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Sample records for meloidogyne incognita suppression

  1. Mustard seed meal amendments for suppression of Meloidogyne incognita on tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mustard seed meal is applied to soil as a fertilizer and for suppressing weeds and pathogens. Brassica juncea (Bj) ‘Pacific Gold’ and Sinapis alba (Sa) ‘IdaGold’ seed meals were tested for suppression of Meloidogyne incognita on tomato ‘BHN 444’. In greenhouse trials these treatments (all 0.25% weig...

  2. A Novel Meloidogyne incognita Effector Misp12 Suppresses Plant Defense Response at Latter Stages of Nematode Parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jialian; Li, Shaojun; Mo, Chenmi; Wang, Gaofeng; Xiao, Xueqiong; Xiao, Yannong

    2016-01-01

    Secreted effectors in plant root-knot nematodes (RKNs, or Meloidogyne spp.) play key roles in their parasite processes. Currently identified effectors mainly focus on the early stage of the nematode parasitism. There are only a few reports describing effectors that function in the latter stage. In this study, we identified a potential RKN effector gene, Misp12, that functioned during the latter stage of parasitism. Misp12 was unique in the Meloidogyne spp., and highly conserved in Meloidogyne incognita. It encoded a secretory protein that specifically expressed in the dorsal esophageal gland, and highly up-regulated during the female stages. Transient expression of Misp12-GUS-GFP in onion epidermal cell showed that Misp12 was localized in cytoplast. In addition, in planta RNA interference targeting Misp12 suppressed the expression of Misp12 in nematodes and attenuated parasitic ability of M. incognita. Furthermore, up-regulation of jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) pathway defense-related genes in the virus-induced silencing of Misp12 plants, and down-regulation of SA pathway defense-related genes in Misp12-expressing plants indicated the gene might be associated with the suppression of the plant defense response. These results demonstrated that the novel nematode effector Misp12 played a critical role at latter parasitism of M. incognita. PMID:27446188

  3. A Novel Meloidogyne incognita Effector Misp12 Suppresses Plant Defense Response at Latter Stages of Nematode Parasitism.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jialian; Li, Shaojun; Mo, Chenmi; Wang, Gaofeng; Xiao, Xueqiong; Xiao, Yannong

    2016-01-01

    Secreted effectors in plant root-knot nematodes (RKNs, or Meloidogyne spp.) play key roles in their parasite processes. Currently identified effectors mainly focus on the early stage of the nematode parasitism. There are only a few reports describing effectors that function in the latter stage. In this study, we identified a potential RKN effector gene, Misp12, that functioned during the latter stage of parasitism. Misp12 was unique in the Meloidogyne spp., and highly conserved in Meloidogyne incognita. It encoded a secretory protein that specifically expressed in the dorsal esophageal gland, and highly up-regulated during the female stages. Transient expression of Misp12-GUS-GFP in onion epidermal cell showed that Misp12 was localized in cytoplast. In addition, in planta RNA interference targeting Misp12 suppressed the expression of Misp12 in nematodes and attenuated parasitic ability of M. incognita. Furthermore, up-regulation of jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) pathway defense-related genes in the virus-induced silencing of Misp12 plants, and down-regulation of SA pathway defense-related genes in Misp12-expressing plants indicated the gene might be associated with the suppression of the plant defense response. These results demonstrated that the novel nematode effector Misp12 played a critical role at latter parasitism of M. incognita. PMID:27446188

  4. Surface Coat of Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Lin, H.-J.; McClure, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    The nematode surface coat is defined as an extracuticular component on the outermost layer of the nematode body wall, visualized only by electron microscopy. Surface coat proteins of Meloidogyne incognita race 3 infective juveniles were characterized by electrophoresis and Western blotting of extracts from radioiodine and biotin-labeled nematodes. Extraction of labeled nematodes with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide yielded a principal protein band larger than 250 kDa and, with water soluble biotin, several faint bands ranging from 31 kDa to 179 kDa. The pattern of labeling was similar for both labeling methods. Western blots of unlabeled proteins were probed with a panel of biotin-lectin conjugates, but only Concanavalin A bound to the principal band. Nematodes labeled with radioiodine and biotin released ¹²⁵I and biotin-labeled molecules into water after 20 hours incubation, indicating that surface coat proteins may be loosely attached to the nematode. Antiserum to the partially purified principal protein bound to the surface of live nematodes and to several proteins on Western blots. Differential patterns of antibody labeling were obtained on immuno-blots of extracts from M. incognita race 1, 2, and 3; Meloidogyne hapla race 2; and Meloidogyne arenaria cytological race B. PMID:19277137

  5. Brassicaceous Seed Meals as Soil Amendments to Suppress the Plant-parasitic Nematodes Pratylenchus penetrans and Meloidogyne incognita1

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, S. L. F.; Morra, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Brassicaceous seed meals are the residual materials remaining after the extraction of oil from seeds; these seed meals contain glucosinolates that potentially degrade to nematotoxic compounds upon incorporation into soil. This study compared the nematode-suppressive ability of four seed meals obtained from Brassica juncea ‘Pacific Gold’, B. napus ‘Dwarf Essex’ and ‘Sunrise’, and Sinapis alba ‘IdaGold’, against mixed stages of Pratylenchus penetrans and Meloidogyne incognita second-stage juveniles (J2). The brassicaceous seed meals were applied to soil in laboratory assays at rates ranging from 0.5 to 10.0% dry w/w with a nonamended control included. Nematode mortality was assessed after 3 days of exposure and calculated as percentage reduction compared to a nonamended control. Across seed meals, M. incognita J2 were more sensitive to the brassicaceous seed meals compared to mixed stages of P. penetrans. Brassica juncea was the most nematode-suppressive seed meal with rates as low as 0.06% resulting in > 90% suppression of both plant-parasitic nematodes. In general B. napus ‘Sunrise’ was the least nematode-suppressive seed meal. Intermediate were the seed meals of S. alba and B. napus ‘Dwarf Essex’; 90% suppression was achieved at 1.0% and 5.0% S. alba and 0.25% and 2.5% B. napus ‘Dwarf Essex’, for M. incognita and P. penetrans, respectively. For B. juncea, seed meal glucosinolate-degradation products appeared to be responsible for nematode suppression; deactivated seed meal (wetted and heated at 70 °C for 48 hr) did not result in similar P. penetrans suppression compared to active seed meal. Sinapis alba seed meal particle size also played a role in nematode suppression with ground meal resulting in 93% suppression of P. penetrans compared with 37 to 46% suppression by pelletized S. alba seed meal. This study demonstrates that all seed meals are not equally suppressive to nematodes and that care should be taken when selecting a source

  6. Development of Multi-Component Transplant Mixes for Suppression of Meloidogyne incognita on Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum)

    PubMed Central

    Kokalis-Burelle, N.; Martinez-Ochoa, N.; Rodríguez-Kábana, R.; Kloepper, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of combinations of organic amendments, phytochemicals, and plant-growth promoting rhizobacteria on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) germination, transplant growth, and infectivity of Meloidogyne incognita were evaluated. Two phytochemicals (citral and benzaldehyde), three organic amendments (pine bark, chitin, and hemicellulose), and three bacteria (Serratia marcescens, Brevibacterium iodinum, and Pseudomonas fluorescens) were assessed. Increasing rates of benzaldehyde and citral reduced nematode egg viability in vitro. Benzaldehyde was 100% efficacious as a nematicide against juveniles, whereas citral reduced juvenile viability to less than 20% at all rates tested. Benzaldehyde increased tomato seed germination and root weight, whereas citral decreased both. High rates of pine bark or chitin reduced plant growth but not seed germination, whereas low rates of chitin increased shoot length, shoot weight, and root weight; improved root condition; and reduced galling. The combination of chitin and benzaldehyde significantly improved tomato transplant growth and reduced galling. While each of the bacterial isolates contributed to increased plant growth in combination treatments, only Brevibacterium iodinum applied alone significantly improved plant growth. PMID:19265957

  7. Chitosan-cinnamon beads enhance suppressive activity against Rhizoctonia solani and Meloidogyne incognita in vitro.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong-Jun; Nguyen, Dang-Minh-Chanh; Park, Ro-Dong; Jung, Woo-Jin

    2014-01-01

    A novel chitosan-cinnamon bead carrier was prepared in this study. Chitosan was mixed with cinnamon powder (CP) and cinnamon extract (CE) to obtain chitosan-cinnamon powder (CCP) beads and chitosan-cinnamon extracted (CCE) beads, respectively. The potential antifungal and nematicidal activities of CCP and CCE were investigated against Rhizoctonia solani and Meloidogyne incognita in vitro. Relative antifungal activity of the CCP (5% CP) bead-treated R. solani was 30.9 and 23.9% after 1 and 2 day incubations, respectively. Relative antifungal activity of the CCE (0.5% CE) bead-treated R. solani was 4.3, 3.0 and 4.2% after 1, 2 and 3 days of incubation. Inhibition of hatch by CCP beads with CP of 5% was 78.8%. Inhibition of hatch by CCE beads with CE of 0.5% was 82.0%. J2 mortality following the CCP (5% CP) and CCE (0.5% CE) bead treatments was 85.0 and 95.8%, respectively against M. incognita after 48 h incubations.

  8. Effects of Tomato Root Exudates on Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guodong; Zhou, Baoli; Zhang, Xinyu; Zhang, Zijun; Wu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yiming; Lü, Shuwen; Zou, Qingdao; Gao, Yuan; Teng, Long

    2016-01-01

    Plant root exudates affect root-knot nematodes egg hatch. Chemicals in root exudates can attract nematodes to the roots or result in repellence, motility inhibition or even death. However, until recently little was known about the relationship between tomato root exudates chemicals and root-knot nematodes. In this study, root exudates were extracted from three tomato rootstocks with varying levels of nematode resistance: Baliya (highly resistant, HR), RS2 (moderately resistant, MR) and L-402 (highly susceptible, T). The effects of the root exudates on Meloidogyne incognita (M. incognita) egg hatch, survival and chemotaxis of second-stage juveniles (J2) were explored. The composition of the root exudates was analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) prior to and following M. incognita inoculation. Four compounds in root exudates were selected for further analysis and their allopathic effect on M. incognita were investigated. Root exudates from each tomato rootstocks (HR, MR and T strains) suppressed M. incognita egg hatch and increased J2 mortality, with the highest rate being observed in the exudates from the HR plants. Exudate from HR variety also repelled M. incognita J2 while that of the susceptible plant, T, was demonstrated to be attractive. The relative amount of esters and phenol compounds in root exudates from HR and MR tomato rootstocks increased notably after inoculation. Four compounds, 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-p-cresol, L-ascorbyl 2,6-dipalmitate, dibutyl phthalate and dimethyl phthalate increased significantly after inoculation. The egg hatch of M. incognita was suppressed by each of the compound. L-ascorbyl 2,6-dipalmitate showed the most notable effect in a concentration-dependent manner. All four compounds were associated with increased J2 mortality. The greatest effect was observed with dimethyl phthalate at 2 mmol·L-1. Dibutyl phthalate was the only compound observed to repel M. incognita J2 with no effect being detected in the other

  9. Pasteuria penetrans for control of Meloidogyne incognita on tomato and cucumber, and M. arenaria on snapdragon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meloidogyne incognita and Meloidogyne arenaria, are important parasitic nematodes of vegetable and ornamental crops. Field microplot and greenhouse experiments were conducted to test commercial formulations of the biocontrol agent Pasteuria penetrans for control of M. incognita on tomato and cucumbe...

  10. Heterologous expression of taro cystatin protects transgenic tomato against Meloidogyne incognita infection by means of interfering sex determination and suppressing gall formation.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuan-Li; Yang, Ai-Hwa; Chen, Jen-Tzu; Yeh, Kai-Wun; Chan, Ming-Tsair

    2010-03-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes are a major pest of many plant species and cause global economic loss. A phytocystatin gene, Colocasia esculenta cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CeCPI), isolated from a local taro Kaosiang No. 1, and driven by a CaMV35S promoter was delivered into CLN2468D, a heat-tolerant cultivar of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). When infected with Meloidogyne incognita, one of root-knot nematode (RKN) species, transgenic T1 lines overexpressing CeCPI suppressed gall formation as evidenced by a pronounced reduction in gall numbers. In comparison with wild-type plants, a much lower proportion of female nematodes without growth retardation was observed in transgenic plants. A decrease of RKN egg mass in transgenic plants indicated seriously impaired fecundity. Overexpression of CeCPI in transgenic tomato has inhibitory functions not only in the early RKN infection stage but also in the production of offspring, which may result from intervention in sex determination. PMID:20054551

  11. Nutsedge Counts Predict Meloidogyne incognita Juvenile Counts in an Integrated Management System.

    PubMed

    Ou, Zhining; Murray, Leigh; Thomas, Stephen H; Schroeder, Jill; Libbin, James

    2008-06-01

    The southern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita), yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) and purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus) are important pests in crops grown in the southern US. Management of the individual pests rather than the pest complex is often unsuccessful due to mutually beneficial pest interactions. In an integrated pest management scheme using alfalfa to suppress nutsedges and M. incognita, we evaluated quadratic polynomial regression models for prediction of the number of M. incognita J2 in soil samples as a function of yellow and purple nutsedge plant counts, squares of nutsedge counts and the cross-product between nutsedge counts . In May 2005, purple nutsedge plant count was a significant predictor of M. incognita count. In July and September 2005, counts of both nutsedges and the cross-product were significant predictors. In 2006, the second year of the alfalfa rotation, counts of all three species were reduced. As a likely consequence, the predictive relationship between nutsedges and M. incognita was not significant for May and July. In September 2006, purple nutsedge was a significant predictor of M. incognita. These results lead us to conclude that nutsedge plant counts in a field infested with the M. incognita-nutsedge pest complex can be used as a visual predictor of M. incognita J2 populations, unless the numbers of nutsedge plants and M. incognita are all very low. PMID:19259526

  12. Reproduction of Meloidogyne marylandi and M. incognita on several Poaceae.

    PubMed

    Faske, T R; Starr, J L

    2009-03-01

    The susceptibility of 22 plant species to Meloidogyne marylandi and M. incognita was examined in three greenhouse experiments. Inoculum of M. marylandi was eggs from cultures maintained on Zoysia matrella "Cavalier" or Cynodon dactylon x C. trasvaalensis "Tifdwarf". Inoculum of M. incognita was eggs from cultures maintained on Solanum lycopersicum 'Rutgers'. In each host test the inoculum density was 2,000 nematode eggs/pot. None of the three dicot species tested (Gossypium hirsutum, Arachis hypogaea, and S. lycopersicum) were hosts for M. marylandi but, as expected, M. incognita had high levels of reproduction on G. hirsutum and S. lycopersicum. Meloidogyne marylandi reproduced on all of the 19 grass species (Poaceae) tested but reproduction varied greatly (P = 0.05) among these hosts. The following grasses were identified for the first time as hosts for M. marylandi: Buchloe dactyloides (buffalograss), Echinochloa colona (jungle rice), Eragostis curvula (weeping lovegrass), Paspalum dilatatum (dallisgrass), P. notatum (bahiagrass), Sorghastrum, nutans (indiangrass), Tripsacum dactyloides (eastern gamagrass), and Zoysia matrella (zoysiagrass). No reproduction of M. incognita was observed on B. dactyloides, Cyndon dactylon (common bermudagrass), E. curvula, P. vaginatum (seashore paspalum), S. nutans, T. dactyloides, Z. matrella or Z. japonica. Reproduction of M. incognita was less than reproduction of M. marylandi on the other grass species, except for the Zea mays inbred line B73 on which M. incognita had greater reproduction than did M. marylandi (P = 0.05) and Stenotaphrum secundatum (St. Augustinegrass) on which M. incognita and M. marylandi had similar levels of reproduction.

  13. Interaction between Meloidogyne incognita and Rhizoctonia solani on green beans

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hazmi, A.S.; Al-Nadary, S.N.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between Meloidogyne incognita (race 2) and Rhizoctonia solani (AG 4) in a root rot disease complex of green beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) was examined in a greenhouse pot experiment. Three week-old seedlings (cv. Contender) were inoculated with the nematode and/or the fungus in different combinations and sequences. Two months after last nematode inoculation, the test was terminated and data were recorded. The synchronized inoculation by both pathogens (N + F) increased the index of Rhizoctonia root rot and the number of root galls; and suppressed plant growth, compared to controls. However, the severity of root rot and suppression of plant growth were greater and more evident when inoculation by the nematode preceded the fungus (N → F) by two weeks. Nematode reproduction (eggs/g root) was adversely affected by the presence of the fungus except by the synchronized inoculation. When inoculation by nematode preceded the fungus, plant growth was severely suppressed and roots were highly damaged and rotted leading to a decrease of root galls and eggs. PMID:26288560

  14. Screening of Carnation Cultivars for Resistance to Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Cho, M R; Kim, J Y; Song, C; Ko, J Y; Na, S Y; Yiem, M S

    1996-12-01

    A total of 33 carnation cultivars cultured in Korea were screened for resistance to the southern root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita. Carnations were tested by either inoculating with 5,000 eggs or by transplanting into a mixture of bedding medium and soil infested with an average of 435 second-stage juveniles/300 cm(3) soil. Cultivars, Desio, Castelaro, Kappa, Rara, Izu Pink, Target, and Antalia were highly resistant to M. incognita. Twelve cultivars were moderately resistant, and the remaining 14 cultivars were susceptible. These results were similar to those obtained when the cultivars were subjected to field populations of the condition on a carnation farm.

  15. Meloidogyne incognita nematode resistance QTL in carrot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are major pests attacking carrots (Daucus carota) worldwide, causing galling and forking of the storage roots, rendering them unacceptable for market. Genetic resistance could significantly reduce the need for broad-spectrum soil fumigants in carrot production....

  16. [Control effects of Ricinus communis extracts on Meloidogyne incognita].

    PubMed

    Gao, Qian-Yuan; Hu, Fei-Long; Zhu, Hong-Hong; Liu, Man-Qiang; Li, Hui-Xin; Hu, Feng

    2011-11-01

    Toxicity test and pot experiment were conducted to study the nematocidal activity and control effects of Ricinus communis extracts on Meloidogyne incognita. The results showed that both the ricinine and the R. communis water extracts had high nematocidal activity. The ricinine at concentration 2 g x L(-1) and treated for 48 hours had the strongest nematocidal activity, leading to 91.5% of corrected mortality of M. incognita and with the LC50 being 0.6 g x L(-1), whereas the R. communis water extracts at concentration 100 g x L(-1) and treated for 48 hours had the strongest nematocidal activity, which led to 83.5% of corrected mortality of M. incognita, and the LC50 was 18.3 g x L(-1). With the inoculation of M. incognita treated with ricinine, R. communis water extracts, and R. communis leaf powder, respectively, on tomato seedlings, the mean number of plant root-knots was 17.6 +/- 1.7, 20.6 +/- 1.5 and 22.8 +/- 3.7, respectively, being significantly lower than the control (37.4 +/- 2.3), and the root length increased by 46.8%, 34.5% and 33.8%, and the plant height increased by 33.5%, 22.6% and 15.8%, and the fresh mass increased by 41.4%, 18.9% and 10.1%, respectively, compared with the control. All the results suggested that R. communis extracts could mitigate the harm of M. incognita, and had obvious effects on potted tomato against M. incognita.

  17. Cyperus Tubers Protect Meloidogyne incognita from 1,3-Dichloropropene

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, S. H.; Schroeder, J.; Murray, L. W.

    2004-01-01

    Meloidogyne incognita-infected and noninfected tubers of yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) and purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus) were treated with 56 L/ha 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) in microplots and subsequently examined for tuber and nematode viability in the greenhouse using a chile pepper (Capsicum annuum) bioassay system. The study was conducted three times. Nutsedge tuber viability and M. incognita harbored in both yellow and purple nutsedge tubers were unaffected by 1,3-D treatment. Nematode reproduction on nutsedges and associated chile pepper plants varied among years, possibly due to differing levels of tuber infection or soil temperature, but was not affected by fumigation. The presence of M. incognita resulted in greater yellow nutsedge tuber germination and reproduction. The efficacy of 1,3-D for management of M. incognita in chile pepper production is likely to be reduced when nutsedges are present in high numbers, reinforcing the importance of managing these weeds and nematodes simultaneously. PMID:19262797

  18. Cyperus Tubers Protect Meloidogyne incognita from 1,3-Dichloropropene.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S H; Schroeder, J; Murray, L W

    2004-06-01

    Meloidogyne incognita-infected and noninfected tubers of yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) and purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus) were treated with 56 L/ha 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) in microplots and subsequently examined for tuber and nematode viability in the greenhouse using a chile pepper (Capsicum annuum) bioassay system. The study was conducted three times. Nutsedge tuber viability and M. incognita harbored in both yellow and purple nutsedge tubers were unaffected by 1,3-D treatment. Nematode reproduction on nutsedges and associated chile pepper plants varied among years, possibly due to differing levels of tuber infection or soil temperature, but was not affected by fumigation. The presence of M. incognita resulted in greater yellow nutsedge tuber germination and reproduction. The efficacy of 1,3-D for management of M. incognita in chile pepper production is likely to be reduced when nutsedges are present in high numbers, reinforcing the importance of managing these weeds and nematodes simultaneously. PMID:19262797

  19. Effect of Tropical Rotation Crops on Meloidogyne incognita and Other Plant-Parasitic Nematodes.

    PubMed

    McSorley, R; Dickson, D W

    1995-12-01

    In a field experiment conducted on sandy soil in Florida during the 1993 season, rotation crops of castor (Ricinus communis), velvetbean (Mucuna deeringina), 'Mississippi Silver' cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), American jointvetch (Aeschynomene americana), 'Dehapine 51' cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), and 'SX-17' sorghum-sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor x S. sudanense) were effective in maintaining low population densities (<12/100 cm(3) soil) of Meloidogyne incognita race 1, whereas high population densities (>450/100 cm(3) soil) resulted after 'Clemson Spineless' okra (Hibiscus esculentus) and 'Kirby' soybean (Glycine max). Following a winter cover crop of rye (Secale cereale), densities of M. incognita following the six most effective rotation crops (1993 season) remained relatively low (incognita. A separate microplot experiment conducted in 1994 revealed that final densities (Pf) of M. incognita race 1 following 13 different crop cultivars were lower (P suppression of individual Meloidogyne spp. be evaluated for their response to other nematode pests as well.

  20. Effect of Crotalaria juncea Amendment on Squash Infected with Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Wang, K-H; McSorley, R; Gallaher, R N

    2004-09-01

    Two greenhouse experiments were conducted to examine the effect of Crotalaria juncea amendment on Meloidogyne incognita population levels and growth of yellow squash (Cucurbita pepo). In the first experiment, four soils with a long history of receiving yard waste compost (YWC+), no-yard-waste compost (YWC-), conventional tillage, or no-tillage treatments were used; in the second experiment, only one recently cultivated soil was used. Half of the amount of each soil received air-dried residues of C. juncea as amendment before planting squash, whereas the other half did not. Crotalaria juncea amendment increased squash shoot and root weights in all soils tested, except in YWC+ soil where the organic matter content was high without the amendment. The amendment suppressed the numbers of M. incognita if the inoculum level was low, and when the soil contained relatively abundant nematode-antagonistic fungi. Microwaved soil resulted in greater numbers of M. incognita and free-living nematodes than frozen or untreated soil, indicating nematode-antagonistic microorganisms played a role in nematode suppression. The effects of C. juncea amendment on nutrient cycling were complex. Amendment with C. juncea increased the abundance of free-living nematodes and Harposporium anguillulae, a fungus antagonistic to them in the second experiment but not in the first experiment. Soil histories, especially long-term yard waste compost treatments that increased soil organic matter, can affect the performance of C. juncea amendment.

  1. Resistance in Selected Corn Hybrids to Meloidogyne arenaria and M. incognita

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R. F.; Timper, P.

    2000-01-01

    A total of 33 corn hybrids were evaluated in a series of greenhouse and field trials to determine if they differed in resistance to either Meloidogyne incognita race 3 or M. arenaria race 1. Reproduction of M. incognita race 3 and M. arenaria race 1 on the hybrids was also compared. Reproduction of M. arenaria differed among corn hybrids after 58 to 65 days in greenhouse experiments; however, reproduction was similar among hybrids in the field experiment. No hybrids were consistently resistant to M. incognita. Two isolates of M. arenaria and two of M. incognita were evaluated in the greenhouse trials, and no evidence of isolate-dependent resistance was observed. Meloidogyne incognita reproduced better than M. arenaria on the hybrids in this study. A survey of 102 corn fields from 11 counties throughout southern Georgia was conducted to determine the relative frequency of M. incognita and M. arenaria. Meloidogyne species were found in 34 of the fields surveyed, and 93.9% of these were identified as M. incognita. The frequency of occurrence of M. incognita was 99.6% if the previous crop was cotton and 84.6% if the previous crop was peanut. Pratylenchus spp. were extracted from all intact corn root systems examined. PMID:19271019

  2. Phenotypic Expression of rkn1-Mediated Meloidogyne incognita Resistance in Gossypium hirsutum Populations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C.; Matthews, W. C.; Roberts, P. A.

    2006-01-01

    The root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita is a damaging pest of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) worldwide. A major gene (rkn1) conferring resistance to M. incognita was previously identified on linkage group A03 in G. hirsutum cv. Acala NemX. To determine the patterns of segregation and phenotypic expression of rkn1, F1, F2, F2:3, BC1F1 and F2:7 recombinant inbred lines (RIL) from intraspecific crosses between Acala NemX and a closely related susceptible cultivar Acala SJ-2 were inoculated in greenhouse tests with M. incognita race 3. The resistance phenotype was determined by the extent of nematode-induced root galling and nematode egg production on roots. Suppression of root galling and egg production was highly correlated among individuals in all tests. Root galling and egg production on heterozygous plants did not differ from the susceptible parent phenotype 125 d or more after inoculation, but were slightly suppressed with shorter screening (60 d), indicating that rkn1 behaved as a recessive gene or an incompletely recessive gene, depending on the screening condition. In the RIL, rkn1 segregated in an expected 1 resistant: 1 susceptible ratio for a major resistance gene. However, within the resistant class, 21 out of 34 RIL were more resistant than the resistant parent Acala NemX, indicating transgressive segregation. These results suggest that rkn1-based resistance in G. hirsutum can be enhanced in progenies of crosses with susceptible genotypes. Allelism tests and molecular genetic analysis are needed to determine the relationship of rkn1 to other M. incognita resistance sources in cotton. PMID:19259455

  3. Interaction between Meloidogyne incognita and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli on Selected Bean Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    France, R. A.; S.Abawi, G.

    1994-01-01

    Four bean genotypes (IPA-1, A-107, A-211, and Calima), representing all possible combinations of resistance and susceptibility to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli (Fop) and Meloidogyne incognita, were each inoculated with three population densities of these pathogens. Calima and A-107 were resistant to Fop; A-107 and A-211 were resistant to M. incognita; and IPA-1 was susceptible to both pathogens. In Fop-susceptible lines (IPA-1 and A-211), the presence of M. incognita contributed to an earlier onset and increased severity of Fusarium wilt symptoms and plant stunting. However, the Fop-resistant Calima developed symptoms of Fusarium wilt only in the presence of M. incognita. Genotype A-107 (resistant to both M. incognita and Fop) exhibited Fusarium wilt symptoms and a moderately susceptible reaction to Fop only after the breakdown of its M. incognita resistance by elevated incubation temperatures (27 C). Root galling and reproduction of M. incognita was generally increased as inoculum density of M. incognita was increased on the M. incognita susceptible cultivars. However, these factors were decreased as the inoculum density of Fop was increased. It was concluded that severe infections of bean roots by M. incognita increase the severity of Fusarium wilt on Fop-susceptible genotypes and may modify the resistant reaction to Fop. PMID:19279917

  4. Chemical-Mediated Toxicity of N-Viro Soil to Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Zasada, I. A.; Tenuta, M.

    2004-01-01

    N-Viro Soil (NVS) is an alkaline-stabilized municipal biosolid that has been shown to lower population densities and reduce egg hatch of Heterodera glycines and other plant-parasitic nematodes; but the mechanism(s) of nematode suppression of this soil amendment are unknown. This study sought to identify NVS-mediated changes in soil chemical properties and their impact upon H. glycines and Meloidogyne incognita mortality. N-Viro Soil was applied to sand in laboratory assays at 0.5%, 1.0%, 2.0%, and 3.0% dry w/w with a nonamended treatment as a control. Nematode mortality and changes in sand-assay chemical properties were determined 24 hours after incubation. Calculated lethal concentration (LC90) values were 1.4% w/w NVS for second-stage juveniles of both nematode species and 2.6 and >3.0% w/w NVS for eggs of M. incognita and H. glycines, respectively. Increasing rates of NVS were strongly correlated (r² = 0.84) with higher sand solution pH levels. Sand solution pH levels and, to a lesser extent, the production of ammonia appeared to be the inorganic chemical-mediated factors responsible for killing plant-parasitic nematodes following amendment with NVS. PMID:19262820

  5. Reducing Meloidogyne incognita Injury to Cucumber in a Tomato-Cucumber Double-Cropping System

    PubMed Central

    Colyer, P. D.; Kirkpatrick, T. L.; Vernon, P. R.; Barham, J. D.; Bateman, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of a root-knot nematode-resistant tomato cultivar and application of the nematicide ethoprop on root-knot nematode injury to cucumber were compared in a tomato-cucumber double-cropping system. A root-knot nematode-resistant tomato cultivar, Celebrity, and a susceptible cultivar, Heatwave, were grown in rotation with cucumber in 1995 and 1996. Celebrity suppressed populations of Meloidogyne incognita in the soil and resulted in a low root-gall rating on the subsequent cucumber crop. Nematode population densities were significantly lower at the termination of the cucumber crop in plots following Celebrity than in plots following Heatwave. Premium and marketable yields of cucumbers were higher in plots following Celebrity than in plots following Heatwave. Application of ethoprop through drip irrigation at 4.6 kg a.i./ha reduced root galling on the cucumber crop but had no effect on the nematode population density in the soil at crop termination. Ethoprop did not affect cucumber yield. These results indicate that planting a resistant tomato cultivar in a tomato-cucumber double-cropping system is more effective than applying ethoprop for managing M. incognita. PMID:19274214

  6. Mustard seed meal mixtures: management of Meloidogyne incognita on pepper and potential phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Susan L F; Zasada, Inga A; Orisajo, Samuel B; Morra, Matthew J

    2011-03-01

    Meals produced when oil is extracted from seeds in the Brassicaceae have been shown to suppress weeds and soilborne pathogens. These seed meals are commonly used individually as soil amendments; the goal of this research was to evaluate seed meal mixes of Brassica juncea (Bj) and Sinapis alba (Sa) against Meloidogyne incognita. Seed meals from Bj 'Pacific Gold' and Sa 'IdaGold' were tested alone and in combinations to determine rates and application times that would suppress M. incognita on pepper (Capsicum annuum) without phytotoxicity. Rates of soil application (% w/w) for the phytotoxicity study were: 0.5 Sa, 0.2 Bj, 0.25 Sa + 0.25 Bj, 0.375 Sa + 0.125 Bj, 0.125 Sa + 0.375 Bj, and 0, applied 0 - 5 weeks before transplant. Overall, 0.2% Bj was the least toxic meal to pepper seedlings. By comparison, 0.5% S. alba seed meal did not reduce lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seed germination at week 0, but all seed meal treatments containing B. juncea prevented or significantly reduced germination at week 0. The seed meals did not affect lettuce seed germination at weeks 1-5, but hypocotyl growth was reduced by all except 0.2% Bj at weeks 1, 4 and 5. Brassica juncea and Sa meals were tested for M. incognita suppression at 0.2, 0.15, 0.1 and 0.05%; mixtures were 0.1% Sa + 0.1% Bj, 0.15% Sa + 0.05% Bj, and 0.05% Sa + 0.15% Bj. All treatments were applied 2 weeks before transplant. The 0.2% Bj and 0.05% Sa + 0.15% Bj treatments overall had the longest shoots and highest fresh weights. Eggs per g root were lowest with 0.1 - 0.2% Bj amendments and the seed meal mixtures. The results indicate that Bj and some Bj + Sa mixtures can be applied close to transplant to suppress M. incognita populations on pepper; consequently, a seed meal mixture could be selected to provide activity against more than one pest or pathogen. For pepper, care should be taken in formulating mixtures so that Sa rates are low compared to Bj.

  7. Mustard seed meal mixtures: management of Meloidogyne incognita on pepper and potential phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Susan L F; Zasada, Inga A; Orisajo, Samuel B; Morra, Matthew J

    2011-03-01

    Meals produced when oil is extracted from seeds in the Brassicaceae have been shown to suppress weeds and soilborne pathogens. These seed meals are commonly used individually as soil amendments; the goal of this research was to evaluate seed meal mixes of Brassica juncea (Bj) and Sinapis alba (Sa) against Meloidogyne incognita. Seed meals from Bj 'Pacific Gold' and Sa 'IdaGold' were tested alone and in combinations to determine rates and application times that would suppress M. incognita on pepper (Capsicum annuum) without phytotoxicity. Rates of soil application (% w/w) for the phytotoxicity study were: 0.5 Sa, 0.2 Bj, 0.25 Sa + 0.25 Bj, 0.375 Sa + 0.125 Bj, 0.125 Sa + 0.375 Bj, and 0, applied 0 - 5 weeks before transplant. Overall, 0.2% Bj was the least toxic meal to pepper seedlings. By comparison, 0.5% S. alba seed meal did not reduce lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seed germination at week 0, but all seed meal treatments containing B. juncea prevented or significantly reduced germination at week 0. The seed meals did not affect lettuce seed germination at weeks 1-5, but hypocotyl growth was reduced by all except 0.2% Bj at weeks 1, 4 and 5. Brassica juncea and Sa meals were tested for M. incognita suppression at 0.2, 0.15, 0.1 and 0.05%; mixtures were 0.1% Sa + 0.1% Bj, 0.15% Sa + 0.05% Bj, and 0.05% Sa + 0.15% Bj. All treatments were applied 2 weeks before transplant. The 0.2% Bj and 0.05% Sa + 0.15% Bj treatments overall had the longest shoots and highest fresh weights. Eggs per g root were lowest with 0.1 - 0.2% Bj amendments and the seed meal mixtures. The results indicate that Bj and some Bj + Sa mixtures can be applied close to transplant to suppress M. incognita populations on pepper; consequently, a seed meal mixture could be selected to provide activity against more than one pest or pathogen. For pepper, care should be taken in formulating mixtures so that Sa rates are low compared to Bj. PMID:22791910

  8. Mustard seed meal mixtures: management of Meloidogyne incognita on pepper and potential phytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zasada, Inga A.; Orisajo, Samuel B.; Morra, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Meals produced when oil is extracted from seeds in the Brassicaceae have been shown to suppress weeds and soilborne pathogens. These seed meals are commonly used individually as soil amendments; the goal of this research was to evaluate seed meal mixes of Brassica juncea (Bj) and Sinapis alba (Sa) against Meloidogyne incognita. Seed meals from Bj ‘Pacific Gold’ and Sa ‘IdaGold’ were tested alone and in combinations to determine rates and application times that would suppress M. incognita on pepper (Capsicum annuum) without phytotoxicity. Rates of soil application (% w/w) for the phytotoxicity study were: 0.5 Sa, 0.2 Bj, 0.25 Sa + 0.25 Bj, 0.375 Sa + 0.125 Bj, 0.125 Sa + 0.375 Bj, and 0, applied 0 – 5 weeks before transplant. Overall, 0.2% Bj was the least toxic meal to pepper seedlings. By comparison, 0.5% S. alba seed meal did not reduce lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seed germination at week 0, but all seed meal treatments containing B. juncea prevented or significantly reduced germination at week 0. The seed meals did not affect lettuce seed germination at weeks 1-5, but hypocotyl growth was reduced by all except 0.2% Bj at weeks 1, 4 and 5. Brassica juncea and Sa meals were tested for M. incognita suppression at 0.2, 0.15, 0.1 and 0.05%; mixtures were 0.1% Sa + 0.1% Bj, 0.15% Sa + 0.05% Bj, and 0.05% Sa + 0.15% Bj. All treatments were applied 2 weeks before transplant. The 0.2% Bj and 0.05% Sa + 0.15% Bj treatments overall had the longest shoots and highest fresh weights. Eggs per g root were lowest with 0.1 – 0.2% Bj amendments and the seed meal mixtures. The results indicate that Bj and some Bj + Sa mixtures can be applied close to transplant to suppress M. incognita populations on pepper; consequently, a seed meal mixture could be selected to provide activity against more than one pest or pathogen. For pepper, care should be taken in formulating mixtures so that Sa rates are low compared to Bj. PMID:22791910

  9. Meloidogyne incognita Infested Soil Amended With Chicken Litter

    PubMed Central

    Riegel, C.; Fernandez, F. A.; Noe, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of chicken litter on Meloidogyne incognita in cotton, Gossypium hirsutum cv. DPL50 were determined in field microplots. Litters (manure and pine-shaving bedding) from a research facility and a commercial broiler house were used. Treatments consisted of 0.25%, 0.5%, and 1% litter by dry weight of soil for each kind of litter. Three control treatments consisted of soil not amended with litter, with and without nematodes, and one treatment to which mineral fertilizer was added at a nitrogen rate equivalent to that of the 0.5% litter rate, with nematodes. Microplots were inoculated at planting with 900 eggs/100 cm³ soil in 1993 and 1,000 eggs/100 cm³ soil in 1994. At 92 and 184 days after planting, nematode population densities decreased linearly with increasing rates of litter. Nematode numbers at midseason were larger in plots treated with mineral fertilizer than in plots treated with a rate of litter equivalent to the 0.5% rate. Fungal and bacterial population densities fluctuated throughout the growing season. Bacterial numbers had a positive linear relationship, with increasing rates of litter only in October 1993; however, significant positive relationships were observed throughout the 1994 growing season. In 1994, nematode population density at 92 days after planting decreased linearly with increasing bacterial numbers 30 days after planting. No other significant relationships between nematode densities and microbial densities were observed. Fungi and bacteria isolated from the litter and litter-amended soil were identified. Fungal genera isolated included Acremonium, Aspergillus, Eurotium, Paecilomyces, Petriella, and Scopulariopsis, whereas bacteria genera included Arthrobacter, Bacillus, and Pseudomonus. PMID:19277155

  10. Control of Meloidogyne incognita Using Mixtures of Organic Acids.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yunhee; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-12-01

    This study sought to control the root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne incognita using benign organo-chemicals. Second-stage juveniles (J2) of RKN were exposed to dilutions (1.0%, 0.5%, 0.2%, and 0.1%) of acetic acid (AA), lactic acid (LA), and their mixtures (MX). The nematode bodies were disrupted severely and moderately by vacuolations in 0.5% of MX and single organic acids, respectively, suggesting toxicity of MX may be higher than AA and LA. The mortality of J2 was 100% at all concentrations of AA and MX and only at 1.0% and 0.5% of LA, which lowered slightly at 0.2% and greatly at 0.1% of LA. This suggests the nematicidal activity of MX may be mostly derived from AA together with supplementary LA toxicity. MX was applied to chili pepper plants inoculated with about 1,000 J2, for which root-knot gall formations and plant growths were examined 4 weeks after inoculation. The root gall formation was completely inhibited by 0.5% MX and standard and double concentrations of fosthiazate; and inhibited 92.9% and 57.1% by 0.2% and 0.1% MX, respectively. Shoot height, shoot weight, and root weight were not significantly (P ≤ 0.05) different among all treatments and the untreated and non-inoculated controls. All of these results suggest that the mixture of the organic acids may have a potential to be developed as an eco-friendly nematode control agent that needs to be supported by the more nematode control experiments in fields. PMID:25506312

  11. Control of Meloidogyne incognita Using Mixtures of Organic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yunhee; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to control the root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne incognita using benign organo-chemicals. Second-stage juveniles (J2) of RKN were exposed to dilutions (1.0%, 0.5%, 0.2%, and 0.1%) of acetic acid (AA), lactic acid (LA), and their mixtures (MX). The nematode bodies were disrupted severely and moderately by vacuolations in 0.5% of MX and single organic acids, respectively, suggesting toxicity of MX may be higher than AA and LA. The mortality of J2 was 100% at all concentrations of AA and MX and only at 1.0% and 0.5% of LA, which lowered slightly at 0.2% and greatly at 0.1% of LA. This suggests the nematicidal activity of MX may be mostly derived from AA together with supplementary LA toxicity. MX was applied to chili pepper plants inoculated with about 1,000 J2, for which root-knot gall formations and plant growths were examined 4 weeks after inoculation. The root gall formation was completely inhibited by 0.5% MX and standard and double concentrations of fosthiazate; and inhibited 92.9% and 57.1% by 0.2% and 0.1% MX, respectively. Shoot height, shoot weight, and root weight were not significantly (P ≤ 0.05) different among all treatments and the untreated and non-inoculated controls. All of these results suggest that the mixture of the organic acids may have a potential to be developed as an eco-friendly nematode control agent that needs to be supported by the more nematode control experiments in fields. PMID:25506312

  12. Pathogenicity of Heterodera daverti, H. zeae, and Meloidogyne incognita on rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reactions of five rice cultivars to the cyst nematodes Heterodera daverti and H. zeae and the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita were determined in the greenhouse. The results showed that both H. daverti and H. zeae infected and reproduced successfully on some of the tested rice cultivars....

  13. Tolerance of sweet sorghum to Meloidogyne incognita and crop effect on nematode population density

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) is a sugar-producing crop that can be used for biofuel and plastics production, and the crop could be incorporated into annual cropping systems in the southern US. The effect of Meloidogyne incognita on sweet sorghum yield and sugar content has not been reported. Beca...

  14. RESPONSES OF HETERODERA GLYCINES AND MELOIDOGYNE INCOGNITA TO EXOGENOUSLY APPLIED NEUROMODULATORS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biogenic amines dopamine, octopamine and serotonin each have significant but differing effects on behavior in juveniles of the plant-parasitic nematodes Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita. Body movement frequency was increased 2-fold in H. glycines by 5mM dopamine (P = 0.00013), while...

  15. Interactions of Heterodera daverti, H. goldeni and H. zeae with Meloidogyne incognita on rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The interactions of the cyst nematodes Heterodera daverti, H. goldeni and H. zeae with the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita on rice (Oryza sativa) cultivars Giza 178 and Sakha 101 were studied in the greenhouse. Inoculation with H. goldeni alone or one week before inoculation with M. incogni...

  16. Protease inhibition by Heterodera glycines cyst content: evidence for effects on the Meloidogyne incognita proteasome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteases from Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita juveniles were inhibited by heat-stable content of H. glycines female cysts (HglCE), and by the plant polyphenol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). General protease activities detected using the nematode peptide KSAYMRFa were inhibited by EG...

  17. Reaction of Prunus Rootstocks to Meloidogyne incognita and M. arenaria in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Marull, J.; Pinochet, J.; Verdejo-Lucas, S.; Soler, A.

    1991-01-01

    Prunus rootstocks were evaluated for their reaction to Meloidogyne incognita and M. arenaria. Most rootstocks were peach-almond hybrids of Spanish origin. In one experiment three selections of Garfi x Nemared (G x N) and Hansen-5 were highly resistant to M. incognita, but four other rootstocks were susceptible showing high galling indices and population increases. In two experiments with M. arenaria, the hybrid selections G x N nos. 1 and 9 were immune, GF-305 and Hansen-5 were resistant, but nine other rootstocks expressed various degrees of susceptibility. All Spanish rootstocks were susceptible to both Meloidogyne species except for the three G x N selections. The root-knot nematode resistant peach Nemared used as a male parent with Garfi was found to transmit a high degree of resistance to M. incognita and immunity to M. arenaria. Progenies of P. davidiana (Ga x D no. 3), a known source of resistance to root-knot nematodes, were susceptible. PMID:19283164

  18. Host-Parasite Relationships of Meloidogyne arenaria and M. incognita on Susceptible Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, K. A.; Lewis, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    Pathogenicity and reproduction of single and combined populations of Meloidogyne arenaria and M. incognita on a susceptible soybean (Glycine max cv. Davis) were investigated. Significant galling and egg mass production were observed on roots of greenhouse-grown soybean inoculated with M. arenaria and M. incognita, in combination and individually. M. arenaria produced more galls and egg masses than M. incognita, whereas in combined inoculation with both nematode species, gall and egg production was intermediate. In growth chamber tests, inoculations with M. arenaria and M. incognita, singly or in combination, produced more galls and egg masses at 30 C than at 25 C. At 25 C, M. arenaria alone produced significantly more galls and egg masses than the combined M. arenaria plus M. incognita, while M. incognita produced the fewest. At 30 C, numbers of egg masses produced by M. arenaria did not differ significantly from combined M. arenaria and M. incognita. In temperature tank tests, M. incognita produced more galls and egg masses at 28 C than at 24 C soil temperature. In contrast, numbers of galls, egg masses, and eggs of M. arenaria were slightly higher at 24 C than at 28 C. Combined inoculum of both nematode species produced greater numbers of galls at 24 C than at 28 C. PMID:19294112

  19. Evaluation of roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) leaf and pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit rind for activity against Meloidogyne incognita

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit and roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) leaves have been used in traditional medicine, including as anthelmintics. Methanolic extracts from these plants were investigated for activity against the southern root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne incognita. Dried, ground p...

  20. Reproduction and Development of Meloidogyne incognita and M. javanica on Guardian Peach Rootstock

    PubMed Central

    Nyczepir, A. P.; Beckman, T. G.; Reighard, G. L.

    1999-01-01

    Guardian peach rootstock was evaluated for susceptibility to Meloidogyne incognita race 3 (Georgia-peach isolate) and M. javanica in the greenhouse. Both commercial Guardian seed sources produced plants that were poor hosts of M. incognita and M. javanica. Reproduction as measured by number of egg masses and eggs per plant, eggs per egg mass, and eggs per gram of root were a better measure of host resistance than number of root galls per plant. Penetration, development, and reproduction of M. incognita in Guardian (resistant) and Lovell (susceptible) peach were also studied in the greenhouse. Differences in susceptibility were not attributed to differential penetration by the infectivestage juveniles (J2) or the number of root galls per plant. Results indicated that M. incognita J2 penetrated Guardian roots and formed galls, but that the majority of the nematodes failed to mature and reproduce. PMID:19270905

  1. Nature of Sweet Potato Resistance to Meloidogyne incognita and the Effects of Temperature on Parasitism.

    PubMed

    Jatala, P; Russell, C C

    1972-01-01

    Penetration, rate of development, and total population of Meloidogyne incognita in roots of susceptible 'Allgold' and resistant 'Nemagold' sweet potatoes increased with temperature 24-32 C. Rate of larval penetration in 'Allgold' was significantly higher than in 'Nemagold' after 48 hr of root exposure at 24, 28, and 32 C. At 24, 28, and 32 C (16 hr) day and 20 C (8 hr) night temperature the life cycle of M. incognita required 42, 32, and 28 days in 'Allgold', and 44, 33, and 31 days in 'Nemagold'; mature females in the first generation were 40, 40, 40, and 10, 22, 20 respectively. The correlation between the length of time roots were allowed to grow in the soil prior to inoculation and number of larvae recovered from the roots after inoculation was positive for 'Allgold' and negative for 'Nemagold'. Therefore, a root exudate repellent to M. incognita larvae is proposed as a hypothetical basis for resistance to M. incognita in sweet potatoes.

  2. Meloidogyne incognita emigration from cotton roots may be induced by the resistance QTL qMi-C11

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) is one of the most widely grown crops in the southern US, and Meloidogyne incognita is the most significant pathogen of cotton in the US. Two QTLs, qMi-C11 and qMi-C14, conferring resistance to M. incognita have been identified in cotton. Previous research docume...

  3. Suitability of Zucchini and Cucumber Genotypes to Populations of Meloidogyne arenaria, M. incognita, and M. javanica.

    PubMed

    López-Gómez, Manuel; Flor-Peregrín, Elena; Talavera, Miguel; Verdejo-Lucas, Soledad

    2015-03-01

    The host suitability of five zucchini and three cucumber genotypes to Meloidogyne incognita (MiPM26) and M. javanica (Mj05) was determined in pot experiments in a greenhouse. The number of egg masses (EM) did not differ among the genotypes of zucchini or cucumber, but the eggs/plant and reproduction factor (Rf) did slightly. M. incognita MiPM26 showed lower EM, eggs/plant, and Rf than M. javanica Mj05. Examination of the zucchini galls for nematode postinfection development revealed unsuitable conditions for M. incognita MiPM26 as only 22% of the females produced EM compared to 95% of the M. javanica females. As far as cucumber was concerned, 86% of the M. incognita and 99% of the M. javanica females produced EM, respectively. In a second type of experiments, several populations of M. arenaria, M. incognita, and M. javanica were tested on zucchini cv. Amalthee and cucumber cv. Dasher II to assess the parasitic variation among species and populations of Meloidogyne. A greater parasitic variation was observed in zucchini than cucumber. Zucchini responded as a poor host for M. incognita MiPM26, MiAL09, and MiAL48, but as a good host for MiAL10 and MiAL15. Intraspecific variation was not observed among the M. javanica or M. arenaria populations. Cucumber was a good host for all the tested populations. Overall, both cucurbits were suitable hosts for Meloidogyne but zucchini was a poorer host than the cucumber. PMID:25861120

  4. Suitability of Zucchini and Cucumber Genotypes to Populations of Meloidogyne arenaria, M. incognita, and M. javanica.

    PubMed

    López-Gómez, Manuel; Flor-Peregrín, Elena; Talavera, Miguel; Verdejo-Lucas, Soledad

    2015-03-01

    The host suitability of five zucchini and three cucumber genotypes to Meloidogyne incognita (MiPM26) and M. javanica (Mj05) was determined in pot experiments in a greenhouse. The number of egg masses (EM) did not differ among the genotypes of zucchini or cucumber, but the eggs/plant and reproduction factor (Rf) did slightly. M. incognita MiPM26 showed lower EM, eggs/plant, and Rf than M. javanica Mj05. Examination of the zucchini galls for nematode postinfection development revealed unsuitable conditions for M. incognita MiPM26 as only 22% of the females produced EM compared to 95% of the M. javanica females. As far as cucumber was concerned, 86% of the M. incognita and 99% of the M. javanica females produced EM, respectively. In a second type of experiments, several populations of M. arenaria, M. incognita, and M. javanica were tested on zucchini cv. Amalthee and cucumber cv. Dasher II to assess the parasitic variation among species and populations of Meloidogyne. A greater parasitic variation was observed in zucchini than cucumber. Zucchini responded as a poor host for M. incognita MiPM26, MiAL09, and MiAL48, but as a good host for MiAL10 and MiAL15. Intraspecific variation was not observed among the M. javanica or M. arenaria populations. Cucumber was a good host for all the tested populations. Overall, both cucurbits were suitable hosts for Meloidogyne but zucchini was a poorer host than the cucumber.

  5. Suitability of Zucchini and Cucumber Genotypes to Populations of Meloidogyne arenaria, M. incognita, and M. javanica

    PubMed Central

    López-Gómez, Manuel; Flor-Peregrín, Elena; Talavera, Miguel; Verdejo-Lucas, Soledad

    2015-01-01

    The host suitability of five zucchini and three cucumber genotypes to Meloidogyne incognita (MiPM26) and M. javanica (Mj05) was determined in pot experiments in a greenhouse. The number of egg masses (EM) did not differ among the genotypes of zucchini or cucumber, but the eggs/plant and reproduction factor (Rf) did slightly. M. incognita MiPM26 showed lower EM, eggs/plant, and Rf than M. javanica Mj05. Examination of the zucchini galls for nematode postinfection development revealed unsuitable conditions for M. incognita MiPM26 as only 22% of the females produced EM compared to 95% of the M. javanica females. As far as cucumber was concerned, 86% of the M. incognita and 99% of the M. javanica females produced EM, respectively. In a second type of experiments, several populations of M. arenaria, M. incognita, and M. javanica were tested on zucchini cv. Amalthee and cucumber cv. Dasher II to assess the parasitic variation among species and populations of Meloidogyne. A greater parasitic variation was observed in zucchini than cucumber. Zucchini responded as a poor host for M. incognita MiPM26, MiAL09, and MiAL48, but as a good host for MiAL10 and MiAL15. Intraspecific variation was not observed among the M. javanica or M. arenaria populations. Cucumber was a good host for all the tested populations. Overall, both cucurbits were suitable hosts for Meloidogyne but zucchini was a poorer host than the cucumber. PMID:25861120

  6. Effects of 1,3-Dicliloropropene for Meloidogyne incognita Management on Cotton Produced under Furrow Irrigation

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, S. H.; Smith, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    Field trials were conducted during 1990 to evaluate the effects of preplant soil fumigation with 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) on yield and fiber quality of furrow-irrigated cotton cultivars subjected to high population densities of Meloidogyne incognita. We measured the responses of eight upland cotton cultivars with different levels of root-knot nematode resistance and compared the responses of upland and Pima cottons. Reductions in lint weight ranged from 10 to 52% among cultivars grown in soil without 1,3-D fumigation compared with those grown in treated soil. Meloidogyne incognita reduced yields primarily by reducing the number of bolls on each plant, rather than by decreasing boll size. Cotton fiber quality varied among cultivars but was unaffected by M. incognita in either study. Upland cotton cultivar Acala 1517-88 and M-315/240 sustained less than half the yield reductions observed with M. incognita-susceptible cultivars Deltapine 41 and Paymaster 145. Sixty days after cotton emergence, fewer M. incognita second-stage juveniles were recovered from M-315/240 than all other cultivars. PMID:19279835

  7. Reproduction of Meloidogyne incognita on Winter Cover Crops Used in Cotton Production.

    PubMed

    Timper, Patricia; Davis, Richard F; Tillman, P Glynn

    2006-03-01

    Substantial reproduction of Meloidogyne incognita on winter cover crops may lead to damaging populations in a subsequent cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) crop. The amount of population increase during the winter depends on soil temperature and the host status of the cover crop. Our objectives were to quantify M. incognita race 3 reproduction on rye (Secale cereale) and several leguminous cover crops and to determine if these cover crops increase population densities of M. incognita and subsequent damage to cotton. The cover crops tested were 'Bigbee' berseem clover (Trifolium alexandrinum), 'Paradana' balansa clover (T. balansae), 'AU Sunrise' and 'Dixie' crimson clover (T. incarnatum), 'Cherokee' red clover (T. pratense), common and 'AU Early Cover' hairy vetch (Vicia villosa), 'Cahaba White' vetch (V. sativa), and 'Wrens Abruzzi' rye. In the greenhouse tests, egg production was greatest on berseem clover, Dixie crimson clover, AU Early Cover hairy vetch, and common hairy vetch; intermediate on Balansa clover and AU Sunrise crimson clover; and least on rye, Cahaba White vetch, and Cherokee red clover. In both 2002 and 2003 field tests, enough heat units were accumulated between 1 January and 20 May for the nematode to complete two generations. Both AU Early Cover and common hairy vetch led to greater root galling than fallow in the subsequent cotton crop; they also supported high reproduction of M. incognita in the greenhouse. Rye and Cahaba White vetch did not increase root galling on cotton and were relatively poor hosts for M. incognita. Only those legumes that increased populations of M. incognita reduced cotton yield. In the southern US, M. incognita can complete one to two generations on a susceptible winter cover crop, so cover crops that support high nematode reproduction may lead to damage and yield losses in the following cotton crop. Planting rye or Meloidogyne-resistant legumes as winter cover crops will lower the risk of increased nematode populations

  8. Biological Control of Meloidogyne incognita by Aspergillus niger F22 Producing Oxalic Acid.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ja Yeong; Choi, Yong Ho; Shin, Teak Soo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Shin, Kee-Sun; Park, Hae Woong; Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Hun; Choi, Gyung Ja; Jang, Kyoung Soo; Cha, Byeongjin; Kim, In Seon; Myung, Eul Jae; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Restricted usage of chemical nematicides has led to development of environmentally safe alternatives. A culture filtrate of Aspergillus niger F22 was highly active against Meloidogyne incognita with marked mortality of second-stage juveniles (J2s) and inhibition of egg hatching. The nematicidal component was identified as oxalic acid by organic acid analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Exposure to 2 mmol/L oxalic acid resulted in 100% juvenile mortality at 1 day after treatment and suppressed egg hatching by 95.6% at 7 days after treatment. Oxalic acid showed similar nematicidal activity against M. hapla, but was not highly toxic to Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. The fungus was incubated on solid medium and dried culture was used for preparation of a wettable powder-type (WP) formulation as an active ingredient. Two WP formulations, F22-WP10 (ai 10%) and oxalic acid-WP8 (ai 8%), were prepared using F22 solid culture and oxalic acid. In a field naturally infested with M. incognita, application of a mixture of F22-WP10 + oxalic acid-WP8 at 1,000- and 500-fold dilutions significantly reduced gall formation on the roots of watermelon plants by 58.8 and 70.7%, respectively, compared to the non-treated control. The disease control efficacy of the mixture of F22-WP10 + oxalic acid-WP8 was significantly higher than that of a chemical nematicide, Sunchungtan (ai 30% fosthiazate). These results suggest that A. niger F22 can be used as a microbial nematicide for the control of root-knot nematode disease. PMID:27258452

  9. Biological Control of Meloidogyne incognita by Aspergillus niger F22 Producing Oxalic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ja Yeong; Choi, Yong Ho; Shin, Teak Soo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Shin, Kee-Sun; Park, Hae Woong; Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Hun; Choi, Gyung Ja; Jang, Kyoung Soo; Cha, Byeongjin; Kim, In Seon; Myung, Eul Jae

    2016-01-01

    Restricted usage of chemical nematicides has led to development of environmentally safe alternatives. A culture filtrate of Aspergillus niger F22 was highly active against Meloidogyne incognita with marked mortality of second-stage juveniles (J2s) and inhibition of egg hatching. The nematicidal component was identified as oxalic acid by organic acid analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Exposure to 2 mmol/L oxalic acid resulted in 100% juvenile mortality at 1 day after treatment and suppressed egg hatching by 95.6% at 7 days after treatment. Oxalic acid showed similar nematicidal activity against M. hapla, but was not highly toxic to Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. The fungus was incubated on solid medium and dried culture was used for preparation of a wettable powder-type (WP) formulation as an active ingredient. Two WP formulations, F22-WP10 (ai 10%) and oxalic acid-WP8 (ai 8%), were prepared using F22 solid culture and oxalic acid. In a field naturally infested with M. incognita, application of a mixture of F22-WP10 + oxalic acid-WP8 at 1,000- and 500-fold dilutions significantly reduced gall formation on the roots of watermelon plants by 58.8 and 70.7%, respectively, compared to the non-treated control. The disease control efficacy of the mixture of F22-WP10 + oxalic acid-WP8 was significantly higher than that of a chemical nematicide, Sunchungtan (ai 30% fosthiazate). These results suggest that A. niger F22 can be used as a microbial nematicide for the control of root-knot nematode disease. PMID:27258452

  10. Biological Control of Meloidogyne incognita by Aspergillus niger F22 Producing Oxalic Acid.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ja Yeong; Choi, Yong Ho; Shin, Teak Soo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Shin, Kee-Sun; Park, Hae Woong; Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Hun; Choi, Gyung Ja; Jang, Kyoung Soo; Cha, Byeongjin; Kim, In Seon; Myung, Eul Jae; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Restricted usage of chemical nematicides has led to development of environmentally safe alternatives. A culture filtrate of Aspergillus niger F22 was highly active against Meloidogyne incognita with marked mortality of second-stage juveniles (J2s) and inhibition of egg hatching. The nematicidal component was identified as oxalic acid by organic acid analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Exposure to 2 mmol/L oxalic acid resulted in 100% juvenile mortality at 1 day after treatment and suppressed egg hatching by 95.6% at 7 days after treatment. Oxalic acid showed similar nematicidal activity against M. hapla, but was not highly toxic to Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. The fungus was incubated on solid medium and dried culture was used for preparation of a wettable powder-type (WP) formulation as an active ingredient. Two WP formulations, F22-WP10 (ai 10%) and oxalic acid-WP8 (ai 8%), were prepared using F22 solid culture and oxalic acid. In a field naturally infested with M. incognita, application of a mixture of F22-WP10 + oxalic acid-WP8 at 1,000- and 500-fold dilutions significantly reduced gall formation on the roots of watermelon plants by 58.8 and 70.7%, respectively, compared to the non-treated control. The disease control efficacy of the mixture of F22-WP10 + oxalic acid-WP8 was significantly higher than that of a chemical nematicide, Sunchungtan (ai 30% fosthiazate). These results suggest that A. niger F22 can be used as a microbial nematicide for the control of root-knot nematode disease.

  11. Differential effects on nematode development of two QTLs for resistance to Meloidogyne incognita in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    QTLs qMi-C11 and qMi-C14 impart resistance to Meloidogyne incognita in cotton. Breeders had backcrossed both QTLs into Coker 201 (C201; susceptible) to create M-120 RNR (M-120; highly resistant), and we crossed C201 and M-120 to create near isogenic lines with either qMi-C11 or qMi-C14. Previous wor...

  12. Bacillus cereus strain S2 shows high nematicidal activity against Meloidogyne incognita by producing sphingosine

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Huijuan; Qi, Gaofu; Yin, Rong; Zhang, Hongchun; Li, Chenggang; Zhao, Xiuyun

    2016-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes cause serious crop losses worldwidely. This study intended to discover the antagonistic mechanism of Bacillus cereus strain S2 against Meloidogyne incognita. Treatment with B. cereus strain S2 resulted in a mortality of 77.89% to Caenorhabditis elegans (a model organism) and 90.96% to M. incognita. In pot experiment, control efficiency of B. cereus S2 culture or supernatants were 81.36% and 67.42% towards M. incognita, respectively. In field experiment, control efficiency was 58.97% towards M. incognita. Nematicidal substances were isolated from culture supernatant of B. cereus S2 by polarity gradient extraction, silica gel column chromatography and HPLC. Two nematicidal compounds were identified as C16 sphingosine and phytosphingosine by LC-MS. The median lethal concentration of sphingosine was determined as 0.64 μg/ml. Sphingosine could obviously inhibit reproduction of C. elegans, with an inhibition rate of 42.72% for 24 h. After treatment with sphingosine, ROS was induced in intestinal tract, and genital area disappeared in nematode. Furthermore, B. cereus S2 could induce systemic resistance in tomato, and enhance activity of defense-related enzymes for biocontrol of M. incognita. This study demonstrates the nematicidal activity of B. cereus and its product sphingosine, as well provides a possibility for biocontrol of M. incognita. PMID:27338781

  13. Coupling of MIC-3 overexpression with the chromosome 11 and 14 root-knot nematode (RKN) (Meloidogyne incognita) resistance QTLs provides insights into the regulation of the RKN resistance response in Upland cotton...

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High levels of resistance to root-knot nematode (RKN) (Meloidogyne incognita) in Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) is mediated by two major quantitative trait loci (QTL) located on chromosomes 11 and 14. We had previously determined that MIC-3 expression played a direct role in suppressing RKN egg...

  14. Pasteuria penetrans for Control of Meloidogyne incognita on Tomato and Cucumber, and M. arenaria on Snapdragon

    PubMed Central

    Kokalis-Burelle, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Meloidogyne incognita and Meloidogyne arenaria are important parasitic nematodes of vegetable and ornamental crops. Microplot and greenhouse experiments were conducted to test commercial formulations of the biocontrol agent Pasteuria penetrans for control of M. incognita on tomato and cucumber and M. arenaria on snapdragon. Three methods of application for P. penetrans were assessed including seed, transplant, and post-plant treatments. Efficacy in controlling galling and reproduction of the two root-knot nematode species was evaluated. Seed treatment application was assessed only for M. incognita on cucumber. Pasteuria treatment rates of a granular transplant formulation ranged from 1.5 × 105 endospores/cm3 to 3 × 105 endospores/cm3 of transplant mix applied at seeding. Additional applications of 1.5 × 105 endospores/cm3 of soil were applied as a liquid formulation to soil post-transplant for both greenhouse and microplot trials. In greenhouse cucumber trials, all Pasteuria treatments were equivalent to steamed soil for reducing M. incognita populations in roots and soil, and reducing nematode reproduction and galling. In cucumber microplot trials there were no differences among treatments for M. incognita populations in roots or soil, eggs/g root, or root condition ratings. Nematode reproduction on cucumber was low with Telone II and with the seed treatment plus post-plant application of Pasteuria, which had the lowest nematode reproduction. However, galling for all Pasteuria treatments was higher than galling with Telone II. Root-knot nematode control with Pasteuria in greenhouse and microplot trials varied on tomato and snapdragon. Positive results were achieved for control of M. incognita with the seed treatment application on cucumber. PMID:26527842

  15. Virulence of Meloidogyne incognita to expression of N gene in pepper.

    PubMed

    Thies, Judy A

    2011-06-01

    Four pepper genotypes classified as resistant and four pepper genotypes classified as susceptible to several avirulent populations of M. incognita were compared for their reactions against a population of Meloidogyne incognita (Chitwood) Kofoid and White which had been shown to be virulent to resistant bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) in preliminary tests. The virulent population of M. incognita originated from a commercial bell pepper field in California. The resistant pepper genotypes used in all experiments were the Capsicum annuum cultivars Charleston Belle, Carolina Wonder, and Carolina Cayenne, and the C. chinense cultigen PA-426. The susceptible pepper genotypes used in the experiments were the C. annuum cultivars Keystone Resistant Giant, Yolo Wonder B, California Wonder, and the C. chinense cultigen PA-350. Root gall indices (GI) were ≥ 3.0 for all genotypes in both tests except for PA-426 (GI=2.57) in test 1 and 'Carolina Cayenne' (GI=2.83) in test 2. Numbers of eggs per gram fresh root weight ranged from 20,635 to 141,319 and reproductive indices ranged from 1.20 to 27.2 for the pepper genotypes in both tests, indicating that all eight pepper genotypes tested were susceptible to the M. incognita population used in these tests. The M. incognita population used in these studies overcame resistance conferred by the N gene in all resistant genotypes of both C. annuum and C. chinense.

  16. Virulence of Meloidogyne incognita to expression of N gene in pepper.

    PubMed

    Thies, Judy A

    2011-06-01

    Four pepper genotypes classified as resistant and four pepper genotypes classified as susceptible to several avirulent populations of M. incognita were compared for their reactions against a population of Meloidogyne incognita (Chitwood) Kofoid and White which had been shown to be virulent to resistant bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) in preliminary tests. The virulent population of M. incognita originated from a commercial bell pepper field in California. The resistant pepper genotypes used in all experiments were the Capsicum annuum cultivars Charleston Belle, Carolina Wonder, and Carolina Cayenne, and the C. chinense cultigen PA-426. The susceptible pepper genotypes used in the experiments were the C. annuum cultivars Keystone Resistant Giant, Yolo Wonder B, California Wonder, and the C. chinense cultigen PA-350. Root gall indices (GI) were ≥ 3.0 for all genotypes in both tests except for PA-426 (GI=2.57) in test 1 and 'Carolina Cayenne' (GI=2.83) in test 2. Numbers of eggs per gram fresh root weight ranged from 20,635 to 141,319 and reproductive indices ranged from 1.20 to 27.2 for the pepper genotypes in both tests, indicating that all eight pepper genotypes tested were susceptible to the M. incognita population used in these tests. The M. incognita population used in these studies overcame resistance conferred by the N gene in all resistant genotypes of both C. annuum and C. chinense. PMID:22791917

  17. Heat Stability of Resistance to Meloidogyne incognita in Scotch Bonnet Peppers ( Capsicum chinense Jacq.).

    PubMed

    Thies, J A; Fery, R L

    2000-12-01

    Stability of resistance to Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid &White) Chitwood was determined in pepper (Capsicum chinense Jacq. and C. annuum L.) at 24, 28, and 32 degrees C. Reactions of the C. annuum cultivars Charleston Belle and Keystone Resistant Giant and the C. chinense cultigens PA-426 and PA-350 to M. incognita were compared. Charleston Belle is homozygous for the N gene that confers resistance to M. incognita in C. annuum, and Keystone Resistant Giant is the susceptible recurrent parent of Charleston Belle. PA-426 is homozygous for a single dominant resistance gene that is allelic to the N gene, and PA-350 is susceptible. Root galling, egg-mass production, numbers of eggs per g fresh root, and reproductive factor of M. incognita increased for all pepper genotypes as temperature increased. Severity of root galling and nematode reproduction were less for PA-426 and Charleston Belle compared to PA-350 and Keystone Resistant Giant at all temperatures. However, both PA-426 and Charleston Belle exhibited a partial loss of resistance at the higher temperatures. For example, at 32 degrees C, the numbers of M. incognita eggs per g fresh root and the reproductive index for PA-426 and Charleston Belle were in the susceptible range. Nevertheless, the gall index for both cultivars was still within the resistant range. Both PA-350 and Keystone Resistant Giant exhibited highly susceptible reactions at 28 and 32 degrees C. Although the resistances of PA-426 and Charleston Belle were somewhat compromised at high temperatures, cultivars possessing these resistances will still be useful for managing M. incognita under high soil temperatures.

