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Sample records for meldud veebifilter barracuda

  1. Is the Great Barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda) a reef fish or a pelagic fish? The phylogeographic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Randall, John E.; Bowen, Brian W.

    2013-01-01

    Current taxonomy indicates a single global species of the Great Barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda) despite differences in color and behavior between Atlantic and Pacific forms. To investigate these differences and qualify the dispersal characteristics of this unique coastal– pelagic teleost (bony fish), we conducted a global phylogeographic survey of 246 specimens from thirteen sampling locations using a 629-base pair fragment of mtDNA cytochrome b. Data indicate high overall gene flow in the Indo-Pacific over large distances (>16,500 km) bridging several biogeographic barriers. The West Atlantic population contains an mtDNA lineage that is divergent from the Indo-Pacific (d = 1.9%), while the East Atlantic (N = 23) has two mutations (d = 0.6%) apart from the Indo-Pacific. While we cannot rule out distinct evolutionary partitions among ocean basins based on behavior, coloration, and near-monophyly between Atlantic and Indo-Pacific subpopulations, more investigation is required before taxonomic status is revised. Overall, the pattern of high global dispersal and connectivity in S. barracuda more closely resembles those reported for large oceanic predators than reef-associated teleosts. PMID:25594680

  2. BarraCUDA - a fast short read sequence aligner using graphics processing units

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background With the maturation of next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) technologies, the throughput of DNA sequencing reads has soared to over 600 gigabases from a single instrument run. General purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU), extracts the computing power from hundreds of parallel stream processors within graphics processing cores and provides a cost-effective and energy efficient alternative to traditional high-performance computing (HPC) clusters. In this article, we describe the implementation of BarraCUDA, a GPGPU sequence alignment software that is based on BWA, to accelerate the alignment of sequencing reads generated by these instruments to a reference DNA sequence. Findings Using the NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) software development environment, we ported the most computational-intensive alignment component of BWA to GPU to take advantage of the massive parallelism. As a result, BarraCUDA offers a magnitude of performance boost in alignment throughput when compared to a CPU core while delivering the same level of alignment fidelity. The software is also capable of supporting multiple CUDA devices in parallel to further accelerate the alignment throughput. Conclusions BarraCUDA is designed to take advantage of the parallelism of GPU to accelerate the alignment of millions of sequencing reads generated by NGS instruments. By doing this, we could, at least in part streamline the current bioinformatics pipeline such that the wider scientific community could benefit from the sequencing technology. BarraCUDA is currently available from http://seqbarracuda.sf.net PMID:22244497

  3. Incorporating Relevance and Rigor in a Game Environment: Barracuda Cove Investment Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Achieving student learning outcomes in a "gamelike" environment allows students to connect real-world activities to marketing and business concepts presented in a relevant and authentic manner. The innovative game, Barracuda Cove Investment Game, can be incorporated into any marketing-related course that would require a marketing or…

  4. DOE SBIR Phase-1 Report on Hybrid CPU-GPU Parallel Development of the Eulerian-Lagrangian Barracuda Multiphase Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Dale M. Snider

    2011-02-28

    This report gives the result from the Phase-1 work on demonstrating greater than 10x speedup of the Barracuda computer program using parallel methods and GPU processors (General-Purpose Graphics Processing Unit or Graphics Processing Unit). Phase-1 demonstrated a 12x speedup on a typical Barracuda function using the GPU processor. The problem test case used about 5 million particles and 250,000 Eulerian grid cells. The relative speedup, compared to a single CPU, increases with increased number of particles giving greater than 12x speedup. Phase-1 work provided a path for reformatting data structure modifications to give good parallel performance while keeping a friendly environment for new physics development and code maintenance. The implementation of data structure changes will be in Phase-2. Phase-1 laid the ground work for the complete parallelization of Barracuda in Phase-2, with the caveat that implemented computer practices for parallel programming done in Phase-1 gives immediate speedup in the current Barracuda serial running code. The Phase-1 tasks were completed successfully laying the frame work for Phase-2. The detailed results of Phase-1 are within this document. In general, the speedup of one function would be expected to be higher than the speedup of the entire code because of I/O functions and communication between the algorithms. However, because one of the most difficult Barracuda algorithms was parallelized in Phase-1 and because advanced parallelization methods and proposed parallelization optimization techniques identified in Phase-1 will be used in Phase-2, an overall Barracuda code speedup (relative to a single CPU) is expected to be greater than 10x. This means that a job which takes 30 days to complete will be done in 3 days. Tasks completed in Phase-1 are: Task 1: Profile the entire Barracuda code and select which subroutines are to be parallelized (See Section Choosing a Function to Accelerate) Task 2: Select a GPU consultant company and

  5. A survey of didymozoid trematodes of the barracuda Sphyraena obtusata from Kuwait Bay.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Salam, J; Sreelatha, B S

    1993-08-01

    Examination of 120 yellow-finned barracudas, Sphyraena obtusata, from Kuwait Bay revealed 8 species of didymozoid trematodes encapsulated in pairs in the tissues. Four species of the didymozoids, Allodidymozoon operculare, Didymocylindrus sp., Didymocystis sp., and Didymocystoides sp., were found in the head region, 3 species, Didymozoon tetragynae, Lepidodidymozoon sinicum and Platocystoides polyaster, in external surfaces and 1 species, Allodidymozoon sp., in stomach wall. The didymozoid species collected constitute new geographic distribution records and occurrence of D. tetragynae and L. sinicum are new host records.

  6. Thermal adaptation of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenases of eastern Pacific barracuda (Sphyraena spp): the role of differential isoenzyme expression

    PubMed

    Lin; Somero

    1995-01-01

    Kinetic properties, electrophoretic patterns and thermal stabilities of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenases (cMDHs) were compared in Eastern Pacific barracuda (Sphyraena spp) from different latitudes. All tissues of the tropical species S. ensis contained only a single, thermostable form of cMDH. Subtropical (S. lucasana) as well as north (S. argentea) and south (S. idiastes) temperate barracuda contained both thermostable and thermolabile cMDHs, the pattern characteristic of most teleosts. Kinetic studies using unfractioned cMDHs showed that the apparent Michaelis­Menten constant (Km) of cofactor (NADH) increased with temperature, but at the physiological temperatures of the four species, Km of NADH was conserved within a narrow range (20­23 µmol l-1). Thermostable and thermolabile cMDHs were chromatographically separated and compared. Thermolabile cMDHs had higher Km values for NADH at all measurement temperatures than did thermostable cMDHs. Thermolabile cMDHs isolated from congeneric barracuda exhibited similar kinetic properties (Km versus temperature, optimal pH, optimal substrate and cofactor concentrations). Thermostable cMDHs, likewise, were similar among the barracuda. Conservation of Km in the differently thermally adapted barracudas is, therefore, apparently due to adjustments in the ratio of expression of the thermostable and thermolabile isoforms, rather than to temperature-adaptive differences among orthologous homologues, as is commonly found for enzymes encoded by a single gene locus. The effects of temperature on the Km of NADH for isolated thermostable and thermolabile cMDHs of a eurythermal goby, Gillichthys mirabilis, however, were consistent with adaptive change in orthologous homologues of cMDH. The selective basis for the absence of thermolabile cMDH in warm-adapted ectotherms, mammals and birds is discussed.

  7. Use of two detection methods to discriminate ciguatoxins from brevetoxins: application to great barracuda from Florida Keys.

    PubMed

    Dechraoui, M-Yasmine Bottein; Tiedeken, Jessica A; Persad, Renuka; Wang, Zhihong; Granade, H Ray; Dickey, Robert W; Ramsdell, John S

    2005-09-01

    In Florida (USA), numerous cases of human ciguatera fish poisoning, as well as neurotoxic shellfish poisoning following consumption of local seafood products, have been reported. By using in parallel, the sodium channel receptor binding assay (RBA), and the ouabain/veratridine-dependent cytotoxicity assay (N2A assay), we established criteria to identify, detect, and quantify ciguatoxins in fish extracts, with a brevetoxin as internal standard. Results showed that the Caribbean ciguatoxin C-CTX-1 exhibited an 8-fold higher potency in the RBA than brevetoxins and, a 440 and 2300-fold higher potency in the N2A assay than PbTx-1 and PbTx-3, respectively. Moreover, a sensitivity comparison between assays revealed that the N2A assay was more sensitive (12-fold) for ciguatoxin analysis, whereas the RBA was more sensitive (3-24-fold) for brevetoxins analysis. Based on the relative potency between toxins and the opposite sensitivity of both assays we have used the RBA and the N2A assay to screen great barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda) collected from the Florida Keys for ciguatoxins and brevetoxins. Fish extract analysis showed a sodium channel-dependent activity consistent with the presence of ciguatoxins, and not brevetoxins. Among 40 barracudas analyzed, 60% contained ciguatoxin levels in their liver measurable by the N2A assay with the most toxic fish containing 2.1ppb C-CTX-1 equivalents.

  8. Life-history traits of temperate and thermophilic barracudas (Teleostei: Sphyraenidae) in the context of sea warming in the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Villegas-Hernández, H; Muñoz, M; Lloret, J

    2014-06-01

    This study indicated that the life-history traits of European barracuda Sphyraena sphyraena are apparently better suited to their environmental conditions compared to the more physically restricted life-history traits of the yellow-mouth barracuda Sphyraena viridensis, which co-habit the north-western Mediterranean Sea. The latter thermophilic species has a considerably higher reproductive potential as it invests its energy reserves in larger numbers of hydrated eggs per spawning batch. This would favour its population growth rates within the study area, especially if sea warming continues, in which case it is likely that the spawning phenology of this species would give it an advantage.

