8 gene is essential for proper meiotic segregationof the X chromosomes in C. elegans. Herewe show that loss of him-8function causes profound X-chromosome-specific defects in homolog pairingand synapsis.him-8 encodes a C2H2 zinc finger protein that is expressedduring meiosis andconcentrates at a site on the X chromosome known as themeiotic Pairing Center (PC). A role for HIM-8 in PC function is supportedby genetic interactions between PC lesions and him-8 mutations.HIM-8-bound chromosome sites associate with the nuclear envelope (NE)throughout meiotic prophase. Surprisingly, a point mutation in him-8 thatretains both chromosome binding and NE localization fails to stabilizepairing or promote synapsis. These observations indicate thatstabilization of homolog pairing is an active process in which thetethering of chromosome sites to the NE may be necessary but is notsufficient.

  6. The Rec102 Mutant of Yeast Is Defective in Meiotic Recombination and Chromosome Synapsis

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, J.; Engebrecht, J. A.; Roeder, G. S.

    1992-01-01

    A mutation at the REC102 locus was identified in a screen for yeast mutants that produce inviable spores. rec102 spore lethality is rescued by a spo13 mutation, which causes cells to bypass the meiosis I division. The rec102 mutation completely eliminates meiotically induced gene conversion and crossing over but has no effect on mitotic recombination frequencies. Cytological studies indicate that the rec102 mutant makes axial elements (precursors to the synaptonemal complex), but homologous chromosomes fail to synapse. In addition, meiotic chromosome segregation is significantly delayed in rec102 strains. Studies of double and triple mutants indicate that the REC102 protein acts before the RAD52 gene product in the meiotic recombination pathway. The REC102 gene was cloned based on complementation of the mutant defect and the gene was mapped to chromosome XII between CDC25 and STE11. PMID:1732169

  7. Meiotic Recombination in Drosophila Females Depends on Chromosome Continuity Between Genetically Defined Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Sherizen, Dalia; Jang, Janet K.; Bhagat, Rajal; Kato, Naohiro; McKim, Kim S.

    2005-01-01

    In the pairing-site model, specialized regions on each chromosome function to establish meiotic homolog pairing. Analysis of these sites could provide insights into the mechanism used by Drosophila females to form a synaptonemal complex (SC) in the absence of meiotic recombination. These specialized sites were first established on the X chromosome by noting that there were barriers to crossover suppression caused by translocation heterozygotes. These sites were genetically mapped and proposed to be pairing sites. By comparing the cytological breakpoints of third chromosome translocations to their patterns of crossover suppression, we have mapped two sites on chromosome 3R. We have performed experiments to determine if these sites have a role in meiotic homolog pairing and the initiation of recombination. Translocation heterozygotes exhibit reduced gene conversion within the crossover-suppressed region, consistent with an effect on the initiation of meiotic recombination. To determine if homolog pairing is disrupted in translocation heterozygotes, we used fluorescent in situ hybridization to measure the extent of homolog pairing. In wild-type oocytes, homologs are paired along their entire lengths prior to accumulation of the SC protein C(3)G. Surprisingly, translocation heterozygotes exhibited homolog pairing similar to wild type within the crossover-suppressed regions. This result contrasted with our observations of c(3)G mutant females, which were found to be defective in pairing. We propose that each Drosophila chromosome is divided into several domains by specialized sites. These sites are not required for homolog pairing. Instead, the initiation of meiotic recombination requires continuity of the meiotic chromosome structure within each of these domains. PMID:15545646

  8. X and B chromosomes display similar meiotic characteristics in male grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Viera, A; Calvente, A; Page, J; Parra, M T; Gómez, R; Suja, J A; Rufas, J S; Santos, J L

    2004-01-01

    We have analysed the chromosome organisation and the location and temporal appearance of different proteins in X and B chromosomes in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans throughout the first meiotic prophase. We have used adult males that carry a B chromosome collected in natural Spanish populations. The scaffold organisation has been analysed by means of silver stained chromatid cores. In addition, we have detected by immunolabelling the presence of phosphoepitopes, the ensemble of cohesin axes, the location of histone gamma-H2AX, and recombinase Rad51. Our observations demonstrate that X and B chromosomes share similarities in chromatin organisation and in the expression of the tested proteins, which strongly differ from those of the autosomes. These results could be interpreted either as a support to the hypothesis that the Bs analysed here originated from the X chromosome, and/or that their chromatin composition and precocious condensation could determine their meiotic behaviour. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. Dbl2 Regulates Rad51 and DNA Joint Molecule Metabolism to Ensure Proper Meiotic Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Hyppa, Randy W.; Benko, Zsigmond; Misova, Ivana; Schleiffer, Alexander; Smith, Gerald R.; Gregan, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    To identify new proteins required for faithful meiotic chromosome segregation, we screened a Schizosaccharomyces pombe deletion mutant library and found that deletion of the dbl2 gene led to missegregation of chromosomes during meiosis. Analyses of both live and fixed cells showed that dbl2Δ mutant cells frequently failed to segregate homologous chromosomes to opposite poles during meiosis I. Removing Rec12 (Spo11 homolog) to eliminate meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) suppressed the segregation defect in dbl2Δ cells, indicating that Dbl2 acts after the initiation of meiotic recombination. Analyses of DSBs and Holliday junctions revealed no significant defect in their formation or processing in dbl2Δ mutant cells, although some Rec12-dependent DNA joint molecules persisted late in meiosis. Failure to segregate chromosomes in the absence of Dbl2 correlated with persistent Rad51 foci, and deletion of rad51 or genes encoding Rad51 mediators also suppressed the segregation defect of dbl2Δ. Formation of foci of Fbh1, an F-box helicase that efficiently dismantles Rad51-DNA filaments, was impaired in dbl2Δ cells. Our results suggest that Dbl2 is a novel regulator of Fbh1 and thereby Rad51-dependent DSB repair required for proper meiotic chromosome segregation and viable sex cell formation. The wide conservation of these proteins suggests that our results apply to many species. PMID:27304859

  10. Evolution of the meiotic prophase and of the chromosome pairing process during human fetal ovarian development.

    PubMed

    Roig, I; Robles, P; Garcia, R; Martin, M; Egozcue, J; Cabero, Ll; Barambio, S; Garcia, M

    2005-09-01

    Studies on human oocytes in prophase I are limited due to the difficulty in obtaining the sample. However, a complete study of meiotic prophase evolution and the homologue pairing process is necessary to try to understand the implication of oogenesis in the origin of human aneuploidy. A complete analysis of meiotic prophase progression comprising the long developmental time period during which meiotic prophase takes place, based on the analysis of a total of 8603 oocytes in prophase I from 15 different cases is presented. The pairing process of chromosomes 13 and 18 is also described. The findings significantly relate for the first time the evolution of meiotic prophase to fetal development. Although for both chromosomes 13 and 18 a high pairing efficiency is found, pairing failure at the pachytene stage has been observed in 0.1% of oocytes. However, errors at the diplotene stage are substantially increased, suggesting that complete, premature disjunction of the homologues commonly occurs. Moreover, pre-meiotic errors are also described. Our findings show that homologous chromosomes pair very efficiently, but the high frequency of complete, premature homologue separation found at diplotene suggests that mechanisms other than the pairing process could be more likely to lead to the high aneuploidy rate observed in human oocytes.

  11. X Chromosome Control of Meiotic Chromosome Synapsis in Mouse Inter-Subspecific Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Tanmoy; Reifova, Radka; Gregorova, Sona; Simecek, Petr; Gergelits, Vaclav; Mistrik, Martin; Martincova, Iva; Pialek, Jaroslav; Forejt, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid sterility (HS) belongs to reproductive isolation barriers that safeguard the integrity of species in statu nascendi. Although hybrid sterility occurs almost universally among animal and plant species, most of our current knowledge comes from the classical genetic studies on Drosophila interspecific crosses or introgressions. With the house mouse subspecies Mus m. musculus and Mus m. domesticus as a model, new research tools have become available for studies of the molecular mechanisms and genetic networks underlying HS. Here we used QTL analysis and intersubspecific chromosome substitution strains to identify a 4.7 Mb critical region on Chromosome X (Chr X) harboring the Hstx2 HS locus, which causes asymmetrical spermatogenic arrest in reciprocal intersubspecific F1 hybrids. Subsequently, we mapped autosomal loci on Chrs 3, 9 and 13 that can abolish this asymmetry. Combination of immunofluorescent visualization of the proteins of synaptonemal complexes with whole-chromosome DNA FISH on pachytene spreads revealed that heterosubspecific, unlike consubspecific, homologous chromosomes are predisposed to asynapsis in F1 hybrid male and female meiosis. The asynapsis is under the trans- control of Hstx2 and Hst1/Prdm9 hybrid sterility genes in pachynemas of male but not female hybrids. The finding concurred with the fertility of intersubpecific F1 hybrid females homozygous for the Hstx2Mmm allele and resolved the apparent conflict with the dominance theory of Haldane's rule. We propose that meiotic asynapsis in intersubspecific hybrids is a consequence of cis-acting mismatch between homologous chromosomes modulated by the trans-acting Hstx2 and Prdm9 hybrid male sterility genes. PMID:24516397

  12. X chromosome control of meiotic chromosome synapsis in mouse inter-subspecific hybrids.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Tanmoy; Reifova, Radka; Gregorova, Sona; Simecek, Petr; Gergelits, Vaclav; Mistrik, Martin; Martincova, Iva; Pialek, Jaroslav; Forejt, Jiri

    2014-02-01

    Hybrid sterility (HS) belongs to reproductive isolation barriers that safeguard the integrity of species in statu nascendi. Although hybrid sterility occurs almost universally among animal and plant species, most of our current knowledge comes from the classical genetic studies on Drosophila interspecific crosses or introgressions. With the house mouse subspecies Mus m. musculus and Mus m. domesticus as a model, new research tools have become available for studies of the molecular mechanisms and genetic networks underlying HS. Here we used QTL analysis and intersubspecific chromosome substitution strains to identify a 4.7 Mb critical region on Chromosome X (Chr X) harboring the Hstx2 HS locus, which causes asymmetrical spermatogenic arrest in reciprocal intersubspecific F1 hybrids. Subsequently, we mapped autosomal loci on Chrs 3, 9 and 13 that can abolish this asymmetry. Combination of immunofluorescent visualization of the proteins of synaptonemal complexes with whole-chromosome DNA FISH on pachytene spreads revealed that heterosubspecific, unlike consubspecific, homologous chromosomes are predisposed to asynapsis in F1 hybrid male and female meiosis. The asynapsis is under the trans- control of Hstx2 and Hst1/Prdm9 hybrid sterility genes in pachynemas of male but not female hybrids. The finding concurred with the fertility of intersubpecific F1 hybrid females homozygous for the Hstx2(Mmm) allele and resolved the apparent conflict with the dominance theory of Haldane's rule. We propose that meiotic asynapsis in intersubspecific hybrids is a consequence of cis-acting mismatch between homologous chromosomes modulated by the trans-acting Hstx2 and Prdm9 hybrid male sterility genes.

  13. Involvement of chromatid cohesiveness at the centromere and chromosome arms in meiotic chromosome segregation: a cytological approach.

    PubMed

    Suja, J A; Antonio, C; Rufas, J S

    1992-06-01

    Kinetochores and chromatid cores of meiotic chromosomes of the grasshopper species Arcyptera fusca and Eyprepocnemis plorans were differentially silver stained to analyse the possible involvement of both structures in chromatid cohesiveness and meiotic chromosome segregation. Special attention was paid to the behaviour of these structures in the univalent sex chromosome, and in B univalents with different orientations during the first meiotic division. It was observed that while sister chromatids of univalents are associated at metaphase I, chromatid cores are individualised independently of their orientation. We think that cohesive proteins on the inner surface of sister chromatids, and not the chromatid cores, are involved in the chromatid cohesiveness that maintains associated sister chromatids of bivalents and univalents until anaphase I. At anaphase I sister chromatids of amphitelically oriented B univalents or spontaneous autosomal univalents separate but do not reach the poles because they remain connected at the centromere by a long strand which can be visualized by silver staining, that joins stretched sister kinetochores. This strand is normally observed between sister kinetochores of half-bivalents at metaphase II and early anaphase II. We suggest that certain centromere proteins that form the silver-stainable strand assure chromosome integrity until metaphase II. These cohesive centromere proteins would be released or modified during anaphase II to allow normal chromatid segregation. Failure of this process during the first meiotic division could lead to the lagging of amphitelically oriented univalents. Based on our results we propose a model of meiotic chromosome segregation. During mitosis the cohesive proteins located at the centromere and chromosome arms are released during the same cellular division.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Chromosome synapsis defects and sexually dimorphic meiotic progression in mice lacking Spo11.

    PubMed

    Baudat, F; Manova, K; Yuen, J P; Jasin, M; Keeney, S

    2000-11-01

    Spo11, a protein first identified in yeast, is thought to generate the chromosome breaks that initiate meiotic recombination. We now report that disruption of mouse Spo11 leads to severe gonadal abnormalities from defective meiosis. Spermatocytes suffer apoptotic death during early prophase; oocytes reach the diplotene/dictyate stage in nearly normal numbers, but most die soon after birth. Consistent with a conserved function in initiating meiotic recombination, Dmc1/Rad51 focus formation is abolished. Spo11(-/-) meiocytes also display homologous chromosome synapsis defects, similar to fungi but distinct from flies and nematodes. We propose that recombination initiation precedes and is required for normal synapsis in mammals. Our results also support the view that mammalian checkpoint responses to meiotic recombination and/or synapsis defects are sexually dimorphic.

  15. Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in male mice with targeted disruptions of Xist.

    PubMed

    Turner, James M A; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Elliott, David J; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Pehrson, John R; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Burgoyne, Paul S

    2002-11-01

    X chromosome inactivation occurs twice during the life cycle of placental mammals. In normal females, one X chromosome in each cell is inactivated early in embryogenesis, while in the male, the X chromosome is inactivated together with the Y chromosome in spermatogenic cells shortly before or during early meiotic prophase. Inactivation of one X chromosome in somatic cells of females serves to equalise X-linked gene dosage between males and females, but the role of male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) is unknown. The inactive X-chromosome of somatic cells and male meiotic cells share similar properties such as late replication and enrichment for histone macroH2A1.2, suggesting a common mechanism of inactivation. This possibility is supported by the fact that Xist RNA that mediates somatic X-inactivation is expressed in the testis of male mice and humans. In the present study we show that both Xist RNA and Tsix RNA, an antisense RNA that controls Xist function in the soma, are expressed in the testis in a germ-cell-dependent manner. However, our finding that MSCI and sex-body formation are unaltered in mice with targeted mutations of Xist that prevent somatic X inactivation suggests that somatic X-inactivation and MSCI occur by fundamentally different mechanisms.

  16. In the platypus a meiotic chain of ten sex chromosomes shares genes with the bird Z and mammal X chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Grützner, Frank; Rens, Willem; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; El-Mogharbel, Nisrine; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Jones, Russell C; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A

    2004-12-16

    Two centuries after the duck-billed platypus was discovered, monotreme chromosome systems remain deeply puzzling. Karyotypes of males, or of both sexes, were claimed to contain several unpaired chromosomes (including the X chromosome) that form a multi-chromosomal chain at meiosis. Such meiotic chains exist in plants and insects but are rare in vertebrates. How the platypus chromosome system works to determine sex and produce balanced gametes has been controversial for decades. Here we demonstrate that platypus have five male-specific chromosomes (Y chromosomes) and five chromosomes present in one copy in males and two copies in females (X chromosomes). These ten chromosomes form a multivalent chain at male meiosis, adopting an alternating pattern to segregate into XXXXX-bearing and YYYYY-bearing sperm. Which, if any, of these sex chromosomes bears one or more sex-determining genes remains unknown. The largest X chromosome, with homology to the human X chromosome, lies at one end of the chain, and a chromosome with homology to the bird Z chromosome lies near the other end. This suggests an evolutionary link between mammal and bird sex chromosome systems, which were previously thought to have evolved independently.

  17. Many X-linked microRNAs escape meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Song, Rui; Ro, Seungil; Michaels, Jason D; Park, Chanjae; McCarrey, John R; Yan, Wei

    2009-04-01

    Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during spermatogenesis is characterized by transcriptional silencing of genes on both the X and Y chromosomes in mid-to-late pachytene spermatocytes. MSCI is believed to result from meiotic silencing of unpaired DNA because the X and Y chromosomes remain largely unpaired throughout first meiotic prophase. However, unlike X-chromosome inactivation in female embryonic cells, where 25-30% of X-linked structural genes have been reported to escape inactivation, previous microarray- and RT-PCR-based studies of expression of >364 X-linked mRNA-encoding genes during spermatogenesis have failed to reveal any X-linked gene that escapes the silencing effects of MSCI in primary spermatocytes. Here we show that many X-linked miRNAs are transcribed and processed in pachytene spermatocytes. This unprecedented escape from MSCI by these X-linked miRNAs suggests that they may participate in a critical function at this stage of spermatogenesis, including the possibility that they contribute to the process of MSCI itself, or that they may be essential for post-transcriptional regulation of autosomal mRNAs during the late meiotic and early postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis.

  18. Spatial organization of bacterial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xindan; Rudner, David Z

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial chromosomes are organized in stereotypical patterns that are faithfully and robustly regenerated in daughter cells. Two distinct spatial patterns were described almost a decade ago in our most tractable model organisms. In recent years, analysis of chromosome organization in a larger and more diverse set of bacteria and a deeper characterization of chromosome dynamics in the original model systems have provided a broader and more complete picture of both chromosome organization and the activities that generate the observed spatial patterns. Here, we summarize these different patterns highlighting similarities and differences and discuss the protein factors that help establish and maintain them.

  19. Sex chromosome-specific regulation in the Drosophila male germline but little evidence for chromosomal dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation.

    PubMed

    Meiklejohn, Colin D; Landeen, Emily L; Cook, Jodi M; Kingan, Sarah B; Presgraves, Daven C

    2011-08-01

    The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes (e.g., XY in males or ZW in females) has repeatedly elicited the evolution of two kinds of chromosome-specific regulation: dosage compensation--the equalization of X chromosome gene expression in males and females--and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI)--the transcriptional silencing and heterochromatinization of the X during meiosis in the male (or Z in the female) germline. How the X chromosome is regulated in the Drosophila melanogaster male germline is unclear. Here we report three new findings concerning gene expression from the X in Drosophila testes. First, X chromosome-wide dosage compensation appears to be absent from most of the Drosophila male germline. Second, microarray analysis provides no evidence for X chromosome-specific inactivation during meiosis. Third, we confirm the previous discovery that the expression of transgene reporters driven by autosomal spermatogenesis-specific promoters is strongly reduced when inserted on the X chromosome versus the autosomes; but we show that this chromosomal difference in expression is established in premeiotic cells and persists in meiotic cells. The magnitude of the X-autosome difference in transgene expression cannot be explained by the absence of dosage compensation, suggesting that a previously unrecognized mechanism limits expression from the X during spermatogenesis in Drosophila. These findings help to resolve several previously conflicting reports and have implications for patterns of genome evolution and speciation in Drosophila.

  20. Proof that univalent chromosomes undergoing equational division at anaphase I are not lost during the second meiotic division

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, D. F.

    1980-01-01

    Monosomics in a diploid organism are ideal for characterizing the behavior of univalent chromosomes because each meiotic cell contains a univalent chromosome. We have isolated microsporocyte samples from all monosomic types except monosomics 3 and 5 and have carried out extensive analyses of the meiotic behavior in each of the different available monosomic types. It is demonstrated that univalent chromosomes can undergo equational division at the first anaphase and the resultant monads are not lost during the remainder of meiosis.

  1. Nonrandom segregation of the mouse univalent X chromosome: evidence of spindle-mediated meiotic drive.

    PubMed Central

    LeMaire-Adkins, R; Hunt, P A

    2000-01-01

    A fundamental principle of Mendelian inheritance is random segregation of alleles to progeny; however, examples of distorted transmission either of specific alleles or of whole chromosomes have been described in a variety of species. In humans and mice, a distortion in chromosome transmission is often associated with a chromosome abnormality. One such example is the fertile XO female mouse. A transmission distortion effect that results in an excess of XX over XO daughters among the progeny of XO females has been recognized for nearly four decades. Utilizing contemporary methodology that combines immunofluorescence, FISH, and three-dimensional confocal microscopy, we have readdressed the meiotic segregation behavior of the single X chromosome in oocytes from XO females produced on two different inbred backgrounds. Our studies demonstrate that segregation of the univalent X chromosome at the first meiotic division is nonrandom, with preferential retention of the X chromosome in the oocyte in approximately 60% of cells. We propose that this deviation from Mendelian expectations is facilitated by a spindle-mediated mechanism. This mechanism, which appears to be a general feature of the female meiotic process, has implications for the frequency of nondisjunction in our species. PMID:11014823

  2. Ionizing irradiation-induced radical stress stalls live meiotic chromosome movements by altering the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Illner, Doris; Scherthan, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Meiosis generates haploid cells or spores for sexual reproduction. As a prelude to haploidization, homologous chromosomes pair and recombine to undergo segregation during the first meiotic division. During the entire meiotic prophase of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, chromosomes perform rapid movements that are suspected to contribute to the regulation of recombination. Here, we investigated the impact of ionizing radiation (IR) on movements of GFP–tagged bivalents in live pachytene cells. We find that exposure of sporulating cultures with >40 Gy (4-krad) X-rays stalls pachytene chromosome movements. This identifies a previously undescribed acute radiation response in yeast meiosis, which contrasts with its reported radioresistance of up to 1,000 Gy in survival assays. A modified 3′-end labeling assay disclosed IR-induced dsDNA breaks (DSBs) in pachytene cells at a linear dose relationship of one IR-induced DSB per cell per 5 Gy. Dihydroethidium staining revealed formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in irradiated cells. Immobility of fuzzy-appearing irradiated bivalents was rescued by addition of radical scavengers. Hydrogen peroxide-induced ROS did reduce bivalent mobility similar to 40 Gy X IR, while they failed to induce DSBs. IR- and H2O2-induced ROS were found to decompose actin cables that are driving meiotic chromosome mobility, an effect that could be rescued by antioxidant treatment. Hence, it appears that the meiotic actin cytoskeleton is a radical-sensitive system that inhibits bivalent movements in response to IR- and oxidant-induced ROS. This may be important to prevent motility-driven unfavorable chromosome interactions when meiotic recombination has to proceed in genotoxic environments. PMID:24046368

  3. Meiotic exchange within and between chromosomes requires a common Rec function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, J E; Klapholz, S; Waddell, C S; Jensen, L; Esposito, R E

    1985-01-01

    We used haploid yeast cells that express both the MATa and MAT alpha mating-type alleles and contain the spo13-1 mutation to characterize meiotic recombination within single, unpaired chromosomes in Rec+ and Rec- Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In Rec+ haploids, as in diploids, intrachromosomal recombination in the ribosomal DNA was detected in 2 to 6% of meiotic divisions, and most events were unequal reciprocal sister chromatid exchange (SCE). By contrast, intrachromosomal recombination between duplicated copies of the his4 locus occurred in approximately 30% of haploid meiotic divisions, a frequency much higher than that reported in diploids; only about one-half of the events were unequal reciprocal SCE. The spo11-1 mutation, which virtually eliminates meiotic exchange between homologs in diploid meiosis, reduced the frequency of intrachromosomal recombination in both the ribosomal DNA and the his4 duplication during meiosis by 10- to greater than 50-fold. This Rec- mutation affected all forms of recombination within chromosomes: unequal reciprocal SCE, reciprocal intrachromatid exchange, and gene conversion. Intrachromosomal recombination in spo11-1 haploids was restored by transformation with a plasmid containing the wild-type SPO11 gene. Mitotic intrachromosomal recombination frequencies were unaffected by spo11-1. This is the first demonstration of a gene product required for recombination between homologs as well as recombination within chromosomes during meiosis. Images PMID:3915779

  4. Sumoylation precedes accumulation of phosphorylated H2AX on sex chromosomes during their meiotic inactivation.

    PubMed

    Vigodner, Margarita

    2009-01-01

    During meiosis in male mammals, X and Y chromosomes undergo the process of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). A crucial role in MSCI has recently been reported for BRCA1, ATR kinase, and phosphorylated histone H2AX, but the exact mechanism remains to be determined. Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins have recently been shown to localize to the sex body in mouse meiotic spermatocytes, but the role they play during MSCI is unknown. In this study, in order to better understand the molecular events of MSCI, we followed dynamic changes in gammaH2AX and SUMO localization patterns during MSCI. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as an analytical tool for visualizing numerous spermatocytes from the same development stage and for consecutively following the meiotic progression, we were able to demonstrate a very early appearance of SUMO-1, which preceded gammaH2AX accumulation on the sex chromosomes during their meiotic inactivation. In contrast to SUMO-1, SUMO-2/3 was undetectable in zygotene spermatocytes, suggesting a possible specific role for SUMO-1 in the initiation of MSCI.

  5. Meiotic crossing-over in nondisjoined chromosomes of children with trisomy 21 and a congenital heart defect

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, C.M.; Davis, G.E.; Farrer, M.J.; Cullen, L.M.; Coleman, M.M.; Williamson, R.; Wyse, R.K.H.; Palmer, R.; Kessling, A.M. )

    1993-08-01

    The authors have used DNA polymorphisms to study meiotic crossovers of chromosome 21q in 27 nuclear families. Each family had a child with Down syndrome and a congenital heart defect. Twenty DNA polymorphisms on chromosome 21 were used to determine parental and meiotic origin of nondisjunction and to identify crossovers. Twenty-four cases were of maternal origin, and three were of paternal origin. Twenty-two unequivocal crossover events were identified. Sixteen crossovers were observed in 22 chromosome pairs nondisjoining at the first meiotic division (MI), and six crossovers were observed in five chromosome pairs disjoining at the second meiotic division. Fifty percent of crossover events in MI nondisjunction are detectable by molecular genetic means. Thus, the results suggest that, in this sample, each nondisjoined chromosome 21 pair has been involved in at least one crossover event. 28 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  6. How did the platypus get its sex chromosome chain? A comparison of meiotic multiples and sex chromosomes in plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Gruetzner, Frank; Ashley, Terry; Rowell, David M; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A

    2006-04-01

    The duck-billed platypus is an extraordinary mammal. Its chromosome complement is no less extraordinary, for it includes a system in which ten sex chromosomes form an extensive meiotic chain in males. Such meiotic multiples are unprecedented in vertebrates but occur sporadically in plant and invertebrate species. In this paper, we review the evolution and formation of meiotic multiples in plants and invertebrates to try to gain insights into the origin of the platypus meiotic multiple. We describe the meiotic hurdles that translocated mammalian chromosomes face, which make longer chains disadvantageous in mammals, and we discuss how sex chromosomes and dosage compensation might have affected the evolution of sex-linked meiotic multiples. We conclude that the evolutionary conservation of the chain in monotremes, the structural properties of the translocated chromosomes and the highly accurate segregation at meiosis make the platypus system remarkably different from meiotic multiples in other species. We discuss alternative evolutionary models, which fall broadly into two categories: either the chain is the result of a sequence of translocation events from an ancestral pair of sex chromosomes (Model I) or the entire chain came into being at once by hybridization of two populations with different chromosomal rearrangements sharing monobrachial homology (Model II).

  7. Expression and epigenomic landscape of the sex chromosomes in mouse post-meiotic male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Charlotte; Vaiman, Daniel; Tores, Frederic; Cocquet, Julie

    2016-01-01

    During meiosis, the X and Y chromosomes are transcriptionally silenced. The persistence of repressive chromatin marks on the sex chromatin after meiosis initially led to the assumption that XY gene silencing persists to some extent in spermatids. Considering the many reports of XY-linked genes expressed and needed in the post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis, it is still unclear whether or not the mouse sex chromatin is a repressive or permissive environment, after meiosis. To determine the transcriptional and chromatin state of the sex chromosomes after meiosis, we re-analyzed ten ChIP-Seq datasets performed on mouse round spermatids and four RNA-seq datasets from male germ cells purified at different stages of spermatogenesis. For this, we used the last version of the genome (mm10/GRCm38) and included reads that map to several genomic locations in order to properly interpret the high proportion of sex chromosome-encoded multicopy genes. Our study shows that coverage of active epigenetic marks H3K4me3 and Kcr is similar on the sex chromosomes and on autosomes. The post-meiotic sex chromatin nevertheless differs from autosomal chromatin in its enrichment in H3K9me3 and its depletion in H3K27me3 and H4 acetylation. We also identified a posttranslational modification, H3K27ac, which specifically accumulates on the Y chromosome. In parallel, we found that the X and Y chromosomes are enriched in genes expressed post-meiotically and display a higher proportion of spermatid-specific genes compared to autosomes. Finally, we observed that portions of chromosome 14 and of the sex chromosomes share specific features, such as enrichment in H3K9me3 and the presence of multicopy genes that are specifically expressed in round spermatids, suggesting that parts of chromosome 14 are under the same evolutionary constraints than the sex chromosomes. Based on our expression and epigenomic studies, we conclude that, after meiosis, the mouse sex chromosomes are no longer silenced

  8. The fragile Y hypothesis: Y chromosome aneuploidy as a selective pressure in sex chromosome and meiotic mechanism evolution.

    PubMed

    Blackmon, Heath; Demuth, Jeffery P

    2015-09-01

    Loss of the Y-chromosome is a common feature of species with chromosomal sex determination. However, our understanding of why some lineages frequently lose Y-chromosomes while others do not is limited. The fragile Y hypothesis proposes that in species with chiasmatic meiosis the rate of Y-chromosome aneuploidy and the size of the recombining region have a negative correlation. The fragile Y hypothesis provides a number of novel insights not possible under traditional models. Specifically, increased rates of Y aneuploidy may impose positive selection for (i) gene movement off the Y; (ii) translocations and fusions which expand the recombining region; and (iii) alternative meiotic segregation mechanisms (achiasmatic or asynaptic). These insights as well as existing evidence for the frequency of Y-chromosome aneuploidy raise doubt about the prospects for long-term retention of the human Y-chromosome despite recent evidence for stable gene content in older non-recombining regions.

  9. Location of 45S Ribosomal Genes in Mitotic and Meiotic Chromosomes of Buthid Scorpions.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Viviane Fagundes; Carvalho, Leonardo Sousa; Cella, Doralice Maria; Schneider, Marielle Cristina

    2014-09-01

    Buthid scorpions exhibit a high variability in diploid number within genera and even within species. Cytogenetically, Buthidae differs from other families of Scorpiones based on its low diploid numbers, holocentric chromosomes, and complex chromosomal chains, which form during meiosis. In this study, we analyzed the distribution of the 45S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) genes in the mitotic and meiotic chromosomes of seven buthid species belonging to the genera Rhopalurus and Tityus with the ultimate goal of elucidating the chromosome organization in these scorpions. The chromosome number ranged from 2n=6 to 2n=28. Despite the high variance in diploid number, all species examined carried their 45S rDNA sites in the terminal region of exactly two chromosomes. Analyses of meiotic cells revealed 45S rDNA clusters in the chromosomal chains of Rhopalurus agamemnon, Tityus bahiensis, Tityus confluens, and Tityus martinpaechi, or in bivalent-like configuration in Rhopalurus rochai, Tityus bahiensis, Tityus confluens, Tityus fasciolatus, and Tityus paraguayensis. In the species examined, the 45S rDNA sites colocalized with constitutive heterochromatin regions. In light of the high chromosome variability and maintenance of number and terminal position of 45S rDNA sites in buthids, the heterochromatin may act to conserve the integrity of the ribosomal genes.

  10. The relation between the axial complex of meiotic prophase chromosomes and chromosome pairing in a salamander (Plethodon cinereus).

    PubMed

    MOSES, M J

    1958-09-25

    An investigation of the structure of meiotic chromosomes from primary spermatocytes of two salamanders, Plethodon cinereus and Desmognathus fusca, has been made using correlated light and electron microscopy. Feulgen squashes were compared with stained sections and these related to adjacent thin sections in the electron microscope. A transition from the familiar cytological preparation to the electron image was thus effected. A linear complex consisting of three parallel strands has been observed with the electron microscope, passing along the central axis of primary spermatocyte chromosomes. The complex is similar to that found in comparable chromosomes from at least a dozen animal species. The structure in Plethodon is described in detail. Synapsis has been positively identified as the stage of meiotic prophase at which the complex occurs. Thus the complex is a part of bivalent chromosomes. It has not been seen in other stages or other divisions and is thus thought to be exclusively of synaptic occurrence. The term synaptinemal complex is suggested for the entire structure. By virtue of the material condensed around it, the complex is also seen in the light microscope where it appears as a fine, densely Feulgen-positive central core along the chromosome. The complex is thus closely associated with DNA, if not at least in part, composed of it. In the stages studied, homologous chromosomes are not always completely paired. The lateral elements of the complex separate and follow the single chromosome axes at these points. The central element disappears and thus may be a phenomenon of pairing. It is concluded that the lateral elements of the synaptinemal complex may more correctly be a "core" of the single meiotic prophase chromosome, possibly being concerned with its linear organization.

  11. The Relation between the Axial Complex of Meiotic Prophase Chromosomes and Chromosome Pairing in a Salamander (Plethodon cinereus)

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Montrose J.

    1958-01-01

    An investigation of the structure of meiotic chromosomes from primary spermatocytes of two salamanders, Plethodon cinereus and Desmognathus fusca, has been made using correlated light and electron microscopy. Feulgen squashes were compared with stained sections and these related to adjacent thin sections in the electron microscope. A transition from the familiar cytological preparation to the electron image was thus effected. A linear complex consisting of three parallel strands has been observed with the electron microscope, passing along the central axis of primary spermatocyte chromosomes. The complex is similar to that found in comparable chromosomes from at least a dozen animal species. The structure in Plethodon is described in detail. Synapsis has been positively identified as the stage of meiotic prophase at which the complex occurs. Thus the complex is a part of bivalent chromosomes. It has not been seen in other stages or other divisions and is thus thought to be exclusively of synaptic occurrence. The term synaptinemal complex is suggested for the entire structure. By virtue of the material condensed around it, the complex is also seen in the light microscope where it appears as a fine, densely Feulgen-positive central core along the chromosome. The complex is thus closely associated with DNA, if not at least in part, composed of it. In the stages studied, homologous chromosomes are not always completely paired. The lateral elements of the complex separate and follow the single chromosome axes at these points. The central element disappears and thus may be a phenomenon of pairing. It is concluded that the lateral elements of the synaptinemal complex may more correctly be a "core" of the single meiotic prophase chromosome, possibly being concerned with its linear organization. PMID:13587560

  12. Caenorhabditis elegans histone methyltransferase MET-2 shields the male X chromosome from checkpoint machinery and mediates meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Checchi, Paula M; Engebrecht, JoAnne

    2011-09-01

    Meiosis is a specialized form of cellular division that results in the precise halving of the genome to produce gametes for sexual reproduction. Checkpoints function during meiosis to detect errors and subsequently to activate a signaling cascade that prevents the formation of aneuploid gametes. Indeed, asynapsis of a homologous chromosome pair elicits a checkpoint response that can in turn trigger germline apoptosis. In a heterogametic germ line, however, sex chromosomes proceed through meiosis with unsynapsed regions and are not recognized by checkpoint machinery. We conducted a directed RNAi screen in Caenorhabditis elegans to identify regulatory factors that prevent recognition of heteromorphic sex chromosomes as unpaired and uncovered a role for the SET domain histone H3 lysine 9 histone methyltransferase (HMTase) MET-2 and two additional HMTases in shielding the male X from checkpoint machinery. We found that MET-2 also mediates the transcriptional silencing program of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) but not meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC), suggesting that these processes are distinct. Further, MSCI and checkpoint shielding can be uncoupled, as double-strand breaks targeted to an unpaired, transcriptionally silenced extra-chromosomal array induce checkpoint activation in germ lines depleted for met-2. In summary, our data uncover a mechanism by which repressive chromatin architecture enables checkpoint proteins to distinguish between the partnerless male X chromosome and asynapsed chromosomes thereby shielding the lone X from inappropriate activation of an apoptotic program.

  13. Plasticity in the Meiotic Epigenetic Landscape of Sex Chromosomes in Caenorhabditis Species

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Braden J.; Van, Mike V.; Nakayama, Taylor; Engebrecht, JoAnne

    2016-01-01

    During meiosis in the heterogametic sex in some species, sex chromosomes undergo meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), which results in acquisition of repressive chromatin and transcriptional silencing. In Caenorhabditis elegans, MSCI is mediated by MET-2 methyltransferase deposition of histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation. Here we examined the meiotic chromatin landscape in germ lines of four Caenorhabditis species; C. remanei and C. brenneri represent ancestral gonochorism, while C. briggsae and C. elegans are two lineages that independently evolved hermaphroditism. While MSCI is conserved across all four species, repressive chromatin modifications are distinct and do not correlate with reproductive mode. In contrast to C. elegans and C. remanei germ cells where X chromosomes are enriched for histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation, X chromosomes in C. briggsae and C. brenneri germ cells are enriched for histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation. Inactivation of C. briggsae MET-2 resulted in germ-line X chromosome transcription and checkpoint activation. Further, both histone H3 lysine 9 di- and trimethylation were reduced in Cbr-met-2 mutant germ lines, suggesting that in contrast to C. elegans, H3 lysine 9 di- and trimethylation are interdependent. C. briggsae H3 lysine 9 trimethylation was redistributed in the presence of asynapsed chromosomes in a sex-specific manner in the related process of meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin. However, these repressive marks did not influence X chromosome replication timing. Examination of additional Caenorhabditis species revealed diverse H3 lysine 9 methylation patterns on the X, suggesting that the sex chromosome epigenome evolves rapidly. PMID:27280692

  14. Plasticity in the Meiotic Epigenetic Landscape of Sex Chromosomes in Caenorhabditis Species.

    PubMed

    Larson, Braden J; Van, Mike V; Nakayama, Taylor; Engebrecht, JoAnne

    2016-08-01

    During meiosis in the heterogametic sex in some species, sex chromosomes undergo meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), which results in acquisition of repressive chromatin and transcriptional silencing. In Caenorhabditis elegans, MSCI is mediated by MET-2 methyltransferase deposition of histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation. Here we examined the meiotic chromatin landscape in germ lines of four Caenorhabditis species; C. remanei and C. brenneri represent ancestral gonochorism, while C. briggsae and C. elegans are two lineages that independently evolved hermaphroditism. While MSCI is conserved across all four species, repressive chromatin modifications are distinct and do not correlate with reproductive mode. In contrast to C. elegans and C. remanei germ cells where X chromosomes are enriched for histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation, X chromosomes in C. briggsae and C. brenneri germ cells are enriched for histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation. Inactivation of C. briggsae MET-2 resulted in germ-line X chromosome transcription and checkpoint activation. Further, both histone H3 lysine 9 di- and trimethylation were reduced in Cbr-met-2 mutant germ lines, suggesting that in contrast to C. elegans, H3 lysine 9 di- and trimethylation are interdependent. C. briggsae H3 lysine 9 trimethylation was redistributed in the presence of asynapsed chromosomes in a sex-specific manner in the related process of meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin. However, these repressive marks did not influence X chromosome replication timing. Examination of additional Caenorhabditis species revealed diverse H3 lysine 9 methylation patterns on the X, suggesting that the sex chromosome epigenome evolves rapidly.

  15. Arabidopsis Cell Division Cycle 20.1 Is Required for Normal Meiotic Spindle Assembly and Chromosome Segregation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Baixiao; Wang, Liudan; Ren, Ding; Ren, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Cell division requires proper spindle assembly; a surveillance pathway, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), monitors whether the spindle is normal and correctly attached to kinetochores. The SAC proteins regulate mitotic chromosome segregation by affecting CDC20 (Cell Division Cycle 20) function. However, it is unclear whether CDC20 regulates meiotic spindle assembly and proper homolog segregation. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana CDC20.1 gene is indispensable for meiosis and male fertility. We demonstrate that cdc20.1 meiotic chromosomes align asynchronously and segregate unequally and the metaphase I spindle has aberrant morphology. Comparison of the distribution of meiotic stages at different time points between the wild type and cdc20.1 reveals a delay of meiotic progression from diakinesis to anaphase I. Furthermore, cdc20.1 meiocytes exhibit an abnormal distribution of a histone H3 phosphorylation mark mediated by the Aurora kinase, providing evidence that CDC20.1 regulates Aurora localization for meiotic chromosome segregation. Further evidence that CDC20.1 and Aurora are functionally related was provided by meiosis-specific knockdown of At-Aurora1 expression, resulting in meiotic chromosome segregation defects similar to those of cdc20.1. Taken together, these results suggest a critical role for CDC20.1 in SAC-dependent meiotic chromosome segregation. PMID:26672070

  16. Histone H2AFX Links Meiotic Chromosome Asynapsis to Prophase I Oocyte Loss in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Cloutier, Jeffrey M.; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K.; ElInati, Elias; Nussenzweig, André; Tóth, Attila; Turner, James M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome abnormalities are common in the human population, causing germ cell loss at meiotic prophase I and infertility. The mechanisms driving this loss are unknown, but persistent meiotic DNA damage and asynapsis may be triggers. Here we investigate the contribution of these lesions to oocyte elimination in mice with chromosome abnormalities, e.g. Turner syndrome (XO) and translocations. We show that asynapsed chromosomes trigger oocyte elimination at diplonema, which is linked to the presence of phosphorylated H2AFX (γH2AFX). We find that DNA double-strand break (DSB) foci disappear on asynapsed chromosomes during pachynema, excluding persistent DNA damage as a likely cause, and demonstrating the existence in mammalian oocytes of a repair pathway for asynapsis-associated DNA DSBs. Importantly, deletion or point mutation of H2afx restores oocyte numbers in XO females to wild type (XX) levels. Unexpectedly, we find that asynapsed supernumerary chromosomes do not elicit prophase I loss, despite being enriched for γH2AFX and other checkpoint proteins. These results suggest that oocyte loss cannot be explained simply by asynapsis checkpoint models, but is related to the gene content of asynapsed chromosomes. A similar mechanistic basis for oocyte loss may operate in humans with chromosome abnormalities. PMID:26509888

  17. The mismatch repair system reduces meiotic homeologous recombination and stimulates recombination-dependent chromosome loss.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, S R; Hunter, N; Louis, E J; Borts, R H

    1996-01-01

    Efficient genetic recombination requires near-perfect homology between participating molecules. Sequence divergence reduces the frequency of recombination, a process that is dependent on the activity of the mismatch repair system. The effects of chromosomal divergence in diploids of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which one copy of chromosome III is derived from a closely related species, Saccharomyces paradoxus, have been examined. Meiotic recombination between the diverged chromosomes is decreased by 25-fold. Spore viability is reduced with an observable increase in the number of tetrads with only two or three viable spores. Asci with only two viable spores are disomic for chromosome III, consistent with meiosis I nondisjunction of the homeologs. Asci with three viable spores are highly enriched for recombinants relative to tetrads with four viable spores. In 96% of the class with three viable spores, only one spore possesses a recombinant chromosome III, suggesting that the recombination process itself contributes to meiotic death. This phenomenon is dependent on the activities of the mismatch repair genes PMS1 and MSH2. A model of mismatch-stimulated chromosome loss is proposed to account for this observation. As expected, crossing over is increased in pms1 and msh2 mutants. Furthermore, genetic exchange in pms1 msh2 double mutants is affected to a greater extent than in either mutant alone, suggesting that the two proteins act independently to inhibit homeologous recombination. All mismatch repair-deficient strains exhibited reductions in the rate of chromosome III nondisjunction. PMID:8887641

  18. Histone H2AFX Links Meiotic Chromosome Asynapsis to Prophase I Oocyte Loss in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Jeffrey M; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; ElInati, Elias; Nussenzweig, André; Tóth, Attila; Turner, James M A

    2015-10-01

    Chromosome abnormalities are common in the human population, causing germ cell loss at meiotic prophase I and infertility. The mechanisms driving this loss are unknown, but persistent meiotic DNA damage and asynapsis may be triggers. Here we investigate the contribution of these lesions to oocyte elimination in mice with chromosome abnormalities, e.g. Turner syndrome (XO) and translocations. We show that asynapsed chromosomes trigger oocyte elimination at diplonema, which is linked to the presence of phosphorylated H2AFX (γH2AFX). We find that DNA double-strand break (DSB) foci disappear on asynapsed chromosomes during pachynema, excluding persistent DNA damage as a likely cause, and demonstrating the existence in mammalian oocytes of a repair pathway for asynapsis-associated DNA DSBs. Importantly, deletion or point mutation of H2afx restores oocyte numbers in XO females to wild type (XX) levels. Unexpectedly, we find that asynapsed supernumerary chromosomes do not elicit prophase I loss, despite being enriched for γH2AFX and other checkpoint proteins. These results suggest that oocyte loss cannot be explained simply by asynapsis checkpoint models, but is related to the gene content of asynapsed chromosomes. A similar mechanistic basis for oocyte loss may operate in humans with chromosome abnormalities.

  19. A constitutional complex chromosome rearrangement involving meiotic arrest in an azoospermic male: case report.

    PubMed

    Coco, R; Rahn, M I; Estanga, P García; Antonioli, G; Solari, A J

    2004-12-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements are rare aberrations that frequently lead to reproductive failure and that may hinder assisted reproduction. A 25-year-old azoospermic male was studied cytogenetically with synaptonemal complex analysis of spermatocytes from a testicular biopsy and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of lymphocytes. The spermatocytes showed a pentavalent plus a univalent chromosome. Cell death occurred mainly at advanced pachytene stages. The sex chromosomes were involved in the multiple, as shown by their typical axial excrescences. Two autosomal pairs, including an acrocentric chromosome (15), were also involved in the multiple. FISH allowed the definite identification of all the involved chromosomes. An inverted chromosome 12 is translocated with most of one long arm of chromosome 15, while the centromeric piece of this chromosome 15 is translocated with Yqh, forming a small marker chromosome t(15;Y). The euchromatic part of the Y chromosome is joined to the remaining piece of chromosome 12, forming a neo-Y chromosome. The patient shows azoospermia and a normal phenotype. The disruption of spermatogenesis is hypothetically due to the extent of asynaptic segments and to sex-body association during pachytene. This CCR occurred 'de novo' during paternal spermatogenesis. Meiotic analysis and FISH are valuable diagnostic tools in these cases.

  20. Lack of global meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, and paucity of tissue-specific gene expression on the Drosophila X chromosome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Paucity of male-biased genes on the Drosophila X chromosome is a well-established phenomenon, thought to be specifically linked to the role of these genes in reproduction and/or their expression in the meiotic male germline. In particular, meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) has been widely considered a driving force behind depletion of spermatocyte-biased X-linked genes in Drosophila by analogy with mammals, even though the existence of global MCSI in Drosophila has not been proven. Results Microarray-based study and qRT-PCR analyses show that the dynamics of gene expression during testis development are very similar between X-linked and autosomal genes, with both showing transcriptional activation concomitant with meiosis. However, the genes showing at least ten-fold expression bias toward testis are significantly underrepresented on the X chromosome. Intriguingly, the genes with similar expression bias toward tissues other than testis, even those not apparently associated with reproduction, are also strongly underrepresented on the X. Bioinformatics analysis shows that while tissue-specific genes often bind silencing-associated factors in embryonic and cultured cells, this trend is less prominent for the X-linked genes. Conclusions Our data show that the global meiotic inactivation of the X chromosome does not occur in Drosophila. Paucity of testis-biased genes on the X appears not to be linked to reproduction or germline-specific events, but rather reflects a general underrepresentation of tissue-biased genes on this chromosome. Our analyses suggest that the activation/repression switch mechanisms that probably orchestrate the highly-biased expression of tissue-specific genes are generally not efficient on the X chromosome. This effect, probably caused by dosage compensation counteracting repression of the X-linked genes, may be the cause of the exodus of highly tissue-biased genes to the autosomes. PMID:21542906

  1. Pachytene asynapsis drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and leads to substantial postmeiotic repression in spermatids.

    PubMed

    Turner, James M A; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Ellis, Peter J I; Mitchell, Michael J; Burgoyne, Paul S

    2006-04-01

    Transcriptional silencing of the sex chromosomes during male meiosis (MSCI) is conserved among organisms with limited sex chromosome synapsis, including mammals. Since the 1990s the prevailing view has been that MSCI in mammals is transient, with sex chromosome reactivation occurring as cells exit meiosis. Recently, we found that any chromosome region unsynapsed during pachytene of male and female mouse meiosis is subject to transcriptional silencing (MSUC), and we hypothesized that MSCI is an inevitable consequence of this more general meiotic silencing mechanism. Here, we provide direct evidence that asynapsis does indeed drive MSCI. We also show that a substantial degree of transcriptional repression of the sex chromosomes is retained postmeiotically, and we provide evidence that this postmeiotic repression is a downstream consequence of MSCI/MSUC. While this postmeiotic repression occurs after the loss of MSUC-related proteins at the end of prophase, other histone modifications associated with transcriptional repression have by then become established.

  2. Abnormal meiotic recombination with complex chromosomal rearrangement in an azoospermic man.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liu; Iqbal, Furhan; Li, Guangyuan; Jiang, Xiaohua; Bukhari, Ihtisham; Jiang, Hanwei; Yang, Qingling; Zhong, Liangwen; Zhang, Yuanwei; Hua, Juan; Cooke, Howard J; Shi, Qinghua

    2015-06-01

    Spermatocyte spreading and immunostaining were applied to detect meiotic prophase I progression, homologous chromosome pairing, synapsis and recombination in an azoospermic reciprocal translocation 46, XY, t(5;7;9;13)(5q11;7p11;7p15;9q12;13p12) carrier. Histological examination of the haematoxylin and eosin stained testicular sections revealed reduced germ cells with no spermatids or sperm in the patient. TdT (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase)-mediated dUDP nick-end labelling assay showed apoptotic cells in testicular sections of translocation carrier. Immnunofluorescence analysis indicated the presence of an octavalent in all the pachytene spermatocytes analysed in the patient. Meiotic progression was disturbed, as an increase in zygotene (P < 0.001) and decrease in the pachytene spermatocytes (P < 0.001) were observed in the t(5;7;9;13) carrier compared with controls. It was further observed that 93% of octavalents were found partially asynapsed between homologous chromosomes. A significant decrease in the recombination frequency was observed on 5p, 5q, 7q, 9p and 13q in the translocation carrier compared with the reported controls. A significant reduction in XY recombination frequency was also found in the participants. Our results indicated that complex chromosomal rearrangements can impair synaptic integrity of translocated chromosomes, which may reduce chromosomal recombination on translocated as well as non-translocated chromosomes, a phenomenon commonly known as interchromosomal effect.

  3. Differing Requirements for RAD51 and DMC1 in Meiotic Pairing of Centromeres and Chromosome Arms in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Da Ines, Olivier; Abe, Kiyomi; Goubely, Chantal; Gallego, Maria Eugenia; White, Charles I.

    2012-01-01

    During meiosis homologous chromosomes pair, recombine, and synapse, thus ensuring accurate chromosome segregation and the halving of ploidy necessary for gametogenesis. The processes permitting a chromosome to pair only with its homologue are not fully understood, but successful pairing of homologous chromosomes is tightly linked to recombination. In Arabidopsis thaliana, meiotic prophase of rad51, xrcc3, and rad51C mutants appears normal up to the zygotene/pachytene stage, after which the genome fragments, leading to sterility. To better understand the relationship between recombination and chromosome pairing, we have analysed meiotic chromosome pairing in these and in dmc1 mutant lines. Our data show a differing requirement for these proteins in pairing of centromeric regions and chromosome arms. No homologous pairing of mid-arm or distal regions was observed in rad51, xrcc3, and rad51C mutants. However, homologous centromeres do pair in these mutants and we show that this does depend upon recombination, principally on DMC1. This centromere pairing extends well beyond the heterochromatic centromere region and, surprisingly, does not require XRCC3 and RAD51C. In addition to clarifying and bringing the roles of centromeres in meiotic synapsis to the fore, this analysis thus separates the roles in meiotic synapsis of DMC1 and RAD51 and the meiotic RAD51 paralogs, XRCC3 and RAD51C, with respect to different chromosome domains. PMID:22532804

  4. Differing requirements for RAD51 and DMC1 in meiotic pairing of centromeres and chromosome arms in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Da Ines, Olivier; Abe, Kiyomi; Goubely, Chantal; Gallego, Maria Eugenia; White, Charles I

    2012-01-01

    During meiosis homologous chromosomes pair, recombine, and synapse, thus ensuring accurate chromosome segregation and the halving of ploidy necessary for gametogenesis. The processes permitting a chromosome to pair only with its homologue are not fully understood, but successful pairing of homologous chromosomes is tightly linked to recombination. In Arabidopsis thaliana, meiotic prophase of rad51, xrcc3, and rad51C mutants appears normal up to the zygotene/pachytene stage, after which the genome fragments, leading to sterility. To better understand the relationship between recombination and chromosome pairing, we have analysed meiotic chromosome pairing in these and in dmc1 mutant lines. Our data show a differing requirement for these proteins in pairing of centromeric regions and chromosome arms. No homologous pairing of mid-arm or distal regions was observed in rad51, xrcc3, and rad51C mutants. However, homologous centromeres do pair in these mutants and we show that this does depend upon recombination, principally on DMC1. This centromere pairing extends well beyond the heterochromatic centromere region and, surprisingly, does not require XRCC3 and RAD51C. In addition to clarifying and bringing the roles of centromeres in meiotic synapsis to the fore, this analysis thus separates the roles in meiotic synapsis of DMC1 and RAD51 and the meiotic RAD51 paralogs, XRCC3 and RAD51C, with respect to different chromosome domains.

  5. An analysis of meiotic impairment and of sex chromosome associations throughout meiosis in XYY mice.

    PubMed

    Mahadevaiah, S K; Evans, E P; Burgoyne, P S

    2000-01-01

    The existing XYY meiotic data for mice present a very heterogeneous picture with respect to the relative frequencies of different sex chromosome associations, both at pachytene and diakinesis/metaphase I. Furthermore, where both pachytene and diakinesis/MI data are available for the same males, the frequencies of the different configurations at the two stages are very different. In the present paper we utilise "XYY" and "XY/XYY" mosaic mice with cytologically distinguishable Y chromosomes to investigate the factors responsible for this heterogeneity between different males and between the two meiotic stages. It is concluded (1) that the initial pattern of synapsis is driven by the relatedness of the three pseudoautosomal regions (PARs); (2) that the order and extent of PAR synapsis within radial trivalents are also affected by PAR relatedness and that this leads to chiasmata being preferentially formed between closely related PARs; (3) that trivalents with a single chiasma resolve into a bivalent + univalent by the diakinesis stage; (4) that although many spermatocytes with asynapsed sex chromosomes are eliminated between pachytene and diakinesis, those that survive this phase of elimination progress to the first meiotic metaphase (MI) and accumulate in large numbers, leading to an over-representation of those with univalents as compared to radial trivalents; and (5) that the arrested MI cells are eventually eliminated, so that very few "XYY" cells contribute products to MII.

  6. Separation of meiotic and mitotic effects of claret non-disjunctional on chromosome segregation in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Komma, D J; Horne, A S; Endow, S A

    1991-01-01

    The claret (ca) locus in Drosophila encodes a kinesin-related motor molecule that is required for proper distribution of chromosomes in meiosis in females and in the early mitotic divisions of the embryo. Here we demonstrate that a mutant allele of claret non-disjunctional (ca(nd)), non-claret disjunctional Dominant (ncdD), causes abnormalities in meiotic chromosome segregation, but is near wild-type with respect to early mitotic chromosome segregation. DNA sequence analysis of this mutant allele reveals two missense mutations compared with the predicted wild-type protein. One mutation lies in a proposed microtubule binding region of the motor domain and affects an amino acid residue that is conserved in all kinesin-related proteins reported to date. This region of the motor domain can be used to distinguish meiotic and mitotic motor function, defining an amino acid sequence criterion for classifying motors according to function. ncdD's mutant meiotic effect, but near wild-type mitotic effect, suggests that interactions of the ca motor protein with spindle microtubules differ in meiosis and mitosis. Images PMID:1825056

  7. Meiotic prophase roles of Rec8 in crossover recombination and chromosome structure

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang-Wook; Lee, Min-Su; Xaver, Martin; Zhang, Liangran; Hong, Soo-Gil; Kong, Yoon-Ju; Cho, Hong-Rae; Kleckner, Nancy; Kim, Keun P.

    2016-01-01

    Rec8 is a prominent component of the meiotic prophase chromosome axis that mediates sister chromatid cohesion, homologous recombination and chromosome synapsis. Here, we explore the prophase roles of Rec8. (i) During the meiotic divisions, Rec8 phosphorylation mediates its separase-mediated cleavage. We show here that such cleavage plays no detectable role for chromosomal events of prophase. (ii) We have analyzed in detail three rec8 phospho-mutants, with 6, 24 or 29 alanine substitutions. A distinct ‘separation of function’ phenotype is revealed. In the mutants, axis formation and recombination initiation are normal, as is non-crossover recombination; in contrast, crossover (CO)-related events are defective. Moreover, the severities of these defects increase coordinately with the number of substitution mutations, consistent with the possibility that global phosphorylation of Rec8 is important for these effects. (iii) We have analyzed the roles of three kinases that phosphorylate Rec8 during prophase. Timed inhibition of Dbf4-dependent Cdc7 kinase confers defects concordant with rec8 phospho-mutant phenotypes. Inhibition of Hrr25 or Cdc5/polo-like kinase does not. Our results suggest that Rec8's prophase function, independently of cohesin cleavage, contributes to CO-specific events in conjunction with the maintenance of homolog bias at the leptotene/zygotene transition of meiotic prophase. PMID:27484478

  8. Modeling meiotic chromosome pairing: nuclear envelope attachment, telomere-led active random motion, and anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Wallace F.; Fung, Jennifer C.

    2016-04-01

    The recognition and pairing of homologous chromosomes during meiosis is a complex physical and molecular process involving a combination of polymer dynamics and molecular recognition events. Two highly conserved features of meiotic chromosome behavior are the attachment of telomeres to the nuclear envelope and the active random motion of telomeres driven by their interaction with cytoskeletal motor proteins. Both of these features have been proposed to facilitate the process of homolog pairing, but exactly what role these features play in meiosis remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the roles of active motion and nuclear envelope tethering using a Brownian dynamics simulation in which meiotic chromosomes are represented by a Rouse polymer model subjected to tethering and active forces at the telomeres. We find that tethering telomeres to the nuclear envelope slows down pairing relative to the rates achieved by unattached chromosomes, but that randomly directed active forces applied to the telomeres speed up pairing dramatically in a manner that depends on the statistical properties of the telomere force fluctuations. The increased rate of initial pairing cannot be explained by stretching out of the chromosome conformation but instead seems to correlate with anomalous diffusion of sub-telomeric regions.

  9. DNA methylation epigenetically silences crossover hot spots and controls chromosomal domains of meiotic recombination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yelina, Nataliya E; Lambing, Christophe; Hardcastle, Thomas J; Zhao, Xiaohui; Santos, Bruno; Henderson, Ian R

    2015-10-15

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes undergo crossover recombination, which is typically concentrated in narrow hot spots that are controlled by genetic and epigenetic information. Arabidopsis chromosomes are highly DNA methylated in the repetitive centromeres, which are also crossover-suppressed. Here we demonstrate that RNA-directed DNA methylation is sufficient to locally silence Arabidopsis euchromatic crossover hot spots and is associated with increased nucleosome density and H3K9me2. However, loss of CG DNA methylation maintenance in met1 triggers epigenetic crossover remodeling at the chromosome scale, with pericentromeric decreases and euchromatic increases in recombination. We used recombination mutants that alter interfering and noninterfering crossover repair pathways (fancm and zip4) to demonstrate that remodeling primarily involves redistribution of interfering crossovers. Using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing, we show that crossover remodeling is driven by loss of CG methylation within the centromeric regions. Using cytogenetics, we profiled meiotic DNA double-strand break (DSB) foci in met1 and found them unchanged relative to wild type. We propose that met1 chromosome structure is altered, causing centromere-proximal DSBs to be inhibited from maturation into interfering crossovers. These data demonstrate that DNA methylation is sufficient to silence crossover hot spots and plays a key role in establishing domains of meiotic recombination along chromosomes.

  10. Modeling meiotic chromosome pairing: nuclear envelope attachment, telomere-led active random motion, and anomalous diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Wallace F.; Fung, Jennifer C.

    2016-01-01

    The recognition and pairing of homologous chromosomes during meiosis is a complex physical and molecular process involving a combination of polymer dynamics and molecular recognition events. Two highly conserved features of meiotic chromosome behavior are the attachment of telomeres to the nuclear envelope and the active random motion of telomeres driven by their interaction with cytoskeletal motor proteins. Both of these features have been proposed to facilitate the process of homolog pairing, but exactly what role these features play in meiosis remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the roles of active motion and nuclear envelope tethering using a Brownian dynamics simulation in which meiotic chromosomes are represented by a Rouse polymer model subjected to tethering and active forces at the telomeres. We find that tethering telomeres to the nuclear envelope slows down pairing relative to the rates achieved by un-attached chromosomes, but that randomly-directed active forces applied to the telomeres speeds up pairing dramatically in a manner that depends on the statistical properties of the telomere force fluctuations. The increased rate of initial pairing cannot be explained by stretching out of the chromosome conformation but instead seems to correlate with anomalous diffusion of sub-telomeric regions. PMID:27046097

  11. RNF8 regulates active epigenetic modifications and escape gene activation from inactive sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids.