  18. Effects of Management Practices on Meloidogyne incognita and Snap Bean Yield.

    PubMed

    Smittle, D A; Johnson, A W

    1982-01-01

    Phenamiphos applied at 6.7 kg ai/ha through a solid set or a center pivot irrigation system with 28 mm of water effectively controlled root-knot nematodes, Meloidogyne incognita, and resulted in greater snap bean growth and yields irrespective of growing season, tillage method, or cover crop system. The percentage yield increases attributed to this method of M. incognita control over nontreated controls were 45% in the spring crop, and 90% and 409% in the fall crops following winter rye and fallow, respectively. Root galling was not affected by tillage systems or cover crop, but disk tillage resulted in over 50% reduction in bean yield compared with yields from the subsoil-bed tillage system.

  19. Host Status of Herbaceous Perennials to Meloidogyne incognita and M. arenaria

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J. T.; Melin, J. B.

    1998-01-01

    Twenty-two different herbaceous perennials were studied for their reaction to separate inoculations of Meloidogyne arenaria and M. incognita under greenhouse conditions. Perennial taxa that did not develop root-galls following inoculation, and therefore are considered as nonhosts of both nematode species, included species and cultivars of Aethionema, Fragaria, Phlox, and Polygonum. Echinacea, Monarda, and Patrinia developed only a few galls. Root-galls developed on species and cultivars of Achillea, Geranium, Heuchera, Heucherella, Linaria, Nepeta, Nierembergia, Penstemon, and Salvia. There was no difference in the number of root-galls caused by M. arenaria or M. incognita on most plants except for Penstemon cultivars. Plant heights and dry weights varied between species and nematode density. PMID:19274254

  20. Relationship of Aerial Broad Band Reflectance to Meloidogyne incognita Density in Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, T. A.; Kaufman, H. W.

    2003-01-01

    Aerial images were obtained on 22 July 1999 and 4 August 2000 from five cotton sites infested with Meloidogyne incognita. Images contained three broad bands representing the green (500-600 nm), red (600-700 nm), and near-infrared (700-900 nm) spectrum. Soil samples were collected and assayed for nematodes in the fall at these sites. Sampling locations were identified from images, by locating the coordinates of a wide range of light intensity (measured as a digital number) for each single band, and combinations of bands. There was no single band or band combination in which reflectance consistently predicted M. incognita density. In all 10 site-year combinations, the minimum number of samples necessary to estimate M. incognita density within 25% of the population mean was greater when sampling by reflectance-based classes (3 to 4 per site) than sampling based on the entire site as one unit. Two sites were sampled at multiple times during the growing season. At these sites, there was no single time during the growing season optimal to take images for nematode sampling. Aerial infrared photography conducted during the growing season could not be used to accurately determine fall population densities of M. incognita. PMID:19265974

  1. Reproduction of Meloidogyne incognita Race 3 on Flue-cured Tobacco Homozygous for Rk1 and/or Rk2 Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pollok, Jill R.; Johnson, Charles S.; Eisenback, J. D.; Reed, T. David

    2016-01-01

    Most commercial tobacco cultivars possess the Rk1 resistance gene to races 1 and 3 of Meloidogyne incognita and race 1 of Meloidogyne arenaria, which has caused a shift in population prevalence in Virginia tobacco fields toward other species and races. A number of cultivars now also possess the Rk2 gene for root-knot resistance. Experiments were conducted in 2013 to 2014 to examine whether possessing both Rk1 and Rk2 increases resistance to a variant of M. incognita race 3 compared to either gene alone. Greenhouse trials were arranged in a completely randomized design with Coker 371-Gold (C371G; susceptible), NC 95 and SC 72 (Rk1Rk1), T-15-1-1 (Rk2Rk2), and STNCB-2-28 and NOD 8 (Rk1Rk1 and Rk2Rk2). Each plant was inoculated with 5,000 root-knot nematode eggs; data were collected 60 d postinoculation. Percent galling and numbers of egg masses and eggs were counted, the latter being used to calculate the reproductive index on each host. Despite variability, entries with both Rk1 and Rk2 conferred greater resistance to a variant of M. incognita race 3 than plants with Rk1 or Rk2 alone. Entries with Rk1 alone were successful in reducing root galling and nematode reproduction compared to the susceptible control. Entry T-15-1-1 did not reduce galling compared to the susceptible control but often suppressed reproduction. PMID:27418700

  2. Reproduction of Meloidogyne incognita Race 3 on Flue-cured Tobacco Homozygous for Rk1 and/or Rk2 Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Pollok, Jill R; Johnson, Charles S; Eisenback, J D; Reed, T David

    2016-06-01

    Most commercial tobacco cultivars possess the Rk1 resistance gene to races 1 and 3 of Meloidogyne incognita and race 1 of Meloidogyne arenaria, which has caused a shift in population prevalence in Virginia tobacco fields toward other species and races. A number of cultivars now also possess the Rk2 gene for root-knot resistance. Experiments were conducted in 2013 to 2014 to examine whether possessing both Rk1 and Rk2 increases resistance to a variant of M. incognita race 3 compared to either gene alone. Greenhouse trials were arranged in a completely randomized design with Coker 371-Gold (C371G; susceptible), NC 95 and SC 72 (Rk1Rk1), T-15-1-1 (Rk2Rk2), and STNCB-2-28 and NOD 8 (Rk1Rk1 and Rk2Rk2). Each plant was inoculated with 5,000 root-knot nematode eggs; data were collected 60 d postinoculation. Percent galling and numbers of egg masses and eggs were counted, the latter being used to calculate the reproductive index on each host. Despite variability, entries with both Rk1 and Rk2 conferred greater resistance to a variant of M. incognita race 3 than plants with Rk1 or Rk2 alone. Entries with Rk1 alone were successful in reducing root galling and nematode reproduction compared to the susceptible control. Entry T-15-1-1 did not reduce galling compared to the susceptible control but often suppressed reproduction. PMID:27418700

  3. Response of cucurbit rootstocks for grafted melon (Cucumis melo) to southern root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN) are an important re-emerging pest of melon (Cucumis melo), due largely to the loss of methyl bromide as a pre-plant soil fumigant. Melon is highly susceptible to southern RKN, Meloidogyne incognita, which causes severe root galling and reduced melon fruit yields. Cucurbit...

  4. SSR markers for marker assisted selection of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) resistant plants in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L) cultivars highly resistant to the southern root-knot nematode (RKN) [Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid & White) Chitwood] are not available. Recently, molecular markers on chromosomes 11 and 14 have been associated with RKN resistance, thus opening the way for marker assis...

  5. Dose-response effects of clove oil from Syzygium aromaticum on the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Clove oil, derived from the plant Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. & Perry, is active against various organisms, and was prepared in a soy lecithin/detergent formulation to determine concentrations active against the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid and White) Chitwood. RE...

  6. Physiological effects of Meloidogyne incognita infection on cotton genotypes with differing levels of resistance in the greenhouse

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Greenhouse tests were conducted to evaluate 1) the effect of Meloidogyne incognita infection in cotton on plant growth and physiology including the height-to-node ratio, chlorophyll content, dark adapted quantum yield of photosystem II, and leaf area, and 2) the extent to which moderate or high leve...

  7. Mining novel effector proteins from the esophageal gland cells of Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Rutter, William B; Hewezi, Tarek; Abubucker, Sahar; Maier, Tom R; Huang, Guozhong; Mitreva, Makedonka; Hussey, Richard S; Baum, Thomas J

    2014-09-01

    Meloidogyne incognita is one of the most economically damaging plant pathogens in agriculture and horticulture. Identifying and characterizing the effector proteins which M. incognita secretes into its host plants during infection is an important step toward finding new ways to manage this pest. In this study, we have identified the cDNAs for 18 putative effectors (i.e., proteins that have the potential to facilitate M. incognita parasitism of host plants). These putative effectors are secretory proteins that do not contain transmembrane domains and whose genes are specifically expressed in the secretory gland cells of the nematode, indicating that they are likely secreted from the nematode through its stylet. We have determined that, in the plant cells, these putative effectors are likely to localize to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, the transcripts of many of these novel effectors are specifically upregulated during different stages of the nematode's life cycle, indicating that they function at specific stages during M. incognita parasitism. The predicted proteins showed little to no homology to known proteins from free-living nematode species, suggesting that they evolved recently to support the parasitic lifestyle. On the other hand, several of the effectors are part of gene families within the M. incognita genome as well as that of M. hapla, which points to an important role that these putative effectors are playing in both parasites. With the discovery of these putative effectors, we have increased our knowledge of the effector repertoire utilized by root-knot nematodes to infect, feed on, and reproduce on their host plants. Future studies investigating the roles that these proteins play in planta will help mitigate the effects of this damaging pest.

  8. Influence of Meloidogyne incognita on the Water Relations of Cotton Grown in Microplots

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, T. L.; Van Iersel, M. W.; Oosterhuis, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of Meloidogyne incognita on the growth and water relations of cotton were evaluated in a 2-year field study. Microplots containing methyl bromide-fumigated fine sandy loam soil were infested with the nematode and planted to cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). Treatments included addition of nematodes alone, addition of nematodes plus the insecticide-nematicide aldicarb (1.7 kg/ha), and an untreated control. Meloidogyne incognita population densities reached high levels in both treatments where nematodes were included. Root galling, plant height at harvest, and seed cotton yield were decreased by nematode infection. In older plants (89 days after planting [DAP]), leaf transpiration rates and stomatal conductance were reduced, and leaf temperature was increased by nematode infection. Nematode infection did not affect (P = 0.05) leaf water potential in either young or older plants but lowered the osmotic potential. The maximum rate and cumulative amount of water flowing through intact plants during a 24-hour period were lower, on both a whole-plant and per-unit-leaf-area basis, in infected plants than in control plants. Application of aldicarb moderated some of the nematode effects but did not eliminate them. PMID:19277313

  9. Plantago lanceolata and Plantago rugelii Extracts are Toxic to Meloidogyne incognita but not to Certain Microbes.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Susan L F; Zasada, Inga A; Roberts, Daniel P; Vinyard, Bryan T; Lakshman, Dilip K; Lee, Jae-Kook; Chitwood, David J; Carta, Lynn K

    2006-09-01

    Extracts from the plants Plantago lanceolata and P. rugelii were evaluated for toxicity to the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita, the beneficial microbes Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Trichoderma virens, and the plant-pathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. gladioli, Phytophthora capsici, Pythium ultimum, and Rhizoctonia solani. Wild plants were collected, roots were excised from shoots, and the plant parts were dried and ground to a powder. One set of extracts (10% w/v) was prepared in water and another in methanol. Treatments included extract concentrations of 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%, and water controls. Meloidogyne incognita egg hatch was recorded after 7-day exposure to the treatments, and second-stage juvenile (J2) activity after 48 hours. All extracts were toxic to eggs and J2, with P. lanceolata shoot extract tending to have the most activity against M. incognita. Numbers of active J2 remained the same or decreased in a 24-hour water rinse following the 48-hour extract treatment, indicating that the extracts were lethal. When data from water- and methanol-extracted roots and shoots of both plant species were combined for analysis, J2 tended to be more sensitive than eggs to the toxic compounds at lower concentrations, while the higher concentrations (75% and 100%) were equally toxic to both life stages. The effective concentrations causing 50% reduction (EC(50)) in egg hatch and in J2 viability were 44.4% and 43.7%, respectively. No extract was toxic to any of the bacteria or fungi in our assays. PMID:19259537

  10. Chemical composition and nematicidal activity of essential oil of Agastache rugosa against Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Li, He Qin; Liu, Qi Zhi; Liu, Zhi Long; Du, Shu Shan; Deng, Zhi Wei

    2013-04-09

    The aim of this research was to determine the chemical composition and nematicidal activity of essential oil of Agastache rugosa flowering aerial parts against the root knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, and to isolate and identify any nematicidal constituents from the essential oil. The essential oil of A. rugosa aerial parts was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. A total of 37 components of the essential oil were identified, with the principal compounds being methyleugenol (50.51%), estragole (8.55%), and eugenol (7.54%), followed by thymol (3.62%), pulegone (2.56%), limonene (2.49%) and caryophyllene (2.38%). Based on bioactivity-guided fractionation, the three active constituents were isolated from the essential oil and identified as methyleugenol, estragole and eugenol. The essential oil of A. rugosa exhibited strong nematicidal activity against M. incognita, with a LC50 value of 47.3 μg/mL. The components eugenol (LC50 = 66.6 μg/mL) and methyleugenol (LC50 = 89.4 μg/mL) exhibited stronger nematicidal activity against M. incognita (LC50 = 185.9 μg/mL). The results indicate that the essential oil of A. rugosa aerial parts and its constituent compounds have potential for development into natural nematicides for control of the root knot nematode.

  11. Use of crop residues for the control of Meloidogyne incognita under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Piedrabuena, Ana; García-Alvarez, Avelino; Díez-Rojo, Miguel A; Bello, Antonio

    2006-10-01

    This laboratory study evaluates the biofumigant effect of different organic materials with the aim of developing non-chemical alternatives for the management of Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid & White) Chitwood populations. Sources of organic material from the production system were selected with the aim of reducing agricultural residue accumulation problems as well as decreasing the costs due to the use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides. The selected materials were residues from pepper, strawberry, tomato and cucumber crops, orange juice industry residues, commercial manure and sheep manure, applied at different dosages. Two biofumigation assays were performed under laboratory conditions, using alkaline soils from the Torreblanca area (Murcia, Spain) and acidic soils from the Villa del Prado area (Madrid, Spain). The assays evaluated the effect of the treatments on M. incognita juveniles and other soil organisms, the nematode galling index on tomato roots (susceptible cv. Marmande) grown in the biofumigated soil and soil fertility parameters. The results showed that all biofumigant materials significantly decreased M. incognita populations and galling indices in tomato cv. Marmande. A greater effect was observed on galling indices when applying crop residues together with manure than with the residues alone. Biofumigation had a general beneficial effect on soil fertility, generally increasing nitrogen, organic carbon, pH and potassium levels, and also calcium levels when crop residues of pepper and strawberry were applied. There were no important variations in the number of saprophagous nematodes, dorylaimids and enchytraeids. PMID:16927410

  12. Nematicidal activity of 2-thiophenecarboxaldehyde and methylisothiocyanate from caper (Capparis spinosa) against Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Caboni, Pierluigi; Sarais, Giorgia; Aissani, Nadhem; Tocco, Graziella; Sasanelli, Nicola; Liori, Barbara; Carta, Annarosa; Angioni, Alberto

    2012-08-01

    New pesticides based on plant extracts have recently gained interest in the development of nontoxic crop protection chemicals. Numerous research studies are focused on the isolation and identification of new active compounds derived from plants. In this manuscript we report about the use of the Mediterranean species Capparis spinosa as a potent natural nematicidal agent against the root knot nematodes Meloidogyne incognita. Leaves, stems, and caper buds of Capparis spinosa were used to obtain their methanol extracts (LME, SME, BME) that were successively in vitro tested against second stage nematode juveniles (J2). In terms of paralysis induction, the methanol extract of the stem part (SME) was found more effective against M. incognita and then the caper methanol buds and leaves extracts. The chemical composition analysis of the extracts carried out by GC/MS and LC/MS techniques showed that methylisothiocyanate was the main compound of SME. The EC50 for SME after 3 days of immersion was 215 ± 36 mg/L. The constituent components of SME such as 2-thiophenecarboxaldehyde and methylisothiocyanate were successively in vitro tested for their nematicidal activity against J2. Both compounds induced paralysis on root knot nematodes ranking first (EC50 = 7.9 ± 1.6, and 14.1 ± 1.9 mg/L respectively) for M. incognita. Moreover, 2-thiophenecarboxaldehyde showed a strong fumigant activity.

  13. Weed Hosts of Meloidogyne arenaria and M. incognita Common in Tobacco Fields in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Tedford, E C; Fortnum, B A

    1988-10-01

    Thirty-two weed species common in South Carolina and one cultivar of tobacco were evaluated as hosts of Meloidogyne arenaria race 2 and M. incognita race 3 in the greenhouse. Egg mass production and galling differed (P < 0.05) among weed species. Chenopodium album, Euphorbia maculata, and Vicia villosa were good hosts of M. arenaria. Amaranthus palmeri, Rumex crispus, Amaranthus hybridus, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, lpomoea hederacea var. integriuscula, Setaria lutescens, Sida spinosa, Portulaca oleracea, and Rumex acetosella were moderate hosts. Taraxacum officinale, Ipomoea hederacea, Cyperus esculentus, Cynodon dactyIon, Echinochloa crus-galli, Eleusine indica, Sorghum halepense, Setaria viridis, Digitaria sanguinalis, and Datura stramonium were poor hosts for M. arenaria. Amaranthus palmeri, Amaranthus hybridus, Chenopodium album, Euphorbia maculata, Setaria lutescens, Vicia villosa, Sida spinosa, Rumex crispus, and Portulaca oleracea were moderate hosts and Ipomoea hederacea var. integriuscula, Xanthium strumarium, Cyperus esculentus, Cynodon dactylon, Paspalum notatum, Eleusine indica, Setaria viridis, and Rumex acetosella were poor hosts for M. incognita. None of the above were good hosts for M. incognita. Tobacco 'PD4' supported large numbers of both nematode species.

  14. Weed Hosts of Meloidogyne arenaria and M. incognita Common in Tobacco Fields in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Tedford, E C; Fortnum, B A

    1988-10-01

    Thirty-two weed species common in South Carolina and one cultivar of tobacco were evaluated as hosts of Meloidogyne arenaria race 2 and M. incognita race 3 in the greenhouse. Egg mass production and galling differed (P < 0.05) among weed species. Chenopodium album, Euphorbia maculata, and Vicia villosa were good hosts of M. arenaria. Amaranthus palmeri, Rumex crispus, Amaranthus hybridus, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, lpomoea hederacea var. integriuscula, Setaria lutescens, Sida spinosa, Portulaca oleracea, and Rumex acetosella were moderate hosts. Taraxacum officinale, Ipomoea hederacea, Cyperus esculentus, Cynodon dactyIon, Echinochloa crus-galli, Eleusine indica, Sorghum halepense, Setaria viridis, Digitaria sanguinalis, and Datura stramonium were poor hosts for M. arenaria. Amaranthus palmeri, Amaranthus hybridus, Chenopodium album, Euphorbia maculata, Setaria lutescens, Vicia villosa, Sida spinosa, Rumex crispus, and Portulaca oleracea were moderate hosts and Ipomoea hederacea var. integriuscula, Xanthium strumarium, Cyperus esculentus, Cynodon dactylon, Paspalum notatum, Eleusine indica, Setaria viridis, and Rumex acetosella were poor hosts for M. incognita. None of the above were good hosts for M. incognita. Tobacco 'PD4' supported large numbers of both nematode species. PMID:19290313

  15. Biocontrol of root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita damaging queen palm, Livistona rotundifolia using Trichoderma species.

    PubMed

    Jegathambigai, V; Karunaratne, M D S D; Svinningen, Arne; Mikunthan, G

    2008-01-01

    Livistona rotundifolia is a widely grown queen palm in all the net houses of floriculture industries in Sri Lanka. It is grown to an extent of 10,000 mZ in Green Farms Ltd, Marawilla under shade net house. Root knot nematode is one among the key pests of queen palms and causes heavy loss in the queen palm industry. Queen palm is grown in a coir based compost media under sprinkler irrigation. Management of nematodes using chemicals is impractical due the non availability and selectivity of the nematicides available in the market. This study attempted to evaluate the efficacy of Trichoderma species to control root knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita that damage L. rotundifolia and caused heavy loss at Green Farms Ltd, Marawilla. Experiments were conducted using organic amendments with T. viride + T. harzianum (1 x 10(10) cfu/ml) to control the nematodes. Carbofuran (3%) (2.5 g/750 ml pot with organic amendments), the only available pesticide with nematicidal property, was used as a standard check. Queen palm naturally infected with M. incognita was treated with Trichoderma species and the effect was compared with the carbofuran treatment. Standard procedures were adopted to count the nematodes in the pre and post treated queen palm plots. The results revealed that the application of mixture of T. viride and T. harzianum at 1 x 10(10) cfu/ml significantly reduced the nematode populations in the media and number of galls in the palms compare to Carbofuran treated palms. Eggs and juveniles of M. incognita were found infected with Trichoderma species under the in-vitro conditions. The population of M. incognita was started declining significantly 3 weeks after the first application of Trichoderma species in the field. The response was apparent in the palms treated with mixture of Trichoderma species and recovered within 3 months as a healthy and quality product with export standards.

  16. Variability in Time and Space of Meloidogyne incognita Fall Population Density in Cotton Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Terry A.; Baugh, Brant; Kaufman, Harold; Schuster, Greta; Siders, Kerry

    2000-01-01

    Three cotton fields infested with Meloidogyne incognita were intensively sampled in the fall for 3 years (1996 to 1998) to determine if intensive sampling for M. incognita, for which spatial location is important, was necessary every year in a continuous cotton system. Two composite soil samples (20 cores each), taken over an area covering one-third of the field length and two rows wide, were averaged to represent that area (row-location combination). Each field (except one) had 24 areas assayed for changes in M. incognita population density (Pf) over a 3-year period. At all three sites, Pf was higher during fall 1998 than fall 1996. There were no differences in Pf between rows within a year or between years (no. row × year interaction) at any of the sites. At all three sites, there was a consistent difference each year in Pf among locations in a field (no. year × location interaction). At each area, M. incognital/500 cm³ was labeled for one of four Pf classes: <250, 250 to 999, 1,000 to 2,499, and ≥ 2,500. Management of root-knot nematode would likely be altered as classification changed. The areas that were reclassified by two classes or more after 1 and 2 years ranged from 0 to 29% and 25 to 54%, respectively. The risk of underestimating Pf of M. incognita was higher in one site 2 years after the initial intensive sampling procedure, whereas in another site there was little change in Pf 2 years after initial sampling. Sampling frequency will need to be decided on a field-by-field basis. PMID:19270975

  17. Biocontrol of root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita damaging queen palm, Livistona rotundifolia using Trichoderma species.

    PubMed

    Jegathambigai, V; Karunaratne, M D S D; Svinningen, Arne; Mikunthan, G

    2008-01-01

    Livistona rotundifolia is a widely grown queen palm in all the net houses of floriculture industries in Sri Lanka. It is grown to an extent of 10,000 mZ in Green Farms Ltd, Marawilla under shade net house. Root knot nematode is one among the key pests of queen palms and causes heavy loss in the queen palm industry. Queen palm is grown in a coir based compost media under sprinkler irrigation. Management of nematodes using chemicals is impractical due the non availability and selectivity of the nematicides available in the market. This study attempted to evaluate the efficacy of Trichoderma species to control root knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita that damage L. rotundifolia and caused heavy loss at Green Farms Ltd, Marawilla. Experiments were conducted using organic amendments with T. viride + T. harzianum (1 x 10(10) cfu/ml) to control the nematodes. Carbofuran (3%) (2.5 g/750 ml pot with organic amendments), the only available pesticide with nematicidal property, was used as a standard check. Queen palm naturally infected with M. incognita was treated with Trichoderma species and the effect was compared with the carbofuran treatment. Standard procedures were adopted to count the nematodes in the pre and post treated queen palm plots. The results revealed that the application of mixture of T. viride and T. harzianum at 1 x 10(10) cfu/ml significantly reduced the nematode populations in the media and number of galls in the palms compare to Carbofuran treated palms. Eggs and juveniles of M. incognita were found infected with Trichoderma species under the in-vitro conditions. The population of M. incognita was started declining significantly 3 weeks after the first application of Trichoderma species in the field. The response was apparent in the palms treated with mixture of Trichoderma species and recovered within 3 months as a healthy and quality product with export standards. PMID:19226812

  18. Temperature-based Prediction of Egg-Mass Production by Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Diana G.; Rothfus, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    A mturation-rate relationship for Meloidogyne incognita on Lycopersicon esculentum 'Rutgers' was derived and used to estimate harvest dates for maximmn egg hatch from laboratory cultures at ambient temperatures. Daily maturation increments were totaled (nematode maturation total, NMT) and correlated with hatch from isolated white, yellow, and amber egg masses. Hatch per mass fluctuated periodically from ca. 1.0 NMT, when egg masses were first visible, to 2.5 NMT by which time plants showed stress. Maximum yields from white and yellow masses occurred, with a shorter than expected periodicity, at 1.5-1.8 and 2.1-2.2 NMT. White masses decreased from 90% of the total masses at 1.0 NMT to 5% at 2.5 NMT, as the proportion of yellow and amber masses increased concomitantly. Harvested masses per gram of root varied from 97 to 276; hatch per gram of root, 11,000 to 86,000. PMID:19305857

  19. Effect of Meloidogyne incognita and M. javanica on Leaf Water Potential and Water Use of Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Rahi, G. S.; Rich, J. R.; Hodge, C.

    1988-01-01

    Greenhouse lysimeter and field microplot tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of Meloidogyne incognita and M. javanica on plant water relations and growth performance of NC 2326 flue-cured tobacco. In the greenhouse, afternoon leaf water potential values at 8-11 weeks after transplanting were lower by as much as 0.22 MPa in plants infected with either nematode than in the control plants. From 11 to 22 weeks, leaf water potential values were similar in all treatments. Over the course of the 22-week experiment, all infected plants showed similar evapotranspiration patterns, and plants in these treatments used 87-88% of the water utilized by noninfected plants. Biomass production from nematode-infected plants, however, was only about 50% of the biomass of control plants. The field microplot study showed water use patterns similar to those in the lysimeter study. PMID:19290249

  20. [Eupolyphaga frass and its extracts protected tomato from Meloidogyne incognita infestation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-yun; Wang, Xiu-feng; Wei, Min; Shi, Qing-hua; Yang, Feng-juan

    2015-08-01

    The control effects of Eupolyphaga (Eupolyphaga sinensis Walker) frass and its extracts on Meloidogyne incognita were studied through laboratory assays and pot experiments, and the organic volatile compounds and oligochitosan contents in the frass were analyzed. The results indicated that the nematode immobility and mortality was significantly increased with increasing the extract concentration and treatment time. Compared with the control, egg hatching was significantly inhibited when the extract concentration was beyond 20%. Pot experiment indicated that root galling of tomato seedlings was reduced and the relative control effect was significantly improved with the increasing frass application. Meanwhile, plant height, stem diameter and leaf number of tomato increased with the increasing dosage of eupolyphaga frass. The ingredients analysis showed that the content of oligochitosan was about 4.35% and there were 9 categories and 110 kinds of volatile compounds in the frass. PMID:26685616

  1. Transcriptome Analysis of Resistant and Susceptible Alfalfa Cultivars Infected With Root-Knot Nematode Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Postnikova, Olga A.; Hult, Maria; Shao, Jonathan; Skantar, Andrea; Nemchinov, Lev G.

    2015-01-01

    Nematodes are one of the major limiting factors in alfalfa production. Root-knot nematodes (RKN, Meloidogyne spp.) are widely distributed and economically important sedentary endoparasites of agricultural crops and they may inflict significant damage to alfalfa fields. As of today, no studies have been published on global gene expression profiling in alfalfa infected with RKN or any other plant parasitic nematode. Very little information is available about molecular mechanisms that contribute to pathogenesis and defense responses in alfalfa against these pests and specifically against RKN. In this work, we performed root transcriptome analysis of resistant (cv. Moapa 69) and susceptible (cv. Lahontan) alfalfa cultivars infected with RKN Meloidogyne incognita, widespread root-knot nematode species and a major pest worldwide. A total of 1,701,622,580 pair-end reads were generated on an Illumina Hi-Seq 2000 platform from the roots of both cultivars and assembled into 45,595 and 47,590 transcripts in cvs Moapa 69 and Lahontan, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a number of common and unique genes that were differentially expressed in susceptible and resistant lines as a result of nematode infection. Although the susceptible cultivar showed a more pronounced defense response to the infection, feeding sites were successfully established in its roots. Characteristically, basal gene expression levels under normal conditions differed between the two cultivars as well, which may confer advantage to one of the genotypes toward resistance to nematodes. Differentially expressed genes were subsequently assigned to known Gene Ontology categories to predict their functional roles and associated biological processes. Real-time PCR validated expression changes in genes arbitrarily selected for experimental confirmation. Candidate genes that contribute to protection against M. incognita in alfalfa were proposed and alfalfa-nematode interactions with respect to resistance

  2. Susceptibility of Several Common Subtropical Weeds to Meloidogyne arenaria, M. incognita, and M. javanica.

    PubMed

    Kokalis-Burelle, Nancy; Rosskopf, Erin N

    2012-06-01

    Experiments were conducted in the greenhouse to assess root galling and egg production of three root-knot nematode species, Meloidogyne arenaria, M. incognita, and M. javanica, on several weeds common to Florida agricultural land. Weeds evaluated were Amaranthus retroflexus (redroot pigweed), Cyperus esculentus (yellow nutsedge), Eleusine indica (goosegrass), Portulaca oleracea (common purslane), and Solanum americanum (American black nightshade). Additionally, although it is recommended as a cover crop in southern regions of the U.S., Aeschynomene americana (American jointvetch) was evaluated as a weed following the detection of root galling in a heavy volunteer infestation of an experimental field in southeastern Florida. Weeds were propagated from seed and inoculated with 1000 nematode eggs when plants reached the two true-leaf stage. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Rutgers') was included as a positive control. Aeschynomene americana and P. oleracea roots supported the highest number of juveniles (J2) and had the highest number of eggs/g of root for all three species of Meloidogyne tested. However, though P. oleracea supported very high root levels of the three nematode species tested, its fleshy roots did not exhibit severe gall symptoms. Low levels of apparent galling, combined with high egg production, increase the potential for P. oleracea to support populations of these three species of root-knot nematodes to a degree that may not be appropriately recognized. This research quantifies the impact of P. oleracea as a host for M. arenaria, M. incognita, and M. javanica compared to several other important weeds commonly found in Florida agricultural production, and the potential for A. americana to serve as an important weed host of the three species of root-knot nematode tested in southern regions of Florida. PMID:23482324

  3. Susceptibility of Several Common Subtropical Weeds to Meloidogyne arenaria, M. incognita, and M. javanica

    PubMed Central

    Kokalis-Burelle, Nancy; Rosskopf, Erin N.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in the greenhouse to assess root galling and egg production of three root-knot nematode species, Meloidogyne arenaria, M. incognita, and M. javanica, on several weeds common to Florida agricultural land. Weeds evaluated were Amaranthus retroflexus (redroot pigweed), Cyperus esculentus (yellow nutsedge), Eleusine indica (goosegrass), Portulaca oleracea (common purslane), and Solanum americanum (American black nightshade). Additionally, although it is recommended as a cover crop in southern regions of the U.S., Aeschynomene americana (American jointvetch) was evaluated as a weed following the detection of root galling in a heavy volunteer infestation of an experimental field in southeastern Florida. Weeds were propagated from seed and inoculated with 1000 nematode eggs when plants reached the two true-leaf stage. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum ‘Rutgers’) was included as a positive control. Aeschynomene americana and P. oleracea roots supported the highest number of juveniles (J2) and had the highest number of eggs/g of root for all three species of Meloidogyne tested. However, though P. oleracea supported very high root levels of the three nematode species tested, its fleshy roots did not exhibit severe gall symptoms. Low levels of apparent galling, combined with high egg production, increase the potential for P. oleracea to support populations of these three species of root-knot nematodes to a degree that may not be appropriately recognized. This research quantifies the impact of P. oleracea as a host for M. arenaria, M. incognita, and M. javanica compared to several other important weeds commonly found in Florida agricultural production, and the potential for A. americana to serve as an important weed host of the three species of root-knot nematode tested in southern regions of Florida. PMID:23482324

  4. Carbon Partitioning in Soybean Infected with Meloidogyne incognita and M. javanica

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, R. G.; Mazzafera, P.; Ferraz, L. C. C. B.

    1999-01-01

    Seven-day-old seedlings of two cultivars (Cristalina and UFV ITM1) of Glycine max were inoculated with 0, 3,000, 9,000, or 27,000 eggs of Meloidogyne incognita race 3 or M. javanica and maintained in a greenhouse. Thirty days later, plants were exposed to ¹⁴CO₂ for 4 hours. Twenty hours after ¹⁴CO₂ exposure, the root fresh weight, leaf dry weight, nematode eggs per gram of root, total and specific radioactivity of carbohydrates in roots, and root carbohydrate content were evaluated. Meloidogyne javanica produced more eggs than M. incognita on both varieties. A general increase in root weight and a decrease in leaf weight with increased inoculum levels were observed. Gall tissue appeared to account for most of the root mass increase in seedlings infected with M. javanica. For both nematodes there was an increase of total radioactivity in the root system with increased levels of nematodes, and this was positively related to the number of eggs per gram fresh weight and to the root fresh weight, but negatively related to leaf dry weight. In most cases, specific radioactivities of sucrose and reducing sugars were also increased with increased inoculum levels. Highest specific radioactivities were observed with reducing sugars. Although significant changes were not observed in endogenous levels of carbohydrates, sucrose content was higher than reducing sugars. The data show that nematodes are strong metabolic sinks and significantly change the carbon distribution pattern in infected soybean plants. Carbon partitioning in plants infected with nematodes may vary with the nematode genotype. PMID:19270907

  5. Management of Meloidogyne incognita with Chemicals and Cultivars in Cotton in a Semi-Arid Environment

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, T. A.; Siders, K. T.; Anderson, M. G.; Russell, S. A.; Woodward, J. E.; Mullinix, B. G.

    2014-01-01

    Management of Meloidogyne incognita (root-knot nematode) in cotton in the United States was substantially affected by the decision to stop production of aldicarb by its principle manufacturer in 2011. The remaining commercially available tools to manage M. incognita included soil fumigation, nematicide seed treatments, postemergence nematicide application, and cultivars partially resistant to M. incognita. Small plot field studies were conducted on a total of nine sites from 2011–2013 to examine the effects of each of these tools alone or in combinations, on early season galling, late-season nematode density in soil, yield, and value ($/ha = lint value minus chemical costs/ha). The use of a partially resistant cultivar resulted in fewer galls/root system at 35 d after planting in eight of nine tests, lower root-knot nematode density late in the growing season for all test sites, higher lint yield in eight of nine sites, and higher value/ha in six of nine sites. Galls per root were reduced by aldicarb in three of nine sites and by 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) in two of eight sites, relative to the nontreated control (no insecticide or nematicide treatment). Soil fumigation reduced M. incognita density late in the season in three of nine sites. Value/ha was not affected by chemical treatment in four of nine sites, but there was a cultivar × chemical interaction in four of nine sites. When value/ha was affected by chemical treatment, the nontreated control had a similar value to the treatment with the highest value/ha in seven of eight cultivar-site combinations. The next “best” value/ha were associated with seed treatment insecticide (STI) + oxamyl and aldicarb (similar value to the highest value/ha in six of eight cultivar-site combinations). The lowest valued treatment was STI + 1,3-D. In a semi-arid region, where rainfall was low during the spring for all three years, cultivars with partial resistance to M. incognita was the most profitable method of

  6. Identification of Nematicidal Constituents of Notopterygium incisum Rhizomes against Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gai; Lai, Daowan; Liu, Qi Zhi; Zhou, Ligang; Liu, Zhi Long

    2016-01-01

    During a screening program for new agrochemicals from Chinese medicinal herbs, the ethanol extract of Notopterygium incisum rhizomes was found to possess strong nematicidal activity against the two species of nematodes, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and Meloidogyne incognita. Based on bioactivity-guided fractionation, the four constituents were isolated from the ethanol extract and identified as columbianetin, falcarindiol, falcarinol, and isoimperatorin. Among the four isolated constituents, two acetylenic compounds, falcarindiol and falcarinol (2.20-12.60 μg/mL and 1.06-4.96 μg/mL, respectively) exhibited stronger nematicidal activity than two furanocoumarins, columbianetin, and isoimperatorin (21.83-103.44 μg/mL and 17.21-30.91 μg/mL, respectively) against the two species of nematodes, B. xylophilus and M. incognita. The four isolated constituents also displayed phototoxic activity against the nematodes. The results indicate that the ethanol extract of N. incisum and its four isolated constituents have potential for development into natural nematicides for control of plant-parasitic nematodes. PMID:27669203

  7. Cowpea-Meloidogyne incognita interaction: Root proteomic analysis during early stages of nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Villeth, Gabriela R C; Carmo, Lilian S T; Silva, Luciano P; Fontes, Wagner; Grynberg, Priscila; Saraiva, Mario; Brasileiro, Ana C M; Carneiro, Regina M D; Oliveira, José T A; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria F; Mehta, Angela

    2015-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) is an important legume species well adapted to low fertility soils and prolonged drought periods. One of the main problems that cause severe yield losses in cowpea is the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. The aim of this work was to analyze the differential expression of proteins in the contrasting cultivars of cowpea CE 31 (highly resistant) and CE 109 (slightly resistant) during early stages of M. incognita infection. Cowpea roots were collected at 3, 6, and 9 days after inoculation and used for protein extraction and 2-DE analysis. From a total of 59 differential spots, 37 proteins were identified, mostly involved in plant defense, such as spermidine synthase, patatin, proteasome component, and nitrile-specifier protein. A follow-up study was performed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis of nine selected proteins and the results revealed a very similar upregulation trend between the protein expression profiles and the corresponding transcripts. This study also identified ACT and GAPDH as a good combination of reference genes for quantitative RT-PCR analysis of the pathosystem cowpea/nematode. Additionally, an interactome analysis showed three major pathways affected by nematode infection: proteasome endopeptidase complex, oxidative phosphorylation, and flavonoid biosynthesis. Taken together, the results obtained by proteome, transcriptome, and interactome approaches suggest that oxidative stress, ubiquitination, and glucosinolate degradation may be part of cowpea CE 31 resistance mechanisms in response to nematode infection. PMID:25736976

  8. Cowpea-Meloidogyne incognita interaction: Root proteomic analysis during early stages of nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Villeth, Gabriela R C; Carmo, Lilian S T; Silva, Luciano P; Fontes, Wagner; Grynberg, Priscila; Saraiva, Mario; Brasileiro, Ana C M; Carneiro, Regina M D; Oliveira, José T A; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria F; Mehta, Angela

    2015-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) is an important legume species well adapted to low fertility soils and prolonged drought periods. One of the main problems that cause severe yield losses in cowpea is the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. The aim of this work was to analyze the differential expression of proteins in the contrasting cultivars of cowpea CE 31 (highly resistant) and CE 109 (slightly resistant) during early stages of M. incognita infection. Cowpea roots were collected at 3, 6, and 9 days after inoculation and used for protein extraction and 2-DE analysis. From a total of 59 differential spots, 37 proteins were identified, mostly involved in plant defense, such as spermidine synthase, patatin, proteasome component, and nitrile-specifier protein. A follow-up study was performed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis of nine selected proteins and the results revealed a very similar upregulation trend between the protein expression profiles and the corresponding transcripts. This study also identified ACT and GAPDH as a good combination of reference genes for quantitative RT-PCR analysis of the pathosystem cowpea/nematode. Additionally, an interactome analysis showed three major pathways affected by nematode infection: proteasome endopeptidase complex, oxidative phosphorylation, and flavonoid biosynthesis. Taken together, the results obtained by proteome, transcriptome, and interactome approaches suggest that oxidative stress, ubiquitination, and glucosinolate degradation may be part of cowpea CE 31 resistance mechanisms in response to nematode infection.

  9. Development of enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Kapur-Ghai, J; Kaur, M; Goel, P

    2014-09-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita) are obligate, sedentary plant endoparasites that are extremely polyphagous in nature and cause severe economic losses in agriculture. Hence, it is essential to control the parasite at an early stage. For any control strategy to be effective, an early and accurate diagnosis is of paramount importance. Immunoassays have the inherent advantages of sensitivity and specificity; have the potential to identify and quantify these plant-parasitic nematodes. Hence, in the present studies, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been developed for the detection of M.incognita antigens. First an indirect ELISA was developed for detection and titration of anti-M.incognita antibodies. Results indicated as high as 320 K titre of the antisera. Finally competitive inhibition ELISA was developed employing these anti-M.incognita antibodies for detection of M.incognita antigens. Sensitivity of ELISA was 10 fg. Competitive inhibition ELISA developed in the present studies has the potential of being used as an easy, rapid, specific and sensitive diagnostic tool for the detection of M.incognita infection.

  10. Effects of plant growth promoting bacteria and composed organic fertilizers on the reproduction of Meloidogyne incognita and tomato growth.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Zaki A

    2004-11-01

    Glasshouse experiments were conducted to assess the influence of Pseudomonas fluorescens, Azotobacter chroococcum, Azospirillum brasilense and composted organic fertilizers (cow dung, horse dung, goat dung and poultry manure) alone and in combination on the multiplication of Meloidogyne incognita and growth of tomato. P. fluorescens was better at improving tomato growth and reducing galling and nematode multiplication than A. chroococcum or A. brasilense. Among composted organic fertilizers, poultry manure resulted in less galling and nematode multiplication than occurred with goat dung. However, composted goat dung was better in reducing nematode multiplication and improving plant growth than horse dung. Cow dung was the composted organic fertilizer least effective in reducing galling and nematode multiplication. Poultry manure with P. fluorescens was the best combination for the management of M. incognita on tomato but improved management of M. incognita can also be obtained if goat dung is used with P. fluorescens or poultry manure with A. chroococcum. PMID:15246448

  11. Effects of plant growth promoting bacteria and composed organic fertilizers on the reproduction of Meloidogyne incognita and tomato growth.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Zaki A

    2004-11-01

    Glasshouse experiments were conducted to assess the influence of Pseudomonas fluorescens, Azotobacter chroococcum, Azospirillum brasilense and composted organic fertilizers (cow dung, horse dung, goat dung and poultry manure) alone and in combination on the multiplication of Meloidogyne incognita and growth of tomato. P. fluorescens was better at improving tomato growth and reducing galling and nematode multiplication than A. chroococcum or A. brasilense. Among composted organic fertilizers, poultry manure resulted in less galling and nematode multiplication than occurred with goat dung. However, composted goat dung was better in reducing nematode multiplication and improving plant growth than horse dung. Cow dung was the composted organic fertilizer least effective in reducing galling and nematode multiplication. Poultry manure with P. fluorescens was the best combination for the management of M. incognita on tomato but improved management of M. incognita can also be obtained if goat dung is used with P. fluorescens or poultry manure with A. chroococcum.

  12. Optimal Release Rates for Attracting Meloidogyne incognita, Rotylenchulus reniformis, and Other Nematodes to Carbon Dioxide in Sand

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, A. F.

    1995-01-01

    Movement of vermiform stages of Meloidogyne incognita, Rotylenchulus reniformis, Ditylenchus phyllobius, Steinernema glaseri, and Caenorhabditis elegans in response to carbon dioxide was studied in 40- and 72-mm-long cylinders of moist sand inside 38-mm-d acrylic tubes. Meloidogyne incognita, R. reniformis, and S. glaseri were attracted to CO₂ when placed on a linear gradient of 0.2%/cm at a mean CO₂ concentration of 1.2%. When CO₂ was delivered into the sand through a syringe needle at flow rates between 2 and 130 μl/minute, the optimal flow rate for attracting M. incognita and R. reniformis was 15 μl/minute, and maximal attraction of the two species from a distance of 52 mm was achieved after 29 and 40 hours, respectively. After 24 hours, a total CO₂ volume of 20 cm³ was sufficient to induce 96% of all M. incognita introduced to move into the half of the cylinder into which CO₂ was delivered and more than 75 % to accumulate in the 9 cm³ of sand volume nearest the source. Results indicate it may be possible to use a chemical or biological source of CO₂ to attract nematodes to nematicide granules or biocontrol agents. PMID:19277260

  13. Effect of a Terminated Cover Crop and Aldicarb on Cotton Yield and Meloidogyne incognita Population Density.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, T A; Leser, J F; Keeling, J W; Mullinix, B

    2008-06-01

    Terminated small grain cover crops are valuable in light textured soils to reduce wind and rain erosion and for protection of young cotton seedlings. A three-year study was conducted to determine the impact of terminated small grain winter cover crops, which are hosts for Meloidogyne incognita, on cotton yield, root galling and nematode midseason population density. The small plot test consisted of the cover treatment as the main plots (winter fallow, oats, rye and wheat) and rate of aldicarb applied in-furrow at-plant (0, 0.59 and 0.84 kg a.i./ha) as subplots in a split-plot design with eight replications, arranged in a randomized complete block design. Roots of 10 cotton plants per plot were examined at approximately 35 days after planting. Root galling was affected by aldicarb rate (9.1, 3.8 and 3.4 galls/root system for 0, 0.59 and 0.84 kg aldicarb/ha), but not by cover crop. Soil samples were collected in mid-July and assayed for nematodes. The winter fallow plots had a lower density of M. incognita second-stage juveniles (J2) (transformed to Log(10) (J2 + 1)/500 cm(3) soil) than any of the cover crops (0.88, 1.58, 1.67 and 1.75 Log(10)(J2 + 1)/500 cm(3) soil for winter fallow, oats, rye and wheat, respectively). There were also fewer M. incognita eggs at midseason in the winter fallow (3,512, 7,953, 8,262 and 11,392 eggs/500 cm(3) soil for winter fallow, oats, rye and wheat, respectively). Yield (kg lint per ha) was increased by application of aldicarb (1,544, 1,710 and 1,697 for 0, 0.59 and 0.84 kg aldicarb/ha), but not by any cover crop treatments. These results were consistent over three years. The soil temperature at 15 cm depth, from when soils reached 18 degrees C to termination of the grass cover crop, averaged 9,588, 7,274 and 1,639 centigrade hours (with a minimum threshold of 10 degrees C), in 2005, 2006 and 2007, respectively. Under these conditions, potential reproduction of M. incognita on the cover crop did not result in a yield penalty.

  14. Assessment of DAPG-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens for Management of Meloidogyne incognita and Fusarium oxysporum on Watermelon.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Susan L F; Everts, Kathryne L; Gardener, Brian McSpadden; Masler, Edward P; Abdelnabby, Hazem M E; Skantar, Andrea M

    2016-03-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens isolates Clinto 1R, Wayne 1R, and Wood 1R, which produce the antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG), can suppress soilborne diseases and promote plant growth. Consequently, these beneficial bacterial isolates were tested on watermelon plants for suppression of Meloidogyne incognita (root-knot nematode: RKN) and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (Fon). In a greenhouse trial, Wayne 1R root dip suppressed numbers of RKN eggs per gram root on 'Charleston Gray' watermelon by 28.9%. However, in studies focused on 'Sugar Baby' watermelon, which is commercially grown in Maryland, a Wayne 1R root dip did not inhibit RKN reproduction or plant death caused by Fon. When all three isolates were applied as seed coats, plant stand in the greenhouse was reduced up to 60% in treatments that included Fon ± P. fluorescens, and eggs per gram root did not differ among treatments. In a microplot trial with Clinto 1R and Wayne 1R root dips, inoculation with P. fluorescens and/or Fon resulted in shorter vine lengths than treatment with either P. fluorescens isolate plus RKN. Root weights, galling indices, eggs per gram root, and second-stage juvenile (J2) numbers in soil were similar among all RKN-inoculated treatments, and fruit production was not affected by treatment. Plant death was high in all treatments. These studies demonstrated that the tested P. fluorescens isolates resulted in some inhibition of vine growth in the field, and were not effective for enhancing plant vigor or suppressing RKN or Fon on watermelon.

  15. Assessment of DAPG-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens for Management of Meloidogyne incognita and Fusarium oxysporum on Watermelon.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Susan L F; Everts, Kathryne L; Gardener, Brian McSpadden; Masler, Edward P; Abdelnabby, Hazem M E; Skantar, Andrea M

    2016-03-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens isolates Clinto 1R, Wayne 1R, and Wood 1R, which produce the antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG), can suppress soilborne diseases and promote plant growth. Consequently, these beneficial bacterial isolates were tested on watermelon plants for suppression of Meloidogyne incognita (root-knot nematode: RKN) and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (Fon). In a greenhouse trial, Wayne 1R root dip suppressed numbers of RKN eggs per gram root on 'Charleston Gray' watermelon by 28.9%. However, in studies focused on 'Sugar Baby' watermelon, which is commercially grown in Maryland, a Wayne 1R root dip did not inhibit RKN reproduction or plant death caused by Fon. When all three isolates were applied as seed coats, plant stand in the greenhouse was reduced up to 60% in treatments that included Fon ± P. fluorescens, and eggs per gram root did not differ among treatments. In a microplot trial with Clinto 1R and Wayne 1R root dips, inoculation with P. fluorescens and/or Fon resulted in shorter vine lengths than treatment with either P. fluorescens isolate plus RKN. Root weights, galling indices, eggs per gram root, and second-stage juvenile (J2) numbers in soil were similar among all RKN-inoculated treatments, and fruit production was not affected by treatment. Plant death was high in all treatments. These studies demonstrated that the tested P. fluorescens isolates resulted in some inhibition of vine growth in the field, and were not effective for enhancing plant vigor or suppressing RKN or Fon on watermelon. PMID:27168652

  16. Assessment of DAPG-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens for Management of Meloidogyne incognita and Fusarium oxysporum on Watermelon

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Susan L. F.; Everts, Kathryne L.; Gardener, Brian McSpadden; Masler, Edward P.; Abdelnabby, Hazem M. E.; Skantar, Andrea M.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens isolates Clinto 1R, Wayne 1R, and Wood 1R, which produce the antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG), can suppress soilborne diseases and promote plant growth. Consequently, these beneficial bacterial isolates were tested on watermelon plants for suppression of Meloidogyne incognita (root-knot nematode: RKN) and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (Fon). In a greenhouse trial, Wayne 1R root dip suppressed numbers of RKN eggs per gram root on ‘Charleston Gray’ watermelon by 28.9%. However, in studies focused on ‘Sugar Baby’ watermelon, which is commercially grown in Maryland, a Wayne 1R root dip did not inhibit RKN reproduction or plant death caused by Fon. When all three isolates were applied as seed coats, plant stand in the greenhouse was reduced up to 60% in treatments that included Fon ± P. fluorescens, and eggs per gram root did not differ among treatments. In a microplot trial with Clinto 1R and Wayne 1R root dips, inoculation with P. fluorescens and/or Fon resulted in shorter vine lengths than treatment with either P. fluorescens isolate plus RKN. Root weights, galling indices, eggs per gram root, and second-stage juvenile (J2) numbers in soil were similar among all RKN-inoculated treatments, and fruit production was not affected by treatment. Plant death was high in all treatments. These studies demonstrated that the tested P. fluorescens isolates resulted in some inhibition of vine growth in the field, and were not effective for enhancing plant vigor or suppressing RKN or Fon on watermelon. PMID:27168652

  17. [Efficiency of Trichoderma longibrachiatum T6 in the control of Meloidogyne incognita and its rhizosphere colonization in cucumber].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-wu; Xu, Bing-liang; Xue, Ying-yu; Liang, Qiao-lan; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency of different concentrations of Trichoderma longibrachiatum T6 against Meloidogyne incognita and its rhizosphere colonization in cucumber were determined in greenhouse experiments. The results of rhizosphere colonization experiments showed that the number of colonies in cucumber soil and root increased significantly ten weeks after inoculation with the second stage juveniles of M. incognita and different concentrations of T. longibrachiatum T6, and there was significant difference in different concentrations of T. longibrachiatum T6, e.g., the maximum numbers of colonies in soil and root were 7.8 x 10⁷ and 6.3 x 10⁵ CFU · mL⁻¹ respectively after treated with the spore suspension of 1.5 x 10⁷ CFU · mL⁻¹. Greenhouse experiments results showed that different concentrations of T. longibrachiatum T6 had significant control effect on different life stages of M. incognita, and the control effect increased with the concentration of T. longibrachiatum T6. T. longibrachiatum T6 significantly increased plant height, root length, above-ground and root fresh mass o cucumber inoculated by M. incognita. T. longibrachiatum T6 could colonize in cucumber rhizosphere, had control effect on M. incognita, and significantly improved the growth of cucumber.

  18. [Efficiency of Trichoderma longibrachiatum T6 in the control of Meloidogyne incognita and its rhizosphere colonization in cucumber].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-wu; Xu, Bing-liang; Xue, Ying-yu; Liang, Qiao-lan; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency of different concentrations of Trichoderma longibrachiatum T6 against Meloidogyne incognita and its rhizosphere colonization in cucumber were determined in greenhouse experiments. The results of rhizosphere colonization experiments showed that the number of colonies in cucumber soil and root increased significantly ten weeks after inoculation with the second stage juveniles of M. incognita and different concentrations of T. longibrachiatum T6, and there was significant difference in different concentrations of T. longibrachiatum T6, e.g., the maximum numbers of colonies in soil and root were 7.8 x 10⁷ and 6.3 x 10⁵ CFU · mL⁻¹ respectively after treated with the spore suspension of 1.5 x 10⁷ CFU · mL⁻¹. Greenhouse experiments results showed that different concentrations of T. longibrachiatum T6 had significant control effect on different life stages of M. incognita, and the control effect increased with the concentration of T. longibrachiatum T6. T. longibrachiatum T6 significantly increased plant height, root length, above-ground and root fresh mass o cucumber inoculated by M. incognita. T. longibrachiatum T6 could colonize in cucumber rhizosphere, had control effect on M. incognita, and significantly improved the growth of cucumber. PMID:27228616

  19. Mitochondrial genomes of Meloidogyne chitwoodi and M. incognita (Nematoda: Tylenchina): comparative analysis, gene order and phylogenetic relationships with other nematodes.

    PubMed

    Humphreys-Pereira, Danny A; Elling, Axel A

    2014-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are among the most important plant pathogens. In this study, the mitochondrial (mt) genomes of the root-knot nematodes, M. chitwoodi and M. incognita were sequenced. PCR analyses suggest that both mt genomes are circular, with an estimated size of 19.7 and 18.6-19.1kb, respectively. The mt genomes each contain a large non-coding region with tandem repeats and the control region. The mt gene arrangement of M. chitwoodi and M. incognita is unlike that of other nematodes. Sequence alignments of the two Meloidogyne mt genomes showed three translocations; two in transfer RNAs and one in cox2. Compared with other nematode mt genomes, the gene arrangement of M. chitwoodi and M. incognita was most similar to Pratylenchus vulnus. Phylogenetic analyses (Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian inference) were conducted using 78 complete mt genomes of diverse nematode species. Analyses based on nucleotides and amino acids of the 12 protein-coding mt genes showed strong support for the monophyly of class Chromadorea, but only amino acid-based analyses supported the monophyly of class Enoplea. The suborder Spirurina was not monophyletic in any of the phylogenetic analyses, contradicting the Clade III model, which groups Ascaridomorpha, Spiruromorpha and Oxyuridomorpha based on the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. Importantly, comparisons of mt gene arrangement and tree-based methods placed Meloidogyne as sister taxa of Pratylenchus, a migratory plant endoparasitic nematode, and not with the sedentary endoparasitic Heterodera. Thus, comparative analyses of mt genomes suggest that sedentary endoparasitism in Meloidogyne and Heterodera is based on convergent evolution.

  20. Growth and Energy Demand of Meloidogyne incognita on Susceptible and Resistant Vitis vinifera Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Melakeberhan, H; Ferris, H

    1988-10-01

    Food (energy) consumption rates ofMeloidogyne incognita were calculated on Vitis vinifera cv. French Colombard (highly susceptible) and cv. Thompson Seedless (moderately resistant). One-month-old grape seedlings in styrofoam cups were inoculated with 2,000 or 8,000 M. incognita second-stage juveniles (J2) and maintained at 17.5 degree days (DD - base 10 C)/day until maximum adult female growth and (or) the end of oviposition. At 70 DD intervals, nematode fresh biomass was calculated on the basis of volumes of 15-20 nematodes per plant obtained with a digitizer and computer algorithm. Egg production was measured at 50-80 DD intervals by weighing 7-10 egg masses and counting the number of eggs. Nematode growth and food (energy) consumption rates were calculated up to 1,000 DD based on biomass increase, respiratory requirements, and an assumption of 60 % assimilation efficiency. The growth rate of a single root-knot nematode, excluding egg production, was similar in both cultivars and had a logistic form. The maximum fresh weight of a mature female nematode was ca. 29-32 mug. The total biomass increase, including egg production, also had a logistic form. Maximum biomass (mature adult female and egg mass) was 211 mug on French Colombard and 127 mug on Thompson Seedless. The calculated total cost to the host for the development of a single J2 from root penetration to the end of oviposition for body growth and total biomass was 0.535 and 0.486 calories with a total energy demand of 1.176 and 0.834 calories in French Colombard and Thompson Seedless, respectively. PMID:19290253

  1. Effect of Simultaneous Water Deficit Stress and Meloidogyne incognita Infection on Cotton Yield and Fiber Quality

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R. F.; Earl, H. J.; Timper, P.

    2014-01-01

    Both water deficit stress and Meloidogyne incognita infection can reduce cotton growth and yield, and drought can affect fiber quality, but the effect of nematodes on fiber quality is not well documented. To determine whether nematode parasitism affects fiber quality and whether the combined effects of nematode and drought stress on yield and quality are additive (independent effects), synergistic, or antagonistic, we conducted a study for 7 yr in a field infested with M. incognita. A split-plot design was used with the main plot factor as one of three irrigation treatments (low [nonirrigated], moderate irrigation, and high irrigation [water-replete]) and the subplot factor as 0 or 56 l/ha 1,3-dichloropropene. We prevented water deficit stress in plots designated as water-replete by supplementing rainfall with irrigation. Plots receiving moderate irrigation received half the water applied to the water-replete treatment. The severity of root galling was greater in nonfumigated plots and in plots receiving the least irrigation, but the amount of irrigation did not influence the effect of fumigation on root galling (no irrigation × fumigation interaction). The weights of lint and seed harvested were reduced in nonfumigated plots and also decreased as the level of irrigation decreased, but fumigation did not influence the effect of irrigation. Nematodes affected fiber quality by increasing micronaire readings but typically had little or no effect on percent lint, fiber length (measured by HVI), uniformity, strength, elongation, length (based on weight or number measured by AFIS), upper quartile length, or short fiber content (based on weight or number). Micronaire also was increased by water deficit stress, but the effects from nematodes and water stress were independent. We conclude that the detrimental effects caused to cotton yield and quality by nematode parasitism and water deficit stress are independent and therefore additive. PMID:24987162

  2. Effect of Simultaneous Water Deficit Stress and Meloidogyne incognita Infection on Cotton Yield and Fiber Quality.

    PubMed

    Davis, R F; Earl, H J; Timper, P

    2014-06-01

    Both water deficit stress and Meloidogyne incognita infection can reduce cotton growth and yield, and drought can affect fiber quality, but the effect of nematodes on fiber quality is not well documented. To determine whether nematode parasitism affects fiber quality and whether the combined effects of nematode and drought stress on yield and quality are additive (independent effects), synergistic, or antagonistic, we conducted a study for 7 yr in a field infested with M. incognita. A split-plot design was used with the main plot factor as one of three irrigation treatments (low [nonirrigated], moderate irrigation, and high irrigation [water-replete]) and the subplot factor as 0 or 56 l/ha 1,3-dichloropropene. We prevented water deficit stress in plots designated as water-replete by supplementing rainfall with irrigation. Plots receiving moderate irrigation received half the water applied to the water-replete treatment. The severity of root galling was greater in nonfumigated plots and in plots receiving the least irrigation, but the amount of irrigation did not influence the effect of fumigation on root galling (no irrigation × fumigation interaction). The weights of lint and seed harvested were reduced in nonfumigated plots and also decreased as the level of irrigation decreased, but fumigation did not influence the effect of irrigation. Nematodes affected fiber quality by increasing micronaire readings but typically had little or no effect on percent lint, fiber length (measured by HVI), uniformity, strength, elongation, length (based on weight or number measured by AFIS), upper quartile length, or short fiber content (based on weight or number). Micronaire also was increased by water deficit stress, but the effects from nematodes and water stress were independent. We conclude that the detrimental effects caused to cotton yield and quality by nematode parasitism and water deficit stress are independent and therefore additive. PMID:24987162

  3. Activity of Hydroxamic Acids from Secale cereale Against the Plant-Parasitic Nematodes Meloidogyne incognita and Xiphinema americanum.

    PubMed

    Zasada, I A; Meyer, S L F; Halbrendt, J M; Rice, C

    2005-10-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic hydroxamic acids are secondary metabolites found in the family Poaceae and have been implicated in the allelopathy of rye (Secale cereale). The toxicity of these compounds against plant-parasitic nematodes is unknown. DIBOA (2,4-dihydroxy-(2H)-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one), DIMBOA (2,4-hydroxy-7-methoxy-(2H)-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one), and their degradation products BOA (benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one) and MBOA (6-methoxy-benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one) were screened in vitro against Meloidogyne incognita second-stage juveniles (J2) and eggs and mixed-stages of Xiphinema americanum. Xiphinema americanum was more sensitive to DIBOA and DIMBOA than M. incognita J2, with a maximum apparent mortality of 96 and 92% compared to 73 and 72% at 90 mug/ml. Eggs of M. incognita were less sensitive to the hydroxamic acids than J2; only DIBOA resulted in a 50% reduction in egg hatch, with a lethal concentration (LC(50)) of 74 mug/ml compared to 21 mug/ml for J2. When M. incognita J2 were exposed to DIBOA for 48 h and the compound was removed and replaced with water, the LC(50) value increased from 21.0 to 40.7 mug/ml. MBOA was not toxic to X. americanum or M. incognita eggs, but was toxic to M. incognita J2, with LC(50) values of 44 and 20 mug/ml before and after the compound was removed and replaced with water. BOA was the least toxic hydroxamic acid tested; it did not reduce M. incognita egg hatch after 1 week of exposure or increase X. americanum mortality after 24 h of exposure. While in vitro studies provide a valuable starting point in determining the toxicity of the chemical component of rye, the relevance of the data to soil remains to be determined.

  4. Response of five lettuce cultivars to root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Pedroche, Nordalyn B; Villanueva, Luciana M; De Dirk, Waele

    2007-01-01

    The root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognito (Kofoid et White) Chitwood is an important pathogen of vegetables. Five commercial cultivars of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) were evaluated under greenhouse conditions for resistance to Meloidogyne incognita, Benguet population. Plants were inoculated with 1000 eggs collected from 'Apollo' tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) roots. The degree of galling and number of egg masses were assessed 4 and 8 weeks after inoculation. Host plant response was classified as immune, highly resistant, resistant, moderately resistant, intermediate, moderately susceptible, and highly susceptible based on the resistance index of Kouamè et at., 1998 [RI = (gall2 + egg2)]. Inoculation of 1000 eggs/plant significantly affected the growth and yield of the five lettuce cultivars 4 and 8 weeks after inoculation. A significant interaction was observed between treatment and cultivar during the two evaluation periods in terms of marketable and non-marketable yield, plant height, root weight, number of galls and number of egg masses. A reduction in growth and yield was observed in the cultivars Ballon, Lollo Rosa and Red Wave. Significant differences were noted in the number of galls and egg masses among the different cultivars tested. The highest average number of galls was obtained from the cultivars Red Wave, Ballon and Lollo Rosa. Cultivar Ballon had the highest average number of recovered nematode while Gilaben had the lowest with 15 and 4 per roots, respectively after 4 weeks inoculation. After 8 weeks, nematode was highest in cultivar Red Wave (615) and lowest in Great Lakes (70). Based on the host response, cultivars Great Lakes and Gilaben were rated highly resistant and resistant, respectively, while Red Wave, Ballon and Lollo Rosa were rated intermediate. PMID:18399501

  5. Resistance of upland-rice lines to root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Souza, D C T; Botelho, F B S; Rodrigues, C S; Furtini, I V; Smiderle, E C; de Matos, D L; Bruzi, A T

    2015-01-01

    Despite the benefits of crop rotation, occurrence of nematodes is a common problem for almost all crops within the Cerrado biome, especially for rice. The use of resistant cultivars is one of the main methods for control of nematodes. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the reaction of 36 upland-rice lines, with desirable agronomic characteristics, according to their resistance to root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita). The experimental design was entirely randomized with four replications. Each plot of land consisted of two rice plants in a 3-L vase. The plants were inoculated with 1000 eggs and eventual juveniles of the respective nematodes. Fifty-five days after the inoculation, the roots and the aerial part of the plant were weighed and the egg mass (EM) as well as the reproduction factor (Rf) were estimated. It was determined that the isolated use of EM was not beneficial in selecting rice lines resistant to the root-knot nematode. This procedure must, therefore, take into account the egg counting and the Rf, in order to improve the reliability of the selection. In our study, 30 evaluated lines were observed to be resistant. Among the recommended cultivars, only BRS Monarca had its performance susceptible to the studied nematode species. PMID:26782379

  6. Nematicidal activity of mint aqueous extracts against the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Caboni, Pierluigi; Saba, Marco; Tocco, Graziella; Casu, Laura; Murgia, Antonio; Maxia, Andrea; Menkissoglu-Spiroudi, Urania; Ntalli, Nikoletta

    2013-10-16

    The nematicidal activity and chemical characterization of aqueous extracts and essential oils of three mint species, namely, Mentha × piperita , Mentha spicata , and Mentha pulegium , were investigated. The phytochemical analysis of the essential oils was performed by means of GC-MS, whereas the aqueous extracts were analyzed by LC-MS. The most abundant terpenes were isomenthone, menthone, menthol, pulegone, and carvone, and the water extracts yielded mainly chlorogenic acid, salvianolic acid B, luteolin-7-O-rutinoside, and rosmarinic acid. The water extracts exhibited significant nematicidal activity against Meloidogyne incognita , and the EC50/72h values were calculated at 1005, 745, and 300 mg/L for M. × piperita, M. pulegium, and M. spicata, respectively. Only the essential oil from M. spicata showed a nematicidal activity with an EC50/72h of 358 mg/L. Interestingly, menthofuran and carvone showed EC50/48h values of 127 and 730 mg/L, respectively. On the other hand, salicylic acid, isolated in the aqueous extracts, exhibited EC50 values at 24 and 48 h of 298 ± 92 and 288 ± 79 mg/L, respectively.

  7. Meloidogyne incognita Inoculum Source Affects Host Suitability and Growth of Yellow Nutsedge and Chile Pepper.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S H; Schroeder, J; Kenney, M J; Murray, L W

    1997-09-01

    Meloidogyne incognita (Mi) reproduction and host plant responses in chile pepper (Capsicum annuum) and yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus = YNS) to three sources of inoculum obtained by rearing a single Mi population on chile, YNS, and tomato were evaluated in two factorial greenhouse experiments. The interactive effects of Mi inoculum source and crop-weed competition were determined. In the absence of YNS competition, chile growth was reduced less by Mi inoculum from chile than by inoculum from YNS or tomato. When YNS was present, chile root weight was not affected and shoot weight increased with Mi initial inoculation, regardless of inoculum source. Chile plants inoculated with Mi from tomato exhibited double the nematode reproduction observed with inoculum from chile or YNS. With chile present, Mi reproduction on YNS was nearly three times greater with inoculum from tomato, but reproduction was similar among inoculum sources when chile was absent. Reductions in YNS root mass due to competition from chile failed to reduce the total number of Mi eggs produced on YNS plants. Differences in total Mi reproduction among inoculum sources were not attributable to differences in root growth or plant competition. This study illustrates the influence of Mi-YNS interactions and previous hosts on severity of Mi infection. PMID:19274174

  8. Effects of Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita on Early Growth of Soybean.

    PubMed

    Niblack, T L; Hussey, R S; Boerma, H R

    1986-10-01

    Greenhouse and field microplot studies were conducted to compare soybean shoot and root growth responses to root penetration by Heterodera glycines (Hg) and Meloidogyne incognita (Mi) individually and in combination. Soybean cultivars Centennial (resistant to Hg and Mi), Braxton (resistant to Mi, susceptible to Hg), and Coker 237 (susceptible to Hg and Mi) were selected for study. In the greenhouse, pot size and number of plants per pot had no effect on Hg or Mi penetration of Coker 237 roots; root weight was higher in the presence of either nematode species compared with the noninoculated controls. In greenhouse studies using a sand or soil medium, and in field microplot studies, each cultivar was grown with increasing initial population densities (Pi) of Hg or Mi. Interactions between Hg and Mi did not affect early plant growth or number of nematodes penetrating roots. Root penetration was the only response related to Pi. Mi penetration was higher in sand than in soil, and higher in the greenhouse than in the field, whereas Hg penetration was similar under all conditions. At 14 days after planting, more second-stage juveniles were present in roots of susceptible than in roots of resistant plants. Roots continued to lengthen in the greenhouse in the presence of either Mi or Hg regardless of host genotype, but only in the presence of Mi in microplots; otherwise, responses in field and greenhouse studies were similar and differed only in magnitude and variability.

