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Sample records for melting curve analysis

  1. High-Resolution Melt Curve Analysis in Cancer Mutation Screen.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Meenakshi; Patel, Keyur P

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis is a PCR-based assay that identifies sequence alterations based on subtle variations in the melting curves of mutated versus wild-type DNA sequences. HRM analysis is a high-throughput, sensitive, and efficient alternative to Sanger sequencing and is used to assess for mutations in clinically important genes involved in cancer diagnosis. The technique involves PCR amplification of a target sequence in the presence of a fluorescent double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) binding dye, melting of the fluorescent amplicons, and subsequent interpretation of melt curve profiles.

  2. Molecular identification of antelope horn by melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yuru; Jiang, Chao; Yuan, Yuan; Jin, Yan; Cui, Zhan-Hu; Huang, Luqi

    2016-11-01

    Antelope horn is a valuable Chinese traditional medicine and widely used in clinic. However, with the deterioration of antelope's living environment and a lot of killing, the saiga population begins falling and in some places plummet. Since the increasing demand of this expensive and good bioactive medicine, the horn of artiodactyla animals is often used as the antelope horn. The adulterated or impostor not only cause damage to clinical medicine but also affect the antelope resources protection and sustainable development. Here, in order to establish a melting curve analysis (MCA) method to distinguish the antelope horn from other animal horns and identify the decoction pieces and Chinese patent medicine in a fast and easy way, animal horns and its decoction pieces, Chinese patent medicines were collected from the market and the DNA of all the collected samples were extracted. The melting curve of two universal fragments (COI and Cyt b) was scanned and Cyt b was selected as feasibility fragment for identifying authentic antelope horn from eight adulterant animal horns. After optimizing the condition for MCA, inspecting the precision and the replication of the method, a reference melting curve modern was established and we performed MCA on the antelope horns, fakes, and adulterants on a 1:1 mix, decoction pieces, and Chinese patent medicine. Thus, this study provides fast and easy methods so that MCA can detect the truth, fakes, and adulterations of antelope horns.

  3. Rapid Diagnosis of α-Thalassemia by Melting Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Munkongdee, Thongperm; Vattanaviboon, Phantip; Thummarati, Parichut; Sewamart, Paijit; Winichagoon, Pranee; Fucharoen, Suthat; Svasti, Saovaros

    2010-01-01

    α-Thalassemia is an inherited hemoglobin disorder that results from defective synthesis of α-globin protein. Couples who both carry the α-thalassemia-1 gene are at risk of having a fetus with Hb Bart's hydrops fetalis. Rapid and accurate screening for individuals carrying the α-thalassemia-1 gene is the most effective strategy to prevent and control this severe form of thalassemia. In this study, a new and accurate method for α-thalassemia diagnosis was developed by genotyping α-thalassemia-1, the Southeast Asian type (−−SEA) and Thai type (−−THAI) deletions, using multiplex PCR followed by a melting curve analysis. Primers were designed to specifically amplify two deletion fragments, the −−SEA and −−THAI deletions and two normal fragments, ψζ- and α2-globin gene. The primers were capable of distinguishing α-thalassemia 1 heterozygotes from α-thalassemia 2 homozygotes, which are unable to be diagnosed by standard hematological data and hemoglobin typing. The melting temperatures of the −−THAI, −−SEA, ψζ-globin, and α2-globin gene fragments were 79.9 ± 0.2, 89.4 ± 0.5, 92.8 ± 0.2, and 85.0 ± 0.2°C, respectively. Melting curve analysis was performed in 130 subjects in parallel with conventional gap-PCR analysis, and results showed 100% concordance. This method eliminates the post-PCR electrophoresis process, which is laborious, and allows high throughput screening suitable for large population screening for prevention and control of thalassemia. PMID:20190015

  4. High resolution melting curve analysis of DNA samples isolated by different DNA extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Martín-Núñez, Gracia M; Gómez-Zumaquero, Juan M; Soriguer, Federico; Morcillo, Sonsoles

    2012-01-18

    High resolution melting is a post-PCR-based method for detecting DNA sequence variation by measuring changes in the melting of a DNA duplex. Melting of double-stranded DNA molecules is influenced by several factors. We evaluated the influence of the DNA isolation method in the melting curve analysis to detect genetic variations. We isolated DNA from whole blood of 547 subjects by two different methods: Maxwell 16 Instrument and DNA FlexiGene Kit. A fragment of 159 bp was amplified and analyzed by high resolution melting. Those samples that showed a different melting curve pattern were sequenced. Of the samples extracted with the Maxwell 16 Instrument, 42% showed variation compared with 0.18% of the samples extracted with DNA FlexiGene Kit. After sequencing, we showed that all samples extracted with the Maxwell 16 Instrument were false positive except one, which coincided with the only sample that showed variation in those extracted with the DNA FlexiGene Kit. The method used to extract DNA is an important factor to consider in the analysis of melting curves obtained by high resolution melting, as it may influence the melting behaviour of the samples, giving false positive results in the detection of genetic variants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Sex determination in beef by melting curve analysis of PCR amplicons from the amelogenin locus.

    PubMed

    Ballin, Nicolai Z; Madsen, Knud G

    2007-11-01

    Sex determination of beef is important to meet the rules of the Commission Regulation (EC) 765/2002 that qualify for export refunds. A SYBR Green sex identification assay based on melting curve analysis of PCR amplicons from the amelogenin locus (AMELX and AMELY) was developed. The PCR amplicons of 130/130 and 130/67 base pairs produced from female and male beef, respectively, are easily distinguished by both melting curve analysis and gel electrophoresis. Results from the melting curve analysis of amplicons are ready in less than three minutes, and requires no additional work in addition to the PCR setup. Applicability of the sex determination assay was studied by analysis of 12 unknown beef samples and the results were compared to an accredited method based on gel electrophoresis. In addition, six different cattle breeds were examined. All test results were correct in respect to sex.

  6. Evaluation of PCR and high resolution melt curve analysis for differentiation of Salmonella isolates.

    PubMed

    Saeidabadi, Mohammad Sadegh; Nili, Hassan; Dadras, Habibollah; Sharifiyazdi, Hassan; Connolly, Joanne; Valcanis, Mary; Raidal, Shane; Ghorashi, Seyed Ali

    2016-12-21

    Consumption of poultry products contaminated with Salmonella is one of the major causes of foodborne diseases worldwide and therefore detection and differentiation of Salmonella spp. in poultry is important. In this study, oligonucleotide primers were designed from hem-D gene and a PCR followed by high-resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis was developed for rapid differentiation of Salmonella isolates. Amplicons of 228 bp were generated from 16 different Salmonella reference strains and from 65 clinical field isolates mainly from poultry farms. High resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis of the amplicons differentiated Salmonella isolates and analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the amplicons from selected isolates revealed that each melting curve profile was related to a unique DNA sequence. The relationship between reference strains and tested specimens was also evaluated using a mathematical model without visual interpretation of HRM curves. In addition, the potential of the PCR-HRM curve analysis was evaluated for genotyping of additional Salmonella isolates from different avian species. The findings indicate that PCR followed by HRM curve analysis provides a rapid and robust technique for genotyping of Salmonella isolates to determine the serovar/serotype.

  7. Differentiating between monozygotic twins through DNA methylation-specific high-resolution melt curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Leander; Evans, Neil; Bexon, Kimberley J; van der Meer, Dieudonne J; Williams, Graham A

    2015-05-01

    Although short tandem repeat profiling is extremely powerful in identifying individuals from crime scene stains, it is unable to differentiate between monozygotic (MZ) twins. Efforts to address this include mutation analysis through whole genome sequencing and through DNA methylation studies. Methylation of DNA is affected by environmental factors; thus, as MZ twins age, their DNA methylation patterns change. This can be characterized by bisulfite treatment followed by pyrosequencing. However, this can be time-consuming and expensive; thus, it is unlikely to be widely used by investigators. If the sequences are different, then in theory the melting temperature should be different. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess whether high-resolution melt curve analysis can be used to differentiate between MZ twins. Five sets of MZ twins provided buccal swabs that underwent extraction, quantification, bisulfite treatment, polymerase chain reaction amplification and high-resolution melting curve analysis targeting two markers, Alu-E2F3 and Alu-SP. Significant differences were observed between all MZ twins targeting Alu-E2F3 and in four of five MZ twins targeting Alu-SP (P<0.05). Thus, it has been demonstrated that bisulfite treatment followed by high-resolution melting curve analysis could be used to differentiate between MZ twins.

  8. Rapid genotyping of beak and feather disease virus using high-resolution DNA melt curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Subir; Ghorashi, Seyed A; Forwood, Jade K; Raidal, Shane R

    2014-11-01

    Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) is a significant pathogen both for wild and captive psittacine birds globally. Genotypic differentiation of BFDV isolates is crucial to establish effective control strategies for the conservation of endangered species and epidemiological investigations of disease outbreaks. The technique developed in this study is a simple, rapid and inexpensive genotyping method for BFDV using PCR and subsequent high-resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis. This was achieved using PCR amplification of the conserved Rep gene in the presence of a fluorescent DNA intercalating dye (SYTO9). HRM curve analysis of the resultant amplicon could readily differentiate between reference strain (92-SR14) and 18 other BFDV isolates used in this study. Analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the amplicon from each isolate revealed that each melt curve profile was related to a unique DNA sequence. The potential of the PCR-HRM curve analysis to differentiate inter-host genetic variation among critically endangered orange-bellied parrots, lorikeets and cockatoos was also evaluated. Phylogenetic tree topology based on partial Rep gene sequences used in this study showed that BFDV Rep gene sequence patterns were correlated with the results of HRM curve analysis. The results presented in this study indicate that this technique could be used in both clinical research and differentiation of BFDV isolates in a fraction of time without further nucleotide sequencing and provides a novel approach for the genetic screening of BFDV in clinical virology laboratories.

  9. STR melting curve analysis as a genetic screening tool for crime scene samples.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quang; McKinney, Jason; Johnson, Donald J; Roberts, Katherine A; Hardy, Winters R

    2012-07-01

    In this proof-of-concept study, high-resolution melt curve (HRMC) analysis was investigated as a postquantification screening tool to discriminate human CSF1PO and THO1 genotypes amplified with mini-STR primers in the presence of SYBR Green or LCGreen Plus dyes. A total of 12 CSF1PO and 11 HUMTHO1 genotypes were analyzed on the LightScanner HR96 and LS-32 systems and were correctly differentiated based upon their respective melt profiles. Short STR amplicon melt curves were affected by repeat number, and single-source and mixed DNA samples were additionally differentiated by the formation of heteroduplexes. Melting curves were shown to be unique and reproducible from DNA quantities ranging from 20 to 0.4 ng and distinguished identical from nonidentical genotypes from DNA derived from different biological fluids and compromised samples. Thus, a method is described which can assess both the quantity and the possible probative value of samples without full genotyping.

  10. Improved protocol for rapid identification of certain spa types using high resolution melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Stöger, Anna; Pietzka, Ariane T; Fernandez, Haizpea Lasa; Prewein, Bernhard; Sorschag, Sieglinde; Kunert, Renate; Allerberger, Franz; Ruppitsch, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant pathogens associated with health care. For efficient surveillance, control and outbreak investigation, S. aureus typing is essential. A high resolution melting curve analysis was developed and evaluated for rapid identification of the most frequent spa types found in an Austrian hospital consortium covering 2,435 beds. Among 557 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates 38 different spa types were identified by sequence analysis of the hypervariable region X of the protein A gene (spa). Identification of spa types through their characteristic high resolution melting curve profiles was considerably improved by double spiking with genomic DNA from spa type t030 and spa type t003 and allowed unambiguous and fast identification of the ten most frequent spa types t001 (58%), t003 (12%), t190 (9%), t041 (5%), t022 (2%), t032 (2%), t008 (2%), t002 (1%), t5712 (1%) and t2203 (1%), representing 93% of all isolates within this hospital consortium. The performance of the assay was evaluated by testing samples with unknown spa types from the daily routine and by testing three different high resolution melting curve analysis real-time PCR instruments. The ten most frequent spa types were identified from all samples and on all instruments with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity. Compared to classical spa typing by sequence analysis, this gene scanning assay is faster, cheaper and can be performed in a single closed tube assay format. Therefore it is an optimal screening tool to detect the most frequent endemic spa types and to exclude non-endemic spa types within a hospital.

  11. Improved Protocol for Rapid Identification of Certain Spa Types Using High Resolution Melting Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Stöger, Anna; Pietzka, Ariane T.; Fernandez, Haizpea Lasa; Prewein, Bernhard; Sorschag, Sieglinde; Kunert, Renate; Allerberger, Franz; Ruppitsch, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant pathogens associated with health care. For efficient surveillance, control and outbreak investigation, S. aureus typing is essential. A high resolution melting curve analysis was developed and evaluated for rapid identification of the most frequent spa types found in an Austrian hospital consortium covering 2,435 beds. Among 557 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates 38 different spa types were identified by sequence analysis of the hypervariable region X of the protein A gene (spa). Identification of spa types through their characteristic high resolution melting curve profiles was considerably improved by double spiking with genomic DNA from spa type t030 and spa type t003 and allowed unambiguous and fast identification of the ten most frequent spa types t001 (58%), t003 (12%), t190 (9%), t041 (5%), t022 (2%), t032 (2%), t008 (2%), t002 (1%), t5712 (1%) and t2203 (1%), representing 93% of all isolates within this hospital consortium. The performance of the assay was evaluated by testing samples with unknown spa types from the daily routine and by testing three different high resolution melting curve analysis real-time PCR instruments. The ten most frequent spa types were identified from all samples and on all instruments with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity. Compared to classical spa typing by sequence analysis, this gene scanning assay is faster, cheaper and can be performed in a single closed tube assay format. Therefore it is an optimal screening tool to detect the most frequent endemic spa types and to exclude non-endemic spa types within a hospital. PMID:25768007

  12. Detection and differentiation of coccidian oocysts by real-time PCR and melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Laura F; Gajadhar, Alvin A

    2011-08-01

    Rapid and reliable detection and identification of coccidian oocysts are essential for animal health and foodborne disease outbreak investigations. Traditional microscopy and morphological techniques can identify large and unique oocysts, but they are often subjective and require parasitological expertise. The objective of this study was to develop a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay using melting curve analysis (MCA) to detect, differentiate, and identify DNA from coccidian species of animal health, zoonotic, and food safety concern. A universal coccidia primer cocktail was designed and employed to amplify DNA from Cryptosporidium parvum, Toxoplasma gondii, Cyclospora cayetanensis, and several species of Eimeria, Sarcocystis, and Isospora using qPCR with SYBR Green detection. MCA was performed following amplification, and melting temperatures (T(m)) were determined for each species based on multiple replicates. A standard curve was constructed from DNA of serial dilutions of T. gondii oocysts to estimate assay sensitivity. The qPCR assay consistently detected DNA from as few as 10 T. gondii oocysts. T(m) data analysis showed that C. cayetanensis, C. parvum, Cryptosporidium muris, T. gondii, Eimeria bovis, Eimeria acervulina, Isospora suis, and Sarcocystis cruzi could each be identified by unique melting curves and could be differentiated based on T(m). DNA of coccidian oocysts in fecal, food, or clinical diagnostic samples could be sensitively detected, reliably differentiated, and identified using qPCR with MCA. This assay may also be used to detect other life-cycle stages of coccidia in tissues, fluids, and other matrices. MCA studies on multiple isolates of each species will further validate the assay and support its application as a routine parasitology screening tool.

  13. Differentiation of five enterohepatic Helicobacter species by nested PCR with high-resolution melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Miaoli; Rao, Dan; Zhu, Yujun; Wang, Jing; Yuan, Wen; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Ren; Guo, Pengju

    2017-04-01

    Enterohepatic Helicobacter species (EHS) are widespread in rodent species around the world. Several studies have demonstrated that infection with EHS can interfere with the outcomes of animal experiments in cancer research and significantly influence the study results. Therefore, it is essential to establish a rapid detection and identification of EHS for biomedical research using laboratory rodents. Our study aimed to develop a rapid and sensitive method to detect and distinguish five enterohepatic Helicobacter species. Nested PCR followed by high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRM) was developed for identification of H. bilis, H. rodentium, H. muridarum, H. typhlonius, as well as H. hepaticus. To validate the accuracy of nested PCR-HRM analysis, quantitative real-time PCR methods for five different enterohepatic Helicobacter species were developed. A total of 50 cecal samples were tested using both nested PCR-HRM analysis and qPCR method. The nested PCR-HRM method could distinguish five enterohepatic Helicobacter species by different melting temperatures. The melting curve were characterized by peaks of 78.7 ± 0.12°C for H. rodentium, 80.51 ± 0.09°C for H. bilis, 81.6 ± 0.1°C for H. typhlonius, 82.11 ± 0.18°C for H. muridarum, and 82.95 ± 0.09°C for H. hepaticus. The nested PCR-HRM assay is a simple, rapid, and cost-effective assay. This assay could be a useful tool for molecular epidemiology study of enterohepatic Helicobacter infection and an attractive alternative for genotyping of enterohepatic Helicobacter species. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Identification of squid species by melting temperature shifts on fluorescence melting curve analysis (FMCA) using single dual-labeled probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Eunjung; Song, Ha Jeong; Kwon, Na Young; Kim, Gi Won; Lee, Kwang Ho; Jo, Soyeon; Park, Sujin; Park, Jihyun; Park, Eun Kyeong; Hwang, Seung Yong

    2017-06-01

    Real time PCR is a standard method for identification of species. One of limitations of the qPCR is that there would be false-positive result due to mismatched hybridization between target sequence and probe depending on the annealing temperature in the PCR condition. As an alternative, fluorescence melting curve analysis (FMCA) could be applied for species identification. FMCA is based on a dual-labeled probe. Even with subtle difference of target sequence, there are visible melting temperature (Tm) shift. One of FMCA applications is distinguishing organisms distributed and consumed globally as popular food ingredients. Their prices are set by species or country of origin. However, counterfeiting or distributing them without any verification procedure are becoming social problems and threatening food safety. Besides distinguishing them in naked eye is very difficult and almost impossible in any processed form. Therefore, it is necessary to identify species in molecular level. In this research three species of squids which have 1-2 base pair differences each are selected as samples since they have the same issue. We designed a probe which perfectly matches with one species and the others mismatches 2 and 1 base pair respectively and labeled with fluorophore and quencher. In an experiment with a single probe, we successfully distinguished them by Tm shift depending on the difference of base pair. By combining FMCA and qPCR chip, smaller-scale assay with higher sensitivity and resolution could be possible, andc furthermore, enabling results analysis with smart phone would realize point-of-care testing (POCT).

  15. Application of real-time PCR and melting curve analysis in rapid Diego blood group genotyping.

    PubMed

    Novaretti, M C Z; Ruiz, A S; Dorlhiac-Llacer, P E; Chamone, D A F

    2010-01-01

    The paucity of appropriate reagents for serologic typing of the Diego blood group antigens has prompted the development of a real-time PCR and melting curve analysis for Diego blood group genotyping. In this study, we phenotyped 4326 donor blood samples for Di(a) using semiautomated equipment. All 157 Di(a+) samples were then genotyped by PCR using sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) for DI*02 because of anti-Di(b) scarcity. Of the 4326 samples, we simultaneously tested 160 samples for Di(a) and Di(b) serology, and DI*01 and DI*02 by PCR-SSP and by real-time PCR. We used the same primers for Diego genotyping by real-time PCR and PCR-SSP. Melting curve profiles obtained using the dissociation software of the real-time PCR apparatus enabled the discrimination of Diego alleles. Of the total samples tested, 4169 blood donors, 96.4 percent (95% confidence interval [CI], 95.8-96.9%), were homozygous for DI*02 and 157, 3.6 percent (95% CI, 3.1%-4.2%), were heterozygous DI*01/02. No blood donor was found to be homozygous for DI*01 in this study. The calculated DI*01 and DI*02 allele frequencies were 0.0181 (95% CI, 0.0173-0.0189) and 0.9819 (95% CI, 0.9791-0.9847), respectively, showing a good fit for the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. There was full concordance among Diego phenotype results by PCR-SSP and real-time PCR. DI*01 and DI*02 allele determination with SYBR Green I and thermal cycler technology are useful methods for Diego determination. The real-time PCR with SYBR Green I melting temperature protocol can be used as a rapid screening tool for DI*01 and DI*02 blood group genotyping.

  16. Methylation-Sensitive Melt Curve Analysis of the Reprimo Gene Methylation in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Junzhong; Luo, Qianping; Ke, Huican; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Reprimo (RPRM) is a p53-induced tumor suppressor gene. Its aberrant DNA methylation is correlated with carcinogenesis and may be used as a surrogate marker for the early detection of gastric cancer. However, the detail information regarding its DNA methylation has not been revealed. Here, we investigated the RPRM gene methylation in gastric cancer tumor and plasma samples by methylation-sensitive melt curve analysis (MS-MCA) and bisulfite sequencing in depth. We developed a semi-quantitative method based on MS-MCA for detecting DNA methylation and unraveled the RPRM gene methylation pattern in gastric cancer. This study provides a solid foundation for the future application of detecting RPRM gene methylation in human plasma or serum samples to help diagnose gastric cancer or for prognosis evaluation. PMID:27992600

  17. Improved capacitive melting curve measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebedash, Alexander; Tuoriniemi, Juha; Pentti, Elias; Salmela, Anssi

    2009-02-01

    Sensitivity of the capacitive method for determining the melting pressure of helium can be enhanced by loading the empty side of the capacitor with helium at a pressure nearly equal to that desired to be measured and by using a relatively thin and flexible membrane in between. This way one can achieve a nanobar resolution at the level of 30 bar, which is two orders of magnitude better than that of the best gauges with vacuum reference. This extends the applicability of melting curve thermometry to lower temperatures and would allow detecting tiny anomalies in the melting pressure, which must be associated with any phenomena contributing to the entropy of the liquid or solid phases. We demonstrated this principle in measurements of the crystallization pressure of isotopic helium mixtures at millikelvin temperatures by using partly solid pure 4He as the reference substance providing the best possible universal reference pressure. The achieved sensitivity was good enough for melting curve thermometry on mixtures down to 100 μK. Similar system can be used on pure isotopes by virtue of a blocked capillary giving a stable reference condition with liquid slightly below the melting pressure in the reference volume. This was tested with pure 4He at temperatures 0.08-0.3 K. To avoid spurious heating effects, one must carefully choose and arrange any dielectric materials close to the active capacitor. We observed some 100 pW loading at moderate excitation voltages.

  18. High-Resolution Melting Curve Analysis for Identification of Pasteurellaceae Species in Experimental Animal Facilities.

    PubMed

    Miller, Manuel; Zorn, Julia; Brielmeier, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurellaceae are among the most prevalent bacterial pathogens isolated from mice housed in experimental animal facilities. Reliable detection and differentiation of Pasteurellaceae are essential for high-quality health monitoring. In this study, we combined a real-time PCR assay amplifying a variable region in the 16S rRNA sequence with high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRM) to identify and differentiate among the commonly isolated species Pasteurella pneumotropica biotypes "Jawetz" and "Heyl", Actinobacillus muris, and Haemophilus influenzaemurium. We used a set of six reference strains for assay development, with the melting profiles of these strains clearly distinguishable due to DNA sequence variations in the amplicon. For evaluation, we used real-time PCR/HRM to test 25 unknown Pasteurellaceae isolates obtained from an external diagnostic laboratory and found the results to be consistent with those of partial 16S rRNA sequencing. The real-time PCR/HRM method provides a sensitive, rapid, and closed-tube approach for Pasteurellaceae species identification for health monitoring of laboratory mice.

  19. High-Resolution Melting Curve Analysis for Identification of Pasteurellaceae Species in Experimental Animal Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Manuel; Zorn, Julia; Brielmeier, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurellaceae are among the most prevalent bacterial pathogens isolated from mice housed in experimental animal facilities. Reliable detection and differentiation of Pasteurellaceae are essential for high-quality health monitoring. In this study, we combined a real-time PCR assay amplifying a variable region in the 16S rRNA sequence with high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRM) to identify and differentiate among the commonly isolated species Pasteurella pneumotropica biotypes “Jawetz” and “Heyl”, Actinobacillus muris, and Haemophilus influenzaemurium. We used a set of six reference strains for assay development, with the melting profiles of these strains clearly distinguishable due to DNA sequence variations in the amplicon. For evaluation, we used real-time PCR/HRM to test 25 unknown Pasteurellaceae isolates obtained from an external diagnostic laboratory and found the results to be consistent with those of partial 16S rRNA sequencing. The real-time PCR/HRM method provides a sensitive, rapid, and closed-tube approach for Pasteurellaceae species identification for health monitoring of laboratory mice. PMID:26556281

  20. High-throughput sex identification by melting curve analysis in blue-breasted quail and chicken.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-C; Liu, Y-S; Cheng, C-C; Wang, C-L; Liao, M-H; Tseng, C-N; Chang, H-W

    2012-06-01

    The objective was to develop a high-throughput method of identifying sex in both Coturnix chinensis and Gallus gallus, which would be useful for biomedical research and hatcheries. Because chromo-helicase-DNA binding protein (CHD)-based Griffiths P2/P8 primers do not produce polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products with distinguishable sex-specific curves in melting curve analysis (MCA), these primers are unsuitable for high throughput application in either species. Conserved regions were identified by basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) analyses of cloned CHD-Z and CHD-W genes of C. chinensis. Based on sequence alignment, a female-specific CHD-W primer (W-cot-F1) and a female/male (or CHD-W/CHD-Z)-common primer (ZW-cot-F1) were redesigned for use in combination with the Griffiths P2 primer for MCA-based PCR reaction. In C. chinensis and G. gallus, W-cot-F1/P2 and ZW-cot-F1/P2 had amplicon lengths of 315/318 and 114 base pairs and melting temperatures (Tm) of approximately 79.5 °C to 80 °C and approximately 78.5 °C to 79°C, respectively. Thus, MCA distinguished sex based on two distinct Tm peaks in females versus only one Tm peak in males. The MCA-based real-time PCR combined with the proposed primer redesign provided a high-throughput method of identifying sex in C. chinensis and G. gallus.

  1. High-throughput gender identification of penguin species using melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chao-Neng; Chang, Yung-Ting; Chiu, Hui-Tzu; Chou, Yii-Cheng; Huang, Hurng-Wern; Cheng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Ming-Hui; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2014-04-03

    Most species of penguins are sexual monomorphic and therefore it is difficult to visually identify their genders for monitoring population stability in terms of sex ratio analysis. In this study, we evaluated the suitability using melting curve analysis (MCA) for high-throughput gender identification of penguins. Preliminary test indicated that the Griffiths's P2/P8 primers were not suitable for MCA analysis. Based on sequence alignment of Chromo-Helicase-DNA binding protein (CHD)-W and CHD-Z genes from four species of penguins (Pygoscelis papua, Aptenodytes patagonicus, Spheniscus magellanicus, and Eudyptes chrysocome), we redesigned forward primers for the CHD-W/CHD-Z-common region (PGU-ZW2) and the CHD-W-specific region (PGU-W2) to be used in combination with the reverse Griffiths's P2 primer. When tested with P. papua samples, PCR using P2/PGU-ZW2 and P2/PGU-W2 primer sets generated two amplicons of 148- and 356-bp, respectively, which were easily resolved in 1.5% agarose gels. MCA analysis indicated the melting temperature (Tm) values for P2/PGU-ZW2 and P2/PGU-W2 amplicons of P. papua samples were 79.75°C-80.5°C and 81.0°C-81.5°C, respectively. Females displayed both ZW-common and W-specific Tm peaks, whereas male was positive only for ZW-common peak. Taken together, our redesigned primers coupled with MCA analysis allows precise high throughput gender identification for P. papua, and potentially for other penguin species such as A. patagonicus, S. magellanicus, and E. chrysocome as well.

  2. Rapid detection of non-deletional mutations causing α-thalassemia by multicolor melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiuying; Wang, Xudong; Tang, Ning; Zhu, Chunjiang; Yan, Tizhen; Chen, Ping; Li, Qingge

    2016-03-01

    α-Thalassemia, caused by mutations in the α-globin genes, is one of the most common monogenic inherited disorders in the world. However, non-deletional α-thalassemia mutations remain undetected in routine clinical testing due to the lack of a suitable method. In this study, a closed- and single-tube assay for the detection of six common non-deletional α-thalassemia mutations in the HBA2 gene was developed based on multicolor melting curve analysis. The assay consisted of one pair of primers specific for the HBA2 gene and four dual-labeled, self-quenched probes targeting six non-deletional α-thalassemia mutations. The sensitivity, reproducibility, and accuracy of the method were validated via 700 genomic DNA samples. The assay had a reproducibility of 100%, could detect gDNA of different genotype as low as 1 ng per reaction, and had an overall accuracy of 100% when compared with RDB analysis and Sanger sequencing. The developed assay is rapid, robust, and cost-effective while maintaining high sensitivity, specificity, and throughput.

  3. The Melting Point of Palladium Using Miniature Fixed Points of Different Ceramic Materials: Part II—Analysis of Melting Curves and Long-Term Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, F.; Huang, K.

    2016-12-01

    Fifteen miniature fixed-point cells made of three different ceramic crucible materials (Al2O3, ZrO2, and Al2O3(86 %)+ZrO2(14 %)) were filled with pure palladium and used to calibrate type B thermocouples (Pt30 %Rh/Pt6 %Rh). A critical point by using miniature fixed points with small amounts of fixed-point material is the analysis of the melting curves, which are characterized by significant slopes during the melting process compared to flat melting plateaus obtainable using conventional fixed-point cells. The method of the extrapolated starting point temperature using straight line approximation of the melting plateau was applied to analyze the melting curves. This method allowed an unambiguous determination of an electromotive force (emf) assignable as melting temperature. The strict consideration of two constraints resulted in a unique, repeatable and objective method to determine the emf at the melting temperature within an uncertainty of about 0.1 μ V. The lifetime and long-term stability of the miniature fixed points was investigated by performing more than 100 melt/freeze cycles for each crucible of the different ceramic materials. No failure of the crucibles occurred indicating an excellent mechanical stability of the investigated miniature cells. The consequent limitation of heating rates to values below {± }3.5 K min^{-1} above 1100° C and the carefully and completely filled crucibles (the liquid palladium occupies the whole volume of the crucible) are the reasons for successfully preventing the crucibles from breaking. The thermal stability of the melting temperature of palladium was excellent when using the crucibles made of Al2O3(86 %)+ZrO2(14 %) and ZrO2. Emf drifts over the total duration of the long-term investigation were below a temperature equivalent of about 0.1 K-0.2 K.

  4. Differentiation of infectious bursal disease virus strains using real-time RT-PCR and high resolution melt curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed A; O'Rourke, Denise; Ignjatovic, Jagoda; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2011-01-01

    Differentiation of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) strains is crucial for effective vaccination programs and epidemiological investigations. In this study, a combination of real-time RT-PCR and high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis was developed for simultaneous detection and differentiation of IBDV strains/isolates. The hypervariable region of VP2 gene was amplified from several IBDV strains and subjected to HRM curve analysis. The method could readily differentiate between classical vaccines/isolates and variants. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the amplicons from each strain revealed that each melt curve profile was related to a unique DNA sequence. The real-time RT-PCR HRM curve analysis was also able to differentiate IBDV strains/isolates directly in bursal tissues from field submissions and from vaccinated commercial flocks. The differences between melting peaks generated from IBDV strains were significantly different (P<0.0001) demonstrating the high discriminatory power of this technique. The results presented in this study indicated that real-time RT-PCR followed by HRM curve analysis provides a rapid and robust technique for genotyping IBDV isolates/strains and can contribute to effective control of IBDV outbreaks.

  5. Rapid detection of Wuchereria bancrofti in mosquitoes by LightCycler polymerase chain reaction and melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Lulitanond, Virapong; Intapan, Pewpan M; Pipitgool, Vichit; Choochote, Wej; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2004-11-01

    A LightCycler real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed to detect Wuchereria bancrofti DNA in blood-fed mosquitoes. The assay is based on fluorescence melting curve analysis of the PCR product generated from a family of repeated DNA elements: the 182 bp SspI repeat, specific to the genus Wuchereria. According to the melting temperature, W. bancrofti infected-mosquitoes were differentiated from Brugia malayi-infected and non-infected mosquitoes as well as from genomic DNA of Dirofilaria immitis and human DNA. The method proved to be 100% sensitive in all W. bancrofti-infected mosquitoes. Melting curve analysis offers a rapid alternative for the specific detection of W. bancrofti in mosquitoes. It is very accurate and sensitive, allows a high throughput and can be performed on very small samples. The method therefore has great potential for application in epidemiological studies.

  6. Rapid and Reliable Detection of Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss Mutations by Multicolor Melting Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xudong; Hong, Yongjun; Cai, Peihong; Tang, Ning; Chen, Ying; Yan, Tizhen; Liu, Yinghua; Huang, Qiuying; Li, Qingge

    2017-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common birth defect worldwide. The GJB2, SLC26A4, MT-RNR1 and MT-TS1 genes have been reported as major pathogenic genes in nonsyndromic hearing loss. Early genetic screening is recommended to minimize the incidence of hearing loss. We hereby described a multicolor melting curve analysis (MMCA)-based assay for simultaneous detection of 12 prevalent nonsyndromic hearing loss-related mutations. The three-reaction assay could process 30 samples within 2.5 h in a single run on a 96-well thermocycler. Allelic types of each mutation could be reproducibly obtained from 10 pg ~100 ng genomic DNA per reaction. For the mitochondrial mutations, 10% ~ 20% heteroplasmic mutations could be detected. A comparison study using 501 clinical samples showed that the MMCA assay had 100% concordance with both SNaPshot minisequencing and Sanger sequencing. We concluded that the MMCA assay is a rapid, convenient and cost-effective method for detecting the common mutations, and can be expectedly a reliable tool in preliminary screening of nonsyndromic hearing loss in the Chinese Han population. PMID:28225033

  7. Rapid Simultaneous Amplification and Detection of the MBR/JH Chromosomal Translocation by Fluorescence Melting Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bohling, Sandra D.; King, Thomas C.; Wittwer, Carl T.; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S. J.

    1999-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and product analysis for the detection of chromosomal translocations, such as the t(14;18), has traditionally been a two-step process. PCR product detection has generally entailed gel electrophoresis and/or hybridization or sequencing for confirmation of assay specificity. Using a microvolume fluorimeter integrated with a thermal cycler and a PCR-compatible double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) binding fluorescent dye (SYBR Green I), we investigated the feasibility of simultaneous thermal amplification and detection of MBR/JH translocation products by fluorescence melting curve analysis. We analyzed DNA from 30 cases of lymphoproliferative disorders comprising 19 cases of previously documented MBR/JH-positive follicle center lymphoma and 11 reactive lymphadenopathies. The samples were coded and analyzed blindly for the presence of MBR/JH translocations by fluorescence melting curve analysis. We also performed dilutional assays using the MBR/JH-positive cell line SUDHL-6. Multiplex PCR for MBR/JH and β-globin was used to simultaneously assess sample adequacy. All (100%) of the 19 cases previously determined to be MBR/JH positive by conventional PCR analysis showed a characteristic sharp decrease in fluorescence at ∼90°C by melting curve analysis after amplification. Fluorescence melting peaks obtained by plotting the negative derivative of fluorescence over temperature (−dF/dT) versus temperature (T) showed melting temperatures (Tm) at 88.85 ± 1.15°C. In addition, multiplex assays using both MBR/JH and β-globin primers yielded easily distinguishable fluorescence melting peaks at ∼90°C and 81.2°C, respectively. Dilutional assays revealed that fluorescence melting curve analysis was more sensitive than conventional PCR and agarose gel electrophoresis with ultraviolet transillumination by as much as 100-fold. Simultaneous amplification and fluorescence melting curve analysis is a simple, reliable, and sensitive method

  8. High resolution melt curve analysis based on methylation status for human semen identification.

    PubMed

    Fachet, Caitlyn; Quarino, Lawrence; Karnas, K Joy

    2017-03-01

    A high resolution melt curve assay to differentiate semen from blood, saliva, urine, and vaginal fluid based on methylation status at the Dapper Isoform 1 (DACT1) gene was developed. Stains made from blood, saliva, urine, semen, and vaginal fluid were obtained from volunteers and DNA was isolated using either organic extraction (saliva, urine, and vaginal fluid) or Chelex(®) 100 extraction (blood and semen). Extracts were then subjected to bisulfite modification in order to convert unmethylated cytosines to uracil, consequently creating sequences whose amplicons have melt curves that vary depending on their initial methylation status. When primers designed to amplify the promoter region of the DACT1 gene were used, DNA from semen samples was distinguishable from other fluids by a having a statistically significant lower melting temperature. The assay was found to be sperm-significant since semen from a vasectomized man produced a melting temperature similar to the non-semen body fluids. Blood and semen stains stored up to 5 months and tested at various intervals showed little variation in melt temperature indicating the methylation status was stable during the course of the study. The assay is a more viable method for forensic science practice than most molecular-based methods for body fluid stain identification since it is time efficient and utilizes instrumentation common to forensic biology laboratories. In addition, the assay is advantageous over traditional presumptive chemical methods for body fluid identification since results are confirmatory and the assay offers the possibility of multiplexing which may test for multiple body fluids simultaneously.

  9. Classification of Fowl Adenovirus Serotypes by Use of High-Resolution Melting-Curve Analysis of the Hexon Gene Region▿

    PubMed Central

    Steer, Penelope A.; Kirkpatrick, Naomi C.; O'Rourke, Denise; Noormohammadi, Amir H.

    2009-01-01

    Identification of fowl adenovirus (FAdV) serotypes is of importance in epidemiological studies of disease outbreaks and the adoption of vaccination strategies. In this study, real-time PCR and subsequent high-resolution melting (HRM)-curve analysis of three regions of the hexon gene were developed and assessed for their potential in differentiating 12 FAdV reference serotypes. The results were compared to previously described PCR and restriction enzyme analyses of the hexon gene. Both HRM-curve analysis of a 191-bp region of the hexon gene and restriction enzyme analysis failed to distinguish a number of serotypes used in this study. In addition, PCR of the region spanning nucleotides (nt) 144 to 1040 failed to amplify FAdV-5 in sufficient quantities for further analysis. However, HRM-curve analysis of the region spanning nt 301 to 890 proved a sensitive and specific method of differentiating all 12 serotypes. All melt curves were highly reproducible, and replicates of each serotype were correctly genotyped with a mean confidence value of more than 99% using normalized HRM curves. Sequencing analysis revealed that each profile was related to a unique sequence, with some sequences sharing greater than 94% identity. Melting-curve profiles were found to be related mainly to GC composition and distribution throughout the amplicons, regardless of sequence identity. The results presented in this study show that the closed-tube method of PCR and HRM-curve analysis provides an accurate, rapid, and robust genotyping technique for the identification of FAdV serotypes and can be used as a model for developing genotyping techniques for other pathogens. PMID:19036935

  10. On-chip magnetic bead-based DNA melting curve analysis using a magnetoresistive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik W.; Henriksen, Anders D.; Dufva, Martin; Hansen, Mikkel F.

    2015-04-01

    We present real-time measurements of DNA melting curves in a chip-based system that detects the amount of surface-bound magnetic beads using magnetoresistive magnetic field sensors. The sensors detect the difference between the amount of beads bound to the top and bottom sensor branches of the differential sensor geometry. The sensor surfaces are functionalized with wild type (WT) and mutant type (MT) capture probes, differing by a single base insertion (a single nucleotide polymorphism, SNP). Complementary biotinylated targets in suspension couple streptavidin magnetic beads to the sensor surface. The beads are magnetized by the field arising from the bias current passed through the sensors. We demonstrate the first on-chip measurements of the melting of DNA hybrids upon a ramping of the temperature. This overcomes the limitation of using a single washing condition at constant temperature. Moreover, we demonstrate that a single sensor bridge can be used to genotype a SNP.

  11. Differentiation of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Using Multiplex-PCR and High Resolution Melt Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Banowary, Banya; Dang, Van Tuan; Sarker, Subir; Connolly, Joanne H.; Chenu, Jeremy; Groves, Peter; Ayton, Michelle; Raidal, Shane; Devi, Aruna; Vanniasinkam, Thiru; Ghorashi, Seyed A.

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter spp. are important causes of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans in developed countries. Among Campylobacter spp. Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) and C. coli are the most common causes of human infection. In this study, a multiplex PCR (mPCR) and high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis were optimized for simultaneous detection and differentiation of C. jejuni and C. coli isolates. A segment of the hippuricase gene (hipO) of C. jejuni and putative aspartokinase (asp) gene of C. coli were amplified from 26 Campylobacter isolates and amplicons were subjected to HRM curve analysis. The mPCR-HRM was able to differentiate between C. jejuni and C. coli species. All DNA amplicons generated by mPCR were sequenced. Analysis of the nucleotide sequences from each isolate revealed that the HRM curves were correlated with the nucleotide sequences of the amplicons. Minor variation in melting point temperatures of C. coli or C. jejuni isolates was also observed and enabled some intraspecies differentiation between C. coli and/or C. jejuni isolates. The potential of PCR-HRM curve analysis for the detection and speciation of Campylobacter in additional human clinical specimens and chicken swab samples was also confirmed. The sensitivity and specificity of the test were found to be 100% and 92%, respectively. The results indicated that mPCR followed by HRM curve analysis provides a rapid (8 hours) technique for differentiation between C. jejuni and C. coli isolates. PMID:26394042

  12. Differentiation of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Using Multiplex-PCR and High Resolution Melt Curve Analysis.

    PubMed

    Banowary, Banya; Dang, Van Tuan; Sarker, Subir; Connolly, Joanne H; Chenu, Jeremy; Groves, Peter; Ayton, Michelle; Raidal, Shane; Devi, Aruna; Vanniasinkam, Thiru; Ghorashi, Seyed A

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter spp. are important causes of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans in developed countries. Among Campylobacter spp. Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) and C. coli are the most common causes of human infection. In this study, a multiplex PCR (mPCR) and high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis were optimized for simultaneous detection and differentiation of C. jejuni and C. coli isolates. A segment of the hippuricase gene (hipO) of C. jejuni and putative aspartokinase (asp) gene of C. coli were amplified from 26 Campylobacter isolates and amplicons were subjected to HRM curve analysis. The mPCR-HRM was able to differentiate between C. jejuni and C. coli species. All DNA amplicons generated by mPCR were sequenced. Analysis of the nucleotide sequences from each isolate revealed that the HRM curves were correlated with the nucleotide sequences of the amplicons. Minor variation in melting point temperatures of C. coli or C. jejuni isolates was also observed and enabled some intraspecies differentiation between C. coli and/or C. jejuni isolates. The potential of PCR-HRM curve analysis for the detection and speciation of Campylobacter in additional human clinical specimens and chicken swab samples was also confirmed. The sensitivity and specificity of the test were found to be 100% and 92%, respectively. The results indicated that mPCR followed by HRM curve analysis provides a rapid (8 hours) technique for differentiation between C. jejuni and C. coli isolates.

  13. High-Throughput Genome Editing and Phenotyping Facilitated by High Resolution Melting Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Holly R.; Percival, Stefanie M.; Yoder, Bradley K.; Parant, John M.

    2014-01-01

    With the goal to generate and characterize the phenotypes of null alleles in all genes within an organism and the recent advances in custom nucleases, genome editing limitations have moved from mutation generation to mutation detection. We previously demonstrated that High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis is a rapid and efficient means of genotyping known zebrafish mutants. Here we establish optimized conditions for HRM based detection of novel mutant alleles. Using these conditions, we demonstrate that HRM is highly efficient at mutation detection across multiple genome editing platforms (ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPRs); we observed nuclease generated HRM positive targeting in 1 of 6 (16%) open pool derived ZFNs, 14 of 23 (60%) TALENs, and 58 of 77 (75%) CRISPR nucleases. Successful targeting, based on HRM of G0 embryos correlates well with successful germline transmission (46 of 47 nucleases); yet, surprisingly mutations in the somatic tail DNA weakly correlate with mutations in the germline F1 progeny DNA. This suggests that analysis of G0 tail DNA is a good indicator of the efficiency of the nuclease, but not necessarily a good indicator of germline alleles that will be present in the F1s. However, we demonstrate that small amplicon HRM curve profiles of F1 progeny DNA can be used to differentiate between specific mutant alleles, facilitating rare allele identification and isolation; and that HRM is a powerful technique for screening possible off-target mutations that may be generated by the nucleases. Our data suggest that micro-homology based alternative NHEJ repair is primarily utilized in the generation of CRISPR mutant alleles and allows us to predict likelihood of generating a null allele. Lastly, we demonstrate that HRM can be used to quickly distinguish genotype-phenotype correlations within F1 embryos derived from G0 intercrosses. Together these data indicate that custom nucleases, in conjunction with the ease and speed of HRM, will facilitate future high

  14. Barcoding melting curve analysis for rapid, sensitive, and discriminating authentication of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) from its adulterants.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chao; Cao, Liang; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Min; Jin, Yan; Huang, Luqi

    2014-01-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) is one of the most important and expensive medicinal spice products in the world. Because of its high market value and premium price, saffron is often adulterated through the incorporation of other materials, such as Carthamus tinctorius L. and Calendula officinalis L. flowers, Hemerocallis L. petals, Daucus carota L. fleshy root, Curcuma longa L. rhizomes, Zea may L., and Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. stigmas. To develop a straightforward, nonsequencing method for rapid, sensitive, and discriminating detection of these adulterants in traded saffron, we report here the application of a barcoding melting curve analysis method (Bar-MCA) that uses the universal chloroplast plant DNA barcoding region trnH-psbA to identify adulterants. When amplified at DNA concentrations and annealing temperatures optimized for the curve analysis, peaks were formed at specific locations for saffron (81.92°C) and the adulterants: D. carota (81.60°C), C. tinctorius (80.10°C), C. officinalis (79.92°C), Dendranthema morifolium (Ramat.) Tzvel. (79.62°C), N. nucifera (80.58°C), Hemerocallis fulva (L.) L. (84.78°C), and Z. mays (84.33°C). The constructed melting curves for saffron and its adulterants have significantly different peak locations or shapes. In conclusion, Bar-MCA could be a faster and more cost-effective method to authenticate saffron and detect its adulterants.

  15. Barcoding Melting Curve Analysis for Rapid, Sensitive, and Discriminating Authentication of Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) from Its Adulterants

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Liang; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Min; Jin, Yan; Huang, Luqi

    2014-01-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) is one of the most important and expensive medicinal spice products in the world. Because of its high market value and premium price, saffron is often adulterated through the incorporation of other materials, such as Carthamus tinctorius L. and Calendula officinalis L. flowers, Hemerocallis L. petals, Daucus carota L. fleshy root, Curcuma longa L. rhizomes, Zea may L., and Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. stigmas. To develop a straightforward, nonsequencing method for rapid, sensitive, and discriminating detection of these adulterants in traded saffron, we report here the application of a barcoding melting curve analysis method (Bar-MCA) that uses the universal chloroplast plant DNA barcoding region trnH-psbA to identify adulterants. When amplified at DNA concentrations and annealing temperatures optimized for the curve analysis, peaks were formed at specific locations for saffron (81.92°C) and the adulterants: D. carota (81.60°C), C. tinctorius (80.10°C), C. officinalis (79.92°C), Dendranthema morifolium (Ramat.) Tzvel. (79.62°C), N. nucifera (80.58°C), Hemerocallis fulva (L.) L. (84.78°C), and Z. mays (84.33°C). The constructed melting curves for saffron and its adulterants have significantly different peak locations or shapes. In conclusion, Bar-MCA could be a faster and more cost-effective method to authenticate saffron and detect its adulterants. PMID:25548775

  16. Application of high-resolution melt curve analysis for classification of infectious bronchitis viruses in field specimens.

    PubMed

    Hewson, K A; Browning, G F; Devlin, J M; Ignjatovic, J; Noormohammadi, A H

    2010-10-01

    A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/high-resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis protocol was developed in our laboratory to differentiate infectious bronchitis (IB) virus reference strains. In the current study, this method was used to detect and classify IB viruses in field submissions. Over an 11-month period samples from 40 cases of suspected IB virus were received and 17 submissions were positive for IB virus by polymerase chain reaction. HRM curve analysis classified each strain as subgroup 1, 2 or 3 strain (12 submissions) or a strain that was unable to be classified (5 submissions). The 3' untranslated region (UTR) and partial S1 gene nucleotide sequences for the 17 IB virus strains were determined and their identity with those of the relative reference strains compared to confirm the classifications generated using the HRM curve analysis. Of the 12 IB field viruses classified as subgroup 1, 2, or 3 using HRM curve analysis, the 3'UTR and S1 gene nucleotide sequences had identities ≥99% with the respective subgroup reference strain. Analysis of the 3' UTR and S1 gene nucleotide sequences for the five IB virus strains that could not be classified indicated that four belonged to one of the subgroups, and one was a potential recombinant strain (between strains from subgroups 2 and 3). A novel recombinant strain was also detected. HRM curve analysis can rapidly assign the majority of IB viruses present in field submissions to known subgroups. Importantly, HRM curve analysis also identified variant genotypes that require further investigation. © 2010 The Authors. Australian Veterinary Journal © 2010 Australian Veterinary Association.

  17. 3He-melting-curve thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greywall, Dennis S.; Busch, Paul A.

    1982-03-01

    Precise measurements of the P-T relation along the melting curve of3He have been made for 8≲ T≲330 mK. The results are in excellent agreement with other precise data for temperatures near the extremes of this range. A best-fit relation is provided which describes the melting curve to within ±1 mbar between the superfluid A transition and the pressure minimum. Detailed descriptions of the melting curve and magnetic thermometers used for the calibration are also given.

  18. Simultaneous detection of Fusarium culmorum and F. graminearum in plant material by duplex PCR with melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Brandfass, Christoph; Karlovsky, Petr

    2006-01-23

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a disease of cereal crops, which has a severe impact on wheat and barley production worldwide. Apart from reducing the yield and impairing grain quality, FHB leads to contamination of grain with toxic secondary metabolites (mycotoxins), which pose a health risk to humans and livestock. The Fusarium species primarily involved in FHB are F. graminearum and F. culmorum. A key prerequisite for a reduction in the incidence of FHB is an understanding of its epidemiology. We describe a duplex-PCR-based method for the simultaneous detection of F. culmorum and F. graminearum in plant material. Species-specific PCR products are identified by melting curve analysis performed in a real-time thermocycler in the presence of the fluorescent dye SYBR Green I. In contrast to multiplex real-time PCR assays, the method does not use doubly labeled hybridization probes. PCR with product differentiation by melting curve analysis offers a cost-effective means of qualitative analysis for the presence of F. culmorum and F. graminearum in plant material. This method is particularly suitable for epidemiological studies involving a large number of samples.

  19. High resolution melting curve analysis as a new tool for rapid identification of canine parvovirus type 2 strains.

    PubMed

    Bingga, Gali; Liu, Zhicheng; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zhu, Yujun; Lin, Lifeng; Ding, Shuangyang; Guo, Pengju

    2014-01-01

    A high resolution melting (HRM) curve method was developed to identify canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) strains by nested PCR. Two sets of primers, CPV-426F/426R and CPV-87R/87F, were designed that amplified a 52 bp and 53 bp product from the viral VP2 capsid gene. The region amplified by CPV-426F/426R included the A4062G and T4064A mutations in CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c. The region amplified by CPV-87F/87R included the A3045T mutation in the vaccine strains of CPV-2 and CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c. Faecal samples were obtained from 30 dogs that were CPV antigen-positive. The DNA was isolated from the faecal samples and PCR-amplified using the two sets of primers, and genotyped by HRM curve analysis. The PCR-HRM assay was able to distinguish single nucleotide polymorphisms between CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c using CPV-426F/426R. CPV-2a was distinguished from CPV-2b and CPV-2c by differences in the melting temperature. CPV-2b and CPV-2c could be distinguished based on the shape of the melting curve after generating heteroduplexes using a CPV-2b reference sample. The vaccine strains of CPV-2 were identified using CPV-87F/87R. Conventional methods for genotyping CPV strains are labor intensive, expensive or time consuming; the present PCR-based HRM assay might be an attractive alternative.

  20. Rapid UGT1A1 (TA)(n) genotyping by high resolution melting curve analysis for Gilbert's syndrome diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Minucci, Angelo; Concolino, Paola; Giardina, Bruno; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2010-02-01

    The basis of Gilbert's syndrome is a 70% reduction in bilirubin glucuronidation which, in the Caucasian population, is the result of a homozygous TA insertion into the promoter region of the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) gene (UGT1A128 allele). In addition, homozygous subjects for UGT1A128 genotype may suffer from severe irinotecan toxicity or jaundice during treatment with the protease inhibitor atazanavir. For these reasons it is very important to perform a correct molecular diagnosis. In this study, we describe for the first time a new high resolution melting (HRM) analysis for a rapid UGT1A1 (TA)(n) genotyping. We screened the TA number repetitions of the TATA-box promoter region of the UGT1A1 gene in 30 patients attending the Gemelli Hospital. In order to evaluate the reliability of this technique, we compared the results obtained by HRM and sequencing. Since the TA insertion modifies the derivative melting curve shape and the melting temperature (T(m)), all possible genotypes for the 6 and 7 repeat alleles were successfully identified. HRM analysis for the UGT1A1 (TA)(n) genotyping is a simple, rapid, sensitive and low cost method, very useful in diagnostics. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessing contamination of microalgal astaxanthin producer Haematococcus cultures with high-resolution melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Dawidziuk, Adam; Popiel, Delfina; Luboinska, Magda; Grzebyk, Michal; Wisniewski, Maciej; Koczyk, Grzegorz

    2016-11-26

    Due to its superior antioxidant capabilities and higher activity than other carotenoids, astaxanthin is used widely in the nutraceutical and medicine industries. The most prolific natural producer of astaxanthin is the unicellular green microalga Haematococcus pluvialis. The correct identification of any contaminants in H. pluvialis cultures is both essential and nontrivial for several reasons. Firstly, while it is possible to distinguish the main microalgal contaminant Coelastrella sp. (in H. pluvialis cultures), in practice, it is frequently a daunting and error-prone task for personnel without extensive experience in the microscopic identification of algal species. Secondly, the undetected contaminants may decrease or stop production of astaxanthin. Lastly, the presence of other contaminants such as fungi can eventually infect and destroy the whole algae collection. In this study, high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was developed to detect microalgal and fungal contamination. The developed diagnostic procedure allowed to distinguish pure H. pluvialis samples from cultures contaminated with low amounts (1.25 ng/ml) of microalgal DNA and fungal DNA (2.5 ng/ml). Such discrimination is not possible with the use of microscopy observations and allows fast and efficient collection testing.

  2. Lineage-specific detection of influenza B virus using real-time polymerase chain reaction with melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Tewawong, Nipaporn; Chansaenroj, Jira; Klinfueng, Sirapa; Vichiwattana, Preeyaporn; Korkong, Sumeth; Thongmee, Thanunrat; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Payungporn, Sunchai; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Poovorawan, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Influenza B viruses comprise two lineages, Victoria (B/Vic) and Yamagata (B/Yam), which co-circulate globally. The surveillance data on influenza B virus lineages in many countries often underestimate the true prevalence due to the lack of a rapid, accurate, and cost-effective method for virus detection. We have developed a real-time PCR with melting curve analysis for lineage-specific differential detection of influenza B virus. By amplifying a region of the hemagglutinin gene using real-time PCR with SYBR Green I dye, B/Vic and B/Yam could be differentiated based on their melting temperature peaks. This method was efficient (B/Vic = 93.2 %; B/Yam 97.7 %), sensitive (B/Vic, 94.6 %; B/Yam, 96.3 %), and specific (B/Vic, 97.7 %; B/Yam, 97.1 %). The lower detection limit was 10(2) copies per microliter. The assay was evaluated using 756 respiratory specimens that were positive for influenza B virus, obtained between 2010 and 2015. The incidence of influenza B virus was approximately 18.9 % of all influenza cases, and the percentage was highest among children aged 6-17 years (7.57 %). The overall percentage of mismatched influenza B vaccine was 21.1 %. Our findings suggest that real-time PCR with melting curve analysis can provide a rapid, simple, and sensitive lineage-specific influenza B virus screening method to facilitate influenza surveillance.

  3. Leptin receptor (LEPR) SNP polymorphisms in HELLP syndrome patients determined by quantitative real-time PCR and melting curve analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown overexpression of leptin in microarray experiments in pre-eclampsia (PE) and in hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets (HELLP) syndrome. We decided to study four leptin receptor (LEPR) SNP polymorphisms in HELLP syndrome patients by using quantitative real-time PCR and melting curve analysis. Methods DNA was isolated from blood samples from 83 normotensive pregnant women and 75 HELLP syndrome patients. Four SNPs, LEPR c.326A>G (K109), LEPR c.668A>G (Q223R), LEPR c.1968G>C (K656N) and LEPR c.3024A>G (S1008) were determined by quantitative real-time PCR and melting curve analysis. Investigators were blinded to clinical outcomes. Results LEPR c.326A>G, LEPR c.668A>G, LEPR c.1968G>C and LEPR c.3024A>G allele, genotype and haplotype polymorphisms were not different in HELLP syndrome patients and normotensive healthy pregnants. There were strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) between loci c.326A>G and c.6687A>G (D' = 0.974), and c.668A>G and c.1968G>C (D' = 0.934), and c.326A>G and c.1968G>C (D' = 0.885), and c.1968G>C and c.3024A>G (D' = 1.0). However, linkages of c.3024A>G with c.668A>G (D' = 0.111) and c.326A>G (D' = 0.398) were weak. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed for all polymorphisms. However the LEPR c.326A>G AG genotype was twice more frequent and the (AG AG GG AG) haplotype was three times more frequent in HELLP syndrome patients. The introduced quantitative real-time PCR combined with melting curve analysis is a fast and reliable method for the determination of LEPR SNPs. Conclusion Although certain LEPR haplotypes are more frequent in HELLP syndrome, we conclude that there is no compelling evidence that the four studied LEPR SNP polymorphisms associated with the development of HELLP syndrome. PMID:20149225

  4. Detection and Differentiation of In Vitro-Spiked Bacteria by Real-Time PCR and Melting-Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Klaschik, S.; Lehmann, L. E.; Raadts, A.; Book, M.; Gebel, J.; Hoeft, A.; Stuber, F.

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a consensus real-time PCR protocol for the detection of bacterial DNA from laboratory-prepared specimens such as water, urine, and plasma. This prototype detection system enables an exact Gram stain classification and, in particular, screening for specific species of 17 intensive care unit-relevant bacteria by means of fluorescence hybridization probes and melting-curve analysis in a one-run experiment. One strain of every species was tested at a final density of 106 CFU/ml. All bacteria examined except Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis could be differentiated successfully; S. aureus and S. epidermidis could only be classified as “Staphylococcus species.” The hands-on time for preparation of the DNA, performance of the PCR, and evaluation of the PCR results was less than 4 h. Nevertheless, this prototype detection system requires more clinical validation. PMID:14766809

  5. DNA-based identification of Peucedanum ostruthium specimens and detection of common adulterants by high-resolution melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Schmiderer, Corinna; Ruzicka, Joana; Novak, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    Masterwort (Peucedanum ostruthium, syn. Imperatoria ostruthium, Apiaceae) is an old economic plant in Alpine countries cultivated as ornamental plant and used for spirits and in folk medicine. P. ostruthium is a species that has often been confused with related Apiaceae species or morphologically similar roots or tubers resulting in products of minor quality. Masterwort can be distinguished from other Apiaceae species by nrDNA (ITS1 and ITS2). The analysed chloroplast markers (trnK 5' intron, trnT-trnL, and psbA-trnH), however, showed no species-specific mutations. With the application of two primer pairs amplifying parts of ITS and developed for high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRM) the target species was distinguishable from the other Peucedanum and Apiaceae species of our reference set. A multiplex PCR/HRM was developed to detect adulterations with Gentiana spp., Aconitum napellus and Veratrum album.

  6. Direct detection of Rifampicin and Isoniazid resistance in sputum samples from tuberculosis patients by High Resolution Melt curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Anthwal, Divya; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Bhalla, Manpreet; Bhatnagar, Shinjini; Tyagi, Jaya Sivaswami; Haldar, Sagarika

    2017-03-22

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is a major threat for TB control worldwide. Globally, only 40% of the 340,000 notified TB patients estimated to have multidrug resistant-TB (MDR-TB) were detected in 2015. This study was carried out to evaluate the utility of High Resolution Melt curve analysis (HRM) for the rapid and direct detection of MDR-TB in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) in sputum samples. A reference plasmid library was first generated of the most frequently observed mutations in the resistance determining regions of rpoB, katG and inhA promoter and used as positive controls in HRM. The assay was first validated in 25 MDR-M. tb clinical isolates. The assay was evaluated on DNA isolated from 99 M. tb culture-positive sputum samples that included 84 smear-negative sputum, using DNA sequencing as gold standard. Mutants were discriminated from wild-type by comparing melting-curve patterns with those of control plasmids using HRM software. Rifampicin (RIF) and isoniazid (INH) mono-resistance were detected in 11 and 21 specimens, respectively by HRM. Six samples were classified as MDR-TB by sequencing, one of which was missed by HRM. HRM-RIF, INH-katG and INH-inhA assay had 89% (52;100), 85% (62;97) and 100% (74;100) sensitivity, respectively in smear-negative samples; while all assays had 100% sensitivity in smear-positive samples. All assays had 100% specificity. Concordance of 97%-100% (κ value;0.9-1) was noted between sequencing and HRM. Hetero-resistance was observed in 5 of 99 samples by sequencing. In conclusion, the HRM assay was a cost-effective (INR400/US$6), rapid and closed-tube method for direct detection of MDR-TB in sputum, especially for direct smear negative cases.

  7. Application of LightCycler polymerase chain reaction and melting curve analysis to the authentication of the traditional Chinese medicinal plant Cimicifuga foetida.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chun-Ying; Li, De-Zhu; Wang, Qing-Zhong

    2009-06-01

    DNA sequence analysis of rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and fluorescence melting curve analysis of LightCycler real-time polymerase chain reaction products were exploited for their applications in the authentication of the traditional Chinese medicinal plant Cimicifuga foetida from four substitutes: C. heracleifolia, C. dahurica, C. acerina, and C. simplex. According to the melting temperature--which is a function of the GC/AT ratio, length, and nucleotide sequences of the amplified product--C. foetida was differentiated from C. heracleifolia, C. dahurica, C. acerina, and C. simplex. Melting curve analysis offers a rapid and reliable method for the authentication of the traditional Chinese medicinal plant C. foetida.

  8. Rapid and simultaneous detection of common aneuploidies by quadruplex real-time polymerase chain reaction combined with melting curve analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jiwu; Sun, Manna; Zhao, Ying; Ji, Zhisong; Liu, Fenghua; Li, Dongzhi; Xu, Wanfang; Lin, Yangyang; Liu, Yanhui

    2017-01-01

    Background During the prenatal period, the number variation of chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y accounts for more than 80% of the clinically significant chromosomal abnormalities diagnosed. Rapid tests for prenatal diagnosis of these abnormalities can improve pregnancy management and alleviate parental anxiety. Here, we present a molecular alternative method for detecting common aneuploidies. Methods This method is based on co-amplification of segmental duplications located on two different chromosomes using a single pair of primers. Segmental duplications have a high degree of sequence identity, but have single-nucleotide differences in some regions. These sequence differences can be quantified using melting curve analysis of dual-labeled probes to estimate the relative dosages of different chromosomes. We designed two quadruplex real-time PCR assays to detect aneuploidies of chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y. Results We examined 75 aneuploid DNA samples and 56 unaffected DNA control samples using these two assays and correctly identified all samples. Four cases of unbalanced translocation were also accurately detected. The observed averaged ratio for each chromosomal disorder was similar to the theoretically expected value. Conclusions Our real-time assay is a robust, rapid, and easy to conduct technique for prenatal diagnosis of common aneuploidies, representing a competitive alternative for use in diagnostic laboratories. PMID:28241016

  9. High-resolution DNA melt curve analysis of the clustered, regularly interspaced short-palindromic-repeat locus of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Price, Erin P; Smith, Helen; Huygens, Flavia; Giffard, Philip M

    2007-05-01

    A novel method for genotyping the clustered, regularly interspaced short-palindromic-repeat (CRISPR) locus of Campylobacter jejuni is described. Following real-time PCR, CRISPR products were subjected to high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis, a new technology that allows precise melt profile determination of amplicons. This investigation shows that the CRISPR HRM assay provides a powerful addition to existing C. jejuni genotyping methods and emphasizes the potential of HRM for genotyping short sequence repeats in other species.

  10. A novel method of multiple nucleic acid detection: Real-time RT-PCR coupled with probe-melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Han, Yang; Hou, Shao-Yang; Ji, Shang-Zhi; Cheng, Juan; Zhang, Meng-Yue; He, Li-Juan; Ye, Xiang-Zhong; Li, Yi-Min; Zhang, Yi-Xuan

    2017-09-04

    A novel method, real-time reverse transcription PCR (real-time RT-PCR) coupled with probe-melting curve analysis, has been established to detect two kinds of samples within one fluorescence channel. Besides a conventional TaqMan probe, this method employs another specially designed melting-probe with a 5' terminus modification which meets the same label with the same fluorescent group. By using an asymmetric PCR method, the melting-probe is able to detect an extra sample in the melting stage effectively while it almost has little influence on the amplification detection. Thus, this method allows the availability of united employment of both amplification stage and melting stage for detecting samples in one reaction. The further demonstration by simultaneous detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) in one channel as a model system is presented in this essay. The sensitivity of detection by real-time RT-PCR coupled with probe-melting analysis was proved to be equal to that detected by conventional real-time RT-PCR. Because real-time RT-PCR coupled with probe-melting analysis can double the detection throughputs within one fluorescence channel, it is expected to be a good solution for the problem of low-throughput in current real-time PCR. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. A new method for ABO genotyping using fluorescence melting curve analysis based on peptide nucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungmyung; Park, Hyun-Chul; An, Sanghyun; Ahn, Eu-Ree; Lee, Yang-Han; Kim, Mi-Jung; Lee, Eun-Jung; Park, Jae Sin; Jung, Jin Wook; Lim, Sikeun

    2015-09-01

    ABO genotyping has been routinely used to identify suspects or unknown remains in crime investigations. Probe-based fluorescence melting curve analysis (FMCA) is a powerful tool for mutation detection and is based on melting temperature shifts due to thermal denaturation. In the present study, we developed a new method for ABO genotyping using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe-based FMCA. This method allowed for the simultaneous detection of three single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites in the ABO gene (nucleotide positions 261, 526, and 803) and the determination of 14 ABO genotypes (A/A, A/O01 or A/O02, A/O03, B/B, B/O01 or B/O02, B/O03, O01/O01 or O01/O02 or O02/O02, O01/O03 or O02/O03, O03/O03, A/B, cis-AB01/A, cis-AB01/B, cis-AB01/O01 or cis-AB01/O02, and cis-AB01/cis-AB01). Using this method, we analyzed 80 samples and successfully identified ABO genotypes (A/A [n=5], A/O01 or A/O02 [n=23], B/B [n=3], B/O01 or B/O02 [n=18], A/B [n=9], O01/O01 or O01/O02 or O02/O02 [n=20], cis-AB01/A [n=1], and cis-AB01/O01 or cis-AB01/O02 [n=1]). In addition, all steps in the method, including polymerase chain reaction, PNA probe hybridization, and FMCA, could be performed in one single closed tube in less than 3h. Since no processing or separation steps were required during analysis, this method was more convenient and rapid than traditional methods and reduced the risk of contamination. Thus, this method may be an effective and helpful tool in forensic investigations.

  12. Rapid detection of the Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 tcdC gene frame shift mutation at position 117 by real-time PCR and melt curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Wolff, D; Brüning, T; Gerritzen, A

    2009-08-01

    The emergence of the hypervirulent strain Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 027 has increased the necessity for rapid C. difficile typing tests for clinical and epidemiological purposes. We developed a rapid real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for the detection of C. difficile. As the target, we chose the tcdC gene, which encodes for a negative regulator in toxin production. A deletion at position 117 of the tcdC gene, which is associated with severe tcdC truncation, is well conserved in all PCR ribotype 027 isolates. Probe sequences of the real-time PCR test were designed to result in distinct melt profiles for sequence variations at positions 117 to 120 of the tcdC gene. The tcdC gene deletion at position 117 was easily detected with real-time PCR and melt curve analysis in all C. difficile ribotype 027 isolates. In five non-027 strains and 46 hospitalised patient samples, melt curve analysis detected no deletion. PCR results were confirmed by DNA sequencing. The combination of real-time PCR and melt curve analysis is a rapid and accurate method for the detection of C. difficile DNA and simultaneous screening for the tcdC gene deletion at position 117, which is closely related to the C. difficile PCR ribotype 027 strain.

  13. [Rapid screening of MT3243A>G mutation in mitochondrial diabetes with high resolution melting curve analysis and pyrosequencing].