  9. Effect of chitosan based active packaging film on the keeping quality of chilled stored barracuda fish.

    PubMed

    Remya, S; Mohan, C O; Bindu, J; Sivaraman, G K; Venkateshwarlu, G; Ravishankar, C N

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, active antimicrobial (AM) packaging films were prepared from chitosan (CH) incorporated with ginger (Zingiber officinale) essential oil at different concentrations (0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 % v/v) and characterized. GC-MS analysis revealed zingiberene (22.54 ± 0.13), geranial (12.34 ± 0.33), β-sesquiphellandrene (8.14 ± 0.14), camphene (7.44 ± 0.54) and neral (5.45 ± 0.23) as the major components of essential oil extracted from ginger. Addition of ginger essential oil (GEO) improved the AM activity of the CH film against food borne pathogens, without significantly (p < 0.05) affecting the mechanical properties of the film. CH film with GEO was more effective against Gram-positive bacteria than Gram-negative bacteria and maximum antibacterial property against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli was shown by 0.3 % GEO added CH film. In a further experiment, steaks of barracuda (Sphyraena jello) fish were wrapped with the CH-GEO (0.3 %) film and stored at 2 °C for 20 days. Throughout the storage period, the total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) value and total mesophilic count of fish steak wrapped with the CH-GEO film were significantly (p < 0.05) lesser than both the unwrapped control fish steak and aerobically packed fish steak in synthetic multilayer film of ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH) (nylon, EVOH and polyethylene). Sensorily, CH-GEO film wrapped sample was acceptable till the end of storage for 20 days compared to 12 days for unwrapped control and fish steak packed in EVOH film. The results indicate that the developed CH-GEO film is efficient in extending the storage life of fish.

  10. Linking ciguatera poisoning to spatial ecology of fish: a novel approach to examining the distribution of biotoxin levels in the great barracuda by combining non-lethal blood sampling and biotelemetry.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Amanda C; Dechraoui Bottein, Marie-Yasmine; Danylchuk, Andy J; Ramsdell, John S; Cooke, Steven J

    2012-06-15

    Ciguatera in humans is typically caused by the consumption of reef fish that have accumulated Ciguatoxins (CTXs) in their flesh. Over a six month period, we captured 38 wild adult great barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda), a species commonly associated with ciguatera in The Bahamas. We sampled three tissues (i.e., muscle, liver, and blood) and analysed them for the presence of ciguatoxins using a functional in vitro N2A bioassay. Detectable concentrations of ciguatoxins found in the three tissue types ranged from 2.51 to 211.74pg C-CTX-1 equivalents/g. Blood and liver toxin concentrations were positively correlated (ρ=0.86, P=0.003), indicating that, for the first time, blood sampling provides a non-lethal method of detecting ciguatoxin in wild fish. Non-lethal blood sampling also presents opportunities to couple this approach with biotelemetry and biologging techniques that enable the study of fish distribution and movement. To demonstrate the potential for linking ciguatoxin occurrence with barracuda spatial ecology, we also present a proof-of-concept case study where blood samples were obtained from 20 fish before releasing them with acoustic transmitters and tracking them in the coastal waters using a fixed acoustic telemetry array covering 44km(2). Fish that tested positive for CTX may have smaller home ranges than non-toxic fish (median distance travelled, U=2.21, P=0.03). Results presented from this study may help identify high risk areas and source-sink dynamics of toxins, potentially reducing the incidence and human health risk of ciguatera fish poisoning. Moreover, development of the non-lethal sampling approach and measurement of ciguatera from blood provide future opportunities to understand the mechanistic relationship between toxins and the spatial ecology of a broad range of marine fish species.

  11. Evolution of lactate dehydrogenase-A homologs of barracuda fishes (genus Sphyraena) from different thermal environments: differences in kinetic properties and thermal stability are due to amino acid substitutions outside the active site.

    PubMed

    Holland, L Z; McFall-Ngai, M; Somero, G N

    1997-03-18

    Orthologous homologs of lactate dehydrogenase-A (LDH-A) (EC 1.1.1.27; NAD+:lactate oxidoreductase) of six barracuda species (genus Sphyraena) display differences in Michaelis-Menten constants (apparent Km) for substrate (pyruvate) and cofactor (NADH) that reflect evolution at different habitat temperatures. Significant increases in Km with increasing measurement temperature occur for all homologs, yet Km at normal body temperatures is similar among species because of the inverse relationship between adaptation temperature and Km. Thermal stabilities of the homologs also differ. To determine the amino acid substitutions responsible for differences in Km and thermal stability, peptide mapping of the LDH-As of all six species was first performed. Then, the amino acid sequences of the three homologs having the most similar peptide maps, those of the north temperate species, S. argentea, the subtropical species, S. lucasana, and the south temperate species, S. idiastes, were deduced from the respective cDNA sequences. At most, there were four amino acid substitutions between any pair of species, none of which occurred in the loop or substrate binding sites of the enzymes. The sequence of LDH-A from S. lucasana differs from that of S. idiastes only at position 8. The homolog of S. argentea differs from the other two sequences at positions 8, 61, 68, and 223. We used a full-length cDNA clone of LDH-A of S. lucasana to test, by site-directed mutagenesis, the importance of these sequence changes in establishing the observed differences in kinetics and thermal stability. Differences in sequence at sites 61 and/or 68 appear to account for the differences in Km between the LDH-As of S. argentea and S. lucasana. Differences at position 8 appear to account for the difference in thermal stability between the homologs of S. argentea and S. lucasana. Evolutionary adaptation of proteins to temperature thus may be achieved by minor changes in sequence at locations outside of active

  12. 50 CFR 665.221 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Sphyraena helleri. Kaku great barracuda Sphyraena barracuda. Turbinidae green snails turban shells Turbo spp... clams Other Bivalves. sea squirts Tunicates. sponges Porifera. tako, he`e octopi Cephalopods. sea...

  13. Electrically Driven General Systems for UAV’s

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    systems are discussed in this paper. First the Barracuda M-05 UAV Demonstrator and second the 270 VDC More Electric Aircraft project launched by the...German Federal Office of Defense Technology and Procurement (BWB). 3.1 Barracuda M-05 The Barracuda M-05 is a company founded unmanned...test flight. Figure 4 showed a picture of the first flight. Figure 4: Barracuda M-05 First Flight With respect to electrically driven

  14. It's in the Bag!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renfro, Nancy

    1983-01-01

    Thirteen ideas for using paper bags for class art activities are given. Directions for making bag barracudas, bionic bags, bigfoot bags, bag sculptures, bag beads, and body bag superstars are included. (PP)

  15. 50 CFR 665.121 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... barracuda. Turbinidae (turban shells, green snails Alili green snails Turbo spp. American Samoa Potentially... species not listed as CHCRT) Zoanthinaria.Mollusca. sisi-sami sea snails Gastropoda. aliao, alili...

  16. The Reliability, Validity and Applicability of Two Sport-Specific Power Tests in Synchronized Swimming

    PubMed Central

    Peric, Mia; Zenic, Natasa; Mandic, Gordana Furjan; Sekulic, Damir; Sajber, Dorica

    2012-01-01

    Sport-specific tests are rarely investigated in synchronized swimming (synchro). The aim of this research was to study the reliability and the validity of two sport-specific tests that are based on synchro elements, namely, the Barracuda thrust (“Barracuda”) and the Boost. The Barracuda is a move in which the swimmer begins in the back pike position (head down with the legs perpendicular to the surface of the water) and then moves the legs and hips rapidly upward, unrolling the body to obtain a maximal vertical position above the surface of the water. The Boost occurs when the swimmer rises rapidly out of the water, head first, to bring as much of the body as possible above the surface of the water. Both patterns are considered power moves and are therefore theoretically related to explosive strength. This study involved 22 female competitive synchro swimmers aged 16–18 years. The variables examined included performance on the Barracuda, Boost and countermovement jump and anthropometric measures (body height, body weight and body composition). Statistical analyses showed appropriate reliability for all tests, with no systematic bias between trials. A factor analysis calculated for the Barracuda, Boost and countermovement jump revealed one significant factor based on the Guttmann-Kaiser criterion with all three tests significantly projected. The structure of the significant factor did not change if the results for the Boost and Barracuda were normalized for body height. The Boost and Barracuda, but not the countermovement jump, were significantly correlated with the competitive achievements of the swimmers. In conclusion, the Boost and Barracuda are reliable and valid measures of the explosive strength of synchronized swimmers and are significantly related to competitive achievement. PMID:23487473

  17. Hazardous marine animals.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, P S

    1984-08-01

    Both traumatic injury and the damage inflicted by envenomating marine animals are considered in this article. Among the creatures causing traumatic injury are sharks, barracudas, moray eels, and needlefish. Envenomating animals include sponges, coelenterates, coral, various mollusks, sea urchins, sea cucumbers, stingrays, sea snakes, and others.

  18. 75 FR 27649 - 2010 Annual Determination for Sea Turtle Observer Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... (Shoop and Kenney 1992; Epperly et al., 1995). During the CETAP aerial survey of the outer continental... documented takes in similar fisheries. CA Yellowtail, Barracuda, and White Seabass Drift Gillnet Fishery... effort using any type of gillnet gear, including set (float and sink), drift, and runaround gillnet...

  19. Binding Assays for the Quantitative Detection of P. Brevis Polyether Neurotoxins in Biological Samples and Antibodies as Therapeutic Aids for Polyether Marine Intoxication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-15

    Recommendations 27 VII. Literature Cited 28 I!. [i• Figure 1. Structures of the Brevetoxins 5 Figure 2. Non-Competitive Brevetoxin-Antibody- Protein A Urease ...Barracuda. 20 Figure 9. Toxin- Urease Assay 23 Figure 10. Toxin-Peroxidase Assay 23 Figure 11. Non-Competitive Peroxidase-Linked Sandwich Immuunoassay 24...8217. Thus, the greatest flexibility is gained employing such techniques, and many different variations may be developed to oset defined :riteria. 9 i Urease 2

  20. Mild ciguatera poisoning: Case reports with neurophysiological evaluations.

    PubMed

    Butera, R; Prockop, L D; Buonocore, M; Locatelli, C; Gandini, C; Manzo, L

    2000-10-01

    Ciguatera poisoning causes mainly gastrointestinal and neurological effects of variable severity. However, symptoms of peripheral neuropathy with paresthesias and paradoxical disturbance of thermal sensation are the hallmark. Electrophysiological studies are often normal, except in severe cases. We report four people who developed mild ciguatera poisoning after barracuda ingestion. Electrophysiological studies documented normocalcemic latent tetany. These findings are consistent with ciguatoxin's mechanism of toxicity, which involves inactivation of voltage-gated Na(+) channels and eventually increases nerve membrane excitability.

