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Sample records for melanoma tumor cell

  1. Tumor cell vascular mimicry: Novel targeting opportunity in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Mary J C; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Seftor, Richard E B; Chao, Jun-Tzu; Chien, Du-Shieng; Chu, Yi-Wen

    2016-03-01

    In 1999, the American Journal of Pathology published an article, entitled "Vascular channel formation by human melanoma cells in vivo and in vitro: vasculogenic mimicry" by Maniotis and colleagues, which ignited a spirited debate for several years and earned the journal's distinction of a "citation classic" (Maniotis et al., 1999). Tumor cell vasculogenic mimicry (VM), also known as vascular mimicry, describes the plasticity of aggressive cancer cells forming de novo vascular networks and is associated with the malignant phenotype and poor clinical outcome. The tumor cells capable of VM share the commonality of a stem cell-like, transendothelial phenotype, which may be induced by hypoxia. Since its introduction as a novel paradigm for melanoma tumor perfusion, many studies have contributed new findings illuminating the underlying molecular pathways supporting VM in a variety of tumors, including carcinomas, sarcomas, glioblastomas, astrocytomas, and melanomas. Of special significance is the lack of effectiveness of angiogenesis inhibitors on tumor cell VM, suggesting a selective resistance by this phenotype to conventional therapy. Facilitating the functional plasticity of tumor cell VM are key proteins associated with vascular, stem cell, extracellular matrix, and hypoxia-related signaling pathways--each deserving serious consideration as potential therapeutic targets and diagnostic indicators of the aggressive, metastatic phenotype. This review highlights seminal findings pertinent to VM, including the effects of a novel, small molecular compound, CVM-1118, currently under clinical development to target VM, and illuminates important molecular pathways involved in the suppression of this plastic, aggressive phenotype, using melanoma as a model.

  2. Tumor cell vascular mimicry: Novel targeting opportunity in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, Mary J.C.; Seftor, Elisabeth A.; Seftor, Richard E.B.; Chao, Jun-Tzu; Chien, Du-Shieng; Chu, Yi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    In 1999, the American Journal of Pathology published an article, entitled “Vascular channel formation by human melanoma cells in vivo and in vitro: vasculogenic mimicry” by Maniotis and colleagues, which ignited a spirited debate for several years and earned the journal's distinction of a “citation classic” (Maniotis et al., 1999). Tumor cell vasculogenic mimicry (VM), also known as vascular mimicry, describes the plasticity of aggressive cancer cells forming de novo vascular networks and is associated with the malignant phenotype and poor clinical outcome. The tumor cells capable of VM share the commonality of a stem cell-like, transendothelial phenotype, which may be induced by hypoxia. Since its introduction as a novel paradigm for melanoma tumor perfusion, many studies have contributed new findings illuminating the underlying molecular pathways supporting VM in a variety of tumors, including carcinomas, sarcomas, glioblastomas, astrocytomas, and melanomas. Of special significance is the lack of effectiveness of angiogenesis inhibitors on tumor cell VM, suggesting a selective resistance by this phenotype to conventional therapy. Facilitating the functional plasticity of tumor cell VM are key proteins associated with vascular, stem cell, extracellular matrix, and hypoxia-related signaling pathways -- each deserving serious consideration as potential therapeutic targets and diagnostic indicators of the aggressive, metastatic phenotype. This review highlights seminal findings pertinent to VM, including the effects of a novel, small molecular compound, CVM-1118, currently under clinical development to target VM, and illuminates important molecular pathways involved in the suppression of this plastic, aggressive phenotype, using melanoma as a model. PMID:26808163

  3. Tumor-Related Methylated Cell-Free DNA and Circulating Tumor Cells in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Salvianti, Francesca; Orlando, Claudio; Massi, Daniela; De Giorgi, Vincenzo; Grazzini, Marta; Pazzagli, Mario; Pinzani, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumor release into the circulation cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which represent promising biomarkers for cancer diagnosis. Circulating tumor DNA may be studied in plasma from cancer patients by detecting tumor specific alterations, such as genetic or epigenetic modifications. Ras association domain family 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) is a tumor suppressor gene silenced by promoter hypermethylation in a variety of human cancers including melanoma. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic performance of a tumor-related methylated cfDNA marker in melanoma patients and to compare this parameter with the presence of CTCs. RASSF1A promoter methylation was quantified in cfDNA by qPCR in a consecutive series of 84 melanoma patients and 68 healthy controls. In a subset of 68 cases, the presence of CTCs was assessed by a filtration method (Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cells, ISET) as well as by an indirect method based on the detection of tyrosinase mRNA by RT-qPCR. The distribution of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA was investigated in cases and controls and the predictive capability of this parameter was assessed by means of the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The percentage of cases with methylated RASSF1A promoter in cfDNA was significantly higher in each class of melanoma patients (in situ, invasive and metastatic) than in healthy subjects (Pearson chi-squared test, p < 0.001). The concentration of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA in the subjects with a detectable quantity of methylated alleles was significantly higher in melanoma patients than in controls. The biomarker showed a good predictive capability (in terms of AUC) in discriminating between melanoma patients and healthy controls. This epigenetic marker associated to cfDNA did not show a significant correlation with the presence of CTCs, but, when the two parameters are jointly considered, we obtain a higher sensitivity of the detection of positive cases in invasive and

  4. Isolation of melanoma tumor-initiating cells from surgical tissues.

    PubMed

    Boiko, Alexander D

    2013-01-01

    A new model of cancer progression has been put forward that predicts existence of tumor stem cells (TSCs) in the heterogeneous bulk tumor mass that self-renew, are resistant to chemo- and radiotherapies, and sustain tumor growth during the course of its progression or relapse (Ailles and Weissman, Curr Opin Biotechnol 18:460-466, 2007; Chan et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:14016-14021, 2009; D'Angelo and Wicha, Prog Mol Biol Transl Sci 95:113-158, 2010; O'Brien, Semin Radiat Oncol 19:71-77, 2009; Park et al., Mol Ther 17:219-230, 2009). Using most advanced methods of cell purification and transplantation, our laboratory and another independent study identified melanoma stem cells as CD271(NFGR/p75)+ cells from surgical human specimens (Boiko et al., Nature 466:133-137, 2010; Civenni et al., Cancer Res 71:3098-3109, 2011). Here we describe in great detail an approach for isolating tumor-initiating cells from freshly resected melanomas (Boiko et al., Nature 466:133-137, 2010).

  5. Biomarker utility of circulating tumor cells in metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Leila; Lorigan, Paul; Zhou, Cong; Lancashire, Matthew; Booth, Jessica; Cummings, Jeff; Califano, Raffaele; Clack, Glen; Hughes, Andrew; Dive, Caroline

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of melanoma is increasing worldwide. Advances in targeted agents and immunotherapy have improved outcomes in metastatic disease, but biomarkers are required to optimize treatment. We determined the prevalence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and explored their utility as prognostic and pharmacodynamic biomarkers. A total of 101 patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma were recruited prospectively. CTC number was determined using the CellSearch platform and melanoma kits in samples taken at baseline and serially during treatment. CTC numbers ranged between 0 and 36 per 7.5 ml blood; 26% of patients had ≥ 2 CTCs. Baseline CTC number was prognostic for median overall survival (OS) in univariate analysis (2.6 vs. 7.2 months (P<0.011) for patients with ≥ 2 CTCs vs. <2 CTCs, respectively). In multivariate analysis, CTC number was an independent prognostic biomarker of OS (hazard ratio (HR) 2.403, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.303-4.430, P=0.005). Patients receiving treatment in whom CTC number remained ≥ 2 CTCs during treatment had shorter median OS than those who maintained <2 CTCs (7 vs. 10 months, HR 0.34, 95% CI 0.14-0.81, log-rank test P=0.015). In conclusion, CTC number in metastatic cutaneous melanoma patients is prognostic for OS with a cutoff of 2 CTCs per 7.5 ml blood. CTC number measured before and throughout treatment provided additional prognostic information. Larger studies are warranted to confirm CTC biomarker utility in melanoma patients.

  6. Eradication of melanomas by targeted elimination of a minor subset of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Patrick; Kopecky, Caroline; Hombach, Andreas; Zigrino, Paola; Mauch, Cornelia; Abken, Hinrich

    2011-02-08

    Proceeding on the assumption that all cancer cells have equal malignant capacities, current regimens in cancer therapy attempt to eradicate all malignant cells of a tumor lesion. Using in vivo targeting of tumor cell subsets, we demonstrate that selective elimination of a definite, minor tumor cell subpopulation is particularly effective in eradicating established melanoma lesions irrespective of the bulk of cancer cells. Tumor cell subsets were specifically eliminated in a tumor lesion by adoptive transfer of engineered cytotoxic T cells redirected in an antigen-restricted manner via a chimeric antigen receptor. Targeted elimination of less than 2% of the tumor cells that coexpress high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen (HMW-MAA) (melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, MCSP) and CD20 lastingly eradicated melanoma lesions, whereas targeting of any random 10% tumor cell subset was not effective. Our data challenge the biological therapy and current drug development paradigms in the treatment of cancer.

  7. FRIZZLED7 Is Required for Tumor Inititation and Metastatic Growth of Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Shweta; Xu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Metastases are thought to arise from cancer stem cells and their tumor initiating abilities are required for the establishment of metastases. Nevertheless, in metastatic melanoma, the nature of cancer stem cells is under debate and their contribution to metastasis formation remains unknown. Using an experimental metastasis model, we discovered that high levels of the WNT receptor, FZD7, correlated with enhanced metastatic potentials of melanoma cell lines. Knocking down of FZD7 in a panel of four melanoma cell lines led to a significant reduction in lung metastases in animal models, arguing that FZD7 plays a causal role during metastasis formation. Notably, limiting dilution analyses revealed that FZD7 is essential for the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and FZD7 knockdown impeded the early expansion of metastatic melanoma cells shortly after seeding, in accordance with the view that tumor initiating ability of cancer cells is required for metastasis formation. FZD7 activated JNK in melanoma cell lines in vitro and the expression of a dominant negative JNK suppressed metastasis formation in vivo, suggesting that FZD7 may promote metastatic growth of melanoma cells via activation of JNK. Taken together, our findings uncovered a signaling pathway that regulates the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and contributes to metastasis formation in melanoma. PMID:26808375

  8. The beating heart of melanomas: a minor subset of cancer cells sustains tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Patrick; Abken, Hinrich

    2011-04-01

    The recent observation that targeted elimination of a minor subpopulation of melanoma cells can lastingly eradicate the tumor lesion provides strong evidence that an established melanoma lesion is hierarchically organized and maintained by definite subset of cells but not by every random cancer cell. This review discusses the concepts of discrete cancer stem cells and of a cellular hierarchy in melanomas, the rationale for shifting therapies from broad tumor cell cytotoxicity into selective cancer cell elimination strategies and the challenges for future therapeutic concepts.

  9. Fibroblast cell interactions with human melanoma cells affect tumor cell growth as a function of tumor progression.

    PubMed Central

    Cornil, I; Theodorescu, D; Man, S; Herlyn, M; Jambrosic, J; Kerbel, R S

    1991-01-01

    It is known from a variety of experimental systems that the ability of tumor cells to grow locally and metastasize can be affected by the presence of adjacent normal tissues and cells, particularly mesenchymally derived stromal cells such as fibroblasts. However, the comparative influence of such normal cell-tumor cell interactions on tumor behavior has not been thoroughly investigated from the perspective of different stages of tumor progression. To address this question we assessed the influence of normal dermal fibroblasts on the growth of human melanoma cells obtained from different stages of tumor progression. We found that the in vitro growth of most (4 out of 5) melanoma cell lines derived from early-stage radial growth phase or vertical growth phase metastatically incompetent primary lesions is repressed by coculture with normal dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that negative homeostatic growth controls are still operative on melanoma cells from early stages of disease. On the other hand, 9 out of 11 melanoma cell lines derived from advanced metastatically competent vertical growth phase primary lesions, or from distant metastases, were found to be consistently stimulated to grow in the presence of dermal fibroblasts. Evidence was obtained to show that this discriminatory fibroblastic influence is mediated by soluble inhibitory and stimulatory growth factor(s). Taken together, these results indicate that fibroblast-derived signals can have antithetical growth effects on metastatic versus metastatically incompetent tumor subpopulations. This resultant conversion in responsiveness to host tissue environmental factors may confer upon small numbers of metastatically competent cells a growth advantage, allowing them to escape local growth constraints both in the primary tumor site and at distant ectopic tissue sites. PMID:2068080

  10. Lymphocyte imprinting with melanoma antigens acquired by trogocytosis facilitates identification of tumor-reactive T cells

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Galit; Uzana, Ronny; Pato, Aviad; Frankenburg, Shoshana; Merims, Sharon; Yefenof, Eitan; Ferrone, Soldano; Peretz, Tamar; Machlenkin, Arthur; Lotem, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Trogocytosis is a contact-dependent inter-cellular transfer of membrane fragments and associated molecules from antigen presenting cells to effector lymphocytes. We previously demonstrated that trogocytosis also occurs between tumor target and cognate melanoma antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTL). Here we show that, following trogocytosis, immune effector cells acquire molecular components of the tumor, including surface antigens, which are detectable by specific monoclonal antibodies. We demonstrate that CD8+ and CD4+ T cells from melanoma patients’ PBMC and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) capture melanoma antigens, enabling identification of trogocytosing lymphocytes by staining with antigen-specific antibodies. This finding circumvents the necessity of tumor pre-labeling, which in the past was mandatory to detect membrane-capturing T cells. Through the detection of melanoma antigens on TIL, we sorted trogocytosing T cells and verified their preferential reactivity and cytotoxicity. Furthermore, tumor-antigen imprinted T cells were detected at low frequency in fresh TIL cultures shortly after extraction from the tumor. Thus, T cell imprinting by tumor antigens may allow the enrichment of melanoma antigen-specific T cells for research and potentially even for the adoptive immunotherapy of patients with cancer. PMID:23626012

  11. VEGFR-1 Expressed by Malignant Melanoma-Initiating Cells Is Required for Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Natasha Y.; Schatton, Tobias; Kim, Soo; Zhan, Qian; Wilson, Brian J.; Ma, Jie; Saab, Karim R.; Osherov, Veronika; Widlund, Hans R.; Gasser, Martin; Waaga-Gasser, Ana-Maria; Kupper, Thomas S.; Murphy, George F.; Frank, Markus H.

    2011-01-01

    Melanoma growth is driven by malignant melanoma-initiating cells (MMIC) identified by expression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) member ABCB5. ABCB5+ melanoma subpopulations have been shown to overexpress the vasculogenic differentiation markers CD144 (VE-cadherin) and TIE1 and are associated with CD31− vasculogenic mimicry (VM), an established biomarker associated with increased patient mortality. Here we identify a critical role for VEGFR-1 signaling in ABCB5+ MMIC-dependent VM and tumor growth. Global gene expression analyses, validated by mRNA and protein determinations, revealed preferential expression of VEGFR-1 on ABCB5+ tumor cells purified from clinical melanomas and established melanoma lines. In vitro, VEGF induced the expression of CD144 in ABCB5+ subpopulations that constitutively expressed VEGFR-1 but not in ABCB5− bulk populations that were predominantly VEGFR-1−. In vivo, melanoma-specific shRNA-mediated knockdown of VEGFR-1 blocked the development of ABCB5+ VM morphology and inhibited ABCB5+ VM-associated production of the secreted melanoma mitogen laminin. Moreover, melanoma-specific VEGFR-1 knockdown markedly inhibited tumor growth (by >90%). Our results show that VEGFR-1 function in MMIC regulates VM and associated laminin production and show that this function represents one mechanism through which MMICs promote tumor growth. PMID:21212411

  12. VEGFR-1 expressed by malignant melanoma-initiating cells is required for tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Frank, Natasha Y; Schatton, Tobias; Kim, Soo; Zhan, Qian; Wilson, Brian J; Ma, Jie; Saab, Karim R; Osherov, Veronika; Widlund, Hans R; Gasser, Martin; Waaga-Gasser, Ana-Maria; Kupper, Thomas S; Murphy, George F; Frank, Markus H

    2011-02-15

    Melanoma growth is driven by malignant melanoma-initiating cells (MMIC) identified by expression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) member ABCB5. ABCB5(+) melanoma subpopulations have been shown to overexpress the vasculogenic differentiation markers CD144 (VE-cadherin) and TIE1 and are associated with CD31(-) vasculogenic mimicry (VM), an established biomarker associated with increased patient mortality. Here we identify a critical role for VEGFR-1 signaling in ABCB5(+) MMIC-dependent VM and tumor growth. Global gene expression analyses, validated by mRNA and protein determinations, revealed preferential expression of VEGFR-1 on ABCB5(+) tumor cells purified from clinical melanomas and established melanoma lines. In vitro, VEGF induced the expression of CD144 in ABCB5(+) subpopulations that constitutively expressed VEGFR-1 but not in ABCB5(-) bulk populations that were predominantly VEGFR-1(-). In vivo, melanoma-specific shRNA-mediated knockdown of VEGFR-1 blocked the development of ABCB5(+) VM morphology and inhibited ABCB5(+) VM-associated production of the secreted melanoma mitogen laminin. Moreover, melanoma-specific VEGFR-1 knockdown markedly inhibited tumor growth (by > 90%). Our results show that VEGFR-1 function in MMIC regulates VM and associated laminin production and show that this function represents one mechanism through which MMICs promote tumor growth. ©2011 AACR.

  13. Measurements of tumor cell autophagy predict invasiveness, resistance to chemotherapy, and survival in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaohong; Piao, Shengfu; Wang, Dan; Mcafee, Quentin; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Lum, Julian J.; Li, Lin Z.; Amaravadi, Ravi K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Autophagy consists of lysosome-dependent degradation of cytoplasmic contents sequestered by autophagic vesicles (AV). The role of autophagy in determining tumor aggressiveness and response to therapy in melanoma was investigated in this study. Experimental Design Autophagy was measured in tumor biopsies obtained from metastatic melanoma patients enrolled on a phase II trial of temozolomide and sorafenib and correlated to clinical outcome. These results were compared to autophagy measurements in aggressive and indolent melanoma cells grown in two and three dimensional culture and as xenograft tumors. The effects of autophagy inhibition with either hydroxychloroquine or inducible shRNA against the autophagy gene ATG5 were assessed in three dimensional spheroids. Results Patients whose tumors had a high autophagic index were less likely to respond to treatment and had a shorter survival compared to those with a low autophagic index. Differences in autophagy were less evident in aggressive and indolent melanoma cells grown in monolayer culture. In contrast, autophagy was increased in aggressive compared to indolent melanoma xenograft tumors. This difference was recapitulated when aggressive and indolent melanoma cells were grown as spheroids. Autophagy inhibition with either hydroxychloroquine or inducible shRNA against ATG5 resulted in cell death in aggressive melanoma spheroids, and significantly augmented temozolomide-induced cell death. Conclusions Autophagy is a potential prognostic factor and therapeutic target in melanoma. Three dimensional culture mimics the tumor microenvironment better than monolayer culture and is an appropriate model for studying therapeutic combinations involving autophagy modulators autophagy inhibition should be tested clinically in patients with melanoma. PMID:21325076

  14. Tumor cell and circulating markers in melanoma: diagnosis, prognosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Kounalakis, Nicole; Goydos, James S

    2005-09-01

    The search is on for biomarkers for use in the diagnosis, staging, prognosis, and management of patients with melanoma. As with many types of cancer, the hematogenous spread of melanoma is a bad prognostic sign, and many groups have attempted to detect circulating melanoma cells in patients with different stages of melanoma. Some studies have used direct extraction of intact tumor cells from the peripheral blood and others the detection of surrogate markers of circulating melanoma cells, such as tyrosinase or MART-1. However, a correlation between the detection of intact melanoma cells in the circulation and prognosis is controversial. Many other biomarkers have also been studied, including lactate dehydrogenase, S100, TA90, and C-reactive protein. Much progress has been made, and preliminary studies have shown promise with many of these markers. Finally, the detection of tumor-specific circulating DNA has shown promise as a prognostic and diagnostic marker of disease in melanoma as well. In this review we examine the most promising biomarkers for use in patients with cutaneous melanoma.

  15. Folate-conjugated immunoglobulin targets melanoma tumor cells for NK cell effector functions.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Cassandra C; McMichael, Elizabeth L; Jaime-Ramirez, Alena C; Abrams, Zachary B; Lee, Robert J; Carson, William E

    2016-08-01

    The folate receptor (FR) is overexpressed on the vascular side of cancerous cells including those of the breast, ovaries, testes, and cervix. We hypothesized that a folate-conjugated immunoglobulin (F-IgG) would bind to the FR that is overexpressed on melanoma tumor cells to target these cells for lysis by natural killer (NK) cells. Folate receptor expression was confirmed in the Mel-39 (human melanoma) cell line by flow cytometry and immunoblot analysis using KB (human oral epithelial) and F01 (human melanoma) as a positive and a negative control, respectively. FR-positive and FR-negative cell lines were treated with F-IgG or control immunoglobulin G in the presence or absence of cytokines to determine NK cell ability to lyse FR-positive cell lines. NK cell activation was significantly upregulated and lysis of Mel 39 tumor cells increased following treatment with F-IgG compared with control immunoglobulin G at all effector : target (E : T) ratios (P<0.01). This trend further increased by NK cell stimulation with the activating cytokine interleukin-12. NK cell production of cytokines such as interferon-gamma, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, and regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) was also significantly increased in response to costimulation with interleukin-12 stimulation and F-IgG-coated Mel 39 target cells compared with controls (P<0.01). In contrast, F-IgG did not bind to the FR-negative cell line F01 and had no significant effect on NK cell lysis or cytokine production. This research indicates the potential use of F-IgG for its ability to induce an immune response from NK cells against FR-positive melanoma tumor cells, which can be further increased by the addition of cytokines.

  16. A Novel Approach for the Detection and Genetic Analysis of Live Melanoma Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Melody J.; Cooke, Mariana; Steinmetz, David; Karakousis, Giorgos; Saxena, Deeksha; Bartlett, Edmund; Xu, Xiaowei; Hahn, Stephen M.; Dorsey, Jay F.; Kao, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection and genetic analysis may complement currently available disease assessments in patients with melanoma to improve risk stratification and monitoring. We therefore sought to establish the feasibility of a telomerase-based assay for detecting and isolating live melanoma CTCs. Methods The telomerase-based CTC assay utilizes an adenoviral vector that, in the presence of elevated human telomerase activity, drives the amplification of green fluorescent protein. Tumor cells are then identified via an image processing system. The protocol was tested on melanoma cells in culture or spiked into control blood, and on samples from patients with metastatic melanoma. Genetic analysis of the isolated melanoma CTCs was then performed for BRAF mutation status. Results The adenoviral vector was effective for all melanoma cell lines tested with sensitivity of 88.7% (95%CI 85.6-90.4%) and specificity of 99.9% (95%CI 99.8-99.9%). In a pilot trial of patients with metastatic disease, CTCs were identified in 9 of 10 patients, with a mean of 6.0 CTCs/mL. At a cutoff of 1.1 CTCs/mL, the telomerase-based assay exhibits test performance of 90.0% sensitivity and 91.7% specificity. BRAF mutation analysis of melanoma cells isolated from culture or spiked control blood, or from pilot patient samples was found to match the known BRAF mutation status of the cell lines and primary tumors. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report of a telomerase-based assay effective for detecting and isolating live melanoma CTCs. These promising findings support further studies, including towards integrating into the management of patients with melanoma receiving multimodality therapy. PMID:25807549

  17. Tumor stem cells (CD271, c-kit, SOX10) in Melanomas: prognostic and outcome implications.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Amr; Gonzalez, Raul S; Lawson, Diane; Wang, Jason; Cohen, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma cells that express stem cell marker CD271 are shown to form tumors when transplanted into nude or immunodeficient mice. These tumors have a higher metastatic potential and worse prognosis than melanomas resulting from transplantation of CD271-negative cells. We studied stem cell markers (CD271, c-kit, SOX1O) in melanomas, correlating their presence with prognostic factors and outcome. A total of 82 melanomas in tissue microarrays were immunostained for CD271, c-kit, and SOX10. Results were correlated with clinicopathologic prognostic parameters (Breslow depth of invasion, Clark level, sentinel lymph node status, and pathologic stage) and outcome (recurrence, metastases, and death). Of the 82 melanomas, CD271 was expressed in 18 (21%), c-kit in 47 (57%), and SOX10 in all (100%). CD271 does show correlation with metastases (P=0.05). c-kit is associated with favorable prognostic parameters [Breslow depth (P<0.001) and pathologic stage (P=0.02)] and with improved outcome [recurrence (P=0.03) and metastases (P=0.004)]. Although SOX10 is a good diagnostic marker, it cannot be used for prognosis because it is expressed in all the melanomas studied. In conclusion, CD271 expression in melanomas is associated with increased frequency of metastases, and c-kit immunoreactivity is associated with favorable prognostic parameters and improved outcome.

  18. Bone marrow-derived cells are recruited by the melanoma tumor with endothelial cells contributing to tumor vasculature.

    PubMed

    Bonfim-Silva, R; Souza, L E B; Melo, F U F; Oliveira, V C; Magalhães, D A R; Oliveira, H F; Covas, D T; Fontes, A M

    2017-01-01

    Tumor expansion is dependent on neovascularization, a process that requires sustained new vessel formation. Although the critical role of angiogenesis by endothelial sprouting in this process, controversy still prevails on whether angiogenesis involving bone marrow-derived endothelial cells, does contribute to this process. This study aims to evaluate the recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells by the melanoma tumor, including endothelial cells, and if they contribute to angiogenesis. A chimeric mouse model of GFP bone marrow was used to induce melanoma tumors derived from murine B16-F10 cell line. These tumors were evaluated for the presence of myeloid cells (CD11b), T lymphocytes (CD3, CD4 and CD8) and endothelial cells (VEGFR2 and CD31) derived from bone marrow. Mice transplanted with GFP+ cells showed significant bone marrow chimerism (90.9 ± 0.87 %) when compared to the GFP transgenic mice (90.66 ± 2.1 %, p = 0.83) demonstrating successful engraftment of donor bone marrow stem/progenitor cells. Analysis of the murine melanoma tumor showed the presence of donor cells in the tumors (3.5 ± 1.7 %) and interestingly, these cells represent endothelial cells (CD31+ cells; 11.5 ± 6.85 %) and myeloid cells (CD11b+ cells; 80 ± 21 %), but also tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (CD8+ T cells, 13.31 ± 0.2 %; CD4+ T-cells, 2.1 ± 1.2 %). Examination of the tumor endothelium by confocal microscopy suggests the presence of donor CD31+/GFP+ cells in the wall of some blood vessels. This study demonstrates that bone marrow-derived cells are recruited by the murine melanoma tumor, with myeloid cells and CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes migrating as antitumor immune response, and endothelial cells participating of the tumor blood vessels formation.

  19. Targeting Tumor Vasculature Endothelial Cells and Tumor Cells for Immunotherapy of Human Melanoma in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Sun, Ying; Garen, Alan

    1999-07-01

    An immunotherapy treatment for cancer that targets both the tumor vasculature and tumor cells has shown promising results in a severe combined immunodeficient mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. The treatment involves systemic delivery of an immunoconjugate molecule composed of a tumor-targeting domain conjugated to the Fc effector domain of human IgG1. The effector domain induces a cytolytic immune response against the targeted cells by natural killer cells and complement. Two types of targeting domains were used. One targeting domain is a human single-chain Fv molecule that binds to a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the surface of most human melanoma cells. Another targeting domain is factor VII (fVII), a zymogen that binds with high specificity and affinity to the transmembrane receptor tissue factor (TF) to initiate the blood coagulation cascade. TF is expressed by endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature but not the normal vasculature, and also by many types of tumor cells including melanoma. Because the binding of a fVII immunoconjugate to TF might cause disseminated intravascular coagulation, the active site of fVII was mutated to inhibit coagulation without affecting the affinity for TF. The immunoconjugates were encoded as secreted molecules in a replication-defective adenovirus vector, which was injected into the tail vein of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The results demonstrate that a mutated fVII immunoconjugate, administered separately or together with a single-chain Fv immunoconjugate that binds to the tumor cells, can inhibit the growth or cause regression of an established human tumor xenograft. This procedure could be effective in treating a broad spectrum of human solid tumors that express TF on vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells.

  20. Ecology of melanoma cell.

    PubMed

    Lacina, Lukáš; Kodet, Ondřej; Dvořánková, Barbora; Szabo, Pavol; Smetana, Karel

    2017-08-29

    Melanoma represents a cancer with increasing incidence worldwide and limited curability of advanced stages of the disease. Similarly to other types of tumors, the microenvironment is an important factor that participates in the control of melanoma biological properties. This review summarizes data regarding the role of the microenvironment, namely fibroblasts, keratinocytes and infiltrating immune cells, on melanoma growth and spreading. The role of embryonic microenvironment on melanoma cell biological properties is also discussed. The potential of therapeutic targeting of the melanoma microenvironment is demonstrated.

  1. New Functional Signatures for Understanding Melanoma Biology from Tumor Cell Lineage-Specific Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rambow, Florian; Job, Bastien; Petit, Valérie; Gesbert, Franck; Delmas, Véronique; Seberg, Hannah; Meurice, Guillaume; Van Otterloo, Eric; Dessen, Philippe; Robert, Caroline; Gautheret, Daniel; Cornell, Robert A; Sarasin, Alain; Larue, Lionel

    2015-10-27

    Molecular signatures specific to particular tumor types are required to design treatments for resistant tumors. However, it remains unclear whether tumors and corresponding cell lines used for drug development share such signatures. We developed similarity core analysis (SCA), a universal and unsupervised computational framework for extracting core molecular features common to tumors and cell lines. We applied SCA to mRNA/miRNA expression data from various sources, comparing melanoma cell lines and metastases. The signature obtained was associated with phenotypic characteristics in vitro, and the core genes CAPN3 and TRIM63 were implicated in melanoma cell migration/invasion. About 90% of the melanoma signature genes belong to an intrinsic network of transcription factors governing neural development (TFAP2A, DLX2, ALX1, MITF, PAX3, SOX10, LEF1, and GAS7) and miRNAs (211-5p, 221-3p, and 10a-5p). The SCA signature effectively discriminated between two subpopulations of melanoma patients differing in overall survival, and classified MEKi/BRAFi-resistant and -sensitive melanoma cell lines. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. TIL therapy broadens the tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cell compartment in melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Kvistborg, Pia; Shu, Chengyi Jenny; Heemskerk, Bianca; Fankhauser, Manuel; Thrue, Charlotte Albæk; Toebes, Mireille; van Rooij, Nienke; Linnemann, Carsten; van Buuren, Marit M; Urbanus, Jos H M; Beltman, Joost B; Thor Straten, Per; Li, Yong F; Robbins, Paul F; Besser, Michal J; Schachter, Jacob; Kenter, Gemma G; Dudley, Mark E; Rosenberg, Steven A; Haanen, John B A G; Hadrup, Sine Reker; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2012-07-01

    There is strong evidence that both adoptive T cell transfer and T cell checkpoint blockade can lead to regression of human melanoma. However, little data are available on the effect of these cancer therapies on the tumor-reactive T cell compartment. To address this issue we have profiled therapy-induced T cell reactivity against a panel of 145 melanoma-associated CD8(+) T cell epitopes. Using this approach, we demonstrate that individual tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte cell products from melanoma patients contain unique patterns of reactivity against shared melanoma-associated antigens, and that the combined magnitude of these responses is surprisingly low. Importantly, TIL therapy increases the breadth of the tumor-reactive T cell compartment in vivo, and T cell reactivity observed post-therapy can almost in full be explained by the reactivity observed within the matched cell product. These results establish the value of high-throughput monitoring for the analysis of immuno-active therapeutics and suggest that the clinical efficacy of TIL therapy can be enhanced by the preparation of more defined tumor-reactive T cell products.

  3. TIL therapy broadens the tumor-reactive CD8+ T cell compartment in melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Kvistborg, Pia; Shu, Chengyi Jenny; Heemskerk, Bianca; Fankhauser, Manuel; Thrue, Charlotte Albæk; Toebes, Mireille; van Rooij, Nienke; Linnemann, Carsten; van Buuren, Marit M.; Urbanus, Jos H.M.; Beltman, Joost B.; thor Straten, Per; Li, Yong F.; Robbins, Paul F.; Besser, Michal J.; Schachter, Jacob; Kenter, Gemma G.; Dudley, Mark E.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Haanen, John B.A.G.; Hadrup, Sine Reker; Schumacher, Ton N.M.

    2012-01-01

    There is strong evidence that both adoptive T cell transfer and T cell checkpoint blockade can lead to regression of human melanoma. However, little data are available on the effect of these cancer therapies on the tumor-reactive T cell compartment. To address this issue we have profiled therapy-induced T cell reactivity against a panel of 145 melanoma-associated CD8+ T cell epitopes. Using this approach, we demonstrate that individual tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte cell products from melanoma patients contain unique patterns of reactivity against shared melanoma-associated antigens, and that the combined magnitude of these responses is surprisingly low. Importantly, TIL therapy increases the breadth of the tumor-reactive T cell compartment in vivo, and T cell reactivity observed post-therapy can almost in full be explained by the reactivity observed within the matched cell product. These results establish the value of high-throughput monitoring for the analysis of immuno-active therapeutics and suggest that the clinical efficacy of TIL therapy can be enhanced by the preparation of more defined tumor-reactive T cell products. PMID:22754759

  4. T-Cell Receptor Gene Therapy of Established Tumors in a Murine Melanoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Abad, John D.; Wrzensinski, Claudia; Overwijk, Willem; De Witte, Moniek A.; Jorritsma, Annelies; Hsu, Gary; Gattinoni, Luca; Cohen, Cyrille J.; Paulos, Chrystal M.; Palmer, Douglas C.; Haanen, John B. A. G.; Schumacher, Ton N. M.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Morgan, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Adoptive cell transfer therapy using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes for patients with metastatic melanoma has demonstrated significant objective response rates. One major limitation of these current therapies is the frequent inability to isolate tumor-reactive lymphocytes for treatment. Genetic engineering of peripheral blood lymphocytes with retroviral vectors encoding tumor antigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) bypasses this restriction. To evaluate the efficacy of TCR gene therapy, a murine treatment model was developed. A retroviral vector was constructed encoding the pmel-1 TCR genes targeting the B16 melanoma antigen, gp100. Transduction of C57BL/6 lymphocytes resulted in efficient pmel-1 TCR expression. Lymphocytes transduced with this retrovirus specifically recognized gp100-pulsed target cells as measured by interferon-γ secretion assays. Upon transfer into B16 tumor-bearing mice, the genetically engineered lymphocytes significantly slowed tumor development. The effectiveness of tumor treatment was directly correlated with the number of TCR-engineered T cells administered. These results demonstrated that TCR gene therapy targeting a native tumor antigen significantly delayed the growth of established tumors. When C57BL/6 lymphocytes were added to antigen-reactive pmel-1 T cells, a reduction in the ability of pmel-1 T cell to treat B16 melanomas was seen, suggesting that untransduced cells may be deleterious to TCR gene therapy. This model may be a powerful tool for evaluating future TCR gene transfer-based strategies. PMID:18157006

  5. T-cell receptor gene therapy of established tumors in a murine melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Abad, John D; Wrzensinski, Claudia; Overwijk, Willem; De Witte, Moniek A; Jorritsma, Annelies; Hsu, Cary; Gattinoni, Luca; Cohen, Cyrille J; Paulos, Chrystal M; Palmer, Douglas C; Haanen, John B A G; Schumacher, Ton N M; Rosenberg, Steven A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Morgan, Richard A

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer therapy using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes for patients with metastatic melanoma has demonstrated significant objective response rates. One major limitation of these current therapies is the frequent inability to isolate tumor-reactive lymphocytes for treatment. Genetic engineering of peripheral blood lymphocytes with retroviral vectors encoding tumor antigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) bypasses this restriction. To evaluate the efficacy of TCR gene therapy, a murine treatment model was developed. A retroviral vector was constructed encoding the pmel-1 TCR genes targeting the B16 melanoma antigen, gp100. Transduction of C57BL/6 lymphocytes resulted in efficient pmel-1 TCR expression. Lymphocytes transduced with this retrovirus specifically recognized gp100-pulsed target cells as measured by interferon-gamma secretion assays. Upon transfer into B16 tumor-bearing mice, the genetically engineered lymphocytes significantly slowed tumor development. The effectiveness of tumor treatment was directly correlated with the number of TCR-engineered T cells administered. These results demonstrated that TCR gene therapy targeting a native tumor antigen significantly delayed the growth of established tumors. When C57BL/6 lymphocytes were added to antigen-reactive pmel-1 T cells, a reduction in the ability of pmel-1 T cell to treat B16 melanomas was seen, suggesting that untransduced cells may be deleterious to TCR gene therapy. This model may be a powerful tool for evaluating future TCR gene transfer-based strategies.

  6. Targeting melanoma with front-line therapy does not abrogate Nodal-expressing tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Mary Jc; Kandela, Irawati; Mazar, Andrew P; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Seftor, Richard Eb; Margaryan, Naira V; Strizzi, Luigi; Murphy, George F; Long, Georgina V; Scolyer, Richard A

    2017-02-01

    Metastatic melanoma is a highly aggressive skin cancer with a poor prognosis. It is the leading cause of skin cancer deaths with a median overall survival for advanced-stage metastatic disease of <6 months. Despite advances in the field with conventional and targeted therapies, the heterogeneity of melanoma poses the greatest ongoing challenge, ultimately leading to relapse and progression to a more drug-resistant tumor in most patients. Particularly noteworthy are recent findings, indicating that these therapies exert selective pressure on tumors resulting in the activation of pathways associated with cancer stem cells that are unresponsive to current therapy. Our previous studies have shown how Nodal, an embryonic morphogen of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily, is one of these critical factors that is reactivated in aggressive melanoma and resistant to conventional chemotherapy, such as dacarbazine. In the current study, we sought to determine whether BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi) therapy targeted Nodal-expressing tumor cells in uniquely matched unresectable stage III and IV melanoma patient samples before and after therapy that preceded their eventual death due to disease. The results demonstrate that BRAFi treatment failed to affect Nodal levels in melanoma tissues. Accompanying experiments in soft agar and in nude mice showed the advantage of using combinatorial treatment with BRAFi plus anti-Nodal monoclonal antibody to suppress tumor growth and metastasis. These data provide a promising new approach using front-line therapy combined with targeting a cancer stem cell-associated molecule-producing a more efficacious response than monotherapy.

  7. Tumor-promoting effects of cannabinoid receptor type 1 in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Carpi, Sara; Fogli, Stefano; Polini, Beatrice; Montagnani, Valentina; Podestà, Adriano; Breschi, Maria Cristina; Romanini, Antonella; Stecca, Barbara; Nieri, Paola

    2017-04-01

    The role of endocannabinoid system in melanoma development and progression is actually not fully understood. This study was aimed at clarifying whether cannabinoid-type 1 (CB1) receptor may function as tumor-promoting or -suppressing signal in human cutaneous melanoma. CB1 receptor expression was measured in human melanoma cell lines by real-time PCR. A genetic deletion of CB1 receptors in selected melanoma cells was carried out by using three different short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). Performance of target gene silencing was verified by real-time PCR and Western blot. The effects of CB1 receptor silencing on cell growth, clonogenicity, migration capability, cell cycle progression, and activation of mitogenic signals was tested. Lentiviral shRNAs vectors targeting different regions of the human CB1 gene led to a significant reduction in CB1 receptor mRNA and a near complete loss of CB1 receptor protein, compared to control vector (LV-c). The number of viable cells, the colony-forming ability and cell migration were significantly reduced in cells transduced with CB1 lentiviral shRNAs compared to LV-c. Cell cycle analyses showed arrest at G1/S phase. p-Akt and p-ERK expression were decreased in transduced versus control cells. Findings of this study suggest that CB1 receptor might function as tumor-promoting signal in human cutaneous melanoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Detection methods of circulating tumor cells in cutaneous melanoma: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rodic, Stefan; Mihalcioiu, Catalin; Saleh, Ramy R

    2014-07-01

    The vast majority of melanoma-related deaths are due to disseminated malignancy. Many treated patients who are clinically disease-free will go on to relapse. Therefore, new prognostic tools must be developed to better assess metastatic potential and assist in patient management. Circulating tumor cells are a widely studied metastatic biomarker with promising prognostic utility, as the shedding of cells from the primary tumor into peripheral blood is a necessary step in disease dissemination. An assortment of technologies and techniques has been developed to isolate and detect circulating melanoma cells (CMCs), but a standardized method is yet to be established. It is the aim of this study to systematically review the diverse enrichment and detection methods of circulating tumor cells in cutaneous melanoma. A literature search yielded 351 articles, of which 74 were deemed eligible according to inclusion criteria, the primary requirement being the reporting of patient CMC positivity status stratified by the stage of melanoma. Pertinent studies were used to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of each method. Additionally, we calculated the sensitivity and specificity of seven common melanoma-associated markers based on the available literature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:26824989

  10. Circulating Tumor Cells, DNA, and mRNA: Potential for Clinical Utility in Patients With Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Melody J.; Dorsey, Jay F.; Amaravadi, Ravi; Karakousis, Giorgos; Simone, Charles B.; Xu, Xiaowei; Xu, Wei; Carpenter, Erica L.; Schuchter, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs), circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), and messenger RNA (mRNA), collectively termed circulating tumor products (CTPs), represent areas of immense interest from scientists’ and clinicians’ perspectives. In melanoma, CTP analysis may have clinical utility in many areas, from screening and diagnosis to clinical decision-making aids, as surveillance biomarkers or sources of real-time genetic or molecular characterization. In addition, CTP analysis can be useful in the discovery of new biomarkers, patterns of treatment resistance, and mechanisms of metastasis development. Here, we compare and contrast CTCs, ctDNA, and mRNA, review the extent of translational evidence to date, and discuss how future studies involving both scientists and clinicians can help to further develop this tool for the benefit of melanoma patients. Implications for Practice: Scientific advancement has enabled the rapid development of tools to analyze circulating tumor cells, tumor DNA, and messenger RNA, collectively termed circulating tumor products (CTPs). A variety of techniques have emerged to detect and characterize melanoma CTPs; however, only a fraction has been applied to human subjects. This review summarizes the available human data that investigate clinical utility of CTP in cancer screening, melanoma diagnosis, prognosis, prediction, and genetic or molecular characterization. It provides a rationale for how CTPs may be useful for future research and discusses how clinicians can be involved in developing this exciting new technology. PMID:26614709

  11. Effective adoptive transfer of haploidentical tumor-specific T cells in B16-melanoma bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Nai-peng; Xie, Shao-jian; Han, Jin-sheng; Ma, Zhen-feng; Chen, Bao-ping; Cai, Jian-hui

    2012-03-01

    Adoptive transfer of allogeneic tumor-specific T cells often results in severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Here, we sought to maximize graft-versus-tumor and minimize GVHD by using haploidentical T cells in pre-irradiated B16-melanoma bearing mice. C57BL/6 mice bearing B16-melanoma tumors were irradiated with 0, 5, or 7 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), or 7 Gy TBI plus bone marrow transplantation. Tumor areas were measured every 3 days to assess the influence of irradiation treatment on tumor regression. B16-melanoma bearing mice were irradiated with 7 Gy TBI; sera and spleens were harvested at days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, and 13 after irradiation. White blood cell levels were measured and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-b1) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) levels in serum were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry were performed to test TGF-b1, IL-10 and Foxp3 mRNA levels and the proportion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T-regulatory cells (Tregs) in spleens. B16-melanoma bearing C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with 7 Gy TBI followed by syngeneic (Syn1/Syn2) or haploidentical (Hap1/Hap2), dendritic cell-induced cytotoxic T lymphocytes (DC-CTLs) treatment, tumor areas and system GVHD were observed every 3 days. Mice were killed 21 days after the DC-CTLs adoptive transfer; histologic analyses of eyes, skin, liver, lungs, and intestine were then performed. Irradiation with 7 Gy TBI on the B16-melanoma-bearing mice did not influence tumor regression compared to the control group; however, it down-regulated the proportion of Tregs in spleens and the TGF-b1 and IL-10 levels in sera and spleens, suggesting inhibition of autoimmunity and intervention of tumor microenvironment. Adoptive transfer of haploidentical DC-CTLs significantly inhibited B16-melanoma growth. GVHD assessment and histology analysis showed no significant difference among the groups. Adoptive transfer of

  12. Reprogramming of Melanoma Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Hidehito; Okita, Keisuke; Fusaki, Noemi; Sabel, Michael S.; Chang, Alfred E.; Ito, Fumito

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from somatic cells of patients hold great promise for autologous cell therapies. One of the possible applications of iPSCs is to use them as a cell source for producing autologous lymphocytes for cell-based therapy against cancer. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) that express programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1) are tumor-reactive T cells, and adoptive cell therapy with autologous TILs has been found to achieve durable complete response in selected patients with metastatic melanoma. Here, we describe the derivation of human iPSCs from melanoma TILs expressing high level of PD-1 by Sendai virus-mediated transduction of the four transcription factors, OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC. TIL-derived iPSCs display embryonic stem cell-like morphology, have normal karyotype, express stem cell-specific surface antigens and pluripotency-associated transcription factors, and have the capacity to differentiate in vitro and in vivo. A wide variety of T cell receptor gene rearrangement patterns in TIL-derived iPSCs confirmed the heterogeneity of T cells infiltrating melanomas. The ability to reprogram TILs containing patient-specific tumor-reactive repertoire might allow the generation of patient- and tumor-specific polyclonal T cells for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27057178

  13. Interleukin-2 regulates the expression of the tumor suppressor Interleukin-24 in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jen, Emily Y.; Poindexter, Nancy J.; Farnsworth, Elizabeth S.; Grimm, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Melanoma is notoriously resistant to chemotherapy, but variable responses to biotherapies, including the IFNs and IL-2, provide intriguing avenues for further study. Systemic IL-2 treatment has provided significant clinical benefit in a minority of metastatic melanoma patients, leading to long term survival in a few cases. We hypothesize that one previously unidentified mechanism of effective IL-2 therapy is through direct upregulation of the tumor suppressor IL-24 in melanoma tumor cells resulting in growth suppression. In this study five melanoma cell lines were treated with high dose recombinant human IL-2. Three (A375, WM1341, WM793) showed statistically significant increases in IL-24 protein; two (WM35, MeWo) remained negative for IL-24 message and protein. This increase was abolished by preincubating with anti-IL-2 antibody or blocking with antibodies against the IL-2 receptor chains. These IL-2 responsive melanoma cell lines expressed IL-2Rβ and γ mRNA. The IL-2Rβγ complex was functional, as measured by IL-2-induced STAT activation as well as IL-15 signaling through its shared receptor complex. IL-24 upregulation was observed in response to either IL-2 or IL-15. Cell growth was significantly decreased by treatment of IL-24 positive cells with IL-2 or IL-15, while no effect was seen in negative cells. Incubating the IL-24 inducible-cells with anti-IL-24 antibody as well as transfecting with IL-24 siRNA effectively reversed the growth suppression seen with IL-2. Thus, we have shown that one mechanism of clinically effective IL-2 therapy may be the direct action of IL-2 on a biologically distinct subset of melanoma cells leading to upregulation of the tumor suppressor IL-24. PMID:22027907

  14. The helicase HAGE expressed by malignant melanoma-initiating cells is required for tumor cell proliferation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Linley, Adam J; Mathieu, Morgan G; Miles, Amanda K; Rees, Robert C; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Regad, Tarik

    2012-04-20

    Malignant melanoma-initiating cells (MMIC) are a subpopulation of cells responsible for melanoma tumor growth and progression. They are defined by the expression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) subfamily B member 5 (ABCB5). Here, we identified a critical role for the DEAD-box helicase antigen (HAGE) in ABCB5+ MMIC-dependent tumorigenesis and show that HAGE-specific inactivation inhibits melanoma tumor growth mediated by this tumor-initiating population. Knockdown of HAGE led to a significant decrease in RAS protein expression with a concomitant decrease in activation of the AKT and ERK signaling pathways implicated to play an important role in melanoma progression. To confirm that the reduction in NRAS (Neuroblastoma RAS) expression was dependent on the HAGE helicase activity, we showed that NRAS, effectively silenced by siRNA, could be rescued by reintroduction of HAGE in cells lacking HAGE. Furthermore, we provide a mechanism by which HAGE promotes NRAS unwinding in vitro. We also observed using tumor transplantation in Non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency mice that the HAGE knockdown in a ABCB5+ melanoma cell line displayed a significant decrease in tumor growth and compared with the control. Our results suggest that the helicase HAGE is required for ABCB5+ MMIC-dependent tumor growth through promoting RAS protein expression and that cancer therapies targeting HAGE helicase may have broad applications for treating malignant melanoma and potentially other cancer types.

  15. The Helicase HAGE Expressed by Malignant Melanoma-Initiating Cells Is Required for Tumor Cell Proliferation in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Linley, Adam J.; Mathieu, Morgan G.; Miles, Amanda K.; Rees, Robert C.; McArdle, Stephanie E. B.; Regad, Tarik

    2012-01-01

    Malignant melanoma-initiating cells (MMIC) are a subpopulation of cells responsible for melanoma tumor growth and progression. They are defined by the expression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) subfamily B member 5 (ABCB5). Here, we identified a critical role for the DEAD-box helicase antigen (HAGE) in ABCB5+ MMIC-dependent tumorigenesis and show that HAGE-specific inactivation inhibits melanoma tumor growth mediated by this tumor-initiating population. Knockdown of HAGE led to a significant decrease in RAS protein expression with a concomitant decrease in activation of the AKT and ERK signaling pathways implicated to play an important role in melanoma progression. To confirm that the reduction in NRAS (Neuroblastoma RAS) expression was dependent on the HAGE helicase activity, we showed that NRAS, effectively silenced by siRNA, could be rescued by reintroduction of HAGE in cells lacking HAGE. Furthermore, we provide a mechanism by which HAGE promotes NRAS unwinding in vitro. We also observed using tumor transplantation in Non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency mice that the HAGE knockdown in a ABCB5+ melanoma cell line displayed a significant decrease in tumor growth and compared with the control. Our results suggest that the helicase HAGE is required for ABCB5+ MMIC-dependent tumor growth through promoting RAS protein expression and that cancer therapies targeting HAGE helicase may have broad applications for treating malignant melanoma and potentially other cancer types. PMID:22393060

  16. Anchorage independency promoted tumor malignancy of melanoma cells under reattachment through elevated interleukin-8 and CXC chemokine receptor 1 expression.

    PubMed

    Uen, Wu-Ching; Hsieh, Chiao-Hui; Tseng, Ting-Ting; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Tseng, Jen-Chih; Lee, Shao-Chen

    2015-02-01

    Metastasis of melanoma cells during the recurrence or the late stage of melanoma has been characterized as the dissemination of tumor cells under anchorage independency. The secreted interleukin-8 (IL-8) and its conical receptors from melanoma cells have been associated with melanoma malignancy. However, their correlations with melanoma cells under anchorage independency were unclear. Suspension of adherent melanoma cells generated the suspended melanoma cell model of anoikis resistance. The in-vivo xenograft experiment, in-vitro cell proliferation/migration assay, microarray, and bioinformatics analysis were used to compare the malignancy and gene expression profiling in adherent and suspended melanoma cells. PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunohistochemistry, and kinase inhibition assay were adapted to validate the expression and regulation of IL-8 and CXCR1/2. Suspended melanoma cells were anoikis resistant and showed elevated malignancy in vivo and in vitro. Gene expression profiling of adherent and suspended melanoma cells showed extensive alteration associated with cell survival/death, cell signaling, and regulation of gene expression. Microarray and bioinformatics analysis on gene set enrichment analysis further showed elevated IL-8 expression in suspended melanoma cells. The upregulation of IL-8 and the effect on chemotaxis were mediated by MEK/ERK activation upon cell suspension. Change in JNK phosphorylation induced CXCR1 downregulation under cell suspension, but upregulation by cell reattachment. We suggest the possible roles of elevated IL-8 secretion and change in CXCR expression contributing toward elevated melanoma malignancy upon reattachment from cell suspension. We show that the suspension of melanoma cells is critical in promoting melanoma malignancy in vivo and in vitro.

  17. Tumor Cell Adhesion As a Risk Factor for Sentinel Lymph Node Metastasis in Primary Cutaneous Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Meves, Alexander; Nikolova, Ekaterina; Heim, Joel B.; Squirewell, Edwin J.; Cappel, Mark A.; Pittelkow, Mark R.; Otley, Clark C.; Behrendt, Nille; Saunte, Ditte M.; Lock-Andersen, Jorgen; Schenck, Louis A.; Weaver, Amy L.; Suman, Vera J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Less than 20% of patients with melanoma who undergo sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy based on American Society of Clinical Oncology/Society of Surgical Oncology recommendations are SLN positive. We present a multi-institutional study to discover new molecular risk factors associated with SLN positivity in thin and intermediate-thickness melanoma. Patients and Methods Gene clusters with functional roles in melanoma metastasis were discovered by next-generation sequencing and validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction using a discovery set of 73 benign nevi, 76 primary cutaneous melanoma, and 11 in-transit melanoma metastases. We then used polymerase chain reaction to quantify gene expression in a model development cohort of 360 consecutive thin and intermediate-thickness melanomas and a validation cohort of 146 melanomas. Outcome of interest was SLN biopsy metastasis within 90 days of melanoma diagnosis. Logic and logistic regression analyses were used to develop a model for the likelihood of SLN metastasis from molecular, clinical, and histologic variables. Results ITGB3, LAMB1, PLAT, and TP53 expression were associated with SLN metastasis. The predictive ability of a model that included these molecular variables in combination with clinicopathologic variables (patient age, Breslow depth, and tumor ulceration) was significantly greater than a model that only considered clinicopathologic variables and also performed well in the validation cohort (area under the curve, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.87 to 0.97; false-positive and false-negative rates of 22% and 0%, respectively, using a 10% cutoff for predicted SLN metastasis risk). Conclusion The addition of cell adhesion–linked gene expression variables to clinicopathologic variables improves the identification of patients with SLN metastases within 90 days of melanoma diagnosis. PMID:26150443

  18. E-cadherin determines Caveolin-1 tumor suppression or metastasis enhancing function in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lobos-González, Lorena; Aguilar, Lorena; Diaz, Jorge; Diaz, Natalia; Urra, Hery; Torres, Vicente A; Silva, Veronica; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Lladser, Alvaro; Hoek, Keith S; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F G

    2013-07-01

    The role of caveolin-1 (CAV1) in cancer is highly controversial. CAV1 suppresses genes that favor tumor development, yet also promotes focal adhesion turnover and migration of metastatic cells. How these contrasting observations relate to CAV1 function in vivo is unclear. Our previous studies implicate E-cadherin in CAV1-dependent tumor suppression. Here, we use murine melanoma B16F10 cells, with low levels of endogenous CAV1 and E-cadherin, to unravel how CAV1 affects tumor growth and metastasis and to assess how co-expression of E-cadherin modulates CAV1 function in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. We find that overexpression of CAV1 in B16F10 (cav-1) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, but enhances metastasis relative to control cells. Furthermore, E-cadherin expression in B16F10 (E-cad) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation and lung metastasis when intravenously injected. Importantly, co-expression of CAV1 and E-cadherin in B16F10 (cav-1/E-cad) cells abolishes tumor formation, lung metastasis, increased Rac-1 activity, and cell migration observed with B16F10 (cav-1) cells. Finally, consistent with the notion that CAV1 participates in switching human melanomas to a more malignant phenotype, elevated levels of CAV1 expression correlated with enhanced migration and Rac-1 activation in these cells. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. E-cadherin determines Caveolin-1 tumor suppression or metastasis enhancing function in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lobos-González, L; Aguilar, L; Diaz, J; Diaz, N; Urra, H; Torres, V; Silva, V; Fitzpatrick, C; Lladser, A; Hoek, K.S.; Leyton, L; Quest, AFG

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The role of caveolin-1 (CAV1) in cancer is highly controversial. CAV1 suppresses genes that favor tumor development, yet also promotes focal adhesion turnover and migration of metastatic cells. How these contrasting observations relate to CAV1 function in vivo is unclear. Our previous studies implicate E-cadherin in CAV1-dependent tumor suppression. Here we use murine melanoma B16F10 cells, with low levels of endogenous CAV1 and E-cadherin, to unravel how CAV1 affects tumor growth and metastasis, and to assess how co-expression of E-cadherin modulates CAV1 function in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. We find that overexpression of CAV1 in B16F10(cav-1) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, but enhances metastasis relative to control cells. Furthermore, E-cadherin expression in B16F10(E-cad) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, and lung metastasis when intravenously injected. Importantly, co-expression of CAV1 and E-cadherin in B16F10(cav1/E-cad) cells abolishes tumor formation, lung metastasis, increased Rac-1 activity and cell migration observed with B16F10(cav-1) cells. Finally, consistent with the notion that CAV1 participates in switching human melanomas to a more malignant phenotype, elevated levels of CAV1 expression correlated with enhanced migration and Rac-1 activation in these cells. PMID:23470013

  20. HLA-G expression in melanoma: A way for tumor cells to escape from immunosurveillance

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Pascale; Rouas-Freiss, Nathalie; Khalil-Daher, Iman; Moreau, Philippe; Riteau, Beatrice; Le Gal, Frederique Anne; Avril, Marie Francoise; Dausset, Jean; Guillet, Jean Gerard; Carosella, Edgardo D.

    1998-01-01

    Considering the well established role of nonclassical HLA-G class I molecules in inhibiting natural killer (NK) cell function, the consequence of abnormal HLA-G expression in malignant cells should be the escape of tumors from immunosurveillance. To examine this hypothesis, we analyzed HLA-G expression and NK sensitivity in human malignant melanoma cells. Our analysis of three melanoma cell lines and ex vivo biopsy demonstrated that (i) IGR and M74 human melanoma cell lines exhibit a high level of HLA-G transcription with differential HLA-G isoform transcription and protein expression patterns, (ii) a higher level of HLA-G transcription ex vivo is detected in a skin melanoma metastasis biopsy compared with a healthy skin fragment from the same individual, and (iii) HLA-G protein isoforms other than membrane-bound HLA-G1 protect IGR from NK lysis. It thus appears of critical importance to consider the specific role of HLA-G expression in tumors in the design of future cancer immunotherapies. PMID:9539768

  1. Monitoring the Systemic Human Memory B Cell Compartment of Melanoma Patients for Anti-Tumor IgG Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Amy E.; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Dodev, Tihomir; Koers, Alexander; Lacy, Katie; Josephs, Debra H.; Takhar, Pooja; Geh, Jenny L. C.; Healy, Ciaran; Harries, Mark; Acland, Katharine M.; Rudman, Sarah M.; Beavil, Rebecca L.; Blower, Philip J.; Beavil, Andrew J.; Gould, Hannah J.; Spicer, James; Nestle, Frank O.; Karagiannis, Sophia N.

    2011-01-01

    Melanoma, a potentially lethal skin cancer, is widely thought to be immunogenic in nature. While there has been much focus on T cell-mediated immune responses, limited knowledge exists on the role of mature B cells. We describe an approach, including a cell-based ELISA, to evaluate mature IgG antibody responses to melanoma from human peripheral blood B cells. We observed a significant increase in antibody responses from melanoma patients (n = 10) to primary and metastatic melanoma cells compared to healthy volunteers (n = 10) (P<0.0001). Interestingly, we detected a significant reduction in antibody responses to melanoma with advancing disease stage in our patient cohort (n = 21) (P<0.0001). Overall, 28% of melanoma patient-derived B cell cultures (n = 1,800) compared to 2% of cultures from healthy controls (n = 600) produced antibodies that recognized melanoma cells. Lastly, a patient-derived melanoma-specific monoclonal antibody was selected for further study. This antibody effectively killed melanoma cells in vitro via antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity. These data demonstrate the presence of a mature systemic B cell response in melanoma patients, which is reduced with disease progression, adding to previous reports of tumor-reactive antibodies in patient sera, and suggesting the merit of future work to elucidate the clinical relevance of activating humoral immune responses to cancer. PMID:21559411

  2. Monitoring the systemic human memory B cell compartment of melanoma patients for anti-tumor IgG antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Amy E; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Dodev, Tihomir; Koers, Alexander; Lacy, Katie; Josephs, Debra H; Takhar, Pooja; Geh, Jenny L C; Healy, Ciaran; Harries, Mark; Acland, Katharine M; Rudman, Sarah M; Beavil, Rebecca L; Blower, Philip J; Beavil, Andrew J; Gould, Hannah J; Spicer, James; Nestle, Frank O; Karagiannis, Sophia N

    2011-04-29

    Melanoma, a potentially lethal skin cancer, is widely thought to be immunogenic in nature. While there has been much focus on T cell-mediated immune responses, limited knowledge exists on the role of mature B cells. We describe an approach, including a cell-based ELISA, to evaluate mature IgG antibody responses to melanoma from human peripheral blood B cells. We observed a significant increase in antibody responses from melanoma patients (n = 10) to primary and metastatic melanoma cells compared to healthy volunteers (n = 10) (P<0.0001). Interestingly, we detected a significant reduction in antibody responses to melanoma with advancing disease stage in our patient cohort (n = 21) (P<0.0001). Overall, 28% of melanoma patient-derived B cell cultures (n = 1,800) compared to 2% of cultures from healthy controls (n = 600) produced antibodies that recognized melanoma cells. Lastly, a patient-derived melanoma-specific monoclonal antibody was selected for further study. This antibody effectively killed melanoma cells in vitro via antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity. These data demonstrate the presence of a mature systemic B cell response in melanoma patients, which is reduced with disease progression, adding to previous reports of tumor-reactive antibodies in patient sera, and suggesting the merit of future work to elucidate the clinical relevance of activating humoral immune responses to cancer.

  3. Primary Tr1 cells from metastatic melanoma eliminate tumor-promoting macrophages through granzyme B- and perforin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hongxia; Zhang, Ping; Kong, Xue; Hou, Xianglian; Zhao, Li; Li, Tianhang; Yuan, Xiaozhou; Fu, Hongjun

    2017-04-01

    In malignant melanoma, tumor-associated macrophages play multiple roles in promoting tumor growth, such as inducing the transformation of melanocytes under ultraviolet irradiation, increasing angiogenesis in melanomas, and suppressing antitumor immunity. Because granzyme B- and perforin-expressing Tr1 cells could specifically eliminate antigen-presenting cells of myeloid origin, we examined whether Tr1 cells in melanoma could eliminate tumor-promoting macrophages and how the interaction between Tr1 cells and macrophages could affect the growth of melanoma cells. Tr1 cells were characterized by high interleukin 10 secretion and low Foxp3 expression and were enriched in the CD4(+)CD49b(+)LAG-3(+) T-cell fraction. Macrophages derived from peripheral blood monocytes in the presence of modified melanoma-conditioned media demonstrated tumor-promoting capacity, exemplified by improving the proliferation of cocultured A375 malignant melanoma cells. But when primary Tr1 cells were present in the macrophage-A375 coculture, the growth of A375 cells was abrogated. The conventional CD25(+) Treg cells, however, were unable to inhibit macrophage-mediated increase in tumor cell growth. Further analyses showed that Tr1 cells did not directly eliminate A375 cells, but mediated the killing of tumor-promoting macrophages through the secretion of granzyme B and perforin. The tumor-infiltrating interleukin 10(+)Foxp3(-)CD4(+) T cells expressed very low levels of granzyme B and perforin, possibly suggested the downregulation of Tr1 cytotoxic capacity in melanoma tumors. Together, these data demonstrated an antitumor function of Tr1 cells through the elimination of tumor-promoting macrophages, which was not shared by conventional Tregs.

  4. Extract of Cordyceps militaris inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth of human malignant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ruma, I Made Winarsa; Putranto, Endy Widya; Kondo, Eisaku; Watanabe, Risayo; Saito, Ken; Inoue, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Ken-Ichi; Nakata, Susumu; Kaihata, Masaji; Murata, Hitoshi; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo

    2014-07-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor development and metastasis. Among several angiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF) is important for tumor-derived angiogenesis and commonly overexpressed in solid tumors. Thus, many antitumor strategies targeting VEGF have been developed to inhibit cancer angiogenesis, offering insights into the successful treatment of solid cancers. However, there are a number of issues such as harmful effects on normal vascularity in clinical trials. Taking this into consideration, we employed Cordyceps militaris as an antitumor approach due to its biological safety in vivo. The herbal medicinal mushroom Cordyceps militaris has been reported to show potential anticancer properties including anti-angiogenic capacity; however, its concrete properties have yet to be fully demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the biological role of Cordyceps militaris extract in tumor cells, especially in regulating angiogenesis and tumor growth of a human malignant melanoma cell line. We demonstrated that Cordyceps militaris extract remarkably suppressed tumor growth via induction of apoptotic cell death in culture that links to the abrogation of VEGF production in melanoma cells. This was followed by mitigation of Akt1 and GSK-3β activation, while p38α phosphorylation levels were increased. Extract treatment in mouse model xenografted with human melanoma cells resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect with down-regulation of VEGF expression. The results suggest that suppression of tumor growth by Cordyceps militaris extract is, at least, mediated by its anti-angiogenicity and apoptosis induction capacities. Cordyceps militaris extract may be a potent antitumor herbal drug for solid tumors.

  5. Melanoma Proteoglycan Modifies Gene Expression to Stimulate Tumor Cell Motility, Growth and Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianbo; Price, Matthew A.; Li, GuiYuan; Bar-Eli, Menashe; Salgia, Ravi; Jagedeeswaran, Ramasamy; Carlson, Jennifer H.; Ferrone, Soldano; Turley, Eva A.; McCarthy, James B.

    2009-01-01

    Melanoma chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (MCSP) is a plasma membrane-associated proteoglycan that facilitates the growth, motility and invasion of tumor cells. MCSP expression in melanoma cells enhances integrin function and constitutive activation of Erk 1,2. The current studies were performed to determine the mechanism by which MCSP expression promotes tumor growth and motility. The results demonstrate that MCSP expression in radial growth phase (RGP), vertical growth phase (VGP) or metastatic cell lines causes sustained activation of Erk 1,2, enhanced growth and motility which all require the cytoplasmic domain of the MCSP core protein. MCSP expression in an RGP cell line also promotes an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) based on changes in cell morphology and the expression of several EMT markers. Finally MCSP enhances the expression of c-Met and HGF, and inhibiting c-Met expression or activation limits the increased growth and motility of multiple melanoma cell lines. The studies collectively demonstrate an importance for MCSP in promoting progression by an epigenetic mechanism and they indicate that MCSP could be targeted to delay or inhibit tumor progression in patients. PMID:19738072

  6. SCS macrophages suppress melanoma by restricting tumor-derived vesicle-B cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Ferdinando; Garris, Christopher; Lai, Charles P; Newton, Andita; Pfirschke, Christina; Engblom, Camilla; Alvarez, David; Sprachman, Melissa; Evavold, Charles; Magnuson, Angela; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Glatz, Katharina; Breakefield, Xandra O; Mempel, Thorsten R; Weissleder, Ralph; Pittet, Mikael J

    2016-04-08

    Tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (tEVs) are important signals in tumor-host cell communication, yet it remains unclear how endogenously produced tEVs affect the host in different areas of the body. We combined imaging and genetic analysis to track melanoma-derived vesicles at organismal, cellular, and molecular scales to show that endogenous tEVs efficiently disseminate via lymphatics and preferentially bind subcapsular sinus (SCS) CD169(+) macrophages in tumor-draining lymph nodes (tdLNs) in mice and humans. The CD169(+) macrophage layer physically blocks tEV dissemination but is undermined during tumor progression and by therapeutic agents. A disrupted SCS macrophage barrier enables tEVs to enter the lymph node cortex, interact with B cells, and foster tumor-promoting humoral immunity. Thus, CD169(+) macrophages may act as tumor suppressors by containing tEV spread and ensuing cancer-enhancing immunity.

  7. TIGIT and PD-1 impair tumor antigen–specific CD8+ T cells in melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Pagliano, Ornella; Fourcade, Julien; Sun, Zhaojun; Wang, Hong; Sander, Cindy; Kirkwood, John M.; Chen, Tseng-hui Timothy; Maurer, Mark; Korman, Alan J.; Zarour, Hassane M.

    2015-01-01

    T cell Ig and ITIM domain (TIGIT) is an inhibitory receptor expressed by activated T cells, Tregs, and NK cells. Here, we determined that TIGIT is upregulated on tumor antigen–specific (TA-specific) CD8+ T cells and CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from patients with melanoma, and these TIGIT-expressing CD8+ T cells often coexpress the inhibitory receptor PD-1. Moreover, CD8+ TILs from patients exhibited downregulation of the costimulatory molecule CD226, which competes with TIGIT for the same ligand, supporting a TIGIT/CD226 imbalance in metastatic melanoma. TIGIT marked early T cell activation and was further upregulated by T cells upon PD-1 blockade and in dysfunctional PD-1+TIM-3+ TA-specific CD8+ T cells. PD-1+TIGIT+, PD-1–TIGIT+, and PD-1+TIGIT– CD8+ TILs had similar functional capacities ex vivo, suggesting that TIGIT alone, or together with PD-1, is not indicative of T cell dysfunction. However, in the presence of TIGIT ligand–expressing cells, TIGIT and PD-1 blockade additively increased proliferation, cytokine production, and degranulation of both TA-specific CD8+ T cells and CD8+ TILs. Collectively, our results show that TIGIT and PD-1 regulate the expansion and function of TA-specific CD8+ T cells and CD8+ TILs in melanoma patients and suggest that dual TIGIT and PD-1 blockade should be further explored to elicit potent antitumor CD8+ T cell responses in patients with advanced melanoma. PMID:25866972

  8. The Cinnamon-derived Michael Acceptor Cinnamic Aldehyde Impairs Melanoma Cell Proliferation, Invasiveness, and Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Cabello, Christopher M.; Bair, Warner B.; Lamore, Sarah D.; Ley, Stephanie; Bause, Alexandra S.; Azimian, Sara; Wondrak, Georg T.

