Science.gov

Sample records for member tumbiana formation

  1. Exercise habit formation in new gym members: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Navin; Rhodes, Ryan E

    2015-08-01

    Reasoned action approaches have primarily been applied to understand exercise behaviour for the past three decades, yet emerging findings in unconscious and Dual Process research show that behavior may also be predicted by automatic processes such as habit. The purpose of this study was to: (1) investigate the behavioral requirements for exercise habit formation, (2) how Dual Process approach predicts behaviour, and (3) what predicts habit by testing a model (Lally and Gardner in Health Psychol Rev 7:S137-S158, 2013). Participants (n = 111) were new gym members who completed surveys across 12 weeks. It was found that exercising for at least four bouts per week for 6 weeks was the minimum requirement to establish an exercise habit. Dual Process analysis using Linear Mixed Models (LMM) revealed habit and intention to be parallel predictors of exercise behavior in the trajectory analysis. Finally, the habit antecedent model in LLM showed that consistency (β = .21), low behavioral complexity (β = .19), environment (β = .17) and affective judgments (β = .13) all significantly (p < .05) predicted changes in habit formation over time. Trainers should keep exercises fun and simple for new clients and focus on consistency which could lead to habit formation in nearly 6 weeks.

  2. Tertiary oxidation in Westwater Canyon member of Morrison formation

    SciTech Connect

    Saucier, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Hematitic oxidation in the Westwater Canyon Sandstone Member of the Morrison Formation extends along the outcrop from the Pipeline fault northeast of Gallup, New Mexico, to the San Mateo fault north of Grants, New Mexico. The hematitic sandstone forms a broad lobe in the subsurface to a depth of 2,400 ft (730 m). The downdip edge of this sandstone arcs eastward from northeast Church Rock through Crownpoint, and southeastward to the west edge of the Ambrosia Lake district. The red sandstone is bordered on the downdip side by a band of limonitic oxidation, which interfingers with reduced sandstones basinward. The limonitic oxidation forms a relatively narrow band along the north and west sides of the hematitic lobe but expands progressively in an east and southeast direction. Weak limonitic oxidation, as indicated by the absence of pyrite and by a bleached to faint yellowish-gray color, appears to extend from the San Mateo fault eastward under Mount Taylor to the Rio Puerco of the east. The hematitic oxidation is epigenetic and is believed to be of early Miocene to late Pliocene age. The limonitic oxidation follows the present ground-water flow pattern and probably dates from late Pliocene to the Holocene. The oxidation patterns are important in uranium exploration because the hematitic area is essentially barren, whereas the limonitic areas contain ore deposits that are in the process of being destroyed by oxidation.

  3. Temple Mountain member, a new member of the Chinle formation in the San Rafael Swell, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robeck, Raymond C.

    1956-01-01

    A lithologic unit, referred to as mottled purple and white, or the 'pinto bed,' in the San Rafael Swell has E?nough thickness and continuity to be formally named the Temple Mountain member of the Chinle formationo The member is characterized by the presence of: the interfingering of siltstone, mudstone, and sandstone; purple and white color; quartz grains and pebbles; jasper; and coalified material.

  4. Formation of six-membered rings via alkyne insertion into four-membered rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Takanori; Miura, Norio; Matsumoto, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Alkyne insertion into four-membered carbocyclic rings was achieved through rhodium(I)-catalyzed C-C bond cleavage. The reaction of (2-pyridylmethylene)cyclobutenes proceeded via C-C oxidative addition, and that of cyclobutenols involved β-carbon elimination. In both the cases, multiply substituted benzenes were obtained through the aromatization of the initially formed 1,4-cyclohexadienes.

  5. Formative Research on Perceptions of Biobanking: What Community Members Think

    PubMed Central

    Luque, John S.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Montel-Ishino, Francisco A.; Arevalo, Mariana; Bynum, Shalanda A.; Noel-Thomas, Shalewa; Wells, Kristen J.; Gwede, Clement K.; Meade, Cathy D.

    2013-01-01

    Preparing healthy community members with timely communications prior to engaging them in a request to donate biospecimens promises to improve the experience of biobanking participation. To this end, a qualitative study was conducted to assess community member knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and informational needs about cancer-related biospecimen collection in a large metropolitan area in southwest Florida. The study utilized purposive sampling techniques to recruit a total of 95 participants to participate in 12 focus groups, segmented by race/ethnicity and language preference (mixed race, African American only, and Spanish speaking) and age (18–29, 30–54, and 55 and older). Focus group interviews were analyzed using content analysis to identify emergent themes. Overall, participants in the 30 years and older groups were favorable toward participating in biobanking if their concerns were addressed, such as confidentiality and consent issues, in contrast to participants aged 18–29 who were more skeptical. For all participants, the desire to participate in research that seeks new cancer treatments outweighed mistrust. Moreover, many cited the potential scientific benefit for future generations as a primary motivator. Finally, in some groups a therapeutic misconception was expressed, where participants expressed a willingness to forego confidentiality of their health status in exchange for therapeutic benefit. This study contributes to the literature on community perceptions of the benefits and barriers of biobanking and adds to the development of meaningful education communication priming tools to advance understandings about biobanking. PMID:21927867

  6. Facies and age of the Oso Ridge Member (new), Abo Formation, Zuni Mountains, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, A.K.; Stamm, R.G.; Kottlowski, F.E.; Mamet, B.L.; Dutro, J.T.; Weary, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Oso Ridge Member (new), at the base of the Abo Formation, nonconformably overlies Proterozoic rocks. The member consists of some 9m of conglomerate and arkose composed principally of fragments of the underlying Proterozoic metamorphic rocks; thin, fossiliferous limestone lenses are interbedded with the arkose. Biota from the lenses include a phylloid alga, foraminifers, conodonts, brachiopods, and molluscs. The age of the Oso Ridge Member is Virgilian Late Pennsylvanian) to Wolfcampian (Early Permian). -from Authors

  7. Members of the Toroweap and Kaibab formations, Lower Permian, northern Arizona and southern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Sorauf, J.E. ); Billingsley, G.H. )

    1991-01-01

    The Toroweap Formation consists of, in ascending order, the Seligman, Brady Canyon, and Woods Ranch members. The Seligman Member, whose type section is near Seligman, Arizona, consists chiefly of pale-red and reddish- to yellowish-brown, fine-grained, calcareous sandstone and, in places, gypsum and dolomite. The Brady Canyon Member is composed of fossiliferous marine limestone, in part cherty. The Woods Ranch Member consists of dolomite, gypsum, and siltstone and, in part, fossiliferous limestone. All three members of the Toroweap change facies eastward from the western Grand Canyon area: the Seligman grades into fine-grained, crossbedded sandstone; the Brady Canyon into sandstone and dolomitic sandstone; and the Woods Ranch into dolomitic sandstone. Because of these facies changes, the members are unrecognizable east of a line running roughly north-south from west of Page, Arizona, to west of Flagstaff, Arizona. East of these areas, the term sandstone facies of the Toroweap Formation is used. The Kaibab Formation consists of the Fossil mountain Member below and the Harrisburg Member above. The Fossil Mountain Member consists of light-gray, thick-bedded, cherty and sandy limestone. It grades eastward into sandstone and calcareous sandstone. The Harrisburg Member consists of light-red to light-gray gypsum, limestone, and dolomite and lesser amounts of red and gray siltstone and sandstone. It merges with the calcareous sandstone facies of the Fossil Mountain east of a line running roughly north-south from near Page to east and south of Flagstaff. The term Kaibab Formation is here applied to the sandstone and calcareous sandstone facies of the Kaibab east of this line.