  9. Responses of Cotton Yield and Meloidogyne incognita Soil Populations to Soil Applications of Aldicarb and 1,3-D in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Kinloch, R. A.; Rich, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    In four tests conducted in loamy-sand soils in northern Florida, cotton lint yield increased and post-harvest soil populations of Meloidogyne incognita were more effectively suppressed by 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) than aldicarb when both nematicides were evaluated over a range of recommended rates. Significant positive relationships existed between lint yield and rates of 1,3-D in three tests, whereas only one significant positive relationship occurred between lint yield and aldicarb rates. Yield increases ranged from 16% to 124%, depending on rate of 1,3-D, and 35% in one aldicarb-treated test. Only a weak negative relationship between post-harvest soil densities of second-stage juveniles (J2) and aldicarb rates was determined by combining data from the four tests. Aldicarb failed to suppress post-harvest J2 soil population densities in any test. All rates of 1,3-D significantly reduced post-harvest M. incognita J2 soil population densities in two tests and provided a stronger negative correlation between nematode soil densities and rates than aldicarb when all test data were combined for each nematicide. PMID:19274259

  10. Does the Presence of Detached Root Border Cells of Zea mays Alter the Activity of the Pathogenic Nematode Meloidogyne incognita?

    PubMed

    Rodger, S; Bengough, A G; Griffiths, B S; Stubbs, V; Young, I M

    2003-09-01

    ABSTRACT The root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita is a major pathogen of a range of important crops. Currently, control is typically achieved by the use of nematicides. However, recent work suggests that manipulating the ability of roots to slough off border cells, which then act as a decoy to the nematode, can significantly decrease damage to the roots. We investigated the attractiveness of border cells to M. incognita and the response of the nematode to border cells in close proximity. We found very limited attraction, in that nematodes did not preferentially alter direction to move toward the border cells, but a large and significant increase in nematode speed was observed once they were in the immediate vicinity of border cells. We discuss the results in the context of physical and biological mechanisms in relation to the control of pathogenic nematodes.

  11. Solanum torvum responses to the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Solanum torvum Sw is worldwide employed as rootstock for eggplant cultivation because of its vigour and resistance/tolerance to the most serious soil-borne diseases as bacterial, fungal wilts and root-knot nematodes. The little information on Solanum torvum (hereafter Torvum) resistance mechanisms, is mostly attributable to the lack of genomic tools (e.g. dedicated microarray) as well as to the paucity of database information limiting high-throughput expression studies in Torvum. Results As a first step towards transcriptome profiling of Torvum inoculated with the nematode M. incognita, we built a Torvum 3’ transcript catalogue. One-quarter of a 454 full run resulted in 205,591 quality-filtered reads. De novo assembly yielded 24,922 contigs and 11,875 singletons. Similarity searches of the S. torvum transcript tags catalogue produced 12,344 annotations. A 30,0000 features custom combimatrix chip was then designed and microarray hybridizations were conducted for both control and 14 dpi (day post inoculation) with Meloidogyne incognita-infected roots samples resulting in 390 differentially expressed genes (DEG). We also tested the chip with samples from the phylogenetically-related nematode-susceptible eggplant species Solanum melongena. An in-silico validation strategy was developed based on assessment of sequence similarity among Torvum probes and eggplant expressed sequences available in public repositories. GO term enrichment analyses with the 390 Torvum DEG revealed enhancement of several processes as chitin catabolism and sesquiterpenoids biosynthesis, while no GO term enrichment was found with eggplant DEG. The genes identified from S. torvum catalogue, bearing high similarity to known nematode resistance genes, were further investigated in view of their potential role in the nematode resistance mechanism. Conclusions By combining 454 pyrosequencing and microarray technology we were able to conduct a cost-effective global transcriptome profiling

  12. Resistance to Southern Root-knot Nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) in Wild Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. citroides)

    PubMed Central

    Thies, Judy A.; Ariss, Jennifer J.; Kousik, Chandrasekar S.; Hassell, Richard L.; Levi, Amnon

    2016-01-01

    Southern root-knot nematode (RKN, Meloidogyne incognita) is a serious pest of cultivated watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) in southern regions of the United States and no resistance is known to exist in commercial watermelon cultivars. Wild watermelon relatives (Citrullus lanatus var. citroides) have been shown in greenhouse studies to possess varying degrees of resistance to RKN species. Experiments were conducted over 2 yr to assess resistance of southern RKN in C. lanatus var. citroides accessions from the U.S. Watermelon Plant Introduction Collection in an artificially infested field site at the U.S. Vegetable Laboratory in Charleston, SC. In the first study (2006), 19 accessions of C. lanatus var. citroides were compared with reference entries of Citrullus colocynthis and C. lanatus var. lanatus. Of the wild watermelon accessions, two entries exhibited significantly less galling than all other entries. Five of the best performing C. lanatus var. citroides accessions were evaluated with and without nematicide at the same field site in 2007. Citrullus lanatus var. citroides accessions performed better than C. lanatus var. lanatus and C. colocynthis. Overall, most entries of C. lanatus var. citroides performed similarly with and without nematicide treatment in regard to root galling, visible egg masses, vine vigor, and root mass. In both years of field evaluations, most C. lanatus var. citroides accessions showed lesser degrees of nematode reproduction and higher vigor and root mass than C. colocynthis and C. lanatus var. lanatus. The results of these two field evaluations suggest that wild watermelon populations may be useful sources of resistance to southern RKN. PMID:27168648

  13. Recovery and Longevity of Egg Masses of Meloidogyne incognita during Simulated Winter Survival

    PubMed Central

    Starr, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Effects of soil matrix potential on longevity of egg masses of Meloidogyne incognita were determined during simulated winter conditions. Egg masses were recovered from isolated root fragments incubated in field soil at matrix potentials of -0.1, -0.3, -1.0, and -4.0 bars throughout winter survival periods of 10 weeks for tomato roots and 12 weeks for cotton roots. Egg masses were more superficial on cotton roots than on tomato roots and were more easily dislodged from cotton roots during recovery of root fragments by elutriation. The rate of decline in numbers of eggs and J2 per egg mass was greater in wet as compared to dry soils (P = 0.01), with the relationship between numbers of eggs and J2 per egg mass and time being best described by quadratic models. Percentage hatch of recovered eggs declines linearly with time at soil matrix potentials of -0.1 and -0.3 bars, but at -1.0 and -4.0 bars the percentage hatch of recovered eggs increased before declining. Effects of soil matrix potential on numbers of eggs per egg mass and percentage hatch of recovered eggs were consistent with previous reports that low soil moisture inhibits egg hatch before affecting egg development. Estimations of egg population densities during winter survival periods will be affected by ability to recover infected root fragments from the soil without dislodging associated egg masses. There is a need for procedures for extraction of egg masses not attached to roots from the soil. PMID:19279764

  14. Resistance to Southern Root-knot Nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) in Wild Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. citroides).

    PubMed

    Thies, Judy A; Ariss, Jennifer J; Kousik, Chandrasekar S; Hassell, Richard L; Levi, Amnon

    2016-03-01

    Southern root-knot nematode (RKN, Meloidogyne incognita) is a serious pest of cultivated watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) in southern regions of the United States and no resistance is known to exist in commercial watermelon cultivars. Wild watermelon relatives (Citrullus lanatus var. citroides) have been shown in greenhouse studies to possess varying degrees of resistance to RKN species. Experiments were conducted over 2 yr to assess resistance of southern RKN in C. lanatus var. citroides accessions from the U.S. Watermelon Plant Introduction Collection in an artificially infested field site at the U.S. Vegetable Laboratory in Charleston, SC. In the first study (2006), 19 accessions of C. lanatus var. citroides were compared with reference entries of Citrullus colocynthis and C. lanatus var. lanatus. Of the wild watermelon accessions, two entries exhibited significantly less galling than all other entries. Five of the best performing C. lanatus var. citroides accessions were evaluated with and without nematicide at the same field site in 2007. Citrullus lanatus var. citroides accessions performed better than C. lanatus var. lanatus and C. colocynthis. Overall, most entries of C. lanatus var. citroides performed similarly with and without nematicide treatment in regard to root galling, visible egg masses, vine vigor, and root mass. In both years of field evaluations, most C. lanatus var. citroides accessions showed lesser degrees of nematode reproduction and higher vigor and root mass than C. colocynthis and C. lanatus var. lanatus. The results of these two field evaluations suggest that wild watermelon populations may be useful sources of resistance to southern RKN.

  15. Resistance to Southern Root-knot Nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) in Wild Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. citroides).

    PubMed

    Thies, Judy A; Ariss, Jennifer J; Kousik, Chandrasekar S; Hassell, Richard L; Levi, Amnon

    2016-03-01

    Southern root-knot nematode (RKN, Meloidogyne incognita) is a serious pest of cultivated watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) in southern regions of the United States and no resistance is known to exist in commercial watermelon cultivars. Wild watermelon relatives (Citrullus lanatus var. citroides) have been shown in greenhouse studies to possess varying degrees of resistance to RKN species. Experiments were conducted over 2 yr to assess resistance of southern RKN in C. lanatus var. citroides accessions from the U.S. Watermelon Plant Introduction Collection in an artificially infested field site at the U.S. Vegetable Laboratory in Charleston, SC. In the first study (2006), 19 accessions of C. lanatus var. citroides were compared with reference entries of Citrullus colocynthis and C. lanatus var. lanatus. Of the wild watermelon accessions, two entries exhibited significantly less galling than all other entries. Five of the best performing C. lanatus var. citroides accessions were evaluated with and without nematicide at the same field site in 2007. Citrullus lanatus var. citroides accessions performed better than C. lanatus var. lanatus and C. colocynthis. Overall, most entries of C. lanatus var. citroides performed similarly with and without nematicide treatment in regard to root galling, visible egg masses, vine vigor, and root mass. In both years of field evaluations, most C. lanatus var. citroides accessions showed lesser degrees of nematode reproduction and higher vigor and root mass than C. colocynthis and C. lanatus var. lanatus. The results of these two field evaluations suggest that wild watermelon populations may be useful sources of resistance to southern RKN. PMID:27168648

  16. Nematicidal Activity of the Volatilome of Eruca sativa on Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Aissani, Nadhem; Urgeghe, Pietro Paolo; Oplos, Chrisostomos; Saba, Marco; Tocco, Graziella; Petretto, Giacomo Luigi; Eloh, Kodjo; Menkissoglu-Spiroudi, Urania; Ntalli, Nikoletta; Caboni, Pierluigi

    2015-07-15

    Research on new pesticides based on plant extracts, aimed at the development of nontoxic formulates, has recently gained increased interest. This study investigated the use of the volatilome of rucola (Eruca sativa) as a powerful natural nematicidal agent against the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita. Analysis of the composition of the volatilome, using GC-MS-SPME, showed that the compound (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate was the most abundant, followed by (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol and erucin, with relative percentages of 22.7 ± 1.6, 15.9 ± 2.3, and 8.6 ± 1.3, respectively. Testing of the nematicidal activity of rucola volatile compounds revealed that erucin, pentyl isothiocyanate, hexyl isothiocyanate, (E)-2-hexenal, 2-ethylfuran, and methyl thiocyanate were the most active with EC50 values of 3.2 ± 1.7, 11.1 ± 5.0, 11.3 ± 2.6, 15.0 ± 3.3, 16.0 ± 5.0, and 18.1 ± 0.6 mg/L, respectively, after 24 h of incubation. Moreover, the nematicidal activity of fresh rucola used as soil amendant in a containerized culture of tomato decreased the nematode infection in a dose-response manner (EC50 = 20.03 mg/g) and plant growth was improved. On the basis of these results, E. sativa can be considered as a promising companion plant in intercropping strategies for tomato growers to control root-knot nematodes. PMID:26082278

  17. Sampling techniques and detection methods for developing risk assessments for root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) on lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) in the Mid-Atlantic region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lima bean, Phaseolus lunatus, is a cornerstone crop in the Mid-Atlantic region and Meloidogyne incognita, the southern root knot nematode (RKN), causes significant yield loss. The RKN has become more pervasive as toxic nematicides have been removed from the market, and risk evaluation research is ne...

  18. In vitro proteolysis of nematode FLPs by preparations from the free-living nematode Panagrellus redivivus and two plant-parasitic nematodes (Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteolytic activities in extracts from three nematodes, the plant parasites Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita, and the free-living Panagrellus redivivus, were surveyed for substrate preferences using a battery of seven FRET-modified peptide substrates, all derived from members of the la...

  19. Effect of Broccoli (Brassica oleracea) Tissue, Incorporated at Different Depths in a Soil Column, on Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Roubtsova, Tatiana; López-Péŕez, Jose-Antonio; Edwards, Scott; Ploeg, Antoon

    2007-01-01

    Brassicas have been used frequently for biofumigation, a pest-management strategy based on the release of biocidal volatiles during decomposition of soil-incorporated tissue. However, the role of such volatiles in control of plant-parasitic nematodes is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine the direct localized and indirect volatile effects of amending soil with broccoli tissue on root-knot nematode populations. Meloidogyne incognita-infested soil in 50-cm-long tubes was amended with broccoli tissue, which was mixed throughout the tube or concentrated in a 10-cm layer. After three weeks at 28°C, M. incognita populations in the amended tubes were 57 to 80% smaller than in non-amended tubes. Mixing broccoli throughout the tubes reduced M. incognita more than concentrating broccoli in a 10-cm layer. Amending a 10-cm layer reduced M. incognita in the non-amended layers of those tubes by 31 to 71%, probably due to a nematicidal effect of released volatiles. However, the localized direct effect was much stronger than the indirect effect of volatiles. The strong direct effect may have resulted from the release of non-volatile nematicidal compounds. Therefore, when using biofumigation with broccoli to control M. incognita, the tissue should be thoroughly and evenly mixed through the soil layer(s) where the target nematodes occur. Effects on saprophytic nematodes were the reverse. Amended soil layers had much greater numbers of saprophytic nematodes than non-amended layers, and there was no indirect effect of amendments on saprophytic nematodes in adjacent non-amended layers. PMID:19259479

  20. Impact of direct and indirect application of rising furfural concentrations on viability, infectivity and reproduction of the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita in Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Abdelnabby, Hazem; Wang, Yunhe; Xiao, Xueqiong; Wang, Gaofeng; Yang, Fan; Xiao, Yannong

    2016-07-01

    The gradual withdraw of several broadly used nematicides from market has enhanced the need to develop sustainable and eco-friendly alternatives with nematicidal properties. Furfural is one of the promising alternatives to fill this need. Baseline information about the impact of furfural on egg hatch, penetration potential and ultrastructure of nematode is lacking. In this study, the reagent-grade (purity ≥ 99.0%) of furfural was applied against Meloidogyne incognita. In vitro tests showed gradual reduction in either the rate of egg hatch or second stage juvenile (J2) viability of M. incognita when immersed in concentrations ranging from 0 to 10.0 μl/ml furfural. The mean EC50 for J2 and egg hatch was 0.37 and 0.27 μl/ml furfural, respectively. Furfural, even at low concentrations, resulted in a considerable suppression in egg hatch. Hatch was <5% after 8 days at 0.63 μl/ml furfural. The same furfural concentrations after 12 h caused 57.25% loss of viability in J2. Moreover, the penetration rate of juveniles to pea roots was suppressed when furfural was even applied at low rates. In pot experiments, furfural was applied as liquid (direct) or vapor (indirect) treatments at rates of 0-1.5 ml/kg soil. Significant reduction in galling, egg production and population density of M. incognita observed when furfural was applied at rates >0.2 ml/kg soil. No adverse effect was detected on plants or free-living nematodes as a result of furfural application. Liquid furfural proved to have superior juvenile-suppressive effect whereas its vapor has such superiority against eggs. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) study showed irregular appearance of the body surface accompanied with some cuticle disfigurement of furfural-treated juveniles. These results indicated that furfural can adversely affect egg hatch, juvenile viability, penetration potential and ultrastructure of M. incognita. Furfural may therefore be of a considerable potential as an appropriate

  1. Host Transcriptional Profiling at Early and Later Stages of the Compatible Interaction Between Phaseolus vulgaris and Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Santini, Luciane; Munhoz, Carla de Freitas; Bonfim, Mauro Ferreira; Brandão, Marcelo Mendes; Inomoto, Mário Massayuki; Vieira, Maria Lucia Carneiro

    2016-03-01

    The root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) is one of most devastating pathogens that attack the common bean crop. Although there is evidence that some cultivars have race-specific resistance against M. incognita, these resistance sources have not proved effective, and nematodes are able to circumvent the host's defense system. We constructed RNA-seq based libraries and used a high-throughput sequencing platform to analyze the plant responses to M. incognita. Assessments were performed at 4 and 10 days after inoculation corresponding to the stages of nematode penetration and giant cell development, respectively. Large-scale transcript mapping to the common bean reference genome (G19833) resulted in the identification of 27,195 unigenes. Of these, 797 host genes were found to be differentially expressed. The functional annotation results confirm the complex interplay between abiotic and biotic stress signaling pathways. High expression levels of the wounding-responsive genes were observed over the interaction. At early response, an overexpression of the N gene, a TIR-NBS-LRR resistance gene, was understood as a host attempt to overcome the pathogen attack. However, the repression of heat shock proteins resulted in a lack of reactive oxygen species accumulation and absence of a hypersensitive response. Furthermore, the host basal response was broken by the repression of the ethylene/jasmonate pathway later in the response, resulting in a continuous compatible process with consequent plant susceptibility. PMID:26551451

  2. Comparison of Variable and Single-Rate Applications of Aldicarb on Cotton Yield in Fields Infested with Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, T. A.; Kaufman, H. W.; Baugh, B.; Kidd, P.; Schuster, G.; Siders, K.

    1999-01-01

    Variable-rate applications of the nematicide aldicarb were compared to producer standard rates in eight field tests over 3 years. Test areas (308 to 1,015 m long) were divided into eight or five blocks. Each block contained two plots with a variable-rate treatment (VRT) of aldicarb and a producer standard treatment (PST) of aldicarb. Each VRT plot was divided into three subunits and intensively sampled for Meloidogyne incognita in either the fall or spring before planting. Rates of aldicarb were assigned to each subunit for VRT based on M. incognita population density. In three of the eight tests, VRT resulted in either higher yield or similar yields, but less nematicide applied. In two tests there were no differences between PST and VRT in yields or average rates of aldicarb applied. In three tests, VRT used more aldicarb (>0.17 kg a.i./ha difference) than PST and yields were not significantly different between treatments. In two of the cases where VRT was superior to PST, the producer's rate of aldicarb was judged to be either too low or too high for the average M. incognita density present in the field. In all three cases where PST was superior to VRT, perennial weeds were an important factor also limiting yield. Variable-rate application of aldicarb did not consistently provide for higher yields or lower nematicide usage than standard application rates. PMID:19270939

  3. Elucidating the molecular bases of epigenetic inheritance in non-model invertebrates: the case of the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Perfus-Barbeoch, Laetitia; Castagnone-Sereno, Philippe; Reichelt, Michael; Fneich, Sara; Roquis, David; Pratx, Loris; Cosseau, Céline; Grunau, Christoph; Abad, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes of the genus Meloidogyne are biotrophic plant parasites that exhibit different life cycles and reproduction modes, ranging from classical amphimixis to obligatory mitotic parthenogenesis (apomixis), depending on the species. Meloidogyne incognita, an apomictic species, exhibits a worldwide distribution and a wide host range affecting more than 3000 plant species. Furthermore, evidences suggest that apomixis does not prevent M. incognita from adapting to its environment in contrast to what is expected from mitotic parthenogenesis that should theoretically produce clonal progenies. This raises questions about mechanisms of genome plasticity leading to genetic variation and adaptive evolution in apomictic animals. We reasoned that epigenetic mechanisms might in part be responsible for the generation of phenotypic variants that provide potential for rapid adaptation. We established therefore a pipeline to investigate the principal carriers of epigenetic information, DNA methylation and post-translational histone modifications. Even if M. incognita possesses the epigenetic machinery i.e., chromatin modifying enzymes, 5-methyl-cytosine and 5-hydroxy-methyl-cytosine content is absent or very weak. In contrast, we demonstrated that the canonical histone modifications are present and chromatin shows typical nucleosome structure. This work is the first characterization of carriers of epigenetic information in M. incognita and constitutes a preamble to further investigate if M. incognita development and its adaptation to plant hosts are under epigenetic control. Our pipeline should allow performing similar types of studies in any non-model organism. PMID:24936189

  4. Elucidating the molecular bases of epigenetic inheritance in non-model invertebrates: the case of the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Perfus-Barbeoch, Laetitia; Castagnone-Sereno, Philippe; Reichelt, Michael; Fneich, Sara; Roquis, David; Pratx, Loris; Cosseau, Céline; Grunau, Christoph; Abad, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes of the genus Meloidogyne are biotrophic plant parasites that exhibit different life cycles and reproduction modes, ranging from classical amphimixis to obligatory mitotic parthenogenesis (apomixis), depending on the species. Meloidogyne incognita, an apomictic species, exhibits a worldwide distribution and a wide host range affecting more than 3000 plant species. Furthermore, evidences suggest that apomixis does not prevent M. incognita from adapting to its environment in contrast to what is expected from mitotic parthenogenesis that should theoretically produce clonal progenies. This raises questions about mechanisms of genome plasticity leading to genetic variation and adaptive evolution in apomictic animals. We reasoned that epigenetic mechanisms might in part be responsible for the generation of phenotypic variants that provide potential for rapid adaptation. We established therefore a pipeline to investigate the principal carriers of epigenetic information, DNA methylation and post-translational histone modifications. Even if M. incognita possesses the epigenetic machinery i.e., chromatin modifying enzymes, 5-methyl-cytosine and 5-hydroxy-methyl-cytosine content is absent or very weak. In contrast, we demonstrated that the canonical histone modifications are present and chromatin shows typical nucleosome structure. This work is the first characterization of carriers of epigenetic information in M. incognita and constitutes a preamble to further investigate if M. incognita development and its adaptation to plant hosts are under epigenetic control. Our pipeline should allow performing similar types of studies in any non-model organism. PMID:24936189

  5. Hatching of Meloidogyne incognita Eggs in the Neutral Carbohydrate Fraction of Root Exudates of Gnotobiotically Grown Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Hamlen, R. A.; Bloom, J. R.; Lukezic, F. L.

    1973-01-01

    Meloidogyne incognita eggs were hatched in soil sterilized by gamma kradiation and wetted with root exudates from alfalfa plants in different stages of development and subjected to various levels of clipping. Carbohydrate components of the exudates were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Although significant stimulation of hatch was detected in exudates of seedling and flowering plants, the practical importance of the increase is doubtful as hatch in distilled water was always greater than 50%. Hatch did not differ among exudate samples from clipped plants. Incubation of eggs in soil moistened with 10⁻⁷ to 10⁻³ M solutions of glucose did not result in increased hatching over that in distilled water. PMID:19319320

  6. Evaluation of Several Approaches to Manage Meloidogyne incognita and Cotton Seedling Disease Complexes in the High Plains of Texas.

    PubMed

    Fichtner, S M; Isakeit, T; Wheeler, T A; Kaufman, H W; Gannaway, J R

    2005-03-01

    Field experiments were conducted for control of the southern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) and cotton seedling disease fungi (primarily Thielaviopsis basicola) in one naturally infested field during 1999 and 2000 and in three additional fields in 2000. Treatments included: seed-applied fungicides (triadimenol + mefenoxam + thiram and carboxin + PCNB + mefenoxam), cultivars (Paymaster [PM] 2326 RR and PM 2200 RR), and a nematicide (aldicarb at 0.83 kg a.i/ha). Plant stands were higher (P = 0.02) in the presence of aldicarb (77% emergence) than in its absence (74% emergence). Hypocotyl disease symptom ratings were lower (P = 0.0001) following triadimenol + mefenoxam + thiram seed treatment (0.53) as compared with carboxin + PCNB + mefenoxam (0.93). Root necrosis was lower (P = 0.002) following triadimenol + mefenoxam + thiram seed treatment (27%) as compared with carboxin + PCNB + mefenoxam (34%). In one field, in both years, aldicarb was associated with more root necrosis (58%) than in its absence (46%) (P = 0.004). At three other sites aldicarb did not affect root necrosis. Population densities of Meloidogyne incognita eggs and juveniles at midseason were greater (P = 0.005, P = 0.003, respectively) on PM 2200 RR (less resistant) than on PM 2326 RR (more resistant). Yield was affected by the plant genotype by aldicarb interaction (P = 0.02) but not by seed treatments. Aldicarb effect on yield was dependent on cultivar, whereas affect of seed treatment on root health was consistent and independent of cultivar and aldicarb. No conditions were identified when use of triadimenol + mefenoxam was detrimental.

  7. Volatile Substances Produced by Fusarium oxysporum from Coffee Rhizosphere and Other Microbes affect Meloidogyne incognita and Arthrobotrys conoides

    PubMed Central

    Freire, E. S.; Campos, V. P.; Pinho, R. S. C.; Oliveira, D. F.; Faria, M. R.; Pohlit, A. M.; Noberto, N. P.; Rezende, E. L.; Pfenning, L. H.; Silva, J. R. C.

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms produce volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which mediate interactions with other organisms and may be the basis for the development of new methods to control plant-parasitic nematodes that damage coffee plants. In the present work, 35 fungal isolates were isolated from coffee plant rhizosphere, Meloidogyne exigua eggs and egg masses. Most of the fungal isolates belonged to the genus Fusarium and presented in vitro antagonism classified as mutual exclusion and parasitism against the nematode-predator fungus Arthrobotrys conoides (isolated from coffee roots). These results and the stronger activity of VOCs against this fungus by 12 endophytic bacteria may account for the failure of A. conoides to reduce plant-parasitic nematodes in coffee fields. VOCs from 13 fungal isolates caused more than 40% immobility to Meloidogyne incognita second stage juveniles (J2), and those of three isolates (two Fusarium oxysporum isolates and an F. solani isolate) also led to 88-96% J2 mortality. M. incognita J2 infectivity decreased as a function of increased exposure time to F. oxysporum isolate 21 VOCs. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis lead to the detection of 38 VOCs produced by F. oxysporum is. 21 culture. Only five were present in amounts above 1% of the total: dioctyl disulfide (it may also be 2-propyldecan-1-ol or 1-(2-hydroxyethoxy) tridecane); caryophyllene; 4-methyl-2,6-di-tert-butylphenol; and acoradiene. One of them was not identified. Volatiles toxic to nematodes make a difference among interacting microorganisms in coffee rhizosphere defining an additional attribute of a biocontrol agent against plant-parasitic nematodes. PMID:23482720

  8. Evaluation of Several Approaches to Manage Meloidogyne incognita and Cotton Seedling Disease Complexes in the High Plains of Texas

    PubMed Central

    Fichtner, S. M.; Isakeit, T.; Wheeler, T. A.; Kaufman, H. W.; Gannaway, J. R.

    2005-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted for control of the southern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) and cotton seedling disease fungi (primarily Thielaviopsis basicola) in one naturally infested field during 1999 and 2000 and in three additional fields in 2000. Treatments included: seed-applied fungicides (triadimenol + mefenoxam + thiram and carboxin + PCNB + mefenoxam), cultivars (Paymaster [PM] 2326 RR and PM 2200 RR), and a nematicide (aldicarb at 0.83 kg a.i/ha). Plant stands were higher (P = 0.02) in the presence of aldicarb (77% emergence) than in its absence (74% emergence). Hypocotyl disease symptom ratings were lower (P = 0.0001) following triadimenol + mefenoxam + thiram seed treatment (0.53) as compared with carboxin + PCNB + mefenoxam (0.93). Root necrosis was lower (P = 0.002) following triadimenol + mefenoxam + thiram seed treatment (27%) as compared with carboxin + PCNB + mefenoxam (34%). In one field, in both years, aldicarb was associated with more root necrosis (58%) than in its absence (46%) (P = 0.004). At three other sites aldicarb did not affect root necrosis. Population densities of Meloidogyne incognita eggs and juveniles at midseason were greater (P = 0.005, P = 0.003, respectively) on PM 2200 RR (less resistant) than on PM 2326 RR (more resistant). Yield was affected by the plant genotype by aldicarb interaction (P = 0.02) but not by seed treatments. Aldicarb effect on yield was dependent on cultivar, whereas affect of seed treatment on root health was consistent and independent of cultivar and aldicarb. No conditions were identified when use of triadimenol + mefenoxam was detrimental. PMID:19262844

  9. Transcriptional Changes of the Root-Knot Nematode Meloidogyne incognita in Response to Arabidopsis thaliana Root Signals

    PubMed Central

    Teillet, Alice; Dybal, Katarzyna; Kerry, Brian R.; Miller, Anthony J.; Curtis, Rosane H. C.; Hedden, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes are obligate parasites that invade roots and induce the formation of specialized feeding structures. Although physiological and molecular changes inside the root leading to feeding site formation have been studied, very little is known about the molecular events preceding root penetration by nematodes. In order to investigate the influence of root exudates on nematode gene expression before plant invasion and to identify new genes potentially involved in parasitism, sterile root exudates from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana were produced and used to treat Meloidogyne incognita pre-parasitic second-stage juveniles. After confirming the activity of A. thaliana root exudates (ARE) on M. incognita stylet thrusting, six new candidate genes identified by cDNA-AFLP were confirmed by qRT-PCR as being differentially expressed after incubation for one hour with ARE. Using an in vitro inoculation method that focuses on the events preceding the root penetration, we show that five of these genes are differentially expressed within hours of nematode exposure to A. thaliana roots. We also show that these genes are up-regulated post nematode penetration during migration and feeding site initiation. This study demonstrates that preceding root invasion plant-parasitic nematodes are able to perceive root signals and to respond by changing their behaviour and gene expression. PMID:23593446

  10. Nuclear receptor nhr-48 is required for pathogenicity of the second stage (J2) of the plant parasite Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chao-Jun; Tian, Bao-Yu; Cao, Yi; Zou, Cheng-Gang; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a diverse class of transcription factors, which are involved in regulating a large number of physiological events in metazoans. However, the function of NRs is poorly understood in plant-parasitic nematodes. Here, members of the NR1J+K group of NRs in nematodes, including the free-living and plant parasites, were examined and phylogenetically analyzed. We found that the number of members of the NR1J+K group in plant-parasitic nematodes was less than that in the free-living nematodes, suggesting this reduction of NR1J+K group members in plant parasites maybe arose during the separation of the free-living and intermediately plant parasitic nematodes (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus). Interestingly, the DNA-binding domain (DBD) and ligand-binding domain (LBD) of NR1J+K members were separated into two gene locations in the plant parasites. Knockdown of Meloidogyne incognita WBMinc13296, the ortholog of Caenorhabditis elegans nhr-48 DBD, reduced infectivity, delayed development, and decreased reproductivity. J2 of M. incognita subjected to silencing of WBMinc13295, the orthologs of B. xylophilus nhr-48 LBD, exhibited developmental lag within the host and reduced reproductivity. This study provides new insights into the function of NRs and suggests that NRs are potential targets for developing effective strategies for biological control of plant-parasitic nematodes. PMID:27762328

  11. Influence of 1,3-Dichloropropene, Fenamiphos, and Carbofuran on Meloidogyne incognita Populations and Yield of Chile Peppers

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, S. H.

    1994-01-01

    Field trials were conducted during 1986, 1988, 1989, and 1991 to compare the effects of 1,3-dichloropropene, fenamiphos, and carbofuran on yield and quality of chile peppers (Capsicum annuum) in soil infested with Meloidogyne incognita. When compared with untreated plots, numbers of M. incognita juveniles recovered from soil 60 and(or) 90 days after chile pepper emergence were reduced (P = 0.05) following 1,3-D treatment every year except 1986. Nematode numbers were also reduced (P = 0.05) by fenamiphos in 1989. Chile pepper yields were significantly higher than those in untreated control plots (P = 0.05) all 4 years in plots treated with 1,3-D and in 1989 in plots treated with fenamiphos. Use of carbofuran did not significantly reduce nematode numbers or enhance yields in these experiments. Green chile pepper fruit quality was enhanced (P = 0.05) following 1,3-D treatments in 1988 and 1989 but was unaffected by fenamiphos or carbofuran application. Increasing placement depth of 1,3-D from 28 to 48 cm increased (P = 0.05) red chile pepper yield compared with that obtained with conventional placement in 1988 only, and did not affect green chile pepper yield. PMID:19279948

  12. Bioefficacy evaluation of controlled release formulations based on amphiphilic nano-polymer of carbofuran against Meloidogyne incognita infecting tomato.

    PubMed

    Pankaj; Shakil, Najam Akhtar; Kumar, Jitendra; Singh, M K; Singh, Khajan

    2012-01-01

    In the present investigation, the bioefficacy of developed carbofuran formulations, with PEG-600 (7a, CP1) & PEG-900 (7b, CP2) @ 5, 10 and 20 ppm, along with commercial formulation of carbofuran 3G (CP0) were evaluated against the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita infecting tomato (cv. Pusa Ruby) in pot and field conditions. The bioefficacy data indicated that the formulations developed by utilizing polymers having PEG - 900 (7b) as hydrophilic segment were effective even at 14 days post inoculation (dpi) as evident from shoot and root length. Also, the reduction in penetration was found to be maximum with CP2 (3.6 - 4.6 J2s) at all concentrations compared to CP1 (6.6-16.4 J2s) and CP0 (29.3-32.6 J2s). Overall, CP2 was more effective in reducing the number of nematodes up to 14 days, compared to CP1 and CP0. Both the CR formulations (CP1 and CP2) in general significantly reduced the number of galls, when compared to CP0. However, under field conditions, lower concentrations (5, and 10 ppm) of CP2, were less effective in controlling the gall formation whereas, CP2 at 20 ppm, was most effective than other treatments. The study revealed that the developed CR formulations of carbofuran have the potential for effective management of M. incognita in tomato under field conditions.

  13. Stage-Wise Identification and Analysis of miRNA from Root-Knot Nematode Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Parthiban; Choi, In-Chan; Mani, Vimalraj; Park, Junhyung; Subramaniyam, Sathiyamoorthy; Choi, Kang-Hyun; Sim, Joon-Soo; Lee, Chang-Muk; Koo, Ja Choon; Hahn, Bum-Soo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated global changes in miRNAs of Meloidogyne incognita throughout its life cycle. Small RNA sequencing resulted in approximately 62, 38, 38, 35, and 39 Mb reads in the egg, J2, J3, J4, and female stages, respectively. Overall, we identified 2724 known and 383 novel miRNAs (read count > 10) from all stages, of which 169 known and 13 novel miRNA were common to all the five stages. Among the stage-specific miRNAs, miR-286 was highly expressed in eggs, miR-2401 in J2, miR-8 and miR-187 in J3, miR-6736 in J4, and miR-17 in the female stages. These miRNAs are reported to be involved in embryo and neural development, muscular function, and control of apoptosis. Cluster analysis indicated the presence of 91 miRNA clusters, of which 36 clusters were novel and identified in this study. Comparison of miRNA families with other nematodes showed 17 families to be commonly absent in animal parasitic nematodes and M. incognita. Validation of 43 predicted common and stage-specific miRNA by quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated their expression in the nematode. Stage-wise exploration of M. incognita miRNAs has not been carried out before and this work presents information on common and stage-specific miRNAs of the root-knot nematode. PMID:27775666

  14. Effects of a Resistant Corn Hybrid and Fenamiphos on Meloidogyne incognita in a Corn-Squash Rotation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A W; Sumner, D R; Windham, G L; Williams, W P

    1999-06-01

    The efficacy of a double-cross corn (Zea mays) hybrid (Old Raccoon selection X T216) X (Tebeau selection X Mp 307) resistant to Meloidogyne incognita as a rotational crop, and fenamiphos treatment for management of root-knot nematode (M. incognita race 1) in squash (Cucurbita pepo var. melopepo) was evaluated in field tests during 1996 and 1997. Numbers of M. incognita in the soil and root-gall indices were lower on the resistant hybrid than on a commercial cultivar DeKalb DK-683. Treatment means across both corn entries had lower root-gall indices following fenamiphos treatment. In soil collected 2 September 1997, there were more colony-forming units (cfu) per gram of oven-dried soil of Pythium spp. from plots planted to DK-683 treated with fenamiphos than in untreated plots (88 vs. 59 cfu). Some corn plots had individual plants with 10% to 15% of the crown and brace roots decayed, but no differences due to fenamiphos treatment. Lodging of stalks was 40% to 50% more in the double-cross hybrid than in DK-683. Yield was greater from DK-683 than the double-cross hybrid. Based on cultivar means across fenamiphos treatments and fenamiphos treatment means across cultivars, root-gall indices and yield of squash were significantly lower following the double cross hybrid than DK-683 and in fenamiphos-treated plots than in untreated plots of squash. Yield of squash was not affected by at-planting treatment with fenamiphos on the preceding crops of corn. Nematode resistance must be transferred into the elite materials of commercial seed companies to reach its full potential as a nematode management strategy.

  15. Identification of MicroRNAs in Meloidogyne incognita Using Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunsheng; Mao, Zhenchuan; Yan, Jin; Cheng, Xinyue; Liu, Feng; Xiao, Luo; Dai, Liangying; Luo, Feng; Xie, Bingyan

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs play important regulatory roles in eukaryotic lineages. In this paper, we employed deep sequencing technology to sequence and identify microRNAs in M. incognita genome, which is one of the important plant parasitic nematodes. We identified 102 M. incognita microRNA genes, which can be grouped into 71 nonredundant miRNAs based on mature sequences. Among the 71 miRANs, 27 are known miRNAs and 44 are novel miRNAs. We identified seven miRNA clusters in M. incognita genome. Four of the seven clusters, miR-100/let-7, miR-71-1/miR-2a-1, miR-71-2/miR-2a-2 and miR-279/miR-2b are conserved in other species. We validated the expressions of 5 M. incognita microRNAs, including 3 known microRNAs (miR-71, miR-100b and let-7) and 2 novel microRNAs (NOVEL-1 and NOVEL-2), using RT-PCR. We can detect all 5 microRNAs. The expression levels of four microRNAs obtained using RT-PCR were consistent with those obtained by high-throughput sequencing except for those of let-7. We also examined how M. incognita miRNAs are conserved in four other nematodes species: C. elegans, A. suum, B. malayi and P. pacificus. We found that four microRNAs, miR-100, miR-92, miR-279 and miR-137, exist only in genomes of parasitic nematodes, but do not exist in the genomes of the free living nematode C. elegans. Our research created a unique resource for the research of plant parasitic nematodes. The candidate microRNAs could help elucidate the genomic structure, gene regulation, evolutionary processes, and developmental features of plant parasitic nematodes and nematode-plant interaction. PMID:26241472

  16. Transcriptome analysis of resistant and susceptible alfalfa cultivars infected with root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematodes are one of the major limiting factors in alfalfa production. Root knot nematodes (RKN, Meloidogyne spp.) are widely distributed and economically important sedentary endoparasites of agricultural crops (Castagnone-Sereno et al. 2013) and they may inflict significant damage to alfalfa fields...

  17. Management of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) in bottle gourd using different botanicals in pots.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tulika; Patel, B A

    2015-09-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the efficacy of different botanicals in varying doses for management of root-knot nematode, M. incognita in bottle gourd. The results exhibited that madar (Calotropis procera) and neem (Azadirachta indica) leaves application proved to be more effective in improving plant growth characters and reducing root-knot index and final nematode population. Among the doses tested, higher dose of 1.5 % (w/w) was more effective than lower ones. PMID:26345048

  18. Effects of Site-specific Application of Aldicarb on Cotton in a Meloidogyne incognita-infested Field

    PubMed Central

    Wrather, J. A.; Stevens, W. E.; Kirkpatrick, T. L.; Kitchen, N. R.

    2002-01-01

    Cotton farmers in Missouri commonly apply a single rate of aldicarb throughout the field at planting to protect their crop from Meloidogyne incognita, even though these nematodes are spatially aggregated. Our purpose was to determine the effect of site-specific application of aldicarb on cotton production in a field infested with these nematodes in 1997 and 1998. Cotton yields were collected from sites not treated with aldicarb (control), sites receiving aldicarb at the standard recommended rate of 0.58 kg a.i./ha, and sites receiving specific aldicarb rates based on the soil population densities of second-stage infective juveniles of root-knot nematode. Yields for the standard rate and site-specific rate treatments were similar and greater (P ≤ 0.05) than the control treatment. Less aldicarb was used for the site-specific than the uniform-rate treatment each year—46% less in 1997 and 61% less in 1998. Costs associated with the site-specific treatment were very high compared with the uniform-rate treatment due to a greater number of soil samples analyzed for nematodes. Site-specific application of aldicarb for root-knot nematode management in cotton may pose fewer environmental risks than the uniform-rate application of aldicarb. PMID:19265917

  19. Exploitation of microbes for enhancing bacoside content and reduction of Meloidogyne incognita infestation in Bacopa monnieri L.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rupali; Tiwari, Sudeep; Saikia, Shilpi K; Shukla, Virendra; Singh, Rashmi; Singh, S P; Kumar, P V Ajay; Pandey, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Despite the vast exploration of rhizospheric microbial wealth for crop yield enhancement, knowledge about the efficacy of microbial agents as biocontrol weapons against root-knot disease is scarce, especially in medicinal plants, viz., Bacopa monnieri. In the present investigation, rhizospheric microbes, viz., Bacillus megaterium, Glomus intraradices, Trichoderma harzianum ThU, and their combinations were evaluated for the management of Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid and White) Chitwood and bacoside content enhancement in B. monnieri var CIM-Jagriti. A novel validated method Fourier transform near infrared was used for rapid estimation of total bacoside content. A significant reduction (2.75-fold) in root-knot indices was observed in the combined treatment of B. megaterium and T. harzianum ThU in comparison to untreated control plants. The same treatment also showed significant enhancement (1.40-fold) in total bacoside contents (plant active molecule) content using Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) method that analyses samples rapidly in an hour without solvent usage and provides ample scope for natural product studies.

  20. A Meloidogyne incognita effector is imported into the nucleus and exhibits transcriptional activation activity in planta.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Davies, Laura J; Elling, Axel A

    2015-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes are sedentary biotrophic endoparasites that maintain a complex interaction with their host plants. Nematode effector proteins are synthesized in the oesophageal glands of nematodes and secreted into plant tissue through a needle-like stylet. Effectors characterized to date have been shown to mediate processes essential for nematode pathogenesis. To gain an insight into their site of action and putative function, the subcellular localization of 13 previously isolated Meloidogyne incognita effectors was determined. Translational fusions were created between effectors and EGFP-GUS (enhanced green fluorescent protein-β-glucuronidase) reporter genes, which were transiently expressed in tobacco leaf cells. The majority of effectors localized to the cytoplasm, with one effector, 7H08, imported into the nuclei of plant cells. Deletion analysis revealed that the nuclear localization of 7H08 was mediated by two novel independent nuclear localization domains. As a result of the nuclear localization of the effector, 7H08 was tested for the ability to activate gene transcription. 7H08 was found to activate the expression of reporter genes in both yeast and plant systems. This is the first report of a plant-parasitic nematode effector with transcriptional activation activity.

  1. Population Dynamics of Meloidogyne incognita and Rotylenchulus reniformis Alone and in Combination, and Their Effects on Sweet Potato.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R J; Clark, C A

    1983-04-01

    Meloidogyne incognita (Mi) and Rotylenchulus reniformis (Rr) interactions on sweet potato were studied in naturally and artificially infested field plots for 3 years. In a naturally infested field, early season counts of Mi or Rr were positively correlated with later counts of the same nematode, but negative correlations were found between early Mi and subsequent Rr, and early Rr and subsequent Mi counts. In field plots fumigated with methyl bromide and then infested with low levels of Rr, Mi, and Rr + Mi, final population densities of Mi juveniles were reduced by Rr, but Rr was not affected by Mi. In field plots with a high natural population density of Rr, artificial infestation with high levels of Mi in both fumigated and nonfumigated treatments inhibited Rr, while the final Mi juvenile population density was not affected. Results indicate that a competitive interaction exists with each species capable of inhibiting the other and becoming the dominant population. The nematodes had no apparent effect on yield at the inoculum densities used, either alone or mixed. Both nematodes increased cracking of sweet potatoes, but mixed populations did not differ in incidence of cracking from either Rr or Mi alone.

  2. Differential expression of antioxidant enzymes and PR-proteins in compatible and incompatible interactions of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) and the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, J T A; Andrade, N C; Martins-Miranda, A S; Soares, A A; Gondim, D M F; Araújo-Filho, J H; Freire-Filho, F R; Vasconcelos, I M

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluated the resistance and susceptibility of 10 cowpea cultivars to Meloidogyne incognita in field studies and to analyze the kinetics of the enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase, chitinase, β-1,3-glucanases and cystein proteinase inhibitors in the root system of two contrasting cowpea cultivars after inoculation with M. incognita. The cultivars CE-31 and Frade Preto were highly resistant; CE-28, CE-01, CE-315, CE-237, were very resistant; CE-70 and CE-216 were moderately resistant, whereas Vita-3 and CE-109 were slightly resistant. In the roots of the highly resistant cultivar CE-31 the activity of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase increased and catalase decreased and those of the pathogenesis-related proteins chitinase, β-1,3-glucanase, peroxidase and cystein proteinase inhibitor increased in comparison with the root system of the slightly resistant CE-109, during the course of M. incognita infestation. Thus the changes in the activities of these enzymes might be related to the smaller final population of M. incognita in CE-31 and may contribute to the high resistance of this cowpea cultivar against infection and colonization by this nematode species.

  3. Integrated application of some compatible biocontrol agents along with mustard oil seed cake and furadan on Meloidogyne incognita infecting tomato plants

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Bijoy Kumar; Pandey, Rajesh Kumar; Rathour, Kabindra Singh; Bhattacharya, Chaitali; Singh, Lokendra

    2006-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to study the effect of two fungal bioagents along with mustard oil cake and furadan against root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita infecting tomato under greenhouse condition. Bioagents viz., Paecilomyces lilacinus and Trichoderma viride alone or in combination with mustard cake and furadan promoted plant growth, reduced number of galls/plant, egg masses/root system and eggs/egg mass. The fungal bioagents along with mustard cake and nematicide showed least nematodes reproduction factor as compared to untreated infested soil. PMID:17048300

  4. Nematicidal Activity of Kojic Acid Produced by Aspergillus oryzae against Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Yoon; Jang, Ja Yeong; Jeon, Sun Jeong; Lee, Hye Won; Bae, Chang-Hwan; Yeo, Joo Hong; Lee, Hyang Burm; Kim, In Seon; Park, Hae Woong; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2016-08-28

    The fungal strain EML-DML3PNa1 isolated from leaf of white dogwood (Cornus alba L.) showed strong nematicidal activity with juvenile mortality of 87.6% at a concentration of 20% fermentation broth filtrate at 3 days after treatment. The active fungal strain was identified as Aspergillus oryzae, which belongs to section Flavi, based on the morphological characteristics and sequence analysis of the ITS rDNA, calmodulin (CaM), and β-tubulin (BenA) genes. The strain reduced the pH value to 5.62 after 7 days of incubation. Organic acid analysis revealed the presence of citric acid (515.0 mg/kg), malic acid (506.6 mg/kg), and fumaric acid (21.7 mg/kg). The three organic acids showed moderate nematicidal activities, but the mixture of citric acid, malic acid, and fumaric acid did not exhibit the full nematicidal activity of the culture filtrate of EML- DML3PNa1. Bioassay-guided fractionation coupled with (1)H- and (13)C-NMR and EI-MS analyses led to identification of kojic acid as the major nematicidal metabolite. Kojic acid exhibited dose-dependent mortality and inhibited the hatchability of M. incognita, showing EC50 values of 195.2 µg/ml and 238.3 µg/ml, respectively, at 72 h postexposure. These results suggest that A. oryzae EML-DML3PNa1 and kojic acid have potential as a biological control agent against M. incognita.

  5. Effect of Three Plant Residues and Chicken Manure used as Biofumigants at Three Temperatures on Meloidogyne incognita Infestation of Tomato in Greenhouse Experiments

    PubMed Central

    López-Pérez, Jose-Antonio; Roubtsova, Tatiana; Ploeg, Antoon

    2005-01-01

    Plant residues of broccoli, melon, and tomato with or without addition of chicken manure were used as biofumigants in two pot experiments with Meloidogyne incognita-infested soils. The efficacy of these biofumigants in controlling M. incognita infestation in susceptible tomato bio-assay plants was studied at soil temperatures of 20º, 25º, and 30 ºC. None of the plant residues was effective at 20 ºC, and broccoli was more effective than tomato or melon at 25 ºC. At 30 ºC all three plant residues reduced M. incognita infestation of tomato to very low levels. Chicken manure was effective in one of two experiments at 20 ºC, and at 25 ºC enhanced the efficacy of tomato and melon residue in one of two experiments. At 30 ºC chicken manure was equally effective as the three plant residues but did not further decrease infestation levels in plant residue amended soils. It is concluded that biofumigation to control M. incognita is unlikely to be effective under cool conditions, that at soil temperatures around 25 ºC broccoli is more effective than melon and tomato, and that the addition of chicken manure at this soil temperature may enhance the efficacy. At high soil temperatures, of approximately 30 ºC, the biofumigant source seems of minor importance as strong reductions in tomato infestation by M. incognita were achieved by addition of each of the three plant residues as well as by addition of chicken manure. PMID:19262896

  6. Optimization of In Vitro Techniques for Distinguishing between Live and Dead Second Stage Juveniles of Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ni; Lawrence, Kathy S

    2016-01-01

    Heterodera glycines (Soybean Cyst nematode, or SCN) and Meloidogyne incognita (Root-Knot nematode, or RKN) are two damaging plant-parasitic nematodes on important field crops. Developing a quick method to distinguish between live and dead SCN and RKN second stage juveniles (J2) is vital for high throughput screening of pesticides or biological compounds against SCN and RKN. The in vitro assays were conducted in 96-well plates to determine the optimum chemical stimulus to distinguish between live and dead SCN and RKN J2. Sodium carbonate (Na2CO3), sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were evaluated for the nematode response to see if these compounds can help distinguish between viable from the dead J2. Results indicated that live SCN J2 responded equally (P ≤ 0.05) to 1 μl Na2CO3 and 10 μl NaHCO3 in 100 μl of water at pH = 10. Live SCN J2 responded by twisting their bodies in a curling shape and increasing rate of movements within 2 minutes of exposure. The twisting activity continued for up to 30 minutes. Live RKN J2 responded by increasing activity with the application of 1 μl NaOH in 100 μl of water at pH = 10 also in the 2 minutes to 30 minutes time frame. Furthermore, in growth chamber tests to confirm the infectivity of live SCN. The live SCN as determined by exposure to 1 μl of Na2CO3 indicated 60.5% of the SCN J2 were alive and of those, 29.5% were infective and entered the soybean roots. The 1 μl of NaOH stimulus revealed that 75.2% RKN J2 were alive and of those, 14.9% were infective and entered soybean roots. These results confirmed that 1 μl of Na2CO3 added to 100 μl suspension of SCN J2 and 1 μl of NaOH added to 100 μl suspension of RKN J2 are the effective stimuli for rapidly distinguishing between live and dead SCN and RKN J2 in vitro. SCN and RKN J2 responded differently to different compounds. PMID:27144277

  7. Optimization of In Vitro Techniques for Distinguishing between Live and Dead Second Stage Juveniles of Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heterodera glycines (Soybean Cyst nematode, or SCN) and Meloidogyne incognita (Root-Knot nematode, or RKN) are two damaging plant-parasitic nematodes on important field crops. Developing a quick method to distinguish between live and dead SCN and RKN second stage juveniles (J2) is vital for high throughput screening of pesticides or biological compounds against SCN and RKN. The in vitro assays were conducted in 96-well plates to determine the optimum chemical stimulus to distinguish between live and dead SCN and RKN J2. Sodium carbonate (Na2CO3), sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were evaluated for the nematode response to see if these compounds can help distinguish between viable from the dead J2. Results indicated that live SCN J2 responded equally (P ≤ 0.05) to 1 μl Na2CO3 and 10 μl NaHCO3 in 100 μl of water at pH = 10. Live SCN J2 responded by twisting their bodies in a curling shape and increasing rate of movements within 2 minutes of exposure. The twisting activity continued for up to 30 minutes. Live RKN J2 responded by increasing activity with the application of 1 μl NaOH in 100 μl of water at pH = 10 also in the 2 minutes to 30 minutes time frame. Furthermore, in growth chamber tests to confirm the infectivity of live SCN. The live SCN as determined by exposure to 1 μl of Na2CO3 indicated 60.5% of the SCN J2 were alive and of those, 29.5% were infective and entered the soybean roots. The 1 μl of NaOH stimulus revealed that 75.2% RKN J2 were alive and of those, 14.9% were infective and entered soybean roots. These results confirmed that 1 μl of Na2CO3 added to 100 μl suspension of SCN J2 and 1 μl of NaOH added to 100 μl suspension of RKN J2 are the effective stimuli for rapidly distinguishing between live and dead SCN and RKN J2 in vitro. SCN and RKN J2 responded differently to different compounds. PMID:27144277

  8. Mustard seed meal mixtures: management of Meloidogyne incognita on pepper and potential phytotoxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meals produced when oil is extracted from brassicaceous seeds have been shown to suppress weeds and soilborne pathogens. These seed meals are commonly used individually as soil amendments; the goal of this research was to evaluate seed meal mixes of Brassica juncea Bj and Sinapis alba (Sa) against ...

  9. Increased size of cotton root system does not impart tolerance to Meloidogyne incognita

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant tolerance or intolerance to parasitic nematodes represent a spectrum describing the degree of damage inflicted by the nematode on the host plant. Tolerance is typically measured in terms of yield suppression. Instances of plant tolerance to nematodes have been documented in some crops, inclu...

  10. Inheritance and Identification of a Major Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) that Confers Resistance to Meloidogyne incognita and a Novel QTL for Plant Height in Sweet Sorghum.

    PubMed

    Harris-Shultz, Karen R; Davis, Richard F; Knoll, Joseph E; Anderson, William; Wang, Hongliang

    2015-12-01

    Southern root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita) are a pest on many economically important row crop and vegetable species and management relies on chemicals, plant resistance, and cultural practices such as crop rotation. Little is known about the inheritance of resistance to M. incognita or the genomic regions associated with resistance in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). In this study, an F2 population (n = 130) was developed between the resistant sweet sorghum cultivar 'Honey Drip' and the susceptible sweet cultivar 'Collier'. Each F2 plant was phenotyped for stalk weight, height, juice Brix, root weight, total eggs, and eggs per gram of root. Strong correlations were observed between eggs per gram of root and total eggs, height and stalk weight, and between two measurements of Brix. Genotyping-by-sequencing was used to generate single nucleotide polymorphism markers. The G-Model, single marker analysis, interval mapping, and composite interval mapping were used to identify a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome 3 for total eggs and eggs per gram of root. Furthermore, a new QTL for plant height was also discovered on chromosome 3. Simple sequence repeat markers were developed in the total eggs and eggs per gram of root QTL region and the markers flanking the resistance gene are 4.7 and 2.4 cM away. These markers can be utilized to move the southern root-knot nematode resistance gene from Honey Drip to any sorghum line. PMID:26574655

  11. Inheritance and Identification of a Major Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) that Confers Resistance to Meloidogyne incognita and a Novel QTL for Plant Height in Sweet Sorghum.

    PubMed

    Harris-Shultz, Karen R; Davis, Richard F; Knoll, Joseph E; Anderson, William; Wang, Hongliang

    2015-12-01

    Southern root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita) are a pest on many economically important row crop and vegetable species and management relies on chemicals, plant resistance, and cultural practices such as crop rotation. Little is known about the inheritance of resistance to M. incognita or the genomic regions associated with resistance in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). In this study, an F2 population (n = 130) was developed between the resistant sweet sorghum cultivar 'Honey Drip' and the susceptible sweet cultivar 'Collier'. Each F2 plant was phenotyped for stalk weight, height, juice Brix, root weight, total eggs, and eggs per gram of root. Strong correlations were observed between eggs per gram of root and total eggs, height and stalk weight, and between two measurements of Brix. Genotyping-by-sequencing was used to generate single nucleotide polymorphism markers. The G-Model, single marker analysis, interval mapping, and composite interval mapping were used to identify a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome 3 for total eggs and eggs per gram of root. Furthermore, a new QTL for plant height was also discovered on chromosome 3. Simple sequence repeat markers were developed in the total eggs and eggs per gram of root QTL region and the markers flanking the resistance gene are 4.7 and 2.4 cM away. These markers can be utilized to move the southern root-knot nematode resistance gene from Honey Drip to any sorghum line.

  12. Response of Resistant and Susceptible Bell Pepper (Capsicum annuum) to a Southern California Meloidogyne incognita Population from a Commercial Bell Pepper Field.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Jose Luis; Bachie, Oli; Ploeg, Antoon

    2014-12-01

    To determine the presence and level of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne spp.) infestation in Southern California bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) fields, soil and root samples were collected in April and May 2012 and analyzed for the presence of root-knot nematodes. The earlier samples were virtually free of root-knot nematodes, but the later samples all contained, sometimes very high numbers, of root-knot nematodes. Nematodes were all identified as M. incognita. A nematode population from one of these fields was multiplied in a greenhouse and used as inoculum for two repeated pot experiments with three susceptible and two resistant bell pepper varieties. Fruit yields of the resistant peppers were not affected by the nematodes, whereas yields of two of the three susceptible pepper cultivars decreased as a result of nematode inoculation. Nematode-induced root galling and nematode multiplication was low but different between the two resistant cultivars. Root galling and nematode reproduction was much higher on the three susceptible cultivars. One of these susceptible cultivars exhibited tolerance, as yields were not affected by the nematodes, but nematode multiplication was high. It is concluded that M. incognita is common in Southern California bell pepper production, and that resistant cultivars may provide a useful tool in a nonchemical management strategy.

  13. Response of Resistant and Susceptible Bell Pepper (Capsicum annuum) to a Southern California Meloidogyne incognita Population from a Commercial Bell Pepper Field.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Jose Luis; Bachie, Oli; Ploeg, Antoon

    2014-12-01

    To determine the presence and level of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne spp.) infestation in Southern California bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) fields, soil and root samples were collected in April and May 2012 and analyzed for the presence of root-knot nematodes. The earlier samples were virtually free of root-knot nematodes, but the later samples all contained, sometimes very high numbers, of root-knot nematodes. Nematodes were all identified as M. incognita. A nematode population from one of these fields was multiplied in a greenhouse and used as inoculum for two repeated pot experiments with three susceptible and two resistant bell pepper varieties. Fruit yields of the resistant peppers were not affected by the nematodes, whereas yields of two of the three susceptible pepper cultivars decreased as a result of nematode inoculation. Nematode-induced root galling and nematode multiplication was low but different between the two resistant cultivars. Root galling and nematode reproduction was much higher on the three susceptible cultivars. One of these susceptible cultivars exhibited tolerance, as yields were not affected by the nematodes, but nematode multiplication was high. It is concluded that M. incognita is common in Southern California bell pepper production, and that resistant cultivars may provide a useful tool in a nonchemical management strategy. PMID:25580027

  14. Knocking-Down Meloidogyne incognita Proteases by Plant-Delivered dsRNA Has Negative Pleiotropic Effect on Nematode Vigor

    PubMed Central

    Antonino de Souza Júnior, José Dijair; Ramos Coelho, Roberta; Tristan Lourenço, Isabela; da Rocha Fragoso, Rodrigo; Barbosa Viana, Antonio Américo; Lima Pepino de Macedo, Leonardo; Mattar da Silva, Maria Cristina; Gomes Carneiro, Regina Maria; Engler, Gilbert; de Almeida-Engler, Janice; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria Fatima

    2013-01-01

    The root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita causes serious damage and yield losses in numerous important crops worldwide. Analysis of the M. incognita genome revealed a vast number of proteases belonging to five different catalytic classes. Several reports indicate that M. incognita proteases could play important roles in nematode parasitism, besides their function in ordinary digestion of giant cell contents for feeding. The precise roles of these proteins during parasitism however are still unknown, making them interesting targets for gene silencing to address protein function. In this study we have knocked-down an aspartic (Mi-asp-1), a serine (Mi-ser-1) and a cysteine protease (Mi-cpl-1) by RNAi interference to get an insight into the function of these enzymes during a host/nematode interaction. Tobacco lines expressing dsRNA for Mi-ser-1 (dsSER), Mi-cpl-1 (dsCPL) and for the three genes together (dsFusion) were generated. Histological analysis of galls did not show clear differences in giant cell morphology. Interestingly, nematodes that infected plants expressing dsRNA for proteases produced a reduced number of eggs. In addition, nematode progeny matured in dsSER plants had reduced success in egg hatching, while progeny resulting from dsCPL and dsFusion plants were less successful to infect wild-type host plants. Quantitative PCR analysis confirmed a reduction in transcripts for Mi-cpl-1 and Mi-ser-1 proteases. Our results indicate that these proteases are possibly involved in different processes throughout nematode development, like nutrition, reproduction and embryogenesis. A better understanding of nematode proteases and their possible role during a plant-nematode interaction might help to develop new tools for phytonematode control. PMID:24392004

  15. Evaluation of the effect of ecologic on root knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, and tomato plant, Lycopersicon esculenum.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Debora C; Tchounwou, Paul B; Lawrence, Gary W

    2008-06-01

    Nonchemical methods and strategies for nematode management including cultural methods and engineered measures have been recommended as an alternative to methyl bromide (a major soil fumigant), due to its role in the depletion of the ozone layer. Hence, an international agreement has recently been reached calling for its reduced consumption and complete phasing out. This present research evaluates the potential of Ecologic, a biological, marine shell meal chitin material, as a soil amendment management agent for root knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, control, and its effect on the growth of Floradel tomato plant, Lycopersicon esculentum. To accomplish this goal, studies were conducted during which, experimental pots were set up in greenhouse environments using sterilized soil inoculated with 5,000 root-knot eggs per 1500 g soil. There were 4 treatments and 5 replications. Treatments were: No chitin; 50 g chitin; 100 g chitin; and 200 g chitin. A two-week wait period following Ecologic amendment preceded Floradel tomato planting to allow breakdown of the chitin material into the soil. Fresh and dry weights of shoot and root materials were taken as growth end-points. A statistically significant difference (p < or = 0.05) was obtained with regard to the growth rate of L. esculentum at 100 g chitin treatment compared to the control with no chitin. Mean fresh weights of Floradel tomato were 78.0 +/- 22.3 g, 81.0 +/- 20.3 g, 109.0 +/- 25.4 g and 102.0 +/- 33.3 g at 0, 50, 100 and 200 g chitin, respectively. The analysis of root knot nematode concentrations indicated a substantial effect on reproduction rate associated with chitin amendment. Study results showed a significant decrease in both root knot nematode eggs and juveniles (J2) at 100g and 200 g Ecologic chitin levels, however, an increase in nematode concentrations was recorded at the 50 g Ecologic chitin level (p < or = 0.05). The mean amounts of J2 population, as expressed per 1500 cm3 soil, were 49

  16. Evaluation of the Effect of Ecologic on Root Knot Nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, and Tomato Plant, Lycopersicon esculenum

    PubMed Central

    Ladner, Debora C.; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Lawrence, Gary W.

    2008-01-01

    Nonchemical methods and strategies for nematode management including cultural methods and engineered measures have been recommended as an alternative to methyl bromide (a major soil fumigant), due to its role in the depletion of the ozone layer. Hence, an international agreement has recently been reached calling for its reduced consumption and complete phasing out. This present research evaluates the potential of Ecologic, a biological, marine shell meal chitin material, as a soil amendment management agent for root knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, control, and its effect on the growth of Floradel tomato plant, Lycopersicon esculentum. To accomplish this goal, studies were conducted during which, experimental pots were set up in greenhouse environments using sterilized soil inoculated with 5,000 root-knot eggs per 1500 g soil. There were 4 treatments and 5 replications. Treatments were: No chitin; 50 g chitin; 100 g chitin; and 200 g chitin. A two-week wait period following Ecologic amendment preceded Floradel tomato planting to allow breakdown of the chitin material into the soil. Fresh and dry weights of shoot and root materials were taken as growth end-points. A statistically significant difference (p ≤ 0.05) was obtained with regard to the growth rate of L. esculentum at 100 g chitin treatment compared to the control with no chitin. Mean fresh weights of Floradel tomato were 78.0 ± 22.3g, 81.0 ± 20.3g, 109.0 ± 25.4g and 102.0 ± 33.3g at 0, 50, 100 and 200g chitin, respectively. The analysis of root knot nematode concentrations indicated a substantial effect on reproduction rate associated with chitin amendment. Study results showed a significant decrease in both root knot nematode eggs and juveniles (J2) at 100g and 200g Ecologic chitin levels, however, an increase in nematode concentrations was recorded at the 50g Ecologic chitin level (p ≤ 0.05). The mean amounts of J2 population, as expressed per 1500cm3 soil, were 49,933 ± 38,819, 86,050

  17. Effects of fly ash, Pseudomonas striata and Rhizobium on the reproduction of nematode Meloidogyne incognita and on the growth and transpiration of pea.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Zaki A; Singh, Lamabam Peter

    2005-01-01

    Glasshouse experiments were conducted twice to assess the ash amendments (0, 20, and 40% with soil), a phosphate solubilizing microorganism Pseudomonas striata and a root-nodule bacterium Rhizobium sp on the reproduction of root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita and on the growth and transpiration of pea. Amendments of fly ash with soil had no effect on transpiration. However, M. incognita reduced the rate of transpiration from 1st week onward after inoculation while inoculation of Rhizobium sp and P. striata increased transpiration from 1st week onward after their inoculation both in nematode inoculated and uninoculated plants. Increase in transpiration was greater when both organisms were inoculated together. Addition of 20 and 40% fly ash with soil was beneficial for plant growth both in nematode inoculated and uninoculated plants. Inoculation of above organisms also increases plant growth of nematode inoculated and uninoculated plants in different fly ash soil mixture but increase in growth was greater when both organisms were inoculated together. Use of 20% fly ash increased galling and nematode multiplication over plants grown in without fly ash while 40% fly ash had adverse effect on galling and nematode multiplication. Rhizobium sp had greater adverse effect on galling and nematode multiplication than P. striata. Use of both organisms together had greater adverse effect on galling and nematode multiplication than caused by either of them alone. Highest reduction in galling and nematode multiplication was observed when both organisms were used in 40% fly ash amended soil. However, highest transpiration was observed in plants without nematodes and inoculated with both organisms together both in with or without fly ash amended soil.

  18. The Infection of Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) Roots by Meloidogyne incognita Alters the Expression of Actin-Depolymerizing Factor (ADF) Genes, Particularly in Association with Giant Cell Formation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Xingwang; Liu, Ying; Xue, Shudan; Cai, Yanling; Yang, Sen; Dong, Mingming; Zhang, Yaqi; Liu, Huiling; Zhao, Binyu; Qi, Changhong; Zhu, Ning; Ren, Huazhong

    2016-01-01

    Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) is threatened by substantial yield losses due to the south root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita). However, understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the process of nematode infection is still limited. In this study, we found that M. incognita infection affected the structure of cells in cucumber roots and treatment of the cytoskeleton inhibitor (cytochalasin D) reduced root-knot nematode (RKN) parasitism. It is known that Actin-Depolymerizing Factor (ADF) affects cell structure, as well as the organization of the cytoskeleton. To address the hypothesis that nematode-induced abnormal cell structures and cytoskeletal rearrangements might be mediated by the ADF genes, we identified and characterized eight cucumber ADF (CsADF) genes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the cucumber ADF gene family is grouped into four ancient subclasses. Expression analysis revealed that CsADF1, CsADF2-1, CsADF2-2, CsADF2-3 (Subclass I), and CsADF6 (Subclass III) have higher transcript levels than CsADF7-1, CsADF7-2 (Subclass II genes), and CsADF5 (Subclass IV) in roots. Members of subclass I genes (CsADF1, CsADF2-1, CsADF2-2, and CsADF2-3), with the exception of CsADF2-1, exhibited a induction of expression in roots 14 days after their inoculation (DAI) with nematodes. However, the expression of subclass II genes (CsADF7-1 and CsADF7-2) showed no significant change after inoculation. The transcript levels of CsADF6 (Subclass III) showed a specific induction at 21 DAI, while CsADF5 (Subclass IV) was weakly expressed in roots, but was strongly up-regulated as early as 7 DAI. In addition, treatment of roots with cytochalasin D caused an approximately 2-fold down-regulation of the CsADF genes in the treated plants. These results suggest that CsADF gene mediated actin dynamics are associated with structural changes in roots as a consequence of M. incognita infection. PMID:27695469

  19. The Infection of Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) Roots by Meloidogyne incognita Alters the Expression of Actin-Depolymerizing Factor (ADF) Genes, Particularly in Association with Giant Cell Formation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Xingwang; Liu, Ying; Xue, Shudan; Cai, Yanling; Yang, Sen; Dong, Mingming; Zhang, Yaqi; Liu, Huiling; Zhao, Binyu; Qi, Changhong; Zhu, Ning; Ren, Huazhong

    2016-01-01

    Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) is threatened by substantial yield losses due to the south root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita). However, understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the process of nematode infection is still limited. In this study, we found that M. incognita infection affected the structure of cells in cucumber roots and treatment of the cytoskeleton inhibitor (cytochalasin D) reduced root-knot nematode (RKN) parasitism. It is known that Actin-Depolymerizing Factor (ADF) affects cell structure, as well as the organization of the cytoskeleton. To address the hypothesis that nematode-induced abnormal cell structures and cytoskeletal rearrangements might be mediated by the ADF genes, we identified and characterized eight cucumber ADF (CsADF) genes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the cucumber ADF gene family is grouped into four ancient subclasses. Expression analysis revealed that CsADF1, CsADF2-1, CsADF2-2, CsADF2-3 (Subclass I), and CsADF6 (Subclass III) have higher transcript levels than CsADF7-1, CsADF7-2 (Subclass II genes), and CsADF5 (Subclass IV) in roots. Members of subclass I genes (CsADF1, CsADF2-1, CsADF2-2, and CsADF2-3), with the exception of CsADF2-1, exhibited a induction of expression in roots 14 days after their inoculation (DAI) with nematodes. However, the expression of subclass II genes (CsADF7-1 and CsADF7-2) showed no significant change after inoculation. The transcript levels of CsADF6 (Subclass III) showed a specific induction at 21 DAI, while CsADF5 (Subclass IV) was weakly expressed in roots, but was strongly up-regulated as early as 7 DAI. In addition, treatment of roots with cytochalasin D caused an approximately 2-fold down-regulation of the CsADF genes in the treated plants. These results suggest that CsADF gene mediated actin dynamics are associated with structural changes in roots as a consequence of M. incognita infection.

