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Sample records for melting curve analysis

  1. Improved protocol for rapid identification of certain spa types using high resolution melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Stöger, Anna; Pietzka, Ariane T; Fernandez, Haizpea Lasa; Prewein, Bernhard; Sorschag, Sieglinde; Kunert, Renate; Allerberger, Franz; Ruppitsch, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant pathogens associated with health care. For efficient surveillance, control and outbreak investigation, S. aureus typing is essential. A high resolution melting curve analysis was developed and evaluated for rapid identification of the most frequent spa types found in an Austrian hospital consortium covering 2,435 beds. Among 557 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates 38 different spa types were identified by sequence analysis of the hypervariable region X of the protein A gene (spa). Identification of spa types through their characteristic high resolution melting curve profiles was considerably improved by double spiking with genomic DNA from spa type t030 and spa type t003 and allowed unambiguous and fast identification of the ten most frequent spa types t001 (58%), t003 (12%), t190 (9%), t041 (5%), t022 (2%), t032 (2%), t008 (2%), t002 (1%), t5712 (1%) and t2203 (1%), representing 93% of all isolates within this hospital consortium. The performance of the assay was evaluated by testing samples with unknown spa types from the daily routine and by testing three different high resolution melting curve analysis real-time PCR instruments. The ten most frequent spa types were identified from all samples and on all instruments with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity. Compared to classical spa typing by sequence analysis, this gene scanning assay is faster, cheaper and can be performed in a single closed tube assay format. Therefore it is an optimal screening tool to detect the most frequent endemic spa types and to exclude non-endemic spa types within a hospital. PMID:25768007

  2. Improved protocol for rapid identification of certain spa types using high resolution melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Stöger, Anna; Pietzka, Ariane T; Fernandez, Haizpea Lasa; Prewein, Bernhard; Sorschag, Sieglinde; Kunert, Renate; Allerberger, Franz; Ruppitsch, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant pathogens associated with health care. For efficient surveillance, control and outbreak investigation, S. aureus typing is essential. A high resolution melting curve analysis was developed and evaluated for rapid identification of the most frequent spa types found in an Austrian hospital consortium covering 2,435 beds. Among 557 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates 38 different spa types were identified by sequence analysis of the hypervariable region X of the protein A gene (spa). Identification of spa types through their characteristic high resolution melting curve profiles was considerably improved by double spiking with genomic DNA from spa type t030 and spa type t003 and allowed unambiguous and fast identification of the ten most frequent spa types t001 (58%), t003 (12%), t190 (9%), t041 (5%), t022 (2%), t032 (2%), t008 (2%), t002 (1%), t5712 (1%) and t2203 (1%), representing 93% of all isolates within this hospital consortium. The performance of the assay was evaluated by testing samples with unknown spa types from the daily routine and by testing three different high resolution melting curve analysis real-time PCR instruments. The ten most frequent spa types were identified from all samples and on all instruments with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity. Compared to classical spa typing by sequence analysis, this gene scanning assay is faster, cheaper and can be performed in a single closed tube assay format. Therefore it is an optimal screening tool to detect the most frequent endemic spa types and to exclude non-endemic spa types within a hospital.

  3. Single fluorophore melting curve analysis for detection of hypervirulent Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Angione, Stephanie L; Croote, Derek; Leung, Joshua W; Mermel, Leonard A; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates a novel detection assay able to identify and subtype strains of Clostridium difficile. Primers carefully designed for melting curve analysis amplify DNA from three C. difficile genes, tcdB, tcdC and cdtB, during quantitative (q)PCR. The tcdB gene allows for confirmation of organism presence, whilst the tcdC and cdtB genes allow for differentiation of virulence status, as deletions in the tcdC gene and the concurrent presence of the cdtB gene, which produces binary toxin, are associated with hypervirulence. Following qPCR, subtyping is then achieved by automated, inline melting curve analysis using only a single intercalating dye and verified by microchip electrophoresis. This assay represents a novel means of distinguishing between toxigenic and hypervirulent C. difficile strains NAP1/027/BI and 078 ribotype, which are highly prevalent hypervirulent strains in humans. This methodology can help rapidly detect and identify C. difficile strains that impose a significant health and economic burden in hospitals and other healthcare settings. PMID:26516039

  4. Validation of a blood group genotyping method based on high-resolution melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Gong, Tianxiang; Hong, Ying; Wang, Naihong; Fu, Xuemei; Zhou, Changhua

    2014-01-01

    The detection of polymorphism is the basis of blood group genotyping and phenotype prediction. Genotyping may be useful to determine blood groups when serologic results are unclear. The development and application of different methods for blood group genotyping may be needed as a substitute for blood group typing. The purpose of this study is to establish an approach for blood group genotyping based on a melting curve analysis of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Using DNA extracted from whole blood, we developed and validated a DNA typing method for detecting DO*01/DO*02, DO*01/DI*02, LU*01/LU*02, and GYPB*03/GYBP*04 alleles using a melting curve analysis. All assays were confirmed with a commercial reagent containing sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP), and a cohort of the samples was confirmed with sequencing. Results for all blood groups were within the range of specificity and assay variability. Genotypes of 300 blood donors were fully consistent with PCR-SSP data. The obtained genotype distribution is in complete concordance with existing data for the Chinese population. There are several advantages for this approach of blood group genotyping: lower contamination rates with PCR products in this laboratory, ease of performance, automation potential, and rapid cycling time.

  5. Single fluorophore melting curve analysis for detection of hypervirulent Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Angione, Stephanie L; Croote, Derek; Leung, Joshua W; Mermel, Leonard A; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates a novel detection assay able to identify and subtype strains of Clostridium difficile. Primers carefully designed for melting curve analysis amplify DNA from three C. difficile genes, tcdB, tcdC and cdtB, during quantitative (q)PCR. The tcdB gene allows for confirmation of organism presence, whilst the tcdC and cdtB genes allow for differentiation of virulence status, as deletions in the tcdC gene and the concurrent presence of the cdtB gene, which produces binary toxin, are associated with hypervirulence. Following qPCR, subtyping is then achieved by automated, inline melting curve analysis using only a single intercalating dye and verified by microchip electrophoresis. This assay represents a novel means of distinguishing between toxigenic and hypervirulent C. difficile strains NAP1/027/BI and 078 ribotype, which are highly prevalent hypervirulent strains in humans. This methodology can help rapidly detect and identify C. difficile strains that impose a significant health and economic burden in hospitals and other healthcare settings.

  6. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in symptomatic patients and detection of clarithromycin resistance using melting curve analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Ayse Demet; Öztürk, C. Elif; Akcan, Yusuf; Behçet, Mustafa; Karakoç, A. Esra; Yücel, Mihriban; Mısırlıoglu, Müge; Tuncer, Serdar

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background: Clarithromycin is often a component of combination therapies for Helicobacter pylori eradication; however, increases in resistance rates have decreased the success of the treatment. Objective: This study was designed to determine the prevalence of H pylori infection in symptomatic patients and to detect clarithromycin resistance rates using melting curve analysis. Methods: Patients scheduled for upper endoscopy at the Endoscopy Unit of the Department of Gastroenterology, Duzce University, Medical Faculty Hospital, Konuralp/Duzce, Turkey, were assessed for enrollment in the study. Two pairs of gastric biopsy specimens (antrum and corpus) were obtained from each study patient. Histopathologic examination, rapid urease test, culture, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the specimens were used to identify H pylori infection. Clarithromycin resistance was detected using melting curve analysis. Results: Seventy-five patients (41 women, 34 men; mean [SD]age, 42.6 [14.5] years [range, 17–70 years]) were included in the study. Using histopathology and rapid urease test, H pylori was detected in 40 (53.3%) of the 75 specimens. H pylori was detected using PCR in 40 (53.3%) specimens and by culture in 10 (13.3%) specimens. The specificity and sensitivity of PCR and culture were interpreted by comparing them with the results of histopathologic examination and urease tests. The specificity and sensitivity of PCR were 68.6% and 72.5%, respectively, and the specificity and sensitivity of culture were 97.1% and 22.5%, respectively. Of the 40 isolates, 21 (52.5%) were susceptible to clarithromycin, 12 (30.0%) were resistant, and a mixed susceptibility pattern was detected in 7 (17.5%) specimens. H pylori isolates from 19 (79.2%) of the 24 patients who had formerly used clarithromycin showed clarithromycin resistance. Conclusions: The prevalence of H pylori infection was 53.3% for the symptomatic patients in this study, and 47.5% of the isolates showed

  7. Comparison of Sanger sequencing, pyrosequencing, and melting curve analysis for the detection of KRAS mutations: diagnostic and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Tsiatis, Athanasios C; Norris-Kirby, Alexis; Rich, Roy G; Hafez, Michael J; Gocke, Christopher D; Eshleman, James R; Murphy, Kathleen M

    2010-07-01

    Mutations in codons 12 and 13 of the KRAS oncogene are relatively common in colorectal and lung adenocarcinomas. Recent data indicate that these mutations result in resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy. Therefore, we assessed Sanger sequencing, pyrosequencing, and melting curve analysis for the detection of KRAS codon 12/13 mutations in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, including 58 primary and 42 metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas, 63 primary and 17 metastatic lung adenocarcinomas, and 20 normal colon samples. Of 180 tumor samples, 62.2% were KRAS mutant positive, and 37.8% were negative. Melting curve analysis yielded no false positive or false negative results, but had 10% equivocal calls. Melting curve analysis also resulted in 4 cases with melting curves inconsistent with either wild-type or codon 12/13 mutations. These patterns were generated from samples with double mutants in codons 12/13 and with mutations outside of codons 12/13. Pyrosequencing yielded no false positive or false negative results as well. However, two samples from one patient yielded a pyrogram that was flagged as abnormal, but the mutation subtype could not be determined. Finally, using an electronic cutoff of 10%, Sanger sequencing showed 11.1% false positives and 6.1% false negatives. In our hands, the limit of detection for Sanger sequencing, pyrosequencing, and melting curve analysis was approximately 15 to 20%, 5%, and 10% mutant alleles, respectively. PMID:20431034

  8. Single-channel multiplexing without melting curve analysis in real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Jo; Kim, Daeyoung; Lee, Kihoon; Chun, Jong-Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Multiplex real-time PCR with quantification of targets in a single fluorescence channel has been the demand in biotechnology industry. Here, we develop a novel analytical real-time PCR technique to detect multiple targets in a single fluorescence channel without melting curve analysis. In this technique, we show the intensity of the fluorescence signals of two discrete Tm targets is different at certain temperatures called detection temperatures, by which a high Tm target can be detected regardless of a low Tm target. We then identify the low Tm target by utilizing a change of the fluorescence signals between two different detection temperatures. Furthermore, it enables us to determine quantification of each target in a single channel, possibly facilitating convenient patient care for drug treatment in clinics. PMID:25501038

  9. High-Resolution Melting Curve Analysis for Identification of Pasteurellaceae Species in Experimental Animal Facilities.

    PubMed

    Miller, Manuel; Zorn, Julia; Brielmeier, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurellaceae are among the most prevalent bacterial pathogens isolated from mice housed in experimental animal facilities. Reliable detection and differentiation of Pasteurellaceae are essential for high-quality health monitoring. In this study, we combined a real-time PCR assay amplifying a variable region in the 16S rRNA sequence with high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRM) to identify and differentiate among the commonly isolated species Pasteurella pneumotropica biotypes "Jawetz" and "Heyl", Actinobacillus muris, and Haemophilus influenzaemurium. We used a set of six reference strains for assay development, with the melting profiles of these strains clearly distinguishable due to DNA sequence variations in the amplicon. For evaluation, we used real-time PCR/HRM to test 25 unknown Pasteurellaceae isolates obtained from an external diagnostic laboratory and found the results to be consistent with those of partial 16S rRNA sequencing. The real-time PCR/HRM method provides a sensitive, rapid, and closed-tube approach for Pasteurellaceae species identification for health monitoring of laboratory mice. PMID:26556281

  10. High-throughput gender identification of penguin species using melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chao-Neng; Chang, Yung-Ting; Chiu, Hui-Tzu; Chou, Yii-Cheng; Huang, Hurng-Wern; Cheng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Ming-Hui; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2014-04-01

    Most species of penguins are sexual monomorphic and therefore it is difficult to visually identify their genders for monitoring population stability in terms of sex ratio analysis. In this study, we evaluated the suitability using melting curve analysis (MCA) for high-throughput gender identification of penguins. Preliminary test indicated that the Griffiths's P2/P8 primers were not suitable for MCA analysis. Based on sequence alignment of Chromo-Helicase-DNA binding protein (CHD)-W and CHD-Z genes from four species of penguins (Pygoscelis papua, Aptenodytes patagonicus, Spheniscus magellanicus, and Eudyptes chrysocome), we redesigned forward primers for the CHD-W/CHD-Z-common region (PGU-ZW2) and the CHD-W-specific region (PGU-W2) to be used in combination with the reverse Griffiths's P2 primer. When tested with P. papua samples, PCR using P2/PGU-ZW2 and P2/PGU-W2 primer sets generated two amplicons of 148- and 356-bp, respectively, which were easily resolved in 1.5% agarose gels. MCA analysis indicated the melting temperature (Tm) values for P2/PGU-ZW2 and P2/PGU-W2 amplicons of P. papua samples were 79.75°C-80.5°C and 81.0°C-81.5°C, respectively. Females displayed both ZW-common and W-specific Tm peaks, whereas male was positive only for ZW-common peak. Taken together, our redesigned primers coupled with MCA analysis allows precise high throughput gender identification for P. papua, and potentially for other penguin species such as A. patagonicus, S. magellanicus, and E. chrysocome as well. PMID:24555797

  11. High-throughput gender identification of penguin species using melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chao-Neng; Chang, Yung-Ting; Chiu, Hui-Tzu; Chou, Yii-Cheng; Huang, Hurng-Wern; Cheng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Ming-Hui; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2014-04-01

    Most species of penguins are sexual monomorphic and therefore it is difficult to visually identify their genders for monitoring population stability in terms of sex ratio analysis. In this study, we evaluated the suitability using melting curve analysis (MCA) for high-throughput gender identification of penguins. Preliminary test indicated that the Griffiths's P2/P8 primers were not suitable for MCA analysis. Based on sequence alignment of Chromo-Helicase-DNA binding protein (CHD)-W and CHD-Z genes from four species of penguins (Pygoscelis papua, Aptenodytes patagonicus, Spheniscus magellanicus, and Eudyptes chrysocome), we redesigned forward primers for the CHD-W/CHD-Z-common region (PGU-ZW2) and the CHD-W-specific region (PGU-W2) to be used in combination with the reverse Griffiths's P2 primer. When tested with P. papua samples, PCR using P2/PGU-ZW2 and P2/PGU-W2 primer sets generated two amplicons of 148- and 356-bp, respectively, which were easily resolved in 1.5% agarose gels. MCA analysis indicated the melting temperature (Tm) values for P2/PGU-ZW2 and P2/PGU-W2 amplicons of P. papua samples were 79.75°C-80.5°C and 81.0°C-81.5°C, respectively. Females displayed both ZW-common and W-specific Tm peaks, whereas male was positive only for ZW-common peak. Taken together, our redesigned primers coupled with MCA analysis allows precise high throughput gender identification for P. papua, and potentially for other penguin species such as A. patagonicus, S. magellanicus, and E. chrysocome as well.

  12. Limitation of high-resolution melting curve analysis for genotyping simple sequence repeats in sheep.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Yue, Y J; Guo, T T; Han, J L; Liu, J B; Guo, J; Sun, X P; Feng, R L; Wu, Y Y; Wang, C F; Wang, L P; Yang, B H

    2014-04-08

    Variation in microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci has, until recently, relied heavily on the use of gel-based methods that can be both time consuming and difficult to genotype. Non gel-based systems are therefore important to increase simplicity and improve turn-around time without compromising assay sensitivity and accuracy. In this report, we assessed the latest of the non-gel-based methods, high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis. HRM is a technique that monitors exactly the decreasing fluorescence of intercalating dye in the process of dissociation of double-stranded DNA. The measurement immediately follows polymerase chain reaction in a one-step, closed-tube method. Four SSR loci of different complexity in sheep, namely MAF209, MCM140, CB226, and SRCRSP5, were assessed using the LightScanners System with LC Greens PLUS DNA binding dye. In order to improve the accuracy of genotyping, we applied internal oligo nucleotide calibrators while performing HRM. DNA polymorphisms were previously identified using capillary electrophoresis analysis (CE). The result showed that CE detected more genotypes than HRM in the same loci regardless of the level of polymorphism at the SSR loci. We demonstrate current limitations of the HRM method for the analysis of SSR loci.

  13. On-chip magnetic bead-based DNA melting curve analysis using a magnetoresistive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik W.; Henriksen, Anders D.; Dufva, Martin; Hansen, Mikkel F.

    2015-04-01

    We present real-time measurements of DNA melting curves in a chip-based system that detects the amount of surface-bound magnetic beads using magnetoresistive magnetic field sensors. The sensors detect the difference between the amount of beads bound to the top and bottom sensor branches of the differential sensor geometry. The sensor surfaces are functionalized with wild type (WT) and mutant type (MT) capture probes, differing by a single base insertion (a single nucleotide polymorphism, SNP). Complementary biotinylated targets in suspension couple streptavidin magnetic beads to the sensor surface. The beads are magnetized by the field arising from the bias current passed through the sensors. We demonstrate the first on-chip measurements of the melting of DNA hybrids upon a ramping of the temperature. This overcomes the limitation of using a single washing condition at constant temperature. Moreover, we demonstrate that a single sensor bridge can be used to genotype a SNP.

  14. Differentiation of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Using Multiplex-PCR and High Resolution Melt Curve Analysis.

    PubMed

    Banowary, Banya; Dang, Van Tuan; Sarker, Subir; Connolly, Joanne H; Chenu, Jeremy; Groves, Peter; Ayton, Michelle; Raidal, Shane; Devi, Aruna; Vanniasinkam, Thiru; Ghorashi, Seyed A

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter spp. are important causes of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans in developed countries. Among Campylobacter spp. Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) and C. coli are the most common causes of human infection. In this study, a multiplex PCR (mPCR) and high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis were optimized for simultaneous detection and differentiation of C. jejuni and C. coli isolates. A segment of the hippuricase gene (hipO) of C. jejuni and putative aspartokinase (asp) gene of C. coli were amplified from 26 Campylobacter isolates and amplicons were subjected to HRM curve analysis. The mPCR-HRM was able to differentiate between C. jejuni and C. coli species. All DNA amplicons generated by mPCR were sequenced. Analysis of the nucleotide sequences from each isolate revealed that the HRM curves were correlated with the nucleotide sequences of the amplicons. Minor variation in melting point temperatures of C. coli or C. jejuni isolates was also observed and enabled some intraspecies differentiation between C. coli and/or C. jejuni isolates. The potential of PCR-HRM curve analysis for the detection and speciation of Campylobacter in additional human clinical specimens and chicken swab samples was also confirmed. The sensitivity and specificity of the test were found to be 100% and 92%, respectively. The results indicated that mPCR followed by HRM curve analysis provides a rapid (8 hours) technique for differentiation between C. jejuni and C. coli isolates.

  15. Heterozygote PCR product melting curve prediction.

    PubMed

    Dwight, Zachary L; Palais, Robert; Kent, Jana; Wittwer, Carl T

    2014-03-01

    Melting curve prediction of PCR products is limited to perfectly complementary strands. Multiple domains are calculated by recursive nearest neighbor thermodynamics. However, the melting curve of an amplicon containing a heterozygous single-nucleotide variant (SNV) after PCR is the composite of four duplexes: two matched homoduplexes and two mismatched heteroduplexes. To better predict the shape of composite heterozygote melting curves, 52 experimental curves were compared with brute force in silico predictions varying two parameters simultaneously: the relative contribution of heteroduplex products and an ionic scaling factor for mismatched tetrads. Heteroduplex products contributed 25.7 ± 6.7% to the composite melting curve, varying from 23%-28% for different SNV classes. The effect of ions on mismatch tetrads scaled to 76%-96% of normal (depending on SNV class) and averaged 88 ± 16.4%. Based on uMelt (www.dna.utah.edu/umelt/umelt.html) with an expanded nearest neighbor thermodynamic set that includes mismatched base pairs, uMelt HETS calculates helicity as a function of temperature for homoduplex and heteroduplex products, as well as the composite curve expected from heterozygotes. It is an interactive Web tool for efficient genotyping design, heterozygote melting curve prediction, and quality control of melting curve experiments. The application was developed in Actionscript and can be found online at http://www.dna.utah.edu/hets/.

  16. Barcoding melting curve analysis for rapid, sensitive, and discriminating authentication of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) from its adulterants.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chao; Cao, Liang; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Min; Jin, Yan; Huang, Luqi

    2014-01-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) is one of the most important and expensive medicinal spice products in the world. Because of its high market value and premium price, saffron is often adulterated through the incorporation of other materials, such as Carthamus tinctorius L. and Calendula officinalis L. flowers, Hemerocallis L. petals, Daucus carota L. fleshy root, Curcuma longa L. rhizomes, Zea may L., and Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. stigmas. To develop a straightforward, nonsequencing method for rapid, sensitive, and discriminating detection of these adulterants in traded saffron, we report here the application of a barcoding melting curve analysis method (Bar-MCA) that uses the universal chloroplast plant DNA barcoding region trnH-psbA to identify adulterants. When amplified at DNA concentrations and annealing temperatures optimized for the curve analysis, peaks were formed at specific locations for saffron (81.92°C) and the adulterants: D. carota (81.60°C), C. tinctorius (80.10°C), C. officinalis (79.92°C), Dendranthema morifolium (Ramat.) Tzvel. (79.62°C), N. nucifera (80.58°C), Hemerocallis fulva (L.) L. (84.78°C), and Z. mays (84.33°C). The constructed melting curves for saffron and its adulterants have significantly different peak locations or shapes. In conclusion, Bar-MCA could be a faster and more cost-effective method to authenticate saffron and detect its adulterants. PMID:25548775

  17. Barcoding Melting Curve Analysis for Rapid, Sensitive, and Discriminating Authentication of Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) from Its Adulterants

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Liang; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Min; Jin, Yan; Huang, Luqi

    2014-01-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) is one of the most important and expensive medicinal spice products in the world. Because of its high market value and premium price, saffron is often adulterated through the incorporation of other materials, such as Carthamus tinctorius L. and Calendula officinalis L. flowers, Hemerocallis L. petals, Daucus carota L. fleshy root, Curcuma longa L. rhizomes, Zea may L., and Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. stigmas. To develop a straightforward, nonsequencing method for rapid, sensitive, and discriminating detection of these adulterants in traded saffron, we report here the application of a barcoding melting curve analysis method (Bar-MCA) that uses the universal chloroplast plant DNA barcoding region trnH-psbA to identify adulterants. When amplified at DNA concentrations and annealing temperatures optimized for the curve analysis, peaks were formed at specific locations for saffron (81.92°C) and the adulterants: D. carota (81.60°C), C. tinctorius (80.10°C), C. officinalis (79.92°C), Dendranthema morifolium (Ramat.) Tzvel. (79.62°C), N. nucifera (80.58°C), Hemerocallis fulva (L.) L. (84.78°C), and Z. mays (84.33°C). The constructed melting curves for saffron and its adulterants have significantly different peak locations or shapes. In conclusion, Bar-MCA could be a faster and more cost-effective method to authenticate saffron and detect its adulterants. PMID:25548775

  18. Barcoding melting curve analysis for rapid, sensitive, and discriminating authentication of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) from its adulterants.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chao; Cao, Liang; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Min; Jin, Yan; Huang, Luqi

    2014-01-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) is one of the most important and expensive medicinal spice products in the world. Because of its high market value and premium price, saffron is often adulterated through the incorporation of other materials, such as Carthamus tinctorius L. and Calendula officinalis L. flowers, Hemerocallis L. petals, Daucus carota L. fleshy root, Curcuma longa L. rhizomes, Zea may L., and Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. stigmas. To develop a straightforward, nonsequencing method for rapid, sensitive, and discriminating detection of these adulterants in traded saffron, we report here the application of a barcoding melting curve analysis method (Bar-MCA) that uses the universal chloroplast plant DNA barcoding region trnH-psbA to identify adulterants. When amplified at DNA concentrations and annealing temperatures optimized for the curve analysis, peaks were formed at specific locations for saffron (81.92°C) and the adulterants: D. carota (81.60°C), C. tinctorius (80.10°C), C. officinalis (79.92°C), Dendranthema morifolium (Ramat.) Tzvel. (79.62°C), N. nucifera (80.58°C), Hemerocallis fulva (L.) L. (84.78°C), and Z. mays (84.33°C). The constructed melting curves for saffron and its adulterants have significantly different peak locations or shapes. In conclusion, Bar-MCA could be a faster and more cost-effective method to authenticate saffron and detect its adulterants.

  19. High resolution melting curve analysis as a new tool for rapid identification of canine parvovirus type 2 strains.

    PubMed

    Bingga, Gali; Liu, Zhicheng; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zhu, Yujun; Lin, Lifeng; Ding, Shuangyang; Guo, Pengju

    2014-01-01

    A high resolution melting (HRM) curve method was developed to identify canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) strains by nested PCR. Two sets of primers, CPV-426F/426R and CPV-87R/87F, were designed that amplified a 52 bp and 53 bp product from the viral VP2 capsid gene. The region amplified by CPV-426F/426R included the A4062G and T4064A mutations in CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c. The region amplified by CPV-87F/87R included the A3045T mutation in the vaccine strains of CPV-2 and CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c. Faecal samples were obtained from 30 dogs that were CPV antigen-positive. The DNA was isolated from the faecal samples and PCR-amplified using the two sets of primers, and genotyped by HRM curve analysis. The PCR-HRM assay was able to distinguish single nucleotide polymorphisms between CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c using CPV-426F/426R. CPV-2a was distinguished from CPV-2b and CPV-2c by differences in the melting temperature. CPV-2b and CPV-2c could be distinguished based on the shape of the melting curve after generating heteroduplexes using a CPV-2b reference sample. The vaccine strains of CPV-2 were identified using CPV-87F/87R. Conventional methods for genotyping CPV strains are labor intensive, expensive or time consuming; the present PCR-based HRM assay might be an attractive alternative.

  20. Leptin receptor (LEPR) SNP polymorphisms in HELLP syndrome patients determined by quantitative real-time PCR and melting curve analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown overexpression of leptin in microarray experiments in pre-eclampsia (PE) and in hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets (HELLP) syndrome. We decided to study four leptin receptor (LEPR) SNP polymorphisms in HELLP syndrome patients by using quantitative real-time PCR and melting curve analysis. Methods DNA was isolated from blood samples from 83 normotensive pregnant women and 75 HELLP syndrome patients. Four SNPs, LEPR c.326A>G (K109), LEPR c.668A>G (Q223R), LEPR c.1968G>C (K656N) and LEPR c.3024A>G (S1008) were determined by quantitative real-time PCR and melting curve analysis. Investigators were blinded to clinical outcomes. Results LEPR c.326A>G, LEPR c.668A>G, LEPR c.1968G>C and LEPR c.3024A>G allele, genotype and haplotype polymorphisms were not different in HELLP syndrome patients and normotensive healthy pregnants. There were strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) between loci c.326A>G and c.6687A>G (D' = 0.974), and c.668A>G and c.1968G>C (D' = 0.934), and c.326A>G and c.1968G>C (D' = 0.885), and c.1968G>C and c.3024A>G (D' = 1.0). However, linkages of c.3024A>G with c.668A>G (D' = 0.111) and c.326A>G (D' = 0.398) were weak. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed for all polymorphisms. However the LEPR c.326A>G AG genotype was twice more frequent and the (AG AG GG AG) haplotype was three times more frequent in HELLP syndrome patients. The introduced quantitative real-time PCR combined with melting curve analysis is a fast and reliable method for the determination of LEPR SNPs. Conclusion Although certain LEPR haplotypes are more frequent in HELLP syndrome, we conclude that there is no compelling evidence that the four studied LEPR SNP polymorphisms associated with the development of HELLP syndrome. PMID:20149225

  1. Detection and differentiation of in vitro-spiked bacteria by real-time PCR and melting-curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Klaschik, S; Lehmann, L E; Raadts, A; Book, M; Gebel, J; Hoeft, A; Stuber, F

    2004-02-01

    We introduce a consensus real-time PCR protocol for the detection of bacterial DNA from laboratory-prepared specimens such as water, urine, and plasma. This prototype detection system enables an exact Gram stain classification and, in particular, screening for specific species of 17 intensive care unit-relevant bacteria by means of fluorescence hybridization probes and melting-curve analysis in a one-run experiment. One strain of every species was tested at a final density of 10(6) CFU/ml. All bacteria examined except Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis could be differentiated successfully; S. aureus and S. epidermidis could only be classified as "Staphylococcus species." The hands-on time for preparation of the DNA, performance of the PCR, and evaluation of the PCR results was less than 4 h. Nevertheless, this prototype detection system requires more clinical validation.

  2. DOUBLE-STEP MULTIPLEX REAL TIME PCR WITH MELTING CURVE ANALYSIS FOR DETECTION AND DIFFERENTIATION OF MYCOBACTERIA IN SPUTUM.

    PubMed

    Kasa, Sawinee; Faksri, Kiatichai; Kaewkes, Wanlop; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Namwat, Wises

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) is a causative agent of tuberculosis, a worldwide public health problem. In recent years, the incidence of human mycobacterial infection due to species other than M. tb has increased. However, the lack of specific, rapid, and inexpensive methods for identification of mycobacterial species remains a pressing problem. A diagnostic test was developed for mycobacterial strain differentiation utilizing a double-step multiplex real time PCR together with melting curve analysis for identifying and distinguishing among M. tb, M. bovis BCG, other members of M. tb. complex, M. avium, and non-tuberculosis mycobacteria. The assay was tested using 167 clinical sputum samples in comparison with acid-fast staining and culturing. Using only the first step (step A) the assay achieved sensitivity and specificity of 81% and 95%, respectively. The detection limit was equivalent to 50 genome copies.

  3. DOUBLE-STEP MULTIPLEX REAL TIME PCR WITH MELTING CURVE ANALYSIS FOR DETECTION AND DIFFERENTIATION OF MYCOBACTERIA IN SPUTUM.

    PubMed

    Kasa, Sawinee; Faksri, Kiatichai; Kaewkes, Wanlop; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Namwat, Wises

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) is a causative agent of tuberculosis, a worldwide public health problem. In recent years, the incidence of human mycobacterial infection due to species other than M. tb has increased. However, the lack of specific, rapid, and inexpensive methods for identification of mycobacterial species remains a pressing problem. A diagnostic test was developed for mycobacterial strain differentiation utilizing a double-step multiplex real time PCR together with melting curve analysis for identifying and distinguishing among M. tb, M. bovis BCG, other members of M. tb. complex, M. avium, and non-tuberculosis mycobacteria. The assay was tested using 167 clinical sputum samples in comparison with acid-fast staining and culturing. Using only the first step (step A) the assay achieved sensitivity and specificity of 81% and 95%, respectively. The detection limit was equivalent to 50 genome copies. PMID:26513906

  4. Rapid detection of isoniazid resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates by use of real-time-PCR-based melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Siyu; Li, Guoli; Li, Hui; Liu, Xiaoli; Niu, Jianjun; Quan, Shengmao; Wang, Feng; Wen, Huixin; Xu, Ye; Li, Qingge

    2014-05-01

    The MeltPro TB/INH assay, recently approved by the Chinese Food and Drug Administration, is a closed-tube, dual-color, melting curve analysis-based, real-time PCR test specially designed to detect 30 isoniazid (INH) resistance mutations in katG position 315 (katG 315), the inhA promoter (positions -17 to -8), inhA position 94, and the ahpC promoter (positions -44 to -30 and -15 to 3) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here we evaluated both the analytical performance and clinical performance of this assay. Analytical studies with corresponding panels demonstrated that the accuracy for detection of different mutation types (10 wild-type samples and 12 mutant type samples), the limit of detection (2×10(3) to 2×10(4) bacilli/ml), reproducibility (standard deviation [SD], <0.4°C), and the lowest heteroresistance level (40%) all met the parameters preset by the kit. The assay could be run on five types of real-time PCR machines, with the shortest running time (105 min) obtained with the LightCycler 480 II. Clinical studies enrolled 1,096 clinical isolates collected from three geographically different tuberculosis centers, including 437 INH-resistant isolates and 659 INH-susceptible isolates characterized by traditional drug susceptibility testing on Löwenstein-Jensen solid medium. The clinical sensitivity and specificity of the MeltPro TB/INH assay were 90.8% and 96.4%, respectively. DNA sequencing analysis showed that, except for the 5 mutants outside the detection range of the MeltPro assay, a concordance rate between the two methods of 99.1% (457/461) was obtained. Among the 26 mutation types detected, katG S315T (AGC→ACC), inhA -15C→T, katG S315N (AGC→AAC), and ahpC promoter -10C→T accounted for more than 90%. Overall, the MeltPro TB/INH assay represents a reliable and rapid tool for the detection of INH resistance in clinical isolates.

  5. Ab initio melting curve of osmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burakovsky, L.; Burakovsky, N.; Preston, D. L.

    2015-11-01

    The melting curve of osmium up to a pressure P of 500 GPa is obtained from an extensive suite of ab initio quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations using the Z method. The ab initio P =0 melting point of Os is 3370 ±75 K; this range encompasses all of the available data in the literature and corroborates the conclusion of J. W. Arblaster [Platinum Metals Rev. 49, 166 (2005)], 10.1595/147106705X70264 that the melting temperature of pure Os is 3400 ±50 K and that the 3300 K typically quoted in the literature is the melting point of impure Os. The T =0 equation of state (EOS) of Os and the P dependence of the optimized c /a ratio for the hexagonal unit cell, both to pressures ˜900 GPa, are obtained in the ab initio approach as validation of its use. Although excellent agreement with the available experimental data (P ≲80 GPa) is found, it is the third-order Birch-Murnaghan EOS with B0'=5 rather than the more widely accepted B0'=4 that describes the QMD data to higher pressures, in agreement with the more recent experimental EOS by Godwal et al. The theoretical melting curve of Os obtained earlier by Joshi et al. is shown to be inconsistent with our QMD results, and the possible reason for this discrepancy is suggested. Regularities in the melting curves of Os and five other third-row transition metals (Ta, W, Re, Pt, Au) could be used to estimate the currently unknown melting curves of Hf and Ir.

  6. High-resolution melting curve analysis for genotyping of common SNP in MTHFR gene using fixed-cell suspension.

    PubMed

    Sinthuwiwat, Thivaratana; Poowasanpetch, Phanasit; Wongngamrungroj, Angsana; Promso, Somying; Auewarakul, Chirayu; Mooney, Sean; Tocharoentanaphol, Chintana

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variation in MTHFR might explain the interindividual differences in both therapeutic and toxic responses to the treatment of cancer and rheumatoid arthritis with methotrexate, and can be involved in the sensitivity of developing diseases like cancer and congenital anomalies. We investigated the common sequence variation, C677T, in the MTHFR gene in fixed-cell specimens archived after chromosomal analysis using a novel gene scanning method based on post PCR analysis of high-resolution melting curves (HRM). These fixed specimens were stored after routine chromosomal analysis for 1 year at -20 degrees C in a 3:1 methanol:acetic acid solution. The method revealed a distinct pattern between homozygous and heterozygous alleles. Sensitivity and specificity of the HRM based method were comparable to that obtained by a hybridization probe. While the success rate for genotyping of a common SNP in MTHFR was similar to the hybridization probe approach, the HRM based method was more cost-effective and had a shorter turnaround time. PMID:18725286

  7. Detection and discrimination of members of the family Luteoviridae by real-time PCR and SYBR® GreenER™ melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Chomic, Anastasija; Winder, Louise; Armstrong, Karen F; Pearson, Michael N; Hampton, John G

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the suitability of a two step real-time RT-PCR melting curve analysis as a tool for the detection and discrimination of nine species in the plant virus family Luteoviridae, being Soybean dwarf virus [SbDV], Bean leafroll virus [BLRV], Beet chlorosis virus [BChV], Beet mild yellowing virus [BMYV], Beet western yellows virus [BWYV], Cereal yellow dwarf virus-RPV [CYDV-RPV], Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus [CABYV], Potato leafroll virus [PLRV] and Turnip yellows virus [TuYV]. Melting temperature and shape of the melting peak were analysed for 68 bp and 148 bp coat protein gene amplicons using SYBR® GreenER™ fluorescent dye. Specific melting peaks with unique melting temperature were observed for the various species of the family Luteoviridae using the 68 bp amplicon, but not with the 148 bp amplicon. Due to the high variability of sequences for some members of this family, different melting temperatures were also observed between different isolates of the species CYDV-RPV and TuYV. Nevertheless, discrimination between species was achieved for SbDV, BLRV, BChV, BMYV, CABYV and either PLRV or BWYV. Melting curve analysis, in this study, is a faster and more discriminatory alternative to gel electrophoresis of end-point PCR products for the detection of Luteoviridae infection. PMID:20933015

  8. Usefulness of three-channel multiplex real-time PCR and melting curve analysis for simultaneous detection and identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yun Ji; Chung, Young Hoon; Kim, Taek Soo; Song, Sang Hoon; Park, Kyoung Un; Yim, Jae Joon; Song, Junghan; Lee, Jae Ho; Kim, Eui Chong

    2011-11-01

    We attempted to determine the benefits of three-channel multiplex real-time PCR and melting curve analysis not only in detecting and distinguishing between nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) and the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex but also in identifying NTM to the species level.

  9. High-resolution DNA melt curve analysis of the clustered, regularly interspaced short-palindromic-repeat locus of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Price, Erin P; Smith, Helen; Huygens, Flavia; Giffard, Philip M

    2007-05-01

    A novel method for genotyping the clustered, regularly interspaced short-palindromic-repeat (CRISPR) locus of Campylobacter jejuni is described. Following real-time PCR, CRISPR products were subjected to high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis, a new technology that allows precise melt profile determination of amplicons. This investigation shows that the CRISPR HRM assay provides a powerful addition to existing C. jejuni genotyping methods and emphasizes the potential of HRM for genotyping short sequence repeats in other species.

  10. Detection of a knockdown resistance mutation associated with permethrin resistance in the body louse Pediculus humanus corporis by use of melting curve analysis genotyping.

    PubMed

    Drali, Rezak; Benkouiten, Samir; Badiaga, Sékéné; Bitam, Idir; Rolain, Jean Marc; Brouqui, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    Louse-borne diseases are prevalent in the homeless, and body louse eradication has thus far been unsuccessful in this population. We aim to develop a rapid and robust genotyping method usable in large field-based clinical studies to monitor permethrin resistance in the human body louse Pediculus humanus corporis. We assessed a melting curve analysis genotyping method based on real-time PCR using hybridization probes to detect the M815I-T917I-L920F knockdown resistance (kdr) mutation in the paraorthologous voltage-sensitive sodium channel (VSSC) α subunit gene, which is associated with permethrin resistance. The 908-bp DNA fragment of the VSSC gene, encoding the α subunit of the sodium channel and encompassing the three mutation sites, was PCR sequenced from 65 lice collected from a homeless population. We noted a high prevalence of the 3 indicated mutations in the body lice collected from homeless people (100% for the M815I and L920F mutations and 56.73% for the T917I mutation). These results were confirmed by melting curve analysis genotyping, which had a calculated sensitivity of 100% for the M815I and T917I mutations and of 98% for the L920F mutation. The specificity was 100% for M815I and L920F and 96% for T917I. Melting curve analysis genotyping is a fast, sensitive, and specific tool that is fully compatible with the analysis of a large number of samples in epidemiological surveys, allowing the simultaneous genotyping of 96 samples in just over an hour (75 min). Thus, it is perfectly suited for the epidemiological monitoring of permethrin resistance in human body lice in large-scale clinical studies. PMID:22573588

  11. Rapid detection and non-subjective characterisation of infectious bronchitis virus isolates using high-resolution melt curve analysis and a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Hewson, Kylie; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Devlin, Joanne M; Mardani, Karim; Ignjatovic, Jagoda

    2009-01-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is a coronavirus that causes upper respiratory, renal and/or reproductive diseases with high morbidity in poultry. Classification of IBV is important for implementation of vaccination strategies to control the disease in commercial poultry. Currently, the lengthy process of sequence analysis of the IBV S1 gene is considered the gold standard for IBV strain identification, with a high nucleotide identity (e.g. > or =95%) indicating related strains. However, this gene has a high propensity to mutate and/or undergo recombination, and alone it may not be reliable for strain identification. A real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) combined with high-resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis was developed based on the 3'UTR of IBV for rapid detection and classification of IBV from commercial poultry. HRM curves generated from 230 to 435-bp PCR products of several IBV strains were subjected to further analysis using a mathematical model also developed during this study. It was shown that a combination of HRM curve analysis and the mathematical model could reliably group 189 out of 190 comparisons of pairs of IBV strains in accordance with their 3'UTR and S1 gene identities. The newly developed RT-PCR/HRM curve analysis model could detect and rapidly identify novel and vaccine-related IBV strains, as confirmed by S1 gene and 3'UTR nucleotide sequences. This model is a rapid, reliable, accurate and non-subjective system for detection of IBVs in poultry flocks.

  12. Quantitative detection and differentiation of free-living amoeba species using SYBR green-based real-time PCR melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Behets, Jonas; Declerck, Priscilla; Delaedt, Yasmine; Verelst, Lieve; Ollevier, Frans

    2006-12-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction melting curve analysis (MCA) allows differentiation of several free-living amoebae species. Distinctive characteristics were found for Naegleria fowleri, N. lovaniensis, N. australiensis, N. gruberi, Hartmanella vermiformis, and Willaertia magna. Species specificity of the amplicons was confirmed using agarose gel electrophoresis and sequence-based approaches. Amplification efficiency ranged from 91% to 98%, indicating the quantitative potential of the assay. This MCA approach can be used for quantitative detection of free-living amoebae after cultivation but also as a culture-independent detection method.

  13. Melting curve of metals evidenced by X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewaele, Agnes

    2013-06-01

    There has been a consistent pattern of disagreement between the determinations of high pressure melting by two experimental techniques, the static laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) and the dynamic shock wave compression. For several elements, ``high'' and ``low'' melting points have been measured by shock compression and LHDAC, respectively. The difference could exceed one thousand of K. We have re-visited the melting curve of a few metals in a LHDAC: lead, tantalum, beryllium and iron. We have used an alternative diagnostic of melting, based on X-ray diffraction instead of optical detection. The melting curves obtained with this diagnostic are in correct agreement with shock wave data. Movements of the sample surface, which were previously interpreted as a melting signature, could be due to a fast recrystallization of the solid sample. This fast recrystallization is evidenced by X-ray diffraction up to several hundreds of degrees below melting for some metals.

  14. Genotyping of velvet antlers for identification of country of origin using mitochondrial DNA and fluorescence melting curve analysis with locked nucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jeong Jin; Kim, Youngjoo; Hong, Ji Young; Kim, Gi Won; Hwang, Seung Yong

    2016-07-01

    Velvet antlers are used medicinally in Asia and possess various therapeutic effects. Prices are set according to the country of origin, which is unidentifiable to the naked eye, and therefore counterfeiting is prevalent. Additionally, antlers of the Canadian elk, which can generate chronic wasting disease, are prevalently smuggled and distributed in the market. Thus, a method for identifying the country of origin of velvet antlers was developed, using polymorphisms in mitochondrial DNA, fluorescence melting curve analysis and analysis of locked nucleic acids (LNA). This combined method is capable of identifying five genotypes of velvet antlers in a single experiment using two probes. It also has advantages in multiplexing, simplicity and efficiency in genotyping, when compared to real-time PCR or microarrays. The developed method can be used to improve identification rates in the velvet antler market and, by extension, research based on polymorphisms in DNA sequences.

  15. Application of a qPCR assay with melting curve analysis for detection and differentiation of protozoan oocysts in human fecal samples from Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Laura F; Reyes, Julissa; Gajadhar, Alvin A

    2013-11-01

    A quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay with melt curve analysis (qPCR-MCA) was applied for the detection of protozoan oocysts in 501 human fecal samples collected in Dominican Republic. Samples were subjected to qPCR using universal coccidia primers targeting 18S rDNA to detect oocysts followed by MCA to identify oocyst species based on amplicon melting temperature. Putative positive samples were also tested by conventional PCR and microscopy. Cystoisospora belli (×3), Cryptosporidium parvum (×3), Cryptosporidium hominis (×5), Cryptosporidium meleagridis (×1), Cryptosporidium canis (×1), and Cyclospora cayetanensis (×9) were detected by qPCR-MCA and confirmed by sequencing. This assay consistently detected 10 copies of the cloned target fragment and can be considered more efficient and sensitive than microscopy flotation methods for detecting multiple species of oocysts in human feces. The qPCR-MCA is a reliable protozoan oocyst screening assay for use on clinical and environmental samples in public health, food safety and veterinary programs.

  16. Rapid and specific detection of Salmonella in water samples using real-time PCR and High Resolution Melt (HRM) curve analysis.

    PubMed

    van Blerk, G N; Leibach, L; Mabunda, A; Chapman, A; Louw, D

    2011-01-01

    A real-time PCR assay combined with a pre-enrichment step for the specific and rapid detection of Salmonella in water samples is described. Following amplification of the invA gene target, High Resolution Melt (HRM) curve analysis was used to discriminate between products formed and to positively identify invA amplification. The real-time PCR assay was evaluated for specificity and sensitivity. The assay displayed 100% specificity for Salmonella and combined with a 16-18 h non-selective pre-enrichment step, the assay proved to be highly sensitive with a detection limit of 1.0 CFU/ml for surface water samples. The detection assay also demonstrated a high intra-run and inter-run repeatability with very little variation in invA amplicon melting temperature. When applied to water samples received routinely by the laboratory, the assay showed the presence of Salmonella in particularly surface water and treated effluent samples. Using the HRM based assay, the time required for Salmonella detection was drastically shortened to less than 24 h compared to several days when using standard culturing methods. This assay provides a useful tool for routine water quality monitoring as well as for quick screening during disease outbreaks.

  17. A simple and rapid genotyping assay for simultaneous detection of two ADRB2 allelic variants using fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes and melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Sábato, M Fernanda; Irani, Anne-Marie; Bukaveckas, Bonny L; Schwartz, Lawrence B; Wilkinson, David S; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Andrea

    2008-05-01

    Allelic variants at codons 16 and 27 of the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor gene (ADRB2) have shown clinical and pharmacological implications in asthma, hypertension, ischemic heart failure, diabetes, obesity, and cystic fibrosis. We have developed a simultaneous genotyping assay for the c.46A>G and c.79C>G allelic variants using hybridization probes and melting curve analysis. The assay was optimized on a panel of 30 DNA samples of known ADRB2 genotype as determined by sequencing with 100% concordance between the two techniques. Melting temperature (Tm) ranges for the different genotypes were obtained using data from three independent experiments. Single peaks for p.Arg16Arg (Tm = 57.76 degrees C +/- 0.10 degrees C) and p.Gly16Gly (Tm = 66.73 degrees C +/- 0.18 degrees C) and two melting peaks for p.Arg16Gly were obtained. Similarly, single peaks for p.Gln27Gln (Tm = 53.98 degrees C +/- 0.19 degrees C) and p.Glu27Glu (Tm = 64.93 degrees C +/- 0.16 degrees C) and two peaks for p.Gln27Glu were detected. Independent operators easily assigned genotypes in a sample set of 385 asthmatic patients. Haplotype and allele frequencies were in concordance with previously published data: Arg allele frequencies in children/adults were 0.34/0.30 in Caucasians and 0.45/0.52 in African Americans, and Gln allele frequencies were 0.58/0.52 in Caucasians and 0.82/0.84 in African Americans. Thus, the ADRB2 genotyping assay represents a highly reliable and rapid technique for routine clinical use in the simultaneous detection of ADRB2 variants.

  18. A Simple and Rapid Genotyping Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Two ADRB2 Allelic Variants Using Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Probes and Melting Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sábato, M. Fernanda; Irani, Anne-Marie; Bukaveckas, Bonny L.; Schwartz, Lawrence B.; Wilkinson, David S.; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Allelic variants at codons 16 and 27 of the β2-adrenergic receptor gene (ADRB2) have shown clinical and pharmacological implications in asthma, hypertension, ischemic heart failure, diabetes, obesity, and cystic fibrosis. We have developed a simultaneous genotyping assay for the c.46A>G and c.79C>G allelic variants using hybridization probes and melting curve analysis. The assay was optimized on a panel of 30 DNA samples of known ADRB2 genotype as determined by sequencing with 100% concordance between the two techniques. Melting temperature (Tm) ranges for the different genotypes were obtained using data from three independent experiments. Single peaks for p.Arg16Arg (Tm = 57.76°C ± 0.10°C) and p.Gly16Gly (Tm = 66.73°C ± 0.18°C) and two melting peaks for p.Arg16Gly were obtained. Similarly, single peaks for p.Gln27Gln (Tm = 53.98°C ± 0.19°C) and p.Glu27Glu (Tm = 64.93°C ± 0.16°C) and two peaks for p.Gln27Glu were detected. Independent operators easily assigned genotypes in a sample set of 385 asthmatic patients. Haplotype and allele frequencies were in concordance with previously published data: Arg allele frequencies in children/adults were 0.34/0.30 in Caucasians and 0.45/0.52 in African Americans, and Gln allele frequencies were 0.58/0.52 in Caucasians and 0.82/0.84 in African Americans. Thus, the ADRB2 genotyping assay represents a highly reliable and rapid technique for routine clinical use in the simultaneous detection of ADRB2 variants. PMID:18440968

  19. Shock melting method to determine melting curve by molecular dynamics: Cu, Pd, and Al

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhong-Li; Zhang, Xiu-Lu; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2015-09-21

    A melting simulation method, the shock melting (SM) method, is proposed and proved to be able to determine the melting curves of materials accurately and efficiently. The SM method, which is based on the multi-scale shock technique, determines melting curves by preheating and/or prepressurizing materials before shock. This strategy was extensively verified using both classical and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD). First, the SM method yielded the same satisfactory melting curve of Cu with only 360 atoms using classical MD, compared to the results from the Z-method and the two-phase coexistence method. Then, it also produced a satisfactory melting curve of Pd with only 756 atoms. Finally, the SM method combined with ab initio MD cheaply achieved a good melting curve of Al with only 180 atoms, which agrees well with the experimental data and the calculated results from other methods. It turned out that the SM method is an alternative efficient method for calculating the melting curves of materials.

  20. Automated Forensic Animal Family Identification by Nested PCR and Melt Curve Analysis on an Off-the-Shelf Thermocycler Augmented with a Centrifugal Microfluidic Disk Segment.

    PubMed

    Keller, Mark; Naue, Jana; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Nested PCR remains a labor-intensive and error-prone biomolecular analysis. Laboratory workflow automation by precise control of minute liquid volumes in centrifugal microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip systems holds great potential for such applications. However, the majority of these systems require costly custom-made processing devices. Our idea is to augment a standard laboratory device, here a centrifugal real-time PCR thermocycler, with inbuilt liquid handling capabilities for automation. We have developed a microfluidic disk segment enabling an automated nested real-time PCR assay for identification of common European animal groups adapted to forensic standards. For the first time we utilize a novel combination of fluidic elements, including pre-storage of reagents, to automate the assay at constant rotational frequency of an off-the-shelf thermocycler. It provides a universal duplex pre-amplification of short fragments of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and cytochrome b genes, animal-group-specific main-amplifications, and melting curve analysis for differentiation. The system was characterized with respect to assay sensitivity, specificity, risk of cross-contamination, and detection of minor components in mixtures. 92.2% of the performed tests were recognized as fluidically failure-free sample handling and used for evaluation. Altogether, augmentation of the standard real-time thermocycler with a self-contained centrifugal microfluidic disk segment resulted in an accelerated and automated analysis reducing hands-on time, and circumventing the risk of contamination associated with regular nested PCR protocols.

  1. Melting curve of metals Cu, Ag and Au under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Pham Dinh; Hoc, Nguyen Quang; Tinh, Bui Duc; Tan, Pham Duy

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the dependence of the melting temperature of metals Cu, Ag and Au under pressure in the interval from 0 kbar to 40 kbar is studied by the statistical moment method (SMM). This dependence has the form of near linearity and the calculated slopes of melting curve are 3.9 for Cu, 5.7 for Ag and 6 for Au. These results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Direct Detection of Macrolide Resistance in Mycoplasma genitalium Isolates from Clinical Specimens from France by Use of Real-Time PCR and Melting Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Touati, Arabella; Peuchant, Olivia; Jensen, Jorgen S.; Bébéar, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a sexually transmitted organism commonly treated with azithromycin. However, macrolide resistance has been reported and is associated with point mutations in the 23S rRNA gene. To evaluate the prevalence of macrolide resistance in M. genitalium isolates from clinical specimens from France, we first used a previously reported high-resolution melting assay. Because susceptible and resistant M. genitalium isolates were hardly discriminated in M. genitalium-positive clinical specimens, we developed a new molecular assay for the rapid detection of macrolide resistance. An assay using real-time PCR based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) coupled with melting curve analysis was designed. The assay was first validated on characterized macrolide-resistant M. genitalium isolates and then applied to 202 urogenital M. genitalium-positive specimens collected from 178 patients from France in 2011 and 2012. Resistant genotypes were confirmed by 23S rRNA gene sequencing. Among the 202 M. genitalium-positive specimens, 155 were amplified, demonstrating a sensitivity of 76.7%. A substitution in the 23S rRNA gene was found in 14.2% of the patient samples. Nine and six patients had M. genitalium isolates with a substitution at positions 2059 and 2058, respectively. In four cases, a mixed population of wild-type and mutated M. genitalium isolates was observed. The prevalence of M. genitalium macrolide resistance has been stable in France since its detection in 2006. Our FRET PCR assay is able to discriminate between wild-type and resistant genotypes directly from clinical specimens. This assay will allow clinicians to shorten the time to the initiation of effective disease treatment. PMID:24574291

  3. Analytical Detection of Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Gene Rearrangements in Gastric Lymphoid Infiltrates by Peak Area Analysis of the Melting Curve in the LightCycler System

    PubMed Central

    Retamales, Eduardo; Rodriguez, Luis; Guzman, Leda; Aguayo, Francisco; Palma, Mariana; Backhouse, Claudia; Argandona, Jorge; Riquelme, Erick; Corvalan, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    Because it is difficult to differentiate gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma from chronic gastritis in gastric lymphoid infiltrates, molecular detection of monoclonality through immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene rearrangements is commonly performed. However, heterogeneity in the performance and results obtained from IgH gene rearrangements has been reported. To improve the accuracy in the diagnosis of gastric lymphoid infiltrates, we developed an analytical approach based on one-peak area analysis of the melting curve in the LightCycler System. Using a training-testing approach, the likelihood ratio method was selected to find a discriminative function of 4.64 in the training set (10 gastric MALT lymphomas and 10 chronic gastritis cases). This discriminative function was validated in the testing set (five gastric MALT lymphomas, six abnormal lymphocytic infiltrates with subsequently demonstrated gastric MALT lymphomas, and six cases of chronic gastritis). All but one case of gastric MALT lymphoma, as well as abnormal lymphocytic infiltrates, clustered under 4.64, and all chronic gastritis cases clustered above 4.64. These results were validated by conventional electrophoreses confirming one or two sharp bands in cases of gastric MALT lymphomas and a smear of multiple bands in cases of chronic gastritis. Analytical detection of IgH gene rearrangement in gastric lymphoid infiltrates by one-peak area analysis correctly distinguishes gastric MALT lymphomas from chronic gastritis, even in cases with diagnosis of abnormal lymphocytic infiltrates. PMID:17591935

  4. Genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms by melting curve analysis using thin film semi-transparent heaters integrated in a lab-on-foil system.

    PubMed

    Ohlander, Anna; Zilio, Caterina; Hammerle, Tobias; Zelenin, Sergey; Klink, Gerhard; Chiari, Marcella; Bock, Karlheinz; Russom, Aman

    2013-06-01

    The recent technological advances in micro/nanotechnology present new opportunities to combine microfluidics with microarray technology for the development of small, sensitive, single-use, point-of-care molecular diagnostic devices. As such, the integration of microarray and plastic microfluidic systems is an attractive low-cost alternative to glass based microarray systems. This paper presents the integration of a DNA microarray and an all-polymer microfluidic foil system with integrated thin film heaters, which demonstrate DNA analysis based on melting curve analysis (MCA). A novel micro-heater concept using semi-transparent copper heaters manufactured by roll-to-roll and lift-off on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) foil has been developed. Using a mesh structure, heater surfaces have been realized in only one single metallization step, providing more efficient and homogenous heating characteristics than conventional meander heaters. A robust DNA microarray spotting protocol was adapted on Parylene C coated heater-foils, using co-polymer poly(DMA-NAS-MAPS) to enable covalent immobilization of DNA. The heaters were integrated in a microfluidic channel using lamination foils and MCA of the spotted DNA duplexes showed single based discrimination of mismatched over matched target DNA-probes. Finally, as a proof of principle, we perform MCA on PCR products to detect the Leu7Pro polymorphism of the neutropeptide Y related to increased risk of Type II diabetes, BMI and depression.

  5. Comparative Study on Two Melting Simulation Methods: Melting Curve of Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhong-Li; Sun, Jun-Sheng; Li, Rui; Zhang, Xiu-Lu; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2016-05-01

    Melting simulation methods are of crucial importance to determining melting temperature of materials efficiently. A high-efficiency melting simulation method saves much simulation time and computational resources. To compare the efficiency of our newly developed shock melting (SM) method with that of the well-established two-phase (TP) method, we calculate the high-pressure melting curve of Au using the two methods based on the optimally selected interatomic potentials. Although we only use 640 atoms to determine the melting temperature of Au in the SM method, the resulting melting curve accords very well with the results from the TP method using much more atoms. Thus, this shows that a much smaller system size in SM method can still achieve a fully converged melting curve compared with the TP method, implying the robustness and efficiency of the SM method. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 41574076 and the NSAF of China under Grant No. U1230201/A06, and the Young Core Teacher Scheme of Henan Province under Grant No. 2014GGJS-108

  6. Automated Forensic Animal Family Identification by Nested PCR and Melt Curve Analysis on an Off-the-Shelf Thermocycler Augmented with a Centrifugal Microfluidic Disk Segment

    PubMed Central

    Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Nested PCR remains a labor-intensive and error-prone biomolecular analysis. Laboratory workflow automation by precise control of minute liquid volumes in centrifugal microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip systems holds great potential for such applications. However, the majority of these systems require costly custom-made processing devices. Our idea is to augment a standard laboratory device, here a centrifugal real-time PCR thermocycler, with inbuilt liquid handling capabilities for automation. We have developed a microfluidic disk segment enabling an automated nested real-time PCR assay for identification of common European animal groups adapted to forensic standards. For the first time we utilize a novel combination of fluidic elements, including pre-storage of reagents, to automate the assay at constant rotational frequency of an off-the-shelf thermocycler. It provides a universal duplex pre-amplification of short fragments of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and cytochrome b genes, animal-group-specific main-amplifications, and melting curve analysis for differentiation. The system was characterized with respect to assay sensitivity, specificity, risk of cross-contamination, and detection of minor components in mixtures. 92.2% of the performed tests were recognized as fluidically failure-free sample handling and used for evaluation. Altogether, augmentation of the standard real-time thermocycler with a self-contained centrifugal microfluidic disk segment resulted in an accelerated and automated analysis reducing hands-on time, and circumventing the risk of contamination associated with regular nested PCR protocols. PMID:26147196

  7. Rapid genotyping of human rotavirus using SYBR green real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with melting curve analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Yupin; Lee, Bonita E; Pang, Xiaoli L

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To develop a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay to genotype rotavirus (G and P) in Alberta from January 2012 to June 2013. METHODS: We developed and validated a different approach to perform rotavirus G and P genotyping using a two-step SYBR green RT-PCR (rt-gPCR) by selecting genotype-specific primers of published conventional RT nested PCR (cnRT-PCR) assay and optimizing the amplification conditions. cDNA was first synthesized from total RNA with SuperScript™ II reverse transcriptase kit followed by amplication step using monoplex SYBR green real-time PCR. After the PCR reaction, melting curve analysis was used to determine specific genotype. Sixteen samples previously genotyped using cnRT-PCR were tested using the new assay and the genotyping results were compared as sensitivity analysis. Assay specificity was evaluated by testing other gastroenteritis viruses with the new assay. The amplicon size of each available genotype was determined by gel-electrophoresis and DNA sequences were obtained using Sanger-sequencing method. After validation and optimization, the new assay was used to genotype 122 pediatric clinical stool samples previously tested positive for rotavirus using electron microscopy between January 2012 and June 2013. RESULTS: The new rt-gPCR assay was validated and optimized. The assay detected G1 to G4, G9, G12 and P[4] and P[8] that were available as positive controls in our laboratory. A single and clear peak of melting curve was generated for each of specific G and P genotypes with a Tm ranging from 80 °C to 82 °C. The sensitivity of rt-gPCR was comparable to cnRT-PCR with 100% correlation of the 16 samples with known G and P genotypes. No cross reaction was found with other gastroenteritis viruses. Using the new rt-gPCR assay, genotypes were obtained for 121 of the 122 pediatric clinical samples tested positive for rotavirus: G1P[8] (42.6%), G2P[4] (4.9%), G3P[8] (10.7%), G9P[8] (10.7%), G9P[4

  8. Quantitative PCR Coupled with Melt Curve Analysis for Detection of Selected Pseudo-nitzschia spp. (Bacillariophyceae) from the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea▿

    PubMed Central

    Andree, Karl B.; Fernández-Tejedor, Margarita; Elandaloussi, Laurence M.; Quijano-Scheggia, Sonia; Sampedro, Nagore; Garcés, Esther; Camp, Jordi; Diogène, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. blooms along the coast of Catalonia have been increasing over the past 20 years. As species from this genus that are documented as toxigenic have been found in local waters, with both toxic and nontoxic species cooccurring in the same bloom, there is a need to develop management tools for discriminating the difference. Currently, differentiation of toxic and nontoxic species requires time-consuming electron microscopy to distinguish taxonomic features that would allow identification as to species, and cryptic species can still remain misidentified. In this study, cells of Pseudo-nitzschia from clonal cultures isolated from seawater were characterized to their species identity using scanning electron microscopy, and subsamples of each culture were used to create an internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1), 5.8S, and ITS-2 ribosomal DNA database for development of species-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. Once developed, these qPCR assays were applied to field samples collected over a 2-year period in Alfaques Bay in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea to evaluate the possibility of a comprehensive surveillance for all Pseudo-nitzschia spp. using molecular methods to supplement optical microscopy, which can discern taxonomy only to the genus level within this taxon. Total Pseudo-nitzschia cell density was determined by optical microscopy from water samples collected weekly and compared to results obtained from the sum of eight Pseudo-nitzschia species-specific qPCR assays using duplicate samples. Species-specific qPCR followed by melt curve analysis allowed differentiation of amplicons and identification of false positives, and results correlated well with the total Pseudo-nitzschia cell counts from optical microscopy. PMID:21193668

  9. Melting curves and entropy of melting of iron under Earth's core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Jin; Liu, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Zhong-Li; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2015-07-01

    The melting curves of iron are determined up to 365 GPa via molecular dynamic (MD) simulations combining with the embedded atom model (EAM) potential developed by Ackland et al. We simulated the melting with three approaches, the hysteresis, two-phase and recently modified Z methods. All three techniques can produce satisfying results, consistent well with most of static compression measurements and shock experiments. Hence, we recommend that these three techniques and this EAM potential are reliable techniques and potential for simulating melting properties of iron. Fitting the well-known Simon equation to our two-phase data we yield the analytical melting curve for iron: 1825(1 + P/57.723)0.654, which gives a melting point at the inner core boundary of 6345 K, very close to the recent diamond anvil cell (DAC) extrapolated value and other ab initio calculations. Furthermore, the analyses of our entropy of melting and solid-liquid interfacial energy γsl indicate that at high pressure, the entropy of fusion shows weak pressure effect. The γsl increases monotonically with pressure, and can be described as a second-order polynomial relation.

  10. Estimation of the diversity between DNA calorimetric profiles, differential melting curves and corresponding melting temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Ling; Fridman, Alexander S; Grigoryan, Inessa E; Galyuk, Elena N; Murashko, Oleg N; Hu, Chin-Kun; Lando, Dmitri Y

    2016-11-01

    The Poland-Fixman-Freire formalism was adapted for modeling of calorimetric DNA melting profiles, and applied to plasmid pBR 322 and long random sequences. We studied the influence of the difference (HGC -HAT ) between the helix-coil transition enthalpies of AT and GC base pairs on the calorimetric melting profile and on normalized calorimetric melting profile. A strong alteration of DNA calorimetrical profile with HGC -HAT was demonstrated. In contrast, there is a relatively slight change in the normalized profiles and in corresponding ordinary (optical) normalized differential melting curves (DMCs). For fixed HGC -HAT , the average relative deviation (S) between DMC and normalized calorimetric profile, and the difference between their melting temperatures (Tcal -Tm ) are weakly dependent on peculiarities of the multipeak fine structure of DMCs. At the same time, both the deviation S and difference (Tcal -Tm ) enlarge with the temperature melting range of the helix-coil transition. It is shown that the local deviation between DMC and normalized calorimetric profile increases in regions of narrow peaks distant from the melting temperature. PMID:27422497

  11. Salt Concentration Effects on Equilibrium Melting Curves from DNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, J.; Fiche, J.-B.; Buhot, A.; Calemczuk, R.; Livache, T.

    2010-01-01

    DNA microarrays find applications in an increasing number of domains where more quantitative results are required. DNA being a charged polymer, the repulsive interactions between the surface of the microarray and the targets in solution are increasing upon hybridization. Such electrostatic penalty is generally reduced by increasing the salt concentration. In this article, we present equilibrium-melting curves obtained from dedicated physicochemical experiments on DNA microarrays in order to get a better understanding of the electrostatic penalty incurred during the hybridization reaction at the surface. Various salt concentrations have been considered and deviations from the commonly used Langmuir adsorption model are experimentally quantified for the first time in agreement with theoretical predictions. PMID:20858434

  12. Multiplex real-time PCR assays for detection of eight Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in food samples by melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant; Mustapha, Azlin

    2015-12-23

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are pathogenic strains of E. coli that can cause bloody diarrhea and kidney failure. Seven STEC serogroups, O157, O26, O45, O103, O111, O121 and O145 are responsible for more than 71% of the total infections caused by this group of pathogens. All seven serogroups are currently considered as adulterants in non-intact beef products in the U.S. In this study, two multiplex melt curve real-time PCR assays with internal amplification controls (IACs) were standardized for the detection of eight STEC serogroups. The first multiplex assay targeted E. coli serogroups O145, O121, O104, and O157; while the second set detected E. coli serogroups O26, O45, O103 and O111. The applicability of the assays was tested using 11 different meat and produce samples. For food samples spiked with a cocktail of four STEC serogroups with a combined count of 10 CFU/25 g food, all targets of the multiplex assays were detected after an enrichment period of 6h. The assays also worked efficiently when 325 g of food samples were spiked with 10 CFU of STECs. The assays are not dependent on fluorescent-labeled probes or immunomagnetic beads, and can be used for the detection of eight STEC serogroups in less than 11h. Routine preliminary screening of STECs in food samples is performed by testing for the presence of STEC virulence genes. The assays developed in this study can be useful as a first- or second-tier test for the identification of the eight O serogroup-specific genes in suspected food samples.

  13. Detection of Babesia canis vogeli and Hepatozoon canis in canine blood by a single-tube real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer polymerase chain reaction assay and melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Kongklieng, Amornmas; Intapan, Pewpan M; Boonmars, Thidarut; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Janwan, Penchom; Sanpool, Oranuch; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Taweethavonsawat, Piyanan; Chungpivat, Sudchit; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2015-03-01

    A real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer polymerase chain reaction (qFRET PCR) coupled with melting curve analysis was developed for detection of Babesia canis vogeli and Hepatozoon canis infections in canine blood samples in a single tube assay. The target of the assay was a region within the 18S ribosomal RNA gene amplified in either species by a single pair of primers. Following amplification from the DNA of infected dog blood, a fluorescence melting curve analysis was done. The 2 species, B. canis vogeli and H. canis, could be detected and differentiated in infected dog blood samples (n = 37) with high sensitivity (100%). The detection limit for B. canis vogeli was 15 copies of a positive control plasmid, and for H. canis, it was 150 copies of a positive control plasmid. The assay could simultaneously distinguish the DNA of both parasites from the DNA of controls. Blood samples from 5 noninfected dogs were negative, indicating high specificity. Several samples can be run at the same time. The assay can reduce misdiagnosis and the time associated with microscopic examination, and is not prone to the carryover contamination associated with the agarose gel electrophoresis step of conventional PCR. In addition, this qFRET PCR method would be useful to accurately determine the range of endemic areas or to discover those areas where the 2 parasites co-circulate. PMID:25776544

  14. Ultrafast real-time PCR with integrated melting curve analysis and duplex capacities using a low-cost polymer lab-on-a-chip system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gransee, Rainer; Schneider, Tristan; Elyorgun, Deniz; Strobach, Xenia; Schunck, Tobias; Gatscha, Theresia; Winkler, Christian; Höth, Julian

    2015-05-01

    Nucleic amplification using quantitative polymeric chain reaction (qPCR) has become the gold standard of molecular testing. These systems offer both amplification and simultaneous fluorescence detection. An ultrafast microfluidic module (allowing 30 PCR cycles in 6 minutes) based on the oscillating fluid plug concept was previously developed [1,2] allowing the amplification of native genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules. This abstract presents the actual status of the advanced system. The upgraded system generates high quality qPCR amplification plots and additional sensitive melting point analysis comparable to data obtained from commercial real-time cyclers. These features provide the user with all information needed to analyze PCR products. The system uses light emitting diodes (LED) for illumination and a low cost Charge-coupled Device (CCD) camera for optical detection. Image data processing allows the automated process control of the overall system components. The system enables the performance of rapid and robust nucleic acid amplifications together with the integration of real time measurement technology. This allows the amplification and simultaneous quantification of the targeted pathogens. The integration of duplex amplification performance allows the incorporation of the necessary controls into the device to validate the PCR performance. This demonstrator can be run either as fully autonomously working device or as OEM part of a sample-to-answer platform.

  15. Comparison of multiple genes and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic space region for their capacity in high resolution melt curve analysis to differentiate Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strain ts-11 from field strains.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed A; Bradbury, Janet M; Ferguson-Noel, Naola M; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2013-12-27

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is an important avian pathogen causing significant economic losses in the global poultry industry. In an attempt to compare and evaluate existing genotyping methods for differentiation of MG strains/isolates, high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis was applied to 5 different PCR methods targeting vlhA, pvpA, gapA, mgc2 genes and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic space region (IGSR). To assess the discriminatory power of PCR-HRM of examined genes and IGSR, MG strains ts-11, F, 6/85 and S6, and, initially, 8 field isolates were tested. All MG strains/isolates were differentiated using PCR-HRM curve analysis and genotype confidence percentage (GCP) values of vlhA and pvpA genes, while only 0, 3 and 4 out of 12 MG strains/isolates were differentiated using gapA, mgc2 genes and IGSR, respectively. The HRM curve analysis of vlhA and pvpA genes was found to be highly correlated with the genetic diversity of the targeted genes confirmed by sequence analysis of amplicons generated from MG strains. The potential of the vlhA and pvpA genes was also demonstrated for genotyping of 12 additional MG strains from Europe and the USA. Results from this study provide a direct comparison between genes previously used in sequencing-based genotyping methods for MG strain identification and highlight the usefulness of vlhA and pvpA HRM curve analyses as rapid and reliable tools specially for diagnosis and differentiation of MG strains used here.