  8. Paleobotany and palynology of the Bristol Hill Coal Member (Bond Formation) and Friendsville Coal Member (Mattoon Formation) of the Illinois Basin (Upper Pennsylvanian)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willard, D.A.; Phillips, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    Late Pennsylvanian coal swamps of the Illinois Basin were dominated by Psarnius tree ferns with a spatially heterogeneous distribution of medullosan pteridosperms (subdominant), calamites, sigillarian lycopsids, and cordaites. Miospore and coal-ball plant assemblages from the Missourian-age Bristol Hill Coal Member (Mattoon Formation) of southeastern Illinois were quantified to analyze vegetational patterns in Late Pennsylvanian peat swamps and to compare vegetational composition of the coals. -from Authors

  9. The formation placement and palaeoenvironment of the Middle Miocene Los Atajos Member, Trinidad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Brent; Farfan, Philip; Hughes, Chantelle

    2017-07-01

    The age, palaeoenvironment and formation placement of the conglomeratic Los Atajos Member of central Trinidad have long been unclear. Seven samples (four from calcareous silts near the member's base exposed by building work at the Los Atajos Community Centre, and three from the underlying calcareous claystones of the Brasso Formation) were examined for calcareous microfossils. These indicate a conformable succession encompassing an overall regression. The oldest of the claystone samples, of uppermost early Middle Miocene Globorotalia fohsi fohsi Zone age (N11), contained an upper bathyal benthic foraminiferal assemblage, while the younger claystone samples yielded abundant, shallow neritic Hanzawaia carstensi. The recovery of the planktonic foraminifera Globorotalia mayeri but absence of Globigerinoides subquadratus suggest a Middle Miocene age (Globorotalia mayeri planktonic foraminiferal Zone; N14) for both the uppermost Brasso claystone sample and the Los Atajos Member. The benthic foraminiferal fauna in the Los Atajos is dominated by Rosalina subaraucana, with subdominant Cibicides ex gr. aknerianus and C. floridanus sensu Galloway and Heminway, and common Elphidium spp. This faunal succession has a close affinity with that of parts of the Lower to Middle Miocene Brasso Formation, especially the N10 Guaracara Limestone Member and the clays on which it sits. However, the Los Atajos Member assemblage differs markedly from that of the overlying Late Miocene San José Calcareous Silt Member of the Manzanilla Formation, from which the Los Atajos is separated by an unconformity of Globorotalia menardii (N15) Zone age. On these grounds, the Los Atajos Member is here placed within the Brasso Formation. The low diversity, high dominance benthic foraminiferal fauna and the associated ostracod assemblage in the Los Atajos are indicative of inner to shallower middle neritic palaeodepths in a carbonate-prone palaeoenvironment with marine vegetation and strong current action

  10. Sedimentology and petroleum occurrence, Schoolhouse Member, Maroon Formation (Lower Permian), northwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, S.Y.; Schenk, C.J.; Anders, D.L.; Tuttle, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Lower Permian Schoolhouse Member of the Maroon Formation forms a partly exhumed petroleum reservoir in the Eagle basin of northwestern Colorado. The Schoolhouse consists mainly of yellowish gray to gray, low-angle to parallel bedded, very fine to fine-grained sandstone of eolian sand-sheet origin; interbedded fluvial deposits are present in most sections. Geological and geochemical data suggest that Schoolhouse Member oils have upper Paleozoic sources, including the intrabasinal Belden Formation. Late Paleozoic faults have served as local conduits for vertical petroleum migration. Large-scale (>200 km) lateral migration from sources in the Permian Phosphoria Formation is also possible but less likely. Belden oil was generated and migrated before about 75 Ma. Subsequently, the Schoolhouse Member reservoir was uplifted, then partly exhumed on the monoclinal flank of the Laramide (latest Cretaceous-Paleogene) White River uplift. -from Authors

  11. Early Visean bryozoans from the Shishtu II Member, Shishtu Formation, central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolokonnikova, Zoya; Yazdi-Moghadam, Mohsen

    2013-12-01

    Four bryozoan species are described from the upper member (Shishtu II) (Visean, Early Carboniferous=Mississippian) of the Shishtu Formation of central Iran: Nikiforovella ulbensis Nekhoroshev, 1956, Nicklesopora elegantulaformis (Nekhoroshev, 1956), Primorella cf. iranica Gorjunova, 2006, and Nikiforopora intermedia (Nikiforova, 1950). This Visean assemblage shows close palaeogeographical affinities of Iran with Kazakhstan and Russia (eastern Transbaikalia, Kurgan region).

  12. New hominid fossils from Member 1 of the Swartkrans formation, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Travis Rayne; Heaton, Jason L; Clarke, Ronald J; Sutton, Morris B; Brain, C K; Kuman, Kathleen

    2012-05-01

    Member 1 of the Swartkrans Formation is comprised of two sedimentary infills, the Lower Bank (LB) and the Hanging Remnant (HR). Together, the LB and HR preserve fossils of early Homo and Paranthropus robustus, Earlier Stone Age lithic artifacts, purported bone digging tools and butchered animal bones. Collectively, this evidence was the first to establish the co-existence of two early Pleistocene hominid species and also led to inferences of plant root harvesting and meat-eating by one or both of those species. P. robustus is the more abundant of the two hominids at Swartrkrans, represented in Member 1 by hundreds of fossils that derive from at least 99 individuals. Thus, Swartkrans Member 1 stands as the world's single largest repository of that extinct species. Here we add to the Member 1 sample of hominid fossils with descriptions of 14 newly discovered specimens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sustainable, effective implementation of a surgical preprocedural checklist: an "attestation" format for all operating team members.

    PubMed

    Porter, Allison J; Narimasu, Jon Y; Mulroy, Michael F; Koehler, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Adoption ofa preprocedural pause (PPP) associated with a checklist and a team briefing has been shown to improve teamwork function in operating rooms (ORs) and has resulted in improved outcomes. The format of the World Health Organization Safe Surgery Saves Lives checklist has been used as a template for a PPP. Performing a PPP, described as a "time-out," is one of the three principal components, along with a preprocedure verification process and marking the procedure site, of the Joint Commission's Universal Protocol for Preventing Wrong Site, Wrong Procedure, Wrong Person Surgery. However, if the surgeon alone leads the pause, its effectiveness may be decreased by lack of input from other operating team members. In this study, the PPP was assessed to measure participation and input from operating team members. On the basis of low participation levels, the pause was modified to include an attestation from each member of the team. Preliminary analysis of our surgeon-led pause revealed only 54% completion of all items, which increased to 97% after the intervention. With the new format, operating team members stopped for the pause in 96% of cases, compared with 78% before the change. Operating team members introduced themselves in 94% of cases, compared with 44% before the change. Follow-up analysis showed sustained performance at 18 months after implementation. A preprocedural checklist format in which each member of the operating team provides a personal attestation can improve pause compliance and may contribute to improvements in the culture of teamwork within an OR. Successful online implementation of a PPP, which includes participation by all operating team members, requires little or no additional expense and only minimal formal coaching outside working situations.

  14. Sedimentology and petroleum occurrence, Schoolhouse Member, Maroon Formation (Lower Permian), northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.Y.; Schenk, C.J.; Anders, D.L.; Tuttle, M.L. )

    1990-02-01

    The Lower Permian Schoolhouse Member of the Maroon Formation (formerly considered the Schoolhouse Tongue of the Weber Sandstone) forms a partly exhumed petroleum reservoir in the Eagle basin of northwestern Colorado. The Schoolhouse consists mainly of yellowish gray to gray, low-angle to parallel bedded, very fine to fine-grained sandstone of eolian sand-sheet origin; interbedded fluvial deposits are present in most sections. The sand-sheet deposits of the Schoolhouse Member are sedimentologically and petrologically similar to those in the underlying red beds of the main body of the Maroon Formation, and the Schoolhouse is considered the uppermost sand sheet in the Maroon depositional sequence. The bleached and oil-stained Schoolhouse member is distinguished from the underlying Maroon red beds on the basis of its diagenetic history, which is related to regional hydrocarbon migration and development of secondary porosity. Geological and geochemical data suggest that Schoolhouse Member oils have upper Paleozoic sources, including the intrabasinal Belden Formation. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Trust in the workplace: factors affecting trust formation between team members.

    PubMed

    Spector, Michele D; Jones, Gwen E

    2004-06-01

    The authors used survey data from 127 professional-level employees working in 8 industries to assess the effects of respondent's trusting stance and (a) the trustee's organization membership (internal or external), (b) the hierarchical relationship (supervisor or peer), and (c) the gender of the trustee, on initial trust level for a new project team member. The authors found that trusting stance was positively related to initial trust level. The authors also found an interaction effect between respondent gender and trustee gender on initial trust. Specifically, male initial trust level was higher for a new male team member and lower for a new female team member. The present study provided additional understanding of the formation of initial trust levels and its importance for team functioning.

  16. A subsurface study of the Denkman sandstone member, Norphlet Formation, hatters Pond field, Mobile County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.M.; Anderson, E.G.; Baria, L.R. ); Higginbotham, R.S.

    1990-09-01

    Hatters Pond field is in east-central Mobile County in southwestern Alabama and it produces from both the Norphlet and Smackover formations. The structural trap involves salt movement along the west side of the Mobile Fault System that resulted in a faulted salt anticline. The Norphlet Formation of southwestern Alabama consists of red to gray siltstone and pinkish to gray sandstone with conglomerate layers. Three facies have been distinguished within the Norphlet Formation: a lower shale, a red siltstone sequence, and an upper quartzose unit. The thickness of the formation ranges from a feather edge to more than 800 ft (234.8 m) in southwestern Alabama. The Upper Jurassic Denkman Sandstone Member of the Norphlet Formation at Hatters Pond field is a medium- to fine-grained, well-sorted arkosic sandstone between the underlying Norphlet redbed lithofacies and the carbonates of the overlying Smackover Formation. Here, the Denkman Member can be subdivided into a massive upper unit and a low- to high-angle cross-stratified lower unit. The sandstones are quartz-rich with a high percentage of feldspars. The majority of the feldspar grains observed are potassium feldspar. Microcline is usually less altered when compared with other types of feldspar grains. The major types of feldspar replacement include illitization, hematitization, dolomitization, chloritization, calcitization, vacuolization, and anhydritization. Carbonate replacement of feldspars is very abundant, mostly by ferroan dolomite. Rock fragments are not abundant in the Denkman Member, although there is good evidence of a metamorphic/volcanic source area. The sandstones are cemented by dolomite, calcite, anhydrite, and quartz and feldspar overgrowths. The lower Denkman unit is slightly more porous than the upper Denkman unit. The pore-lining authigenic clay, illite, greatly reduces permeability and porosity in these sandstones.