    2009-01-01

    Redox dysregulation in cancer cells represents a chemical vulnerability that can be targeted by prooxidant redox intervention. Dietary constituents that contain an electrophilic Michael acceptor pharmacophore may therefore display promising chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic anti-cancer activity. Here, we demonstrate that the cinnamon-derived dietary Michael acceptor trans-cinnamic aldehyde (CA) impairs melanoma cell proliferation and tumor growth. Feasibility of therapeutic intervention using high doses of CA (120 mg/kg, p.o., q.d., 10 days) was demonstrated in a human A375 melanoma SCID-mouse xenograft model. Low micromolar concentrations (IC50 < 10 μM) of CA, but not closely related CA-derivatives devoid of Michael acceptor activity, suppressed proliferation of human metastatic melanoma cell lines (A375, G361, LOX) with G1 cell cycle arrest, elevated intracellular ROS, and impaired invasiveness. Expression array analysis revealed that CA induced an oxidative stress response in A375 cells, up-regulating heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), sulfiredoxin 1 homolog (SRXN1), thioredoxin reductase 1 (TXNRD1), and other genes including the cell cycle regulator and stress-responsive tumor suppressor gene cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A), a key mediator of G1 phase arrest. CA, but not Michael-inactive derivatives, inhibited NFκB transcriptional activity and TNFα-induced IL-8 production in A375 cells. These findings support a previously unrecognized role of CA as a dietary Michael acceptor with potential anticancer activity. PMID:19000754

  9. The cinnamon-derived Michael acceptor cinnamic aldehyde impairs melanoma cell proliferation, invasiveness, and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Christopher M; Bair, Warner B; Lamore, Sarah D; Ley, Stephanie; Bause, Alexandra S; Azimian, Sara; Wondrak, Georg T

    2009-01-15

    Redox dysregulation in cancer cells represents a chemical vulnerability that can be targeted by pro-oxidant redox intervention. Dietary constituents that contain an electrophilic Michael acceptor pharmacophore may therefore display promising chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic anti-cancer activity. Here, we demonstrate that the cinnamon-derived dietary Michael acceptor trans-cinnamic aldehyde (CA) impairs melanoma cell proliferation and tumor growth. Feasibility of therapeutic intervention using high doses of CA (120 mg/kg, po, daily, 10 days) was demonstrated in a human A375 melanoma SCID mouse xenograft model. Low-micromolar concentrations (IC(50)< 10 microM) of CA, but not closely related CA derivatives devoid of Michael acceptor activity, suppressed proliferation of human metastatic melanoma cell lines (A375, G361, LOX) with G1 cell-cycle arrest, elevated intracellular ROS, and impaired invasiveness. Expression array analysis revealed that CA induced an oxidative stress response in A375 cells, up-regulating heme oxygenase 1, sulfiredoxin 1 homolog, thioredoxin reductase 1, and other genes, including the cell-cycle regulator and stress-responsive tumor suppressor gene cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A, a key mediator of G1-phase arrest. CA, but not Michael-inactive derivatives, inhibited NF-kappaB transcriptional activity and TNFalpha-induced IL-8 production in A375 cells. These findings support a previously unrecognized role of CA as a dietary Michael acceptor with potential anti-cancer activity.

  10. Antrodia camphorata Grown on Germinated Brown Rice Suppresses Melanoma Cell Proliferation by Inducing Apoptosis and Cell Differentiation and Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Song, Minjung; Park, Dong Ki; Park, Hye-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Antrodia camphorata grown on germinated brown rice (CBR) was prepared to suppress melanoma development. CBR extracts were divided into hexane, EtOAc, BuOH, and water fractions. Among all the fractions, EtOAc fraction showed the best suppressive effect on B16F10 melanoma cell proliferation by CCK-8 assay. It also showed the increased cell death and the changed cellular morphology after CBR treatment. Annexin V-FITC/PI, flow cytometry, and western blotting were performed to elucidate anticancer activity of CBR. The results showed that CBR induced p53-mediated apoptotic cell death of B16F10. CBR EtOAc treatment increased melanin content and melanogenesis-related proteins of MITF and TRP-1 expressions, which supports its anticancer activity. Its potential as an anticancer agent was further investigated in tumor-xenografted mouse model. In melanoma-xenografted mouse model, melanoma tumor growth was significantly suppressed under CBR EtOAc fraction treatment. HPLC analysis of CBR extract showed peak of adenosine. In conclusion, CBR extracts notably inhibited B16F10 melanoma cell proliferation through the p53-mediated apoptosis induction and increased melanogenesis. These findings suggest that CBR EtOAc fraction can act as an effective anticancer agent to treat melanoma. PMID:23533475

  11. Antrodia camphorata Grown on Germinated Brown Rice Suppresses Melanoma Cell Proliferation by Inducing Apoptosis and Cell Differentiation and Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Song, Minjung; Park, Dong Ki; Park, Hye-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Antrodia camphorata grown on germinated brown rice (CBR) was prepared to suppress melanoma development. CBR extracts were divided into hexane, EtOAc, BuOH, and water fractions. Among all the fractions, EtOAc fraction showed the best suppressive effect on B16F10 melanoma cell proliferation by CCK-8 assay. It also showed the increased cell death and the changed cellular morphology after CBR treatment. Annexin V-FITC/PI, flow cytometry, and western blotting were performed to elucidate anticancer activity of CBR. The results showed that CBR induced p53-mediated apoptotic cell death of B16F10. CBR EtOAc treatment increased melanin content and melanogenesis-related proteins of MITF and TRP-1 expressions, which supports its anticancer activity. Its potential as an anticancer agent was further investigated in tumor-xenografted mouse model. In melanoma-xenografted mouse model, melanoma tumor growth was significantly suppressed under CBR EtOAc fraction treatment. HPLC analysis of CBR extract showed peak of adenosine. In conclusion, CBR extracts notably inhibited B16F10 melanoma cell proliferation through the p53-mediated apoptosis induction and increased melanogenesis. These findings suggest that CBR EtOAc fraction can act as an effective anticancer agent to treat melanoma.

  12. In vitro and in vivo study of melanoma tumor cell invasion and metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Gehlsen, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    In order to better understand and associate in vitro tumor cell invasion through basement membranes with in vivo tumor metastasis in syngeneic animal models, and the subsequent modulation of these processes, the following studies have been undertaken. Malignant murine melanoma cell lines designated B16F1 and B16F10, syngeneic to the C57BL6 mouse, a melanotic variant of the Cloudman S-91 melanoma cell line (denoted Mel-11a) with the syngeneic host being the DBA/2J mouse, and a malignant human melanoma line referenced as A375P (parental) and A375M (metastatic) were used for this dissertation project. Tumor cells were labeled with either /sup 14/C-thymidine or /sup 125/I-deoxyuridine using previously established protocols. Radiolabeled tumor cells were introduced into the Membrane Invasion Culture System (MICS) in vitro, a system developed in the lab, and concomitantly into the lateral tail vein by injection or intracutaneously into the appropriate syngeneic host in the presence or absence of such biological response modifying agents as (NIe/sup 4/, D-Phe/sup 7/)-MSH, and ..cap alpha..-MSH. In concert with these studies, the development of a control cell line, comprised of neural crest-derived melanocytes, and the study of their subsequent invasiveness in vitro were pursued. These studies demonstrate the ability of the MICS in vitro invasion assay to discriminate between tumor cells with differing metastatic propensities and could possibly be used in future studies to predict the effectiveness of biological response modifying agents in vivo.

  13. Tumor-reactive CD4+ T cell responses to the melanoma-associated chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan in melanoma patients and healthy individuals in the absence of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Erfurt, Cornelia; Sun, Zhaojun; Haendle, Ina; Schuler-Thurner, Beatrice; Heirman, Carlo; Thielemans, Kris; van der Bruggen, Pierre; Schuler, Gerold; Schultz, Erwin S

    2007-06-15

    To avoid immune escape by down-regulation or loss of Ag by the tumor cells, target Ags are needed, which are important for the malignant phenotype and survival of the tumor. We could identify a CD4(+) T cell epitope derived from the human melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (MCSP) (also known as high m.w.-melanoma-associated Ag), which is strongly expressed on >90% of human melanoma lesions and is important for the motility and invasion of melanoma cells. However, MCSP is not strictly tumor specific, because it is also expressed in a variety of normal tissues. Therefore, self tolerance should prevent the induction of strong T cell responses against these Ags by vaccination strategies. In contrast, breaking self tolerance to this Ag by effectively manipulating the immune system might mediate antitumor responses, although it would bear the risk of autoimmunity. Surprisingly, we could readily isolate CD4(+) Th cells from the blood of a healthy donor-recognizing peptide MCSP(693-709) on HLA-DR11-expressing melanoma cells. Broad T cell reactivity against this Ag could be detected in the peripheral blood of both healthy donors and melanoma patients, without any apparent signs of autoimmune disease. In some patients, a decline of T cell reactivity was observed upon tumor progression. Our data indicate that CD4(+) T cells are capable of recognizing a membrane glycoprotein that is important in melanoma cell function, and it may be possible that the sizable reactivity to this Ag in most normal individuals contributes to immune surveillance against cancer.

  14. Melanoma Cells Block PEDF Production in Fibroblasts to Induce the Tumor-Promoting Phenotype of Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nwani, Nkechiyere G; Deguiz, Maria L; Jimenez, Benilde; Vinokour, Elena; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Ugolkov, Andrey; Mazar, Andrew P; Volpert, Olga V

    2016-04-15

    Loss of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF, SERPINF1) in cancer cells is associated with poor prognosis and metastasis, but the contribution of stromal PEDF to cancer evolution is poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the role of fibroblast-derived PEDF in melanoma progression. We demonstrate that normal dermal fibroblasts expressing high PEDF levels attenuated melanoma growth and angiogenesis in vivo, whereas PEDF-depleted fibroblasts exerted tumor-promoting effects. Accordingly, mice with global PEDF knockout were more susceptible to melanoma metastasis. We also demonstrate that normal fibroblasts in close contact with PEDF-null melanoma cells lost PEDF expression and tumor-suppressive properties. Further mechanistic investigations underlying the crosstalk between tumor and stromal cells revealed that melanoma cells produced PDGF-BB and TGFβ, which blocked PEDF production in fibroblasts. Notably, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) isolated from patient-derived tumors expressed markedly low levels of PEDF. Treatment of patient CAF and TGFβ-treated normal fibroblasts with exogenous PEDF decreased the expression of CAF markers and restored PEDF expression. Finally, expression profiling of PEDF-depleted fibroblasts revealed induction of IL8, SERPINB2, hyaluronan synthase-2, and other genes associated with tumor promotion and metastasis. Collectively, our results demonstrate that PEDF maintains tumor-suppressive functions in fibroblasts to prevent CAF conversion and illustrate the mechanisms by which melanoma cells silence stromal PEDF to promote malignancy. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2265-76. ©2016 AACR.

  15. Human CD271-positive melanoma stem cells associated with metastasis establish tumor heterogeneity and long-term growth.

    PubMed

    Civenni, Gianluca; Walter, Anne; Kobert, Nikita; Mihic-Probst, Daniela; Zipser, Marie; Belloni, Benedetta; Seifert, Burkhardt; Moch, Holger; Dummer, Reinhard; van den Broek, Maries; Sommer, Lukas

    2011-04-15

    Human melanoma is composed of distinct cell types reminiscent of neural crest derivatives and contains multipotent cells that express the neural crest stem cell markers CD271(p75(NTR)) and Sox10. When isolated from solid tumors by using a method that leaves intact cell surface epitopes, CD271-positive, but not CD271-negative, cells formed tumors on transplantation into nude or nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice. These tumors fully mirrored the heterogeneity of the parental melanoma and could be passaged more than 5 times. In contrast, in more immunocompromised NOD/SCID/IL2rγ(null) mice, or in natural killer cell-depleted nude or NOD/SCID mice, both CD271-positive and CD271-negative tumor cell fractions established tumors. However, tumors resulting from either fraction did not phenocopy the parental tumors, and tumors derived from the CD271-negative cell fraction could not be passaged multiple times. Together, our findings identify CD271-positive cells as melanoma stem cells. Our observation that a relatively high frequency of CD271/Sox10-positive cells correlates with higher metastatic potential and worse prognosis further supports that CD271-positive cells within human melanoma represent genuine cancer stem cells. ©2011 AACR.

  16. Comparison of the Serum Tumor Markers S100 and Melanoma-inhibitory Activity (MIA) in the Monitoring of Patients with Metastatic Melanoma Receiving Vaccination Immunotherapy with Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Uslu, Ugur; Schliep, Stefan; Schliep, Klaus; Erdmann, Michael; Koch, Hans-Uwe; Parsch, Hans; Rosenheinrich, Stina; Anzengruber, Doris; Bosserhoff, Anja Katrin; Schuler, Gerold; Schuler-Thurner, Beatrice

    2017-09-01

    In patients with melanoma, early dissemination via lymphatic and hematogenous routes is frequently seen. Thus, besides clinical follow-up examination and imaging, reliable melanoma-specific serological tumor markers are needed. We retrospectively compared two serum markers for melanoma, S100 and melanoma-inhibitory activity (MIA), for monitoring of patients with metastatic melanoma under either adjuvant or therapeutic vaccination immunotherapy with dendritic cells (DC). Serum was obtained from a total of 100 patients (28 patients in stage III and 72 patients in stage IV, according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer 2002) at regular intervals during therapy, accompanied by follow-up imaging. When relapse was detected, both markers often remained within normal range. In contrast, in patients with metastatic measurable disease receiving therapeutic and not adjuvant DC vaccination, an increase of both markers was a strong indicator for disease progression. When comparing both markers in the whole study population, MIA showed a superior sensitivity to detect disease progression. S100 and MIA are highly sensitive tumor markers for monitoring of patients with melanoma with current metastases, but less sensitive for monitoring of tumor-free patients. In the current study, MIA had a slightly superior sensitivity to detect progressive disease compared to S100 and seems to be more useful in monitoring of patients with metastatic melanoma receiving immunotherapy. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  17. T-cell receptor usage by melanoma-specific clonal and highly oligoclonal tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte lines.

    PubMed Central

    Shilyansky, J; Nishimura, M I; Yannelli, J R; Kawakami, Y; Jacknin, L S; Charmley, P; Rosenberg, S A

    1994-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) obtained from human melanomas can specifically lyse autologous tumor in vitro and mediate tumor regression in vivo. To develop more effective therapeutic reagents and to further understand the T-cell response to tumors, the diversity of T-cell receptors (TCRs) involved in melanoma antigen recognition has been studied. The TCR variable (V) genes, joining (J) segments, and N diversity regions used by five clonal lines and one highly oligoclonal, melanoma-specific, CD8+ TIL line were examined utilizing PCR amplification with V gene subfamily-specific primers and anchor PCR. The TIL lysed multiple allogeneic melanomas expressing matched surface major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. TCR analysis confirmed the clonal nature of the TIL lines; however, the TCR repertoire was diverse. Even among the three HLA-A2 restricted TIL (TIL 1200, TIL F2-2, and TIL-5), no common V gene usage was found. Comparison of the third complementarity-determining regions of the TCRs from the HLA-A2 restricted TIL revealed no homology. Results presented here identify T-cell clonotypes that recognize epitopes on highly prevalent, shared melanoma tumor-associated antigens presented in the context of HLA-B55, HLA-A1, and HLA-A2. These T cells and the antigens they recognize represent important components for the design of new immunotherapies for patients with advanced melanoma. PMID:7511820

  18. Macrophage-Tumor Cell Fusions from Peripheral Blood of Melanoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Clawson, Gary A.; Matters, Gail L.; Xin, Ping; Imamura-Kawasawa, Yuka; Du, Zhen; Thiboutot, Diane M.; Helm, Klaus F.; Neves, Rogerio I.; Abraham, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background While the morbidity and mortality from cancer are largely attributable to its metastatic dissemination, the integral features of the cascade are not well understood. The widely accepted hypothesis is that the primary tumor microenvironment induces the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in cancer cells, facilitating their escape into the bloodstream, possibly accompanied by cancer stem cells. An alternative theory for metastasis involves fusion of macrophages with tumor cells (MTFs). Here we culture and characterize apparent MTFs from blood of melanoma patients. Methods We isolated enriched CTC populations from peripheral blood samples from melanoma patients, and cultured them. We interrogated these cultured cells for characteristic BRAF mutations, and used confocal microscopy for immunophenotyping, motility, DNA content and chromatin texture analyses, and then conducted xenograft studies using nude mice. Findings Morphologically, the cultured MTFs were generally large with many pseudopod extensions and lamellipodia. Ultrastructurally, the cultured MTFs appeared to be macrophages. They were rich in mitochondria and lysosomes, as well as apparent melanosomes. The cultured MTF populations were all heterogeneous with regard to DNA content, containing aneuploid and/or high-ploidy cells, and they typically showed large sheets (and/or clumps) of cytoplasmic chromatin. This cytoplasmic DNA was found within heterogeneously-sized autophagic vacuoles, which prominently contained chromatin and micronuclei. Cultured MTFs uniformly expressed pan-macrophage markers (CD14, CD68) and macrophage markers indicative of M2 polarization (CD163, CD204, CD206). They also expressed melanocyte-specific markers (ALCAM, MLANA), epithelial biomarkers (KRT, EpCAM), as well as the pro-carcinogenic cytokine MIF along with functionally related stem cell markers (CXCR4, CD44). MTF cultures from individual patients (5 of 8) contained melanoma-specific BRAF activating mutations

  19. High Immunogenicity of the Human Leukocyte Antigen Peptidomes of Melanoma Tumor Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Jarmalavicius, Saulius; Welte, Yvonne; Walden, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) bind peptides generated by limited proteolysis in cells and present them at the cell surfaces for recognition by T cells. Through this antigen presentation function they control the specificity of T cell responses and thereby adaptive immune responses. Knowledge of HLA-bound peptides is thus key to understanding adaptive immunity and to the development of vaccines and other specific immune intervention strategies. To gain insight into the antigenicity of melanomas, peptides were extracted from HLA isolated from the tumor cells, separated by two-dimensional HPLC, and sequenced by mass spectrometry. The spectra were analyzed by database-dependent MASCOT searches and database-independent de novo sequencing and, where required, confirmed with synthetic peptides, which were also used to determine their immunogenicity. Comparing four different melanoma cell lines, little overlap of the HLA-bound peptides was found, suggesting a high degree of individualization of the HLA peptidomes. This notwithstanding, the peptidomes were highly immunogenic in the patients from whom the tumor cells had been established and in unrelated patients. This broad cross-patient immunogenicity was only exceptionally related to individual peptides. The majority of the identified epitopes were derived from low to medium abundance proteins, mostly involved in sensitive cellular processes such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, control of gene expression, tumor suppressor function, and protein metabolism. The peptidomes thus provide insights into processes potentially related to tumorigenesis. Furthermore, analyses of the peptide sequences yield information on the specificity of peptide selection by HLA applicable to the developing prediction algorithms for T cell epitopes. PMID:22869377

  20. The Tumor Antigen NY-ESO-1 Mediates Direct Recognition of Melanoma Cells by CD4+ T Cells after Intercellular Antigen Transfer.

    PubMed

    Fonteneau, Jean Francois; Brilot, Fabienne; Münz, Christian; Gannagé, Monique

    2016-01-01

    NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells are of interest for immune therapy against tumors, because it has been shown that their transfer into a patient with melanoma resulted in tumor regression. Therefore, we investigated how NY-ESO-1 is processed onto MHC class II molecules for direct CD4(+) T cell recognition of melanoma cells. We could rule out proteasome and autophagy-dependent endogenous Ag processing for MHC class II presentation. In contrast, intercellular Ag transfer, followed by classical MHC class II Ag processing via endocytosis, sensitized neighboring melanoma cells for CD4(+) T cell recognition. However, macroautophagy targeting of NY-ESO-1 enhanced MHC class II presentation. Therefore, both elevated NY-ESO-1 release and macroautophagy targeting could improve melanoma cell recognition by CD4(+) T cells and should be explored during immunotherapy of melanoma. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  1. The Tumor Antigen NY-ESO-1 Mediates Direct Recognition of Melanoma Cells by CD4+ T Cells after Intercellular Antigen Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Fonteneau, Jean Francois; Brilot, Fabienne; Münz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    NY-ESO-1–specific CD4+ T cells are of interest for immune therapy against tumors, because it has been shown that their transfer into a patient with melanoma resulted in tumor regression. Therefore, we investigated how NY-ESO-1 is processed onto MHC class II molecules for direct CD4+ T cell recognition of melanoma cells. We could rule out proteasome and autophagy-dependent endogenous Ag processing for MHC class II presentation. In contrast, intercellular Ag transfer, followed by classical MHC class II Ag processing via endocytosis, sensitized neighboring melanoma cells for CD4+ T cell recognition. However, macroautophagy targeting of NY-ESO-1 enhanced MHC class II presentation. Therefore, both elevated NY-ESO-1 release and macroautophagy targeting could improve melanoma cell recognition by CD4+ T cells and should be explored during immunotherapy of melanoma. PMID:26608910

  2. Inflammatory Marker Testing Identifies CD74 Expression in Melanoma Tumor Cells, and Its Expression Associates with Favorable Survival for Stage III Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Davies, Michael A; Tanese, Keiji; Roszik, Jason; Shin-Sim, Myung; Bassett, Roland L; Milton, Denái R; Woodman, Scott E; Prieto, Victor G; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Morton, Donald L; Hoon, Dave S; Grimm, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-15

    Inflammatory marker expression in stage III melanoma tumors was evaluated for association with outcome, using two independent cohorts of stage III melanoma patients' tumor tissues. Fifteen markers of interest were selected for analysis, and their expression in melanoma tissues was determined by immunohistochemistry. Proteins associating with either overall survival (OS) or recurrence-free survival (RFS) in the retrospective discovery tissue microarray (TMA; n = 158) were subsequently evaluated in an independent validation TMA (n = 114). Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess the association between survival parameters and covariates, the Kaplan-Meier method to estimate the distribution of survival, and the log-rank test to compare distributions. Expression of CD74 on melanoma cells was unique, and in the discovery TMA, it associated with favorable patient outcome (OS: HR, 0.53; P = 0.01 and RFS: HR, 0.56; P = 0.01). The validation data set confirmed the CD74 prognostic significance and revealed that the absence of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was also associated with poor survival parameters. Consistent with the protein observation, tumor CD74 mRNA expression also correlated positively (P = 0.003) with OS in the melanoma TCGA data set. Our data validate CD74 as a useful prognostic tumor cell protein marker associated with favorable RFS and OS in stage III melanoma. Low or negative expression of MIF in both TMAs and of iNOS in the validation set also provided useful prognostic data. A disease-specific investigation of CD74's functional significance is warranted, and other markers appear intriguing to pursue. Clin Cancer Res; 22(12); 3016-24. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Inflammatory Marker Testing Identifies CD74 Expression in Melanoma Tumor Cells, and its Expression Associates with Favorable Survival for Stage III Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Davies, Michael A.; Tanese, Keiji; Roszik, Jason; Shin-Sim, Myung; Bassett, Roland L.; Milton, Denái R.; Woodman, Scott E.; Prieto, Victor G.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Morton, Donald L.; Hoon, Dave S.; Grimm, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Inflammatory marker expression in stage III melanoma tumors was evaluated for association with outcome, using two independent cohorts of stage III melanoma patients’ tumor tissues. Experimental Design Fifteen markers of interest were selected for analysis, and their expression in melanoma tissues was determined by immunohistochemistry. Proteins associating with either overall survival (OS) or relapse-free survival (RFS) in the retrospective discovery tissue microarray (TMA) (n = 158) were subsequently evaluated in an independent validation TMA (n = 114). Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess the association between survival parameters and covariates, the Kaplan-Meier method to estimate the distribution of survival, and the log-rank test to compare distributions. Results Expression of CD74 on melanoma cells was unique, and in the discovery TMA it associated with favorable patient outcome (OS: HR, 0.53, P = 0.01 and RFS: HR, 0.56; P = 0.01). The validation dataset confirmed the CD74 prognostic significance and revealed that the absence of MIF and iNOS was also associated with poor survival parameters. Consistent with the protein observation, tumor CD74 mRNA expression also correlated positively (p = 0.003) with OS in the melanoma TCGA dataset. Conclusions Our data validate CD74 as a useful prognostic tumor cell protein marker associated with favorable RFS and OS in stage III melanoma. Low or negative expression of MIF in both TMAs, and of iNOS in the validation set also provided useful prognostic data. A disease-specific investigation of CD74’s functional significance is warranted, and other markers appear intriguing to pursue. PMID:26783288

  4. Modeling the Spatiotemporal Evolution of the Melanoma Tumor Microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signoriello, Alexandra; Bosenberg, Marcus; Shattuck, Mark; O'Hern, Corey

    The tumor microenvironment, which includes tumor cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), cancer-associated fibroblasts, and endothelial cells, drives the formation and progression of melanoma tumors. Using quantitative analysis of in vivo confocal images of melanoma tumors in three spatial dimensions, we examine the physical properties of the melanoma tumor microenvironment, including the numbers of different cells types, cell size, and morphology. We also compute the nearest neighbor statistics and measure intermediate range spatial correlations between different cell types. We also calculate the step size distribution, mean-square displacement, and non-Gaussian parameter from the spatial trajectories of different cell types in the tumor microenvironment.

  5. Evaluation of the Photodynamic Therapy effect using a tumor model in Chorioallantoic Membrane with Melanoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzá, Hilde H.; Pires, Layla; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is a type of cancer treatment that is based on the interaction of light (with specific wavelength), a photosensitizing agent and molecular oxygen. The photosensitizer (PS) is activated by light and reacts with oxygen resulting in the production of singlet oxygen that is highly reactive and responsible for the cell death. The Chick Chorioallantoic Membrane (CAM) model is a transparent membrane that allows visualization and evaluation of blood vessels and structural changes, where a tumor model was developed. Two induction tumor models were investigated: tumor biopsy or cell culture. It was used a murine melanoma cell B16F10 in culture and a biopsy from a xenograft tumor in hairless mouse. Two PS were tested: Photodithazine® and Photogem®, a chlorine and porphyrin compounds, respectively. Using intravenous administration, the light-drug interval was of 30 minutes, 1 and 3 hours. Illumination was performed at 630 nm and 660 nm, and the vascular and tumor response was monitored and analyzed. The PS distribution was checked with confocal microscopy. This model can be useful to study several parameters of PDT and the effect of this therapy in the cancer treatment since it allows direct visualization of its effects.

  6. Monoclonal Antibody and an Antibody-Toxin Conjugate to a Cell Surface Proteoglycan of Melanoma Cells Suppress in vivo Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumol, T. F.; Wang, Q. C.; Reisfeld, R. A.; Kaplan, N. O.

    1983-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody directed against a cell surface chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan of human melanoma cells, 9.2.27, and its diphtheria toxin A chain (DTA) conjugate were investigated for their effects on in vitro protein synthesis and in vivo tumor growth of human melanoma cells. The 9.2.27 IgG and its DTA conjugate display similar serological activities against melanoma target cells but only the conjugate can induce consistent in vitro inhibition of protein synthesis and toxicity in M21 melanoma cells. However, both 9.2.27 IgG and its DTA conjugate effect significant suppression of M21 tumor growth in vivo in an immunotherapy model of a rapidly growing tumor in athymic nu/nu mice, suggesting that other host mechanisms may mediate monoclonal antibody-induced tumor suppression.

  7. Melanoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Roesch, Alexander

    2015-02-01

    The cancer stem cell concept significantly broadens our understanding of melanoma biology. However, this concept should be regarded as an integral part of a holistic cancer model that also includes the genetic evolution of tumor cells and the variability of cell phenotypes within a dynamic tumor microenvironment. The biologic complexity and methodological difficulties in identifying cancer stem cells and their biomarkers are currently impeding the direct translation of experimental findings into clinical practice. Nevertheless, it is these methodological shortcomings that provide a new perspective on the phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity of melanoma with important consequences for future therapies. The development of new combination treatment strategies, particularly with regard to overcoming treatment resistance, could significantly benefit from targeted elimination of cell subpopulations with cancer stem cell properties. © 2015 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. miR-204-5p acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting matrix metalloproteinases-9 and B-cell lymphoma-2 in malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Wenkang; Qian, Yao; Ni, Xin; Bu, Xuefeng; Xia, Yun; Wang, Jinlong; Ruan, Hongru; Ma, Shaojun; Xu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of microRNAs have been found to be involved in tumorigenesis, including melanoma tumorigenesis. miR-204-5p is down-regulated and functions as a tumor suppressor in many human malignant tumors. miR-204-5p expression is also decreased in melanoma tissues, but its biological roles and molecular mechanisms in malignant melanoma remain unclear. In this study, the aberrant down-regulation of miR-204-5p was detected in melanoma, especially in metastatic melanoma. miR-204-5p also served as a protective factor for the prognosis of melanoma patients. We determined that miR-204-5p suppresses cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and promotes cell apoptosis in melanoma. Matrix metalloproteinases-9 and B-cell lymphoma-2 are the functional targets of miR-204-5p, through which it plays an important biological role in malignant melanoma. The effect of miR-204-5p on malignant melanoma is verified using a xenograft model. We also determined that miR-204-5p increases 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin (DDP) chemosensitivity in malignant melanoma cells. This finding elucidates new functions and mechanisms for miR-204-5p in melanoma development, and provides potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:28280358

  9. Activation of the A2B adenosine receptor in B16 melanomas induces CXCL12 expression in FAP-positive tumor stromal cells, enhancing tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Claudia; Miele, Lucio; Porta, Amalia; Pinto, Aldo; Morello, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    The A2B receptor (A2BR) can mediate adenosine-induced tumor proliferation, immunosuppression and angiogenesis. Targeting the A2BR has proved to be therapeutically effective in some murine tumor models, but the mechanisms of these effects are still incompletely understood. Here, we report that pharmacologic inhibition of A2BR with PSB1115, which inhibits tumor growth, decreased the number of fibroblast activation protein (FAP)-expressing cells in tumors in a mouse model of melanoma. This effect was associated with reduced expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2. Treatment of melanoma-associated fibroblasts with the A2BR agonist Bay60-6583 enhanced CXCL12 and FGF2 expression. This effect was abrogated by PSB1115. The A2AR agonist CGS21680 did not induce CXCL12 or FGF2 expression in tumor associated fibroblasts. Similar results were obtained under hypoxic conditions in skin-derived fibroblasts, which responded to Bay60-6583 in an A2BR-dependent manner, by stimulating pERK1/2. FGF2 produced by Bay60-6583-treated fibroblasts directly enhanced the proliferation of melanoma cells. This effect could be reversed by PSB1115 or an anti-FGF2 antibody. Interestingly, melanoma growth in mice receiving Bay60-6583 was attenuated by inhibition of the CXCL12/CXCR4 pathway with AMD3100. CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 are involved in angiogenesis and immune-suppression. Treatment of mice with AMD3100 reduced the number of CD31+ cells induced by Bay60-6583. Conversely, CXCR4 blockade did not affect the accumulation of tumor-infiltrating MDSCs or Tregs. Together, our data reveal an important role for A2BR in stimulating FGF2 and CXCL12 expression in melanoma-associated fibroblasts. These factors contribute to create a tumor-promoting microenvironment. Our findings support the therapeutic potential of PSB1115 for melanoma. PMID:27590504

  10. Dehydroleucodine inhibits tumor growth in a preclinical melanoma model by inducing cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Valeria V; Lobos-Gonzalez, Lorena; Ibañez, Jorge; Fernandez, Dario; Cuello-Carrión, F Darío; Valenzuela, Manuel A; Barbieri, Manuel A; Semino, Silvana N; Jahn, Graciela A; Quest, Andrew F G; Lopez, Luis A

    2016-03-01

    Malignant melanoma represents the fastest growing public health risk of all cancer types worldwide. Several strategies and anti-cancer drugs have been used in an effort to improve treatments, but the development of resistance to anti-neoplastic drugs remains the major cause of chemotherapy failure in melanomas. Previously, we showed that the sesquiterpene lactone, dehydroleucodine (DhL), promotes the accumulation of DNA damage markers, such as H2AX and 53BP1, in human tumor cells. Also DhL was shown to trigger either cell senescence or apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner in HeLa and MCF7 cells. Here, we evaluated the effects of DhL on B16F0 mouse melanoma cells in vitro and in a pre-clinical melanoma model. DhL inhibited the proliferation of B16F0 cells by inducing senescence or apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Also, DhL reduced the expression of the cell cycle proteins cyclin D1 and B1 and the inhibitor of apoptosis protein, survivin. In melanomas generated by subcutaneous injection of B16F0 cells into C57/BL6 mice, the treatment with 20 mg DhL /Kg/day in preventive, simultaneous and therapeutic protocols reduced tumor volumes by 70%, 60% and 50%, respectively. DhL treatments reduced the number of proliferating, while increasing the number of senescent and apoptotic tumor cells. To estimate the long-term effects of DhL, a mathematical model was applied to fit experimental data. Extrapolation beyond experimental time points revealed that DhL administration following preventive and therapeutic protocols is predicted to be more effective than simultaneous treatments with DhL in restricting tumor growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Very Late Antigen-1 Marks Functional Tumor-Resident CD8 T Cells and Correlates with Survival of Melanoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Timothy; Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A.; Baumgaertner, Petra; Bordry, Natacha; Cagnon, Laurène; Donda, Alena; Romero, Pedro; Verdeil, Grégory; Speiser, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    A major limiting factor in the success of immunotherapy is tumor infiltration by CD8+ T cells, a process that remains poorly understood. In the present study, we characterized homing receptors expressed by human melanoma-specific CD8+ T cells. Our data reveal that P-selectin binding and expression of the retention integrin, very late antigen (VLA)-1, by vaccine-induced T cells correlate with longer patient survival. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CD8+VLA-1+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are highly enriched in melanoma metastases in diverse tissues. VLA-1-expressing TIL frequently co-express CD69 and CD103, indicating tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM) differentiation. We employed a mouse model of melanoma to further characterize VLA-1-expressing TIL. Our data show that VLA-1+ TRM develop in murine tumors within 2 weeks, where they exhibit increased activation status, as well as superior effector functions. In addition, in vivo blockade of either VLA-1 or CD103 significantly impaired control of subcutaneous tumors. Together, our data indicate that VLA-1+ TRM develop in tumors and play an important role in tumor immunity, presenting novel targets for the optimization of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:28018343

  12. Tanespimycin and tipifarnib exhibit synergism in inducing apoptosis in melanoma cell lines from later stages of tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Bentke, Anna; Małecki, Jędrzej; Ostrowska, Barbara; Krzykowska-Petitjean, Katarzyna; Laidler, Piotr

    2013-10-01

    Many anticancer strategies rely on efficient induction of apoptosis. The need for development of drug combinations with a strong pro-apoptotic activity is of particular interest in melanoma resistant to currently available chemotherapeutic regimes. We studied the pro-apoptotic properties of combination of tanespimycin+tipifarnib in five melanoma cell lines representing various stages of tumor progression. Our results show that in cells derived from vertical- and metastatic-phase the combination of tested drugs is strongly cytotoxic and efficient in inducing apoptosis, as evidenced by activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 and enhanced fragmentation of DNA.

  13. Persistence of Multiple Tumor-Specific T-Cell Clones Is Associated with Complete Tumor Regression in a Melanoma Patient Receiving Adoptive Cell Transfer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Juhua; Dudley, Mark E.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Robbins, Paul F.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The authors recently reported that adoptive immunotherapy with autologous tumor-reactive tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) immediately following a conditioning nonmyeloablative chemotherapy regimen resulted in an enhanced clinical response rate in patients with metastatic melanoma. These observations led to the current studies, which are focused on a detailed analysis of the T-cell antigen reactivity as well as the in vivo persistence of T cells in melanoma patient 2098, who experienced a complete regression of all metastatic lesions in lungs and soft tissues following therapy. Screening of an autologous tumor cell cDNA library using transferred TILs resulted in the identification of novel mutated growth arrest-specific gene 7 (GAS7) and glyceral-dehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) gene transcripts. Direct sequence analysis of the expressed T-cell receptor beta chain variable regions showed that the transferred TILs contained multiple T-cell clonotypes, at least six of which persisted in peripheral blood for a month or more following transfer. The persistent T cells recognized both the mutated GAS7 and GAPDH. These persistent tumor-reactive T-cell clones were detected in tumor cell samples obtained from the patient following adoptive cell transfer and appeared to be represented at higher levels in the tumor sample obtained 1 month following transfer than in the peripheral blood obtained at the same time. Overall, these results indicate that multiple tumor-reactive T cells can persist in the peripheral blood and at the tumor site for prolonged times following adoptive transfer and thus may be responsible for the complete tumor regression in this patient. PMID:15614045

  14. Tumor PD-L1 expression, immune cell correlates and PD-1+ lymphocytes in sentinel lymph node melanoma metastases.

    PubMed

    Kakavand, Hojabr; Vilain, Ricardo E; Wilmott, James S; Burke, Hazel; Yearley, Jennifer H; Thompson, John F; Hersey, Peter; Long, Georgina V; Scolyer, Richard A

    2015-12-01

    Melanoma patients with sentinel lymph node metastases have variable 5-year survival rates (39-70%). The prognostic significance of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in sentinel lymph node metastases from such patients is currently unknown. Anti-PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors have significantly improved clinical outcome in unresectable AJCC stage IIIC/IV metastatic melanoma patients, and are being trialed in the adjuvant setting in advanced stage disease, however, their role in early stage (sentinel lymph node positive) metastatic disease remains unclear. The aims of this study were to characterize, in sentinel lymph nodes, the subpopulations of lymphocytes that interact with metastatic melanoma cells and analyze their associations with outcome, and to determine tumor PD-L1 expression as this may provide a rational scientific basis for the administration of adjuvant anti-PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors in sentinel lymph node positive metastatic melanoma patients. Sentinel lymph nodes containing metastatic melanoma from 60 treatment-naive patients were analyzed for CD3, CD4, CD8, FOXP3, PD-1, and PD-L1 using immunohistochemistry on serial sections. The results were correlated with clinicopathologic features and outcome. Positive correlations between recurrence-free/overall survival with the number of CD3+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (hazard ratio=0.36 (0.17-0.76), P=0.005; hazard ratio=0.29 (0.14-0.61), P=0.0005, respectively), the number of CD4+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (hazard ratio=0.34 (0.15-0.77), P=0.007; hazard ratio=0.32 (0.14-0.74), P=0.005, respectively), and the number of CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (hazard ratio =0.42 (0.21-0.85), P=0.013; hazard ratio =0.32 (0.19-0.78), P=0.006, respectively) were observed. There was also a negative correlation with the number of peritumoral PD-1+ lymphocytes (hazard ratio=2.67 (1.17-6.13), P=0.016; hazard ratio=2.74 (1.14-6.76), P=0.019, respectively). Tumoral PD-L1 expression was present in 26 cases (43%) but did not

  15. Archaeosome Adjuvant Overcomes Tolerance to Tumor-Associated Melanoma Antigens Inducing Protective CD8+ T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Lakshmi; Deschatelets, Lise; Stark, Felicity C.; Gurnani, Komal; Sprott, G. Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Vesicles comprised of the ether glycerolipids of the archaeon Methanobrevibacter smithii (archaeosomes) are potent adjuvants for evoking CD8+ T cell responses. We therefore explored the ability of archaeosomes to overcome immunologic tolerance to self-antigens. Priming and boosting of mice with archaeosome-antigen evoked comparable CD8+ T cell response and tumor protection to an alternate boosting strategy utilizing live bacterial vectors for antigen delivery. Vaccination with melanoma antigenic peptides TRP181-189 and Gp10025-33 delivered in archaeosomes resulted in IFN-γ producing antigen-specific CD8+ T cells with strong cytolytic capability and protection against subcutaneous B16 melanoma. Targeting responses against multiple antigens afforded prolonged median survival against melanoma challenge. Entrapment of multiple peptides within the same vesicle or admixed formulations were both effective at evoking CD8+ T cells against each antigen. Melanoma-antigen archaeosome formulations also afforded therapeutic protection against established B16 tumors when combined with depletion of T-regulatory cells. Overall, we demonstrate that archaeosome adjuvants constitute an effective choice for formulating cancer vaccines. PMID:21318177

  16. LncRNA GAS5 is a critical regulator of metastasis phenotype of melanoma cells and inhibits tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Yang, Huixin; Xiao, Yanbin; Tang, Xiaoxia; Li, Yuqian; Han, Qiaoqiao; Fu, Junping; Yang, Yuye; Zhu, Yuechun

    2016-01-01

    The present study intended to demonstrate the effects of long noncoding RNA growth arrest-specific transcript 5 (GAS5) on the migration and invasion of melanoma cells. We first detected the expression of GAS5 among four kinds of melanoma cell lines, followed by constructing GAS5-knocked down and overexpressed stable cells. Next, we evaluated the effects of GAS5 on cell migration and invasion using wound healing and gelatin zymography assays. Finally, melanoma cells with different GAS5 expression were injected into nude mice, and the tumor volumes were recorded and tumor tissues were analyzed after sacrificing the mice. This study systematically examined the function of GAS5 in mediating melanoma metastasis and revealed that GAS5 plays an anticancer role in melanoma via regulating gelatinase A and B, both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27445498

  17. Lymphadenectomy promotes tumor growth and cancer cell dissemination in the spontaneous RET mouse model of human uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Pin, Yeo Kim; Khoo, Karen; Tham, Muly; Karwai, Tan; Hwee, Thiam Chung; Puaux, Anne-Laure; Cindy Phua, Meow Ling; Kato, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Resection of infiltrated tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLNs) is a standard practice for the treatment of several cancers including breast cancer and melanoma. However, many randomized prospective trials have failed to show convincing clinical benefits associated with LN removal and the role of TDLNs in cancer dissemination is poorly understood. Here, we found in a well-characterized spontaneous mouse model of uveal melanoma that the growth of the primary tumor was accompanied by increased lymphangiogenesis and cancer cell colonization in the LNs draining the eyes. But, unexpectedly, early resection of the TDLNs increased the growth of the primary tumor and associated blood vessels as well as promoted cancer cell survival and dissemination. These effects were accompanied by increased tumor cell proliferation and expression of phosphorylated AKT. Topical application of a broad anti-inflammatory agent, Tobradex, or an oral treatment with cyclooxygenase-2 specific inhibitor, Celecoxib, reversed tumor progression observed after complete lymphadenectomy. Our study confirms the importance of tumor homeostasis in cancer progression by showing the enhancing effects of TDLN removal on tumor growth and cancer cell dissemination, and suggests that TDLN resection may only be beneficial if used in combination with anti-inflammatory drugs such as Tobradex and Celecoxib. PMID:26575174

  18. Tumor cell-intrinsic PD-L1 promotes tumor-initiating cell generation and functions in melanoma and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Harshita B.; Clark, Curtis A.; Yuan, Bin; Sareddy, Gangadhara; Pandeswara, Srilakshmi; Padron, Alvaro S.; Hurez, Vincent; Conejo-Garcia, José; Vadlamudi, Ratna; Li, Rong; Curiel, Tyler J.

    2017-01-01

    As tumor PD-L1 provides signals to anti-tumor PD-1+ T cells that blunt their functions, αPD-1 and αPD-L1 antibodies have been developed as anti-cancer immunotherapies based on interrupting this signaling axis. However, tumor cell-intrinsic PD-L1 signals also regulate immune-independent tumor cell proliferation and mTOR signals, among other important effects. Tumor initiating cells (TIC) generate carcinomas, resist treatments and promote relapse. We show here that in murine B16 melanoma and ID8agg ovarian carcinoma cells, TIC express more PD-L1 versus non-TIC. Silencing PD-L1 in B16 and ID8agg cells by shRNA (“PD-L1lo”) reduced TIC numbers, the canonical TIC genes nanog and pou5f1 (oct4), and functions as assessed by tumorosphere development, immune-dependent and immune-independent tumorigenesis, and serial transplantability in vivo. Strikingly, tumor PD-L1 sensitized TIC to interferon-γ and rapamycin in vitro. Cell-intrinsic PD-L1 similarly drove functional TIC generation, canonical TIC gene expression, and sensitivity to interferon-γ and rapamycin in human ES2 ovarian cancer cells. Thus, tumor-intrinsic PD-L1 signals promote TIC generation and virulence, possibly by promoting canonical TIC gene expression, suggesting that PD-L1 has novel signaling effects on cancer pathogenesis and treatment responses. PMID:28798885

  19. TIGIT and PD-1 impair tumor antigen-specific CD8⁺ T cells in melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Pagliano, Ornella; Fourcade, Julien; Sun, Zhaojun; Wang, Hong; Sander, Cindy; Kirkwood, John M; Chen, Tseng-hui Timothy; Maurer, Mark; Korman, Alan J; Zarour, Hassane M

    2015-05-01

    T cell Ig and ITIM domain (TIGIT) is an inhibitory receptor expressed by activated T cells, Tregs, and NK cells. Here, we determined that TIGIT is upregulated on tumor antigen-specific (TA-specific) CD8⁺ T cells and CD8⁺ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from patients with melanoma, and these TIGIT-expressing CD8⁺ T cells often coexpress the inhibitory receptor PD-1. Moreover, CD8⁺ TILs from patients exhibited downregulation of the costimulatory molecule CD226, which competes with TIGIT for the same ligand, supporting a TIGIT/CD226 imbalance in metastatic melanoma. TIGIT marked early T cell activation and was further upregulated by T cells upon PD-1 blockade and in dysfunctional PD-1⁺TIM-3⁺ TA-specific CD8⁺ T cells. PD-1⁺TIGIT⁺, PD-1⁻TIGIT⁺, and PD-1⁺TIGIT⁻ CD8⁺ TILs had similar functional capacities ex vivo, suggesting that TIGIT alone, or together with PD-1, is not indicative of T cell dysfunction. However, in the presence of TIGIT ligand-expressing cells, TIGIT and PD-1 blockade additively increased proliferation, cytokine production, and degranulation of both TA-specific CD8⁺ T cells and CD8⁺ TILs. Collectively, our results show that TIGIT and PD-1 regulate the expansion and function of TA-specific CD8⁺ T cells and CD8⁺ TILs in melanoma patients and suggest that dual TIGIT and PD-1 blockade should be further explored to elicit potent antitumor CD8⁺ T cell responses in patients with advanced melanoma.

  20. Adjuvant dendritic cell vaccination induces tumor-specific immune responses in the majority of stage III melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Boudewijns, Steve; Bol, Kalijn F.; Schreibelt, Gerty; Westdorp, Harm; Textor, Johannes C.; van Rossum, Michelle M.; Scharenborg, Nicole M.; de Boer, Annemiek J.; van de Rakt, Mandy W. M. M.; Pots, Jeanne M.; van Oorschot, Tom G. M.; Duiveman-de Boer, Tjitske; Olde Nordkamp, Michel A.; van Meeteren, Wilmy S. E. C.; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Bonenkamp, Johannes J.; de Wilt, Johannes H. W.; Aarntzen, Erik H. J. G.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Gerritsen, Winald R.; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of adjuvant dendritic cell (DC) vaccination to induce tumor-specific immunological responses in stage III melanoma patients. Experimental design: Retrospective analysis of stage III melanoma patients, vaccinated with autologous monocyte-derived DC loaded with tumor-associated antigens (TAA) gp100 and tyrosinase after radical lymph node dissection. Skin-test infiltrating lymphocytes (SKILs) obtained from delayed-type hypersensitivity skin-test biopsies were analyzed for the presence of TAA-specific CD8+ T cells by tetrameric MHC-peptide complexes and by functional TAA-specific T cell assays, defined by peptide-recognition (T2 cells) and/or tumor-recognition (BLM and/or MEL624) with specific production of Th1 cytokines and no Th2 cytokines. Results: Ninety-seven patients were analyzed: 21 with stage IIIA, 34 with stage IIIB, and 42 had stage IIIC disease. Tetramer-positive CD8+ T cells were present in 68 patients (70%), and 24 of them showed a response against all 3 epitopes tested (gp100:154–162, gp100:280–288, and tyrosinase:369–377) at any point during vaccinations. A functional T cell response was found in 62 patients (64%). Rates of peptide-recognition of gp100:154–162, gp100:280–288, and tyrosinase:369–377 were 40%, 29%, and 45%, respectively. Median recurrence-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival of the whole study population were 23.0 mo and 36.8 mo, respectively. Conclusions: DC vaccination induces a functional TAA-specific T cell response in the majority of stage III melanoma patients, indicating it is more effective in stage III than in stage IV melanoma patients. Furthermore, performing multiple cycles of vaccinations enhances the chance of a broader immune response. PMID:27622047

  1. Jolkinolide B induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor growth in mouse melanoma B16F10 cells by altering glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Caixia; Yan, Xinyan; Wang, Bo; Yu, Lina; Han, Jichun; Li, Defang; Zheng, Qiusheng

    2016-01-01

    Most cancer cells preferentially rely on glycolysis to produce the energy (adenosine triphosphate, ATP) for growth and proliferation. Emerging evidence demonstrates that the apoptosis in cancer cells could be closely associated with the inhibition of glycolysis. In this study, we have found that jolkinolide B (JB), a bioactive diterpenoid extracted from the root of Euphorbia fischeriana Steud, induced tumor cells apoptosis and decreased the production of ATP and lactic acid in mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. Furthermore, we found that JB downregulated the mRNA expression of glucose transporter genes (Glut1, Glut3 and Glut4) and glycolysis-related kinase genes (Hk2 and Ldha) in B16F10 cells. Moreover, treatment with JB upregulated the mRNA expression of pro-apoptosis genes (Bax), downregulated the mRNA expression of anti-apoptosis genes (Bcl-2, Caspase-3 and Caspase-9), decreased the potential of mitochondrial membrane and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in B16F10 cells. Finally, intragastric administration of JB suppressed tumor growth and induced tumor apoptosis in mouse xenograft model of murine melanoma B16F10 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that JB could induce apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway and inhibit tumor growth. The inhibition of glycolysis could play a crucial role in the induction of apoptosis in JB-treated B16F10 cells. PMID:27796318

  2. Jolkinolide B induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor growth in mouse melanoma B16F10 cells by altering glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Caixia; Yan, Xinyan; Wang, Bo; Yu, Lina; Han, Jichun; Li, Defang; Zheng, Qiusheng

    2016-10-31

    Most cancer cells preferentially rely on glycolysis to produce the energy (adenosine triphosphate, ATP) for growth and proliferation. Emerging evidence demonstrates that the apoptosis in cancer cells could be closely associated with the inhibition of glycolysis. In this study, we have found that jolkinolide B (JB), a bioactive diterpenoid extracted from the root of Euphorbia fischeriana Steud, induced tumor cells apoptosis and decreased the production of ATP and lactic acid in mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. Furthermore, we found that JB downregulated the mRNA expression of glucose transporter genes (Glut1, Glut3 and Glut4) and glycolysis-related kinase genes (Hk2 and Ldha) in B16F10 cells. Moreover, treatment with JB upregulated the mRNA expression of pro-apoptosis genes (Bax), downregulated the mRNA expression of anti-apoptosis genes (Bcl-2, Caspase-3 and Caspase-9), decreased the potential of mitochondrial membrane and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in B16F10 cells. Finally, intragastric administration of JB suppressed tumor growth and induced tumor apoptosis in mouse xenograft model of murine melanoma B16F10 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that JB could induce apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway and inhibit tumor growth. The inhibition of glycolysis could play a crucial role in the induction of apoptosis in JB-treated B16F10 cells.

  3. Detection rate and prognostic value of circulating tumor cells and circulating tumor DNA in metastatic uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bidard, François-Clément; Madic, Jordan; Mariani, Pascale; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Rampanou, Aurore; Servois, Vincent; Cassoux, Nathalie; Desjardins, Laurence; Milder, Maud; Vaucher, Isabelle; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Lebofsky, Ronald; Stern, Marc-Henri; Lantz, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) have been recently investigated in several cancer types, but their respective clinical significance remains to be determined. In our prospective study, we compared the detection rate and the prognostic value of these two circulating biomarkers in patients with metastatic uveal melanoma. GNAQ/GNA11 mutations were characterized in archived tumor tissue. Using a highly sensitive and mutation-specific bidirectional pyrophosphorolysis-activated polymerization (bi-PAP) technique, GNAQ c.626A>T, GNAQ c.626A>C and GNA11 c.626A>T copy numbers were quantified in plasma from 12 mL of blood. CTCs were detected at the same time in 7.5 mL of blood by the CellSearch technique. Patient characteristics and outcome were prospectively collected. CTCs (≥1) were detected in 12 of the 40 included patients (30%, range 1-20). Among the 26 patients with known detectable mutations, ctDNA was detected and quantified in 22 (84%, range 4-11,421 copies/mL). CTC count and ctDNA levels were associated with the presence of miliary hepatic metastasis (p = 0.004 and 0.03, respectively), with metastasis volume (p = 0.005 and 0.004) and with each other (p < 0.0001). CTC count and ctDNA levels were both strongly associated with progression-free survival (p = 0.003 and 0.001) and overall survival (p = 0.0009 and <0.0001). In multivariate analyses, ctDNA appeared to be a better prognostic marker than CTC. In conclusion, ctDNA and CTC are correlated and both have poor prognostic significance. CTC detection can be performed in every patient but, in patients with detectable mutations, ctDNA was more frequently detected than CTC and has possibly more prognostic value. © 2013 UICC.

  4. Melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in primary melanocytes through paracrine/autocrine signaling in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Deyi; Barry, Samantha; Kmetz, Daniel; Egger, Michael; Pan, Jianmin; Rai, Shesh N; Qu, Jifu; McMasters, Kelly M; Hao, Hongying

    2016-07-01

    The tumor microenvironment is abundant with exosomes that are secreted by the cancer cells themselves. Exosomes are nanosized, organelle-like membranous structures that are increasingly being recognized as major contributors in the progression of malignant neoplasms. A critical element in melanoma progression is its propensity to metastasize, but little is known about how melanoma cell-derived exosomes modulate the microenvironment to optimize conditions for tumor progression and metastasis. Here, we provide evidence that melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote phenotype switching in primary melanocytes through paracrine/autocrine signaling. We found that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was activated during the exosome-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-resembling process, which promotes metastasis. Let-7i, an miRNA modulator of EMT, was also involved in this process. We further defined two other miRNA modulators of EMT (miR-191 and let-7a) in serum exosomes for differentiating stage I melanoma patients from non-melanoma subjects. These results provide the first strong molecular evidence that melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote the EMT-resembling process in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, novel strategies targeting EMT and modulating the tumor microenvironment may emerge as important approaches for the treatment of metastatic melanoma.

  5. Tumor regression in patients with metastatic synovial cell sarcoma and melanoma using genetically engineered lymphocytes reactive with NY-ESO-1.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Paul F; Morgan, Richard A; Feldman, Steven A; Yang, James C; Sherry, Richard M; Dudley, Mark E; Wunderlich, John R; Nahvi, Azam V; Helman, Lee J; Mackall, Crystal L; Kammula, Udai S; Hughes, Marybeth S; Restifo, Nicholas P; Raffeld, Mark; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Levy, Catherine L; Li, Yong F; El-Gamil, Mona; Schwarz, Susan L; Laurencot, Carolyn; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2011-03-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes represents an effective cancer treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma. The NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigen, which is expressed in 80% of patients with synovial cell sarcoma and approximately 25% of patients with melanoma and common epithelial tumors, represents an attractive target for immune-based therapies. The current trial was carried out to evaluate the ability of adoptively transferred autologous T cells transduced with a T-cell receptor (TCR) directed against NY-ESO-1 to mediate tumor regression in patients with metastatic melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. A clinical trial was performed in patients with metastatic melanoma or metastatic synovial cell sarcoma refractory to all standard treatments. Patients with NY-ESO-1-positive tumors were treated with autologous TCR-transduced T cells plus 720,000 iU/kg of interleukin-2 to tolerance after preparative chemotherapy. Objective clinical responses were evaluated using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Objective clinical responses were observed in four of six patients with synovial cell sarcoma and five of 11 patients with melanoma bearing tumors expressing NY-ESO-1. Two of 11 patients with melanoma demonstrated complete regressions that persisted after 1 year. A partial response lasting 18 months was observed in one patient with synovial cell sarcoma. These observations indicate that TCR-based gene therapies directed against NY-ESO-1 represent a new and effective therapeutic approach for patients with melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. To our knowledge, this represents the first demonstration of the successful treatment of a nonmelanoma tumor using TCR-transduced T cells.

  6. Isolation of tumorigenic circulating melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Lin, Jennifer Y.; Alloo, Allireza; Wilson, Brian J.; Schatton, Tobias; Zhan, Qian; Murphy, George F.; Waaga-Gasser, Ana-Maria; Gasser, Martin; Hodi, F. Stephen; Frank, Natasha Y.; Frank, Markus H.

    2010-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) have been identified in several human malignancies, including malignant melanoma. However, whether melanoma CTC are tumorigenic and cause metastatic progression is currently unknown. Here we isolate for the first time viable tumorigenic melanoma CTC and demonstrate that this cell population is capable of metastasis formation in human-to-mouse xenotransplantation experiments. The presence of CTC among peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of murine recipients of subcutaneous (s.c.) human melanoma xenografts could be detected based on mRNA expression for human GAPDH and/or ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 5 (ABCB5), a marker of malignant melanoma-initiating cells previously shown to be associated with metastatic disease progression in human patients. ABCB5 expression could also be detected in PBMC preparations from human stage IV melanoma patients but not healthy controls. The detection of melanoma CTC in human-to-mouse s.c. tumor xenotransplantation models correlated significantly with pulmonary metastasis formation. Moreover, prospectively isolated CTC from murine recipients of s.c. melanoma xenografts were capable of primary tumor initiation and caused metastasis formation upon xenotransplantation to secondary murine NOD-scid IL2Rγnull recipients. Our results provide initial evidence that melanoma CTC are tumorigenic and demonstrate that CTC are capable of causing metastatic tumor progression. These findings suggest a need for CTC eradication to inhibit metastatic progression and provide a rationale for assessment of therapeutic responses of this tumorigenic cell population to promising emerging melanoma treatment modalities. PMID:20977885

  7. SNPase-ARMS qPCR: Ultrasensitive Mutation-Based Detection of Cell-Free Tumor DNA in Melanoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Julia; Eder, Johanna; Pratscher, Barbara; Brandt, Sabine; Schneller, Doris; Müllegger, Robert; Vogl, Claus; Trautinger, Franz; Brem, Gottfried; Burgstaller, Joerg P.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free circulating tumor DNA in the plasma of cancer patients has become a common point of interest as indicator of therapy options and treatment response in clinical cancer research. Especially patient- and tumor-specific single nucleotide variants that accurately distinguish tumor DNA from wild type DNA are promising targets. The reliable detection and quantification of these single-base DNA variants is technically challenging. Currently, a variety of techniques is applied, with no apparent “gold standard”. Here we present a novel qPCR protocol that meets the conditions of extreme sensitivity and specificity that are required for detection and quantification of tumor DNA. By consecutive application of two polymerases, one of them designed for extreme base-specificity, the method reaches unprecedented sensitivity and specificity. Three qPCR assays were tested with spike-in experiments, specific for point mutations BRAF V600E, PTEN T167A and NRAS Q61L of melanoma cell lines. It was possible to detect down to one copy of tumor DNA per reaction (Poisson distribution), at a background of up to 200 000 wild type DNAs. To prove its clinical applicability, the method was successfully tested on a small cohort of BRAF V600E positive melanoma patients. PMID:26562020

  8. Targeting macrophage anti-tumor activity to suppress melanoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Luhong; Liu, Chengfang; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Linjing

    2017-01-01

    By phagocytosing cancer cells and their cellular debris, macrophages play a critical role in nonspecific defense (innate immunity) and, as antigen presenters, they help initiate specific defense mechanisms (adaptive immunity). Malignant melanoma is a lethal disease due to its aggressive capacity for metastasis and resistance to therapy. For decades, considerable effort has gone into development of an effective immunotherapy for treatment of metastatic melanoma. In this review, we focus on the anti-tumor activities of macrophages in melanoma and their potential as therapeutic targets in melanoma. Although macrophages can be re-educated through intercellular signaling to promote tumor survival owing to their plasticity, we expect that targeting the anti-tumor activity of macrophages remains a promising strategy for melanoma inhibition. The combination of tumoricidal macrophage activation and other treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, may provide an effective and comprehensive anti-melanoma strategy. PMID:28060744

  9. Timosaponin AIII inhibits melanoma cell migration by suppressing COX-2 and in vivo tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Mo; Im, A-Rang; Kim, Seung Hyung; Hyun, Jin Won; Chae, Sungwook

    2016-02-01

    Melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin disease, due in large part to its propensity to metastasize. We examined the effects of timosaponin AIII, a compound isolated from Anemarrhena asphodeloides Bunge, on melanoma cancer cell migration and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects using B16-F10 and WM-115 melanoma cells lines. Overexpression of COX-2, its metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and PGE2 receptors (EP2 and EP4) promoted cell migration in vitro. Exposure to timosaponin AIII resulted in concentration-dependent inhibition of cell migration, which was associated with reduced levels of COX-2, PGE2, and PGE2 receptors. Transient transfection of COX-2 siRNA also inhibited cell migration. Exposure to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbal-13-acetate enhanced cell migration, whereas timosaponin AIII inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbal-13-acetate-induced cell migration and reduced basal levels of EP2 and EP4. Moreover, timosaponin AIII inhibited activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), an upstream regulator of COX-2 in B16-F10 cells. Consistent with our in vitro findings, in vivo studies showed that timosaponin AIII treatment significantly reduced the total number of metastatic nodules in the mouse lung and improved histological alterations in B16-F10-injected C57BL/6 mice. In addition, C57BL/6 mice treated with timosaponin AIII showed reduced expression of COX-2 and NF-κB in the lung. Together, these results indicate that timosaponin AIII has the capacity to inhibit melanoma cell migration, an essential step in the process of metastasis, by inhibiting expression of COX-2, NF-κB, PGE2, and PGE2 receptors. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  10. Specific lymphocyte subsets predict response to adoptive cell therapy using expanded autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in metastatic melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Radvanyi, Laszlo G.; Bernatchez, Chantale; Zhang, Minying; Fox, Patricia S.; Miller, Priscilla; Chacon, Jessica; Wu, Richard; Lizee, Gregory; Mahoney, Sandy; Alvarado, Gladys; Glass, Michelle; Johnson, Valen E.; McMannis, John D.; Shpall, Elizabeth; Prieto, Victor; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Kim, Kevin; Homsi, Jade; Bedikian, Agop; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Patel, Sapna; Ross, Merrick I.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Lucci, Anthony; Royal, Richard; Cormier, Janice N.; Davies, Michael A.; Mansaray, Rahmatu; Fulbright, Orenthial J.; Toth, Christopher; Ramachandran, Renjith; Wardell, Seth; Gonzalez, Audrey; Hwu, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) is a promising treatment for metastatic melanoma unresponsive to conventional therapies. We report here on the results of an ongoing Phase II clinical trial testing the efficacy of ACT using TIL in metastatic melanoma patients and the association of specific patient clinical characteristics and the phenotypic attributes of the infused TIL with clinical response. Experimental Design Altogether, 31 transiently lymphodepleted patients were treated with their expanded TIL followed by two cycles of high-dose (HD) IL-2 therapy. The effects of patient clinical features and the phenotypes of the T-cells infused on clinical response were determined. Results Overall, 15/31 (48.4%) patients had an objective clinical response using immune-related response criteria (irRC), with two patients (6.5%) having a complete response. Progression-free survival of >12 months was observed for 9/15 (60%) of the responding patients. Factors significantly associated with objective tumor regression included a higher number of TIL infused, a higher proportion of CD8+ T-cells in the infusion product, a more differentiated effector phenotype of the CD8+ population and a higher frequency of CD8+ T-cells co-expressing the negative costimulation molecule “B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator” (BTLA). No significant difference in telomere lengths of TIL between responders and non-responders was identified. Conclusion These results indicate that immunotherapy with expanded autologous TIL is capable of achieving durable clinical responses in metastatic melanoma patients and that CD8+ T-cells in the infused TIL, particularly differentiated effectors cells and cells expressing BTLA, are associated with tumor regression. PMID:23032743

  11. AZD1480 delays tumor growth in a melanoma model while enhancing the suppressive activity of myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Maenhout, Sarah K.; Four, Stephanie Du; Corthals, Jurgen; Neyns, Bart; Thielemans, Kris; Aerts, Joeri L.

    2014-01-01

    AZD1480 is a potent, competitive small-molecule inhibitor of JAK1/2 kinase which inhibits STAT3 phosphorylation and tumor growth. Here we investigated the effects of AZD1480 on the function of different immune cell populations in a melanoma model. When MO4 tumor-bearing mice were treated with AZD1480 we observed a strong inhibition of tumor growth as well as a prolonged survival. Moreover, a significant decrease in the percentage of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) was observed after treatment with AZD1480. However, AZD1480 enhanced the suppressive capacity of murine MDSCs while at the same time impairing the proliferative as well as the IFN-γ secretion capacity of murine T cells. The addition of AZD1480 to co-cultures of human MDSCs and T cells does not affect the suppressive activity of MDSCs but it does reduce the IFN-γ secretion and the proliferative capacity of T cells. We showed that although AZD1480 has the ability to delay the tumor growth of MO4 tumor-bearing mice, this drug has detrimental effects on several aspects of the immune system. These data indicate that systemic targeting of the JAK/STAT pathway by JAK1/2 inhibition can have divergent effects on tumor growth and anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:25149535

  12. Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway-dependent tumor-specific survival signaling in melanoma cells through inactivation of the proapoptotic protein bad.

    PubMed

    Eisenmann, Kathryn M; VanBrocklin, Matthew W; Staffend, Nancy A; Kitchen, Susan M; Koo, Han-Mo

    2003-12-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling regulates fundamental cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, and survival. We have demonstrated previously that inhibiting MAPK signaling induces apoptosis in melanoma cells but not in normal melanocytes, suggesting that the MAPK pathway propagates essential survival signals in melanoma cells. Here, we report that the 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK), a downstream effector in the MAPK signaling cascade, phosphorylates and inactivates the Bcl-2 homology 3-only proapoptotic protein Bad, thereby mediating a MAPK-dependent tumor-specific survival signal in melanoma cells. The MAPK kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/RSK MAPK signaling module is constitutively hyperactivated, and Bad is maintained in its inactive state by phosphorylation at Ser(75) in a MEK/ERK/RSK-dependent manner in melanoma cells. In contrast, in normal melanocytes, Bad is highly phosphorylated at multiple residues (Ser(75), Ser(99), and Ser(118)) in a MAPK pathway-independent manner. Importantly, ectopic expression of a constitutively activated RSK mutant abrogates Bad activation and renders melanoma cells resistant to apoptosis induced by a MEK inhibitor. Furthermore, overexpressing alanine-substituted (S75A) Bad further sensitizes melanoma cells to MEK inhibitor-induced apoptosis. Our results suggest that the MAPK pathway mediates melanoma-specific survival signaling by differentially regulating RSK-mediated phosphorylation of the proapoptotic protein Bad and may present potentially selective therapeutic targets for the treatment of melanomas.

  13. Anti-tumor Properties of cis-Resveratrol Methylated Analogues in Metastatic Mouse Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Valery L.; Toseef, Tayyaba; Nazumudeen, Fathima B.; Rivoira, Christian; Spatafora, Carmela; Tringali, Corrado; Rotenberg, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol (E-3,5,4’-trihydroxystilbene) is a polyphenol found in red wine that has been shown to have multiple anti-cancer properties. Although cis (Z) and trans (E) isomers of resveratrol occur in nature, the cis form is not biologically active. However, methylation at key positions of the cis form results in more potent anti-cancer properties. This study determined that synthetic cis-polymethoxystilbenes (methylated analogues of cis-resveratrol) inhibited cancer-related phenotypes of metastatic B16 F10 and non-metastatic B16 F1 mouse melanoma cells. In contrast with cis or trans-resveratrol and trans-polymethoxystilbene which were ineffective at 10 μM, cis-polymethoxystilbenes inhibited motility and proliferation of melanoma cells with low micromolar specificity (IC50 <10 μM). Inhibitory effects by cis-polymethoxystilbenes were significantly stronger with B16 F10 cells and were accompanied by decreased expression of β-tubulin and pleckstrin homology domain-interacting protein, a marker of metastatic B16 cells. Thus, cis-polymethoxystilbenes have potential as chemotherapeutic agents for metastatic melanoma. PMID:25567208

  14. Label-free high-throughput detection and quantification of circulating melanoma tumor cell clusters by linear-array-based photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Ruiying; Ma, Jun; Li, Yang; Shao, Jin-Yu; Wang, Lihong V.

    2017-04-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) clusters, arising from multicellular groupings in a primary tumor, greatly elevate the metastatic potential of cancer compared with single CTCs. High-throughput detection and quantification of CTC clusters are important for understanding the tumor metastatic process and improving cancer therapy. Here, we applied a linear-array-based photoacoustic tomography (LA-PAT) system and improved the image reconstruction for label-free high-throughput CTC cluster detection and quantification in vivo. The feasibility was first demonstrated by imaging CTC cluster ex vivo. The relationship between the contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) and the number of cells in melanoma tumor cell clusters was investigated and verified. Melanoma CTC clusters with a minimum of four cells could be detected, and the number of cells could be computed from the CNR. Finally, we demonstrated imaging of injected melanoma CTC clusters in rats in vivo. Similarly, the number of cells in the melanoma CTC clusters could be quantified. The data showed that larger CTC clusters had faster clearance rates in the bloodstream, which agreed with the literature. The results demonstrated the capability of LA-PAT to detect and quantify melanoma CTC clusters in vivo and showed its potential for tumor metastasis study and cancer therapy.