  20. Population Dynamics of Meloidogyne incognita, M. arenaria,and Other Nematodes and Crop Yields in Rotations of Cotton, Peanut, and Wheat Under Minimum Tillage.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A W; Dowler, C C; Handoo, Z A

    2000-03-01

    Wheat, cotton, and peanut were arranged in three cropping sequences to determine the effects of fenamiphos (6.7 kg a.i./ha) and cropping sequence on nematode population densities and crop yields under conservation tillage and irrigation for 6 years. The cropping sequences included a wheat winter cover crop each year and summer crops of cotton every year, peanut every year, or cotton rotated every other year with peanut. The population densities of Meloidogyne spp. and Helicotylenchus dihystera were determined monthly during the experiment. Numbers of M. incognita increased on cotton and decreased on peanut, whereas M. arenaria increased on peanut, and decreased on cotton; both nematode species remained in moderate to high numbers in plots of wheat. Root damage was more severe on cotton than peanut and was not affected by fenamiphos treatment. The H. dihystera population densities were highest in plots with cotton every summer, intermediate in the cotton-peanut rotation, and lowest in plots with peanut every summer. Over all years and cropping sequences, yield increases in fenamiphos treatment over untreated control were 9% for wheat, 8% for cotton, and 0% for peanut. Peanut yields following cotton were generally higher than yields following peanut. These results show that nematode problems may be manageable in cotton and peanut production under conservation tillage and irrigation in the southeastern United States.

  1. Pyramiding taro cystatin and fungal chitinase genes driven by a synthetic promoter enhances resistance in tomato to root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuan-Li; He, Yong; Hsiao, Tsen-Tsz; Wang, Chii-Jeng; Tian, Zhihong; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2015-02-01

    Meloidogyne incognita, one of the major root-knot nematode (RKN) species in agriculture, attacks many plant species, causing severe economic losses. Genetic engineering of plants with defense-responsive genes has been demonstrated to control RKN. These studies, however, focused on controlling RKN at certain growth stages. In the present study, a dual gene overexpression system, utilizing a plant cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CeCPI) and a fungal chitinase (PjCHI-1), was used to transform tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) in order to provide protection from all growth stages of RKN. A synthetic promoter, pMSPOA, containing NOS-like and SP8a elements, was employed to drive the expression of introduced genes. Gall formation and the proportion of female nematodes in the population, as well as effects on the reproduction of RKN, were monitored in both transgenic and control plants. RKN eggs collected from transgenic plants displayed reduced chitin content and retardation in embryogenesis. The results demonstrated that transgenic plants had inhibitory effects on RKN that were superior to plants transformed with a single gene. The pyramiding expression system produced synergistic effects by the two defense-responsive genes, leading to a detrimental effect on all growth stages of RKN. PMID:25575993

  2. Population Dynamics of Meloidogyne incognita, M. arenaria,and Other Nematodes and Crop Yields in Rotations of Cotton, Peanut, and Wheat Under Minimum Tillage

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, A. W.; Dowler, C. C.; Handoo, Z. A.

    2000-01-01

    Wheat, cotton, and peanut were arranged in three cropping sequences to determine the effects of fenamiphos (6.7 kg a.i./ha) and cropping sequence on nematode population densities and crop yields under conservation tillage and irrigation for 6 years. The cropping sequences included a wheat winter cover crop each year and summer crops of cotton every year, peanut every year, or cotton rotated every other year with peanut. The population densities of Meloidogyne spp. and Helicotylenchus dihystera were determined monthly during the experiment. Numbers of M. incognita increased on cotton and decreased on peanut, whereas M. arenaria increased on peanut, and decreased on cotton; both nematode species remained in moderate to high numbers in plots of wheat. Root damage was more severe on cotton than peanut and was not affected by fenamiphos treatment. The H. dihystera population densities were highest in plots with cotton every summer, intermediate in the cotton-peanut rotation, and lowest in plots with peanut every summer. Over all years and cropping sequences, yield increases in fenamiphos treatment over untreated control were 9% for wheat, 8% for cotton, and 0% for peanut. Peanut yields following cotton were generally higher than yields following peanut. These results show that nematode problems may be manageable in cotton and peanut production under conservation tillage and irrigation in the southeastern United States. PMID:19270949

  3. Pyramiding taro cystatin and fungal chitinase genes driven by a synthetic promoter enhances resistance in tomato to root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuan-Li; He, Yong; Hsiao, Tsen-Tsz; Wang, Chii-Jeng; Tian, Zhihong; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2015-02-01

    Meloidogyne incognita, one of the major root-knot nematode (RKN) species in agriculture, attacks many plant species, causing severe economic losses. Genetic engineering of plants with defense-responsive genes has been demonstrated to control RKN. These studies, however, focused on controlling RKN at certain growth stages. In the present study, a dual gene overexpression system, utilizing a plant cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CeCPI) and a fungal chitinase (PjCHI-1), was used to transform tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) in order to provide protection from all growth stages of RKN. A synthetic promoter, pMSPOA, containing NOS-like and SP8a elements, was employed to drive the expression of introduced genes. Gall formation and the proportion of female nematodes in the population, as well as effects on the reproduction of RKN, were monitored in both transgenic and control plants. RKN eggs collected from transgenic plants displayed reduced chitin content and retardation in embryogenesis. The results demonstrated that transgenic plants had inhibitory effects on RKN that were superior to plants transformed with a single gene. The pyramiding expression system produced synergistic effects by the two defense-responsive genes, leading to a detrimental effect on all growth stages of RKN.

  4. Suppression of Meloidogyne chitwoodi with Sudangrass Cultivars as Green Manure

    PubMed Central

    Mojtahedi, H.; Santo, G. S.; Ingham, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    Meloidogyne chitwoodi race 1 reproduced on Piper sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench), 332 (sudangrass hybrid), and P855F and P877F (sorghum-sudangrass hybrids), but failed to reproduce efficiently on Trudan 8, Trudex 9 (sudangrass hybrids), and Sordan 79, SS-222, and Bravo II (sorghum-sudangrass hybrids). Meloidogyne chitwoodi race 2 behaved similarly and reproduced more efficiently on Piper, P855F, and P877F than on Trudan 8, Trudex 9, or Sordan 79. The mean reproductive factor for M. chitwoodi races on the poorer hosts ranged from <0.1 to 0.9 under greenhouse and field conditions. Meloidogyne hapla failed to reproduce on any of the cultivars tested. In the laboratory, leaves of each cultivar chopped and incorporated as green manure reduced the M. chitwoodi population in infested soil more than unamended or wheat green manure treatments. Trudan 8, although limited to the zone of incorporation, protected this zone from colonization of upward migrating second stage juveniles (J2) for up to 6 weeks. Leaves of Trudan 8 but not roots were effective against M. chitwoodi, and J2 appeared to be more sensitive than egg masses. Trudan 8 and Sordan 79 as green manure reduced M. chitwoodi in bucket microplots under field conditions. PMID:19279773

  5. Morphological and Morphometrical Characterization of Meloidogyne incognita from Different Host Plants in Four Districts of Punjab, India.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harpreet; Attri, Rajni

    2013-06-01

    The population of M. incognita, the root knot nematode (RKN) was found infesting five different host plants (okra, banana, sunflower, bottle gourd, and brinjal) out of 24 examined from four districts of Punjab, India (Gurdaspur, Ludhiana, Patiala, and Hoshiarpur). Morphological and morphometrical characterization indicated that in the case of mature female, the characters of body length and width, neck length, ratio 'a', anus to tail terminus (ATT), interphasmid distance (IPD), and perineal pattern were recorded as stable characters. These taxonomic characters can be reliable for identification. All characters of second-stage juvenile (J2) such as body length, stylet length, head to median bulb length (H-MB), distance from median bulb to excretory pore (MB-EP), tail length, anal body width (ABW), and ratios C and C' were highly variable. Analysis of interpopulation morphometric characters of mature female of M. incognita, namely, body length, width, and ratio 'a' were moderately variable characters (CV 0.26% to 20%) and stylet length, neck length, length of median bulb (LMB), and width of median bulb (WMB) were highly variable (CV 1.0% to 36.1%). In the perineal pattern, the two characters ATT and IPD were moderately variable (CV 8.8% to 17.6%) and two characters, anus to vulval slit (AVS) and length of vulval slit (LVS), were highly variable (CV 2.1% to 40.5%). In J2, body length, stylet length, H-MB, MB-EP, ABW, tail length, ratios C, and C' were highly variable characters (CV > 12%). PMID:23833327

  6. Evaluation of in vitro and in vivo nematicidal potential of a multifunctional streptomycete, Streptomyces hydrogenans strain DH16 against Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Talwinder; Jasrotia, Shivam; Ohri, Puja; Manhas, Rajesh Kumari

    2016-11-01

    The present work demonstrated the nematicidal potential of Streptomyces hydrogenans strain DH16 (a strain with strong antagonism against fungal phytopathogens and insect pest) against Meloidogyne incognita. The culture supernatant and solvent extract significantly inhibited egg hatching (almost 100%) along with J2 mortality of more than 95% after 96h. The nematicidal activity of 10-(2,2-dimethyl-cyclohexyl)-6,9-dihydroxy-4,9-dimethyl-dec-2-enoic acid methyl ester (SH2; a new antifungal compound) purified from this streptomycete was also evaluated using different concentrations. The juvenile mortality of the nematode increased with increasing concentration and exposure time and reached the maximum (95%) after 96h at concentration of 100μg/ml. After 160h of incubation, egg hatch of 16% was observed at concentration of 100μg/ml as compared to control where 100% egg hatching was achieved. However, at the highest concentration of the compound (200μg/ml), 100% J2 mortality and 0% egg hatching were observed after 72 and 160h of incubation, respectively. In vivo pot experiments further revealed the nematicidal potential of S. hydrogenans where soil drenching with its culture supernatant and cells effectively controlled root galls, egg masses in nematode infested tomato plants and at the same time promoted the growth of tomato plants. Additionally, in the absence of nematodes, soil drenching with culture supernatant and cells significantly enhanced the various agronomic traits of plants as compared to control plants. Thus, the outcomes of the current study endorse the potential of S. hydrogenans strain DH16 and its metabolites to be developed as safe nematicidal and plant growth promoting agents.

  7. Evaluation of in vitro and in vivo nematicidal potential of a multifunctional streptomycete, Streptomyces hydrogenans strain DH16 against Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Talwinder; Jasrotia, Shivam; Ohri, Puja; Manhas, Rajesh Kumari

    2016-11-01

    The present work demonstrated the nematicidal potential of Streptomyces hydrogenans strain DH16 (a strain with strong antagonism against fungal phytopathogens and insect pest) against Meloidogyne incognita. The culture supernatant and solvent extract significantly inhibited egg hatching (almost 100%) along with J2 mortality of more than 95% after 96h. The nematicidal activity of 10-(2,2-dimethyl-cyclohexyl)-6,9-dihydroxy-4,9-dimethyl-dec-2-enoic acid methyl ester (SH2; a new antifungal compound) purified from this streptomycete was also evaluated using different concentrations. The juvenile mortality of the nematode increased with increasing concentration and exposure time and reached the maximum (95%) after 96h at concentration of 100μg/ml. After 160h of incubation, egg hatch of 16% was observed at concentration of 100μg/ml as compared to control where 100% egg hatching was achieved. However, at the highest concentration of the compound (200μg/ml), 100% J2 mortality and 0% egg hatching were observed after 72 and 160h of incubation, respectively. In vivo pot experiments further revealed the nematicidal potential of S. hydrogenans where soil drenching with its culture supernatant and cells effectively controlled root galls, egg masses in nematode infested tomato plants and at the same time promoted the growth of tomato plants. Additionally, in the absence of nematodes, soil drenching with culture supernatant and cells significantly enhanced the various agronomic traits of plants as compared to control plants. Thus, the outcomes of the current study endorse the potential of S. hydrogenans strain DH16 and its metabolites to be developed as safe nematicidal and plant growth promoting agents. PMID:27664743

  8. Assessment of DAPG-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens for management of Meloidogyne incognita and Fusarium oxysporum on watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens isolates Clinto 1R, Wayne 1R and Wood 1R, which produce the antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG), can suppress soilborne diseases and promote plant growth. Consequently, these beneficial bacterial isolates were tested on watermelon plants for suppression of Meloidogy...

  9. Exposure to double-stranded RNA mediated by tobacco rattle virus leads to transcription up-regulation of effector gene Mi-vap-2 from Meloidogyne incognita and promotion of pathogenicity in progeny.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yuankai; Wang, Xuan; Le, Xiuhu; Ju, Yuliang; Guan, Tinglong; Li, Hongmei

    2016-02-01

    Meloidogyne spp. are economically important plant parasites and cause enormous damage to agriculture world-wide. These nematodes use secreted effectors which modify host cells, allowing them to obtain the nutrients required for growth and development. A better understanding of the roles of effectors in nematode parasitism is critical for understanding the mechanisms of nematode-host interactions. In this study, Mi-vap-2 of Meloidogyne incognita, a gene encoding a venom allergen-like protein, was targeted by RNA interference mediated by the tobacco rattle virus. Unexpectedly, compared with a wild type line, a substantial up-regulation of Mi-vap-2 transcript was observed in juveniles collected at 7 days p.i. from Nicotiana benthamiana agroinfiltrated with TRV::vap-2. This up-regulation of the targeted transcript did not impact development of females or the production of galls, nor the number of females on the TRV::vap-2 line. In a positive control line, the transcript of Mi16D10 was knocked down in juveniles from the TRV::16D10 line at 7 days p.i., resulting in a significant inhibition of nematode development. The up-regulation of Mi-vap-2 triggered by TRV-RNAi was inherited by the progeny of the nematodes exposed to double-stranded RNA. Meanwhile, a substantial increase in Mi-VAP-2 expression in those juvenile progeny was revealed by ELISA. This caused an increase in the number of galls (71.2%) and females (84.6%) produced on seedlings of N. benthamiana compared with the numbers produced by control nematodes. Up-regulation of Mi-vap-2 and its encoded protein therefore enhanced pathogenicity of the nematodes, suggesting that Mi-vap-2 may be required for successful parasitism during the early parasitic stage of M. incognita.

  10. Effects of Meloidogyne spp. and Rhizoctonia solani on the Growth of Grapevine Rootings.

    PubMed

    Walker, G E

    1997-06-01

    A disease complex involving Meloidogyne incognita and Rhizoctonia solani was associated with stunting of grapevines in a field nursery. Nematode reproduction was occurring on both susceptible and resistant cultivars, and pot experiments were conducted to determine the virulence of this M. incognita population, and of M. javanica and M. hapla populations, to V. vinifera cv. Colombard (susceptible) and to V. champinii cv. Ramsey (regarded locally as highly resistant). The virulence of R. solani isolates obtained from roots of diseased grapevines also was determined both alone and in combination with M. incognita. Ramsey was susceptible to M. incognita (reproduction ratio 9.8 to 18.4 in a shadehouse and heated glasshouse, respectively) but was resistant to M. javanica and M. hapla. Colombard was susceptible to M. incognita (reproduction ratio 24.3 and 41.3, respectively) and M. javanica. Shoot growth was suppressed (by 35%) by M. incognita and, to a lesser extent, by M. hapla. Colombard roots were more severely galled than Ramsey roots by all three species, and nematode reproduction was higher on Colombard. Isolates of R. solani assigned to putative anastomosis groups 2-1 and 4, and an unidentified isolate, colonized and induced rotting of grapevine roots. Ramsey was more susceptible to root rotting than Colombard. Shoot growth was inhibited by up to 15% by several AG 4 isolates and by 20% by the AG 2-1 isolate. AG 4 isolates varied in their virulence. Root rotting was higher when grapevines were inoculated with both M. incognita and R. solani and was highest when nematode inoculation preceded the fungus. Shoot weights were lower when vines were inoculated with the nematode 13 days before the fungus compared with inoculation with both the nematode and the fungus on the same day. It was concluded that both the M. incognita population and some R. solani isolates were virulent against both Colombard and Ramsey, and that measures to prevent spread in nursery stock were

  11. Occurrence of Meloidogyne spp. in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Doucet, M. E.; Pinochet, J.

    1992-01-01

    A record of 84 plant species in 32 families that are hosts to the root-knot nematode species found in Argentina is presented. The genus Meloidogyne appears to be widely distributed in the country, with Meloidogyne incognita and M. javanica the most frequently detected species. Other species found in Argentina include M. arenaria, M. cruciani, M. decalineata, M. hapla, and M. ottersoni. The present survey is supplemented with existing published information. PMID:19283059

  12. Studies on the management of root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita-wilt fungus, Fusarium oxysporum disease complex of green gram, Vigna radiata cv ML-1108

    PubMed Central

    Haseeb, Akhtar; Sharma, Anita; Shukla, Prabhat Kuma

    2005-01-01

    Studies were conducted under pot conditions to determine the comparative efficacy of carbofuran at 1 mg a.i./kg soil, bavistin at 1 mg a.i./kg soil, neem (Azadirachta indica) seed powder at 50 mg/kg soil, green mould (Trichoderma harzianum) at 50.0 ml/kg soil, rhizobacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens) at 50.0 ml/kg soil against root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita–wilt fungus, Fusarium oxysporum disease complex on green gram, Vigna radiata cv ML-1108. All the treatments significantly improved the growth of the plants as compared to untreated inoculated plants. Analysis of data showed that carbofuran and A. indica seed powder increased plant growth and yield significantly more in comparison to bavistin and P. fluorescens. Carbofuran was highly effective against nematode, bavistin against fungus, A. indica seed powder against both the pathogens and both the bioagents were moderately effective against both the pathogens. PMID:16052706

  13. Suitability of Small Grains as Hosts of Meloidogyne Species

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, A. W.; Motsinger, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    Seven cultivars of wheat, five of oat, one of rye, and four of barley were tested as hosts for Meloidogyne incognita, M. javanica, or M. arenaria under greenhouse conditions where soil temperature ranged from 21 to 34 C. Reproduction rates of all nematode species were high on all cultivars, except M. javanica and M. arenaria on 'Brooks' and 'Florida 501' oat. Meloidogyne incognita and M. javanica produced more eggs on roots of 'Rutgers' tomato than on cultivars of wheat, oat, rye, or barley. PMID:19287666

  14. Survey of Meloidogyne spp. in Tomato Production Fields of Baix Llobregat County, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Sorribas, F. J.; Verdejo-Lucas, S.

    1994-01-01

    A survey was conducted to determine the frequency and abundance of Meloidogyne spp. in tomato production sites located in Baix Llobregat County, Barcelona, Spain. Forty-five sites were sampled before planting and at harvest from February to October, 1991. Meloidogyne spp. occurred in 49% of the sites sampled. Preplant population densities ranged from 10 to 220 (x̄ = 110)juveniles/ 250 cm³ soil, and final population densities ranged from 20 to 1,530 (x̄ = 410)juveniles/250 cm³ soil. Final population densities were higher in open fields than in field greenhouses, but initial population densities were higher in greenhouses than in fields. Meloidogyne incognita, M. javanica, and M. arenaria were found in this survey. Meloidogyne populations that reproduced on M. incognita-resistant tomato cultivars in the field sites did not circumvent the Mi gene resistance in greenhouse tests. PMID:19279955

  15. Effect of Crop Rotation on Meloidogyne spp. and Pratylenchus spp. Populations in Strawberry Fields in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, P; Tsay, T T

    2006-09-01

    Changes in population levels of Meloidogyne hapla, M. incognita, Pratylenchus coffeae, and P. penetrans were studied in 12 strawberry fields in the Dahu region of Taiwan. Ten potential rotation crops and two cultural practices were evaluated for their effect on nematode populations and influence on strawberry yield. Rotation with rice or taro and the cultural practice of flooding and bare fallowing for four months were found to reduce nematode soil populations to two or fewer nematodes per 100 ml soil. Average strawberry yields increased between 2.4% to 6.3% following taro compared to the bare fallow treatment. Corn suppressed M. incognita and M. hapla populations and resulted in an increased in strawberry yield compared to bare fallow. Other phytopathogens also present in these fields limited taro as the rotation choice for nematode management. Results of this research and economic analysis of the input requirements for various rotation crops, corn and bare fallow were recommended as the most appropriate rotation strategies for nematode management in strawberry in this region.

  16. Evidence of Differences between the Communities of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Colonizing Galls and Roots of Prunus persica Infected by the Root-Knot Nematode Meloidogyne incognita▿

    PubMed Central

    Alguacil, Maria del Mar; Torrecillas, Emma; Lozano, Zenaida; Roldán, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) play important roles as plant protection agents, reducing or suppressing nematode colonization. However, it has never been investigated whether the galls produced in roots by nematode infection are colonized by AMF. This study tested whether galls produced by Meloidogyne incognita infection in Prunus persica roots are colonized by AMF. We also determined the changes in AMF composition and biodiversity mediated by infection with this root-knot nematode. DNA from galls and roots of plants infected by M. incognita and from roots of noninfected plants was extracted, amplified, cloned, and sequenced using AMF-specific primers. Phylogenetic analysis using the small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) data set revealed 22 different AMF sequence types (17 Glomus sequence types, 3 Paraglomus sequence types, 1 Scutellospora sequence type, and 1 Acaulospora sequence type). The highest AMF diversity was found in uninfected roots, followed by infected roots and galls. This study indicates that the galls produced in P. persica roots due to infection with M. incognita were colonized extensively by a community of AMF, belonging to the families Paraglomeraceae and Glomeraceae, that was different from the community detected in roots. Although the function of the AMF in the galls is still unknown, we hypothesize that they act as protection agents against opportunistic pathogens. PMID:21984233

  17. Pathogenicity and control of Heterodera schachtii and Meloidogyne spp. on some cruciferous plant cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pathogenicity of the sugar beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii and the root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne arenaria, M. incognita and M. javanica on cabbage cvs. Balady, Brunswick and Ganzouri, cauliflower cv. Balady, turnip cv. Balady, and radish cv. Balady was determined in several greenhouse ...

  18. Assessment of selected pecan and peach rootstocks for resistance to Meloidogyne partityla

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Open pollinated pecan seedling rootstocks were evaluated for susceptibility to Meloidogyne partityla, M. arenaria, and M. incognita in the greenhouse. Cultivars tested included seed from ‘Apache’, ‘Caddo’, ‘Curtis’, ‘Moneymaker’, ‘Pawnee’, ‘Schley’, ‘Stuart’, and ‘Wichita’ parent trees. ‘Elliott’...

  19. Mitochondrial genome plasticity among species of the nematode genus Meloidogyne (Nematoda: Tylenchina).

    PubMed

    Humphreys-Pereira, Danny A; Elling, Axel A

    2015-04-15

    The mitochondrial (mt) genomes of the plant-parasitic root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne arenaria, Meloidogyne enterolobii and Meloidogyne javanica were sequenced and compared with those of three other root-knot nematode species in order to explore the mt genome plasticity within Meloidogyne. The mt genomes of M. arenaria, M. enterolobii and M. javanica are circular, with an estimated size of 18.8, 18.9 and 19.6 kb, respectively. Compared to other nematodes these mt genomes are larger, due to the presence of large non-coding regions. The mt genome architecture within the genus Meloidogyne varied in the position of trn genes and in the position, length and nucleotide composition of non-coding regions. These variations were observed independent of the species' natural environments or reproductive modes. M. enterolobii showed three main non-coding regions whereas Meloidogyne chitwoodi, Meloidogyne incognita, M. javanica and M. arenaria had two non-coding regions, and Meloidogyne graminicola had a unique large non-coding region interrupted by two trn genes. trn genes were positioned in different regions of the mt genomes in M. chitwoodi, M. enterolobii and M. graminicola, whereas the trn gene order was identical between M. arenaria, M. incognita and M. javanica. Importantly, M. graminicola had extra copies of trnV and trnS2. High divergence levels between the two copies of each trn might indicate duplication events followed by random loss and mutations in the anticodon. Tree-based methods based on amino acid sequences of 12 mt protein-coding genes support the monophyly for the tropical and mitotic parthenogenetic species, M. arenaria, M. enterolobii, M. incognita and M. javanica and for a clade that includes the meiotic parthenogenetic species, M. chitwoodi and M. graminicola. A comparison of the mt genome architecture in plant-parasitic nematodes and phylogenetic analyses support that Pratylenchus is the most recent ancestor of root-knot nematodes.

  20. Dehydrogenases, Acid and Alkaline Phosphatases, and Esterases for Chemotaxonomy of Selected Meloidogyne, Ditylenchus, Heterodera and Aphelenchus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, D. W.; Huisingh, D.; Sasser, J. N.

    1971-01-01

    Various taxonomically useful profiles of four dehydrogenases (lactate, malate, glucose-6-phosphate, and a-glycerophosphate) and three hydrolases (acid and alkaline phosphatase and esterase) were detected in whole nematode homogenates of Meloidogyne javanica, M. hapla, M. incognita, M. arenaria, Ditylenchus dipsaci, D. triformis, Heterodera glycines, and Aphelenchus avenae. The enzyme profiles were stable in populations cultured on several different hosts. A tentative enzymically-determined phylogeny of Meloidogyne is given. PMID:19322334

  1. Mitochondrial Haplotype-based Identification of Root-knot Nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) on Cut Foliage Crops in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Baidoo, Richard; Joseph, Soumi; Mengistu, Tesfamariam M.; Brito, Janete A.; McSorley, Robert; Stamps, Robert H.; Crow, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Florida accounts for more than 75% of the national cut foliage production. Unfortunately, root-knot nematodes (RKN) (Meloidogyne spp.) are a serious problem on these crops, rendering many farms unproductive. Currently, information on the Meloidogyne spp. occurring on most commonly cultivated cut foliage crops in Florida, and tools for their rapid identification are lacking. The objectives of this study were to (i) identify specific RKN infecting common ornamental cut foliage crops in Florida and (ii) evaluate the feasibility of using the mtDNA haplotype as a molecular diagnostic tool for rapid identification of large samples of RKN. A total of 200 Meloidogyne females were collected from cut foliage plant roots. Meloidogyne spp. were identified by PCR and RFLP of mitochondrial DNA. PCR and RFLP of mitochondrial DNA were effective in discriminating the Meloidogyne spp. present. Meloidogyne incognita is the most dominant RKN on cut foliage crops in Florida and must be a high target for making management decisions. Other Meloidogyne spp. identified include M. javanica, M. hapla, Meloidogyne sp. 1, and Meloidogyne sp. 2. The results for this study demonstrate the usefulness of the mtDNA haplotype-based designation as a valuable molecular tool for identification of Meloidogyne spp. PMID:27765993

  2. Evaluation of Cover Crops with Potential for Use in Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation (ASD) for Susceptibility to Three Species of Meloidogyne

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several cover crops with potential for use in tropical and subtropical regions were assessed for susceptibility to three common species of root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne arenaria, M. incognita, and M. javanica. Crops were selected based on potential use as organic amendments in anaerobic soil disin...

  3. Effects of cover crops with potential for use in anaerobic soil disinfestation (asd) on reproduction of meloidogyne spp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several cover crops were assessed for their susceptibility to invasion and galling by three species of root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne arenaria, M. incognita, and M. javanica. Crops were selected based on their potential for use as the organic amendment component in anaerobic soil disinfestation (AS...

  4. Root Tissue Response of Two Related Soybean Cultivars to Infection by Lectin-treated Meloidogyne spp.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, E. L.; Kaplan, D. T.; Dickson, D. W.; Mitchell, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Treatment of second-stage juveniles (J2) of Meloidogyne incognita race 1 and M. javanica with soybean agglutinin, Concanavalin A, wheat germ agglutinin, Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinin, or Limax flavus agglutinin or the corresponding competitive sugars for each of these lectins did not alter normal root tissue response of soybean cultivars Centennial and Pickett 71 to infection by M. incognita race 1 or M. javanica. Giant cells were frequently induced in Centennial and Pickett 71 roots 5 and 20 days after inoculation of roots with untreated J2 of a population of M. incognita race 3. Treatment of J2 of M. incognita race 3 with the lectins or carbohydrates listed above caused Centennial, but not Pickett 71, root tissue to respond in a hypersensitive manner to infection by M. incognita race 3. Penetration of soybean roots by J2 of Meloidogyne spp. was strongly inhibited in the presence of 0.1 M sialic acid. Treatment of J2 with sialic acid was not lethal to nematodes, and the inhibitory activity of sialic acid was apparently not caused by low pH. These results suggest that carbohydrates may influence plant-nematode interactions. PMID:19287600

  5. Virulence of Meloidogyne spp. and Induced Resistance in Grape Rootstocks

    PubMed Central

    McKenry, Michael V.; Anwar, Safdar A.

    2007-01-01

    Harmony grape rootstock displays resistance to several Meloidogyne spp. but that resistance is not durable in commercial vineyard settings. A 2-year experiment in a microplot setting revealed host specificities of two virulent populations of Meloidogyne arenaria and an avirulent population of Meloidogyne incognita. In a subsequent split-root experiment, the avirulent nematode population was demonstrated to induce resistance to the virulent nematode population. To quantify the level of resistance, reproduction of the virulent nematode population was determined 63 days after being challenged by an avirulent nematode population using a range of inoculum densities and timeframes. Induction of resistance became apparent when the virulent nematode population was inoculated 7 days after the avirulent nematode population and increased thereafter. The level of induced resistance increased with increased inoculum levels of the avirulent nematode population. Root systems of perennial crops are commonly fed upon simultaneously by multiple nematode species. These two studies indicate that field populations can become preferentially virulent upon one or multiple rootstocks and that co-inhabiting populations may induce existing resistance mechanisms. In perennial crops, it is common for numerous nematode species besides Meloidogyne spp. to be present, including some that feed without causing apparent damage. PMID:19259475

  6. Histopathological response of Lens culinaris roots towards root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognito.

    PubMed

    Singh, Swarn; Abbasi; Hisamuddin

    2013-04-01

    Lens culinaris (lentil) is an important pulse crop. The yield of the crop is reduced if grown in root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) infested field. Meloidogyne incognita caused infection in primary and the secondary roots leading to the anomalies in the affected part of the root. The study revealed that the second stage juveniles (J2) of Meloidogyne incognita entered the growing roots and their branches inter and intracellularly. The immediate response was hypertrophy and hyperplasia in the root tissue near the nematode head. In response to hypertrophy some cells became very large and contained dense and granular cytoplasm. Adjacent to the giant cells, the vascular tissue was found to be disturbed. Shape, size and orientation of the vascular elements was so much altered that it had become difficult to trace the normal course of vascular strands. In various sections vascular strands were found disrupted. The vessel elements had the shapes resembling the shapes of parenchyma cells. Similarly sieve tube elements of the phloem, near the giant cells were shorter and resembled with nearby parenchyma cells. Abnormalities in xylem and phloem favored transport water, minerals and metabolites towards the giant cells. From this study, it might be inferred that alteration in the cells of galled tissue was essential for the sustenance of giant cells and for the survival of the nematode.

  7. RKN Lethal DB: A database for the identification of Root Knot Nematode (Meloidogyne spp.) candidate lethal genes

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Ahmed; Matthews, Benjamin F; Alkharouf, Nadim W

    2012-01-01

    Root Knot nematode (RKN; Meloidogyne spp.) is one of the most devastating parasites that infect the roots of hundreds of plant species. RKN cannot live independently from their hosts and are the biggest contributors to the loss of the world's primary foods. RNAi gene silencing studies have demonstrated that there are fewer galls and galls are smaller when RNAi constructs targeted to silence certain RKN genes are expressed in plant roots. We conducted a comparative genomics analysis, comparing RKN genes of six species: Meloidogyne Arenaria, Meloidogyne Chitwoodi, Meloidogyne Hapla, Meloidogyne Incognita, Meloidogyne Javanica, and Meloidogyne Paranaensis to that of the free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, to identify candidate genes that will be lethal to RKN when silenced or mutated. Our analysis yielded a number of such candidate lethal genes in RKN, some of which have been tested and proven to be effective in soybean roots. A web based database was built to house and allow scientists to search the data. This database will be useful to scientists seeking to identify candidate genes as targets for gene silencing to confer resistance in plants to RKN. Availability The database can be accessed from http://bioinformatics.towson.edu/RKN/ PMID:23144556

  8. Observations on the suppression of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne arenaria) on tomato by incorporation of cyanobacterial powder (Oscillatoria chlorina) into potting field soil.

    PubMed

    Khan, Z; Kim, Y H; Kim, S G; Kim, H W

    2007-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the nematicidal potential of a cyanobacterium, Oscillatoria chlorina, against the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne arenaria on tomato plants grown in pots filled with 500 cm3 of field soil infested with 12-s stage juveniles (J2)/cm3 soil. Incorporation of freeze-dried cyanobacterial powder into potted field soil at the rate of 0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%, 0.8% and 1.0% (w/w) 5 days prior to tomato planting, reduced root galling, final population of M. arenaria and increased vegetative growth of tomato plants and root-mass production, compared with untreated control (P > or = 0.05). The beneficial effect of adding cyanobacterial powder into infested potted field soil increased exponentially with concentration up to 0.8%. Root galling and nematode population decreased by 68.9% and 97.6%, respectively at the highest dose (1%) of cyanobacterial powder compared with the untreated control. Addition of cyanobacterial powder into infested potted field soil at 5 days before planting was the most effective followed by 2 days before and at the time of tomato planting. We conclude that application rate and timing are important factors in the control of root-knot nematodes with O. chlorina.

  9. Esterase and Malate Dehydrogenase Phenotypes in Portuguese Populations of Meloidogyne Species

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Célia S.; de O. Abrantes, Isabel M.

    1989-01-01

    Nonspecific esterases and malate dehydrogenases of 1-5 females from 40 root-knot nematode populations from Portugal were analyzed by electrophoresis in 0.4-mm-thick polyacrylamide gels. Fourteen major bands of esterase activity were detected, corresponding to 10 distinct phenotypes, Meloidogyne javanica and M. hapla had distinct species-specific phenotypes. Two phenotypes occurred in M. arenaria. The most variability was found among M. incognita populations. Of the remaining two phenotypes, one was associated with M. hispanica and the other belonged to a new species. Three malate dehydrogenase phenotypes were discerned on the basis of particular combinations of the eight main bands of activity found. As previously found, esterases were more useful than malate dehydrogenases in identification of the major Meloidogyne species. The host plant had no effect on the nematode esterase or malate dehydrogenase phenotypes. PMID:19287618

  10. Clove oil and fungus compounds: Can nematode suppression be achieved without phytotoxicity?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural products from a plant (Syzygium aromaticum) and a fungus (Aspergillus sp.) were examined for the presence of compounds with potential for application as novel nematicides. The plant-derived material, clove oil, was tested in the greenhouse against the nematode Meloidogyne incognita on cucum...

  11. Molecular and Morphological Characterization of an Unusual Meloidogyne arenaria Population from Traveler's Tree, Ravenala madagascariensis

    PubMed Central

    Carta, LK; Handoo, ZA

    2008-01-01

    An unusual variant of Meloidogyne arenaria was discovered on roots of a traveler's tree (Ravenala madagascariensis) intended for display at a public arboretum in Pennsylvania. The population aroused curiosity by the lack of visible galling on the roots of the infected plant, and the female vulval region was typically surrounded by egg sacs. Most morphometrics of the population fit within the ranges reported for M. arenaria, with a mosaic of features in common with either M. platani or other tropical Meloidogyne spp. Molecular characterization included analysis of four loci. The mitochondrial sequence, extending from cytochrome oxidase II (COII) to the 16S (1RNA) gene, was nearly identical to another M. arenaria population and closely related to sequences from M. morocciensis and M. thailandica. The 28S D2-D3 expansion segment was most similar to those from M. arenaria, M. incognita and M. paranaensis, and the IGS-2 was most related to those from M. thailandica, M. arenaria and M. incognita. Analysis of partial Hsp90 genomic sequences revealed the greatest similarity to M. arenaria, M. thailandica and an Hsp90 haplotype from M. floridensis, and a composite sequence comprised of EST from M. arenaria. No morphological or molecular features clearly distinguished this population as a new species, and, when considered as a whole, the evidence points to its identification as M. arenaria. PMID:19440257

  12. Mentha x piperita, Mentha spicata and Effects of Their Essential Oils on Meloidogyne in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J. T.; Melin, J. B.

    1996-01-01

    Six peppermint (Mentha x piperita) and six spearmint (M. spicata) PI accessions were inoculated with Meloidogyne incognita race 3 and M. arenaria race 2, under greenhouse conditions. No galls formed on roots of any of the plants inoculated with 1,800 eggs/pot. Fewer than two galls per root system formed on three PI accessions of peppermint inoculated with M. incognita at 5,400 eggs/pot. Only one peppermint accession developed galls when inoculated with M. arenaria, whereas none of the spearmint accessions was susceptible to this species. Plant dry weights generally were unaffected by infection with root-knot nematodes at these densities. Growing peppermint and spearmint accessions for 8 or 12 weeks in M. arenaria-infested soil before tomato resulted in 90% reduction of root galls compared with tomato following tomato. Cineole, eugenol, geraniol, linalool, and peppermint oils at 50 and 250 mg oil/kg soil caused no reduction in the number of galls caused by M. arenaria on tomato. At 1,500 mg oil/kg soil, geraniol, eugenol, linalool, and peppermint oils (P =0.05) reduced the number of galls caused by M. arenaria, but the decrease in galling caused by M. incognita was not significant. Geraniol, linalool, and peppermint oil at 1,000 and 1,500 mg were phytotoxic to tomato. PMID:19277186

  13. Mentha x piperita, Mentha spicata and Effects of Their Essential Oils on Meloidogyne in Soil.

    PubMed

    Walker, J T; Melin, J B

    1996-12-01

    Six peppermint (Mentha x piperita) and six spearmint (M. spicata) PI accessions were inoculated with Meloidogyne incognita race 3 and M. arenaria race 2, under greenhouse conditions. No galls formed on roots of any of the plants inoculated with 1,800 eggs/pot. Fewer than two galls per root system formed on three PI accessions of peppermint inoculated with M. incognita at 5,400 eggs/pot. Only one peppermint accession developed galls when inoculated with M. arenaria, whereas none of the spearmint accessions was susceptible to this species. Plant dry weights generally were unaffected by infection with root-knot nematodes at these densities. Growing peppermint and spearmint accessions for 8 or 12 weeks in M. arenaria-infested soil before tomato resulted in 90% reduction of root galls compared with tomato following tomato. Cineole, eugenol, geraniol, linalool, and peppermint oils at 50 and 250 mg oil/kg soil caused no reduction in the number of galls caused by M. arenaria on tomato. At 1,500 mg oil/kg soil, geraniol, eugenol, linalool, and peppermint oils (P =0.05) reduced the number of galls caused by M. arenaria, but the decrease in galling caused by M. incognita was not significant. Geraniol, linalool, and peppermint oil at 1,000 and 1,500 mg were phytotoxic to tomato.

  14. SUPPRESSION OF DAMPING-OFF OF CUCUMBER CAUSED BY PYTHIUM ULTIMUM WITH LIVE CELLS AND EXTRACTS OF SERRATIA MARCESCENS N4-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmentally friendly control measures are needed for the soilborne pathogens Pythium ultimum and Meloidogyne incognita. These pathogens can cause severe losses to field- and greenhouse-grown cucumber and other cucurbits. Live cells and ethanol extracts of cultures of the bacterium Serratia mar...

  15. DNA Isolation and GC Base Composition of Four Root-knot Nematode (Meloidogyne spp.) Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Pableo, E. C.; Triantaphyllou, A. C.; Kloos, W. E.

    1988-01-01

    Phenol extraction and cesium trifluoroacetate ultracentrifugation were compared for efficiency in the extraction of DNA from eggs and second-stage juveniles of four species of Meloidogyne. The second method proved to be more satisfactory in that it yielded larger amounts of DNA, shortened the extraction period, and reduced sample handling by eliminating phenol and ether extraction and RNAse treatment. It also made possible the extraction of DNA: from more than one sample at a time. The mean base compositions (% GC) of the total DNA of M. incognita, M. javanica, M. arenaria, and M. hapla, as determined by thermal denaturation tests, were quite similar, as they ranged only between 31 and 33%. Similarly, the thermal stability of the DNA of all four species covered a narrow range from 82.97 to 83.63 C. PMID:19290179

  16. Crop Rotation Studies with Velvetbean (Mucuna deeringiana) for the Management of Meloidogyne spp.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Kábana, R.; Pinochet, J.; Robertson, D. G.; Wells, L.

    1992-01-01

    Results from a greenhouse experiment at Cabrils, Spain, with two velvetbean (Mucuna deeringiana) accessions (Florida and Mozambique) growing in sterilized sandy loam and inoculated with Meloidogyne arenaria race 2, M. incognita race 1, and M. javanica revealed that the legume was not a host for these nematodes. In contrast, roots of 'Clemson Spineless' okra (Hibiscus esculentum), 'Summer Crookneck' squash (Cucurbita pepo), and 'Davis' soybean (Glycine max) were galled by all three root-knot nematodes. Greenhouse experiments at Auburn, Alabama, using soils infested with Heterodera glycines (race 14) + M. incognita or with H. glycines + M. arenaria (race 2) showed that, in contrast to Davis soybean, a Mexican and the Florida velvetbean accessions were not hosts for the nematodes. An experiment with 'Florunner' peanut (Arachis hypogaea) and the Florida velvetbean in a field infested with M. arenaria (race 1), near Headland, Alabama, showed that significant juvenile populations of the nematode at peanut harvest time were present only in plots with peanut. A microplot rotation experiment demonstrated that 'Black Beauty' eggplant (Solanum melongena) following the Florida velvetbean had heavier shoots and lower numbers of M. arenaria juveniles in the roots and in the soil than eggplant after Summer Crookneck squash or Davis soybean. PMID:19283043

  17. Variability of Meloidogyne exigua on Coffee in the Zona da Mata of Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, D. S.; Oliveira, R. D. L.; Freitas, L. G.; Silva, R. V.

    2005-01-01

    Minas Gerais is the major coffee-producing state of Brazil, with 28% of its production coming from the region of Zona da Mata. Four major species of root-knot nematode attacking coffee (Meloidogyne incognita, M. paranaensis, M. coffeicola, and M. exigua) have been reported from Brazil. To determine the variability in Meloidogyne spp. occurring in that region, 57 populations from 20 localities were evaluated for morphological, enzymatic, and physiological characteristics. According to the perineal pattern, all the populations were identified as M. exigua; however populations from the municipality of São João do Manhuaçu exhibited patterns very similar to M. arenaria. The identity of all the populations was confirmed by the phenotypes of esterase, malate dehydrogenase, superoxide dismutase, and glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase. Thirteen populations (22.8%) showed the typical one-band (E1) esterase phenotype, whereas the others (77.2%) had a novel two-band phenotype (E2). No intraspecies variability was found in any population. All populations were able to reproduce on tomato, pepper, beans, cacao, and soybean. Reproduction was greater on tomato and pepper than on coffee seedlings, the susceptible standard. PMID:19262880

  18. Effects of metabolites of Gliocladium Roseum on egg hatch and juvenile mortality of Meloidogyne incognita

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root-knot disease caused by root-knot nematode is a serious yield limiting factor for several economically important crops including soybean, vegetables, fruit trees, tea, tobacco, and medicinal plants. Control of nematode is currently mostly limited to application of soil nematicides, which are cos...

  19. Identification of widely varying levels of resistance to meloidogyne incognita in sweet sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) is a potential bioenergy crop that could be incorporated into annual cropping systems in the southern US, where it would likely be rotated with cotton. The desirability of including sweet sorghum in a cotton cropping system will be influenced by sweet sorghum’s host ...

  20. Tall fescue ‘Jesup (Max-Q)’: Meloidogyne incognita development in roots and nematotoxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tall fescue cv. Jesup (Max-Q) was recently recommended as a preplant ground cover for managing plant-parasitic nematodes on peach trees in the southeastern United States. Jesup (Max-Q) is associated with a strain of the endosymbiotic fungus Neotyphodium coenophialum that does not produce ergot alka...

  1. Utility of Grafting for Managing Southern Root-knot Nematode, Meloidogyne Incognita, in Watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four bottlegourd (Lagenaria siceraria) cultivars, one squash (Cucurbita moschata x C. maxima) hybrid, four wild watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. citroides) germplasm lines, and one commercial wild watermelon (C. lanatus var. citroides) cultivar were evaluated as rootstocks for cultivated watermelo...

  2. Grafting for Management of Southern Root-knot Nematode, Meloidogyne Incognita, in Watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four bottlegourd (Lagenaria siceraria) cultivars, one squash (Cucurbita moschata x C. maxima) hybrid, four wild watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. citroides) germplasm lines, and one commercial wild watermelon (C. lanatus var. citroides) cultivar were evaluated as rootstocks for cultivated watermelo...

  3. Expression of a Cystatin Transgene in Eggplant Provides Resistance to Root-knot Nematode, Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Papolu, Pradeep K.; Dutta, Tushar K.; Tyagi, Nidhi; Urwin, Peter E.; Lilley, Catherine J.; Rao, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN) cause substantial yield decline in eggplant and sustainable management options to minimize crop damage due to nematodes are still limited. A number of genetic engineering strategies have been developed to disrupt the successful plant–nematode interactions. Among them, delivery of proteinase inhibitors from the plant to perturb nematode development and reproduction is arguably the most effective strategy. In the present study, transgenic eggplant expressing a modified rice cystatin (OC-IΔD86) gene under the control of the root-specific promoter, TUB-1, was generated to evaluate the genetically modified nematode resistance. Five putative transformants were selected through PCR and genomic Southern blot analysis. Expression of the cystatin transgene was confirmed in all the events using western blotting, ELISA and qPCR assay. Upon challenge inoculation, all the transgenic events exhibited a detrimental effect on RKN development and reproduction. The best transgenic line (a single copy event) showed 78.3% inhibition in reproductive success of RKN. Our results suggest that cystatins can play an important role for improving nematode resistance in eggplant and their deployment in gene pyramiding strategies with other proteinase inhibitors could ultimately enhance crop yield. PMID:27516765

  4. Expression of a Cystatin Transgene in Eggplant Provides Resistance to Root-knot Nematode, Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Papolu, Pradeep K; Dutta, Tushar K; Tyagi, Nidhi; Urwin, Peter E; Lilley, Catherine J; Rao, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN) cause substantial yield decline in eggplant and sustainable management options to minimize crop damage due to nematodes are still limited. A number of genetic engineering strategies have been developed to disrupt the successful plant-nematode interactions. Among them, delivery of proteinase inhibitors from the plant to perturb nematode development and reproduction is arguably the most effective strategy. In the present study, transgenic eggplant expressing a modified rice cystatin (OC-IΔD86) gene under the control of the root-specific promoter, TUB-1, was generated to evaluate the genetically modified nematode resistance. Five putative transformants were selected through PCR and genomic Southern blot analysis. Expression of the cystatin transgene was confirmed in all the events using western blotting, ELISA and qPCR assay. Upon challenge inoculation, all the transgenic events exhibited a detrimental effect on RKN development and reproduction. The best transgenic line (a single copy event) showed 78.3% inhibition in reproductive success of RKN. Our results suggest that cystatins can play an important role for improving nematode resistance in eggplant and their deployment in gene pyramiding strategies with other proteinase inhibitors could ultimately enhance crop yield. PMID:27516765

  5. Greenhouse evaluation of capsicum rootstocks for management of meloidogyne incognita on grafted bell pepper

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The growth, development, and nematode susceptibility of various rootstock genotypes grafted to a commercial bell pepper variety scion were evaluated in a series of greenhouse experiments. Nine rootstocks including ‘Caribbean Red Habanero’, ‘ PA-136’ , ‘Keystone Resistant Giant’, ‘Yolo Wonder’, ‘Car...

  6. Influence of Six Vegetable Cultivars on Reproduction of Meloidogyne javanica.

    PubMed

    Bafokuzara, N D

    1983-10-01

    Replicated field and greenhouse experiments were used to evaluate the effect of tomato, cabbage, cucumber, carrot, Amaranthus hybridus, and pepper on growth and fecundity of Meloidogyne spp., particularly M. javanica. In the field tests, tomato, cucumber, and carrot favored population increases of Meloidogyne spp., while Amaranthus, pepper, and cabbage limited them. Some cropping sequences that included crops from the latter group had a suppressive effect on population growth. Thus, of the 36 cropping sequences that were investigated, the following kept the pests in check: tomato-pepper; tomato-Amaranthus; cabbage-pepper; Amaranthus-pepper; carrot-cabbage; pepper-pepper; pepper-Amaranthus; and Amaranthus-pepper. In the greenhouse tests, tomato, cucumber, and carrot had a high number of galls per 50 cm of root, large, conspicuous galls and egg masses, and a high number of larvae per egg mass. Thus, they were highly susceptible. Cabbage and Amaranthus were unsuitable hosts as reflected in the absence of galls or a low number per 50 cm of root. small size of galls and egg masses, and few progeny on the subsequent crop of pepper. The length of time required for eggs to hatch on different hosts varied considerably and is thought to be a significant factor in infection of hosts. PMID:19295847

  7. Analysis of 1,3-Dichloropropene for Control of Meloidogyne spp. in a Tobacco Pest Management System.

    PubMed

    Fortnum, B A; Johnson, A W; Lewis, S A

    2001-12-01

    1,3-Dichloropropene (1,3-D) and nonfumigant nematicides were evaluated for control of Meloidogyne spp. and soil and foliar insects in a tobacco pest management system. In a field with a high Meloidogyne spp. population density (root gall index 4.0 to 4.5 on a 0 to 10 scale in untreated controls), tobacco yields and crop values increased (482 kg/ha and $1,784/ha for 1, 3-D; 326 kg/ha and $1,206/ha for fenamiphos; 252 kg/ha and $933/ha for ethoprop) with nematicide application over an untreated control. In fields with a low population density of Meloidogyne arenaria or M. incognita (root gall index 2.3 to 2.5 in untreated controls), yields ranged from 1,714 to 2,027 kg/ha and were not altered by fumigant or nonfumigant nematicide application. Carbofuran, a soil-applied nonfumigant nematicide/insecticide, reduced the number of foliar insecticide applications required to keep insect populations below treatment threshold (3.8 vs. 4.5, respectively, for treated vs. untreated). Carbofuran reduced the cost ($23/ha) of foliar insecticide treatments when compared to an untreated control. Although nonfumigant nematicides provided some soil and foliar insect control, the cost of using a fumigant plus a lower insecticidal rate of a soil insecticide/nematicide was comparable to the least expensive non-fumigant nematicide when the cost of foliar insecticide applications was included in the cost estimates. Savings in foliar insecticide cost by use of soil-applied nonfumigant nematicide/insecticides were small ($23/ha) in comparison to potential value reductions by root-knot nematodes when the nonfumigant nematicides fenamiphos or ethoprop ($578/ha and $851/ha, respectively) were used instead of 1,3-D.

  8. Morphological and Molecular Evaluation of a Meloidogyne hapla Population Damaging Coffee (Coffea arabica) in Maui, Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    Handoo, Z. A.; Skantar, A. M.; Carta, L. K.; Schmitt, D. P.

    2005-01-01

    An unusual population of Meloidogyne hapla, earlier thought to be an undescribed species, was found causing large galls, without adventitious roots, and substantial damage to coffee in Maui, Hawaii. Only in Brazil had similar damage to coffee been reported by this species. Unlike M. exigua from South and Central America, this population reproduced well on coffee cv. Mokka and M. incognita-susceptible tomato but poorly on tomato with the Mi resistance gene. Characterization included SEM images, esterase isozymes, and five DNA sequences: i) the D3 segment of the large subunit (LSU-D3 or 28S) rDNA, ii) internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) rDNA, iii) intergenic spacer (IGS) rDNA, iv) the mitochondrial interval from cytochrome oxidase (CO II) to 16S mtDNA, and v) the nuclear gene Hsp90. Sequences for ITS-1, IGS, and COII were similar to other M. hapla populations, but within species ITS-1 variability was not less than among species. One LSU-D3 haplotype was similar to a previously analyzed population with two minor haplotypes. Hsp90 exhibited some variation between Maryland and Hawaiian populations distinct from other species. Females were narrow with wide vulval slits, large interphasmidial distances, and more posterior excretory pores; 20% of perineal patterns had atypical perivulval lines. Males had a low b ratio (<12 µm). Juveniles had a short distance between stylet and dorsal gland orifice. Juvenile body length was short (<355 µm) and was different between summer and winter populations. PMID:19262853

  9. The Multi-Resistant Reaction of Drought-Tolerant Coffee 'Conilon Clone 14' to Meloidogyne spp. and Late Hypersensitive-Like Response in Coffea canephora.

    PubMed

    Lima, Edriana A; Furlanetto, Cleber; Nicole, Michel; Gomes, Ana C M M; Almeida, Maria R A; Jorge-Júnior, Aldemiro; Correa, Valdir R; Salgado, Sônia Maria; Ferrão, Maria A G; Carneiro, Regina M D G

    2015-06-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN), Meloidogyne spp., have major economic impact on coffee production in Central and South America. Genetic control of RKN constitutes an essential part for integrated pest management strategy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the resistance of Coffea canephora genotypes (clones) to Meloidogyne spp. Sensitive and drought-tolerant coffee genotypes were used to infer their resistance using nematode reproduction factor and histopathology. Eight clonal genotypes were highly resistant to M. paranaensis. 'Clone 14' (drought-tolerant) and 'ESN2010-04' were the only genotypes highly resistant and moderately resistant, respectively, to both M. incognita races 3 and 1. Several clones were highly resistant to both avirulent and virulent M. exigua. Clone 14 and ESN2010-04 showed multiple resistance to major RKNs tested. Roots of 'clone 14' (resistant) and 'clone 22' (susceptible) were histologically studied against infection by M. incognita race 3 and M. paranaensis. Reduction of juvenile (J2) penetration in clone 14 was first seen at 2 to 6 days after inoculation (DAI). Apparent early hypersensitive reaction (HR) was seen in root cortex between 4 and 6 DAI, which led to cell death and prevention of some nematode development. At 12 to 20 DAI, giant cells formed in the vascular cylinder, besides normal development into J3/J4. From 32 to 45 DAI, giant cells were completely degenerated. Late, intense HR and cell death were frequently observed around young females and giant cells reported for the first time in coffee pathosystem. These results provide rational bases for future studies, including prospection, characterization, and expression profiling of genomic loci involved in both drought tolerance and resistance to multiple RKN species. PMID:25738554

  10. The Multi-Resistant Reaction of Drought-Tolerant Coffee 'Conilon Clone 14' to Meloidogyne spp. and Late Hypersensitive-Like Response in Coffea canephora.

    PubMed

    Lima, Edriana A; Furlanetto, Cleber; Nicole, Michel; Gomes, Ana C M M; Almeida, Maria R A; Jorge-Júnior, Aldemiro; Correa, Valdir R; Salgado, Sônia Maria; Ferrão, Maria A G; Carneiro, Regina M D G

    2015-06-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN), Meloidogyne spp., have major economic impact on coffee production in Central and South America. Genetic control of RKN constitutes an essential part for integrated pest management strategy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the resistance of Coffea canephora genotypes (clones) to Meloidogyne spp. Sensitive and drought-tolerant coffee genotypes were used to infer their resistance using nematode reproduction factor and histopathology. Eight clonal genotypes were highly resistant to M. paranaensis. 'Clone 14' (drought-tolerant) and 'ESN2010-04' were the only genotypes highly resistant and moderately resistant, respectively, to both M. incognita races 3 and 1. Several clones were highly resistant to both avirulent and virulent M. exigua. Clone 14 and ESN2010-04 showed multiple resistance to major RKNs tested. Roots of 'clone 14' (resistant) and 'clone 22' (susceptible) were histologically studied against infection by M. incognita race 3 and M. paranaensis. Reduction of juvenile (J2) penetration in clone 14 was first seen at 2 to 6 days after inoculation (DAI). Apparent early hypersensitive reaction (HR) was seen in root cortex between 4 and 6 DAI, which led to cell death and prevention of some nematode development. At 12 to 20 DAI, giant cells formed in the vascular cylinder, besides normal development into J3/J4. From 32 to 45 DAI, giant cells were completely degenerated. Late, intense HR and cell death were frequently observed around young females and giant cells reported for the first time in coffee pathosystem. These results provide rational bases for future studies, including prospection, characterization, and expression profiling of genomic loci involved in both drought tolerance and resistance to multiple RKN species.

  11. Biological Relationship of Meloidogyne hapla Populations to Alfalfa Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, G. D.; Gray, F. A.

    1995-01-01

    Greenhouse and growth chamber studies were established to determine if there are pathological and physiological differences among Meloidogyne hapla populations from California (CA), Nevada (NV), Utah (UT), and Wyoming (WY) on alfalfa cultivars classified as resistant or susceptible to root-knot nematodes. In the greenhouse, plant survival was not consistent with resistance classifications. While all highly resistant Nevada Synthetic germplasm (Nev Syn XX) plants survived inoculation with all nematode populations, two cultivars classified as moderately resistant ('Chief' and 'Kingstar') survived (P ≤ 0.05) inoculation with M. hapla populations better than did 'Lobo' cultivar, which is classified as resistant. Plant growth of Nev Syn XX was suppressed by only the CA population, whereas growth of the other alfalfa cultivars classified as M. hapla resistant or moderately resistant was suppressed by all nematode populations. Excluding Nev Syn XX, all alfalfa cultivars were severely galled and susceptible to all nematode populations. Except for Nev Syn XX, reproduction did not differ among the nematode populations on alfalfa cultivars. Nev Syn XX was not as favorable a host to CA as were the other cultivars; but, it was a good host (reproductive factor [Rf] = 37). Temperature affected plant resistance; the UT and WY populations were more pathogenic at 15-25 C, and CA was more pathogenic at 30 C. Nev Syn XX was susceptible to all nematode populations, except for CA, at only 30 C, and all other alfalfa cultivars were susceptible to all nematode populations at all temperatures. PMID:19277299

  12. Descriptions of Meloidogyne camelliae n.sp. and M. querciana n.sp (Nematoda:Meloidogynidae), with SEM and Host-Range Observations

    PubMed Central

    Golden, A. Morgan

    1979-01-01

    Meloidogyne camelliae n.sp. on camellia (Camellia japonica) from Japan and M. querciana n.sp. on pin oak (Quercus palustris) from Virginia, USA, are described and illustrated. M. camelliae n.sp. is distingnishable from other species of the genus especially by its striking perineal pattern having heavy ropelike striae forming a squarish to rectangular outline with shoulders or projections, appearing sometimes ahnost starlike. M. querciana differs from other species by its characteristic perineal pattern round to oval in outline, sometimes with a low arch, and sunken vulva surrounded by a prominent obovate area devoid of striae. M. querciana shows some relationship to M. ovalis, but differs further fxom the latter by longer larvae, absence of annules on head of larvae, and rarity of males. Examination of specimens of M. camelliae n.sp. and M. querciana n.sp. with the scanning electron microscope confirmed observations made by optical microscopy and revealed diagnostic and other structures in greater detail. In greenhouse host tests, M. camelliae infected camellia heavily, showed moderate infection on oxalis, only a trace infection on tomato, and no infection on five other plants tested; and M. querciana attacked pin oak, red oak, and American chestnut heavily, but did not infect nine other test plants. In another test, pin oak seedlings did not become infected when heavily inoculated with and grown in the presence of two populations of M. incognita incognita and one of M. incognita acrita. The common names "camellia root-knot nematode" and "oak root-knot nematode" are respectively proposed for M. camelliae and M. querciana. PMID:19305554

  13. Effects of the Mi-1, N and Tabasco Genes on Infection and Reproduction of Meloidogyne mayaguensis on Tomato and Pepper Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Brito, J A; Stanley, J D; Kaur, R; Cetintas, R; Di Vito, M; Thies, J A; Dickson, D W

    2007-12-01

    Meloidogyne mayaguensis is a damaging root-knot nematode able to reproduce on root-knot nematode-resistant tomato and other economically important crops. In a growth chamber experiment conducted at 22 and 33 degrees C, isolate 1 of M. mayaguensis reproduced at both temperatures on the Mi-1-carrying tomato lines BHN 543 and BHN 585, whereas M. incognita race 4 failed to reproduce at 22 degrees C, but reproduced well at 33 degrees C. These results were confirmed in another experiment at 26 +/- 1.8 degrees C, where minimal or no reproduction of M. incognita race 4 was observed on the Mi-1-carrying tomato genotypes BHN 543, BHN 585, BHN 586 and 'Sanibel', whereas heavy infection and reproduction of M. mayaguensis isolate 1 occurred on these four genotypes. Seven additional Florida M. mayaguensis isolates also reproduced on resistant 'Sanibel' tomato at 26 +/- 1.8 degrees C. Isolate 3 was the most virulent, with reproduction factor (Rf) equal to 8.4, and isolate 8 was the least virulent (Rf = 2.1). At 24 degrees C, isolate 1 of M. mayaguensis also reproduced well (Rf >/= 1) and induced numerous small galls and large egg masses on the roots of root-knot nematode-resistant bell pepper 'Charleston Belle' carrying the N gene and on three root-knot nematode-resistant sweet pepper lines (9913/2, SAIS 97.9001 and SAIS 97.9008) carrying the Tabasco gene. In contrast, M. incognita race 4 failed to reproduce or reproduced poorly on these resistant pepper genotypes. The ability of M. mayaguensis isolates to overcome the resistance of tomato and pepper genotypes carrying the Mi-1, N and Tabasco genes limits the use of resistant cultivars to manage this nematode species in infested tomato and pepper fields in Florida.

  14. Effects of catechins and low temperature on embryonic development and hatching in Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mimics of two natural influences, a chemical similar to one present in cyst nematodes and low temperature exposure of nematode eggs, were evaluated for their effects on quantitative and qualitative features of embryonic development and hatching. The polyphenol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), an ana...

  15. The use of root gall ratings to determine high risk zones in cotton fields infested by Meloidogyne Incognita

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton farmers need a reliable, accurate, and inexpensive method for determining the potential threat of root-knot nematodes (RKN) to cotton within individual fields for site specific application of nematicides. Evaluation of cotton roots for RKN galling at harvest may be an alternative to soil ana...

  16. Greenhouse Evaluation of a commercial Bell Pepper scion grafted onto various Capsicum rootstocks for management of Meloidogyne incognita.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The growth, development, and nematode susceptibility of various rootstock genotypes grafted to a commercial bell pepper variety scion were evaluated in conventional and climate controlled greenhouses. Eight rootstocks including ‘Caribbean Red Habanero’, ‘PA-136’, ‘Keystone Resistant Giant’, ‘Yolo W...

  17. Precision mapping and identification of candidate genes for a QTL affecting Meloidogyne incognita reproduction in Upland cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The resistant line Auburn 623RNR and a number of elite breeding lines derived from it remain the most important source of root-knot nematode (RKN) resistance because they exhibit the highest level of resistance to RKN known to date in Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L). Prior genetic mapping analy...

  18. Behaviour of Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita infective juveniles exposed to nematode FMRFamide-like peptides in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-parasitic nematodes depend upon a family of neuropeptides, the FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs), to regulate locomotion and behavior. To exploit FLPs as leads to novel nematode control agents, an understanding of how specific FLPs affect behavior, and what differences exist between species, is i...

  19. Tinea Incognita following the Use of an Antipsoriatic Gel.

    PubMed

    Starace, Michela; Alessandrini, Aurora; Piraccini, Bianca Maria

    2016-02-01

    Tinea incognita is a dermatophyte infection of the skin whose clinical presentation has been modified by the misuse of steroids or, as has been described recently, calcineurin inhibitors. We report a case of pustular psoriasis treated with an antipsoriatic cream, composed of topical steroids and a vitamin D3 derivative, which gave rise to a tinea incognita. Our case underlines that clinical features of fungal infection can be modified by the increasing use of self-prescribed topical therapies, usually applied to treat incorrectly 'self-diagnosed' diseases. Moreover, we suggest that a mycological examination should be performed in every atypical presentation of skin lesion, and to rule out tinea pedis, in any disease of the feet that requires topical application of steroids. PMID:27171394

  20. Molecular Characterisation and Diagnosis of Root-Knot Nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) from Turfgrasses in North Carolina, USA

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Weimin; Zeng, Yongsan; Kerns, James

    2015-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are the most common and destructive plant-parasitic nematode group worldwide and adversely influence both crop quality and yield. In this study, a total of 51 root-knot nematode populations from turfgrasses were tested, of which 44 were from North Carolina, 6 from South Carolina and 1 from Virginia. Molecular characterisation was performed on these samples by DNA sequencing on the ribosomal DNA 18S, ITS and 28S D2/D3. Species-specific primers were developed to identify turfgrass root-knot nematode through simplex or duplex PCR. Four species were identified, including M. marylandi Jepson & Golden in Jepson, 1987, M. graminis (Sledge & Golden, 1964) Whitehead, 1968, M. incognita (Kofoid & White, 1919) Chitwood, 1949 and M. naasi Franklin, 1965 through a combined analysis of DNA sequencing and PCR by species-specific primers. M. marylandi has been reported from North Carolina and South Carolina for the first time. Molecular diagnosis using PCR by species-specific primers provides a rapid and cheap species identification approach for turfgrass root-knot nematodes. PMID:26599462

  1. Mixtures of Olive Pomace with Different Nitrogen Sources for the Control of Meloidogyne spp. on Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Kábana, R.; Estaún, V.; Pinochet, J.; Marfá, O.

    1995-01-01

    The efficacy of mixtures of dry olive (Olea europea) pomace with biuret, guanidine, and melamine for control of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) was studied in greenhouse experiments. Olive pomace (OP) applied pre-plant at 10 g/kg soil was phytotoxic. Mixtures of OP (10 g/kg soil) with biuret or guanidine at 200-300 mg/kg soil reduced or eliminated the phytotoxic effect, controlled root-knot nematodes, and increased soil esterase activity indicative of microbial activity. The addition of biuret or guanidine without OP to soil at rates <300 mg/kg soil did not control root-knot nematodes. Melamine applied at 100-400 mg/kg soil was phytotoxic as were mixtures of melamine with OP. Treatment of OP with anhydrous ammonia increased N content of the material. In another greenhouse experiment, NH₃-treated OP added to soil was not phytotoxic to tomato, suppressed root-knot nematodes, and increased soil esterase activity. Greenhouse and microplot experiments with OP plus chicken litter demonstrated the efficacy of these combination amendments to control root-knot nematodes and increase tomato yields in Meloidogyne-infested soil. PMID:19277325

  2. Interaction of Concurrent Populations of Meloidogyne partityla and Mesocriconema xenoplax on Pecan.

    PubMed

    Nyczepir, A P; Wood, B W

    2008-09-01

    The effect of the interaction between Meloidogyne partityla and Mesocriconema xenoplax on nematode reproduction and vegetative growth of Carya illinoinensis 'Desirable' pecan was studied in field microplots. Meloidogyne partityla suppressed reproduction of M. xenoplax, whereas the presence of M. xenoplax did not affect the population density of M. partityla second-stage juveniles in soil. Above-ground tree growth, as measured by trunk diameter 32 months following inoculation, was reduced in the presence of M. partityla alone or in combination with M. xenoplax as compared with the uninoculated control trees. The interaction between M. partityla and M. xenoplax was significant for dry root weight 37 months after inoculation. Results indicate that the presence of the two nematode species together caused a greater reduction in root growth than M. xenoplax alone, but not when compared to M. partityla alone. Mouse-ear symptom severity in pecan leaves was increased in the presence of M. partityla compared with M. xenoplax and the uninoculated control. Infection with M. partityla increased severity of mouse-ear symptoms expressed by foliage. The greater negative impact of M. partityla on vegetative growth of pecan seedlings in field microplots indicates that it is likely a more detrimental pathogen to pecan than is M. xenoplax and is likely an economic pest of pecan. PMID:19440263

  3. Effects of Incorporation Method of Ethoprop and Addition of Aldicarb on Potato Tuber Infection by Meloidogyne hapla

    PubMed Central

    Ingham, Russell E.; Morris, Mark; Newcomb, Gene B.