  16. Two alternative multiplex PCRs for the identification of the seven species of anglerfish (Lophius spp.) using an end-point or a melting curve analysis real-time protocol.

    PubMed

    Castigliego, Lorenzo; Armani, Andrea; Tinacci, Lara; Gianfaldoni, Daniela; Guidi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Anglerfish (Lophius spp.) is consumed worldwide and is an important economic resource though its seven species are often fraudulently interchanged due to their different commercial value, especially when sold in the form of fillets or pieces. Molecular analysis is the only possible mean to verify traceability and counteract fraud. We developed two multiplex PCRs, one end-point and one real-time with melting curve post-amplification analysis, which can even be run with the simplest two-channel thermocyclers. The two methods were tested on seventy-five reference samples. Their specificity was checked in twenty more species of those most commonly available on the market and in other species of the Lophiidae family. Both methods, the choice of which depends on the equipment and budget of the lab, provide a rapid and easy-to-read response, improving both the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of existing methods for identifying Lophius species. PMID:25053020

  17. Two alternative multiplex PCRs for the identification of the seven species of anglerfish (Lophius spp.) using an end-point or a melting curve analysis real-time protocol.

    PubMed

    Castigliego, Lorenzo; Armani, Andrea; Tinacci, Lara; Gianfaldoni, Daniela; Guidi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Anglerfish (Lophius spp.) is consumed worldwide and is an important economic resource though its seven species are often fraudulently interchanged due to their different commercial value, especially when sold in the form of fillets or pieces. Molecular analysis is the only possible mean to verify traceability and counteract fraud. We developed two multiplex PCRs, one end-point and one real-time with melting curve post-amplification analysis, which can even be run with the simplest two-channel thermocyclers. The two methods were tested on seventy-five reference samples. Their specificity was checked in twenty more species of those most commonly available on the market and in other species of the Lophiidae family. Both methods, the choice of which depends on the equipment and budget of the lab, provide a rapid and easy-to-read response, improving both the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of existing methods for identifying Lophius species.

  18. Monitoring the melt-extrusion transesterification of ethylene-vinylacetate copolymer by self-modeling curve resolution analysis of on-line near-infrared spectra.

    PubMed

    Sasić, S; Kita, Y; Furukawa, T; Watari, M; Siesler, H W; Ozaki, Y

    2000-12-01

    The transesterification of molten ethylene-vinylacetate (EVA) copolymers by octanol with sodium methoxide as catalyst in an extruder has been monitored by on-line near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. A total of 60 NIR spectra were acquired for 37 min with the last spectrum recorded 31 min after the addition of octanol and catalyst was stopped. The experimental spectra show strong baseline fluctuations which are corrected for by multiplicative scatter correction (MSC). The chemometric methods of the orthogonal projection approach (OPA) and multivariate curve resolution (MCR) were used to resolve the spectra and to derive concentration profiles of the species. The detailed analysis reveals the absence of completely pure variables which leads to small errors in the calculation of pure spectra. The initial estimation of a concentration that is necessary as an input parameter for MCR also presents a non-trivial task. We obtained results that were not ideal but applicable for practical concentration control. They enable a fast monitoring of the process in real-time and resolve the spectra of the EVA copolymer and the ethylene-vinyl alcohol (EVAL) copolymer to be very close to the reference spectra. The chemometric methods used and the decomposed spectra are discussed in detail. PMID:11219074

  19. High pressure melting curves of silver, gold and copper

    SciTech Connect

    Hieu, Ho Khac

    2013-11-15

    In this work, based on the Lindemann's formula of melting and the pressure-dependent Grüneisen parameter, we have investigated the pressure effect on melting temperature of silver, gold and copper metals. The analytical expression of melting temperature as a function of volume compression has been derived. Our results are compared with available experimental data as well as with previous theoretical studies and the good and reasonable agreements are found. We also proposed the potential of this approach on predicting melting of copper at very high pressure.

  20. Intracavity DNA melting analysis with optofluidic lasers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonsuk; Fan, Xudong

    2012-11-01

    DNA melting analysis holds great promise for simple and fast DNA sequence discrimination. However, conventional fluorescence-based methods suffer from a small differential signal and demanding melting curve analysis, both of which make it difficult to distinguish the target DNA from the mismatched one. Herein, we propose and demonstrate a highly specific intracavity DNA melting analysis scheme utilizing an optofluidic laser. The laser optically amplifies the small yet intrinsic thermal dynamic difference between the target and the single-base-mismatched DNA, resulting in a differential signal that is orders of magnitude greater than with fluorescence-based methods. In particular, the existence of a phase transition between the stimulated laser emission and fluorescence (i.e., spontaneous emission) enables accurate determination of the DNA transition temperature difference. Furthermore, the high differential signal in the intracavity detection allows for scanning of the laser excitation at a fixed temperature to distinguish two DNA sequences, which provides another means for rapid DNA analysis. In this paper, we first theoretically investigate DNA melting analysis using an optofluidic laser and then experimentally explore this scheme with a high-quality optofluidic ring resonator. Distinction of two DNA sequences of up to 100 bases long is demonstrated. The intracavity detection developed here will lead to novel optofluidic devices that enable rapid and simple analysis of DNAs with very long sequences.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of the melting curve of NiAl alloy under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenjin; Peng, Yufeng; Liu, Zhongli

    2014-05-15

    The melting curve of B2-NiAl alloy under pressure has been investigated using molecular dynamics technique and the embedded atom method (EAM) potential. The melting temperatures were determined with two approaches, the one-phase and the two-phase methods. The first one simulates a homogeneous melting, while the second one involves a heterogeneous melting of materials. Both approaches reduce the superheating effectively and their results are close to each other at the applied pressures. By fitting the well-known Simon equation to our melting data, we yielded the melting curves for NiAl: 1783(1 + P/9.801){sup 0.298} (one-phase approach), 1850(1 + P/12.806){sup 0.357} (two-phase approach). The good agreement of the resulting equation of states and the zero-pressure melting point (calc., 1850 ± 25 K, exp., 1911 K) with experiment proved the correctness of these results. These melting data complemented the absence of experimental high-pressure melting of NiAl. To check the transferability of this EAM potential, we have also predicted the melting curves of pure nickel and pure aluminum. Results show the calculated melting point of Nickel agrees well with experiment at zero pressure, while the melting point of aluminum is slightly higher than experiment.

  2. MEASUREMENT OF THE SHOCK-HEATED MELT CURVE OF LEAD USING PYROMETRY AND REFLECTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    D. Partouche-Sebban and J. L. Pelissier, Commissariat a` l'Energie Atomique, F. G. Abeyta, Los Alamos National Laboratory; W. W. Anderson, Los Alamos National Laboratory; M. E. Byers, Los Alamos National Laboratory; D. Dennis-Koller, Los Alamos National Laboratory; J. S. Esparza, Los Alamos National Laboratory; S. D. Borror, Bechtel Nevada; C. A. Kruschwitz, Bechtel Nevada

    2004-01-01

    Data on the high-pressure melting temperatures of metals is of great interest in several fields of physics including geophysics. Measuring melt curves is difficult but can be performed in static experiments (with laser-heated diamond-anvil cells for instance) or dynamically (i.e., using shock experiments). However, at the present time, both experimental and theoretical results for the melt curve of lead are at too much variance to be considered definitive. As a result, we decided to perform a series of shock experiments designed to provide a measurement of the melt curve of lead up to about 50 GPa in pressure. At the same time, we developed and fielded a new reflectivity diagnostic, using it to make measurements on tin. The results show that the melt curve of lead is somewhat higher than the one previously obtained with static compression and heating techniques.

  3. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: Theoretical study of a melting curve for tin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Feng; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2009-07-01

    The melting curve of Sn has been calculated using the dislocation-mediated melting model with the 'zone-linking method'. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data. According to our calculation, the melting temperature of γ-Sn at zero pressure is about 436 K obtained by the extrapolation of the method from the triple point of Sn. The results show that this calculation method is better than other theoretical methods for predicting the melting curve of polymorphic material Sn.

  4. High pressure melting curve of tin measured using an internal resistive heating technique to 45 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, S. T.; Lipp, M. J.; Falabella, S.; Samudrala, G.; Vohra, Y. K.

    2012-06-01

    The high pressure melting curve of tin was measured to 45 GPa using a designer diamond anvil cell with an integrated internal resistive heating element. Melting of the tin sample was detected by an abrupt increase in the electrical resistance of the sample and also by a change in the slope of the electrical heating power versus temperature curve. The melting temperatures determined by these two methods are in good agreement with each other. We find that the melting temperature of tin tends to monotonically increase with increasing pressure and reaches a temperature of about 2000 K at 45 GPa.

  5. Melting curve of CaCO3 with implications for the presence of melt in the transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Li, J.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonates are important carriers for carbon exchange between the surface and interior of the Earth and therefore their melting behavior bears directly on the deep carbon cycle. Previous studies showed that the solidus temperature of carbonated silicate spans a wide range of temperature due to composition variations in the starting materials. In order to provide fundamental data for thermodynamic calculations, the melting curve of pure CaCO3 was measured up to 22 GPa using an in-situ electrical method in this study. The measurement was realized by monitoring abrupt changes in electrical conductivity upon melting. The results showed that the melting temperature of CaCO3 increases rapidly from 2 to 8 GPa, consistent with the existing data (Irving and Wyllie, 1975; Suito et al., 2001). Our new data at high pressures reveal that the CaCO3 melting curve flattens around 8GPa, starts to decrease until 15 GPa, and then increases again from 15 to 22 GPa. The changes in the melting slope reflect the evolution of the melt compressibility with pressure and the sub-solidus structural phase transformations. The inferred CaCO3 melt density from melting curve slope is slightly smaller than basaltic melt at same pressureand temperature. The unusual negative slope melting curve between 8 and 15 GPa likely indicates the presence of melt around 400-500 Km depth, which may explain some of observed low-velocity zones in the transition zone (Vinnik & Farra, 2006). Reference: Irving AJ, Wyllie PJ (1975) Subsolidus and melting relationshipsfor calcite, magnesite and the join CaCO3-MgCO3 to 36 kb. GeochimCosmochimActa 39: 35-53. Suito K, Namba J, Horikawa T, Taniguchi Y, Sakurai N, Kobayashi M, Onodera A, Shimomura O, Kikegawa T (2001) Phase relations of CaCO3 at high pressure and high temperature. Am Mineral 86(9):997-1002. Vinnik L. & Farra V. (2006) S velocity reversal in the mantle Transition Zone. Geophysical Research Letters 33, L18316.

  6. The high-pressure melting curve of iron - A technical discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Quentin; Knittle, Elise; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1991-01-01

    The melting curve of iron is reliably determined to 105 GPa using the laser-heated diamond cell, in close agreement with independent measurements using piston-cylinder and large-volume presses or shock-wave experiments. In order to obtain reliable melting data from the internally heated diamond cell, whether by laser or Joule heating, temperature gradients across the sample must be quantitatively measured; otherwise, such 'wire heating' experiments can lead to significant underestimates of the melting temperature and its pressure dependence. The best estimate of the high-pressure melting curve of iron, as derived from the laser-heated diamond cell and Hugoniot temperature measurements, yields melting temperatures of 4800 + or - 200 K and 6700 + or - 400 K at 133 GPa and 243 GPa, respectively.

  7. Laser-shock compression of diamond and evidence of a negative-slope melting curve.

    PubMed

    Brygoo, Stéphanie; Henry, Emeric; Loubeyre, Paul; Eggert, Jon; Koenig, Michel; Loupias, Bérénice; Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Rabec Le Gloahec, Marc

    2007-04-01

    Diamond is the only known high-pressure structure of carbon. In spite of its fundamental and planetary importance, the stability domain of this strong covalent material is largely unknown. After decades of experimental efforts, evidence was obtained that the diamond-liquid melting line has a positive slope above the graphite-diamond-liquid triple point. At higher pressure, theoretical studies have suggested that the melting curve of diamond should have a maximum, owing to a loss of stability of the sp3 hybridization in the fluid phase. Accurate Hugoniot data of diamond exist up to 590 GPa (ref. 6). Higher-pressure measurements along the diamond Hugoniot have recently been achieved by laser shocks, showing that diamond probably melts to a conducting fluid. We report here laser-shock Hugoniot data across the melting transition. The shocked diamond crystal begins to melt around 750 GPa. Furthermore, a negative volume discontinuity at melting is observed. This requires a negative melting slope and thus supports the existence of a maximum on the diamond melting curve. These melting data allow us to test various calculations of the phase diagram of carbon at very high pressure. Finally, the stability domain of the diamond crystal is now constrained in a relevant region for Uranus-like planetary interiors.

  8. Laser-shock compression of diamond and evidence of a negative-slope melting curve.

    PubMed

    Brygoo, Stéphanie; Henry, Emeric; Loubeyre, Paul; Eggert, Jon; Koenig, Michel; Loupias, Bérénice; Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Rabec Le Gloahec, Marc

    2007-04-01

    Diamond is the only known high-pressure structure of carbon. In spite of its fundamental and planetary importance, the stability domain of this strong covalent material is largely unknown. After decades of experimental efforts, evidence was obtained that the diamond-liquid melting line has a positive slope above the graphite-diamond-liquid triple point. At higher pressure, theoretical studies have suggested that the melting curve of diamond should have a maximum, owing to a loss of stability of the sp3 hybridization in the fluid phase. Accurate Hugoniot data of diamond exist up to 590 GPa (ref. 6). Higher-pressure measurements along the diamond Hugoniot have recently been achieved by laser shocks, showing that diamond probably melts to a conducting fluid. We report here laser-shock Hugoniot data across the melting transition. The shocked diamond crystal begins to melt around 750 GPa. Furthermore, a negative volume discontinuity at melting is observed. This requires a negative melting slope and thus supports the existence of a maximum on the diamond melting curve. These melting data allow us to test various calculations of the phase diagram of carbon at very high pressure. Finally, the stability domain of the diamond crystal is now constrained in a relevant region for Uranus-like planetary interiors. PMID:17384637

  9. Differentiation between pathogenic serotype 1 isolates of Marek's disease virus and the Rispens CVI988 vaccine in Australia using real-time PCR and high resolution melt curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Renz, K G; Cheetham, B F; Walkden-Brown, S W

    2013-01-01

    Two real-time PCR assays were developed which enable quantitation and differentiation between pathogenic Australian isolates of Marek's disease virus (MDV) serotype 1 and the serotype 1 vaccine strain Rispens CVI988. The assays are based on a DNA sequence variation in the meq gene between pathogenic and vaccinal MDV1 which has been confirmed by sequencing of 20 Australian field strains of MDV. Complete specificity has been demonstrated in samples containing pathogenic MDV (n=20), Rispens (3 commercial vaccine strains), or both. The limit of detection of both the Rispens-specific and the pathogenic MDV1-specific assays was 10 viral copies/reaction. The tests successfully differentiated and quantified MDV in mixtures of pathogenic and vaccinal Rispens virus. A high resolution melt curve analysis targeting the same SNP used for the real-time PCR assays was also developed which successfully detected sequence variation between Md5, six Australian MDV1 isolates and the three Rispens vaccines. However it was ineffective at differentiating mixtures of pathogenic and vaccinal MDV1. The real-time PCR assays have both diagnostic and epidemiological applications as they enable differentiation and quantitation of Rispens CVI988 and pathogenic MDV1 in co-infected chickens in Australia.

  10. A screening method for the detection of the 35S promoter and the nopaline synthase terminator in genetically modified organisms in a real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction using high-resolution melting-curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Fumi; Yamada, Chihiro; Nakamura, Kosuke; Nakajima, Osamu; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Harikai, Naoki; Furui, Satoshi; Kitta, Kazumi; Teshima, Reiko

    2009-11-01

    To screen for unauthorized genetically modified organisms (GMO) in the various crops, we developed a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction high-resolution melting-curve analysis method for the simultaneous qualitative detection of 35S promoter sequence of cauliflower mosaic virus (35SP) and the nopaline synthase terminator (NOST) in several crops. We selected suitable primer sets for the simultaneous detection of 35SP and NOST and designed the primer set for the detection of spiked ColE1 plasmid to evaluate the validity of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. In addition, we optimized the multiplex PCR conditions using the designed primer sets and EvaGreen as an intercalating dye. The contamination of unauthorized GMO with single copy similar to NK603 maize can be detected as low as 0.1% in a maize sample. Furthermore, we showed that the present method would be applicable in identifying GMO in various crops and foods like authorized GM soybean, authorized GM potato, the biscuit which is contaminated with GM soybeans and the rice which is contaminated with unauthorized GM rice. We consider this method to be a simple and reliable assay for screening for unauthorized GMO in crops and the processing food products.

  11. Molecular dynamics study of the melting curve of NiTi alloy under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhao-Yi; Hu, Cui-E.; Cai, Ling-Cang; Chen, Xiang-Rong; Jing, Fu-Qian

    2011-02-01

    The melting curve of NiTi alloy was predicted by using molecular dynamics simulations combining with the embedded atom model potential. The calculated thermal equation of state consists well with our previous results obtained from quasiharmonic Debye approximation. Fitting the well-known Simon form to our Tm data yields the melting curves for NiTi: 1850(1 + P/21.938)0.328 (for one-phase method) and 1575(1 + P/7.476)0.305 (for two-phase method). The two-phase simulations can effectively eliminate the superheating in one-phase simulations. At 1 bar, the melting temperature of NiTi is 1575 ± 25 K and the corresponding melting slope is 64 K/GPa.

  12. Automated Classification and Cluster Visualization of Genotypes Derived from High Resolution Melt Curves

    PubMed Central

    Kanderian, Sami; Jiang, Lingxia; Knight, Ivor

    2015-01-01

    Introduction High Resolution Melting (HRM) following PCR has been used to identify DNA genotypes. Fluorescent dyes bounded to double strand DNA lose their fluorescence with increasing temperature, yielding different signatures for different genotypes. Recent software tools have been made available to aid in the distinction of different genotypes, but they are not fully automated, used only for research purposes, or require some level of interaction or confirmation from an analyst. Materials and Methods We describe a fully automated machine learning software algorithm that classifies unknown genotypes. Dynamic melt curves are transformed to multidimensional clusters of points whereby a training set is used to establish the distribution of genotype clusters. Subsequently, probabilistic and statistical methods were used to classify the genotypes of unknown DNA samples on 4 different assays (40 VKORC1, CYP2C9*2, CYP2C9*3 samples in triplicate, and 49 MTHFR c.665C>T samples in triplicate) run on the Roche LC480. Melt curves of each of the triplicates were genotyped separately. Results Automated genotyping called 100% of VKORC1, CYP2C9*3 and MTHFR c.665C>T samples correctly. 97.5% of CYP2C9*2 melt curves were genotyped correctly with the remaining 2.5% given a no call due to the inability to decipher 3 melt curves in close proximity as either homozygous mutant or wild-type with greater than 99.5% posterior probability. Conclusions We demonstrate the ability to fully automate DNA genotyping from HRM curves systematically and accurately without requiring any user interpretation or interaction with the data. Visualization of genotype clusters and quantification of the expected misclassification rate is also available to provide feedback to assay scientists and engineers as changes are made to the assay or instrument. PMID:26605797

  13. Analysis of Exoplanet Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Budding, E.; Rhodes, M. D.; Püsküllü, Ç.; Soydugan, F.; Soydugan, E.; Tüysüz, M.; Demircan, O.

    2015-07-01

    We have applied the close binary system analysis package WINFITTER to a variety of exoplanet transiting light curves taken both from the NASA Exoplanet Archive and our own ground-based observations. WINFitter has parameter options for a realistic physical model, including gravity brightening and structural parameters derived from Kopal's applications of the relevant Radau equation, and it includes appropriate tests for determinacy and adequacy of its best fitting parameter sets. We discuss a number of issues related to empirical checking of models for stellar limb darkening, surface maculation, Doppler beaming, microvariability, and transit time variation (TTV) effects. The Radau coefficients used in the light curve modeling, in principle, allow structural models of the component stars to be tested.

  14. Analysis of the continuous melting of glass

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, A R

    1984-01-01

    Some historical aspects of continuous glass melting are recalled. Then, an overall heat balance of the process is used to illustrate that future improvements will be achieved by different means than those which have been successful in the past. The heat balance also permits comparison of ohmic melting with combustion melting when the primary energy source in both cases is coal. A simplified analysis of batch melting begins by defining a melted batch according to its effective viscosity and proceeds to calculate the temperature distribution in a cold tap batch blanket. Then, the fraction liquid as a function of temperature is determined. 15 references, 7 figures.

  15. Melting curves and structural properties of tantalum from the modified-Z method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. M.; Xu, C.; Cheng, Y.; Chen, X. R.; Cai, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    The melting curves and structural properties of tantalum (Ta) are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations combining with potential model developed by Ravelo et al. [Phys. Rev. B 88, 134101 (2013)]. Before calculations, five potentials are systematically compared with their abilities of producing reasonable compressional and equilibrium mechanical properties of Ta. We have improved the modified-Z method introduced by Wang et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 114, 163514 (2013)] by increasing the sizes in Lx and Ly of the rectangular parallelepiped box (Lx = Ly ≪ Lz). The influences of size and aspect ratio of the simulation box to melting curves are also fully tested. The structural differences between solid and liquid are detected by number density and local-order parameters Q6. Moreover, the atoms' diffusion with simulation time, defects, and vacancies formations in the sample are all studied by comparing situations in solid, solid-liquid coexistence, and liquid state.

  16. Ab initio melting curve of iron at extreme pressures: implications for exoplanets' cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, J.; Morard, G.; Valencia, D. C.; Mazevet, S.; Guyot, F. J.

    2010-12-01

    Exoplanets with masses similar to that of Earth have recently been discovered1. A first order question for understanding their dynamics is to know whether they possess Earth like liquid metallic cores. However, the iron melting curve is unknown at conditions corresponding to planets of several times the Earth's mass (over 15 Mbar for planets with 10 times the Earth’s mass (ME)2). In the density-temperature region of the cores of those super-Earths, we calculate the iron melting curve using first principle molecular dynamics simulations based on density functional theory. By comparing calculated thermal profiles of Super Earths, we show that planets heavier than 3-5 ME have solid cores, thus precluding the existence of an internal magnetic field. This new field of investigation of the iron melting curve shows that the Earth may be close to the maximal size for a terrestrial planet to possess a partially molten metallic core. References 1 J. P. Beaulieu, D. P. Bennett, P. Fouque et al., Nature 439 (7075), 437 (2006). 2 D. Valencia, R. J. O'Connell, and D. Sasselov, Icarus 181, 545 (2006).

  17. Theoretical calculation of the melting curve of Cu-Zr binary alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gunawardana, K. G.S.H.; Wilson, S. R.; Mendelev, M. I.; Song, Xueyu

    2014-11-14

    Helmholtz free energies of the dominant binary crystalline solids found in the Cu-Zr system at high temperatures close to the melting curve are calculated. This theoretical approach combines fundamental measure density functional theory (applied to the hard-sphere reference system) and a perturbative approach to include the attractive interactions. The studied crystalline solids are Cu(fcc), Cu51Zr14(β), CuZr(B2), CuZr2(C11b), Zr(hcp), and Zr(bcc). The calculated Helmholtz free energies of crystalline solids are in good agreement with results from molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations. Using the same perturbation approach, the liquid phase free energies are calculated as a function of composition and temperature, from which themore » melting curve of the entire composition range of this system can be obtained. Phase diagrams are determined in this way for two leading embedded atom method potentials, and the results are compared with experimental data. Furthermore, theoretical melting temperatures are compared both with experimental values and with values obtained directly from MD simulations at several compositions.« less

  18. Theoretical calculation of the melting curve of Cu-Zr binary alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gunawardana, K. G.S.H.; Wilson, S. R.; Mendelev, M. I.; Song, Xueyu

    2014-11-14

    Helmholtz free energies of the dominant binary crystalline solids found in the Cu-Zr system at high temperatures close to the melting curve are calculated. This theoretical approach combines fundamental measure density functional theory (applied to the hard-sphere reference system) and a perturbative approach to include the attractive interactions. The studied crystalline solids are Cu(fcc), Cu51Zr14(β), CuZr(B2), CuZr2(C11b), Zr(hcp), and Zr(bcc). The calculated Helmholtz free energies of crystalline solids are in good agreement with results from molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations. Using the same perturbation approach, the liquid phase free energies are calculated as a function of composition and temperature, from which the melting curve of the entire composition range of this system can be obtained. Phase diagrams are determined in this way for two leading embedded atom method potentials, and the results are compared with experimental data. Furthermore, theoretical melting temperatures are compared both with experimental values and with values obtained directly from MD simulations at several compositions.

  19. Efficient and highly sensitive screen for myotonic dystrophy type 1 using a one-step triplet-primed PCR and melting curve assay.

    PubMed

    Lian, Mulias; Rajan-Babu, Indhu-Shree; Singh, Kunal; Lee, Caroline G; Law, Hai-Yang; Chong, Samuel S

    2015-03-01

    Instability and expansion of the DMPK CTG repeat cause myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), the most common adult-onset neuromuscular disorder. Overlapping clinical features between DM1 and other myotonic disorders necessitate molecular confirmation for definitive diagnosis. Preconception screening could improve reproductive planning especially in DM1-affected women, who show diminished ovarian reserve and unfavorable in vitro fertilization-preimplantation genetic diagnosis outcome. We optimized triplet-primed PCR and melting curve analysis on 17 DNAs from DM1-affected/unaffected cell lines. A blinded test was performed on 60 genotype-known clinical samples. Plasmid constructs pDMPK(CTG)35 and pDMPK(CTG)48 were used to establish threshold temperatures separating DM1-affected from unaffected samples. Postscreen triplet-primed PCR amplicon sizing was achieved by short-cycle labeled-primer extension followed by capillary electrophoresis. Triplet-primed PCR melting curve analysis melt peak temperatures of unaffected and DM1-affected samples were lower and higher than the control plasmids' melt peak temperatures, respectively. Capillary electrophoresis of post-melting curve analysis amplicons was completely concordant with the screening results. Triplet-primed PCR melting curve analysis is a simple and cost-effective screening tool for rapid identification of DM1. The companion confirmation protocol allows quick determination of CTG repeat size when required. This strategy avoids the need to perform capillary electrophoresis sizing on all test samples, limiting capillary electrophoresis analysis to only a subset of cases that are screen-positive. PMID:25684273

  20. Fast and Efficient Screening for Wheat Loss-of-Gene Mutants Using Multiplexed Melt Curve Analyses.

    PubMed

    Mieog, Jos C; Ral, Jean-Philippe F

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a new approach in the screening for loss-of-gene mutants in Heavy Ion Bombardment (HIB) mutant populations of genetically complex organisms such as hexaploid bread wheat using multiplexed single-color (SYBR Green) melt curve analyses. The assay was set up for three target genes to test its validity and applicability. For each gene, three genome-specific primer pairs (one for each genome) with distinct melt curves were developed and multiplexed. This allowed screening for "single null mutants" (plants with the target gene deleted in one of the three genomes) for all three genomes in a single reaction. The first two genes (α-Amylase 3 and Epsilon Cyclase) were used to test the approach as HIB null lines for all three genomes were already available for these. The third assay was successfully applied to identify new single null lines of the target gene α-Amylase 2 in an in-house HIB wheat collection. The use of SYBR Green greatly reduced the time and/or cost investment compared to other techniques and the approach proved highly suitable for high-throughput applications. PMID:27459606

  1. Fast and Efficient Screening for Wheat Loss-of-Gene Mutants Using Multiplexed Melt Curve Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Mieog, Jos C.; Ral, Jean-Philippe F.

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a new approach in the screening for loss-of-gene mutants in Heavy Ion Bombardment (HIB) mutant populations of genetically complex organisms such as hexaploid bread wheat using multiplexed single-color (SYBR Green) melt curve analyses. The assay was set up for three target genes to test its validity and applicability. For each gene, three genome-specific primer pairs (one for each genome) with distinct melt curves were developed and multiplexed. This allowed screening for “single null mutants” (plants with the target gene deleted in one of the three genomes) for all three genomes in a single reaction. The first two genes (α-Amylase 3 and Epsilon Cyclase) were used to test the approach as HIB null lines for all three genomes were already available for these. The third assay was successfully applied to identify new single null lines of the target gene α-Amylase 2 in an in-house HIB wheat collection. The use of SYBR Green greatly reduced the time and/or cost investment compared to other techniques and the approach proved highly suitable for high-throughput applications. PMID:27459606

  2. Melting curves and structural properties of tantalum from the modified-Z method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. M. E-mail: ycheng@scu.edu.cn; Xu, C.; Cheng, Y. E-mail: ycheng@scu.edu.cn; Chen, X. R.; Cai, L. C.

    2015-12-21

    The melting curves and structural properties of tantalum (Ta) are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations combining with potential model developed by Ravelo et al. [Phys. Rev. B 88, 134101 (2013)]. Before calculations, five potentials are systematically compared with their abilities of producing reasonable compressional and equilibrium mechanical properties of Ta. We have improved the modified-Z method introduced by Wang et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 114, 163514 (2013)] by increasing the sizes in L{sub x} and L{sub y} of the rectangular parallelepiped box (L{sub x} = L{sub y} ≪ L{sub z}). The influences of size and aspect ratio of the simulation box to melting curves are also fully tested. The structural differences between solid and liquid are detected by number density and local-order parameters Q{sub 6}. Moreover, the atoms' diffusion with simulation time, defects, and vacancies formations in the sample are all studied by comparing situations in solid, solid-liquid coexistence, and liquid state.

  3. High-Resolution DNA Melting Analysis in Plant Research.

    PubMed

    Simko, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Genetic and genomic studies provide valuable insight into the inheritance, structure, organization, and function of genes. The knowledge gained from the analysis of plant genes is beneficial to all aspects of plant research, including crop improvement. New methods and tools are continually being developed to facilitate rapid and accurate mapping, sequencing, and analyzing of genes. Here, I review the recent progress in the application of high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis of DNA, a method that allows detecting polymorphism in double-stranded DNA by comparing profiles of melting curves. Use of HRM has expanded considerably in the past few years as the method was successfully applied for high-throughput genotyping, mapping genes, testing food products and seeds, and other areas of plant research. PMID:26827247

  4. Melting curve of SiO2 at multimegabar pressures: implications for gas giants and super-Earths.

    PubMed

    González-Cataldo, Felipe; Davis, Sergio; Gutiérrez, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Ultrahigh-pressure phase boundary between solid and liquid SiO2 is still quite unclear. Here we present predictions of silica melting curve for the multimegabar pressure regime, as obtained from first principles molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the melting temperatures from three high pressure phases of silica (pyrite-, cotunnite-, and Fe2P-type SiO2) at different pressures using the Z method. The computed melting curve is found to rise abruptly around 330 GPa, an increase not previously reported by any melting simulations. This is in close agreement with recent experiments reporting the α-PbO2-pyrite transition around this pressure. The predicted phase diagram indicates that silica could be one of the dominant components of the rocky cores of gas giants, as it remains solid at the core of our Solar System's gas giants. These results are also relevant to model the interior structure and evolution of massive super-Earths.

  5. A Rapid Multiplex Real-Time PCR High-Resolution Melt Curve Assay for the Simultaneous Detection of Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus in Food.

    PubMed

    Forghani, Fereidoun; Wei, Shuai; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    Three important foodborne pathogens, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, are of great concern for food safety. They may also coexist in food matrices and, in the case of B. cereus and S. aureus, the resulting illnesses can resemble each other owing to similar symptoms. Therefore, their simultaneous detection may have advantages in terms of cost savings and rapidity. Given this context, a rapid multiplex real-time PCR high-resolution melt curve assay for the simultaneous detection of these three pathogens in food was developed. The assay successfully detected B. cereus (gyrB), L. monocytogenes (hly), and S. aureus (nuc) in a single reaction, and the average melting temperatures were 76.23, 80.19, and 74.01°C, respectively. The application of SYTO9 dye and a slow melt curve analysis ramp rate (0.1°C/s) enabled the production of sharp, high-resolution melt curve peaks that were easily distinguishable from each other. The detection limit in food (milk, rice, and lettuce) was 3.7 × 10(3) CFU/g without an enrichment step and 3.7 × 10(1) CFU/g following the 10-h enrichment. Hence, the assay developed here is specific and sensitive, providing an efficient tool for implementation in food for the simultaneous detection of B. cereus, L. monocytogenes, and S. aureus . PMID:27296430

  6. Ab initio melting curve of Fe and Fe-S alloys at extreme pressures: implications for Earth's and exoplanets' cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, Johann; Morard, Guillaume; Mazevet, Stephane; Guyot, Francois

    2011-03-01

    Exoplanets with masses similar to that of Earth have recently been discovered in extrasolar systems [1]. A first order question for understanding their dynamics is to know whether they possess Earth like liquid metallic cores. However, the iron melting curve is unknown at conditions corresponding to planets of several times the Earth's mass (over 15 Mbar for planets with 10 times the Earth's mass [2]). In the density-temperature region of the cores of those super-Earths, we calculate the iron melting curve using first principle molecular dynamics simulations based on density functional theory. We also propose an equation of state for iron in this pressure range. Finally we show the melting curve of Fe3S and discuss the effects of the addition of sulfur to the melting curve of pure iron. [4pt] [1] J. P. Beaulieu, D. P. Bennett, P. Fouque et al., Nature 439 (7075), 437 (2006).[0pt] [2] D. Valencia, R. J. O'Connell, and D. Sasselov, Icarus 181, 545 (2006).

  7. Image analysis of speckle patterns as a probe of melting transitions in laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments.

    PubMed

    Salem, Ran; Matityahu, Shlomi; Melchior, Aviva; Nikolaevsky, Mark; Noked, Ori; Sterer, Eran

    2015-09-01

    The precision of melting curve measurements using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) is largely limited by the correct and reliable determination of the onset of melting. We present a novel image analysis of speckle interference patterns in the LHDAC as a way to define quantitative measures which enable an objective determination of the melting transition. Combined with our low-temperature customized IR pyrometer, designed for measurements down to 500 K, our setup allows studying the melting curve of materials with low melting temperatures, with relatively high precision. As an application, the melting curve of Te was measured up to 35 GPa. The results are found to be in good agreement with previous data obtained at pressures up to 10 GPa.

  8. Image analysis of speckle patterns as a probe of melting transitions in laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments.

    PubMed

    Salem, Ran; Matityahu, Shlomi; Melchior, Aviva; Nikolaevsky, Mark; Noked, Ori; Sterer, Eran

    2015-09-01

    The precision of melting curve measurements using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) is largely limited by the correct and reliable determination of the onset of melting. We present a novel image analysis of speckle interference patterns in the LHDAC as a way to define quantitative measures which enable an objective determination of the melting transition. Combined with our low-temperature customized IR pyrometer, designed for measurements down to 500 K, our setup allows studying the melting curve of materials with low melting temperatures, with relatively high precision. As an application, the melting curve of Te was measured up to 35 GPa. The results are found to be in good agreement with previous data obtained at pressures up to 10 GPa. PMID:26429457

  9. Image analysis of speckle patterns as a probe of melting transitions in laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Ran; Matityahu, Shlomi; Melchior, Aviva; Nikolaevsky, Mark; Noked, Ori; Sterer, Eran

    2015-09-01

    The precision of melting curve measurements using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) is largely limited by the correct and reliable determination of the onset of melting. We present a novel image analysis of speckle interference patterns in the LHDAC as a way to define quantitative measures which enable an objective determination of the melting transition. Combined with our low-temperature customized IR pyrometer, designed for measurements down to 500 K, our setup allows studying the melting curve of materials with low melting temperatures, with relatively high precision. As an application, the melting curve of Te was measured up to 35 GPa. The results are found to be in good agreement with previous data obtained at pressures up to 10 GPa.

  10. Multiplex real-time PCR melting curve assay to detect drug-resistant mutations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Tao; Jiang, Lili; Sun, Weiming; Fu, G; Mei, Jian; Gao, Qian

    2011-09-01

    Early diagnosis of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is urgently needed to optimize treatment regimens and to prevent the transmission of resistant strains. Real-time PCR assays have been developed to detect drug resistance rapidly, but none of them have been widely applied due to their complexity, high cost, or requirement for advanced instruments. In this study, we developed a real-time PCR method based on melting curve analysis of dually labeled probes. Six probes targeting the rpoB 81-bp core region, katG315, the inhA promoter, the ahpC promoter, and embB306 were designed and validated with clinical isolates. First, 10 multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains with a wide mutation spectrum were used to analyze the melting temperature (T(m)) deviations of different mutations by single real-time PCR. All mutations can be detected by significant T(m) reductions compared to the wild type. Then, three duplex real-time PCRs, with two probes in each, were developed to detect mutations in 158 MDR isolates. Comparison of the results with the sequencing data showed that all mutations covered by the six probes were detected with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Our method provided a new way to rapidly detect drug-resistant mutations in M. tuberculosis. Compared to other real-time PCR methods, we use fewer probes, which are labeled with the same fluorophore, guaranteeing that this assay can be used for detection in a single fluorescent channel or can be run on single-channel instruments. In conclusion, we have developed a widely applicable real-time PCR assay to detect drug-resistant mutations in M. tuberculosis.

  11. A real-time ARMS PCR/high-resolution melt curve assay for the detection of the three primary mitochondrial mutations in Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Fergus; O’Dwyer, Veronica; Neylan, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 95% of patients who are diagnosed with Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) have one of three mitochondrial point mutations responsible for the disease, G3460A, G11778A, and T14484C. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel multiplex real-time amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) PCR combined with high-resolution melt curves to identify the individual mutations involved. The study aimed to provide a more robust, cost- and time-effective mutation detection strategy than that offered with currently available methods. The assay reported in this study will allow diagnostic laboratories to avoid costly next-generation sequencing (NGS) assays for most patients with LHON and to focus resources on patients with unknown mutations that require further analysis. Methods The test uses a combination of multiplex allele-specific PCR (ARMS PCR) in combination with a high-resolution melt curve analysis to detect the presence of the mutations in G3460A, G11778A, and T14484C. PCR primer sets were designed to produce a control PCR product and PCR products only in the presence of the mutations in 3460A, 11778A, and 14484C in a multiplex single tube format. Products produce discrete well-separated melt curves to clearly detect the mutations. Results This novel real-time ARMS PCR/high-resolution melt curve assay accurately detected 95% of the mutations that cause LHON. The test has proved to be robust, cost- and time-effective with the real-time closed tube system taking approximately 1 h to complete. Conclusions A novel real-time ARMS PCR/high-resolution melt curve assay is described for the detection of the three primary mitochondrial mutations in LHON. This test provides a simple, robust, easy-to-read output that is cost- and time-effective, thus providing an alternative method to individual endpoint PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), PCR followed by Sanger sequencing or pyrosequencing, and next-generation sequencing

  12. Theoretical analysis on flow characteristics of melt gear pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R. J.; Wang, J. Q.; Kong, F. Y.

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between Geometric parameters and theoretical flow of melt gear pump is revealed, providing a theoretical basis to melt gear pump design. The paper has an analysis of meshing movement of melt gear pump on the condition of four different tooth numbers, stack movement law and flow ripple. The regulation of flow pulsation coefficient is researched by MATLAB software. The modulus formula of melt gear pump is proposed, consistent with actual situation.

  13. The Melting Curve and High-Pressure Chemistry of Formic Acid to 8 GPa and 600 K

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, W; Zaug, J M; Howard, W M; Goncharov, A F; Crowhurst, J C; Jeanloz, R

    2005-04-13

    We have determined the melting temperature of formic acid (HCOOH) to 8.5 GPa using infrared absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and visual observation of samples in a resistively heated diamond-anvil cell. The experimentally determined melting curve compares favorably with a two-phase thermodynamic model. Decomposition reactions were observed above the melting temperature up to a pressure of 6.5 GPa, where principal products were CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and CO. At pressures above 6.5 GPa, decomposition led to solid-like reaction products. Infrared and Raman spectra of these recovered products indicate that pressure affects the nature of carbon-carbon bonding.

  14. Melting curve of SiO2 at multimegabar pressures: implications for gas giants and super-Earths.

    PubMed

    González-Cataldo, Felipe; Davis, Sergio; Gutiérrez, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Ultrahigh-pressure phase boundary between solid and liquid SiO2 is still quite unclear. Here we present predictions of silica melting curve for the multimegabar pressure regime, as obtained from first principles molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the melting temperatures from three high pressure phases of silica (pyrite-, cotunnite-, and Fe2P-type SiO2) at different pressures using the Z method. The computed melting curve is found to rise abruptly around 330 GPa, an increase not previously reported by any melting simulations. This is in close agreement with recent experiments reporting the α-PbO2-pyrite transition around this pressure. The predicted phase diagram indicates that silica could be one of the dominant components of the rocky cores of gas giants, as it remains solid at the core of our Solar System's gas giants. These results are also relevant to model the interior structure and evolution of massive super-Earths. PMID:27210813

  15. Melting curve of SiO2 at multimegabar pressures: implications for gas giants and super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Cataldo, Felipe; Davis, Sergio; Gutiérrez, Gonzalo

    2016-05-01

    Ultrahigh-pressure phase boundary between solid and liquid SiO2 is still quite unclear. Here we present predictions of silica melting curve for the multimegabar pressure regime, as obtained from first principles molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the melting temperatures from three high pressure phases of silica (pyrite-, cotunnite-, and Fe2P-type SiO2) at different pressures using the Z method. The computed melting curve is found to rise abruptly around 330 GPa, an increase not previously reported by any melting simulations. This is in close agreement with recent experiments reporting the α-PbO2–pyrite transition around this pressure. The predicted phase diagram indicates that silica could be one of the dominant components of the rocky cores of gas giants, as it remains solid at the core of our Solar System’s gas giants. These results are also relevant to model the interior structure and evolution of massive super-Earths.

  16. Melting curve of SiO2 at multimegabar pressures: implications for gas giants and super-Earths

    PubMed Central

    González-Cataldo, Felipe; Davis, Sergio; Gutiérrez, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Ultrahigh-pressure phase boundary between solid and liquid SiO2 is still quite unclear. Here we present predictions of silica melting curve for the multimegabar pressure regime, as obtained from first principles molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the melting temperatures from three high pressure phases of silica (pyrite-, cotunnite-, and Fe2P-type SiO2) at different pressures using the Z method. The computed melting curve is found to rise abruptly around 330 GPa, an increase not previously reported by any melting simulations. This is in close agreement with recent experiments reporting the α-PbO2–pyrite transition around this pressure. The predicted phase diagram indicates that silica could be one of the dominant components of the rocky cores of gas giants, as it remains solid at the core of our Solar System’s gas giants. These results are also relevant to model the interior structure and evolution of massive super-Earths. PMID:27210813

  17. Analysis of light curve of LP Camelopardalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudil, Z.; Skarka, M.; Zejda, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present photometric analysis of the RRab type pulsating star LP Cam. The star was observed at Brno Observatory and Planetarium during nine nights. Measurements were calibrated to the Johnson photometric system. Four captured and thirteen previously published maxima timings allowed us to refine the pulsation period and the zero epoch. The light curve was Fourier decomposed to estimate physical parameters using empirical relations. Our results suggest that LP Cam is a common RR Lyrae star with high, almost solar metallicity.

  18. Incorporating Experience Curves in Appliance Standards Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Garbesi, Karina; Chan, Peter; Greenblatt, Jeffery; Kantner, Colleen; Lekov, Alex; Meyers, Stephen; Rosenquist, Gregory; Buskirk, Robert Van; Yang, Hung-Chia; Desroches, Louis-Benoit

    2011-10-31

    The technical analyses in support of U.S. energy conservation standards for residential appliances and commercial equipment have typically assumed that manufacturing costs and retail prices remain constant during the projected 30-year analysis period. There is, however, considerable evidence that this assumption does not reflect real market prices. Costs and prices generally fall in relation to cumulative production, a phenomenon known as experience and modeled by a fairly robust empirical experience curve. Using price data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and shipment data obtained as part of the standards analysis process, we present U.S. experience curves for room air conditioners, clothes dryers, central air conditioners, furnaces, and refrigerators and freezers. These allow us to develop more representative appliance price projections than the assumption-based approach of constant prices. These experience curves were incorporated into recent energy conservation standards for these products. The impact on the national modeling can be significant, often increasing the net present value of potential standard levels in the analysis. In some cases a previously cost-negative potential standard level demonstrates a benefit when incorporating experience. These results imply that past energy conservation standards analyses may have undervalued the economic benefits of potential standard levels.

  19. NEXT Performance Curve Analysis and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saripalli, Pratik; Cardiff, Eric; Englander, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Performance curves of the NEXT thruster are highly important in determining the thruster's ability in performing towards mission-specific goals. New performance curves are proposed and examined here. The Evolutionary Mission Trajectory Generator (EMTG) is used to verify variations in mission solutions based on both available thruster curves and the new curves generated. Furthermore, variations in BOL and EOL curves are also examined. Mission design results shown here validate the use of EMTG and the new performance curves.

  20. Electrochemistry of cations in diopsidic melt - Determining diffusion rates and redox potentials from voltammetric curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, Russell O.; Haskin, Larry A.; Crane, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on determinations of reduction potentials and their temperature dependence of selected ions in diopsidic melt, by using linear sweep voltammetry. Diffusion coefficients were measured for cations of Eu, Mn, Cr, and In. Enthalpies and entropies of reduction were determined for the cations V(V), Cr(3+), Mn(2+), Mn(3+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+), Mo(VI), Sn(IV), and Eu(3+). Reduction potentials were used to study the structural state of cations in the melt.

  1. Use of the melting curve assay as a means for high-throughput quantification of Illumina sequencing libraries.

    PubMed

    Shinozuka, Hiroshi; Forster, John W

    2016-01-01

    Background. Multiplexed sequencing is commonly performed on massively parallel short-read sequencing platforms such as Illumina, and the efficiency of library normalisation can affect the quality of the output dataset. Although several library normalisation approaches have been established, none are ideal for highly multiplexed sequencing due to issues of cost and/or processing time. Methods. An inexpensive and high-throughput library quantification method has been developed, based on an adaptation of the melting curve assay. Sequencing libraries were subjected to the assay using the Bio-Rad Laboratories CFX Connect(TM) Real-Time PCR Detection System. The library quantity was calculated through summation of reduction of relative fluorescence units between 86 and 95 °C. Results.PCR-enriched sequencing libraries are suitable for this quantification without pre-purification of DNA. Short DNA molecules, which ideally should be eliminated from the library for subsequent processing, were differentiated from the target DNA in a mixture on the basis of differences in melting temperature. Quantification results for long sequences targeted using the melting curve assay were correlated with those from existing methods (R (2) > 0.77), and that observed from MiSeq sequencing (R (2) = 0.82). Discussion.The results of multiplexed sequencing suggested that the normalisation performance of the described method is equivalent to that of another recently reported high-throughput bead-based method, BeNUS. However, costs for the melting curve assay are considerably lower and processing times shorter than those of other existing methods, suggesting greater suitability for highly multiplexed sequencing applications.

  2. Use of the melting curve assay as a means for high-throughput quantification of Illumina sequencing libraries.

    PubMed

    Shinozuka, Hiroshi; Forster, John W

    2016-01-01

    Background. Multiplexed sequencing is commonly performed on massively parallel short-read sequencing platforms such as Illumina, and the efficiency of library normalisation can affect the quality of the output dataset. Although several library normalisation approaches have been established, none are ideal for highly multiplexed sequencing due to issues of cost and/or processing time. Methods. An inexpensive and high-throughput library quantification method has been developed, based on an adaptation of the melting curve assay. Sequencing libraries were subjected to the assay using the Bio-Rad Laboratories CFX Connect(TM) Real-Time PCR Detection System. The library quantity was calculated through summation of reduction of relative fluorescence units between 86 and 95 °C. Results.PCR-enriched sequencing libraries are suitable for this quantification without pre-purification of DNA. Short DNA molecules, which ideally should be eliminated from the library for subsequent processing, were differentiated from the target DNA in a mixture on the basis of differences in melting temperature. Quantification results for long sequences targeted using the melting curve assay were correlated with those from existing methods (R (2) > 0.77), and that observed from MiSeq sequencing (R (2) = 0.82). Discussion.The results of multiplexed sequencing suggested that the normalisation performance of the described method is equivalent to that of another recently reported high-throughput bead-based method, BeNUS. However, costs for the melting curve assay are considerably lower and processing times shorter than those of other existing methods, suggesting greater suitability for highly multiplexed sequencing applications. PMID:27602269

  3. Use of the melting curve assay as a means for high-throughput quantification of Illumina sequencing libraries

    PubMed Central

    Forster, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Multiplexed sequencing is commonly performed on massively parallel short-read sequencing platforms such as Illumina, and the efficiency of library normalisation can affect the quality of the output dataset. Although several library normalisation approaches have been established, none are ideal for highly multiplexed sequencing due to issues of cost and/or processing time. Methods. An inexpensive and high-throughput library quantification method has been developed, based on an adaptation of the melting curve assay. Sequencing libraries were subjected to the assay using the Bio-Rad Laboratories CFX ConnectTM Real-Time PCR Detection System. The library quantity was calculated through summation of reduction of relative fluorescence units between 86 and 95 °C. Results.PCR-enriched sequencing libraries are suitable for this quantification without pre-purification of DNA. Short DNA molecules, which ideally should be eliminated from the library for subsequent processing, were differentiated from the target DNA in a mixture on the basis of differences in melting temperature. Quantification results for long sequences targeted using the melting curve assay were correlated with those from existing methods (R2 > 0.77), and that observed from MiSeq sequencing (R2 = 0.82). Discussion.The results of multiplexed sequencing suggested that the normalisation performance of the described method is equivalent to that of another recently reported high-throughput bead-based method, BeNUS. However, costs for the melting curve assay are considerably lower and processing times shorter than those of other existing methods, suggesting greater suitability for highly multiplexed sequencing applications. PMID:27602269

  4. Development of a Melting Curve-Based Allele-Specific PCR of Apolipoprotein E (APOE) Genotyping Method for Genomic DNA, Guthrie Blood Spot, and Whole Blood.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of apolipoprotein E (APOE) are associated with various health conditions and diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, etc. Hence, genotyping of APOE has broad applications in biomedical research and clinical settings, particularly in the era of precision medicine. The study aimed to develop a convenient and accurate method with flexible throughput to genotype the APOE polymorphisms. A melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method was developed to genotype two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of APOE, i.e. rs429358 at codon 112 and rs7412 at codon 158. These two SNPs determine the genotype of APOE2, E3, and E4. PCR-based Sanger sequencing was used as the reference method for APOE genotyping. A 100% concordance rate was obtained in 300 subjects between the melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method and the Sanger sequencing method. This method was applied to a genetic association analysis of APOE and schizophrenia consisting of 711 patients with schizophrenia and 665 control subjects from Taiwan. However, no significant differences in the allele and genotype frequencies were detected between these two groups. Further experiments showed that DNA dissolved from blood collected on Guthrie filter paper and total blood cell lysate without DNA extraction can be used in the melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method. Thus, we suggest that this is a fast, accurate and robust APOE genotyping method with a flexible throughput and suitable for DNA template from different preparations. This convenient method shall meet the different needs of various research and clinical laboratories. PMID:27078154

  5. Light-curve Analysis of Neon Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Izumi; Kato, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed light curves of five neon novae, QU Vul, V351 Pup, V382 Vel, V693 CrA, and V1974 Cyg, and determined their white dwarf (WD) masses and distance moduli on the basis of theoretical light curves composed of free-free and photospheric emission. For QU Vul, we obtained a distance of d ˜ 2.4 kpc, reddening of E(B - V) ˜ 0.55, and WD mass of MWD = 0.82-0.96 {M}⊙ . This suggests that an oxygen-neon WD lost a mass of more than ˜ 0.1 {M}⊙ since its birth. For V351 Pup, we obtained d˜ 5.5 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.45, and {M}{{WD}}=0.98-1.1 {M}⊙ . For V382 Vel, we obtained d˜ 1.6 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.15, and {M}{{WD}}=1.13-1.28 {M}⊙ . For V693 CrA, we obtained d˜ 7.1 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.05, and {M}{{WD}}=1.15-1.25 {M}⊙ . For V1974 Cyg, we obtained d˜ 1.8 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.30, and {M}{{WD}}=0.95-1.1 {M}⊙ . For comparison, we added the carbon-oxygen nova V1668 Cyg to our analysis and obtained d˜ 5.4 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.30, and {M}{{WD}}=0.98-1.1 {M}⊙ . In QU Vul, photospheric emission contributes 0.4-0.8 mag at most to the optical light curve compared with free-free emission only. In V351 Pup and V1974 Cyg, photospheric emission contributes very little (0.2-0.4 mag at most) to the optical light curve. In V382 Vel and V693 CrA, free-free emission dominates the continuum spectra, and photospheric emission does not contribute to the optical magnitudes. We also discuss the maximum magnitude versus rate of decline relation for these novae based on the universal decline law.

  6. Development of a real-time PCR melt curve assay for simultaneous detection of virulent and antibiotic resistant Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant; Mustapha, Azlin

    2014-12-01

    Multiple drug resistance in Salmonella is an emerging problem in the area of food safety. Depending on the virulence and antibiotic resistance characteristics of the Salmonella strain, infections of varying severity could result. In this study, a multiplex melt curve real-time PCR assay for the detection of virulent and antibiotic resistance strains of Salmonella was developed with two primer sets. The first set targets the virulence gene, invasin (invA), and tetracycline (tetG), streptomycin (aadA2) and sulphonamide (sulI) antibiotic resistance genes, and the second set amplifies ampicillin (blaPSE,blaTEM) and chloramphenicol (floR) resistance genes. The multiplex assay was evaluated using 41 Salmonella strains and was further tested on eight different artificially inoculated food samples. The fluorescent DNA intercalating dye, SYTO9, generated high resolution melt curve peaks and, hence, was used for the development of the assay. This multiplex assay worked efficiently over a DNA concentration range of 20 ng-200 fg and showed a sensitivity of 290 CFU/mL with serially diluted broth cultures. The detection limit for un-enriched artificially inoculated food samples was 10(4) CFU/g, but an enrichment period of 6 h allowed for detection of 10 CFU/g of cells in the samples.

  7. Mathematics analysis of polymerase chain reaction kinetic curves.

    PubMed

    Sochivko, D G; Fedorov, A A; Varlamov, D A; Kurochkin, V E; Petrov, R V

    2016-01-01

    The paper reviews different approaches to the mathematical analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) kinetic curves. The basic principles of PCR mathematical analysis are presented. Approximation of PCR kinetic curves and PCR efficiency curves by various functions is described. Several PCR models based on chemical kinetics equations are suggested. Decision criteria for an optimal function to describe PCR efficiency are proposed.

  8. Analysis of Picosecond Pulsed Laser Melted Graphite

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-12-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm{sup -1} and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm{sup -1}, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nanosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  9. Analysis of an EBeam melting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunk, P. R.

    Electron-Beam (EBeam) melting furnaces are routinely used to minimize the occurrence of second-phase particles in the processing of segregation-sensitive alloys. As one part of the process, a circulating electron beam impinges the surface of a crucible melt pool to help control the shape of the solidification front below. By modeling melt pool hydrodynamics, heat transfer, and the shape of solidification boundaries, we plan to optimize the dwell pattern of the beam so that the material solidifies with a composition as spatially homogeneous as possible. Both two-and three-dimensional models are being pursued with FIDAP 5.02, the former serving as a test bed for various degrees of model sophistication. A heat flux distribution is specified on the top of the domain to simulate the EBeam dwell pattern. In two dimensions it is found that an inertially-driven recirculation in the melt pool interacts with a counter-rotating buoyancy-driven recirculation, and that both recirculation influence heavily the shape of the solidification front. In three dimensions the inertial cell decays quickly with distance from the position of the inlet stream. Because the Rayleigh number can exceed 10(exp 7) for materials and operating conditions of interest, stability and the possibility of spontaneous transients are explored.

  10. SCALE ANALYSIS OF CONVECTIVE MELTING WITH INTERNAL HEAT GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    John Crepeau

    2011-03-01

    Using a scale analysis approach, we model phase change (melting) for pure materials which generate internal heat for small Stefan numbers (approximately one). The analysis considers conduction in the solid phase and natural convection, driven by internal heat generation, in the liquid regime. The model is applied for a constant surface temperature boundary condition where the melting temperature is greater than the surface temperature in a cylindrical geometry. We show the time scales in which conduction and convection heat transfer dominate.

  11. Replication and Analysis of Ebbinghaus’ Forgetting Curve

    PubMed Central

    Murre, Jaap M. J.; Dros, Joeri

    2015-01-01

    We present a successful replication of Ebbinghaus’ classic forgetting curve from 1880 based on the method of savings. One subject spent 70 hours learning lists and relearning them after 20 min, 1 hour, 9 hours, 1 day, 2 days, or 31 days. The results are similar to Ebbinghaus' original data. We analyze the effects of serial position on forgetting and investigate what mathematical equations present a good fit to the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve and its replications. We conclude that the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve has indeed been replicated and that it is not completely smooth but most probably shows a jump upwards starting at the 24 hour data point. PMID:26148023

  12. Recession curve analysis for groundwater levels: case study in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailuma, A.; VÄ«tola, I.; Abramenko, K.; Lauva, D.; Vircavs, V.; Veinbergs, A.; Dimanta, Z.

    2012-04-01

    Recession curve analysis is powerful and effective analysis technique in many research areas related with hydrogeology where observations have to be made, such as water filtration and absorption of moisture, irrigation and drainage, planning of hydroelectric power production and chemical leaching (elution of chemical substances) as well as in other areas. The analysis of the surface runoff hydrograph`s recession curves, which is performed to conceive the after-effects of interaction of precipitation and surface runoff, has approved in practice. The same method for analysis of hydrograph`s recession curves can be applied for the observations of the groundwater levels. There are manually prepared hydrograph for analysis of recession curves for observation wells (MG2, BG2 and AG1) in agricultural monitoring sites in Latvia. Within this study from the available monitoring data of groundwater levels were extracted data of declining periods, splitted by month. The drop-down curves were manually (by changing the date) moved together, until to find the best match, thereby obtaining monthly drop-down curves, representing each month separately. Monthly curves were combined and manually joined, for obtaining characterizing drop-down curves of the year for each well. Within the process of decreased recession curve analysis, from the initial curve was cut out upward areas, leaving only the drops of the curve, consequently, the curve is transformed more closely to the groundwater flow, trying to take out the impact of rain or drought periods from the curve. Respectively, the drop-down curve is part of the data, collected with hydrograph, where data with the discharge dominates, without considering impact of precipitation. Using the recession curve analysis theory, ready tool "A Visual Basic Spreadsheet Macro for Recession Curve Analysis" was used for selection of data and logarithmic functions matching (K. Posavec et.al., GROUND WATER 44, no. 5: 764-767, 2006), as well as

  13. SS433 Trek 2: light curve analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, J.; Obana, Y.; Okugami, M.

    The authors have calculated theoretical light curves of SS433 during eclipse and precession, using a model in which SS433 consists of a geometrically thick torus around a compact star and a companion star filling the Roche lobe. The favorite combination is that the mass ratio is about 2 (a compact star is a black hole) and the surface temperature of the companion is around 17000K.

  14. PSD analysis of optical QSO light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simm, Torben; Salvato, M.; Saglia, R.; Ponti, G.; Lanzuisi, G.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Nandra, K.; Bender, R.

    2016-08-01

    One of the elementary properties of quasar activity is continuous variability in the UV/optical bands. The power spectral density (PSD) potentially contains information about the underlying processes connected to variability. We applied a novel method based on continuous-time autoregressive moving average (CARMA) models (Kelly et al. 2014) to derive the PSD even for irregularly sampled light curves. Using a sample of ~100 X-ray selected non-local QSOs from the XMM-COSMOS catalog and optical light curves provided by the Pan-STARRS1 MDF survey we find that the PSD resembles a broken power-law with a high-frequency slope significantly steeper than observed in X-ray studies. The PSD normalization is observed to scale inversely with bolometric luminosity and Eddington ratio, whereas there is no correlation between the characteristic bend timescale and black hole mass. We find a weak tendency for QSOs with higher black hole mass to have steeper high-frequency PSD slopes. In an ongoing work we extend these studies employing a sample of ~700 variable broad-line QSOs with high-quality black hole mass estimates and well-sampled light curves from the SDSS-RM project.

  15. Rapid identification and classification of bacteria by 16S rDNA restriction fragment melting curve analyses (RFMCA).

    PubMed

    Rudi, Knut; Kleiberg, Gro H; Heiberg, Ragnhild; Rosnes, Jan T

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate restriction fragment melting curve analyses (RFMCA) as a novel approach for rapid classification of bacteria during food production. RFMCA was evaluated for bacteria isolated from sous vide food products, and raw materials used for sous vide production. We identified four major bacterial groups in the material analysed (cluster I-Streptococcus, cluster II-Carnobacterium/Bacillus, cluster III-Staphylococcus and cluster IV-Actinomycetales). The accuracy of RFMCA was evaluated by comparison with 16S rDNA sequencing. The strains satisfying the RFMCA quality filtering criteria (73%, n=57), with both 16S rDNA sequence information and RFMCA data (n=45) gave identical group assignments with the two methods. RFMCA enabled rapid and accurate classification of bacteria that is database compatible. Potential application of RFMCA in the food or pharmaceutical industry will include development of classification models for the bacteria expected in a given product, and then to build an RFMCA database as a part of the product quality control. PMID:17367680

  16. Theoretical foundations for environmental Kuznets curve analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, Van

    This thesis provides a dynamic theory for analyzing the paths of aggregate output and pollution in a country over time. An infinite horizon, competitive growth-pollution model is explored in order to determine the role that economic scale, production techniques, and pollution regulations play in explaining the inverted U-shaped relationship between output and some forms of pollution (otherwise known as the Environmental Kuznets Curve, or EKC). Results indicate that the output-pollution relationship may follow a strictly increasing, strictly decreasing (but bounded), inverted U-shaped, or some combination of curves. While the 'scale' effect may cause output and pollution to exhibit a monotonic relationship, 'technique' and 'regulation' effects may ultimately cause a de-linking of these two variables. Pollution-minimizing energy regulation policies are also investigated within this framework. It is found that the EKC may be 'flattened' or even eliminated moving from a poorly-regulated economy to one that minimizes pollution. The model is calibrated to the US economy for output (gross national product, GNP) and two pollutants (sulfur dioxide, SO2, and carbon dioxide, CO2) over the period 1900 to 1990. Results indicate that the model replicates the observations quite well. The predominance of 'scale' effects cause aggregate SO2 and CO2 levels to increase with GNP in the early stages of development. Then, in the case of SO 2, 'technique' and 'regulation' effects may be the cause of falling SO2 levels with continued economic growth (establishing the EKC). CO2 continues to monotonically increase as output levels increase over time. The positive relationship may be due to the lack of regulations on this pollutant. If stricter regulation policies were instituted in the two case studies, an improved allocation of resources may result. While GNP may be 2.596 to 20% lower than what has been realized in the US economy (depending on the pollution variable analyzed), individual

  17. Primate genotyping via high resolution melt analysis: rapid and reliable identification of color vision status in wild lemurs.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Rachel L; Spriggs, Amanda N; MacFie, Tammie S; Baden, Andrea L; Irwin, Mitchell T; Wright, Patricia C; Louis, Edward E; Lawler, Richard R; Mundy, Nicholas I; Bradley, Brenda J

    2016-10-01

    Analyses of genetic polymorphisms can aid our understanding of intra- and interspecific variation in primate sociality, ecology, and behavior. Studies of primate opsin genes are prime examples of this, as single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the X-linked opsin gene underlie variation in color vision. For primate species with polymorphic trichromacy, genotyping opsin SNVs can generally indicate whether individual primates are red-green color-blind (denoted homozygous M or homozygous L) or have full trichromatic color vision (heterozygous ML). Given the potential influence of color vision on behavior and fitness, characterizing the color vision status of study subjects is becoming commonplace for many primate field projects. Such studies traditionally involve a multi-step sequencing-based method that can be costly and time-consuming. Here we present a new reliable, rapid, and relatively inexpensive method for characterizing color vision in primate populations using high resolution melt analysis (HRMA). Using lemurs as a case study, we characterized variation at exons 3 and/or 5 of the X-linked opsin gene for 87 individuals representing nine species. We scored opsin genotypes and color vision status using both traditional sequencing-based methods as well as our novel melting-curve based HRMA protocol. For each species, the melting curves of varying genotypes (homozygous M, homozygous L, heterozygous ML) differed in melting temperature and/or shape. Melting curves for each sample were consistent across replicates, and genotype-specific melting curves were consistent across DNA sources (blood vs. feces). We show that opsin genotypes can be quickly and reliably scored using HRMA once lab-specific reference curves have been developed based on known genotypes. Although the protocol presented here focuses on genotyping lemur opsin loci, we also consider the larger potential for applying this approach to various types of genetic studies of primate populations. PMID:27271303

  18. Primate genotyping via high resolution melt analysis: rapid and reliable identification of color vision status in wild lemurs.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Rachel L; Spriggs, Amanda N; MacFie, Tammie S; Baden, Andrea L; Irwin, Mitchell T; Wright, Patricia C; Louis, Edward E; Lawler, Richard R; Mundy, Nicholas I; Bradley, Brenda J

    2016-10-01

    Analyses of genetic polymorphisms can aid our understanding of intra- and interspecific variation in primate sociality, ecology, and behavior. Studies of primate opsin genes are prime examples of this, as single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the X-linked opsin gene underlie variation in color vision. For primate species with polymorphic trichromacy, genotyping opsin SNVs can generally indicate whether individual primates are red-green color-blind (denoted homozygous M or homozygous L) or have full trichromatic color vision (heterozygous ML). Given the potential influence of color vision on behavior and fitness, characterizing the color vision status of study subjects is becoming commonplace for many primate field projects. Such studies traditionally involve a multi-step sequencing-based method that can be costly and time-consuming. Here we present a new reliable, rapid, and relatively inexpensive method for characterizing color vision in primate populations using high resolution melt analysis (HRMA). Using lemurs as a case study, we characterized variation at exons 3 and/or 5 of the X-linked opsin gene for 87 individuals representing nine species. We scored opsin genotypes and color vision status using both traditional sequencing-based methods as well as our novel melting-curve based HRMA protocol. For each species, the melting curves of varying genotypes (homozygous M, homozygous L, heterozygous ML) differed in melting temperature and/or shape. Melting curves for each sample were consistent across replicates, and genotype-specific melting curves were consistent across DNA sources (blood vs. feces). We show that opsin genotypes can be quickly and reliably scored using HRMA once lab-specific reference curves have been developed based on known genotypes. Although the protocol presented here focuses on genotyping lemur opsin loci, we also consider the larger potential for applying this approach to various types of genetic studies of primate populations.

  19. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING MELTING ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and simple fluorescence screening assay for UV radiation-, chemical-, and enzyme-induced DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on a melting/annealing analysis technique and has been used with both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from E. coli). DN...

  20. Melting analysis on microbeads in rapid temperature-gradient inside microchannels for single nucleotide polymorphisms detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Kan-Chien; Ding, Shih-Torng; Lin, En-Chung; Wang, Lon Alex; Lu, Yen-Wen

    2014-11-01

    A continuous-flow microchip with a temperature gradient in microchannels was utilized to demonstrate spatial melting analysis on microbeads for clinical Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyping on animal genomic DNA. The chip had embedded heaters and thermometers, which created a rapid and yet stable temperature gradient between 60 °C and 85 °C in a short distance as the detection region. The microbeads, which served as mobile supports carrying the target DNA and fluorescent dye, were transported across the temperature gradient. As the surrounding temperature increased, the fluorescence signals of the microbeads decayed with this relationship being acquired as the melting curve. Fast DNA denaturation, as a result of the improved heat transfer and thermal stability due to scaling, was also confirmed. Further, each individual microbead could potentially bear different sequences and pass through the detection region, one by one, for a series of melting analysis, with multiplex, high-throughput capability being possible. A prototype was tested with target DNA samples in different genotypes (i.e., wild and mutant types) with a SNP location from Landrace sows. The melting temperatures were obtained and compared to the ones using a traditional tube-based approach. The results showed similar levels of SNP discrimination, validating our proposed technique for scanning homozygotes and heterozygotes to distinguish single base changes for disease research, drug development, medical diagnostics, agriculture, and animal production.

  1. Microstructure analysis of magnesium alloy melted by laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. Y.; Hu, J. D.; Yang, Y.; Guo, Z. X.; Wang, H. Y.

    2005-12-01

    The effects of laser surface melting (LSM) on microstructure of magnesium alloy containing Al8.57%, Zn 0.68%, Mn0.15%, Ce0.52% were investigated. In the present work, a pulsed Nd:YAG laser was used to melt and rapidly solidify the surface of the magnesium alloy with the objective of changing microstructure and improving the corrosion resistance. The results indicate that laser-melted layer contains the finer dendrites and behaviors good resistance corrosion compared with the untreated layer. Furthermore, the absorption coefficient of the magnesium alloy has been estimated according to the numeral simulation of the thermal conditions. The formation process of fine microstructure in melted layers was investigated based on the experimental observation and the theoretical analysis. Some simulation results such as the re-solidification velocities are obtained. The phase constitutions of the melted layers determined by X-ray diffraction were β-Mg 17Al 12 and α-Mg as well as some phases unidentified.

  2. Light curve demography via Bayesian functional data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredo, Thomas; Budavari, Tamas; Hendry, Martin A.; Kowal, Daniel; Ruppert, David

    2015-08-01

    Synoptic time-domain surveys provide astronomers, not simply more data, but a different kind of data: large ensembles of multivariate, irregularly and asynchronously sampled light curves. We describe a statistical framework for light curve demography—optimal accumulation and extraction of information, not only along individual light curves as conventional methods do, but also across large ensembles of related light curves. We build the framework using tools from functional data analysis (FDA), a rapidly growing area of statistics that addresses inference from datasets that sample ensembles of related functions. Our Bayesian FDA framework builds hierarchical models that describe light curve ensembles using multiple levels of randomness: upper levels describe the source population, and lower levels describe the observation process, including measurement errors and selection effects. Schematically, a particular object's light curve is modeled as the sum of a parameterized template component (modeling population-averaged behavior) and a peculiar component (modeling variability across the population), subsequently subjected to an observation model. A functional shrinkage adjustment to individual light curves emerges—an adaptive, functional generalization of the kind of adjustments made for Eddington or Malmquist bias in single-epoch photometric surveys. We are applying the framework to a variety of problems in synoptic time-domain survey astronomy, including optimal detection of weak sources in multi-epoch data, and improved estimation of Cepheid variable star luminosities from detailed demographic modeling of ensembles of Cepheid light curves.

  3. Hydrogen-bond breaking by O/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/. II. Melting curves of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Mathers, T.L.; Schoeffler, G.; McGlynn, S.P.

    1982-01-01

    Evidence for hydrogen bond breaking (HBB) by O/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/ in the denaturation or melting of DNA is presented. It was found that air and oxygen significantly reduce the temperature of the DNA melting process. The possible relationship of this HBB ability of oxygen and nitrogen to phenomena observed in vivo are discussed. (ACR)

  4. Rapid Genetic Analysis of X-Linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease by High-Resolution Melting

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Harry R.; Augustine, Nancy H.; Pryor, Robert J.; Reed, Gudrun H.; Bagnato, Joshua D.; Tebo, Anne E.; Bender, Jeffrey M.; Pasi, Brian M.; Chinen, Javier; Hanson, I. Celine; de Boer, Martin; Roos, Dirk; Wittwer, Carl T.