  1. NATO and the Challenges of Austerity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Barracuda nuclear-powered attack submarines (SSNs) are expected to enter service around 2017 . Two amphibious force projec- tion and command ships, the...powered attack submarines to replace the Rubis-Amethyste–class vessels between 2012 and 2022. The first boat will enter service around 2017 , the next...for training, maintenance, and operations. In order to maxi - mize the readiness of the units deploying to Afghanistan (and those getting ready to

  2. System-Call Based Problem Diagnosis for PVFS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES U.S. Government or Federal Rights License 14 . ABSTRACT see report 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...our experiments on a cluster of AMD Opteron 1220 machines, each with 4 GB RAM, two Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 320 GB disks (one dedi- cated for PVFS...interpositioned between the Linux VFS layer and the underlying file-system to provide opera- tion traces at multiple granularities. Performance tools for HPC

  3. Final Environmental Assessment Eglin Gulf Test and Training Range (EGTTR) Precision Strike Weapons (PSW) Test (5-Year Plan) Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-01

    Rachycentridae Cobia Sciaenidae Drums Sphymidae Hammerhead sharks Tropical Sphyraenidae Barracudas Fishes of the eastern Gulf can be characterized by...Dusky shark Carcharinus obscurus C One of the larger shark species of continental shelf waters; occurs in Atlantic and Pacific. Feeds on fish...other sharks , rays, squid, octopus, and starfish. Sand tiger shark Odontaspis taurus C In North America, the sand tiger ranges from the Gulf of

  4. 'Cebiche'--a potential source of human anisakiasis in Mexico?

    PubMed

    Laffon-Leal, S M; Vidal-Martínez, V M; Arjona-Torres, G

    2000-06-01

    Five fish species used for preparation of a popular dish (cebiche) made with raw fish flesh in Mexico were obtained from five localities of the coast of Yucatan. Lutjanus synagris, Gerres cinereus, Sphyraena barracuda, Epinephelus morio and Haemulon plumieriwere examined for the presence of larvae of anisakid nematodes, causative agents of human anisakiasis. The nematode Pseudoterranova sp. was found in E. morio and S. barracuda with a total prevalence of 83% and 6.5 +/- 6.2 worms per fish for E. morio, and a prevalence of 33% and 10.2 +/- 30.0 worms per fish for S. barracuda. Contracaecumsp. was found to infect G. cinereus with a prevalence of 57% and 7.6 +/- 11.4 worms per fish. The relatively high prevalence of Pseudoterranova sp. indicates that this parasite is a potential causal agent of anisakiasis on the coast of Yucatan. Although all larvae were found only in the mesentery of the fish host, their importance as a potential source of human infection cannot be excluded as larval migration to the muscles in dead fish is possible.

  5. Predator identity and time of day interact to shape the risk-reward trade-off for herbivorous coral reef fishes.

    PubMed

    Catano, Laura B; Barton, Mark B; Boswell, Kevin M; Burkepile, Deron E

    2017-03-01

    Non-consumptive effects (NCEs) of predators occur as prey alters their habitat use and foraging decisions to avoid predation. Although NCEs are recognized as being important across disparate ecosystems, the factors influencing their strength and importance remain poorly understood. Ecological context, such as time of day, predator identity, and prey condition, may modify how prey species perceive and respond to risk, thereby altering NCEs. To investigate how predator identity affects foraging of herbivorous coral reef fishes, we simulated predation risk using fiberglass models of two predator species (grouper Mycteroperca bonaci and barracuda Sphyraena barracuda) with different hunting modes. We quantified how predation risk alters herbivory rates across space (distance from predator) and time (dawn, mid-day, and dusk) to examine how prey reconciles the conflicting demands of avoiding predation vs. foraging. When we averaged the effect of both predators across space and time, they suppressed herbivory similarly. Yet, they altered feeding differently depending on time of day and distance from the model. Although feeding increased strongly with increasing distance from the predators particularly during dawn, we found that the barracuda model suppressed herbivory more strongly than the grouper model during mid-day. We suggest that prey hunger level and differences in predator hunting modes could influence these patterns. Understanding how context mediates NCEs provides insight into the emergent effects of predator-prey interactions on food webs. These insights have broad implications for understanding how anthropogenic alterations to predator abundances can affect the spatial and temporal dynamics of important ecosystem processes.

  6. A GPS estimate of relative motion between North and South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Timothy H.; Mao, Ailin

    GPS velocity data are used to estimate the Euler vector describing rigid body motion of North America relative to South America. Assuming the boundary between the North and South American plates is located near the Fifteen Twenty fracture zone in the equatorial Atlantic, the Euler vector predicts extension across the Royal Trough up to 1 mm/yr, and convergence across the Barracuda Ridge at about 2 mm/yr, in agreement with geological estimates averaged over tens of millions of years. Further west, convergence between North and South America at rates up to 8 mm/yr may contribute to deformation of the Caribbean plate along its southwest boundary with South America.

  7. The Resource, Fall 2002

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    that also give information such as flops and were run on the ERDC MSRC’s Origin 3800 (O3K). Vampir Trace, also run on the O3K, gave a complete trace...such as the LBJ Presidential Library, watching bats at the Congress Street Bridge, and enjoying jet skiing at nearby Lake Travis. The conference, by...technology services firms, also funded the purchase of monogrammed bat bags for the Vicksburg Barracudas, a baseball team of 12-year-olds, and

  8. Environmental drivers of diurnal visits by transient predatory fishes to Caribbean patch reefs.

    PubMed

    Harborne, A R; Selwyn, J D; Lawson, J M; Gallo, M

    2017-01-01

    Video cameras recorded the diurnal visitation rates of transient (large home range) piscivorous fishes to coral patch reefs in The Bahamas and identified 11 species. Visits by bar jack Caranx ruber, mutton snapper Lutjanus analis, yellowtail snapper Ocyurus chrysurus, barracuda Sphyraena barracuda and cero Scomberomorus regalis were sufficiently frequent to correlate with a range of biophysical factors. Patch-reef visitation rates and fish abundances varied with distance from shore and all species except S. regalis were seen more frequently inshore. This pattern is likely to be caused by factors including close proximity to additional foraging areas in mangroves and on fore-reefs and higher abundances close to inshore nursery habitats. Visitation rates and abundances of C. ruber, L. analis, O. chrysurus and S. regalis also varied seasonally (spring v. winter), possibly as fishes responded to temperature changes or undertook spawning migrations. The abundance of each transient predator species on the patch reefs generally exhibited limited diurnal variability, but L. analis was seen more frequently towards dusk. This study demonstrates that the distribution of transient predators is correlated spatially and temporally with a range of factors, even within a single lagoon, and these drivers are species specific. Transient predators are considered an important source of mortality shaping reef-fish assemblages and their abundance, in combination with the biomass of resident predators, was negatively correlated with the density of prey fishes. Furthermore, transient predators are often targeted by fishers and understanding how they utilize seascapes is critical for protecting them within reserves.

  9. Evaluation of Computational Method of High Reynolds Number Slurry Flow for Caverns Backfilling

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, Giorgia

    2015-05-01

    The abandonment of salt caverns used for brining or product storage poses a significant environmental and economic risk. Risk mitigation can in part be address ed by the process of backfilling which can improve the cavern geomechanical stability and reduce the risk o f fluid loss to the environment. This study evaluate s a currently available computational tool , Barracuda, to simulate such process es as slurry flow at high Reynolds number with high particle loading . Using Barracuda software, a parametric sequence of simu lations evaluated slurry flow at Re ynolds number up to 15000 and loading up to 25%. Li mitations come into the long time required to run these simulation s due in particular to the mesh size requirement at the jet nozzle. This study has found that slurry - jet width and centerline velocities are functions of Re ynold s number and volume fractio n The solid phase was found to spread less than the water - phase with a spreading rate smaller than 1 , dependent on the volume fraction. Particle size distribution does seem to have a large influence on the jet flow development. This study constitutes a first step to understand the behavior of highly loaded slurries and their ultimate application to cavern backfilling.

  10. Multi-phase CFD modeling of solid sorbent carbon capture system

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, E. M.; DeCroix, D.; Breault, Ronald W.; Xu, W.; Huckaby, E. David

    2013-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to investigate a low temperature post-combustion carbon capture reactor. The CFD models are based on a small scale solid sorbent carbon capture reactor design from ADA-ES and Southern Company. The reactor is a fluidized bed design based on a silica-supported amine sorbent. CFD models using both Eulerian–Eulerian and Eulerian–Lagrangian multi-phase modeling methods are developed to investigate the hydrodynamics and adsorption of carbon dioxide in the reactor. Models developed in both FLUENT® and BARRACUDA are presented to explore the strengths and weaknesses of state of the art CFD codes for modeling multi-phase carbon capture reactors. The results of the simulations show that the FLUENT® Eulerian–Lagrangian simulations (DDPM) are unstable for the given reactor design; while the BARRACUDA Eulerian–Lagrangian model is able to simulate the system given appropriate simplifying assumptions. FLUENT® Eulerian–Eulerian simulations also provide a stable solution for the carbon capture reactor given the appropriate simplifying assumptions.

  11. Multi-Phase CFD Modeling of Solid Sorbent Carbon Capture System

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Emily M.; DeCroix, David; Breault, Ronald W.; Xu, Wei; Huckaby, E. D.; Saha, Kringan; Darteville, Sebastien; Sun, Xin

    2013-07-30

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to investigate a low temperature post-combustion carbon capture reactor. The CFD models are based on a small scale solid sorbent carbon capture reactor design from ADA-ES and Southern Company. The reactor is a fluidized bed design based on a silica-supported amine sorbent. CFD models using both Eulerian-Eulerian and Eulerian-Lagrangian multi-phase modeling methods are developed to investigate the hydrodynamics and adsorption of carbon dioxide in the reactor. Models developed in both FLUENT® and BARRACUDA are presented to explore the strengths and weaknesses of state of the art CFD codes for modeling multi-phase carbon capture reactors. The results of the simulations show that the FLUENT® Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations (DDPM) are unstable for the given reactor design; while the BARRACUDA Eulerian-Lagrangian model is able to simulate the system given appropriate simplifying assumptions. FLUENT® Eulerian-Eulerian simulations also provide a stable solution for the carbon capture reactor given the appropriate simplifying assumptions.

  12. Infections and Intoxications from the Ocean: Risks of the Shore.

    PubMed

    Clemence, Mark A; Guerrant, Richard L

    2015-12-01

    Marine and coastal regions provide a diverse range of foods and serve as recreation and leisure areas for large numbers of people in many parts of the world. However, they also serve as environments associated with numerous hazards. The number of cases of fish- and shellfish-related food poisonings in the United States has increased in recent years, accounting for over 600,000 illnesses, with 3,000 hospitalizations and 94 deaths annually. Human diseases due to pathogenic Vibrio species can result from both ingestion of contaminated shellfish and exposure of open wounds to contaminated seawater. A variety of infections may result from human interactions with marine life, including sharks, barracudas, and moray eels. This chapter covers some of the risks of the shore, including fish and shellfish intoxications, infections related to Vibrio species, and infections resulting from marine trauma.