    PubMed

    Wei, Xinjun; Du, Xiujuan; Wang, Congrong; Yan, Jingbin

    2016-08-01

    To establish a rapid, accurate, noninvasive and low cost method for screening MT3243A>G mutation in mitochondrial diabetes. Blood, saliva, and urine sediment samples were collected from 6 patients with confirmed mitochondrial diabetes and 50 healthy controls from Shanghai Children's Hospital and Shanghai Sixth People's Hospital. The heterozygosity levels of MT3243A>G mutation in above samples were detected with pyrosequencing, and the data were compared. MT3243A>G mutations were rapidly screened with high resolution melting curve analysis (HRM) in the urine sediment samples of 1070 diabetic patients from 4 communities in Shanghai. Furthermore, pyrosequencing was used to validate the suspected positive samples, and the heterozygosity levels were also quantified. Comparative experiments found that heterozygosity of MT3243A>G mutation was 2 to 7 times higher in urine sediment than in saliva and blood samples from the 6 patients with confirmed mitochondrial diabetes. However, the heterozygosity was slightly higher in saliva than blood samples. MT3243A>G mutation was not detected in the 50 healthy controls. Two samples with suspected MT3243A>G mutation were identified in the 1070 urine sediment samples of diabetes patients with HRM screening, which were validated by pyrosequencing. The heterozygosity of MT3243A>G mutation were 33.32% and 14.67% in the urine sediment samples, respectively. Urine sediment samples can be used for rapid screening of MT3243A>G mutation for its ease to collect, noninvasiveness and higher level of heterozygosity. HRM is suitable for rapid screening for mitochondrian mutations for its low cost, while such mutations could be detected with sensitivity and accuracy by pyrosequencing.

  14. High-resolution DNA melt-curve analysis for cost-effective mass screening of pairwise species interactions.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, James K; Didham, Raphael K; Brockerhoff, Eckehard G; van Bysterveldt, Katherine A; Varsani, Arvind

    2013-09-01

    Ecological studies of pairwise interactions are constrained by the methods available for rapid species identification of the interacting organisms. The resolution of data required to characterize species interaction networks at multiple spatio-temporal scales can be intensive, and therefore laborious and costly to collect. We explore the utility of high-resolution DNA melt-curve analysis (HRM) as a rapid species identification method. An approach was developed to identify organisms at the pairwise interaction level, with particular application to cryptic species interactions that are traditionally difficult to study. Here, we selected a challenging application; to identify the presence/absence of pathogenic fungi (Sporothrix inflata, Ophiostoma nigrocarpum and Ophiostoma galeiforme) transported by bark beetle vectors (Hylastes ater and Hylurgus ligniperda). The technique was able to distinguish between different species of DNA within a single, pooled sample. In test applications, HRM was effective in the mass screening and identification of pathogenic fungal species carried by many individual bark beetle vectors (n = 455 beetles screened) across large geographic scales. For two of the fungal species, there was no difference in the frequency of association with either of their vectors, but for the third fungal species there was a shift in vector-pathogen associations across locations. This technique allows rapid, mass screening and characterization of species interactions at a fraction of the time and cost of traditional methods. It is anticipated that this method can be readily applied to explore other cryptic species interactions, or other studies requiring rapid generation of large data sets and/or high-throughput efficiency. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The development and validation of a rapid genetic method for species identification and genotyping of medically important fungal pathogens using high-resolution melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Alnuaimi, A D; Wiesenfeld, D; O'Brien-Simpson, N M; Reynolds, E C; Peng, B; McCullough, M J

    2014-06-01

    Accurate, rapid and economical fungal species identification has been a major aim in mycology. In this study, our goal was to examine the feasibility of a high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRMA) of internal transcribed regions ITS1 and ITS2 in ribosomal DNA (rDNA) for a rapid, simple and inexpensive differentiation of eight clinically relevant Candida species (Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis, Candida guilliermondii, Candida dubliniensis and Candida lusitaniae). In addition, for the first time, we tested the applicability of HRMA to classify C. albicans strains into four previously described genotypes (A, B, C and D) using a primer set that spans the transposable intron region of 25S of rDNA. Type and unknown clinical oral isolates were used in this study and the melting curve analysis was compared with both amplicons' sequencing and agarose gel electrophoresis analysis. Real-time PCR and subsequent HRMA of the two described rDNA regions generated distinct melting curve profiles that were in accord with sequencing and gel electrophoresis analysis, highly reproducible, and characteristic of each of the eight Candida species and C. albicans genotypes. Moreover, results were obtained in 4 h and without the need for any post-amplification handling, so reducing time and cost. Owing to its simplicity and speed, this technique is a good fit for genotypic analysis of hundreds of clinical strains in large epidemiological settings.

  16. 5'-MGB probes allow rapid identification of methanogens and sulfate reducers in cold marine sediments by real-time PCR and melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Afonina, Irina; Savvichev, Alexander; Ankoudinova, Irina; Mahoney, Walt

    2009-09-01

    The analysis of microorganism communities in uncultured environmental samples requires laborious and cumbersome techniques such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of amplicons generated with 16S rRNA generic primers with subsequent fragment sequencing. We have developed a simple method for genus identification of methanogen archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria based on a real-time PCR hybridization probe melting curve analysis. The method takes advantage of a recent explosion of microorganism sequencing data conveniently packaged in the Ribosomal Database Project. Specificity of detection is based on a genus-specific real-time PCR fluorescent 5'-MGB-probe melt. As the probes are designed to have destabilizing mismatches with undesired genera, only samples with a proper melting temperature are called positive.

  17. Evaluation of a new rapid molecular diagnostic system for Plasmodium falciparum combined with DNA filter paper, loop-mediated isothermal amplification, and melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Mariko; Makimura, Koichi; Ota, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    Falciparum malaria is a fatal infection without immediate diagnosability or treatment. There are shortages of clinicians and examiners skilled in the treatment of malaria in non-endemic countries, including Japan. This study was performed to evaluate a novel rapid molecular diagnostic system consisting of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) combined with DNA filter paper (FTA card) and melting curve analysis. Combining LAMP with melting curve analysis enabled diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum more accurately with relative ease. FTA cards could be used to clarify problems regarding storage, infectivity, and transportation. The LAMP assay was carried out at a constant temperature of 63 degrees C for 90 min. The diagnostic system (malaria-LAMP) accurately diagnosed malaria (47 samples from Thailand and 50 from Zimbabwe) with 97.8% sensitivity and 85.7% specificity as compared with microscopic methods, indicating the usefulness of this combined system.

  18. Melting curve of materials: theory versus experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfè, D.; Vocadlo, L.; Price, G. D.; Gillan, M. J.

    2004-04-01

    A number of melting curves of various materials have recently been measured experimentally and calculated theoretically, but the agreement between different groups is not always good. We discuss here some of the problems which may arise in both experiments and theory. We also report the melting curves of Fe and Al calculated recently using quantum mechanics techniques, based on density functional theory with generalized gradient approximations. For Al our results are in very good agreement with both low pressure diamond-anvil-cell experiments (Boehler and Ross 1997 Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 153 223, Hänström and Lazor 2000 J. Alloys Compounds 305 209) and high pressure shock wave experiments (Shaner et al 1984 High Pressure in Science and Technology ed Homan et al (Amsterdam: North-Holland) p 137). For Fe our results agree with the shock wave experiments of Brown and McQueen (1986 J. Geophys. Res. 91 7485) and Nguyen and Holmes (2000 AIP Shock Compression of Condensed Matter 505 81) and the recent diamond-anvil-cell experiments of Shen et al (1998 Geophys. Res. Lett. 25 373). Our results are at variance with the recent calculations of Laio et al (2000 Science 287 1027) and, to a lesser extent, with the calculations of Belonoshko et al (2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 3638). The reasons for these disagreements are discussed.

  19. Detection of Ehrlichia canis in canine blood samples by real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) PCR and melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Kongklieng, Amornmas; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Intapan, Pewpan M; Boonmars, Thidarut; Janwan, Penchom; Sanpool, Oranuch; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Taweethavonsawat, Piyanan; Chungpivat, Sudchit; Morakote, Nimit; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2014-09-01

    Ehrlichia canis is a small pleomorphic gram-negative, coccoid, obligatory intracellular bacterium and the cause of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. A real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer polymerase chain reaction (real-time FRET PCR) coupled with melting curve analysis was established for detection of E. canis infection in canine blood samples. The VirB9 gene was amplified using one pair of primers and the melting curve analysis was generated by heating the hybridizing probes and amplified products. Eight E. canis-infected dog blood samples were initially identified using the Giemsa staining/microscopic method followed by conventional PCR (cPCR)/Sanger sequencing for confirmation. The sensitivity and specificity of the real-time FRET PCR detection were 87.5% and 100%, respectively and the limit of detection was 6.6 x 10(3) copies of positive E. canis control plasmids. The real-time FRET PCR with melting curve analysis reported here is better than microscopic visualization or cPCR because the method is not affected by the false bias inherent in the microscopic method. Furthermore, many samples can be processed rapidly at the same time. This convenient tool is beneficial as an alternative assay for the epidemiologic study of canine ehrlichiosis as well as for eradication of these organisms in prevention and control programs in endemic areas.

  20. Assessment of genetic mutations in the XRCC2 coding region by high resolution melting curve analysis and the risk of differentiated thyroid carcinoma in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Fayaz, Shima; Fard-Esfahani, Pezhman; Fard-Esfahani, Armaghan; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Meshkani, Reza; Mirmiranpour, Hossein; Khaghani, Shahnaz

    2012-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is the major pathway for repairing double strand breaks (DSBs) in eukaryotes and XRCC2 is an essential component of the HR repair machinery. To evaluate the potential role of mutations in gene repair by HR in individuals susceptible to differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) we used high resolution melting (HRM) analysis, a recently introduced method for detecting mutations, to examine the entire XRCC2 coding region in an Iranian population. HRM analysis was used to screen for mutations in three XRCC2 coding regions in 50 patients and 50 controls. There was no variation in the HRM curves obtained from the analysis of exons 1 and 2 in the case and control groups. In exon 3, an Arg188His polymorphism (rs3218536) was detected as a new melting curve group (OR: 1.46; 95%CI: 0.432–4.969; p = 0.38) compared with the normal melting curve. We also found a new Ser150Arg polymorphism in exon 3 of the control group. These findings suggest that genetic variations in the XRCC2 coding region have no potential effects on susceptibility to DTC. However, further studies with larger populations are required to confirm this conclusion. PMID:22481871

  1. Simultaneous Detection and Genotype Determination of HSV 1 and 2 by Real-time PCR Using Melting Curve Analysis and a Unique Pair of Primers.

    PubMed

    Paryan, Mahdi; Mohammadi-Yeganeh, Samira; Rezvan, Houri; Kia, Vahid; Mansouri, Ardalan; Mirab Samiee, Siamak

    2017-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a human pathogen that causes different pathologic manifestations. Rapid and feasible detection and discrimination methods for HSV genotyping is a challenge in clinical laboratories, especially in children suffering from herpetic encephalitis. A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genotyping assay using SYBR Green I was established. We designed only 1 pair of primer for HSV 1 and 2, targeting thymidine kinase gene conserved region. HSV genotypes were determined by PCR using melting curve analysis with LightCycler. Different HSV genotypes were successfully detected in all clinical samples. The melting temperature for HSV 1 and 2 was 85.5±0.78°C and 89±0.53°C, respectively. These 2 genotypes were completely distinguished by means of the accurate melting assay. Importantly, detection was reliably performed within only 1 hour. The assay had no cross-reactivity across species, an excellent dynamic range from 10 to 10 copies per reaction, a good intra-assay and interassay reproducibility, and a detection limit of a single copy per reaction. Our homebrew designed and validated quantitative real-time PCR followed by a melting curve analysis provided a rapid and convenient screening test for differential identification of HSV genotypes 1 and 2. We recommend the large-scale application of this method for HSV 1 and 2 detection.

  2. Rapid detection of Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi in mosquito vectors (Diptera: Culicidae) using a real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer multiplex PCR and melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Intapan, Pewpan M; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2009-01-01

    We developed a single-step real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) merged with melting curve analysis for the detection of Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi DNA in blood-fed mosquitoes. Real-time FRET multiplex PCR is based on fluorescence melting curve analysis of a hybrid of amplicons generated from two families of repeated DNA elements: the 188 bp SspI repeated sequence, specific to W. bancrofti, and the 153-bp HhaI repeated sequence, specific to the genus Brugia and two pairs of specific fluorophore-labeled probes. Both W. bancrofti and B. malayi can be differentially detected in infected vectors by this process through their different fluorescence channel and melting temperatures. The assay could distinguish both human filarial DNAs in infected vectors from the DNAs of Dirofilaria immitis- and Plasmodium falciparum-infected human red blood cells and noninfected mosquitoes and human leukocytes. The technique showed 100% sensitivity and specificity and offers a rapid and reliable procedure for differentially identifying lymphatic filariasis. The introduced real-time FRET multiplex PCR can reduce labor time and reagent costs and is not prone to carry over contamination. The test can be used to screen mosquito vectors in endemic areas and therefore should be a useful diagnostic tool for the evaluation of infection rate of the mosquito populations and for xenomonitoring in the community after eradication programs such as the Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis.

  3. Detection of a Knockdown Resistance Mutation Associated with Permethrin Resistance in the Body Louse Pediculus humanus corporis by Use of Melting Curve Analysis Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Drali, Rezak; Benkouiten, Samir; Badiaga, Sékéné; Bitam, Idir

    2012-01-01

    Louse-borne diseases are prevalent in the homeless, and body louse eradication has thus far been unsuccessful in this population. We aim to develop a rapid and robust genotyping method usable in large field-based clinical studies to monitor permethrin resistance in the human body louse Pediculus humanus corporis. We assessed a melting curve analysis genotyping method based on real-time PCR using hybridization probes to detect the M815I-T917I-L920F knockdown resistance (kdr) mutation in the paraorthologous voltage-sensitive sodium channel (VSSC) α subunit gene, which is associated with permethrin resistance. The 908-bp DNA fragment of the VSSC gene, encoding the α subunit of the sodium channel and encompassing the three mutation sites, was PCR sequenced from 65 lice collected from a homeless population. We noted a high prevalence of the 3 indicated mutations in the body lice collected from homeless people (100% for the M815I and L920F mutations and 56.73% for the T917I mutation). These results were confirmed by melting curve analysis genotyping, which had a calculated sensitivity of 100% for the M815I and T917I mutations and of 98% for the L920F mutation. The specificity was 100% for M815I and L920F and 96% for T917I. Melting curve analysis genotyping is a fast, sensitive, and specific tool that is fully compatible with the analysis of a large number of samples in epidemiological surveys, allowing the simultaneous genotyping of 96 samples in just over an hour (75 min). Thus, it is perfectly suited for the epidemiological monitoring of permethrin resistance in human body lice in large-scale clinical studies. PMID:22573588

  4. Quantitative detection and differentiation of free-living amoeba species using SYBR green-based real-time PCR melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Behets, Jonas; Declerck, Priscilla; Delaedt, Yasmine; Verelst, Lieve; Ollevier, Frans

    2006-12-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction melting curve analysis (MCA) allows differentiation of several free-living amoebae species. Distinctive characteristics were found for Naegleria fowleri, N. lovaniensis, N. australiensis, N. gruberi, Hartmanella vermiformis, and Willaertia magna. Species specificity of the amplicons was confirmed using agarose gel electrophoresis and sequence-based approaches. Amplification efficiency ranged from 91% to 98%, indicating the quantitative potential of the assay. This MCA approach can be used for quantitative detection of free-living amoebae after cultivation but also as a culture-independent detection method.

  5. High-resolution melt curve analysis to confirm the presence of co-circulating isolates of avian nephritis virus in commercial chicken flocks.

    PubMed

    Chamings, A; Hewson, K A; O'Rourke, D; Ignjatovic, J; Noormohammadi, A H

    2015-01-01

    Avian Nephritis Virus (ANV) has been implicated in poor growth and renal disease of young chickens. This paper describes the development of a reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for the detection of ANV in commercial meat chickens and the use of high-resolution melt curves to detect the presence of genetically different ANVs. Pooled cloacal swabs from both healthy and ill commercial chicken broiler flocks were tested for the presence of ANV using a combination of polymerase chain reaction, molecular cloning, high-resolution melt curve analysis and sequencing. Except for one, all specimens were found to contain two genetically different ANVs. Phylogenetic analysis of the capsid amino acid sequences revealed the presence of four of six groups of ANV identified previously in other countries as well as in two novel groups of ANV. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences of partial polymerase, capsid and 3' untranslated regions reveal that the genes of individual ANV virus isolates have different ancestors. This was shown to be due to a template-switching event in the capsid gene that resulted in the 3' end of the capsid gene and the 3' untranslated region of one ANV isolate being transferred to another ANV. These results reveal that infection of chicken flocks with multiple ANV isolates is common and this needs to be taken into consideration in diagnosis of ANV using molecular techniques and in future epidemiological investigations.

  6. Interferon λ 3 and 4 Genotyping Using High-Resolution Melt Curve Analysis Suitable for Multiple Clinical Sample Types.

    PubMed

    Lamoury, François M J; Bartlett, Sofia; Jacka, Brendan; Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Grebely, Jason; Matthews, Gail V; Dore, Gregory J; Applegate, Tanya L

    2015-09-01

    Many people living with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection will continue to rely on interferon-based regimens until effective strategies to minimize the cost of directly acting antivirals (DAAs) and to improve treatment access are implemented. Host single-nucleotide polymorphisms related to IFNL3 and IFNL4 are associated with spontaneous clearance of HCV, and pegylated interferon- and DAA-based treatment outcomes. We describe a simple and rapid genotyping method for IFNL rs12979860, rs8099917, and rs368234815 using high-resolution melting analysis for DNA extracted from whole blood, buffy coat, plasma, serum, and dried blood spots. This assay successfully detected all three polymorphisms on DNA extracted by the automated platform easyMAG from all samples when compared to sequenced amplicons. Analysis of 126 participants with recent HCV infection from the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C study demonstrated the prevalence of favorable single-nucleotide polymorphisms were 62%, 51%, and 45% for rs8099917 TT, rs12979860 CC, and rs368234815 TT/TT, respectively. The genotyping assay described here provides a rapid and affordable IFNL3 and IFNL4 genotyping method for a range of clinical sample types. Until global access to DAAs is achieved, IFNL3 and IFNL4 genotyping could identify those likely to clear naturally and in whom treatment could be delayed, or help prioritize DAA treatment to those less likely to respond to interferon-containing regimens.

  7. A comparison of PCR assays for beak and feather disease virus and high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis of replicase associated protein and capsid genes.

    PubMed

    Das, Shubhagata; Sarker, Subir; Ghorashi, Seyed Ali; Forwood, Jade K; Raidal, Shane R

    2016-11-01

    Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) threatens a wide range of endangered psittacine birds worldwide. In this study, we assessed a novel PCR assay and genetic screening method using high-resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis for BFDV targeting the capsid (Cap) gene (HRM-Cap) alongside conventional PCR detection as well as a PCR method that targets a much smaller fragment of the virus genome in the replicase initiator protein (Rep) gene (HRM-Rep). Limits of detection, sensitivity, specificity and discriminatory power for differentiating BFDV sequences were compared. HRM-Cap had a high positive predictive value and could readily differentiate between a reference genotype and 17 other diverse BFDV genomes with more discriminatory power (genotype confidence percentage) than HRM-Rep. Melt curve profiles generated by HRM-Cap correlated with unique DNA sequence profiles for each individual test genome. The limit of detection of HRM-Cap was lower (2×10(-5)ng/reaction or 48 viral copies) than that for both HRM-Rep and conventional BFDV PCR which had similar sensitivity (2×10(-6)ng or 13 viral copies/reaction). However, when used in a diagnostic setting with 348 clinical samples there was strong agreement between HRM-Cap and conventional PCR (kappa=0.87, P<0.01, 98% specificity) and HRM-Cap demonstrated higher specificity (99.9%) than HRM-Rep (80.3%).

  8. Evaluation of the Capacity of PCR and High-Resolution Melt Curve Analysis for Identification of Mixed Infection with Mycoplasma gallisepticum Strains.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed A; Kanci, Anna; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenicity and presentation of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) infection may differ from one strain to another and this may have implications on control measures. Infection of individual birds with more than one MG strain has been reported. A PCR followed by high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis has been developed in our laboratory and routinely used for detection and differentiation of MG strains. However the potential of this test for identification of MG strains in a mixed specimen has not been evaluated. In the present study, the capability of PCR-HRM curve analysis technique, targeting vlhA and pvpA genes was assessed for identification of individual MG strains in a mixed population. Different DNA ratios of two MG strains from 1 to 10(-4) ng were tested with some generated conventional and normalized curves distinct from those of individual strains alone. Using genotype confidence percentages (GCP) generated from HRM curve analysis, it was found that vlhA PCR-HRM was more consistent than pvpA PCR-HRM for the detection of MG ts-11 vaccine strain mixed with any of the MG strains 6/85, F, S6 or a field isolate. The potential of vlhA PCR-HRM to detect mixed MG strains in a specimen was found to be primarily dependent on quantity and proportion of the target DNAs in the mixture. This is the first study examining the capacity of PCR-HRM technique for identification of individual MG strains in a mixed strain population.

  9. High-Resolution Melting Curve Analysis of the 16S Ribosomal Gene to Detect and Identify Pathogenic and Saprophytic Leptospira Species in Colombian Isolates.

    PubMed

    Peláez Sánchez, Ronald G; Quintero, Juan Álvaro López; Pereira, Martha María; Agudelo-Flórez, Piedad

    2017-05-01

    AbstractIt is important to identify the circulating Leptospira agent to enhance the performance of serodiagnostic tests by incorporating specific antigens of native species, develop vaccines that take into account the species/serovars circulating in different regions, and optimize prevention and control strategies. The objectives of this study were to develop a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-high-resolution melting (HRM) assay for differentiating between species of the genus Leptospira and to verify its usefulness in identifying unknown samples to species level. A set of primers from the initial region of the 16S ribosomal gene was designed to detect and differentiate the 22 species of Leptospira. Eleven reference strains were used as controls to establish the reference species and differential melting curves. Twenty-five Colombian Leptospira isolates were studied to evaluate the usefulness of the PCR-HRM assay in identifying unknown samples to species level. This identification was confirmed by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S ribosomal gene. Eleven Leptospira species were successfully identified, except for Leptospira meyeri/Leptospira yanagawae because the sequences were 100% identical. The 25 isolates from humans, animals, and environmental water sources were identified as Leptospira santarosai (twelve), Leptospira interrogans (nine), and L. meyeri/L. yanagawae (four). The species verification was 100% concordant between PCR-HRM and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S ribosomal gene. The PCR-HRM assay designed in this study is a useful tool for identifying Leptospira species from isolates.

  10. Diagnosis and identification of Leishmania spp. from Giemsa-stained slides, by real-time PCR and melting curve analysis in south-west of Iran.

    PubMed

    Khademvatan, S; Neisi, N; Maraghi, S; Saki, J

    2011-12-01

    The aim of present study was describing a real-time PCR assay for the diagnosis and direct identification of Leishmania species on Giemsa-stained slides in south-west of Iran. Altogether, 102 Giemsa-stained slides were collected from different part of south-west of Iran between 2008 and 2011. All the Giemsa-stained slides were examined under light microscope. After DNA extraction, real-time PCR amplification and detection were conducted with fluorescent SYBR Green I. For identification, PCR products were analysed with melting curve analysis. One hundred and two archived slides from suspected lesion examined by microscopy and real-time PCR. The sensitivity of the real-time PCR on Giemsa-stained slid was 98% (96/102). The melting curve analysis (T(m)) were 88·3±0·2°C for L. tropica (MHOM/IR/02/Mash10), 86·5±0·2°C for L. major (MHOM/IR/75/ER) and 89·4±0·3°C for L. infantum (MCAN/IR/97/LON 49), respectively. This study is first report in use of real-time PCR for diagnosis and identification of Leishmania spp. in Iran. Up to now, in Iran, the majority of identification of Leishmania species is restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of ITS1 and kinetoplast DNA. Our data showed that Giemsa-stained slides that were stored more than 3 years, can be use for Leishmania DNA extraction and amplification by real-time PCR. Compared to conventional PCR-based methods, the real-time PCR is extremely rapid with results and more samples can be processed at one time.

  11. Complementary use of MALDI-TOF MS and real-time PCR-melt curve analysis for rapid identification of methicillin-resistant staphylococci and VRE.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wai-Sing; Chan, Tsz-Ming; Lai, Tsz-Wan; Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; Lai, Raymond Wai-Man; Lai, Christopher Koon-Chi; Tang, Bone Siu-Fai

    2015-02-01

    To develop a rapid method for routine screening of methicillin-resistant staphylococci and VRE for clinical isolates and positive blood cultures. Our method consisted of two parts: MALDI-TOF MS was used for identification of staphylococci and enterococci, followed by antibiotic resistance detection by real-time PCR-melt curve analysis without DNA extraction. The latter part included a triplex reaction for staphylococcal culture isolates (mecA, mecALGA251 and Panton-Valentine leucocidin genes), dual PCR of mecA/mecALGA251 and nuc genes for staphylococcal blood cultures, and a duplex reaction for enterococci (vanA and vanB genes). A total of 124 clinical isolates and 56 positive blood cultures were tested. MALDI-TOF MS was performed using Microflex LT (Bruker Daltonik, Bremen, Germany) and Rotor-Gene Q (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany) was used for real-time PCR-melt curve analysis. The total assay time was <2.5 h. The results revealed 100% concordance with antibiotic susceptibility testing or other reference methods for all culture isolates and enterococcal blood cultures. The percentage of concordance for staphylococcal blood cultures was 97.5%. The method described herein was fast, economical, reliable and capable of detecting mecALGA251, vanB1 and vanB2 genotypes, which are not included in most commercial assays. Large-scale screening is required to further test the performance of this protocol, especially for genotypes that are infrequently encountered. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Application of a qPCR assay with melting curve analysis for detection and differentiation of protozoan oocysts in human fecal samples from Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Laura F; Reyes, Julissa; Gajadhar, Alvin A

    2013-11-01

    A quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay with melt curve analysis (qPCR-MCA) was applied for the detection of protozoan oocysts in 501 human fecal samples collected in Dominican Republic. Samples were subjected to qPCR using universal coccidia primers targeting 18S rDNA to detect oocysts followed by MCA to identify oocyst species based on amplicon melting temperature. Putative positive samples were also tested by conventional PCR and microscopy. Cystoisospora belli (×3), Cryptosporidium parvum (×3), Cryptosporidium hominis (×5), Cryptosporidium meleagridis (×1), Cryptosporidium canis (×1), and Cyclospora cayetanensis (×9) were detected by qPCR-MCA and confirmed by sequencing. This assay consistently detected 10 copies of the cloned target fragment and can be considered more efficient and sensitive than microscopy flotation methods for detecting multiple species of oocysts in human feces. The qPCR-MCA is a reliable protozoan oocyst screening assay for use on clinical and environmental samples in public health, food safety and veterinary programs.

  13. Application of a qPCR Assay with Melting Curve Analysis for Detection and Differentiation of Protozoan Oocysts in Human Fecal Samples from Dominican Republic

    PubMed Central

    Lalonde, Laura F.; Reyes, Julissa; Gajadhar, Alvin A.

    2013-01-01

    A quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay with melt curve analysis (qPCR-MCA) was applied for the detection of protozoan oocysts in 501 human fecal samples collected in Dominican Republic. Samples were subjected to qPCR using universal coccidia primers targeting 18S rDNA to detect oocysts followed by MCA to identify oocyst species based on amplicon melting temperature. Putative positive samples were also tested by conventional PCR and microscopy. Cystoisospora belli (×3), Cryptosporidium parvum (×3), Cryptosporidium hominis (×5), Cryptosporidium meleagridis (×1), Cryptosporidium canis (×1), and Cyclospora cayetanensis (×9) were detected by qPCR-MCA and confirmed by sequencing. This assay consistently detected 10 copies of the cloned target fragment and can be considered more efficient and sensitive than microscopy flotation methods for detecting multiple species of oocysts in human feces. The qPCR-MCA is a reliable protozoan oocyst screening assay for use on clinical and environmental samples in public health, food safety and veterinary programs. PMID:24019437

  14. Fluorescence melting curve analysis using self-quenching dual-labeled peptide nucleic acid probes for simultaneously identifying multiple DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jeong Jin; Kim, Youngjoo; Lee, Seung Yong; Hong, Ji Young; Kim, Gi Won; Hwang, Seung Yong

    2015-09-01

    Previous fluorescence melting curve analysis (FMCA) used intercalating dyes, and this method has restricted application. Therefore, FMCA methods such as probe-based FMCA and molecular beacons were studied. However, the usual dual-labeled probes do not possess adequate fluorescence quenching ability and sufficient specificity, and molecular beacons with the necessary stem structures are hard to design. Therefore, we have developed a peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-based FMCA method. PNA oligonucleotide can have a much higher melting temperature (Tm) value than DNA. Therefore, short PNA probes can have adequate Tm values for FMCA, and short probes can have higher specificity and accuracy in FMCA. Moreover, dual-labeled PNA probes have self-quenching ability via single-strand base stacking, which makes PNA more favorable. In addition, this method can facilitate simultaneous identification of multiple DNA templates. In conventional real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), one fluorescence channel can identify only one DNA template. However, this method uses two fluorescence channels to detect three types of DNA. Experiments were performed with one to three different DNA sequences mixed in a single tube. This method can be used to identify multiple DNA sequences in a single tube with high specificity and high clarity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A simple and rapid genotyping assay for simultaneous detection of two ADRB2 allelic variants using fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes and melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Sábato, M Fernanda; Irani, Anne-Marie; Bukaveckas, Bonny L; Schwartz, Lawrence B; Wilkinson, David S; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Andrea

    2008-05-01

    Allelic variants at codons 16 and 27 of the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor gene (ADRB2) have shown clinical and pharmacological implications in asthma, hypertension, ischemic heart failure, diabetes, obesity, and cystic fibrosis. We have developed a simultaneous genotyping assay for the c.46A>G and c.79C>G allelic variants using hybridization probes and melting curve analysis. The assay was optimized on a panel of 30 DNA samples of known ADRB2 genotype as determined by sequencing with 100% concordance between the two techniques. Melting temperature (Tm) ranges for the different genotypes were obtained using data from three independent experiments. Single peaks for p.Arg16Arg (Tm = 57.76 degrees C +/- 0.10 degrees C) and p.Gly16Gly (Tm = 66.73 degrees C +/- 0.18 degrees C) and two melting peaks for p.Arg16Gly were obtained. Similarly, single peaks for p.Gln27Gln (Tm = 53.98 degrees C +/- 0.19 degrees C) and p.Glu27Glu (Tm = 64.93 degrees C +/- 0.16 degrees C) and two peaks for p.Gln27Glu were detected. Independent operators easily assigned genotypes in a sample set of 385 asthmatic patients. Haplotype and allele frequencies were in concordance with previously published data: Arg allele frequencies in children/adults were 0.34/0.30 in Caucasians and 0.45/0.52 in African Americans, and Gln allele frequencies were 0.58/0.52 in Caucasians and 0.82/0.84 in African Americans. Thus, the ADRB2 genotyping assay represents a highly reliable and rapid technique for routine clinical use in the simultaneous detection of ADRB2 variants.

  16. Shock melting method to determine melting curve by molecular dynamics: Cu, Pd, and Al

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhong-Li; Zhang, Xiu-Lu; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2015-09-21

    A melting simulation method, the shock melting (SM) method, is proposed and proved to be able to determine the melting curves of materials accurately and efficiently. The SM method, which is based on the multi-scale shock technique, determines melting curves by preheating and/or prepressurizing materials before shock. This strategy was extensively verified using both classical and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD). First, the SM method yielded the same satisfactory melting curve of Cu with only 360 atoms using classical MD, compared to the results from the Z-method and the two-phase coexistence method. Then, it also produced a satisfactory melting curve of Pd with only 756 atoms. Finally, the SM method combined with ab initio MD cheaply achieved a good melting curve of Al with only 180 atoms, which agrees well with the experimental data and the calculated results from other methods. It turned out that the SM method is an alternative efficient method for calculating the melting curves of materials.

  17. Melting curves of metals by ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakov, Dmitry; Levashov, Pavel

    2015-06-01

    In this work we used several ab initio approaches to reproduce melting curves and discussed their abilities, advantages and drawbacks. We used quasiharmonic appoximation and Lindemann criterion to build melting curves in wide region of pressures. This approach allows to calculate the total free energy of electrons and phonons, so it is possible to obtain all thermodynamic properties in the crystalline state. We also used quantum molecular dynamics simulations to investigate melting at various pressures. We explored the size-effect of the heat until it melts (HUM) method in detail. Special attention was paid to resolve the boundaries of the melting region on density. All calculations were performed for aluminum, copper and gold. Results were in good agreement with available experimental data. Also we studied the influence of electronic temperature on melting curves. It turned out that the melting temperature increased with the rise of electron temperature at normal density and had non-monotonic behavior at higher densities. This work is supported by the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation (Project No. 3.522.2014/K).

  18. Melting curve analysis of a groEL PCR fragment for the rapid genotyping of strains belonging to the Lactobacillus casei group of species.

    PubMed

    Koirala, Ranjan; Taverniti, Valentina; Balzaretti, Silvia; Ricci, Giovanni; Fortina, Maria Grazia; Guglielmetti, Simone

    2015-04-01

    Lactobacillus casei group (Lcs) consists of three phylogenetically closely related species (L. casei, L. paracasei, and L. rhamnosus), which are widely used in the dairy and probiotic industrial sectors. Strategies to easily and rapidly characterize Lcs are therefore of interest. To this aim, we developed a method according to a technique known as high resolution melting analysis (HRMa), which was applied to a 150 bp groEL gene fragment. The analysis was performed on 53 Lcs strains and 29 strains representatives of species that are commonly present in dairy and probiotic products and can be most probably co-isolated with Lcs strains. DNA amplification was obtained only from Lcs strains, demonstrating the specificity of the groEL primers designed in this study. The HRMa clustered Lcs strains in three groups that exactly corresponded to the species of the L. casei group. A following HRMa separated the 39 L. paracasei strains in two well distinct intraspecific groups, indicating the possible existence of at least two distinct genotypes inside the species. Nonetheless, the phenotypic characterization demonstrated that the genotypes do not correspond to the two L. paracasei subspecies, namely paracasei and tolerans. In conclusion, the melting curve analysis developed in this study is demonstrably a simple, labor-saving, and rapid strategy obtain the genotyping of a bacterial isolate and simultaneously potentially confirm its affiliation to the L. casei group of species. The application of this method to a larger collection of strains may validate the possibility to use the proposed HRMa protocol for the taxonomic discrimination of L. casei group of species. In general, this study suggests that HRMa can be a suitable technique for the genetic typization of Lactobacillus strains.

  19. Development of a high-resolution melting curve analysis screening test for SRSF2 splicing factor gene mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Garza, Eduardo; Fabiani, Emiliano; Noguera, Nelida; Panetta, Paola; Piredda, Maria L; Borgia, Loredana; Maurillo, Luca; Catalano, Gianfranco; Voso, Maria T; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations of the spliceosome machinery have been recently identified by whole genome analysis in hematologic diseases, such as myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, myeloproliferative neoplasms, acute myeloid leukemia, and advanced forms of mastocytosis, and also in nonhematologic conditions. SRSF2 is a member of the serine/arginine-rich family pre-mRNA splicing factors that plays a role in mRNA export from the nucleus and translation. We describe a high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis to screen for SRSF2 hotspot mutations in a fast, sensitive, and reliable way. Fifty bone marrow samples from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome were analyzed by the HRM assay and by direct sequencing. HRM screening identified four melting patterns corresponding to a negative (wild-type) group and three different mutated groups. Each mutated group was identified according to the positive control used: P95H, P95L, and P95R, respectively. An HRM mutated pattern was identified in seven patients. Positive and negative results from HRM were compared with direct sequencing results with a sensitivity and specificity of 100% (95% CI, 0.56-1, and 95% CI, 0.89-1, respectively). Analytical sensitivity analysis revealed a detection threshold of up to 1:9 (mutated/wild type) dilution. This rapid screening method may provide useful information for clinical decision making and be helpful to optimize laboratory resources and reduce turnaround time. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. rpoB gene high-resolution melt curve analysis: a rapid approach for diagnosis and screening of drug resistance in tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kusum; Modi, Manish; Kaur, Harsimran; Sharma, Aman; Ray, Pallab; Varma, Subhash

    2015-10-01

    Timely and rapid diagnosis of multidrug resistance in tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is a challenge both for a microbiologist and neurologist. The present study was conducted to evaluate role of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using rpoB, IS6110, and MPB64 as targets in diagnosis of TBM in 110 patients and subsequent high-resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis of rpoB gene amplicons for screening of drug resistance. The sensitivity of smear, culture, and real-time PCR was 1.8%, 10.9%, and 83.63%, respectively. All 120 control patients showed negative results. With HRM rpoB analysis, rifampicin resistance was detected in 3 out of 110 cases of TBM (3.33%). Subsequently, results of HRM analysis were confirmed by rpoB gene sequencing, and mutations were observed at 516 (2 patients) and 531 (1 patient) codons, respectively. rpoB HRM analysis can be a promising tool for rapid diagnosis and screening of drug resistance in TBM patients in 90minutes.

  1. Melting curve of metals Cu, Ag and Au under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Pham Dinh; Hoc, Nguyen Quang; Tinh, Bui Duc; Tan, Pham Duy

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the dependence of the melting temperature of metals Cu, Ag and Au under pressure in the interval from 0 kbar to 40 kbar is studied by the statistical moment method (SMM). This dependence has the form of near linearity and the calculated slopes of melting curve are 3.9 for Cu, 5.7 for Ag and 6 for Au. These results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Simple calculation of ab initio melting curves: Application to aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Grégory; Legrand, Philippe; Arnault, Philippe; Desbiens, Nicolas; Clérouin, Jean

    2015-03-01

    We present a simple, fast, and promising method to compute the melting curves of materials with ab initio molecular dynamics. It is based on the two-phase thermodynamic model of Lin et al [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11792 (2003), 10.1063/1.1624057] and its improved version given by Desjarlais [Phys. Rev. E 88, 062145 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.88.062145]. In this model, the velocity autocorrelation function is utilized to calculate the contribution of the nuclei motion to the entropy of the solid and liquid phases. It is then possible to find the thermodynamic conditions of equal Gibbs free energy between these phases, defining the melting curve. The first benchmark on the face-centered cubic melting curve of aluminum from 0 to 300 GPa demonstrates how to obtain an accuracy of 5%-10%, comparable to the most sophisticated methods, for a much lower computational cost.

  3. Direct Detection of Macrolide Resistance in Mycoplasma genitalium Isolates from Clinical Specimens from France by Use of Real-Time PCR and Melting Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Touati, Arabella; Peuchant, Olivia; Jensen, Jorgen S.; Bébéar, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a sexually transmitted organism commonly treated with azithromycin. However, macrolide resistance has been reported and is associated with point mutations in the 23S rRNA gene. To evaluate the prevalence of macrolide resistance in M. genitalium isolates from clinical specimens from France, we first used a previously reported high-resolution melting assay. Because susceptible and resistant M. genitalium isolates were hardly discriminated in M. genitalium-positive clinical specimens, we developed a new molecular assay for the rapid detection of macrolide resistance. An assay using real-time PCR based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) coupled with melting curve analysis was designed. The assay was first validated on characterized macrolide-resistant M. genitalium isolates and then applied to 202 urogenital M. genitalium-positive specimens collected from 178 patients from France in 2011 and 2012. Resistant genotypes were confirmed by 23S rRNA gene sequencing. Among the 202 M. genitalium-positive specimens, 155 were amplified, demonstrating a sensitivity of 76.7%. A substitution in the 23S rRNA gene was found in 14.2% of the patient samples. Nine and six patients had M. genitalium isolates with a substitution at positions 2059 and 2058, respectively. In four cases, a mixed population of wild-type and mutated M. genitalium isolates was observed. The prevalence of M. genitalium macrolide resistance has been stable in France since its detection in 2006. Our FRET PCR assay is able to discriminate between wild-type and resistant genotypes directly from clinical specimens. This assay will allow clinicians to shorten the time to the initiation of effective disease treatment. PMID:24574291

  4. Differential detection of Trichinella papuae, T. spiralis and T. pseudospiralis by real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer PCR and melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Boonmars, Thidarut; Wu, Zhiliang; Morakote, Nimit; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2012-04-30

    Trichinellosis caused by nematodes of Trichinella spp. is a zoonotic foodborne disease. Three Trichinella species of the parasite including Trichinella spiralis, Trichinella papuae and Trichinella pseudospiralis, have been etiologic agents of human trichinellosis in Thailand. Definite diagnosis of this helminthiasis is based on a finding of the Trichinella larva (e) in a muscle biopsy. The parasite species or genotype can be determined using molecular methods, e.g., polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This study has utilized real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer PCR (real-time FRET PCR) and a melting curve analysis for the differential diagnosis of trichinellosis. Three common Trichinella species in Thailand were studied using one set of primers and fluorophore-labeled hybridization probes specific for the small subunit of the mitochondrial ribosomal RNA gene. Using fewer than 35 cycles as the cut-off for positivity and using different melting temperatures (T(m)), this assay detected T. spiralis, T. papuae and T. pseudospiralis in muscle tissue and found the mean T(m) ± SD values to be 51.79 ± 0.06, 66.09 ± 0.46 and 51.46 ± 0.09, respectively. The analytical sensitivity of the technique enabled the detection of a single Trichinella larva of each species, and the detection limit for the target DNA sequence was 16 copies of positive control plasmid. A test of the technique's analytical specificity showed no fluorescence signal for a panel of 19 non-Trichinella parasites or for human and mouse genomic DNA. Due to the sensitivity and specificity of the detection of these Trichinella species, as well as the fast and high-throughput nature of these tools, this method has application potential in differentiating non-encapsulated larvae of T. papuae from T. spiralis and T. pseudospiralis in tissues of infected humans and animals.

  5. Genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms by melting curve analysis using thin film semi-transparent heaters integrated in a lab-on-foil system.

    PubMed

    Ohlander, Anna; Zilio, Caterina; Hammerle, Tobias; Zelenin, Sergey; Klink, Gerhard; Chiari, Marcella; Bock, Karlheinz; Russom, Aman

    2013-06-07

    The recent technological advances in micro/nanotechnology present new opportunities to combine microfluidics with microarray technology for the development of small, sensitive, single-use, point-of-care molecular diagnostic devices. As such, the integration of microarray and plastic microfluidic systems is an attractive low-cost alternative to glass based microarray systems. This paper presents the integration of a DNA microarray and an all-polymer microfluidic foil system with integrated thin film heaters, which demonstrate DNA analysis based on melting curve analysis (MCA). A novel micro-heater concept using semi-transparent copper heaters manufactured by roll-to-roll and lift-off on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) foil has been developed. Using a mesh structure, heater surfaces have been realized in only one single metallization step, providing more efficient and homogenous heating characteristics than conventional meander heaters. A robust DNA microarray spotting protocol was adapted on Parylene C coated heater-foils, using co-polymer poly(DMA-NAS-MAPS) to enable covalent immobilization of DNA. The heaters were integrated in a microfluidic channel using lamination foils and MCA of the spotted DNA duplexes showed single based discrimination of mismatched over matched target DNA-probes. Finally, as a proof of principle, we perform MCA on PCR products to detect the Leu7Pro polymorphism of the neutropeptide Y related to increased risk of Type II diabetes, BMI and depression.

  6. Melting of cross-linked DNA. III. Calculation of differential melting curves.

    PubMed

    Lando, D Y; Fridman, A S; Krot, V I; Akhrem, A A

    1998-08-01

    In our previous papers I and II (D. Y. Lando et al, J. Biomol. Struct. Dynam. (1997) v. 15, N1, p. 129-140, p. 141-150), two methods were developed for calculation of melting curves of cross-linked DNA. One of them is based on Poland's and another on the Fixman-Freire approach. In the present communication, III, a new theoretical method is developed for computation of differential melting curves of DNAs cross-linked by anticancer drugs and their inactive analogs. As Poland's approach, the method allows study of the influence of the loop entropy factor, delta(n), on melting behavior (n is the length of a loop in base pairs). However the method is much faster and requires computer time that inherent for the most rapid Fixman-Freire calculation approach. In contrast to the computation procedures described before in communications I and II, the method is suitable for computation of differential melting curves in the case of long DNA chains, arbitrary loop entropy factors of melted regions and arbitrary degree of cross-linking including very low values that occur in vivo after administration of antitumor drugs. The method is also appropriate for DNAs without cross-links. The results of calculation demonstrate that even very low degree of cross-linking alters the DNA differential melting curve. Cross-linking also markedly strengthens the influence of particular function delta(n) upon melting behavior.

  7. Comparative Study on Two Melting Simulation Methods: Melting Curve of Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhong-Li; Sun, Jun-Sheng; Li, Rui; Zhang, Xiu-Lu; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2016-05-01

    Melting simulation methods are of crucial importance to determining melting temperature of materials efficiently. A high-efficiency melting simulation method saves much simulation time and computational resources. To compare the efficiency of our newly developed shock melting (SM) method with that of the well-established two-phase (TP) method, we calculate the high-pressure melting curve of Au using the two methods based on the optimally selected interatomic potentials. Although we only use 640 atoms to determine the melting temperature of Au in the SM method, the resulting melting curve accords very well with the results from the TP method using much more atoms. Thus, this shows that a much smaller system size in SM method can still achieve a fully converged melting curve compared with the TP method, implying the robustness and efficiency of the SM method. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 41574076 and the NSAF of China under Grant No. U1230201/A06, and the Young Core Teacher Scheme of Henan Province under Grant No. 2014GGJS-108

  8. Duplex Real-time PCR assay and SYBR green I melting curve analysis for molecular identification of HPV genotypes 16, 18, 31, 35, 51 and 66.

    PubMed

    Tsakogiannis, D; Papacharalampous, M; Toska, E; Kyriakopoulou, Z; Dimitriou, T G; Ruether, I G A; Komiotis, D; Markoulatos, P

    2015-02-01

    Long-term infection with high-risk HPV genotypes is the leading cause of cervical cancer. In the present study a Duplex Real-time PCR assay was developed in order to identify HPV types 16, 18, 31, 35, 51 and 66 in three reactions, through SYBR green I melting curve analysis. The method utilizes type-specific primer sets that allowed the amplification of highly conserved regions of L1 gene. Reconstitution experiments were conducted by using HPV DNA plasmids in order to determine the sensitivity of the assay. The newly designed assay has a limit of detection of 10 copies per reaction. The most prevalent HPV genotype in single and in multiple HPV infections was HPV16 followed by HPV18, HPV51, HPV31, HPV35 and HPV66. The proposed method is a simple, specific, sensitive and cost-effective assay that can be easily incorporated in small and medium size laboratories for the rapid identification of the most clinically important HPV genotypes.

  9. Development of a SYBR Green real-time PCR assay with melting curve analysis for simultaneous detection and differentiation of canine adenovirus type 1 and type 2.

    PubMed

    Balboni, Andrea; Dondi, Francesco; Prosperi, Santino; Battilani, Mara

    2015-09-15

    Canine adenovirus type 1 (CAdV-1) and canine adenovirus type 2 (CAdV-2) cause infectious canine hepatitis (ICH) and infectious tracheobronchitis (ITB) in dogs, respectively. Cases of ICH have been documented in recent years and recent surveys have demonstrated a wide percentage of asymptomatic CAdV-1 infection in the canine population. Since both CAdV types are detectable in the same biological matrices, and viral coinfection with CAdV-1 and CAdV-2 are reported with high frequency, it is urgent to have available a rapid, highly sensitive and specific assay for the diagnosis of CAdV infection and distinction between CAdV-1 and CAdV-2. In order to detect canine adenovirus in biological samples and to rapidly distinguish the two viral types, a SYBR Green real-time PCR assay was optimized to discriminate CAdV-1 and CAdV-2 via a melting curve analysis. The developed assay showed high sensitivity and reproducibility and was highly efficient and specific in discriminating the two CAdV types. This reliable and rapid technique may represent a simple, useful and economic option for simultaneous CAdV types detection, which would be feasible and attractive for all diagnostic laboratories, both for clinical purposes and for epidemiological investigations.

  10. The melting curve of Ni to 1 Mbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, Oliver T.; Wood, Ian G.; Dobson, David P.; Vočadlo, Lidunka; Wang, Weiwei; Thomson, Andrew R.; Wann, Elizabeth T. H.; Morard, Guillaume; Mezouar, Mohamed; Walter, Michael J.

    2014-12-01

    The melting curve of Ni has been determined to 125 GPa using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) experiments in which two melting criteria were used: firstly, the appearance of liquid diffuse scattering (LDS) during in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and secondly, plateaux in temperature vs. laser power functions in both in situ and off-line experiments. Our new melting curve, defined by a Simon-Glatzel fit to the data where TM (K) =[ (PM/18.78±10.20 + 1) ] 1 / 2.42 ± 0.66 × 1726, is in good agreement with the majority of the theoretical studies on Ni melting and matches closely the available shock wave melting data. It is however dramatically steeper than the previous off-line LH-DAC studies in which determination of melting was based on the visual observation of motion aided by the laser speckle method. We estimate the melting point (TM) of Ni at the inner-core boundary (ICB) pressure of 330 GPa to be TM = 5800 ± 700 K (2 σ), within error of the value for Fe of TM = 6230 ± 500 K determined in a recent in situ LH-DAC study by similar methods to those employed here. This similarity suggests that the alloying of 5-10 wt.% Ni with the Fe-rich core alloy is unlikely to have any significant effect on the temperature of the ICB, though this is dependent on the details of the topology of the Fe-Ni binary phase diagram at core pressures. Our melting temperature for Ni at 330 GPa is ∼2500 K higher than that found in previous experimental studies employing the laser speckle method. We find that those earlier melting curves coincide with the onset of rapid sub-solidus recrystallization, suggesting that visual observations of motion may have misinterpreted dynamic recrystallization as convective motion of a melt. This finding has significant implications for our understanding of the high-pressure melting behaviour of a number of other transition metals.

  11. High-Resolution DNA Melt Curve Analysis of the Clustered, Regularly Interspaced Short-Palindromic-Repeat Locus of Campylobacter jejuni▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Price, Erin P.; Smith, Helen; Huygens, Flavia; Giffard, Philip M.

    2007-01-01

    A novel method for genotyping the clustered, regularly interspaced short-palindromic-repeat (CRISPR) locus of Campylobacter jejuni is described. Following real-time PCR, CRISPR products were subjected to high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis, a new technology that allows precise melt profile determination of amplicons. This investigation shows that the CRISPR HRM assay provides a powerful addition to existing C. jejuni genotyping methods and emphasizes the potential of HRM for genotyping short sequence repeats in other species. PMID:17400785

  12. Enhancing melting curve analysis for the discrimination of loop-mediated isothermal amplification products from four pathogenic molds: Use of inorganic pyrophosphatase and its effect in reducing the variance in melting temperature values.

    PubMed

    Tone, Kazuya; Fujisaki, Ryuichi; Yamazaki, Takashi; Makimura, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is widely used for differentiating causative agents in infectious diseases. Melting curve analysis (MCA) in conjunction with the LAMP method reduces both the labor required to conduct an assay and contamination of the products. However, two factors influence the melting temperature (Tm) of LAMP products: an inconsistent concentration of Mg(2+) ion due to the precipitation of Mg2P2O7, and the guanine-cytosine (GC) content of the starting dumbbell-like structure. In this study, we investigated the influence of inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase), an enzyme that inhibits the production of Mg2P2O7, on the Tm of LAMP products, and examined the correlation between the above factors and the Tm value using MCA. A set of LAMP primers that amplify the ribosomal DNA of the large subunit of Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium expansum, Penicillium marneffei, and Histoplasma capsulatum was designed, and the LAMP reaction was performed using serial concentrations of these fungal genomic DNAs as templates in the presence and absence of PPase. We compared the Tm values obtained from the PPase-free group and the PPase-containing group, and the relationship between the GC content of the theoretical starting dumbbell-like structure and the Tm values of the LAMP product from each fungus was analyzed. The range of Tm values obtained for several fungi overlapped in the PPase-free group. In contrast, in the PPase-containing group, the variance in Tm values was smaller and there was no overlap in the Tm values obtained for all fungi tested: the LAMP product of each fungus had a specific Tm value, and the average Tm value increased as the GC% of the starting dumbbell-like structure increased. The use of PPase therefore reduced the variance in the Tm value and allowed the differentiation of these pathogenic fungi using the MCA method.

  13. Automated Forensic Animal Family Identification by Nested PCR and Melt Curve Analysis on an Off-the-Shelf Thermocycler Augmented with a Centrifugal Microfluidic Disk Segment

    PubMed Central

    Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Nested PCR remains a labor-intensive and error-prone biomolecular analysis. Laboratory workflow automation by precise control of minute liquid volumes in centrifugal microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip systems holds great potential for such applications. However, the majority of these systems require costly custom-made processing devices. Our idea is to augment a standard laboratory device, here a centrifugal real-time PCR thermocycler, with inbuilt liquid handling capabilities for automation. We have developed a microfluidic disk segment enabling an automated nested real-time PCR assay for identification of common European animal groups adapted to forensic standards. For the first time we utilize a novel combination of fluidic elements, including pre-storage of reagents, to automate the assay at constant rotational frequency of an off-the-shelf thermocycler. It provides a universal duplex pre-amplification of short fragments of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and cytochrome b genes, animal-group-specific main-amplifications, and melting curve analysis for differentiation. The system was characterized with respect to assay sensitivity, specificity, risk of cross-contamination, and detection of minor components in mixtures. 92.2% of the performed tests were recognized as fluidically failure-free sample handling and used for evaluation. Altogether, augmentation of the standard real-time thermocycler with a self-contained centrifugal microfluidic disk segment resulted in an accelerated and automated analysis reducing hands-on time, and circumventing the risk of contamination associated with regular nested PCR protocols. PMID:26147196

  14. 3He melting curve below 15 mK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hiroshi; Ishimoto, Hidehiko; Tazaki, Tetsurou; Ogawa, Shinji

    1987-12-01

    We have performed new measurements of the P-T relation along the 3He melting curve for temperatures between 0.4 and 15 mK in zero magnetic field. The temperature was determined by a Pt-wire nuclear-magnetic-resonance thermometer calibrated against the National Bureau of Standards scale (1983) above 15 mK. Three distinct points on the melting curve (the two superfluid transitions and the nuclear-spin ordering in the solid phase) were observed at temperatures lower than currently accepted values by about 10%. Our results are in good agreement with the P-T relation recently proposed by Greywall using a La-cerium magnesium nitrate thermometer, but differ seriously from the thermodynamic measurements by Halperin et al. From the measured melting curve, we could determine the ground-state energy of a nuclear spin in solid 3He to be -1.24 mK at the melting density. This value can be quantitatively explained by the current four-spin exchange theory.

  15. Allele specific-PCR and melting curve analysis showed relatively high frequency of β-casein gene A1 allele in Iranian Holstein, Simmental and native cows.

    PubMed

    Gholami, M; Hafezian, S H; Rahimi, G; Farhadi, A; Rahimi, Z; Kahrizi, D; Kiani, S; Karim, H; Vaziri, S; Muhammadi, S; Veisi, F; Ghadiri, K; Shetabi, H; Zargooshi, J

    2016-10-31

    There are two allelic forms of A1 and A2 of β-casein gene in dairy cattle. Proteolytic digestion of bovine β-casein A1 type produces bioactive peptide of β-casomorphin-7 known as milk devil. β-casomorphin-7 causes many diseases, including type 1 diabetes, cardiovascular disease syndrome, sudden death and madness. The aim of the present study was to determine the different allelic forms of β-casein gene in Iranian Holstein, Simmental and native cattle in order to identify A1 and A2 variants. The blood samples were collected randomly and DNA was extracted using modified salting out method. An 854 bp fragment including part of exon 7 and part of intron 6 of β-casein gene was amplified by allele specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR). Also, the accuracy of AS-PCR genotyping has been confirmed by melting temperature curve analysis using Real-time PCR machinery. The comparison of observed allele and genotype frequency among the studied breeds was performed using the Fisher exact and Chi-squared test, respectively by SAS program. Obtained results showed the A1 allele frequencies of 50, 51.57, 54.5, 49.4 and 46.6% in Holstein, Simmental, Sistani, Taleshi and Mazandarani cattle populations, respectively. The chi-square test was shown that no any populations were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for studied marker locus. Comparison and analysis of the test results for allelic frequency showed no any significant differences between breeds (P>0.05). The frequency of observed genotypes only differs significantly between Holstein and Taleshi breeds but no any statistically significant differences were found for other breeds (P>0.05). A relatively high frequency of β-casein A1 allele was observed in Iranian native cattle. Therefore, determine the genotypes and preference alleles A2 in these native and commercial cattle is recommended.

  16. Real-time PCR followed by high-resolution melting curve analysis: A rapid and pragmatic approach for screening of multidrug-resistant extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kusum; Sharma, Megha; Singh, Shreya; Modi, Manish; Sharma, Aman; Ray, Pallab; Varma, Subhash

    2017-09-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) is a diagnostic challenge in an endemic country like India. Timely detection of MDR-TB can contribute to a better patient outcome. To perform real-time PCR (qPCR) using rpoB, mpb64 and IS6110 gene on a variety of EPTB samples and to compare the performance of different gene targets. All qPCR positive samples were subjected to high resolution melt-curve analysis (HRM analysis) for rpoB and katG gene to evaluate its potential for MDR screening among different sample types. Real-time PCR using rpoB, mpb64 and IS6110 genes was carried out on 200 cases of study group and 100 cases of non-TB control group. The study group consisted of 100 culture-confirmed and 100 clinically suspected cases of EPTB. Phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST) for culture isolates was performed by the 1% indirect agar proportion method. DNA extracted from all qPCR positive samples was subjected to rpoB and katG HRM analysis for screening of MDR. Sequencing was used to confirm the results of HRM analysis and the results were also compared with phenotypic DST in all culture positive cases. The sensitivity of qPCR using rpoB, mpb64 and IS6110 was 86.5%, 86.5% and 76.5%, respectively. All isolates from the control group were negative by all the three targets, giving a specificity of 100%. HRM analysis detected MDR in 22/200 (11%) isolates. 3/200 (1.5%) had mono-rifampicin resistance while 8/200 (4%) had mono-isoniazid resistance. HRM analysis identified an additional 4 MDR cases directly from the samples which were negative by culture. On sequencing, mutations were observed at codon 531 (60%); 533 (16%); 516 (12%) and 526 (12%) of the rpoB gene and at codon 315 (100%) of the katG gene. There was 100% concordance in the results of phenotypic DST, HRM analysis and sequencing. The HRM analysis can play a promising role in the reliable and rapid screening of EPTB samples for detection of MDR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  17. Simultaneous detection and genotyping of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) by real-time RT-PCR and amplicon melting curve analysis using SYBR Green.

    PubMed

    Martínez, E; Riera, P; Sitjà, M; Fang, Y; Oliveira, S; Maldonado, J

    2008-08-01

    The feasibility of using a SYBR Green-based real-time RT-PCR assay (SYBR Green ReTi RT-PCR) followed by melting curve analysis (MCA) for detecting and genotyping porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) was assessed. The SYBR Green ReTi RT-PCR and a previously reported two-step, non-nested RT-PCR assays were simultaneously tested on selected European (EU) and North American (US) PRRSV strains and isolates collected from diverse clinical, temporal, and geographical origins. The validation experiments showed that the optimised SYBR Green ReTi RT-PCR can sensitively and specifically detect PRRSV, consistently detecting as little as 0.03TCID(50)/sample of each virus genotype, with no type-bias and no amplification signal for other swine pathogens. After MCA, two well-differentiated melting temperature (T(m)) profiles for each virus genotype were obtained, as sequencing confirmed it. High repeatability was obtained for the T(m) values, with intra-run coefficients of variation (CoVs) of 0.25 and 0.32 and inter-run CoVs of 0.42 and 0.52 for EU and US genotypes, respectively. The sensitivity of the SYBR Green ReTi RT-PCR (100%) was higher than that of the RT-PCR (95.7%) when testing field isolates. This greater sensitivity of the SYBR Green ReTi RT-PCR was further confirmed by the detection of a higher proportion of PRRSV-positive diagnostic specimens (29.7%) than by the RT-PCR (28.5%). The SYBR Green ReTi RT-PCR test detected infection as early as 2 dpi in the sera of experimentally infected pigs regardless of virus genotype, and discriminated negative (non-inoculated), EU- and US-infected pigs. In conclusion, the reported SYBR Green ReTi RT-PCR assay coupled with MCA can detect and type PRRSV and may be useful as an alternative diagnostic assay in diverse PRRSV epidemiological circumstances.

  18. Rapid detection and grouping of porcine bocaviruses by an EvaGreen(®) based multiplex real-time PCR assay using melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaowen; Liu, Gaopeng; Opriessnig, Tanja; Wang, Zining; Yang, Zongqi; Jiang, Yonghou

    2016-08-01

    Several novel porcine bocaviruses (PBoVs) have been identified in pigs in recent years and association of these viruses with respiratory signs or diarrhea has been suggested. In this study, an EvaGreen(®)-based multiplex real-time PCR (EG-mPCR) with melting curve analysis was developed for simultaneous detection and grouping of novel PBoVs into the same genogroups G1, G2 and G3. Each target produced a specific amplicon with a melting peak of 81.3 ± 0.34 °C for PBoV G1, 78.2 ± 0.37 °C for PBoV G2, and 85.0 ± 0.29 °C for PBoV G3. Non-specific reactions were not observed when other pig viruses were used to assess the EG-mPCR assay. The sensitivity of the EG-mPCR assay using purified plasmid constructs containing the specific viral target fragments was 100 copies for PBoV G1, 50 for PBoV G2 and 100 for PBoV G3. The assay is able to detect and distinguish three PBoV groups with intra-assay and inter-assay variations ranging from 0.13 to 1.59%. The newly established EG-mPCR assay was validated with 227 field samples from pigs. PBoV G1, G2 and G3 was detected in 15.0%, 25.1% and 41.9% of the investigated samples and coinfections of two or three PBoV groups were also detected in 25.1% of the cases, indicating that all PBoV groups are prevalent in Chinese pigs. The agreement of the EG-mPCR assay with an EvaGreen-based singleplex real-time PCR (EG-sPCR) assay was 99.1%. This EG-mPCR will serve as a rapid, sensitive, reliable and cost effective alternative for routine surveillance testing of multiple PBoVs in pigs and will enhance our understanding of the epidemiological features and possible also pathogenetic changes associated with these viruses in pigs.

  19. Entropy and transport properties of liquid metals along the melting curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qi-Long; Wang, Pan-Pan; Shao, Ju-Xiang; Wang, Fan-Hou

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed for several monatomic metals and Fe0.9Ni0.1 metallic alloy to study the transport properties and entropy of liquids along melting curve. Our results show that the self-diffusion coefficients and viscosity of liquids increase with increasing pressure along the melting curves. Analysis suggests that, at high pressure conditions, the pair correlation entropy S2 of liquids along melting curve is bout -3.71kB, independent of the pressure and variety of liquids, which indicates that there is no obvious change in liquid structure along the melting curve. The Rosenfeld entropy-scaling laws with S2 = -3.71kB and the special values of scaling parameters can give reasonable estimates for the self-diffusion coefficients and viscosity of liquid metals along melting curves. The effect of pressure on transport coefficients can be quantified through its corresponding effect on the melting temperature and number density, and this result is in consistent with the Andrade's model. In addition, the variation of S2 provides a useful, experimentally accessible, structure-based criterion for freezing of liquid metals.

  20. Comparison of pyrosequencing, Sanger sequencing, and melting curve analysis for detection of low-frequency macrolide-resistant mycoplasma pneumoniae quasispecies in respiratory specimens.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kwok-Hung; To, Kelvin K W; Chan, Betsy W K; Li, Clara P Y; Chiu, Susan S; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Ho, Pak-Leung

    2013-08-01

    Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MRMP) is emerging worldwide and has been associated with treatment failure. In this study, we used pyrosequencing to detect low-frequency MRMP quasispecies in respiratory specimens, and we compared the findings with those obtained by Sanger sequencing and SimpleProbe PCR coupled with a melting curve analysis (SimpleProbe PCR). Sanger sequencing, SimpleProbe PCR, and pyrosequencing were successfully performed for 96.7% (88/91), 96.7% (88/91), and 93.4% (85/91) of the M. pneumoniae-positive specimens, respectively. The A-to-G transition at position 2063 was the only mutation identified. Pyrosequencing identified A2063G MRMP quasispecies populations in 78.8% (67/88) of the specimens. Only 38.8% (26/67) of these specimens with the A2063G quasispecies detected by pyrosequencing were found to be A2063G quasispecies by Sanger sequencing or SimpleProbe PCR. The specimens that could be detected by SimpleProbe PCR and Sanger sequencing had higher frequencies of MRMP quasispecies (51% to 100%) than those that could not be detected by those two methods (1% to 44%). SimpleProbe PCR correctly categorized all specimens that were identified as wild type or mutant by Sanger sequencing. The clinical characteristics of the patients were not significantly different when they were grouped by the presence or absence of MRMP quasispecies, while patients with MRMP identified by Sanger sequencing more often required a switch from macrolides to an alternative M. pneumoniae-targeted therapy. The clinical significance of mutant quasispecies should be investigated further with larger patient populations and with specimens obtained before and after macrolide therapy.

  1. Detection of clonal antigen receptor gene rearrangement in dogs with lymphoma by real-time polymerase chain reaction and melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Langner, Kathrin F A; Joetzke, Alexa E; Nerschbach, Verena; Eberle, Nina; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim; Koy, Mirja; Nolte, Ingo; Betz, Daniela

    2014-01-03

    Molecular techniques that detect canine lymphoma cells by their clonal antigen receptor gene rearrangement play an increasing role for diagnosis as well as for monitoring minimal residual disease during and after cytostatic therapy. However, the methods currently available are time-consuming and/or cost-intensive thus impeding the use in clinical routine. The aim of the present study was to develop and evaluate a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with subsequent melting curve analysis (MCA) for the detection of clonally rearranged antigen receptor genes in dogs with B and T cell lymphoma on non formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded lymph node samples. In lymph node aspirates from 30 dogs with multicentric B cell lymphoma, real-time PCR with MCA detected clonal rearrangement in 100% and conventional PCR with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) in 93% of samples. Both methods correctly identified clonality in 80% of lymph node aspirates of 10 dogs with T cell lymphoma. None of the two PCR systems detected clonal rearrangement in samples from 9 dogs with lymph node hyperplasia. Using a dilutional series with regular lymphoid desoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), detection limits of lymphoma DNA were as low as 0.8% and 6.25% for B and T cell clonal rearrangement with real-time PCR and MCA and at 3.13% and 12.5% with the conventional system. Median absolute detection limits of lymphoma DNA were shown to be at 0.1 ng and 1 ng for the B and T cell immunophenotype with the real-time PCR system and at 10 ng each with conventional PCR and PAGE. Real-time PCR with MCA is a convenient and reliable method with a good analytical sensitivity. Thus, the method may assist the detection of clonal antigen receptor gene rearrangement in canine lymphoma patients in a clinical setting also in the presence of small amounts of neoplastic cells.

  2. Quantitative PCR Coupled with Melt Curve Analysis for Detection of Selected Pseudo-nitzschia spp. (Bacillariophyceae) from the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea▿

    PubMed Central

    Andree, Karl B.; Fernández-Tejedor, Margarita; Elandaloussi, Laurence M.; Quijano-Scheggia, Sonia; Sampedro, Nagore; Garcés, Esther; Camp, Jordi; Diogène, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. blooms along the coast of Catalonia have been increasing over the past 20 years. As species from this genus that are documented as toxigenic have been found in local waters, with both toxic and nontoxic species cooccurring in the same bloom, there is a need to develop management tools for discriminating the difference. Currently, differentiation of toxic and nontoxic species requires time-consuming electron microscopy to distinguish taxonomic features that would allow identification as to species, and cryptic species can still remain misidentified. In this study, cells of Pseudo-nitzschia from clonal cultures isolated from seawater were characterized to their species identity using scanning electron microscopy, and subsamples of each culture were used to create an internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1), 5.8S, and ITS-2 ribosomal DNA database for development of species-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. Once developed, these qPCR assays were applied to field samples collected over a 2-year period in Alfaques Bay in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea to evaluate the possibility of a comprehensive surveillance for all Pseudo-nitzschia spp. using molecular methods to supplement optical microscopy, which can discern taxonomy only to the genus level within this taxon. Total Pseudo-nitzschia cell density was determined by optical microscopy from water samples collected weekly and compared to results obtained from the sum of eight Pseudo-nitzschia species-specific qPCR assays using duplicate samples. Species-specific qPCR followed by melt curve analysis allowed differentiation of amplicons and identification of false positives, and results correlated well with the total Pseudo-nitzschia cell counts from optical microscopy. PMID:21193668

  3. Quantitative PCR coupled with melt curve analysis for detection of selected pseudo-nitzschia spp. (Bacillariophyceae) from the Northwestern Mediterranean sea.