  15. Enhanced anti-tumor activity by the combination of a conditionally replicating adenovirus mediated interleukin-24 and dacarbazine against melanoma cells via induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guan; Liu, Yan-Qun; Wei, Zhi-Ping; Pei, Dong-Sheng; Mao, Li-Jun; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2010-08-28

    Malignant melanoma is one of the most lethal and aggressive human malignancies. It is notoriously resistant to all of the current therapeutic modalities, including chemotherapy. Suppressed apoptosis and extraordinary invasiveness are the distinctive features that contribute to the malignancy of melanoma. Dacarbazine (DTIC) has been considered as the gold standard for melanoma treatment with a response rate of 15-20%. Unfortunately, the resistance to this chemotherapeutic agent occurs frequently. ZD55-IL-24 is a selective conditionally replicating adenovirus that can mediate the expression of interleukin-24 (IL-24) gene, which has a strong anti-tumor effect. In this study, we hypothesized that a combination of ZD55-IL-24-mediated gene virotherapy and chemotherapy using DTIC would produce an increased cytotoxicity against human melanoma cells in comparison with these agents alone. Our results showed that the combination of ZD55-IL-24 and DTIC significantly enhanced the anti-tumor activity by more effectively inducing apoptosis in melanoma cells than either agent used alone without any overlapping toxicity against normal cells. This additive or synergistic effect of ZD55-IL-24 in combination with DTIC in killing human malignant melanoma cells implies a promising novel approach for melanoma therapy.

  16. Adoptive Transfer of Tumor-Specific Tc17 Effector T Cells Controls the Growth of B16 Melanoma in Mice

    PubMed Central

    de la Luz Garcia-Hernandez, Maria; Hamada, Hiromasa; Reome, Joyce B.; Misra, Sara K.; Tighe, Michael P.; Dutton, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro generated OVA-specific IL-17–producing CD8 T effector cells (Tc17) from OT-1 mice, adoptively transferred into B16-OVA tumor-bearing mice, controlled tumor growth in early and late stage melanoma. IL-17, TNF, and IFN-γ from the Tc17 effectors all played a role in an enhanced recruitment of T cells, neutrophils, and macrophages to the tumor. In addition, Tc17 cells and recently recruited, activated neutrophils produced further chemokines, including CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL10, responsible for the attraction of type 1 lymphocytes (Th1 and Tc1) and additional neutrophils. Neutrophils were rapidly attracted to the tumor site by an IL-17 dependent mechanism, but at later stages the induction of the chemokine CXCL2 by Tc17-derived TNF and IFN-γ contributed to sustain neutrophil recruitment. Approximately 10–50 times as many Tc17 effectors were required compared with Tc1 effectors to exert the same level of control over tumor growth. The recruitment of neutrophils was more prominent when Tc17 rather than Tc1 were used to control tumor and depletion of neutrophils resulted in a diminished capacity to control tumor growth. PMID:20237297

  17. Low numbers of tryptase+ and chymase+ mast cells associated with reduced survival and advanced tumor stage in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Siiskonen, Hanna; Poukka, Mari; Bykachev, Andrey; Tyynelä-Korhonen, Kristiina; Sironen, Reijo; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna; Harvima, Ilkka T

    2015-12-01

    The role of mast cells in cutaneous melanoma remains unclear. Tryptase and chymase are serine proteinases and major proteins in mast cell secretory granules. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the presence of tryptase and chymase mast cells in benign and malignant cutaneous melanocytic lesions and in lymph node metastases of melanomas. The presence of positively stained mast cells was correlated with clinicopathological characteristics in invasive melanomas. Paraffin-embedded sections of 28 benign (13 intradermal, 10 compound, and five junctional nevi) and 26 dysplastic nevi, 15 in-situ melanomas, 36 superficially (pT1, Breslow's thickness<1 mm), and 49 deeply (pT4, Breslow's thickness>4 mm) invasive melanomas and 30 lymph node metastases were immunohistochemically stained for mast cell tryptase and chymase, and immunopositive cells were counted using the hotspot counting method. The mean count of tryptase and chymase mast cells was lower in invasive melanomas compared with in-situ melanomas and dysplastic and benign nevi. In deeply invasive melanomas, the difference was statistically significant compared with dysplastic nevi (P=0.003 for tryptase and P=0.009 for chymase) and in-situ melanomas (0.043 for tryptase). Low numbers of tryptase mast cells were associated with poor overall survival (P=0.031) in deeply invasive melanomas and with a more advanced stage (T1b, P=0.008) in superficially invasive melanomas. Low numbers of chymase mast cells were associated with microsatellites (P=0.017) in deeply invasive melanomas. The results suggest that these serine proteinases of mast cells may be protective in the pathogenesis of melanoma.

  18. Serial Monitoring of Circulating Tumor Cells Predicts Outcome of Induction Biochemotherapy plus Maintenance Biotherapy for Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Kazuo; O’Day, Steven J.; Boasberg, Peter; Atkins, Michael B.; Wang, He-Jing; Gonzalez, Rene; Lewis, Karl; Thompson, John A.; Anderson, Clay M.; Lutzky, Jose; Amatruda, Thomas T.; Hersh, Evan; Richards, Jon; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Hoon, Dave S. B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Molecular biomarkers in blood are promising for assessment of tumor progression and treatment response. We hypothesized that serial monitoring of circulating tumor cells (CTC) using multimarker quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR (qRT) assays could be a surrogate predictor of outcome for melanoma patients enrolled in a multicenter phase II clinical trial of biochemotherapy (BCT) combined with maintenance biotherapy (mBT). Experimental Design Blood specimens were collected from 87 patients before and during induction BCT and mBT for stage IV melanoma. Expression of five melanoma-associated CTC biomarkers (MART-1, GalNAc-T, PAX-3, MAGE-A3, and Mitf) was assessed by qRT and correlated with treatment response and disease outcome. Results The number of positive CTC biomarkers decreased overall during induction BCT (P<0.0001). CTC biomarker detection after two cycles of BCT was correlated with treatment response (P=0.005) and overall survival (OS) (P=0.001): an increase in the number of CTC biomarkers was associated with poor response (P=0.006) and OS (P<0.0001). Multivariate analyses using a Cox proportional-hazards model identified the change in CTC biomarkers after two cycles of BCT as an independent prognostic factor for disease progression (risk ratio, 12.6; 95% CI, 4.78 to 33.4; P<0.0001) and OS (risk ratio, 6.11; 95% CI, 2.37 to 15.7; P=0.0005). Conclusion Serial monitoring of CTC during induction BCT may be useful for predicting the therapeutic efficacy and disease outcome in patients receiving BCT and mBT for stage IV melanoma. PMID:20371696

  19. Direct Melanoma Cell Contact Induces Stromal Cell Autocrine Prostaglandin E2-EP4 Receptor Signaling That Drives Tumor Growth, Angiogenesis, and Metastasis*

    PubMed Central

    Inada, Masaki; Takita, Morichika; Yokoyama, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kenta; Tominari, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Chiho; Hirata, Michiko; Maru, Yoshiro; Maruyama, Takayuki; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Narumiya, Shuh; Uematsu, Satoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Murphy, Gillian; Nagase, Hideaki; Miyaura, Chisato

    2015-01-01

    The stromal cells associated with tumors such as melanoma are significant determinants of tumor growth and metastasis. Using membrane-bound prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPges1−/−) mice, we show that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production by host tissues is critical for B16 melanoma growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis to both bone and soft tissues. Concomitant studies in vitro showed that PGE2 production by fibroblasts is regulated by direct interaction with B16 cells. Autocrine activity of PGE2 further regulates the production of angiogenic factors by fibroblasts, which are key to the vascularization of both primary and metastatic tumor growth. Similarly, cell-cell interactions between B16 cells and host osteoblasts modulate mPGES-1 activity and PGE2 production by the osteoblasts. PGE2, in turn, acts to stimulate receptor activator of NF-κB ligand expression, leading to osteoclast differentiation and bone erosion. Using eicosanoid receptor antagonists, we show that PGE2 acts on osteoblasts and fibroblasts in the tumor microenvironment through the EP4 receptor. Metastatic tumor growth and vascularization in soft tissues was abrogated by an EP4 receptor antagonist. EP4-null Ptger4−/− mice do not support B16 melanoma growth. In vitro, an EP4 receptor antagonist modulated PGE2 effects on fibroblast production of angiogenic factors. Our data show that B16 melanoma cells directly influence host stromal cells to generate PGE2 signals governing neoangiogenesis and metastatic growth in bone via osteoclast erosive activity as well as angiogenesis in soft tissue tumors. PMID:26475855

  20. In vivo overexpression of tumstatin domains by tumor cells inhibits their invasive properties in a mouse melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Pasco, Sylvie; Ramont, Laurent; Venteo, Lydie; Pluot, Michel; Maquart, François-Xavier; Monboisse, Jean-Claude

    2004-12-10

    Our previous studies demonstrated that a synthetic peptide encompassing residues 185-203 of the noncollagenous (NC1) domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen, named tumstatin, inhibits in vitro melanoma cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, B16F1 melanoma cells were stably transfected to overexpress the complete tumstatin domain (Tum 1-232) or its C-terminal part, encompassing residues 185-203 (Tum 183-232). Tumstatin domain overexpression inhibited B16F1 in vitro cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, and invasive properties. For studying the in vivo effect of overexpression, representative clones were subcutaneously injected into the left side of C57BL6 mice. In vivo tumor growth was decreased by -60% and -56%, respectively, with B16F1 cells overexpressing Tum 1-232 or Tum 183-232 compared to control cells. This inhibitory effect was associated with a decrease of in vivo cyclin D1 expression. We also demonstrated that the overexpression of Tum 1-232 or Tum 183-232 induced an in vivo down-regulation of proteolytic cascades involving matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), especially the production or activation of MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-13, as well as MMP-14. The plasminogen activation system was also altered in tumors with a decrease of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) and tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and a strong increase of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Collectively, our results demonstrate that tumstatin or its C-terminal antitumor fragment, Tum 183-232, inhibits in vivo melanoma progression by triggering an intracellular transduction pathway, which involves a cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent mechanism.

  1. Adoptive T-cell Therapy Using Autologous Tumor-infiltrating Lymphocytes for Metastatic Melanoma: Current Status and Future Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Richard; Forget, Marie-Andree; Chacon, Jessica; Bernatchez, Chantale; Haymaker, Cara; Chen, Jie Qing; Hwu, Patrick; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    Immunotherapy using autologous T-cells has emerged to be a powerful treatment option for patients with metastatic melanoma. These include the adoptive transfer of autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), T-cells transduced with high-affinity T-cell receptors (TCR) against major melanosomal tumor antigens, and T cells transduced with chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) composed of hybrid immunoglobulin light chains with endo-domains of T-cell signaling molecules. Among these and other options for T-cell therapy, TIL together with high-dose IL-2 has had the longest clinical history with multiple clinical trials in centers across the world consistently demonstrating durable clinical response rates near 50% or more. A distinct advantage of TIL therapy making it still the T-cell therapy of choice is the broad nature of the T-cell recognition against both defined as well as un-defined tumors antigens against all possible MHC, rather than the single specificity and limited MHC coverage of the newer TCR and CAR transduction technologies. In the past decade, significant inroads have been made in defining the phenotypes of T cells in TIL mediating tumor regression. CD8+ T cells are emerging to be critical, although the exact subset of CD8+ T cells exhibiting the highest clinical activity in terms of memory and effector markers is still controversial. We present a model in which both effector-memory and more differentiated effector T cells ultimately may need to cooperate to mediate long-term tumor control in responding patients. Although TIL therapy has shown great potential to treat metastatic melanoma, a number of issues have emerged that need to be addressed to bring it more into the mainstream of melanoma care. First, we have a reached the point where a pivotal phase II or phase III trials are needed in an attempt to gain regulatory approval of TIL as standard-of-care. Second, improvements in how we expand TIL for therapy are needed, that minimize the time the T-cells

  2. Inhibition of Autophagy Enhances Curcumin United light irradiation-induced Oxidative Stress and Tumor Growth Suppression in Human Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Tianhui; Tian, Yan; Mei, Zhusong; Guo, Guangjin

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin carcinoma, which possesses fast propagating and highly invasive characteristics. Curcumin is a natural phenol compound that has various biological activities, such as anti-proliferative and apoptosis-accelerating impacts on tumor cells. Unfortunately, the therapeutical activities of Cur are severely hindered due to its extremely low bioavailability. In this study, a cooperative therapy of low concentration Cur combined with red united blue light irradiation was performed to inspect the synergistic effects on the apoptosis, proliferation and autophagy in human melanoma A375 cell. The results showed that red united blue light irradiation efficaciously synergized with Cur to trigger oxidative stress-mediated cell death, induce apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation. Meanwhile, Western blotting revealed that combined disposure induced the formation of autophagosomes. Conversely, inhibition of the autophagy enhanced apoptosis, obstructed cell cycle arrest and induced reversible proliferation arrest to senescence. These findings suggest that Cur combined with red united blue light irradiation could generate photochemo-preventive effects via enhancing apoptosis and triggering autophagy, and pharmacological inhibition of autophagy convert reversible arrested cells to senescence, therefore reducing the possibility that damaged cells might escape programmed death. PMID:27502897

  3. Comparative analysis of BRAF, NRAS and c-KIT mutation status between tumor tissues and autologous tumor cell-lines of stage III/IV melanoma.

    PubMed

    Knol, Anne-Chantal; Pandolfino, Marie-Christine; Vallée, Audrey; Nguyen, Frédérique; Lella, Virginie; Khammari, Amir; Denis, Marc; Puaux, Anne-Laure; Dréno, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, advances in molecular biology have provided evidence of the genotypic heterogeneity of melanoma. We analysed BRAF, NRAS and c-KIT alterations in tissue samples from 63 stage III/IV melanoma patients and autologous cell-lines, using either allele-specific or quantitative PCR. The expression of BRAF V600E protein was also investigated using an anti-BRAF antibody in the same tissue samples. 81% of FFPE samples and tumor cell-lines harboured a genetic alteration in either BRAF (54%) or NRAS (27%) oncogenes. There was a strong concordance (100%) between tissue samples and tumor cell-lines. The BRAF V600E mutant-specific antibody showed high sensitivity (96%) and specificity (100%) for detecting the presence of a BRAF V600E mutation. The correlation was of 98% between PCR and immunohistochemistry results for BRAF mutation. These results suggest that BRAF and NRAS mutation status of tumor cells is not affected by culture conditions.

  4. Amblyomin-X induces ER stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and caspase activation in human melanoma and pancreatic tumor cell.

    PubMed

    Morais, Katia L P; Pacheco, Mario Thiego Fernandes; Berra, Carolina Maria; Bosch, Rosemary V; Sciani, Juliana Mozer; Chammas, Roger; de Freitas Saito, Renata; Iqbal, Asif; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana Marisa

    2016-04-01

    During the last two decades, new insights into proteasome function and its role in several human diseases made it a potential therapeutic target. In this context, Amblyomin-X is a Kunitz-type FXa inhibitor similar to endogenous tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and is a novel proteasome inhibitor. Herein, we have demonstrated Amblyomin-X cytotoxicity to different tumor cells lines such as pancreatic (Panc1, AsPC1BxPC3) and melanoma (SK-MEL-5 and SK-MEL-28). Of note, Amblyomin-X was not cytotoxic to normal human fibroblast cells. In addition, Amblyomin-X promoted accumulation of ER stress markers (GRP78 and GADD153) in sensitive (SK-MEL-28) and bortezomib-resistant (Mia-PaCa-2) tumor cells. The intracellular calcium concentration [Ca(2+)] i was slightly modulated in human tumor cells (SK-MEL-28 and Mia-PaCa-2) after 24 h of Amblyomin-X treatment. Furthermore, Amblyomin-X induced mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome-c release, PARP cleavage, and activation of caspase cascade in both human tumor (SK-MEL-28 and Mia-PaCa-2) cells. These investigations might help in further understanding of the antitumor properties of Amblyomin-X.

  5. Adoptive Cell Therapy for Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Merhavi-Shoham, Efrat; Itzhaki, Orit; Markel, Gal; Schachter, Jacob; Besser, Michal J

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) is a powerful form of immunotherapy by inducing durable complete responses that significantly extend the survival of melanoma patients. Mutation-derived neoantigens were recently identified as key factors for tumor recognition and rejection by TILs. The isolation of T-cell receptor (TCR) genes directed against neoantigens and their retransduction into peripheral T cells may provide a new form of ACT.Genetic modifications of T cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) have demonstrated remarkable clinical results in hematologic malignancies, but are so far less effective in solid tumors. Only very limited reports exist in melanoma. Progress in CAR T-cell engineering, including neutralization of inhibitory signals or additional safety switches, may open opportunities also in melanoma.We review clinical results and latest developments of adoptive therapies with TILs, T-cell receptor, and CAR-modified T cells and discuss future directions for the treatment of melanoma.

  6. Anti-Tumor Effect of Adipose Tissue Derived-Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expressing Interferon-β and Treatment with Cisplatin in a Xenograft Mouse Model for Canine Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jin ok; Lee, Hee woo; Seo, Kyoung won; Kang, Sung keun; Ra, Jeong chan; Youn, Hwa young

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) are attractive cell-therapy vehicles for the delivery of anti-tumor molecules into the tumor microenvironment. The innate tropism of AT-MSCs for tumors has important implications for effective cellular delivery of anti-tumor molecules, including cytokines, interferon, and pro-drugs. The present study was designed to determine the possibility that the combination of stem cell-based gene therapy with low-dose cisplatin would improve therapeutic efficacy against canine melanoma. The IFN-β transduced canine AT-MSCs (cAT-MSC-IFN-β) inhibited the growth of LMeC canine melanoma cells in direct and indirect in vitro co-culture systems. In animal experiments using BALB/c nude mouse xenografts, which developed by injecting LMeC cells, the combination treatment of cAT-MSC-IFN-β and low-dose cisplatin significantly reduced tumor volume compared with the other treatment groups. Fluorescent microscopic analysis with a TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling) assay of tumor section provided evidence for homing of cAT-MSC-IFN-β to the tumor site and revealed that the combination treatment of cAT-MSC-IFN-β with low-dose cisplatin induced high levels of cell apoptosis. These findings may prove useful in further explorations of the application of these combined approaches to the treatment of malignant melanoma and other tumors. PMID:24040358

  7. Anti-tumor effect of adipose tissue derived-mesenchymal stem cells expressing interferon-β and treatment with cisplatin in a xenograft mouse model for canine melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin ok; Lee, Hee woo; Seo, Kyoung won; Kang, Sung keun; Ra, Jeong chan; Youn, Hwa young

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) are attractive cell-therapy vehicles for the delivery of anti-tumor molecules into the tumor microenvironment. The innate tropism of AT-MSCs for tumors has important implications for effective cellular delivery of anti-tumor molecules, including cytokines, interferon, and pro-drugs. The present study was designed to determine the possibility that the combination of stem cell-based gene therapy with low-dose cisplatin would improve therapeutic efficacy against canine melanoma. The IFN-β transduced canine AT-MSCs (cAT-MSC-IFN-β) inhibited the growth of LMeC canine melanoma cells in direct and indirect in vitro co-culture systems. In animal experiments using BALB/c nude mouse xenografts, which developed by injecting LMeC cells, the combination treatment of cAT-MSC-IFN-β and low-dose cisplatin significantly reduced tumor volume compared with the other treatment groups. Fluorescent microscopic analysis with a TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling) assay of tumor section provided evidence for homing of cAT-MSC-IFN-β to the tumor site and revealed that the combination treatment of cAT-MSC-IFN-β with low-dose cisplatin induced high levels of cell apoptosis. These findings may prove useful in further explorations of the application of these combined approaches to the treatment of malignant melanoma and other tumors.

  8. Selective Growth, In Vitro and In Vivo, of Individual T Cell Clones from Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes Obtained from Patients with Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Juhua; Dudley, Mark E.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Robbins, Paul F.

    2007-01-01

    In recent clinical trials in patients with metastatic melanoma, adoptive transfer of tumor-reactive lymphocytes mediated the regression of metastatic tumor deposits. To better understand the role of individual T cell clones in mediating tumor regression, a 5′ RACE technique was used to determine the distribution of TCR β-chain V region sequences expressed in the transferred cells as well as in tumor samples and circulating lymphocytes from melanoma patients following adoptive cell transfer. We found that dominant T cell clones were present in the in vitro-expanded and transferred tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte samples and certain T cell clones including the dominant T cell clones persisted at relatively high levels in the peripheral blood of the patients that demonstrated clinical responses to adoptive immunotherapy. However, these dominant clones were either undetected or present at a very low level in the resected tumor samples used for tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte generation. These data demonstrated that there was selective growth and survival, both in vitro and in vivo, of individual T cell clones from a relatively small number of T cells in the original tumor samples. These results suggest that the persistent T cell clones played an active role in mediating tumor regression and that 5′ RACE analysis may provide an important tool for the analysis of the role of individual T cell clones in mediating tumor regression. A similar analysis may also be useful for monitoring autoimmune responses. PMID:15585890

  9. Risks of different skin tumor combinations after a first melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma in Dutch population based cohorts: 1989 - 2009.

    PubMed

    van der Leest, R J T; Hollestein, L M; Liu, L; Nijsten, T; de Vries, E

    2017-09-12

    Skin cancer patients are primarily at increased risk of developing subsequent skin cancers of the same type. Shared risk factors might also increase the occurrence of a different type of subsequent skin cancer. To investigate risks of different skin tumor combinations after a first melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC). All melanoma and SCC patients included in the national Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) and all BCC patients included in the regional Eindhoven Cancer Registry (ECR) between 1989 and 2009 were followed until diagnosis of a subsequent different skin cancer (melanoma, SCC or BCC), date of death or end of study. Cumulative risks, Standardized Incidence Ratios (SIR) and Absolute Excess Risks (AER) of subsequent skin cancers were calculated. A total of 50,510 melanoma patients and 64,054 patients with a SCC of the skin were included (national data NCR). The regional data of the ECR consisted of 5,776 melanoma patients, 5,749 SCC patients and 41,485 BCC patients. The 21-year cumulative risk for a subsequent melanoma after a first SCC or BCC was respectively 1.7% and 1.3% for males and 1.3% and 1.2% for females; SCC after melanoma or BCC was 4.6% and 9.3% (males) and 2.6% and 4.1% (females); BCC after melanoma or SCC was respectively 13.2% and 27.8% (males) and 14.9% and 21.1% (females). SIRs and AERs remained elevated up to 21 years after the first melanoma, SCC or BCC. This large population based study investigating risks of developing a different subsequent cutaneous malignancy showed high cumulative risks of mainly KC and markedly increased relative and absolute risks of all tumor combinations. These estimates confirm a common carcinogenesis and can serve as a base for follow-up guidelines and patient education aiming for an early detection of the subsequent cancers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Fisetin, a phytochemical, potentiates sorafenib-induced apoptosis and abrogates tumor growth in athymic nude mice implanted with BRAF-mutated melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Harish Chandra; Baxter, Ronald D.; Hunt, Katherine M.; Agarwal, Jyoti; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad; Afaq, Farrukh

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is the most deadly form of cutaneous malignancy, and its incidence rates are rising worldwide. In melanoma, constitutive activation of the BRAF/MEK/ERK (MAPK) and PI3K/AKT/mTOR (PI3K) signaling pathways plays a pivotal role in cell proliferation, survival and tumorigenesis. A combination of compounds that lead to an optimal blockade of these critical signaling pathways may provide an effective strategy for prevention and treatment of melanoma. The phytochemical fisetin is known to possess anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. We found that fisetin treatment inhibited PI3K signaling pathway in melanoma cells. Therefore, we investigated the effect of fisetin and sorafenib (an RAF inhibitor) alone and in combination on cell proliferation, apoptosis and tumor growth. Combination treatment (fisetin + sorafenib) more effectively reduced the growth of BRAF-mutated human melanoma cells at lower doses when compared to individual agents. In addition, combination treatment resulted in enhanced (i) apoptosis, (ii) cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP, (iii) expression of Bax and Bak, (iv) inhibition of Bcl2 and Mcl-1, and (v) inhibition of expression of PI3K, phosphorylation of MEK1/2, ERK1/2, AKT and mTOR. In athymic nude mice subcutaneously implanted with melanoma cells (A375 and SK-MEL-28), we found that combination therapy resulted in greater reduction of tumor growth when compared to individual agents. Furthermore, combination therapy was more effective than monotherapy in: (i) inhibition of proliferation and angiogenesis, (ii) induction of apoptosis, and (iii) inhibition of the MAPK and PI3K pathways in xenograft tumors. These data suggest that simultaneous inhibition of both these signaling pathways using combination of fisetin and sorafenib may serve as a therapeutic option for the management of melanoma. PMID:26299806

  11. Fisetin, a phytochemical, potentiates sorafenib-induced apoptosis and abrogates tumor growth in athymic nude mice implanted with BRAF-mutated melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pal, Harish Chandra; Baxter, Ronald D; Hunt, Katherine M; Agarwal, Jyoti; Elmets, Craig A; Athar, Mohammad; Afaq, Farrukh

    2015-09-29

    Melanoma is the most deadly form of cutaneous malignancy, and its incidence rates are rising worldwide. In melanoma, constitutive activation of the BRAF/MEK/ERK (MAPK) and PI3K/AKT/mTOR (PI3K) signaling pathways plays a pivotal role in cell proliferation, survival and tumorigenesis. A combination of compounds that lead to an optimal blockade of these critical signaling pathways may provide an effective strategy for prevention and treatment of melanoma. The phytochemical fisetin is known to possess anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. We found that fisetin treatment inhibited PI3K signaling pathway in melanoma cells. Therefore, we investigated the effect of fisetin and sorafenib (an RAF inhibitor) alone and in combination on cell proliferation, apoptosis and tumor growth. Combination treatment (fisetin + sorafenib) more effectively reduced the growth of BRAF-mutated human melanoma cells at lower doses when compared to individual agents. In addition, combination treatment resulted in enhanced (i) apoptosis, (ii) cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP, (iii) expression of Bax and Bak, (iv) inhibition of Bcl2 and Mcl-1, and (v) inhibition of expression of PI3K, phosphorylation of MEK1/2, ERK1/2, AKT and mTOR. In athymic nude mice subcutaneously implanted with melanoma cells (A375 and SK-MEL-28), we found that combination therapy resulted in greater reduction of tumor growth when compared to individual agents. Furthermore, combination therapy was more effective than monotherapy in: (i) inhibition of proliferation and angiogenesis, (ii) induction of apoptosis, and (iii) inhibition of the MAPK and PI3K pathways in xenograft tumors. These data suggest that simultaneous inhibition of both these signaling pathways using combination of fisetin and sorafenib may serve as a therapeutic option for the management of melanoma.

  12. Simultaneous inhibition of key growth pathways in melanoma cells and tumor regression by a designed bidentate constrained helical peptide.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Amlanjyoti; Mallick, Shampa; Ghosh, Piya; Maiti, Atanu; Ahmed, Israr; Bhattacharya, Seemana; Mandal, Tapashi; Manna, Asit; Roy, Koushik; Singh, Sandeep; Nayak, Dipak Kumar; Wilder, Paul T; Markowitz, Joseph; Weber, David; Ghosh, Mrinal K; Chattopadhyay, Samit; Guha, Rajdeep; Konar, Aditya; Bandyopadhyay, Santu; Roy, Siddhartha

    2014-07-01

    Protein-protein interactions are part of a large number of signaling networks and potential targets for drug development. However, discovering molecules that can specifically inhibit such interactions is a major challenge. S100B, a calcium-regulated protein, plays a crucial role in the proliferation of melanoma cells through protein-protein interactions. In this article, we report the design and development of a bidentate conformationally constrained peptide against dimeric S100B based on a natural tight-binding peptide, TRTK-12. The helical conformation of the peptide was constrained by the substitution of α-amino isobutyric acid--an amino acid having high helical propensity--in positions which do not interact with S100B. A branched bidentate version of the peptide was bound to S100B tightly with a dissociation constant of 8 nM. When conjugated to a cell-penetrating peptide, it caused growth inhibition and rapid apoptosis in melanoma cells. The molecule exerts antiproliferative action through simultaneous inhibition of key growth pathways, including reactivation of wild-type p53 and inhibition of Akt and STAT3 phosphorylation. The apoptosis induced by the bidentate constrained helix is caused by direct migration of p53 to mitochondria. At moderate intravenous dose, the peptide completely inhibits melanoma growth in a mouse model without any significant observable toxicity. The specificity was shown by lack of ability of a double mutant peptide to cause tumor regression at the same dose level. The methodology described here for direct protein-protein interaction inhibition may be effective for rapid development of inhibitors against relatively weak protein-protein interactions for de novo drug development.

  13. Applications for quantitative measurement of BRAF V600 mutant cell-free tumor DNA in the plasma of patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Schreuer, Max; Meersseman, Geert; van Den Herrewegen, Sari; Jansen, Yanina; Seremet, Teofila; Bott, Ambre; Chevolet, Ines; Wilgenhof, Sofie; Maertens, Geert; Neyns, Bart

    2016-04-01

    Small fragments of cell-free DNA that are shed by normal and tumor cells can be detected in the plasma of patients with advanced melanoma. Quantitative measurement of BRAF V600 mutant DNA within the cell-free DNA holds promise as a tumor-specific biomarker for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in patients with BRAF V600 mutant melanoma. Allele-specific quantitative PCR analysis for BRAF V600 E/E2/D/K/R/M mutations on DNA extracted from 1 ml of plasma is currently under evaluation in a number of ongoing prospective clinical studies. We report five patient cases that indicate the potential applications and utility of quantitative measurements of BRAF V600 mutant cell-free tumor DNA as a diagnostic test and as a therapeutic monitoring tool in stage IV melanoma patients treated with BRAF-targeted therapy or immunotherapy. Finally, we offer novel insights into the dynamics of cell-free tumor DNA in melanoma.

  14. Nanomedicine as a potent strategy in melanoma tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Pautu, Vincent; Leonetti, Daniela; Lepeltier, Elise; Clere, Nicolas; Passirani, Catherine

    2017-02-20

    Melanoma originated from melanocytes is the most aggressive type of skin cancer. Despite considerable progresses in clinical treatment with the discovery of BRAF or MEK inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, the durability of response to treatment is often limited to the development of acquired resistance and systemic toxicity. The limited success of conventional treatment highlights the importance of understanding the role of melanoma tumor microenvironment in tumor developement and drug resistance. Nanoparticles represent a promising strategy for the development of new cancer treatments able to improve the bioavailability of drugs and increase their penetration by targeting specifically tumors cells and/or tumor environment. In this review, we will discuss the main influence of tumor microenvironment in melanoma growth and treatment outcome. Furthermore, third generation loaded nanotechnologies represent an exciting tool for detection, treatment, and escape from possible mechanism of resistance mediated by tumor microenvironment, and will be highlighted in this review.

  15. TANGO is a tumor suppressor of malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Stephanie; Bosserhoff, Anja K

    2006-12-15

    The TANGO gene was originally identified as a new family member of the melanoma inhibitory activity gene family. The gene codes for a 14 kDa protein of so far unknown function. In our study we revealed that TANGO was downregulated or lost in 9 melanoma cell lines when compared to normal melanocytes and in most of the 8 tumor samples analyzed. The losses were associated with advanced stage of the disease. These results were confirmed in situ by immunohistochemistry on 10 paraffin-embedded sections of human malignant melanoma primary tumors and melanoma skin metastases. A small reduction of TANGO was also seen in different benign and atypical nevi when compared to normal skin. For functional analysis of TANGO we evaluated TANGO re-expressing melanoma cell clones and antisense TANGO cell clones with a complete loss of TANGO. Functional assays with TANGO transfected or treated cell lines revealed that TANGO expression reduces motility, whereas reduction of TANGO enhances migration. Our studies, therefore, indicate that reduction of TANGO expression contributes to tumor progression. These results taken together provide the first indications for a tumor suppressor role of TANGO gene in human malignant melanoma.

  16. Rapid Induction of Tumor-specific Type 1 T Helper Cells in Metastatic Melanoma Patients by Vaccination with Mature, Cryopreserved, Peptide-loaded Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schuler-Thurner, Beatrice; Schultz, Erwin S.; Berger, Thomas G.; Weinlich, Georg; Ebner, Susanne; Woerl, Petra; Bender, Armin; Feuerstein, Bernadette; Fritsch, Peter O.; Romani, Nikolaus; Schuler, Gerold

    2002-01-01

    There is consensus that an optimized cancer vaccine will have to induce not only CD8+ cytotoxic but also CD4+ T helper (Th) cells, particularly interferon (IFN)-γ–producing, type 1 Th cells. The induction of strong, ex vivo detectable type 1 Th cell responses has not been reported to date. We demonstrate now that the subcutaneous injection of cryopreserved, mature, antigen-loaded, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) rapidly induces unequivocal Th1 responses (ex vivo detectable IFN-γ–producing effectors as well as proliferating precursors) both to the control antigen KLH and to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II–restricted tumor peptides (melanoma-antigen [Mage]-3.DP4 and Mage-3.DR13) in the majority of 16 evaluable patients with metastatic melanoma. These Th1 cells recognized not only peptides, but also DCs loaded with Mage-3 protein, and in case of Mage-3DP4–specific Th1 cells IFN-γ was released even after direct recognition of viable, Mage-3–expressing HLA-DP4+ melanoma cells. The capacity of DCs to rapidly induce Th1 cells should be valuable to evaluate whether Th1 cells are instrumental in targeting human cancer and chronic infections. PMID:12021308

  17. Microphthalmia Transcription Factor as a Molecular Marker for Circulating Tumor Cell Detection in Blood of Melanoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Kazuo; O’Day, Steven J.; Gonzalez, Rene; Lewis, Karl; Robinson, William A.; Amatruda, Thomas T.; Kuo, Christine; Wang, He-Jing; Milford, Robert; Morton, Donald L.; Hoon, Dave S.B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Microphthalmia transcription factor (Mitf), which is important in melanocyte development and melanoma growth, was assessed using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assay to investigate its expression as a marker for circulating melanoma cells in blood and determine the correlation with disease stage and survival in melanoma patients. Experimental Design In optimization studies for Mitf, we tested 15 melanoma cell lines, 41 peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy volunteers, and 21metastatic melanoma tissues. Blood specimens were procured from 90 patients with stage I (n = 20), stage II (n = 20), stage III (n = 28), and stage IV (n = 22) melanoma. Blood specimens were also obtained at four bleed intervals from 58 patients enrolled in a prospective multicenter trial of biochemotherapy before and after surgical treatment of American Joint Committee on Cancer stage III melanoma. Results Under the optimized conditions, Mitf was negative in healthy peripheral blood lymphocytes and positive in all melanoma cell lines and 18 (86%) melanoma tissues. In the 90 patients, the rate of Mitf detection was higher with increasing American Joint Committee on Cancer stage (P < 0.0001). In the 58 patients treated with biochemotherapy and surgery, Mitf detection decreased with treatment (P = 0.019). Mitf detection after treatment was associated with a significantly lower relapse-free (P < 0.0001) and overall (P = 0.001) survival and was a significant independent prognostic factor for relapse-free (risk ratio, 5.63; P = 0.0004) and overall (risk ratio, 5.36; P = 0.005) survival. Conclusions Mitf detection in blood can indicate subclinical metastatic disease and predict treatment outcome in melanoma patients. PMID:16489066

  18. In vitro and in vivo studies on the cytotoxicity of irradiated silk fibroin against mouse melanoma tumor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Eui-Baek; Sung, Nak-Yun; Kwon, Sun-Kyu; Song, Beom-Seok; Kim, Jae-Hun; Choi, Jong-il; Hwang, Han-Joon; Byun, Myung-Woo; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2009-07-01

    The physicochemical properties of proteins can be altered by irradiation. But, it is rarely that the researches on the functional properties of irradiated proteins have been reported. Fibroin is a fibrous protein derived from silkworm Bombyx mori and has been suggested as a biomaterial for biomedical application. Therefore, fibroin was selected as a model protein and was examined with the irradiation effects on the cytotoxicity of fibroin on tumor cell. The cytotoxicity of fibroin against mouse melanoma cell (B16BL6) showed a significant increase dependent upon the increase of irradiation dose. And also, the splenocyte proliferation activities of fibroin were increased by gamma irradiation. In addition, the oral administration of irradiated fibroin significantly increased the inhibition rate of tumor growth in tumor-bearing mouse model. The reason might be due to the change of protein structure by gamma irradiation and is being studied. From these result, it could be concluded that the irradiated fibroin might be a potential candidate as a valuable product in food and medical industry.

  19. SKI knockdown inhibits human melanoma tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dahu; Lin, Qiushi; Box, Neil; Roop, Dennis; Ishii, Shunsuke; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Fan, Tao; Hornyak, Thomas J; Reed, Jon A; Stavnezer, Ed; Timchenko, Nikolai A; Medrano, Estela E

    2009-12-01

    The SKI protein represses the TGF-beta tumor suppressor pathway by associating with the Smad transcription factors. SKI is upregulated in human malignant melanoma tumors in a disease-progression manner and its overexpression promotes proliferation and migration of melanoma cells in vitro. The mechanisms by which SKI antagonizes TGF-beta signaling in vivo have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that human melanoma cells in which endogenous SKI expression was knocked down by RNAi produced minimal orthotopic tumor xenograft nodules that displayed low mitotic rate and prominent apoptosis. These minute tumors exhibited critical signatures of active TGF-beta signaling including high levels of nuclear Smad3 and p21(Waf-1), which are not found in the parental melanomas. To understand how SKI promotes tumor growth we used gain- and loss-of-function approaches and found that simultaneously to blocking the TGF-beta-growth inhibitory pathway, SKI promotes the switch of Smad3 from tumor suppression to oncogenesis by favoring phosphorylations of the Smad3 linker region in melanoma cells but not in normal human melanocytes. In this context, SKI is required for preventing TGF-beta-mediated downregulation of the oncogenic protein c-MYC, and for inducing the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, a mediator of tumor growth and angiogenesis. Together, the results indicate that SKI exploits multiple regulatory levels of the TGF-beta pathway and its deficiency restores TGF-beta tumor suppressor and apoptotic activities in spite of the likely presence of oncogenic mutations in melanoma tumors.

  20. Intralesional rose bengal in melanoma elicits tumor immunity via activation of dendritic cells by the release of high mobility group box 1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hao; Innamarato, Pasquale Patrick; Kodumudi, Krithika; Weber, Amy; Nemoto, Satoshi; Robinson, John L.; Crago, Georgina; McCardle, Timothy; Royster, Erica; Sarnaik, Amod A.; Pilon-Thomas, Shari

    2016-01-01

    Intralesional (IL) therapy is under investigation to treat dermal and subcutaneous metastatic cancer. Rose bengal (RB) is a staining agent that was originally used by ophthalmologists and in liver function studies. IL injection of RB has been shown to induce regression of injected and uninjected tumors in murine models and clinical trials. In this study, we have shown a mechanism of tumor-specific immune response induced by IL RB. In melanoma-bearing mice, IL RB induced regression of injected tumor and inhibited the growth of bystander lesions mediated by CD8+ T cells. IL RB resulted in necrosis of tumor cells and the release of High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1), with increased dendritic cell (DC) infiltration into draining lymph nodes and the activation of tumor-specific T cells. Treatment of DC with tumor supernatants increased the ability of DCs to stimulate T cell proliferation, and blockade of HMGB1 in the supernatants suppressed DC activity. Additionally, increased HMGB1 levels were measured in the sera of melanoma patients treated with IL RB. These results support the role of IL RB to activate dendritic cells at the site of tumor necrosis for the induction of a systemic anti-tumor immune response. PMID:27177220

  1. Promotion of melanoma cell invasion and tumor metastasis by microcystin-LR via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Miao, Chen; Fu, Ziyi; Li, Zhengrong; Zhang, Gen; Zheng, Maqing; Liu, Yuefang; Yang, Liuyan; Wang, Ting

    2013-08-06

    Recently, we have indicated that microcystin-LR, a cyanobacterial toxin produced in eutrophic lakes or reservoirs, can increase invasive ability of melanoma MDA-MB-435 cells; however, the stimulatory effect needs identification by in vivo experiment and the related molecular mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, in vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of microcystin-LR on invasion and metastasis of human melanoma cells, and the underlying molecular mechanism was also explored. MDA-MB-435 xenograft model assay showed that oral administration of nude mice with microcystin-LR at 0.001-0.1 mg/kg/d posed no significant effect on tumor weight. Histological examination demonstrated that microcystin-LR could promote lung metastasis, which is confirmed by Matrigel chamber assay suggesting that microcystin-LR treatment at 25 nM can increase the invasiveness of MDA-MB-435 cells. In vitro and in vivo experiments consistently showed that microcystin-LR exposure increased mRNA and protein levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2/-9) by activating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)/AKT. Additionally, microcystin-LR treatment at low doses (≤25 nM) decreased lipid phosphatase PTEN expression, and the microcystin-induced invasiveness enhancement and MMP-2/-9 overexpression were reversed by the PI3-K/AKT chemical inhibitor LY294002 and AKT siRNA, indicating that microcystin-LR promotes invasion and metastasis of MDA-MB-435 cells via the PI3-K/AKT pathway.

  2. Long-term Survival and Clinical Benefit from Adoptive T-cell Transfer in Stage IV Melanoma Patients Is Determined by a Four-Parameter Tumor Immune Signature.

    PubMed

    Melief, Sara M; Visconti, Valeria V; Visser, Marten; van Diepen, Merel; Kapiteijn, Ellen H W; van den Berg, Joost H; Haanen, John B A G; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Oosting, Jan; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Verdegaal, Els M E

    2017-02-01

    The presence of tumor-infiltrating immune cells is associated with longer survival and a better response to immunotherapy in early-stage melanoma, but a comprehensive study of the in situ immune microenvironment in stage IV melanoma has not been performed. We investigated the combined influence of a series of immune factors on survival and response to adoptive cell transfer (ACT) in stage IV melanoma patients. Metastases of 73 stage IV melanoma patients, 17 of which were treated with ACT, were studied with respect to the number and functional phenotype of lymphocytes and myeloid cells as well as for expression of galectins-1, -3, and -9. Single factors associated with better survival were identified using Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariate Cox regression analyses, and those factors were used for interaction analyses. The results were validated using The Cancer Genome Atlas database. We identified four parameters that were associated with a better survival: CD8(+) T cells, galectin-9(+) dendritic cells (DC)/DC-like macrophages, a high M1/M2 macrophage ratio, and the expression of galectin-3 by tumor cells. The presence of at least three of these parameters formed an independent positive prognostic factor for long-term survival. Patients displaying this four-parameter signature were found exclusively among patients responding to ACT and were the ones with sustained clinical benefit. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(2); 170-9. ©2017 AACR.

  3. Tumor-tropic endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) loaded with near-infrared sensitive Au nanoparticles: A "cellular stove" approach to the photoablation of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Margheri, Giancarlo; Zoppi, Angela; Olmi, Roberto; Trigari, Silvana; Traversi, Rita; Severi, Mirko; Bani, Daniele; Bianchini, Francesca; Torre, Eugenio; Margheri, Francesca; Chillà, Anastasia; Biagioni, Alessio; Calorini, Lido; Laurenzana, Anna; Fibbi, Gabriella; Del Rosso, Mario

    2016-06-28

    In the photothermal treatments (PTs) of tumor, the localization of a high number of near-infrared (NIR) absorbing gold nanoparticles in the tumor mass is still a challenging issue. Here, we propose a promising strategy to deliver therapeutic chitosan-coated gold nanoparticles to tumor cells as hidden cargo of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFCs) endowed with an innate tumor-tropism. Remarkably, ECFC gold enrichement doesn't affect cell viability and preserves the endothelial lineage characteristics such as capillary morphogenesis and cell migration. We demonstrate that heavily Au-doped ECFCs are able to efficiently warm up the tumor environment, and kill the cancer cells via hyperthermic heating both in vitro as well as in vivo. Thus, we show an excellent thermotransductive property of gold enriched ECFCs and their capability to kill melanoma cells at moderate NIR light intensities.

  4. Tumor-tropic endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) loaded with near-infrared sensitive Au nanoparticles: A “cellular stove” approach to the photoablation of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Margheri, Giancarlo; Zoppi, Angela; Olmi, Roberto; Trigari, Silvana; Traversi, Rita; Severi, Mirko; Bani, Daniele; Bianchini, Francesca; Torre, Eugenio; Margheri, Francesca; Chillà, Anastasia; Biagioni, Alessio; Calorini, Lido; Laurenzana, Anna; Fibbi, Gabriella; Rosso, Mario Del

    2016-01-01

    In the photothermal treatments (PTs) of tumor, the localization of a high number of near-infrared (NIR) absorbing gold nanoparticles in the tumor mass is still a challenging issue. Here, we propose a promising strategy to deliver therapeutic chitosan-coated gold nanoparticles to tumor cells as hidden cargo of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFCs) endowed with an innate tumor-tropism. Remarkably, ECFC gold enrichement doesn't affect cell viability and preserves the endothelial lineage characteristics such as capillary morphogenesis and cell migration. We demonstrate that heavily Au-doped ECFCs are able to efficiently warm up the tumor environment, and kill the cancer cells via hyperthermic heating both in vitro as well as in vivo. Thus, we show an excellent thermotransductive property of gold enriched ECFCs and their capability to kill melanoma cells at moderate NIR light intensities. PMID:27223433

  5. Tumor vascularity and hematogenous metastasis in experimental murine intraocular melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Grossniklaus, H E

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that primary tumor vascularity in a murine model of intraocular melanoma positively correlates with the development and hematogenous spread of metastasis. METHODS: Forty 12-week-old C57BL6 mice were inoculated in either the anterior chamber (AC) or posterior compartment (PC) of 1 eye with 5 x 10(5) cells/microL of Queens tissue culture melanoma cells. The inoculated eye was enucleated at 2 weeks; the mice were sacrificed at 4 weeks postinoculation, and necropsies were performed. The enucleated eyes were examined for histologic and ultrastructural features, including relationship of tumor cells to tumor vascular channels, vascular pattern, and mean vascular density. RESULTS: Melanoma grew and was confined to the eye in 12 of 20 AC eyes and 10 of 20 PC eyes. Histologic and electron microscopic examination showed tumor invasion into vascular channels. Five of 12 AC tumors (42%) and 8 of 10 PC tumors (80%) metastasized. All of the AC tumors, but none of the PC tumors, that distantly metastasized also metastasized to ipsilateral cervical lymph nodes (P = .00535). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern between the melanomas that did and did not metastasize to lungs in the PC group (P = .24), although there was a significant difference in the AC group (P = .02). Tumors with high-grade vascular patterns were more likely to metastasize than tumors with low-grade vascular patterns in the AC group. The mean vascular density positively correlated with the presence and number of metastases in both groups (P = .0000 and P < .001, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern and mean vascular density for AC versus PC melanoma (P = .97). CONCLUSIONS: The rate of metastasis in this murine intraocular melanoma model positively correlates with primary tumor vascularity. The melanoma metastasizes via invasion of tumor vascular channels. AC melanoma also

  6. Differential arginine methylation of the G-protein pathway suppressor GPS-2 recognized by tumor-specific T cells in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Jarmalavicius, Saulius; Trefzer, Uwe; Walden, Peter

    2010-03-01

    The aim of the study was to identify as potential therapeutic targets specific molecular alterations in tumor cells recognized by the immune system. To identify such targets, we analyzed the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) peptidomes of human melanoma cells by 2-dimensional nano-HPLC/mass spectrometry and tested the immunological significance of the peptides by ex vivo ELISpot assays with lymphocytes from melanoma patients. The peptide SQNPRFYHK was identified as derived from the regulator of the nuclear corepressor complex (NCoR) G-protein pathway suppressor 2 (GPS-2) and to be differentially unmethylated, monomethylated or asymmetrically dimethylated at the arginine. The methylation state was specifically recognized by the immune system in that only the monomethylated variant induced T-cell responses and significantly stronger responses in patients than in healthy controls. The methylations were confirmed with synthetic analogues and in vitro radiolabeling assays with recombinant GPS-2 and synthetic peptides. The immunity of the 3 variants of GPS-2 was tested in T-cell assays with T lymphocytes of melanoma patients compared with healthy donors. The results show for the first time that GPS-2 is differentially methylated at a site that lacks known methylation motifs and that the methylation state is detected by the immune system.-Jarmalavicius, S., Trefzer, U., Walden, P. Differential arginine methylation of the G-protein pathway suppressor GPS-2 recognized by tumor-specific T cells in melanoma.

  7. [Melanoma immunotherapy: dendritic cell vaccines].

    PubMed

    Lozada-Requena, Ivan; Núñez, César; Aguilar, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    This is a narrative review that shows accessible information to the scientific community about melanoma and immunotherapy. Dendritic cells have the ability to participate in innate and adaptive immunity, but are not unfamiliar to the immune evasion of tumors. Knowing the biology and role has led to generate in vitro several prospects of autologous cell vaccines against diverse types of cancer in humans and animal models. However, given the low efficiency they have shown, we must implement strategies to enhance their natural capacity either through the coexpression of key molecules to activate or reactivate the immune system, in combination with biosimilars or chemotherapeutic drugs. The action of natural products as alternative or adjuvant immunostimulant should not be ruled out. All types of immunotherapy should measure the impact of myeloid suppressor cells, which can attack the immune system and help tumor progression, respectively. This can reduce the activity of cellular vaccines and/or their combinations, that could be the difference between success or not of the immunotherapy. Although for melanoma there exist biosimilars approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), not all have the expected success. Therefore it is necessary to evaluate other strategies including cellular vaccines loaded with tumor antigenic peptides expressed exclusively or antigens from tumor extracts and their respective adjuvants.

  8. APN401 in Treating Patients With Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-14

    Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Melanoma; Stage IIIB Melanoma; Stage IIIC Melanoma; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  9. Dacarbazine-mediated upregulation of NKG2D ligands on tumor cells activates NK and CD8 T cells and restrains melanoma growth.

    PubMed

    Hervieu, Alice; Rébé, Cédric; Végran, Frédérique; Chalmin, Fanny; Bruchard, Mélanie; Vabres, Pierre; Apetoh, Lionel; Ghiringhelli, François; Mignot, Grégoire

    2013-02-01

    Dacarbazine (DTIC) is a cytotoxic drug widely used for melanoma treatment. However, the putative contribution of anticancer immune responses in the efficacy of DTIC has not been evaluated. By testing how DTIC affects host immune responses to cancer in a mouse model of melanoma, we unexpectedly found that both natural killer (NK) and CD8(+) T cells were indispensable for DTIC therapeutic effect. Although DTIC did not directly affect immune cells, it triggered the upregulation of NKG2D ligands on tumor cells, leading to NK cell activation and IFNγ secretion in mice and humans. NK cell-derived IFNγ subsequently favored upregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules on tumor cells, rendering them sensitive to cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. Accordingly, DTIC markedly enhanced cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 inhibition efficacy in vivo in an NK-dependent manner. These results underscore the immunogenic properties of DTIC and provide a rationale to combine DTIC with immunotherapeutic agents that relieve immunosuppression in vivo.

  10. Role of Dietary Crocin in In Vivo Melanoma Tumor Remission

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Hamid A; Hakkim, Faruck Lukmanul; Sam, Smitha; Javid, Farideh

    2017-03-01

    Background: Melanoma is a deadly form of malignancy. Early diagnosis might pave the way to cure but its aggressive nature leads to rapid dissemination and colonization of distant organs. Dietary herbs may play a significant role in prevention of cancer. In this study, we tested anti-tumor efficacy of the Crocus sativus derived active constituent crocin, it is well established to have anti-cancer properties in different cancer models by our group and other groups. Notably, crocin is reported to exert anti-proliferative effect on melanoma cells (B16F10) in vitro. However, roles of crocin on in vivo melanoma tumor remission have not yet been reported to our knowledge. Materials and Methods: Melanoma tumor model was established by transplanting B16F10 (5 X 105) cells into C57BL/6 mice, which were then observed for tumor development and once the tumor volume reached 6 mm, mice were divided into (Group I: tumor-bearing animals treated with normal saline and Group II: counterparts treated with crocin at 2 mg/kg body weight for 21 days). . Tumor remission and tumor growth related parameters such as tumor silent period (TSP), tumor volume doubling time (VDT), growth delay (GD), and mean survival time (MST) were determined. In addition, serum protein profiles were analyzed. Results: The 21 days crocin treatment significantly reduced the tumor burden in mice, extending the mean survival time significantly as compared to control. Crocin treatment also significantly increased the TGD and TSP and decreased VDT. Furthermore, while serum proteins such as albumin and globulin (alpha1, alpha2, beta, and gamma) were altered due to tumor burden, crocin treatment resulted in their levels near to normal at the end of the experimental period. Conclusion: Our study provided clear evidence that crocin may exhibit significant melanoma tumor remission properties by positively modulating tumor growth related parameters. In future, the molecular mechanisms of crocin action should be studied

  11. Role of Dietary Crocin in In Vivo Melanoma Tumor Remission

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Hamid A; Hakkim, Faruck Lukmanul; Sam, Smitha; Javid, Farideh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Melanoma is a deadly form of malignancy. Early diagnosis might pave the way to cure but its aggressive nature leads to rapid dissemination and colonization of distant organs. Dietary herbs may play a significant role in prevention of cancer. In this study, we tested anti-tumor efficacy of the Crocus sativus derived active constituent crocin, it is well established to have anti-cancer properties in different cancer models by our group and other groups. Notably, crocin is reported to exert anti-proliferative effect on melanoma cells (B16F10) in vitro. However, roles of crocin on in vivo melanoma tumor remission have not yet been reported to our knowledge. Materials and Methods: Melanoma tumor model was established by transplanting B16F10 (5 X 105) cells into C57BL/6 mice, which were then observed for tumor development and once the tumor volume reached 6 mm, mice were divided into (Group I: tumor-bearing animals treated with normal saline and Group II: counterparts treated with crocin at 2 mg/kg body weight for 21 days).. Tumor remission and tumor growth related parameters such as tumor silent period (TSP), tumor volume doubling time (VDT), growth delay (GD), and mean survival time (MST) were determined. In addition, serum protein profiles were analyzed. Results: The 21 days crocin treatment significantly reduced the tumor burden in mice, extending the mean survival time significantly as compared to control. Crocin treatment also significantly increased the TGD and TSP and decreased VDT. Furthermore, while serum proteins such as albumin and globulin (alpha1, alpha2, beta, and gamma) were altered due to tumor burden, crocin treatment resulted in their levels near to normal at the end of the experimental period. Conclusion: Our study provided clear evidence that crocin may exhibit significant melanoma tumor remission properties by positively modulating tumor growth related parameters. In future, the molecular mechanisms of crocin action should be studied

  12. Isolation and molecular characterization of circulating melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi; Mitra, Devarati; Sullivan, Ryan J; Wittner, Ben S; Kimura, Anya M; Pan, Shiwei; Hoang, Mai P; Brannigan, Brian W; Lawrence, Donald P; Flaherty, Keith T; Sequist, Lecia V; McMahon, Martin; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Stott, Shannon L; Ting, David T; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Toner, Mehmet; Fisher, David E; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A

    2014-05-08

    Melanoma is an invasive malignancy with a high frequency of blood-borne metastases, but circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have not been readily isolated. We adapted microfluidic CTC capture to a tamoxifen-driven B-RAF/PTEN mouse melanoma model. CTCs were detected in all tumor-bearing mice and rapidly declined after B-RAF inhibitor treatment. CTCs were shed early from localized tumors, and a short course of B-RAF inhibition following surgical resection was sufficient to dramatically suppress distant metastases. The large number of CTCs in melanoma-bearing mice enabled a comparison of RNA-sequencing profiles with matched primary tumors. A mouse melanoma CTC-derived signature correlated with invasiveness and cellular motility in human melanoma. CTCs were detected in smaller numbers in patients with metastatic melanoma and declined with successful B-RAF-targeted therapy. Together, the capture and molecular characterization of CTCs provide insight into the hematogenous spread of melanoma.

  13. Anti-tumor effects of canine adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cell-based interferon-β gene therapy and cisplatin in a mouse melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kyoung-Won; Lee, Hee-Woo; Oh, Ye-In; Ahn, Jin-Ok; Koh, Ye-Rin; Oh, Seung-Hyun; Kang, Sung-Keun; Youn, Hwa-Young

    2011-09-01

    Adipose tissue (AT)-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) (AT-MSC) represent a novel tool for delivering therapeutic genes to tumor cells. Interferon (IFN)-β is a cytokine with pleiotropic cellular functions, including anti-proliferative, immunomodulatory and anti-angiogenic activities. The purpose of this study was to engineer canine AT-MSC (cAT-MSC) producing IFN-β and to evaluate the anti-tumor effect of cAT-MSC-IFN-β combined with cisplatin in mouse melanoma model. cAT-MSC engineered to express mouse IFN-β were generated using a lentiviral vector (cAT-MSC-IFN-β) and the secreted IFN-β-induced inhibition of tumor cell growth and apoptosis on B16F10 cells was investigated in vitro prior to in vivo studies. Melanoma-bearing mouse was developed by injecting B16F10 cells subcutaneously into 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice. After 14 days, cisplatin (10 mg/kg) was injected intratumorally, and 3 days later the engineered cAT-MSC were injected subcutaneously every 3 days to death. Tumor volume and survival times were measured. The combination treatment of cAT-MSC-IFN-β with cisplatin was more effective in inhibiting the growth of melanoma and resulted in significantly extended survival time than both an unengineered cAT-MSC-cisplatin combination group and a cisplatin-alone group. Interestingly, subcutaneously injected cAT-MSC-IFN-β were migrated to tumor sites. Our data suggest that canine AT-MSC could serve as a powerful cell-based delivery vehicle for releasing therapeutic proteins to tumor lesions. Maximal anti-tumor effects were seen when this therapy was combined with a DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agent. This study demonstrates the possible applicability of AT-MSC-mediated IFN-β in treating canine and human cancer patients.

  14. Norepinephrine promotes tumor microenvironment reactivity through β3-adrenoreceptors during melanoma progression.

    PubMed

    Calvani, Maura; Pelon, Floriane; Comito, Giuseppina; Taddei, Maria Letizia; Moretti, Silvia; Innocenti, Stefania; Nassini, Romina; Gerlini, Gianni; Borgognoni, Lorenzo; Bambi, Franco; Giannoni, Elisa; Filippi, Luca; Chiarugi, Paola

    2015-03-10

    Stress has an emerging role in cancer and targeting stress-related β-adrenergic receptors (AR) has been proposed as a potential therapeutic approach in melanoma. Here we report that β3-AR expression correlates with melanoma aggressiveness. In addition, we highlight that β3-AR expression is not only restricted to cancer cells, but it is also expressed in vivo in stromal, inflammatory and vascular cells of the melanoma microenvironment. Particularly, we demonstrated that β3-AR can (i) instruct melanoma cells to respond to environmental stimuli, (ii) enhance melanoma cells response to stromal fibroblasts and macrophages, (iii) increase melanoma cell motility and (iv) induce stem-like traits. Noteworthy, β3-AR activation in melanoma accessory cells drives stromal reactivity by inducing pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion and de novo angiogenesis, sustaining tumor growth and melanoma aggressiveness. β3-ARs also play a mandatory role in the recruitment to tumor sites of circulating stromal cells precursors, in the differentiation of these cells towards different lineages, further favoring tumor inflammation, angiogenesis and ultimately melanoma malignancy. Our findings validate selective β3-AR antagonists as potential promising anti-metastatic agents. These could be used to complement current therapeutic approaches for melanoma patients (e.g. propranolol) by targeting non-neoplastic stromal cells, hence reducing therapy resistance of melanoma.

  15. Norepinephrine promotes tumor microenvironment reactivity through β3-adrenoreceptors during melanoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Calvani, Maura; Pelon, Floriane; Comito, Giuseppina; Taddei, Maria Letizia; Moretti, Silvia; Innocenti, Stefania; Nassini, Romina; Gerlini, Gianni; Borgognoni, Lorenzo; Bambi, Franco; Giannoni, Elisa; Filippi, Luca; Chiarugi, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Stress has an emerging role in cancer and targeting stress-related β-adrenergic receptors (AR) has been proposed as a potential therapeutic approach in melanoma. Here we report that β3-AR expression correlates with melanoma aggressiveness. In addition, we highlight that β3-AR expression is not only restricted to cancer cells, but it is also expressed in vivo in stromal, inflammatory and vascular cells of the melanoma microenvironment. Particularly, we demonstrated that β3-AR can (i) instruct melanoma cells to respond to environmental stimuli, (ii) enhance melanoma cells response to stromal fibroblasts and macrophages, (iii) increase melanoma cell motility and (iv) induce stem-like traits. Noteworthy, β3-AR activation in melanoma accessory cells drives stromal reactivity by inducing pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion and de novo angiogenesis, sustaining tumor growth and melanoma aggressiveness. β3-ARs also play a mandatory role in the recruitment to tumor sites of circulating stromal cells precursors, in the differentiation of these cells towards different lineages, further favoring tumor inflammation, angiogenesis and ultimately melanoma malignancy. Our findings validate selective β3-AR antagonists as potential promising anti-metastatic agents. These could be used to complement current therapeutic approaches for melanoma patients (e.g. propranolol) by targeting non-neoplastic stromal cells, hence reducing therapy resistance of melanoma. PMID:25474135

  16. Cuprous oxide nanoparticle-inhibited melanoma progress by targeting melanoma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bin; Wang, Ye; Yu, Xinlu; Zhang, Hongxia; Zhu, Ji; Wang, Chen; Chen, Fei; Liu, Changcheng; Wang, Jingqiang; Zhu, Haiying

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that metal and metal oxide have a potential function in antitumor therapy. Our previous studies demonstrated that cuprous oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) not only selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells in vitro but also inhibit the growth and metastasis of melanoma by targeting mitochondria with little hepatic and renal toxicities in mice. As a further study, our current research revealed that CONPs induced apoptosis of human melanoma stem cells (CD271+/high cells) in A375 and WM266-4 melanoma cell lines and could significantly suppress the expression of MITF, SOX10 and CD271 involved in the stemness maintenance and tumorigenesis of melanoma stem cells. CD271+/high cells could accumulate more CONPs than CD271−/low through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In addition, lower dosage of CONPs exhibited good anti-melanoma effect by decreasing the cell viability, stemness and tumorigenesis of A375 and WM266-4 cells through reducing the expression of SOX10, MITF, CD271 and genes in MAPK pathway involved in tumor progression. Finally, CONPs obviously suppressed the growth of human melanoma in tumor-bearing nonobese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD-SCID) mice, accompanied with tumors structural necrosis and fibrosis remarkably and decreased expression of CD271, SOX10 and MITF. These results above proved the effectiveness of CONPs in inhibiting melanoma progress through multiple pathways, especially through targeting melanoma stem cells. PMID:28435246

  17. Cuprous oxide nanoparticle-inhibited melanoma progress by targeting melanoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bin; Wang, Ye; Yu, Xinlu; Zhang, Hongxia; Zhu, Ji; Wang, Chen; Chen, Fei; Liu, Changcheng; Wang, Jingqiang; Zhu, Haiying

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that metal and metal oxide have a potential function in antitumor therapy. Our previous studies demonstrated that cuprous oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) not only selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells in vitro but also inhibit the growth and metastasis of melanoma by targeting mitochondria with little hepatic and renal toxicities in mice. As a further study, our current research revealed that CONPs induced apoptosis of human melanoma stem cells (CD271(+/high) cells) in A375 and WM266-4 melanoma cell lines and could significantly suppress the expression of MITF, SOX10 and CD271 involved in the stemness maintenance and tumorigenesis of melanoma stem cells. CD271(+/high) cells could accumulate more CONPs than CD271(-/low) through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In addition, lower dosage of CONPs exhibited good anti-melanoma effect by decreasing the cell viability, stemness and tumorigenesis of A375 and WM266-4 cells through reducing the expression of SOX10, MITF, CD271 and genes in MAPK pathway involved in tumor progression. Finally, CONPs obviously suppressed the growth of human melanoma in tumor-bearing nonobese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD-SCID) mice, accompanied with tumors structural necrosis and fibrosis remarkably and decreased expression of CD271, SOX10 and MITF. These results above proved the effectiveness of CONPs in inhibiting melanoma progress through multiple pathways, especially through targeting melanoma stem cells.

  18. NLRC4 suppresses melanoma tumor progression independently of inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Janowski, Ann M.; Colegio, Oscar R.; Hornick, Emma E.; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Martin, Matthew D.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.; Norian, Lyse A.; Zhang, Weizhou; Cassel, Suzanne L.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the NLR family can assemble inflammasome complexes with the adaptor protein ASC and caspase-1 that result in the activation of caspase-1 and the release of IL-1β and IL-18. Although the NLRC4 inflammasome is known to have a protective role in tumorigenesis, there is an increased appreciation for the inflammasome-independent actions of NLRC4. Here, we utilized a syngeneic subcutaneous murine model of B16F10 melanoma to explore the role of NLRC4 in tumor suppression. We found that NLRC4-deficient mice exhibited enhanced tumor growth that was independent of the inflammasome components ASC and caspase-1. Nlrc4 expression was critical for cytokine and chemokine production in tumor-associated macrophages and was necessary for the generation of protective IFN-γ–producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Tumor progression was diminished when WT or caspase-1–deficient, but not NLRC4-deficient, macrophages were coinjected with B16F10 tumor cells in NLRC4-deficient mice. Finally, examination of human primary melanomas revealed the extensive presence of NLRC4+ tumor-associated macrophages. In contrast, there was a paucity of NLRC4+ tumor-associated macrophages observed in human metastatic melanoma, supporting the concept that NLRC4 expression controls tumor growth. These results reveal a critical role for NLRC4 in suppressing tumor growth in an inflammasome-independent manner. PMID:27617861

  19. PERK Is a Haploinsufficient Tumor Suppressor: Gene Dose Determines Tumor-Suppressive Versus Tumor Promoting Properties of PERK in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Mackiewicz, Katarzyna; Katlinskaya, Yuliya V.; Staschke, Kirk A.; Paredes, Maria C. G.; Yoshida, Akihiro; Qie, Shuo; Zhang, Gao; Chajewski, Olga S.; Majsterek, Ireneusz; Herlyn, Meenhard; Fuchs, Serge Y.; Diehl, J. Alan

    2016-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) regulates cell fate following exposure of cells to endoplasmic reticulum stresses. PERK, a UPR protein kinase, regulates protein synthesis and while linked with cell survival, exhibits activities associated with both tumor progression and tumor suppression. For example, while cells lacking PERK are sensitive to UPR-dependent cell death, acute activation of PERK triggers both apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, which would be expected to contribute tumor suppressive activity. We have evaluated these activities in the BRAF-dependent melanoma and provide evidence revealing a complex role for PERK in melanoma where a 50% reduction is permissive for BrafV600E-dependent transformation, while complete inhibition is tumor suppressive. Consistently, PERK mutants identified in human melanoma are hypomorphic with dominant inhibitory function. Strikingly, we demonstrate that small molecule PERK inhibitors exhibit single agent efficacy against BrafV600E-dependent tumors highlighting the clinical value of targeting PERK. PMID:27977682

  20. PERK Is a Haploinsufficient Tumor Suppressor: Gene Dose Determines Tumor-Suppressive Versus Tumor Promoting Properties of PERK in Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Pytel, Dariusz; Gao, Yan; Mackiewicz, Katarzyna; Katlinskaya, Yuliya V; Staschke, Kirk A; Paredes, Maria C G; Yoshida, Akihiro; Qie, Shuo; Zhang, Gao; Chajewski, Olga S; Wu, Lawrence; Majsterek, Ireneusz; Herlyn, Meenhard; Fuchs, Serge Y; Diehl, J Alan

    2016-12-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) regulates cell fate following exposure of cells to endoplasmic reticulum stresses. PERK, a UPR protein kinase, regulates protein synthesis and while linked with cell survival, exhibits activities associated with both tumor progression and tumor suppression. For example, while cells lacking PERK are sensitive to UPR-dependent cell death, acute activation of PERK triggers both apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, which would be expected to contribute tumor suppressive activity. We have evaluated these activities in the BRAF-dependent melanoma and provide evidence revealing a complex role for PERK in melanoma where a 50% reduction is permissive for BrafV600E-dependent transformation, while complete inhibition is tumor suppressive. Consistently, PERK mutants identified in human melanoma are hypomorphic with dominant inhibitory function. Strikingly, we demonstrate that small molecule PERK inhibitors exhibit single agent efficacy against BrafV600E-dependent tumors highlighting the clinical value of targeting PERK.

  1. CARI III inhibits tumor growth in a melanoma-bearing mouse model through induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Jin

    2014-09-12

    Mushroom-derived natural products have been used to prevent or treat cancer for millennia. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of CARI (Cell Activation Research Institute) III, which consists of a blend of mushroom mycelia from Phellinus linteus grown on germinated brown rice, Inonotus obliquus grown on germinated brown rice, Antrodia camphorata grown on germinated brown rice and Ganoderma lucidum. Here, we showed that CARI III exerted anti-cancer activity, which is comparable to Dox against melanoma in vivo. B16F10 cells were intraperitoneally injected into C57BL6 mice to develop solid intra-abdominal tumors. Three hundred milligrams of the CARI III/kg/day p.o. regimen reduced tumor weight, comparable to the doxorubicin (Dox)-treated group. An increase in life span (ILS% = 50.88%) was observed in the CARI III-administered group, compared to the tumor control group. CARI III demonstrates anti-proliferative activity against B16F10 melanoma cells through inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. CARI III inhibits the expression of cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK2 and induces p21. Therefore, CARI III could be a potential chemopreventive supplement to melanoma patients.