  13. [Land and marine fauna constituting a threat for recreational divers in the tropics].

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof

    2008-09-01

    Due to intensively growing international tourism, increasing numbers of people leave for countries with hot climates, where various threats for human health and life exist. Besides climatic and sanitary conditions, a rich fauna, represented by predators and venomous animals, can be included. Based on available world literature and their own observations, the authors present the threats that a tourist can possibly encounter whilst relaxing on the beach or during recreational diving in tropical waters. When staying in water, a large threat is posed by marine fish of prey (sharks, barracuda, muraena), Cnidaria (jellyfish, corals, anemones) and venomous animals (fish, sea snakes). On land, on the other hand, a threat can be posed by venomous arthropods (scorpions, spiders) and Hymenoptera insects. The study presents the most important representatives of fauna present in coastal areas frequently visited by diving enthusiasts. Also, clinical image and conduct in the case of body injures are discussed.

  14. Ciguatera fish poisoning in the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Oreihaka, E

    1992-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning may have existed in the Solomon Islands long ago though there has never been any ciguatera fish poisoning tests been carried to confirm its presence. Suspected occurrences are infrequent and seasonal. Most cases of ciguatera fish poisoning are undocumented that when cases do occur they depend largely on traditional-knowledge and anecdotal information. Areas suspected to have ciguatoxic poisoning problem in the Solomon Islands includes Santa Cruz, Rennell and Bellona, Indispensable reefs, Ontong Java and Wagina island. Fish species considered ciguatoxic includes red emperor, red snapper, roundfaced batfish, barracuda and blue lined sea-bream. In any way ciguatera fish poisoning is as yet not a big health problem in the Solomon Islands.

  15. Hypnosis to alleviate the symptoms of ciguatera toxicity: a case study.

    PubMed

    Laser, Eleanor D; Shenefelt, Philip D

    2012-01-01

    Ciguatera toxicity is a poisoning from consuming reef fish that had fed on dinoflagellates such as Gambierdiscus toxicus found along coral reefs. The toxin is oil soluble, odorless, colorless, tasteless, heat stable, and is concentrated in larger carnivorous fish such as amberjack, barracuda, eel, grouper, red snapper, sea bass, and Spanish mackerel. Onset of symptoms is usually within 6-12 hours after ingestion. Gastrointestinal symptoms lasting 1-2 days include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Neurological symptoms may persist for weeks or several months or--rarely--years and include circumoral and extremity paresthesias, temperature sensation reversal, itching, weakness, ataxia, and others. A patient with burning hands and feet who had not found relief using other methods had diagnosis of ciguatera toxicity assisted by hypnotically refreshed memory followed by rapid relief with hypnotic suggestions in 1 session and remained free of symptoms.

  16. Maximum swimming speeds of sailfish and three other large marine predatory fish species based on muscle contraction time and stride length: a myth revisited

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, Morten B. S.; Domenici, Paolo; Marras, Stefano; Krause, Jens; Boswell, Kevin M.; Rodriguez-Pinto, Ivan; Wilson, Alexander D. M.; Kurvers, Ralf H. J. M.; Viblanc, Paul E.; Finger, Jean S.; Steffensen, John F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Billfishes are considered to be among the fastest swimmers in the oceans. Previous studies have estimated maximum speed of sailfish and black marlin at around 35 m s−1 but theoretical work on cavitation predicts that such extreme speed is unlikely. Here we investigated maximum speed of sailfish, and three other large marine pelagic predatory fish species, by measuring the twitch contraction time of anaerobic swimming muscle. The highest estimated maximum swimming speeds were found in sailfish (8.3±1.4 m s−1), followed by barracuda (6.2±1.0 m s−1), little tunny (5.6±0.2 m s−1) and dorado (4.0±0.9 m s−1); although size-corrected performance was highest in little tunny and lowest in sailfish. Contrary to previously reported estimates, our results suggest that sailfish are incapable of exceeding swimming speeds of 10-15 m s−1, which corresponds to the speed at which cavitation is predicted to occur, with destructive consequences for fin tissues. PMID:27543056

  17. Surgical hazards posed by marine and freshwater animals in Florida.

    PubMed

    Howard, R J; Burgess, G H

    1993-11-01

    Marine and freshwater animals can cause injury to humans by biting, stinging, being poisonous to eat, and causing infections. Biting aquatic animals in Florida include sharks, barracudas, alligators, and moray eels. Devitalized tissue should be débrided, and vascular, neurologic, and tendinous injuries should be repaired. Radiographs should be obtained to examine the injury sit for fractures and retained foreign bodies (teeth). The spines of stingrays and marine catfish can cause soft tissue injury and infection. The spine has a recurved, serrated shape that may cause further injury and break if it is pulled out. The venom may cause local tissue necrosis requiring débridement. Soft tissue infections with marine Vibrio bacteria can occur after eating raw oysters or receiving even minor injuries from marine animals. Thirty-one individuals developed soft tissue infections, 49 developed sepsis, and 23 developed both sepsis and soft tissue infection with marine Vibrio species during a 12-year period. Sixteen patients developed necrotizing soft tissue infections. Treatment is with antibiotics and débridement when necrosis occurs.

  18. Monophyly and interrelationships of Snook and Barramundi (Centropomidae sensu Greenwood) and five new markers for fish phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenhong; Ricardo, Betancur-R; Smith, Wm Leo; Ortí, Guillermo

    2011-09-01

    Centropomidae as defined by Greenwood (1976) is composed of three genera: Centropomus, Lates, and Psammoperca. But composition and monophyly of this family have been challenged in subsequent morphological studies. In some classifications, Ambassis, Siniperca and Glaucosoma were added to the Centropomidae. In other studies, Lates+Psammoperca were excluded, restricting the family to Centropomus. Recent analyses of DNA sequences did not solve the controversy, mainly due to limited taxonomic or character sampling. The present study is based on DNA sequence data from thirteen genes (one mitochondrial and twelve nuclear markers) for 57 taxa, representative of all relevant species. Five of the nuclear markers are new for fish phylogenetic studies. The monophyly of Centropomidae sensu Greenwood was supported by both maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses of a concatenated data set (12,888 bp aligned). No support was found for previous morphological hypotheses suggesting that ambassids are closely allied to the Centropomidae. Putative affinities between centropomids and Glaucosoma, Niphon, or Siniperca were strongly rejected by topology tests. In agreement with previous molecular hypotheses, our results place Centropomidae within a group of fishes that includes carangoids (e.g., jacks, remoras, dolphinfish, roosterfish, and cobia), flatfishes, barracudas, archerfishes, billfishes, moonfish, and threadfins. The phylogeny for the extant Centropomidae is ((Lates, Psammoperca), Centropomus).

  19. Ciguatera fish poisoning in the Caribbean islands and Western Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Pottier, I; Vernoux, J P; Lewis, R J

    2001-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (ciguatera), a common poisoning caused by fish ingestion, is reviewed in the Western Atlantic and the Caribbean waters. It is endemic from Florida coasts (northern limit) to Martinique Island (southern limit), with outbreaks occurring from time to time. In the Caribbean, ciguatera causes a polymorphic syndrome with gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and neurological signs and symptoms. Neurological and muscular dysfunctions can be treated by intravenous injection of D-mannitol. The lipid-soluble toxins involved are ciguatoxins that are likely produced by the dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus. G. toxicus strains are endemic in the Caribbean Sea and in theWestern Atlantic. Although it is likely that blooms of G. toxicus are ingested by herbivorous fishes, they are not implicated in ciguatera in the Caribbean. Rather, large carnivores (barracudas, jacks, snappers, groupers), consumers of smaller benthic fish, are often involved in ciguatera. Fish toxicity depends on fishing area and depth, fish size and tissues, and climatic disturbances. Ciguatoxins have been isolated and purified from Caribbean fish species. The structure of two epimers, C-CTX-1 and C-CTX-2 from horse-eye jack, comprise 14 trans-fused ether-linked rings and a hemiketal in terminal ring. Caribbean ciguatoxins are mainly detected in the laboratory by chicken, mouse, mosquito, or cell bioassays, and by analytical HPLC/tandem mass spectrometry down to parts per billion (ppb). A ciguatera management plan that integrates epidemiology, treatment, and a simple method of detection is required to ensure the protection of consumers.

  20. Scombroid fishes provide novel insights into the trait/rate associations of molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Fan; Kitchen, Andrew; Burleigh, J Gordon; Miyamoto, Michael M

    2014-06-01

    The study of which life history traits primarily affect molecular evolutionary rates is often confounded by the covariance of these traits. Scombroid fishes (billfishes, tunas, barracudas, and their relatives) are unusual in that their mass-specific metabolic rate is positively associated with body size. This study exploits this atypical pattern of trait variation, which allows for direct tests of whether mass-specific metabolic rate or body size is the more important factor of molecular evolutionary rates. We inferred a phylogeny for scombroids from a supermatrix of molecular and morphological characters and used new phylogenetic comparative approaches to assess the associations of body size and mass-specific metabolic rate with substitution rate. As predicted by the body size hypothesis, there is a negative correlation between body size and substitution rate. However, unexpectedly, we also find a negative association between mass-specific metabolic and substitution rates. These relationships are supported by analyses of the total molecular data, separate mitochondrial and nuclear genes, and individual loci, and they are robust to phylogenetic uncertainty. The molecular evolutionary rates of scombroids are primarily tied to body size. This study demonstrates that groups with novel patterns of trait variation can be particularly informative for identifying which life history traits are the primary factors of molecular evolutionary rates.

  1. High population density enhances recruitment and survival of a harvested coral reef fish.

    PubMed

    Wormald, Clare L; Steele, Mark A; Forrester, Graham E

    2013-03-01

    A negative relationship between population growth and population density (direct density dependence) is necessary for population regulation and is assumed in most models of harvested populations. Experimental tests for density dependence are lacking for large-bodied, harvested fish because of the difficulty of manipulating population density over large areas. We studied a harvested coral reef fish, Lutjanus apodus (schoolmaster snapper), using eight large, isolated natural reefs (0.4-1.6 ha) in the Bahamas as replicates. An initial observational test for density dependence was followed by a manipulation of population density. The manipulation weakened an association between density and shelter-providing habitat features and revealed a positive effect of population density on recruitment and survival (inverse density dependence), but no effect of density on somatic growth. The snappers on an individual reef were organized into a few shoals, and we hypothesize that large shoals on high-density reefs were less vulnerable to large piscivores (groupers and barracudas) than the small shoals on low-density reefs. Reductions in predation risk for individuals in large social groups are well documented, but because snapper shoals occupied reefs the size of small marine reserves, these ecological interactions may influence the outcome of management actions.