    PubMed

    Andree, Karl B; Fernández-Tejedor, Margarita; Elandaloussi, Laurence M; Quijano-Scheggia, Sonia; Sampedro, Nagore; Garcés, Esther; Camp, Jordi; Diogène, Jorge

    2011-03-01

    The frequency and intensity of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. blooms along the coast of Catalonia have been increasing over the past 20 years. As species from this genus that are documented as toxigenic have been found in local waters, with both toxic and nontoxic species cooccurring in the same bloom, there is a need to develop management tools for discriminating the difference. Currently, differentiation of toxic and nontoxic species requires time-consuming electron microscopy to distinguish taxonomic features that would allow identification as to species, and cryptic species can still remain misidentified. In this study, cells of Pseudo-nitzschia from clonal cultures isolated from seawater were characterized to their species identity using scanning electron microscopy, and subsamples of each culture were used to create an internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1), 5.8S, and ITS-2 ribosomal DNA database for development of species-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. Once developed, these qPCR assays were applied to field samples collected over a 2-year period in Alfaques Bay in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea to evaluate the possibility of a comprehensive surveillance for all Pseudo-nitzschia spp. using molecular methods to supplement optical microscopy, which can discern taxonomy only to the genus level within this taxon. Total Pseudo-nitzschia cell density was determined by optical microscopy from water samples collected weekly and compared to results obtained from the sum of eight Pseudo-nitzschia species-specific qPCR assays using duplicate samples. Species-specific qPCR followed by melt curve analysis allowed differentiation of amplicons and identification of false positives, and results correlated well with the total Pseudo-nitzschia cell counts from optical microscopy.

  4. 3He melting-curve thermometry at millikelvin temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greywall, Dennis S.

    1985-03-01

    A pressure-versus-temperature calibration of the 3He melting curve is given for 1melting-curve scale is found to be proportional to the magnetic temperature scales of Paulson et al. and Haavasoja et al. Included is a description of the PrNi5 nuclear demagnetization refrigerator which was used to cool the 3He samples to less than 0.3 mK.

  5. Detection of clonal antigen receptor gene rearrangement in dogs with lymphoma by real-time polymerase chain reaction and melting curve analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques that detect canine lymphoma cells by their clonal antigen receptor gene rearrangement play an increasing role for diagnosis as well as for monitoring minimal residual disease during and after cytostatic therapy. However, the methods currently available are time-consuming and/or cost-intensive thus impeding the use in clinical routine. The aim of the present study was to develop and evaluate a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with subsequent melting curve analysis (MCA) for the detection of clonally rearranged antigen receptor genes in dogs with B and T cell lymphoma on non formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded lymph node samples. Results In lymph node aspirates from 30 dogs with multicentric B cell lymphoma, real-time PCR with MCA detected clonal rearrangement in 100% and conventional PCR with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) in 93% of samples. Both methods correctly identified clonality in 80% of lymph node aspirates of 10 dogs with T cell lymphoma. None of the two PCR systems detected clonal rearrangement in samples from 9 dogs with lymph node hyperplasia. Using a dilutional series with regular lymphoid desoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), detection limits of lymphoma DNA were as low as 0.8% and 6.25% for B and T cell clonal rearrangement with real-time PCR and MCA and at 3.13% and 12.5% with the conventional system. Median absolute detection limits of lymphoma DNA were shown to be at 0.1 ng and 1 ng for the B and T cell immunophenotype with the real-time PCR system and at 10 ng each with conventional PCR and PAGE. Conclusions Real-time PCR with MCA is a convenient and reliable method with a good analytical sensitivity. Thus, the method may assist the detection of clonal antigen receptor gene rearrangement in canine lymphoma patients in a clinical setting also in the presence of small amounts of neoplastic cells. PMID:24383544

  6. Temperature effects on DNA chip experiments from surface plasmon resonance imaging: isotherms and melting curves.

    PubMed

    Fiche, J B; Buhot, A; Calemczuk, R; Livache, T

    2007-02-01

    We present an analysis of hybridization experiments on a DNA chip studied by surface plasmon resonance imaging. The reaction constants at various temperatures and for different probe lengths are obtained from Langmuir isotherms and hybridization kinetics. The melting curves from temperature scans are also obtained without any labeling of the targets. The effects of the probe length on the hybridization thermodynamics, deduced from the temperature dependence of the reaction constants as well as from the melting curves, suggest dispersion in the length of the hybridization segments of the probes accessible to the targets. Those are, however, sufficient to suggest efficient point mutation detection from temperature scans.

  7. Asymmetric real-time PCR and multiplex melting curve analysis with TaqMan probes for detecting PIK3CA mutations.

    PubMed

    Botezatu, Irina V; Nechaeva, Irina O; Stroganova, Аnna М; Senderovich, Anastasia I; Kondratova, Valentina N; Shelepov, Valery P; Lichtenstein, Anatoly V

    2015-12-01

    The data in this article are related to the research article entitled "Optimization of melting analysis with TaqMan probes for detection of KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutations" Botezatu et al. [1]. Somatic mutations in the PIK3CA gene ("hot spots" in exons 9 and 20) are found in many human cancers, and their presence can determine prognosis and a treatment strategy. An effective method of mutation scanning PIK3CA in clinical laboratories is DNA Melting Analysis (DMA) (Vorkas et al., 2010; Simi et al., 2008) [2], [3]. It was demonstrated recently that the TaqMan probes which have been long used in Real Time PCR may also be utilized in DMA (Huang et al., 2011) [4]. After optimization of this method Botezatu et al. [1], it was used for multiplex scanning PIK3CA hotspot mutations in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples from patients with colorectal and lung cancer.

  8. Detection of Babesia canis vogeli and Hepatozoon canis in canine blood by a single-tube real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer polymerase chain reaction assay and melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Kongklieng, Amornmas; Intapan, Pewpan M; Boonmars, Thidarut; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Janwan, Penchom; Sanpool, Oranuch; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Taweethavonsawat, Piyanan; Chungpivat, Sudchit; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2015-03-01

    A real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer polymerase chain reaction (qFRET PCR) coupled with melting curve analysis was developed for detection of Babesia canis vogeli and Hepatozoon canis infections in canine blood samples in a single tube assay. The target of the assay was a region within the 18S ribosomal RNA gene amplified in either species by a single pair of primers. Following amplification from the DNA of infected dog blood, a fluorescence melting curve analysis was done. The 2 species, B. canis vogeli and H. canis, could be detected and differentiated in infected dog blood samples (n = 37) with high sensitivity (100%). The detection limit for B. canis vogeli was 15 copies of a positive control plasmid, and for H. canis, it was 150 copies of a positive control plasmid. The assay could simultaneously distinguish the DNA of both parasites from the DNA of controls. Blood samples from 5 noninfected dogs were negative, indicating high specificity. Several samples can be run at the same time. The assay can reduce misdiagnosis and the time associated with microscopic examination, and is not prone to the carryover contamination associated with the agarose gel electrophoresis step of conventional PCR. In addition, this qFRET PCR method would be useful to accurately determine the range of endemic areas or to discover those areas where the 2 parasites co-circulate.

  9. Ultrafast real-time PCR with integrated melting curve analysis and duplex capacities using a low-cost polymer lab-on-a-chip system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gransee, Rainer; Schneider, Tristan; Elyorgun, Deniz; Strobach, Xenia; Schunck, Tobias; Gatscha, Theresia; Winkler, Christian; Höth, Julian

    2015-05-01

    Nucleic amplification using quantitative polymeric chain reaction (qPCR) has become the gold standard of molecular testing. These systems offer both amplification and simultaneous fluorescence detection. An ultrafast microfluidic module (allowing 30 PCR cycles in 6 minutes) based on the oscillating fluid plug concept was previously developed [1,2] allowing the amplification of native genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules. This abstract presents the actual status of the advanced system. The upgraded system generates high quality qPCR amplification plots and additional sensitive melting point analysis comparable to data obtained from commercial real-time cyclers. These features provide the user with all information needed to analyze PCR products. The system uses light emitting diodes (LED) for illumination and a low cost Charge-coupled Device (CCD) camera for optical detection. Image data processing allows the automated process control of the overall system components. The system enables the performance of rapid and robust nucleic acid amplifications together with the integration of real time measurement technology. This allows the amplification and simultaneous quantification of the targeted pathogens. The integration of duplex amplification performance allows the incorporation of the necessary controls into the device to validate the PCR performance. This demonstrator can be run either as fully autonomously working device or as OEM part of a sample-to-answer platform.

  10. Accurate zygote-specific discrimination of single-nucleotide polymorphisms using microfluidic electrochemical DNA melting curves.

    PubMed

    Yang, Allen H J; Hsieh, Kuangwen; Patterson, Adriana S; Ferguson, B Scott; Eisenstein, Michael; Plaxco, Kevin W; Soh, H Tom

    2014-03-17

    We report the first electrochemical system for the detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that can accurately discriminate homozygous and heterozygous genotypes using microfluidics technology. To achieve this, our system performs real-time melting-curve analysis of surface-immobilized hybridization probes. As an example, we used our sensor to analyze two SNPs in the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) gene, where homozygous and heterozygous mutations greatly affect the risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Using probes specific for each SNP, we simultaneously acquired melting curves for probe-target duplexes at two different loci and thereby accurately distinguish all six possible ApoE allele combinations. Since the design of our device and probes can be readily adapted for targeting other loci, we believe that our method offers a modular platform for the diagnosis of SNP-based diseases and personalized medicine. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Rapid detection and differentiation of Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini eggs in human fecal samples using a duplex real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer PCR and melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Sanpool, Oranuch; Intapan, Pewpan M; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Janwan, Penchom; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Doanh, Pham Ngoc; Van Hien, Hoang; Dung, Do Trung; Maleewong, Wanchai; Nawa, Yukifumi

    2012-07-01

    We developed a single step duplex real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) PCR merged with melting curve analysis for the fast detection and differentiation of Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini eggs in human fecal samples. Two species of mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (nad2) DNA elements, the 165-bp nad2 product of C. sinensis and the 209-bp nad2 product of O. viverrini, were amplified by species-specific primers, and the fluorescence melting curve analyses were generated from hybrid of amplicons and two pairs of species-specific fluorophore-labeled probes. By their different fluorescence channels and melting temperatures, both C. sinensis and O. viverrini eggs in infected human fecal samples were detected and differentiated with high (100%) sensitivity and specificity. Detection limit was as little as a single C. sinensis egg and two O. viverrini eggs in 100 mg of fecal sample. The assay could distinguish the DNA of both parasites from the DNA of negative fecal samples and fecal samples with other parasitosis, as well as from the well-defined genomic DNA of human leukocytes and other parasites. It can reduce labor time of microscopic examination and is not prone to carry over contamination of agarose electrophoresis. Our duplex real-time FRET PCR method would be useful to determine the accurate range of endemic areas and/or to discover the co-endemic areas of two liver flukes, C. sinensis and O. viverrini, in Asia. This method also would be helpful for the differential diagnosis of the suspected cases of liver fluke infections among travelers who had visited the endemic countries of those parasites.

  12. Comparison of multiple genes and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic space region for their capacity in high resolution melt curve analysis to differentiate Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strain ts-11 from field strains.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed A; Bradbury, Janet M; Ferguson-Noel, Naola M; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2013-12-27

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is an important avian pathogen causing significant economic losses in the global poultry industry. In an attempt to compare and evaluate existing genotyping methods for differentiation of MG strains/isolates, high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis was applied to 5 different PCR methods targeting vlhA, pvpA, gapA, mgc2 genes and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic space region (IGSR). To assess the discriminatory power of PCR-HRM of examined genes and IGSR, MG strains ts-11, F, 6/85 and S6, and, initially, 8 field isolates were tested. All MG strains/isolates were differentiated using PCR-HRM curve analysis and genotype confidence percentage (GCP) values of vlhA and pvpA genes, while only 0, 3 and 4 out of 12 MG strains/isolates were differentiated using gapA, mgc2 genes and IGSR, respectively. The HRM curve analysis of vlhA and pvpA genes was found to be highly correlated with the genetic diversity of the targeted genes confirmed by sequence analysis of amplicons generated from MG strains. The potential of the vlhA and pvpA genes was also demonstrated for genotyping of 12 additional MG strains from Europe and the USA. Results from this study provide a direct comparison between genes previously used in sequencing-based genotyping methods for MG strain identification and highlight the usefulness of vlhA and pvpA HRM curve analyses as rapid and reliable tools specially for diagnosis and differentiation of MG strains used here.

  13. High pressure melting curves of silver, gold and copper

    SciTech Connect

    Hieu, Ho Khac

    2013-11-15

    In this work, based on the Lindemann's formula of melting and the pressure-dependent Grüneisen parameter, we have investigated the pressure effect on melting temperature of silver, gold and copper metals. The analytical expression of melting temperature as a function of volume compression has been derived. Our results are compared with available experimental data as well as with previous theoretical studies and the good and reasonable agreements are found. We also proposed the potential of this approach on predicting melting of copper at very high pressure.

  14. Application of a real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer polymerase chain reaction assay with melting curve analysis for the detection of Paragonimus heterotremus eggs in the feces of experimentally infected cats.

    PubMed

    Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Anamnart, Witthaya; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-09-01

    Paragonimus heterotremus is a medically important lung fluke that causes human and animal paragonimiasis in Southeast Asia, including Thailand. In the current study, a real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer polymerase chain reaction (real-time FRET PCR) with melting curve analysis was developed and evaluated to detect P. heterotremus eggs in the feces of experimentally infected cats. The detection limit of this method for the P. heterotremus DNA sequence was 3 × 10(2) copies of the positive control plasmid and 10(-3) ng of P. heterotremus genomic DNA. The assay system could detect 10 eggs of P. heterotremus per gram of cat feces. No fluorescence signal was observed when DNA purified from 16 other organisms or genomic DNA from cats and human beings were tested. Real-time FRET PCR yielded positive results for all fecal samples from 17 P. heterotremus-infected cats and showed a negative relationship (r = -0.852, P < 0.001) between the number of parasite eggs in feces and the number of PCR cycles. The assay could detect genomic DNA from P. heterotremus, P. westermani, P. macrorchis, P. siamensis, P. harinasutai, and P. bangkokensis and can differentiate P. heterotremus from the other 5 species. The 6 Paragonimus species examined were divided into 4 groups by melting peak analysis. This assay can be useful for the detection of, and epidemiological studies on, P. heterotremus infection in endemic areas.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of the melting curve of NiAl alloy under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenjin; Peng, Yufeng; Liu, Zhongli

    2014-05-15

    The melting curve of B2-NiAl alloy under pressure has been investigated using molecular dynamics technique and the embedded atom method (EAM) potential. The melting temperatures were determined with two approaches, the one-phase and the two-phase methods. The first one simulates a homogeneous melting, while the second one involves a heterogeneous melting of materials. Both approaches reduce the superheating effectively and their results are close to each other at the applied pressures. By fitting the well-known Simon equation to our melting data, we yielded the melting curves for NiAl: 1783(1 + P/9.801){sup 0.298} (one-phase approach), 1850(1 + P/12.806){sup 0.357} (two-phase approach). The good agreement of the resulting equation of states and the zero-pressure melting point (calc., 1850 ± 25 K, exp., 1911 K) with experiment proved the correctness of these results. These melting data complemented the absence of experimental high-pressure melting of NiAl. To check the transferability of this EAM potential, we have also predicted the melting curves of pure nickel and pure aluminum. Results show the calculated melting point of Nickel agrees well with experiment at zero pressure, while the melting point of aluminum is slightly higher than experiment.

  16. Analysis of melt copolymers.

    PubMed

    Montaudo, Maurizio S

    2007-01-01

    Melt copolymer chains are the main (most abundant) reaction product obtained when heating a blend of two (or more) condensation polymers (such as polyester + polycarbonate or polyester + polyamide or polyester + polyester) in which exchange reactions occur. In fact, during the melt-mixing reaction, an AB copolymer is formed and, as a consequence, the sample is a complex mixture made of three components or simply "parts", referred to as Z1, Z2 and Z3, where Z1 and Z2 are the parts for unreacted homopolymers (A and B), whereas Z3 is the part for the copolymer. In this paper, it is shown that matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (and mass spectrometry in general) can be used to monitor the yield of the reactive blending reaction, YR, by measuring the amount of unreacted homopolymer (Z1 and Z2). In order to allow for comparisons, the paper also discusses conventional methods for measuring Z1 and Z2, such as liquid chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance.

  17. Classification of Mycoplasma synoviae strains using single-strand conformation polymorphism and high-resolution melting-curve analysis of the vlhA gene single-copy region.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Nathan; Gasser, Robin B; Steer, Penelope A; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2007-08-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae is an economically important pathogen of poultry worldwide, causing respiratory infection and synovitis in chickens and turkeys. Identification of M. synoviae isolates is of critical importance, particularly in countries in which poultry flocks are vaccinated with the live attenuated M. synoviae strain MS-H. Using oligonucleotide primers complementary to the single-copy conserved 5' end of the variable lipoprotein and haemagglutinin gene (vlhA), amplicons of approximately 400 bp were generated from 35 different M. synoviae strains/isolates from chickens and subjected to mutation scanning analysis. Analysis of the amplicons by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) revealed 10 distinct profiles (A-J). Sequencing of the amplicons representing these profiles revealed that each profile related to a unique sequence, some differing from each other by only one base-pair substitution. Comparative high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis of the amplicons using SYTO 9 green fluorescent dye also displayed profiles which were concordant with the same 10 SSCP profiles (A-J) and their sequences. For both mutation detection methods, the Australian M. synoviae strains represented one of the A, B, C or D profiles, while the USA strains represented one of the E, F, G, H, I or J profiles. The results presented in this study show that the PCR-based SSCP or HRM curve analyses of vlhA provide high-resolution mutation detection tools for the detection and identification of M. synoviae strains. In particular, the HRM curve analysis is a rapid and effective technique which can be performed in a single test tube in less than 2 h.

  18. Improved detection of genetic markers of antimicrobial resistance by hybridization probe-based melting curve analysis using primers to mask proximal mutations: examples include the influenza H275Y substitution.

    PubMed

    Whiley, David M; Jacob, Kevin; Nakos, Jennifer; Bletchly, Cheryl; Nimmo, Graeme R; Nissen, Michael D; Sloots, Theo P

    2012-06-01

    Numerous real-time PCR assays have been described for detection of the influenza A H275Y alteration. However, the performance of these methods can be undermined by sequence variation in the regions flanking the codon of interest. This is a problem encountered more broadly in microbial diagnostics. In this study, we developed a modification of hybridization probe-based melting curve analysis, whereby primers are used to mask proximal mutations in the sequence targets of hybridization probes, so as to limit the potential for sequence variation to interfere with typing. The approach was applied to the H275Y alteration of the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 strain, as well as a Neisseria gonorrhoeae mutation associated with antimicrobial resistance. Assay performances were assessed using influenza A and N. gonorrhoeae strains characterized by DNA sequencing. The modified hybridization probe-based approach proved successful in limiting the effects of proximal mutations, with the results of melting curve analyses being 100% consistent with the results of DNA sequencing for all influenza A and N. gonorrhoeae strains tested. Notably, these included influenza A and N. gonorrhoeae strains exhibiting additional mutations in hybridization probe targets. Of particular interest was that the H275Y assay correctly typed influenza A strains harbouring a T822C nucleotide substitution, previously shown to interfere with H275Y typing methods. Overall our modified hybridization probe-based approach provides a simple means of circumventing problems caused by sequence variation, and offers improved detection of the influenza A H275Y alteration and potentially other resistance mechanisms.

  19. Fluid-fluid-solid triple point on melting curves at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, G. E.; Saitov, I. M.

    2016-11-01

    An analysis is presented of experimental data where fluid-fluid phase transitions are observed for different substances at high temperatures with triple points on melting curves. Viscosity drops point to the structural character of the transition, whereas conductivity jumps remind of both semiconductor-to-metal and plasma nature. The slope of the phase equilibrium dependencies of pressure on temperature and the consequent change of the specific volume, which follows from the Clapeyron-Clausius equation, are discussed. P(V, T) surfaces are presented and discussed for the phase transitions considered in the vicinity of the triple points. The cases of abnormal P(T) dependencies on curves of phase equilibrium are in the focus of discussion. In particular, a P(V, T) surface is presented when both fluid-fluid and melting P(T) curves are abnormal. Particular attention is paid to warm dense hydrogen and deuterium, where remarkable contradictions exist between data of different authors. The possible connection of the P(V, T) surface peculiarities with the experimental data uncertainties is outlined.

  20. Flash heating in the diamond cell: melting curve of rhenium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liuxiang; Karandikar, Amol; Boehler, Reinhard

    2012-06-01

    A new method for measuring melting temperatures in the laser-heated diamond cell is described. This method circumvents previous problems associated with the sample instability, thermal runaway, and chemical reactions. Samples were heated with a single, 20 milliseconds rectangular pulse from a fiber laser, monitoring their thermal response with a fast photomultiplier while measuring the steady state temperature with a CCD spectrometer. The samples were recovered and analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Focused ion beam milling allowed to examine both the lateral and the vertical solid-liquid boundaries. Ambient pressure tests reproducibly yielded the known melting temperatures of rhenium and molybdenum. Melting of Re was measured to 50 GPa, a 5-fold extension of previous data. The refractory character of Re is drastically enhanced by pressure, in contrast to Mo.

  1. A One-Phase Approach for Predicting the Melting Curve of MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kazuma; Fuchizaki, Kazuhiro

    2017-06-01

    The melting curve of MgO, an important compound dissociated from the component of the Earth's lower mantle, was predicted in this work by using a one-phase approach. The existing data for the melting points under pressures were used as input. The necessary thermodynamic information was supplemented by constructing the equation of state. The melting point near the core-mantle boundary was estimated to be approximately 6000 K.

  2. A singleplex real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer PCR with melting curve analysis for the differential detection of Paragonimus heterotremus, Echinostoma malayanum and Fasciola gigantica eggs in faeces.

    PubMed

    Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Saijuntha, Weerachai; Manochantr, Sirikul; Kheolamai, Pakpoom; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Sadaow, Lakkhana; Intapan, Pewpan M; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2016-01-01

    Because the eggs of Paragonimus, Echinostoma and Fasciola are very similar in size and shape, it is difficult to distinguish and accurately identify species by the morphology of their eggs, which is a standard diagnostic method. In this study, a novel assay combining a real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer PCR and melting curve analysis using one set of primers and fluorophore-labelled hybridization probes specific for the 28S rDNA region was developed for the molecular detection of Paragonimus heterotremus, Echinostoma malayanum and Fasciola gigantica eggs. This assay could detect and distinguish P. heterotremus, E. malayanum and F. gigantica DNA with the distinct melting temperature (Tm) values of 57.99±0.08, 62.12±0.15 and 74.10±0.18, respectively. The assay can also be used to detect and distinguish DNA from P. bangkokensis, P. harinasutai, P. machorchis, E. revolutum, Hypodereum conoideum and F. hepatica, which have different Tm values. The sensitivity of this assay enabled the detection of one egg of P. heterotremus, E. malayanum or F. gigantica per 100 mg of faeces. In addition, the specificity testing showed no fluorescence signal for other parasites. Due to the sensitivity and specificity of our assay in detecting P. heterotremus, E. malayanum and F. gigantica, our method could be used to accurately diagnose these three medically important parasitic groups and has potential implications for molecular epidemiological investigations of human and/or animal infections. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Two alternative multiplex PCRs for the identification of the seven species of anglerfish (Lophius spp.) using an end-point or a melting curve analysis real-time protocol.

    PubMed

    Castigliego, Lorenzo; Armani, Andrea; Tinacci, Lara; Gianfaldoni, Daniela; Guidi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Anglerfish (Lophius spp.) is consumed worldwide and is an important economic resource though its seven species are often fraudulently interchanged due to their different commercial value, especially when sold in the form of fillets or pieces. Molecular analysis is the only possible mean to verify traceability and counteract fraud. We developed two multiplex PCRs, one end-point and one real-time with melting curve post-amplification analysis, which can even be run with the simplest two-channel thermocyclers. The two methods were tested on seventy-five reference samples. Their specificity was checked in twenty more species of those most commonly available on the market and in other species of the Lophiidae family. Both methods, the choice of which depends on the equipment and budget of the lab, provide a rapid and easy-to-read response, improving both the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of existing methods for identifying Lophius species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The high-pressure melting curve of iron - A technical discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Quentin; Knittle, Elise; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1991-01-01

    The melting curve of iron is reliably determined to 105 GPa using the laser-heated diamond cell, in close agreement with independent measurements using piston-cylinder and large-volume presses or shock-wave experiments. In order to obtain reliable melting data from the internally heated diamond cell, whether by laser or Joule heating, temperature gradients across the sample must be quantitatively measured; otherwise, such 'wire heating' experiments can lead to significant underestimates of the melting temperature and its pressure dependence. The best estimate of the high-pressure melting curve of iron, as derived from the laser-heated diamond cell and Hugoniot temperature measurements, yields melting temperatures of 4800 + or - 200 K and 6700 + or - 400 K at 133 GPa and 243 GPa, respectively.

  5. Differentiation of entC1 from entC2/entC3 with a single primer pair using simple and rapid SYBR Green-based RT-PCR melt curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Sowmya; Ramlal, Shylaja; Venkataswamachari, Bhavani Peddayelachagiri; Paul, Soumya; Kingston, Joseph; Batra, Harsh Vardhan

    2016-10-01

    In spite of their involvement in foodborne illness, the epidemiological relevance of staphylococcal enterotoxin C (SEC) subtypes is poorly documented may be due to high sequence similarity. Among subtypes, SEC1, SEC2, and SEC3 exhibit more than 97 % homology because of which specific detection tools are seldom available to identify and differentiate them. In this study, a SYBR Green-based RT-PCR followed by melt curve analysis was developed for differentiation of entC1 from entC2/entC3 using a single primer pair. Nucleotide sequences of all three subtypes were analyzed using Clustal Omega program and the region with significant sequence variation/heterogeneity (where utmost SNPs were closely located and accessible for RT-PCR) was selected for amplification by designing a single primer pair that could amplify all three subtypes. In spite of same amplicon size, entC1 showed distinct melt peak at 76 °C. However, due to high similarity between entC2 and entC3, the developed format was deficient to discriminate between them and both showed melt peak at 82 °C. Reliability of developed RT-PCR was evaluated using various naturally contaminated samples and 91 food and clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates where satisfactory results were obtained in comparison with commercial immunoassay kit and conventional PCRs using validated primers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first method being reported to differentiate entC1 from entC2/entC3 using single primer pair which is unachievable by conventional PCR due to same amplicon size. As benefits, the method is sensitive, rapid, and inexpensive with no requirement of fluorescent probes, multiple primers, and post-PCR procedures. Thus, the assay might find its utility as a detection tool in epidemiological survey of foodborne outbreaks for simultaneous identification and differentiation of entC1 from entC2/entC3.

  6. Differentiation between pathogenic serotype 1 isolates of Marek's disease virus and the Rispens CVI988 vaccine in Australia using real-time PCR and high resolution melt curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Renz, K G; Cheetham, B F; Walkden-Brown, S W

    2013-01-01

    Two real-time PCR assays were developed which enable quantitation and differentiation between pathogenic Australian isolates of Marek's disease virus (MDV) serotype 1 and the serotype 1 vaccine strain Rispens CVI988. The assays are based on a DNA sequence variation in the meq gene between pathogenic and vaccinal MDV1 which has been confirmed by sequencing of 20 Australian field strains of MDV. Complete specificity has been demonstrated in samples containing pathogenic MDV (n=20), Rispens (3 commercial vaccine strains), or both. The limit of detection of both the Rispens-specific and the pathogenic MDV1-specific assays was 10 viral copies/reaction. The tests successfully differentiated and quantified MDV in mixtures of pathogenic and vaccinal Rispens virus. A high resolution melt curve analysis targeting the same SNP used for the real-time PCR assays was also developed which successfully detected sequence variation between Md5, six Australian MDV1 isolates and the three Rispens vaccines. However it was ineffective at differentiating mixtures of pathogenic and vaccinal MDV1. The real-time PCR assays have both diagnostic and epidemiological applications as they enable differentiation and quantitation of Rispens CVI988 and pathogenic MDV1 in co-infected chickens in Australia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A screening method for the detection of the 35S promoter and the nopaline synthase terminator in genetically modified organisms in a real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction using high-resolution melting-curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Fumi; Yamada, Chihiro; Nakamura, Kosuke; Nakajima, Osamu; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Harikai, Naoki; Furui, Satoshi; Kitta, Kazumi; Teshima, Reiko

    2009-11-01

    To screen for unauthorized genetically modified organisms (GMO) in the various crops, we developed a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction high-resolution melting-curve analysis method for the simultaneous qualitative detection of 35S promoter sequence of cauliflower mosaic virus (35SP) and the nopaline synthase terminator (NOST) in several crops. We selected suitable primer sets for the simultaneous detection of 35SP and NOST and designed the primer set for the detection of spiked ColE1 plasmid to evaluate the validity of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. In addition, we optimized the multiplex PCR conditions using the designed primer sets and EvaGreen as an intercalating dye. The contamination of unauthorized GMO with single copy similar to NK603 maize can be detected as low as 0.1% in a maize sample. Furthermore, we showed that the present method would be applicable in identifying GMO in various crops and foods like authorized GM soybean, authorized GM potato, the biscuit which is contaminated with GM soybeans and the rice which is contaminated with unauthorized GM rice. We consider this method to be a simple and reliable assay for screening for unauthorized GMO in crops and the processing food products.

  8. Rapid detection of the factor XIII Val34Leu (163 G-->T) polymorphism by real-time PCR using fluorescence resonance energy transfer detection and melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Shemirani, Amir H; Muszbek, László

    2004-01-01

    The Val34Leu polymorphism in the A subunit of blood coagulation factor XIII (FXIII-A) is located in the activation peptide, just three amino acids upstream of the thrombin cleavage site. The Val-->Leu replacement accelerates the rate of the proteolytic activation of FXIII and it seems to provide protection against myocardial infarction. Methods available for the assessment of the FXIII-A Val34Leu polymorphism are rather time-consuming, laborious and not easily applicable for large-scale studies. In this study a new method based on real-time PCR with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) detection and melting curve analysis was developed. The rapid, simple method was adapted to the widely used real-time PCR instrument, LightCycler (Roche Diagnostics). The results showed 100% coincidence with those obtained by the traditional PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay and fluorescent DNA sequencing. Using this method, an allele frequency of 24.2% was obtained (n=113), which well agrees with the allele frequency obtained by PCR-RFLP on a different group of the same ethnic Hungarian population (25.9%).

  9. Detection and discrimination of two Brucella species by multiplex real-time PCR and high-resolution melt analysis curve from human blood and comparison of results using RFLP

    PubMed Central

    Piranfar, Vahhab; Sharif, Malike; Hashemi, Mojtaba; Vahdati, Ali Reza; Mirnejad, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Rapid and accurate detection of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis from clinical samples is so important because antibiotic treatment has major side effects. This study reveals a new method in detection of clinical samples of brucellosis using real-time PCR and high-resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis. Materials and Methods: 160 brucellosis suspicious samples with more than 1/80 serum antibody titers were collected and the results were compared with the RFLP method. In order to amplify the sequences for HRM analysis, vdcc, int-hyp and glk and for RFLP, omp2a and omp2b with PstI and Hinf1 restriction endonuclease were used. At last, the accuracy and specificity of the two methods were compared with each other. Results: Out of these 160 samples, multiplex real time PCR showed 108 positive samples (67.5%), including 56% B. melitensis and 44% B. abortus; whereas in PCR-RFLP 52 out of 160 samples were positive, where recognition of two species were accordant with HRM analysis, separation was based on the size of the amplified fragment. Using the designed primers and performing the assay, we confirmed this method to be much faster and have lower cost with more than 99% accuracy compared to methods such as RFLP. Conclusion: The present study showed that this technique, which scans gene segments and creates an analysis pattern for detection of clinical samples, is useful and more dominant compared with PCR-RFLP. Thus, this method can be used for brucellosis detection, and clinical and epidemiological research. PMID:26523223

  10. Molecular dynamics study of the melting curve of NiTi alloy under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhao-Yi; Hu, Cui-E.; Cai, Ling-Cang; Chen, Xiang-Rong; Jing, Fu-Qian

    2011-02-01

    The melting curve of NiTi alloy was predicted by using molecular dynamics simulations combining with the embedded atom model potential. The calculated thermal equation of state consists well with our previous results obtained from quasiharmonic Debye approximation. Fitting the well-known Simon form to our Tm data yields the melting curves for NiTi: 1850(1 + P/21.938)0.328 (for one-phase method) and 1575(1 + P/7.476)0.305 (for two-phase method). The two-phase simulations can effectively eliminate the superheating in one-phase simulations. At 1 bar, the melting temperature of NiTi is 1575 ± 25 K and the corresponding melting slope is 64 K/GPa.

  11. Prediction of solubility curves and melting properties of organic and pharmaceutical compounds.

    PubMed

    Nordström, Fredrik L; Rasmuson, Ake C

    2009-02-15

    The relationships between solubility, temperature dependence of solubility, melting temperature and melting enthalpy are investigated for the purpose of finding relations that can significantly reduce the need for experimental work in the selection of the solvent for processing of organic fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals. The relationships are investigated theoretically and by evaluation of experimental data for 41 organic and pharmaceutical compounds comprising a total of 115 solubility curves in organic and aqueous solvents. The work considers (i) selection of the equation for correlation of solubility data based on thermodynamic considerations and ability to predict melting properties of the solute from solubility data, (ii) prediction of the temperature dependence of solubility, and (iii) prediction of solubility curves in new solvents. While it is a simple task to find an equation to obtain a decent fit of experimental solubility data, it is more challenging to find relations that are sufficiently sound thermodynamically to allow for extrapolation to the melting temperature. However, with a proper choice of equation it is shown that the melting temperature of the solute can readily be predicted from solubility data in organic solvents (average accuracy of -5K, standard deviation of 26K). Relationships are identified by which the entire solubility curve can be predicted of the compound in a new solvent using only the melting properties and a single solubility data point in that solvent.

  12. The melting curve of Ni to 125 GPa: implications for Earth's Fe rich core alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, O. T.; Wood, I. G.; Dobson, D. P.; Vocadlo, L.; Thomson, A. R.; Wann, E.; Wang, W.; Edgington, A.; Morard, G.; Mezouar, N.; Walter, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The melting curve of Ni has been determined to 125 GPa using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) experiments and two melting criteria: the appearance of liquid diffuse scattering (LDS) during in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and simultaneous plateaux in temperature vs. laser power functions [1]. Our melting curve (Fig. 1) is in good agreement with most theoretical studies [e.g. 2] and the available shock wave data (Fig. 2). It is, however, dramatically steeper than the previous off-line LH-DAC studies in which the determination of melting was based on the visual observation of motion aided by the laser speckle method [e.g. 3]. We estimate the melting point of Ni at the inner-core boundary (ICB; 330 GPa) to be 5800±700 K (2σ), ~2500 K higher than the estimate based on the laser speckle method [3] and within error of Fe (6230±500 K) as determined in a similar in situ LH-DAC study [4]. We find that laser speckle based melting curves coincide with the onset of rapid sub-solidus recrystallization, suggesting that visual observations of motion may have misinterpreted dynamic recrystallization as melt convection. Our new melting curve suggests that the reduction in ICB temperature due to the alloying of Ni with Fe is likely to be significantly smaller than would be expected had the earlier experimental Ni melting studies been correct. We have applied our methodology to a range of other transition metals (Mo, Ti, V, Cu). In the case of Mo, Ti and V the melting curves are in good agreement with the shock compression and theoretical melting studies but hotter and steeper than those based on the laser speckle method, as with Ni. Cu is an exception in which all studies agree, including those employing the laser speckle method. These results go a long way toward resolving the the long-standing controversy over the phase diagrams of the transition metals as determined from static LH-DAC studies on the one hand, and theoretical and dynamic compression studies on the other

  13. Development of an EvaGreen-based multiplex real-time PCR assay with melting curve analysis for simultaneous detection and differentiation of six viral pathogens of porcine reproductive and respiratory disorder.

    PubMed

    Rao, Pinbin; Wu, Haigang; Jiang, Yonghou; Opriessnig, Tanja; Zheng, Xiaowen; Mo, Yecheng; Yang, Zongqi

    2014-11-01

    Concurrent infection of pigs with two or more pathogens is common in pigs under intensive rearing conditions. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), porcine parvovirus (PPV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), classical swine fever virus (CSFV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV) are all associated with reproductive or respiratory disorders or both and can cause significant economic losses in pig production worldwide. An EvaGreen-based multiplex real-time PCR (EG-mPCR) with melting curve analysis was developed in this study for simultaneous detection and differentiation of these six viruses in pigs. This method is able to detect and distinguish PCV2, PPV, PRRSV, CSFV, JEV and PRV with the limits of detection ranging from 100 to 500 copies/μL, high reproducibility, and intra-assay and inter-assay variation ranging from 0.11 to 3.20%. After validation, a total of 118 field samples were tested by the newly developed EG-mPCR. PCV2 was identified in 23%, PPV in 15%, PRRSV in 17% and PRV in 5% of the samples. Concurrent PCV2 and PRRSV infection was detected in 6.7%, PCV2 and PPV in 5% and PPV2 and PRRSV infection was detected in 5% of the cases. The agreement of the EG-mPCR and conventional PCR tests was 99.2%. This EG-mPCR will be a useful, rapid, reliable and cost-effective alternative for routine surveillance testing of viral infections in pigs.

  14. Melting curve of NaCl determined using synchrotron x-ray radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Yu, T.; Long, H.; Wang, L.; Garai, J.

    2009-12-01

    NaCl has been widely used as a pressure calibrant in in-situ high pressure synchrotron x-ray study. The applicable pressure and temperature range of this calibrant is from ambient condition up to B1-B2 transition in pressure and to melting in temperature. Melting data of NaCl at high pressures are still very limited. We have conducted comparative experiments to study melting of NaCl using energy dispersive x-ray diffraction and radiographic imaging at high pressure up to 8.8GPa. The experiments were carried out using the cubic-type multi-anvil pressure (SAM85) at the X17B2 beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). In the x-ray diffraction experiments, melting is inferred when disappearance of diffraction peak of NaCl from a mixture of NaCl+BN (to reduce possible grain growth) is observed. In the x-ray radiography experiment, a WC sphere is place in the top portion of pure NaCl sample; melting is inferred when the WC sphere start to drop in the sample. The experimental result indicates that the melting temperatures determined from the two types of observations may differ by 60°C at 5 GPa. Due to unavoidable grain growth near melting, x-ray diffraction signals may disappear from the point solid state detector even though the melting is not achieved. Therefore the radiography method may reflect more accurate measurement of melting temperature. Melting curve of NaCl was measured up to 1.8 GPa by Clark et al (1), and between 2 and 4 GPa by Pistorius (2). The new melting data are consistent with the previous results. All the experimental are in good agreement with theoretical prediction using Simon fusion equation (2) and the relation between melting temperature and Debye temperature (3). References: (1) Clark, Jr. Effect of Pressure on the Melting Points of Eight Alkali Halides, Journal of Chemical Physics 31 (6) 1526-1531 (1959). (2) Kraut and Kennedy, New Melting Law at High Pressures, Physical Review 151 (2) 668-675 (1966) (3) J. Garai, and J. Chen

  15. Analysis of Exoplanet Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Budding, E.; Rhodes, M. D.; Püsküllü, Ç.; Soydugan, F.; Soydugan, E.; Tüysüz, M.; Demircan, O.

    2015-07-01

    We have applied the close binary system analysis package WINFITTER to a variety of exoplanet transiting light curves taken both from the NASA Exoplanet Archive and our own ground-based observations. WINFitter has parameter options for a realistic physical model, including gravity brightening and structural parameters derived from Kopal's applications of the relevant Radau equation, and it includes appropriate tests for determinacy and adequacy of its best fitting parameter sets. We discuss a number of issues related to empirical checking of models for stellar limb darkening, surface maculation, Doppler beaming, microvariability, and transit time variation (TTV) effects. The Radau coefficients used in the light curve modeling, in principle, allow structural models of the component stars to be tested.

  16. A Melting Curve-Based Multiplex RT-qPCR Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Four Human Coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhenzhou; Zhang, Ya'nan; He, Zhixiang; Liu, Jia; Lan, Ke; Hu, Yihong; Zhang, Chiyu

    2016-11-23

    Human coronaviruses HCoV-OC43, HCoV-229E, HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-HKU1 are common respiratory viruses associated with acute respiratory infection. They have a global distribution. Rapid and accurate diagnosis of HCoV infection is important for the management and treatment of hospitalized patients with HCoV infection. Here, we developed a melting curve-based multiplex RT-qPCR assay for simultaneous detection of the four HCoVs. In the assay, SYTO 9 was used to replace SYBR Green I as the fluorescent dye, and GC-modified primers were designed to improve the melting temperature (Tm) of the specific amplicon. The four HCoVs were clearly distinguished by characteristic melting peaks in melting curve analysis. The detection sensitivity of the assay was 3 × 10² copies for HCoV-OC43, and 3 × 10¹ copies for HCoV-NL63, HCoV-229E and HCoV-HKU1 per 30 μL reaction. Clinical evaluation and sequencing confirmation demonstrated that the assay was specific and reliable. The assay represents a sensitive and reliable method for diagnosis of HCoV infection in clinical samples.

  17. A Melting Curve-Based Multiplex RT-qPCR Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Four Human Coronaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Zhenzhou; Zhang, Ya’nan; He, Zhixiang; Liu, Jia; Lan, Ke; Hu, Yihong; Zhang, Chiyu

    2016-01-01

    Human coronaviruses HCoV-OC43, HCoV-229E, HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-HKU1 are common respiratory viruses associated with acute respiratory infection. They have a global distribution. Rapid and accurate diagnosis of HCoV infection is important for the management and treatment of hospitalized patients with HCoV infection. Here, we developed a melting curve-based multiplex RT-qPCR assay for simultaneous detection of the four HCoVs. In the assay, SYTO 9 was used to replace SYBR Green I as the fluorescent dye, and GC-modified primers were designed to improve the melting temperature (Tm) of the specific amplicon. The four HCoVs were clearly distinguished by characteristic melting peaks in melting curve analysis. The detection sensitivity of the assay was 3 × 102 copies for HCoV-OC43, and 3 × 101 copies for HCoV-NL63, HCoV-229E and HCoV-HKU1 per 30 μL reaction. Clinical evaluation and sequencing confirmation demonstrated that the assay was specific and reliable. The assay represents a sensitive and reliable method for diagnosis of HCoV infection in clinical samples. PMID:27886052

  18. Evaluation of High-Resolution Melting Curve Analysis of Ligation-Mediated Real-Time PCR, a Rapid Method for Epidemiological Typing of ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter Species) Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ryberg, Anna; Billström, Hanna; Hällgren, Anita; Nilsson, Lennart E.; Marklund, Britt-Inger; Olsson-Liljequist, Barbro; Schön, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A single-tube method, ligation-mediated real-time PCR high-resolution melt analysis (LMqPCR HRMA), was modified for the rapid typing of Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter spp. (ESKAPE) pathogens. A 97% agreement (60/62 isolates) was achieved in comparison to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) results, which indicates that LMqPCR HRMA is a rapid and accurate screening tool for monitoring nosocomial outbreaks. PMID:25232168

  19. Melting curves of metals with excited electrons in the quasiharmonic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakov, D. V.; Levashov, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present melting curves of aluminum, copper, and nickel calculated on the basis of a quasiharmonic approximation. The dependence of a phonon density of states on electron temperature is taken into account for both thermodynamic properties and a mean square displacement of atoms. Linear expansion coefficients are strongly dependent on an approximation of the exchange-correlation functional; the generalized gradient approximation gives better results at normal conditions. Using the Lindemann criterion we obtain good agreement with experimental pressure dependences of the melting temperature for Al and Cu. In the case of Ni we consider a spin polarization effect to reproduce a recent first-principle simulation and shock-wave data. However, our melting curve is located significantly higher than static experimental points. We also consider a thermal excitation of electrons in a crystal and investigate the dependence of the melting temperature on the electronic one at normal and elevated densities. Hardening of the crystal structure for all the metals is obtained in our simulation; this effect might be confirmed experimentally owing to a relatively long lifetime of the two-temperature state.

  20. Measurements on the melting curve of ^4He down to 10 mK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alles, Harry

    2007-03-01

    Recent discovery of a nonclassical rotational inertia in solid ^4He below about 0.2 K by Kim and Chan has initiated an intensive study on the properties of solid ^4He. As Kim and Chan have interpreted their observation as the evidence of supersolid behavior, we have decided to measure very accurately the melting curve of ^4He because, as the slope of the melting curve is proportional to the difference in the entropy of the liquid and solid phases, there should be an anomaly at the possible supersolid transition. We have measured the melting curve of ^4He with the accuracy of about 0.5 microbar with ^4He crystals which had various concentration of defects. All our samples showed only the expected T^4 dependence due to phonons without any sign of the supersolid transition in the temperature range of 80400 mK. Below 80 mK we observed a small deviation from T^4 dependence which, however, cannot be attributed to the supersolid transition because our recent measurements with the cell containing liquid sample only suggest that this deviation is by the temperature variation of properties of BeCu membrane of our capacitive pressure gauge. In addition to our published data with ^4He of natural purity [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 165302 (2006)] we also report our recent measurements of the melting curve with ultra pure ^4He (0.3 ppb of ^3He impurities). In these measurements we followed optically the shape of the sample crystals which had very good quality.

  1. Evaluation of high-resolution melting curve analysis of ligation-mediated real-time PCR, a rapid method for epidemiological typing of ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter Species) pathogens.

    PubMed

    Woksepp, Hanna; Ryberg, Anna; Billström, Hanna; Hällgren, Anita; Nilsson, Lennart E; Marklund, Britt-Inger; Olsson-Liljequist, Barbro; Schön, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    A single-tube method, ligation-mediated real-time PCR high-resolution melt analysis (LMqPCR HRMA), was modified for the rapid typing of Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter spp. (ESKAPE) pathogens. A 97% agreement (60/62 isolates) was achieved in comparison to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) results, which indicates that LMqPCR HRMA is a rapid and accurate screening tool for monitoring nosocomial outbreaks. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Theoretical calculation of the melting curve of Cu-Zr binary alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Gunawardana, K. G.S.H.; Wilson, S. R.; Mendelev, M. I.; ...

    2014-11-14

    Helmholtz free energies of the dominant binary crystalline solids found in the Cu-Zr system at high temperatures close to the melting curve are calculated. This theoretical approach combines fundamental measure density functional theory (applied to the hard-sphere reference system) and a perturbative approach to include the attractive interactions. The studied crystalline solids are Cu(fcc), Cu51Zr14(β), CuZr(B2), CuZr2(C11b), Zr(hcp), and Zr(bcc). The calculated Helmholtz free energies of crystalline solids are in good agreement with results from molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations. Using the same perturbation approach, the liquid phase free energies are calculated as a function of composition and temperature, from which themore » melting curve of the entire composition range of this system can be obtained. Phase diagrams are determined in this way for two leading embedded atom method potentials, and the results are compared with experimental data. Furthermore, theoretical melting temperatures are compared both with experimental values and with values obtained directly from MD simulations at several compositions.« less

  3. Theoretical calculation of the melting curve of Cu-Zr binary alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gunawardana, K. G.S.H.; Wilson, S. R.; Mendelev, M. I.; Song, Xueyu

    2014-11-14

    Helmholtz free energies of the dominant binary crystalline solids found in the Cu-Zr system at high temperatures close to the melting curve are calculated. This theoretical approach combines fundamental measure density functional theory (applied to the hard-sphere reference system) and a perturbative approach to include the attractive interactions. The studied crystalline solids are Cu(fcc), Cu51Zr14(β), CuZr(B2), CuZr2(C11b), Zr(hcp), and Zr(bcc). The calculated Helmholtz free energies of crystalline solids are in good agreement with results from molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations. Using the same perturbation approach, the liquid phase free energies are calculated as a function of composition and temperature, from which the melting curve of the entire composition range of this system can be obtained. Phase diagrams are determined in this way for two leading embedded atom method potentials, and the results are compared with experimental data. Furthermore, theoretical melting temperatures are compared both with experimental values and with values obtained directly from MD simulations at several compositions.

  4. Trainable high resolution melt curve machine learning classifier for large-scale reliable genotyping of sequence variants.

    PubMed

    Athamanolap, Pornpat; Parekh, Vishwa; Fraley, Stephanie I; Agarwal, Vatsal; Shin, Dong J; Jacobs, Michael A; Wang, Tza-Huei; Yang, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    High resolution melt (HRM) is gaining considerable popularity as a simple and robust method for genotyping sequence variants. However, accurate genotyping of an unknown sample for which a large number of possible variants may exist will require an automated HRM curve identification method capable of comparing unknowns against a large cohort of known sequence variants. Herein, we describe a new method for automated HRM curve classification based on machine learning methods and learned tolerance for reaction condition deviations. We tested this method in silico through multiple cross-validations using curves generated from 9 different simulated experimental conditions to classify 92 known serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae and demonstrated over 99% accuracy with 8 training curves per serotype. In vitro verification of the algorithm was tested using sequence variants of a cancer-related gene and demonstrated 100% accuracy with 3 training curves per sequence variant. The machine learning algorithm enabled reliable, scalable, and automated HRM genotyping analysis with broad potential clinical and epidemiological applications.

  5. Lactase persistence genotyping: rapid detection of seven sequence variants in a single tube with melting curve analyses.

    PubMed

    Strand, Harald; Sørensen, Liv Karin; Ingebretsen, Ole Christian

    2014-09-01

    Lactase persistence is an inherited autosomal dominant trait that confers the ability to digest lactose after weaning. Lactose persistence is caused by single nucleotide variants in a regulatory element for the lactase gene (LCT). In Europeans, lactase persistence is associated with the nucleotide variant LCT -13910C>T. Ethnic groups from Africa and the Arabian Peninsula have other lactase persistence variants in close proximity to the -13910C>T variant. Current hybridisation probe analysis methods have been limited by the inability to detect all the known nucleotide variants. The aim of this study was to devise a method based on hybridisation probes and melting curve analysis for rapidly detecting LCT variants. We designed hybridisation probes for producing melting curve profiles that could identify seven LCT nucleotide variants: -13907C>G, -13910C>T, -13913T>C, -13914G>A, -13915T>G, -14009T>G, and -14010G>C. To validate the assay, we generated plasmid standards of all the alleles and mixed them to create artificial heterozygote samples. All genotypes could be detected in a single tube assay. Rare genotypes were confirmed in a second assay with probes that had different complementary sequences. This assay can be used for rapidly genotyping lactase persistence in multi-ethnic populations.

  6. High resolution melting curve assay for rapid detection of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yuhki; Iwade, Yoshito; Hayakawa, Eri; Nakano, Manabu; Sakai, Takashi; Mitarai, Satoshi; Katayama, Masahiko; Nosaka, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo

    2013-12-01

    We developed and evaluated a high resolution melting (HRM) curve assay by using real-time PCR for the detection of the most frequent mutations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which are responsible for the resistance of four anti-TB drugs: rifampicin, isoniazid, ethambutol, and streptomycin. The HRM assay was successfully used for the detection of dominant mutations: A516V, H526A, H526T, S531L, L533P, and A516G/S531L in rpoB; S315T, and S315A in katG; -15C/T, and -8T/C in mab-inhA; M306I in embB; K88Q and K43R in rpsL; and 513A/C in rrs. We were able to discriminate the mutant from the wild type by analyzing the melting-curve shape in 40 clinical M. tuberculosis isolates, and the results of the HRM assay were completely consistent with those of DNA sequencing. This HRM assay is a simple, rapid, and cost-effective method that can be performed in a closed tube. Therefore, our assay is a potentially useful tool for the rapid detection of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis.

  7. Fast and Efficient Screening for Wheat Loss-of-Gene Mutants Using Multiplexed Melt Curve Analyses.

    PubMed

    Mieog, Jos C; Ral, Jean-Philippe F

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a new approach in the screening for loss-of-gene mutants in Heavy Ion Bombardment (HIB) mutant populations of genetically complex organisms such as hexaploid bread wheat using multiplexed single-color (SYBR Green) melt curve analyses. The assay was set up for three target genes to test its validity and applicability. For each gene, three genome-specific primer pairs (one for each genome) with distinct melt curves were developed and multiplexed. This allowed screening for "single null mutants" (plants with the target gene deleted in one of the three genomes) for all three genomes in a single reaction. The first two genes (α-Amylase 3 and Epsilon Cyclase) were used to test the approach as HIB null lines for all three genomes were already available for these. The third assay was successfully applied to identify new single null lines of the target gene α-Amylase 2 in an in-house HIB wheat collection. The use of SYBR Green greatly reduced the time and/or cost investment compared to other techniques and the approach proved highly suitable for high-throughput applications.

  8. Melting curves and structural properties of tantalum from the modified-Z method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. M. E-mail: ycheng@scu.edu.cn; Xu, C.; Cheng, Y. E-mail: ycheng@scu.edu.cn; Chen, X. R.; Cai, L. C.

    2015-12-21

    The melting curves and structural properties of tantalum (Ta) are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations combining with potential model developed by Ravelo et al. [Phys. Rev. B 88, 134101 (2013)]. Before calculations, five potentials are systematically compared with their abilities of producing reasonable compressional and equilibrium mechanical properties of Ta. We have improved the modified-Z method introduced by Wang et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 114, 163514 (2013)] by increasing the sizes in L{sub x} and L{sub y} of the rectangular parallelepiped box (L{sub x} = L{sub y} ≪ L{sub z}). The influences of size and aspect ratio of the simulation box to melting curves are also fully tested. The structural differences between solid and liquid are detected by number density and local-order parameters Q{sub 6}. Moreover, the atoms' diffusion with simulation time, defects, and vacancies formations in the sample are all studied by comparing situations in solid, solid-liquid coexistence, and liquid state.

  9. Quantum method for fluorescence background removal in DNA melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Lindsay N; Kent, Jana O; Wittwer, Carl T

    2013-10-15

    Fluorescent high-resolution DNA melting analysis is a robust method of genotyping and mutation scanning. However, removing background fluorescence is important for accurate classification and to correctly display helicity. Linear baseline extrapolation, commonly used with absorbance, often fails at low temperatures when fluorescence is used. A new quantum method of background removal based on the inherent decrease of fluorescence with temperature is described. Absorbance and fluorescence melting curves were compared using synthetic targets including hairpins, unlabeled probes, and a 50 bp duplex. In addition, the quantum method was compared to a previously described exponential method for analysis of genotyping data produced after polymerase chain reaction (PCR), including those from small amplicons, unlabeled probes, and snapback primers. The quantum method best matched absorbance data and predicted helicity, with the exponential method displaying low-temperature bulges and domain artifacts that can lead to incorrect genotyping. When two melting domains were widely separated, quantum analysis produced a flat baseline between domains, while exponential analysis was temperature-dependent. Both methods have little effect on the melting temperature (Tm) although some differences were significant (hairpin Tm values increased 0.7 °C by the quantum method and decreased 1.5 °C by exponential method, p = 0.01). However, peak heights on derivative plots were strongly algorithm-dependent, with exponential analysis enhancing low-temperature peaks while dampening high-temperature peaks. Quantum-analyzed fluorescence curves were a better match to absorbance data in terms of shape, area, and peak height compared to other methods, indicating that DNA helicity is best approximated by the quantum method.

  10. Melting curve of SiO2 at multimegabar pressures: implications for gas giants and super-Earths.

    PubMed

    González-Cataldo, Felipe; Davis, Sergio; Gutiérrez, Gonzalo

    2016-05-23

    Ultrahigh-pressure phase boundary between solid and liquid SiO2 is still quite unclear. Here we present predictions of silica melting curve for the multimegabar pressure regime, as obtained from first principles molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the melting temperatures from three high pressure phases of silica (pyrite-, cotunnite-, and Fe2P-type SiO2) at different pressures using the Z method. The computed melting curve is found to rise abruptly around 330 GPa, an increase not previously reported by any melting simulations. This is in close agreement with recent experiments reporting the α-PbO2-pyrite transition around this pressure. The predicted phase diagram indicates that silica could be one of the dominant components of the rocky cores of gas giants, as it remains solid at the core of our Solar System's gas giants. These results are also relevant to model the interior structure and evolution of massive super-Earths.

  11. Dynamic time warping assessment of high-resolution melt curves provides a robust metric for fungal identification

    PubMed Central

    Phatak, Sayali S.; Li, Dongmei; Luka, Janos; Calderone, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Fungal infections are a global problem imposing considerable disease burden. One of the unmet needs in addressing these infections is rapid, sensitive diagnostics. A promising molecular diagnostic approach is high-resolution melt analysis (HRM). However, there has been little effort in leveraging HRM data for automated, objective identification of fungal species. The purpose of these studies was to assess the utility of distance methods developed for comparison of time series data to classify HRM curves as a means of fungal species identification. Dynamic time warping (DTW), first introduced in the context of speech recognition to identify temporal distortion of similar sounds, is an elastic distance measure that has been successfully applied to a wide range of time series data. Comparison of HRM curves of the rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region from 51 strains of 18 fungal species using DTW distances allowed accurate classification and clustering of all 51 strains. The utility of DTW distances for species identification was demonstrated by matching HRM curves from 243 previously identified clinical isolates against a database of curves from standard reference strains. The results revealed a number of prior misclassifications, discriminated species that are not resolved by routine phenotypic tests, and accurately identified all 243 test strains. In addition to DTW, several other distance functions, Edit Distance on Real sequence (EDR) and Shape-based Distance (SBD), showed promise. It is concluded that DTW-based distances provide a useful metric for the automated identification of fungi based on HRM curves of the ITS region and that this provides the foundation for a robust and automatable method applicable to the clinical setting. PMID:28264030

  12. Dynamic time warping assessment of high-resolution melt curves provides a robust metric for fungal identification.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sha; Mirchevska, Gordana; Phatak, Sayali S; Li, Dongmei; Luka, Janos; Calderone, Richard A; Fonzi, William A

    2017-01-01

    Fungal infections are a global problem imposing considerable disease burden. One of the unmet needs in addressing these infections is rapid, sensitive diagnostics. A promising molecular diagnostic approach is high-resolution melt analysis (HRM). However, there has been little effort in leveraging HRM data for automated, objective identification of fungal species. The purpose of these studies was to assess the utility of distance methods developed for comparison of time series data to classify HRM curves as a means of fungal species identification. Dynamic time warping (DTW), first introduced in the context of speech recognition to identify temporal distortion of similar sounds, is an elastic distance measure that has been successfully applied to a wide range of time series data. Comparison of HRM curves of the rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region from 51 strains of 18 fungal species using DTW distances allowed accurate classification and clustering of all 51 strains. The utility of DTW distances for species identification was demonstrated by matching HRM curves from 243 previously identified clinical isolates against a database of curves from standard reference strains. The results revealed a number of prior misclassifications, discriminated species that are not resolved by routine phenotypic tests, and accurately identified all 243 test strains. In addition to DTW, several other distance functions, Edit Distance on Real sequence (EDR) and Shape-based Distance (SBD), showed promise. It is concluded that DTW-based distances provide a useful metric for the automated identification of fungi based on HRM curves of the ITS region and that this provides the foundation for a robust and automatable method applicable to the clinical setting.

  13. Changes of magnetization and entropy across the melting curve for a classical two-dimensional plasma in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, N. H.; Capuzzi, P.; Tosi, M. P.

    2004-06-01

    Dubey and Gumbs have reported molecular-dynamics simulations for a two-dimensional, classical one-component plasma in the presence of a transverse magnetic field B. Here we combine their melting ( m) curve for temperature Tm vs. B with thermodynamics to gain insight into the changes in magnetization M and entropy S across the melting line as functions of applied field B. The magnetization of the Coulomb liquid plays a central role, and yet is entirely due to particle repulsions.

  14. A Rapid Multiplex Real-Time PCR High-Resolution Melt Curve Assay for the Simultaneous Detection of Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus in Food.

    PubMed

    Forghani, Fereidoun; Wei, Shuai; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    Three important foodborne pathogens, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, are of great concern for food safety. They may also coexist in food matrices and, in the case of B. cereus and S. aureus, the resulting illnesses can resemble each other owing to similar symptoms. Therefore, their simultaneous detection may have advantages in terms of cost savings and rapidity. Given this context, a rapid multiplex real-time PCR high-resolution melt curve assay for the simultaneous detection of these three pathogens in food was developed. The assay successfully detected B. cereus (gyrB), L. monocytogenes (hly), and S. aureus (nuc) in a single reaction, and the average melting temperatures were 76.23, 80.19, and 74.01°C, respectively. The application of SYTO9 dye and a slow melt curve analysis ramp rate (0.1°C/s) enabled the production of sharp, high-resolution melt curve peaks that were easily distinguishable from each other. The detection limit in food (milk, rice, and lettuce) was 3.7 × 10(3) CFU/g without an enrichment step and 3.7 × 10(1) CFU/g following the 10-h enrichment. Hence, the assay developed here is specific and sensitive, providing an efficient tool for implementation in food for the simultaneous detection of B. cereus, L. monocytogenes, and S. aureus .

  15. Determination of the Melting Curve of the Modified Lennard-Jones System Using the Nonequilibrium Relaxation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Yuta; Fuchizaki, Kazuhiro

    2017-02-01

    The melting curve of the modified Lennard-Jones system, which has been obtained by equating the free energies between the solid and liquid phases, was reinvestigated using the nonequilibrium relaxation method. The latter method satisfactorily reproduced the previous result with much simplified procedures.

  16. International Equations for the Pressure Along the Melting and Along the Sublimation Curve of Ordinary Water Substance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Wolfgang; Saul, A.; Pruss, A.

    1994-05-01

    In order to define the phase boundary between the solid phase (ice) and the fluid phase (liquid and gas) of ordinary (light) water substance in pressure-temperature coordinates, correlation equations for the pressure along the melting curve of the various modifications of ice as well as for the pressure along the sublimation curve are presented. The five equations for the melting pressure of the ice phases, ice I, ice III, ice V, ice VI, and ice VII, which only contain one to three fitted coefficients, cover the pressure range from the ``normal'' triple point to 20000 MPa. In this entire range the equations represent the selected measurements of the melting pressure within their experimental uncertainty. The 2-coefficient equation for the sublimation pressure covers the temperature range from 190 K to the triple point (273.16 K). The equations correspond to the new International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). All these equations form the basis of the revised release on the pressure along the melting and sublimation curves of ordinary water substance. A verbatium copy of this release is presented in the Appendix of this paper. §

  17. Improved high sensitivity screen for Huntington disease using a one-step triplet-primed PCR and melting curve assay

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mingjue; Cheah, Felicia S. H.; Chen, Min; Lee, Caroline G.; Law, Hai-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Molecular diagnosis of Huntington disease (HD) is currently performed by fluorescent repeat-flanking or triplet-primed PCR (TP-PCR) with capillary electrophoresis (CE). However, CE requires multiple post-PCR steps and may result in high cost in high-throughput settings. We previously described a cost-effective single-step molecular screening strategy employing the use of melting curve analysis (MCA). However, because it relies on repeat-flanking PCR, its efficiency in detecting expansion mutations decreases with increasing size of the repeat, which could lead to false-negative results. To address this pitfall, we have developed an improved screening assay coupling TP-PCR, which has been shown in CE-based assays to detect all expanded alleles regardless of size, with MCA in a rapid one-step assay. A companion protocol for rapid size confirmation of expansion-positive samples is also described. The assay was optimized on 30 genotype-known DNAs, and two plasmids pHTT(CAG)26 and pHTT(CAG)33 were used to establish the threshold temperatures (TTs) distinguishing normal from expansion-positive samples. In contrast to repeat-flanking PCR MCA, TP-PCR MCA displayed much higher sensitivity for detecting large expansions. All 30 DNAs generated distinct melt peak Tms which correlated well with each sample’s larger allele. Normal samples were clearly distinguished from affected samples. The companion sizing protocol accurately sized even the largest expanded allele of ~180 CAGs. Blinded analysis of 69 clinical samples enriched for HD demonstrated 100% assay sensitivity and specificity in sample segregation. The assay targets the HTT CAG repeat specifically, tolerates a wide range of input DNA, and works well using DNA from saliva and buccal swab in addition to blood. Therefore, rapid, accurate, reliable, and high-throughput detection/exclusion of HD can be achieved using this one-step screening assay, at less than half the cost of fluorescent PCR with CE. PMID:28700716

  18. Analysis of HIV Using a High Resolution Melting (HRM) Diversity Assay: Automation of HRM Data Analysis Enhances the Utility of the Assay for Analysis of HIV Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Matthew M.; Swan, David; Magaret, Craig A.; Hoover, Donald R.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2012-01-01

    Background HIV diversity may be a useful biomarker for discriminating between recent and non-recent HIV infection. The high resolution melting (HRM) diversity assay was developed to quantify HIV diversity in viral populations without sequencing. In this assay, HIV diversity is expressed as a single numeric HRM score that represents the width of a melting peak. HRM scores are highly associated with diversity measures obtained with next generation sequencing. In this report, a software package, the HRM Diversity Assay Analysis Tool (DivMelt), was developed to automate calculation of HRM scores from melting curve data. Methods DivMelt uses computational algorithms to calculate HRM scores by identifying the start (T1) and end (T2) melting temperatures for a DNA sample and subtracting them (T2–T1 = HRM score). DivMelt contains many user-supplied analysis parameters to allow analyses to be tailored to different contexts. DivMelt analysis options were optimized to discriminate between recent and non-recent HIV infection and to maximize HRM score reproducibility. HRM scores calculated using DivMelt were compared to HRM scores obtained using a manual method that is based on visual inspection of DNA melting curves. Results HRM scores generated with DivMelt agreed with manually generated HRM scores obtained from the same DNA melting data. Optimal parameters for discriminating between recent and non-recent HIV infection were identified. DivMelt provided greater discrimination between recent and non-recent HIV infection than the manual method. Conclusion DivMelt provides a rapid, accurate method of determining HRM scores from melting curve data, facilitating use of the HRM diversity assay for large-scale studies. PMID:23240016

  19. Melting curve of the deep mantle applied to properties of early magma ocean and actual core-mantle boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrault, Denis; Lo Nigro, Giacomo; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Bouhifd, Mohamed A.; Garbarino, Gaston; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2010-05-01

    Our planet experienced partial melting early in its history as a consequence of energy release due to accretion. Partial mantle melting could still happen today in the lowermost mantle. Occurrence of melting is primordial for the chemical segregation between the different Earth's reservoirs and for the dynamics of the whole planet. Melting of iron-alloys is relatively easy to achieve, but the silicated mantle happens to be more refractory. We investigated experimentally melting properties of two starting material, forsterite and chondritic-mantle, at pressures ranging from 25 to 140 GPa, using laser-heated diamond anvil cell coupled with synchrotron radiation. We show that partial melting in the lowermost mantle, as suggested by seismology on the basis of the ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZ), requires temperatures above 4200 K at the core-mantle boundary. At low pressures, our curve plots significantly lower than previous reports. Compared to recent estimates of mantle geotherm, while this temperature remains possible if the Earth's core is very hot, it is more likely that ULVZs correspond to high concentration of incompatible elements driven down to the D"-layer by subducting slabs or extracted out from the outer core. When our chondritic melting curve is coupled with recent isentropic temperature profiles for a magma ocean, we obtain a correlation between magma ocean depth and the potential temperature (Tp) at its surface; an ocean depth of 1000 km (equivalent to ~40 GPa) corresponds to Tp=2000 K, which happens to be significantly hotter than the estimated surface temperature of a sustained magma ocean. It emphasizes the importance of a lid at the magma ocean surface at an epoch as early as that of core-mantle segregation.