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution melting analysis was applied to X-linked chronic granulomatous disease, a rare disorder resulting from mutations in CYBB. Melting curves of the 13 PCR products bracketing CYBB exons were predicted by Poland's algorithm and compared with observed curves from 96 normal individuals. Primer plates were prepared robotically in batches and dried, greatly simplifying the 3- to 6-hour workflow that included DNA isolation, PCR, melting, and cycle sequencing of any positive products. Small point mutations or insertions/deletions were detected by mixing the hemizygous male DNA with normal male DNA to produce artificial heterozygotes, whereas detection of gross deletions was performed on unmixed samples. Eighteen validation samples and 22 clinical kindreds were analyzed for CYBB mutations. All blinded validation samples were correctly identified. The clinical probands were identified after screening for neutrophil oxidase activity. Nineteen different mutations were found, including seven near intron-exon boundaries predicting splicing defects, five substitutions within exons, three small deletions predicting premature termination, and four gross deletions of multiple exons. Ten novel mutations were found, including (c.) two missense (730T>A, 134T>G), one nonsense (90C>A), four splice site defects (45 + 1G>T, 674 + 4A>G, 1461 + 2delT, and 1462-2A>C), two small deletions (636delT, 1661_1662delCT), and one gross deletion of exons 6 to 8. High-resolution melting can provide timely diagnosis at low cost for effective clinical management of rare, genetic primary immunodeficiency disorders. PMID:20228266

  5. Cepheid light curve demography via Bayesian functional data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredo, Thomas J.; Hendry, Martin; Kowal, Daniel; Ruppert, David

    2016-01-01

    Synoptic time-domain surveys provide astronomers, not simply more data, but a different kind of data: large ensembles of multivariate, irregularly and asynchronously sampled light curves. We describe a statistical framework for light curve demography—optimal accumulation and extraction of information, not only along individual light curves as conventional methods do, but also across large ensembles of related light curves. We build the framework using tools from functional data analysis (FDA), a rapidly growing area of statistics that addresses inference from datasets that sample ensembles of related functions. Our Bayesian FDA framework builds hierarchical models that describe light curve ensembles using multiple levels of randomness: upper levels describe the source population, and lower levels describe the observation process, including measurement errors and selection effects. Roughly speaking, a particular object's light curve is modeled as the sum of a parameterized template component (modeling population-averaged behavior) and a peculiar component (modeling variability across the population), subsequently subjected to an observation model. A functional shrinkage adjustment to individual light curves emerges—an adaptive, functional generalization of the kind of adjustments made for Eddington or Malmquist bias in single-epoch photometric surveys. We describe ongoing work applying the framework to improved estimation of Cepheid variable star luminosities via FDA-based refinement and generalization of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation.

  6. Melt pool and keyhole behaviour analysis for deep penetration laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbro, R.

    2010-11-01

    One usually defines the main characteristic of the welding performances of a given laser system by its 'penetration curve' that corresponds to the welding depth as a function of the welding speed Vw for a given set of operating parameters. Analysis of a penetration curve is interesting and gives very fruitful results. Coupled with high-speed video imaging of melt pool surface and ejected plume behaviour, the analysis of this penetration curve on a very large range of welding speeds, typically from 0 to 50 m min-1, has allowed us to observe very different and characteristic regimes. These regimes are mainly characterized by the physical processes by which they impede the laser beam penetration inside the material. We show that it is only at rather high welding speeds that these limiting processes are reduced. Consequently, the scaling law of welding depth with welding speed is in agreement with adapted modelling of this process. On the other hand, as the welding speed is reduced, different effects depending on the weld pool dynamics and plume interaction strongly disturb the keyhole stability and are responsible for the deviation of the penetration curve from the previous modelling that agrees with a 1/Vw scaling law. A corresponding criterion for the occurrence of this effect is defined.

  7. Identification of forensically important blowfly species (Diptera: Calliphoridae) by high-resolution melting PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Malewski, Tadeusz; Draber-Mońko, Agnieszka; Pomorski, Jan; Łoś, Marta; Bogdanowicz, Wiesław

    2010-07-01

    We describe here the successful coupling of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis to rapidly identify 15 forensically important species of blowfly from the family Calliphoridae (Diptera), which occur in Poland. Two short regions (119 and 70 base pairs, respectively) of cytochrome oxidase gene subunit I with sufficient sequence diversity were selected. In the case of lacking taxa (e.g., reference species) these amplicons can be synthesized using sequences deposited in gene banks. The technique utilizes low template DNA concentration and is highly reproducible. The melting profile was not altered up to a 10,000-fold difference in DNA template concentration (ranging from 5 pg to 50 ng). The several HRM runs performed on different specimens from Poland belonging to the same species and on different days resulted in only minor variations in the amplification curves and in melting temperatures of the peaks. Intraspecific variation in a larger scale was tested using synthesized oligonucleotides from cosmopolitan Lucilia illustris originating from Poland, France, Great Britain, India, and USA. As HRM PCR analysis is sensitive to even single base changes, all geographic variants of this species were identified. This technique is also cost-effective and simple, and it may even be used by non-geneticists. A working protocol was ultimately constructed for the purpose of rapid and accurate species identification in most countries in Europe regardless of which stage or which part of a blowfly was collected.

  8. Melting of oxidized nickel ores in a barbotage unit: I. Thermodynamic analysis of melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomov, R. A.; Starykh, R. V.

    2015-09-01

    The possibility of effective processing of oxidized nickel ores (ONOs) to form ferronickel in a barbotage unit (Vanyukov furnace for liquid bath melting (LBM)) is theoretically corroborated. The heat balances of the LBM processing of unreduced ONOs or the cinder preliminarily reduced in tubular kilns to form ferronickel are calculated. It is shown that deep reduction of ONOs and melting of the reduced cinder are energetically more favorable than direct melting of a slightly dried ore to form ferronickel. The proposed twostage scheme of processing of ONOs makes it possible to decrease the furnace area and the effluent gas flow. Parallel reduction and oxidation processes in the same region of a bubbled slag melt during direct melting of unreduced ore is debatable.

  9. Texture analysis of melt-textured YBCO superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblischka-Veneva, A.; Koblischka, M. R.; Simon, P.; Ogasawara, K.; Murakami, M.

    2003-10-01

    We compare the results of an X-ray based pole figure texture analysis with the local texture analysis by means of electron-backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis. As samples, we employ two different melt-textured YBCO samples; one fully processed and one without oxygen treatment. To enable the direct comparison of the two techniques, we employ the [1 0 3] pole figures. We find a clear coincidence between the results obtained by the two measurement techniques on our samples, however, the EBSD results are much more detailed, yielding the local grain orientation distribution and quantitative results of the grain or subgrain misorientation angles. Therefore, the EBSD measurements give information not accessible to the X-ray pole figure analysis. The surface preparation procedure is essential to enable the automated EBSD mapping as high image quality Kikuchi patterns are required. The polishing procedures are discussed in detail.

  10. High-resolution melt analysis of the minisatellite D1S80: a potential forensic screening tool.

    PubMed

    Pomeroy, Robert S; Balamurugan, Kuppareddi; Wong, Helena; Duncan, George

    2014-11-01

    High-resolution melt (HRM) analysis of the VNTR region of the human D1S80 locus, a 16-bp repeat minisatellite from approximately 400 to over 700 bp in length, was investigated. A Qiagen Rotor-Gene Q using the Type-it PCR HRM kit was used to acquire HRM curves for 14 single, and 16 biallelic, dsDNA samples. The HRM analysis was applicable over a range of DNA concentrations; however the characteristics of the melt curve did depend on the forward and reverse primer ratio. Despite the large amplicon size and the similarities of the repeat sequences, it was possible to discriminate different genotypes. Heterozygotes were clearly different from the homozygous variants and even small differences in the repeat sequence could be differentiated. However, the melt analysis requires a high-resolution system with temperature resolution of 0.02°C or better in order to sort out differences in these large amplicons of near identical GC content (in this case 56%). HRM analysis of amplicons with large repeat sequences can be used as a means of comparing DNA fragments. Examination of multiple sequences can be used to differentiate DNA samples and demonstrate the potential of HRM analysis as a rapid and inexpensive prescreening technique in forensic applications.

  11. Multivariate curve resolution: a powerful tool for the analysis of conformational transitions in nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Jaumot, Joaquim; Escaja, Núria; Gargallo, Raimundo; González, Carlos; Pedroso, Enrique; Tauler, Romà

    2002-01-01

    A successful application is reported of the multivariate curve resolution alternating least-squares method (MCR-ALS) for the analysis of nucleic acid melting and salt-induced transitions. Under conditions where several structures co-exist in a conformational equilibrium, MCR-ALS analysis of the UV and circular dichroism (CD) spectra at different temperatures, ionic strength and oligonucleotide concentration allows for the resolution of concentration profiles and pure spectra of the different species. The methodology is illustrated by the case of the cyclic oligonucleotide d. The melting transition of this molecule at different oligonucleotide concentrations was studied at 0, 2 and 10 mM MgCl2 by UV and CD spectroscopy. In addition, salt titration experiments were carried out at 21.0 and 54.0°C. The MCR-ALS analysis indicates that three different conformations of this molecule co-exist in solution. In agreement with previous NMR studies, these conformations were assigned to a monomeric dumbbell-like structure, a dimeric four-stranded conformation and a disordered (random coil) structure. The MCR-ALS methodology allows for a detailed analysis of how this equilibrium is affected by temperature, salt and oligonucleotide concentration. PMID:12202780

  12. Determination of zircon/melt trace element partition coefficients from SIMS analysis of melt inclusions in zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J. B.; Bodnar, R. J.; Shimizu, N.; Sinha, A. K.

    2002-09-01

    Partition coefficients ( zircon/meltD M) for rare earth elements (REE) (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Dy, Er and Yb) and other trace elements (Ba, Rb, B, Sr, Ti, Y and Nb) between zircon and melt have been calculated from secondary ion mass spectrometric (SIMS) analyses of zircon/melt inclusion pairs. The melt inclusion-mineral (MIM) technique shows that D REE increase in compatibility with increasing atomic number, similar to results of previous studies. However, D REE determined using the MIM technique are, in general, lower than previously reported values. Calculated D REE indicate that light REE with atomic numbers less than Sm are incompatible in zircon and become more incompatible with decreasing atomic number. This behavior is in contrast to most previously published results which indicate D > 1 and define a flat partitioning pattern for elements from La through Sm. The partition coefficients for the heavy REE determined using the MIM technique are lower than previously published results by factors of ≈15 to 20 but follow a similar trend. These differences are thought to reflect the effects of mineral and/or glass contaminants in samples from earlier studies which employed bulk analysis techniques. D REE determined using the MIM technique agree well with values predicted using the equations of Brice (1975), which are based on the size and elasticity of crystallographic sites. The presence of Ce 4+ in the melt results in elevated D Ce compared to neighboring REE due to the similar valence and size of Ce 4+ and Zr 4+. Predicted zircon/meltD values for Ce 4+ and Ce 3+ indicate that the Ce 4+/Ce 3+ ratios of the melt ranged from about 10 -3 to 10 -2. Partition coefficients for other trace elements determined in this study increase in compatibility in the order Ba < Rb < B < Sr < Ti < Y < Nb, with Ba, Rb, B and Sr showing incompatible behavior (D M < 1.0), and Ti, Y and Nb showing compatible behavior (D M > 1.0). The effect of partition coefficients on melt evolution during

  13. Differentiation of Staphylococcus spp. by high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Slany, Michal; Vanerkova, Martina; Nemcova, Eva; Zaloudikova, Barbora; Ruzicka, Filip; Freiberger, Tomas

    2010-12-01

    High-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) is a fast (post-PCR) high-throughput method to scan for sequence variations in a target gene. The aim of this study was to test the potential of HRMA to distinguish particular bacterial species of the Staphylococcus genus even when using a broad-range PCR within the 16S rRNA gene where sequence differences are minimal. Genomic DNA samples isolated from 12 reference staphylococcal strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus capitis, Staphylococcus caprae, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staphylococcus hominis, Staphylococcus intermedius, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Staphylococcus sciuri, Staphylococcus simulans, Staphylococcus warneri, and Staphylococcus xylosus) were subjected to a real-time PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene in the presence of fluorescent dye EvaGreen™, followed by HRMA. Melting profiles were used as molecular fingerprints for bacterial species differentiation. HRMA of S. saprophyticus and S. xylosus resulted in undistinguishable profiles because of their identical sequences in the analyzed 16S rRNA region. The remaining reference strains were fully differentiated either directly or via high-resolution plots obtained by heteroduplex formation between coamplified PCR products of the tested staphylococcal strain and phylogenetically unrelated strain.

  14. Determining the melting curves of NiSi using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell and the multi-anvil press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wann, E.; Lord, O. T.; Dobson, D. P.; Hunt, S. A.; Wood, I. G.; Vocadlo, L.; Ahmed, J.; Walker, A. M.; Santangeli, J. R.; Walter, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    It is believed that the cores of terrestrial planets consist primarily of an iron-nickel alloy with a small fraction of light elements1. In the case of the Earth, the possible candidates for the light elements are constrained by cosmochemical arguments2. However, although the exact nature of the light element is in dispute, it is widely believed that Si is a significant light element in the core3. Research into the iron-nickel-silicon ternary system is therefore invaluable for our understanding of the composition of the Earth's core and of planetary cores in general. We have initially focused on the FeSi and NiSi end-members as a first step in understanding the ternary system. Recent work on NiSi4,5 has revealed a more complicated phase diagram than that of FeSi, with a range of stable phases found at high pressure and temperature. In order to constrain the liquidus of NiSi, we have carried out experiments in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) using perturbations in the power versus temperature function as the melting criterion6. Thus far we have determined the melting curve of the room-pressure MnP structured phase to ~20 GPa, which agrees closely with an in situ multi-anvil press experiment in which the melting criteria were 1) the appearance of diffuse scattering during X-ray diffraction and 2) the appearance of convection during X-ray videography. We have also detected the break-in-slope of the melting curve associated with the MnP+ɛ-FeSi+liquid triple point, and extended the melting curve of the ɛ-FeSi structure of NiSi to 50 GPa. We are currently undertaking further experimental work to extend the melting curve above 100 GPa, beyond the pressure at which the CsCl structure becomes the liquid phase. Previous studies indicate that the CsCl structure is likely stable to inner core conditions4,5 making the results of relevance to planetary cores including that of the Earth. (1) Birch, F. Journal of Geophysical Research 1952, 57, 227. (2) Poirier, J. P

  15. Instrumentation for automated acquisition and analysis of TLD glow curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostock, I. J.; Kennett, T. J.; Harvey, J. W.

    1991-04-01

    Instrumentation for the automated and complete acquisition of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) data from a Panasonic UD-702E TLD reader is reported. The system that has been developed consists of both hardware and software components and is designed to operate with an IBM-type personal computer. Acquisition of glow curve, timing, and heating data has been integrated with elementary numerical analysis to permit real-time validity and diagnostic assessments to be made. This allows the optimization of critical parameters such as duration of the heating cycles and the time window for the integration of the dosimetry peak. The form of the Li 2B 4O 7:Cu TLD glow curve has been studied and a mathematical representation devised to assist in the implementation of automated analysis. Differences in the shape of the curve can be used to identify dosimetry peaks due to artifacts or to identify failing components. Examples of the use of this system for quality assurance in the TLD monitoring program at McMaster University are presented.

  16. High resolution melting (HRM) analysis of DNA--its role and potential in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Druml, Barbara; Cichna-Markl, Margit

    2014-09-01

    DNA based methods play an increasing role in food safety control and food adulteration detection. Recent papers show that high resolution melting (HRM) analysis is an interesting approach. It involves amplification of the target of interest in the presence of a saturation dye by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequent melting of the amplicons by gradually increasing the temperature. Since the melting profile depends on the GC content, length, sequence and strand complementarity of the product, HRM analysis is highly suitable for the detection of single-base variants and small insertions or deletions. The review gives an introduction into HRM analysis, covers important aspects in the development of an HRM analysis method and describes how HRM data are analysed and interpreted. Then we discuss the potential of HRM analysis based methods in food analysis, i.e. for the identification of closely related species and cultivars and the identification of pathogenic microorganisms.

  17. Multi-wavelength analysis of Ellerman Bomb Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlender, M.; Berlicki, A.

    We present the results of a multi-wavelength photometric analysis of Ellerman Bomb (EB) observations obtained from the Dutch Open Telescope. In our data we have found 6 EBs located in the super-penumbra of the main spot in the active region NOAA 10781. We present light curves of EB observed in the Hα line centre and wing +0.7 Å, in the Ca II H line centre and wing~+2.35 Å, in the G-band and in the TRACE 1600 Å filter. We have shown that EBs were visible in the G-band and moreover, there was a good correlation between the light curves in the G-band and in the Hα line wings. We also found quasi-periodic oscillations of EBs brightness in the G-band, CaII H line and TRACE 1600 Å filter.

  18. Stress analysis in curved composites due to thermal loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, Jared Cornelius

    Many structures in aircraft, cars, trucks, ships, machines, tools, bridges, and buildings, consist of curved sections. These sections vary from straight line segments that have curvature at either one or both ends, segments with compound curvatures, segments with two mutually perpendicular curvatures or Gaussian curvatures, and segments with a simple curvature. With the advancements made in multi-purpose composites over the past 60 years, composites slowly but steadily have been appearing in these various vehicles, compound structures, and buildings. These composite sections provide added benefits over isotropic, polymeric, and ceramic materials by generally having a higher specific strength, higher specific stiffnesses, longer fatigue life, lower density, possibilities in reduction of life cycle and/or acquisition cost, and greater adaptability to intended function of structure via material composition and geometry. To be able to design and manufacture a safe composite laminate or structure, it is imperative that the stress distributions, their causes, and effects are thoroughly understood in order to successfully accomplish mission objectives and manufacture a safe and reliable composite. The objective of the thesis work is to expand upon the knowledge of simply curved composite structures by exploring and ascertaining all pertinent parameters, phenomenon, and trends in stress variations in curved laminates due to thermal loading. The simply curved composites consist of composites with one radius of curvature throughout the span of the specimen about only one axis. Analytical beam theory, classical lamination theory, and finite element analysis were used to ascertain stress variations in a flat, isotropic beam. An analytical method was developed to ascertain the stress variations in an isotropic, simply curved beam under thermal loading that is under both free-free and fixed-fixed constraint conditions. This is the first such solution to Author's best knowledge

  19. High-resolution melting analysis (HRM) for differentiation of four major Taeniidae species in dogs Taenia hydatigena, Taenia multiceps, Taenia ovis, and Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Mansoureh; Mohammadi, Mohammad Ali; Rostami, Sima; Shamsaddini, Saeedeh; Mirbadie, Seyed Reza; Harandi, Majid Fasihi

    2016-07-01

    Tapeworms of the genus Taenia include several species of important parasites with considerable medical and veterinary significance. Accurate identification of these species in dogs is the prerequisite of any prevention and control program. Here, we have applied an efficient method for differentiating four major Taeniid species in dogs, i.e., Taenia hydatigena, T. multiceps, T. ovis, and Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto. High-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is simpler, less expensive, and faster technique than conventional DNA-based assays and enables us to detect PCR amplicons in a closed system. Metacestode samples were collected from local abattoirs from sheep. All the isolates had already been identified by PCR-sequencing, and their sequence data were deposited in the GenBank. Real-time PCR coupled with HRM analysis targeting mitochondrial cox1 and ITS1 genes was used to differentiate taeniid species. Distinct melting curves were obtained from ITS1 region enabling accurate differentiation of three Taenia species and E. granulosus in dogs. The HRM curves of Taenia species and E .granulosus were clearly separated at Tm of 85 to 87 °C. In addition, double-pick melting curves were produced in mixed infections. Cox1 melting curves were not decisive enough to distinguish four taeniids. In this work, the efficiency of HRM analysis to differentiate four major taeniid species in dogs has been demonstrated using ITS1 gene. PMID:27008188

  20. Cancer mutation screening: Comparison of high-resolution melt analysis between two platforms.

    PubMed

    Ebili, Henry O; Ilyas, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution melt analysis (HRMA) is a cheap and reliable post-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) cancer mutation screening technique, which is fast gaining clinical relevance. The HRMA capabilities of the LightScanner (Idaho Technology) have been severally studied. However, the ABI 7500 HRM has not been tested against the purpose-built HRM instrument such as the LightScanner. DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded gastric cancer, colorectal cancer, and normal tissue as well as from colorectal cancer cell lines were amplified at exons 2, 3, and 4 of KRAS, and at exons 11 and 15 of BRAF in the ABI 7500 fast real-time PCR machine and subjected to melting both on the ABI and on the LightScanner. HRMA data were analysed with the ABI HRM software v2.0.1 and the LightScanner Call-IT 2.5. We tested the ABI 7500 HRM for internal precision, accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity at mutation screening relative to the LightScanner, using crude percentage concordance, kappa statistics, and the area under the receiver operator characteristics (AUROC) curve on SPSS version 19. The results show that the ABI 7500 HRMA has a high internal precision, and excellent concordance, sensitivity, and specificity at mutation screening compared with the LightScanner. However, in contrast to the LightScanner HRM software analysis, the ABI HRM software v.2.0.1, cannot distinguish real from certain pseudovariations in PCR amplicons that are sometimes brought about by the artefacts of the melting process. In conclusion, the ABI HRM has a comparable performance level with the LightScanner, although in certain respects mentioned previously, the LightScanner has an edge over the ABI. PMID:25932046

  1. Cancer mutation screening: Comparison of high-resolution melt analysis between two platforms.

    PubMed

    Ebili, Henry O; Ilyas, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution melt analysis (HRMA) is a cheap and reliable post-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) cancer mutation screening technique, which is fast gaining clinical relevance. The HRMA capabilities of the LightScanner (Idaho Technology) have been severally studied. However, the ABI 7500 HRM has not been tested against the purpose-built HRM instrument such as the LightScanner. DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded gastric cancer, colorectal cancer, and normal tissue as well as from colorectal cancer cell lines were amplified at exons 2, 3, and 4 of KRAS, and at exons 11 and 15 of BRAF in the ABI 7500 fast real-time PCR machine and subjected to melting both on the ABI and on the LightScanner. HRMA data were analysed with the ABI HRM software v2.0.1 and the LightScanner Call-IT 2.5. We tested the ABI 7500 HRM for internal precision, accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity at mutation screening relative to the LightScanner, using crude percentage concordance, kappa statistics, and the area under the receiver operator characteristics (AUROC) curve on SPSS version 19. The results show that the ABI 7500 HRMA has a high internal precision, and excellent concordance, sensitivity, and specificity at mutation screening compared with the LightScanner. However, in contrast to the LightScanner HRM software analysis, the ABI HRM software v.2.0.1, cannot distinguish real from certain pseudovariations in PCR amplicons that are sometimes brought about by the artefacts of the melting process. In conclusion, the ABI HRM has a comparable performance level with the LightScanner, although in certain respects mentioned previously, the LightScanner has an edge over the ABI.

  2. Identification of gene mutation in patients with osteogenesis imperfect using high resolution melting analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianhai; Ren, Xiuzhi; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Tianke; Wang, Yi; Li, Keqiu; Li, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a congenital bone disorder, is caused by mutations in COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes, leading to deficiency of type I collagen. The high resolution melting (HRM) analysis has been used for detecting mutations, polymorphisms and epigenetic alteration in double-stranded DNAs. This study was to evaluate the potential application of HRM analysis for identifying gene mutations in patients with OI. This study included four children with OI and their parents and fifty normal people as controls. Blood samples were collected for HRM analysis of PCR-amplified exons and flanking DNA sequences of COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes. Direct gene sequencing was performed to validate HRM-identified gene mutations. As compared to controls, HRM analysis of samples form children with OI showed abnormal melting curves in exons 11 and 33–34 of the COL1A1 gene and exons 19 and 48 of the COL1A2 gene, which indicates the presence of heterozygous mutations in COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes. In addition to two known mutations in the COL1A2 gene, c.982G > A and c.3197G > T, sequencing analysis identified two novel mutations in the COL1A1 gene, c.2321delC and c.768dupC mutations, which function as premature stop codons. These results support future studies of applying HRM analysis as a diagnostic approach for OI. PMID:26307460

  3. Identification of gene mutation in patients with osteogenesis imperfect using high resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhai; Ren, Xiuzhi; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Tianke; Wang, Yi; Li, Keqiu; Li, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a congenital bone disorder, is caused by mutations in COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes, leading to deficiency of type I collagen. The high resolution melting (HRM) analysis has been used for detecting mutations, polymorphisms and epigenetic alteration in double-stranded DNAs. This study was to evaluate the potential application of HRM analysis for identifying gene mutations in patients with OI. This study included four children with OI and their parents and fifty normal people as controls. Blood samples were collected for HRM analysis of PCR-amplified exons and flanking DNA sequences of COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes. Direct gene sequencing was performed to validate HRM-identified gene mutations. As compared to controls, HRM analysis of samples form children with OI showed abnormal melting curves in exons 11 and 33-34 of the COL1A1 gene and exons 19 and 48 of the COL1A2 gene, which indicates the presence of heterozygous mutations in COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes. In addition to two known mutations in the COL1A2 gene, c.982G > A and c.3197G > T, sequencing analysis identified two novel mutations in the COL1A1 gene, c.2321delC and c.768dupC mutations, which function as premature stop codons. These results support future studies of applying HRM analysis as a diagnostic approach for OI. PMID:26307460

  4. High resolution melt analysis to track infections due to ribotype 027 Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Grando, Danilla; Said, Mohamed M; Mayall, Barrie C; Gurtler, Volker

    2012-05-01

    The increased prevalence of hypervirulent ribotype 027 Clostridium difficile requires rapid identification of isolates in order to implement timely infection control strategies. High resolution melt (HRM) analysis of PCR products can identify strain variation amongst genera of bacteria. The intergenic (16S-23S rDNA) spacer region contains sequence regions conserved within genera and other sequence region variables between species within genera. We wished to investigate whether HRM analysis of PCR ribotyping products could identify ribotype 027 C. difficile. Ribotyping was performed on 93 clinical isolates and five control strains and band patterns were analysed using GelCompar II (Applied Maths, USA). Real-time PCR using ribotyping primers was performed and normalised melt curves were generated. The HRM data was then imported into ScreenClust software (QIAGEN) to generate principal component analysis graphs depicting clustered relationships of strains. Ribotyping produced clear PCR bands for 88/98 isolates tested. Dendrograms generated by GelCompar showed a diversity of ribotype patterns amongst these 88 isolates with 18 groups identified with 70% homology. One clinical isolate showed 100% homology with the control 027 strains. ScreenClust analysis of the same 88 HRM results showed clustering of isolates, with 027 strains identifiable as a unique cluster. HRM analysis correctly identified the control 027 stains and the clinical isolate shown to be 027. HRM combined with ScreenClust analysis of real-time PCR products of the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region successfully identified ribotype 027 strains. For infection control purposes this was achieved within 2-3 h of colony isolation.

  5. Automated Microfluidic Platform for Serial Polymerase Chain Reaction and High-Resolution Melting Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Weidong; Bean, Brian; Corey, Scott; Coursey, Johnathan S; Hasson, Kenton C; Inoue, Hiroshi; Isano, Taisuke; Kanderian, Sami; Lane, Ben; Liang, Hongye; Murphy, Brian; Owen, Greg; Shinoda, Nobuhiko; Zeng, Shulin; Knight, Ivor T

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of an automated genetic analyzer for human sample testing based on microfluidic rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA). The integrated DNA microfluidic cartridge was used on a platform designed with a robotic pipettor system that works by sequentially picking up different test solutions from a 384-well plate, mixing them in the tips, and delivering mixed fluids to the DNA cartridge. A novel image feedback flow control system based on a Canon 5D Mark II digital camera was developed for controlling fluid movement through a complex microfluidic branching network without the use of valves. The same camera was used for measuring the high-resolution melt curve of DNA amplicons that were generated in the microfluidic chip. Owing to fast heating and cooling as well as sensitive temperature measurement in the microfluidic channels, the time frame for PCR and HRMA was dramatically reduced from hours to minutes. Preliminary testing results demonstrated that rapid serial PCR and HRMA are possible while still achieving high data quality that is suitable for human sample testing. PMID:25827436

  6. Automated Microfluidic Platform for Serial Polymerase Chain Reaction and High-Resolution Melting Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Weidong; Bean, Brian; Corey, Scott; Coursey, Johnathan S; Hasson, Kenton C; Inoue, Hiroshi; Isano, Taisuke; Kanderian, Sami; Lane, Ben; Liang, Hongye; Murphy, Brian; Owen, Greg; Shinoda, Nobuhiko; Zeng, Shulin; Knight, Ivor T

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of an automated genetic analyzer for human sample testing based on microfluidic rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA). The integrated DNA microfluidic cartridge was used on a platform designed with a robotic pipettor system that works by sequentially picking up different test solutions from a 384-well plate, mixing them in the tips, and delivering mixed fluids to the DNA cartridge. A novel image feedback flow control system based on a Canon 5D Mark II digital camera was developed for controlling fluid movement through a complex microfluidic branching network without the use of valves. The same camera was used for measuring the high-resolution melt curve of DNA amplicons that were generated in the microfluidic chip. Owing to fast heating and cooling as well as sensitive temperature measurement in the microfluidic channels, the time frame for PCR and HRMA was dramatically reduced from hours to minutes. Preliminary testing results demonstrated that rapid serial PCR and HRMA are possible while still achieving high data quality that is suitable for human sample testing.

  7. Sex Determination in Highly Fragmented Human DNA by High-Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Sandoval, Brenda A.; Manzanilla, Linda R.; Montiel, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Sex identification in ancient human remains is a common problem especially if the skeletons are sub-adult, incomplete or damaged. In this paper we propose a new method to identify sex, based on real-time PCR amplification of small fragments (61 and 64 bp) of the third exon within the amelogenin gene covering a 3-bp deletion on the AMELX-allele, followed by a High Resolution Melting analysis (HRM). HRM is based on the melting curves of amplified fragments. The amelogenin gene is located on both chromosomes X and Y, showing dimorphism in length. This molecular tool is rapid, sensitive and reduces the risk of contamination from exogenous genetic material when used for ancient DNA studies. The accuracy of the new method described here has been corroborated by using control samples of known sex and by contrasting our results with those obtained with other methods. Our method has proven to be useful even in heavily degraded samples, where other previously published methods failed. Stochastic problems such as the random allele drop-out phenomenon are expected to occur in a less severe form, due to the smaller fragment size to be amplified. Thus, their negative effect could be easier to overcome by a proper experimental design. PMID:25098828

  8. Sex determination in highly fragmented human DNA by high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Sandoval, Brenda A; Manzanilla, Linda R; Montiel, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Sex identification in ancient human remains is a common problem especially if the skeletons are sub-adult, incomplete or damaged. In this paper we propose a new method to identify sex, based on real-time PCR amplification of small fragments (61 and 64 bp) of the third exon within the amelogenin gene covering a 3-bp deletion on the AMELX-allele, followed by a High Resolution Melting analysis (HRM). HRM is based on the melting curves of amplified fragments. The amelogenin gene is located on both chromosomes X and Y, showing dimorphism in length. This molecular tool is rapid, sensitive and reduces the risk of contamination from exogenous genetic material when used for ancient DNA studies. The accuracy of the new method described here has been corroborated by using control samples of known sex and by contrasting our results with those obtained with other methods. Our method has proven to be useful even in heavily degraded samples, where other previously published methods failed. Stochastic problems such as the random allele drop-out phenomenon are expected to occur in a less severe form, due to the smaller fragment size to be amplified. Thus, their negative effect could be easier to overcome by a proper experimental design. PMID:25098828

  9. Sex determination in highly fragmented human DNA by high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Sandoval, Brenda A; Manzanilla, Linda R; Montiel, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Sex identification in ancient human remains is a common problem especially if the skeletons are sub-adult, incomplete or damaged. In this paper we propose a new method to identify sex, based on real-time PCR amplification of small fragments (61 and 64 bp) of the third exon within the amelogenin gene covering a 3-bp deletion on the AMELX-allele, followed by a High Resolution Melting analysis (HRM). HRM is based on the melting curves of amplified fragments. The amelogenin gene is located on both chromosomes X and Y, showing dimorphism in length. This molecular tool is rapid, sensitive and reduces the risk of contamination from exogenous genetic material when used for ancient DNA studies. The accuracy of the new method described here has been corroborated by using control samples of known sex and by contrasting our results with those obtained with other methods. Our method has proven to be useful even in heavily degraded samples, where other previously published methods failed. Stochastic problems such as the random allele drop-out phenomenon are expected to occur in a less severe form, due to the smaller fragment size to be amplified. Thus, their negative effect could be easier to overcome by a proper experimental design.

  10. A new approach to the analysis of Mira light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennessier, M. O.; Barthes, D.; Mattei, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Two different but complementary methods for predicting Mira luminosities are presented. One method is derived from a Fourier analysis, it requires performing deconvolution, and its results are not certain due to the inherent instability of deconvolution problems. The other method is a learning method utilizing artificial intelligence techniques where a light curve is presented as an ordered sequence of pseudocycles, and rules are learned by linking the characteristics of several consecutive pseudocycles to one characteristic of the future cycle. It is observed that agreement between these methods is obtainable when it is possible to eliminate similar false frequencies from the preliminary power spectrum and to improve the degree of confidence in the rules.

  11. Analysis of melt ejection during long pulsed laser drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting-Zhong, Zhang; Zhi-Chao, Jia; Hai-Chao, Cui; De-Hua, Zhu; Xiao-Wu, Ni; Jian, Lu

    2016-05-01

    In pulsed laser drilling, melt ejection greatly influences the keyhole shape and its quality as well, but its mechanism has not been well understood. In this paper, numerical simulation and experimental investigations based on 304 stainless steel and aluminum targets are performed to study the effects of material parameters on melt ejection. The numerical method is employed to predict the temperatures, velocity fields in the solid, liquid, and vapour front, and melt pool dynamics of targets as well. The experimental methods include the shadow-graphic technique, weight method, and optical microscope imaging, which are applied to real-time observations of melt ejection phenomena, measurements of collected melt and changes of target mass, observations of surface morphology and the cross-section of the keyhole, respectively. Numerical and experimental results show that the metallic material with high thermal diffusivity like aluminum is prone to have a thick liquid zone and a large quantity of melt ejection. Additionally, to the best of our knowledge, the liquid zone is used to illustrate the relations between melt ejection and material thermal diffusivity for the first time. The research result in this paper is useful for manufacturing optimization and quality control in laser-material interaction. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. KYLX_0341) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61405147).

  12. Analysis of melt ejection during long pulsed laser drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting-Zhong, Zhang; Zhi-Chao, Jia; Hai-Chao, Cui; De-Hua, Zhu; Xiao-Wu, Ni; Jian, Lu

    2016-05-01

    In pulsed laser drilling, melt ejection greatly influences the keyhole shape and its quality as well, but its mechanism has not been well understood. In this paper, numerical simulation and experimental investigations based on 304 stainless steel and aluminum targets are performed to study the effects of material parameters on melt ejection. The numerical method is employed to predict the temperatures, velocity fields in the solid, liquid, and vapour front, and melt pool dynamics of targets as well. The experimental methods include the shadow-graphic technique, weight method, and optical microscope imaging, which are applied to real-time observations of melt ejection phenomena, measurements of collected melt and changes of target mass, observations of surface morphology and the cross-section of the keyhole, respectively. Numerical and experimental results show that the metallic material with high thermal diffusivity like aluminum is prone to have a thick liquid zone and a large quantity of melt ejection. Additionally, to the best of our knowledge, the liquid zone is used to illustrate the relations between melt ejection and material thermal diffusivity for the first time. The research result in this paper is useful for manufacturing optimization and quality control in laser-material interaction. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. KYLX_0341) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61405147).

  13. Nonlinear Time Series Analysis of White Dwarf Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jevtic, N.; Zelechoski, S.; Feldman, H.; Peterson, C.; Schweitzer, J.

    2001-12-01

    We use nonlinear time series analysis methods to examine the light intensity curves of white dwarf PG1351+489 obtained by the Whole Earth Telescope (WET). Though these methods were originally introduced to study chaotic systems, when a clear signature of determinism is found for the process generating an observable and it couples the active degrees of freedom of the system, then the notion of phase space provides a framework for exploring the system dynamics of nonlinear systems in general. With a pronounced single frequency, its harmonics and other frequencies of lower amplitude on a broadband background, the PG1351 light curve lends itself to the use of time delay coordinates. Our phase space reconstruction yields a triangular, toroidal three-dimensional shape. This differs from earlier results of a circular toroidal representation. We find a morphological similarity to a magnetic dynamo model developed for fast rotators that yields a union of both results: the circular phase space structure for the ascending portion of the cycle, and the triangular structure for the declining portion. The rise and fall of the dynamo cycle yield both different phase space representations and different correlation dimensions. Since PG1351 is known to have no significant fields, these results may stimulate the observation of light curves of known magnetic white dwarfs for comparison. Using other data obtained by the WET, we compare the phase space reconstruction of DB white dwarf PG1351 with that of GD 358 which has a more complex power spectrum. We also compare these results with those for PG1159. There is some general similarity between the results of the phase space reconstruction for the DB white dwarfs. As expected, the difference between the results for the DB white dwarfs and PG1159 is great.

  14. Thermal expansivity, bulk modulus, and melting curve of H2O-ice VII to 20 GPa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fei, Yingwei; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Hemley, Russell J.

    1993-01-01

    Equation of state properties of ice VII and fluid H2O at high pressures and temperatures have been studied experimentally from 6 to 20 GPa and 300-700 K. The techniques involve direct measurements of the unit-cell volume of the solid using synchrotron X-ray diffraction with an externally heated diamond-anvil cell. The pressure dependencies of the volume and bulk modulus of ice VII at room temperature are in good agreement with previous synchrotron X-ray studies. The thermal expansivity was determined as a function of pressure and the results fit to a newly proposed phenomenological relation and to a Mie-Gruneisen equation of state formalism. The onset of melting of ice VII was determined directly by X-ray diffraction at a series of pressures and found to be in accord with previous volumetric determinations. Thermodynamic calculations based on the new data are performed to evaluate the range of validity of previously proposed equations of state for fluid water derived from static and shock-wave compression experiments and from simulations.

  15. Thermodynamic temperature assignment to the point of inflection of the melting curve of high-temperature fixed points.

    PubMed

    Woolliams, E R; Anhalt, K; Ballico, M; Bloembergen, P; Bourson, F; Briaudeau, S; Campos, J; Cox, M G; del Campo, D; Dong, W; Dury, M R; Gavrilov, V; Grigoryeva, I; Hernanz, M L; Jahan, F; Khlevnoy, B; Khromchenko, V; Lowe, D H; Lu, X; Machin, G; Mantilla, J M; Martin, M J; McEvoy, H C; Rougié, B; Sadli, M; Salim, S G R; Sasajima, N; Taubert, D R; Todd, A D W; Van den Bossche, R; van der Ham, E; Wang, T; Whittam, A; Wilthan, B; Woods, D J; Woodward, J T; Yamada, Y; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoon, H W; Yuan, Z

    2016-03-28

    The thermodynamic temperature of the point of inflection of the melting transition of Re-C, Pt-C and Co-C eutectics has been determined to be 2747.84 ± 0.35 K, 2011.43 ± 0.18 K and 1597.39 ± 0.13 K, respectively, and the thermodynamic temperature of the freezing transition of Cu has been determined to be 1357.80 ± 0.08 K, where the ± symbol represents 95% coverage. These results are the best consensus estimates obtained from measurements made using various spectroradiometric primary thermometry techniques by nine different national metrology institutes. The good agreement between the institutes suggests that spectroradiometric thermometry techniques are sufficiently mature (at least in those institutes) to allow the direct realization of thermodynamic temperature above 1234 K (rather than the use of a temperature scale) and that metal-carbon eutectics can be used as high-temperature fixed points for thermodynamic temperature dissemination. The results directly support the developing mise en pratique for the definition of the kelvin to include direct measurement of thermodynamic temperature.

  16. Thermodynamic temperature assignment to the point of inflection of the melting curve of high-temperature fixed points.

    PubMed

    Woolliams, E R; Anhalt, K; Ballico, M; Bloembergen, P; Bourson, F; Briaudeau, S; Campos, J; Cox, M G; del Campo, D; Dong, W; Dury, M R; Gavrilov, V; Grigoryeva, I; Hernanz, M L; Jahan, F; Khlevnoy, B; Khromchenko, V; Lowe, D H; Lu, X; Machin, G; Mantilla, J M; Martin, M J; McEvoy, H C; Rougié, B; Sadli, M; Salim, S G R; Sasajima, N; Taubert, D R; Todd, A D W; Van den Bossche, R; van der Ham, E; Wang, T; Whittam, A; Wilthan, B; Woods, D J; Woodward, J T; Yamada, Y; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoon, H W; Yuan, Z

    2016-03-28

    The thermodynamic temperature of the point of inflection of the melting transition of Re-C, Pt-C and Co-C eutectics has been determined to be 2747.84 ± 0.35 K, 2011.43 ± 0.18 K and 1597.39 ± 0.13 K, respectively, and the thermodynamic temperature of the freezing transition of Cu has been determined to be 1357.80 ± 0.08 K, where the ± symbol represents 95% coverage. These results are the best consensus estimates obtained from measurements made using various spectroradiometric primary thermometry techniques by nine different national metrology institutes. The good agreement between the institutes suggests that spectroradiometric thermometry techniques are sufficiently mature (at least in those institutes) to allow the direct realization of thermodynamic temperature above 1234 K (rather than the use of a temperature scale) and that metal-carbon eutectics can be used as high-temperature fixed points for thermodynamic temperature dissemination. The results directly support the developing mise en pratique for the definition of the kelvin to include direct measurement of thermodynamic temperature. PMID:26903099

  17. Evaluating Random Forests for Survival Analysis using Prediction Error Curves.

    PubMed

    Mogensen, Ulla B; Ishwaran, Hemant; Gerds, Thomas A

    2012-09-01

    Prediction error curves are increasingly used to assess and compare predictions in survival analysis. This article surveys the R package pec which provides a set of functions for efficient computation of prediction error curves. The software implements inverse probability of censoring weights to deal with right censored data and several variants of cross-validation to deal with the apparent error problem. In principle, all kinds of prediction models can be assessed, and the package readily supports most traditional regression modeling strategies, like Cox regression or additive hazard regression, as well as state of the art machine learning methods such as random forests, a nonparametric method which provides promising alternatives to traditional strategies in low and high-dimensional settings. We show how the functionality of pec can be extended to yet unsupported prediction models. As an example, we implement support for random forest prediction models based on the R-packages randomSurvivalForest and party. Using data of the Copenhagen Stroke Study we use pec to compare random forests to a Cox regression model derived from stepwise variable selection. Reproducible results on the user level are given for publicly available data from the German breast cancer study group.

  18. WASP-14 b: transit timing analysis of 19 light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raetz, St.; Maciejewski, G.; Seeliger, M.; Marka, C.; Fernández, M.; Güver, T.; Göğüş, E.; Nowak, G.; Vaňko, M.; Berndt, A.; Eisenbeiss, T.; Mugrauer, M.; Trepl, L.; Gelszinnis, J.

    2015-08-01

    Although WASP-14 b is one of the most massive and densest exoplanets on a tight and eccentric orbit, it has never been a target of photometric follow-up monitoring or dedicated observing campaigns. We report on new photometric transit observations of WASP-14 b obtained within the framework of Transit Timing Variations @ Young Exoplanet Transit Initiative (TTV@YETI). We collected 19 light curves of 13 individual transit events using six telescopes located in five observatories distributed in Europe and Asia. From light-curve modelling, we determined the planetary, stellar, and geometrical properties of the system and found them in agreement with the values from the discovery paper. A test of the robustness of the transit times revealed that in case of a non-reproducible transit shape the uncertainties may be underestimated even with a wavelet-based error estimation methods. For the timing analysis, we included two publicly available transit times from 2007 and 2009. The long observation period of seven years (2007-2013) allowed us to refine the transit ephemeris. We derived an orbital period 1.2 s longer and 10 times more precise than the one given in the discovery paper. We found no significant periodic signal in the timing-residuals and, hence, no evidence for TTV in the system.

  19. Rapid identification of bovine mastitis pathogens by high-resolution melt analysis of 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Ajitkumar, Praseeda; Barkema, Herman W; De Buck, Jeroen

    2012-03-23

    Accurate identification of mastitis pathogens is often compromised when using conventional culture-based methods. Here, we report a novel, rapid assay tested for speciation of bacterial mastitis pathogens using high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA) of 16S rDNA sequences. Real-time PCR amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragment, spanning the variable region V5 and V6 was performed with a resulting amplicon of 290bp. First, a library was generated of melt curves of 9 common pathogens that are implicated in bovine mastitis. Six of the isolates, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus uberis, Staphylococcus aureus and Mycoplasma bovis, were type strains while the other 3, Arcanobacterium pyogenes, Corynebacterium bovis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae, were bovine mastitis field isolates. Four of the type strains, E. coli, S. agalactiae, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus, were found to be of human origin, while the other 3 type strains were isolated from bovine infections. Secondly, the melt curves and corresponding amplicon sequences of A. pyogenes, E. coli, S. agalactiae, S. dysgalactiae, K. pneumoniae, S. uberis and S. aureus were compared with 10 bovine mastitis field isolates of each pathogen. Based on the distinct differences in melt curves and sequences between human and bovine isolates of E. coli and K. pneumoniae, it was deemed necessary to select a set of bovine strains for these pathogens to be used as reference strains in the HRMA. Next, the HRMA was validated by three interpreters analyzing the differential clustering pattern of melt curves of 60 bacterial cultures obtained from mastitis milk samples. The three test interpreters were blinded to the culture and sequencing results of the isolates. Overall accuracy of the validation assay was 95% as there was difficulty in identifying the streptococci due to heterogeneity observed in the PCR amplicons of S. uberis. The present study revealed that broad-range real-time PCR with

  20. High Resolution Melting Analysis Is a More Sensitive and Effective Alternative to Gel-Based Platforms in Analysis of SSR – An Example in Citrus

    PubMed Central

    Distefano, Gaetano; Caruso, Marco; La Malfa, Stefano; Gentile, Alessandra; Wu, Shu-Biao

    2012-01-01

    High resolution melting curve analysis (HRM) has been used as an efficient, accurate and cost-effective tool to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or insertions or deletions (INDELs). However, its efficiency, accuracy and applicability to discriminate microsatellite polymorphism have not been extensively assessed. The traditional protocols used for SSR genotyping include PCR amplification of the DNA fragment and the separation of the fragments on electrophoresis-based platform. However, post-PCR handling processes are laborious and costly. Furthermore, SNPs present in the sequences flanking repeat motif cannot be detected by polyacrylamide-gel-electrophoresis based methods. In the present study, we compared the discriminating power of HRM with the traditional electrophoresis-based methods and provided a panel of primers for HRM genotyping in Citrus. The results showed that sixteen SSR markers produced distinct polymorphic melting curves among the Citrus spp investigated through HRM analysis. Among those, 10 showed more genotypes by HRM analysis than capillary electrophoresis owing to the presence of SNPs in the amplicons. For the SSR markers without SNPs present in the flanking region, HRM also gave distinct melting curves which detected same genotypes as were shown in capillary electrophoresis (CE) analysis. Moreover, HRM analysis allowed the discrimination of most of the 15 citrus genotypes and the resulting genetic distance analysis clustered them into three main branches. In conclusion, it has been approved that HRM is not only an efficient and cost-effective alternative of electrophoresis-based method for SSR markers, but also a method to uncover more polymorphisms contributed by SNPs present in SSRs. It was therefore suggested that the panel of SSR markers could be used in a variety of applications in the citrus biodiversity and breeding programs using HRM analysis. Furthermore, we speculate that the HRM analysis can be employed to analyse SSR

  1. Concentrated photovoltaics system costs and learning curve analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haysom, Joan E.; Jafarieh, Omid; Anis, Hanan; Hinzer, Karin

    2013-09-01

    An extensive set of costs in /W for the installed costs of CPV systems has been amassed from a range of public sources, including both individual company prices and market reports. Cost reductions over time are very evident, with current prices for 2012 in the range of 3.0 ± 0.7 /W and a predicted cost of 1.5 /W for 2020. Cost data is combined with deployment volumes in a learning curve analysis, providing a fitted learning rate of either 18.5% or 22.3% depending on the methodology. This learning rate is compared to that of PV modules and PV installed systems, and the influence of soft costs is discussed. Finally, if an annual growth rate of 39% is assumed for deployed volumes, then, using the learning rate of 20%, this would predict the achievement of a cost point of 1.5 /W by 2016.

  2. MeltMan: Optimization, Evaluation, and Universal Application of a qPCR System Integrating the TaqMan qPCR and Melting Analysis into a Single Assay.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Alexander; Černíková, Lenka; Vitásková, Eliška; Křivda, Vlastimil; Dán, Ádám; Dirbáková, Zuzana; Jiřincová, Helena; Procházka, Bohumír; Sedlák, Kamil; Havlíčková, Martina

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, we optimised and evaluated a qPCR system integrating 6-FAM (6-carboxyfluorescein)-labelled TaqMan probes and melting analysis using the SYTO 82 (S82) DNA binding dye in a single reaction. We investigated the influence of the S82 on various TaqMan and melting analysis parameters and defined its optimal concentration. In the next step, the method was evaluated in 36 different TaqMan assays with a total of 729 paired reactions using various DNA and RNA templates, including field specimens. In addition, the melting profiles of interest were correlated with the electrophoretic patterns. We proved that the S82 is fully compatible with the FAM-TaqMan system. Further, the advantages of this approach in routine diagnostic TaqMan qPCR were illustrated with practical examples. These included solving problems with flat or other atypical amplification curves or even false negativity as a result of probe binding failure. Our data clearly show that the integration of the TaqMan qPCR and melting analysis into a single assay provides an additional control option as well as the opportunity to perform more complex analyses, get more data from the reactions, and obtain analysis results with higher confidence.

  3. MeltMan: Optimization, Evaluation, and Universal Application of a qPCR System Integrating the TaqMan qPCR and Melting Analysis into a Single Assay

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Alexander; Černíková, Lenka; Vitásková, Eliška; Křivda, Vlastimil; Dán, Ádám; Dirbáková, Zuzana; Jiřincová, Helena; Procházka, Bohumír; Sedlák, Kamil; Havlíčková, Martina

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, we optimised and evaluated a qPCR system integrating 6-FAM (6-carboxyfluorescein)-labelled TaqMan probes and melting analysis using the SYTO 82 (S82) DNA binding dye in a single reaction. We investigated the influence of the S82 on various TaqMan and melting analysis parameters and defined its optimal concentration. In the next step, the method was evaluated in 36 different TaqMan assays with a total of 729 paired reactions using various DNA and RNA templates, including field specimens. In addition, the melting profiles of interest were correlated with the electrophoretic patterns. We proved that the S82 is fully compatible with the FAM-TaqMan system. Further, the advantages of this approach in routine diagnostic TaqMan qPCR were illustrated with practical examples. These included solving problems with flat or other atypical amplification curves or even false negativity as a result of probe binding failure. Our data clearly show that the integration of the TaqMan qPCR and melting analysis into a single assay provides an additional control option as well as the opportunity to perform more complex analyses, get more data from the reactions, and obtain analysis results with higher confidence. PMID:27031831

  4. MeltMan: Optimization, Evaluation, and Universal Application of a qPCR System Integrating the TaqMan qPCR and Melting Analysis into a Single Assay.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Alexander; Černíková, Lenka; Vitásková, Eliška; Křivda, Vlastimil; Dán, Ádám; Dirbáková, Zuzana; Jiřincová, Helena; Procházka, Bohumír; Sedlák, Kamil; Havlíčková, Martina

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, we optimised and evaluated a qPCR system integrating 6-FAM (6-carboxyfluorescein)-labelled TaqMan probes and melting analysis using the SYTO 82 (S82) DNA binding dye in a single reaction. We investigated the influence of the S82 on various TaqMan and melting analysis parameters and defined its optimal concentration. In the next step, the method was evaluated in 36 different TaqMan assays with a total of 729 paired reactions using various DNA and RNA templates, including field specimens. In addition, the melting profiles of interest were correlated with the electrophoretic patterns. We proved that the S82 is fully compatible with the FAM-TaqMan system. Further, the advantages of this approach in routine diagnostic TaqMan qPCR were illustrated with practical examples. These included solving problems with flat or other atypical amplification curves or even false negativity as a result of probe binding failure. Our data clearly show that the integration of the TaqMan qPCR and melting analysis into a single assay provides an additional control option as well as the opportunity to perform more complex analyses, get more data from the reactions, and obtain analysis results with higher confidence. PMID:27031831

  5. An item response curves analysis of the Force Concept Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Gary A.; Harshman, Nathan; Branum-Martin, Lee; Mazur, Eric; Mzoughi, Taha; Baker, Stephen D.

    2012-09-01

    Several years ago, we introduced the idea of item response curves (IRC), a simplistic form of item response theory (IRT), to the physics education research community as a way to examine item performance on diagnostic instruments such as the Force Concept Inventory (FCI). We noted that a full-blown analysis using IRT would be a next logical step, which several authors have since taken. In this paper, we show that our simple approach not only yields similar conclusions in the analysis of the performance of items on the FCI to the more sophisticated and complex IRT analyses but also permits additional insights by characterizing both the correct and incorrect answer choices. Our IRC approach can be applied to a variety of multiple-choice assessments but, as applied to a carefully designed instrument such as the FCI, allows us to probe student understanding as a function of ability level through an examination of each answer choice. We imagine that physics teachers could use IRC analysis to identify prominent misconceptions and tailor their instruction to combat those misconceptions, fulfilling the FCI authors' original intentions for its use. Furthermore, the IRC analysis can assist test designers to improve their assessments by identifying nonfunctioning distractors that can be replaced with distractors attractive to students at various ability levels.

  6. Structural analysis of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bifluoride melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Hagiwara, Rika; Ito, Yasuhiko; Kohara, Shinji; Suzuya, Kentaro

    2003-01-01

    The structure of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bifluoride (EMImF · HF) melt has been analyzed at 333 K by a high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction method. The total correlation function of the EMImF · HF melt was similar to that of the solid state, indicating that not only the short range but also the intermediate-range ordering in the solid are partially preserved in the liquid state. The intra-molecular F-F correlation in the anions clearly appears in the total correlation function of the EMImF · HF melt, whereas prominent peaks are not observed in the case of a room temperature molten salt, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium fluorohydrogenate.

  7. Analysis of selected Kepler Mission planetary light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, M. D.; Budding, E.

    2014-06-01

    We have modified the graphical user interfaced close binary system analysis program CurveFit to the form WinKepler and applied it to 16 representative planetary candidate light curves found in the NASA Exoplanet Archive (NEA) at the Caltech website http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu, with an aim to compare different analytical approaches. WinKepler has parameter options for a realistic physical model, including gravity-brightening and structural parameters derived from the relevant Radau equation. We tested our best-fitting parameter-sets for formal determinacy and adequacy. A primary aim is to compare our parameters with those listed in the NEA. Although there are trends of agreement, small differences in the main parameter values are found in some cases, and there may be some relative bias towards a 90∘ value for the NEA inclinations. These are assessed against realistic error estimates. Photometric variability from causes other than planetary transits affects at least 6 of the data-sets studied; with small pulsational behaviour found in 3 of those. For the false positive KOI 4.01, we found that the eclipses could be modelled by a faint background classical Algol as effectively as by a transiting exoplanet. Our empirical checks of limb-darkening, in the cases of KOI 1.01 and 12.01, revealed that the assigned stellar temperatures are probably incorrect. For KOI 13.01, our empirical mass-ratio differs by about 7 % from that of Mislis and Hodgkin (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 422:1512, 2012), who neglected structural effects and higher order terms in the tidal distortion. Such detailed parameter evaluation, additional to the usual main geometric ones, provides an additional objective for this work.

  8. Crystallization and Melt Removal at Arenal Volcano, Polytopic Vector Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, P. J.; Vogel, T. A.; Bolge, L. L.; Ehrlich, R.; Alvarado, G. E.

    2007-12-01

    Tephra sequences ET3 and ET4 from Arenal volcano in Costa Rica have recently been interpreted to be a product of crystal fractionation by Bolge and coworkers in a series of papers (2004, 2006). The two tephra units are part of a sequence of 22 tephra units that represent a 7000 year span of the Arenal volcano activity. The tephro- stratigraphy has been described extensively by Melson (1982; 1994). The ET3 and ET4 tephras were interpreted (based on major- and trace-element, isotopic analyses of whole rocks and microchemical analyses of individual phases) as clear evidence of crystal separation by gravity settling (Bolge et al., 2004, 2006). The lower ET4 tephra sequence (andesitic and crystal poor) and the upper ET3 tephra (basaltic and crystal rich) represent an inverted snapshot of the magma chamber with contrasting geochemical properties. The ET3 sequence (deeper part of the magma chamber) has nearly constant composition with only a few elements varying stratigraphically (best represented by CaO). This is consistent with gradually decreasing amounts of melt in the upper part of ET3. The lower ET4 tephra (upper part of the magma chamber) contains large chemical gradients in both incompatible and compatible elements. In the present study we use whole-rock geochemical data from the recent tephra sequences ET3 and ET4 as inputs to Polytopic Vector Analysis (PVA) (for a review of this method see Vogel and coworkers, in press). With this method we produce a three end member solution that is consistent with crystallization of Olivine, plagioclase and pyroxene from the most mafic end member (EM1) resulting in a crystal rich mush zone. As crystallization progresses the compositions of the liquids are driven towards an intermediate end member (EM3), which has an intermediate composition liquid. At EM3 composition, rapid depletion of FeO, MgO and TiO2 by crystallization of Fe-Ti oxides, rapidly drives the liquid composition towards the silicic EM1 (incompatible element

  9. High Resolution Melting Analysis: A Rapid and Accurate Method to Detect CALR Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Melania; Torres, Laura; Santana-Lopez, Gonzalo; Rodriguez-Medina, Carlos; Perera, María; Bellosillo, Beatriz; de la Iglesia, Silvia; Molero, Teresa; Gomez-Casares, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent discovery of CALR mutations in essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) patients without JAK2/MPL mutations has emerged as a relevant finding for the molecular diagnosis of these myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). We tested the feasibility of high-resolution melting (HRM) as a screening method for rapid detection of CALR mutations. Methods CALR was studied in wild-type JAK2/MPL patients including 34 ET, 21 persistent thrombocytosis suggestive of MPN and 98 suspected secondary thrombocytosis. CALR mutation analysis was performed through HRM and Sanger sequencing. We compared clinical features of CALR-mutated versus 45 JAK2/MPL-mutated subjects in ET. Results Nineteen samples showed distinct HRM patterns from wild-type. Of them, 18 were mutations and one a polymorphism as confirmed by direct sequencing. CALR mutations were present in 44% of ET (15/34), 14% of persistent thrombocytosis suggestive of MPN (3/21) and none of the secondary thrombocytosis (0/98). Of the 18 mutants, 9 were 52 bp deletions, 8 were 5 bp insertions and other was a complex mutation with insertion/deletion. No mutations were found after sequencing analysis of 45 samples displaying wild-type HRM curves. HRM technique was reproducible, no false positive or negative were detected and the limit of detection was of 3%. Conclusions This study establishes a sensitive, reliable and rapid HRM method to screen for the presence of CALR mutations. PMID:25068507

  10. Three-Dimensional Postbuckling Analysis of Curved Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, P. Frank; Lee, Seung-Yoon

    2002-01-01

    Presented here is a method of solving highly flexible curved beam undergoing huge static or quasi-static deformations. A geometrically exact beam theory based on the use of Jaumann stresses and strains and exact coordinate transformation is presented in terms of 17 first-order ordinary differential equations, and a multiple shooting method is used to solve the corresponding nonlinear two-point boundary value problems. The geometrically exact beam theory accounts far large rotations, large displacements, initial curvatures, extensionality, and transverse shear strains. Four examples are used to demonstrate this method, including a rotating clamped-free beam under the influence of gravity and centrifugal forces, an L-frame subjected to an in-plane tip load, a circular arch subjected to a concentrated load, and a clamped-hinged helical spring subjected to an axial displacement. Results show that the combination of the multiple shooting method and the geometrically exact beam theory works very well. Moreover, the obtained numerically exact solutions can be used to verify the accuracy of nonlinear finite element codes for nonlinear analysis of complex structures.

  11. Numerical modeling of free surface and rapid solidification for simulation and analysis of melt spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunbai

    The work provides methodologies for studying, designing, and optimizing melt spinning processes of fiber manufacture. Amorphous metallic materials can be created through melt spinning processes, in which a highly spinning wheel undercools a jet of molten metal or alloy below the equilibrium melting and the nucleation temperatures. Free-jet melt spinning employs a larger nozzle-wheel gap compared to planar flow casting. The instability of melt pool formation in a free-jet melt spinning will allow the variability of ribbon production. In general, a stable delivery of amorphous materials depends simultaneously on various control parameters, such as wheel speed, molten flow viscosity, surface tension force, and heat transfer. To analyze dynamical and thermodynamical characteristics of a free-jet melt spinning, two mathematical models, free surface and rapid solidification, have been established by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics. Based on the nucleation theory, I have predicted the nucleation temperature and the critical cooling rate for an alloy Fe75-Si10-B15 (at.%). The applications of these crystalline solidification properties in the simulation and analysis help the researchers gain insight into the processes. The research focuses on a novel simple and second-order accurate algorithm for computing surface normal and curvature in the Volume of Fluid method; it reconstructs the continuum surface force model to eliminate spurious currents. A computer program has been developed with the enhanced numerical schemes and the capability of heat transfer for two-dimensional laminar Newtonian surface flows. It conducted numerical simulations of impingement of a melt stream against a highly rotating wheel, and explains the complicated processes with numerical results of velocity and temperature in melt pools. The analytical estimates of ribbon thickness presented in the thesis agree with the experimental observation of the alloy. An in-depth investigation of the melt

  12. High-resolution melt analysis for species identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci derived from bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Ajitkumar, Praseeda; Barkema, Herman W; Zadoks, Ruth N; Morck, Douglas W; van der Meer, Frank J U M; De Buck, Jeroen

    2013-03-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are the most frequently isolated pathogens isolated from bovine milk. In this study, we report a rapid assay for species identification of CNS using high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA) of 16S rDNA sequences. Real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragment, spanning the variable region V1 and V2, was performed with a resulting amplicon of 215 bp. A library of distinct melt curves of reference strains of 13 common CNS species was created using HRMA. Sequencing of 16S rRNA and rpoB genes, and, when needed, tuf gene, of 100 CNS isolates obtained from Canadian Bovine Mastitis Research Network was done to determine their species identity, allowing for subsequent evaluation of the performance of HRMA for field isolates of bovine CNS. A combination of HRMA and sequencing revealed that Staphylococcus chromogenes, S. xylosus, S. simulans, and S. sciuri had multiple genotypes, complicating their resolution by HRMA. As the 3 genotypes of S. chromogenes had distinct melt curves, the 3 distinct genotypes were employed as reference strains in a blinded trial of 156 CNS isolates to identify S. chromogenes. HRMA correctly identified all S. chromogenes isolates which were later confirmed by sequencing. Staphylococcus chromogenes (68%) was most frequently found among the CNS isolates, followed by S. haemolyticus (10%) and S. xylosus (6%). The present study revealed that HRMA of 16S rRNA gene (V1-V2) could be used as a rapid, efficient, low-cost, and minimally cumbersome technique for S. chromogenes identification, the most common CNS derived from bovine milk. PMID:23273337

  13. Optical analysis of miniature lenses with curved imaging surfaces.

    PubMed

    Reshidko, Dmitry; Sasian, Jose

    2015-10-01

    Miniature cameras for consumer electronics and mobile phones have been, and continue to be, in fast development. The system level requirements, such as manufacturing cost, packaging, and sensor characteristics, impose unique challenges for optical designers. In this paper, we discuss the potential optical benefits of having a curved image surface rather than a flat one. We show that curved sensor technology allows for optically faster lens solutions. We discuss trade-offs of several relevant characteristics, such as packaging, chief ray angle, image quality, and tolerance sensitivity. A comparison of a benchmark flat field lens, and an evaluation design imaging on a curved surface and working at f/1.6, provides useful specific insights. For a given image quality, departing from a flat imaging surface does not allow significantly reducing the total length of a lens. PMID:26479656

  14. Automatic generation and analysis of solar cell IV curves

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, Steven M.; Jones, Jason C.

    2014-06-03

    A photovoltaic system includes multiple strings of solar panels and a device presenting a DC load to the strings of solar panels. Output currents of the strings of solar panels may be sensed and provided to a computer that generates current-voltage (IV) curves of the strings of solar panels. Output voltages of the string of solar panels may be sensed at the string or at the device presenting the DC load. The DC load may be varied. Output currents of the strings of solar panels responsive to the variation of the DC load are sensed to generate IV curves of the strings of solar panels. IV curves may be compared and analyzed to evaluate performance of and detect problems with a string of solar panels.

  15. Voronoi analysis of the short–range atomic structure in iron and iron–carbon melts

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, Andrey; Mirzoev, Alexander

    2015-08-17

    In this work, we simulated the atomic structure of liquid iron and iron–carbon alloys by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. Voronoi analysis was used to highlight changes in the close environments of Fe atoms as carbon concentration in the melt increases. We have found, that even high concentrations of carbon do not affect short–range atomic order of iron atoms — it remains effectively the same as in pure iron melts.

  16. Voronoi analysis of the short-range atomic structure in iron and iron-carbon melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, Andrey; Mirzoev, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we simulated the atomic structure of liquid iron and iron-carbon alloys by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. Voronoi analysis was used to highlight changes in the close environments of Fe atoms as carbon concentration in the melt increases. We have found, that even high concentrations of carbon do not affect short-range atomic order of iron atoms — it remains effectively the same as in pure iron melts.

  17. Analysis and Historical Perspective of the Extensive Surface Melting on Greenland in July 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, T. L.; Albert, M. R.; Hall, D. K.; Nghiem, S. V.; Shuman, C. A.; Tedesco, M.; DiGirolamo, N. E.; Neumann, G.

    2012-12-01

    The analysis of multiple remote sensing data sources revealed a surface melt event across almost the entire surface of the Greenland ice sheet by mid July of 2012, which was a unique event in the satellite record. Data from three different satellite sensors - including the Oceansat-2 scatterometer, the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder - are combined to obtain composite melt area, representing the most complete melt conditions detectable across the ice sheet. Satellite observations reveal that at least 97% of the Greenland ice sheet surface was undergoing melting, including areas at high altitudes like Summit in the dry snow zone of the Greenland ice sheet. This melt event coincided with an anomalous ridge across Greenland, following a period of persistent positive mid-tropospheric height anomalies, and was confirmed by NOAA air temperature data on 11-12 July at Summit. This event is compared to observations from 33 years of satellite data and to other events from the ice core record from Summit. Melt events at Summit are uncommon, with the last significant melt identified by ice core data in 1889, and the previous occurring around 680 years earlier, as reported in the published literature.

  18. Melt analysis of mismatch amplification mutation assays (Melt-MAMA): a functional study of a cost-effective SNP genotyping assay in bacterial models.

    PubMed

    Birdsell, Dawn N; Pearson, Talima; Price, Erin P; Hornstra, Heidie M; Nera, Roxanne D; Stone, Nathan; Gruendike, Jeffrey; Kaufman, Emily L; Pettus, Amanda H; Hurbon, Audriana N; Buchhagen, Jordan L; Harms, N Jane; Chanturia, Gvantsa; Gyuranecz, Miklos; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul S

    2012-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are abundant in genomes of all species and biologically informative markers extensively used across broad scientific disciplines. Newly identified SNP markers are publicly available at an ever-increasing rate due to advancements in sequencing technologies. Efficient, cost-effective SNP genotyping methods to screen sample populations are in great demand in well-equipped laboratories, but also in developing world situations. Dual Probe TaqMan assays are robust but can be cost-prohibitive and require specialized equipment. The Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assay, coupled with melt analysis (Melt-MAMA), is flexible, efficient and cost-effective. However, Melt-MAMA traditionally suffers from high rates of assay design failures and knowledge gaps on assay robustness and sensitivity. In this study, we identified strategies that improved the success of Melt-MAMA. We examined the performance of 185 Melt-MAMAs across eight different pathogens using various optimization parameters. We evaluated the effects of genome size and %GC content on assay development. When used collectively, specific strategies markedly improved the rate of successful assays at the first design attempt from ~50% to ~80%. We observed that Melt-MAMA accurately genotypes across a broad DNA range (~100 ng to ~0.1 pg). Genomic size and %GC content influence the rate of successful assay design in an independent manner. Finally, we demonstrated the versatility of these assays by the creation of a duplex Melt-MAMA real-time PCR (two SNPs) and conversion to a size-based genotyping system, which uses agarose gel electrophoresis. Melt-MAMA is comparable to Dual Probe TaqMan assays in terms of design success rate and accuracy. Although sensitivity is less robust than Dual Probe TaqMan assays, Melt-MAMA is superior in terms of cost-effectiveness, speed of development and versatility. We detail the parameters most important for the successful application of Melt-MAMA, which

  19. Mediation Analysis in a Latent Growth Curve Modeling Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Soest, Tilmann; Hagtvet, Knut A.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents several longitudinal mediation models in the framework of latent growth curve modeling and provides a detailed account of how such models can be constructed. Logical and statistical challenges that might arise when such analyses are conducted are also discussed. Specifically, we discuss how the initial status (intercept) and…

  20. Multiresolution Analysis of UTAT B-spline Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamnii, A.; Mraoui, H.; Sbibih, D.; Zidna, A.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we describe a multiresolution curve representation based on periodic uniform tension algebraic trigonometric (UTAT) spline wavelets of class ??? and order four. Then we determine the decomposition and the reconstruction vectors corresponding to UTAT-spline spaces. Finally, we give some applications in order to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed approach.

  1. Analysis of growth curves of fowl. III. Geese.

    PubMed

    Knízetová, H; Hyánek, J; Veselský, A

    1994-07-01

    1. Growth curves of two lines (S,D) and their reciprocal hybrids (in total,. n = 344) were evaluated by the Richards function. Geese were weighed at 7 d intervals to the ninth week, and then at 92, 154, 192 and 217 d of age. Food and water were supplied ad libitum. 2. The accuracy of curve fit measured by the coefficient of determination (R2) for different genetic groups ranged from 0.9840 to 0.9918. The highest percentage deviations between observed and estimated live weights were recorded at hatching (on average 15.1%), while at the others points of curve they were significantly lower (from 0.6 to 6.8%). 3. The geese are characterised by an early maturing rate. The peak of the absolute growth rate (the inflection point of the curve) occurred at 18.7 to 23.5 d of age (t+). The degree of maturity at a slaughter age of 63 d (u63 = y63/A) ranged from 0.69 to 0.76. Fitting the inflection point at the beginning of the linear growth phase significantly affects the maturing rate (k) and the ratio between the inflection (y+) and the asymptotic (A) weights. The values of these correlated parameters were very low (y+/A = 0.233 to 0.294, k = 0.0281 to 0.0373 ln theta/d). 4. The live weights of geese from 28 d of age and the parameters of the Richards function were significantly higher (P < 0.05, P < 0.01) in th sire line (S) than in the dam line (D). A low negative heterosis was observed at all points of the growth curves (-0.01 to -9.7%). The results indicated the effect of sex-linked growth genes. 5. The phenotypic correlations between parameters of the Richards function within genetic groups are discussed. PMID:7953778

  2. UNSUPERVISED TRANSIENT LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS VIA HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN INFERENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, N. E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Betancourt, M.