    PubMed

    Sin, Ho-Su; Barski, Artem; Zhang, Fan; Kartashov, Andrey V; Nussenzweig, Andre; Chen, Junjie; Andreassen, Paul R; Namekawa, Satoshi H

    2012-12-15

    Sex chromosomes are uniquely subject to chromosome-wide silencing during male meiosis, and silencing persists into post-meiotic spermatids. Against this background, a select set of sex chromosome-linked genes escapes silencing and is activated in post-meiotic spermatids. Here, we identify a novel mechanism that regulates escape gene activation in an environment of chromosome-wide silencing in murine germ cells. We show that RNF8-dependent ubiquitination of histone H2A during meiosis establishes active epigenetic modifications, including dimethylation of H3K4 on the sex chromosomes. RNF8-dependent active epigenetic memory, defined by dimethylation of H3K4, persists throughout meiotic division. Various active epigenetic modifications are subsequently established on the sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids. These RNF8-dependent modifications include trimethylation of H3K4, histone lysine crotonylation (Kcr), and incorporation of the histone variant H2AFZ. RNF8-dependent epigenetic programming regulates escape gene activation from inactive sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids. Kcr accumulates at transcriptional start sites of sex-linked genes activated in an RNF8-dependent manner, and a chromatin conformational change is associated with RNF8-dependent epigenetic programming. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this RNF8-dependent pathway is distinct from that which recognizes DNA double-strand breaks. Our results establish a novel connection between a DNA damage response factor (RNF8) and epigenetic programming, specifically in establishing active epigenetic modifications and gene activation.

  12. RNF8 regulates active epigenetic modifications and escape gene activation from inactive sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Ho-Su; Barski, Artem; Zhang, Fan; Kartashov, Andrey V.; Nussenzweig, Andre; Chen, Junjie; Andreassen, Paul R.; Namekawa, Satoshi H.

    2012-01-01

    Sex chromosomes are uniquely subject to chromosome-wide silencing during male meiosis, and silencing persists into post-meiotic spermatids. Against this background, a select set of sex chromosome-linked genes escapes silencing and is activated in post-meiotic spermatids. Here, we identify a novel mechanism that regulates escape gene activation in an environment of chromosome-wide silencing in murine germ cells. We show that RNF8-dependent ubiquitination of histone H2A during meiosis establishes active epigenetic modifications, including dimethylation of H3K4 on the sex chromosomes. RNF8-dependent active epigenetic memory, defined by dimethylation of H3K4, persists throughout meiotic division. Various active epigenetic modifications are subsequently established on the sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids. These RNF8-dependent modifications include trimethylation of H3K4, histone lysine crotonylation (Kcr), and incorporation of the histone variant H2AFZ. RNF8-dependent epigenetic programming regulates escape gene activation from inactive sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids. Kcr accumulates at transcriptional start sites of sex-linked genes activated in an RNF8-dependent manner, and a chromatin conformational change is associated with RNF8-dependent epigenetic programming. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this RNF8-dependent pathway is distinct from that which recognizes DNA double-strand breaks. Our results establish a novel connection between a DNA damage response factor (RNF8) and epigenetic programming, specifically in establishing active epigenetic modifications and gene activation. PMID:23249736

  13. Chromosome-wide nucleosome replacement and H3.3 incorporation during mammalian meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Godfried W; Derijck, Alwin A H A; Pósfai, Eszter; Giele, Maud; Pelczar, Pawel; Ramos, Liliana; Wansink, Derick G; van der Vlag, Johan; Peters, Antoine H F M; de Boer, Peter

    2007-02-01

    In mammalian males, the first meiotic prophase is characterized by formation of a separate chromatin domain called the sex body. In this domain, the X and Y chromosomes are partially synapsed and transcriptionally silenced, a process termed meiotic sex-chromosome inactivation (MSCI). Likewise, unsynapsed autosomal chromatin present during pachytene is also silenced (meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin, MSUC). Although it is known that MSCI and MSUC are both dependent on histone H2A.X phosphorylation mediated by the kinase ATR, and cause repressive H3 Lys9 dimethylation, the mechanisms underlying silencing are largely unidentified. Here, we demonstrate an extensive replacement of nucleosomes within unsynapsed chromatin, depending on and initiated shortly after induction of MSCI and MSUC. Nucleosomal eviction results in the exclusive incorporation of the H3.3 variant, which to date has primarily been associated with transcriptional activity. Nucleosomal exchange causes loss and subsequent selective reacquisition of specific histone modifications. This process therefore provides a means for epigenetic reprogramming of sex chromatin presumably required for gene silencing in the male mammalian germ line.

  14. Chromosome Synapsis Alleviates Mek1-Dependent Suppression of Meiotic DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Vijayalakshmi V.; MacQueen, Amy J.; Vader, Gerben; Shinohara, Miki; Sanchez, Aurore; Borde, Valérie; Shinohara, Akira; Hochwagen, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Faithful meiotic chromosome segregation and fertility require meiotic recombination between homologous chromosomes rather than the equally available sister chromatid, a bias that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on the meiotic kinase, Mek1. Mek1 is thought to mediate repair template bias by specifically suppressing sister-directed repair. Instead, we found that when Mek1 persists on closely paired (synapsed) homologues, DNA repair is severely delayed, suggesting that Mek1 suppresses any proximal repair template. Accordingly, Mek1 is excluded from synapsed homologues in wild-type cells. Exclusion requires the AAA+-ATPase Pch2 and is directly coupled to synaptonemal complex assembly. Stage-specific depletion experiments further demonstrate that DNA repair in the context of synapsed homologues requires Rad54, a repair factor inhibited by Mek1. These data indicate that the sister template is distinguished from the homologue primarily by its closer proximity to inhibitory Mek1 activity. We propose that once pairing or synapsis juxtaposes homologues, exclusion of Mek1 is necessary to avoid suppression of all templates and accelerate repair progression. PMID:26870961

  15. A developmentally regulated translational control pathway establishes the meiotic chromosome segregation pattern

    PubMed Central

    Berchowitz, Luke E.; Gajadhar, Aaron S.; van Werven, Folkert J.; De Rosa, Alexandra A.; Samoylova, Mariya L.; Brar, Gloria A.; Xu, Yifeng; Xiao, Che; Futcher, Bruce; Weissman, Jonathan S.; White, Forest M.; Amon, Angelika

    2013-01-01

    Production of haploid gametes from diploid progenitor cells is mediated by a specialized cell division, meiosis, where two divisions, meiosis I and II, follow a single S phase. Errors in progression from meiosis I to meiosis II lead to aneuploid and polyploid gametes, but the regulatory mechanisms controlling this transition are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the conserved kinase Ime2 regulates the timing and order of the meiotic divisions by controlling translation. Ime2 coordinates translational activation of a cluster of genes at the meiosis I–meiosis II transition, including the critical determinant of the meiotic chromosome segregation pattern CLB3. We further show that Ime2 mediates translational control through the meiosis-specific RNA-binding protein Rim4. Rim4 inhibits translation of CLB3 during meiosis I by interacting with the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of CLB3. At the onset of meiosis II, Ime2 kinase activity rises and triggers a decrease in Rim4 protein levels, thereby alleviating translational repression. Our results elucidate a novel developmentally regulated translational control pathway that establishes the meiotic chromosome segregation pattern. PMID:24115771

  16. The Meiotic Nuclear Lamina Regulates Chromosome Dynamics and Promotes Efficient Homologous Recombination in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Johannes; Göb, Eva; Baar, Johannes; Ortega, Sagrario; Benavente, Ricardo; Alsheimer, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is the structural scaffold of the nuclear envelope and is well known for its central role in nuclear organization and maintaining nuclear stability and shape. In the past, a number of severe human disorders have been identified to be associated with mutations in lamins. Extensive research on this topic has provided novel important clues about nuclear lamina function. These studies have contributed to the knowledge that the lamina constitutes a complex multifunctional platform combining both structural and regulatory functions. Here, we report that, in addition to the previously demonstrated significance for somatic cell differentiation and maintenance, the nuclear lamina is also an essential determinant for germ cell development. Both male and female mice lacking the short meiosis-specific A-type lamin C2 have a severely defective meiosis, which at least in the male results in infertility. Detailed analysis revealed that lamin C2 is required for telomere-driven dynamic repositioning of meiotic chromosomes. Loss of lamin C2 affects precise synapsis of the homologs and interferes with meiotic double-strand break repair. Taken together, our data explain how the nuclear lamina contributes to meiotic chromosome behaviour and accurate genome haploidization on a mechanistic level. PMID:23382700

  17. Evidence that meiotic sex chromosome inactivation is essential for male fertility.

    PubMed

    Royo, Hélène; Polikiewicz, Grzegorz; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Prosser, Haydn; Mitchell, Mike; Bradley, Allan; de Rooij, Dirk G; Burgoyne, Paul S; Turner, James M A

    2010-12-07

    The mammalian X and Y chromosomes share little homology and are largely unsynapsed during normal meiosis. This asynapsis triggers inactivation of X- and Y-linked genes, or meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). Whether MSCI is essential for male meiosis is unclear. Pachytene arrest and apoptosis is observed in mouse mutants in which MSCI fails, e.g., Brca1(-/-), H2afx(-/-), Sycp1(-/-), and Msh5(-/-). However, these also harbor defects in synapsis and/or recombination and as such may activate a putative pachytene checkpoint. Here we present evidence that MSCI failure is sufficient to cause pachytene arrest. XYY males exhibit Y-Y synapsis and Y chromosomal escape from MSCI without accompanying synapsis/recombination defects. We find that XYY males, like synapsis/recombination mutants, display pachytene arrest and that this can be circumvented by preventing Y-Y synapsis and associated Y gene expression. Pachytene expression of individual Y genes inserted as transgenes on autosomes shows that expression of the Zfy 1/2 paralogs in XY males is sufficient to phenocopy the pachytene arrest phenotype; insertion of Zfy 1/2 on the X chromosome where they are subject to MSCI prevents this response. Our findings show that MSCI is essential for male meiosis and, as such, provide insight into the differential severity of meiotic mutations' effects on male and female meiosis.

  18. Diversity and abundance of the abnormal chromosome 10 meiotic drive complex in Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Kanizay, L B; Pyhäjärvi, T; Lowry, E G; Hufford, M B; Peterson, D G; Ross-Ibarra, J; Dawe, R K

    2013-01-01

    Maize Abnormal chromosome 10 (Ab10) contains a classic meiotic drive system that exploits the asymmetry of meiosis to preferentially transmit itself and other chromosomes containing specialized heterochromatic regions called knobs. The structure and diversity of the Ab10 meiotic drive haplotype is poorly understood. We developed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library from an Ab10 line and used the data to develop sequence-based markers, focusing on the proximal portion of the haplotype that shows partial homology to normal chromosome 10. These molecular and additional cytological data demonstrate that two previously identified Ab10 variants (Ab10-I and Ab10-II) share a common origin. Dominant PCR markers were used with fluorescence in situ hybridization to assay 160 diverse teosinte and maize landrace populations from across the Americas, resulting in the identification of a previously unknown but prevalent form of Ab10 (Ab10-III). We find that Ab10 occurs in at least 75% of teosinte populations at a mean frequency of 15%. Ab10 was also found in 13% of the maize landraces, but does not appear to be fixed in any wild or cultivated population. Quantitative analyses suggest that the abundance and distribution of Ab10 is governed by a complex combination of intrinsic fitness effects as well as extrinsic environmental variability. PMID:23443059

  19. ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS ON THE SUBMICROSCOPIC MORPHOLOGY OF THE MEIOTIC NUCLEUS AND CHROMOSOMES

    PubMed Central

    De Robertis, E.

    1956-01-01

    Thin sections of the testicular follicles of the grasshopper Laplatacris dispar were studied under the electron microscope. In the primary spermatocytes, during meiotic prophase, three main regions can be recognized within the nucleus: (1) the nucleolus and associated nucleolar material; (2) the interchromosomal regions with the dense particles; and (3) the chromosomes. The nucleolus is generally compact and is surrounded by nucleolar bodies that comprise aggregations of dense round particles 100 to 250 A in diameter. A continuous transition can be observed between these particles and those found isolated or in short chains in the interchromosomal spaces. Particles of similar size (mean diameter of 160 A) can be found associated with the nuclear membrane and in the cytoplasm. The chromosomes show different degrees of condensation in different stages of meiotic prophase. The bulk of the chromosome appears to be made of very fine and irregularly coiled filaments of macromolecular dimensions. Their length cannot be determined because of the thinness of the section but some of them can be followed without interruption for about 1000 to 2000 A. The thickness of the chromosome filaments seems to vary with different stages of prophase and in metaphase. In early prophase, filaments vary between 28 ± 7 A and 84 ± 7 A with a mean of 47 A, in late prophase the mean is about 70 A. In metaphase the filaments vary between 60 and 170 A with a mean of about 100 A. Neither the prophase nor the metaphase chromosomes have a membrane or other inhomogeneities. The finding of a macromolecular filamentous component of chromosomes is discussed in relation to the physicochemical literature on nucleoproteins and nucleic acids and as a result it is suggested that the thinnest chromosome filaments (28 ± 7 A) probably represent single deoxyribonucleoprotein molecules. PMID:13398445

  20. Probing the meiotic mechanism of intergenomic exchanges by genomic in situ hybridization on lampbrush chromosomes of unisexual Ambystoma (Amphibia: Caudata).

    PubMed

    Bi, Ke; Bogart, James P

    2010-04-01

    The meiotic mechanism of unisexual salamanders in the genus Ambystoma was previously explained by observing lampbrush chromosomes (LBCs). In polyploid unisexual females, a pre-meiotic endomitotic event doubles the chromosome number so that, after meiotic reduction, the mature eggs have the same ploidy as the female. It was assumed that synapses during meiotic I prophase, which result in observed bivalents, join duplicated sister chromosomes. Previous studies also found LBC quadrivalents in some oocytes that could be explained by occasional synapses between homologs. The discovery of widespread intergenomic exchanges among unisexual populations has prompted new speculations on this meiotic mechanism. Synapses that involve homeologous chromosomes may be frequent during meiosis and could be responsible for intergenomic exchanges and the high embryonic mortality of unisexuals. Furthermore, LBC quadrivalents may be established by associations between homeologous rather than homologous chromosomes. The present study investigated these two important aspects pertaining to the mechanism of intergenomic exchanges: the frequency of homeologous synapses and the relationship between homeologous associations and meiotic quadrivalents. We applied genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) on LBCs from oocytes of 14 triploid and two tetraploid unisexual females. Homeologous bivalents were not observed, and all 13 LBC quadrivalents that we found were the result of homologous synapses and were not associated with any homeologous or exchanged LBCs. Intergenomic exchanges were used as markers to compare the same chromosomes at meiotic diplotene and mitotic metaphase stages. We conclude that contemporary intergenomic exchanges are very rare, and no direct link exists between intergenomic exchanges and high embryonic mortality. The actual mechanisms and evolutionary implications of intergenomic exchanges appear to be complicated and difficult to assess. The application of GISH-type molecular

  1. Zfy genes are required for efficient meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) in spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Vernet, Nadège; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; de Rooij, Dirk G; Burgoyne, Paul S; Ellis, Peter J I

    2016-10-13

    During spermatogenesis, germ cells that fail to synapse their chromosomes or fail to undergo meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) are eliminated via apoptosis during mid-pachytene. Previous work showed that Y-linked genes Zfy1 and Zfy2 act as 'executioners' for this checkpoint, and that wrongful expression of either gene during pachytene triggers germ cell death. Here, we show that in mice, Zfy genes are also necessary for efficient MSCI and the sex chromosomes are not correctly silenced in Zfy-deficient spermatocytes. This unexpectedly reveals a triple role for Zfy at the mid-pachytene checkpoint in which Zfy genes first promote MSCI, then monitor its progress (since if MSCI is achieved, Zfy genes will be silenced), and finally execute cells with MSCI failure. This potentially constitutes a negative feedback loop governing this critical checkpoint mechanism.

  2. Meiotic Recombination Analyses of Individual Chromosomes in Male Domestic Pigs (Sus scrofa domestica)

    PubMed Central

    Mary, Nicolas; Barasc, Harmonie; Ferchaud, Stéphane; Billon, Yvon; Meslier, Frédéric; Robelin, David; Calgaro, Anne; Loustau-Dudez, Anne-Marie; Bonnet, Nathalie; Yerle, Martine; Acloque, Hervé; Ducos, Alain; Pinton, Alain

    2014-01-01

    For the first time in the domestic pig, meiotic recombination along the 18 porcine autosomes was directly studied by immunolocalization of MLH1 protein. In total, 7,848 synaptonemal complexes from 436 spermatocytes were analyzed, and 13,969 recombination sites were mapped. Individual chromosomes for 113 of the 436 cells (representing 2,034 synaptonemal complexes) were identified by immunostaining and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The average total length of autosomal synaptonemal complexes per cell was 190.3 µm, with 32.0 recombination sites (crossovers), on average, per cell. The number of crossovers and the lengths of the autosomal synaptonemal complexes showed significant intra- (i.e. between cells) and inter-individual variations. The distributions of recombination sites within each chromosomal category were similar: crossovers in metacentric and submetacentric chromosomes were concentrated in the telomeric regions of the p- and q-arms, whereas two hotspots were located near the centromere and in the telomeric region of acrocentrics. Lack of MLH1 foci was mainly observed in the smaller chromosomes, particularly chromosome 18 (SSC18) and the sex chromosomes. All autosomes displayed positive interference, with a large variability between the chromosomes. PMID:24919066

  3. Reduced dosage of the chromosome axis factor Red1 selectively disrupts the meiotic recombination checkpoint in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Tovah E; Suarez, Daniel; Blitzblau, Hannah G; Patel, Neem J; Markhard, Andrew L; MacQueen, Amy J; Hochwagen, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Meiotic chromosomes assemble characteristic "axial element" structures that are essential for fertility and provide the chromosomal context for meiotic recombination, synapsis and checkpoint signaling. Whether these meiotic processes are equally dependent on axial element integrity has remained unclear. Here, we investigated this question in S. cerevisiae using the putative condensin allele ycs4S. We show that the severe axial element assembly defects of this allele are explained by a linked mutation in the promoter of the major axial element gene RED1 that reduces Red1 protein levels to 20-25% of wild type. Intriguingly, the Red1 levels of ycs4S mutants support meiotic processes linked to axis integrity, including DNA double-strand break formation and deposition of the synapsis protein Zip1, at levels that permit 70% gamete survival. By contrast, the ability to elicit a meiotic checkpoint arrest is completely eliminated. This selective loss of checkpoint function is supported by a RED1 dosage series and is associated with the loss of most of the cytologically detectable Red1 from the axial element. Our results indicate separable roles for Red1 in building the structural axis of meiotic chromosomes and mounting a sustained recombination checkpoint response.

  4. Differential timing of S phases, X chromosome replication, and meiotic prophase in the C. elegans germ line.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Lambert, Aimee; Ellefson, Marina; Villeneuve, Anne M; Engebrecht, JoAnne

    2007-08-01

    The replication of chromosomes in meiosis is an important first step for subsequent chromosomal interactions that promote accurate disjunction in the first of two segregation events to generate haploid gametes. We have developed an assay to monitor DNA replication in vivo in mitotic and meiotic germline nuclei of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Using mutants that affect the mitosis/meiosis switch, we show that meiotic S phase is at least twice as long as mitotic S phase in C. elegans germ cell nuclei. Furthermore, our assay reveals that different regions of the genome replicate at different times, with the heterochromatic-like X chromosomes replicating at a distinct time from the autosomes. Finally, we have exploited S-phase labeling to monitor the timing of progression through meiotic prophase. Meiotic prophase for oocyte production in hermaphrodites lasts 54-60 h. Further, we find that the duration of the pachytene sub-stage is modulated by the presence of sperm. On the other hand, meiotic prophase for sperm production in males is completed by 20-24 h. Possible sources for the sex-specific differences in meiotic prophase kinetics are discussed.

  5. Genetic linkage between a sexually selected trait and X chromosome meiotic drive.

    PubMed

    Johns, Philip M; Wolfenbarger, L LaReesa; Wilkinson, Gerald S

    2005-10-07

    Previous studies on the stalk-eyed fly, Cyrtodiopsis dalmanni, have shown that males with long eye-stalks win contests and are preferred by females, and artificial selection on male relative eye span alters brood sex-ratios. Subsequent theory proposes that X-linked meiotic drive can catalyse the evolution of mate preferences when drive is linked to ornament genes. Here we test this prediction by mapping meiotic drive and quantitative trait loci (QTL) for eye span. To map QTL we genotyped 24 microsatellite loci using 1228 F2 flies from two crosses between lines selected for long or short eye span. The crosses differed by presence or absence of a drive X chromosome, X(D), in the parental male. Linkage analysis reveals that X(D) dramatically reduces recombination between X and X(D) chromosomes. In the X(D) cross, half of the F2 males carried the drive haplotype, produced partially elongated spermatids and female-biased broods, and had shorter eye span. The largest QTL mapped 1.3cM from drive on the X chromosome and explained 36% of the variation in male eye span while another QTL mapped to an autosomal region that suppresses drive. These results indicate that selfish genetic elements that distort the sex-ratio can influence the evolution of exaggerated traits.

  6. BRCA1, histone H2AX phosphorylation, and male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Turner, James M A; Aprelikova, Olga; Xu, Xiaoling; Wang, Ruihong; Kim, Sangsoo; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V R; Barrett, J Carl; Burgoyne, Paul S; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2004-12-14

    In mammalian spermatogenesis, the X and Y chromosomes are transcriptionally silenced during the pachytene stage of meiotic prophase (meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, MSCI), forming a condensed chromatin domain termed the sex or XY body. The nucleosomal core histone H2AX is phosphorylated within the XY chromatin domain just prior to MSCI, and it has been hypothesized that this triggers the chromatin condensation and transcriptional repression. Here, we show that the kinase ATR localizes to XY chromatin at the onset of MSCI and that this localization is disrupted in mice with a mutant form of the tumor suppressor protein BRCA1. In the mutant pachytene cells, ATR is usually present at nonsex chromosomal sites, where it colocalizes with aberrant sites of H2AX phosphorylation; in these cells, there is MSCI failure. In rare pachytene cells, ATR does locate to XY chromatin, H2AX is then phosphorylated, a sex body forms, and MSCI ensues. These observations highlight an important role for BRCA1 in recruiting the kinase ATR to XY chromatin at the onset of MSCI and provide compelling evidence that it is ATR that phosphorylates H2AX and triggers MSCI.

  7. High Resolution Analysis of Meiotic Chromosome Structure and Behaviour in Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Dylan; Nibau, Candida; Wnetrzak, Joanna; Jenkins, Glyn

    2012-01-01

    Reciprocal crossing over and independent assortment of chromosomes during meiosis generate most of the genetic variation in sexually reproducing organisms. In barley, crossovers are confined primarily to distal regions of the chromosomes, which means that a substantial proportion of the genes of this crop rarely, if ever, engage in recombination events. There is potentially much to be gained by redistributing crossovers to more proximal regions, but our ability to achieve this is dependent upon a far better understanding of meiosis in this species. This study explores the meiotic process by describing with unprecedented resolution the early behaviour of chromosomal domains, the progression of synapsis and the structure of the synaptonemal complex (SC). Using a combination of molecular cytogenetics and advanced fluorescence imaging, we show for the first time in this species that non-homologous centromeres are coupled prior to synapsis. We demonstrate that at early meiotic prophase the loading of the SC-associated structural protein ASY1, the cluster of telomeres, and distal synaptic initiation sites occupy the same polarised region of the nucleus. Through the use of advanced 3D image analysis, we show that synapsis is driven predominantly from the telomeres, and that new synaptic initiation sites arise during zygotene. In addition, we identified two different SC configurations through the use of super-resolution 3D structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM). PMID:22761818

  8. Automated construction of highly accurate meiotic mapping panels for human chromosome 7 using BINS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Helms, C.; Dutchik, J.

    1994-09-01

    Development of a set of highly accurate meiotic breakpoint panels for the human genome based on CEPH reference pedigree genotypes and highly informative microsatellite markers will provide a valuable resource for the efficient mapping of new markers and will promote the rapid integration of physical and genetic map information. Key to the development of such a panel is the availability of a reliable set of genotypic data and automated methods for panel construction and verification. We have recently completed construction of comprehensive, microsatellite, and index linkage maps for human chromosome 7 using CEPH pedigree genotypes and CRI-MAP (with odds for marker order of 1000:1). A subset of markers used to build these maps that were typed on 40 CEPH families and rigorously checked for errors (e.g. using the Chrompics option of CRI-MAP) were selected for use to develop a set of meiotic breakpoint panels. The BINS programs has been developed to determine the locations of reliable crossovers using primary genotype data for every individual of each pedigree with the aim of creating crossover mapping panels. BINS utilizes a set of algorithms that parses out reliable and consistent data and uses these data to construct a crossover-based map. BINS has been utilized to construct a primary meiotic mapping panel for human chromosome 7. A graphical display of the breakpoint data provides an easily interpretable image and specifically highlights possible data inconsistencies (e.g. questionable double crossovers). We have used BINS and the CEPH genotypes to construct a preliminary set of panels for chromosome 7. Refinement of the panels is in progress.

  9. Post-meiotic B chromosome expulsion, during spermiogenesis, in two grasshopper species.

    PubMed

    Cabrero, Josefa; Martín-Peciña, María; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J; Gómez, Ricardo; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2017-02-11

    Most supernumerary (B) chromosomes are parasitic elements carrying out an evolutionary arms race with the standard (A) chromosomes. A variety of weapons for attack and defense have evolved in both contending elements, the most conspicuous being B chromosome drive and A chromosome drive suppression. Here, we show for the first time that most microspermatids formed during spermiogenesis in two grasshopper species contain expulsed B chromosomes. By using DNA probes for B-specific satellite DNAs in Eumigus monticola and Eyprepocnemis plorans, and also 18S rDNA in the latter species, we were able to count the number of B chromosomes in standard spermatids submitted to fluorescence in situ hybridization, as well as visualizing B chromosomes inside most microspermatids. In E. plorans, the presence of B-carrying microspermatids in 1B males was associated with a significant decrease in the proportion of B-carrying standard spermatids. The fact that this decrease was apparent in elongating spermatids but not in round ones demonstrates that meiosis yields 1:1 proportions of 0B and 1B spermatids and hence that B elimination takes place post-meiotically, i.e., during spermiogenesis, implying a 5-25% decrease in B transmission rate. In E. monticola, the B chromosome is mitotically unstable and B number varies between cells within a same individual. A comparison of B frequency between round and elongating spermatids of a same individual revealed a significant 12.3% decrease. We conclude that B chromosome elimination during spermiogenesis is a defense weapon of the host genome to get rid of parasitic chromosomes.

  10. Meiotic recombination at the Lmp2 hotspot tolerates minor sequence divergence between homologous chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshino, Masayasu; Sagai, Tomoko; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    1996-06-01

    Recombination is widely considered to linearly depend on the length of the homologous sequences. An 11% mismatch decreases the rate of phage-plasmid recombination 240-fold. Two single nucleotide mismatches, which reduce the longest uninterrupted stretch of similarity from 232 base pairs (bp) to 134 bp, reduce gene conversion in mouse L cells 20-fold. The efficiency of gene targeting through homologous recombination in mouse embryonic stem cells can be increased by using an isogenic, rather than a non-isogenic, DNA construct. In this study we asked whether a high degree of sequence identity between homologous mouse chromosomes enhances meiotic recombination at a hotspot. Sites of meiotic recombination in the mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II region are not randomly distributed but are almost all clustered within short segments known as recombinational hotspots. The wm7 MHC haplotype, derived from Japanese wild mice Mus musculus molossinus, enhances meiotic recombination at a hotspot near the Lmp2 gene. Heterozygotes between the wm7 haplotype and the b or k haplotypes have yielded a high frequency of recombination (2.1%) in 1.3 kilobase kb segment of this hotspot. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Cytomixis and meiotic abnormalities during microsporogenesis are responsible for male sterility and chromosome variations in Houttuynia cordata.

    PubMed

    Guan, J-Z; Wang, J-J; Cheng, Z-H; Liu, Y; Li, Z-Y

    2012-01-17

    Houttuynia cordata (Saururaceae) is a leaf vegetable and a medicinal herb througout much of Asia. Cytomixis and meiotic abnormalities during microsporogenesis were found in two populations of H. cordata with different ploidy levels (2n = 38, 96). Cytomixis occurred in pollen mother cells during meiosis at high frequencies and with variable degrees of chromatin/chromosome transfer. Meiotic abnormalities, such as chromosome laggards, asymmetric segregation and polyads, also prevailed in pollen mother cells at metaphase of the first division and later stages. They were caused by cytomixis and resulted in very low pollen viability and male sterility. Pollen mother cells from the population with 2n = 38 showed only simultaneous cytokinesis, but most pollen mother cells from the population with 2n = 96 showed successive cytokinesis; a minority underwent simultaneous cytokinesis. Cytomixis and irregular meiotic divisions appear to be the origin of the intraspecific polyploidy in this species, which has large variations in chromosome numbers.

  12. DYNLT3 is required for chromosome alignment during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Wang, Hai-Long; Qi, Shu-Tao; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Tong, Jing-Shan; Zhang, Qing-Hua; Ouyang, Ying-Chun; Hou, Yi; Schatten, Heide; Qi, Zhong-Quan; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2011-10-01

    Dynein light chain, Tctex-type 3 (DYNLT3), is a member of the cytoplasmic dynein DYNLT light chain family and has been reported to have a potential role in chromosome congression in human mitosis. However, its role in mammalian meiosis is unclear. In this study, we examined its localization, expression, and functions in mouse oocyte meiosis. Immunofluorescent staining showed that DYNLT3 was restricted to the germinal vesicle and associated with kinetochores at the germinal vesicle breakdown stage, metaphase I and metaphase II. The expression level of DYNLT3 was similar at all meiotic stages. Depletion of DYNLT3 by antibody injection resulted in chromosome misalignment and decrease of the polar body extrusion rate. We further found that DYNLT3-depleted oocytes displayed kinetochore-microtubule detachments. Chromosome-spread experiments showed that depletion of DYNLT3 inhibited the metaphase-anaphase transition by preventing homologous chromosome segregation in meiosis I. Our data suggest that DYNLT3 is required for chromosome alignment and homologous chromosome segregation during mouse oocyte meiosis.

  13. Meiotic chromosome pairing behaviour of natural tetraploids and induced autotetraploids of Actinidia chinensis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Hu; Datson, Paul M; Manako, Kelvina I; Murray, Brian G

    2014-03-01

    Non-preferential chromosome pairing was identified in tetraploid Actinidia chinensis and a higher mean multivalent frequency in pollen mother cells was found in colchine-induced tetraploids of A. chinensis compared with naturally occurring tetraploids. Diploid and tetraploid Actinidia chinensis are used for the development of kiwifruit cultivars. Diploid germplasm can be exploited in a tetraploid breeding programme via unreduced (2n) gametes and chemical-induced chromosome doubling of diploid cultivars and selections. Meiotic chromosome behaviour in diploid A. chinensis 'Hort16A' and colchicine-induced tetraploids from 'Hort16A' was analysed and compared with that in a diploid male and tetraploid males of A. chinensis raised from seeds sourced from the wild in China. Both naturally occurring and induced tetraploids formed multivalents, but colchicine-induced tetraploids showed a higher mean multivalent frequency in the pollen mother cells. Lagging chromosomes at anaphase I and II were observed at low frequencies in the colchicine-induced tetraploids. To investigate whether preferential or non-preferential chromosome pairing occurs in tetraploid A. chinensis, the inheritance of microsatellite alleles was analysed in the tetraploid progeny of crosses between A. chinensis (4x) and A. arguta (4x). The frequencies of inherited microsatellite allelic combinations in the hybrids suggested that non-preferential chromosome pairing had occurred in the tetraploid A. chinensis parent.

  14. Phosphorylation of cohesin Rec11/SA3 by casein kinase 1 promotes homologous recombination by assembling the meiotic chromosome axis.

    PubMed

    Sakuno, Takeshi; Watanabe, Yoshinori

    2015-01-26

    In meiosis, cohesin is required for sister chromatid cohesion, as well as meiotic chromosome axis assembly and recombination. However, mechanisms underlying the multifunctional nature of cohesin remain elusive. Here, we show that fission yeast casein kinase 1 (CK1) plays a crucial role in assembling the meiotic chromosome axis (so-called linear element: LinE) and promoting recombination. An in vitro phosphorylation screening assay identified meiotic cohesin subunit Rec11/SA3 as an excellent substrate of CK1. The phosphorylation of Rec11 by CK1 mediates the interaction with the Rec10/Red1/SCP2 axis component, a key step in meiotic chromosome axis assembly, and is dispensable for sister chromatid cohesion. Crucially, the expression of Rec11-Rec10 fusion protein nearly completely bypasses the requirement for CK1 or cohesin phosphorylation for LinE assembly and recombination. This study uncovers a central mechanism of the cohesin-dependent assembly of the meiotic chromosome axis and recombination apparatus that acts independently of sister chromatid cohesion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evidence that sex chromosome asynapsis, rather than excess Y gene dosage, is responsible for the meiotic impairment of XYY mice.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, T A; Burgoyne, P S

    2000-01-01

    There is extensive evidence for the existence of a meiotic checkpoint that acts to eliminate spermatocytes that fail to achieve full sex chromosome synapsis at the pachytene stage of the first meiotic prophase. XYY mice are nearly always sterile, with clear signs of meiotic impairment, and sex chromosome asynapsis has been proposed to underlie this impairment. However, a study of XYY*(X) mice (mice having three sex chromosomes but only a single dose of Y genes) revealed that these mice are fertile, and thus implicated Y gene dosage as a major factor in the sterility of XYY mice. To address this question further, sex chromosome synapsis and spermatogenic proficiency were compared between XYY*(X) and XYY mice generated in the same litters. This established that differences in spermatogenic proficiency within and between the two genotypes correlated with the frequency of radial trivalent formation (full sex chromosome synapsis); XYY*(X) males, as a group, had double the radial trivalent frequency of XYY males. This observation provides strong support for the view that sex chromosome asynapsis (or some consequence thereof), rather than Y gene dosage, is the major factor leading to the meiotic impairment of XYY mice.

  16. Matefin/SUN-1 phosphorylation is part of a surveillance mechanism to coordinate chromosome synapsis and recombination with meiotic progression and chromosome movement.

    PubMed

    Woglar, Alexander; Daryabeigi, Anahita; Adamo, Adele; Habacher, Cornelia; Machacek, Thomas; La Volpe, Adriana; Jantsch, Verena

    2013-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation during meiosis I depends on the establishment of a crossover between homologous chromosomes. This requires induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), alignment of homologs, homolog association by synapsis, and repair of DSBs via homologous recombination. The success of these events requires coordination between chromosomal events and meiotic progression. The conserved SUN/KASH nuclear envelope bridge establishes transient linkages between chromosome ends and cytoskeletal forces during meiosis. In Caenorhabditis elegans, this bridge is essential for bringing homologs together and preventing nonhomologous synapsis. Chromosome movement takes place during synapsis and recombination. Concomitant with the onset of chromosome movement, SUN-1 clusters at chromosome ends associated with the nuclear envelope, and it is phosphorylated in a chk-2- and plk-2-dependent manner. Identification of all SUN-1 phosphomodifications at its nuclear N terminus allowed us to address their role in prophase I. Failures in recombination and synapsis led to persistent phosphorylations, which are required to elicit a delay in progression. Unfinished meiotic tasks elicited sustained recruitment of PLK-2 to chromosome ends in a SUN-1 phosphorylation-dependent manner that is required for continued chromosome movement and characteristic of a zygotene arrest. Furthermore, SUN-1 phosphorylation supported efficient synapsis. We propose that signals emanating from a failure to successfully finish meiotic tasks are integrated at the nuclear periphery to regulate chromosome end-led movement and meiotic progression. The single unsynapsed X chromosome in male meiosis is precluded from inducing a progression delay, and we found it was devoid of a population of phosphorylated SUN-1. This suggests that SUN-1 phosphorylation is critical to delaying meiosis in response to perturbed synapsis. SUN-1 may be an integral part of a checkpoint system to monitor establishment of the

  17. Kdm5/Lid Regulates Chromosome Architecture in Meiotic Prophase I Independently of Its Histone Demethylase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhaunova, Liudmila; Ohkura, Hiroyuki; Breuer, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    During prophase of the first meiotic division (prophase I), chromatin dynamically reorganises to recombine and prepare for chromosome segregation. Histone modifying enzymes are major regulators of chromatin structure, but our knowledge of their roles in prophase I is still limited. Here we report on crucial roles of Kdm5/Lid, one of two histone demethylases in Drosophila that remove one of the trimethyl groups at Lys4 of Histone 3 (H3K4me3). In the absence of Kdm5/Lid, the synaptonemal complex was only partially formed and failed to be maintained along chromosome arms, while localisation of its components at centromeres was unaffected. Kdm5/Lid was also required for karyosome formation and homologous centromere pairing in prophase I. Although loss of Kdm5/Lid dramatically increased the level of H3K4me3 in oocytes, catalytically inactive Kdm5/Lid can rescue the above cytological defects. Therefore Kdm5/Lid controls chromatin architecture in meiotic prophase I oocytes independently of its demethylase activity. PMID:27494704

  18. Kdm5/Lid Regulates Chromosome Architecture in Meiotic Prophase I Independently of Its Histone Demethylase Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhaunova, Liudmila; Ohkura, Hiroyuki; Breuer, Manuel

    2016-08-01

    During prophase of the first meiotic division (prophase I), chromatin dynamically reorganises to recombine and prepare for chromosome segregation. Histone modifying enzymes are major regulators of chromatin structure, but our knowledge of their roles in prophase I is still limited. Here we report on crucial roles of Kdm5/Lid, one of two histone demethylases in Drosophila that remove one of the trimethyl groups at Lys4 of Histone 3 (H3K4me3). In the absence of Kdm5/Lid, the synaptonemal complex was only partially formed and failed to be maintained along chromosome arms, while localisation of its components at centromeres was unaffected. Kdm5/Lid was also required for karyosome formation and homologous centromere pairing in prophase I. Although loss of Kdm5/Lid dramatically increased the level of H3K4me3 in oocytes, catalytically inactive Kdm5/Lid can rescue the above cytological defects. Therefore Kdm5/Lid controls chromatin architecture in meiotic prophase I oocytes independently of its demethylase activity.

  19. Karyotype evolution in Tilapia: mitotic and meiotic chromosome analysis of Oreochromis karongae and O. niloticus x O. karongae hybrids.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S C; Campos-Ramos, R; Kennedy, D D; Ezaz, M T; Bromage, N R; Griffin, D K; Penman, D J

    2002-06-01

    The karyotype of Oreochromis species is considered to be highly conserved, with a diploid chromosome complement of 2n = 44. Here we show, by analysis of mitotic and meiotic chromosomes, that the karyotype of O. karongae, one of the Lake Malawi 'chambo' species, is 2n = 38. This difference in chromosome number does not prevent the production of inter-specific hybrids between O. niloticus (2n = 44) and O. karongae (2n = 38). Analysis of the meiotic chromosomes of the O. niloticus x O. karongae hybrids indicates that three separate chromosome fusion events have occurred in O. karongae. Comparison of the O. karongae and O. niloticus karyotypes suggests that these consist of one Robertsonian fusion and two fusions of a more complex nature.

  20. Chromatin structure analysis of spermatozoa from reciprocal chromosome translocation (RCT) carriers with known meiotic segregation patterns.

    PubMed

    Olszewska, Marta; Fraczek, Monika; Huleyuk, Nataliya; Czernikiewicz, Anna; Wiland, Ewa; Boksa, Magdalena; Zastavna, Danuta; Panasiuk, Barbara; Midro, Alina T; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2013-09-01

    The presence of reciprocal chromosome translocations (RCTs), as well as sperm chromatin disturbances, is known to exert negative influence on male fertility. The aim of this study was to identify an association between chromosome structural rearrangements in male RCT carriers and sperm seminological parameters (concentration, motility, morphology), chromatin status (fragmentation and maturity), meiotic segregation pattern and observed chromosomal hyperhaploidy. Sperm samples originated from ten male RCT carriers with reproductive failure/success. TUNEL assay (DNA fragmentation) and chromomycin A3 (CMA3)/aniline blue (AB) staining (chromatin maturity) were used to analyze sperm chromatin status while fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was applied to observe meiotic segregation patterns and hyperhaploidy in spermatozoa. We found that the mean level of sperm DNA fragmentation in the RCT carrier group (18.0 ± 11.9%) was significantly higher (p=0.0006) than the mean of the control group (7.5 ± 4.3%). There was no correlation observed between sperm DNA fragmentation levels (5.6-38.0%) and the frequency of genetically normal/balanced gametes (34.3-62.4%), sperm seminological quality or revealed reproductive failure. In contrast, a correlation between the frequencies of genetically normal/balanced spermatozoa and of gametes with mature chromatin was observed (CMA3: R=0.4524, p=0.2604; AB: R=0.5238, p=0.1827). A statistically significant increase in the hyperhaploidy level of selected chromosomes in all analyzed RCT carriers was documented but was not correlated to sperm seminology or fertility status. Further evaluation and additional assays toward sperm chromatin quality assessment in RCT carriers is suggested to explain the complexity of genomic structural rearrangements and its possible relevance to reproductive success or failure. Copyright © 2013 Society for Biology of Reproduction & the Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of

  1. Autophagy is required for efficient meiosis progression and proper meiotic chromosome segregation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Matsuhara, Hirotada; Yamamoto, Ayumu

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved intracellular degradation system, which contributes to development and differentiation of various organisms. Yeast cells undergo meiosis under nitrogen-starved conditions and require autophagy for meiosis initiation. However, the precise roles of autophagy in meiosis remain unclear. Here, we show that autophagy is required for efficient meiosis progression and proper meiotic chromosome segregation in fission yeast. Autophagy-defective strains bearing a mutation in the autophagy core factor gene atg1, atg7, or atg14 exhibit deformed nuclear structures during meiosis. These mutant cells require an extracellular nitrogen supply for meiosis progression following their entry into meiosis and show delayed meiosis progression even with a nitrogen supply. In addition, they show frequent chromosome dissociation from the spindle together with spindle overextension, forming extra nuclei. Furthermore, Aurora kinase, which regulates chromosome segregation and spindle elongation, is significantly increased at the centromere and spindle in the mutant cells. Aurora kinase down-regulation eliminated delayed initiation of meiosis I and II, chromosome dissociation, and spindle overextension, indicating that increased Aurora kinase activity may cause these aberrances in the mutant cells. Our findings show a hitherto unrecognized relationship of autophagy with the nuclear structure, regulation of cell cycle progression, and chromosome segregation in meiosis.

  2. Meiotic inheritance of a fungal supernumerary chromosome and its effect on sexual fertility in Nectria haematococca.

    PubMed

    Garmaroodi, Hamid S; Taga, Masatoki

    2015-10-01

    PDA1-conditionally dispensable chromosome (CDC) of Nectria haematococca MP VI has long served as a model of supernumerary chromosomes in plant pathogenic fungi because of pathogenicity-related genes located on it. In our previous study, we showed the dosage effects of PDA1-CDC on pathogenicity and homoserine utilization by exploiting tagged PDA1-CDC with a marker gene. CDC content of mating partners and progenies analyzed by PCR, PFGE combined with Southern analysis and chromosome painting via FISH. In this study, we analyzed mode of meiotic inheritance of PDA1-CDC in several mating patterns with regard to CDC content and found a correlation between CDC content of parental strains with fertility of crosses. The results showed non-Mendelian inheritance of this chromosome followed by duplication or loss of the CDC in haploid genome through meiosis that probably were due to premature centromere division, not by nondisjunction as reported for the supernumerary chromosomes in other species. Correlation of CDC with fertility is the first time to be examined in fungi in this study. Copyright © 2015 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Meiotic behavior and H3K4m distribution in B chromosomes of Characidium gomesi (Characiformes, Crenuchidae)

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Érica Alves; Araya-Jaime, Cristian; Suárez-Villota, Elkin Y.; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Characidium gomesi Travasso, 1956 specimens from the Pardo River have up to four heterochromatic supernumerary chromosomes, derived from the sex chromosomes. To access the meiotic behavior and distribution of an active chromatin marker, males and females of Characidium gomesi with two or three B chromosomes were analyzed. Mitotic chromosomes were characterized using C-banding and FISH with B chromosome probes. Meiocytes were subjected to immunofluorescence-FISH assay using anti-SYCP3, anti-H3K4m, and B chromosomes probes. Molecular homology of supernumeraries was confirmed by FISH and by its bivalent conformation in individuals with two of these chromosomes. In individuals with three Bs, these elements formed a bivalent and a univalent. Supernumerary and sex chromosomes exhibited H3K4m signals during pachytene contrasting with their heterochromatic and asynaptic nature, which suggest a more structural role than functional of this histone modification. The implications of this result are discussed in light of the homology, meiotic nuclear organization, and meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chomatin. PMID:27551347

  4. Oocyte heterogeneity with respect to the meiotic silencing of unsynapsed X chromosomes in the XY female mouse.

    PubMed

    Taketo, Teruko; Naumova, Anna K

    2013-10-01

    In the XY pachytene spermatocyte, the sex chromosomes do not synapse except for the pseudoautosomal region and become transcriptionally silenced. It has been suggested that the meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC) also occurs in oocytes. In the XY sex-reversed female mouse, the sex chromosomes fail to pair in the majority of oocytes and a greater number of oocytes are eliminated during the meiotic prophase compared to the XX female. Yet, many XY oocytes survive to reach the second meiotic metaphase. The goal of our current study was to determine whether the single X chromosome shows the characteristics of asynapsis and meiotic silencing in a proportion of XY oocytes, which can explain the survival of the remaining oocytes. We first examined the accumulation of markers associated with asynapsis or transcriptional silencing, i.e., BRCA1, γH2AX, H3K9me3, and H3K27me3, at the single X chromosome in the XY oocyte. We found that γH2AX and BRCA1 were enriched on the single X chromosome whereas H3K9me3 was not, and H3K27me3 was enriched at all chromosomes in the majority of XY oocytes. We next examined the meiotic silencing of the single X chromosome using enrichment of the X-encoded ATRX protein. On average, ATRX enrichment was lower in XY oocytes than in XX oocytes as expected from its half gene dosage. However, the intensity of ATRX staining in XY oocytes harboring γH2AX domains showed a remarkable heterogeneity. We conclude that MSUC occurs with varying consequences, resulting in a heterogeneous population of oocytes with respect to protein enrichment in the XY female mouse.

  5. The axial element protein HTP-3 promotes cohesin loading and meiotic axis assembly in C. elegans to implement the meiotic program of chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Severson, Aaron F; Ling, Lorraine; van Zuylen, Vanessa; Meyer, Barbara J

    2009-08-01

    Faithful transmission of the genome through sexual reproduction requires reduction of genome copy number during meiosis to produce haploid sperm and eggs. Meiosis entails steps absent from mitosis to achieve this goal. When meiosis begins, sisters are held together by sister chromatid cohesion (SCC), mediated by the cohesin complex. Homologs then become linked through crossover recombination. SCC subsequently holds both sisters and homologs together. Separation of homologs and then sisters requires two successive rounds of chromosome segregation and the stepwise removal of Rec8, a meiosis-specific cohesin subunit. We show that HTP-3, a known component of the C. elegans axial element (AE), molecularly links these meiotic innovations. We identified HTP-3 in a genetic screen for factors necessary to maintain SCC until meiosis II. Our data show that interdependent loading of HTP-3 and cohesin is a principal step in assembling the meiotic chromosomal axis and in establishing SCC. HTP-3 recruits all known AE components to meiotic chromosomes and promotes cohesin loading, the first known involvement of an AE protein in this process. Furthermore, REC-8 and two paralogs, called COH-3 and COH-4, together mediate meiotic SCC, but they perform specialized functions. REC-8 alone is necessary and sufficient for the persistence of SCC after meiosis I. In htp-3 and rec-8 mutants, sister chromatids segregate away from one another in meiosis I (equational division), rather than segregating randomly, as expected if SCC were completely eliminated. AE assembly fails only when REC-8, COH-3, and COH-4 are simultaneously disrupted. Premature equational sister separation in rec8 mutants of other organisms suggests the involvement of multiple REC-8 paralogs, which may have masked a conserved requirement for cohesin in AE assembly.

  6. The axial element protein HTP-3 promotes cohesin loading and meiotic axis assembly in C. elegans to implement the meiotic program of chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Severson, Aaron F.; Ling, Lorraine; van Zuylen, Vanessa; Meyer, Barbara J.

    2009-01-01

    Faithful transmission of the genome through sexual reproduction requires reduction of genome copy number during meiosis to produce haploid sperm and eggs. Meiosis entails steps absent from mitosis to achieve this goal. When meiosis begins, sisters are held together by sister chromatid cohesion (SCC), mediated by the cohesin complex. Homologs then become linked through crossover recombination. SCC subsequently holds both sisters and homologs together. Separation of homologs and then sisters requires two successive rounds of chromosome segregation and the stepwise removal of Rec8, a meiosis-specific cohesin subunit. We show that HTP-3, a known component of the C. elegans axial element (AE), molecularly links these meiotic innovations. We identified HTP-3 in a genetic screen for factors necessary to maintain SCC until meiosis II. Our data show that interdependent loading of HTP-3 and cohesin is a principal step in assembling the meiotic chromosomal axis and in establishing SCC. HTP-3 recruits all known AE components to meiotic chromosomes and promotes cohesin loading, the first known involvement of an AE protein in this process. Furthermore, REC-8 and two paralogs, called COH-3 and COH-4, together mediate meiotic SCC, but they perform specialized functions. REC-8 alone is necessary and sufficient for the persistence of SCC after meiosis I. In htp-3 and rec-8 mutants, sister chromatids segregate away from one another in meiosis I (equational division), rather than segregating randomly, as expected if SCC were completely eliminated. AE assembly fails only when REC-8, COH-3, and COH-4 are simultaneously disrupted. Premature equational sister separation in rec8 mutants of other organisms suggests the involvement of multiple REC-8 paralogs, which may have masked a conserved requirement for cohesin in AE assembly. PMID:19574299

  7. Centromere and telomere movements during early meiotic prophase of mouse and man are associated with the onset of chromosome pairing

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The preconditions and early steps of meiotic chromosome pairing were studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome- specific DNA probes to mouse and human testis tissue sections. Premeiotic pairing of homologous chromosomes was not detected in spermatogonia of the two species. FISH with centromere- and telomere- specific DNA probes in combination with immunostaining (IS) of synaptonemal complex (SC) proteins to testis sections of prepuberal mice at days 4-12 post partum was performed to study sequentially the meiotic pairing process. Movements of centromeres and then telomeres to the nuclear envelope, and of telomeres along the nuclear envelope leading to the formation of a chromosomal bouquet were detected during mouse prophase. At the bouquet stage, pairing of a mouse chromosome-8- specific probe was observed. SC-IS and simultaneous telomere FISH revealed that axial element proteins appear as large aggregates in mouse meiocytes when telomeres are attached to the nuclear envelope. Axial element formation initiates during tight telomere clustering and transverse filament-IS indicated the initiation of synapsis during this stage. Comparison of telomere and centromere distribution patterns of mouse and human meiocytes revealed movements of centromeres and then telomeres to the nuclear envelope and subsequent bouquet formation as conserved motifs of the pairing process. Chromosome painting in human spermatogonia revealed compacted, largely mutually exclusive chromosome territories. The territories developed into long, thin threads at the onset of meiotic prophase. Based on these results a unified model of the pairing process is proposed. PMID:8794855

  8. Translocations of Chromosome End-Segments and Facultative Heterochromatin Promote Meiotic Ring Formation in Evening Primroses[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Golczyk, Hieronim; Massouh, Amid; Greiner, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Due to reciprocal chromosomal translocations, many species of Oenothera (evening primrose) form permanent multichromosomal meiotic rings. However, regular bivalent pairing is also observed. Chiasmata are restricted to chromosomal ends, which makes homologous recombination virtually undetectable. Genetic diversity is achieved by changing linkage relations of chromosomes in rings and bivalents via hybridization and reciprocal translocations. Although the structural prerequisite for this system is enigmatic, whole-arm translocations are widely assumed to be the mechanistic driving force. We demonstrate that this prerequisite is genome compartmentation into two epigenetically defined chromatin fractions. The first one facultatively condenses in cycling cells into chromocenters negative both for histone H3 dimethylated at lysine 4 and for C-banding, and forms huge condensed middle chromosome regions on prophase chromosomes. Remarkably, it decondenses in differentiating cells. The second fraction is euchromatin confined to distal chromosome segments, positive for histone H3 lysine 4 dimethylation and for histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation. The end-segments are deprived of canonical telomeres but capped with constitutive heterochromatin. This genomic organization promotes translocation breakpoints between the two chromatin fractions, thus facilitating exchanges of end-segments. We challenge the whole-arm translocation hypothesis by demonstrating why reciprocal translocations of chromosomal end-segments should strongly promote meiotic rings and evolution toward permanent translocation heterozygosity. Reshuffled end-segments, each possessing a major crossover hot spot, can furthermore explain meiotic compatibility between genomes with different translocation histories. PMID:24681616

  9. The dissection of meiotic chromosome movement in mice using an in vivo electroporation technique.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Hiroki; Morimoto, Akihiro; Watanabe, Yoshinori

    2014-12-01

    During meiosis, the rapid movement of telomeres along the nuclear envelope (NE) facilitates pairing/synapsis of homologous chromosomes. In mammals, the mechanical properties of chromosome movement and the cytoskeletal structures responsible for it remain poorly understood. Here, applying an in vivo electroporation (EP) technique in live mouse testis, we achieved the quick visualization of telomere, chromosome axis and microtubule organizing center (MTOC) movements. For the first time, we defined prophase sub-stages of live spermatocytes morphologically according to GFP-TRF1 and GFP-SCP3 signals. We show that rapid telomere movement and subsequent nuclear rotation persist from leptotene/zygotene to pachytene, and then decline in diplotene stage concomitant with the liberation of SUN1 from telomeres. Further, during bouquet stage, telomeres are constrained near the MTOC, resulting in the transient suppression of telomere mobility and nuclear rotation. MTs are responsible for these movements by forming cable-like structures on the NE, and, probably, by facilitating the rail-tacking movements of telomeres on the MT cables. In contrast, actin regulates the oscillatory changes in nuclear shape. Our data provide the mechanical scheme for meiotic chromosome movement throughout prophase I in mammals.

  10. Escape of X-linked miRNA genes from meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Enrique; Flores, Luis; Yan, Wei; McCarrey, John R

    2015-11-01

    Past studies have indicated that transcription of all X-linked genes is repressed by meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during the meiotic phase of spermatogenesis in mammals. However, more recent studies have shown an increase in steady-state levels of certain X-linked miRNAs in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that either synthesis of these miRNAs increases or that degradation of these miRNAs decreases dramatically in these cells. To distinguish between these possibilities, we performed RNA-FISH to detect nascent transcripts from multiple miRNA genes in various spermatogenic cell types. Our results show definitively that Type I X-linked miRNA genes are subject to MSCI, as are all or most X-linked mRNA genes, whereas Type II and III X-linked miRNA genes escape MSCI by continuing ongoing, active transcription in primary spermatocytes. We corroborated these results by co-localization of RNA-FISH signals with both a corresponding DNA-FISH signal and an immunofluorescence signal for RNA polymerase II. We also found that X-linked miRNA genes that escape MSCI locate non-randomly to the periphery of the XY body, whereas genes that are subject to MSCI remain located within the XY body in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that the mechanism of escape of X-linked miRNA genes from MSCI involves their relocation to a position outside of the repressive chromatin domain associated with the XY body. The fact that Type II and III X-linked miRNA genes escape MSCI suggests an immediacy of function of the encoded miRNAs specifically required during the meiotic stages of spermatogenesis. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Escape of X-linked miRNA genes from meiotic sex chromosome inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Enrique; Flores, Luis; Yan, Wei; McCarrey, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have indicated that transcription of all X-linked genes is repressed by meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during the meiotic phase of spermatogenesis in mammals. However, more recent studies have shown an increase in steady-state levels of certain X-linked miRNAs in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that either synthesis of these miRNAs increases or that degradation of these miRNAs decreases dramatically in these cells. To distinguish between these possibilities, we performed RNA-FISH to detect nascent transcripts from multiple miRNA genes in various spermatogenic cell types. Our results show definitively that Type I X-linked miRNA genes are subject to MSCI, as are all or most X-linked mRNA genes, whereas Type II and III X-linked miRNA genes escape MSCI by continuing ongoing, active transcription in primary spermatocytes. We corroborated these results by co-localization of RNA-FISH signals with both a corresponding DNA-FISH signal and an immunofluorescence signal for RNA polymerase II. We also found that X-linked miRNA genes that escape MSCI locate non-randomly to the periphery of the XY body, whereas genes that are subject to MSCI remain located within the XY body in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that the mechanism of escape of X-linked miRNA genes from MSCI involves their relocation to a position outside of the repressive chromatin domain associated with the XY body. The fact that Type II and III X-linked miRNA genes escape MSCI suggests an immediacy of function of the encoded miRNAs specifically required during the meiotic stages of spermatogenesis. PMID:26395485

  12. Rejuvenation of Meiotic Cohesion in Oocytes during Prophase I Is Required for Chiasma Maintenance and Accurate Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Katherine A.; Jeffreys, Charlotte A.; Bickel, Sharon E.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome segregation errors in human oocytes are the leading cause of birth defects, and the risk of aneuploid pregnancy increases dramatically as women age. Accurate segregation demands that sister chromatid cohesion remain intact for decades in human oocytes, and gradual loss of the original cohesive linkages established in fetal oocytes is proposed to be a major cause of age-dependent segregation errors. Here we demonstrate that maintenance of meiotic cohesion in Drosophila oocytes during prophase I requires an active rejuvenation program, and provide mechanistic insight into the molecular events that underlie rejuvenation. Gal4/UAS inducible knockdown of the cohesion establishment factor Eco after meiotic S phase, but before oocyte maturation, causes premature loss of meiotic cohesion, resulting in destabilization of chiasmata and subsequent missegregation of recombinant homologs. Reduction of individual cohesin subunits or the cohesin loader Nipped B during prophase I leads to similar defects. These data indicate that loading of newly synthesized replacement cohesin rings by Nipped B and establishment of new cohesive linkages by the acetyltransferase Eco must occur during prophase I to maintain cohesion in oocytes. Moreover, we show that rejuvenation of meiotic cohesion does not depend on the programmed induction of meiotic double strand breaks that occurs during early prophase I, and is therefore mechanistically distinct from the DNA damage cohesion re-establishment pathway identified in G2 vegetative yeast cells. Our work provides the first evidence that new cohesive linkages are established in Drosophila oocytes after meiotic S phase, and that these are required for accurate chromosome segregation. If such a pathway also operates in human oocytes, meiotic cohesion defects may become pronounced in a woman's thirties, not because the original cohesive linkages finally give out, but because the rejuvenation program can no longer supply new cohesive linkages

  13. Rejuvenation of meiotic cohesion in oocytes during prophase I is required for chiasma maintenance and accurate chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Weng, Katherine A; Jeffreys, Charlotte A; Bickel, Sharon E

    2014-09-01

    Chromosome segregation errors in human oocytes are the leading cause of birth defects, and the risk of aneuploid pregnancy increases dramatically as women age. Accurate segregation demands that sister chromatid cohesion remain intact for decades in human oocytes, and gradual loss of the original cohesive linkages established in fetal oocytes is proposed to be a major cause of age-dependent segregation errors. Here we demonstrate that maintenance of meiotic cohesion in Drosophila oocytes during prophase I requires an active rejuvenation program, and provide mechanistic insight into the molecular events that underlie rejuvenation. Gal4/UAS inducible knockdown of the cohesion establishment factor Eco after meiotic S phase, but before oocyte maturation, causes premature loss of meiotic cohesion, resulting in destabilization of chiasmata and subsequent missegregation of recombinant homologs. Reduction of individual cohesin subunits or the cohesin loader Nipped B during prophase I leads to similar defects. These data indicate that loading of newly synthesized replacement cohesin rings by Nipped B and establishment of new cohesive linkages by the acetyltransferase Eco must occur during prophase I to maintain cohesion in oocytes. Moreover, we show that rejuvenation of meiotic cohesion does not depend on the programmed induction of meiotic double strand breaks that occurs during early prophase I, and is therefore mechanistically distinct from the DNA damage cohesion re-establishment pathway identified in G2 vegetative yeast cells. Our work provides the first evidence that new cohesive linkages are established in Drosophila oocytes after meiotic S phase, and that these are required for accurate chromosome segregation. If such a pathway also operates in human oocytes, meiotic cohesion defects may become pronounced in a woman's thirties, not because the original cohesive linkages finally give out, but because the rejuvenation program can no longer supply new cohesive linkages

  14. Platypus chain reaction: directional and ordered meiotic pairing of the multiple sex chromosome chain in Ornithorhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Daish, Tasman; Casey, Aaron; Grützner, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Monotremes are phylogenetically and phenotypically unique animals with an unusually complex sex chromosome system that is composed of ten chromosomes in platypus and nine in echidna. These chromosomes are alternately linked (X1Y1, X2Y2, ...) at meiosis via pseudoautosomal regions and segregate to form spermatozoa containing either X or Y chromosomes. The physical and epigenetic mechanisms involved in pairing and assembly of the complex sex chromosome chain in early meiotic prophase I are completely unknown. We have analysed the pairing dynamics of specific sex chromosome pseudoautosomal regions in platypus spermatocytes during prophase of meiosis I. Our data show a highly coordinated pairing process that begins at the terminal Y5 chromosome and completes with the union of sex chromosomes X1Y1. The consistency of this ordered assembly of the chain is remarkable and raises questions about the mechanisms and factors that regulate the differential pairing of sex chromosomes and how this relates to potential meiotic silencing mechanisms and alternate segregation.