  17. Subaqueous evaporites of Buckner member, Haynesville Formation, northeastern Mobile County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, S.D.

    1988-09-01

    The lower part of the Buckner anhydrite member of the Haynesville Formation (Upper Jurassic) was deposited as shallowing upward cycles of subaqueous to subaerial deposits on the north flank of the Wiggins arch in northeastern Mobile County, Alabama. The unit studied conformably overlies the Smackover Formation and is generally evaporite dominated. The Buckner anhydrite averages about 35 m (115 ft) thick and has been buried to depths of 5.5 km (> 18,000 ft). Despite this deep burial, the unit has suffered little deformation since alteration of gypsum to anhydrite.

  18. Biocatalysts for the formation of three- to six-membered carbo- and heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Horst; Pressnitz, Desiree; Kroutil, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, the number of different types of enzymes applicable for organic synthesis as biocatalysts has significantly increased. Consequently, the spectrum of reactions has significantly expanded also for cyclisations. This review highlights heterologously expressable biocatalysts transforming non-natural substrates for the formation of three- to six-membered carbo- and heterocycles, excluding terpene cyclases as well as SAM-dependent enzymes. The review focuses on the non-natural substrate scope and the mechanism of the selected enzymes.

  19. Paleoecology of Eocene Wheelock Member of Cook Mountain Formation in western Houston County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Gaskell, B.A.

    1989-09-01

    Sixty-nine foraminifera species and 49 mollusk species were recovered from the Wheelock Member of the Cook Mountain Formation, in the Porter's Springs area of Houston County, Texas, and along the Little Brazos River in Brazos County, Texas. The Wheelock Member is primarily a regressive unit. A thin shell lag deposit at the base of the member, consisting of abraded mollusk fragments and subrounded pebbles of impure fossiliferous limestone, is all that remains of the transgressive part of the sequence. Above the shell lag deposit, the lower part of the member consists dominantly of bioturbated, glauconitic, fossiliferous mudstone. The species composition and diversity of benthic foraminifera and the planktonic/benthic ratio, suggest deposition in a normal marine inner or inner-middle shelf environment. Dominant benthic foraminifera include: Ceratobulimina eximia, Cibicides mauricensis, Eponides mexicanus, Gyroidina octocamerata, Melonis planatum, Siphonina claibornensis, and Spiroplectammina mississippiensis. The mollusk population has a low diversity and is dominated by only a few species. These include: Buccitriton texanum, Mesalia claibornensis, Polinices aratus, Notocorbula texana, Vokesula petropolitana, and Cadulus subcoarevatus. The low diversity and high dominance of the mollusk population suggest deposition in an unstable environment. This instability, however, had little or no effect on the foraminifera. The upper part of the Wheelock Member consists dominantly of regularly layered mudstone and siltstone and contains only a low-diversity assemblage of agglutinated foraminifera. This part of the member was probably deposited in a shallow brackish-water environment with a high sedimentation rate. Dominant agglutinated species include: Haplophragmoides mauricensis, Trochammina claibornensis, and Verneuilina cushmanii.

  20. Multiple Leader Candidate and Competitive Position Allocation for Robust Formation against Member Robot Faults

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ji-Wook; Kim, Jin Hyo; Seo, Jiwon

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a Multiple Leader Candidate (MLC) structure and a Competitive Position Allocation (CPA) algorithm which can be applicable for various applications including environmental sensing. Unlike previous formation structures such as virtual-leader and actual-leader structures with position allocation including a rigid allocation and an optimization based allocation, the formation employing the proposed MLC structure and CPA algorithm is robust against the fault (or disappearance) of the member robots and reduces the entire cost. In the MLC structure, a leader of the entire system is chosen among leader candidate robots. The CPA algorithm is the decentralized position allocation algorithm that assigns the robots to the vertex of the formation via the competition of the adjacent robots. The numerical simulations and experimental results are included to show the feasibility and the performance of the multiple robot system employing the proposed MLC structure and the CPA algorithm. PMID:25954956

  1. Multiple Leader Candidate and Competitive Position Allocation for Robust Formation against Member Robot Faults.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ji-Wook; Kim, Jin Hyo; Seo, Jiwon

    2015-05-06

    This paper proposes a Multiple Leader Candidate (MLC) structure and a Competitive Position Allocation (CPA) algorithm which can be applicable for various applications including environmental sensing. Unlike previous formation structures such as virtual-leader and actual-leader structures with position allocation including a rigid allocation and an optimization based allocation, the formation employing the proposed MLC structure and CPA algorithm is robust against the fault (or disappearance) of the member robots and reduces the entire cost. In the MLC structure, a leader of the entire system is chosen among leader candidate robots. The CPA algorithm is the decentralized position allocation algorithm that assigns the robots to the vertex of the formation via the competition of the adjacent robots. The numerical simulations and experimental results are included to show the feasibility and the performance of the multiple robot system employing the proposed MLC structure and the CPA algorithm.

  2. Geology of the Molina Member of the Wasatch Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.; Nadon, G.; LaFreniere, L.

    1996-06-01

    The Molina Member of the Wasatch Formation has been cored in order to assess the presence/absence and character of microbial communities in the deep subsurface. Geological study of the Molina Member was undertaken in support of the microbiological tasks of this project, for the purposes of characterizing the host strata and of assessing the potential for post-depositional introduction of microbes into the strata. The Molina Member comprises a sandy fluvial unit within a formation dominated by mudstones. Sandy to conglomeratic deposits of braided and meandering fluvial systems are present on the western and eastern margins of the basin respectively, although the physical and temporal equivalence of these systems cannot be proven. Distal braided facies of planar-horizontal bedded sandstones are recognized on the western margin of the basin. Natural fractures are present in all Molina sandstones, commonly as apparent shear pairs. Core from the 1-M-18 well contains natural fractures similar to those found in outcrops, and has sedimentological affinities to the meandering systems of the eastern margin of the basin. The hydrologic framework of the Molina, and thus any potential post-depositional introduction of microbes into the formation, should have been controlled by approximately east-west flow through the natural fracture system, the geometries and extent of the sandstones in which the fractures occur, and hydraulic gradient. Migration to the well site, from outcropping recharge areas at the edge of the basin, could have started as early as 40 million years ago if the cored strata are connected to the eastern sedimentary system.

  3. Late Miocene fanglomerates in lower member of Starlight Formation, northern Portneuf Range, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Sevrin, L.A.

    1987-08-01

    The lower member of the late Miocene Starlight Formation in the northern Portneuf Range, southeastern Idaho, represents sedimentation influenced by both Basin-and Range faulting and eastern Snake River plain (SRP) volcanism. The lower Starlight contains at least 610 m of fanglomerates and thin, interbedded basalt flows. The formations lower half is interpreted as medial alluvial fan facies and consists of coarse tuffaceous heterolithologic conglomerate lenses and sheets, and interbedded immature tuffaceous pebbly lithic arenites. The fine-grained upper half of the member is interpreted as distal-fan facies. The sandy deposits of the distal facies are cut by numerous gravel-filled channels. On the basis of clast assemblages and preservation of fragile rhyolite tuff grains that could not survive long transport distances, these deposits were likely derived from nearby sources. In addition, paleocurrent data indicate a general westerly transport direction. Individual drainage systems apparently controlled sedimentation, as indicated by different clast assemblages at various locations. The dominant clast type in The Cove, southwest of the Blackfoot River, is Eocene andesitic volcanics. In outcrops 20 km south, Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic sedimentary clasts predominate. Chert pebble conglomerate clasts, found only in southern exposures, may have been derived from distant eastern outcrops of Cretaceous conglomerates. Alluvial fan deposits in the lower member of the Starlight Formation developed as a response to early Basin-and-Range uplift. However, they were also influenced by eastern SRP volcanism, as indicated by the presence of tuffaceous sediments and basaltic lava flows. The fan deposits likely originated from a nearby eastern source that is now covered by Tertiary volcanics of the Blackfoot laval field.