    2015-02-10

    Historically, light curve studies of supernovae (SNe) and other transient classes have focused on individual objects with copious and high signal-to-noise observations. In the nascent era of wide field transient searches, objects with detailed observations are decreasing as a fraction of the overall known SN population, and this strategy sacrifices the majority of the information contained in the data about the underlying population of transients. A population level modeling approach, simultaneously fitting all available observations of objects in a transient sub-class of interest, fully mines the data to infer the properties of the population and avoids certain systematic biases. We present a novel hierarchical Bayesian statistical model for population level modeling of transient light curves, and discuss its implementation using an efficient Hamiltonian Monte Carlo technique. As a test case, we apply this model to the Type IIP SN sample from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey, consisting of 18,837 photometric observations of 76 SNe, corresponding to a joint posterior distribution with 9176 parameters under our model. Our hierarchical model fits provide improved constraints on light curve parameters relevant to the physical properties of their progenitor stars relative to modeling individual light curves alone. Moreover, we directly evaluate the probability for occurrence rates of unseen light curve characteristics from the model hyperparameters, addressing observational biases in survey methodology. We view this modeling framework as an unsupervised machine learning technique with the ability to maximize scientific returns from data to be collected by future wide field transient searches like LSST.

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of high resolution melting analysis for detection of KRAS mutations: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue-Ping; Wu, Hai-Yan; Yang, Xiang; Xu, Han-Qing; Chen, Dong; Huang, Qing; Fu, Wei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to a negative correlation between KRAS mutations and patients' responses to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody treatment. Therefore, patients must undergo KRAS mutation detection to be eligible for treatment. High resolution melting analysis (HRM) is gaining increasing attention in KRAS mutation detection. However, its accuracy has not been systematically evaluated. We conducted a meta-analysis of published articles, involving 13 articles with 1,520 samples, to assess its diagnostic accuracy compared with DNA sequencing. The quality of included articles was assessed using the revised Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy (QUADAS-2) tools. Random effects models were applied to analyze the performance of pooled characteristics. The overall sensitivity and specificity of HRM were 0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98-1.00) and 0.96 (95%CI: 0.94-0.97), respectively. The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.996. High sensitivity and specificity, less labor, rapid turn-around and the closed-tube format of HRM make it an attractive choice for rapid detection of KRAS mutations in clinical practice. The burden of DNA sequencing can be reduced dramatically by the implementation of HRM, but positive results still need to be sequenced for diagnostic confirmation. PMID:25515911

  4. Analysis of Water Recovery Rate from the Heat Melt Compactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Hegde, U.; Gokoglu, S.

    2013-01-01

    Human space missions generate trash with a substantial amount of plastic (20% or greater by mass). The trash also contains water trapped in food residue and paper products and other trash items. The Heat Melt Compactor (HMC) under development by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) compresses the waste, dries it to recover water and melts the plastic to encapsulate the compressed trash. The resulting waste disk or puck represents an approximately ten-fold reduction in the volume of the initial trash loaded into the HMC. In the current design concept being pursued, the trash is compressed by a piston after it is loaded into the trash chamber. The piston face, the side walls of the waste processing chamber and the end surface in contact with the waste can be heated to evaporate the water and to melt the plastic. Water is recovered by the HMC in two phases. The first is a pre-process compaction without heat or with the heaters initially turned on but before the waste heats up. Tests have shown that during this step some liquid water may be expelled from the chamber. This water is believed to be free water (i.e., not bound with or absorbed in other waste constituents) that is present in the trash. This phase is herein termed Phase A of the water recovery process. During HMC operations, it is desired that liquid water recovery in Phase A be eliminated or minimized so that water-vapor processing equipment (e.g., condensers) downstream of the HMC are not fouled by liquid water and its constituents (i.e., suspended or dissolved matter) exiting the HMC. The primary water recovery process takes place next where the trash is further compacted while the heated surfaces reach their set temperatures for this step. This step will be referred to herein as Phase B of the water recovery process. During this step the waste chamber may be exposed to different selected pressures such as ambient, low pressure (e.g., 0.2 atm), or vacuum. The objective for this step is to remove both bound and

  5. High-resolution melting analysis of the spa locus reveals significant diversity within sequence type 93 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Tong, S Y C; Lilliebridge, R A; Holt, D C; McDonald, M I; Currie, B J; Giffard, P M

    2009-12-01

    High-resolution melting analysis is an inherently robust, easy and inexpensive approach to the examination of genomic regions containing single-nucleotide polymorphisms and hypervariable loci. Staphylococcus aureus sequence type (ST) 93 is a singleton, Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive clone unique to Australia. A high-resolution melting-based method for the identification of ST93 was developed, and a similar approach was used to reveal diversity within the spa locus of this lineage. Statistical and graphical methods that account for instrumental and operator-dependent variation in high-resolution melting curves were developed, to allow greater confidence and reproducibility in deciding whether another curve is truly different from the baseline curve of an amplicon with known sequence. The data support a very early acquisition, or multiple independent acquisitions, of SCCmec by ST93 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), and the coexistence of MSSA and methicillin-resistant S. aureus versions of the same lineage within northern Australia.

  6. Analysis of growth curves of fowl. I. Chickens.

    PubMed

    Knízetová, H; Hyánek, J; Kníze, B; Roubícek, J

    1991-12-01

    1. The Richards function was used to describe the growth curves (n = 989) of 9 broiler lines. Chickens were fed ad libitum and body weight was recorded every second week from hatching to 26 weeks of age. 2. The accuracy of curve fit measured by the coefficient of determination (R2) was better for males than for females (0.9986-0.9995 vs 0.9972-0.9988, respectively). 3. The estimation of the asymptotic final weight (A) for different lines enabled the degree of maturity (ut = yt/A) to be determined at any fixed point of the curve. At the age of 7 weeks this had a value of 0.318-0.369 for cockerels and 0.325-0.377 for pullets and represented the slaughter maturity of individual lines. The ratio of inflection/asymptotic weight (y+/A = 0.370-0.388) indicated that in some cases chicken growth can be described approximately by the Gompertz function (y+/A = 0.368). 4. It was found that the age at the inflection point of curves (t+ 48.2-55.7 d for cockerels and t+ = 47.8-52.8 d for pullets) roughly corresponds to the slaughter age of the chickens. 5. The interline differences in the parameters of maturation rate for weight (y+/A, k, t+, u7) are low in comparison with the differences in body weight (A, y+, y7) and absolute growth rate (v, v+). 6. The intragroup phenotypic correlation among growth parameters and the importance of the mathematical models are discussed. PMID:1786568

  7. Thermoluminescence glow curve analysis and CGCD method for erbium doped CaZrO3 phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Ratnesh; Chopra, Seema

    2016-05-01

    The manuscript report the synthesis, thermoluminescence study at fixed concentration of Er3+ (1 mol%) doped CaZrO3 phosphor. The phosphors were prepared by modified solid state reaction method. The powder sample was characterized by thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve analysis. In TL glow curve the optimized concentration in 1mol% for UV irradiated sample. The kinetic parameters were calculated by computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) techniaue. Trapping parameters gives the information of dosimetry loss in prepared phosphor and its usability in environmental monitoring and for personal monitoring. CGCD is the advance tool for analysis of complicated TL glow curves.

  8. Curved Thermopiezoelectric Shell Structures Modeled by Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun

    2000-01-01

    "Smart" structures composed of piezoelectric materials may significantly improve the performance of aeropropulsion systems through a variety of vibration, noise, and shape-control applications. The development of analytical models for piezoelectric smart structures is an ongoing, in-house activity at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field focused toward the experimental characterization of these materials. Research efforts have been directed toward developing analytical models that account for the coupled mechanical, electrical, and thermal response of piezoelectric composite materials. Current work revolves around implementing thermal effects into a curvilinear-shell finite element code. This enhances capabilities to analyze curved structures and to account for coupling effects arising from thermal effects and the curved geometry. The current analytical model implements a unique mixed multi-field laminate theory to improve computational efficiency without sacrificing accuracy. The mechanics can model both the sensory and active behavior of piezoelectric composite shell structures. Finite element equations are being implemented for an eight-node curvilinear shell element, and numerical studies are being conducted to demonstrate capabilities to model the response of curved piezoelectric composite structures (see the figure).

  9. Thermoluminescence glow curve analysis of natural onyx from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Tamer; Toktamış, Hüseyin; Yüksel, Mehmet; Topaksu, Mustafa; Yazici, A Necmeddin

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the thermoluminesce (TL) properties of natural onyx were determined after β-irradiation ((90)Sr/(90)Y) at room temperature. The effect of the additive dose and variable heating rate for TL glow peaks of the sample were investigated. Computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) methods were used to determine the number of peaks and kinetic parameters related to the TL glow peaks in natural onyx from Turkey. It was also determined kinetic parameters of onyx by means of the variable heating rate (VHR) method. The sample was exposed to β-irradiation between 2.4 Gy and 2.457 kGy. The CGCD methods showed that the glow curve of sample is the superposition of at least six first order components which were ascribed as P1-P6. The dose responses of some peaks have similar patterns and they follow linearity. The effect of heating rates on the response of dosimetric glow peaks of sample was studied. The maximum TL peak intensities of glow curve are decreasing with increasing heating rate and maximum TL peak intensities at 1 °C/s drops to 20% of the initial value when the sample is read at 6 °C/s.

  10. Paleomagnetic analysis of curved thrust belts reproduced by physical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Elisabetta; Speranza, Fabio

    2003-12-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for studying the evolution of curved mountain belts by means of paleomagnetic analyses performed on analogue models. Eleven models were designed aimed at reproducing various tectonic settings in thin-skinned tectonics. Our models analyze in particular those features reported in the literature as possible causes for peculiar rotational patterns in the outermost as well as in the more internal fronts. In all the models the sedimentary cover was reproduced by frictional low-cohesion materials (sand and glass micro-beads), which detached either on frictional or on viscous layers. These latter were reproduced in the models by silicone. The sand forming the models has been previously mixed with magnetite-dominated powder. Before deformation, the models were magnetized by means of two permanent magnets generating within each model a quasi-linear magnetic field of intensity variable between 20 and 100 mT. After deformation, the models were cut into closely spaced vertical sections and sampled by means of 1×1-cm Plexiglas cylinders at several locations along curved fronts. Care was taken to collect paleomagnetic samples only within virtually undeformed thrust sheets, avoiding zones affected by pervasive shear. Afterwards, the natural remanent magnetization of these samples was measured, and alternating field demagnetization was used to isolate the principal components. The characteristic components of magnetization isolated were used to estimate the vertical-axis rotations occurring during model deformation. We find that indenters pushing into deforming belts from behind form non-rotational curved outer fronts. The more internal fronts show oroclinal-type rotations of a smaller magnitude than that expected for a perfect orocline. Lateral symmetrical obstacles in the foreland colliding with forward propagating belts produce non-rotational outer curved fronts as well, whereas in between and inside the obstacles a perfect orocline forms

  11. Rapid molecular identification of Listeria species by use of real-time PCR and high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dazhi; Luo, Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Fang, Weijia; Ye, Julian; Wu, Fang; Ding, Gangqiang

    2012-05-01

    Identification of Listeria species via a molecular method is critical for food safety and clinical diagnosis. In this study, an assay integrating real-time quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) with high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis was developed and assessed for rapid identification of six Listeria species. The ssrA gene, which encodes a transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) is conserved and common to all bacterial phyla, contains a variable domain in Listeria spp. Therefore, Q-PCR and a HRM profile were applied to characterize this gene. Fifty-three Listeria species and 45 non-Listeria species were detected using one primer set, with an accuracy of 100% in reference to conventional methods. There was a 93.3% correction rate to 30 artificially contaminated samples. Thus, Q-PCR with melting profiling analysis proved able to identify Listeria species accurately. Consequently, this study demonstrates that the assay we developed is a functional tool for rapidly identifying six Listeria species, and has the potential for discriminating novel species food safety and epidemiological research.

  12. Reconstructing CO2 concentrations in basaltic melt inclusions using Raman analysis of vapor bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aster, Ellen M.; Wallace, Paul J.; Moore, Lowell R.; Watkins, James; Gazel, Esteban; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2016-09-01

    Melt inclusions record valuable information about pre-eruptive volatile concentrations of melts. However, a vapor bubble commonly forms in inclusions after trapping, and this decreases the dissolved CO2 concentration in the melt (glass) phase in the inclusion. To quantify CO2 loss to vapor bubbles, Raman spectroscopic analysis was used to determine the density of CO2 in bubbles in melt inclusions from two Cascade cinder cones near Mt. Lassen and two Mexican cinder cones (Jorullo, Parícutin). Using analyses of dissolved CO2 and H2O in the glass in the inclusions, the measured CO2 vapor densities were used to reconstruct the original dissolved CO2 contents of the melt inclusions at the time of trapping. Our results show that 30-90% of the CO2 in a melt inclusion is contained in the vapor bubble, values similar to those found in other recent studies. We developed a model for vapor bubble growth to show how post-entrapment bubbles form in melt inclusions as a result of cooling, crystallization, and eruptive quenching. The model allows us to predict the bubble volume fraction as a function of ΔT (the difference between the trapping temperature and eruptive temperature) and the amount of CO2 lost to a bubble. Comparison of the Raman and modeling methods shows highly variable agreement. For 10 of 17 inclusions, the two methods are within ± 550 ppm CO2 (avg. difference 290 ppm), equivalent to ±~300 bars uncertainty in estimated trapping pressure for restored inclusions. Discrepancies between the two methods occur for inclusions that have been strongly affected by post-entrapment diffusive H+ loss, because this process enhances bubble formation. For our dataset, restoring the CO2 lost to vapor bubbles increases inferred trapping pressures of the inclusions by 600 to as much as 4000 bars, highlighting the importance of accounting for vapor bubble formation in melt inclusion studies.

  13. Rouse mode analysis of chain relaxation in homopolymer melts

    SciTech Connect

    Kalathi, Jagannathan T.; Kumar, Sanat K.; Rubinstein, Michael; Grest, Gary S.

    2014-09-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations of the Kremer–Grest (KG) bead–spring model of polymer chains of length between 10 and 500, and a closely related analogue that allows for chain crossing, to clearly delineate the effects of entanglements on the length-scale-dependent chain relaxation in polymer melts. We analyze the resulting trajectories using the Rouse modes of the chains and find that entanglements strongly affect these modes. The relaxation rates of the chains show two limiting effective monomeric frictions, with the local modes experiencing much lower effective friction than the longer modes. The monomeric relaxation rates of longer modes vary approximately inversely with chain length due to kinetic confinement effects. The time-dependent relaxation of Rouse modes has a stretched exponential character with a minimum of stretching exponent in the vicinity of the entanglement chain length. None of these trends are found in models that allow for chain crossing. As a result, these facts, in combination, argue for the confined motion of chains for time scales between the entanglement time and their ultimate free diffusion.

  14. Rouse mode analysis of chain relaxation in homopolymer melts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kalathi, Jagannathan T.; Kumar, Sanat K.; Rubinstein, Michael; Grest, Gary S.

    2014-09-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations of the Kremer–Grest (KG) bead–spring model of polymer chains of length between 10 and 500, and a closely related analogue that allows for chain crossing, to clearly delineate the effects of entanglements on the length-scale-dependent chain relaxation in polymer melts. We analyze the resulting trajectories using the Rouse modes of the chains and find that entanglements strongly affect these modes. The relaxation rates of the chains show two limiting effective monomeric frictions, with the local modes experiencing much lower effective friction than the longer modes. The monomeric relaxation rates of longer modes vary approximately inverselymore » with chain length due to kinetic confinement effects. The time-dependent relaxation of Rouse modes has a stretched exponential character with a minimum of stretching exponent in the vicinity of the entanglement chain length. None of these trends are found in models that allow for chain crossing. As a result, these facts, in combination, argue for the confined motion of chains for time scales between the entanglement time and their ultimate free diffusion.« less

  15. Rouse Mode Analysis of Chain Relaxation in Homopolymer Melts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations of the Kremer–Grest (KG) bead–spring model of polymer chains of length between 10 and 500, and a closely related analogue that allows for chain crossing, to clearly delineate the effects of entanglements on the length-scale-dependent chain relaxation in polymer melts. We analyze the resulting trajectories using the Rouse modes of the chains and find that entanglements strongly affect these modes. The relaxation rates of the chains show two limiting effective monomeric frictions, with the local modes experiencing much lower effective friction than the longer modes. The monomeric relaxation rates of longer modes vary approximately inversely with chain length due to kinetic confinement effects. The time-dependent relaxation of Rouse modes has a stretched exponential character with a minimum of stretching exponent in the vicinity of the entanglement chain length. None of these trends are found in models that allow for chain crossing. These facts, in combination, argue for the confined motion of chains for time scales between the entanglement time and their ultimate free diffusion. PMID:25328247

  16. Analysis of growth curves of fowl. II. Ducks.

    PubMed

    Knízetová, H; Hyánek, J; Kníze, B; Procházková, H

    1991-12-01

    1. Growth curves of nine selected lines and one random-bred control population (in total, n = 1070) were evaluated by the Richards function. The ducks were weighed at 7-d intervals and, after the tenth week, every second week (up to 18 weeks). Food and water were supplied ad libitum. 2. The predicted curves closely fitted the weight data points (R2 = 0.9991-0.9997). 3. The ducks are characterized by early maturity rate. The peak of the absolute growth rate (the inflection point of the curve) occurred at 24.1-27.6 d of age (t+). A higher ratio of the inflection to the asymptotic weights (y+/A = 0.380-0.424) was found in comparison to those from the Gompertz-type function of growth (y+/A = 0.368). 4. In the selected lines the degree of maturity at a slaughter age of 7 weeks (u7 = y7/A) ranged from 0.784 to 0.835 for males and from 0.819 to 0.889 for females. 5. Ducks within the non-selected control line had a significantly lower maturing rate than the selected lines. 6. Sexual dimorphism was recorded for all growth parameters analysed. Females have faster maturation rate than males (higher values of y+/A, u7, k and a shorter auto-acceleration phase of growth). 7. High interline differences were found for body weight (A, y+, y7) and for absolute growth rate (v, v+) and smaller ones for parameters of the maturation rate (y+/A, u7, k and t+). 8. The intragroup phenotype correlation between growth parameters and the use of weight data only up to 7 weeks of age for the estimation of parameters of the Richards function are discussed. PMID:1786569

  17. Transit Light Curves with Finite Integration Time: Fisher Information Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Ellen M.; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2014-10-01

    Kepler has revolutionized the study of transiting planets with its unprecedented photometric precision on more than 150,000 target stars. Most of the transiting planet candidates detected by Kepler have been observed as long-cadence targets with 30 minute integration times, and the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will record full frame images with a similar integration time. Integrations of 30 minutes affect the transit shape, particularly for small planets and in cases of low signal to noise. Using the Fisher information matrix technique, we derive analytic approximations for the variances and covariances on the transit parameters obtained from fitting light curve photometry collected with a finite integration time. We find that binning the light curve can significantly increase the uncertainties and covariances on the inferred parameters when comparing scenarios with constant total signal to noise (constant total integration time in the absence of read noise). Uncertainties on the transit ingress/egress time increase by a factor of 34 for Earth-size planets and 3.4 for Jupiter-size planets around Sun-like stars for integration times of 30 minutes compared to instantaneously sampled light curves. Similarly, uncertainties on the mid-transit time for Earth and Jupiter-size planets increase by factors of 3.9 and 1.4. Uncertainties on the transit depth are largely unaffected by finite integration times. While correlations among the transit depth, ingress duration, and transit duration all increase in magnitude with longer integration times, the mid-transit time remains uncorrelated with the other parameters. We provide code in Python and Mathematica for predicting the variances and covariances at www.its.caltech.edu/~eprice.

  18. Transit light curves with finite integration time: Fisher information analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Ellen M.; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2014-10-10

    Kepler has revolutionized the study of transiting planets with its unprecedented photometric precision on more than 150,000 target stars. Most of the transiting planet candidates detected by Kepler have been observed as long-cadence targets with 30 minute integration times, and the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will record full frame images with a similar integration time. Integrations of 30 minutes affect the transit shape, particularly for small planets and in cases of low signal to noise. Using the Fisher information matrix technique, we derive analytic approximations for the variances and covariances on the transit parameters obtained from fitting light curve photometry collected with a finite integration time. We find that binning the light curve can significantly increase the uncertainties and covariances on the inferred parameters when comparing scenarios with constant total signal to noise (constant total integration time in the absence of read noise). Uncertainties on the transit ingress/egress time increase by a factor of 34 for Earth-size planets and 3.4 for Jupiter-size planets around Sun-like stars for integration times of 30 minutes compared to instantaneously sampled light curves. Similarly, uncertainties on the mid-transit time for Earth and Jupiter-size planets increase by factors of 3.9 and 1.4. Uncertainties on the transit depth are largely unaffected by finite integration times. While correlations among the transit depth, ingress duration, and transit duration all increase in magnitude with longer integration times, the mid-transit time remains uncorrelated with the other parameters. We provide code in Python and Mathematica for predicting the variances and covariances at www.its.caltech.edu/∼eprice.

  19. The first light curve analysis of eclipsing binary NR Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakkoli, F.; Hasanzadeh, A.; Poro, A.

    2015-05-01

    New observations of the eclipsing binary system NR Cam were carried out using a CCD in B, V, and R filters and new times of light minimum and new ephemeris were obtained. The B, V, and R light curves were analyzed using both the Binary Maker 3.0 and PHOEBE 0.31 programs to determine some geometrical and physical parameters of the system. These results show that NR Cam is an overcontact binary and that both components are Main Sequence stars. The O'Connell effect on NR Cam was studied and some variations in spot parameters were obtained over the different years.

  20. Vibration Analysis of Composite Rectangular Plates Reinforced along Curved Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Shinya; Oonishi, Yoshimasa; Narita, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Katsuhiko

    In the past few decades, composite materials composed of straight fibers and polymer matrix have gained their status as the most promising material for light-weight structures. Technical merit of the composites as tailored material also provided practical advantages in the optimum design process. Recently, it is reported that the fabrication machine has been developed to make curved fibers embedded in the matrix material. Based on such technical advancement, this paper proposes an analytical method to study vibration of composite rectangular plates reinforced along curved lines. The approach is based on the Ritz method where variable fiber direction can be accommodated. For this purpose, the fibers continuously changing their direction are formulated as the variable bending stiffness in the total potential energy. A frequency equation is derived by the Ritz minimizing process, and frequency parameters are calculated as the eigenvlaues in the eigenvalue problem. In numerical results, the accuracy of the method is presented by comparing present results with FEM results. The advantages of present plate are confirmed by comparing natural frequencies and mode shapes with those of conventional composite and isotropic plates, and the effectiveness of the new solution to the most recent problem is demonstrated.

  1. Evaluation of post-polymerase chain reaction melting temperature analysis for meat species identification in mixed DNA samples.

    PubMed

    López-Andreo, María; Garrido-Pertierra, Amando; Puyet, Antonio

    2006-10-18

    Real-time uniplex and duplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays with a SYBR Green I post-PCR melting curve analysis were evaluated for the identification and quantification of bovine, porcine, horse, and wallaroo DNA in food products. Quantitative values were derived from threshold-cycle (C(t)) data obtained from serial dilutions of purified DNA. The limits of detection in uniplex reactions were 0.04 pg for porcine and wallaroo DNA and 0.4 pg for cattle and horse DNA. Species specificity of the PCR products was tested by the identification of peaks in DNA melting curves, measured as the decrease of SYBR Green I fluorescence at the dissociation temperature. The peaks could be distinguished above the background even at the lowest amount of template DNA detected by the C(t) method. The system was also tested in duplex reactions, by use of either single-species DNA or DNA admixtures containing different shares of two species. The minimum proportions of each DNA species allowing the resolution of T(m) peaks in the duplex reactions were 5% (cattle or wallaroo) in cattle/wallaroo mixtures, 5% porcine and 1% horse in porcine/horse mixtures, 60% porcine and 1% wallaroo in porcine/wallaroo mixtures, and 1% cattle and 5% horse in cattle/horse mixtures. A loss in the sensitivity of the method was observed for some DNA combinations in the duplex assay. In contrast, the results obtained from SYBR Green I uniplex and duplex reactions with single-species DNA were largely comparable to those obtained previously with species-specific TaqMan probes, showing the suitability of that simpler experimental approach for large-scale analytical applications.

  2. Analysis of Turf Fungicides in Snow Melt Runoff by LC/MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungicides are applied on turf grass, in autumn, to control snow mold in the north-central United States. Fungicides of varying chemical classes have been detected in snow melt runoff from turf. A multi-residue method for simultaneous sample extraction and analysis is needed to process a large quant...

  3. GLOBAL ANALYSIS OF KOI-977: SPECTROSCOPY, ASTEROSEISMOLOGY, AND PHASE-CURVE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Sato, Bun'ei; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Masuda, Kento; Benomar, Othman; Takeda, Yoichi; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki

    2015-01-20

    We present a global analysis of KOI-977, one of the planet host candidates detected by Kepler. The Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) reports that KOI-977 is a red giant, for which few close-in planets have been discovered. Our global analysis involves spectroscopic and asteroseismic determinations of stellar parameters (e.g., mass and radius) and radial velocity (RV) measurements. Our analyses reveal that KOI-977 is indeed a red giant, possibly in the red clump, but its estimated radius (≳ 20 R {sub ☉} = 0.093 AU) is much larger than KOI-977.01's orbital distance (∼0.027 AU) estimated from its period (P {sub orb} ∼ 1.35 days) and host star's mass. RV measurements show a small variation, which also contradicts the amplitude of ellipsoidal variations seen in the light curve folded with KOI-977.01's period. Therefore, we conclude that KOI-977.01 is a false positive, meaning that the red giant, for which we measured the radius and RVs, is different from the object that produces the transit-like signal (i.e., an eclipsing binary). On the basis of this assumption, we also perform a light curve analysis including the modeling of transits/eclipses and phase-curve variations, adopting various values for the dilution factor D, which is defined as the flux ratio between the red giant and eclipsing binary. Fitting the whole folded light curve as well as individual transits in the short cadence data simultaneously, we find that the estimated mass and radius ratios of the eclipsing binary are consistent with those of a solar-type star and a late-type star (e.g., an M dwarf) for D ≳ 20.

  4. Parent involvement and science achievement: A latent growth curve analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ursula Yvette

    This study examined science achievement growth across elementary and middle school and parent school involvement using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study - Kindergarten Class of 1998--1999 (ECLS-K). The ECLS-K is a nationally representative kindergarten cohort of students from public and private schools who attended full-day or half-day kindergarten class in 1998--1999. The present study's sample (N = 8,070) was based on students that had a sampling weight available from the public-use data file. Students were assessed in science achievement at third, fifth, and eighth grades and parents of the students were surveyed at the same time points. Analyses using latent growth curve modeling with time invariant and varying covariates in an SEM framework revealed a positive relationship between science achievement and parent involvement at eighth grade. Furthermore, there were gender and racial/ethnic differences in parents' school involvement as a predictor of science achievement. Findings indicated that students with lower initial science achievement scores had a faster rate of growth across time. The achievement gap between low and high achievers in earth, space and life sciences lessened from elementary to middle school. Parents' involvement with school usually tapers off after elementary school, but due to parent school involvement being a significant predictor of eighth grade science achievement, later school involvement may need to be supported and better implemented in secondary schooling.

  5. Melting of Transition Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M; Japel, S; Boehler, R

    2005-04-11

    We review the transition melting studies carried out at Mainz, and describe a recently developed model used to explain that the relatively low melting slopes are due to the partially filled d-bands, and the persistence of the pressure induced s-d transition. The basic tenets of the model have now been reconfirmed by new measurements for Cu and Ni. The measurements show that Cu which has a filled 3d-band, has a melt slope that is about 2.5 greater than its neighbor Ni. In the case of Mo, the apparent discrepancy of DAC melting measurements with shock melting can be explained by accounting for the change in melt slope due to the bcc-cp transition observed in the shock studies. The Fe melt curve is revisited. The possible relevance of the Jahn-Teller effect and recently observed transition metal melts with Icosahedral Short-Range Order (ISRO) is discussed.

  6. Melt Analysis of Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assays (Melt-MAMA): A Functional Study of a Cost-Effective SNP Genotyping Assay in Bacterial Models

    PubMed Central

    Birdsell, Dawn N.; Pearson, Talima; Price, Erin P.; Hornstra, Heidie M.; Nera, Roxanne D.; Stone, Nathan; Gruendike, Jeffrey; Kaufman, Emily L.; Pettus, Amanda H.; Hurbon, Audriana N.; Buchhagen, Jordan L.; Harms, N. Jane; Chanturia, Gvantsa; Gyuranecz, Miklos; Wagner, David M.; Keim, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are abundant in genomes of all species and biologically informative markers extensively used across broad scientific disciplines. Newly identified SNP markers are publicly available at an ever-increasing rate due to advancements in sequencing technologies. Efficient, cost-effective SNP genotyping methods to screen sample populations are in great demand in well-equipped laboratories, but also in developing world situations. Dual Probe TaqMan assays are robust but can be cost-prohibitive and require specialized equipment. The Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assay, coupled with melt analysis (Melt-MAMA), is flexible, efficient and cost-effective. However, Melt-MAMA traditionally suffers from high rates of assay design failures and knowledge gaps on assay robustness and sensitivity. In this study, we identified strategies that improved the success of Melt-MAMA. We examined the performance of 185 Melt-MAMAs across eight different pathogens using various optimization parameters. We evaluated the effects of genome size and %GC content on assay development. When used collectively, specific strategies markedly improved the rate of successful assays at the first design attempt from ∼50% to ∼80%. We observed that Melt-MAMA accurately genotypes across a broad DNA range (∼100 ng to ∼0.1 pg). Genomic size and %GC content influence the rate of successful assay design in an independent manner. Finally, we demonstrated the versatility of these assays by the creation of a duplex Melt-MAMA real-time PCR (two SNPs) and conversion to a size-based genotyping system, which uses agarose gel electrophoresis. Melt-MAMA is comparable to Dual Probe TaqMan assays in terms of design success rate and accuracy. Although sensitivity is less robust than Dual Probe TaqMan assays, Melt-MAMA is superior in terms of cost-effectiveness, speed of development and versatility. We detail the parameters most important for the successful application of Melt

  7. A Brief Review: The Z-curve Theory and its Application in Genome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ren; Zhang, Chun-Ting

    2014-04-01

    In theoretical physics, there exist two basic mathematical approaches, algebraic and geometrical methods, which, in most cases, are complementary. In the area of genome sequence analysis, however, algebraic approaches have been widely used, while geometrical approaches have been less explored for a long time. The Z-curve theory is a geometrical approach to genome analysis. The Z-curve is a three-dimensional curve that represents a given DNA sequence in the sense that each can be uniquely reconstructed given the other. The Z-curve, therefore, contains all the information that the corresponding DNA sequence carries. The analysis of a DNA sequence can then be performed through studying the corresponding Z-curve. The Z-curve method has found applications in a wide range of areas in the past two decades, including the identifications of protein-coding genes, replication origins, horizontally-transferred genomic islands, promoters, translational start sides and isochores, as well as studies on phylogenetics, genome visualization and comparative genomics. Here, we review the progress of Z-curve studies from aspects of both theory and applications in genome analysis.

  8. A Brief Review: The Z-curve Theory and its Application in Genome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ren; Zhang, Chun-Ting

    2014-01-01

    In theoretical physics, there exist two basic mathematical approaches, algebraic and geometrical methods, which, in most cases, are complementary. In the area of genome sequence analysis, however, algebraic approaches have been widely used, while geometrical approaches have been less explored for a long time. The Z-curve theory is a geometrical approach to genome analysis. The Z-curve is a three-dimensional curve that represents a given DNA sequence in the sense that each can be uniquely reconstructed given the other. The Z-curve, therefore, contains all the information that the corresponding DNA sequence carries. The analysis of a DNA sequence can then be performed through studying the corresponding Z-curve. The Z-curve method has found applications in a wide range of areas in the past two decades, including the identifications of protein-coding genes, replication origins, horizontally-transferred genomic islands, promoters, translational start sides and isochores, as well as studies on phylogenetics, genome visualization and comparative genomics. Here, we review the progress of Z-curve studies from aspects of both theory and applications in genome analysis. PMID:24822026

  9. Determination of the optimum working range from a calibration curve for colorimetric analysis with an "autoanalyzer".

    PubMed

    Whitehead, D

    1973-02-01

    A study has been made of the types and distribution of errors in determining the optimum working range from a calibration curve for automated analysis. Three error equations are derived for the fitting of a linear, quadratic or cubic curve, involving a thorough statistical analysis of the data. The errors from a set of silica and alumina standards, requiring a quadratic and cubic fit respectively, compare favourably with replicate analyses of standard rocks done on a previous occasion. PMID:18961254

  10. First-principles calculations of solid and liquid aluminum optical absorption spectra near the melting curve: Ambient and high-pressure results

    SciTech Connect

    Ogitsu, Tadashi; Benedict, Lorin X.; Schwegler, Eric; Draeger, Erik W.; Prendergast, David

    2009-12-04

    Here, we present ab initio calculations of the linear optical conductivity of heated Al at ambient pressure and at the conditions relevant for shock melting (P~125 GPa, T~5000 K). It is shown that the visible and near-UV optical spectrum is very sensitive to the phase (fcc solid versus liquid) of Al for both P=0 and 125 GPa. The ambient-P results confirm an earlier prediction and the results of a recent experiment while the high-(P,T) results allow us to conclude that in situ measurements of optical constants should be able to diagnose the shock melting of Al.

  11. First-principles calculations of solid and liquid aluminum optical absorption spectra near the melting curve: Ambient and high-pressure results

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ogitsu, Tadashi; Benedict, Lorin X.; Schwegler, Eric; Draeger, Erik W.; Prendergast, David

    2009-12-04

    Here, we present ab initio calculations of the linear optical conductivity of heated Al at ambient pressure and at the conditions relevant for shock melting (P~125 GPa, T~5000 K). It is shown that the visible and near-UV optical spectrum is very sensitive to the phase (fcc solid versus liquid) of Al for both P=0 and 125 GPa. The ambient-P results confirm an earlier prediction and the results of a recent experiment while the high-(P,T) results allow us to conclude that in situ measurements of optical constants should be able to diagnose the shock melting of Al.

  12. Rapid fingerprinting of methanogenic communities by high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaai; Lee, Changsoo

    2014-12-01

    Characterizing microbial community structure using molecular techniques is becoming a popular approach in studies of waste/wastewater treatment processes. A rapid and robust tool to analyze microbial communities is required for efficient process monitoring and control. In this study, a new community fingerprinting method based on high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was developed and applied to compare methanogenic community structures of five different anaerobic digesters. The new method produced robust community clustering and ordination results comparable to the results from the commonly used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) performed in parallel. This method transforms melting peak plots (MPs) of community DNA samples generated by HRM analysis to molecular fingerprints and estimates the relationships between the communities based on the fingerprints. The MP-based fingerprinting would provide a good alternative to monitor variations in microbial community structure especially when handling large sample numbers due to its high-throughput capacity and short analysis time.

  13. A light-curve distortion-wave analysis of eight RS Canum Venaticorum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    A program of differential U,B,V photometry of 14 RS CVn systems carried out at Rosemary Hill Observatory in 1978 - 1981 is described, and an analysis of the light curves for the characteristic distortion wave for eight of the systems is presented. The V light curves of the systems are shown. Significant waves were observed in RS CVn, RZ Eri, and RW UMa. No significant waves were found in UX Com, GK Hya, AR Lac, LX Per, or TY Pyx. Unusual light curve distortions were observed in UX Com and AR Lac.

  14. WTF- and A- Stars: Spectroscopic Analysis of Kepler Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grae Short, Miona; Soderblom, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of Kepler data in 2012 found that in a sample of about 2000 A- and F- stars, 1% of them seemed to exhibit white light flares. However, such stars are not thought to have the convective envelopes needed to produce the magnetic dynamos that yield flares. We use the same Kepler data but examine the flaring stars more comprehensively by analyzing the pixel data in order to predict whether this flare-like behavior may be caused by smaller, less luminous M dwarfs exhibiting genuine flares in the line of sight of the A- and F-stars. The implications of finding verifiable flare activity in a subset of these stars would be enough to incite further investigation of the physical processes that allow this to take place. Yet, if that were not the case, this project would further be able to demonstrate the steps necessary to correct for false-positives in finding flares in A- and F- stars.

  15. Constraints on the Parental Melts of Enriched Shergottites from Image Analysis and High Pressure Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collinet, M.; Medard, E.; Devouard, B.; Peslier, A.

    2012-01-01

    Martian basalts can be classified in at least two geochemically different families: enriched and depleted shergottites. Enriched shergottites are characterized by higher incompatible element concentrations and initial Sr-87/Sr-86 and lower initial Nd-143/Nd-144 and Hf-176/Hf-177 than depleted shergottites [e.g. 1, 2]. It is now generally admitted that shergottites result from the melting of at least two distinct mantle reservoirs [e.g. 2, 3]. Some of the olivine-phyric shergottites (either depleted or enriched), the most magnesian Martian basalts, could represent primitive melts, which are of considerable interest to constrain mantle sources. Two depleted olivine-phyric shergottites, Yamato (Y) 980459 and Northwest Africa (NWA) 5789, are in equilibrium with their most magnesian olivine (Fig. 1) and their bulk rock compositions are inferred to represent primitive melts [4, 5]. Larkman Nunatak (LAR) 06319 [3, 6, 7] and NWA 1068 [8], the most magnesian enriched basalts, have bulk Mg# that are too high to be in equilibrium with their olivine megacryst cores. Parental melt compositions have been estimated by subtracting the most magnesian olivine from the bulk rock composition, assuming that olivine megacrysts have partially accumulated [3, 9]. However, because this technique does not account for the actual petrography of these meteorites, we used image analysis to study these rocks history, reconstruct their parent magma and understand the nature of olivine megacrysts.

  16. Estimation of Linear Viscoelasticity of Polymer Melts in Molecular Dynamics Simulations Based on Relaxation Mode Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaoka, Nobuyuki; Hagita, Katsumi; Takano, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    On the basis of relaxation mode analysis (RMA), we present an efficient method to estimate the linear viscoelasticity of polymer melts in a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Slow relaxation phenomena appeared in polymer melts cause a problem that a calculation of the stress relaxation function in MD simulations, especially in the terminal time region, requires large computational efforts. Relaxation mode analysis is a method that systematically extracts slow relaxation modes and rates of the polymer chain from the time correlation of its conformations. We show the computational cost may be drastically reduced by combining a direct calculation of the stress relaxation function based on the Green-Kubo formula with the relaxation rates spectra estimated by RMA. N. I. acknowledges the Graduate School Doctoral Student Aid Program from Keio University.

  17. The mathematical analysis of the heart rate and blood lactate curves during incremental exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Rosic, Mirko; Ilic, V; Obradovic, Z; Pantovic, S; Rosic, G

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes a new mathematical approach for the analysis of HR (heart rate) and BL (blood lactate) curves during incremental exercise testing using a HR/BL curve and its derivatives, taking into account the native shape of all curves, without any linear approximation. Using this approach the results indicate the appearance of three characteristic points (A, B and C) on the HR/BL curve. The point A on the HR/BL curve which is the value that corresponds to the load (12.73 ± 0.46 km h-1) at which BL starts to increase above the resting levels (0.9 ± 0.06 mM), and is analogous to Lactate Turn Point 1 (LTP1). The point C on the HR/BL curve which corresponds to a BL of approximately 4mM, and is analogous to LTP2. The point B on the HR/BL curve, which corresponds to the load (16.32 ± 0.49 km h-1) at which the moderate increase turns into a more pronounced increase in BL. This point has not been previously recognized in literature. We speculate this point represents attenuation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) increase, accompanied by the decrease in diastolic time duration during incremental exercise testing. Proposed mathematical approach allows precise determination of lactate turnpoints during incremental exercise testing.

  18. Development of synthetic flood damage curve by explicit costs analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martina, Mario; Molinari, Daniela; Dottori, Francesco; Scorzini, Annarita

    2015-04-01

    characteristics. Such functions were developed using a what-if analysis using data collected after the 2012 flood in the Umbria Region in Central Italy, as well as authors' experience, as reference to understand damage mechanisms. Observed damage data were also used to calibrate the functions.

  19. Genotyping of beta thalassemia trait by high-resolution DNA melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Saetung, Rattika; Ongchai, Siriwan; Charoenkwan, Pimlak; Sanguansermsri, Torpong

    2013-11-01

    Beta thalassemia is a common hereditary hemalogogical disease in Thailand, with a prevalence of 5-8%. In this study, we evaluated the high resolution DNA melting (HRM) assay to identify beta thalassemia mutation in samples from 143 carriers of the beta thalassemia traits in at risk couples. The DNA was isolated from venous blood samples and tested for mutation under a series of 5 PCR-HRM (A, B, C, D and E primers) protocols. The A primers were for detection of beta thalassemia mutations in the HBB promoter region, the B primers for mutations in exon I, the C primers for exon II, the D primers for exon III and the E primers for the 3.4 kb deletion mutation. The mutations were diagnosed by comparing the complete melting curve profiles of a wild type control with those for each mutant sample. With the PCR-HRM technique, fourteen types of beta thalassemia mutations were detected. Each mutation had a unique and specific melting profile. The mutations included 36.4% (52 cases) codon 41/42-CTTT, 26.6% (38 cases) codon 17 A-T, 11.2% (16 cases) IVS1-1 G-T, 8.4% (12 cases) codon 71/72 +A, 8.4% (12 cases) of the 3.4 kb deletion and 3.5% (5 cases) -28 A-G. The remainder included one instance each of -87 C-A, -31 A-C, codon 27/28 +C, codon 30 G-A, IVS1-5 G-C, codon 35 C-A, codon 41-C and IVSII -654 C-T. Of the total cases, 85.8% of the mutations could be detected by primers B and C. The PCR-HRM method provides a rapid, simple and highly feasible strategy for mutation screening of beta thalassemia traits. PMID:24450243

  20. Late-phase melt progression experiment: MP-2. Results and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gasser, R.D.; Gauntt, R.O.; Bourcier, S.C.

    1997-05-01

    In-pile experiments addressing late-phase processes in Light Water Reactors (LWRs) were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories. Melt Progression (MP) experiments were designed to provide information to develop and verify computer models for analysis of LWR core damage in severe accidents. Experiments examine the formation and motion of ceramic molten pools in disrupted reactor core regions. The MP-2 experiment assembly consisted of: (1) a rubble bed of enriched UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} simulating severely disrupted reactor core regions, (2) a ceramic/metallic crust representing blockage formed by early phase melting, relocation, and refreezing of core components, and (3) an intact rod stub region that remained in place below the blockage region. The test assembly was fission heated in the central cavity of the ACRR at an average rate of about 0.2 KA, reaching a peak molten pool temperature around 3400 K. Melting of the debris bed ceramic components was initiated near the center of the bed. The molten material relocated downward, refreezing to form a ceramic crust near the bottom of the rubble bed. As power levels were increased, the crust gradually remelted and reformed at progressively lower positions in the bed until late in the experiment when it penetrated into and attacked the ceramic/metallic blockage. The metallic components of the blockage region melted and relocated to the bottom of the intact rod stub region before the ceramic melt penetrated the blockage region from above. The ceramic pool penetrated halfway into the blockage region by the end of the experiment. Measurements of thermal response and material relocation are compared to the results of the computer simulations. Postexperiment examination of the assembly with the associated material interactions and metallurgy are also discussed in detail with the analyses and interpretation of results. 16 refs., 206 figs., 24 tabs.

  1. A new methodology for free wake analysis using curved vortex elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, Donald B.; Teske, Milton E.; Quackenbush, Todd R.

    1987-01-01

    A method using curved vortex elements was developed for helicopter rotor free wake calculations. The Basic Curve Vortex Element (BCVE) is derived from the approximate Biot-Savart integration for a parabolic arc filament. When used in conjunction with a scheme to fit the elements along a vortex filament contour, this method has a significant advantage in overall accuracy and efficiency when compared to the traditional straight-line element approach. A theoretical and numerical analysis shows that free wake flows involving close interactions between filaments should utilize curved vortex elements in order to guarantee a consistent level of accuracy. The curved element method was implemented into a forward flight free wake analysis, featuring an adaptive far wake model that utilizes free wake information to extend the vortex filaments beyond the free wake regions. The curved vortex element free wake, coupled with this far wake model, exhibited rapid convergence, even in regions where the free wake and far wake turns are interlaced. Sample calculations are presented for tip vortex motion at various advance ratios for single and multiple blade rotors. Cross-flow plots reveal that the overall downstream wake flow resembles a trailing vortex pair. A preliminary assessment shows that the rotor downwash field is insensitive to element size, even for relatively large curved elements.

  2. Numerical analysis of curved frequency selective surface by finite-difference time-domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin-yi; Wang, Jian-bo; Chen, Gui-bo; Sun, Guan-cheng; Lu, Jun

    2011-08-01

    Frequency selective surface is a monolayer or multilayer 2D periodic structure which is composed of multiple resonance units scattering by a two-dimensional periodic array on dielectric layer. FSS can't absorb radio frequency energy, but can filter the frequency which is therefore applied in microwave technique or stealth technology. The relative research on curved FSS is relatively scarce since the curved FSS structure can be obtained only when FSS is attached on the materials surfaces of curved structures in engineering application. However, curved FSS is widely applied in practical engineering; therefore, the research on curved FSS structure has important significance. In this paper, a curved FSS structure model of Y-pore unit is established and numerical simulated by means of FDTD. The influence of curvature on FSS transmission characteristics is studied according to the analysis on the changing of radar cross section (RCS). The results show: the center frequency point of the plane band pass FSS structure drifts after the curve surface deformation of the structure; the center frequency point of the curved band pass FSS structure drifts with the changing of the curvature radius, i. e. with the decreasing of curvature radius, the frequency point drifts towards high points and the transmittance decreases. The design of FSS radome demands of accurate and stable center resonance frequency; therefore, the actual situation of curved surface should be considered in practical engineering application when band pass FSS is made into frequency selection filtering radome. The curvature radius should be long enough to avoid center frequency drifting and transmittance deceasing.

  3. Light curve morphology analysis of contact binaries observed with the Kepler satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debski, Bartłomiej; Zoła, Stanisław

    2014-09-01

    Light-curve morphology analysis of contact binaries provides model-independent insight into the short-term evolution of the system activity. Light-curve morphology applied to the Kepler data of contact binaries reveals directly the migration spot connection to the light curve's intrinsic rapid changes. Since the flat-bottom secondary minima cannot be studied in the way Tran et al. (2013) or Conroy et al. (2014) did, we measure the actual light-curve minimum, instead of the presumed mid-eclipse time. This, combined with the study of the minimum depth, allowed us to uncover the direction of the spot migration for particular binaries. At the same time, the O'Connell effect evolution and the maxima separation confronted with modeling based on the Wilson-Devinney code agree with polar dark spots. The combined results of this new approach offer constraints on the star spots size, temperature and latitude at high precision.

  4. Detection of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium by Real-Time PCR with High Resolution Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sady, Hany; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Ngui, Romano; Atroosh, Wahib M.; Al-Delaimy, Ahmed K.; Nasr, Nabil A.; Dawaki, Salwa; Abdulsalam, Awatif M.; Ithoi, Init; Lim, Yvonne A. L.; Chua, Kek Heng; Surin, Johari

    2015-01-01

    The present study describes a real-time PCR approach with high resolution melting-curve (HRM) assay developed for the detection and differentiation of Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium in fecal and urine samples collected from rural Yemen. The samples were screened by microscopy and PCR for the Schistosoma species infection. A pair of degenerate primers were designed targeting partial regions in the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (cox1) gene of S. mansoni and S. haematobium using real-time PCR-HRM assay. The overall prevalence of schistosomiasis was 31.8%; 23.8% of the participants were infected with S. haematobium and 9.3% were infected with S. mansoni. With regards to the intensity of infections, 22.1% and 77.9% of S. haematobium infections were of heavy and light intensities, respectively. Likewise, 8.1%, 40.5% and 51.4% of S. mansoni infections were of heavy, moderate and light intensities, respectively. The melting points were distinctive for S. mansoni and S. haematobium, categorized by peaks of 76.49 ± 0.25 °C and 75.43 ± 0.26 °C, respectively. HRM analysis showed high detection capability through the amplification of Schistosoma DNA with as low as 0.0001 ng/µL. Significant negative correlations were reported between the real-time PCR-HRM cycle threshold (Ct) values and microscopic egg counts for both S. mansoni in stool and S. haematobium in urine (p < 0.01). In conclusion, this closed-tube HRM protocol provides a potentially powerful screening molecular tool for the detection of S. mansoni and S. haematobium. It is a simple, rapid, accurate, and cost-effective method. Hence, this method is a good alternative approach to probe-based PCR assays. PMID:26193254

  5. AtomicJ: an open source software for analysis of force curves.

    PubMed

    Hermanowicz, Paweł; Sarna, Michał; Burda, Kvetoslava; Gabryś, Halina

    2014-06-01

    We present an open source Java application for analysis of force curves and images recorded with the Atomic Force Microscope. AtomicJ supports a wide range of contact mechanics models and implements procedures that reduce the influence of deviations from the contact model. It generates maps of mechanical properties, including maps of Young's modulus, adhesion force, and sample height. It can also calculate stacks, which reveal how sample's response to deformation changes with indentation depth. AtomicJ analyzes force curves concurrently on multiple threads, which allows for high speed of analysis. It runs on all popular operating systems, including Windows, Linux, and Macintosh. PMID:24985823

  6. AtomicJ: An open source software for analysis of force curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanowicz, Paweł; Sarna, Michał; Burda, Kvetoslava; Gabryś, Halina

    2014-06-01

    We present an open source Java application for analysis of force curves and images recorded with the Atomic Force Microscope. AtomicJ supports a wide range of contact mechanics models and implements procedures that reduce the influence of deviations from the contact model. It generates maps of mechanical properties, including maps of Young's modulus, adhesion force, and sample height. It can also calculate stacks, which reveal how sample's response to deformation changes with indentation depth. AtomicJ analyzes force curves concurrently on multiple threads, which allows for high speed of analysis. It runs on all popular operating systems, including Windows, Linux, and Macintosh.

  7. AtomicJ: An open source software for analysis of force curves

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanowicz, Paweł Gabryś, Halina; Sarna, Michał; Burda, Kvetoslava

    2014-06-15

    We present an open source Java application for analysis of force curves and images recorded with the Atomic Force Microscope. AtomicJ supports a wide range of contact mechanics models and implements procedures that reduce the influence of deviations from the contact model. It generates maps of mechanical properties, including maps of Young's modulus, adhesion force, and sample height. It can also calculate stacks, which reveal how sample's response to deformation changes with indentation depth. AtomicJ analyzes force curves concurrently on multiple threads, which allows for high speed of analysis. It runs on all popular operating systems, including Windows, Linux, and Macintosh.

  8. Identification and Differentiation of Monilinia Species Causing Brown Rot of Pome and Stone Fruit using High-Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis.

    PubMed

    Papavasileiou, Antonios; Madesis, Panagiotis B; Karaoglanidis, George S

    2016-09-01

    Brown rot is a devastating disease of stone fruit caused by Monilinia spp. Among these species, Monilinia fructicola is a quarantine pathogen in Europe but has recently been detected in several European countries. Identification of brown rot agents relies on morphological differences or use of molecular methods requiring fungal isolation. The current study was initiated to develop and validate a high-resolution melting (HRM) method for the identification of the Monilinia spp. and for the detection of M. fructicola among other brown rot pathogens. Based on the sequence of the cytb intron from M. laxa, M. fructicola, M. fructigena, M. mumecola, M. linhartiana, and M. yunnanensis isolates originating from several countries, a pair of universal primers for species identification and a pair of primers specific to M. fructicola were designed. The specificity of the primers was verified to ensure against cross-reaction with other fungal species. The melting curve analysis using the universal primers generated six different HRM curve profiles, each one specific for each species. Τhe HRM analysis primers specific to M. fructicola amplified a 120-bp region with a distinct melt profile corresponding to the presence of M. fructicola, regardless of the presence of other species. HRM analysis can be a useful tool for rapid identification and differentiation of the six Monilinia spp. using a single primer pair. This novel assay has the potential for simultaneous identification and differentiation of the closely related Monilinia spp. as well as for the differentiation of M. fructicola from other common pathogens or saprophytes that may occur on the diseased fruit. PMID:27247082

  9. Retrospective North American CFL Experience Curve Analysis and Correlation to Deployment Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Sarah J.; Wei, Max; Sohn, Michael D.

    2015-07-01

    Retrospective experience curves are a useful tool for understanding historic technology development, and can contribute to investment program analysis and future cost estimation efforts. This work documents our development of an analysis approach for deriving retrospective experience curves with a variable learning rate, and its application to develop an experience curve for compact fluorescent lamps for the global and North American markets over the years 1990-2007. Uncertainties and assumptions involved in interpreting data for our experience curve development are discussed, including the processing and transformation of empirical data, the selection of system boundaries, and the identification of historical changes in the learning rate over the course of 15 years. In the results that follow, we find that that the learning rate has changed at least once from 1990-2007. We also explore if, and to what degree, public deployment programs may have contributed to an increased technology learning rate in North America. We observe correlations between the changes in the learning rate and the initiation of new policies, abrupt technological advances, including improvements to ballast technology, and economic and political events such as trade tariffs and electricity prices. Finally, we discuss how the findings of this work (1) support the use of segmented experience curves for retrospective and prospective analysis and (2) may imply that investments in technological research and development have contributed to a change in market adoption and penetration.

  10. Oxidation and melting of aluminum nanopowders.

    PubMed

    Trunov, Mikhaylo A; Umbrajkar, Swati M; Schoenitz, Mirko; Mang, Joseph T; Dreizin, Edward L

    2006-07-01

    Recently, nanometer-sized aluminum powders became available commercially, and their use as potential additives to propellants, explosives, and pyrotechnics has attracted significant interest. It has been suggested that very low melting temperatures are expected for nanosized aluminum powders and that such low melting temperatures could accelerate oxidation and trigger ignition much earlier than for regular, micron-sized aluminum powders. The objective of this work was to investigate experimentally the melting and oxidation behavior of nanosized aluminum powders. Powder samples with three different nominal sizes of 44, 80, and 121 nm were provided by Nanotechnologies Inc. The particle size distributions were measured using small-angle X-ray scattering. Melting was studied by differential scanning calorimetry where the powders were heated from room temperature to 750 degrees C in an argon environment. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to measure the mass increase indicative of oxidation while the powders were heated in an oxygen-argon gas mixture. The measured melting curves were compared to those computed using the experimental particle size distributions and thermodynamic models describing the melting temperature and enthalpy as functions of the particle size. The melting behavior predicted by different models correlated with the experimental observations only qualitatively. Characteristic stepwise oxidation was observed for all studied nanopowders. The observed oxidation behavior was well interpreted considering the recently established kinetics of oxidation of micron-sized aluminum powders. No correlation was found between the melting and oxidation of aluminum nanopowders.

  11. Hybrid analysis (barcode-high resolution melting) for authentication of Thai herbal products, Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Wall.ex Nees

    PubMed Central

    Osathanunkul, Maslin; Suwannapoom, Chatmongkon; Khamyong, Nuttaluck; Pintakum, Danupol; Lamphun, Santisuk Na; Triwitayakorn, Kanokporn; Osathanunkul, Kitisak; Madesis, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Background: Andrographis paniculata Nees is a medicinal plant with multiple pharmacological properties. It has been used over many centuries as a household remedy. A. paniculata products sold on the markets are in processed forms so it is difficult to authenticate. Therefore buying the herbal products poses a high-risk of acquiring counterfeited, substituted and/or adulterated products. Due to these issues, a reliable method to authenticate products is needed. Materials and Methods: High resolution melting analysis coupled with DNA barcoding (Bar-HRM) was applied to detect adulteration in commercial herbal products. The rbcL barcode was selected to use in primers design for HRM analysis to produce standard melting profile of A. paniculata species. DNA of the tested commercial products was isolated and their melting profiles were then generated and compared with the standard A. paniculata. Results: The melting profiles of the rbcL amplicons of the three closely related herbal species (A. paniculata, Acanthus ebracteatus and Rhinacanthus nasutus) are clearly separated so that they can be distinguished by the developed method. The method was then used to authenticate commercial herbal products. HRM curves of all 10 samples tested are similar to A. paniculata which indicated that all tested products were contained the correct species as labeled. Conclusion: The method described in this study has been proved to be useful in aiding identification and/or authenticating A. paniculata. This Bar-HRM analysis has allowed us easily to determine the A. paniculata species in herbal products on the markets even they are in processed forms. SUMMARY We propose the use of DNA barcoding combined with High Resolution Melting analysis for authenticating of Andrographis paniculata products.The developed method can be used regardless of the type of the DNA template (fresh or dried tissue, leaf, and stem).rbcL region was chosen for the analysis and work well with our samplesWe can easily

  12. Detection of Indel Mutations in Drosophila by High-Resolution Melt Analysis (HRMA).

    PubMed

    Housden, Benjamin E; Perrimon, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Although CRISPR technology allows specific genome alterations to be created with relative ease, detection of these events can be problematic. For example, CRISPR-induced double-strand breaks are often repaired imprecisely to generate unpredictable short indel mutations. Detection of these events requires the use of molecular screening techniques such as endonuclease assays, restriction profiling, or high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA). Here, we provide detailed protocols for HRMA-based mutation screening in Drosophila and analysis of the resulting data using the online tool HRMAnalyzer. PMID:27587781

  13. Soil hydraulic properties estimate based on numerical analysis of disc infiltrometer three-dimensional infiltration curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre, Borja; Peña-Sancho, Carolina; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafaël; Moret-Fernández, David

    2015-04-01

    Measurement of soil hydraulic properties is of paramount importance in fields such as agronomy, hydrology or soil science. Fundamented on the analysis of the Haverkamp et al. (1994) model, the aim of this paper is to explain a technique to estimate the soil hydraulic properties (sorptivity, S, and hydraulic conductivity, K) from the full-time cumulative infiltration curves. The method (NSH) was validated by means of 12 synthetic infiltration curves generated with HYDRUS-3D from known soil hydraulic properties. The K values used to simulate the synthetic curves were compared to those estimated with the proposed method. A procedure to identify and remove the effect of the contact sand layer on the cumulative infiltration curve was also developed. A sensitivity analysis was performed using the water level measurement as uncertainty source. Finally, the procedure was evaluated using different infiltration times and data noise. Since a good correlation between the K used in HYDRUS-3D to model the infiltration curves and those estimated by the NSH method was obtained, (R2 =0.98), it can be concluded that this technique is robust enough to estimate the soil hydraulic conductivity from complete infiltration curves. The numerical procedure to detect and remove the influence of the contact sand layer on the K and S estimates seemed to be robust and efficient. An effect of the curve infiltration noise on the K estimate was observed, which uncertainty increased with increasing noise. Finally, the results showed that infiltration time was an important factor to estimate K. Lower values of K or smaller uncertainty needed longer infiltration times.

  14. Taxometrics, Polytomous Constructs, and the Comparison Curve Fit Index: A Monte Carlo Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Glenn D.; McGrath, Robert E.; Knight, Raymond A.

    2010-01-01

    The taxometric method effectively distinguishes between dimensional (1-class) and taxonic (2-class) latent structure, but there is virtually no information on how it responds to polytomous (3-class) latent structure. A Monte Carlo analysis showed that the mean comparison curve fit index (CCFI; Ruscio, Haslam, & Ruscio, 2006) obtained with 3…

  15. Aptitude-Treatment Interaction Effects on Explicit Rule Learning: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwu, Fenfang; Pan, Wei; Sun, Shuyan

    2014-01-01

    Finding the match between individuals and educational treatments is the aim of both educators and the aptitude-treatment interaction research paradigm. Using the latent growth curve analysis, the present study investigates the interaction between the type of explicit instructional approaches (deductive vs. explicit-inductive) and the level of…

  16. Policy Effectiveness and the Slopes of IS and LM Curves: A Graphical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revier, Charles F.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the IS-LM model providing a graphical analysis designed to clarify the confusion induced by misleading statements in several major macroeconomics textbooks concerning the connection between policy effectiveness and the slopes of the IS and LM curves. Includes references. (CMK)

  17. IMAGE-PLANE ANALYSIS OF n-POINT-MASS LENS CRITICAL CURVES AND CAUSTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Danek, Kamil; Heyrovský, David E-mail: heyrovsky@utf.mff.cuni.cz

    2015-06-10

    The interpretation of gravitational microlensing events caused by planetary systems or multiple stars is based on the n-point-mass lens model. The first planets detected by microlensing were well described by the two-point-mass model of a star with one planet. By the end of 2014, four events involving three-point-mass lenses had been announced. Two of the lenses were stars with two planetary companions each; two were binary stars with a planet orbiting one component. While the two-point-mass model is well understood, the same cannot be said for lenses with three or more components. Even the range of possible critical-curve topologies and caustic geometries of the three-point-mass lens remains unknown. In this paper we provide new tools for mapping the critical-curve topology and caustic cusp number in the parameter space of n-point-mass lenses. We perform our analysis in the image plane of the lens. We show that all contours of the Jacobian are critical curves of re-scaled versions of the lens configuration. Utilizing this property further, we introduce the cusp curve to identify cusp-image positions on all contours simultaneously. In order to track cusp-number changes in caustic metamorphoses, we define the morph curve, which pinpoints the positions of metamorphosis-point images along the cusp curve. We demonstrate the usage of both curves on simple two- and three-point-mass lens examples. For the three simplest caustic metamorphoses we illustrate the local structure of the image and source planes.

  18. Progress curve analysis of qRT-PCR reactions using the logistic growth equation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meile; Udhe-Stone, Claudia; Goudar, Chetan T

    2011-01-01

    We present an alternate approach for analyzing data from real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) experiments by fitting individual fluorescence vs. cycle number (F vs. C) curves to the logistic growth equation. The best fit parameters determined by nonlinear least squares were used to compute the second derivative of the logistic equation and the cycle threshold, C(t), was determined from the maximum value of the second derivative. This C(t) value was subsequently used to determine ΔΔC(t) and the amplification efficiency, E(n), thereby completing the analysis on a qRT-PCR data set. The robustness of the logistic approach was verified by testing ~600 F vs. C curves using both new and previously published data sets. In most cases, comparisons were made between the logistic estimates and those from the standard curve and comparative C(t) methods. Deviations between the logistic and standard curve method ranged between 3-10% for C(t) estimates, 2-10% for ΔΔC(t) estimates, and 1-11% for E(n) estimates. The correlations between C(t) estimates from the logistic and standard curve methods were very high, often >0.95. When compared with five other established methods of qRT-PCR data analysis to predict initial concentrations of two genes encompassing a total of 500 F vs. C curves, the logistic estimates were of comparable accuracy. This reliable performance of the logistic approach comes without the need to construct standard curves which can be a laborious undertaking. Also, no a priori assumptions for E(n) are necessary while some other methods assume equal E(n) values for the reference and target genes, an assumption that is not universally valid. In addition, by accurately describing the data in the plateau region of the F vs. C curve, the logistic method overcomes the limitations of the sigmoidal curve fitting method. The streamlined nature of the logistic approach makes it ideal for complete automation on a variety of computing

  19. Characterizing Decision-Analysis Performances of Risk Prediction Models Using ADAPT Curves

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Chung; Wu, Yun-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve is a widely used index to characterize the performance of diagnostic tests and prediction models. However, the index does not explicitly acknowledge the utilities of risk predictions. Moreover, for most clinical settings, what counts is whether a prediction model can guide therapeutic decisions in a way that improves patient outcomes, rather than to simply update probabilities. Based on decision theory, the authors propose an alternative index, the “average deviation about the probability threshold” (ADAPT). An ADAPT curve (a plot of ADAPT value against the probability threshold) neatly characterizes the decision-analysis performances of a risk prediction model. Several prediction models can be compared for their ADAPT values at a chosen probability threshold, for a range of plausible threshold values, or for the whole ADAPT curves. This should greatly facilitate the selection of diagnostic tests and prediction models. PMID:26765451

  20. Segmented coupled-wave analysis of a curved wire-grid polarizer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyun; Sim, Eunji

    2008-03-01

    The performance of a wire-grid polarizer (WGP) on a curved surface was investigated with a simple numerical model. The computation model combines rigorous coupled-wave analysis with piecewise linear segmentation that approximates a curved surface for two bending configurations. A curvature-induced Rayleigh anomaly is found to be the main performance degradation mechanism that reduces transmittance and polarization contrast. A WGP on a curved surface is more likely to incur the Rayleigh anomaly with smaller surface curvature. For a given curvature, a larger WGP is more vulnerable. Effects of polar and azimuthal incidence angles were also analyzed. Suggestions were made in regard to a WGP design that minimizes the performance degradation.

  1. Effects of variable recruitment on catch-curve analysis for crappie populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    Catch-curve analysis is frequently used to estimate total annual mortality (A) of exploited fishes, but the method assumes constant recruitment. Because populations of crappie Pomoxis spp. have exhibited large fluctuations in recruitment, I conducted simulations to assess the amount of variability in recruitment that precludes the use of a catch curve and compared results to recruitment dynamics in six crappie populations. Coefficients of variation (CV = 100 ?? SD/mean) in recruitment to age 1 ranged from 55% to 84% among the six crappie populations. Simulations suggested that recruitment variability in these ranges would likely allow estimation of A within ?? 10%, but the probability of obtaining estimates of A that were ??5% or more of the true A would exceed 0.15. I suggest that catch curves may be used to approximate A in crappie populations but that managers should consider the effects on management recommendations if A were ??10% of the estimated A.

  2. Practical Prediction of Ten Common Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes/Serogroups in One PCR Reaction by Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification and Melting Curve (MLPA-MC) Assay in Shenzhen, China

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lei; Zou, Jianhua; Jin, Ping; Hu, Yanwei; Kudinha, Timothy; Kong, Fanrong; Chen, Xu; Wang, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae has more than 95 distinct serotypes described to date. However, only certain serotypes are more likely to cause pneumococcal diseases. Thus serotype surveillance is important for vaccine formula design as well as in post-vaccine serotype shift monitor. The goal of this study was to develop a practical screening assay for ten Shenzhen China common pneumococcal serotypes/serogroups in one molecular reaction. Methods A molecular assay, based on multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and melting curve (MC) analysis, was developed in an integrated approach (MLPA-MC) for the detection of ten capsular serotypes/serogroups 4, 6 (6A/6B/6C/6D), 9V/9A, 14, 15F/15A, 15B/15C, 18 (18F/18A/18B/18C), 19F, 19A and 23F. We designed serotype/serogroup-specific MLPA probes and fluorescent detection probes to discriminate the different serotypes/serogroups in one molecular reaction. The three steps of MLPA-MC assay are continuous reactions in one well detected by LightCycler 480. A total of 210 S. pneumoniae isolates from our local Maternity and Child Health Hospital were randomly chosen to evaluate the assay against published multiplex PCR assays. Results Our results showed that 198 (94.3%) of S. pneumoniae isolates were type-able by our assays and the results were in complete concordance with the published multiplex PCRs. Using the MLPA-MC assay, 96 S. pneumoniae isolates could be typed within 3 hours with limited hands-on time. This serotype/serogroup-screening assay can be easily modified or extended by modification of the serotype/serogroup-specific MLPA probes combinations according to the needs of different laboratories. Conclusions We recommend use of this assay as a starting point for screening serotype/serogroup frequencies. There is a need for this assay to be combined with other molecular typing assays, like published serotype specific PCRs, or even the Quellung reaction for serotype confirmation. PMID:26151828

  3. The analysis of dose-response curve from bioassays with quantal response: Deterministic or statistical approaches?

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, G; Sfara, V

    2016-04-25

    Dose-response relations can be obtained from systems at any structural level of biological matter, from the molecular to the organismic level. There are two types of approaches for analyzing dose-response curves: a deterministic approach, based on the law of mass action, and a statistical approach, based on the assumed probabilities distribution of phenotypic characters. Models based on the law of mass action have been proposed to analyze dose-response relations across the entire range of biological systems. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the principles that determine the dose-response relations. Dose-response curves of simple systems are the result of chemical interactions between reacting molecules, and therefore are supported by the law of mass action. In consequence, the shape of these curves is perfectly sustained by physicochemical features. However, dose-response curves of bioassays with quantal response are not explained by the simple collision of molecules but by phenotypic variations among individuals and can be interpreted as individual tolerances. The expression of tolerance is the result of many genetic and environmental factors and thus can be considered a random variable. In consequence, the shape of its associated dose-response curve has no physicochemical bearings; instead, they are originated from random biological variations. Due to the randomness of tolerance there is no reason to use deterministic equations for its analysis; on the contrary, statistical models are the appropriate tools for analyzing these dose-response relations.

  4. The analysis of dose-response curve from bioassays with quantal response: Deterministic or statistical approaches?

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, G; Sfara, V

    2016-04-25

    Dose-response relations can be obtained from systems at any structural level of biological matter, from the molecular to the organismic level. There are two types of approaches for analyzing dose-response curves: a deterministic approach, based on the law of mass action, and a statistical approach, based on the assumed probabilities distribution of phenotypic characters. Models based on the law of mass action have been proposed to analyze dose-response relations across the entire range of biological systems. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the principles that determine the dose-response relations. Dose-response curves of simple systems are the result of chemical interactions between reacting molecules, and therefore are supported by the law of mass action. In consequence, the shape of these curves is perfectly sustained by physicochemical features. However, dose-response curves of bioassays with quantal response are not explained by the simple collision of molecules but by phenotypic variations among individuals and can be interpreted as individual tolerances. The expression of tolerance is the result of many genetic and environmental factors and thus can be considered a random variable. In consequence, the shape of its associated dose-response curve has no physicochemical bearings; instead, they are originated from random biological variations. Due to the randomness of tolerance there is no reason to use deterministic equations for its analysis; on the contrary, statistical models are the appropriate tools for analyzing these dose-response relations. PMID:26952004

  5. A computational model-based validation of Guyton's analysis of cardiac output and venous return curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Cohen, R. J.; Mark, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    Guyton developed a popular approach for understanding the factors responsible for cardiac output (CO) regulation in which 1) the heart-lung unit and systemic circulation are independently characterized via CO and venous return (VR) curves, and 2) average CO and right atrial pressure (RAP) of the intact circulation are predicted by graphically intersecting the curves. However, this approach is virtually impossible to verify experimentally. We theoretically evaluated the approach with respect to a nonlinear, computational model of the pulsatile heart and circulation. We developed two sets of open circulation models to generate CO and VR curves, differing by the manner in which average RAP was varied. One set applied constant RAPs, while the other set applied pulsatile RAPs. Accurate prediction of intact, average CO and RAP was achieved only by intersecting the CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs because of the pulsatility and nonlinearity (e.g., systemic venous collapse) of the intact model. The CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs were also practically independent. This theoretical study therefore supports the validity of Guyton's graphical analysis.