  2. Twelve invertebrate and eight fish species new to the marine fauna of Madeira, and a discussion of the zoogeography of the area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirtz, Peter

    1998-06-01

    The benthic ctenophore Vallicula multiformis, a large undescribed flatworm species of the genus Pseudoceros, the prosobranch gastropod Tonna maculosa, the opisthobranch gastropods Placida cf. dendritica, Caloria elegans, Aeolidiella sanguinea, Janolus cristatus, the decapod Balssia gasti, the sea urchin Schizaster canaliferus and the tunicates Clavelina lepadiformis, Clavelina dellavallei and Pycnoclavella taureanensis are recorded from Madeira for the first time. This is the first record of a platyctenid ctenophore in the eastern Atlantic. The teleost fishes Pomatoschistus pictus, Vaneaugobius canariensis, Chromogobius sp., Nerophis ophidion, Hippocampus hippocampus, Acanthocybium solandri, Sphyraena viridensis and Sphyraena barracuda are recorded from Madeira for the first time. The presence of the sea-hare Aplysia dactylomela at Madeira is confirmed; the species has increased tremendously in abundance in the last four years. The crocodile fish Grammoplites gruveli can occasionally be found in the mantle cavity of cuttlefish ( Sepia officinalis) sold at the fish market of Funchal, but does not originate from Madeiran waters. An analysis of 100 new records from the coastal fauna of Madeira shows that, while predominantly of lusitanian, mediterranean and mauritanian affinity, Madeira’s shallow water fauna contains a large component of tropical species.

  3. Enhanced Productivity of Chemical Processes Using Dense Fluidized Beds

    SciTech Connect

    Sibashis Banerjee; Alvin Chen; Rutton Patel; Dale Snider; Ken Williams; Timothy O'Hern; Paul Tortora

    2008-02-29

    The work detailed in this report addresses Enabling Technologies within Computational Technology by integrating a “breakthrough” particle-fluid computational technology into traditional Process Science and Engineering Technology. The work completed under this DOE project addresses five major development areas 1) gas chemistry in dense fluidized beds 2) thermal cracking of liquid film on solids producing gas products 3) liquid injection in a fluidized bed with particle-to-particle liquid film transport 4) solid-gas chemistry and 5) first level validation of models. Because of the nature of the research using tightly coupled solids and fluid phases with a Lagrangian description of the solids and continuum description of fluid, the work provides ground-breaking advances in reactor prediction capability. This capability has been tested against experimental data where available. The commercial product arising out of this work is called Barracuda and is suitable for a wide (dense-to-dilute) range of industrial scale gas-solid flows with and without reactions. Commercial applications include dense gas-solid beds, gasifiers, riser reactors and cyclones.

  4. Repeatability of clades as a criterion of reliability: a case study for molecular phylogeny of Acanthomorpha (Teleostei) with larger number of taxa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Jen; Bonillo, Céline; Lecointre, Guillaume

    2003-02-01

    Although much progress has been made recently in teleostean phylogeny, relationships among the main lineages of the higher teleosts (Acanthomorpha), containing more than 60% of all fish species, remain poorly defined. This study represents the most extensive taxonomic sampling effort to date to collect new molecular characters for phylogenetic analysis of acanthomorph fishes. We compiled and analyzed three independent data sets, including: (i) mitochondrial ribosomal fragments from 12S and 16s (814bp for 97 taxa); (ii) nuclear ribosomal 28S sequences (847bp for 74 taxa); and (iii) a nuclear protein-coding gene, rhodopsin (759bp for 86 taxa). Detailed analyses were conducted on each data set separately and the principle of taxonomic congruence without consensus trees was used to assess confidence in the results as follows. Repeatability of clades from separate analyses was considered the primary criterion to establish reliability, rather than bootstrap proportions from a single combined (total evidence) data matrix. The new and reliable clades emerging from this study of the acanthomorph radiation were: Gadiformes (cods) with Zeioids (dories); Beloniformes (needlefishes) with Atheriniformes (silversides); blenioids (blennies) with Gobiesocoidei (clingfishes); Channoidei (snakeheads) with Anabantoidei (climbing gouramies); Mastacembeloidei (spiny eels) with Synbranchioidei (swamp-eels); the last two pairs of taxa grouping together, Syngnathoidei (aulostomids, macroramphosids) with Dactylopteridae (flying gurnards); Scombroidei (mackerels) plus Stromatoidei plus Chiasmodontidae; Ammodytidae (sand lances) with Cheimarrhichthyidae (torrentfish); Zoarcoidei (eelpouts) with Cottoidei; Percidae (perches) with Notothenioidei (Antarctic fishes); and a clade grouping Carangidae (jacks), Echeneidae (remoras), Sphyraenidae (barracudas), Menidae (moonfish), Polynemidae (threadfins), Centropomidae (snooks), and Pleuronectiformes (flatfishes).

  5. [Dangerous marine animals].

    PubMed

    Antensteiner, G

    1999-01-01

    Sea-biological basic knowledge for divers is offered only in special lessons for advanced scuba divers. According to statistics, however, five per cent of the deadly diving accidents are caused by underwater organisms. This number could be reduced to a fraction, by correct behaviour during the dive and after an accident. The most frequent accidents with sea animals during water sports are not by unprovoked shark attacks, which cause six deaths world-wide per year on the average, but turn out with usually well camouflaged sea inhabitants, that do not attack humans, rather by their inadvertence coincidentally get in contact with it. The various defense instruments of the often small, inconspicuous organisms reach from teeth over poison stings, pricks, spines, scalpelles, nettle injections and chemical weapons up to poison arrows. Due to that variety of the maritime life, the most important representatives of its type are explained including severity level of the caused injury or contamination. Both, diagnostic position and therapy possibility are described as follows: 1. Porifera (sponge), 2. Hydrozoa (white weed, yellow flower head), Actinaria (sea anemones), 3. Conidae (cone shells), Tridocna (giant clam), octopoda (octopus), 4. Acanthaster planci (crown of thorns), Echinodea (sea urchins), Holothurioidea (sea cucumber), 5. Selachoidei (shark), Batoidei (Ray), Muraenidae (moray), Plotosidae (barbel eels), Synanciidae (stonefish), Scorpaenidae (scorpionfish), Pterois (lion fish), Sphyraena Spec. (barracuda), Balistidae (triggerfish), Ostracionidae (puffer).

  6. Monitoring of Irradiated Food Products Marketed in Italy and Evaluation of Electron Spin Resonance Signal Sensitivity of Experimentally Irradiated Fish Scales

    PubMed Central

    Carosielli, Leonardo; Mangiacotti, Michele; Chiaravalle, Eugenio; Smaldone, Giorgio; Anastasio, Aniello

    2014-01-01

    Many countries, in order to authorise the use of food irradiation, claim the availability of methods to detect the occurred treatment in addition to the respect of safe use of this technology. Among physical methods, the electron spin resonance (ESR) measuring the number of free radicals that are formed during irradiation can be applied only to those foods with cellulose, a crystalline or bone structure, in which free radicals have a shelf life greater than irradiated product. The aim of this study was to highlight an irradiation treatment in European and extra-European foods marketed in Southern Italy by the means of ESR technique. Furthermore, in order to optimise the preparation procedures the efficacy of the above mentioned method in fish scales experimentally irradiated has been evaluated. From February to September 2012, a total number of 83 samples of food products of animal and plant origin were taken at the border inspection post and at retail market and finally analysed. At the same time, the scales of grouper and barracuda have been experimentally irradiated at 0.5 kGy and were subsequently analysed using ESR. Results showed 5 frog legs out of 83 samples positive for treatment and confirm the applicability of ESR also for fish scales. PMID:27800329

  7. Maximum swimming speeds of sailfish and three other large marine predatory fish species based on muscle contraction time and stride length: a myth revisited.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Morten B S; Domenici, Paolo; Marras, Stefano; Krause, Jens; Boswell, Kevin M; Rodriguez-Pinto, Ivan; Wilson, Alexander D M; Kurvers, Ralf H J M; Viblanc, Paul E; Finger, Jean S; Steffensen, John F

    2016-10-15

    Billfishes are considered to be among the fastest swimmers in the oceans. Previous studies have estimated maximum speed of sailfish and black marlin at around 35 m s(-1) but theoretical work on cavitation predicts that such extreme speed is unlikely. Here we investigated maximum speed of sailfish, and three other large marine pelagic predatory fish species, by measuring the twitch contraction time of anaerobic swimming muscle. The highest estimated maximum swimming speeds were found in sailfish (8.3±1.4 m s(-1)), followed by barracuda (6.2±1.0 m s(-1)), little tunny (5.6±0.2 m s(-1)) and dorado (4.0±0.9 m s(-1)); although size-corrected performance was highest in little tunny and lowest in sailfish. Contrary to previously reported estimates, our results suggest that sailfish are incapable of exceeding swimming speeds of 10-15 m s(-1), which corresponds to the speed at which cavitation is predicted to occur, with destructive consequences for fin tissues.

  8. [Risk factors of ciguatera in the French West Indies in Saint-Barthélémy, Saint-Martin and Anguilla].

    PubMed

    Bourdeau, P; Bagnis, R

    1989-01-01

    An epidemiological study on ciguatera fish poisoning in the French West Indies (St-Barthelemy, St-Martin and Anguilla) was conducted during the years 1985-1986. The investigation on intoxications shows a non seasonal significant prevalence. Though it was difficult to list the cases, the morbidity seems to vary between 7 and 30 per thousand. A study of fish toxicity was realised; 46 different species were tested (individually or by pools) by the mosquito bio-test. Observations of intoxications give the following results: High risk species: Caranx bartholomaei, C. lugubris, Seriola dumerili, Lutjanus apodus, L. jocu, Pristipomoides macrophtalmus, Gymnothorax funebris, G. moringa, Scomberomorus cavalla, S. regalis, Mycteroperca venenosa, M. tigris, Epinephelus morio, Sphyraena barracuda. Intermediate species: Caranx latus, C. ruber, Lachnolaimus maximus, Lutjanus analis, L. buccanella, L. griseus, Malacanthus plumieri, Scomberomorus maculatus. Low risk species: Balistes vetula, Alectis ciliaris, Haemulon album, Bodianus rufus, Halichoeres radiatus, Priacanthus arenatus, Alphestes afer. Many species are involved in the toxic food chain. New ones have been identified, but it is difficult to determine the toxic level range. A cartography is presented but no place is free of risk. A research of Gambierdiscus toxicus, the causal agent, on algal surface from dead corals was conducted around St-Barthelemy and St-Martin. The dinoflagellate is found in low or medium populations all around the islands with no difference between North and South. There is a maximal activity during the spring. A model of the epidemiology of the ciguatera in the area is proposed.