  4. Paleoclimatology indicators of the Salt Wash member of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation near Jensen, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Medlyn, D.A. . Dept. of Geology); Bilbey, S.A. )

    1993-04-01

    The Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation has yielded one of the richest floras of the so-called transitional conifers'' of the Middle Mesozoic. Recently, a silicified axis of one of these conifers was collected from the Salt Wash member in essentially the same horizon as a previously reported partial Stegosaurus skeleton. In addition, two other axes of conifers were collected in the same immediate vicinity. Paleoecological considerations are extrapolated from the coniferous flora, vertebrate fauna and associated lithologies. Techniques of paleodendrology and relationships of extant/extinct environments are compared. The paleoclimatic conditions of the transitional conifers and associated dinosaurian fossils are postulated.

  5. Carbon-Isotope Chemostratigraphy of the Yellow Cat Member of the Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, C. A.; Hatzell, G.; Suarez, M. B.; Salazar-Verdin, J.; Al-Suwaidi, A. H.; Kirkland, J. I.

    2014-12-01

    Paleosols and lacustrine sediments of the Yellow Cat Member (YCM), Cedar Mountain Formation (CMF), Eastern Utah were collected at the "Lake Madsen" (a dominantly lacustrine section) and Doelling's Bowl (a mixed lacustrine/ palustrine/ paleosol section) and analyzed for bulk organic carbon isotopes (δ13Corg) . The YCM is thought to span the Barremian to Aptian based on dinosaur faunal assemblages. Correlation with distinct carbon isotope excursions (CIE) specifically those associated with the Selli Event or OAE 1a would allow insight into the response of terrestrial ecosystems to C-cycle perturbations during the Aptian, and may improve chronostratigraphy. Lake Madsen data ranges between a minimum of -28.5‰ and a maximum of -21.4‰ with an average of ~ -25‰ and shows a stepped negative isotope excursion of -3‰., with three distinct negative steps starting ~ 7.5 m above the Jurassic Morrison Formation and an intervening large positive excursion ~ 4.5 m from the base of the Poison Strip Sandstone (~119Ma) Member of the CMF. Doelling's Bowl data spans a longer vertical distance and ranges from a minimum of -29.0‰ to a maximum of -25.7‰, averages -27.7‰ and is somewhat cyclic in nature. δ13Corg chemostratigraphic profile for Doelling's Bowl poorly correlates to the Lake Madsen section, likely due to recycling of organic C and wet/dry cycles of the palustrine environment. Correlation of the Lake Madsen section to marine δ13CCO3 curve from Cismon Valley of the southern Alps indicates the lower Aptian C-isotope excursions C1 to C6, with the distinctive C3 negative CIE occur at the top of the Yellow Cat Member, therefore documenting a terrestrial manifestation of the CIE associated with OAE1a - Selli Event. This suggests the age of the majority of the Yellow Cat Member is Barremian to lower Aptian and the Barremian-Aptian boundary occurs at the top of the Member ~ 25cm below the base of the Poison Strip Sandstone. Further isotopic analysis of vertebrate

  6. Petrophysical and petrographic evaluation of Sidri Member of Belayim Formation, Badri field, Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudeif, A. M.; Attia, M. M.; Radwan, A. E.

    2016-03-01

    Presence of sandstone streaks in Sidri Member within Belayim Formation that lies between two productive zones; Kareem Formation and Hammam Faraun Member, was the main reason to perform this study. It may represent a good hydrocarbon reservoir and will be added to the Egyptian oil production in some wells of Badri field. This Member has high resistivity signature on Electric-logs responses which attracted the attention to investigate its occurrence in the field, to delineate its distribution all-over the area, to evaluate the petrographic and petrophysical characteristics and to evaluate its productivity. Petrographic and petrophysical analyses of these sand zones were undertaken using thin section samples. The electric logs and subsurface geologic data was used to evaluate the main reservoir characteristics of the Sidri sandstone such as lithology, cementation, shale volume, porosity (Φ), effective porosity (Φ eff), estimated permeability (K), fluid saturation, fluid type and Net pay thickness. This study revealed that, Sidri sandstone facies was classified into two mainly sandy facies; blocky sandy facies which located at the northern part of the field and streaky sandy facies at the southern area of the field. These two facies are separated by shaley facies. Some wells were studied to represent the two sandy facies in Sidri Member and these sand intervals have not been tested yet. These sands consist of quartz grains with grey and pink feldspars as accessory minerals, with siliceous and calcareous cementation, with good porosity. Petrophysical evaluation of this sand unit indicated that it is hydrocarbon bearing formation in three wells and water bearing one in other wells. Electrical logs analysis (Resistivity, Density-Neutron, Sonic and Gamma-Ray) revealed that The volume of shale in this sandstone, the effective porosity, the water saturation, the estimated permeability, the hydrocarbon saturation, and the net-pay thickness are varying from 9 to 13%, 19

  7. Diagenetic origin of nodules in the Sheepbed member, Yellowknife Bay formation, Gale crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stack, K. M.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Kah, L. C.; Schmidt, M. E.; Mangold, N.; Edgett, K. S.; Sumner, D. Y.; Siebach, K. L.; Nachon, M.; Lee, R.; Blaney, D. L.; Deflores, L. P.; Edgar, L. A.; Fairén, A. G.; Leshin, L. A.; Maurice, S.; Oehler, D. Z.; Rice, M. S.; Wiens, R. C.

    2014-07-01

    The Sheepbed member of the Yellowknife Bay formation in Gale crater contains millimeter-scale nodules that represent an array of morphologies unlike those previously observed in sedimentary deposits on Mars. Three types of nodules have been identified in the Sheepbed member in order of decreasing abundance: solid nodules, hollow nodules, and filled nodules, a variant of hollow nodules whose voids have been filled with sulfate minerals. This study uses Mast Camera (Mastcam) and Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) images from the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover to determine the size, shape, and spatial distribution of the Sheepbed nodules. The Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) and ChemCam instruments provide geochemical data to help interpret nodule origins. Based on their physical characteristics, spatial distribution, and composition, the nodules are interpreted as concretions formed during early diagenesis. Several hypotheses are considered for hollow nodule formation including origins as primary or secondary voids. The occurrence of concretions interpreted in the Sheepbed mudstone and in several other sedimentary sequences on Mars suggests that active groundwater systems play an important role in the diagenesis of Martian sedimentary rocks. When concretions are formed during early diagenetic cementation, as interpreted for the Sheepbed nodules, they have the potential to create a taphonomic window favorable for the preservation of Martian organics.

  8. Lower Cretaceous bentonitic strata in southwestern Montana assigned to Vaughn Member of Mowry Shale (East) and of Blackleaf Formation (West)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tysdal, R.G.; Dyman, T.S.; Nichols, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    The Vaughn Member, newly assigned to the Mowry Shale in this report, comprises strata that crop out in the Greenhorn, Gravelly, Madison, and Gallatin ranges, and the Centennial and Beartooth mountains of southwestern Montana. Herein the member is correlated with the Vaughn Member of the Blackleaf Formation, which crops out to the west in the Lima Peaks area, Snowcrest Range, and Pioneer Mountains. Strata assigned to the Vaughn Member of the Blackleaf Formation in southwestern Montana exhibit the same contrasting relationships that exist in northwestern Montana. The Vaughn Member of the Mowry is late Albian in age, determined by bracketing with shallow water marine bivalves in the Muddy Sandstone below and palynomorphs in Mowry strata above. Palynomorphs from the Vaughn Member itself are typically mid-Cretaceous, but do not permit a more exact determination of age. -from Authors

  9. Variations in sulfur mineralization in the Parachute Creek member of Green River Formation, Colorado and Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, D.L.; Cole, R.D.

    1983-04-01

    Sulfur in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation occurs primarily as pyrite, with lesser amounts of marcasite and pyrrhotite. In this study 222 samples were collected from the openlacustrine facies at Rio Blanco, the marginallacustrine facies at Douglas Pass, and a WOSCO oil shale core drilled in the Eastern Uinta Basin. One portion of each sample was crushed and analyzed for total-weight-percent sulfur (TWPS). Polished blocks were prepared from the remaining slabs. Iron-sulfide morphotypes in these blocks were characterized with a reflected light microscope. Total sulfur contents ranged from 0.0 to 4.6 wt %. Open-lacustrine oil shales in the Parachute Creek Member have much higher relative TWPS values than marginal-lacustrine rocks from the same member. In oil shale, increases in kerogen content are mirrored by increases in total-sulfur content. This correlation is most significant for moderate- to rich-grade oil shales which average between 0.42 and 0.98 TWPS. In oil shale with high relative total sulfur contents, megascopic pods and stringers and microscopic blades, compound-blade clusters and bands, and irregular massive blebs of iron sulfide are the most abundant morphotypes. Stratigraphic variations in sulfur mineralization are present at Rio Blanco. High TWPS values (more than 0.5) are found in the Mahogany ledge and R-8 zone. Rocks above and below this interval have TWPS values less than 0.5. Cyclical stratigraphic variations in TWPS values occur in the Mahogany and R-8 zones.