  6. Analysis of the nonlinear dynamics of a 2-axle freight wagon in curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Gialleonardo, Egidio; Bruni, Stefano; True, Hans

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the study of the nonlinear dynamic behaviour of 2-axle freight wagons in curves, considering the case of one single wagon (neglecting inter-car coupling forces) and of multiple wagons interacting through the buffers and the couplers. A multi-body model of a single wagon and of a three-car assembly is introduced, paying particular attention to the nonlinear and nonsmooth modelling of the suspensions and of the inter-car coupling elements. Using this model, a numerical analysis of the steady-state solution reached after the negotiation of curve transition is presented and bifurcations are identified for some particular values of the curve radius. For the single car case, it is shown that depending on the curve radius and the vehicle speed the carbody may experience severe periodic oscillations at speeds lying in the operating range of the vehicle. For the car-assembly case, it is shown that the coupling forces exchanged by the wagons significantly affect their dynamics in a curve, reducing the amplitude of vibration.

  7. Analytical Problems and Suggestions in the Analysis of Behavioral Economic Demand Curves.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jihnhee; Liu, Liu; Collins, R Lorraine; Vincent, Paula C; Epstein, Leonard H

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral economic demand curves (Hursh, Raslear, Shurtleff, Bauman, & Simmons, 1988) are innovative approaches to characterize the relationships between consumption of a substance and its price. In this article, we investigate common analytical issues in the use of behavioral economic demand curves, which can cause inconsistent interpretations of demand curves, and then we provide methodological suggestions to address those analytical issues. We first demonstrate that log transformation with different added values for handling zeros changes model parameter estimates dramatically. Second, demand curves are often analyzed using an overparameterized model that results in an inefficient use of the available data and a lack of assessment of the variability among individuals. To address these issues, we apply a nonlinear mixed effects model based on multivariate error structures that has not been used previously to analyze behavioral economic demand curves in the literature. We also propose analytical formulas for the relevant standard errors of derived values such as P max, O max, and elasticity. The proposed model stabilizes the derived values regardless of using different added increments and provides substantially smaller standard errors. We illustrate the data analysis procedure using data from a relative reinforcement efficacy study of simulated marijuana purchasing. PMID:26741176

  8. Learning Factors Transfer Analysis: Using Learning Curve Analysis to Automatically Generate Domain Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlik, Philip I. Jr.; Cen, Hao; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method to create a quantitative model of an educational content domain of related practice item-types using learning curves. By using a pairwise test to search for the relationships between learning curves for these item-types, we show how the test results in a set of pairwise transfer relationships that can be…

  9. ATWS Analysis with an Advanced Boiling Curve Approach within COBRA 3-CP

    SciTech Connect

    Gensler, A.; Knoll, A.; Kuehnel, K.

    2007-07-01

    In 2005 the German Reactor Safety Commission issued specific requirements on core coolability demonstration for PWR ATWS (anticipated transients without scram). Thereupon AREVA NP performed detailed analyses for all German PWRs. For a German KONVOI plant the results of an ATWS licensing analysis are presented. The plant dynamic behavior is calculated with NLOOP, while the hot channel analysis is performed with the thermal hydraulic computer code COBRA 3-CP. The application of the fuel rod model included in COBRA 3-CP is essential for this type of analysis. Since DNB (departure from nucleate boiling) occurs, the advanced post DNB model (advanced boiling curve approach) of COBRA 3-CP is used. The results are compared with those gained with the standard BEEST model. The analyzed ATWS case is the emergency power case 'loss of main heat sink with station service power supply unavailable'. Due to the decreasing coolant flow rate during the transient the core attains film boiling conditions. The results of the hot channel analysis strongly depend on the performance of the boiling curve model. The BEEST model is based on pool boiling conditions whereas typical PWR conditions - even in most transients - are characterized by forced flow for which the advanced boiling curve approach is particularly suitable. Compared with the BEEST model the advanced boiling curve approach in COBRA 3-CP yields earlier rewetting, i.e. a shorter period in film boiling. Consequently, the fuel rod cladding temperatures, that increase significantly due to film boiling, drop back earlier and the high temperature oxidation is significantly diminished. The Baker-Just-Correlation was used to calculate the value of equivalent cladding reacted (ECR), i.e. the reduction of cladding thickness due to corrosion throughout the transient. Based on the BEEST model the ECR value amounts to 0.4% whereas the advanced boiling curve only leads to an ECR value of 0.2%. Both values provide large margins to the 17

  10. Better P-curves: Making P-curve analysis more robust to errors, fraud, and ambitious P-hacking, a Reply to Ulrich and Miller (2015).

    PubMed

    Simonsohn, Uri; Simmons, Joseph P; Nelson, Leif D

    2015-12-01

    When studies examine true effects, they generate right-skewed p-curves, distributions of statistically significant results with more low (.01 s) than high (.04 s) p values. What else can cause a right-skewed p-curve? First, we consider the possibility that researchers report only the smallest significant p value (as conjectured by Ulrich & Miller, 2015), concluding that it is a very uncommon problem. We then consider more common problems, including (a) p-curvers selecting the wrong p values, (b) fake data, (c) honest errors, and (d) ambitiously p-hacked (beyond p < .05) results. We evaluate the impact of these common problems on the validity of p-curve analysis, and provide practical solutions that substantially increase its robustness. PMID:26595842

  11. Better P-curves: Making P-curve analysis more robust to errors, fraud, and ambitious P-hacking, a Reply to Ulrich and Miller (2015).

    PubMed

    Simonsohn, Uri; Simmons, Joseph P; Nelson, Leif D

    2015-12-01

    When studies examine true effects, they generate right-skewed p-curves, distributions of statistically significant results with more low (.01 s) than high (.04 s) p values. What else can cause a right-skewed p-curve? First, we consider the possibility that researchers report only the smallest significant p value (as conjectured by Ulrich & Miller, 2015), concluding that it is a very uncommon problem. We then consider more common problems, including (a) p-curvers selecting the wrong p values, (b) fake data, (c) honest errors, and (d) ambitiously p-hacked (beyond p < .05) results. We evaluate the impact of these common problems on the validity of p-curve analysis, and provide practical solutions that substantially increase its robustness.

  12. High resolution melting analysis as a new approach to discriminate gluten-containing cereals.

    PubMed

    Martín-Fernández, Begoña; Costa, Joana; de-Los-Santos-Álvarez, Noemí; López-Ruiz, Beatriz; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Mafra, Isabel

    2016-11-15

    With this work, it is intended to propose a novel approach based on high resolution melting (HRM) analysis to detect wheat and discriminate it from other gluten-containing cereals. The method consisted of a real-time PCR assay targeting the gene encoding for the germ agglutinin isolectin A protein (Tri a 18 allergen), using the fluorescent Evagreen dye combined with HRM analysis. The results enabled wheat differentiation from other phylogenetically related cereals, namely barley, rye and oat with high level of confidence. Additionally, a quantitative real-time PCR approach was proposed, allowing detecting and quantifying wheat down to 20mg/kg in rice flour and 20pg of wheat DNA (∼1.1 DNA copies). Its application was successfully achieved in the analysis of processed foods to verify labelling compliance, being considered as a cost-effective tool for the specific detection of cereals in gluten-free foods. PMID:27283646

  13. High resolution melting analysis as a new approach to discriminate gluten-containing cereals.

    PubMed

    Martín-Fernández, Begoña; Costa, Joana; de-Los-Santos-Álvarez, Noemí; López-Ruiz, Beatriz; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Mafra, Isabel

    2016-11-15

    With this work, it is intended to propose a novel approach based on high resolution melting (HRM) analysis to detect wheat and discriminate it from other gluten-containing cereals. The method consisted of a real-time PCR assay targeting the gene encoding for the germ agglutinin isolectin A protein (Tri a 18 allergen), using the fluorescent Evagreen dye combined with HRM analysis. The results enabled wheat differentiation from other phylogenetically related cereals, namely barley, rye and oat with high level of confidence. Additionally, a quantitative real-time PCR approach was proposed, allowing detecting and quantifying wheat down to 20mg/kg in rice flour and 20pg of wheat DNA (∼1.1 DNA copies). Its application was successfully achieved in the analysis of processed foods to verify labelling compliance, being considered as a cost-effective tool for the specific detection of cereals in gluten-free foods.

  14. Genotyping of classical swine fever virus using high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Titov, Ilya; Tsybanov, Sodnom; Malogolovkin, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Discrimination between different field and vaccine strains of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is crucial for meaningful disease diagnosis and epidemiological investigation. In this study, a rapid method for differentiating vaccine strains and outbreak CSFV isolates by combined RT-PCR and high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis has been developed. The assay is based on PCR amplification of short fragments from the most variable region of CSFVgene E2, followed by HRM analysis of amplicons. Real-Time PCR/HRM for CSFV detection and differentiation analysis has sensitivity comparable to RT-qPCR and genotyping resolution comparable to E2 nucleotide sequencing. This assay in one step enables rapid and sensitive identification and genotype discrimination of CSFV in field samples, and thus will be valuable for CSF outbreak response and disease control. PMID:26300371

  15. Position-dependent texture analysis of melt-textured YBCO by means of electron backscatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblischka-Veneva, A.; Koblischka, M. R.; Ogasawara, K.; Murakami, M.

    2003-10-01

    The texture and phase distribution of melt-textured YBa 2Cu 3O x (YBCO) was studied by means of automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis as a function of the position in the bulk pellet of 4 cm diameter. A total of five samples was cut from the pellet; four samples from the surface of the bulk with different distances to the seed crystal, and one cut in vertical direction in the middle of the pellet. The melt-textured YBCO samples require a two-phase analysis to be performed, so a high surface quality is necessary to enable an automated EBSD scan. Good quality Kikuchi patterns are obtained from both the 1 2 3 and 2 1 1 phases. We found an inhomogeneous distribution of the 2 1 1 particles. Whereas the samples cut from the surface contain a large amount of 2 1 1 particles, in the samples of the vertical direction only traces of 2 1 1 particles are found. Furthermore, we measured the misorientation angle distribution of all samples. The data are presented in form of phase mappings, misorientation distribution functions and pole figures.

  16. Robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy: analysis of an experienced open surgeon's learning curve after 300 procedures.

    PubMed

    Doumerc, Nicolas; Yuen, Carlo; Savdie, Richard; Rahman, Md Bayzidur; Pe Benito, Ruth; Stricker, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    To critically analyse the learning curve for a single experienced open surgeon converting to robotic surgery. From February 2006 to July 2009, 300 patients underwent a robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) by a single urologist. This study is a prospective analysis of the baseline patient and tumour characteristics, intraoperative and postoperative data, and histopathologic features. To analyse the RALP learning curve, the joinpoint regression method was used. Mean age of the patient was 61.3 years (range 46-76). Mean pre-operative PSA level was 7 ng/ml (range 0.7-41), and follow-up was 14 months (0.7-41). The mean operating time was 185 min (range 119-525). One hundred and ten cases were required to achieve 3-h proficiency. There were no conversions. The mean hospital stay was 2.8 days (range 2-7). Major complications rate was 1.3%. The blood transfusion rate was 0.6%. The overall positive surgical margin (PSM) rate was 21.3%. pT2 and pT3 PSM rate was 10 and 44%, respectively. The joinpoint regression method showed that the learning curve started to plateau for the overall PSM rate after 205 cases (95% CI 200-249). For pT2 and pT3, PSM rate, the learning curve tended to flatten after 130 and 170 cases, respectively. The analysis of an experienced open surgeon learning curve in transferring his skills to the robotic platform has shown that 3-h proficiency requires 110 cases. The overall, pT2, and pT3 PSM rate take approximately 200, 130, and 170 cases, respectively, to flatten. PMID:27628635

  17. Rapid and Reliable Detection of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) Gene Mutations in Han Chinese Using High-Resolution Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing-bin; Xu, Hong-ping; Xiong, Can; Ren, Zhao-rui; Tian, Guo-li; Zeng, Fanyi; Huang, Shu-zhen

    2010-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, an X-linked inherited disease, is one of the most common enzymopathies and affects over 400 million people worldwide. In China at least 21 distinct point mutations have been identified so far. In this study high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was used to screen for G6PD mutations in 260 unrelated Han Chinese individuals, and the rapidity and reliability of this method was investigated. The mutants were readily differentiated by using HRM analysis, which produced distinct melting curves for each tested mutation. Interestingly, G1388A and G1376T, the two most common variants accounting for 50% to 60% of G6PD deficiency mutations in the Chinese population, could be differentiated in a single reaction. Further, two G6PD mutations not previously reported in the Chinese population were identified in this study. One of these mutations, designated “G6PD Jiangxi G1340T,” involved a G1340T substitution in exon 11, predicting a Gly447Val change in the protein. The other mutation involved a C406T substitution in exon 5. The frequencies of the common polymorphism site C1311T/IVS (intervening sequence) XI t93c between patients with G6PD and healthy volunteers were not significantly different. Thus, HRM analysis will be a useful alternative for screening G6PD mutations. PMID:20203002

  18. Rapid and reliable detection of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) gene mutations in Han Chinese using high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing-bin; Xu, Hong-ping; Xiong, Can; Ren, Zhao-rui; Tian, Guo-li; Zeng, Fanyi; Huang, Shu-zhen

    2010-05-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, an X-linked inherited disease, is one of the most common enzymopathies and affects over 400 million people worldwide. In China at least 21 distinct point mutations have been identified so far. In this study high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was used to screen for G6PD mutations in 260 unrelated Han Chinese individuals, and the rapidity and reliability of this method was investigated. The mutants were readily differentiated by using HRM analysis, which produced distinct melting curves for each tested mutation. Interestingly, G1388A and G1376T, the two most common variants accounting for 50% to 60% of G6PD deficiency mutations in the Chinese population, could be differentiated in a single reaction. Further, two G6PD mutations not previously reported in the Chinese population were identified in this study. One of these mutations, designated "G6PD Jiangxi G1340T," involved a G1340T substitution in exon 11, predicting a Gly447Val change in the protein. The other mutation involved a C406T substitution in exon 5. The frequencies of the common polymorphism site C1311T/IVS (intervening sequence) XI t93c between patients with G6PD and healthy volunteers were not significantly different. Thus, HRM analysis will be a useful alternative for screening G6PD mutations. PMID:20203002

  19. Nonlinear calibration curves in secondary ion mass spectrometry for quantitative analysis of gesi heterostructures with nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, M. N.; Drozdov, Yu. N.; Novikov, A. V.; Yunin, P. A.; Yurasov, D. V.

    2016-03-01

    For the first time in the practice of secondary ion mass spectrometry, we obtained a nonlinear calibration curve for the ratio of the cluster and elementary secondary ions of germanium Ge2/Ge without secondary ions of silicon, which enables the quantification of germanium in Ge x Si1- x heterostructures in the entire range of 0 < x ≤ 1. We developed a method for quantitative lateral analysis based on the plotting of a lateral map of x. An algorithm to identify and analyze the lateral heterogeneity of x in Ge x Si1- x heterostructures with 3D clusters by comparing the results of depth profiling analysis, obtained using linear and nonlinear calibration curves, is developed, and concentration x in the self-assembled nanoislands is determined.

  20. Mathematical analysis of the heart rate performance curve during incremental exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Rosic, G; Pantovic, S; Niciforovic, J; Colovic, V; Rankovic, V; Obradovic, Z; Rosic, Mirko

    2011-03-01

    In this study we performed laboratory treadmill protocols of increasing load. Heart rate was continuously recorded and blood lactate concentration was measured for determination of lactate threshold by means of LTD-max and LT4.0 methods.Our results indicate that the shape of heart rate performance curve (HRPC) during incremental testing depends on the applied exercise protocol (change of initial speed and the step of running speed increase, with the constant stage duration). Depending on the applied protocol, the HRPC can be described by linear, polynomial (S-shaped), and exponential mathematical expression.We presented mathematical procedure for estimation of heart rate threshold points at the level of LTD-max and LT4.0, by means of exponential curve and its relative deflection from the initial trend line (tangent line to exponential curve at the point of starting heart rate). The relative deflection of exponential curve from the initial trend line at the level of LTD-max and/or LT4.0 can be defined, based on the slope of the initial trend line. Using originally developed software that allows mathematical analysis of heart rate-load relation, LTD-max and/or LT4.0 can be estimated without direct measurement of blood lactate concentration.

  1. Improving Accuracy and Temporal Resolution of Learning Curve Estimation for within- and across-Session Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tabelow, Karsten; König, Reinhard; Polzehl, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of learning curves is ubiquitously based on proportions of correct responses within moving trial windows. Thereby, it is tacitly assumed that learning performance is constant within the moving windows, which, however, is often not the case. In the present study we demonstrate that violations of this assumption lead to systematic errors in the analysis of learning curves, and we explored the dependency of these errors on window size, different statistical models, and learning phase. To reduce these errors in the analysis of single-subject data as well as on the population level, we propose adequate statistical methods for the estimation of learning curves and the construction of confidence intervals, trial by trial. Applied to data from an avoidance learning experiment with rodents, these methods revealed performance changes occurring at multiple time scales within and across training sessions which were otherwise obscured in the conventional analysis. Our work shows that the proper assessment of the behavioral dynamics of learning at high temporal resolution can shed new light on specific learning processes, and, thus, allows to refine existing learning concepts. It further disambiguates the interpretation of neurophysiological signal changes recorded during training in relation to learning. PMID:27303809

  2. Light curve solution and orbital period analysis of the contact binary V842 Herculis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selam, S. O.; Albayrak, B.; Şenavci, H. V.; Aksu, O.

    2005-10-01

    New photoelectric BV light curves were obtained for the neglected eclipsing binary V842 Her at the TÜB{İTAK National Observatory (TUG) and studied for the first time in detail to determine the orbital parameters and geometry of the system. The solutions obtained simultaneously for the new light curves and the radial velocity curves in the literature by using the Wilson-Devinney code reveal a typical W-type contact system. The light curves exhibit the so-called O'Connell effect which the level of the primary maxima being higher than that of the secondary ones in both pass-bands. The O'Connell effect in the light curves is explained in terms of a dark-spot located on the more massive component which makes the more massive larger component slightly cooler than the less massive smaller one. The O-C diagram constructed for all available times of minima of V842 Her exhibits a cyclic character superimposed on a quadratic variation. The quadratic character yields a orbital period increase with a rate of dP/dt=7.76×10-7 days yr-1 which can be attributed to the mass exchange/loss mechanism in the system. By assuming the presence of a gravitationally bound third body in the system, the analysis of the cyclic nature in the O-C diagram revealed a third body with mass of 0.4M\\sun orbiting around the eclipsing pair. The possibility of magnetic activity cycle effect as a cause for the observed cyclic variation in the O-C diagram was also discussed.

  3. Bayesian analysis of stage-fall-discharge rating curves and their uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansanarez, Valentin; Le Coz, Jérôme; Renard, Benjamin; Lang, Michel; Pierrefeu, Gilles; Le Boursicaud, Raphaël; Pobanz, Karine

    2016-04-01

    Stage-fall-discharge (SFD) rating curves are traditionally used to compute streamflow records at sites where the energy slope of the flow is variable due to variable backwater effects. Building on existing Bayesian approaches, we introduce an original hydraulics-based method for developing SFD rating curves used at twin gauge stations and estimating their uncertainties. Conventional power functions for channel and section controls are used, and transition to a backwater-affected channel control is computed based on a continuity condition, solved either analytically or numerically. The difference between the reference levels at the two stations is estimated as another uncertain parameter of the SFD model. The method proposed in this presentation incorporates information from both the hydraulic knowledge (equations of channel or section controls) and the information available in the stage-fall-discharge observations (gauging data). The obtained total uncertainty combines the parametric uncertainty and the remnant uncertainty related to the model of rating curve. This method provides a direct estimation of the physical inputs of the rating curve (roughness, width, slope bed, distance between twin gauges, etc.). The performance of the new method is tested using an application case affected by the variable backwater of a run-of-the-river dam: the Rhône river at Valence, France. In particular, a sensitivity analysis to the prior information and to the gauging dataset is performed. At that site, the stage-fall-discharge domain is well documented with gaugings conducted over a range of backwater affected and unaffected conditions. The performance of the new model was deemed to be satisfactory. Notably, transition to uniform flow when the overall range of the auxiliary stage is gauged is correctly simulated. The resulting curves are in good agreement with the observations (gaugings) and their uncertainty envelopes are acceptable for computing streamflow records. Similar

  4. Robust mean traveltime curves: a powerful tool for analysis in 2D transmission tomographic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Martinez, J.; Pedruelo Gonzalez, L.; Rector, J.

    2008-12-01

    Acoustic tomography methods belong to the class of non destructive inspection techniques and are widely used in engineering applications. One of the main issues for these methods is the direct arrivals, which can be noisy or affected by scattering or other propagation effects. Mean traveltime curves (mean and standard deviation) have been introduced by Fernández Martínez et al (2006), and describe the variation of the main statistical parameters of the traveltime distribution for the different gathering subsets as a function of the gather index. These curves constitute a simple methodology (Fernández Martínez et al., 2008) to analyze before inversion the traveltime quality in 2D acoustic transmission tomography experiments conducted in relatively homogeneous blocks. This analysis can help to discriminate the contribution of picking errors from that of geological heterogeneities. In this contribution we present the so-called robust mean traveltime curves, which refer to the variation of the different p-percentiles and related measures of dispersion (inter-quartile range and minimum absolute deviation) for the above mentioned gathering subsets. Together with the mean curve, the median and upper-quartile traveltime curves are very resistant to the presence of outliers, and thus, are preferred to infer a background velocity model, which is valid at experiment scale and honors the experimental traveltime distribution. This methodology is valid for 2D zonal isotropic or elliptical anisotropic media, explored via any arbitrary acquisition geometry. We show the application to a well-known granitic medium (Febex Project, Nagra, Switzerland). Fernández Martínez et al. 2006. Mathematical Geology:38-3.343-374 Fernández Martínez et al.2008. Computer and Geosciences:34-3,213-225, 2008.

  5. Diagnostic accuracy and receiver-operating characteristics curve analysis in surgical research and decision making.

    PubMed

    Søreide, Kjetil; Kørner, Hartwig; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2011-01-01

    In surgical research, the ability to correctly classify one type of condition or specific outcome from another is of great importance for variables influencing clinical decision making. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis is a useful tool in assessing the diagnostic accuracy of any variable with a continuous spectrum of results. In order to rule a disease state in or out with a given test, the test results are usually binary, with arbitrarily chosen cut-offs for defining disease versus health, or for grading of disease severity. In the postgenomic era, the translation from bench-to-bedside of biomarkers in various tissues and body fluids requires appropriate tools for analysis. In contrast to predetermining a cut-off value to define disease, the advantages of applying ROC analysis include the ability to test diagnostic accuracy across the entire range of variable scores and test outcomes. In addition, ROC analysis can easily examine visual and statistical comparisons across tests or scores. ROC is also favored because it is thought to be independent from the prevalence of the condition under investigation. ROC analysis is used in various surgical settings and across disciplines, including cancer research, biomarker assessment, imaging evaluation, and assessment of risk scores.With appropriate use, ROC curves may help identify the most appropriate cutoff value for clinical and surgical decision making and avoid confounding effects seen with subjective ratings. ROC curve results should always be put in perspective, because a good classifier does not guarantee the expected clinical outcome. In this review, we discuss the fundamental roles, suggested presentation, potential biases, and interpretation of ROC analysis in surgical research.

  6. Precise Detection of IDH1/2 and BRAF Hotspot Mutations in Clinical Glioma Tissues by a Differential Calculus Analysis of High-Resolution Melting Data.

    PubMed

    Hatae, Ryusuke; Hata, Nobuhiro; Yoshimoto, Koji; Kuga, Daisuke; Akagi, Yojiro; Murata, Hideki; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Iihara, Koji

    2016-01-01

    High resolution melting (HRM) is a simple and rapid method for screening mutations. It offers various advantages for clinical diagnostic applications. Conventional HRM analysis often yields equivocal results, especially for surgically obtained tissues. We attempted to improve HRM analyses for more effective applications to clinical diagnostics. HRM analyses were performed for IDH1R132 and IDH2R172 mutations in 192 clinical glioma samples in duplicate and these results were compared with sequencing results. BRAFV600E mutations were analyzed in 52 additional brain tumor samples. The melting profiles were used for differential calculus analyses. Negative second derivative plots revealed additional peaks derived from heteroduplexes in PCR products that contained mutations; this enabled unequivocal visual discrimination of the mutations. We further developed a numerical expression, the HRM-mutation index (MI), to quantify the heteroduplex-derived peak of the mutational curves. Using this expression, all IDH1 mutation statuses matched those ascertained by sequencing, with the exception of three samples. These discordant results were all derived from the misinterpretation of sequencing data. The effectiveness of our approach was further validated by analyses of IDH2R172 and BRAFV600E mutations. The present analytical method enabled an unequivocal and objective HRM analysis and is suitable for reliable mutation scanning in surgically obtained glioma tissues. This approach could facilitate molecular diagnostics in clinical environments. PMID:27529619

  7. Precise Detection of IDH1/2 and BRAF Hotspot Mutations in Clinical Glioma Tissues by a Differential Calculus Analysis of High-Resolution Melting Data.

    PubMed

    Hatae, Ryusuke; Hata, Nobuhiro; Yoshimoto, Koji; Kuga, Daisuke; Akagi, Yojiro; Murata, Hideki; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Iihara, Koji

    2016-01-01

    High resolution melting (HRM) is a simple and rapid method for screening mutations. It offers various advantages for clinical diagnostic applications. Conventional HRM analysis often yields equivocal results, especially for surgically obtained tissues. We attempted to improve HRM analyses for more effective applications to clinical diagnostics. HRM analyses were performed for IDH1R132 and IDH2R172 mutations in 192 clinical glioma samples in duplicate and these results were compared with sequencing results. BRAFV600E mutations were analyzed in 52 additional brain tumor samples. The melting profiles were used for differential calculus analyses. Negative second derivative plots revealed additional peaks derived from heteroduplexes in PCR products that contained mutations; this enabled unequivocal visual discrimination of the mutations. We further developed a numerical expression, the HRM-mutation index (MI), to quantify the heteroduplex-derived peak of the mutational curves. Using this expression, all IDH1 mutation statuses matched those ascertained by sequencing, with the exception of three samples. These discordant results were all derived from the misinterpretation of sequencing data. The effectiveness of our approach was further validated by analyses of IDH2R172 and BRAFV600E mutations. The present analytical method enabled an unequivocal and objective HRM analysis and is suitable for reliable mutation scanning in surgically obtained glioma tissues. This approach could facilitate molecular diagnostics in clinical environments.

  8. Application of the High Resolution Melting analysis for genetic mapping of Sequence Tagged Site markers in narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.).

    PubMed

    Kamel, Katarzyna A; Kroc, Magdalena; Święcicki, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Sequence tagged site (STS) markers are valuable tools for genetic and physical mapping that can be successfully used in comparative analyses among related species. Current challenges for molecular markers genotyping in plants include the lack of fast, sensitive and inexpensive methods suitable for sequence variant detection. In contrast, high resolution melting (HRM) is a simple and high-throughput assay, which has been widely applied in sequence polymorphism identification as well as in the studies of genetic variability and genotyping. The present study is the first attempt to use the HRM analysis to genotype STS markers in narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.). The sensitivity and utility of this method was confirmed by the sequence polymorphism detection based on melting curve profiles in the parental genotypes and progeny of the narrow-leafed lupin mapping population. Application of different approaches, including amplicon size and a simulated heterozygote analysis, has allowed for successful genetic mapping of 16 new STS markers in the narrow-leafed lupin genome.

  9. Precise Detection of IDH1/2 and BRAF Hotspot Mutations in Clinical Glioma Tissues by a Differential Calculus Analysis of High-Resolution Melting Data

    PubMed Central

    Hatae, Ryusuke; Yoshimoto, Koji; Kuga, Daisuke; Akagi, Yojiro; Murata, Hideki; Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Iihara, Koji

    2016-01-01

    High resolution melting (HRM) is a simple and rapid method for screening mutations. It offers various advantages for clinical diagnostic applications. Conventional HRM analysis often yields equivocal results, especially for surgically obtained tissues. We attempted to improve HRM analyses for more effective applications to clinical diagnostics. HRM analyses were performed for IDH1R132 and IDH2R172 mutations in 192 clinical glioma samples in duplicate and these results were compared with sequencing results. BRAFV600E mutations were analyzed in 52 additional brain tumor samples. The melting profiles were used for differential calculus analyses. Negative second derivative plots revealed additional peaks derived from heteroduplexes in PCR products that contained mutations; this enabled unequivocal visual discrimination of the mutations. We further developed a numerical expression, the HRM-mutation index (MI), to quantify the heteroduplex-derived peak of the mutational curves. Using this expression, all IDH1 mutation statuses matched those ascertained by sequencing, with the exception of three samples. These discordant results were all derived from the misinterpretation of sequencing data. The effectiveness of our approach was further validated by analyses of IDH2R172 and BRAFV600E mutations. The present analytical method enabled an unequivocal and objective HRM analysis and is suitable for reliable mutation scanning in surgically obtained glioma tissues. This approach could facilitate molecular diagnostics in clinical environments. PMID:27529619

  10. High Resolution Melting Analysis for JAK2 Exon 14 and Exon 12 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rapado, Inmaculada; Grande, Silvia; Albizua, Enriqueta; Ayala, Rosa; Hernández, José-Angel; Gallardo, Miguel; Gilsanz, Florinda; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin

    2009-01-01

    JAK2 mutations are important criteria for the diagnosis of Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms. We aimed to assess JAK2 exon 14 and exon 12 mutations by high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis, which allows variation screening. The exon 14 analysis included 163 patients with polycythemia vera, secondary erythrocytoses, essential thrombocythemia, or secondary thrombocytoses, and 126 healthy subjects. The study of exon 12 included 40 JAK2 V617F-negative patients (nine of which had polycythemia vera, and 31 with splanchnic vein thrombosis) and 30 healthy subjects. HRM analyses of JAK2 exons 14 and 12 gave analytical sensitivities near 1% and both intra- and interday coefficients of variation of less than 1%. For HRM analysis of JAK2 exon 14 in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia, clinical sensitivities were 93.5% and 67.9%, clinical specificities were 98.8% and 97.0%, positive predictive values were 93.5% and 79.2%, and negative predictive values were 98.8% and 94.6, respectively. Correlations were observed between the results from HRM and three commonly used analytical methods. The JAK2 exon 12 HRM results agreed completely with those from sequencing analysis, and the three mutations in exon 12 were detected by both methods. Hence, HRM analysis of exons 14 and 12 in JAK2 shows better diagnostic values than three other routinely used methods against which it was compared. In addition, HRM analysis has the advantage of detecting unknown mutations. PMID:19225136

  11. Application of high-resolution melting analysis for differentiation of spoilage yeasts.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Mine; Kesmen, Zülal; Özbekar, Esra; Çetin, Bülent; Yetim, Hasan

    2016-09-01

    A new method based on high resolution melting (HRM) analysis was developed for the differentiation and classification of the yeast species that cause food spoilage. A total 134 strains belonging to 21 different yeast species were examined to evaluate the discriminative power of HRM analysis. Two different highly variable DNA regions on the 26 rRNA gene were targeted to produce the HRM profiles of each strain. HRM-based grouping was compared and confirmed by (GTG)5 rep-PCR fingerprinting analysis. All of the yeast species belonging to the genera Pichia, Candida, Kazachstania, Kluyveromyces, Debaryomyces, Dekkera, Saccharomyces, Torulaspora, Ustilago, and Yarrowia, which were produced as species-specific HRM profiles, allowed discrimination at species and/or strain level. The HRM analysis of both target regions provided successful discrimination that correlated with rep-PCR fingerprinting analysis. Consequently, the HRM analysis has the potential for use in the rapid and accurate classification and typing of yeast species isolated from different foods to determine their sources and routes as well as to prevent contamination. PMID:27572511

  12. Updated UBV Light-Curve and Period Analysis of Eclipsing Binary HS Herculis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkurt, Zeynep; Değirmenci, Ömer Lütfi

    2006-08-01

    UBV light-curves of the eclipsing binary HS Herculis, obtained in 2002 2003 observational seasons, were analysed with Wilson-Devinney computer code. New absolute dimensions of the system were calculated using the results of the light-curve analysis. Period variation of the system was also investigated. Several new times of minima have been secured for this problematic system. An apsidal motion with a period of 80.7 years was confirmed and a third body in a pretty eccentric orbit (e 3 = 0.90 ± 0.08) with a period of 85.4 years was found. The corresponding internal structure constants of the binary system, log k 2, and the mass of the third body were derived.

  13. Updated UBV Light-Curve and Period Analysis of Eclipsing Binary HS Herculis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkurt, Zeynep; Değirmenci, Ömer Lütfi

    2006-08-01

    UBV light-curves of the eclipsing binary HS Herculis, which obtained in 2002--2003 observational seasons, were analysed with Wilson-Devinney computer code. New absolute dimensions of the system were calculated using the results of the light-curve analysis. Period variation of the system also investigated. Several new times of minima have been secured for this problematic system. An apsidal motion with the period of 80.7 years was confirmed and a third body in an pretty eccentric orbit (e 3 = 0.90 ± 0.08) with a period of 85.4 years was found. The corresponding internal structure constants of the binary system, log k 2, and mass of third body were derived.

  14. Consequence analysis to determine the damage to humans from vapour cloud explosions using characteristic curves.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Fernando Díaz; Ferradás, Enrique González; Sánchez, Teresa de Jesús Jiménez; Aznar, Agustín Miñana; Gimeno, José Ruiz; Alonso, Jesús Martínez

    2008-01-15

    The aim of this paper is to provide a methodology to facilitate consequence analysis for vapour cloud explosions (VCE). Firstly, the main PROBIT equations to evaluate direct damage on humans from those accidents (eardrum rupture, death due to skull fracture, death due to whole body impact and lung damage) are discussed and the most suitable ones are selected. Secondly, a new methodology is developed to relate characteristic overpressure-impulse-distance curves for VCE, obtained in a previous paper (F. Diaz Alonso et al., Characteristic overpressure-impulse-distance curves for vapour cloud explosions using the TNO Multi-Energy model, J. Hazard. Mater. A137 (2006) 734-741) with the selected PROBIT equations. This methodology allows the determination of damage as a function of distance to the accident's origin in only one step, using explosion energy and VCE Multi-Energy charge strength as input parameters.

  15. Ice shelf structure derived from dispersion curve analysis of ambient seismic noise, Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, A.; Bromirski, P. D.; Gerstoft, P.; Stephen, R. A.; Anthony, R. E.; Aster, R. C.; Cai, C.; Nyblade, A.; Wiens, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    An L-configured, three-component short period seismic array was deployed on the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica during November 2014. Polarization analysis of ambient noise data from these stations shows linearly polarized waves for frequency bands between 0.2 and 2 Hz. A spectral peak at about 1.6 Hz is interpreted as the resonance frequency of the water column and is used to estimate the water layer thickness below the ice shelf. The frequency band from 4 to 18 Hz is dominated by Rayleigh and Love waves propagating from the north that, based on daily temporal variations, we conclude were generated by field camp activity. Frequency-slowness plots were calculated using beamforming. Resulting Love and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves were inverted for the shear wave velocity profile within the firn and ice to ˜150 m depth. The derived density profile allows estimation of the pore close-off depth and the firn-air content thickness. Separate inversions of Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion curves give different shear wave velocity profiles within the firn. We attribute this difference to an effective anisotropy due to fine layering. The layered structure of firn, ice, water and the seafloor results in a characteristic dispersion curve below 7 Hz. Forward modelling the observed Rayleigh wave dispersion curves using representative firn, ice, water and sediment structures indicates that Rayleigh waves are observed when wavelengths are long enough to span the distance from the ice shelf surface to the seafloor. The forward modelling shows that analysis of seismic data from an ice shelf provides the possibility of resolving ice shelf thickness, water column thickness and the physical properties of the ice shelf and underlying seafloor using passive-source seismic data.

  16. Structural analysis of low melting organic salts: perspectives on ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Dean, Pamela M; Pringle, Jennifer M; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2010-08-28

    Ionic liquid-forming salts often display low melting points (a lack of crystallisation at ambient temperature and pressure) as a result of decreased lattice energies in the crystalline state. Intermolecular interactions between the anion and cation, and the conformational states of each component of the salt, are of significant interest as many of the distinctive properties ascribed to ionic liquids are determined to a large extent by these interactions. Crystallographic analysis provides a direct insight into the spatial relationship between the cations and anions and provides a basis for an enhanced understanding of the physico-chemical relationship of the ionic liquids. This perspective article examines the crystallographic studies of relevance to ionic liquid-forming organic salts as a basis for the rational design and synthesis of novel ionic liquids. PMID:20593067

  17. 3D combinational curves for accuracy and performance analysis of positive biometrics identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yingzi; Chang, Chein-I.

    2008-06-01

    The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve has been widely used as an evaluation criterion to measure the accuracy of biometrics system. Unfortunately, such an ROC curve provides no indication of the optimum threshold and cost function. In this paper, two kinds of 3D combinational curves are proposed: the 3D combinational accuracy curve and the 3D combinational performance curve. The 3D combinational accuracy curve gives a balanced view of the relationships among FAR (false alarm rate), FRR (false rejection rate), threshold t, and Cost. Six 2D curves can be derived from the 3D combinational accuracy curve: the conventional 2D ROC curve, 2D curve of (FRR, t), 2D curve of (FAR, t), 2D curve of (FRR, Cost), 2D curve of (FAR, Cost), and 2D curve of ( t, Cost). The 3D combinational performance curve can be derived from the 3D combinational accuracy curve which can give a balanced view among Security, Convenience, threshold t, and Cost. The advantages of using the proposed 3D combinational curves are demonstrated by iris recognition systems where the experimental results show that the proposed 3D combinational curves can provide more comprehensive information of the system accuracy and performance.

  18. Quantitative high-resolution melting PCR analysis for monitoring of fermentation microbiota in sourdough.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoxi B; Gänzle, Michael G

    2014-09-01

    Current methods of monitoring the microbial ecology of food fermentation system are generally labor intensive and/or time consuming. This study developed two methods based on high-resolution melting curves (HRM) to monitor sourdough microbiota during fermentation and to investigate the effect of cereal substrate on microbial ecology. A strain cocktail of Lactobacillus fermentum FUA3165, Lactobacillus plantarum FUA3309, Lactobacillus paracasei FUA3166 and Lactobacillus reuteri FUA3168 was used to ferment red (Town and PAN8609) and white (commercial and Segaolane) sorghum sourdough, and wheat sourdough. The microbial composition of sourdoughs was determined by plate count and HRM-qPCR to differentiate at the species level. The resistance of each species to sorghum phenolic extract was measured. There was no difference in microbial composition among the four sorghum sourdoughs, with L. fermentum FUA3165 in all sourdoughs. The competiveness of the strains in sorghum sourdoughs corresponded to their resistance to sorghum phenolic extract. In a second experiment, five L. reuteri strains, the human-lineage strains FUA3400 and 3401 isolated from wheat sourdough, the rodent-lineage strain FUA5448 isolated from rye sourdough and the sorghum isolates FUA3168 and 3324, were used to ferment wheat, rye and sorghum sourdoughs. The microbial composition of sourdoughs was determined by plate counts and HRM-qPCR to different L. reuteri strains representing different host-adapted lineages. No difference among different substrates was observed; indicating cereal type had no selective effect on sourdough microbial ecology. In conclusion, HRM-qPCR assays were established as rapid and highly specific tool for monitoring of sourdough microbiota. The ability to distinguish highly similar microbes in samples containing only few genotypes makes HRM-qPCR suitable for quality control in other food fermentation systems. The presence of phenolic compounds in sorghum sourdough favored organisms

  19. Quantitative high-resolution melting PCR analysis for monitoring of fermentation microbiota in sourdough.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoxi B; Gänzle, Michael G

    2014-09-01

    Current methods of monitoring the microbial ecology of food fermentation system are generally labor intensive and/or time consuming. This study developed two methods based on high-resolution melting curves (HRM) to monitor sourdough microbiota during fermentation and to investigate the effect of cereal substrate on microbial ecology. A strain cocktail of Lactobacillus fermentum FUA3165, Lactobacillus plantarum FUA3309, Lactobacillus paracasei FUA3166 and Lactobacillus reuteri FUA3168 was used to ferment red (Town and PAN8609) and white (commercial and Segaolane) sorghum sourdough, and wheat sourdough. The microbial composition of sourdoughs was determined by plate count and HRM-qPCR to differentiate at the species level. The resistance of each species to sorghum phenolic extract was measured. There was no difference in microbial composition among the four sorghum sourdoughs, with L. fermentum FUA3165 in all sourdoughs. The competiveness of the strains in sorghum sourdoughs corresponded to their resistance to sorghum phenolic extract. In a second experiment, five L. reuteri strains, the human-lineage strains FUA3400 and 3401 isolated from wheat sourdough, the rodent-lineage strain FUA5448 isolated from rye sourdough and the sorghum isolates FUA3168 and 3324, were used to ferment wheat, rye and sorghum sourdoughs. The microbial composition of sourdoughs was determined by plate counts and HRM-qPCR to different L. reuteri strains representing different host-adapted lineages. No difference among different substrates was observed; indicating cereal type had no selective effect on sourdough microbial ecology. In conclusion, HRM-qPCR assays were established as rapid and highly specific tool for monitoring of sourdough microbiota. The ability to distinguish highly similar microbes in samples containing only few genotypes makes HRM-qPCR suitable for quality control in other food fermentation systems. The presence of phenolic compounds in sorghum sourdough favored organisms

  20. Spectrophotometric analysis of gamma-ray burst afterglow extinction curves with X-Shooter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japelj, J.; Covino, S.; Gomboc, A.; Vergani, S. D.; Goldoni, P.; Selsing, J.; Cano, Z.; D'Elia, V.; Flores, H.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Hammer, F.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Kaper, L.; Kopač, D.; Krühler, T.; Melandri, A.; Piranomonte, S.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tanvir, N. R.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Watson, D.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2015-07-01

    We use gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow spectra observed with the VLT/X-Shooter spectrograph to measure rest-frame extinction in GRB lines-of-sight by modelling the broadband near-infrared (NIR) to X-ray afterglow spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Our sample consists of nine Swift GRBs, of which eight belong to the long-duration and one to the short-duration class. Dust is modelled using the average extinction curves of the Milky Way and the two Magellanic Clouds. We derive the rest-frame extinction of the entire sample, which fall in the range 0 ≲ AV ≲ 1.2. Moreover, the SMC extinction curve is the preferred extinction curve template for the majority of our sample, a result that is in agreement with those commonly observed in GRB lines of sights. In one analysed case (GRB 120119A), the common extinction curve templates fail to reproduce the observed extinction. To illustrate the advantage of using the high-quality, X-Shooter afterglow SEDs over the photometric SEDs, we repeat the modelling using the broadband SEDs with the NIR-to-UV photometric measurements instead of the spectra. The main result is that the spectroscopic data, thanks to a combination of excellent resolution and coverage of the blue part of the SED, are more successful in constraining extinction curves and therefore dust properties in GRB hosts with respect to photometric measurements. In all cases but one the extinction curve of one template is preferred over the others. We show that themodelled values of the extinction AV and the spectral slope, obtained through spectroscopic and photometric SED analysis, can differ significantly for individual events, though no apparent trend in the differences is observed. Finally we stress that, regardless of the resolution of the optical-to-NIR data, the SED modelling gives reliable results only when the fit is performed on a SED covering a broader spectral region (in our case extending to X-rays). Based on observations collected at the European

  1. Assessing the Classification Accuracy of Early Numeracy Curriculum-Based Measures Using Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laracy, Seth D.; Hojnoski, Robin L.; Dever, Bridget V.

    2016-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was used to investigate the ability of early numeracy curriculum-based measures (EN-CBM) administered in preschool to predict performance below the 25th and 40th percentiles on a quantity discrimination measure in kindergarten. Areas under the curve derived from a sample of 279 students ranged…

  2. Segregation during directional melting and its implications on seeded crystal growth: A theoretical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourret, E. D.; Favier, J. J.; Witt, A. F.

    1982-01-01

    Directional melting of binary systems, as encountered during seeding in melt growth, is analyzed for concurrent compositional changes at the crystal-melt interface. It is shown that steady state conditions cannot normally be reached during seeding and that the growth interface temperature at the initial stages of seeded growth is a function of backmelt conditions. The theoretical treatment is numerically applied to Hg1-xCdXTe and Ga-doped Ge.

  3. Thermal analysis and FTIR spectral curve-fitting investigation of formation mechanism and stability of indomethacin-saccharin cocrystals via solid-state grinding process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang-Chun; Lin, Hong-Liang; Lin, Shan-Yang

    2012-07-01

    The cocrystal formation of indomethacin (IMC) and saccharin (SAC) by mechanical cogrinding or thermal treatment was investigated. The formation mechanism and stability of IMC-SAC cocrystal prepared by cogrinding process were explored. Typical IMC-SAC cocrystal was also prepared by solvent evaporation method. All the samples were identified and characterized by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy with curve-fitting analysis. The physical stability of different IMC-SAC ground mixtures before and after storage for 7 months was examined. The results demonstrate that the stepwise measurements were carried out at specific intervals over a continuous cogrinding process showing a continuous growth in the cocrystal formation between IMC and SAC. The main IR spectral shifts from 3371 to 3,347 cm(-1) and 1693 to 1682 cm(-1) for IMC, as well as from 3094 to 3136 cm(-1) and 1718 to 1735 cm(-1) for SAC suggested that the OH and NH groups in both chemical structures were taken part in a hydrogen bonding, leading to the formation of IMC-SAC cocrystal. A melting at 184 °C for the 30-min IMC-SAC ground mixture was almost the same as the melting at 184 °C for the solvent-evaporated IMC-SAC cocrystal. The 30-min IMC-SAC ground mixture was also confirmed to have similar components and contents to that of the solvent-evaporated IMC-SAC cocrystal by using a curve-fitting analysis from IR spectra. The thermal-induced IMC-SAC cocrystal formation was also found to be dependent on the temperature treated. Different IMC-SAC ground mixtures after storage at 25 °C/40% RH condition for 7 months had an improved tendency of IMC-SAC cocrystallization.

  4. A new method for simultaneous detection and discrimination of Bovine herpesvirus types 1 (BoHV-1) and 5 (BoHV-5) using real time PCR with high resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Marin, M S; Quintana, S; Leunda, M R; Recavarren, M; Pagnuco, I; Späth, E; Pérez, S; Odeón, A

    2016-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus types 1 (BoHV-1) and 5 (BoHV-5) are antigenically and genetically similar. The aim of this study was to develop a simple and reliable one-step real time PCR assay with high resolution melting (HRM) analysis for the simultaneous detection and differentiation of BoHV-1 and BoHV-5. Optimization of assay conditions was performed with DNA from reference strains. Then, DNA from field isolates, clinical samples and tissue samples of experimentally infected animals were studied by real time PCR-HRM. An efficient amplification of real time PCR products was obtained, and a clear melting curve and appropriate melting peaks for both viruses were achieved in the HRM curve analysis for BoHV type identification. BoHV was identified in all of the isolates and clinical samples, and BoHV types were properly differentiated. Furthermore, viral DNA was detected in 12/18 and 7/18 samples from BoHV-1- and BoHV-5-infected calves, respectively. Real time PCR-HRM achieved a higher sensitivity compared with virus isolation or conventional PCR. In this study, HRM was used as a novel procedure. This method provides rapid, sensitive, specific and simultaneous detection of bovine alpha-herpesviruses DNA. Thus, this technique is an excellent tool for diagnosis, research and epidemiological studies of these viruses in cattle. PMID:26478539

  5. On the Analysis and Construction of the Butterfly Curve Using "Mathematica"[R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geum, Y. H.; Kim, Y. I.

    2008-01-01

    The butterfly curve was introduced by Temple H. Fay in 1989 and defined by the polar curve r = e[superscript cos theta] minus 2 cos 4 theta plus sin[superscript 5] (theta divided by 12). In this article, we develop the mathematical model of the butterfly curve and analyse its geometric properties. In addition, we draw the butterfly curve and…

  6. Circular Helix-Like Curve: An Effective Tool of Biological Sequence Analysis and Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yushuang

    2016-01-01

    This paper constructed a novel injection from a DNA sequence to a 3D graph, named circular helix-like curve (CHC). The presented graphical representation is available for visualizing characterizations of a single DNA sequence and identifying similarities and differences among several DNAs. A 12-dimensional vector extracted from CHC, as a numerical characterization of CHC, was applied to analyze phylogenetic relationships of 11 species, 74 ribosomal RNAs, 48 Hepatitis E viruses, and 18 eutherian mammals, respectively. Successful experiments illustrated that CHC is an effective tool of biological sequence analysis and comparison. PMID:27403205

  7. Circular Helix-Like Curve: An Effective Tool of Biological Sequence Analysis and Comparison.

    PubMed

    Li, Yushuang; Xiao, Wenli

    2016-01-01

    This paper constructed a novel injection from a DNA sequence to a 3D graph, named circular helix-like curve (CHC). The presented graphical representation is available for visualizing characterizations of a single DNA sequence and identifying similarities and differences among several DNAs. A 12-dimensional vector extracted from CHC, as a numerical characterization of CHC, was applied to analyze phylogenetic relationships of 11 species, 74 ribosomal RNAs, 48 Hepatitis E viruses, and 18 eutherian mammals, respectively. Successful experiments illustrated that CHC is an effective tool of biological sequence analysis and comparison. PMID:27403205

  8. [Aging Process of Puer Black Tea Studied by FTIR Spectroscopy Combined with Curve-Fitting Analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-yu; Shi, You-ming; Yi, Shi Lai

    2015-07-01

    For better determination of the chemical components in the Puer black tea, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used for obtaining vibrational spectra of Puer black tea at different aging time. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra indicated that the chemical components had change in Puer black tea at different aging time. The leaf of Puer black tea was a complex system, its Fourier transform infrared spectrum showed a total overlap of each absorption spectrum of various components. Each band represented an overall overlap of some characteristic absorption peaks of functional groups in the Puer black tea. In order to explore the change of characteristic absorption peaks of functional groups with aging time, the prediction positions and the number of second peaks in the range of 1900-900 cm(-1) were determined by Fourier self-deconvolution at first, and later the curve fitting analysis was performed in this overlap band. At different aging time of Puer black tea, the wave number of second peaks of amide II, tea polyphenol, pectin and polysaccharides at overlap band were assigned by curve fitting analysis. The second peak at 1520 cm(-1) was characteristic absorption band of amide II, the second peaks of tea polyphenol and pectin appeared at 1278 and 1103 cm(-1) respectively. Two second peaks at 1063 and 1037 cm(-1), corresponds mainly to glucomannan and arabinan. The relative area of these second peaks could be indicated the content of protein, tea polyphenol, pectin and polysaccharides in the Puer black tea. The results of curve fitting analysis showed that the relative area of amide II was increasing first and then decreasing, it indicated the change of protein in Puer black tea. At the same time, the content of tea polyphenol and pectin were decreased with the increase of aging time, but the glucomannan and arabinan were increased in reverse. It explained that the bitter taste was become weak and a sweet taste appeared in the tea with the increase of

  9. An analysis of long-term light curves of four novalike variables.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraicheva, Z.; Stanishev, V.; Spassovska, I.; Popov, V.

    The long-term light curves of the novalike systems TT Ari, KR Aur, AM Her and MV Lyr, were compiled and analysed in a search for solar-like cyclical behaviour. The frequency analysis shows long-term cyclical modulations of the brightness of the stars, which can be ascribed to changes of the radii of the late type secondaries of the order of ΔR/R ≅ 10-4 - 10-5. Periods of about 250 - 400 days are also suspected for all systems studied here.

  10. Analyzing Multiple-Choice Questions by Model Analysis and Item Response Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wattanakasiwich, P.; Ananta, S.

    2010-07-01

    In physics education research, the main goal is to improve physics teaching so that most students understand physics conceptually and be able to apply concepts in solving problems. Therefore many multiple-choice instruments were developed to probe students' conceptual understanding in various topics. Two techniques including model analysis and item response curves were used to analyze students' responses from Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation (FMCE). For this study FMCE data from more than 1000 students at Chiang Mai University were collected over the past three years. With model analysis, we can obtain students' alternative knowledge and the probabilities for students to use such knowledge in a range of equivalent contexts. The model analysis consists of two algorithms—concentration factor and model estimation. This paper only presents results from using the model estimation algorithm to obtain a model plot. The plot helps to identify a class model state whether it is in the misconception region or not. Item response curve (IRC) derived from item response theory is a plot between percentages of students selecting a particular choice versus their total score. Pros and cons of both techniques are compared and discussed.

  11. Asymptotic analysis of a newtonian fluid in a curved pipe with moving walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiñeira, Gonzalo; Rodríguez, José M.

    2016-06-01

    This communication is devoted to the presentation of our recent results regarding the asymptotic analysis of a viscous flow in a tube with elastic walls. This study can be applied, for example, to the blood flow in an artery. With this aim, we consider the dynamic problem of the incompressible flow of a viscous fluid through a curved pipe with a smooth central curve. Our analysis leads to the obtention of an one dimensional model via singular perturbation of the Navier-Stokes system as ɛ, a non dimensional parameter related to the radius of cross-section of the tube, tends to zero. We allow the radius depend on tangential direction and time, so a coupling with an elastic or viscoelastic law on the wall of the pipe is possible. To perform the asymptotic analysis, we do a change of variable to a reference domain where we assume the existence of asymptotic expansions on ɛ for both velocity and pressure which, upon substitution on Navier-Stokes equations, leads to the characterization of various terms of the expansion. This allows us to obtain an approximation of the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations.

  12. Analysis of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons migrating from a polyolefin-based hot-melt adhesive into food.

    PubMed

    Lommatzsch, Martin; Biedermann, Maurus; Grob, Koni; Simat, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Hot-melt adhesives are widely utilised to glue cardboard boxes used as food packaging material. They have to comply with the requirements of Article 3 of the European Framework Regulation for food contact materials (1935/2004). The hot melt raw materials analysed mainly consisted of paraffinic waxes, hydrocarbon resins and polyolefins. The hydrocarbon resins, functioning as tackifiers, were the predominant source of hydrocarbons of sufficient volatility to migrate into dry foods: the 18 hydrocarbon resins analysed contained 8.2-118 g kg(-1) saturated and up to 59 g kg(-1) aromatic hydrocarbons eluted from GC between n-C16 and n-C24, substantially more than the paraffinic waxes and the polyolefins. These tackfier resins, especially the oligomers ≤ C24, have been characterised structurally by GC×GC-MS and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. Migration into food was estimated using a simulating system with polenta as food simulant, which was verified by the analysis of a commercial risotto rice sample packed in a virgin fibre folding box sealed with a hot melt. About 0.5-1.5% of the potentially migrating substances (between n-C16 and n-C24) of a hot melt were found to be transferred into food under storage conditions, which can result in a food contamination in the order of 1 mg kg(-1) food (depending on the amount of potentially migrating substances from the hot melt, the hot melt surface, amount of food, contact time etc.). Migrates from hot melts are easily mistaken for mineral oil hydrocarbons from recycled cardboard.

  13. Analysis of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons migrating from a polyolefin-based hot-melt adhesive into food.

    PubMed

    Lommatzsch, Martin; Biedermann, Maurus; Grob, Koni; Simat, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Hot-melt adhesives are widely utilised to glue cardboard boxes used as food packaging material. They have to comply with the requirements of Article 3 of the European Framework Regulation for food contact materials (1935/2004). The hot melt raw materials analysed mainly consisted of paraffinic waxes, hydrocarbon resins and polyolefins. The hydrocarbon resins, functioning as tackifiers, were the predominant source of hydrocarbons of sufficient volatility to migrate into dry foods: the 18 hydrocarbon resins analysed contained 8.2-118 g kg(-1) saturated and up to 59 g kg(-1) aromatic hydrocarbons eluted from GC between n-C16 and n-C24, substantially more than the paraffinic waxes and the polyolefins. These tackfier resins, especially the oligomers ≤ C24, have been characterised structurally by GC×GC-MS and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. Migration into food was estimated using a simulating system with polenta as food simulant, which was verified by the analysis of a commercial risotto rice sample packed in a virgin fibre folding box sealed with a hot melt. About 0.5-1.5% of the potentially migrating substances (between n-C16 and n-C24) of a hot melt were found to be transferred into food under storage conditions, which can result in a food contamination in the order of 1 mg kg(-1) food (depending on the amount of potentially migrating substances from the hot melt, the hot melt surface, amount of food, contact time etc.). Migrates from hot melts are easily mistaken for mineral oil hydrocarbons from recycled cardboard. PMID:26744923

  14. Composite beam analysis linear analysis of naturally curved and twisted anisotropic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borri, Marco; Ghiringhelli, Gian L.; Merlini, Teodoro

    1992-05-01

    The aim of this report is to present a consistent theory for the deformation of a naturally curved and twisted anisotropic beam. The proposed formulation naturally extends the classical Saint-Venant approach to the case of curved and twisted anisotropic beams. The mathematical model developed under the assumption of span-wise uniform cross-section, curvature and twist, can take into account any kind of elastic coupling due to the material properties and the curved geometry. The consistency of the presented math-model and its generality about the cross-sectional shape, make it a useful tool even in a preliminary design optimization context such as the aeroelastic tailoring of helicopter rotor blades. The advantage of the present procedure is that it only requires a two-dimensional discretization; thus, very detailed analyses can be performed and interlaminar stresses between laminae can be evaluated. Such analyses would be extremely time consuming if performed with standard finite element codes: that prevents their recursive use as for example when optimizing a beam design. Moreover, as a byproduct of the proposed formulation, one obtains the constitutive law of the cross-section in terms of stress resultant and moment and their conjugate strain measures. This constitutive law takes into account any kind of elastic couplings, e.g., torsion-tension, tension-shear, bending-shear, and constitutes a fundamental input in aeroelastic analyses of helicopter blades. Four simple examples are given in order to show the principal features of the method.

  15. Analysis of gravity and conduction-driven melting in a sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, P. A.; Wang, T. G.

    1987-01-01

    An approach similar to those employed in the theories of lubrication and film condensation is applied to the problem of melting within a sphere. An approximate closed-form solution is obtained which yields relationships between the solid speed, position, and time. The results are compared with those obtained by Bareiss and Beer (1984) for the case of melting in a horizontal cylinder.

  16. Rapid Diagnosis of Old World Leishmaniasis by High-Resolution Melting Analysis of the 7SL RNA Gene▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Jaffe, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution melt analysis PCR (HRM PCR) for diagnosis of Old World Leishmania was developed using the 7SL RNA gene. Cutaneous leishmaniasis samples were analyzed. Sensitivity and specificity of HRM PCR were significantly better (P < 0.001) than those of internal transcribed spacer 1 PCR and similar to those of kinetoplast DNA PCR. PMID:20392923

  17. Tectonic and kinematics of curved orogenic systems: insights from AMS analysis and paleomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifelli, Francesca; Mattei, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    During the past few years, paleomagnetism has been considered a unique tool for constraining kinematic models of curved orogenic systems, because of its great potential in quantifying vertical axis rotations and in discriminating between primary and secondary (orocline s.l.) arcs. In fact, based on the spatio-temporal relationships between deformation and vertical axis rotation, curved orogens can be subdivided as primary or secondary (oroclines s.l.), if they formed respectively in a self-similar manner without undergoing important variations in their original curved shape or if their curvature in map-view is the result of a bending about a vertical axis of rotation. In addition to the kinematics of the arc and the timing of its curvature, a crucial factor for understanding the origin of belts curvature is the knowledge of the geodynamic process governing arc formation. In this context, the detailed reconstruction of the rotational history is mainly based on paleomagnetic and structural analyses (fold axes, kinematic indicators), which include the magnetic fabric. In fact, in curved fold and thrust belts, assuming that the magnetic lineation is tectonically originated and formed during layer-parallel shortening (LPS) before vertical axis rotations, the orientation of the magnetic lineation often strictly follows the curvature of the orogeny. This assumption represents a fundamental prerequisite to fully understand the origin of orogenic arcs and to unravel the geodynamic processes responsible for their curvature. We present two case studies: the central Mediterranean arcs and the Alborz Mts in Iran. The Mediterranean area has represented an attractive region to apply paleomagnetic analysis, as it shows a large number of narrow arcs, whose present-day shape has been driven by the space-time evolution of the Mediterranean subduction system, which define a irregular and rather diffuse plate boundary. The Alborz Mts. form a sinuous range over 1,200 km long, defining

  18. Ammonia-water mixtures at high pressures - Melting curves of ammonia dihydrate and ammonia monohydrate and a revised high-pressure phase diagram for the water-rich region. [in primordial solar system ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boone, S.; Nicol, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    The phase relations of some mixtures of ammonia and water are investigated to create a phase diagram in pressure-temperature-composition space relevant to the geophysical study of bodies in the outer solar system. The mixtures of NH3(x)H2O(1-x), where x is greater than 0.30 but less than 0.51, are examined at pressures and temperatures ranging from 0-6.5 GPa and 125-400 K, respectively. The ruby luminescence technique monitors the pressure and a diamond-anvil cell compresses the samples, and the phases are identified by means of normal- and polarized-light optical microscopy. The melting curve for NH3H2O(2) is described by the equation T = 176 + 60P - 8.5P squared for the ranges of 0.06-1.4 GPa and 179-243 K. The equation for NH3H2O is T = 194 + 37P - P squared, which represents a minor correction of a previous description by Johnson et al. (1985). Observed phase transitions are consistent with the high-pressure stability limit of NH3H2O(2), and the transition boundary is found to be linear.

  19. Nonlinear Analysis and Post-Test Correlation for a Curved PRSEUS Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Kevin; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Jegley, Dawn; Neal, Albert L.; Linton, Kim, A.; Bergan, Andrew C.; Bakuckas, John G., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept, developed by The Boeing Company, has been extensively studied as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA s) Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program. The PRSEUS concept provides a light-weight alternative to aluminum or traditional composite design concepts and is applicable to traditional-shaped fuselage barrels and wings, as well as advanced configurations such as a hybrid wing body or truss braced wings. Therefore, NASA, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and The Boeing Company partnered in an effort to assess the performance and damage arrestments capabilities of a PRSEUS concept panel using a full-scale curved panel in the FAA Full-Scale Aircraft Structural Test Evaluation and Research (FASTER) facility. Testing was conducted in the FASTER facility by subjecting the panel to axial tension loads applied to the ends of the panel, internal pressure, and combined axial tension and internal pressure loadings. Additionally, reactive hoop loads were applied to the skin and frames of the panel along its edges. The panel successfully supported the required design loads in the pristine condition and with a severed stiffener. The panel also demonstrated that the PRSEUS concept could arrest the progression of damage including crack arrestment and crack turning. This paper presents the nonlinear post-test analysis and correlation with test results for the curved PRSEUS panel. It is shown that nonlinear analysis can accurately calculate the behavior of a PRSEUS panel under tension, pressure and combined loading conditions.

  20. A Light Curve And Period Analysis Of AE Ursae Majoris, CY Aquarii, And DY Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, Michael D.; Iverson, E. P.; Jolley, J. W.; Joner, L. A.; Swenson, C. A.

    2007-12-01

    We present a light curve analysis of three high amplitude delta Scuti stars (HADs). Data for this presentation were all secured during spring and fall of 2007. Most of the observations were obtained using the facilities of the Brigham Young University West Mountain Observatory. The variable stars we observed in this investigation include AE Ursae Majoris, CY Aquarii, and DY Pegasi. We present evidence for small period changes as well as an analysis of the light curve components for each of the variables. We compare the results obtained in the present investigation with prior studies of these same targets. This investigation is part of an initiative to provide a mentored learning environment at the West Mountain Observatory and to promote a variety of undergraduate research experiences. Tools developed in this investigation include the data reduction procedures that enable us to process the several thousand CCD frames that are secured each night as raw observations. We thank the Department of Physics and Astronomy and the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences at Brigham Young University for the continued support of mentored undergraduate research.

  1. Analysis of Rail Vehicle Suspension Spring with Special Emphasis on Curving, Tracking and Tractive Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumbhalkar, M. A.; Bhope, D. V.; Vanalkar, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of the rail vehicle represents a balance between the forces acting between wheel and rail, the inertia forces and the forces exerted by suspension and articulation. Axial loading on helical spring causes vertical deflection at straight track but failures calls to investigate for lateral and longitudinal loading at horizontal and vertical curves respectively. Goods carrying vehicle has the frequent failures of middle axle inner suspension spring calls for investigation. The springs are analyzed for effect of stress concentration due to centripetal force and due to tractive and breaking effort. This paper also discusses shear failure analysis of spring at curvature and at uphill at various speeds for different loading condition analytically and by finite element analysis. Two mass rail vehicle suspension systems have been analyzed for vibration responses analytically using mathematical tool Matlab Simulink and the same will be evaluated using FFT vibration analyzer to find peak resonance in vertical, lateral and longitudinal direction. The results prove that the suspension acquires high repeated load in vertical and lateral direction due to tracking and curving causes maximum stress concentration on middle axle suspension spring as height of this spring is larger than end axle spring in primary suspension system and responsible for failure of middle axle suspension spring due to high stress acquisition.

  2. Pseudoperonospora cubensis and P. humuli detection using species-specific probes and high definition melt curve analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three assays were developed for molecular differentiation of Pseudoperonospora cubensis and P. humuli, causal agents of cucurbit and hop downy mildew, respectively, for detection of airborne sporangia and diagnosis of symptomatic leaf tissue. The assays were based on previously identified single nuc...

  3. Pair distribution function X-ray analysis explains dissolution characteristics of felodipine melt extrusion products.

    PubMed

    Nollenberger, K; Gryczke, A; Meier, Ch; Dressman, J; Schmidt, M U; Brühne, S

    2009-04-01

    Solid solutions of felodipine with EUDRAGIT E and EUDRAGIT E/NE were shown to dramatically increase the dissolution rate of felodipine in biorelevant media. Of the two polymer systems, extrudates containing 5% EUDRAGIT NE showed a faster dissolution rate and less recrystallization (no precipitation within 2 h). Although differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and conventional X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) were able to verify the amorphous state of the drug after melt extrusion, it was not possible to differentiate the two extrudate compositions further with these methods. We then applied pair distribution function (PDF) analysis to investigate extrudates. It was possible to more closely characterize the solid state of the amorphous extrudates in terms of local structural order: PDF analysis revealed that addition of minor amounts of EUDRAGIT NE to the main component EUDRAGIT E during extrusion changed the local structure of EUDRAGIT E in a nonadditive way. We conclude that local ordering can be important to the release characteristics of extrudates, even when the components are present in the amorphous state.

  4. High-resolution melt analysis of DNA methylation to discriminate semen in biological stains.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Joana; Silva, Deborah S B S; Balamurugan, Kuppareddi; Duncan, George; Alho, Clarice S; McCord, Bruce

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a method for the detection of semen in biological stains using high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis and DNA methylation. To perform this task, we used an epigenetic locus that targets a tissue-specific differentially methylated region for semen. This specific locus, ZC3H12D, contains methylated CpG sites that are hypomethylated in semen and hypermethylated in blood and saliva. Using this procedure, DNA from forensic stains can be isolated, processed using bisulfite-modified polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and detected by real-time PCR with HRM capability. The method described in this article is robust; we were able to obtain results from samples with as little as 1 ng of genomic DNA. Samples inhibited by humic acid still produced reliable results. Furthermore, the procedure is specific and will not amplify non-bisulfite-modified DNA. Because this process can be performed using real-time PCR and is quantitative, it fits nicely within the workflow of current forensic DNA laboratories. As a result, it should prove to be a useful technique for processing trace evidence samples for serological analysis.

  5. Cooling Curve Analysis as an Alternative to Dilatometry in Continuous Cooling Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, John W.; Schlacher, Christian; Kamyabi-Gol, Ata; Mayr, Peter; Mendez, Patricio F.

    2015-01-01

    Dilatometry and cooling curve analysis (CCA) are two methods of determining the evolution of a phase transformation with temperature. The two methods are similar conceptual in that they take an indirect measure of the transformation and extract phase fraction information from it; however, the differences between the two methods typically makes one method better suited to analyzing a given transformation. However, without a quantitative comparison between the two methods, it is difficult to use them interchangeably. We address this by presenting a quantitative comparison of CCA and dilatometry for a martensitic transformation in a 9Cr3W3CoVNb steel. The resulting phase fraction data matches very well, within 5 K (5 °C) for any given phase fraction. This paper also extends to the quantitative methodology of calorimetry to the analysis of dilatometric data, with results comparable to ASTM A1033-10, but with expected higher accuracy by accounting by variable thermal expansion coefficients.

  6. Spectral analysis of stellar light curves by means of neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliaferri, R.; Ciaramella, A.; Milano, L.; Barone, F.; Longo, G.

    1999-06-01

    Periodicity analysis of unevenly collected data is a relevant issue in several scientific fields. In astrophysics, for example, we have to find the fundamental period of light or radial velocity curves which are unevenly sampled observations of stars. Classical spectral analysis methods are unsatisfactory to solve the problem. In this paper we present a neural network based estimator system which performs well the frequency extraction in unevenly sampled signals. It uses an unsupervised Hebbian nonlinear neural algorithm to extract, from the interpolated signal, the principal components which, in turn, are used by the MUSIC frequency estimator algorithm to extract the frequencies. The neural network is tolerant to noise and works well also with few points in the sequence. We benchmark the system on synthetic and real signals with the Periodogram and with the Cramer-Rao lower bound. This work was been partially supported by IIASS, by MURST 40\\% and by the Italian Space Agency.

  7. Z curve theory-based analysis of the dynamic nature of nucleosome positioning in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xueting; Liu, Hui; Liu, Hongbo; Su, Jianzhong; Lv, Jie; Cui, Ying; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Yan

    2013-11-01

    Nucleosome is the elementary structural unit of eukaryotic chromatin. Instability of nucleosome positioning plays critical roles in chromatin remodeling in differentiation and disease. In this study, we investigated nucleosome dynamics in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome using a geometric model based on Z curve theory. We identified 52,941 stable nucleosomes and 7607 dynamic nucleosomes, compiling them into a genome-wide nucleosome dynamic positioning map and constructing a user-friendly visualization platform (http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/nucleosome). Our approach achieved a sensitivity of 90.31% and a specificity of 87.76% for S. cerevisiae. Analysis revealed transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) were enriched in linkers. And among the sparse nucleosomes around TFBSs, dynamic nucleosomes were slightly preferred. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis indicated that stable and dynamic nucleosomes were enriched on genes involved in different biological processes and functions. This study provides an approach for comprehending chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation of genes.

  8. The composition-explicit distillation curve technique: Relating chemical analysis and physical properties of complex fluids.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Thomas J; Ott, Lisa S; Lovestead, Tara M; Huber, Marcia L

    2010-04-16

    The analysis of complex fluids such as crude oils, fuels, vegetable oils and mixed waste streams poses significant challenges arising primarily from the multiplicity of components, the different properties of the components (polarity, polarizability, etc.) and matrix properties. We have recently introduced an analytical strategy that simplifies many of these analyses, and provides the added potential of linking compositional information with physical property information. This aspect can be used to facilitate equation of state development for the complex fluids. In addition to chemical characterization, the approach provides the ability to calculate thermodynamic properties for such complex heterogeneous streams. The technique is based on the advanced distillation curve (ADC) metrology, which separates a complex fluid by distillation into fractions that are sampled, and for which thermodynamically consistent temperatures are measured at atmospheric pressure. The collected sample fractions can be analyzed by any method that is appropriate. The analytical methods we have applied include gas chromatography (with flame ionization, mass spectrometric and sulfur chemiluminescence detection), thin layer chromatography, FTIR, corrosivity analysis, neutron activation analysis and cold neutron prompt gamma activation analysis. By far, the most widely used analytical technique we have used with the ADC is gas chromatography. This has enabled us to study finished fuels (gasoline, diesel fuels, aviation fuels, rocket propellants), crude oils (including a crude oil made from swine manure) and waste oils streams (used automotive and transformer oils). In this special issue of the Journal of Chromatography, specifically dedicated to extraction technologies, we describe the essential features of the advanced distillation curve metrology as an analytical strategy for complex fluids.