  2. Tamoxifen inhibits tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma through suppression of PKC/MEK/ERK and PKC/PI3K/Akt pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Tsubaki, Masanobu; Yamazoe, Yuzuru; Ogaki, Mitsuhiko; Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki; Kusunoki, Takashi; Nishida, Shozo

    2009-07-15

    In melanoma, several signaling pathways are constitutively activated. Among these, the protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways are activated through multiple signal transduction molecules and appear to play major roles in melanoma progression. Recently, it has been reported that tamoxifen, an anti-estrogen reagent, inhibits PKC signaling in estrogen-negative and estrogen-independent cancer cell lines. Thus, we investigated whether tamoxifen inhibited tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma cell line B16BL6. Tamoxifen significantly inhibited lung metastasis, cell migration, and invasion at concentrations that did not show anti-proliferative effects on B16BL6 cells. Tamoxifen also inhibited the mRNA expressions and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Furthermore, tamoxifen suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt through the inhibition of PKC{alpha} and PKC{delta} phosphorylation. However, other signal transduction factor, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) was unaffected. The results indicate that tamoxifen suppresses the PKC/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/ERK and PKC/phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting B16BL6 cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Moreover, tamoxifen markedly inhibited not only developing but also clinically evident metastasis. These findings suggest that tamoxifen has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis.

  3. The novel tumor suppressor p33ING2 enhances UVB-induced apoptosis in human melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, M.Y.; Ng, Kin Cheung P.; Li Gang . E-mail: gangli@interchange.ubc.ca

    2005-04-01

    The roles of p33ING2 as a tumor suppressor candidate have been shown through regulation of gene transcription, induction of cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. As p33ING2 shares 58.9% homology with p33ING1b, we hypothesized that p33ING2 shares functional similarities with p33ING1b. We previously found that p33ING1b cooperates with p53 to enhance UVB-induced apoptosis. Here, we report that overexpression of p33ING2 enhanced apoptosis in UVB-irradiated and non-irradiated melanoma MMRU cells. We demonstrate that enhancement of apoptosis by p33ING2 requires the presence of functional p53. Furthermore, we found that overexpression of p33ING2 significantly downregulated the expression of Bcl-2 after UVB irradiation, resulting in an increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Moreover, we found that p33ING2 promoted Bax translocation to mitochondria, altered the mitochondrial membrane potential, and induced cytochrome c release and thus the activation of caspases 9 and 3. In addition, we showed that under non-stress conditions p33ING2 upregulates Fas expression and activates caspase 8. Taken together, we demonstrate that p33ING2 cooperates with p53 to regulate apoptosis via activation of both the mitochondrial/intrinsic and death-receptor/extrinsic apoptotic pathways.

  4. Tumor antigen PRAME is up-regulated by MZF1 in cooperation with DNA hypomethylation in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Kyu; Park, Ui-Hyun; Kim, Eun-Joo; Hwang, Jin-Taek; Jeong, Ji-Cheon; Um, Soo-Jong

    2017-09-10

    Elevated expression of preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma (PRAME) has been implicated in disease progression in a variety of cancers. However, the mechanisms underlying the transcriptional regulation of PRAME remain largely unexplored. Initially, we observed that PRAME was elevated in proportion to the malignant potential of melanoma cells. From the in silico prediction of PRAME gene structure, we identified the putative myeloid zinc finger 1 (MZF1) binding sites, which overlap with a CpG-rich region located in the first intron. The transcription factor MZF1 increased PRAME expression via its direct binding to the intron DNA. Upon treatment with a DNA methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycitidine (5-azaC), together with ectopic expression of MZF1, PRAME expression was significantly enhanced at both the protein and mRNA levels. More pronounced MZF1 binding to the PRAME DNA was observed in the presence of 5-azaC. DNA methylation was inversely correlated with PRAME expression in melanoma cells. Finally, we observed that MZF1, like PRAME, promotes the colony-forming ability in melanoma cells. Overall, our findings suggest that MZF1, via stimulation of PRAME expression, may be a potential prognostic and therapeutic target in melanoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Tumor Initiation in Human Malignant Melanoma and Potential Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Frank, Markus H.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells, have been identified in several human malignancies, including human malignant melanoma. The frequency of malignant melanoma-initiating cells (MMICs), which are identified by their expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family member ABCB5, correlates with disease progression in human patients. Furthermore, targeted MMIC ablation through ABCB5 inhibits tumor initiation and growth in preclinical xenotransplantation models, pointing to potential therapeutic promise of the CSC concept. Recent advances also show that CSCs can exert pro-angiogenic roles in tumor growth and serve immunomodulatory functions related to the evasion of host anti-tumor immunity. Thus, MMICs might initiate and sustain tumorigenic growth not only as a result of CSC-intrinsic self-renewal, differentiation and proliferative capacity, but also based on pro-tumorigenic interactions with the host environment. PMID:20184545

  6. Tumor initiation in human malignant melanoma and potential cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Frank, Markus H

    2010-02-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells, have been identified in several human malignancies, including human malignant melanoma. The frequency of malignant melanoma-initiating cells (MMICs), which are identified by their expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family member ABCB5, correlates with disease progression in human patients. Furthermore, targeted MMIC ablation through ABCB5 inhibits tumor initiation and growth in preclinical xenotransplantation models, pointing to potential therapeutic promise of the CSC concept. Recent advances also show that CSCs can exert pro-angiogenic roles in tumor growth and serve immunomodulatory functions related to the evasion of host anti-tumor immunity. Thus, MMICs might initiate and sustain tumorigenic growth not only as a result of CSC-intrinsic self-renewal, differentiation and proliferative capacity, but also based on pro-tumorigenic interactions with the host environment.

  7. PD-L1, PD-L2 and PD-1 expression in metastatic melanoma: Correlation with tumor-infiltrating immune cells and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Joseph M; Erdag, Gulsun; Smolkin, Mark E; Deacon, Donna H; Patterson, James W; Chen, Leiping; Bullock, Timothy N; Slingluff, Craig L

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic blockade of PD-1/PD-L1 can have dramatic therapeutic benefit in some patients; however, the prognostic associations of PD-1 and its ligands, in the absence of therapeutic blockade have not been definitively addressed. In particular, associations of PD-L2 with immune infiltrates and with outcome have yet to be explored. We hypothesized that surface expression of both PD-L1 and PD-L2 by melanoma cells would be associated with immune cell infiltration and with overall patient survival, independent of checkpoint blockade therapy. We also characterized the heterogeneity of their distribution within a tumor and within tumors of the same patient. Tissue microarrays of metastatic melanoma samples from 147 patients were quantified for CD8(+), CD45, CD4(+), CD3, CD163, CD20, CD138, FoxP3, PD-1, PD-L1 and PD-L2 markers by immunohistochemistry. Relationships between the proportions of PD-L1 and PD-L2 expressing tumor cells with the immune cell count, distribution (immunotype) and patient survival were studied. Expressions of both PD-L1 and PD-L2 correlated significantly with increasing densities of immune cells in the tumor specimens and with immunotype. Positive PD-L2 expression was associated with improved overall survival and the simultaneous positive expression of both PD-1 ligands showed a higher association with survival. Significant heterogeneity of PD-L1 and PD-L2 expressions within tumors were observed, however, they were less pronounced with PD-L2. In conclusion, both are markers of immune infiltration and PD-L2, alone or in combination with PD-L1, is a marker for prognosis in metastatic melanoma patients. Larger tumor samples yield more reliable assessments of PD-L1/L2 expression.

  8. Dacarbazine treatment before peptide vaccination enlarges T-cell repertoire diversity of melan-a-specific, tumor-reactive CTL in melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Belinda; Del Bello, Duilia; Sottini, Alessandra; Serana, Federico; Ghidini, Claudia; Gualtieri, Novella; Ferraresi, Virginia; Catricalà, Caterina; Belardelli, Filippo; Proietti, Enrico; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Imberti, Luisa; Nisticò, Paola

    2010-09-15

    Combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy to increase the effectiveness of an antitumor immune response is currently regarded as an attractive antitumor strategy. In a pilot clinical trial, we have recently documented an increase of melanoma antigen A (Melan-A)-specific, tumor-reactive, long-lasting effector-memory CD8(+) T cells after the administration of dacarbazine (DTIC) 1 day before peptide vaccination in melanoma patients. Global transcriptional analysis revealed a DTIC-induced activation of genes involved in the immune response and leukocyte activation. To identify the possible mechanisms underlying this improved immune response, we have compared the endogenous and the treatment-induced anti-Melan-A response at the clonal level in patients treated with the vaccine alone or with DTIC plus vaccine. We report a progressive widening of T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire diversity, accompanied by high avidity and tumor reactivity, only in Melan-A-specific T-cell clones of patients treated with chemoimmunotherapy, with a trend toward longer survival. Differently, patients treated with vaccine alone showed a tendency to narrowing the TCR repertoire diversity, accompanied by a decrease of tumor lytic activity in one patient. Collectively, our findings indicate that DTIC plus vaccination shapes the TCR repertoire in terms of diversity and antitumor response, suggesting that this combined therapy could be effective in preventing melanoma relapse.

  9. A Melanoma Lymph Node Metastasis with a Donor-Patient Hybrid Genome following Bone Marrow Transplantation: A Second Case of Leucocyte-Tumor Cell Hybridization in Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Duvall, Eric; Grasmick, Zachary; Haedicke, Kay

    2017-01-01

    Background Metastatic disease is the principal cause of mortality in cancer, yet the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Macrophage-cancer cell fusion as a cause of metastasis was proposed more than a century ago by German pathologist Prof. Otto Aichel. Since then this theory has been confirmed in numerous animal studies and recently in a patient with metastatic melanoma. Methods Here we analyzed tumor DNA from a 51-year-old man who, 8 years following an allogeneic BMT from his brother for treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), developed a nodular malignant melanoma on the upper back with spread to an axillary sentinal lymph node. We used laser microdissection to isolate FFPE tumor cells free of leucocytes. They were genotyped using forensic short tandem repeat (STR) length-polymorphisms to distinguish donor and patient genomes. Tumor and pre-transplant blood lymphocyte DNAs were analyzed for donor and patient alleles at 15 autosomal STR loci and the sex chromosomes. Results DNA analysis of the primary melanoma and the nodal metastasis exhibit alleles at each STR locus that are consistent with both the patient and donor. The doses vary between these samples indicative of the relative amounts of genomic DNA derived from the patient and donor. Conclusion The evidence supports fusion and hybridization between donor and patient cells as the initiator of metastasis in this patient. That this phenomenon has now been seen in a second case suggests that fusion is likely to play a significant role for melanoma and other solid tumor metastasis, perhaps leading to new avenues of treatment for this most problematic disease. PMID:28146572

  10. Bonded Cumomer Analysis of Human Melanoma Metabolism Monitored by 13C NMR Spectroscopy of Perfused Tumor Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Shestov, Alexander A.; Mancuso, Anthony; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Guo, Lili; Nelson, David S.; Roman, Jeffrey C.; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Leeper, Dennis B.; Blair, Ian A.; Glickson, Jerry D.

    2016-01-01

    A network model for the determination of tumor metabolic fluxes from 13C NMR kinetic isotopomer data has been developed and validated with perfused human DB-1 melanoma cells carrying the BRAF V600E mutation, which promotes oxidative metabolism. The model generated in the bonded cumomer formalism describes key pathways of tumor intermediary metabolism and yields dynamic curves for positional isotopic enrichment and spin-spin multiplets. Cells attached to microcarrier beads were perfused with 26 mm [1,6-13C2]glucose under normoxic conditions at 37 °C and monitored by 13C NMR spectroscopy. Excellent agreement between model-predicted and experimentally measured values of the rates of oxygen and glucose consumption, lactate production, and glutamate pool size validated the model. ATP production by glycolytic and oxidative metabolism were compared under hyperglycemic normoxic conditions; 51% of the energy came from oxidative phosphorylation and 49% came from glycolysis. Even though the rate of glutamine uptake was ∼50% of the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux, the rate of ATP production from glutamine was essentially zero (no glutaminolysis). De novo fatty acid production was ∼6% of the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux. The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway flux was 3.6% of glycolysis, and three non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway exchange fluxes were calculated. Mass spectrometry was then used to compare fluxes through various pathways under hyperglycemic (26 mm) and euglycemic (5 mm) conditions. Under euglycemic conditions glutamine uptake doubled, but ATP production from glutamine did not significantly change. A new parameter measuring the Warburg effect (the ratio of lactate production flux to pyruvate influx through the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier) was calculated to be 21, close to upper limit of oxidative metabolism. PMID:26703469

  11. The microenvironment in primary cutaneous melanoma with associated spontaneous tumor regression: evaluation for T-regulatory cells and the presence of an immunosuppressive microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Gray, Arielle; Grushchak, Solomiya; Mudaliar, Kumaran; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Carey, Kyle; Hutchens, Kelli A

    2017-04-01

    Spontaneous tumor regression, regression in the absence of therapeutic intervention, can be identified histologically in over 25% of primary cutaneous melanomas at initial diagnosis. A unique subset of T lymphocytes found in areas of regression can be histologically distinguished from tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes (TIL) found in areas of tumor progression. We call this unique subset of T lymphocytes regression-associated T lymphocytes (RATs). The aim of this study is to determine the phenotype of lymphocytes and the density of specific cell types linked to immunosuppression in areas of tumor progression compared with areas of tumor regression. These specific cell types include T-regulatory cells (Tregs) and S100A9 cells. A total of 14 primary cutaneous melanomas with areas of progression and regression were used. Immunohistochemistry staining was used to identify CD4 cells, CD8 cells, Tregs, and S100A9 cells. Two independent observers manually counted three high-powered ×40 fields. There was no predominance of CD4 or CD8 T lymphocytes in either RATs or TIL. We identified a lower density of Tregs in RATs compared with TIL when using the FOXP3/CD4 Treg marker (P=0.04) and a marginal difference when using our second, confirmatory Treg marker, FOXP3/CD25 (P=0.11). We observed a lower density of S100A9 cells in RATs compared with TIL (P=0.002). There was an observable difference in the tumor microenvironments of RATs and TIL, with RATs having a significantly lower density of Tregs and S100A9 cells. We deduce that the absence of immunosuppression in areas of regression allows for a more robust immune response and thus effective eradication of tumor cells.

  12. MHC class II-transduced tumor cells originating in the immune-privileged eye prime and boost CD4(+) T lymphocytes that cross-react with primary and metastatic uveal melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Jacobus J; Thompson, James A; Srivastava, Minu K; Iheagwara, Uzoma K; Murray, Timothy G; Lotem, Michal; Ksander, Bruce R; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2007-05-01

    Uveal melanoma, the most common malignancy of the eye, has a 50% rate of liver metastases among patients with large primary tumors. Several therapies prolong survival of metastatic patients; however, none are curative and no patients survive. Therefore, we are exploring immunotherapy as an alternative or adjunctive treatment. Uveal melanoma may be particularly appropriate for immunotherapy because primary tumors arise in an immune-privileged site and may express antigens to which the host is not tolerized. We are developing MHC class II (MHC II)-matched allogeneic, cell-based uveal melanoma vaccines that activate CD4(+) T lymphocytes, which are key cells for optimizing CD8(+) T-cell immunity, facilitating immune memory, and preventing tolerance. Our previous studies showed that tumor cells genetically modified to express costimulatory and MHC II molecules syngeneic to the recipient are potent inducers of antitumor immunity. Because the MHC II-matched allogeneic vaccines do not express the accessory molecule, Invariant chain, they present MHC II-restricted peptides derived from endogenously encoded tumor antigens. We now report that MHC II-matched allogeneic vaccines, prepared from primary uveal melanomas that arise in the immune-privileged eye, prime and boost IFNgamma-secreting CD4(+) T cells from the peripheral blood of either healthy donors or uveal melanoma patients that cross-react with primary uveal melanomas from other patients and metastatic tumors. In contrast, vaccines prepared from metastatic cells in the liver are less effective at activating CD4(+) T cells, suggesting that tumor cells originating in immune-privileged sites may have enhanced capacity for inducing antitumor immunity and for serving as immunotherapeutic agents.

  13. Muc1 promotes migration and lung metastasis of melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoli; Lan, Hongwen; Li, Jun; Su, Yushu; Xu, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    Early stages of melanoma can be successfully treated by surgical resection of the tumor, but there is still no effective treatment once it is progressed to metastatic phases. Although growing family of both melanoma metastasis promoting and metastasis suppressor genes have been reported be related to metastasis, the molecular mechanisms governing melanoma metastatic cascade are still not completely understood. Therefore, defining the molecules that govern melanoma metastasis may aid the development of more effective therapeutic strategies for combating melanoma. In the present study, we found that muc1 is involved in the metastasis of melanoma cells and demonstrated that muc1 disruption impairs melanoma cells migration and metastasis. The requirement of muc1 in the migration of melanoma cells was further confirmed by gene silencing in vitro. In corresponding to this result, over-expression of muc1 significantly promoted the migratory of melanoma cells. Moreover, down-regulation of muc1 expression strikingly inhibits melanoma cellular metastasis in vivo. Finally, we found that muc1 promotes melanoma migration through the protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway. To conclude, our findings suggest a novel mechanism underlying the metastasis of melanoma cells which might serve as a new intervention target for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:26609470

  14. Evaluation of the Functional Capacity of NK Cells of Melanoma Patients in an In Vitro Model of NK Cell Contact with K562 and FemX Tumor Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Konjevic, Gordana; Vuletic, Ana; Mirjacic Martinovic, Katarina; Krivokuca, Ana; Jankovic, Radmila; Babovic, Nada

    2017-09-08

    NK cells of metastatic melanoma (MM) patients display impaired function, making them incapable to mount an effective antitumor response. In this study, we evaluated immunophenotypic characteristics and functional capacity of CD3(-)CD16(+) NK cells of MM patients in an in vitro model based on NK cell contact with an NK sensitive, K562, and a tumor-specific, melanoma FemX tumor cell line. Although our results indicate similar NK cell antitumor cytotoxic potential of MM patients in contact with both cell lines based on the expression of CD107a degranulation marker, there is a discrepancy in NK cell IFNγ production, as it is not significantly induced by FemX tumor cells, found to be, contrary to K562, HLA class I positive. Furthermore, we show NKG2D receptor downregulation by K562 tumor cell line, only. This may result from the obtained higher gene expression of TGFβ and VEGFA growth factors in K562 tumor cells that can negatively regulate NKG2D expression. Additionally, aside from postcontact downmodulation of activating CD16 receptor, there are no significant changes in the expression of CD161, CD158a, and CD158b NK cell receptors. Therefore, the applied in vitro model shows that, compared to the full NK cell functional capacity of MM patients displayed in a tumor-sensitive setting represented by contact with K562 cells, tumor-specific melanoma setting provided by FemX tumor cells leads to reduced NK functional potential. The obtained insight into NK cell capacity may be of use for evaluation of the state of disease and can help in selecting effective immunotherapeutic agents for MM patients.

  15. MART-1- and gp100-expressing and -non-expressing melanoma cells are equally proliferative in tumors and clonogenic in vitro.

    PubMed

    Aris, Mariana; Zubieta, Mariana Rodríguez; Colombo, Marina; Arriaga, Juan Martín; Bianchini, Michele; Alperovich, Myriam; Bravo, Alicia I; Barrio, María M; Mordoh, José

    2012-02-01

    MART-1 and gp100 are prototypical melanoma antigen (Ag), but their clinical use as vaccines or as targets of cytotoxic lymphocytes achieved modest success. Possible explanations could be that as MART-1 and gp100 are melanocyte differentiation Ag, clonogenic Ag-non-expressing cells would be spared by immune effectors, or that clonogenic cells would be intrinsically resistant to cytotoxic lymphocytes. We therefore analyzed the proliferative status of MART-1/gp100-expressing and -non-expressing cells in biopsies, and the clonogenicity and sensitiveness to cytotoxic lymphocytes of the human cutaneous melanoma cell lines MEL-XY1 and MEL-XY3. Analysis of MART-1/gp100 and Ki-67 expression in 22 melanoma tumors revealed that MART-1/gp100-expressing and -non-expressing cells proliferated competitively. MART-1, gp100, tyrosinase, and CD271 expression were studied in MEL-XY1 and MEL-XY3 colonies. At 7 days, colonies displayed positive, negative, and mixed expression patterns. By 14 days, colonies of different sizes developed, showing cells with different clonogenic potential, and Ag were downregulated, suggesting Ag plasticity. Subcloning of MEL-XY1 colonies showed that Ag expression varied with time without interfering with clonogenicity. Finally, clonogenic, MART-1/gp100-expressing cells were lysed by specific CD8 lymphocytes. Thus, MART-1 and gp100 expression and plasticity would not interfere with proliferation or clonogenicity, and clonogenic cells may be lysed by cytotoxic lymphocytes.

  16. Upregulation of Tim-3 and PD-1 expression is associated with tumor antigen–specific CD8+ T cell dysfunction in melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Fourcade, Julien; Sun, Zhaojun; Benallaoua, Mourad; Guillaume, Philippe; Luescher, Immanuel F.; Sander, Cindy; Kirkwood, John M.; Kuchroo, Vijay

    2010-01-01

    The paradoxical coexistence of spontaneous tumor antigen–specific immune responses with progressive disease in cancer patients furthers the need to dissect the molecular pathways involved in tumor-induced T cell dysfunction. In patients with advanced melanoma, we have previously shown that the cancer-germline antigen NY-ESO-1 stimulates spontaneous NY-ESO-1–specific CD8+ T cells that up-regulate PD-1 expression. We also observed that PD-1 regulates NY-ESO-1–specific CD8+ T cell expansion upon chronic antigen stimulation. In the present study, we show that a fraction of PD-1+ NY-ESO-1–specific CD8+ T cells in patients with advanced melanoma up-regulates Tim-3 expression and that Tim-3+PD-1+ NY-ESO-1–specific CD8+ T cells are more dysfunctional than Tim-3−PD-1+ and Tim-3−PD-1− NY-ESO-1–specific CD8+ T cells, producing less IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-2. Tim-3–Tim-3L blockade enhanced cytokine production by NY-ESO-1–specific CD8+ T cells upon short ex vivo stimulation with cognate peptide, thus enhancing their functional capacity. In addition, Tim-3–Tim-3L blockade enhanced cytokine production and proliferation of NY-ESO-1–specific CD8+ T cells upon prolonged antigen stimulation and acted in synergy with PD-1–PD-L1 blockade. Collectively, our findings support the use of Tim-3–Tim-3L blockade together with PD-1–PD-L1 blockade to reverse tumor-induced T cell exhaustion/dysfunction in patients with advanced melanoma. PMID:20819923

  17. Epidermal growth factor facilitates melanoma lymph node metastasis by influencing tumor lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bracher, Andreas; Cardona, Ana Soler; Tauber, Stefanie; Fink, Astrid M; Steiner, Andreas; Pehamberger, Hubert; Niederleithner, Heide; Petzelbauer, Peter; Gröger, Marion; Loewe, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in epidermal growth factor (EGF) expression are known to be of prognostic relevance in human melanoma, but EGF-mediated effects on melanoma have not been extensively studied. As lymph node metastasis usually represents the first major step in melanoma progression, we were trying to identify a potential role of primary tumor-derived EGF in the mediation of melanoma lymph node metastases. Stable EGF knockdown (EGFkd) in EGF-high (M24met) and EGF-low (A375) expressing melanoma cells was generated. Only in EGF-high melanoma cells, EGFkd led to a significant reduction of lymph node metastasis and primary tumor lymphangiogenesis in vivo, as well as impairment of tumor cell migration in vitro. Moreover, EGF-induced sprouting of lymphatic but not of blood endothelial cells was abolished using supernatants of M24met EGFkd cells. In addition, M24met EGFkd tumors showed reduced vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) expression levels. Similarly, in human primary melanomas, a direct correlation between EGF/VEGF-C and EGF/Prox-1 expression levels was found. Finally, melanoma patients with lymph node micrometastases undergoing sentinel node biopsy were found to have significantly elevated EGF serum levels as compared with sentinel lymph node-negative patients. Our data indicate that tumor-derived EGF is important in mediating melanoma lymph node metastasis.

  18. Variant G6PD levels promote tumor cell proliferation or apoptosis via the STAT3/5 pathway in the human melanoma xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), elevated in tumor cells, catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose-phosphate pathway. The regulation mechanism of G6PD and pathological change in human melanoma growth remains unknown. Methods HEM (human epidermal melanocyte) cells and human melanoma cells with the wild-type G6PD gene (A375-WT), G6PD deficiency (A375-G6PD∆), G6PD cDNA overexpression (A375-G6PD∆-G6PD-WT), and mutant G6PD cDNA (A375-G6PD∆-G6PD-G487A) were subcutaneously injected into 5 groups of nude mice. Expressions of G6PD, STAT3, STAT5, cell cycle-related proteins, and apoptotic proteins as well as mechanistic exploration of STAT3/STAT5 were determined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry and western blot. Results Delayed formation and slowed growth were apparent in A375-G6PD∆ cells, compared to A375-WT cells. Significantly decreased G6PD expression and activity were observed in tumor tissues induced by A375-G6PD∆, along with down-regulated cell cycle proteins cyclin D1, cyclin E, p53, and S100A4. Apoptosis-inhibited factors Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl were up-regulated; however, apoptosis factor Fas was down-regulated, compared to A375-WT cells. Moderate protein expressions were observed in A375-G6PD∆-G6PD-WT and A375-G6PD∆-G6PD-G487A cells. Conclusions G6PD may regulate apoptosis and expression of cell cycle-related proteins through phosphorylation of transcription factors STAT3 and STAT5, thus mediating formation and growth of human melanoma cells. Further study will, however, be required to determine potential clinical applications. PMID:23693134

  19. Parthenolide enhances dacarbazine activity against melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Koprowska, Kamila; Hartman, Mariusz L; Sztiller-Sikorska, Malgorzata; Czyz, Malgorzata E

    2013-09-01

    Dacarbazine induces a clinical response only in 15% of melanoma patients. New treatment strategies may involve combinations of drugs with different modes of action to target the tumor heterogeneity. We aimed to determine whether the combined treatment of heterogeneous melanoma cell populations in vitro with the alkylating agent dacarbazine and the nuclear factor-κB inhibitor parthenolide could be more effective than either drug alone. A panel of melanoma cell lines, including highly heterogeneous populations derived from surgical specimens, was treated with dacarbazine and parthenolide. The effect of drugs on the viable cell number was examined using an acid phosphatase activity assay, and the combination effect was determined by median-effect analysis. Cell death and cell-cycle arrest were assessed by flow cytometry. Gene expression was measured by real-time PCR and changes in the protein levels were evaluated by western blotting. Secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-8 was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The self-renewing capacity was assessed using a clonogenic assay. Dacarbazine was less effective in heterogeneous melanoma populations than in the A375 cell line. Parthenolide and dacarbazine synergistically reduced the viable cell numbers. Both drugs induced cell-cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death. Importantly, parthenolide abrogated the baseline and dacarbazine-induced vascular endothelial growth factor secretion from melanoma cells in heterogeneous populations, whereas interleukin-8 secretion was not significantly affected by either drug. Parthenolide eradicated melanoma cells with self-renewing capacity also in cultures simultaneously treated with dacarbazine. The combination of parthenolide and dacarbazine might be considered as a new therapeutic modality against metastatic melanoma.

  20. T-cell receptor gene therapy targeting melanoma-associated antigen-A4 inhibits human tumor growth in non-obese diabetic/SCID/γcnull mice.

    PubMed

    Shirakura, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Yukari; Wang, Linan; Imai, Naoko; Amaike, Chisaki; Sato, Eiichi; Ito, Mamoru; Nukaya, Ikuei; Mineno, Junichi; Takesako, Kazutoh; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with lymphocytes that have been genetically engineered to express tumor-reactive T-cell receptors (TCR) is a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy. We have been exploring the development of TCR gene therapy targeting cancer/testis antigens, including melanoma-associated antigen (MAGE) family antigens, that are ideal targets for adoptive T-cell therapy. The efficacy of TCR gene therapy targeting MAGE family antigens, however, has not yet been evaluated in vivo. Here, we demonstrate the in vivo antitumor activity in immunodeficient non-obese diabetic/SCID/γc(null) (NOG) mice of human lymphocytes genetically engineered to express TCR specific for the MAGE-A4 antigen. Polyclonal T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were transduced with the αβ TCR genes specific for MAGE-A4, then adoptively transferred into NOG mice inoculated with MAGE-A4 expressing human tumor cell lines. The transferred T cells maintained their effector function in vivo, infiltrated into tumors, and inhibited tumor growth in an antigen-specific manner. The combination of adoptive cell therapy with antigen peptide vaccination enhanced antitumor activity, with improved multifunctionality of the transferred cells. These data suggest that TCR gene therapy with MAGE-A4-specific TCR is a promising strategy to treat patients with MAGE-A4-expressing tumors; in addition, the acquisition of multifunctionality in vivo is an important factor to predict the quality of the T-cell response during adoptive therapy with human lymphocytes.

  1. Co-stimulation through the CD137/4-1BB pathway protects human melanoma tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes from activation-induced cell death and enhances anti-tumor effector function

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Chacon, Jessica Ann; Li, Yufeng; Wu, Richard C.; Bernatchez, Chantale; Wang, Yijun; Weber, Jeffrey; Hwu, Patrick; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2011-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT) using expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) with high-dose IL-2 is a promising form of immunotherapy for Stage IV melanoma having clinical response rates of 50% or more. One of the major problems preventing further success of this therapy is that the current protocols used to highly expand TIL for infusion drive CD8+ T cells to differentiate into effector cells losing key co-stimulatory molecules such as CD28 and CD27. This has been associated with a lack of persistence in vivo for reasons not entirely clear. In this study, we demonstrate that while human melanoma CD8+ TIL lost CD27 and CD28 expression during the rapid expansion for ACT, they gained expression of the alternative co-stimulatory molecule CD137/4-1BB, and to a lesser extent CD134/OX40. Post-REP TIL were found to be highly sensitive to activation-induced cell death (AICD) when re-activated through the TCR with low levels of OKT3 antibody. However, co-ligation of 4-1BB using two different agonistic anti-4-1BB antibodies potently prevented AICD of post-REP CD8+ TIL, including those specific for MART-1, and facilitated even further cell expansion. This was correlated with increased levels of bcl-2 and bcl-xL together with decreased bim expression. 4-1BB-co-stimulated post-REP TIL also expressed increased levels of the cytolytic granule proteins and exhibited enhanced CTL activity against melanoma cells. Lastly, post-REP CD8+ TIL were protected from cell death by anti-4-1BB ligation when exposed to HLA-matched melanoma cells. Our results indicate that 4-1BB co-stimulation may significantly improve TIL survival during melanoma ACT and boost anti-tumor cytolytic activity. PMID:21389874

  2. PD-1 and Tim-3 regulate the expansion of tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cells induced by melanoma vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Fourcade, Julien; Sun, Zhaojun; Pagliano, Ornella; Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Sander, Cindy; Janjic, Bratislav; Tarhini, Ahmad A.; Tawbi, Hussein A.; Kirkwood, John M.; Moschos, Stergios; Wang, Hong; Guillaume, Philippe; Luescher, Immanuel F.; Krieg, Arthur; Anderson, Ana C.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Zarour, Hassane M.

    2014-01-01

    Although melanoma vaccines stimulate tumor antigen (TA)-specific CD8+ T cells, objective clinical responses are rarely observed. To investigate this discrepancy, we evaluated the character of vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells with regard to the inhibitory T cell co-receptors PD-1 and Tim-3 in metastatic melanoma patients who were administered tumor vaccines. The vaccines included incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA), CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG) and the HLA-A2-restricted analog peptide NY-ESO-1 157-165V, either by itself or in combination with the pan-DR epitope NY-ESO-1 119-143. Both vaccines stimulated rapid TA-specific CD8+ T-cell responses detected ex vivo, however, TA-specific CD8+ T cells produced more IFN-γ and exhibited higher lytic function upon immunization with MHC class I and class II epitopes. Notably, the vast majority of vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells upregulated PD-1 and a minority also upregulated Tim-3. Levels of PD-1 and Tim-3 expression by vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells at the time of vaccine administration correlated inversely with their expansion in vivo. Dual blockade of PD-1 and Tim-3 enhanced the expansion and cytokine production of vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells in vitro. Collectively, our findings support the use of PD-1 and Tim-3 blockades with cancer vaccines to stimulate potent antitumor T cell responses and increase the likelihood of clinical responses in advanced melanoma patients. PMID:24343228

  3. Prophylactic vaccines are potent activators of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and drive effective anti-tumor responses in melanoma patients at the cost of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bol, Kalijn F; Aarntzen, Erik H J G; Pots, Jeanette M; Olde Nordkamp, Michel A M; van de Rakt, Mandy W M M; Scharenborg, Nicole M; de Boer, Annemiek J; van Oorschot, Tom G M; Croockewit, Sandra A J; Blokx, Willeke A M; Oyen, Wim J G; Boerman, Otto C; Mus, Roel D M; van Rossum, Michelle M; van der Graaf, Chantal A A; Punt, Cornelis J A; Adema, Gosse J; Figdor, Carl G; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Schreibelt, Gerty

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy is explored worldwide in cancer patients, predominantly with DC matured with pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin E2. We studied the safety and efficacy of vaccination with monocyte-derived DC matured with a cocktail of prophylactic vaccines that contain clinical-grade Toll-like receptor ligands (BCG, Typhim, Act-HIB) and prostaglandin E2 (VAC-DC). Stage III and IV melanoma patients were vaccinated via intranodal injection (12 patients) or combined intradermal/intravenous injection (16 patients) with VAC-DC loaded with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and mRNA encoding tumor antigens gp100 and tyrosinase. Tumor antigen-specific T cell responses were monitored in blood and skin-test infiltrating-lymphocyte cultures. Almost all patients mounted prophylactic vaccine- or KLH-specific immune responses. Both after intranodal injection and after intradermal/intravenous injection, tumor antigen-specific immune responses were detected, which coincide with longer overall survival in stage IV melanoma patients. VAC-DC induce local and systemic CTC grade 2 and 3 toxicity, which is most likely caused by BCG in the maturation cocktail. The side effects were self-limiting or resolved upon a short period of systemic steroid therapy. We conclude that VAC-DC can induce functional tumor-specific responses. Unfortunately, toxicity observed after vaccination precludes the general application of VAC-DC, since in DC maturated with prophylactic vaccines BCG appears to be essential in the maturation cocktail.

  4. Versican Is Differentially Expressed in Human Melanoma and May Play a Role in Tumor Development

    PubMed Central

    Touab, Malika; Villena, Juan; Barranco, Carlos; Arumí-Uría, Montserrat; Bassols, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Undifferentiated human melanoma cell lines produce a large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, different from the well-known melanoma-specific proteoglycan mel-PG (Heredia and colleagues, Arch Biochem Biophys, 333: 198–206, 1996). We have identified this proteoglycan as versican and analyzed the expression of versican in several human melanoma cell lines. Versican isoforms are expressed in undifferentiated cell lines but not in differentiated cells, and the isoform expression pattern depends on the degree of cell differentiation. The V0 and V1 isoforms are found on cells with an early degree of differentiation, whereas the V1 isoform is present in cells with an intermediate degree of differentiation. We have also characterized some functional properties of versican on human melanoma cells: the purified proteoglycan stimulates cell growth and inhibits cell adhesion when cells are grown on fibronectin or collagen type I as substrates, and thus may facilitate tumor cell detachment and proliferation. Furthermore, we have analyzed the expression of versican in human melanocytic nevi and melanoma: 10 benign melanocytic nevi, 10 dysplastic nevi, 11 primary malignant melanomas, and 8 metastatic melanomas were tested. Immunoreactivity for versican was negative in benign melanocytic nevi, weakly to strongly positive in dysplastic nevi, and intensely positive in primary malignant melanomas and metastatic melanomas. Our results indicate that versican is involved in the progression of melanomas and may be a reliable marker for clinical diagnosis. PMID:11839575

  5. Mast cells promote melanoma colonization of lungs.

    PubMed

    Öhrvik, Helena; Grujic, Mirjana; Waern, Ida; Gustafson, Ann-Marie; Ernst, Nancy; Roers, Axel; Hartmann, Karin; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-10-18

    Mast cells have been implicated in malignant processes, mainly through clinical correlative studies and by experiments performed using animals lacking mast cells due to defective c-kit signaling. However, mast cell-deficient mouse models based on c-kit defects have recently been questioned for their relevance. Here we addressed the effect of mast cells in a tumor setting by using transgenic Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ mice, in which the deficiency of mast cells is independent of c-kit defects. Melanoma cells (B16.F10) were administered either subcutaneously or intravenously into Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ mice or Mcpt5-Cre- R-DTA+ littermate controls, followed by the assessment of formed tumors. In the subcutaneous model, mast cells were abundant in the tumor stroma of control mice but were absent in Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ mice. However, the absence of mast cells did not affect tumor size. In contrast, after intravenous administration of B16.F10 cells, melanoma colonization of the lungs was markedly reduced in Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ vs. Mcpt5-Cre- R-DTA+ animals. Decreased melanoma colonization of the lungs in Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ animals was accompanied by increased inflammatory cell recruitment into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, suggesting that mast cells suppress inflammation in this setting. Further, qPCR analysis revealed significant alterations in the expression of Twist and E-cadherin in lungs of Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ vs. control Mcpt5-Cre- R-DTA+ animals, suggesting an impact of mast cells on epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In conclusion, this study reveals that mast cells promote melanoma colonization of the lung.

  6. The Novel Gamma Secretase Inhibitor RO4929097 Reduces the Tumor Initiating Potential of Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Miguel F.; Medicherla, Ratna; Haimovic, Adele; Menendez, Silvia; Shang, Shulian; Pavlick, Anna; Shao, Yongzhao; Darvishian, Farbod; Boylan, John F.; Osman, Iman; Hernando, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Several reports have demonstrated a role for aberrant NOTCH signaling in melanoma genesis and progression, prompting us to explore if targeting this pathway is a valid therapeutic approach against melanoma. We targeted NOTCH signaling using RO4929097, a novel inhibitor of gamma secretase, which is a key component of the enzymatic complex that cleaves and activates NOTCH. The effects of RO4929097 on the oncogenic and stem cell properties of a panel of melanoma cell lines were tested both in vitro and in vivo, using xenograft models. In human primary melanoma cell lines, RO4929097 decreased the levels of NOTCH transcriptional target HES1. This was accompanied by reduced proliferation and impaired ability to form colonies in soft agar and to organize in tridimensional spheres. Moreover, RO4929097 affected the growth of human primary melanoma xenograft in NOD/SCID/IL2gammaR-/- mice and inhibited subsequent tumor formation in a serial xenotransplantation model, suggesting that inhibition of NOTCH signaling suppresses the tumor initiating potential of melanoma cells. In addition, RO4929097 decreased tumor volume and blocked the invasive growth pattern of metastatic melanoma cell lines in vivo. Finally, increased gene expression of NOTCH signaling components correlated with shorter post recurrence survival in metastatic melanoma cases. Our data support NOTCH inhibition as a promising therapeutic strategy against melanoma. PMID:21980408

  7. Modulation of T Cell Activation by Malignant Melanoma Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schatton, Tobias; Schütte, Ute; Frank, Natasha Y.; Zhan, Qian; Hoerning, André; Robles, Susanne C.; Zhou, Jun; Hodi, F. Stephen; Spagnoli, Giulio C.; Murphy, George F.; Frank, Markus H.

    2010-01-01

    Highly immunogenic cancers such as malignant melanoma are capable of inexorable tumor growth despite the presence of antitumor immunity. This raises the possibility that only a restricted minority of tumorigenic malignant cells might possess the phenotypic and functional characteristics to modulate tumor-directed immune activation. Here we provide evidence supporting this hypothesis, by demonstrating that tumorigenic ABCB5+ malignant melanoma-initiating cells (MMICs) possess the capacity to preferentially inhibit interleukin (IL)-2-dependent T cell activation and to support, in a B7.2-dependent manner, regulatory T (Treg) cell induction. Compared to melanoma bulk populations, ABCB5+ MMICs expressed lower levels of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, showed aberrant positivity for MHC class II, and exhibited lower expression levels of the melanoma-associated antigens (MAAs) MART-1, ML-IAP, NY-ESO-1, and MAGE-A. In addition, tumorigenic ABCB5+ subpopulations preferentially expressed the costimulatory molecules B7.2 and PD-1 in both established melanoma xenografts and clinical tumor specimens in vivo. In immune activation assays, ABCB5+ melanoma cells inhibited mitogen-dependent human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation and IL-2 production more efficiently than ABCB5− populations. Moreover, coculture with ABCB5+ MMICs increased, in a B7.2 signalling-dependent manner, CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg cell abundance and IL-10 production by mitogen-activated PBMCs. Consistent with these findings, ABCB5+ melanoma subsets also preferentially inhibited IL-2 production and induced IL-10 secretion by cocultured patient-derived, syngeneic PBMCs. Our findings identify novel T cell-modulatory functions of ABCB5+ melanoma subpopulations and suggest specific roles for MMICs in the evasion of antitumor immunity and in cancer immunotherapeutic resistance. PMID:20068175

  8. Tumoral Melanosis Associated with Pembrolizumab-Treated Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R

    2017-01-01

    Tumoral melanosis is a form of completely regressed melanoma that usually presents as darkly pigmented lesions suspicious for malignant melanoma. Histology reveals dense dermal and subcutaneous infiltration of melanophages. Pembrolizumab is an antibody directed against programmed death receptor-1 (PD1) and is frontline treatment for advanced melanoma. An 81-year-old man with metastatic melanoma treated with pembrolizumab who developed tumoral melanosis at previous sites of metastases is described. The PubMed database was searched with the key words: antibody, immunotherapy, melanoma, melanosis, metastasis, pembrolizumab, and tumoral. The papers generated by the search and their references were reviewed. The patient was initially diagnosed with lentigo maligna melanoma on the left cheek three years earlier, and he was treated with wide local excision. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with epidermotropic metastatic malignant melanoma on the left parietal scalp 14 months later and was treated with wide local excision. Three months later, the patient was found to have metastatic melanoma in the same area of the scalp and was started on pembrolizumab immunotherapy. The patient was diagnosed with tumoral melanosis in the site of previous metastases nine months later. The patient remained free of disease 13 months after starting pembrolizumab. Tumoral melanosis may mimic malignant melanoma; hence a workup, including skin biopsy, should be undertaken. Extensive tumoral melanosis has been reported with ipilimumab, and we add a case following treatment with pembrolizumab. Additional cases of tumoral melanosis may present since immunotherapy has become frontline therapy for advanced melanoma.  PMID:28348944

  9. Proteome Serological Determination of Tumor-Associated Antigens in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Forgber, Michael; Trefzer, Uwe; Sterry, Wolfram; Walden, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Proteome serology may complement expression library-based approaches as strategy utilizing the patients' immune responses for the identification pathogenesis factors and potential targets for therapy and markers for diagnosis. Melanoma is a relatively immunogenic tumor and antigens recognized by melanoma-specific T cells have been extensively studied. The specificities of antibody responses to this malignancy have been analyzed to some extent by molecular genetic but not proteomics approaches. We screened sera of 94 melanoma patients for anti-melanoma reactivity and detected seropositivity in two-thirds of the patients with 2–6 antigens per case detected by 1D and an average of 2.3 per case by 2D Western blot analysis. For identification, antigen spots in Western blots were aligned with proteins in 2-DE and analyzed by mass spectrometry. 18 antigens were identified, 17 of which for the first time for melanoma. One of these antigens, galectin-3, has been related to various oncogenic processes including metastasis formation and invasiveness. Similarly, enolase has been found deregulated in different cancers. With at least 2 of 18 identified proteins implicated in oncogenic processes, the work confirms the potential of proteome-based antigen discovery to identify pathologically relevant proteins. PMID:19381273

  10. Development of potent autophagy inhibitors that sensitize oncogenic BRAF V600E mutant melanoma tumor cells to vemurafenib.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Megan L; Wang, Tong; Martin, Katie R; Kortus, Matthew G; Kauffman, Audra L; Trent, Jeffrey M; Gately, Stephen; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P

    2014-06-01

    Autophagy is a dynamic cell survival mechanism by which a double-membrane vesicle, or autophagosome, sequesters portions of the cytosol for delivery to the lysosome for recycling. This process can be inhibited using the antimalarial agent chloroquine (CQ), which impairs lysosomal function and prevents autophagosome turnover. Despite its activity, CQ is a relatively inadequate inhibitor that requires high concentrations to disrupt autophagy, highlighting the need for improved small molecules. To address this, we screened a panel of antimalarial agents for autophagy inhibition and chemically synthesized a novel series of acridine and tetrahydroacridine derivatives. Structure-activity relationship studies of the acridine ring led to the discovery of VATG-027 as a potent autophagy inhibitor with a high cytotoxicity profile. In contrast, the tetrahydroacridine VATG-032 showed remarkably little cytotoxicity while still maintaining autophagy inhibition activity, suggesting that both compounds act as autophagy inhibitors with differential effects on cell viability. Further, knockdown of autophagy-related genes showed no effect on cell viability, demonstrating that the ability to inhibit autophagy is separate from the compound cytotoxicity profiles. Next, we determined that both inhibitors function through lysosomal deacidification mechanisms and ultimately disrupt autophagosome turnover. To evaluate the genetic context in which these lysosomotropic inhibitors may be effective, they were tested in patient-derived melanoma cell lines driven by oncogenic BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B). We discovered that both inhibitors sensitized melanoma cells to the BRAF V600E inhibitor vemurafenib. Overall, these autophagy inhibitors provide a means to effectively block autophagy and have the potential to sensitize mutant BRAF melanomas to first-line therapies.

  11. Interaction of human malignant melanoma (ST-ML-12) tumor spheroids with endothelial cell monolayers. Damage to endothelium by oxygen-derived free radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Offner, F. A.; Wirtz, H. C.; Schiefer, J.; Bigalke, I.; Klosterhalfen, B.; Bittinger, F.; Mittermayer, C.; Kirkpatrick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    Clinical and experimental observations suggest that tumor-induced endothelial cell injury may be one of several initial events in the establishment of tumor metastases. To test this hypothesis, the authors have analyzed the interaction of malignant melanoma (ST-ML-12) multicenter tumor spheroids with endothelial cell monolayers in a three-dimensional coculture system. After 1.5 hours of interaction, the authors observed a toxic effect on endothelial cells in the perispheroid region. The latter was demonstrated by testing membrane integrity with the fluorescent probes acridine orange/ethidium bromide and resulted in sensitivity to shear stress of the damaged cells. The endothelium then underwent a regenerative cycle to replace the denuded halo. Addition of the oxygen radical-scavenging enzyme superoxide dismutase to the culture medium prevented this endothelial cell damage in a dose-dependent manner for up to 12 hours. By contrast, catalase, deferoxamine mesylate, allopurinol, and the proteinase inhibitors soybean trypsin inhibitor and aprotinin were not protective under the same conditions. The endothelial damage was dependent on the attachment of the spheroids. Medium conditioned by ST-ML-12-spheroids proved to be ineffective. A similar, but less prominent, deleterious effect was seen when human peritoneal mesothelial cells were used in place of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Spheroids of the uroepithelial cell line HU-609 were used as control. No toxicity was observed in these cocultures. Melanin biosynthesis is associated with the production of oxygen-derived free radicals. The results suggest a possible implication of these free radicals in metastasis formation of malignant melanoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1519667

  12. In vitro melanoma cell growth after preenucleation radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneally, C.Z.; Farber, M.G.; Smith, M.E.; Devineni, R.

    1988-02-01

    The in vitro efficacy of 20 Gy (2000 rad) of external beam irradiation delivered to patients with choroidal melanomas prior to enucleation was investigated in 11 patients whose tumors were grown in cell culture. Phase-contrast microscopy was used to compare growth patterns between irradiated and nonirradiated tumors. Cell types were determined by histologic stains, and electron microscopy identified intracytoplasmic melanin. Irradiated melanomas did not grow and did not attach to culture flasks, thus demonstrating that preenucleation irradiation alters the in vitro growth of melanoma cells.

  13. Increased expression of melanoma stem cell marker CD271 in metastatic melanoma to the brain

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ruifeng; Fierro-Fine, Amelia; Goddard, Lindsey; Russell, Madison; Chen, Jie; Liu, Cheng Z; Fung, Kar-Ming; Hassell, Lewis A

    2014-01-01

    Human melanoma contains multipotent stem cells that express the neural crest stem cell marker CD271. CD271-expressing melanoma cells in murine xenografts give rise to metastatic tumor. However, a comprehensive clinical investigation of its role in different stages of melanomagenesis has not been well studied. We studied CD271 expression with immunohistochemistry in 11 cases of banal melanocytic nevus, 9 cases of primary cutaneous melanoma, 10 cases of primary mucosal melanoma, 5 cases of metastatic melanoma in regional lymph nodes, and 11 cases of metastatic melanoma in the brain. In addition, 9 cases of metastatic, high-grade adenocarcinomas from breast and lung to the brain were studied as controls. The staining was scored based on the number of positive cells and analyzed by student t-test. All banal melanocytic nevi showed negative to equivocal staining. Primary cutaneous melanomas showed variable patterns, mucosal melanomas were mostly negative, and metastases to lymph nodes ranged from negative to moderate positivity. In contrast, all 11 cases of metastatic melanoma to the brain showed moderate (4 cases) to strong positivity (7 cases). Metastases from lung and breast origin were used as controls and showed negative to weakly positive staining in all but one case. Statistically, CD271 has significantly increased expression in metastatic melanoma to the brain when compared to the other groups studied (P < 0.05). The findings suggest that CD271 expression is specifically increased in metastatic melanoma to the brain. Further prospective study for the role of CD271 in prediction of melanoma brain metastasis as well as prognosis assessment will be of great clinical significance. PMID:25674270

  14. Increased expression of melanoma stem cell marker CD271 in metastatic melanoma to the brain.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ruifeng; Fierro-Fine, Amelia; Goddard, Lindsey; Russell, Madison; Chen, Jie; Liu, Cheng Z; Fung, Kar-Ming; Hassell, Lewis A

    2014-01-01

    Human melanoma contains multipotent stem cells that express the neural crest stem cell marker CD271. CD271-expressing melanoma cells in murine xenografts give rise to metastatic tumor. However, a comprehensive clinical investigation of its role in different stages of melanomagenesis has not been well studied. We studied CD271 expression with immunohistochemistry in 11 cases of banal melanocytic nevus, 9 cases of primary cutaneous melanoma, 10 cases of primary mucosal melanoma, 5 cases of metastatic melanoma in regional lymph nodes, and 11 cases of metastatic melanoma in the brain. In addition, 9 cases of metastatic, high-grade adenocarcinomas from breast and lung to the brain were studied as controls. The staining was scored based on the number of positive cells and analyzed by student t-test. All banal melanocytic nevi showed negative to equivocal staining. Primary cutaneous melanomas showed variable patterns, mucosal melanomas were mostly negative, and metastases to lymph nodes ranged from negative to moderate positivity. In contrast, all 11 cases of metastatic melanoma to the brain showed moderate (4 cases) to strong positivity (7 cases). Metastases from lung and breast origin were used as controls and showed negative to weakly positive staining in all but one case. Statistically, CD271 has significantly increased expression in metastatic melanoma to the brain when compared to the other groups studied (P < 0.05). The findings suggest that CD271 expression is specifically increased in metastatic melanoma to the brain. Further prospective study for the role of CD271 in prediction of melanoma brain metastasis as well as prognosis assessment will be of great clinical significance.

  15. Biology, Therapy and Implications of Tumor Exosomes in the Progression of Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Isola, Allison L.; Eddy, Kevinn; Chen, Suzie

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States, and about 6% of the estimated cancer diagnoses this year will be melanoma cases. Melanomas are derived from transformation of the pigment producing cells of the skin, melanocytes. Early stage melanoma is usually curable by surgical resection, but late stage or subsequent secondary metastatic tumors are treated with some success with chemotherapies, radiation and/or immunotherapies. Most cancer patients die from metastatic disease, which is especially the case in melanoma. A better understanding of tumor metastasis will provide insights and guide rational therapeutic designs. Recently, the importance of melanoma-derived exosomes in the progression of that cancer has become more apparent, namely, their role in various stages of metastasis, including the induction of migration, invasion, primary niche manipulation, immune modulation and pre-metastatic niche formation. This review focuses on the critical roles that melanoma exosomes play in the progression of this deadly disease. PMID:27941674

  16. Melanoma Stem Cells and Metastasis: Mimicking Hematopoietic Cell Trafficking?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nayoung; Barthel, Steven R.; Schatton, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is a highly metastatic cancer that bears responsibility for the majority of skin cancer-related deaths. Amidst the research efforts to better understand melanoma progression, there has been increasing evidence that hints at a role for a subpopulation of virulent cancer cells, termed malignant melanoma stem or initiating cells (MMICs), in metastasis formation. MMICs are characterized by their preferential ability to initiate and propagate tumor growth and their selective capacity for self-renewal and differentiation into less tumorigenic melanoma cells. The frequency of MMICs has been shown to correlate with poor clinical prognosis in melanoma. Additionally, MMICs are enriched among circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the peripheral blood of cancer patients, suggesting that MMICs may be a critical player in the metastatic cascade. Although these links exist between MMICs and metastatic disease, the mechanisms by which MMICs may advance metastatic progression are only beginning to be elucidated. Recent studies have shown that MMICs express molecules critical for hematopoietic cell maintenance and trafficking, providing a possible explanation for how circulating MMICs could drive melanoma dissemination. We therefore propose that MMICs might fuel melanoma metastasis by exploiting homing mechanisms commonly utilized by hematopoietic cells. Here we review the biological properties of MMICs and the existing literature on their metastatic potential. We will discuss possible mechanisms by which MMICs might initiate metastases in the context of established knowledge of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in other cancers and of hematopoietic homing molecules, with a particular focus on selectins, integrins, chemokines, and chemokine receptors known to be expressed by melanoma cells. Biological understanding of how these molecules might be utilized by MMICs to propel the metastatic cascade could critically impact the development of more effective therapies for advanced

  17. V3 versican isoform expression has a dual role in human melanoma tumor growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Miquel-Serra, Laia; Serra, Montserrat; Hernández, Daniel; Domenzain, Clelia; Docampo, María José; Rabanal, Rosa M; de Torres, Inés; Wight, Thomas N; Fabra, Angels; Bassols, Anna

    2006-09-01

    Versican is a large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan produced by several tumor cell types, including malignant melanoma, which exists as four different splice variants. The presence of versican in the extracellular matrix plays a role in tumor cell growth, adhesion and migration, which could be altered by altering the ratio between versican isoforms. We have previously shown that overexpression of the V3 isoform of versican in human melanoma cell lines markedly reduces cell growth in vitro and in vivo, since V3-overexpressing (LV3SN) cultured cells as well as primary tumors arising from these cells grow slower than their vector-only counterparts (LXSN). In the present work, we have extended these observations to demonstrate that the delayed cell growth is due to multiple events since differences in proliferative index as well as in apoptosis are observed in LV3SN cells and tumors compared to LXSN. For example, LV3SN melanoma cells exhibit delayed activation of MAPK in response to EGF, we have also characterized further the primary tumors originated in nude mice from V3-transduced melanoma cells to determine if other events affect the V3 tumor phenotype. For example, hyaluronan content of LV3SN tumors was higher than in LXSN tumors, whereas other related matrix components and vascularization were unaffected. Furthermore, lung metastasis in nude mice occurred only in animals carrying LV3SN tumors, indicating a dual role for this molecule, both as an inhibitor of tumor growth and a metastasis inductor.

  18. A Study of CD45RA+ Depleted Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors and Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-17

    Ewing Sarcoma; Gastrointestinal Tumor; Germ Cell Tumor; Hepatic Tumor; Lymphoma; Wilms Tumor; Rhabdoid Tumor; Clear Cell Carcinoma; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Melanoma; Neuroblastoma; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Non-rhabdomyosarcoma

  19. Effect of melanoma cells on proliferation and migration of activated hepatic stellate cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Theresa; Koch, Andreas; Ebert, Eva-Vanessa; Czech, Barbara; Mueller, Martina; Bosserhoff, Anja; Lang, Sven Arke; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2017-04-01

    Melanoma is a highly aggressive tumor of the skin. The clinical outcome is determined by the presence or absence of metastases, and the liver is a common site of distant metastases. Hepatic metastasis is causing activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC), which form the stroma of hepatic metastases and are increasingly recognized as a crucial component of the pro- metastatic liver microenvironment. Most studies have focused on the effects of HSC on (metastasizing) tumor cells. Here, we aimed to analyze functional in vitro effects of conditioned medium (CM) of twelve different human melanoma cell lines on LX2 cells and HSC(htert) cells, two well established human activated HSC cell lines. CM from melanoma cells significantly induced HSC proliferation and acted as chemoattractant for HSC in Boyden chamber assays. The CM effects significantly varied between different HSC as well as melanoma cells. Interestingly, CM from melanoma cell lines derived from melanoma metastases (WM239A, WM9, WM1158, WM1232, 451Lu and 1205Lu) had a stronger effect on proliferation of HSC(htert) cells than CM derived from primary melanoma tumors (SbCl2, WM3211, WM35, WM278, WM1366 and WM793). Moreover, we observed a significant correlation between the chemoattractive effects of CM from the different melanoma cells on HSC(htert) and LX2 cells. In contrast, the melanoma CM effects on the proliferation of the two HSC lines did not show a significant correlation. In summary, our data indicate that melanoma cells metastasizing to the liver have the potential to attract HSC and to induce HSC proliferation, respectively. Still, it appears that melanoma effects on HSC migration and proliferation are mediated via different soluble factors indicating the complexity of melanoma-HSC interaction. Furthermore, the intensity of at least some functional effects varies between different human tumor cells and HSC which may point to mechanisms explaining diverse hepatic metastasis in melanoma patients

  20. Noninvasive and label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ping; Liu, Rongrong; Niu, Zhenyu; Suo, Yuanzhen; He, Hao; Wei, Xunbin

    2015-03-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Circulating melanoma cell has high light absorption due to melanin highly contained in melanoma cells. This property is employed for the detection of circulating melanoma cell by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC). PAFC is based on photoacoustic effect. Compared to in vivo flow cytometry based on fluorescence, PAFC can employ high melanin content of melanoma cells as endogenous biomarkers to detect circulating melanoma cells in vivo. In our research, we developed in vitro experiments to prove the ability of PAFC system of detecting PA signals from melanoma cells. For in vivo experiments, we constructed a model of melanoma tumor bearing mice by inoculating highly metastatic murine melanoma cancer cells B16F10 with subcutaneous injection. PA signals were detected in the blood vessels of mouse ears in vivo. By counting circulating melanoma cells termly, we obtained the number variation of circulating melanoma cells as melanoma metastasized. Those results show that PAFC is a noninvasive and label-free method to detect melanoma metastases in blood or lymph circulation. Our PAFC system is an efficient tool to monitor melanoma metastases, cancer recurrence and therapeutic efficacy.

  1. The role of ING tumor suppressors in UV stress response and melanoma progression.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Wang, Yemin; Wong, Ronald P C; Li, Gang

    2009-05-01

    The INhibitor of Growth (ING) genes were discovered during the past decade and identified as type II tumor suppressor genes. Previous studies demonstrated that ING family members participate in various cellular stress responses and thus play important roles in the pathogenesis of various types of cancers, including melanoma. Epidemiological studies showed that UV radiation is the primary etiological factor in melanoma development. Here we review the studies on the role of ING proteins in cellular responses to UV irradiation, melanoma cell motility, and melanoma progression.

  2. CCL3 and CCL20-recruited dendritic cells modified by melanoma antigen gene-1 induce anti-tumor immunity against gastric cancer ex vivo and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To investigate whether dendritic cell (DC) precursors, recruited by injection of chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3) and CCL20, induce anti-tumor immunity against gastric cancer induced by a DC vaccine expressing melanoma antigen gene-1 (MAGE-1) ex vivo and in vivo. Methods B6 mice were injected with CCL3 and CCL20 via the tail vein. Freshly isolated F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells cultured with cytokines were analyzed by phenotype analysis and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). For adenoviral (Ad)-mediated gene transduction, cultured F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells were incubated with Ad-MAGE-1. Vaccination of stimulated DC induced T lymphocytes. The killing effect of these T cells against gastric carcinoma cells was assayed by MTT. INF-γ production was determined with an INF-γ ELISA kit. In the solid tumor and metastases model, DC-based vaccines were used for immunization after challenge with MFC cells. Tumor size, survival of mice, and number of pulmonary metastatic foci were used to assess the therapeutic effect of DC vaccines. Results F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cell numbers increased after CCL3 and CCL20 injection. Freshly isolated F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells cultured with cytokines were phenotyically identical to typical DC and gained the capacity to stimulate allogeneic T cells. These DCs were transduced with Ad-MAGE-1, which were prepared for DC vaccines expressing tumor antigen. T lymphocytes stimulated by DCs transduced with Ad-MAGE-1 exhibited specific killing effects on gastric carcinoma cells and produced high levels of INF-γ ex vivo. In vivo, tumor sizes of the experimental group were much smaller than both the positive control group and the negative control groups (P < 0.05). Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that survival of the experimental group mice was significantly longer than the control groups (P < 0.05). In addition, MAGE-1-transduced DCs were also a therapeutic benefit on an established metastatic tumor, resulting in a tremendous decrease in the number of pulmonary

  3. Melanoma cells influence the differentiation pattern of human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kodet, Ondřej; Lacina, Lukáš; Krejčí, Eliška; Dvořánková, Barbora; Grim, Miloš; Štork, Jiří; Kodetová, Daniela; Vlček, Čestmír; Šáchová, Jana; Kolář, Michal; Strnad, Hynek; Smetana, Karel

    2015-01-05

    Nodular melanoma is one of the most life threatening tumors with still poor therapeutic outcome. Similarly to other tumors, permissive microenvironment is essential for melanoma progression. Features of this microenvironment are arising from molecular crosstalk between the melanoma cells (MC) and the surrounding cell populations in the context of skin tissue. Here, we study the effect of melanoma cells on human primary keratinocytes (HPK). Presence of MC is as an important modulator of the tumor microenvironment and we compare it to the effect of nonmalignant lowly differentiated cells also originating from neural crest (NCSC). Comparative morphometrical and immunohistochemical analysis of epidermis surrounding nodular melanoma (n = 100) was performed. Data were compared to results of transcriptome profiling of in vitro models, in which HPK were co-cultured with MC, normal human melanocytes, and NCSC, respectively. Differentially expressed candidate genes were verified by RT-qPCR. Biological activity of candidate proteins was assessed on cultured HPK. Epidermis surrounding nodular melanoma exhibits hyperplastic features in 90% of cases. This hyperplastic region exhibits aberrant suprabasal expression of keratin 14 accompanied by loss of keratin 10. We observe that MC and NCSC are able to increase expression of keratins 8, 14, 19, and vimentin in the co-cultured HPK. This in vitro finding partially correlates with pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia observed in melanoma biopsies. We provide evidence of FGF-2, CXCL-1, IL-8, and VEGF-A participation in the activity of melanoma cells on keratinocytes. We conclude that the MC are able to influence locally the differentiation pattern of keratinocytes in vivo as well as in vitro. This interaction further highlights the role of intercellular interactions in melanoma. The reciprocal role of activated keratinocytes on biology of melanoma cells shall be verified in the future.

  4. Salmonella VNP20009-mediated RNA interference of ABCB5 moderated chemoresistance of melanoma stem cell and suppressed tumor growth more potently

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoxin; Cheng, Xiawei; Lai, Yueyang; Zhou, Yuqiang; Cao, Wenmin; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance remains an obstacle hindering the success of chemotherapy. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been recently found to confer resistance to chemotherapy. Therefore functional markers of CSCs should be discovered and specific therapies targeting these cells should be developed. In our investigation, a small population of B16F10 cells which was positive for ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 5 (ABCB5) was isolated. This population displayed characteristics similar to those of CSCs and ABCB5 was identified to confer tumor growth and drug resistance in B16F10 cell line. Although targeting ABCB5 by small short interfering RNA delivered by VNP20009 failed to inhibit tumor growth, the combined treatment of VNP-shABCB5 and chemotherapy can act synergistically to delay tumor growth and enhance survival time in a primary B16F10 mice model. Results suggest that the combined treatment of VNP-shABCB5 and chemotherapy can improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs. Therefore, this combination therapy is of potential significance for melanoma treatment. PMID:26910836

  5. Salmonella VNP20009-mediated RNA interference of ABCB5 moderated chemoresistance of melanoma stem cell and suppressed tumor growth more potently.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxin; Cheng, Xiawei; Lai, Yueyang; Zhou, Yuqiang; Cao, Wenmin; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2016-03-22

    Drug resistance remains an obstacle hindering the success of chemotherapy. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been recently found to confer resistance to chemotherapy. Therefore functional markers of CSCs should be discovered and specific therapies targeting these cells should be developed. In our investigation, a small population of B16F10 cells which was positive for ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 5 (ABCB5) was isolated. This population displayed characteristics similar to those of CSCs and ABCB5 was identified to confer tumor growth and drug resistance in B16F10 cell line. Although targeting ABCB5 by small short interfering RNA delivered by VNP20009 failed to inhibit tumor growth, the combined treatment of VNP-shABCB5 and chemotherapy can act synergistically to delay tumor growth and enhance survival time in a primary B16F10 mice model. Results suggest that the combined treatment of VNP-shABCB5 and chemotherapy can improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs. Therefore, this combination therapy is of potential significance for melanoma treatment.

  6. Immune response and long-term clinical outcome in advanced melanoma patients vaccinated with tumor-mRNA-transfected dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Kyte, Jon Amund; Aamdal, Steinar; Dueland, Svein; Sæbøe-Larsen, Stein; Inderberg, Else Marit; Madsbu, Ulf Erik; Skovlund, Eva; Gaudernack, Gustav; Kvalheim, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    The most effective anticancer immune responses are probably directed against patient-specific neoantigens. We have developed a melanoma vaccine targeting this individual mutanome based on dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with autologous tumor-mRNA. Here, we report a phase I/II trial evaluating toxicity, immune response and clinical outcome in 31 metastatic melanoma patients. The first cohort (n = 22) received the vaccine without any adjuvant; the next cohort (n = 9) received adjuvant IL2. Each subject received four weekly intranodal or intradermal injections, followed by optional monthly vaccines. Immune response was evaluated by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), T cell proliferation and cytokine assays. Data were collected for 10 y after inclusion of the last patient. No serious adverse events were detected. In the intention-to-treat-cohort, we demonstrated significantly superior survival compared to matched controls from a benchmark meta-analysis (1 y survival 43% vs. 24%, 2 y 23% vs. 6.6%). A tumor-specific immune response was demonstrated in 16/31 patients. The response rate was higher after intradermal than intranodal vaccination (80% vs. 38%). Immune responders had improved survival compared to non-responders (median 14 mo vs. 6 mo; p = 0.030), and all eight patients surviving >20 mo were immune responders. In addition to the tumor-specific response, most patients developed a response against autologous DC antigens. The cytokine profile was polyfunctional and did not follow a Th1/Th2 dichotomy. We conclude that the favorable safety profile and evidence of a possible survival benefit warrant further studies of the RNA/DC vaccine. The vaccine appears insufficient as monotherapy, but there is a strong rationale for combination with checkpoint modulators.

  7. PTEN functions as a melanoma tumor suppressor by promoting host immune response.

    PubMed

    Dong, Y; Richards, J-Ae; Gupta, R; Aung, P P; Emley, A; Kluger, Y; Dogra, S K; Mahalingam, M; Wajapeyee, N

    2014-09-18

    Cancer cells acquire several traits that allow for their survival and progression, including the ability to evade the host immune response. However, the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade host immune responses remain largely elusive. Here we study the phenomena of immune evasion in malignant melanoma cells. We find that the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is an important regulator of the host immune response against melanoma cells. Mechanistically, PTEN represses the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines by blocking the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. In melanoma cells lacking PTEN, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activates the transcription of immunosuppressive cytokines in a PI3K-dependent manner. Furthermore, conditioned media from PTEN-deficient, patient-derived short-term melanoma cultures and established melanoma cell lines blocked the production of the interleukin-12 (IL-12) in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Inhibition of IL-12 production was rescued by restoring PTEN or using neutralizing antibodies against the immunosuppressive cytokines. Furthermore, we report that PTEN, as an alternative mechanism to promote the host immune response against cancer cells, represses the expression of programmed cell death 1 ligand, a known repressor of the host immune response. Finally, to establish the clinical significance of our results, we analyzed malignant melanoma patient samples with or without brisk host responses. These analyses confirmed that PTEN loss is associated with a higher percentage of malignant melanoma samples with non-brisk host responses compared with samples with brisk host responses. Collectively, these results establish that PTEN functions as a melanoma tumor suppressor in part by regulating the host immune response against melanoma cells and highlight the importance of assessing PTEN status before recruiting melanoma patients for immunotherapies.