  20. A real-time ARMS PCR/high-resolution melt curve assay for the detection of the three primary mitochondrial mutations in Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Fergus; O’Dwyer, Veronica; Neylan, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 95% of patients who are diagnosed with Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) have one of three mitochondrial point mutations responsible for the disease, G3460A, G11778A, and T14484C. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel multiplex real-time amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) PCR combined with high-resolution melt curves to identify the individual mutations involved. The study aimed to provide a more robust, cost- and time-effective mutation detection strategy than that offered with currently available methods. The assay reported in this study will allow diagnostic laboratories to avoid costly next-generation sequencing (NGS) assays for most patients with LHON and to focus resources on patients with unknown mutations that require further analysis. Methods The test uses a combination of multiplex allele-specific PCR (ARMS PCR) in combination with a high-resolution melt curve analysis to detect the presence of the mutations in G3460A, G11778A, and T14484C. PCR primer sets were designed to produce a control PCR product and PCR products only in the presence of the mutations in 3460A, 11778A, and 14484C in a multiplex single tube format. Products produce discrete well-separated melt curves to clearly detect the mutations. Results This novel real-time ARMS PCR/high-resolution melt curve assay accurately detected 95% of the mutations that cause LHON. The test has proved to be robust, cost- and time-effective with the real-time closed tube system taking approximately 1 h to complete. Conclusions A novel real-time ARMS PCR/high-resolution melt curve assay is described for the detection of the three primary mitochondrial mutations in LHON. This test provides a simple, robust, easy-to-read output that is cost- and time-effective, thus providing an alternative method to individual endpoint PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), PCR followed by Sanger sequencing or pyrosequencing, and next-generation sequencing

  1. The Melting Curve and High-Pressure Chemistry of Formic Acid to 8 GPa and 600 K

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, W; Zaug, J M; Howard, W M; Goncharov, A F; Crowhurst, J C; Jeanloz, R

    2005-04-13

    We have determined the melting temperature of formic acid (HCOOH) to 8.5 GPa using infrared absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and visual observation of samples in a resistively heated diamond-anvil cell. The experimentally determined melting curve compares favorably with a two-phase thermodynamic model. Decomposition reactions were observed above the melting temperature up to a pressure of 6.5 GPa, where principal products were CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and CO. At pressures above 6.5 GPa, decomposition led to solid-like reaction products. Infrared and Raman spectra of these recovered products indicate that pressure affects the nature of carbon-carbon bonding.

  2. Calculating the melting curves by the thermodynamic data matching method: Platinum-group refractory metals (Ru, Os, and Ir)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulyamina, E. Yu.; Zitserman, V. Yu.; Fokin, L. R.

    2017-01-01

    A technique for reconstructing thermal properties, including the melting curve, of refractory metals based on the use of experimental data on caloric properties available up to the melting point and some regularities of the Debye-Grüneisen theory has been proposed. The calculation result is the consistent system of high-temperature thermal data, including the thermal expansion coefficient, solid-phase density, and volume jump upon melting. This technique was tried-out on refractory platinum-group metals based on experimental data on the enthalpy of the metals and confirmed by consistency with a thermodynamic calculation using shock-wave experiments and results obtained by the quantum molecular dynamics method.

  3. Melting curve of SiO2 at multimegabar pressures: implications for gas giants and super-Earths

    PubMed Central

    González-Cataldo, Felipe; Davis, Sergio; Gutiérrez, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Ultrahigh-pressure phase boundary between solid and liquid SiO2 is still quite unclear. Here we present predictions of silica melting curve for the multimegabar pressure regime, as obtained from first principles molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the melting temperatures from three high pressure phases of silica (pyrite-, cotunnite-, and Fe2P-type SiO2) at different pressures using the Z method. The computed melting curve is found to rise abruptly around 330 GPa, an increase not previously reported by any melting simulations. This is in close agreement with recent experiments reporting the α-PbO2–pyrite transition around this pressure. The predicted phase diagram indicates that silica could be one of the dominant components of the rocky cores of gas giants, as it remains solid at the core of our Solar System’s gas giants. These results are also relevant to model the interior structure and evolution of massive super-Earths. PMID:27210813

  4. Analysis of light curve of LP Camelopardalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudil, Z.; Skarka, M.; Zejda, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present photometric analysis of the RRab type pulsating star LP Cam. The star was observed at Brno Observatory and Planetarium during nine nights. Measurements were calibrated to the Johnson photometric system. Four captured and thirteen previously published maxima timings allowed us to refine the pulsation period and the zero epoch. The light curve was Fourier decomposed to estimate physical parameters using empirical relations. Our results suggest that LP Cam is a common RR Lyrae star with high, almost solar metallicity.

  5. Incorporating Experience Curves in Appliance Standards Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Garbesi, Karina; Chan, Peter; Greenblatt, Jeffery; Kantner, Colleen; Lekov, Alex; Meyers, Stephen; Rosenquist, Gregory; Buskirk, Robert Van; Yang, Hung-Chia; Desroches, Louis-Benoit

    2011-10-31

    The technical analyses in support of U.S. energy conservation standards for residential appliances and commercial equipment have typically assumed that manufacturing costs and retail prices remain constant during the projected 30-year analysis period. There is, however, considerable evidence that this assumption does not reflect real market prices. Costs and prices generally fall in relation to cumulative production, a phenomenon known as experience and modeled by a fairly robust empirical experience curve. Using price data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and shipment data obtained as part of the standards analysis process, we present U.S. experience curves for room air conditioners, clothes dryers, central air conditioners, furnaces, and refrigerators and freezers. These allow us to develop more representative appliance price projections than the assumption-based approach of constant prices. These experience curves were incorporated into recent energy conservation standards for these products. The impact on the national modeling can be significant, often increasing the net present value of potential standard levels in the analysis. In some cases a previously cost-negative potential standard level demonstrates a benefit when incorporating experience. These results imply that past energy conservation standards analyses may have undervalued the economic benefits of potential standard levels.

  6. Electrochemistry of cations in diopsidic melt - Determining diffusion rates and redox potentials from voltammetric curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, Russell O.; Haskin, Larry A.; Crane, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on determinations of reduction potentials and their temperature dependence of selected ions in diopsidic melt, by using linear sweep voltammetry. Diffusion coefficients were measured for cations of Eu, Mn, Cr, and In. Enthalpies and entropies of reduction were determined for the cations V(V), Cr(3+), Mn(2+), Mn(3+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+), Mo(VI), Sn(IV), and Eu(3+). Reduction potentials were used to study the structural state of cations in the melt.

  7. Electrochemistry of cations in diopsidic melt - Determining diffusion rates and redox potentials from voltammetric curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, Russell O.; Haskin, Larry A.; Crane, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on determinations of reduction potentials and their temperature dependence of selected ions in diopsidic melt, by using linear sweep voltammetry. Diffusion coefficients were measured for cations of Eu, Mn, Cr, and In. Enthalpies and entropies of reduction were determined for the cations V(V), Cr(3+), Mn(2+), Mn(3+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+), Mo(VI), Sn(IV), and Eu(3+). Reduction potentials were used to study the structural state of cations in the melt.

  8. Use of the melting curve assay as a means for high-throughput quantification of Illumina sequencing libraries.

    PubMed

    Shinozuka, Hiroshi; Forster, John W

    2016-01-01

    Background. Multiplexed sequencing is commonly performed on massively parallel short-read sequencing platforms such as Illumina, and the efficiency of library normalisation can affect the quality of the output dataset. Although several library normalisation approaches have been established, none are ideal for highly multiplexed sequencing due to issues of cost and/or processing time. Methods. An inexpensive and high-throughput library quantification method has been developed, based on an adaptation of the melting curve assay. Sequencing libraries were subjected to the assay using the Bio-Rad Laboratories CFX Connect(TM) Real-Time PCR Detection System. The library quantity was calculated through summation of reduction of relative fluorescence units between 86 and 95 °C. Results.PCR-enriched sequencing libraries are suitable for this quantification without pre-purification of DNA. Short DNA molecules, which ideally should be eliminated from the library for subsequent processing, were differentiated from the target DNA in a mixture on the basis of differences in melting temperature. Quantification results for long sequences targeted using the melting curve assay were correlated with those from existing methods (R (2) > 0.77), and that observed from MiSeq sequencing (R (2) = 0.82). Discussion.The results of multiplexed sequencing suggested that the normalisation performance of the described method is equivalent to that of another recently reported high-throughput bead-based method, BeNUS. However, costs for the melting curve assay are considerably lower and processing times shorter than those of other existing methods, suggesting greater suitability for highly multiplexed sequencing applications.

  9. NEXT Performance Curve Analysis and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saripalli, Pratik; Cardiff, Eric; Englander, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Performance curves of the NEXT thruster are highly important in determining the thruster's ability in performing towards mission-specific goals. New performance curves are proposed and examined here. The Evolutionary Mission Trajectory Generator (EMTG) is used to verify variations in mission solutions based on both available thruster curves and the new curves generated. Furthermore, variations in BOL and EOL curves are also examined. Mission design results shown here validate the use of EMTG and the new performance curves.

  10. Identification of fibrillin-1 gene mutations in Marfan syndrome by high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chia-Cheng; Lin, Shin-Yu; Lee, Chien-Nan; Cheng, Hui-Yu; Lin, Chiou-Ya; Chang, Chien-Hui; Chiu, Hsin-Hui; Yu, Chih-Chieh; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Cheng, Wen-Fang; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Niu, Dau-Ming; Su, Yi-Ning

    2009-06-15

    Marfan syndrome has been associated with approximately 562 mutations in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene. Mutation scanning of the FBN1 gene with DNA direct sequencing is time-consuming and expensive because of its large size. This study analyzed the diagnostic value of high-resolution melting analysis as an alternative method for scanning of the FBN1 gene. A total of 75 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons (179-301bp, average 256bp) that covered the complete coding regions and splicing sites were evaluated on the 96-well LightCycler system. Melting curves were analyzed as fluorescence derivative plots (-dF/dT vs. temperature). To determine the sensitivity of this method, a total of 82 samples from patients with Marfan syndrome and 50 unaffected individuals were analyzed. All mutations reported in this study had been confirmed previously by direct sequencing analysis. Melting analysis identified 48 heterozygous variants. The variant c.3093 G>T (exon 25) was incorrectly identified by melting curve analysis. The sensitivity of the technique in this sample was 98.78% (81/82). This study demonstrated that high-resolution melting analysis is a reliable gene scanning method with greater speed than DNA sequencing. Our results support the use of this technology as an alternative method for the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome as well as its suitability for high-throughput mutation scanning of other large genes.

  11. Triple point on the melting curve and polymorphism of nitrogen at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Goncharov, Alexander F; Crowhurst, Jonathan C; Struzhkin, Viktor V; Hemley, Russell J

    2008-08-29

    Raman spectra of solid and fluid nitrogen to pressures up to 120 GPa and temperatures up to 2500 K reveal that the melting line exhibits a maximum near 70 GPa, followed by a triple point near 87 GPa, after which the melting temperature rises again. Fluid nitrogen remains molecular over the entire pressure range studied, and there is no sign of a fluid-fluid transition. Solid phases obtained on quenching from the melt above 48 GPa are identical to the recently discovered iota and zeta' phases. We find that kinetics plays a major role in the experimentally observed phase changes and account for the metastability of various crystalline molecular phases and the existence of an amorphous single bonded eta-N.

  12. Study of the role of tumor necrosis factor-α (-308 G/A) and interleukin-10 (-1082 G/A) polymorphisms as potential risk factors to acute kidney injury in patients with severe sepsis using high-resolution melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Hashad, Doaa I; Elsayed, Eman T; Helmy, Tamer A; Elawady, Samier M

    2017-11-01

    Septic acute kidney injury (AKI) is a prevalent complication in intensive care units with an increased incidence of complications. The aim of the present study was to assess the use of high-resolution melting curve (HRM) analysis in investigating whether the genetic polymorphisms; -308 G/A of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and -1082 G /A of Interleukin-10 (IL-10) genes may predispose patients diagnosed with severe sepsis to the development of AKI. One hundred and fifty patients with severe sepsis participated in the present study; only sixty-six developed AKI. Both polymorphisms were studied using HRM analysis. The low producer genotype of both studied polymorphism of TNF-α and IL-10 genes was associated with AKI. Using logistic regression analysis, the low producer genotypes remained an independent risk factor for AKI. A statistically significant difference was detected between both studied groups as regards the low producer genotype in both TNF-α (-308 G/A) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) (-1082 G/A) polymorphisms being prevalent in patients developing AKI. Principle conclusions: The low producer genotypes of both TNF-α (-308 G/A) and IL-10 (-1082 G/A) polymorphisms could be considered a risk factor for the development of AKI in critically ill patients with severe sepsis, thus management technique implemented for this category should be modulated rescuing this sector of patients from the grave deterioration to acute kidney injury. Using HRM for genotyping proved to be a highly efficient, simple, cost-effective genotyping technique that is most appropriate for the routine study of large-scale samples.

  13. Phenomenological analysis of the clotting curve.

    PubMed

    De Cristofaro, R; Di Cera, E

    1991-10-01

    A model-independent (phenomenological) characterization of the clotting curve is proposed. Three parameters are used to encapsulate the main features of the increase in absorbance observed at 350 nm due to the reaction of thrombin with fibrinogen that leads to clot formation: (1) the maximum increase in absorbance per unit time, delta Am, at the inflection point of the clotting curve; (2) the time needed to reach the maximum increase in absorbance, tm; and (3) the clotting time, tc, obtained from extrapolation of the slope at tm to the zero absorbance baseline. Clotting curves at low fibrinogen concentrations (0.125 divided by 0.250 microM), well below the Km, where thrombin amidase activity is rate-limiting with respect to the subsequent aggregation process, have been measured under a wide variety of experimental conditions, (i.e., as a function of thrombin concentration, pH and temperature) in order to explore the basic response of each parameter to changes in solution conditions. Under all conditions examined in this study we have observed that tm and tc are linked through a linear relationship that appears to be an important invariant property of the clotting curve, regardless of experimental conditions. No such clear relationship exists between delta Am and tc, with tc being associated with several possible values of delta Am and vice versa, depending upon solution conditions. It is proposed that tc is strictly dependent on thrombin amidase activity, while delta Am reflects properties of the aggregation process leading to clot formation. The clotting time shows a pH and temperature dependence that closely resembles that of Km/Vm for synthetic amide substrates. Furthermore, tc changes linearly with either the inverse thrombin concentration and the concentration of competitive inhibitors of fibrinogen binding to thrombin, as expected for the ratio Km/Vm. We show how the analysis of clotting curves obtained at different thrombin and inhibitor concentrations

  14. Development of a Melting Curve-Based Allele-Specific PCR of Apolipoprotein E (APOE) Genotyping Method for Genomic DNA, Guthrie Blood Spot, and Whole Blood.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of apolipoprotein E (APOE) are associated with various health conditions and diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, etc. Hence, genotyping of APOE has broad applications in biomedical research and clinical settings, particularly in the era of precision medicine. The study aimed to develop a convenient and accurate method with flexible throughput to genotype the APOE polymorphisms. A melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method was developed to genotype two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of APOE, i.e. rs429358 at codon 112 and rs7412 at codon 158. These two SNPs determine the genotype of APOE2, E3, and E4. PCR-based Sanger sequencing was used as the reference method for APOE genotyping. A 100% concordance rate was obtained in 300 subjects between the melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method and the Sanger sequencing method. This method was applied to a genetic association analysis of APOE and schizophrenia consisting of 711 patients with schizophrenia and 665 control subjects from Taiwan. However, no significant differences in the allele and genotype frequencies were detected between these two groups. Further experiments showed that DNA dissolved from blood collected on Guthrie filter paper and total blood cell lysate without DNA extraction can be used in the melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method. Thus, we suggest that this is a fast, accurate and robust APOE genotyping method with a flexible throughput and suitable for DNA template from different preparations. This convenient method shall meet the different needs of various research and clinical laboratories.

  15. Analysis of the vitreoretinal surgery learning curve.

    PubMed

    Martín-Avià, J; Romero-Aroca, P

    2017-06-01

    To describe intra- and post-operative complications, as well as the evolution of the surgical technique in first 4years of work of a novice retina surgeon, and evaluate minimal learning time required to reduce its complications, deciding which pathologies should still be referred to higher level hospitals, until further experience may be achieved. A study was conducted on patients that had undergone vitreoretinal surgery by a novice surgeon in Tarragona between 23rd October 2007 and 31st December 2011. The primary diagnosis, surgeon learning time, surgical technique, intra-operative and post-operative complications were recorded. A total of 247 surgeries were studied. The percentage of use of 20G and 23G calibres during the time, marks a change towards trans-conjunctival surgery from the ninth trimester (98 surgeries). Surgical complications decreased towards twelfth trimester (130 surgeries) with an increase in the previous months. The shift towards 23G technique around 100 surgeries is interpreted as greater comfort and safety by the surgeon. Increased surgical complications during the following months until its decline around 130 surgeries can be interpreted as an 'overconfidence'. It is arguable that the learning curve is slower than what the surgeon believes. An individual analysis of the complications and surgical outcomes is recommended to ascertain the status of the learning curve. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of Picosecond Pulsed Laser Melted Graphite

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-12-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm{sup -1} and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm{sup -1}, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nanosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  17. Mathematics analysis of polymerase chain reaction kinetic curves.

    PubMed

    Sochivko, D G; Fedorov, A A; Varlamov, D A; Kurochkin, V E; Petrov, R V

    2016-01-01

    The paper reviews different approaches to the mathematical analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) kinetic curves. The basic principles of PCR mathematical analysis are presented. Approximation of PCR kinetic curves and PCR efficiency curves by various functions is described. Several PCR models based on chemical kinetics equations are suggested. Decision criteria for an optimal function to describe PCR efficiency are proposed.

  18. Detection and differentiation of classical swine fever virus strains C and Shimen by high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Ning, Pengbo; Li, Helin; Liang, Wulong; Guo, Kangkang; Tan, Xuechao; Cao, Weiwei; Cheng, Liang; Zhang, Yanming

    2013-12-01

    Differentiation of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) strains is crucial for the development of effective vaccination programs and in epidemiological investigations. Most of current detection methods do not discriminate between wild-type CSFV strains and those used in vaccines. In this study, method involving high-resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis for the simultaneous detection and differentiation of the C and Shimen strains of CSFV was developed. A specific fragment of the NS2 gene was amplified from various CSFV strains and subjected to HRM curve analysis. Analysis of the melt curve profile for the amplicons of each strain allowed the differentiation of CSFV strains in blood samples taken from the field, or from vaccinated commercial flocks. These findings indicate that HRM curve analysis is a rapid and practical technique for discriminating CSFV isolates/strains; it can contribute to epidemiological studies of CSFV and effective control of classical swine fever.

  19. SCALE ANALYSIS OF CONVECTIVE MELTING WITH INTERNAL HEAT GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    John Crepeau

    2011-03-01

    Using a scale analysis approach, we model phase change (melting) for pure materials which generate internal heat for small Stefan numbers (approximately one). The analysis considers conduction in the solid phase and natural convection, driven by internal heat generation, in the liquid regime. The model is applied for a constant surface temperature boundary condition where the melting temperature is greater than the surface temperature in a cylindrical geometry. We show the time scales in which conduction and convection heat transfer dominate.

  20. Recession curve analysis for groundwater levels: case study in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailuma, A.; VÄ«tola, I.; Abramenko, K.; Lauva, D.; Vircavs, V.; Veinbergs, A.; Dimanta, Z.

    2012-04-01

    Recession curve analysis is powerful and effective analysis technique in many research areas related with hydrogeology where observations have to be made, such as water filtration and absorption of moisture, irrigation and drainage, planning of hydroelectric power production and chemical leaching (elution of chemical substances) as well as in other areas. The analysis of the surface runoff hydrograph`s recession curves, which is performed to conceive the after-effects of interaction of precipitation and surface runoff, has approved in practice. The same method for analysis of hydrograph`s recession curves can be applied for the observations of the groundwater levels. There are manually prepared hydrograph for analysis of recession curves for observation wells (MG2, BG2 and AG1) in agricultural monitoring sites in Latvia. Within this study from the available monitoring data of groundwater levels were extracted data of declining periods, splitted by month. The drop-down curves were manually (by changing the date) moved together, until to find the best match, thereby obtaining monthly drop-down curves, representing each month separately. Monthly curves were combined and manually joined, for obtaining characterizing drop-down curves of the year for each well. Within the process of decreased recession curve analysis, from the initial curve was cut out upward areas, leaving only the drops of the curve, consequently, the curve is transformed more closely to the groundwater flow, trying to take out the impact of rain or drought periods from the curve. Respectively, the drop-down curve is part of the data, collected with hydrograph, where data with the discharge dominates, without considering impact of precipitation. Using the recession curve analysis theory, ready tool "A Visual Basic Spreadsheet Macro for Recession Curve Analysis" was used for selection of data and logarithmic functions matching (K. Posavec et.al., GROUND WATER 44, no. 5: 764-767, 2006), as well as

  1. One-step species-specific high resolution melting analysis for nosocomial bacteria detection.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yeng Pooi; Chua, Kek Heng; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2014-12-01

    Nosocomial infections are a major public health concern worldwide. Early and accurate identification of nosocomial pathogens which are often multidrug resistant is crucial for prompt treatment. Hence, an alternative real-time polymerase chain reaction coupled with high resolution melting-curve analysis (HRMA) was developed for identification of five nosocomial bacteria. This assay targets species-specific regions of each nosocomial bacteria and produced five distinct melt curves with each representing a particular bacterial species. The melting curves were characterized by peaks of 78.8 ± 0.2 °C for Acinetobacter baumannii, 82.7 ± 0.2 °C for Escherichia coli, 86.3 ± 0.3 °C for Klebsiella pneumoniae, 88.8 ± 0.2 °C for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 74.6 ± 02 °C for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The assay was able to specifically detect the five bacterial species with an overall detection limit of 2 × 10(-2) ng/μL. In conclusion, the HRM assay developed is a simple and rapid method for identification of the selected nosocomial pathogens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Delamination Analysis Of Composite Curved Bars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1990-01-01

    Classical anisotropic elasticity theory used to construct "multilayer" composite semicircular curved bar subjected to end forces and end moments. Radial location and intensity of open-mode delamination stress calculated and compared with results obtained from anisotropic continuum theory and from finite element method. Multilayer theory gave more accurate predictions of location and intensity of open-mode delamination stress. Currently being applied to predict open-mode delamination stress concentrations in horse-shoe-shaped composite test coupons.

  3. Delamination Analysis Of Composite Curved Bars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1990-01-01

    Classical anisotropic elasticity theory used to construct "multilayer" composite semicircular curved bar subjected to end forces and end moments. Radial location and intensity of open-mode delamination stress calculated and compared with results obtained from anisotropic continuum theory and from finite element method. Multilayer theory gave more accurate predictions of location and intensity of open-mode delamination stress. Currently being applied to predict open-mode delamination stress concentrations in horse-shoe-shaped composite test coupons.

  4. SS433 Trek 2: light curve analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, J.; Obana, Y.; Okugami, M.

    The authors have calculated theoretical light curves of SS433 during eclipse and precession, using a model in which SS433 consists of a geometrically thick torus around a compact star and a companion star filling the Roche lobe. The favorite combination is that the mass ratio is about 2 (a compact star is a black hole) and the surface temperature of the companion is around 17000K.

  5. PSD analysis of optical QSO light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simm, Torben; Salvato, M.; Saglia, R.; Ponti, G.; Lanzuisi, G.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Nandra, K.; Bender, R.

    2016-08-01

    One of the elementary properties of quasar activity is continuous variability in the UV/optical bands. The power spectral density (PSD) potentially contains information about the underlying processes connected to variability. We applied a novel method based on continuous-time autoregressive moving average (CARMA) models (Kelly et al. 2014) to derive the PSD even for irregularly sampled light curves. Using a sample of ~100 X-ray selected non-local QSOs from the XMM-COSMOS catalog and optical light curves provided by the Pan-STARRS1 MDF survey we find that the PSD resembles a broken power-law with a high-frequency slope significantly steeper than observed in X-ray studies. The PSD normalization is observed to scale inversely with bolometric luminosity and Eddington ratio, whereas there is no correlation between the characteristic bend timescale and black hole mass. We find a weak tendency for QSOs with higher black hole mass to have steeper high-frequency PSD slopes. In an ongoing work we extend these studies employing a sample of ~700 variable broad-line QSOs with high-quality black hole mass estimates and well-sampled light curves from the SDSS-RM project.

  6. Rapid identification and classification of bacteria by 16S rDNA restriction fragment melting curve analyses (RFMCA).

    PubMed

    Rudi, Knut; Kleiberg, Gro H; Heiberg, Ragnhild; Rosnes, Jan T

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate restriction fragment melting curve analyses (RFMCA) as a novel approach for rapid classification of bacteria during food production. RFMCA was evaluated for bacteria isolated from sous vide food products, and raw materials used for sous vide production. We identified four major bacterial groups in the material analysed (cluster I-Streptococcus, cluster II-Carnobacterium/Bacillus, cluster III-Staphylococcus and cluster IV-Actinomycetales). The accuracy of RFMCA was evaluated by comparison with 16S rDNA sequencing. The strains satisfying the RFMCA quality filtering criteria (73%, n=57), with both 16S rDNA sequence information and RFMCA data (n=45) gave identical group assignments with the two methods. RFMCA enabled rapid and accurate classification of bacteria that is database compatible. Potential application of RFMCA in the food or pharmaceutical industry will include development of classification models for the bacteria expected in a given product, and then to build an RFMCA database as a part of the product quality control.

  7. Instantaneous normal mode analysis of melting of finite dust clusters.

    PubMed

    Melzer, André; Schella, André; Schablinski, Jan; Block, Dietmar; Piel, Alexander

    2012-06-01

    The experimental melting transition of finite two-dimensional dust clusters in a dusty plasma is analyzed using the method of instantaneous normal modes. In the experiment, dust clusters are heated in a thermodynamic equilibrium from a solid to a liquid state using a four-axis laser manipulation system. The fluid properties of the dust cluster, such as the diffusion constant, are measured from the instantaneous normal mode analysis. Thereby, the phase transition of these finite clusters is approached from the liquid phase. From the diffusion constants, unique melting temperatures have been assigned to dust clusters of various sizes that very well reflect their dynamical stability properties.

  8. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING MELTING ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and simple fluorescence screening assay for UV radiation-, chemical-, and enzyme-induced DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on a melting/annealing analysis technique and has been used with both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from E. coli). DN...

  9. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING MELTING ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and simple fluorescence screening assay for UV radiation-, chemical-, and enzyme-induced DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on a melting/annealing analysis technique and has been used with both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from E. coli). DN...

  10. Primate genotyping via high resolution melt analysis: rapid and reliable identification of color vision status in wild lemurs.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Rachel L; Spriggs, Amanda N; MacFie, Tammie S; Baden, Andrea L; Irwin, Mitchell T; Wright, Patricia C; Louis, Edward E; Lawler, Richard R; Mundy, Nicholas I; Bradley, Brenda J

    2016-10-01

    Analyses of genetic polymorphisms can aid our understanding of intra- and interspecific variation in primate sociality, ecology, and behavior. Studies of primate opsin genes are prime examples of this, as single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the X-linked opsin gene underlie variation in color vision. For primate species with polymorphic trichromacy, genotyping opsin SNVs can generally indicate whether individual primates are red-green color-blind (denoted homozygous M or homozygous L) or have full trichromatic color vision (heterozygous ML). Given the potential influence of color vision on behavior and fitness, characterizing the color vision status of study subjects is becoming commonplace for many primate field projects. Such studies traditionally involve a multi-step sequencing-based method that can be costly and time-consuming. Here we present a new reliable, rapid, and relatively inexpensive method for characterizing color vision in primate populations using high resolution melt analysis (HRMA). Using lemurs as a case study, we characterized variation at exons 3 and/or 5 of the X-linked opsin gene for 87 individuals representing nine species. We scored opsin genotypes and color vision status using both traditional sequencing-based methods as well as our novel melting-curve based HRMA protocol. For each species, the melting curves of varying genotypes (homozygous M, homozygous L, heterozygous ML) differed in melting temperature and/or shape. Melting curves for each sample were consistent across replicates, and genotype-specific melting curves were consistent across DNA sources (blood vs. feces). We show that opsin genotypes can be quickly and reliably scored using HRMA once lab-specific reference curves have been developed based on known genotypes. Although the protocol presented here focuses on genotyping lemur opsin loci, we also consider the larger potential for applying this approach to various types of genetic studies of primate populations.

  11. Melting analysis on microbeads in rapid temperature-gradient inside microchannels for single nucleotide polymorphisms detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Kan-Chien; Ding, Shih-Torng; Lin, En-Chung; Wang, Lon Alex; Lu, Yen-Wen

    2014-11-01

    A continuous-flow microchip with a temperature gradient in microchannels was utilized to demonstrate spatial melting analysis on microbeads for clinical Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyping on animal genomic DNA. The chip had embedded heaters and thermometers, which created a rapid and yet stable temperature gradient between 60 °C and 85 °C in a short distance as the detection region. The microbeads, which served as mobile supports carrying the target DNA and fluorescent dye, were transported across the temperature gradient. As the surrounding temperature increased, the fluorescence signals of the microbeads decayed with this relationship being acquired as the melting curve. Fast DNA denaturation, as a result of the improved heat transfer and thermal stability due to scaling, was also confirmed. Further, each individual microbead could potentially bear different sequences and pass through the detection region, one by one, for a series of melting analysis, with multiplex, high-throughput capability being possible. A prototype was tested with target DNA samples in different genotypes (i.e., wild and mutant types) with a SNP location from Landrace sows. The melting temperatures were obtained and compared to the ones using a traditional tube-based approach. The results showed similar levels of SNP discrimination, validating our proposed technique for scanning homozygotes and heterozygotes to distinguish single base changes for disease research, drug development, medical diagnostics, agriculture, and animal production.

  12. Melting analysis on microbeads in rapid temperature-gradient inside microchannels for single nucleotide polymorphisms detectiona)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kan-Chien; Ding, Shih-Torng; Lin, En-Chung; Wang, Lon (Alex); Lu, Yen-Wen

    2014-01-01

    A continuous-flow microchip with a temperature gradient in microchannels was utilized to demonstrate spatial melting analysis on microbeads for clinical Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyping on animal genomic DNA. The chip had embedded heaters and thermometers, which created a rapid and yet stable temperature gradient between 60 °C and 85 °C in a short distance as the detection region. The microbeads, which served as mobile supports carrying the target DNA and fluorescent dye, were transported across the temperature gradient. As the surrounding temperature increased, the fluorescence signals of the microbeads decayed with this relationship being acquired as the melting curve. Fast DNA denaturation, as a result of the improved heat transfer and thermal stability due to scaling, was also confirmed. Further, each individual microbead could potentially bear different sequences and pass through the detection region, one by one, for a series of melting analysis, with multiplex, high-throughput capability being possible. A prototype was tested with target DNA samples in different genotypes (i.e., wild and mutant types) with a SNP location from Landrace sows. The melting temperatures were obtained and compared to the ones using a traditional tube-based approach. The results showed similar levels of SNP discrimination, validating our proposed technique for scanning homozygotes and heterozygotes to distinguish single base changes for disease research, drug development, medical diagnostics, agriculture, and animal production. PMID:25553186

  13. Determination of calcium carbonate and sodium carbonate melting curves up to Earth's transition zone pressures with implications for the deep carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zeyu; Li, Jie; Lange, Rebecca; Liu, Jiachao; Militzer, Burkhard

    2017-01-01

    Melting of carbonated eclogite or peridotite in the mantle influences the Earth's deep volatile cycles and bears on the long-term evolution of the atmosphere. Existing data on the melting curves of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) are limited to 7 GPa and therefore do not allow a full understanding of carbon storage and cycling in deep Earth. We determined the melting curves of CaCO3 and Na2CO3 to the pressures of Earth's transition zone using a multi-anvil apparatus. Melting was detected in situ by monitoring a steep and large increase in ionic conductivity, or inferred from sunken platinum markers in recovered samples. The melting point of CaCO3 rises from 1870 K at 3 GPa to ∼2000 K at 6 GPa and then stays within 50 K of 2000 K between 6 and 21 GPa. In contrast, the melting point of Na2CO3 increases continuously from ∼1123 K at 3 GPa to ∼1950 K at 17 GPa. A pre-melting peak in the alternating current through solid CaCO3 is attributed to the transition from aragonite to calcite V. Accordingly the calcite V-aragonite-liquid invariant point is placed at 13 ± 1 GPa and 1970 ± 40 K, with the Clapeyron slope of the calcite V to aragonite transition constrained at ∼70 K/GPa. The experiments on CaCO3 suggest a slight decrease in the melting temperature from 8 to 13 GPa, followed by a slight increase from 14 to 21 GPa. The negative melting slope is consistent with the prediction from our ab initio simulations that the liquid may be more compressible and become denser than calcite V at sufficiently high pressure. The positive melting slope at higher pressures is supported by the ab initio prediction that aragonite is denser than the liquid at pressures up to 30 GPa. At transition zone pressures the melting points of CaCO3 are comparable to that of Na2CO3 but nearly 400 K and 500 K lower than that of MgCO3. The fusible nature of compressed CaCO3 may be partially responsible for the majority of carbonatitic melts found on Earth's surface

  14. Segmented wave analysis of surface plasmon resonance on curved surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunwoong; Kim, Donghyun

    2017-07-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has been heavily used as biosensors and studied dominantly on a flat surface. Recently, flexible sensor platforms have emerged, for example, as wearable devices. Here, we report investigation of SPR characteristics on a curved film structure. A rigorous 3D computational model requires extremely heavy calculation time and resources. Therefore, we adopted segmentation analysis in which curved surface is divided into an array of flat segments. Such analysis allows fast and efficient calculation. The results indicate that increased curvature produces broader SPR due to wider momentum-matching. The segmentation analysis is expected to play a critical role for diverse optical elements on curved surface.

  15. Parametric receiver operating characteristic curve analysis using mathematica.

    PubMed

    Heckerling, Paul S

    2002-07-01

    Several computer programs have been written to perform receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, and are available in the public domain. Here, the author provides the theory and description for 'rocMath', a Mathematica program that performs parametric ROC curve analysis. The 'rocMath' program has some advantages over other ROC curve programs, including the ability to provide, through optional arguments: (a) user-specified pointwise confidence limits, as well as default 95% limits, on ROC curve area and on true-positive rates; (b) ROC curve plots with data points, a fitted curve, and user-specified pointwise confidence bands; and (c) ROC curve areas, tables, and plots based on a logistic distribution as well as on a standard normal distribution. In addition, the code of 'rocMath' can be modified to address additional ROC curve applications. The program uses Mathematica's ability to operate on purely symbolic as well as numeric data to achieve substantial coding efficiency. Limitations of the 'rocMath' program are also discussed.

  16. An analysis of the light curve of Pluto.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, A. A.; Fix, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    The light curve of Pluto is analyzed in terms of a geometrical model consisting of bright and dark areas which are assumed to exhibit either a diffuse or a geometrical type of reflectivity. A Fourier analysis method is used to invert the observed light curve to obtain the longitudinal distribution of bright and dark areas for any combination of albedos selected for the two types of terrain. The analysis indicates that the light curve of Pluto can be readily understood in terms of a surface consisting of bright and dark areas. However, on the basis of the presently available photometric data, the existence or absence of limb-darkened material cannot be established.

  17. Hydrogen-bond breaking by O/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/. II. Melting curves of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Mathers, T.L.; Schoeffler, G.; McGlynn, S.P.

    1982-01-01

    Evidence for hydrogen bond breaking (HBB) by O/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/ in the denaturation or melting of DNA is presented. It was found that air and oxygen significantly reduce the temperature of the DNA melting process. The possible relationship of this HBB ability of oxygen and nitrogen to phenomena observed in vivo are discussed. (ACR)

  18. Light curve demography via Bayesian functional data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredo, Thomas; Budavari, Tamas; Hendry, Martin A.; Kowal, Daniel; Ruppert, David

    2015-08-01

    Synoptic time-domain surveys provide astronomers, not simply more data, but a different kind of data: large ensembles of multivariate, irregularly and asynchronously sampled light curves. We describe a statistical framework for light curve demography—optimal accumulation and extraction of information, not only along individual light curves as conventional methods do, but also across large ensembles of related light curves. We build the framework using tools from functional data analysis (FDA), a rapidly growing area of statistics that addresses inference from datasets that sample ensembles of related functions. Our Bayesian FDA framework builds hierarchical models that describe light curve ensembles using multiple levels of randomness: upper levels describe the source population, and lower levels describe the observation process, including measurement errors and selection effects. Schematically, a particular object's light curve is modeled as the sum of a parameterized template component (modeling population-averaged behavior) and a peculiar component (modeling variability across the population), subsequently subjected to an observation model. A functional shrinkage adjustment to individual light curves emerges—an adaptive, functional generalization of the kind of adjustments made for Eddington or Malmquist bias in single-epoch photometric surveys. We are applying the framework to a variety of problems in synoptic time-domain survey astronomy, including optimal detection of weak sources in multi-epoch data, and improved estimation of Cepheid variable star luminosities from detailed demographic modeling of ensembles of Cepheid light curves.

  19. Rapid identification of bacteria associated with Acute Oak Decline by high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Brady, C; Allainguillaume, J; Denman, S; Arnold, D

    2016-08-01

    Two Gram-negative Enterobacteriaceae, Gibbsiella quercinecans and Brenneria goodwinii, are frequently isolated from oak suffering from Acute Oak Decline. These two species are difficult to identify based on colony morphology, carbohydrate utilization or 16S rRNA gene sequence, and identification using gyrB gene sequencing is time-consuming and laborious. A rapid identification technique, based on high-resolution melt analysis of the atpD gene, was designed to efficiently process numerous isolates from an increasing number of affected woodlands and parks. Principal component analysis of the resulting melt curves from strains of G. quercinecans, B. goodwinii and their close phylogenetic relatives allowed differentiation into distinct clusters based on species or subspecies identity. Acute Oak Decline is an increasing threat to Britain's native oak population. Two novel bacterial species both belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae, Gibbsiella quercinecans and Brenneria goodwinii, are thought to play an important role in symptom development. Here, we describe a rapid identification technique using high-resolution melt analysis of the atpD gene able to assign isolates to either G. quercinecans or B. goodwinii in a single assay, greatly reducing the time taken to identify if either or both of these species are present in symptomatic oak. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Identification of Chlamydial species in crocodiles and chickens by PCR-HRM curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Robertson, T; Bibby, S; O'Rourke, D; Belfiore, T; Agnew-Crumpton, R; Noormohammadi, A H

    2010-10-26

    Recently, a PCR protocol (16SG), targeting 16S rRNA gene coupled with high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis was developed in our laboratory and shown to reliably detect and identify the seven different Chlamydiaceae spp. In this study, the potential of this method was assessed for detection and differentiation of Chlamydiosis in clinical specimens. Of the total number of 733 specimens from a range of animal species, 219 (30%) were found positive by 16SG PCR. When a sufficient amount of DNA was available (64 submissions), amplicons generated by the 16SG PCR were subjected to HRM curve analysis and results were compared to that of nucleotide sequencing. In all instances, the infecting Chlamydiaceae spp. was genotyped according to the identity of its nucleotide sequence to a reference species. Analysis of the HRM curves and nucleotide sequences from 16SG PCR amplicons also revealed the occurrence of a Chlamydophila-like, a Parachlamydia-like and a variant of Chlamydophila psittaci in chickens. These results reveal the potential of 16SG PCR-HRM curve analysis for rapid and simultaneous detection and identification of Chlamydiaceae spp. in animals and demonstrate the capacity of this system for rapid identification of new Chlamydiaceae spp. in animals during routine diagnostic testings.

  1. Analysis of alternative keyboards using learning curves.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Allison M; Mirka, Gary A; Joines, Sharon M B; Kaber, David B

    2009-02-01

    To quantify learning percentages for alternative keyboards (chord, contoured split, Dvorak, and split fixed angle) and understand how physical, cognitive, and perceptual demand affect learning. Alternative keyboards have been shown to offer ergonomic benefits over the conventional, single-plane QWERTY keyboard design, but productivity-related challenges may hinder their widespread acceptance. Sixteen participants repeatedly typed a standard text passage using each alternative keyboard. Completion times were collected and subsequent learning percentages were calculated. Participants were asked to subjectively rate the physical, cognitive, and perceptual demands of each keyboard, and these values were then related to the calculated learning percentages. Learning percentage calculations revealed the percentage for the split fixed-angle keyboard (90.4%) to be significantly different (p < .05) from the learning percentages for the other three keyboards (chord, 77.3%; contour split, 76.9%; Dvorak, 79.1%). The average task completion time for the conventional QWERTY keyboard was 40 s, and the average times for the fifth trial on the chord, contoured split, Dvorak, and split fixed-angle keyboards were 346, 69, 181, and 42 s, respectively. Productivity decrements can be quickly regained for the split fixed-angle and contour split keyboard but will take considerably longer for Dvorak and chord keyboards. The split fixed-angle keyboard involved physical learning, whereas the others involved some combination of physical and cognitive learning, a result supported by the subjective responses. Understanding the changes in task performance time that come with learning can provide additional information for a cost-benefit analysis when considering the implementation of ergonomic interventions.

  2. Functional principal component analysis of H-reflex recruitment curves.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Kristof; Johnson, Samuel T; Hoffman, Mark A

    2011-04-30

    The primary purpose of this study was to use functional principal component analysis (FPCA) to analyze Hoffman-reflex (H-reflex) recruitment curves. Smoothed and interpolated recruitment curves from 38 participants were used for analysis. Standard methods were used to calculate three discrete variables (i.e., H(max)/M(max) ratio, H(th), H(slp)). FPCA was then used to extract principal component functions (PCFs) from the processed recruitment curves. PCF scores were calculated to determine how much each PCF contributed to an individuals' recruitment curve. The analysis extracted three PCFs, and three sets of PCF scores. Correlation analyses and systematic variation in the PCF scores indicated that the scores for the first PCF were primarily correlated to H-reflex threshold (H(th)) and that the scores for the second and third PCFs were correlated to H-reflex magnitude (H(max)/M(max) ratio) and slope (H(slp)), respectively. In addition, results from the FPCA indicated that the first PCF explained 56.0% of the variance between all H-reflex recruitment curves, whereas the second and third PCFs explained 24.1% and 13.0%, respectively. The high correlations indicate FPCA-derived PCFs capture similar physiological information as the standard discrete variables and suggest that application of FPCA to H-reflex recruitment curves could be used in future studies to complement traditional analyses that investigate excitability of the motoneuron pool. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cepheid light curve demography via Bayesian functional data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredo, Thomas J.; Hendry, Martin; Kowal, Daniel; Ruppert, David

    2016-01-01

    Synoptic time-domain surveys provide astronomers, not simply more data, but a different kind of data: large ensembles of multivariate, irregularly and asynchronously sampled light curves. We describe a statistical framework for light curve demography—optimal accumulation and extraction of information, not only along individual light curves as conventional methods do, but also across large ensembles of related light curves. We build the framework using tools from functional data analysis (FDA), a rapidly growing area of statistics that addresses inference from datasets that sample ensembles of related functions. Our Bayesian FDA framework builds hierarchical models that describe light curve ensembles using multiple levels of randomness: upper levels describe the source population, and lower levels describe the observation process, including measurement errors and selection effects. Roughly speaking, a particular object's light curve is modeled as the sum of a parameterized template component (modeling population-averaged behavior) and a peculiar component (modeling variability across the population), subsequently subjected to an observation model. A functional shrinkage adjustment to individual light curves emerges—an adaptive, functional generalization of the kind of adjustments made for Eddington or Malmquist bias in single-epoch photometric surveys. We describe ongoing work applying the framework to improved estimation of Cepheid variable star luminosities via FDA-based refinement and generalization of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation.

  4. Decision curve analysis revisited: overall net benefit, relationships to ROC curve analysis, and application to case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Decision curve analysis has been introduced as a method to evaluate prediction models in terms of their clinical consequences if used for a binary classification of subjects into a group who should and into a group who should not be treated. The key concept for this type of evaluation is the "net benefit", a concept borrowed from utility theory. Methods We recall the foundations of decision curve analysis and discuss some new aspects. First, we stress the formal distinction between the net benefit for the treated and for the untreated and define the concept of the "overall net benefit". Next, we revisit the important distinction between the concept of accuracy, as typically assessed using the Youden index and a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, and the concept of utility of a prediction model, as assessed using decision curve analysis. Finally, we provide an explicit implementation of decision curve analysis to be applied in the context of case-control studies. Results We show that the overall net benefit, which combines the net benefit for the treated and the untreated, is a natural alternative to the benefit achieved by a model, being invariant with respect to the coding of the outcome, and conveying a more comprehensive picture of the situation. Further, within the framework of decision curve analysis, we illustrate the important difference between the accuracy and the utility of a model, demonstrating how poor an accurate model may be in terms of its net benefit. Eventually, we expose that the application of decision curve analysis to case-control studies, where an accurate estimate of the true prevalence of a disease cannot be obtained from the data, is achieved with a few modifications to the original calculation procedure. Conclusions We present several interrelated extensions to decision curve analysis that will both facilitate its interpretation and broaden its potential area of application. PMID:21696604

  5. Droplet Array Platform for High-Resolution Melt Analysis of DNA Methylation Density.

    PubMed

    Athamanolap, Pornpat; Shin, Dong Jin; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2014-06-01

    High-resolution melting (HRM) has garnered significant interest as an analytical technique for a number of applications, including DNA methylation detection, due to its inherent sensitivity and robustness. In this study, we describe a miniaturized assay platform for quantitative methylation density analysis using a microfluidic droplet array cartridge. We demonstrate that the DNA methylation level of the RASSF1A promoter can be directly analyzed using HRM. PCR products were generated by amplifying bisulfite-treated DNA with varying CpG densities using CpG island-flanking primer sets. Subsequent HRM analysis on the miniaturized droplet platform shows distinct melting curve profiles associated with methylation levels, which was verified using a conventional benchtop PCR-HRM system. The characteristic melting temperature (Tm) of the PCR products was used to directly quantify the respective levels of DNA methylation density. Our approach provides a key advantage over current gold standard methods such as methylation-specific PCR (MSP), which are incapable of providing specific information regarding the overall methylation density of the target genes. The miniaturized platform establishes a practical approach to methylation density profiling from multiple DNA samples with a potential application in point-of-care diagnostics.

  6. Assessment of high resolution melting analysis as a potential SNP genotyping technique in forensic casework.

    PubMed

    Venables, Samantha J; Mehta, Bhavik; Daniel, Runa; Walsh, Simon J; van Oorschot, Roland A H; McNevin, Dennis

    2014-11-01

    High resolution melting (HRM) analysis is a simple, cost effective, closed tube SNP genotyping technique with high throughput potential. The effectiveness of HRM for forensic SNP genotyping was assessed with five commercially available HRM kits evaluated on the ViiA™ 7 Real Time PCR instrument. Four kits performed satisfactorily against forensically relevant criteria. One was further assessed to determine the sensitivity, reproducibility, and accuracy of HRM SNP genotyping. The manufacturer's protocol using 0.5 ng input DNA and 45 PCR cycles produced accurate and reproducible results for 17 of the 19 SNPs examined. Problematic SNPs had GC rich flanking regions which introduced additional melting domains into the melting curve (rs1800407) or included homozygotes that were difficult to distinguish reliably (rs16891982; a G to C SNP). A proof of concept multiplexing experiment revealed that multiplexing a small number of SNPs may be possible after further investigation. HRM enables genotyping of a number of SNPs in a large number of samples without extensive optimization. However, it requires more genomic DNA as template in comparison to SNaPshot®. Furthermore, suitably modifying pre-existing forensic intelligence SNP panels for HRM analysis may pose difficulties due to the properties of some SNPs.

  7. Defining the Iron-Rich Fe-Ni-S Melting Curve at 20GPa: Implications for Martian Core Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfoy, F. G.; Li, J.

    2016-12-01

    In 1997, the Mars Global Surveyor detected strong remnant magnetization of 4 Ga impact basins in the planet's southern highlands (Acuna et al. 1999), but the dearth of strongly magnetized rocks younger than 4 Ga in age is interpreted as evidence cataloging the death of an early Martian dynamo (Stevenson, 2001; Fassett 2011). In order to investigate the thermal evolution of the Martian core and assess the possibility of iron "snow" core crystallization to restart the dynamo, a series of multi-anvil experiments have been conducted to define the iron-rich liquidus of the Fe-Ni-S system at 20 GPa, the estimated pressure of the Martian core-mantle boundary (CMB), across its entire temperature range. Due to the fineness of features at high temperatures and low S concentrations, area analysis techniques, in additional to traditional electron microprobe analysis, were used to determine the composition of the experimental data. When fitted using an asymmetrical regular solution model, our data yields a liquidus that is significantly depressed when compared to calculations made assuming ideal behavior. Pronounced melting point depression at S contents corresponding to the likely composition of the Martian core means that the onset of crystallization will take much longer than previously thought. By comparing a calculated areotherm to liquidii interpolated between our experimental data and that from the literature, we find that the two intersect at the high-pressure end. Thus, the Martian core solidification is expected to begin at the center of planet and iron "snow" core crystallization is unlikely to occur within Mars .

  8. High resolution melting analysis for the differentiation of Mycobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Issa, Rahizan; Abdul, Hatijah; Hashim, Siti Hasmah; Seradja, Valentinus H; Shaili, Nurul 'Aishah; Hassan, Nurul Akma Mohd

    2014-10-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) followed by high resolution melting (HRM) analysis was developed for the differentiation of Mycobacterium species. Rapid differentiation of Mycobacterium species is necessary for the effective diagnosis and management of tuberculosis. In this study, the 16S rRNA gene was tested as the target since this has been identified as a suitable target for the identification of mycobacteria species. During the temperature gradient and primer optimization process, the melting peak (Tm) analysis was determined at a concentration of 50 ng DNA template and 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 µM primer. The qPCR assay for the detection of other mycobacterial species was done at the Tm and primer concentration of 62 °C and 0.4 µM, respectively. The HRM analysis generated cluster patterns that were specific and sensitive to distinguished small sequence differences of the Mycobacterium species. This study suggests that the 16S rRNA-based real-time PCR followed by HRM analysis produced unique cluster patterns for species of Mycobacterium and could differentiate the closely related mycobacteria species. © 2014 The Authors.

  9. Monitoring temperature with fluorescence during real-time PCR and melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Lindsay N; Wittwer, Carl T

    2013-03-01

    Accurate control of the sample temperature during thermal cycling is critical for successful polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Direct sensor contact with the reaction is problematic, forcing measurements external to the sample and compromising accuracy during rapid temperature transitions. The widespread use of fluorescence in real-time PCR and melting analysis suggests another measure of temperature, the intrinsic fluorescence of temperature-sensitive passive dyes. Calibration curves correlating sulforhodamine B fluorescence to temperature on nine real-time PCR instruments were obtained by heating at 0.018-0.1 °C/s between 50 and 95 °C, with a twofold change in fluorescence. After instrument stabilization for 20 min, no dye photobleaching was observed and thermal degradation was 2.2%/h at 80 °C. During cycling, solution temperatures derived from fluorescence were well matched to thermocouples placed within samples, but not to temperatures recorded by the instrument. Solution temperatures lagged instrument temperatures by up to 8 °C during cycling, often requiring 5-10 s at target temperatures for equilibration. Melting curves were displaced by 0.2-1.1 °C. Temperature inaccuracies were dependent on the instrument, the ramp rate, and the sample volume. The fluorescence of passive dyes can be used to accurately assess solution temperatures during PCR and should be particularly useful at fast cycling speeds.

  10. Testing Main Effects and Interactions in Latent Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Patrick J.; Bauer, Daniel J.; Willoughby, Michael T.

    2004-01-01

    A key strength of latent curve analysis (LCA) is the ability to model individual variability in rates of change as a function of 1 or more explanatory variables. The measurement of time plays a critical role because the explanatory variables multiplicatively interact with time in the prediction of the repeated measures. However, this interaction…

  11. Testing Main Effects and Interactions in Latent Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Patrick J.; Bauer, Daniel J.; Willoughby, Michael T.

    2004-01-01

    A key strength of latent curve analysis (LCA) is the ability to model individual variability in rates of change as a function of 1 or more explanatory variables. The measurement of time plays a critical role because the explanatory variables multiplicatively interact with time in the prediction of the repeated measures. However, this interaction…

  12. Real-time PCR/DNA melting curve-based assay to identify individual strongylid larvae recovered from ovine faecal cultures.

    PubMed

    Knight, Jacqueline S; Bisset, Stewart A

    2015-12-15

    A closed-tube real-time PCR (RT PCR) method was developed to identify individual strongylid nematode larvae recovered from ovine faecal cultures. The method builds on an earlier conventional PCR assay established by our group and similarly targets species-specific sequence motifs in the ITS-2 region of ribosomal DNA. The new procedure combines RT PCR with DNA melting curve analyses to identify species-specific amplicons, thus avoiding the need to undertake gel electrophoresis. As with the earlier method, it involves two sets of species-specific reactions. The first targets Haemonchus contortus, Teladorsagia circumcincta, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Nematodirus spathiger and Oesophagostomum venulosum while the second targets Trichostrongylus axei, Trichostrongylus vitrinis, Cooperia curticei and Chabertia ovina. With two exceptions, all the DNA primers employed in the new assay were among those described and tested in developing the earlier assay. The exceptions are the forward "generic" primer, which was re-designed to generate smaller amplicon sizes more suitable for melting curve analyses, and the T. axei-specific primer, which was modified to achieve a higher amplicon melt temperature to enable larvae of this species to be more readily differentiated from those of C. curticei. The melt temperature range for amplicons representing each of the species targeted was determined using lysates derived from both microscopically identified adult male worms (2-12/species), as well as 30 larvae of each of the species which were derived from at least 6 different geographical locations throughout New Zealand. The new assay potentially provides a simpler, faster method to identify individual ovine strongylid larvae for downstream applications than was provided by the earlier conventional PCR assay. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of Magnetization Curves and Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy of Uniaxial Ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhova, M. B.; Zhdanova, O. V.

    2017-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of the processes of magnetization of uniaxial ferromagnetic materials is performed within the Neel theory of magnetic phases. Relations are obtained for the constants of magnetic crystal anisotropy K 1, K 2, the form factor N, and the saturation magnetization I s , at which the magnetization curves exhibit jumps (FOMP). Formulas for computing the saturation fields H s and the jump fields H FOMP are derived for crystals with different types of magnetocrystalline anisotropy MCA. It is shown that the Sucksmith-Thompson method is applicable for computing the first too MCAconstants of uniaxial ferromagnets with any type of MCA. Constants K 1 and K 2 are computed with allowance for the form factor of the specimen. Model magnetization curves are plotted for uniaxial ferromagnets with different types of MCA along and perpendicularly to crystallographic axis c. The analytical results match the model curves well.

  14. SurvCurv database and online survival analysis platform update

    PubMed Central

    Ziehm, Matthias; Ivanov, Dobril K.; Bhat, Aditi; Partridge, Linda; Thornton, Janet M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Understanding the biology of ageing is an important and complex challenge. Survival experiments are one of the primary approaches for measuring changes in ageing. Here, we present a major update to SurvCurv, a database and online resource for survival data in animals. As well as a substantial increase in data and additions to existing graphical and statistical survival analysis features, SurvCurv now includes extended mathematical mortality modelling functions and survival density plots for more advanced representation of groups of survival cohorts. Availability and implementation: The database is freely available at https://www.ebi.ac.uk/thornton-srv/databases/SurvCurv/. All data are published under the Creative Commons Attribution License. Contact: matthias.ziehm@ebi.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26249811

  15. Determination of zircon/melt trace element partition coefficients from SIMS analysis of melt inclusions in zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J. B.; Bodnar, R. J.; Shimizu, N.; Sinha, A. K.

    2002-09-01

    Partition coefficients ( zircon/meltD M) for rare earth elements (REE) (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Dy, Er and Yb) and other trace elements (Ba, Rb, B, Sr, Ti, Y and Nb) between zircon and melt have been calculated from secondary ion mass spectrometric (SIMS) analyses of zircon/melt inclusion pairs. The melt inclusion-mineral (MIM) technique shows that D REE increase in compatibility with increasing atomic number, similar to results of previous studies. However, D REE determined using the MIM technique are, in general, lower than previously reported values. Calculated D REE indicate that light REE with atomic numbers less than Sm are incompatible in zircon and become more incompatible with decreasing atomic number. This behavior is in contrast to most previously published results which indicate D > 1 and define a flat partitioning pattern for elements from La through Sm. The partition coefficients for the heavy REE determined using the MIM technique are lower than previously published results by factors of ≈15 to 20 but follow a similar trend. These differences are thought to reflect the effects of mineral and/or glass contaminants in samples from earlier studies which employed bulk analysis techniques. D REE determined using the MIM technique agree well with values predicted using the equations of Brice (1975), which are based on the size and elasticity of crystallographic sites. The presence of Ce 4+ in the melt results in elevated D Ce compared to neighboring REE due to the similar valence and size of Ce 4+ and Zr 4+. Predicted zircon/meltD values for Ce 4+ and Ce 3+ indicate that the Ce 4+/Ce 3+ ratios of the melt ranged from about 10 -3 to 10 -2. Partition coefficients for other trace elements determined in this study increase in compatibility in the order Ba < Rb < B < Sr < Ti < Y < Nb, with Ba, Rb, B and Sr showing incompatible behavior (D M < 1.0), and Ti, Y and Nb showing compatible behavior (D M > 1.0). The effect of partition coefficients on melt evolution during

  16. High-resolution melt analysis of the minisatellite D1S80: a potential forensic screening tool.

    PubMed

    Pomeroy, Robert S; Balamurugan, Kuppareddi; Wong, Helena; Duncan, George

    2014-11-01

    High-resolution melt (HRM) analysis of the VNTR region of the human D1S80 locus, a 16-bp repeat minisatellite from approximately 400 to over 700 bp in length, was investigated. A Qiagen Rotor-Gene Q using the Type-it PCR HRM kit was used to acquire HRM curves for 14 single, and 16 biallelic, dsDNA samples. The HRM analysis was applicable over a range of DNA concentrations; however the characteristics of the melt curve did depend on the forward and reverse primer ratio. Despite the large amplicon size and the similarities of the repeat sequences, it was possible to discriminate different genotypes. Heterozygotes were clearly different from the homozygous variants and even small differences in the repeat sequence could be differentiated. However, the melt analysis requires a high-resolution system with temperature resolution of 0.02°C or better in order to sort out differences in these large amplicons of near identical GC content (in this case 56%). HRM analysis of amplicons with large repeat sequences can be used as a means of comparing DNA fragments. Examination of multiple sequences can be used to differentiate DNA samples and demonstrate the potential of HRM analysis as a rapid and inexpensive prescreening technique in forensic applications.

  17. PMAnalyzer: a new web interface for bacterial growth curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Daniel A; Edwards, Robert A

    2017-06-15

    Bacterial growth curves are essential representations for characterizing bacteria metabolism within a variety of media compositions. Using high-throughput, spectrophotometers capable of processing tens of 96-well plates, quantitative phenotypic information can be easily integrated into the current data structures that describe a bacterial organism. The PMAnalyzer pipeline performs a growth curve analysis to parameterize the unique features occurring within microtiter wells containing specific growth media sources. We have expanded the pipeline capabilities and provide a user-friendly, online implementation of this automated pipeline. PMAnalyzer version 2.0 provides fast automatic growth curve parameter analysis, growth identification and high resolution figures of sample-replicate growth curves and several statistical analyses. PMAnalyzer v2.0 can be found at https://edwards.sdsu.edu/pmanalyzer/ . Source code for the pipeline can be found on GitHub at https://github.com/dacuevas/PMAnalyzer . Source code for the online implementation can be found on GitHub at https://github.com/dacuevas/PMAnalyzerWeb . dcuevas08@gmail.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  18. Differentiation of Staphylococcus spp. by high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Slany, Michal; Vanerkova, Martina; Nemcova, Eva; Zaloudikova, Barbora; Ruzicka, Filip; Freiberger, Tomas

    2010-12-01

    High-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) is a fast (post-PCR) high-throughput method to scan for sequence variations in a target gene. The aim of this study was to test the potential of HRMA to distinguish particular bacterial species of the Staphylococcus genus even when using a broad-range PCR within the 16S rRNA gene where sequence differences are minimal. Genomic DNA samples isolated from 12 reference staphylococcal strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus capitis, Staphylococcus caprae, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staphylococcus hominis, Staphylococcus intermedius, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Staphylococcus sciuri, Staphylococcus simulans, Staphylococcus warneri, and Staphylococcus xylosus) were subjected to a real-time PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene in the presence of fluorescent dye EvaGreen™, followed by HRMA. Melting profiles were used as molecular fingerprints for bacterial species differentiation. HRMA of S. saprophyticus and S. xylosus resulted in undistinguishable profiles because of their identical sequences in the analyzed 16S rRNA region. The remaining reference strains were fully differentiated either directly or via high-resolution plots obtained by heteroduplex formation between coamplified PCR products of the tested staphylococcal strain and phylogenetically unrelated strain.

  19. Tiling analysis of melting in strongly-coupled dusty plasma*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suranga Ruhunusiri, W. D.; Feng, Yan; Liu, Bin; Goree, John

    2010-11-01

    A dusty plasma is an ionized gas containing micron-size particles of solid matter, which collect electrons and ions and become negatively charged. Due to large Coulomb interparticle potential energies, the microparticles represent a strongly-coupled plasma. In the absence of an external disturbance, the microparticles self-organize, arranging themselves in a crystalline lattice, due to their Coulomb interaction. If kinetic energy is added, the arrangement of microparticles becomes disordered, like atoms in a liquid. This melting process can be characterized by a proliferation of defects, which previous experimenters measured using Voronoi analysis. Here we use another method, tiling [1] to quantify defects. We demonstrate this method, which until now has been used only in simulations, in a dusty plasma experiment. A single layer of 4.83 μm polymer microparticles was electrically levitated in a glow discharge argon plasma. The lattice was melted by applying random kicks to the micoparticles from rastered laser beams. We imaged the particle positions and computed the corresponding tiling for both the crystalline lattice and liquid states. [1] Matthew A. Glaser, Phys. Rev A 41, 4585 (1990) ^*Work supported by NSF and NASA.

  20. [Utilization of high-resolution melting analysis to screen patients with neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency].

    PubMed

    Wen, Peng-qiang; Wang, Guo-bing; Chen, Zhan-ling; Cui, Dong; Liu, Xiao-hong; Ying, Li-fang; Song, Ping; Yuan, Quan; Chen, Shu-li; Liao, Jian-xiang

    2012-04-01

    To assess the feasibility of high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis for screening patients with neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency (NICCD). Based on previous studies on SLC25A13 gene in Chinese patients with NICCD, four hotspot mutations (851del4, 1638ins23, IVS6+5G>A and IVS16ins3kb) were selected. Results of the HRM analysis was validated using 50 negative controls and 20 patients with NICCD whose genotypes were confirmed previously by direct sequencing. With the established protocol, 171 suspected patients were enrolled. Samples with abnormal melting curves were further validated by DNA sequencing. HRM analysis can accurately determine the genotypes of all negative controls and patients. The sensitivity and specificity of the technique reached 100% (70/70). The melting curves of samples with the same genotype were highly reproducible. In 171 suspected patients, seven NICCD patients were detected by HRM. Identified mutations have included one case of 851del4 homozygote, one case of IVS6+5G>A heterozygote, 3 cases of 851del4 heterozygotes, one case of [IVS6+5G>A]+[ 851del4] and one case of [1638ins23+IVS16ins3kb]+[1638ins23]. All mutations were subsequently confirmed by DNA sequencing. HRM analysis is a convenient, high-throughput and rapid technique for the screening of NICCD patients.

  1. Determining the melting curves of NiSi using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell and the multi-anvil press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wann, E.; Lord, O. T.; Dobson, D. P.; Hunt, S. A.; Wood, I. G.; Vocadlo, L.; Ahmed, J.; Walker, A. M.; Santangeli, J. R.; Walter, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    It is believed that the cores of terrestrial planets consist primarily of an iron-nickel alloy with a small fraction of light elements1. In the case of the Earth, the possible candidates for the light elements are constrained by cosmochemical arguments2. However, although the exact nature of the light element is in dispute, it is widely believed that Si is a significant light element in the core3. Research into the iron-nickel-silicon ternary system is therefore invaluable for our understanding of the composition of the Earth's core and of planetary cores in general. We have initially focused on the FeSi and NiSi end-members as a first step in understanding the ternary system. Recent work on NiSi4,5 has revealed a more complicated phase diagram than that of FeSi, with a range of stable phases found at high pressure and temperature. In order to constrain the liquidus of NiSi, we have carried out experiments in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) using perturbations in the power versus temperature function as the melting criterion6. Thus far we have determined the melting curve of the room-pressure MnP structured phase to ~20 GPa, which agrees closely with an in situ multi-anvil press experiment in which the melting criteria were 1) the appearance of diffuse scattering during X-ray diffraction and 2) the appearance of convection during X-ray videography. We have also detected the break-in-slope of the melting curve associated with the MnP+ɛ-FeSi+liquid triple point, and extended the melting curve of the ɛ-FeSi structure of NiSi to 50 GPa. We are currently undertaking further experimental work to extend the melting curve above 100 GPa, beyond the pressure at which the CsCl structure becomes the liquid phase. Previous studies indicate that the CsCl structure is likely stable to inner core conditions4,5 making the results of relevance to planetary cores including that of the Earth. (1) Birch, F. Journal of Geophysical Research 1952, 57, 227. (2) Poirier, J. P

  2. Developmental trajectories of adolescent popularity: a growth curve modelling analysis.

    PubMed

    Cillessen, Antonius H N; Borch, Casey

    2006-12-01

    Growth curve modelling was used to examine developmental trajectories of sociometric and perceived popularity across eight years in adolescence, and the effects of gender, overt aggression, and relational aggression on these trajectories. Participants were 303 initially popular students (167 girls, 136 boys) for whom sociometric data were available in Grades 5-12. The popularity and aggression constructs were stable but non-overlapping developmental dimensions. Growth curve models were run with SAS MIXED in the framework of the multilevel model for change [Singer, J. D., & Willett, J. B. (2003). Applied longitudinal data analysis. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press]. Sociometric popularity showed a linear change trajectory; perceived popularity showed nonlinear change. Overt aggression predicted low sociometric popularity but an increase in perceived popularity in the second half of the study. Relational aggression predicted a decrease in sociometric popularity, especially for girls, and continued high-perceived popularity for both genders. The effect of relational aggression on perceived popularity was the strongest around the transition from middle to high school. The importance of growth curve models for understanding adolescent social development was discussed, as well as specific issues and challenges of growth curve analyses with sociometric data.

  3. High resolution melting analysis for identification of commercially-important Mytilus species.

    PubMed

    Jilberto, Felipe; Araneda, Cristián; Larraín, María Angélica

    2017-08-15

    Mytilus are edible mussels, including commercially-significant species such as M. chilensis, M. galloprovincialis and M. edulis. The scientific name of the species must be indicated on commercial products to satisfy labelling and traceability requirements. Species identification using morphological criteria is difficult due the plasticity of these characteristics and the absence of shells in processed products, and conventional PCR-based methods are laborious and time-intensive. As alternative, we propose high resolution melting (HRM) analysis as a simple tool to detect and identify SNP (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and length polymorphisms in Mytilus spp. We designed HRM-specific primers for the Mytilus genus to identify M. chilensis, M. galloprovincialis, M. edulis and their hybrids through clearly-distinguishable melting curves. HRM analysis showed high sensitivity (0.9639), specificity (1.0000) and precision (1.0000) compared to a conventional PCR-RFLP test. HRM is a fast and low cost method, being a reliable tool for species identification within the Mytilus genus.

  4. High resolution melting (HRM) analysis of DNA--its role and potential in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Druml, Barbara; Cichna-Markl, Margit

    2014-09-01

    DNA based methods play an increasing role in food safety control and food adulteration detection. Recent papers show that high resolution melting (HRM) analysis is an interesting approach. It involves amplification of the target of interest in the presence of a saturation dye by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequent melting of the amplicons by gradually increasing the temperature. Since the melting profile depends on the GC content, length, sequence and strand complementarity of the product, HRM analysis is highly suitable for the detection of single-base variants and small insertions or deletions. The review gives an introduction into HRM analysis, covers important aspects in the development of an HRM analysis method and describes how HRM data are analysed and interpreted. Then we discuss the potential of HRM analysis based methods in food analysis, i.e. for the identification of closely related species and cultivars and the identification of pathogenic microorganisms.

  5. Cancer mutation screening: Comparison of high-resolution melt analysis between two platforms.

    PubMed

    Ebili, Henry O; Ilyas, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution melt analysis (HRMA) is a cheap and reliable post-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) cancer mutation screening technique, which is fast gaining clinical relevance. The HRMA capabilities of the LightScanner (Idaho Technology) have been severally studied. However, the ABI 7500 HRM has not been tested against the purpose-built HRM instrument such as the LightScanner. DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded gastric cancer, colorectal cancer, and normal tissue as well as from colorectal cancer cell lines were amplified at exons 2, 3, and 4 of KRAS, and at exons 11 and 15 of BRAF in the ABI 7500 fast real-time PCR machine and subjected to melting both on the ABI and on the LightScanner. HRMA data were analysed with the ABI HRM software v2.0.1 and the LightScanner Call-IT 2.5. We tested the ABI 7500 HRM for internal precision, accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity at mutation screening relative to the LightScanner, using crude percentage concordance, kappa statistics, and the area under the receiver operator characteristics (AUROC) curve on SPSS version 19. The results show that the ABI 7500 HRMA has a high internal precision, and excellent concordance, sensitivity, and specificity at mutation screening compared with the LightScanner. However, in contrast to the LightScanner HRM software analysis, the ABI HRM software v.2.0.1, cannot distinguish real from certain pseudovariations in PCR amplicons that are sometimes brought about by the artefacts of the melting process. In conclusion, the ABI HRM has a comparable performance level with the LightScanner, although in certain respects mentioned previously, the LightScanner has an edge over the ABI.