  9. Comparative analysis of base flow recession curves for different Andean catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, P.; Batelaan, O.; Wyseure, G.

    2012-04-01

    Little is known in the Paute River basin, Ecuador about the groundwater resources, the relation between aquifers and their recharge zones and interaction with rivers. The pressure from human activities in the river basin is increasing and impacting the surface water quality and quantity, therefore it becomes increasingly useful to estimate the potential of groundwater exploitation as an alternative resource. Due to the lack of specific groundwater data and information, assessment of suitable alternative methods for groundwater research at different scales is considered. In low flow hydrology literature it is noted that the majority of natural gains to streamflow during low-flow periods are derived from releases from groundwater storage, moreover baseflow is generally suggested to be an indicator of groundwater or other delayed sources. Analysis of flow recession curves allows the determination of characteristics of the groundwater reservoir, which is a prerequisite for the separation of baseflow from total discharge and the estimation of groundwater storage and recharge. The flow recession curve at a river cross section is defined as the discharge hydrograph of the basin during a rainless or dry period. Its analysis yields information on the retention characteristics of the basin and of groundwater storage and depletion. In the Paute River basin baseflows are assumed to be originating from Paramo storage, which is largely determined by the high water retention capacity of the soils in combination with their slopes. In the case of the sub-catchment of the Tarqui River, there are evidences based on topography, hydromorphology, discharges and soils that suggest the presence of a major aquifer in the valley. Hence, the goal of this contribution is the comparison and analysis of groundwater conditions based on baseflow recession analysis for the Tarqui and Yanuncay River sub-catchments. Baseflow analyses are translated in recharge and groundwater resources

  10. Heat-transfer analysis of the basal melting of Antarctic ice shelves

    SciTech Connect

    Minale, M.; Astarita, G.

    1993-12-01

    Basal melting of Antarctic ice shelves is an important element in the overall balance of Antarctic ice. A heat-transfer model for the basal melting of the Drygalski Ice Tongue is presented. The model does not contain any adjustable parameter. The calculated basal melting rate agrees very well with the value estimated from an overall ice balance on the ice tongue. It is concluded that relatively simple concepts of transport phenomena may be used to model some important features of the dynamics of the Antarctic ice sheet.

  11. Buckling analysis of curved composite sandwich panels subjected to inplane loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juan R.

    1993-01-01

    Composite sandwich structures are being considered for primary structure in aircraft such as subsonic and high speed civil transports. The response of sandwich structures must be understood and predictable to use such structures effectively. Buckling is one of the most important response mechanisms of sandwich structures. A simple buckling analysis is derived for sandwich structures. This analysis is limited to flat, rectangular sandwich panels loaded by uniaxial compression (N(sub x)) and having simply supported edges. In most aerospace applications, however, the structure's geometry, boundary conditions, and loading are usually very complex. Thus, a general capability for analyzing the buckling behavior of sandwich structures is needed. The present paper describes and evaluates an improved buckling analysis for cylindrically curved composite sandwich panels. This analysis includes orthotropic facesheets and first-order transverse shearing effects. Both simple support and clamped boundary conditions are also included in the analysis. The panels can be subjected to linearly varying normal loads N(sub x) and N(sub y) in addition to a constant shear load N(sub xy). The analysis is based on the modified Donnell's equations for shallow shells. The governing equations are solved by direct application of Galerkin's method. The accuracy of the present analysis is verified by comparing results with those obtained from finite element analysis for a variety of geometries, loads, and boundary conditions. The limitations of the present analysis are investigated, in particular those related to the shallow shell assumptions in the governing equations. Finally, the computational efficiency of the present analysis is considered.

  12. Analysis of variation in L-365,260 competition curves in radioligand binding assays.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, E. A.; Roberts, S. P.; Shankley, N. P.; Black, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    1. For several years, we have used the cholecystokinin (CCK)B/gastrin receptor selective antagonist, L-365,260, as a reference compound in a variety of studies in CCKB/gastrin receptor radioligand binding assays. Here, we have analysed the competition curve data sets obtained between L-365,260 and [125I]-BH-CCK8S in guinea-pig gastric gland and mouse and rat cerebral cortex preparations. 2. Competition curves obtained for L-365,260 in the mouse cortex assay were not different from rectangular hyperbolae (slope = 1.01 +/- 0.02) implying the presence of a single population of binding sites (pKI = 8.41 +/- 0.01; data from 47 experiments, slope constrained to unity). However, in the rat cortex and guinea-pig gastric gland assays, the mean slope of the competition curves was significantly less than one and the mean apparent pKI significantly lower than that obtained in the mouse cortex (slope = 0.85 +/- 0.03, 0.90 +/- 0.03; apparent pKI = 7.98 +/- 0.05, 8.07 +/- 0.05; 48 and 45 experiments, in rat and guinea-pig, respectively). The distribution of the individual pKI and slope estimates of the competition curves in these two assays was consistent with expectations for the variable expression (in terms of absolute number and proportion) of two binding sites. The two sites were characterized by pKI values for L-365,260 of 8.50 +/- 0.04 and 8.48 +/- 0.04 for the high affinity site and 7.32 +/- 0.04 and 7.22 +/- 0.06 for the low affinity site in guinea-pig and rat, respectively. 3. The affinity estimates for L-365,260, although obtained on different tissues, are consistent with data obtained from the analysis of L-365,260 antagonism of pentagastrin-stimulated responses in mouse and rat stomach (acid secretion) and guinea-pig gastric muscle (isotonic contraction) assays. To this extent, these data suggest the existence of two CCKB/gastrin receptor subtypes. PMID:8842437

  13. Determination of secondary flow morphologies by wavelet analysis in a curved artery model with physiological inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Hussain, Shadman; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2014-11-01

    Secondary flow vortical patterns in arterial curvatures have the potential to affect several cardiovascular phenomena, e.g., progression of atherosclerosis by altering wall shear stresses, carotid atheromatous disease, thoracic aortic aneurysms and Marfan's syndrome. Temporal characteristics of secondary flow structures vis-à-vis physiological (pulsatile) inflow waveform were explored by continuous wavelet transform (CWT) analysis of phase-locked, two-component, two-dimensional particle image velocimeter data. Measurements were made in a 180° curved artery test section upstream of the curvature and at the 90° cross-sectional plane. Streamwise, upstream flow rate measurements were analyzed using a one-dimensional antisymmetric wavelet. Cross-stream measurements at the 90° location of the curved artery revealed interesting multi-scale, multi-strength coherent secondary flow structures. An automated process for coherent structure detection and vortical feature quantification was applied to large ensembles of PIV data. Metrics such as the number of secondary flow structures, their sizes and strengths were generated at every discrete time instance of the physiological inflow waveform. An autonomous data post-processing method incorporating two-dimensional CWT for coherent structure detection was implemented. Loss of coherence in secondary flow structures during the systolic deceleration phase is observed in accordance with previous research. The algorithmic approach presented herein further elucidated the sensitivity and dependence of morphological changes in secondary flow structures on quasiperiodicity and magnitude of temporal gradients in physiological inflow conditions.

  14. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Derivation from regional analysis of streamflow recession curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Sheng; Li, Hong-Yi; Huang, Maoyi; Ali, Melkamu; Leng, Guoyong; Leung, L. Ruby; Wang, Shao-wen; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-11-01

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfall-runoff response, especially in steep terrain. Its contribution to total runoff is, however, poorly represented in the current generation of land surface models. The lack of physical basis of these common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation of the stormflow (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global land surface models. This paper is aimed at deriving regionalized parameterizations of the storage-discharge relationship relating to subsurface stormflow from a top-down empirical data analysis of streamflow recession curves extracted from 50 eastern United States catchments. Detailed regression analyses were performed between parameters of the empirical storage-discharge relationships and the controlling climate, soil and topographic characteristics. The regression analyses performed on empirical recession curves at catchment scale indicated that the coefficient of the power-law form storage-discharge relationship is closely related to the catchment hydrologic characteristics, which is consistent with the hydraulic theory derived mainly at the hillslope scale. As for the exponent, besides the role of field scale soil hydraulic properties as suggested by hydraulic theory, it is found to be more strongly affected by climate (aridity) at the catchment scale. At a fundamental level these results point to the need for more detailed exploration of the co-dependence of soil, vegetation and topography with climate.

  15. Verbal learning across the lifespan: an analysis of the components of the learning curve.

    PubMed

    Blachstein, Haya; Vakil, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on the acquisition process of verbal material, conducted separately on child and adult populations, reveal that the lifespan is characterized by an inverted-U performance curve with similar achievements at its two poles. To clarify the acquisition mechanism across the entire lifespan, the learning curve for the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test was reproduced for participants aged 8-91. The study utilized typical trial summary scores and a more refined analysis of trial-by-trial single-word recalls, including omissions (missed words that were previously recalled), additions (recalled words previously missed), and touched words (a count for the first recall time only, for each word during the five learning trial). A clear age effect was shown for the number of words recalled - symmetrically increases during childhood and decreases in adulthood. Similarly, increased turnover of words omitted and added characterized both incremental and decremental age differences. Measurement patterns differed for the age segments on the two sides of the lifespan, despite the similar total number of words recalled by the two sides. Acquisition pattern in children was characterized by a higher number of touched words and higher turnover than for adult groups. In contrast, older adults achieved fewer touched words and lower turnover than the child groups. This study shows that it is possible to reach the same quantitative results via different cognitive processes. The results are interpreted in terms of specific mechanisms of maturational characteristics.

  16. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Derivation from regional analysis of streamflow recession curves

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Sheng; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Ali, Melkamu; Leng, Guoyong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Wang, Shaowen; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-07-21

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfall–runoff response, especially in steep terrain. Its contribution to total runoff is, however, poorly represented in the current generation of land surface models. The lack of physical basis of these common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation of the stormflow (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global land surface models. This paper is aimed at deriving regionalized parameterizations of the storage–discharge relationship relating to subsurface stormflow from a top–down empirical data analysis of streamflow recession curves extracted from 50 eastern United States catchments. Detailed regression analyses were performed between parameters of the empirical storage–discharge relationships and the controlling climate, soil and topographic characteristics. The regression analyses performed on empirical recession curves at catchment scale indicated that the coefficient of the power-law form storage–discharge relationship is closely related to the catchment hydrologic characteristics, which is consistent with the hydraulic theory derived mainly at the hillslope scale. As for the exponent, besides the role of field scale soil hydraulic properties as suggested by hydraulic theory, it is found to be more strongly affected by climate (aridity) at the catchment scale. At a fundamental level these results point to the need for more detailed exploration of the co-dependence of soil, vegetation and topography with climate.

  17. A multi-scale analysis of the impact of pressure on melting of crystalline phase change material germanium telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie

    2014-10-27

    The impact of the moderate pressure (about 10{sup 0 }GPa) on the melting of crystalline (c-) phase change material (PCM) germanium telluride (GeTe) is analyzed, by combining the heat transfer equation in the PCM device scale (10{sup 1}–10{sup 2 }nm and beyond), and the ab initio molecular dynamics and the nudged elastic band simulations in the atomistic scale (10{sup −1}–10{sup 0 }nm). The multi-scale analysis unravels that a pressure P = 1.0 GPa can increase the melting temperature of c-GeTe and the PCM device “reset” operation energy consumption by 6%–7%. It is shown that the melting temperature increase originates from the pressure-induced raise of the energy barrier of the umbrella-flip transition of the Ge atom from the octahedral symmetry site to the tetrahedral symmetry site. It is revealed that when P > 1.0 GPa, which is normal in PCM devices, the “reset” energy will be increased even by more. Based on the analysis, suggestions to alleviate pressure-induced raise of melting temperature and “reset” energy are provided.

  18. An analysis of the learning curve to achieve competency at colonoscopy using the JETS database

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Stephen Thomas; Mohammed, Mohammed A; Walt, Robert; Valori, Roland; Ismail, Tariq; Dunckley, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Objective The number of colonoscopies required to reach competency is not well established. The primary aim of this study was to determine the number of colonoscopies trainees need to perform to attain competency, defined by a caecal intubation rate (CIR) ≥90%. As competency depends on completion, we also investigated trainee factors that were associated with colonoscopy completion. Design The Joint Advisory Group on GI Endoscopy in the UK has developed a trainee e-portfolio from which colonoscopy data were retrieved. Inclusion criteria were all trainees who had performed a total of ≥20 colonoscopies and had performed ≤50 colonoscopies prior to submission of data to the e-portfolio. The primary outcome measure was colonoscopy completion. The number of colonoscopies required to achieve CIR ≥90% was calculated by the moving average method and learning curve cumulative summation (LC-Cusum) analysis. To determine factors which determine colonoscopy completion, a mixed effect logistic regression model was developed which allowed for nesting of patients within trainees and nesting of patients within hospitals, with various patient, trainee and training factors entered as fixed effects. Results 297 trainees undertook 36 730 colonoscopies. By moving average analysis, the cohort of trainees reached a CIR of 90% at 233 procedures. By LC-Cusum analysis, 41% of trainees were competent after 200 procedures. Of the trainee factors, the number of colonoscopies, intensity of training and previous flexible sigmoidoscopy experience were significant factors associated with colonoscopy completion. Conclusions This is the largest study to date investigating the number of procedures required to achieve competency in colonoscopy. The current training certification benchmark in the UK of 200 procedures does not appear to be an inappropriate minimum requirement. The LC-Cusum chart provides real time feedback on individual learning curves for trainees. The association of training

  19. Numerical analysis of radiation propagation in innovative volumetric receivers based on selective laser melting techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Fabrizio; Santiago, Sergio; Roccabruna, Mattia; Luque, Salvador; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Jose; Crema, Luigi; Romero, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Volumetric absorbers constitute one of the key elements in order to achieve high thermal conversion efficiencies in concentrating solar power plants. Regardless of the working fluid or thermodynamic cycle employed, design trends towards higher absorber output temperatures are widespread, which lead to the general need of components of high solar absorptance, high conduction within the receiver material, high internal convection, low radiative and convective heat losses and high mechanical durability. In this context, the use of advanced manufacturing techniques, such as selective laser melting, has allowed for the fabrication of intricate geometries that are capable of fulfilling the previous requirements. This paper presents a parametric design and analysis of the optical performance of volumetric absorbers of variable porosity conducted by means of detailed numerical ray tracing simulations. Sections of variable macroscopic porosity along the absorber depth were constructed by the fractal growth of single-cell structures. Measures of performance analyzed include optical reflection losses from the absorber front and rear faces, penetration of radiation inside the absorber volume, and radiation absorption as a function of absorber depth. The effects of engineering design parameters such as absorber length and wall thickness, material reflectance and porosity distribution on the optical performance of absorbers are discussed, and general design guidelines are given.

  20. Analysis of impact melt and vapor production in CTH for planetary applications

    SciTech Connect

    Quintana, S. N.; Crawford, D. A.; Schultz, P. H.

    2015-05-19

    This study explores impact melt and vapor generation for a variety of impact speeds and materials using the shock physics code CTH. The study first compares the results of two common methods of impact melt and vapor generation to demonstrate that both the peak pressure method and final temperature method are appropriate for high-speed impact models (speeds greater than 10 km/s). However, for low-speed impact models (speeds less than 10 km/s), only the final temperature method is consistent with laboratory analyses to yield melting and vaporization. Finally, a constitutive model for material strength is important for low-speed impacts because strength can cause an increase in melting and vaporization.

  1. Analysis of impact melt and vapor production in CTH for planetary applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Quintana, S. N.; Crawford, D. A.; Schultz, P. H.

    2015-05-19

    This study explores impact melt and vapor generation for a variety of impact speeds and materials using the shock physics code CTH. The study first compares the results of two common methods of impact melt and vapor generation to demonstrate that both the peak pressure method and final temperature method are appropriate for high-speed impact models (speeds greater than 10 km/s). However, for low-speed impact models (speeds less than 10 km/s), only the final temperature method is consistent with laboratory analyses to yield melting and vaporization. Finally, a constitutive model for material strength is important for low-speed impacts because strengthmore » can cause an increase in melting and vaporization.« less

  2. Analysis of flow development in centrifugal atomization: Part I. Film thickness of a fully spreading melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. Y.

    2004-09-01

    Centrifugal atomization of metal melts is a cost-effective process for powder production and spray deposition. The properties of the as-produced powder and deposit are determined primarily by the characteristics of the atomized droplets, which in turn are largely dependent on the flow development of the melt on the atomizer. This paper develops a model for analysing the flow development of a fully spreading melt on and off the atomizing cup. The model can be used to calculate the velocity and film thickness of the melt as a function of melt volume flow rate, cup rotation speed, cup radius and cup slope angle, as well as to predict the trajectory of the spray off the cup. The model implies that the disintegration of a fully spreading melt takes place in the region just off the cup edge and the film thickness at the cup edge is a critical factor determining the sizes of the resultant droplets. The film thickness at the cup edge is shown to decrease with decreasing volume flow rate, with increasing cup rotation speed, with increasing cup radius and with decreasing cup slope angle.

  3. Vibration analysis and transient response of a functionally graded piezoelectric curved beam with general boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zhu; Jin, Guoyong; Ye, Tiangui

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a unified solution for free and transient vibration analyses of a functionally graded piezoelectric curved beam with general boundary conditions within the framework of Timoshenko beam theory. The formulation is derived by means of the variational principle in conjunction with a modified Fourier series which consists of standard Fourier cosine series and supplemented functions. The mechanical and electrical properties of functionally graded piezoelectric materials (FGPMs) are assumed to vary continuously in the thickness direction and are estimated by Voigt’s rule of mixture. The convergence, accuracy and reliability of the present formulation are demonstrated by comparing the present solutions with those from the literature and finite element analysis. Numerous results for FGPM beams with different boundary conditions, geometrical parameters as well as material distributions are given. Moreover, forced vibration of the FGPM beams subjected to dynamic loads and general boundary conditions are also investigated.

  4. Correlation Analysis of Optical and Radio Light Curves for a Large Sample of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, S. D.; Smith, A. G.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.

    1995-08-01

    The Rosemary Hill Observatory has accumulated internally consistent light curves extending over as much as 26 years for a large sample of active galactic nuclei. Forty-six of these optical records have been compared with similar radio records from the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory and the Algonquin Radio Observatory. For 18 objects, pairs of records were sufficiently long and unconfused to allow reliable application of the Discrete Correlation Function analysis; this group included 8 BL Lacertids, 8 quasars, and 2 Seyfert galaxies. Nine of the 18 sources showed positive radio-optical correlations, with the radio events lagging the optical by intervals ranging from 0 to 14 months. Consistent with the relativistic beaming model of the BL Lacertids, the group displaying correlations was dominated by this type of object.

  5. Recurrence plot analysis of nonstationary data: The understanding of curved patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, A.; Kantz, H.; Tiezzi, E.

    2005-08-01

    Recurrence plots of the calls of the Nomascus concolor (Western black crested gibbon) and Hylobates lar (White-handed gibbon) show characteristic circular, curved, and hyperbolic patterns superimposed to the main temporal scale of the signal. It is shown that these patterns are related to particular nonstationarities in the signal. Some of them can be reproduced by artificial signals like frequency modulated sinusoids and sinusoids with time divergent frequency. These modulations are too faint to be resolved by conventional time-frequency analysis with similar precision. Therefore, recurrence plots act as a magnifying glass for the detection of multiple temporal scales in slightly modulated signals. The detected phenomena in these acoustic signals can be explained in the biomechanical context by taking in account the role of the muscles controlling the vocal folds.

  6. BLOT: A mesh and curve plot program for the output of a finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gilkey, A.P.; Glick, J.H.

    1989-06-01

    BLOT is a graphics program for post-processing of finite element analysis output that is presented in the EXODUS database format. It is command driven with free-format input and can drive any graphics device supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. BLOT produces mesh plots with various representations of the analysis output variables. The major mesh plot capabilities are deformed mesh plots, line contours, banded contours, vector plots of two or three variables (e.g., velocity vectors), and symbol plots of scalar variables (e.g., temperature). Pathlines of analysis variables can also be drawn on the mesh. BLOT's features include element selection by material, element birth and death, multiple views for combining several displays on each plot, symmetry mirroring, and node and element numbering. BLOT can also produce X-Y curve plots of the analysis variables. BLOT generates time-versus-variable plots or variable-versus-variable plots. It also generates distance versus-variable plots at selected time steps where the distance is the accumulated distance between pairs of nodes or element centers. 14 refs.

  7. Multivariate curve resolution for hyperspectral image analysis :applications to microarray technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Sinclair, Michael B.; Haaland, David Michael; Martinez, M. Juanita (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Werner-Washburne, Margaret C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Aragon, Anthony D. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01

    Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) using constrained alternating least squares algorithms represents a powerful analysis capability for a quantitative analysis of hyperspectral image data. We will demonstrate the application of MCR using data from a new hyperspectral fluorescence imaging microarray scanner for monitoring gene expression in cells from thousands of genes on the array. The new scanner collects the entire fluorescence spectrum from each pixel of the scanned microarray. Application of MCR with nonnegativity and equality constraints reveals several sources of undesired fluorescence that emit in the same wavelength range as the reporter fluorphores. MCR analysis of the hyperspectral images confirms that one of the sources of fluorescence is due to contaminant fluorescence under the printed DNA spots that is spot localized. Thus, traditional background subtraction methods used with data collected from the current commercial microarray scanners will lead to errors in determining the relative expression of low-expressed genes. With the new scanner and MCR analysis, we generate relative concentration maps of the background, impurity, and fluorescent labels over the entire image. Since the concentration maps of the fluorescent labels are relatively unaffected by the presence of background and impurity emissions, the accuracy and useful dynamic range of the gene expression data are both greatly improved over those obtained by commercial microarray scanners.

  8. Multivariate Curve Resolution Applied to Hyperspectral Imaging Analysis of Chocolate Samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; de Juan, Anna; Tauler, Romà

    2015-08-01

    This paper shows the application of Raman and infrared hyperspectral imaging combined with multivariate curve resolution (MCR) to the analysis of the constituents of commercial chocolate samples. The combination of different spectral data pretreatment methods allowed decreasing the high fluorescent Raman signal contribution of whey in the investigated chocolate samples. Using equality constraints during MCR analysis, estimations of the pure spectra of the chocolate sample constituents were improved, as well as their relative contributions and their spatial distribution on the analyzed samples. In addition, unknown constituents could be also resolved. White chocolate constituents resolved from Raman hyperspectral image indicate that, at macro scale, sucrose, lactose, fat, and whey constituents were intermixed in particles. Infrared hyperspectral imaging did not suffer from fluorescence and could be applied for white and milk chocolate. As a conclusion of this study, micro-hyperspectral imaging coupled to the MCR method is confirmed to be an appropriate tool for the direct analysis of the constituents of chocolate samples, and by extension, it is proposed for the analysis of other mixture constituents in commercial food samples.

  9. Analysis of H2 clearance curves used to measure blood flow in rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Day, T J; Lagerlund, T D; Low, P A

    1989-01-01

    1. By use of the H2 clearance technique, blood flow was measured in the sciatic nerve of healthy, anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats at rest, during inferior vena cava occlusion and during 5-hydroxytryptamine infusion. The purpose was to clarify the mechanisms underlying the biexponential curves which are commonly obtained using this technique. 2. An analysis of the frequency distribution of rate constants of 270 nerve and thirty-three arterial samples indicated that H2 clearance rates cluster below 20 ml min-1 100 g-1 and between 70 and 100 ml min-1 100 g-1. This suggests that at least two compartments are present. 3. The contribution of diffusion was studied by recording H2 clearance immediately following circulatory arrest. Slow clearance rates (median = 2.4 ml min-1 100 g-1) were observed, indicating that diffusion is not likely to contribute significantly to nutritive flow under most situations. 4. The contribution of arteriovenous shunts to H2 clearance was assessed by determining H2 clearance during inferior vena cava occlusion and the infusion of 5-hydroxytryptamine. Both manoeuvres caused abolition of, or a significant reduction in the weight of, the fast component which indicates that this compartment is closely related to arteriovenous shunts in nerve. 5. By use of a multi-compartmental model, it was shown that H2 clearance should follow a multi-exponential course, where the weights of the components reflect the relative volumes of each compartment and the exponents represent the relative flow (i.e. flow per unit volume) in each compartment. 6. By use of other mathematical models, estimates were made for the clearance rates attributable to polarographic oxidation of H2 at the tip of the microelectrode (0.2 ml min-1 100 g-1) and to diffusion to air (2 ml min-1 100 g-1). The latter estimate is very close to the measured value of 2.4 ml min-1 100 g-1. 7. These findings indicate that it is possible to separately assess nutritive and non-nutritive flow by

  10. Light curve analysis of GSC 2750-0054 and GSC 03208-02644

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhateeb, M. M.; Nouh, M. I.

    2016-11-01

    We present the first photometric analysis for the newly discovered eclipsing binary systems of Algole-type GSC 2750-0054 and GSC 03208-02644. Our analysis was carried out by means of the most recent version of Wilson Devinney (WD) code, which applies the model atmosphere by (Kurucz, R., 1993. In: Milon, E. (Ed.), Light Curve Modeling of Eclipsing Binary Stars. Springer-Verlag, New York, p. 93) with a prescription in passband for the radiative treatment. The accepted light curve solutions reveal absolute physical parameters and the spectral classifications for the components are adopted. We derived the spectral types of the system GSC 2750-0054 as K3 and K7. The physical parameters of the system are M1 = 0.72 ± 0.03 M⊙, M2 = 0.47 ± 0.02 M⊙, R1 = 0.81 ± 0.03 R⊙, R2 = 0.62 ± 0.03 R⊙, L1 = 0.27 ± 0.01 L⊙ and L2 = 0.1 ± 0.004 L⊙. For the system, GSC 03208 02644 the spectral types of the components are A5 and A8. The physical parameters are M1 = 1.86 ± 0.076 M⊙, M2 = 1.21 ± 0.049 M⊙, R1 = 1.84 ± 0.075 R⊙, R2 = 1.75 ± 0.072 R⊙, L1 = 13.58 ± 0.55 L⊙ and L2 = 9.94 ± 0.41 L⊙. Comparison with the evolutionary models as well as the empirical databases is presented.

  11. Human fetal weight and placental weight growth curves. A mathematical analysis from a population at sea level.

    PubMed

    Bonds, D R; Mwape, B; Kumar, S; Gabbe, S G

    1984-01-01

    A mathematical analysis of human fetal and placental growth curves was made on data collected prospectively from a population at sea level. Both the fetal and placental growth curves can best be described by a form of the logistic equation inhibited growth model. The fetal growth rate reaches its maximum approximately 4 weeks after the placental growth rate has reached its maximum. Growth rate constants were calculated for several populations at various altitudes. PMID:6733167

  12. Melt electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Dalton, Paul D

    2011-01-01

    Melt electrospinning is relatively under-investigated compared to solution electrospinning but provides opportunities in numerous areas, in which solvent accumulation or toxicity are a concern. These applications are diverse, and provide a broad set of challenges to researchers involved in electrospinning. In this context, melt electrospinning provides an alternative approach that bypasses some challenges to solution electrospinning, while bringing new issues to the forefront, such as the thermal stability of polymers. This Focus Review describes the literature on melt electrospinning, as well as highlighting areas where both melt and solution are combined, and potentially merge together in the future.

  13. Melting of Ice under Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

    2008-07-31

    The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 to 50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 to 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above {approx}45 GPa there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve due to the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid, prior to melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

  14. Investigating the Equilibrium Melting Temperature of Polyethylene Using the Non-Linear Hoffman-Weeks Analysis: Effect of Molecular Weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Marand, Herve

    The limiting equilibrium melting temperature for infinite molar mass linear polyethylene, Tmo , has been a point of controversy for about five decades. On one hand, Broadhurst and Flory-Vrij extrapolated melting data for short alkanes to a value of ca. 145oC. On the other hand, Wunderlich proposed a value of 141oC from melting studies of extended-chain PE crystals formed under high pressure. While a difference in Tmo by 4oC might seem superfluous, it has significant implication for the analysis of the temperature and chain length dependences of crystal growth kinetic data. In this work we estimate the equilibrium melting temperatures, Tm for three linear narrow molecular weight distribution polyethylenes using the non-linear Hoffman-Weeks treatment. The resulting Tm values thus obtained are significantly lower than these predicted by the Flory-Vrij treatment and are within experimental uncertainty indistinguishable from those reported by Wunderlich and Hikosaka et al. Our results also suggest that the constant C2 in the expression for the undercooling dependence of the initial lamellar thickness (lg*= C1/ ΔT + C2) increases linearly with chain length.

  15. Microwave melt and offgas analysis results from a Ferro Corporation{reg_sign} glass frit

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.A.; Hoffman, C.R.; Knutson, P.T.

    1995-03-01

    In support of the Residue Treatment Technology (RTT) Microwave Solidification project, Waste Projects and Surface Water personnel conducted a series of experiments to determine the feasibility of encapsulating a surrogate sludge waste using the microwave melter. The surrogate waste was prepared by RTT and melted with five varying compositions of low melting glass frit supplied by the Ferro Corporation. Samples were melted using a 50% waste/50% glass frit and a 47.5% waste/47.5% glass frit/5% carbon powder. This was done to evaluate the effectiveness of carbon at reducing a sulfate-based surface scale which has been observed in previous experiments and in full-scale testing. These vitrified samples were subsequently submitted to Environmental Technology for toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. Two of the five frits tested in this experiment merit further evaluation as raw materials for the microwave melter. Ferro frit 3110 with and without carbon powder produced a crystalline product which passed TCLP testing. The quality of the melt product could be improved by increasing the melting temperature from 900{degrees}C to approximately 1150-1200{degrees}C. Ferro frit 3249 produced the optimal quality of glass based on visual observations, but failed TCLP testing for silver when melted without carbon powder. This frit requires a slightly higher melting temperature ({ge} 1200{degrees}C) compared to frit 3110 and produces a superior product. In conjunction with this work, Surface Water personnel conducted offgas analyses using a Thermal Desorption Mass Spectrometer (TDMS) on selected formulations. The offgas analyses identified and quantified water vapor (H{sub 2}O), oxygen (O{sub 2}) and carbon oxides (CO and CO{sub 2}), sulfur (S) and sulfur oxides (SO and SO{sub 2}), and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO{sub 2}) that volatilized during glass formation.

  16. Analysis of Surface Plasmon Resonance Curves with a Novel Sigmoid-Asymmetric Fitting Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Jang, Daeho; Chae, Geunhyoung; Shin, Sehyun

    2015-01-01

    The present study introduces a novel curve-fitting algorithm for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) curves using a self-constructed, wedge-shaped beam type angular interrogation SPR spectroscopy technique. Previous fitting approaches such as asymmetric and polynomial equations are still unsatisfactory for analyzing full SPR curves and their use is limited to determining the resonance angle. In the present study, we developed a sigmoid-asymmetric equation that provides excellent curve-fitting for the whole SPR curve over a range of incident angles, including regions of the critical angle and resonance angle. Regardless of the bulk fluid type (i.e., water and air), the present sigmoid-asymmetric fitting exhibited nearly perfect matching with a full SPR curve, whereas the asymmetric and polynomial curve fitting methods did not. Because the present curve-fitting sigmoid-asymmetric equation can determine the critical angle as well as the resonance angle, the undesired effect caused by the bulk fluid refractive index was excluded by subtracting the critical angle from the resonance angle in real time. In conclusion, the proposed sigmoid-asymmetric curve-fitting algorithm for SPR curves is widely applicable to various SPR measurements, while excluding the effect of bulk fluids on the sensing layer. PMID:26437414

  17. Analysis of Surface Plasmon Resonance Curves with a Novel Sigmoid-Asymmetric Fitting Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Daeho; Chae, Geunhyoung; Shin, Sehyun

    2015-01-01

    The present study introduces a novel curve-fitting algorithm for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) curves using a self-constructed, wedge-shaped beam type angular interrogation SPR spectroscopy technique. Previous fitting approaches such as asymmetric and polynomial equations are still unsatisfactory for analyzing full SPR curves and their use is limited to determining the resonance angle. In the present study, we developed a sigmoid-asymmetric equation that provides excellent curve-fitting for the whole SPR curve over a range of incident angles, including regions of the critical angle and resonance angle. Regardless of the bulk fluid type (i.e., water and air), the present sigmoid-asymmetric fitting exhibited nearly perfect matching with a full SPR curve, whereas the asymmetric and polynomial curve fitting methods did not. Because the present curve-fitting sigmoid-asymmetric equation can determine the critical angle as well as the resonance angle, the undesired effect caused by the bulk fluid refractive index was excluded by subtracting the critical angle from the resonance angle in real time. In conclusion, the proposed sigmoid-asymmetric curve-fitting algorithm for SPR curves is widely applicable to various SPR measurements, while excluding the effect of bulk fluids on the sensing layer. PMID:26437414

  18. Kepler light-curve analysis of the blazar W2R 1926+42

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, P.; Gupta, Alok C.; Bachev, Rumen; Strigachev, Anton

    2016-02-01

    We study the long term Kepler light curve of the blazar W2R 1926+42 (˜1.6 yr) which indicates a variety of variability properties during different intervals of observation. The normalized excess variance, Fvar ranges from 1.8 per cent in the quiescent phase and 43.3 per cent in the outburst phase. We find no significant deviation from linearity in the Fvar-flux relation. Time series analysis is conducted using the Fourier power spectrum and the wavelet analysis methods to study the power spectral density (PSD) shape, infer characteristic time-scales and statistically significant quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). A bending power law with an associated time-scale of T_B = 6.2^{+6.4}_{-3.1} hours is inferred in the PSD analysis. We obtain a black hole mass of M• = (1.5-5.9) × 107 M⊙ for the first time using Fvar and the bend time-scale for this source. From a mean outburst lifetime of days, we infer a distance from the jet base r ≤ 1.75 pc indicating that the outburst originates due to a shock. A possible QPO peaked at 9.1 d and lasting 3.4 cycles is inferred from the wavelet analysis. Assuming that the QPO is a true feature, r = (152-378)GM•/c2 and supported by the other timing analysis products such as a weighted mean PSD slope of -1.5 ± 0.2 from the PSD analysis, we argue that the observed variability and the weak and short duration QPO could be due to jet based processes including orbital features in a relativistic helical jet and others such as shocks and turbulence.

  19. Evaluation of drug-polymer solubility curves through formal statistical analysis: comparison of preparation techniques.

    PubMed

    Knopp, Matthias Manne; Olesen, Niels Erik; Holm, Per; Löbmann, Korbinian; Holm, René; Langguth, Peter; Rades, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the influence of the preparation technique (ball milling, spray drying, and film casting) of a supersaturated amorphous dispersion on the quality of solubility determinations of indomethacin in polyvinylpyrrolidone was investigated by means of statistical analysis. After annealing of the amorphous dispersions above the crystallization temperature for 2 h, the solubility curve was derived from the glass transition temperature of the demixed material using the Gordon-Taylor relationship and fitting with the Flory-Huggins model. The study showed that the predicted solubility from the ball-milled mixtures was not consistent with those from spray drying and film casting, indicating fundamental differences between the preparation techniques. Through formal statistical analysis, the best combination of fit to the Flory-Huggins model and reproducibility of the measurements was analyzed. Ball milling provided the best reproducibility of the three preparation techniques; however, an analysis of residuals revealed a systematic error. In contrast, film casting demonstrated a good fit to the model but poor reproducibility of the measurements. Therefore, this study recommends that techniques such as spray drying or potentially film casting (if experimental reproducibility can be improved) should be used to prepare the amorphous dispersions when performing solubility measurements of this kind.

  20. Rapid real-time PCR and high resolution melt analysis in a self-filling thermoplastic chip.

    PubMed

    Sposito, A; Hoang, V; DeVoe, D L

    2016-09-21

    A microfluidic platform designed for point-of-care PCR-based nucleic acid diagnostics is described. Compared to established microfluidic PCR technologies, the system is unique in its ability to achieve exceptionally rapid PCR amplification in a low cost thermoplastic format, together with high temperature accuracy enabling effective validation of reaction product by high resolution melt analysis performed in the same chamber as PCR. In addition, the system employs capillary pumping for automated loading of sample into the reaction chamber, combined with an integrated hydrophilic valve for precise self-metering of sample volumes into the device. Using the microfluidic system to target a mutation in the G6PC gene, efficient PCR from human genomic DNA template is achieved with cycle times as low as 14 s, full amplification in 8.5 min, and final melt analysis accurately identifying the desired amplicon. PMID:27460504

  1. [Application of calibration curve method and partial least squares regression analysis to quantitative analysis of nephrite samples using XRF].

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Su, Bo-min; Li, Qing-hui; Gan, Fu-xi

    2015-01-01

    The authors tried to find a method for quantitative analysis using pXRF without solid bulk stone/jade reference samples. 24 nephrite samples were selected, 17 samples were calibration samples and the other 7 are test samples. All the nephrite samples were analyzed by Proton induced X-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE) quantitatively. Based on the PIXE results of calibration samples, calibration curves were created for the interested components/elements and used to analyze the test samples quantitatively; then, the qualitative spectrum of all nephrite samples were obtained by pXRF. According to the PIXE results and qualitative spectrum of calibration samples, partial least square method (PLS) was used for quantitative analysis of test samples. Finally, the results of test samples obtained by calibration method, PLS method and PIXE were compared to each other. The accuracy of calibration curve method and PLS method was estimated. The result indicates that the PLS method is the alternate method for quantitative analysis of stone/jade samples.

  2. Decline curve analysis of production data from The Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Ripperda, M.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1987-01-01

    Production data for over two hundred wells at The Geysers geothermal field were compiled and analyzed. Decline curves for groups of wells with 5, 10, and 40 acre spacing are presented and compared to curves published previously by Budd (1972) and Dykstra (1981). Decline curves for several individual wells and leases are discussed to illustrate the effects of well spacing and location, as well as the heterogeneous nature of the reservoir.

  3. Decline Curve Analysis of Production Data from the Geysers Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Ripperda, M.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1987-01-20

    Production data for over two hundred wells at The Geysers geothermal field were compiled and analysed. Decline curves for groups of wells with 5, 10, and 40 acre spacing are presented and compared to curves published previously by Budd (1972) and Dykstra (1981). Decline curves for several individual wells and leases are discussed to illustrate the effects of well spacing and location, as well as the heterogeneous nature of the reservoir. 6 figs., 1 tab., 10 refs.

  4. Testing and Analysis of the First Plastic Melt Waste Compactor Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, Gregory S.; Fisher, John W.

    2005-01-01

    A half scale Plastic Melt Waste Compactor prototype has been developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The half scale prototype unit will lead to the development of a full scale Plastic Melt Waste Compactor prototype that is representative of flight hardware that would be used on near and far term space missions. This report details the testing being done on the prototype Plastic Melt Waste Compactor by the Solid Waste Management group at NASA Ames Research Center. The tests are designed to determine the prototype's functionality, simplicity of operation, ability to contain and control noxious off-gassing, biological stability of the processed waste, and water recovery potential using a waste composite that is representative of the types of wastes produced on the International Space Station, Space Shuttle, MIR and Skylab missions.

  5. Analysis of multicomponent evaporation in electron beam melting and refining of titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, A.; Szekely, J.; Pal, U.; Avyle, J. van den; Damkroger, B.

    1997-12-01

    Experimental evidence and a mathematical model are presented to evaluate the effect of beam-scan frequency on composition change in electron-beam melting of titanium alloys. Experiments characterized the evaporation rate of commercially pure (CP) titanium and vapor composition over titanium alloy with up to 6 wt pct aluminum and 4.5 wt pct vanadium, as a function of beam power, scan frequency, and background pressure. These data and thermal mapping of the hearth melt surface are used to estimate activity coefficients of aluminum and vanadium in the hearth. The model describes transient heat transfer in the surface of the melt and provides a means of estimating enhancement of pure titanium evaporation and change in final aluminum composition due to local heating at moderate beam-scan frequencies.

  6. Reconstructing CO2 concentrations in basaltic melt inclusions from Cascade cinder cones using Raman analysis of vapor bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aster, E. M.; Wallace, P. J.; Moore, L.; Gazel, E.; Bodnar, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Because melt inclusions (MIs) trap melt prior to eruptive degassing, they are useful probes of melt volatile concentrations. However, during post-entrapment cooling and crystallization, the melt in the inclusion contracts more than the mineral host, causing depressurization and nucleation of a vapor bubble. This causes pressure-soluble volatiles, particularly CO2, to exsolve from the melt into the bubble. To explore the extent of CO2 loss, CO2 densities in bubbles were estimated using data from Raman analysis of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from two cinder cones in the southern Cascade Arc (Basalt of Round Valley Butte [BRVB]; Basalt of Old Railroad Grade [BORG]). In BRVB, bubble vol. % (bubble vol./MI vol.) and measured CO2 densities ranged from 0.9 - 6.7 vol. % and 0.05- 0.24 g/cm3, respectively. In BORG, bubble vol. % and CO2 densities ranged from 1.4 - 9.2 vol. % and 0.07 - 0.29 g/cm3, respectively. To eliminate MI containing bubbles that were co-entrapped with the melt, we used a model from Riker (2005) to predict bubble vol. % as a function of the difference between eruption and formation temperatures. This suggested that bubbles larger than ~3.3 vol. % should be eliminated from CO2 reconstructions. Using average values of MI H2O and CO2 measured by FTIR, we added CO2 from the bubbles back into the MIs to obtain estimates of dissolved CO2 at the time of trapping. Analyzed concentrations were 933 ppm CO2 and 2.8 wt. % H2O for BORG (2.7 kbar, or ~9 km depth), with a reconstructed CO2 concentration of 1860 ± 612 (2s) ppm. Analyzed concentrations for BRVB were 426 ppm CO2 and 1.6 wt. % H2O (1.1 kbar, or ~3.7 km depth), with a reconstructed CO2 concentration of 2320 ± 1688 (2s) ppm. Using the reconstructed CO2 concentrations, VolatileCalc estimates place both BORG and BRVB MI entrapment at 4.3 kbar, or ~14 km depth. Thus, adding the CO2 in bubbles back to the CO2 in the glass of MIs is essential for determining accurate depths of magma crystallization.

  7. Non-linear multivariate curve resolution analysis of voltammetric pH titrations.

    PubMed

    Díaz Cruz, José Manuel; Sanchís, Josep; Chekmeneva, Elena; Ariño, Cristina; Esteban, Miquel

    2010-07-01

    A new chemometric approach is put forward, dealing with the non-linear behaviour observed in the multivariate curve resolution (MCR) analysis of certain overlapping voltammetric signals obtained in titrations of metal complexes where pH is progressively changed. In such cases, non-reversible reduction signals move along the potential axis as a consequence of the involvement of H(+)-ions in the electrochemical process and cause a dramatic loss of linearity, which hinders accurate MCR analysis. The method proposed is based on the least-squares fitting of peak potential vs. pH datasets to parametric linear and sigmoid functions through the decomposition of the data matrix into both a concentration profile matrix and a unit signal matrix, in a similar way as in the alternating least-squares algorithm of MCR (ALS). Such calculations are carried out through several home-made Matlab programs which are freely available as Supplementary Material of the present work. The fitted parameters, along with the evolution of resolved concentrations and potential shifts with pH, provide valuable information on the complexation/reduction processes. The method is tested first on the relatively simple Cd(II)-NTA system and then applied to the study of the binding of Cd(II)-ions by glutathione (gamma-Glu-Cys-Gly, GSH) and the phytochelatin PC(2) ((gamma-Glu-Cys)(2)-Gly).

  8. THE XMM-NEWTON/EPIC X-RAY LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS OF WR 6

    SciTech Connect

    Ignace, R.; Gayley, K. G.; Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L. M.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Pollock, A. M. T.; McFall, M.

    2013-09-20

    We obtained four pointings of over 100 ks each of the well-studied Wolf-Rayet star WR 6 with the XMM-Newton satellite. With a first paper emphasizing the results of spectral analysis, this follow-up highlights the X-ray variability clearly detected in all four pointings. However, phased light curves fail to confirm obvious cyclic behavior on the well-established 3.766 day period widely found at longer wavelengths. The data are of such quality that we were able to conduct a search for event clustering in the arrival times of X-ray photons. However, we fail to detect any such clustering. One possibility is that X-rays are generated in a stationary shock structure. In this context we favor a corotating interaction region (CIR) and present a phenomenological model for X-rays from a CIR structure. We show that a CIR has the potential to account simultaneously for the X-ray variability and constraints provided by the spectral analysis. Ultimately, the viability of the CIR model will require both intermittent long-term X-ray monitoring of WR 6 and better physical models of CIR X-ray production at large radii in stellar winds.

  9. Impact Analysis of Embedded Delamination Location in Hybrid Curved Laminated Composite Stiffened Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naini, Jeevan Kumar; P, Ramesh Babu

    2016-08-01

    Modern, aero structures are predominantly of curved construction characterized by a skin and stiffeners. The latest generation of large passenger aircraft also uses mostly composite material in their primary structure and there is trend towards the utilization of bonding of subcomponents. The presence of delamination is a major problem in composite laminated panels and so, it is of great concern to both the academic and aeronautical industrial worlds Indeed delamination can strongly affect the material strength and, sometimes, can cause their breaking up in service. A Pre-damaged configuration is loaded to study the delamination location and mode for delamination initiation and propagation. A parametric study is conducted to investigate the effect of the location of the delamination propagation when delamination is embedded inbetween plies of the skin-stiffener interface, with the cases i) delamination located at front and inbetween plies of the skin-stiffener interface ii) delamination located in middle and inbetween plies of the skin-stiffener interface iii) delamination located at the end and inbetween plies of the skin- stiffener interface. Further the influence of the location of the delamination on load carrying capacity of the panel is investigated. The effect of location of debonds on crack growth and collapse behavior is analyzed using analysis tool. An analysis tool is applied that includes an approach for predicting interlaminar damage initiation and interlaminar damage growth as well as in-plane damage mechanisms to predict the design of defect free panel.

  10. Modeling and regression analysis of semiochemical dose-response curves of insect antennal reception and behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dose-response curves with semiochemicals are reported in many articles in insect chemical ecology regarding neurophysiology and behavioral bioassays. Most such curves are shown in figures where the x-axis has order of magnitude increases in dosages versus responses on the y-axis represented by point...

  11. Imaging the shallow subsurface with surface waves: dispersion curve analysis versus full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés Pérez Solano, Carlos; Donno, Daniela; Strobbia, Claudio; Chauris, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    Seismic surface wave analysis is a standard tool in geotechnical engineering for imaging the shallow subsurface. Most current surface wave analysis methods assume a horizontally layered medium, and estimate the near-surface shear velocity profile from dispersion curves, which are picked on frequency-wavenumber (f-k) gathers and then inverted using 1D modelling approaches. Media containing high velocity contrasts and irregular lateral variations might be difficult to be handled with the local 1D approximation. For 2D model estimation, full waveform inversion (FWI) is an alternative and can estimate high resolution models. The classical FWI objective function consists of the least-squares misfit between observed and modelled shot gathers (Tarantola, 1986). Classical FWI needs an accurate initial model for achieving convergence. Data sets containing surface waves could be inverted, without falling into secondary minima, if the data contains sufficiently low frequencies and large offsets such that multi-scale and time windowing approaches can be applied. We propose to invert surface waves with an alternative FWI-based approach that uses a modified objective function. It is based on the least-squares misfit between the absolute value of the f-k transform of windowed shot gathers. We refer to this approach as the windowed-Amplitude Waveform Inversion (w-AWI). Some secondary minima problems are mitigated: the choice of an initial model is easier in w-AWI than in FWI. The alternative objective function is intermediary between the one used in the 1D inversion approach (dispersion curves) and classical FWI. As most of the phase information is neglected in w-AWI, we use it as a first step before classical FWI. This sequential inversion approach using w-AWI followed by classical FWI aims at estimating a high-resolution near-surface velocity model, by explaining the complete elastic wavefield, even when the initial velocity model is far from the exact one. The proposed approach

  12. An analysis of watershed hydrological double mass curve based on elasticity index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenzhao; Ning, Tingting; Lin, Wen; Cheng, Liping; Han, Xiaoyang

    2016-04-01

    The method of double mass curve (DMC) is often used in the analysis of the consistency of hydro-meteorological factors and their inter-annual variations. The trend and slope of DMC are the focus of general concern. By taking the DMC of annual precipitation-runoff in a watershed as an example, this paper analyzed the characteristics of DMC variations by means of the elasticity index obtained by the curve slope divided by the ratio of accumulated runoff to accumulated precipitation at corresponding location. Using a year as a time step, the index was further simplified to be the ratio of annual runoff coefficient to the runoff coefficient averaged over the period from starting year to computing year. An elasticity index greater than, less than, or equal to one indicated rising, decline, or stability of average annual runoff coefficient, respectively. Variation trend of elasticity index was analyzed to extract the information on the years with significant change and then, dominant factors and their impacts could be enquired further. The Jinghe River is located in the middle reaches of the Yellow River, being the largest tributary of the Weihe River. The elasticity index was used to analyze the DMC of annual precipitation-runoff on the scale of water year for the Jinghe River watershed from 1961 to 2012 and the two years of 1971 and 1997 were first chosen as the years showing abrupt changes. The elasticity indices in three periods separated by the two years in the past 50 years averaged 1.08, 0.89 and 0.64 and annual runoff coefficients, 0.08, 0.07 and 0.05, respectively. The human activities disturbing underlying surface were found to be the important factor responsible for the remarkable decline of runoff coefficient. The large-scale comprehensive control of soil erosion and the adjustment of landuse structure had made some achievements in the recent twenty years. However, their disturbing effects on underlying surface interacted with the impacts of climate change

  13. Rapid and efficient differentiation of Yersinia species using high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Roberto A; Frazão, Miliane R; Almeida, Alzira M P; Falcão, Juliana P

    2015-08-01

    The primary goal of clinical microbiology is the accurate identification of the causative agent of the disease. Here, we describe a method for differentiation between Yersinia species using PCR-HRMA. The results revealed species-specific melting profiles. The herein developed assay can be used as an effective method to differentiate Yersinia species.

  14. BEER Analysis of Kepler and CoRoT Light Curves. II. Evidence for Superrotation in the Phase Curves of Three Kepler Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faigler, S.; Mazeh, T.

    2015-02-01

    We analyzed the Kepler light curves of four transiting hot Jupiter systems—KOI-13, HAT-P-7, TrES-2, and Kepler-76, which show BEaming, Ellipsoidal, and Reflection (BEER) phase modulations. The mass of the four planets can be estimated from either the beaming or the ellipsoidal amplitude, given the mass and radius of their parent stars. For KOI-13, HAT-P-7, and Kepler-76 we find that the beaming-based planetary mass estimate is larger than the mass estimated from the ellipsoidal amplitude, consistent with previous studies. This apparent discrepancy may be explained by equatorial superrotation of the planet atmosphere, which induces an angle shift of the planet reflection/emission phase modulation, as was suggested for Kepler-76 in the first paper of this series. We propose a modified BEER model that supports superrotation, assuming either a Lambertian or geometric reflection/emission phase function, and provides a photometry-consistent estimate of the planetary mass. Our analysis shows that for Kepler-76 and HAT-P-7, the Lambertian superrotation BEER model is highly preferable over an unshifted null model, while for KOI-13 it is preferable only at a 1.4σ level. For TrES-2 we do not find such preference. For all four systems the Lambertian superrotation model mass estimates are in excellent agreement with the planetary masses derived from, or constrained by, radial velocity measurements. This makes the Lambertian superrotation BEER model a viable tool for estimating the masses of hot Jupiters from photometry alone. We conclude that hot Jupiter superrotation may be a common phenomenon that can be detected in the visual light curves of Kepler.

  15. BEER ANALYSIS OF KEPLER AND CoRoT LIGHT CURVES. II. EVIDENCE FOR SUPERROTATION IN THE PHASE CURVES OF THREE KEPLER HOT JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Faigler, S.; Mazeh, T.

    2015-02-10

    We analyzed the Kepler light curves of four transiting hot Jupiter systems—KOI-13, HAT-P-7, TrES-2, and Kepler-76, which show BEaming, Ellipsoidal, and Reflection (BEER) phase modulations. The mass of the four planets can be estimated from either the beaming or the ellipsoidal amplitude, given the mass and radius of their parent stars. For KOI-13, HAT-P-7, and Kepler-76 we find that the beaming-based planetary mass estimate is larger than the mass estimated from the ellipsoidal amplitude, consistent with previous studies. This apparent discrepancy may be explained by equatorial superrotation of the planet atmosphere, which induces an angle shift of the planet reflection/emission phase modulation, as was suggested for Kepler-76 in the first paper of this series. We propose a modified BEER model that supports superrotation, assuming either a Lambertian or geometric reflection/emission phase function, and provides a photometry-consistent estimate of the planetary mass. Our analysis shows that for Kepler-76 and HAT-P-7, the Lambertian superrotation BEER model is highly preferable over an unshifted null model, while for KOI-13 it is preferable only at a 1.4σ level. For TrES-2 we do not find such preference. For all four systems the Lambertian superrotation model mass estimates are in excellent agreement with the planetary masses derived from, or constrained by, radial velocity measurements. This makes the Lambertian superrotation BEER model a viable tool for estimating the masses of hot Jupiters from photometry alone. We conclude that hot Jupiter superrotation may be a common phenomenon that can be detected in the visual light curves of Kepler.

  16. Rapid Identification of Echinococcus granulosus and E. canadensis Using High-Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis by Focusing on a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Safa, Ahmad Hosseini; Harandi, Majid Fasihi; Tajaddini, Mohammadhasan; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Mohtashami-Pour, Mehdi; Pestehchian, Nader

    2016-07-22

    High-resolution melting (HRM) is a reliable and sensitive scanning method to detect variation in DNA sequences. We used this method to better understand the epidemiology and transmission of Echinococcus granulosus. We tested the use of HRM to discriminate the genotypes of E. granulosus and E. canadensis. One hundred forty-one hydatid cysts were collected from slaughtered animals in different parts of Isfahan-Iran in 2013. After DNA extraction, the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene was amplified using PCR coupled with the HRM curve. The result of HRM analysis using partial the sequences of cox1 gene revealed that 93, 35, and 2 isolates were identified as G1, G3, and G6 genotypes, respectively. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was found in locus 9867 of the cox1 gene. This is a critical locus for the differentiation between the G6 and G7 genotypes. In the phylogenic tree, the sample with a SNP was located between the G6 and G7 genotypes, which suggest that this isolate has a G6/G7 genotype. The HRM analysis developed in the present study provides a powerful technique for molecular and epidemiological studies on echinococcosis in humans and animals. PMID:26567833

  17. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of complex temperature-programmed desorption data by multivariate curve resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Reyes, Juan Carlos F.; Teplyakov, Andrew V.; Brown, Steven D.

    2010-10-01

    The substantial amount of information carried in temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments is often difficult to mine due to the occurrence of competing reaction pathways that produce compounds with similar mass spectrometric features. Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) is introduced as a tool capable of overcoming this problem by mathematically detecting spectral variations and correlations between several m/z traces, which is later translated into the extraction of the cracking pattern and the desorption profile for each desorbate. Different from the elegant (though complex) methods currently available to analyze TPD data, MCR analysis is applicable even when no information regarding the specific surface reaction/desorption process or the nature of the desorbing species is available. However, when available, any information can be used as constraints that guide the outcome, increasing the accuracy of the resolution. This approach is especially valuable when the compounds desorbing are different from what would be expected based on a chemical intuition, when the cracking pattern of the model test compound is difficult or impossible to obtain (because it could be unstable or very rare), and when knowing major components desorbing from the surface could in more traditional methods actually bias the quantification of minor components. The enhanced level of understanding of thermal processes achieved through MCR analysis is demonstrated by analyzing three phenomena: i) the cryogenic desorption of vinyltrimethylsilane from silicon, an introductory system where the known multilayer and monolayer components are resolved; ii) acrolein hydrogenation on a bimetallic Pt-Ni-Pt catalyst, where a rapid identification of hydrogenated products as well as other desorbing species is achieved, and iii) the thermal reaction of Ti[N(CH 3) 2] 4 on Si(100), where the products of surface decomposition are identified and an estimation of the surface composition after the

  18. The role of Soil Water Retention Curve in slope stability analysis in unsaturated and heterogeneous soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antinoro, Chiara; Arnone, Elisa; Noto, Leonardo V.

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms of rainwater infiltration causing slope instability had been analyzed and reviewed in many scientific works. Rainwater infiltration into unsaturated soil increases the degree of saturation, hence affecting the shear strength properties and thus the probability of slope failure. It has been widely proved that the shear strength properties change with the soil water suction in unsaturated soils; therefore, the accuracy to predict the relationship between soil water content and soil water suction, parameterized by the soil-water characteristic curve, has significant effects on the slope stability analysis. The aim of this study is to investigate how the characterization of SWRC of differently structured unsaturated soils affects the slope stability on a simple infinite slope. In particular, the unimodal and bimodal distributions of the soil pore size were compared. Samples of 40 soils, highly different in terms of structure and texture, were collected and used to calibrate two bimodal SWRCs, i.e. Ross and Smettem (1993) and Dexter et al., (2008). The traditional unimodal van Genuchten (1980) model was also applied for comparison. Slope stability analysis was conducted in terms of Factor of Safety (FS) by applying the infinite slope model for unsaturated soils. In the used formulation, the contribution of the suction effect is tuned by a parameter 'chi' in a rate proportional to the saturation conditions. Different parameterizations of this term were also compared and analyzed. Results indicated that all three SWRC models showed good overall performance in fitting the sperimental SWRCs. Both the RS and DE models described adequately the water retention data for soils with a bimodal behavior confirmed from the analysis of pore size distribution, but the best performance was obtained by DE model confirmed. In terms of FS, the tree models showed very similar results as soil moisture approached to the saturated condition; however, within the residual zone

  19. XCT analysis of the influence of melt strategies on defect population in Ti–6Al–4V components manufactured by Selective Electron Beam Melting

    SciTech Connect

    Tammas-Williams, S.; Zhao, H.; Léonard, F.; Derguti, F.; Todd, I.; Prangnell, P.B.

    2015-04-15

    Selective Electron Beam Melting (SEBM) is a promising powder bed Additive Manufacturing technique for near-net-shape manufacture of high-value titanium components. However without post-manufacture HIPing the fatigue life of SEBM parts is currently dominated by the presence of porosity. In this study, the size, volume fraction, and spatial distribution of the pores in model samples have been characterised in 3D, using X-ray Computed Tomography, and correlated to the process variables. The average volume fraction of the pores (< 0.2%) was measured to be lower than that usually observed in competing processes, such as selective laser melting, but a strong relationship was found with the different beam strategies used to contour, and infill by hatching, a part section. The majority of pores were found to be small spherical gas pores, concentrated in the infill hatched region; this was attributed to the lower energy density and less focused beam used in the infill strategy allowing less opportunity for gas bubbles to escape the melt pool. Overall, increasing the energy density or focus of the beam was found to correlate strongly to a reduction in the level of gas porosity. Rarer irregular shaped pores were mostly located in the contour region and have been attributed to a lack of fusion between powder particles. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Vast majority of defects detected were small spherical gas pores. • Gas bubbles trapped in the powder granules expand and coalesce in the melt pool. • Pores have been shown not to be randomly distributed. • Larger and deeper melt pools give more opportunity for gas to escape. • Minor changes to melt strategy result in significant reductions in pore population.

  20. Selecting a linear mixed model for longitudinal data: repeated measures analysis of variance, covariance pattern model, and growth curve approaches.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siwei; Rovine, Michael J; Molenaar, Peter C M

    2012-03-01

    With increasing popularity, growth curve modeling is more and more often considered as the 1st choice for analyzing longitudinal data. Although the growth curve approach is often a good choice, other modeling strategies may more directly answer questions of interest. It is common to see researchers fit growth curve models without considering alterative modeling strategies. In this article we compare 3 approaches for analyzing longitudinal data: repeated measures analysis of variance, covariance pattern models, and growth curve models. As all are members of the general linear mixed model family, they represent somewhat different assumptions about the way individuals change. These assumptions result in different patterns of covariation among the residuals around the fixed effects. In this article, we first indicate the kinds of data that are appropriately modeled by each and use real data examples to demonstrate possible problems associated with the blanket selection of the growth curve model. We then present a simulation that indicates the utility of Akaike information criterion and Bayesian information criterion in the selection of a proper residual covariance structure. The results cast doubt on the popular practice of automatically using growth curve modeling for longitudinal data without comparing the fit of different models. Finally, we provide some practical advice for assessing mean changes in the presence of correlated data.

  1. Study of iron nanoparticle melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Shulgin, A. V.; Lavruk, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    In paper melting process of iron nanoparticles was investigated with molecular dynamics method. Melting temperatures was found for particles with radius from 1.5 to 4 nm. Results match with data of other authors. Heat capacity was calculated based on investigation of caloric curves. Dependence between heat capacity and temperature for different size of nanoparticles was approximated. Heat conductivity of iron nanoparticles was calculated.

  2. A BAYESIAN APPROACH TO THE ANALYSIS OF TIME SYMMETRY IN LIGHT CURVES: RECONSIDERING SCORPIUS X-1 OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Blocker, Alexander W.; Protopapas, Pavlos; Alcock, Charles R.

    2009-08-20

    We present a new approach to the analysis of time symmetry in light curves, such as those in the X-ray at the center of the Scorpius X-1 occultation debate. Our method uses a new parameterization for such events (the bilogistic event profile) and provides a clear, physically relevant characterization of each event's key features. We also demonstrate a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to carry out this analysis, including a novel independence chain configuration for the estimation of each event's location in the light curve. These tools are applied to the Scorpius X-1 light curves presented in Chang et al., providing additional evidence based on the time series that the events detected thus far are most likely not occultations by trans-Neptunian objects.

  3. M DWARFS IN SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY STRIPE 82: PHOTOMETRIC LIGHT CURVES AND FLARE RATE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hilton, Eric J.; Becker, Andrew C.; Sesar, Branimir; West, Andrew A.; Bochanski, John J.

    2009-08-15

    We present a flare rate analysis of 50,130 M dwarf light curves in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82. We identified 271 flares using a customized variability index to search {approx}2.5 million photometric observations for flux increases in the u and g bands. Every image of a flaring observation was examined by eye and with a point-spread function-matching and image subtraction tool to guard against false positives. Flaring is found to be strongly correlated with the appearance of H{alpha} in emission in the quiet spectrum. Of the 99 flare stars that have spectra, we classify eight as relatively inactive. The flaring fraction is found to increase strongly in stars with redder colors during quiescence, which can be attributed to the increasing flare visibility and increasing active fraction for redder stars. The flaring fraction is strongly correlated with |Z| distance such that most stars that flare are within 300 pc of the Galactic plane. We derive flare u-band luminosities and find that the most luminous flares occur on the earlier-type m dwarfs. Our best estimate of the lower limit on the flaring rate (averaged over Stripe 82) for flares with {delta}u {>=} 0.7 mag on stars with u < 22 is 1.3 flares hr{sup -1} deg{sup -2} but can vary significantly with the line of sight.

  4. M Dwarfs in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82: Photometric Light Curves and Flare Rate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hilton, Eric J.; Becker, Andrew C.; West, Andrew A.; Bochanski, John J.; Sesar, Branimir

    2009-08-01

    We present a flare rate analysis of 50,130 M dwarf light curves in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82. We identified 271 flares using a customized variability index to search ~2.5 million photometric observations for flux increases in the u and g bands. Every image of a flaring observation was examined by eye and with a point-spread function-matching and image subtraction tool to guard against false positives. Flaring is found to be strongly correlated with the appearance of Hα in emission in the quiet spectrum. Of the 99 flare stars that have spectra, we classify eight as relatively inactive. The flaring fraction is found to increase strongly in stars with redder colors during quiescence, which can be attributed to the increasing flare visibility and increasing active fraction for redder stars. The flaring fraction is strongly correlated with |Z| distance such that most stars that flare are within 300 pc of the Galactic plane. We derive flare u-band luminosities and find that the most luminous flares occur on the earlier-type m dwarfs. Our best estimate of the lower limit on the flaring rate (averaged over Stripe 82) for flares with Δu >= 0.7 mag on stars with u < 22 is 1.3 flares hr-1 deg-2 but can vary significantly with the line of sight. Based on observations obtained with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium.

  5. Analysis of HAT-P-2b Warm Spitzer Full Orbit Light Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nikole; Knuston, H.; Showman, A. P.; Fortney, J. J.; Agol, E.; Burrows, A.; Charbonneau, D.; Cowan, N. B.; Deming, D.; Desert, J.; Langton, J.; Laughlin, G.; Mighell, K. J.

    2011-05-01

    The Spitzer warm mission has already greatly expanded the field of exoplanet characterization with over 3000 hours of time dedicated to exoplanet observations. Observations of eclipsing systems with Spitzer are at the heart of these advances, as they allow us to move beyond simple mass and period estimates to determine planetary radius, dayside emission, and emission variations as a function of orbital phase. The eclipsing system HAT-P-2 is of special interest because the massive Jovian sized planet in this system is on a highly eccentric orbit (e=0.5171). Because HAT-P-2b's orbit is eccentric, the planet is subject to time variable heating and probable non-synchronous rotation. Circulation patterns that we expect to develop in HAT-P-2b's atmosphere will likely vary with both planetary local time and orbital phase. Here we present an analysis of a full orbit light curve from the HAT-P-2 system obtained during the most recent cycle of the Spitzer warm mission and discuss the constraints it imposes on the atmospheric circulation of HAT-P-2b. Support for this work was provided by NASA.

  6. Analysis of Curved Sandwich Panels Subjected to Combined Temperature Gradient and Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1998-01-01

    The results of a detailed study of the nonlinear response of curved sandwich panels with composite face sheets and subjected to a temperature gradient through-the-thickness combined with mechanical loadings are presented. The analysis is based on a first-order shear-deformation Sanders-Budiansky type theory with the effects of large displacements, moderate rotations, transverse shear deformation and laminated anisotropic material behavior included. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the generalized displacements and the stress resultants of the panel. The nonlinear displacements, strain energy, principal strains, transverse shear stresses, transverse shear strain energy density, and their hierarchical sensitivity coefficients are evaluated. The hierarchical sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the nonlinear response to variations in the panel parameters, the effective properties of the face sheet layers and the core, and the micromechanical parameters. Numerical results are presented for cylindrical panels subjected to combined pressure loading, edge shortening or extension, edge shear and a temperature gradient through the thickness. The results show the effects of variations in the loading and the panel aspect ratio, on the nonlinear response and its sensitivity to changes in the various panel, effective layer and micromechanical parameters.

  7. Reliability analysis of laser ultrasonics for train axle diagnostics based on model assisted POD curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, M. S.; Cavuto, A.; Martarelli, M.; Pandarese, G.; Revel, G. M.

    2014-05-01

    High speed train axles are integrated for a lifetime and it is time and resource consuming to conduct in service inspection with high accuracy. Laser ultrasonics is a proposed solution as a subset of non-contact measuring methods effective also for hard to reach areas and even recently proved to be effective using Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) or air-coupled probes in reception. A reliability analysis of laser ultrasonics for this specific application is here performed. The research is mainly based on numerical study of the effect of high energy laser pulses on the surface of a steel axle and of the behavior of the ultrasonic waves in detecting possible defects. Probability of Detection (POD) concept is used as an estimated reliability of the inspection method. In particular Model Assisted Probability of Detection (MAPOD), a modified form of POD where models are used to infer results for making a decisive statistical approach of POD curve, is here adopted. This paper implements this approach by taking the inputs from limited experiments conducted on a high speed train axle using laser ultrasonics (source pulsed Nd:Yag, reception by high-frequency LDV) to calibrate a multiphysics FE model and by using the calibrated model to generate data samples statistically representative of damaged train axles. The simulated flaws are in accordance with the real defects present on the axle. A set of flaws of different depth has been modeled in order to assess the laser ultrasonics POD for this specific application.

  8. BEER analysis of Kepler and CoRoT light curves. III. Spectroscopic confirmation of seventy new beaming binaries discovered in CoRoT light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal-Or, L.; Faigler, S.; Mazeh, T.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The BEER algorithm searches stellar light curves for the BEaming, Ellipsoidal, and Reflection photometric modulations that are caused by a short-period companion. These three effects are typically of very low amplitude and can mainly be detected in light curves from space-based photometers. Unlike eclipsing binaries, these effects are not limited to edge-on inclinations. Aims: Applying the algorithm to wide-field photometric surveys such as CoRoT and Kepler offers an opportunity to better understand the statistical properties of short-period binaries. It also widens the window for detecting intrinsically rare systems, such as short-period brown-dwarf and massive-planetary companions to main-sequence stars. Methods: Applying the search to the first five long-run center CoRoT fields, we identified 481 non-eclipsing candidates with periodic flux amplitudes of 0.5-87 mmag. Optimizing the Anglo-Australian-Telescope pointing coordinates and the AAOmega fiber-allocations with dedicated softwares, we acquired six spectra for 231 candidates and seven spectra for another 50 candidates in a seven-night campaign. Analysis of the red-arm AAOmega spectra, which covered the range of 8342-8842 Å, yielded a radial-velocity precision of ~1 km s-1. Spectra containing lines of more than one star were analyzed with the two-dimensional correlation algorithm TODCOR. Results: The measured radial velocities confirmed the binarity of seventy of the BEER candidates - 45 single-line binaries, 18 double-line binaries, and 7 diluted binaries. We show that red giants introduce a major source of false candidates and demonstrate a way to improve BEER's performance in extracting higher fidelity samples from future searches of CoRoT light curves. The periods of the confirmed binaries span a range of 0.3-10 days and show a rise in the number of binaries per ΔlogP toward longer periods. The estimated mass ratios of the double-line binaries and the mass ratios assigned to the single

  9. Deformation Analysis of Curved Folds in the Southern Upper Magdalena Valley. Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, G.; Bayona, G. A.; Silva, C.; Rapalini, A.; Trindade, R.