  8. Chemical Castration of melanoma patients does not increase the frequency of tumor-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells after peptide vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Vence, Luis; Wang, Chiyu; Pappu, Himabindu; Anson, Ryan; Patel, Tejal A.; Miller, Priscilla; Bassett, Roland; Lizee, Gregory; Overwijk, Willem W.; Komanduri, Krishna; Benjamin, Cara; Alvarado, Gladys; Patel, Sapna P.; Kim, Kevin; Papadopoulos, Nicholas E.; Bedikian, Agop Y.; Homsi, Jade; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Boyd, Richard; Radvanyi, Laszlo; Hwu, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Peptide vaccination against tumor associated antigens (TAA) remains one of the most common methods of immunization in cancer vaccine clinical trials. While peptide vaccination has been reported to increase circulating antigen-specific T-cells, they have had limited clinical efficacy and there is a necessity to increase their capacity to generate strong anti-tumor responses. We sought to improve the clinical efficacy of peptide-based vaccines in cancer immunotherapy of metastatic melanoma using a LHRH-agonist (Leuprolide) as adjuvant. Seventy HLA-A*0201+ Stage IIb-IV melanoma patients were vaccinated with class I HLA-A*0201-restricted gp100209-2M peptide and stratified for HLA-DP4 restriction. HLA-DP4+ patients were also vaccinated with class II HLA-DP4-restricted MAGE-3243-258 peptide. Patients from both groups were randomized to receive 2 doses of Leuprolide or not. Here we report the increase in PBMC TREC levels at week 24 after peptide vaccination which was independent of the Leuprolide treatment. This change was mirrored by a small increase in the TREC-enriched CD8+CD45RA+RO−CD27+CD103+, but not the TREC-enriched CD4+CD45RA+RO−CD31+ T cell population. Serum concentration of two important factors for thymopoiesis was measured: IGF-1 levels were not changed, while a moderate increase in IL-7 levels was noted in the sera of all patients 6 weeks after vaccination. Increased expression of CD127 (IL-7 receptor alpha) at week 24, compared to baseline, was only seen in the CD8+CD45RA+RO−CD27+CD103+ T cell population. Our results suggest that Leuprolide has no effect on thymic output when used as peptide vaccine adjuvant, but IFA-based peptide vaccination may unexpectedly affect the thymus by increasing thymic output of new T cells. PMID:23603862

  9. Cell Cycle Regulation and Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; McArthur, Grant

    2016-06-01

    Dysregulation of cell cycle control is a hallmark of melanomagenesis. Agents targeting the G1-S and G2-M checkpoints, as well as direct anti-mitotic agents, have all shown promising preclinical activity in melanoma. However, in vivo, standalone single agents targeting cell cycle regulation have only demonstrated modest efficacy in unselected patients. The advent of specific CDK 4/6 inhibitors targeting the G1-S transition, with an improved therapeutic index, is a significant step forward. Potential synergy exists with the combination of CDK4/6 inhibitors with existing therapies targeting the MAPK pathway, particularly in subsets of metastatic melanomas such as NRAS and BRAF mutants. This reviews summaries of the latest developments in both preclinical and clinical data with cell cycle-targeted therapies in melanoma.

  10. miR-137 suppresses tumor growth of malignant melanoma by targeting aurora kinase A

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Xiao; Zhang, Haiping; Lian, Shi; Zhu, Wei

    2016-07-01

    As an oncogene, aurora kinase A (AURKA) is overexpressed in various types of human cancers. However, the expression and roles of AURKA in malignant melanoma are largely unknown. In this study, a miR-137-AURKA axis was revealed to regulate melanoma growth. We found a significant increase in levels of AURKA in melanoma. Both genetic knockdown and pharmacologic inhibition of AURKA decreased tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Further found that miR-137 reduced AURKA expression through interaction with its 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) and that miR-137 was negatively correlated with AURKA expression in melanoma specimens. Overexpression of miR-137 decreased cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro. Notably, re-expression of AURKA significantly rescued miR-137-mediated suppression of cell growth and clonality. In summary, these results reveal that miR-137 functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting AURKA, providing new insights into investigation of therapeutic strategies against malignant melanoma. -- Highlights: •First reported overexpression of AURKA in melanoma. •Targeting AURKA inhibits melanoma growth in vitro and in vivo. •Further found miR-137 suppressed cell growth by binding to AURKA 3′UTR. •Re-expression of AURKA rescued miR-137-mediated suppression. •miR-137-AURKA axis may be potential therapeutic targets of melanoma.

  11. Melanoma stem cells: not rare, but well done.

    PubMed

    Girouard, Sasha D; Murphy, George F

    2011-05-01

    Since the identification of self-renewing cells in the hematopoietic system, stem cells have transformed the study of medicine. Cancer biologists have identified stem-like cells in multiple malignancies, including those of solid organs. This has led to the development of a stem cell theory of cancer, which purports that a subpopulation of self-renewing tumor cells is responsible for tumorigenesis. This contrasts with the stochastic model of tumor development, which advances that all tumor cells are capable of tumor formation. Within the field of melanoma, the identity and existence of cancer stem cells has been the subject of recent debate. Much of the controversy may be traced to differences in interpretations and definitions related to the cancer stem cell theory, and the use of dissimilar methodologies to study melanoma cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that cancer stem cells may exist in melanoma, although their frequency may vary and they may be capable of phenotypic plasticity. Importantly, these primitive melanoma cells are not only capable of self-renewal and differentiation plasticity, but also may confer virulence via immune evasion and multidrug resistance, and potentially via vasculogenic mimicry and transition to migratory and metastasizing derivatives. Therapeutic targeting of melanoma stem cells and the pathways that endow them with virulence hold promise for the design of more effective strategies for amelioration and eradication of this most lethal form of skin cancer.

  12. The NF1 gene in tumor syndromes and melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kiuru, Maija; Busam, Klaus J

    2017-02-01

    Activation of the RAS/MAPK pathway is critical in melanoma. Melanoma can be grouped into four molecular subtypes based on their main genetic driver: BRAF-mutant, NRAS-mutant, NF1-mutant, and triple wild-type tumors. The NF1 protein, neurofibromin 1, negatively regulates RAS proteins through GTPase activity. Germline mutations in NF1 cause neurofibromatosis type I, a common genetic tumor syndrome caused by dysregulation of the RAS/MAPK pathway, ie, RASopathy. Melanomas with NF1 mutations typically occur on chronically sun-exposed skin or in older individuals, show a high mutation burden, and are wild-type for BRAF and NRAS. Additionally, NF1 mutations characterize certain clinicopathologic melanoma subtypes, specifically desmoplastic melanoma. This review discusses the current knowledge of the NF1 gene and neurofibromin 1 in neurofibromatosis type I and in melanoma.

  13. Different efficacy of in vivo herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene transduction and ganciclovir treatment on the inhibition of tumor growth of murine and human melanoma cells and rat glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Berenstein, M; Adris, S; Ledda, F; Wolfmann, C; Medina, J; Bravo, A; Mordoh, J; Chernajovsky, Y; Podhajcer, O L

    1999-01-01

    Initial studies have demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy for cancer treatment of in vivo transfer of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene followed by ganciclovir (GCV) treatment. However, recent studies have questioned the validity of this approach. Using retroviral vector-producing cells (VPC) as a source for in vivo gene transfer, we evaluated the efficacy of in vivo transduction of malignant cells using three different tumor cell models: B16 murine and IIB-MEL-LES human melanomas and a C6 rat glioblastoma. In vitro studies showed a bystander effect only in C6 cells. In vivo studies showed an inhibition of tumor growth in the two melanoma models when tumor cells were coinjected with VPC-producing retroviral vectors carrying the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene, followed by GCV treatment; however, 100% of mice developed tumors in both models. Under similar experimental conditions, 70% (7 of 10) of syngeneic rats completely rejected stereotactically transferred C6 tumor cells; most of them (5 of 10) showed a prolonged survival. Treating established C6 tumors with VPC-producing retroviral vectors carrying the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene and GCV led to the cure of 33% (4 of 12) of the animals. Rats that rejected tumor growth developed an antitumor immune memory, leading to a rejection of a stereotactic contralateral challenge with parental cells. The immune infiltrate, which showed the presence of T lymphocytes, macrophages, and polymorphonuclear cells at the site of the first injection and mainly T lymphocytes and macrophages at the site of tumor challenge, strengthened the importance of the immune system in achieving complete tumor rejection.

  14. Effects of Malignant Melanoma Initiating Cells on T-Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Schatton, Tobias; Schütte, Ute; Frank, Markus H.

    2016-01-01

    Although human malignant melanoma is a highly immunogenic cancer, both the endogenous antitumor immune response and melanoma immunotherapy often fail to control neoplastic progression. Accordingly, characterizing melanoma cell subsets capable of evading antitumor immunity could unravel optimized treatment strategies that might reduce morbidity and mortality from melanoma. By virtue of their preferential capacity to modulate antitumor immune responses and drive inexorable tumor growth and progression, malignant melanoma-initiating cells (MMICs) warrant closer investigation to further elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying melanoma immune evasion and immunotherapy resistance. Here we describe methodologies that enable the characterization of immunoregulatory effects of purified MMICs versus melanoma bulk populations in coculture with syngeneic or allogeneic lymphocytes, using [3H] thymidine incorporation, enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT), or ELISA assays. These assays were traditionally developed to analyze alloimmune processes and we successfully adapted them for the study of tumor-mediated immunomodulatory functions. PMID:26786883

  15. Functional features of cancer stem cells in melanoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zimmerer, Rüdiger M; Korn, Philippe; Demougin, Philippe; Kampmann, Andreas; Kokemüller, Horst; Eckardt, André M; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Tavassol, Frank

    2013-08-06

    Recent evidence suggests a subset of cells within a tumor with "stem-like" characteristics. These cells are able to transplant tumors in immunodeficient hosts. Distinct from non-malignant stem cells, cancer stem cells (CSC) show low proliferative rates, high self-renewing capacity, propensity to differentiate into actively proliferating tumor cells, and resistance to chemotherapy or radiation. They are often characterized by elevated expression of stem cell surface markers, in particular CD133, and sets of differentially expressed stem cell-associated genes. CSC are usually rare in clinical specimens and hardly amenable to functional studies and gene expression profiling. In this study, a panel of heterogenous melanoma cell lines was screened for typical CSC features. Nine heterogeneous metastatic melanoma cell lines including D10 and WM115 were studied. Cell lines were phenotyped using flow cytometry and clonogenic assays were performed by limiting dilution analysis on magnetically sorted cells. Spheroidal growth was investigated in pretreated flasks. Gene expression profiles were assessed by using real-time rt-PCR and DNA microarrays. Magnetically sorted tumor cells were subcutaneously injected into the flanks of immunodeficient mice. Comparative immunohistochemistry was performed on xenografts and primary human melanoma sections. D10 cells expressed CD133 with a significantly higher clonogenic capacity as compared to CD133- cells. Na8, D10, and HBL cells formed spheroids on poly-HEMA-coated flasks. D10, Me39, RE, and WM115 cells expressed at least 2 of the 3 regulatory core transcription factors SOX2, NANOG, and OCT4 involved in the maintenance of stemness in mesenchymal stem cells. Gene expression profiling on CD133+ and CD133- D10 cells revealed 68 up- and 47 downregulated genes (+/-1.3 fold). Two genes, MGP and PROM1 (CD133), were outstandingly upregulated. CD133+ D10 cells formed tumors in NSG mice contrary to CD133- cells and CD133 expression was detected

  16. Cancer stem cell as therapeutic target for melanoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Alamodi, Abdulhadi A; Eshaq, Abdulaziz M; Hassan, Sofie-Yasmin; Al Hmada, Youssef; El Jamal, Siraj M; Fothan, Ahmed M; Arain, Omair M; Hassan, Sarah-Lilly; Haikel, Youssef; Megahed, Mosaad; Hassan, Mohamed

    2016-12-01

    Human malignant melanoma is a highly aggressive skin tumor that is characterized by its extraordinary heterogeneity, propensity for dissemination to distant organs and resistance to cytotoxic agents. Although chemo- and immune-based therapies have been evaluated in clinical trials, most of these therapeutics do not show significant benefit for patients with advanced disease. Treatment failure in melanoma patients is attributed mainly to the development of tumor heterogeneity resulting from the formation of genetically divergent subpopulations. These subpopulations are composed of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) as a small fraction and non-cancer stem cells that form the majority of the tumor mass. In recent years, CSCs gained more attention and suggested as valuable experimental model system for tumor study. In melanoma, intratumoral heterogeneity, progression and drug resistance result from the unique characteristics of melanoma stem cells (MSCs). These MSCs are characterized by their distinct protein signature and tumor growth-driving pathways, whose activation is mediated by driver mutation-dependent signal. The molecular features of MSCs are either in a causal or consequential relationship to melanoma progression, drug resistance and relapse. Here, we review the current scientific evidence that supports CSC hypothesis and the validity of MSCs-dependent pathways and their key molecules as potential therapeutic target for melanoma treatment.

  17. Contrary melanoma-associated antigen-A expression at the tumor front and center: A comparative analysis of stage I and IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Stefan; Brisam, Muna; Rauthe, Stephan; Driemel, Oliver; Brands, Roman C.; Rosenwald, Andreas; Kübler, Alexander C.; Müller-Richter, Urs D. A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence indicating that several melanoma-associated antigen-A (MAGE-A) subgroups contribute to the malignancy of head and neck cancer. The present study retrospectively analyzed the expression of all known MAGE-A subgroups in the tumor front and center of 38 head and neck cancer patients (Union for International Cancer Control stage I or IV) by immunohistochemistry. MAGE-A1, -A6, -A8, -A9 and -A11 were expressed at significantly higher levels at the tumor front of stage IV specimens compared with the tumor front of stage I specimens. In stage I cancer, the tumor center and front ratio (C/F ratio) for each subgroup was >1.0. In stage IV cancer, the C/F ratio was <1.0 in 9/11 subgroups. The most significant change in the expression pattern was observed for MAGE-A11. These results indicated that there is a marked alteration and shift to the invasive front of almost all MAGE-A subgroups, but particularly MAGE-A11, during the progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27703530

  18. CD271 on melanoma cell is an IFN-γ-inducible immunosuppressive factor that mediates downregulation of melanoma antigens.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Junpei; Inozume, Takashi; Harada, Kazutoshi; Shimada, Shinji

    2014-05-01

    IFN-γ released from cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) during the effector phase is essential for rejecting bulky melanoma tumors. In contrast, IFN-γ is known to induce certain immunosuppressive factors in tumor cells such as programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1). In this study, we have identified candidates for IFN-γ-inducible CTL-suppressive factors in melanoma cells using complementary DNA microarray analysis, and CD271/p75/neurotrophin receptor (NTR) was one of the candidate genes. Recently, CD271 was identified as a marker of the cancer stem cell-like population in human melanoma tissues. In this study, we showed that overexpression of CD271 on melanoma cells suppressed the in vitro activation of melanoma-specific CTLs. This suppression was mediated by CD271 ligation with activated CTL-derived nerve growth factor and the subsequent downregulation of melanoma antigens. Moreover, we found that the expression levels of PD-L1 on melanoma cells correlated with those of CD271, and they additively suppressed the activation of melanoma-specific CTLs. To the best of our knowledge, the role of overexpression of CD271 in an anti-melanoma T-cell response has been unreported.

  19. Paraganglioma-like dermal melanocytic tumor: a unique entity distinct from cellular blue nevus, clear cell sarcoma, and cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Deyrup, Andrea T; Althof, Pamela; Zhou, Ming; Morgan, Michael; Solomon, Alvin R; Bridge, Julia A; Weiss, Sharon W

    2004-12-01

    We are reporting a previously undescribed primary dermal melanocytic tumor identified by reviewing all dermal melanocytic tumors referred in consultation that did not qualify histologically as a previously described entity. From these cases, 8 were remarkably similar. We termed them "paraganglioma-like dermal melanocytic tumor" (PDMT) based on their nested growth pattern. This term is used descriptively and does not imply any histogenetic or biologic similarity to true paraganglioma. PDMT is primarily a tumor of the extremities of adult females (18-53 years, mean 35 years; males 2; females 6) which present as a dermal nodule (range, 0.5-4.2 cm; mean, 1.4 cm) composed of nests of clear to amphophilic oval cells separated by delicate fibrous strands. Nuclear atypia was mild and mitotic activity low (1-4 mitoses/10 HPF). Melanin was not obvious on light microscopy. Tumors expressed S-100 protein (8 of 8), Melan-A (4 of 8), HMB-45 (8 of 8), and microphthalmia transcription factor (8 of 8) and lacked pancytokeratin (8 of 8) and smooth muscle actin (8 of 8). FISH analysis of 5 cases revealed an intact EWS gene locus, supporting absence of the clear cell sarcoma 12;22 translocation. Follow-up information in 8 patients (range, 35-92 months; mean, 54 months) indicated that all were alive without disease. PDMT comprises a clinically and pathologically unique subtype of dermal melanocytic tumors. Our study suggests a benign course, although a lesion of low malignant potential cannot be excluded.

  20. Extracellular acidity strengthens mesenchymal stem cells to promote melanoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Peppicelli, Silvia; Bianchini, Francesca; Toti, Alessandra; Laurenzana, Anna; Fibbi, Gabriella; Calorini, Lido

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) participate to tumor stroma development and several evidence suggests that they play a role in facilitating cancer progression. Because melanoma often shows extracellular pH low enough to influence host cell as tumor cell behavior, the aim of this study is to elucidate whether acidity affects cross talk between MSC and melanoma cells to disclose new liaisons promoting melanoma progression, and to offer new therapeutic opportunities. We found that MSC grown in a low pH medium (LpH-MSC) stimulate melanoma xenografts more than MSC grown in a standard pH medium. LpH-MSC express a higher level of TGFβ that is instrumental of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like phenotype induction in melanoma cells. LpH-MSC profile also shows a switching to an oxidative phosphorylation metabolism that was accompanied by a forced glycolytic pathway of melanoma cells grown in LpH-MSC-conditioned medium. Metformin, an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiratory chain was able to reconvert oxidative metabolism and abrogate TGFβ expression in LpH-MSC. In addition, esomeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor activated in acidosis, blocked TGFβ expression in LpH-MSC through the downregulation of IkB. Both agents, metformin and esomeprazole, inhibited EMT profile in melanoma cells grown in LpH-MSC medium, and reduced glycolytic markers. Thus, acidosis of tumor microenvironment potentiates the pro-tumoral activity of MSC and orchestrates for a new potential symbiosis, which could be target to limit melanoma progression. PMID:26496168

  1. Metastatic melanoma mimicking solitary fibrous tumor: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Bekers, Elise M; van Engen-van Grunsven, Adriana C H; Groenen, Patricia J T A; Westdorp, Harm; Koornstra, Rutger H T; Bonenkamp, Johannes J; Flucke, Uta; Blokx, Willeke A M

    2014-02-01

    Malignant melanomas are known for their remarkable morphological variation and aberrant immunophenotype with loss of lineage-specific markers, especially in recurrences and metastases. Hot spot mutations in BRAF, NRAS, GNAQ, and GNA11 and mutations in KIT are oncogenic events in melanomas. Therefore, genotyping can be a useful ancillary diagnostic tool. We present one case each of recurrent and metastatic melanoma, both showing histological and immunohistochemical features of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT). Mutational analysis detected BRAF and NRAS mutations in the primary and secondary lesions, respectively. This result confirmed the diagnosis of recurrent/metastastic melanoma.

  2. Tumor-suppressive effects of natural-type interferon-β through CXCL10 in melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Hikaru; Nobeyama, Yoshimasa Nakagawa, Hidemi

    2015-08-21

    Introduction: Type 1 interferon is in widespread use as adjuvant therapy to inhibit melanoma progression. Considering the tumor-suppressive effects of local administration of interferon-β (IFN-β) on lymphatic metastasis, the present study was conducted to identify melanoma-suppressive molecules that are up-regulated by IFN-β treatment of lymphatic endothelial cells. Materials and methods: Lymphatic endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and melanoma cells were treated with natural-type IFN-β, and melanoma cells were treated with CXCL10. Genome-wide oligonucleotide microarray analysis was performed using lymphatic endothelial cells with or without IFN-β treatment. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were performed to examine CXCL10 expression. A proliferation assay was performed to examine the effects of IFN-β and CXCL10 in melanoma cells. Results: Genome-wide microarray analyses detected CXCL10 as a gene encoding a secretory protein that was up-regulated by IFN-β in lymphatic endothelial cells. IFN-β treatment significantly induced CXCL10 in dermal lymphatic endothelial cells and melanoma cells that are highly sensitive to IFN-β. CXCL10 reduced melanoma cell proliferation in IFN-β-sensitive cells as well as resistant cells. Melanoma cells in which CXCL10 was knocked down were sensitive to IFN-β. CXCR3-B, which encodes the CXCL10 receptor, was up-regulated in melanoma cells with high sensitivity to IFN-β and down-regulated in melanoma cells with medium to low sensitivity. Conclusions: Our data suggest that IFN-β suppresses proliferation and metastasis from the local lymphatic system and melanoma cells via CXCL10. Down-regulation of CXCR3-B by IFN-β may be associated with resistance to IFN-β. - Highlights: • We search melanoma-suppressive molecules induced by IFN-β. • IFN-β induces a high amount of CXCL10 from lymphatic endothelial cells. • CXCL10 induction level in melanoma cells is correlated

  3. Nifuroxazide exerts potent anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongxia; Ye, Tinghong; Yu, Xi; Lei, Qian; Yang, Fangfang; Xia, Yong; Song, Xuejiao; Liu, Li; Deng, Hongxia; Gao, Tiantao; Peng, Cuiting; Zuo, Weiqiong; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Lidan; Wang, Ningyu; Zhao, Lifeng; Xie, Yongmei; Yu, Luoting; Wei, Yuquan

    2016-02-02

    Melanoma is a highly malignant neoplasm of melanocytes with considerable metastatic potential and drug resistance, explaining the need for new candidates that inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. The signal transducer and activator of the transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling pathway plays an important role in melanoma and has been validated as promising anticancer target for melanoma therapy. In this study, nifuroxazide, an antidiarrheal agent identified as an inhibitor of Stat3, was evaluated for its anti-melanoma activity in vitro and in vivo. It had potent anti-proliferative activity against various melanoma cell lines and could induce G2/M phase arrest and cell apoptosis. Moreover, nifuroxazide markedly impaired melanoma cell migration and invasion by down-regulating phosphorylated-Src, phosphorylated-FAK, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -2, MMP-9 and vimentin. It also significantly inhibited tumor growth without obvious side effects in the A375-bearing mice model by inducing apoptosis and reducing cell proliferation and metastasis. Notably, nifuroxazide significantly inhibited pulmonary metastases, which might be associated with the decrease of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These findings suggested that nifuroxazide might be a potential agent for inhibiting the growth and metastasis of melanoma.

  4. Nifuroxazide exerts potent anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yongxia; Ye, Tinghong; Yu, Xi; Lei, Qian; Yang, Fangfang; Xia, Yong; Song, Xuejiao; Liu, Li; Deng, Hongxia; Gao, Tiantao; Peng, Cuiting; Zuo, Weiqiong; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Lidan; Wang, Ningyu; Zhao, Lifeng; Xie, Yongmei; Yu, Luoting; Wei, Yuquan

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly malignant neoplasm of melanocytes with considerable metastatic potential and drug resistance, explaining the need for new candidates that inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. The signal transducer and activator of the transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling pathway plays an important role in melanoma and has been validated as promising anticancer target for melanoma therapy. In this study, nifuroxazide, an antidiarrheal agent identified as an inhibitor of Stat3, was evaluated for its anti-melanoma activity in vitro and in vivo. It had potent anti-proliferative activity against various melanoma cell lines and could induce G2/M phase arrest and cell apoptosis. Moreover, nifuroxazide markedly impaired melanoma cell migration and invasion by down-regulating phosphorylated-Src, phosphorylated-FAK, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -2, MMP-9 and vimentin. It also significantly inhibited tumor growth without obvious side effects in the A375-bearing mice model by inducing apoptosis and reducing cell proliferation and metastasis. Notably, nifuroxazide significantly inhibited pulmonary metastases, which might be associated with the decrease of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These findings suggested that nifuroxazide might be a potential agent for inhibiting the growth and metastasis of melanoma. PMID:26830149

  5. Immunization with analog peptide in combination with CpG and montanide expands tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Fourcade, Julien; Kudela, Pavol; Andrade Filho, Pedro A; Janjic, Bratislav; Land, Stephanie R; Sander, Cindy; Krieg, Arthur; Donnenberg, Albert; Shen, Hongmei; Kirkwood, John M; Zarour, Hassane M

    2008-10-01

    Analog peptides represent a promising tool to further optimize peptide-based vaccines in promoting the expansion of tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Here, we report the results of a pilot trial designed to study the immunogenicity of the analog peptide NY-ESO-1 157-165V in combination with CpG 7909/PF3512676 and Montanide ISA 720 in patients with stage III/IV NY-ESO-1-expressing melanoma. Eight patients were immunized either with Montanide and CpG (arm 1, 3 patients); Montanide and peptide NY-ESO-1 157-165V (arm 2, 2 patients); or with Montanide, CpG, and peptide NY-ESO-1 157-165V (arm 3, 3 patients). Only the 3 patients immunized with Montanide, CpG, and peptide NY-ESO-1 157-165V in arm 3 developed a rapid increase of effector-memory NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells, detectable ex vivo. The majority of these cells exhibited an intermediate/late-stage differentiated phenotype (CD28-). Our study further demonstrated that our vaccine approach stimulated spontaneous tumor-reactive NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells in 2 patients with advanced disease, but failed to prime tumor-reactive NY-ESO-1-specific T cells in 1 patient with no spontaneously tumor-induced CD8+ T-cell responses to NY-ESO-1. Collectively, our data support the capability of the analog peptide NY-ESO-1 157-165V in combination with CpG and Montanide to promote the expansion of NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells in patients with advanced cancer. They also suggest that the presence of tumor-induced NY-ESO-1-specific T cells of well-defined clonotypes is critical for the expansion of tumor-reactive NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells after peptide-based vaccine strategies.

  6. Chemical castration of melanoma patients does not increase the frequency of tumor-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells after peptide vaccination.

    PubMed

    Vence, Luis M; Wang, Chiyu; Pappu, Himabindu; Anson, Ryan E; Patel, Tejal A; Miller, Priscilla; Bassett, Roland; Lizee, Gregory; Overwijk, Willem W; Komanduri, Krishna; Benjamin, Cara; Alvarado, Gladys; Patel, Sapna P; Kim, Kevin; Papadopoulos, Nicholas E; Bedikian, Agop Y; Homsi, Jade; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Boyd, Richard; Radvanyi, Laszlo; Hwu, Patrick

    2013-05-01

    Peptide vaccination against tumor-associated antigens remains one of the most common methods of immunization in cancer vaccine clinical trials. Although peptide vaccination has been reported to increase circulating antigen-specific T-cells, they have had limited clinical efficacy and there is a necessity to increase their capacity to generate strong antitumor responses. We sought to improve the clinical efficacy of peptide-based vaccines in cancer immunotherapy of metastatic melanoma using a LHRH agonist (leuprolide) as adjuvant. Seventy HLA-A*0201 stage IIb-IV melanoma patients were vaccinated with class I HLA-A*0201-restricted gp100209-2M peptide and stratified for HLA-DP4 restriction. HLA-DP4 patients were also vaccinated with class II HLA-DP4-restricted MAGE-3243-258 peptide. Patients from both groups were randomized to receive 2 doses of leuprolide or not. Here we report the increase in PBMC TREC levels at week 24 after peptide vaccination, which was independent of the leuprolide treatment. This change was mirrored by a small increase in the TREC-enriched CD8CD45RAROCD27CD103, but not the TREC-enriched CD4CD45RAROCD31 T-cell population. Serum concentration of 2 important factors for thymopoiesis was measured: insulin growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels were not changed, whereas a moderate increase in IL-7 levels was noted in the sera of all patients 6 weeks after vaccination. Increased expression of CD127 (IL-7 receptor-α) at week 24, compared with baseline, was only seen in the CD8CD45RAROCD27CD103 T-cell population. Our results suggest that leuprolide has no effect on thymic output when used as peptide vaccine adjuvant, but IFA-based peptide vaccination may unexpectedly affect the thymus by increasing thymic output of new T cells.

  7. CD204 suppresses large heat shock protein-facilitated priming of tumor antigen gp100-specific T cells and chaperone vaccine activity against mouse melanoma.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jie; Yi, Huanfa; Guo, Chunqing; Yu, Xiaofei; Zuo, Daming; Chen, Xing; Kane, John M; Repasky, Elizabeth A; Subjeck, John R; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2011-09-15

    We previously reported that scavenger receptor A (SRA/CD204), a binding structure on dendritic cells (DCs) for large stress/heat shock proteins (HSPs; e.g., hsp110 and grp170), attenuated an antitumor response elicited by large HSP-based vaccines. In this study, we show that SRA/CD204 interacts directly with exogenous hsp110, and lack of SRA/CD204 results in a reduction in the hsp110 binding and internalization by DCs. However, SRA(-/-) DCs pulsed with hsp110 or grp170-reconstituted gp100 chaperone complexes exhibit a profoundly increased capability of stimulating melanoma Ag gp100-specific naive T cells compared with wild-type (WT) DCs. Similar results were obtained when SRA/CD204 was silenced in DCs using short hairpin RNA-encoding lentiviruses. In addition, hsp110-stimulated SRA(-/-) DCs produced more inflammatory cytokines associated with increased NF-κB activation, implicating an immunosuppressive role for SRA/CD204. Immunization with the hsp110-gp100 vaccine resulted in a more robust gp100-specific CD8(+) T cell response in SRA(-/-) mice than in WT mice. Lastly, SRA/CD204 absence markedly improved the therapeutic efficacy of the hsp110-gp100 vaccine in mice established with B16 melanoma, which was accompanied by enhanced activation and tumor infiltration of CD8(+) T cells. Given the presence of multiple HSP-binding scavenger receptors on APCs, we propose that selective scavenger receptor interactions with HSPs may lead to highly distinct immunological consequences. Our findings provide new insights into the immune regulatory functions of SRA/CD204 and have important implications in the rational design of protein Ag-targeted recombinant chaperone vaccines for the treatment of cancer.

  8. Enrichment of circulating melanoma cells (CMCs) using negative selection from patients with metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Powrnima; Jacobs, Barbara; Derakhshan, Adeeb; Moore, Lee R.; Elson, Paul; Triozzi, Pierre L.; Borden, Ernest; Zborowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells have emerged as prognostic biomarkers in the treatment of metastatic cancers of epithelial origins viz., breast, colorectal and prostate. These tumors express Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) on their cell surface which is used as an antigen for immunoaffinity capture. However, EpCAM capture technologies are of limited utility for non-epithelial cancers such as melanoma. We report a method to enrich Circulating Melanoma Cells (CMCs) that does not presuppose malignant cell characteristics. CMCs were enriched by centrifugation of blood samples from healthy (N = 10) and patient (N = 11) donors, followed by RBC lysis and immunomagnetic depletion of CD45-positive leukocytes in a specialized magnetic separator. CMCs were identified by immunocytochemistry using Melan-A or S100B as melanoma markers and enumerated using automated microscopy image analyses. Separation was optimized for maximum sensitivity and recovery of CMCs. Our results indicate large number of CMCs in Stage IV melanoma patients. Analysis of survival suggested a trend toward decreased survival with increased number of CMCs. Moreover, melanoma-associated miRs were found to be higher in CMC-enriched fractions in two patients when compared with the unseparated samples, validating this method as applicable for molecular analyses. Negative selection is a promising approach for isolation of CMCs and other EpCAM -negative CTCs, and is amenable to molecular analysis of CMCs. Further studies are required to validate its efficacy at capturing specific circulating cells for genomic analysis, and xenograft studies. PMID:24811334

  9. Enrichment of circulating melanoma cells (CMCs) using negative selection from patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Powrnima; Jacobs, Barbara; Derakhshan, Adeeb; Moore, Lee R; Elson, Paul; Triozzi, Pierre L; Borden, Ernest; Zborowski, Maciej

    2014-05-15

    Circulating tumor cells have emerged as prognostic biomarkers in the treatment of metastatic cancers of epithelial origins viz., breast, colorectal and prostate. These tumors express Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) on their cell surface which is used as an antigen for immunoaffinity capture. However, EpCAM capture technologies are of limited utility for non-epithelial cancers such as melanoma. We report a method to enrich Circulating Melanoma Cells (CMCs) that does not presuppose malignant cell characteristics. CMCs were enriched by centrifugation of blood samples from healthy (N = 10) and patient (N = 11) donors, followed by RBC lysis and immunomagnetic depletion of CD45-positive leukocytes in a specialized magnetic separator. CMCs were identified by immunocytochemistry using Melan-A or S100B as melanoma markers and enumerated using automated microscopy image analyses. Separation was optimized for maximum sensitivity and recovery of CMCs. Our results indicate large number of CMCs in Stage IV melanoma patients. Analysis of survival suggested a trend toward decreased survival with increased number of CMCs. Moreover, melanoma-associated miRs were found to be higher in CMC-enriched fractions in two patients when compared with the unseparated samples, validating this method as applicable for molecular analyses. Negative selection is a promising approach for isolation of CMCs and other EpCAM -negative CTCs, and is amenable to molecular analysis of CMCs. Further studies are required to validate its efficacy at capturing specific circulating cells for genomic analysis, and xenograft studies.

  10. Inhibition of mouse B16 melanoma by sodium butyrate correlated to tumor associated macrophages differentiation suppression

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Fen; Mou, Yun-Zhu; Xiang, Xiao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: As one member of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) family, Sodium butyrate (NaB) was found out that could be used as a differentiation inducer of much cancer cell. But its effects on tumor microenvironment cells are not well recognized. The goal of this research is to investigate the effect of NaB on B16 melanoma and analysis its relevant mechanism. Methods: We observed the effect of sodium butyrate on B16 melanoma in vivo and in vitro. MTT method was performed to detect cell apoptosis rate after treatment. Tumor associated macrophage infiltration condition was detected by flow cytometry. Western-blotting and immunohistochemical method were used to detect the expression of tumor associated macrophage cytokines. Results: A certain concentration of sodium butyrate could effectively inhibit B16 melanoma growth in vivo and in vitro, and this inhibition effects related to the suppression of tumor associated macrophage differentiation. At the same time we observed the relevant macrophage factors were down-regulated compared to the control. Conclusion: Sodium butyrate could effectively inhibit B16 melanoma growth through suppressing tumor associated macrophage proliferation and reduce relevant pro-tumor macrophage factors expression, which may help to promote the clinical study of melanoma epigenetic therapy. PMID:26064327

  11. Inhibition of melanocortin 1 receptor slows melanoma growth, reduces tumor heterogeneity and increases survival

    PubMed Central

    Kansal, Rita G.; McCravy, Matthew S.; Basham, Jacob H.; Earl, Joshua A.; McMurray, Stacy L.; Starner, Chelsey J.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma risk is increased in patients with mutations of melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) yet the basis for the increased risk remains unknown. Here we report in vivo evidence supporting a critical role for MC1R in regulating melanoma tumor growth and determining overall survival time. Inhibition of MC1R by its physiologically relevant competitive inhibitor, agouti signaling protein (ASIP), reduced melanin synthesis and morphological heterogeneity in murine B16-F10 melanoma cells. In the lungs of syngeneic C57BL/6 mice, mCherry-marked, ASIP-secreting lung tumors inhibited MC1R on neighboring tumors lacking ASIP in a dose dependent manner as evidenced by a proportional loss of pigment in tumors from mice injected with 1:1, 3:1 and 4:1 mixtures of parental B16-F10 to ASIP-expressing tumor cells. ASIP-expressing B16-F10 cells formed poorly pigmented tumors in vivo that correlated with a 20% longer median survival than those bearing parental B16-F10 tumors (p=0.0005). Mice injected with 1:1 mixtures also showed survival benefit (p=0.0054), whereas injection of a 4:1 mixture showed no significant difference in survival. The longer survival time of mice bearing ASIP-expressing tumors correlated with a significantly slower growth rate than parental B16-F10 tumors as judged by quantification of numbers of tumors and total tumor load (p=0.0325), as well as a more homogeneous size and morphology of ASIP-expressing lung tumors. We conclude that MC1R plays an important role in regulating melanoma growth and morphology. Persistent inhibition of MC1R provided a significant survival advantage resulting in part from slower tumor growth, establishing MC1R as a compelling new molecular target for metastatic melanoma. PMID:27028866

  12. [The mechanism of anti-tumor immune response against mouse melanoma to xenogeneic vaccination].

    PubMed

    Luo, Feng; Mao, Yong-qiu; Kan, Bing; He, Qiu-Ming; Jiang, Yu; Peng, Feng; Yang, Li; Tian, Ling

    2004-11-01

    To investigate the immunological mechanism for inhibiting melanoma growth in mouse by vaccination with xenogeneic melanocytes. Xenogeneic vaccine was prepared from pig eye melanocytes. By means of indirect ELISA the antibodies against pig melanocytes and B16 melanoma cells in immunized mice sera were detected and the immunoglobulin subclass were analyzed. Then after purification, the immunoglobulins were used for the inhibition of cell proliferation in vitro. Analyses of cross-reactive antigen in both pig melanocytes and B16 melanoma cells were performed by Western blot. Xenogeneic vaccine was used before B16 melanoma challenge in C57 BL/c mice and then the growth of tumor was monitored. Meanwhile, other mice immunized with xenogeneic vaccine were depleted of NK cells or CD4+ or CD8+ T lymphocytes. The antibodies against pig melanocytes and B16 melanoma cells in mice sera were not detected by indirect ELISA until 2 weeks after first xenogeneic vaccination, and after the first finding, the antibody titers increased with the time of immunization. The anti-tumor activity and production of autoantibodies, conspicuously those of the elevated IgG, could be abrogated by the depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes. The cross-reactive antigen with 180 kda protein in both pig melanocytes and B16 melanoma cells was confirmed. Xenogeneic vaccination resulted in inhibition of tumor growth in 90% of the immunized mice. The protective immune response elicited in this fashion was dispelled in the mice depleted of CD4+ T lymphocytes. However this response was found in 70% of the mice depleted of CD8+ T lymphocytes, and the depletion NK cells did not influence the anti-tumor effect of the vaccine. The anti-tumor immune response is capable of inhibiting melanoma growth; both humoral immunity and cellular immunity could be induced by xenogeneic melanocytes vaccination. This immune response is mainly mediated by CD4+ T lymphocytes.

  13. Combining a BCL2 inhibitor with the retinoid derivative fenretinide targets melanoma cells including melanoma initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Nabanita; Reuland, Steven N; Lu, Yan; Luo, Yuchun; Lambert, Karoline; Fujita, Mayumi; Robinson, William A; Robinson, Steven E; Norris, David A; Shellman, Yiqun G

    2015-03-01

    Investigations from multiple laboratories support the existence of melanoma initiating cells (MICs) that potentially contribute to melanoma's drug resistance. ABT-737, a small molecule BCL-2/BCL-XL/BCL-W inhibitor, is promising in cancer treatments, but not very effective against melanoma, with the antiapoptotic protein MCL-1 as the main contributor to resistance. The synthetic retinoid fenretinide N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide (4-HPR) has shown promise for treating breast cancers. Here, we tested whether the combination of ABT-737 with 4-HPR is effective in killing both the bulk of melanoma cells and MICs. The combination synergistically decreased cell viability and caused cell death in multiple melanoma cells lines (carrying either BRAF or NRAS mutations) but not in normal melanocytes. The combination increased the NOXA expression and caspase-dependent MCL-1 degradation. Knocking down NOXA protected cells from combination-induced apoptosis, implicating the role of NOXA in the drug synergy. The combination treatment also disrupted primary spheres (a functional assay for MICs) and decreased the percentage of aldehyde dehydrogenase (high) cells (a marker of MICs) in melanoma cell lines. Moreover, the combination inhibited the self-renewal capacity of MICs, measured by secondary sphere-forming assays. In vivo, the combination inhibited tumor growth. Thus, this combination is a promising treatment strategy for melanoma, regardless of mutation status of BRAF or NRAS.

  14. Melanomas and Dysplastic Nevi Differ in Epidermal CD1c+ Dendritic Cell Count

    PubMed Central

    Dyduch, Grzegorz; Tyrak, Katarzyna Ewa; Glajcar, Anna; Szpor, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Background. Dendritic cells could be involved in immune surveillance of highly immunogenic tumors such as melanoma. Their role in the progression melanocytic nevi to melanoma is however a matter of controversy. Methods. The number of dendritic cells within epidermis, in peritumoral zone, and within the lesion was counted on slides immunohistochemically stained for CD1a, CD1c, DC-LAMP, and DC-SIGN in 21 of dysplastic nevi, 27 in situ melanomas, and 21 invasive melanomas. Results. We found a significant difference in the density of intraepidermal CD1c+ cells between the examined lesions; the mean CD1c cell count was 7.00/mm2 for invasive melanomas, 2.94 for in situ melanomas, and 13.35 for dysplastic nevi. The differences between dysplastic nevi and melanoma in situ as well as between dysplastic nevi and invasive melanoma were significant. There was no correlation in number of positively stained cells between epidermis and dermis. We did not observe any intraepidermal DC-LAMP+ cells neither in melanoma in situ nor in invasive melanoma as well as any intraepidermal DC-SIGN+ cells in dysplastic nevi. Conclusion. It was shown that the number of dendritic cells differs between dysplastic nevi, in situ melanomas, and invasive melanomas. This could eventually suggest their participation in the development of melanoma. PMID:28331853

  15. Phenotypic heterogeneity among tumorigenic melanoma cells from patients that is reversible and not hierarchically organized.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Elsa; Shackleton, Mark; Foster, Hannah R; Fullen, Douglas R; Sabel, Michael S; Johnson, Timothy M; Morrison, Sean J

    2010-11-16

    We investigated whether melanoma is hierarchically organized into phenotypically distinct subpopulations of tumorigenic and nontumorigenic cells or whether most melanoma cells retain tumorigenic capacity, irrespective of their phenotype. We found 28% of single melanoma cells obtained directly from patients formed tumors in NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) mice. All stage II, III, and IV melanomas obtained directly from patients had common tumorigenic cells. All tumorigenic cells appeared to have unlimited tumorigenic capacity on serial transplantation. We were unable to find any large subpopulation of melanoma cells that lacked tumorigenic potential. None of 22 heterogeneously expressed markers, including CD271 and ABCB5, enriched tumorigenic cells. Some melanomas metastasized in mice, irrespective of whether they arose from CD271(-) or CD271(+) cells. Many markers appeared to be reversibly expressed by tumorigenic melanoma cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression of basement membrane antigens in spindle cell melanoma.

    PubMed

    Prieto, V G; Woodruff, J M

    1998-07-01

    Spindle cell melanoma (SCM) is an uncommon form of melanoma that may be confused histologically with other tumors, including malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). Tumors with neural differentiation and melanocytic nevi may both show basement membrane immunohistochemically and at the ultrastructural level. However, most ultrastructural studies of melanoma have failed to demonstrate well formed basement membrane around tumor cells. The presence of basement membrane has been used by some authors as evidence favoring MPNST, as opposed to SCM. To evaluate this distinction immunohistochemically, 22 primary and metastatic cutaneous melanomas having a spindle cell component (SCM) were studied using monoclonal antibodies against laminin and Type IV collagen. S100 protein and HMB45 antigen expression were also studied. All but one of the SCM were reactive for S100 protein in at least 25% of the cells. Thirteen of 20 tumors (65%) were focally reactive with HMB45. Laminin was expressed in 42% of the tumors (only membranous pattern in 3; cytoplasmic and membranous in 5). Seventeen tumors (77%) expressed type IV collagen (only membranous pattern in 7; cytoplasmic and membranous pattern in 10). Laminin and type IV collagen, known components of basement membrane, are often found in SCM. Therefore, their detection cannot be used to distinguish SCM from MPNST.

  17. Establishment and characterization of an oral mucosal melanoma cell line (MEMO) derived from a longstanding primary oral melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Silvia V; Bologna, Sheyla B; Hsieh, Ricardo; Sangueza, Martin; Fernandes, Juliana D; Nico, Marcello M S

    2013-04-01

    Oral mucosal melanoma is rare. Its incidence peaks between 41 and 60 years of age; male/female ratio is 2:1. Preferred oral sites include hard palate and maxillary gingiva. Risk factors have not been clearly identified, but pigmented lesions may be present before the diagnosis of oral melanoma. We report an unusual case of oral mucosal melanoma of long-standing duration on hard palate and maxillary alveolar ridge in a male patient. Histopathologic features confirmed the diagnosis of invasive melanoma with a prominent in situ component. A cell lineage derived from the tumor was established and characterized, with phenotypic markers of melanocytes.

  18. NLRP1 promotes tumor growth by enhancing inflammasome activation and suppressing apoptosis in metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Z; Liu, W; Kaur, M; Luo, Y; Domenico, J; Samson, J M; Shellman, Y G; Norris, D A; Dinarello, C A; Spritz, R A; Fujita, M

    2017-03-06

    Inflammasomes are mediators of inflammation, and constitutively activated NLRP3 inflammasomes have been linked to interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-mediated tumorigenesis in human melanoma. Whereas NLRP3 regulation of caspase-1 activation requires the adaptor protein ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (caspase recruitment domain)), caspase-1 activation by another danger-signaling sensor NLRP1 does not require ASC because NLRP1 contains a C-terminal CARD domain that facilitates direct caspase-1 activation via CARD-CARD interaction. We hypothesized that NLRP1 has additional biological activities besides IL-1β maturation and investigated its role in melanoma tumorigenesis. NLRP1 expression in melanoma was confirmed by analysis of 216 melanoma tumors and 13 human melanoma cell lines. Unlike monocytic THP-1 cells with prominent nuclear localization of NLRP1, melanoma cells expressed NLRP1 mainly in the cytoplasm. Knocking down NLRP1 revealed a tumor-promoting property of NLRP1 both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies showed that caspase-1 activity, IL-1β production, IL-1β secretion and nuclear factor-kB activity were reduced by knocking down of NLRP1 in human metastatic melanoma cell lines 1205Lu and HS294T, indicating that NLRP1 inflammasomes are active in metastatic melanoma. However, unlike previous reports showing that NLRP1 enhances pyroptosis in macrophages, NLRP1 in melanoma behaved differently in the context of cell death. Knocking down NLRP1 increased caspase-2, -9 and -3/7 activities and promoted apoptosis in human melanoma cells. Immunoprecipitation revealed interaction of NLRP1 with CARD-containing caspase-2 and -9, whereas NLRP3 lacking a CARD motif did not interact with the caspases. Consistent with these findings, NLRP1 activation but not NLRP3 activation reduced caspase-2, -9 and -3/7 activities and provided protection against apoptosis in human melanoma cells, suggesting a suppressive role of NLRP1 in caspase-3/7 activation

  19. Phytochemical potential of Eruca sativa for inhibition of melanoma tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Khoobchandani, M; Ganesh, N; Gabbanini, S; Valgimigli, L; Srivastava, M M

    2011-06-01

    Solvent extracts from the aerial and root parts and seed oil from E. sativa (rocket salad) were assayed for anticancer activity against melanoma cells. The seed oil (isothiocyanates rich) significantly (p<0.01) reduced the tumor growth comparable to the control. Remarkably, the seed oil inhibited melanoma growth and angiogenesis in mice without any major toxicity. The findings qualify seed oil for further investigations in the real of cancer prevention and treatment.

  20. Fibroblasts Protect Melanoma Cells from the Cytotoxic Effects of Doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Tiago, Manoela; de Oliveira, Edson Mendes; Brohem, Carla Abdo; Pennacchi, Paula Comune; Paes, Rafael Duarte; Haga, Raquel Brandão; Campa, Ana; de Moraes Barros, Silvia Berlanga; Smalley, Keiran S.

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and until recently, it was extremely resistant to radio-, immuno-, and chemotherapy. Despite the latest success of BRAF V600E-targeted therapies, responses are typically short lived and relapse is all but certain. Furthermore, a percentage (40%) of melanoma cells is BRAF wild type. Emerging evidence suggests a role for normal host cells in the occurrence of drug resistance. In the current study, we compared a variety of cell culture models with an organotypic incomplete skin culture model (the “dermal equivalent”) to investigate the role of the tissue microenvironment in the response of melanoma cells to the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (Dox). In the dermal equivalent model, consisting of fibroblasts embedded in type I collagen matrix, melanoma cells showed a decreased cytotoxic response when compared with less complex culture conditions, such as seeding on plastic cell culture plate (as monolayers cultures) or on collagen gel. We further investigated the role of the microenvironment in p53 induction and caspase 3 and 9 cleavage. Melanoma cell lines cultured on dermal equivalent showed decreased expression of p53 after Dox treatment, and this outcome was accompanied by induction of interleukin IL-6, IL-8, and matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9. Here, we show that the growth of melanoma cells in the dermal equivalent model inflects drug responses by recapitulating important pro-survival features of the tumor microenvironment. These studies indicate that the presence of stroma enhances the drug resistance of melanoma in vitro, more closely mirroring the in vivo phenotype. Our data, thus, demonstrate the utility of organotypic cell culture models in providing essential context-dependent information critical for the development of new therapeutic strategies for melanoma. We believe that the organotypic model represents an improved screening platform to investigate novel anti-cancer agents, as it provides

  1. Renalase expression by melanoma and tumor associated-macrophages promotes tumor growth through a STAT3-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hollander, Lindsay; Guo, Xiaojia; Velazquez, Heino; Chang, John; Safirstein, Robert; Kluger, Harriet; Cha, Charles; Desir, Gary V.

    2016-01-01

    To sustain their proliferation cancer cells overcome negative-acting signals that restrain their growth and promote senescence and cell death. Renalase (RNLS) is a secreted flavoprotein that functions as a survival factor after ischemic and toxic injury, signaling through the plasma calcium channel PMCA4b to activate the PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathways. We show that RNLS expression is increased markedly in primary melanomas and CD163+ tumor associated macrophages (TAM). In clinical specimens, RNLS expression in the tumor correlated inversely with disease-specific survival, suggesting a pathogenic role for RNLS. Attenuation of RNLS by RNAi, blocking antibodies or an RNLS-derived inhibitory peptide decreased melanoma cell survival, and anti-RNLS therapy blocked tumor growth in vivo in murine xenograft assays. Mechanistic investigations showed that increased apoptosis in tumor cells was temporally related to p38 MAPK-mediated Bax activation and that increased cell growth arrest was associated with elevated expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21. Overall, our results established a role for the secreted flavoprotein RNLS in promoting melanoma cell growth and CD163+ TAM in the tumor microenvironment, with potential therapeutic implications for the management of melanoma. PMID:27197188

  2. Intra- and Inter-Tumoral Homogeneity of BRAF(V600E) Mutations in Melanoma Tumors.

    PubMed

    Riveiro-Falkenbach, Erica; Villanueva, Cándida A; Garrido, María C; Ruano, Yolanda; García-Martín, Rosa M; Godoy, Elena; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L; Ríos-Martín, Juan J; Santos-Briz, Angel; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L

    2015-12-01

    The era of targeted therapy has introduced a new therapeutic perspective for melanoma patients. Treatment with BRAFV600 inhibitors has improved overall and disease-free survival in metastatic melanoma patients whose tumors harbor BRAFV600 mutations. Although the BRAFV600E mutation appears to have a critical role in tumor initiation, its expression during tumor progression remains controversial. In fact, various authors claim that BRAFV600E heterogeneity is evident in melanoma tumors. Herein, we investigated the pattern of BRAFV600E expression in matched primary and metastatic samples from 140 patients. Using a combination of real-time PCR and immunohistochemical analyses, we demonstrated that BRAFV600E expression is homogeneous in melanoma tumors and hypothesized that the heterogeneity described by others might be attributable to technical issues when molecular methods are used. We also demonstrated the high efficiency of the anti-BRAFV600E VE1 antibody for the detection of BRAFV600E mutations in melanoma tumors.

  3. Differential mechanisms of tumor progression in clones from a single heterogeneous human melanoma.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Walburga; Jenkins, Molly H; Ye, Siying; Mullins, David W; Brinckerhoff, Constance E

    2013-04-01

    We used vertical growth phase (VGP) human VMM5 melanoma cells to ask whether the tumor microenvironment could induce matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) in vivo, and whether this induction correlated with metastasis. We isolated two clones from parental VMM5 cells: a low MMP-1 producing clone (C4) and high producing clone (C9). When these clones were injected orthotopically (intradermally) into nude mice, both were equally tumorigenic and produced equivalent and abundant amounts of MMP-1. However, the tumors from the C4 clones displayed different growth kinetics and distinct profiles of gene expression from the C9 population. The C4 tumors, which had low MMP-1 levels in vitro, appeared to rely on growth factors and cytokines in the microenvironment to increase MMP-1 expression in vivo, while MMP-1 levels remained constant in the C9 tumors. C9 cells, but not C4 cells, grew as spheres in culture and expressed higher levels of JARID 1B, a marker associated with melanoma initiating cells. We conclude that VMM5 melanoma cells exhibit striking intra-tumor heterogeneity, and that the tumorigenicity of these clones is driven by different molecular pathways. Our data suggest that there are multiple mechanisms for melanoma progression within a tumor, which may require different therapeutic strategies.

  4. Tumor-induced sentinel lymph node lymphangiogenesis and increased lymph flow precede melanoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Harrell, Maria I; Iritani, Brian M; Ruddell, Alanna

    2007-02-01

    Lymphangiogenesis is associated with human and murine cancer metastasis, suggesting that lymphatic vessels are important for tumor dissemination. Lymphatic vessel alterations were examined using B16-F10 melanoma cells implanted in syngeneic C57Bl/6 mice, which form tumors metastasizing to draining lymph nodes and subsequently to the lungs. Footpad tumors showed no lymphatic or blood vessel growth; however, the tumor-draining popliteal lymph node featured greatly increased lymphatic sinuses. Lymph node lymphangiogenesis began before melanoma cells reached draining lymph nodes, indicating that primary tumors induce these alterations at a distance. Lymph flow imaging revealed that nanoparticle transit was greatly increased through tumor-draining relative to nondraining lymph nodes. Lymph node lymphatic sinuses and lymph flow were increased in mice implanted with unmarked or with foreign antigen-expressing melanomas, indicating that these effects are not due to foreign antigen expression. However, tumor-derived immune signaling could promote lymph node alterations, as macrophages infiltrated footpad tumors, whereas lymphocytes accumulated in tumor-draining lymph nodes. B lymphocytes are required for lymphangiogenesis and increased lymph flow through tumor-draining lymph nodes, as these alterations were not observed in mice deficient for B cells. Lymph node lymphangiogenesis and increased lymph flow through tumor-draining lymph nodes may actively promote metastasis via the lymphatics.

  5. Andrographolide inhibits melanoma tumor growth by inactivating the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Zhou, Da-Lei; Ding, Yi; Liu, Hong-Ying; Lei, Yan; Fang, Hai-Yan; Gu, Qu-Liang; He, Xiao-Dong; Qi, Cui-Ling; Yang, Yi; Lan, Tian; Li, Jiang-Chao; Gong, Ping; Wu, Xiao-Yun; Yang, Xuesong; Li, Wei-Dong; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-12-01

    The TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway plays a critical role in tumor progression. Andrographolide (Andro) has been reported to have anticancer activity in multiple types of cancer. However, the pharmacological activities of Andro in melanoma are not completely understood. In this study, we defined the anticancer effects of Andro in melanoma and elucidated its potential mechanisms of action. Our experiments showed that Andro significantly inhibited melanoma tumor growth and metastasis by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In addition, Andro significantly inhibited the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, the inactivation of TLR4/NF-κB signaling inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of CXCR4 and Bcl-6, which are antitumor genes. This work provides evidence that the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic target and may also be indispensable in the Andro-mediated anticancer effect in melanoma.

  6. Reduction of human melanoma tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficient mice by passive transfer of antibodies induced by a high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen mimotope vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Stefan; Krepler, Clemens; Allwardt, Dorothee; Latzka, Julia; Strommer, Sabine; Scheiner, Otto; Pehamberger, Hubert; Wiedermann, Ursula; Hafner, Christine; Breiteneder, Heimo

    2008-12-15

    The high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen (HMW-MAA) is an attractive target for immunotherapy of malignant melanoma. We have recently generated a vaccine based on the HMW-MAA mimotope 225D9.2+ that was able to induce anti-HMW-MAA antibodies with antitumor activity in vitro. Here, we investigated the antitumor activity of these antibodies in a human melanoma xenotransplant severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model. Tumors were established by injecting the human melanoma 518A2 cells into C.B.17 SCID/SCID mice. In tumor prevention experiments, 200 microg purified total IgG antibodies were injected intravenously the same day or on day 5 in therapeutic experiments. Antibody administration was repeated every fourth day and tumor volumes were measured. Antibody specificity and tumor infiltration by macrophages were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Within 35 days after cell inoculation, antibody treatment reduced tumor growth up to 40% in the therapeutic and up to 62% in the tumor prevention experiments compared with the control mice. In tumors of all groups, a similar distribution of the HMW-MAA and no differences in infiltration of macrophages were detected by immunohistochemistry. Here, we showed that antibodies induced by the 225D9.2+ mimotope effectively inhibited melanoma tumor growth. Additional mechanisms besides antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity like disruption of interactions of melanoma cells mediated by extracellular matrix components seem to be involved in tumor growth inhibition. Based on our findings, we suggest that active immunization with this mimotope might be a promising strategy for treatment of melanoma.

  7. Anti-apoptotic proteins on guard of melanoma cell survival.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Mariusz L; Czyz, Malgorzata

    2013-04-30

    Apoptosis plays a pivotal role in sustaining proper tissue development and homeostasis. Evading apoptosis by cancer cells is a part of their adaption to microenvironment and therapies. Cellular integrity is predominantly maintained by pro-survival members of Bcl-2 family and IAPs. Melanoma cells are characterized by a labile and stage-dependent phenotype. Pro-survival molecules can protect melanoma cells from apoptosis and mediate other processes, thus enhancing aggressive phenotype. The essential role of Bcl-2, Mcl-1, Bcl-X(L), livin, survivin and XIAP was implicated for melanoma, often in a tumor stage-dependent fashion. In this review, the current knowledge of pro-survival machinery in melanoma is discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Takabe, Piia; Bart, Geneviève; Ropponen, Antti; Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna

    2015-09-10

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma.

  9. Identification of melanoma cells: a method based in mean variance of signatures via spectral densities

    PubMed Central

    Guerra-Rosas, Esperanza; Álvarez-Borrego, Josué; Angulo-Molina, Aracely

    2017-01-01

    In this paper a new methodology to detect and differentiate melanoma cells from normal cells through 1D-signatures averaged variances calculated with a binary mask is presented. The sample images were obtained from histological sections of mice melanoma tumor of 4 μm in thickness and contrasted with normal cells. The results show that melanoma cells present a well-defined range of averaged variances values obtained from the signatures in the four conditions used. PMID:28736664

  10. Identification of melanoma cells: a method based in mean variance of signatures via spectral densities.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Rosas, Esperanza; Álvarez-Borrego, Josué; Angulo-Molina, Aracely

    2017-04-01

    In this paper a new methodology to detect and differentiate melanoma cells from normal cells through 1D-signatures averaged variances calculated with a binary mask is presented. The sample images were obtained from histological sections of mice melanoma tumor of 4 [Formula: see text] in thickness and contrasted with normal cells. The results show that melanoma cells present a well-defined range of averaged variances values obtained from the signatures in the four conditions used.

  11. LFA-1 and ICAM-1 expression induced during melanoma-endothelial cell co-culture favors the transendothelial migration of melanoma cell lines in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with metastatic melanoma have a poor median rate of survival. It is therefore necessary to increase our knowledge about melanoma cell dissemination which includes extravasation, where cancer cells cross the endothelial barrier. Extravasation is well understood during travelling of white blood cells, and involves integrins such as LFA-1 (composed of two chains, CD11a and CD18) expressed by T cells, while ICAM-1 is induced during inflammation by endothelial cells. Although melanoma cell lines cross endothelial cell barriers, they do not express LFA-1. We therefore hypothesized that melanoma-endothelial cell co-culture might induce the LFA-1/ICAM ligand/receptor couple during melanoma transmigration. Methods A transwell approach has been used as well as blocking antibodies against CD11a, CD18 and ICAM-1. Data were analyzed with an epifluorescence microscope. Fluorescence intensity was quantified with the ImageJ software. Results We show here that HUVEC-conditioned medium induce cell-surface expression of LFA-1 on melanoma cell lines. Similarly melanoma-conditioned medium activates ICAM-1 expression in endothelial cells. Accordingly blocking antibodies of ICAM-1, CD11a or CD18 strongly decrease melanoma transmigration. We therefore demonstrate that melanoma cells can cross endothelial monolayers in vitro due to the induction of ICAM-1 and LFA-1 occurring during the co-culture of melanoma and endothelial cells. Our data further suggest a role of LFA-1 and ICAM-1 in the formation of melanoma cell clumps enhancing tumor cell transmigration. Conclusion Melanoma-endothelial cell co-culture induces LFA-1 and ICAM-1 expression, thereby favoring in vitro melanoma trans-migration. PMID:23039186

  12. Tumor heterogeneity and plasticity as elusive drivers for resistance to MAPK pathway inhibition in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Roesch, A

    2015-06-04

    Despite the recent success of MAPK signaling-targeted drugs in melanoma, the majority of patients with metastatic melanoma still undergo disease progression after initial tumor shrinkage indicating gradually developing therapy resistance. This review will give an overview on currently suggested concepts of resistance to MAPK pathway inhibitors in melanoma with particular focus on inter- and intraindividual as well as intratumor heterogeneity. The high plasticity of melanoma cells promotes both the clonal evolution of genetic resistance, for example, because of mutations in the MAPK or PI3K/AKT/PTEN pathways, and the emergence of cell phenotypes that functionally and metabolically overcome MAPK inhibition. Like a 'moving target', melanoma cells are shifting between different metabolic, cell cycle and differentiation states reflecting a highly dynamic potential to adapt to exogenous stressors including drugs. The introduction of MAPK inhibitors into the clinics has tremendously pushed the field of melanoma research not just because of the historic therapeutic success but also by providing a new tool to study human melanoma in its natural microenvironment.

  13. Photoacoustic imaging of single circulating melanoma cells in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lidai; Yao, Junjie; Zhang, Ruiying; Xu, Song; Li, Guo; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Melanoma, one of the most common types of skin cancer, has a high mortality rate, mainly due to a high propensity for tumor metastasis. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is a potential predictor for metastasis. Label-free imaging of single circulating melanoma cells in vivo provides rich information on tumor progress. Here we present photoacoustic microscopy of single melanoma cells in living animals. We used a fast-scanning optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope to image the microvasculature in mouse ears. The imaging system has sub-cellular spatial resolution and works in reflection mode. A fast-scanning mirror allows the system to acquire fast volumetric images over a large field of view. A 500-kHz pulsed laser was used to image blood and CTCs. Single circulating melanoma cells were imaged in both capillaries and trunk vessels in living animals. These high-resolution images may be used in early detection of CTCs with potentially high sensitivity. In addition, this technique enables in vivo study of tumor cell extravasation from a primary tumor, which addresses an urgent pre-clinical need.

  14. Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Schadendorf, Dirk; Fisher, David E; Garbe, Claus; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Grob, Jean-Jacques; Halpern, Allan; Herlyn, Meenhard; Marchetti, Michael A; McArthur, Grant; Ribas, Antoni; Roesch, Alexander; Hauschild, Axel

    2015-04-23

    Melanoma is a common cancer in the Western world with an increasing incidence. Sun exposure is still considered to be the major risk factor for melanoma. The prognosis of patients with malignant (advanced-stage) melanoma differs widely between countries, but public campaigns advocating early detection have led to significant reductions in mortality rates. As well as sun exposure, distinct genetic alterations have been identified as associated with melanoma. For example, families with melanoma who have germline mutations in CDKN2A are well known, whereas the vast majority of sporadic melanomas have mutations in the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, which is the pathway with the highest oncogenic and therapeutic relevance for this disease. BRAF and NRAS mutations are typically found in cutaneous melanomas, whereas KIT mutations are predominantly observed in mucosal and acral melanomas. GNAQ and GNA11 mutations prevail in uveal melanomas. Additionally, the PI3K-AKT-PTEN pathway and the immune checkpoint pathways are important. The finding that programmed cell death protein 1 ligand 1 (PDL1) and PDL2 are expressed by melanoma cells, T cells, B cells and natural killer cells led to the recent development of programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1)-specific antibodies (for example, nivolumab and pembrolizumab). Alongside other new drugs - namely, BRAF inhibitors (vemurafenib and dabrafenib) and MEK inhibitors (trametinib and cobimetinib) - these agents are very promising and have been shown to significantly improve prognosis for patients with advanced-stage metastatic disease. Early signs are apparent that these new treatment modalities are also improving long-term clinical benefit and the quality of life of patients. This Primer summarizes the current understanding of melanoma, from mechanistic insights to clinical progress. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/vX2N9s.

  15. Downregulation of sphingosine kinase-1 induces protective tumor immunity by promoting M1 macrophage response in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Mrad, Marguerite; Imbert, Caroline; Garcia, Virginie; Rambow, Florian; Therville, Nicole; Carpentier, Stéphane; Ségui, Bruno; Levade, Thierry; Azar, Rania; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Diab-Assaf, Mona; Colacios, Céline; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The infiltration of melanoma tumors by macrophages is often correlated with poor prognosis. However, the molecular signals that regulate the dialogue between malignant cells and the inflammatory microenvironment remain poorly understood. We previously reported an increased expression of sphingosine kinase-1 (SK1), which produces the bioactive lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), in melanoma. The present study aimed at defining the role of tumor SK1 in the recruitment and differentiation of macrophages in melanoma. Herein, we show that downregulation of SK1 in melanoma cells causes a reduction in the percentage of CD206highMHCIIlow M2 macrophages in favor of an increased proportion of CD206lowMHCIIhigh M1 macrophages into the tumor. This macrophage differentiation orchestrates T lymphocyte recruitment as well as tumor rejection through the expression of Th1 cytokines and chemokines. In vitro experiments indicated that macrophage migration is triggered by the binding of tumor S1P to S1PR1 receptors present on macrophages whereas macrophage differentiation is stimulated by SK1-induced secretion of TGF-β1. Finally, RNA-seq analysis of human melanoma tumors revealed a positive correlation between SK1 and TGF-β1 expression. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that melanoma SK1 plays a key role in the recruitment and phenotypic shift of the tumor macrophages that promote melanoma growth. PMID:27708249

  16. A Multikinase and DNA-PK Inhibitor Combination Immunomodulates Melanomas, Suppresses Tumor Progression, and Enhances Immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Alexander K; Khan, Asra Y; Worgo, Christina E; Wang, Lucy L; Liang, Yuanyuan; Davila, Eduardo

    2017-09-01

    Combination therapies have the potential to improve outcomes in melanoma patients but have not yet been clinically efficacious. Here, we used high-throughput flow cytometry-based screening to identify and characterize candidate therapies that might synergize with and augment T-cell immunotherapy efficacy. Two lead therapies, regorafenib (Reg) and NU7441, were selected based on their ability to alter a variety of immunomodulatory proteins, including CD55, CD73, CD155, programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR), and HLA class I in a heterogeneous panel of melanomas. The therapies also upregulated several melanoma antigens, inhibited proliferation, and perturbed activation of oncogenic signaling pathways in melanomas. T cells treated with the therapies proliferated normally and exhibited a favorably altered phenotype, including increased CD25, CD28, inducible T-cell costimulator (ICOS), and reduced expression of coinhibitory receptors. Cytokine production was also increased in treated T cells. When administered in mice, REg suppressed melanoma progression in a CD8(+) T cell-dependent manner when used alone and with various immunotherapies. Additionally, Reg altered the number, phenotype, and function of various T-cell subsets in the tumor microenvironment. These studies reveal that Reg and NU7441 influence the immunobiology of both tumor cells and T cells and enhance the efficacy of various immunotherapies. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(9); 790-803. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Advances in Personalized Targeted Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma and Non-Invasive Tumor Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Klinac, Dragana; Gray, Elin S.; Millward, Michael; Ziman, Mel

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive scientific progress in the melanoma field, treatment of advanced stage melanoma with chemotherapeutics and biotherapeutics has rarely provided response rates higher than 20%. In the past decade, targeted inhibitors have been developed for metastatic melanoma, leading to the advent of more personalized therapies of genetically characterized tumors. Here we review current melanoma treatments and emerging targeted molecular therapies. In particular we discuss the mutant BRAF inhibitors Vemurafenib and Dabrafenib, which markedly inhibit tumor growth and advance patients’ overall survival. However this response is almost inevitably followed by complete tumor relapse due to drug resistance hampering the encouraging initial responses. Several mechanisms of resistance within and outside the MAPK pathway have now been uncovered and have paved the way for clinical trials of combination therapies to try and overcome tumor relapse. It is apparent that personalized treatment management will be required in this new era of targeted treatment. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) provide an easily accessible means of monitoring patient relapse and several new approaches are available for the molecular characterization of CTCs. Thus CTCs provide a monitoring tool to evaluate treatment efficacy and early detection of drug resistance in real time. We detail here how advances in the molecular analysis of CTCs may provide insight into new avenues of approaching therapeutic options that would benefit personalized melanoma management. PMID:23515890

  18. HERV-K activation is strictly required to sustain CD133+ melanoma cells with stemness features.

    PubMed

    Argaw-Denboba, Ayele; Balestrieri, Emanuela; Serafino, Annalucia; Cipriani, Chiara; Bucci, Ilaria; Sorrentino, Roberta; Sciamanna, Ilaria; Gambacurta, Alessandra; Sinibaldi-Vallebona, Paola; Matteucci, Claudia

    2017-01-26

    Melanoma is a heterogeneous tumor in which phenotype-switching and CD133 marker have been associated with metastasis promotion and chemotherapy resistance. CD133 positive (CD133+) subpopulation has also been suggested as putative cancer stem cell (CSC) of melanoma tumor. Human endogenous retrovirus type K (HERV-K) has been described to be aberrantly activated during melanoma progression and implicated in the etiopathogenesis of disease. Earlier, we reported that stress-induced HERV-K activation promotes cell malignant transformation and reduces the immunogenicity of melanoma cells. Herein, we investigated the correlation between HERV-K and the CD133+ melanoma cells during microenvironmental modifications. TVM-A12 cell line, isolated in our laboratory from a primary human melanoma lesion, and other commercial melanoma cell lines (G-361, WM-115, WM-266-4 and A375) were grown and maintained in the standard and stem cell media. RNA interference, Real-time PCR, flow cytometry analysis, self-renewal and migration/invasion assays were performed to characterize cell behavior and HERV-K expression. Melanoma cells, exposed to stem cell media, undergo phenotype-switching and expansion of CD133+ melanoma cells, concomitantly promoted by HERV-K activation. Notably, the sorted CD133+ subpopulation showed stemness features, characterized by higher self-renewal ability, embryonic genes expression, migration and invasion capacities compared to the parental cell line. RNA interference-mediated downregulation experiments showed that HERV-K has a decisive role to expand and maintain the CD133+ melanoma subpopulation during microenvironmental modifications. Similarly, non nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) efavirenz and nevirapine were effective to restrain the activation of HERV-K in melanoma cells, to antagonize CD133+ subpopulation expansion and to induce selective high level apoptosis in CD133+ cells. HERV-K activation promotes melanoma cells phenotype

  19. Study of the primo vascular system utilizing a melanoma tumor model in a green fluorescence protein expressing mouse.