  6. High-resolution melt PCR analysis for genotyping of Ureaplasma parvum isolates directly from clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Payne, Matthew S; Tabone, Tania; Kemp, Matthew W; Keelan, Jeffrey A; Spiller, O Brad; Newnham, John P

    2014-02-01

    Ureaplasma sp. infection in neonates and adults underlies a variety of disease pathologies. Of the two human Ureaplasma spp., Ureaplasma parvum is clinically the most common. We have developed a high-resolution melt (HRM) PCR assay for the differentiation of the four serovars of U. parvum in a single step. Currently U. parvum strains are separated into four serovars by sequencing the promoter and coding region of the multiple-banded antigen (MBA) gene. We designed primers to conserved sequences within this region for PCR amplification and HRM analysis to generate reproducible and distinct melt profiles that distinguish clonal representatives of serovars 1, 3, 6, and 14. Furthermore, our HRM PCR assay could classify DNA extracted from 74 known (MBA-sequenced) test strains with 100% accuracy. Importantly, HRM PCR was also able to identify U. parvum serovars directly from 16 clinical swabs. HRM PCR performed with DNA consisting of mixtures of combined known serovars yielded profiles that were easily distinguished from those for single-serovar controls. These profiles mirrored clinical samples that contained mixed serovars. Unfortunately, melt curve analysis software is not yet robust enough to identify the composition of mixed serovar samples, only that more than one serovar is present. HRM PCR provides a single-step, rapid, cost-effective means to differentiate the four serovars of U. parvum that did not amplify any of the known 10 serovars of Ureaplasma urealyticum tested in parallel. Choice of reaction reagents was found to be crucial to allow sufficient sensitivity to differentiate U. parvum serovars directly from clinical swabs rather than requiring cell enrichment using microbial culture techniques.

  7. High-resolution melting analysis (HRM) for differentiation of four major Taeniidae species in dogs Taenia hydatigena, Taenia multiceps, Taenia ovis, and Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Mansoureh; Mohammadi, Mohammad Ali; Rostami, Sima; Shamsaddini, Saeedeh; Mirbadie, Seyed Reza; Harandi, Majid Fasihi

    2016-07-01

    Tapeworms of the genus Taenia include several species of important parasites with considerable medical and veterinary significance. Accurate identification of these species in dogs is the prerequisite of any prevention and control program. Here, we have applied an efficient method for differentiating four major Taeniid species in dogs, i.e., Taenia hydatigena, T. multiceps, T. ovis, and Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto. High-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is simpler, less expensive, and faster technique than conventional DNA-based assays and enables us to detect PCR amplicons in a closed system. Metacestode samples were collected from local abattoirs from sheep. All the isolates had already been identified by PCR-sequencing, and their sequence data were deposited in the GenBank. Real-time PCR coupled with HRM analysis targeting mitochondrial cox1 and ITS1 genes was used to differentiate taeniid species. Distinct melting curves were obtained from ITS1 region enabling accurate differentiation of three Taenia species and E. granulosus in dogs. The HRM curves of Taenia species and E .granulosus were clearly separated at Tm of 85 to 87 °C. In addition, double-pick melting curves were produced in mixed infections. Cox1 melting curves were not decisive enough to distinguish four taeniids. In this work, the efficiency of HRM analysis to differentiate four major taeniid species in dogs has been demonstrated using ITS1 gene.

  8. Rapid Detection and Identification of Human Hookworm Infections through High Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ngui, Romano; Lim, Yvonne A. L.; Chua, Kek Heng

    2012-01-01

    Background Hookworm infections are still endemic in low and middle income tropical countries with greater impact on the socioeconomic and public health of the bottom billion of the world's poorest people. In this study, a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with high resolution melting-curve (HRM) analysis was evaluated for an accurate, rapid and sensitive tool for species identification focusing on the five human hookworm species. Methods Real-time PCR coupled with HRM analysis targeting the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA as the genetic marker was used to identify and distinguish hookworm species in human samples. Unique and distinct characteristics of HRM patterns were produced for each of the five hookworm species. The melting curves were characterized by peaks of 79.24±0.05°C and 83.00±0.04°C for Necator americanus, 79.12±0.10°C for Ancylostoma duodenale, 79.40±0.10°C for Ancylostoma ceylanicum, 79.63±0.05°C for Ancylostoma caninum and 79.70±0.14°C for Ancylostoma braziliense. An evaluation of the method's sensitivity and specificity revealed that this assay was able to detect as low as 0.01 ng/µl hookworm DNA and amplification was only recorded for hookworm positive samples. Conclusion The HRM assay developed in this study is a rapid and straightforward method for the diagnosis, identification and discrimination of five human hookworms. This assay is simple compared to other probe-based genotyping methods as it does not require multiplexing, DNA sequencing or post-PCR processing. Therefore, this method offers a new alternative for rapid detection of human hookworm species. PMID:22844538

  9. Rapid detection and identification of human hookworm infections through high resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Ngui, Romano; Lim, Yvonne A L; Chua, Kek Heng

    2012-01-01

    Hookworm infections are still endemic in low and middle income tropical countries with greater impact on the socioeconomic and public health of the bottom billion of the world's poorest people. In this study, a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with high resolution melting-curve (HRM) analysis was evaluated for an accurate, rapid and sensitive tool for species identification focusing on the five human hookworm species. Real-time PCR coupled with HRM analysis targeting the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA as the genetic marker was used to identify and distinguish hookworm species in human samples. Unique and distinct characteristics of HRM patterns were produced for each of the five hookworm species. The melting curves were characterized by peaks of 79.24±0.05°C and 83.00±0.04°C for Necator americanus, 79.12±0.10°C for Ancylostoma duodenale, 79.40±0.10°C for Ancylostoma ceylanicum, 79.63±0.05°C for Ancylostoma caninum and 79.70±0.14°C for Ancylostoma braziliense. An evaluation of the method's sensitivity and specificity revealed that this assay was able to detect as low as 0.01 ng/µl hookworm DNA and amplification was only recorded for hookworm positive samples. The HRM assay developed in this study is a rapid and straightforward method for the diagnosis, identification and discrimination of five human hookworms. This assay is simple compared to other probe-based genotyping methods as it does not require multiplexing, DNA sequencing or post-PCR processing. Therefore, this method offers a new alternative for rapid detection of human hookworm species.

  10. Identification of the GST-T1 and GST-M1 Null Genotypes using High Resolution Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Drobná, Zuzana; Del Razo, Luz Maria; Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo; Sánchez-Ramírez, Blanca; González-Horta, Carmen; Ballinas-Casarrubias, Lourdes; Loomis, Dana; Stýblo, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases, including GST-T1 and GST-M1, are known to be involved in the phase II detoxification pathways for xenobiotics as well as in the metabolism of endogenous compounds. Polymorphisms in these genes have been linked to an increased susceptibility to carcinogenesis and associated with risk factors that predispose to certain inflammatory diseases. In addition, GST-T1 and GST-M1 null genotypes have been shown to be responsible for interindividual variations in metabolism of arsenic, a known human carcinogen. To assess the specific GST genotypes in the Mexican population chronically exposed to arsenic, we have developed a multiplex High Resolution Melting PCR (HRM-PCR) analysis using LightCycler480 instrument. This method is based on analysis of the PCR product melting curve that discriminates PCR products according to their lengths and base sequences. Three pairs of primers that specifically recognize GST-T1, GST-M1, and β-globin, an internal control, to produce amplicons of different length were designed and combined with LightCycler480 High Resolution Melting Master Mix containing ResoLight, a completely saturating DNA dye. Data collected from melting curve analysis were evaluated using LightCycler480 software to determine specific melting temperatures of individual melting curves representing target genes. Using this newly developed multiplex HRM-PCR analysis we evaluated GST-T1 and GST-M1 genotypes in 504 DNA samples isolated from blood of individuals residing in Zimapan, Lagunera, and Chihuahua regions in Mexico. We found that Zimapan and Lagunera populations have similar GST-T1 and GST-M1 genotype frequencies which differ from Chihuahua population. In addition, 14 individuals have been identified as carriers of double null genotype, i.e. null genotypes in both GST-T1 and GST-M1 genes. Although this procedure does not distinguish between biallelic (+/+) and monoallelic (+/−) genotypes it can be used in an automated workflow as a simple

  11. Identification of the GST-T1 and GST-M1 null genotypes using high resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Drobná, Zuzana; Del Razo, Luz Maria; Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo; Sánchez-Ramírez, Blanca; González-Horta, Carmen; Ballinas-Casarrubias, Lourdes; Loomis, Dana; Stýblo, Miroslav

    2012-01-13

    Glutathione S-transferases, including GST-T1 and GST-M1, are known to be involved in the phase II detoxification pathways for xenobiotics as well as in the metabolism of endogenous compounds. Polymorphisms in these genes have been linked to an increased susceptibility to carcinogenesis and associated with risk factors that predispose to certain inflammatory diseases. In addition, GST-T1 and GST-M1 null genotypes have been shown to be responsible for interindividual variations in the metabolism of arsenic, a known human carcinogen. To assess the specific GST genotypes in the Mexican population chronically exposed to arsenic, we have developed a multiplex High Resolution Melting PCR (HRM-PCR) analysis using a LightCycler480 instrument. This method is based on analysis of the PCR product melting curve that discriminates PCR products according to their lengths and base sequences. Three pairs of primers that specifically recognize GST-T1, GST-M1, and β-globin, an internal control, to produce amplicons of different length were designed and combined with LightCycler480 High Resolution Melting Master Mix containing ResoLight, a completely saturating DNA dye. Data collected from melting curve analysis were evaluated using LightCycler480 software to determine specific melting temperatures of individual melting curves representing target genes. Using this newly developed multiplex HRM-PCR analysis, we evaluated GST-T1 and GST-M1 genotypes in 504 DNA samples isolated from the blood of individuals residing in Zimapan, Lagunera, and Chihuahua regions in Mexico. We found that the Zimapan and Lagunera populations have similar GST-T1 and GST-M1 genotype frequencies which differ from those of the Chihuahua population. In addition, 14 individuals have been identified as carriers of the double null genotype, i.e., null genotypes in both GST-T1 and GST-M1 genes. Although this procedure does not distinguish between biallelic (+/+) and monoallelic (+/-) genotypes, it can be used in an

  12. High-throughput identification and quantification of Candida species using high resolution derivative melt analysis of panfungal amplicons.

    PubMed

    Mandviwala, Tasneem; Shinde, Rupali; Kalra, Apoorv; Sobel, Jack D; Akins, Robert A

    2010-01-01

    Fungal infections pose unique challenges to molecular diagnostics; fungal molecular diagnostics consequently lags behind bacterial and viral counterparts. Nevertheless, fungal infections are often life-threatening, and early detection and identification of species is crucial to successful intervention. A high throughput PCR-based method is needed that is independent of culture, is sensitive to the level of one fungal cell per milliliter of blood or other tissue types, and is capable of detecting species and resistance mutations. We introduce the use of high resolution melt analysis, in combination with more sensitive, inclusive, and appropriately positioned panfungal primers, to address these needs. PCR-based amplification of the variable internal transcribed regions of the rDNA genes generates an amplicon whose sequence melts with a shape that is characteristic and therefore diagnostic of the species. Simple analysis of the differences between test and reference melt curves generates a single number that calls the species. Early indications suggest that high resolution melt analysis can distinguish all eight major species of Candida of clinical significance without interference from excess human DNA. Candida species, including mixed and novel species, can be identified directly in vaginal samples. This tool can potentially detect, count, and identify fungi in hundreds of samples per day without further manipulation, costs, or delays, offering a major step forward in fungal molecular diagnostics.

  13. Multi-wavelength analysis of Ellerman Bomb Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlender, M.; Berlicki, A.

    We present the results of a multi-wavelength photometric analysis of Ellerman Bomb (EB) observations obtained from the Dutch Open Telescope. In our data we have found 6 EBs located in the super-penumbra of the main spot in the active region NOAA 10781. We present light curves of EB observed in the Hα line centre and wing +0.7 Å, in the Ca II H line centre and wing~+2.35 Å, in the G-band and in the TRACE 1600 Å filter. We have shown that EBs were visible in the G-band and moreover, there was a good correlation between the light curves in the G-band and in the Hα line wings. We also found quasi-periodic oscillations of EBs brightness in the G-band, CaII H line and TRACE 1600 Å filter.

  14. Stress analysis in curved composites due to thermal loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, Jared Cornelius

    Many structures in aircraft, cars, trucks, ships, machines, tools, bridges, and buildings, consist of curved sections. These sections vary from straight line segments that have curvature at either one or both ends, segments with compound curvatures, segments with two mutually perpendicular curvatures or Gaussian curvatures, and segments with a simple curvature. With the advancements made in multi-purpose composites over the past 60 years, composites slowly but steadily have been appearing in these various vehicles, compound structures, and buildings. These composite sections provide added benefits over isotropic, polymeric, and ceramic materials by generally having a higher specific strength, higher specific stiffnesses, longer fatigue life, lower density, possibilities in reduction of life cycle and/or acquisition cost, and greater adaptability to intended function of structure via material composition and geometry. To be able to design and manufacture a safe composite laminate or structure, it is imperative that the stress distributions, their causes, and effects are thoroughly understood in order to successfully accomplish mission objectives and manufacture a safe and reliable composite. The objective of the thesis work is to expand upon the knowledge of simply curved composite structures by exploring and ascertaining all pertinent parameters, phenomenon, and trends in stress variations in curved laminates due to thermal loading. The simply curved composites consist of composites with one radius of curvature throughout the span of the specimen about only one axis. Analytical beam theory, classical lamination theory, and finite element analysis were used to ascertain stress variations in a flat, isotropic beam. An analytical method was developed to ascertain the stress variations in an isotropic, simply curved beam under thermal loading that is under both free-free and fixed-fixed constraint conditions. This is the first such solution to Author's best knowledge

  15. Magnetostatic interaction in soft magnetic bilayer ribbons unambiguously identified by first-order reversal curve analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, M.; Martínez-García, J. C.; Škorvánek, I.; Marcin, J.; Švec, P.; Gorria, P.

    2015-09-01

    Monolithic amorphous Fe73.5Nb3Si13.5B9Cu1/Fe74.5Nb3Si13.5B9 bilayer ribbons were obtained by double-nozzle melt-spinning and subsequently annealed to produce a composite with a tailored nano/micro-crystalline structure. The overall magnetic behavior is characterized by butterfly-shaped high field hysteresis loops and positively biased low field ones. The main questions we wish to address here are whether the global magnetic behavior of the bilayer can be separated into the individual contributions of each layer and the magneto-coupling between them can be well understood. For that purpose, we performed first-order reversal curve analysis, which enabled us to distinctly identify two phases, of ultra-soft and semi-soft magnetic natures, whose mutual predominant interaction is the magnetostatic coupling.

  16. High resolution melt analysis to track infections due to ribotype 027 Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Grando, Danilla; Said, Mohamed M; Mayall, Barrie C; Gurtler, Volker

    2012-05-01

    The increased prevalence of hypervirulent ribotype 027 Clostridium difficile requires rapid identification of isolates in order to implement timely infection control strategies. High resolution melt (HRM) analysis of PCR products can identify strain variation amongst genera of bacteria. The intergenic (16S-23S rDNA) spacer region contains sequence regions conserved within genera and other sequence region variables between species within genera. We wished to investigate whether HRM analysis of PCR ribotyping products could identify ribotype 027 C. difficile. Ribotyping was performed on 93 clinical isolates and five control strains and band patterns were analysed using GelCompar II (Applied Maths, USA). Real-time PCR using ribotyping primers was performed and normalised melt curves were generated. The HRM data was then imported into ScreenClust software (QIAGEN) to generate principal component analysis graphs depicting clustered relationships of strains. Ribotyping produced clear PCR bands for 88/98 isolates tested. Dendrograms generated by GelCompar showed a diversity of ribotype patterns amongst these 88 isolates with 18 groups identified with 70% homology. One clinical isolate showed 100% homology with the control 027 strains. ScreenClust analysis of the same 88 HRM results showed clustering of isolates, with 027 strains identifiable as a unique cluster. HRM analysis correctly identified the control 027 stains and the clinical isolate shown to be 027. HRM combined with ScreenClust analysis of real-time PCR products of the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region successfully identified ribotype 027 strains. For infection control purposes this was achieved within 2-3 h of colony isolation.

  17. Sex determination in highly fragmented human DNA by high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Sandoval, Brenda A; Manzanilla, Linda R; Montiel, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Sex identification in ancient human remains is a common problem especially if the skeletons are sub-adult, incomplete or damaged. In this paper we propose a new method to identify sex, based on real-time PCR amplification of small fragments (61 and 64 bp) of the third exon within the amelogenin gene covering a 3-bp deletion on the AMELX-allele, followed by a High Resolution Melting analysis (HRM). HRM is based on the melting curves of amplified fragments. The amelogenin gene is located on both chromosomes X and Y, showing dimorphism in length. This molecular tool is rapid, sensitive and reduces the risk of contamination from exogenous genetic material when used for ancient DNA studies. The accuracy of the new method described here has been corroborated by using control samples of known sex and by contrasting our results with those obtained with other methods. Our method has proven to be useful even in heavily degraded samples, where other previously published methods failed. Stochastic problems such as the random allele drop-out phenomenon are expected to occur in a less severe form, due to the smaller fragment size to be amplified. Thus, their negative effect could be easier to overcome by a proper experimental design.

  18. Efficient Method of Genotyping Ob/Ob Mice Using High Resolution Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Nichole; Spyropoulos, Demetri D.; Chavin, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Direct health care costs of obesity continue to grow throughout the world and research on obesity disease models are on the rise. The ob/ob mouse is a well-characterized model of obesity and associated risk factors. Successful breeding and backcrossing onto different backgrounds are essential to create knockout models. Ob/ob mice are sterile and heterozygotes must be identified by genotyping to maintain breeding colonies. Several methods are employed to detect the ob mutant allele, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Gel based methods are time consuming and inconsistent, and non-gel based assays rely upon expensive and complex reagents or instruments. A fast, high-throughput, cost effective, and consistent method to identify Lepob mutation is much needed. Design and Methods Primers to produce an amplicon for High Resolution Melting Analysis (HRM) of the Lepob SNP were designed and validated. Results Fluorescence normalized high resolution melting curve plots delineated ob/+, ob/ob, and WT genotypes. Genotypes were also confirmed phenotypically. Conclusions HRM of the Lepob SNP allows closed-tube identification of the Lepob mutation using a real-time PCR machine now common to most labs/departments. Advantages of this method include assay sensitivity/accuracy, low cost dyes, less optimization, and cost effectiveness as compared to other genotyping techniques. PMID:24236058

  19. Automated Microfluidic Platform for Serial Polymerase Chain Reaction and High-Resolution Melting Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Weidong; Bean, Brian; Corey, Scott; Coursey, Johnathan S; Hasson, Kenton C; Inoue, Hiroshi; Isano, Taisuke; Kanderian, Sami; Lane, Ben; Liang, Hongye; Murphy, Brian; Owen, Greg; Shinoda, Nobuhiko; Zeng, Shulin; Knight, Ivor T

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of an automated genetic analyzer for human sample testing based on microfluidic rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA). The integrated DNA microfluidic cartridge was used on a platform designed with a robotic pipettor system that works by sequentially picking up different test solutions from a 384-well plate, mixing them in the tips, and delivering mixed fluids to the DNA cartridge. A novel image feedback flow control system based on a Canon 5D Mark II digital camera was developed for controlling fluid movement through a complex microfluidic branching network without the use of valves. The same camera was used for measuring the high-resolution melt curve of DNA amplicons that were generated in the microfluidic chip. Owing to fast heating and cooling as well as sensitive temperature measurement in the microfluidic channels, the time frame for PCR and HRMA was dramatically reduced from hours to minutes. Preliminary testing results demonstrated that rapid serial PCR and HRMA are possible while still achieving high data quality that is suitable for human sample testing. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  20. High-resolution melt analysis without DNA extraction affords rapid genotype resolution and species identification.

    PubMed

    Rugman-Jones, Paul F; Stouthamer, Richard

    2016-09-22

    Extracting and sequencing DNA from specimens can impose major time and monetary costs to studies requiring genotyping, or identification to species, of large numbers of individuals. As such, so-called direct PCR methods have been developed enabling significant savings at the DNA extraction step. Similarly, real-time quantitative PCR techniques (qPCR) offer very cost-effective alternatives to sequencing. High-resolution melt analysis (HRM) is a qPCR method that incorporates an intercalating dye into a double-stranded PCR amplicon. The dye fluoresces brightly, but only when it is bound. Thus, after PCR, raising the temperature of the amplicon while measuring the fluorescence of the reaction results in the generation of a sequence-specific melt curve, allowing discrimination of genotypes. Methods combining HRM (or other qPCR methods) and direct PCR have not previously been reported, most likely due to concerns that any tissue in the reaction tube would interfere with detection of the fluorescent signal. Here, we couple direct PCR with HRM and, by way of three examples, demonstrate a very quick and cost-effective method for genotyping large numbers of specimens, using Rotor-Gene HRM instruments (QIAGEN). In contrast to the heated-block design of most qPCR/HRM instruments, the Rotor-Gene's centrifugal rotor and air-based temperature-regulation system facilitate our method by depositing tissues away from the pathway of the machine's fluorescence detection optics.

  1. Rapid detection and identification of four major Schistosoma species by high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Lin, RuiQing; Blair, David; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-11-01

    Schistosomiasis, caused by blood flukes belonging to several species of the genus Schistosoma, is a serious and widespread parasitic disease. Accurate and rapid differentiation of these etiological agents of animal and human schistosomiasis to species level can be difficult. We report a real-time PCR assay coupled with a high-resolution melt (HRM) assay targeting a portion of the nuclear 18S rDNA to detect, identify, and distinguish between four major blood fluke species (Schistosoma japonicum, Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma haematobium, and Schistosoma mekongi). Using this system, the Schistosoma spp. was accurately identified and could also be distinguished from all other trematode species with which they were compared. As little as 10(-5) ng genomic DNA from a Schistosoma sp. could be detected. This process is inexpensive, easy, and can be completed within 3 h. Examination of 21 representative Schistosoma samples from 15 geographical localities in seven endemic countries validated the value of the HRM detection assay and proved its reliability. The melting curves were characterized by peaks of 83.65 °C for S. japonicum and S. mekongi, 85.65 °C for S. mansoni, and 85.85 °C for S. haematobium. The present study developed a real-time PCR coupled with HRM analysis assay for detection and differential identification of S. mansoni, S. haematobium, S. japonicum, and S. mekongi. This method is rapid, sensitive, and inexpensive. It has important implications for epidemiological studies of Schistosoma.

  2. Sex Determination in Highly Fragmented Human DNA by High-Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Sandoval, Brenda A.; Manzanilla, Linda R.; Montiel, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Sex identification in ancient human remains is a common problem especially if the skeletons are sub-adult, incomplete or damaged. In this paper we propose a new method to identify sex, based on real-time PCR amplification of small fragments (61 and 64 bp) of the third exon within the amelogenin gene covering a 3-bp deletion on the AMELX-allele, followed by a High Resolution Melting analysis (HRM). HRM is based on the melting curves of amplified fragments. The amelogenin gene is located on both chromosomes X and Y, showing dimorphism in length. This molecular tool is rapid, sensitive and reduces the risk of contamination from exogenous genetic material when used for ancient DNA studies. The accuracy of the new method described here has been corroborated by using control samples of known sex and by contrasting our results with those obtained with other methods. Our method has proven to be useful even in heavily degraded samples, where other previously published methods failed. Stochastic problems such as the random allele drop-out phenomenon are expected to occur in a less severe form, due to the smaller fragment size to be amplified. Thus, their negative effect could be easier to overcome by a proper experimental design. PMID:25098828

  3. Dissection of the Hormetic Curve: Analysis of Components and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lushchak, Volodymyr I.

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between the dose of an effector and the biological response frequently is not described by a linear function and, moreover, in some cases the dose-response relationship may change from positive/adverse to adverse/positive with increasing dose. This complicated relationship is called “hormesis”. This paper provides a short analysis of the concept along with a description of used approaches to characterize hormetic relationships. The whole hormetic curve can be divided into three zones: I – a lag-zone where no changes are observed with increasing dose; II – a zone where beneficial/adverse effects are observed, and III – a zone where the effects are opposite to those seen in zone II. Some approaches are proposed to analyze the molecular components involved in the development of the hormetic character of dose-response relationships with the use of specific genetic lines or inhibitors of regulatory pathways. The discussion is then extended to suggest a new parameter (half-width of the hormetic curve at zone II) for quantitative characterization of the hormetic curve. The problems limiting progress in the development of the hormesis concept such as low reproducibility and predictability may be solved, at least partly, by deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying the hormetic dose-effect relationship. PMID:25249836

  4. Dissection of the hormetic curve: analysis of components and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2014-07-01

    The relationship between the dose of an effector and the biological response frequently is not described by a linear function and, moreover, in some cases the dose-response relationship may change from positive/adverse to adverse/positive with increasing dose. This complicated relationship is called "hormesis". This paper provides a short analysis of the concept along with a description of used approaches to characterize hormetic relationships. The whole hormetic curve can be divided into three zones: I - a lag-zone where no changes are observed with increasing dose; II - a zone where beneficial/adverse effects are observed, and III - a zone where the effects are opposite to those seen in zone II. Some approaches are proposed to analyze the molecular components involved in the development of the hormetic character of dose-response relationships with the use of specific genetic lines or inhibitors of regulatory pathways. The discussion is then extended to suggest a new parameter (half-width of the hormetic curve at zone II) for quantitative characterization of the hormetic curve. The problems limiting progress in the development of the hormesis concept such as low reproducibility and predictability may be solved, at least partly, by deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying the hormetic dose-effect relationship.

  5. A new approach to the analysis of Mira light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennessier, M. O.; Barthes, D.; Mattei, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Two different but complementary methods for predicting Mira luminosities are presented. One method is derived from a Fourier analysis, it requires performing deconvolution, and its results are not certain due to the inherent instability of deconvolution problems. The other method is a learning method utilizing artificial intelligence techniques where a light curve is presented as an ordered sequence of pseudocycles, and rules are learned by linking the characteristics of several consecutive pseudocycles to one characteristic of the future cycle. It is observed that agreement between these methods is obtainable when it is possible to eliminate similar false frequencies from the preliminary power spectrum and to improve the degree of confidence in the rules.

  6. Entropy analysis of pressure driven flow in a curved duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narla, V. K.; Jaliparthi, Vijayasekhar

    2017-07-01

    This paper aims to present a theoretical model describing entropy generation analysis using second law of thermodynamics. A two-dimensional, incompressible, viscous MHD fluid flow in a curved duct undergoing peristalsis with prescribed wall motions in the presence of heat transfer is applied and demonstrated. In this problem, It is assumed that the inertial effect is very small and the wall wave length is comparatively large with duct width. The velocity and temperature fields are obtained analytically by solving momentum and energy equations. The entropy generation number is calculated by utilizing velocity and temperature profiles. The influence of various physical parameters on entropy generation are discussed numerically with the help of graphs.

  7. A new approach to the analysis of Mira light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennessier, M. O.; Barthes, D.; Mattei, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Two different but complementary methods for predicting Mira luminosities are presented. One method is derived from a Fourier analysis, it requires performing deconvolution, and its results are not certain due to the inherent instability of deconvolution problems. The other method is a learning method utilizing artificial intelligence techniques where a light curve is presented as an ordered sequence of pseudocycles, and rules are learned by linking the characteristics of several consecutive pseudocycles to one characteristic of the future cycle. It is observed that agreement between these methods is obtainable when it is possible to eliminate similar false frequencies from the preliminary power spectrum and to improve the degree of confidence in the rules.

  8. Analysis of rotation curves in the framework of Rn gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigerio Martins, C.; Salucci, P.

    2007-11-01

    We present an analysis of a devised sample of rotation curves (RCs), with the aim of checking the consequences of a modified f(R) gravity on galactic scales. Originally motivated by the mystery of dark energy, this theory may explain the observed non-Keplerian profiles of galactic RCs in terms of a breakdown of Einstein general relativity. We show that, in general, the power-law f(R) version could fit the observations well, with reasonable values for the mass model parameters. This could encourage further investigation into Rn gravity from both observational and theoretical points of view.

  9. A visual basic spreadsheet macro for recession curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Posavec, Kristijan; Bacani, Andrea; Nakić, Zoran

    2006-01-01

    A Visual Basic program for an Excel spreadsheet was written to construct a master recession curve (MRC), using the adapted matching strip method, for recession analysis of ground water level time series. The program uses five different linear/nonlinear regression models to adjust individual recession segments to their proper positions in the MRC. The program can also be used to analyze the recession segments of other time series, such as daily stream discharge or stage. Some examples of field data from Croatia are used to illustrate the usefulness of its application.

  10. Analysis of melt ejection during long pulsed laser drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting-Zhong, Zhang; Zhi-Chao, Jia; Hai-Chao, Cui; De-Hua, Zhu; Xiao-Wu, Ni; Jian, Lu

    2016-05-01

    In pulsed laser drilling, melt ejection greatly influences the keyhole shape and its quality as well, but its mechanism has not been well understood. In this paper, numerical simulation and experimental investigations based on 304 stainless steel and aluminum targets are performed to study the effects of material parameters on melt ejection. The numerical method is employed to predict the temperatures, velocity fields in the solid, liquid, and vapour front, and melt pool dynamics of targets as well. The experimental methods include the shadow-graphic technique, weight method, and optical microscope imaging, which are applied to real-time observations of melt ejection phenomena, measurements of collected melt and changes of target mass, observations of surface morphology and the cross-section of the keyhole, respectively. Numerical and experimental results show that the metallic material with high thermal diffusivity like aluminum is prone to have a thick liquid zone and a large quantity of melt ejection. Additionally, to the best of our knowledge, the liquid zone is used to illustrate the relations between melt ejection and material thermal diffusivity for the first time. The research result in this paper is useful for manufacturing optimization and quality control in laser-material interaction. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. KYLX_0341) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61405147).

  11. Cusum analysis for learning curve of videothoracoscopic lobectomy

    PubMed Central

    Avcı, Alper; Türktan, Mediha

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Video assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) lobectomy has a demanding learning curve due to its technical complexity and risk of uncontrollable bleeding. We investigated the case number required for gaining technical proficiency by applying cumulative sum analysis on initial VATS lobectomy operations of a single surgeon. Methods CALGB definition was used for the definition of VATS lobectomy. The data of the initial cases evaluated and cumulative sum (CUSUM) analysis was applied to duration of the operations and length of hospital stay. Results Fifty-eight patients underwent VATS lobectomy. Of those 51 were malignant and 7 were benign. Fifty-five of the procedures were lobectomy, 2 were inferior bi-lobectomy and 1 was left upper lobectomy with chest wall resection. CUSUM analysis reached to proficiency at 27 cases for duration of the operations. Conclusions The length of learning curve depends on previous experience of the surgeon on open lobectomy and simpler VATS operations, potential number of VATS lobectomy cases and VATS capability of the surgeon. Depending on these factors, it is possible to obtain technical proficiency with an inferior number of procedures compared with existing literature (50-200). PMID:28352848

  12. First-order-reversal-curve analysis of Pr-Fe-B-based nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo, D. R.; Peixoto, T. R. F.; Reboh, S.; Fichtner, P. F. P.; de Franco, V. C.; Villas-Boas, V.; Missell, F. P.

    2010-04-01

    Ribbons of nominal composition (Pr9.5Fe84.5B6)0.96Cr0.01(TiC)0.03 were produced by arc-melting and melt-spinning the alloys on a Cu wheel. X-ray diffraction reveals two main phases, one based upon α-Fe and the other upon Pr2Fe14B. The ribbons show exchange spring behavior with Hc=12.5 kOe and (BH)max=13.6 MGOe when these two phases are well coupled. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the coupled behavior is observed when the microstructure consists predominantly of α-Fe grains (diameter ˜100 nm.) surrounded by hard material containing Pr2Fe14B. A first-order-reversal-curve (FORC) analysis was performed for both a well-coupled sample and a partially-coupled sample. The FORC diagrams show two strong peaks for both the partially-coupled sample and for the well-coupled material. In both cases, the localization of the FORC probability suggests demagnetizing interactions between particles. Switching field distributions were calculated and are consistent with the sample microstructure.

  13. FMRI Signal Analysis Using Empirical Mean Curve Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fan; Zhu, Dajiang; Lv, Jinglei; Guo, Lei; Liu, Tianming

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) time series is non-linear and composed of components at multiple temporal scales, which presents significant challenges to its analysis. In the literature, significant effort has been devoted into model-based fMRI signal analysis, while much less attention has been directed to data-driven fMRI signal analysis. In this paper, we present a novel data-driven multi-scale signal decomposition framework named Empirical Mean Curve Decomposition (EMCD). Targeted on functional brain mapping, the EMCD optimizes mean envelopes from fMRI signals and iteratively extracts coarser-to-finer scale signal components. The EMCD framework was applied to infer meaningful low-frequency information from Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) signals from resting state fMRI, task-based fMRI, and natural stimulus fMRI, and promising results are obtained. PMID:23047856

  14. Thermal expansivity, bulk modulus, and melting curve of H2O-ice VII to 20 GPa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fei, Yingwei; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Hemley, Russell J.

    1993-01-01

    Equation of state properties of ice VII and fluid H2O at high pressures and temperatures have been studied experimentally from 6 to 20 GPa and 300-700 K. The techniques involve direct measurements of the unit-cell volume of the solid using synchrotron X-ray diffraction with an externally heated diamond-anvil cell. The pressure dependencies of the volume and bulk modulus of ice VII at room temperature are in good agreement with previous synchrotron X-ray studies. The thermal expansivity was determined as a function of pressure and the results fit to a newly proposed phenomenological relation and to a Mie-Gruneisen equation of state formalism. The onset of melting of ice VII was determined directly by X-ray diffraction at a series of pressures and found to be in accord with previous volumetric determinations. Thermodynamic calculations based on the new data are performed to evaluate the range of validity of previously proposed equations of state for fluid water derived from static and shock-wave compression experiments and from simulations.

  15. Thermal expansivity, bulk modulus, and melting curve of H2O-ice VII to 20 GPa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fei, Yingwei; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Hemley, Russell J.

    1993-01-01

    Equation of state properties of ice VII and fluid H2O at high pressures and temperatures have been studied experimentally from 6 to 20 GPa and 300-700 K. The techniques involve direct measurements of the unit-cell volume of the solid using synchrotron X-ray diffraction with an externally heated diamond-anvil cell. The pressure dependencies of the volume and bulk modulus of ice VII at room temperature are in good agreement with previous synchrotron X-ray studies. The thermal expansivity was determined as a function of pressure and the results fit to a newly proposed phenomenological relation and to a Mie-Gruneisen equation of state formalism. The onset of melting of ice VII was determined directly by X-ray diffraction at a series of pressures and found to be in accord with previous volumetric determinations. Thermodynamic calculations based on the new data are performed to evaluate the range of validity of previously proposed equations of state for fluid water derived from static and shock-wave compression experiments and from simulations.

  16. Thermodynamic temperature assignment to the point of inflection of the melting curve of high-temperature fixed points.

    PubMed

    Woolliams, E R; Anhalt, K; Ballico, M; Bloembergen, P; Bourson, F; Briaudeau, S; Campos, J; Cox, M G; del Campo, D; Dong, W; Dury, M R; Gavrilov, V; Grigoryeva, I; Hernanz, M L; Jahan, F; Khlevnoy, B; Khromchenko, V; Lowe, D H; Lu, X; Machin, G; Mantilla, J M; Martin, M J; McEvoy, H C; Rougié, B; Sadli, M; Salim, S G R; Sasajima, N; Taubert, D R; Todd, A D W; Van den Bossche, R; van der Ham, E; Wang, T; Whittam, A; Wilthan, B; Woods, D J; Woodward, J T; Yamada, Y; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoon, H W; Yuan, Z

    2016-03-28

    The thermodynamic temperature of the point of inflection of the melting transition of Re-C, Pt-C and Co-C eutectics has been determined to be 2747.84 ± 0.35 K, 2011.43 ± 0.18 K and 1597.39 ± 0.13 K, respectively, and the thermodynamic temperature of the freezing transition of Cu has been determined to be 1357.80 ± 0.08 K, where the ± symbol represents 95% coverage. These results are the best consensus estimates obtained from measurements made using various spectroradiometric primary thermometry techniques by nine different national metrology institutes. The good agreement between the institutes suggests that spectroradiometric thermometry techniques are sufficiently mature (at least in those institutes) to allow the direct realization of thermodynamic temperature above 1234 K (rather than the use of a temperature scale) and that metal-carbon eutectics can be used as high-temperature fixed points for thermodynamic temperature dissemination. The results directly support the developing mise en pratique for the definition of the kelvin to include direct measurement of thermodynamic temperature.

  17. Analysis of velocity planning interpolation algorithm based on NURBS curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wanjun; Gao, Shanping; Cheng, Xiyan; Zhang, Feng

    2017-04-01

    To reduce interpolation time and Max interpolation error in NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline) inter-polation caused by planning Velocity. This paper proposed a velocity planning interpolation algorithm based on NURBS curve. Firstly, the second-order Taylor expansion is applied on the numerator in NURBS curve representation with parameter curve. Then, velocity planning interpolation algorithm can meet with NURBS curve interpolation. Finally, simulation results show that the proposed NURBS curve interpolator meet the high-speed and high-accuracy interpolation requirements of CNC systems. The interpolation of NURBS curve should be finished.

  18. Rapid identification of bovine mastitis pathogens by high-resolution melt analysis of 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Ajitkumar, Praseeda; Barkema, Herman W; De Buck, Jeroen

    2012-03-23

    Accurate identification of mastitis pathogens is often compromised when using conventional culture-based methods. Here, we report a novel, rapid assay tested for speciation of bacterial mastitis pathogens using high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA) of 16S rDNA sequences. Real-time PCR amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragment, spanning the variable region V5 and V6 was performed with a resulting amplicon of 290bp. First, a library was generated of melt curves of 9 common pathogens that are implicated in bovine mastitis. Six of the isolates, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus uberis, Staphylococcus aureus and Mycoplasma bovis, were type strains while the other 3, Arcanobacterium pyogenes, Corynebacterium bovis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae, were bovine mastitis field isolates. Four of the type strains, E. coli, S. agalactiae, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus, were found to be of human origin, while the other 3 type strains were isolated from bovine infections. Secondly, the melt curves and corresponding amplicon sequences of A. pyogenes, E. coli, S. agalactiae, S. dysgalactiae, K. pneumoniae, S. uberis and S. aureus were compared with 10 bovine mastitis field isolates of each pathogen. Based on the distinct differences in melt curves and sequences between human and bovine isolates of E. coli and K. pneumoniae, it was deemed necessary to select a set of bovine strains for these pathogens to be used as reference strains in the HRMA. Next, the HRMA was validated by three interpreters analyzing the differential clustering pattern of melt curves of 60 bacterial cultures obtained from mastitis milk samples. The three test interpreters were blinded to the culture and sequencing results of the isolates. Overall accuracy of the validation assay was 95% as there was difficulty in identifying the streptococci due to heterogeneity observed in the PCR amplicons of S. uberis. The present study revealed that broad-range real-time PCR with

  19. Optimized hyperbolic decline curve analysis of gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.

    1982-02-15

    Based on analyses of gas production from tight formations conducted for the Department of Energy's Western Gas Sands Project (WGSP) it has been found that, at least for this category of gas wells, significantly better results are obtained by using regression analysis to determine optimal values of the three hyperbolic decline function parameters. It is shown that the least-squares generalized hyperbolic decline model, as described, has the disadvantage of requiring starting values for the iteration and requiring more memory than is available in a handheld calculator. However, it was found that for analysis of gas wells producing from tight formations in the various Western basins, the improvement in the curve fit obtained by optimizing the decline exponent (as well as the other two hyperbolic parameters) justified the increased complication.

  20. Rapid discrimination between Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles arabiensis by High-Resolution Melt (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Zianni, Michael R; Nikbakhtzadeh, Mahmood R; Jackson, Bryan T; Panescu, Jenny; Foster, Woodbridge A

    2013-04-01

    There is a need for more cost-effective options to more accurately discriminate among members of the Anopheles gambiae complex, particularly An. gambiae and Anopheles arabiensis. These species are morphologically indistinguishable in the adult stage, have overlapping distributions, but are behaviorally and ecologically different, yet both are efficient vectors of malaria in equatorial Africa. The method described here, High-Resolution Melt (HRM) analysis, takes advantage of minute differences in DNA melting characteristics, depending on the number of incongruent single nucleotide polymorphisms in an intragenic spacer region of the X-chromosome-based ribosomal DNA. The two species in question differ by an average of 13 single-nucleotide polymorphisms giving widely divergent melting curves. A real-time PCR system, Bio-Rad CFX96, was used in combination with a dsDNA-specific dye, EvaGreen, to detect and measure the melting properties of the amplicon generated from leg-extracted DNA of selected mosquitoes. Results with seven individuals from pure colonies of known species, as well as 10 field-captured individuals unambiguously identified by DNA sequencing, demonstrated that the method provided a high level of accuracy. The method was used to identify 86 field mosquitoes through the assignment of each to the two common clusters with a high degree of certainty. Each cluster was defined by individuals from pure colonies. HRM analysis is simpler to use than most other methods and provides comparable or more accurate discrimination between the two sibling species but requires a specialized melt-analysis instrument and software.

  1. MeltMan: Optimization, Evaluation, and Universal Application of a qPCR System Integrating the TaqMan qPCR and Melting Analysis into a Single Assay

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Alexander; Černíková, Lenka; Vitásková, Eliška; Křivda, Vlastimil; Dán, Ádám; Dirbáková, Zuzana; Jiřincová, Helena; Procházka, Bohumír; Sedlák, Kamil; Havlíčková, Martina

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, we optimised and evaluated a qPCR system integrating 6-FAM (6-carboxyfluorescein)-labelled TaqMan probes and melting analysis using the SYTO 82 (S82) DNA binding dye in a single reaction. We investigated the influence of the S82 on various TaqMan and melting analysis parameters and defined its optimal concentration. In the next step, the method was evaluated in 36 different TaqMan assays with a total of 729 paired reactions using various DNA and RNA templates, including field specimens. In addition, the melting profiles of interest were correlated with the electrophoretic patterns. We proved that the S82 is fully compatible with the FAM-TaqMan system. Further, the advantages of this approach in routine diagnostic TaqMan qPCR were illustrated with practical examples. These included solving problems with flat or other atypical amplification curves or even false negativity as a result of probe binding failure. Our data clearly show that the integration of the TaqMan qPCR and melting analysis into a single assay provides an additional control option as well as the opportunity to perform more complex analyses, get more data from the reactions, and obtain analysis results with higher confidence. PMID:27031831

  2. MeltMan: Optimization, Evaluation, and Universal Application of a qPCR System Integrating the TaqMan qPCR and Melting Analysis into a Single Assay.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Alexander; Černíková, Lenka; Vitásková, Eliška; Křivda, Vlastimil; Dán, Ádám; Dirbáková, Zuzana; Jiřincová, Helena; Procházka, Bohumír; Sedlák, Kamil; Havlíčková, Martina

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, we optimised and evaluated a qPCR system integrating 6-FAM (6-carboxyfluorescein)-labelled TaqMan probes and melting analysis using the SYTO 82 (S82) DNA binding dye in a single reaction. We investigated the influence of the S82 on various TaqMan and melting analysis parameters and defined its optimal concentration. In the next step, the method was evaluated in 36 different TaqMan assays with a total of 729 paired reactions using various DNA and RNA templates, including field specimens. In addition, the melting profiles of interest were correlated with the electrophoretic patterns. We proved that the S82 is fully compatible with the FAM-TaqMan system. Further, the advantages of this approach in routine diagnostic TaqMan qPCR were illustrated with practical examples. These included solving problems with flat or other atypical amplification curves or even false negativity as a result of probe binding failure. Our data clearly show that the integration of the TaqMan qPCR and melting analysis into a single assay provides an additional control option as well as the opportunity to perform more complex analyses, get more data from the reactions, and obtain analysis results with higher confidence.

  3. WASP-14 b: transit timing analysis of 19 light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raetz, St.; Maciejewski, G.; Seeliger, M.; Marka, C.; Fernández, M.; Güver, T.; Göğüş, E.; Nowak, G.; Vaňko, M.; Berndt, A.; Eisenbeiss, T.; Mugrauer, M.; Trepl, L.; Gelszinnis, J.

    2015-08-01

    Although WASP-14 b is one of the most massive and densest exoplanets on a tight and eccentric orbit, it has never been a target of photometric follow-up monitoring or dedicated observing campaigns. We report on new photometric transit observations of WASP-14 b obtained within the framework of Transit Timing Variations @ Young Exoplanet Transit Initiative (TTV@YETI). We collected 19 light curves of 13 individual transit events using six telescopes located in five observatories distributed in Europe and Asia. From light-curve modelling, we determined the planetary, stellar, and geometrical properties of the system and found them in agreement with the values from the discovery paper. A test of the robustness of the transit times revealed that in case of a non-reproducible transit shape the uncertainties may be underestimated even with a wavelet-based error estimation methods. For the timing analysis, we included two publicly available transit times from 2007 and 2009. The long observation period of seven years (2007-2013) allowed us to refine the transit ephemeris. We derived an orbital period 1.2 s longer and 10 times more precise than the one given in the discovery paper. We found no significant periodic signal in the timing-residuals and, hence, no evidence for TTV in the system.

  4. Light Curve and Orbital Period Analysis of VX Lac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, M.; Nelson, R. H.; Şenavcı, H. V.; İzci, D.; Özavcı, İ.; Gümüş, D.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we performed simultaneously light curve and radial velocity, and also period analyses of the eclipsing binary system VX Lac. Four color (BVRI) light curves of the system were analysed using the W-D code. The results imply that VX Lac is a classic Algol-type binary with a mass ratio of q=0.27, of which the less massive secondary component fills its Roche lobe. The orbital period behaviour of the system was analysed by assuming the light time effect (LITE) from a third body. The O-C analysis yielded a mass transfer rate of dM/dt=1.86×10-8M⊙yr-1 and the minimal mass of the third body to be M3=0.31M⊙. The residuals from mass transfer and the third body were also analysed because another cyclic variation is seen in O-C diagram. This periodic variation was examined under the hypotheses of stellar magnetic activity and fourth body.

  5. High Resolution Melting Analysis Is a More Sensitive and Effective Alternative to Gel-Based Platforms in Analysis of SSR – An Example in Citrus

    PubMed Central

    Distefano, Gaetano; Caruso, Marco; La Malfa, Stefano; Gentile, Alessandra; Wu, Shu-Biao

    2012-01-01

    High resolution melting curve analysis (HRM) has been used as an efficient, accurate and cost-effective tool to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or insertions or deletions (INDELs). However, its efficiency, accuracy and applicability to discriminate microsatellite polymorphism have not been extensively assessed. The traditional protocols used for SSR genotyping include PCR amplification of the DNA fragment and the separation of the fragments on electrophoresis-based platform. However, post-PCR handling processes are laborious and costly. Furthermore, SNPs present in the sequences flanking repeat motif cannot be detected by polyacrylamide-gel-electrophoresis based methods. In the present study, we compared the discriminating power of HRM with the traditional electrophoresis-based methods and provided a panel of primers for HRM genotyping in Citrus. The results showed that sixteen SSR markers produced distinct polymorphic melting curves among the Citrus spp investigated through HRM analysis. Among those, 10 showed more genotypes by HRM analysis than capillary electrophoresis owing to the presence of SNPs in the amplicons. For the SSR markers without SNPs present in the flanking region, HRM also gave distinct melting curves which detected same genotypes as were shown in capillary electrophoresis (CE) analysis. Moreover, HRM analysis allowed the discrimination of most of the 15 citrus genotypes and the resulting genetic distance analysis clustered them into three main branches. In conclusion, it has been approved that HRM is not only an efficient and cost-effective alternative of electrophoresis-based method for SSR markers, but also a method to uncover more polymorphisms contributed by SNPs present in SSRs. It was therefore suggested that the panel of SSR markers could be used in a variety of applications in the citrus biodiversity and breeding programs using HRM analysis. Furthermore, we speculate that the HRM analysis can be employed to analyse SSR

  6. High resolution melting analysis is a more sensitive and effective alternative to gel-based platforms in analysis of SSR--an example in citrus.

    PubMed

    Distefano, Gaetano; Caruso, Marco; La Malfa, Stefano; Gentile, Alessandra; Wu, Shu-Biao

    2012-01-01

    High resolution melting curve analysis (HRM) has been used as an efficient, accurate and cost-effective tool to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or insertions or deletions (INDELs). However, its efficiency, accuracy and applicability to discriminate microsatellite polymorphism have not been extensively assessed. The traditional protocols used for SSR genotyping include PCR amplification of the DNA fragment and the separation of the fragments on electrophoresis-based platform. However, post-PCR handling processes are laborious and costly. Furthermore, SNPs present in the sequences flanking repeat motif cannot be detected by polyacrylamide-gel-electrophoresis based methods. In the present study, we compared the discriminating power of HRM with the traditional electrophoresis-based methods and provided a panel of primers for HRM genotyping in Citrus. The results showed that sixteen SSR markers produced distinct polymorphic melting curves among the Citrus spp investigated through HRM analysis. Among those, 10 showed more genotypes by HRM analysis than capillary electrophoresis owing to the presence of SNPs in the amplicons. For the SSR markers without SNPs present in the flanking region, HRM also gave distinct melting curves which detected same genotypes as were shown in capillary electrophoresis (CE) analysis. Moreover, HRM analysis allowed the discrimination of most of the 15 citrus genotypes and the resulting genetic distance analysis clustered them into three main branches. In conclusion, it has been approved that HRM is not only an efficient and cost-effective alternative of electrophoresis-based method for SSR markers, but also a method to uncover more polymorphisms contributed by SNPs present in SSRs. It was therefore suggested that the panel of SSR markers could be used in a variety of applications in the citrus biodiversity and breeding programs using HRM analysis. Furthermore, we speculate that the HRM analysis can be employed to analyse SSR

  7. A new method for detection and discrimination of Pepino mosaic virus isolates using high resolution melting analysis of the triple gene block 3.

    PubMed

    Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata; Komorowska, Beata

    2013-10-01

    Diagnostic methods distinguished different Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) genotypes but the methods do not detect sequence variation in particular gene segments. The necrotic and non-necrotic isolates (pathotypes) of PepMV share a 99% sequence similarity. These isolates differ from each other at one nucleotide site in the triple gene block 3. In this study, a combination of real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and high resolution melting curve analysis of triple gene block 3 was developed for simultaneous detection and differentiation of PepMV pathotypes. The triple gene block 3 region carrying a transition A → G was amplified using two primer pairs from twelve virus isolates, and was subjected to high resolution melting curve analysis. The results showed two distinct melting curve profiles related to each pathotype. The results also indicated that the high resolution melting method could readily differentiate between necrotic and non-necrotic PepMV pathotypes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Concentrated photovoltaics system costs and learning curve analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haysom, Joan E.; Jafarieh, Omid; Anis, Hanan; Hinzer, Karin

    2013-09-01

    An extensive set of costs in /W for the installed costs of CPV systems has been amassed from a range of public sources, including both individual company prices and market reports. Cost reductions over time are very evident, with current prices for 2012 in the range of 3.0 ± 0.7 /W and a predicted cost of 1.5 /W for 2020. Cost data is combined with deployment volumes in a learning curve analysis, providing a fitted learning rate of either 18.5% or 22.3% depending on the methodology. This learning rate is compared to that of PV modules and PV installed systems, and the influence of soft costs is discussed. Finally, if an annual growth rate of 39% is assumed for deployed volumes, then, using the learning rate of 20%, this would predict the achievement of a cost point of 1.5 /W by 2016.

  9. Analysis of melting of pyrope compound at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. P.; Singh, K. S.

    2012-02-01

    The pressure-volume-temperature relationships have been studied for the pyrope mineral. Values of volumes at simultaneously elevated temperatures and pressures have been evaluated using the Rydberg-Vinet equation of state for isothermal compression and the Singh-Suzuki equation for isobaric thermal expansion. It has been found that the results obtained from these two conventional equations can be reproduced very well by a single equation of state which covers both temperature and pressure changes in solids namely the Hartmann equation of state. Values of volumes at melting temperatures corresponding to elevated pressures have been obtained and found to compare well with the experimental values. It is also found that there exists a simple linear relationship between relative change in melting volume and melting temperature in case of pyrope at different pressures. This is supported by the earlier findings of Anderson in case of forsterite mineral.

  10. Learning curve analysis of mitral valve repair using telemanipulative technology.

    PubMed

    Charland, Patrick J; Robbins, Tom; Rodriguez, Evilio; Nifong, Wiley L; Chitwood, Randolph W

    2011-08-01

    To determine if the time required to perform mitral valve repairs using telemanipulation technology decreases with experience and how that decrease is influenced by patient and procedure variables. A single-center retrospective review was conducted using perioperative and outcomes data collected contemporaneously on 458 mitral valve repair surgeries using telemanipulative technology. A regression model was constructed to assess learning with this technology and predict total robot time using multiple predictive variables. Statistical analysis was used to determine if models were significantly useful, to rule out correlation between predictor variables, and to identify terms that did not contribute to the prediction of total robot time. We found a statistically significant learning curve (P < .01). The institutional learning percentage∗ derived from total robot times† for the first 458 recorded cases of mitral valve repair using telemanipulative technology is 95% (R(2) = .40). More than one third of the variability in total robot time can be explained through our model using the following variables: type of repair (chordal procedures, ablations, and leaflet resections), band size, use of clips alone in band implantation, and the presence of a fellow at bedside (P < .01). Learning in mitral valve repair surgery using telemanipulative technology occurs at the East Carolina Heart Institute according to a logarithmic curve, with a learning percentage of 95%. From our regression output, we can make an approximate prediction of total robot time using an additive model. These metrics can be used by programs for benchmarking to manage the implementation of this new technology, as well as for capacity planning, scheduling, and capital budget analysis. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of spatial location on the timing of the snow accumulation and melt in the Sierra Nevada: An analysis with FANOVA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, E.; Meiring, W.; Dozier, J.

    2015-12-01

    In California, snow represents one of the primary water resources. California precipitation occurs predominately in the winter and spring months, whereas the summer and fall generally are dry. Variation in the timing of snowpack accumulation and melt in the Sierra Nevada can be quantified through statistical curve registration summaries of seasonal cycle variation in daily snow pillow records. This procedure provides a set of functional sample observations that may be used to study the characteristics that influence the timing of snowpack events. Using functional analysis of variance, we investigate differences in the timing of snowpack accumulation and melt associated with spatial location attributes.

  12. Bifurcation analysis of an automobile model negotiating a curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Rossa, Fabio; Mastinu, Giampiero; Piccardi, Carlo

    2012-10-01

    The paper deals with the bifurcation analysis of a rather simple model describing an automobile negotiating a curve. The mechanical model has two degrees of freedom and the related equations of motion contain the nonlinear tyre characteristics. Bifurcation analysis is adopted as the proper procedure for analysing steady-state cornering. Two independent parameters referring to running conditions, namely steering angle and speed, are varied. Ten different combinations of front and rear tyre characteristics (featuring understeer or oversteer automobiles) are considered for the bifurcation analysis. Many different dynamical behaviours of the model are obtained by slightly varying the parameters describing the tyre characteristics. Both simple and extremely complex bifurcations may occur. Homoclinic bifurcations, stable and unstable limit cycles (of considerable amplitude) are found, giving a sound and ultimate interpretation to some actual (rare but very dangerous) dynamic behaviours of automobiles, as reported by professional drivers. The presented results are cross-validated by exploiting handling diagram theory. The knowledge of the derived set of bifurcations is dramatically important to fully understand the actual vehicle yaw motions occurring while running on an even surface. Such a knowledge is a pre-requisite for robustly designing the chassis and for enhancing the active safety of vehicles.

  13. Analysis of selected Kepler Mission planetary light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, M. D.; Budding, E.

    2014-06-01

    We have modified the graphical user interfaced close binary system analysis program CurveFit to the form WinKepler and applied it to 16 representative planetary candidate light curves found in the NASA Exoplanet Archive (NEA) at the Caltech website http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu, with an aim to compare different analytical approaches. WinKepler has parameter options for a realistic physical model, including gravity-brightening and structural parameters derived from the relevant Radau equation. We tested our best-fitting parameter-sets for formal determinacy and adequacy. A primary aim is to compare our parameters with those listed in the NEA. Although there are trends of agreement, small differences in the main parameter values are found in some cases, and there may be some relative bias towards a 90∘ value for the NEA inclinations. These are assessed against realistic error estimates. Photometric variability from causes other than planetary transits affects at least 6 of the data-sets studied; with small pulsational behaviour found in 3 of those. For the false positive KOI 4.01, we found that the eclipses could be modelled by a faint background classical Algol as effectively as by a transiting exoplanet. Our empirical checks of limb-darkening, in the cases of KOI 1.01 and 12.01, revealed that the assigned stellar temperatures are probably incorrect. For KOI 13.01, our empirical mass-ratio differs by about 7 % from that of Mislis and Hodgkin (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 422:1512, 2012), who neglected structural effects and higher order terms in the tidal distortion. Such detailed parameter evaluation, additional to the usual main geometric ones, provides an additional objective for this work.

  14. High Resolution Melting Analysis: A Rapid and Accurate Method to Detect CALR Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Melania; Torres, Laura; Santana-Lopez, Gonzalo; Rodriguez-Medina, Carlos; Perera, María; Bellosillo, Beatriz; de la Iglesia, Silvia; Molero, Teresa; Gomez-Casares, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent discovery of CALR mutations in essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) patients without JAK2/MPL mutations has emerged as a relevant finding for the molecular diagnosis of these myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). We tested the feasibility of high-resolution melting (HRM) as a screening method for rapid detection of CALR mutations. Methods CALR was studied in wild-type JAK2/MPL patients including 34 ET, 21 persistent thrombocytosis suggestive of MPN and 98 suspected secondary thrombocytosis. CALR mutation analysis was performed through HRM and Sanger sequencing. We compared clinical features of CALR-mutated versus 45 JAK2/MPL-mutated subjects in ET. Results Nineteen samples showed distinct HRM patterns from wild-type. Of them, 18 were mutations and one a polymorphism as confirmed by direct sequencing. CALR mutations were present in 44% of ET (15/34), 14% of persistent thrombocytosis suggestive of MPN (3/21) and none of the secondary thrombocytosis (0/98). Of the 18 mutants, 9 were 52 bp deletions, 8 were 5 bp insertions and other was a complex mutation with insertion/deletion. No mutations were found after sequencing analysis of 45 samples displaying wild-type HRM curves. HRM technique was reproducible, no false positive or negative were detected and the limit of detection was of 3%. Conclusions This study establishes a sensitive, reliable and rapid HRM method to screen for the presence of CALR mutations. PMID:25068507

  15. Rapid identification of Borrelia by high resolution melting analysis of the groEL gene.

    PubMed

    Koś, Władysław; Wodecka, Beata; Anklewicz, Marek; Skotarczak, Bogumiła

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the possibility of applying a new diagnostic method, high resolution analysis of DNA denaturation curve (high resolution melting - HRM), for identification of Borrelia species. DNA samples were obtained from Ixodes ricinus ticks collected from vegetation and removed from hunted roe deer. For differentiation of Borrelia species, the HRM protocol based on the analysis of the groEL gene was applied. A product characteristic for Borrelia was obtained in 19/123 samples (15.4%). The studied isolates were classified as four species: B. garinii, B. valaisiana, B. afzelii and B. miyamotoi. Two separate groups of isolates within the B. afzelii species were also found. The results show that the groEL gene is useful for rapid differentiation of B. burgdorferi sensu lato with the HRM method from different extracts of DNA and it also allows precise differentiation of Borrelia species and strains. The HRM method shortened and simplified detection and differentiation of Borrelia species from different biological sources.

  16. Hybrid analytical technique for the nonlinear analysis of curved beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Andersen, C. M.

    1992-01-01

    The application of a two-step hybrid technique to the geometrically nonlinear analysis of curved beams is used to demonstrate the potential of hybrid analytical techniques in nonlinear structural mechanics. The hybrid technique is based on successive use of the perturbation method and a classical direct variational procedure. The functions associated with the various-order terms in the perturbation expansion of the fundamental unknowns, and their sensitivity derivatives with respect to material and geometric parameters of the beam, are first obtained by using the perturbation method. These functions are selected as coordinate functions (or modes) and the classical direct variational technique is then used to compute their amplitudes. The potential of the proposed hybrid technique for nonlinear analysis of structures is discussed. The effectiveness of the hybrid technique is demonstrated by means of numerical examples. The symbolic computation system Mathematica is used in the present study. The tasks performed on Mathematica include: (1) generation of algebraic expressions for the perturbation functions of the different response quantities and their sensitivity derivatives: and (2) determination of the radius of convergence of the perturbation series.

  17. Simultaneous Profiling of DNA Mutation and Methylation by Melting Analysis Using Magnetoresistive Biosensor Array.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Lee, Jung-Rok; Dahl, Christina; Guldberg, Per; Dufva, Martin; Wang, Shan X; Hansen, Mikkel F

    2017-09-13

    Epigenetic modifications, in particular DNA methylation, are gaining increasing interest as complementary information to DNA mutations for cancer diagnostics and prognostics. We introduce a method to simultaneously profile DNA mutation and methylation events for an array of sites with single site specificity. Genomic (mutation) or bisulphite-treated (methylation) DNA is amplified using nondiscriminatory primers, and the amplicons are then hybridized to a giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor array followed by melting curve measurements. The GMR biosensor platform offers scalable multiplexed detection of DNA hybridization, which is insensitive to temperature variation. The melting curve approach further enhances the assay specificity and tolerance to variations in probe length. We demonstrate the utility of this method by simultaneously profiling five mutation and four methylation sites in human melanoma cell lines. The method correctly identified all mutation and methylation events and further provided quantitative assessment of methylation density validated by bisulphite pyrosequencing.

  18. Light curve analysis of southern eclipsing binary EM Car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćiçek, C.; Bulut, I.; Bulut, A.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, ASAS light curve of the eclipsing binary EM Car (Sp = O8V, P = 3.4 days) has been analyzed using the Wilson-Devinney method. The light curve analyses have found that EM Car is a detached eclipsing binary system with small eccentric orbit

  19. Multivariate data analysis for finding the relevant fatty acids contributing to the melting fractions of cream.

    PubMed

    Buldo, Patrizia; Larsen, Mette K; Wiking, Lars

    2013-05-01

    The melting behaviour and fatty acid composition of cream from a total of 33 cows from four farms were analysed. Multivariate data analysis was used to identify the fatty acids that contributed most to the melting points and to differentiate between creams from different practical feeding regimes. It was demonstrated that the melting point of the medium melting fraction of milk fat was positively correlated with palmitic acid (C16:0), whereas it was negatively correlated with oleic acid (C18:1 cis9), conjugated linoleic acid (CLA cis9 trans11), vaccenic acid (C18:1 trans11), elaic acid (C18:1 trans9) and myristoleic acid (C14:1). The melting points of the high melting fractions could not be related to the fatty acid composition. Addition of palmitic acid-based fat supplement to the feeding ration in combination with a lower forage intake increased the amount of C16:0 and palmitoleic acid (C16:1) in milk fat, whereas it decreased the amount of stearic acid (C18:0) and C18:1 trans fatty acid. Average data on the melting behaviour of cream separated the farms into two groups where the main differences in feeding were the amounts of maize silage and rapeseed cake used. Multivariate analysis of data from individual cows identified the most relevant fatty acids contributing to the melting point of the medium melting fraction of cream. The fatty acid composition of milk fat could differentiate cream from different feeding strategies; however, owing to individual cow variation, it was not possible to extract clear correlations between feeding regime and melting behaviour of cream. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Impact of fixation artifacts and threshold selection on high resolution melting analysis for KRAS mutation screening.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Báez, Wendy; García-Latorre, Ethel A; Maldonado-Martínez, Héctor Aquiles; Coronado-Martínez, Iris; Flores-García, Leonardo; Taja-Chayeb, Lucía

    2017-10-01

    Treatment in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has expanded with monoclonal antibodies targeting epidermal growth factor receptor, but is restricted to patients with a wild-type (WT) KRAS mutational status. The most sensitive assays for KRAS mutation detection in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues are based on real-time PCR. Among them, high resolution melting analysis (HRMA), is a simple, fast, highly sensitive, specific and cost-effective method, proposed as adjunct for KRAS mutation detection. However the method to categorize WT vs mutant sequences in HRMA is not clearly specified in available studies, besides the impact of FFPE artifacts on HRMA performance hasn't been addressed either. Avowedly adequate samples from 104 consecutive mCRC patients were tested for KRAS mutations by Therascreen™ (FDA Validated test), HRMA, and HRMA with UDG pre-treatment to reverse FFPE fixation artifacts. Comparisons of KRAS status allocation among the three methods were done. Focusing on HRMA as screening test, ROC curve analyses were performed for HRMA and HMRA-UDG against Therascreen™, in order to evaluate their discriminative power and to determine the threshold of profile concordance between WT control and sample for KRAS status determination. Comparing HRMA and HRMA-UDG against Therascreen™ as surrogate gold standard, sensitivity was 1 for both HRMA and HRMA-UDG; and specificity and positive predictive values were respectively 0.838 and 0.939; and 0.777 and 0.913. As evaluated by the McNemar test, HRMA-UDG allocated samples to a WT/mutated genotype in a significatively different way from HRMA (p > 0.001). On the other hand HRMA-UDG did not differ from Therascreen™ (p = 0.125). ROC-curve analysis showed a significant discriminative power for both HRMA and HRMA-UDG against Therascreen™ (respectively, AUC of 0.978, p > 0.0001, CI 95% 0.957-0.999; and AUC of 0.98, p > 0.0001, CI 95% 0.000-1.0). For HRMA as a screening tool, the best threshold

  1. Three-Dimensional Postbuckling Analysis of Curved Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, P. Frank; Lee, Seung-Yoon

    2002-01-01

    Presented here is a method of solving highly flexible curved beam undergoing huge static or quasi-static deformations. A geometrically exact beam theory based on the use of Jaumann stresses and strains and exact coordinate transformation is presented in terms of 17 first-order ordinary differential equations, and a multiple shooting method is used to solve the corresponding nonlinear two-point boundary value problems. The geometrically exact beam theory accounts far large rotations, large displacements, initial curvatures, extensionality, and transverse shear strains. Four examples are used to demonstrate this method, including a rotating clamped-free beam under the influence of gravity and centrifugal forces, an L-frame subjected to an in-plane tip load, a circular arch subjected to a concentrated load, and a clamped-hinged helical spring subjected to an axial displacement. Results show that the combination of the multiple shooting method and the geometrically exact beam theory works very well. Moreover, the obtained numerically exact solutions can be used to verify the accuracy of nonlinear finite element codes for nonlinear analysis of complex structures.

  2. High Resolution Melting Analysis for Rapid Mutation Screening in Gyrase and Topoisomerase IV Genes in Quinolone-Resistant Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Thong, Kwai Lin

    2014-01-01

    The increased Salmonella resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones is a public health concern in the Southeast Asian region. The objective of this study is to develop a high resolution melt curve (HRM) assay to rapidly screen for mutations in quinolone-resistant determining region (QRDR) of gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes. DNA sequencing was performed on 62 Salmonella strains to identify mutations in the QRDR of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes. Mutations were detected in QRDR of gyrA (n = 52; S83F, S83Y, S83I, D87G, D87Y, and D87N) and parE (n = 1; M438I). Salmonella strains with mutations within QRDR of gyrA are generally more resistant to nalidixic acid (MIC 16 > 256 μg/mL). Mutations were uncommon within the QRDR of gyrB, parC, and parE genes. In the HRM assay, mutants can be distinguished from the wild-type strains based on the transition of melt curves, which is more prominent when the profiles are displayed in difference plot. In conclusion, HRM analysis allows for rapid screening for mutations at the QRDRs of gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes in Salmonella. This assay markedly reduced the sequencing effort involved in mutational studies of quinolone-resistance genes. PMID:25371903

  3. High resolution melting analysis for rapid mutation screening in gyrase and Topoisomerase IV genes in quinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Ngoi, Soo Tein; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2014-01-01

    The increased Salmonella resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones is a public health concern in the Southeast Asian region. The objective of this study is to develop a high resolution melt curve (HRM) assay to rapidly screen for mutations in quinolone-resistant determining region (QRDR) of gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes. DNA sequencing was performed on 62 Salmonella strains to identify mutations in the QRDR of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes. Mutations were detected in QRDR of gyrA (n = 52; S83F, S83Y, S83I, D87G, D87Y, and D87N) and parE (n = 1; M438I). Salmonella strains with mutations within QRDR of gyrA are generally more resistant to nalidixic acid (MIC 16 > 256 μg/mL). Mutations were uncommon within the QRDR of gyrB, parC, and parE genes. In the HRM assay, mutants can be distinguished from the wild-type strains based on the transition of melt curves, which is more prominent when the profiles are displayed in difference plot. In conclusion, HRM analysis allows for rapid screening for mutations at the QRDRs of gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes in Salmonella. This assay markedly reduced the sequencing effort involved in mutational studies of quinolone-resistance genes.