  9. Mercury (Hg) speciation in coral reef systems of remote Oceania: Implications for the artisanal fisheries of Tutuila, Samoa Islands.

    PubMed

    Morrison, R John; Peshut, Peter J; West, Ronald J; Lasorsa, Brenda K

    2015-07-15

    We investigated Hg in muscle tissue of fish species from three trophic levels on fringing reefs of Tutuila (14°S, 171°W), plus water, sediment and turf alga. Accumulation of total Hg in the herbivore Acanthurus lineatus (Acanthuridae, lined surgeonfish, (n=40)) was negligible at 1.05 (±0.04) ng g(-1) wet-weight, (∼65% occurring as methyl Hg). The mid-level carnivore Parupeneus spp. (Mullidae, goatfishes (n=10)) had total Hg 29.8 (±4.5) ng g(-1) wet-weight (∼99% as methyl Hg). Neither A. lineatus or Parupeneus spp. showed a propensity to accumulate Hg based on body size. Both groups were assigned a status of "un-restricted" for monthly consumption limits for non-carcinogenic health endpoints for methyl Hg. The top-level carnivore Sphyraena qenie (Sphyraenidae, blackfin barracuda, n=3) had muscle tissue residues of 105, 650 and 741 ng g(-1) wet-weight (100% methyl Hg, with increasing concentration with body mass, suggesting that S. qenie >15 kg would have a recommendation of "no consumption".

  10. Epidemiology of Ciguatera in Florida.

    PubMed

    Radke, Elizabeth G; Reich, Andrew; Morris, John Glenn

    2015-08-01

    Ciguatera is the most commonly reported marine food-borne illness worldwide. Because there is a biological plausibility that ciguatera may be impacted by long-term climate variability and Florida is on the northern border of the geographic distribution of ciguatera, it is important to update our understanding of its epidemiology in Florida. We performed an analysis of 291 reports in Florida from 2000 to 2011 and an e-mail survey of 5,352 recreational fishers to estimate incidence and underreporting and identify high risk demographic groups, fish types, and catch locations. Incidence was 5.6 per 100,000 adjusted for underreporting. Hispanics had the highest incidence rate (relative risk [RR] = 3.4) and were more likely to eat barracuda than non-Hispanics. The most common catch locations for ciguatera-causing fish were the Bahamas and Florida Keys. Cases caused by fish from northern Florida were infrequent. These results indicate that ciguatera incidence is higher than estimated from public health reports alone. There is little evidence that incidence or geographic range has increased because of increased seawater temperatures since earlier studies.

  11. Epidemiology of Ciguatera in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Radke, Elizabeth G.; Reich, Andrew; Morris, John Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Ciguatera is the most commonly reported marine food-borne illness worldwide. Because there is a biological plausibility that ciguatera may be impacted by long-term climate variability and Florida is on the northern border of the geographic distribution of ciguatera, it is important to update our understanding of its epidemiology in Florida. We performed an analysis of 291 reports in Florida from 2000 to 2011 and an e-mail survey of 5,352 recreational fishers to estimate incidence and underreporting and identify high risk demographic groups, fish types, and catch locations. Incidence was 5.6 per 100,000 adjusted for underreporting. Hispanics had the highest incidence rate (relative risk [RR] = 3.4) and were more likely to eat barracuda than non-Hispanics. The most common catch locations for ciguatera-causing fish were the Bahamas and Florida Keys. Cases caused by fish from northern Florida were infrequent. These results indicate that ciguatera incidence is higher than estimated from public health reports alone. There is little evidence that incidence or geographic range has increased because of increased seawater temperatures since earlier studies. PMID:26123957

  12. Ciguatera fish poisoning--Texas, 1998, and South Carolina, 2004.

    PubMed

    2006-09-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning is characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea and neurologic symptoms such as weakness, tingling, and pruritus (itching). The condition is caused by eating fish containing toxins produced by the dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus, a one-celled plantlike organism that grows on algae in tropical waters worldwide. Because these toxins are lipid soluble, they accumulate through the food chain as carnivorous fish consume contaminated herbivorous reef fish; toxin concentrations are highest in large, predatory fish such as barracuda, grouper, amberjack, snapper, and shark. Because fish caught in ciguatera-endemic areas are shipped nationwide, ciguatera fish poisoning can occur anywhere in the United States. This report describes ciguatera fish poisoning in four persons (two in 1998, two in 2004) who ate fish caught by recreational fishers in waters outside of ciguatera-endemic areas (e.g., the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic and Gulf Coast waters off southern Florida). These cases underscore the need for physicians, regardless of whether they are in a ciguatera-endemic area, to consider ciguatera in patients who have gastrointestinal or neurologic symptoms after eating large, predatory fish.

  13. Census of U.S. Civil Aircraft. Calendar Year 1982.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-31

    46C 65 51 2 0 1 1 C-46 69 51 2 0 3 3 C-46A 69 51 2 0 2 2 C-46F 69 51 2 0 5 5 C-46R 69 51 2 0 3 3 SB2C5 2 41 1 0 1 1 P-40N 1 41 1 0 1 1 JN-4-D JENNY 2...1 JEENIE TEENIE 1 41 1 0 1 1 JEENIES TEENIE 1 41 1 0 1 1 - JEFFAIR BARRACUDA 2 41 1 0 1 1 JENNY JN-40 1 41 1 0 1 1 JGM-1 1 41 1 0 1 1 JH-1 1 41 1 0 1...1 . JIM’S FLY BABY 1 41 1 0 1 1 JK I-A 1 41 1 0 1 1 *JK1-B 1 41 1 0 1 1 * JL-65 1 41 1 0 1 1 JM-1 1 41 1 0 1 1 JM-i01 2 41 1 0 1 1 JN-4D JENNY

  14. Census of U.S. Civil Aircraft for Calendar Year 1983.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-31

    3 69 51 2 0 2 2 69 51 2 0 5 5 69 51 2 0 3 3 2 41 1 0 1 1 1 41 1 0 1 1 % JENNY 2 41 1 0 1 1 ENG REC. ENO 41 1 212 213 ":’ LTI REC. ENG 51 8 48 52 OTAL 7...34" " JEENIE TEENIE 1 41 1 0 1 1 • JEENIES TEENIE 1 41 1 0 1 1 JEFFAIR BARRACUDA 2 41 1 0 1 1 JENNY JN-4D 1 41 1 0 1 1 JENNY JN4D 1 41 1 0 1 1 JGM-1 1...1-- UN-4D JENNY REPLICA 2 41 1 0 1 1 UN-4H 2 41 1 0 1 1 UND-1 1 41 1 0 1 1 UN4C-REPLICA 2 41 1 0 1 1 JN4CAN 2 41 I 0 1 1 JODEL D-l 2 41 1 0 2 2 JODEL

  15. Census of U.S. Civil Aircraft for Calendar Year 1984.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-31

    CLOUD DANCER JENNY 1 41 1 0 1 1 CLOUDBUSTER 1 41 1 0 1 1 CLOUDHAWK 1 41 1 0 1 1 CM-I 2 41 1 0 2 2 CMI 1 41 1 0 1 1 CM2GI-S 1 41 1 0 1 1 CO-Z 3 41 1 0 1...1 0 1 1 JEFFAIR BARRACUDA 2 41 1 0 1 1 JENNY CLOUDDANCER 1 41 1 0 1 1 JENNY JN-4O I 41 1 0 1 1 JENNY JN4D 1 41 1 0 1 " JGm-1 1 41 1 0 1 1 JH-1 1 41 1...1 1 "Ju-1 1 41 1 0 1 1 JM" 101 2 41 1 0 1 1 JN-4D JENNY REPLICA 2 41 1 0 1 1 JN-4H 2 41 1 0 1 1JND-1 1 41 1 0 1 1 JN4C-REPLICA 2 41 1 0 1 1 JN4CAN 2

  16. Surveillance of Viruses in Wild Fish Populations in Areas around the Gulf of Cadiz (South Atlantic Iberian Peninsula)

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Patricia; Olveira, José G.; Labella, Alejandro; Cutrín, Juan Manuel; Baro, Jorge C.; Borrego, Juan Jose

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a viral epidemiological study of wild fish around the Gulf of Cadiz (southwestern Iberian Peninsula) and is focused on infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), and viral nervous necrosis virus (VNNV). One fish species (Chelon labrosus) was sampled inside the gulf, at the mouth of the San Pedro River. Another 29 were sampled, in three oceanographic campaigns, at sites around the Bay of Cadiz. The fish were processed individually and subjected to isolation in cell culture and molecular diagnosis. VHSV was not isolated from any species. Thirteen IPNV-type isolates were obtained from barracuda (Sphyraena sphyraena), axillary seabream (Pagellus acarne), common two-banded seabream (Diplodus vulgaris), common pandora (P. erythrinus), Senegal seabream (D. bellottii), and surmullet (Mullus surmuletus). Six VNNV isolates were obtained from axillary seabream, common pandora, black seabream (Spondyliosoma cantharus), red mullet (Mullet barbatus), Lusitanian toadfish (Halobatrachus didactylus), and tub gurnard (Chelidonichtys lucerna). In the river mouth, viruses were detected only after reamplification, obtaining prevalence percentages of IPNV and VNNV (44.4 and 63.0%, respectively) much higher than those observed in the oceanographic campaigns (25.7 and 19.6%, respectively). The opposite results were obtained in the case of VHSV after reamplification: 11.1% in the river mouth and 43.6% in the oceanic locations. Analyzing the results with respect to the proximity of the sampling sites to the coast, an anthropogenic influence on wild fish is suggested and discussed. The type of viruses and the presence of natural reassortants are also discussed. PMID:25128341

  17. Structure, attachment, replacement and growth of teeth in bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix (Linnaeus, 1776), a teleost with deeply socketed teeth.