    1991-01-01

    The efficacy of controlling Meloidogyne hapla on potato with water incorporation of ethoprop was compared to physical incorporation before planting. The standard practice of aldicarb application for insect control was also evaluated for M. hapla suppression with and without ethoprop. Physical incorporation before planting by rototilling or discing reduced (P ≤ 0.05) tuber infection. Postplant water incorporation of ethoprop was not as effective as physical incorporation of ethoprop or postplant water incorporation of aldicarb and did not reduce (P ≤ 0.05) tuber infection at harvest. Ethoprop did not affect yield, whereas aldicarb increased yield in one experiment. PMID:19283186

  4. Effects of different inoculum densities of Trichoderma harzianum and Trichoderma viride against Meloidogyne javanica on tomato.

    PubMed

    Al-Hazmi, Ahmad Saad; TariqJaveed, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of different inoculum densities of two Saudi isolates of Trichoderma harzianum and Trichoderma viride against Meloidogyne javanica on tomato. Four densities (10(4), 10(6), 10(8) and 10(10) spores/g of soil) of each fungus were used. The results indicate that all four inoculum densities of the two Trichoderma species suppressed the nematode reproduction and root galling; and increased the growth of tomato plants, compared to controls. Efficacy of both fungi increased as their inoculum densities increased. Generally, efficacy of T. harzianum was better than that of T. viride, especially at the highest used density (10(10) spore/g soil) which resulted in the best control. PMID:26981012

  5. Effects of different inoculum densities of Trichoderma harzianum and Trichoderma viride against Meloidogyne javanica on tomato

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hazmi, Ahmad Saad; TariqJaveed, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of different inoculum densities of two Saudi isolates of Trichoderma harzianum and Trichoderma viride against Meloidogyne javanica on tomato. Four densities (104, 106, 108 and 1010 spores/g of soil) of each fungus were used. The results indicate that all four inoculum densities of the two Trichoderma species suppressed the nematode reproduction and root galling; and increased the growth of tomato plants, compared to controls. Efficacy of both fungi increased as their inoculum densities increased. Generally, efficacy of T. harzianum was better than that of T. viride, especially at the highest used density (1010 spore/g soil) which resulted in the best control. PMID:26981012

  6. Variability and the recognition of two races in Meloidogyne graminicola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rice root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne graminicola, is an important pathogen, impacting rice, wheat and possibly vegetable production in South-East Asia. Ten isolates of M. graminicola from broad geographic areas were compared using traditional and molecular methods. Total body length, oesophageal...

  7. The Nematicidal Effect of Camellia Seed Cake on Root-Knot Nematode Meloidogyne javanica of Banana

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiujuan; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Kang; Su, Lanxi; Li, Hongmei; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of root-knot nematodes is crucially important for maintaining the worldwide development of the banana industry. Growing concerns about human and environmental safety have led to the withdrawal of commonly used nematicides and soil fumigants, thus motivating the development of alternative nematode management strategies. In this study, Meloidogyne javanica was isolated, and the nematicidal effect of Camellia seed cake on this pest was investigated. The results showed that in dish experiments, Camellia seed cake extracts under low concentration (2 g/L) showed a strong nematicidal effect. After treatment for 72 h, the eggs of M. javanica were gradually dissolved, and the intestine of the juveniles gradually became indistinct. Nematicidal compounds, including saponins identified by HPLC-ESI-MS and 8 types of volatile compounds identified by GC-MS, exhibited effective nematicidal activities, especially 4-methylphenol. The pot experiments demonstrated that the application of Camellia seed cake suppressed M. javanica, and promoted the banana plant growth. This study explored an effective nematicidal agent for application in soil and revealed its potential mechanism of nematode suppression. PMID:25849382

  8. The nematicidal effect of camellia seed cake on root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica of banana.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiujuan; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Kang; Su, Lanxi; Li, Hongmei; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of root-knot nematodes is crucially important for maintaining the worldwide development of the banana industry. Growing concerns about human and environmental safety have led to the withdrawal of commonly used nematicides and soil fumigants, thus motivating the development of alternative nematode management strategies. In this study, Meloidogyne javanica was isolated, and the nematicidal effect of Camellia seed cake on this pest was investigated. The results showed that in dish experiments, Camellia seed cake extracts under low concentration (2 g/L) showed a strong nematicidal effect. After treatment for 72 h, the eggs of M. javanica were gradually dissolved, and the intestine of the juveniles gradually became indistinct. Nematicidal compounds, including saponins identified by HPLC-ESI-MS and 8 types of volatile compounds identified by GC-MS, exhibited effective nematicidal activities, especially 4-methylphenol. The pot experiments demonstrated that the application of Camellia seed cake suppressed M. javanica, and promoted the banana plant growth. This study explored an effective nematicidal agent for application in soil and revealed its potential mechanism of nematode suppression. PMID:25849382

  9. Mustard seed meal for management of root-knot nematode and weeds in tomato production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mustard seed meals of indian mustard [InM (Brassica juncea)] and yellow mustard [YeM (Sinapis alba)], alone and combined, were tested for effects on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants and for suppression of southern root-knot nematode [RKN (Meloidogyne incognita)] and weed populations. In the gree...

  10. Response of Additional Herbaceous Perennial Ornamentals to Meloidogyne hapla

    PubMed Central

    LaMondia, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-nine herbaceous perennial ornamentals were evaluated for root galling after 2 months in soil infested with Meloidogyne hapla u n d e r greenhouse conditions. Plants such as Asclepias, Epimedium, Liriope, Lithospermura, Myosotis, Penstemon, Sidalecea, and Solidago did not have galls or egg masses present on the root system and were rated as resistant. Astrantia, Boltonia, Centranthus, and Miscanthus had more than 100 galls on the roots (similar to 'Rutgers' tomato controls) and were rated susceptible. The remaining plants were intermediate in response. The identification of additional M. hapla-resistant perennial ornamentals will aid in nematode management in nurseries and landscapes. PMID:19277187

  11. Heterodera glycines cysts contain an extensive array of endoproteases as well as inhibitors of proteases in H. glycines and Meloidogyne incognita infective juvenile stages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterodera glycines cysts contain proteases, and inhibitors of protease activities in various nematode species. In this investigation, proteases in H. glycines cysts were identified using a commercially available FRET-peptide library comprising 512 peptide pools qualified to detect up to 4 endoprot...

  12. Metagenomic insights into communities, functions of endophytes, and their associates with infection by root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, in tomato roots.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bao-Yu; Cao, Yi; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2015-11-25

    Endophytes are known to play important roles in plant's health and productivity. In this study, we investigated the root microbiome of tomato in association with infection by root knot nematodes. Our objectives were to observe the effects and response of the bacterial endophytes before nematode attacks and to reveal the functional attributes of microbes in plant health and nematode pathogenesis. Community analysis of root-associated microbiomes in healthy and nematode-infected tomatoes indicated that nematode infections were associated with variation and differentiation of the endophyte and rhizosphere bacterial populations in plant roots. The community of the resident endophytes in tomato root was significantly affected by nemato-pathogenesis. Remarkably, some bacterial groups in the nematode feeding structure, the root gall, were specifically enriched, suggesting an association with nematode pathogenesis. Function-based metagenomic analysis indicated that the enriched bacterial populations in root gall harbored abundant genes related to degradation of plant polysaccharides, carbohydrate and protein metabolism, and biological nitrogen fixation. Our data indicated that some of the previously assumed beneficial endophytes or bacterial associates with nematode might be involved in nematode infections of the tomato roots.

  13. Metagenomic insights into communities, functions of endophytes, and their associates with infection by root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, in tomato roots

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Bao-Yu; Cao, Yi; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Endophytes are known to play important roles in plant’s health and productivity. In this study, we investigated the root microbiome of tomato in association with infection by root knot nematodes. Our objectives were to observe the effects and response of the bacterial endophytes before nematode attacks and to reveal the functional attributes of microbes in plant health and nematode pathogenesis. Community analysis of root-associated microbiomes in healthy and nematode-infected tomatoes indicated that nematode infections were associated with variation and differentiation of the endophyte and rhizosphere bacterial populations in plant roots. The community of the resident endophytes in tomato root was significantly affected by nemato-pathogenesis. Remarkably, some bacterial groups in the nematode feeding structure, the root gall, were specifically enriched, suggesting an association with nematode pathogenesis. Function-based metagenomic analysis indicated that the enriched bacterial populations in root gall harbored abundant genes related to degradation of plant polysaccharides, carbohydrate and protein metabolism, and biological nitrogen fixation. Our data indicated that some of the previously assumed beneficial endophytes or bacterial associates with nematode might be involved in nematode infections of the tomato roots. PMID:26603211

  14. Effects of Tropical Rotation Crops on Meloidogyne arenaria Population Densities and Vegetable Yields in Microplots.

    PubMed

    McSorley, R; Dickson, D W; de Brito, J A; Hewlett, T E; Frederick, J J

    1994-06-01

    The effects of 12 summer crop rotation treatments on population densities of Meloidogyne arenaria race 1 and on yields of subsequent spring vegetable crops were determined in microplots. The crop sequence was: (i) rotation crops during summer 1991 ; (ii) cover crop of rye (Secale cereale) during winter 1991-92; (iii) squash (Cucurbita pepo) during spring 1992; (iv) rotation crops during summer 1992; (v) rye during winter 1992-93; (vi) eggplant (Solanum melongena) during spring 1993. The 12 rotation treatments were castor (Ricinus communis), cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), velvetbean (Mucuna deeringiana), crotalaria (Crotalaria spectabilis), fallow, hairy indigo (Indigofera hirsuta), American jointvetch (Aeschynomene americana), sorghum-sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor x S. sudanense), soybean (Glycine max), horsebean (Canavalia ensiformis), sesame (Sesamum indicum), and peanut (Arachis hypogaea). Compared to peanut, the first eight rotation treatments resulted in lower (P suppressing nematodes. Yield of squash was greater (P

  15. Relative Damage Functions and Reproductive Potentials of Meloidogyne arenaria and M. hapla on Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Koenning, S. R.; Barker, K. R.

    1992-01-01

    The reproductive potential and damage functions for Meloidogyne hapla and M. arenaria race 1 on Virginia-type peanuts (Arachis hypogaea cv. Florigiant) were determined over 2 years in microplot experiments in North Carolina. Peanut yield suppression and damage to pods as a result of galling were greatest in response to M. arenaria (P = 0.01). Damage functions for the two species were adequately described by the quadratic models: yield (g/plot) = 398 - 17.1 (log₁₀[Pi + 1]) - 17.0(log₁₀[Pi + 1])²; (R² = 0.83, P = 0.0001) for M. arenaria; and yield = 388 - 10.2(log₁₀[Pi + 1]) - 7.5(log₁₀[Pi + 1])², (R² = 0.30, P = 0.0001) for M. hapla. Both species caused galling on pods, but this was more severe in response to M. arenaria. Reproduction of M. arenaria race 1 was greater than M. hapla on peanut, which accounts in part for the more severe pod galling. Peanut was an excellent host for both M. arenaria race 1 and for M. hapla, but reproduction by M. hapla was more variable. PMID:19283222

  16. Interaction of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri and Meloidogyne javanica on Cicer arietinum

    PubMed Central

    Maheswari, T. Uma; Sharma, S. B.; Reddy, D. D. R.; Haware, M. P.

    1997-01-01

    Interaction of Meloidogyne javanica and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri was studied on Fusarium wilt-susceptible (JG 62 and K 850) and resistant (JG 74 and Avrodhi) chickpea cultivars. In greenhouse experiments, inoculation of M. javanica juveniles prior to F. oxysporum f. sp. ciceri caused greater wilt incidence in susceptible cultivars and induced vascular discoloration in roots of resistant cultivars. Nematode reproduction was greatest (P = 0.05) at 25 °C. Number of galls and percentage of root area galled increased when the temperature was increased from 15 °C to 25 °C. Wilt incidence was greater at 20 °C than at 25 °C. Chlorosis of leaves and vascular discoloration of plants did not occur at 15 °C. The nematode enhanced the wilt incidence in wilt-susceptible cultivars only at 25 °C. Interaction between the two pathogens on shoot and root weights was significant only at 20 °C, and F. o. ciceri suppressed the nematode density at this temperature. Wilt incidence was greater in clayey (48% clay) than in loamy sand (85% sand) soils. The nematode caused greater plant damage on loamy sand than on clayey soil. Fusarium wilt resistance in Avrodhi and JG 74 was stable in the presence of M. javanica across temperatures and soil types. PMID:19274140

  17. Transcriptional analysis through RNA sequencing of giant cells induced by Meloidogyne graminicola in rice roots

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hongli; Gheysen, Godelieve; Denil, Simon; Lindsey, Keith; Topping, Jennifer F.; Nahar, Kamrun; Haegeman, Annelies; De Vos, Winnok H.; Trooskens, Geert; Van Criekinge, Wim; De Meyer, Tim; Kyndt, Tina

    2013-01-01

    One of the reasons for the progressive yield decline observed in aerobic rice production is the rapid build-up of populations of the rice root knot nematode Meloidogyne graminicola. These nematodes induce specialized feeding cells inside root tissue, called giant cells. By injecting effectors in and sipping metabolites out of these cells, they reprogramme normal cell development and deprive the plant of its nutrients. In this research we have studied the transcriptome of giant cells in rice, after isolation of these cells by laser-capture microdissection. The expression profiles revealed a general induction of primary metabolism inside the giant cells. Although the roots were shielded from light induction, we detected a remarkable induction of genes involved in chloroplast biogenesis and tetrapyrrole synthesis. The presence of chloroplast-like structures inside these dark-grown cells was confirmed by confocal microscopy. On the other hand, genes involved in secondary metabolism and more specifically, the majority of defence-related genes were strongly suppressed in the giant cells. In addition, significant induction of transcripts involved in epigenetic processes was detected inside these cells 7 days after infection. PMID:23881398

  18. Potential of Leguminous Cover Crops in Management of a Mixed Population of Root-knot Nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Osei, Kingsley; Gowen, Simon R.; Pembroke, Barbara; Brandenburg, Rick L.; Jordan, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Root-knot nematode is an important pest in agricultural production worldwide. Crop rotation is the only management strategy in some production systems, especially for resource poor farmers in developing countries. A series of experiments was conducted in the laboratory with several leguminous cover crops to investigate their potential for managing a mixture of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne arenaria, M. incognita, M. javanica). The root-knot nematode mixture failed to multiply on Mucuna pruriens and Crotalaria spectabilis but on Dolichos lablab the population increased more than 2- fold when inoculated with 500 and 1,000 nematodes per plant. There was no root-galling on M. pruriens and C. spectabilis but the gall rating was noted on D. lablab. Greater mortality of juvenile root-knot nematodes occurred when exposed to eluants of roots and leaves of leguminous crops than those of tomato; 48.7% of juveniles died after 72 h exposure to root eluant of C. spectabilis. The leaf eluant of D. lablab was toxic to nematodes but the root eluant was not. Thus, different parts of a botanical contain different active ingredients or different concentrations of the same active ingredient. The numbers of root-knot nematode eggs that hatched in root exudates of M. pruriens and C. spectabilis were significantly lower (20% and 26%) than in distilled water, tomato and P. vulgaris root exudates (83%, 72% and 89%) respectively. Tomato lacks nematotoxic compounds found in M. pruriens and C. spectabilis. Three months after inoculating plants with 1,000 root-knot nematode juveniles the populations in pots with M. pruriens, C. spectabilis and C. retusa had been reduced by approximately 79%, 85% and 86% respectively; compared with an increase of 262% nematodes in pots with Phaseolus vulgaris. There was significant reduction of 90% nematodes in fallow pots with no growing plant. The results from this study demonstrate that some leguminous species contain compounds that either kill root

  19. Fatal verminous pharyngitis and esophagitis caused by Streptocara incognita in mute swans (Cygnus olor).

    PubMed

    Alić, A; Prasović, S; Hodzić, A; Besirović, H; Residbegović, Emina; Omeragić, J

    2013-03-01

    Streptocara spp. infections are reported to cause gastritis, proventriculitis, esophagitis, and pharyngitis in various waterfowls, especially diving ducks. In the present paper, we describe severe fatal diphtheritic pharyngitis and esophagitis caused by Streptocara incognita in three female mute swans (Cygnus olor) in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Prior to death, the swans were showing signs of lethargy, anorexia, and reluctance to move. At necropsy, in all swans severe diphtheritic pharyngitis and esophagitis with deep, dark red hemorrhagic ulcerations were observed. Numerous thin, white, up to 1-cm-long nematodes, identified as S. incognita, were observed embedded in the pharyngeal and esophageal mucosa under the diphtheritic membranes. Histopathology revealed severe fibrinonecrotic inflammation with numerous cross-sections of the parasites. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of severe, fatal streptocariasis in mute swans. PMID:23678745

  20. Interrelationship of Heterodera schachtii and Meloidogyne hapla on Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, G. D.

    1985-01-01

    Invasion of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) roots by combined and sequential inoculations of Meloidogyne hapla and a tomato population of Heterodera schachtii was affected more by soil temperature than by nematode competition. Maximum invasion of tomato roots, by M. hapla and H. schachtii occurred at 30 and 26 C, respectively. Female development and nematode reproduction (eggs per plant) of M. hapla was adversely affected by H. schachtii in combined inoculations of the two nematode species. Inhibition of M. hapla development and reproduction on tomato roots from combined nematode inoculations was more pronounced as soil temperature was increased over a range of 18-30 C and with prior inoculation of tomato with H. schachtii. M. hapla minimally affected H. schachtii female development, but there was significant reduction in the buildup of H. schachtii when M. hapla inoculation preceded that of H. schachtii by 20 days. PMID:19294113

  1. Histopathogenesis of Galls Induced by Meloidogyne naasi in Wheat Roots

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, I. A.; Taylor, D. P.

    1970-01-01

    Histopathogenesis of galls induced by Meloidogyne naasi in wheat roots was studied. Large numbers of larvae penetrated wheat root tips within 24 hr; larvae migrated both inter- and intracellularly, causing cortical hypertrophy. Giant cells were formed in the stele around the head of each nematode within 4 to 5 days. Initial pathological alterations in giant cell formation consisted of hypertrophy of protophloem and protoxylem cells, their nuclei and nucleoli. Giant ceils contained 2 to 8 agglomerated multinucleolate nuclei. Synchronous mitotic divisions were first observed 9 days after inoculation. After 21 days, giant cells became highly vacuolate. Observations 40 days after inoculation revealed a complete degeneration of cell contents in many giant cells but their thick walls remained intact. Abnormal xylem completely surrounded the degenerated or partially degenerated giant cells. PMID:19322304

  2. Response of Perennial Herbaceous Ornamentals to Meloidogyne hapla

    PubMed Central

    LaMondia, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Sixty-nine herbaceous perennial ornamentals in 56 genera were evaluated for root galling after 2 months in soil infested with Meloidogyne hapla under greenhouse conditions. Plants were rated susceptible or resistant based on the number of galls present on the root system. Thirty-six percent had more than 100 galls on the roots (similar to 'Rutgers' tomato controls) and were rated susceptible. Thirty percent of the plants tested did not have galls or egg masses present on the root system and were rated resistant. The remaining 34 percent were intermediate in response. Variation in response to M. hapla was observed within plant genera and species. The identification of M. hapla-resistant perennial ornamentals will aid in management of this nematode in landscapes and production fields. PMID:19277335

  3. Biology of Meloidogyne platani Hirschmann Parasitic on Sycamore, Platanus occidentalis.

    PubMed

    Al-Hazmi, A S; Sasser, J N

    1982-04-01

    The development of Meloidogyne platani on sycamore was followed for 40 days (22-28 C). Juveniles penetrated the feeder roots behind the root cap and invaded the vascular cylinder within 3 days after inoculation. All subsequent development of the nematodes and host effects occurred only within the stele. The second juvenile molt and sex differentiation occurred by the 17th day. Young females were observed by the 26th day. Eggs were observed inside the roots by the 35th day and were exposed to the surface of galls by the 40th day. In pathogenicity studies, a significant negative correlation was shown to exist between fresh shoot and root weights and inoculum density. Besides sycamore, white ash was the only hardwood species tested to become infected. Of the herbacious plants tested, tobacco was heavily galled, tomato and watermelon moderately galled, and pepper only slightly galled. Egg production was moderate on tobacco, slight on tomato and watermelon, and absent on pepper.

  4. De Novo Analysis of the Transcriptome of Meloidogyne enterolobii to Uncover Potential Target Genes for Biological Control.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangyang; Yang, Dan; Niu, Junhai; Zhao, Jianlong; Jian, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Meloidogyne enterolobii is one of the obligate biotrophic root-knot nematodes that has the ability to reproduce on many economically-important crops. We carried out de novo sequencing of the transcriptome of M. enterolobii using Roche GS FLX and obtained 408,663 good quality reads that were assembled into 8193 contigs and 31,860 singletons. We compared the transcripts in different nematodes that were potential targets for biological control. These included the transcripts that putatively coded for CAZymes, kinases, neuropeptide genes and secretory proteins and those that were involved in the RNAi pathway and immune signaling. Typically, 75 non-membrane secretory proteins with signal peptides secreted from esophageal gland cells were identified as putative effectors, three of which were preliminarily examined using a PVX (pGR107)-based high-throughput transient plant expression system in Nicotiana benthamiana (N. benthamiana). Results showed that these candidate proteins suppressed the programmed cell death (PCD) triggered by the pro-apoptosis protein BAX, and one protein also caused necrosis, suggesting that they might suppress plant immune responses to promote pathogenicity. In conclusion, the current study provides comprehensive insight into the transcriptome of M. enterolobii for the first time and lays a foundation for further investigation and biological control strategies. PMID:27598122

  5. De Novo Analysis of the Transcriptome of Meloidogyne enterolobii to Uncover Potential Target Genes for Biological Control

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangyang; Yang, Dan; Niu, Junhai; Zhao, Jianlong; Jian, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Meloidogyne enterolobii is one of the obligate biotrophic root-knot nematodes that has the ability to reproduce on many economically-important crops. We carried out de novo sequencing of the transcriptome of M. enterolobii using Roche GS FLX and obtained 408,663 good quality reads that were assembled into 8193 contigs and 31,860 singletons. We compared the transcripts in different nematodes that were potential targets for biological control. These included the transcripts that putatively coded for CAZymes, kinases, neuropeptide genes and secretory proteins and those that were involved in the RNAi pathway and immune signaling. Typically, 75 non-membrane secretory proteins with signal peptides secreted from esophageal gland cells were identified as putative effectors, three of which were preliminarily examined using a PVX (pGR107)-based high-throughput transient plant expression system in Nicotiana benthamiana (N. benthamiana). Results showed that these candidate proteins suppressed the programmed cell death (PCD) triggered by the pro-apoptosis protein BAX, and one protein also caused necrosis, suggesting that they might suppress plant immune responses to promote pathogenicity. In conclusion, the current study provides comprehensive insight into the transcriptome of M. enterolobii for the first time and lays a foundation for further investigation and biological control strategies. PMID:27598122

  6. Population Development of Pasteuria penetrans on Meloidogyne arenaria.

    PubMed

    Oostendorp, M; Dickson, D W; Mitchell, D J

    1991-01-01

    A microplot study on the influence of cropping sequences with peanut in summer and bare fallowed or cover crops of rye or vetch in winter on the population development of Pasteuria penetrans was initiated in the spring of 1987. The number of spores of P. penetrans attached per second-stage juvenile of Meloidogyne arenaria race 1 increased from 0.11 in the fall of 1987 to 7.6, 8.6, and 3.6 in the fall of 1989 in the rye, vetch, and fallowed plots, respectively. Higher (P

  7. Ozone, antioxidant spray and meloidogyne hapla effects on tobacco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisessar, S.; Palmer, K. T.

    The relationship between ozone and the northern root-knot nematode on tobacco was investigated. Seedlings of tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum L.) cv. Virginia 115 were inoculated and not inoculated with root-knot ( Meloidogyne hapla (Chitwood) prior to transplanting to a field plot. One-half the plants were sprayed at weekly intervals with an antioxidant, EDU at the rate of 1 kg ha -1 to protect against oxidant injury. O 3 concentrations in excess of 80 ppb were recorded 14 times during the summer of 1982. Ambient ozone inhibited growth and yield of tobacco inoculated and not inoculated with M. hapla. Tobacco inoculated with nematode alone developed significantly more ozone injury than other treatments indicating that tobacco infected with M. hapla is more susceptible to ambient O 3. Significantly 20% more galls developed on plants with nematode inoculation compared to plants with nematode inoculation + EDU indicating that EDU indirectly reduced gall development in tobacco. Plants protected with EDU also showed an increase in dry weight of shoot, root and biomass.

  8. Effects of Bahiagrass and Nematicides on Meloidogyne arenaria on Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, D. W.; Hewlett, T. E.

    1989-01-01

    A field infested with Meloidogyne arenaria and with a history of peanut yield losses was divided into two equal parts. One-half of the field (bahia site) was planted to bahiagrass in 1986 and maintained through 1987. The other half (peanut site) was planted to soybean in 1986 and peanut in 1987 with hairy vetch planted each fall as a cover crop. In 1988 identical nematicide treatments including 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D), aldicarb, and ethoprop were applied to the two sites, and the sites were planted with the peanut cultivar Florunner. At mid-season, population levels of M. arenaria second-stage juveniles in the bahia site were relatively low, compared with those in the peanut site. At harvest, however, population levels were high in both sites. No nematicide treatment increased yields over the untreated control in either site (P ≤ 0.05). Bahiagrass alone and the combination of bahiagrass and 1,3-D applied broadcast resulted in 6.6-fold and 9.7-fold increases in yield, respectively, over the untreated control in the peanut site. All treatments in the bahia site resulted in increased vegetative growth and yields, compared with the duplicate treatments in the peanut site. PMID:19287670

  9. Morphometric Evaluation of Hypotriploid and Triploid Populations of Meloidogyne arenaria

    PubMed Central

    Hirschmann, Hedwig; Rammah, Abdallah

    1993-01-01

    A morphometric comparison of seven hypotriploid populations with five pooled triploid populations of Meloidogyne arenaria was made using standard descriptive statistics, stepwise discriminant analysis (SDA), and cluster analysis. Six morphometric characters of females, 14 of second-stage juveniles (J2), and 18 of males were measured for each population. Useful differentiating characters included: body length in J2; stylet length in females and J2; stylet-knob dimensions in females and males; dorsal esophageal gland orifice distance in all three life stages; esophagus-length ratio in males and J2; excretory pore position in J2; and spicule length in males. SDA and cluster analysis showed that in each life stage, the hypotriploid populations were set off to varying degrees from the triploid populations. In addition, the relationships among populations differed when different life stages were compared. No consistent relationships could be detected among the populations, when morphometric data of the present study and morphological findings of the same populations in a parallel study were considered. Morphometric differences were not sufficient to propose any of the hypotriploid populations as new species. PMID:19279751

  10. Host-Parasite Relationship of Meloidogyne chitwoodi on Potato

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, G. D.

    1985-01-01

    The soil fumigant 1,3-dichloropropene gave good to excellent control of the Columbia root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne chitwoodi, on potato, Solanum tuberosum L. Nonfumigant nematicides (aldicarb, fensulfothion, carbofuran, ethoprop, and phenamiphos) were less effective in controlling M. chitwoodi, since the nematode affects tuber quality more than quantity. Soil temperature during the growing season affected parasitism of M. chitwoodi on potato more than did the initial nematode population. There were positive linear correlations between degree-days and infected and galled tubers (r = 0.92), degree-days and nematode generations (r = 1.00), and infected and galled tubers and nematode generations (r = 0.91). Differences in degree-days and resultant nematode reproduction caused great variability in infection and galling of potato tubers during four growing seasons: 89% for 1979, 0% for 1980, 13% for 1981, and 18% for 1982, giving positive linear correlation (r = 0.99) between final nematode soil population (Pf) and percentage of infected and galled tubers. Corresponding increases in the soil populations of second-stage juveniles (J2) during the growing season were 9,700% in 1979, 170% in 1980,552% in 1981, and 326% in 1982. There was a negative linear correlation (r = -0.87) between initial soil J2 populations (Pi) and the degree of parasitism (infection and galling) of potato tubers, Pi being of secondary importance to degree-days. PMID:19294115

  11. Characterization of Soil Suppressiveness to Root-Knot Nematodes in Organic Horticulture in Plastic Greenhouse.

    PubMed

    Giné, Ariadna; Carrasquilla, Marc; Martínez-Alonso, Maira; Gaju, Núria; Sorribas, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    The fluctuation of Meloidogyne population density and the percentage of fungal egg parasitism were determined from July 2011 to July 2013 in two commercial organic vegetable production sites (M10.23 and M10.55) in plastic greenhouses, located in northeastern Spain, in order to know the level of soil suppressiveness. Fungal parasites were identified by molecular methods. In parallel, pot tests characterized the level of soil suppressiveness and the fungal species growing from the eggs. In addition, the egg parasitic ability of 10 fungal isolates per site was also assessed. The genetic profiles of fungal and bacterial populations from M10.23 and M10.55 soils were obtained by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), and compared with a non-suppressive soil (M10.33). In M10.23, Meloidogyne population in soil decreased progressively throughout the rotation zucchini, tomato, and radish or spinach. The percentage of egg parasitism was 54.7% in zucchini crop, the only one in which eggs were detected. Pochonia chlamydosporia was the only fungal species isolated. In M10.55, nematode densities peaked at the end of the spring-summer crops (tomato, zucchini, and cucumber), but disease severity was lower than expected (0.2-6.3). The percentage of fungal egg parasitism ranged from 3 to 84.5% in these crops. The results in pot tests confirmed the suppressiveness of the M10.23 and M10.55 soils against Meloidogyne. The number of eggs per plant and the reproduction factor of the population were reduced (P < 0.05) in both non-sterilized soils compared to the sterilized ones after one nematode generation. P. chlamydosporia was the only fungus isolated from Meloidogyne eggs. In in vitro tests, P. chlamydosporia isolates were able to parasitize Meloidogyne eggs from 50 to 97% irrespective of the site. DGGE fingerprints revealed a high diversity in the microbial populations analyzed. Furthermore, both bacterial and fungal genetic patterns differentiated suppressive from non-suppressive

  12. Characterization of Soil Suppressiveness to Root-Knot Nematodes in Organic Horticulture in Plastic Greenhouse

    PubMed Central

    Giné, Ariadna; Carrasquilla, Marc; Martínez-Alonso, Maira; Gaju, Núria; Sorribas, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    The fluctuation of Meloidogyne population density and the percentage of fungal egg parasitism were determined from July 2011 to July 2013 in two commercial organic vegetable production sites (M10.23 and M10.55) in plastic greenhouses, located in northeastern Spain, in order to know the level of soil suppressiveness. Fungal parasites were identified by molecular methods. In parallel, pot tests characterized the level of soil suppressiveness and the fungal species growing from the eggs. In addition, the egg parasitic ability of 10 fungal isolates per site was also assessed. The genetic profiles of fungal and bacterial populations from M10.23 and M10.55 soils were obtained by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), and compared with a non-suppressive soil (M10.33). In M10.23, Meloidogyne population in soil decreased progressively throughout the rotation zucchini, tomato, and radish or spinach. The percentage of egg parasitism was 54.7% in zucchini crop, the only one in which eggs were detected. Pochonia chlamydosporia was the only fungal species isolated. In M10.55, nematode densities peaked at the end of the spring-summer crops (tomato, zucchini, and cucumber), but disease severity was lower than expected (0.2–6.3). The percentage of fungal egg parasitism ranged from 3 to 84.5% in these crops. The results in pot tests confirmed the suppressiveness of the M10.23 and M10.55 soils against Meloidogyne. The number of eggs per plant and the reproduction factor of the population were reduced (P < 0.05) in both non-sterilized soils compared to the sterilized ones after one nematode generation. P. chlamydosporia was the only fungus isolated from Meloidogyne eggs. In in vitro tests, P. chlamydosporia isolates were able to parasitize Meloidogyne eggs from 50 to 97% irrespective of the site. DGGE fingerprints revealed a high diversity in the microbial populations analyzed. Furthermore, both bacterial and fungal genetic patterns differentiated suppressive from non-suppressive

  13. Entomopathogenic Nematodes and Bacteria Applications for Control of the Pecan Root-Knot Nematode, Meloidogyne partityla, in the Greenhouse.

    PubMed

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Nyczepir, Andrew P; Lewis, Edwin E

    2006-12-01

    Meloidogyne partityla is a parasite of pecan and walnut. Our objective was to determine interactions between the entomopathogenic nematode-bacterium complex and M. partityla. Specifically, we investigated suppressive effects of Steinernema feltiae (strain SN) and S. riobrave (strain 7-12) applied as infective juveniles and in infected host insects, as well as application of S. feltiae's bacterial symbiont Xenorhabdus bovienii on M. partityla. In two separate greenhouse trials, the treatments were applied to pecan seedlings that were simultaneously infested with M. partityla eggs; controls received only water and M. partityla eggs. Additionally, all treatment applications were re-applied (without M. partityla eggs) two months later. Four months after initial treatment, plants were assessed for number of galls per root system, number of egg masses per root system, number of eggs per root system, number of eggs per egg mass, number of eggs per gram dry root weight, dry shoot weight, and final population density of M. partityla second-stage juveniles (J2). In the first trial, the number of egg masses per plant was lower in the S. riobrave-infected host treatment than in the control (by approximately 18%). In the second trial, dry root weight was higher in the S. feltiae-infected host treatment than in the control (approximately 80% increase). No other treatment effects were detected. The marginal and inconsistent effects observed in our experiments indicate that the treatments we applied are not sufficient for controlling M. partityla. PMID:19259462

  14. Host status of own-rooted Vitis vinifera varieties to Meloidogyne hapla

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-parasitic nematodes are microscopic soil worms that attack the roots of grape plants and cause yield loss. One of the most commonly encountered plant-parasitic nematodes in eastern Washington Vitis vinifera vineyards is Meloidogyne hapla, the northern root-knot nematode. The selection of plant...

  15. Influence of root exudates on attachment of Pasteuria penetrans to Meloidogyne arenaria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that root exudates would influence the spore attachment of Pasteuria penetrans to root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne arenaria). An experiment was carried out using a factorial arrangement of two single spore (SS) lines cultured from P. penetrans and three single egg mass(SEM)lines cult...

  16. Evaluation of steam and soil solarization for Meloidogyne arenaria control in Florida floriculture crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Steam and soil solarization were investigated for control of the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne arenaria in two years of field trials on a commercial flower farm in Florida. The objective was to determine if pre-plant steam treatments in combination with solarization, or solarization alone effective...

  17. Transcriptome analysis of resistant soybean roots infected by Meloidogyne javanica

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, Maria Eugênia Lisei; Conceição Lopes, Marcus José; de Araújo Campos, Magnólia; Paiva, Luciano Vilela; dos Santos, Regina Maria Amorim; Beneventi, Magda Aparecida; Firmino, Alexandre Augusto Pereira; de Sá, Maria Fátima Grossi

    2012-01-01

    Soybean is an important crop for Brazilian agribusiness. However, many factors can limit its production, especially root-knot nematode infection. Studies on the mechanisms employed by the resistant soybean genotypes to prevent infection by these nematodes are of great interest for breeders. For these reasons, the aim of this work is to characterize the transcriptome of soybean line PI 595099-Meloidogyne javanica interaction through expression analysis. Two cDNA libraries were obtained using a pool of RNA from PI 595099 uninfected and M. javanica (J2) infected roots, collected at 6, 12, 24, 48, 96, 144 and 192 h after inoculation. Around 800 ESTs (Expressed Sequence Tags) were sequenced and clustered into 195 clusters. In silico subtraction analysis identified eleven differentially expressed genes encoding putative proteins sharing amino acid sequence similarities by using BlastX: metallothionein, SLAH4 (SLAC1 Homologue 4), SLAH1 (SLAC1 Homologue 1), zinc-finger proteins, AN1-type proteins, auxin-repressed proteins, thioredoxin and nuclear transport factor 2 (NTF-2). Other genes were also found exclusively in nematode stressed soybean roots, such as NAC domain-containing proteins, MADS-box proteins, SOC1 (suppressor of overexpression of constans 1) proteins, thioredoxin-like protein 4-Coumarate-CoA ligase and the transcription factor (TF) MYBZ2. Among the genes identified in non-stressed roots only were Ser/Thr protein kinases, wound-induced basic protein, ethylene-responsive family protein, metallothionein-like protein cysteine proteinase inhibitor (cystatin) and Putative Kunitz trypsin protease inhibitor. An understanding of the roles of these differentially expressed genes will provide insights into the resistance mechanisms and candidate genes involved in soybean-M. javanica interaction and contribute to more effective control of this pathogen. PMID:22802712

  18. Resistance to Meloidogyne arenaria in Arachis spp. Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, S. C.; Simpson, C. E.; Starr, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    Field and greenhouse evaluations of 116 wild Arachis spp. genotypes demonstrated the presence of resistance to reproduction of the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne arenaria race 1. Resistance in greenhouse tests was based on test lines having ≤ 2.5% of the number of eggs per gram of roots as did the susceptible A. hypogaea cv. Tamnut 74. In field tests, resistant genotypes were identified on the basis of having lower (P = 0.05) final nematode population densities than did Tamnut 74. Resistance was identified in genotypes from 11 of 15 wild species tested and in 10 of 20 genotypes belonging to undescribed species. Results of field and greenhouse experiments were similar; 26 of 31 genotypes common to both tests gave similar responses in both tests. Resistance to M. arenaria was identified in the complex hybrid TP-135, which was derived from A. hypogaea cv. Florunner x (A. batizocoi K 9484 x [A. cardenasii GKP 10017 x A. chacoensis GKP 10602])⁴x. In a single greenhouse test, three of six genotypes resistant to M. arenaria were also resistant to M. hapla. These data indicate that the Arachis spp. germplasm contains several sources of resistance to M. arenaria and possibly M. hapla. Some of this resistance is in germplasm that is genetically compatible with A. hypogaea. The complex hybrid TP-135 incorporates resistance from wild species into the genetic background of A. hypogaea. On the basis of these data, we believe it may be possible to develop peanut cultivars with high levels of resistance to M. arenaria and M. hapla. PMID:19287667

  19. Transcriptome analysis of resistant soybean roots infected by Meloidogyne javanica.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Maria Eugênia Lisei; Conceição Lopes, Marcus José; de Araújo Campos, Magnólia; Paiva, Luciano Vilela; Dos Santos, Regina Maria Amorim; Beneventi, Magda Aparecida; Firmino, Alexandre Augusto Pereira; de Sá, Maria Fátima Grossi

    2012-06-01

    Soybean is an important crop for Brazilian agribusiness. However, many factors can limit its production, especially root-knot nematode infection. Studies on the mechanisms employed by the resistant soybean genotypes to prevent infection by these nematodes are of great interest for breeders. For these reasons, the aim of this work is to characterize the transcriptome of soybean line PI 595099-Meloidogyne javanica interaction through expression analysis. Two cDNA libraries were obtained using a pool of RNA from PI 595099 uninfected and M. javanica (J(2)) infected roots, collected at 6, 12, 24, 48, 96, 144 and 192 h after inoculation. Around 800 ESTs (Expressed Sequence Tags) were sequenced and clustered into 195 clusters. In silico subtraction analysis identified eleven differentially expressed genes encoding putative proteins sharing amino acid sequence similarities by using BlastX: metallothionein, SLAH4 (SLAC1 Homologue 4), SLAH1 (SLAC1 Homologue 1), zinc-finger proteins, AN1-type proteins, auxin-repressed proteins, thioredoxin and nuclear transport factor 2 (NTF-2). Other genes were also found exclusively in nematode stressed soybean roots, such as NAC domain-containing proteins, MADS-box proteins, SOC1 (suppressor of overexpression of constans 1) proteins, thioredoxin-like protein 4-Coumarate-CoA ligase and the transcription factor (TF) MYBZ2. Among the genes identified in non-stressed roots only were Ser/Thr protein kinases, wound-induced basic protein, ethylene-responsive family protein, metallothionein-like protein cysteine proteinase inhibitor (cystatin) and Putative Kunitz trypsin protease inhibitor. An understanding of the roles of these differentially expressed genes will provide insights into the resistance mechanisms and candidate genes involved in soybean-M. javanica interaction and contribute to more effective control of this pathogen.

  20. Molecular Characterization of Meloidogyne christiei Golden and Kaplan, 1986 (Nematoda, Meloidogynidae) Topotype Population Infecting Turkey Oak (Quercus laevies) in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Brito, J. A.; Subbotin, S. A.; Han, H.; Stanley, J. D.; Dickson, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    Meloidogyne christiei isolated from turkey oak, Quercus laevies, from the type locality in Florida was characterized using isozyme profiles and ribosomal and mitochondrial gene sequences. The phenotype N1a detected from a single egg-laying female of M. christiei showed one very strong band of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity; however, no esterase (EST) activity was identified from macerate of one or even 20 females per well. Phylogenetic relationships within the genus Meloidogyne as inferred from Bayesian analysis of partial 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), D2-D3 of 28S rRNA, internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rRNA, and cytochrome oxidase subunit II (COII)-16S rRNA of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene fragments showed that M. christiei formed a separate lineage within the crown group of Meloidogyne and its relationships with any of three Meloidogyne clades were not resolved. PMID:26527837

  1. Host Suitability of the Olive Cultivars Arbequina and Picual for Plant-Parasitic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Nico, A. I.; Jiménez-Díaz, R. M.; Castillo, P.

    2003-01-01

    Host suitability of olive cultivars Arbequina and Picual to several plant-parasitic nematodes was studied under controlled conditions. Arbequina and Picual were not suitable hosts for the root-lesion nematodes Pratylenchus fallax, P. thornei, and Zygotylenchus guevarai. However, the ring nematode Mesocriconema xenoplax and the spiral nematodes Helicotylenchus digonicus and H. pseudorobustus reproduced on both olive cultivars. The potential of Meloidogyne arenaria race 2, M. incognita race 1, and M. javanica, as well as P. vulnus and P. penetrans to damage olive cultivars, was also assessed. Picual planting stocks infected by root-knot nematodes showed a distinct yellowing affecting the uppermost leaves, followed by a partial defoliation. Symptoms were more severe on M. arenaria and M. javanica-infected plants than on M. incognita-infected plants. Inoculation of plants with 15,000 eggs + second-stage juveniles/pot of these Meloidogyne spp. suppressed the main height of shoot and number of nodes of Arbequina, but not Picual. Infection by each of the two lesion nematodes (5,000 nematodes/pot) or by each of the three Meloidogyne spp. suppressed (P < 0.05) the main stem diameter of both cultivars. On Arbequina, the reproduction rate of Meloidogyne spp. was higher (P < 0.05) than that of Pratylenchus spp.; on Picual, Pratylenchus spp. reproduction was higher (P < 0.05) than that of Meloidogyne spp. PMID:19265971

  2. Races of the Barley Root-Knot Nematode, Meloidogyne naasi. I. Characterization by Host Preference

    PubMed Central

    Michell, R. E.; Malek, R. B.; Taylor, D. P.; Edwards, D. I.

    1973-01-01

    The host preferences of populations of Meloidogyne naasi from England, California, Illinois, Kentucky and Kansas were compared. Among 22 plant species tested, most were hosts for isolates of all five populations; crabgrass was added to the list of known hosts. Differential reactions of isolates on creeping bentgrass, curly dock, sorghum, and common chickweed demonstrated the existence of at least five physiological races within M. naasi. The known races are numerically designated and characterized. PMID:19319294

  3. Occurrence of Meloidogyne fallax in North America, and molecular characterization of M. fallax and M. minor from U.S. golf course greens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several species of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are known to have significant presence on turf grass in golf course greens, particularly in the western United States. Nematodes isolated from a golf course in King Co., Washington were identified as Meloidogyne minor based on analysis of the...

  4. Site-Specific Management of Meloidogyne chitwoodi in Idaho Potatoes Using 1,3-Dichloropropene; Approach, Experiences, and Economics.

    PubMed

    King, Bradley A; Taberna, John P

    2013-09-01

    Fumigation for nematode management in irrigated potato production systems of Idaho is widely practiced. Soil injection is the only labeled application method for 1,3-dichloropropene that is conventionally applied on a whole-field basis. Plant-parasitic nematode species exhibit spatially variable population densities that provide an opportunity to practice site-specific fumigation to reduce chemical usage and production costs. During 2002 to 2008, 62 fields intended for commercial potato production in eastern Idaho were sampled using a geo-referenced grid sampling system for plant-parasitic nematode population densities. In total, 4,030 grid samples were collected representing nearly 3,200 ha of commercial potato production. Collectively, 73% of the grid samples had Columbia root knot (CRN) (Meloidogyne chitwoodi) population densities below detectable levels. Site-specific fumigation is the practice of varying application rate of a fumigant based on nematode population density. In 2007, 640 ha of potato production were site-specific fumigated for CRN nematode control in eastern Idaho. On average, this practice resulted in a 30% reduction in chemical usage and production cost savings of $209/ha when 1,3-dichloropropene was used as the sole source of nematode suppression. Reductions in usage of 1,3-dichloropropene can exceed 50% if used in combination with a nonfumigant nematicide such as oxamyl. This combination approach can have production cost savings exceeding $200/ha. Based on farm-gate receipts and USDA inspections provided by potato producers from 2001 to 2011, potato tuber yield and quality have not been adversely affected using site-specific fumigation.

  5. Site-Specific Management of Meloidogyne chitwoodi in Idaho Potatoes Using 1,3-Dichloropropene; Approach, Experiences, and Economics

    PubMed Central

    King, Bradley A.; Taberna, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Fumigation for nematode management in irrigated potato production systems of Idaho is widely practiced. Soil injection is the only labeled application method for 1,3-dichloropropene that is conventionally applied on a whole-field basis. Plant-parasitic nematode species exhibit spatially variable population densities that provide an opportunity to practice site-specific fumigation to reduce chemical usage and production costs. During 2002 to 2008, 62 fields intended for commercial potato production in eastern Idaho were sampled using a geo-referenced grid sampling system for plant-parasitic nematode population densities. In total, 4,030 grid samples were collected representing nearly 3,200 ha of commercial potato production. Collectively, 73% of the grid samples had Columbia root knot (CRN) (Meloidogyne chitwoodi) population densities below detectable levels. Site-specific fumigation is the practice of varying application rate of a fumigant based on nematode population density. In 2007, 640 ha of potato production were site-specific fumigated for CRN nematode control in eastern Idaho. On average, this practice resulted in a 30% reduction in chemical usage and production cost savings of $209/ha when 1,3-dichloropropene was used as the sole source of nematode suppression. Reductions in usage of 1,3-dichloropropene can exceed 50% if used in combination with a nonfumigant nematicide such as oxamyl. This combination approach can have production cost savings exceeding $200/ha. Based on farm-gate receipts and USDA inspections provided by potato producers from 2001 to 2011, potato tuber yield and quality have not been adversely affected using site-specific fumigation. PMID:24115785

  6. Clinical and mycological analysis of twenty-one cases of tinea incognita in the Aegean region of Turkey: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Turk, Bengu Gerceker; Taskin, Banu; Karaca, Nezih; Sezgin, Aycan Ozden; Aytimur, Derya

    2013-01-01

    Tinea incognita is a dermatophyte infection with atypical clinical features modified by the improper use of corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors. The aim of this study was to analyze clinical and microbiological features of patients with tinea incognita. A total of 6326 patients referred to mycology laboratory between January 2008 and January 2011 for mycological examination with a diagnosis of tinea incognita were reviewed retrospectively. Twenty-one patients, 13 (61.9%) women and 8 (38.1%) men, mean age 42.2±36.8, were included in the study. Of them, lesions were localized in 15 (71.4%) patients and widespread in six (28.6%) patients. The mean duration of the disease was 9.5 (range 1-120) months. All patients had a history of treatment with steroids. Before admission, most of them had been misdiagnosed as eczema or psoriasis. Microscopic examination revealed hyphae and spores in most of the cases (n=17, 80.95%). Mycological cultures were positive in 19 (90.5%) patients. The most frequently isolated dermatophyte was Trichophyton rubrum (n=14, 66.7%). This case series revealed Trichophyton rubrum as the most frequent agent of tinea incognita. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest case series from Turkey describing clinical features and mycological agents of tinea incognita.

  7. Vertical Migration of Meloidogyne chitwoodi and M. hapla under Controlled Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, J. N.; Mojtahedi, H.; Santo, G. S.; O'Bannon, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    Migratory ability of second-stage juveniles (J2) of two Meloidogyne chitwoodi races and a M. hapla population were compared in soil-filled columns at 12, 18, and 24 C. J2 of all populations migrated farthest at 18 C and least at 12 C. Nematode survival was significantly reduced (P = 0.05) at 24 C.M. chitwoodi J2 migrated further and in greater numbers than M. hapla J2 at all temperatures. A comparison with and without a host plant demonstrated no preferential migration toward the plant. Water percolation through the migration columns stimulated upward migration. PMID:19290123

  8. Preliminary study of the green algae chlorella (Chlorella vulgaris) for control on the root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne arenaria) in tomato plants and ectoparasite Xiphinema indexin grape seedlings.

    PubMed

    Choleva, B; Bileva, T; Tzvetkov, Y; Barakov, P

    2005-01-01

    The alternative ecological methods require investigation of many organo-biological means for plant protection against dangerous root parasites such as root-knot nematode Meloidogyne arenaria and some ectoparasites (Xiphinema index). The Bulgarian organic product - dry extract of green alga Chlorella vulgaris ("The Golden Apple"-Plamen Barakov) is the latest product, which in comparative aspect gives the best results. Series of laboratory and pot experiments are carried out with tomato (cv. Bele and cv. Ideal) and grape seedlings (cv. Cabernet Sauvignon). Different dosages of Chlorella from 0.5 g to 2 g per plant/pot are investigated. The first results show that even low dosages had double effect - on the one hand they suppress the parasite development and on the other hand they strongly stimulate plant growing. The very important conclusion is that Chlorella vulgaris ignores the negative influence of M. arenaria and X. index. These results give us opportunity for future model and field investigations of Chlorella vulgaris with the aim of its practical application.

  9. Impact of grapevine (Vitis vinifera) varieties on reproduction of the northern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-parasitic nematodes are microscopic soil worms that attack the roots of grape plants and cause yield loss. One of the most commonly encountered plant-parasitic nematodes in eastern Washington Vitis vinifera vineyards is Meloidogyne hapla, the northern root-knot nematode. The selection of plant...

  10. Evaluation of steam for Meloidogyne Arenaria control in production of in-ground floriculture crops in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Steam and soil solarization were investigated for control of the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne arenaria in two years of field trials on a commercial flower farm in Florida. The objective was to determine if pre-plant steam treatments in combination with solarization, or solarization alone effective...

  11. Effects of Temperature on Resistance in Phaseolus vulgaris Genotypes and on Development of Meloidogyne Species

    PubMed Central

    Sydenham, G. M.; McSorley, R.; Dunn, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Phaseolus vulgaris lines with heat-stable resistance to Meloidogyne spp. may be needed to manage root-knot nematodes in tropical regions. Resistance expression before and during the process of nematode penetration and development in resistant genotypes were studied at pre- and postinoculation temperatures of 24 °C and 24 °C, 24 °C and 28 °C, 28 °C and 24 °C, and 28 °C and 28 °C. Resistance was effective at all temperature regimes examined, with fewer nematodes in roots of a resistant line compared with a susceptible line. Preinoculation temperature did not modify resistance expression to later infections by root-knot nematodes. However, postinoculation temperatures affected development of Meloidogyne spp. in both the resistant and susceptible bean lines tested. The more rapid development of nematodes to adults at the higher postinoculation temperature of 28 °C in both bean lines suggests direct temperature effects on nematode development instead of on resistance expression of either of two gene systems. Also, resistance was stable at 30 °C and 32 °C. PMID:19274137

  12. Ecological Relationships between Meloidogyne spartinae and Salt Marsh Grasses in Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Lamondia, J A; Elmer, W H

    2008-09-01

    Healthy specimens of selected grasses were collected from salt marshes and grown in the greenhouse. Plants were inoculated with Meloidogyne spartinae to determine the host range of this nematode. After 12 weeks, Spartina alterniflora plants formed root galls in response to infection and increased M. spartinae populations. Spartina patens, Spartina cynosuroides, Juncus gerardii and Distichlis spicata were non-hosts. In order to determine the natural distribution of M. spartinae in dieback areas, S. alterniflora plants were sampled from transects adjacent to dieback areas in Madison, CT, at low tide. Plants were sampled at the top or the creek and at 1-m intervals to the lowest area of plant growth at the low tide water's edge. Five samples were taken over an elevation drop of 90 cm. Two transects were taken each day on 21 June and 5 July 2007, and one transect was taken on 31 October 2007. Meloidogyne spartinae galls per gram root were higher at the higher elevations. In late June and early July 2007, M. spartinae developed more quickly in the higher elevations, perhaps because peat and sediments were drier and warmer away from low tide water levels. The effects of M. spartinae on S. alterniflora and the role of the nematode in marsh decline and dieback in the northeast United States remain to be determined.

  13. Ecological Relationships between Meloidogyne spartinae and Salt Marsh Grasses in Connecticut

    PubMed Central

    Elmer, W. H.

    2008-01-01

    Healthy specimens of selected grasses were collected from salt marshes and grown in the greenhouse. Plants were inoculated with Meloidogyne spartinae to determine the host range of this nematode. After 12 weeks, Spartina alterniflora plants formed root galls in response to infection and increased M. spartinae populations. Spartina patens, Spartina cynosuroides, Juncus gerardii and Distichlis spicata were non-hosts. In order to determine the natural distribution of M. spartinae in dieback areas, S. alterniflora plants were sampled from transects adjacent to dieback areas in Madison, CT, at low tide. Plants were sampled at the top or the creek and at 1-m intervals to the lowest area of plant growth at the low tide water's edge. Five samples were taken over an elevation drop of 90 cm. Two transects were taken each day on 21 June and 5 July 2007, and one transect was taken on 31 October 2007. Meloidogyne spartinae galls per gram root were higher at the higher elevations. In late June and early July 2007, M. spartinae developed more quickly in the higher elevations, perhaps because peat and sediments were drier and warmer away from low tide water levels. The effects of M. spartinae on S. alterniflora and the role of the nematode in marsh decline and dieback in the northeast United States remain to be determined. PMID:19440262

  14. Characterization of a Root-Knot Nematode Population of Meloidogyne arenaria from Tupungato (Mendoza, Argentina)

    PubMed Central

    Evangelina García, Laura; Sánchez-Puerta, María Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are polyphagous plant parasites of global importance. Successful host infection depends on the particular interaction between a specific nematode species and race and a specific plant species and cultivar. Accurate diagnosis of nematode species is relevant to effective agricultural management; and benefits further from understanding the variability within a single nematode species. Here, we described a population of M. arenaria race 2 from Mendoza (Argentina). This study represents the first morphometric, morphological, biochemical, reproductive, molecular, and host range characterization of a root-knot nematode species from Argentina. Even after gathering morphological and morphometric data of this population and partially sequencing its rRNA, an unequivocal taxonomic assignment could not be achieved. The most decisive data was provided by esterase phenotyping and molecular methods using SCARs. These results highlight the importance of taking a multidimensional approach for Meloidogyne spp. diagnosis. This study contributes to the understanding of the variability of morphological, reproductive and molecular traits of M. arenaria, and provides data on the identification of root-knot nematodes on tomato cultivars from Argentina. PMID:23481918

  15. Identification of microsatellite markers in coffee associated with resistance to Meloidogyne exigua.

    PubMed

    Pereira, T B; Setotaw, T A; Santos, D N; Mendes, A N G; Salgado, S M L; Carvalho, G R; Rezende, R M

    2016-01-01

    Meloidogyne species are destructive phytonematodes that result in reduced yields of coffee. The classic test for resistance to Meloidogyne exigua in coffee progenies is both expensive and time-consuming. The use of molecular marker techniques can assist the selection process when it is difficult to measure the phenotype, such as in cases of resistance to nematode infestation. The objective of this study was to identify microsatellite markers associated with resistance to M. exigua in F5 progenies of coffee derived from a cross between Híbrido de Timor 440-10 and Catuaí Amarelo IAC 86. Of the 44 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers evaluated, 11 showed a polymorphic pattern with a mean number of 4.5 alleles per marker. Clustering analysis classified 82 progenies into three groups related to the response to nematodes and parental genotypes allocated to different groups (resistant and susceptible). SSRCafé 40 allele 2, SSRCafé 15 allele 3, SSRCafé 20 allele 3, and SSRCafé 13 allele 1 were negatively correlated with reproduction factor. In addition, SSRCafé 13 allele 2, SSRCafé 19 allele 3, SSRCafé 40 allele 2, SSRCafé 15 allele 3, and SSRCafé 20 allele 3 were correlated with the root gall index of M. exigua. These SSR markers, which have been validated in this population, represent a potential method to select progenies resistant to nematodes in coffee-breeding programs. PMID:27525876

  16. Effects of biosolid amendment on populations of Meloidogyne hapla and soils with different textures and pHs.

    PubMed

    Mennan, Sevilhan; Melakeberhan, Haddish

    2010-09-01

    Temperate vegetable and nursery industries face significant challenges in managing Meloidogyne hapla, a plant-parasite for which few resistant cultivars and/or viable alternatives to methyl bromide exist. N-Viro Soil(R) (NVS), an alkaline-stabilized biosolid product, has soil nutrition enrichment capacity and potential for plant-parasitic nematode suppression. In three sets of experiments, we investigated the effects of NVS on M. hapla populations from Rhode Island (RI), Connecticut (CT), New York, Geneva (NYG) and Lyndonville (NYL), and Michigan (MI), and growth of tomato cv 'Rutgers' in five soils commonly used for vegetable and nursery crop production in the Great Lakes Region of the USA. Either 0 (control) or 600 eggs/100 cm(3) of soil per M. hapla population were added in all experiments. In the first set, NVS was applied at rates of 0, 1, 2 and 4 g/100 cm(3) of sandy loam soil (pH 7) and resulted in variable responses on the numbers of nematodes recovered and plant growth at 30 and 90 days (25+/-2 degrees C); however, the 2g NVS treatment consistently increased plant growth. Either 0 or 2 NVS/100 cm(3) were applied to a coarse loamy (pH 4.5) and sandy loam (pH 8, second set of experiments), and muck (pH 5.5), loamy sand (pH 7.1) and sandy loam (pH 7.5, third set of experiments) soils and experiments terminated four weeks after nematode inoculation. Across experiments, the effect of NVS on the M. hapla populations varied. Generally nematode infection decreased plant growth. NVS increased soil pH the most in muck and the least in sandy loam soil. The most consistent interaction effects of NVS*soil, NVS*M. hapla, soil*M. hapla and/or NVS*soil*M. hapla across the experiments indicate that NVS affects M. hapla populations in different ways in different soil types, suggesting that NVS application is likely to be site-specific. These findings further provide basis that may potentially explain reports of variable effects of NVS on nematodes and how future studies may

  17. Effects of biosolid amendment on populations of Meloidogyne hapla and soils with different textures and pHs.

    PubMed

    Mennan, Sevilhan; Melakeberhan, Haddish

    2010-09-01

    Temperate vegetable and nursery industries face significant challenges in managing Meloidogyne hapla, a plant-parasite for which few resistant cultivars and/or viable alternatives to methyl bromide exist. N-Viro Soil(R) (NVS), an alkaline-stabilized biosolid product, has soil nutrition enrichment capacity and potential for plant-parasitic nematode suppression. In three sets of experiments, we investigated the effects of NVS on M. hapla populations from Rhode Island (RI), Connecticut (CT), New York, Geneva (NYG) and Lyndonville (NYL), and Michigan (MI), and growth of tomato cv 'Rutgers' in five soils commonly used for vegetable and nursery crop production in the Great Lakes Region of the USA. Either 0 (control) or 600 eggs/100 cm(3) of soil per M. hapla population were added in all experiments. In the first set, NVS was applied at rates of 0, 1, 2 and 4 g/100 cm(3) of sandy loam soil (pH 7) and resulted in variable responses on the numbers of nematodes recovered and plant growth at 30 and 90 days (25+/-2 degrees C); however, the 2g NVS treatment consistently increased plant growth. Either 0 or 2 NVS/100 cm(3) were applied to a coarse loamy (pH 4.5) and sandy loam (pH 8, second set of experiments), and muck (pH 5.5), loamy sand (pH 7.1) and sandy loam (pH 7.5, third set of experiments) soils and experiments terminated four weeks after nematode inoculation. Across experiments, the effect of NVS on the M. hapla populations varied. Generally nematode infection decreased plant growth. NVS increased soil pH the most in muck and the least in sandy loam soil. The most consistent interaction effects of NVS*soil, NVS*M. hapla, soil*M. hapla and/or NVS*soil*M. hapla across the experiments indicate that NVS affects M. hapla populations in different ways in different soil types, suggesting that NVS application is likely to be site-specific. These findings further provide basis that may potentially explain reports of variable effects of NVS on nematodes and how future studies may

  18. Characterization of Isolates of Meloidogyne from Rice-Wheat Production Fields in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Pokharel, Ramesh R.; Abawi, George S.; Zhang, Ning; Duxbury, John M.; Smart, Christine D.

    2007-01-01

    Thirty-three isolates of root-knot nematode were recovered from soil samples from rice-wheat fields in Nepal and maintained on rice cv. BR 11. The isolates were characterized using morphology, host range and DNA sequence analyses in order to ascertain their identity. Results indicated phenotypic similarity (juvenile measurements, perennial pattern, host range and gall shape) of the Nepalese isolates with Meloidogyne graminicola, with minor variations. The rice varieties LA 110 and Labelle were susceptible to all of the Nepalese isolates, but differences in the aggressiveness of the isolates were observed. Phylogenetic analyses based on the sequences of partial internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the rRNA genes indicated that all Nepalese isolates formed a distinct clade with known isolates of M. graminicola with high bootstrap support. Furthermore, two groups were identified within the M. graminicola clade. No correlation between ITS haplotype and aggressiveness or host range was found among the tested isolates. PMID:19259491

  19. Meloidogyne microcephala n. sp. (Meloidogynidae), a Root-knot Nematode from Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Cliff, Gean M.; Hirschmann, Hedwig

    1984-01-01

    Meloidogyne microcephala n. sp. is described and illustrated from specimens obtained from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) in Thailand. The female perineal pattern usually has a low dorsal arch, coarse striae, and a series of small cuticular flaps around the tail terminus. The stylet of the female is 14.4 μm long, with large, square to rectangular stylet knobs, The distinctive male head region is narrow, small, and truncate with a low, flattened head cap. The stylet length is 20.6 μm, and the knobs are small, angular, and set off from the shaft. Mean length of second-stage juveniles is 457.5 μm, and stylet length is 9.3 μm. The tail tip in the juveniles is set off from the rest of the tail as a small finger-like projection. M. microcephala reproduces by mitotic parthenogenesis, and has a chromosome number of 2n = 36. PMID:19295899

  20. Host Range and Distribution of the Clover Root-knot Nematode, Meloidogyne trifoliophila

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, E. C.; Jennings, P. L.

    1997-01-01

    The ability of Meloidogyne trifoliophila to gall 230 species and cultivars of plants was determined in a greenhouse. All clovers (Trifolium spp.) were severely galled regardless of species or cultivar. Most soybean cultivars were moderately to severely galled. Among other legumes, broad bean, garden pea, Korean lespedeza, sweetclover, and common vetch were good hosts, but alfalfa, bird's-foot trefoil, peanut, and pole bean were poor or nonhosts. Among other plant families, most Apiaceae (Umbelliferae) and Brassicaceae (Cruciferae) were galled, but Cucurbitaceae, Iridaceae, Malvaceae, Poaceae, and Solanaceae were rarely or never galled. Results for Amaryllidaceae, Asteraceae, Lamiaceae, and Liliaceae were variable. This nematode was not found in a survey of pasture and soybean fields in southwestern Tennessee. PMID:19274266

  1. Cellular Responses of Resistant and Susceptible Soybean Genotypes Infected with Meloidogyne arenaria Races 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, E M; Hussey, R S; Boerma, H R

    1996-06-01

    The cellular responses induced by Meloidogyne arenaria races 1 and 2 in three soybean genotypes, susceptible CNS, resistant Jackson, and resistant PI 200538, were examined by light microscopy 20 days after inoculation. Differences in giant-cell development were greater between races than among the soybean genotypes. M. arenaria race 1 stimulated small, poorly formed giant-cells in contrast with M. arenaria race 2, which induced well-developed, thick-walled, multinucleate giant-cells. The number of nuclei per giant-celt was variable, but fewer nuclei were usually present in giant-cells induced by race 1 (mean 16 nuclei) than in giant-cells induced by race 2 (mean 41 nuclei). Differences observed in giant-cell development were related to differences in growth and maturation of M. arenaria races 1 and 2 and host suitability of the soybean genotypes.

  2. Efficacy of Fumigant and Nonfurmigant Nematicides for Control of Meloidogyne arenaria on Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, D. W.; Hewlett, T. E.

    1988-01-01

    Three tests were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of fumigant and nonfumigant nematicides for control of Meloidogyne arenaria race 1 on peanut. Methyl bromide, 1,3-D, methyl isothiocyanate, and methyl isothiocyanate mixtures were applied 7 or 8 days preplant either broadcast or in-the-row. Aldicarb, ethoprop, fenamiphos, and F5145 were applied at different rates and by different methods at-plant or at early flowering. Of the 32 treatments evaluated, only seven resulted in yield increases (P = 0.05), although early season vigor was high in all treated plots. During the latter one-third of the growing season, however, nematode control was not adequate in most treatments resulting in heavy peg, pod, and root infection by M. arenaria. PMID:19290312

  3. Description of the Blueberry Root-knot Nematode, Meloidogyne carolinensis n. sp.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenback, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    Meloidogyne carolinensis n. sp. is described from cultivated highbush blueberry (cultivars derived from hybrids of Vaccinium corymbosum L. and V. lamarckii Camp) in North Carolina. The perineal pattern of the female has a large cuticular ridge that surrounds the perivulval area, and the excretory pore is near the level of the base of the stylet. The stylet is 15.9 μm long and the knobs gradually merge with the shaft. The head shape and stylet morphology of the male are quite variable. The typical head and four variants, as well as the typical stylet and two variants, are described. The labial disc, medial lips, and lateral lips of second-stage juveniles are fused and in the same contour. The head region is not annulated. Mean juvenile length is 463.7 μm, stylet length is 11.9 μm, and tail length is 42.5 μm. PMID:19295713

  4. Identifying rates of meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba) seed meal needed for suppression of Meloidogyne hapla and Pythium irregulare in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba) is a commercial oilseed crop grown in Oregon. After extracting oil from seed, the remaining seed meal is rich in the secondary plant metabolite glucolimnanthin, which can be converted into pesticidal compounds such as 3-methoxybenzyl isothiocyanate (ITC) and 3-methoxyphe...

  5. The male imago of Paramaka incognita Domínguez, Grillet, Nieto, Molineri and Guerrero, 2014 (Ephemeroptera: Leptophlebiidae).

    PubMed

    Boldrini, R; Barroso, P C S

    2015-01-01

    The genus Paramaka Savage & Domínguez, 1992 (Ephemeroptera: Leptophlebiidae) is restricted to South America, and it is comprised of four species. The male imago of P. incognita is described for the first time based on material from the state of Roraima in northern Brazil. The male adult differs from other described species of the genus by having the following combination of characteristics: Forewing with costal and subcostal areas basally washed with light yellowish brown; hind wing with base of wing washed with yellowish brown; abdominal terga II-V and VI-IX with lateral margins washed with reddish brown; abdominal sterna VI-VIII with lateral blackish stripes; styliger plate median portion with a pointed, posterior projection that is oriented in a posterior direction; and penes with ventral spines length subequal to length of penes, located on the distal third of the penes.

  6. The male imago of Paramaka incognita Domínguez, Grillet, Nieto, Molineri and Guerrero, 2014 (Ephemeroptera: Leptophlebiidae).

    PubMed

    Boldrini, R; Barroso, P C S

    2015-01-01

    The genus Paramaka Savage & Domínguez, 1992 (Ephemeroptera: Leptophlebiidae) is restricted to South America, and it is comprised of four species. The male imago of P. incognita is described for the first time based on material from the state of Roraima in northern Brazil. The male adult differs from other described species of the genus by having the following combination of characteristics: Forewing with costal and subcostal areas basally washed with light yellowish brown; hind wing with base of wing washed with yellowish brown; abdominal terga II-V and VI-IX with lateral margins washed with reddish brown; abdominal sterna VI-VIII with lateral blackish stripes; styliger plate median portion with a pointed, posterior projection that is oriented in a posterior direction; and penes with ventral spines length subequal to length of penes, located on the distal third of the penes. PMID:26249069

  7. Comparison of saline tolerance among genetically similar species of Fusarium and Meloidogyne recovered from marine and terrestrial habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmer, W. H.; LaMondia, J. A.