    PubMed

    Heo, Chaejeong; Hong, Min Young; Jo, Areum; Lee, Young Hee; Suh, Minah

    2011-09-01

    A melanoma tumor is a representative malignant tumor. Melanoma tumor growth involves vigorous angiogenesis around the tumor and a vasculogenic-like network inside an aggressive tumor. Primo vessels (PVs) are also found on the surface of the tumor and coexist alongside blood vessels (BVs), and sometimes within the BVs. We hypothesized that the primo vessels system plays a significant role in regulating the development of a melanoma tumor, and therefore has a tight coupling with BVs and angiogenesis. To prove this hypothesis, we developed a murine melanoma model by inoculating melanoma cell lines into the abdominal region. We used a green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing mouse as a host to distinguish the endogenous source of the tumor PVs. We found strong formation of PVs on the tumor that coexisted with BVs and expression of GFP. PVs also had a tight coupling with adipose tissues, especially with white adipose tissue. These data suggest that the PVs of an induced melanoma tumor evolve endogenously from the host body and may be highly related to BVs and adipose tissue. This model of PVs in an overexpressing GFP mouse is a useful system for observing PVs, primo nodes, and primo vessel networks, and has potential to be developed as a model for examining novel treatments for cancer metastasis.

  20. Clinicopathologic features of incident and subsequent tumors in patients with multiple primary cutaneous melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Murali, Rajmohan; Goumas, Chris; Kricker, Anne; From, Lynn; Busam, Klaus J.; Begg, Colin B.; Dwyer, Terence; Gruber, Stephen B.; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Orlow, Irene; Rosso, Stefano; Thomas, Nancy E.; Berwick, Marianne; Scolyer, Richard A.; Armstrong, Bruce K.

    2011-01-01

    Background 0.6–12.7% of patients with primary cutaneous melanoma will develop additional melanomas. Pathologic features of tumors in patients with multiple primary cutaneous melanomas have not been well described. In this large international multi-center case-control study, we compared the clinicopathologic features of a subsequent melanoma with the preceding (usually the first) melanoma in patients with multiple primary cutaneous melanomas, and with those of melanomas in patients with single primary cutaneous melanomas. Methods Multiple primary melanoma (cases) and single primary invasive melanoma (controls) patients from the Genes, Environment and Melanoma (GEM) study were included if their tumors were available for pathologic review and confirmed as melanoma. Clinicopathologic characteristics of invasive subsequent and first melanomas in cases and invasive single melanomas in controls were compared. Results 473 pairs comprising a subsequent and a first melanoma and 1989 single melanomas were reviewed. Forward stepwise regression modeling in 395 pairs with complete data showed that, compared to first melanomas, subsequent melanomas were: more commonly contiguous with a dysplastic nevus; more prevalent on the head/neck and legs than other sites; and thinner. Compared with single primary melanomas, subsequent melanomas were also more likely to be: associated with a contiguous dysplastic nevus; more prevalent on the head/neck and legs; and thinner. The same differences were observed when subsequent melanomas were compared with single melanomas. First melanomas were more likely than single melanomas to have associated solar elastosis and no observed mitoses. Conclusions Thinner subsequent than first melanomas suggest earlier diagnosis, perhaps due to closer clinical scrutiny. The association of subsequent melanomas with dysplastic nevi is consistent with the latter being risk factors or risk markers for melanoma. PMID:21913010

  1. Tanapoxvirus lacking a neuregulin-like gene regresses human melanoma tumors in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tiantian; Suryawanshi, Yogesh R; Kordish, Dennis H; Woyczesczyk, Helene M; Jeng, David; Essani, Karim

    2017-02-01

    Neuregulin (NRG), an epidermal growth factor is known to promote the growth of various cell types, including human melanoma cells through ErbB family of tyrosine kinases receptors. Tanapoxvirus (TPV)-encoded protein TPV-15L, a functional mimic of NRG, also acts through ErbB receptors. Here, we show that the TPV-15L protein promotes melanoma proliferation. TPV recombinant generated by deleting the 15L gene (TPVΔ15L) showed replication ability similar to that of wild-type TPV (wtTPV) in owl monkey kidney cells, human lung fibroblast (WI-38) cells, and human melanoma (SK-MEL-3) cells. However, a TPV recombinant with both 15L and the thymidine kinase (TK) gene 66R ablated (TPVΔ15LΔ66R) replicated less efficiently compared to TPVΔ15L and the parental virus. TPVΔ15L exhibited more robust tumor regression in the melanoma-bearing nude mice compared to other TPV recombinants. Our results indicate that deletion of TPV-15L gene product which facilitates the growth of human melanoma cells can be an effective strategy to enhance the oncolytic potential of TPV for the treatment of melanoma.

  2. Microsomal PGE2 synthase-1 regulates melanoma cell survival and associates with melanoma disease progression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Hee; Hashimoto, Yuuri; Cho, Sung-Nam; Roszik, Jason; Milton, Denái R; Dal, Fulya; Kim, Sangwon F; Menter, David G; Yang, Peiying; Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Grimm, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    COX-2 and its product PGE2 enhance carcinogenesis and tumor progression, which has been previously reported in melanoma. As most COX inhibitors cause much toxicity, the downstream microsomal PGE2 synthase-1 (mPGES1) is a consideration for targeting. Human melanoma TMAs were employed for testing mPGES1 protein staining intensity and percentage levels, and both increased with clinical stage; employing a different Stage III TMA, mPGES1 intensity (not percentage) associated with reduced patient survival. Our results further show that iNOS was also highly expressed in melanoma tissues with high mPGES1 levels, and iNOS-mediated NO promoted mPGES1 expression and PGE2 production. An mPGES1-specific inhibitor (CAY10526) as well as siRNA attenuated cell survival and increased apoptosis. CAY10526 significantly suppressed tumor growth and increased apoptosis in melanoma xenografts. Our findings support the value of a prognostic and predictive role for mPGES1, and suggest targeting this molecule in the PGE2 pathway as another avenue toward improving melanoma therapy.

  3. Microsomal PGE2 synthase-1 regulates melanoma cell survival and associates with melanoma disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Hee; Hashimoto, Yuuri; Cho, Sung-Nam; Roszik, Jason; Milton, Denái R.; Dal, Fulya; Kim, Sangwon F.; Menter, David G.; Yang, Peiying; Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Grimm, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary COX-2 and its product PGE2 enhance carcinogenesis and tumor progression, which has been previously reported in melanoma. As most COX inhibitors cause much toxicity, the downstream microsomal PGE2 synthase-1 (mPGES1) is a consideration for targeting. Human melanoma TMAs were employed for testing mPGES1 protein staining intensity and percentage levels and both increased with clinical stage; employing a different Stage III TMA, mPGES1 intensity (not percentage) associated with reduced patient survival. Our results further show that iNOS was also highly expressed in melanoma tissues with high mPGES1 levels, and iNOS-mediated NO promoted mPGES1 expression and PGE2 production. An mPGES1specific inhibitor (CAY10526) as well as siRNA attenuated cell survival and increased apoptosis. CAY10526 significantly suppressed tumor growth and increased apoptosis in melanoma xenografts. Our findings support the value of a prognostic and predictive role for mPGES1, and suggest targeting this molecule in the PGE2 pathway as another avenue toward improving melanoma therapy. PMID:26801201

  4. Acetylsalicylic acid inhibits the growth of melanoma tumors via SOX2-dependent-PAF-R-independent signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Thyagarajan, Anita; Saylae, Jeremiah; Sahu, Ravi P.

    2017-01-01

    Acquired resistance to standard therapies remains a serious challenge, requiring novel therapeutic approaches that incorporate potential factors involved in tumor resistance. As cancers including melanoma express inflammatory cyclooxygenases generating prostaglandins implicated in tumor growth, we investigated mechanism of anti-inflammatory drug, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) which has been shown to inhibit various tumor types, however, its effects against highly aggressive melanoma model are unclear. Given our reports that an activation of platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R) augments the growth and impede efficacies of therapeutic agents in experimental melanoma, we also sought to determine if PAF-R mediates anti-melanoma activity of ASA. The current studies using stably PAF-R-positive (B16-PAFR) and negative (B16-MSCV) murine melanoma cells and PAF-R-expressing and deficient mice, demonstrate that ASA inhibits the in-vitro and in-vivo growth of highly aggressive B16F10 melanoma via bypassing tumoral or stromal PAF-R signaling. Similar ASA-induced effects in-vitro were seen in human melanoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells positive or negative in PAF-R. Mechanistically, the ASA-induced decrease in cell survival and increase in apoptosis were significantly blocked by prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2α) agonists. Importantly, PCR array and qRT-PCR analysis of B16-tumors revealed significant downregulation of sry-related high-mobility-box-2 (SOX2) oncogene by ASA treatment. Interestingly, modulation of SOX2 expression by PGF2α agonists and upregulation by fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF-1) rescued melanoma cells from ASA-induced decreased survival and increased apoptosis. Moreover, PGF2α-receptor antagonist, AL8810 mimics ASA-induced decreased melanoma cells survival which was significantly blocked by PGF2α and FGF-1. These findings indicate that ASA inhibits the growth of aggressive melanoma via SOX2-dependent-PAF-R-indepedent pathway. PMID:28636992

  5. Activation of the Kinin B1 Receptor Attenuates Melanoma Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dillenburg-Pilla, Patricia; Maria, Andrea G.; Reis, Rosana I.; Floriano, Elaine Medeiros; Pereira, Cacilda Dias; De Lucca, Fernando Luiz; Ramos, Simone Gusmão; Pesquero, João B.; Jasiulionis, Miriam G.; Costa-Neto, Claudio M.

    2013-01-01

    Melanoma is a very aggressive tumor that does not respond well to standard therapeutic approaches, such as radio- and chemotherapies. Furthermore, acquiring the ability to metastasize in melanoma and many other tumor types is directly related to incurable disease. The B1 kinin receptor participates in a variety of cancer-related pathophysiological events, such as inflammation and angiogenesis. Therefore, we investigated whether this G protein-coupled receptor plays a role in tumor progression. We used a murine melanoma cell line that expresses the kinin B1 receptor and does not express the kinin B2 receptor to investigate the precise contribution of activation of the B1 receptor in tumor progression and correlated events using various in vitro and in vivo approaches. Activation of the kinin B1 receptor in the absence of B2 receptor inhibits cell migration in vitro and decreases tumor formation in vivo. Moreover, tumors formed from cells stimulated with B1-specific agonist showed several features of decreased aggressiveness, such as smaller size and infiltration of inflammatory cells within the tumor area, higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines implicated in the host anti-tumor immune response, lower number of cells undergoing mitosis, a poorer vascular network, no signs of invasion of surrounding tissues or metastasis and increased animal survival. Our findings reveal that activation of the kinin B1 receptor has a host protective role during murine melanoma tumor progression, suggesting that the B1 receptor could be a new anti-tumor GPCR and provide new opportunities for therapeutic targeting. PMID:23691222

  6. Activation of the kinin B1 receptor attenuates melanoma tumor growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Dillenburg-Pilla, Patricia; Maria, Andrea G; Reis, Rosana I; Floriano, Elaine Medeiros; Pereira, Cacilda Dias; De Lucca, Fernando Luiz; Ramos, Simone Gusmão; Pesquero, João B; Jasiulionis, Miriam G; Costa-Neto, Claudio M

    2013-01-01

    Melanoma is a very aggressive tumor that does not respond well to standard therapeutic approaches, such as radio- and chemotherapies. Furthermore, acquiring the ability to metastasize in melanoma and many other tumor types is directly related to incurable disease. The B1 kinin receptor participates in a variety of cancer-related pathophysiological events, such as inflammation and angiogenesis. Therefore, we investigated whether this G protein-coupled receptor plays a role in tumor progression. We used a murine melanoma cell line that expresses the kinin B1 receptor and does not express the kinin B2 receptor to investigate the precise contribution of activation of the B1 receptor in tumor progression and correlated events using various in vitro and in vivo approaches. Activation of the kinin B1 receptor in the absence of B2 receptor inhibits cell migration in vitro and decreases tumor formation in vivo. Moreover, tumors formed from cells stimulated with B1-specific agonist showed several features of decreased aggressiveness, such as smaller size and infiltration of inflammatory cells within the tumor area, higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines implicated in the host anti-tumor immune response, lower number of cells undergoing mitosis, a poorer vascular network, no signs of invasion of surrounding tissues or metastasis and increased animal survival. Our findings reveal that activation of the kinin B1 receptor has a host protective role during murine melanoma tumor progression, suggesting that the B1 receptor could be a new anti-tumor GPCR and provide new opportunities for therapeutic targeting.

  7. CD147 silencing inhibits tumor growth by suppressing glucose transport in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Su, Juan; Gao, Tianyuan; Jiang, Minghao; Wu, Lisha; Zeng, Weiqi; Zhao, Shuang; Peng, Cong; Chen, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a very malignant disease and there are still no effective treatments. CD147 participates in the carcinogenesis of multiple human cancers and GLUT-1, as a glucose transporter, is associated with tumor growth. However, the function of CD147 and GLUT-1 in melanoma have not been completely understood. Thus, in this study we investigated the expression of CD147 and GLUT-1 in melanoma tissue, which were overexpressed compared with that in nevus tissue. In addition, CD147 and GLUT-1 were co-localized in the cytoplasm of human melanoma A375 cells. Immunoprecipitation proved that CD147 interacted with GLUT-1 at D105-199. Silencing CD147 by specific siRNA could downregulate GLUT-1 level via inhibiting PI3K/Akt signaling and decrease glucose uptake in A375 cells. In vivo experiments also supported that CD147 knockdown suppressed the tumor growth in melanoma subcutaneous mice model, observed by micro PET/CT. Our results could help validate CD147 as a new therapeutic target for treating melanoma. PMID:27556188

  8. Targeting glutamine transport to suppress melanoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Beaumont, Kimberley A; Otte, Nicholas J; Font, Josep; Bailey, Charles G; van Geldermalsen, Michelle; Sharp, Danae M; Tiffen, Jessamy C; Ryan, Renae M; Jormakka, Mika; Haass, Nikolas K; Rasko, John E J; Holst, Jeff

    2014-09-01

    Amino acids, especially leucine and glutamine, are important for tumor cell growth, survival and metabolism. A range of different transporters deliver each specific amino acid into cells, some of which are increased in cancer. These amino acids consequently activate the mTORC1 pathway and drive cell cycle progression. The leucine transporter LAT1/4F2hc heterodimer assembles as part of a large complex with the glutamine transporter ASCT2 to transport amino acids. In this study, we show that the expression of LAT1 and ASCT2 is significantly increased in human melanoma samples and is present in both BRAF(WT) (C8161 and WM852) and BRAF(V600E) mutant (1205Lu and 451Lu) melanoma cell lines. While inhibition of LAT1 by BCH did not suppress melanoma cell growth, the ASCT2 inhibitor BenSer significantly reduced both leucine and glutamine transport in melanoma cells, leading to inhibition of mTORC1 signaling. Cell proliferation and cell cycle progression were significantly reduced in the presence of BenSer in melanoma cells in 2D and 3D cell culture. This included reduced expression of the cell cycle regulators CDK1 and UBE2C. The importance of ASCT2 expression in melanoma was confirmed by shRNA knockdown, which inhibited glutamine uptake, mTORC1 signaling and cell proliferation. Taken together, our study demonstrates that ASCT2-mediated glutamine transport is a potential therapeutic target for both BRAF(WT) and BRAF(V600E) melanoma.

  9. Effects of Wnt-10b on proliferation and differentiation of murine melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Misu, Masayasu; Ouji, Yukiteru; Kawai, Norikazu; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Nakamura-Uchiyama, Fukumi; Yoshikawa, Masahide

    2015-08-07

    In spite of the strong expression of Wnt-10b in melanomas, its role in melanoma cells has not been elucidated. In the present study, the biological effects of Wnt-10b on murine B16F10 (B16) melanoma cells were investigated using conditioned medium from Wnt-10b-producing COS cells (Wnt-CM). After 2 days of culture in the presence of Wnt-CM, proliferation of B16 melanoma cells was inhibited, whereas tyrosinase activity was increased. An in vitro wound healing assay demonstrated that migration of melanoma cells to the wound area was inhibited with the addition of Wnt-CM. Furthermore, evaluation of cellular senescence revealed prominent induction of SA-β-gal-positive senescent cells in cultures with Wnt-CM. Finally, the growth of B16 melanoma cell aggregates in collagen 3D-gel cultures was markedly suppressed in the presence of Wnt-CM. These results suggest that Wnt-10b represses tumor cell properties, such as proliferation and migration of B16 melanoma cells, driving them toward a more differentiated state along a melanocyte lineage. - Highlights: • Wnt-10b inhibited proliferation and migration of melanoma cells. • Wnt-10b induced tyrosinase activity and senescence of melanoma cells. • Wnt-10b suppressed growth of cell aggregates in collagen 3D-gel cultures. • Wnt-10b represses tumor cell properties, driving them toward a more differentiated state along a melanocyte lineage.

  10. Targeting invasive properties of melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Arozarena, Imanol; Wellbrock, Claudia

    2017-07-01

    Melanoma is a skin cancer notorious for its metastatic potential. As an initial step of the metastatic cascade, melanoma cells part from the primary tumour and invade the surrounding tissue, which is crucial for their dissemination and the formation of distant secondary tumours. Over the last two decades, our understanding of both, general and melanoma specific mechanisms of invasion has significantly improved, but to date no efficient therapeutic strategy tackling the invasive properties of melanoma cells has reached the clinic. In this review, we assess the major contributions towards the understanding of the molecular biology of melanoma cell invasion with a focus on melanoma specific traits. These traits are based on the neural crest origin of melanoma cells and explain their intrinsic invasive nature. A particular emphasis is given not only to lineage specific signalling mediated by TGFβ, and noncanonical and canonical WNT signalling, but also to the role of PDE5A and RHO-GTPases in modulating modes of melanoma cell invasion. We discuss existing caveats in the current understanding of the metastatic properties of melanoma cells, as well as the relevance of the 'phenotype switch' model and 'co-operativity' between different phenotypes in heterogeneous tumours. At the centre of these phenotypes is the lineage commitment factor microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, one of the most crucial regulators of the balance between de-differentiation (neural crest specific gene expression) and differentiation (melanocyte specific gene expression) that defines invasive and noninvasive melanoma cell phenotypes. Finally, we provide insight into the current evidence linking resistance to targeted therapies to invasive properties of melanoma cells. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Melanoma-associated chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan as a new target antigen for CD4+ T cells in melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Erfurt, Cornelia; Müller, Esther; Emmerling, Sonja; Klotz, Claudia; Hertl, Michael; Schuler, Gerold; Schultz, Erwin S

    2009-05-15

    Melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (MCSP) (also known as high molecular weight-melanoma-associated antigen) represents an interesting target antigen for cancer immunotherapy which is expressed on human melanomas and other tumors such as breast carcinomas, gliomas, neuroblastomas and acute leukemias. MCSP seems to play an important functional role in melanoma as it is involved in tumor cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis. In this study, we isolated CD4(+) T helper cells from the blood of a healthy donor, recognizing a peptide from the MCSP core protein presented by HLA-DBR1*1101 molecules. T cell reactivity against the identified peptide could be detected in the blood of healthy donors and melanoma patients. MCSP specific T cells from the blood of a patient could be readily expanded by repeated peptide stimulation and recognized MCSP and HLA-DR expressing tumor cells. Our findings suggest that vaccination against MCSP helper T cell epitopes might be a promising approach to fight melanoma.

  12. Growth inhibition of human melanoma tumor cells by the combination of sodium phenylacetate (NaPA) and substituted dextrans and one NaPA-dextran conjugate.

    PubMed

    Gervelas, C; Avramoglou, T; Crépin, M; Jozefonvicz, J

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the cytostatic effects of sodium phenylacetate (NaPA) in association with several substituted dextrans on human tumor melanoma 1205LU cells. We show that NaPA alone inhibits the growth of these cells (IC50 = 3.9 mM) while a weak inhibitory effect appears at a concentration of 37 microM (10 microg/ml) for a dextran methyl carboxylate benzylamide (LS17-DMCB). The precursors of LS17-DMCB [T40 Dextran and carboxymethyl dextran (LS17-DMC)] did not affect the growth of 1205LU cells. To potentiate the inhibitory activity of NaPA at low concentrations (below 5.6 mM), we have tested NaPA and LS17-DMCB in physical mixture (association) or linked together covalently (this conjugate is termed 'LS17-NaPaC'). We have observed an increase of the 1205LU cell growth inhibition effect with NaPA in association (IC50 1.8 mM). For a concentration of 5 mM of NaPA (free in the case of association or linked in the case of conjugate), the association with dextran derivative exhibits a 4.6-fold higher efficacy than with NaPA alone (9 versus 41% surviving fraction), while the conjugate is 1.3-fold smaller (52% growth inhibition). By performing isobologram analysis of the IC50 data, we have shown a synergistic effect for a particular molar ratio of NaPA and LS17-DMCB (NaPA:LS17-DMCB = 0.35).

  13. Subcutaneous Adipocytes Promote Melanoma Cell Growth by Activating the Akt Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Hiu Yee; Fu, Xiuqiong; Liu, Bin; Chao, Xiaojuan; Chan, Chi Leung; Cao, Huihui; Su, Tao; Tse, Anfernee Kai Wing; Fong, Wang Fun; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Tumorigenesis involves constant communication between tumor cells and neighboring normal cells such as adipocytes. The canonical function of adipocytes is to store triglyceride and release fatty acids for other tissues. This study was aimed to find out if adipocytes promoted melanoma cell growth and to investigate the underlying mechanism. Here we isolated adipocytes from inguinal adipose tissue in mice and co-cultured with melanoma cells. We found that the co-cultured melanoma had higher lipid accumulation compared with mono-cultured melanoma. In addition, fluorescently labeled fatty acid BODIPY® FLC16 signal was detected in melanoma co-cultured with the adipocytes that had been loaded with the fluorescent dye, suggesting that the adipocytes provide fatty acids to melanoma cells. Compared with mono-cultured melanoma, co-cultured melanoma cells had a higher proliferation and phospho-Akt (Ser-473 and Thr-450) expression. Overexpression of Akt mutants in melanoma cells reduced the co-culture-enhanced proliferation. A lipidomic study showed that the co-cultured melanoma had an elevated palmitic acid level. Interestingly, we found that palmitic acid stimulated melanoma cell proliferation, changed the cell cycle distribution, and increased phospho-Akt (Ser-473 and Thr-450) and PI3K but not phospho-PTEN (phosphophosphatase and tensin homolog) expressions. More importantly, the palmitic acid-stimulated proliferation was further enhanced in the Akt-overexpressed melanoma cells and was reduced by LY294002 or knockdown of endogenous Akt or overexpression of Akt mutants. We also found that palmitic acid-pretreated B16F10 cells were grown to a significantly larger tumor in mice compared with control cells. Taken together, we suggest that adipocytes may serve as an exogenous source of palmitic acid that promotes melanoma cell growth by activating Akt. PMID:25228694

  14. Subcutaneous adipocytes promote melanoma cell growth by activating the Akt signaling pathway: role of palmitic acid.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Hiu Yee; Fu, Xiuqiong; Liu, Bin; Chao, Xiaojuan; Chan, Chi Leung; Cao, Huihui; Su, Tao; Tse, Anfernee Kai Wing; Fong, Wang Fun; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2014-10-31

    Tumorigenesis involves constant communication between tumor cells and neighboring normal cells such as adipocytes. The canonical function of adipocytes is to store triglyceride and release fatty acids for other tissues. This study was aimed to find out if adipocytes promoted melanoma cell growth and to investigate the underlying mechanism. Here we isolated adipocytes from inguinal adipose tissue in mice and co-cultured with melanoma cells. We found that the co-cultured melanoma had higher lipid accumulation compared with mono-cultured melanoma. In addition, fluorescently labeled fatty acid BODIPY® FLC16 signal was detected in melanoma co-cultured with the adipocytes that had been loaded with the fluorescent dye, suggesting that the adipocytes provide fatty acids to melanoma cells. Compared with mono-cultured melanoma, co-cultured melanoma cells had a higher proliferation and phospho-Akt (Ser-473 and Thr-450) expression. Overexpression of Akt mutants in melanoma cells reduced the co-culture-enhanced proliferation. A lipidomic study showed that the co-cultured melanoma had an elevated palmitic acid level. Interestingly, we found that palmitic acid stimulated melanoma cell proliferation, changed the cell cycle distribution, and increased phospho-Akt (Ser-473 and Thr-450) and PI3K but not phospho-PTEN (phosphophosphatase and tensin homolog) expressions. More importantly, the palmitic acid-stimulated proliferation was further enhanced in the Akt-overexpressed melanoma cells and was reduced by LY294002 or knockdown of endogenous Akt or overexpression of Akt mutants. We also found that palmitic acid-pretreated B16F10 cells were grown to a significantly larger tumor in mice compared with control cells. Taken together, we suggest that adipocytes may serve as an exogenous source of palmitic acid that promotes melanoma cell growth by activating Akt.

  15. Loss of alleles from the distal short arm of chromosome 1 occurs late in melanoma tumor progression

    SciTech Connect

    Dracopoli, N.C.; Harnett, P.; Bale, S.J.; Stanger, B.Z.; Tucker, M.A.; Housman, D.E.; Kefford, R.F. )

    1989-06-01

    The gene for familial malignant melanoma and its precursor lesion, the dysplastic nevus, has been assigned to a region of the distal short arm of chromosome 1, which is frequently involved in karyotypic abnormalities in melanoma cells. The authors have examined loci on chromosome 1p for loss-of-constitutional heterozygosity in 35 melanomas and 21 melanoma cell lines to analyze the role of these abnormalities in melanocyte transformation. Loss-of-heterozygosity at loci on chromosome 1p was identified in 15/35 (43%) melanomas and 11/21 (52%) melanoma cell lines. Analysis of multiple metastases derived from the same patient and of melanoma and lymphoblastoid samples from a family with hereditary melanoma showed that the loss-of-heterozygosity at loci on distal 1p is a late event in tumor progression, rather than the second mutation that would occur if melanoma were due to a cellular recessive mechanism. Comparisons with neuroblastoma and multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN2) suggest that the frequent 1p loss-of-heterozygosity in these malignancies is a common late event of neuroectodermal tumor progression.

  16. In vivo tumor transfection with superantigen plus cytokine genes induces tumor regression and prolongs survival in dogs with malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Dow, S W; Elmslie, R E; Willson, A P; Roche, L; Gorman, C; Potter, T A

    1998-06-01

    In vivo transfection of established tumors with immunostimulatory genes can elicit antitumor immunity. Therefore, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of intratumoral injections of a bacterial superantigen with a cytokine gene in dogs with malignant melanoma, a spontaneous and highly malignant canine tumor. 26 dogs with melanoma were treated with lipid-complexed plasmid DNA encoding staphylococcal enterotoxin B and either GM-CSF or IL-2. Dogs were evaluated for treatment-associated toxicity, tumor responses, immunologic responses, and survival times. The overall response rate (complete or partial remissions) for all 26 dogs was 46% (12 of 26), and was highest in patients with smaller tumors. Toxicity was minimal or absent in all dogs. Injected tumors developed marked infiltrates of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and macrophages, and tumor regression was associated with development of high levels of antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Survival times for animals with stage III melanomas treated by intratumoral gene therapy were prolonged significantly compared with animals treated with surgical tumor excision only. Thus, local tumor transfection with superantigen and cytokine genes was capable of inducing both local and systemic antitumor immunity in an outbred animal with a spontaneously developing malignant tumor.

  17. In vivo tumor transfection with superantigen plus cytokine genes induces tumor regression and prolongs survival in dogs with malignant melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Dow, S W; Elmslie, R E; Willson, A P; Roche, L; Gorman, C; Potter, T A

    1998-01-01

    In vivo transfection of established tumors with immunostimulatory genes can elicit antitumor immunity. Therefore, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of intratumoral injections of a bacterial superantigen with a cytokine gene in dogs with malignant melanoma, a spontaneous and highly malignant canine tumor. 26 dogs with melanoma were treated with lipid-complexed plasmid DNA encoding staphylococcal enterotoxin B and either GM-CSF or IL-2. Dogs were evaluated for treatment-associated toxicity, tumor responses, immunologic responses, and survival times. The overall response rate (complete or partial remissions) for all 26 dogs was 46% (12 of 26), and was highest in patients with smaller tumors. Toxicity was minimal or absent in all dogs. Injected tumors developed marked infiltrates of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and macrophages, and tumor regression was associated with development of high levels of antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Survival times for animals with stage III melanomas treated by intratumoral gene therapy were prolonged significantly compared with animals treated with surgical tumor excision only. Thus, local tumor transfection with superantigen and cytokine genes was capable of inducing both local and systemic antitumor immunity in an outbred animal with a spontaneously developing malignant tumor. PMID:9616212

  18. Tumor necrosis is associated with increased alphavbeta3 integrin expression and poor prognosis in nodular cutaneous melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Ingeborg M; Ladstein, Rita G; Straume, Oddbjørn; Naumov, George N; Akslen, Lars A

    2008-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis and apoptotic activity are considered important in cancer progression, but these features have not been much studied in melanomas. Our hypothesis was that rapid growth in cutaneous melanomas of the vertical growth phase might lead to tissue hypoxia, alterations in apoptotic activity and tumor necrosis. We proposed that these tumor characteristics might be associated with changes in expression of cell adhesion proteins leading to increased invasive capacity and reduced patient survival. Methods A well characterized series of nodular melanoma (originally 202 cases) and other benign and malignant melanocytic tumors (109 cases) were examined for the presence of necrosis, apoptotic activity (TUNEL assay), immunohistochemical expression of hypoxia markers (HIF-1 α, CAIX, TNF-α, Apaf-1) and cell adhesion proteins (αvβ3 integrin, CD44/HCAM and osteopontin). We hypothesized that tumor hypoxia and necrosis might be associated with increased invasiveness in melanoma through alterations of tumor cell adhesion proteins. Results Necrosis was present in 29% of nodular melanomas and was associated with increased tumor thickness, tumor ulceration, vascular invasion, higher tumor proliferation and apoptotic index, increased expression of αvβ3 integrin and poor patient outcome by multivariate analysis. Tumor cell apoptosis did also correlate with reduced patient survival. Expression of TNF-α and Apaf-1 was significantly associated with tumor thickness, and osteopontin expression correlated with increased tumor cell proliferation (Ki-67). Conclusion Tumor necrosis and apoptotic activity are important features of melanoma progression and prognosis, at least partly through alterations in cell adhesion molecules such as increased αvβ3 integrin expression, revealing potentially important targets for new therapeutic approaches to be further explored. PMID:19061491

  19. Cell Surface CD74-MIF Interactions Drive Melanoma Survival in Response to Interferon-γ.

    PubMed

    Tanese, Keiji; Hashimoto, Yuuri; Berkova, Zuzana; Wang, Yuling; Samaniego, Felipe; Lee, Jeffrey E; Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Grimm, Elizabeth A

    2015-11-01

    Melanoma is believed to be a highly immunogenic tumor and recent developments in immunotherapies are promising. IFN-γ produced by immune cells has a crucial role in tumor immune surveillance; however, it has also been reported to be pro-tumorigenic. In the current study, we found that IFN-γ enhances the expression of CD74, which interacts with its ligand, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), and thereby activates the PI3K/AKT pathway in melanoma, promoting tumor survival. IFN-γ increased phosphorylation of AKT Ser473 and upregulated total cell surface expression of CD74 in human melanoma cell lines tested. CD74 was highly expressed in melanoma tissues. Moreover, the expression of CD74 on tumor cells correlated with plasma IFN-γ levels in melanoma patient samples. In our analysis of melanoma cell lines, all produced MIF constitutively. Blockade of CD74-MIF interaction reduced AKT phosphorylation and expression of pro-tumorigenic molecules, including IL-6, IL-8, and BCL-2. Inhibition of CD74-MIF interaction significantly suppressed tumor growth in the presence of IFN-γ in our xenograft mouse model. Thus, we conclude that IFN-γ promotes melanoma cell survival by regulating CD74-MIF signaling, suggesting that targeting the CD74-MIF interaction under IFN-γ-stimulatory conditions would be an effective therapeutic approach for melanoma.

  20. Identification of melanoma-reactive CD4+ T cell subsets from Human Melanoma Draining Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei; Graor, Hallie; Yan, Lu; Kim, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that melanoma draining lymph node (MDLN) samples from stage III patients contained both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells that can be readily expanded to mediate tumor cell apoptosis in vitro and improve survival in mice bearing human melanoma xenografts. In this study, we investigated whether MDLN T cells contain melanoma-reactive CD4+ T cell compartment and what they are. In order to test this, we performed multi-parametric (11-color and 6-color) FACS analyses to monitor phenotypic and functional property of CD4+ T cells in response to melanoma cell antigen re-exposure. Our results have demonstrated that the antigen re-exposure could result in a generation of CD4+CCR7+CD62L+CD27− T cell subsets with various effector cell-like properties. Within the CD4+CCR7+CD62L+CD27− T cell compartment, in response to antigen re-exposure, some of the cells expressed significantly up-regulated CD40L and/or CXCR5, and some of them expressed significantly up-regulated IL-2 and/or TNF-α. This may suggest the existence of melanoma reactive CD4+ “effector-precursor” cells within the expanded MDLN cells and their differentiation into various effector lineages in response to antigen re-stimulation. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated that effective adoptive cellular immunotherapy (ACI) maybe enhanced by antigen specific CD4+ T cells. Therefore, results of this study may significantly benefit innovative design of ACI that can potentially mediate enhanced and durable clinical responses. PMID:26641258

  1. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells inhibit melanoma growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin-Ok; Coh, Ye-Rin; Lee, Hee-Woo; Shin, Il-Seob; Kang, Sung-Keun; Youn, Hwa-Young

    2015-01-01

    The effects of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) on the growth of human malignancies, including melanoma, are controversial and the underlying mechanisms are not yet-well understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor effects of human AT-MSCs on human melanoma. The inhibitory effect of AT-MSC-conditioned medium (AT-MSC-CM) on the growth of A375SM and A375P (human melanoma) cells was evaluated using a cell viability assay. Cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in melanoma cells were investigated by flow cytometry and western blot analysis. To evaluate the in vivo anti-tumor effect of AT-MSCs, CM-DiI-labeled AT-MSCs were circumtumorally injected in tumor-bearing athymic mice and tumor size was measured. AT-MSC-CM inhibited melanoma growth by altering cell-cycle distribution and inducing apoptosis in vitro. AT-MSCs suppressed tumor growth in tumor-bearing athymic mice and fluorescence analysis showed that AT-MSCs migrated efficiently to tumor tissues. AT-MSCs inhibit the growth of melanoma suggesting promise as a novel therapeutic agent for melanoma. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Immunohistochemistry in Melanoma Tumors.

    PubMed

    Lilyquist, Jenna; White, Kirsten Anne Meyer; Lee, Rebecca J; Philips, Genevieve K; Hughes, Christopher R; Torres, Salina M

    2017-04-01

    Identification of positive staining is often qualitative and subjective. This is particularly troublesome in pigmented melanoma lesions, because melanin is difficult to distinguish from the brown stain resulting from immunohistochemistry (IHC) using horse radish peroxidase developed with 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine (HRP-DAB). We sought to identify and quantify positive staining, particularly in melanoma lesions. We visualized G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) expression developed with HRP-DAB and counterstained with Azure B (stains melanin) in melanoma tissue sections (n = 3). Matched sections (n = 3), along with 22 unmatched sections, were stained only with Azure B as a control. Breast tissue (n = 1) was used as a positive HRP-DAB control. Images of the stained tissues were generated using a Nuance Spectral Imaging Camera. Analysis of the images was performed using the Nuance Spectral Imaging software and SlideBook. Data was analyzed using a Kruskal-Wallis one way analysis of variance (ANOVA). We showed that a pigmented melanoma tissue doubly stained with anti-GPER HRP-DAB and Azure B can be unmixed using spectra derived from a matched, Azure B-only section, and an anti-GPER HRP-DAB control. We unmixed each of the melanoma lesions using each of the Azure B spectra, evaluated the mean intensity of positive staining, and examined the distribution of the mean intensities (P = .73; Kruskal-Wallis). These results suggest that this method does not require a matched Azure B-only stained control tissue for every melanoma lesion, allowing precious tissues to be conserved for other studies. Importantly, this quantification method reduces the subjectivity of protein expression analysis, and provides a valuable tool for accurate evaluation, particularly for pigmented tissues.

  3. Microarray evidence of glutaminyl cyclase gene expression in melanoma: implications for tumor antigen specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, John Stuart

    2006-01-01

    Background In recent years encouraging progress has been made in developing vaccine treatments for cancer, particularly with melanoma. However, the overall rate of clinically significant results has remained low. The present research used microarray datasets from previous investigations to examine gene expression patterns in cancer cell lines with the goal of better understanding the tumor microenvironment. Methods Principal Components Analyses with Promax rotational transformations were carried out with 90 cancer cell lines from 3 microarray datasets, which had been made available on the internet as supplementary information from prior publications. Results In each of the analyses a well defined melanoma component was identified that contained a gene coding for the enzyme, glutaminyl cyclase, which was as highly expressed as genes from a variety of well established biomarkers for melanoma, such as MAGE-3 and MART-1, which have frequently been used in clinical trials of melanoma vaccines. Conclusion Since glutaminyl cyclase converts glutamine and glutamic acid into a pyroglutamic form, it may interfere with the tumor destructive process of vaccines using peptides having glutamine or glutamic acid at their N-terminals. Finding ways of inhibiting the activity of glutaminyl cyclase in the tumor microenvironment may help to increase the effectiveness of some melanoma vaccines. PMID:16820060

  4. Label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Yang, Ping; Liu, Rongrong; Niu, Zhenyu; Suo, Yuanzhen; He, Hao; Gao, Wenyuan; Tang, Shuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Melanoma cells have high light absorption due to melanin highly contained in melanoma cells. This property is employed for the detection of circulating melanoma cell by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC), which is based on photoacoustic effect. Compared to in vivo flow cytometry based on fluorescence, PAFC can employ high melanin content of melanoma cells as endogenous biomarkers to detect circulating melanoma cells in vivo. We have developed in vitro experiments to prove the ability of PAFC system of detecting photoacoustic signals from melanoma cells. For in vivo experiments, we have constructed a model of melanoma tumor bearing mice by inoculating highly metastatic murine melanoma cancer cells, B16F10 with subcutaneous injection. PA signals are detected in the blood vessels of mouse ears in vivo. The raw signal detected from target cells often contains some noise caused by electronic devices, such as background noise and thermal noise. We choose the Wavelet denoising method to effectively distinguish the target signal from background noise. Processing in time domain and frequency domain would be combined to analyze the signal after denoising. This algorithm contains time domain filter and frequency transformation. The frequency spectrum image of the signal contains distinctive features that can be used to analyze the property of target cells or particles. The processing methods have a great potential for analyzing signals accurately and rapidly. By counting circulating melanoma cells termly, we obtain the number variation of circulating melanoma cells as melanoma metastasized. Those results show that PAFC is a noninvasive and label-free method to detect melanoma metastases in blood or lymph circulation.

  5. Human Melanoma Initiating Cells Express Neural Crest Nerve Growth Factor Receptor CD271

    PubMed Central

    Boiko, Alexander D.; Razorenova, Olga V.; van de Rijn, Matt; Swetter, Susan M.; Johnson, Denise L.; Ly, Daphne P.; Butler, Paris D.; Yang, George P.; Joshua, Benzion; Kaplan, Michael J.; Longaker, Michael T.; Weissman, Irving L.

    2010-01-01

    The question whether tumorigenic cancer stem cells exist in human melanomas has arisen recently1. Here we show that in melanomas, tumor stem cells (MTSC) can be isolated prospectively as a highly enriched CD271+ MTSC population using a process that maximizes viable cell transplantation1,6. In this study the tumors sampled were taken from a broad spectrum of sites and stages. High viability FACS isolated cells resuspended in a matrigel vehicle were implanted into T, B, and NK deficient Rag2−/− γc−/− mice (RG) mice. The CD271+ subset of cells was the tumor initiating population in 9/10 melanomas tested. Transplantation of isolated melanoma cells into engrafted human skin or bone in RG mice resulted in melanoma from CD271+ but not CD271− cells. We also showed that tumors transplanted by CD271+ patient cells were capable of metastasis in-vivo. Importantly, CD271+ melanoma cells lacked expression of TYR, MART and MAGE in 86%, 69% and 68% of melanoma patients respectively suggesting why T cell therapies directed at these antigens usually result in only temporary tumor shrinkage. PMID:20596026

  6. Point of care assessment of melanoma tumor signaling and metastatic burden from μNMR analysis of tumor fine needle aspirates and peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Gee, Michael S; Ghazani, Arezou A; Haq, Rizwan; Wargo, Jennifer A; Sebas, Matthew; Sullivan, Ryan J; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluates μNMR technology for molecular profiling of tumor fine needle aspirates and peripheral blood of melanoma patients. In vitro assessment of melanocyte (MART-1, HMB45) and MAP kinase signaling (pERK, pS6K) molecule expression was performed in human cell lines, while clinical validation was performed in an IRB-approved study of melanoma patients undergoing biopsy and blood sampling. Tumor FNA and blood specimens were compared with BRAF genetic analysis and cross-sectional imaging. μNMR in vitro analysis showed increased expression of melanocyte markers in melanoma cells as well as increased expression of phosphorylated MAP kinase targets in BRAF-mutant melanoma cells. Melanoma patient FNA samples showed increased pERK and pS6K levels in BRAF mutant compared with BRAF WT melanomas, with μNMR blood circulating tumor cell level increased with higher metastatic burden visible on imaging. These results indicate that μNMR technology provides minimally invasive point-of-care evaluation of tumor signaling and metastatic burden in melanoma patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most important contributors to melanoma is ultraviolet (UV) sun damage. Cells that have been damaged — particularly ... red hair) multiple moles (typically, more than 25) UV exposure (whether from the sun or a tanning ...

  8. Fine needle aspiration biopsy to reestablish cell culture in an animal model of uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Correa, Zelia Maria da Silva; Marshall, Jean-Claude; Souza Filho, João Pessoa; Odashiro, Alexandre Nakao; Burnier Jr, Miguel Noel

    2009-01-01

    To access the reliability of fine-needle aspiration biopsy in harvesting a sufficient amount of viable melanoma cells to establish a cell culture and maintain a melanoma cell line from an animal model of uveal melanoma. For this study, fifteen male New Zealand albino rabbits had their right eye surgically inoculated with uveal melanoma cell line 92.1. The animals were immunosupressed with cyclosporine A using a dose schedule previously published. The animals were followed for 12 weeks. Intraocular tumor growth was monitored weekly by indirect ophthalmoscopy. After the fourth week, one animal was sacrificed per week preceded by fine-needle aspiration biopsy using a sharp 25-gauge, 1-inch long needle. Two separate aspirates were made from different areas of the tumor. Each aspirate was flushed to a separate cell culture media and sent for cell culture. The cells were frozen after two weeks when there were at least 1 million cells, which is enough to maintain a cell line. Cells were defrosted for HMB-45 immuno-stains to confirm the melanoma origin. Cell growth was observed from the samples harvested from 11 out of the 15 animals inoculated with uveal melanoma. All cell cultures, after defrost, immunoassayed positive for HMB-45. Fine needle aspiration biopsy seems to be a reliable method to harvest cells from solid intraocular melanomas in an animal model, to establish cell culture and to maintain a melanoma cell line.

  9. MicroRNA 211 Functions as a Metabolic Switch in Human Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mazar, Joseph; Qi, Feng; Lee, Bongyong; Marchica, John; Govindarajan, Subramaniam; Shelley, John; Li, Jian-Liang; Ray, Animesh

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA 211 (miR-211) negatively regulates genes that drive invasion of metastatic melanoma. Compared to normal human melanocytes, miR-211 expression is significantly reduced or absent in nonpigmented melanoma cells and lost during human melanoma progression. To investigate the molecular mechanism of its tumor suppressor function, miR-211 was ectopically expressed in nonpigmented melanoma cells. Ectopic expression of miR-211 reduced hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) protein levels and decreased cell growth during hypoxia. HIF-1α protein loss was correlated with the downregulation of a miR-211 target gene, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4). We present evidence that resumption of miR-211-mediated downregulation of PDK4 in melanoma cells causes inhibition of invasion by nonpigmented melanomas via HIF-1α protein destabilization. Thus, the tumor suppressor miR-211 acts as a metabolic switch, and its loss is expected to promote cancer hallmarks in human melanomas. Melanoma, one of the deadliest forms of skin cancer, kills nearly 10,000 people in the United States per year. We had previously shown that a small noncoding RNA, termed miR-211, suppresses invasion and the growth of aggressive melanoma cells. The results presented here support the hypothesis that miR-211 loss in melanoma cells causes abnormal regulation of energy metabolism, which in turn allows cancer cells to survive under low oxygen concentrations—a condition that generally kills normal cells. These findings highlight a novel mechanism of melanoma formation: miR-211 is a molecular switch that is turned off in melanoma cells, raising the hope that in the future we might be able to turn the switch back on, thus providing a better treatment option for melanoma. PMID:26787841

  10. Melanoma chemotherapy leads to the selection of ABCB5-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Chartrain, Marine; Riond, Joëlle; Stennevin, Aline; Vandenberghe, Isabelle; Gomes, Bruno; Lamant, Laurence; Meyer, Nicolas; Gairin, Jean Edouard; Guilbaud, Nicolas; Annereau, Jean Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer. Recently, phenotypically distinct subpopulations of tumor cells were identified. Among them, ABCB5-expressing cells were proposed to display an enhanced tumorigenicity with stem cell-like properties. In addition, ABCB5(+) cells are thought to participate to chemoresistance through a potential efflux function of ABCB5. Nevertheless, the fate of these cells upon drugs that are used in melanoma chemotherapy remains to be clarified. Here we explored the effect of anti-melanoma treatments on the ABCB5-expressing cells. Using a melanoma xenograft model (WM266-4), we observed in vivo that ABCB5-expressing cells are enriched after a temozolomide treatment that induces a significant tumor regression. These results were further confirmed in a preliminary study conducted on clinical samples from patients that received dacarbazine. In vitro, we showed that ABCB5-expressing cells selectively survive when exposed to dacarbazine, the reference treatment of metastatic melanoma, but also to vemurafenib, a new inhibitor of the mutated kinase V600E BRAF and other various chemotherapeutic drugs. Our results show that anti-melanoma chemotherapy might participate to the chemoresistance acquisition by selecting tumor cell subpopulations expressing ABCB5. This is of particular importance in understanding the relapses observed after anti-melanoma treatments and reinforces the interest of ABCB5 and ABCB5-expressing cells as potential therapeutic targets in melanoma.

  11. Melanoma Chemotherapy Leads to the Selection of ABCB5-Expressing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stennevin, Aline; Vandenberghe, Isabelle; Gomes, Bruno; Lamant, Laurence; Meyer, Nicolas; Gairin, Jean Edouard; Guilbaud, Nicolas; Annereau, Jean Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer. Recently, phenotypically distinct subpopulations of tumor cells were identified. Among them, ABCB5-expressing cells were proposed to display an enhanced tumorigenicity with stem cell-like properties. In addition, ABCB5+ cells are thought to participate to chemoresistance through a potential efflux function of ABCB5. Nevertheless, the fate of these cells upon drugs that are used in melanoma chemotherapy remains to be clarified. Here we explored the effect of anti-melanoma treatments on the ABCB5-expressing cells. Using a melanoma xenograft model (WM266-4), we observed in vivo that ABCB5-expressing cells are enriched after a temozolomide treatment that induces a significant tumor regression. These results were further confirmed in a preliminary study conducted on clinical samples from patients that received dacarbazine. In vitro, we showed that ABCB5-expressing cells selectively survive when exposed to dacarbazine, the reference treatment of metastatic melanoma, but also to vemurafenib, a new inhibitor of the mutated kinase V600E BRAF and other various chemotherapeutic drugs. Our results show that anti-melanoma chemotherapy might participate to the chemoresistance acquisition by selecting tumor cell subpopulations expressing ABCB5. This is of particular importance in understanding the relapses observed after anti-melanoma treatments and reinforces the interest of ABCB5 and ABCB5-expressing cells as potential therapeutic targets in melanoma. PMID:22675422

  12. Effect of low frequency magnetic fields on melanoma: tumor inhibition and immune modulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We previously found that the low frequency magnetic fields (LF-MF) inhibited gastric and lung cancer cell growth. We suppose that exposure to LF-MF may modulate immune function so as to inhibit tumor. We here investigated whether LF-MF can inhibit the proliferation and metastasis of melanoma and influence immune function. Methods The effect of MF on the proliferation, cell cycle and ultrastracture of B16-F10 in vitro was detected by cell counting Kit-8 assay, flow cytometry, and transmission electron microscopy. Lung metastasis mice were prepared by injection of 2 × 105 B16-F10 melanoma cells into the tail vein in C57BL/6 mice. The mice were then exposed to an LF-MF (0.4 T, 7.5 Hz) for 43 days. Survival rate, tumor markers and the innate and adaptive immune parameters were measured. Results The growth of B16-F10 cells was inhibited after exposure to the LF-MF. The inhibition was related to induction of cell cycle arrest and decomposition of chromatins. Moreover, the LF-MF prolonged the mouse survival rate and inhibited the proliferation of B16-F10 in melanoma metastasis mice model. Furthermore, the LF-MF modulated the immune response via regulation of immune cells and cytokine production. In addition, the number of Treg cells was decreased in mice with the LF-MF exposure, while the numbers of T cells as well as dendritic cells were significantly increased. Conclusion LF-MF inhibited the growth and metastasis of melanoma cancer cells and improved immune function of tumor-bearing mice. This suggests that the inhibition may be attributed to modulation of LF-MF on immune function and LF-MF may be a potential therapy for treatment of melanoma. PMID:24314291

  13. Endostar attenuates melanoma tumor growth via its interruption of b-FGF mediated angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lijia; Yang, ShuCai; Hao, Jianhua; Yuan, Xue; Luo, Wei; Jiang, Liping; Hu, Yang; Fu, Zhongping; Zhang, Yun; Zou, Chang

    2015-04-01

    To develop optimal therapeutics is one of the hotspots in both clinical and basic melanoma studies. Previous studies indicate that fibroblast growth factors (b-FGF/FGF-2), an angiogenesis inducer beyond VEGF, might be a potential drug target in melanoma. As a novel anti-angiogenesis peptide drug, Endostar has shown promising therapeutic efficacy in non-small cell lung cancer. However, the effect of Endostar on b-FGF-induced angiogenesis in melanoma is unraveled. To this end, both in vivo and in vitro experiments were conducted and it was found that treatment of Endostar could inhibit tumor growth, which was accompanied by decreased micro-vessel density and serum b-FGF levels in a mouse melanoma model. In addition, treatment with Endostar in blood vessel endothelial cells could reduce their proliferation, cell migration and tube formation capacity in a dosage-dependent manner. Moreover, treatment of Endostar could also attenuate b-FGF-activated phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 in HUVECs. These findings indicate that Endostar might exert its anti-tumor effect via suppressing b-FGF-induced angiogenesis and b-FGF-activated MAPK signaling pathway, suggesting that Endostar might be a potential choice for clinical melanoma treatment.

  14. Phenotypic heterogeneity among tumorigenic melanoma cells from patients that is reversible and not hierarchically organized

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Elsa; Shackleton, Mark; Foster, Hannah R.; Fullen, Douglas R.; Sabel, Michael S.; Johnson, Timothy M.; Morrison, Sean J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary We investigated whether melanoma is hierarchically organized into phenotypically distinct subpopulations of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells, or whether most melanoma cells retain tumorigenic capacity, irrespective of their phenotype. We found 28% of single melanoma cells obtained directly from patients formed tumors in NOD/SCID IL2Rγnull mice. All stage II, III, and IV melanomas obtained directly from patients had common tumorigenic cells. All tumorigenic cells appeared to have unlimited tumorigenic capacity upon serial transplantation. We were unable to find any large subpopulation of melanoma cells that lacked tumorigenic potential. None of 22 heterogeneously-expressed markers, including CD271 and ABCB5, enriched tumorigenic cells. Some melanomas metastasized in mice, irrespective of whether they arose from CD271- or CD271+ cells. Many markers appeared to be reversibly expressed by tumorigenic melanoma cells. Significance In cancers that follow a stem cell model, phenotypically distinct tumorigenic cells form abundant and phenotypically diverse non-tumorigenic progeny in a hierarchical manner that resembles normal stem cell differentiation. In contrast to this model, our results indicate that primary cutaneous or metastatic melanomas from patients have common and phenotypically diverse tumorigenic cells that undergo reversible phenotypic changes in vivo. Most of the phenotypic heterogeneity in melanoma is therefore not associated with a loss of tumorigenic potential or organized in stable hierarchies. These data suggest a phenotypic plasticity model in which phenotypic heterogeneity is driven largely by reversible changes within lineages of tumorigenic cells rather than by irreversible epigenetic or genetic changes. PMID:21075313

  15. Therapeutic potential of the metabolic modulator phenformin in targeting the stem cell compartment in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Albini, Adriana; Longo, Caterina; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Grisendi, Giulia; Dominici, Massimo; Ciarrocchi, Alessia; Dallaglio, Katiuscia

    2017-01-01

    Melanoma is the most dangerous and treatment-resistant skin cancer. Tumor resistance and recurrence are due to the persistence in the patient of aggressive cells with stem cell features, the cancer stem cells (CSC). Recent evidences have shown that CSC display a distinct metabolic profile as compared to tumor bulk population: a promising anti-tumor strategy is therefore to target specific metabolic pathways driving CSC behavior. Biguanides (metformin and phenformin) are anti-diabetic drugs able to perturb cellular metabolism and displaying anti-cancer activity. However, their ability to target the CSC compartment in melanoma is not known. Here we show that phenformin, but not metformin, strongly reduces melanoma cell viability, growth and invasion in both 2D and 3D (spheroids) models. While phenformin decreases melanoma CSC markers expression and the levels of the pro-survival factor MITF, MITF overexpression fails to prevent phenformin effects. Phenformin significantly reduces cell viability in melanoma by targeting both CSC (ALDHhigh) and non-CSC cells and by significantly reducing the number of viable cells in ALDHhigh and ALDHlow-derived spheroids. Consistently, phenformin reduces melanoma cell viability and growth independently from SOX2 levels. Our results show that phenformin is able to affect both CSC and non-CSC melanoma cell viability and growth and suggests its potential use as anti-cancer therapy in melanoma. PMID:28036292

  16. Targeting antisense mitochondrial ncRNAs inhibits murine melanoma tumor growth and metastasis through reduction in survival and invasion factors

    PubMed Central

    Lobos-González, Lorena; Silva, Verónica; Araya, Mariela; Restovic, Franko; Echenique, Javiera; Oliveira-Cruz, Luciana; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Briones, Macarena; Villegas, Jaime; Villota, Claudio; Vidaurre, Soledad; Borgna, Vincenzo; Socias, Miguel; Valenzuela, Sebastián; Lopez, Constanza; Socias, Teresa; Varas, Manuel; Díaz, Jorge; Burzio, Luis O.; Burzio, Verónica A.

    2016-01-01

    We reported that knockdown of the antisense noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ASncmtRNAs) induces apoptotic death of several human tumor cell lines, but not normal cells, suggesting this approach for selective therapy against different types of cancer. In order to translate these results to a preclinical scenario, we characterized the murine noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ncmtRNAs) and performed in vivo knockdown in syngeneic murine melanoma models. Mouse ncmtRNAs display structures similar to the human counterparts, including long double-stranded regions arising from the presence of inverted repeats. Knockdown of ASncmtRNAs with specific antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) reduces murine melanoma B16F10 cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in vitro through downregulation of pro-survival and metastasis markers, particularly survivin. For in vivo studies, subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors in C57BL/6 mice were treated systemically with specific and control antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). For metastasis studies, tumors were resected, followed by systemic administration of ASOs and the presence of metastatic nodules in lungs and liver was assessed. Treatment with specific ASO inhibited tumor growth and metastasis after primary tumor resection. In a metastasis-only assay, mice inoculated intravenously with cells and treated with the same ASO displayed reduced number and size of melanoma nodules in the lungs, compared to controls. Our results suggest that ASncmtRNAs could be potent targets for melanoma therapy. To our knowledge, the ASncmtRNAs are the first potential non-nuclear targets for melanoma therapy. PMID:27507060

  17. Targeting antisense mitochondrial ncRNAs inhibits murine melanoma tumor growth and metastasis through reduction in survival and invasion factors.

    PubMed

    Lobos-González, Lorena; Silva, Verónica; Araya, Mariela; Restovic, Franko; Echenique, Javiera; Oliveira-Cruz, Luciana; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Briones, Macarena; Villegas, Jaime; Villota, Claudio; Vidaurre, Soledad; Borgna, Vincenzo; Socias, Miguel; Valenzuela, Sebastián; Lopez, Constanza; Socias, Teresa; Varas, Manuel; Díaz, Jorge; Burzio, Luis O; Burzio, Verónica A

    2016-09-06

    We reported that knockdown of the antisense noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ASncmtRNAs) induces apoptotic death of several human tumor cell lines, but not normal cells, suggesting this approach for selective therapy against different types of cancer. In order to translate these results to a preclinical scenario, we characterized the murine noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ncmtRNAs) and performed in vivo knockdown in syngeneic murine melanoma models. Mouse ncmtRNAs display structures similar to the human counterparts, including long double-stranded regions arising from the presence of inverted repeats. Knockdown of ASncmtRNAs with specific antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) reduces murine melanoma B16F10 cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in vitro through downregulation of pro-survival and metastasis markers, particularly survivin. For in vivo studies, subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors in C57BL/6 mice were treated systemically with specific and control antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). For metastasis studies, tumors were resected, followed by systemic administration of ASOs and the presence of metastatic nodules in lungs and liver was assessed. Treatment with specific ASO inhibited tumor growth and metastasis after primary tumor resection. In a metastasis-only assay, mice inoculated intravenously with cells and treated with the same ASO displayed reduced number and size of melanoma nodules in the lungs, compared to controls. Our results suggest that ASncmtRNAs could be potent targets for melanoma therapy. To our knowledge, the ASncmtRNAs are the first potential non-nuclear targets for melanoma therapy.

  18. The gallium complex KP46 exerts strong activity against primary explanted melanoma cells and induces apoptosis in melanoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Valiahdi, Seied Mojtaba; Heffeter, Petra; Jakupec, Michael A.; Marculescu, Rodrig; Berger, Walter; Rappersberger, Klemens; Keppler, Bernhard K.

    2012-01-01

    The antineoplastic properties of gallium are well documented. Owing to their robust accumulation of gallium, melanoma cells should be amenable to gallium-based anticancer drugs. With the aim of improving the disappointingly low activity of inorganic gallium salts, we have developed the orally bioavailable gallium complex KP46 [tris(8-quinolinolato)gallium(III)] that was already successfully studied in a phase I clinical trial. To assess its therapeutic potential in malignant melanoma, its antiproliferative effects were investigated in series of human cell lines and primary explanted melanoma samples by means of the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay and the Human Tumor Cloning Assay, respectively. When compared with other cell lines, the majority of melanoma cells rank among the KP46-sensitive cell lines (50% inhibitory concentration values: 0.8–3.7 μmol/l). Clinically achievable concentrations of KP46 proved to be highly effective in melanoma cells from primary explants of cutaneous and lymph node metastases. Colony growth was inhibited in 10 of 10 specimens by 5 lmol/l KP46 (corresponding to the steady-state plasma concentration measured earlier in a study patient) and in four of 10 specimens by 0.5 μmol/l KP46. In-vitro potency of KP46 is higher than that of dacarbazine or fotemustine and comparable with that of cisplatin. The effects induced by KP46 in melanoma cell lines involve cell cycle perturbations (S-phase arrest) and apoptosis (activation of caspase-9, PARP [poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase] cleavage, formation of apoptotic bodies). No effects on DNA secondary structure could be observed in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay using double-stranded plasmid DNA. Thus, further studies on the therapeutic applicability of KP46 in malignant melanoma are warranted. PMID:19584767

  19. Functional effects of GRM1 suppression in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wangari-Talbot, Janet; Wall, Brian A; Goydos, James S; Chen, Suzie

    2012-11-01

    Ectopic expression of a neuronal receptor, metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (Grm1), in melanocytes has been implicated in melanoma development in mouse models. The human relevance of this receptor's involvement in melanoma pathogenesis was shown by detecting GRM1 expression in subsets of human melanomas, an observation lacking in benign nevi or normal melanocytes. Grm1-transformed mouse melanocytes and a conditional Grm1 transgenic mouse model confirmed a requirement for sustained expression of Grm1 for the maintenance of transformed phenotypes in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Here, we investigate if continued GRM1 expression is also required in human melanoma cell lines by using two inducible, silencing RNA systems: the ecdysone/Ponasterone A and tetracycline on/off approaches to regulate GRM1 expression in the presence of each inducer. Various in vitro assays were conducted to assess the consequences of a reduction in GRM1 expression on cell proliferation, apoptosis, downstream targeted signaling pathways, and in vivo tumorigenesis. We showed that suppression of GRM1 expression in several human melanoma cell lines resulted in a reduction in the number of viable cells and a decrease in stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and PI3K/AKT and suppressed tumor progression in vivo. These results reinforce earlier observations where a reduction in cell growth in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo were correlated with decreased GRM1 activities by pharmacologic inhibitors of the receptor, supporting the notion that GRM1 plays a role in the maintenance of transformed phenotypes in human melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo and could be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma.

  20. Functional Effects of GRM1 Suppression in Human Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wangari-Talbot, Janet; Wall, Brian A.; Goydos, James S.; Chen, Suzie

    2012-01-01

    Ectopic expression of a neuronal receptor, Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1 (Grm1), in melanocytes has been implicated in melanoma development in mouse models. The human relevance of this receptor’s involvement in melanoma pathogenesis was demonstrated by detecting GRM1 expression in subsets of human melanomas, an observation lacking in benign nevi or normal melanocytes. Grm1-transformed mouse melanocytes and a conditional Grm1 transgenic mouse model confirmed a requirement for sustained expression of Grm1 for the maintenance of transformed phenotypes in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Here, we investigate if continued GRM1 expression is also required in human melanoma cell lines by using two inducible, silencing RNA systems: the ecdysone/Ponasterone A and tetracycline on/off approaches to regulate GRM1 expression in the presence of each inducer. Various in vitro assays were performed to assess consequences of a reduction in GRM1 expression on cell proliferation, apoptosis, downstream targeted signaling pathways and in vivo tumorigenesis. We demonstrated that suppression of GRM1 expression in several human melanoma cell lines resulted in a reduction in the number of viable cells and a decrease in stimulated MAPK and PI3K/AKT and suppressed tumor progression in vivo. These results reinforce earlier observations where a reduction in cell growth in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo were correlated with decreased GRM1 activities by pharmacological inhibitors of the receptor, supporting the notion that GRM1 plays a role in the maintenance of transformed phenotypes in human melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo and potentially be a therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:22798429

  1. BPTF transduces MITF-driven prosurvival signals in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Altaf A.; Majid, Shahana; Bezrookove, Vladimir; Phan, Binh; Ursu, Sarah; Nosrati, Mehdi; De Semir, David; Sagebiel, Richard W.; Miller, James R.; Debs, Robert; Cleaver, James E.; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) plays a critical and complex role in melanocyte transformation. Although several downstream targets of MITF action have been identified, the precise mechanisms by which MITF promotes melanocytic tumor progression are incompletely understood. Recent studies identified an oncogenic role for the bromodomain plant homeodomain finger transcription factor (BPTF) gene in melanoma progression, in part through activation of BCL2, a canonical target of MITF signaling. Analysis of the BPTF promoter identified a putative MITF-binding site, suggesting that MITF may regulate BPTF expression. Overexpression of MITF resulted in up-regulation of BPTF in a panel of melanoma and melanocyte cell lines. shRNA-mediated down-regulation of MITF in melanoma cells was accompanied by down-regulation of BPTF and BPTF-regulated genes (including BCL2) and resulted in reduced proliferative capacity of melanoma cells. The suppression of cell growth mediated by MITF silencing was rescued by overexpression of BPTF cDNA. Binding of MITF to the BPTF promoter was demonstrated using ChIP analysis. MITF overexpression resulted in direct transcriptional activation of BPTF, as evidenced by increased luciferase activity driven by the BPTF promoter. These results indicate that BPTF transduces key prosurvival signals driven by MITF, further supporting its important role in promoting melanoma cell survival and progression. PMID:27185926

  2. Oxidative stress inhibits distant metastasis by human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Piskounova, Elena; Agathocleous, Michalis; Murphy, Malea M.; Hu, Zeping; Huddlestun, Sara E.; Zhao, Zhiyu; Leitch, A. Marilyn; Johnson, Timothy M.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Morrison, Sean J.

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancer cells commonly enter the blood and disseminate systemically but are highly inefficient at forming distant metastases for poorly understood reasons. We studied human melanomas that differed in their metastasis histories in patients and in their capacity to metastasize in NSG mice. All melanomas had high frequencies of cells that formed subcutaneous tumours, but much lower percentages of cells that formed tumours after intravenous or intrasplenic transplantation, particularly among inefficient metastasizers. Melanoma cells in the blood and visceral organs experienced oxidative stress not observed in established subcutaneous tumours. Successfully metastasizing melanomas underwent reversible metabolic changes during metastasis that increased their capacity to withstand oxidative stress, including increased dependence upon NADPH-generating enzymes in the folate pathway. Anti-oxidants promoted distant metastasis in NSG mice. Folate pathway inhibition using low-dose methotrexate, ALDH1L2 knockdown, or MTHFD1 knockdown inhibited distant metastasis without significantly affecting the growth of subcutaneous tumors in the same mice. Oxidative stress thus limits distant metastasis by melanoma cells in vivo. PMID:26466563

  3. BPTF transduces MITF-driven prosurvival signals in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dar, Altaf A; Majid, Shahana; Bezrookove, Vladimir; Phan, Binh; Ursu, Sarah; Nosrati, Mehdi; De Semir, David; Sagebiel, Richard W; Miller, James R; Debs, Robert; Cleaver, James E; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed

    2016-05-31

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) plays a critical and complex role in melanocyte transformation. Although several downstream targets of MITF action have been identified, the precise mechanisms by which MITF promotes melanocytic tumor progression are incompletely understood. Recent studies identified an oncogenic role for the bromodomain plant homeodomain finger transcription factor (BPTF) gene in melanoma progression, in part through activation of BCL2, a canonical target of MITF signaling. Analysis of the BPTF promoter identified a putative MITF-binding site, suggesting that MITF may regulate BPTF expression. Overexpression of MITF resulted in up-regulation of BPTF in a panel of melanoma and melanocyte cell lines. shRNA-mediated down-regulation of MITF in melanoma cells was accompanied by down-regulation of BPTF and BPTF-regulated genes (including BCL2) and resulted in reduced proliferative capacity of melanoma cells. The suppression of cell growth mediated by MITF silencing was rescued by overexpression of BPTF cDNA. Binding of MITF to the BPTF promoter was demonstrated using ChIP analysis. MITF overexpression resulted in direct transcriptional activation of BPTF, as evidenced by increased luciferase activity driven by the BPTF promoter. These results indicate that BPTF transduces key prosurvival signals driven by MITF, further supporting its important role in promoting melanoma cell survival and progression.

  4. Testing the cancer stem cell hypothesis in melanoma: the clinics will tell.

    PubMed

    Shakhova, Olga; Sommer, Lukas

    2013-09-10

    Whether tumorigenic cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in melanoma has been the focus of much controversy in recent years. A number of studies have pointed to the existence of melanoma cell sub-populations that act as CSCs and can be distinguished from other tumor cells based on specific surface marker expression or specific properties such as the capacity for extensive self-renewal. Other studies failed to identify melanoma stem cells and proposed that the potential to initiate tumors is a wide spread feature in melanoma inherent to most if not all cells of the tumor mass. As with normal stem cells, the term CSC is based on an operational definition, indicating not just a tumor-initiating cell, but also a cell with the capacity to sustain long-term tumor propagation. Therefore, the experimental set-up chosen to identify putative CSCs in melanoma is crucial: Both the method of tumor cell preparation and the procedure used to assess CSC properties in vivo influence the experimental outcome and hence its interpretation. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge on CSCs and the role of stem cell properties in melanoma and discuss recent findings with respect to their clinical relevance.