  10. Facies development and paleoenvironment of the Hajajah Limestone Member, Aruma Formation, central Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sorogy, Abdelbaset S.; Ismail, Abdelmoneim; Youssef, Mohamed; Nour, Hamdy

    2016-12-01

    The Campanian Hajajah Limestone Member of the Aruma Formation was formed during two regressive episodes. Each of them formed of three depositional facies, from base to top: 1) intra-shelf basin facies, made up of fossiliferous green shale and mudstone with ostracods and badly preserved foraminifers. 2) fore-reef facies, consists of hard, massive, marly coralline limestone. The upper part is rich with low divers, badly to moderate preserved, solitary and colonial corals, and, 3) back reef and near-shore facies, consists of fossiliferous sandy dolomitized, bioturbated limestone with abundant reworked corals, bivalves, gastropods, and aggregate grains. On the basis of field observations, micro-and macrofossils and microfacies analysis, the Hajajah Limestone Member was deposited in distal marine settings below storm wave base in a low-energy environment changed upward to fore-reef framework in an open marine environment with moderate to high energy conditions and terminated with shallow marine facies with accumulation of skeletal grains by storms during regression.

  11. Cobleskill and Akron members of the Rondout formation: late Silurian carbonate shelf sedimentation in the Appalachian Basin, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Belak, R.

    1980-12-01

    The outcrop of the upper Silurian Cobleskill and Akron members of the Rondout formation of New York State extends from Buffalo to E. Schoharie County and is continuous except where the units have been removed by pre-onondaga erosion. Strata included in the Cobleskill, Akron, and Chrysler members of the Rondout formation, underlying Williamsville member of the Bertie formation, and underlying Brayman Shale include several distinct Carbonate facies which have been identified by field characteristics, thin section petrography, insoluble residue analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Subfacies of the Cobleskill include subtidal biomicrites with stromatoporoid biostromes and intertidal fossiliferous micrites, whereas the Akron contains dolomitized analogs of these limestones. The overlying Chrysler is composed of supratidal, laminated, thinly bedded, finely crystalline dolostone. Careful lateral tracing of lithofacies, analysis of vertical lithofacies sequences, and study of key beds within the Cobleskill and Akron have resulted in recognition of the lateral equivalence of these 2 members. 32 references.

  12. Chemical composition of strata of the Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale Member of the Permian Phosphoria Formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, J.R.; Grauch, R.I.; Siems, D.F.; Tysdal, R.G.; Johnson, E.A.; Zielinski, R.A.; Desborough, G.A.; Knudsen, A.; Gunter, M.E.

    2001-01-01

    This study, one in a series, reports bulk chemical composition of rock samples collected from a core, referred to as Measured Section J, drilled at a site that subsequently was developed into the Enoch Valley phosphate mine in southeastern Idaho. The core is continuous and cuts through the entire thickness of the Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale Member of the Phosphoria Formation. The steeply dipping Meade Peak extends from 182 to 495 feet below the ground surface, which is the greatest below-ground depth of rock that has been sampled to date. The core was drilled before the start of mining, and the rocks consequently have not been exposed to the atmosphere or surficial weathering processes or fractured as a result of mining as are the rocks from other described sections. Hence, this section of the Meade Peak in the core is the least altered section of this member sampled in this series of studies. The channel-sampled rocks from Section J form a set of contiguous intervals across the entire thickness of the Meade Peak. These channel samples characterize?in ascending order?the lower phosphate ore, interlayered middle waste shale, upper phosphate ore, and upper waste shale units of the member. The Section J channel-sample suite includes 3 composite samples of the uppermost 7 feet of the Grandeur Tongue of the Permian Park City Formation, a dolomitic unit that directly underlies the Meade Peak. It also includes an analysis of a 0.1 foot section of chert directly overlying the Meade Peak. The concentrations of the chemical elements in the channel samples are compared with those of Measured Sections Aand B that were obtained from the same mine. In addition to the channel samples, 85 rock samples were selected from the core to address specific geochemical questions that resulted from examination of the core. For example, several of these samples correspond to cored rock that had unusual concentrations of various elements that were determined using a hand-held, x

  13. Magnetostratigraphy and Paleocurrent Directions for the Upper Member of the Palm Spring Formation, Mecca Hills, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messe, G. T.; Housen, B. A.; Burmester, R. F.; McNabb, J. C.; Dorsey, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Ongoing paleomagnetic analysis of the Plio-Pleistocene Palm Spring Formation of the Mecca Hills, CA provides insight into the development and sedimentation of transtensional basins in the San Andreas fault zone. Samples have a mixture of demagnetization behavior- roughly half the samples and sites have well-defined magnetization components that allow for best-fit lines to be identified, while the other set of samples and sites have curvilinear trends, so a combined line-and-plane analysis was used to determine their characteristic directions. In the upper section of Painted Canyon, samples collected and analyzed thus far yield four well-defined polarity zones in the upper member of the Palm Spring Formation. Interpretation of the polarity zones suggests that the section spans most of the Matuyama chron, including the Jaramillo and the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary. The upper member of the Palm Spring Formation is likely younger than 1.79 Ma (the termination of the Olduvai). Preliminary interpretation of measured anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) provides sediment transport/paleocurrent direction from several of the sites, based on the interpretation methods detailed by Tarling and Hrouda (1993) and Tauxe (1998). Plots of minimum, intermediate and maximum susceptibility axes on equal area projections indicate variation of depositional settings through time, represented by the variation in susceptibility axes alignment. Substantial differences are observed between sediment types, with specimens from the two siltiest sites having the most well-defined AMS axis directions. First order analysis of AMS is consistent with a SW paleocurrent direction for the top two sites, a SE or NW paleocurrent direction for mid-section sites and SW or NE paleocurrent direction for lower sites. This interpretation is reasonable considering the provenance and transport direction of the sediments, inferred by McNabb et al. (this meeting). Alternatively, some of the AMS results may be

  14. End-member fluids for diamond formation and their possible sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navon, O.; Weiss, Y.; Klein-Bendavid, O.; Bell, D. R.

    2009-04-01

    Microinclusions in fibrous diamonds carry high density fluids (HDF) with compositions that vary between silicic, carbonatitic and saline end-members. Combining EPMA and FTIR data we can estimate the composition of each end-member. The silicic end-member composition (Udachnaya) comprises ~90 wt% silicates, 4% carbonate, 4% water and minor apatite. The saline end-member (Diavik, Canada) carries 51 wt% alkali halides, 12% carbonates and 37% water. Klein-BenDavid et al. (in review) defined two carbonatitic end-members. The low-Mg one carries ~75 wt% carbonates, 11% silicates, 5% halides, 2% apatite and 7% water; the high-Mg end-member carries similar proportions, except for the higher apatite: 78% carbonates, 9% silicates, 5% apatite, 2% halides and 6% water, but with much higher Mg/(Mg+Fe+Ca) ratio. The volatile-free oxides proportions of the most silicic microinclusions in an Udachnaya diamond are: 69 wt% SiO2; 14% Al2O3; 10% K2O, 2% Na2O, 1% CaO and P2O5 and minor FeO, TiO2, MgO, and Cl. The saline HDF carries 73 wt% KCl, 12% NaCl, 7% CaO, 2.5% MgO, 2.5% BaO, 1.5% FeO and 1.5% SiO2. In the low-Mg carbonatitic HDF calcium exceeds magnesium: ~21 wt% CaO, 18% FeO, 12% MgO, 22% K2O; 10% SiO2, 8% Na2O and minor TiO2, Al2O3, P2O5 and Cl, while in the high-Mg end-member MgO is the main oxide: ~29% MgO, 23% CaO, 7% FeO, 17% K2O, 8% SiO2, 9% Na2O, 2% P2O5 and Cl and minor BaO, TiO2, Cr2O3 and Al2O3 ( all values were calculated on volatile-free basis). Weiss et al., in a companion abstract, suggest that the four end-members form two arrays; one between the saline and the high-Mg carbonatitic compositions and the second between the silicic and the low-Mg carbonatitic ones. They further suggest that the first array represents a process that takes place in a peridotitic environment and the other in an eclogitic one. For example, the arrays may be formed by interaction of hydrous or saline fluids with carbonate-eclogite or with carbonate-peridotite. Safonov et al. (2007

  15. Team Formation under Normal versus Crisis Situations: Leaders’ Assessments of Task Requirements and Selection of Team Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    performance ( Katzenbach & Smith, 2003). Teams are different from groups in the sense that team formation is initiated for a unique purpose and with a...mutual commitment among team members towards it ( Katzenbach & Smith, 1993). Each individual contributes knowledge, skills, and abilities into the...towards a mutually accountable unique purpose, as well as commitment to other team members ( Katzenbach & Smith, 1993). Small size (approximately 8-10

  16. Stratigraphy of the upper Triassic Petrified Forest Member (Chinle Formation) in Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Murry, P.A. )

    1990-09-01

    The Petrified Forest Member of the Triassic Chinle Formation in a Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona may be divided into a lower and upper unit by means of the Sonsela Sandstone Bed. Analysis of fossil vertebrates indicates that the Sonsela Sandstone Bed and upper Petrified Forest Member are characterized by a fauna distinct from that within the lower portion of the Petrified Forest Member. These faunas are believed to be of Norian and Carnian age respectively. Utilizing fossil vertebrates and certain lithostratigraphic units, especially the Sonsela Sandstone Bed and black forest tuff, exposures may be correlated within and between the Rainbow Forest, Blue Mesa, and Painted Desert areas of Petrified Forest National Park.