    2014-08-01

    Successful plant pathogens co-evolve and adapt to the environmental constraints placed on host plants. We compared the salt tolerance of two salt marsh pathogens, Fusarium palustre and Meloidogyne spartinae, to genetically related terrestrial species, F. sporotrichioides and Meloidogyne hapla, to assess whether the salt marsh species had acquired selective traits for persisting in saline environments or if salt tolerance was comparable among Fusarium and Meloidogyne species. Comparisons of both species were made in vitro in vessels containing increasing concentration of NaCl. We observed that F. palustre was more tolerant to NaCl than F. sporotrichioides. The radial expansion of F. palustre on NaCl-amended agar plates was unaffected by increasing concentrations up to 0.3 M. F. sporotrichioides showed large reductions in growth at the same concentrations. Survival of M. hapla was greatest at 0 M, and reduced by half in a 0.3 M solution for 4 days. No juveniles survived exposure to 0.3 M NaCl for 12 days. M. spartinae survived at all NaCl concentrations tested, including 1.0 M for at least 12 days. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that marine organisms in the upper tidal zone must osmoregulate to withstand a wide range of salinity and provide evidence that these pathogens evolved in saline conditions and are not recent introductions from terrestrial niches.

  8. Identification of resistance to Meloidogyne javanica in the Lycopersicon peruvianum complex.

    PubMed

    Veremis, J C; Roberts, P A

    1996-10-01

    Clones of Lycopersicon peruvianum PI 2704352R2, PI 270435-3MH and PI 126443-1MH expressed novel resistance to three Mi-avirulent M. javanica isolates in greenhouse experiments. Clones from PI 126443-1MH were resistant to the three M. javanica isolates at 25°C. The three isolates were able to reproduce on one embryorescue hybrid of PI 126443-1MH, but not on three L. peruvianum-L. esculentum bridge-line hybrids of PI 1264431MH when screened at 25°C (Mi-expressed temperature). Clones of PI 270435-2R2 and all its hybrids with susceptible genotypes were resistant to the three M. javanica isolates at 25°C. The bridge-line hybrid EPP-2xPI 2704352R2 was susceptible to M. javanica isolate 811 at 32°C, whereas PI 270435-2R2 and all other hybrids of PI 27043 5-2R2 crossed with susceptible genotypes were resistant at 32°C. At 32°C, one F2 progeny of PI 126443-IMHxEPP-1, and three test-cross progenies of PI 1264409MHx[PI 270435-3MHxPI 126443-1MH], and reciprocal test-cross progenies of [PI 270435-3MHxPI 2704352R2]xPI 126440-9MH, each segregated into resistant: susceptible (R∶S) ratios close to 3∶1. The results from the F2 progeny indicated that heat-stable resistance to Mi-avirulent M. javanica in PI 126443 -1MH is conferred by a single dominant gene. The results from the test-crosses indicated that this gene in PI 126443-1MH is different from the resistance gene in PI 270435-3MH. The resistance gene in PI 270435-3MH was also shown to differ from the resistance factor in PI 270435-2R2. The expression of differential susceptibility and resistance to M. javanica and M. incognita in individual plants of the bridge-line hybrid, embryo-rescue hybrid, F2, and test-crosses indicated that at least some genes governing resistance to M. javanica differ from the genes conferring resistance to M. incognita. A new source of heat-stable resistance to M. javanica was identified in Lycopersicon chilense.

  9. Evaluation of Steam and Soil Solarization for Meloidogyne arenaria Control in Florida Floriculture Crops

    PubMed Central

    Kokalis-Burelle, Nancy; Rosskopf, Erin N.; Butler, David M.; Fennimore, Steven A.; Holzinger, John

    2016-01-01

    Steam and soil solarization were investigated for control of the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne arenaria in 2 yr of field trials on a commercial flower farm in Florida. The objective was to determine if preplant steam treatments in combination with solarization, or solarization alone effectively controlled nematodes compared to methyl bromide (MeBr). Trials were conducted in a field with naturally occurring populations of M. arenaria. Treatments were solarization alone, steam treatment after solarization using standard 7.6-cm-diameter perforated plastic drain tile (steam 1), steam treatment following solarization using custom-drilled plastic drain tile with 1.6-mm holes spaced every 3.8 cm (steam 2), and MeBr applied at 392 kg/ha 80:20 MeBr:chloropicrin. Drain tiles were buried approximately 35 cm deep with four tiles per 1.8 by 30 m plot. Steam application followed a 4-wk solarization period concluding in mid-October. All steam was generated using a Sioux propane boiler system. Plots were steamed for sufficient time to reach the target temperature of 70°C for 20 min. Solarization plastic was retained on the plots during steaming and plots were covered with a single layer of carpet padding to provide additional insulation. The floriculture crops larkspur (Delphinium elatum and Delphinium × belladonna), snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus), and sunflower (Helianthus annuus) were produced according to standard commercial practices. One month after treatment in both years of the study, soil populations of M. arenaria were lower in both steam treatments and in MeBr compared to solarization alone. At the end of the season in both years, galling on larkspur, snapdragon, and sunflowers was lower in both steam treatments than in solarization. Both steam treatments also provided control of M. arenaria in soil at the end of the season comparable to, or exceeding that provided by MeBr. Both steam treatments also reduced M. arenaria in snapdragon roots comparable to, or exceeding

  10. Population dynamics of Meloidogyne arenaria and Pasteuria penetrans in a long-term crop rotation study.

    PubMed

    Timper, Patricia

    2009-12-01

    The endospore-forming bacterium Pasteuria penetrans is an obligate parasite of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). The primary objective of this study was to determine the effect of crop sequence on abundance of P. penetrans. The experiment was conducted from 2000 to 2008 at a field site naturally infested with both the bacterium and its host Meloidogyne arenaria and included the following crop sequences: continuous peanut (Arachis hypogaea) (P-P-P) and peanut rotated with either 2 years of corn (Zea mays) (C-C-P), 1 year each of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and corn (Ct-C-P), or 1 year each of corn and a vegetable (V-C-P). The vegetable was a double crop of sweet corn and eggplant (Solanum melongena). A bioassay with second-stage juveniles (J2) of M. arenaria from a greenhouse (GH) population was used to estimate endospore abundance under the different crop sequences. A greater numerical increase in endospore densities was expected in the P-P-P and V-C-P sequences than in the other sequences because both peanut and eggplant are good hosts for M. arenaria. However, endospore densities, as determined by bioassay, did not substantially increase in any of the sequences during the 9-year experiment. To determine whether the nematode population had developed resistance to the resident P. penetrans, five single egg-mass (SEM) lines from the field population of M. arenaria were tested alongside the GH population for acquisition of endospores from the field soil. Four of the five SEM lines acquired 9 to 14 spores/J2 whereas the GH population and one of the SEM lines acquired 3.5 and 1.8 spores/J2, respectively. Endospore densities estimated with the four receptive SEM lines were highest in the P-P-P plots (14-20 spores/J2), intermediate in the V-C-P plots (6-7 spores/J2), and lowest in the Ct-C-P plots (< 1 spore/J2). These results indicate that the field population of M. arenaria is heterogeneous for attachment of P. penetrans endospores. Moreover, spore densities

  11. Molecular dissection of the rDNA array and of the 5S rDNA gene in Meloidogyne artiellia: phylogenetic and diagnostic implications.

    PubMed

    Veronico, Pasqua; De Luca, Francesca; De Giorgi, Carla

    2004-06-01

    The sequence of a 13.423 nucleotide genomic fragment has been determined for the plant parasitic nematode Meloidogyne artiellia. It contains an entire rDNA cluster, the bordering intergenic regions and portions of the flanking coding regions. The sequence analysis of the rDNA repeats suggests homogeneity in M. artiellia, thus providing a further indication of the usefulness of these genes for the diagnostic identification of this species. The comparison of the secondary structures of the internal transcribed spacer 2 region in several Meloidogyne species indicates that RNA folding predictions can be used as a tool of potential diagnostic relevance. The other ribosomal gene, 5S rDNA, has been demonstrated to be functional and located near the trans-spliced leader sequences, in the same arrangement found in the distantly related nematode Caenorhabditis elegans but never in other Meloidogyne thus providing species-specific markers for the identification of several Thylenchida parasitic nematodes. PMID:15135452

  12. Fungi Parasitic on Juveniles and Egg Masses of Meloidogyne hapla in Organic Soils from New York

    PubMed Central

    Viaene, Nicole M.; Abawi, George S.

    1998-01-01

    Fungi associated with egg masses and juveniles of Meloidogyne hapla were isolated from organic soil samples obtained from five fields planted to lettuce or onion in NewYork. The soil samples were placed in sterilized clay pots, infested with M. hapla, and planted to lettuce. After 4 months, egg masses and juveniles were surface-disinfested, plated on water agar, and examined for fungal infection. Depending on the soil sample, fungal isolates were recovered from 13% to 30%, and from 5% to 24% of the egg masses and juveniles, respectively. A total of 24 and 16 isolates collected from egg masses and juveniles, respectively, were selected for further characterization. Fifteen of the isolates were considered as egg-mass pathogens as they were able to infect healthy assay egg masses and could be succesfully reisolated. These fungi included species of Fusarium, Alternatia, and Verticillium psalliotae. Six of the egg-mass-parasitizing fungi could not be identified. Nine fungal isolates were found to be pathogenic to juveniles of M. hapla; six were identified as Monacrosporium sp., two as Arthrobotrys sp., and one as Hirsutella rhossiliensis. The remaining 16 fungal isolates were unable to infect egg masses or juveniles, and thus were considered nonparasitic to M. hapla. PMID:19274258

  13. Resistance to Meloidogyne javanica and Rotylenchulus reniformis in Wild Relatives of Pigeonpea.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S B; Remanandan, P; McDonald, D

    1993-12-01

    Meloidogyne javanica and Rotylenchulus reniformis are important nematode pests of pigeonpea. Greenhouse evaluation of 66 accessions of 25 species of Cajanus, Rhynchosia, and Flemingia for resistance to M. javanica based on number and size of galls, galled area of root, and number of egg masses showed resistance to be available in these wild relatives of pigeonpea. Thirty-five accessions had

  14. Resistance to Meloidogyne javanica and Rotylenchulus reniformis in Wild Relatives of Pigeonpea

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, S. B.; Remanandan, P.; McDonald, D.

    1993-01-01

    Meloidogyne javanica and Rotylenchulus reniformis are important nematode pests of pigeonpea. Greenhouse evaluation of 66 accessions of 25 species of Cajanus, Rhynchosia, and Flemingia for resistance to M. javanica based on number and size of galls, galled area of root, and number of egg masses showed resistance to be available in these wild relatives of pigeonpea. Thirty-five accessions had ≤ 10 galls. Five accessions of C. scarabaeoides (ICPW 92, 101, 103, 128, and 133) had very small or no galls. Damage indices (based on gall number, gall size, and galled area of root) ranged between 1 and 8 on a 1 (highly resistant) to 9 (highly susceptible) scale. ICPW 92 was highly resistant to M. javanica, and 38 other accessions were resistant. Accessions of Flemingia spp. and Rhynchosia spp. showed greater susceptibility than accessions of Cajanus spp. Based on the number of egg masses on roots, no accession of the three genera was highly resistant to R. reniformis, and 83% of the tested accessions were susceptible. Two accessions of C. scarabaeoides (ICPW 38 and 92) and one accession each of R. aurea (ICPW 210), R. minima (ICPW 237), and R. rothii (ICPW 257) were resistant to R. reniformis. Species of Cajanus and Flemingia were generally more susceptible to R. reniformis than were Rhynchosia spp. ICPW 92 was identified as a promising genotype with genes for resistance to both nematodes. PMID:19279848

  15. Trichoderma harzianum Endochitinase Does Not Provide Resistance to Meloidogyne hapla in Transgenic Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Brants, A.; Brown, C. R.; Earle, E. D.

    2000-01-01

    Eggs of Meloidogyne hapla contain chitin, a substrate for chitinase. Our goal was to determine if endochitinase from the biocontrol fungus T. harzianum expressed in transgenic tobacco increases resistance to this nematode. Endochitinase-transgenic T₁ tobacco seedlings expressing increased endochitinase activity in leaves (11 to 125 times over control) and roots (2 to 15 times over control) were transferred to quartz sand:loam soil mix (4:1 ratio) and inoculated with 5,000 M. hapla eggs/pot. Tomato (cv. Rutgers), pepper (cv. California Dream), and non-transformed tobacco plants were used as susceptible controls. Two experiments were performed in the greenhouse with nine and ten transgenic tobacco lines, respectively. Roots were harvested 55 days after inoculation, and number of eggs, secondstage juveniles (J2), reproductive factor (Rf), and (eggs + nematodes [J2])/g of fresh root weight were determined. The reproduction factor for tobacco plants ranged from 1.06 to 3.40. Significant differences in number of J2 and egg counts were found between some transgenic lines and control tobacco; however, they were not consistent for lines tested in both experiments. No statistical differences were detected for (eggs + nematodes [J2])/g of fresh root weight in either experiment. We conclude that the elevated endochitinase activity did not provide protection against root-knot nematodes. PMID:19270979

  16. Comparison of Methods for Assessing Resistance to Meloidogyne arenaria in Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Weibo; Holbrook, C. Corley; Timper, Patricia; Brenneman, Timothy B.; Mullinix, Benjamin G.

    2007-01-01

    Use of resistant cultivars is a desirable approach to manage the peanut root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne arenaria). To incorporate resistance into commercially acceptable cultivars requires reliable, efficient screening methods. To optimize the resistance screening protocol, a series of greenhouse tests were done using seven genotypes with three levels of resistance to M. arenaria. The three resistance levels could be separated based on gall indices as early as two weeks after inoculation (WAI) using 8,000 eggs of M. arenaria per plant, while four or more weeks were needed when 1,000–6,000 eggs/plant were used. High inoculum densities (over 8,000 eggs/plant) were needed to separate the three resistance levels based on eggs per gram of root within eight WAI. A gall index based on percentage of galled roots could separate the three resistance levels at lower inoculum levels and earlier harvest dates than other assessment methods. The use of eggs vs. second-stage juveniles (J2) as inoculum provided similar results; however, it took three to five more days to collect J2 than to collect eggs from roots. Plant age affected gall index and nematode reproduction on peanut, especially on the susceptible genotypes AT201 and D098. The genotypes were separated into their correct resistance classes when inoculated 10 to 30 days after planting, but were not separated correctly when inoculated on day 40. PMID:19259486

  17. Effect of Cutting Age on the Resistance of Prunus cerasifera (Myrobalan Plum) to Meloidogyne arenaria.

    PubMed

    Esmenjaud, D; Minot, J C; Voisin, R; Salesses, G; Bonnet, A

    1995-12-01

    The response of softwood cuttings of Myrobalan plum infested after 50 and 105 days with 3,000 second-stage juveniles (J2) of Meloidogyne arenaria was compared to 15-month-old hardwood cuttings in 13 genotypes ranging from highly resistant to susceptible. Gall index and number of galls were recorded 30 days after infestation. Fifty-day-old cuttings rooted in perlite developed many rootlets, but had only incipient galls after infestation. In sand, rooting of 50-day-old cuttings not treated with indolebutyric acid (IBA) hormone was so variable that their resistance could not be assessed. Similar cuttings rooted with IBA developed more galls, but neither number of galls per plant nor gall index was a reliable criterion for determination of host suitability. Because of the better rooting results with IBA treatment, 105-day-old cuttings were first rooted with IBA in perlite and then transferred into sand for nematode inoculation. Known highly resistant genotypes of Myrobalan plum were gall-free and the responses of other genotypes paralleled that of the reference hardwood cuttings, although the test was less discriminating. Expression of M. arenaria host suitability in Myrobalan plum depends on root tissue maturation and cannot be reliably evaluated with 50-day-old cuttings. PMID:19277333

  18. Population Dynamics of Meloidogyne chitwoodi on Russet Burbank Potatoes in Relation to Degree-day Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, J. N.; Santo, G. S.; Mojtahedi, H.

    1991-01-01

    Population dynamics of Meloidogyne chitwoodi were studied for 2 years in a commercial potato field and microplots. Annual second-stage juvenile (J2) densities peaked at harvest in mid-fall, declined through the winter, and were lowest in early summer. In the field and in one microplot study, population increase displayed trimodal patterns during the 1984 and 1985 seasons. Overwintering nematodes produced egg masses on roots by 600-800 degree-days base 5 C (DD₅) after planting. Second-generation and third-generation eggs hatched by 950-1,100 DD₅ and 1,500-1,600 DD₅, respectively, and J2 densities rapidly increased in the soil. A fourth generation was observed at 2,150 DD₅ in 1985 microplot studies. Tubers were initiated by 450-500 DD₅, but J2 were not observed in the tubers until after the second generation hatched at 988-1,166 DD₅. A second period of tuber invasion was observed when third generation J2 hatched. The regional variation in M. chitwoodi damage on potato may be explained by degree-day accumulation in different potato production regions of the western United States. PMID:19283128

  19. Seasonal Migration of Meloidogyne chitwoodi and its Role in Potato Production

    PubMed Central

    Mojtahedi, H.; Ingram, R. E.; Santo, G. S.; Pinkerton, J. N.; Reed, G. L.; Wilson, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    Seasonal vertical migration of Meloidogyne chitwoodi through soil and its impact on potato production in Washington and Oregon was studied. Nematode eggs and second-stage juveniles (J2) were placed at various depths (0-180 cm) in tubes filled with soil and buried vertically or in holes dug in potato fields. Tubes were removed at intervals over a 12-month period and soil was bioassayed on tomato roots. Upward migration began in the spring after water had percolated through the tubes. Nematodes were detected in the top 5 cm of tubes within 1-2 months of burial, depending on depth of placement. Potatoes were grown in field plots for 4 or 5 months before the tubers were evaluated for infection. One hundred eggs and J2 per gram soil placed at 60 and 90 cm caused significant tuber damage at the Washington and Oregon sites, respectively. At the Washington site, inoculum placed at 90, 120, and 150 cm caused potato root infection without serious impact on tuber quality, but inoculum diluted 2-8 times and placed at 90 cm did not cause root or tuber infection. Nematode migration was dependent on soil texture; 9 days after placement at the bottoms of tubes, J2 had moved up 55 cm in sandy loam soil (Oregon) but only 15 cm in silt loam (Washington). Thus, the importance of M. chitwoodi which occur deep in a soil profile may depend on soil texture, population density, and length of the growing season. PMID:19283107

  20. Efficacy of Ethoprop on Meloidogyne hapla and M. chitwoodi and Enhanced Biodegradation in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Mojtahedi, H.; Santo, G. S.; Pinkerton, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    Responses of egg masses, free eggs, and second-stage juveniles (J2) ofMeloidogyne hapla and M. chitwoodi to ethoprop were evaluated. The results indicated that J2 were the most sensitive, followed by free eggs and egg masses. In general, M. chitwoodi was more susceptible to ethoprop than M. hapla. Ethoprop at 7.2 μg a.i./g soil protected tomato roots from upward migrating M. chitwoodi for 5 weeks. The zone of protection was extended to 10 and 20 cm below the root zone when 3.6 and 7.2 cm water were applied over 8 days. Ethoprop at 1.8, 3.6, and 7.2 μg a.i./g soil degraded faster and killed fewer M. chitwoodi J2 in potato field soil previously exposed to ethoprop than in unexposed soil or sterilized exposed soil. The enhanced biodegradation property of the exposed soil lasted 17 months after the last application of ethoprop. The limited downward movement of ethoprop in the soil, migration of M. chitwoodi J2 into the treated zone, presence of resistant life stage(s) at the time of application, and loss of efficacy due to enhanced biodegradation may have a significant effect on the performance of ethoprop. PMID:19283141

  1. Effect of Soil Water Potential on Survival of Meloidogyne javanica in Fallow Soil

    PubMed Central

    Towson, A. J.; Apt, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    A natural infestation of Meloidogyne javanica in an aggregated Oxisol declined at an exponential rate when aliquots of the soil were stored for 72 days in polyethylene bags at various soil water potentials (Ψ). Time periods required for reduction in soil infestations by 50% were 2.7, 4.9, 110, 10, and 2.6 days at Ψ of -0.16, -0.30, -1.1, -15, and -92 bars, respectively. In the wetter soils, at Ψ of -0.16, -0.30, and -1.1 bars, the predominant stage recovered was the second-stage larva. In the drier soils, at Ψ of -15 and -92 bars, both eggs and larvae were recovered with neither stage predominating. Incidence of coiled larvae was inversely related to the Ψ value of the soil, a greater incidence occurring in the drier soils. After 15-32 days, percentages of coiled larvae were 13, 27, 55, 65, and 88% in soil at Ψ of -0.17, -0.60, -1.9, -15, and -82 bars, respectively. PMID:19295774

  2. Sequence and genetic map of Meloidogyne hapla: A compact nematode genome for plant parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Opperman, Charles H.; Bird, David M.; Williamson, Valerie M.; Rokhsar, Dan S.; Burke, Mark; Cohn, Jonathan; Cromer, John; Diener, Steve; Gajan, Jim; Graham, Steve; Houfek, T. D.; Liu, Qingli; Mitros, Therese; Schaff, Jennifer; Schaffer, Reenah; Scholl, Elizabeth; Sosinski, Bryon R.; Thomas, Varghese P.; Windham, Eric

    2008-01-01

    We have established Meloidogyne hapla as a tractable model plant-parasitic nematode amenable to forward and reverse genetics, and we present a complete genome sequence. At 54 Mbp, M. hapla represents not only the smallest nematode genome yet completed, but also the smallest metazoan, and defines a platform to elucidate mechanisms of parasitism by what is the largest uncontrolled group of plant pathogens worldwide. The M. hapla genome encodes significantly fewer genes than does the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (most notably through a reduction of odorant receptors and other gene families), yet it has acquired horizontally from other kingdoms numerous genes suspected to be involved in adaptations to parasitism. In some cases, amplification and tandem duplication have occurred with genes suspected of being acquired horizontally and involved in parasitism of plants. Although M. hapla and C. elegans diverged >500 million years ago, many developmental and biochemical pathways, including those for dauer formation and RNAi, are conserved. Although overall genome organization is not conserved, there are areas of microsynteny that may suggest a primary biological function in nematodes for those genes in these areas. This sequence and map represent a wealth of biological information on both the nature of nematode parasitism of plants and its evolution. PMID:18809916

  3. Resistance to root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne spp. in woody plants.

    PubMed

    Saucet, Simon Bernard; Van Ghelder, Cyril; Abad, Pierre; Duval, Henri; Esmenjaud, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    I. 42 II. 43 III. 44 IV. 47 V. 49 VI. 50 VII. 50 VIII. 50 IX. 52 52 References 52 SUMMARY: Root-knot nematodes (RKNs) Meloidogyne spp. cause major damage to cultivated woody plants. Among them, Prunus, grapevine and coffee are the crops most infested by worldwide polyphagous species and species with a more limited distribution and/or narrower host range. The identification and characterization of natural sources of resistance are important steps to develop RKN control strategies. In woody crops, resistant rootstocks genetically different from the scion of agronomical interest may be engineered. We describe herein the interactions between RKNs and different woody crops, and highlight the plant species in which resistance and corresponding resistance (R) genes have been discovered. Even though grapevine and, to a lesser extent, coffee have a history of rootstock selection for RKN resistance, few cases of resistance have been documented. By contrast, in Prunus, R genes with different spectra have been mapped in plums, peach and almond and can be pyramided for durable resistance in interspecific rootstocks. We particularly discuss here the Ma Toll/interleukin-1 receptor-like-nucleotide binding-leucine-rich repeat gene from Myrobalan plum, one of the longest plant R genes cloned to date, due to its unique biological and structural properties. RKN R genes in Prunus will enable us to carry out molecular studies aimed at improving our knowledge of plant immunity in woody plants. PMID:27128375

  4. Responses of Guava Plants to Inoculation with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Soil Infested with Meloidogyne enterolobii.

    PubMed

    Campos, Maryluce Albuquerque da Silva; da Silva, Fábio Sérgio Barbosa; Yano-Melo, Adriana Mayumi; de Melo, Natoniel Franklin; Pedrosa, Elvira Maria Régis; Maia, Leonor Costa

    2013-09-01

    In the Northeast of Brazil, expansion of guava crops has been impaired by Meloidogyne enterolobii that causes root galls, leaf fall and plant death. Considering the fact that arbuscular mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) improve plant growth giving protection against damages by plant pathogens, this work was carried out to select AMF efficient to increase production of guava seedlings and their tolerance to M. enterolobii. Seedlings of guava were inoculated with 200 spores of Gigaspora albida, Glomus etunicatum or Acaulospora longula and 55 days later with 4,000 eggs of M. enterolobii. The interactions between the AMF and M. enterolobii were assessed by measuring leaf number, aerial dry biomass, CO2 evolution and arbuscular and total mycorrhizal colonization. In general, plant growth was improved by the treatments with A. longula or with G. albida. The presence of the nematode decreased arbuscular colonization and increased general enzymatic activity. Higher dehydrogenase activity occurred with the A. longula treatment and CO2 evolution was higher in the control with the nematode. More spores and higher production of glomalin-related soil proteins were observed in the treatment with G. albida. The numbers of galls, egg masses and eggs were reduced in the presence of A. longula. Inoculation with this fungus benefitted plant growth and decreased nematode reproduction. PMID:25288951

  5. Resistance and Host-response of Selected Plants to Meloidogyne megadora

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, A. M. S. F.; de A. Santos, M. S. N.

    2002-01-01

    Fourteen plant species, including 30 genotypes, were assessed for host suitability to Meloidogyne megadora in a growth room at 20 to 28°C. Host suitability was based on the gall index (GI) and the reproduction factor (Rf):final population density (Pf)/initial population density (Pi). The presence of distinct galling was observed on roots of six plant species, and reproduction occurred on five of the 14 species tested. Three cultivars of cantaloupe (cvs. Branco do Ribatejo, Concerto, and Galia), three of cucumber (cvs. LM 809, Half Long Palmetto, and Market More), six of banana (cvs. Maçá, Ouro Branco, Ouro Roxo, Prata, Páo, and Valery), and one of broad bean (cv. Algarve) were considered susceptible (Pf/Pi > 1). Resistant cultivars (Pf/Pi = 0) included beet (cv, Crosby), pepper (cv. LM 204), watermelon (cvs. Black Magic and Crimson Sweet), tomato (cvs. Moneymaker and Rossol), radish (cv. Cherry Belle), and corn (cv. Dunia); sunn hemp and black velvetbean genotypes were also resistant. All Brassica cultivars were galled, although no egg masses were observed (Pf/Pi = 0), and classified as resistant/hypersensitive. PMID:19265922

  6. Optimum Concentrations of Trichoderma longibrachiatum and Cadusafos for Controlling Meloidogyne javanica on Zucchini Plants.

    PubMed

    Sokhandani, Zahra; Moosavi, Mohammad Reza; Basirnia, Tahereh

    2016-03-01

    A factorial experiment was established in a completely randomized design to verify the effect of different inoculum levels of an Iranian isolate of Trichoderma longibrachiatum separately and in combination with various concentrations of cadusafos against Meloidogyne javanica in the greenhouse. Zucchini seeds were soaked for 12 hr in five densities (0, 10(5), 10(6), 10(7), and 10(8) spores/ml suspension) of the fungus prior to planting in pots containing four concentrations of cadusafos (0, 0.5, 1, and 2 mg a.i./kg soil). The data were analyzed using a custom response surface regression model and the response surface curve and contour plots were drawn. Reliability of the model was examined by comparing the result of new experimental treatments with the predicted results. The optimal levels of these two variables also were calculated. The interactive effects of concentrations of Trichoderma and cadusafos were insignificant for several responses such as the total number of eggs per gram soil, the number of intact eggs per gram soil, nematode reproduction factor, and control percent. Closeness of experimental mean values with the expected values proved the validity of the model. The optimal levels of the cadusafos concentration and Trichoderma concentration that caused the best plant growth and lowest nematode reproduction were 1.7 mg a.i./kg soil and 10(8) conidia/ml suspension, respectively. PMID:27168653

  7. Plant Sources of Chinese Herbal Remedies: Effects on Pratylenchus vulnus and Meloidogyne javanica

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, H.; Zheng, L.

    1999-01-01

    More than 500 plant species, used alone or in combination, are documented in Chinese traditional medicine to have activity against helminth and micro-invertebrate pests of humans. We subjected 153 candidate medicines or their plant sources to multilevel screening for effectiveness against plant-parasitic nematodes. For extracts effective in preliminary screens, we determined time-course and concentration-response relationships. Seventy-three of the aqueous extracts of medicines or their plant sources killed either Meloidogyne javanica juveniles or Pratylenchus vulnus (mixed stages), or both, within a 24-hour exposure period. Of 64 remedies reported as antihelminthics, 36 were effective; of 21 classi- fied as purgatives, 13 killed the nematodes; of 29 indicated as generally effective against pests, 13 killed the nematodes. Sources of extracts effective against one or both species of plant-parasitic nematodes are either the whole plant or vegetative, storage or reproductive components of the plants. Effective plants include both annuals and perennials, range from grasses and herbs to woody trees, and represent 46 plant families. PMID:19270895

  8. Optimum Concentrations of Trichoderma longibrachiatum and Cadusafos for Controlling Meloidogyne javanica on Zucchini Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sokhandani, Zahra; Moosavi, Mohammad Reza; Basirnia, Tahereh

    2016-01-01

    A factorial experiment was established in a completely randomized design to verify the effect of different inoculum levels of an Iranian isolate of Trichoderma longibrachiatum separately and in combination with various concentrations of cadusafos against Meloidogyne javanica in the greenhouse. Zucchini seeds were soaked for 12 hr in five densities (0, 105, 106, 107, and 108 spores/ml suspension) of the fungus prior to planting in pots containing four concentrations of cadusafos (0, 0.5, 1, and 2 mg a.i./kg soil). The data were analyzed using a custom response surface regression model and the response surface curve and contour plots were drawn. Reliability of the model was examined by comparing the result of new experimental treatments with the predicted results. The optimal levels of these two variables also were calculated. The interactive effects of concentrations of Trichoderma and cadusafos were insignificant for several responses such as the total number of eggs per gram soil, the number of intact eggs per gram soil, nematode reproduction factor, and control percent. Closeness of experimental mean values with the expected values proved the validity of the model. The optimal levels of the cadusafos concentration and Trichoderma concentration that caused the best plant growth and lowest nematode reproduction were 1.7 mg a.i./kg soil and 108 conidia/ml suspension, respectively. PMID:27168653

  9. Effects of Cropping Sequences on Population Densities of Meloidogyne hapla and Carrot Yield in Organic Soil

    PubMed Central

    Bélair, Guy

    1992-01-01

    The influence of various cropping sequences on population densities of Meloidogyne hapla and carrot yield was studied in organic soil under microplot-and field conditions. Spinach, radish, barley, oat, and wheat were poor or nonhosts for M. hapla. Population densities of M. hapla were maintained or increased on cabbage, celery, lettuce, leek, marigold, and potato. Marketable percent-age and root weight of carrots were greater following spinach, oat, radish, and fallow-onion than those following two crops of onion or carrot in microplots. Under field conditions, the carrot-onion-oat-carrot cropping sequence decreased M. hapla population densities and provided a 282% increase in marketable yield of carrot compared to a carrot monoculture. Two consecutive years of onion increased M. hapla population densities causing severe root galling and a 50% yield loss in the following crop of carrot. Based on root-gall indices, carrots could be grown economically for 2 years following radish, spinach, and oat, but not following onion and carrot without the use of nematicides. PMID:19283022

  10. Meloidogyne platani n. sp. (Meloidogynidae), a Root-knot Nematode Parasitizing American Sycamore.

    PubMed

    Hirschmann, H

    1982-01-01

    Meloidogyne platani n. sp. is described and illustrated from specimens obtained from roots of American sycamore, Platanus occidentalis, in Virginia. This new species shows certain similarities with M. arenaria but differs from it by a number of distinctive characters. The perineal pattern of females is rounded with fine, wavy to zig-zag striae and raised, convoluted striae in the inner lateral line regions. The stylet of females is 16.5 mum long with large, rounded stylet knobs set off from the shaft. Males have a low head cap and smooth head region. The styler length is 22.0 mum, and the stylet knobs are rounded and set off from the shaft. Mean second-stage juvenile length is 443.0 mum, and stylet length is 12.2 mum. The head region of juveniles is not annulated, and the tail has a definite terminus. This nematode causes severe galling and reproduces well on sycamore. Other good hosts include white ash and tobacco cv. NC 95. M. platani n. sp. reproduces by mitotic parthenogenesis and has a somatic chromosome number of approximately 45 (2n).

  11. Control of Meloidogyne chitwoodi in Potato with Fumigant and Nonfumigant Nematicides

    PubMed Central

    Ingham, R. E.; Hamm, P. B.; Williams, R. E.; Swanson, W. H.

    2000-01-01

    During 1993-94, several fumigant and nonfumigant nematicides were tested alone and in combination at various rates for control of Columbia root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne chitwoodi) in potato. Ethoprop, oxamyl, or metam sodium alone did not adequately reduce tuber infection. Metam sodium plus ethoprop reduced culled tubers to 3%, and metam sodium plus 2 or 3 foliar applications of oxamyl reduced culls to ≤10% in all but one instance. Fosthiazate provided excellent control of tuber infection with or without metam sodium. Rates of 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) below 234 liters/ha did not always adequately control tuber damage, but 140 liters/ha of 1,3-D plus ethoprop reduced the percentage of culled tubers to zero. 1,3-Dichloropropene plus chloropicrin did not provide better control than 1,3-D alone. Combinations of 1,3-D at 94 liters/ha or greater plus metam sodium at 374 liters/ha or greater consistently provided excellent control of tuber damage by M. chitwoodi and would be the treatment of choice where soilborne fungal pathogens are also present. PMID:19271010

  12. Comparison of Fumigant and Nonfumigant Nematicides for control of Meloidogyne chitwoodi on Potato

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, G. D.

    1989-01-01

    The fumigant 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) effectively controlled Meloidogyne chitwoodi on Russet Burbank potato, Solanum tuberosum. There was a maximum of 4% infected and galled tubers from the 1,3-D treatment after 2,028 degree-days with a base temperature of 5 C (DD5). This compared to 66% infected and galled tubers in aldicarb at-plant treated plots. Soil temperature, as determined by DD5, and timing of chemical applications affected the nematicidal activity on M. chitwoodi (P < 0.05). Aldicarb was most effective when applied postplant (PP) during the nematode reproductive cycle. After 1,684 DD5 of growth, there were 59, 26, 22, and 6% infected and galled tubers from untreated control plots and aldicarb treatments of 2.1 g/m row at 600 DD5, 2.1 g/m row at 1,228 DD5, and 1.3 g/m row at 600 DD5 plus 2.1 g/m row at 1,228 DD5, respectively. No aldicarb treatments were effective over a growing period of 2,028 DD5; 34% of the tubers were infected and galled following the most effective aldicarb treatment (1.3 g/m row at 504 DD5 plus 2.1 g/m row at 996 DD5). PMID:19287664

  13. Responses of Guava Plants to Inoculation with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Soil Infested with Meloidogyne enterolobii

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Maryluce Albuquerque da Silva; da Silva, Fábio Sérgio Barbosa; Yano-Melo, Adriana Mayumi; de Melo, Natoniel Franklin; Pedrosa, Elvira Maria Régis; Maia, Leonor Costa

    2013-01-01

    In the Northeast of Brazil, expansion of guava crops has been impaired by Meloidogyne enterolobii that causes root galls, leaf fall and plant death. Considering the fact that arbuscular mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) improve plant growth giving protection against damages by plant pathogens, this work was carried out to select AMF efficient to increase production of guava seedlings and their tolerance to M. enterolobii. Seedlings of guava were inoculated with 200 spores of Gigaspora albida, Glomus etunicatum or Acaulospora longula and 55 days later with 4,000 eggs of M. enterolobii. The interactions between the AMF and M. enterolobii were assessed by measuring leaf number, aerial dry biomass, CO2 evolution and arbuscular and total mycorrhizal colonization. In general, plant growth was improved by the treatments with A. longula or with G. albida. The presence of the nematode decreased arbuscular colonization and increased general enzymatic activity. Higher dehydrogenase activity occurred with the A. longula treatment and CO2 evolution was higher in the control with the nematode. More spores and higher production of glomalin-related soil proteins were observed in the treatment with G. albida. The numbers of galls, egg masses and eggs were reduced in the presence of A. longula. Inoculation with this fungus benefitted plant growth and decreased nematode reproduction. PMID:25288951

  14. Optimum Concentrations of Trichoderma longibrachiatum and Cadusafos for Controlling Meloidogyne javanica on Zucchini Plants.

    PubMed

    Sokhandani, Zahra; Moosavi, Mohammad Reza; Basirnia, Tahereh

    2016-03-01

    A factorial experiment was established in a completely randomized design to verify the effect of different inoculum levels of an Iranian isolate of Trichoderma longibrachiatum separately and in combination with various concentrations of cadusafos against Meloidogyne javanica in the greenhouse. Zucchini seeds were soaked for 12 hr in five densities (0, 10(5), 10(6), 10(7), and 10(8) spores/ml suspension) of the fungus prior to planting in pots containing four concentrations of cadusafos (0, 0.5, 1, and 2 mg a.i./kg soil). The data were analyzed using a custom response surface regression model and the response surface curve and contour plots were drawn. Reliability of the model was examined by comparing the result of new experimental treatments with the predicted results. The optimal levels of these two variables also were calculated. The interactive effects of concentrations of Trichoderma and cadusafos were insignificant for several responses such as the total number of eggs per gram soil, the number of intact eggs per gram soil, nematode reproduction factor, and control percent. Closeness of experimental mean values with the expected values proved the validity of the model. The optimal levels of the cadusafos concentration and Trichoderma concentration that caused the best plant growth and lowest nematode reproduction were 1.7 mg a.i./kg soil and 10(8) conidia/ml suspension, respectively.

  15. Genetics and Mechanism of Resistance to Meloidogyne arenaria in Peanut Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Choi, K.; Burow, M. D.; Church, G.; Burow, G.; Paterson, A. H.; Simpson, C. E.; Starr, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    Segregation of resistance to Meloidogyne arenaria in six BC₅F₂ peanut breeding populations was examined in greenhouse tests. Chi-square analysis indicated that segregation of resistance was consistent with resistance being conditioned by a single gene in three breeding populations (TP259-3, TP262-3, and TP271-2), whereas two resistance genes may be present in the breeding populations TP259-2, TP263-2, and TP268-3. Nematode development in clonally propagated lines of resistant individuals of TP262-3 and TP263-2 was compared to that of the susceptible cultivar Florunner. Juvenile nematodes readily penetrated roots of all peanut genotypes, but rate of development was slower (P = 0.05) in the resistant genotypes than in Florunner. Host cell necrosis indicative of a hypersensitive response was not consistently observed in resistant genotypes of either population. Three RFLP loci linked to resistance at distances of 4.2 to 11.0 centiMorgans were identified. Resistant and susceptible alleles for RFLP loci R2430E and R2545E were quite distinct and are useful for identifying individuals homozygous for resistance in segregating populations. PMID:19270898

  16. Evaluation of Paecilomyces lilacinus as a Biocontrol Agent of Meloidogyne javanica on Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Hewlett, T E; Dickson, D W; Mitchell, D J; Kannwischer-Mitchell, M E

    1988-10-01

    The efficacy of the nematode parasite Paecilomyces lilacinus, alone and in combination with phenamiphos and ethoprop, for controlling the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica on tobacco and the ability of this fungus to colonize in soil under field conditions were evaluated for 2 years in microplots. Combinations and individual treatments of the fungus grown on autoclaved wheat seed, M. javanica eggs (76,000 per plot), and nematicides were applied to specified microplots at the time of transplanting tobacco the first year. Vetch was planted as a winter cover crop, and the fungus and nematicides were applied again the second year to specified plots at transplanting time. The fungus did not control the nematode in either year of these experiments. The average root-gall index (0 = no visible galls and 5 = > 100 galls per root system) ranged from 2.7 to 3.9 the first year and from 4.3 to 5.0 the second in nematode-infested plots treated with nematicides. Plants with M. javanica alone or in combination with P. lilacinus had galling indices of 5.0 both years; the latter produced lower yields than all other treatments during both years of the study. Nevertheless, the average soil population densities of P. lilacinus remained high, ranging from 1.2 to 1.3 x 106 propagules/g soil 1 week after the initial inoculation and from 1.6 to 2.3 x 104 propagules/g soil at harvest the second year. At harvest the second year the density of fungal propagules was greatest at the depth of inoculation, 15 cm, and rapidly decreased below this level.

  17. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Meloidogyne graminicola (Tylenchina): A Unique Gene Arrangement and Its Phylogenetic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Longhua; Zhuo, Kan; Lin, Borong; Wang, Honghong; Liao, Jinling

    2014-01-01

    Meloidogyne graminicola is one of the most economically important plant parasitic-nematodes (PPNs). In the present study, we determined the complete mitochondrial (mt) DNA genome sequence of this plant pathogen. Compared with other PPNs genera, this genome (19,589 bp) is only slightly smaller than that of Pratylenchus vulnus (21,656 bp). The nucleotide composition of the whole mtDNA sequence of M. graminicola is significantly biased toward A and T, with T being the most favored nucleotide and C being the least favored. The A+T content of the entire genome is 83.51%. The mt genome of M. graminicola contains 36 genes (lacking atp8) that are transcribed in the same direction. The gene arrangement of the mt genome of M. graminicola is unique. A total of 21 out of 22 tRNAs possess a DHU loop only, while tRNASer(AGN) lacks a DHU loop. The two large noncoding regions (2,031 bp and 5,063 bp) are disrupted by tRNASer(UCN). Phylogenetic analysis based on concatenated amino acid sequences of 12 protein-coding genes support the monophylies of the three orders Rhabditida, Mermithida and Trichinellida, the suborder Rhabditina and the three infraorders Spiruromorpha, Oxyuridomorpha and Ascaridomorpha, but do not support the monophylies of the two suborders Spirurina and Tylenchina, and the three infraorders Rhabditomorpha, Panagrolaimomorpha and Tylenchomorpha. The four Tylenchomorpha species including M. graminicola, P. vulnus, H. glycines and R. similis from the superfamily Tylenchoidea are placed within a well-supported monophyletic clade, but far from the other two Tylenchomorpha species B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus of Aphelenchoidea. In the clade of Tylenchoidea, M. graminicola is sister to P. vulnus, and H. glycines is sister to R. similis, which suggests root-knot nematodes has a closer relationship to Pratylenchidae nematodes than to cyst nematodes. PMID:24892428

  18. Control of Meloidogyne chitwoodi in Potato with Shank-injected Metam Sodium and other Nematicides

    PubMed Central

    Ingham, R. E.; Hamm, P. B.; Baune, M.; David, N. L.; Wade, N. M.

    2007-01-01

    Metam sodium (MS) is often applied to potato fields via sprinkler irrigation systems (water-run, WR) to reduce propagules of soil-borne pathogenic fungi, particularly Verticillium dahliae, to prevent yield loss from potato early dying disease. However, this procedure has not been effective for controlling quality defects in tubers caused by Columbia root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne chitwoodi). In five trials from 1996 to 2001, application of MS by soil shank injection (SH) provided better control and tuber quality than that generally obtained by WR MS, in three of five trials. Results were similar when SH MS was injected at one (41–45 cm), two (15 and 30 cm) or three (15, 30 and 45 cm) depths. In the two trials where SH metam potassium was tested, culls were reduced to 3% and 0% and were equivalent to those resulting from a similar rate in kg a.i./ha of SH MS. A shank-injected tank mix of MS plus ethoprop EC and SH MS plus in-season chemigation applications of oxamyl provided acceptable control in trials where SH MS alone was inadequate. In-furrow application of aldicarb at planting following SH MS did not appear to increase performance. Most consistent control (0–2% culled tubers in five trials) occurred when SH MS at 280 liters/ha was used together with 1,3- dichloropropene (140 liters/ha), applied simultaneously or sequentially. This was similar to combinations of 1,3-D and WR MS, but SH MS may be preferred under certain conditions. PMID:19259485

  19. Control of Meloidogyne chitwoodi in Potato with Shank-injected Metam Sodium and other Nematicides.

    PubMed

    Ingham, R E; Hamm, P B; Baune, M; David, N L; Wade, N M

    2007-06-01

    Metam sodium (MS) is often applied to potato fields via sprinkler irrigation systems (water-run, WR) to reduce propagules of soil-borne pathogenic fungi, particularly Verticillium dahliae, to prevent yield loss from potato early dying disease. However, this procedure has not been effective for controlling quality defects in tubers caused by Columbia root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne chitwoodi). In five trials from 1996 to 2001, application of MS by soil shank injection (SH) provided better control and tuber quality than that generally obtained by WR MS, in three of five trials. Results were similar when SH MS was injected at one (41-45 cm), two (15 and 30 cm) or three (15, 30 and 45 cm) depths. In the two trials where SH metam potassium was tested, culls were reduced to 3% and 0% and were equivalent to those resulting from a similar rate in kg a.i./ha of SH MS. A shank-injected tank mix of MS plus ethoprop EC and SH MS plus in-season chemigation applications of oxamyl provided acceptable control in trials where SH MS alone was inadequate. In-furrow application of aldicarb at planting following SH MS did not appear to increase performance. Most consistent control (0-2% culled tubers in five trials) occurred when SH MS at 280 liters/ha was used together with 1,3- dichloropropene (140 liters/ha), applied simultaneously or sequentially. This was similar to combinations of 1,3-D and WR MS, but SH MS may be preferred under certain conditions. PMID:19259485

  20. Evaluation of Protocol for Assessing the Reaction of Rice and Wheat Germplasm to Infection by Meloidogyne graminicola

    PubMed Central

    Pokharel, Ramesh R.; Duxbury, John M.; Abawai, George

    2012-01-01

    Root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne graminicola), an important and widespread pathogen, causes high yield losses in rice with limited information on wheat and on efficient management. Absence of uniform screening protocols is contributing to slow progress of host resistance development. To develop an efficient screening protocol, several greenhouse studies were conducted, and effects of incubation period, inoculum level, inoculation method, seedling age, and their interactions on root-galling severity (RGS) ratings and reproductive factor (RF) values of M. graminicola were determined. At 2 eggs/cm3 soil, significantly lower RGS but higher RF values were observed at 60 days than at 45 days of incubation. Meloidogyne graminicola reproduced six times more on rice than on wheat where the RGS index in both crops increased steadily with increasing inoculum levels, but RF increased at lower levels and decreased beyond a maximum at medium inoculum levels. Inoculum level, container size, seedling age, inoculation method, and their interactions impacted nematode infection and reproduction. The protocol was verified on eleven rice germplasm lines and seven wheat cultivars using the resistance index (RI) calculated from RGS and RF, to screen rice and wheat germplasm. PMID:23481227

  1. High and Low Throughput Screens with Root-knot Nematodes Meloidogyne spp.

    PubMed Central

    Atamian, Hagop S.; Roberts, Philip A.; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2012-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (genus Meloidogyne) are obligate plant parasites. They are extremely polyphagous and considered one of the most economically important plant parasitic nematodes. The microscopic second-stage juvenile (J2), molted once in the egg, is the infective stage. The J2s hatch from the eggs, move freely in the soil within a film of water, and locate root tips of suitable plant species. After penetrating the plant root, they migrate towards the vascular cylinder where they establish a feeding site and initiate feeding using their stylets. The multicellular feeding site is comprised of several enlarged multinuclear cells called 'giant cells' which are formed from cells that underwent karyokinesis (repeated mitosis) without cytokinesis. Neighboring pericycle cells divide and enlarge in size giving rise to a typical gall or root knot, the characteristic symptom of root-knot nematode infection. Once feeding is initiated, J2s become sedentary and undergo three additional molts to become adults. The adult female lays 150-250 eggs in a gelatinous matrix on or below the surface of the root. From the eggs new infective J2s hatch and start a new cycle. The root-knot nematode life cycle is completed in 4-6 weeks at 26-28°C. Here we present the traditional protocol to infect plants, grown in pots, with root-knot nematodes and two methods for high-throughput assays. The first high-throughput method is used for plants with small seeds such as tomato while the second is for plants with large seeds such as cowpea and common bean. Large seeds support extended seedling growth with minimal nutrient supplement. The first high throughput assay utilizes seedlings grown in sand in trays while in the second assay plants are grown in pouches in the absence of soil. The seedling growth pouch is made of a 15.5 x 12.5cm paper wick, folded at the top to form a 2-cm-deep trough in which the seed or seedling is placed. The paper wick is contained inside a transparent plastic pouch

  2. Accomplishments of a 10-year initiative to develop host plant resistance to root-knot and reniform nematodes in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2003 Cotton Incorporated initiated a Beltwide research program to develop host plant resistance against root-knot (Meloidogyne incognita) and reniform (Rotylenchulus reniformis) nematodes. Objectives formulated at a coordinating meeting in 2003 that included participants from public institutions...

  3. Control of Meloidogyne spp. on Russet Burbank Potato by Applying Metham Sodium through Center Pivot Irrigation Systems.

    PubMed

    Santo, G S; Qualls, M

    1984-04-01

    Metham sodium applied in October through center pivot irrigation systems was evaluated for control of Meloidogyne hapla at 374, 468, and 701 liters/ha and for control of M. chitwoodi at 468 liters/ha on potato. Metham sodium at the high rates effectively controlled M. hapla. No females were detected in the tubers at the high rates of nematicide application, whereas a mean of 19 and 69% of the tubers were infected at the low rate and in the nontreated controls, respectively. In the M. chitwoodi trial only 1.5% of the tubers in the treated plots were infected compared with 82% in the nontreated plots. Metham sodium effectively controlled M. chitwoodi to soil depths of 30, 61, and 91 cm. PMID:19295894

  4. Control of Meloidogyne spp. on Russet Burbank Potato by Applying Metham Sodium through Center Pivot Irrigation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Santo, G. S.; Qualls, M.

    1984-01-01

    Metham sodium applied in October through center pivot irrigation systems was evaluated for control of Meloidogyne hapla at 374, 468, and 701 liters/ha and for control of M. chitwoodi at 468 liters/ha on potato. Metham sodium at the high rates effectively controlled M. hapla. No females were detected in the tubers at the high rates of nematicide application, whereas a mean of 19 and 69% of the tubers were infected at the low rate and in the nontreated controls, respectively. In the M. chitwoodi trial only 1.5% of the tubers in the treated plots were infected compared with 82% in the nontreated plots. Metham sodium effectively controlled M. chitwoodi to soil depths of 30, 61, and 91 cm. PMID:19295894

  5. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    GH suppression test; Glucose loading test; Acromegaly - blood test; Gigantism - blood test ... is not changed and stays high during the suppression test, the provider will suspect gigantism or acromegaly. ...

  6. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medication. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  7. Nematode suppression and growth stimulation in corn plants (Zea mays L.) irrigated with domestic effluent.

    PubMed

    Barros, Kenia Kelly; do Nascimento, Clístenes Williams Araújo; Florencio, Lourdinha

    2012-01-01

    Treated wastewater has great potential for agricultural use due to its concentrations of nutrients and organic matter, which are capable of improving soil characteristics. Additionally, effluents can induce suppression of plant diseases caused by soil pathogens. This study evaluates the effect of irrigation with effluent in a UASB reactor on maize (Zea mays L.) development and on suppression of the diseases caused by nematodes of the genus Meloidogyne. Twelve lysimeters of 1 m(3) each were arranged in a completely randomized design, with four treatments and three replicates. The following treatments were used: T1 (W+I), irrigation with water and infestation with nematodes; T2 (W+I+NPK), irrigation with water, infestation with nematodes and fertilization with nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K); T3 (E+I), irrigation with effluent and infestation with nematodes; and T4 (E+I+P), irrigation with effluent, infestation with nematodes and fertilization with phosphorus. The plants irrigated with the effluent plus the phosphorus fertilizer had better growth and productivity and were more resistant to the disease symptoms caused by the nematodes. The suppression levels may have been due to the higher levels of Zn and NO(3)(-) found in the leaf tissue of the plants irrigated with the effluent and phosphorus fertilizer.

  8. Nematode suppression and growth stimulation in corn plants (Zea mays L.) irrigated with domestic effluent.

    PubMed

    Barros, Kenia Kelly; do Nascimento, Clístenes Williams Araújo; Florencio, Lourdinha

    2012-01-01

    Treated wastewater has great potential for agricultural use due to its concentrations of nutrients and organic matter, which are capable of improving soil characteristics. Additionally, effluents can induce suppression of plant diseases caused by soil pathogens. This study evaluates the effect of irrigation with effluent in a UASB reactor on maize (Zea mays L.) development and on suppression of the diseases caused by nematodes of the genus Meloidogyne. Twelve lysimeters of 1 m(3) each were arranged in a completely randomized design, with four treatments and three replicates. The following treatments were used: T1 (W+I), irrigation with water and infestation with nematodes; T2 (W+I+NPK), irrigation with water, infestation with nematodes and fertilization with nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K); T3 (E+I), irrigation with effluent and infestation with nematodes; and T4 (E+I+P), irrigation with effluent, infestation with nematodes and fertilization with phosphorus. The plants irrigated with the effluent plus the phosphorus fertilizer had better growth and productivity and were more resistant to the disease symptoms caused by the nematodes. The suppression levels may have been due to the higher levels of Zn and NO(3)(-) found in the leaf tissue of the plants irrigated with the effluent and phosphorus fertilizer. PMID:22744702

  9. Bacterial Antagonists of Fungal Pathogens Also Control Root-Knot Nematodes by Induced Systemic Resistance of Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Mohamed; Heuer, Holger; Hallmann, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The potential of bacterial antagonists of fungal pathogens to control the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita was investigated under greenhouse conditions. Treatment of tomato seeds with several strains significantly reduced the numbers of galls and egg masses compared with the untreated control. Best performed Bacillus subtilis isolates Sb4-23, Mc5-Re2, and Mc2-Re2, which were further studied for their mode of action with regard to direct effects by bacterial metabolites or repellents, and plant mediated effects. Drenching of soil with culture supernatants significantly reduced the number of egg masses produced by M. incognita on tomato by up to 62% compared to the control without culture supernatant. Repellence of juveniles by the antagonists was shown in a linked twin-pot set-up, where a majority of juveniles penetrated roots on the side without inoculated antagonists. All tested biocontrol strains induced systemic resistance against M. incognita in tomato, as revealed in a split-root system where the bacteria and the nematodes were inoculated at spatially separated roots of the same plant. This reduced the production of egg masses by up to 51%, while inoculation of bacteria and nematodes in the same pot had only a minor additive effect on suppression of M. incognita compared to induced systemic resistance alone. Therefore, the plant mediated effect was the major reason for antagonism rather than direct mechanisms. In conclusion, the bacteria known for their antagonistic potential against fungal pathogens also suppressed M. incognita. Such “multi-purpose” bacteria might provide new options for control strategies, especially with respect to nematode-fungus disease complexes that cause synergistic yield losses. PMID:24587352

  10. Effective suppressibility of chaos.

    PubMed

    López, Álvaro G; Seoane, Jesús M; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2013-06-01

    Suppression of chaos is a relevant phenomenon that can take place in nonlinear dynamical systems when a parameter is varied. Here, we investigate the possibilities of effectively suppressing the chaotic motion of a dynamical system by a specific time independent variation of a parameter of our system. In realistic situations, we need to be very careful with the experimental conditions and the accuracy of the parameter measurements. We define the suppressibility, a new measure taking values in the parameter space, that allows us to detect which chaotic motions can be suppressed, what possible new choices of the parameter guarantee their suppression, and how small the parameter variations from the initial chaotic state to the final periodic one are. We apply this measure to a Duffing oscillator and a system consisting on ten globally coupled Hénon maps. We offer as our main result tool sets that can be used as guides to suppress chaotic dynamics. PMID:23822472

  11. Fire Suppression and Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This report is concerned with the following topics regarding fire suppression:What is the relative effectiveness of candidate suppressants to extinguish a representative fire in reduced gravity, including high-O2 mole fraction, low -pressure environments? What are the relative advantages and disadvantages of physically acting and chemically-acting agents in spacecraft fire suppression? What are the O2 mole fraction and absolute pressure below which a fire cannot exist? What effect does gas-phase radiation play in the overall fire and post-fire environments? Are the candidate suppressants effective to extinguish fires on practical solid fuels? What is required to suppress non-flaming fires (smoldering and deep seated fires) in reduced gravity? How can idealized space experiment results be applied to a practical fire scenario? What is the optimal agent deployment strategy for space fire suppression?

  12. Comparison of Winter and Spring Soil Fumigation with 1,3-D for the Management of Meloidogyne arenaria on Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Kinloch, R. A.; Dickson, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted in which the fumigant 1,3-D was applied at broadcast rates of 56 and 112 liters/ha during late winter and spring to two differing soil types in north Florida. No advantage was demonstrated in applying the fumigant at the higher rate for the management of Meloidogyne arenaria on peanut, and there was no disadvantage to applying a standard rate of the fumigant during winter as opposed to the standard practice of a 2-week preplant treatment. At one site, where rainfall was less than adequate for normal peanut yields, all treatments with 1,3-D decreased nematode populations and increased yields 2.5-fold over banded applications of aldicarb (broadcast rates of 6.7 kg/ha at planting with 3.4 kg/ha at peg initiation), and 5-fold over the untreated control. At a site where weather conditions were optimal and soil infestation levels of M. arenariajuveniles were relatively low at harvest, none of the treatments produced peanut yields different (P ≤ 0.05) from the untreated control. PMID:19283185

  13. Relationship Between Crop Losses and Initial Population Densities of Meloidogyne arenaria in Winter-Grown Oriental Melon in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, D.G.; Ferris, H.

    2002-01-01

    To determine the economic threshold level, oriental melon (Cucumis melo L. cv. Geumssaragi-euncheon) grafted on Shintozoa (Cucurbita maxima × Cu. moschata) was planted in plots (2 × 3 m) under a plastic film in February with a range of initial population densities (Pi) of Meloidogyne arenaria. The relationships of early, late, and total yield to Pi measured in September and January were adequately described by both linear regression and the Seinhorst damage model. Initial nematode densities in September in excess of 14 second-stage juveniles (J2)/100 cm³ soil caused losses in total yields that exceeded the economic threshold and indicate the need for fosthiazate nematicide treatment at current costs. Differences in yield-loss relationships to Pi between early- and late-season harvests enhance the resolution of the management decision and suggest approaches for optimizing returns. Determination of population levels for advisory purposes can be based on assay samples taken several months before planting, which allows time for implementation of management procedures. We introduce (i) an amendment of the economic threshold definition to reflect efficacy of the nematode management procedure under consideration, and (ii) the concept of profit limit as the nematode population at which net returns from the system will become negative. PMID:19265907

  14. Co-infection of Wilt-Resistant Chickpeas by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri and Meloidogyne javanica

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, T. Uma; Sharma, S. B.; Reddy, D. D. R.; Haware, M. P.

    1995-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri and Meloidogyne javanica are important pathogens of chickpea. Interrelationships between Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri and M. javanica were investigated on 53 Fusarium wilt-resistant chickpea genotypes in pot experiments. All of the genotypes were susceptible to M. javanica. Fusarium wilt resistance in one genotype (ICC 12275) was ineffective in the presence of M. javanica, and all the plants completely wilted. Resistance in four genotypes (ICCs 11319, 11322, 12254, 12272) was reduced in the presence of the nematode. Vascular discoloration above the collar region of the plants, an indication of susceptibility to the fungus, was observed. Wilt resistance in 48 genotypes was not modified by M. javanica. The effects of interactions between the pathogens on shoot and root weights, gall index, and galled area of root were significant only on 10-28% of the genotypes. Presence of the fungus reduced the adverse effects of nematodes on growth of 15% of the genotypes. Appraisal of wilt-resistant chickpea genotypes for their reactions to combinations of the two pathogens would help to identify and develop chickpea cultivars with wilt resistance stable in presence of M. javanica. PMID:19277336

  15. Fast assembly of the mitochondrial genome of a plant parasitic nematode (Meloidogyne graminicola) using next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Besnard, Guillaume; Jühling, Frank; Chapuis, Élodie; Zedane, Loubab; Lhuillier, Émeline; Mateille, Thierry; Bellafiore, Stéphane

    2014-05-01

    Little is known about the variations of nematode mitogenomes (mtDNA). Sequencing a complete mtDNA using a PCR approach remains a challenge due to frequent genome reorganizations and low sequence similarities between divergent nematode lineages. Here, a genome skimming approach based on HiSeq sequencing (shotgun) was used to assemble de novo the first complete mtDNA sequence of a root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne graminicola). An AT-rich genome (84.3%) of 20,030 bp was obtained with a mean sequencing depth superior to 300. Thirty-six genes were identified with a semi-automated approach. A comparison with a gene map of the M. javanica mitochondrial genome indicates that the gene order is conserved within this nematode lineage. However, deep genome rearrangements were observed when comparing with other species of the superfamily Hoplolaimoidea. Repeat elements of 111 bp and 94 bp were found in a long non-coding region of 7.5 kb, as similarly reported in M. javanica and M. hapla. This study points out the power of next generation sequencing to produce complete mitochondrial genomes, even without a reference sequence, and possibly opening new avenues for species/race identification, phylogenetics and population genetics of nematodes.

  16. Intraspecific variability of the facultative meiotic parthenogenetic root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne graminicola) from rice fields in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Bellafiore, Stéphane; Jougla, Claire; Chapuis, Élodie; Besnard, Guillaume; Suong, Malyna; Vu, Phong Nguyen; De Waele, Dirk; Gantet, Pascal; Thi, Xuyen Ngo

    2015-07-01

    Twenty years ago, the facultative meiotic parthenogenetic root-knot nematode (RKN), Meloidogyne graminicola, was recognised as an important rice pathogen in South Vietnam. Although this country is one of the most important rice exporters worldwide, a comprehensive picture of the occurrence of M. graminicola in Vietnamese rice fields is still not available. Therefore a nematode survey was carried out with the aim of better understanding the geographical distribution, and the pathogenic and genetic variability of the RKN in Vietnam. From the fields surveyed in a range of ecosystems, 21 RKN populations were recovered from infected rice roots. A diagnostic SCAR marker was developed showing that all Vietnamese populations belong to M. graminicola. Furthermore, sequencing of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) of the rDNA genes confirmed this identification. These populations were then characterised using morphometrics and pathogenicity tests (host plant range diversity, reproduction and virulence diversity) revealing intraspecific variability. We showed that morphometric traits are mainly genetically heritable characters with significant differences among the studied populations. Finally, a distinctive trait signature was found for the populations isolated from the upland rice cultures. All together, our study reveals the prevalence of M. graminicola populations in Vietnamese rice. Further investigations need to be developed to explore the population dynamics and evolutionary history of this species in South East Asia.

  17. Genetic Mapping of Resistance to Meloidogyne arenaria in Arachis stenosperma: A New Source of Nematode Resistance for Peanut.

    PubMed

    Leal-Bertioli, Soraya C M; Moretzsohn, Márcio C; Roberts, Philip A; Ballén-Taborda, Carolina; Borba, Tereza C O; Valdisser, Paula A; Vianello, Rosana P; Araújo, Ana Cláudia G; Guimarães, Patricia M; Bertioli, David J

    2016-02-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN; Meloidogyne sp.) are a major threat to crops in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. The use of resistant crop varieties is the preferred method of control because nematicides are expensive, and hazardous to humans and the environment. Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is infected by four species of RKN, the most damaging being M. arenaria, and commercial cultivars rely on a single source of resistance. In this study, we genetically characterize RKN resistance of the wild Arachis species A. stenosperma using a population of 93 recombinant inbred lines developed from a cross between A. duranensis and A. stenosperma. Four quantitative trait loci (QTL) located on linkage groups 02, 04, and 09 strongly influenced nematode root galling and egg production. Drought-related, domestication and agronomically relevant traits were also evaluated, revealing several QTL. Using the newly available Arachis genome sequence, easy-to-use KASP (kompetitive allele specific PCR) markers linked to the newly identified RKN resistance loci were developed and validated in a tetraploid context. Therefore, we consider that A. stenosperma has high potential as a new source of RKN resistance in peanut breeding programs. PMID:26656152

  18. Impact of Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) Varieties on Reproduction of the Northern Root-Knot Nematode (Meloidogyne hapla)

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Amanda D.; Skinkis, Patricia A.; Wilson, John H.; Riga, Ekaterini; Pinkerton, John N.; Schreiner, R. Paul; Zasada, Inga A.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most commonly encountered plant-parasitic nematodes in eastern Washington Vitis vinifera vineyards is Meloidogyne hapla; however, limited research exists on the impact of this nematode on V. vinifera. The objectives of this research were to determine the impact of M. hapla on Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon vine establishment and to determine the host status of V. vinifera varieties/clones predominantly grown in Washington to M. hapla. In a microplot experiment, Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon vines were planted into soil inoculated with different densities of M. hapla; population dynamics of M. hapla and vine performance were monitored over 3 yr. In greenhouse experiments, several clones representing five V. vinifera varieties, Chardonnay, Riesling, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Syrah, were evaluated as hosts for M. hapla. In both microplot and greenhouse experiments, white varieties were significantly better hosts than red varieties. In the greenhouse experiments, Chardonnay and Riesling had 40% higher reproduction factor values than Syrah and Merlot, however, all varieties/clones screened were good hosts for M. hapla (reproduction factors > 3). In the microplot experiment, M. hapla eggs/g root were 4.5 times greater in Chardonnay compared to Cabernet Sauvignon 3 yr after planting but there was no evident impact of M. hapla on vine establishment. PMID:26170476

  19. Intraspecific variability of the facultative meiotic parthenogenetic root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne graminicola) from rice fields in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Bellafiore, Stéphane; Jougla, Claire; Chapuis, Élodie; Besnard, Guillaume; Suong, Malyna; Vu, Phong Nguyen; De Waele, Dirk; Gantet, Pascal; Thi, Xuyen Ngo

    2015-07-01

    Twenty years ago, the facultative meiotic parthenogenetic root-knot nematode (RKN), Meloidogyne graminicola, was recognised as an important rice pathogen in South Vietnam. Although this country is one of the most important rice exporters worldwide, a comprehensive picture of the occurrence of M. graminicola in Vietnamese rice fields is still not available. Therefore a nematode survey was carried out with the aim of better understanding the geographical distribution, and the pathogenic and genetic variability of the RKN in Vietnam. From the fields surveyed in a range of ecosystems, 21 RKN populations were recovered from infected rice roots. A diagnostic SCAR marker was developed showing that all Vietnamese populations belong to M. graminicola. Furthermore, sequencing of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) of the rDNA genes confirmed this identification. These populations were then characterised using morphometrics and pathogenicity tests (host plant range diversity, reproduction and virulence diversity) revealing intraspecific variability. We showed that morphometric traits are mainly genetically heritable characters with significant differences among the studied populations. Finally, a distinctive trait signature was found for the populations isolated from the upland rice cultures. All together, our study reveals the prevalence of M. graminicola populations in Vietnamese rice. Further investigations need to be developed to explore the population dynamics and evolutionary history of this species in South East Asia. PMID:26026576

  20. Nematicidal activity of (E,E)-2,4-decadienal and (E)-2-decenal from Ailanthus altissima against Meloidogyne javanica.

    PubMed

    Caboni, Pierluigi; Ntalli, Nikoletta G; Aissani, Nadhem; Cavoski, Ivana; Angioni, Alberto

    2012-02-01

    Methanol extracts of various plant parts of Ailanthus altissima were tested against the root knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica . Extracts of bark (ABE), wood (AWE), roots (ARE), and leaves (ALE) from A. altissima were investigated against freshly hatched second-stage juveniles (J(2)). AWE was the most active extract, with EC(50/3d) of 58.9 mg/L, while ALE, ARE, and ABE did not show nematicidal activity. The chemical composition of the extracts of A. altissima was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and (E,E)-2,4-decadienal, (E)-2-undecenal, (E)-2-decenal, hexanal, nonanal, and furfural were the most prominent constituents. (E,E)-2,4-Decadienal, (E)-2-decenal, and furfural showed the highest nematicidal activity against M. javanica , with EC(50/1d) = 11.7, 20.43, and 21.79 mg/L, respectively, while the other compounds were inactive at the concentrations tested. The results obtained showed that AWE and its constituents (E,E)-2,4-decadienal and (E)-2-decenal could be considered as potent botanical nematicidal agents. PMID:22224661

  1. Genetic Mapping of Resistance to Meloidogyne arenaria in Arachis stenosperma: A New Source of Nematode Resistance for Peanut.