  5. In vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity of CoQ0 against melanoma cells: inhibition of metastasis and induction of cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis through modulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hseu, You-Cheng; Thiyagarajan, Varadharajan; Tsou, Hsiao-Tung; Lin, Kai-Yuan; Chen, Hui-Jye; Lin, Chung-Ming; Liao, Jiuun-Wang; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme Q0 (CoQ0, 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone), a novel quinone derivative, has been shown to modulate cellular redox balance. However, effect of this compound on melanoma remains unclear. This study examined the in vitro or in vivo anti-tumor, apoptosis, and anti-metastasis activities of CoQ0 (0-20 μM) through inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. CoQ0 exhibits a significant cytotoxic effect on melanoma cell lines (B16F10, B16F1, and A2058), while causing little toxicity toward normal (HaCaT) cells. The suppression of β-catenin was seen with CoQ0 administration accompanied by a decrease in the expression of Wnt/β-catenin transcriptional target c-myc, cyclin D1, and survivin through GSK3β-independent pathway. We found that CoQ0 treatment caused G1 cell-cycle arrest by reducing the levels of cyclin E and CDK4. Furthermore, CoQ0 treatment induced apoptosis through caspase-9/-3 activation, PARP degradation, Bcl-2/Bax dysregulation, and p53 expression. Notably, non- or sub-cytotoxic concentrations of CoQ0 markedly inhibited migration and invasion, accompanied by the down-regulation of MMP-2 and -9, and up-regulation of TIMP-1 and -2 expressions in highly metastatic B16F10 cells. Furthermore, the in vivo study results revealed that CoQ0 treatment inhibited the tumor growth in B16F10 xenografted nude mice. Histological analysis and western blotting confirmed that CoQ0 significantly decreased the xenografted tumor progression as demonstrated by induction of apoptosis, suppression of β-catenin, and inhibition of cell cycle-, apoptotic-, and metastatic-regulatory proteins. The data suggest that CoQ0 unveils a novel mechanism by down-regulating Wnt/β-catenin pathways and could be used as a potential lead compound for melanoma chemotherapy. PMID:26968952

  6. Inhibition of uPAR-TGFβ crosstalk blocks MSC-dependent EMT in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Bianchini, Francesca; Peppicelli, Silvia; Chillà, Anastasia; Margheri, Francesca; Luciani, Cristina; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Del Rosso, Mario; Calorini, Lido; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2015-07-01

    The capacity of cancer cells to undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is now considered a hallmark of tumor progression, and it is known that interactions between cancer cells and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) of tumor microenvironment may promote this program. Herein, we demonstrate that MSC-conditioned medium (MSC-CM) is a potent inducer of EMT in melanoma cells. The EMT profile acquired by MSC-CM-exposed melanoma cells is characterized by an enhanced level of mesenchymal markers, including TGFβ/TGFβ-receptors system upregulation, by increased invasiveness and uPAR expression, and in vivo tumor growth. Silencing TGFβ in MSC is found to abrogate ability of MSC to promote EMT characteristics in melanoma cells, together with uPAR expression, and this finding is strengthened using an antagonist peptide of TGFβRIII, the so-called P17. Finally, we demonstrate that the uPAR antisense oligonucleotide (uPAR aODN) may inhibit EMT of melanoma cells either stimulated by exogenous TGFβ or MSC-CM. Thus, uPAR upregulation in melanoma cells exposed to MSC-medium drives TGFβ-mediated EMT. On the whole, TGFβ/uPAR dangerous liaison in cancer cell/MSC interactions may disclose a new strategy to abrogate melanoma progression. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-conditioned medium induces EMT-like profile in melanoma. MSC-derived TGFβ promotes uPAR and TGFβ/TGFβ-receptor upregulation in melanoma. TGFβ gene silencing in MSCs downregulates uPAR expression and EMT in melanoma. uPAR downregulation prevents MSC-induced EMT-like profile in melanoma cells. Inhibition of the dangerous TGFβ/uPAR relationship might abrogate melanoma progression.

  7. Platelet GPIIb supports initial pulmonary retention but inhibits subsequent proliferation of melanoma cells during hematogenic metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Echtler, Katrin; Konrad, Ildiko; Lorenz, Michael; Schneider, Simon; Hofmaier, Sebastian; Plenagl, Florian; Stark, Konstantin; Czermak, Thomas; Tirniceriu, Anca; Eichhorn, Martin; Walch, Axel; Enders, Georg; Massberg, Steffen; Schulz, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Platelets modulate the process of cancer metastasis. However, current knowledge on the direct interaction of platelets and tumor cells is mostly based on findings obtained in vitro. We addressed the role of the platelet fibrinogen receptor glycoprotein IIb (integrin αIIb) for experimental melanoma metastasis in vivo. Highly metastatic B16-D5 melanoma cells were injected intravenously into GPIIb-deficient (GPIIb-/-) or wildtype (WT) mice. Acute accumulation of tumor cells in the pulmonary vasculature was assessed in real-time by confocal videofluorescence microscopy. Arrest of tumor cells was dramatically reduced in GPIIb-/- mice as compared to WT. Importantly, we found that mainly multicellular aggregates accumulated in the pulmonary circulation of WT, instead B16-D5 aggregates were significantly smaller in GPIIb-/- mice. While pulmonary arrest of melanoma was clearly dependent on GPIIb in this early phase of metastasis, we also addressed tumor progression 10 days after injection. Inversely, and unexpectedly, we found that melanoma metastasis was now increased in GPIIb-/- mice. In contrast, GPIIb did not regulate local melanoma proliferation in a subcutaneous tumor model. Our data suggest that the platelet fibrinogen receptor has a differential role in the modulation of hematogenic melanoma metastasis. While platelets clearly support early steps in pulmonary metastasis via GPIIb-dependent formation of platelet-tumor-aggregates, at a later stage its absence is associated with an accelerated development of melanoma metastases. PMID:28253287

  8. Honokiol inhibits melanoma stem cells by targeting notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Gaurav; Venugopal, Anand; Ramamoorthy, Prabhu; Standing, David; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Umar, Shahid; Jensen, Roy A; Anant, Shrikant; Mammen, Joshua M V

    2015-12-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive disease with limited therapeutic options. Here, we determined the effects of honokiol (HNK), a biphenolic natural compound on melanoma cells and stemness. HNK significantly inhibited melanoma cell proliferation, viability, clonogenicity and induced autophagy. In addition, HNK significantly inhibited melanosphere formation in a dose dependent manner. Western blot analyses also demonstrated reduction in stem cell markers CD271, CD166, Jarid1b, and ABCB5. We next examined the effect of HNK on Notch signaling, a pathway involved in stem cell self-renewal. Four different Notch receptors exist in cells, which when cleaved by a series of enzymatic reactions catalyzed by Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Converting Enzyme (TACE) and γ-secretase protein complex, results in the release of the Notch intracellular domain (NICD), which then translocates to the nucleus and induces target gene expression. Western blot analyses demonstrated that in HNK treated cells there is a significant reduction in the expression of cleaved Notch-2. In addition, there was a reduction in the expression of downstream target proteins, Hes-1 and cyclin D1. Moreover, HNK treatment suppressed the expression of TACE and γ-secretase complex proteins in melanoma cells. To confirm that suppression of Notch-2 activation is critical for HNK activity, we overexpressed NICD1, NICD2, and performed HNK treatment. NICD2, but not NICD1, partially restored the expression of Hes-1 and cyclin D1, and increased melanosphere formation. Taken together, these data suggest that HNK is a potent inhibitor of melanoma cells, in part, through the targeting of melanoma stem cells by suppressing Notch-2 signaling.

  9. Honokiol Inhibits Melanoma Stem Cells by Targeting Notch Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Gaurav; Venugopal, Anand; Ramamoorthy, Prabhu; Standing, David; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Umar, Shahid; Jensen, Roy A.; Anant, Shrikant; Mammen, Joshua M.V.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive disease with limited therapeutic options. Here, we determined the effects of honokiol (HNK), a biphenolic natural compound on melanoma cells and stemness. HNK significantly inhibited melanoma cell proliferation, viability, clonogenicity and induced autophagy. In addition, HNK significantly inhibited melanosphere formation in a dose dependent manner. Western blot analyses also demonstrated reduction in stem cell markers CD271, CD166, Jarid1b, and ABCB5. We next examined the effect of HNK on Notch signaling, a pathway involved in stem cell self-renewal. Four different Notch receptors exist in cells, which when cleaved by a series of enzymatic reactions catalyzed by Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Converting Enzyme (TACE) and γ-secretase protein complex, results in the release of the Notch intracellular domain (NICD), which then translocates to the nucleus and induces target gene expression. Western blot analyses demonstrated that in HNK treated cells there is a significant reduction in the expression of cleaved Notch-2. In addition, there was a reduction in the expression of downstream target proteins, Hes-1 and cyclin D1. Moreover, HNK treatment suppressed the expression of TACE and γ-secretase complex proteins in melanoma cells. To confirm that suppression of Notch-2 activation is critical for HNK activity, we overexpressed NICD1, NICD2, and performed HNK treatment. NICD2, but not NICD1, partially restored the expression of Hes-1 and cyclin D1, and increased melanosphere formation. Taken together, these data suggest that HNK is a potent inhibitor of melanoma cells, in part, through the targeting of melanoma stem cells by suppressing Notch-2 signaling. PMID:25491779

  10. Propranolol induces a favourable shift of anti-tumor immunity in a murine spontaneous model of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Ludovic Jean; Bod, Lloyd; Lengagne, Renée; Kato, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study on a xenograft model of melanoma, we showed that the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol inhibits melanoma development by modulating angiogenesis, proliferation and cell survival. Stress hormones can influence tumor development in different ways and norepinephrine was shown to downregulate antitumor immune responses by favoring the accumulation of immunosuppressive cells, impairing the function of lymphocytes. We assessed the effect of propranolol on antitumor immune response in the MT/Ret mouse model of melanoma. Propranolol treatment delayed primary tumor growth and metastases development in MT/Ret mice. Consistent with our previous observations in human melanoma xenografts, propranolol induces a decrease in cell proliferation and vessel density in the primary tumors and in metastases. In this immunocompetent model, propranolol significantly reduced the infiltration of myeloid cells, particularly neutrophils, in the primary tumor. Inversely, cytotoxic tumor infiltrating lymphocytes were more frequent in the tumor stroma of treated mice. In a consistent manner, we observed the same shift in the proportions of infiltrating leukocytes in the metastases of treated mice. Our results suggest that propranolol, by decreasing the infiltration of immunosuppressive myeloid cells in the tumor microenvironment, restores a better control of the tumor by cytotoxic cells. PMID:27788481

  11. Cytoskeleton alterations in melanoma: aberrant expression of cortactin, an actin-binding adapter protein, correlates with melanocytic tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xu-Zhi; Garcia, Marileila Varella; Li, Tian-yu; Khor, Li-Yan; Gajapathy, R Sujatha; Spittle, Cindy; Weed, Scott; Lessin, Stuart R; Wu, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Cortactin is a multidomain actin-binding protein important for the functions of cytoskeleton by regulating cortical actin dynamics. It is involved in a diverse array of basic cellular functions. Tumorigenesis and tumor progression involves alterations in actin cytoskeleton proteins. We sought to study the role of cortactin in melanocytic tumor progression using immunohistochemistry on human tissues. The results reveal quantitative differences between benign and malignant lesions. Significantly higher cortactin expression is found in melanomas than in nevi (P<0.0001), with levels greater in metastatic than in invasive melanomas (P<0.05). Qualitatively, tumor tissues often show aberrant cortactin localization at the cell periphery, corresponding to its colocalization with filamentous actin in cell cortex of cultured melanoma cells. This suggests an additional level of protein dysregulation. Furthermore, in patients with metastatic disease, high-level cortactin expression correlates with poor disease-specific survival. Our data, in conjunction with outcome data on several other types of human cancers and experimental data from melanoma cell lines, supports a potential role of aberrant cortactin expression in melanoma tumor progression and a rational for targeting key elements of actin-signaling pathway for developmental therapeutics in melanomas. PMID:19898426

  12. Photothermal therapy of melanoma tumor using multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sobhani, Zahra; Behnam, Mohammad Ali; Emami, Farzin; Dehghanian, Amirreza; Jamhiri, Iman

    2017-01-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a therapeutic method in which photon energy is transformed into heat rapidly via different operations to extirpate cancer. Nanoparticles, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have exceptional optical absorbance in visible and near infrared spectra. Therefore, they could be a good converter to induce hyperthermia in PTT technique. In our study, for improving the dispersibility of multiwalled CNTs in water, the CNTs were oxidized (O-CNTs) and then polyethylene glycol (PEG) was used for wrapping the surface of nanotubes. The formation of a thin layer of PEG around the nanotubes was confirmed through Fourier transform infrared, thermogravimetric analysis, and field emission scanning electron microscopy techniques. Results of thermogravimetric analysis showed that the amount of PEG component in the O-CNT-PEG was approximately 80% (w/w). Cell cytotoxicity study showed that O-CNT was less cytotoxic than pristine multiwalled nanotubes, and O-CNT-PEG had the lowest toxicity against HeLa and HepG2 cell lines. The effect of O-CNT-PEG in reduction of melanoma tumor size after PTT was evaluated. Cancerous mice were exposed to a continuous-wave near infrared laser diode (λ=808 nm, P=2 W and I=8 W/cm(2)) for 10 minutes once in the period of the treatment. The average size of tumor in mice receiving O-CNT-PEG decreased sharply in comparison with those that received laser therapy alone. Results of animal studies indicate that O-CNT-PEG is a powerful candidate for eradicating solid tumors in PTT technique.

  13. Knockout of MDA-9/Syntenin (SDCBP) expression in the microenvironment dampens tumor-supporting inflammation and inhibits melanoma metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Swadesh K.; Guo, Chunqing; Pradhan, Anjan K.; Bhoopathi, Praveen; Talukdar, Sarmistha; Shen, Xue-Ning; Emdad, Luni; Subler, Mark A.; Windle, Jolene J.; Sarkar, Devanand; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Fisher, Paul B.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer development and progression to metastasis is a complex process, which largely depends on bidirectional communication between tumor cells and their microenvironment. Melanoma differentiation associated gene-9 (mda-9, also known as Syntenin-1, SDCBP), a gene first cloned by our group, is robustly expressed in multiple cancers including melanoma and contributes to invasion and metastasis in a tumor cell-intrinsic manner. However, the role of MDA-9/Syntenin in the tumor cell-extrinsic microenvironment remains unclear even though MDA-9/Syntenin is ubiquitously expressed in most organs that are active metastatic sites for melanoma, e.g., lung, lymph node, brain, and liver. In this study, we explored the effect of environmental mda-9/syntenin expression on melanoma growth and metastasis using multiple immunocompetent animal models, syngeneic B16 xenograft and intravenous B16 mouse model and a genetically engineered mouse (GEM) model of melanoma. Host-deficient expression of mda-9/syntenin in mice negatively impacted on subcutaneously implanted B16 tumor growth and lung metastasis. Absence of MDA-9/Syntenin in the lung microenvironment suppressed tumor growth by modulating in situ Interleukin 17A (IL17A) expression and impaired the recruitment of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and Th17 cells as compared to genetically wild type animals. Additionally, loss of mda-9/syntenin expression in a spontaneous melanoma model (melanocyte-specific pten loss and BrafV600E mutation) significantly delayed tumor initiation and suppressed metastasis to the lymph nodes and lungs. The present study highlights a novel role of mda-9/syntenin in tumor-promoting inflammation and immune suppression. These observations along with other documented roles of MDA-9/Syntenin in cancer and metastasis support the potential relevance of MDA-9/Syntenin in the carcinogenic process and as a target for developing improved therapies by using either genetic or pharmacologic approaches to treat

  14. INFα-2b inhibitory effects on CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells in the tumor microenvironment of C57BL/6 J mice with melanoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Huang, Run; Zong, Xiangyun; He, Xiangming; Mo, Wenju

    2016-07-07

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs), particularly the CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs, down regulate immunity and promote tumor cell growth by directly suppressing CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Alternatively they can promote tumor growth by generating interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) in situ, which help tumor cells to evade the immune system. In vivo tumor models were prepared via subcutaneous injection with a suspension of B16 melanoma cells into the left upper flank of C57BL/6 J mice. The mice were randomized into five groups: radiotherapy (RT), chemotherapy (CT), radiochemotherapy (RCT), Inteferon α (INFα) groups, and a control group. Flow cytometry was used to determine the Tregs levels in the spleen and peripheral blood, and immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expression levels of TGFβ and IL-10 in the tumor microenvironment. Tumor weight was significantly reduced in the CT or RCT groups (40.91 % and 41.83 %, respectively), while the reduction in tumor weight was relatively lower for the RT and IFNα groups (15.10 % and 13.15 %, respectively). The flow cytometry results showed that the ratios of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs to lymphocytes and CD4(+) cells in the spleen and in peripheral blood were significantly decreased after treatment with IFNα (P < 0.05). Expression of TGFβ and IL-10 in the tumor microenvironment in the CT and RT groups was higher compared with the control group (P < 0.01), while the expression of TGFβ and IL-10 in the INFα group was not significantly different (P > 0.05). The results show that INFα-2b inhibits cancer cell immune evasion by decreasing the levels of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs and suppressing the expression of TGFβ and IL-10 in the tumor microenvironment.

  15. Absence of BRAF gene mutation in non-melanoma skin tumors.

    PubMed

    Libra, Massimo; Malaponte, Grazia; Bevelacqua, Valentina; Siciliano, Roberta; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Fulvi, Alberto; Micali, Giuseppe; Ligresti, Giovanni; Mazzarino, Maria C; Stivala, Franca; Travali, Salvatore; McCubrey, James A

    2006-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer, and its incidence is increasing. It was proposed that the RAS oncogene significantly contributes to skin cancer development. Numerous BRAF mutations have been detected in melanoma biopsy specimens and cell lines. For the first time, in the present study, tumor biopsy specimens from 78 patients with BCC were screened for BRAF mutation within exons 11 and 15. Our results indicate that the BRAF gene does not appear to be frequently mutated in nonmelanoma skin tumors such as BCC. These data suggest that other gene alterations may cause tumor development.

  16. Vascular channels formed by subpopulations of PECAM1+ melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Dunleavey, James M.; Xiao, Lin; Thompson, Joshua; Kim, Mi Mi; Shields, Janiel M.; Shelton, Sarah E.; Irvin, David M.; Brings, Victoria E.; Ollila, David; Brekken, Rolf A.; Dayton, Paul A.; Melero-Martin, Juan M.; Dudley, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    Targeting the vasculature remains a promising approach for treating solid tumors; however, the mechanisms of tumor neovascularization are diverse and complex. Here we uncover a new subpopulation of melanoma cells that express the vascular cell adhesion molecule PECAM1, but not VEGFR-2, and participate in a PECAM1-dependent form of vasculogenic mimicry (VM). Clonally-derived PECAM1+ tumor cells coalesce to form PECAM1-dependent networks in vitro and they generate well-perfused, VEGF-independent channels in mice. The neural crest specifier AP-2α is diminished in PECAM1+ melanoma cells and is a transcriptional repressor of PECAM1. Reintroduction of AP-2α into PECAM1+ tumor cells represses PECAM1 and abolishes tube-forming ability whereas AP-2α knockdown in PECAM1− tumor cells up-regulates PECAM1 expression and promotes tube formation. Thus, VM-competent subpopulations, rather than all cells within a tumor, may instigate VM, supplant host-derived endothelium, and form PECAM1-dependent conduits that are not diminished by neutralizing VEGF. PMID:25335460

  17. Detection of GD3 ganglioside in primary melanomas depends on histopathologic procedures used for tumor preservation.

    PubMed

    Debarbieux, Sébastien; Popa, Iuliana; Thomas, Luc; Kanitakis, Jean; Pirot, Fabrice; Portoukalian, Jacques; Haftek, Marek

    2009-01-01

    Gangliosides, cell surface glycosphingolipids, are implicated in diverse biologic functions potentially important for tumor growth. Because expression of the GD3 ganglioside may have an impact on the melanoma malignancy, and therefore on the patient prognosis, we evaluated the feasibility of a retrospective immunohistochemical study of GD3 in paraffin embedded biopsies of primary melanomas. Immunoperoxidase staining of frozen and deparaffinized sections of melanoma lesions with two anti-GD3 antibodies was compared using Dako biotin-streptavidin detection kit. Residual ganglioside content was evaluated in the tissues submitted to routine histopathologic procedures using HPLC. A strong and reproducible staining was obtained with both antibodies on frozen sections of all 17 melanoma samples. However, only KM641 antibody could detect GD3 on deparaffinized sections. Biochemical quantification revealed that the Bouin fixative resulted in degradation of GD3. Additionally, most of GD3 was eluted from the tissue samples during dehydration and re-hydration steps. A subgroup of tumors particularly rich in GD3 could be detected on deparaffinized sections after standard formaldehyde fixation. Clinical evolution of such melanomas can now be compared to the group with low GD3 expression. However, any Bouin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsies should be excluded from such a retrospective study.

  18. Increased NY-ESO-1 Expression and Reduced Infiltrating CD3+ T Cells in Cutaneous Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Giavina-Bianchi, Mara; Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Sotto, Mirian Nacagami; Muzikansky, Alona; Kalil, Jorge; Festa-Neto, Cyro; Duncan, Lyn M.

    2015-01-01

    NY-ESO-1 is a cancer-testis antigen aberrantly expressed in melanomas, which may serve as a robust and specific target in immunotherapy. NY-ESO-1 antigen expression, tumor features, and the immune profile of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes were assessed in primary cutaneous melanoma. NY-ESO-1 protein was detected in 20% of invasive melanomas (16/79), rarely in in situ melanoma (1/10) and not in benign nevi (0/20). Marked intratumoral heterogeneity of NY-ESO-1 protein expression was observed. NY-ESO-1 expression was associated with increased primary tumor thickness (P = 0.007) and inversely correlated with superficial spreading melanoma (P < 0.02). NY-ESO-1 expression was also associated with reduced numbers and density of CD3+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (P = 0.017). When NY-ESO-1 protein was expressed, CD3+ T cells were less diffusely infiltrating the tumor and were more often arranged in small clusters (P = 0.010) or as isolated cells (P = 0.002) than in large clusters of more than five lymphocytes. No correlation of NY-ESO-1 expression with gender, age, tumor site, ulceration, lymph node sentinel status, or survival was observed. NY-ESO-1 expression in melanoma was associated with tumor progression, including increased tumor thickness, and with reduced tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. PMID:25954764

  19. Increased NY-ESO-1 expression and reduced infiltrating CD3+ T cells in cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Giavina-Bianchi, Mara; Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Sotto, Mirian Nacagami; Muzikansky, Alona; Kalil, Jorge; Festa-Neto, Cyro; Duncan, Lyn M

    2015-01-01

    NY-ESO-1 is a cancer-testis antigen aberrantly expressed in melanomas, which may serve as a robust and specific target in immunotherapy. NY-ESO-1 antigen expression, tumor features, and the immune profile of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes were assessed in primary cutaneous melanoma. NY-ESO-1 protein was detected in 20% of invasive melanomas (16/79), rarely in in situ melanoma (1/10) and not in benign nevi (0/20). Marked intratumoral heterogeneity of NY-ESO-1 protein expression was observed. NY-ESO-1 expression was associated with increased primary tumor thickness (P = 0.007) and inversely correlated with superficial spreading melanoma (P < 0.02). NY-ESO-1 expression was also associated with reduced numbers and density of CD3+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (P = 0.017). When NY-ESO-1 protein was expressed, CD3+ T cells were less diffusely infiltrating the tumor and were more often arranged in small clusters (P = 0.010) or as isolated cells (P = 0.002) than in large clusters of more than five lymphocytes. No correlation of NY-ESO-1 expression with gender, age, tumor site, ulceration, lymph node sentinel status, or survival was observed. NY-ESO-1 expression in melanoma was associated with tumor progression, including increased tumor thickness, and with reduced tumor infiltrating lymphocytes.

  20. [Pulsed electric fields inhibit tumor growth but induce myocardial injury of melanoma-bearing mice].

    PubMed

    Pan, Fengying; Wu, Sha; Wang, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2016-07-01

    Objective To investigate the tumor inhibiting effect of pulsed electric fields (PEFs) on melanoma-bearing mice, and understand its influence on myocardial cells and cardial electrical activity. Methods The melanoma models of the BALB/c mice were established by subcutaneously injecting B16 melanoma cells. These mice were randomly divided into four groups. The treated groups received pulsed electric stimulation at pulse width of 1, 3, 5 ms, with field strength of 100 V/cm and frequency of 10 Hz for 10 minutes daily in 15 consecutive days. ECG of mice was recorded. Tumor volume was measured with vernier caliper. Morphological changes of tumors were observed by HE staining. The expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) mRNA was tested by real-time quantitative PCR, and the expression of PCNA protein was detected by immunofluorescence histochemistry. The ultrastructural changes of the cardiac tissues were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The serum levels of cardial troponin T (cTnT) and creatine kinase isoenzyme MB (CK-MB) were detected by ELISA. Results Compared with the control group, tumor volumes in all treated groups were reduced 7 days after PEFs treatment; more melanin granules in tumor cells were found in the treated groups; the expressions of PCNA mRNA and protein were down-regulated in all treated groups, and there were greater changes in the groups receiving the bigger pulse width. Myocardial injury was found in 3 ms group and 5 ms group, and the expressions of cTnT and CK-MB were significantly higher than those in the control group. Conclusion PEFs can inhibit tumor growth in melanoma-bearing mice. Increase of pulse width will aggravate myocardial injury.

  1. Interferon-β gene transfer induces a strong cytotoxic bystander effect on melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Úrsula A; Gil-Cardeza, María L; Villaverde, Marcela S; Finocchiaro, Liliana M E; Glikin, Gerardo C

    2015-05-01

    A local gene therapy scheme for the delivery of type I interferons could be an alternative for the treatment of melanoma. We evaluated the cytotoxic effects of interferon-β (IFNβ) gene lipofection on tumor cell lines derived from three human cutaneous and four canine mucosal melanomas. The cytotoxicity of human IFNβ gene lipofection resulted higher or equivalent to that of the corresponding addition of the recombinant protein (rhIFNβ) to human cells. IFNβ gene lipofection was not cytotoxic for only one canine melanoma cell line. When cultured as monolayers, three human and three canine IFNβ-lipofected melanoma cell lines displayed a remarkable bystander effect. As spheroids, the same six cell lines were sensitive to IFNβ gene transfer, two displaying a significant multicell resistance phenotype. The effects of conditioned IFNβ-lipofected canine melanoma cell culture media suggested the release of at least one soluble thermolabile cytotoxic factor that could not be detected in human melanoma cells. By using a secretion signal-free truncated human IFNβ, we showed that its intracellular expression was enough to induce cytotoxicity in two human melanoma cell lines. The lower cytoplasmatic levels of reactive oxygen species detected after intracellular IFNβ expression could be related to the resistance displayed by one human melanoma cell line. As IFNβ gene transfer was effective against most of the assayed melanomas in a way not limited by relatively low lipofection efficiencies, the clinical potential of this approach is strongly supported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. A multi-trimeric fusion of CD40L and gp100 tumor antigen activates dendritic cells and enhances survival in a B16-F10 melanoma DNA vaccine model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sachin; Termini, James M; Rivas, Yaelis; Otero, Miguel; Raffa, Francesca N; Bhat, Vikas; Farooq, Amjad; Stone, Geoffrey W

    2015-09-11

    Vaccination with tumor-associated antigens can induce cancer-specific CD8+ T cells. A recent improvement has been the targeting of antigen to dendritic cells (DC) using antibodies that bind DC surface molecules. This study explored the use of multi-trimers of CD40L to target the gp100 melanoma tumor antigen to DC. The spontaneously-multimerizing gene Surfactant Protein D (SPD) was used to fuse gp100 tumor antigen and CD40L, creating the recombinant protein SPD-gp100-CD40L. This "third generation" DC-targeting vaccine was designed to both target antigen to DC and optimally activate dendritic cells by aggregating CD40 trimers on the DC membrane surface. SPD-gp100-CD40L expressed as a 110kDa protein. Analytical light scattering analysis gave elution data corresponding to 4-trimer and multi-trimer SPD-gp100-CD40L oligomers. The protein was biologically active on dendritic cells and induced CD40-mediated NF-κB signaling. DNA vaccination with SPD-gp100-CD40L plasmid, together with plasmids encoding IL-12p70 and GM-CSF, significantly enhanced survival and inhibited tumor growth in a B16-F10 melanoma model. Expression of gp100 and SPD-CD40L as separate molecules did not enhance survival, highlighting the requirement to encode gp100 within SPD-CD40L for optimal vaccine activity. These data support a model where DNA vaccination with SPD-gp100-CD40L targets gp100 to DC in situ, induces activation of these DC, and generates a protective anti-tumor response when given in combination with IL-12p70 and GM-CSF plasmids.

  3. Human Single-Chain Fv Immunoconjugates Targeted to a Melanoma-Associated Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan Mediate Specific Lysis of Human Melanoma Cells by Natural Killer Cells and Complement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baiyang; Chen, Yi-Bin; Ayalon, Oran; Bender, Jeffrey; Garen, Alan

    1999-02-01

    Two antimelanoma immunoconjugates containing a human single-chain Fv (scFv) targeting domain conjugated to the Fc effector domain of human IgG1 were synthesized as secreted two-chain molecules in Chinese hamster ovary and Drosophila S2 cells, and purified by affinity chromatography on protein A. The scFv targeting domains originally were isolated as melanoma-specific clones from a scFv fusion-phage library, derived from the antibody repertoire of a vaccinated melanoma patient. The purified immunoconjugates showed similar binding specificity as did the fusion-phage clones. Binding occurred to human melanoma cells but not to human melanocytes or to several other types of normal cells and tumor cells. A 250-kDa melanoma protein was immunoprecipitated by the immunoconjugates and analyzed by mass spectrometry, using two independent procedures. A screen of protein sequence databases showed an exact match of several peptide masses between the immunoprecipitated protein and the core protein of a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, which is expressed on the surface of most human melanoma cells. The Fc effector domain of the immunoconjugates binds natural killer (NK) cells and also the C1q protein that initiates the complement cascade; both NK cells and complement can activate powerful cytolytic responses against the targeted tumor cells. An in vitro cytolysis assay was used to test for an immunoconjugate-dependent specific cytolytic response against cultured human melanoma cells by NK cells and complement. The melanoma cells, but not the human fibroblast cells used as the control, were efficiently lysed by both NK cells and complement in the presence of the immunoconjugates. The in vitro results suggest that the immunoconjugates also could activate a specific cytolytic immune response against melanoma tumors in vivo.

  4. Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Gershenwald, J E

    2001-01-01

    The presentations at the American Society of Clinical Oncology 2001 meeting reported or updated the results of phase I, II, and III randomized trials and also reported important meta-analyses and retrospective studies impacting on the management of patients with melanoma. In the treatment of early stage melanoma, the prognostic significance of pathologic status of sentinel lymph nodes was affirmed. With respect to regional nodal involvement (American Joint Committee on Cancer [AJCC] stage III), investigators presented the interim results of the United Kingdom randomized low-dose interferon (IFN) trial, and up-to-date meta-analyses of several IFN trials including a pooled analysis of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group trials evaluating interferon in the adjuvant setting. In the advanced disease setting (AJCC stage IV), several studies elucidated the pros and cons of biochemotherapy in patients with metastatic melanoma, with an emphasis on seeking to improve response in the central nervous system and durability of response in general. Thought provoking was new data regarding the potential for lovastatin to act as a chemopreventive agent for melanoma. Translational studies were presented, one supporting the importance of HLA-typing in developing targeted vaccine therapy. Finally, the results of a novel experimental melanoma vaccine were presented using autologous tumor-derived heat-shock protein peptide complex-96 (HSPPC-96).

  5. Familial melanoma-associated mutations in p16 uncouple its tumor suppressor functions

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Noah C.; Jung, Jae; Liu, Tong; Wilde, Megan; Holmen, Sheri L.; Grossman, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Familial melanoma is associated with point mutations in the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p16INK4A (p16). We recently reported that p16 regulates intracellular oxidative stress in a cell cycle-independent manner. Here, we constructed 12 different familial melanoma-associated point mutants spanning the p16 coding region and analyzed their capacity to regulate cell-cycle phase and suppress reactive oxygen species (ROS). Compared to wild-type p16 which fully restored both functions in p16-deficient fibroblasts, various p16 mutants differed in their capacity to normalize ROS and cell cycle profiles. While some mutations did not impair either function, others impaired both. Interestingly, several impaired cell-cycle (R24Q, R99P, V126D) or oxidative function (A36P, A57V, P114S) selectively, indicating that these two functions of p16 can be uncoupled. Similar activities were confirmed with selected mutants in human melanoma cells. Many mutations impairing both cell-cycle and oxidative functions, or only cell cycle function, localize to the third ankyrin repeat of the p16 molecule. Alternatively, most mutations impairing oxidative but not cell-cycle function, or those not impairing either function, lie outside this region. These results demonstrate that particular familial melanoma-associated mutations in p16 can selectively compromise these two independent tumor-suppressor functions, which may be mediated by distinct regions of the protein. PMID:23190892

  6. Characteristics of malignant melanoma cells in the treatment with fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Morita, S.; Mori, S. )

    1989-07-01

    The radioresistance of malignant melanoma cells has been explained by the wide shoulder of the dose-cell-survival curve of the cells exposed to photon beams. Fast neutrons, 30 MeV d-Be, were used to treat patients who had malignant melanoma in order to confirm the biological effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation for tumor control. Seventy-two patients suffering from malignant melanoma participated in the clinical trials with fast neutrons between November 1975 and December 1986. Of 72 patients, 45 had melanoma of the skin, 20 had melanoma of the head and neck, and seven had choroidal melanoma. Five-year survival rate of the patients who had previously untreated melanoma of the skin was 61% and for patients who received postoperative irradiation, it was 35.7% whereas no patients who had recurrent tumor survived over 4 years. Of 22 patients who had melanoma of the skin, stage I, local control in four cases was achieved by irradiation alone, whereas local control was achieved in 17 of 18 patients who required salvage surgery after fast-neutron therapy. The results of pathological studies performed with specimens obtained from salvage surgery have shown that melanoma cells growing in intradermal tissue are radioresistant, compared with cells growing in intraepidermal tissue. This might suggest that melanoma cells acquire radioresistance when the connective tissue is involved. Five-year survival rate of the patients who had locally advanced melanoma of the head and neck, previously untreated, was 15.4%. Radiation therapy with accelerated protons was suitable for patients suffering from choroidal melanoma.

  7. Tumor-specific frequencies and ocular melanoma.

    PubMed

    Milham, Samuel; Stetzer, David

    2017-01-01

    Specific kilohertz frequencies in the environment from variable frequency drives on electric motors at a liquid natural gas compressor and storage station on a natural gas pipeline seem to be associated with the development of a very rare cancer, ocular melanoma, at a high school and in individuals living or working in a neighborhood near the plant. Primary neutral-to-earth oscilloscope voltage waveforms and spectra measured near the high school were nearly identical to the ground voltage 2.3 miles away at the gas pipeline. Peak frequencies of 7440 and 19,980 Hz were found at both places. The electric utility practice of using the earth as a conduit for return currents facilitated this exposure.

  8. Glucocorticoid receptor knockdown decreases the antioxidant protection of B16 melanoma cells: an endocrine system-related mechanism that compromises metastatic cell resistance to vascular endothelium-induced tumor cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Obrador, Elena; Valles, Soraya L; Benlloch, María; Sirerol, J Antoni; Pellicer, José A; Alcácer, Javier; Coronado, Javier Alcácer-F; Estrela, José M

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported an interorgan system in which stress-related hormones (corticosterone and noradrenaline), interleukin-6, and glutathione (GSH) coordinately regulate metastatic growth of highly aggressive B16-F10 melanoma cells. Corticosterone, at levels measured in tumor-bearing mice, also induces apoptotic cell death in metastatic cells with low GSH content. In the present study we explored the potential role of glucocorticoids in the regulation of metastatic cell death/survival during the early stages of organ invasion. Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) knockdown decreased the expression and activity of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), the rate-limiting step in GSH synthesis, in metastatic cells in vivo independent of the tumor location (liver, lung, or subcutaneous). The decrease in γ-GCS activity was associated with lower intracellular GSH levels. Nrf2- and p53-dependent down-regulation of γ-GCS was associated with a decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase 1 and 2, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase, but not of the O2--generating NADPH oxidase. The GCR knockdown-induced decrease in antioxidant protection caused a drastic decrease in the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with endothelial cells, both in vitro and in vivo; only 10% of cancer cells attached to the endothelium survived compared to 90% survival observed in the controls. This very low rate of metastatic cell survival was partially increased (up to 52%) in vivo by inoculating B16-F10 cells preloaded with GSH ester, which enters the cell and delivers free GSH. Taken together, our results indicate that glucocorticoid signaling influences the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with the vascular endothelium.

  9. Glucocorticoid Receptor Knockdown Decreases the Antioxidant Protection of B16 Melanoma Cells: An Endocrine System-Related Mechanism that Compromises Metastatic Cell Resistance to Vascular Endothelium-Induced Tumor Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Obrador, Elena; Valles, Soraya L.; Benlloch, María; Sirerol, J. Antoni; Pellicer, José A.; Alcácer, Javier; Coronado, Javier Alcácer-F.; Estrela, José M.

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported an interorgan system in which stress-related hormones (corticosterone and noradrenaline), interleukin-6, and glutathione (GSH) coordinately regulate metastatic growth of highly aggressive B16-F10 melanoma cells. Corticosterone, at levels measured in tumor-bearing mice, also induces apoptotic cell death in metastatic cells with low GSH content. In the present study we explored the potential role of glucocorticoids in the regulation of metastatic cell death/survival during the early stages of organ invasion. Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) knockdown decreased the expression and activity of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), the rate-limiting step in GSH synthesis, in metastatic cells in vivo independent of the tumor location (liver, lung, or subcutaneous). The decrease in γ-GCS activity was associated with lower intracellular GSH levels. Nrf2- and p53-dependent down-regulation of γ-GCS was associated with a decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase 1 and 2, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase, but not of the O2−-generating NADPH oxidase. The GCR knockdown-induced decrease in antioxidant protection caused a drastic decrease in the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with endothelial cells, both in vitro and in vivo; only 10% of cancer cells attached to the endothelium survived compared to 90% survival observed in the controls. This very low rate of metastatic cell survival was partially increased (up to 52%) in vivo by inoculating B16-F10 cells preloaded with GSH ester, which enters the cell and delivers free GSH. Taken together, our results indicate that glucocorticoid signaling influences the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with the vascular endothelium. PMID:24802641

  10. Melanoma Cell Galectin-1 Ligands Functionally Correlate with Malignant Potential.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Erika M; Geddes-Sweeney, Jenna E; Cedeno-Laurent, Filiberto; Walley, Kempland C; Barthel, Steven R; Opperman, Matthew J; Liang, Jennifer; Lin, Jennifer Y; Schatton, Tobias; Laga, Alvaro C; Mihm, Martin C; Qureshi, Abrar A; Widlund, Hans R; Murphy, George F; Dimitroff, Charles J

    2015-07-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1)-binding to Gal-1 ligands on immune and endothelial cells can influence melanoma development through dampening antitumor immune responses and promoting angiogenesis. However, whether Gal-1 ligands are functionally expressed on melanoma cells to help control intrinsic malignant features remains poorly understood. Here, we analyzed expression, identity, and function of Gal-1 ligands in melanoma progression. Immunofluorescent analysis of benign and malignant human melanocytic neoplasms revealed that Gal-1 ligands were abundant in severely dysplastic nevi, as well as in primary and metastatic melanomas. Biochemical assessments indicated that melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) was a major Gal-1 ligand on melanoma cells that was largely dependent on its N-glycans. Other melanoma cell Gal-1 ligand activity conferred by O-glycans was negatively regulated by α2,6 sialyltransferase ST6GalNAc2. In Gal-1-deficient mice, MCAM-silenced (MCAM(KD)) or ST6GalNAc2-overexpressing (ST6(O/E)) melanoma cells exhibited slower growth rates, underscoring a key role for melanoma cell Gal-1 ligands and host Gal-1 in melanoma growth. Further analysis of MCAM(KD) or ST6(O/E) melanoma cells in cell migration assays indicated that Gal-1 ligand-dependent melanoma cell migration was severely inhibited. These findings provide a refined perspective on Gal-1/melanoma cell Gal-1 ligand interactions as contributors to melanoma malignancy.

  11. Effective activity of cytokine-induced killer cells against autologous metastatic melanoma including cells with stemness features.

    PubMed

    Gammaitoni, Loretta; Giraudo, Lidia; Leuci, Valeria; Todorovic, Maja; Mesiano, Giulia; Picciotto, Franco; Pisacane, Alberto; Zaccagna, Alessandro; Volpe, Maria Giuseppa; Gallo, Susanna; Caravelli, Daniela; Giacone, Elena; Venesio, Tiziana; Balsamo, Antonella; Pignochino, Ymera; Grignani, Giovanni; Carnevale-Schianca, Fabrizio; Aglietta, Massimo; Sangiolo, Dario

    2013-08-15

    We investigate the unknown tumor-killing activity of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells against autologous metastatic melanoma and the elusive subset of putative cancer stem cells (mCSC). We developed a preclinical autologous model using same patient-generated CIK cells and tumor targets to consider the unique biology of each patient/tumor pairing. In primary tumor cell cultures, we visualized and immunophenotypically defined a putative mCSC subset using a novel gene transfer strategy that exploited their exclusive ability to activate the promoter of stemness gene Oct4. The CIK cells from 10 patients with metastatic melanoma were successfully expanded (median, 23-fold; range, 11-117). Primary tumor cell cultures established and characterized from the same patients were used as autologous targets. Patient-derived CIK cells efficiently killed autologous metastatic melanoma [up to 71% specific killing (n = 26)]. CIK cells were active in vivo against autologous melanoma, resulting in delayed tumor growth, increased necrotic areas, and lymphocyte infiltration at tumor sites. The metastatic melanoma cultures presented an average of 11.5% ± 2.5% putative mCSCs, which was assessed by Oct4 promoter activity and stemness marker expression (Oct4, ABCG2, ALDH, MITF). Expression was confirmed on mCSC target molecules recognized by CIK cells (MIC A/B; ULBPs). CIK tumor killing activity against mCSCs was intense (up to 71%, n = 4) and comparable with results reported against differentiated metastatic melanoma cells (P = 0.8). For the first time, the intense killing activity of CIK cells against autologous metastatic melanoma, including mCSCs, has been shown. These findings move clinical investigation of a new immunotherapy for metastatic melanoma, including mCSCs, closer. ©2013 AACR.

  12. Basic and clinical aspects of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nathanson, L. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the following 10 chapters: The role of oncogenes in the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma; Laminin and fibronectin modulate the metastatic activity of melanoma cells; Structure, function and biosynthesis of ganglioside antigens associated with human tumors derived from the neuroectoderm; Epidemiology of ocular melanoma; Malignant melanoma: Prognostic factors; Endocrine influences on the natural history of human malignant melanoma; Psychosocial factors associated with prognostic indicators, progression, psychophysiology, and tumor-host response in cutaneous malignant melanoma; Central nervous system metastases in malignant melanoma; Interferon trials in the management of malignant melanoma and other neoplasms: an overview; and The treatment of malignant melanoma by fast neutrons.

  13. Systemic Tolerance Mediated by Melanoma Brain Tumors is Reversible by Radiotherapy and Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Christopher M.; Kochel, Christina M.; Nirschl, Christopher J.; Durham, Nicholas M.; Ruzevick, Jacob; Alme, Angela; Francica, Brian J.; Elias, Jimmy; Daniels, Andrew; Dubensky, Thomas W.; Lauer, Peter; Brockstedt, Dirk G.; Baxi, Emily G.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Taube, Janis M.; Pardo, Carlos A.; Brem, Henry; Pardoll, Drew M.; Lim, Michael; Drake, Charles G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Immune responses to antigens originating in the CNS are generally attenuated, since collateral damage can have devastating consequences. The significance of this finding for the efficacy of tumor-targeted immunotherapies is largely unknown. Experimental Design The B16 murine melanoma model was used to compare cytotoxic responses against established tumors in the CNS and in the periphery. Cytokine analysis of tissues from brain tumor-bearing mice detected elevated TGF-β secretion from microglia and in the serum and TGF-β signaling blockade reversed tolerance of tumor antigen-directed CD8 T cells. Additionally, a treatment regimen using focal radiation therapy and recombinant Listeria monocytogenes was evaluated for immunologic activity and efficacy in this model. Results CNS melanomas were more tolerogenic than equivalently progressed tumors outside the CNS as antigen-specific CD8 T cells were deleted and exhibited impaired cytotoxicity. Tumor-bearing mice had elevated serum levels of TGF-β; however, blocking TGF-β signaling with a small molecule inhibitor or a monoclonal antibody did not improve survival. Conversely, tumor antigen-specific vaccination in combination with focal radiation therapy reversed tolerance and improved survival. This treatment regimen was associated with increased polyfunctionality of CD8 T cells, elevated T effector to T regulatory cell ratios and decreased TGF-β secretion from microglia. Conclusions These data suggest that CNS tumors may impair systemic antitumor immunity and consequently accelerate cancer progression locally as well as outside the CNS while antitumor immunity may be restored by combining vaccination with radiation therapy. These findings are hypothesis-generating and warrant further study in more contemporary melanoma models as well as human trials. PMID:26490306

  14. Melanoma Cells Can Adopt the Phenotype of Stromal Fibroblasts and Macrophages by Spontaneous Cell Fusion in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Kemény, Lajos V; Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Jakab, Ádám; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B

    2016-06-02

    After the removal of primary cutaneous melanoma some patients develop local recurrences, even after having histologically tumor-free re-excision. A potential explanation behind this phenomenon is that tumor cells switch their phenotype, making their recognition via standard histopathological assessments extremely difficult. Tumor-stromal cell fusion has been proposed as a potential mechanism for tumor cells to acquire mesenchymal traits; therefore, we hypothesized that melanoma cells could acquire fibroblast- and macrophage-like phenotypes via cell fusion. We show that melanoma cells spontaneously fuse with human dermal fibroblasts and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. The hybrid cells' nuclei contain chromosomes from both parental cells and are indistinguishable from the parental fibroblasts or macrophages based on their morphology and immunophenotype, as they could lose the melanoma specific MART1 marker, but express the fibroblast marker smooth muscle actin or the macrophage marker CD68. Our results suggest that, by spontaneous cell fusion in vitro, tumor cells can adopt the morphology and immunophenotype of stromal cells while still carrying oncogenic, tumor-derived genetic information. Therefore, melanoma-stromal cell fusion might play a role in missing tumor cells by routine histopathological assessments.

  15. Photoacoustic imaging features of intraocular tumors: Retinoblastoma and uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guan; Xue, Yafang; Özkurt, Zeynep Gürsel; Slimani, Naziha; Hu, Zizhong; Wang, Xueding; Xia, Kewen; Ma, Teng; Zhou, Qifa; Demirci, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the capability of photoacoustic (PA) imaging (PAI) in assessing the unique molecular and architectural features in ocular tumors. A real-time PA and ultrasonography (US) parallel imaging system based on a research US platform was developed to examine retinoblastoma in mice in vivo and human retinoblastoma and uveal melanoma ex vivo. PA signals were generated by optical illumination at 720, 750, 800, 850, 900 and 950 nm delivered through a fiber optical bundle. The optical absorption spectra of the tumors were derived from the PA images. The optical absorption spectrum of each tumor was quantified by fitting to a polynomial model. The microscopic architectures of the tumors were quantified by frequency domain analysis of the PA signals. Both the optical spectral and architectural features agree with the histological findings of the tumors. The mouse and human retinoblastoma showed comparable total optical absorption spectra at a correlation of 0.95 (p<0.005). The quantitative PAI features of human retinoblastoma and uveal melanoma have shown statistically significant difference in two tailed t-tests (p<0.05). Fully compatible with the concurrent procedures, PAI could be a potential tool complementary to other diagnostic modalities for characterizing intraocular tumors. PMID:28231293

  16. MILI, a PIWI family protein, inhibits melanoma cell migration through methylation of LINE1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuxing; Jiang, Chen; Fu, Bingyuan; Zhu, Ruilou; Diao, Fan; Xu, Na; Chen, Zhong; Tao, Weiwei; Li, Chao-Jun

    2015-02-20

    MILI, a member of the PIWI/AGO gene family, has been well documented to maintain genome integrity by transposon silencing in animal germ cells. It has been reported to be selectively expressed in precancerous stem cells (pCSCs), tumor cell lines and various malignancies. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unclear. Here, we found that MILI is expressed in the melanoma cell line B16 but not in the highly metastatic mouse melanoma model B16BL6. Interestingly, the knockdown of MILI in B16 could activate MAGEA expression and increase the cell migration ability, whereas the overexpression of MILI in B16BL6 could inhibit MAGEA expression and decrease the cell migration ability. Further investigations showed that MILI can methylate LINE1, which is crucial for MAGEA expression and melanoma cell migration. Our results provide a novel function of MILI in melanoma metastasis and tumor progression.

  17. Resistance to BRAF inhibitors induces glutamine dependency in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Baenke, Franziska; Chaneton, Barbara; Smith, Matthew; Van Den Broek, Niels; Hogan, Kate; Tang, Haoran; Viros, Amaya; Martin, Matthew; Galbraith, Laura; Girotti, Maria R.; Dhomen, Nathalie; Gottlieb, Eyal; Marais, Richard

    2016-01-01

    BRAF inhibitors can extend progression-free and overall survival in melanoma patients whose tumors harbor mutations in BRAF. However, the majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these drugs. Here we show that BRAF mutant melanoma cells that have developed acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors display increased oxidative metabolism and increased dependency on mitochondria for survival. Intriguingly, the increased oxidative metabolism is associated with a switch from glucose to glutamine metabolism and an increased dependence on glutamine over glucose for proliferation. We show that the resistant cells are more sensitive to mitochondrial poisons and to inhibitors of glutaminolysis, suggesting that targeting specific metabolic pathways may offer exciting therapeutic opportunities to treat resistant tumors, or to delay emergence of resistance in the first-line setting. PMID:26365896

  18. Galangin inhibits tumor growth and metastasis of B16F10 melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Tang, Bo; Huang, Qilai; Hua, Zichun

    2013-01-01

    Galangin, an active flavonoid extracted from the root of the Alpinia officinarum Hance, showed a cytotoxic effect on several cancer cell lines in vitro. However, there is no information available concerning its antimetastatic effect. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase, is involved in many aspects of cellular processes such as proliferation, adhesion, and invasion. Studies have shown that FAK is a promising target for therapeutic intervention in melanoma. In the present study, proliferation of B16F10 cells was suppressed when exposed to various doses of galangin. Inhibition on proliferation by galangin was also detected by clonogenic survival assay. The capabilities of cell adhesion, cell spreading, and cell motility were impaired by galangin, reinforced by F-actin rearrangement. Molecular data showed that both FAK mRNA level and protein level were reduced dose-dependently. Additionally, galangin reduced phosphorylation of FAK (Tyr397) protein. Transient transfection reporter assays showed that galangin suppressed the transcription of FAK gene, indicating FAK expression is a candidate target of galangin. The antimetastatic function of galangin is further supported by the fact that it could inhibit the formation of tumor colonies in the lung tissue on C57BL/6J mouse lung metastatic model using B16F10 melanoma cells. Immunochemical analyses showed that galangin decreased FAK expression in vivo. These data add to our new understanding that galangin can inhibit B16F10 melanoma metastasis both in vivo and in vitro, and that FAK is a valid therapeutic target against melanoma.

  19. Circulating Melanoma Cell Subpopulations: Their Heterogeneity and Differential Responses to Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gray, Elin S; Reid, Anna L; Bowyer, Samantha; Calapre, Leslie; Siew, Kelvin; Pearce, Robert; Cowell, Lester; Frank, Markus H; Millward, Michael; Ziman, Mel

    2015-08-01

    Metastatic melanoma is a highly heterogeneous tumor; thus, methods to analyze tumor-derived cells circulating in blood should address this diversity. Taking this into account, we analyzed, using multiparametric flow cytometry, the co-expression of the melanoma markers melanoma cell adhesion molecule and melanoma-associated chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan and the tumor-initiating markers ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 5 (ABCB5), CD271, and receptor activator of NF-κβ (RANK) in individual circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from 40 late-stage (III-IV) and 16 early-stage (I-II) melanoma patients. CTCs were heterogeneous within and between patients, with limited co-expression between the five markers analyzed. Analysis of patient matched blood and metastatic tumors revealed that ABCB5 and RANK subpopulations are more common among CTCs than in the solid tumors, suggesting a preferential selection for these cells in circulation. Pairwise comparison of CTC subpopulations longitudinally before and 6-13 weeks after treatment initiation showed that the percentage of RANK(+) CTCs significantly increased in the patients undergoing targeted therapy (N=16, P<0.01). Moreover, the presence of ⩾5 RANK(+) CTCs in the blood of patients undergoing targeted therapies was prognostic of shorter progression-free survival (hazards ratio 8.73, 95% confidence interval 1.82-41.75, P<0.01). Taken together, our results provide evidence of the heterogeneity among CTC subpopulations in melanoma and the differential response of these subpopulations to targeted therapy.

  20. Rap1-GTP-interacting Adaptor Molecule (RIAM) Protein Controls Invasion and Growth of Melanoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Varas, Pablo; Coló, Georgina P.; Bartolomé, Ruben A.; Paterson, Andrew; Medraño-Fernández, Iria; Arellano-Sánchez, Nohemí; Cabañas, Carlos; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Lafuente, Esther M.; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A.; Strömblad, Staffan; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2011-01-01

    The Mig-10/RIAM/lamellipodin (MRL) family member Rap1-GTP-interacting adaptor molecule (RIAM) interacts with active Rap1, a small GTPase that is frequently activated in tumors such as melanoma and prostate cancer. We show here that RIAM is expressed in metastatic human melanoma cells and that both RIAM and Rap1 are required for BLM melanoma cell invasion. RIAM silencing in melanoma cells led to inhibition of tumor growth and to delayed metastasis in a severe combined immunodeficiency xenograft model. Defective invasion of RIAM-silenced melanoma cells arose from impairment in persistent cell migration directionality, which was associated with deficient activation of a Vav2-RhoA-ROCK-myosin light chain pathway. Expression of constitutively active Vav2 and RhoA in cells depleted for RIAM partially rescued their invasion, indicating that Vav2 and RhoA mediate RIAM function. These results suggest that inhibition of cell invasion in RIAM-silenced melanoma cells is likely based on altered cell contractility and cell polarization. Furthermore, we show that RIAM depletion reduces β1 integrin-dependent melanoma cell adhesion, which correlates with decreased activation of both Erk1/2 MAPK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, two central molecules controlling cell growth and cell survival. In addition to causing inhibition of cell proliferation, RIAM silencing led to higher susceptibility to cell apoptosis. Together, these data suggest that defective activation of these kinases in RIAM-silenced cells could account for inhibition of melanoma cell growth and that RIAM might contribute to the dissemination of melanoma cells. PMID:21454517

  1. Tumor-associated B-cells induce tumor heterogeneity and therapy resistance.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Rajasekharan; Zhang, Gao; Fukunaga-Kalabis, Mizuho; Perego, Michela; Krepler, Clemens; Xu, Xiaowei; Wagner, Christine; Hristova, Denitsa; Zhang, Jie; Tian, Tian; Wei, Zhi; Liu, Qin; Garg, Kanika; Griss, Johannes; Hards, Rufus; Maurer, Margarita; Hafner, Christine; Mayerhöfer, Marius; Karanikas, Georgios; Jalili, Ahmad; Bauer-Pohl, Verena; Weihsengruber, Felix; Rappersberger, Klemens; Koller, Josef; Lang, Roland; Hudgens, Courtney; Chen, Guo; Tetzlaff, Michael; Wu, Lawrence; Frederick, Dennie Tompers; Scolyer, Richard A; Long, Georgina V; Damle, Manashree; Ellingsworth, Courtney; Grinman, Leon; Choi, Harry; Gavin, Brian J; Dunagin, Margaret; Raj, Arjun; Scholler, Nathalie; Gross, Laura; Beqiri, Marilda; Bennett, Keiryn; Watson, Ian; Schaider, Helmut; Davies, Michael A; Wargo, Jennifer; Czerniecki, Brian J; Schuchter, Lynn; Herlyn, Dorothee; Flaherty, Keith; Herlyn, Meenhard; Wagner, Stephan N

    2017-09-19

    In melanoma, therapies with inhibitors to oncogenic BRAF(V600E) are highly effective but responses are often short-lived due to the emergence of drug-resistant tumor subpopulations. We describe here a mechanism of acquired drug resistance through the tumor microenvironment, which is mediated by human tumor-associated B cells. Human melanoma cells constitutively produce the growth factor FGF-2, which activates tumor-infiltrating B cells to produce the growth factor IGF-1. B-cell-derived IGF-1 is critical for resistance of melanomas to BRAF and MEK inhibitors due to emergence of heterogeneous subpopulations and activation of FGFR-3. Consistently, resistance of melanomas to BRAF and/or MEK inhibitors is associated with increased CD20 and IGF-1 transcript levels in tumors and IGF-1 expression in tumor-associated B cells. Furthermore, first clinical data from a pilot trial in therapy-resistant metastatic melanoma patients show anti-tumor activity through B-cell depletion by anti-CD20 antibody. Our findings establish a mechanism of acquired therapy resistance through tumor-associated B cells with important clinical implications.Resistance to BRAFV600E inhibitors often occurs in melanoma patients. Here, the authors describe a potential mechanism of acquired drug resistance mediated by tumor-associated B cells-derived IGF-1.

  2. Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer. Often the first sign of melanoma is a change in the size, shape, color, or feel of a mole. Most melanomas have a black or black-blue area. Melanoma ...

  3. Directed Dedifferentiation Using Partial Reprogramming Induces Invasive Phenotype in Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Knappe, Nathalie; Novak, Daniel; Weina, Kasia; Bernhardt, Mathias; Reith, Maike; Larribere, Lionel; Hölzel, Michael; Tüting, Thomas; Gebhardt, Christoffer; Umansky, Viktor; Utikal, Jochen

    2016-04-01

    The combination of cancer-focused studies and research related to nuclear reprogramming has gained increasing importance since both processes-reprogramming towards pluripotency and malignant transformation-share essential features. Studies have revealed that incomplete reprogramming of somatic cells leads to malignant transformation indicating that epigenetic regulation associated with iPSC generation can drive cancer development [J Mol Cell Biol 2011;341-350; Cell 2012;151:1617-1632; Cell 2014;156:663-677]. However, so far it is unclear whether incomplete reprogramming also affects cancer cells and their function. In the context of melanoma, dedifferentiation correlates to therapy resistance in mouse studies and has been documented in melanoma patients [Nature 2012;490:412-416; Clin Cancer Res 2014;20:2498-2499]. Therefore, we sought to investigate directed dedifferentiation using incomplete reprogramming of melanoma cells. Using a murine model we investigated the effects of partial reprogramming on the cellular plasticity of melanoma cells. We demonstrate for the first time that induced partial reprogramming results in a reversible phenotype switch in melanoma cells. Partially reprogrammed cells at day 12 after transgene induction display elevated invasive potential in vitro and increased lung colonization in vivo. Additionally, using global gene expression analysis of partially reprogrammed cells, we identified SNAI3 as a novel invasion-related marker in human melanoma. SNAI3 expression correlates with tumor thickness in primary melanomas and thus, may be of prognostic value. In summary, we show that investigating intermediate states during the process of reprogramming melanoma cells can reveal novel insights into the pathogenesis of melanoma progression. We propose that deeper analysis of partially reprogrammed melanoma cells may contribute to identification of yet unknown signaling pathways that can drive melanoma progression.

  4. Lumican Inhibits SNAIL-Induced Melanoma Cell Migration Specifically by Blocking MMP-14 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stasiak, Marta; Boncela, Joanna; Perreau, Corinne; Karamanou, Konstantina; Chatron-Colliet, Aurore; Proult, Isabelle; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Chakravarti, Shukti; Maquart, François-Xavier; Kowalska, M. Anna; Wegrowski, Yanusz; Brézillon, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Lumican, a small leucine rich proteoglycan, inhibits MMP-14 activity and melanoma cell migration in vitro and in vivo. Snail triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transitions endowing epithelial cells with migratory and invasive properties during tumor progression. The aim of this work was to investigate lumican effects on MMP-14 activity and migration of Snail overexpressing B16F1 (Snail-B16F1) melanoma cells and HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. Lumican inhibits the Snail induced MMP-14 activity in B16F1 but not in HT-29 cells. In Snail-B16F1 cells, lumican inhibits migration, growth, and melanoma primary tumor development. A lumican-based strategy targeting Snail-induced MMP-14 activity might be useful for melanoma treatment. PMID:26930497

  5. The application of quantum dots for the melanoma tumor in vivo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yayi; Zhai, Peng; Wang, Xiaomei; Ying, Ming; Wu, Jinbo; Zhu, Xiaomei; Lin, Guimiao; Chen, Qiang; Xu, Gaixia

    2014-09-01

    Objective: Over the past decade, fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals, also known as quantum dots (QDs), have been applied in biomedical imaging in vitro and in vivo because of their fascinating optical properties. In this work, we investigated the application of CdTe QDs for tumor fluorescence in vivo imaging. Methods: The transparent dorsal skin fold window chamber (DSFC) was constructed on the 4~6 week-old BALB/c mice. The melanoma cells stably expressing green fluorescent protein ---ZsGreen were transplanted into the chamber and the melanoma DSFC model was established successfully. The water soluble CdTe QDs were synthesized and then administrated in the model through the tail intravenous injection. The fluorescent expression of B16 cells were assayed by fluorescent microscopy, the tumor growth, the blood capillaries distributions and its dynamic changes were observed by stereomicroscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy. Results: The results demonstrated that the expression efficiency of ZsGreen was 41%, which met the experimental requirement. The tumors was visible inside the chamber after implantation of melanoma cells for 5~6 days, while no obvious changes in mice behaviors were found. After injection of the QDs, CdTe QDs accumulated at the invading edge of a range of solid tumor. We could also observe the tumor cells growth near the blood vessels, the angiogenesis occurred inside the tumor and the local blood capillaries increased. Conclusions: This work provided a new strategy for the tumor in vivo imaging and the development of targeted antineoplastic drugs.

  6. Ultraviolet B-induced tumors in pigmented hairless mice, with an unsuccessful attempt to induce cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    van Weelden, H; van der Putte, S C; Toonstra, J; van der Leun, J C

    1990-04-01

    An animal experiment is presented in which pigmented hairless mice were exposed once per fortnight to high doses of ultraviolet B (UVB) to study tumorigenesis. The aim of the study was to confirm a causal relationship between cutaneous melanoma and UV radiation, and to find an animal model to study it. The experiment was based on the hypothesis that the risk of developing a melanoma is increased by a history of severe sunburns. Pigmented hairless mice, Skh-hr2, were exposed once every fortnight to high doses of UVB radiation from fluorescent sunlamps, Westinghouse FS40 T12. Heavy actinic damage was observed for several days after each exposure. Seventeen of the 24 animals eventually developed tumors. Histopathologically, 80% of the tumors were squamous cell carcinomas. Depositions of melanophages were observed, but no melanomas. In this mouse experiment no causal relationship between cutaneous melanomas and UV radiation could be established.

  7. Galectin-3 Expression Correlates with Apoptosis of Tumor-Associated Lymphocytes in Human Melanoma Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Zubieta, Mariana Rodríguez; Furman, David; Barrio, Marcela; Bravo, Alicia Inés; Domenichini, Enzo; Mordoh, José

    2006-01-01

    The immune system recognizes diverse melanoma antigens. However, tumors can evade the immune response, therefore growing and progressing. It has been reported that galectin-3 and galectin-1 can induce apoptosis of activated lymphocytes. However, there is strong evidence indicating that the regulation of galectins function in the human tumor microenvironment is a complex process that is influenced by diverse biological circumstances. Here, we have investigated 33 biopsies (eight primary and 25 metastases) from 24 melanoma patients (15–72 years old) and describe the correlation between the expression of galectin-3 or galectin-1 and the level of apoptosis of tumor-associated lymphocytes using immunohistochemistry and an in situ nick translation assay. The range of galectin-3-positive tumor cells varied between 0% and 93% and that of galectin-1-positive tumor cells varied between 5% and 97%. In addition, 23 ± 27% of tumor-associated lymphocytes were apoptotic. Although our results show a correlation between galectin-3 expression and apoptosis of tumor-associated lymphocytes, we could not find such correlation with galectin-1. Considering the complex process of cancer immunoediting, various interacting factors must be considered. PMID:16651632

  8. Induction of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interleukin-10 by TGFbeta1 in melanoma enhances tumor infiltration and immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Valdés, Nancy; Basagoiti, María; Dotor, Javier; Aranda, Fernando; Monreal, Iñaki; Riezu-Boj, José Ignacio; Borrás-Cuesta, Francisco; Sarobe, Pablo; Feijoó, Esperanza

    2011-02-01

    Melanoma progression is associated with the expression of different growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines. Because TGFβ1 is a pleiotropic cytokine involved not only in physiologic processes but also in cancer development, we analyzed in A375 human melanoma cells, the effect of TGFβ1 on monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) expression, two known factors responsible for melanoma progression. TGFβ1 increased the expression of MCP-1 and IL-10 in A375 cells, an effect mediated by the cross-talk between Smad, PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/AKT, and BRAF-MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinase) signaling pathways. Supernatants from TGFβ1-treated A375 cells enhanced MCP-1-dependent migration of monocytes, which, in turn, expressed high levels of TGF,β1, bFGF, and VEGF mRNA. Moreover, these supernatants also inhibited functional properties of dendritic cells through IL-10-dependent mechanisms. When using in vitro, the TGFβ1-blocking peptide P144, TGFβ1-dependent Smad3 phosphorylation, and expression of MCP-1 and IL-10 were inhibited. In vivo, treatment of A375 tumor-bearing athymic mice with P144 significantly reduced tumor growth, associated with a lower macrophage infiltrate and decreased intratumor MCP-1 and VEGF levels, as well as angiogenesis. Finally, in C57BL/6 mice with B16-OVA melanoma tumors, when administered with immunotherapy, P144 decreased tumor growth and intratumor IL-10 levels, linked to enhanced activation of dendritic cells and natural killer cells, as well as anti-OVA T-cell responses. These results show new effects of TGFβ1 on melanoma cells, which promote tumor progression and immunosuppression, strongly reinforcing the relevance of this cytokine as a molecular target in melanoma.

  9. SLT-VEGF reduces lung metastases, decreases tumor recurrence, and improves survival in an orthotopic melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Rachel; Backer, Joseph M; Backer, Marina; Skariah, Sini; Hamby, Carl V

    2010-09-01

    SLT-VEGF is a recombinant cytotoxin comprised of Shiga-like toxin (SLT) subunit A fused to human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It is highly cytotoxic to tumor endothelial cells overexpressing VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2/KDR/Flk1) and inhibits the growth of primary tumors in subcutaneous models of breast and prostate cancer and inhibits metastatic dissemination in orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer. We examined the efficacy of SLT-VEGF in limiting tumor growth and metastasis in an orthotopic melanoma model, using NCR athymic nude mice inoculated with highly metastatic Line IV Cl 1 cultured human melanoma cells. Twice weekly injections of SLT-VEGF were started when tumors became palpable at one week after intradermal injection of 1 × 10(6) cells/mouse. Despite selective depletion of VEGFR-2 overexpressing endothelial cells from the tumor vasculature, SLT-VEGF treatment did not affect tumor growth. However, after primary tumors were removed, continued SLT-VEGF treatment led to fewer tumor recurrences (p = 0.007), reduced the incidence of lung metastasis (p = 0.038), and improved survival (p = 0.002). These results suggest that SLT-VEGF is effective at the very early stages of tumor development, when selective killing of VEGFR-2 overexpressing endothelial cells can still prevent further progression. We hypothesize that SLT-VEGF could be a promising adjuvant therapy to inhibit or prevent outgrowth of metastatic foci after excision of aggressive primary melanoma lesions.

  10. Vitamin E δ-tocotrienol triggers endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Montagnani Marelli, Marina; Marzagalli, Monica; Moretti, Roberta M.; Beretta, Giangiacomo; Casati, Lavinia; Comitato, Raffaella; Gravina, Giovanni L.; Festuccia, Claudio; Limonta, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin cancer. Drug toxicity and resistance represent a serious challange for melanoma treatments. Evidence demonstrates that natural compounds may play a crucial role in cancer prevention, growth and progression. Vitamin E tocotrienols (TT) were shown to possess antitumor activity. Here, we analyzed the effects of δ-TT on melanoma cell growth and the involvement of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in this activity. The experiments were performed on human melanoma cell lines, BLM and A375. δ-TT exerted a significant proapoptotic effect on both cell lines, involving the intrinsic apoptosis pathway; importantly, this compound did not affect the viability of normal human melanocytes. In melanoma cells, δ-TT exerted its antitumor effect through activation of the PERK/p-eIF2α/ATF4/CHOP, IRE1α and caspase-4 ER stress-related branches. Salubrinal, an inhibitor of the ER stress, counteracted the cytotoxic activity of δ-TT. In vivo experiments performed in nude mice bearing A375 xenografts evidenced that δ-TT reduces tumor volume and tumor mass; importantly, tumor progression was significantly delayed by δ-TT treatment. In conclusion, δ-TT exerts a proapoptotic activity on melanoma cells, through activation of the ER stress-related pathways. δ-TT might represent an effective option for novel chemopreventive/therapeutic strategies for melanoma. PMID:27461002

  11. Vitamin E δ-tocotrienol triggers endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Montagnani Marelli, Marina; Marzagalli, Monica; Moretti, Roberta M; Beretta, Giangiacomo; Casati, Lavinia; Comitato, Raffaella; Gravina, Giovanni L; Festuccia, Claudio; Limonta, Patrizia

    2016-07-27

    Malignant melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin cancer. Drug toxicity and resistance represent a serious challange for melanoma treatments. Evidence demonstrates that natural compounds may play a crucial role in cancer prevention, growth and progression. Vitamin E tocotrienols (TT) were shown to possess antitumor activity. Here, we analyzed the effects of δ-TT on melanoma cell growth and the involvement of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in this activity. The experiments were performed on human melanoma cell lines, BLM and A375. δ-TT exerted a significant proapoptotic effect on both cell lines, involving the intrinsic apoptosis pathway; importantly, this compound did not affect the viability of normal human melanocytes. In melanoma cells, δ-TT exerted its antitumor effect through activation of the PERK/p-eIF2α/ATF4/CHOP, IRE1α and caspase-4 ER stress-related branches. Salubrinal, an inhibitor of the ER stress, counteracted the cytotoxic activity of δ-TT. In vivo experiments performed in nude mice bearing A375 xenografts evidenced that δ-TT reduces tumor volume and tumor mass; importantly, tumor progression was significantly delayed by δ-TT treatment. In conclusion, δ-TT exerts a proapoptotic activity on melanoma cells, through activation of the ER stress-related pathways. δ-TT might represent an effective option for novel chemopreventive/therapeutic strategies for melanoma.