    PubMed

    Bemis, William E; Giuliano, Anne; McGuire, Betty

    2005-01-01

    Tooth replacement poses many questions about development, pattern formation, tooth attachment mechanisms, functional morphology and the evolution of vertebrate dentitions. Although most vertebrate species have polyphyodont dentitions, detailed knowledge of tooth structure and replacement is poor for most groups, particularly actinopterygians. We examined the oral dentition of the bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix, a pelagic and coastal marine predator, using a sample of 50 individuals. The oral teeth are located on the dentary and premaxillary bones, and we scored each tooth locus in the dentary and premaxillary bones using a four-part functional classification: absent (A), incoming (I), functional (F=fully ankylosed) or eroding (E). The homodont oral teeth of Pomatomus are sharp, deeply socketed and firmly ankylosed to the bone of attachment. Replacement is intraosseus and occurs in alternate tooth loci with long waves of replacement passing from rear to front. The much higher percentage of functional as opposed to eroding teeth suggests that replacement rates are low but that individual teeth are quickly lost once erosion begins. Tooth number increases ontogenetically, ranging from 15-31 dentary teeth and 15-39 premaxillary teeth in the sample studied. Teeth increase in size with every replacement cycle. Remodeling of the attachment bone occurs continuously to accommodate growth. New tooth germs originate from a discontinuous dental lamina and migrate from the lingual (dentary) or labial (premaxillary) epithelium through pores in the bone of attachment into the resorption spaces beneath the existing teeth. Pomatomus shares unique aspects of tooth replacement with barracudas and other scombroids and this supports the interpretation that Pomatomus is more closely related to scombroids than to carangoids.

  18. Marine communities on oil platforms in Gabon, West Africa: high biodiversity oases in a low biodiversity environment.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Alan M; Ballesteros, Enric; Fay, Michael; Sala, Enric

    2014-01-01

    The marine biodiversity of Gabon, West Africa has not been well studied and is largely unknown. Our examination of marine communities associated with oil platforms in Gabon is the first scientific investigation of these structures and highlights the unique ecosystems associated with them. A number of species previously unknown to Gabonese waters were recorded during our surveys on these platforms. Clear distinctions in benthic communities were observed between older, larger platforms in the north and newer platforms to the south or closer to shore. The former were dominated by a solitary cup coral, Tubastraea sp., whereas the latter were dominated by the barnacle Megabalanus tintinnabulum, but with more diverse benthic assemblages compared to the northerly platforms. Previous work documented the presence of limited zooxanthellated scleractinian corals on natural rocky substrate in Gabon but none were recorded on platforms. Total estimated fish biomass on these platforms exceeded one ton at some locations and was dominated by barracuda (Sphyraena spp.), jacks (Carangids), and rainbow runner (Elagatis bipinnulata). Thirty-four percent of fish species observed on these platforms are new records for Gabon and 6% are new to tropical West Africa. Fish assemblages closely associated with platforms had distinct amphi-Atlantic affinities and platforms likely extend the distribution of these species into coastal West Africa. At least one potential invasive species, the snowflake coral (Carijoa riisei), was observed on the platforms. Oil platforms may act as stepping stones, increasing regional biodiversity and production but they may also be vectors for invasive species. Gabon is a world leader in terrestrial conservation with a network of protected areas covering >10% of the country. Oil exploration and biodiversity conservation currently co-exist in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems in Gabon. Efforts to increase marine protection in Gabon may benefit by including oil

  19. Ciguatera fish poisoning - New York City, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    2013-02-01

    During August 2010-July 2011, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) received reports of six outbreaks and one single case of ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP), involving a total of 28 persons. CFP results from consumption of certain large, predatory, tropical reef fish that have bioaccumulated ciguatoxins (CTX). CFP is characterized by various gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and neurologic symptoms. A prolonged period of acute illness can result, and the neurologic symptoms can last months, with variable asymptomatic and symptomatic periods. The first two outbreaks and the single case, involving 13 persons, were reported during August 6-September 13, 2010. DOHMH distributed a health alert in November 2010 requesting health-care providers be alert for CFP signs and symptoms. The health alert resulted in identification of 11 more cases that month and an additional two outbreaks involving four persons in July 2011. In comparison, only four CFP outbreaks, involving 21 persons total, had been reported in New York City (NYC) during the preceding 10 years (2000-2009). DOHMH's investigation revealed that 13 persons became ill after eating barracuda, and 15 became ill after eating grouper. Although specific and highly sensitive laboratory analyses can detect and confirm CTX in fish, no practical field tests are available for fish monitoring programs. CFP prevention depends on educating the public, seafood suppliers, and distributors about known CFP endemic areas and high-risk fish species. Traceback investigations of fish associated with outbreaks provide valuable information regarding fishing areas associated with CFP. Not all fish from CFP endemic areas are ciguatoxic, but persons who eat fish from endemic regions are at higher risk for CFP. If an illness is suspected to be CFP, public health authorities should be notified and informed of the case history for possible investigation and intervention measures.

  20. Assessing the Incidence of Ciguatera Fish Poisoning with Two Surveys Conducted in Culebra, Puerto Rico, during 2005 and 2006

    PubMed Central

    Luber, George; Conklin, Laura; Tosteson, Thomas R.; Granade, Hudson R.; Dickey, Robert W.; Backer, Lorraine C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is the most common seafood intoxication worldwide, its burden has been difficult to establish because there are no biomarkers to diagnose human exposure. Objective: We explored the incidence of CFP, percentage of CFP case-patients with laboratory-confirmed ciguatoxic meal remnants, cost of CFP illness, and potential risk factors for CFP. Methods: During 2005 and again during 2006, we conducted a census of all occupied households on the island of Culebra, Puerto Rico, where locally caught fish are a staple food. We defined CFP case-patients as persons with gastrointestinal symptoms (abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, or nausea) and neurological symptoms (extremity paresthesia, arthralgia, myalgia, malaise, pruritus, headache, dizziness, metallic taste, visual disturbance, circumoral paresthesia, temperature reversal, or toothache) or systemic symptoms (e.g., bradycardia) within 72 hr of eating fish during the previous year. Participants were asked to save fish remnants eaten by case-patients for ciguatoxin analysis at the Food and Drug Administration laboratory in Dauphin Island, Alabama (USA). Results: We surveyed 340 households during 2005 and 335 households during 2006. The estimated annual incidence of possible CFP was 4.0 per 1,000 person-years, and that of probable CFP was 7.5 per 1,000 person-years. One of three fish samples submitted by probable case-patients was positive for ciguatoxins. None of the case-patients required respiratory support. Households that typically consumed barracuda were more likely to report CFP (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Our estimates, which are consistent with previous studies using similar case findings, contribute to the overall information available to support public health decision making about CFP prevention. PMID:22275728

  1. Determination and assessment of total mercury levels in local, frozen and canned fish in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Pierre J; El-Khoury, Bilal; Burger, Joanne; Aouad, Samer; Younis, Mira; Aoun, Amal; El-Nakat, John Hanna

    2011-01-01

    Fish is an important constituent of the Lebanese diet. However, very little attention in our area is given to bring awareness regarding the effect of the toxicity of mercury (Hg) mainly through fish consumption. This study aimed to report analytical data on total mercury levels in several fish species for the first time in thirty years and to also made individuals aware of the presence and danger from exposure to mercury through fish consumption. Fish samples were selected from local Lebanese markets and fisheries and included 94 samples of which were fresh, frozen, processed, and canned fish. All values were reported as microgram of mercury per gram of fish based on wet weight. The level of mercury ranged from 0.0190 to 0.5700 microg/g in fresh samples, 0.0059 to 0.0665 microg/g in frozen samples, and 0.0305 to 0.1190 microg/g in canned samples. The data clearly showed that higher levels of mercury were detected in local fresh fish as opposed to other types thus placing consumers at higher risk from mercury exposure. Moreover, the data revealed that Mallifa (yellowstripe barracuda/Sphyraena chrysotaenia), Sargous (white seabream/Diplodus sargus), Ghobbos (bogue/Boops boops), and shrimp (Penaeus sp.) were among the types containing the highest amounts of mercury. On the other hand, processed fish such as fish fillet, fish burger, small shrimp and crab are found to contain lower levels of mercury and are associated with lower exposure risks to mercury. Lebanese population should therefore, be aware to consume limited amounts of fresh local fish to minimize exposure to mercury.

  2. Prevalence and proposal for cost-effective management of the ciguatera risk in the Noumea fish market, New Caledonia (South Pacific).

    PubMed

    Clua, Eric; Brena, Pierpaolo F; Lecasble, Côme; Ghnassia, Reine; Chauvet, Claude

    2011-11-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is a common intoxication associated with the consumption of reef fish, which constitutes a critical issue for public health in many countries. The complexity of its epidemiology is responsible for the poor management of the risk in tropical fish markets. We used the example of the Noumea fish market in New Caledonia to develop a cost-effective methodology of assessing the CFP risk. We first used published reports and the knowledge of local experts to define a list of potentially poisonous local species, ranked by their ciguatoxic potential. Based on two 1-month surveys in the market, conducted in winters 2008 and 2009, we then calculated the consolidated ratio of biomass of potentially poisonous species vs. total biomass of fish sold on the market. The prevalence of high CFP-risk species in the market was 16.1% and 18.9% in 2008 and 2009, respectively. The most common high CFP risk species were groupers (serranids), king mackerels (scombrids), snappers (lutjanids), barracudas (sphyaraenids), emperors (lethrinids) and wrasses (labrids). The size (age) of the fish also plays a critical role in the potential ciguatoxic risk. According to proposals of average size thresholds provided by experts for high-risk species, we were also able to assess the additional risk induced by the sale of some large fish on the market. The data collected both from experts and from the market allowed us to develop a cost-effective proposal for improving the management of the CFP risk in this market. However, the successful implementation of any regulation aiming to ban some specific species and sizes from the market, with an acceptable economical impact, will require the improvement of the expertise in fish identification by public health officers and, ideally, the commitment of retailers.