  15. The chromosome axis controls meiotic events through a hierarchical assembly of HORMA domain proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yumi; Rosenberg, Scott C.; Kugel, Christine L.; Kostow, Nora; Rog, Ofer; Davydov, Vitaliy; Su, Tiffany Y.; Dernburg, Abby F.; Corbett, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Proteins of the HORMA domain family play central but poorly understood roles in chromosome organization and dynamics during meiosis. In C. elegans, four such proteins (HIM-3, HTP-1, HTP-2, and HTP-3) have distinct but overlapping functions. Through combined biochemical, structural, and in vivo analysis, we find that these proteins form hierarchical complexes through binding of their HORMA domains to cognate peptides within their partners’ C-terminal tails, analogous to the “safety belt” binding mechanism of Mad2. These interactions are critical for recruitment of HIM-3, HTP-1, and HTP-2 to chromosome axes. HTP-3, in addition to recruiting the other HORMA domain proteins to the axis, plays an independent role in sister chromatid cohesion and double-strand break formation. Finally, we find that mammalian HORMAD1 binds a peptide motif found both at its own C-terminus and that of HORMAD2, indicating that this mode of intermolecular association is a conserved feature of meiotic chromosome structure in eukaryotes. PMID:25446517

  16. The chromosome axis controls meiotic events through a hierarchical assembly of HORMA domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yumi; Rosenberg, Scott C; Kugel, Christine L; Kostow, Nora; Rog, Ofer; Davydov, Vitaliy; Su, Tiffany Y; Dernburg, Abby F; Corbett, Kevin D

    2014-11-24

    Proteins of the HORMA domain family play central, but poorly understood, roles in chromosome organization and dynamics during meiosis. In Caenorhabditis elegans, four such proteins (HIM-3, HTP-1, HTP-2, and HTP-3) have distinct but overlapping functions. Through combined biochemical, structural, and in vivo analysis, we find that these proteins form hierarchical complexes through binding of their HORMA domains to cognate peptides within their partners' C-terminal tails, analogous to the "safety belt" binding mechanism of Mad2. These interactions are critical for recruitment of HIM-3, HTP-1, and HTP-2 to chromosome axes. HTP-3, in addition to recruiting the other HORMA domain proteins to the axis, plays an independent role in sister chromatid cohesion and double-strand break formation. Finally, we find that mammalian HORMAD1 binds a motif found both at its own C terminus and at that of HORMAD2, indicating that this mode of intermolecular association is a conserved feature of meiotic chromosome structure in eukaryotes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Silencing of X-Linked MicroRNAs by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Royo, Hélène; Seitz, Hervé; ElInati, Elias; Peters, Antoine H. F. M.; Stadler, Michael B.; Turner, James M. A.

    2015-01-01

    During the pachytene stage of meiosis in male mammals, the X and Y chromosomes are transcriptionally silenced by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI). MSCI is conserved in therian mammals and is essential for normal male fertility. Transcriptomics approaches have demonstrated that in mice, most or all protein-coding genes on the X chromosome are subject to MSCI. However, it is unclear whether X-linked non-coding RNAs behave in a similar manner. The X chromosome is enriched in microRNA (miRNA) genes, with many exhibiting testis-biased expression. Importantly, high expression levels of X-linked miRNAs (X-miRNAs) have been reported in pachytene spermatocytes, indicating that these genes may escape MSCI, and perhaps play a role in the XY-silencing process. Here we use RNA FISH to examine X-miRNA expression in the male germ line. We find that, like protein-coding X-genes, X-miRNAs are expressed prior to prophase I and are thereafter silenced during pachynema. X-miRNA silencing does not occur in mouse models with defective MSCI. Furthermore, X-miRNAs are expressed at pachynema when present as autosomally integrated transgenes. Thus, we conclude that silencing of X-miRNAs during pachynema in wild type males is MSCI-dependent. Importantly, misexpression of X-miRNAs during pachynema causes spermatogenic defects. We propose that MSCI represents a chromosomal mechanism by which X-miRNAs, and other potential X-encoded repressors, can be silenced, thereby regulating genes with critical late spermatogenic functions. PMID:26509798

  18. Silencing of X-Linked MicroRNAs by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Royo, Hélène; Seitz, Hervé; ElInati, Elias; Peters, Antoine H F M; Stadler, Michael B; Turner, James M A

    2015-10-01

    During the pachytene stage of meiosis in male mammals, the X and Y chromosomes are transcriptionally silenced by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI). MSCI is conserved in therian mammals and is essential for normal male fertility. Transcriptomics approaches have demonstrated that in mice, most or all protein-coding genes on the X chromosome are subject to MSCI. However, it is unclear whether X-linked non-coding RNAs behave in a similar manner. The X chromosome is enriched in microRNA (miRNA) genes, with many exhibiting testis-biased expression. Importantly, high expression levels of X-linked miRNAs (X-miRNAs) have been reported in pachytene spermatocytes, indicating that these genes may escape MSCI, and perhaps play a role in the XY-silencing process. Here we use RNA FISH to examine X-miRNA expression in the male germ line. We find that, like protein-coding X-genes, X-miRNAs are expressed prior to prophase I and are thereafter silenced during pachynema. X-miRNA silencing does not occur in mouse models with defective MSCI. Furthermore, X-miRNAs are expressed at pachynema when present as autosomally integrated transgenes. Thus, we conclude that silencing of X-miRNAs during pachynema in wild type males is MSCI-dependent. Importantly, misexpression of X-miRNAs during pachynema causes spermatogenic defects. We propose that MSCI represents a chromosomal mechanism by which X-miRNAs, and other potential X-encoded repressors, can be silenced, thereby regulating genes with critical late spermatogenic functions.

  19. Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation is disrupted in sterile hybrid male house mice.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Polly; Good, Jeffrey M; Nachman, Michael W

    2013-03-01

    In male mammals, the X and Y chromosomes are transcriptionally silenced in primary spermatocytes by meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) and remain repressed for the duration of spermatogenesis. Here, we test the longstanding hypothesis that disrupted MSCI might contribute to the preferential sterility of heterogametic hybrid males. We studied a cross between wild-derived inbred strains of Mus musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus in which sterility is asymmetric: F1 males with a M. m. musculus mother are sterile or nearly so while F1 males with a M. m. domesticus mother are normal. In previous work, we discovered widespread overexpression of X-linked genes in the testes of sterile but not fertile F1 males. Here, we ask whether this overexpression is specifically a result of disrupted MSCI. To do this, we isolated cells from different stages of spermatogenesis and measured the expression of several genes using quantitative PCR. We found that X overexpression in sterile F1 primary spermatocytes is coincident with the onset of MSCI and persists in postmeiotic spermatids. Using a series of recombinant X genotypes, we then asked whether X overexpression in hybrids is controlled by cis-acting loci across the X chromosome. We found that it is not. Instead, one large interval in the proximal portion of the M. m. musculus X chromosome is associated with both overexpression and the severity of sterility phenotypes in hybrids. These results demonstrate a strong association between X-linked hybrid male sterility and disruption of MSCI and suggest that trans-acting loci on the X are important for the transcriptional regulation of the X chromosome during spermatogenesis.

  20. Meiotic Pairing and Segregation of Achiasmate Sex Chromosomes in Eutherian Mammals: The Role of SYCP3 Protein

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Roberto; Parra, María Teresa; Viera, Alberto; Calvente, Adela; Gómez, Rocío; Suja, José Ángel; Rufas, Julio S; Page, Jesús

    2007-01-01

    In most eutherian mammals, sex chromosomes synapse and recombine during male meiosis in a small region called pseudoautosomal region. However in some species sex chromosomes do not synapse, and how these chromosomes manage to ensure their proper segregation is under discussion. Here we present a study of the meiotic structure and behavior of sex chromosomes in one of these species, the Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus). We have analyzed the location of synaptonemal complex (SC) proteins SYCP1 and SYCP3, as well as three proteins involved in the process of meiotic recombination (RAD51, MLH1, and γ-H2AX). Our results show that although X and Y chromosomes are associated at pachytene and form a sex body, their axial elements (AEs) do not contact, and they never assemble a SC central element. Furthermore, MLH1 is not detected on the AEs of the sex chromosomes, indicating the absence of reciprocal recombination. At diplotene the organization of sex chromosomes changes strikingly, their AEs associate end to end, and SYCP3 forms an intricate network that occupies the Y chromosome and the distal region of the X chromosome long arm. Both the association of sex chromosomes and the SYCP3 structure are maintained until metaphase I. In anaphase I sex chromosomes migrate to opposite poles, but SYCP3 filaments connecting both chromosomes are observed. Hence, one can assume that SYCP3 modifications detected from diplotene onwards are correlated with the maintenance of sex chromosome association. These results demonstrate that some components of the SC may participate in the segregation of achiasmate sex chromosomes in eutherian mammals. PMID:17983272

  1. The PHD Finger Protein MMD1/DUET Ensures the Progression of Male Meiotic Chromosome Condensation and Directly Regulates the Expression of the Condensin Gene CAP-D3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Niu, Baixiao; Huang, Jiyue; Wang, Hongkuan; Yang, Xiaohui; Dong, Aiwu; Makaroff, Christopher; Ma, Hong; Wang, Yingxiang

    2016-08-01

    Chromosome condensation, a process mediated by the condensin complex, is essential for proper chromosome segregation during cell division. Unlike rapid mitotic chromosome condensation, meiotic chromosome condensation occurs over a relatively long prophase I and is unusually complex due to the coordination with chromosome axis formation and homolog interaction. The molecular mechanisms that regulate meiotic chromosome condensation progression from prophase I to metaphase I are unclear. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana meiotic PHD-finger protein MMD1/DUET is required for progressive compaction of prophase I chromosomes to metaphase I bivalents. The MMD1 PHD domain is required for its function in chromosome condensation and binds to methylated histone tails. Transcriptome analysis and qRT-PCR showed that several condensin genes exhibit significantly reduced expression in mmd1 meiocytes. Furthermore, MMD1 specifically binds to the promoter region of the condensin subunit gene CAP-D3 to enhance its expression. Moreover, cap-d3 mutants exhibit similar chromosome condensation defects, revealing an MMD1-dependent mechanism for regulating meiotic chromosome condensation, which functions in part by promoting condensin gene expression. Together, these discoveries provide strong evidence that the histone reader MMD1/DUET defines an important step for regulating the progression of meiotic prophase I chromosome condensation.

  2. Spo11-accessory proteins link double-strand break sites to the chromosome axis in early meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Panizza, Silvia; Mendoza, Marco A; Berlinger, Marc; Huang, Lingzhi; Nicolas, Alain; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Klein, Franz

    2011-08-05

    Meiotic recombination between homologous chromosomes initiates via programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), generated by complexes comprising Spo11 transesterase plus accessory proteins. DSBs arise concomitantly with the development of axial chromosome structures, where the coalescence of axis sites produces linear arrays of chromatin loops. Recombining DNA sequences map to loops, but are ultimately tethered to the underlying axis. How and when such tethering occurs is currently unclear. Using ChIPchip in yeast, we show that Spo11-accessory proteins Rec114, Mer2, and Mei4 stably interact with chromosome axis sequences, upon phosphorylation of Mer2 by S phase Cdk. This axis tethering requires meiotic axis components (Red1/Hop1) and is modulated in a domain-specific fashion by cohesin. Loss of Rec114, Mer2, and Mei4 binding correlates with loss of DSBs. Our results strongly suggest that hotspot sequences become tethered to axis sites by the DSB machinery prior to DSB formation.

  3. Smc5/6 Coordinates Formation and Resolution of Joint Molecules with Chromosome Morphology to Ensure Meiotic Divisions

    PubMed Central

    Blitzblau, Hannah G.; Newcombe, Sonya; Chan, Andrew Chi-ho; Newnham, Louise; Li, Zhaobo; Gray, Stephen; Herbert, Alex D.; Arumugam, Prakash; Hochwagen, Andreas; Hunter, Neil; Hoffmann, Eva

    2013-01-01

    During meiosis, Structural Maintenance of Chromosome (SMC) complexes underpin two fundamental features of meiosis: homologous recombination and chromosome segregation. While meiotic functions of the cohesin and condensin complexes have been delineated, the role of the third SMC complex, Smc5/6, remains enigmatic. Here we identify specific, essential meiotic functions for the Smc5/6 complex in homologous recombination and the regulation of cohesin. We show that Smc5/6 is enriched at centromeres and cohesin-association sites where it regulates sister-chromatid cohesion and the timely removal of cohesin from chromosomal arms, respectively. Smc5/6 also localizes to recombination hotspots, where it promotes normal formation and resolution of a subset of joint-molecule intermediates. In this regard, Smc5/6 functions independently of the major crossover pathway defined by the MutLγ complex. Furthermore, we show that Smc5/6 is required for stable chromosomal localization of the XPF-family endonuclease, Mus81-Mms4Eme1. Our data suggest that the Smc5/6 complex is required for specific recombination and chromosomal processes throughout meiosis and that in its absence, attempts at cell division with unresolved joint molecules and residual cohesin lead to severe recombination-induced meiotic catastrophe. PMID:24385939

  4. PHS1 regulates meiotic recombination and homologous chromosome pairing by controlling the transport of RAD50 to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ronceret, Arnaud; Doutriaux, Marie-Pascale; Golubovskaya, Inna N; Pawlowski, Wojciech P

    2009-11-24

    Recombination and pairing of homologous chromosomes are critical for bivalent formation in meiotic prophase. In many organisms, including yeast, mammals, and plants, pairing and recombination are intimately interconnected. The POOR HOMOLOGOUS SYNAPSIS1 (PHS1) gene acts in coordination of chromosome pairing and early recombination steps in plants, ensuring pairing fidelity and proper repair of meiotic DNA double-strand-breaks. In phs1 mutants, chromosomes exhibit early recombination defects and frequently associate with non-homologous partners, instead of pairing with their proper homologs. Here, we show that the product of the PHS1 gene is a cytoplasmic protein that functions by controlling transport of RAD50 from cytoplasm to the nucleus. RAD50 is a component of the MRN protein complex that processes meiotic double-strand-breaks to produce single-stranded DNA ends, which act in the homology search and recombination. We demonstrate that PHS1 plays the same role in homologous pairing in both Arabidopsis and maize, whose genomes differ dramatically in size and repetitive element content. This suggests that PHS1 affects pairing of the gene-rich fraction of the genome rather than preventing pairing between repetitive DNA elements. We propose that PHS1 is part of a system that regulates the progression of meiotic prophase by controlling entry of meiotic proteins into the nucleus. We also document that in phs1 mutants in Arabidopsis, centromeres interact before pairing commences along chromosome arms. Centromere coupling was previously observed in yeast and polyploid wheat while our data suggest that it may be a more common feature of meiosis.

  5. Mps1 and Ipl1/Aurora B Act Sequentially to Correctly Orient Chromosomes on the Meiotic Spindle of Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Régis E.; Kim, Seoyoung; Obeso, David; Straight, Paul D.; Winey, Mark; Dawson, Dean S.

    2013-01-01

    The conserved kinases Mps1 and Ipl1/Aurora B are critical for enabling chromosomes to attach to microtubules such that partner chromosomes will be segregated correctly from each other, but the precise roles of these kinases have been unclear. Here, imaging of live yeast cells was performed to elucidate the stages of chromosome-microtubule interactions, and their regulation by Ipl1 and Mps1, through meiosis I. Ipl1 was found to release kinetochore-microtubule (kMT) associations following meiotic entry, liberating chromosomes to begin homologous pairing. Surprisingly, most chromosome pairs were found to begin their spindle interactions with incorrect kMT attachments. Ipl1 released these improper connections while Mps1 triggered the formation of new force-generating microtubule attachments. This microtubule release and reattachment cycle can prevent catastrophic chromosome segregation errors in meiosis. PMID:23371552

  6. The synaptonemal complex has liquid crystalline properties and spatially regulates meiotic recombination factors

    PubMed Central

    Rog, Ofer; Köhler, Simone; Dernburg, Abby F

    2017-01-01

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a polymer that spans ~100 nm between paired homologous chromosomes during meiosis. Its striated, periodic appearance in electron micrographs led to the idea that transverse filaments within this structure ‘crosslink’ the axes of homologous chromosomes, stabilizing their pairing. SC proteins can also form polycomplexes, three-dimensional lattices that recapitulate the periodic structure of SCs but do not associate with chromosomes. Here we provide evidence that SCs and polycomplexes contain mobile subunits and that their assembly is promoted by weak hydrophobic interactions, indicative of a liquid crystalline phase. We further show that in the absence of recombination intermediates, polycomplexes recapitulate the dynamic localization of pro-crossover factors during meiotic progression, revealing how the SC might act as a conduit to regulate chromosome-wide crossover distribution. Properties unique to liquid crystals likely enable long-range signal transduction along meiotic chromosomes and underlie the rapid evolution of SC proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21455.001 PMID:28045371

  7. Meiotic stability and polymorphism of CAG repeat in normal chromosome at SCA1 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Limprasert, P.; Nouri, N.; Keats, B.J.B.

    1994-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder associated with an unstable and expanded CAG repeat. We analyzed the CAG repeat in normal chromosomes from various sources including SCA1 and nonSCA1 families, and Caucasian, African American, Eskimo, South American Indian and Acadian populations. The range of CAG repeats is 10-37 in normal alleles while the disease allele contains 45-65 repeats in our studies. To determine unbiased normal allelic frequencies, we analyzed data from unrelated individuals in each group. The significance of differences in allelic frequencies among the groups was determined by a chi-square test. Caucasian and Acadian frequencies were similar (p = 0.23), but highly significant differences were found among the Caucasians, African Americans, Eskimos, and South American Indians (p < 0.0005), and the range of allele sizes was much narrower in Eskimos and South American Indians. To determine if the normal chromosome is susceptible to meiotic instability, we examined members of 19 Caucasian and 24 Acadian families. Normal sized CAG repeats were faithfully transmitted from parents to offspring without any alteration in CAG number in 236 meioses. Transmission of CAG repeats in normal alleles were also stable in our SCA1 family. However, the disease allele was associated with a significant degree of instability. Some patients showed 2 expanded bands in DNA prepared from untransformed blood cells. This finding suggest mitotic instability of the disease allele.

  8. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Targeted induction of meiotic double-strand breaks reveals chromosomal domain-dependent regulation of Spo11 and interactions among potential sites of meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Tomoyuki; Kugou, Kazuto; Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Takehiko; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2008-02-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation mediated by Spo11. DSBs occur with frequency in chromosomal regions called hot domains but are seldom seen in cold domains. To obtain insights into the determinants of the distribution of meiotic DSBs, we examined the effects of inducing targeted DSBs during yeast meiosis using a UAS-directed form of Spo11 (Gal4BD-Spo11) and a meiosis-specific endonuclease, VDE (PI-SceI). Gal4BD-Spo11 cleaved its target sequence (UAS) integrated in hot domains but rarely in cold domains. However, Gal4BD-Spo11 did bind to UAS and VDE efficiently cleaved its recognition sequence in either context, suggesting that a cold domain is not a region of inaccessible or uncleavable chromosome structure. Importantly, self-association of Spo11 occurred at UAS in a hot domain but not in a cold domain, raising the possibility that Spo11 remains in an inactive intermediate state in cold domains. Integration of UAS adjacent to known DSB hotspots allowed us to detect competitive interactions among hotspots for activation. Moreover, the presence of VDE-introduced DSB repressed proximal hotspot activity, implicating DSBs themselves in interactions among hotspots. Thus, potential sites for Spo11-mediated DSB are subject to domain-specific and local competitive regulations during and after DSB formation.

  10. Mammalian DNA ligase III: Molecular cloning, chromosomal localization, and expression in spermatocytes undergoing meiotic recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jingwen; Danehower, S.; Besterman, J.M.; Husain, I.

    1995-10-01

    Three biochemically distinct DNA ligase activities have been identified in mammalian cell extracts. We have recently purified DNA ligase II and DNA ligase III to near homogeneity from bovine liver and testis tissue, respectively. Amino acid sequencing studies indicated that these enzymes are encoded by the same gene. In the present study, human and murine cDNA clones encoding DNA ligase III were isolated with probes based on the peptide sequences. The human DNA ligase III cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 862 amino acids, whose sequence is more closely related to those of the DNA ligases encoded by poxviruses than to replicative DNA ligases, such as human DNA ligase I. In vitro transcription and translation of the cDNA produced a catalytically active DNA ligase similar in size and substrate specificity to the purified bovine enzyme. The DNA ligase III gene was localized to human chromosome 17, which eliminated this gene as a candidate for the cancer-prone disease Bloom syndrome that is associated with DNA joining abnormalities. DNA ligase III is ubiquitously expressed at low levels, except in the testes, in which the steady-state levels of DNA ligase III mRNA are at least 10-fold higher than those detected in other tissues and cells. Since DNA ligase I mRNA is also present at high levels in the testes, we examined the expression of the DNA ligase genes during spermatogenesis. DNA ligase I mRNA expression correlated with the contribution of proliferating supermatogonia cells to the testes, in agreement with the previously defined role of this enzyme in DNA replications. In contrast, elevated levels of DNA ligase III mRNA were observed in primary supermatocytes undergoing recombination prior to the first meiotic division. Therefore, we suggest that DNA ligase III seals DNA strand breaks that arise during the process of meiotic recombination in germ cells and as a consequence of DNA damage in somatic cells. 62 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Meiotic recombination between yeast artificial chromosomes yields a single clone containing the entire BCL2 protooncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, G A; Green, E D; Young, R L; Jockel, J I; Domer, P H; Korsmeyer, S J

    1990-01-01

    The common translocation found in human follicular lymphoma, t(14;18)(q32;q21), results in deregulation of the BCL2 protoonocogene. The isolation of the intact gene would provide an essential substrate to analyze the molecular basis of this malignancy. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis suggested that this three-exon gene was several hundred kilobases (kb) long. Therefore, a library of yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones was screened to isolate the intact BCL2 gene. Two clones, yA85B6 (200 kb) and yB206A6 (700 kb), were isolated by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays specific for exon I/II and exon III, respectively. However, neither YAC contained the entire BCL2 locus. Since the two YACs were found to overlap by 60 kb, we sought to take advantage of the high recombination frequency in yeast and induce physical recombination between the two clones. Cells containing each YAC were mated and induced to undergo meiotic division and sporulation. Analysis of the resulting tetrads revealed a spore containing a single recombinant YAC of 800 kb. PCR assays and Southern blotting demonstrated that this recombined YAC contained the entire approximately 230-kb BCL2 gene. Furthermore, probe order was conserved and there was no evidence of overt rearrangements or deletions. These results indicate the feasibility of reconstructing large genomic segments with overlapping YAC clones to study genes spanning hundreds of kilobases. Images PMID:2263642

  12. Casein kinase 1 alpha regulates chromosome congression and separation during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and early embryo development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Lu, Angeleem; Zhou, Hong-Xia; Sun, Ran; Zhao, Jie; Zhou, Cheng-Jie; Shen, Jiang-Peng; Wu, Sha-Na; Liang, Cheng-Guang

    2013-01-01

    Casein kinase I alpha (CK1α) is a member of serine/threonine protein kinase, generally present in all eukaryotes. In mammals, CK1α regulates the transition from interphase to metaphase in mitosis. However, little is known about its role in meiosis. Here we examined Ck1α mRNA and protein expression, as well as its subcellular localization in mouse oocytes from germinal vesicle to the late 1-cell stage. Our results showed that the expression level of CK1α was increased in metaphase. Immunostaining results showed that CK1α colocalized with condensed chromosomes during oocyte meiotic maturation and early embryo development. We used the loss-of-function approach by employing CK1α specific morpholino injection to block the function of CK1α. This functional blocking leads to failure of polar body 1 (PB1) extrusion, chromosome misalignment and MII plate incrassation. We further found that D4476, a specific and efficient CK1 inhibitor, decreased the rate of PB1 extrusion. Moreover, D4476 resulted in giant polar body extrusion, oocyte pro-MI arrest, chromosome congression failure and impairment of embryo developmental potential. In addition, we employed pyrvinium pamoate (PP), an allosteric activator of CK1α, to enhance CK1α activity in oocytes. Supplementation of PP induced oocyte meiotic maturation failure, severe congression abnormalities and misalignment of chromosomes. Taken together, our study for the first time demonstrates that CK1α is required for chromosome alignment and segregation during oocyte meiotic maturation and early embryo development.

  13. Pseudosynapsis and Decreased Stringency of Meiotic Repair Pathway Choice on the Hemizygous Sex Chromosome of Caenorhabditis elegans Males

    PubMed Central

    Checchi, Paula M.; Lawrence, Katherine S.; Van, Mike V.; Larson, Braden J.; Engebrecht, JoAnne

    2014-01-01

    During meiosis, accurate chromosome segregation relies on homology to mediate chromosome pairing, synapsis, and crossover recombination. Crossovers are dependent upon formation and repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination (HR). In males of many species, sex chromosomes are largely hemizygous, yet DSBs are induced along nonhomologous regions. Here we analyzed the genetic requirements for meiotic DSB repair on the completely hemizygous X chromosome of Caenorhabditis elegans males. Our data reveal that the kinetics of DSB formation, chromosome pairing, and synapsis are tightly linked in the male germ line. Moreover, DSB induction on the X is concomitant with a brief period of pseudosynapsis that may allow X sister chromatids to masquerade as homologs. Consistent with this, neither meiotic kleisins nor the SMC-5/6 complex are essential for DSB repair on the X. Furthermore, early processing of X DSBs is dependent on the CtIP/Sae2 homolog COM-1, suggesting that as with paired chromosomes, HR is the preferred pathway. In contrast, the X chromosome is refractory to feedback mechanisms that ensure crossover formation on autosomes. Surprisingly, neither RAD-54 nor BRC-2 are essential for DSB repair on the X, suggesting that unlike autosomes, the X is competent for repair in the absence of HR. When both RAD-54 and the structure-specific nuclease XPF-1 are abrogated, X DSBs persist, suggesting that single-strand annealing is engaged in the absence of HR. Our findings indicate that alteration in sister chromatid interactions and flexibility in DSB repair pathway choice accommodate hemizygosity on sex chromosomes. PMID:24939994

  14. The SMC-5/6 Complex and the HIM-6 (BLM) Helicase Synergistically Promote Meiotic Recombination Intermediate Processing and Chromosome Maturation during Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ye; Sonneville, Remi; Agostinho, Ana; Meier, Bettina; Wang, Bin; Blow, J Julian; Gartner, Anton

    2016-03-01

    Meiotic recombination is essential for the repair of programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) to generate crossovers (COs) during meiosis. The efficient processing of meiotic recombination intermediates not only needs various resolvases but also requires proper meiotic chromosome structure. The Smc5/6 complex belongs to the structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) family and is closely related to cohesin and condensin. Although the Smc5/6 complex has been implicated in the processing of recombination intermediates during meiosis, it is not known how Smc5/6 controls meiotic DSB repair. Here, using Caenorhabditis elegans we show that the SMC-5/6 complex acts synergistically with HIM-6, an ortholog of the human Bloom syndrome helicase (BLM) during meiotic recombination. The concerted action of the SMC-5/6 complex and HIM-6 is important for processing recombination intermediates, CO regulation and bivalent maturation. Careful examination of meiotic chromosomal morphology reveals an accumulation of inter-chromosomal bridges in smc-5; him-6 double mutants, leading to compromised chromosome segregation during meiotic cell divisions. Interestingly, we found that the lethality of smc-5; him-6 can be rescued by loss of the conserved BRCA1 ortholog BRC-1. Furthermore, the combined deletion of smc-5 and him-6 leads to an irregular distribution of condensin and to chromosome decondensation defects reminiscent of condensin depletion. Lethality conferred by condensin depletion can also be rescued by BRC-1 depletion. Our results suggest that SMC-5/6 and HIM-6 can synergistically regulate recombination intermediate metabolism and suppress ectopic recombination by controlling chromosome architecture during meiosis.

  15. The SMC-5/6 Complex and the HIM-6 (BLM) Helicase Synergistically Promote Meiotic Recombination Intermediate Processing and Chromosome Maturation during Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ye; Sonneville, Remi; Agostinho, Ana; Meier, Bettina; Wang, Bin; Blow, J. Julian; Gartner, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is essential for the repair of programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) to generate crossovers (COs) during meiosis. The efficient processing of meiotic recombination intermediates not only needs various resolvases but also requires proper meiotic chromosome structure. The Smc5/6 complex belongs to the structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) family and is closely related to cohesin and condensin. Although the Smc5/6 complex has been implicated in the processing of recombination intermediates during meiosis, it is not known how Smc5/6 controls meiotic DSB repair. Here, using Caenorhabditis elegans we show that the SMC-5/6 complex acts synergistically with HIM-6, an ortholog of the human Bloom syndrome helicase (BLM) during meiotic recombination. The concerted action of the SMC-5/6 complex and HIM-6 is important for processing recombination intermediates, CO regulation and bivalent maturation. Careful examination of meiotic chromosomal morphology reveals an accumulation of inter-chromosomal bridges in smc-5; him-6 double mutants, leading to compromised chromosome segregation during meiotic cell divisions. Interestingly, we found that the lethality of smc-5; him-6 can be rescued by loss of the conserved BRCA1 ortholog BRC-1. Furthermore, the combined deletion of smc-5 and him-6 leads to an irregular distribution of condensin and to chromosome decondensation defects reminiscent of condensin depletion. Lethality conferred by condensin depletion can also be rescued by BRC-1 depletion. Our results suggest that SMC-5/6 and HIM-6 can synergistically regulate recombination intermediate metabolism and suppress ectopic recombination by controlling chromosome architecture during meiosis. PMID:27010650

  16. A Pair of Maternal Chromosomes Derived from Meiotic Nondisjunction in Trisomy 21 Affects Nuclear Architecture and Transcriptional Regulation.

    PubMed

    Omori, Sayaka; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Banno, Kimihiko; Tsuji, Ayumi; Nawa, Nobutoshi; Hirata, Katsuya; Kawatani, Keiji; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Taniguchi, Hidetoshi; Arahori, Hitomi; Wada, Kazuko; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Ozono, Keiichi

    2017-04-10

    Eukaryotic genomes are organised into complex higher-order structures within the nucleus, and the three-dimensional arrangement of chromosomes is functionally important for global gene regulation. The existence of supernumerary chromosome 21 in Down syndrome may perturb the nuclear architecture at different levels, which is normally optimised to maintain the physiological balance of gene expression. However, it has not been clearly elucidated whether and how aberrant configuration of chromosomes affects gene activities. To investigate the effects of trisomy 21 on nuclear organisation and gene expression, we performed three-dimensional fluorescent imaging analysis of chromosome-edited human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which enabled identification of the parental origin of the three copies of chromosome 21. We found that two copies of maternal chromosomes resulting from meiotic nondisjunction had a higher tendency to form an adjacent pair and were located relatively distant from the nuclear membrane, suggesting the conserved interaction between these homologous chromosomes. Transcriptional profiling of parental-origin-specific corrected disomy 21 iPSC lines indicated upregulated expression of the maternal alleles for a group of genes, which was accompanied by a fluctuating expression pattern. These results suggest the unique effects of a pair of maternal chromosomes in trisomy 21, which may contribute to the pathological phenotype.

  17. A Meiotic Drive Element in the Maize Pathogen Fusarium verticillioides Is Located Within a 102 kb Region of Chromosome V

    PubMed Central

    Pyle, Jay; Patel, Tejas; Merrill, Brianna; Nsokoshi, Chabu; McCall, Morgan; Proctor, Robert H.; Brown, Daren W.; Hammond, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium verticillioides is an agriculturally important fungus because of its association with maize and its propensity to contaminate grain with toxic compounds. Some isolates of the fungus harbor a meiotic drive element known as Spore killer (SkK) that causes nearly all surviving meiotic progeny from an SkK × Spore killer-susceptible (SkS) cross to inherit the SkK allele. SkK has been mapped to chromosome V but the genetic element responsible for meiotic drive has yet to be identified. In this study, we used cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers to genotype individual progeny from an SkK × SkS mapping population. We also sequenced the genomes of three progeny from the mapping population to determine their single nucleotide polymorphisms. These techniques allowed us to refine the location of SkK to a contiguous 102 kb interval of chromosome V, herein referred to as the Sk region. Relative to SkS genotypes, SkK genotypes have one extra gene within this region for a total of 42 genes. The additional gene in SkK genotypes, herein named SKC1 for Spore Killer Candidate 1, is the most highly expressed gene from the Sk region during early stages of sexual development. The Sk region also has three hyper-variable regions, the longest of which includes SKC1. The possibility that SKC1, or another gene from the Sk region, is an essential component of meiotic drive and spore killing is discussed. PMID:27317777

  18. Meiotic studies of infertile men in case of non-obstructive azoospermia with normal karyotype and no microdeleted Y-chromosome precise the clinical couple management.

    PubMed

    North, Marie-Odile; Lellei, Ilona; Erdei, Edit; Barbet, Jacques Patrick; Tritto, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    To identify meiotic criteria for infertility management in non-obstructive azoospermic men, a prospective and multicentric study was organized in Andrological Departments of Paris (France), Roma (Italy) and Budapest (Hungary). In 117 non-obstructive azoospermic men with normal karyotype and no Y-chromosome microdeletion, histology and meiotic studies on bilateral bipolar testicular biopsies were done. Histologically, 40 patients (34%) presented spermatocyte or spermatid arrest, 39 (33%) hypospermatogenesis whereas no meiotic cell could be observed in the remaining patients (33%). Cytogenetically, meiotic figures could only be obtained from the two first histological groups. Meiotic abnormalities were observed in a total of 44 patients (37.6%) including nine patients (7.7%) with severe class I and class IIB anomalies and 19 patients (16.2%) with class IIC environmentally linked meiotic abnormalities. These results provided essential clues for an accurate clinical management. For patients with no meiotic figures and patients with class I and class IIB anomalies, an hormonal stimulation is illusory and a sperm gift should be directly proposed. An hormonal stimulation should be proposed to all the other patients, either directly or following the treatment of the testicular microenvironment for the patients presenting class IIC anomalies. The genetic risk and possibility of prenatal chromosomal analysis in case of pregnancy should be clearly exposed to all the couples in all the cases where type IIA, III or IV anomalies are present. This therapeutical strategy has been applied to all the patients in our series.

  19. Presence of an extra chromosome alters meiotic double-stranded break repair dynamics and MLH1 foci distribution in human oocytes.

    PubMed

    Robles, P; Roig, I; Garcia, R; Brieño-Enríquez, M; Martin, M; Cabero, Ll; Toran, N; Garcia Caldés, M

    2013-03-01

    Studies performed on human trisomic 21 oocytes have revealed that during meiosis, the three homologues 21 synapse and, in some cases, achieve what looks like a trivalent. This implies that meiotic recombination takes place among the three homologous chromosomes 21, and to some extent, crossovers form between them. To see how meiotic recombination is in the presence of an extra chromosome 21, we analyzed the distribution of three recombination markers (γH2AX, RPA, and MLH1) on trisomic 21 oocytes at pachynema and, in particular, on chromosomes 21. Results clearly show how the presence of an extra chromosome 21 alters meiotic recombination progression, leading to the presence of a higher number of early recombination markers at pachynema. Moreover, the distribution on these chromosomes 21 of some of these markers is different in aneuploid oocytes. Finally, there is a substantial increase in the number of MLH1 foci, a marker of most crossovers in mammals, which is related to the number of synapsed chromosomes in pachynema. Thus, bivalents 21 had fewer MLH1 foci than partial or total trivalents, suggesting a close relationship between synapsis and crossover designation. All of the data presented suggest that the presence of an extra chromosome alters meiotic recombination globally in aneuploid human oocytes.

  20. Sex-ratio meiotic drive in Drosophila simulans is related to equational nondisjunction of the Y chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Cazemajor, M; Joly, D; Montchamp-Moreau, C

    2000-01-01

    The sex-ratio trait, an example of naturally occurring X-linked meiotic drive, has been reported in a dozen Drosophila species. Males carrying a sex-ratio X chromosome produce an excess of female offspring caused by a deficiency of Y-bearing sperm. In Drosophila simulans, such males produce approximately 70-90% female offspring, and 15-30% of the male offspring are sterile. Here, we investigate the cytological basis of the drive in this species. We show that the sex-ratio trait is associated with nondisjunction of Y chromatids in meiosis II. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using sex-chromosome-specific probes provides direct evidence that the drive is caused by the failure of the resulting spermatids to develop into functional sperm. XYY progeny were not observed, indicating that few or no YY spermatids escape failure. The recovery of XO males among the progeny of sex-ratio males shows that some nullo-XY spermatids become functional sperm and likely explains the male sterility. A review of the cytological data in other species shows that aberrant behavior of the Y chromosome may be a common basis of sex-ratio meiotic drive in Drosophila and the signal that triggers differential spermiogenesis failure. PMID:10628983

  1. The rad9 gene of Coprinus cinereus encodes a proline-rich protein required for meiotic chromosome condensation and synapsis

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, L.C.; Tang, Keliang; Cummings, W.J.; Zolan, M.E.

    1996-04-01

    The rad9 gene of Coprinus cinereus is essential for the normal completion of meiosis. We examined surface-spread preparations of wild-type and rad9-1 nuclei from the meiotic stages of karyogamy through metaphase I, and we determined the primary sequence, structure, and meiotic expression of the rad9 gene. In wild-type C. cinereus, karyogamy is followed by condensation and alignment of homologous chromosomes. Condensation and axial core development largely precede synapsis, which often initiates at telomeres. A diffuse diplotene phase coincides with dissolution of the synaptonemal complex, and subsequently chromosomes further condense as the cells progress into metaphase I. In contrast, although karyogamy and nucleolar fusion are apparently normal in rad9-1 basidia, only short stretches of synaptonemal complex form. These correlate with stretches of condensed chromatin, mostly at apparent chromosome ends, and regions of presumptive triple synapsis are numerous. rad9-1 basidia enter the diffuse stages of early diplotene, and then 50% of these cells enter metaphase I by the criteria of nucleolar elimination and at least some chromatin condensation. rad9 gene expression is induced after gamma irradiation and during meiosis. The gene has 27 exons and encodes a predicted protein of 2157 amino acids, with a proline-rich amino terminus. 62 refs., 10 figs.

  2. The role of meiotic cohesin REC8 in chromosome segregation in {gamma} irradiation-induced endopolyploid tumour cells

    SciTech Connect

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Cragg, Mark S.; Salmina, Kristine; Hausmann, Michael; Scherthan, Harry

    2009-09-10

    Escape from mitotic catastrophe and generation of endopolyploid tumour cells (ETCs) represents a potential survival strategy of tumour cells in response to genotoxic treatments. ETCs that resume the mitotic cell cycle have reduced ploidy and are often resistant to these treatments. In search for a mechanism for genome reduction, we previously observed that ETCs express meiotic proteins among which REC8 (a meiotic cohesin component) is of particular interest, since it favours reductional cell division in meiosis. In the present investigation, we induced endopolyploidy in p53-dysfunctional human tumour cell lines (Namalwa, WI-L2-NS, HeLa) by gamma irradiation, and analysed the sub-cellular localisation of REC8 in the resulting ETCs. We observed by RT-PCR and Western blot that REC8 is constitutively expressed in these tumour cells, along with SGOL1 and SGOL2, and that REC8 becomes modified after irradiation. REC8 localised to paired sister centromeres in ETCs, the former co-segregating to opposite poles. Furthermore, REC8 localised to the centrosome of interphase ETCs and to the astral poles in anaphase cells where it colocalised with the microtubule-associated protein NuMA. Altogether, our observations indicate that radiation-induced ETCs express features of meiotic cell divisions and that these may facilitate chromosome segregation and genome reduction.

  3. Arabidopsis RAD51, RAD51C and XRCC3 proteins form a complex and facilitate RAD51 localization on chromosomes for meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Juan; Ma, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is required for proper homologous chromosome segregation in plants and other eukaryotes. The eukaryotic RAD51 gene family has seven ancient paralogs with important roles in mitotic and meiotic recombination. Mutations in mammalian RAD51 homologs RAD51C and XRCC3 lead to embryonic lethality. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, RAD51C and XRCC3 homologs are not essential for vegetative development but are each required for somatic and meiotic recombination, but the mechanism of RAD51C and XRCC3 in meiotic recombination is unclear. The non-lethal Arabidopsis rad51c and xrcc3 null mutants provide an opportunity to study their meiotic functions. Here, we show that AtRAD51C and AtXRCC3 are components of the RAD51-dependent meiotic recombination pathway and required for normal AtRAD51 localization on meiotic chromosomes. In addition, AtRAD51C interacts with both AtRAD51 and AtXRCC3 in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that these proteins form a complex (es). Comparison of AtRAD51 foci in meiocytes from atrad51, atrad51c, and atxrcc3 single, double and triple heterozygous mutants further supports an interaction between AtRAD51C and AtXRCC3 that enhances AtRAD51 localization. Moreover, atrad51c-/+ atxrcc3-/+ double and atrad51-/+ atrad51c-/+ atxrcc3-/+ triple heterozygous mutants have defects in meiotic recombination, suggesting the role of the AtRAD51C-AtXRCC3 complex in meiotic recombination is in part AtRAD51-dependent. Together, our results support a model in which direct interactions between the RAD51C-XRCC3 complex and RAD51 facilitate RAD51 localization on meiotic chromosomes and RAD51-dependent meiotic recombination. Finally, we hypothesize that maintenance of RAD51 function facilitated by the RAD51C-XRCC3 complex could be highly conserved in eukaryotes. PMID:28562599

  4. Arabidopsis RAD51, RAD51C and XRCC3 proteins form a complex and facilitate RAD51 localization on chromosomes for meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Su, Hang; Cheng, Zhihao; Huang, Jiyue; Lin, Juan; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Ma, Hong; Wang, Yingxiang

    2017-05-01

    Meiotic recombination is required for proper homologous chromosome segregation in plants and other eukaryotes. The eukaryotic RAD51 gene family has seven ancient paralogs with important roles in mitotic and meiotic recombination. Mutations in mammalian RAD51 homologs RAD51C and XRCC3 lead to embryonic lethality. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, RAD51C and XRCC3 homologs are not essential for vegetative development but are each required for somatic and meiotic recombination, but the mechanism of RAD51C and XRCC3 in meiotic recombination is unclear. The non-lethal Arabidopsis rad51c and xrcc3 null mutants provide an opportunity to study their meiotic functions. Here, we show that AtRAD51C and AtXRCC3 are components of the RAD51-dependent meiotic recombination pathway and required for normal AtRAD51 localization on meiotic chromosomes. In addition, AtRAD51C interacts with both AtRAD51 and AtXRCC3 in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that these proteins form a complex (es). Comparison of AtRAD51 foci in meiocytes from atrad51, atrad51c, and atxrcc3 single, double and triple heterozygous mutants further supports an interaction between AtRAD51C and AtXRCC3 that enhances AtRAD51 localization. Moreover, atrad51c-/+ atxrcc3-/+ double and atrad51-/+ atrad51c-/+ atxrcc3-/+ triple heterozygous mutants have defects in meiotic recombination, suggesting the role of the AtRAD51C-AtXRCC3 complex in meiotic recombination is in part AtRAD51-dependent. Together, our results support a model in which direct interactions between the RAD51C-XRCC3 complex and RAD51 facilitate RAD51 localization on meiotic chromosomes and RAD51-dependent meiotic recombination. Finally, we hypothesize that maintenance of RAD51 function facilitated by the RAD51C-XRCC3 complex could be highly conserved in eukaryotes.

  5. Numerical and spatial patterning of yeast meiotic DNA breaks by Tel1.

    PubMed

    Mohibullah, Neeman; Keeney, Scott

    2017-02-01

    The Spo11-generated double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination are dangerous lesions that can disrupt genome integrity, so meiotic cells regulate their number, timing, and distribution. Mechanisms of this regulation remain poorly understood. Here, we use Spo11-oligonucleotide complexes, a byproduct of DSB formation, to reveal aspects of the contribution of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA damage-responsive kinase Tel1 (ortholog of mammalian ATM). A tel1Δ mutant has globally increased amounts of Spo11-oligonucleotide complexes and altered Spo11-oligonucleotide lengths, consistent with conserved roles for Tel1 in control of DSB number and processing. A kinase-dead tel1 mutation similarly increases Spo11-oligonucleotide levels but mutating known Tel1 phosphotargets on Hop1 and Rec114 does not, implicating Tel1 kinase activity and clarifying roles of Tel1 phosphorylation substrates. Deep sequencing of Spo11 oligonucleotides demonstrates that Tel1 shapes the genome-wide DSB landscape in unexpected ways. Early in meiosis, Tel1 absence causes widespread changes in DSB distributions across large chromosomal domains. Many of these changes are erased as meiosis proceeds, however, illustrating homeostatic behavior of DSB regulatory systems. We further find that effects of Tel1 are distinct but partially overlapping with previously described contributions of the recombination regulator Cst9 (also known as Zip3). Finally, we provide evidence indicating that Tel1-dependent DSB interference influences the population-average DSB landscape but also demonstrate that locally inhibitory effects of an artificial hotspot insertion can be both Tel1-independent and chromosomal context-dependent. Our findings delineate Tel1 roles in regulating number and location of DSBs and illuminate the complex interplay between Tel1 and other pathways for DSB control.

  6. Nicotine-induced Disturbances of Meiotic Maturation in Cultured Mouse Oocytes: Alterations of Spindle Integrity and Chromosome Alignment.

    PubMed

    Zenzes, Maria Teresa; Bielecki, Ryszard

    2004-09-15

    We investigated whether nicotine exposure in vitro of mouse oocytes affects spindle and chromosome function during meiotic maturation (M-I and M-II). Oocytes in germinal vesicle (GV) stage were cultured in nicotine for 8 h or for 16 h, to assess effects in M-I and in metaphase II (M-II). The latter culture setting used the three protocols: 8 h nicotine then 8 h medium (8N + 8M); 16 h nicotine (16N); 8 h medium then 8 h nicotine (8M + 8N). Non-toxic concentrations of nicotine at 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mmol/L were used. Spindle-chromosome configurations were analyzed with wide-field optical sectioning microscopy. In 8 h cultures, nicotine exposure resulted in dose-related increased proportions of M-I oocytes with defective spindle-chromosome configurations. A dose-related delayed entry into anaphase I was also detected. In 16 h cultures, nicotine exposure for the first 8 h (8N + 8M), or for 16 h (16N), resulted in dose- and time-related increased proportions of oocytes arrested in M-I (10 mmol/L; 8 h: 53.2%, controls 9.6%; 16 h: 87.6%, controls 8.5%). Defects in M-I spindles and chromosomes caused M-I arrest leading to dose-related decreased proportions of oocytes that reached metaphase-II (10 mmol/L 8 h: 46.8%, controls 90.4%;16 h: 12.4%, controls 91.5%). A delayed anaphase-I affected the normal timing of M-II, leading to abnormal oocytes with dispersed chromosomes, or with double spindles and no polar body. Nicotine exposure during the second 8 h (8M + 8N) resulted in dose-related, increased proportions of M-II oocytes with defective spindles and chromosomes (10 mmol/L: 42.9%, controls 2.0%). Nicotine has no adverse effects on GV break down, but induces spindle and chromosome defects compromising oocyte meiotic maturation and development.

  7. Knockdown of UCHL5IP causes abnormalities in γ-tubulin localisation, spindle organisation and chromosome alignment in mouse oocyte meiotic maturation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Peng; Qi, Shu-Tao; Wei, Yanchang; Ge, Zhao-Jia; Chen, Lei; Hou, Yi; Ouyang, Ying-Chun; Schatten, Heide; Zhao, Jian-Guo; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    UCHL5IP is one of the subunits of the haus complex, which is important for microtubule generation, spindle bipolarity and accurate chromosome segregation in Drosophila and human mitotic cells. In this study, the expression and localisation of UCHL5IP were explored, as well as its functions in mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. The results showed that the UCHL5IP protein level was consistent during oocyte maturation and it was localised to the meiotic spindle in MI and MII stages. Knockdown of UCHL5IP led to spindle defects, chromosome misalignment and disruption of γ-tubulin localisation in the spindle poles. These results suggest that UCHL5IP plays critical roles in spindle formation during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation.

  8. Spp1, a member of the Set1 Complex, promotes meiotic DSB formation in promoters by tethering histone H3K4 methylation sites to chromosome axes.

    PubMed

    Sommermeyer, Vérane; Béneut, Claire; Chaplais, Emmanuel; Serrentino, Maria Elisabetta; Borde, Valérie

    2013-01-10

    Meiotic chromosomes are organized into arrays of loops that are anchored to the chromosome axis structure. Programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination, catalyzed by Spo11 and accessory DSB proteins, form in loop sequences in promoters, whereas the DSB proteins are located on chromosome axes. Mechanisms bridging these two chromosomal regions for DSB formation have remained elusive. Here we show that Spp1, a conserved member of the histone H3K4 methyltransferase Set1 complex, is required for normal levels of DSB formation and is associated with chromosome axes during meiosis, where it physically interacts with the Mer2 DSB protein. The PHD finger module of Spp1, which reads H3K4 methylation close to promoters, promotes DSB formation by tethering these regions to chromosome axes and activating cleavage by the DSB proteins. This paper provides the molecular mechanism linking DSB sequences to chromosome axes and explains why H3K4 methylation is important for meiotic recombination.

  9. Error-prone ZW pairing and no evidence for meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the chicken germ line.

    PubMed

    Guioli, Silvana; Lovell-Badge, Robin; Turner, James M A

    2012-01-01

    In the male mouse the X and Y chromosomes pair and recombine within the small pseudoautosomal region. Genes located on the unsynapsed segments of the X and Y are transcriptionally silenced at pachytene by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI). The degree to which MSCI is conserved in other vertebrates is currently unclear. In the female chicken the ZW bivalent is thought to undergo a transient phase of full synapsis at pachytene, starting from the homologous ends and spreading through the heterologous regions. It has been proposed that the repair of the ZW DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is postponed until diplotene and that the ZW bivalent is subject to MSCI, which is independent of its synaptic status. Here we present a distinct model of meiotic pairing and silencing of the ZW pair during chicken oogenesis. We show that, in most oocytes, DNA DSB foci on the ZW are resolved by the end of pachytene and that the ZW desynapses in broad synchrony with the autosomes. We unexpectedly find that ZW pairing is highly error prone, with many oocytes failing to engage in ZW synapsis and crossover formation. Oocytes with unsynapsed Z and W chromosomes nevertheless progress to the diplotene stage, suggesting that a checkpoint does not operate during pachytene in the chicken germ line. Using a combination of epigenetic profiling and RNA-FISH analysis, we find no evidence for MSCI, associated with neither the asynaptic ZW, as described in mammals, nor the synaptic ZW. The lack of conservation of MSCI in the chicken reopens the debate about the evolution of MSCI and its driving forces.

  10. Meiotic DNA break formation requires the unsynapsed chromosome axis-binding protein IHO1 (CCDC36) in mice

    PubMed Central

    Stanzione, Marcello; Baumann, Marek; Papanikos, Frantzeskos; Dereli, Ihsan; Lange, Julian; Ramlal, Angelique; Tränkner, Daniel; Shibuya, Hiroki; de Massy, Bernard; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Jasin, Maria; Keeney, Scott; Tóth, Attila

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are induced by SPO11 during meiosis to initiate recombination-mediated pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes. Germline genome integrity requires spatiotemporal control of DSB formation, which involves the proteinaceous chromosome axis along the core of each meiotic chromosome. In particular, a component of unsynapsed axes, HORMAD1, promotes DSB formation in unsynapsed regions where DSB formation must occur to ensure completion of synapsis. Despite its importance, the underlying mechanism has remained elusive. We identify CCDC36 as a direct interactor of HORMAD1 (IHO1) that is essential for DSB formation. Underpinning this function, IHO1 and conserved SPO11-auxiliary proteins MEI4 and REC114 assemble chromatin-bound recombinosomes that are predicted activators of DSB formation. HORMAD1 is needed for robust recruitment of IHO1 to unsynapsed axes and efficient formation and/or stabilization of these recombinosomes. Thus we propose that HORMAD1-IHO1 interaction provides a mechanism for the selective promotion of DSB formation along unsynapsed chromosome axes. PMID:27723721

  11. Chromosomal mapping of the human CNP gene using a meiotic crossover DNA panel, PCR, and allele-specific probes

    SciTech Connect

    Sprinkle, T.J.; Stoming, T.A.; Whitney, J.B. III; Kouri, R.E.; Fain, P.D.

    1993-05-01

    The human 2{prime},3{prime}-cyclic nucleotide 3{prime}-phosphohydrolase (CNP) gene is located on chromosome 17, as determined by PCR of somatic cell hybrid DNA panels and confirmed using a mouse-human hybrid containing only human chromosome 17. A polymorphic site (C,T) was previously described at nucleotide 1215 within the most 3{prime} intron of the gene. Nested PCR primer pairs were designed to amplify across this site, and PCR products were hybridized to end-labeled allele-specific probes. To localize further the CNP gene within chromosome 17, a two-step strategy was used. First, dot blots containing DNA from the parents of 10 three-generation families were screened to identify the potentially informative families. Second, 53 members of four selected families were typed at this locus. Previous studies had shown that the 29 siblings present in these four families carry a total of 84 meiotic breakpoints on chromosome 17. Based on the genotypes observed in these 29 siblings, the human CNP gene was localized to a fragment on 17q bounded by THRA1 (thyroid receptor A1) and NGFR (nerve growth factor receptor), a genetic distance of approximately 6 cM. 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Separable Roles for a Caenorhabditis elegans RMI1 Homolog in Promoting and Antagonizing Meiotic Crossovers Ensure Faithful Chromosome Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Jagut, Marlène; Hamminger, Patricia; Woglar, Alexander; Millonigg, Sophia; Paulin, Luis; Mikl, Martin; Dello Stritto, Maria Rosaria; Tang, Lois; Habacher, Cornelia; Tam, Angela; Gallach, Miguel; von Haeseler, Arndt; Villeneuve, Anne M.; Jantsch, Verena

    2016-01-01

    During the first meiotic division, crossovers (COs) between homologous chromosomes ensure their correct segregation. COs are produced by homologous recombination (HR)-mediated repair of programmed DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). As more DSBs are induced than COs, mechanisms are required to establish a regulated number of COs and to repair remaining intermediates as non-crossovers (NCOs). We show that the Caenorhabditis elegans RMI1 homolog-1 (RMH-1) functions during meiosis to promote both CO and NCO HR at appropriate chromosomal sites. RMH-1 accumulates at CO sites, dependent on known pro-CO factors, and acts to promote CO designation and enforce the CO outcome of HR-intermediate resolution. RMH-1 also localizes at NCO sites and functions in parallel with SMC-5 to antagonize excess HR-based connections between chromosomes. Moreover, RMH-1 also has a major role in channeling DSBs into an NCO HR outcome near the centers of chromosomes, thereby ensuring that COs form predominantly at off-center positions. PMID:27011106

  13. [The hybridization of tetraploid wheat with the octoploid wheat-wild rye amphiploid Elytricum fertile and the chromosome behavior in meiotic MI].

    PubMed

    Motsnyĭ, I I; Prokopovich, E L; Simonenko, V K

    2000-01-01

    The hybridization and chromosome behaviour regularities at meiotic MI of reciprocal F1 hybrids of tetraploid wheats T. durum and T. turgidum with 56-chromosome incomplete wheat-Elymus amphiploid (IWEA) Elytricum fertile, were investigated. Variation of main indices of the hybridization has been revealed to be determined by variance of such factors as cross direction, genotype peculiarities of wheat strains and their interaction. Elymus sibiricus genome, contained in IWEA karyotype, carries several genes, that can suppress wheat diploidization system. Reduction of homologous chromosome synapsis is not determined by these genes, but is connected with influence of other Elymus sibiricus chromosome factors.

  14. Meiotic DNA double-strand breaks and chromosome asynapsis in mice are monitored by distinct HORMAD2-independent and -dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wojtasz, Lukasz; Cloutier, Jeffrey M; Baumann, Marek; Daniel, Katrin; Varga, János; Fu, Jun; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Stewart, A Francis; Reményi, Attila; Turner, James M A; Tóth, Attila

    2012-05-01

    Meiotic crossover formation involves the repair of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and synaptonemal complex (SC) formation. Completion of these processes must precede the meiotic divisions in order to avoid chromosome abnormalities in gametes. Enduring key questions in meiosis have been how meiotic progression and crossover formation are coordinated, whether inappropriate asynapsis is monitored, and whether asynapsis elicits prophase arrest via mechanisms that are distinct from the surveillance of unrepaired DNA DSBs. We disrupted the meiosis-specific mouse HORMAD2 (Hop1, Rev7, and Mad2 domain 2) protein, which preferentially associates with unsynapsed chromosome axes. We show that HORMAD2 is required for the accumulation of the checkpoint kinase ATR along unsynapsed axes, but not at DNA DSBs or on DNA DSB-associated chromatin loops. Consistent with the hypothesis that ATR activity on chromatin plays important roles in the quality control of meiotic prophase, HORMAD2 is required for the elimination of the asynaptic Spo11(-/-), but not the asynaptic and DSB repair-defective Dmc1(-/-) oocytes. Our observations strongly suggest that HORMAD2-dependent recruitment of ATR to unsynapsed chromosome axes constitutes a mechanism for the surveillance of asynapsis. Thus, we provide convincing evidence for the existence of a distinct asynapsis surveillance mechanism that safeguards the ploidy of the mammalian germline.

  15. The mouse X chromosome is enriched for sex-biased genes not subject to selection by meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Khil, Pavel P; Smirnova, Natalya A; Romanienko, Peter J; Camerini-Otero, R Daniel

    2004-06-01

    Sex chromosomes are subject to sex-specific selective evolutionary forces. One model predicts that genes with sex-biased expression should be enriched on the X chromosome. In agreement with Rice's hypothesis, spermatogonial genes are over-represented on the X chromosome of mice and sex- and reproduction-related genes are over-represented on the human X chromosome. Male-biased genes are under-represented on the X chromosome in worms and flies, however. Here we show that mouse spermatogenesis genes are relatively under-represented on the X chromosome and female-biased genes are enriched on it. We used Spo11(-/-) mice blocked in spermatogenesis early in meiosis to evaluate the temporal pattern of gene expression in sperm development. Genes expressed before the Spo11 block are enriched on the X chromosome, whereas those expressed later in spermatogenesis are depleted. Inactivation of the X chromosome in male meiosis may be a universal driving force for X-chromosome demasculinization.

  16. The PHD Finger Protein MMD1/DUET Ensures the Progression of Male Meiotic Chromosome Condensation and Directly Regulates the Expression of the Condensin Gene CAP-D3[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Niu, Baixiao; Huang, Jiyue; Wang, Hongkuan; Yang, Xiaohui; Dong, Aiwu

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome condensation, a process mediated by the condensin complex, is essential for proper chromosome segregation during cell division. Unlike rapid mitotic chromosome condensation, meiotic chromosome condensation occurs over a relatively long prophase I and is unusually complex due to the coordination with chromosome axis formation and homolog interaction. The molecular mechanisms that regulate meiotic chromosome condensation progression from prophase I to metaphase I are unclear. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana meiotic PHD-finger protein MMD1/DUET is required for progressive compaction of prophase I chromosomes to metaphase I bivalents. The MMD1 PHD domain is required for its function in chromosome condensation and binds to methylated histone tails. Transcriptome analysis and qRT-PCR showed that several condensin genes exhibit significantly reduced expression in mmd1 meiocytes. Furthermore, MMD1 specifically binds to the promoter region of the condensin subunit gene CAP-D3 to enhance its expression. Moreover, cap-d3 mutants exhibit similar chromosome condensation defects, revealing an MMD1-dependent mechanism for regulating meiotic chromosome condensation, which functions in part by promoting condensin gene expression. Together, these discoveries provide strong evidence that the histone reader MMD1/DUET defines an important step for regulating the progression of meiotic prophase I chromosome condensation. PMID:27385818

  17. A dynamic meiotic SUN belt includes the zygotene-stage telomere bouquet and is disrupted in chromosome segregation mutants of maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Shaun P.; Gumber, Hardeep K.; Mao, Yunyun; Bass, Hank W.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) plays an essential role in meiotic telomere behavior and links the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm during homologous chromosome pairing and recombination in many eukaryotic species. Resident NE proteins including SUN (Sad-1/UNC-84) and KASH (Klarsicht/ANC-1/Syne-homology) domain proteins are known to interact forming the Linker of Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton (LINC) complex that connects chromatin to the cytoskeleton. To investigate the possible cross-kingdom conservation of SUN protein functions in plant meiosis, we immunolocalized maize SUN2 using 3D microscopy of pollen mother cells from maize (Zea mays L.), a large-genome plant model with a canonical NE zygotene-stage telomere bouquet. We detected SUN2 at the nuclear periphery and found that it exhibited a distinct belt-like structure that transitioned to a half-belt during the zygotene stage and back to a full belt during and beyond the pachytene stage. The zygotene-stage half-belt SUN structure was shown by 3D immuno-FISH to include the NE-associated telomere cluster that defines the bouquet stage and coincides with homologous chromosome synapsis. Microtubule and filamentous actin staining patterns did not show any obvious belt or a retracted-like structure other than a general enrichment of tubulin staining distributed widely around the nucleus and throughout the cytoplasm. Genetic disruption of the meiotic SUN belt staining patterns with three different meiosis-specific mutants, desynaptic (dy1), asynaptic1 (as1), and divergent spindle1 (dv1) provides additional evidence for the role of the nuclear envelope in meiotic chromosome behavior. Taking into account all of the observations from this study, we propose that the maize SUN belt is directly or indirectly involved in meiotic telomere dynamics, chromosome synapsis, and possibly integration of signals and forces across the meiotic prophase nuclear envelope. PMID:25071797

  18. The maize (Zea mays) desynaptic (dy) mutation defines a pathway for meiotic chromosome segregation, linking nuclear morphology, telomere distribution and synapsis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Shaun P; Bass, Hank W

    2012-08-01

    Meiosis involves a dramatic reorganization of the genetic material, along with changes in the architecture of the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. In the opisthokonts, nuclear envelope and meiotic chromosome behavior are coordinated by forces generated in the cytoplasm and transferred to the nucleus by the nuclear-envelope protein linkers SUN and KASH. During meiotic prophase I, the telomere bouquet arrangement has roles in interhomolog recognition, pairing, synapsis, interlock resolution and homologous chromosome recombination. The maize desynaptic (dy) mutant is defective in homologous chromosome synapsis, recombination, telomere-nuclear envelope interactions and chromosome segregation. A detailed three-dimensional cytological analysis of dy revealed telomere misplacement during the bouquet stage, synaptic irregularities, nuclear envelope distortion and chromosome bridges at anaphase I. Using linkage and B-A translocation mapping, we placed dy on the long arm of chromosome 3, genetic bin 3.06. SSR marker analysis narrowed the mapping interval to 9 cM. Candidate genes in this region include a PM3-type SUN domain protein, ZmSUN3. No obvious genetic lesions were found in the ZmSUN3 allele of dy, but a conspicuous splice variant, ZmSUN3-sv1, was observed in mRNA from dy. The variant message is predicted to result in the synthesis of a truncated ZmSUN3 protein lacking two C-terminal transmembrane domains. Other potential candidate genes relevant to the documented phenotypes were also considered. In summary, this study reveals that dy causes disruption of a central meiotic pathway connecting nuclear envelope integrity to telomere localization and synapsis during meiotic prophase.