  4. High-resolution melting analysis for bird sexing: a successful approach to molecular sex identification using different biological samples.

    PubMed

    Morinha, Francisco; Travassos, Paulo; Seixas, Fernanda; Santos, Nuno; Sargo, Roberto; Sousa, Luís; Magalhães, Paula; Cabral, João A; Bastos, Estela

    2013-05-01

    High-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is a very attractive and flexible advanced post-PCR method with high sensitivity/specificity for simple, fast and cost-effective genotyping based on the detection of specific melting profiles of PCR products. Next generation real-time PCR systems, along with improved saturating DNA-binding dyes, enable the direct acquisition of HRM data after quantitative PCR. Melting behaviour is particularly influenced by the length, nucleotide sequence and GC content of the amplicons. This method is expanding rapidly in several research areas such as human genetics, reproductive biology, microbiology and ecology/conservation of wild populations. Here we have developed a successful HRM protocol for avian sex identification based on the amplification of sex-specific CHD1 fragments. The melting curve patterns allowed efficient sexual differentiation of 111 samples analysed (plucked feathers, muscle tissues, blood and oral cavity epithelial cells) of 14 bird species. In addition, we sequenced the amplified regions of the CHD1 gene and demonstrated the usefulness of this strategy for the genotype discrimination of various amplicons (CHD1Z and CHD1W), which have small size differences, ranging from 2 bp to 44 bp. The established methodology clearly revealed the advantages (e.g. closed-tube system, high sensitivity and rapidity) of a simple HRM assay for accurate sex differentiation of the species under study. The requirements, strengths and limitations of the method are addressed to provide a simple guide for its application in the field of molecular sexing of birds. The high sensitivity and resolution relative to previous real-time PCR methods makes HRM analysis an excellent approach for improving advanced molecular methods for bird sexing.

  5. Magneto-electro-elastic buckling analysis of nonlocal curved nanobeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Reza Barati, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a size-dependent curved beam model is developed to take into account the effects of nonlocal stresses on the buckling behavior of curved magneto-electro-elastic FG nanobeams for the first time. The governing differential equations are derived based on the principle of virtual work and Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. The power-law function is employed to describe the spatially graded magneto-electro-elastic properties. By extending the radius of the curved nanobeam to infinity, the results of straight nonlocal FG beams can be rendered. The effects of magnetic potential, electric voltage, opening angle, nonlocal parameter, power-law index and slenderness ratio on buckling loads of curved MEE-FG nanobeams are studied.

  6. Analysis of the pentafecta learning curve for laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Good, D W; Stewart, G D; Stolzenburg, J U; McNeill, S A

    2014-10-01

    Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) has a long learning curve; however, little is known about the pentafecta learning curve for LRP. We analysed the learning curve for a fellowship trained surgeon with regard to the pentafecta with up to 6-year follow-up. A retrospective review was performed in 550 cases, by dividing these cases into 11 groups of 50 patients. Outcomes analysed were the following: (1) the pentafecta (complication rate, positive surgical margin (PSM) rate, continence, potency and biochemical recurrence); (2) operative time and blood loss; and (3) overall pentafecta attainment. The mean complication rate for the entire series was 9 %; this plateaued after 150 cases. The overall PSM rate for the series was 23.5 %, 16.3 % for pT2 and 40.5 % for pT3. PSM plateaued after 200 cases. Excluding the first 100 cases, the overall PSM rate for pT2 was 10.9 % and 37.8 % for pT3. The continence rate stabilised after approximately 250 cases. The rate of male sling/artificial urinary sphincter plateaued after 200 cases. The potency learning curve continues to improve after 250 cases of nerve-sparing (ns) endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy (EERPE) as does the pentafecta learning curve which closely follows the pattern of the potency learning curve. The last group of nsEERPE achieved pentafecta in 63 %. This study shows multiple learning curves: an initial for peri-operative outcomes, then stabilisation of oncologic outcomes and the final for stabilisation of functional outcomes. In this series over 250 cases were required to achieve the learning curve.

  7. Analysis of Thermoluminescence Glow Curves Using Derivatives of Different Orders.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Mahua; Bhattacharyya, S; Sarkar, A; Mazumdar, P S; Singh, S D

    2017-01-16

    The suitability of the second derivative method for locating component peaks in complex thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves has been investigated in this work by considering both numerically simulated and experimental TL peaks. This technique is useful to acquire knowledge of the number of component peaks in a complex TL curve which in turn serves as a basic information before applying the deconvolution technique to the glow curve. To check the consistency of the results so obtained, we have also applied the first derivative technique to TL glow curves. It is well-known that kinetic order formalism fails for saturated TL peaks with heavy retrapping. Such peaks are usually broad and, to the best of our knowledge, have not yet been observed experimentally. The present derivative technique has been used to detect whether such broad peaks are truly single or not by considering a number of numerically simulated saturated glow curves with heavy retrapping where the conventional peak shape method fails. In all the cases considered here, the second derivative technique proves to be a potential candidate for estimating the number of peaks and their respective locations in a complex TL glow curve.

  8. Analysis of Melting for Alkali Earth and Alkali Oxides Based on the Diffusional Force Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quan; Chen, Li-Rong

    An analysis of the melting alkali earth and alkali oxides is presented using the concept of diffusional force. The calculations are performed by developing an ionic model based on Harrison's quantum mechanical treatment of overlap repulsive potential which takes into account the interactions up to second neighbors. Van der Waals dipole-dipole and dipole-quadrupole interactions calculated by more accurate methods are also included in the model. Using the formula by Fang, derived on the basis of thermodynamic analysis, the values of interionic distances for 8 alkali earth and alkali oxides at melting have been obtained. A simple model for melting is developed based on the diffusional force models. The values of Tm thus obtained are found to show fairly good agreement with experimental values of melting temperatures.

  9. Voronoi analysis of the short–range atomic structure in iron and iron–carbon melts

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, Andrey; Mirzoev, Alexander

    2015-08-17

    In this work, we simulated the atomic structure of liquid iron and iron–carbon alloys by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. Voronoi analysis was used to highlight changes in the close environments of Fe atoms as carbon concentration in the melt increases. We have found, that even high concentrations of carbon do not affect short–range atomic order of iron atoms — it remains effectively the same as in pure iron melts.

  10. Melt analysis of mismatch amplification mutation assays (Melt-MAMA): a functional study of a cost-effective SNP genotyping assay in bacterial models.

    PubMed

    Birdsell, Dawn N; Pearson, Talima; Price, Erin P; Hornstra, Heidie M; Nera, Roxanne D; Stone, Nathan; Gruendike, Jeffrey; Kaufman, Emily L; Pettus, Amanda H; Hurbon, Audriana N; Buchhagen, Jordan L; Harms, N Jane; Chanturia, Gvantsa; Gyuranecz, Miklos; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul S

    2012-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are abundant in genomes of all species and biologically informative markers extensively used across broad scientific disciplines. Newly identified SNP markers are publicly available at an ever-increasing rate due to advancements in sequencing technologies. Efficient, cost-effective SNP genotyping methods to screen sample populations are in great demand in well-equipped laboratories, but also in developing world situations. Dual Probe TaqMan assays are robust but can be cost-prohibitive and require specialized equipment. The Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assay, coupled with melt analysis (Melt-MAMA), is flexible, efficient and cost-effective. However, Melt-MAMA traditionally suffers from high rates of assay design failures and knowledge gaps on assay robustness and sensitivity. In this study, we identified strategies that improved the success of Melt-MAMA. We examined the performance of 185 Melt-MAMAs across eight different pathogens using various optimization parameters. We evaluated the effects of genome size and %GC content on assay development. When used collectively, specific strategies markedly improved the rate of successful assays at the first design attempt from ~50% to ~80%. We observed that Melt-MAMA accurately genotypes across a broad DNA range (~100 ng to ~0.1 pg). Genomic size and %GC content influence the rate of successful assay design in an independent manner. Finally, we demonstrated the versatility of these assays by the creation of a duplex Melt-MAMA real-time PCR (two SNPs) and conversion to a size-based genotyping system, which uses agarose gel electrophoresis. Melt-MAMA is comparable to Dual Probe TaqMan assays in terms of design success rate and accuracy. Although sensitivity is less robust than Dual Probe TaqMan assays, Melt-MAMA is superior in terms of cost-effectiveness, speed of development and versatility. We detail the parameters most important for the successful application of Melt-MAMA, which

  11. High-resolution melt analysis for species identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci derived from bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Ajitkumar, Praseeda; Barkema, Herman W; Zadoks, Ruth N; Morck, Douglas W; van der Meer, Frank J U M; De Buck, Jeroen

    2013-03-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are the most frequently isolated pathogens isolated from bovine milk. In this study, we report a rapid assay for species identification of CNS using high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA) of 16S rDNA sequences. Real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragment, spanning the variable region V1 and V2, was performed with a resulting amplicon of 215 bp. A library of distinct melt curves of reference strains of 13 common CNS species was created using HRMA. Sequencing of 16S rRNA and rpoB genes, and, when needed, tuf gene, of 100 CNS isolates obtained from Canadian Bovine Mastitis Research Network was done to determine their species identity, allowing for subsequent evaluation of the performance of HRMA for field isolates of bovine CNS. A combination of HRMA and sequencing revealed that Staphylococcus chromogenes, S. xylosus, S. simulans, and S. sciuri had multiple genotypes, complicating their resolution by HRMA. As the 3 genotypes of S. chromogenes had distinct melt curves, the 3 distinct genotypes were employed as reference strains in a blinded trial of 156 CNS isolates to identify S. chromogenes. HRMA correctly identified all S. chromogenes isolates which were later confirmed by sequencing. Staphylococcus chromogenes (68%) was most frequently found among the CNS isolates, followed by S. haemolyticus (10%) and S. xylosus (6%). The present study revealed that HRMA of 16S rRNA gene (V1-V2) could be used as a rapid, efficient, low-cost, and minimally cumbersome technique for S. chromogenes identification, the most common CNS derived from bovine milk.

  12. Empirical Bayes Analysis of Families of Survival Curves: Applications to the Analysis of Degree Attainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Henry I.; Zwick, Rebecca

    1993-01-01

    An approach to empirical Bayes analysis of aggregated survival data from different groups of subjects is presented based on a contingency table representation of data using transformations to permit the use of normal priors. Analysis of families of survival curves leads to improvements over classical estimates. (SLD)

  13. Experimental study of the structural characteristics of Al melts on the basis of Fourier analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorontsov, Vadim; Zhuravlev, Danil; Cherepanov, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    This scientific work is devoted to the study of the genetic connection structures of solid and liquid phases. Fourier analysis of signals of acoustic emission (AE) accompanying the melting of high purity aluminum from the melting point up to t=860°C was performed. The experimental data allowed for following the dynamics of the range order of the disorder zones in the melt with increasing melt temperature until their complete destruction.

  14. Optical analysis of miniature lenses with curved imaging surfaces.

    PubMed

    Reshidko, Dmitry; Sasian, Jose

    2015-10-01

    Miniature cameras for consumer electronics and mobile phones have been, and continue to be, in fast development. The system level requirements, such as manufacturing cost, packaging, and sensor characteristics, impose unique challenges for optical designers. In this paper, we discuss the potential optical benefits of having a curved image surface rather than a flat one. We show that curved sensor technology allows for optically faster lens solutions. We discuss trade-offs of several relevant characteristics, such as packaging, chief ray angle, image quality, and tolerance sensitivity. A comparison of a benchmark flat field lens, and an evaluation design imaging on a curved surface and working at f/1.6, provides useful specific insights. For a given image quality, departing from a flat imaging surface does not allow significantly reducing the total length of a lens.

  15. Automatic generation and analysis of solar cell IV curves

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, Steven M.; Jones, Jason C.

    2014-06-03

    A photovoltaic system includes multiple strings of solar panels and a device presenting a DC load to the strings of solar panels. Output currents of the strings of solar panels may be sensed and provided to a computer that generates current-voltage (IV) curves of the strings of solar panels. Output voltages of the string of solar panels may be sensed at the string or at the device presenting the DC load. The DC load may be varied. Output currents of the strings of solar panels responsive to the variation of the DC load are sensed to generate IV curves of the strings of solar panels. IV curves may be compared and analyzed to evaluate performance of and detect problems with a string of solar panels.

  16. Enhanced annealing of mismatched oligonucleotides using a novel melting curve assay allows efficient in vitro discrimination and restriction of a single nucleotide polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Stephen R; Chan, Chee Kai; Grant, Warwick N

    2011-08-30

    Many SNP discrimination strategies employ natural restriction endonucleases to discriminate between allelic states. However, SNPs are often not associated with a restriction site and therefore, a number of attempts have been made to generate sequence-adaptable restriction endonucleases. In this study, a simple, sequence-adaptable SNP discrimination mechanism between a 'wild-type' and 'mutant' template is demonstrated. This model differs from other artificial restriction endonuclease models as cis- rather than trans-orientated regions of single stranded DNA were generated and cleaved, and therefore, overcomes potential issues of either inefficient or non-specific binding when only a single variant is targeted. A series of mismatch 'bubbles' that spanned 0-5-bp surrounding a point mutation was generated and analysed for sensitivity to S1 nuclease. In this model, generation of oligonucleotide-mediated ssDNA mismatch 'bubbles' in the presence of S1 nuclease resulted in the selective degradation of the mutant template while maintaining wild-type template integrity. Increasing the size of the mismatch increased the rate of mutant sequence degradation, until a threshold above which discrimination was lost and the wild-type sequence was degraded. This level of fine discrimination was possible due to the development of a novel high-resolution melting curve assay to empirically determine changes in Tm (~5.0°C per base-pair mismatch) and to optimise annealing conditions (~18.38°C below Tm) of the mismatched oligonucleotide sets. The in vitro 'cleavage bubble' model presented is sequence-adaptable as determined by the binding oligonucleotide, and hence, has the potential to be tailored to discriminate between any two or more SNPs. Furthermore, the demonstrated fluorometric assay has broad application potential, offering a rapid, sensitive and high-throughput means to determine Tm and annealing rates as an alternative to conventional hybridisation detection strategies.

  17. rpoB gene: a target for identification of LAB cocci by PCR-DGGE and melting curves analyses in real time PCR.

    PubMed

    Renouf, Vincent; Claisse, Olivier; Lonvaud-Funel, Aline

    2006-10-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are essential in the quality of many fermented beverages like beer, cider and wine. In the two later cases, they convert malic acid into lactic acid during the malolactic fermentation. After fermentation, microbial stabilization is needed to prevent the development of spoilage bacteria species. Among them, cocci lead to different alterations: Pediococcus sp., and some strains of Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Oenococcus oeni can produce exopolysaccharides which modify wine viscosity and lead to ropiness. They also can produce acetic acid, biogenic amine, ethyl carbamate and volatile phenols. Therefore detection and identification are crucial. Results of phenotypic tests and DNA-DNA probes are not accurate enough. 16S RNA gene which is currently used for bacterial species identification presents intraspecies heterogeneity. The rpoB gene is an alternative to this limitation. However previous PCR targeting partial sequence of rpoB gene could not delimit cocci species. Therefore we compared the rpoB gene sequence of the six main cocci species found in fermented beverages: P. damnosus, P. dextrinicus, P. parvulus, P. pentosaceus, L. mesenteroides and O. oeni. The most discriminating partial sequence of the rpoB gene was chosen for designing primers. By PCR-DGGE the reliability of these primers was verified. It was controlled in a mixture of several cocci and other lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus sp.). Then we adapted the primers and the PCR conditions in order to achieve the identification of cocci species by real time PCR program including the fluorescent dye SYBR Green I, which gives faster results. PCR melt curves were established and a specific T(m) was attributed to each species.

  18. Analysis of Water Recovery Rate from the Heat Melt Compactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Hegde, U.; Gokoglu, S.

    2013-01-01

    Human space missions generate trash with a substantial amount of plastic (20% or greater by mass). The trash also contains water trapped in food residue and paper products and other trash items. The Heat Melt Compactor (HMC) under development by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) compresses the waste, dries it to recover water and melts the plastic to encapsulate the compressed trash. The resulting waste disk or puck represents an approximately ten-fold reduction in the volume of the initial trash loaded into the HMC. In the current design concept being pursued, the trash is compressed by a piston after it is loaded into the trash chamber. The piston face, the side walls of the waste processing chamber and the end surface in contact with the waste can be heated to evaporate the water and to melt the plastic. Water is recovered by the HMC in two phases. The first is a pre-process compaction without heat or with the heaters initially turned on but before the waste heats up. Tests have shown that during this step some liquid water may be expelled from the chamber. This water is believed to be free water (i.e., not bound with or absorbed in other waste constituents) that is present in the trash. This phase is herein termed Phase A of the water recovery process. During HMC operations, it is desired that liquid water recovery in Phase A be eliminated or minimized so that water-vapor processing equipment (e.g., condensers) downstream of the HMC are not fouled by liquid water and its constituents (i.e., suspended or dissolved matter) exiting the HMC. The primary water recovery process takes place next where the trash is further compacted while the heated surfaces reach their set temperatures for this step. This step will be referred to herein as Phase B of the water recovery process. During this step the waste chamber may be exposed to different selected pressures such as ambient, low pressure (e.g., 0.2 atm), or vacuum. The objective for this step is to remove both bound and

  19. Analysis of surface tension driven flow in floating zone melting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. E.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    Surface tension driven flow in a cylindrical melt suspended between two rods was investigated by numerical solution of the steady state differential equations for heat and momentum transfer. Radiation heating and electron beam heating were considered approximately. For small values of the driving force, one rotating ring was formed in the top half of the zone, and its mirror image in the bottom half. At larger driving forces, secondary cells form which probably would undergo oscillatory motion. The influence of Prandtl number, zone movement, and buoyancy on the convection was also studied. The primary resistance to mass transfer in the laminar regime was in the center of the zone rather than at the solid-liquid interfaces.

  20. Analysis of a DNA simulation model through hairpin melting experiments

    PubMed Central

    Linak, Margaret C.; Dorfman, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    We compare the predictions of a two-bead Brownian dynamics simulation model to melting experiments of DNA hairpins with complementary AT or GC stems and noninteracting loops in buffer A. This system emphasizes the role of stacking and hydrogen bonding energies, which are characteristics of DNA, rather than backbone bending, stiffness, and excluded volume interactions, which are generic characteristics of semiflexible polymers. By comparing high throughput data on the open-close transition of various DNA hairpins to the corresponding simulation data, we (1) establish a suitable metric to compare the simulations to experiments, (2) find a conversion between the simulation and experimental temperatures, and (3) point out several limitations of the model, including the lack of G-quartets and cross stacking effects. Our approach and experimental data can be used to validate similar coarse-grained simulation models. PMID:20886965

  1. Assessing combined methylation-sensitive high resolution melting and pyrosequencing for the analysis of heterogeneous DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous DNA methylation leads to difficulties in accurate detection and quantification of methylation. Methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM) is unique among regularly used methods for DNA methylation analysis in that heterogeneous methylation can be readily identified, although not quantified, by inspection of the melting curves. Bisulfite pyrosequencing has been used to estimate the level of heterogeneous methylation by quantifying methylation levels present at individual CpG dinucleotides. Sequentially combining the two methodologies using MS-HRM to screen the amplification products prior to bisulfite pyrosequencing would be advantageous. This would not only replace the quality control step using agarose gel analysis prior to the pyrosequencing step but would also provide important qualitative information in its own right. We chose to analyze DAPK1 as it is an important tumor suppressor gene frequently heterogeneously methylated in a number of malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). A region of the DAPK1 promoter was analyzed in ten CLL samples by MS-HRM. By using a biotinylated primer, bisulfite pyrosequencing could be used to directly analyze the samples. MS-HRM revealed the presence of various extents of heterogeneous DAPK1 methylation in all CLL samples. Further analysis of the biotinylated MS-HRM products by bisulfite pyrosequencing provided quantitative information for each CpG dinucleotide analyzed, and confirmed the presence of heterogeneous DNA methylation. Whereas each method could be used individually, MS-HRM and bisulfite pyrosequencing provided complementary information for the assessment of heterogeneous methylation. PMID:21364322

  2. Multiresolution Analysis of UTAT B-spline Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamnii, A.; Mraoui, H.; Sbibih, D.; Zidna, A.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we describe a multiresolution curve representation based on periodic uniform tension algebraic trigonometric (UTAT) spline wavelets of class ??? and order four. Then we determine the decomposition and the reconstruction vectors corresponding to UTAT-spline spaces. Finally, we give some applications in order to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed approach.

  3. Developmental Trajectories of Adolescent Popularity: A Growth Curve Modelling Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Borch, Casey

    2006-01-01

    Growth curve modelling was used to examine developmental trajectories of sociometric and perceived popularity across eight years in adolescence, and the effects of gender, overt aggression, and relational aggression on these trajectories. Participants were 303 initially popular students (167 girls, 136 boys) for whom sociometric data were…

  4. Mediation Analysis in a Latent Growth Curve Modeling Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Soest, Tilmann; Hagtvet, Knut A.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents several longitudinal mediation models in the framework of latent growth curve modeling and provides a detailed account of how such models can be constructed. Logical and statistical challenges that might arise when such analyses are conducted are also discussed. Specifically, we discuss how the initial status (intercept) and…

  5. Mediation Analysis in a Latent Growth Curve Modeling Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Soest, Tilmann; Hagtvet, Knut A.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents several longitudinal mediation models in the framework of latent growth curve modeling and provides a detailed account of how such models can be constructed. Logical and statistical challenges that might arise when such analyses are conducted are also discussed. Specifically, we discuss how the initial status (intercept) and…

  6. Use of the Zoom in the Analysis of a Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montaner, F. Rubio

    1987-01-01

    How the computer can aid the teacher in discussing plane curves is shown. Use of the zoom enables the teacher to illustrate aspects of graphs that would be difficult and time-consuming to show in other ways. Many illustrative graphs are included, and four programs are listed. (MNS)

  7. UNSUPERVISED TRANSIENT LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS VIA HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN INFERENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, N. E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Betancourt, M.

    2015-02-10

    Historically, light curve studies of supernovae (SNe) and other transient classes have focused on individual objects with copious and high signal-to-noise observations. In the nascent era of wide field transient searches, objects with detailed observations are decreasing as a fraction of the overall known SN population, and this strategy sacrifices the majority of the information contained in the data about the underlying population of transients. A population level modeling approach, simultaneously fitting all available observations of objects in a transient sub-class of interest, fully mines the data to infer the properties of the population and avoids certain systematic biases. We present a novel hierarchical Bayesian statistical model for population level modeling of transient light curves, and discuss its implementation using an efficient Hamiltonian Monte Carlo technique. As a test case, we apply this model to the Type IIP SN sample from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey, consisting of 18,837 photometric observations of 76 SNe, corresponding to a joint posterior distribution with 9176 parameters under our model. Our hierarchical model fits provide improved constraints on light curve parameters relevant to the physical properties of their progenitor stars relative to modeling individual light curves alone. Moreover, we directly evaluate the probability for occurrence rates of unseen light curve characteristics from the model hyperparameters, addressing observational biases in survey methodology. We view this modeling framework as an unsupervised machine learning technique with the ability to maximize scientific returns from data to be collected by future wide field transient searches like LSST.

  8. Automated amplicon design suitable for analysis of DNA variants by melting techniques.

    PubMed

    Ekstrøm, Per Olaf; Nakken, Sigve; Johansen, Morten; Hovig, Eivind

    2015-11-11

    The technological development of DNA analysis has had tremendous development in recent years, and the present deep sequencing techniques present unprecedented opportunities for detailed and high-throughput DNA variant detection. Although DNA sequencing has had an exponential decrease in cost per base pair analyzed, focused and target-specific methods are however still much in use for analysis of DNA variants. With increasing capacity in the analytical procedures, an equal demand in automated amplicon and primer design has emerged. We have constructed a web-based tool that is able to batch design DNA variant assay suitable for analysis by denaturing gel/capillary electrophoresis and high resolution melting. The tool is developed as a computational workflow that implements one of the most widely used primer design tools, followed by validation of primer specificity, as well as calculation and visualization of the melting properties of the resulting amplicon, with or without an artificial high melting domain attached. The tool will be useful for scientists applying DNA melting techniques in analysis of DNA variations. The tool is freely available at http://meltprimer.ous-research.no/ . Herein, we demonstrate a novel tool with respect to covering the whole amplicon design workflow necessary for groups that use melting equilibrium techniques to separate DNA variants.

  9. Reconstructing CO2 concentrations in basaltic melt inclusions using Raman analysis of vapor bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aster, Ellen M.; Wallace, Paul J.; Moore, Lowell R.; Watkins, James; Gazel, Esteban; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2016-09-01

    Melt inclusions record valuable information about pre-eruptive volatile concentrations of melts. However, a vapor bubble commonly forms in inclusions after trapping, and this decreases the dissolved CO2 concentration in the melt (glass) phase in the inclusion. To quantify CO2 loss to vapor bubbles, Raman spectroscopic analysis was used to determine the density of CO2 in bubbles in melt inclusions from two Cascade cinder cones near Mt. Lassen and two Mexican cinder cones (Jorullo, Parícutin). Using analyses of dissolved CO2 and H2O in the glass in the inclusions, the measured CO2 vapor densities were used to reconstruct the original dissolved CO2 contents of the melt inclusions at the time of trapping. Our results show that 30-90% of the CO2 in a melt inclusion is contained in the vapor bubble, values similar to those found in other recent studies. We developed a model for vapor bubble growth to show how post-entrapment bubbles form in melt inclusions as a result of cooling, crystallization, and eruptive quenching. The model allows us to predict the bubble volume fraction as a function of ΔT (the difference between the trapping temperature and eruptive temperature) and the amount of CO2 lost to a bubble. Comparison of the Raman and modeling methods shows highly variable agreement. For 10 of 17 inclusions, the two methods are within ± 550 ppm CO2 (avg. difference 290 ppm), equivalent to ±~300 bars uncertainty in estimated trapping pressure for restored inclusions. Discrepancies between the two methods occur for inclusions that have been strongly affected by post-entrapment diffusive H+ loss, because this process enhances bubble formation. For our dataset, restoring the CO2 lost to vapor bubbles increases inferred trapping pressures of the inclusions by 600 to as much as 4000 bars, highlighting the importance of accounting for vapor bubble formation in melt inclusion studies.

  10. Evaluation of lung elastic recoil by exponential curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Knudson, R J; Kaltenborn, W T

    1981-10-01

    Static deflation pressure-volume curves for the lungs of 104 subjects were satisfactorily fitted to an exponential function, V = Vmax - Ae-kP (where Vmax is volume V extrapolated to infinite transpulmonary pressure P, and A and k are constants). Subjects included 48 who met rigorous criteria defining normal, 35 were PiM phenotype for alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and 21 were PiMZ phenotype. The shape constant k was significantly related to age, whereas an index of curve position was not. Values for k corresponded closely to the data of other investigators suggesting that it was independent of size and insensitive to differences in experimental technique. Elevated values of k, indicative of emphysema, were no more prevalent among PiMZ subjects than among subjects with no alpha-1-anti-trypsin deficiency. The natural logarithm (1n) of k, rather than k itself, appears to provide a useful, normally distributed, expression of lung distensibility.

  11. Curved Thermopiezoelectric Shell Structures Modeled by Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun

    2000-01-01

    "Smart" structures composed of piezoelectric materials may significantly improve the performance of aeropropulsion systems through a variety of vibration, noise, and shape-control applications. The development of analytical models for piezoelectric smart structures is an ongoing, in-house activity at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field focused toward the experimental characterization of these materials. Research efforts have been directed toward developing analytical models that account for the coupled mechanical, electrical, and thermal response of piezoelectric composite materials. Current work revolves around implementing thermal effects into a curvilinear-shell finite element code. This enhances capabilities to analyze curved structures and to account for coupling effects arising from thermal effects and the curved geometry. The current analytical model implements a unique mixed multi-field laminate theory to improve computational efficiency without sacrificing accuracy. The mechanics can model both the sensory and active behavior of piezoelectric composite shell structures. Finite element equations are being implemented for an eight-node curvilinear shell element, and numerical studies are being conducted to demonstrate capabilities to model the response of curved piezoelectric composite structures (see the figure).

  12. Thermoluminescence glow curve analysis of natural onyx from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Tamer; Toktamış, Hüseyin; Yüksel, Mehmet; Topaksu, Mustafa; Yazici, A Necmeddin

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the thermoluminesce (TL) properties of natural onyx were determined after β-irradiation ((90)Sr/(90)Y) at room temperature. The effect of the additive dose and variable heating rate for TL glow peaks of the sample were investigated. Computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) methods were used to determine the number of peaks and kinetic parameters related to the TL glow peaks in natural onyx from Turkey. It was also determined kinetic parameters of onyx by means of the variable heating rate (VHR) method. The sample was exposed to β-irradiation between 2.4 Gy and 2.457 kGy. The CGCD methods showed that the glow curve of sample is the superposition of at least six first order components which were ascribed as P1-P6. The dose responses of some peaks have similar patterns and they follow linearity. The effect of heating rates on the response of dosimetric glow peaks of sample was studied. The maximum TL peak intensities of glow curve are decreasing with increasing heating rate and maximum TL peak intensities at 1 °C/s drops to 20% of the initial value when the sample is read at 6 °C/s.

  13. Rapid analysis of fold shape using Bézier curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Deepak C.; Lisle, Richard J.

    2004-09-01

    We approximate and classify the forms of profile sections of folded surfaces by comparison with cubic Bézier curves. The method analyses a digital image of the fold profile, by interactive visual comparison, with the curves generated by the Bézier drawing tool available commonly in graphics software products. Simplified equations of cubic Bézier curves form the basis of the classification in terms of two parameters. The first parameter, L, is related to the distribution of curvature on a single limb of a fold between the hinge point and the inflection point. It places the fold within a shape spectrum that ranges from straight-limbed chevron folds ( L=0) in which curvature is concentrated in the hinge region through to rounded folds with a uniform curvature distribution ( L=1). The second parameter, R, is related to the ratio of amplitude to wavelength. A graph of L against R serves to group samples of folds into 'shape groups'. This classification can be used as a tool to assist the determination of relative competence of folded layers and of the folding mechanism. The new method, which has the advantages of speed and simplicity, is applied to examples of natural and experimentally developed folds to demonstrate its versatility for analysing a wide range of fold geometries.

  14. Rouse Mode Analysis of Chain Relaxation in Homopolymer Melts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations of the Kremer–Grest (KG) bead–spring model of polymer chains of length between 10 and 500, and a closely related analogue that allows for chain crossing, to clearly delineate the effects of entanglements on the length-scale-dependent chain relaxation in polymer melts. We analyze the resulting trajectories using the Rouse modes of the chains and find that entanglements strongly affect these modes. The relaxation rates of the chains show two limiting effective monomeric frictions, with the local modes experiencing much lower effective friction than the longer modes. The monomeric relaxation rates of longer modes vary approximately inversely with chain length due to kinetic confinement effects. The time-dependent relaxation of Rouse modes has a stretched exponential character with a minimum of stretching exponent in the vicinity of the entanglement chain length. None of these trends are found in models that allow for chain crossing. These facts, in combination, argue for the confined motion of chains for time scales between the entanglement time and their ultimate free diffusion. PMID:25328247

  15. Rouse mode analysis of chain relaxation in homopolymer melts

    DOE PAGES

    Kalathi, Jagannathan T.; Kumar, Sanat K.; Rubinstein, Michael; ...

    2014-09-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations of the Kremer–Grest (KG) bead–spring model of polymer chains of length between 10 and 500, and a closely related analogue that allows for chain crossing, to clearly delineate the effects of entanglements on the length-scale-dependent chain relaxation in polymer melts. We analyze the resulting trajectories using the Rouse modes of the chains and find that entanglements strongly affect these modes. The relaxation rates of the chains show two limiting effective monomeric frictions, with the local modes experiencing much lower effective friction than the longer modes. The monomeric relaxation rates of longer modes vary approximately inverselymore » with chain length due to kinetic confinement effects. The time-dependent relaxation of Rouse modes has a stretched exponential character with a minimum of stretching exponent in the vicinity of the entanglement chain length. None of these trends are found in models that allow for chain crossing. As a result, these facts, in combination, argue for the confined motion of chains for time scales between the entanglement time and their ultimate free diffusion.« less

  16. Rouse mode analysis of chain relaxation in homopolymer melts

    SciTech Connect

    Kalathi, Jagannathan T.; Kumar, Sanat K.; Rubinstein, Michael; Grest, Gary S.

    2014-09-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations of the Kremer–Grest (KG) bead–spring model of polymer chains of length between 10 and 500, and a closely related analogue that allows for chain crossing, to clearly delineate the effects of entanglements on the length-scale-dependent chain relaxation in polymer melts. We analyze the resulting trajectories using the Rouse modes of the chains and find that entanglements strongly affect these modes. The relaxation rates of the chains show two limiting effective monomeric frictions, with the local modes experiencing much lower effective friction than the longer modes. The monomeric relaxation rates of longer modes vary approximately inversely with chain length due to kinetic confinement effects. The time-dependent relaxation of Rouse modes has a stretched exponential character with a minimum of stretching exponent in the vicinity of the entanglement chain length. None of these trends are found in models that allow for chain crossing. As a result, these facts, in combination, argue for the confined motion of chains for time scales between the entanglement time and their ultimate free diffusion.

  17. Rapid molecular identification of Listeria species by use of real-time PCR and high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dazhi; Luo, Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Fang, Weijia; Ye, Julian; Wu, Fang; Ding, Gangqiang

    2012-05-01

    Identification of Listeria species via a molecular method is critical for food safety and clinical diagnosis. In this study, an assay integrating real-time quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) with high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis was developed and assessed for rapid identification of six Listeria species. The ssrA gene, which encodes a transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) is conserved and common to all bacterial phyla, contains a variable domain in Listeria spp. Therefore, Q-PCR and a HRM profile were applied to characterize this gene. Fifty-three Listeria species and 45 non-Listeria species were detected using one primer set, with an accuracy of 100% in reference to conventional methods. There was a 93.3% correction rate to 30 artificially contaminated samples. Thus, Q-PCR with melting profiling analysis proved able to identify Listeria species accurately. Consequently, this study demonstrates that the assay we developed is a functional tool for rapidly identifying six Listeria species, and has the potential for discriminating novel species food safety and epidemiological research.

  18. Paleomagnetic analysis of curved thrust belts reproduced by physical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Elisabetta; Speranza, Fabio

    2003-12-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for studying the evolution of curved mountain belts by means of paleomagnetic analyses performed on analogue models. Eleven models were designed aimed at reproducing various tectonic settings in thin-skinned tectonics. Our models analyze in particular those features reported in the literature as possible causes for peculiar rotational patterns in the outermost as well as in the more internal fronts. In all the models the sedimentary cover was reproduced by frictional low-cohesion materials (sand and glass micro-beads), which detached either on frictional or on viscous layers. These latter were reproduced in the models by silicone. The sand forming the models has been previously mixed with magnetite-dominated powder. Before deformation, the models were magnetized by means of two permanent magnets generating within each model a quasi-linear magnetic field of intensity variable between 20 and 100 mT. After deformation, the models were cut into closely spaced vertical sections and sampled by means of 1×1-cm Plexiglas cylinders at several locations along curved fronts. Care was taken to collect paleomagnetic samples only within virtually undeformed thrust sheets, avoiding zones affected by pervasive shear. Afterwards, the natural remanent magnetization of these samples was measured, and alternating field demagnetization was used to isolate the principal components. The characteristic components of magnetization isolated were used to estimate the vertical-axis rotations occurring during model deformation. We find that indenters pushing into deforming belts from behind form non-rotational curved outer fronts. The more internal fronts show oroclinal-type rotations of a smaller magnitude than that expected for a perfect orocline. Lateral symmetrical obstacles in the foreland colliding with forward propagating belts produce non-rotational outer curved fronts as well, whereas in between and inside the obstacles a perfect orocline forms

  19. Transit light curves with finite integration time: Fisher information analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Ellen M.; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2014-10-10

    Kepler has revolutionized the study of transiting planets with its unprecedented photometric precision on more than 150,000 target stars. Most of the transiting planet candidates detected by Kepler have been observed as long-cadence targets with 30 minute integration times, and the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will record full frame images with a similar integration time. Integrations of 30 minutes affect the transit shape, particularly for small planets and in cases of low signal to noise. Using the Fisher information matrix technique, we derive analytic approximations for the variances and covariances on the transit parameters obtained from fitting light curve photometry collected with a finite integration time. We find that binning the light curve can significantly increase the uncertainties and covariances on the inferred parameters when comparing scenarios with constant total signal to noise (constant total integration time in the absence of read noise). Uncertainties on the transit ingress/egress time increase by a factor of 34 for Earth-size planets and 3.4 for Jupiter-size planets around Sun-like stars for integration times of 30 minutes compared to instantaneously sampled light curves. Similarly, uncertainties on the mid-transit time for Earth and Jupiter-size planets increase by factors of 3.9 and 1.4. Uncertainties on the transit depth are largely unaffected by finite integration times. While correlations among the transit depth, ingress duration, and transit duration all increase in magnitude with longer integration times, the mid-transit time remains uncorrelated with the other parameters. We provide code in Python and Mathematica for predicting the variances and covariances at www.its.caltech.edu/∼eprice.

  20. Transit Light Curves with Finite Integration Time: Fisher Information Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Ellen M.; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2014-10-01

    Kepler has revolutionized the study of transiting planets with its unprecedented photometric precision on more than 150,000 target stars. Most of the transiting planet candidates detected by Kepler have been observed as long-cadence targets with 30 minute integration times, and the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will record full frame images with a similar integration time. Integrations of 30 minutes affect the transit shape, particularly for small planets and in cases of low signal to noise. Using the Fisher information matrix technique, we derive analytic approximations for the variances and covariances on the transit parameters obtained from fitting light curve photometry collected with a finite integration time. We find that binning the light curve can significantly increase the uncertainties and covariances on the inferred parameters when comparing scenarios with constant total signal to noise (constant total integration time in the absence of read noise). Uncertainties on the transit ingress/egress time increase by a factor of 34 for Earth-size planets and 3.4 for Jupiter-size planets around Sun-like stars for integration times of 30 minutes compared to instantaneously sampled light curves. Similarly, uncertainties on the mid-transit time for Earth and Jupiter-size planets increase by factors of 3.9 and 1.4. Uncertainties on the transit depth are largely unaffected by finite integration times. While correlations among the transit depth, ingress duration, and transit duration all increase in magnitude with longer integration times, the mid-transit time remains uncorrelated with the other parameters. We provide code in Python and Mathematica for predicting the variances and covariances at www.its.caltech.edu/~eprice.

  1. Modeling and analysis of doubly curved aerobrake truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, Gregory; Klang, Eric

    1992-01-01

    An aerobrake structural concept featuring a double curved tetrahedral truss support system and hexagonal heat shield panels was modeled and analyzed. Modeling equations for a sphere, cone, and paraboloid were developed for the purpose. Design equation and computer codes were also evolved and employed to determine the total mass of the aerobrake as well as any parameters that had an adverse effect on the total aerobrake mass. These data were used in a point design for a Mars mission aerobrake. A 131-ft diameter aerobrake was found to be viable using the present structural concept (i.e., the total aerobrake mass is not greater than 450,000 lb, which is the attached spacecraft mass). It is also shown that curvature, load point placement, number of load points, number of strut designs, and number of rings all have an effect on the mass of the aerobrake.

  2. High-resolution melting analysis for detection of a single-nucleotide polymorphism and the genotype of the myostatin gene in warmblood horses.

    PubMed

    Serpa, Priscila B S; Garbade, Petra; Natalini, Cláudio C; Pires, Ananda R; Tisotti, Tainor M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To develop a high-resolution melting (HRM) assay to detect the g.66493737C>T polymorphism in the myostatin gene (MSTN) and determine the frequency of 3 previously defined g.66493737 genotypes (T/T, T/C, and C/C) in warmblood horses. SAMPLES Blood samples from 23 horses. PROCEDURES From each blood sample, DNA was extracted and analyzed by standard PCR methods and an HRM assay to determine the MSTN genotype. Three protocols (standard protocol, protocol in which a high-salt solution was added to the reaction mixture before the first melting cycle, and protocol in which an unlabeled probe was added to the reaction mixture before analysis) for the HRM assay were designed and compared. Genotype results determined by the HRM protocol that generated the most consistent melting curves were compared with those determined by sequencing. RESULTS The HRM protocol in which an unlabeled probe was added to the reaction mixture generated the most consistent melting curves. The genotypes of the g.66493737C>T polymorphism were determined for 22 horses (16 by HRM analysis and 20 by sequencing); 14, 7, and 1 had the T/T, T/C, and C/C genotypes, respectively. The genotype determined by HRM analysis agreed with that determined by sequencing for 14 of 16 horses. The frequency of alleles T and C was 79.5% and 20.5%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that HRM analysis may be a faster and more economical alternative than PCR methods for genotyping. Genotyping results might be useful as predictors of athletic performance for horses.

  3. Melt Analysis of Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assays (Melt-MAMA): A Functional Study of a Cost-Effective SNP Genotyping Assay in Bacterial Models

    PubMed Central

    Birdsell, Dawn N.; Pearson, Talima; Price, Erin P.; Hornstra, Heidie M.; Nera, Roxanne D.; Stone, Nathan; Gruendike, Jeffrey; Kaufman, Emily L.; Pettus, Amanda H.; Hurbon, Audriana N.; Buchhagen, Jordan L.; Harms, N. Jane; Chanturia, Gvantsa; Gyuranecz, Miklos; Wagner, David M.; Keim, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are abundant in genomes of all species and biologically informative markers extensively used across broad scientific disciplines. Newly identified SNP markers are publicly available at an ever-increasing rate due to advancements in sequencing technologies. Efficient, cost-effective SNP genotyping methods to screen sample populations are in great demand in well-equipped laboratories, but also in developing world situations. Dual Probe TaqMan assays are robust but can be cost-prohibitive and require specialized equipment. The Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assay, coupled with melt analysis (Melt-MAMA), is flexible, efficient and cost-effective. However, Melt-MAMA traditionally suffers from high rates of assay design failures and knowledge gaps on assay robustness and sensitivity. In this study, we identified strategies that improved the success of Melt-MAMA. We examined the performance of 185 Melt-MAMAs across eight different pathogens using various optimization parameters. We evaluated the effects of genome size and %GC content on assay development. When used collectively, specific strategies markedly improved the rate of successful assays at the first design attempt from ∼50% to ∼80%. We observed that Melt-MAMA accurately genotypes across a broad DNA range (∼100 ng to ∼0.1 pg). Genomic size and %GC content influence the rate of successful assay design in an independent manner. Finally, we demonstrated the versatility of these assays by the creation of a duplex Melt-MAMA real-time PCR (two SNPs) and conversion to a size-based genotyping system, which uses agarose gel electrophoresis. Melt-MAMA is comparable to Dual Probe TaqMan assays in terms of design success rate and accuracy. Although sensitivity is less robust than Dual Probe TaqMan assays, Melt-MAMA is superior in terms of cost-effectiveness, speed of development and versatility. We detail the parameters most important for the successful application of Melt

  4. High-resolution DNA melting analysis in plant research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic and genomic studies provide valuable insight into the inheritance, structure, organization, and function of genes. The knowledge gained from the analysis of plant genes is beneficial to all aspects of plant research, including crop improvement. New methods and tools are continually developed...

  5. Parent involvement and science achievement: A latent growth curve analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ursula Yvette

    This study examined science achievement growth across elementary and middle school and parent school involvement using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study - Kindergarten Class of 1998--1999 (ECLS-K). The ECLS-K is a nationally representative kindergarten cohort of students from public and private schools who attended full-day or half-day kindergarten class in 1998--1999. The present study's sample (N = 8,070) was based on students that had a sampling weight available from the public-use data file. Students were assessed in science achievement at third, fifth, and eighth grades and parents of the students were surveyed at the same time points. Analyses using latent growth curve modeling with time invariant and varying covariates in an SEM framework revealed a positive relationship between science achievement and parent involvement at eighth grade. Furthermore, there were gender and racial/ethnic differences in parents' school involvement as a predictor of science achievement. Findings indicated that students with lower initial science achievement scores had a faster rate of growth across time. The achievement gap between low and high achievers in earth, space and life sciences lessened from elementary to middle school. Parents' involvement with school usually tapers off after elementary school, but due to parent school involvement being a significant predictor of eighth grade science achievement, later school involvement may need to be supported and better implemented in secondary schooling.

  6. Can posture analysis point towards curve progression in scoliotic subjects?

    PubMed

    Chockalingam, Nachiappan; Rahmatalla, Aziz; Dangerfield, Peter; Ahmed, El-Nasri

    2006-01-01

    Previous research employing biomechanical measurement has demonstrated asymmetries in kinematics and kinetics. Similar asymmetries have been reported from anthropometric studies. These findings suggest that asymmetry may play an important aetiological role in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). The present study is a part of a wider comprehensive investigation aimed at identifying asymmetries in lower limb kinematics and pelvic and back movements during level walking in a sample of scoliotic subjects. Such asymmetries may be related to the spinal deformity. While previous studies indicate that force platform measurements provide a good estimation of the static balance of individuals, there remains a paucity of information on dynamic balance during walking. There is published evidence on the use of Centre of Pressure (CoP) and net joint moments in gait assessment. Although these investigations have assessed Centre of Mass (CoM)-CoP distance relationships in clinical conditions, there is a paucity of data relating to the moments about CoM. An objective of the present study was to assess and establish the asymmetry in the CoP pattern and moments about CoM during level walking and its relationship to spinal deformity. Results indicate differences across the subjects depending on the laterality of the major curve. Furthermore, the results indicate that the variables identified in this study could be applied to initial screening and surgical evaluation of scoliosis and other spinal deformities. Further studies are being undertaken to validate these findings.

  7. Analysis of driver's characteristics on a curved road in a lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Ramanpreet; Sharma, Sapna

    2017-04-01

    The present paper investigates the effect of driver's behavior on the curved road via lattice hydrodynamic approach. The basic model for straight road is extended for the curved road and the characteristics of driver's behavior is incorporated in the lattice model. The extended model is investigated theoretically by the means of linear stability analysis and the effect of curved road and intensity of influence of driver's behavior on the traffic flow stability is examined. Through nonlinear stability analysis, the modified Korteweg-de Vries (MKdV) equation near the critical point is derived to describe the evolution properties of traffic density waves by applying the reductive perturbation method. Furthermore, the numerical simulation is carried out to validate the theoretical results which indicates that the curved road has a negative influence on the stability of the traffic flow. It is also seen that the traffic jam on a curved road can be suppressed efficiently via taking into account aggressive drivers.

  8. GLOBAL ANALYSIS OF KOI-977: SPECTROSCOPY, ASTEROSEISMOLOGY, AND PHASE-CURVE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Sato, Bun'ei; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Masuda, Kento; Benomar, Othman; Takeda, Yoichi; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki

    2015-01-20

    We present a global analysis of KOI-977, one of the planet host candidates detected by Kepler. The Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) reports that KOI-977 is a red giant, for which few close-in planets have been discovered. Our global analysis involves spectroscopic and asteroseismic determinations of stellar parameters (e.g., mass and radius) and radial velocity (RV) measurements. Our analyses reveal that KOI-977 is indeed a red giant, possibly in the red clump, but its estimated radius (≳ 20 R {sub ☉} = 0.093 AU) is much larger than KOI-977.01's orbital distance (∼0.027 AU) estimated from its period (P {sub orb} ∼ 1.35 days) and host star's mass. RV measurements show a small variation, which also contradicts the amplitude of ellipsoidal variations seen in the light curve folded with KOI-977.01's period. Therefore, we conclude that KOI-977.01 is a false positive, meaning that the red giant, for which we measured the radius and RVs, is different from the object that produces the transit-like signal (i.e., an eclipsing binary). On the basis of this assumption, we also perform a light curve analysis including the modeling of transits/eclipses and phase-curve variations, adopting various values for the dilution factor D, which is defined as the flux ratio between the red giant and eclipsing binary. Fitting the whole folded light curve as well as individual transits in the short cadence data simultaneously, we find that the estimated mass and radius ratios of the eclipsing binary are consistent with those of a solar-type star and a late-type star (e.g., an M dwarf) for D ≳ 20.

  9. A Brief Review: The Z-curve Theory and its Application in Genome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ren; Zhang, Chun-Ting

    2014-01-01

    In theoretical physics, there exist two basic mathematical approaches, algebraic and geometrical methods, which, in most cases, are complementary. In the area of genome sequence analysis, however, algebraic approaches have been widely used, while geometrical approaches have been less explored for a long time. The Z-curve theory is a geometrical approach to genome analysis. The Z-curve is a three-dimensional curve that represents a given DNA sequence in the sense that each can be uniquely reconstructed given the other. The Z-curve, therefore, contains all the information that the corresponding DNA sequence carries. The analysis of a DNA sequence can then be performed through studying the corresponding Z-curve. The Z-curve method has found applications in a wide range of areas in the past two decades, including the identifications of protein-coding genes, replication origins, horizontally-transferred genomic islands, promoters, translational start sides and isochores, as well as studies on phylogenetics, genome visualization and comparative genomics. Here, we review the progress of Z-curve studies from aspects of both theory and applications in genome analysis. PMID:24822026

  10. Detection and identification of vegetative insecticidal proteins vip3 genes of Bacillus thuringiensis strains using polymerase chain reaction-high resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Haitao; Shu, Changlong; He, Xiaoming; Gao, JiGuo; Liu, Rongmei; Huang, Dafang

    2012-05-01

    In this study, vegetative insecticidal proteins vip3 genes from Bacillus thuringiensis strains were detected based on polymerase chain reaction-high resolution melt (PCR-HRM) analysis. A pair of primers was designed according to the conservative sequences in 150 bp region of the known vip3 subfamily. The 150 bp regions of difference vip3 genes have only a few nucleotide difference vip3 genes were detected in 8 of 11 standard B. thuringiensis strains, and vip3Aa genes, vip3Af genes and vip3Ba gene can be distinguished as different melting curves by this method. The results demonstrate the utility of the HRM assay for mutant screening using vip3 gene. The PCR-HRM method may be a valuable and reliable tool for specific detection and identification of vip3 genes.

  11. Functional principal component analysis of glomerular filtration rate curves after kidney transplant.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jianghu J; Wang, Liangliang; Gill, Jagbir; Cao, Jiguo

    2017-01-01

    This article is motivated by some longitudinal clinical data of kidney transplant recipients, where kidney function progression is recorded as the estimated glomerular filtration rates at multiple time points post kidney transplantation. We propose to use the functional principal component analysis method to explore the major source of variations of glomerular filtration rate curves. We find that the estimated functional principal component scores can be used to cluster glomerular filtration rate curves. Ordering functional principal component scores can detect abnormal glomerular filtration rate curves. Finally, functional principal component analysis can effectively estimate missing glomerular filtration rate values and predict future glomerular filtration rate values.

  12. Analysis of the Effects of Fixed Costs on Learning Curve Calculations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    Gansler, Jacques S. The Defense Industry. Cambridge MA: MIT Press, 1980. 11. Horngren , Charles T. and George Foster. Cost Accounting: A Managerial...Best Available Copy AD-A285 040Q "𔃻 EU 󈧒 4 44 ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTS OF FIXED COSTS ON LEARNING CURVE CALCULATIONS THESIS . . . - Charles B. Shea...Justification ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTS OF FIXED COSTS ON LEARNING CURVE CALCULATIONS ............................Distribution I THESIS Charles B. Shea

  13. Genotyping of the protozoan pathogen Toxoplasma gondii using high-resolution melting analysis of the repeated B1 gene.

    PubMed

    Costa, Jean-Marc; Cabaret, Odile; Moukoury, Sandrine; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2011-09-01

    Genetic studies of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii have identified three main distinct types according to virulence in some hosts. Several methods have been developed to differentiate genotypes currently dominated by microsatellite markers targeting single-copy loci. We analyzed the possibility of using the 35-fold repetitive B1 gene via high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis. Sequencing of the B1 gene of 14 reference strains (four Type I, six Type II, and four Type III strains) identified 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). Primers were designed to amplify eight of them for HRM analysis and for relative quantification of each nucleotide variation using SNaPshot mini-sequencing. Genotyping with five microsatellite markers was performed for comparison. Two to four HRM profiles were obtained depending on the SNP tested. The differences observed relied on the different ratios of nucleotides at the SNP locus as evidenced via SNaPshot mini-sequencing. The three main lineages could be distinguished by using several HRM profiles. Some HRM profiles proved more informative than the analysis based on five microsatellite markers, showing additional differences in Type I and Type II strains. Using HRM analysis, we obtained at least an equally good discrimination of the main lineages than that based on five microsatellite markers.

  14. Constraints on the Parental Melts of Enriched Shergottites from Image Analysis and High Pressure Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collinet, M.; Medard, E.; Devouard, B.; Peslier, A.

    2012-01-01

    Martian basalts can be classified in at least two geochemically different families: enriched and depleted shergottites. Enriched shergottites are characterized by higher incompatible element concentrations and initial Sr-87/Sr-86 and lower initial Nd-143/Nd-144 and Hf-176/Hf-177 than depleted shergottites [e.g. 1, 2]. It is now generally admitted that shergottites result from the melting of at least two distinct mantle reservoirs [e.g. 2, 3]. Some of the olivine-phyric shergottites (either depleted or enriched), the most magnesian Martian basalts, could represent primitive melts, which are of considerable interest to constrain mantle sources. Two depleted olivine-phyric shergottites, Yamato (Y) 980459 and Northwest Africa (NWA) 5789, are in equilibrium with their most magnesian olivine (Fig. 1) and their bulk rock compositions are inferred to represent primitive melts [4, 5]. Larkman Nunatak (LAR) 06319 [3, 6, 7] and NWA 1068 [8], the most magnesian enriched basalts, have bulk Mg# that are too high to be in equilibrium with their olivine megacryst cores. Parental melt compositions have been estimated by subtracting the most magnesian olivine from the bulk rock composition, assuming that olivine megacrysts have partially accumulated [3, 9]. However, because this technique does not account for the actual petrography of these meteorites, we used image analysis to study these rocks history, reconstruct their parent magma and understand the nature of olivine megacrysts.

  15. Decline Curve Analysis for Production Forecast and Optimization of Liquid-Dominated Geothermal Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, I.

    2016-09-01

    Power projects in the geothermal field has a long span of about 30 years. The power supply should be maintained at a certain value across a range of time. A geothermal field, however, has the characteristics of natural production decline with time. In a geothermal field, development of decline curve model of steam production is important for forecasting production decline in the future. This study was developed using decline curve by production data along 3 years liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir in Ulubelu field. Decline curve in geothermal field based on decline curve in petroleum industry. The decline curve was correlated by reservoir management in geothermal. The purposes of this study to get best match model decline curve and forecasting production in the future. Based on decline curve analysis by production data in Ulubelu field, the result model decline curve is exponential model. From the model, we can get the value of decline rate in the field is 9.4 %/year. Then, the formula of forecasting steam flow used exponent decline to forecast in the future. By using separated system cycle in Ulubelu field, the minimal steam flowrate towards turbine was 502018.4 ton/month. Based on formula of forecasting production and minimal steam flowrate, we can get the time make up wells to maintain steam supply for stability in generator power capacity.

  16. Constraining the equation of state of fluid H2O to 60 GPa using the melting curve of Ice VII and the formation of Mg(OH)2 in the MgO-H2O system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, M. R.; Fei, Y.

    2002-12-01

    The physical properties of fluid H2O are important geologically over a large range of pressure and temperature. Shock-wave data have served as the main resource for the derivations of many equations of state for fluid H2O. Direct measurements of the specific volume of water are required to test the validity of these models; however, direct measurements at elevated pressures and temperatures are difficult and, as a result, rare. The study presented here sought to determine the PVT properties of Ice VII along the melting curve at pressures > 20 GPa using the a Mao-Bell type diamond anvil cell with an external Mo-wire resistance heater. Small grains of MgO, gold and a relatively large volume of H2O were loaded in a sample chamber drilled in a pre-indented Re-gasket. The temperature of the experiment was determined by placing a thermocouple between the diamond anvil and Re-gasket, directly against the surface of the diamond. The experiments were conducted on beam line X17C at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source using the Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction (EDXD) technique. The unit cells of Ice VII, MgO, and gold were monitored during the experiment with gold being used as an internal pressure calibrant. The methodology was to use the disappearance of the diffraction pattern of Ice VII with the production of brucite following the reaction of fluid H2O with MgO. Generally, experiments would follow the following sequence as temperature was increased: 1.) slight drop in pressure, 2.) the appearance of diffraction lines indicative of brucite, and 3.) total disappearance of Ice VII diffraction lines and noticeable drop in pressure (up to ~2 GPa at the highest pressures). The appearance of brucite would always proceed the disappearance of Ice VII diffraction lines. The data suggest that brucite formed as soon as fluid H2O became available whereas Ice VII melted over a small range over temperature (<50 K). The melting curve for Ice VII from 3-60 GPa can be

  17. Genetic analysis of growth curves using the SAEM algorithm.

    PubMed

    Jaffrézic, Florence; Meza, Cristian; Lavielle, Marc; Foulley, Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of nonlinear function-valued characters is very important in genetic studies, especially for growth traits of agricultural and laboratory species. Inference in nonlinear mixed effects models is, however, quite complex and is usually based on likelihood approximations or Bayesian methods. The aim of this paper was to present an efficient stochastic EM procedure, namely the SAEM algorithm, which is much faster to converge than the classical Monte Carlo EM algorithm and Bayesian estimation procedures, does not require specification of prior distributions and is quite robust to the choice of starting values. The key idea is to recycle the simulated values from one iteration to the next in the EM algorithm, which considerably accelerates the convergence. A simulation study is presented which confirms the advantages of this estimation procedure in the case of a genetic analysis. The SAEM algorithm was applied to real data sets on growth measurements in beef cattle and in chickens. The proposed estimation procedure, as the classical Monte Carlo EM algorithm, provides significance tests on the parameters and likelihood based model comparison criteria to compare the nonlinear models with other longitudinal methods.

  18. A light-curve distortion-wave analysis of eight RS Canum Venaticorum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    A program of differential U,B,V photometry of 14 RS CVn systems carried out at Rosemary Hill Observatory in 1978 - 1981 is described, and an analysis of the light curves for the characteristic distortion wave for eight of the systems is presented. The V light curves of the systems are shown. Significant waves were observed in RS CVn, RZ Eri, and RW UMa. No significant waves were found in UX Com, GK Hya, AR Lac, LX Per, or TY Pyx. Unusual light curve distortions were observed in UX Com and AR Lac.

  19. Late-phase melt progression experiment: MP-2. Results and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gasser, R.D.; Gauntt, R.O.; Bourcier, S.C.

    1997-05-01

    In-pile experiments addressing late-phase processes in Light Water Reactors (LWRs) were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories. Melt Progression (MP) experiments were designed to provide information to develop and verify computer models for analysis of LWR core damage in severe accidents. Experiments examine the formation and motion of ceramic molten pools in disrupted reactor core regions. The MP-2 experiment assembly consisted of: (1) a rubble bed of enriched UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} simulating severely disrupted reactor core regions, (2) a ceramic/metallic crust representing blockage formed by early phase melting, relocation, and refreezing of core components, and (3) an intact rod stub region that remained in place below the blockage region. The test assembly was fission heated in the central cavity of the ACRR at an average rate of about 0.2 KA, reaching a peak molten pool temperature around 3400 K. Melting of the debris bed ceramic components was initiated near the center of the bed. The molten material relocated downward, refreezing to form a ceramic crust near the bottom of the rubble bed. As power levels were increased, the crust gradually remelted and reformed at progressively lower positions in the bed until late in the experiment when it penetrated into and attacked the ceramic/metallic blockage. The metallic components of the blockage region melted and relocated to the bottom of the intact rod stub region before the ceramic melt penetrated the blockage region from above. The ceramic pool penetrated halfway into the blockage region by the end of the experiment. Measurements of thermal response and material relocation are compared to the results of the computer simulations. Postexperiment examination of the assembly with the associated material interactions and metallurgy are also discussed in detail with the analyses and interpretation of results. 16 refs., 206 figs., 24 tabs.

  20. Analysis of the curve of Spee and the curve of Wilson in adult Indian population: A three-dimensional measurement study.

    PubMed

    Surendran, Sowmya Velekkatt; Hussain, Sharmila; Bhoominthan, S; Nayar, Sanjna; Jayesh, Ragavendra

    2016-01-01

    When reconstructing the occlusal curvatures dentists often use a 4-inch radii arc as a rough standard based on Monson spherical theory. The use of an identical radius for the curve of Spee for all patients may not be appropriate because each patient is individually different. The validity of application of this theory in the Indian population and the present study has been undertaken. This study is an attempt to evaluate the curve of Spee and curve of Wilson in young Indian population using three dimensional analysis. This study compared the radius and the depth of right and left, maxillary and mandibular curves of Spee and the radius of maxillary and mandibular curves of Wilson in males and females. The cusp tips of canines, buccal cusp tips of premolars and molars and palatal/lingual cusp tips of second molars of 60 maxillary and 60 mandibular casts were obtained. Three-dimensional (x, y, z) coordinates of the cusp tips of the molars, premolars, and canines of the right and left sides of the maxilla and mandible were obtained with three dimensional coordinate measuring machine. The radius and the depth of right and left, maxillary and mandibular curves of Spee and the radius of maxillary and mandibular curves of Wilson were measured by means of computer software Metrologic-XG. Pearson's correlation test and Independent t-test were used to test the statistical significance (α=.05). The values of curve of Spee and curve of Wilson in Indian population obtained from this study were higher than the 4 inch (100 mm) radius proposed by Monson. These findings suggest ethnic differences in the radius of curve of Spee and curve of Wilson.

  1. A novel gap-PCR with high resolution melting analysis for the detection of α-thalassaemia Southeast Asian and Filipino β°-thalassaemia deletion.

    PubMed

    Kho, Siew Leng; Chua, Kek Heng; George, Elizabeth; Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne

    2015-09-14

    Homozygosity for the α-thalassaemia Southeast Asian (α-SEA) and Filipino β°-thalassaemia (β-FIL) deletions can cause serious complications leading to foetal death or life-long blood transfusions. A rapid and accurate molecular detection assay is essential in populations where the deletions are common. In this study, gap-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with high resolution melting (HRM) analysis was developed to detect both the large deletions. Melting curves at 86.9 ± 0.1 °C were generated by normal individuals without the α-SEA deletion, 84.7 ± 0.1 °C by homozygous α-SEA deletion individuals and two melting curves at 84.7 ± 0.1 °C and 86.9 ± 0.1 °C by α-SEA deletion carriers. Normal individuals without the β-FIL deletion produce amplicons with a melting temperature (Tm) at 74.6 ± 0.1 °C, homozygous β-FIL individuals produce amplicons with Tm at 73.6 ± 0.1 °C and heterozygous β-FIL individuals generate two amplicons with Tm at 73.6 ± 0.1 °C and 74.6 ± 0.1 °C. Evaluation using blinded tests on 220 DNA samples showed 100% sensitivity and specificity. The developed assays are sensitive and specific for rapid molecular and prenatal diagnosis for the α-SEA and β-FIL deletions.

  2. A novel gap-PCR with high resolution melting analysis for the detection of α-thalassaemia Southeast Asian and Filipino β0-thalassaemia deletion

    PubMed Central

    Leng Kho, Siew; Heng Chua, Kek; George, Elizabeth; Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne

    2015-01-01

    Homozygosity for the α-thalassaemia Southeast Asian (α-SEA) and Filipino β0-thalassaemia (β-FIL) deletions can cause serious complications leading to foetal death or life-long blood transfusions. A rapid and accurate molecular detection assay is essential in populations where the deletions are common. In this study, gap-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with high resolution melting (HRM) analysis was developed to detect both the large deletions. Melting curves at 86.9 ± 0.1 °C were generated by normal individuals without the α-SEA deletion, 84.7 ± 0.1 °C by homozygous α-SEA deletion individuals and two melting curves at 84.7 ± 0.1 °C and 86.9 ± 0.1 °C by α-SEA deletion carriers. Normal individuals without the β-FIL deletion produce amplicons with a melting temperature (Tm) at 74.6 ± 0.1 °C, homozygous β-FIL individuals produce amplicons with Tm at 73.6 ± 0.1 °C and heterozygous β-FIL individuals generate two amplicons with Tm at 73.6 ± 0.1 °C and 74.6 ± 0.1 °C. Evaluation using blinded tests on 220 DNA samples showed 100% sensitivity and specificity. The developed assays are sensitive and specific for rapid molecular and prenatal diagnosis for the α-SEA and β-FIL deletions. PMID:26365497

  3. Analysis and Simulation of Long-Range Correlations in Curved Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabi, Ali Reza; Sahimi, Muhammad

    Numerical simulation and analysis of long-range correlations in curved space are studied. The study is motivated by the problem of constructing accurate models of large-scale porous media which usually contain long-range correlations in their various properties (such as their permeability, porosity, and elastic moduli) within and between their strata that are typically curved layers. The problem is, however, relevant to many other important models and phenomena in which extended correlations in curved space play a prominent role. Examples include the nonlinear σ-model in a curved space, models for describing the long-range structural correlations of amorphous semiconductors that consist of polytopes (tilings of positively-curved three-dimensional space), long-range correlations in the extrapolar total zone, and models in which the Universe is created by bubble nucleations and contain long-range correlations in the fluctuations in the curved spacetime. The study is also relevant to the important industrial problem of designing highly curved objects, such as cars and ships, which use composite materials that contain extended correlations in their property values. We study such correlations along two- and three-dimensional curves, as well as curved surfaces. We show that such correlations are well-defined only on developable surfaces, i.e. those that can be flattened to form planar surfaces without any stretching or distortion, and preserve the distance between two points on such surfaces after the stretching. If a given curved surface is not developable, but can be approximated as piecewise developable, one may still define and analyze extended correlations on it. Representative examples are presented and analyzed.

  4. Type Ia Supernova Light-Curve Inference: Hierarchical Bayesian Analysis in the Near-Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Kaisey S.; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Friedman, Andrew S.; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2009-10-01

    We present a comprehensive statistical analysis of the properties of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves in the near-infrared using recent data from Peters Automated InfraRed Imaging TELescope and the literature. We construct a hierarchical Bayesian framework, incorporating several uncertainties including photometric error, peculiar velocities, dust extinction, and intrinsic variations, for principled and coherent statistical inference. SN Ia light-curve inferences are drawn from the global posterior probability of parameters describing both individual supernovae and the population conditioned on the entire SN Ia NIR data set. The logical structure of the hierarchical model is represented by a directed acyclic graph. Fully Bayesian analysis of the model and data is enabled by an efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm exploiting the conditional probabilistic structure using Gibbs sampling. We apply this framework to the JHKs SN Ia light-curve data. A new light-curve model captures the observed J-band light-curve shape variations. The marginal intrinsic variances in peak absolute magnitudes are σ(MJ ) = 0.17 ± 0.03, σ(MH ) = 0.11 ± 0.03, and σ(MKs ) = 0.19 ± 0.04. We describe the first quantitative evidence for correlations between the NIR absolute magnitudes and J-band light-curve shapes, and demonstrate their utility for distance estimation. The average residual in the Hubble diagram for the training set SNe at cz > 2000kms-1 is 0.10 mag. The new application of bootstrap cross-validation to SN Ia light-curve inference tests the sensitivity of the statistical model fit to the finite sample and estimates the prediction error at 0.15 mag. These results demonstrate that SN Ia NIR light curves are as effective as corrected optical light curves, and, because they are less vulnerable to dust absorption, they have great potential as precise and accurate cosmological distance indicators.

  5. Development of synthetic flood damage curve by explicit costs analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martina, Mario; Molinari, Daniela; Dottori, Francesco; Scorzini, Annarita

    2015-04-01

    characteristics. Such functions were developed using a what-if analysis using data collected after the 2012 flood in the Umbria Region in Central Italy, as well as authors' experience, as reference to understand damage mechanisms. Observed damage data were also used to calibrate the functions.

  6. High-Resolution Melt Analysis for Rapid Comparison of Bacterial Community Compositions

    PubMed Central

    Hjelmsø, Mathis Hjort; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Bælum, Jacob; Feld, Louise; Holben, William E.