    2008-12-01

    In the Upper Magdalena Valley of Colombia there are folds with changes in the strike of their axes (e.g La Hocha Anticline), the origin of which was studied by integrating field, paleomagnetic and magnetic anisotropy data. Two structural domains were defined: the northern is a symmetrical fold and has a strike N10W, whereas the southern is an asymmetrical fold and has a N30E strike. The principal fault is the San Jacinto Fault, which is a reverse fault with slikensides indicating also a horizontal component of displacement. In the hanging wall of the San Jacinto Fault Mesozoic rocks crops out forming an anticline, whereas in the footwall Cenozoic rocks with vertical and locally overturned beds are exposed. Four magnetic components were isolated, being the low coercivity/temperature component similar to the present field. A characteristic component isolated in Cretaceous and Cenozoic rocks is a pre-fold but post-Oligocene component (n=5, D=0.8, I=2.4, K=62.33, a95=9.8). Two characteristic components were isolated in Jurassic rocks. The directions of the first are similar between domains (north domain: n=10 D=20.7 I=35.6 K=13 a95=12.5; south domain: n=6 D=12 I=28.9 K=16 a95=9.5), suggesting no relationship between strike changes and declination variation. The other component has negative inclination (n=2 D=13.8 I=-27.1 K=61.42 a95=11.8) indicating a mean paleolatitude of 14.4S in Jurassic time. Paleomagnetic data suggest that the curved fold is controlled by the geometry of the paleobasin and support the northward translation of accreted terranes along the Western margin of South America during the Jurassic. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility analysis in Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks document three magnetic fabrics: (1) Undeformed fabrics are located in the back limb of La Hocha Anticline; (2) tectonics fabrics are associated to reverse fault planes in the north and south domains and indicated a relationship between the anisotropy ellipsoid with the local stress

  10. Influence of plasma conditions on the intensity ratio calibration curve during laser induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan-Kyu; In, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Seok-Hee; Jeong, Sungho

    2014-07-01

    Quantitative prediction of elemental concentration or concentration ratio of solid samples can be achieved by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy if a calibration curve that is little influenced by plasma conditions could be obtained. This work demonstrates that such a calibration curve is available for copper indium gallium diselenide (CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se₂) thin film solar cells for properly selected spectral lines. The possible changes of calibration curves based on the selected spectral lines are discussed in consideration of self-absorption in optically thick plasma and the dependency of spectral line properties on plasma temperature.

  11. Analysis of the U-B-V photoelectric light curves of the eclipsing binary GT CEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolini, C.; Bonifazi, A.; Milano, L.

    1984-03-01

    The authors analyse the UBV light curves of GT Cep with different methods of solution. Some difficulties arise from the peculiar morphology of the light curves. The authors discuss the set of results and finally adopt the solution they derived by the Wilson and Devinney direct method. The system results to be a semi-detached one and this fact partly justifies the observed peculiarities. Given their results, the authors question the physical reliability of different models representing the light curves of eclipsing binaries.

  12. Re-Analysis of the Solar Phase Curves of the Icy Galilean Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domingue, Deborah; Verbiscer, Anne

    1997-01-01

    Re-analysis of the solar phase curves of the icy Galilean satellites demonstrates that the quantitative results are dependent on the single particle scattering function incorporated into the photometric model; however, the qualitative properties are independent. The results presented here show that the general physical characteristics predicted by a Hapke model (B. Hapke, 1986, Icarus 67, 264-280) incorporating a two parameter double Henyey-Greenstein scattering function are similar to the predictions given by the same model incorporating a three parameter double Henyey-Greenstein scattering function as long as the data set being modeled has adequate coverage in phase angle. Conflicting results occur when the large phase angle coverage is inadequate. Analysis of the role of isotropic versus anisotropic multiple scattering shows that for surfaces as bright as Europa the two models predict very similar results over phase angles covered by the data. Differences arise only at those phase angles for which there are no data. The single particle scattering behavior between the leading and trailing hemispheres of Europa and Ganymede is commensurate with magnetospheric alterations of their surfaces. Ion bombardment will produce more forward scattering single scattering functions due to annealing of potential scattering centers within regolith particles (N. J. Sack et al., 1992, Icarus 100, 534-540). Both leading and trailing hemispheres of Europa are consistent with a high porosity model and commensurate with a frost surface. There are no strong differences in predicted porosity between the two hemispheres of Callisto, both are consistent with model porosities midway between that deduced for Europa and the Moon. Surface roughness model estimates predict that surface roughness increases with satellite distance from Jupiter, with lunar surface roughness values falling midway between those measured for Ganymede and Callisto. There is no obvious variation in predicted surface

  13. Development of synthetic velocity - depth damage curves using a Weighted Monte Carlo method and Logistic Regression analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vozinaki, Anthi Eirini K.; Karatzas, George P.; Sibetheros, Ioannis A.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.

    2014-05-01

    Damage curves are the most significant component of the flood loss estimation models. Their development is quite complex. Two types of damage curves exist, historical and synthetic curves. Historical curves are developed from historical loss data from actual flood events. However, due to the scarcity of historical data, synthetic damage curves can be alternatively developed. Synthetic curves rely on the analysis of expected damage under certain hypothetical flooding conditions. A synthetic approach was developed and presented in this work for the development of damage curves, which are subsequently used as the basic input to a flood loss estimation model. A questionnaire-based survey took place among practicing and research agronomists, in order to generate rural loss data based on the responders' loss estimates, for several flood condition scenarios. In addition, a similar questionnaire-based survey took place among building experts, i.e. civil engineers and architects, in order to generate loss data for the urban sector. By answering the questionnaire, the experts were in essence expressing their opinion on how damage to various crop types or building types is related to a range of values of flood inundation parameters, such as floodwater depth and velocity. However, the loss data compiled from the completed questionnaires were not sufficient for the construction of workable damage curves; to overcome this problem, a Weighted Monte Carlo method was implemented, in order to generate extra synthetic datasets with statistical properties identical to those of the questionnaire-based data. The data generated by the Weighted Monte Carlo method were processed via Logistic Regression techniques in order to develop accurate logistic damage curves for the rural and the urban sectors. A Python-based code was developed, which combines the Weighted Monte Carlo method and the Logistic Regression analysis into a single code (WMCLR Python code). Each WMCLR code execution

  14. Video meteor light curve analysis of Orionids and Geminids and developing a method for obtaining the absolute light curves of shower meteors from the single station data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grašić, L.; Milanović, N.; Pavlović, D.

    2016-01-01

    We developed a method for obtaining the absolute light curves of the shower meteors from single station video data. We found that even though the height of a meteor atmospheric trajectory obtained by using this method may have a large error, the absolute light curve shape is preserved. We used our method to calculate the F parameters of the Orionid and Geminid light curves. The light curves were obtained from the single station video data by the instrument with a limiting sensitivity of 3.5m. We found that for our sample of the light curves the zenith distance of meteor radiant does not affect the F parameter for either of the two showers. The value of F parameter of the Orionids obtained in this paper matches the values obtained by other authors, whilst for the Geminids it is significantly different.

  15. High-resolution melting analysis using unlabeled probe and amplicon scanning simultaneously detects several lactase persistence variants.

    PubMed

    Janukonyté, Jurgita; Vestergaard, Else M; Ladefoged, Søren A; Nissen, Peter H

    2010-12-01

    Lactase persistence and thereby tolerance to lactose is a common trait in people of Northern European descent. It is linked to the LCT -13910C>T variant located in intron 13 of the MCM6 gene 13.9 kb upstream of the lactase (LCT) gene. In people of African and Middle Eastern descent, lactase persistence can be associated with other variants nearby the -13910C>T variant, limiting the use of the -13910C>T-based SNP analysis, e.g. TaqMan assays for the diagnosis of lactose intolerance. Using high-resolution melting analysis, we identified five samples that were heterozygous for the -13915T>G variant among 78 patients genotyped as -13910C/C by a TaqMan assay. All samples originated from patients of probable Middle Eastern descent. In order to detect the -13910 and -13915 variants simultaneously, we developed a new high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis assay based on unlabeled probe genotyping and simultaneous amplicon scanning analysis. By using this assay we were able to distinguish the -13910 and -13915 genotypes clearly. Furthermore, we identified two rare variants, the -13907C>G and -13913T>C. With this method, based on an inexpensive unlabeled probe, it is possible to simultaneously detect the -13910C>T and -13915T>G variants in addition to rarer variants surrounding the -13910 site. This new method may contribute to improve the diagnostic performance of the genetic analysis for lactose intolerance.

  16. Development of a viability standard curve for microencapsulated probiotic bacteria using confocal microscopy and image analysis software.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sarah; Kailasapathy, Kasipathy; Phillips, Michael; Jones, Mark R

    2015-07-01

    Microencapsulation is proposed to protect probiotic strains from food processing procedures and to maintain probiotic viability. Little research has described the in situ viability of microencapsulated probiotics. This study successfully developed a real-time viability standard curve for microencapsulated bacteria using confocal microscopy, fluorescent dyes and image analysis software.

  17. Enhancing the Psychological Well-Being of Elderly Individuals through Tai Chi Exercise: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Fuzhong; Duncan, Terry E.; Duncan, Susan C.; McAuley, Edward; Chaumeton, Nigel R.; Harmer, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Examined whether a Tai Chi exercise program enhanced the psychological well-being of 98 elderly individuals. Analyzed repeated measures data about participants using latent growth curve analysis. Results indicate the beneficial effects of participation in the Tai Chi program. Discusses implications related to the exercise-psychological health…

  18. Self-Esteem Trajectories among Ethnic Minority Adolescents: A Growth Curve Analysis of the Patterns and Predictors of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Melissa L.; Way, Niobe

    2005-01-01

    The current study presents a growth curve analysis of self-esteem among Black, Latino, and Asian American high school students. A series of hierarchical linear models were used to examine patterns and predictors of change in self-esteem over time. Results revealed an average increase in self-esteem with age. Although boys and girls experienced…

  19. Prediction Accuracy of the Washington and Illinois Risk Assessment Instruments: An Application of Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camasso, Michael J.; Jagannathan, Radha

    1995-01-01

    Compares the predictive performances of the Illinois CANTS 17B and the Washington State Risk Matrix on a sample of New Jersey child protective services cases using logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Both instruments predict case recidivism, closings, and substantiation with probabilities greater than chance.…

  20. Specimen analysis of Skylab, M553 experiment, flight specimens, phase C.. [on metals melting containerless solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, D. J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Skylab 2 flight samples were analyzed to study containerless solidification and the effects of weightlessness on the process. A record of solute redistribution processes and of solidification terracing is reported. The solute redistribution process was highly localized, and low index, crystallographic system were suggested. Samples demonstrated that under reduced pressure and gravity conditions the anticipated solid/liquid solidification process was perturbed and superseded by solid/liquid/gas reactions during melting and solidification.

  1. Multilevel Models for the Analysis of Angle-Specific Torque Curves with Application to Master Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Humberto M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to outline a multilevel modeling approach to fit individual angle-specific torque curves describing concentric knee extension and flexion isokinetic muscular actions in Master athletes. The potential of the analytical approach to examine between individual differences across the angle-specific torque curves was illustrated including between-individuals variation due to gender differences at a higher level. Torques in concentric muscular actions of knee extension and knee extension at 60º·s−1 were considered within a range of motion between 5º and 85º (only torques “truly” isokinetic). Multilevel time series models with autoregressive covariance structures with standard multilevel models were superior fits compared with standard multilevel models for repeated measures to fit angle-specific torque curves. Third and fourth order polynomial models were the best fits to describe angle-specific torque curves of isokinetic knee flexion and extension concentric actions, respectively. The fixed exponents allow interpretations for initial acceleration, the angle at peak torque and the decrement of torque after peak torque. Also, the multilevel models were flexible to illustrate the influence of gender differences on the shape of torque throughout the range of motion and in the shape of the curves. The presented multilevel regression models may afford a general framework to examine angle-specific moment curves by isokinetic dynamometry, and add to the understanding mechanisms of strength development, particularly the force-length relationship, both related to performance and injury prevention. PMID:26839603

  2. Mixed Waste Treatment Cost Analysis for a Range of GeoMelt Vitrification Process Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L. E.

    2002-02-27

    GeoMelt is a batch vitrification process used for contaminated site remediation and waste treatment. GeoMelt can be applied in several different configurations ranging from deep subsurface in situ treatment to aboveground batch plants. The process has been successfully used to treat a wide range of contaminated wastes and debris including: mixed low-level radioactive wastes; mixed transuranic wastes; polychlorinated biphenyls; pesticides; dioxins; and a range of heavy metals. Hypothetical cost estimates for the treatment of mixed low-level radioactive waste were prepared for the GeoMelt subsurface planar and in-container vitrification methods. The subsurface planar method involves in situ treatment and the in-container vitrification method involves treatment in an aboveground batch plant. The projected costs for the subsurface planar method range from $355-$461 per ton. These costs equate to 18-20 cents per pound. The projected cost for the in-container method is $1585 per ton. This cost equates to 80 cents per pound. These treatment costs are ten or more times lower than the treatment costs for alternative mixed waste treatment technologies according to a 1996 study by the US Department of Energy.

  3. Melt Inclusion Analysis of RBT 04262 with Relationship to Shergottites and Mars Surface Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, S. A.; Brandon, A. D.; Peslier, A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Martian meteorite RBT 04262 is in the shergottite class. It displays the two lithologies typically found in "lherzolitic shergottites": one with a poikilitic texture of large pyroxene enclosing olivine and another with non-poikilitic texture. In the case of RBT 04262, the latter strongly ressembles an olivine- phyric shergottite which led the initial classification of this meteorite in that class. RBT 04262 has been studied with regards to its petrology, geochemistry and cosmic ray exposure and belongs to the enriched oxidized end-member of the shergottites. Studies on RBT 04262 have primarily focused on the bulk rock composition or each of the lithologies independently. To further elucidate RBT 04262's petrology and use it to better understand Martian geologic history, an in-depth study of its melt inclusions (MI) is being conducted. The MI chosen for this study are found within olivine grains. MI are thought to be trapped melts of the crystallizing magma preserved by the encapsulating olivine and offer snapshots of the composition of the magma as it evolves. Some MI, in the most Mg-rich part of the olivine of olivine-pyric shergottites, may even be representative of the meteorite parent melt.

  4. Statistical model to perform error analysis of curve fits of wind tunnel test data using the techniques of analysis of variance and regression analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    The considered research had the objective to design a statistical model that could perform an error analysis of curve fits of wind tunnel test data using analysis of variance and regression analysis techniques. Four related subproblems were defined, and by solving each of these a solution to the general research problem was obtained. The capabilities of the evolved true statistical model are considered. The least squares fit is used to determine the nature of the force, moment, and pressure data. The order of the curve fit is increased in order to delete the quadratic effect in the residuals. The analysis of variance is used to determine the magnitude and effect of the error factor associated with the experimental data.

  5. Second-Law Analysis of the Peristaltic Flow of an Incompressible Viscous Fluid in a Curved Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narla, V. K.; Prasad, K. M.; Ramana Murthy, J. V.

    2016-03-01

    The present investigation extends a consideration of peristaltic flow in curved channels through the second-law analysis. The lubrication approximation is employed to linearize the momentum, energy, and entropy generation rate equations. The stream function and temperature distribution are used to calculate the entropy generation number and the Bejan number. It is shown that the entropy generation rate in a peristaltic pump increases with the occlusion parameter. The entropy generation increases at the upper wall and decreases near the lower wall of the peristaltic channel as the curvature parameter increases. A curved surface acts as a strong source of entropy generation.

  6. Periodicity Analysis of X-ray Light Curves of SS 433

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. Y.; Lu, X. L.; Zhao, Q. W.; Dong, D. Q.; Lao, B. Q.; Lu, Y.; Wei, Y. H.; Wu, X. C.; An, T.

    2016-03-01

    SS 433 is the only X-ray binary to date that was detected to have a pair of well-collimated jets, and its orbital period, super orbital period, and nutation period were all detected at the same time. The study on the periodic X-ray variabilities is helpful for understanding its dynamic process of the central engine and the correlation with other bands. In the present paper, two time series analysis techniques, Lomb-Scargle periodogram and weighted wavelet Z-transform, are employed to search for the periodicities from the Swift/BAT (Burst Alert Telescope)(15--50 keV) and RXTE/ASM (Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer/All-Sky Monitor)(1.5--3, 3--5 and 5--12 keV) light curves of SS 433, and the Monte Carlo simulation is performed. For the 15--50 keV energy band, five significant periodic signals are detected, which are P_1(˜6.29 d), P_2 (˜6.54 d), P_3 (˜13.08 d), P_4 (˜81.50 d), and P_5 (˜162.30 d). For the 3--5 and 5--12 keV energy bands, periodic signals P_3 (˜13 d) and P_5 (˜162 d) are detected in both energy bands. However, for the 1.5--3 keV energy band, no significant periodic signal is detected. P_5 has the strongest periodic signal in the power spectrum for all the energy bands of 3--5, 5--12, and 15--50 keV, and it is consistent with that obtained by previous study in optical band. Further, due to the existence of relativistic radio jets, the X-ray and optical band variability of P_5 (˜162 d) is probably related to the precession of the relativistic jets. High coherence between X-ray and optical light curves may also imply that the X-ray and optical emissions are of the same physical origin. P_3 shows a good agreement with the orbital period (˜13.07 d) first obtained by previous study, and P_2 and P_4 are the high frequency harmonic components of P_3 and P_5, respectively. P_1 is detected from the power spectrum of 15--50 keV energy band only, and it is consistent with the systematic nutation period. As the power of energy band decreases (from hard X-ray to

  7. Evaluation of qPCR curve analysis methods for reliable biomarker discovery: bias, resolution, precision, and implications.

    PubMed

    Ruijter, Jan M; Pfaffl, Michael W; Zhao, Sheng; Spiess, Andrej N; Boggy, Gregory; Blom, Jochen; Rutledge, Robert G; Sisti, Davide; Lievens, Antoon; De Preter, Katleen; Derveaux, Stefaan; Hellemans, Jan; Vandesompele, Jo

    2013-01-01

    RNA transcripts such as mRNA or microRNA are frequently used as biomarkers to determine disease state or response to therapy. Reverse transcription (RT) in combination with quantitative PCR (qPCR) has become the method of choice to quantify small amounts of such RNA molecules. In parallel with the democratization of RT-qPCR and its increasing use in biomedical research or biomarker discovery, we witnessed a growth in the number of gene expression data analysis methods. Most of these methods are based on the principle that the position of the amplification curve with respect to the cycle-axis is a measure for the initial target quantity: the later the curve, the lower the target quantity. However, most methods differ in the mathematical algorithms used to determine this position, as well as in the way the efficiency of the PCR reaction (the fold increase of product per cycle) is determined and applied in the calculations. Moreover, there is dispute about whether the PCR efficiency is constant or continuously decreasing. Together this has lead to the development of different methods to analyze amplification curves. In published comparisons of these methods, available algorithms were typically applied in a restricted or outdated way, which does not do them justice. Therefore, we aimed at development of a framework for robust and unbiased assessment of curve analysis performance whereby various publicly available curve analysis methods were thoroughly compared using a previously published large clinical data set (Vermeulen et al., 2009) [11]. The original developers of these methods applied their algorithms and are co-author on this study. We assessed the curve analysis methods' impact on transcriptional biomarker identification in terms of expression level, statistical significance, and patient-classification accuracy. The concentration series per gene, together with data sets from unpublished technical performance experiments, were analyzed in order to assess the

  8. Evaluation of qPCR curve analysis methods for reliable biomarker discovery: bias, resolution, precision, and implications.

    PubMed

    Ruijter, Jan M; Pfaffl, Michael W; Zhao, Sheng; Spiess, Andrej N; Boggy, Gregory; Blom, Jochen; Rutledge, Robert G; Sisti, Davide; Lievens, Antoon; De Preter, Katleen; Derveaux, Stefaan; Hellemans, Jan; Vandesompele, Jo

    2013-01-01

    RNA transcripts such as mRNA or microRNA are frequently used as biomarkers to determine disease state or response to therapy. Reverse transcription (RT) in combination with quantitative PCR (qPCR) has become the method of choice to quantify small amounts of such RNA molecules. In parallel with the democratization of RT-qPCR and its increasing use in biomedical research or biomarker discovery, we witnessed a growth in the number of gene expression data analysis methods. Most of these methods are based on the principle that the position of the amplification curve with respect to the cycle-axis is a measure for the initial target quantity: the later the curve, the lower the target quantity. However, most methods differ in the mathematical algorithms used to determine this position, as well as in the way the efficiency of the PCR reaction (the fold increase of product per cycle) is determined and applied in the calculations. Moreover, there is dispute about whether the PCR efficiency is constant or continuously decreasing. Together this has lead to the development of different methods to analyze amplification curves. In published comparisons of these methods, available algorithms were typically applied in a restricted or outdated way, which does not do them justice. Therefore, we aimed at development of a framework for robust and unbiased assessment of curve analysis performance whereby various publicly available curve analysis methods were thoroughly compared using a previously published large clinical data set (Vermeulen et al., 2009) [11]. The original developers of these methods applied their algorithms and are co-author on this study. We assessed the curve analysis methods' impact on transcriptional biomarker identification in terms of expression level, statistical significance, and patient-classification accuracy. The concentration series per gene, together with data sets from unpublished technical performance experiments, were analyzed in order to assess the

  9. High-throughput quantitative analysis with cell growth kinetic curves for low copy number mutant cells.

    PubMed

    Xing, James Z; Gabos, Stephan; Huang, Biao; Pan, Tianhong; Huang, Min; Chen, Jie

    2012-10-01

    The mutation rate in cells induced by environmental genotoxic hazards is very low and difficult to detect using traditional cell counting assays. The established genetic toxicity tests currently recognized by regulatory authorities, such as conventional Ames and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) assays, are not well suited for higher-throughput screening as they require large amounts of test compounds and are very time consuming. In this study, we developed a novel cell-based assay for quantitative analysis of low numbers of cell copies with HPRT mutation induced by an environmental mutagen. The HPRT gene mutant cells induced by the mutagen were selected by 6-thioguanine (6-TG) and the cell's kinetic growth curve monitored by a real-time cell electronic sensor (RT-CES) system. When a threshold is set at a certain cell index (CI) level, samples with different initial mutant cell copies take different amounts of time in order for their growth (or CI accumulation) to cross this threshold. The more cells that are initially seeded in the test well, the faster the cell accumulation and therefore the shorter the time required to cross this threshold. Therefore, the culture time period required to cross the threshold of each sample corresponds to the original number of cells in the sample. A mutant cell growth time threshold (MT) value of each sample can be calculated to predict the number of original mutant cells. For mutagenesis determination, the RT-CES assay displayed an equal sensitivity (p > 0.05) and coefficients of variation values with good correlation to conventional HPRT mutagenic assays. Most importantly, the RT-CES mutation assay has a higher throughput than conventional cellular assays.

  10. Magnetic unmixing of first-order reversal curve diagrams using principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascu, Ioan; Harrison, Richard J.; Li, Yuting; Muraszko, Joy R.; Channell, James E. T.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Hodell, David A.

    2015-09-01

    We describe a quantitative magnetic unmixing method based on principal component analysis (PCA) of first-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams. For PCA, we resample FORC distributions on grids that capture diagnostic signatures of single-domain (SD), pseudosingle-domain (PSD), and multidomain (MD) magnetite, as well as of minerals such as hematite. Individual FORC diagrams are recast as linear combinations of end-member (EM) FORC diagrams, located at user-defined positions in PCA space. The EM selection is guided by constraints derived from physical modeling and imposed by data scatter. We investigate temporal variations of two EMs in bulk North Atlantic sediment cores collected from the Rockall Trough and the Iberian Continental Margin. Sediments from each site contain a mixture of magnetosomes and granulometrically distinct detrital magnetite. We also quantify the spatial variation of three EM components (a coarse silt-sized MD component, a fine silt-sized PSD component, and a mixed clay-sized component containing both SD magnetite and hematite) in surficial sediments along the flow path of the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). These samples were separated into granulometric fractions, which helped constrain EM definition. PCA-based unmixing reveals systematic variations in EM relative abundance as a function of distance along NADW flow. Finally, we apply PCA to the combined data set of Rockall Trough and NADW sediments, which can be recast as a four-EM mixture, providing enhanced discrimination between components. Our method forms the foundation of a general solution to the problem of unmixing multicomponent magnetic mixtures, a fundamental task of rock magnetic studies.

  11. More basic approach to the analysis of multiple specimen R-curves for determination of J/sub c/

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, K.W.; Williams, J.A.

    1980-02-01

    Multiple specimen J-R curves were developed for groups of 1T compact specimens with different a/W values and depth of side grooving. The purpose of this investigation was to determine J/sub c/ (J at onset of crack extension) for each group. Judicious selection of points on the load versus load-line deflection record at which to unload and heat tint specimens permitted direct observation of approximate onset of crack extension. It was found that the present recommended procedure for determining J/sub c/ from multiple specimen R-curves, which is being considered for standardization, consistently yielded nonconservative J/sub c/ values. A more basic approach to analyzing multiple specimen R-curves is presented, applied, and discussed. This analysis determined J/sub c/ values that closely corresponded to actual observed onset of crack extension.

  12. Combined statistical analysis of vasodilation and flow curves in brachial ultrasonography: technique and its connection to cardiovascular risk factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisrobert, Loic; Laclaustra, Martin; Bossa, Matias; Frangi, Andres G.; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2005-04-01

    Clinical studies report that impaired endothelial function is associated with Cardio-Vascular Diseases (CVD) and their risk factors. One commonly used mean for assessing endothelial function is Flow-Mediated Dilation (FMD). Classically, FMD is quantified using local indexes e.g. maximum peak dilation. Although such parameters have been successfully linked to CVD risk factors and other clinical variables, this description does not consider all the information contained in the complete vasodilation curve. Moreover, the relation between flow impulse and the vessel vasodilation response to this stimulus, although not clearly known, seems to be important and is not taken into account in the majority of studies. In this paper we propose a novel global parameterization for the vasodilation and the flow curves of a FMD test. This parameterization uses Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to describe independently and jointly the variability of flow and FMD curves. These curves are obtained using computerized techniques (based on edge detection and image registration, respectively) to analyze the ultrasound image sequences. The global description obtained through PCA yields a detailed characterization of the morphology of such curves allowing the extraction of intuitive quantitative information of the vasodilation process and its interplay with flow changes. This parameterization is consistent with traditional measurements and, in a database of 177 subjects, seems to correlate more strongly (and with more clinical parameters) than classical measures to CVD risk factors and clinical parameters such as LDL- and HDL-Cholesterol.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Biologically Relevant Response Curves in Gene Expression Experiments: Heteromorphy, Heterochrony, and Heterometry.

    PubMed

    Baker, Stuart G

    2014-01-01

    To gain biological insights, investigators sometimes compare sequences of gene expression measurements under two scenarios (such as two drugs or species). For this situation, we developed an algorithm to fit, identify, and compare biologically relevant response curves in terms of heteromorphy (different curves), heterochrony (different transition times), and heterometry (different magnitudes). The curves are flat, linear, sigmoid, hockey-stick (sigmoid missing a steady state), transient (sigmoid missing two steady states), impulse (with peak or trough), step (with intermediate-level plateau), impulse+ (impulse with an extra parameter), step+ (step with an extra parameter), further characterized by upward or downward trend. To reduce overfitting, we fit the curves to every other response, evaluated the fit in the remaining responses, and identified the most parsimonious curves that yielded a good fit. We measured goodness of fit using a statistic comparable over different genes, namely the square root of the mean squared prediction error as a percentage of the range of responses, which we call the relative prediction error (RPE). We illustrated the algorithm using data on gene expression at 14 times in the embryonic development in two species of frogs. Software written in Mathematica is freely available. PMID:27605029

  14. An analysis of calibration curve models for solid-state heat-flow calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Hypes, P. A.; Bracken, D. S.; McCabe, G.

    2001-01-01

    Various calibration curve models for solid-state calorimeters are compared to determine which model best fits the calibration data. The calibration data are discussed. The criteria used to select the best model are explained. A conclusion regarding the best model for the calibration curve is presented. These results can also be used to evaluate the random and systematic error of a calorimetric measurement. A linear/quadratic model has been used for decades to fit the calibration curves for wheatstone bridge calorimeters. Excellent results have been obtained using this calibration curve model. The Multical software package uses this model for the calibration curve. The choice of this model is supported by 40 years [1] of calorimeter data. There is good empirical support for the linear/quadratic model. Calorimeter response is strongly linear. Calorimeter sensitivity is slightly lower at higher powers; the negative coefficient of the x{sup 2} term accounts for this. The solid-state calorimeter is operated using the Multical [2] software package. An investigation was undertaken to determine if the linear/quadratic model is the best model for the new sensor technology used in the solid-state calorimeter.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Biologically Relevant Response Curves in Gene Expression Experiments: Heteromorphy, Heterochrony, and Heterometry

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Stuart G.

    2014-01-01

    To gain biological insights, investigators sometimes compare sequences of gene expression measurements under two scenarios (such as two drugs or species). For this situation, we developed an algorithm to fit, identify, and compare biologically relevant response curves in terms of heteromorphy (different curves), heterochrony (different transition times), and heterometry (different magnitudes). The curves are flat, linear, sigmoid, hockey-stick (sigmoid missing a steady state), transient (sigmoid missing two steady states), impulse (with peak or trough), step (with intermediate-level plateau), impulse+ (impulse with an extra parameter), step+ (step with an extra parameter), further characterized by upward or downward trend. To reduce overfitting, we fit the curves to every other response, evaluated the fit in the remaining responses, and identified the most parsimonious curves that yielded a good fit. We measured goodness of fit using a statistic comparable over different genes, namely the square root of the mean squared prediction error as a percentage of the range of responses, which we call the relative prediction error (RPE). We illustrated the algorithm using data on gene expression at 14 times in the embryonic development in two species of frogs. Software written in Mathematica is freely available.

  16. Identification case of evidence in timber tracing of Pinus radiate, using high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Solano, Jaime; Anabalón, Leonardo; Encina, Francisco

    2016-03-01

    Fast, accurate detection of plant species and their hybrids using molecular tools will facilitate assessment and monitoring of timber tracing evidence. In this study the origin of unknown pine samples is determined for a case of timber theft in the region of Araucania southern Chile. We evaluate the utility of the trnL marker region for species identification applied to pine wood based on High Resolution Melting. This efficient tracing methods can be incorporated into forestry applications such as certification of origin. The object of this work was genotype identification using high-resolution melting (HRM) and trnL approaches for Pinus radiata (Don) in timber tracing evidence. Our results indicate that trnL is a very sensitive marker for delimiting species and HRM analysis was used successfully for genotyping Pinus samples for timber tracing purposes. Genotyping samples by HRM analysis with the trnL1 approach allowed us to differentiate two wood samples from the Pinaceae family: Pinus radiata (Don) and Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco. The same approach with Pinus trnL wood was not able to discriminate between samples of Pinus radiata, indicating that the samples were genetically indistinguishable, possibly because they have the same genotype at this locus. Timber tracing with HRM analysis is expected to contribute to future forest certification schemes, control of illegal trading, and molecular traceability of Pinus spp.

  17. Martian rampart crater ejecta - Experiments and analysis of melt-water interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohletz, K. H.; Sheridan, M. F.

    1983-10-01

    Viking images of Martian craters with rampart-bordered ejecta deposits reveal distinct impact ejecta morphology when compared to that associated with similar-sized craters on the Moon and Mercury. It is suggested that target water explosively vaporized during impact alters initial ballistic trajectories of ejecta and produces surging flow emplacement. The dispersal of particulates during a series of controlled steam explosions generated by interaction of a thermite melt with water has been experimentally modeled. Study of terrestrial, lobate, volcanic ejecta produced by steam-blast explosions reveals that particle size and vapor to clast volume ratio are primary parameters characterizing the emplacement mechanism and deposit morphology.

  18. High-resolution melting analysis for the detection of two erythromycin-resistant Bordetella pertussis strains carried by healthy schoolchildren in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Li, M; Wang, L; Xin, T; He, Q

    2013-06-01

    Two erythromycin-resistant strains of Bordetella pertussis were isolated from nasopharyngeal specimens of two asymptomatic schoolchildren in China. High-resolution melting and sequencing analyses confirmed the homogeneous A2047G mutation in 23S rRNA genes of the two isolates. High-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is a useful assay for the rapid detection of erythromycin-resistant B. pertussis. The appearance of erythromycin-resistant B. pertussis strains in China is alarming.

  19. A method to distinguish morphologically similar Peromyscus species using extracellular RNA and high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Veronica A; Clarke, Benjamin L; Crossland, Janet P; Bemis, Lynne T

    2016-09-01

    A method applying high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis to PCR products copied and amplified from extracellular RNA (exRNA) has been developed to distinguish two morphologically similar Peromyscus species: Peromyscus leucopus and Peromyscus maniculatus. P. leucopus is considered the primary reservoir host of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent for Lyme disease in North America. In northern Minnesota the habitat ranges of P. leucopus overlaps with that of P. maniculatus. Serum samples from live mice of both species were collected from cheek bleeds, total extracellular RNA (exRNA) was extracted, copied using reverse transcription and amplified by PCR followed by HRM analysis. A circulating ribosomal RNA (rRNA) was identified which differed at seven nucleotides between the two species and a method of HRM analysis was developed allowing rapid species confirmation. In the future, this HRM based method may be adapted for additional species. PMID:27349513

  20. A method to distinguish morphologically similar Peromyscus species using extracellular RNA and high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Veronica A; Clarke, Benjamin L; Crossland, Janet P; Bemis, Lynne T

    2016-09-01

    A method applying high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis to PCR products copied and amplified from extracellular RNA (exRNA) has been developed to distinguish two morphologically similar Peromyscus species: Peromyscus leucopus and Peromyscus maniculatus. P. leucopus is considered the primary reservoir host of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent for Lyme disease in North America. In northern Minnesota the habitat ranges of P. leucopus overlaps with that of P. maniculatus. Serum samples from live mice of both species were collected from cheek bleeds, total extracellular RNA (exRNA) was extracted, copied using reverse transcription and amplified by PCR followed by HRM analysis. A circulating ribosomal RNA (rRNA) was identified which differed at seven nucleotides between the two species and a method of HRM analysis was developed allowing rapid species confirmation. In the future, this HRM based method may be adapted for additional species.

  1. Texture analysis of melt-spun Ni-Mn-Ga tapes by means of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblischka-Veneva, A.; Koblischka, M. R.; Schmauch, J.; Mitra, A.; Panda, A. K.

    2010-01-01

    A texture analysis is performed by means of the electron-backscatter diffraction technique (EBSD) on melt-spun ribbon-like samples of the composition Ni52.5Mn24.5Ga23 (at.-%) were prepared. A dedicated surface treatment is required in order to achieve high quality Kikuchi patterns. For this purpose, mechanical polishing plus ion polishing was employed. EBSD analysis and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the samples have a polycrystalline, granular morphology, with grain sizes around 1 - 2 μm. Several larger grains being present in the region selected for EBSD analysis, and many small grains are found, even embedded in the larger ones. The larger grains exhibit a common direction of elongation, yielding to a specific texture.

  2. Applications of species accumulation curves in large-scale biological data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Chao; Daley, Timothy; Smith, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    The species accumulation curve, or collector’s curve, of a population gives the expected number of observed species or distinct classes as a function of sampling effort. Species accumulation curves allow researchers to assess and compare diversity across populations or to evaluate the benefits of additional sampling. Traditional applications have focused on ecological populations but emerging large-scale applications, for example in DNA sequencing, are orders of magnitude larger and present new challenges. We developed a method to estimate accumulation curves for predicting the complexity of DNA sequencing libraries. This method uses rational function approximations to a classical non-parametric empirical Bayes estimator due to Good and Toulmin [Biometrika, 1956, 43, 45–63]. Here we demonstrate how the same approach can be highly effective in other large-scale applications involving biological data sets. These include estimating microbial species richness, immune repertoire size, and k-mer diversity for genome assembly applications. We show how the method can be modified to address populations containing an effectively infinite number of species where saturation cannot practically be attained. We also introduce a flexible suite of tools implemented as an R package that make these methods broadly accessible. PMID:27252899

  3. Parent Involvement and Science Achievement: A Cross-Classified Multilevel Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ursula Y.; Hull, Darrell M.

    2014-01-01

    The authors examined science achievement growth at Grades 3, 5, and 8 and parent school involvement at the same time points using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999. Data were analyzed using cross-classified multilevel latent growth curve modeling with time invariant and varying covariates. School-based…

  4. Development of Oral Reading Fluency in Children with Speech or Language Impairments: A Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puranik, Cynthia S.; Petscher, Yaacov; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Catts, Hugh W.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    This longitudinal study used piece-wise growth curve analyses to examine growth patterns in oral reading fluency for 1,991 students with speech impairments (SI) or language impairments (LI) from first through third grade. The main finding of this study was that a diagnosis of SI or LI can have a detrimental and persistent effect on early reading…

  5. Three-dimensional FE analysis of a nailed soil wall curved in plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, I. M.; Su, N.

    1997-09-01

    A nailed soil wall curved in plan was modelled in three-dimensions by the finite element method for construction, service and ultimate loading conditions. The behaviour of the nailed soil wall, the soil-nail interaction, the role of the reinforcement, and the overall and internal failure mechanisms were investigated.

  6. The Second Order Approximation to Sample Influence Curve in Canonical Correlation Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fung, Wing K.; Gu, Hong

    1998-01-01

    A second order approximation to the sample influence curve (SIC) has been derived in the literature. This paper presents a more accurate second order approximation, which is exact for the SIC of the squared multiple correction coefficient. An example is presented. (SLD)

  7. Analysis of a Kepler Light Curve of the Novalike Cataclysmic Variable KIC 8751494

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Taichi; Maehara, Hiroyuki

    2013-08-01

    We analyzed a Kepler light curve of KIC 8751494, a recently recognized novalike cataclysmic variable in the Kepler field. We detected a stable periodicity of 0.114379(1) d, which we identified as being the binary's orbital period. The stronger photometric period at around 0.12245 d, which had been detected from a ground-based observation, was found to be variable, and we identified this period as the positive-superhump period. This superhump period showed short-term (10-20 d) strong variations in period most unexpectedly when the object entered a slightly faint state. The fractional superhump excess varied by as much large as ˜ 30%. The variation of the period very well traced the variation of the brightness of the system. The time-scale of this variation of superhump periods was too slow to be interpreted as a variation caused by a change of the disk radius due to thermal disk instability. We interpreted the cause of the period variation as a varying pressure effect on the period of positive superhumps. This finding suggests that the pressure effect, in at least novalike systems, plays a very important (up to ˜ 30% in the precession rate) role in producing the period of positive superhumps. We also described a possible detection of negative superhumps with a varying period of 0.1071-0.1081 d in the Q14 run of the Kepler data, and found that the variation of frequency of negative superhumps followed that of positive superhumps. The relation between the fractional superhump excesses of negative and positive superhumps can be understood if the angular frequency of positive superhumps is decreased by a pressure effect. We also found that the phase of the variation in the velocity of the emission lines reported in the earlier study is compatible with the SW Sex-type classification. Further, we introduced a new two-dimentional period analysis using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso), and showed superior advantages of this method.

  8. A breakthrough curve analysis of unstable density-driven flow and transport in homogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, M.; Simmons, C. T.; Hutson, J. L.

    2004-03-01

    In certain hydrogeological situations, density variations occur because of changes in solute concentration, temperature, and pressure of the fluid. These include seawater intrusion, high-level radioactive waste disposal, groundwater contamination, and geothermal energy production. Under certain conditions, when the density of the invading fluid is greater than that of the ambient one, gravitational instabilities or fingers may lead to transport over larger spatial scales and significantly shorter timescales than compared with diffusion alone. This study has two key objectives: (1) to explore how the nature of a breakthrough curve changes as the density of the invading fluid changes and there is a subsequent transition from stable to unstable behavior and (2) to examine the feasibility of using 1-D advection-dispersion fitting models to fit the experimental data as the density of the invading fluid increases. Thirty-six breakthrough curve experiments were carried out in fully saturated, homogeneous sand columns. Results show that an increase in the density of the source solutions leads to breakthrough curves with lower peak concentrations at breakthrough, earlier peak breakthrough pore volume and time, and an increase in positive skewness of the breakthrough curve. Visual experiments conducted in transparent columns confirm that a transition from stable to unstable behavior occurs as the density of the injectant increases and that backward convective reflux in the high-density cases leads to dilution of the trailing edge of the pulse as evidenced by positively skewed breakthrough curves. These mixed convective systems (controlled by both forced and free convection) are characterized by a mixed convective ratio. Parameter estimation using a 1-D advection-dispersion fitting model suggests that unstable plume migration can be fitted with an apparent pore flow velocity and dispersivity at low-density gradients. However, as the density of the injectant increases, it

  9. Analysis of hyperspherical adiabatic curves of helium: A classical dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonović, N. S.; Solov'ev, E. A.

    2013-05-01

    The hyperspherical adiabatic curves (adiabatic eigenenergies as functions of the hyperradius R) of helium for zero total angular momentum are analyzed by studying the underlying classical dynamics which in the adiabatic treatment reduces to constrained two-electron motion on a hypersphere. This dynamics supports five characteristic classical configurations which can be represented by five types of short periodic orbits: the frozen planet (FP), the inverted frozen planet (IFP), the asymmetric stretch (AS), the asynchronous (ASC), and the Langmuir periodic orbit (PO). These POs are considered as fundamental modes of the two-electron motion on a hypersphere which, after quantization, give five families of so-called adiabatic lines (adiabatic energies related to these POs as functions of R). It is found that multiplets, each of them consisting of adiabatic curves which converge to the same ionization threshold, are at large values of R delimited from the bottom and from the top by the adiabatic lines which are related to the IFP and stable AS POs and to the FP PO, respectively. At smaller values of R, where the AS PO becomes unstable, the curves move to the area between the ASC (bottom) and AS (top) lines by crossing the latter. Therefore, at different values of R the lower limiting line of the multiplet is related to the three types of PO (IFP, AS, and ASC), which are all stable in the negative-energy part of this line. As a consequence, the quantum states of helium in principle are not related individually to a single classical configuration on the hypersphere. In addition, it is demonstrated that “unstable parts” of adiabatic lines (the so-called diabatic curves) determine the positions and type of avoided and hidden crossings between hyperspherical adiabatic curves. Two clearly visible classes of avoided crossings are related to the AS and ASC POs. In addition, a number of avoided crossings of the adiabatic curves is observed at the positions where the

  10. Melting in super-earths.

    PubMed

    Stixrude, Lars

    2014-04-28

    We examine the possible extent of melting in rock-iron super-earths, focusing on those in the habitable zone. We consider the energetics of accretion and core formation, the timescale of cooling and its dependence on viscosity and partial melting, thermal regulation via the temperature dependence of viscosity, and the melting curves of rock and iron components at the ultra-high pressures characteristic of super-earths. We find that the efficiency of kinetic energy deposition during accretion increases with planetary mass; considering the likely role of giant impacts and core formation, we find that super-earths probably complete their accretionary phase in an entirely molten state. Considerations of thermal regulation lead us to propose model temperature profiles of super-earths that are controlled by silicate melting. We estimate melting curves of iron and rock components up to the extreme pressures characteristic of super-earth interiors based on existing experimental and ab initio results and scaling laws. We construct super-earth thermal models by solving the equations of mass conservation and hydrostatic equilibrium, together with equations of state of rock and iron components. We set the potential temperature at the core-mantle boundary and at the surface to the local silicate melting temperature. We find that ancient (∼4 Gyr) super-earths may be partially molten at the top and bottom of their mantles, and that mantle convection is sufficiently vigorous to sustain dynamo action over the whole range of super-earth masses.

  11. Noise transmission from a curved panel into a cylindrical enclosure: analysis of structural acoustic coupling.

    PubMed

    Henry, J K; Clark, R L

    2001-04-01

    Much of the research on sound transmission through the aircraft fuselage into the interior of aircraft has considered coupling of the entire cylinder to the acoustic modes of the enclosure. Yet, much of the work on structural acoustic control of sound radiation has focused on reducing sound radiation from individual panels into an acoustic space. Research by the authors seeks to bridge this gap by considering the transmission of sound from individual panels on the fuselage to the interior of the aircraft. As part of this research, an analytical model of a curved panel, with attached piezoelectric actuators, subjected to a static pressure load was previously developed. In the present work, the analytical model is extended to consider the coupling of a curved panel to the interior acoustics of a rigid-walled cylinder. Insight gained from an accurate analytical model of the dynamics of the noise transmission from the curved panels of the fuselage into the cylindrical enclosure of an aircraft is essential to the development of feedback control systems for the control of stochastic inputs, such as turbulent boundary layer excitation. The criteria for maximal structural acoustic coupling between the modes of the curved panel and the modes of the cylindrical enclosure are studied. For panels with aspect ratios typical of those found in aircraft, results indicate that predominately axial structural modes couple most efficiently to the acoustic modes of the enclosure. The effects of the position of the curved panel on the cylinder are also studied. Structural acoustic coupling is found to not be significantly affected by varying panel position. The impact of the findings of this study on structural acoustic control design is discussed. PMID:11325117

  12. A LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS OF CLASSICAL NOVAE: FREE-FREE EMISSION VERSUS PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Hachisu, Izumi; Kato, Mariko E-mail: mariko@educ.cc.keio.ac.jp

    2015-01-10

    We analyzed light curves of seven relatively slower novae, PW Vul, V705 Cas, GQ Mus, RR Pic, V5558 Sgr, HR Del, and V723 Cas, based on an optically thick wind theory of nova outbursts. For fast novae, free-free emission dominates the spectrum in optical bands rather than photospheric emission, and nova optical light curves follow the universal decline law. Faster novae blow stronger winds with larger mass-loss rates. Because the brightness of free-free emission depends directly on the wind mass-loss rate, faster novae show brighter optical maxima. In slower novae, however, we must take into account photospheric emission because of their lower wind mass-loss rates. We calculated three model light curves of free-free emission, photospheric emission, and their sum for various white dwarf (WD) masses with various chemical compositions of their envelopes and fitted reasonably with observational data of optical, near-IR (NIR), and UV bands. From light curve fittings of the seven novae, we estimated their absolute magnitudes, distances, and WD masses. In PW Vul and V705 Cas, free-free emission still dominates the spectrum in the optical and NIR bands. In the very slow novae, RR Pic, V5558 Sgr, HR Del, and V723 Cas, photospheric emission dominates the spectrum rather than free-free emission, which makes a deviation from the universal decline law. We have confirmed that the absolute brightnesses of our model light curves are consistent with the distance moduli of four classical novae with known distances (GK Per, V603 Aql, RR Pic, and DQ Her). We also discussed the reason why the very slow novae are about ∼1 mag brighter than the proposed maximum magnitude versus rate of decline relation.

  13. Melting of Bridgmanite to 135 Gpa: Toward a Coherent Model for the Melting Behavior in the Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrault, D.; Pesce, G.; Mezouar, N.

    2015-12-01

    Our knowledge on the melting behavior in the deep mantle remains based on a limited number of experimental and theoretical works. Today, thanks to (i) availability of very brilliant X-ray synchrotron sources and (ii) improved control of the P-T conditions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC), the experimental results should reach some agreement about the melting diagrams. However, it is not the case and major controversies remain. For example, liquidi of peridotitic (1) and chondritic-type (2) mantles are reported with a temperature difference of ~1000 K at a pressure of ~90 GPa (corresponding to ~2000 km depth), which cannot be explained by the relatively small compositional difference between these two materials. To bring new insights about the melting properties of the deep mantle, our strategy has been to study the melting curve of the end-member liquidus phase, the (Mg,Fe)(Al,Si)O3 bridgmanite (Bg), before applying a basic thermodynamical approach to the mineralogical system made of Bg, CaSiO3-perovskite and (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase. Our approach cannot be as formal as currently done for melting in the shallow mantle, due to lack of major thermodynamical parameters. Still, our analysis yields original information, such as the degree of partial melting as a function of P, T and fraction of Bg in the geological material. The Mg/Si ratio in melts can also be addressed. Concerning the controversy between LH-DAC experiments, it can be solved taking into account migration in the temperature gradient of the pseudo-eutectic melt, when the sample starts to melt. This effect is expected to occur more extensively in absence of an insulating material between the sample and the diamond anvils. It yields an overestimation of the liquidus temperature for a given chemical composition, due to loss of the most fusing elements. References:1. Fiquet et al. (2010) Melting of Peridotite to 140 Gigapascals. Science 329, 1516-1518. 2. Andrault et al. (2011) Melting curve of

  14. Analysis of bla(SHV) codon 238 and 240 allele mixtures using Sybr green high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Patiyan; Harris, Tegan; Tong, Steven Y C; Giffard, Philip M

    2009-06-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates frequently contain complex mixtures of bla(SHV) alleles. A high-resolution melting-based method for interrogating the extended-spectrum activity conferring codon 238 and 240 polymorphisms was developed. This detects minority extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-encoding alleles, allows estimation of allele ratios, and discriminates between single and double mutants.

  15. Highlights and pitfalls of 20 years of application of computerised glow curve analysis to thermoluminescence research and dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Y S; Moscovitch, M

    2013-01-01

    The technical and dosimetric aspects of computerised glow curve analysis are described in detail including a review of the current 'state-of-the-achieved' in applications to environmental and personal dosimetry, clinical dosimetry, quality control, characterisation of new materials, continuing characterisation of 'old' materials, heavy charged particle dosimetry, mixed field n-gamma dosimetry, X-ray dosimetry and other aspects of thermoluminescence dosimetry. Fearless emphasis is placed on 'pitfalls' as well as successes.

  16. Spectral analysis of sealevel during the altimetry era, and evidence for GIA and glacial melting fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spada, Giorgio; Galassi, Gaia

    2016-04-01

    We study the spatial patterns of the mass and steric components of sea-level change during the "altimetry era" (1992-today), and we characterize them at different scales by the orthonormal functions method. The spectrum of the altimetry-derived rate of sea-level rise is red and decays with increasing wavenumber nearly following a power law with exponent ≈ 10. By analyzing the degree correlation and the admittance function, we find that the altimetric rate of sea-level change is coherent with the total steric field in the whole range of wavelengths considered (down to 1000 km), but particularly for wavelengths exceeding 2000 km. Thermosteric and halosteric components are moderately anti-correlated within the range of wavelengths 1000-4000 km. Their power spectrum varies significantly with the wavelength and, for 2000 km, it is equally partitioned between the two components. The power of regional sea-level variations driven by Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) and the melting of continental ice sheets is small compared to that held by the steric component, which explains most of the regional variability shown by the altimetry record. This causes the elusiveness of the "static" sea-level fingerprints, which at present are hidden in the pattern of the residual sea-level (i.e., the altimetry-derived sea-level minus the steric component). However, we find that at harmonic degree 2, mainly associated with rotational variations, the power of glacial melting is significant and it will progressively increase during next century in response to global warming. We also estimate that at the end of the Mid-Holocene the strength of the GIA fingerprints was ≈ 10 times larger than today, well above the long-wavelength component of residual sea-level.

  17. Numerical analysis on thermal characteristics and ice melting efficiency for microwave deicing vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Can; Yang, Bo; Tan, Gangfeng; Guo, Xuexun; Zhou, Li; Xiong, Shengguang

    2016-05-01

    In the high latitudes, the icy patches on the road are frequently generated and have a wide distribution, which are difficult to remove and obviously affect the normal usage of the highways, bridges and airport runways. Physical deicing, such as microwave (MW) deicing, help the ice melt completely through heating mode and then the ice layer can be swept away. Though it is no pollution and no damage to the ground, the low efficiency hinders the development of MW deicing vehicle equipped without sufficient speed. In this work, the standard evaluation of deicing is put forward firstly. The intensive MW deicing is simplified to ice melting process characterized by one-dimensional slab with uniform volumetric energy generation, which results in phase transformation and interface motion between ice and water. The heating process is split into the superposition of three parts — non-heterogeneous heating for ground without phase change, heat transfer with phase change and the heat convection between top surface of ice layer and flow air. Based on the transient heat conduction theory, a mathematical model, combining electromagnetic and two-phase thermal conduction, is proposed in this work, which is able to reveal the relationship between the deicing efficiency and ambient conditions, as well as energy generation and material parameters. Using finite difference time-domain, this comprehensive model is developed to solve the moving boundary heat transfer problem in a one-dimensional structured gird. As a result, the stimulation shows the longitudinal temperature distributions in all circumstances and quantitative validation is obtained by comparing simulated temperature distributions under different conditions. In view of the best economy and fast deicing, these analytic solutions referring to the complex influence factors of deicing efficiency demonstrate the optimal matching for the new deicing design.

  18. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of super high resolution video for histopathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, Kenneth J.; Rozek, L. S.; Weinstein, Ronald S.

    1987-10-01

    The receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve is used to assess the ability of a diagnostic test to distinguish between two discreet states, such as tumor present or tumor absent in a histopathologic section. We have used ROC methodology to assess the ability of pathologists to diagnose frozen section biopsies of breast tissue as benign or malignant, using both a conventional light microscope and a high resolution camera/monitor system. 115 consecutive frozen section breast biopsies were reviewed using each of the above modalities. Results yielded identical ROC curves for the conventional light microscope and high resolution camera/monitor system. Furthermore, the percentage of cases in which pathologists rendered an "equivocal" diagnosis was the same with both modalities.

  19. Eigen analysis of tree-ring records: Part 1, a limited representativeness of regional curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bao; Sonechkin, Dmitry M.; Datsenko, Nina M.; Ivashchenko, Nadezda N.; Liu, Jingjing; Qin, Chun

    2011-12-01

    Based on a set of very long-living (2,000 years) Qilian junipers ( Sabina przewalskii Kom.) from the north-eastern part of the Tibetan Plateau (the region of Dulan), we carefully consider the regional curve standardization (RCS) technique. For this goal, we correlate deviations of individual tree-ring width records from their regional mean age-dependent curve (RC). It turns out that these correlations keep their positivity for almost all shifts between ages compared (up to 500 years and even more) evidencing each Dulan juniper to be a unique "thermometer". Just the unification of these "thermometers" in the form RC creates a spurious positive trend in the Dulan chronology. We modify the RCS technique to closer attach RC to these "thermometers" in order to construct a new chronology in which the trend is absent.

  20. Fracture toughness master-curve analysis of the tempered martensitic steel Eurofer97

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Pablo; Spätig, P.; Bonadé, R.; Odette, G. R.; Gragg, D.

    2009-04-01

    We report fracture toughness data for the reduced activation tempered martensitic steel Eurofer97 in the lower to middle transition region. The fracture toughness was measured from tests carried out on 0.35 T and 0.87 T pre-cracked compact tension specimens. The data were first analyzed using the ASTM E1921 standard. The toughness-temperature behavior and scatter were shown to deviate from the ASTM E1921 standard predictions near the lower shelf. Using the method of maximum likelihood, the athermal component of the master-curve was calculated to better fit the data from the lower to the middle transition region. We showed that these master-curve adjustments are necessary to make the To values obtained near the lower shelf with 0.35 TC( T) specimens consistent with those obtained in the middle transition region with 0.87 TC( T) specimens.

  1. Fitting sediment rating curves using regression analysis: a case study of Russian Arctic rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tananaev, N. I.

    2015-03-01

    Published suspended sediment data for Arctic rivers is scarce. Suspended sediment rating curves for three medium to large rivers of the Russian Arctic were obtained using various curve-fitting techniques. Due to the biased sampling strategy, the raw datasets do not exhibit log-normal distribution, which restricts the applicability of a log-transformed linear fit. Non-linear (power) model coefficients were estimated using the Levenberg-Marquardt, Nelder-Mead and Hooke-Jeeves algorithms, all of which generally showed close agreement. A non-linear power model employing the Levenberg-Marquardt parameter evaluation algorithm was identified as an optimal statistical solution of the problem. Long-term annual suspended sediment loads estimated using the non-linear power model are, in general, consistent with previously published results.

  2. Effects of experimental design on calibration curve precision in routine analysis.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, M F; Neto, B de B; Saldanha, T C; Araújo, M C

    1998-01-01

    A computational program which compares the effciencies of different experimental designs with those of maximum precision (D-optimized designs) is described. The program produces confidence interval plots for a calibration curve and provides information about the number of standard solutions, concentration levels and suitable concentration ranges to achieve an optimum calibration. Some examples of the application of this novel computational program are given, using both simulated and real data.

  3. Analysis of spatial variability of extreme rainfall at radar subpixel scale using IDF curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peleg, Nadav; Marra, Francesco; Fatichi, Simone; Paschalis, Athanasios; Molnar, Peter; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Extreme rainfall is quantified in engineering practice using Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves (IDFs) that are traditionally derived from rain-gauges and, more recently, also from weather radars. These instruments measure rainfall at different spatial scales: rain-gauge samples rainfall at the point scale while weather radar averages precipitation over a relatively large area, generally around 1 km2. As such, a radar derived IDF curve is representative of the mean areal rainfall over a given radar pixel and neglects the within-pixel rainfall variability. In this study, we quantify subpixel variability of extreme rainfall by using a novel space-time rainfall generator (STREAP model) that downscales in space the rainfall within a given radar pixel. The study was conducted using a long radar data record (23 years) and a very dense rain-gauge network in the Eastern Mediterranean area. Radar-IDF curves, together with an ensemble of point-based IDF curves representing the radar subpixel extreme rainfall variability, were developed fitting GEV distributions to annual rainfall maxima. It was found that the mean areal extreme rainfall derived from the radar underestimate most of the extreme values computed for point locations within the radar pixel. The subpixel variability of extreme rainfall was found to increase with longer return periods and shorter durations. For the longer return periods, a considerable enhancement of extreme rainfall variability was found when stochastic (natural) climate variability was taken into account. Bounding the range of the subpixel extreme rainfall derived from radar-IDF can be of major importance for applications that require very local estimates of rainfall extremes.

  4. Establishment of a simple and rapid identification method for Listeria spp. by using high-resolution melting analysis, and its application in food industry.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Chihiro; Takahashi, Hajime; Phraephaisarn, Chirapiphat; Vesaratchavest, Mongkol; Keeratipibul, Suwimon; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative bacteria of listeriosis, which has a higher mortality rate than that of other causes of food poisoning. Listeria spp., of which L. monocytogenes is a member, have been isolated from food and manufacturing environments. Several methods have been published for identifying Listeria spp.; however, many of the methods cannot identify newly categorized Listeria spp. Additionally, they are often not suitable for the food industry, owing to their complexity, cost, or time consumption. Recently, high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA), which exploits DNA-sequence differences, has received attention as a simple and quick genomic typing method. In the present study, a new method for the simple, rapid, and low-cost identification of Listeria spp. has been presented using the genes rarA and ldh as targets for HRMA. DNA sequences of 9 Listeria species were first compared, and polymorphisms were identified for each species for primer design. Species specificity of each HRM curve pattern was estimated using type strains of all the species. Among the 9 species, 7 were identified by HRMA using rarA gene, including 3 new species. The remaining 2 species were identified by HRMA of ldh gene. The newly developed HRMA method was then used to assess Listeria isolates from the food industry, and the method efficiency was compared to that of identification by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The 2 methods were in coherence for 92.6% of the samples, demonstrating the high accuracy of HRMA. The time required for identifying Listeria spp. was substantially low, and the process was considerably simplified, providing a useful and precise method for processing multiple samples per day. Our newly developed method for identifying Listeria spp. is highly valuable; its use is not limited to the food industry, and it can be used for the isolates from the natural environment.

  5. Statistically generated weighted curve fit of residual functions for modal analysis of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bookout, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    A statistically generated weighting function for a second-order polynomial curve fit of residual functions has been developed. The residual flexibility test method, from which a residual function is generated, is a procedure for modal testing large structures in an external constraint-free environment to measure the effects of higher order modes and interface stiffness. This test method is applicable to structures with distinct degree-of-freedom interfaces to other system components. A theoretical residual function in the displacement/force domain has the characteristics of a relatively flat line in the lower frequencies and a slight upward curvature in the higher frequency range. In the test residual function, the above-mentioned characteristics can be seen in the data, but due to the present limitations in the modal parameter evaluation (natural frequencies and mode shapes) of test data, the residual function has regions of ragged data. A second order polynomial curve fit is required to obtain the residual flexibility term. A weighting function of the data is generated by examining the variances between neighboring data points. From a weighted second-order polynomial curve fit, an accurate residual flexibility value can be obtained. The residual flexibility value and free-free modes from testing are used to improve a mathematical model of the structure. The residual flexibility modal test method is applied to a straight beam with a trunnion appendage and a space shuttle payload pallet simulator.

  6. CONFIRMATION OF HOT JUPITER KEPLER-41b VIA PHASE CURVE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Quintana, Elisa V.; Rowe, Jason F.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Morris, Robert L.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Barclay, Thomas; Ciardi, David R.; Klaus, Todd C.

    2013-04-20

    We present high precision photometry of Kepler-41, a giant planet in a 1.86 day orbit around a G6V star that was recently confirmed through radial velocity measurements. We have developed a new method to confirm giant planets solely from the photometric light curve, and we apply this method herein to Kepler-41 to establish the validity of this technique. We generate a full phase photometric model by including the primary and secondary transits, ellipsoidal variations, Doppler beaming, and reflected/emitted light from the planet. Third light contamination scenarios that can mimic a planetary transit signal are simulated by injecting a full range of dilution values into the model, and we re-fit each diluted light curve model to the light curve. The resulting constraints on the maximum occultation depth and stellar density combined with stellar evolution models rules out stellar blends and provides a measurement of the planet's mass, size, and temperature. We expect about two dozen Kepler giant planets can be confirmed via this method.

  7. In situ analysis of melt-drawing behavior of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene films with different molecular weights: roles of entanglements on oriented crystallization.

    PubMed

    Kato, Satomi; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Yamanobe, Takeshi; Uehara, Hiroki

    2015-04-16

    Ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) films having different molecular weights (MWs) were melt-drawn at 150 °C. The stress-strain curve for higher-MW film exhibits higher stress on the characteristic plateau region and a subsequent steeper increase of stress due to strain hardening. Structural changes during such melt-drawing were analyzed using in situ wide-angle X-ray diffraction measurements. Hexagonal crystallization occurs at the beginning of the plateau region, independent of the sample MW. Once this hexagonal reflection intensity is saturated, it remains constant even at the later stage of draw. In contrast, orthorhombic reflection intensities gradually increase with increasing draw strain. Both of these oriented crystallizations into plateau hexagonal and increasing orthorhombic forms are accelerated with increasing MW. Correspondingly, the higher amount of extended chain crystals (ECCs) was confirmed from morphological observation for the resultant melt-drawn films of the higher-MW sample. Deep entanglements can effectively transmit the applied stress; thus, the oriented amorphous melts induce rapid hexagonal crystallization with disentangling shallow entanglements, which subsequently transforms into orthorhombic form. Such hexagonal crystallization plays the role of a thermodynamic pathway for growing such ECCs, where the stable orthorhombic form gradually accumulates with increasing draw strain.

  8. In situ analysis of melt-drawing behavior of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene films with different molecular weights: roles of entanglements on oriented crystallization.

    PubMed

    Kato, Satomi; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Yamanobe, Takeshi; Uehara, Hiroki

    2015-04-16

    Ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) films having different molecular weights (MWs) were melt-drawn at 150 °C. The stress-strain curve for higher-MW film exhibits higher stress on the characteristic plateau region and a subsequent steeper increase of stress due to strain hardening. Structural changes during such melt-drawing were analyzed using in situ wide-angle X-ray diffraction measurements. Hexagonal crystallization occurs at the beginning of the plateau region, independent of the sample MW. Once this hexagonal reflection intensity is saturated, it remains constant even at the later stage of draw. In contrast, orthorhombic reflection intensities gradually increase with increasing draw strain. Both of these oriented crystallizations into plateau hexagonal and increasing orthorhombic forms are accelerated with increasing MW. Correspondingly, the higher amount of extended chain crystals (ECCs) was confirmed from morphological observation for the resultant melt-drawn films of the higher-MW sample. Deep entanglements can effectively transmit the applied stress; thus, the oriented amorphous melts induce rapid hexagonal crystallization with disentangling shallow entanglements, which subsequently transforms into orthorhombic form. Such hexagonal crystallization plays the role of a thermodynamic pathway for growing such ECCs, where the stable orthorhombic form gradually accumulates with increasing draw strain. PMID:25785561

  9. Molecular Differentiation of Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis Eggs by Multiplex Real-Time PCR with High Resolution Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kaewkong, Worasak; Intapan, Pewpan M.; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Doanh, Pham Ngoc

    2013-01-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis are parasites known to be carcinogenic and causative agents of cholangiocarcinoma in Asia. The standard method for diagnosis for those parasite infections is stool examination to detect parasite eggs. However, the method has low sensitivity, and eggs of O. viverrini and C. sinensis are difficult to distinguish from each other and from those of some other trematodes. Here, we report a multiplex real-time PCR coupled with high resolution melting (HRM) analysis for the differentiation of O. viverrini and C. sinensis eggs in fecal samples. Using 2 pairs of species-specific primers, DNA sequences from a portion of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (nad 2) gene, were amplified to generate 209 and 165 bp products for O. viverrini and C. sinensis, respectively. The distinct characteristics of HRM patterns were analyzed, and the melting temperatures peaked at 82.4±0.09℃ and 85.9±0.08℃ for O. viverrini and C. sinensis, respectively. This technique was able to detect as few as 1 egg of O. viverrini and 2 eggs of C. sinensis in a 150 mg fecal sample, which is equivalent to 7 and 14 eggs per gram of feces, respectively. The method is species-specific, rapid, simple, and does not require fluorescent probes or post-PCR processing for discrimination of eggs of the 2 species. It offers a new tool for differentiation and detection of Asian liver fluke infections in stool specimens. PMID:24516275

  10. Rapid detection of fungal pathogens in bronchoalveolar lavage samples using panfungal PCR combined with high resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Bezdicek, Matej; Lengerova, Martina; Ricna, Dita; Weinbergerova, Barbora; Kocmanova, Iva; Volfova, Pavlina; Drgona, Lubos; Poczova, Miroslava; Mayer, Jiri; Racil, Zdenek

    2016-10-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of invasive fungal diseases (IFD), mortality rates remain high. Moreover, due to the expanding spectrum of causative agents, fast and accurate pathogen identification is necessary. We designed a panfungal polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which targets the highly variable ITS2 region of rDNA genes and uses high resolution melting analysis (HRM) for subsequent species identification. The sensitivity and specificity of this method was tested on a broad spectrum of the most clinically important fungal pathogens including Aspergillus spp., Candida spp. and mucormycetes. Despite the fact that fluid from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is one of the most frequently tested materials there is a lack of literature sources aimed at panfungal PCR as an IFD diagnostic tool from BAL samples. The applicability of this method in routine practice was evaluated on 104 BAL samples from immunocompromised patients. Due to high ITS region variability, we obtained divergent melting peaks for different fungal species. Thirteen out of 18 patients with proven or probable IFD were positive. Therefore, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of our method were 67%, 100%, 100%, and 94%, respectively. In our assay, fungal pathogens identification is based on HRM, therefore omitting the expensive and time consuming sequencing step. With the high specificity, positive and negative predictive values, short time needed to obtain a result, and low price, the presented assay is intended to be used as a quick screening method for patients at risk of IFD. PMID:27161789

  11. Detection of orthopoxvirus DNA by real-time PCR and identification of variola virus DNA by melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Andreas; Ellerbrok, Heinz; Pauli, Georg

    2004-03-01

    Although variola virus was eradicated by the World Health Organization vaccination program in the 1970s, the diagnosis of smallpox infection has attracted great interest in the context of a possible deliberate release of variola virus in bioterrorist attacks. Obviously, fast and reliable diagnostic tools are required to detect variola virus and to distinguish it from orthopoxviruses that have identical morphological characteristics, including vaccinia virus. The advent of real-time PCR for the clinical diagnosis of viral infections has facilitated the detection of minute amounts of viral nucleic acids in a fast, safe, and precise manner, including the option to quantify and to genotype the target reliably. In this study a complete set of four hybridization probe-based real-time PCR assays for the specific detection of orthopoxvirus DNA is presented. Melting analysis following PCR enables the identification of variola virus by the PCR product's characteristic melting temperature, permitting the discrimination of variola virus from other orthopoxviruses. In addition, an assay for the specific amplification of variola virus DNA is presented. All assays can be performed simultaneously in the same cycler, and results of a PCR run are obtained in less than 1 h. The application of more than one assay for the same organism significantly contributes to the diagnostic reliability, reducing the risk of false-negative results due to unknown sequence variations. In conclusion, the assays presented will improve the speed and reliability of orthopoxvirus diagnostics and variola virus identification.

  12. Advances in the interpretation and analysis of lunar occultation light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richichi, A.; Glindemann, A.

    2012-02-01

    Context. The introduction of fast 2D detectors and the use of very large telescopes have significantly advanced the sensitivity and accuracy of the lunar occultation technique. Recent routine observations at the ESO Very Large Telescope have yielded hundreds of events with results, especially in the area of binary stars, which are often beyond the capabilities of any other techniques. Aims: With the increase in the quality and in the number of the events, subtle features in the light curve patterns have occasionally been detected which challenge the standard analytical definition of the lunar occultation phenomenon as diffraction from an infinite straight edge. We investigate the possible causes for the observed peculiarities. Methods: We have evaluated the available statistics of distortions in occultation light curves observed at the ESO VLT, and compared it to data from other facilities. We have developed an alternative approach to model and interpret lunar occultation light curves, based on 2D diffraction integrals describing the light curves in the presence of an arbitrary lunar limb profile. We distinguish between large limb irregularities requiring the Fresnel diffraction formalism, and small irregularities described by Fraunhofer diffraction. We have used this to generate light curves representative of several limb geometries, and attempted to relate them to some of the peculiar data observed. Results: We conclude that the majority of the observed peculiarities is due to limb irregularities, which can give origin both to anomalies in the amplitude of the diffraction fringes and to varying limb slopes. We investigate also other possible effects, such as detector response and atmospheric perturbations, finding them negligible. We have developed methods and procedures that for the first time allow us to analyze data affected by limb irregularities, with large ones bending the fringe pattern along the shape of the irregularity, and small ones creating fringe

  13. AN ANALYSIS OF THE SHAPES OF INTERSTELLAR EXTINCTION CURVES. VI. THE NEAR-IR EXTINCTION LAW

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, E. L.; Massa, D. E-mail: massa@derckmassa.net

    2009-07-10

    We combine new observations from the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera of Survey with existing data to investigate the wavelength dependence of near-IR (NIR) extinction. Previous studies suggest a power law form for NIR extinction, with a 'universal' value of the exponent, although some recent observations indicate that significant sight line-to-sight line variability may exist. We show that a power-law model for the NIR extinction provides an excellent fit to most extinction curves, but that the value of the power, {beta}, varies significantly from sight line to sight line. Therefore, it seems that a 'universal NIR extinction law' is not possible. Instead, we find that as {beta} decreases, R(V) {identical_to} A(V)/E(B - V) tends to increase, suggesting that NIR extinction curves which have been considered 'peculiar' may, in fact, be typical for different R(V) values. We show that the power-law parameters can depend on the wavelength interval used to derive them, with the {beta} increasing as longer wavelengths are included. This result implies that extrapolating power-law fits to determine R(V) is unreliable. To avoid this problem, we adopt a different functional form for NIR extinction. This new form mimics a power law whose exponent increases with wavelength, has only two free parameters, can fit all of our curves over a longer wavelength baseline and to higher precision, and produces R(V) values which are consistent with independent estimates and commonly used methods for estimating R(V). Furthermore, unlike the power-law model, it gives R(V)s that are independent of the wavelength interval used to derive them. It also suggests that the relation R(V) = -1.36 E(K-V)/(E(B-V)) - 0.79 can estimate R(V) to {+-}0.12. Finally, we use model extinction curves to show that our extinction curves are in accord with theoretical expectations, and demonstrate how large samples of observational quantities can provide useful constraints on the grain properties.

  14. Photometric analysis of the contact binary star V842 Hercules on the basis of seasonal light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Özkardeş, B.