  19. Spatial organization of chromatin domains and compartments in single chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siyuan; Su, Jun-Han; Beliveau, Brian J; Bintu, Bogdan; Moffitt, Jeffrey R; Wu, Chao-ting; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-08-05

    The spatial organization of chromatin critically affects genome function. Recent chromosome-conformation-capture studies have revealed topologically associating domains (TADs) as a conserved feature of chromatin organization, but how TADs are spatially organized in individual chromosomes remains unknown. Here, we developed an imaging method for mapping the spatial positions of numerous genomic regions along individual chromosomes and traced the positions of TADs in human interphase autosomes and X chromosomes. We observed that chromosome folding deviates from the ideal fractal-globule model at large length scales and that TADs are largely organized into two compartments spatially arranged in a polarized manner in individual chromosomes. Active and inactive X chromosomes adopt different folding and compartmentalization configurations. These results suggest that the spatial organization of chromatin domains can change in response to regulation.

  20. Spatial ordering of chromosomes enhances the fidelity of chromosome partitioning in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Jain, Isha H; Vijayan, Vikram; O'Shea, Erin K

    2012-08-21

    Many cyanobacteria have been shown to harbor multiple chromosome copies per cell, yet little is known about the organization, replication, and segregation of these chromosomes. Here, we visualize individual chromosomes in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus via time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. We find that chromosomes are equally spaced along the long axis of the cell and are interspersed with another regularly spaced subcellular compartment, the carboxysome. This remarkable organization of the cytoplasm along with accurate midcell septum placement allows for near-optimal segregation of chromosomes to daughter cells. Disruption of either chromosome ordering or midcell septum placement significantly increases the chromosome partitioning error. We find that chromosome replication is both asynchronous and independent of the position of the chromosome in the cell and that spatial organization is preserved after replication. Our findings on chromosome organization, replication, and segregation in S. elongatus provide a basis for understanding chromosome dynamics in bacteria with multiple chromosomes.

  1. Spatial ordering of chromosomes enhances the fidelity of chromosome partitioning in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Isha H.; Vijayan, Vikram; O’Shea, Erin K.

    2012-01-01

    Many cyanobacteria have been shown to harbor multiple chromosome copies per cell, yet little is known about the organization, replication, and segregation of these chromosomes. Here, we visualize individual chromosomes in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus via time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. We find that chromosomes are equally spaced along the long axis of the cell and are interspersed with another regularly spaced subcellular compartment, the carboxysome. This remarkable organization of the cytoplasm along with accurate midcell septum placement allows for near-optimal segregation of chromosomes to daughter cells. Disruption of either chromosome ordering or midcell septum placement significantly increases the chromosome partitioning error. We find that chromosome replication is both asynchronous and independent of the position of the chromosome in the cell and that spatial organization is preserved after replication. Our findings on chromosome organization, replication, and segregation in S. elongatus provide a basis for understanding chromosome dynamics in bacteria with multiple chromosomes. PMID:22869746

  2. Chromosomes carrying meiotic avoidance loci in three apomictic eudicot Hieracium subgenus Pilosella species share structural features with two monocot apomicts.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Ito, Kanae; Johnson, Susan D; Oelkers, Karsten; Suzuki, Go; Houben, Andreas; Mukai, Yasuhiko; Koltunow, Anna M

    2011-11-01

    The LOSS OF APOMEIOSIS (LOA) locus is one of two dominant loci known to control apomixis in the eudicot Hieracium praealtum. LOA stimulates the differentiation of somatic aposporous initial cells after the initiation of meiosis in ovules. Aposporous initial cells undergo nuclear proliferation close to sexual megaspores, forming unreduced aposporous embryo sacs, and the sexual program ceases. LOA-linked genetic markers were used to isolate 1.2 Mb of LOA-associated DNAs from H. praealtum. Physical mapping defined the genomic region essential for LOA function between two markers, flanking 400 kb of identified sequence and central unknown sequences. Cytogenetic and sequence analyses revealed that the LOA locus is located on a single chromosome near the tip of the long arm and surrounded by extensive, abundant complex repeat and transposon sequences. Chromosomal features and LOA-linked markers are conserved in aposporous Hieracium caespitosum and Hieracium piloselloides but absent in sexual Hieracium pilosella. Their absence in apomictic Hieracium aurantiacum suggests that meiotic avoidance may have evolved independently in aposporous subgenus Pilosella species. The structure of the hemizygous chromosomal region containing the LOA locus in the three Hieracium subgenus Pilosella species resembles that of the hemizygous apospory-specific genomic regions in monocot Pennisetum squamulatum and Cenchrus ciliaris. Analyses of partial DNA sequences at these loci show no obvious conservation, indicating that they are unlikely to share a common ancestral origin. This suggests convergent evolution of repeat-rich hemizygous chromosomal regions containing apospory loci in these monocot and eudicot species, which may be required for the function and maintenance of the trait.

  3. Physical mapping of the Period gene on meiotic chromosomes of South American grasshoppers (Acridomorpha, Orthoptera).

    PubMed

    Souza, T E; Oliveira, D L; Santos, J F; Rieger, T T

    2014-12-19

    The single-copy gene Period was located in five grasshopper species belonging to the Acridomorpha group through permanent in situ hybridization (PISH). The mapping revealed one copy of this gene in the L1 chromosome pair in Ommexecha virens, Xyleus discoideus angulatus, Tropidacris collaris, Schistocerca pallens, and Stiphra robusta. A possible second copy was mapped on the L2 chromosome pair in S. robusta, which should be confirmed by further studies. Except for the latter case, the chromosomal position of the Period gene was highly conserved among the four families studied. The S. robusta karyotype also differs from the others both in chromosome number and morphology. The position conservation of the single-copy gene Period contrasts with the location diversification of multigene families in these species. The localization of single-copy genes by PISH can provide new insights about the genomic content and chromosomal evolution of grasshoppers and others insects.

  4. Meiotic abnormalities in metaphase I human spermatocytes from infertile males: frequencies, chromosomes involved, and the relationships with polymorphic karyotype and seminal parameters.

    PubMed

    Sarrate, Zaida; Vidal, Francesca; Blanco, Joan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to look in depth at the relationship between meiotic anomalies and male infertility, such as the determination of the chromosomes involved or the correlation with patient features. For this purpose, a total of 31 testicular tissue samples from individuals consulting for fertility problems were analyzed. Metaphase I cells were evaluated using a sequential methodology combining Leishman stained procedures and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization protocols. The number of chromosomal units and chiasmata count per bivalent were established and a hierarchical cluster analysis of the individuals was performed. The relationship of the seminogram and the karyotype over recombination were evaluated using Poisson regression models. Results obtained in this study show a significant percentage of infertile individuals with altered meiotic behavior, mostly specified as a reduction in chiasmata count in medium and large chromosomes, the presence of univalents, and the observation of tetraploid metaphases. Moreover, the number and the type of anomalies were found to be different between cells of the same individual, suggesting the coexistence of cell lines with normal meiotic behavior and cell lines with abnormalities. In addition, chromosomal abnormalities in metaphase I are significantly associated with oligozoospermia and/or polymorphic karyotype variants.

  5. Meiotic abnormalities in metaphase I human spermatocytes from infertile males: frequencies, chromosomes involved, and relationship with polymorphic karyotype and seminal parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sarrate, Zaida; Vidal, Francesca; Blanco, Joan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to look in depth at the relationship between meiotic anomalies and male infertility, such as the determination of the chromosomes involved or the correlation with patient features. For this purpose, a total of 31 testicular tissue samples from individuals consulting for fertility problems were analyzed. Metaphase I cells were evaluated using a sequential methodology combining Leishman stained procedures and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization protocols. The number of chromosomal units and chiasmata count per bivalent were established and a hierarchical cluster analysis of the individuals was performed. The relationship of the seminogram and the karyotype over recombination were evaluated using Poisson regression models. Results obtained in this study show a significant percentage of infertile individuals with altered meiotic behavior, mostly specified as a reduction in chiasmata count in medium and large chromosomes, the presence of univalents, and the observation of tetraploid metaphases. Moreover, the number and the type of anomalies were found to be different between cells of the same individual, suggesting the coexistence of cell lines with normal meiotic behavior and cell lines with abnormalities. In addition, chromosomal abnormalities in metaphase I are significantly associated with oligozoospermia and/or polymorphic karyotype variants. PMID:25080930

  6. Meiotic behaviour of sex chromosomes investigated by three-colour FISH on 35,142 sperm nuclei from two 47,XYY males.

    PubMed

    Chevret, E; Rousseaux, S; Monteil, M; Usson, Y; Cozzi, J; Pelletier, R; Sele, B

    1997-03-01

    Meiotic segregation of sex chromosomes from two fertile 47,XYY men was analysed by a three-colour fluorescence in situ hybridisation procedure. This method allows the identification of hyperhaploidies (spermatozoa with 24 chromosomes) and diploidies (spermatozoa with 46 chromosomes), and their meiotic origin (meiosis I or II). Alpha-satellite probes specific for chromosomes X, Y and 1 were observed simultaneously in 35,142 sperm nuclei. For both 47,XYY men (24,315 sperm nuclei analysed from one male and 10,827 from the other one) the sex ratio differs from the expected 1:1 ratio (P < 0.001). The rates of disomic Y, diploid YY and diploid XY spermatozoa were increased for both 47,XYY men compared with control sperm (142,050 sperm nuclei analysed from five control men), whereas the rates of hyperhaploidy XY, disomy X and disomy 1 were not significantly different from those of control sperm. These results support the hypothesis that the extra Y chromosome is lost before meiosis with a proliferative advantage of the resulting 46,XY germ cells. Our observations also suggest that a few primary spermatocytes with two Y chromosomes are able to progress through meiosis and to produce Y-bearing sperm cells. A theoretical pairing of the three gonosomes in primary spermatocytes with an extra sex chromosome, compatible with active spermatogenesis, is proposed.

  7. Pulled Polymer Loops as a Model for the Alignment of Meiotic Chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen Ting; Frömberg, Daniela; Huang, Wenwen; Delivani, Petrina; Chacón, Mariola; Tolić, Iva M.; Jülicher, Frank; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2015-11-01

    During recombination, the DNA of parents exchange their genetic information to give rise to a genetically unique offspring. For recombination to occur, homologous chromosomes need to find each other and align with high precision. Fission yeast solves this problem by folding chromosomes in loops and pulling them through the viscous nucleoplasm. We propose a theory of pulled polymer loops to quantify the effect of drag forces on the alignment of chromosomes. We introduce an external force field to the concept of a Brownian bridge and thus solve for the statistics of loop configurations in space.

  8. A conserved checkpoint monitors meiotic chromosome synapsis inCaenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Bhalla, Needhi; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-07-14

    We report the discovery of a checkpoint that monitorssynapsis between homologous chromosomes to ensure accurate meioticsegregation. Oocytes containing unsynapsed chromosomes selectivelyundergo apoptosis even if agermline DNA damage checkpoint is inactivated.This culling mechanism isspecifically activated by unsynapsed pairingcenters, cis-acting chromosomesites that are also required to promotesynapsis in Caenorhabditis elegans. Apoptosis due to synaptic failurealso requires the C. elegans homolog of PCH2,a budding yeast pachytenecheckpoint gene, which suggests that this surveillance mechanism iswidely conserved.

  9. Meiotic Recombination Analyses in Pigs Carrying Different Balanced Structural Chromosomal Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Mary, Nicolas; Barasc, Harmonie; Ferchaud, Stéphane; Priet, Aurélia; Calgaro, Anne; Loustau-Dudez, Anne-Marie; Bonnet, Nathalie; Yerle, Martine; Ducos, Alain; Pinton, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Correct pairing, synapsis and recombination between homologous chromosomes are essential for normal meiosis. All these events are strongly regulated, and our knowledge of the mechanisms involved in this regulation is increasing rapidly. Chromosomal rearrangements are known to disturb these processes. In the present paper, synapsis and recombination (number and distribution of MLH1 foci) were studied in three boars (Sus scrofa domestica) carrying different chromosomal rearrangements. One (T34he) was heterozygote for the t(3;4)(p1.3;q1.5) reciprocal translocation, one (T34ho) was homozygote for that translocation, while the third (T34Inv) was heterozygote for both the translocation and a pericentric inversion inv(4)(p1.4;q2.3). All three boars were normal for synapsis and sperm production. This particular situation allowed us to rigorously study the impact of rearrangements on recombination. Overall, the rearrangements induced only minor modifications of the number of MLH1 foci (per spermatocyte or per chromosome) and of the length of synaptonemal complexes for chromosomes 3 and 4. The distribution of MLH1 foci in T34he was comparable to that of the controls. Conversely, the distributions of MLH1 foci on chromosome 4 were strongly modified in boar T34Inv (lack of crossover in the heterosynaptic region of the quadrivalent, and crossover displaced to the chromosome extremities), and also in boar T34ho (two recombination peaks on the q-arms compared with one of higher magnitude in the controls). Analyses of boars T34he and T34Inv showed that the interference was propagated through the breakpoints. A different result was obtained for boar T34ho, in which the breakpoints (transition between SSC3 and SSC4 chromatin on the bivalents) seemed to alter the transmission of the interference signal. Our results suggest that the number of crossovers and crossover interference could be regulated by partially different mechanisms. PMID:27124413

  10. Behavior of homologous chromosomes in early meiotic stages of human spermatocytes as revealed by FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Bar-Am, I.; Avivi, L.; Mukame, E.

    1994-09-01

    The process by which homologous chromosomes recognize each other at the beginning of meiosis, prior to synapsis, is poorly understood. To gain a better understanding as to when, where and how a given chromosome approaches its pairing partner, chromosome behavior at early stages of meiosis in human spermatocytes was studied. Using multi-color FISH with centromeric- and telomeric-specific probes, as well as with whole chromosome DNA libraries, it was clearly aligned. Rather, similarly to non-homologous chromosomes, they were well separated from each other. At the commencement of synapsis, during the process of homology search, homologues underwent a drastic conformational change, elongating into strands that approached each other by their telomeres. Just preceding the co-alignment of the homologous centromeres, telomeres changed their interphase random distribution and occupied a confined region of the nuclear periphery. Following synapsis, telomeres spread over the whole nuclear periphery. These dynamics in the telomeres distribution, which are unique to early stages of meiosis, are presumably related to the role that telomeres play in the process of homology search and the commencement of synapsis.

  11. Meiotic spindle assembly in Drosophila females: behavior of nonexchange chromosomes and the effects of mutations in the nod kinesin-like protein

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Mature Drosophila oocytes are arrested in metaphase of the first meiotic division. We have examined microtubule and chromatin reorganization as the meiosis I spindle assembles on maturation using indirect immunofluorescence and laser scanning confocal microscopy. The results suggest that chromatin captures or nucleates microtubules, and that these subsequently form a highly tapered spindle in which the majority of microtubules do not terminate at the poles. Nonexchange homologs separate from each other and move toward opposite poles during spindle assembly. By the time of metaphase arrest, these chromosomes are positioned on opposite half spindles, between the metaphase plate and the spindle poles, with the large nonexchange X chromosomes always closer to the metaphase plate than the smaller nonexchange fourth chromosomes. Nonexchange homologs are therefore oriented on the spindle in the absence of a direct physical linkage, and the spindle position of these chromosomes appears to be determined by size. Loss-of-function mutations at the nod locus, which encodes a kinesin-like protein, cause meiotic loss and nondisjunction of nonexchange chromosomes, but have little or no effect on exchange chromosome segregation. In oocytes lacking functional nod protein, most of the nonexchange chromosomes are ejected from the main chromosomal mass shortly after the nuclear envelope breaks down and microtubules interact with the chromatin. In addition, the nonexchange chromosomes that are associated with spindles in nod/nod oocytes show excessive poleward migration. Based on these observations, and the structural similarity of the nod protein and kinesin, we propose that nonexchange chromosomes are maintained on the half spindle by opposing poleward and anti-poleward forces, and that the nod protein provides the anti-poleward force. PMID:1740471

  12. Mitotic behavior in root tips of Brachiaria genotypes with meiotic chromosome elimination during microsporogenesis.

    PubMed

    Felismino, M F; Silva, N; Pagliarini, M S; Valle, C B

    2008-04-15

    Three accessions of Brachiaria brizantha, three of B. humidicola, and two interspecific hybrids between B. ruziziensis and B. brizantha were analyzed with regard to their mitotic behavior in root tips. All these genotypes revealed chromosome elimination or lack of chromosome affinity in previous analyses of microsporogenesis. Analyses of root tips showed a normal mitotic division in all accessions and hybrids, reinforcing the notion that the genetic control of meiosis is totally independent of that of mitosis. The implications of these findings for the Brachiaria breeding program are discussed.

  13. Meiotic chromosome synapsis in yeast can occur without spo11-induced DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Hasanuzzaman; Schmekel, Karin

    2004-10-01

    Proper chromosome segregation and formation of viable gametes depend on synapsis and recombination between homologous chromosomes during meiosis. Previous reports have shown that the synaptic structures, the synaptonemal complexes (SCs), do not occur in yeast cells with the SPO11 gene removed. The Spo11 enzyme makes double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the DNA and thereby initiates recombination. The view has thus developed that synapsis in yeast strictly depends on the initiation of recombination. Synapsis in some other species (Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans) is independent of recombination events, and SCs are found in spo11 mutants. This difference between species led us to reexamine spo11 deletion mutants of yeast. Using antibodies against Zip1, a SC component, we found that a small fraction (1%) of the spo11 null mutant cells can indeed form wild-type-like SCs. We further looked for synapsis in a spo11 mutant strain that accumulates pachytene cells (spo11Delta ndt80Delta), and found that the frequency of cells with apparently complete SC formation was 10%. Other phenotypic criteria, such as spore viability and homologous chromosome juxtaposition measured by FISH labeling of chromosomal markers, agree with several previous reports of the spo11 mutant. Our results demonstrate that although the Spo11-induced DSBs obviously promote synapsis in yeast, the presence of Spo11 is not an absolute requirement for synapsis.

  14. Evidence that meiotic pairing starts at the telomeres: Molecular analysis of recombination in a family with a pericentric X chromosome inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Shashi, V.; Allinson, P.S.; Golden, W.L.; Kelly, T.E.

    1994-09-01

    Recent studies in yeast have shown that telomeres rather than centromeres lead in chromosome movement just prior to meiosis and may have a role in recombination. Cytological studies of meiosis in Drosophila and mice have shown that in pericentric inversion heterozygotes there is lack of loop formation, with recobmination seen only outside the inversion. In a family with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) we recognized that only affected males and carrier females had a pericentric X chromosome inversion (inv X(p11.4;q26)). Since the short arm inversion breakpoint was proximal to the DMD locus, it could not be implicated in the mutational event causing DMD. There was no history of infertility, recurrent miscarriages or liveborn unbalanced females to suggest there was recombination within the inversion. We studied 22 members over three generations to understand the pattern of meiotic recombination between the normal and the inverted X chromosome. In total, 17 meioses involving the inverted X chromosome in females were studied by cytogenetic analysis and 16 CA repeat polymorphisms along the length of the X chromosome. Results: (a) There was complete concordance between the segregation of the DMD mutation and the inverted X chromosome. (b) On DNA analysis, there was complete absence of recombination within the inverted segment. We also found no recombination at the DMD locus. Recombination was seen only at Xp22 and Xq27-28. (c) Recombination was seen in the same individual at both Xp22 and Xq27-28 without recombination otherwise. Conclusions: (1) Pericentric X inversions reduce the genetic map length of the chromosome, with the physical map length being normal. (2) Meiotic X chromosome pairing in this family is initiated at the telomeres. (3) Following telomeric pairing in pericentric X chromosome inversions, there is inhibition of recombination within the inversion and adjacent regions.

  15. Differential association of SMC1alpha and SMC3 proteins with meiotic chromosomes in wild-type and SPO11-deficient male mice.

    PubMed

    James, Rosalina D; Schmiesing, John A; Peters, Antoine H F M; Yokomori, Kyoko; Disteche, Christine M

    2002-01-01

    SMC proteins are components of cohesin complexes that function in chromosome cohesion. We determined that SMC1alpha and SMC3 localized to wild-type mouse meiotic chromosomes, but with distinct differences in their patterns. Anti-SMC3 coincided with axial elements of the synaptonemal complex, while SMC1alpha was observed mainly in regions where homologues were synapsed. This pattern was especially visible in pachytene sex vesicles where SMC1alpha localized only weakly to the asynapsed regions. At diplotene, SMC3, but not SMC1alpha, remained bound along axial elements of desynapsed chromosomes. SMC1alpha and SMC3 were also found to localize along meiotic chromosome cores of Spo11 null spermatocytes, in which double-strand break formation required for DNA recombination and homologous pairing were disrupted. In Spo11 -/- cells, SMC1alpha localization differed from SMC3 again, confirming that SMC1alpha is mainly associated with homologous or non-homologous synapsed regions, whereas SMC3 localized throughout the chromosomes. Our results suggest that the two cohesin proteins may not always be associated in a dimer and may function as separate complexes in mammalian meiosis, with SMC1alpha playing a more specific role in synapsis. In addition, our results indicate that cohesin cores can form independently of double-strand break formation and homologous pairing.

  16. Chromosome pairing and meiotic recombination in Neurospora crassa spo11 mutants.

    PubMed

    Bowring, Frederick J; Yeadon, P Jane; Stainer, Russell G; Catcheside, David E A

    2006-08-01

    Some organisms, such as mammals, green plants and fungi, require double-strand breaks in DNA (DSBs) for synapsis of homologous chromosomes at pachynema. Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans are exceptions, achieving synapsis independently of DSB. SPO11 is responsible for generating DSBs and perhaps for the initiation of recombination in all organisms. Although it was previously suggested that Neurospora may not require DSBs for synapsis, we report here that mutation of Neurospora spo11 disrupts meiosis, abolishing synapsis of homologous chromosomes during pachynema and resulting in ascospores that are frequently aneuploid and rarely viable. Alignment of homologues is partially restored after exposure of spo11 perithecia to ionising radiation. Crossing over in a spo11 mutant is reduced in two regions of the Neurospora genome as expected, but is unaffected in a third.

  17. Karyotypes, B-chromosomes and meiotic abnormalities in 13 populations of Alebra albostriella and A. wahlbergi (Hemiptera, Auchenorrhyncha, Cicadellidae) from Greece.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Valentina G; Golub, Natalia V; Aguin-Pombo, Dora

    2013-11-26

    In this work 13 populations of the leafhopper species Alebra albostriella (Fallén, 1826) (6 populations) and A. wahlbergi (Boheman, 1845) (7 populations) (Cicadellidae: Typhlocybinae) from Greece were studied cytogenetically. We examined chromosomal complements and meiosis in 41 males of A. albostriella sampled from Castanea sativa, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus cerris and in 21 males of A. wahlbergi sampled from C. sativa, Acer opalus and Ulmus sp. The species were shown to share 2n = 22 + X(0) and male meiosis of the chiasmate preductional type typical for Auchenorrhyncha. In all populations of A. albostriella and in all but two populations of A. wahlbergi B chromosomes and/or different meiotic abnormalities including the end-to-end non-homologous chromosomal associations, translocation chains, univalents, anaphasic laggards besides aberrant sperms were encountered. This study represents the first chromosomal record for the genus Alebra and one of the few population-cytogenetic studies in the Auchenorrhyncha.

  18. A meiotic drive element in the maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides is located within a 102-kb region of chromosome V

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium verticillioides is an agriculturally important fungus because of its association with maize and its propensity to contaminate grain with toxic compounds. Some isolates of the fungus harbor a meiotic drive element known as Spore killer (SkK) that causes nearly all surviving meiotic progeny f...

  19. CDC-48/p97 is required for proper meiotic chromosome segregation via controlling AIR-2/Aurora B kinase localization in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Yohei; Higashitani, Atsushi; Urano, Takeshi; Ogura, Teru; Yamanaka, Kunitoshi

    2012-08-01

    CDC-48/p97 is a AAA (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) chaperone involved in protein conformational changes such as the disassembly of protein complexes. We previously reported that Caenorhabditis elegans CDC-48.1 and CDC-48.2 (CDC-48s) are essential for the progression of meiosis I metaphase. Here, we report that CDC-48s are required for proper chromosome segregation during meiosis in C. elegans. In wild-type worms, at the diakinesis phase, phosphorylation of histone H3, one of the known substrates of aurora B kinase (AIR-2), on meiosis I chromatids correlated with AIR-2 localization at the cohesion sites of homologous chromatids. Conversely, depletion of CDC-48s resulted in a significant expansion of signals for AIR-2 and phosphorylated histone H3 over the entire length of meiotic chromosomes, leading to defective chromosome segregation, while the total amount of AIR-2 in lysates was not changed by the depletion of CDC-48s. The defective segregation of meiotic chromosomes caused by the depletion of CDC-48s was suppressed by the simultaneous depletion of AIR-2 and is similar to that observed following the depletion of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) phosphatases. However, the amount and localization of PP1 were not changed by the depletion of CDC-48s. These results suggest that CDC-48s control the restricted localization of AIR-2 to the cohesion sites of homologous chromatids in meiosis I.

  20. The Opposing Actions of Arabidopsis CHROMOSOME TRANSMISSION FIDELITY7 and WINGS APART-LIKE1 and 2 Differ in Mitotic and Meiotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sayantan; Yang, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Sister chromatid cohesion, which is mediated by the cohesin complex, is essential for the proper segregation of chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis. Stable binding of cohesin with chromosomes is regulated in part by the opposing actions of CTF7 (CHROMOSOME TRANSMISSION FIDELITY7) and WAPL (WINGS APART-LIKE). In this study, we characterized the interaction between Arabidopsis thaliana CTF7 and WAPL by conducting a detailed analysis of wapl1-1 wapl2 ctf7 plants. ctf7 plants exhibit major defects in vegetative growth and development and are completely sterile. Inactivation of WAPL restores normal growth, mitosis, and some fertility to ctf7 plants. This shows that the CTF7/WAPL cohesin system is not essential for mitosis in vegetative cells and suggests that plants may contain a second mechanism to regulate mitotic cohesin. WAPL inactivation restores cohesin binding and suppresses ctf7-associated meiotic cohesion defects, demonstrating that WAPL and CTF7 function as antagonists to regulate meiotic sister chromatid cohesion. The ctf7 mutation only had a minor effect on wapl-associated defects in chromosome condensation and centromere association. These results demonstrate that WAPL has additional roles that are independent of its role in regulating chromatin-bound cohesin. PMID:26813623

  1. A synaptonemal complex-derived mechanism for meiotic segregation precedes the evolutionary loss of homology between sex chromosomes in arvicolid mammals.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Roberto; Sánchez, Antonio; Marchal, Juan Alberto; Viera, Alberto; Parra, María Teresa; Rufas, Julio S; Page, Jesús

    2012-10-01

    Synapsis and reciprocal recombination between sex chromosomes are restricted to the pseudoautosomal region. In some animal species, sex chromosomes do not present this region, although they utilize alternative mechanisms that ensure meiotic pairing and segregation. The subfamily Arvicolinae (Rodentia, Cricetidae) includes numerous species with achiasmate sex chromosomes. In order to know whether the mechanism involved in achiasmate segregation is an ancient feature in arvicolid species, we have compared the sex chromosomes of both the Mediterranean vole (Microtus duodecimcostatus) and the water vole (Arvicola terrestris). By means of immunofluorescence, we have found that sex chromosomes in M. duodecimcostatus are asynaptic and develop a synaptonemal complex-derived structure that mediates pairing and facilitates segregation. In A. terrestris, sex chromosomes are synaptic and chiasmate but also exhibit a synaptonemal complex-derived filament during anaphase I. Since phylogenetic relationships indicate that the synaptic condition is ancestral in arvicolids, this finding indicates that the mechanism for achiasmate sex chromosome segregation precedes the switching to the asynaptic condition. We discuss the origin of this synaptonemal complex-derived mechanism that, in turn, could counterbalance the disruption of homology in the sex chromosomes of those species.

  2. Evidence for human meiotic recombination interference obtained through construction of a short tandem repeat-polymorphism linkage map of chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.L.; Wang, Z.; Hansen, K.; Stephenson, M.; Kappel, C.; Salzman, S.; Wilkie, P.J. ); Keats, B. ); Dracopoli, N.C. ); Brandriff, B.F.; Olsen, A.S. )

    1993-11-01

    An improved linkage map for human chromosome 19 containing 35 short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) and one VNTR (D19S20) was constructed. The map included 12 new (GATA)[sub n] tetranucleotide STRPs. Although total lengths of the male (114 cM) and female (128 cM) maps were similar, at both ends of the chromosome male recombination exceeded female recombination, while in the interior portion of the map female recombination was in excess. Cosmid clones containing the STRP sequences were identified and were positioned along the chromosome by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Four rounds of careful checking and removal of genotyping errors allowed biologically relevant conclusions to be made concerning the numbers and distributions of recombination events on chromosome 19. The average numbers of recombinations per chromosome matched closely the lengths of the genetic maps computed by using the program CRIMAP. Significant numbers of chromosomes with zero, one, two, or three recombinations were detected as products of both female and male meioses. On the basis of the total number of observed pairs of recombination events in which only a single informative marker was situated between the two recombinations, a maximal estimate for the rate of meiotic STRP [open quotes]gene[close quotes] conversion without recombination was calculated as 3 [times] 10[sup [minus]4]/meiosis. For distances up to 30 cM between recombinations, many fewer chromosomes which had undergone exactly two recombinations were observed than were expected on the basis of the assumption of independent recombination locations. This strong new evidence for human meiotic interference will help to improve the accuracy of interpretation of clinical DNA test results involving polymorphisms flanking a genetic abnormality. 61 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Comprehensive meiotic segregation analysis of a 4-breakpoint t(1;3;6) complex chromosome rearrangement using single sperm array comparative genomic hybridization and FISH.

    PubMed

    Hornak, Miroslav; Vozdova, Miluse; Musilova, Petra; Prinosilova, Petra; Oracova, Eva; Linkova, Vlasta; Vesela, Katerina; Rubes, Jiri

    2014-10-01

    Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCR) represent rare structural chromosome abnormalities frequently associated with infertility. In this study, meiotic segregation in spermatozoa of an infertile normospermic carrier of a 4-breakpoint t(1;3;6) CCR was analysed. A newly developed array comparative genomic hybridization protocol was used, and all chromosomes in 50 single sperm cells were simultaneously examined. Three-colour FISH was used to analyse chromosome segregation in 1557 other single sperm cells. It was also used to measure an interchromosomal effect; sperm chromatin structure assay was used to measure chromatin integrity. A high-frequency of unbalanced spermatozoa (84%) was observed, mostly arising from the 3:3 symmetrical segregation mode. Array comparative genomic hybridization was used to detect additional aneuploidies in two out of 50 spermatozoa (4%) in chromosomes not involved in the complex chromosome rearrangement. Significantly increased rates of diploidy and XY disomy were found in the CCR carrier compared with the control group (P < 0.001). Defective condensation of sperm chromatin was also found in 22.7% of spermatozoa by sperm chromatin structure assay. The results indicate that the infertility in the man with CCR and normal spermatozoa was caused by a production of chromosomally unbalanced, XY disomic and diploid spermatozoa and spermatozoa with defective chromatin condensation.

  4. Caenorhabditis elegans Elongin BC complex is essential for cell proliferation and chromosome condensation and segregation during mitosis and meiotic division II.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Yohei; Kikuchi, Koji; Dazai, Kumiko; Higashitani, Atsushi

    2005-01-01

    The ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation system is involved in a wide variety of cellular functions. The RING-H2 finger protein RBX1 is a common subunit of Cullin-based ubiquitin ligases. Caenorhabditis elegans RBX1 and CUL2 are essential for regulating chromosome condensation and segregation during mitosis and meiosis and are also critical for cell proliferation. Here, we demonstrate that Elongin B (ELB1) and C (ELC1) form a stable complex, and that depletion of either gene product by RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) causes pronounced defects in the second meiotic division. Embryos and adults that escape meiotic arrest have several irregular phenotypes. These include defects in mitotic chromosomal condensation and segregation, pronuclear rotation, and germ cell proliferation, abnormal cortical protrusion, and accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CKI1. All these defects are consistent with those found after depletion of CUL2. In addition, direct interaction between ELC1 and CUL2 is revealed by bacterial two-hybrid analysis. Thus, the RBX1/CUL2/ELC1/ELB1 complex acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in C. elegans and is essential for diverse functions relevant to chromosomal dynamics and cell cycle control.

  5. Meiotic behaviour of the sex chromosomes in three patients with sex chromosome anomalies (47,XXY, mosaic 46,XY/47,XXY and 47,XYY) assessed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Blanco, J; Egozcue, J; Vidal, F

    2001-05-01

    Meiotic studies using multicolour fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) and chromosome painting were carried out in three patients with sex chromosome anomalies (47,XXY; 46,XY/47,XXY and 47,XYY). In the two patients with Klinefelter syndrome, although variable percentages of XXY cells (88.5 and 28.3%) could be found in the pre-meiotic stages, none of the abnormal cells entered meiosis, and all pachytenes were XY. However, the abnormal testicular environment of these patients probably resulted in meiotic I non-disjunction, and a certain proportion of post-reductional cells were XY (18.3 and 1.7%). The fact that none of the spermatozoa were XY also suggests the existence of an arrest at the secondary spermatocyte or the spermatid level. In the XYY patient, most (95.9%) premeiotic cells were XYY. The percentage of XYY pachytenes was 57.9%. The sex chromosomes were either in close proximity (XYY) or the X chromosome was separated from the two Ys (X + YY). A high proportion (42.1%) of post-reductional germ cells were XY. However, only 0.11% of spermatozoa were disomic for the sex chromosomes. In this case, the data suggest the existence of an arrest of the abnormal cells at the primary and the secondary spermatocyte or the spermatid level, giving rise to the continuous elimination of abnormal cells in the germ-cell line along spermatogenesis. The fact that the proportion of diploid spermatozoa was only increased in one of the three cases (XXY) is also suggestive of an arrest of the abnormal cell lines in these patients. The two apparently non-mosaic patients were, in fact, germ-cell mosaics. This suggests that the cytogenetic criteria used to define non-mosaic patients may be inadequate; thus, the risk of intracytoplasmic sperm injection in apparently non-mosaics may be lower than expected.

  6. Specific deletion of Cdc42 does not affect meiotic spindle organization/migration and homologous chromosome segregation but disrupts polarity establishment and cytokinesis in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Bo; Jiang, Zong-Zhe; Zhang, Qing-Hua; Hu, Meng-Wen; Huang, Lin; Ou, Xiang-Hong; Guo, Lei; Ouyang, Ying-Chun; Hou, Yi; Brakebusch, Cord; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2013-12-01

    Mammalian oocyte maturation is distinguished by highly asymmetric meiotic divisions during which a haploid female gamete is produced and almost all the cytoplasm is maintained in the egg for embryo development. Actin-dependent meiosis I spindle positioning to the cortex induces the formation of a polarized actin cap and oocyte polarity, and it determines asymmetric divisions resulting in two polar bodies. Here we investigate the functions of Cdc42 in oocyte meiotic maturation by oocyte-specific deletion of Cdc42 through Cre-loxP conditional knockout technology. We find that Cdc42 deletion causes female infertility in mice. Cdc42 deletion has little effect on meiotic spindle organization and migration to the cortex but inhibits polar body emission, although homologous chromosome segregation occurs. The failure of cytokinesis is due to the loss of polarized Arp2/3 accumulation and actin cap formation; thus the defective contract ring. In addition, we correlate active Cdc42 dynamics with its function during polar body emission and find a relationship between Cdc42 and polarity, as well as polar body emission, in mouse oocytes.

  7. Persistence of histone H2AX phosphorylation after meiotic chromosome synapsis and abnormal centromere cohesion in Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (Parp-1) null oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feikun; Baumann, Claudia; De La Fuente, Rabindranath

    2009-01-01

    In spite of the impact of aneuploidy on human health little is known concerning the molecular mechanisms involved in the formation of structural or numerical chromosome abnormalities during meiosis. Here, we provide novel evidence indicating that lack of PARP-1 function during oogenesis predisposes the female gamete to genome instability. During prophase I of meiosis, a high proportion of Parp-1 (−/−) mouse oocytes exhibit a spectrum of meiotic defects including incomplete homologous chromosome synapsis or persistent histone H2AX phosphorylation in fully synapsed chromosomes at the late pachytene stage. Moreover, the X chromosome bivalent is also prone to exhibit persistent double strand DNA breaks (DSBs). In striking contrast, such defects were not detected in mutant pachytene spermatocytes. In fully-grown wild type oocytes at the germinal vesicle stage, PARP-1 protein associates with nuclear speckles and upon meiotic resumption, undergoes a striking re-localization towards spindle poles as well as pericentric heterochromatin domains at the metaphase II stage. Notably, a high proportion of in vivo matured Parp-1 (−/−) oocytes show lack of recruitment of the kinetochore-associated protein BUB3 to centromeric domains and fail to maintain metaphase II arrest. Defects in chromatin modifications in the form of persistent histone H2AX phosphorylation during prophase I of meiosis and deficient sister chromatid cohesion during metaphase II predispose mutant oocytes to premature anaphase II onset upon removal from the oviductal environment. Our results indicate that PARP-1 plays a critical role in the maintenance of chromosome stability at key stages of meiosis in the female germ line. Moreover, in the metaphase II stage oocyte PARP-1 is required for the regulation of centromere structure and function through a mechanism that involves the recruitment of BUB3 protein to centromeric domains. PMID:19463809

  8. Spatiotemporal Asymmetry of the Meiotic Program Underlies the Predominantly Distal Distribution of Meiotic Crossovers in Barley[W

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, James D.; Perry, Ruth M.; Barakate, Abdellah; Ramsay, Luke; Waugh, Robbie; Halpin, Claire; Armstrong, Susan J.; Franklin, F. Chris H.

    2012-01-01

    Meiosis involves reciprocal exchange of genetic information between homologous chromosomes to generate new allelic combinations. In cereals, the distribution of genetic crossovers, cytologically visible as chiasmata, is skewed toward the distal regions of the chromosomes. However, many genes are known to lie within interstitial/proximal regions of low recombination, creating a limitation for breeders. We investigated the factors underlying the pattern of chiasma formation in barley (Hordeum vulgare) and show that chiasma distribution reflects polarization in the spatiotemporal initiation of recombination, chromosome pairing, and synapsis. Consequently, meiotic progression in distal chromosomal regions occurs in coordination with the chromatin cycles that are a conserved feature of the meiotic program. Recombination initiation in interstitial and proximal regions occurs later than distal events, is not coordinated with the cycles, and rarely progresses to form chiasmata. Early recombination initiation is spatially associated with early replicating, euchromatic DNA, which is predominately found in distal regions. We demonstrate that a modest temperature shift is sufficient to alter meiotic progression in relation to the chromosome cycles. The polarization of the meiotic processes is reduced and is accompanied by a shift in chiasma distribution with an increase in interstitial and proximal chiasmata, suggesting a potential route to modify recombination in cereals. PMID:23104831

  9. Meiotic prophase abnormalities and metaphase cell death in MLH1-deficient mouse spermatocytes: insights into regulation of spermatogenic progress.

    PubMed

    Eaker, Shannon; Cobb, John; Pyle, April; Handel, Mary Ann

    2002-09-01

    The MLH1 protein is required for normal meiosis in mice and its absence leads to failure in maintenance of pairing between bivalent chromosomes, abnormal meiotic division, and ensuing sterility in both sexes. In this study, we investigated whether failure to develop foci of MLH1 protein on chromosomes in prophase would lead to elimination of prophase spermatocytes, and, if not, whether univalent chromosomes could align normally on the meiotic spindle and whether metaphase spermatocytes would be delayed and/or eliminated. In spite of the absence of MLH1 foci, no apoptosis of spermatocytes in prophase was detected. In fact, chromosomes of pachytene spermatocytes from Mlh1(-/-) mice were competent to condense metaphase chromosomes, both in vivo and in vitro. Most condensed chromosomes were univalents with spatially distinct FISH signals. Typical metaphase events, such as synaptonemal complex breakdown and the phosphorylation of Ser10 on histone H3, occurred in Mlh1(-/-) spermatocytes, suggesting that there is no inhibition of onset of meiotic metaphase in the face of massive chromosomal abnormalities. However, the condensed univalent chromosomes did not align correctly onto the spindle apparatus in the majority of Mlh1(-/-) spermatocytes. Most meiotic metaphase spermatocytes were characterized with bipolar spindles, but chromosomes radiated away from the microtubule-organizing centers in a prometaphase-like pattern rather than achieving a bipolar orientation. Apoptosis was not observed until after the onset of meiotic metaphase. Thus, spermatocytes are not eliminated in direct response to the initial meiotic defect, but are eliminated later. Taken together, these observations suggest that a spindle assembly checkpoint, rather than a recombination or chiasmata checkpoint, may be activated in response to meiotic errors, thereby ensuring elimination of chromosomally abnormal gamete precursors.

  10. Role of the pseudoautosomal region in sex-chromosome pairing during male meiosis: Meiotic studies in a man with a deletion of distal Xp

    SciTech Connect

    Mohandas, T.K.; Passage, M.B.; Yen, P.H.; Speed, R.M.; Chandley, A.C.; Shapiro, L.J. )

    1992-09-01

    Meiotic studies were undertaken in a 24-year-old male patient with short stature, chondrodysplasia punctata, ichthyosis, steroid sulfatase deficiency, and mild mental retardation with an inherited cytologically visible deletion of distal Xp. Molecular investigations showed that the pseudoautosomal region as well as the steroid sulfatase gene were deleted, but telomeric sequences were present at the pter on the deleted X chromosome. A complete failure of sex-chromosome pairing was observed in the primary spermatocytes of the patient. Telomeric approaches between the sex chromosomes were made at zygotene in some cells, but XY synaptonemal complex was formed. The sex chromosomes were present as univalents at metaphase I, and germ-cell development was arrested between metaphase I and metaphase II in the vast majority of cells, consistent with the azoospermia observed in the patient. The failure of XY pairing in this individual indicates that the pseudoautosomal sequences play an important role in initiating XY pairing and formation of synaptonemal complex at meiosis. 36 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Localization of 5S and 25S rRNA genes on somatic and meiotic chromosomes in Capsicum species of chili pepper.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jin-Kyung; Kim, Byung-Dong

    2009-02-28

    The loci of the 5S and 45S rRNA genes were localized on chromosomes in five species of Capsicum, namely, annuum, chacoense, frutescens, baccatum, and chinense by FISH. The 5S rDNA was localized to the distal region of one chromosome in all species observed. The number of 45S rDNA loci varied among species; one in annuum, two in chacoense, frutescens, and chinense, and four in baccatum, with the exceptions that 'CM334' of annuum had three loci and 'tabasco' of frutescens had one locus. 'CM334'-derived BAC clones, 384B09 and 365P05, were screened with 5S rDNA as a probe, and BACs 278M03 and 262A23 were screened with 25S rDNA as a probe. Both ends of these BAC clones were sequenced. FISH with these BAC probes on pachytenes from 'CM334' plant showed one 5S rDNA locus and three 45S rDNA loci, consistent with the patterns on the somatic chromosomes. The 5S rDNA probe was also applied on extended DNA fibers to reveal that its coverage measured as long as 0.439 Mb in the pepper genome. FISH techniques applied on somatic and meiotic chromosomes and fibers have been established for chili to provide valuable information about the copy number variation of 45S rDNA and the actual physical size of the 5S rDNA in chili.

  12. Crossovers trigger a remodeling of meiotic chromosome axis composition that is linked to two-step loss of sister chromatid cohesion

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Schvarzstein, Mara; Barroso, Consuelo; Lightfoot, James; Dernburg, Abby F.; Villeneuve, Anne M.

    2008-01-01

    Segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis depends on linkages (chiasmata) created by crossovers and on selective release of a subset of sister chromatid cohesion at anaphase I. During Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis, each chromosome pair forms a single crossover, and the position of this event determines which chromosomal regions will undergo cohesion release at anaphase I. Here we provide insight into the basis of this coupling by uncovering a large-scale regional change in chromosome axis composition that is triggered by crossovers. We show that axial element components HTP-1 and HTP-2 are removed during late pachytene, in a crossover-dependent manner, from the regions that will later be targeted for anaphase I cohesion release. We demonstrate correspondence in position and number between chiasmata and HTP-1/2-depleted regions and provide evidence that HTP-1/2 depletion boundaries mark crossover sites. In htp-1 mutants, diakinesis bivalents lack normal asymmetrical features, and sister chromatid cohesion is prematurely lost during the meiotic divisions. We conclude that HTP-1 is central to the mechanism linking crossovers with late-prophase bivalent differentiation and defines the domains where cohesion will be protected until meiosis II. Further, we discuss parallels between the pattern of HTP-1/2 removal in response to crossovers and the phenomenon of crossover interference. PMID:18923085

  13. Stage-specific expression profiling of Drosophila spermatogenesis suggests that meiotic sex chromosome inactivation drives genomic relocation of testis-expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Vibranovski, Maria D; Lopes, Hedibert F; Karr, Timothy L; Long, Manyuan

    2009-11-01

    In Drosophila, genes expressed in males tend to accumulate on autosomes and are underrepresented on the X chromosome. In particular, genes expressed in testis have been observed to frequently relocate from the X chromosome to the autosomes. The inactivation of X-linked genes during male meiosis (i.e., meiotic sex chromosome inactivation-MSCI) was first proposed to explain male sterility caused by X-autosomal translocation in Drosophila, and more recently it was suggested that MSCI might provide the conditions under which selection would favor the accumulation of testis-expressed genes on autosomes. In order to investigate the impact of MSCI on Drosophila testis-expressed genes, we performed a global gene expression analysis of the three major phases of D. melanogaster spermatogenesis: mitosis, meiosis, and post-meiosis. First, we found evidence supporting the existence of MSCI by comparing the expression levels of X- and autosome-linked genes, finding the former to be significantly reduced in meiosis. Second, we observed that the paucity of X-linked testis-expressed genes was restricted to those genes highly expressed in meiosis. Third, we found that autosomal genes relocated through retroposition from the X chromosome were more often highly expressed in meiosis in contrast to their X-linked parents. These results suggest MSCI as a general mechanism affecting the evolution of some testis-expressed genes.

  14. Conditional inactivation of the DNA damage response gene Hus1 in mouse testis reveals separable roles for components of the RAD9-RAD1-HUS1 complex in meiotic chromosome maintenance.

    PubMed

    Lyndaker, Amy M; Lim, Pei Xin; Mleczko, Joanna M; Diggins, Catherine E; Holloway, J Kim; Holmes, Rebecca J; Kan, Rui; Schlafer, Donald H; Freire, Raimundo; Cohen, Paula E; Weiss, Robert S

    2013-01-01

    The RAD9-RAD1-HUS1 (9-1-1) complex is a heterotrimeric PCNA-like clamp that responds to DNA damage in somatic cells by promoting DNA repair as well as ATR-dependent DNA damage checkpoint signaling. In yeast, worms, and flies, the 9-1-1 complex is also required for meiotic checkpoint function and efficient completion of meiotic recombination; however, since Rad9, Rad1, and Hus1 are essential genes in mammals, little is known about their functions in mammalian germ cells. In this study, we assessed the meiotic functions of 9-1-1 by analyzing mice with germ cell-specific deletion of Hus1 as well as by examining the localization of RAD9 and RAD1 on meiotic chromosomes during prophase I. Hus1 loss in testicular germ cells resulted in meiotic defects, germ cell depletion, and severely compromised fertility. Hus1-deficient primary spermatocytes exhibited persistent autosomal γH2AX and RAD51 staining indicative of unrepaired meiotic DSBs, synapsis defects, an extended XY body domain often encompassing partial or whole autosomes, and an increase in structural chromosome abnormalities such as end-to-end X chromosome-autosome fusions and ruptures in the synaptonemal complex. Most of these aberrations persisted in diplotene-stage spermatocytes. Consistent with a role for the 9-1-1 complex in meiotic DSB repair, RAD9 localized to punctate, RAD51-containing foci on meiotic chromosomes in a Hus1-dependent manner. Interestingly, RAD1 had a broader distribution that only partially overlapped with RAD9, and localization of both RAD1 and the ATR activator TOPBP1 to the XY body and to unsynapsed autosomes was intact in Hus1 conditional knockouts. We conclude that mammalian HUS1 acts as a component of the canonical 9-1-1 complex during meiotic prophase I to promote DSB repair and further propose that RAD1 and TOPBP1 respond to unsynapsed chromatin through an alternative mechanism that does not require RAD9 or HUS1.

  15. Meiotic Development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Doris Y.

    2013-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans has become a powerful experimental organism with which to study meiotic processes that promote the accurate segregation of chromosomes during the generation of haploid gametes. Haploid reproductive cells are produced through one round of chromosome replication followed by two successive cell divisions. Characteristic meiotic chromosome structure and dynamics are largely conserved in C. elegans. Chromosomes adopt a meiosis-specific structure by loading cohesin proteins, assembling axial elements, and acquiring chromatin marks. Homologous chromosomes pair and form physical connections though synapsis and recombination. Synaptonemal complex and crossover formation allow for the homologs to stably associate prior to remodeling that facilitates their segregation. This chapter will cover conserved meiotic processes as well as highlight aspects of meiosis that are unique to C. elegans. PMID:22872477

  16. The Double-Strand Break Landscape of Meiotic Chromosomes Is Shaped by the Paf1 Transcription Elongation Complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gothwal, Santosh K; Patel, Neem J; Colletti, Meaghan M; Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Shinohara, Miki; Hochwagen, Andreas; Shinohara, Akira

    2016-02-01

    Histone modification is a critical determinant of the frequency and location of meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs), and thus recombination. Set1-dependent histone H3K4 methylation and Dot1-dependent H3K79 methylation play important roles in this process in budding yeast. Given that the RNA polymerase II associated factor 1 complex, Paf1C, promotes both types of methylation, we addressed the role of the Paf1C component, Rtf1, in the regulation of meiotic DSB formation. Similar to a set1 mutation, disruption of RTF1 decreased the occurrence of DSBs in the genome. However, the rtf1 set1 double mutant exhibited a larger reduction in the levels of DSBs than either of the single mutants, indicating independent contributions of Rtf1 and Set1 to DSB formation. Importantly, the distribution of DSBs along chromosomes in the rtf1 mutant changed in a manner that was different from the distributions observed in both set1 and set1 dot1 mutants, including enhanced DSB formation at some DSB-cold regions that are occupied by nucleosomes in wild-type cells. These observations suggest that Rtf1, and by extension the Paf1C, modulate the genomic DSB landscape independently of H3K4 methylation.

  17. Production of aneuhaploid and euhaploid sporocytes by meiotic restitution in fertile hybrids between durum wheat Langdon chromosome substitution lines and Aegilops tauschii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianquan; Chen, Qijiao; Yuan, Zhongwei; Xiang, Zhiguo; Zheng, Youliang; Liu, Dengcai

    2008-10-01

    Fertile F(1) hybrids were obtained between durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) Langdon (LDN) and its 10 disomic substitution (LDN DS) lines with Aegilops tauschii accession AS60 without embryo rescue. Selfed seedset rates for hybrids of LDN with AS60 were 36.87% and 49.45% in 2005 and 2006, respectively. Similar or higher selfed seedset rates were observed in the hybrids of 1D (1A), 1D (1B), 3D (3A), 4D (4B), 7D (7A), and 2D (2B) with AS60, while lower in hybrids of 3D (3B) + 3BL, 5D (5A) + 5AL, 5D (5B) + 5B and 6D (6B) + 6BS with AS60 compared with the hybrids of LDN with AS60. Observation of male gametogenesis showed that meiotic restitution, both first-division restitution (FDR) and single-division meiosis (SDM) resulted in the formation of functional unreduced gametes, which in turn produced seeds. Both euhaploid and aneuhaploid gametes were produced in F(1) hybrids. This suggested a strategy to simultaneously transfer and locate major genes from the ancestral species T. turgidum or Ae. tauschii. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the aneuhaploid rates between the F(1) hybrids of LDN and LDN DS lines with AS60, suggesting that meiotic pairing between the two D chromosomes in the hybrids of LDN DS lines with AS60 did not promote the formation of aneuhaploid gametes.

  18. A mutation in the FHA domain of Coprinus cinereus Nbs1 Leads to Spo11-independent meiotic recombination and chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Crown, K Nicole; Savytskyy, Oleksandr P; Malik, Shehre-Banoo; Logsdon, John; Williams, R Scott; Tainer, John A; Zolan, Miriam E

    2013-11-06

    Nbs1, a core component of the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 complex, plays an essential role in the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and poorly understood roles in meiosis. We used the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus to examine the meiotic roles of Nbs1. We identified the C. cinereus nbs1 gene and demonstrated that it corresponds to a complementation group previously known as rad3. One allele, nbs1-2, harbors a point mutation in the Nbs1 FHA domain and has a mild spore viability defect, increased frequency of meiosis I nondisjunction, and an altered crossover distribution. The nbs1-2 strain enters meiosis with increased levels of phosphorylated H2AX, which we hypothesize represent unrepaired DSBs formed during premeiotic replication. In nbs1-2, there is no apparent induction of Spo11-dependent DSBs during prophase. We propose that replication-dependent DSBs, resulting from defective replication fork protection and processing by the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 complex, are competent to form meiotic crossovers in C. cinereus, and that these crossovers lead to high levels of faithful chromosome segregation. In addition, although crossover distribution is altered in nbs1-2, the majority of crossovers were found in subtelomeric regions, as in wild-type. Therefore, the location of crossovers in C. cinereus is maintained when DSBs are induced via a Spo11-independent mechanism.

  19. Microinjected centromere [corrected] kinetochore antibodies interfere with chromosome movement in meiotic and mitotic mouse oocytes [published erratum appears in J Cell Biol 1990 Dec;111(6 Pt 1):following 2800

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Kinetochores may perform several functions at mitosis and meiosis including: (a) directing anaphase chromosome separation, (b) regulating prometaphase alignment of the chromosomes at the spindle equator (congression), and/or (c) capturing and stabilizing microtubules. To explore these functions in vivo, autoimmune sera against the centromere/kinetochore complex are microinjected into mouse oocytes during specific phases of first or second meiosis, or first mitosis. Serum E.K. crossreacts with an 80-kD protein in mouse cells and detects the centromere/kinetochore complex in permeabilized cells or when microinjected into living oocytes. Chromosome separation at anaphase is not blocked when these antibodies are microinjected into unfertilized oocytes naturally arrested at second meiotic metaphase, into eggs at first mitotic metaphase, or into immature oocytes at first meiotic metaphase. Microtubule capture and spindle reformation occur normally in microinjected unfertilized oocytes recovering from cold or microtubule disrupting drugs; the chromosomes segregate correctly after parthenogenetic activation. Prometaphase congression is dramatically influenced when antikinetochore/centromere antibodies are introduced during interphase or in prometaphase-stage meiotic or mitotic eggs. At metaphase, these oocytes have unaligned chromosomes scattered throughout the spindle with several remaining at the poles; anaphase is aberrant and, after division, karyomeres are found in the polar body and oocyte or daughter blastomeres. Neither nonimmune sera, diffuse scleroderma sera, nor sham microinjections affect either meiosis or mitosis. These results suggest that antikinetochore/centromere antibodies produced by CREST patients interfere with chromosome congression at prometaphase in vivo. PMID:2211822

  20. The spatial regulation of meiotic recombination hotspots: are all DSB hotspots crossover hotspots?

    PubMed

    Serrentino, Maria-Elisabetta; Borde, Valérie

    2012-07-15

    A key step for the success of meiosis is programmed homologous recombination, during which crossovers, or exchange of chromosome arms, take place. Crossovers increase genetic diversity but their main function is to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. Defects in crossover number and position produce aneuploidies that represent the main cause of miscarriages and chromosomal abnormalities such as Down's syndrome. Recombination is initiated by the formation of programmed double strand breaks (DSBs), which occur preferentially at places called DSB hotspots. Among all DSBs generated, only a small fraction is repaired by crossover, the other being repaired by other homologous recombination pathways. Crossover maps have been generated in a number of organisms, defining crossover hotspots. With the availability of genome-wide maps of DSBs as well as the ability to measure genetically the repair outcome at several hotspots, it is becoming more and more clear that not all DSB hotspots behave the same for crossover formation, suggesting that chromosomal features distinguish different types of hotspots.

  1. Identification of a male meiosis-specific gene, Tcte2, which is differentially spliced in species that form sterile hybrids with laboratory mice and deleted in t chromosomes showing meiotic drive.

    PubMed

    Braidotti, G; Barlow, D P

    1997-06-01

    Tcte2 (t complex testes expressed 2) is a male meiosis-specific gene that maps to band 3.3 of mouse chromosome 17. Two distinct male fertility defects, hybrid sterility and transmission ratio distortion, have previously been mapped to this region. Hybrid sterility arises in crosses between different mouse species and the F1 generation males have defects in the first meiotic division and are sterile. Transmission ratio distortion is shown by males heterozygous for the t haplotype form of chromosome 17 and is a type of meiotic drive in which male gametes function unequally at fertilization. The Tcte2 gene expresses a coding mRNA and a number of putative non-ORF transcripts in meiosis I. A deletion of the 5' part of the locus abolishes Tcte2 expression on the t haplotype form of chromosome 17. Additionally, the series of putative non-ORF RNAs at the Tcte2 locus are differentially spliced in species that show hybrid sterility when crossed to laboratory mice. The identification of polymorphisms in t haplotypes and in different mouse species allows alleles of Tcte2 to be proposed as candidates for loci which contribute to both meiotic drive and hybrid sterility phenotypes. While theoretical considerations have previously been used to propose that speciation and meiotic drive involve alleles of the same genes, Tcte2 is the first cloned candidate gene to support this link at a molecular level.

  2. Chromosomes Carrying Meiotic Avoidance Loci in Three Apomictic Eudicot Hieracium Subgenus Pilosella Species Share Structural Features with Two Monocot Apomicts1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Takashi; Ito, Kanae; Johnson, Susan D.; Oelkers, Karsten; Suzuki, Go; Houben, Andreas; Mukai, Yasuhiko; Koltunow, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    The LOSS OF APOMEIOSIS (LOA) locus is one of two dominant loci known to control apomixis in the eudicot Hieracium praealtum. LOA stimulates the differentiation of somatic aposporous initial cells after the initiation of meiosis in ovules. Aposporous initial cells undergo nuclear proliferation close to sexual megaspores, forming unreduced aposporous embryo sacs, and the sexual program ceases. LOA-linked genetic markers were used to isolate 1.2 Mb of LOA-associated DNAs from H. praealtum. Physical mapping defined the genomic region essential for LOA function between two markers, flanking 400 kb of identified sequence and central unknown sequences. Cytogenetic and sequence analyses revealed that the LOA locus is located on a single chromosome near the tip of the long arm and surrounded by extensive, abundant complex repeat and transposon sequences. Chromosomal features and LOA-linked markers are conserved in aposporous Hieracium caespitosum and Hieracium piloselloides but absent in sexual Hieracium pilosella. Their absence in apomictic Hieracium aurantiacum suggests that meiotic avoidance may have evolved independently in aposporous subgenus Pilosella species. The structure of the hemizygous chromosomal region containing the LOA locus in the three Hieracium subgenus Pilosella species resembles that of the hemizygous apospory-specific genomic regions in monocot Pennisetum squamulatum and Cenchrus ciliaris. Analyses of partial DNA sequences at these loci show no obvious conservation, indicating that they are unlikely to share a common ancestral origin. This suggests convergent evolution of repeat-rich hemizygous chromosomal regions containing apospory loci in these monocot and eudicot species, which may be required for the function and maintenance of the trait. PMID:21896890

  3. Initiation of meiotic recombination in chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takatomi; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2013-08-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is markedly activated during meiotic prophase to play central roles in faithful chromosome segregation and conferring genetic diversity to gametes. It is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the conserved protein Spo11, and preferentially occurs at discrete sites called hotspots. Since the functions of Spo11 are influenced by both of local chromatin at hotspots and higher-order chromosome structures, formation of meiotic DSBs is under regulation of chromatin structure. Therefore, investigating features and roles of meiotic chromatin is crucial to elucidate the in vivo mechanism of meiotic recombination initiation. Recent progress in genome-wide chromatin analyses tremendously improved our understanding on this point, but many critical questions are left unaddressed. In this review, we summarize current knowledge in the field, and also discuss the future problems that must be solved to understand the role of chromatin structure in meiotic recombination.