  17. Conceptual model for transport processes in the Culebra Dolomite Member, Rustler Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R.M.

    1997-08-01

    The Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation represents a possible pathway for contaminants from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant underground repository to the accessible environment. The geologic character of the Culebra is consistent with a double-porosity, multiple-rate model for transport in which the medium is conceptualized as consisting of advective porosity, where solutes are carried by the groundwater flow, and fracture-bounded zones of diffusive porosity, where solutes move through slow advection or diffusion. As the advective travel length or travel time increases, the nature of transport within a double-porosity medium changes. This behavior is important for chemical sorption, because the specific surface area per unit mass of the diffusive porosity is much greater than in the advective porosity. Culebra transport experiments conducted at two different length scales show behavior consistent with a multiple-rate, double-porosity conceptual model for Culebra transport. Tracer tests conducted on intact core samples from the Culebra show no evidence of significant diffusion, suggesting that at the core scale the Culebra can be modeled as a single-porosity medium where only the advective porosity participates in transport. Field tracer tests conducted in the Culebra show strong double-porosity behavior that is best explained using a multiple-rate model.

  18. Laboratory column experiments for radionuclide adsorption studies of the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lucero, D.A.; Heath, C.E.; Brown, G.O.

    1998-04-01

    Radionuclide transport experiments were carried out using intact cores obtained from the Culebra member of the Rustler Formation inside the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Air Intake Shaft. Twenty-seven separate tests are reported here and include experiments with {sup 3}H, {sup 22}Na, {sup 241}Am, {sup 239}Np, {sup 228}Th, {sup 232}U and {sup 241}Pu, and two brine types, AIS and ERDA 6. The {sup 3}H was bound as water and provides a measure of advection, dispersion, and water self-diffusion. The other tracers were injected as dissolved ions at concentrations below solubility limits, except for americium. The objective of the intact rock column flow experiments is to demonstrate and quantify transport retardation coefficients, (R) for the actinides Pu, Am, U, Th and Np, in intact core samples of the Culebra Dolomite. The measured R values are used to estimate partition coefficients, (kd) for the solute species. Those kd values may be compared to values obtained from empirical and mechanistic adsorption batch experiments, to provide predictions of actinide retardation in the Culebra. Three parameters that may influence actinide R values were varied in the experiments; core, brine and flow rate. Testing five separate core samples from four different core borings provided an indication of sample variability. While most testing was performed with Culebra brine, limited tests were carried out with a Salado brine to evaluate the effect of intrusion of those lower waters. Varying flow rate provided an indication of rate dependent solute interactions such as sorption kinetics.

  19. Radius of Paranthropus robustus from member 1, Swartkrans formation, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Grine, F E; Susman, R L

    1991-03-01

    Recently recovered hominid postcrania from Member 1, Swartkrans Formation include the proximal and distal ends of a right radius attributed to a single individual of Paranthropus robustus. These fossils are essentially similar to Australopithecus afarensis, A. africanus, and P. boisei homologues. The head manifests an ape-like circumferentia articularis, and the distal end has prominent medial, dorsal, and lateral tubercles and a well developed brachioradialis crest, features also commonly exhibited by extant great apes. The volar set of the P. robustus radiocarpal joint, like that of Australopithecus homologues, more closely resembles the neutral condition exhibited by Homo than the greater flexion evinced by living apes. Compared with fossil and recent specimens of Homo, the configuration of the P. robustus radial head suggests enhanced stability against medial displacement during pronation and supination; the strong crest for the attachment of brachioradialis may attest to enhanced forearm flexor capability. In addition, this crest and the prominent dorsal tubercles may indicate enhanced hand extensor and, therefore, hand flexor capabilities. The differences in radial morphology between Paranthropus and Homo may relate to significant behavioral differences between these two synchronic taxa.

  20. Depositional environments of Painted Rock sandstone member of Miocene Vaqueros Formation in eastern Caliente Range, San Luis Obispo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Oldershaw, M.W.

    1988-03-01

    The Painted Rock Sandstone Member of the Miocene Vaqueros Formation in the southeastern Caliente Range, San Luis Obispo County, California, crops out in a narrow band along the anticlinal Caliente Range. The study area is on the eastern flanks of the northwest-trending range. The Painted Rock Sandstone Member is conformably underlain by the Soda Lake Shale Member of the Vaqueros. In the eastern part of the study area, the member is conformably overlain or interfingers with the Oligocene-Miocene Caliente Formation. In the western study area, Painted Rock is conformably overlain by the Miocene Monterey Formation. The Painted Rock Member thickens rapidly to the west with measured thickness ranging from 130 m in the easternmost section to 1800 m in the westernmost and type section. The member generally coarsens upward from interbedded mudstone and fossiliferous, laminated, fine-grained sandstones to cyclical couplets of fossiliferous, medium-grained, cross-bedded sandstones underlying laminated, medium-grained sandstones and local conglomerates. Interspersed within the member is a medium to coarse-grained, structureless sandstone. The Painted Rock generally coarsens to the east, except for almost completely conglomeratic outcrops in a central section. The Painted Rock sequence represents a gradual shoaling from lower-shoreface environments (fine sands and mudstones), to shoreface and foreshore deposits (sandy couplets). The structureless sandstone may fit in this sequence or it may record a subaqueous part of the nearby Caliente delta. The conglomerate section represents a basin-feeding channel. The anomalously thick type section coupled with the conformably overlying deep-marine Monterey Formation records rapid basin subsidence in the western study area.

  1. Ramah Member of the Crevasse Canyon Formation - A new stratigraphic unit in the Zuni Basin, west-central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, O.J.; Stricker, G.D.

    1996-01-01

    Nonmarine deposition accompanying and following a regression of the Cretaceous Interior Seaway during late Turonian time left a sedimentary sequence consisting of fluvial channel sandstones, thin overbank sandstones, and paludal shales containing thin coal beds. This unit is herein designated the Ramah Member of the Crevasse Canyon Formation. The Ramah Member is locally well exposed in the Zuni Basin of west-central New Mexico where it rests on the Gallup Sandstone (marine) and is overlain by the distinctive, feldspathic Torrivio Member of the Crevasse Canyon Formation (formerly of the Gallup Sandstone) Near Ramah, New Mexico the sequence overlies the F member of the Gallup but northward it overlies progressively younger members. These younger members are discrete sand-stone units associated with minor oscillations of relative sea level during a major regional-scale regression. North and east of Puerco Gap, near Gallup. New Mexico, the Ramah Member thins appreciably, and where unmappable it may be included with the Torrivio Member Southward from Gallup in the Zuni Basin. the Ramah locally approaches 150 ft in thickness and contains minable coal beds. The interval was previously referred to as the coal-bearing member of the Gallup (Mapel and Yesberger, 1985) or the Ramah unit (Anderson and Stricker, 1904). In the northern part of the Zuni Basin a problem may exist locally in determinig the top of the Ramah Member. This is due to the presence of fluviel sandstone with coarse-grained facies that looks much the s ame as the Torrivio Member, but underlines it Two criteria may be employed to distiguish the lower sandstone from the Torrivio and properly place it in the strartigraphic succession: (1) the lower sandstone is generally not as feldspathic as the Torrivio nor do the coarse-grained facies contain pebble-size material; and (2) the lower sandstone is not nearly as widespread as the overlying Torrivio. which has a blanket geometry. The type section of the Ramah

  2. Trace Element Geochemistry of the Dolomite Member of the Neoproterozoic Ibex Formation, Death Valley National Park, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, E. E.; Lanids, J. D.; Quicksall, A. N.; Ddamba, I.