  12. Phyllodes Tumor of the Breast With Malignant Melanoma Component: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Vergine, Marco; Guy, Catherine; Taylor, Mark R

    2015-09-01

    Phyllodes tumors of the breast display a wide variation in histological appearance and are classified into benign, borderline, and malignant categories based on a combination of histological parameters. These tumors may include a malignant heterologous component that is believed to originate through a process of multidirectional differentiation from a cancer stem cell. In these cases, the tumor is classified as a malignant phyllodes tumor. Among the heterologous elements that have been described in malignant phyllodes tumors are rhabdomyosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, osteosarcoma, liposarcoma and angiosarcoma. We present the first case of a phyllodes tumor with a malignant melanoma component in the breast of a 71-year-old lady, discussing the clinical implications of this diagnosis.

  13. Melanoma cells inhibit natural killer cell function by modulating the expression of activating receptors and cytolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Pietra, Gabriella; Manzini, Claudia; Rivara, Silvia; Vitale, Massimo; Cantoni, Claudia; Petretto, Andrea; Balsamo, Mirna; Conte, Romana; Benelli, Roberto; Minghelli, Simona; Solari, Nicola; Gualco, Marina; Queirolo, Paola; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2012-03-15

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in tumor immune surveillance. However, adoptive immunotherapy protocols using NK cells have shown limited clinical efficacy to date, possibly due to tumor escape mechanisms that inhibit NK cell function. In this study, we analyzed the effect of coculturing melanoma cells and NK cells on their phenotype and function. We found that melanoma cells inhibited the expression of major NK receptors that trigger their immune function, including NKp30, NKp44, and NKG2D, with consequent impairment of NK cell-mediated cytolytic activity against various melanoma cell lines. This inhibitory effect was primarily mediated by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Together, our findings suggest that immunosuppressive barriers erected by tumors greatly hamper the antitumor activity of human NK cells, thereby favoring tumor outgrowth and progression.

  14. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Takabe, Piia; Bart, Geneviève; Ropponen, Antti; Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna

    2015-09-10

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells.

  15. Vaccination with Irradiated Autologous Melanoma Cells Engineered to Secrete Human Granulocyte--Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Generates Potent Antitumor Immunity in Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soiffer, Robert; Lynch, Thomas; Mihm, Martin; Jung, Ken; Rhuda, Catherine; Schmollinger, Jan C.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Liebster, Laura; Lam, Prudence; Mentzer, Steven; Singer, Samuel; Tanabe, Kenneth K.; Benedict Cosimi, A.; Duda, Rosemary; Sober, Arthur; Bhan, Atul; Daley, John; Neuberg, Donna; Parry, Gordon; Rokovich, Joseph; Richards, Laurie; Drayer, Jan; Berns, Anton; Clift, Shirley; Cohen, Lawrence K.; Mulligan, Richard C.; Dranoff, Glenn

    1998-10-01

    We conducted a Phase I clinical trial investigating the biologic activity of vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete human granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with metastatic melanoma. Immunization sites were intensely infiltrated with T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, macrophages, and eosinophils in all 21 evaluable patients. Although metastatic lesions resected before vaccination were minimally infiltrated with cells of the immune system in all patients, metastatic lesions resected after vaccination were densely infiltrated with T lymphocytes and plasma cells and showed extensive tumor destruction (at least 80%), fibrosis, and edema in 11 of 16 patients examined. Antimelanoma cytotoxic T cell and antibody responses were associated with tumor destruction. These results demonstrate that vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates potent antitumor immunity in humans with metastatic melanoma.

  16. Notch3 signaling-mediated melanoma-endothelial crosstalk regulates melanoma stem-like cell homeostasis and niche morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Mei-Yu; Yang, Moon Hee; Schnegg, Caroline I; Hwang, Soonyean; Ryu, Byungwoo; Alani, Rhoda M

    2017-02-06

    Melanoma is among the most virulent cancers, owing to its propensity to metastasize and its resistance to current therapies. The treatment failure is largely attributed to tumor heterogeneity, particularly subpopulations possessing stem cell-like properties, ie, melanoma stem-like cells (MSLCs). Evidence indicates that the MSLC phenotype is malleable and may be acquired by non-MSLCs through phenotypic switching upon appropriate stimuli, the so-called 'dynamic stemness'. Since the phenotypic characteristics and functional integrity of MSLCs depend on their vascular niche, using a two-dimensional (2D) melanoma-endothelium co-culture model, where the MSLC niche is recapitulated in vitro, we identified Notch3 signaling pathway as a micro-environmental cue governing MSLC phenotypic plasticity via pathway-specific gene expression arrays. Accordingly, lentiviral shRNA-mediated Notch3 knockdown (KD) in melanoma cell lines exhibiting high levels of endogenous Notch3 led to retarded/abolished tumorigenicity in vivo through both depleting MSLC fractions, evinced by MSLC marker downregulation (eg, CD133 and CD271); and impeding the MSLC niche, corroborated by the attenuated tumor angiogenesis as well as vasculogenic mimicry. In contrast, Notch3 KD affected neither tumor growth nor MSLC subsets in a melanoma cell line with relatively low endogenous Notch3 expression. Thus, Notch3 signaling may facilitate MSLC plasticity and niche morphogenesis in a cell context-dependent manner. Our findings illustrate Notch3 as a molecular switch driving melanoma heterogeneity, and provide the biological rationale for Notch inhibition as a promising therapeutic option.Laboratory Investigation advance online publication, 6 February 2017; doi:10.1038/labinvest.2017.1.

  17. Notch3 Signaling-Mediated Melanoma-Endothelial Crosstalk Regulates Melanoma Stem-Like Cell Homeostasis and Niche Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Mei-Yu; Yang, Moon Hee; Schnegg, Caroline I.; Hwang, Soonyean; Ryu, Byungwoo; Alani, Rhoda M.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is among the most virulent cancers, owing to its propensity to metastasize and its resistance to current therapies. The treatment failure is largely attributed to tumor heterogeneity, particularly subpopulations possessing stem cell-like properties, i.e., melanoma stem-like cells (MSLCs). Evidence indicates that the MSLC phenotype is malleable and may be acquired by non-MSLCs through phenotypic switching upon appropriate stimuli, the so–called “dynamic stemness”. Since the phenotypic characteristics and functional integrity of MSLCs depend on their vascular niche, using a two dimensional (2D) melanoma-endothelium co-culture model, where the MSLC niche is recapitulated in vitro, we identified Notch3 signaling pathway as a micro-environmental cue governing MSLC phenotypic plasticity via pathway-specific gene expression arrays. Accordingly, lentiviral shRNA-mediated Notch3 knockdown (KD) in melanoma cell lines exhibiting high levels of endogenous Notch3 led to retarded/abolished tumorigenicity in vivo through both depleting MSLC fractions, evinced by MSLC marker down-regulation (e.g., CD133 and CD271); and impeding the MSLC niche, corroborated by the attenuated tumor angiogenesis as well as vasculogenic mimicry. In contrast, Notch3 KD affected neither tumor growth nor MSLC subsets in a melanoma cell line with relatively low endogenous Notch3 expression. Thus, Notch3 signaling may facilitate MSLC plasticity and niche morphogenesis in a cell context-dependent fashion. Our findings illustrate Notch3 as a molecular switch driving melanoma heterogeneity, and provide the biological rationale for Notch inhibition as a promising therapeutic option. PMID:28165469

  18. Blue light inhibits proliferation of melanoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Anja; Distler, Elisabeth; Klapczynski, Anna; Arpino, Fabiola; Kuch, Natalia; Simon-Keller, Katja; Sticht, Carsten; van Abeelen, Frank A.; Gretz, Norbert; Oversluizen, Gerrit

    2016-03-01

    Photobiomodulation with blue light is used for several treatment paradigms such as neonatal jaundice, psoriasis and back pain. However, little is known about possible side effects concerning melanoma cells in the skin. The aim of this study was to assess the safety of blue LED irradiation with respect to proliferation of melanoma cells. For that purpose we used the human malignant melanoma cell line SK-MEL28. Cell proliferation was decreased in blue light irradiated cells where the effect size depended on light irradiation dosage. Furthermore, with a repeated irradiation of the melanoma cells on two consecutive days the effect could be intensified. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting with Annexin V and Propidium iodide labeling did not show a higher number of dead cells after blue light irradiation compared to non-irradiated cells. Gene expression analysis revealed down-regulated genes in pathways connected to anti-inflammatory response, like B cell signaling and phagosome. Most prominent pathways with up-regulation of genes were cytochrome P450, steroid hormone biosynthesis. Furthermore, even though cells showed a decrease in proliferation, genes connected to the cell cycle were up-regulated after 24h. This result is concordant with XTT test 48h after irradiation, where irradiated cells showed the same proliferation as the no light negative control. In summary, proliferation of melanoma cells can be decreased using blue light irradiation. Nevertheless, the gene expression analysis has to be further evaluated and more studies, such as in-vivo experiments, are warranted to further assess the safety of blue light treatment.

  19. TLR2/6 agonists and interferon-gamma induce human melanoma cells to produce CXCL10

    PubMed Central

    Mauldin, Ileana S.; Wang, Ena; Deacon, Donna H.; Olson, Walter C.; Bao, Yongde; Slingluff, Craig L.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical approaches to treat advanced melanoma include immune therapies, whose benefits depend on tumor-reactive T-cell infiltration of metastases. However, most tumors lack significant immune infiltration prior to therapy. Selected chemokines promote T-cell migration into tumors; thus, agents that induce these chemokines in the tumor microenvironment (TME) may improve responses to systemic immune therapy. CXCL10 has been implicated as a critical chemokine supporting T-cell infiltration into the TME. Here we show that toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists can induce chemokine production directly from melanoma cells when combined with IFNγ treatment. We find that TLR2 and TLR6 are widely expressed on human melanoma cells, and that TLR2/6 agonists (MALP-2 or FSL-1) synergize with interferon-gamma (IFNγ) to induce production of CXCL10 from melanoma cells. Furthermore, melanoma cells and immune cells from surgical specimens also respond to TLR2/6 agonists and IFNγ by upregulating CXCL10 production, compared to treatment with either agent alone. Collectively, these data identify a novel mechanism for inducing CXCL10 production directly from melanoma cells, with TLR2/6 agonists +IFNγ and raise the possibility that intratumoral administration of these agents may improve immune signatures in melanoma and have value in combination with other immune therapies, by supporting T-cell migration into melanoma metastases. PMID:25765738

  20. Myeloid cells that impair immunotherapy are restored in melanomas which acquire resistance to BRAF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Shannon M; Shabaneh, Tamer; Zhang, Peisheng; Martyanov, Viktor; Li, Zhenghui; Malik, Brian; Wood, Tammara; Boni, Andrea; Molodtsov, Aleksey; Angeles, Christina V; Curiel, Tyler J; Whitfield, Michael; Turk, Mary Jo

    2017-02-15

    Acquired resistance to BRAFV600E inhibitors (BRAFi) in melanoma remains a common clinical obstacle, as is the case for any targeted drug therapy that can be developed given the plastic nature of cancers. While there has been significant focus on the cancer cell-intrinsic properties of BRAFi resistance, the impact of BRAFi resistance on host immunity has not been explored. Here we provide preclinical evidence that resistance to BRAFi in an autochthonous mouse model of melanoma is associated with restoration of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in the tumor microenvironment initially reduced by BRAFi treatment. In contrast to restoration of MDSC, levels of T regulatory cells remained reduced in BRAFi-resistant tumors. Accordingly, tumor gene expression signatures specific for myeloid cell chemotaxis and homeostasis reappeared in BRAFi-resistant tumors. Notably, MDSC restoration relied upon MAPK pathway reactivation and downstream production of the myeloid attractant CCL2 in BRAFi-resistant melanoma cells. Strikingly, while combination checkpoint blockade (anti-CTLA-4 + anti-PD-1) was ineffective against BRAFi-resistant melanomas, the addition of MDSC depletion/blockade (anti-Gr-1 + CCR2 antagonist) prevented outgrowth of BRAFi-resistant tumors. Our results illustrate how extrinsic pathways of immunosuppression elaborated by melanoma cells dominate the tumor microenvironment and highlight the need to target extrinsic as well as intrinsic mechanisms of drug resistance.

  1. The glutamate release inhibitor Riluzole decreases migration, invasion, and proliferation of melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Le, Maithao N; Chan, Joseph L-K; Rosenberg, Stephen A; Nabatian, Adam S; Merrigan, Kim T; Cohen-Solal, Karine A; Goydos, James S

    2010-09-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effects of metabotropic glutamate receptor-1 (GRM1) blockade on melanoma anchorage-independent growth and invasion. We performed colony and invasion assays using GRM1-expressing melanoma lines and the GRM1-negative UACC930 line. Using the glutamate-release inhibitor Riluzole or the non-competitive GRM1 antagonist BAY 36-7620 we were able to induce considerable inhibition of colony formation and invasion in GRM1-expressing melanoma lines. Neither pharmacological agent induced significant reduction in colony formation or invasion in the GRM1-negative melanoma line, UACC930. Additionally we assessed the efficacy of these inhibitors to inhibit the growth of fresh melanoma tumor samples cultured on a 74-mum nylon mesh. Both Riluzole and BAY 36-7620 significantly inhibited tumor cell growth into the interstitial spaces of the mesh. When repeated with normal mole samples both inhibitors were much less effective in preventing the outgrowth of cells. These experiments show that a specific antagonist of GRM1 (BAY 36-7620) or an inhibitor of glutamate release (Riluzole) can significantly suppress melanoma migration, invasion and colony formation as well as inhibit the proliferation of fresh melanoma cells. These findings, added to our previous work, strengthen the case that GRM1 is a valid therapeutic target in patients with melanoma.

  2. The Glutamate Release Inhibitor Riluzole Decreases Migration, Invasion and Proliferation of Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Le, Maithao N.; Chan, Joseph L.-K.; Rosenberg, Stephen A.; Nabatian, Adam S.; Merrigan, Kim T.; Cohen-Solal, Karine A.; Goydos, James S.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effects of GRM1 blockade on melanoma anchorage independent growth and invasion. We performed colony and invasion assays using GRM1-expressing melanoma lines and the GRM1 negative UACC930 line. Using the glutamate-release inhibitor Riluzole or the noncompetitive GRM1 antagonist BAY36-7620 we were able to induced considerable inhibition of colony formation and invasion in GRM1-expressing melanoma lines. Neither pharmacological agent induced a significant reduction in colony formation or invasion in the GRM1 negative melanoma line, UACC930. Additionally we assessed the efficacy of these inhibitors to inhibit the growth of fresh melanoma tumor samples cultured on a 74μm nylon mesh. Both Riluzole and BAY36-7620 significantly inhibited tumor cell growth into the interstitial spaces of the mesh. When repeated with normal mole samples both inhibitors were much less effective in preventing the outgrowth of cells. These experiments show that a specific antagonist of GRM1 (BAY36-7620) or an inhibitor of glutamate release (Riluzole) can significantly suppress melanoma migration, invasion and colony formation as well as inhibit the proliferation of fresh melanoma cells. These findings added to our previous work, strengthen the case that GRM1 is a valid therapeutic target in patients with melanoma. PMID:20505744

  3. The Disintegrin-like and Cysteine-rich domains of ADAM-9 Mediate Interactions between Melanoma Cells and Fibroblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Zigrino, Paola; Nischt, Roswitha; Mauch, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    A characteristic of malignant cells is their capacity to invade their surrounding and to metastasize to distant organs. During these processes, proteolytic activities of tumor and stromal cells modify the extracellular matrix to produce a microenvironment suitable for their growth and migration. In recent years the family of ADAM proteases has been ascribed important roles in these processes. ADAM-9 is expressed in human melanoma at the tumor-stroma border where direct or indirect interactions between tumor cells and fibroblasts occur. To analyze the role of ADAM-9 for the interaction between melanoma cells and stromal fibroblasts, we produced the recombinant disintegrin-like and cysteine-rich domain of ADAM-9 (DC-9). Melanoma cells and human fibroblasts adhered to immobilized DC-9 in a Mn2+-dependent fashion suggesting an integrin-mediated process. Inhibition studies showed that adhesion of fibroblasts was mediated by several β1 integrin receptors independent of the RGD and ECD recognition motif. Furthermore, interaction of fibroblasts and high invasive melanoma cells with soluble recombinant DC-9 resulted in enhanced expression of MMP-1 and MMP-2. Silencing of ADAM-9 in melanoma cells significantly reduced cell adhesion to fibroblasts. Ablation of ADAM-9 in fibroblasts almost completely abolished these cellular interactions and melanoma cell invasion in vitro. In summary, these results suggest that ADAM-9 expression plays an important role in mediating cell-cell contacts between fibroblasts and melanoma cells and that these interactions contribute to proteolytic activities required during invasion of melanoma cells. PMID:21135106

  4. Modulation of the Metastatic Activity of Melanoma Cells by Laminin and Fibronectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terranova, Victor P.; Williams, Jeannette E.; Liotta, Lance A.; Martin, George R.

    1984-11-01

    Metastatic mouse melanoma cells have a high affinity for the basement membrane and the ability to degrade it; these properties may allow tumor cells to invade the membrane and disseminate. In this study it was found that the metastatic potential of mouse melanoma cells varied when the cells were exposed in culture to fibronectin or laminin. After removal of fibronectin or exposure to laminin, the cells had an increased affinity for basement membrane collagen, were more invasive of basement membranes in vitro, and produced more lung colonies in vivo. These changes are correlated with and may be due to an increase in the laminin-binding capacity of the tumor cell surface.

  5. Resveratrol Is Rapidly Metabolized in Athymic (Nu/Nu) Mice and Does Not Inhibit Human Melanoma Xenograft Tumor Growth1

    PubMed Central

    Niles, Richard M.; Cook, Carla P.; Meadows, Gary G.; Fu, Ya-Min; McLaughlin, Jerry L.; Rankin, Gary O.

    2006-01-01

    Resveratrol has been shown to have anticarcinogenic activity. We previously found that resveratrol inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in 2 human melanoma cell lines. In this study we determined whether resveratrol would inhibit human melanoma xenograft growth. Athymic mice received control diets or diets containing 110 μmol/L or 263 μmol/L resveratrol, 2 wk prior to subcutaneous injection of the tumor cells. Tumor growth was measured during a 3-wk period. Metabolism of resveratrol was assayed by bolus gavage of 75 mg/kg resveratrol in tumor-bearing and nontumor-bearing mice. Pellets containing 10–100 mg resveratrol were implanted into the mice, next to newly palpated tumors, and tumor growth determined. We also determined the effect of a major resveratrol metabolite, piceatannol, on experimental lung metastasis. Resveratrol, at any concentration tested, did not have a statistically significant effect on tumor growth. The higher levels of resveratrol tested (0.006% in food or 100 mg in slow-release pellets) tended to stimulate tumor growth (P = 0.08–0.09). Resveratrol and its major metabolites, resveratrol glucuronide and piceatannol, were found in serum, liver, skin, and tumor tissue. Piceatannol did not affect the in vitro growth of a murine melanoma cell line, but significantly stimulated the number of lung metastases when these melanoma cells were directly injected into the tail vein of the mouse. These results suggest that resveratrol is not likely to be useful in the treatment of melanoma and that the effects of phytochemicals on cell cultures may not translate to the whole animal system. PMID:16988123

  6. Efficacy of Juzentaihoto for Tumor Immunotherapy in B16 Melanoma Metastasis Model

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Takako; Tezuka, Chiaki

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Medical care for Japanese cancer patients includes Western and Kampo medicines, and treatments with juzentaihoto (JTT) reportedly prevent cancer metastasis and recurrence. In this study, we examined the effects of JTT on natural killer (NK) cell activity and metastasis in combined treatments with anti-PD-1 antibody in a mouse model of melanoma metastasis. Methods. C57BL/6 male mice were intravenously injected with B16 melanoma cells (B16 cell) and were given chow containing 3% JTT. In subsequent in vivo experiments, we assessed serum cytokine levels and tumor colony formation in the lungs. Additionally, we assessed NK cell activity in ex vivo experiments. Results. JTT significantly suppressed B16 cell metastasis, whereas injection of anti-asialo-GM1 antibody into mice abrogated the inhibitory actions of JTT. JTT significantly increased interleukin- (IL-) 12 and interferon- (IFN-) γ levels in serum and induced NK cell activity. It increased the inhibitory actions of the anti-PD-1 antibody on B16 cell metastasis. Discussion. These data suggest that JTT inhibits B16 cell metastasis by inducing NK cell activity. Additionally, combination therapy with JTT and anti-PD-1 antibody increased treatment response rates for B16 melanoma. PMID:28286532

  7. Identification of different tumor escape mechanisms in several metastases from a melanoma patient undergoing immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Rosa; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco; Rodríguez, Teresa; Del Campo, Ana; Paschen, Annette; Schadendorf, Dirk; Garrido, Federico

    2007-01-01

    The cytotoxic activity of T cells selects the outgrowth of tumor cells that escape from immune surveillance by different strategies. The different mechanisms that interfere with immune recognition and limit vaccination efficiency are still poorly understood. We analysed six cell lines established from different metastases of melanoma patient UKRV-Mel-20 for specific characteristics known to have an impact on the tumor-T cell interaction: (1) alterations in the HLA class I phenotype, (2) expression of Fas/CD95, and (3) expression of specific cytokines and chemokines. One of the cell lines, UKRV-Mel-20f, exhibited an HLA class I haplotype loss and just this cell line was also characterised by the expression of Fas/CD95 and of relatively high levels of proinflammatory chemokines suggesting that the cytotoxic activity of tumor-infiltrating T cells might have selected the outgrowth of this tumor cell variant. All other cell lines analysed showed no alterations in HLA class I expression, but, in contrast to UKRV-Mel-20f, expressed much lower levels of Fas/CD95 and of proinflammatory chemokines and some of them produced high levels of immunosuppressive TGF-beta1. These results suggest that in patient UKRV-Mel-20, tumor cells interfere with T cell recognition by different strategies which might partially explain why this patient did not have a clinical response to an autologous tumor cell vaccine.

  8. Growth Hormone Receptor Knockdown Sensitizes Human Melanoma Cells to Chemotherapy by Attenuating Expression of ABC Drug Efflux Pumps.

    PubMed

    Basu, Reetobrata; Baumgaertel, Nicholas; Wu, Shiyong; Kopchick, John J

    2017-03-14

    Melanoma remains one of the most therapy-resistant forms of human cancer despite recent introductions of highly efficacious targeted therapies. The intrinsic therapy resistance of human melanoma is largely due to abundant expression of a repertoire of xenobiotic efflux pumps of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. Here, we report that GH action is a key mediator of chemotherapeutic resistance in human melanoma cells. We investigated multiple ABC efflux pumps (ABCB1, ABCB5, ABCB8, ABCC1, ABCC2, ABCG1, and ABCG2) reportedly associated with melanoma drug resistance in different human melanoma cells and tested the efficacy of five different anti-cancer compounds (cisplatin, doxorubicin, oridonin, paclitaxel, vemurafenib) with decreased GH action. We found that GH treatment of human melanoma cells upregulates expression of multiple ABC transporters and increases the EC50 of melanoma drug vemurafenib. Also, vemurafenib-resistant melanoma cells had upregulated levels of GH receptor (GHR) expression as well as ABC efflux pumps. GHR knockdown (KD) using siRNA in human melanoma cells treated with sub-EC50 doses of anti-tumor compounds resulted in significantly increased drug retention, decreased cell proliferation and increased drug efficacy, compared to mock-transfected controls. Our set of findings identify an unknown mechanism of GH regulation in mediating melanoma drug resistance and validates GHR as a unique therapeutic target for sensitizing highly therapy-resistant human melanoma cells to lower doses of anti-cancer drugs.

  9. Dissecting the multicellular ecosystem of metastatic melanoma by single-cell RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Tirosh, Itay; Izar, Benjamin; Prakadan, Sanjay M.; Wadsworth, Marc H.; Treacy, Daniel; Trombetta, John J.; Rotem, Asaf; Rodman, Christopher; Lian, Christine; Murphy, George; Fallahi-Sichani, Mohammad; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Lin, Jia-Ren; Cohen, Ofir; Shah, Parin; Lu, Diana; Genshaft, Alex S.; Hughes, Travis K.; Ziegler, Carly G. K.; Kazer, Samuel W.; Gaillard, Aleth; Kolb, Kellie E.; Villani, Alexandra-Chloé; Johannessen, Cory M.; Andreev, Aleksandr Y.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Bertagnolli, Monica; Sorger, Peter K.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Frederick, Dennie T.; Jané-Valbuena, Judit; Yoon, Charles H.; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Shalek, Alex K.; Regev, Aviv; Garraway, Levi A.

    2016-01-01

    To explore the distinct genotypic and phenotypic states of melanoma tumors we applied single-cell RNA-seq to 4,645 single cells isolated from 19 patients, profiling malignant, immune, stromal and endothelial cells. Malignant cells within the same tumor displayed transcriptional heterogeneity associated with the cell cycle, spatial context, and a drug resistance program. In particular, all tumors harbored malignant cells from two distinct transcriptional cell states, such that “MITF-high” tumors also contained “AXL-high” tumor cells. Single-cell analyses suggested distinct tumor micro-environmental patterns, including cell-to-cell interactions. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating T cells revealed exhaustion programs, their connection to T cell activation and to clonal expansion, and their variability across patients. Overall, we begin to unravel the cellular ecosystem of tumors and how single cell genomics offers insights with implications for both targeted and immune therapies. PMID:27124452

  10. Raman spectroscopy detects melanoma and the tissue surrounding melanoma using tissue-engineered melanoma models

    PubMed Central

    Yorucu, Ceyla; Lau, Katherine; Mittar, Shweta; Green, Nicola H.; Raza, Ahtasham; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Invasion of melanoma cells from the primary tumor involves interaction with adjacent tissues and extracellular matrix. The extent of this interaction is not fully understood. In this study Raman spectroscopy was applied to cryo-sections of established 3D models of melanoma in human skin. Principal component analysis was used to investigate differences between the tumor and normal tissue and between the peri-tumor area and the normal skin. Two human melanoma cells lines A375SM and C8161 were investigated and compared in 3D melanoma models. Changes were found in protein conformations and tryptophan configurations across the entire melanoma samples, in tyrosine orientation and in more fluid lipid packing only in tumor dense areas, and in increased glycogen content in the peri-tumor areas of melanoma. Raman spectroscopy revealed changes around the perimeter of a melanoma tumor as well as detecting differences between the tumor and the normal tissue. PMID:27158185

  11. Detection and capture of single circulating melanoma cells using photoacoustic flowmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Christine; Mosley, Jeffrey; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Viator, John A.

    2010-02-01

    Photoacoustic flowmetry has been used to detect single circulating melanoma cells in vitro. Circulating melanoma cells are those cells that travel in the blood and lymph systems to create secondary tumors and are the hallmark of metastasis. This technique involves taking blood samples from patients, separating the white blood and melanoma cells from whole blood and irradiating them with a pulsed laser in a flowmetry set up. Rapid, visible wavelength laser pulses on the order of 5 ns can induce photoacoustic waves in melanoma cells due to their melanin content, while surrounding white blood cells remain acoustically passive. We have developed a system that identifies rare melanoma cells and captures them in 50 microliter volumes using suction applied near the photoacoustic detection chamber. The 50 microliter sample is then diluted and the experiment is repeated using the new sample until only a melanoma cell remains. We have tested this system on dyed microspheres ranging in size from 300 to 500 microns. Capture of circulating melanoma cells may provide the opportunity to study metastatic cells for basic understanding of the spread of cancer and to optimize patient specific therapies.

  12. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 and Hydroxychloroquine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, Melanoma, Prostate or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-12

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  13. MiR-769 promoted cell proliferation in human melanoma by suppressing GSK3B expression.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hai-Jiang; Lu, Xiao-He; Yang, Sha-Sha; Weng, Chen-Yin; Zhang, E-Keng; Chen, Fang-Chao

    2016-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, non-coding RNAs with post-transcriptional regulatory function, playing crucial roles in cancer development and progression of human melanoma. Previous studies have indicated that miR-769 was implicated in diverse biological processes. However, the underlying mechanism of miR-769 in human melanoma has not been intensively investigated. In this present study, we aimed to investigate the role of miR-769 and its target genes in human melanoma. We found that miR-769 expression was strongly increased in human melanoma cells and clinical tissues compared with their corresponding controls. Overexpression of miR-769 promoted cell proliferation in human melanoma cell line A375, whereas miR-769-in reverses the function. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 Beta (GSK3B), a potential target gene of miR-769, and was validated by luciferase assay. Further studies revealed that miR-769 regulated cell proliferation of human melanoma by directly suppressing GSK3B expression and the knockdown of GSK3B expression reversed the effect of miR-769-in on human melanoma cell proliferation. In summary, our data demonstrated that miR-769 might act as a tumor promoter by targeting GSK3B during development of human melanoma.

  14. Detection and Isolation of Circulating Melanoma Cells using Photoacoustic Flowmetry

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Christine M.; Rood, Kyle; Sengupta, Shramik; Gupta, Sagar K.; DeSouza, Thiago; Cook, Aaron; Viator, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are those cells that have separated from a macroscopic tumor and spread through the blood and lymph systems to seed secondary tumors1,2,3. CTCs are indicators of metastatic disease and their detection in blood samples may be used to diagnose cancer and monitor a patient′s response to therapy. Since CTCs are rare, comprising about one tumor cell among billions of normal blood cells in advanced cancer patients, their detection and enumeration is a difficult task. We exploit the presence of pigment in most melanoma cells to generate photoacoustic, or laser induced ultrasonic waves in a custom flow cytometer for detection of circulating melanoma cells (CMCs)4,5. This process entails separating a whole blood sample using centrifugation and obtaining the white blood cell layer. If present in whole blood, CMCs will separate with the white blood cells due to similar density. These cells are resuspended in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and introduced into the flowmeter. Rather than a continuous flow of the blood cell suspension, we induced two phase flow in order to capture these cells for further study. In two phase flow, two immiscible liquids in a microfluidic system meet at a junction and form alternating slugs of liquid6,7. PBS suspended white blood cells and air form microliter slugs that are sequentially irradiated with laser light. The addition of a surfactant to the liquid phase allows uniform slug formation and the user can create different sized slugs by altering the flow rates of the two phases. Slugs of air and slugs of PBS with white blood cells contain no light absorbers and hence, do not produce photoacoustic waves. However, slugs of white blood cells that contain even single CMCs absorb laser light and produce high frequency acoustic waves. These slugs that generate photoacoustic waves are sequestered and collected for cytochemical staining for verification of CMCs. PMID:22143421

  15. Detection and isolation of circulating melanoma cells using photoacoustic flowmetry.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Christine M; Rood, Kyle; Sengupta, Shramik; Gupta, Sagar K; DeSouza, Thiago; Cook, Aaron; Viator, John A

    2011-11-25

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are those cells that have separated from a macroscopic tumor and spread through the blood and lymph systems to seed secondary tumors(1,2,3). CTCs are indicators of metastatic disease and their detection in blood samples may be used to diagnose cancer and monitor a patient's response to therapy. Since CTCs are rare, comprising about one tumor cell among billions of normal blood cells in advanced cancer patients, their detection and enumeration is a difficult task. We exploit the presence of pigment in most melanoma cells to generate photoacoustic, or laser induced ultrasonic waves in a custom flow cytometer for detection of circulating melanoma cells (CMCs)(4,5). This process entails separating a whole blood sample using centrifugation and obtaining the white blood cell layer. If present in whole blood, CMCs will separate with the white blood cells due to similar density. These cells are resuspended in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and introduced into the flowmeter. Rather than a continuous flow of the blood cell suspension, we induced two phase flow in order to capture these cells for further study. In two phase flow, two immiscible liquids in a microfluidic system meet at a junction and form alternating slugs of liquid(6,7). PBS suspended white blood cells and air form microliter slugs that are sequentially irradiated with laser light. The addition of a surfactant to the liquid phase allows uniform slug formation and the user can create different sized slugs by altering the flow rates of the two phases. Slugs of air and slugs of PBS with white blood cells contain no light absorbers and hence, do not produce photoacoustic waves. However, slugs of white blood cells that contain even single CMCs absorb laser light and produce high frequency acoustic waves. These slugs that generate photoacoustic waves are sequestered and collected for cytochemical staining for verification of CMCs.

  16. ONCOGENIC BRAF(V600E) PROMOTES STROMAL CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNOSUPPRESSION VIA INDUCTION OF INTERLEUKIN-1 IN MELANOMA

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Jahan S.; Liu, Shujuan; Rodríguez-Cruz, Tania G.; Whittington, Mayra; Wardell, Seth; Liu, Chengwen; Zhang, Minying; Cooper, Zachary A.; Frederick, Dennie T.; Li, Yufeng; Zhang, Min; Joseph, Richard W.; Bernatchez, Chantale; Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Grimm, Elizabeth; Radvanyi, Laszlo G.; Davis, Richard E.; Davies, Michael A.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Hwu, Patrick; Lizée, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In this study, we assessed the specific role of BRAF(V600E) signaling in modulating the expression of immune regulatory genes in melanoma, in addition to analyzing downstream induction of immune suppression by primary human melanoma tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs). Experimental Design Primary human melanocytes and melanoma cell lines were transduced to express WT or V600E forms of BRAF, followed by gene expression analysis. The BRAF(V600E) inhibitor vemurafenib was used to confirm targets in BRAF(V600E)-positive melanoma cell lines and in tumors from melanoma patients undergoing inhibitor treatment. TAF lines generated from melanoma patient biopsies were tested for their ability to inhibit the function of tumor antigen-specific T-cells, prior to and following treatment with BRAF(V600E)-upregulated immune modulators. Transcriptional analysis of treated TAFs was conducted to identify potential mediators of T-cell suppression. Results Expression of BRAF(V600E) induced transcription of IL-1α and IL-1β in melanocytes and melanoma cell lines. Furthermore, vemurafenib reduced the expression of IL-1 protein in melanoma cell lines and most notably in human tumor biopsies from 11 of 12 melanoma patients undergoing inhibitor treatment. Treatment of melanoma-patient-derived TAFs with IL-1α/β significantly enhanced their ability to suppress the proliferation and function of melanoma-specific cytotoxic T cells, and this inhibition was partially attributable to upregulation by IL-1 of COX-2 and the PD-1 ligands PD-L1 and PD-L2 in TAFs. Conclusions This study reveals a novel mechanism of immune suppression sensitive to BRAF(V600E) inhibition, and suggests that clinical blockade of IL-1 may benefit patients with BRAF wild-type tumors and potentially synergize with immunotherapeutic interventions. PMID:22850568

  17. UVB-irradiation regulates VLA-4-mediated melanoma cell adhesion to endothelial VCAM-1 under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Shirure, Venktesh S; Burdick, Monica M; Wu, Shiyong

    2011-01-01

    The major aspect contributing to the mortality of melanoma is its ability to spread, or metastasize. Ultraviolet B light (UVB) is considered an indirect cause of melanoma formation. However, little is known about the potential effects of UVB to melanoma metastasis. Integrins, a large family of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) expressed on the melanoma cell surface, are important for cell signaling, growth, and migration during metastasis. Most critically, tumor cell tissue invasion is dependent on the initial interaction of tumor cells with vascular endothelium at the target organ, and there is increasing evidence for a prominent role of melanoma very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) integrin binding to its endothelial ligand vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in this process. This research focuses on the quantitative modulation of VLA-4 integrin expression and function on melanoma cells after UVB irradiation. The present data show that at 3, 12, and 18 h post-UVB irradiation, VLA-4 expression was unchanged relative to untreated cells, but adhesion to VCAM-1 decreased significantly. Immunofluorescence studies implied that the spatial organization of VLA-4 on the melanoma cell surface contributed to the changes in avidity for VCAM-1 upon UVB irradiation. With increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying melanoma-endothelial interactions upon UVB irradiation, clinical advances for melanoma may be developed.

  18. ALDH1A Isozymes Are Markers of Human Melanoma Stem Cells and Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuchun; Dallaglio, Katiuscia; Chen, Ying; Robinson, William A; Robinson, Steven E; McCarter, Martin D; Wang, Jianbin; Gonzalez, Rene; Thompson, David C; Norris, David A; Roop, Dennis R; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Fujita, Mayumi

    2012-01-01

    Although the concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is well accepted for many tumors, the existence of such cells in human melanoma has been the subject of debate. In the present study, we demonstrate the existence of human melanoma cells that fulfill the criteria for CSCs (self-renewal and differentiation) by serially xenotransplanting cells into NOD/SCID mice. These cells possess high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity with ALDH1A1 and ALDH1A3 being the predominant ALDH isozymes. ALDH-positive melanoma cells are more tumorigenic than ALDH-negative cells in both NOD/SCID mice and NSG mice. Biological analyses of the ALDH-positive melanoma cells reveal the ALDH isozymes to be key molecules regulating the function of these cells. Silencing ALDH1A by siRNA or shRNA leads to cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and decreased cell viability in vitro and reduced tumorigenesis in vivo. ALDH-positive melanoma cells are more resistant to chemotherapeutic agents and silencing ALDH1A by siRNA sensitizes melanoma cells to drug-induced cell death. Furthermore, we, for the first time, examined the molecular signatures of ALDH-positive CSCs from patient-derived tumor specimens. The signatures of melanoma CSCs include retinoic acid (RA)-driven target genes with RA response elements and genes associated with stem cell function. These findings implicate that ALDH isozymes are not only biomarkers of CSCs but also attractive therapeutic targets for human melanoma. Further investigation of these isozymes and genes will enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing CSCs and reveal new molecular targets for therapeutic intervention of cancer. PMID:22887839

  19. Molecular profiling of CD8 T cells in autochthonous melanoma identifies Maf as driver of exhaustion

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Marilyn; Henin, Coralie; Maurizio, Julien; Imbratta, Claire; Bourdely, Pierre; Buferne, Michel; Baitsch, Lukas; Vanhille, Laurent; Sieweke, Michael H; Speiser, Daniel E; Auphan-Anezin, Nathalie; Schmitt-Verhulst, Anne-Marie; Verdeil, Grégory

    2015-01-01

    T cells infiltrating neoplasms express surface molecules typical of chronically virus-stimulated T cells, often termed “exhausted” T cells. We compared the transcriptome of “exhausted” CD8 T cells infiltrating autochthonous melanomas to those of naïve and acutely stimulated CD8 T cells. Despite strong similarities between transcriptional signatures of tumor- and virus-induced exhausted CD8 T cells, notable differences appeared. Among transcriptional regulators, Nr4a2 and Maf were highly overexpressed in tumor-exhausted T cells and significantly upregulated in CD8 T cells from human melanoma metastases. Transduction of murine tumor-specific CD8 T cells to express Maf partially reproduced the transcriptional program associated with tumor-induced exhaustion. Upon adoptive transfer, the transduced cells showed normal homeostasis but failed to accumulate in tumor-bearing hosts and developed defective anti-tumor effector responses. We further identified TGFβ and IL-6 as main inducers of Maf expression in CD8 T cells and showed that Maf-deleted tumor-specific CD8 T cells were much more potent to restrain tumor growth in vivo. Therefore, the melanoma microenvironment contributes to skewing of CD8 T cell differentiation programs, in part by TGFβ/IL-6-mediated induction of Maf. PMID:26139534

  20. Real-Time Cell Cycle Imaging in a 3D Cell Culture Model of Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Spoerri, Loredana; Beaumont, Kimberley A; Anfosso, Andrea; Haass, Nikolas K

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant cell cycle progression is a hallmark of solid tumors; therefore, cell cycle analysis is an invaluable technique to study cancer cell biology. However, cell cycle progression has been most commonly assessed by methods that are limited to temporal snapshots or that lack spatial information. Here, we describe a technique that allows spatiotemporal real-time tracking of cell cycle progression of individual cells in a multicellular context. The power of this system lies in the use of 3D melanoma spheroids generated from melanoma cells engineered with the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (FUCCI). This technique allows us to gain further and more detailed insight into several relevant aspects of solid cancer cell biology, such as tumor growth, proliferation, invasion, and drug sensitivity.

  1. CD44 and melanocytic tumors: a possible role for standard CD44 in the epidermotropic spread of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Figueras, M T; Ariza, A; Calatrava, A; Puig, L; Fernández-Vasalo, A; Ferrándiz, C

    1996-04-01

    CD44 is a polymorphic family of cell membrane glycoproteins that mediate cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions involved in the mechanisms of tumor invasion and metastasis, and are subject to differential regulation during normal and malignant cell growth. We have investigated immunohistochemically the expression of CD44S and the variant isoforms CD44v3 and CD44v6 in paraffin-embedded tissue from 5 Spitz nevi, 3 compound melanocytic nevi, 2 blue nevi, 6 primary melanomas, 15 cutaneous metastases (three epidermotropic, nine dermal and three ulcerated) and 10 lymph node metastases of melanoma. Melanocytes were extensively positive for CD44S in primary melanomas and benign melanocytic proliferations. Among 15 cases of cutaneous metastases of melanoma, the three epidermotropic metastases, as well as one of the three ulcerated ones were positive for CD44S. CD44S expression was diminished or totally absent in six of the nine dermal metastases, in two of the ulcerated metastases and in seven of the ten lymph node metastases. CD44v3 and CD44v6 melanocytic expression was absent in all the lesions studied. According to our results, selective retention of CD44S expression by melanocytes in epidermotropic metastases of melanoma seems to indicate that preservation of CD44S may contribute to the intraepidermal spread of melanoma.

  2. SLC45A2: A Melanoma Antigen with High Tumor Selectivity and Reduced Potential for Autoimmune Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungsun; Talukder, Amjad H; Lim, Seon A; Kim, Kwanghee; Pan, Ke; Melendez, Brenda; Bradley, Sherille D; Jackson, Kyle R; Khalili, Jahan S; Wang, Junmei; Creasy, Caitlin; Pan, Bih-Fang; Woodman, Scott E; Bernatchez, Chantale; Hawke, David; Hwu, Patrick; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Roszik, Jason; Lizée, Gregory; Yee, Cassian

    2017-08-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-based immunotherapies have had remarkable success at generating objective clinical responses in patients with advanced metastatic melanoma. Although the melanocyte differentiation antigens (MDA) MART-1, PMEL, and tyrosinase were among the first melanoma tumor-associated antigens identified and targeted with immunotherapy, expression within normal melanocytes of the eye and inner ear can elicit serious autoimmune side effects, thus limiting their clinical potential as CTL targets. Using a tandem mass spectrometry (MS) approach to analyze the immunopeptidomes of 55 melanoma patient-derived cell lines, we identified a number of shared HLA class I-bound peptides derived from the melanocyte-specific transporter protein SLC45A2. Antigen-specific CTLs generated against HLA-A*0201- and HLA-A*2402-restricted SLC45A2 peptides effectively killed a majority of HLA-matched cutaneous, uveal, and mucosal melanoma cell lines tested (18/25). CTLs specific for SLC45A2 showed significantly reduced recognition of HLA-matched primary melanocytes that were, conversely, robustly killed by MART1- and PMEL-specific T cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that SLC45A2 mRNA expression in normal melanocytes was less than 2% that of other MDAs, therefore providing a more favorable melanoma-to-melanocyte expression ratio. Expression of SLC45A2 and CTL sensitivity could be further upregulated in BRAF(V600E)-mutant melanoma cells upon treatment with BRAF or MEK inhibitors, similarly to other MDAs. Taken together, our study demonstrates the feasibility of using tandem MS as a means of discovering shared immunogenic tumor-associated epitopes and identifies SLC45A2 as a promising immunotherapeutic target for melanoma with high tumor selectivity and reduced potential for autoimmune toxicity. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(8); 618-29. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Melanoma Cells Can Adopt the Phenotype of Stromal Fibroblasts and Macrophages by Spontaneous Cell Fusion in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kemény, Lajos V.; Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Jakab, Ádám; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B.

    2016-01-01

    After the removal of primary cutaneous melanoma some patients develop local recurrences, even after having histologically tumor-free re-excision. A potential explanation behind this phenomenon is that tumor cells switch their phenotype, making their recognition via standard histopathological assessments extremely difficult. Tumor-stromal cell fusion has been proposed as a potential mechanism for tumor cells to acquire mesenchymal traits; therefore, we hypothesized that melanoma cells could acquire fibroblast- and macrophage-like phenotypes via cell fusion. We show that melanoma cells spontaneously fuse with human dermal fibroblasts and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. The hybrid cells’ nuclei contain chromosomes from both parental cells and are indistinguishable from the parental fibroblasts or macrophages based on their morphology and immunophenotype, as they could lose the melanoma specific MART1 marker, but express the fibroblast marker smooth muscle actin or the macrophage marker CD68. Our results suggest that, by spontaneous cell fusion in vitro, tumor cells can adopt the morphology and immunophenotype of stromal cells while still carrying oncogenic, tumor-derived genetic information. Therefore, melanoma–stromal cell fusion might play a role in missing tumor cells by routine histopathological assessments. PMID:27271591

  4. Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocyte Grade in Primary Melanomas Is Independently Associated With Melanoma-Specific Survival in the Population-Based Genes, Environment and Melanoma Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Nancy E.; Busam, Klaus J.; From, Lynn; Kricker, Anne; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gruber, Stephen B.; Gallagher, Richard P.; Zanetti, Roberto; Rosso, Stefano; Dwyer, Terence; Venn, Alison; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Groben, Pamela A.; Hao, Honglin; Orlow, Irene; Reiner, Anne S.; Luo, Li; Paine, Susan; Ollila, David W.; Wilcox, Homer; Begg, Colin B.; Berwick, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although most hospital-based studies suggest more favorable survival with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) present in primary melanomas, it is uncertain whether TILs provide prognostic information beyond existing melanoma staging definitions. We addressed the issue in an international population-based study of patients with single and multiple primary melanomas. Patients and Methods On the basis of the Genes, Environment and Melanoma (GEM) study, we conducted follow-up of 2,845 patients diagnosed from 1998 to 2003 with 3,330 invasive primary melanomas centrally reviewed for TIL grade (absent, nonbrisk, or brisk). The odds of TIL grades associated with clinicopathologic features and survival by TIL grade were examined. Results Independent predictors (P < .05) for nonbrisk TIL grade were site, histologic subtype, and Breslow thickness, and for brisk TIL grade, they were age, site, Breslow thickness, and radial growth phase. Nonbrisk and brisk TIL grades were each associated with lower American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) tumor stage compared with TIL absence (Ptrend < .001). Death as a result of melanoma was 30% less with nonbrisk TIL grade (hazard ratio [HR], 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5 to 1.0) and 50% less with brisk TIL grade (HR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3 to 0.9) relative to TIL absence, adjusted for age, sex, site, and AJCC tumor stage. Conclusion At the population level, higher TIL grade of primary melanoma is associated with a lower risk of death as a result of melanoma independently of tumor characteristics currently used for AJCC tumor stage. We conclude that TIL grade deserves further prospective investigation to determine whether it should be included in future AJCC staging revisions. PMID:24127443

  5. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte grade in primary melanomas is independently associated with melanoma-specific survival in the population-based genes, environment and melanoma study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Nancy E; Busam, Klaus J; From, Lynn; Kricker, Anne; Armstrong, Bruce K; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gruber, Stephen B; Gallagher, Richard P; Zanetti, Roberto; Rosso, Stefano; Dwyer, Terence; Venn, Alison; Kanetsky, Peter A; Groben, Pamela A; Hao, Honglin; Orlow, Irene; Reiner, Anne S; Luo, Li; Paine, Susan; Ollila, David W; Wilcox, Homer; Begg, Colin B; Berwick, Marianne

    2013-11-20

    Although most hospital-based studies suggest more favorable survival with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) present in primary melanomas, it is uncertain whether TILs provide prognostic information beyond existing melanoma staging definitions. We addressed the issue in an international population-based study of patients with single and multiple primary melanomas. On the basis of the Genes, Environment and Melanoma (GEM) study, we conducted follow-up of 2,845 patients diagnosed from 1998 to 2003 with 3,330 invasive primary melanomas centrally reviewed for TIL grade (absent, nonbrisk, or brisk). The odds of TIL grades associated with clinicopathologic features and survival by TIL grade were examined. Independent predictors (P < .05) for nonbrisk TIL grade were site, histologic subtype, and Breslow thickness, and for brisk TIL grade, they were age, site, Breslow thickness, and radial growth phase. Nonbrisk and brisk TIL grades were each associated with lower American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) tumor stage compared with TIL absence (P(trend) < .001). Death as a result of melanoma was 30% less with nonbrisk TIL grade (hazard ratio [HR], 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5 to 1.0) and 50% less with brisk TIL grade (HR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3 to 0.9) relative to TIL absence, adjusted for age, sex, site, and AJCC tumor stage. At the population level, higher TIL grade of primary melanoma is associated with a lower risk of death as a result of melanoma independently of tumor characteristics currently used for AJCC tumor stage. We conclude that TIL grade deserves further prospective investigation to determine whether it should be included in future AJCC staging revisions.

  6. Uveal Melanoma Cell Lines: Where do they come from? (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Jager, Martine J.; Magner, J. Antonio Bermudez; Ksander, Bruce R.; Dubovy, Sander R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether some of the most often used uveal melanoma cell lines resemble their original tumor. Methods Analysis of the literature, patient charts, histopathology, mutations, chromosome status, HLA type, and expression of melanocyte markers on cell lines and their primary tumors. We examined five cell lines and the primary tumors from which they were derived. Results Four of the five examined primary tumors were unusual: one occupied the orbit, two were recurrences after prior irradiation, and one developed in an eye with a nevus of Ota. One cell line did not contain the GNA11 mutation, but it was present in the primary tumor. Three of the primary tumors had monosomy 3 (two of these lacked BAP1 expression); however, all five cell lines showed disomy 3 and BAP1 expression. All of the cell lines had gain of 8q. Two cell lines lacked expression of melanocyte markers, although these were present in the corresponding primary tumor. Conclusions All cell lines could be traced back to their original uveal melanoma. Four of the five primary tumors were unusual. Cell lines often differed from their primary tumor in chromosome status and melanocyte markers. However, their specific chromosome aberrations and capacity to continue proliferation characterize them as uveal melanoma cell lines. PMID:28018010

  7. Uveal Melanoma Cell Lines: Where do they come from? (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis).

    PubMed

    Jager, Martine J; Magner, J Antonio Bermudez; Ksander, Bruce R; Dubovy, Sander R

    2016-08-01

    To determine whether some of the most often used uveal melanoma cell lines resemble their original tumor. Analysis of the literature, patient charts, histopathology, mutations, chromosome status, HLA type, and expression of melanocyte markers on cell lines and their primary tumors. We examined five cell lines and the primary tumors from which they were derived. Four of the five examined primary tumors were unusual: one occupied the orbit, two were recurrences after prior irradiation, and one developed in an eye with a nevus of Ota. One cell line did not contain the GNA11 mutation, but it was present in the primary tumor. Three of the primary tumors had monosomy 3 (two of these lacked BAP1 expression); however, all five cell lines showed disomy 3 and BAP1 expression. All of the cell lines had gain of 8q. Two cell lines lacked expression of melanocyte markers, although these were present in the corresponding primary tumor. All cell lines could be traced back to their original uveal melanoma. Four of the five primary tumors were unusual. Cell lines often differed from their primary tumor in chromosome status and melanocyte markers. However, their specific chromosome aberrations and capacity to continue proliferation characterize them as uveal melanoma cell lines.

  8. Blockade of FLT4 suppresses metastasis of melanoma cells by impaired lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yoon; Hong, Seok-Ho; Shin, Minsang; Heo, Hye-Ryeon; Jang, In Ho

    2016-09-16

    The metastatic spread of tumor cells via lymphatic vessels affects the relapse of tumor patients. New lymphatic vessel formation, including lymphangiogenesis, is promoted in the tumor environment. The lymphangiogenic factor VEGF-C can mediate lymphatic vessel formation and induce tumor metastasis by binding with FLT4. In melanoma, metastasis via lymphatics such as lymph nodes is one of the main predictors of poor outcome. Thus, we investigated whether blockade of FLT4 can reduce metastasis via the suppression of lymphatic capillaries. Proliferative lymphatic capillaries in melanoma were estimated by immunohistochemistry using FLT4 antibody after the injection of the FLT4 antagonist MAZ51. The numbers of tumor modules in metastasised lungs were calculated by gross examination and lymphatic related factors were examined by qRT-PCR. MAZ51 injection resulted in the suppression of tumor size and module number and the inhibition of proliferative lymphatic vessels in the intratumoral region in the lung and proliferating melanoma cells in the lung compared to those of untreated groups. Additionally, high FLT4 and TNF-alpha were detected in melanoma-induced tissue, while lymphatic markers such as VEGF-C, FLT4 and Prox-1 were significantly decreased in MAZ51 treated groups, implying that anti-lymphangiogenesis by MAZ51 may provide a potential strategy to prevent tumor metastasis in melanoma and high number of lymphatic capillaries could be used diagnosis for severe metastasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of the initiator element in the regulation of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule gene.

    PubMed

    Karlen, S; Braathen, L R

    2000-10-01

    The melanoma cell adhesion molecule is a membrane glycoprotein whose expression is associated with tumor progression and the development of metastatic potential. The mechanisms for upregulation of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule during melanoma progression are still poorly understood. In this study, we show further evidence that melanoma cell adhesion molecule expression is tightly regulated at the transcriptional level. Using a combination of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter assays and DNA mobility shift experiments, we investigated the role played by three putative melanoma cell adhesion molecule regulatory elements, namely the initiator sequence, the SCA element, and the ASp element. The SCA and the ASp boxes can potentially interact with the transcription factors Sp1 and AP-2. Sp1 binding to both sites was confirmed, but only the SCA sequence could form a complex with AP-2. AP-2-driven downregulation of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule promoter, however, did not depend only on a functional SCA element. The pyrimidine-rich CTCACTTG initiator, which overlaps the RNA start site, was essential for promoter function and was shown to interact with proteins related to basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. Binding in nonmetastatic melanoma cells was induced by cAMP. In metastatic cells, however, binding was constitutive, but could be markedly decreased upon treatment with phorbol esters. As melanoma cell adhesion molecule expression is modulated by cAMP and phorbol ester signaling, these results suggest that the initiator is the central element that mediates cAMP and phorbol ester sensitivity and initiates melanoma cell adhesion molecule overexpression in melanomas.

  10. Melanoma-Derived BRAF(V600E) Mutation in Peritumoral Stromal Cells: Implications for in Vivo Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Kemény, Lajos V; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Oláh, Judit; Jakab, Ádám; Polyánka, Hilda; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B

    2016-06-21

    Melanoma often recurs in patients after the removal of the primary tumor, suggesting the presence of recurrent tumor-initiating cells that are undetectable using standard diagnostic methods. As cell fusion has been implicated to facilitate the alteration of a cell's phenotype, we hypothesized that cells in the peritumoral stroma having a stromal phenotype that initiate recurrent tumors might originate from the fusion of tumor and stromal cells. Here, we show that in patients with BRAF(V600E) melanoma, melanoma antigen recognized by T-cells (MART1)-negative peritumoral stromal cells express BRAF(V600E) protein. To confirm the presence of the oncogene at the genetic level, peritumoral stromal cells were microdissected and screened for the presence of BRAF(V600E) with a mutation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, cells carrying the BRAF(V600E) mutation were not only found among cells surrounding the primary tumor but were also present in the stroma of melanoma metastases as well as in a histologically tumor-free re-excision sample from a patient who subsequently developed a local recurrence. We did not detect any BRAF(V600E) mutation or protein in the peritumoral stroma of BRAF(WT) melanoma. Therefore, our results suggest that peritumoral stromal cells contain melanoma-derived oncogenic information, potentially as a result of cell fusion. These hybrid cells display the phenotype of stromal cells and are therefore undetectable using routine histological assessments. Our results highlight the importance of genetic analyses and the application of mutation-specific antibodies in the identification of potentially recurrent-tumor-initiating cells, which may help better predict patient survival and disease outcome.

  11. The Junctional Adhesion Molecule-B regulates JAM-C-dependent melanoma cell metastasis.

    PubMed

    Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; Frontera, Vincent; Bardin, Florence; Thomassin, Jeanne; Chetaille, Bruno; Adams, Susanne; Adams, Ralf H; Aurrand-Lions, Michel

    2012-11-16

    Metastasis is a major clinical issue and results in poor prognosis for most cancers. The Junctional Adhesion Molecule-C (JAM-C) expressed by B16 melanoma and endothelial cells has been involved in metastasis of tumor cells through homophilic JAM-C/JAM-C trans-interactions. Here, we show that JAM-B expressed by endothelial cells contributes to murine B16 melanoma cells metastasis through its interaction with JAM-C on tumor cells. We further show that this adhesion molecular pair mediates melanoma cell adhesion to primary Lung Microvascular Endothelial Cells and that it is functional in vivo as demonstrated by the reduced metastasis of B16 cells in Jam-b deficient mice.

  12. ADAM15 expression is downregulated in melanoma metastasis compared to primary melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ungerer, Christopher; Doberstein, Kai; Boehm, Beate; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Mihic-Probst, Daniela; Gutwein, Paul

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Strong ADAM15 expression is found in normal melanocytes. {yields} ADAM15 expression is significantly downregulated in patients with melanoma metastasis. {yields} TGF-{beta} can downregulate ADAM15 expression in melanoma cells. {yields} Overexpression of ADAM15 in melanoma cells inhibits migration, proliferation and invasion of melanoma cells. {yields} Conclusion: ADAM15 represents an tumor suppressor protein in melanoma. -- Abstract: In a mouse melanoma metastasis model it has been recently shown that ADAM15 overexpression in melanoma cells significantly reduced the number of metastatic nodules on the lung. Unfortunately, the expression of ADAM15 in human melanoma tissue has not been determined so far. In our study, we characterized the expression of ADAM15 in tissue micro-arrays of patients with primary melanoma with melanoma metastasis. ADAM15 was expressed in melanocytes and endothelial cells of benign nevi and melanoma tissue. Importantly, ADAM15 was significantly downregulated in melanoma metastasis compared to primary melanoma. We further demonstrate that IFN-{gamma} and TGF-{beta} downregulate ADAM15 protein levels in melanoma cells. To investigate the role of ADAM15 in melanoma progression, we overexpressed ADAM15 in melanoma cells. Importantly, overexpression of ADAM15 in melanoma cells reduced the migration, invasion and the anchorage dependent and independent cell growth of melanoma cells. In summary, the downregulation of ADAM15 plays an important role in melanoma progression and ADAM15 act as a tumorsuppressor in melanoma.

  13. Melanoma-Derived BRAFV600E Mutation in Peritumoral Stromal Cells: Implications for in Vivo Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Kemény, Lajos V.; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Oláh, Judit; Jakab, Ádám; Polyánka, Hilda; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma often recurs in patients after the removal of the primary tumor, suggesting the presence of recurrent tumor-initiating cells that are undetectable using standard diagnostic methods. As cell fusion has been implicated to facilitate the alteration of a cell’s phenotype, we hypothesized that cells in the peritumoral stroma having a stromal phenotype that initiate recurrent tumors might originate from the fusion of tumor and stromal cells. Here, we show that in patients with BRAFV600E melanoma, melanoma antigen recognized by T-cells (MART1)-negative peritumoral stromal cells express BRAFV600E protein. To confirm the presence of the oncogene at the genetic level, peritumoral stromal cells were microdissected and screened for the presence of BRAFV600E with a mutation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, cells carrying the BRAFV600E mutation were not only found among cells surrounding the primary tumor but were also present in the stroma of melanoma metastases as well as in a histologically tumor-free re-excision sample from a patient who subsequently developed a local recurrence. We did not detect any BRAFV600E mutation or protein in the peritumoral stroma of BRAFWT melanoma. Therefore, our results suggest that peritumoral stromal cells contain melanoma-derived oncogenic information, potentially as a result of cell fusion. These hybrid cells display the phenotype of stromal cells and are therefore undetectable using routine histological assessments. Our results highlight the importance of genetic analyses and the application of mutation-specific antibodies in the identification of potentially recurrent-tumor-initiating cells, which may help better predict patient survival and disease outcome. PMID:27338362

  14. Dissecting the multicellular ecosystem of metastatic melanoma by single-cell RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Tirosh, Itay; Izar, Benjamin; Prakadan, Sanjay M; Wadsworth, Marc H; Treacy, Daniel; Trombetta, John J; Rotem, Asaf; Rodman, Christopher; Lian, Christine; Murphy, George; Fallahi-Sichani, Mohammad; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Lin, Jia-Ren; Cohen, Ofir; Shah, Parin; Lu, Diana; Genshaft, Alex S; Hughes, Travis K; Ziegler, Carly G K; Kazer, Samuel W; Gaillard, Aleth; Kolb, Kellie E; Villani, Alexandra-Chloé; Johannessen, Cory M; Andreev, Aleksandr Y; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Bertagnolli, Monica; Sorger, Peter K; Sullivan, Ryan J; Flaherty, Keith T; Frederick, Dennie T; Jané-Valbuena, Judit; Yoon, Charles H; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Shalek, Alex K; Regev, Aviv; Garraway, Levi A

    2016-04-08

    To explore the distinct genotypic and phenotypic states of melanoma tumors, we applied single-cell RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to 4645 single cells isolated from 19 patients, profiling malignant, immune, stromal, and endothelial cells. Malignant cells within the same tumor displayed transcriptional heterogeneity associated with the cell cycle, spatial context, and a drug-resistance program. In particular, all tumors harbored malignant cells from two distinct transcriptional cell states, such that tumors characterized by high levels of the MITF transcription factor also contained cells with low MITF and elevated levels of the AXL kinase. Single-cell analyses suggested distinct tumor microenvironmental patterns, including cell-to-cell interactions. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating T cells revealed exhaustion programs, their connection to T cell activation and clonal expansion, and their variability across patients. Overall, we begin to unravel the cellular ecosystem of tumors and how single-cell genomics offers insights with implications for both targeted and immune therapies.

  15. IGFBP‐3 inhibits Wnt signaling in metastatic melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zingariello, Maria; Sancillo, Laura; Panasiti, Vincenzo; Polinari, Dorina; Martella, Marianna; Rosa Alba, Rana; Londei, Paola

    2016-01-01

    In previous works, we have shown that insulin‐like growth factor‐binding protein‐3 (IGFBP‐3), a tissue and circulating protein able to bind to IGFs, decreases drastically in the blood serum of patients with diffuse metastatic melanoma. In agreement with the clinical data, recombinant IGFBP‐3 was found to inhibit the motility and invasiveness of cultured metastatic melanoma cells and to prevent growth of grafted melanomas in mice. The present work was aimed at identifying the signal transduction pathways underlying the anti‐tumoral effects of IGFBP‐3. We show that the anti‐tumoral effect of IGFBP‐3 is due to inhibition of the Wnt pathway and depends upon the presence of CD44, a receptor protein known to modulate Wnt signaling. Once it has entered the cell, IGFBP‐3 binds the Wnt signalosome interacting specifically with its component GSK‐3β. As a consequence, the β‐catenin destruction complex dissociates from the LRP6 Wnt receptor and GSK‐3β is activated through dephosphorylation, becoming free to target cytoplasmic β‐catenin which is degraded by the proteasomal pathway. Altogether, the results suggest that IGFBP‐3 is a novel and effective inhibitor of Wnt signaling. As IGFBP‐3 is a physiological protein which has no detectable toxic effects either on cultured cells or live mice, it might qualify as an interesting new therapeutic agent in melanoma, and potentially many other cancers with a hyperactive Wnt signaling. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27377812

  16. CCR5 in recruitment and activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Umansky, Viktor; Blattner, Carolin; Gebhardt, Christoffer; Utikal, Jochen

    2017-04-05

    Malignant melanoma is characterized by the development of chronic inflammation in the tumor microenvironment, leading to the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Using ret transgenic mouse melanoma model, we found a significant migration of MDSCs expressing C-C chemokine receptor (CCR)5 into primary tumors and metastatic lymph nodes, which was correlated with tumor progression. An increased CCR5 expression on MDSCs was associated with elevated concentrations of CCR5 ligands in melanoma microenvironment. In vitro experiments showed that the upregulation of CCR5 expression on CD11b(+)Gr1(+) immature myeloid cells was induced by CCR5 ligands, IL-6, GM-CSF, and other inflammatory factors. Furthermore, CCR5(+) MDSCs infiltrating melanoma lesions displayed a stronger immunosuppressive pattern than their CCR5(-) counterparts. Targeting CCR5/CCR5 ligand signaling via a fusion protein mCCR5-Ig, which selectively binds and neutralizes all three CCR5 ligands, increased the survival of tumor-bearing mice. This was associated with a reduced migration and immunosuppressive potential of tumor MDSCs. In melanoma patients, circulating CCR5(+) MDSCs were increased as compared to healthy donors. Like in melanoma-bearing mice, we observed an enrichment of these cells and CCR5 ligands in tumors as compared to the peripheral blood. Our findings define a critical role for CCR5 not only in the recruitment but also in the activation of MDSCs in tumor lesions, suggesting that novel strategies of melanoma treatment could be based on blocking CCR5/CCR5 ligand interactions.

  17. In-vivo visualization of melanoma tumor microvessels and blood flow velocity changes accompanying tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Hiroki; Hachiga, Tadashi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Akiguchi, Shunsuke

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate that using micro multipoint laser Doppler velocimetry (μ-MLDV) for noninvasive in-vivo imaging of blood vessels is useful for diagnosing malignant melanomas by comparison with visual diagnosis by dermoscopy. The blood flow velocity in microvessels varied during growth of melanomas transplanted in mouse ears. Mouse ears were observed by μ-MLDV up to 16 days after transplantation. The blood flow velocity in the tumor increased with increasing time and reached maximum of 4.5 mm/s at 9 days, which is more than twice that prior to transplantation. After 12 days, when the lesion had grown to an area of 6.6 mm2, we observed the formation of new blood vessels in the tumor. Finally, when the lesion had an area of 18 mm2 after 16 days, the flow velocity in the tumor decreased to approximately 3.2 mm/s.

  18. SIRT1 promotes proliferation and inhibits the senescence-like phenotype in human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohanna, Mickaël; Bonet, Caroline; Bille, Karine; Allegra, Maryline; Davidson, Irwin; Bahadoran, Philippe; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Ballotti, Robert; Bertolotto, Corine

    2014-01-01

    SIRT1 operates as both a tumor suppressor and oncogenic factor depending on the cell context. Whether SIRT1 plays a role in melanoma biology remained poorly elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that SIRT1 is a critical regulator of melanoma cell proliferation. SIRT1 suppression by genetic or pharmacological approaches induces cell cycle arrest and a senescence-like phenotype. Gain and loss of function experiments show that M-MITF regulates SIRT1 expression, thereby revealing a melanocyte-specific control of SIRT1. SIRT1 over-expression relieves the senescence-like phenotype and the proliferation arrest caused by MITF suppression, demonstrating that SIRT1 is an effector of MITF-induced proliferation in melanoma cells. Interestingly, SIRT1 level and activity are enhanced in the PLX4032-resistant BRAFV600E-mutated melanoma cells compared with their sensitive counterpart. SIRT1 inhibition decreases melanoma cell growth and rescues the sensibility to PLX4032 of PLX4032-resistant BRAFV600E-mutated melanoma cells. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence that inhibition of SIRT1 warrants consideration as an anti-melanoma therapeutic option. PMID:24742694

  19. Melanoma Development and Progression Are Associated with Rad6 Upregulation and β-Catenin Relocation to the Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Mehregan, Darius R.; Abrams, Judith; Haynes, Brittany; Shekhar, Malathy P. V.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that Rad6 and β-catenin enhance each other's expression through a positive feedback loop to promote breast cancer development/progression. While β-catenin has been implicated in melanoma pathogenesis, Rad6 function has not been investigated. Here, we examined the relationship between Rad6 and β-catenin in melanoma development and progression. Eighty-eight cutaneous tumors, 30 nevi, 29 primary melanoma, and 29 metastatic melanomas, were immunostained with anti-β-catenin and anti-Rad6 antibodies. Strong expression of Rad6 was observed in only 27% of nevi as compared to 100% of primary and 96% of metastatic melanomas. β-Catenin was strongly expressed in 97% of primary and 93% of metastatic melanomas, and unlike Rad6, in 93% of nevi. None of the tumors expressed nuclear β-catenin. β-Catenin was exclusively localized on the cell membrane of 55% of primary, 62% of metastatic melanomas, and only 10% of nevi. Cytoplasmic β-catenin was detected in 90% of nevi, 17% of primary, and 8% of metastatic melanoma, whereas 28% of primary and 30% of metastatic melanomas exhibited β-catenin at both locations. These data suggest that melanoma development and progression are associated with Rad6 upregulation and membranous redistribution of β-catenin and that β-catenin and Rad6 play independent roles in melanoma development. PMID:24891954

  20. A novel immune resistance mechanism of melanoma cells controlled by the ADAR1 enzyme.

    PubMed

    Galore-Haskel, Gilli; Nemlich, Yael; Greenberg, Eyal; Ashkenazi, Shira; Hakim, Motti; Itzhaki, Orit; Shoshani, Noa; Shapira-Fromer, Ronnie; Ben-Ami, Eytan; Ofek, Efrat; Anafi, Liat; Besser, Michal J; Schachter, Jacob; Markel, Gal

    2015-10-06

    The blossom of immunotherapy in melanoma highlights the need to delineate mechanisms of immune resistance. Recently, we have demonstrated that the RNA editing protein, adenosine deaminase acting on RNA-1 (ADAR1) is down-regulated during metastatic transition of melanoma, which enhances melanoma cell proliferation and tumorigenicity. Here we investigate the role of ADAR1 in melanoma immune resistance.Importantly, knockdown of ADAR1 in human melanoma cells induces resistance to tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in a cell