  4. Analysis of meiotic chromosome structure and behavior in Robertsonian heterozygotes of Ellobius tancrei (Rodentia, Cricetidae): a case of monobrachial homology

    PubMed Central

    Matveevsky, Sergey; Bakloushinskaya, Irina; Tambovtseva, Valentina; Romanenko, Svetlana; Kolomiets, Oxana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Synaptonemal complex (SC) chains were revealed in semisterile intraspecific F1 hybrids of Ellobius tancrei Blasius, 1884 (2n = 49, NF=56 and 2n=50, NF=56), heterozygous for Robertsonian (Rb) translocations. Chains were formed by Rb submetacentrics with monobrachial homology. Chromosome synapsis in spermatocytes of these hybrids was disturbed, apparently because of the problematic release of the chromosomes from the SC chains. These hybrids suffer from low fertility, and our data support the opinion that this is because a formation of Rb metacentrics with monobrachial homology within different races of the same species might be an initial event for the divergence of chromosomal forms. PMID:26752380

  5. Spatial organization and dynamics of interphase yeast chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avsaroglu, Baris; Gordon-Messer, Susannah; Fritsche, Miriam; Ham, Jungoh; Heermann, Dieter W.; Haber, James E.; Kondev, Jane

    2012-02-01

    Understanding how the genome is spatially organized is an important problem in cell biology, due to its key roles in gene expression and DNA recombination. Here we report on a combined experimental and theoretical study of the organization and dynamics of yeast chromosome III which has a functional role in the yeast life cycle, in particular, it is responsible for mating type switching. By imaging two fluorescent markers, one at the spindle pole body (SPB) and the other proximal to the HML locus that is involved in DNA recombination during mating type switching, we measured the cell to cell distribution of distances and the mean square displacement between the markers as a function of time. We compared our experimental results with a random-walk polymer model that takes into account tethering and confinement of chromosomes in the nucleus, and found that the model recapitulates the observed spatial and temporal organization of chromosome III in yeast in quantitative detail. The polymer model makes specific predictions for mating-type switching in yeast, and suggests new experiments to test them.

  6. Meiotic Recombination: The Essence of Heredity.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Neil

    2015-10-28

    The study of homologous recombination has its historical roots in meiosis. In this context, recombination occurs as a programmed event that culminates in the formation of crossovers, which are essential for accurate chromosome segregation and create new combinations of parental alleles. Thus, meiotic recombination underlies both the independent assortment of parental chromosomes and genetic linkage. This review highlights the features of meiotic recombination that distinguish it from recombinational repair in somatic cells, and how the molecular processes of meiotic recombination are embedded and interdependent with the chromosome structures that characterize meiotic prophase. A more in-depth review presents our understanding of how crossover and noncrossover pathways of meiotic recombination are differentiated and regulated. The final section of this review summarizes the studies that have defined defective recombination as a leading cause of pregnancy loss and congenital disease in humans.

  7. Preparations of Meiotic Pachytene Chromosomes and Extended DNA Fibers from Cotton Suitable for Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Ling, Jian; Wang, Chunying; Li, Shaohui; Zhang, Xiangdi; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Kunbo

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become one of the most important techniques applied in plant molecular cytogenetics. However, the application of this technique in cotton has lagged behind because of difficulties in chromosome preparation. The focus of this article was FISH performed not only on cotton pachytene chromosomes, but also on cotton extended DNA fibers. The cotton pollen mother cells (PMCs) instead of buds or anthers were directly digested in enzyme to completely breakdown the cell wall. Before the routine acetic acid treatment, PMCs were incubated in acetic acid and enzyme mixture to remove the cytoplasm and clear the background. The method of ice-cold Carnoy's solution spreading chromosome was adopted instead of nitrogen removed method to avoid chromosomes losing and fully stretch chromosome. With the above-improved steps, the high-quality well-differentiated pachytene chromosomes with clear background were obtained. FISH results demonstrated that a mature protocol of cotton pachytene chromosomes preparation was presented. Intact and no debris cotton nuclei were obtained by chopping from etiolation cotyledons instead of the conventional liquid nitrogen grinding method. After incubating the nuclei with nucleus lysis buffer on slide, the parallel and clear background DNA fibers were acquired along the slide. This method overcomes the twist, accumulation and fracture of DNA fibers compared with other methods. The entire process of DNA fibers preparation requires only 30 min, in contrast, it takes 3 h with routine nitrogen grinding method. The poisonous mercaptoethanol in nucleus lysis buffer is replaced by nonpoisonous dithiothreitol. PVP40 in nucleus isolation buffer is used to prevent oxidation. The probability of success in isolating nuclei for DNA fiber preparation is almost 100% tested with this method in cotton. So a rapid, safe, and efficient method for the preparation of cotton extended DNA fibers suitable for FISH was established

  8. Telomere Attachment, Meiotic Chromosome Condensation, Pairing, and Bouquet Stage Duration Are Modified in Spermatocytes Lacking Axial Elements

    PubMed Central

    Liebe, Bodo; Alsheimer, Manfred; Höög, Christer; Benavente, Ricardo; Scherthan, Harry

    2004-01-01

    During the extended prophase to the meiosis I division, chromosomes assemble axial elements (AE) along replicated sister chromatids whose ends attach to the inner nuclear membrane (NM) via a specialized conical thickening. Here, we show at the EM level that in Sycp3-/- spermatocyte chromosomes lack the AE and the conical end thickening, but still they attach their telomeres to the inner NM with an electron-dense plate that contains T2AG3 repeats. Immunofluorescence detected telomere proteins, SCP2, and the meiosis-specific cohesin STAG3 at the Sycp3-/- telomere. Bouquet stage spermatocytes were approximately threefold enriched, and the number of telomere but not centromere signals was reduced to the haploid in advanced Sycp3-/- spermatocytes, which indicates a special mode of homolog pairing at the mammalian telomere. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with mouse chromosome 8- and 12-specific subsatellite probes uncovered reduced levels of regional homolog pairing, whereas painting of chromosomes 13 revealed partial or complete juxtapositioning of homologs; however, condensation of Sycp3-/- bivalents was defective. Electron microscopic analysis of AE-deficient spermatocytes revealed that transverse filaments formed short structures reminiscent of the synaptonemal complex central region, which likely mediate stable homolog pairing. It appears that the AE is required for chromosome condensation, rapid exit from the bouquet stage, and fine-tuning of homolog pairing. PMID:14657244

  9. Transillumination spatially modulated illumination microscopy for human chromosome imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitris, Costas; Heracleous, Peter; Patsalis, Philippos

    2005-03-01

    Human chromosome analysis is an essential task in cytogenetics, especially in prenatal screening, genetic syndrome diagnosis, cancer pathology research and mutagen dosimetry. Chromosomal analysis begins with the creation of a karyotype, which is a layout of chromosome images organized by decreasing size in pairs. Both manual and automatic classification of chromosomes are limited by the resolution of the microscope and imaging system used. One way to improve the results of classification and even detect subtleties now remaining undetected, is to enhance the resolution of the images. It is possible to achieve lateral resolution beyond the classical limit, by using spatially modulated illumination (SMI) in a wide-field, non-confocal microscope. In this case, the sample is illuminated with spatially modulated light, which makes normally inaccessible high-resolution information visible in the observed image by shifting higher frequencies within the OTF limits of the microscope. Although, SMI microscopes have been reported in the past, this manuscript reports the development of a transillumination microscope for opaque, non-fluorescent samples. The illumination path consisted of a light source illuminating a ruled grating which was subsequently imaged on the sample. The grating was mounted on a rotating and translating stage so that the magnification and rotation of the pattern could be adjusted. The imaging lens was a 1.25 NA oil immersion objective. Test samples showed resolution improvement, as judged from a comparison of the experimentally obtained FWHM. Further studies using smaller fringe distance or laser interference pattern illumination will be evaluated to further optimize the SMI results.

  10. Shaping meiotic chromosomes with SUMO: a feedback loop controls the assembly of the synaptonemal complex in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Tsubouchi, Hideo; Argunhan, Bilge; Tsubouchi, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a meiosis-specific chromosomal structure in which homologous chromosomes are intimately linked through arrays of specialized proteins called transverse filaments (TF). Widely conserved in eukaryote meiosis, the SC forms during prophase I and is essential for accurate segregation of homologous chromosomes at meiosis I. However, the basic mechanism overlooking formation and regulation of the SC has been poorly understood. By using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we recently showed that SC formation is controlled through the attachment of multiple molecules of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) to a regulator of TF assembly. Intriguingly, this SUMOylation is activated by TF, implicating the involvement of a positive feedback loop in the control of SC assembly. We discuss the implication of this finding and possible involvement of a similar mechanism in regulating other processes.

  11. Spatial dynamics of chromosome translocations in living cells.

    PubMed

    Roukos, Vassilis; Voss, Ty C; Schmidt, Christine K; Lee, Seungtaek; Wangsa, Darawalee; Misteli, Tom

    2013-08-09

    Chromosome translocations are a hallmark of cancer cells. We have developed an experimental system to visualize the formation of translocations in living cells and apply it to characterize the spatial and dynamic properties of translocation formation. We demonstrate that translocations form within hours of the occurrence of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and that their formation is cell cycle-independent. Translocations form preferentially between prepositioned genome elements, and perturbation of key factors of the DNA repair machinery uncouples DSB pairing from translocation formation. These observations generate a spatiotemporal framework for the formation of translocations in living cells.

  12. Analysis of four microsatellite markers on the long arm of chromosome 9 by meiotic recombination in flow-sorted single sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, R.A.; Goudie, D.R.; Carter, N.P.; Lyall, J.E.W.; Affara, N.A.; Ferguson-Smith, M.A. )

    1993-06-01

    Meiotic recombination in flow-sorted single sperm was used to analyze four highly polymorphic microsatellite markers on the long arm of chromosome 9. The microsatellites comprised three tightly linked markers: 9CMP1 (D9S109), 9CMP2 (D9S127), and D9S53, which map to 9q31, and a reference marker, ASS, which is located in 9q34.1. Haplotypes of single sperm were assessed by using PCR in a single-step multiplex reaction to amplify each locus. Recombinant haplotypes were identified by their relative infrequency and were analyzed using THREELOC, a maximum-likelihood-analysis program, and an adaptation of CRI-MAP. The most likely order of these markers was cen-D9S109-D9S127-D9S53-ASS-tel with D9S109, D9S127, and D9S53 being separated by a genetic distance of approximately 3%. The order of the latter three markers did not however achieve statistical significance using the THREELOC program. 21 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Recombinational landscape of porcine X chromosome and individual variation in female meiotic recombination associated with haplotypes of Chinese pigs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Variations in recombination fraction (θ) among chromosomal regions, individuals and families have been observed and have an important impact on quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping studies. Such variations on porcine chromosome X (SSC-X) and on other mammalian chromosome X are rarely explored. The emerging assembly of pig sequence provides exact physical location of many markers, facilitating the study of a fine-scale recombination landscape of the pig genome by comparing a clone-based physical map to a genetic map. Using large offspring of F1 females from two large-scale resource populations (Large White ♂ × Chinese Meishan ♀, and White Duroc ♂ × Chinese Erhualian ♀), we were able to evaluate the heterogeneity in θ for a specific interval among individual F1 females. Results Alignments between the cytogenetic map, radiation hybrid (RH) map, genetic maps and clone map of SSC-X with the physical map of human chromosome X (HSA-X) are presented. The most likely order of 60 markers on SSC-X is inferred. The average recombination rate across SSC-X is of ~1.27 cM/Mb. However, almost no recombination occurred in a large region of ~31 Mb extending from the centromere to Xq21, whereas in the surrounding regions and in the Xq telomeric region a recombination rate of 2.8-3.3 cM/Mb was observed, more than twice the chromosome-wide average rate. Significant differences in θ among F1 females within each population were observed for several chromosomal intervals. The largest variation was observed in both populations in the interval UMNP71-SW1943, or more precisely in the subinterval UMNP891-UMNP93. The individual variation in θ over this subinterval was found associated with F1 females' maternal haplotypes (Chinese pig haplotypes) and independent of paternal haplotype (European pig haplotypes). The θ between UMNP891 and UMNP93 for haplotype 1122 and 4311 differed by more than fourteen-fold (10.3% vs. 0.7%). Conclusions This study reveals marked

  14. Meiotic segregation of sex chromosomes in mosaic and non-mosaic XYY males: case reports and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rives, N; Siméon, N; Milazzo, J P; Barthélémy, C; Macé, B

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of sex chromosome aneuploidy in spermatozoa of two males with a 47,XYY karyotype and one male with a 46,XY/47,XYY constitution. Spermatozoa obtained from two oligospermic patients and one volunteer semen donor were studied by multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization. In the XY/XYY male, the frequencies of X-bearing to Y-bearing sperm were significantly different from the 1 : 1 expected ratio. Significantly increased frequencies were found in the mosaic and non-mosaic males for 24,XX and 24,YY sperm when compared with control donors. The number of 24,XY sperm was significantly different from the controls in the XYY males, but not in the mosaic male. The incidence of disomy 18 and the rate of diploidy also increased in the three patients. However, the mosaic male had the lowest cumulative rate of disomic and diploid spermatozoa when compared with the two XYY patients. Our data suggest that: (i) chromosome abnormalities observed in spermatozoa of the two XYY oligoasthenoteratospermic (OAT) males arise through segregation errors in XY germ cells rather than normal meiosis of XYY germ cells, (ii) mosaic XYY males with normal semen parameters have a lower risk of producing offspring with a sex chromosomal abnormality than OAT males with XYY karyotype.

  15. Epigenetic control of meiotic recombination in plants.

    PubMed

    Yelina, Natasha; Diaz, Patrick; Lambing, Christophe; Henderson, Ian R

    2015-03-01

    Meiotic recombination is a deeply conserved process within eukaryotes that has a profound effect on patterns of natural genetic variation. During meiosis homologous chromosomes pair and undergo DNA double strand breaks generated by the Spo11 endonuclease. These breaks can be repaired as crossovers that result in reciprocal exchange between chromosomes. The frequency of recombination along chromosomes is highly variable, for example, crossovers are rarely observed in heterochromatin and the centromeric regions. Recent work in plants has shown that crossover hotspots occur in gene promoters and are associated with specific chromatin modifications, including H2A.Z. Meiotic chromosomes are also organized in loop-base arrays connected to an underlying chromosome axis, which likely interacts with chromatin to organize patterns of recombination. Therefore, epigenetic information exerts a major influence on patterns of meiotic recombination along chromosomes, genetic variation within populations and evolution of plant genomes.

  16. Homologue engagement controls meiotic DNA break number and distribution.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Drew; Mohibullah, Neeman; Zhu, Xuan; Keeney, Scott

    2014-06-12

    Meiotic recombination promotes genetic diversification as well as pairing and segregation of homologous chromosomes, but the double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate recombination are dangerous lesions that can cause mutation or meiotic failure. How cells control DSBs to balance between beneficial and deleterious outcomes is not well understood. Here we test the hypothesis that DSB control involves a network of intersecting negative regulatory circuits. Using multiple complementary methods, we show that DSBs form in greater numbers in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking ZMM proteins, a suite of recombination-promoting factors traditionally regarded as acting strictly downstream of DSB formation. ZMM-dependent DSB control is genetically distinct from a pathway tying break formation to meiotic progression through the Ndt80 transcription factor. These counterintuitive findings suggest that homologous chromosomes that have successfully engaged one another stop making breaks. Genome-wide DSB maps uncover distinct responses by different subchromosomal domains to the ZMM mutation zip3 (also known as cst9), and show that Zip3 is required for the previously unexplained tendency of DSB density to vary with chromosome size. Thus, feedback tied to ZMM function contributes in unexpected ways to spatial patterning of recombination.

  17. Meiotic interstrand DNA damage escapes paternal repair and causes chromosomal aberrations in the zygote by maternal misrepair

    DOE PAGES

    Marchetti, Francesco; Bishop, Jack; Gingerich, John; ...

    2015-01-08

    De novo point mutations and chromosomal structural aberrations (CSA) detected in offspring of unaffected parents show a preferential paternal origin with higher risk for older fathers. Studies in rodents suggest that heritable mutations transmitted from the father can arise from either paternal or maternal misrepair of damaged paternal DNA, and that the entire spermatogenic cycle can be at risk after mutagenic exposure. Understanding the susceptibility and mechanisms of transmission of paternal mutations is important in family planning after chemotherapy and donor selection for assisted reproduction. We report that treatment of male mice with melphalan (MLP), a bifunctional alkylating agent widelymore » used in chemotherapy, induces DNA lesions during male mouse meiosis that persist unrepaired as germ cells progress through DNA repair-competent phases of spermatogenic development. After fertilization, unrepaired sperm DNA lesions are mis-repaired into CSA by the egg's DNA repair machinery producing chromosomally abnormal offspring. In conclusion, these findings highlight the importance of both pre- and post-fertilization DNA repair in assuring the genomic integrity of the conceptus.« less

  18. Meiotic interstrand DNA damage escapes paternal repair and causes chromosomal aberrations in the zygote by maternal misrepair

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Bishop, Jack; Gingerich, John; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2015-01-08

    De novo point mutations and chromosomal structural aberrations (CSA) detected in offspring of unaffected parents show a preferential paternal origin with higher risk for older fathers. Studies in rodents suggest that heritable mutations transmitted from the father can arise from either paternal or maternal misrepair of damaged paternal DNA, and that the entire spermatogenic cycle can be at risk after mutagenic exposure. Understanding the susceptibility and mechanisms of transmission of paternal mutations is important in family planning after chemotherapy and donor selection for assisted reproduction. We report that treatment of male mice with melphalan (MLP), a bifunctional alkylating agent widely used in chemotherapy, induces DNA lesions during male mouse meiosis that persist unrepaired as germ cells progress through DNA repair-competent phases of spermatogenic development. After fertilization, unrepaired sperm DNA lesions are mis-repaired into CSA by the egg's DNA repair machinery producing chromosomally abnormal offspring. In conclusion, these findings highlight the importance of both pre- and post-fertilization DNA repair in assuring the genomic integrity of the conceptus.

  19. Meiotic interstrand DNA damage escapes paternal repair and causes chromosomal aberrations in the zygote by maternal misrepair.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Francesco; Bishop, Jack; Gingerich, John; Wyrobek, Andrew J

    2015-01-08

    De novo point mutations and chromosomal structural aberrations (CSA) detected in offspring of unaffected parents show a preferential paternal origin with higher risk for older fathers. Studies in rodents suggest that heritable mutations transmitted from the father can arise from either paternal or maternal misrepair of damaged paternal DNA, and that the entire spermatogenic cycle can be at risk after mutagenic exposure. Understanding the susceptibility and mechanisms of transmission of paternal mutations is important in family planning after chemotherapy and donor selection for assisted reproduction. We report that treatment of male mice with melphalan (MLP), a bifunctional alkylating agent widely used in chemotherapy, induces DNA lesions during male mouse meiosis that persist unrepaired as germ cells progress through DNA repair-competent phases of spermatogenic development. After fertilization, unrepaired sperm DNA lesions are mis-repaired into CSA by the egg's DNA repair machinery producing chromosomally abnormal offspring. These findings highlight the importance of both pre- and post-fertilization DNA repair in assuring the genomic integrity of the conceptus.

  20. Meiotic interstrand DNA damage escapes paternal repair and causes chromosomal aberrations in the zygote by maternal misrepair

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Francesco; Bishop, Jack; Gingerich, John; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    De novo point mutations and chromosomal structural aberrations (CSA) detected in offspring of unaffected parents show a preferential paternal origin with higher risk for older fathers. Studies in rodents suggest that heritable mutations transmitted from the father can arise from either paternal or maternal misrepair of damaged paternal DNA, and that the entire spermatogenic cycle can be at risk after mutagenic exposure. Understanding the susceptibility and mechanisms of transmission of paternal mutations is important in family planning after chemotherapy and donor selection for assisted reproduction. We report that treatment of male mice with melphalan (MLP), a bifunctional alkylating agent widely used in chemotherapy, induces DNA lesions during male mouse meiosis that persist unrepaired as germ cells progress through DNA repair-competent phases of spermatogenic development. After fertilization, unrepaired sperm DNA lesions are mis-repaired into CSA by the egg's DNA repair machinery producing chromosomally abnormal offspring. These findings highlight the importance of both pre- and post-fertilization DNA repair in assuring the genomic integrity of the conceptus. PMID:25567288

  1. Advanced maternal age and the risk of Down syndrome characterized by the meiotic stage of the chromosomal error: A population-based study

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, P.W.; Khoury, M.J.; Freeman, S.B.

    1996-03-01

    The identification of DNA polymorphisms makes it possible to classify trisomy 21 according to the parental origin and stage (meiosis I [MI], meiosis II [MII], or postzygotic mitotic) of the chromosomal error. Studying the effect of parental age on these subgroups could shed light on parental exposures and their timing. From 1989 through 1993, 170 infants with trisomy 21 and 267 randomly selected control infants were ascertained in a population-based, case-control study in metropolitan Atlanta. Blood samples for genetic studies were obtained from case infants and their parents. Using logistic regression, we independently examined the association between maternal and paternal age and subgroups of trisomy 21 defined by parental origin and meiotic stage. The distribution of trisomy 21 by origin was 86% maternal (75% MI and 25% MII), 9% paternal (50% MI and 50% MII), and 5% mitotic. Compared with women <25 years of age, women {>=}40 years old had an odds ratio of 5.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.0-27.4) for maternal MI (MMI) errors and 51.4 (95% confidence interval, 2.3-999.0) for maternal MII (MMII) errors. Birth-prevalence rates for women {>=}40 years old were 4.2/1,000 births for MMI errors and 1.9/1,000 births for MMII errors. These results support an association between advanced maternal age and both MMI and MMII errors. The association with MI does not pinpoint the timing of the error; however, the association with MII implies that there is at least one maternal age-related mechanism acting around the time of conception. 16 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  3. Meiotic functions of RAD18.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Akiko; Sleddens-Linkels, Esther; Wassenaar, Evelyne; Ooms, Marja; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Seibler, Jost; Vogt, Thomas F; Shin, Myung K; Grootegoed, J Anton; Baarends, Willy M

    2011-08-15

    RAD18 is an ubiquitin ligase that is involved in replication damage bypass and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair processes in mitotic cells. Here, we investigated the testicular phenotype of Rad18-knockdown mice to determine the function of RAD18 in meiosis, and in particular, in the repair of meiotic DSBs induced by the meiosis-specific topoisomerase-like enzyme SPO11. We found that RAD18 is recruited to a specific subfraction of persistent meiotic DSBs. In addition, RAD18 is recruited to the chromatin of the XY chromosome pair, which forms the transcriptionally silent XY body. At the XY body, RAD18 mediates the chromatin association of its interaction partners, the ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes HR6A and HR6B. Moreover, RAD18 was found to regulate the level of dimethylation of histone H3 at Lys4 and maintain meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, in a manner similar to that previously observed for HR6B. Finally, we show that RAD18 and HR6B have a role in the efficient repair of a small subset of meiotic DSBs.

  4. Meiotic and mitotic recombination in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Kathryn P; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2013-06-01

    Meiotic crossovers facilitate the segregation of homologous chromosomes and increase genetic diversity. The formation of meiotic crossovers was previously posited to occur via two pathways, with the relative use of each pathway varying between organisms; however, this paradigm could not explain all crossovers, and many of the key proteins involved were unidentified. Recent studies that identify some of these proteins reinforce and expand the model of two meiotic crossover pathways. The results provide novel insights into the evolutionary origins of the pathways, suggesting that one is similar to a mitotic DNA repair pathway and the other evolved to incorporate special features unique to meiosis.

  5. Chromosome structure and function

    SciTech Connect

    Risley, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents topics in chromosome structure and function. Topics covered include: the structure of interphase chromatin; chromatin structure, gene expression and differentiation; organization of mitotic chromosomes; organization of meiotic chromosomes and synaptonimal complexes; the lampbrush chromsome of animal oocytes; dosage compensation in mammals: x chromosome inactivation; and polytene chromosomes.

  6. High-resolution mapping of the spatial organization of a bacterial chromosome.

    PubMed

    Le, Tung B K; Imakaev, Maxim V; Mirny, Leonid A; Laub, Michael T

    2013-11-08

    Chromosomes must be highly compacted and organized within cells, but how this is achieved in vivo remains poorly understood. We report the use of chromosome conformation capture coupled with deep sequencing (Hi-C) to map the structure of bacterial chromosomes. Analysis of Hi-C data and polymer modeling indicates that the Caulobacter crescentus chromosome consists of multiple, largely independent spatial domains that are probably composed of supercoiled plectonemes arrayed into a bottle brush-like fiber. These domains are stable throughout the cell cycle and are reestablished concomitantly with DNA replication. We provide evidence that domain boundaries are established by highly expressed genes and the formation of plectoneme-free regions, whereas the histone-like protein HU and SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) promote short-range compaction and the colinearity of chromosomal arms, respectively. Collectively, our results reveal general principles for the organization and structure of chromosomes in vivo.

  7. The role of chromatin modifications in progression through mouse meiotic prophase.

    PubMed

    Crichton, James H; Playfoot, Christopher J; Adams, Ian R

    2014-03-20

    Meiosis is a key event in gametogenesis that generates new combinations of genetic information and is required to reduce the chromosome content of the gametes. Meiotic chromosomes undergo a number of specialised events during prophase to allow meiotic recombination, homologous chromosome synapsis and reductional chromosome segregation to occur. In mammalian cells, DNA physically associates with histones to form chromatin, which can be modified by methylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination and acetylation to help regulate higher order chromatin structure, gene expression, and chromosome organisation. Recent studies have identified some of the enzymes responsible for generating chromatin modifications in meiotic mammalian cells, and shown that these chromatin modifying enzymes are required for key meiosis-specific events that occur during meiotic prophase. This review will discuss the role of chromatin modifications in meiotic recombination, homologous chromosome synapsis and regulation of meiotic gene expression in mammals. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Meiotic abnormalities in infertile males.

    PubMed

    Egozcue, J; Sarrate, Z; Codina-Pascual, M; Egozcue, S; Oliver-Bonet, M; Blanco, J; Navarro, J; Benet, J; Vidal, F

    2005-01-01

    Meiotic anomalies, as reviewed here, are synaptic chromosome abnormalities, limited to germ cells that cannot be detected through the study of the karyotype. Although the importance of synaptic errors has been underestimated for many years, their presence is related to many cases of human male infertility. Synaptic anomalies can be studied by immunostaining of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), but in this case their frequency is probably underestimated due to the phenomenon of synaptic adjustment. They can also be studied in classic meiotic preparations, which, from a clinical point of view, is still the best approach, especially if multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization is at hand to solve difficult cases. Sperm chromosome FISH studies also provide indirect evidence of their presence. Synaptic anomalies can affect the rate of recombination of all bivalents, produce achiasmate small univalents, partially achiasmate medium-sized or large bivalents, or affect all bivalents in the cell. The frequency is variable, interindividually and intraindividually. The baseline incidence of synaptic anomalies is 6-8%, which may be increased to 17.6% in males with a severe oligozoospermia, and to 27% in normozoospermic males with one or more previous IVF failures. The clinical consequences are the production of abnormal spermatozoa that will produce a higher number of chromosomally abnormal embryos. The indications for a meiotic study in testicular biopsy are provided.

  9. Meioc maintains an extended meiotic prophase I in mice

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Y. Q. Shirleen; Godfrey, Alexander K.; de Rooij, Dirk G.; Page, David C.

    2017-01-01

    The meiosis-specific chromosomal events of homolog pairing, synapsis, and recombination occur over an extended meiotic prophase I that is many times longer than prophase of mitosis. Here we show that, in mice, maintenance of an extended meiotic prophase I requires the gene Meioc, a germ-cell specific factor conserved in most metazoans. In mice, Meioc is expressed in male and female germ cells upon initiation of and throughout meiotic prophase I. Mouse germ cells lacking Meioc initiate meiosis: they undergo pre-meiotic DNA replication, they express proteins involved in synapsis and recombination, and a subset of cells progress as far as the zygotene stage of prophase I. However, cells in early meiotic prophase—as early as the preleptotene stage—proceed to condense their chromosomes and assemble a spindle, as if having progressed to metaphase. Meioc-deficient spermatocytes that have initiated synapsis mis-express CYCLIN A2, which is normally expressed in mitotic spermatogonia, suggesting a failure to properly transition to a meiotic cell cycle program. MEIOC interacts with YTHDC2, and the two proteins pull-down an overlapping set of mitosis-associated transcripts. We conclude that when the meiotic chromosomal program is initiated, Meioc is simultaneously induced so as to extend meiotic prophase. Specifically, MEIOC, together with YTHDC2, promotes a meiotic (as opposed to mitotic) cell cycle program via post-transcriptional control of their target transcripts. PMID:28380054

  10. Entropy-driven spatial organization of highly confined polymers: Lessons for the bacterial chromosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Suckjoon; Mulder, Bela

    2006-08-01

    Despite recent progress in visualization experiments, the mechanism underlying chromosome segregation in bacteria still remains elusive. Here we address a basic physical issue associated with bacterial chromosome segregation, namely the spatial organization of highly confined, self-avoiding polymers (of nontrivial topology) in a rod-shaped cell-like geometry. Through computer simulations, we present evidence that, under strong confinement conditions, topologically distinct domains of a polymer complex effectively repel each other to maximize their conformational entropy, suggesting that duplicated circular chromosomes could partition spontaneously. This mechanism not only is able to account for the spatial separation per se but also captures the major features of the spatiotemporal organization of the duplicating chromosomes observed in Escherichia coli and Caulobacter crescentus. bacterial chromosome segregation | Caulobacter crescentus | Escherichia coli | polymer physics

  11. Analysis of meiotic sister chromatid cohesion in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Severson, Aaron F.

    2016-01-01

    In sexually reproducing organisms, the formation of healthy gametes (sperm and eggs) requires the proper establishment and release of meiotic sister chromatid cohesion (SCC). SCC tethers replicated sisters from their formation in premeiotic S phase until the stepwise removal of cohesion in anaphase of meiosis I and II allows the separation of homologs and then sisters. Defects in the establishment or release of meiotic cohesion cause chromosome segregation errors that lead to the formation of aneuploid gametes and inviable embryos. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an excellent model for studies of meiotic sister chromatid cohesion due to its genetic tractability and the excellent cytological properties of the hermaphrodite gonad. Moreover, mutants defective in the establishment or maintenance of meiotic SCC nevertheless produce abundant gametes, allowing analysis of the pattern of chromosome segregation. Here I will describe two approaches for analysis of meiotic cohesion in C. elegans. The first approach relies on cytology to detect and quantify defects in SCC. The second approach relies on PCR and restriction digests to identify embryos that inherited an incorrect complement of chromosomes due to aberrant meiotic chromosome segregation. Both approaches are sensitive enough to identify rare errors and precise enough to reveal distinctive phenotypes resulting from mutations that perturb meiotic SCC in different ways. The robust, quantitative nature of these assays should strengthen phenotypic comparisons of different meiotic mutants and enhance the reproducibility of data generated by different investigators. PMID:27797074

  12. Cytogenetic Characterization of Brown Howler Monkeys, Alouatta guariba clamitans (Atelidae, Platyrrhini): Meiotic Confirmation of an X1X1X2X2X3X3/X1X2X3Y1Y2 Sex Chromosome System.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Eliana R; Fortes, Vanessa B; Rossi, Luis F; Murer, Laurete; Lovato, Maristela; Merani, Maria S; Mudry, Marta D

    2017-04-13

    For brown howler monkeys (Alouatta guariba clamitans), diploid chromosome numbers varying from 2n = 45 to 2n = 52, with XX/XY, X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y, and X1X1X2X2X3X3/X1X2X3Y1Y2 sex chromosome systems have been described by mitotic studies but still await confirmation by meiotic analyses. We analyzed 3 male individuals sampled in the wild (in the municipality of Santa Maria, RS, Brazil) as well as 1 male and 1 female individual in captivity at the São Braz breeding center. Peripheral blood samples and testicular biopsies were taken. We found different diploid numbers for both sexes in somatic cells, 2n = 45,X1X2X3Y1Y2 in males and 2n = 46,X1X1X2X2X3X3 in females, with 4 metacentric (9-12), 7 submetacentric (1-6, 8), and 9 acrocentric autosomal chromosome pairs (13-20, 22). X1 and X2 were submetacentric chromosomes, while X3, Y1, and Y2 were acrocentric ones. Spermatocyte microspreads were examined for synaptonemal complexes. Pachytene spermatocyte analysis was done to verify the chromosome number and morphologies observed in mitotic karyotypes. Immunodetection was performed using anti-SMC3 and anti-CREST antibodies. The presence of a sex chromosome pentavalent X1X2X3Y1Y2 in the males was confirmed by C-banding in metaphase I and by immunodetection in prophase I by the clear identification of 5 centromeres. The G-banded karyotype corresponded to that previously described for A. g. clamitans in the south of Brazil (Curitiba, Parana State, and Blumenau, Santa Catarina State) and for the Misiones Province, Argentina.

  13. Modeling and Experimental Methods to Probe the Link between Global Transcription and Spatial Organization of Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Soumya; Libchaber, Albert; Tlusty, Tsvi; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2012-01-01

    Genomes are spatially assembled into chromosome territories (CT) within the nucleus of living cells. Recent evidences have suggested associations between three-dimensional organization of CTs and the active gene clusters within neighboring CTs. These gene clusters are part of signaling networks sharing similar transcription factor or other downstream transcription machineries. Hence, presence of such gene clusters of active signaling networks in a cell type may regulate the spatial organization of chromosomes in the nucleus. However, given the probabilistic nature of chromosome positions and complex transcription factor networks (TFNs), quantitative methods to establish their correlation is lacking. In this paper, we use chromosome positions and gene expression profiles in interphase fibroblasts and describe methods to capture the correspondence between their spatial position and expression. In addition, numerical simulations designed to incorporate the interacting TFNs, reveal that the chromosome positions are also optimized for the activity of these networks. These methods were validated for specific chromosome pairs mapped in two distinct transcriptional states of T-Cells (naïve and activated). Taken together, our methods highlight the functional coupling between topology of chromosomes and their respective gene expression patterns. PMID:23049710

  14. Spatial control of chromosomal location in a live cell with functionalized magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Juhee; Purwar, Prashant; Cha, Misun; Lee, Junghoon

    2015-11-01

    Long-range chromosomal travel is a phenomenon unique to cell division. Methods for non-invasive, artificial manipulation of chromosomes, such as optical or magnetic tweezers, have difficulty in producing the motion of whole chromosomes in live cells. Here, we report the spatial control of chromosomes over 10 μm in a live mouse oocyte using magnetic particles driven by an external magnetic field. Selective capture of the chromosomes was achieved using antibodies specific for histone H1 in the chromosome that were conjugated to magnetic particles (H1-BMPs). When an external magnetic field was applied, the chromosomes captured by the H1-BMPs traveled through the cytosol and accumulated near the cell membrane though the movement of the chromosomes captured by H1-BMPs was strongly disturbed by the distribution of the cytoskeleton (e.g. actin filaments). Being non-invasive in nature, our approach will enable new opportunities in the remote manipulation of subcellular elements.Long-range chromosomal travel is a phenomenon unique to cell division. Methods for non-invasive, artificial manipulation of chromosomes, such as optical or magnetic tweezers, have difficulty in producing the motion of whole chromosomes in live cells. Here, we report the spatial control of chromosomes over 10 μm in a live mouse oocyte using magnetic particles driven by an external magnetic field. Selective capture of the chromosomes was achieved using antibodies specific for histone H1 in the chromosome that were conjugated to magnetic particles (H1-BMPs). When an external magnetic field was applied, the chromosomes captured by the H1-BMPs traveled through the cytosol and accumulated near the cell membrane though the movement of the chromosomes captured by H1-BMPs was strongly disturbed by the distribution of the cytoskeleton (e.g. actin filaments). Being non-invasive in nature, our approach will enable new opportunities in the remote manipulation of subcellular elements. Electronic supplementary

  15. Nuclear Architecture of Mouse Spermatocytes: Chromosome Topology, Heterochromatin, and Nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Berrios, Soledad

    2017-01-01

    The nuclear organization of spermatocytes in meiotic prophase I is primarily determined by the synaptic organization of the bivalents that are bound by their telomeres to the nuclear envelope and described as arc-shaped trajectories through the 3D nuclear space. However, over this basic meiotic organization, a spermatocyte nuclear architecture arises that is based on higher-ordered patterns of spatial associations among chromosomal domains from different bivalents that are conditioned by the individual characteristics of chromosomes and the opportunity for interactions between their domains. Consequently, the nuclear architecture is species-specific and prone to modification by chromosomal rearrangements. This model is valid for the localization of any chromosomal domain in the meiotic prophase nucleus. However, constitutive heterochromatin plays a leading role in shaping nuclear territories. Thus, the nuclear localization of nucleoli depends on the position of NORs in nucleolar bivalents, but the association among nucleolar chromosomes mainly depends on the presence of constitutive heterochromatin that does not affect the expression of the ribosomal genes. Constitutive heterochromatin and nucleoli form complex nuclear territories whose distribution in the nuclear space is nonrandom, supporting the hypothesis regarding the existence of a species-specific nuclear architecture in first meiotic prophase spermatocytes. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Meiotic recombination in mammals: localization and regulation.

    PubMed

    Baudat, Frédéric; Imai, Yukiko; de Massy, Bernard

    2013-11-01

    During meiosis, a programmed induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) leads to the exchange of genetic material between homologous chromosomes. These exchanges increase genome diversity and are essential for proper chromosome segregation at the first meiotic division. Recent findings have highlighted an unexpected molecular control of the distribution of meiotic DSBs in mammals by a rapidly evolving gene, PR domain-containing 9 (PRDM9), and genome-wide analyses have facilitated the characterization of meiotic DSB sites at unprecedented resolution. In addition, the identification of new players in DSB repair processes has allowed the delineation of recombination pathways that have two major outcomes, crossovers and non-crossovers, which have distinct mechanistic roles and consequences for genome evolution.

  17. Complex elaboration: making sense of meiotic cohesin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Susannah

    2015-01-01

    In mitotically dividing cells, the cohesin complex tethers sister chromatids, the products of DNA replication, together from the time they are generated during S phase until anaphase. Cohesion between sister chromatids ensures accurate chromosome segregation, and promotes normal gene regulation and certain kinds of DNA repair. In somatic cells, the core cohesin complex is composed of four subunits: Smc1, Smc3, Rad21 and an SA subunit. During meiotic cell divisions meiosis-specific isoforms of several of the cohesin subunits are also expressed and incorporated into distinct meiotic cohesin complexes. The relative contributions of these meiosis-specific forms of cohesin to chromosome dynamics during meiotic progression have not been fully worked out. However, the localization of these proteins during chromosome pairing and synapsis, and their unique loss-of-function phenotypes, suggest non-overlapping roles in controlling meiotic chromosome behavior. Many of the proteins that regulate cohesin function during mitosis also appear to regulate cohesin during meiosis. Here we review how cohesin contributes to meiotic chromosome dynamics, and explore similarities and differences between cohesin regulation during the mitotic cell cycle and meiotic progression. A deeper understanding of the regulation and function of cohesin in meiosis will provide important new insights into how the cohesin complex is able to promote distinct kinds of chromosome interactions under diverse conditions. PMID:25895170

  18. Self-Organization of Meiotic Recombination Initiation: General Principles and Molecular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Keeney, Scott; Lange, Julian; Mohibullah, Neeman

    2015-01-01

    Recombination in meiosis is a fascinating case study for the coordination of chromosomal duplication, repair, and segregation with each other and with progression through a cell-division cycle. Meiotic recombination initiates with formation of developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at many places across the genome. DSBs are important for successful meiosis but are also dangerous lesions that can mutate or kill, so cells ensure that DSBs are made only at the right times, places, and amounts. This review examines the complex web of pathways that accomplish this control. We explore how chromosome breakage is integrated with meiotic progression and how feedback mechanisms spatially pattern DSB formation and make it homeostatic, robust, and error-correcting. Common regulatory themes recur in different organisms or in different contexts in the same organism. We review this evolutionary and mechanistic conservation but also highlight where control modules have diverged. The framework that emerges helps explain how meiotic chromosomes behave as a self-organizing system. PMID:25421598

  19. Meiotic process and aneuploidy

    SciTech Connect

    Grell, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    The process of meiosis is analyzed by dissecting it into its component parts using the early oocyte of Drosophila as a model. Entrance of the oocytes into premeiotic interphase signals initiation of DNA replication which continues for 30 h. Coincidentally, extensive synaptonemal complexes appear, averaging 50 ..mu..m (132 h), peaking at 75 ..mu..m (144 h) and continuing into early vitellarial stages. Recombinational response to heat, evidenced by enhancement or induction of exchange, is limited to the S-phase with a peak at 144 h coinciding with maximal extension of the SC. Coincidence of synapsis and recombination response with S at premeiotic interphase is contrary to their conventional localization at meiotic prophase. The interrelationship between exchange and nondisjunction has been clarified by the Distributive Pairing Model of meiosis. Originally revealed through high frequencies of nonrandom assortment of nonhomologous chromosomes, distributive pairing has been shown to follow and to be noncompetitive with exchange, to be based on size-recognition, not homology, and as a raison d'etre, to provide a segregational mechanism for noncrossover homologues. Rearrangements, recombination mutants and aneuploids may contribute noncrossover chromosomes to the distributive pool and so promote the nonhomologous associations responsible for nondisjunction of homologues and regular segregation of nonhomologues. 38 references, 15 figures. (ACR)

  20. Multimodality hard-x-ray imaging of a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hanfei; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Lauer, Kenneth; Huang, Xiaojing; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph; Yusuf, Mohammed; Robinson, Ian; Kalbfleisch, Sebastian; Li, Li; Bouet, Nathalie; Zhou, Juan; Conley, Ray; Chu, Yong S.

    2016-02-01

    We developed a scanning hard x-ray microscope using a new class of x-ray nano-focusing optic called a multilayer Laue lens and imaged a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution. The combination of the hard x-ray’s superior penetration power, high sensitivity to elemental composition, high spatial-resolution and quantitative analysis creates a unique tool with capabilities that other microscopy techniques cannot provide. Using this microscope, we simultaneously obtained absorption-, phase-, and fluorescence-contrast images of Pt-stained human chromosome samples. The high spatial-resolution of the microscope and its multi-modality imaging capabilities enabled us to observe the internal ultra-structures of a thick chromosome without sectioning it.

  1. Multimodality hard-x-ray imaging of a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Hanfei; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Lauer, Kenneth R.; ...

    2016-02-05

    Here, we developed a scanning hard x-ray microscope using a new class of x-ray nano-focusing optic called a multilayer Laue lens and imaged a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution. The combination of the hard x-ray's superior penetration power, high sensitivity to elemental composition, high spatial-resolution and quantitative analysis creates a unique tool with capabilities that other microscopy techniques cannot provide. Using this microscope, we simultaneously obtained absorption-, phase-, and fluorescence-contrast images of Pt-stained human chromosome samples. The high spatial-resolution of the microscope and its multi-modality imaging capabilities enabled us to observe the internal ultra-structures of a thick chromosome without sectioningmore » it.« less

  2. Multimodality hard-x-ray imaging of a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Hanfei; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Lauer, Kenneth R.; Huang, Xiaojing; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph; Yusuf, Mohammed; Robinson, Ian K.; Kalbfleisch, Sebastian; Li, Li; Bouet, Nathalie; Zhou, Juan; Conley, Ray; Chu, Yong S.

    2016-02-05

    Here, we developed a scanning hard x-ray microscope using a new class of x-ray nano-focusing optic called a multilayer Laue lens and imaged a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution. The combination of the hard x-ray's superior penetration power, high sensitivity to elemental composition, high spatial-resolution and quantitative analysis creates a unique tool with capabilities that other microscopy techniques cannot provide. Using this microscope, we simultaneously obtained absorption-, phase-, and fluorescence-contrast images of Pt-stained human chromosome samples. The high spatial-resolution of the microscope and its multi-modality imaging capabilities enabled us to observe the internal ultra-structures of a thick chromosome without sectioning it.

  3. Multimodality hard-x-ray imaging of a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hanfei; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Lauer, Kenneth; Huang, Xiaojing; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph; Yusuf, Mohammed; Robinson, Ian; Kalbfleisch, Sebastian; Li, Li; Bouet, Nathalie; Zhou, Juan; Conley, Ray; Chu, Yong S.

    2016-01-01

    We developed a scanning hard x-ray microscope using a new class of x-ray nano-focusing optic called a multilayer Laue lens and imaged a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution. The combination of the hard x-ray’s superior penetration power, high sensitivity to elemental composition, high spatial-resolution and quantitative analysis creates a unique tool with capabilities that other microscopy techniques cannot provide. Using this microscope, we simultaneously obtained absorption-, phase-, and fluorescence-contrast images of Pt-stained human chromosome samples. The high spatial-resolution of the microscope and its multi-modality imaging capabilities enabled us to observe the internal ultra-structures of a thick chromosome without sectioning it. PMID:26846188

  4. Polyploidization increases meiotic recombination frequency in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Polyploidization is the multiplication of the whole chromosome complement and has occurred frequently in vascular plants. Maintenance of stable polyploid state over generations requires special mechanisms to control pairing and distribution of more than two homologous chromosomes during meiosis. Since a minimal number of crossover events is essential for correct chromosome segregation, we investigated whether polyploidy has an influence on the frequency of meiotic recombination. Results Using two genetically linked transgenes providing seed-specific fluorescence, we compared a high number of progeny from diploid and tetraploid Arabidopsis plants. We show that rates of meiotic recombination in reciprocal crosses of genetically identical diploid and autotetraploid Arabidopsis plants were significantly higher in tetraploids compared to diploids. Although male and female gametogenesis differ substantially in meiotic recombination frequency, both rates were equally increased in tetraploids. To investigate whether multivalent formation in autotetraploids was responsible for the increased recombination rates, we also performed corresponding experiments with allotetraploid plants showing strict bivalent pairing. We found similarly increased rates in auto- and allotetraploids, suggesting that the ploidy effect is independent of chromosome pairing configurations. Conclusions The evolutionary success of polyploid plants in nature and under domestication has been attributed to buffering of mutations and sub- and neo-functionalization of duplicated genes. Should the data described here be representative for polyploid plants, enhanced meiotic recombination, and the resulting rapid creation of genetic diversity, could have also contributed to their prevalence. PMID:21510849

  5. History of chromosome rearrangements reflects the spatial organization of yeast chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Khrameeva, Ekaterina E; Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Mirny, Leonid A

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) organization of genomes affects critical cellular processes such as transcription, replication, and deoxyribo nucleic acid (DNA) repair. While previous studies have investigated the natural role, the 3D organization plays in limiting a possible set of genomic rearrangements following DNA repair, the influence of specific organizational principles on this process, particularly over longer evolutionary time scales, remains relatively unexplored. In budding yeast S.cerevisiae, chromosomes are organized into a Rabl-like configuration, with clustered centromeres and telomeres tethered to the nuclear periphery. Hi-C data for S.cerevisiae show that a consequence of this Rabl-like organization is that regions equally distant from centromeres are more frequently in contact with each other, between arms of both the same and different chromosomes. Here, we detect rearrangement events in Saccharomyces species using an automatic approach, and observe increased rearrangement frequency between regions with higher contact frequencies. Together, our results underscore how specific principles of 3D chromosomal organization can influence evolutionary events.

  6. Spatial organization of chromosomes in the salivary gland nuclei of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Using a computer-based system for model building and analysis, three- dimensional models of 24 Drosophila melanogaster salivary gland nuclei have been constructed from optically or physically sectioned glands, allowing several generalizations about chromosome folding and packaging in these nuclei. First and most surprising, the prominent coiling of the chromosomes is strongly chiral, with right-handed gyres predominating. Second, high frequency appositions between certain loci and the nuclear envelope appear almost exclusively at positions of intercalary heterochromatin; in addition, the chromocenter is always apposed to the envelope. Third, chromosomes are invariably separated into mutually exclusive spatial domains while usually extending across the nucleus in a polarized (Rabl) orientation. Fourth, the arms of each autosome are almost always juxtaposed, but no other relative arm positions are strongly favored. Finally, despite these nonrandom structural features, each chromosome is found to fold into a wide variety of different configurations. In addition, a set of nuclei has been analyzed in which the normally aggregrated centromeric regions of the chromosomes are located far apart from one another. These nuclei have the same architectural motifs seen in normal nuclei. This implies that such characteristics as separate chromosome domains and specific chromosome-nuclear envelope contacts are largely independent of the relative placement of the different chromosomes within the nucleus. PMID:3079766

  7. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  8. Key mediators of somatic ATR signaling localize to unpaired chromosomes in spermatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fedoriw, Andrew M.; Menon, Debashish; Kim, Yuna; Mu, Weipeng; Magnuson, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic silencing of unpaired chromatin (MSUC) occurs during the first meiotic prophase, as chromosomes that fail to pair are sequestered into a transcriptionally repressive nuclear domain. This phenomenon is exemplified by the heterologous sex chromosomes of male mammals, where the ATR DNA damage response kinase is crucial for this silencing event. However, the mechanisms underlying the initiation of MSUC remain unknown. Here, we show that essential components of ATR signaling in murine somatic cells are spatially confined to unpaired chromosomes in spermatocytes, including the ATR-dependent phosphorylation of the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding complex replication protein A (RPA) and the checkpoint kinase CHK1. These observations support a model in which ssDNA plays a central role in the recruitment of ATR during MSUC, and provide a link to meiotic progression through activation of CHK1. PMID:26209650

  9. A Link between Meiotic Prophase Progression and CrossoverControl

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, Peter M.; Farruggio, Alfonso P.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-07-06

    During meiosis, most organisms ensure that homologous chromosomes undergo at least one exchange of DNA, or crossover, to link chromosomes together and accomplish proper segregation. How each chromosome receives a minimum of one crossover is unknown. During early meiosis in Caenorhabditis elegans and many other species, chromosomes adopt a polarized organization within the nucleus, which normally disappears upon completion of homolog synapsis. Mutations that impair synapsis even between a single pair of chromosomes in C. elegans delay this nuclear reorganization. We quantified this delay by developing a classification scheme for discrete stages of meiosis. Immunofluorescence localization of RAD-51 protein revealed that delayed meiotic cells also contained persistent recombination intermediates. Through genetic analysis, we found that this cytological delay in meiotic progression requires double-strand breaks and the function of the crossover-promoting heteroduplex HIM-14 (Msh4) and MSH-5. Failure of X chromosome synapsis also resulted in impaired crossover control on autosomes, which may result from greater numbers and persistence of recombination intermediates in the delayed nuclei. We conclude that maturation of recombination events on chromosomes promotes meiotic progression, and is coupled to the regulation of crossover number and placement. Our results have broad implications for the interpretation of meiotic mutants, as we have shown that asynapsis of a single chromosome pair can exert global effects on meiotic progression and recombination frequency.

  10. B Chromosomes - A Matter of Chromosome Drive.

    PubMed

    Houben, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    B chromosomes are supernumerary chromosomes which are often preferentially inherited, deviating from usual Mendelian segregation. The balance between the so-called chromosome drive and the negative effects that the presence of Bs applies on the fitness of their host determines the frequency of Bs in a particular population. Drive is the key for understanding most B chromosomes. Drive occurs in many ways at pre-meiotic, meiotic or post-meiotic divisions, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. The cellular mechanism of drive is reviewed based on the findings obtained for the B chromosomes of rye, maize and other species. How novel analytical tools will expand our ability to uncover the biology of B chromosome drive is discussed.

  11. Genetic controls of meiotic recombination and somatic DNA metabolism in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, B S; Boyd, J B; Carpenter, A T; Green, M M; Nguyen, T D; Ripoll, P; Smith, P D

    1976-01-01

    Recombination-defective meiotic mutants and mutagen-sensitive mutants of D. melanogaster have been examined for their effects on meiotic chromosome behavior, sensitivity to killing by mutagens, somatic chromosome integrity, and DNA repair processes. Several loci have been identified that specify functions that are necessary for both meiotic recombination and DNA repair processes, whereas mutants at combination and DNA repair processes, whereas mutants at other loci appear to be defective in only one pathway of DNA processing. PMID:825857

  12. Gibberellin Induces Diploid Pollen Formation by Interfering with Meiotic Cytokinesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    De Storme, Nico

    2017-01-01

    The plant hormone gibberellic acid (GA) controls many physiological processes, including cell differentiation, cell elongation, seed germination, and response to abiotic stress. In this study, we report that exogenous treatment of flowering Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with GA specifically affects the process of male meiotic cytokinesis leading to meiotic restitution and the production of diploid (2n) pollen grains. Similar defects in meiotic cell division and reproductive ploidy stability occur in Arabidopsis plants depleted of RGA and GAI, two members of the DELLA family that function as suppressor of GA signaling. Cytological analysis of the double rga-24 gai-t6 mutant revealed that defects in male meiotic cytokinesis are not caused by alterations in meiosis I (MI or meiosis II (MII) chromosome dynamics, but instead result from aberrations in the spatial organization of the phragmoplast-like radial microtubule arrays (RMAs) at the end of meiosis II. In line with a role for GA in the genetic regulation of the male reproductive system, we additionally show that DELLA downstream targets MYB33 and MYB65 are redundantly required for functional RMA biosynthesis and male meiotic cytokinesis. By analyzing the expression of pRGA::GFP-RGA in the wild-type Landsberg erecta background, we demonstrate that the GFP-RGA protein is specifically expressed in the anther cell layers surrounding the meiocytes and microspores, suggesting that appropriate GA signaling in the somatic anther tissue is critical for male meiotic cell wall formation and thus plays an important role in consolidating the male gametophytic ploidy consistency. PMID:27621423

  13. Cytoplasm replacement following germinal vesicle transfer restores meiotic maturation and spindle assembly in meiotically arrested oocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, John; Liu, Hui

    2015-07-01

    Both the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments are essential for the acquisition of meiotic competence. This study assessed the role of the cytoplasm in meiosis resumption in meiotically arrested oocytes at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage. Mouse oocytes at GV stage were meiotically arrested with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). GV transfer was performed between IBMX-treated and non-treated (control) mouse oocytes, and between control mouse and human GV oocytes. Extrusion of first polar body (PB) was examined as an indication of nuclear maturation. Meiotic spindle assembly and chromosome alignment were examined by immunostaining. Results indicated that oocytes arrested with IBMX for 24 and 48 h exhibited reduced ability for meiotic maturation and for extruding the first PB when compared with controls (P < 0.01). IBMX-treated oocytes reconstituted with cytoplasm, but not GV, of control oocytes restored the assembly of meiotic spindle and meiotic maturation. Mouse oocytes reconstituted with GV of human oocytes underwent meiosis similar to that observed in mice, but not humans. Additionally, human oocytes reconstituted by mouse GV underwent meiosis similar to that observed in humans, but not mice. These findings suggest that cytoplasm replacement by GV transfer could represent a potential therapeutic option for women who do not produce mature oocytes during IVF. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Spatial and temporal variations of the chromosomal inversion polymorphism of Anopheles funestus in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Dia, I; Lochouarn, L; Boccolini, D; Costantini, C; Fontenille, D

    2000-09-01

    The polymorphism of paracentric inversions of An. funestus polytene chromosomes was studied along a transect in Senegal in order to assess their variations at the spatial and temporal level. There was an increase in the degree of chromosomal polymorphism from the West to South-East. At the geographical level the variations in inversion frequencies were highly significant whatever the chromosomal arm considered. However, the variations in the chromosomal inversion frequencies did not change significantly over either seasons or years, except for inversion 3b in the village of Dielmo. Such geographical variability within a relatively limited area, associated to temporal stability, suggest a restricted gene flow between the populations studied, probably due to discontinuities in the An. funestus distribution and to its bioecology.

  15. Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Exhibit Impaired Spatial Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Ling M.; Riggins, Tracy; Harvey, Danielle; Cabaral, Margarita; Simon, Tony J.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have been shown to have impairments in processing spatiotemporal information. The authors examined whether children with 22q11.2DS exhibit impairments in spatial working memory performance due to these weaknesses, even when controlling for maintenance of attention. Children with…

  16. Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Exhibit Impaired Spatial Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Ling M.; Riggins, Tracy; Harvey, Danielle; Cabaral, Margarita; Simon, Tony J.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have been shown to have impairments in processing spatiotemporal information. The authors examined whether children with 22q11.2DS exhibit impairments in spatial working memory performance due to these weaknesses, even when controlling for maintenance of attention. Children with…

  17. Meiotic recombination hotspots - a comparative view.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyuha; Henderson, Ian R

    2015-07-01

    During meiosis homologous chromosomes pair and undergo reciprocal genetic exchange, termed crossover. Meiotic recombination has a profound effect on patterns of genetic variation and is an important tool during crop breeding. Crossovers initiate from programmed DNA double-stranded breaks that are processed to form single-stranded DNA, which can invade a homologous chromosome. Strand invasion events mature into double Holliday junctions that can be resolved as crossovers. Extensive variation in the frequency of meiotic recombination occurs along chromosomes and is typically focused in narrow hotspots, observed both at the level of DNA breaks and final crossovers. We review methodologies to profile hotspots at different steps of the meiotic recombination pathway that have been used in different eukaryote species. We then discuss what these studies have revealed concerning specification of hotspot locations and activity and the contributions of both genetic and epigenetic factors. Understanding hotspots is important for interpreting patterns of genetic variation in populations and how eukaryotic genomes evolve. In addition, manipulation of hotspots will allow us to accelerate crop breeding, where meiotic recombination distributions can be limiting. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Genetic analysis of meiotic recombination in humans by use of sperm typing: reduced recombination within a heterozygous paracentric inversion of chromosome 9q32-q34.3.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, G M; Leversha, M; Hulten, M; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Affara, N A; Furlong, R A

    1998-01-01

    To investigate patterns of genetic recombination within a heterozygous paracentric inversion of chromosome 9 (46XY inv[9] [q32q34.3]), we performed sperm typing using a series of polymorphic microsatellite markers spanning the inversion region. For comparison, two donors with cytogenetically normal chromosomes 9, one of whom was heterozygous for a pericentric chromosome 2 inversion (46XY inv[2] [p11q13]), were also tested. Linkage analysis was performed by use of the multilocus linkage-analysis program SPERM, and also CRI-MAP, which was adapted for sperm-typing data. Analysis of the controls generated a marker order in agreement with previously published data and revealed no significant interchromosomal effects of the inv(2) on recombination on chromosome 9. FISH employing cosmids containing appropriate chromosome 9 markers was used to localize the inversion breakpoint of inv(9). Analysis of inv(9) sperm was performed by use of a set of microsatellite markers that mapped centromeric to, telomeric to, and within the inversion breakpoints. Three distinct patterns of recombination across the region were observed. Proximal to the centromeric breakpoint, recombination was similar to normal levels. Distal to the telomeric breakpoint, there was an increase in recombination found in the inversion patient. Finally, within the inversion, recombination was dramatically reduced, but several apparent double recombinants were found. A putative model explaining these data is proposed. PMID:9585591

  19. Meiotic Consequences of Genetic Divergence Across the Murine Pseudoautosomal Region

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Beth L.

    2017-01-01

    The production of haploid gametes during meiosis is dependent on the homology-driven processes of pairing, synapsis, and recombination. On the mammalian heterogametic sex chromosomes, these key meiotic activities are confined to the pseudoautosomal region (PAR), a short region of near-perfect sequence homology between the X and Y chromosomes. Despite its established importance for meiosis, the PAR is rapidly evolving, raising the question of how proper X/Y segregation is buffered against the accumulation of homology-disrupting mutations. Here, I investigate the interplay of PAR evolution and function in two interfertile house mouse subspecies characterized by structurally divergent PARs, Mus musculus domesticus and M. m. castaneus. Using cytogenetic methods to visualize the sex chromosomes at meiosis, I show that intersubspecific F1 hybrids harbor an increased frequency of pachytene spermatocytes with unsynapsed sex chromosomes. This high rate of asynapsis is due, in part, to the premature release of synaptic associations prior to completion of prophase I. Further, I show that when sex chromosomes do synapse in intersubspecific hybrids, recombination is reduced across the paired region. Together, these meiotic defects afflict ∼50% of spermatocytes from F1 hybrids and lead to increased apoptosis in meiotically dividing cells. Despite flagrant disruption of the meiotic program, a subset of spermatocytes complete meiosis and intersubspecific F1 males remain fertile. These findings cast light on the meiotic constraints that shape sex chromosome evolution and offer initial clues to resolve the paradox raised by the rapid evolution of this functionally significant locus. PMID:28100589

  20. Tissue-specific features of the X chromosome and nucleolus spatial dynamics in a malaria mosquito, Anopheles atroparvus

    PubMed Central

    Bondarenko, Semen M.; Artemov, Gleb N.; Stegniy, Vladimir N.