    PubMed

    Leal-Bertioli, Soraya C M; Moretzsohn, Márcio C; Roberts, Philip A; Ballén-Taborda, Carolina; Borba, Tereza C O; Valdisser, Paula A; Vianello, Rosana P; Araújo, Ana Cláudia G; Guimarães, Patricia M; Bertioli, David J

    2015-12-12

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN; Meloidogyne sp.) are a major threat to crops in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. The use of resistant crop varieties is the preferred method of control because nematicides are expensive, and hazardous to humans and the environment. Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is infected by four species of RKN, the most damaging being M. arenaria, and commercial cultivars rely on a single source of resistance. In this study, we genetically characterize RKN resistance of the wild Arachis species A. stenosperma using a population of 93 recombinant inbred lines developed from a cross between A. duranensis and A. stenosperma. Four quantitative trait loci (QTL) located on linkage groups 02, 04, and 09 strongly influenced nematode root galling and egg production. Drought-related, domestication and agronomically relevant traits were also evaluated, revealing several QTL. Using the newly available Arachis genome sequence, easy-to-use KASP (kompetitive allele specific PCR) markers linked to the newly identified RKN resistance loci were developed and validated in a tetraploid context. Therefore, we consider that A. stenosperma has high potential as a new source of RKN resistance in peanut breeding programs.

  2. Genetic Mapping of Resistance to Meloidogyne arenaria in Arachis stenosperma: A New Source of Nematode Resistance for Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Leal-Bertioli, Soraya C. M.; Moretzsohn, Márcio C.; Roberts, Philip A.; Ballén-Taborda, Carolina; Borba, Tereza C. O.; Valdisser, Paula A.; Vianello, Rosana P.; Araújo, Ana Cláudia G; Guimarães, Patricia M.; Bertioli, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN; Meloidogyne sp.) are a major threat to crops in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. The use of resistant crop varieties is the preferred method of control because nematicides are expensive, and hazardous to humans and the environment. Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is infected by four species of RKN, the most damaging being M. arenaria, and commercial cultivars rely on a single source of resistance. In this study, we genetically characterize RKN resistance of the wild Arachis species A. stenosperma using a population of 93 recombinant inbred lines developed from a cross between A. duranensis and A. stenosperma. Four quantitative trait loci (QTL) located on linkage groups 02, 04, and 09 strongly influenced nematode root galling and egg production. Drought-related, domestication and agronomically relevant traits were also evaluated, revealing several QTL. Using the newly available Arachis genome sequence, easy-to-use KASP (kompetitive allele specific PCR) markers linked to the newly identified RKN resistance loci were developed and validated in a tetraploid context. Therefore, we consider that A. stenosperma has high potential as a new source of RKN resistance in peanut breeding programs. PMID:26656152

  3. Nematodetoxic aurovertin-type metabolites from a root-knot nematode parasitic fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xue-Mei; Wang, Yan-Li; Chu, Yan-Sheng; Xue, Hua-Xi; Li, Nan; Wei, Lu-Xia; Mo, Ming-He; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2010-01-27

    Chemical investigation of one fungal strain P. chlamydosporia YMF 1.00613 isolated from root knots of tobacco infected by Meloidogyne incognita led to the isolation and identification of four aurovertin-type metabolites, which include a new compound, aurovertin I (A1), and three known metabolites, aurovertins E, F and D (A2-A4). Their structures were established by spectroscopic studies such as 1D- and 2D-NMR and MS analysis. Aurovertin I (A1) is the first natural product with an aurovertin skeleton with one less carbon. Compounds A3 and A4 showed the toxicity to the worms of the free-living nematode Panagrellus redivevus with the LC(50) values 88.6 and 41.7 microg/mL at 48 h, respectively. All four aurovertins did not show obvious inhibitory effects on egg hatch of root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. The results suggested that the aurovertin-type metabolites produced by P. chlamydosporia might be one of the pathogenic factors involved in the suppression of nematodes.

  4. Cough suppression disorders spectrum.

    PubMed

    Reich, Jerome M

    2014-02-01

    Volitional cough suppression, identified exclusively in females, is an unusual causal mechanism for instances of lobar atalectasis and bronchiectasis. It is a postulated mechanism for the genesis of Lady Windermere Syndrome.

  5. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  6. Effect of Entomopathogenic Nematodes (Rhabditida: Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae) on Meloidogyne mayaguensis Rammah and Hirschmann (Tylenchida: Meloidoginidae) Infection in Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Molina, J. P.; Dolinski, C.; Souza, R. M.; Lewis, E. E.

    2007-01-01

    Some studies suggest that entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) affect plant-parasitic nematode populations. Here, the effects of live and dead IJ of Heterorhabditis bacteriophora JPM4, H. baujardi LPP7, Steinernema feltiae SN and S. carpocapsae All were evaluated against eggs and J2 of the plant-parasitic nematode Meloidogyne mayaguensis. According to treatment, 100 IJ were applied with 350 eggs, 350 J2 or 175 eggs + 175 J2 to tomato plants. Bioassays were conducted in March to May and repeated in September to November 2005. Both experiments lasted 9 weeks, and the variable evaluated was number of galls per plant. When eggs were used for infections in the first trial, plants exhibited lower gall number compared to control when live and dead H. baujardi IJ and live S. feltiae IJ were added (9.7, 4.5, 7.3 and 85.7 galls, respectively). In the second trial, live S. feltiae and S. carpocapasae IJ influenced gall formation compared to control (14.33, 14.57 and 168.02 galls, respectively). When J2 were used for infections, plants with live H. baujardi IJ presented less galls when compared to control in both trials (38.3 and 355.7 galls in the first trial and 145.2 and 326.2 in the second one, respectively). Infection with a mixture of J2 and eggs resulted in fewer galls than when live S. feltiae IJ were present in both trials, compared to control (38.3 and 44.2 galls vs. 275.3 and 192.2 galls, respectively). We conclude that H. baujardi and S. feltiae apparently may be inhibiting egg hatching and J2 infection. PMID:19259509

  7. A study of interaction between Verticillium wilt Verticillium dahliae and root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica in olive cultivars.

    PubMed

    Saeedizadeh, Ayatollah; Kheiri, Ahmad; Zad, Javad; Etebarian, Hasan Reza; Bandani, Ali Reza; Nasiri, Mohammad Bagher

    2009-01-01

    Second stage juvenile (J2) of root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne javanica, and microsclerotia of verticillium wilt, Verticillium dahliae, were used as the source of inoculum for nematode and fungus respectively. One-year-old seedlings of olive cultivars, Zard, Roghani, Koroneiki and Manzanilla, were transplanted to pots containing 2000g of sterilized sandy loam soil. Experiment was conducted in completely randomized design with 32 treatments and five replications. Treatments were as follows: control, nematode alone, fungus alone and fungus + nematode. Pots were inoculated with (0, 2000, 3000, 4000) J2 of nematode and/or (10 no/g soil) microsclerotia of fungus according to the treatments. Experiment was terminated after 10 months and fallowing parameters were determined i.e., fresh weight of root and stem, number of galls and egg masses per root system, and percentage of incidence of symptom on aerial parts, browning of vascular tissue, decrease of seedling height and stem/root tissue colonization by fungus. Results showed that presence of nematode caused reduction on colonization of the fungus in the root and stem and vice versa i.e. presence of fungus caused reduction on number of galls and egg masses produced by the nematode. Severe fungus wilt on aerial parts of Manzanilla cultivar was observed when both pathogens were inoculated and mild fungus wilt was observed in fungus alone treatments of Koroneiki cultivar. Galling and egg mass production in root system were reduced in cvs Manzanilla, Zard, Roghani and Koroneiki, respectively (p < or = 0/05). Based on the results obtained in this study, verticilliosis symptoms and galling of nematode in olive seedlings were be less on cvs Koroneiki, Roghani, Zard and Manzanilla, respectively (p < or = 0/05). PMID:20222619

  8. Rhizosphere Colonization and Control of Meloidogyne spp. by Nematode-trapping Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Christina; Jansson, Hans-Börje

    1999-01-01

    The ability of nematode-trapping fungi to colonize the rhizosphere of crop plants has been suggested to be an important factor in biological control of root-infecting nematodes. In this study, rhizosphere colonization was evaluated for 38 isolates of nematode-trapping fungi representing 11 species. In an initial screen, Arthrobotrys dactyloides, A. superba, and Monacrosporium ellipsosporum were most frequently detected in the tomato rhizosphere. In subsequent pot experiments these fungi and the non-root colonizing M. geophyropagum were introduced to soil in a sodium alginate matrix, and further tested both for establishment in the tomato rhizosphere and suppression of root-knot nematodes. The knob-forming M. ellipsosporum showed a high capacity to colonize the rhizosphere both in the initial screen and the pot experiments, with more than twice as many fungal propagules in the rhizosphere as in the root-free soil. However, neither this fungus nor the other nematode-trapping fungi tested reduced nematode damage to tomato plants. PMID:19270886

  9. Explosion suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Sapko, Michael J.; Cortese, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  10. Managing Root-knot on Tobacco in the Southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Charles S.

    1989-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes suppress yields of flue-cured tobacco an estimated 0.1 to 4.8% annually in the southeastern United States, even though nematode management practices have been widely adopted. Although Meloidogyne incognita races 1 and 3 have predominated, M. arenaria, M. javanica, and M. incognita races 2 and 4 are increasingly important. Seventy-five percent of the flue-cured tobacco hectarage in North Carolina and Virginia is rotated on 2-year or 3-year intervals. Over half of the hectarage in the southeastern United States was planted with tobacco cultivars resistant to M. incognita races 1 and 3 in 1986. Resistance to other species or races of root-knot nematodes is not available in commercially available flue-cured tobacco cultivars. Most producers plow and (or) disc-out flue-cured tobacco roots and stalks after harvest. Nematicide use ranges from virtually 100% in Florida and Georgia to 60% in Virginia. Continued research is needed to develop management strategies for mixed populations of root-knot nematodes and to incorporate resistance to more root-knot nematode species and races into tobacco cultivars. Nematode advisory programs that allow producers to optimize nematicide use from an economical and ecological point of view are also needed. PMID:19287655

  11. Use of Nematodes as Biomonitors of Nonfumigant Nematicide Movement through Field Soil

    PubMed Central

    Gourd, T. R.; Schmitt, D. P.; Barker, K. R.

    1993-01-01

    Three field experiments were established in a loamy sand soil in the Coastal Plain of North Carolina to determine downward movement of aldicarb and fenamiphos with a nematode bioassay. Penetration of bioassay plant roots by Meloidogyne incognita was measured at 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after treatment in the greenhouse as a means of determining nematicide effectiveness. Chemical movement was similar in planted and fallow soil. Nematicidal activity was greater in soil collected from the 0 to 10 cm depth than from the 10 to 20 cm depth. Fenamiphos suppressed host penetration by the nematode more than aldicarb under the high rainfall (19 cm) and low soil temperatures that occurred soon after application in the spring. During the summer, which had 13 cm precipitation and warmer soil temperatures, both chemicals performed equally well at the 0 to 10 cm depth. At the lower soil level (10 to 20 cm), aldicarb limited nematode penetration of host roots more quickly than fenamiphos. Both of these chemicals moved readily in the sandy soil in concentrations sufficient to control M. incognita. Although some variability was encountered in similar experiments, nematodes such as M. incognita have considerable potential as biomonitors of nematicide movement in soil. PMID:19279744

  12. Photoimmune suppression and photocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Stephen E

    2002-03-01

    The primary cause of non-melanoma skin cancer, the most prevalent form of human neoplasia, is the ultraviolet (UV) radiation found in sunlight. Exposing mice to UV radiation induces skin cancers that are highly antigenic. Upon transfer of an UV-induced skin cancer to a normal syngeneic mouse, the tumor cells are recognized and rapidly destroyed by the immune system of the recipient. This raises the question of how these cancers avoided immune destruction during their development in the UV-irradiated host. This question was answered when it was discovered that in addition to being carcinogenic, UV radiation was also immunosuppressive. Studies with immune suppressed transplantation recipients, and biopsy proven skin cancer patients have confirmed that UV-induced immune suppression is a risk factor for skin cancer development in humans. It is of great importance, therefore, to understand the mechanisms underlying UV-induced immune suppression. The focus of this manuscript will be to use some examples from the more recent scientific literature to review the mechanisms by which UV radiation suppresses the immune response and allows for the progressive outgrowth of antigenic skin tumors. PMID:11861222

  13. Study on interaction between root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica and wilt fungus Verticillium dahliae on olive seedlings in greenhouse.

    PubMed

    Saeedizadeh, A; Kheiri, A; Okhovat, M; Hoseininejad, A

    2003-01-01

    Verticillium dahliae has been reported as a limiting factor in cotton, olive, potato and tomato fields from several countries in the world. Root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne javanica causes considerable damage to olive groves in olive growing areas. Since the presence of these two pathogens in olive trees and seedlings were confirmed in Golestan Province, this study was proposed to find the mode of their action and interaction with olive seedlings in greenhouse. The non-defoliant strain of the fungus (SS-4) was isolated from olive groves showing symptom in Golestan Province. M. javanica was also recovered from the infested olive seedlings. After species identification, it was reared on tomato seedlings var. Rutgers. The larvae were used as a source of inoculum. Conidia and microsclerotia of V. dahliae were used as a source of inoculum for pathogenesis in this study. Stem cuttings of olive cultivar Zard were transplanted in different sets of pots containing 720 ml. of sterilized loamy soil and sandy soil. Experiment was conducted in Completely Randomized Design with 6 treatments and 8 replicates including control, nematode alone, fungus alone, nematode and fungus simultaneously, nematode and fungus concomitantly, fungus two weeks prior to nematode, nematode and fungus concomitantly, nematode two weeks prior to fungus. Pots were inoculated with 1500 larvae of nematodes and 7200 microsclerotia of V. dahliae. Experiment was terminated after 9 months and following parameters were determined i.e. fresh weight of roots, number of galls and females, per root system and discoloration of leaf and root tissues. Presence of nematode prior to fungus caused reduction in colonization of fungus in the roots and the stems and vis presence of fungus prior to nematode caused reduction in number of galls produced by nematode. Sever symptom on aerial parts of plant was observed when both pathogens were inoculated simultaneously. However fresh weight of roots was reduced in all treatments

  14. Study on interaction between root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica and wilt fungus Verticillium dahliae on olive seedlings in greenhouse.

    PubMed

    Saeedizadeh, A; Kheiri, A; Okhovat, M; Hoseininejad, A

    2003-01-01

    Verticillium dahliae has been reported as a limiting factor in cotton, olive, potato and tomato fields from several countries in the world. Root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne javanica causes considerable damage to olive groves in olive growing areas. Since the presence of these two pathogens in olive trees and seedlings were confirmed in Golestan Province, this study was proposed to find the mode of their action and interaction with olive seedlings in greenhouse. The non-defoliant strain of the fungus (SS-4) was isolated from olive groves showing symptom in Golestan Province. M. javanica was also recovered from the infested olive seedlings. After species identification, it was reared on tomato seedlings var. Rutgers. The larvae were used as a source of inoculum. Conidia and microsclerotia of V. dahliae were used as a source of inoculum for pathogenesis in this study. Stem cuttings of olive cultivar Zard were transplanted in different sets of pots containing 720 ml. of sterilized loamy soil and sandy soil. Experiment was conducted in Completely Randomized Design with 6 treatments and 8 replicates including control, nematode alone, fungus alone, nematode and fungus simultaneously, nematode and fungus concomitantly, fungus two weeks prior to nematode, nematode and fungus concomitantly, nematode two weeks prior to fungus. Pots were inoculated with 1500 larvae of nematodes and 7200 microsclerotia of V. dahliae. Experiment was terminated after 9 months and following parameters were determined i.e. fresh weight of roots, number of galls and females, per root system and discoloration of leaf and root tissues. Presence of nematode prior to fungus caused reduction in colonization of fungus in the roots and the stems and vis presence of fungus prior to nematode caused reduction in number of galls produced by nematode. Sever symptom on aerial parts of plant was observed when both pathogens were inoculated simultaneously. However fresh weight of roots was reduced in all treatments

  15. Brassinosteroids suppress rice defense against root-knot nematodes through antagonism with the jasmonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Kamrun; Kyndt, Tina; Hause, Bettina; Höfte, Monica; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2013-01-01

    The importance of phytohormone balance is increasingly recognized as central to the outcome of plant-pathogen interactions. Next to their well-known developmental role, brassinosteroids (BR) were recently found to be involved in plant innate immunity. In this study, we examined the role of BR in rice (Oryza sativa) innate immunity during infection with the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne graminicola, and we studied the inter-relationship with the jasmonate (JA) pathway. Exogenous epibrassinolide (BL) supply at low concentrations induced susceptibility in the roots whereas high concentrations of BL enforced systemic defense against this nematode. Upon high exogenous BL supply on the shoot, quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) confirmed a strong feedback inhibitory effect, leading to reduced BR biosynthesis in the root. Moreover, we demonstrate that the immune suppressive effect of BR is at least partly due to negative cross-talk with the JA pathway. Mutants in the BR biosynthesis or signaling pathway accumulate slightly higher levels of the immediate JA-precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, and qRT-PCR data showed that the BR and JA pathway are mutually antagonistic in rice roots. Collectively, these results suggest that the balance between the BR and JA pathway is an effective regulator of the outcome of the rice-M. graminicola interaction.

  16. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  17. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  18. Nonsense suppression in archaea

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Arpita; Köhrer, Caroline; Mandal, Debabrata; RajBhandary, Uttam L.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial strains carrying nonsense suppressor tRNA genes played a crucial role in early work on bacterial and bacterial viral genetics. In eukaryotes as well, suppressor tRNAs have played important roles in the genetic analysis of yeast and worms. Surprisingly, little is known about genetic suppression in archaea, and there has been no characterization of suppressor tRNAs or identification of nonsense mutations in any of the archaeal genes. Here, we show, using the β-gal gene as a reporter, that amber, ochre, and opal suppressors derived from the serine and tyrosine tRNAs of the archaeon Haloferax volcanii are active in suppression of their corresponding stop codons. Using a promoter for tRNA expression regulated by tryptophan, we also show inducible and regulatable suppression of all three stop codons in H. volcanii. Additionally, transformation of a ΔpyrE2 H. volcanii strain with plasmids carrying the genes for a pyrE2 amber mutant and the serine amber suppressor tRNA yielded transformants that grow on agar plates lacking uracil. Thus, an auxotrophic amber mutation in the pyrE2 gene can be complemented by expression of the amber suppressor tRNA. These results pave the way for generating archaeal strains carrying inducible suppressor tRNA genes on the chromosome and their use in archaeal and archaeviral genetics. We also provide possible explanations for why suppressor tRNAs have not been identified in archaea. PMID:25918386

  19. Nonsense suppression in archaea.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Arpita; Köhrer, Caroline; Mandal, Debabrata; RajBhandary, Uttam L

    2015-05-12

    Bacterial strains carrying nonsense suppressor tRNA genes played a crucial role in early work on bacterial and bacterial viral genetics. In eukaryotes as well, suppressor tRNAs have played important roles in the genetic analysis of yeast and worms. Surprisingly, little is known about genetic suppression in archaea, and there has been no characterization of suppressor tRNAs or identification of nonsense mutations in any of the archaeal genes. Here, we show, using the β-gal gene as a reporter, that amber, ochre, and opal suppressors derived from the serine and tyrosine tRNAs of the archaeon Haloferax volcanii are active in suppression of their corresponding stop codons. Using a promoter for tRNA expression regulated by tryptophan, we also show inducible and regulatable suppression of all three stop codons in H. volcanii. Additionally, transformation of a ΔpyrE2 H. volcanii strain with plasmids carrying the genes for a pyrE2 amber mutant and the serine amber suppressor tRNA yielded transformants that grow on agar plates lacking uracil. Thus, an auxotrophic amber mutation in the pyrE2 gene can be complemented by expression of the amber suppressor tRNA. These results pave the way for generating archaeal strains carrying inducible suppressor tRNA genes on the chromosome and their use in archaeal and archaeviral genetics. We also provide possible explanations for why suppressor tRNAs have not been identified in archaea.

  20. Denervation suppresses gastric tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Yosuke; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Westphalen, Christoph B.; Andersen, Gøran T.; Flatberg, Arnar; Johannessen, Helene; Friedman, Richard A.; Renz, Bernhard W.; Sandvik, Arne K.; Beisvag, Vidar; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Hara, Akira; Quante, Michael; Li, Zhishan; Gershon, Michael D.; Kaneko, Kazuhiro; Fox, James G.; Wang, Timothy C.; Chen, Duan

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system plays an important role in the regulation of epithelial homeostasis and has also been postulated to play a role in tumorigenesis. We provide evidence that proper innervation is critical at all stages of gastric tumorigenesis. In three separate mouse models of gastric cancer, surgical or pharmacological denervation of the stomach (bilateral or unilateral truncal vagotomy, or local injection of botulinum toxin type A) markedly reduced tumor incidence and progression, but only in the denervated portion of the stomach. Vagotomy or botulinum toxin type A treatment also enhanced the therapeutic effects of systemic chemotherapy and prolonged survival. Denervation-induced suppression of tumorigenesis was associated with inhibition of Wnt signaling and suppression of stem cell expansion. In gastric organoid cultures, neurons stimulated growth in a Wnt-mediated fashion through cholinergic signaling. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition or genetic knockout of the muscarinic acetylcholine M3 receptor suppressed gastric tumorigenesis. In gastric cancer patients, tumor stage correlated with neural density and activated Wnt signaling, whereas vagotomy reduced the risk of gastric cancer. Together, our findings suggest that vagal innervation contributes to gastric tumorigenesis via M3 receptor–mediated Wnt signaling in the stem cells, and that denervation might represent a feasible strategy for the control of gastric cancer. PMID:25143365

  1. Nonsense suppression in archaea.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Arpita; Köhrer, Caroline; Mandal, Debabrata; RajBhandary, Uttam L

    2015-05-12

    Bacterial strains carrying nonsense suppressor tRNA genes played a crucial role in early work on bacterial and bacterial viral genetics. In eukaryotes as well, suppressor tRNAs have played important roles in the genetic analysis of yeast and worms. Surprisingly, little is known about genetic suppression in archaea, and there has been no characterization of suppressor tRNAs or identification of nonsense mutations in any of the archaeal genes. Here, we show, using the β-gal gene as a reporter, that amber, ochre, and opal suppressors derived from the serine and tyrosine tRNAs of the archaeon Haloferax volcanii are active in suppression of their corresponding stop codons. Using a promoter for tRNA expression regulated by tryptophan, we also show inducible and regulatable suppression of all three stop codons in H. volcanii. Additionally, transformation of a ΔpyrE2 H. volcanii strain with plasmids carrying the genes for a pyrE2 amber mutant and the serine amber suppressor tRNA yielded transformants that grow on agar plates lacking uracil. Thus, an auxotrophic amber mutation in the pyrE2 gene can be complemented by expression of the amber suppressor tRNA. These results pave the way for generating archaeal strains carrying inducible suppressor tRNA genes on the chromosome and their use in archaeal and archaeviral genetics. We also provide possible explanations for why suppressor tRNAs have not been identified in archaea. PMID:25918386

  2. Msp40 effector of root-knot nematode manipulates plant immunity to facilitate parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Junhai; Liu, Pei; Liu, Qian; Chen, Changlong; Guo, Quanxin; Yin, Junmei; Yang, Guangsui; Jian, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKNs) are obligate biotrophic parasites that invade plant roots and engage in prolonged and intimate relationships with their hosts. Nematode secretions, some of which have immunosuppressing activity, play essential roles in successful parasitism; however, their mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the RKN-specific gene MiMsp40, cloned from Meloidogyne incognita, is expressed exclusively in subventral oesophageal gland cells and is strongly upregulated during early parasitic stages. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing MiMsp40 were more susceptible to nematode infection than were wild type plants. Conversely, the host-derived MiMsp40 RNAi suppressed nematode parasitism and/or reproduction. Moreover, overexpression of MiMsp40 in plants suppressed the deposition of callose and the expression of marker genes for bacterial elicitor elf18-triggered immunity. Transient expression of MiMsp40 prevented Bax-triggered defence-related programmed cell death. Co-agroinfiltration assays indicated that MiMsp40 also suppressed macroscopic cell death triggered by MAPK cascades or by the ETI cognate elicitors R3a/Avr3a. Together, these results demonstrate that MiMsp40 is a novel Meloidogyne-specific effector that is injected into plant cells by early parasitic stages of the nematode and that plays a role in suppressing PTI and/or ETI signals to facilitate RKN parasitism. PMID:26797310

  3. Evaluation of changes in the element content and biomass of invaded with Meloidogyne arenaria Tiny Tim tomato plants under NH4VO3 treatment.

    PubMed

    Damianova, Anna; Baicheva, Olga; Salkova, Delka; Sivriev, I; Lihareva, Nadejda

    2003-01-01

    The parasite-host system Meloidogyne arenaria--Tiny Tim tomato plants has been studied in order to investigate the influence of the process of invasion on the chemical composition and biomass of plants. The concentrations of seven chemical elements Cu, Zn, Mg, K, Na, Mn and Fe have been determined using AAS in controls and invaded plants, and their changes have been evaluated under treatment with NH4VO3 in three different concentrations 0.01, 0.1 and 0.13 mg/100 ml H2O. The process of treatment with NH4VO3 disbalances significantly the trace element content of plants. The lowest concentration (0.01 mg NH4VO3) causes bigger changes in the concentrations of Mn, Fe and Na in non-invaded plants. The highest concentration (0.13 mg NH4VO3) balances the content of the elements back to their levels in the control plants for the elements Zn, Fe and Na. The pure effect of the process of invasion with Meloidogyne arenaria on the biomass (leaves, stems, roots and total biomass) of Tiny Tim plants is expressed in a significant increasing, mainly due to the development of the parasites. After treatment with different concentrations of NH4VO3 the decreasing in the biomass of leaves, stems and roots is observed which reflects on the total biomass of plants. The concentration of NH4VO3 eliminates the unfavourable changes not only in the chemical content of plants but also in their biomass. It could be taken into consideration as an alternative method used instead of treatment with nematocides.

  4. Next generation fire suppressants

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral band microprocessor controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  5. Next generation fire suppressants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jerry A.

    1995-01-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral ban microprocessors controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  6. Development and Validation of LNA-Based Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection and Identification of the Root-Knot Nematode Meloidogyne enterolobii in Complex DNA Backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Kiewnick, Sebastian; Frey, Jürg E; Braun-Kiewnick, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    Meloidogyne enterolobii is a quarantine root-knot nematode posing a major threat to agricultural production systems worldwide. It attacks many host plants, including important agricultural crops, ornamentals, and trees. M. enterolobii is a highly virulent and pathogenic root-knot nematode species, able to reproduce on plants resistant to other Meloidogyne spp. Significant crop damage has been reported in Asia, South America, Africa, the United States, France, and greenhouses in Switzerland. To identify potential introduction pathways and ensure appropriate phytosanitary measures and management strategies, accurate detection and identification tools are needed. Therefore, two real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays based on the second intergenic spacer region of the ribosomal DNA cistron and the cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (COI) gene using locked nucleic acid probes were developed and validated for fast and reliable detection and identification of M. enterolobii. Analytical specificity was confirmed with 16 M. enterolobii populations, 16 populations of eight closely related Meloidogyne spp., and four species from other nematode genera. Optimizing and testing the assays on two real-time PCR platforms revealed an analytical sensitivity of one juvenile in a background of 1,000 nematodes and the intended limit of detection of one juvenile per 100 ml of soil. Both assays performed equally well, with the COI-based assay showing a slightly better performance concerning detection of M. enterolobii target DNA in complex DNA backgrounds.

  7. Coastal Bermudagrass Rotation and Fallow for Management of Nematodes and Soilborne Fungi on Vegetable Crops

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, A. W.; Burton, G. W.; Sumner, D. R.; Handoo, Z.

    1997-01-01

    The efficacy of clean fallow, bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) as a rotational crop, and fenamiphos for control of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita race 1) and soilborne fungi in okra (Hibiscus esculentus), snapbean (Phaseolus vulgaris), and pepper (Capsicum annuum) production was evaluated in field tests from 1993 to 1995. Numbers of M. incognita in the soil and root-gall indices were greater on okra than on snapbean or pepper. Application of fenamiphos at 6.7 kg a.i./ha did not suppress numbers of nematodes on any sampling date when compared with untreated plots. The lack of efficacy could be the result of microbial degradation of the nematicide. Application of fenamiphos suppressed root-gall development on okra following fallow and 1-year sod in 1993, but not thereafter. A few galls were observed on roots of snapbean following 2- and 3-year fallow but none following 1-, 2-, and 3-year bermudagrass sod. Population densities of Pythium aphanidermatum, P. myriotylum, and Rhizoctonia solani in soil after planting vegetables were suppressed by 2- or 3-year sod compared with fallow but were not affected by fenamiphos. Yields of snapbean, pepper, and okra did not differ between fallow and 1-year sod. In the final year of the study, yields of all crops were greater following 3-year sod than following fallow. Application of fenamiphos prior to planting each crop following fallow or sod did not affect yields. PMID:19274273

  8. Coastal bermudagrass rotation and fallow for management of nematodes and soilborne fungi on vegetable crops.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A W; Burton, G W; Sumner, D R; Handoo, Z

    1997-12-01

    The efficacy of clean fallow, bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) as a rotational crop, and fenamiphos for control of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita race 1) and soilborne fungi in okra (Hibiscus esculentus), snapbean (Phaseolus vulgaris), and pepper (Capsicum annuum) production was evaluated in field tests from 1993 to 1995. Numbers of M. incognita in the soil and root-gall indices were greater on okra than on snapbean or pepper. Application of fenamiphos at 6.7 kg a.i./ha did not suppress numbers of nematodes on any sampling date when compared with untreated plots. The lack of efficacy could be the result of microbial degradation of the nematicide. Application of fenamiphos suppressed root-gall development on okra following fallow and 1-year sod in 1993, but not thereafter. A few galls were observed on roots of snapbean following 2- and 3-year fallow but none following 1-, 2-, and 3-year bermudagrass sod. Population densities of Pythium aphanidermatum, P. myriotylum, and Rhizoctonia solani in soil after planting vegetables were suppressed by 2- or 3-year sod compared with fallow but were not affected by fenamiphos. Yields of snapbean, pepper, and okra did not differ between fallow and 1-year sod. In the final year of the study, yields of all crops were greater following 3-year sod than following fallow. Application of fenamiphos prior to planting each crop following fallow or sod did not affect yields. PMID:19274273

  9. Summation of punishment suppression.

    PubMed

    Van Houten, R; Rudolph, R

    1971-01-01

    In two experiments, eight rats were trained to lever press with food on a variable-interval schedule. Bar pressing produced shock on a variable-interval schedule in the presence of two independently presented stimuli, a light and a tone. Two rats in each experiment received alternative presentations of the light and the tone and were consequently always in the presence of a stimulus that signalled variable-interval punishment. The other two rats in each experiment were treated similarly except that they received periods in which neither light nor tone was present. During these periods, bar pressing was not punished. The two stimuli that signalled punishment were then presented simultaneously to evaluate the effect of stimulus compounding on response suppression. The subjects trained without punishment-free periods did not show summation to the compound stimulus; the subjects trained with punishment-free periods showed summation of suppression. The major difference between the two experiments was the longer mean interval of variable-interval punishment used in the second experiment. This manipulation made the summation effect more resistant to extinction and thus increased its magnitude. PMID:16811483

  10. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein.

  11. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1994-10-04

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein. 3 figs.

  12. ZERO SUPPRESSION FOR RECORDERS

    DOEpatents

    Fort, W.G.S.

    1958-12-30

    A zero-suppression circuit for self-balancing recorder instruments is presented. The essential elements of the circuit include a converter-amplifier having two inputs, one for a reference voltage and the other for the signal voltage under analysis, and a servomotor with two control windings, one coupled to the a-c output of the converter-amplifier and the other receiving a reference input. Each input circuit to the converter-amplifier has a variable potentiometer and the sliders of the potentiometer are ganged together for movement by the servoinotor. The particular noveity of the circuit resides in the selection of resistance values for the potentiometer and a resistor in series with the potentiometer of the signal circuit to ensure the full value of signal voltage variation is impressed on a recorder mechanism driven by servomotor.

  13. Factors influencing dust suppressant effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, C.R.; Eisele, T.C.; Chesney, D.J.; Kawatra, S.K.

    2008-11-15

    Water sprays are a common method used to reduce particulate matter (PM) emissions. Various factors such as wettability, surface area coverage, fine particle engulfment rates, interparticle adhesion forces, suppressant penetration and suppressant longevity have all been suggested as critical factors in achieving effective PM control. However, it has not been established which of these factors are the most important. Experimental work indicated that suppressant penetration is the most critical of these factors. The length of time after application that suppressants were effective was also improved by using hygroscopic reagents that retained moisture to prevent evaporation. Maximizing suppressant penetration and improving suppressant longevity led to an average 86% reduction in PM10 concentrations in laboratory dust tower tests.

  14. Effects of Management Practices on Nematode and Fungus Populations and Cucumber Yield

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, A. W.; Sumner, D. R.; Jaworski, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    Three crops of cucumber were grown in succession in beds by use of trickle irrigation, plastic film mulch, and soil chemical treatments over a 17-month period, including a fallow winter season. Total yield for the three crops was highest (1208 quintals/ha) in film-mulched plots treated with MBR-CP, and next-highest in film-mulched plots treated with DD-MENCS (1094 quintals/ha); total yield was only 456 quintals/ha in film-mulched control (untreated) plots. Yield in untreated film-mulched plots was 256% of that in untreated unmulched plots (178 quintals/ha). Plant growth and yields were greatest when populations of nematodes and soil-borne fungi were suppressed to very low levels. The residual control by soil treatments lasted longest on Meloidogyne incognita and Fusarium solani. PMID:19305534

  15. An Alternative to Thought Suppression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boice, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Setting free the bears: Escape from thought suppression," by D. M. Wegner (see record 2011-25622-008). While Wegner supposed that we might have to learn to live with bad thoughts, the present author discusses the use of imagination and guided imagery as an alternative to forced thought suppression.

  16. Nonanesthetics can suppress learning.

    PubMed

    Kandel, L; Chortkoff, B S; Sonner, J; Laster, M J; Eger, E I

    1996-02-01

    Nonanesthetic gases or vapors do not abolish movement in response to noxious stimuli despite partial pressures and affinities for lipids that would, according to the Meyer-Overton hypothesis, predict such abolition. We investigated whether nonanesthetics depress learning and memory (i.e., provide amnesia). To define learning, we used a "fear-potentiated startle paradigm": rats trained to associate light with a noxious stimulus (footshock) will startle more, as measured by an accelerometer, when a startle-eliciting stimulus (e.g., a noise) is paired with light than when the startle-eliciting stimulus is presented alone. We imposed light-shock pairings on 98 rats under three conditions: no anesthesia (control); 0.20, 0.29, and 0.38 times the minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) of desflurane; or two nonanesthetics (1,2-dichloroperfluorocyclobutane and perfluoropentane) at partial pressures predicted from their lipid solubilities to be between 0.2 and 1 MAC. Desflurane produced a dose-related depression of learning with abolition of learning at 0.28 MAC. Perfluoropentane at 0.2-predicted MAC had the same effect as 0.28 MAC desflurane. 1,2-Dichloroperfluorocyclobutane at 0.5- to 1-predicted MAC abolished learning. Because nonanesthetics suppress learning but not movement (the two critical components of anesthesia), they may prove useful in discriminating between mechanisms and sites of action of anesthetics. PMID:8561335

  17. Inducing amnesia through systemic suppression

    PubMed Central

    Hulbert, Justin C.; Henson, Richard N.; Anderson, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal damage profoundly disrupts the ability to store new memories of life events. Amnesic windows might also occur in healthy people due to disturbed hippocampal function arising during mental processes that systemically reduce hippocampal activity. Intentionally suppressing memory retrieval (retrieval stopping) reduces hippocampal activity via control mechanisms mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex. Here we show that when people suppress retrieval given a reminder of an unwanted memory, they are considerably more likely to forget unrelated experiences from periods surrounding suppression. This amnesic shadow follows a dose-response function, becomes more pronounced after practice suppressing retrieval, exhibits characteristics indicating disturbed hippocampal function, and is predicted by reduced hippocampal activity. These findings indicate that stopping retrieval engages a suppression mechanism that broadly compromises hippocampal processes and that hippocampal stabilization processes can be interrupted strategically. Cognitively triggered amnesia constitutes an unrecognized forgetting process that may account for otherwise unexplained memory lapses following trauma. PMID:26977589

  18. Inducing amnesia through systemic suppression.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, Justin C; Henson, Richard N; Anderson, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal damage profoundly disrupts the ability to store new memories of life events. Amnesic windows might also occur in healthy people due to disturbed hippocampal function arising during mental processes that systemically reduce hippocampal activity. Intentionally suppressing memory retrieval (retrieval stopping) reduces hippocampal activity via control mechanisms mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex. Here we show that when people suppress retrieval given a reminder of an unwanted memory, they are considerably more likely to forget unrelated experiences from periods surrounding suppression. This amnesic shadow follows a dose-response function, becomes more pronounced after practice suppressing retrieval, exhibits characteristics indicating disturbed hippocampal function, and is predicted by reduced hippocampal activity. These findings indicate that stopping retrieval engages a suppression mechanism that broadly compromises hippocampal processes and that hippocampal stabilization processes can be interrupted strategically. Cognitively triggered amnesia constitutes an unrecognized forgetting process that may account for otherwise unexplained memory lapses following trauma. PMID:26977589

  19. Sound can suppress visual perception.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Souta; Ide, Masakazu

    2015-05-29

    In a single modality, the percept of an input (e.g., voices of neighbors) is often suppressed by another (e.g., the sound of a car horn nearby) due to close interactions of neural responses to these inputs. Recent studies have also suggested that close interactions of neural responses could occur even across sensory modalities, especially for audio-visual interactions. However, direct behavioral evidence regarding the audio-visual perceptual suppression effect has not been reported in a study with humans. Here, we investigated whether sound could have a suppressive effect on visual perception. We found that white noise bursts presented through headphones degraded visual orientation discrimination performance. This auditory suppression effect on visual perception frequently occurred when these inputs were presented in a spatially and temporally consistent manner. These results indicate that the perceptual suppression effect could occur across auditory and visual modalities based on close and direct neural interactions among those sensory inputs.

  20. Effects of the Mi-1 and the N root-knot nematode-resistance gene on infection and reproduction of Meloidogyne enterolobii on tomato and pepper cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Dessimoz, Mireille; Franck, Lucie

    2009-01-01

    Meloidogyne enterolobii is widely considered to be an aggressive root-knot nematode species that is able to reproduce on root-knot nematode-resistant tomato and pepper cultivars. In greenhouse experiments, M. enterolobii isolates 1 and 2 from Switzerland were able to reproduce on tomato cultivars carrying the Mi-1 resistance gene as well as an N-carrying pepper cultivar. Reproduction factors (Rf) ranged between 12 and 109 depending on the plant cultivar, with M. enterolobii isolate 2 being more virulent when compared to isolate 1. In contrast, M. arenaria completely failed to reproduce on these resistant tomato and pepper cultivars. Although some variability in virulence and effectiveness of root-knot nematode-resistance genes was detected, none of the plant cultivars showed Rf values less than 1 or less than 10% of the reproduction observed on the susceptible cv. ‘Moneymaker’ (Rf = 23-44) used to characterize resistance. The ability of M. enterolobii to overcome the resistance of tomato and pepper carrying the Mi-1 and the N gene makes it difficult to manage this root-knot nematode species, particularly in organic farming systems where chemical control is not an option. PMID:22661786

  1. Mitochondrial coding genome analysis of tropical root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne) supports haplotype based diagnostics and reveals evidence of recent reticulate evolution

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Toon; Karssen, Gerrit; Verhaeven, Myrtle; Coyne, Danny; Bert, Wim

    2016-01-01

    The polyphagous parthenogenetic root-knot nematodes of the genus Meloidogyne are considered to be the most significant nematode pest in sub-tropical and tropical agriculture. Despite the crucial need for correct diagnosis, identification of these pathogens remains problematic. The traditionally used diagnostic strategies, including morphometrics, host-range tests, biochemical and molecular techniques, now appear to be unreliable due to the recently-suggested hybrid origin of root-knot nematodes. In order to determine a suitable barcode region for these pathogens nine quickly-evolving mitochondrial coding genes were screened. Resulting haplotype networks revealed closely related lineages indicating a recent speciation, an anthropogenic-aided distribution through agricultural practices, and evidence for reticulate evolution within M. arenaria. Nonetheless, nucleotide polymorphisms harbor enough variation to distinguish these closely-related lineages. Furthermore, completeness of lineage sorting was verified by screening 80 populations from widespread geographical origins and variable hosts. Importantly, our results indicate that mitochondrial haplotypes are strongly linked and consistent with traditional esterase isozyme patterns, suggesting that different parthenogenetic lineages can be reliably identified using mitochondrial haplotypes. The study indicates that the barcode region Nad5 can reliably identify the major lineages of tropical root-knot nematodes. PMID:26940543

  2. Molecular and biochemical characterization of the β-1,4-endoglucanase gene Mj-eng-3 in the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lili; Cui, Ruqiang; Sun, Longhua; Lin, Borong; Zhuo, Kan; Liao, Jinling

    2013-09-01

    This study describes the molecular and biochemical characterization of the β-1,4-endoglucanase gene (Mj-eng-3) from the root knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica. A 2156-bp genomic DNA sequence of Mj-eng-3 containing six introns was obtained. Mj-eng-3 was localized in the subventral esophageal glands of M. javanica juveniles by in situ hybridization. Real-time RT-PCR assay showed that the highest transcriptional level of Mj-eng-3 occurred in pre-parasitic second-stage juveniles, and this high expression persisted in parasitic second-stage juveniles. Recombinant MJ-ENG-3 degraded carboxymethylcellulose and optimum enzyme activity at 40°C and pH 8.0. EDTA, Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Ca(2+), Co(2+), and Cu(2+) did not affect the activity of MJ-ENG-3; however, Zn(2+) and Fe(2+) inhibited MJ-ENG-3 enzyme activity. In planta Mj-eng-3 RNAi assay displayed a reduction in the number of nematodes and galls in transgenic tobacco roots. These results suggested that MJ-ENG-3 could be secreted by M. javanica to degrade the cellulose of plant cell walls to facilitate its entry and migration during the early stages of parasitism.

  3. The diverse nematicidal properties and biocontrol efficacy of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry6A against the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne hapla.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ziquan; Xiong, Jing; Zhou, Qiaoni; Luo, Haiyan; Hu, Shengbiao; Xia, Liqiu; Sun, Ming; Li, Lin; Yu, Ziniu

    2015-02-01

    Cry6A toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis is a representative nematicidal crystal protein with a variety of nematicidal properties to free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Cry6A shares very low homology and different structure with Cry5B, another representative nematicidal crystal protein, and probably acts in a distinct pathway. All these strongly indicate that Cry6A toxin is likely a potent candidate for nematicide. The present study dealt with global investigation to determine the detrimental impacts of Cry6Aa2 toxin on Meloidogyne hapla, a root-knot nematode, and evaluated its biocontrol efficacy in pot experiment. Obtained results indicated that Cry6Aa2 toxin exhibits obvious toxicity to second-stage juvenile of M. hapla, and significantly inhibits egg hatch, motility, and penetration to host plant. Pot experiment suggested that soil drenching with spore-crystal mixture of Cry6Aa2 can clearly lighten the disease of root-knot nematode, including reduction of galling index and egg masses on host plant root, decreasing final population of nematode in soil. Moreover, application of Cry6Aa2 can obviously promote plant growth. These results demonstrated that Cry6Aa2 toxin is a promising nematicidal agent, and possesses great potential in plant-parasitic nematode management and construction of transgenic crop with constant resistance to nematode.

  4. Menstrual suppression in the adolescent.

    PubMed

    Kantartzis, Kelly L; Sucato, Gina S

    2013-06-01

    Menstrual suppression, the use of contraceptive methods to eliminate or decrease the frequency of menses, is often prescribed for adolescents to treat menstrual disorders or to accommodate patient preference. For young women using hormonal contraceptives, there is no medical indication for menstruation to occur monthly, and various hormonal contraceptives can be used to decrease the frequency of menstruation with different side effect profiles and rates of amenorrhea. This article reviews the different modalities for menstrual suppression, common conditions in adolescents which may improve with menstrual suppression, and strategies for managing common side effects.

  5. Quantitative digital imaging of banana growth suppression by plant parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Roderick, Hugh; Mbiru, Elvis; Coyne, Danny; Tripathi, Leena; Atkinson, Howard J

    2012-01-01

    A digital camera fitted with a hemispherical lens was used to generate canopy leaf area index (LAI) values for a banana (Musa spp.) field trial with the aim of establishing a method for monitoring stresses on tall crop plants. The trial in Uganda consisted of two cultivars susceptible to nematodes, a plantain, Gonja manjaya and an East African Highland banana, Mbwazirume, plus a nematode resistant dessert banana, Yangambi km5. A comparative approach included adding a mixed population of Radopholus similis, Helicotylenchus multicinctus and Meloidogyne spp. to the soil around half the plants of each cultivar prior to field planting. Measurements of LAI were made fortnightly from 106 days post-planting over two successive cropping cycles. The highest mean LAI during the first cycle for Gonja manjaya was suppressed to 74.8±3.5% by the addition of nematodes, while for Mbwazirume the values were reduced to 71.1±1.9%. During the second cycle these values were 69.2±2.2% and 72.2±2.7%, respectively. Reductions in LAI values were validated as due to the biotic stress by assessing nematode numbers in roots and the necrosis they caused at each of two harvests and the relationship is described. Yield losses, including a component due to toppled plants, were 35.3% and 55.3% for Gonja manjaya and 31.4% and 55.8% for Mbwazirume, at first and second harvests respectively. Yangambi km5 showed no decrease in LAI and yield in the presence of nematodes at both harvests. LAI estimated by hemispherical photography provided a rapid basis for detecting biotic growth checks by nematodes on bananas, and demonstrated the potential of the approach for studies of growth checks to other tall crop plants caused by biotic or abiotic stresses. PMID:23285286

  6. Quantitative digital imaging of banana growth suppression by plant parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Roderick, Hugh; Mbiru, Elvis; Coyne, Danny; Tripathi, Leena; Atkinson, Howard J

    2012-01-01

    A digital camera fitted with a hemispherical lens was used to generate canopy leaf area index (LAI) values for a banana (Musa spp.) field trial with the aim of establishing a method for monitoring stresses on tall crop plants. The trial in Uganda consisted of two cultivars susceptible to nematodes, a plantain, Gonja manjaya and an East African Highland banana, Mbwazirume, plus a nematode resistant dessert banana, Yangambi km5. A comparative approach included adding a mixed population of Radopholus similis, Helicotylenchus multicinctus and Meloidogyne spp. to the soil around half the plants of each cultivar prior to field planting. Measurements of LAI were made fortnightly from 106 days post-planting over two successive cropping cycles. The highest mean LAI during the first cycle for Gonja manjaya was suppressed to 74.8±3.5% by the addition of nematodes, while for Mbwazirume the values were reduced to 71.1±1.9%. During the second cycle these values were 69.2±2.2% and 72.2±2.7%, respectively. Reductions in LAI values were validated as due to the biotic stress by assessing nematode numbers in roots and the necrosis they caused at each of two harvests and the relationship is described. Yield losses, including a component due to toppled plants, were 35.3% and 55.3% for Gonja manjaya and 31.4% and 55.8% for Mbwazirume, at first and second harvests respectively. Yangambi km5 showed no decrease in LAI and yield in the presence of nematodes at both harvests. LAI estimated by hemispherical photography provided a rapid basis for detecting biotic growth checks by nematodes on bananas, and demonstrated the potential of the approach for studies of growth checks to other tall crop plants caused by biotic or abiotic stresses.

  7. A formula for charmonium suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, C. Blaschke, D.

    2012-07-15

    In this work a formula for charmonium suppression obtained by Matsui in 1989 is analytically generalized for the case of complex cc-barpotential described by a 3-dimensional and isotropic time-dependent harmonic oscillator (THO). It is suggested that under certain scheme the formula can be applied to describe J/{psi} suppression in heavy-ion collisions at CERN-SPS, RHIC, and LHC with the advantage of analytical tractability.

  8. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Snoek, Hella Leonie

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  9. Odour suppression in binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Cashion, Larry; Livermore, Andrew; Hummel, Thomas

    2006-10-01

    It has been suggested that odours causing stronger trigeminal activation suppress weaker trigeminal stimuli and that mixed olfactory-trigeminal stimuli suppress odorants that only activate one of these systems. Volunteer normosmic participants (n=20) were exposed to six odorants with varying trigeminal impact to test the hypothesis that more intense "trigeminal" odorants would suppress weaker trigeminal stimuli in binary odour mixtures. It was also hypothesised that stronger trigeminal odorants would dominate six-odour mixtures. The predicted linear pattern of suppression was not seen, with a quadratic model emerging from the data. Stronger trigeminal stimuli failed to dominate six-odour mixtures. Despite the fact that the major hypothesis was not supported, it can be hypothesised from this experiment that the effect of suppression in binary mixtures is reliant upon two major effects: (1) the association formed between odours and the multiple memory systems that they interact with during the encoding and recognition processes, and (2) the balance between activation of the olfactory and trigeminal systems.

  10. Effects of temperature on the life-history traits of Sancassania (Caloglyphus) berlesei (Acari: Astigmatina: Acaridae) feeding on root-knot nematodes, Meloidogyne spp. (Nematoda: Meloidogynidae).

    PubMed

    Abou El-Atta, Doaa Abd El-Maksoud; Ghazy, Noureldin Abuelfadl; Osman, Mohamed Ali

    2014-11-01

    Sancassania (Caloglyphus) berlesei (Michael) is a cosmopolitan and free-living mite that inhabits soil as well as laboratory colonies of insects and fungi and may have a role as a biocontrol agent of nematodes. In this study, we investigated the effects of temperature on the development, reproduction, and food consumption of S. berlesei fed egg masses of root-knot nematodes, Meloidogyne spp., an important group of agricultural pests. Mites were reared at 20, 25 or 30 °C in the dark. The mites could feed on the nematode egg masses, and their developmental time decreased at higher temperatures. Time from the egg to adult was similar in females and males reared at the same temperature. Adult females lived longer than males at 25 °C, but not at 20 or 30 °C. Generally, females showed a higher rate of food consumption than males. Females laid the largest number of eggs at 20 and 25 °C (199.7 and 189.8 eggs/female, respectively), but the intrinsic rate of natural increase was highest at 30 °C (r m = 0.29). In comparing our data with previous reports, we noted that S. berlesei that fed on egg masses of root-knot nematodes showed a longer developmental time and a lower reproductive rate than Sancassania mites that fed on other diets. Nonetheless, the relatively high value of r m (e.g., at 25 and 30 °C) suggests that this mite may have certain advantages as a biocontrol agent of root-knot nematodes.

  11. Detection and quantification of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne javanica), lesion nematode (Pratylenchus zeae) and dagger nematode (Xiphinema elongatum) parasites of sugarcane using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Berry, Shaun D; Fargette, Mireille; Spaull, Vaughan W; Morand, Serge; Cadet, Patrice

    2008-06-01

    A number of different plant parasitic nematode species are found associated with sugarcane in South Africa. Of these, the root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne javanica), the lesion nematode (Pratylenchus zeae) and the dagger nematode (Xiphinema elongatum) are potentially the most damaging pests. Identification and enumeration of the number of these nematodes are necessary for providing advice to farmers as well as studying the effects of various treatments in field and glasshouse trials. We report on the development, use, and extent of specificity of three sets of primers, for M. javanica, P. zeae and X. elongatum, and on tests to detect and quantify the number of these nematodes in soil samples using SYBR Green I dye and real-time PCR technology. Amplicons from the three target species (obtained with their respective primer sets) are discernible in size by gel electrophoresis (380bp for M. javanica, 250bp for P. zeae and 500bp for X. elongatum). Also, these amplicons have characteristic melting temperatures of 83.8 degrees C (M. javanica), 86.6 degrees C (P. zeae) and 86.1 degrees C (X. elongatum). Investigations into multiplex reactions found competition between species with M. javanica competing with P. zeae and X. elongatum. Subsequent single tube (simplex) assays, enabled the construction of calibration curves for each of the three species. These were then used for quantification of the numbers of each of these species in nematode samples extracted from the field, with a high (R2=0.83) and significant positive correlation between real-time PCR and counts performed with microscopy.

  12. Effects of temperature on the life-history traits of Sancassania (Caloglyphus) berlesei (Acari: Astigmatina: Acaridae) feeding on root-knot nematodes, Meloidogyne spp. (Nematoda: Meloidogynidae).

    PubMed

    Abou El-Atta, Doaa Abd El-Maksoud; Ghazy, Noureldin Abuelfadl; Osman, Mohamed Ali

    2014-11-01

    Sancassania (Caloglyphus) berlesei (Michael) is a cosmopolitan and free-living mite that inhabits soil as well as laboratory colonies of insects and fungi and may have a role as a biocontrol agent of nematodes. In this study, we investigated the effects of temperature on the development, reproduction, and food consumption of S. berlesei fed egg masses of root-knot nematodes, Meloidogyne spp., an important group of agricultural pests. Mites were reared at 20, 25 or 30 °C in the dark. The mites could feed on the nematode egg masses, and their developmental time decreased at higher temperatures. Time from the egg to adult was similar in females and males reared at the same temperature. Adult females lived longer than males at 25 °C, but not at 20 or 30 °C. Generally, females showed a higher rate of food consumption than males. Females laid the largest number of eggs at 20 and 25 °C (199.7 and 189.8 eggs/female, respectively), but the intrinsic rate of natural increase was highest at 30 °C (r m = 0.29). In comparing our data with previous reports, we noted that S. berlesei that fed on egg masses of root-knot nematodes showed a longer developmental time and a lower reproductive rate than Sancassania mites that fed on other diets. Nonetheless, the relatively high value of r m (e.g., at 25 and 30 °C) suggests that this mite may have certain advantages as a biocontrol agent of root-knot nematodes. PMID:24923664

  13. Differentially expressed small RNAs in Arabidopsis galls formed by Meloidogyne javanica: a functional role for miR390 and its TAS3-derived tasiRNAs.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Javier; Barcala, Marta; García, Alejandra; Rio-Machín, Ana; Medina, Clémence; Jaubert-Possamai, Stephanie; Favery, Bruno; Maizel, Alexis; Ruiz-Ferrer, Virginia; Fenoll, Carmen; Escobar, Carolina

    2016-03-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKNs) induce inside the vascular cylinder the giant cells (GCs) embedded in the galls. The distinctive gene repression in early-developing GCs could be facilitated by small RNAs (sRNA) such as miRNAs, and/or epigenetic mechanisms mediated by 24nt-sRNAs, rasiRNAs and 21-22nt-sRNAs. Therefore, the sRNA-population together with the role of the miR390/TAS3/ARFs module were studied during early gall/GC formation. Three sRNA libraries from 3-d-post-inoculation (dpi) galls induced by Meloidogyne javanica in Arabidopsis and three from uninfected root segments were sequenced following Illumina-Solexa technology. pMIR390a::GUS and pTAS3::GUS lines were assayed for nematode-dependent promoter activation. A sensor line indicative of TAS3-derived tasiRNAs binding to the ARF3 sequence (pARF3:ARF3-GUS) together with a tasiRNA-resistant ARF3 line (pARF3:ARF3m-GUS) were used for functional analysis. The sRNA population showed significant differences between galls and controls, with high validation rate and correspondence with their target expression: 21-nt sRNAs corresponding mainly to miRNAs were downregulated, whilst 24-nt-sRNAs from the rasiRNA family were mostly upregulated in galls. The promoters of MIR390a and TAS3, active in galls, and the pARF3:ARF3-GUS line, indicated a role of TAS3-derived-tasiRNAs in galls. The regulatory module miR390/TAS3 is necessary for proper gall formation possibly through auxin-responsive factors, and the abundance of 24-nt sRNAs (mostly rasiRNAs) constitutes a gall hallmark.

  14. Aging and repeated thought suppression success.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Ann E; Smyth, Frederick L; Beadel, Jessica R; Teachman, Bethany A

    2013-01-01

    Intrusive thoughts and attempts to suppress them are common, but while suppression may be effective in the short-term, it can increase thought recurrence in the long-term. Because intentional suppression involves controlled processing, and many aspects of controlled processing decline with age, age differences in thought suppression outcomes may emerge, especially over repeated thought suppression attempts as cognitive resources are expended. Using multilevel modeling, we examined age differences in reactions to thought suppression attempts across four thought suppression sequences in 40 older and 42 younger adults. As expected, age differences were more prevalent during suppression than during free monitoring periods, with younger adults indicating longer, more frequent thought recurrences and greater suppression difficulty. Further, younger adults' thought suppression outcomes changed over time, while trajectories for older adults' were relatively stable. Results are discussed in terms of older adults' reduced thought recurrence, which was potentially afforded by age-related changes in reactive control and distractibility.

  15. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Xue, Yongjun

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans.

  16. Visual cortex: suppression by depression?

    PubMed

    Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas; Hübener, Mark

    2002-08-20

    The response of a neuron in the visual cortex to an oriented light bar is strongly reduced by concurrent presentation of a stimulus with a different orientation. New data suggest this 'cross-orientation suppression' is caused, not by intracortical inhibition, but by rapid depression of thalamocortical synapses.

  17. Multiple cilia suppress tumour formation.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Primary cilia are cellular structures that have important functions in development and disease. The suppression of multiciliate differentiation of choroid plexus precursors, and maintenance of a single primary cilium by Notch1, is now shown to be involved in choroid plexus tumour formation. PMID:27027488

  18. Conditioned suppression, punishment, and aversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme-Johnson, D. W.; Yarczower, M.

    1974-01-01

    The aversive action of visual stimuli was studied in two groups of pigeons which received response-contingent or noncontingent electric shocks in cages with translucent response keys. Presentation of grain for 3 sec, contingent on key pecking, was the visual stimulus associated with conditioned punishment or suppression. The responses of the pigeons in three different experiments are compared.

  19. Overview of nematodes infesting cotton in the U.S., life beyond Temik.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The three primary nematode pathogens of cotton are the cotton root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita), the reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis), and the Columbia lance nematode (Hoplolaimus columbus). Those three nematodes are estimated to reduce US cotton production by 4.2%, with the co...

  20. Resistant Citrullus lanatus var. citroides Rootstocks for Managing Root-knot Nematodes in Grafted Watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Southern root-knot nematode (RKN), Meloidogyne incognita, is an important re-emerging pest of watermelon. Several factors have contributed to re-emergence of RKN including: 1) ban of methyl bromide for soil fumigation; 2) reduced land area for crop rotation; and 3) continuous cropping of cucurbits u...

  1. Field level risk assessment for root-knot nematodes in lima beans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Southern Root-Knot Nematode (RKN), Meloidogyne incognita, is a major yield limiting pest in lima beans (Phaseolus lunatus). RKN are not evenly distributed through fields and population dynamics are fluid making whole field management challenging. The objectives of this research were to characterize ...

  2. Host status of three transgenic plum lines to Mesocriconema xenoplax

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastrodianin anti-fungal protein (GAFP) increases tolerance against Phytophthora root rot and root knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) in transgenic plum lines. However, nothing is known about the potential of GAFP lectin to confer resistance to the ring nematode Mesocriconema xenoplax. Three t...

  3. Differential behavioral responses of two plant-parasitic nematodes to biogenic amines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hatching and infective juvenile (J2) behavior in two species of plant-parasitic nematodes, Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita, were affected by in vitro treatment with the biogenic amines dopamine, octopamine, and serotonin. While the overall responses of each species to amine exposures w...

  4. Accomplishments of a 10-year initiative to develop host plant resistance to root-knot and reniform nematodes in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2003 Cotton Incorporated initiated a Beltwide research program to develop host plant resistance to root-knot (Meloidogyne incognita) and reniform (Rotylenchulus reniformis) nematodes. Objectives formulated at a coordinating meeting in 2003 that included participants from public institutions and p...

  5. Screening edible ginger and turmeric cultivars for resistance to root-knot nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-two edible ginger and turmeric cultivars were screened for resistance or tolerance to Meloidogyne incognita. Plants were raised in 66 L grow bags in greenhouses in Hawaii according to established practices for producing bacterial wilt-free ginger. Three months after planting, each grow bag ...

  6. Phytotoxicity of Clove Oil to Vegetable Crop Seedlings and Nematotoxicity to Root-knot Nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clove oil derived from the plant Syzygium aromaticum is active against various soilborne plant pathogens, and therefore has potential for use as a biobased pesticide. A clove oil formulation previously found to be toxic to the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita in laboratory assays was invest...

  7. A Transgressive Segregation Factor (RKN2) in Gossypium barbadense for Nematode Resistance Clusters with Gene rkn1 in G. hirsutum.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host plant resistance is an important strategy for managing root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) in cotton (Gossypium L.). Here we report evidence for enhanced resistance in interspecific crosses resulting from transgressive segregation of clustered gene loci. Recently, a major gene, rkn1, on ...

  8. Evidence for a disease complex between Pythium aphanidermatum and root-knot nematodes in cucumber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field trial in 2012 indicated a possible disease complex between Pythium aphanidermatum and the root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne incognita in cucumber. Two growth chamber trials were conducted to investigate this potential disease complex. Treatments included inoculating nine-day-old cucumbe...

  9. EVALUATION OF SPK, A NOVEL COMBINATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FOR ROOT-KNOT NEMATODE CONTROL IN TOMATO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory, greenhouse, and field microplot trials were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a novel combination of organic compounds, referred to as SPK, for control of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) on tomato. SPK has zero ozone depletion potential, has a short half-life in soil (3-7...

  10. Mi-1-mediated nematode resistance in tomatoes is broken by short-term heat stress but recovers over time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill.), the only available genomic resource of resistance to root-knot nematodes (RKN; Meloidogyne incognita, M. javanica and M. arenaria), which are considered among the most devastating crop pests worldwide, is a single dominant gene termed Mi-1. Heat stress is thou...

  11. High temperature suppression of dioxins.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Ming-Xiu; Chen, Tong; Fu, Jian-Ying; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Lu, Sheng-Yong; Li, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Jian-Hua; Buekens, Alfons

    2016-03-01

    Combined Sulphur-Nitrogen inhibitors, such as sewage sludge decomposition gases (SDG), thiourea and amidosulphonic acid have been observed to suppress the de novo synthesis of dioxins effectively. In this study, the inhibition of PCDD/Fs formation from model fly ash was investigated at unusually high temperatures (650 °C and 850 °C), well above the usual range of de novo tests (250-400 °C). At 650 °C it was found that SDG evolving from dried sewage sludge could suppress the formation of 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDD/Fs with high efficiency (90%), both in weight units and in I-TEQ units. Additionally, at 850 °C, three kinds of sulphur-amine or sulphur-ammonium compounds were tested to inhibit dioxins formation during laboratory-scale tests, simulating municipal solid waste incineration. The suppression efficiencies of PCDD/Fs formed through homogeneous gas phase reactions were all above 85% when 3 wt. % of thiourea (98.7%), aminosulphonic acid (96.0%) or ammonium thiosulphate (87.3%) was added. Differences in the ratio of PCDFs/PCDDs, in weight average chlorination level and in the congener distribution of the 17 toxic PCDD/Fs indicated that the three inhibitors tested followed distinct suppression pathways, possibly in relation to their different functional groups of nitrogen. Furthermore, thiourea reduced the (weight) average chlorinated level. In addition, the thermal decomposition of TUA was studied by means of thermogravimetry-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TG-FTIR) and the presence of SO2, SO3, NH3 and nitriles (N≡C bonds) was shown in the decomposition gases; these gaseous inhibitors might be the primary dioxins suppressants.

  12. Effect of winter cover crops on nematode population levels in north Florida.

    PubMed

    Wang, K-H; McSorley, R; Gallaher, R N

    2004-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted in north-central Florida to examine the effects of various winter cover crops on plant-parasitic nematode populations through time. In the first experiment, six winter cover crops were rotated with summer corn (Zea mays), arranged in a randomized complete block design. The cover crops evaluated were wheat (Triticum aestivum), rye (Secale cereale), oat (Avena sativa), lupine (Lupinus angustifolius), hairy vetch (Vicia villosa), and crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum). At the end of the corn crop in year 1, population densities of Meloidogyne incognita were lowest on corn following rye or oat (P incognita and Helicotylenchus dihystera were affected by previous tropical cover crops (P incognita and H. dihystera numbers. Results suggest that winter cover crops tested did not suppress plant-parasitic nematodes effectively. Planting tropical cover crops such as sunn hemp after corn in a triple-cropping system with winter cover crops may provide more versatile nematode management strategies in northern Florida.

  13. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Xue, Y.

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans. 13 figs.

  14. Soil nematode assemblages indicate the potential for biological regulation of pest species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steel, Hanne; Ferris, Howard

    2016-05-01

    In concept, regulation or suppression of target nematode pest species should be enhanced when an abundance of predator species is supported by ample availability of bacterial- fungal- and non-damaging plant-feeding prey species. We selected soils from natural and managed environments that represented different levels of resource availability and disturbance. In microcosm chambers of each soil, in its natural state or after heat defaunation, we introduced test prey species not already resident in the soils (Meloidogyne incognita and Steinernema feltiae). Survival of the test prey was determined after a 5-day bioassay exposure. Across the soils tested, predator abundance and biomass were greater in undisturbed soils with plentiful resources and lower in soils from agricultural sites. Suppressiveness to the two introduced species increased with both numerical abundance and metabolic footprint of the predator assemblages. The magnitude of the increase in suppressiveness was greater at low numbers of predators then dampened to an asymptotic level at greater predator abundance, possibly determined by temporal and spatial aspects of the bioassay system and/or satiation of the predators. The more resource-limited the predators were and the higher the metabolic predator footprint, the greater the suppressiveness. The applied implications of this study are that soil suppressiveness to pest species may be enhanced by increasing resources to predators, removing chemical and physical constraints to their survival and increase, and altering management practices so that predators and target prey are co-located in time and space.

  15. Background Suppression Effects on Signal Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Gamma detectors at border crossings are intended to detect illicit nuclear material. One performance challenge involves the fact that vehicles suppress the natural background, thus potentially reducing detection probability for threat items. Methods to adjust for background suppression have been considered in related but different settings. Here, methods to adjust for background suppression are tested in the context of signal estimation. Adjustment methods include several clustering options. We find that for the small-to-moderate suppression magnitudes exhibited in the analyzed data, suppression adjustment is only moderatel helpful in locating the signal peak, and in estimating its width or magnitude.

  16. Fire suppression and detection equipment

    SciTech Connect

    E.E. Bates

    2006-01-15

    Inspection and testing guidelines go beyond the 'Code of Federal Regulation'. Title 30 of the US Code of Federal Regulations (30 CFR) contains requirements and references to national standards for inspection, testing and maintenance of fire suppression and detection equipment for mine operators. However, federal requirements have not kept pace with national standards and best practices. The article lists National Fire Protection (NFPA) standards that are referenced by the US Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 30 CFR. It then discusses other NFPA Standards excluded from 30 CFR and explains the NFPA standard development process. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 5 photos.

  17. Menstrual suppression in special circumstances.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Yolanda A; Ornstein, Melanie P; Aggarwal, Anjali; McQuillan, Sarah; Allen, Lisa; Millar, Debra; Dalziel, Nancy; Gascon, Suzy; Hakim, Julie; Ryckman, Julie; Spitzer, Rachel; Van Eyk, Nancy

    2014-10-01

    Objectif : Offrir, aux fournisseurs de soins de santé, un document de consensus canadien comptant des recommandations pour ce qui est de la suppression menstruelle chez les patientes qui font face à des obstacles physiques et/ou cognitifs ou chez les patientes qui font l’objet d’un traitement contre le cancer et pour lesquelles les règles pourraient exercer un effet délétère sur la santé. Options : Le présent document analyse les options disponibles aux fins de la suppression menstruelle, les indications, les contre-indications et les effets indésirables (tant immédiats qu’à long terme) propres à cette dernière, et les explorations et le monitorage nécessaires tout au long de la suppression. Issues : Les cliniciens seront mieux renseignés au sujet des options et des indications propres à la suppression menstruelle chez les patientes qui présentent des déficiences cognitives et/ou physiques et chez les patientes qui font l’objet d’une chimiothérapie, d’une radiothérapie ou d’autres traitements contre le cancer. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans Medline, EMBASE, OVID et The Cochrane Library au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé et de mots clés appropriés (p. ex. « heavy menstrual bleeding », « menstrual suppression », « chemotherapy/radiation », « cognitive disability », « physical disability », « learning disability »). Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux essais comparatifs randomisés, aux études observationnelles et aux études pilotes. Aucune restriction n’a été imposée en matière de langue ou de date. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et du nouveau matériel a été intégré à la directive clinique jusqu’en septembre 2013. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d

  18. Methods of suppressing automotive interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taggart, H. E.

    1981-11-01

    Automotive manufacturers utilize several techniques to reduce EMI emanating from the vehicle. The techniques include resistor spark plugs, resistor spark plug cables, use of silicone lubricant in the distributor, use of capacitors as filters, placement of grounding straps at key locations, conductive fan belt discharge, and tire static-charge reduction. If even further reduction is needed to obtain the maximum capability of a specific mobile communication system, additional suppression techniques are discussed which are effective at frequencies from approximately 30 to 1000 MHz. Measurement results show that the EMI from a new production-line automobile, measured in accordance with SAE Standard J551g, can be reduced as much as 10 to 15 dB by employing these suppression techniques. The amount of degradation to a mobile narrow-band FM receiver, such as the type used by law enforcement agencies, can be measured using the measurement technique described. This same technique can then be used as a tool to further reduce EMI from the vehicle components.