    2009-04-01

    We present new BVR light curves and photometric analysis of the contact binary star V842 Her. The light curves were obtained at the ÇOMU Observatory in the consecutive years 2003, 2004, 2005, and also 2007. We studied the variation of the orbital period of the system. The O- C diagram shows a quasi-sinusoidal form superimposed on a parabola. The parabolic variation, which indicates the secular increase of the orbital period of the system, was interpreted in terms of the combined effect of mass transfer between the components of the system and mass loss by a stellar wind from the system. The sinusoidal form of the orbital period variation was considered as an apparent change and interpreted in term of the light-time effect due to an unseen component in the system. We have also studied the nature of asymmetries and the intrinsic variability in the light curves of the system. The differences between light levels of both maxima (i.e. O'Connell effect) and minima are changing with time. These peculiar asymmetries were explained by a dark spot on the surface of the large and more massive component star. The present BVR light curves and radial velocity curves obtained by [Rucinski, S.M., Lu, W., 1999. AJ 118, 2451] were analysed by means of the Wilson-Devinney method supplemented with a Monte Carlo type algorithm. Absolute parameters of the system were also derived. They are m1 = 0.38 m⊙, m2 = 1.45 m⊙, R1 = 0.81 R⊙, R2 = 1.47 R⊙, M = 5m.08 and M = 4m.06.

  15. A novel method for simultaneous Enterococcus species identification/typing and van genotyping by high resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Gurtler, Volker; Grando, Danilla; Mayall, Barrie C; Wang, Jenny; Ghaly-Derias, Shahbano

    2012-09-01

    In order to develop a typing and identification method for van gene containing Enterococcus faecium, two multiplex PCR reactions were developed for use in HRM-PCR (High Resolution Melt-PCR): (i) vanA, vanB, vanC, vanC23 to detect van genes from different Enterococcus species; (ii) ISR (intergenic spacer region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes) to detect all Enterococcus species and obtain species and isolate specific HRM curves. To test and validate the method three groups of isolates were tested: (i) 1672 Enterococcus species isolates from January 2009 to December 2009; (ii) 71 isolates previously identified and typed by PFGE (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) and MLST (multi-locus sequence typing); and (iii) 18 of the isolates from (i) for which ISR sequencing was done. As well as successfully identifying 2 common genotypes by HRM from the Austin Hospital clinical isolates, this study analysed the sequences of all the vanB genes deposited in GenBank and developed a numerical classification scheme for the standardised naming of these vanB genotypes. The identification of Enterococcus faecalis from E. faecium was reliable and stable using ISR PCR. The typing of E. faecium by ISR PCR: (i) detected two variable peaks corresponding to different copy numbers of insertion sequences I and II corresponding to peak I and II respectively; (ii) produced 7 melt profiles for E. faecium with variable copy numbers of sequences I and II; (iii) demonstrated stability and instability of peak heights with equal frequency within the patient sample (36.4±4.5 days and 38.6±5.8 days respectively for 192 patients); (iv) detected ISR-HRM types with as much discrimination as PFGE and more than MLST; and (v) detected ISR-HRM types that differentiated some isolates that were identical by PFGE and MLST. In conjunction with the rapid and accurate van genotyping method described here, this ISR-HRM typing and identification method can be used as a stable identification and typing method with

  16. Buckling Analysis of Anisotropic Curved Panels and Shells with Variable Curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaunky, Navin; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    1998-01-01

    A buckling formulation for anisotropic curved panels with variable curvature is presented in this paper. The variable curvature panel is assumed to consists of two or more panels of constant but different curvatures. Bezier functions are used as Ritz functions Displacement (C(sup 0)), and slope (C(sup 1)) continuities between segments are imposed by manipulation of the Bezier control points. A first-order shear-deformation theory is used in the buckling formulation. Results obtained from the present formulation are compared with those from finite element simulations and are found to be in good agreement.

  17. [Molecular identification of hairy antler by analysis of high resolution melting].

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Jiang, Chao; Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Lu-qi; Jin, Yan

    2015-02-01

    High resolution melting (HRM) , an important technology for genotyping and mutation scanning, has broad prospects in the authenticity of traditional Chinese medicine. This paper selected universal CO I primers and used HRM to establish a new method for authenticity of Hairy Antler. PCR was conducted at the annealing temperature of 60 °C and 45 cycles. The range of the DNA template concentration, the primer concentration and the Mg2+ ion concentration were further optimized. The results showed that the Tm values of Cervus nippon were (81.96 ± 0.07), (84.51 ± 0.03) °C and Cervus elaphus was(82.58 ± 0.13), (85.95 ± 0.05) °C with 10-100 mg · L(-1) DNA template, 0.2 µLmol · L(-1) primer, 2.0 mmol · L(-1) Mg2+. This method can authenticate of hairy antler and is simple, fast, high-throughput, visualization. PMID:26137679

  18. Development of High Resolution Melting Analysis for the Diagnosis of Human Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Kek Heng; Lim, Siew Chee; Ng, Ching Ching; Lee, Ping Chin; Lim, Yvonne Ai Lian; Lau, Tze Pheng; Chai, Hwa Chia

    2015-01-01

    Molecular detection has overcome limitations of microscopic examination by providing greater sensitivity and specificity in Plasmodium species detection. The objective of the present study was to develop a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction coupled with high-resolution melting (qRT-PCR-HRM) assay for rapid, accurate and simultaneous detection of all five human Plasmodium spp. A pair of primers targeted the 18S SSU rRNA gene of the Plasmodium spp. was designed for qRT-PCR-HRM assay development. Analytical sensitivity and specificity of the assay were evaluated. Samples collected from 229 malaria suspected patients recruited from Sabah, Malaysia were screened using the assay and results were compared with data obtained using PlasmoNexTM, a hexaplex PCR system. The qRT-PCR-HRM assay was able to detect and discriminate the five Plasmodium spp. with lowest detection limits of 1–100 copy numbers without nonspecific amplifications. The detection of Plasmodium spp. in clinical samples using this assay also achieved 100% concordance with that obtained using PlasmoNexTM. This indicated that the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of this assay in Plasmodium spp. detection is comparable with those of PlasmoNexTM. The qRT-PCR-HRM assay is simple, produces results in two hours and enables high-throughput screening. Thus, it is an alternative method for rapid and accurate malaria diagnosis. PMID:26507008

  19. Petrogenesis and volatile stratigraphy of the Bishop Tuff - evidence from melt inclusion analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dunbar, N.W.; Hervig, R.L. Arizona State Univ., Tempe )

    1992-10-01

    The preeruptive volatile gradient of the Bishop Tuff (BT) is determined on the basis of detailed analyses of the H2O, F, and Cl contents of melt inclusions in phenocrysts from different stratigraphic levels of the deposit. The magma which produced BT was found to be strongly zoned with respect to H2O, and slightly zoned with respect to F and B. The bulk of the volatile zonation within the BT magma was in the 120 cu km of magma which produced the Plinian tephra, where the H2O content decreases from a mean of 6 wt pct to a mean of 3.3 wt pct to between 2 and 3 wt pct for the magma which formed the ignimbrite. The strong H2O gradient suggests that only the magma from the very upper portion of the magma chamber could have been saturated with respect to an H2O-dominated vapor phase, because of the decrease in H2O contents with decreasing pressure. The volatile enrichment in the magma which formed the BT Plinian tephra appears to have occurred independently of strong trace element enrichment and may have been generated by rapid diffusion from a sidewall crystallization zone. 60 refs.

  20. The Application of the Principal Curve Analysis Technique to Smooth Beam Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Friedsam, H.; Oren, W.; /SLAC

    2005-08-12

    The smoothness of a beam line refers to the quality of the relative positioning of a number of adjacent beam guiding components. The fact that smoothness is of highest priority when positioning magnets can be seen in the local tolerances imposed by the beam optics. In the past, smoothing has been done by separating horizontal and vertical misalignments and then applying some sort of analytical or manual ''feathering'' technique. The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) did not easily lend itself to this sort of smoothing because of the highly coupled nature of its pitched and rolled beam line. This paper will discuss an attempt to develop a repeatable method which is independent of the inconsistencies of human judgment and can simultaneously smooth in two or more dimensions. Four major goals were defined for the smoothing algorithm used on the SLC alignment. The first, was to simultaneously model errors for both horizontal and vertical directions. Secondly, a smooth curve whose shape was suggested by the data and not by a predetermined model was implied by the fact that unknown systematic errors were being eliminated. Thirdly, this curve must be a reproducibly fit, independent of the inconsistent nature of human judgment. Fourth, the result of the procedure was to minimize the number and size of magnet movements to reach the final alignment criteria.

  1. Barcode High Resolution Melting (Bar-HRM) analysis for detection and quantification of PDO "Fava Santorinis" (Lathyrus clymenum) adulterants.

    PubMed

    Ganopoulos, Ioannis; Madesis, Panagiotis; Darzentas, Nikos; Argiriou, Anagnostis; Tsaftaris, Athanasios

    2012-07-15

    Legumes considered as one of the most important crops worldwide. Due to high price as a PDO product, commercial products of "Fava Santorinis" are often subjected to adulterations from other legume products coming from other Lathyrus or Vicia and Pisum species. Using plant DNA barcoding regions (trnL and rpoC) coupled with High Resolution Melting (Bar-HRM) we have developed a method allowing us to detect and authenticate PDO "Fava Santorinis". Bar-HRM proved to be a very sensitive tool able to genotype Lathyrus and its closed relative species and to detect admixtures, being sensitive enough to as low as 1:100 of non-"Fava Santorinis" in "Fava Santorinis" commercial products. In conclusion, Bar-HRM analysis can be a faster, with higher resolution and cost effectiveness alternative method to authenticate PDO "Fava Santorinis" and to quantitatively detect adulterations in "Fava Santorinis" with other relative commercial "Fava" food products. PMID:25683426

  2. Glacier surface melt characterization and trend analysis (1992-2011) in the Russian High Arctic from combined resolution-enhanced scatterometer and passive microwave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, M.; Ramage, J. M.; Semmens, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Global warming has been pronounced in the remote glacierized archipelagoes (Severnaya Zemlya, Novaya Zemlya and Franz Josef Land) of the Russian High Arctic (RHA) and its effect on the low altitude, high latitude small ice caps needs examination. The timing and spatial variability of snow melt onset, duration and intensity are key factors influencing mass balance and the ice marginal hydrological system as well as important indicators of glacial response to anthropogenic and natural forcings. Characterization and trend analysis of RHA glacier melt behaviors provide insight about assessing the mass loss rate under recent Arctic climate change. However, due to the harsh environment, long term records of glaciological data for RHA are limited, necessitating the application of remotely sensed data to accomplish the research. The high sensitivity to liquid water and the ability to penetrate non-precipitating clouds enables microwave remote sensing to detect glacier surface melt. The appearance of melt water in snow dramatically decreases the returned scatterometer radar signal from active microwave sensors and sharply augments passive microwave emission. Based on this feature, we combined resolution-enhanced ERS-1/2 C-band (1992-2000), QuickSCAT Ku-band (2000-2009), ASCAT C-band (2009-2011) scatterometer data and SSMI 37 GHz (1995-2007) vertically polarized passive microwave products from Brigham Young University and analyzed glacier surface melt trends from 1992 to 2011 with a spatial resolution downscaled to 4.45km. We concatenated scatterometer derived melt behaviors by overlapping years and refined the results based on passive microwave data. Cross-validation shows that melt timing to be consistent between the active and passive sensors. Trend analysis (α < 0.005) reveals that the average glacier surface melt onset date occurs earlier by approximately 0.85 days/year in Severnaya Zemlya which outpaced the mean advancing rate in the pan-Arctic. Surrounded by ocean

  3. Distinguishing Mantle Components by Sr and Nd Isotope Analysis of Single Melt Inclusions: Case Study on Italian Potassium-rich Lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koornneef, J.; Nikogosian, I.; van Bergen, M.; Smeets, R.; Bouman, C.; Schwieters, J. B.; Davies, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Melt inclusions record more extreme isotopic variability than their bulk host lavas and offer the potential to better constrain mantle components that contribute to magmatism. Isotopic analyses of melt inclusions are, however, challenging because of their limited size. To date, Sr and Pb isotope data have been obtained for oceanic islands by application of in situ analysis techniques, either by SIMS or LA-(MC)-ICPMS. Comprehensive studies of inclusions from other settings have yet to be performed. Here, we report the first combined Sr and Nd isotope data on individual melt inclusions from Pliocene-Quaternary K-rich lavas from mainland Italy, obtained using wet chemistry techniques and TIMS analysis. We use newly developed 1013 Ohm resistors mounted in the feedback loop of Faraday cup amplifiers. Compared to default 1011 Ohm resistors, use of 1013 Ohm resistors results in a 10-fold improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio and more precise data when analysing small ion beams (< 20 mV). Twenty-one olivine hosted (85 - 92 mol % Fo) melt inclusions from seven volcanic centres along the Italian peninsula were analysed. Inclusions were homogenised and analysed for trace elements prior to isotopic analysis. 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the melt inclusions range from 0.70508 to 0.71543; 143Nd/144Nd ratios from 0.51175 to 0.51268. Significant differences in 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd were found between melt inclusions and host lavas indicating distinct evolution paths for the lava groundmasses and the primitive melts that were trapped in the phenocrysts. The isotopic variability is interpreted to be the result of (1) mixing of melts derived from a heterogeneous mantle modified by subduction-related metasomatism, (2) mingling of distinct batches of olivine-bearing magma within a plumbing system, and (3) local assimilation of crustal material. These preliminary data suggest that combined analysis of individual melt inclusions for trace elements and Sr-Nd isotope ratios is a promising

  4. Rapid and high throughput molecular identification of diverse mosquito species by high resolution melting analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ajamma, Yvonne Ukamaka; Mararo, Enock; Omondi, David; Onchuru, Thomas; Muigai, Anne W. T.; Masiga, Daniel; Villinger, Jandouwe

    2016-01-01

    Mosquitoes are a diverse group of invertebrates, with members that are among the most important vectors of diseases. The correct identification of mosquitoes is paramount to the control of the diseases that they transmit. However, morphological techniques depend on the quality of the specimen and often unavailable taxonomic expertise, which may still not be able to distinguish mosquitoes among species complexes (sibling and cryptic species). High resolution melting (HRM) analyses, a closed-tube, post-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method used to identify variations in nucleic acid sequences, has been used to differentiate species within the Anopheles gambiae and Culex pipiens complexes. We validated the use of PCR-HRM analyses to differentiate species within Anopheles and within each of six genera of culicine mosquitoes, comparing primers targeting cytochrome b ( cyt b), NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1), intergenic spacer region (IGS) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 ( COI) gene regions. HRM analyses of amplicons from all the six primer pairs successfully differentiated two or more mosquito species within one or more genera ( Aedes ( Ae. vittatus from Ae. metallicus), Culex ( Cx. tenagius from Cx. antennatus, Cx. neavei from Cx. duttoni, cryptic Cx. pipiens species), Anopheles ( An. gambiae s.s. from An. arabiensis) and Mansonia ( Ma. africana from Ma. uniformis)) based on their HRM profiles. However, PCR-HRM could not distinguish between species within Aedeomyia ( Ad. africana and Ad. furfurea), Mimomyia ( Mi. hispida and Mi. splendens) and Coquillettidia ( Cq. aurites, Cq. chrysosoma, Cq. fuscopennata, Cq. metallica, Cq. microannulatus, Cq. pseudoconopas and Cq. versicolor) genera using any of the primers. The IGS and COI barcode region primers gave the best and most definitive separation of mosquito species among anopheline and culicine mosquito genera, respectively, while the other markers may serve to confirm identifications of closely related sub

  5. Rapid and high throughput molecular identification of diverse mosquito species by high resolution melting analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ajamma, Yvonne Ukamaka; Mararo, Enock; Omondi, David; Onchuru, Thomas; Muigai, Anne W. T.; Masiga, Daniel; Villinger, Jandouwe

    2016-01-01

    Mosquitoes are a diverse group of invertebrates, with members that are among the most important vectors of diseases. The correct identification of mosquitoes is paramount to the control of the diseases that they transmit. However, morphological techniques depend on the quality of the specimen and often unavailable taxonomic expertise, which may still not be able to distinguish mosquitoes among species complexes (sibling and cryptic species). High resolution melting (HRM) analyses, a closed-tube, post-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method used to identify variations in nucleic acid sequences, has been used to differentiate species within the Anopheles gambiae and Culex pipiens complexes. We validated the use of PCR-HRM analyses to differentiate species within Anopheles and within each of six genera of culicine mosquitoes, comparing primers targeting cytochrome b ( cyt b), NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1), intergenic spacer region (IGS) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 ( COI) gene regions. HRM analyses of amplicons from all the six primer pairs successfully differentiated two or more mosquito species within one or more genera ( Aedes ( Ae. vittatus from Ae. metallicus), Culex ( Cx. tenagius from Cx. antennatus, Cx. neavei from Cx. duttoni, cryptic Cx. pipiens species), Anopheles ( An. gambiae s.s. from An. arabiensis) and Mansonia ( Ma. africana from Ma. uniformis)) based on their HRM profiles. However, PCR-HRM could not distinguish between species within Aedeomyia ( Ad. africana and Ad. furfurea), Mimomyia ( Mi. hispida and Mi. splendens) and Coquillettidia ( Cq. aurites, Cq. chrysosoma, Cq. fuscopennata, Cq. metallica, Cq. microannulatus, Cq. pseudoconopas and Cq. versicolor) genera using any of the primers. The IGS and COI barcode region primers gave the best and most definitive separation of mosquito species among anopheline and culicine mosquito genera, respectively, while the other markers may serve to confirm identifications of closely related sub

  6. Experimental analysis of selective laser melting process for Ti-6Al-4V turbine blade manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiazzo, Fabrizia; Cardaropoli, Francesco; Alfieri, Vittorio; Sergi, Vincenzo; Cuccaro, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    The present work focuses on the use of Selective Laser Melting (SLM) technique for manufacturing of near-net-shape aircraft component prototypes with Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy, which has already successfully employed for the production of turbine blades since it combines mechanical properties with excellent wear resistance. The main characteristic of SLM is layer manufacturing which allows to obtain complex shaped elements using three dimensional computer aided design data, with the addition of particular features like channels or cavities which can not been easily obtained with traditional technologies. The other key aspect in comparison with investment casting is shorter post-processing. The feasibility of manufacturing turbine blades with mentioned process using a laser sintered machine EOSINT M 270 (Titanium version) is analysed. The first experimental phase has dealt with the definition of processing parameters which would guarantee laser sintered part maximum density. Preliminary specimens have been manufactured to define any material-dependent scaling value to control dimensional shrinkage. Afterwards a prototype of a turbine blade has been produced using optimal process parameter set. The element positioning and support definition are discussed as they influence the overall job time and the need of post processing operations. Further analyses have been carried out to check the whole structure of the prototype using X-rays and Fluorescent Penetrant Inspection, aiming to point out possible imperfections; no defects have been detected. Furthermore, laser sintered part dimensional inspection has been successively performed via coordinate measuring machine. Eventually, the microstructure of the prototype has been examined.

  7. Experimental investigations of melting at ultra-high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavner, Abby

    The laser-heated diamond anvil cell is an important experimental tool used to access the high pressures and temperatures existing in the interior of the Earth and other planets. The ability to measure a temperature at high pressures is established, and the melting curves of elemental platinum and a complex aggregate, Allende meteorite, are determined. The melting curve of platinum was determined using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell in the pressure range of 12 to 70 GPa. The melting temperature at a given pressure is bracketed by a combination of visual observations and corresponding temperature measurements. The complete melting curve is built up from a series of melting experiments as a function of pressure, performed under different experimental conditions in the diamond cell; however, the placement of the phase boundary is inherently uncertain, due to an experimental "region of indifference" as the phase boundary is approached. To quantify the uncertainties, a statistical method using the logistic model is presented to provide best-fit phase boundaries to the platinum melting data, and can be generalized to fit phase boundary data of any sort. The high-pressure high-temperature phase diagram of Allende meteorite, a chondritic meteorite serving as a model of a primordial terrestrial planet, was investigated in the pressure and temperature ranges of 15 to 70 GPa and 1000 to 4000 K. The melting curve determined here overlaps and is in excellent agreement with previous piston-cylinder and multi-anvil measurements on the same material (Agee, et al., 1995). X-ray diffraction analysis of phases quenched from high pressure and temperature, and high pressure phases both before and after heating, are in good agreement with previous work. The phase diagram of Allende meteorite can be used to constrain events in the early geological evolution of the terrestrial planets.

  8. Study of the deterioration mechanism of LiCoO2/graphite cells in charge/discharge cycles using the discharge curve analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honkura, Kohei; Horiba, Tatsuo

    2014-10-01

    The differential discharge curve analysis that separates the discharge curve of battery cells into those of the positive and negative electrodes is useful for investigating deterioration mechanisms. We applied it to LiCoO2/graphite cells and investigated the capacity fading mechanisms during charge/discharge cycles. In the initial state, the discharge curves of the cells were reconstructed very well by the discharge curves of the positive and negative electrodes measured in advance. The discharge curve analysis revealed that the initial cell capacities were controlled by the negative electrodes. On the other hand, the capacity of the positive electrode decreased faster than that of the negative electrode during the course of the cycle test. With repeated charge/discharge cycles, the positive electrodes came to control the cell capacities. After that, deep charge/discharge cycles of the positive electrode accelerated the loss of capacity and the increase of the internal resistance. Furthermore, the rapid increase of the internal resistance lowered the accuracy of the discharge curve analysis. Although the discharge curve analysis was still applicable to the cells that were controlled by the positive electrodes, there were some discrepancies around the endpoints of the discharge curves.

  9. Comparative analysis of two broad-range PCR assays for pathogen detection in positive-blood-culture bottles: PCR-high-resolution melting analysis versus PCR-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Kevin; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Blyn, Lawrence B; Yang, Samuel; Won, Helen; Matthews, Heather; Toleno, Donna; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Carroll, Karen C; Hardick, Justin; Masek, Billy; Kecojevic, Alexander; Sampath, Rangarajan; Peterson, Stephen; Rothman, Richard E

    2012-10-01

    Detection of pathogens in bloodstream infections is important for directing antimicrobial treatment, but current culture-based approaches can be problematic. Broad-range PCR assays which target conserved genomic motifs for postamplification amplicon analysis permit detection of sepsis-causing pathogens. Comparison of different broad-range assays is important for informing future implementation strategies. In this study, we compared positive-blood-culture bottles processed by PCR coupled to high-resolution melting curve analysis (PCR/HRMA) and PCR coupled to electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) to microbiology culture results. Genus-level concordance was 90% (confidence interval [CI], 80 to 96%) for PCR/HRMA and 94% (CI, 85 to 98%) for PCR/ESI-MS. Species-level concordance was 90% (CI, 80 to 96%) for PCR/HRMA and 86% (CI, 75 to 93%) for PCR/ESI-MS. Unlike PCR/HRMA, PCR/ESI-MS was able to resolve polymicrobial samples. Our results demonstrated that the two assays have similar overall concordance rates but may have different roles as potential adjunctive tests with standard blood culture, since each method has different capabilities, advantages, and disadvantages.

  10. A unified approach for nonlinear vibration analysis of curved structures using non-uniform rational B-spline representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askari, H.; Esmailzadeh, E.; Barari, A.

    2015-09-01

    A novel procedure for the nonlinear vibration analysis of curved beam is presented. The Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) is combined with the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory to define the curvature of the structure. The governing equation of motion and the general frequency formula, using the NURBS variables, is applicable for any type of curvatures, is developed. The Galerkin procedure is implemented to obtain the nonlinear ordinary differential equation of curved system and the multiple time scales method is utilized to find the corresponding frequency responses. As a case study, the nonlinear vibration of carbon nanotubes with different shapes of curvature is investigated. The effect of oscillation amplitude and the waviness on the natural frequency of the curved nanotube is evaluated and the primary resonance case of system with respect to the variations of different parameters is discussed. For the sake of comparison of the results obtained with those from the molecular dynamic simulation, the natural frequencies evaluated from the proposed approach are compared with those reported in literature for few types of carbon nanotube simulation.

  11. Mixed convection analysis in lid-driven cavity with sinusoidally curved bottom wall using CNT-water nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohieminul Islam; Rabbi, Khan Md.; Khan, Saadbin; Mamun, M. A. H.

    2016-07-01

    Mixed convection in a lid-driven enclosure with a curved bottom wall has been investigated using CNT (Carbon Nanotube)-water nanofluid in this paper. The curvature of the bottom wall follows the sine function. Studies have been made with different amplitudes (λ = 0.05, 0.1, 0.15) of the sine function hence wall curvature. The curved wall at the bottom is heated and the top wall is kept at a relatively low temperature. Left vertical and right vertical surface are assumed to be adiabatic. Top wall has been moving at a constant lid velocity U0 at right direction. Galerkin method of FEA (Finite Element Analysis) has been used to solve the governing equations. Different parameters like Richardson number (Ri = 0.1 ˜ 10) at a fixed Reynolds number (Re = 100), solid volume fraction of CNT particle (φ = 0 ˜ 0.09) are used to observe better heat transfer rate. Streamlines, isothermal lines and average Nusselt number plots are included to discuss the result of the investigation. A 2D plot between average Nusselt number and solid volume fraction of CNT-water nanofluid is also given to analyse heat transfer rate. It is observed that higher value of Richardson number shows better heat transfer rate. Finally, the paper concludes that better heat transfer is achieved at higher amplitude (λ = 0.15) of curved surface at higher solid volume fraction (φ = 0.09).

  12. Type curve analysis of inertial effects in the response of a well to a slug test.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kipp, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    The water level response to a slug or bailer test in a well completed in a confined aquifer, has been evaluated taking into account well-bore storage and inertial effects of the water column in the well. The response range, from overdamped with negligible inertial effects to damped oscillations, was covered employing numerical inversions of the Laplace-transform solution. By scaling the time with respect to the undamped natural period of the well-aquifer system and by using the damping parameter for a second-order damped, inertial-elastic system, a set of type curves was constructed that enables water level response data from a slug or bailer test to be analyzed under conditions where the inertial parameter is large.-from Author

  13. Modal analysis using a Fourier analyzer, curve-fitting, and modal tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. R., Jr.; Chung, Y. T.

    1981-01-01

    The proposed modal test program differs from single-input methods in that preliminary data may be acquired using multiple inputs, and modal tuning procedures may be employed to define closely spaced frquency modes more accurately or to make use of frequency response functions (FRF's) which are based on several input locations. In some respects the proposed modal test proram resembles earlier sine-sweep and sine-dwell testing in that broadband FRF's are acquired using several input locations, and tuning is employed to refine the modal parameter estimates. The major tasks performed in the proposed modal test program are outlined. Data acquisition and FFT processing, curve fitting, and modal tuning phases are described and examples are given to illustrate and evaluate them.

  14. Quantitative vibrational imaging by hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy and multivariate curve resolution analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Delong; Wang, Ping; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Ben-Amotz, Dor; Weiner, Andrew M; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopic imaging has been an increasingly critical approach for unveiling specific molecules in biological environments. Toward this goal, we demonstrate hyperspectral stimulated Raman loss (SRL) imaging by intrapulse spectral scanning through a femtosecond pulse shaper. The hyperspectral stack of SRL images is further analyzed by a multivariate curve resolution (MCR) method to reconstruct quantitative concentration images for each individual component and retrieve the corresponding vibrational Raman spectra. Using these methods, we demonstrate quantitative mapping of dimethyl sulfoxide concentration in aqueous solutions and in fat tissue. Moreover, MCR is performed on SRL images of breast cancer cells to generate maps of principal chemical components along with their respective vibrational spectra. These results show the great capability and potential of hyperspectral SRL microscopy for quantitative imaging of complicated biomolecule mixtures through resolving overlapped Raman bands.

  15. Single Cell Wall Nonlinear Mechanics Revealed by a Multiscale Analysis of AFM Force-Indentation Curves.

    PubMed

    Digiuni, Simona; Berne-Dedieu, Annik; Martinez-Torres, Cristina; Szecsi, Judit; Bendahmane, Mohammed; Arneodo, Alain; Argoul, Françoise

    2015-05-01

    Individual plant cells are rather complex mechanical objects. Despite the fact that their wall mechanical strength may be weakened by comparison with their original tissue template, they nevertheless retain some generic properties of the mother tissue, namely the viscoelasticity and the shape of their walls, which are driven by their internal hydrostatic turgor pressure. This viscoelastic behavior, which affects the power-law response of these cells when indented by an atomic force cantilever with a pyramidal tip, is also very sensitive to the culture media. To our knowledge, we develop here an original analyzing method, based on a multiscale decomposition of force-indentation curves, that reveals and quantifies for the first time the nonlinearity of the mechanical response of living single plant cells upon mechanical deformation. Further comparing the nonlinear strain responses of these isolated cells in three different media, we reveal an alteration of their linear bending elastic regime in both hyper- and hypotonic conditions. PMID:25954881

  16. Frequency analysis of curved nano-sandwich structure based on a nonlocal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, O.; Hosseini, S. A. H.; Hayati, H.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study the vibration of curved nano-sandwich (CNS) with considering the influence of core shear based on the Eringen nonlocal theory. The equation of motion is derived and exact solution for the natural frequencies of CNS is presented. The proposed nonlocal model includes a material length scale parameter that can capture the size effect in CNS beam. The effects of important parameters, such as the thickness to length ratio, nonlocal parameter and mode number on the frequencies of CNS are investigated. The result of our research shows that as the opening angle increases, the amount of natural frequencies decrease. We have additionally validate, our results against previous research works which showed good agreement.

  17. Light Curve Analysis for W UMa-Type Eclipsing Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Scott; Peach, N.; Olsen, T.

    2006-12-01

    We report results from summer 2006 in an ongoing study of eclipsing binary stars. Our investigations have focused on the measurement and interpretation of light curves for W UMa-type systems 44i Boötis and VW Cephei. These contact binaries have component stars of spectral type G, and revolve with periods of 6.43 and 6.67 hours. Dome automation and scripting capabilities introduced this summer have significantly reduced experimental uncertainties in our data. In support of previous findings we continue to observe an increase in the orbital period of 44i Boo at a rate of 10.4 µs/epoch or 14.2 ms/yr. Residuals computed after incorporating the increasing period suggest an underlying sinusoidal oscillation with a 61.5 year period and amplitude of 648 seconds. AAPT Member Thomas Olsen is sponsoring the lead presenter, SPS Member Scott Henderson, and the co-presenter, SPS Member Nick Peach.

  18. Single Cell Wall Nonlinear Mechanics Revealed by a Multiscale Analysis of AFM Force-Indentation Curves

    PubMed Central

    Digiuni, Simona; Berne-Dedieu, Annik; Martinez-Torres, Cristina; Szecsi, Judit; Bendahmane, Mohammed; Arneodo, Alain; Argoul, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Individual plant cells are rather complex mechanical objects. Despite the fact that their wall mechanical strength may be weakened by comparison with their original tissue template, they nevertheless retain some generic properties of the mother tissue, namely the viscoelasticity and the shape of their walls, which are driven by their internal hydrostatic turgor pressure. This viscoelastic behavior, which affects the power-law response of these cells when indented by an atomic force cantilever with a pyramidal tip, is also very sensitive to the culture media. To our knowledge, we develop here an original analyzing method, based on a multiscale decomposition of force-indentation curves, that reveals and quantifies for the first time the nonlinearity of the mechanical response of living single plant cells upon mechanical deformation. Further comparing the nonlinear strain responses of these isolated cells in three different media, we reveal an alteration of their linear bending elastic regime in both hyper- and hypotonic conditions. PMID:25954881

  19. "Textbook as a Contradictory Melting-Pot": An Analysis of Multicultural Content in Korean Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Youngdal; Park, Yunkyoung

    2016-01-01

    In this study we will observe how multicultural content is covered in elementary and secondary schools in Korea. For this purpose, a total of 52 textbooks (social studies, ethics and Korean language from third to ninth grade) were analysed using two analysis frames. The first frame is the "multicultural content analysis frame (MCAF)"…

  20. Bradford Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousseau, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of informetric distributions shows that generalized Leimkuhler functions give proper fits to a large variety of Bradford curves, including those exhibiting a Groos droop or a rising tail. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is used to test goodness of fit, and least-square fits are compared with Egghe's method. (Contains 53 references.) (LRW)

  1. Numerical analysis of the effects of non-conventional laser beam geometries during laser melting of metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safdar, Shakeel; Li, Lin; Sheikh, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    Laser melting is an important industrial activity encountered in a variety of laser manufacturing processes, e.g. selective laser melting, welding, brazing, soldering, glazing, surface alloying, cladding etc. The majority of these processes are carried out by using either circular or rectangular beams. At present, the melt pool characteristics such as melt pool geometry, thermal gradients and cooling rate are controlled by the variation of laser power, spot size or scanning speed. However, the variations in these parameters are often limited by other processing conditions. Although different laser beam modes and intensity distributions have been studied to improve the process, no other laser beam geometries have been investigated. The effect of laser beam geometry on the laser melting process has received very little attention. This paper presents an investigation of the effects of different beam geometries including circular, rectangular and diamond shapes on laser melting of metallic materials. The finite volume method has been used to simulate the transient effects of a moving beam for laser melting of mild steel (EN-43A) taking into account Marangoni and buoyancy convection. The temperature distribution, melt pool geometry, fluid flow velocities and heating/cooling rates have been calculated. Some of the results have been compared with the experimental data.

  2. DSA Analysis of IRM Curves for Hydrocarbon Microseepage Characterization in Oil Fields From Eastern and Western Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldana, M.; Costanzo-Alvarez, V.; Gonzalez, C.; Gomez, L.

    2009-05-01

    During the last few years we have performed surface reservoir characterization at some Venezuelan oil fields using rock magnetic properties. We have tried to identify, at shallow levels, the "oil magnetic signature" of subjacent reservoirs. Recent data obtained from eastern Venezuela (San Juan field) emphasizes the differences between rock magnetic data from eastern and western oil fields. These results support the hypothesis of different authigenic processes. To better characterize hydrocarbon microseepage in both cases, we apply a new method to analyze IRM curves in order to find out the main magnetic phases responsible for the observed magnetic susceptibility (MS) anomalies. This alternative method is based on a Direct Signal Analysis (DSA) of the IRM in order to identify the number and type of magnetic components. According to this method, the IRM curve is decomposed as the sum of N elementary curves (modeled using the expression proposed by Robertson and France, 1994) whose mean coercivities vary in the interval of the measured magnetic field. The result is an adjusted spectral histogram from which the number of main contributions, their widths and mean coercivities, associated with the number and type of magnetic minerals, can be obtained. This analysis indicates that in western fields the main magnetic mineralogy is magnetite. Conversely in eastern fields, the MS anomalies are mainly caused by the presence of Fe sulphides (i.e. greigite). These results support the hypothesis of two different processes. In western fields a net electron transfer from the organic matter, degraded by hydrocarbon gas leakage, should occur precipitating Fe(II) magnetic minerals (e.g. magnetite). On the other hand, high concentrations of H2S at shallow depth levels, might allow the formation of secondary Fe-sulphides in eastern fields.

  3. A TRANSIT TIMING ANALYSIS OF NINE RISE LIGHT CURVES OF THE EXOPLANET SYSTEM TrES-3

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, N. P.; Pollacco, D.; Simpson, E. K.; Barros, S.; Joshi, Y. C.; Todd, I.; Keenan, F. P.; Skillen, I.; Benn, C.; Christian, D.; Hrudkova, M.; Steele, I. A.

    2009-08-01

    We present nine newly observed transits of TrES-3, taken as part of a transit timing program using the RISE instrument on the Liverpool Telescope. A Markov-Chain Monte Carlo analysis was used to determine the planet-star radius ratio and inclination of the system, which were found to be R{sub p} /R {sub *} = 0.1664{sup +0.0011} {sub -0.0018} and i = 81.73{sup +0.13} {sub -0.04}, respectively, consistent with previous results. The central transit times and uncertainties were also calculated, using a residual-permutation algorithm as an independent check on the errors. A re-analysis of eight previously published TrES-3 light curves was conducted to determine the transit times and uncertainties using consistent techniques. Whilst the transit times were not found to be in agreement with a linear ephemeris, giving {chi}{sup 2} = 35.07 for 15 degrees of freedom, we interpret this to be the result of systematics in the light curves rather than a real transit timing variation. This is because the light curves that show the largest deviation from a constant period either have relatively little out-of-transit coverage or have clear systematics. A new ephemeris was calculated using the transit times and was found to be T{sub c} (0) = 2454632.62610 {+-} 0.00006 HJD and P = 1.3061864 {+-} 0.0000005 days. The transit times were then used to place upper mass limits as a function of the period ratio of a potential perturbing planet, showing that our data are sufficiently sensitive to have probed sub-Earth mass planets in both interior and exterior 2:1 resonances, assuming that the additional planet is in an initially circular orbit.

  4. Analysis of glass and glass melts during the vitrification of fly and bottom ashes by laser-induced plasma spectroscopy. Part II. Process analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panne, U.; Clara, M.; Haisch, C.; Niessner, R.

    1998-12-01

    Laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) is employed for in situ and on-line process analysis of major glass constituents during a vitrification process for fly and bottom ashes from waste incineration. The system is based on an Nd:YAG laser for plasma ignition, while the elemental emissions from the plasma are detected time-resolved by an intensified multichannel analyzer. The perpendicular, single axis, imaging optics allow a remote sensing of the composition of the hot glass melt. Taking into account the plasma characteristics for calibration, good agreement between the LIPS analysis and the established reference analysis is achieved for the concentration ratios of SiO 2, Al 2O 3, and CaO. In addition, LIPS is applied to the analysis of aerosols generated by homogeneous nucleation during the heating-up of the investigated fly ashes. A distinctive temperature dependence of the heavy metal concentration of the aerosols is observed.

  5. Rapid identification of bacterial pathogens in positive blood culture bottles by use of a broad-based PCR assay coupled with high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Won, Helen; Rothman, Richard; Ramachandran, Padmini; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Kecojevic, Aleksandar; Carroll, Karen C; Aird, Deborah; Gaydos, Charlotte; Yang, Samuel

    2010-09-01

    We evaluated a broad-based PCR assay coupled with high-resolution melt analysis for rapid bacterial identification in patients with bacterial sepsis. With a reference library of 60 clinically relevant bacterial species, 52 positive blood culture samples were tested. Our assay identified 46/52 samples at the species level, with 100% concordance to culture findings.

  6. Disequilibrium Experiments and Micro-XANES Analysis: Novel Tools to Unravel the Speciation of Sulfur in Silicate Melts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugo, P. J.; Wilke, M.; Susini, J.

    2007-12-01

    Sulfur is an element of interest in magmatic processes for several reasons, some of which are related to the oxidation state of S during magma generation and evolution. For example, S as sulfide (S2-) controls the behavior of chalcophile and highly siderophile elements, whereas S as sulfate (S6+) is responsible for high- S explosive volcanic eruptions, which can cause global cooling by increasing the Earth's albedo. An adequate understanding of the speciation of S in magmatic systems and the transition from S2- to S6+ is therefore needed to understand these processes. Data from natural samples is incomplete and experimental data are required to link natural data with oxygen fugacity (fO2). However, the change in speciation from sulfide to sulfate in silicate melts is difficult to simulate experimentally because: (a) common capsule materials react with S (e.g. Pt) or have low melting points (e.g. Au); (b) the change in speciation occurs over a very narrow fO2 interval (FMQ to FMQ+2) and common buffering techniques (e.g. "double capsule" technique with FMQ or NNO buffers) are not sufficient to investigate a wide-enough range in fO2; (c) sulfur solubility in silicate melts in the fO2 range of interest is too low at atmospheric pressures, limiting the use of gas-mixing furnaces to either very oxidized or very reduced conditions. We have used disequilibrium experiments in which sulfate-saturated (i.e. oxidized) basaltic and andesitic melts were reacted with graphite (a reductant) and quenched before the system reached equilibrium. Quenching of the experiments before complete re-equilibration (i.e. complete reduction by graphite) preserved reduction profiles in which sulfate-saturated glass (in the center of the capsule) coexisted with sulfide-saturated glass (at the edge of graphite capsule). We used the ID-21 beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) to perform micro-XANES analysis at the S K- edge to determine the speciation of sulfur along the

  7. Analysis of the Validity of Environmental Kuznets Curve for the Baltic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapinskienė, Giedrė; Tvaronavičienė, Manuela; Vaitkus, Pranas

    2013-12-01

    The paper analyses a traditional Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) relationship between greenhouse gases (GHG) and gross domestic product (GDP), extending the research to include some additional factors, such as environmental tax, research and development expenditure, implicit tax rate on energy, primary production of coal and lignite, energy intensity of the economy taken from the Eurostat database. The EKC indicates that, at the early stages of economic growth, pollution increases with the growing use of resources, but when a certain level of income per capita is reached, the trend reverses so that, at a higher development stage, further economic growth leads to the improvement of the environment. In the first part of the research, the validity of the reduced EKC for the Baltic region for the period 1995-2008 is determined. In the second part, the impact of selected factors is statistically tested. In both cases, the standard cubic equation is used because it is believed that this model is the most accurate for the development stage of this region. The research results may be useful for climate change policy design.

  8. Stability and dynamic analysis of a slender column with curved longitudinal stiffeners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a stability design study are presented for a slender column with curved longitudinal stiffeners for large space structure applications. Linear stability analyses are performed using a link-plate representation of the stiffeners to determine stiffener local buckling stresses. Results from a set of parametric analyses are used to determine an approximate explicit expression for stiffener local buckling in terms of its geometric parameters. This expression along with other equations governing column stability and mass are assembled into a determinate system describing minimum mass stiffened column design. An iterative solution is determined to solve this system and a computer program incorporating this routine is presented. Example design problems are presented which verify the solution accuracy and illustrate the implementation of the solution routine. Also, observations are made which lead to a greatly simplified first iteration design equation relating the percent increase in column mass to the percent increase in column buckling load. From this, generalizations are drawn as to the mass savings offered by the stiffened column concept. Finally, the percent increase in fundamental column vibration frequency due to the addition of deployable stiffeners is studied.

  9. Development of oral reading fluency in children with speech or language impairments: A growth curve analysis

    PubMed Central

    Puranik, Cynthia S.; Petscher, Yaacov; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Catts, Hugh W.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study used piece-wise growth curve analyses to examine growth patterns in oral reading fluency for students diagnosed with speech (SI) or language impairments (LI) from first through third grade (N = 1,991). The main finding of this study was that a diagnosis of SI or LI can have a detrimental effect on early reading skills and these problems can be persistent. The results indicate differences between subgroups in growth trajectories that were evident in first grade. These differences were associated with a students’ speech or language status. A large proportion of students with SI or LI did not meet grade-level reading fluency benchmarks. Overall students with SI showed better performance than students with LI. Reading fluency performance was negatively related to the persistence of the SI or LI; the lowest performing students were those originally identified with SI or LI whose diagnosis changed to a learning disability. The results underscore the need to identify, monitor, and address reading fluency difficulties early among students with SI or LI. PMID:18625782

  10. Vertically stratified two-phase flow in a curved channel: Insights from a domain perturbation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, P.; Picardo, J. R.; Pushpavanam, S.

    2014-07-15

    In this work, we investigate the fully developed flow field of two vertically stratified fluids (one phase flowing above the other) in a curved channel of rectangular cross section. The domain perturbation technique is applied to obtain an analytical solution in the asymptotic limit of low Reynolds numbers and small curvature ratios (the ratio of the width of the channel to its radius of curvature). The accuracy of this solution is verified by comparison with numerical simulations of the nonlinear equations. The flow is characterized by helical vortices within each fluid, which are driven by centrifugal forces. The number of vortices and their direction of circulation varies with the parameters of the system (the volume fraction, viscosity ratio, and Reynolds numbers). We identify nine distinct flow patterns and organize the parameter space into corresponding flow regimes. We show that the fully developed interface between the fluids is not horizontal, in general, but is deformed by normal stresses associated with the circulatory flow. The results are especially significant for flows in microchannels, where the Reynolds numbers are small. The mathematical results in this paper include an analytical solution to two coupled biharmonic partial differential equations; these equations arise in two-phase, two-dimensional Stokes flows.

  11. A novel three-dimensional smile analysis based on dynamic evaluation of facial curve contour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi; Lin, Han; Lin, Qiuping; Zhang, Jinxin; Zhu, Ping; Lu, Yao; Zhao, Zhi; Lv, Jiahong; Lee, Mln Kyeong; Xu, Yue

    2016-02-01

    The influence of three-dimensional facial contour and dynamic evaluation decoding on factors of smile esthetics is essential for facial beauty improvement. However, the kinematic features of the facial smile contour and the contribution from the soft tissue and underlying skeleton are uncharted. Here, the cheekbone-maxilla contour and nasolabial fold were combined into a “smile contour” delineating the overall facial topography emerges prominently in smiling. We screened out the stable and unstable points on the smile contour using facial motion capture and curve fitting, before analyzing the correlation between soft tissue coordinates and hard tissue counterparts of the screened points. Our finding suggests that the mouth corner region was the most mobile area characterizing smile expression, while the other areas remained relatively stable. Therefore, the perioral area should be evaluated dynamically while the static assessment outcome of other parts of the smile contour contribute partially to their dynamic esthetics. Moreover, different from the end piece, morphologies of the zygomatic area and the superior part of the nasolabial crease were determined largely by the skeleton in rest, implying the latter can be altered by orthopedic or orthodontic correction and the former better improved by cosmetic procedures to improve the beauty of smile.

  12. Analyzing Exercise Behaviors during the College Years: Results from Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wittman, Werner

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze changes in the predictors of physical activity behavior among college students. The Theory of Planned Behavior served as its theoretical framework. Methods: Among an initial sample of 417 college students, 195 participants completed a validated questionnaire measuring attitudes, subjective norms, perceived control, intentions and self-reported physical activity, at the beginning and end of each of 3 college semesters. Latent growth curve modeling analyses were conducted to examine the relationships between the trajectories of changes in PA, intentions, attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control. Results: Good fit indices supported the validity of the proposed longitudinal model (CFI > .97, RMSEA < .05). Changes in perceived control (γ = 0.57) were significantly linked with changes in intentions (p < .05). Perceived control (γ = 0.28) and intention growth (γ = 0.36) predicted behavior changes (p < .05). No gender differences were observed on attitudes, subjective norms and perceived control (p > .10). However, girls tend to have higher growth parameters on intentions and physical activity (p < .05). In summary, intentions and physical activity has significantly increased over 3 college semesters (growth parameters significant at p < .05). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that attitudes and perceived control are key determinants regarding the intentions of being active. On a longer term perspective, future physical activity interventions should focus on the enhancement of students’ perceived control. Such educational context should help in promoting the adoption of an active lifestyle during college. PMID:27124179

  13. Secondary flow structure in a model curved artery: 3D morphology and circulation budget analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we examined the rate of change of circulation within control regions encompassing the large-scale vortical structures associated with secondary flows, i.e. deformed Dean-, Lyne- and Wall-type (D-L-W) vortices at planar cross-sections in a 180° curved artery model (curvature ratio, 1/7). Magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments were performed independently, under the same physiological inflow conditions (Womersley number, 4.2) and using Newtonian blood-analog fluids. The MRV-technique performed at Stanford University produced phase-averaged, three-dimensional velocity fields. Secondary flow field comparisons of MRV-data to PIV-data at various cross-sectional planes and inflow phases were made. A wavelet-decomposition-based approach was implemented to characterize various secondary flow morphologies. We hypothesize that the persistence and decay of arterial secondary flow vortices is intrinsically related to the influence of the out-of-plane flow, tilting, in-plane convection and diffusion-related factors within the control regions. Evaluation of these factors will elucidate secondary flow structures in arterial hemodynamics. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number CBET-0828903, and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE). The MRV data were acquired at Stanford University in collaboration with Christopher Elkins and John Eaton.

  14. A novel three-dimensional smile analysis based on dynamic evaluation of facial curve contour.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi; Lin, Han; Lin, Qiuping; Zhang, Jinxin; Zhu, Ping; Lu, Yao; Zhao, Zhi; Lv, Jiahong; Lee, Mln Kyeong; Xu, Yue

    2016-02-25

    The influence of three-dimensional facial contour and dynamic evaluation decoding on factors of smile esthetics is essential for facial beauty improvement. However, the kinematic features of the facial smile contour and the contribution from the soft tissue and underlying skeleton are uncharted. Here, the cheekbone-maxilla contour and nasolabial fold were combined into a "smile contour" delineating the overall facial topography emerges prominently in smiling. We screened out the stable and unstable points on the smile contour using facial motion capture and curve fitting, before analyzing the correlation between soft tissue coordinates and hard tissue counterparts of the screened points. Our finding suggests that the mouth corner region was the most mobile area characterizing smile expression, while the other areas remained relatively stable. Therefore, the perioral area should be evaluated dynamically while the static assessment outcome of other parts of the smile contour contribute partially to their dynamic esthetics. Moreover, different from the end piece, morphologies of the zygomatic area and the superior part of the nasolabial crease were determined largely by the skeleton in rest, implying the latter can be altered by orthopedic or orthodontic correction and the former better improved by cosmetic procedures to improve the beauty of smile.

  15. A novel three-dimensional smile analysis based on dynamic evaluation of facial curve contour

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi; Lin, Han; Lin, Qiuping; Zhang, Jinxin; Zhu, Ping; Lu, Yao; Zhao, Zhi; Lv, Jiahong; Lee, Mln Kyeong; Xu, Yue

    2016-01-01

    The influence of three-dimensional facial contour and dynamic evaluation decoding on factors of smile esthetics is essential for facial beauty improvement. However, the kinematic features of the facial smile contour and the contribution from the soft tissue and underlying skeleton are uncharted. Here, the cheekbone-maxilla contour and nasolabial fold were combined into a “smile contour” delineating the overall facial topography emerges prominently in smiling. We screened out the stable and unstable points on the smile contour using facial motion capture and curve fitting, before analyzing the correlation between soft tissue coordinates and hard tissue counterparts of the screened points. Our finding suggests that the mouth corner region was the most mobile area characterizing smile expression, while the other areas remained relatively stable. Therefore, the perioral area should be evaluated dynamically while the static assessment outcome of other parts of the smile contour contribute partially to their dynamic esthetics. Moreover, different from the end piece, morphologies of the zygomatic area and the superior part of the nasolabial crease were determined largely by the skeleton in rest, implying the latter can be altered by orthopedic or orthodontic correction and the former better improved by cosmetic procedures to improve the beauty of smile. PMID:26911450

  16. Multivariate curve resolution for the analysis of remotely sensed thermal infrared hyperspectral images.

    SciTech Connect

    Haaland, David Michael; Stork, Christopher Lyle; Keenan, Michael Robert

    2004-07-01

    While hyperspectral imaging systems are increasingly used in remote sensing and offer enhanced scene characterization relative to univariate and multispectral technologies, it has proven difficult in practice to extract all of the useful information from these systems due to overwhelming data volume, confounding atmospheric effects, and the limited a priori knowledge regarding the scene. The need exists for the ability to perform rapid and comprehensive data exploitation of remotely sensed hyperspectral imagery. To address this need, this paper describes the application of a fast and rigorous multivariate curve resolution (MCR) algorithm to remotely sensed thermal infrared hyperspectral images. Employing minimal a priori knowledge, notably non-negativity constraints on the extracted endmember profiles and a constant abundance constraint for the atmospheric upwelling component, it is demonstrated that MCR can successfully compensate thermal infrared hyperspectral images for atmospheric upwelling and, thereby, transmittance effects. We take a semi-synthetic approach to obtaining image data containing gas plumes by adding emission gas signals onto real hyperspectral images. MCR can accurately estimate the relative spectral absorption coefficients and thermal contrast distribution of an ammonia gas plume component added near the minimum detectable quantity.

  17. Post-Buckling Analysis of Curved Honeycomb Sandwich Panels Containing Interfacial Disbonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Krivanek, Thomas K.

    2016-01-01

    A numerical study on the effect of facesheet-core disbonds on the post-buckling response of curved honeycomb sandwich panels is presented herein. This work was conducted as part of the development of a damage tolerance plan for the next-generation Space Launch System heavy lift launch vehicle payload fairing. As such, the study utilized full-scale fairing barrel segments as the structure of interest. The panels were composed of carbon fiber reinforced polymer facesheets and aluminum honeycomb core. The panels were analyzed numerically using the finite element method incorporating geometric nonlinearity. In a predetermined circular region, facesheet and core nodes were detached to simulate a disbond, between the outer mold line facesheet and honeycomb core, induced via low-speed impact. Surface-to-surface contact in the disbonded region was invoked to prevent interpenetration of the facesheet and core elements and obtain realistic stresses in the core. The diameter of this disbonded region was varied and the effect of the size of the disbond on the post-buckling response was observed. Significant changes in the slope of the edge load-deflection response were used to determine the onset of global buckling and corresponding buckling load. Finally, several studies were conducted to determine the sensitivity of the numerical predictions to refinement in the finite element mesh.

  18. Isotope analysis of crystalline impact melt rocks from Apollo 16 stations 11 and 13, North Ray Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimold, W. U.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bansal, B. M.; Shih, C.-Y.; Weismann, H.; Wooden, J. L.; Mackinnon, I. D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The North Ray Crater Target Rock Consortium was formed to study a large number of rake samples collected at Apollo 16 stations 11 and 13 with comparative chemical, mineralogical, and chronological techniques in order to provide a larger data base for the discussion of lunar highland evolution in the vicinity of the Apollo 16 landing region. The present investigation is concerned with Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic analyses of a number of whole-rock samples of feldspathic microporhyritic (FM) impact melt, a sample type especially abundant among the North Ray crater (station 11) sample collection. Aspects of sample mineralogy and analytical procedures are discussed, taking into account FM impact melt rocks 6715 and 63538, intergranular impact melt rock 67775, subophitic impact melt rock 67747, subophitic impact melt rock 67559, and studies based on the utilization of electron microscopy and mass spectroscopy.

  19. Evaluation of pollutant loads from stormwater BMPs to receiving water using load frequency curves with uncertainty analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Daeryong; Roesner, Larry A

    2012-12-15

    This study examined pollutant loads released to receiving water from a typical urban watershed in the Los Angeles (LA) Basin of California by applying a best management practice (BMP) performance model that includes uncertainty. This BMP performance model uses the k-C model and incorporates uncertainty analysis and the first-order second-moment (FOSM) method to assess the effectiveness of BMPs for removing stormwater pollutants. Uncertainties were considered for the influent event mean concentration (EMC) and the aerial removal rate constant of the k-C model. The storage treatment overflow and runoff model (STORM) was used to simulate the flow volume from watershed, the bypass flow volume and the flow volume that passes through the BMP. Detention basins and total suspended solids (TSS) were chosen as representatives of stormwater BMP and pollutant, respectively. This paper applies load frequency curves (LFCs), which replace the exceedance percentage with an exceedance frequency as an alternative to load duration curves (LDCs), to evaluate the effectiveness of BMPs. An evaluation method based on uncertainty analysis is suggested because it applies a water quality standard exceedance based on frequency and magnitude. As a result, the incorporation of uncertainty in the estimates of pollutant loads can assist stormwater managers in determining the degree of total daily maximum load (TMDL) compliance that could be expected from a given BMP in a watershed.

  20. Scaling and disorder analysis of local I-V curves from ferroelectric thin films of lead zirconate titanate.

    PubMed

    Maksymovych, Peter; Pan, Minghu; Yu, Pu; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Baddorf, Arthur P; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2011-06-24

    Differential analysis of current-voltage characteristics, obtained on the surface of epitaxial films of ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate (Pb(Zr(0.2)Ti(0.8))O(3)) using scanning probe microscopy, was combined with spatially resolved mapping of variations in local conductance to differentiate between candidate mechanisms of local electronic transport and the origin of disorder. Within the assumed approximations, electron transport was inferred to be determined by two mechanisms depending on the magnitude of applied bias, with the low-bias range dominated by the trap-assisted Fowler-Nordheim tunneling through the interface and the high-bias range limited by the hopping conduction through the bulk. Phenomenological analysis of the I-V curves has further revealed that the transition between the low- and high-bias regimes is manifested both in the strength of variations within the I-V curves sampled across the surface, as well as the spatial distribution of conductance. Spatial variations were concluded to originate primarily from the heterogeneity of the interfacial electronic barrier height with an additional small contribution from random changes in the tip-contact geometry.

  1. Curved Beam Computed Tomography based Structural Rigidity Analysis of Bones with Simulated Lytic Defect: A Comparative Study with Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oftadeh, R.; Karimi, Z.; Villa-Camacho, J.; Tanck, E.; Verdonschot, N.; Goebel, R.; Snyder, B. D.; Hashemi, H. N.; Vaziri, A.; Nazarian, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a CT based structural rigidity analysis (CTRA) method that incorporates bone intrinsic local curvature is introduced to assess the compressive failure load of human femur with simulated lytic defects. The proposed CTRA is based on a three dimensional curved beam theory to obtain critical stresses within the human femur model. To test the proposed method, ten human cadaveric femurs with and without simulated defects were mechanically tested under axial compression to failure. Quantitative computed tomography images were acquired from the samples, and CTRA and finite element analysis were performed to obtain the failure load as well as rigidities in both straight and curved cross sections. Experimental results were compared to the results obtained from FEA and CTRA. The failure loads predicated by curved beam CTRA and FEA are in agreement with experimental results. The results also show that the proposed method is an efficient and reliable method to find both the location and magnitude of failure load. Moreover, the results show that the proposed curved CTRA outperforms the regular straight beam CTRA, which ignores the bone intrinsic curvature and can be used as a useful tool in clinical practices. PMID:27585495

  2. Curved Beam Computed Tomography based Structural Rigidity Analysis of Bones with Simulated Lytic Defect: A Comparative Study with Finite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    Oftadeh, R; Karimi, Z; Villa-Camacho, J; Tanck, E; Verdonschot, N; Goebel, R; Snyder, B D; Hashemi, H N; Vaziri, A; Nazarian, A

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a CT based structural rigidity analysis (CTRA) method that incorporates bone intrinsic local curvature is introduced to assess the compressive failure load of human femur with simulated lytic defects. The proposed CTRA is based on a three dimensional curved beam theory to obtain critical stresses within the human femur model. To test the proposed method, ten human cadaveric femurs with and without simulated defects were mechanically tested under axial compression to failure. Quantitative computed tomography images were acquired from the samples, and CTRA and finite element analysis were performed to obtain the failure load as well as rigidities in both straight and curved cross sections. Experimental results were compared to the results obtained from FEA and CTRA. The failure loads predicated by curved beam CTRA and FEA are in agreement with experimental results. The results also show that the proposed method is an efficient and reliable method to find both the location and magnitude of failure load. Moreover, the results show that the proposed curved CTRA outperforms the regular straight beam CTRA, which ignores the bone intrinsic curvature and can be used as a useful tool in clinical practices. PMID:27585495

  3. Curved Beam Computed Tomography based Structural Rigidity Analysis of Bones with Simulated Lytic Defect: A Comparative Study with Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oftadeh, R.; Karimi, Z.; Villa-Camacho, J.; Tanck, E.; Verdonschot, N.; Goebel, R.; Snyder, B. D.; Hashemi, H. N.; Vaziri, A.; Nazarian, A.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a CT based structural rigidity analysis (CTRA) method that incorporates bone intrinsic local curvature is introduced to assess the compressive failure load of human femur with simulated lytic defects. The proposed CTRA is based on a three dimensional curved beam theory to obtain critical stresses within the human femur model. To test the proposed method, ten human cadaveric femurs with and without simulated defects were mechanically tested under axial compression to failure. Quantitative computed tomography images were acquired from the samples, and CTRA and finite element analysis were performed to obtain the failure load as well as rigidities in both straight and curved cross sections. Experimental results were compared to the results obtained from FEA and CTRA. The failure loads predicated by curved beam CTRA and FEA are in agreement with experimental results. The results also show that the proposed method is an efficient and reliable method to find both the location and magnitude of failure load. Moreover, the results show that the proposed curved CTRA outperforms the regular straight beam CTRA, which ignores the bone intrinsic curvature and can be used as a useful tool in clinical practices.

  4. Statistical signal analysis of the Phanerozoic ð13C curve: implications for Earth system evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachan, A.; Kump, L. R.; Payne, J.; Saltzman, M.; Thomas, E.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, vast amounts of carbon isotopic data have been collected allowing the construction of the Phanerozoic δ13C curve in unprecedented detail. Our dataset comprises 8143 points spanning the last 541 m.y., with a mean spacing of 66 k.y. The average δ13C of Phanerozoic carbonate is 1 ‰ ± 2 ‰, in accordance with the canonical values measured in the past. However, the record also shows numerous, highly resolved, large (± 6 ‰) excursions whose magnitude declines through time, especially going into the late Mesozoic and Cenozoic. When the magnitude - distribution of the excursions is tabulated we find that it follows a power law: plotting the min-max differences vs. number of bins in which a particular value occurs reveals that the data fall on a semilogarithmic line with a slope of -0.23 and R2 = 0.99. The result is insensitive to outliers: smoothing the data with lowess, spline, Savitzky-Golay, and Butterworth filters yields similar results. The continuity from small variation to large perturbations, both positive and negative, suggests that, despite the numerous proposed causes for individual carbon isotopic evens, there is likely an underlying mechanism which governs the magnitude of δ13C response to perturbations. We suggest that a mechanism acting to amplify carbon cycle perturbations is the key to explaining the power-law distribution, and identify the anoxia-productivity feedback as the most likely candidate. Establishment of sulfidic conditions is accompanied by increased release of phosphate to the water column, which allows for further productivity, and thus acts as a destabilizing, positive, feedback. This feedback would act to increase carbon cycle swings irrespective of their proximal trigger. The decline in frequency of anoxic-sulfidic bottom waters in the world's oceans, and potential disappearance in the Late Mesozoic-Cenozoic, may account for a reduction in the Earth system's gain and increase in its resilience.

  5. The Impact of Tides on Transiting Planet Structure and Evolution and Light Curve Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrier, Gilles

    2011-09-01

    We examine two key consequences of tidal forces on the transiting planet observed and theoretical properties. First, based on consistent calculations coupling gravothermal evolution with complete tidal equations, we revisit the viability of the tidal heating hypothesis to explain the anomalously large radius of some transiting planets. We demonstrate, both analytically and numerically, that calculations based on tidal models truncated at second order in eccentricity, as done in all previous studies, lead to severely erroneous tidal evolutions. Such truncated calculations yield characteristic timescales for dynamical evolution that can be wrong by orders of magnitude, leading accordingly to completely erroneous tidal energy dissipation rates during the planet's evolution. We demontrate that these results do not stem from uncertainties in the tidal quality factor, as often (erroneously) suggested, but from the exact calculations of the tidal equations. We show that, although tidal heating provides a substantial contribution to the planet's heat budget, this mechanism can not explain alone all the anomalously inflated planets. We examine alternative mechanisms to explain these puzzling properties. Furthermore, due to strong tidal forces, transiting planets exhibit a non-spherical shape. Such a departure from sphericity has a measurable impact on the observed transit depth and leads to a bias in the derivation of the transit radius from the light curve. As the tidally deformed planet projects its smallest cross section area during the transit, the measured effective radius is smaller than the one of the unperturbed genuine spherical planet. To correct this bias, we present analytical expressions that can easily be used to calculate the shape of observed planets (and Love number) and its impact on the transit lightcurve. These expressions enable us to convert the planet’s measured cross section into its real equilibrium radius, the one to be used when comparing

  6. The first multi-color light curve analysis of FI Lyn and new V and Rc light curve analysis for GN Boo, two W-subtype W Ursae Majoris systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barani, C.; Martignoni, M.; Acerbi, F.

    2015-08-01

    Here we present the first analysis of the B, V and Ic CCD light curves of the W UMa type eclipsing binary star FI Lyn obtained in the year 2009 (8 nights) and in the year 2010 (2 nights), and new CCD V and Rc light curves of the known contact eclipsing binary GN Boo obtained in 4 nights in May 2012. Our data permits us the determination of ten and six new times of minimum light respectively for FI Lyn and GN Boo and refine both the orbital periods of the systems to P = 0.3732612 days and P = 0.3016022 days. The periods of both the systems are variable. FI Lyn shows an increasing period at the rate of dP / dt 1.05 × 10-6 days yr-1 while GN Boo shows cyclic oscillations. The observed light curves are analyzed simultaneously with the Wilson-Devinney program analysis; the geometrical and photometric elements are derived. Our solutions show that FI Lyn and GN Boo belong to the W-subtype W Ursae Majoris contact binary class, consisting of a hotter, less massive primary star eclipsed at primary minimum with a primary spectral type of G1 and G8 and a companion of spectral type G3 and G4 respectively. We found, for FI Lyn a mass ratio of q = 2.58 , the degree of contact of f = 38.9 % , an orbital inclination of i = 71 ° .5 and a small temperature difference between the components of about Δ T = 150 K indicating a good thermal contact, while for GN Boo we found a mass ratio of q = 3.33 , the degree of contact of f = 24.3 % , an orbital inclination of i = 83 ° .6 and a difference between the components temperature of about Δ T = 620 K. The elements obtained from the W-D analysis are used to compute the physical parameters of the systems in order to study their evolutionary status.

  7. Melting in the Fe-Ni system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, O. T.; Walter, M. J.; Vocadlo, L.; Wood, I. G.; Dobson, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    The melting temperature of the Fe-rich core alloy at the inner core boundary (ICB) condition of 330 GPa is a key geophysical parameter because it represents an anchor point on the geotherm. An accurate knowledge of the melting curves of candidate alloys is therefore highly desirable. In spite of this, there is still considerable uncertainty in the melting point even of pure Fe at these conditions; estimates range from as low as 4850K based on one laser heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) study [1] to as high as 6900K based on recent quantum Monte Carlo calculations [2]. In reality we expect that the bulk core alloy may contain 5-10 wt% Ni (based on cosmochemical and meteoritic arguments) and up to 10 wt% of an as yet undetermined mix of light elements (with Si, S, C and O being the most likely candidates). While some recent studies have looked at the effects of light elements on the melting curve of Fe [e.g.: 3,4] with some of these studies including a small amount of Ni in their starting material, to date there has been no systematic study of melting temperatures in the Fe-Ni system. To address this issue, we have embarked upon just such a study. Using the LHDAC we have determined the melting curve of the pure Ni end-member to 180 GPa, and that of pure Fe to 50 GPa, using perturbations in the power vs. temperature function as the melting criterion [5]. Ar or NaCl were employed as pressure media while temperature was measured using standard spectroradiometric techniques [6]. In the case of Ni, perturbations were observed for both the sample and the Ar medium, allowing us to determine the melting curve of Ar and Ni simultaneously. Our results thus far for Ni and Ar agree closely with all of the available data, while extending the melting curves by a factor of two in pressure. In the case of Fe, our current dataset is also in good agreement with previous studies [2,7]. The agreement of all three melting curves with the literature data as well as other materials

  8. Analysis of flow development in centrifugal atomization: Part II. Disintegration of a non-fully spreading melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. Y.

    2004-09-01

    Centrifugal atomization of metal melts is a cost-effective process for powder production and spray deposition. The properties of the as-produced powder and deposit are determined primarily by the characteristics of the atomized droplets, which in turn are largely dependent on the flow development of the melt on the atomizer. This paper develops a model for analysing the flow development of a non-fully spreading melt on the atomizing cup. The model shows that the melt can disintegrate prematurely before reaching the edge of the cup when the dynamic contact angle of the melt exceeds a critical contact angle. The critical contact angle is very small for a flat disc but increases markedly with increasing slope angle of a cup. The critical contact angle also increases with increasing melt flow rate and cup rotation speed. The model gives a good insight into the atomization mechanism and explains well the phenomena observed in centrifugal atomization, including the conditions of the occurrence of the three atomization modes and the existence of an optimum melt flow rate, cup radius, cup slope angle and cup rotation speed for achieving small droplet sizes.

  9. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-05-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply rigorous thermodynamic analysis to an important biochemical problem. Because the stacking of base pairs on top of one another is a significant factor in the energetics of oligonucleotide melting, several investigators have applied van't Hoff analysis to melting temperature data using a nearest-neighbor model and have obtained entropies and enthalpies for the stacking of bases. The present article explains how the equilibrium constant for the dissociation of strands from double-stranded oligonucleotides can be expressed in terms of the total strand concentration and thus how the total strand concentration influences the melting temperature. It also presents a simplified analysis based on the entropies and enthalpies of stacking that is manually tractable so that students can work examples to help them understand the thermodynamics of oligonucleotide melting.

  10. Establishment of an x-ray standard calibration curve by conventional dicentric analysis as prerequisite for accurate radiation dose assessment.

    PubMed

    Beinke, Christina; Braselmann, Herbert; Meineke, Viktor

    2010-02-01

    The dicentric assay was established to carry out cytogenetic biodosimetry after suspected radiation overexposure, including a comprehensive documentation system to record the processing of the specimen, all data, results, and stored information. As an essential prerequisite for retrospective radiation dose assessment, a dose-response curve for dicentric induction by in vitro x-ray irradiation of peripheral blood samples was produced. The accelerating potential was 240 kV (maximum photon energy: 240 keV). A total of 8,377 first-division metaphases of four healthy volunteers were analyzed after exposure to doses ranging from 0.2 to 4.0 Gy at a dose rate of 1.0 Gy min. The background level of aberrations at 0-dose was determined by the analysis of 14,522 first-division metaphases obtained from unirradiated blood samples of 10 healthy volunteers. The dose-response relationship follows a linear-quadratic equation, Y = c + alphaD + betaD, with the coefficients c = 0.0005 +/- 0.0002, alpha = 0.043 +/- 0.006, and beta = 0.063 +/- 0.004. The technical competence and the quality of the calibration curve were assessed by determination of the dose prediction accuracy in an in vitro experiment simulating whole-body exposures within a range of 0.2 to 2.0 Gy. Dose estimations were derived by scoring up to 500-1,000 metaphase spreads or more (full estimation mode) and by evaluating only 50 metaphase spreads (triage mode) per subject. The triage mode was applied by performing manifold evaluations of the full estimation data in order to test the robustness of the curve for triage purposes and to assess possible variations among the estimated doses referring to a single exposure and preparation.

  11. Not proper ROC curves as new tool for the analysis of differentially expressed genes in microarray experiments

    PubMed Central

    Parodi, Stefano; Pistoia, Vito; Muselli, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Background Most microarray experiments are carried out with the purpose of identifying genes whose expression varies in relation with specific conditions or in response to environmental stimuli. In such studies, genes showing similar mean expression values between two or more groups are considered as not differentially expressed, even if hidden subclasses with different expression values may exist. In this paper we propose a new method for identifying differentially expressed genes, based on the area between the ROC curve and the rising diagonal (ABCR). ABCR represents a more general approach than the standard area under the ROC curve (AUC), because it can identify both proper (i.e., concave) and not proper ROC curves (NPRC). In particular, NPRC may correspond to those genes that tend to escape standard selection methods. Results We assessed the performance of our method using data from a publicly available database of 4026 genes, including 14 normal B cell samples (NBC) and 20 heterogeneous lymphomas (namely: 9 follicular lymphomas and 11 chronic lymphocytic leukemias). Moreover, NBC also included two sub-classes, i.e., 6 heavily stimulated and 8 slightly or not stimulated samples. We identified 1607 differentially expressed genes with an estimated False Discovery Rate of 15%. Among them, 16 corresponded to NPRC and all escaped standard selection procedures based on AUC and t statistics. Moreover, a simple inspection to the shape of such plots allowed to identify the two subclasses in either one class in 13 cases (81%). Conclusion NPRC represent a new useful tool for the analysis of microarray data. PMID:18834513

  12. Determining Mechanics of Segregating Small Crystals from Melt Using Modeling and SHRIMP-RG Trace Element Analysis of Zircons: Application to the Spirit Mountain Batholith, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claiborne, L. L.; Furbish, D. J.; Miller, C. F.

    2006-12-01

    Melt segregation from crystal mush is commonly cited as generating the highly differentiated