    2017-01-01

    Spatial organization of chromosome territories is important for maintenance of genomic stability and regulation of gene expression. Recent studies have shown tissue-specific features of chromosome attachments to the nuclear envelope in various organisms including malaria mosquitoes. However, other spatial characteristics of nucleus organization, like volume and shape of chromosome territories, have not been studied in Anopheles. We conducted a thorough analysis of tissue-specific features of the X chromosome and nucleolus volume and shape in follicular epithelium and nurse cells of the Anopheles atroparvus ovaries using a modern open-source software. DNA of the polytene X chromosome from ovarian nurse cells was obtained by microdissection and was used as a template for amplification with degenerate oligo primers. A fluorescently labeled X chromosome painting probe was hybridized with formaldehyde-fixed ovaries of mosquitoes using a 3D-FISH method. The nucleolus was stained by immunostaining with an anti-fibrillarin antibody. The analysis was conducted with TANGO—a software for a chromosome spatial organization analysis. We show that the volume and position of the X chromosome have tissue-specific characteristics. Unlike nurse cell nuclei, the growth of follicular epithelium nuclei is not accompanied with the proportional growth of the X chromosome. However, the shape of the X chromosome does not differ between the tissues. The dynamics of the X chromosome attachment regions location is tissue-specific and it is correlated with the process of nucleus growth in follicular epithelium and nurse cells. PMID:28158219

  1. Tissue-specific features of the X chromosome and nucleolus spatial dynamics in a malaria mosquito, Anopheles atroparvus.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Semen M; Artemov, Gleb N; Sharakhov, Igor V; Stegniy, Vladimir N

    2017-01-01

    Spatial organization of chromosome territories is important for maintenance of genomic stability and regulation of gene expression. Recent studies have shown tissue-specific features of chromosome attachments to the nuclear envelope in various organisms including malaria mosquitoes. However, other spatial characteristics of nucleus organization, like volume and shape of chromosome territories, have not been studied in Anopheles. We conducted a thorough analysis of tissue-specific features of the X chromosome and nucleolus volume and shape in follicular epithelium and nurse cells of the Anopheles atroparvus ovaries using a modern open-source software. DNA of the polytene X chromosome from ovarian nurse cells was obtained by microdissection and was used as a template for amplification with degenerate oligo primers. A fluorescently labeled X chromosome painting probe was hybridized with formaldehyde-fixed ovaries of mosquitoes using a 3D-FISH method. The nucleolus was stained by immunostaining with an anti-fibrillarin antibody. The analysis was conducted with TANGO-a software for a chromosome spatial organization analysis. We show that the volume and position of the X chromosome have tissue-specific characteristics. Unlike nurse cell nuclei, the growth of follicular epithelium nuclei is not accompanied with the proportional growth of the X chromosome. However, the shape of the X chromosome does not differ between the tissues. The dynamics of the X chromosome attachment regions location is tissue-specific and it is correlated with the process of nucleus growth in follicular epithelium and nurse cells.

  2. Sister cohesion and structural axis components mediate homolog bias of meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Keun P.; Weiner, Beth M.; Zhang, Liangran; Jordan, Amy; Dekker, Job; Kleckner, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Meiotic recombination occurs between one chromatid of each maternal and paternal homolog (homolog bias) versus between sister chromatids (sister bias). Physical DNA analysis reveals that meiotic cohesin/axis component Rec8 promotes sister bias, likely via its cohesion activity. Two meiosis-specific axis components, Red1/Mek1kinase, counteract this effect. With this precondition satisfied, other molecules directly specify homolog bias per se. Rec8 also acts positively to maintain homolog bias during crossover recombination. These observations point to sequential release of double-strand break ends from association with their sister. Red1 and Rec8 are found to play distinct roles for sister cohesion, DSB formation and recombination progression kinetics. Also, the two components are enriched in spatially distinct domains of axial structure that develop prior to DSB formation. We propose that Red1 and Rec8 domains provide functionally complementary environments whereby inputs evolved from DSB repair and late-stage chromosome morphogenesis are integrated to give the complete meiotic chromosomal program. PMID:21145459

  3. [Cortical cytoskeletal ring in prophase II leads to correction of abnormalities of the first meiotic division and to meiotic restitution of pollen mother cell nucleus].

    PubMed

    Shamina, N V; Zaporozhchenko, I A; Maksiutova, Iu R; Shatskaia, O A

    2007-01-01

    The deviation of prophase cytoskeletal ring formation was determined during meiotic division in 50% of pollen mother cells (PMCs) in maize haploid No 1498 (Zea mays). At prophase in both meiotic divisions the cytoskeletal ring is formed in cortical region of cytoplasm instead of perinuclear. Sometimes formation of both perinuclear and cortical rings is observed in the same cell. It has been shown that in multinucleate PMCs the cortical ring leads to the consolidation of chromosomes into common spindle and to meiotic restitution.

  4. Extensive nonhomologous meiotic synapsis between normal chromosome axes of an rcp(3;6)(p14;q21) translocation in a hairless Mexican boar.

    PubMed

    Villagómez, D A F; Ayala-Valdovinos, M A; Galindo-García, J; Sánchez-Chipres, D R; Mora-Galindo, J; Taylor-Preciado, J J

    2008-01-01

    Due to its low fertility, expressed as small litter size, a Mexican hairless boar was subjected to cytogenetic investigation. Analysis of G-banded mitotic chromosomes revealed a reciprocal chromosome translocation, rcp(3;6) (p14;q21). Synaptonemal complex analysis showed a regular pairing behavior of the translocation chromosome axes, always resulting in a quadrivalent configuration. However, due to extensive nonhomologous pairing between the axes of nonderivative chromosomes 3 and 6, the quadrivalent mostly had an asymmetrical cross-shaped morphology. The nonhomologous pairing occurred not only at mid and late pachytene, but also at the earliest stage of pachytene. It seems that early pachytene heterosynapsis is a common phenomenon in the pairing behavior of pig reciprocal translocations. Therefore, heterosynapsis may reduce apoptosis of germ cells due to partial absence of homologous synapsis during the pairing phase of meiosis. The frequency of spermatocytes showing quadrivalent configurations with unpaired axial segments apparently did not affect germ cell progression in the boar, since fairly normal testicular histology was noticed. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Tissue-Specific Differences in the Spatial Interposition of X-Chromosome and 3R Chromosome Regions in the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles messeae Fall.

    PubMed Central

    Artemov, Gleb; Bondarenko, Semen; Sapunov, Gleb; Stegniy, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Spatial organization of a chromosome in a nucleus is very important in biology but many aspects of it are still generally unresolved. We focused on tissue-specific features of chromosome architecture in closely related malaria mosquitoes, which have essential inter-specific differences in polytene chromosome attachments in nurse cells. We showed that the region responsible for X-chromosome attachment interacts with nuclear lamina stronger in nurse cells, then in salivary glands cells in Anopheles messeae Fall. The inter-tissue differences were demonstrated more convincingly in an experiment of two distinct chromosomes interposition in the nucleus space of cells from four tissues. Microdissected DNA-probes from nurse cells X-chromosome (2BC) and 3R chromosomes (32D) attachment regions were hybridized with intact nuclei of nurse cells, salivary gland cells, follicle epithelium cells and imaginal disсs cells in 3D-FISH experiments. We showed that only salivary gland cells and follicle epithelium cells have no statistical differences in the interposition of 2BC and 32D. Generally, the X-chromosome and 3R chromosome are located closer to each other in cells of the somatic system in comparison with nurse cells on average. The imaginal disсs cell nuclei have an intermediate arrangement of chromosome interposition, similar to other somatic cells and nurse cells. In spite of species-specific chromosome attachments there are no differences in interposition of nurse cells chromosomes in An. messeae and An. atroparvus Thiel. Nurse cells have an unusual chromosome arrangement without a chromocenter, which could be due to the special mission of generative system cells in ontogenesis and evolution. PMID:25671311

  6. Tissue-specific differences in the spatial interposition of X-chromosome and 3R chromosome regions in the malaria mosquito Anopheles messeae Fall.

    PubMed

    Artemov, Gleb; Bondarenko, Semen; Sapunov, Gleb; Stegniy, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Spatial organization of a chromosome in a nucleus is very important in biology but many aspects of it are still generally unresolved. We focused on tissue-specific features of chromosome architecture in closely related malaria mosquitoes, which have essential inter-specific differences in polytene chromosome attachments in nurse cells. We showed that the region responsible for X-chromosome attachment interacts with nuclear lamina stronger in nurse cells, then in salivary glands cells in Anopheles messeae Fall. The inter-tissue differences were demonstrated more convincingly in an experiment of two distinct chromosomes interposition in the nucleus space of cells from four tissues. Microdissected DNA-probes from nurse cells X-chromosome (2BC) and 3R chromosomes (32D) attachment regions were hybridized with intact nuclei of nurse cells, salivary gland cells, follicle epithelium cells and imaginal disсs cells in 3D-FISH experiments. We showed that only salivary gland cells and follicle epithelium cells have no statistical differences in the interposition of 2BC and 32D. Generally, the X-chromosome and 3R chromosome are located closer to each other in cells of the somatic system in comparison with nurse cells on average. The imaginal disсs cell nuclei have an intermediate arrangement of chromosome interposition, similar to other somatic cells and nurse cells. In spite of species-specific chromosome attachments there are no differences in interposition of nurse cells chromosomes in An. messeae and An. atroparvus Thiel. Nurse cells have an unusual chromosome arrangement without a chromocenter, which could be due to the special mission of generative system cells in ontogenesis and evolution.

  7. Coevolutionary dynamics of polyandry and sex-linked meiotic drive.

    PubMed

    Holman, Luke; Price, Thomas A R; Wedell, Nina; Kokko, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    Segregation distorters located on sex chromosomes are predicted to sweep to fixation and cause extinction via a shortage of one sex, but in nature they are often found at low, stable frequencies. One potential resolution to this longstanding puzzle involves female multiple mating (polyandry). Because many meiotic drivers severely reduce the sperm competitive ability of their male carriers, females are predicted to evolve more frequent polyandry and thereby promote sperm competition when a meiotic driver invades. Consequently, the driving chromosome's relative fitness should decline, halting or reversing its spread. We used formal modeling to show that this initially appealing hypothesis cannot resolve the puzzle alone: other selective pressures (e.g., low fitness of drive homozygotes) are required to establish a stable meiotic drive polymorphism. However, polyandry and meiotic drive can strongly affect one another's frequency, and polyandrous populations may be resistant to the invasion of rare drive mutants. © 2015 The Author(s).

  8. Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of meiotic chromosome segregation in a 47,XYY male and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q; Martin, R H

    2000-07-03

    The frequencies of aneuploid and diploid sperm were determined in a 47,XYY male using multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, and compared with those from 10 control donors. A total of 30,078 sperm from the patient was scored, 15,044 by two-color FISH for chromosomes 13 and 21, and 15,034 by three-color FISH for the sex chromosomes using chromosome 1 as an internal autosomal control for diploidy and lack of hybridization. The frequencies of X-bearing (49.73%) and Y-bearing sperm (49.46%) in control males were not significantly different from the expected 50% (chi(2)-test for goodness of fit). The ratio of 24,X (50.60%) to 24, Y sperm (48.35%) in the patient, however, was significantly different from the controls (P = 0.0144, chi(2)-test for independence) and from the expected 1:1 ratio (P = 0.0055, chi(2)-test for goodness of fit). There was no significant increase in the frequency of diploid sperm when compared with the controls (chi(2)-test for independence). Significantly increased frequencies were found for 24,YY (0.07% vs. 0.02%, P = 0.0009) and 24,XY (0.44% vs. 0.29%, P = 0.0025), but not for 24,XX (0.05% vs. 0.05%, P > 0. 05), 24,+13 (0.07% vs. 0.07%, P > 0.05) or 24,+21 sperm (0.21% vs. 0. 18%, P > 0.05) in the 47,XYY male when compared with control donors (chi(2)-test for independence). Our results support the theory that loss of the extra Y chromosome occurs during spermatogenesis in most cells. In this XYY patient there was a significant increase in the frequency of sperm with sex chromosomal abnormalities but no suggestion of an inter-chromosomal effect on autosomes. All 3-color FISH studies in the literature demonstrate a significantly increased risk of gonosomal aneuploidy in XYY males, with the risk being on the order of 1%.

  9. Chromosomal G-dark Bands Determine the Spatial Organization of Centromeric Heterochromatin in the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Célia; Pereira, Henrique M.; Ferreira, João; Pina, Cristina; Mendonça, Denise; Rosa, Agostinho C.; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2001-01-01

    Gene expression can be silenced by proximity to heterochromatin blocks containing centromeric α-satellite DNA. This has been shown experimentally through cis-acting chromosome rearrangements resulting in linear genomic proximity, or through trans-acting changes resulting in intranuclear spatial proximity. Although it has long been been established that centromeres are nonrandomly distributed during interphase, little is known of what determines the three-dimensional organization of these silencing domains in the nucleus. Here, we propose a model that predicts the intranuclear positioning of centromeric heterochromatin for each individual chromosome. With the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal microscopy, we show that the distribution of centromeric α-satellite DNA in human lymphoid cells synchronized at G0/G1 is unique for most individual chromosomes. Regression analysis reveals a tight correlation between nuclear distribution of centromeric α-satellite DNA and the presence of G-dark bands in the corresponding chromosome. Centromeres surrounded by G-dark bands are preferentially located at the nuclear periphery, whereas centromeres of chromosomes with a lower content of G-dark bands tend to be localized at the nucleolus. Consistent with the model, a t(11; 14) translocation that removes G-dark bands from chromosome 11 causes a repositioning of the centromere, which becomes less frequently localized at the nuclear periphery and more frequently associated with the nucleolus. The data suggest that “chromosomal environment” plays a key role in the intranuclear organization of centromeric heterochromatin. Our model further predicts that facultative heterochromatinization of distinct genomic regions may contribute to cell-type specific patterns of centromere localization. PMID:11694589

  10. High-resolution meiotic and physical mapping of the Best`s vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2) locus to pericentromeric chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, B.H.F.; Vogt, G.; Walker, D.

    1994-09-01

    Vitelliform macular dystrophy, also known as Best`s disease, is a juvenile-onset macular degeneration with autosomal dominant inheritance. It is characterized by well-demarcated accumulation of lipofuscin-like material within and beneath the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and classically results in an egg yolk-like appearance of the macula. Typically, carriers of the disease gene show a specific electrophysiological sign which can be detected by electrooculography (EOG). The EOG measures a standing potential between the cornea and the retina which is primarily generated by the RPE. The histopathological findings as well as the EOG abnormalities suggest that Best`s disease is a generalized disorder of the RPE. The basic biochemical defect is still unknown. As a first step in the positional cloning of the defective gene, the Best`s disease locus was mapped to chromosome 11 between markers at D11S871 and INT2. Subsequently, his region was refined to a 3.7 cM interval flanked by loci D11S903 and PYGM. To further narrow the D11S903-PYGM interval and to obtain an estimate of the physical size of the minimal candidate region, we used a combination of high-resolution PCR hybrid mapping and analysis of recombinant Best`s disease chromosomes. We identified six markers from within the D11S903-PYGM interval that show no recombination with the defective gene in three multigeneration Best`s disease pedigrees. Our hybrid panel localizes these markers on either side of the centromere on chromosome 11. The closest markers flanking the disease gene are at D11S986 in band p12-11.22 and at D11S480 in band q13.2-13.3. Our study demonstrates that the physical size of the Best`s disease region is exceedingly larger than was previously estimated from the genetic data due to the proximity of the defective gene to the centromere of chromosome 11.

  11. Alternative meiotic chromatid segregation in the holocentric plant Luzula elegans

    PubMed Central

    Heckmann, Stefan; Jankowska, Maja; Schubert, Veit; Kumke, Katrin; Ma, Wei; Houben, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Holocentric chromosomes occur in a number of independent eukaryotic lineages. They form holokinetic kinetochores along the entire poleward chromatid surfaces, and owing to this alternative chromosome structure, species with holocentric chromosomes cannot use the two-step loss of cohesion during meiosis typical for monocentric chromosomes. Here we show that the plant Luzula elegans maintains a holocentric chromosome architecture and behaviour throughout meiosis, and in contrast to monopolar sister centromere orientation, the unfused holokinetic sister centromeres behave as two distinct functional units during meiosis I, resulting in sister chromatid separation. Homologous non-sister chromatids remain terminally linked after metaphase I, by satellite DNA-enriched chromatin threads, until metaphase II. They then separate at anaphase II. Thus, an inverted sequence of meiotic sister chromatid segregation occurs. This alternative meiotic process is most likely one possible adaptation to handle a holocentric chromosome architecture and behaviour during meiosis. PMID:25296379

  12. Accurate Chromosome Segregation at First Meiotic Division Requires AGO4, a Protein Involved in RNA-Dependent DNA Methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Cecilia; Santos, Juan Luis; Pradillo, Mónica

    2016-10-01

    The RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway is important for the transcriptional repression of transposable elements and for heterochromatin formation. Small RNAs are key players in this process by regulating both DNA and histone methylation. Taking into account that methylation underlies gene silencing and that there are genes with meiosis-specific expression profiles, we have wondered whether genes involved in RdDM could play a role during this specialized cell division. To address this issue, we have characterized meiosis progression in pollen mother cells from Arabidopsis thaliana mutant plants defective for several proteins related to RdDM. The most relevant results were obtained for ago4-1 In this mutant, meiocytes display a slight reduction in chiasma frequency, alterations in chromatin conformation around centromeric regions, lagging chromosomes at anaphase I, and defects in spindle organization. These abnormalities lead to the formation of polyads instead of tetrads at the end of meiosis, and might be responsible for the fertility defects observed in this mutant. Findings reported here highlight an involvement of AGO4 during meiosis by ensuring accurate chromosome segregation at anaphase I.

  13. DNA double strand break repair, chromosome synapsis and transcriptional silencing in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Akiko; Schoenmakers, Sam; Baarends, Willy M

    2010-05-16

    Chromosome pairing and synapsis during meiotic prophase requires the formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the topoisomerase-like enzyme SPO11. Chromosomes, or chromosomal regions, that lack a pairing partner, such as the largely heterologous X and Y chromosomes, show delayed meiotic DSB repair and are transcriptionally silenced. Herein, we review meiosis-specific aspects of DSB repair in relation to homology recognition and meiotic silencing of heterologous regions. We propose a dynamic interplay between progression of synapsis and persistent meiotic DSBs. Signaling from these persistent breaks could inhibit heterologous synapsis and stimulate meiotic silencing of the X and Y chromosomes.

  14. Spatial Positioning of All 24 Chromosomes in the Lymphocytes of Six Subjects: Evidence of Reproducible Positioning and Spatial Repositioning following DNA Damage with Hydrogen Peroxide and Ultraviolet B

    PubMed Central

    Kandukuri, Lakshmi; Quadri, Ameer; Becerra, Victor; Simpson, Joe Leigh

    2015-01-01

    The higher-order organization of chromatin is well-established, with chromosomes occupying distinct positions within the interphase nucleus. Chromatin is susceptible to, and constantly assaulted by both endogenous and exogenous threats. However, the effects of DNA damage on the spatial topology of chromosomes are hitherto, poorly understood. This study investigates the organization of all 24 human chromosomes in lymphocytes from six individuals prior to- and following in-vitro exposure to genotoxic agents: hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B. This study is the first to report reproducible distinct hierarchical radial organization of chromosomes with little inter-individual differences between subjects. Perturbed nuclear organization was observed following genotoxic exposure for both agents; however a greater effect was observed for hydrogen peroxide including: 1) More peripheral radial organization; 2) Alterations in the global distribution of chromosomes; and 3) More events of chromosome repositioning (18 events involving 10 chromosomes vs. 11 events involving 9 chromosomes for hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B respectively). Evidence is provided of chromosome repositioning and altered nuclear organization following in-vitro exposure to genotoxic agents, with notable differences observed between the two investigated agents. Repositioning of chromosomes following genotoxicity involved recurrent chromosomes and is most likely part of the genomes inherent response to DNA damage. The variances in nuclear organization observed between the two agents likely reflects differences in mobility and/or decondensation of chromatin as a result of differences in the type of DNA damage induced, chromatin regions targeted, and DNA repair mechanisms. PMID:25756782

  15. Spatial positioning of all 24 chromosomes in the lymphocytes of six subjects: evidence of reproducible positioning and spatial repositioning following DNA damage with hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Dimitrios; Kandukuri, Lakshmi; Quadri, Ameer; Becerra, Victor; Simpson, Joe Leigh; Tempest, Helen G

    2015-01-01

    The higher-order organization of chromatin is well-established, with chromosomes occupying distinct positions within the interphase nucleus. Chromatin is susceptible to, and constantly assaulted by both endogenous and exogenous threats. However, the effects of DNA damage on the spatial topology of chromosomes are hitherto, poorly understood. This study investigates the organization of all 24 human chromosomes in lymphocytes from six individuals prior to- and following in-vitro exposure to genotoxic agents: hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B. This study is the first to report reproducible distinct hierarchical radial organization of chromosomes with little inter-individual differences between subjects. Perturbed nuclear organization was observed following genotoxic exposure for both agents; however a greater effect was observed for hydrogen peroxide including: 1) More peripheral radial organization; 2) Alterations in the global distribution of chromosomes; and 3) More events of chromosome repositioning (18 events involving 10 chromosomes vs. 11 events involving 9 chromosomes for hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B respectively). Evidence is provided of chromosome repositioning and altered nuclear organization following in-vitro exposure to genotoxic agents, with notable differences observed between the two investigated agents. Repositioning of chromosomes following genotoxicity involved recurrent chromosomes and is most likely part of the genomes inherent response to DNA damage. The variances in nuclear organization observed between the two agents likely reflects differences in mobility and/or decondensation of chromatin as a result of differences in the type of DNA damage induced, chromatin regions targeted, and DNA repair mechanisms.

  16. Verbal and spatial processing efficiency in 32 children with sex chromosome abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bender, B G; Linden, M G; Robinson, A

    1989-06-01

    Spatial and linguistic processing efficiency was evaluated in sixty 8- to 18-yr-old children, including thirteen 47,XXY boys, eleven 47,XXX girls, six girls with 45,X, two girls with 46,X,Xq-, and 28 chromosomally normal controls. Results indicated that the 47,XXX girls performed significantly below controls on all four cognitive tests. Scores of the X monosomy group were reduced on both spatial tests, one requiring rapid information processing and one without time requirements, which is consistent with previous reports of spatial thinking deficits in these propositae. The X monosomy girls also had difficulty completing the high efficiency but not the low efficiency verbal tests. Scores in the 47,XXY group did not differ from controls on either spatial test or on the low efficiency verbal task. When required to rapidly access verbal information from memory, however, the performance of these boys was significantly impaired. This finding confirms earlier reports of impeded verbal fluency in these propositi. Alteration in capacity to rapidly process information appears to distinguish 47,XXY boys and X monosomy girls from their chromosomally normal peers, and suggests that adaptations in their educational setting should be introduced to allow additional time to learn and complete work.

  17. Chromosome Painting Reveals Asynaptic Full Alignment of Homologs and HIM-8–Dependent Remodeling of X Chromosome Territories during Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Nabeshima, Kentaro; Mlynarczyk-Evans, Susanna; Villeneuve, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    During early meiotic prophase, a nucleus-wide reorganization leads to sorting of chromosomes into homologous pairs and to establishing associations between homologous chromosomes along their entire lengths. Here, we investigate global features of chromosome organization during this process, using a chromosome painting method in whole-mount Caenorhabditis elegans gonads that enables visualization of whole chromosomes along their entire lengths in the context of preserved 3D nuclear architecture. First, we show that neither spatial proximity of premeiotic chromosome territories nor chromosome-specific timing is a major factor driving homolog pairing. Second, we show that synaptonemal complex-independent associations can support full lengthwise juxtaposition of homologous chromosomes. Third, we reveal a prominent elongation of chromosome territories during meiotic prophase that initiates prior to homolog association and alignment. Mutant analysis indicates that chromosome movement mediated by association of chromosome pairing centers (PCs) with mobile patches of the nuclear envelope (NE)–spanning SUN-1/ZYG-12 protein complexes is not the primary driver of territory elongation. Moreover, we identify new roles for the X chromosome PC (X-PC) and X-PC binding protein HIM-8 in promoting elongation of X chromosome territories, separable from their role(s) in mediating local stabilization of pairing and association of X chromosomes with mobile SUN-1/ZYG-12 patches. Further, we present evidence that HIM-8 functions both at and outside of PCs to mediate chromosome territory elongation. These and other data support a model in which synapsis-independent elongation of chromosome territories, driven by PC binding proteins, enables lengthwise juxtaposition of chromosomes, thereby facilitating assessment of their suitability as potential pairing partners. PMID:21876678

  18. Chromosome painting reveals asynaptic full alignment of homologs and HIM-8-dependent remodeling of X chromosome territories during Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis.

    PubMed

    Nabeshima, Kentaro; Mlynarczyk-Evans, Susanna; Villeneuve, Anne M

    2011-08-01

    During early meiotic prophase, a nucleus-wide reorganization leads to sorting of chromosomes into homologous pairs and to establishing associations between homologous chromosomes along their entire lengths. Here, we investigate global features of chromosome organization during this process, using a chromosome painting method in whole-mount Caenorhabditis elegans gonads that enables visualization of whole chromosomes along their entire lengths in the context of preserved 3D nuclear architecture. First, we show that neither spatial proximity of premeiotic chromosome territories nor chromosome-specific timing is a major factor driving homolog pairing. Second, we show that synaptonemal complex-independent associations can support full lengthwise juxtaposition of homologous chromosomes. Third, we reveal a prominent elongation of chromosome territories during meiotic prophase that initiates prior to homolog association and alignment. Mutant analysis indicates that chromosome movement mediated by association of chromosome pairing centers (PCs) with mobile patches of the nuclear envelope (NE)-spanning SUN-1/ZYG-12 protein complexes is not the primary driver of territory elongation. Moreover, we identify new roles for the X chromosome PC (X-PC) and X-PC binding protein HIM-8 in promoting elongation of X chromosome territories, separable from their role(s) in mediating local stabilization of pairing and association of X chromosomes with mobile SUN-1/ZYG-12 patches. Further, we present evidence that HIM-8 functions both at and outside of PCs to mediate chromosome territory elongation. These and other data support a model in which synapsis-independent elongation of chromosome territories, driven by PC binding proteins, enables lengthwise juxtaposition of chromosomes, thereby facilitating assessment of their suitability as potential pairing partners.

  19. Theory of meiotic spindle assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furthauer, Sebastian; Foster, Peter; Needleman, Daniel; Shelley, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The meiotic spindle is a biological structure that self assembles from the intracellular medium to separate chromosomes during meiosis. It consists of filamentous microtubule (MT) proteins that interact through the fluid in which they are suspended and via the associated molecules that orchestrate their behavior. We aim to understand how the interplay between fluid medium, MTs, and regulatory proteins allows this material to self-organize into the spindle's highly stereotyped shape. To this end we develop a continuum model that treats the spindle as an active liquid crystal with MT turnover. In this active material, molecular motors, such as dyneins which collect MT minus ends and kinesins which slide MTs past each other, generate active fluid and material stresses. Moreover nucleator proteins that are advected with and transported along MTs control the nucleation and depolymerization of MTs. This theory captures the growth process of meiotic spindles, their shapes, and the essential features of many perturbation experiments. It thus provides a framework to think about the physics of this complex biological suspension.

  20. Spatial distribution of the chromosomal forms of anopheles gambiae in Mali.

    PubMed

    Sogoba, Nafomon; Vounatsou, Penelope; Bagayoko, Magaran M; Doumbia, Seydou; Dolo, Guimogo; Gosoniu, Laura; Traoré, Sékou F; Smith, Thomas A; Touré, Yéya T

    2008-10-10

    Maps of the distribution of malaria vectors are useful tools for stratification of malaria risk and for selective vector control strategies. Although the distribution of members of the Anopheles gambiae complex is well documented in Africa, a continuous map of the spatial distribution of the chromosomal forms of An. gambiae s.s. is not yet available at country level to support control efforts. Bayesian geostatistical methods were used to produce continuous maps of the spatial distribution of the chromosomal forms of An. gambiae s.s. (Mopti, Bamako, Savanna and their hybrids/recombinants) based on their relative frequencies in relation to climatic and environmental factors in Mali. The maps clearly show that each chromosomal form favours a particular defined eco-climatic zone. The Mopti form prefers the dryer northern Savanna and Sahel and the flooded/irrigated areas of the inner delta of the Niger River. The Savanna form favours the Sudan savanna areas, particularly the South and South-Eastern parts of the country (Kayes and Sikasso regions). The Bamako form has a strong preference for specific environmental conditions and it is confined to the Sudan savanna areas around urban Bamako and the Western part of Sikasso region. The hybrids/recombinants favour the Western part of the country (Kayes region) bordering the Republic of Guinea Conakry. The maps provide valuable information for selective vector control in Mali (insecticide resistance management) and may serve as a decision support tool for the basis for future malaria control strategies including genetically manipulated mosquitoes.

  1. Control of Oocyte Growth and Meiotic Maturation in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongseop; Spike, Caroline; Greenstein, David

    2013-01-01

    In sexually reproducing animals, oocytes arrest at diplotene or diakinesis and resume meiosis (meiotic maturation) in response to hormones. Chromosome segregation errors in female meiosis I are the leading cause of human birth defects, and age-related changes in the hormonal environment of the ovary are a suggested cause. C. elegans is emerging as a genetic paradigm for studying hormonal control of meiotic maturation. The meiotic maturation processes in C. elegans and mammals share a number of biological and molecular similarities. Major sperm protein (MSP) and luteinizing hormone (LH), though unrelated in sequence, both trigger meiotic resumption using somatic Gαs-adenylate cyclase pathways and soma-germline gap-junctional communication. At a molecular level, the oocyte responses apparently involve the control of conserved protein kinase pathways and post-transcriptional gene regulation in the oocyte. At a cellular level, the responses include cortical cytoskeletal rearrangement, nuclear envelope breakdown, assembly of the acentriolar meiotic spindle, chromosome segregation, and likely changes important for fertilization and the oocyte-to-embryo transition. This chapter focuses on signaling mechanisms required for oocyte growth and meiotic maturation in C. elegans and discusses how these mechanisms coordinate the completion of meiosis and the oocyte-to-embryo transition. PMID:22872481

  2. Proteins involved in meiotic recombination: a role in male infertility?

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Matthew L; Hassold, Terry J; Carrell, Douglas T

    2008-01-01

    Meiotic recombination results in the formation of crossovers, by which genetic information is exchanged between homologous chromosomes during prophase I of meiosis. Recombination is a complex process involving many proteins. Alterations in the genes involved in recombination may result in infertility. Molecular studies have improved our understanding of the roles and mechanisms of the proteins and protein complexes involved in recombination, some of which have function in mitotic cells as well as meiotic cells. Human gene sequencing studies have been performed for some of these genes and have provided further information on the phenotypes observed in some infertile individuals. However, further studies are needed to help elucidate the particular role(s) of a given protein and to increase our understanding of these protein systems. This review will focus on our current understanding of proteins involved in meiotic recombination from a genomic perspective, summarizing our current understanding of known mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms that may affect male fertility by altering meiotic recombination.

  3. Meiotic Recombination in the Giraffe (G. reticulata).

    PubMed

    Vozdova, Miluse; Fröhlich, Jan; Kubickova, Svatava; Sebestova, Hana; Rubes, Jiri

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the reticulated giraffe (G. reticulata) was identified as a distinct species, which emphasized the need for intensive research in this interesting animal. To shed light on the meiotic process as a source of biodiversity, we analysed the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination in 2 reticulated giraffe males. We used immunofluorescence detection of synaptonemal complex protein (SYCP3), meiotic double strand breaks (DSB, marked as RAD51 foci) in leptonema, and crossovers (COs, as MLH1 foci) in pachynema. The mean number of autosomal MLH1 foci per cell (27), which resulted from a single, distally located MLH1 focus observed on most chromosome arms, is one of the lowest among mammalian species analysed so far. The CO/DSB conversion ratio was 0.32. The pseudoautosomal region was localised in the Xq and Yp termini by FISH and showed an MLH1 focus in 83% of the pachytene cells. Chromatin structures corresponding to the nucleolus organiser regions were observed in the pachytene spermatocytes. The results are discussed in the context of known data on meiosis in Cetartiodactyla, depicting that the variation in CO frequency among species of this taxonomic group is mostly associated with their diploid chromosome number. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. B Chromosomes – A Matter of Chromosome Drive

    PubMed Central

    Houben, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    B chromosomes are supernumerary chromosomes which are often preferentially inherited, deviating from usual Mendelian segregation. The balance between the so-called chromosome drive and the negative effects that the presence of Bs applies on the fitness of their host determines the frequency of Bs in a particular population. Drive is the key for understanding most B chromosomes. Drive occurs in many ways at pre-meiotic, meiotic or post-meiotic divisions, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. The cellular mechanism of drive is reviewed based on the findings obtained for the B chromosomes of rye, maize and other species. How novel analytical tools will expand our ability to uncover the biology of B chromosome drive is discussed. PMID:28261259

  5. Spatial distribution of the chromosomal forms of anopheles gambiae in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Sogoba, Nafomon; Vounatsou, Penelope; Bagayoko, Magaran M; Doumbia, Seydou; Dolo, Guimogo; Gosoniu, Laura; Traoré, Sékou F; Smith, Thomas A; Touré, Yéya T

    2008-01-01

    Background Maps of the distribution of malaria vectors are useful tools for stratification of malaria risk and for selective vector control strategies. Although the distribution of members of the Anopheles gambiae complex is well documented in Africa, a continuous map of the spatial distribution of the chromosomal forms of An. gambiae s.s. is not yet available at country level to support control efforts. Methods Bayesian geostatistical methods were used to produce continuous maps of the spatial distribution of the chromosomal forms of An. gambiae s.s. (Mopti, Bamako, Savanna and their hybrids/recombinants) based on their relative frequencies in relation to climatic and environmental factors in Mali. Results The maps clearly show that each chromosomal form favours a particular defined eco-climatic zone. The Mopti form prefers the dryer northern Savanna and Sahel and the flooded/irrigated areas of the inner delta of the Niger River. The Savanna form favours the Sudan savanna areas, particularly the South and South-Eastern parts of the country (Kayes and Sikasso regions). The Bamako form has a strong preference for specific environmental conditions and it is confined to the Sudan savanna areas around urban Bamako and the Western part of Sikasso region. The hybrids/recombinants favour the Western part of the country (Kayes region) bordering the Republic of Guinea Conakry. Conclusion The maps provide valuable information for selective vector control in Mali (insecticide resistance management) and may serve as a decision support tool for the basis for future malaria control strategies including genetically manipulated mosquitoes. PMID:18847463

  6. FANCM limits meiotic crossovers.

    PubMed

    Crismani, Wayne; Girard, Chloé; Froger, Nicole; Pradillo, Mónica; Santos, Juan Luis; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Horlow, Christine; Mercier, Raphaël

    2012-06-22

    The number of meiotic crossovers (COs) is tightly regulated within a narrow range, despite a large excess of molecular precursors. The factors that limit COs remain largely unknown. Here, using a genetic screen in Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified the highly conserved FANCM helicase, which is required for genome stability in humans and yeasts, as a major factor limiting meiotic CO formation. The fancm mutant has a threefold-increased CO frequency as compared to the wild type. These extra COs arise not from the pathway that accounts for most of the COs in wild type, but from an alternate, normally minor pathway. Thus, FANCM is a key factor imposing an upper limit on the number of meiotic COs, and its manipulation holds much promise for plant breeding.

  7. Spatiotemporal regulation of meiotic recombination by Liaisonin

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Tomoichiro; Ito, Masaru; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2013-01-01

    Sexual reproduction involves diversification of genetic information in successive generations. Meiotic recombination, which substantially contributes to the increase in genetic diversity, is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the evolutionarily conserved Spo11 protein. Spo11 requires additional partner proteins for its DNA cleavage reaction. DSBs are preferentially introduced at defined chromosomal sites called “recombination hotspots.” Recent studies have revealed that meiotically established higher-order chromosome structures, such as chromosome axes and loops, are also crucial in the control of DSB formation. Most of the DSB sites are located within chromatin loop regions, while many of the proteins involved in DSB formation reside on chromosomal axes. Hence, DSB proteins and DSB sites seem to be distantly located. To resolve this paradox, we conducted comprehensive proteomics and ChIP-chip analyses on Spo11 partners in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, in combination with mutant studies. We identified two distinct DSB complexes, the “DSBC (DSB Catalytic core)“ and “SFT (Seven-Fifteen-Twenty four; Rec7-Rec15-Rec24)” subcomplexes. The DSBC subcomplex contains Spo11 and functions as the catalytic core for the DNA cleavage reaction. The SFT subcomplex is assumed to execute regulatory functions. To activate the DSBC subcomplex, the SFT subcomplex tethers hotspots to axes via its interaction with Mde2, which can interact with proteins in both DSBC and SFT subcomplexes. Thus, Mde2 is likely to bridge these two subcomplexes, forming a “tethered loop-axis complex.” It should be noted that Mde2 expression is strictly regulated by S phase checkpoint monitoring of the completion of DNA replication. From these observations, we proposed that Mde2 is a central coupler for meiotic recombination initiation to establish a tethered loop-axis complex in liaison with the S phase checkpoint. PMID:23572041

  8. Spatiotemporal regulation of meiotic recombination by Liaisonin.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Tomoichiro; Ito, Masaru; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2013-01-01

    Sexual reproduction involves diversification of genetic information in successive generations. Meiotic recombination, which substantially contributes to the increase in genetic diversity, is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the evolutionarily conserved Spo11 protein. Spo11 requires additional partner proteins for its DNA cleavage reaction. DSBs are preferentially introduced at defined chromosomal sites called "recombination hotspots." Recent studies have revealed that meiotically established higher-order chromosome structures, such as chromosome axes and loops, are also crucial in the control of DSB formation. Most of the DSB sites are located within chromatin loop regions, while many of the proteins involved in DSB formation reside on chromosomal axes. Hence, DSB proteins and DSB sites seem to be distantly located. To resolve this paradox, we conducted comprehensive proteomics and ChIP-chip analyses on Spo11 partners in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, in combination with mutant studies. We identified two distinct DSB complexes, the "DSBC (DSB Catalytic core)" and "SFT (Seven-Fifteen-Twenty four; Rec7-Rec15-Rec24)" subcomplexes. The DSBC subcomplex contains Spo11 and functions as the catalytic core for the DNA cleavage reaction. The SFT subcomplex is assumed to execute regulatory functions. To activate the DSBC subcomplex, the SFT subcomplex tethers hotspots to axes via its interaction with Mde2, which can interact with proteins in both DSBC and SFT subcomplexes. Thus, Mde2 is likely to bridge these two subcomplexes, forming a "tethered loop-axis complex." It should be noted that Mde2 expression is strictly regulated by S phase checkpoint monitoring of the completion of DNA replication. From these observations, we proposed that Mde2 is a central coupler for meiotic recombination initiation to establish a tethered loop-axis complex in liaison with the S phase checkpoint.

  9. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis outcomes and meiotic segregation analysis of robertsonian translocation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ko, Duck Sung; Cho, Jae Won; Lee, Hyoung-Song; Kim, Jin Yeong; Kang, Inn Soo; Yang, Kwang Moon; Lim, Chun Kyu

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the meiotic segregation patterns of cleavage-stage embryos from robertsonian translocation carriers and aneuploidy of chromosome 18 according to meiotic segregation patterns. Retrospective study. Infertility center and laboratory of reproductive biology and infertility. Sixty-two couples with robertsonian translocation carriers. One blastomere was biopsied from embryos and diagnosed with the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Translocation chromosomes were analyzed with the use of locus-specific and subtelomeric FISH probes. Aneuploidy of chromosome 18 was assessed simultaneously with translocation chromosomes. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) outcomes, meiotic segregation patterns of robertsonian translocation, and aneuploidy of chromosome 18 depending on meiotic segregation patterns. Two hundred seventy embryos of 332 transferrable embryos were transferred in 113 cycles, and 27 healthy babies were born. The alternate segregation was significantly higher in male carriers than in female carriers (43.9% vs. 29.9%, respectively), and adjacent segregation was higher in female carriers than in male carriers (44.7% vs. 38.7%, respectively). Aneuploidy of chromosome 18 was significantly increased in 3:0-segregated or chaotic embryos. Forty-seven alternate embryos were excluded from embryo replacement owing to aneuploidy of chromosome 18. In carriers of robertsonian translocation, meiotic segregation showed differences between men and women. Frequent meiotic errors caused by premature predivision or nondisjunction and less stringent checkpoint in women might cause such differences between sexes. Aneuploidy of chromosome 18 might be influenced by meiotic segregation of translocation chromosomes. Factors that cause malsegregation, such as 3:0 or chaotic segregation, seem to play a role in aneuploidy of chromosome 18. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Meiotic recombination initiated by a double-strand break in rad50{Delta} yeast cells otherwise unable to initiate meiotic recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Malkova, A.; Haber, J.E.; Dawson, D.

    1996-06-01

    Meiotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is initiated by double-strand breaks (DSBs). We have developed a system to compare the properties of meiotic DSBs with those created by the site-specific HO endonuclease. HO endonuclease was expressed under the control of the meiotic-specific SPO13 promoter, creating a DSB at a single site on one of yeast`s 16 chromosomes. In Rad{sup +} strains the times of appearance of the HO-induced DSBs and of subsequent recombinants are coincident with those induced by normal meiotic DSBs. Physical monitoring of DNA showed that SPO13::HO induced gene conversions both in Rad{sup +} and in rad50{Delta} cells that cannot initiate normal meiotic DSBs. We find that the RAD50 gene is important, but not essential, for recombination even after a DSB has been created in a meiotic cell. In rad50{Delta} cells, some DSBs are not repaired until a broken chromosome has been packaged into a spore and is subsequently germinated. This suggests that a broken chromosome does not signal an arrest of progression through meiosis. The recombination defect in rad50{Delta} diploids is not, however, meiotic specific, as mitotic rad50 diploids, experiencing an HO-induced DSB, exhibit similar departures from wild-type recombination. 57 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Segregation for fertility and meiotic stability in novel Brassica allohexaploids.

    PubMed

    Mwathi, Margaret W; Gupta, Mehak; Atri, Chaya; Banga, Surinder S; Batley, Jacqueline; Mason, Annaliese S

    2017-04-01

    Allohexaploid Brassica populations reveal ongoing segregation for fertility, while genotype influences fertility and meiotic stability. Creation of a new Brassica allohexaploid species is of interest for the development of a crop type with increased heterosis and adaptability. At present, no naturally occurring, meiotically stable Brassica allohexaploid exists, with little data available on chromosome behaviour and meiotic control in allohexaploid germplasm. In this study, 100 plants from the cross B. carinata × B. rapa (A2 allohexaploid population) and 69 plants from the cross (B. napus × B. carinata) × B. juncea (H2 allohexaploid population) were assessed for fertility and meiotic behaviour. Estimated pollen viability, self-pollinated seed set, number of seeds on the main shoot, number of pods on the main shoot, seeds per ten pods and plant height were measured for both the A2 and H2 populations and for a set of reference control cultivars. The H2 population had high segregation for pollen viability and meiotic stability, while the A2 population was characterised by low pollen fertility and a high level of chromosome loss. Both populations were taller, but had lower average fertility trait values than the control cultivar samples. The study also characterises fertility and meiotic chromosome behaviour in genotypes and progeny sets in heterozygous allotetraploid Brassica derived lines, and indicates that genotypes of the parents and H1 hybrids are affecting chromosome pairing and fertility phenotypes in the H2 population. The identification and characterisation of factors influencing stability in novel allohexaploid Brassica populations will assist in the development of this as a new crop species for food and agricultural benefit.

  12. Abnormal meiotic recombination in infertile men and its association with sperm aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Kyle A; Wong, Edgar Chan; Chow, Victor; Nigro, Mark; Ma, Sai

    2007-12-01

    Defects in early meiotic events are thought to play a critical role in male infertility; however, little is known regarding the relationship between early meiotic events and the chromosomal constitution of human sperm. Thus, we analyzed testicular tissue from 26 men (9 fertile and 17 infertile men), using immunofluorescent techniques to examine meiotic chromosomes, and fluorescent in situ hybridization to assess sperm aneuploidy. Based on a relatively small sample size, we observed that 42% (5/12) of men with impaired spermatogenesis displayed reduced genome-wide recombination when compared to the fertile men. Analysis of individual chromosomes showed chromosome-specific defects in recombination: chromosome 13 and 18 bivalents with only a single crossover and chromosome 21 bivalents lacking a crossover were more frequent among the infertile men. We identified two infertile men who displayed a novel meiotic defect in which the sex chromosomes failed to recombine: one man had an absence of sperm in the testes, while the other displayed increased sex chromosome aneuploidy in the sperm, resulting in a 45,X abortus after intracytoplasmic sperm injection. When all men were pooled, we observed an inverse correlation between the frequency of sex chromosome recombination and XY disomy in the sperm. Recombination between the sex chromosomes may be a useful indicator for identifying men at risk of producing chromosomally abnormal sperm. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms that contribute to sperm aneuploidy in infertile men could aid in risk assessment for couples undergoing assisted reproduction.

  13. Meiotic behavior as a selection tool in silage corn breeding.

    PubMed

    Souza, V F; Pagliarini, M S; Scapim, C A; Rodovalho, M; Faria, M V

    2010-10-19

    In breeding programs, commercial hybrids are frequently used as a source of inbred lines to obtain new hybrids. Considering that maize production is dependent on viable gametes, the selection of populations to obtain inbred lines with high meiotic stability could contribute to the formation of new silage corn hybrids adapted to specific region. We evaluated the meiotic stability of five commercial hybrids of silage corn used in southern Brazil with conventional squashing methods. All of them showed meiotic abnormalities. Some abnormalities, such as abnormal chromosome segregation and absence of cytokinesis, occurred in all the genotypes, while others, including cytomixis and abnormal spindle orientation, were found only in some genotypes. The hybrid SG6010 had the lowest mean frequency of abnormal cells (21.27%); the highest frequency was found in the hybrid P30K64 (44.43%). However, the frequency of abnormal meiotic products was much lower in most genotypes, ranging from 7.63% in the hybrid CD304 to 43.86% in Garra. Taking into account the percentage of abnormal meiotic products and, hence, meiotic stability, only the hybrids CD304, P30K64, SG6010, and P30F53 are recommended to be retained in the breeding program to obtain inbred lines to create new hybrids.

  14. Finding the Correct Partner: The Meiotic Courtship

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo, Tomás

    2012-01-01

    Homologous chromosomes are usually separated at the entrance of meiosis; how they become paired is one of the outstanding mysteries of the meiotic process. Reduction of spacing between homologues makes possible the occurrence of chromosomal interactions leading to homology detection and the formation of bivalents. In many organisms, telomere-led chromosome movements are generated that bring homologues together. Additional movements produced by chromatin conformational changes at early meiosis may also facilitate homologous contacts. Organisms used in the study of meiosis show a surprising variety of strategies for homology detection. In dipterans, homologous chromosomes remain paired throughout most of development. Pairing seems to arise as a balance between promoter and suppressor pairing genes. Some fungi, plants and animals, use mechanisms based on recombinational interactions. Other mechanisms leading to homology search are recombination-independent and require specialized pairing sites. In the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, each chromosome carries a pairing center consisting of a chromosome-specific DNA-protein complex, and in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the sme2 locus encodes a meiosis-specific non-coding RNA that mediates on homologous recognition. In addition, mismatch correction plays a relevant role, especially in polyploids, which evolved genetic systems that suppress pairing between non-homologous related (homoeologus) chromosomes. PMID:24278707

  15. Expression Profiling of MAP Kinase–Mediated Meiotic Progression in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Leacock, Stefanie W; Reinke, Valerie

    2006-01-01

    The LET-60 (Ras)/LIN-45 (Raf)/MPK-1 (MAP kinase) signaling pathway plays a key role in the development of multiple tissues in Caenorhabditis elegans. For the most part, the identities of the downstream genes that act as the ultimate effectors of MPK-1 signaling have remained elusive. A unique allele of mpk-1, ga111, displays a reversible, temperature-sensitive, tissue-specific defect in progression through meiotic prophase I. We performed gene expression profiling on mpk-1(ga111) animals to identify candidate downstream effectors of MPK-1 signaling in the germ line. This analysis delineated a cohort of genes whose expression requires MPK-1 signaling in germ cells in the pachytene stage of meiosis I. RNA in situ hybridization analysis shows that these genes are expressed in the germ line in an MPK-1-dependent manner and have a spatial expression pattern consistent with the location of activated MPK-1. We found that one MPK-1 signaling-responsive gene encoding a C2H2 zinc finger protein plays a role in meiotic chromosome segregation downstream of MPK-1. Additionally, discovery of genes responsive to MPK-1 signaling permitted us to order MPK-1 signaling relative to several events occurring in pachytene, including EFL-1/DPL-1 gene regulation and X chromosome reactivation. This study highlights the utility of applying global gene expression methods to investigate genes downstream of commonly used signaling pathways in vivo. PMID:17096596

  16. Expression profiling of MAP kinase-mediated meiotic progression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Leacock, Stefanie W; Reinke, Valerie

    2006-11-10

    The LET-60 (Ras)/LIN-45 (Raf)/MPK-1 (MAP kinase) signaling pathway plays a key role in the development of multiple tissues in Caenorhabditis elegans. For the most part, the identities of the downstream genes that act as the ultimate effectors of MPK-1 signaling have remained elusive. A unique allele of mpk-1, ga111, displays a reversible, temperature-sensitive, tissue-specific defect in progression through meiotic prophase I. We performed gene expression profiling on mpk-1(ga111) animals to identify candidate downstream effectors of MPK-1 signaling in the germ line. This analysis delineated a cohort of genes whose expression requires MPK-1 signaling in germ cells in the pachytene stage of meiosis I. RNA in situ hybridization analysis shows that these genes are expressed in the germ line in an MPK-1-dependent manner and have a spatial expression pattern consistent with the location of activated MPK-1. We found that one MPK-1 signaling-responsive gene encoding a C2H2 zinc finger protein plays a role in meiotic chromosome segregation downstream of MPK-1. Additionally, discovery of genes responsive to MPK-1 signaling permitted us to order MPK-1 signaling relative to several events occurring in pachytene, including EFL-1/DPL-1 gene regulation and X chromosome reactivation. This study highlights the utility of applying global gene expression methods to investigate genes downstream of commonly used signaling pathways in vivo.

  17. A Gene Regulatory Program for Meiotic Prophase in the Fetal Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Mark E.; Mueller, Jacob L.; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Page, David C.

    2015-01-01

    The chromosomal program of meiotic prophase, comprising events such as laying down of meiotic cohesins, synapsis between homologs, and homologous recombination, must be preceded and enabled by the regulated induction of meiotic prophase genes. This gene regulatory program is poorly understood, particularly in organisms with a segregated germline. We characterized the gene regulatory program of meiotic prophase as it occurs in the mouse fetal ovary. By profiling gene expression in the mouse fetal ovary in mutants with whole tissue and single-cell techniques, we identified 104 genes expressed specifically in pre-meiotic to pachytene germ cells. We characterized the regulation of these genes by 1) retinoic acid (RA), which induces meiosis, 2) Dazl, which is required for germ cell competence to respond to RA, and 3) Stra8, a downstream target of RA required for the chromosomal program of meiotic prophase. Initial induction of practically all identified meiotic prophase genes requires Dazl. In the presence of Dazl, RA induces at least two pathways: one Stra8-independent, and one Stra8-dependent. Genes vary in their induction by Stra8, spanning fully Stra8-independent, partially Stra8-independent, and fully Stra8-dependent. Thus, Stra8 regulates the entirety of the chromosomal program but plays a more nuanced role in governing the gene expression program. We propose that Stra8-independent gene expression enables the stockpiling of selected meiotic structural proteins prior to the commencement of the chromosomal program. Unexpectedly, we discovered that Stra8 is required for prompt down-regulation of itself and Rec8. Germ cells that have expressed and down-regulated Stra8 are refractory to further Stra8 expression. Negative feedback of Stra8, and subsequent resistance to further Stra8 expression, may ensure a single, restricted pulse of Stra8 expression. Collectively, our findings reveal a gene regulatory logic by which germ cells prepare for the chromosomal program of

  18. Understanding spatial organizations of chromosomes via statistical analysis of Hi-C data

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ming; Deng, Ke; Qin, Zhaohui; Liu, Jun S.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how chromosomes fold provides insights into the transcription regulation, hence, the functional state of the cell. Using the next generation sequencing technology, the recently developed Hi-C approach enables a global view of spatial chromatin organization in the nucleus, which substantially expands our knowledge about genome organization and function. However, due to multiple layers of biases, noises and uncertainties buried in the protocol of Hi-C experiments, analyzing and interpreting Hi-C data poses great challenges, and requires novel statistical methods to be developed. This article provides an overview of recent Hi-C studies and their impacts on biomedical research, describes major challenges in statistical analysis of Hi-C data, and discusses some perspectives for future research. PMID:26124977

  19. Chromosome in situ suppression hybridisation in human male meiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, A S; Hultén, M A

    1992-01-01

    Chromosome in situ suppression hybridisation with biotinylated whole chromosome libraries permits the unequivocable identification of specific human somatic chromosomes in numerous situations. We have now used this so called 'chromosome painting' technique in meiotically dividing cells, isolated from human testicular biopsy. It is shown that the method allows identification of target homologues, bivalents, and sister chromatids throughout the relevant stages of meiosis. Thus, a more accurate study of meiosis per se is now available to increase our understanding of such processes as first meiotic synapsis of homologues and chiasma formation/meiotic crossing over, which are still outstanding biological enigmas. The new technology also makes it possible, for the first time, (1) to obtain direct numerical data in first meiotic non-disjunction for individual chromosomes, and (2) to quantify segregation in male carriers of structural rearrangements. We exemplify the use of the chromosome painting technique for a first meiotic segregation analysis of an insertional translocation carrier. Images PMID:1613773

  20. Oocyte nucleus controls progression through meiotic maturation.

    PubMed

    Polanski, Zbigniew; Hoffmann, Steffen; Tsurumi, Chizuko

    2005-05-15

    We analyzed progression through the meiotic maturation in oocytes manipulated to replace the prophase oocyte nucleus with the nucleus from a cumulus cell, a pachytene spermatocyte or the pronucleus from a fertilized egg. Removal of the oocyte nucleus led to a significant reduction in histone H1 kinase activity. Replacement of the oocyte nucleus by a pronucleus followed by culture resulted in premature pseudomeiotic division and occasional abnormal cytokinesis; however, histone H1 kinase activity was rescued, microtubules formed a bipolar spindle, and chromosomes were condensed. In addition to the anomalies observed after pronuclear transfer, those after transfer of the nucleus from a cumulus cell or spermatocyte included a dramatically impaired ability to form the bipolar spindle or to condense chromosomes, and histone H1 kinase activity was not rescued. Expression of a cyclin B-YFP in enucleated oocytes receiving the cumulus cell nucleus rescued histone H1 kinase activity, but spindle formation and chromosome condensation remained impaired, indicating a pleiotropic effect of oocyte nucleus removal. However, when the cumulus cell nucleus was first transformed into pronuclei (transfer into a metaphase II oocyte followed by activation), such pronuclei supported maturation after transfer into the oocyte in a manner similar to that of normal pronuclei. These results show that the oocyte nucleus contains specific components required for the control of progression through the meiotic maturation and that some of these components are also present in pronuclei.

  1. Connecting by breaking and repairing: mechanisms of DNA strand exchange in meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Sansam, Christopher L; Pezza, Roberto J

    2015-01-01

    During prophase of meiosis I, homologous chromosomes interact and undergo recombination. Successful completion of these processes is required in order for the homologous chromosomes to mount the meiotic spindle as a pair. The organization of the chromosomes into pairs ensures orderly segregation to opposite poles of the dividing cell, such that each gamete receives one copy of each chromosome. Chiasmata, the cytological manifestation of crossover products of recombination, physically connect the homologs in pairs, providing a linkage that facilitates their segregation. Consequently, mutations that reduce the level of recombination are invariably associated with increased errors in meiotic chromosome segregation. In this review, we focus on recent biochemical and genetic advances in elucidating the mechanisms of meiotic DNA strand exchange catalyzed by the Dmc1 protein. We also discuss the mode by which two recombination mediators, Hop2 and Mnd1, facilitate rate-limiting steps of DNA strand exchange catalyzed by Dmc1. PMID:25953379

  2. Connecting by breaking and repairing: mechanisms of DNA strand exchange in meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Sansam, Christopher L; Pezza, Roberto J

    2015-07-01

    During prophase of meiosis I, homologous chromosomes interact and undergo recombination. Successful completion of these processes is required in order for the homologous chromosomes to mount the meiotic spindle as a pair. The organization of the chromosomes into pairs ensures orderly segregation to opposite poles of the dividing cell, such that each gamete receives one copy of each chromosome. Chiasmata, the cytological manifestation of crossover products of recombination, physically connect the homologs in pairs, providing a linkage that facilitates their segregation. Consequently, mutations that reduce the level of recombination are invariably associated with increased errors in meiotic chromosome segregation. In this review, we focus on recent biochemical and genetic advances in elucidating the mechanisms of meiotic DNA strand exchange catalyzed by the Dmc1 protein. We also discuss the mode by which two recombination mediators, Hop2 and Mnd1, facilitate rate-limiting steps of DNA strand exchange catalyzed by Dmc1.

  3. Conserved forkhead dimerization motif controls DNA replication timing and spatial organization of chromosomes in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ostrow, A Zachary; Kalhor, Reza; Gan, Yan; Villwock, Sandra K; Linke, Christian; Barberis, Matteo; Chen, Lin; Aparicio, Oscar M

    2017-03-21

    Forkhead Box (Fox) proteins share the Forkhead domain, a winged-helix DNA binding module, which is conserved among eukaryotes from yeast to humans. These sequence-specific DNA binding proteins have been primarily characterized as transcription factors regulating diverse cellular processes from cell cycle control to developmental fate, deregulation of which contributes to developmental defects, cancer, and aging. We recently identified Saccharomyces cerevisiae Forkhead 1 (Fkh1) and Forkhead 2 (Fkh2) as required for the clustering of a subset of replication origins in G1 phase and for the early initiation of these origins in the ensuing S phase, suggesting a mechanistic role linking the spatial organization of the origins and their activity. Here, we show that Fkh1 and Fkh2 share a unique structural feature of human FoxP proteins that enables FoxP2 and FoxP3 to form domain-swapped dimers capable of bridging two DNA molecules in vitro. Accordingly, Fkh1 self-associates in vitro and in vivo in a manner dependent on the conserved domain-swapping region, strongly suggestive of homodimer formation. Fkh1- and Fkh2-domain-swap-minus (dsm) mutations are functional as transcription factors yet are defective in replication origin timing control. Fkh1-dsm binds replication origins in vivo but fails to cluster them, supporting the conclusion that Fkh1 and Fkh2 dimers perform a structural role in the spatial organization of chromosomal elements with functional importance.

  4. Conserved forkhead dimerization motif controls DNA replication timing and spatial organization of chromosomes in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ostrow, A. Zachary; Gan, Yan; Villwock, Sandra K.; Linke, Christian; Barberis, Matteo; Chen, Lin; Aparicio, Oscar M.

    2017-01-01

    Forkhead Box (Fox) proteins share the Forkhead domain, a winged-helix DNA binding module, which is conserved among eukaryotes from yeast to humans. These sequence-specific DNA binding proteins have been primarily characterized as transcription factors regulating diverse cellular processes from cell cycle control to developmental fate, deregulation of which contributes to developmental defects, cancer, and aging. We recently identified Saccharomyces cerevisiae Forkhead 1 (Fkh1) and Forkhead 2 (Fkh2) as required for the clustering of a subset of replication origins in G1 phase and for the early initiation of these origins in the ensuing S phase, suggesting a mechanistic role linking the spatial organization of the origins and their activity. Here, we show that Fkh1 and Fkh2 share a unique structural feature of human FoxP proteins that enables FoxP2 and FoxP3 to form domain-swapped dimers capable of bridging two DNA molecules in vitro. Accordingly, Fkh1 self-associates in vitro and in vivo in a manner dependent on the conserved domain-swapping region, strongly suggestive of homodimer formation. Fkh1- and Fkh2-domain-swap-minus (dsm) mutations are functional as transcription factors yet are defective in replication origin timing control. Fkh1-dsm binds replication origins in vivo but fails to cluster them, supporting the conclusion that Fkh1 and Fkh2 dimers perform a structural role in the spatial organization of chromosomal elements with functional importance. PMID:28265091

  5. RPA homologs and ssDNA processing during meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jonathan; Abby, Emilie; Livera, Gabriel; Martini, Emmanuelle

    2016-06-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is a specialized process that involves homologous chromosome pairing and strand exchange to guarantee proper chromosome segregation and genetic diversity. The formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiotic recombination differs from those during mitotic recombination in that the homologous chromosome rather than the sister chromatid is the preferred repair template. The processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) formed on intermediate recombination structures is central to driving the specific outcomes of DSB repair during meiosis. Replication protein A (RPA) is the main ssDNA-binding protein complex involved in DNA metabolism. However, the existence of RPA orthologs in plants and the recent discovery of meiosis specific with OB domains (MEIOB), a widely conserved meiosis-specific RPA1 paralog, strongly suggest that multiple RPA complexes evolved and specialized to subdivide their roles during DNA metabolism. Here we review ssDNA formation and maturation during mitotic and meiotic recombination underlying the meiotic specific features. We describe and discuss the existence and properties of MEIOB and multiple RPA subunits in plants and highlight how they can provide meiosis-specific fates to ssDNA processing during homologous recombination. Understanding the functions of these RPA homologs and how they interact with the canonical RPA subunits is of major interest in the fields of meiosis and DNA repair.