  19. Water Mist fire suppression experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Water Mist commercial research program is scheduled to fly an investigation on STS-107 in 2002. This investigation will be flown as an Experimental Mounting Structure (EMS) insert into the updated Combustion Module (CM-2), a sophisticated combustion chamber plus diagnostic equipment. (The investigation hardware is shown here mounted in a non-flight frame similar to the EMS.) Water Mist is a commercial research program by the Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS), a NASA Commercial Space Center located at the Colorado School of Mines, in Golden, CO and Industry Partner Environmental Engineering Concepts. The program is focused on developing water mist as a replacement for bromine-based chemical fire suppression agents (halons). By conducting the experiments in microgravity, interference from convection currents is minimized and fundamental knowledge can be gained. This knowledge is incorporated into models, which can be used to simulate a variety of physical environments. The immediate objective of the project is to study the effect of a fine water mist on a laminar propagating flame generated in a propane-air mixture at various equivalence ratios. The effects of droplet size and concentration on the speed of the flame front is used as a measure of the effectiveness of fire suppression in this highly controlled experimental environment.

  20. Suppressed epidemics in multirelational networks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Elvis H W; Wang, Wei; Xu, C; Tang, Ming; Do, Younghae; Hui, P M

    2015-08-01

    A two-state epidemic model in networks with links mimicking two kinds of relationships between connected nodes is introduced. Links of weights w1 and w0 occur with probabilities p and 1-p, respectively. The fraction of infected nodes ρ(p) shows a nonmonotonic behavior, with ρ drops with p for small p and increases for large p. For small to moderate w1/w0 ratios, ρ(p) exhibits a minimum that signifies an optimal suppression. For large w1/w0 ratios, the suppression leads to an absorbing phase consisting only of healthy nodes within a range pL≤p≤pR, and an active phase with mixed infected and healthy nodes for ppR. A mean field theory that ignores spatial correlation is shown to give qualitative agreement and capture all the key features. A physical picture that emphasizes the intricate interplay between infections via w0 links and within clusters formed by nodes carrying the w1 links is presented. The absorbing state at large w1/w0 ratios results when the clusters are big enough to disrupt the spread via w0 links and yet small enough to avoid an epidemic within the clusters. A theory that uses the possible local environments of a node as variables is formulated. The theory gives results in good agreement with simulation results, thereby showing the necessity of including longer spatial correlations.

  1. Suppressed epidemics in multirelational networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Elvis H. W.; Wang, Wei; Xu, C.; Tang, Ming; Do, Younghae; Hui, P. M.

    2015-08-01

    A two-state epidemic model in networks with links mimicking two kinds of relationships between connected nodes is introduced. Links of weights w1 and w0 occur with probabilities p and 1 -p , respectively. The fraction of infected nodes ρ (p ) shows a nonmonotonic behavior, with ρ drops with p for small p and increases for large p . For small to moderate w1/w0 ratios, ρ (p ) exhibits a minimum that signifies an optimal suppression. For large w1/w0 ratios, the suppression leads to an absorbing phase consisting only of healthy nodes within a range pL≤p ≤pR , and an active phase with mixed infected and healthy nodes for p pR . A mean field theory that ignores spatial correlation is shown to give qualitative agreement and capture all the key features. A physical picture that emphasizes the intricate interplay between infections via w0 links and within clusters formed by nodes carrying the w1 links is presented. The absorbing state at large w1/w0 ratios results when the clusters are big enough to disrupt the spread via w0 links and yet small enough to avoid an epidemic within the clusters. A theory that uses the possible local environments of a node as variables is formulated. The theory gives results in good agreement with simulation results, thereby showing the necessity of including longer spatial correlations.

  2. Chaos suppression through asymmetric coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragard, J.; Vidal, G.; Mancini, H.; Mendoza, C.; Boccaletti, S.

    2007-12-01

    We study pairs of identical coupled chaotic oscillators. In particular, we have used Roessler (in the funnel and no funnel regimes), Lorenz, and four-dimensional chaotic Lotka-Volterra models. In all four of these cases, a pair of identical oscillators is asymmetrically coupled. The main result of the numerical simulations is that in all cases, specific values of coupling strength and asymmetry exist that render the two oscillators periodic and synchronized. The values of the coupling strength for which this phenomenon occurs is well below the previously known value for complete synchronization. We have found that this behavior exists for all the chaotic oscillators that we have used in the analysis. We postulate that this behavior is presumably generic to all chaotic oscillators. In order to complete the study, we have tested the robustness of this phenomenon of chaos suppression versus the addition of some Gaussian noise. We found that chaos suppression is robust for the addition of finite noise level. Finally, we propose some extension to this research.

  3. Hiding information by cell suppression.

    PubMed Central

    Vinterbo, S. A.; Ohno-Machado, L.; Dreiseitl, S.

    2001-01-01

    Joining relational data can jeopardize patient confidentiality if disseminated data for research can be joined with publicly available data containing, for example, explicit identifiers. Ambiguity in data hinders the construction of primary keys that are of importance when joining data tables. We define two values to be indiscernible if they are the same or at least one of them is a special value. Two rows in a data table are indiscernible if their corresponding entries are indiscernible. We further define a table to be k-ambiguous if each row is indiscernible from at least k rows in the same table. We present two simple heuristics to make a table k-ambiguous by cell suppression, and compare them on example data. PMID:11825281

  4. Engineered decoherence: Characterization and suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, Swathi S.; Mahesh, T. S.

    2014-06-01

    Due to omnipresent environmental interferences, quantum coherences inevitably undergo irreversible transformations over certain time scales, thus leading to the loss of encoded information. This process, known as decoherence, has been a major obstacle in realizing efficient quantum information processors. Understanding the mechanism of decoherence is crucial in developing tools to inhibit it. Here we utilize a method proposed by Teklemariam et al. [Phys. Rev. A 67, 062316 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevA.67.062316] to engineer artificial decoherence in the system qubits by randomly perturbing their surrounding ancilla qubits. Using a two-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum register, we characterize the artificial decoherence by noise spectroscopy and quantum process tomography. Further, we study the efficacy of dynamical decoupling sequences in suppressing the artificial decoherence. Here we describe the experimental results and their comparisons with theoretical simulations.

  5. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-07-31

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. - Highlights: • MEK5 inhibitor BIX02189 suppresses proliferation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 knockdown and MEK5 inhibitor promote differentiation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 overexpression inhibits differentiation of osteoblasts.

  6. Genetics of barley hooded suppression.

    PubMed Central

    Roig, Cristina; Pozzi, Carlo; Santi, Luca; Müller, Judith; Wang, Yamei; Stile, Maria Rosaria; Rossini, Laura; Stanca, Michele; Salamini, Francesco

    2004-01-01

    The molecular basis of the barley dominant Hooded (K) mutant is a duplication of 305 bp in intron IV of the homeobox gene Bkn3. A chemical mutagenesis screen was carried out to identify genetical factors that participate in Bkn3 intron-mediated gene regulation. Plants from recurrently mutagenized KK seeds were examined for the suppression of the hooded awn phenotype induced by the K allele and, in total, 41 suK (suppressor of K) recessive mutants were identified. Complementation tests established the existence of five suK loci, and alleles suKB-4, suKC-33, suKD-25, suKE-74, and suKF-76 were studied in detail. All K-suppressed mutants showed a short-awn phenotype. The suK loci have been mapped by bulked segregant analysis nested in a standard mapping procedure based on AFLP markers. K suppressor loci suKB, B, E, and F all map in a short interval of chromosome 7H, while the locus suKD is assigned to chromosome 5H. A complementation test between the four suK mutants mapping on chromosome 7H and the short-awn mutant lks2, located nearby, excluded the allelism between suK loci and lks2. The last experiment made clear that the short-awn phenotype of suK mutants is due to a specific dominant function of the K allele, a function that is independent from the control on hood formation. The suK loci are discussed as candidate participants in the regulation of Bkn3 expression. PMID:15166167

  7. Acoustic Suppression Systems and Related Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R. (Inventor); Kern, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic suppression system for absorbing and/or scattering acoustic energy comprising a plurality of acoustic targets in a containment is described, the acoustic targets configured to have resonance frequencies allowing the targets to be excited by incoming acoustic waves, the resonance frequencies being adjustable to suppress acoustic energy in a set frequency range. Methods for fabricating and implementing the acoustic suppression system are also provided.

  8. Residual Versus Suppressed-Carrier Coherent Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, M. K.; Million, S.

    1996-07-01

    This article addresses the issue of when to suppress or not to suppress the transmitted carrier in designing a coherent communication system employing a carrier tracking loop for carrier synchronization. Assuming that a phase-locked loop (PLL) is used whenever there exists a residual carrier and a Costas loop is used whenever the carrier is suppressed, the regions of system parameters that delineate these two options are presented based on the desire to minimize the average probability of error of the system.

  9. Issues in Numerical Simulation of Fire Suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Lopez, A.R.

    1999-04-12

    This paper outlines general physical and computational issues associated with performing numerical simulation of fire suppression. Fire suppression encompasses a broad range of chemistry and physics over a large range of time and length scales. The authors discuss the dominant physical/chemical processes important to fire suppression that must be captured by a fire suppression model to be of engineering usefulness. First-principles solutions are not possible due to computational limitations, even with the new generation of tera-flop computers. A basic strategy combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation techniques with sub-grid model approximations for processes that have length scales unresolvable by gridding is presented.

  10. Deconstructing Interocular Suppression: Attention and Divisive Normalization.

    PubMed

    Li, Hsin-Hung; Carrasco, Marisa; Heeger, David J

    2015-10-01

    In interocular suppression, a suprathreshold monocular target can be rendered invisible by a salient competitor stimulus presented in the other eye. Despite decades of research on interocular suppression and related phenomena (e.g., binocular rivalry, flash suppression, continuous flash suppression), the neural processing underlying interocular suppression is still unknown. We developed and tested a computational model of interocular suppression. The model included two processes that contributed to the strength of interocular suppression: divisive normalization and attentional modulation. According to the model, the salient competitor induced a stimulus-driven attentional modulation selective for the location and orientation of the competitor, thereby increasing the gain of neural responses to the competitor and reducing the gain of neural responses to the target. Additional suppression was induced by divisive normalization in the model, similar to other forms of visual masking. To test the model, we conducted psychophysics experiments in which both the size and the eye-of-origin of the competitor were manipulated. For small and medium competitors, behavioral performance was consonant with a change in the response gain of neurons that responded to the target. But large competitors induced a contrast-gain change, even when the competitor was split between the two eyes. The model correctly predicted these results and outperformed an alternative model in which the attentional modulation was eye specific. We conclude that both stimulus-driven attention (selective for location and feature) and divisive normalization contribute to interocular suppression.

  11. ISS Update: Burning and Suppression of Solids

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update Commentator Pat Ryan interviews Paul Ferkul, Principal Investigator for the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS) experiment, about performing combustion experiments in microgravity. ...

  12. Photoperiodic Suppression of Drug Reinstatement

    PubMed Central

    Sorg, Barbara A.; Stark, Gemaine; Sergeeva, Anna; Jansen, Heiko T.

    2011-01-01

    The rewarding influence of drugs of abuse varies with time of day and appears to involve interactions between the circadian and the mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems. The circadian system is also intimately involved in measuring daylength. Thus, the present study examined the impact of changing daylength (photoperiod) on cocaine-seeking behaviors. Male Sprague Dawley rats were trained and tested on a 12L:12D light:dark schedule for cocaine-induced reinstatement of conditioned place preference (CPP) at three times of day (Zeitgeber time (ZT): 4, 12, and 20) to determine a preference score. Rats were then shifted to either shorter (6L:18D) or longer (18L:6D) photoperiods and then to constant conditions, re-tested for cocaine-induced reinstatement under each different condition, and then returned to their original photoperiod (12L:12D) and tested once more. Rats exhibited a circadian profile of preference score in constant darkness with a peak at 12h after lights-off. At both ZT4 and ZT20, but not at ZT12, shorter photoperiods profoundly suppressed cocaine reinstatement, which did not recover even after switching back to 12L:12D. In contrast, longer photoperiods did not alter reinstatement. Separate studies showed that the suppression of cocaine reinstatement was not due to repeated testing. In an additional experiment, we examined the photoperiodic regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT) proteins in drug-naive rats. These results revealed photoperiodic modulation of proteins in the prefrontal cortex and dorsal striatum, but not in the nucleus accumbens or ventral tegmental area. Together, these findings add further support to the circadian genesis of cocaine-seeking behaviors and demonstrate that drug-induced reinstatement is modulated by photoperiod. Furthermore, the results suggest that photoperiod partly contributes to the seasonal expression of certain drug-related behaviors in humans living at different latitudes and thus our

  13. Suppressing Irrelevant Information: Knowledge Activation or Inhibition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Danielle S.; McDaniel, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors examined the role of knowledge activation in the suppression of contextually irrelevant meanings for ambiguous homographs. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants with greater baseball knowledge, regardless of reading skill, more quickly suppressed the irrelevant meaning of ambiguous words in baseball-related, but not…

  14. Identifying separate components of surround suppression.

    PubMed

    Schallmo, Michael-Paul; Murray, Scott O

    2016-01-01

    Surround suppression is a well-known phenomenon in which the response to a visual stimulus is diminished by the presence of neighboring stimuli. This effect is observed in neural responses in areas such as primary visual cortex, and also manifests in visual contrast perception. Studies in animal models have identified at least two separate mechanisms that may contribute to surround suppression: one that is monocular and resistant to contrast adaptation, and another that is binocular and strongly diminished by adaptation. The current study was designed to investigate whether these two mechanisms exist in humans and if they can be identified psychophysically using eye-of-origin and contrast adaptation manipulations. In addition, we examined the prediction that the monocular suppression component is broadly tuned for orientation, while suppression between eyes is narrowly tuned. Our results confirmed that when center and surrounding stimuli were presented dichoptically (in opposite eyes), suppression was orientation-tuned. Following adaptation in the surrounding region, no dichoptic suppression was observed, and monoptic suppression no longer showed orientation selectivity. These results are consistent with a model of surround suppression that depends on both low-level and higher level components. This work provides a method to assess the separate contributions of these components during spatial context processing in human vision.

  15. Suppressive soils: back on the radar screen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Suppressive soils are those in which a pathogen does not establish or persist, establishes but causes little or no damage, or establishes and causes disease for a while but thereafter the disease is less important, although the pathogen may persist in the soil (Weller, 2002). ‘General suppression,’ ...

  16. Ferromagnetic resonance probe liftoff suppression apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Thomas J.; Tomeraasen, Paul L.

    1985-01-01

    A liftoff suppression apparatus utilizing a liftoff sensing coil to sense the amount a ferromagnetic resonance probe lifts off the test surface during flaw detection and utilizing the liftoff signal to modulate the probe's field modulating coil to suppress the liftoff effects.

  17. Prolonged over-suppression syndrome.

    PubMed

    Good, A E; Kempers, R D

    1974-07-01

    The syndrome of postpill amenorrhea was investigated retrospectively by studying records of diagnosed cases of amenorrhea (1300) treated or confirmed at the Mayo Clinic. Data are taken from records dating to 1960 (low use of contraceptives) and terminate in 1971. 12 cases are reviewed which were diagnosed as prolonged oversuppression syndrome. No particular oral contraceptive formulation was implicated. 4 of 12 patients had had irregular menstrual cycles before oral contraceptive therapy; whereas 8 had had regular cycles. Bioassay of urinary gonadotropins were consistently in the mid-low normal limits (only 1 determination was available for each patient); some patients had been radioimmunoassayed (single assay) for other pituitary hormones: LH (luteinizing hormone) was at normal basal levels and FSH (follicle stimulating hormone) was also in the normal range. Concentrations of total circulating estrogens were in low or subnormal range in each case. 4 cases had associated galactorrhea, which was attributed to exogenous steroid suppression of the prolactin-inhibiting center of the pituitary. Clomiphene citrate was used to restore functions of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, and of the 8 receiving clomiphene, 5 responded and 2 conceived.

  18. Vibration suppression of satellites using multifunctional platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antin, Nicolas; Russ, Richard; Ma, Kougen; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2009-03-01

    This research focuses on a finite element analysis of active vibration suppression capabilities of a smart composite platform, which is a structural interface between a satellite main thruster and its structure and possesses simultaneous precision positioning and vibration suppression capabilities for thrust vector control of a satellite. First, the combined system of the smart composite platform and the satellite structure are briefly described followed by the finite element modeling and simulations. The smart platform piezoelectric patches and stacks material properties modeling, for the finite element analysis, are developed consistent with the manufacturer data. Next, a vibration suppression scheme, based on the modal analysis, is presented and used in vibration suppression analysis of satellite structures of the thrust vector under the thruster-firing excitation. The approach introduced here is an effective technique for the design of smart structures with complex geometry to study their MIMO active vibration suppression capabilities.

  19. Impacts of suppressing guide on information spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinghong; Zhang, Lin; Ma, Baojun; Wu, Ye

    2016-02-01

    It is quite common that guides are introduced to suppress the information spreading in modern society for different purposes. In this paper, an agent-based model is established to quantitatively analyze the impacts of suppressing guides on information spreading. We find that the spreading threshold depends on the attractiveness of the information and the topology of the social network with no suppressing guides at all. Usually, one would expect that the existence of suppressing guides in the spreading procedure may result in less diffusion of information within the overall network. However, we find that sometimes the opposite is true: the manipulating nodes of suppressing guides may lead to more extensive information spreading when there are audiences with the reversal mind. These results can provide valuable theoretical references to public opinion guidance on various information, e.g., rumor or news spreading.

  20. Suppressing irrelevant information: knowledge activation or inhibition?

    PubMed

    McNamara, Danielle S; McDaniel, Mark A

    2004-03-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors examined the role of knowledge activation in the suppression of contextually irrelevant meanings for ambiguous homographs. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants with greater baseball knowledge, regardless of reading skill, more quickly suppressed the irrelevant meaning of ambiguous words in baseball-related, but not general-topic, sentences. Experiment 3 demonstrated that participants with greater general knowledge, regardless of reading skill, more quickly suppressed the irrelevant meaning of the ambiguous words in general-topic sentences. As predicted by D. S. McNamara's (1997) knowledge-based account of suppression, ambiguity effects are influenced by greater activation of knowledge related to the intended meaning of the homograph. These results challenge inhibition (e.g. M. A. Gernsbacher, K. R. Varner. & M. Faust, 1990) as the sole mechanism responsible for the suppression of irrelevant information.

  1. Suppression of operant vs consummatory behavior.

    PubMed

    DeCosta, M J; Ayres, J J

    1971-07-01

    The magnitude and variability of conditioned suppression of bar pressing and dipper licking were compared. In two steady-state experiments, suppression of bar pressing was more profound and more stable from day to day. The two measures of suppression were uncorrelated as indexed by Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients computed for adjacent trials. Correlations within measures (internal consistency) were somewhat higher for the bar-press system except when a high proportion of rats completely suppressed on one of the correlated trials. In a transient state experiment in which possible adventitious punishment of both response systems was eliminated, suppression of bar pressing was again more profound and considerably slower to extinguish. PMID:5142387

  2. Biological control of soil pests by mixed application of entomopathogenic and fungivorous nematodes.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, N; Choi, D R

    1991-04-01

    In greenhouse experiments, massive application of the fungivorous nematode, Aphelenchus avenae, in summer at 26-33 C (1 x l0 nematodes/500 cm(3) autoclaved soil) or in autumn at 18-23 C (5 x 10 nematodes/500 cm(3) autoclaved soil) suppressed pre-emergence damping-off of cucumber seedlings due to Rhizoctonia solani AG-4 by 67% or 87%, respectively. Application of 2 x l0 A. avenae to sterilized soil infested with R. solani caused leafminer-like symptom on the cotyledons, which did not occur in mixed inoculations with the entomopathogenic nematode, Steinernema carpocapsae. When 1 x 10 A. avenae were applied 3 days before inoculation with 100 Meloidogyne incognita juveniles, gall numbers on tomato roots were reduced to 50% of controls. Gall numbers also were suppressed by S. carpocapsae (str. All). Reduction in gall numbers was no greater with mixed application of A. avenae and S. carpocapsae than with application of single species, even though twice the number of nematodes were added in the former case. These nematodes were positively attracted to tomato root tips. Aphelenchus avenae suppressed infection of the turnip moth, Agrotis segetum, but not the common cutworm, Spodoptera litura, by S. carpocapsae.

  3. Burst suppression probability algorithms: state-space methods for tracking EEG burst suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemali, Jessica; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L.; Solt, Ken; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram pattern in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with an isoelectric state. This pattern is commonly seen in states of severely reduced brain activity such as profound general anesthesia, anoxic brain injuries, hypothermia and certain developmental disorders. Devising accurate, reliable ways to quantify burst suppression is an important clinical and research problem. Although thresholding and segmentation algorithms readily identify burst suppression periods, analysis algorithms require long intervals of data to characterize burst suppression at a given time and provide no framework for statistical inference. Approach. We introduce the concept of the burst suppression probability (BSP) to define the brain's instantaneous propensity of being in the suppressed state. To conduct dynamic analyses of burst suppression we propose a state-space model in which the observation process is a binomial model and the state equation is a Gaussian random walk. We estimate the model using an approximate expectation maximization algorithm and illustrate its application in the analysis of rodent burst suppression recordings under general anesthesia and a patient during induction of controlled hypothermia. Main result. The BSP algorithms track burst suppression on a second-to-second time scale, and make possible formal statistical comparisons of burst suppression at different times. Significance. The state-space approach suggests a principled and informative way to analyze burst suppression that can be used to monitor, and eventually to control, the brain states of patients in the operating room and in the intensive care unit.

  4. Effect of Emamectin Benzoate on Root-Knot Nematodes and Tomato Yield

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xingkai; Liu, Xiumei; Wang, Hongyan; Ji, Xiaoxue; Wang, Kaiyun; Wei, Min; Qiao, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Southern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) is an obligate, sedentary endoparasite of more than 3000 plant species, that causes heavy economic losses and limit the development of protected agriculture of China. As a biological pesticide, emamectin benzoate has effectively prevented lepidopteran pests; however, its efficacy to control M. incognita remains unknown. The purpose of the present study was to test soil application of emamectin benzoate for management of M. incognita in laboratory, greenhouse and field trials. Laboratory results showed that emamectin benzoate exhibited high toxicity to M. incognita, with LC50 and LC90 values 3.59 and 18.20 mg L-1, respectively. In greenhouse tests, emamectin benzoate soil application offered good efficacy against M. incognita while maintaining excellent plant growth. In field trials, emamectin benzoate provided control efficacy against M. incognita and resulted in increased tomato yields. Compared with the untreated control, there was a 36.5% to 81.3% yield increase obtained from all treatments and the highest yield was received from the highest rate of emamectin benzoate. The results confirmed that emamectin benzoate has enormous potential for the control of M. incognita in tomato production in China. PMID:26509680

  5. Mutual Suppression: Comment on Paulhus et Al. (2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Paulhus, Robins, Trzesniewski, and Tracy ("Multivariate Behavioral Research," 2004, 39, 305-328) suggested that the three types of two-predictor suppression situations--classical suppression, cooperative suppression, and net suppression--can all be considered special cases of mutual suppression, in that the magnitude of each of the two…

  6. Suppression effects in feature-based attention

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yixue; Miller, James; Liu, Taosheng

    2015-01-01

    Attending to a feature enhances visual processing of that feature, but it is less clear what occurs to unattended features. Single-unit recording studies in middle temporal (MT) have shown that neuronal modulation is a monotonic function of the difference between the attended and neuron's preferred direction. Such a relationship should predict a monotonic suppressive effect in psychophysical performance. However, past research on suppressive effects of feature-based attention has remained inconclusive. We investigated the suppressive effect for motion direction, orientation, and color in three experiments. We asked participants to detect a weak signal among noise and provided a partially valid feature cue to manipulate attention. We measured performance as a function of the offset between the cued and signal feature. We also included neutral trials where no feature cues were presented to provide a baseline measure of performance. Across three experiments, we consistently observed enhancement effects when the target feature and cued feature coincided and suppression effects when the target feature deviated from the cued feature. The exact profile of suppression was different across feature dimensions: Whereas the profile for direction exhibited a “rebound” effect, the profiles for orientation and color were monotonic. These results demonstrate that unattended features are suppressed during feature-based attention, but the exact suppression profile depends on the specific feature. Overall, the results are largely consistent with neurophysiological data and support the feature-similarity gain model of attention. PMID:26067533

  7. Integrin endosomal signalling suppresses anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Alanko, Jonna; Mai, Anja; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Schauer, Kristine; Kaukonen, Riina; Saari, Markku; Goud, Bruno; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    to enhanced signalling of co-trafficked receptor tyrosine kinases10, 11 it has remained unclear whether endocytosed active integrins signal in endosomes. Here, we demonstrate that integrin signalling is not restricted to focal adhesions as previously described and that endocytosis is necessary for full ECM-induced, integrin mediated ERK, AKT and FAK signalling. We find that FAK binds directly to and can become activated on purified endosomes. Moreover, the FERM-domain of FAK is able to bind purified integrin containing endosomes, suggesting the potential for integrin signalling complexes to assemble on endosomes after internalization of active integrins. Importantly, FAK is required for anchorage-independent growth and suppression of anoikis 12. Integrin endosomal signalling correlates with reduced anoikis sensitivity in normal cells and anchorage-independent growth and metastasis in breast cancer cells. PMID:26436690

  8. Effects of tic suppression: ability to suppress, rebound, negative reinforcement, and habituation to the premonitory urge.

    PubMed

    Specht, Matt W; Woods, Douglas W; Nicotra, Cassandra M; Kelly, Laura M; Ricketts, Emily J; Conelea, Christine A; Grados, Marco A; Ostrander, Rick S; Walkup, John T

    2013-01-01

    The comprehensive behavioral intervention for tics (CBIT) represents a safe, effective non-pharmacological treatment for Tourette's disorder that remains underutilized as a treatment option. Contributing factors include the perceived negative consequences of tic suppression and the lack of a means through which suppression results in symptom improvement. Participants (n = 12) included youth ages 10-17 years with moderate-to-marked tic severity and noticeable premonitory urges who met Tourette's or chronic tic disorder criteria. Tic frequency and urge rating data were collected during an alternating sequence of tic freely or reinforced tic suppression periods. Even without specific instructions regarding how to suppress tics, youth experienced a significant, robust (72%), stable reduction in tic frequency under extended periods (40 min) of contingently reinforced tic suppression in contrast to periods of time when tics were ignored. Following periods of prolonged suppression, tic frequency returned to pre-suppression levels. Urge ratings did not show the expected increase during the initial periods of tic suppression, nor a subsequent decline in urge ratings during prolonged, effective tic suppression. Results suggest that environments conducive to tic suppression result in reduced tic frequency without adverse consequences. Additionally, premonitory urges, underrepresented in the literature, may represent an important enduring etiological consideration in the development and maintenance of tic disorders.

  9. Quadratic dynamical decoupling with nonuniform error suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Quiroz, Gregory; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2011-10-15

    We analyze numerically the performance of the near-optimal quadratic dynamical decoupling (QDD) single-qubit decoherence errors suppression method [J. West et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 130501 (2010)]. The QDD sequence is formed by nesting two optimal Uhrig dynamical decoupling sequences for two orthogonal axes, comprising N{sub 1} and N{sub 2} pulses, respectively. Varying these numbers, we study the decoherence suppression properties of QDD directly by isolating the errors associated with each system basis operator present in the system-bath interaction Hamiltonian. Each individual error scales with the lowest order of the Dyson series, therefore immediately yielding the order of decoherence suppression. We show that the error suppression properties of QDD are dependent upon the parities of N{sub 1} and N{sub 2}, and near-optimal performance is achieved for general single-qubit interactions when N{sub 1}=N{sub 2}.

  10. METHOD OF SUPPRESSING GASTROINTESTINAL UREASE ACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Visek, W.J.

    1963-04-23

    This patent shows a method of increasing the growth rate of chicks. Certain diacyl substituted ureas such as alloxan, murexide, and barbituric acid are added to their feed, thereby suppressing gastrointestinal urease activity and thus promoting growth. (AEC)

  11. Suppression of reactions to certain cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Fisher, A A

    1977-08-01

    Reactions to hair dyes and bleaches may be "suppressed" with corticosteroids and antihistamines. Reactions to nail polish may be prevented by a "drying" or "polymerizing" technique. Sensitization to certain perfume ingredients may be inhibited by a "quenching" phenomenon.

  12. Strangeness suppression in the unquenched quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijker, Roelof; García-Tecocoatzi, Hugo; Santopinto, Elena

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we discuss the strangeness suppression in the proton in the framework of the unquenched quark model. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the values extracted from CERN and JLab experiments.

  13. Morphine suppression of ethanol withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    Blum, K; Wallace, J E; Schwerter, H A; Eubanks, J D

    1976-01-15

    The acute administration of morphine, alcohol or dopamine results in a pronounced suppression of the convulsions produced by alcohol in mice. The suppressive action of morphine on alcohol withdrawal in the mouse apparently is not a product of morphine intoxication, but rather to some other specific interaction between alcohol and morphine in the central nervous system. The conclusion suggest that dopamine may play a significant role as a modulator in convulsions produced during alcohol withdrawal.

  14. Neural repetition suppression reflects fulfilled perceptual expectations

    PubMed Central

    Summerfield, Christopher; Monti, Jim M.P.; Trittschuh, Emily H.; Mesulam, M.-Marsel; Egner, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    Stimulus-evoked neural activity is attenuated upon stimulus repetition (‘repetition suppression’), a phenomenon attributed to largely automatic processes in sensory neurons. By manipulating the likelihood of stimulus repetition, we show that repetition suppression in the human brain is reduced when stimulus repetitions are improbable (and thus, unexpected). These data suggest that repetition suppression reflects a relative reduction in top-down perceptual ‘prediction error’ when processing an expected compared to an unexpected stimulus. PMID:19160497

  15. Measurement of myeloid cell immune suppressive activity.

    PubMed

    Dolcetti, Luigi; Peranzoni, Elisa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    This unit presents simple methods to assess the immunosuppressive properties of immunoregulatory cells of myeloid origin, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), both in vitro and in vivo. These methods are general and could be adapted to test the impact of different suppressive populations on T cell activation, proliferation, and cytotoxic activity; moreover they could be useful to assess the influence exerted on immune suppressive pathways by genetic modifications, chemical inhibitors, and drugs.

  16. On the suppression of vaccination dissent.

    PubMed

    Martin, Brian

    2015-02-01

    Dissenters from the dominant views about vaccination sometimes are subject to adverse actions, including abusive comment, threats, formal complaints,censorship, and de registration, a phenomenon that can be called suppression of dissent. Three types of cases are examined: scientists and physicians; a high-profile researcher; and a citizen campaigner. Comparing the methods used in these different types of cases provides a preliminary framework for understanding the dynamics of suppression in terms of vulnerabilities. PMID:24658876

  17. Flame Suppression Agent, System and Uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous droplets encapsulated in a flame retardant polymer are useful in suppressing combustion. Upon exposure to a flame, the encapsulated aqueous droplets rupture and vaporize, removing heat and displacing oxygen to retard the combustion process. The polymer encapsulant, through decomposition, may further add free radicals to the combustion atmosphere, thereby further retarding the combustion process. The encapsulated aqueous droplets may be used as a replacement to halon, water mist and dry powder flame suppression systems.

  18. On the suppression of vaccination dissent.

    PubMed

    Martin, Brian

    2015-02-01

    Dissenters from the dominant views about vaccination sometimes are subject to adverse actions, including abusive comment, threats, formal complaints,censorship, and de registration, a phenomenon that can be called suppression of dissent. Three types of cases are examined: scientists and physicians; a high-profile researcher; and a citizen campaigner. Comparing the methods used in these different types of cases provides a preliminary framework for understanding the dynamics of suppression in terms of vulnerabilities.

  19. Noise suppression in surface microseismic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forghani-Arani, Farnoush; Batzle, Mike; Behura, Jyoti; Willis, Mark; Haines, Seth S.; Davidson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform. We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform.

  20. The temporal frequency tuning of continuous flash suppression reveals peak suppression at very low frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shui’er; Lunghi, Claudia; Alais, David

    2016-01-01

    Continuous flash suppression (CFS) is a psychophysical technique where a rapidly changing Mondrian pattern viewed by one eye suppresses the target in the other eye for several seconds. Despite the widespread use of CFS to study unconscious visual processes, the temporal tuning of CFS suppression is currently unknown. In the present study we used spatiotemporally filtered dynamic noise as masking stimuli to probe the temporal characteristics of CFS. Surprisingly, we find that suppression in CFS peaks very prominently at approximately 1 Hz, well below the rates typically used in CFS studies (10 Hz or more). As well as a strong bias to low temporal frequencies, CFS suppression is greater for high spatial frequencies and increases with increasing masker contrast, indicating involvement of parvocellular/ventral mechanisms in the suppression process. These results are reminiscent of binocular rivalry, and unifies two phenomenon previously thought to require different explanations. PMID:27767078

  1. Feature-based attention modulates surround suppression.

    PubMed

    Flevaris, Anastasia V; Murray, Scott O

    2015-01-28

    Stimuli appearing in the surround of the classical receptive field (CRF) can reduce neuronal firing and perceived contrast of a preferred stimulus in the CRF, a phenomenon referred to as surround suppression. Suppression is greatest when the surrounding stimulus has the same orientation and spatial frequency (SF) as the central target. Although spatial attention has been shown to influence surround suppression, the effects of feature-based attention have yet to be characterized. Using behavioral contrast adaptation in humans, we examined center-surround interactions between SF and orientation, and asked whether attending to one feature dimension versus the other influenced suppression. A center-surround triplet comprised of a central target Gabor and two flanking Gabors were used for adaptation. The flankers could have the same SF and orientation as the target, or differ in one or both of the feature dimensions. Contrast thresholds were measured for the target before and after adapting to center-surround triplets, and postadaptation thresholds were taken as an indirect measure of surround suppression. Both feature dimensions contributed to surround suppression and did not summate. Moreover, when center and surround had the same feature value in one dimension (e.g., same orientation) but had different values in the other dimension (e.g., different SF), there was more suppression when attention was directed to the feature dimension that matched between center and surround than when attention was directed to the feature dimension that differed. These results demonstrate that feature-based attention can influence center-surround interactions by enhancing the effects of the attended dimension.

  2. TEOAE suppression in adults with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Garinis, Angela C; Glattke, Theodore; Cone-Wesson, Barbara K

    2008-10-01

    The presentation of contralateral noise during the recording of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) reduces the amplitude of the TEOAE in normally-hearing adults. This is known as TEOAE suppression. The present study investigated TEOAE suppression in 18 adults with learning disabilities (LDs) compared to 18 adults without LDs. TEOAEs were elicited by 60 dB p.e. SPL clicks and were suppressed by the presentation of 60 dB SPL contralateral broadband noise. Suppression was measured as a change in the overall TEOAE response amplitude, and also analysed in 2-ms epochs representing different TEOAE frequency-response bands. A significant interaction was evident between group type and ear tested. Participants in the control group had right ear dominance for the suppression effect, whereas the left ear was found to be dominant for the LD group. These findings suggest a mechanism of the medial olivary cochlear bundle and efferent auditory pathway that differs in those with LD compared to those with typical learning abilities.

  3. Effects of Solarization and Ammonium Amendments on Plant-Parasitic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    McSorley, R.; McGovern, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of soil solarization and ammonium bicarbonate or ammonium sulfate against plant-parasitic nematodes on yellow squash (Cucurbita pepo) and on vinca (Catharanthus roseus) were evaluated at two sites. Solarization for 3 weeks in the spring suppressed population levels of Belonolaimus longicaudatus, Criconemella spp., and Dolichodorus heterocephalus throughout the growing season on both crops at both sites. Levels of Meloidogyne incognita were suppressed initially, but population densities increased by the end of the crop in several cases. In one site, numbers of Paratrichodorus minor resurged following solarization to levels that were greater than those present in unsolarized control plots. The effect of solarization was not enhanced by combination with ammonium amendments, but, in one site, application of ammonium bicarbonate or ammonium sulfate resulted in lower numbers of B. longicaudatus than in the unamended control. Additional research and improved efficacy of candidate amendments are required before they can be successfully integrated with solarization for nematode management. Efficacy of solarization against plant-parasitic nematodes was achieved despite a relatively short (3 weeks) solarization period. PMID:19271007

  4. Perilous terra incognita--open-access journals.

    PubMed

    Balon, Richard

    2014-04-01

    The author focuses on a new rapidly spreading practice of publication in open-access journals. The pros and cons of open-access journals are discussed. Publishing in these journals may be cost prohibitive for educators and junior faculty members. Some authors may be lured by the ease of publishing in open-access journals (and their, at times, inflated self-description, e.g., "international", "scientific"), and their possibly valuable contributions will escape the attention of Academic Psychiatry readership in the vast sea of open-access journals. The readership may be flooded with a large number of low-quality articles (maybe not even properly peer-reviewed) from open-access journals. It may take some time to sort out what is and what is not relevant and useful. Open-access publishing represents a problematic and controversial practice and may be associated with a conflict of interest for the editors and publishers of these journals.

  5. Traversing "Terra Incognita": Mapping Literary Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Sharona A.

    2001-01-01

    Considers how mapping literary works provides students with a powerful tool for critical analysis. Suggests that educators need to force students to do something different with the text. Notes that the author's solution is to insist that her students visualize the text on paper. (SG)

  6. Suppression of behavior by timeout punishment when suppression results in loss of positive reinforcement1

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Arnold; Baron, Alan

    1968-01-01

    This investigation, using rats as subjects and punishment by timeout for responses maintained on a ratio schedule, sought to determine whether behavior would be suppressed by timeout punishment when such suppression also reduced reinforcement density or frequency. A series of experiments indicated that timeout punishment suppressed responding, with the degree of suppression increasing as a function of the duration of the timeout period. Suppressive effects were found to decrease as a function of increases in deprivation (body weight) and were eliminated when the punished response also was reinforced. It was concluded that timeout can produce aversive effects even when loss of reinforcement results. An alternative interpretation of the findings, based on the effects of extinction periods and delay of reinforcement on chained behavior, was discussed. PMID:5722425

  7. Suppression of behavior by timeout punishment when suppression results in loss of positive reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, A; Baron, A

    1968-09-01

    This investigation, using rats as subjects and punishment by timeout for responses maintained on a ratio schedule, sought to determine whether behavior would be suppressed by timeout punishment when such suppression also reduced reinforcement density or frequency. A series of experiments indicated that timeout punishment suppressed responding, with the degree of suppression increasing as a function of the duration of the timeout period. Suppressive effects were found to decrease as a function of increases in deprivation (body weight) and were eliminated when the punished response also was reinforced. It was concluded that timeout can produce aversive effects even when loss of reinforcement results. An alternative interpretation of the findings, based on the effects of extinction periods and delay of reinforcement on chained behavior, was discussed.

  8. Modeling extreme ultraviolet suppression of electrostatic analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Gershman, Daniel J.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-04-15

    In addition to analyzing energy-per-charge ratios of incident ions, electrostatic analyzers (ESAs) for spaceborne time-of-flight mass spectrometers must also protect detectors from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons from the Sun. The required suppression rate often exceeds 1:10{sup 7} and is generally established in tests upon instrument design and integration. This paper describes a novel technique to model the EUV suppression of ESAs using photon ray tracing integrated into SIMION, the most commonly used ion optics design software for such instruments. The paper compares simulation results with measurements taken from the ESA of the Mass instrument flying onboard the Wind spacecraft. This novel technique enables an active inclusion of EUV suppression requirements in the ESA design process. Furthermore, the simulation results also motivate design rules for such instruments.

  9. Semantic and subword priming during binocular suppression.

    PubMed

    Costello, Patricia; Jiang, Yi; Baartman, Brandon; McGlennen, Kristine; He, Sheng

    2009-06-01

    In general, stimuli that are familiar and recognizable have an advantage of predominance during binocular rivalry. Recent research has demonstrated that familiar and recognizable stimuli such as upright faces and words in a native language could break interocular suppression faster than their matched controls. In this study, a visible word prime was presented binocularly then replaced by a high-contrast dynamic noise pattern presented to one eye and either a semantically related or unrelated word was introduced to the other eye. We measured how long it took for target words to break from suppression. To investigate word-parts priming, a second experiment also included word pairs that had overlapping subword fragments. Results from both experiments consistently show that semantically related words and words that shared subword fragments were faster to gain dominance compared to unrelated words, suggesting that words, even when interocularly suppressed and invisible, can benefit from semantic and subword priming.

  10. Modeling extreme ultraviolet suppression of electrostatic analyzers.

    PubMed

    Gershman, Daniel J; Zurbuchen, Thomas H

    2010-04-01

    In addition to analyzing energy-per-charge ratios of incident ions, electrostatic analyzers (ESAs) for spaceborne time-of-flight mass spectrometers must also protect detectors from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons from the Sun. The required suppression rate often exceeds 1:10(7) and is generally established in tests upon instrument design and integration. This paper describes a novel technique to model the EUV suppression of ESAs using photon ray tracing integrated into SIMION, the most commonly used ion optics design software for such instruments. The paper compares simulation results with measurements taken from the ESA of the Mass instrument flying onboard the Wind spacecraft. This novel technique enables an active inclusion of EUV suppression requirements in the ESA design process. Furthermore, the simulation results also motivate design rules for such instruments.

  11. Propofol and sevoflurane induce distinct burst suppression patterns in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Jonathan D.; Westover, M. Brandon; Ching, ShiNung; Brown, Emery N.; Solt, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Burst suppression is an EEG pattern characterized by alternating periods of high-amplitude activity (bursts) and relatively low amplitude activity (suppressions). Burst suppression can arise from several different pathological conditions, as well as from general anesthesia. Here we review current algorithms that are used to quantify burst suppression, its various etiologies, and possible underlying mechanisms. We then review clinical applications of anesthetic-induced burst suppression. Finally, we report the results of our new study showing clear electrophysiological differences in burst suppression patterns induced by two common general anesthetics, sevoflurane and propofol. Our data suggest that the circuit mechanisms that generate burst suppression activity may differ among general anesthetics. PMID:25565990

  12. Large-Scale Identification and Analysis of Suppressive Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cokol, Murat; Weinstein, Zohar B.; Yilancioglu, Kaan; Tasan, Murat; Doak, Allison; Cansever, Dilay; Mutlu, Beste; Li, Siyang; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Guvenek, Aysegul; Cokol, Melike; Cetiner, Selim; Giaever, Guri; Iossifov, Ivan; Nislow, Corey; Shoichet, Brian; Roth, Frederick P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY One drug may suppress the effects of another. Although knowledge of drug suppression is vital to avoid efficacy-reducing drug interactions or discover countermeasures for chemical toxins, drug-drug suppression relationships have not been systematically mapped. Here, we analyze the growth response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to anti-fungal compound (“drug”) pairs. Among 440 ordered drug pairs, we identified 94 suppressive drug interactions. Using only pairs not selected on the basis of their suppression behavior, we provide an estimate of the prevalence of suppressive interactions between anti-fungal compounds as 17%. Analysis of the drug suppression network suggested that Bromopyruvate is a frequently suppressive drug and Staurosporine is a frequently suppressed drug. We investigated potential explanations for suppressive drug interactions, including chemogenomic analysis, coaggregation, and pH effects, allowing us to explain the interaction tendencies of Bromopyruvate. PMID:24704506

  13. THEORETICAL ISSUES IN J/PSI SUPPRESSION.

    SciTech Connect

    KHARZEEV,D.

    2006-11-14

    Two decades ago Matsui and Satz suggested that Debye screening in the quark-gluon plasma would result in J/{psi} suppression in heavy ion collisions. Much has happened in the subsequent years, and the picture of quark-gluon plasma at present is rapidly evolving - what does it imply for the J/{psi} suppression? What are the recent RHIC and SPS results trying to tell us? What else has to be done? This talk is an attempt to address these questions.

  14. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1995-01-01

    Method of active suppression of nonlinear and nonstationary vibrations developed to reduce sonic fatigue and interior noise in high-speed aircraft. Structure of aircraft exhibits periodic, chaotic, and random vibrations when forced by high-intensity sound from jet engines, shock waves, turbulence, and separated flows. Method of suppressing vibrations involves feedback control: Strain gauges or other sensors mounted in paths of propagation of vibrations on structure sense vibrations; outputs of sensors processed into control signal applied to actuator mounted on structure, inducing compensatory forces.

  15. Immune suppressive mechanisms in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Munn, David H; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Effective immunotherapy, whether by checkpoint blockade or adoptive cell therapy, is limited in most patients by a key barrier: the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Suppression of tumor-specific T cells is orchestrated by the activity of a variety of stromal myeloid and lymphoid cells. These often display inducible suppressive mechanisms that are triggered by the same anti-tumor inflammatory response that the immunotherapy intends to create. Therefore, a more comprehensive understanding of how the immunosuppressive milieu develops and persists is critical in order to harness the full power of immunotherapy of cancer.

  16. Yellow Pigment Aurovertins Mediate Interactions between the Pathogenic Fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia and Its Nematode Host.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-li; Li, Lin-fang; Li, Dong-xian; Wang, Baile; Zhang, Keqin; Niu, Xuemei

    2015-07-29

    Nematophagous fungi are globally distributed soil fungi and well-known natural predators of soil-dwelling nematodes. Pochonia chlamydosporia can be found in diverse nematode-suppressive soils as a parasite of nematode eggs and is one of the most studied potential biological control agents of nematodes. However, little is known about the functions of small molecules in the process of infection of nematodes by this parasitic fungus or about small-molecule-mediated interactions between the pathogenic fungus and its host. Our recent study demonstrated that a P. chlamydosporia strain isolated from root knots of tobacco infected by the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita produced a class of yellow pigment metabolite aurovertins, which induced the death of the free-living nematode Panagrellus redivevus. Here we report that nematicidal P. chlamydosporia strains obtained from the nematode worms tended to yield a total yellow pigment aurovertin production exceeding the inhibitory concentration shown in nematicidal bioassays. Aurovertin D was abundant in the pigment metabolites of P. chlamydosporia strains. Aurovertin D showed strong toxicity toward the root-knot nematode M. incognita and exerted profound and detrimental effects on the viability of Caenorhabditis elegans even at a subinhibitory concentration. Evaluation of the nematode mutation in the β subunit of F1-ATPase, together with the application of RNA interference in screening each subunit of F1FO-ATPase in the nematode worms, demonstrated that the β subunit of F1-ATPase might not be the specific target for aurovertins in nematodes. The resistance of C. elegans daf-2(e1370) and the hypersensitivity of C. elegans daf-16(mu86) to aurovertin D indicated that DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor in nematodes was triggered in response to the aurovertin attack. These findings advance our understanding of the roles of aurovertin production in the interactions between nematodes and the pathogen fungus P. chlamydosporia

  17. Yellow Pigment Aurovertins Mediate Interactions between the Pathogenic Fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia and Its Nematode Host.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-li; Li, Lin-fang; Li, Dong-xian; Wang, Baile; Zhang, Keqin; Niu, Xuemei

    2015-07-29

    Nematophagous fungi are globally distributed soil fungi and well-known natural predators of soil-dwelling nematodes. Pochonia chlamydosporia can be found in diverse nematode-suppressive soils as a parasite of nematode eggs and is one of the most studied potential biological control agents of nematodes. However, little is known about the functions of small molecules in the process of infection of nematodes by this parasitic fungus or about small-molecule-mediated interactions between the pathogenic fungus and its host. Our recent study demonstrated that a P. chlamydosporia strain isolated from root knots of tobacco infected by the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita produced a class of yellow pigment metabolite aurovertins, which induced the death of the free-living nematode Panagrellus redivevus. Here we report that nematicidal P. chlamydosporia strains obtained from the nematode worms tended to yield a total yellow pigment aurovertin production exceeding the inhibitory concentration shown in nematicidal bioassays. Aurovertin D was abundant in the pigment metabolites of P. chlamydosporia strains. Aurovertin D showed strong toxicity toward the root-knot nematode M. incognita and exerted profound and detrimental effects on the viability of Caenorhabditis elegans even at a subinhibitory concentration. Evaluation of the nematode mutation in the β subunit of F1-ATPase, together with the application of RNA interference in screening each subunit of F1FO-ATPase in the nematode worms, demonstrated that the β subunit of F1-ATPase might not be the specific target for aurovertins in nematodes. The resistance of C. elegans daf-2(e1370) and the hypersensitivity of C. elegans daf-16(mu86) to aurovertin D indicated that DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor in nematodes was triggered in response to the aurovertin attack. These findings advance our understanding of the roles of aurovertin production in the interactions between nematodes and the pathogen fungus P. chlamydosporia.

  18. Reappraising suppression: subjective and physiological correlates of experiential suppression in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Mathieu; El-Hage, Wissam; Frangou, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Emotion regulation strategies based on suppressing behavioral expressions of emotion have been considered maladaptive. However, this may not apply to suppressing the emotional experience (experiential suppression). The aim of this study was to define the effect of experiential suppression on subjective and physiological emotional responses. Methods: Healthy adults (N = 101) were characterized in terms of the temperament, personality, and hedonic capacity using the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, the Fawcett–Clark Pleasure Scale, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Participants were shown positive, negative, and neutral pictures from the International Affective Picture System under two conditions, passive viewing, and experiential suppression. During both conditions, subjective ratings of the intensity and duration of emotional responses and physiological measures of skin conductance (SC) and cardiac inter-beat interval (IBI) to each picture were recorded. Results: Negative pictures elicited the most intense physiological and emotional responses regardless of experimental condition. Ratings of emotional intensity were not affected by condition. In contrast, experiential suppression, compared to passive viewing, was associated with decreased duration of the emotional response, reduced maximum SC amplitude and longer IBIs independent of age, picture valence, personality traits, hedonic capacity, and anxiety. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that experiential suppression may represent an adaptive emotion regulation mechanism associated with reduced arousal and cardiovascular activation. PMID:24966844

  19. Suppression Situations in Multiple Linear Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes alternative expressions for the two most prevailing definitions of suppression without resorting to the standardized regression modeling. The formulation provides a simple basis for the examination of their relationship. For the two-predictor regression, the author demonstrates that the previous results in the literature are…

  20. Emotions shape memory suppression in trait anxiety.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Tessa; Regina, Antonio; Righi, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    The question that motivated this study was to investigate the relation between trait anxiety, emotions and memory control. To this aim, memory suppression was explored in high and low trait anxiety individuals with the Think/No-think paradigm. After learning associations between neutral words and emotional scenes (negative, positive, and neutral), participants were shown a word and were requested either to think about the associated scene or to block it out from mind. Finally, in a test phase, participants were again shown each word and asked to recall the paired scene. The results show that memory control is influenced by high trait anxiety and emotions. Low trait anxiety individuals showed a memory suppression effect, whereas there was a lack of memory suppression in high trait anxious individuals, especially for emotionally negative scenes. Thus, we suggest that individuals with anxiety may have difficulty exerting cognitive control over memories with a negative valence. These findings provide evidence that memory suppression can be impaired by anxiety thus highlighting the crucial relation between cognitive control, emotions, and individual differences in regulating emotions.

  1. Polyphosphate suppresses complement via the terminal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wat, Jovian M.; Foley, Jonathan H.; Krisinger, Michael J.; Ocariza, Linnette Mae; Lei, Victor; Wasney, Gregory A.; Lameignere, Emilie; Strynadka, Natalie C.; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Polyphosphate, synthesized by all cells, is a linear polymer of inorganic phosphate. When released into the circulation, it exerts prothrombotic and proinflammatory activities by modulating steps in the coagulation cascade. We examined the role of polyphosphate in regulating the evolutionarily related proteolytic cascade complement. In erythrocyte lysis assays, polyphosphate comprising more than 1000 phosphate units suppressed total hemolytic activity with a concentration to reduce maximal lysis to 50% that was 10-fold lower than with monophosphate. In the ion- and enzyme-independent terminal pathway complement assay, polyphosphate suppressed complement in a concentration- and size-dependent manner. Phosphatase-treated polyphosphate lost its ability to suppress complement, confirming that polymer integrity is required. Sequential addition of polyphosphate to the terminal pathway assay showed that polyphosphate interferes with complement only when added before formation of the C5b-7 complex. Physicochemical analyses using native gels, gel filtration, and differential scanning fluorimetry revealed that polyphosphate binds to and destabilizes C5b,6, thereby reducing the capacity of the membrane attack complex to bind to and lyse the target cell. In summary, we have added another function to polyphosphate in blood, demonstrating that it dampens the innate immune response by suppressing complement. These findings further establish the complex relationship between coagulation and innate immunity. PMID:24335501

  2. Visual Blocking: Suppression of Excessive Verbalizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zlomke, Lee; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Visual blocking procedures (briefly holding a paper screen in front of a subject's face contingent upon inappropriate behavior) were effective in decreasing inappropriate verbalizations in a moderately retarded 32-year-old male. Followup 4 months later indicated that suppression was maintained in treatment settings but failed to generalize to…

  3. Decoherence suppression in a resonant driving field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minns, R. S.; Kutteruf, M. R.; Commisso, M. A.; Jones, R. R.

    2008-04-01

    Resonant radio frequency (rf) control fields have been employed to suppress decoherence in single quantum bits (qubits) encoded in the probability amplitudes of np fine-structure states in Li Rydberg atoms. As described previously [1], static electric-field tuning of the spin and orbital angular momentum composition of the fine-structure eigenstates enables qubit storage in an approximate decoherence-free subspace in which phase errors due to small stray electric and magnetic fields are strongly suppressed. In addition, it was found that sequences of short electric field pulses could be utilized in a 'bang-bang' dynamic decoupling scheme to improve coherence times. We now show that a continuous resonant rf field can also suppress decoherence in this system. The rf-dressed fine-structure states form a more robust basis in which the energy splitting between the component qubit levels is locked to the drive frequency, and decoherence is essentially eliminated. Measurements of the operational range of rf frequency and field strength required to achieve decoherence suppression are in agreement with the predictions of a two-level model.

  4. Radio Science Measurements with Suppressed Carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami; Divsalar, Dariush; Oudrhiri, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Radio Science started when it became apparent with early Solar missions that occultations by planetary atmospheres would affect the quality of radio communications. Since then the atmospheric properties and other aspects of planetary science, solar science, and fundamental physics were studied by scientists. Radio Science data was always extracted from a received pure residual carrier (without data modulation). For some missions, it is very desirable to obtain Radio Science data from a suppressed carrier modulation. In this paper we propose a method to extract Radio Science data when a coded suppressed carrier modulation is used in deep space communications. Type of modulation can be BPSK, QPSK, OQPSK, MPSK or even GMSK. However we concentrate mostly on BPSK modulation. The proposed method for suppressed carrier simply tries to wipe out data that acts as an interference for Radio Science measurements. In order to measure the estimation errors in amplitude and phase of the Radio Science data we use Cramer-Rao bound (CRB). The CRB for the suppressed carrier modulation with non-ideal data wiping is then compared with residual carrier modulation under the same noise condition. The method of derivation of CRB for non-ideal data wiping is an innovative method that presented here. Some numerical results are provided for coded system.

  5. Government Doublethink: Protection or Suppression in Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Miriam A.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses regulations and actions related to government withholding, suppressing, and altering information since September 11, 2001. Topics include conflicting goals of an informed citizenry versus national security, science and technology progress versus protection of sensitive information, and public health versus ideology; political pressure;…

  6. Motor induced suppression of auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Aliu, Sheye O.; Houde, John F.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2010-01-01

    Sensory responses to stimuli that are triggered by a self-initiated motor act are suppressed when compared with the response to the same stimuli triggered externally, a phenomenon referred to as motor-induced suppression (MIS) of sensory cortical feedback. Studies in the somatosensory system suggest that such suppression might be sensitive to delays between the motor act and the stimulus-onset, and a recent study in the auditory system suggests that such MIS develops rapidly. In three MEG experiments, we characterize the properties of MIS, by examining the M100 response from the auditory cortex to a simple tone triggered by a button press. In Experiment 1, we found that MIS develops for zero-delays but does not generalize to non-zero delays. In Experiment 2, we found that MIS developed for 100 ms delays within 300 trials and occurs in excess of auditory habituation. In Experiment 3, we found that unlike MIS for zero-delays, MIS for non-zero delays does not exhibit sensitivity to sensory, delay or motor-command changes. These results are discussed in relation to suppression to self-produced speech and a general model of sensory motor control. PMID:18593265

  7. Spacecraft Fire Suppression: Testing and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbud-Madrid, Angel; McKinnon, J. Thomas; Delplanque, Jean-Pierre; Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Gokoglu, Suleyman; Wu, Ming-Shin

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this project is the testing and evaluation of the effectiveness of a variety of fire suppressants and fire-response techniques that will be used in the next generation of spacecraft (Crew Exploration Vehicle, CEV) and planetary habitats. From the many lessons learned in the last 40 years of space travel, there is common agreement in the spacecraft fire safety community that a new fire suppression system will be needed for the various types of fire threats anticipated in new space vehicles and habitats. To date, there is no single fire extinguishing system that can address all possible fire situations in a spacecraft in an effective, reliable, clean, and safe way. The testing conducted under this investigation will not only validate the various numerical models that are currently being developed, but it will provide new design standards on fire suppression that can then be applied to the next generation of spacecraft extinguishment systems. The test program will provide validation of scaling methods by conducting small, medium, and large scale fires. A variety of suppression methods will be tested, such as water mist, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen with single and multiple injection points and direct or distributed agent deployment. These injection methods cover the current ISS fire suppression method of a portable hand-held fire extinguisher spraying through a port in a rack and also next generation spacecraft units that may have a multi-point suppression delivery system built into the design. Consideration will be given to the need of a crew to clean-up the agent and recharge the extinguishers in flight in a long-duration mission. The fire suppression methods mentioned above will be used to extinguish several fire scenarios that have been identified as the most relevant to spaceflight, such as overheated wires, cable bundles, and circuit boards, as well as burning cloth and paper. Further testing will be conducted in which obstructions and

  8. Immune Suppression and Immune Activation in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Depression has been characterized as a disorder of both immune suppression and immune activation. Markers of impaired cellular immunity (decreased natural killer cell cytotoxicity) and inflammation (elevated IL-6, TNFα, CRP) have been associated with depression. These immunological markers have been associated with other medical illnesses, suggesting that immune dysregulation may be a central feature common to both depression and to its frequent medical comorbidities. Yet the significant associations of findings of both immune suppression and immune activation with depression raise questions concerning the relationship between these two classes of immunological observations. Depressed populations are heterogeneous groups, and there may be differences in the immune profiles of populations that are more narrowly defined in terms of symptom profile and/or demographic features. There have been few reports concurrently investigating markers of immune suppression and immune activation in the same depressed individuals. An emerging preclinical literature suggests that chronic inflammation may directly contribute to the pathophysiology of immune suppression in the context of illnesses such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. This literature provides us with specific immunoregulatory mechanisms mediating these relationships that could also explain differences in immune disturbances between subsets of depressed individuals We propose a research agenda emphasizing the assessment of these immunoregulatory mechanisms in large samples of depressed subjects as a means to define the relationships among immune findings (suppression and/or activation) within the same depressed individuals and to characterize subsets of depressed subjects based on shared immune profiles. Such a program of research, building on and integrating our knowledge of the psychoneuroimmunology of depression, could lead to innovation in the assessment and treatment of depression and its medical comorbidities

  9. Reproduction of Plant-parasitic Nematodes on Winter Rapeseed (Brassica napus ssp. oleiferas)

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, E. C.; Montgomery-Dee, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    The reproduction of isolates of five plant-parasitic nematode species on the winter rapeseed cultivars Bridger, Gorzanski, H-47, Lindora, and Viking was evaluated. Each cultivar was a good host for Helicotylenchus pseudorobustus, Meloidogyne hapla, and M. incognita, All rapeseed cultivars were poor hosts for Pratylenchus scribneri, in comparison with a susceptible reference host. Heterodera glycines females rarely developed on any cultivar, but low numbers of juveniles invaded roots and males occasionally reached maturity. PMID:19279854

  10. The Potential of Five Winter-grown Crops to Reduce Root-knot Nematode Damage and Increase Yield of Tomato

    PubMed Central

    López-Pérez, Jose Antonio; Roubtsova, Tatiana; de Cara García, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Broccoli (Brassica oleracea), carrot (Daucus carota), marigold (Tagetes patula), nematode-resistant tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and strawberry (Fragaria ananassa) were grown for three years during the winter in a root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) infested field in Southern California. Each year in the spring, the tops of all crops were shredded and incorporated in the soil. Amendment with poultry litter was included as a sub-treatment. The soil was then covered with clear plastic for six weeks and M. incognita-susceptible tomato was grown during the summer season. Plastic tarping raised the average soil temperature at 13 cm depth by 7°C.The different winter-grown crops or the poultry litter did not affect M. incognita soil population levels. However, root galling on summer tomato was reduced by 36%, and tomato yields increased by 19% after incorporating broccoli compared to the fallow control. This crop also produced the highest amount of biomass of the five winter-grown crops. Over the three-year trial period, poultry litter increased tomato yields, but did not affect root galling caused by M. incognita. We conclude that cultivation followed by soil incorporation of broccoli reduced M. incognita damage to tomato. This effect is possibly due to delaying or preventing a portion of the nematodes to reach the host roots. We also observed that M. incognita populations did not increase under a host crop during the cool season when soil temperatures remained low (< 18°C). PMID:22736848

  11. Benchmark enclosure fire suppression experiments - phase 1 test report.

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Victor G.; Nichols, Robert Thomas; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-06-01

    A series of fire benchmark water suppression tests were performed that may provide guidance for dispersal systems for the protection of high value assets. The test results provide boundary and temporal data necessary for water spray suppression model development and validation. A review of fire suppression in presented for both gaseous suppression and water mist fire suppression. The experimental setup and procedure for gathering water suppression performance data are shown. Characteristics of the nozzles used in the testing are presented. Results of the experiments are discussed.

  12. [The advances of suppression in research of amblyopia].

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Liu, H

    2016-04-11

    Suppression that is the result of interocular competition is an important machanism of amblyopia. The imbalance of suppression may lead the consequence to amblyopia. In the early study, researchers had raised the theory of II. Quadratic Summation which had revealed the relationship of interocular interaction and suppression. In some basic researches, other studies had showed the most possible anatomic location of suppression. Recently, researchers found a new method to quantify the interocular suppression named the noise model. Further studies found a novel disinhibition therapy to treat amblyopia. We summarized the research advances in suppression and disinhibition treatment in amblyopia. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 52: 305-308). PMID:27094069

  13. Suppression of friction by mechanical vibrations.

    PubMed

    Capozza, Rosario; Vanossi, Andrea; Vezzani, Alessandro; Zapperi, Stefano

    2009-08-21

    Mechanical vibrations are known to affect frictional sliding and the associated stick-slip patterns causing sometimes a drastic reduction of the friction force. This issue is relevant for applications in nanotribology and to understand earthquake triggering by small dynamic perturbations. We study the dynamics of repulsive particles confined between a horizontally driven top plate and a vertically oscillating bottom plate. Our numerical results show a suppression of the high dissipative stick-slip regime in a well-defined range of frequencies that depends on the vibrating amplitude, the normal applied load, the system inertia and the damping constant. We propose a theoretical explanation of the numerical results and derive a phase diagram indicating the region of parameter space where friction is suppressed. Our results allow to define better strategies for the mechanical control of friction. PMID:19792738

  14. Mercury vapour suppression by various liquid media.

    PubMed

    Sutow, E J; Foong, W C; Rizkalla, A S; Jones, D W; Power, N L

    1994-09-01

    Fresh and used photographic fixer, Merconvap and water were evaluated for their ability to suppress the vapourization of mercury. Mercury vapour concentration above the four test storage liquids was measured at various times between 10 min and 335 days, using a mercury vapour measuring instrument. The data were analysed using a Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test (P = 0.05). The results showed that fresh and used fixer and Merconvap suppressed the vapourization of mercury to below the detection limit of the measuring instrument (0.01 mg/m3). Water was much less effective compared with the other liquids and showed an increase in mercury vapour concentration with log t. PMID:7996339

  15. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  16. Overcoming fixation with repeated memory suppression.

    PubMed

    Angello, Genna; Storm, Benjamin C; Smith, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Fixation (blocks to memories or ideas) can be alleviated not only by encouraging productive work towards a solution, but, as the present experiments show, by reducing counterproductive work. Two experiments examined relief from fixation in a word-fragment completion task. Blockers, orthographically similar negative primes (e.g., ANALOGY), blocked solutions to word fragments (e.g., A_L_ _GY) in both experiments. After priming, but before the fragment completion test, participants repeatedly suppressed half of the blockers using the Think/No-Think paradigm, which results in memory inhibition. Inhibiting blockers did not alleviate fixation in Experiment 1 when conscious recollection of negative primes was not encouraged on the fragment completion test. In Experiment 2, however, when participants were encouraged to remember negative primes at fragment completion, relief from fixation was observed. Repeated suppression may nullify fixation effects, and promote creative thinking, particularly when fixation is caused by conscious recollection of counterproductive information.

  17. Active flutter suppression using dipole filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinathkumar, S.; Waszak, Martin R.

    1992-01-01

    By using traditional control concepts of gain root locus, the active suppression of a flutter mode of a flexible wing is examined. It is shown that the attraction of the unstable mode towards a critical system zero determines the degree to which the flutter mode can be stabilized. For control situations where the critical zero is adversely placed in the complex plane, a novel compensation scheme called a 'Dipole' filter is proposed. This filter ensures that the flutter mode is stabilized with acceptable control energy. The control strategy is illustrated by designing flutter suppression laws for an active flexible wing (AFW) wind-tunnel model, where minimal control effort solutions are mandated by control rate saturation problems caused by wind-tunnel turbulence.

  18. Adaptive Suppression of Noise in Voice Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozel, David; DeVault, James A.; Birr, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    A subsystem for the adaptive suppression of noise in a voice communication system effects a high level of reduction of noise that enters the system through microphones. The subsystem includes a digital signal processor (DSP) plus circuitry that implements voice-recognition and spectral- manipulation techniques. The development of the adaptive noise-suppression subsystem was prompted by the following considerations: During processing of the space shuttle at Kennedy Space Center, voice communications among test team members have been significantly impaired in several instances because some test participants have had to communicate from locations with high ambient noise levels. Ear protection for the personnel involved is commercially available and is used in such situations. However, commercially available noise-canceling microphones do not provide sufficient reduction of noise that enters through microphones and thus becomes transmitted on outbound communication links.

  19. Suppression of Eimeria tenella sporulation by disinfectants.

    PubMed

    You, Myung-Jo

    2014-08-01

    The disinfectant effects (DEs) of 10 types of chemicals, defined by their ability to destroy or inhibit oocysts and consequently prevent sporulation of Eimeria tenella field isolate, were evaluated in vitro. Correct species assignments and sample purities were confirmed by the singular internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-PCR analysis. A total of 18 treatments were performed, and the disinfection suppression levels were 75.9% for 39% benzene + 22% xylene (1:10 dilution), 85.5% for 30% cresol soup (1:1 dilution), and 91.7% for 99.9% acetic acid (1:2 dilution) group. The results indicate that acetic acid, cresol soup, and benzene+xylene are good candidates for suppression of E. tenella oocyst sporulation.

  20. Glucose Suppresses Biological Ferroelectricity in Aortic Elastin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanming; Wang, Yunjie; Chow, Ming-Jay; Chen, Nataly Q.; Ma, Feiyue; Zhang, Yanhang; Li, Jiangyu

    2013-04-01

    Elastin is an intriguing extracellular matrix protein present in all connective tissues of vertebrates, rendering essential elasticity to connective tissues subjected to repeated physiological stresses. Using piezoresponse force microscopy, we show that the polarity of aortic elastin is switchable by an electrical field, which may be associated with the recently discovered biological ferroelectricity in the aorta. More interestingly, it is discovered that the switching in aortic elastin is largely suppressed by glucose treatment, which appears to freeze the internal asymmetric polar structures of elastin, making it much harder to switch, or suppressing the switching completely. Such loss of ferroelectricity could have important physiological and pathological implications from aging to arteriosclerosis that are closely related to glycation of elastin.