  3. Marine Communities on Oil Platforms in Gabon, West Africa: High Biodiversity Oases in a Low Biodiversity Environment

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Alan M.; Ballesteros, Enric; Fay, Michael; Sala, Enric

    2014-01-01

    The marine biodiversity of Gabon, West Africa has not been well studied and is largely unknown. Our examination of marine communities associated with oil platforms in Gabon is the first scientific investigation of these structures and highlights the unique ecosystems associated with them. A number of species previously unknown to Gabonese waters were recorded during our surveys on these platforms. Clear distinctions in benthic communities were observed between older, larger platforms in the north and newer platforms to the south or closer to shore. The former were dominated by a solitary cup coral, Tubastraea sp., whereas the latter were dominated by the barnacle Megabalanus tintinnabulum, but with more diverse benthic assemblages compared to the northerly platforms. Previous work documented the presence of limited zooxanthellated scleractinian corals on natural rocky substrate in Gabon but none were recorded on platforms. Total estimated fish biomass on these platforms exceeded one ton at some locations and was dominated by barracuda (Sphyraena spp.), jacks (Carangids), and rainbow runner (Elagatis bipinnulata). Thirty-four percent of fish species observed on these platforms are new records for Gabon and 6% are new to tropical West Africa. Fish assemblages closely associated with platforms had distinct amphi-Atlantic affinities and platforms likely extend the distribution of these species into coastal West Africa. At least one potential invasive species, the snowflake coral (Carijoa riisei), was observed on the platforms. Oil platforms may act as stepping stones, increasing regional biodiversity and production but they may also be vectors for invasive species. Gabon is a world leader in terrestrial conservation with a network of protected areas covering >10% of the country. Oil exploration and biodiversity conservation currently co-exist in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems in Gabon. Efforts to increase marine protection in Gabon may benefit by including oil

  4. SAN/CXFS test report to LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Ruwart, T M; Eldel, A

    2000-01-01

    The primary objectives of this project were to evaluate the performance of the SGI CXFS File System in a Storage Area Network (SAN) and compare/contrast it to the performance of a locally attached XFS file system on the same computer and storage subsystems. The University of Minnesota participants were asked to verify that the performance of the SAN/CXFS configuration did not fall below 85% of the performance of the XFS local configuration. There were two basic hardware test configurations constructed from the following equipment: Two Onyx 2 computer systems each with two Qlogic-based Fibre Channel/XIO Host Bus Adapter (HBA); One 8-Port Brocade Silkworm 2400 Fibre Channel Switch; and Four Ciprico RF7000 RAID Disk Arrays populated Seagate Barracuda 50GB disk drives. The Operating System on each of the ONYX 2 computer systems was IRIX 6.5.6. The first hardware configuration consisted of directly connecting the Ciprico arrays to the Qlogic controllers without the Brocade switch. The purpose for this configuration was to establish baseline performance data on the Qlogic controllers / Ciprico disk raw subsystem. This baseline performance data would then be used to demonstrate any performance differences arising from the addition of the Brocade Fibre Channel Switch. Furthermore, the performance of the Qlogic controllers could be compared to that of the older, Adaptec-based XIO dual-channel Fibre Channel adapters previously used on these systems. It should be noted that only raw device tests were performed on this configuration. No file system testing was performed on this configuration. The second hardware configuration introduced the Brocade Fibre Channel Switch. Two FC ports from each of the ONYX2 computer systems were attached to four ports of the switch and the four Ciprico arrays were attached to the remaining four. Raw disk subsystem tests were performed on the SAN configuration in order to demonstrate the performance differences between the direct-connect and the

  5. Foodborne toxins of marine origin: ciguatera.

    PubMed

    Juranovic, L R; Park, D L

    1991-01-01

    Ciguatera poisoning has long been recognized as a serious problem in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Due to international and interstate commerce and tourist travel the phenomenon is spreading to other parts of the globe. Various species of fish (surgeonfish, snapper, grouper, barracuda, jack, amberjack among others) have been implicated in this type of poisoning. These fish accumulate toxins in their flesh and viscera through the consumption of smaller fish that have been previously contaminated by feeding on toxic dinoflagellates. The most probable source of ciguatera is thought to be the benthic microorganism, Gambierdiscus toxicus, which produces both CTX and MTX, but other species of dinoflagellates such as Prorocentrum lima may also contribute with secondary toxins associated with the disease. Potentially ciguatoxic dinoflagellates have been isolated, cultured under laboratory conditions and dinoflagellate growth requirements as well as some factors affecting toxin production have been determined. Also, data from their ecological environment have been accumulated in an attempt to reveal a relationship with the epidemiology of ciguatera outbreaks. Several bioassays have been employed to determine the ciguatoxicity of fish. Cats have been used due to their sensitivity, but regurgitation has made dosage information difficult to obtain. Mongooses have also been used but they often carry parasitic and other type of diseases which complicate the bioassay. Mice have been used more commonly; they offer a more reliable model, can be easily housed, readily are dosed in several ways, and manifest diverse symptoms similar to human intoxications; but the amount of toxic extract needed, time consumed, complicated extraction techniques, and instrumentation involved limit the use of this assay commercially. Other bioassays have been explored including the brine shrimp, chicken, mosquito, crayfish nerve cord, guinea pig ileum, guinea pig atrium, and other

  6. Local-Reference Patient Dose Evaluation in Conventional Radiography Examinations in Mazandaran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khoshdel-Navi, D.; Shabestani-Monfared, A.; Deevband, M. R.; Abdi, R.; Nabahati, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The most efficient application of ionizing radiation is serving medical purposes and using this radiation has caused people to learn that artificial sources of radiation exposure among these resources can be of highest exposure rate. Obiective The present study is aimed at initially establishing a baseline for local-reference dose level in Mazandaran, Iran in 12 projections of the most conventional x-ray examination. Methods In this study, 13 public hospitals in Mazandaran province were selected for review and required data collected for ten adult patients with mean weight of 70±10kg in each projection. Then, information of each center was separately analyzed. Next, in order to measure x-ray output tube, the dosimeter RTI model Barracuda calibrated has been applied for measuring air karma within energy rage of 40-150kvp. ESAK and ESD parameters, usually used for monitoring DRL in conventional radiography, were calculated. Results Mean ESDs in this study has been obtained to 1.47±0.98 for skull (PA/AP), 1.01±0.79 for skull (LAT), 0.67±0.38 for cervical spine (AP), 0.79±0.37 for cervical (LAT), 0.49±0.38 for chest (PA/AP), 1.06±0.44 for chest (LAT), 2.15±0.73 for thoracic spine (AP), 3±0.87 for thoracic spine (LAT), 2.81 ±0.82 for lumbar spine (AP), 4.28±0.78 for lumbar (LAT), 2.07±1.17 for abdomen and 1.90±0.99 for pelvis, respectively. The ESDs calculated for chest examination in both projections, PA and LAT are more than values recommended by the UK (2000), Brazil and Slovenia. Conclusion The present study has determined wide variations in radiation dose of x-ray examinations among hospitals in Mazandaran, Iran. In order to reduce skin dose, an optimization procedure should be considered. Application of a reference dose (DRL) could be a practical method for this purpose. The role of optimization of radiography parameters for reducing patient dose is a significant issue. Through optimizing parameters, it would be possible to preserve image

  7. The Bolivar Channel Ecosystem of the Galapagos Marine Reserve: Energy flow structure and role of keystone groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Diego J.; Wolff, Matthias

    2011-08-01

    Oscillation. Most important keystone groups of large relative impact over other system compartments are sharks and marine mammals. In addition, the important role of macro-algae, sea stars and urchins, phytoplankton and barracudas should be emphasized for their great contribution to the trophic flows and biomass of the system.

  8. Forearc kinematics in obliquely convergent margins: Examples from Nicaragua and the northern Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Henry L., III

    sites and to qualitatively examine the observed post-seismic motion. Coseismic and post-seismic motion in this portion of the forearc indicate that long-term motion of the forearc across the earthquake cycle may proceed in a zig-zag pattern, which may contribute to east-west extension as observed in the Managua graben. Sites to the northwest and southeast were not substantially effected by the earthquake, and longer duration time-series (˜7 yrs) from these areas support the earlier estimates of forearc sliver motion. Results from our analysis of Nicaraguan GPS time-series from 2004--2008 and our earthquake modeling efforts are discussed in Chapter 4 and will form the basis of an article to be submitted for publication. In the northern Lesser Antilles, plate convergence is slow at ˜2 cm yr1, and obliquity varies substantially along the convex Lesser Antilles Subduction Zone. In chapter 5, I present GPS velocities derived from a decade of observations on sites in the northern Lesser Antilles and Virgin Islands. The velocities support forearc sliver motion on the order of ˜2--3 mm yr1 consistent with the lower value estimated by Lopez et al. (2006), indicating convergence in the northern region is only partially partitioned. GPS velocities in the northern Lesser Antilles show considerable variation between islands, suggesting possible independent block motion and internal deformation within the forearc region, however, velocity uncertainties for some sites remain high and may reflect the low signal-to-noise ratio of our residual velocities for the region. The lack of a substantial arc-normal component of shortening is similar to that seen in Nicaragua and may indicate a small amount of locking along the subduction interface with forearc sliver motion being driven from a more fully locked region south of Guadeloupe where the Barracuda and Tiburon aseismic ridges impinge on the subduction zone. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  9. Storage-Intensive Supercomputing Benchmark Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J; Dossa, D; Gokhale, M; Hysom, D; May, J; Pearce, R; Yoo, A

    2007-10-30

    DBE Xeon Dual Socket Blackford Server Motherboard; 2 Intel Xeon Dual-Core 2.66 GHz processors; 1 GB DDR2 PC2-5300 RAM (2 x 512); 80GB Hard Drive (Seagate SATA II Barracuda). The Fusion board is presently capable of 4X in a PCIe slot. The image resampling benchmark was run on a dual Xeon workstation with NVIDIA graphics card (see Chapter 5 for full specification). An XtremeData Opteron+FPGA was used for the language classification application. We observed that these benchmarks are not uniformly I/O intensive. The only benchmark that showed greater that 50% of the time in I/O was the graph algorithm when it accessed data files over NFS. When local disk was used, the graph benchmark spent at most 40% of its time in I/O. The other benchmarks were CPU dominated. The image resampling benchmark and language classification showed order of magnitude speedup over software by using co-processor technology to offload the CPU-intensive kernels. Our experiments to date suggest that emerging hardware technologies offer significant benefit to boosting the performance of data-intensive algorithms. Using GPU and FPGA co-processors, we were able to improve performance by more than an order of magnitude on the benchmark algorithms, eliminating the processor bottleneck of CPU-bound tasks. Experiments with a prototype solid state nonvolative memory available today show 10X better throughput on random reads than disk, with a 2X speedup on a graph processing benchmark when compared to the use of local SATA disk.