  6. Does Stellate cause meiotic drive in Drosophila melanogaster?

    PubMed Central

    Belloni, Massimo; Tritto, Patrizia; Bozzetti, Maria Pia; Palumbo, Gioacchino; Robbins, Leonard G

    2002-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster males deficient for the crystal (cry) locus of the Y chromosome that carry between 15 and 60 copies of the X-linked Stellate (Ste) gene are semisterile, have elevated levels of nondisjunction, produce distorted sperm genotype ratios (meiotic drive), and evince hyperactive transcription of Ste in the testes. Ste seems to be the active element in this system, and it has been proposed that the ancestral Ste gene was "selfish" and increased in frequency because it caused meiotic drive. This hypothetical evolutionary history is based on the idea that Ste overexpression, and not the lack of cry, causes the meiotic drive of cry(-) males. To test whether this is true, we have constructed a Ste-deleted X chromosome and examined the phenotype of Ste(-)/cry(-) males. If hyperactivity of Ste were necessary for the transmission defects seen in cry(-) males, cry(-) males completely deficient for Ste would be normal. Although it is impossible to construct a completely Ste(-) genotype, we find that Ste(-)/cry(-) males have exactly the same phenotype as Ste(+)/cry(-) males. The deletion of all X chromosome Ste copies not only does not eliminate meiotic drive and nondisjunction, but it also does not even reduce them below the levels produced when the X carries 15 copies of Ste. PMID:12196400

  7. Sisters Unbound Is Required for Meiotic Centromeric Cohesion in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Badri; Thomas, Sharon E.; Yan, Rihui; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Zhulin, Igor B.; McKee, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Regular meiotic chromosome segregation requires sister centromeres to mono-orient (orient to the same pole) during the first meiotic division (meiosis I) when homologous chromosomes segregate, and to bi-orient (orient to opposite poles) during the second meiotic division (meiosis II) when sister chromatids segregate. Both orientation patterns require cohesion between sister centromeres, which is established during meiotic DNA replication and persists until anaphase of meiosis II. Meiotic cohesion is mediated by a conserved four-protein complex called cohesin that includes two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) subunits (SMC1 and SMC3) and two non-SMC subunits. In Drosophila melanogaster, however, the meiotic cohesion apparatus has not been fully characterized and the non-SMC subunits have not been identified. We have identified a novel Drosophila gene called sisters unbound (sunn), which is required for stable sister chromatid cohesion throughout meiosis. sunn mutations disrupt centromere cohesion during prophase I and cause high frequencies of non-disjunction (NDJ) at both meiotic divisions in both sexes. SUNN co-localizes at centromeres with the cohesion proteins SMC1 and SOLO in both sexes and is necessary for the recruitment of both proteins to centromeres. Although SUNN lacks sequence homology to cohesins, bioinformatic analysis indicates that SUNN may be a structural homolog of the non-SMC cohesin subunit stromalin (SA), suggesting that SUNN may serve as a meiosis-specific cohesin subunit. In conclusion, our data show that SUNN is an essential meiosis-specific Drosophila cohesion protein. PMID:25194162

  8. MEI4 – a central player in the regulation of meiotic DNA double-strand break formation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Ghyselinck, Norbert; Ishiguro, Kei-ichiro; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Kouznetsova, Anna; Höög, Christer; Strong, Edward; Schimenti, John; Daniel, Katrin; Toth, Attila; de Massy, Bernard

    2015-05-01

    The formation of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at the beginning of meiotic prophase marks the initiation of meiotic recombination. Meiotic DSB formation is catalyzed by SPO11 and their repair takes place on meiotic chromosome axes. The evolutionarily conserved MEI4 protein is required for meiotic DSB formation and is localized on chromosome axes. Here, we show that HORMAD1, one of the meiotic chromosome axis components, is required for MEI4 localization. Importantly, the quantitative correlation between the level of axis-associated MEI4 and DSB formation suggests that axis-associated MEI4 could be a limiting factor for DSB formation. We also show that MEI1, REC8 and RAD21L are important for proper MEI4 localization. These findings on MEI4 dynamics during meiotic prophase suggest that the association of MEI4 to chromosome axes is required for DSB formation, and that the loss of this association upon DSB repair could contribute to turning off meiotic DSB formation.

  9. The Landscape of Mouse Meiotic Double-Strand Break Formation, Processing, and Repair.

    PubMed

    Lange, Julian; Yamada, Shintaro; Tischfield, Sam E; Pan, Jing; Kim, Seoyoung; Zhu, Xuan; Socci, Nicholas D; Jasin, Maria; Keeney, Scott

    2016-10-20

    Heritability and genome stability are shaped by meiotic recombination, which is initiated via hundreds of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The distribution of DSBs throughout the genome is not random, but mechanisms molding this landscape remain poorly understood. Here, we exploit genome-wide maps of mouse DSBs at unprecedented nucleotide resolution to uncover previously invisible spatial features of recombination. At fine scale, we reveal a stereotyped hotspot structure-DSBs occur within narrow zones between methylated nucleosomes-and identify relationships between SPO11, chromatin, and the histone methyltransferase PRDM9. At large scale, DSB formation is suppressed on non-homologous portions of the sex chromosomes via the DSB-responsive kinase ATM, which also shapes the autosomal DSB landscape at multiple size scales. We also provide a genome-wide analysis of exonucleolytic DSB resection lengths and elucidate spatial relationships between DSBs and recombination products. Our results paint a comprehensive picture of features governing successive steps in mammalian meiotic recombination.

  10. MPS3 mediates meiotic bouquet formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Michael N.; Lee, Chih-Ying; Wilkerson, Joseph L.; Dresser, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    In meiotic prophase, telomeres associate with the nuclear envelope and accumulate adjacent to the centrosome/spindle pole to form the chromosome bouquet, a well conserved event that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the meiotic telomere protein Ndj1p. Ndj1p interacts with Mps3p, a nuclear envelope SUN domain protein that is required for spindle pole body duplication and for sister chromatid cohesion. Removal of the Ndj1p-interaction domain from MPS3 creates an ndj1Δ-like separation-of-function allele, and Ndj1p and Mps3p are codependent for stable association with the telomeres. SUN domain proteins are found in the nuclear envelope across phyla and are implicated in mediating interactions between the interior of the nucleus and the cytoskeleton. Our observations indicate a general mechanism for meiotic telomere movements. PMID:17495028

  11. Sperm ultrastructure and meiotic segregation in an infertile 47, XYY man.

    PubMed

    Moretti, E; Anichini, C; Sartini, B; Collodel, G

    2007-12-01

    The majority of 47, XYY males are fertile and contribute to produce chromosomally normal children. In 47, XYY carriers, most meiotic studies indicated that the extra Y chromosomes were lost in the pre-meiotic stages, but in some cases the presence of one X and the two Y chromosomes has been detected during prophase I as an X univalent plus a YY bivalent. The aim of this study was to describe sperm parameters and meiotic segregation in a case of an infertile man with a 47, XYY karyotype. Sperm morphology was evaluated for the first time by transmission electron microscopy highlighting apoptosis and necrosis as the most frequent pathologies. Meiotic segregation was explored by fluorescence in situ hybridisation technique, which makes us capable of detecting aneuploidies of sex chromosomes. The fact that the frequency of 1818XY diploidy was very high reveals an error occurring during first meiotic division. Polymerase chain reaction analysis did not show any Y microdeletion. The combination of these two techniques led us to clarify the status of the spermatogenic process, showing an altered meiotic segregation concomitant with the presence of sperm apoptosis and necrosis in a patient 47, XYY.

  12. Specific features in linear and spatial organizations of pericentromeric heterochromatin regions in polytene chromosomes of the closely related species Drosophila virilis and D. kanekoi (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    Wasserlauf, Irina; Usov, Konstantin; Artemov, Gleb; Anan'ina, Tatyana; Stegniy, Vladimir

    2015-06-01

    Heterochromatin plays an important role in the spatial arrangement and evolution of the eukaryotic genetic apparatus. The closely related species Drosophila virilis (phyla virilis) and D. kanekoi (phyla montana) differ in the amount of heterochromatin along the chromosomes as well as by the presence of the metacentric chromosome 2, which emerged as a result of a pericentric inversion during speciation, in the D. kanekoi karyotype. The purpose of this study was to establish if chromosome rearrangements have any influence on the linear redistribution of centromeric heterochromatin in polytene chromosomes and the spatial organization of chromosomes in the nuclei of nurse cell. We have microdissected the chromocenter of D. virilis salivary gland polytene chromosomes; obtained a DNA library of this region (DvirIII); and hybridized (FISH) DvirIII to the salivary gland and nurse cell polytene chromosomes of D. virilis and D. kanekoi. We demonstrated that DvirIII localizes to the pericentromeric heterochromatin regions of all chromosomes and peritelomeric region of chromosome 5 in both species. Unlike D. virilis, the DvirIII signal in D. kanekoi chromosomes is detectable in the telomeric region of chromosome 2. We have also conducted a 3D FISH of DvirIII probe to the D. virilis and D. kanekoi nurse cell chromosomes. In particular, the DvirIII signal in D. virilis was observed in the local chromocenter at one pole of the nucleus, while the signal belonging to the telomeric region of chromosome 5 was detectable at the other pole. In contrast, in D. kanekoi there exist two separate DvirIII-positive regions. One of these regions belongs to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 2 and the other, to pericentromeric regions of the remaining chromosomes. These results suggest that chromosome rearrangements play an important role in the redistribution of heterochromatin DNA sequences in the genome, representing a speciation mechanism, which, in general, could also affect the

  13. The Chromosomes of Birds during Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Pigozzi, María I

    2016-01-01

    The cytological analysis of meiotic chromosomes is an exceptional tool to approach complex processes such as synapsis and recombination during the division. Chromosome studies of meiosis have been especially valuable in birds, where naturally occurring mutants or experimental knock-out animals are not available to fully investigate the basic mechanisms of major meiotic events. This review highlights the main contributions of synaptonemal complex and lampbrush chromosome research to the current knowledge of avian meiosis, with special emphasis on the organization of chromosomes during prophase I, the impact of chromosome rearrangements during meiosis, and distinctive features of the ZW pair.

  14. Cohesin in determining chromosome architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Haering, Christian H.; Jessberger, Rolf

    2012-07-15

    Cells use ring-like structured protein complexes for various tasks in DNA dynamics. The tripartite cohesin ring is particularly suited to determine chromosome architecture, for it is large and dynamic, may acquire different forms, and is involved in several distinct nuclear processes. This review focuses on cohesin's role in structuring chromosomes during mitotic and meiotic cell divisions and during interphase.

  15. Reversible phosphorylation and regulation of mammalian oocyte meiotic chromatin remodeling and segregation.

    PubMed

    Swain, J E; Smith, G D

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian oocyte is notorious for high rates of chromosomal abnormalities. This results in subsequent embryonic aneuploidy, resulting in infertility and congenital defects. Therefore, understanding regulatory mechanisms involved in chromatin remodeling and chromosome segregation during oocyte meiotic maturation is imperative to fully understand the complex process and establish potential therapies. This review will focus on major events occurring during oocyte meiosis, critical to ensure proper cellular ploidy. Mechanistic and cellular events such as chromosome condensation, meiotic spindle formation, as well as cohesion of homologues and sister chromatids will be discussed, focusing on the role of reversible phosphorylation in control of these processes.

  16. The Meiotic Recombination Checkpoint Suppresses NHK-1 Kinase to Prevent Reorganisation of the Oocyte Nucleus in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Oscar M.; Breuer, Manuel; Cullen, C. Fiona; Ito, Takashi; Ohkura, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    The meiotic recombination checkpoint is a signalling pathway that blocks meiotic progression when the repair of DNA breaks formed during recombination is delayed. In comparison to the signalling pathway itself, however, the molecular targets of the checkpoint that control meiotic progression are not well understood in metazoans. In Drosophila, activation of the meiotic checkpoint is known to prevent formation of the karyosome, a meiosis-specific organisation of chromosomes, but the molecular pathway by which this occurs remains to be identified. Here we show that the conserved kinase NHK-1 (Drosophila Vrk-1) is a crucial meiotic regulator controlled by the meiotic checkpoint. An nhk-1 mutation, whilst resulting in karyosome defects, does so independent of meiotic checkpoint activation. Rather, we find unrepaired DNA breaks formed during recombination suppress NHK-1 activity (inferred from the phosphorylation level of one of its substrates) through the meiotic checkpoint. Additionally DNA breaks induced by X-rays in cultured cells also suppress NHK-1 kinase activity. Unrepaired DNA breaks in oocytes also delay other NHK-1 dependent nuclear events, such as synaptonemal complex disassembly and condensin loading onto chromosomes. Therefore we propose that NHK-1 is a crucial regulator of meiosis and that the meiotic checkpoint suppresses NHK-1 activity to prevent oocyte nuclear reorganisation until DNA breaks are repaired. PMID:21060809

  17. Spatial arrangement of chromosomes in oocytes and spermatocytes of malaria mosquitoes

    SciTech Connect

    Stegnii, V.N.; Vasserlauf, I.E.

    1995-02-01

    It is shown that prophase chromosomes of oocytes in Anopheles messeae ovaries do not form local chromocenters, unlike spermatocytes, in which chromosomes fuse in a joint centromeric assembly. This fact reflects the dynamic nature of the system of chromocenter formation in generative tissues. During analysis of interspecific hybrids F{sub 1} A. maculipennis x A. subalpinus, no conjunction of homeologous chromosomes was observed, and the latter remained separated from one another. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  18. ATM controls meiotic double-strand-break formation.

    PubMed

    Lange, Julian; Pan, Jing; Cole, Francesca; Thelen, Michael P; Jasin, Maria; Keeney, Scott

    2011-10-16

    In many organisms, developmentally programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs) formed by the SPO11 transesterase initiate meiotic recombination, which promotes pairing and segregation of homologous chromosomes. Because every chromosome must receive a minimum number of DSBs, attention has focused on factors that support DSB formation. However, improperly repaired DSBs can cause meiotic arrest or mutation; thus, having too many DSBs is probably as deleterious as having too few. Only a small fraction of SPO11 protein ever makes a DSB in yeast or mouse and SPO11 and its accessory factors remain abundant long after most DSB formation ceases, implying the existence of mechanisms that restrain SPO11 activity to limit DSB numbers. Here we report that the number of meiotic DSBs in mouse is controlled by ATM, a kinase activated by DNA damage to trigger checkpoint signalling and promote DSB repair. Levels of SPO11-oligonucleotide complexes, by-products of meiotic DSB formation, are elevated at least tenfold in spermatocytes lacking ATM. Moreover, Atm mutation renders SPO11-oligonucleotide levels sensitive to genetic manipulations that modulate SPO11 protein levels. We propose that ATM restrains SPO11 via a negative feedback loop in which kinase activation by DSBs suppresses further DSB formation. Our findings explain previously puzzling phenotypes of Atm-null mice and provide a molecular basis for the gonadal dysgenesis observed in ataxia telangiectasia, the human syndrome caused by ATM deficiency.

  19. Formation of interference-sensitive meiotic cross-overs requires sufficient DNA leading-strand elongation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiyue; Cheng, Zhihao; Wang, Cong; Hong, Yue; Su, Hang; Wang, Jun; Copenhaver, Gregory P.; Ma, Hong; Wang, Yingxiang

    2015-01-01

    Meiosis halves diploid genomes to haploid and is essential for sexual reproduction in eukaryotes. Meiotic recombination ensures physical association of homologs and their subsequent accurate segregation and results in the redistribution of genetic variations among progeny. Most organisms have two classes of cross-overs (COs): interference-sensitive (type I) and -insensitive (type II) COs. DNA synthesis is essential for meiotic recombination, but whether DNA synthesis has a role in differentiating meiotic CO pathways is unknown. Here, we show that Arabidopsis POL2A, the homolog of the yeast DNA polymerase-ε (a leading-strand DNA polymerase), is required for plant fertility and meiosis. Mutations in POL2A cause reduced fertility and meiotic defects, including abnormal chromosome association, improper chromosome segregation, and fragmentation. Observation of prophase I cell distribution suggests that pol2a mutants likely delay progression of meiotic recombination. In addition, the residual COs in pol2a have reduced CO interference, and the double mutant of pol2a with mus81, which affects type II COs, displayed more severe defects than either single mutant, indicating that POL2A functions in the type I pathway. We hypothesize that sufficient leading-strand DNA elongation promotes formation of some type I COs. Given that meiotic recombination and DNA synthesis are conserved in divergent eukaryotes, this study and our previous study suggest a novel role for DNA synthesis in the differentiation of meiotic recombination pathways. PMID:26392549

  20. Formation of interference-sensitive meiotic cross-overs requires sufficient DNA leading-strand elongation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiyue; Cheng, Zhihao; Wang, Cong; Hong, Yue; Su, Hang; Wang, Jun; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Ma, Hong; Wang, Yingxiang

    2015-10-06

    Meiosis halves diploid genomes to haploid and is essential for sexual reproduction in eukaryotes. Meiotic recombination ensures physical association of homologs and their subsequent accurate segregation and results in the redistribution of genetic variations among progeny. Most organisms have two classes of cross-overs (COs): interference-sensitive (type I) and -insensitive (type II) COs. DNA synthesis is essential for meiotic recombination, but whether DNA synthesis has a role in differentiating meiotic CO pathways is unknown. Here, we show that Arabidopsis POL2A, the homolog of the yeast DNA polymerase-ε (a leading-strand DNA polymerase), is required for plant fertility and meiosis. Mutations in POL2A cause reduced fertility and meiotic defects, including abnormal chromosome association, improper chromosome segregation, and fragmentation. Observation of prophase I cell distribution suggests that pol2a mutants likely delay progression of meiotic recombination. In addition, the residual COs in pol2a have reduced CO interference, and the double mutant of pol2a with mus81, which affects type II COs, displayed more severe defects than either single mutant, indicating that POL2A functions in the type I pathway. We hypothesize that sufficient leading-strand DNA elongation promotes formation of some type I COs. Given that meiotic recombination and DNA synthesis are conserved in divergent eukaryotes, this study and our previous study suggest a novel role for DNA synthesis in the differentiation of meiotic recombination pathways.

  1. Roles for mismatch repair family proteins in promoting meiotic crossing over

    PubMed Central

    Manhart, Carol M.; Alani, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The mismatch repair (MMR) family complexes Msh4-Msh5 and Mlh1-Mlh3 act with Exo1 and Sgs1-Top3-Rmi1 in a meiotic double strand break repair pathway that results in the asymmetric cleavage of double Holliday junctions (dHJ) to form crossovers. This review discusses how meiotic roles for Msh4-Msh5 and Mlh1-Mlh3 do not fit paradigms established for post-replicative MMR. We also outline models used to explain how these factors promote the formation of meiotic crossovers required for the accurate segregation of chromosome homologs during the Meiosis I division. PMID:26686657

  2. Aurora B inhibitor barasertib prevents meiotic maturation and subsequent embryo development in pig oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ju, Shiqiang; Peng, Xu; Yang, Xiaoliu; Sozar, Sparksi; Muneri, Caroline W; Xu, Yaping; Chen, Changchao; Cui, Panpan; Xu, Weichao; Rui, Rong

    2016-07-15

    Barasertib, a highly selective Aurora B inhibitor, has been widely used in a variety of cells to investigate the role of Aurora B kinase, which has been implicated in various functions in the mitotic process. However, effects of barasertib on the meiotic maturation process are not fully understood, particularly in porcine oocyte meiotic maturation. In the present study, the effects of barasertib on the meiotic maturation and developmental competence of pig oocytes were investigated, and the possible roles of Aurora B were also evaluated in porcine oocytes undergoing meiosis. Initially, we examined the expression and subcellular localization of Aurora B using Western blot analysis and immunofluorescent staining. Aurora B was found to express and exhibit specific dynamic intracellular localization during porcine oocyte meiotic maturation. Aurora B was observed around the chromosomes after germinal vesicle breakdown. Then it was transferred to the spindle region after metaphase I stage, and was particularly concentrated at the central spindles at telophase I stage. barasertib treatment resulted in the failure of polar body extrusion in pig oocytes, with a larger percentage of barasertib-treated oocytes remaining at the pro-metaphase I stage. Additional results reported that barasertib treatment had no effect on chromosome condensation but resulted in a significantly higher percentage of the treated oocytes with aberrant spindles and misaligned chromosomes during the first meiotic division. In addition, inhibition of Aurora B with lower concentrations of barasertib during pig oocyte meiotic maturation decreased the subsequent embryo developmental competence. Thus, these results illustrate that barasertib has significant effects on porcine oocyte meiotic maturation and subsequent development through Aurora B inhibition, and this regulation is related to its effects on spindle formation and chromosome alignment during the first meiotic division in porcine oocytes.

  3. Volume increase and spatial shifts of chromosome territories in nuclei of radiation-induced polyploidizing tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Schwarz-Finsterle, Jutta; Scherthan, Harry; Huna, Anda; González, Paula; Mueller, Patrick; Schmitt, Eberhard; Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Hausmann, Michael

    2013-08-30

    The exposure of tumour cells to high doses of ionizing radiation can induce endopolyploidization as an escape route from cell death. This strategy generally results in mitotic catastrophe during the first few days after irradiation. However, some cells escape mitotic catastrophe, polyploidize and attempt to undergo genome reduction and de-polyploidization in order to create new, viable para-diploid tumour cell sub-clones. In search for the consequences of ionizing radiation induced endopolyploidization, genome and chromosome architecture in nuclei of polyploid tumour cells, and sub-nuclei after division of bi- or multi-nucleated cells were investigated during 7 days following irradiation. Polyploidization was induced in p53-function deficient HeLa cells by exposure to 10Gy of X-irradiation. Chromosome territories #1, #4, #12 and centromeres of chromosomes #6, #10, #X were labelled by FISH and analysed for chromosome numbers, volumes and spatial distribution during 7 days post irradiation. The numbers of interphase chromosome territories or centromeres, respectively, the positions of the most peripherally and centrally located chromosome territories, and the territory volumes were compared to non-irradiated controls over this time course. Nuclei with three copies of several chromosomes (#1, #6, #10, #12, #X) were found in the irradiated as well as non-irradiated specimens. From day 2 to day 5 post irradiation, chromosome territories (#1, #4, #12) shifted towards the nuclear periphery and their volumes increased 16- to 25-fold. Consequently, chromosome territories returned towards the nuclear centre during day 6 and 7 post irradiation. In comparison to non-irradiated cells (∼500μm(3)), the nuclear volume of irradiated cells was increased 8-fold (to ∼4000μm(3)) at day 7 post irradiation. Additionally, smaller cell nuclei with an average volume of about ∼255μm(3) were detected on day 7. The data suggest a radiation-induced generation of large intra

  4. A cohesin-based structural platform supporting homologous chromosome pairing in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Da-Qiao; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2016-08-01

    The pairing and recombination of homologous chromosomes during the meiotic prophase is necessary for the accurate segregation of chromosomes in meiosis. However, the mechanism by which homologous chromosomes achieve this pairing has remained an open question. Meiotic cohesins have been shown to affect chromatin compaction; however, the impact of meiotic cohesins on homologous pairing and the fine structures of cohesion-based chromatin remain to be determined. A recent report using live-cell imaging and super-resolution microscopy demonstrated that the lack of meiotic cohesins alters the chromosome axis structures and impairs the pairing of homologous chromosomes. These results suggest that meiotic cohesin-based chromosome axis structures are crucial for the pairing of homologous chromosomes.

  5. Meiotic recombination errors, the origin of sperm aneuploidy and clinical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Tempest, Helen G

    2011-02-01

    Since the early 1990s male infertility has successfully been treated by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), nevertheless concerns have been raised regarding the genetic risk of ICSI. Chromosome aneuploidy (the presence of extra or missing chromosomes) is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and mental retardation in humans. While the majority of chromosome aneuploidies are maternal in origin, the paternal contribution to aneuploidy is clinically relevant particularly for the sex chromosomes. Given that it is difficult to study female gametes investigations are predominantly conducted in male meiotic recombination and sperm aneuploidy. Research suggests that infertile men have increased levels of sperm aneuploidy and that this is likely due to increased errors in meiotic recombination and chromosome synapsis within these individuals. It is perhaps counterintuitive but there appears to be no selection against chromosomally aneuploid sperm at fertilization. In fact the frequency of aneuploidy in sperm appears to be mirrored in conceptions. Given this information this review will cover our current understanding of errors in meiotic recombination and chromosome synapsis and how these may contribute to increased sperm aneuploidy. Frequencies of sperm aneuploidy in infertile men and individuals with constitutional karyotypic abnormalities are reviewed, and based on these findings, indications for clinical testing of sperm aneuploidy are discussed. In addition, the application of single nucleotide arrays for the analysis of meiotic recombination and identification of parental origin of aneuploidy are considered.

  6. Increased frequency of asynapsis and associated meiotic silencing of heterologous chromatin in the presence of irradiation-induced extra DNA double strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Schoenmakers, Sam; Wassenaar, Evelyne; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; Derijck, Alwin A; de Boer, Peter; Laven, Joop S E; Grootegoed, J Anton; Baarends, Willy M

    2008-05-01

    In meiotic prophase of male placental mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, which activates meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), leading to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. MSCI is most likely related to meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC), a mechanism that can silence autosomal unsynapsed chromatin. However, heterologous synapsis and escape from silencing also occur. In mammalian species, formation of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) during leptotene precedes meiotic chromosome pairing. These DSBs are essential to achieve full synapsis of homologous chromosomes. We generated 25% extra meiotic DSBs by whole body irradiation of mice. This leads to a significant increase in meiotic recombination frequency. In mice carrying translocation chromosomes with synaptic problems, we observed an approximately 35% increase in asynapsis and MSUC of the nonhomologous region in the smallest chromosome pair following irradiation. However, the same nonhomologous region in the largest chromosome pair, shows complete synapsis and escape from MSUC in almost 100% of the nuclei, irrespective of exposure to irradiation. We propose that prevention of synapsis and associated activation of MSUC is linked to the presence of unrepaired meiotic DSBs in the nonhomologous region. Also, spreading of synaptonemal complex formation from regions of homology may act as an opposing force, and drive heterologous synapsis.

  7. Interplay between modifications of chromatin and meiotic recombination hotspots.

    PubMed

    Brachet, Elsa; Sommermeyer, Vérane; Borde, Valérie

    2012-02-01

    Meiotic recombination lies at the heart of sexual reproduction. It is essential for producing viable gametes with a normal haploid genomic content and its dysfunctions can be at the source of aneuploidies, such as the Down syndrome, or many genetic disorders. Meiotic recombination also generates genetic diversity that is transmitted to progeny by shuffling maternal and paternal alleles along chromosomes. Recombination takes place at non-random chromosomal sites called 'hotspots'. Recent evidence has shown that their location is influenced by properties of chromatin. In addition, many studies in somatic cells have highlighted the need for changes in chromatin dynamics to allow the process of recombination. In this review, we discuss how changes in the chromatin landscape may influence the recombination map, and reciprocally, how recombination events may lead to epigenetic modifications at sites of recombination, which could be transmitted to progeny.

  8. Localization and roles of Ski8p protein in Sordaria meiosis and delineation of three mechanistically distinct steps of meiotic homolog juxtaposition.

    PubMed

    Tessé, Sophie; Storlazzi, Aurora; Kleckner, Nancy; Gargano, Silvana; Zickler, Denise

    2003-10-28

    Ski8p is implicated in degradation of non-poly(A) and double-stranded RNA, and in meiotic DNA recombination. We have identified the Sordaria macrospora SKI8 gene. Ski8p is cytoplasmically localized in all vegetative and sexual cycle cells, and is nuclear localized, specifically in early-mid-meiotic prophase, in temporal correlation with Spo11p, the meiotic double-strand break (DSB) transesterase. Localizations of Ski8p and Spo11p are mutually interdependent. ski8 mutants exhibit defects in vegetative growth, entry into the sexual program, and sporulation. Diverse meiotic defects, also seen in spo11 mutants, are diagnostic of DSB absence, and they are restored by exogenous DSBs. These results suggest that Ski8p promotes meiotic DSB formation by acting directly within meiotic prophase chromosomes. Mutant phenotypes also divide meiotic homolog juxtaposition into three successive, mechanistically distinct steps; recognition, presynaptic alignment, and synapsis, which are distinguished by their differential dependence on DSBs.

  9. Heteromorphic Sex Chromosomes: Navigating Meiosis without a Homologous Partner

    PubMed Central

    Checchi, Paula M.; Engebrecht, JoAnne

    2011-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis relies on homology between the maternal and paternal chromosomes. Yet by definition, sex chromosomes of the heterogametic sex lack a homologous partner. Recent studies in a number of systems have shed light on the unique meiotic behavior of heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and highlight both the commonalities and differences in divergent species. During meiotic prophase, the homology-dependent processes of pairing, synapsis, and recombination have been modified in many different ways to ensure segregation of heteromorphic sex chromosomes at the first meiotic division. Additionally, an almost universal feature of heteromorphic sex chromosomes during meiosis is transcriptional silencing, or meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, an essential process proposed to prevent expression of genes deleterious to meiosis in the heterogametic sex as well as to shield unpaired sex chromosomes from recognition by meiotic checkpoints. Comparative analyses of the meiotic behavior of sex chromosomes in nematodes, mammals, and birds reveal important conserved features as well as provide insight into sex chromosome evolution. PMID:22113949

  10. Heteromorphic sex chromosomes: navigating meiosis without a homologous partner.

    PubMed

    Checchi, Paula M; Engebrecht, Joanne

    2011-09-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis relies on homology between the maternal and paternal chromosomes. Yet by definition, sex chromosomes of the heterogametic sex lack a homologous partner. Recent studies in a number of systems have shed light on the unique meiotic behavior of heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and highlight both the commonalities and differences in divergent species. During meiotic prophase, the homology-dependent processes of pairing, synapsis, and recombination have been modified in many different ways to ensure segregation of heteromorphic sex chromosomes at the first meiotic division. Additionally, an almost universal feature of heteromorphic sex chromosomes during meiosis is transcriptional silencing, or meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, an essential process proposed to prevent expression of genes deleterious to meiosis in the heterogametic sex as well as to shield unpaired sex chromosomes from recognition by meiotic checkpoints. Comparative analyses of the meiotic behavior of sex chromosomes in nematodes, mammals, and birds reveal important conserved features as well as provide insight into sex chromosome evolution. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Engineering of plant chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Mette, Michael Florian; Houben, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Engineered minimal chromosomes with sufficient mitotic and meiotic stability have an enormous potential as vectors for stacking multiple genes required for complex traits in plant biotechnology. Proof of principle for essential steps in chromosome engineering such as truncation of chromosomes by T-DNA-mediated telomere seeding and de novo formation of centromeres by cenH3 fusion protein tethering has been recently obtained. In order to generate robust protocols for application in plant biotechnology, these steps need to be combined and supplemented with additional methods such as site-specific recombination for the directed transfer of multiple genes of interest on the minichromosomes. At the same time, the development of these methods allows new insight into basic aspects of plant chromosome functions such as how centromeres assure proper distribution of chromosomes to daughter cells or how telomeres serve to cap the chromosome ends to prevent shortening of ends over DNA replication cycles and chromosome end fusion.

  12. DNA polymerase beta is critical for mouse meiotic synapsis.

    PubMed

    Kidane, Dawit; Jonason, Alan S; Gorton, Timothy S; Mihaylov, Ivailo; Pan, Jing; Keeney, Scott; de Rooij, Dirk G; Ashley, Terry; Keh, Agnes; Liu, Yanfeng; Banerjee, Urmi; Zelterman, Daniel; Sweasy, Joann B

    2010-01-20

    We have shown earlier that DNA polymerase beta (Pol beta) localizes to the synaptonemal complex (SC) during Prophase I of meiosis in mice. Pol beta localizes to synapsed axes during zygonema and pachynema, and it associates with the ends of bivalents during late pachynema and diplonema. To test whether these localization patterns reflect a function for Pol beta in recombination and/or synapsis, we used conditional gene targeting to delete the PolB gene from germ cells. We find that Pol beta-deficient spermatocytes are defective in meiotic chromosome synapsis and undergo apoptosis during Prophase I. We also find that SPO11-dependent gammaH2AX persists on meiotic chromatin, indicating that Pol beta is critical for the repair of SPO11-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs). Pol beta-deficient spermatocytes yielded reduced steady-state levels of the SPO11-oligonucleotide complexes that are formed when SPO11 is removed from the ends of DSBs, and cytological experiments revealed that chromosome-associated foci of replication protein A (RPA), RAD51 and DMC1 are less abundant in Pol beta-deficient spermatocyte nuclei. Localization of Pol beta to meiotic chromosomes requires the formation of SPO11-dependent DSBs. Taken together, these findings strongly indicate that Pol beta is required at a very early step in the processing of meiotic DSBs, at or before the removal of SPO11 from DSB ends and the generation of the 3' single-stranded tails necessary for subsequent strand exchange. The chromosome synapsis defects and Prophase I apoptosis of Pol beta-deficient spermatocytes are likely a direct consequence of these recombination defects.

  13. Meiotic behavior of aneuploid chromatin in mouse models of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reinholdt, Laura G; Czechanski, Anne; Kamdar, Sonya; King, Benjamin L; Sun, Fengyun; Handel, Mary Ann

    2009-12-01

    Aneuploidy, which leads to unpaired chromosomal axes during meiosis, is frequently accompanied by infertility. We previously showed, using three mouse models of Down syndrome, that it is an extra chromosome, but not extra gene dose, that is associated with male infertility and virtual absence of post-meiotic gem cells. Here, we test the hypothesis that aneuploid segments are differentially modified and expressed during meiosis, depending on whether they are present as an extra chromosome or not. In all three models examined, the trisomic region lacks a pairing partner, but in one case, spermatocytes have an extra (and unpaired) chromosome, while the two other models involve translocation of the trisomic region rather than an extra chromosome. An extra unpaired chromosome was always modified by phosphorylation of histone H2AX and lacked RNA PolII. But in the case of trisomic regions attached to a paired chromosome, assembly of these protein modifications was affected by the position of a trisomic region relative to a centromere and the physical extent of the unpaired chromatin. Analysis of gene expression in testes revealed that extra copy number alone was not sufficient for meiotic upregulation of genes in the trisomic interval. Additionally and unexpectedly, presence of meiotic gene silencing chromatin modifications was not sufficient for downregulation of genes in unpaired trisomic chromatin. Thus, the meiotic chromatin modifications that are cytologically visible are unlikely to be directly involved in sterility versus fertility of DS models. Finally, the presence of an extra unpaired chromosome, but not the presence of extra (trisomic) genes, caused global deregulation of transcription in spermatocytes. These results reveal mechanisms by which an extra chromosome, but not trisomic gene dose, impact on meiotic progress and infertility.

  14. Y-autosome translocation interferes with meiotic sex inactivation and expression of autosomal genes: a case study in the pig.

    PubMed

    Barasc, H; Mary, N; Letron, R; Calgaro, A; Dudez, A M; Bonnet, N; Lahbib-Mansais, Y; Yerle, M; Ducos, A; Pinton, A

    2012-01-01

    Y-autosome translocations are rare in humans and pigs. In both species, these rearrangements can be responsible for meiotic arrest and subsequent infertility. Chromosome pairing abnormalities on the SSCX, SSCY and SSC1 chromatin domains were identified by analyzing pachytene spermatocytes from a boar carrying a (Y;1) translocation by immunolocalization of specific meiotic protein combined with FISH. Disturbance of the meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) was observed by Cot-RNA-FISH and analysis of ZFY gene expression by sequential RNA- and DNA-FISH on spermatocytes. We hypothesized that the meiotic arrest observed in this boar might be due to the silencing of critical autosomal genes and/or the reactivation of some sex chromosome genes.

  15. OsHUS1 facilitates accurate meiotic recombination in rice.

    PubMed

    Che, Lixiao; Wang, Kejian; Tang, Ding; Liu, Qiaoquan; Chen, Xiaojun; Li, Yafei; Hu, Qing; Shen, Yi; Yu, Hengxiu; Gu, Minghong; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2014-06-01

    Meiotic recombination normally takes place between allelic sequences on homologs. This process can also occur between non-allelic homologous sequences. Such ectopic interaction events can lead to chromosome rearrangements and are normally avoided. However, much remains unknown about how these ectopic interaction events are sensed and eliminated. In this study, using a screen in rice, we characterized a homolog of HUS1 and explored its function in meiotic recombination. In Oshus1 mutants, in conjunction with nearly normal homologous pairing and synapsis, vigorous, aberrant ectopic interactions occurred between nonhomologous chromosomes, leading to multivalent formation and subsequent chromosome fragmentation. These ectopic interactions relied on programmed meiotic double strand breaks and were formed in a manner independent of the OsMER3-mediated interference-sensitive crossover pathway. Although early homologous recombination events occurred normally, the number of interference-sensitive crossovers was reduced in the absence of OsHUS1. Together, our results indicate that OsHUS1 might be involved in regulating ectopic interactions during meiosis, probably by forming the canonical RAD9-RAD1-HUS1 (9-1-1) complex.

  16. Impact of histone H4K16 acetylation on the meiotic recombination checkpoint in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cavero, Santiago; Herruzo, Esther; Ontoso, David; San-Segundo, Pedro A.

    2016-01-01

    In meiotic cells, the pachytene checkpoint or meiotic recombination checkpoint is a surveillance mechanism that monitors critical processes, such as recombination and chromosome synapsis, which are essential for proper distribution of chromosomes to the meiotic progeny. Failures in these processes lead to the formation of aneuploid gametes. Meiotic recombination occurs in the context of chromatin; in fact, the histone methyltransferase Dot1 and the histone deacetylase Sir2 are known regulators of the pachytene checkpoint in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report here that Sas2-mediated acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16ac), one of the Sir2 targets, modulates meiotic checkpoint activity in response to synaptonemal complex defects. We show that, like sir2, the H4-K16Q mutation, mimicking constitutive acetylation of H4K16, eliminates the delay in meiotic cell cycle progression imposed by the checkpoint in the synapsis-defective zip1 mutant. We also demonstrate that, like in dot1, zip1-induced phosphorylation of the Hop1 checkpoint adaptor at threonine 318 and the ensuing Mek1 activation are impaired in H4-K16 mutants. However, in contrast to sir2 and dot1, the H4-K16R and H4-K16Q mutations have only a minor effect in checkpoint activation and localization of the nucleolar Pch2 checkpoint factor in ndt80-prophase-arrested cells. We also provide evidence for a cross-talk between Dot1-dependent H3K79 methylation and H4K16ac and show that Sir2 excludes H4K16ac from the rDNA region on meiotic chromosomes. Our results reveal that proper levels of H4K16ac orchestrate this meiotic quality control mechanism and that Sir2 impinges on additional targets to fully activate the checkpoint. PMID:28357333

  17. Understanding and Manipulating Meiotic Recombination in Plants[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Meiosis is a specialized cell division, essential in most reproducing organisms to halve the number of chromosomes, thereby enabling the restoration of ploidy levels during fertilization. A key step of meiosis is homologous recombination, which promotes homologous pairing and generates crossovers (COs) to connect homologous chromosomes until their separation at anaphase I. These CO sites, seen cytologically as chiasmata, represent a reciprocal exchange of genetic information between two homologous nonsister chromatids. This gene reshuffling during meiosis has a significant influence on evolution and also plays an essential role in plant breeding, because a successful breeding program depends on the ability to bring the desired combinations of alleles on chromosomes. However, the number and distribution of COs during meiosis is highly constrained. There is at least one CO per chromosome pair to ensure accurate segregation of homologs, but in most organisms, the CO number rarely exceeds three regardless of chromosome size. Moreover, their positions are not random on chromosomes but exhibit regional preference. Thus, genes in recombination-poor regions tend to be inherited together, hindering the generation of novel allelic combinations that could be exploited by breeding programs. Recently, much progress has been made in understanding meiotic recombination. In particular, many genes involved in the process in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have been identified and analyzed. With the coming challenges of food security and climate change, and our enhanced knowledge of how COs are formed, the interest and needs in manipulating CO formation are greater than ever before. In this review, we focus on advances in understanding meiotic recombination and then summarize the attempts to manipulate CO formation. Last, we pay special attention to the meiotic recombination in polyploidy, which is a common genomic feature for many crop plants. PMID:28108697

  18. Isolation of Meiotic Recombinants from Mouse Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Francesca; Jasin, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Homologous recombination during meiosis is critical for the formation of gametes. Recombination is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks which preferentially occur at hotspots dispersed throughout the genome. These double-strand breaks are repaired from the homolog, resulting in either a crossover or noncrossover product. Multiple noncrossover events are required for homolog pairing, and at least one crossover is critical for proper chromosome segregation at the first meiotic division. Consequently, homologous recombination in meiosis occurs at high frequencies. This chapter describes how to characterize crossovers and noncrossovers at a hotspot in mice using allele-specific PCR. Amplification of recombinant products directly from sperm DNA is a powerful approach to determine recombination frequencies and map recombination breakpoints, providing insight into homologous recombination mechanisms. PMID:21660699

  19. Competition between Adjacent Meiotic Recombination Hotspots in the Yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Q. Q.; Xu, F.; White, M. A.; Petes, T. D.

    1997-01-01

    In a wild-type strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a hotspot for meiotic recombination is located upstream of the HIS4 gene. An insertion of a 49-bp telomeric sequence into the coding region of HIS4 strongly stimulates meiotic recombination and the local formation of meiosis-specific double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). When strains are constructed in which both hotspots are heterozygous, hotspot activity is substantially less when the hotspots are on the same chromosome than when they are on opposite chromosomes. PMID:9055076

  20. Spatial organization of fibroblast and spermatocyte nuclei with different B-chromosome content in Korean field mouse, Apodemus peninsulae (Rodentia, Muridae).

    PubMed

    Karamysheva, Tatyana V; Torgasheva, Anna A; Yefremov, Yaroslav R; Bogomolov, Anton G; Liehr, Thomas; Borodin, Pavel M; Rubtsov, Nikolay B

    2017-10-01

    Korean field mouse (Apodemus peninsulae) shows a wide variation in the number of B chromosomes composed of constitutive heterochromatin. For this reason, it provides a good model to study the influence of the number of centromeres and amount of heterochromatin on spatial organization of interphase nuclei. We analyzed the three-dimensional organization of fibroblast and spermatocyte nuclei of the field mice carrying a different number of B chromosomes using laser scanning microscopy and 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization. We detected a co-localization of the B chromosomes with constitutive heterochromatin of the chromosomes of the basic set. We showed a non-random distribution of B chromosomes in the spermatocyte nuclei. Unpaired B chromosomes showed a tendency to occur in the compartment formed by the unpaired part of the XY bivalent.

  1. Nuclear Localization of PRDM9 and Its Role in Meiotic Chromatin Modifications and Homologous Synapsis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fengyun; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Reinholdt, Laura G.; Hu, Jianjun; Saxl, Ruth L.; Baker, Christopher L.; Petkov, Petko M.; Paigen, Kenneth; Handel, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Developmental progress of germ cells through meiotic phases is closely tied to ongoing meiotic recombination. In mammals, recombination preferentially occurs in genomic regions known as hotspots; the protein that activates these hotspots is PRDM9, containing a genetically variable zinc-finger domain and a PR-SET domain with histone H3K4 trimethyltransferase activity. PRDM9 is required for fertility in mice, but little is known about its localization and developmental dynamics. Application of spermatogenic stage-specific markers demonstrates that PRDM9 accumulates in male germ-cell nuclei at pre-leptonema to early leptonema, but is no longer detectable in nuclei by late zygonema. By the pachytene stage, PRDM9-dependent histone H3K4 trimethyl marks on hotspots also disappear. PRDM9 localizes to nuclei concurrently with the deposition of meiotic cohesin complexes, but is not required for incorporation of cohesin complex proteins into chromosomal axial elements, or accumulation of normal numbers of RAD51 foci on meiotic chromatin by late zygonema. Germ cells lacking PRDM9 exhibit inefficient homology recognition and synapsis, with aberrant repair of meiotic DNA double-strand breaks and transcriptional abnormalities characteristic of meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin. Together, these results on the developmental time course for nuclear localization of PRDM9 establish its direct window of function, and demonstrate the independence of chromosome axial element formation from the concurrent PRDM9-mediated activation of recombination hotspots. PMID:25894966

  2. Nuclear localization of PRDM9 and its role in meiotic chromatin modifications and homologous synapsis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fengyun; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Reinholdt, Laura G; Hu, Jianjun; Saxl, Ruth L; Baker, Christopher L; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth; Handel, Mary Ann

    2015-09-01

    Developmental progress of germ cells through meiotic phases is closely tied to ongoing meiotic recombination. In mammals, recombination preferentially occurs in genomic regions known as hotspots; the protein that activates these hotspots is PRDM9, containing a genetically variable zinc finger (ZNF) domain and a PR-SET domain with histone H3K4 trimethyltransferase activity. PRDM9 is required for fertility in mice, but little is known about its localization and developmental dynamics. Application of spermatogenic stage-specific markers demonstrates that PRDM9 accumulates in male germ cell nuclei at pre-leptonema to early leptonema but is no longer detectable in nuclei by late zygonema. By the pachytene stage, PRDM9-dependent histone H3K4 trimethyl marks on hotspots also disappear. PRDM9 localizes to nuclei concurrently with the deposition of meiotic cohesin complexes, but is not required for incorporation of cohesin complex proteins into chromosomal axial elements, or accumulation of normal numbers of RAD51 foci on meiotic chromatin by late zygonema. Germ cells lacking PRDM9 exhibit inefficient homology recognition and synapsis, with aberrant repair of meiotic DNA double-strand breaks and transcriptional abnormalities characteristic of meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin. Together, these results on the developmental time course for nuclear localization of PRDM9 establish its direct window of function and demonstrate the independence of chromosome axial element formation from the concurrent PRDM9-mediated activation of recombination hotspots.

  3. wtf genes are prolific dual poison-antidote meiotic drivers

    PubMed Central

    Nuckolls, Nicole L; Bravo Núñez, María Angélica; Eickbush, Michael T; Young, Janet M; Lange, Jeffrey J; Yu, Jonathan S; Smith, Gerald R; Jaspersen, Sue L; Malik, Harmit S; Zanders, Sarah E

    2017-01-01

    Meiotic drivers are selfish genes that bias their transmission into gametes, defying Mendelian inheritance. Despite the significant impact of these genomic parasites on evolution and infertility, few meiotic drive loci have been identified or mechanistically characterized. Here, we demonstrate a complex landscape of meiotic drive genes on chromosome 3 of the fission yeasts Schizosaccharomyces kambucha and S. pombe. We identify S. kambucha wtf4 as one of these genes that acts to kill gametes (known as spores in yeast) that do not inherit the gene from heterozygotes. wtf4 utilizes dual, overlapping transcripts to encode both a gamete-killing poison and an antidote to the poison. To enact drive, all gametes are poisoned, whereas only those that inherit wtf4 are rescued by the antidote. Our work suggests that the wtf multigene family proliferated due to meiotic drive and highlights the power of selfish genes to shape genomes, even while imposing tremendous costs to fertility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26033.001 PMID:28631612

  4. Hed1 Promotes Meiotic Crossover Formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yoon-Ju; Joo, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Keun Pil; Hong, Soogil

    2017-02-28

    Homologous recombination occurs between homologous chromosomes and is significantly involved in programmed double-strand break (DSB) repair. Activation of two recombinases, Rad51 and Dmc1, is essential for an interhomolog bias during meiosis. Rad51 participates in both mitotic and meiotic recombination, and its strand exchange activity is regulated by an inhibitory factor during meiosis. Thus, activities of Rad51 and Dmc1 are coordinated to promote homolog bias. It has been reported that Hed1, a meiosis-specific protein in budding yeast, regulates Rad51-dependent recombination activity. Here, we investigated the role of Hed1 in meiotic recombination by ectopic expression of the protein after pre-meiotic replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. DNA physical analysis revealed that the overexpression of Hed1 delays the DSB-to-joint molecule (JM) transition and promotes interhomolog JM formation. The study indicates a possible role of Hed1 in controlling the strand exchange activity of Rad51 and, eventually, meiotic crossover formation.

  5. The human Y chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Goodfellow, P; Darling, S; Wolfe, J

    1985-01-01

    Despite its central role in sex determination, genetic analysis of the Y chromosome has been slow. This poor progress has been due to the paucity of available genetic markers. Whereas the X chromosome is known to include at least 100 functional genetic loci, only three or four loci have been ascribed to the Y chromosome and even the existence of several of these loci is controversial. Other factors limiting genetic analysis are the small size of the Y chromosome, which makes cytogenetic definition difficult, and the absence of extensive recombination. Based on cytogenetic observation and speculation, a working model of the Y chromosome has been proposed. In this classical model the Y chromosome is defined into subregions; an X-Y homologous meiotic pairing region encompassing most of the Y chromosome short arm and, perhaps, including a pseudoautosomal region of sex chromosome exchange; a pericentric region containing the sex determining gene or genes; and a long arm heterochromatic genetically inert region. The classical model has been supported by studies on the MIC2 loci, which encode a cell surface antigen defined by the monoclonal antibody 12E7. The X linked locus MIC2X, which escapes X inactivation, maps to the tip of the X chromosome short arm and the homologous locus MIC2Y maps to the Y chromosome short arm; in both cases, these loci are within the proposed meiotic pairing region. MIC2Y is the first biochemically defined, expressed locus to be found on the human Y chromosome. The proposed simplicity of the classical model has been challenged by recent molecular analysis of the Y chromosome. Using cloned probes, several groups have shown that a major part of the Y chromosome short arm is unlikely to be homologous to the X chromosome short arm. A substantial block of sequences of the short arm are homologous to sequences of the X chromosome long arm but well outside the pairing region. In addition, the short arm contains sequences shared with the Y chromosome

  6. Functional interactions between SPO11 and REC102 during initiation of meiotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kee, Kehkooi; Keeney, Scott

    2002-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, formation of the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination requires the products of at least 10 genes. Spo11p is thought to be the catalytic subunit of the DNA cleaving activity, but the roles of the other proteins, and the interactions among them, are not well understood. This study demonstrates genetic and physical interactions between the products of SPO11 and another early meiotic gene required for DSB formation, REC102. We found that epitope-tagged versions of SPO11 and REC102 that by themselves were capable of supporting normal or nearly normal levels of meiotic recombination conferred a severe synthetic cold-sensitive phenotype when combined in the same cells. DSB formation, meiotic gene conversion, and spore viability were drastically reduced in the doubly tagged strain at a nonpermissive temperature. This conditional defect could be partially rescued by expression of untagged SPO11, but not by expression of untagged REC102, indicating that tagged REC102 is fully dominant for this synthetic phenotype. Both tagged and wild-type Spo11p co-immunoprecipitated with tagged Rec102p from meiotic cell extracts, indicating that these proteins are present in a common complex in vivo. Tagged Rec102p localized to the nucleus in whole cells and to chromatin on spread meiotic chromosomes. Our results are consistent with the idea that a multiprotein complex that includes Spo11p and Rec102p promotes meiotic DSB formation.

  7. Transcription reactivation during the first meiotic prophase in bugs is not dependent on synapsis.

    PubMed

    Viera, Alberto; Parra, María Teresa; Rufas, Julio S; Page, Jesús

    2016-02-22

    During meiosis, transcription is precisely regulated in relation to the process of chromosome synapsis. In mammals, transcription is very low until the completion of synapsis in early pachytene, and then reactivates during mid pachytene, up to the end of diplotene. Moreover, chromosomes or chromosomal regions that do not achieve synapsis undergo a specific process of inactivation called meiotic silencing of unpaired chromatin (MSUC). Sex chromosomes, which are mostly unsynapsed, present a special case of inactivation named meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). Although processes that are similar to MSUC/MSCI have been described in other species like Sordaria and Caenorhabditis elegans, very few studies have been developed in insects. We present a study on the relationships between synapsis and transcription in two hemipteran species (Graphosoma italicum and Carpocoris fuscispinus) that possess holocentric chromosomes but develop different synaptic patterns. We have found that transcription, revealed by the presence of RNA polymerase II, is very low at the beginning of meiosis, but robustly increases during zygotene, long before the completion of synapsis, excepting in the sex chromosomes. In fact, we show that histone H3 methylation at lysine 9 (H3K9me3) may be present in the sex chromosomes at leptotene, thus acting as a likely epigenetic mark for this inactive state. Our results suggest that the meiotic transcription in these two species is differently regulated from that of mammals and, therefore, offer new opportunities to understand the relationship between synapsis and transcription and the mechanisms that govern MSUC/MSCI processes.

  8. akirin is required for diakinesis bivalent structure and synaptonemal complex disassembly at meiotic prophase I.

    PubMed

    Clemons, Amy M; Brockway, Heather M; Yin, Yizhi; Kasinathan, Bhavatharini; Butterfield, Yaron S; Jones, Steven J M; Colaiácovo, Monica P; Smolikove, Sarit

    2013-04-01

    During meiosis, evolutionarily conserved mechanisms regulate chromosome remodeling, leading to the formation of a tight bivalent structure. This bivalent, a linked pair of homologous chromosomes, is essential for proper chromosome segregation in meiosis. The formation of a tight bivalent involves chromosome condensation and restructuring around the crossover. The synaptonemal complex (SC), which mediates homologous chromosome association before crossover formation, disassembles concurrently with increased condensation during bivalent remodeling. Both chromosome condensation and SC disassembly are likely critical steps in acquiring functional bivalent structure. The mechanisms controlling SC disassembly, however, remain unclear. Here we identify akir-1 as a gene involved in key events of meiotic prophase I in Caenorhabditis elegans. AKIR-1 is a protein conserved among metazoans that lacks any previously known function in meiosis. We show that akir-1 mutants exhibit severe meiotic defects in late prophase I, including improper disassembly of the SC and aberrant chromosome condensation, independently of the condensin complexes. These late-prophase defects then lead to aberrant reconfiguring of the bivalent. The meiotic divisions are delayed in akir-1 mutants and are accompanied by lagging chromosomes. Our analysis therefore provides evidence for an important role of proper SC disassembly in configuring a functional bivalent structure.

  9. MEIOTIC F-BOX Is Essential for Male Meiotic DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Rice[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong; Yu, Junping; Zong, Jie; Lu, Pingli

    2016-01-01

    F-box proteins constitute a large superfamily in plants and play important roles in controlling many biological processes, but the roles of F-box proteins in male meiosis in plants remain unclear. Here, we identify the rice (Oryza sativa) F-box gene MEIOTIC F-BOX (MOF), which is essential for male meiotic progression. MOF belongs to the FBX subfamily and is predominantly active during leptotene to pachytene of prophase I. mof meiocytes display disrupted telomere bouquet formation, impaired pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes, and arrested meiocytes at late prophase I, followed by apoptosis. Although normal, programmed double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) form in mof mutants, foci of the phosphorylated histone variant γH2AX, a marker for DSBs, persist in the mutant, indicating that many of the DSBs remained unrepaired. The recruitment of Completion of meiosis I (COM1) and Radiation sensitive51C (RAD51C) to DSBs is severely compromised in mutant meiocytes, indicating that MOF is crucial for DSB end-processing and repair. Further analyses showed that MOF could physically interact with the rice SKP1-like Protein1 (OSK1), indicating that MOF functions as a component of the SCF E3 ligase to regulate meiotic progression in rice. Thus, this study reveals the essential role of an F-box protein in plant meiosis and provides helpful information for elucidating the roles of the ubiquitin proteasome system in plant meiotic progression. PMID:27436711

  10. The Utilization during Mitotic Cell Division of Loci Controlling Meiotic Recombination and Disjunction in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Bruce S.; Carpenter, Adelaide T. C.; Ripoll, P.

    1978-01-01

    To inquire whether the loci identified by recombination-defective and disjunction-defective meiotic mutants in Drosophila are also utilized during mitotic cell division, the effects of 18 meiotic mutants (representing 13 loci) on mitotic chromosome stability have been examined genetically. To do this, meiotic-mutant-bearing flies heterozygous for recessive somatic cell markers were examined for the frequencies and types of spontaneous clones expressing the cell markers. In such flies, marked clones can arise via mitotic recombination, mutation, chromosome breakage, nondisjunction or chromosome loss, and clones from these different origins can be distinguished. In addition, meiotic mutants at nine loci have been examined for their effects on sensitivity to killing by UV and X rays.—Mutants at six of the seven recombination-defective loci examined (mei-9, mei-41, c(3)G, mei-W68, mei-S282, mei-352, mei-218) cause mitotic chromosome instability in both sexes, whereas mutants at one locus (mei-218) do not affect mitotic chromosome stability. Thus many of the loci utilized during meiotic recombination also function in the chromosomal economy of mitotic cells.—The chromosome instability produced by mei-41 alleles is the consequence of chromosome breakage, that of mei-9 alleles is primarily due to chromosome breakage and, to a lesser extent, to an elevated frequency of mitotic recombination, whereas no predominant mechanism responsible for the instability caused by c(3)G alleles is discernible. Since these three loci are defective in their responses to mutagen damage, their effects on chromosome stability in nonmutagenized cells are interpreted as resulting from an inability to repair spontaneous lesions. Both mei-W68 and mei-S282 increase mitotic recombination (and in mei-W68, to a lesser extent, chromosome loss) in the abdomen but not the wing. In the abdomen, the primary effect on chromosome stability occurs during the larval period when the abdominal histoblasts

  11. Global Patterns in Human Mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome Variation Caused by Spatial Instability of the Local Cultural Processes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vikrant; Langstieh, Banrida T; Madhavi, Komal V; Naidu, Vegi M; Singh, Hardeep Pal; Biswas, Silpak; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Singh, Lalji; Reddy, B. Mohan

    2006-01-01

    Because of the widespread phenomenon of patrilocality, it is hypothesized that Y-chromosome variants tend to be more localized geographically than those of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Empirical evidence confirmatory to this hypothesis was subsequently provided among certain patrilocal and matrilocal groups of Thailand, which conforms to the isolation by distance mode of gene diffusion. However, we expect intuitively that the patterns of genetic variability may not be consistent with the above hypothesis among populations with different social norms governing the institution of marriage, particularly among those that adhere to strict endogamy rules. We test the universality of this hypothesis by analyzing Y-chromosome and mtDNA data in three different sets of Indian populations that follow endogamy rules to varying degrees. Our analysis of the Indian patrilocal and the matrilocal groups is not confirmatory to the sex-specific variation observed among the tribes of Thailand. Our results indicate spatial instability of the impact of different cultural processes on the genetic variability, resulting in the lack of universality of the hypothesized pattern of greater Y-chromosome variation when compared to that of mtDNA among the patrilocal populations. PMID:16617372

  12. Spermatogenesis-Specific Features of the Meiotic Program in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Shakes, Diane C.; Wu, Jui-ching; Sadler, Penny L.; LaPrade, Kristen; Moore, Landon L.; Noritake, Alana; Chu, Diana S.

    2009-01-01

    In most sexually reproducing organisms, the fundamental process of meiosis is implemented concurrently with two differentiation programs that occur at different rates and generate distinct cell types, sperm and oocytes. However, little is known about how the meiotic program is influenced by such contrasting developmental programs. Here we present a detailed timeline of late meiotic prophase during spermatogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans using cytological and molecular landmarks to interrelate changes in chromosome dynamics with germ cell cellularization, spindle formation, and cell cycle transitions. This analysis expands our understanding C. elegans spermatogenesis, as it identifies multiple spermatogenesis-specific features of the meiotic program and provides a framework for comparative studies. Post-pachytene chromatin of spermatocytes is distinct from that of oocytes in both composition and morphology. Strikingly, C. elegans spermatogenesis includes a previously undescribed karyosome stage, a common but poorly understood feature of meiosis in many organisms. We find that karyosome formation, in which chromosomes form a constricted mass within an intact nuclear envelope, follows desynapsis, involves a global down-regulation of transcription, and may support the sequential activation of multiple kinases that prepare spermatocytes for meiotic divisions. In spermatocytes, the presence of centrioles alters both the relative timing of meiotic spindle assembly and its ultimate structure. These microtubule differences are accompanied by differences in kinetochores, which connect microtubules to chromosomes. The sperm-specific features of meiosis revealed here illuminate how the underlying molecular machinery required for meiosis is differentially regulated in each sex. PMID:19696886

  13. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis in patients with male meiotic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Aran, B; Veiga, A; Vidal, F; Parriego, M; Vendrell, J M; Santaló, J; Egozcue, J; Barri, P N

    2004-04-01

    Indications and candidates for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) have increased in recent years. This study evaluates whether IVF-intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) results could be improved by selecting embryos through PGD-AS (aneuploidy screening) in couples in whom the male partner presents meiotic abnormalities. Two hundred and fifty-six embryos were biopsied and 183 were suitable for analysis (73.2%). Ninety-two embryos showed normal chromosomal analysis (50.3% of the analysed embryos and 57.5% of the diagnosed embryos). Pregnancy, abortion and implantation rates were compared with 66 IVF-ICSI cycles performed in 44 patients with meiotic abnormalities without PGD (control group). No statistically significant differences in the pregnancy rate (52 versus 43.9%), implantation rate (32.1 versus 23.5%) and miscarriage rate (15.4 versus 10.3%) were observed between the groups. Although the embryos obtained from men with meiotic abnormalities showed a high frequency of chromosome abnormalities, no improvements in pregnancy and implantation rates were obtained after PGD-AS in the series analysed.

  14. [Diagnosticum of abnormalities of plant meiotic division].

    PubMed

    Shamina, N V

    2006-01-01

    Abnormalities of plant meiotic division leading to abnormal meiotic products are summarized schematically in the paper. Causes of formation of monads, abnormal diads, triads, pentads, polyads, etc. have been observed in meiosis with both successive and simultaneous cytokinesis.