    2014-01-01

    In the study of bacterial community composition, 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing is today among the preferred methods of analysis. The cost of nucleotide sequence analysis, including requisite computational and bioinformatic steps, however, takes up a large part of many research budgets. High-resolution melt (HRM) analysis is the study of the melt behavior of specific PCR products. Here we describe a novel high-throughput approach in which we used HRM analysis targeting the 16S rRNA gene to rapidly screen multiple complex samples for differences in bacterial community composition. We hypothesized that HRM analysis of amplified 16S rRNA genes from a soil ecosystem could be used as a screening tool to identify changes in bacterial community structure. This hypothesis was tested using a soil microcosm setup exposed to a total of six treatments representing different combinations of pesticide and fertilization treatments. The HRM analysis identified a shift in the bacterial community composition in two of the treatments, both including the soil fumigant Basamid GR. These results were confirmed with both denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis and 454-based 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. HRM analysis was shown to be a fast, high-throughput technique that can serve as an effective alternative to gel-based screening methods to monitor microbial community composition. PMID:24610853

  7. High-resolution melt analysis for rapid comparison of bacterial community compositions.

    PubMed

    Hjelmsø, Mathis Hjort; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Baelum, Jacob; Feld, Louise; Holben, William E; Jacobsen, Carsten Suhr

    2014-06-01

    In the study of bacterial community composition, 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing is today among the preferred methods of analysis. The cost of nucleotide sequence analysis, including requisite computational and bioinformatic steps, however, takes up a large part of many research budgets. High-resolution melt (HRM) analysis is the study of the melt behavior of specific PCR products. Here we describe a novel high-throughput approach in which we used HRM analysis targeting the 16S rRNA gene to rapidly screen multiple complex samples for differences in bacterial community composition. We hypothesized that HRM analysis of amplified 16S rRNA genes from a soil ecosystem could be used as a screening tool to identify changes in bacterial community structure. This hypothesis was tested using a soil microcosm setup exposed to a total of six treatments representing different combinations of pesticide and fertilization treatments. The HRM analysis identified a shift in the bacterial community composition in two of the treatments, both including the soil fumigant Basamid GR. These results were confirmed with both denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis and 454-based 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. HRM analysis was shown to be a fast, high-throughput technique that can serve as an effective alternative to gel-based screening methods to monitor microbial community composition.

  8. The mathematical analysis of the heart rate and blood lactate curves during incremental exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Rosic, Mirko; Ilic, V; Obradovic, Z; Pantovic, S; Rosic, G

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes a new mathematical approach for the analysis of HR (heart rate) and BL (blood lactate) curves during incremental exercise testing using a HR/BL curve and its derivatives, taking into account the native shape of all curves, without any linear approximation. Using this approach the results indicate the appearance of three characteristic points (A, B and C) on the HR/BL curve. The point A on the HR/BL curve which is the value that corresponds to the load (12.73 ± 0.46 km h-1) at which BL starts to increase above the resting levels (0.9 ± 0.06 mM), and is analogous to Lactate Turn Point 1 (LTP1). The point C on the HR/BL curve which corresponds to a BL of approximately 4mM, and is analogous to LTP2. The point B on the HR/BL curve, which corresponds to the load (16.32 ± 0.49 km h-1) at which the moderate increase turns into a more pronounced increase in BL. This point has not been previously recognized in literature. We speculate this point represents attenuation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) increase, accompanied by the decrease in diastolic time duration during incremental exercise testing. Proposed mathematical approach allows precise determination of lactate turnpoints during incremental exercise testing.

  9. Rapid differentiation of mycobacteria by simplex real-time PCR with melting temperature calling analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, L; Yin, X; Wang, Q

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to develop a rapid, simple and cost-effective method for the differentiation of Mycobacterium species. A total of 80 clinical mycobacterial isolates belonging to 12 different species and 16 reference strains of 16 different species were differentiated by the simplex real-time PCR coupled with melting temperature calling analysis. By comparing their melting profiles with those of the reference strains, all clinical mycobacterial isolates were differentiated as Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex or nontuberculous mycobacteria, and the latter were further divided into five groups. In comparison with 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer sequencing method as the gold standard method, both sensitivity and specificity of the assay were 100% when it was used for the differentiation between Myco. tuberculosis complex and nontuberculous mycobacteria. The simplex real-time PCR coupled with melting temperature calling analysis could be an alternative method for the differentiation between Myco. tuberculosis complex and nontuberculous mycobacteria. Rapid differentiation of mycobacteria could shorten the diagnostic time of mycobacterial diseases. It is also helpful for achieving optimal therapy and appropriate patient management. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Matched Molecular Pair Analysis on Large Melting Point Datasets: A Big Data Perspective.

    PubMed

    Withnall, Michael; Chen, Hongming; Tetko, Igor V

    2017-06-26

    A matched molecular pair (MMP) analysis was used to examine the change in melting point (MP) between pairs of similar molecules in a set of ∼275k compounds. We found many cases in which the change in MP (ΔMP) of compounds correlates with changes in functional groups. In line with the results of a previous study, correlations between ΔMP and simple molecular descriptors, such as the number of hydrogen bond donors, were identified. In using a larger dataset, covering a wider chemical space and range of melting points, we observed that this method remains stable and scales well with larger datasets. This MMP-based method could find use as a simple privacy-preserving technique to analyze large proprietary databases and share findings between participating research groups. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  11. Analysis of Pu Isotopes in Melted Fuel by Neutron Resonance Transmission: Examination by Linear Absorption Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitatani, F.; Harada, H.; Takamine, J.; Kureta, M.; Seya, M.

    2014-04-01

    We have been studying the feasibility of neutron resonance transmission analysis (NRTA) for quantifying nuclear materials (Pu/U isotopes) in particle-like debris of melted fuel for nuclear material accountability and safeguards. The achievable measurement accuracy of NRTA was examined using a linear absorption model for the sample which contain substances other than nuclear fuel materials, such as boron and iron. The impurities (boron and iron etc.) in melted fuel are from the support structure and criticality control materials of the reactor core, and should be included to study the feasibility of NRTA for actual application. Neutron transmission spectra were calculated using the total neutron cross-sections in JENDL-4.0. The transmission spectra together with their uncertainties were evaluated. The study showed quantitatively that the statistical uncertainty in the determination of atomic number density of each isotope depends on the impurity density in the sample. The optimal thickness of the sample was determined for various impurity densities.

  12. Detection of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium by Real-Time PCR with High Resolution Melting Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sady, Hany; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Ngui, Romano; Atroosh, Wahib M; Al-Delaimy, Ahmed K; Nasr, Nabil A; Dawaki, Salwa; Abdulsalam, Awatif M; Ithoi, Init; Lim, Yvonne A L; Chua, Kek Heng; Surin, Johari

    2015-07-16

    The present study describes a real-time PCR approach with high resolution melting-curve (HRM) assay developed for the detection and differentiation of Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium in fecal and urine samples collected from rural Yemen. The samples were screened by microscopy and PCR for the Schistosoma species infection. A pair of degenerate primers were designed targeting partial regions in the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (cox1) gene of S. mansoni and S. haematobium using real-time PCR-HRM assay. The overall prevalence of schistosomiasis was 31.8%; 23.8% of the participants were infected with S. haematobium and 9.3% were infected with S. mansoni. With regards to the intensity of infections, 22.1% and 77.9% of S. haematobium infections were of heavy and light intensities, respectively. Likewise, 8.1%, 40.5% and 51.4% of S. mansoni infections were of heavy, moderate and light intensities, respectively. The melting points were distinctive for S. mansoni and S. haematobium, categorized by peaks of 76.49 ± 0.25 °C and 75.43 ± 0.26 °C, respectively. HRM analysis showed high detection capability through the amplification of Schistosoma DNA with as low as 0.0001 ng/µL. Significant negative correlations were reported between the real-time PCR-HRM cycle threshold (Ct) values and microscopic egg counts for both S. mansoni in stool and S. haematobium in urine (p < 0.01). In conclusion, this closed-tube HRM protocol provides a potentially powerful screening molecular tool for the detection of S. mansoni and S. haematobium. It is a simple, rapid, accurate, and cost-effective method. Hence, this method is a good alternative approach to probe-based PCR assays.

  13. Detection of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium by Real-Time PCR with High Resolution Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sady, Hany; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Ngui, Romano; Atroosh, Wahib M.; Al-Delaimy, Ahmed K.; Nasr, Nabil A.; Dawaki, Salwa; Abdulsalam, Awatif M.; Ithoi, Init; Lim, Yvonne A. L.; Chua, Kek Heng; Surin, Johari

    2015-01-01

    The present study describes a real-time PCR approach with high resolution melting-curve (HRM) assay developed for the detection and differentiation of Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium in fecal and urine samples collected from rural Yemen. The samples were screened by microscopy and PCR for the Schistosoma species infection. A pair of degenerate primers were designed targeting partial regions in the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (cox1) gene of S. mansoni and S. haematobium using real-time PCR-HRM assay. The overall prevalence of schistosomiasis was 31.8%; 23.8% of the participants were infected with S. haematobium and 9.3% were infected with S. mansoni. With regards to the intensity of infections, 22.1% and 77.9% of S. haematobium infections were of heavy and light intensities, respectively. Likewise, 8.1%, 40.5% and 51.4% of S. mansoni infections were of heavy, moderate and light intensities, respectively. The melting points were distinctive for S. mansoni and S. haematobium, categorized by peaks of 76.49 ± 0.25 °C and 75.43 ± 0.26 °C, respectively. HRM analysis showed high detection capability through the amplification of Schistosoma DNA with as low as 0.0001 ng/µL. Significant negative correlations were reported between the real-time PCR-HRM cycle threshold (Ct) values and microscopic egg counts for both S. mansoni in stool and S. haematobium in urine (p < 0.01). In conclusion, this closed-tube HRM protocol provides a potentially powerful screening molecular tool for the detection of S. mansoni and S. haematobium. It is a simple, rapid, accurate, and cost-effective method. Hence, this method is a good alternative approach to probe-based PCR assays. PMID:26193254

  14. Sensitive quantitative analysis of murine LINE1 DNA methylation using high resolution melt analysis

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Michelle; Blyth, Benjamin J.; Hussey, Damian J.; Jardine, Daniel; Ormsby, Rebecca J.

    2012-01-01

    We present here the first high resolution melt (HRM) assay to quantitatively analyze differences in murine DNA methylation levels utilizing CpG methylation of Long Interspersed Elements-1 (LINE1 or L1). By calculating the integral difference in melt temperature between samples and a methylated control, and biasing PCR primers for unmethylated CpGs, the assay demonstrates enhanced sensitivity to detect changes in methylation in a cell line treated with low doses of 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (5-aza). The L1 assay was confirmed to be a good marker of changes in DNA methylation of L1 elements at multiple regions across the genome when compared with total 5-methyl-cytosine content, measured by Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS). The assay design was also used to detect changes in methylation at other murine repeat elements (B1 and Intracisternal-A-particle Long-terminal Repeat elements). Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that L1 methylation changes were non-uniform across the CpGs within the L1-HRM target region, demonstrating that the L1 assay can detect small changes in CpG methylation among a large pool of heterogeneously methylated DNA templates. Application of the assay to various tissues from Balb/c and CBA mice, including previously unreported peripheral blood (PB), revealed a tissue hierarchy (from hypermethylated to hypomethylated) of PB > kidney > liver > prostate > spleen. CBA mice demonstrated overall greater methylation than Balb/c mice, and male mice demonstrated higher tissue methylation compared with female mice in both strains. Changes in DNA methylation have been reported to be an early and fundamental event in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, including cancer. Mouse studies designed to identify modulators of DNA methylation, the critical doses, relevant time points and the tissues affected are limited by the low throughput nature and exorbitant cost of many DNA methylation assays. The L1 assay provides a high throughput, inexpensive

  15. Sensitive quantitative analysis of murine LINE1 DNA methylation using high resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Newman, Michelle; Blyth, Benjamin J; Hussey, Damian J; Jardine, Daniel; Sykes, Pamela J; Ormsby, Rebecca J

    2012-01-01

    We present here the first high resolution melt (HRM) assay to quantitatively analyze differences in murine DNA methylation levels utilizing CpG methylation of Long Interspersed Elements-1 (LINE1 or L1). By calculating the integral difference in melt temperature between samples and a methylated control, and biasing PCR primers for unmethylated CpGs, the assay demonstrates enhanced sensitivity to detect changes in methylation in a cell line treated with low doses of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza). The L1 assay was confirmed to be a good marker of changes in DNA methylation of L1 elements at multiple regions across the genome when compared with total 5-methyl-cytosine content, measured by Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS). The assay design was also used to detect changes in methylation at other murine repeat elements (B1 and Intracisternal-A-particle Long-terminal Repeat elements). Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that L1 methylation changes were non-uniform across the CpGs within the L1-HRM target region, demonstrating that the L1 assay can detect small changes in CpG methylation among a large pool of heterogeneously methylated DNA templates. Application of the assay to various tissues from Balb/c and CBA mice, including previously unreported peripheral blood (PB), revealed a tissue hierarchy (from hypermethylated to hypomethylated) of PB > kidney > liver > prostate > spleen. CBA mice demonstrated overall greater methylation than Balb/c mice, and male mice demonstrated higher tissue methylation compared with female mice in both strains. Changes in DNA methylation have been reported to be an early and fundamental event in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, including cancer. Mouse studies designed to identify modulators of DNA methylation, the critical doses, relevant time points and the tissues affected are limited by the low throughput nature and exorbitant cost of many DNA methylation assays. The L1 assay provides a high throughput, inexpensive

  16. Peristaltic Flow of Rabinowitsch Fluid in a Curved Channel: Mathematical Analysis Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Nasir; Sajid, Muhammad; Javid, Khurram; Ahmed, Raheel

    2017-03-01

    Recently, Maraj and Nadeem (E. N. Maraj, S. Nadeem, Z. Naturforsch. A 70, 513 (2015)) discussed the application of Rabinowitsch fluid model for the mathematical analysis of peristaltic flow in a curved channel. The mathematical analysis presented by these authors is scrutinised in detail and certain subtle details are pointed out which affect the final results.

  17. Application of the normalization data analysis technique for single specimen R-curve determination

    SciTech Connect

    Porr, W.C.; Mills, W.J.

    1999-03-01

    The authors conclude that the normalization technique for single specimen R-curve and J{sub IC} determination can be very effective. Much like EPD, this technique requires some user interpretation/judgement during data analysis and may be difficult to standardize or fully automate even with strict analysis rules.

  18. Numerical analysis of curved frequency selective surface by finite-difference time-domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin-yi; Wang, Jian-bo; Chen, Gui-bo; Sun, Guan-cheng; Lu, Jun

    2011-08-01

    Frequency selective surface is a monolayer or multilayer 2D periodic structure which is composed of multiple resonance units scattering by a two-dimensional periodic array on dielectric layer. FSS can't absorb radio frequency energy, but can filter the frequency which is therefore applied in microwave technique or stealth technology. The relative research on curved FSS is relatively scarce since the curved FSS structure can be obtained only when FSS is attached on the materials surfaces of curved structures in engineering application. However, curved FSS is widely applied in practical engineering; therefore, the research on curved FSS structure has important significance. In this paper, a curved FSS structure model of Y-pore unit is established and numerical simulated by means of FDTD. The influence of curvature on FSS transmission characteristics is studied according to the analysis on the changing of radar cross section (RCS). The results show: the center frequency point of the plane band pass FSS structure drifts after the curve surface deformation of the structure; the center frequency point of the curved band pass FSS structure drifts with the changing of the curvature radius, i. e. with the decreasing of curvature radius, the frequency point drifts towards high points and the transmittance decreases. The design of FSS radome demands of accurate and stable center resonance frequency; therefore, the actual situation of curved surface should be considered in practical engineering application when band pass FSS is made into frequency selection filtering radome. The curvature radius should be long enough to avoid center frequency drifting and transmittance deceasing.

  19. A new methodology for free wake analysis using curved vortex elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, Donald B.; Teske, Milton E.; Quackenbush, Todd R.

    1987-01-01

    A method using curved vortex elements was developed for helicopter rotor free wake calculations. The Basic Curve Vortex Element (BCVE) is derived from the approximate Biot-Savart integration for a parabolic arc filament. When used in conjunction with a scheme to fit the elements along a vortex filament contour, this method has a significant advantage in overall accuracy and efficiency when compared to the traditional straight-line element approach. A theoretical and numerical analysis shows that free wake flows involving close interactions between filaments should utilize curved vortex elements in order to guarantee a consistent level of accuracy. The curved element method was implemented into a forward flight free wake analysis, featuring an adaptive far wake model that utilizes free wake information to extend the vortex filaments beyond the free wake regions. The curved vortex element free wake, coupled with this far wake model, exhibited rapid convergence, even in regions where the free wake and far wake turns are interlaced. Sample calculations are presented for tip vortex motion at various advance ratios for single and multiple blade rotors. Cross-flow plots reveal that the overall downstream wake flow resembles a trailing vortex pair. A preliminary assessment shows that the rotor downwash field is insensitive to element size, even for relatively large curved elements.

  20. The random walk function in the analysis of time-activity curves from dynamic radionuclide studies.

    PubMed

    Hart, G C; Bunday, B; Kiri, V

    1987-04-01

    The random walk function is a mathematical function derived from studies of the mass transport and flow of diffusible materials through tubes. Approximations to the function were first used some time ago in the field of cardiac tracer dilution curves, but in the absence of rapid and reproducible curve fitting the method never became commonplace. The current study uses the latest curve-fitting techniques and shows how the method may be used with precision in the analysis of time-activity curves from dynamic oesophageal and blood flow studies. The physiological basis of the method is given and parameters obtained which relate to both the rate of flow and the local dispersion of the bolus.

  1. First report of Tasmanian sheep strain (G2) genotype isolated from Iranian goat using the high resolution melting (HRM) analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-Safa, Ahmad; Mohag, hegh, Mohammad Ali; Pestechian, Nader; Ganji, Maryam; Mohammadi, Rasoul; Mahmoudi Lamouki, Reza; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The present study was aimed to evaluate E. granulosus genotypes isolated from goats using HRM analysis in Isfahan province. Background: Cystic echincoccosis, so-called hydatidosis, is widespread infection caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus. This is an important zoonotic disease worldwide, especially in the developing countries such as Iran. To date, molecular studies mainly based on the mitochondrial DNA sequences have identified distinct genotypes termed G1-G10 which can differ in some characteristics such as the growth and infectivity to different intermediate hosts or the survival rate in the definitive hosts that are important for the development of control strategies. Methods: From August to December 2014, 1341 goats were investigated and hydatid cysts were collected from the liver and lungs of 43 infected goats in Isfahan province abattoirs, Isfahan, Iran. Total genomic DNA was extracted from each sample, amplified for the presence of polymorphism of mitochondrial gene coding for cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1), using high resolution melting curve (HRM) method. Results: the results of HRM analysis using the sequence of CO1 gene for 43 Echinococcus granulosus isolates from goats showed 31, 2 and 10 isolates were identified as G1, G2, and G3 genotypes, respectively. Conclusion: G1 is the predominant genotype in the isolated goat samples in Isfahan province, and the presence of G2 strain was reported for the first time in goat in Iran. PMID:28224031

  2. Identification and Differentiation of Monilinia Species Causing Brown Rot of Pome and Stone Fruit using High-Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis.

    PubMed

    Papavasileiou, Antonios; Madesis, Panagiotis B; Karaoglanidis, George S

    2016-09-01

    Brown rot is a devastating disease of stone fruit caused by Monilinia spp. Among these species, Monilinia fructicola is a quarantine pathogen in Europe but has recently been detected in several European countries. Identification of brown rot agents relies on morphological differences or use of molecular methods requiring fungal isolation. The current study was initiated to develop and validate a high-resolution melting (HRM) method for the identification of the Monilinia spp. and for the detection of M. fructicola among other brown rot pathogens. Based on the sequence of the cytb intron from M. laxa, M. fructicola, M. fructigena, M. mumecola, M. linhartiana, and M. yunnanensis isolates originating from several countries, a pair of universal primers for species identification and a pair of primers specific to M. fructicola were designed. The specificity of the primers was verified to ensure against cross-reaction with other fungal species. The melting curve analysis using the universal primers generated six different HRM curve profiles, each one specific for each species. Τhe HRM analysis primers specific to M. fructicola amplified a 120-bp region with a distinct melt profile corresponding to the presence of M. fructicola, regardless of the presence of other species. HRM analysis can be a useful tool for rapid identification and differentiation of the six Monilinia spp. using a single primer pair. This novel assay has the potential for simultaneous identification and differentiation of the closely related Monilinia spp. as well as for the differentiation of M. fructicola from other common pathogens or saprophytes that may occur on the diseased fruit.

  3. Hybrid analysis (barcode-high resolution melting) for authentication of Thai herbal products, Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Wall.ex Nees

    PubMed Central

    Osathanunkul, Maslin; Suwannapoom, Chatmongkon; Khamyong, Nuttaluck; Pintakum, Danupol; Lamphun, Santisuk Na; Triwitayakorn, Kanokporn; Osathanunkul, Kitisak; Madesis, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Background: Andrographis paniculata Nees is a medicinal plant with multiple pharmacological properties. It has been used over many centuries as a household remedy. A. paniculata products sold on the markets are in processed forms so it is difficult to authenticate. Therefore buying the herbal products poses a high-risk of acquiring counterfeited, substituted and/or adulterated products. Due to these issues, a reliable method to authenticate products is needed. Materials and Methods: High resolution melting analysis coupled with DNA barcoding (Bar-HRM) was applied to detect adulteration in commercial herbal products. The rbcL barcode was selected to use in primers design for HRM analysis to produce standard melting profile of A. paniculata species. DNA of the tested commercial products was isolated and their melting profiles were then generated and compared with the standard A. paniculata. Results: The melting profiles of the rbcL amplicons of the three closely related herbal species (A. paniculata, Acanthus ebracteatus and Rhinacanthus nasutus) are clearly separated so that they can be distinguished by the developed method. The method was then used to authenticate commercial herbal products. HRM curves of all 10 samples tested are similar to A. paniculata which indicated that all tested products were contained the correct species as labeled. Conclusion: The method described in this study has been proved to be useful in aiding identification and/or authenticating A. paniculata. This Bar-HRM analysis has allowed us easily to determine the A. paniculata species in herbal products on the markets even they are in processed forms. SUMMARY We propose the use of DNA barcoding combined with High Resolution Melting analysis for authenticating of Andrographis paniculata products.The developed method can be used regardless of the type of the DNA template (fresh or dried tissue, leaf, and stem).rbcL region was chosen for the analysis and work well with our samplesWe can easily

  4. Detection of Indel Mutations in Drosophila by High-Resolution Melt Analysis (HRMA).

    PubMed

    Housden, Benjamin E; Perrimon, Norbert

    2016-09-01

    Although CRISPR technology allows specific genome alterations to be created with relative ease, detection of these events can be problematic. For example, CRISPR-induced double-strand breaks are often repaired imprecisely to generate unpredictable short indel mutations. Detection of these events requires the use of molecular screening techniques such as endonuclease assays, restriction profiling, or high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA). Here, we provide detailed protocols for HRMA-based mutation screening in Drosophila and analysis of the resulting data using the online tool HRMAnalyzer.

  5. Detection of genetic variation using dual-labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe-based melting point analysis.

    PubMed

    Hur, Deokhwe; Kim, Myoung Sug; Song, Minsik; Jung, Jinwook; Park, Heekyung

    2015-01-01

    Thermal denaturation of probe-target hybrid is highly reproducible, and which makes probe melting point analysis reliable in the detection of mutations, polymorphisms and epigenetic differences in DNA. To improve resolution of these detections, we used dual-labeled (quencher and fluorescence), full base of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe for fluorescence probe based melting point analysis. Because of their uncharged nature and peptide bond-linked backbone, PNA probes have more favorable hybridization properties, which make a large difference in the melting temperature between specific hybridization and partial hybridization. Here, we have shown that full base dual-labeled PNA is apt material for fluorescence probe-based melting point analysis with large difference in the melting temperature between full specific hybridization and that of partial hybridization, including insertion and deletion. In case of narrowly distributed mutations, PNA probe effectively detects three mutations in a single reaction tube with three probes. Moreover, we successfully diagnose virus analogues with amplification and melting temperature signal. Lastly, Melting temperature of PNA oligomer can be easily adjusted just by adding gamma-modified PNA probe. The PNA probes offer advantage of improved flexibility in probe design, which could be used in various applications in mutation detection among a wide range of spectrums.

  6. A novel snapback primer probe assay for the detection and discrimination of sympatric Haemonchus species using DNA melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Rudolf; Silbermayr, Katja; Periasamy, Kathiravan

    2017-02-20

    Different sympatric species of Haemonchus parasites infecting ruminants and camels can be distinguished morphologically, but involves tedious microscopic examinations, measurements and several other limitations. Information on internal transcribed spacer-2 (ITS-2) sequence provides confirmatory differentiation of sympatric Haemonchus species. The present study introduces a novel, snapback primer probe based, real time PCR assay for the differentiation of three sympatric Haemonchus species, H. contortus (Hco), H. placei (Hpl) and H. longistipes (Hlo). The assay was designed to amplify a region of 130bp within the ITS-2 gene that included three diagnostic mutational sites capable of discriminating Hco, Hpl and Hlo. Following melt curve analysis, species-specific diagnostic melt peaks were obtained for Hco, Hpl and Hlo with a mean melting temperature of 56.6±0.3°C, 64.4±0.1°C and 54.4±0.1°C respectively. The test for analytical sensitivity revealed the ability of the assay to detect up to 5 copies per reaction. To evaluate the discriminating power of the assay, 174 samples from adult worms and 3rd stage larvae belonging to different Haemonchus species and various other nematode species including Cooperia curticei, Trichostrongylus axei, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, and Teladorsagia circumcincta were tested. Additionally, DNA extracted from 25 fecal egg samples was also tested and the specificity of the assay was verified by sequencing the ITS-2 gene of all the Haemonchus positive and non-Haemonchus samples. The assay worked accurately with 100% specificity in at least three real time PCR platforms. The assay is an effective alternative to the sequencing approach and is expected to be helpful for the screening of individual adult and larval Haemonchus parasites. However, caution needs to be applied while interpreting the results from fecal egg samples due to varying levels of sympatric co-infections from different Haemonchus species. The present study is the

  7. AtomicJ: an open source software for analysis of force curves.

    PubMed

    Hermanowicz, Paweł; Sarna, Michał; Burda, Kvetoslava; Gabryś, Halina

    2014-06-01

    We present an open source Java application for analysis of force curves and images recorded with the Atomic Force Microscope. AtomicJ supports a wide range of contact mechanics models and implements procedures that reduce the influence of deviations from the contact model. It generates maps of mechanical properties, including maps of Young's modulus, adhesion force, and sample height. It can also calculate stacks, which reveal how sample's response to deformation changes with indentation depth. AtomicJ analyzes force curves concurrently on multiple threads, which allows for high speed of analysis. It runs on all popular operating systems, including Windows, Linux, and Macintosh.

  8. AtomicJ: An open source software for analysis of force curves

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanowicz, Paweł Gabryś, Halina; Sarna, Michał; Burda, Kvetoslava

    2014-06-15

    We present an open source Java application for analysis of force curves and images recorded with the Atomic Force Microscope. AtomicJ supports a wide range of contact mechanics models and implements procedures that reduce the influence of deviations from the contact model. It generates maps of mechanical properties, including maps of Young's modulus, adhesion force, and sample height. It can also calculate stacks, which reveal how sample's response to deformation changes with indentation depth. AtomicJ analyzes force curves concurrently on multiple threads, which allows for high speed of analysis. It runs on all popular operating systems, including Windows, Linux, and Macintosh.

  9. AtomicJ: An open source software for analysis of force curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanowicz, Paweł; Sarna, Michał; Burda, Kvetoslava; Gabryś, Halina

    2014-06-01

    We present an open source Java application for analysis of force curves and images recorded with the Atomic Force Microscope. AtomicJ supports a wide range of contact mechanics models and implements procedures that reduce the influence of deviations from the contact model. It generates maps of mechanical properties, including maps of Young's modulus, adhesion force, and sample height. It can also calculate stacks, which reveal how sample's response to deformation changes with indentation depth. AtomicJ analyzes force curves concurrently on multiple threads, which allows for high speed of analysis. It runs on all popular operating systems, including Windows, Linux, and Macintosh.

  10. Evaluation of spa-typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus using high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Mazi, Waleed; Sangal, Vartul; Sandstrom, Gunnar; Saeed, Amir; Yu, Jun

    2015-09-01

    spa-typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been used widely in clinical diagnostics and epidemiological studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate high-resolution melting (HRM) as a rapid and cost-effective method, to replace DNA-sequencing, for spa-typing in a global collection of 50 MRSA isolates. The polymorphic X region of the spa gene was amplified by colony PCR using the SensiMix HRM kit, and the melting temperature (Tm) and melting curves of the amplicons were analyzed in close tubes using a Rotor-Gene 6000 instrument. Fifteen out of 19 spa-types each had a distinct Tm, which was sufficient to unambiguously type each of these spa-types. The remaining four spa-types could not be separated by Tm alone: t008 and t2770 shared a Tm (80.3°C) and t021 and t311 shared a Tm (80.0°C). However, they could be separated based on the shapes of their melting curves. There are discrepancies between the findings of the present study and those of previous studies, suggesting that standardization remains a challenge for cross-referencing. HRM-based spa-typing is reproducible, simple, rapid, and cost-effective. t037 is prevalent in Brazil and Sudan, while diverse spa-types are found in Scotland and Saudi Arabia. Standardization is required for cross-referencing between laboratories globally. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Time-dependent ROC curve analysis in medical research: current methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Kamarudin, Adina Najwa; Cox, Trevor; Kolamunnage-Dona, Ruwanthi

    2017-04-07

    ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve analysis is well established for assessing how well a marker is capable of discriminating between individuals who experience disease onset and individuals who do not. The classical (standard) approach of ROC curve analysis considers event (disease) status and marker value for an individual as fixed over time, however in practice, both the disease status and marker value change over time. Individuals who are disease-free earlier may develop the disease later due to longer study follow-up, and also their marker value may change from baseline during follow-up. Thus, an ROC curve as a function of time is more appropriate. However, many researchers still use the standard ROC curve approach to determine the marker capability ignoring the time dependency of the disease status or the marker. We comprehensively review currently proposed methodologies of time-dependent ROC curves which use single or longitudinal marker measurements, aiming to provide clarity in each methodology, identify software tools to carry out such analysis in practice and illustrate several applications of the methodology. We have also extended some methods to incorporate a longitudinal marker and illustrated the methodologies using a sequential dataset from the Mayo Clinic trial in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) of the liver. From our methodological review, we have identified 18 estimation methods of time-dependent ROC curve analyses for censored event times and three other methods can only deal with non-censored event times. Despite the considerable numbers of estimation methods, applications of the methodology in clinical studies are still lacking. The value of time-dependent ROC curve methods has been re-established. We have illustrated the methods in practice using currently available software and made some recommendations for future research.

  12. Microstructures define melting of molybdenum at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrubiak, Rostislav; Meng, Yue; Shen, Guoyin

    2017-03-01

    High-pressure melting anchors the phase diagram of a material, revealing the effect of pressure on the breakdown of the ordering of atoms in the solid. An important case is molybdenum, which has long been speculated to undergo an exceptionally steep increase in melting temperature when compressed. On the other hand, previous experiments showed nearly constant melting temperature as a function of pressure, in large discrepancy with theoretical expectations. Here we report a high-slope melting curve in molybdenum by synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis of crystalline microstructures, generated by heating and subsequently rapidly quenching samples in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Distinct microstructural changes, observed at pressures up to 130 gigapascals, appear exclusively after melting, thus offering a reliable melting criterion. In addition, our study reveals a previously unsuspected transition in molybdenum at high pressure and high temperature, which yields highly textured body-centred cubic nanograins above a transition temperature.

  13. Microstructures define melting of molybdenum at high pressures

    PubMed Central

    Hrubiak, Rostislav; Meng, Yue; Shen, Guoyin

    2017-01-01

    High-pressure melting anchors the phase diagram of a material, revealing the effect of pressure on the breakdown of the ordering of atoms in the solid. An important case is molybdenum, which has long been speculated to undergo an exceptionally steep increase in melting temperature when compressed. On the other hand, previous experiments showed nearly constant melting temperature as a function of pressure, in large discrepancy with theoretical expectations. Here we report a high-slope melting curve in molybdenum by synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis of crystalline microstructures, generated by heating and subsequently rapidly quenching samples in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Distinct microstructural changes, observed at pressures up to 130 gigapascals, appear exclusively after melting, thus offering a reliable melting criterion. In addition, our study reveals a previously unsuspected transition in molybdenum at high pressure and high temperature, which yields highly textured body-centred cubic nanograins above a transition temperature. PMID:28248309

  14. Retrospective North American CFL Experience Curve Analysis and Correlation to Deployment Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Sarah J.; Wei, Max; Sohn, Michael D.

    2015-07-01

    Retrospective experience curves are a useful tool for understanding historic technology development, and can contribute to investment program analysis and future cost estimation efforts. This work documents our development of an analysis approach for deriving retrospective experience curves with a variable learning rate, and its application to develop an experience curve for compact fluorescent lamps for the global and North American markets over the years 1990-2007. Uncertainties and assumptions involved in interpreting data for our experience curve development are discussed, including the processing and transformation of empirical data, the selection of system boundaries, and the identification of historical changes in the learning rate over the course of 15 years. In the results that follow, we find that that the learning rate has changed at least once from 1990-2007. We also explore if, and to what degree, public deployment programs may have contributed to an increased technology learning rate in North America. We observe correlations between the changes in the learning rate and the initiation of new policies, abrupt technological advances, including improvements to ballast technology, and economic and political events such as trade tariffs and electricity prices. Finally, we discuss how the findings of this work (1) support the use of segmented experience curves for retrospective and prospective analysis and (2) may imply that investments in technological research and development have contributed to a change in market adoption and penetration.

  15. Influence of NaCl on ice VI and ice VII melting curves up to 6 GPa, implications for large icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Journaux, B.; Daniel, I.; Caracas, R.; Montagnac, G.; Cardon, H.

    2013-09-01

    The influence of sodium chloride salt on the liquidus of ice VI and ice VII has been measured for concentrations ranging between 0.01 and 4 mol kg-1 NaCl. Dissolved NaCl significantly increases the melting pressure or decreases the melting temperature as a function of the salt concentration and induces a density crossover between ice VI and the brine. For NaCl concentrations higher than 2.5 mol kg-1 ice VI is more buoyant than the brine. The liquidus points are fitted to a second order polynomial law and a model is provided to predict the melting pressures of ice VI and ice VII (Pm,VI and Pm,VII), respectively as a function of temperature T (K) and NaCl concentration XNaCl (mol kg-1): Pm,VI(T,XNaCl)=9.27+0.996XNaCl-(6.99×10-2+7.6×10-3XNaCl)·T+(1.414×10-4+1.541×10-5XNaCl)·T2 Pm,VII(T,XNaCl)=-0.133+0.122XNaCl-(1.28×10-4+4.17×10-4XNaCl)·T+(1.86×10-5+8.56×10-7XNaCl)·T2 The temperature of the triple point between ice VI, ice VII and the brine shifts of -7 K/XNaCl along the 2.17 GPa isobar. The consequences of potentially dissolved NaCl for the internal structure of water rich planetary bodies are discussed. The density crossover between ice VI and brines suggests that migration of brines through a deep ice VI layer is enhanced for high thermal profiles and is unlikely for colder thermal conditions. It also suggests that patches of brines may actually be gravitationally stable at the interface between the bedrock and a deep ice VI basal layer allowing for a potential new class of exobiological habitat.

  16. Visualization and Analysis of Structural and Dynamical Properties of Hydrous Silicate Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, B. B.; Bhattarai, D.; Stixrude, L. P.

    2008-12-01

    We have carried out a detailed visualization-based analysis of position-time data produced by first principles molecular dynamics simulations of hydrous MgSiO3 liquid to gain insight into its structural and dynamical behavior. A wide range of pressure (0 to ~100 GPa) and temperature (2000 to 6000 K) is covered and the water content is also varied (5 and 10 wt percent water in the melt). By exploring a number of structural parameters associated with short- and mid-range orders, we have shown that the melt structure changes substantially on compression. The speciation of the water component at low pressures is dominated by the isolated structures (with over 90 percent hydrogen participated) consisting of hydroxyls, water molecules, O- H-O bridging, and four-atom (O-H-O-H and H-O-H-O) groups, where every oxygen atom may be a part of polyhedron or free (i.e., bound to only magnesium atom). Hydroxyls slightly favor polyhedral sites over magnesium sites whereas molecular water is almost entirely bound to magnesium sites, and also interpolyhedral bridging (Si-O-H-O-Si) dominates other bridging. As compression increases, these isolated structures increasingly combine with each other to form extended structures involving a total of five or more O and H atoms and/or containing three-fold coordination species, which together consume over 60 percent hydrogen at the highest compression studied. Protons in the melt can be considered on equal footing with other cations (or more precisely as network modifier cations), and they are shown to increase and decrease, respectively, the contents of non-bridging and bridging oxygen. Relatively long runs are used to calculate the self-diffusion coefficients of all atomic species, which are enhanced in the presence of water compared to those of anhydrous melt. This is consistent with the prediction that water depolymerizes the melt structure at all pressures. Our analysis suggests that proton diffusion involves two processes - the transfer

  17. Testing and analysis of flat and curved panels with multiple cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broek, David; Jeong, David Y.; Thomson, Douglas

    1994-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation of multiple cracking in various types of test specimens is described in this paper. The testing phase is comprised of a flat unstiffened panel series and curved stiffened and unstiffened panel series. The test specimens contained various configurations for initial damage. Static loading was applied to these specimens until ultimate failure, while loads and crack propagation were recorded. This data provides the basis for developing and validating methodologies for predicting linkup of multiple cracks, progression to failure, and overall residual strength. The results from twelve flat coupon and ten full scale curved panel tests are presented. In addition, an engineering analysis procedure was developed to predict multiple crack linkup. Reasonable agreement was found between predictions and actual test results for linkup and residual strength for both flat and curved panels. The results indicate that an engineering analysis approach has the potential to quantitatively assess the effect of multiple cracks in the arrest capability of an aircraft fuselage structure.

  18. Melted Paraffin Wax as an Innovative Liquid and Solid Extractant for Elemental Analysis by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Papai, Rodrigo; Sato, Roseli Hiromi; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; Krug, Francisco José; Gaubeur, Ivanise

    2017-03-07

    This work proposes a new development in the use of melted paraffin wax as a new extractant in a procedure designed to aggregate the advantages of liquid phase extraction (extract homogeneity, fast, and efficient transfer, low cost and simplicity) to solid phase extraction. As proof of concept, copper(II) in aqueous samples was converted into a hydrophobic complex of copper(II) diethyldithiocarbamate and subsequently extracted into paraffin wax. Parameters which affect the complexation and extraction (pH, DDTC, and Triton X-100 concentration, vortex agitation time and complexation time) were optimized in a univariate way. The combination of the extraction proposed procedure with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy allowed the precise copper determination (coefficient of variation = 3.1%, n = 10) and enhanced detectability because of the concentration factor of 18 times. A calibration curve was obtained with a linear range of 0.50-10.00 mg L(-1) (R(2) = 0.9990, n = 7), LOD = 0.12 mg L(-1), and LOQ = 0.38 mg L(-1) under optimized conditions. An extraction procedure efficiency of 94% was obtained. The accuracy of the method was confirmed through the analysis of a reference material of human blood serum, by the spike and recovery trials with seawater, tap water, mineral water, and alcoholic beverages and by comparing with those results obtained by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

  19. Flood Envelope Curves for the Setouchi Region Derived by Spatial Distribution Analysis of Radar Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikamori, Hidetaka; Nagai, Akihiro

    This paper presents the estimation procedure of a flood envelope curve originally developed by Kadoya and Nagai (1979) on the basis of depth-area-duration (DAD) analysis of radar precipitation data in order to examine the availability of spatial distribution data of precipitation for statistical flood peak analysis. The estimated flood envelope curves by applying the presented procedure to the Yoshii River Basin located in Okayama Prefecture of the western Japan well enveloped the flood peaks observed in the Hiroshima and Okayama Prefectures; the curves tended, however, to overestimate flood peaks for small catchments. It was explained by the fact that very limited areas are with regionally maximum areal rainfall arising maximum flood peak discharge and the other areas are with smaller areal rainfall than maximum in the objective region. Flood envelope curve equation considering spatial probability of regionally maximum areal rainfall was presented and applied to the Yoshii River Basin to show the effect of adjusting the spatial probability for mitigating overestimation of maximum flood peaks for small basin. This result shows probabilistic aspects of flood envelope curves deterministically estimated from hydrological records, which should be considered when determining design flood discharge for dam planning.

  20. Practical Prediction of Ten Common Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes/Serogroups in One PCR Reaction by Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification and Melting Curve (MLPA-MC) Assay in Shenzhen, China

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lei; Zou, Jianhua; Jin, Ping; Hu, Yanwei; Kudinha, Timothy; Kong, Fanrong; Chen, Xu; Wang, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae has more than 95 distinct serotypes described to date. However, only certain serotypes are more likely to cause pneumococcal diseases. Thus serotype surveillance is important for vaccine formula design as well as in post-vaccine serotype shift monitor. The goal of this study was to develop a practical screening assay for ten Shenzhen China common pneumococcal serotypes/serogroups in one molecular reaction. Methods A molecular assay, based on multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and melting curve (MC) analysis, was developed in an integrated approach (MLPA-MC) for the detection of ten capsular serotypes/serogroups 4, 6 (6A/6B/6C/6D), 9V/9A, 14, 15F/15A, 15B/15C, 18 (18F/18A/18B/18C), 19F, 19A and 23F. We designed serotype/serogroup-specific MLPA probes and fluorescent detection probes to discriminate the different serotypes/serogroups in one molecular reaction. The three steps of MLPA-MC assay are continuous reactions in one well detected by LightCycler 480. A total of 210 S. pneumoniae isolates from our local Maternity and Child Health Hospital were randomly chosen to evaluate the assay against published multiplex PCR assays. Results Our results showed that 198 (94.3%) of S. pneumoniae isolates were type-able by our assays and the results were in complete concordance with the published multiplex PCRs. Using the MLPA-MC assay, 96 S. pneumoniae isolates could be typed within 3 hours with limited hands-on time. This serotype/serogroup-screening assay can be easily modified or extended by modification of the serotype/serogroup-specific MLPA probes combinations according to the needs of different laboratories. Conclusions We recommend use of this assay as a starting point for screening serotype/serogroup frequencies. There is a need for this assay to be combined with other molecular typing assays, like published serotype specific PCRs, or even the Quellung reaction for serotype confirmation. PMID:26151828

  1. Rapid and efficient zebrafish genotyping using PCR with high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lingyan; Quist, Tyler S; Stevenson, Tamara J; Dahlem, Timothy J; Bonkowsky, Joshua L

    2014-02-05

    Zebrafish is a powerful vertebrate model system for studying development, modeling disease, and performing drug screening. Recently a variety of genetic tools have been introduced, including multiple strategies for inducing mutations and generating transgenic lines. However, large-scale screening is limited by traditional genotyping methods, which are time-consuming and labor-intensive. Here we describe a technique to analyze zebrafish genotypes by PCR combined with high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA). This approach is rapid, sensitive, and inexpensive, with lower risk of contamination artifacts. Genotyping by PCR with HRMA can be used for embryos or adult fish, including in high-throughput screening protocols.

  2. Aptitude-Treatment Interaction Effects on Explicit Rule Learning: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwu, Fenfang; Pan, Wei; Sun, Shuyan

    2014-01-01

    Finding the match between individuals and educational treatments is the aim of both educators and the aptitude-treatment interaction research paradigm. Using the latent growth curve analysis, the present study investigates the interaction between the type of explicit instructional approaches (deductive vs. explicit-inductive) and the level of…

  3. Computational Tools for Probing Interactions in Multiple Linear Regression, Multilevel Modeling, and Latent Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preacher, Kristopher J.; Curran, Patrick J.; Bauer, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    Simple slopes, regions of significance, and confidence bands are commonly used to evaluate interactions in multiple linear regression (MLR) models, and the use of these techniques has recently been extended to multilevel or hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) and latent curve analysis (LCA). However, conducting these tests and plotting the…

  4. Taxometrics, Polytomous Constructs, and the Comparison Curve Fit Index: A Monte Carlo Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Glenn D.; McGrath, Robert E.; Knight, Raymond A.

    2010-01-01

    The taxometric method effectively distinguishes between dimensional (1-class) and taxonic (2-class) latent structure, but there is virtually no information on how it responds to polytomous (3-class) latent structure. A Monte Carlo analysis showed that the mean comparison curve fit index (CCFI; Ruscio, Haslam, & Ruscio, 2006) obtained with 3…

  5. Aptitude-Treatment Interaction Effects on Explicit Rule Learning: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwu, Fenfang; Pan, Wei; Sun, Shuyan

    2014-01-01

    Finding the match between individuals and educational treatments is the aim of both educators and the aptitude-treatment interaction research paradigm. Using the latent growth curve analysis, the present study investigates the interaction between the type of explicit instructional approaches (deductive vs. explicit-inductive) and the level of…

  6. Computational Tools for Probing Interactions in Multiple Linear Regression, Multilevel Modeling, and Latent Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preacher, Kristopher J.; Curran, Patrick J.; Bauer, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    Simple slopes, regions of significance, and confidence bands are commonly used to evaluate interactions in multiple linear regression (MLR) models, and the use of these techniques has recently been extended to multilevel or hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) and latent curve analysis (LCA). However, conducting these tests and plotting the…

  7. A Novel Representation for Riemannian Analysis of Elastic Curves in ℝn

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shantanu H.; Klassen, Eric; Srivastava, Anuj; Jermyn, Ian

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel representation of continuous, closed curves in ℝn that is quite efficient for analyzing their shapes. We combine the strengths of two important ideas - elastic shape metric and path-straightening methods -in shape analysis and present a fast algorithm for finding geodesics in shape spaces. The elastic metric allows for optimal matching of features while path-straightening provides geodesics between curves. Efficiency results from the fact that the elastic metric becomes the simple 2 metric in the proposed representation. We present step-by-step algorithms for computing geodesics in this framework, and demonstrate them with 2-D as well as 3-D examples. PMID:21311729

  8. IMAGE-PLANE ANALYSIS OF n-POINT-MASS LENS CRITICAL CURVES AND CAUSTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Danek, Kamil; Heyrovský, David E-mail: heyrovsky@utf.mff.cuni.cz

    2015-06-10

    The interpretation of gravitational microlensing events caused by planetary systems or multiple stars is based on the n-point-mass lens model. The first planets detected by microlensing were well described by the two-point-mass model of a star with one planet. By the end of 2014, four events involving three-point-mass lenses had been announced. Two of the lenses were stars with two planetary companions each; two were binary stars with a planet orbiting one component. While the two-point-mass model is well understood, the same cannot be said for lenses with three or more components. Even the range of possible critical-curve topologies and caustic geometries of the three-point-mass lens remains unknown. In this paper we provide new tools for mapping the critical-curve topology and caustic cusp number in the parameter space of n-point-mass lenses. We perform our analysis in the image plane of the lens. We show that all contours of the Jacobian are critical curves of re-scaled versions of the lens configuration. Utilizing this property further, we introduce the cusp curve to identify cusp-image positions on all contours simultaneously. In order to track cusp-number changes in caustic metamorphoses, we define the morph curve, which pinpoints the positions of metamorphosis-point images along the cusp curve. We demonstrate the usage of both curves on simple two- and three-point-mass lens examples. For the three simplest caustic metamorphoses we illustrate the local structure of the image and source planes.

  9. Asymptotic analysis of a cohesive crack. 2: Influence of the softening curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planas, J.; Elices, M.

    1993-12-01

    This paper presents a numerical method well suited to solve the integral equation governing the asymptotic behavior of a cohesive crack, and uses it to analyze the influence of the softening curve on the cracking response of large specimens. The analysis is performed with two main objectives in mind: (1) providing criteria to determine when a simplified linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) approach can be applied, and (2) providing possible procedures of extracting information on the softening behavior from experimental data. The main conclusion is that the effective crack extension prior to peak is nearly determined by the length of the softening curve (the critical crack opening) and so is the deviation from LEFM. Furthermore, a simplified R-curve approach is proposed as an approximate alternative to solving the governing integral equation.

  10. The analysis of dose-response curve from bioassays with quantal response: Deterministic or statistical approaches?

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, G; Sfara, V

    2016-04-25

    Dose-response relations can be obtained from systems at any structural level of biological matter, from the molecular to the organismic level. There are two types of approaches for analyzing dose-response curves: a deterministic approach, based on the law of mass action, and a statistical approach, based on the assumed probabilities distribution of phenotypic characters. Models based on the law of mass action have been proposed to analyze dose-response relations across the entire range of biological systems. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the principles that determine the dose-response relations. Dose-response curves of simple systems are the result of chemical interactions between reacting molecules, and therefore are supported by the law of mass action. In consequence, the shape of these curves is perfectly sustained by physicochemical features. However, dose-response curves of bioassays with quantal response are not explained by the simple collision of molecules but by phenotypic variations among individuals and can be interpreted as individual tolerances. The expression of tolerance is the result of many genetic and environmental factors and thus can be considered a random variable. In consequence, the shape of its associated dose-response curve has no physicochemical bearings; instead, they are originated from random biological variations. Due to the randomness of tolerance there is no reason to use deterministic equations for its analysis; on the contrary, statistical models are the appropriate tools for analyzing these dose-response relations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Learning Curve Analysis of Different Stages of Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Feng-Hsiang

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the learning curves of the different stages of robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy. Design. Retrospective analysis. Design Classification. Canadian Task Force classification II-2. Setting. Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Patient Intervention. Women receiving robotic-assisted total and subtotal laparoscopic hysterectomies for benign conditions from May 1, 2013, to August 31, 2015. Measurements and Main Results. The mean age, body mass index (BMI), and uterine weight were 46.44 ± 5.31 years, 23.97 ± 4.75 kg/m2, and 435.48 ± 250.62 g, respectively. The most rapid learning curve was obtained for the main surgery console stage; eight experiences were required to achieve duration stability, and the time spent in this stage did not violate the control rules. The docking stage required 14 experiences to achieve duration stability, and the suture stage was the most difficult to master, requiring 26 experiences. BMI did not considerably affect the duration of the three stages. The uterine weight and the presence of adhesion did not substantially affect the main surgery console time. Conclusion. Different stages of robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy have different learning curves. The main surgery console stage has the most rapid learning curve, whereas the suture stage has the slowest learning curve. PMID:28373977

  12. A computational model-based validation of Guyton's analysis of cardiac output and venous return curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Cohen, R. J.; Mark, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    Guyton developed a popular approach for understanding the factors responsible for cardiac output (CO) regulation in which 1) the heart-lung unit and systemic circulation are independently characterized via CO and venous return (VR) curves, and 2) average CO and right atrial pressure (RAP) of the intact circulation are predicted by graphically intersecting the curves. However, this approach is virtually impossible to verify experimentally. We theoretically evaluated the approach with respect to a nonlinear, computational model of the pulsatile heart and circulation. We developed two sets of open circulation models to generate CO and VR curves, differing by the manner in which average RAP was varied. One set applied constant RAPs, while the other set applied pulsatile RAPs. Accurate prediction of intact, average CO and RAP was achieved only by intersecting the CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs because of the pulsatility and nonlinearity (e.g., systemic venous collapse) of the intact model. The CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs were also practically independent. This theoretical study therefore supports the validity of Guyton's graphical analysis.

  13. Split calibration curve: an approach to avoid repeat analysis of the samples exceeding ULOQ.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sudipta; Basit, Abdul; Ravindran, Selvan; Patel, Vandana B; Vangala, Subrahmanyam; Patel, Hitesh

    2012-10-01

    The current practice of using calibration curves with narrow concentration ranges during bioanalysis of new chemical entities has some limitations and is time consuming. In the present study we describe a split calibration curve approach, where sample dilution and repeat analysis can be avoided without compromising the quality and integrity of the data obtained. A split calibration curve approach is employed to determine the drug concentration in plasma samples with accuracy and precision over a wide dynamic range of approximately 0.6 to 15,000 ng/ml for dapsone and approximately 1 to 25,000 ng/ml for cyclophosphamide and glipizide. A wide dynamic range of concentrations for these three compounds was used in the current study to construct split calibration curves and was successfully validated for sample analysis in a single run. Using this method, repeat analysis of samples can be avoided. This is useful for the bioanalysis of toxicokinetic studies with wide dose ranges and studies where the sample volume is limited.

  14. High resolution melting analysis as a new approach to discriminate gluten-containing cereals.

    PubMed

    Martín-Fernández, Begoña; Costa, Joana; de-Los-Santos-Álvarez, Noemí; López-Ruiz, Beatriz; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Mafra, Isabel

    2016-11-15

    With this work, it is intended to propose a novel approach based on high resolution melting (HRM) analysis to detect wheat and discriminate it from other gluten-containing cereals. The method consisted of a real-time PCR assay targeting the gene encoding for the germ agglutinin isolectin A protein (Tri a 18 allergen), using the fluorescent Evagreen dye combined with HRM analysis. The results enabled wheat differentiation from other phylogenetically related cereals, namely barley, rye and oat with high level of confidence. Additionally, a quantitative real-time PCR approach was proposed, allowing detecting and quantifying wheat down to 20mg/kg in rice flour and 20pg of wheat DNA (∼1.1 DNA copies). Its application was successfully achieved in the analysis of processed foods to verify labelling compliance, being considered as a cost-effective tool for the specific detection of cereals in gluten-free foods.

  15. Genotyping of classical swine fever virus using high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Titov, Ilya; Tsybanov, Sodnom; Malogolovkin, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Discrimination between different field and vaccine strains of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is crucial for meaningful disease diagnosis and epidemiological investigation. In this study, a rapid method for differentiating vaccine strains and outbreak CSFV isolates by combined RT-PCR and high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis has been developed. The assay is based on PCR amplification of short fragments from the most variable region of CSFVgene E2, followed by HRM analysis of amplicons. Real-Time PCR/HRM for CSFV detection and differentiation analysis has sensitivity comparable to RT-qPCR and genotyping resolution comparable to E2 nucleotide sequencing. This assay in one step enables rapid and sensitive identification and genotype discrimination of CSFV in field samples, and thus will be valuable for CSF outbreak response and disease control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Z-analysis: a new approach to analyze stimulation curves with intrinsic basal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hedlund, Peter B; von Euler, Gabriel

    2005-07-01

    In the study of receptor biology it is of considerable importance to describe the stimulatory properties of an agonist according to mathematically defined models. However, the presently used models are insufficient if the experimental preparation contains an intrinsic basal stimulation. We have developed a novel approach, tentatively named Z-analysis. In this approach, the concentration of endogenous agonist is calculated by extending the stimulation curve to zero effect. The concentration of endogenous agonist is then combined with the concentration of added agonist to estimate the true EC(50) value. We developed a new model, the Z-model, specifically for this purpose, but in addition, we describe how Z-analysis can be applied to the traditional E(0)-model. Models were applied to computer-generated curves with different Hill coefficients, using iterative curve fitting procedures. In addition to applying the models to ideal cases, we also used Monte Carlo-simulated data. Specific transformations were used to enable comparisons between parameters determined from these models. Both models were able to provide estimates of all eight parameters analyzed, both using ideal data and on Monte Carlo-simulated data. The Z-model was found to provide better estimates of the concentration of endogenous agonist, the EC(50) values, and the Hill value, in curves with Hill coefficient deviating from one. In conclusion, Z-analysis was suitable both to determine the concentration of endogenous agonists and to determine true EC(50) values. We found several advantages with the Z-model compared to traditional E(0)-model for analysis of stimulation curves that contain basic intrinsic stimulation.

  17. Rapid detection of functional gene polymorphisms of TLRs and IL-17 using high resolution melting analysis

    PubMed Central

    Teräsjärvi, Johanna; Hakanen, Antti; Korppi, Matti; Nuolivirta, Kirsi; Gröndahl-Yli-Hannuksela, Kirsi; Mertsola, Jussi; Peltola, Ville; He, Qiushui

    2017-01-01

    Genetic variations in toll-like receptors (TLRs) and IL-17A have been widely connected to different diseases. Associations between susceptibility and resistance to different infections and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TLR1 to TLR4 and IL17A have been found. In this study, we aimed to develop a rapid and high throughput method to detect functional SNPs of above mentioned proteins. The following most studied and clinically important SNPs: TLR1 (rs5743618), TLR2 (rs5743708), TLR3 (rs3775291), TLR4 (rs4986790) and IL17 (rs2275913) were tested. High resolution melting analysis (HRMA) based on real-time PCR combined with melting analysis of a saturating double stranded-DNA binding dye was developed and used. The obtained results were compared to the “standard” sequencing method. A total of 113 DNA samples with known genotypes were included. The HRMA method correctly identified all genotypes of these five SNPs. Co-efficient values of variation of intra- and inter-run precision repeatability ranged from 0.04 to 0.23%. The determined limit of qualification for testing samples was from 0.5 to 8.0 ng/μl. The identical genotyping result was obtained from the same sample with these concentrations. Compared to “standard” sequencing methods HRMA is cost-effective, rapid and simple. All the five SNPs can be analyzed separately or in combination. PMID:28148965

  18. Learning Factors Transfer Analysis: Using Learning Curve Analysis to Automatically Generate Domain Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlik, Philip I. Jr.; Cen, Hao; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method to create a quantitative model of an educational content domain of related practice item-types using learning curves. By using a pairwise test to search for the relationships between learning curves for these item-types, we show how the test results in a set of pairwise transfer relationships that can be…

  19. Diagnosis of genetic predisposition for lactose intolerance by high resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Delacour, Hervé; Leduc, Amandine; Louçano-Perdriat, Andréa; Plantamura, Julie; Ceppa, Franck

    2017-02-01

    Lactose, the principle sugar in milk, is a disaccharide hydrolyzed by intestinal lactase into glucose and galactose, which are absorbed directly by diffusion in the intestine. The decline of lactase expression (or hypolactasia) in intestinal microvilli after weaning is a normal phenomenon in mammals known as lactase deficiency. It is observed in nearly 75% of the world population and is an inherited autosomal recessive trait with incomplete penetrance. It is caused by SNPs in a regulatory element for lactase gene. In Indo-European, lactase deficiency is associated with rs4982235 SNP (or -13910C>T). The aim of this study is to describe a method based on high resolution melting for rapidly detecting genetic predisposition to lactose intolerance. Analytical performance of the assay was assessed by evaluating within and betwwen-run precision and by comparing the results (n = 50 patients) obtained with the HRM assay to those obtained with the gold standard (Sanger sequencing of the region of interest). In silico prediction of HRM curves was performed to evaluate the potential impact of the other SNPs described within the PCR product on the HRM analytical performances. The assay has good performance (CV <0.2% during the between-run study). A perfect agreement with the gold standard method was observed. The presence of other polymorphisms within the amplified sequence is detected, the misclassification risk is low. This assay can be used for rapidly diagnosing genetic predisposition to lactose intolerance.

  20. ATWS Analysis with an Advanced Boiling Curve Approach within COBRA 3-CP

    SciTech Connect

    Gensler, A.; Knoll, A.; Kuehnel, K.

    2007-07-01

    In 2005 the German Reactor Safety Commission issued specific requirements on core coolability demonstration for PWR ATWS (anticipated transients without scram). Thereupon AREVA NP performed detailed analyses for all German PWRs. For a German KONVOI plant the results of an ATWS licensing analysis are presented. The plant dynamic behavior is calculated with NLOOP, while the hot channel analysis is performed with the thermal hydraulic computer code COBRA 3-CP. The application of the fuel rod model included in COBRA 3-CP is essential for this type of analysis. Since DNB (departure from nucleate boiling) occurs, the advanced post DNB model (advanced boiling curve approach) of COBRA 3-CP is used. The results are compared with those gained with the standard BEEST model. The analyzed ATWS case is the emergency power case 'loss of main heat sink with station service power supply unavailable'. Due to the decreasing coolant flow rate during the transient the core attains film boiling conditions. The results of the hot channel analysis strongly depend on the performance of the boiling curve model. The BEEST model is based on pool boiling conditions whereas typical PWR conditions - even in most transients - are characterized by forced flow for which the advanced boiling curve approach is particularly suitable. Compared with the BEEST model the advanced boiling curve approach in COBRA 3-CP yields earlier rewetting, i.e. a shorter period in film boiling. Consequently, the fuel rod cladding temperatures, that increase significantly due to film boiling, drop back earlier and the high temperature oxidation is significantly diminished. The Baker-Just-Correlation was used to calculate the value of equivalent cladding reacted (ECR), i.e. the reduction of cladding thickness due to corrosion throughout the transient. Based on the BEEST model the ECR value amounts to 0.4% whereas the advanced boiling curve only leads to an ECR value of 0.2%. Both values provide large margins to the 17

  1. Better P-curves: Making P-curve analysis more robust to errors, fraud, and ambitious P-hacking, a Reply to Ulrich and Miller (2015).

    PubMed

    Simonsohn, Uri; Simmons, Joseph P; Nelson, Leif D

    2015-12-01

    When studies examine true effects, they generate right-skewed p-curves, distributions of statistically significant results with more low (.01 s) than high (.04 s) p values. What else can cause a right-skewed p-curve? First, we consider the possibility that researchers report only the smallest significant p value (as conjectured by Ulrich & Miller, 2015), concluding that it is a very uncommon problem. We then consider more common problems, including (a) p-curvers selecting the wrong p values, (b) fake data, (c) honest errors, and (d) ambitiously p-hacked (beyond p < .05) results. We evaluate the impact of these common problems on the validity of p-curve analysis, and provide practical solutions that substantially increase its robustness.

  2. Development of high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis for population studies of Fascioloides magna (Trematoda: Fasciolidae), the giant liver fluke of ruminants.

    PubMed

    Radvánský, Ján; Bazsalovicsová, Eva; Králová-Hromadová, Ivica; Minárik, Gabriel; Kádaši, Ludevít

    2011-01-01

    The high-resolution melting (HRM) technique was successfully optimized as fast and effective method for population study of digenetic fluke, Fascioloides magna (Trematoda: Fasciolidae), originally North American liver parasite of free-living and domestic ruminants. Previously selected variable region (439 bp) of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1) of 249 fluke individuals from enzootic European and North American regions were sequenced and mutually compared. The sequence analysis of partial cox1 revealed presence of seven structurally different haplotypes. Based on the sequence structure and alignments of six of them (Ha1-Ha6), three internal probes were designed and applied in HRM-based haplotype determination of all F. magna specimens. HRM analysis, performed with three designed probes, resulted in classification of samples into the seven haplogroups, equally with their assortment according to the sequence analysis. The representative of the haplotype, which was not involved in probe design (Ha7), was characterized by a unique melting curve shape as well. This provided an evidence of optimally settled conditions in HRM assay and indicated a probability of successful discrimination of novel haplotypes in future population studies on F. magna. The successful optimization of HRM method stands for an opportunity of detection of genetically unknown North American variants of F. magna and promises its application as fast and cheap screening technique for phylogeography studies of the giant liver fluke on its original continent.

  3. The spa typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates by High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Fasihi, Yasser; Fooladi, Saba; Mohammadi, Mohammad Ali; Emaneini, Mohammad; Kalantar-Neyestanaki, Davood

    2017-09-06

    Molecular typing is an important tool for control and prevention of infection. A suitable molecular typing method for epidemiological investigation must be easy to perform, highly reproducible, inexpensive, rapid and easy to interpret. In this study, two molecular typing methods including the conventional PCR-sequencing method and high resolution melting (HRM) analysis were used for staphylococcal protein A (spa) typing of 30 Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates recovered from clinical samples. Based on PCR-sequencing method results, 16 different spa types were identified among the 30 MRSA isolates. Among the 16 different spa types, 14 spa types separated by HRM method. Two spa types including t4718 and t2894 were not separated from each other. According to our results, spa typing based on HRM analysis method is very rapid, easy to perform and cost-effective, but this method must be standardized for different regions, spa types, and real-time machinery.

  4. Effect of silicate structure on thermodynamic properties of calcium silicate melts: Quantitative analysis of Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joo Hyun

    2013-05-01

    The distribution of silicate anionic species (Qn units, n=0, 1, 2, 3) and the chemical speciation of oxygen in CaO-SiO2-MO (M=Mn and Mg) slags were investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopic analysis. Furthermore, the thermochemical properties were evaluated using a concentration of free oxygen and a degree of polymerization. A good linear relationship was obtained between sulfide capacity and concentration of free oxygen in the CaO-SiO2 (-MnO) melts at 1500 to 1600 °C. However, even though there was more abundant free oxygen in the CaO-SiO2-MgO system than in the CaO-SiO2 system, the sulfide capacity of the former was lower than the latter, indicating that the sulfur dissolution behavior in the silicate melts cannot be simply explained by the content of free oxygen, because the composition dependency of the stability ratio of oxygen and sulfide ions should be taken into account. The excess free energy of CaO, MgO and MnO linearly decreased as the ln (Q3/Q2) increased. The effect of the degree of polymerization on the excess free energy of mixing of MgO-containing slag was larger than that of MnO-containing slag, which was explained by the difference of the ionization potential between Mn2+ and Mg2+ ions.

  5. Identification and discrimination of Toxoplasma gondii, Sarcocystis spp., Neospora spp., and Cryptosporidium spp. by righ-resolution melting analysis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to standardize the high-resolution melting method for identification and discrimination of Toxoplasma gondii, Sarcocystis spp., Neospora spp., and Cryptosporidium spp. by amplification of 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) using a single primer pair. The analyses were performed on individual reactions (containing DNA from a single species of a protozoan), on duplex reactions (containing DNA from two species of protozoa in each reaction), and on a multiplex reaction (containing DNA of four parasites in a single reaction). The proposed method allowed us to identify and discriminate the four species by analyzing the derivative, normalized, and difference melting curves, with high reproducibility among and within the experiments, as demonstrated by low coefficients of variation (less than 2.2% and 2.0%, respectively). This is the first study where this method is used for discrimination of these four species of protozoa in a single reaction. PMID:28346485

  6. Total laparoscopic hysterectomy: Analysis of the surgical learning curve in benign conditions.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Hasan; Biler, Alper; Demirtas, Omer; Guler, Omer Tolga; Peker, Nuri; Kale, Ahmet

    2016-11-01

    To assess the learning curve for total laparoscopic hysterectomy. This study was a retrospective analysis of the learning curve for two surgeons during their first 257 consecutive cases of total laparoscopic hysterectomy at a teaching hospital. Patients were divided sequentially into groups comprising the first 75 patients, the next 75, and the final 107 patients. Age, body mass index, gestational parity, indications for laparoscopic hysterectomy, previous pelvic surgery, operating time, haemoglobin decline, complications, need for transfusion, and length of hospital stay were evaluated. The mean operating time for total laparoscopic hysterectomy reduced significantly from 76.2 min to 68.9 min (p = 0.001) between the first and second 75-patient groups. Linear regression analysis showed a plateau was reached on the learning curve after 71-80 cases. The rate of all complications started at 8% in the first group of 75 patients, reduced to 6.7% in the next group, and decreased further in the final group to 4.7%. The decline was not statistically significant (p = 0.6). The difference in the need for transfusion was statistically significant between the first 75 patients and the second group of 75 (p = 0.04). Conversion from laparoscopy to laparotomy was required in five patients, four in the early group and one in the final group. Age, body mass index, parity, previous pelvic surgery, decline in haemoglobin, and length of hospital stay were similar among the three groups. A plateau in the learning curve for TLH was reached after the first 75 cases. We can infer that there is a learning curve for TLH as confirmed by the decrease in operating time (accompanied by no change in complications) correlated to gain in experience. On the other hand, one should not disregard the fact that laparoscopy is not a complication-free surgery and achievement of the learning curve does not exclude complications. Gynaecological surgeons can perform TLH securely during the learning

  7. Monitoring for idiopathic scoliosis curve progression using surface topography asymmetry analysis of the torso in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Komeili, Amin; Westover, Lindsey; Parent, Eric C; El-Rich, Marwan; Adeeb, Samer

    2015-04-01

    At first visit and each clinical follow-up session, patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) undergo radiographic examination, from which the Cobb angle is measured. The cumulative exposure to X-ray radiation justifies efforts in developing noninvasive methods for scoliosis monitoring. To determine the capability of the three-dimensional markerless surface topography (ST) asymmetry analysis to detect ≥5° progression in the spinal curvature in patients with AIS over 1-year follow-up interval. Cross-sectional study in a specialized scoliosis clinic. In this study, baseline and 1-year follow-up full torso ST scans of 100 patients with AIS were analyzed using three-dimensional markerless asymmetry analysis. Patients with ΔCobb≥5° and ΔCobb<5° were categorized into progression and nonprogression groups, respectively. The ST scan of each full torso was analyzed to calculate the best plane of symmetry by minimizing the distances between the torso and its reflection about the plane of symmetry. Distance between the torso and its reflection was measured and displayed as deviation color maps. The difference of ST measurements between two successive acquisitions was used to determine if the scoliosis has progressed at least 5° or not. The classification tree technique was implemented using the local deformity of the torso in the thoracic-thoracolumbar (T-TL) and lumbar (L) regions to categorize curves into progression and nonprogression groups. The change in maximum deviation and root mean square of the deviations in the torso were the parameters effective in capturing the curve progression. Funding for this research is provided by the Scoliosis Research Society, and Women and Children's Health Research Institute. The classification model detected 85.7% of the progression and 71.6% of the nonprogression cases. The resulting false-negative rate of 4% for T-TL curves, representing the proportion of undetected progressions, confirmed that the technique shows

  8. Mathematical analysis of the heart rate performance curve during incremental exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Rosic, G; Pantovic, S; Niciforovic, J; Colovic, V; Rankovic, V; Obradovic, Z; Rosic, Mirko

    2011-03-01

    In this study we performed laboratory treadmill protocols of increasing load. Heart rate was continuously recorded and blood lactate concentration was measured for determination of lactate threshold by means of LTD-max and LT4.0 methods.Our results indicate that the shape of heart rate performance curve (HRPC) during incremental testing depends on the applied exercise protocol (change of initial speed and the step of running speed increase, with the constant stage duration). Depending on the applied protocol, the HRPC can be described by linear, polynomial (S-shaped), and exponential mathematical expression.We presented mathematical procedure for estimation of heart rate threshold points at the level of LTD-max and LT4.0, by means of exponential curve and its relative deflection from the initial trend line (tangent line to exponential curve at the point of starting heart rate). The relative deflection of exponential curve from the initial trend line at the level of LTD-max and/or LT4.0 can be defined, based on the slope of the initial trend line. Using originally developed software that allows mathematical analysis of heart rate-load relation, LTD-max and/or LT4.0 can be estimated without direct measurement of blood lactate concentration.