    2012-12-01

    This work examines the major and trace element geochemistry of the pink, laminated Dolomite Member of the Neoprotoerozic Ibex Formation, sampled at high resolution in the Ibex Hills of Death Valley, California. The Dolomite Member of the Ibex Formation directly overlies a basal conglomerate which has lead Corsetti and Kaufman (2005) to speculate that the juxtaposition of these units represents a diamictite - cap carbonate pair. Cap carbonates are inferred to represent deposition under high alkalinity conditions in the shallow ocean at the termination of low latitude glaciation. Increased alkalinity may be driven by the post glacial overturn of anoxic water masses. Here we infer paleoredox conditions during the deposition of the Dolomite Member of the Ibex Formation using trace metal enrichments. The Dolomite Member shows enrichments of Ni, Mo, Fe, Cu, V, Co, and Ba near the base of the unit, and also has a weak overall enrichment in Mn. The enrichment of these metals suggests a period of anoxia during the initial deposition of the Dolomite, and may signal the introduction of basin brines to the shallow ocean during marine transgression. These data are consistent with patterns observed in other cap carbonates worldwide, and support the speculation that the Dolomite Member is a cap carbonate. Alternatively, trace metal enrichments may reflect diagenetic alteration.

  3. Identification of the progenitors of rich clusters and member galaxies in rapid formation at z > 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimakawa, Rhythm; Kodama, Tadayuki; Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Tanaka, Ichi; Hayashi, Masao; Koyama, Yusei

    2014-06-01

    We present the results of near-infrared spectroscopy of Hα emitters (HAEs) associated with two protoclusters around radio galaxies (PKS 1138-262 at z = 2.2 and USS 1558-003 at z = 2.5) with the Multi-Object Infrared Camera and Spectrograph (MOIRCS) on the Subaru telescope. Among the HAE candidates constructed from our narrow-band imaging, we have confirmed membership of 27 and 36 HAEs for the respective protoclusters, with a success rate of 70 per cent of our observed targets. The large number of spectroscopically confirmed members per cluster has enabled us for the first time to reveal the detailed kinematical structures of the protoclusters at z > 2. The clusters show prominent substructures such as clumps, filaments and velocity gradients, suggesting that they are still in the midst of rapid construction to grow to rich clusters at later times. We also estimate the dynamical masses of the clusters and substructures, assuming their local virialization. The inferred masses (˜1014 M⊙) of the protocluster cores are consistent with their being typical progenitors of the present-day most massive class of galaxy clusters (˜1015 M⊙) if we take into account the typical mass growth history of clusters. We then calculate the integrated star formation rates of the protocluster cores normalized by the dynamical masses and compare these with lower redshift descendants. We see a marked increase of star-forming activities in the cluster cores, by almost three orders of magnitude, as we go back in time to 11 billion years ago; this scales as (1 + z)6.

  4. Increasing Physical Activity Through Principles of Habit Formation in New Gym Members: a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Navin; Rhodes, Ryan E; Spence, John C; Meldrum, John T

    2017-02-10

    The promotion of physical activity (PA) is paramount to public health, yet interventions in the social cognitive tradition have yielded negligible improvements. The limited progression may be due to an overreliance on intention as the proximal determinant of behavior and a lack of consideration of implicit/automatic processes. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a habit formation intervention on PA over 8 weeks in a two-arm parallel design, randomized controlled trial. Participants (n = 94) were new gym members with the intention to engage in PA but below international PA guidelines at baseline, who were randomized into a control or habit experimental group. The experimental group attended a workshop (at baseline) and received a follow-up booster phone call at week 4. The primary outcome of the study was minutes of moderate-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) at week 8. The secondary outcome was a manipulation check to determine if the experimental group effectively incorporated habit-building constructs (cues and practice consistency). The experimental group showed a significant increase in MVPA after 8 weeks in both accelerometry (d = 0.39, p = .04) and self-report (d = 0.53, p = .01) compared with the control group. The experimental group also showed an increase in use of cues (d = 0.56, p < .001) and practice consistency (d = 0.40, p = .01) at week 8. The results contribute to the initial validity of increasing PA through a focus on preparation cues and practice consistency. Future research should replicate these findings and extend the duration of assessment to evaluate whether PA changes are sustained. Registered Trial Number NCT02785107.

  5. Investigating Shared Norms in Multicultural Teams: Exploring How Team Member Scripts and Cognitive Adjustment Strategies Impact the Norm Formation Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGurrin, Daniel Paul

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how shared norms are developed in the early phase of multicultural team (MCT) formation. The development of shared norms is recognized as critical to MCTs' contributions to organizations, and they are a result of the cognitive adjustment of the team members in recognition of their differences (Brandl…

  6. Investigating Shared Norms in Multicultural Teams: Exploring How Team Member Scripts and Cognitive Adjustment Strategies Impact the Norm Formation Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGurrin, Daniel Paul

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how shared norms are developed in the early phase of multicultural team (MCT) formation. The development of shared norms is recognized as critical to MCTs' contributions to organizations, and they are a result of the cognitive adjustment of the team members in recognition of their differences (Brandl…

  7. Unconformities in the mid-Late Proterozoic Pahrump Group: Stratigraphic evidence from the upper member Crystal Spring Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mbuyi, K.; Prave, A.R. . Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Deposition of the Pahrump Group rocks (Crystal Spring-Beck Spring-Kingston Peak Formations) in the Death Valley region of California post-dates 1.7 to 1.4 Ga gneissic basement rocks (Wright et al., 1976) and mostly predates the inferred 0.75 Ga glacial deposits of the Kingston Peak Formation. The 1.08 Ga age of the diabase sills in the middle Crystal Spring Formation provides an additional time constraint. Event though this time span is excessive when compared to better dated Phanerozoic successions, the Pahrump Group, nonetheless, has been assumed to be internally conformable. Results from the authors recent work invalidates that assumption. They have carefully measured 15 sections of upper member Crystal Spring Formation rocks and have mapped in detail the belt of exposures in the Saratoga, Saddle Peak, and Ibex Hills, and northern Kingston Range. Their data indicates that an unconformity of significant but unknown duration occurs within the upper member. Evidence for this unconformity includes: (1) local angular discordance of up to 20[degree]; (2) presence of an erosive-based breccia unit (0.10--30 m thick) that consists mostly of hornfelsic clasts derived from immediately subjacent rocks; and (3) erosional beveling and truncation of underlying rocks. In addition, the upward transition to Beck Spring deposition is marked by a disconformity (sequence boundary) that cuts down across and erosionally truncates strata of the upper member Crystal Spring Formation.

  8. Diagenesis and fracture development in the Bakken Formation, Williston Basin; implications for reservoir quality in the middle member

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitman, Janet K.; Price, Leigh C.; LeFever, Julie A.

    2001-01-01

    The middle member of the Bakken Formation is an attractive petroleum exploration target in the deeper part of the Williston Basin because it is favorably positioned with respect to source and seal units. Progressive rates of burial and minor uplift and erosion of this member led to a stable thermal regime and, consequently, minor variations in diagenesis across much of the basin. The simple diagenetic history recorded in sandstones and siltstones in the middle member can, in part, be attributed to the closed, low-permeability nature of the Bakken petroleum system during most of its burial history. Most diagenesis ceased in the middle member when oil entered the sandstones and siltstones in the Late Cretaceous. Most oil in the Bakken Formation resides in open, horizontal fractures in the middle member. Core analysis reveals that sandstones and siltstones associated with thick mature shales typically have a greater density of fractures than sandstones and siltstones associated with thin mature shales. Fractures were caused by superlithostatic pressures that formed in response to increased fluid volumes in the source rocks during hydrocarbon generation

  9. A new species of Pulvinites (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from the upper Paleocene Paspotansa Member of the Aquia Formation in Virginia ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, L.W.; Waller, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Pulvinites lawrencei n.sp. is described from the upper Paleocene (Landenian Stage) Paspotansa Member of the Aquia Formation in Stafford County, Virginia. This is the first report of a member of the pteriacean family Pulvinitidae in the Tertiary on either side of the Atlantic, the only other post-Mesozoic records of Pulvinites being in the Paleocene of California and the present-day Pacific off southeast Australia. The stratigraphic setting and co-occurring molluscan assemblage of the new species indicate shallow-shelf, open-marine conditions with near normal salinities. -Authors

  10. Petrology of Tullock Member, Fort Union Formation, Wyoming and Montana: Evidence for early Paleocene uplift of Bighorn Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.L.; Hansley, P.L. )

    1989-09-01

    New petrologic data collected from sandstones in the Paleocene Tullock Member of the Fort Union Formation above the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary in the Powder River basin (PRB) and from the lowermost Paleocene in the Bighorn basin, Wyoming and Montana, compel reevaluation of the timing of the bighorn uplift, formerly thought to be middle Paleocene. The Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary is identified by regionally valid palynological and trace element geochemical criteria. Basin-wide outcrop and subsurface studies of the Tullock Member indicate deposition on a low-gradient alluvial plain extending toward the retreating Cannonball sea. Eastward-flowing, low-sinuosity paleostreams containing small, sandy, stable channels characterized the fluvial systems.