  15. A Quality Control Mechanism Coordinates Meiotic Prophase Events to Promote Crossover Assurance

    PubMed Central

    Deshong, Alison J.; Ye, Alice L.; Lamelza, Piero; Bhalla, Needhi

    2014-01-01

    Meiotic chromosome segregation relies on homologous chromosomes being linked by at least one crossover, the obligate crossover. Homolog pairing, synapsis and meiosis specific DNA repair mechanisms are required for crossovers but how they are coordinated to promote the obligate crossover is not well understood. PCH-2 is a highly conserved meiotic AAA+-ATPase that has been assigned a variety of functions; whether these functions reflect its conserved role has been difficult to determine. We show that PCH-2 restrains pairing, synapsis and recombination in C. elegans. Loss of pch-2 results in the acceleration of synapsis and homolog-dependent meiotic DNA repair, producing a subtle increase in meiotic defects, and suppresses pairing, synapsis and recombination defects in some mutant backgrounds. Some defects in pch-2 mutants can be suppressed by incubation at lower temperature and these defects increase in frequency in wildtype worms grown at higher temperature, suggesting that PCH-2 introduces a kinetic barrier to the formation of intermediates that support pairing, synapsis or crossover recombination. We hypothesize that this kinetic barrier contributes to quality control during meiotic prophase. Consistent with this possibility, defects in pch-2 mutants become more severe when another quality control mechanism, germline apoptosis, is abrogated or meiotic DNA repair is mildly disrupted. PCH-2 is expressed in germline nuclei immediately preceding the onset of stable homolog pairing and synapsis. Once chromosomes are synapsed, PCH-2 localizes to the SC and is removed in late pachytene, prior to SC disassembly, correlating with when homolog-dependent DNA repair mechanisms predominate in the germline. Indeed, loss of pch-2 results in premature loss of homolog access. Altogether, our data indicate that PCH-2 coordinates pairing, synapsis and recombination to promote crossover assurance. Specifically, we propose that the conserved function of PCH-2 is to destabilize pairing

  16. Sisters unbound is required for meiotic centromeric cohesion in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Badri; Thomas, Sharon E; Yan, Rihui; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Zhulin, Igor B; McKee, Bruce D

    2014-11-01

    Regular meiotic chromosome segregation requires sister centromeres to mono-orient (orient to the same pole) during the first meiotic division (meiosis I) when homologous chromosomes segregate, and to bi-orient (orient to opposite poles) during the second meiotic division (meiosis II) when sister chromatids segregate. Both orientation patterns require cohesion between sister centromeres, which is established during meiotic DNA replication and persists until anaphase of meiosis II. Meiotic cohesion is mediated by a conserved four-protein complex called cohesin that includes two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) subunits (SMC1 and SMC3) and two non-SMC subunits. In Drosophila melanogaster, however, the meiotic cohesion apparatus has not been fully characterized and the non-SMC subunits have not been identified. We have identified a novel Drosophila gene called sisters unbound (sunn), which is required for stable sister chromatid cohesion throughout meiosis. sunn mutations disrupt centromere cohesion during prophase I and cause high frequencies of non-disjunction (NDJ) at both meiotic divisions in both sexes. SUNN co-localizes at centromeres with the cohesion proteins SMC1 and SOLO in both sexes and is necessary for the recruitment of both proteins to centromeres. Although SUNN lacks sequence homology to cohesins, bioinformatic analysis indicates that SUNN may be a structural homolog of the non-SMC cohesin subunit stromalin (SA), suggesting that SUNN may serve as a meiosis-specific cohesin subunit. In conclusion, our data show that SUNN is an essential meiosis-specific Drosophila cohesion protein. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  17. Control of meiotic recombination frequency in plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Ian R

    2012-11-01

    Sexual eukaryotes reproduce via the meiotic cell division, where ploidy is halved and homologous chromosomes undergo reciprocal genetic exchange, termed crossover (CO). CO frequency has a profound effect on patterns of genetic variation and species evolution. Relative CO rates vary extensively both within and between plant genomes. Plant genome size varies by over 1000-fold, largely due to differential expansion of repetitive sequences, and increased genome size is associated with reduced CO frequency. Gene versus repeat sequences associate with distinct chromatin modifications, and evidence from plant genomes indicates that this epigenetic information influences CO patterns. This is consistent with data from diverse eukaryotes that demonstrate the importance of chromatin structure for control of meiotic recombination. In this review I will discuss CO frequency patterns in plant genomes and recent advances in understanding recombination distributions.

  18. A computational model predicts Xenopus meiotic spindle organization.

    PubMed

    Loughlin, Rose; Heald, Rebecca; Nédélec, François

    2010-12-27

    The metaphase spindle is a dynamic bipolar structure crucial for proper chromosome segregation, but how microtubules (MTs) are organized within the bipolar architecture remains controversial. To explore MT organization along the pole-to-pole axis, we simulated meiotic spindle assembly in two dimensions using dynamic MTs, a MT cross-linking force, and a kinesin-5-like motor. The bipolar structures that form consist of antiparallel fluxing MTs, but spindle pole formation requires the addition of a NuMA-like minus-end cross-linker and directed transport of MT depolymerization activity toward minus ends. Dynamic instability and minus-end depolymerization generate realistic MT lifetimes and a truncated exponential MT length distribution. Keeping the number of MTs in the simulation constant, we explored the influence of two different MT nucleation pathways on spindle organization. When nucleation occurs throughout the spindle, the simulation quantitatively reproduces features of meiotic spindles assembled in Xenopus egg extracts.

  19. Probing the mechanical architecture of the vertebrate meiotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Itabashi, Takeshi; Takagi, Jun; Shimamoto, Yuta; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kuwana, Kenta; Shimoyama, Isao; Gaetz, Jedidiah; Kapoor, Tarun M; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2009-02-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis depends on the assembly of a microtubule-based spindle of proper shape and size. Current models for spindle-size control focus on reaction diffusion-based chemical regulation and balance in activities of motor proteins. Although several molecular perturbations have been used to test these models, controlled mechanical perturbations have not been possible. Here we report a piezoresistive dual cantilever-based system to test models for spindle-size control and examine the mechanical features, such as deformability and stiffness, of the vertebrate meiotic spindle. We found that meiotic spindles prepared in Xenopus laevis egg extracts were viscoelastic and recovered their original shape in response to small compression. Larger compression resulted in plastic deformation, but the spindle adapted to this change, establishing a stable mechanical architecture at different sizes. The technique we describe here may also be useful for examining the micromechanics of other cellular organelles.

  20. Evidence for meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, A.M.; Barnetson, R.A.; Phillips, M.F.

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM), an autosomal dominant disorder, is the most common form of adult muscular dystrophy, affecting at least 1 in 8000 of the population. It is a multisystemic disorder, primarily characterized by myotonia, muscle wasting and cataract. The molecular basis of DM is an expanded CTG repeat located within the 3{prime} untranslated region of a putative serine-threonine protein kinase on chromosome 19q13.3. DM exhibits anticipation, that is, with successive generations there is increasing disease severity and earlier age of onset. This mechanism and the fact that the origin of the disease has been attributed to one or a small number of founder chromosomes suggests that, in time, DM should die out. Meiotic drive has been described as a way in which certain alleles are transmitted to succeeding generations in preference to others: preferential transmission of large CTG alleles may account for their continued existence in the gene pool. There is evidence that a CTG allele with > 19 repeats may gradually increase in repeat number over many generations until it is sufficiently large to give a DM phenotype. We report a study of 495 transmissions from individuals heterozygous for the CTG repeat and with repeat numbers within the normal range (5-30). Alleles were simply classified as large or small relative to the other allele in an individual. Of 242 male meioses, 126 transmissions from parent to child were of the larger allele to their offspring (57.7%, p=0.014). This shows that there is strong evidence for meiotic drive favoring the transmission of the larger DM allele in unaffected individuals. Contrary to a previous report of meiotic drive in the male, we have shown that females preferentially transmit the larger DM allele. Taken together, the data suggest the occurrence of meiotic drive in both males and females in this locus.

  1. Unisexual Reproduction Drives Meiotic Recombination and Phenotypic and Karyotypic Plasticity in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sheng; Billmyre, R. Blake; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    In fungi, unisexual reproduction, where sexual development is initiated without the presence of two compatible mating type alleles, has been observed in several species that can also undergo traditional bisexual reproduction, including the important human fungal pathogens Cryptococcus neoformans and Candida albicans. While unisexual reproduction has been well characterized qualitatively, detailed quantifications are still lacking for aspects of this process, such as the frequency of recombination during unisexual reproduction, and how this compares with bisexual reproduction. Here, we analyzed meiotic recombination during α-α unisexual and a-α bisexual reproduction of C. neoformans. We found that meiotic recombination operates in a similar fashion during both modes of sexual reproduction. Specifically, we observed that in α-α unisexual reproduction, the numbers of crossovers along the chromosomes during meiosis, recombination frequencies at specific chromosomal regions, as well as meiotic recombination hot and cold spots, are all similar to those observed during a-α bisexual reproduction. The similarity in meiosis is also reflected by the fact that phenotypic segregation among progeny collected from the two modes of sexual reproduction is also similar, with transgressive segregation being observed in both. Additionally, we found diploid meiotic progeny were also produced at similar frequencies in the two modes of sexual reproduction, and transient chromosomal loss and duplication likely occurs frequently and results in aneuploidy and loss of heterozygosity that can span entire chromosomes. Furthermore, in both α-α unisexual and a-α bisexual reproduction, we observed biased allele inheritance in regions on chromosome 4, suggesting the presence of fragile chromosomal regions that might be vulnerable to mitotic recombination. Interestingly, we also observed a crossover event that occurred within the MAT locus during α-α unisexual reproduction. Our results

  2. Meiotic Studies in Some Species of Tribe Cichorieae (Asteraceae) from Western Himalayas

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Raghbir Chand; Goyal, Henna; Singh, Vijay; Goel, Rajesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The present paper deals with meiotic studies in 15 species belonging to 6 genera of the tribe Cichorieae from various localities of Western Himalayas. The chromosome number has been reported for the first time in Hieracium crocatum (2n = 10) and Lactuca lessertiana (2n = 2x = 16). Further, intraspecific variability has been reported for the first time in H. umbellatum (2n = 2x = 10 and 2n = 6x = 54), Tragopogon dubius (2n = 2x = 14 and 2n = 4x = 28), and T. gracilis (2n = 2x = 14). The chromosome report of 2n = 2x = 10 in Youngia tenuifolia is made for the first time in India. Maximum numbers of the populations show laggards, chromosome stickiness, and cytomixis from early prophase to telophase-II, leading to the formation of aneuploid cells or meiocytes with double chromosome number. Such meiotic abnormalities produce unreduced pollen grains and the reduced pollen viability. PMID:25489603

  3. Meiotic studies in some species of tribe Cichorieae (Asteraceae) from Western Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Raghbir Chand; Goyal, Henna; Singh, Vijay; Goel, Rajesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The present paper deals with meiotic studies in 15 species belonging to 6 genera of the tribe Cichorieae from various localities of Western Himalayas. The chromosome number has been reported for the first time in Hieracium crocatum (2n = 10) and Lactuca lessertiana (2n = 2x = 16). Further, intraspecific variability has been reported for the first time in H. umbellatum (2n = 2x = 10 and 2n = 6x = 54), Tragopogon dubius (2n = 2x = 14 and 2n = 4x = 28), and T. gracilis (2n = 2x = 14). The chromosome report of 2n = 2x = 10 in Youngia tenuifolia is made for the first time in India. Maximum numbers of the populations show laggards, chromosome stickiness, and cytomixis from early prophase to telophase-II, leading to the formation of aneuploid cells or meiocytes with double chromosome number. Such meiotic abnormalities produce unreduced pollen grains and the reduced pollen viability.

  4. Analysis of meiotic segregation, using single-sperm typing: Meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Leeflang, E.P.; Arnheim, N.; McPeek, M.S.

    1996-10-01

    Meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus has recently been suggested as being responsible for maintaining the frequency, in the human population, of DM chromosomes capable of expansion to the disease state. In order to test this hypothesis, we have studied samples of single sperm from three individuals heterozygous at the DM locus, each with one allele larger and one allele smaller than 19 CTG repeats. To guard against the possible problem of differential PCR amplification rates based on the lengths of the alleles, the sperm were also typed at another closely linked marker whose allele size was unrelated to the allele size at the DM locus. Using statistical models specifically designed to study single-sperm segregation data, we find no evidence of meiotic segregation distortion. The upper limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval for the estimate of the common segregation probability for the three donors is at or below .515 for all models considered, and no statistically significant difference from .5 is detected in any of the models. This suggests that any greater amount of segregation distortion at the myotonic dystrophy locus must result from events following sperm ejaculation. The mathematical models developed make it possible to study segregation distortion with high resolution by using sperm-typing data from any locus. 26 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  5. Identification of novel Drosophila meiotic genes recovered in a P-element screen.

    PubMed

    Sekelsky, J J; McKim, K S; Messina, L; French, R L; Hurley, W D; Arbel, T; Chin, G M; Deneen, B; Force, S J; Hari, K L; Jang, J K; Laurençon, A C; Madden, L D; Matthies, H J; Milliken, D B; Page, S L; Ring, A D; Wayson, S M; Zimmerman, C C; Hawley, R S

    1999-06-01

    The segregation of homologous chromosomes from one another is the essence of meiosis. In many organisms, accurate segregation is ensured by the formation of chiasmata resulting from crossing over. Drosophila melanogaster females use this type of recombination-based system, but they also have mechanisms for segregating achiasmate chromosomes with high fidelity. We describe a P-element mutagenesis and screen in a sensitized genetic background to detect mutations that impair meiotic chromosome pairing, recombination, or segregation. Our screen identified two new recombination-deficient mutations: mei-P22, which fully eliminates meiotic recombination, and mei-P26, which decreases meiotic exchange by 70% in a polar fashion. We also recovered an unusual allele of the ncd gene, whose wild-type product is required for proper structure and function of the meiotic spindle. However, the screen yielded primarily mutants specifically defective in the segregation of achiasmate chromosomes. Although most of these are alleles of previously undescribed genes, five were in the known genes alphaTubulin67C, CycE, push, and Trl. The five mutations in known genes produce novel phenotypes for those genes.

  6. Surface-spreading technique of meiotic cells and immunodetection of synaptonemal complex proteins in teleostean fishes.

    PubMed

    Araya-Jaime, Cristian; Serrano, Érica Alves; de Andrade Silva, Duílio Mazzoni Zerbinato; Yamashita, Masakane; Iwai, Toshiharu; Oliveira, Cláudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Different moderrn methodologies are presently available to analyze meiotic chromosomes. These methods permit investigation of the behavior of chromosomes in the normal complement and of sex and B chromosomes, two special types of chromosomes that are associated with the A complement and are present in many organisms, including fishes. However, meiotic studies are still scarce in fishes, considering the wide number of species in this group.. Here, we describe a new protocol for the visualization of the synaptonemal complex in spermatocytes and oocytes of fishes and to the sequential use of the technique with other procedures and techniques such as immunodetection of the synaptonemal complex protein with a specific antibody and co-detection of DNA sequences by FISH. The meiotic surface-spreading protocol used in the present proposal worked well in representative species of four fish orders and was useful in obtaining good results even in small specimens. Fish-specific antibodies and commercial products worked similarly well to detect synaptonemal complex (SC) proteins. The sequential application of fluorescence in situ hybridization using specific probes showed clear signals associated with the SC structures identified by immunostaining. Here, we provide a useful and applicable immunofluorescent protocol for the visualization of synaptonemal complex proteins in the meiotic cells of fishes in surface-spreading preparations. Furthermore, this technique allows for the sequential application of other cytogenetic procedures.

  7. Identification of novel Drosophila meiotic genes recovered in a P-element screen.

    PubMed Central

    Sekelsky, J J; McKim, K S; Messina, L; French, R L; Hurley, W D; Arbel, T; Chin, G M; Deneen, B; Force, S J; Hari, K L; Jang, J K; Laurençon, A C; Madden, L D; Matthies, H J; Milliken, D B; Page, S L; Ring, A D; Wayson, S M; Zimmerman, C C; Hawley, R S

    1999-01-01

    The segregation of homologous chromosomes from one another is the essence of meiosis. In many organisms, accurate segregation is ensured by the formation of chiasmata resulting from crossing over. Drosophila melanogaster females use this type of recombination-based system, but they also have mechanisms for segregating achiasmate chromosomes with high fidelity. We describe a P-element mutagenesis and screen in a sensitized genetic background to detect mutations that impair meiotic chromosome pairing, recombination, or segregation. Our screen identified two new recombination-deficient mutations: mei-P22, which fully eliminates meiotic recombination, and mei-P26, which decreases meiotic exchange by 70% in a polar fashion. We also recovered an unusual allele of the ncd gene, whose wild-type product is required for proper structure and function of the meiotic spindle. However, the screen yielded primarily mutants specifically defective in the segregation of achiasmate chromosomes. Although most of these are alleles of previously undescribed genes, five were in the known genes alphaTubulin67C, CycE, push, and Trl. The five mutations in known genes produce novel phenotypes for those genes. PMID:10353897

  8. Discovery of Supernumerary B Chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Bauerly, Elisabeth; Hughes, Stacie E.; Vietti, Dana R.; Miller, Danny E.; McDowell, William; Hawley, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    B chromosomes are small, heterochromatic chromosomes that are transmitted in a non-Mendelian manner. We have identified a stock of Drosophila melanogaster that recently (within the last decade) acquired an average of 10 B chromosomes per fly. These B chromosomes are transmitted by both males and females and can be maintained for multiple generations in a wild-type genetic background despite the fact that they cause high levels of 4th chromosome meiotic nondisjunction in females. Most curiously, these B chromosomes are mitotically unstable, suggesting either the absence of critical chromosomal sites or the inability of the meiotic or mitotic systems to cope with many additional chromosomes. These B chromosomes also contain centromeres and are primarily composed of the heterochromatic AATAT satellite sequence. Although the AATAT sequence comprises the majority of the 4th chromosome heterochromatin, the B chromosomes lack most, if not all, 4th chromosome euchromatin. Presumably as a consequence of their heterochromatic content, these B chromosomes significantly modify position-effect variegation in two separate reporter systems, acting as enhancers of variegation in one case and suppressors in the other. The identification of B chromosomes in a genetically tractable organism like D. melanogaster will facilitate studies of chromosome evolution and the analysis of the mechanisms by which meiotic and mitotic processes cope with additional chromosomes. PMID:24478336

  9. Bisphenol A exposure at an environmentally relevant dose induces meiotic abnormalities in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan; Duan, Weixia; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Shangcheng; Li, Renyan; Chen, Chunhai; He, Mindi; Lu, Yonghui; Wu, Hongjuan; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Whether environmental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) may induce reproductive disorders is still controversial but certain studies have reported that BPA may cause meiotic abnormalities in C. elegans and female mice. However, little is known about the effect of BPA on meiosis in adult males. To determine whether BPA exposure at an environmentally relevant dose could induce meiotic abnormalities in adult male rats, we exposed 9-week-old male Wistar rats to BPA by gavage at 20 μg/kg body weight (bw)/day for 60 consecutive days. We found that BPA significantly increased the proportion of stage VII seminiferous epithelium and decreased the proportion of stage VIII. Consequently, spermiation was inhibited and spermatogenesis was disrupted. Further investigation revealed that BPA exposure delayed meiosis initiation in the early meiotic stage and induced the accumulation of chromosomal abnormalities and meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the late meiotic stage. The latter event subsequently activated the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (ATM). Our results suggest that long-term exposure to BPA may lead to continuous meiotic abnormalities and ultimately put mammalian reproductive health at risk.

  10. Meiotic Recombination in Arabidopsis Is Catalysed by DMC1, with RAD51 Playing a Supporting Role

    PubMed Central

    Da Ines, Olivier; Degroote, Fabienne; Goubely, Chantal; Amiard, Simon; Gallego, Maria E.; White, Charles I.

    2013-01-01

    Recombination establishes the chiasmata that physically link pairs of homologous chromosomes in meiosis, ensuring their balanced segregation at the first meiotic division and generating genetic variation. The visible manifestation of genetic crossing-overs, chiasmata are the result of an intricate and tightly regulated process involving induction of DNA double-strand breaks and their repair through invasion of a homologous template DNA duplex, catalysed by RAD51 and DMC1 in most eukaryotes. We describe here a RAD51-GFP fusion protein that retains the ability to assemble at DNA breaks but has lost its DNA break repair capacity. This protein fully complements the meiotic chromosomal fragmentation and sterility of Arabidopsis rad51, but not rad51 dmc1 mutants. Even though DMC1 is the only active meiotic strand transfer protein in the absence of RAD51 catalytic activity, no effect on genetic map distance was observed in complemented rad51 plants. The presence of inactive RAD51 nucleofilaments is thus able to fully support meiotic DSB repair and normal levels of crossing-over by DMC1. Our data demonstrate that RAD51 plays a supporting role for DMC1 in meiotic recombination in the flowering plant, Arabidopsis. PMID:24086145

  11. DNA methylation restrains transposons from adopting a chromatin signature permissive for meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zamudio, Natasha; Barau, Joan; Teissandier, Aurélie; Walter, Marius; Borsos, Maté; Servant, Nicolas; Bourc'his, Déborah

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is essential for protecting the mammalian germline against transposons. When DNA methylation-based transposon control is defective, meiotic chromosome pairing is consistently impaired during spermatogenesis: How and why meiosis is vulnerable to transposon activity is unknown. Using two DNA methylation-deficient backgrounds, the Dnmt3L and Miwi2 mutant mice, we reveal that DNA methylation is largely dispensable for silencing transposons before meiosis onset. After this, it becomes crucial to back up to a developmentally programmed H3K9me2 loss. Massive retrotransposition does not occur following transposon derepression, but the meiotic chromatin landscape is profoundly affected. Indeed, H3K4me3 marks gained over transcriptionally active transposons correlate with formation of SPO11-dependent double-strand breaks and recruitment of the DMC1 repair enzyme in Dnmt3L−/− meiotic cells, whereas these features are normally exclusive to meiotic recombination hot spots. Here, we demonstrate that DNA methylation restrains transposons from adopting chromatin characteristics amenable to meiotic recombination, which we propose prevents the occurrence of erratic chromosomal events. PMID:26109049

  12. Meiotic recombination in Arabidopsis is catalysed by DMC1, with RAD51 playing a supporting role.

    PubMed

    Da Ines, Olivier; Degroote, Fabienne; Goubely, Chantal; Amiard, Simon; Gallego, Maria E; White, Charles I

    2013-01-01

    Recombination establishes the chiasmata that physically link pairs of homologous chromosomes in meiosis, ensuring their balanced segregation at the first meiotic division and generating genetic variation. The visible manifestation of genetic crossing-overs, chiasmata are the result of an intricate and tightly regulated process involving induction of DNA double-strand breaks and their repair through invasion of a homologous template DNA duplex, catalysed by RAD51 and DMC1 in most eukaryotes. We describe here a RAD51-GFP fusion protein that retains the ability to assemble at DNA breaks but has lost its DNA break repair capacity. This protein fully complements the meiotic chromosomal fragmentation and sterility of Arabidopsis rad51, but not rad51 dmc1 mutants. Even though DMC1 is the only active meiotic strand transfer protein in the absence of RAD51 catalytic activity, no effect on genetic map distance was observed in complemented rad51 plants. The presence of inactive RAD51 nucleofilaments is thus able to fully support meiotic DSB repair and normal levels of crossing-over by DMC1. Our data demonstrate that RAD51 plays a supporting role for DMC1 in meiotic recombination in the flowering plant, Arabidopsis.

  13. DNA methylation restrains transposons from adopting a chromatin signature permissive for meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Zamudio, Natasha; Barau, Joan; Teissandier, Aurélie; Walter, Marius; Borsos, Maté; Servant, Nicolas; Bourc'his, Déborah

    2015-06-15

    DNA methylation is essential for protecting the mammalian germline against transposons. When DNA methylation-based transposon control is defective, meiotic chromosome pairing is consistently impaired during spermatogenesis: How and why meiosis is vulnerable to transposon activity is unknown. Using two DNA methylation-deficient backgrounds, the Dnmt3L and Miwi2 mutant mice, we reveal that DNA methylation is largely dispensable for silencing transposons before meiosis onset. After this, it becomes crucial to back up to a developmentally programmed H3K9me2 loss. Massive retrotransposition does not occur following transposon derepression, but the meiotic chromatin landscape is profoundly affected. Indeed, H3K4me3 marks gained over transcriptionally active transposons correlate with formation of SPO11-dependent double-strand breaks and recruitment of the DMC1 repair enzyme in Dnmt3L(-/-) meiotic cells, whereas these features are normally exclusive to meiotic recombination hot spots. Here, we demonstrate that DNA methylation restrains transposons from adopting chromatin characteristics amenable to meiotic recombination, which we propose prevents the occurrence of erratic chromosomal events.

  14. Purification, folding, and characterization of Rec12 (Spo11) meiotic recombinase of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng; Gao, Jun; Sharif, Wallace D; Davidson, Mari K; Wahls, Wayne P

    2004-11-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by controlled dsDNA breaks (DSBs). Rec12 (Spo11) protein of fission yeast is essential for the formation of meiotic DSBs in vivo, for meiotic recombination, and for segregation of chromosomes during meiosis I. Rec12 is orthologous to Top6A topoisomerase of Archaea and is likely the catalytic subunit of a meiotic recombinase that introduces recombinogenic DSBs. However, despite intensive effort, it has not been possible to produce Rec12 protein in a soluble form required to permit biochemical analyses of function. To obtain purified Rec12 protein for in vitro studies, a rec12(+) cDNA was generated, cloned into vector pET15b(+), and expressed in Escherichia coli. Rec12 protein was produced at moderate levels and it partitioned into insoluble fractions of whole-cell extracts. The protein was enriched based upon its differential solubility in two different denaturants and was further purified by column chromatography. A combinatorial, fractional, factorial approach was used to identify conditions under which Rec12 protein could be refolded. Four parameters were most important and, following optimization, soluble Rec12 protein was obtained. Gel filtration demonstrated that refolded Rec12 protein exists as a monomer in solution, suggesting that additional proteins may be required to assemble biologically-active Rec12 dimers, as inferred previously from genetic data [Cell Chromosome 1 (2002) 1]. The production of refolded Rec12 in a soluble form will allow for characterization in vitro of this key meiotic recombination enzyme.

  15. Histone methyltransferases MES-4 and MET-1 promote meiotic checkpoint activation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lamelza, Piero; Bhalla, Needhi

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomes that fail to synapse during meiosis become enriched for chromatin marks associated with heterochromatin assembly. This response, called meiotic silencing of unsynapsed or unpaired chromatin (MSUC), is conserved from fungi to mammals. In Caenorhabditis elegans, unsynapsed chromosomes also activate a meiotic checkpoint that monitors synapsis. The synapsis checkpoint signal is dependent on cis-acting loci called Pairing Centers (PCs). How PCs signal to activate the synapsis checkpoint is currently unknown. We show that a chromosomal duplication with PC activity is sufficient to activate the synapsis checkpoint and that it undergoes heterochromatin assembly less readily than a duplication of a non-PC region, suggesting that the chromatin state of these loci is important for checkpoint function. Consistent with this hypothesis, MES-4 and MET-1, chromatin-modifying enzymes associated with transcriptional activity, are required for the synapsis checkpoint. In addition, a duplication with PC activity undergoes heterochromatin assembly when mes-4 activity is reduced. MES-4 function is required specifically for the X chromosome, while MES-4 and MET-1 act redundantly to monitor autosomal synapsis. We propose that MES-4 and MET-1 antagonize heterochromatin assembly at PCs of unsynapsed chromosomes by promoting a transcriptionally permissive chromatin environment that is required for meiotic checkpoint function. Moreover, we suggest that different genetic requirements to monitor the behavior of sex chromosomes and autosomes allow for the lone unsynapsed X present in male germlines to be shielded from inappropriate checkpoint activation.

  16. Histone Methyltransferases MES-4 and MET-1 Promote Meiotic Checkpoint Activation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lamelza, Piero; Bhalla, Needhi

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomes that fail to synapse during meiosis become enriched for chromatin marks associated with heterochromatin assembly. This response, called meiotic silencing of unsynapsed or unpaired chromatin (MSUC), is conserved from fungi to mammals. In Caenorhabditis elegans, unsynapsed chromosomes also activate a meiotic checkpoint that monitors synapsis. The synapsis checkpoint signal is dependent on cis-acting loci called Pairing Centers (PCs). How PCs signal to activate the synapsis checkpoint is currently unknown. We show that a chromosomal duplication with PC activity is sufficient to activate the synapsis checkpoint and that it undergoes heterochromatin assembly less readily than a duplication of a non-PC region, suggesting that the chromatin state of these loci is important for checkpoint function. Consistent with this hypothesis, MES-4 and MET-1, chromatin-modifying enzymes associated with transcriptional activity, are required for the synapsis checkpoint. In addition, a duplication with PC activity undergoes heterochromatin assembly when mes-4 activity is reduced. MES-4 function is required specifically for the X chromosome, while MES-4 and MET-1 act redundantly to monitor autosomal synapsis. We propose that MES-4 and MET-1 antagonize heterochromatin assembly at PCs of unsynapsed chromosomes by promoting a transcriptionally permissive chromatin environment that is required for meiotic checkpoint function. Moreover, we suggest that different genetic requirements to monitor the behavior of sex chromosomes and autosomes allow for the lone unsynapsed X present in male germlines to be shielded from inappropriate checkpoint activation. PMID:23166523

  17. Cycles in spatial and temporal chromosomal organization driven by the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Arnal, Lorena; Hakim, Ofir; Patel, Vishal R; Baldi, Pierre; Hager, Gordon L; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2013-10-01

    Dynamic transitions in the epigenome have been associated with regulated patterns of nuclear organization. The accumulating evidence that chromatin remodeling is implicated in circadian function prompted us to explore whether the clock may control nuclear architecture. We applied the chromosome conformation capture on chip technology in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to demonstrate the presence of circadian long-range interactions using the clock-controlled Dbp gene as bait. The circadian genomic interactions with Dbp were highly specific and were absent in MEFs whose clock was disrupted by ablation of the Bmal1 gene (also called Arntl). We establish that the Dbp circadian interactome contains a wide variety of genes and clock-related DNA elements. These findings reveal a previously unappreciated circadian and clock-dependent shaping of the nuclear landscape.

  18. Cycles in spatial and temporal chromosomal organization driven by the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Arnal, Lorena; Hakim, Ofir; Patel, Vishal R.; Baldi, Pierre; Hager, Gordon L.; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic transitions in the epigenome have been associated with regulated patterns of nuclear organization. The accumulating evidence that chromatin remodeling is implicated in circadian function prompted us to explore whether the clock may control nuclear architecture. We applied the 3C-derived 4C technology (Chromosome Conformation Capture on Chip) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to demonstrate the presence of circadian long-range interactions, using the clock-controlled Dbp gene as bait. The circadian genomic interactions with Dbp are highly specific and are absent in MEFs whose clock is disrupted by ablation of the Bmal1 gene. We establish that the Dbp circadian interactome contains a wide variety of genes and clock-related DNA elements. These findings reveal a previously unappreciated circadian and clock-dependent shaping of the nuclear landscape. PMID:24056944

  19. SPO11-independent DNA repair foci and their role in meiotic silencing.

    PubMed

    Carofiglio, Fabrizia; Inagaki, Akiko; de Vries, Sandra; Wassenaar, Evelyne; Schoenmakers, Sam; Vermeulen, Christie; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; Sleddens-Linkels, Esther; Grootegoed, J Anton; Te Riele, Hein P J; de Massy, Bernard; Baarends, Willy M

    2013-06-01

    In mammalian meiotic prophase, the initial steps in repair of SPO11-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are required to obtain stable homologous chromosome pairing and synapsis. The X and Y chromosomes pair and synapse only in the short pseudo-autosomal regions. The rest of the chromatin of the sex chromosomes remain unsynapsed, contains persistent meiotic DSBs, and the whole so-called XY body undergoes meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). A more general mechanism, named meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC), is activated when autosomes fail to synapse. In the absence of SPO11, many chromosomal regions remain unsynapsed, but MSUC takes place only on part of the unsynapsed chromatin. We asked if spontaneous DSBs occur in meiocytes that lack a functional SPO11 protein, and if these might be involved in targeting the MSUC response to part of the unsynapsed chromatin. We generated mice carrying a point mutation that disrupts the predicted catalytic site of SPO11 (Spo11(YF/YF)), and blocks its DSB-inducing activity. Interestingly, we observed foci of proteins involved in the processing of DNA damage, such as RAD51, DMC1, and RPA, both in Spo11(YF/YF) and Spo11 knockout meiocytes. These foci preferentially localized to the areas that undergo MSUC and form the so-called pseudo XY body. In SPO11-deficient oocytes, the number of repair foci increased during oocyte development, indicating the induction of S phase-independent, de novo DNA damage. In wild type pachytene oocytes we observed meiotic silencing in two types of pseudo XY bodies, one type containing DMC1 and RAD51 foci on unsynapsed axes, and another type containing only RAD51 foci, mainly on synapsed axes. Taken together, our results indicate that in addition to asynapsis, persistent SPO11-induced DSBs are important for the initiation of MSCI and MSUC, and that SPO11-independent DNA repair foci contribute to the MSUC response in oocytes.

  20. Meiotic DSB patterning: A multifaceted process

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Tim J.; Garcia, Valerie; Neale, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Meiosis is a specialized two-step cell division responsible for genome haploidization and the generation of genetic diversity during gametogenesis. An integral and distinctive feature of the meiotic program is the evolutionarily conserved initiation of homologous recombination (HR) by the developmentally programmed induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The inherently dangerous but essential act of DSB formation is subject to multiple forms of stringent and self-corrective regulation that collectively ensure fruitful and appropriate levels of genetic exchange without risk to cellular survival. Within this article we focus upon an emerging element of this control—spatial regulation—detailing recent advances made in understanding how DSBs are evenly distributed across the genome, and present a unified view of the underlying patterning mechanisms employed. PMID:26730703

  1. Meiotic DSB patterning: A multifaceted process.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Tim J; Garcia, Valerie; Neale, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a specialized two-step cell division responsible for genome haploidization and the generation of genetic diversity during gametogenesis. An integral and distinctive feature of the meiotic program is the evolutionarily conserved initiation of homologous recombination (HR) by the developmentally programmed induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The inherently dangerous but essential act of DSB formation is subject to multiple forms of stringent and self-corrective regulation that collectively ensure fruitful and appropriate levels of genetic exchange without risk to cellular survival. Within this article we focus upon an emerging element of this control--spatial regulation--detailing recent advances made in understanding how DSBs are evenly distributed across the genome, and present a unified view of the underlying patterning mechanisms employed.

  2. Dynamic spatial organization of multi-protein complexes controlling microbial polar organization, chromosome replication, and cytokinesis

    SciTech Connect

    McAdams, Harley; Shapiro, Lucille; Horowitz, Mark; Andersen, Gary; Downing, Kenneth; Earnest, Thomas; Ellisman, Mark; Gitai, Zemer; Larabell, Carolyn; Viollier, Patrick

    2012-06-18

    This project was a program to develop high-throughput methods to identify and characterize spatially localized multiprotein complexes in bacterial cells. We applied a multidisciplinary systems engineering approach to the detailed characterization of localized multi-protein structures in vivo a problem that has previously been approached on a fragmented, piecemeal basis.

  3. The Pch2 AAA+ ATPase promotes phosphorylation of the Hop1 meiotic checkpoint adaptor in response to synaptonemal complex defects

    PubMed Central

    Herruzo, Esther; Ontoso, David; González-Arranz, Sara; Cavero, Santiago; Lechuga, Ana; San-Segundo, Pedro A.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic cells possess surveillance mechanisms that monitor critical events such as recombination and chromosome synapsis. Meiotic defects resulting from the absence of the synaptonemal complex component Zip1 activate a meiosis-specific checkpoint network resulting in delayed or arrested meiotic progression. Pch2 is an evolutionarily conserved AAA+ ATPase required for the checkpoint-induced meiotic block in the zip1 mutant, where Pch2 is only detectable at the ribosomal DNA array (nucleolus). We describe here that high levels of the Hop1 protein, a checkpoint adaptor that localizes to chromosome axes, suppress the checkpoint defect of a zip1 pch2 mutant restoring Mek1 activity and meiotic cell cycle delay. We demonstrate that the critical role of Pch2 in this synapsis checkpoint is to sustain Mec1-dependent phosphorylation of Hop1 at threonine 318. We also show that the ATPase activity of Pch2 is essential for its checkpoint function and that ATP binding to Pch2 is required for its localization. Previous work has shown that Pch2 negatively regulates Hop1 chromosome abundance during unchallenged meiosis. Based on our results, we propose that, under checkpoint-inducing conditions, Pch2 also possesses a positive action on Hop1 promoting its phosphorylation and its proper distribution on unsynapsed chromosome axes. PMID:27257060

  4. Time-dependent Effects of Transcription- and Translation-halting Drugs on the Spatial Distributions of the E. coli Chromosome and Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Somenath; Choi, Heejun; Mondal, Jagannath; Weisshaar, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Previously observed effects of rifampicin and chloramphenicol indicate that transcription and translation activity strongly affect the coarse spatial organization of the bacterial cytoplasm. Single-cell, time-resolved, quantitative imaging of chromosome and ribosome spatial distributions and ribosome diffusion in live E. coli provides insight into the underlying mechanisms. Monte Carlo simulations of model DNA-ribosome mixtures support a novel nucleoid-ribosome mixing hypothesis. In normal conditions, 70S-polysomes and the chromosomal DNA segregate, while 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits are able to penetrate the nucleoids. Growth conditions and drug treatments determine the partitioning of ribosomes into 70S-polysomes vs free 30S and 50S subunits. Entropic and excluded volume effects then dictate the resulting chromosome and ribosome spatial distributions. Direct observation of radial contraction of the nucleoids 0-5 min after treatment with either transcription- or translation-halting drugs supports the hypothesis that simultaneous transcription, translation, and insertion of proteins into the membrane (“transertion”) exerts an expanding force on the chromosomal DNA. Breaking of the DNA-RNA polymerase-mRNA-ribosome-membrane chain in either of two ways causes similar nucleoid contraction on a similar timescale. We suggest that chromosomal expansion due to transertion enables co-transcriptional translation throughout the nucleoids. PMID:25250841

  5. A meiotic linkage map of the silver fox, aligned and compared to the canine genome.

    PubMed

    Kukekova, Anna V; Trut, Lyudmila N; Oskina, Irina N; Johnson, Jennifer L; Temnykh, Svetlana V; Kharlamova, Anastasiya V; Shepeleva, Darya V; Gulievich, Rimma G; Shikhevich, Svetlana G; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Acland, Gregory M

    2007-03-01

    A meiotic linkage map is essential for mapping traits of interest and is often the first step toward understanding a cryptic genome. Specific strains of silver fox (a variant of the red fox, Vulpes vulpes), which segregate behavioral and morphological phenotypes, create a need for such a map. One such strain, selected for docility, exhibits friendly dog-like responses to humans, in contrast to another strain selected for aggression. Development of a fox map is facilitated by the known cytogenetic homologies between the dog and fox, and by the availability of high resolution canine genome maps and sequence data. Furthermore, the high genomic sequence identity between dog and fox allows adaptation of canine microsatellites for genotyping and meiotic mapping in foxes. Using 320 such markers, we have constructed the first meiotic linkage map of the fox genome. The resulting sex-averaged map covers 16 fox autosomes and the X chromosome with an average inter-marker distance of 7.5 cM. The total map length corresponds to 1480.2 cM. From comparison of sex-averaged meiotic linkage maps of the fox and dog genomes, suppression of recombination in pericentromeric regions of the metacentric fox chromosomes was apparent, relative to the corresponding segments of acrocentric dog chromosomes. Alignment of the fox meiotic map against the 7.6x canine genome sequence revealed high conservation of marker order between homologous regions of the two species. The fox meiotic map provides a critical tool for genetic studies in foxes and identification of genetic loci and genes implicated in fox domestication.

  6. Evidence for meiotic drive as an explanation for karyotype changes in fishes.

    PubMed

    Molina, Wagner Franco; Martinez, Pablo A; Bertollo, Luiz Antônio C; Bidau, Claudio Juan

    2014-06-01

    The process of preferential chromosome segregation during meiosis has been suggested to be responsible for the predominance of certain chromosome types in the karyotypes of mammals, birds and insects. We developed an extensive analysis of the fixation of mono- or bibrachial chromosomes in the karyotypes of the large Actinopterygii fish group, a key link in the evolution of terrestrial vertebrates, in order to investigate the generality of meiotic drive in determining karyotypic macrotrends. Unlike mammals, fishes have markedly undergone several types of preferential chromosomal rearrangements throughout evolution. Data from the analyzed orders indicate a prevalence of karyotypes with few (<33%) or many (>66%) acrocentric chromosomes and a low number of karyotypes with balanced numbers of mono- and bi-brachial elements. Parallel trends towards a higher number of karyotypes with prevalence of monobrachial chromosomes occurred in phylogenetically close orders (e.g. Perciformes and Tetraodontiformes, and in the order Mugiliformes) and in clades with prevalence of bibrachial elements (e.g. Characiformes, Gymnotiformes, Siluriformes, and Cypriniformes). Some orders where fewer species were available for study, such as Atheriniformes and Anguilliformes, showed karyotype assemblages where both trends were present. Our results strongly suggest a primary role of meiotic drive in karyotypic evolution as indicated by the accumulation of monobrachial chromosomes in Perciformes and Cypriniformes, or bibrachial chromosomes in Siluriformes and Characiformes. Further examinations of the interaction between life history traits, environmental characteristics, and the fixation of chromosomal rearrangements would be exceedingly valuable.

  7. Evaluating the relationship between spermatogenic silencing of the X chromosome and evolution of the Y chromosome in chimpanzee and human.

    PubMed

    Mulugeta Achame, Eskeatnaf; Baarends, Willy M; Gribnau, Joost; Grootegoed, J Anton

    2010-12-14

    Chimpanzees and humans are genetically very similar, with the striking exception of their Y chromosomes, which have diverged tremendously. The male-specific region (MSY), representing the greater part of the Y chromosome, is inherited from father to son in a clonal fashion, with natural selection acting on the MSY as a unit. Positive selection might involve the performance of the MSY in spermatogenesis. Chimpanzees have a highly polygamous mating behavior, so that sperm competition is thought to provide a strong selective force acting on the Y chromosome in the chimpanzee lineage. In consequence of evolution of the heterologous sex chromosomes in mammals, meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) results in a transcriptionally silenced XY body in male meiotic prophase, and subsequently also in postmeiotic repression of the sex chromosomes in haploid spermatids. This has evolved to a situation where MSCI has become a prerequisite for spermatogenesis. Here, by analysis of microarray testicular expression data representing a small number of male chimpanzees and men, we obtained information indicating that meiotic and postmeiotic X chromosome silencing might be more effective in chimpanzee than in human spermatogenesis. From this, we suggest that the remarkable reorganization of the chimpanzee Y chromosome, compared to the human Y chromosome, might have an impact on its meiotic interactions with the X chromosome and thereby on X chromosome silencing in spermatogenesis. Further studies will be required to address comparative functional aspects of MSCI in chimpanzee, human, and other placental mammals.

  8. Tet1 controls meiosis by regulating meiotic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shinpei; Hong, Kwonho; Liu, Rui; Shen, Li; Inoue, Azusa; Diep, Dinh; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Yi

    2012-12-20

    Meiosis is a germ-cell-specific cell division process through which haploid gametes are produced for sexual reproduction. Before the initiation of meiosis, mouse primordial germ cells undergo a series of epigenetic reprogramming steps, including the global erasure of DNA methylation at the 5-position of cytosine (5mC) in CpG-rich DNA. Although several epigenetic regulators, such as Dnmt3l and the histone methyltransferases G9a and Prdm9, have been reported to be crucial for meiosis, little is known about how the expression of meiotic genes is regulated and how their expression contributes to normal meiosis. Using a loss-of-function approach in mice, here we show that the 5mC-specific dioxygenase Tet1 has an important role in regulating meiosis in mouse oocytes. Tet1 deficiency significantly reduces female germ-cell numbers and fertility. Univalent chromosomes and unresolved DNA double-strand breaks are also observed in Tet1-deficient oocytes. Tet1 deficiency does not greatly affect the genome-wide demethylation that takes place in primordial germ cells, but leads to defective DNA demethylation and decreased expression of a subset of meiotic genes. Our study thus establishes a function for Tet1 in meiosis and meiotic gene activation in female germ cells.

  9. Tet1 controls meiosis by regulating meiotic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Shinpei; Hong, Kwonho; Liu, Rui; Shen, Li; Inoue, Azusa; Diep, Dinh; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Meiosis is a germ cell-specific cell division process through which haploid gametes are produced for sexual reproduction1. Prior to initiation of meiosis, mouse primordial germ cells (PGCs) undergo a series of epigenetic reprogramming steps2,3, including global erasure of DNA methylation on the 5-position of cytosine (5mC) at CpG4,5. Although several epigenetic regulators, such as Dnmt3l, histone methyltransferases G9a and Prdm9, have been reported to be critical for meiosis6, little is known about how the expression of meiotic genes is regulated and how their expression contributes to normal meiosis. Using a loss of function approach, here we demonstrate that the 5mC-specific dioxygenase Tet1 plays an important role in regulating meiosis in mouse oocytes. Tet1 deficiency significantly reduces female germ cell numbers and fertility. Univalent chromosomes and unresolved DNA double strand breaks are also observed in Tet1-deficient oocytes. Tet1 deficiency does not greatly affect the genome-wide demethylation that takes place in PGCs but leads to defective DNA demethylation and decreased expression of a subset of meiotic genes. Our study thus establishes a function for Tet1 in meiosis and meiotic gene activation in female germ cells. PMID:23151479

  10. Identification of DSB-1, a protein required for initiation of meiotic recombination in Caenorhabditis elegans, illuminates a crossover assurance checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Stamper, Ericca L; Rodenbusch, Stacia E; Rosu, Simona; Ahringer, Julie; Villeneuve, Anne M; Dernburg, Abby F

    2013-01-01

    Meiotic recombination, an essential aspect of sexual reproduction, is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). DSBs are catalyzed by the widely-conserved Spo11 enzyme; however, the activity of Spo11 is regulated by additional factors that are poorly conserved through evolution. To expand our understanding of meiotic regulation, we have characterized a novel gene, dsb-1, that is specifically required for meiotic DSB formation in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. DSB-1 localizes to chromosomes during early meiotic prophase, coincident with the timing of DSB formation. DSB-1 also promotes normal protein levels and chromosome localization of DSB-2, a paralogous protein that plays a related role in initiating recombination. Mutations that disrupt crossover formation result in prolonged DSB-1 association with chromosomes, suggesting that nuclei may remain in a DSB-permissive state. Extended DSB-1 localization is seen even in mutants with defects in early recombination steps, including spo-11, suggesting that the absence of crossover precursors triggers the extension. Strikingly, failure to form a crossover precursor on a single chromosome pair is sufficient to extend the localization of DSB-1 on all chromosomes in the same nucleus. Based on these observations we propose a model for crossover assurance that acts through DSB-1 to maintain a DSB-permissive state until all chromosome pairs acquire crossover precursors. This work identifies a novel component of the DSB machinery in C. elegans, and sheds light on an important pathway that regulates DSB formation for crossover assurance.

  11. [Sex chromosomes and meiosis].

    PubMed

    Guichaoua, M-R; Geoffroy-Siraudin, C; Tassistro, V; Ghalamoun-Slaimi, R; Perrin, J; Metzler-Guillemain, C

    2009-01-01

    Sex chromosome behaviour fundamentally differs between male and female meiosis. In oocyte, X chromosomes synapse giving a XX bivalent which is not recognizable in their morphology and behaviour from autosomal bivalents. In human male, X and Y chromosomes differ from one another in their morphology and their genetic content, leading to a limited pairing and preventing genetic recombination, excepted in homologous region PAR1. During pachytene stage of the first meiotic prophase, X and Y chromosomes undergo a progressive condensation and form a transcriptionally silenced peripheral XY body. The condensation of the XY bivalent during pachytene stage led us to describe four pachytene substages and to localize the pachytene checkpoint between substages 2 and 3. We also defined the pachytene index (PI=P1+P2/P1+P2+P3+P4) which is always less than 0.50 in normal meiosis. XY body undergoes decondensation at diplotene stage, but transcriptional inactivation of the two sex chromosomes or Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI) persists through to the end of spermatogenesis. Sex chromosome inactivation involves several proteins, some of them were now identified. Two isoforms of the HP1 protein, HP1beta and HP1gamma, are involved in the facultative heterochromatinization of the XY body, but the initiation of this process involves the phosphorylation of the protein H2AX by the kinase ATR whose recruitment depends on BRCA1. Extensive researches on the inactivation of the sex chromosomes during male meiosis will allow to a better understanding of some male infertilities.

  12. Pre-meiotic bands and novel meiotic spindle ontogeny in quadrilobed sporocytes of leafy liverworts (Jungermannidae, Bryophyta).

    PubMed

    Brown, Roy C; Lemmon, Betty E

    2009-10-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy were used to study the nucleation and organization of microtubules during meiosis in two species of leafy liverworts, Cephalozia macrostachya and Telaranea longifolia. This is the first such study of sporogenesis in the largest group of liverworts important as living representatives of some of the first land plant lineages. These studies show that cytoplasmic quadrilobing of pre-meiotic sporocytes into future spore domains is initiated by girdling bands of gamma-tubulin and microtubules similar to those recently described in lobed sporocytes of simple thalloid liverworts. However, spindle ontogeny is not like other liverworts studied and is, in fact, probably unique among bryophytes. Following the establishment of quadrilobing, numerous microtubules diverge from the bands and extend into the enlarging lobes. The bands disappear and are replaced by microtubules that arise from gamma-tubulin associated with the nuclear envelope. This microtubule system extends into the four lobes and is gradually reorganized into a quadripolar spindle, each half spindle consisting of a pair of poles straddling opposite cleavage furrows. Chromosomes move on this spindle to the polar cleavage furrows. The reniform daughter nuclei, each curved over a cleavage furrow, immediately enter second meiotic division with spindles now terminating in the lobes. Phragmoplasts that develop in the interzones among the haploid tetrad nuclei guide deposition of cell plates that join with the pre-meiotic furrows resulting in cleavage of the tetrad of spores. These observations document a significant variation in the innovative process of sporogenesis evolved in early land plants.

  13. Inactivation or non-reactivation: what accounts better for the silence of sex chromosomes during mammalian male meiosis?

    PubMed

    Page, Jesús; de la Fuente, Roberto; Manterola, Marcia; Parra, María Teresa; Viera, Alberto; Berríos, Soledad; Fernández-Donoso, Raúl; Rufas, Julio S

    2012-06-01

    During the first meiotic prophase in male mammals, sex chromosomes undergo a program of transcriptional silencing called meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). MSCI is triggered by accumulation of proteins like BRCA1, ATR, and γH2AX on unsynapsed chromosomes, followed by local changes on the sex chromatin, including histone modifications, incorporation of specific histone variants, non-histone proteins, and RNAs. It is generally thought that MSCI represents the transition of unsynapsed chromatin from a transcriptionally active state to a repressed state. However, transcription is generally low in the whole nucleus during the early stages of the first meiotic prophase, when markers of MSCI first appear, and is then reactivated globally during pachytene. Thus, an alternative possibility is that MSCI represents the targeted maintenance and/or reinforcement of a prior repressed state, i.e., a failure to reactivate. Here, we present an analysis of the temporal and spatial appearance of transcriptional and MSCI markers, as well as chromatin modifications related to transcriptional regulation. We show that levels of RNA pol II and histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9 (H3K9ac) are low during leptotene, zygotene, and early pachytene, but increase strongly in mid-pachytene, indicating that reactivation occurs with some delay after synapsis. However, while transcription markers appear abundantly on the autosomes at mid-pachytene, they are not directed to the sex chromosomes. Interestingly, we found that chromatin modifications related to transcriptional silencing and/or MSCI, namely, histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 9 (H3K9me3), histone H3 monomethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me1), γH2AX, SUMO1, and XMR, appear on the sex chromosomes before autosomes become reactivated. These results suggest that the onset of MSCI during late zygotene and early pachytene may prevent sex chromosome reactivation during mid-pachytene instead of promoting inactivation de novo. Additionally, we

  14. Measuring Meiotic Crossovers via Multi-Locus Genotyping of Single Pollen Grains in Barley.

    PubMed

    Dreissig, Steven; Fuchs, Jörg; Cápal, Petr; Kettles, Nicola; Byrne, Ed; Houben, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The detection of meiotic crossovers in crop plants currently relies on scoring DNA markers in a segregating population or cytological visualization. We investigated the feasibility of using flow-sorted haploid nuclei, Phi29 DNA polymerase-based whole-genome-amplification (WGA) and multi-locus KASP-genotyping to measure meiotic crossovers in individual barley pollen grains. To demonstrate the proof of concept, we used 24 gene-based physically mapped single nucleotide polymorphisms to genotype the WGA products of 50 single pollen nuclei. The number of crossovers per chromosome, recombination frequencies along chromosome 3H and segregation distortion were analysed and compared to a doubled haploid (DH) population of the same genotype. The number of crossovers and chromosome wide recombination frequencies show that this approach is able to produce results that resemble those obtained from other methods in a biologically meaningful way. Only the segregation distortion was found to be lower in the pollen population than in DH plants.

  15. Description of the pre-reductional sex chromosome during male meiosis of Pachylis laticornis (Heteroptera: Coreidae).

    PubMed

    Banho, C A; Alevi, K C C; Pereira, L L V; Souza-Firmino, T S; Itoyama, M M

    2016-04-28

    In Heteroptera, the division of sex chromosomes is well defined as post-reductional for most of species, i.e., the first meiotic division is equational and the second is reductional. However, in some species pre-reductional division has been observed, whereby the first meiotic division is reductional and the second is equational. These include Anisops fieberi (Notonectidae), Ectrychotes disparate (Reduviidae), Dictyonota tricornis (Tingidae), and Archimerus alternatus (Coreidae), as well as other species of the genus Pachylis, in the family Coreidae. Thus, this study aimed to characterize the meiotic behavior of Pachylis laticornis, in order to consider whether this species also undergoes pre-reduction division for the sex chromosomes. Cytogenetic analysis of meiosis in P. laticornis made it possible to characterize the holocentric nature of the chromosomes, the chromosome number of this species [2n = 15 (2m + 12A + X0)], the chromosomal system of sex X0 type, and the presence of m-chromosomes. Furthermore, the analysis of anaphase I, telophase I and II allowed pre-reductional meiotic behavior to be observed for this sex chromosome. Thus, this meiotic behavior was confirmed for another species of Heteroptera, stressing the importance of more cytogenetic studies of meiosis to increase our understanding of variation in the behavior of sex chromosomes during spermatogenesis in heteropterans. Therefore, the present study describes the chromosomal number, the system of sex determination, and meiotic behavior of P. laticornis, corroborating the relationship of this species with others of the same genus.

  16. Cage trials using an endogenous meiotic drive gene in the mosquito Aedes aegypti to promote population replacement.

    PubMed

    Cha, Sung-Jae; Mori, Akio; Chadee, Dave D; Severson, David W

    2006-01-01

    Control of arthropod-borne diseases based on population replacement with genetically modified non-competent vectors has been proposed as a promising alternative to conventional control strategies. Due to likely fitness costs associated with vectors manipulated to carry anti-pathogen effector genes, the effector genes will need to be coupled with a strong drive system to rapidly sweep them into natural populations. Endogenous meiotic drive systems have strong and stable population replacement potential, and have previously been reported in two mosquito species: Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens. To investigate the influence of an endogenous meiotic drive gene on Ae. aegypti population dynamics, we established three experimental population types that were initiated with 100%, 10%, and 1% male mosquitoes carrying a strong meiotic driver (T37 strain) and 100% sensitive females (RED strain), respectively. Among the 100% and 10% populations, early generations were highly male biased, which reflected the effects of the meiotic driver, and remained more than 60% male by the F(15). A genetic marker tightly linked with the meiotic driver on chromosome 1 showed strong selection for the T37 strain-specific allele. Similar but reduced effects of the meiotic driver were also observed in the 1% populations. These results suggest that release of Ae. aegypti males carrying a strong meiotic driver into drive sensitive populations can be an effective tool for population replacement, and provide a foundation for additional studies including both experimental populations and simulations by mathematical modeling.

  17. Unique sex chromosome systems in Ellobius: How do male XX chromosomes recombine and undergo pachytene chromatin inactivation?

    PubMed

    Matveevsky, Sergey; Bakloushinskaya, Irina; Kolomiets, Oxana

    2016-07-18

    Most mammalian species have heteromorphic sex chromosomes in males, except for a few enigmatic groups such as the mole voles Ellobius, which do not have the Y chromosome and Sry gene. The Ellobius (XX ♀♂) system of sex chromosomes has no analogues among other animals. The structure and meiotic behaviour of the two X chromosomes were investigated for males of the sibling species Ellobius talpinus and Ellobius tancrei. Their sex chromosomes, despite their identical G-structure, demonstrate short synaptic fragments and crossover-associated MLH1 foci in both telomeric regions only. The chromatin undergoes modifications in the meiotic sex chromosomes. SUMO-1 marks a small nucleolus-like body of the meiotic XX. ATR and ubiH2A are localized in the asynaptic area and the histone γH2AFX covers the entire XX bivalent. The distribution of some markers of chromatin inactivation differentiates sex chromosomes of mole voles from those of other mammals. Sex chromosomes of both studied species have identical recombination and meiotic inactivation patterns. In Ellobius, similar chromosome morphology masks the functional heteromorphism of the male sex chromosomes, which can be seen at meiosis.

  18. Unique sex chromosome systems in Ellobius: How do male XX chromosomes recombine and undergo pachytene chromatin inactivation?

    PubMed Central

    Matveevsky, Sergey; Bakloushinskaya, Irina; Kolomiets, Oxana

    2016-01-01

    Most mammalian species have heteromorphic sex chromosomes in males, except for a few enigmatic groups such as the mole voles Ellobius, which do not have the Y chromosome and Sry gene. The Ellobius (XX ♀♂) system of sex chromosomes has no analogues among other animals. The structure and meiotic behaviour of the two X chromosomes were investigated for males of the sibling species Ellobius talpinus and Ellobius tancrei. Their sex chromosomes, despite their identical G-structure, demonstrate short synaptic fragments and crossover-associated MLH1 foci in both telomeric regions only. The chromatin undergoes modifications in the meiotic sex chromosomes. SUMO-1 marks a small nucleolus-like body of the meiotic XX. ATR and ubiH2A are localized in the asynaptic area and the histone γH2AFX covers the entire XX bivalent. The distribution of some markers of chromatin inactivation differentiates sex chromosomes of mole voles from those of other mammals. Sex chromosomes of both studied species have identical recombination and meiotic inactivation patterns. In Ellobius, similar chromosome morphology masks the functional heteromorphism of the male sex chromosomes, which can be seen at meiosis. PMID:27425629

  19. Meiotic behaviour and sperm aneuploidy in an infertile man with a mosaic 45,X/46,XY karyotype.

    PubMed

    Ren, He; Chow, Victor; Ma, Sai

    2015-12-01

    The meiotic behaviour of the germ cells in 45,X/46,XY men has not been extensively studied. This study investigated the meiotic events and sperm aneuploidy in an azoospermic man with a 45,X/46,XY (50/50) mosaic karyotype to better understand the fate of the 45,X cells and the production of chromosomally abnormal spermatozoa. Combining immunofluorescence techniques and fluorescence in-situ hybridization, meiotic recombination, synapsis, meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) and configuration were analysed, as well as sperm aneuploidy in the patient and 10 normal, fertile men. Despite the 50:50 somatic mosaicism in the patient, 25% of pachytene cells analysed were 45,X. Furthermore, 63% of pachytene cells were 46,XY with paired sex chromosomes, and 12% were 46,XY with unpaired sex chromosomes, which displayed abnormal MCSI patterns. Although the patient's testicular spermatozoa showed increased aneuploidy, the majority were of normal constitution. The X:Y sperm ratio was significantly increased compared with the controls (P < 0.001), which may indicate that some 45,X cells gave rise to X-bearing spermatozoa. The findings provide insight into the fate of 45,X/46,XY cells in meiosis, supporting the hypothesis that stringent checkpoints ensure the favourable production of spermatozoa with normal chromosomal constitution despite an individual's abnormal karyotype.

  20. A large-scale screen in S. pombe identifies seven novel genes required for critical meiotic events.

    PubMed

    Martín-Castellanos, Cristina; Blanco, Miguel; Rozalén, Ana E; Pérez-Hidalgo, Livia; García, Ana I; Conde, Francisco; Mata, Juan; Ellermeier, Chad; Davis, Luther; San-Segundo, Pedro; Smith, Gerald R; Moreno, Sergio

    2005-11-22

    Meiosis is a specialized form of cell division by which sexually reproducing diploid organisms generate haploid gametes. During a long prophase, telomeres cluster into the bouquet configuration to aid chromosome pairing, and DNA replication is followed by high levels of recombination between homologous chromosomes (homologs). This recombination is important for the reductional segregation of homologs at the first meiotic division; without further replication, a second meiotic division yields haploid nuclei. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we have deleted 175 meiotically upregulated genes and found seven genes not previously reported to be critical for meiotic events. Three mutants (rec24, rec25, and rec27) had strongly reduced meiosis-specific DNA double-strand breakage and recombination. One mutant (tht2) was deficient in karyogamy, and two (bqt1 and bqt2) were deficient in telomere clustering, explaining their defects in recombination and segregation. The moa1 mutant was delayed in premeiotic S phase progression and nuclear divisions. Further analysis of these mutants will help elucidate the complex machinery governing the special behavior of meiotic chromosomes.