  9. Learning curve analysis of intracorporeal cuff suturing during robotic single-site total hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Akdemir, Ali; Zeybek, Burak; Ozgurel, Banu; Oztekin, Mehmet Kemal; Sendag, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the learning curve of intracorporeal cuff suturing during robotic single-site total hysterectomy. Retrospective study (Canadian Task Force classification II-1). University hospital. Twenty-four patients with benign indications for hysterectomy. Twenty-four patients who underwent robotic single-site total hysterectomy to treat benign indications were included in the study. Surgical procedures were performed by a single surgeon with extensive experience in laparoscopy, using the single-site platform of the da Vinci Surgical System. All vaginal cuffs were closed intracorporeally using semi-rigid single-site instruments. An exponential learning curve technique was used to analyze the learning curve. The overall mean (SD) vaginal cuff closure time was 23.2 (7) minutes. Learning curve analysis revealed a decrease in vaginal closure time after 14 procedures. An experienced robotic surgeon requires approximately 14 procedures to achieve proficiency in intracorporeal cuff suturing during robotic single-site total hysterectomy. Novel instruments that create perfect triangulation are needed to overcome the current challenges of suturing and to shorten operative time. Copyright © 2015 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Light curve analysis of beta Lyrae type binary star EM TrA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özkardeş, B.

    2017-02-01

    An analysis of photometric observations of the eclipsing binary system EM TrA (TYC 9258-211-1=CD-67 1660) is presented in this study. The V light curve of the system from All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) was solved using the Wilson-Devinney code. The final solution describes EM TrA as a detached system. The absolute parameters of the components of the system were estimated.

  11. Improving Accuracy and Temporal Resolution of Learning Curve Estimation for within- and across-Session Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tabelow, Karsten; König, Reinhard; Polzehl, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of learning curves is ubiquitously based on proportions of correct responses within moving trial windows. Thereby, it is tacitly assumed that learning performance is constant within the moving windows, which, however, is often not the case. In the present study we demonstrate that violations of this assumption lead to systematic errors in the analysis of learning curves, and we explored the dependency of these errors on window size, different statistical models, and learning phase. To reduce these errors in the analysis of single-subject data as well as on the population level, we propose adequate statistical methods for the estimation of learning curves and the construction of confidence intervals, trial by trial. Applied to data from an avoidance learning experiment with rodents, these methods revealed performance changes occurring at multiple time scales within and across training sessions which were otherwise obscured in the conventional analysis. Our work shows that the proper assessment of the behavioral dynamics of learning at high temporal resolution can shed new light on specific learning processes, and, thus, allows to refine existing learning concepts. It further disambiguates the interpretation of neurophysiological signal changes recorded during training in relation to learning. PMID:27303809

  12. Efficient curve-skeleton computation for the analysis of biomedical 3d images - biomed 2010.

    PubMed

    Brun, Francesco; Dreossi, Diego

    2010-01-01

    Advances in three dimensional (3D) biomedical imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT), make it easy to reconstruct high quality 3D models of portions of human body and other biological specimens. A major challenge lies in the quantitative analysis of the resulting models thus allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the object under investigation. An interesting approach is based on curve-skeleton (or medial axis) extraction, which gives basic information concerning the topology and the geometry. Curve-skeletons have been applied in the analysis of vascular networks and the diagnosis of tracheal stenoses as well as a 3D flight path in virtual endoscopy. However curve-skeleton computation is a crucial task. An effective skeletonization algorithm was introduced by N. Cornea in [1] but it lacks in computational performances. Thanks to the advances in imaging techniques the resolution of 3D images is increasing more and more, therefore there is the need for efficient algorithms in order to analyze significant Volumes of Interest (VOIs). In the present paper an improved skeletonization algorithm based on the idea proposed in [1] is presented. A computational comparison between the original and the proposed method is also reported. The obtained results show that the proposed method allows a significant computational improvement making more appealing the adoption of the skeleton representation in biomedical image analysis applications.

  13. A rapid Bézier curve method for shape analysis and point representation of asymmetric folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Deepak C.; Rastogi, Vipul; Ghosh, Rajit

    2010-05-01

    Point representation of fold shapes is useful, in particular, for classification of a large number of folds into different geometric populations. The methods for shape analysis and point representation of asymmetric folds are a few and tedious, although several methods exist for the analysis of the individual fold limbs, or symmetric folds. This article gives a rapid method that uses the Bézier curve tool, available in any common computer graphics software, for the analysis of a complete asymmetric fold and its point representation in the two-dimensional frame. The new method is based on the reduction of variables in the parametric equations of a cubic Bézier curve. It makes the length of one Bézier handle zero, pins the end point of the other Bézier handle at the origin of the X- Y frame and drags its control point along the Y-axis to fit the Bézier curve on the given asymmetric fold. A Cartesian plot between normalised length of the Bézier handle and the lift, i.e., difference between the heights of the two inflection points, gives the unique point that represents the given asymmetric fold shape. We test the validity of the new method on several computer simulated asymmetric folds and demonstrate its usefulness with the help of a natural example.

  14. High Resolution Melting Analysis for JAK2 Exon 14 and Exon 12 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rapado, Inmaculada; Grande, Silvia; Albizua, Enriqueta; Ayala, Rosa; Hernández, José-Angel; Gallardo, Miguel; Gilsanz, Florinda; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin

    2009-01-01

    JAK2 mutations are important criteria for the diagnosis of Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms. We aimed to assess JAK2 exon 14 and exon 12 mutations by high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis, which allows variation screening. The exon 14 analysis included 163 patients with polycythemia vera, secondary erythrocytoses, essential thrombocythemia, or secondary thrombocytoses, and 126 healthy subjects. The study of exon 12 included 40 JAK2 V617F-negative patients (nine of which had polycythemia vera, and 31 with splanchnic vein thrombosis) and 30 healthy subjects. HRM analyses of JAK2 exons 14 and 12 gave analytical sensitivities near 1% and both intra- and interday coefficients of variation of less than 1%. For HRM analysis of JAK2 exon 14 in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia, clinical sensitivities were 93.5% and 67.9%, clinical specificities were 98.8% and 97.0%, positive predictive values were 93.5% and 79.2%, and negative predictive values were 98.8% and 94.6, respectively. Correlations were observed between the results from HRM and three commonly used analytical methods. The JAK2 exon 12 HRM results agreed completely with those from sequencing analysis, and the three mutations in exon 12 were detected by both methods. Hence, HRM analysis of exons 14 and 12 in JAK2 shows better diagnostic values than three other routinely used methods against which it was compared. In addition, HRM analysis has the advantage of detecting unknown mutations. PMID:19225136

  15. Application of the High Resolution Melting analysis for genetic mapping of Sequence Tagged Site markers in narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.).

    PubMed

    Kamel, Katarzyna A; Kroc, Magdalena; Święcicki, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Sequence tagged site (STS) markers are valuable tools for genetic and physical mapping that can be successfully used in comparative analyses among related species. Current challenges for molecular markers genotyping in plants include the lack of fast, sensitive and inexpensive methods suitable for sequence variant detection. In contrast, high resolution melting (HRM) is a simple and high-throughput assay, which has been widely applied in sequence polymorphism identification as well as in the studies of genetic variability and genotyping. The present study is the first attempt to use the HRM analysis to genotype STS markers in narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.). The sensitivity and utility of this method was confirmed by the sequence polymorphism detection based on melting curve profiles in the parental genotypes and progeny of the narrow-leafed lupin mapping population. Application of different approaches, including amplicon size and a simulated heterozygote analysis, has allowed for successful genetic mapping of 16 new STS markers in the narrow-leafed lupin genome.

  16. Precise Detection of IDH1/2 and BRAF Hotspot Mutations in Clinical Glioma Tissues by a Differential Calculus Analysis of High-Resolution Melting Data.

    PubMed

    Hatae, Ryusuke; Hata, Nobuhiro; Yoshimoto, Koji; Kuga, Daisuke; Akagi, Yojiro; Murata, Hideki; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Iihara, Koji

    2016-01-01

    High resolution melting (HRM) is a simple and rapid method for screening mutations. It offers various advantages for clinical diagnostic applications. Conventional HRM analysis often yields equivocal results, especially for surgically obtained tissues. We attempted to improve HRM analyses for more effective applications to clinical diagnostics. HRM analyses were performed for IDH1R132 and IDH2R172 mutations in 192 clinical glioma samples in duplicate and these results were compared with sequencing results. BRAFV600E mutations were analyzed in 52 additional brain tumor samples. The melting profiles were used for differential calculus analyses. Negative second derivative plots revealed additional peaks derived from heteroduplexes in PCR products that contained mutations; this enabled unequivocal visual discrimination of the mutations. We further developed a numerical expression, the HRM-mutation index (MI), to quantify the heteroduplex-derived peak of the mutational curves. Using this expression, all IDH1 mutation statuses matched those ascertained by sequencing, with the exception of three samples. These discordant results were all derived from the misinterpretation of sequencing data. The effectiveness of our approach was further validated by analyses of IDH2R172 and BRAFV600E mutations. The present analytical method enabled an unequivocal and objective HRM analysis and is suitable for reliable mutation scanning in surgically obtained glioma tissues. This approach could facilitate molecular diagnostics in clinical environments.

  17. Thermoluminescence glow curve analysis and CGCD method for erbium doped CaZrO{sub 3} phosphor

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Ratnesh; Chopra, Seema

    2016-05-06

    The manuscript report the synthesis, thermoluminescence study at fixed concentration of Er{sup 3+} (1 mol%) doped CaZrO{sub 3} phosphor. The phosphors were prepared by modified solid state reaction method. The powder sample was characterized by thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve analysis. In TL glow curve the optimized concentration in 1mol% for UV irradiated sample. The kinetic parameters were calculated by computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) techniaue. Trapping parameters gives the information of dosimetry loss in prepared phosphor and its usability in environmental monitoring and for personal monitoring. CGCD is the advance tool for analysis of complicated TL glow curves.

  18. Robotic right hemicolectomy: Analysis of 108 consecutive procedures and multidimensional assessment of the learning curve.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Amilcare; Scrucca, Luca; Desiderio, Jacopo; Gemini, Alessandro; Guarino, Salvatore; Ricci, Francesco; Cirocchi, Roberto; Palazzini, Giorgio; D'Andrea, Vito; Minelli, Liliana; Trastulli, Stefano

    2017-03-01

    Surgeons tend to view the robotic right colectomy (RRC) as an ideal beginning procedure to gain proficiency in robotic general and colorectal surgery. Nevertheless, oncological RRC, especially if performed with intracorporeal ileocolic anastomosis confectioning, cannot be considered a technically easier procedure. The aim of this study was to assess the learning curve of the RRC performed for oncological purposes and to evaluate its safety and efficacy investigating the perioperative and pathology outcomes in the different learning phases. Data on a consecutive series of 108 patients undergoing RRC with intracorporeal anastomosis between June 2011 and September 2015 at our institution were prospectively collected to evaluate surgical and short-term oncological outcomes. CUSUM (Cumulative Sum) and Risk-Adjusted (RA) CUSUM analysis were performed in order to perform a multidimensional assessment of the learning curve for the RRC surgical procedure. Intraoperative, postoperative and pathological outcomes were compared among the learning curve phases. Based on the CUSUM and RA-CUSUM analyses, the learning curve for RRC could be divided into 3 different phases: phase 1, the initial learning period (1st-44th case); phase 2, the consolidation period (45th-90th case); and phase 3, the mastery period (91th-108th case). Operation time, conversion to open surgery rate and the number of harvested lymph nodes significantly improve through the three learning phases. The learning curve for oncological RRC with intracorporeal anastomosis is composed of 3 phases. Our data indicate that the performance of RRC is safe from an oncological point of view in all of the three phases of the learning curve. However, the technical skills necessary to significantly reduce operative time, conversion to open surgery rate and to significantly improve the number of harvested lymph nodes were achieved after 44 procedures. These data suggest that it might be prudent to start the RRC learning curve

  19. Rapid screening for sickle cell disease by polymerase chain reaction-high resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Yue, Liang; Lin, Min; Chen, Jiang-Tao; Zhan, Xiao-Fen; Zhong, De-Shang; Monte-Nguba, Santiago-M; Liu, Pei-Fen; Pan, Xue-Fen; Huang, Jiang-Hua; Wang, Xi; Ehapo, Juan Carlos Salas; Eyi, Urbano Monsuy; Yang, Hui-Tian; Yang, Li-Ye

    2014-06-01

    Each year, ~300,000 individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD), a hemoglobinopathy caused by β-globin gene mutation, are born, and >75% of those are in Africa. The present study examined 511 individuals on the island of Bioko (Equatorial Guinea) and attempted to establish a method for rapid sickle cell disease screening. Following DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, high resolution melting (HRM) analysis was used to assess the specificity of fluorescence signals of the PCR products and to differentiate various genotypes of these products. The analytical results of HRM were validated using DNA sequencing. By HRM analysis, 80 out of 511 samples were classified as hemoglobin S (Hb S) heterozygotes, while 431 out of 511 samples were classified as wild-type. No mutant homozygote was identified. DNA sequencing indicated that within the 431 wild-type samples as indicated by HRM analysis, one case was actually a Hb S heterozygote and another case was a rare hemoglobin S-C genotype (sickle-hemoglobin C disease). One out of 80 suspected Hb S heterozygotes as indicated by HRM was confirmed as wild-type by DNA sequencing and the results of residual 508 cases were consistent for HRM analysis and sequencing. In conclusion, HRM analysis is a simple, high-efficiency approach for Hb S screening and is useful for early diagnosis of SCD and particularly suitable for application in the African area.

  20. Selection of excipients for melt extrusion with two poorly water-soluble drugs by solubility parameter calculation and thermal analysis.

    PubMed

    Forster, A; Hempenstall, J; Tucker, I; Rades, T

    2001-09-11

    The aim of this study was to determine the miscibility of drug and excipient to predict if glass solutions are likely to form when drug and excipient are melt extruded. Two poorly water-soluble drugs, indomethacin and lacidipine, were selected along with 11 excipients (polymeric and non-polymeric). Estimation of drug/excipient miscibility was performed using a combination of the Hoy and Hoftzyer/Van Krevelen methods for Hansen solubility parameter calculation. Miscibility was experimentally investigated with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and hot stage microscopy (HSM). Studies were performed at drug/excipient ratios, 1:4, 1:1 and 4:1. Analysis of the glass transition temperature (T(g)) was performed by quench cooling drug/excipient melts in the DSC. Differences in the drug/excipient solubility parameters of <7.0 MPa(1/2) were predicted to indicate significant miscibility and, therefore, glass solution formation on melt extrusion. In comparison, differences of >10 MPa(1/2) were expected to indicate a lack of miscibility and not form glass solutions when melt extruded. Experimentally, miscibility was shown by changes in drug/excipient melting endotherms and confirmed by HSM investigations. Experimental results were in agreement with solubility parameter predictions. In addition, drug/excipient combinations predicted to be largely immiscible often exhibited more than one T(g) upon reheating in the DSC. Melt extrusion of miscible components resulted in amorphous solid solution formation, whereas extrusion of an "immiscible" component led to amorphous drug dispersed in crystalline excipient. In conclusion, combining calculation of Hansen solubility parameters with thermal analysis of drug/excipient miscibility can be successfully applied to predict formation of glass solutions with melt extrusion.

  1. Hierarchical band-target entropy minimization curve resolution and Pearson VII curve-fitting analysis of cellular protein infrared imaging spectra.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiyin; Chen, Kejia; Liang, Dayang; Chew, Wee

    2009-04-01

    A soft-modeling multivariate numerical approach that combines self-modeling curve resolution (SMCR) and mixed Lorentzian-Gaussian curve fitting was successfully implemented for the first time to elucidate spatially and spectroscopically resolved spectral information from infrared imaging data of oral mucosa cells. A novel variant form of the robust band-target entropy minimization (BTEM) SMCR technique, coined as hierarchical BTEM (hBTEM), was introduced to first cluster similar cellular infrared spectra using the unsupervised hierarchical leader-follower cluster analysis (LFCA) and subsequently apply BTEM to clustered subsets of data to reconstruct three protein secondary structure (PSS) pure component spectra-alpha-helix, beta-sheet, and ambiguous structures-that associate with spatially differentiated regions of the cell infrared image. The Pearson VII curve-fitting procedure, which approximates a mixed Lorentzian-Gaussian model for spectral band shape, was used to optimally curve fit the resolved amide I and II bands of various hBTEM reconstructed PSS pure component spectra. The optimized Pearson VII band-shape parameters and peak center positions serve as means to characterize amide bands of PSS spectra found in various cell locations and for approximating their actual amide I/II intensity ratios. The new hBTEM methodology can also be potentially applied to vibrational spectroscopic datasets with dynamic or spatial variations arising from chemical reactions, physical perturbations, pathological states, and the like.

  2. Segregation during directional melting and its implications on seeded crystal growth: A theoretical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourret, E. D.; Favier, J. J.; Witt, A. F.

    1982-01-01

    Directional melting of binary systems, as encountered during seeding in melt growth, is analyzed for concurrent compositional changes at the crystal-melt interface. It is shown that steady state conditions cannot normally be reached during seeding and that the growth interface temperature at the initial stages of seeded growth is a function of backmelt conditions. The theoretical treatment is numerically applied to Hg1-xCdXTe and Ga-doped Ge.

  3. An analysis of the massless planet approximation in transit light curve models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millholland, Sarah; Ruch, Gerry

    2015-08-01

    Many extrasolar planet transit light curve models use the approximation of a massless planet. They approximate the planet as orbiting elliptically with the host star at the orbit’s focus instead of depicting the planet and star as both orbiting around a common center of mass. This approximation should generally be very good because the transit is a small fraction of the full-phase curve and the planet to stellar mass ratio is typically very small. However, to fully examine the legitimacy of this approximation, it is useful to perform a robust, all-parameter space-encompassing statistical comparison between the massless planet model and the more accurate model.Towards this goal, we establish two questions: (1) In what parameter domain is the approximation invalid? (2) If characterizing an exoplanetary system in this domain, what is the error of the parameter estimates when using the simplified model? We first address question (1). Given each parameter vector in a finite space, we can generate the simplified and more complete model curves. Associated with these model curves is a measure of the deviation between them, such as the root mean square (RMS). We use Gibbs sampling to generate a sample that is distributed according to the RMS surface. The high-density regions in the sample correspond to a large deviation between the models. To determine the domains of these high-density areas, we first employ the Ordering Points to Identify the Clustering Structure (OPTICS) algorithm. We then characterize the subclusters by performing the Patient Rule Induction Method (PRIM) on the transformed Principal Component spaces of each cluster. This process yields descriptors of the parameter domains with large discrepancies between the models.To consider question (2), we start by generating synthetic transit curve observations in the domains specified by the above analysis. We then derive the best-fit parameters of these synthetic light curves according to each model and examine

  4. Consequence analysis to determine the damage to humans from vapour cloud explosions using characteristic curves.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Fernando Díaz; Ferradás, Enrique González; Sánchez, Teresa de Jesús Jiménez; Aznar, Agustín Miñana; Gimeno, José Ruiz; Alonso, Jesús Martínez

    2008-01-15

    The aim of this paper is to provide a methodology to facilitate consequence analysis for vapour cloud explosions (VCE). Firstly, the main PROBIT equations to evaluate direct damage on humans from those accidents (eardrum rupture, death due to skull fracture, death due to whole body impact and lung damage) are discussed and the most suitable ones are selected. Secondly, a new methodology is developed to relate characteristic overpressure-impulse-distance curves for VCE, obtained in a previous paper (F. Diaz Alonso et al., Characteristic overpressure-impulse-distance curves for vapour cloud explosions using the TNO Multi-Energy model, J. Hazard. Mater. A137 (2006) 734-741) with the selected PROBIT equations. This methodology allows the determination of damage as a function of distance to the accident's origin in only one step, using explosion energy and VCE Multi-Energy charge strength as input parameters.

  5. Analysis of Characteristics of Light Curve Profiles of the Flares Erupted from Sun-like Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duo, Yun; Hua-ning, Wang; Han, He

    2017-01-01

    Solar flares belong to a kind of eruptive phenomena caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy nearby sunspots. It is found that similar flares occurred as well in many Sun-like stars (called as Sun-like star flares). From the data acquired by the Kepler space telescope the SC (Short Cadence) data are mainly selected to make analysis, in order to find the characteristic parameters of light curve profiles of the flares erupted from Sun-like stars for a statistical study, and to summarize the activity features of these stellar flares. The analyzed results show that the light curve profiles and characteristic timescales of the flares of Sun-like stars are quite similar to those of solar flares, which may indicate the same physical mechanism for these two kinds of flares.

  6. Anthropometry, CT, and DXA as predictors of GH deficiency in premenopausal women: ROC curve analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bredella, Miriam A.; Utz, Andrea L.; Torriani, Martin; Thomas, Bijoy; Schoenfeld, David A.; Miller, Karen K.

    2009-01-01

    Visceral adiposity is a strong determinant of growth hormone (GH) secretion, and states of GH deficiency are associated with increased visceral adiposity and decreased lean body mass. The purpose of our study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of different methods of assessing body composition [anthropometry, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and computed tomography (CT)] to predict GH deficiency in premenopausal women and threshold values for each technique to predict GH deficiency, using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. We studied a group of 45 healthy lean, overweight, and obese premenopausal women who underwent anthropometric measurements (body mass index, waist and hip circumferences, skin fold thickness), DXA, CT, and a GH-releasing hormone-arginine stimulation test. ROC curve analysis was used to determine cutoff values for each method to identify GH deficiency. Visceral adiposity measured by CT showed the highest sensitivity and specificity for identifying subjects with GH deficiency with a cutoff of >9,962 mm2 [area under the curve (AUC), 0.95; sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 77.8%; P = 0.0001]. Largest waist circumference showed high sensitivity and specificity with a cutoff of >101.7 cm (AUC, 0.89; sensitivity, 88.9%; specificity, 75%; P = 0.0001). When the ROC curves of visceral fat measured by CT and largest waist circumference were compared, the difference between the two methods was not statistically significant (P = 0.36). Our study showed that the largest waist circumference predicts the presence of GH deficiency in healthy premenopausal women with high sensitivity and specificity and nearly as well as CT measurement of visceral adiposity. It can be used to identify women in whom GH deficiency is likely and therefore in whom formal GH stimulation testing might be indicated. PMID:19095751

  7. Ice shelf structure derived from dispersion curve analysis of ambient seismic noise, Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, A.; Bromirski, P. D.; Gerstoft, P.; Stephen, R. A.; Anthony, R. E.; Aster, R. C.; Cai, C.; Nyblade, A.; Wiens, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    An L-configured, three-component short period seismic array was deployed on the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica during November 2014. Polarization analysis of ambient noise data from these stations shows linearly polarized waves for frequency bands between 0.2 and 2 Hz. A spectral peak at about 1.6 Hz is interpreted as the resonance frequency of the water column and is used to estimate the water layer thickness below the ice shelf. The frequency band from 4 to 18 Hz is dominated by Rayleigh and Love waves propagating from the north that, based on daily temporal variations, we conclude were generated by field camp activity. Frequency-slowness plots were calculated using beamforming. Resulting Love and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves were inverted for the shear wave velocity profile within the firn and ice to ˜150 m depth. The derived density profile allows estimation of the pore close-off depth and the firn-air content thickness. Separate inversions of Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion curves give different shear wave velocity profiles within the firn. We attribute this difference to an effective anisotropy due to fine layering. The layered structure of firn, ice, water and the seafloor results in a characteristic dispersion curve below 7 Hz. Forward modelling the observed Rayleigh wave dispersion curves using representative firn, ice, water and sediment structures indicates that Rayleigh waves are observed when wavelengths are long enough to span the distance from the ice shelf surface to the seafloor. The forward modelling shows that analysis of seismic data from an ice shelf provides the possibility of resolving ice shelf thickness, water column thickness and the physical properties of the ice shelf and underlying seafloor using passive-source seismic data.

  8. A novel high-resolution melting analysis-based method for Yersinia pseudotuberculosis genotyping.

    PubMed

    Souza, Roberto A; Falcão, Juliana P

    2012-12-01

    Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is an enteric pathogen that is environmentally widespread and is known to cause human and animal infections. The development of a fast and inexpensive typing system is necessary to facilitate epidemiological studies of Y. pseudotuberculosis infections. In this study, we aimed to develop a method of Y. pseudotuberculosis genotyping based on determining differences in single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using a high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA). Using a set of nine primer pairs, ten SNPs were screened from sequences in the 16S rRNA, glnA, gyrB and recA sequences of 12 Y. pseudotuberculosis strains that were deposited in the GenBank database. The genetic diversity of a collection of 40 clinical Y. pseudotuberculosis strains was determined using the HRMA method and the multilocus sequence typing (MLST) technique was used for comparison. Different melting profiles were found in five out of a total of nine analyzed fragments. A phylogenetic tree was constructed from the nucleotides that were identified in the nine analyzed fragments, and the tree demonstrated that Y. pseudotuberculosis strains were separated into two groups. The first cluster was composed of strains from the 1/O:1a serogroup and the second of strains from the 2/O:3 serogroup. The separation into two clusters based on distinct bio-serogroups of Y. pseudotuberculosis was consistent with the results in the MLST database. The simple and highly reproducible HRMA assay developed by us may be used as a rapid and cost-effective method to genotype Y. pseudotuberculosis strains of O:1 and O:3 serogroups and it can complement sequence-based methods facilitating epidemiological studies of this Yersinia species.

  9. Rapid identification of Campylobacter spp. by melting peak analysis of biprobes in real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Logan, J M; Edwards, K J; Saunders, N A; Stanley, J

    2001-06-01

    We describe rapid PCR-biprobe identification of Campylobacter spp. This is based on real-time PCR with product analysis in the same system. The assay identifies enteropathogenic campylobacters to the species level on the basis of their degree of hybridization to three 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) biprobes. First-round symmetric PCR is performed with genus-specific primers which selectively target and amplify a portion of the 16S rRNA gene common to all Campylobacter species. Second-round asymmetric PCR is performed in a LightCycler in the presence of one of three biprobes; the identity of an amplified DNA-biprobe duplex is established after determination of the species-specific melting peak temperature. The biprobe specificities were determined by testing 37 reference strains of Campylobacter, Helicobacter, and Arcobacter spp. and 59 Penner serotype reference strains of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli. From the combination of melting peak profiles for each probe, an identification scheme was devised which accurately detected the five taxa pathogenic for humans (C. jejuni/C. coli, C. lari, C. upsaliensis, C. hyointestinalis, and C. fetus), as well as C. helveticus and C. lanienae. The assay was evaluated with 110 blind-tested field isolates; when the code was broken their previous phenotypic species identification was confirmed in every case. The PCR-biprobe assay also identified campylobacters directly from fecal DNA. PCR-biprobe testing of stools from 38 diarrheic subjects was 100% concordant with PCR-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay identification (13, 20) and thus more sensitive than phenotypic identification following microaerobic culture.

  10. Rapid Identification of Campylobacter spp. by Melting Peak Analysis of Biprobes in Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Logan, J. M. J.; Edwards, K. J.; Saunders, N. A.; Stanley, J.

    2001-01-01

    We describe rapid PCR-biprobe identification of Campylobacter spp.. This is based on real-time PCR with product analysis in the same system. The assay identifies enteropathogenic campylobacters to the species level on the basis of their degree of hybridization to three 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) biprobes. First-round symmetric PCR is performed with genus-specific primers which selectively target and amplify a portion of the 16S rRNA gene common to all Campylobacter species. Second-round asymmetric PCR is performed in a LightCycler in the presence of one of three biprobes; the identity of an amplified DNA-biprobe duplex is established after determination of the species-specific melting peak temperature. The biprobe specificities were determined by testing 37 reference strains of Campylobacter, Helicobacter, and Arcobacter spp. and 59 Penner serotype reference strains of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli. From the combination of melting peak profiles for each probe, an identification scheme was devised which accurately detected the five taxa pathogenic for humans (C. jejuni/C. coli, C. lari, C. upsaliensis, C. hyointestinalis, and C. fetus), as well as C. helveticus and C. lanienae. The assay was evaluated with 110 blind-tested field isolates; when the code was broken their previous phenotypic species identification was confirmed in every case. The PCR-biprobe assay also identified campylobacters directly from fecal DNA. PCR-biprobe testing of stools from 38 diarrheic subjects was 100% concordant with PCR–enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay identification (13, 20) and thus more sensitive than phenotypic identification following microaerobic culture. PMID:11376061

  11. Analysis of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons migrating from a polyolefin-based hot-melt adhesive into food.

    PubMed

    Lommatzsch, Martin; Biedermann, Maurus; Grob, Koni; Simat, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Hot-melt adhesives are widely utilised to glue cardboard boxes used as food packaging material. They have to comply with the requirements of Article 3 of the European Framework Regulation for food contact materials (1935/2004). The hot melt raw materials analysed mainly consisted of paraffinic waxes, hydrocarbon resins and polyolefins. The hydrocarbon resins, functioning as tackifiers, were the predominant source of hydrocarbons of sufficient volatility to migrate into dry foods: the 18 hydrocarbon resins analysed contained 8.2-118 g kg(-1) saturated and up to 59 g kg(-1) aromatic hydrocarbons eluted from GC between n-C16 and n-C24, substantially more than the paraffinic waxes and the polyolefins. These tackfier resins, especially the oligomers ≤ C24, have been characterised structurally by GC×GC-MS and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. Migration into food was estimated using a simulating system with polenta as food simulant, which was verified by the analysis of a commercial risotto rice sample packed in a virgin fibre folding box sealed with a hot melt. About 0.5-1.5% of the potentially migrating substances (between n-C16 and n-C24) of a hot melt were found to be transferred into food under storage conditions, which can result in a food contamination in the order of 1 mg kg(-1) food (depending on the amount of potentially migrating substances from the hot melt, the hot melt surface, amount of food, contact time etc.). Migrates from hot melts are easily mistaken for mineral oil hydrocarbons from recycled cardboard.

  12. A new method for simultaneous detection and discrimination of Bovine herpesvirus types 1 (BoHV-1) and 5 (BoHV-5) using real time PCR with high resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Marin, M S; Quintana, S; Leunda, M R; Recavarren, M; Pagnuco, I; Späth, E; Pérez, S; Odeón, A

    2016-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus types 1 (BoHV-1) and 5 (BoHV-5) are antigenically and genetically similar. The aim of this study was to develop a simple and reliable one-step real time PCR assay with high resolution melting (HRM) analysis for the simultaneous detection and differentiation of BoHV-1 and BoHV-5. Optimization of assay conditions was performed with DNA from reference strains. Then, DNA from field isolates, clinical samples and tissue samples of experimentally infected animals were studied by real time PCR-HRM. An efficient amplification of real time PCR products was obtained, and a clear melting curve and appropriate melting peaks for both viruses were achieved in the HRM curve analysis for BoHV type identification. BoHV was identified in all of the isolates and clinical samples, and BoHV types were properly differentiated. Furthermore, viral DNA was detected in 12/18 and 7/18 samples from BoHV-1- and BoHV-5-infected calves, respectively. Real time PCR-HRM achieved a higher sensitivity compared with virus isolation or conventional PCR. In this study, HRM was used as a novel procedure. This method provides rapid, sensitive, specific and simultaneous detection of bovine alpha-herpesviruses DNA. Thus, this technique is an excellent tool for diagnosis, research and epidemiological studies of these viruses in cattle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A fast and accurate method for controlling the correct labeling of products containing buffalo meat using High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Sakaridis, Ioannis; Ganopoulos, Ioannis; Argiriou, Anagnostis; Tsaftaris, Athanasios

    2013-05-01

    The substitution of high priced meat with low cost ones and the fraudulent labeling of meat products make the identification and traceability of meat species and their processed products in the food chain important. A polymerase chain reaction followed by a High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis was developed for species specific detection of buffalo; it was applied in six commercial meat products. A pair of specific 12S and universal 18S rRNA primers were employed and yielded DNA fragments of 220bp and 77bp, respectively. All tested products were found to contain buffalo meat and presented melting curves with at least two visible inflection points derived from the amplicons of the 12S specific and 18S universal primers. The presence of buffalo meat in meat products and the adulteration of buffalo products with unknown species were established down to a level of 0.1%. HRM was proven to be a fast and accurate technique for authentication testing of meat products. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of arthroscopic and open Latarjet with a learning curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, G; Benchouk, S; Kherad, O; Lädermann, A

    2016-02-01

    To compare arthroscopic and open Latarjet performed by a single shoulder surgeon with learning curve analysis A comparative and learning curve analysis was carried out on a prospectively gathered database of 2 consecutive series of patients treated with arthroscopic and open Latarjet procedures performed by a single shoulder surgeon between 2008 and 2014. The database included patient characteristics, ISIS scores, operative time, intra- and postoperative complications, graft and screws positioning, as well as pre- and postoperative Walch-Duplay scores. Sixty-four patients were included in the study, 28 in the arthroscopic group and 36 in the open group with similar age, sex ratio and preoperative ISIS score. Operative time was significantly higher in the arthroscopic group (146 versus 81 min, p = 0.001), and although no intra-operative complications were recorded in either group, there were significantly more postoperative complications in the arthroscopic group (29 vs. 11 %, p = 0.03). Screw placement was more accurate in the open group, and postoperative Walch-Duplay score did not show any significant difference between the groups (88 points in the arthroscopic group and 91 points in the open group). The arthroscopic Latarjet learning curve analysis showed that the need for conversion ceased after the first 10 patients and that surgical time came close to that of open procedure after 20 procedures. In this study, 10 arthroscopic Latarjet procedures were needed to overcome the need for conversion, and 20 procedures to achieve equal operating time to the open technique. Even though functional outcome and patient satisfaction were similar in both techniques, complications, screw placement inaccuracy, persistent apprehension and recurrences still remain higher with the arthroscopic technique. Retrospective comparative analysis, Level III.

  15. Modeling and regression analysis of semiochemical dose-response curves of insect antennal reception and behavior.

    PubMed

    Byers, John A

    2013-08-01

    Dose-response curves of the effects of semiochemicals on neurophysiology and behavior are reported in many articles in insect chemical ecology. Most curves are shown in figures representing points connected by straight lines, in which the x-axis has order of magnitude increases in dosage vs. responses on the y-axis. The lack of regression curves indicates that the nature of the dose-response relationship is not well understood. Thus, a computer model was developed to simulate a flux of various numbers of pheromone molecules (10(3) to 5 × 10(6)) passing by 10(4) receptors distributed among 10(6) positions along an insect antenna. Each receptor was depolarized by at least one strike by a molecule, and subsequent strikes had no additional effect. The simulations showed that with an increase in pheromone release rate, the antennal response would increase in a convex fashion and not in a logarithmic relation as suggested previously. Non-linear regression showed that a family of kinetic formation functions fit the simulated data nearly perfectly (R(2) >0.999). This is reasonable because olfactory receptors have proteins that bind to the pheromone molecule and are expected to exhibit enzyme kinetics. Over 90 dose-response relationships reported in the literature of electroantennographic and behavioral bioassays in the laboratory and field were analyzed by the logarithmic and kinetic formation functions. This analysis showed that in 95% of the cases, the kinetic functions explained the relationships better than the logarithmic (mean of about 20% better). The kinetic curves become sigmoid when graphed on a log scale on the x-axis. Dose-catch relationships in the field are similar to dose-EAR (effective attraction radius, in which a spherical radius indicates the trapping effect of a lure) and the circular EARc in two dimensions used in mass trapping models. The use of kinetic formation functions for dose-response curves of attractants, and kinetic decay curves for

  16. Thermal analysis and FTIR spectral curve-fitting investigation of formation mechanism and stability of indomethacin-saccharin cocrystals via solid-state grinding process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang-Chun; Lin, Hong-Liang; Lin, Shan-Yang

    2012-07-01

    The cocrystal formation of indomethacin (IMC) and saccharin (SAC) by mechanical cogrinding or thermal treatment was investigated. The formation mechanism and stability of IMC-SAC cocrystal prepared by cogrinding process were explored. Typical IMC-SAC cocrystal was also prepared by solvent evaporation method. All the samples were identified and characterized by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy with curve-fitting analysis. The physical stability of different IMC-SAC ground mixtures before and after storage for 7 months was examined. The results demonstrate that the stepwise measurements were carried out at specific intervals over a continuous cogrinding process showing a continuous growth in the cocrystal formation between IMC and SAC. The main IR spectral shifts from 3371 to 3,347 cm(-1) and 1693 to 1682 cm(-1) for IMC, as well as from 3094 to 3136 cm(-1) and 1718 to 1735 cm(-1) for SAC suggested that the OH and NH groups in both chemical structures were taken part in a hydrogen bonding, leading to the formation of IMC-SAC cocrystal. A melting at 184 °C for the 30-min IMC-SAC ground mixture was almost the same as the melting at 184 °C for the solvent-evaporated IMC-SAC cocrystal. The 30-min IMC-SAC ground mixture was also confirmed to have similar components and contents to that of the solvent-evaporated IMC-SAC cocrystal by using a curve-fitting analysis from IR spectra. The thermal-induced IMC-SAC cocrystal formation was also found to be dependent on the temperature treated. Different IMC-SAC ground mixtures after storage at 25 °C/40% RH condition for 7 months had an improved tendency of IMC-SAC cocrystallization.

  17. LA-ICPMS analyses of silicate melt inclusions in co-precipitated minerals: Quantification, data analysis and mineral/melt partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajacz, Zoltán; Halter, Werner

    2007-02-01

    We present a new approach to determine the composition of silicate melt inclusions (SMI) using LA-ICPMS. In this study, we take advantage of the occurrence of SMI in co-precipitated mineral phases to quantify their composition without depending on additional sources of information. Quantitative SMI analyses are obtained by assuming that the ratio of selected elements in SMI trapped in different phases are identical. In addition Fe/Mg exchange equilibrium between olivine and melt was successfully used to quantify LA-ICPMS analyses of SMI in olivine. Results show that compositions of SMI from the different host minerals are identical within their uncertainty. Thus (1) the quantification approach is valid; (2) analyses are not affected by the composition of the host phase; (3) the derived melt compositions are representative of the original melt, excluding significant syn- or postentrapment modification such as boundary layer effects or diffusive reequilibration with the host mineral. With this data we established a large dataset of mineral/melt partition coefficients for the investigated mineral phases in hydrous calc-alkaline basaltic-andesitic melts. The clinopyroxene/melt and plagioclase/melt partition coefficients are consistent with the lattice strain model of Blundy and Wood [Blundy, J., Wood B., 1994. Prediction of crystal-melt partition-coefficients from elastic-moduli. Nature372, 452-454].

  18. Analysis of gravity and conduction-driven melting in a sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, P. A.; Wang, T. G.

    1987-01-01

    An approach similar to those employed in the theories of lubrication and film condensation is applied to the problem of melting within a sphere. An approximate closed-form solution is obtained which yields relationships between the solid speed, position, and time. The results are compared with those obtained by Bareiss and Beer (1984) for the case of melting in a horizontal cylinder.

  19. Design curves for non-linear analysis of simply-supported, uniformly-loaded rectangular plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D.

    1979-01-01

    Design curves for the non-linear analysis of simply-supported rectangular plates subjected to uniform normal pressure loads have been developed. These curves yield the center deflection, center stress and corner stress in non-dimensionalized form plotted against a dimensionless parameter describing the load intensity. The results presented are based on extensive non-linear finite element analysis employing the ARGUS structural analysis program. Plates with length to width ratios of 1, 1.5, 2, 3 and 4 are included. The load range considered extends to 1000 times the load at which the behavior of the plate becomes significantly non-linear. Over the load range considered, the analysis shows that the ratio of center deflection to plate thickness for a square plate is less than 16 to 1, whereas linear theory would predict a center deflection 400 times the plate thickness. Likewise, the stress is markedly lower than would be predicted by linear theory. The present results are shown to be in excellent agreement with the classical linear theory up to a central deflection to plate thickness ratio of about one-half. In the non-linear regime the present results for deflection and stress are in very good agreement with the analytical and experimental work of other investigators.

  20. High Resolution Melt analysis for mutation screening in PKD1 and PKD2.

    PubMed

    Bataille, Stanislas; Berland, Yvon; Fontes, Michel; Burtey, Stéphane

    2011-10-18

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary kidney disorder. It is characterized by focal development and progressive enlargement of renal cysts leading to end-stage renal disease. PKD1 and PKD2 have been implicated in ADPKD pathogenesis but genetic features and the size of PKD1 make genetic diagnosis tedious. We aim to prove that high resolution melt analysis (HRM), a recent technique in molecular biology, can facilitate molecular diagnosis of ADPKD. We screened for mutations in PKD1 and PKD2 with HRM in 37 unrelated patients with ADPKD. We identified 440 sequence variants in the 37 patients. One hundred and thirty eight were different. We found 28 pathogenic mutations (25 in PKD1 and 3 in PKD2 ) within 28 different patients, which is a diagnosis rate of 75% consistent with literature mean direct sequencing diagnosis rate. We describe 52 new sequence variants in PKD1 and two in PKD2. HRM analysis is a sensitive and specific method for molecular diagnosis of ADPKD. HRM analysis is also costless and time sparing. Thus, this method is efficient and might be used for mutation pre-screening in ADPKD genes.

  1. Analysis of strain relatedness using High Resolution Melting in a case of recurrent candiduria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several genotyping protocols have been described to study Candida albicans strains with different sensitivity values. In this study we have analyzed the genetic relatedness and the antifungal susceptibility of several Candida albicans strains isolated from a patient who from suffered recurrent candiduria for a period of five years. Strains were genotyped using Microsatellite Length Polymorphism (MLP) with three microsatellite markers (HIS 3, EF 3 and CDC 3), and a new method based on high resolution melting (HRM) was developed to analyze the microsatellite region. This method was compared with the conventional technique that uses capillary electrophoresis. Results MICs of the isolates showed the existence of fluconazole susceptible and resistant strains. An inter-colony test using single concentration (8 and 16 mg/l) of fluconazole revealed the coexistence of both fluconazole susceptible and resistant strains. Both genotyping analysis methods showed that all the patient’s isolates had a clonal origin. HRM analysis method developed was able to accurately establish strain relatedness and presented a discriminatory power of 0.77. Conclusions Although HRM analysis method presented a lower discriminatory power compared to methods based on capillary electrophoresis, it provided a more cost-effective and suitable alternative for genotyping C. albicans in a clinical laboratory. PMID:23343107

  2. High resolution melt analysis (HRMA); a viable alternative to agarose gel electrophoresis for mouse genotyping.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Nicole; Ali, Radiya G; Ahmed, Jehangir N; Arkell, Ruth M

    2012-01-01

    Most mouse genetics laboratories maintain mouse strains that require genotyping in order to identify the genetically modified animals. The plethora of mutagenesis strategies and publicly available mouse alleles means that any one laboratory may maintain alleles with random or targeted insertions of orthologous or unrelated sequences as well as random or targeted deletions and point mutants. Many experiments require that different strains be cross bred conferring the need to genotype progeny at more than one locus. In contrast to the range of new technologies for mouse mutagenesis, genotyping methods have remained relatively static with alleles typically discriminated by agarose gel electrophoresis of PCR products. This requires a large amount of researcher time. Additionally it is susceptible to contamination of future genotyping experiments because it requires that tubes containing PCR products be opened for analysis. Progress has been made with the genotyping of mouse point mutants because a range of new high-throughput techniques have been developed for the detection of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms. Some of these techniques are suitable for genotyping point mutants but do not detect insertion or deletion alleles. Ideally, mouse genetics laboratories would use a single, high-throughput platform that enables closed-tube analysis to genotype the entire range of possible insertion and deletion alleles and point mutants. Here we show that High Resolution Melt Analysis meets these criteria, it is suitable for closed-tube genotyping of all allele types and current genotyping assays can be converted to this technology with little or no effort.

  3. Bayesian analysis of stage-fall-discharge rating curves and their uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansanarez, V.; Le Coz, J.; Renard, B.; Lang, M.; Pierrefeu, G.; Vauchel, P.

    2016-09-01

    Stage-fall-discharge (SFD) rating curves are traditionally used to compute streamflow records at sites where the energy slope of the flow is variable due to variable backwater effects. We introduce a model with hydraulically interpretable parameters for estimating SFD rating curves and their uncertainties. Conventional power functions for channel and section controls are used. The transition to a backwater-affected channel control is computed based on a continuity condition, solved either analytically or numerically. The practical use of the method is demonstrated with two real twin-gauge stations, the Rhône River at Valence, France, and the Guthusbekken stream at station 0003ṡ0033, Norway. Those stations are typical of a channel control and a section control, respectively, when backwater-unaffected conditions apply. The performance of the method is investigated through sensitivity analysis to prior information on controls and to observations (i.e., available gaugings) for the station of Valence. These analyses suggest that precisely identifying SFD rating curves requires adapted gauging strategy and/or informative priors. The Madeira River, one of the largest tributaries of the Amazon, provides a challenging case typical of large, flat, tropical river networks where bed roughness can also be variable in addition to slope. In this case, the difference in staff gauge reference levels must be estimated as another uncertain parameter of the SFD model. The proposed Bayesian method is a valuable alternative solution to the graphical and empirical techniques still proposed in hydrometry guidance and standards.

  4. Analysis of microstrip antennas on a curved surface using the conformal grids FD-TD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukai, Ichiro; Onishi, Teruo; Kashiwa, Tatsuya

    1994-03-01

    The need for small, potable antennas for mobile communications has recently spurred the study of microstrip antennas (MSA). MSA are quite flexible and have been used as conformal antennas on arbitrary curved surfaces. The characteristics of conformal MSA can be expected to differ from those of planar models. Dependable numerical analyses will obviate many of the costs and other inconveniences associated with experiments, but as antennas may be mounted on the surfaces of arbitrary topological complexity, analysis methods must have as general applicability as possible. The curvilinear finite difference time-domain (FD-TD) method has shown excellent versatility. In this paper, the curvilinear FD-TD method is applied to analyze microstrip antennas mounted on curved surfaces. The numerical predictions are compared with the experimental values. The results confirm the predictions within acceptable limits and appear to confirm the validity of the method. As a result, it was confirmed that the input impedance and directivity of MSA on curved surfaces are different from the flat MSA.

  5. Direct determination of enzyme kinetic parameters from single reactions using a new progress curve analysis tool.

    PubMed

    Bäuerle, Felix; Zotter, Agnes; Schreiber, Gideon

    2016-10-15

    With computer-based data-fitting methods becoming a standard tool in biochemistry, progress curve analysis of enzyme kinetics is a feasible, yet seldom used tool. Here we present a versatile Matlab-based tool (PCAT) to analyze catalysis progress curves with three complementary model approaches. The first two models are based on the known closed-form solution for this problem: the first describes the required Lambert W function with an analytical approximation and the second provides a numerical solution of the Lambert W function. The third model is a direct simulation of the enzyme kinetics. Depending on the chosen model, the tools excel in speed, accuracy or initial value requirements. Using simulated and experimental data, we show the strengths and pitfalls of the different fitting models. Direct simulation proves to have the highest level of accuracy, but it also requires reasonable initial values to converge. Finally, we propose a standard procedure to obtain optimized enzyme kinetic parameters from single progress curves.

  6. Pg 1115+080: New Analysis of the Light Curves Confirms Old Time Delay Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonov, B.; Koptelova, E.; Oknyanskij, V.; Shimanovskaya, E.

    We analyze all publicly available long-term optical observations of the gravitationally lensed quasar PG1115+080 with the aim of measuring time delays between its four components. In particular, we present analysis of the Maidanak light curves of the PG1115+080 components obtained between 2001 and 2006 (Tsvetkova et al. 2010). We find that the light curves of the 2006 observational season show almost linear trend with some fast variations seen only in the A1 and C components. This can be as due to microlensing or observational errors. These fast variations can decrease statistical significance of the time delay estimates or even produce misleading results. Application of the MCCF technique (Oknyanskij 1993) to photometric data collected in the 2004-2005 seasons gives time delay values tBC = 22±3, tAC = 12±3, and tBA = 10±3 days, which are in agreement with previous results of Schechter et al. (1997) and Barkana (1997) reported for the 1995-1996 light curves analyzed using two different statistical methods. The ratio tAC/tBA between our intermediate delays is about 1.2 that is close to the value reported by Barkana ( ∼1.13) and predicted by lens models (∼1.4) unlike the Schechter's and Vakulik's (2009) values (∼ 0.7 and ∼2.7).

  7. Constraints on melt content of off-axis magma lenses at the East Pacific Rise from analysis of 3-D seismic amplitude variation with angle of incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaei, Omid; Nedimović, Mladen R.; Marjanović, Milena; Carbotte, Suzanne M.; Pablo Canales, J.; Carton, Hélène; Nikić, Nikola

    2017-06-01

    We use 3-D multichannel seismic data to form partial angle P wave stacks and apply amplitude variation with angle (AVA) crossplotting to assess melt content and melt distribution within two large midcrustal off-axis magma lenses (OAMLs) found along the East Pacific Rise from 9°37.5'N to 9°57'N. The signal envelope of the partial angle stacks suggests that both OAMLs are partially molten with higher average melt content and more uniform melt distribution in the southern OAML than in the northern OAML. For AVA crossplotting, the OAMLs are subdivided into seven 1 km2 analysis windows. The AVA crossplotting results indicate that the OAMLs contain a smaller amount of melt than the axial magma lens (AML). For both OAMLs, a higher melt fraction is detected within analysis windows located close to the ridge axis than within the most distant windows. The highest average melt concentration is interpreted for the central sections of the OAMLs. The overall low OAML melt content could be indicative of melt lost due to recent off-axis eruptions, drainage to the AML, or limited mantle melt supply. Based on the results of this and earlier bathymetric, morphological, geochemical, and geophysical investigations, we propose that the melt-poor OAML state is largely the result of limited melt supply from the underlying mantle source reservoir with smaller contribution attributed to melt leakage to the AML. We hypothesize that the investigated OAMLs have a longer period of melt replenishment, lower eruption recurrence rates, and lower eruption volumes than the AML, though some could be single intrusion events.

  8. An elastic-plastic finite-element analysis of the J-resistance curve using a CTOD criterion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Booth, B. C.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    1988-01-01

    The fracture process in compact and bend specimens was simulated using a two-dimensional finite-element analysis of the J-resistance (J-R) curve and a CTOD criterion. The J-R curves were calculated from the numerical results for each specimen type using several different methods. In general, the J-R curves obtained for the bend specimens were found to be higher than those for the compact specimens, especially beyond maximum load. However, below the maximum load, the modified deformation theory of plasticity and the contour-integral J(r) method resulted in very similar J-R curves for both specimen types.

  9. Rapid determination of lymphogranuloma venereum serovars of Chlamydia trachomatis by quantitative high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA).

    PubMed

    Twin, Jimmy; Stevens, Matthew P; Garland, Suzanne M; Zaia, Angelo M; Tabrizi, Sepehr N

    2012-11-01

    A quantitative high-resolution melt analysis assay was developed to differentiate lymphogranuloma venereum-causing serovars of Chlamydia trachomatis (L1 to L3) from other C. trachomatis serovars (D to K). The detection limit of this assay is approximately 10 copies per reaction, comparable to the limits of other quantitative-PCR-based methods.

  10. Rapid Diagnosis of Old World Leishmaniasis by High-Resolution Melting Analysis of the 7SL RNA Gene▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Jaffe, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution melt analysis PCR (HRM PCR) for diagnosis of Old World Leishmania was developed using the 7SL RNA gene. Cutaneous leishmaniasis samples were analyzed. Sensitivity and specificity of HRM PCR were significantly better (P < 0.001) than those of internal transcribed spacer 1 PCR and similar to those of kinetoplast DNA PCR. PMID:20392923

  11. Assessing the Classification Accuracy of Early Numeracy Curriculum-Based Measures Using Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laracy, Seth D.; Hojnoski, Robin L.; Dever, Bridget V.

    2016-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was used to investigate the ability of early numeracy curriculum-based measures (EN-CBM) administered in preschool to predict performance below the 25th and 40th percentiles on a quantity discrimination measure in kindergarten. Areas under the curve derived from a sample of 279 students ranged…

  12. Assessing the Classification Accuracy of Early Numeracy Curriculum-Based Measures Using Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laracy, Seth D.; Hojnoski, Robin L.; Dever, Bridget V.

    2016-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was used to investigate the ability of early numeracy curriculum-based measures (EN-CBM) administered in preschool to predict performance below the 25th and 40th percentiles on a quantity discrimination measure in kindergarten. Areas under the curve derived from a sample of 279 students ranged…

  13. Urgent and Elective Robotic Single-Site Cholecystectomy: Analysis and Learning Curve of 150 Consecutive Cases.

    PubMed

    Kubat, Eric; Hansen, Nathan; Nguyen, Huy; Wren, Sherry M; Eisenberg, Dan

    2016-03-01

    The use of robotic single-site cholecystectomy has increased exponentially. There are few reports describing the safety, efficacy, and operative learning curve of robotic single-site cholecystectomy either in the community setting or with nonelective surgery. We performed a retrospective review of a prospective database of our initial experience with robotic single-site cholecystectomy. Demographics and perioperative outcomes were evaluated for both urgent and elective cholecystectomy. Cumulative sum analysis was performed to determine the surgeon's learning curve. One hundred fifty patients underwent robotic single-site cholecystectomy. Seventy-four (49.3%) patients underwent urgent robotic single-site cholecystectomy, and 76 (50.7%) underwent elective robotic single-site cholecystectomy. Mean total operative time for robotic single-site cholecystectomy was 83.3 ± 2.7 minutes. Mean operative time for the urgent cohort was significantly longer than for the elective cohort (95.0 ± 4.4 versus 71.9 ± 2.6 minutes; P < .001). There was one conversion in the urgent cohort and none in the elective cohort. There was one bile duct injury (0.7%) in the urgent cohort. Perioperative complications occurred in 8.7% of patients, and most consisted of superficial surgical-site infections. There were no incisional hernias detected. The surgeon's learning curve, inclusive of urgent and elective cases, was 48 operations. Robotic single-site cholecystectomy can be performed safely and effectively in both elective and urgent cholecystectomy with a reasonable learning curve and acceptable perioperative outcomes.

  14. Towards a new classification of galaxies: principal component analysis of CALIFA circular velocity curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinova, V.; Colombo, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Kannan, R.; Galbany, L.; García-Benito, R.; González Delgado, R.; Sánchez, S. F.; Ruiz-Lara, T.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; Sánchez-Menguiano, L.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Costantin, L.; Florido, E.; Kodaira, K.; Marino, R. A.; Läsker, R.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    2017-08-01

    We present a galaxy classification system for 238 (E1-Sdm) CALIFA (Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area) galaxies based on the shapes and amplitudes of their circular velocity curves (CVCs). We infer the CVCs from the de-projected surface brightness of the galaxies, after scaling by a constant mass-to-light ratio based on stellar dynamics - solving axisymmetric Jeans equations via fitting the second velocity moment V_{rms}=√{V^2+σ ^2} of the stellar kinematics. We use principal component analysis (PCA) applied to the CVC shapes to find characteristic features and use a k-means classifier to separate circular curves into classes. This objective classification method identifies four different classes, which we name slow-rising (SR), flat (FL), round-peaked (RP) and sharp-peaked (SP) circular curves. SR are typical for low-mass, late-type (Sb-Sdm), young, faint, metal-poor and disc-dominated galaxies. SP are typical for high-mass, early-type (E1-E7), old, bright, metal-rich and bulge-dominated galaxies. FL and RP appear presented by galaxies with intermediate mass, age, luminosity, metallicity, bulge-to-disc ratio and morphologies (E4-S0a, Sa-Sbc). The discrepancy mass factor, fd = 1 - M*/Mdyn, have the largest value for SR and SP classes (∼ 74 per cent and ∼ 71 per cent, respectively) in contrast to the FL and RP classes (with ∼ 59 per cent and ∼ 61 per cent, respectively). Circular curve classification presents an alternative to typical morphological classification and appears more tightly linked to galaxy evolution.

  15. Analysis of the effect of symmetric/asymmetric CUSP magnetic fields on melt/crystal interface during Czochralski silicon growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daggolu, Parthiv; Ryu, Jae Woo; Galyukov, Alex; Kondratyev, Alexey

    2016-10-01

    With the use of 300 mm silicon wafers for industrial semiconductor device manufacturing, the Czochralski (Cz) crystal growth process has to be optimized to achieve higher quality and productivity. Numerical studies based on 2D global thermal models combined with 3D simulation of melt convection are widely used today to save time and money in the process development. Melt convection in large scale Cz Si growth is controlled by a CUSP or transversal magnetic field (MF) to suppress the melt turbulence. MF can be optimized to meet necessary characteristics of the growing crystal, in terms of point defects, as MF affects the melt/crystal interface geometry and allows adjustment of the pulling rate. Among the different knobs associated with the CUSP magnetic field, the nature of its configuration, going from symmetric to asymmetric, is also reported to be an important tool for the control of crystallization front. Using a 3D unsteady model of the CGSim software, we have studied these effects and compared with several experimental results. In addition, physical mechanisms behind these observations are explored through a detailed modeling analysis of the effect of an asymmetric CUSP MF on convection features governing the heat transport in the silicon melt.

  16. Development of a Rapid High-Throughput Method for High-Resolution Melting Analysis for Routine Detection and Genotyping of Noroviruses▿

    PubMed Central

    Tajiri-Utagawa, Etsuko; Hara, Masayuki; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Watanabe, Mayumi; Wakita, Takaji

    2009-01-01

    We developed a simple, rapid, high-throughput detection and genotyping method for noroviruses using real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis to create a difference plot. The capsid gene was amplified by real-time RT-PCR in the presence of ResoLight HRM dye, a saturating DNA dye. Following optimization of the HRM assay conditions, the major norovirus genotypes were selected. Because we had only small quantities of the patient stool samples used in this study, we constructed plasmids for each genotype and used these to optimize the HRM assay. We selected six stool samples, each positive for one of the six dominant subtypes of noroviruses that have been circulating in Japan, namely, genotypes 4, 8, and 9 from genogroup 1 and genotypes 3, 4, and 10 from genogroup 2. The specific high-resolution derivate plot of the HRM assay for each plasmid was constructed by subtracting the melting-curve shape of the plasmid from the reference or base curve. The RNAs extracted from 14 clinical samples positive for small round structured viruses were then directly analyzed using the HRM assay. The HRM data from the clinical RNA samples corresponded with the genotype results obtained by RT-PCR and sequencing of the clinical samples. In addition, the HRM data from the clinical RNA samples corresponded with the HRM data from the six reference plasmid DNAs, indicating that this assay is useful for the direct detection and genotyping of noroviruses in clinical samples. This assay requires no multiplexing or hybridization probes and provides a new approach to the genetic screening of noroviruses in clinical virology laboratories. PMID:19073870

  17. Numerical analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer during melting inside a cylindrical container for thermal energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellan, Selvan; Cheok, Cho Hyun; Gokon, Nobuyuki; Matsubara, Koji; Kodama, Tatsuya

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a numerical analysis of unconstrained melting of high temperature(>1000K) phase change material (PCM) inside a cylindrical container. Sodium chloride and Silicon carbide have been used as phase change material and shell of the capsule respectively. The control volume discretization approach has been used to solve the conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy. The enthalpy-porosity method has been used to track the solid-liquid interface of the PCM during melting process. Transient numerical simulations have been performed in order to study the influence of radius of the capsule and the Stefan number on the heat transfer rate. The simulation results show that the counter-clockwise Buoyancy driven convection over the top part of the solid PCM enhances the melting rate quite faster than the bottom part.

  18. Ammonia-water mixtures at high pressures - Melting curves of ammonia dihydrate and ammonia monohydrate and a revised high-pressure phase diagram for the water-rich region. [in primordial solar system ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boone, S.; Nicol, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    The phase relations of some mixtures of ammonia and water are investigated to create a phase diagram in pressure-temperature-composition space relevant to the geophysical study of bodies in the outer solar system. The mixtures of NH3(x)H2O(1-x), where x is greater than 0.30 but less than 0.51, are examined at pressures and temperatures ranging from 0-6.5 GPa and 125-400 K, respectively. The ruby luminescence technique monitors the pressure and a diamond-anvil cell compresses the samples, and the phases are identified by means of normal- and polarized-light optical microscopy. The melting curve for NH3H2O(2) is described by the equation T = 176 + 60P - 8.5P squared for the ranges of 0.06-1.4 GPa and 179-243 K. The equation for NH3H2O is T = 194 + 37P - P squared, which represents a minor correction of a previous description by Johnson et al. (1985). Observed phase transitions are consistent with the high-pressure stability limit of NH3H2O(2), and the transition boundary is found to be linear.

  19. Ammonia-water mixtures at high pressures - Melting curves of ammonia dihydrate and ammonia monohydrate and a revised high-pressure phase diagram for the water-rich region. [in primordial solar system ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boone, S.; Nicol, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    The phase relations of some mixtures of ammonia and water are investigated to create a phase diagram in pressure-temperature-composition space relevant to the geophysical study of bodies in the outer solar system. The mixtures of NH3(x)H2O(1-x), where x is greater than 0.30 but less than 0.51, are examined at pressures and temperatures ranging from 0-6.5 GPa and 125-400 K, respectively. The ruby luminescence technique monitors the pressure and a diamond-anvil cell compresses the samples, and the phases are identified by means of normal- and polarized-light optical microscopy. The melting curve for NH3H2O(2) is described by the equation T = 176 + 60P - 8.5P squared for the ranges of 0.06-1.4 GPa and 179-243 K. The equation for NH3H2O is T = 194 + 37P - P squared, which represents a minor correction of a previous description by Johnson et al. (1985). Observed phase transitions are consistent with the high-pressure stability limit of NH3H2O(2), and the transition boundary is found to be linear.

  20. On the Analysis and Construction of the Butterfly Curve Using "Mathematica"[R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geum, Y. H.; Kim, Y. I.

    2008-01-01

    The butterfly curve was introduced by Temple H. Fay in 1989 and defined by the polar curve r = e[superscript cos theta] minus 2 cos 4 theta plus sin[superscript 5] (theta divided by 12). In this article, we develop the mathematical model of the butterfly curve and analyse its geometric properties. In addition, we draw the butterfly curve and…

  1. On the Analysis and Construction of the Butterfly Curve Using "Mathematica"[R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geum, Y. H.; Kim, Y. I.

    2008-01-01

    The butterfly curve was introduced by Temple H. Fay in 1989 and defined by the polar curve r = e[superscript cos theta] minus 2 cos 4 theta plus sin[superscript 5] (theta divided by 12). In this article, we develop the mathematical model of the butterfly curve and analyse its geometric properties. In addition, we draw the butterfly curve and…

  2. Genotype-specific real-time PCR combined with high-resolution melting analysis for rapid identification of red-spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Toubanaki, Dimitra K; Karagouni, Evdokia

    2017-08-01

    A real-time genotype-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay combined with high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was developed to assess the most common genotypes of nervous necrosis viruses or nodaviruses. Nodaviruses are the causal agents of viral nervous necrosis infections, which have been wreaking havoc in the aquaculture industry worldwide, with fish mortality up to 100%. The four different genotypes of nodaviruses correlate with differences in viral pathogenicity. Therefore, rational development of effective vaccines and diagnostics requires analysis of genetic variation among viruses. The aim of the present study was to develop a real-time tetra-primer genotype-specific PCR assay for genotype identification. Four primers were utilized for simultaneous amplification of nodavirus genotype-specific products in a single closed-tube PCR after a reverse-transcription reaction using RNA isolated from fish samples. For high-throughput sample analysis, SYBR Green-based real-time PCR was used in combination with HRM analysis. The assay was evaluated in terms of specificity and sensitivity. The analysis resulted in melting curves that were indicative of each genotype. The detection limit when using reference plasmids was 100 ag/µL for both genotypes, while the sensitivity of the assays when testing a complex mixture was 10 fg/µL for red-spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) and 100 fg/µL for striped jack nervous necrosis virus (SJNNV). To test the capability of this method under real-world conditions, 58 samples were examined. All samples belonged to the RGNNV genotype, which was fully validated. The results were in full agreement with genotyping by reference methods. The proposed methodology provides a rapid, sensitive, specific, robust and automatable assay for nodavirus genotyping, making it a useful tool for diagnosis and screening for epidemiological studies.

  3. Evaluation of the formation of a junctional DNA nanostructure through annealing curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung Won; Park, Kyung Soo; Um, Soong Ho

    2015-02-20

    During the self-assembly of different numbers of oligonucleotides comprising junctional DNA nanostructures, a change in environmental variables (e.g., temperature or salt concentration) has a substantial influence on the final products. Further, distinctive annealing temperatures of oligonucleotides are observed depending on the state of hybridization. Here, we present an evaluation of the annealing characteristics of oligonucleotides for the formation of a simple junctional DNA nanostructure using an annealing curve analysis. This method may be useful for analyzing the formation of complex junctional DNA nanostructures.

  4. To homogenize, or not to homogenize, that is the question: Quartz-hosted melt inclusion analysis avenues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercer, C. N.; Roberge, J.; Todorov, T. I.; Hofstra, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Melt inclusions hosted in quartz can provide the only direct information about the pressure, temperature, and melt composition of pre-eruptive rhyolitic magmas, many of which are the precursors to mineralizing aqueous fluids [1]. With ideal, rapidly-quenched pumice samples, analysis of glassy quartz-hosted melt inclusions is relatively straightforward. These data can be directly interpreted to represent snapshots of metal and volatile concentrations during magma crystallization and degassing. However, most ore deposit-related igneous samples are non-ideal; being older, potentially hydrothermally altered, and often crystallized due to slow cooling in subvolcanic regions (e.g., porphyry-type deposits). In this case, analysis of crystalline melt inclusions in quartz is not straightforward and resulting data must be meticulously examined before interpretation. Many melt inclusions may have experienced post-entrapment modifications [1] such as diffusion of elements (e.g., H, Li, Na, Ag, Cu) [2], which may lead to changes in measured oxygen fugacity. Slowly cooled inclusions may crystallize, producing a heterogeneous "micro-rock" that cannot be analyzed by spectroscopic methods or electron microprobe. While crystallized inclusions can be homogenized in a high-temperature furnace, many new problems may arise such as inclusion decrepitation [3], diffusion of elements [2], and incorporation of too little or too much Si from the inclusion rim or host crystal. However, if unwanted homogenization effects are minimized by choosing ideal experimental conditions, then these homogenized inclusions can be analyzed by traditional FTIR and electron microprobe methods. The electron microprobe data from homogenized inclusions can be used as accurate internal standards for laser ablation-ICP-MS data reduction. Alternatively, crystalline inclusions can be directly analyzed for major and trace elements by laser ablation-ICP-MS [4], which considerably reduces sample preparation time, but

  5. Improved factor analysis of dynamic PET images to estimate arterial input function and tissue curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Mitra, Debasis; Pan, Hui; Jagust, William; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-03-01

    Factor analysis of dynamic structures (FADS) is a methodology of extracting time-activity curves (TACs) for corresponding different tissue types from noisy dynamic images. The challenges of FADS include long computation time and sensitivity to the initial guess, resulting in convergence to local minima far from the true solution. We propose a method of accelerating and stabilizing FADS application to sequences of dynamic PET images by adding preliminary cluster analysis of the time activity curves for indi