  11. Cooperation during cultural group formation promotes trust towards members of out-groups

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaofei Sophia; Houser, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    People often cooperate with members of their own group, and discriminate against members of other groups. Previous research establishes that cultural groups can form endogenously, and that these groups demonstrate in-group favouritism. Given the presence of cultural groups, the previous literature argues that cultural evolution selects for groups that exhibit parochial altruism. The source of initial variation in these traits, however, remains uninformed. We show here that a group's economic production environment may substantially influence parochial tendencies, with groups formed around more cooperative production (CP) displaying less parochialism than groups formed around more independent production (IP) processes. Participants randomized into CP and IP production tasks formed cultural groups, and subsequently played hidden-action trust games with in-group and out-group trustees. We found CP to be associated with significantly greater sharing and exchanging behaviours than IP. In trust games, significant parochial altruism (in-group favouritism combined with out-group discrimination) was displayed by members of IP groups. By contrast, members of CP groups did not engage in either in-group favouritism or out-group discrimination. Further, we found the absence of out-group discrimination in CP to persist even following ‘betrayal’. Finally, belief data suggest that members of CP are not more intrinsically generous than IP members, but rather more likely to believe that out-group trustees will positively reciprocate. Our results have important implications for anyone interested in building cooperative teams, and shed new light on connections between culture and cooperation. PMID:23658200

  12. Revised Lithostratigraphy of the Sonsela Member (Chinle Formation, Upper Triassic) in the Southern Part of Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona

    PubMed Central

    Martz, Jeffrey W.; Parker, William G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent revisions to the Sonsela Member of the Chinle Formation in Petrified Forest National Park have presented a three-part lithostratigraphic model based on unconventional correlations of sandstone beds. As a vertebrate faunal transition is recorded within this stratigraphic interval, these correlations, and the purported existence of a depositional hiatus (the Tr-4 unconformity) at about the same level, must be carefully re-examined. Methodology/Principal Findings Our investigations demonstrate the neglected necessity of walking out contacts and mapping when constructing lithostratigraphic models, and providing UTM coordinates and labeled photographs for all measured sections. We correct correlation errors within the Sonsela Member, demonstrate that there are multiple Flattops One sandstones, all of which are higher than the traditional Sonsela sandstone bed, that the Sonsela sandstone bed and Rainbow Forest Bed are equivalent, that the Rainbow Forest Bed is higher than the sandstones at the base of Blue Mesa and Agate Mesa, that strata formerly assigned to the Jim Camp Wash beds occur at two stratigraphic levels, and that there are multiple persistent silcrete horizons within the Sonsela Member. Conclusions/Significance We present a revised five-part model for the Sonsela Member. The units from lowest to highest are: the Camp Butte beds, Lot's Wife beds, Jasper Forest bed (the Sonsela sandstone)/Rainbow Forest Bed, Jim Camp Wash beds, and Martha's Butte beds (including the Flattops One sandstones). Although there are numerous degradational/aggradational cycles within the Chinle Formation, a single unconformable horizon within or at the base of the Sonsela Member that can be traced across the entire western United States (the “Tr-4 unconformity”) probably does not exist. The shift from relatively humid and poorly-drained to arid and well-drained climatic conditions began during deposition of the Sonsela Member (low in the Jim Camp Wash beds), well

  13. Scrutiny of a Diamictite to Cap-Carbonate Contact: Neoproterozoic Scout Mountain Member, Pocatello Formation, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkham, K. R.; Dehler, C. M.; Sallay, S. A.

    2008-12-01

    It is common in Neoproterozoic strata worldwide to find 'cap carbonates' overlying inferred glaciogenic diamictites. Despite the fact that many of the contacts are sharp, the relationship between these carbonate units and the underlying diamictites is commonly interpreted to be conformable and to indicate post-glacial transgressive alkalinity events immediately following the aftermath of low-latitude glaciation. If, however, these cap-carbonate units are not conformable with the underlying diamictites, it might imply that they are recording local or global alkalinity events independent of the glacial conditions recorded in the diamictites. The cap carbonate in the Scout Mountain Member of the Pocatello Formation in southeastern Idaho is an excellent site to study the nature of the diamictite to cap-carbonate relationship because the contact is bracketed by two absolute ages: the contact lies ~100 m above a tuff that is 709 Ma and a reworked tuff ~50 m above the contact has been dated at 667 Ma (Fanning and Link, 2004). There is thus ca. 42 million years of time represented in a ~150-m-thick stratigraphic interval implying that there should be at least one unconformity present in this relatively thin stratal package. Most workers have placed a single major sequence boundary/unconformity in this 150-m-thick interval at the top of the cap carbonate, associated with a dolomite-chip breccia unit. Our facies analysis suggests that the most likely place for an unconformity is at the contact between the diamictite and the cap carbonate. The cap carbonate displays a genetic relationship with adjacent and overlying facies, and sits sharply on the diamictite unit (~50 m thick). The cap carbonate comprises pink laminated peloidal dolomicrite (1 m thick) and exhibits rare symmetric and interference ripples, possible hummocky-cross stratification, and negative δ13Ccarb values. Approximately 2 kms along strike, this cap dolomicrite facies is absent and the dolomite-chip breccia

  14. Characterization of DOE reference oil shales: Mahogany Zone, Parachute Creek Member, Green River Formation Oil Shale, and Clegg Creek Member, New Albany Shale

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F. P.; Robertson, R. E.

    1987-09-01

    Measurements have been made on the chemical and physical properties of two oil shales designated as reference oil shales by the Department of Energy. One oil shale is a Green River Formation, Parachute Creek Member, Mahogany Zone Colorado oil shale from the Exxon Colony mine and the other is a Clegg Creek Member, New Albany shale from Kentucky. Material balance Fischer assays, carbon aromaticities, thermal properties, and bulk mineralogic properties have been determined for the oil shales. Kerogen concentrates were prepared from both shales. The measured properties of the reference shales are comparable to results obtained from previous studies on similar shales. The western reference shale has a low carbon aromaticity, high Fischer assay conversion to oil, and a dominant carbonate mineralogy. The eastern reference shale has a high carbon aromaticity, low Fischer assay conversion to oil, and a dominant silicate mineralogy. Chemical and physical properties, including ASTM distillations, have been determined for shale oils produced from the reference shales. The distillation data were used in conjunction with API correlations to calculate a large number of shale oil properties that are required for computer models such as ASPEN. There was poor agreement between measured and calculated molecular weights for the total shale oil produced from each shale. However, measured and calculated molecular weights agreed reasonably well for true boiling point distillate fractions in the temperature range of 204 to 399/sup 0/C (400 to 750/sup 0/F). Similarly, measured and calculated viscosities of the total shale oils were in disagreement, whereas good agreement was obtained on distillate fractions for a boiling range up to 315/sup 0/C (600/sup 0/F). Thermal and dielectric properties were determined for the shales and shale oils. The dielectric properties of the reference shales and shale oils decreased with increasing frequency of the applied frequency. 42 refs., 34 figs., 24

  15. Tumor necrosis factor superfamily member APRIL contributes to fibrotic scar formation after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Funk, Lucy H; Hackett, Amber R; Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Lee, Jae K

    2016-04-20

    Fibrotic scar formation contributes to the axon growth-inhibitory environment that forms following spinal cord injury (SCI). We recently demonstrated that depletion of hematogenous macrophages led to a reduction in fibrotic scar formation and increased axon growth after SCI. These changes were associated with decreased TNFSF13 (a proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL)) expression, but the role of APRIL in fibrotic scar formation after SCI has not been directly investigated. Thus, the goal of this study was to determine the role of APRIL in fibrotic scar formation after SCI. APRIL knockout and wild-type mice received contusive SCI and were assessed for inflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression, leukocyte infiltration, fibrotic scar formation, axon growth, and cell proliferation. Expression of APRIL and its receptor BCMA is increased following SCI, and genetic deletion of APRIL led to reduced fibrotic scar formation and increased axon growth. However, the fibrotic scar reduction in APRIL KO mice was not a result of changes in fibroblast or astrocyte proliferation. Rather, APRIL knockout mice displayed reduced TNFα and CCL2 expression and less macrophage and B cell infiltration at the injury site. Our data indicate that APRIL contributes to fibrotic scar formation after SCI by mediating the inflammatory response.

  16. A branching, positive relief network in the middle member of the Medusae Fossae Formation, equatorial Mars—Evidence for sapping?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, S. K.; Balme, M. R.; Hagermann, A.; Murray, J. B.; Muller, J.-P.; Wilson, A.

    2013-09-01

    The Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF) is a geological formation comprising three geological units (members) spread across five principal lobes. It dominates a quarter of the longitudinal extent of the equatorial region of Mars. Positive relief features referred to as ‘sinuous ridges’ (commonly interpreted as inverted paleoflow channel or valley fills) have been observed in the lowest member of the western MFF, but have not been identified within the central and eastern portions of the formation, in the middle and upper members. This paper presents the identification and analysis of a branching, positive relief system which occurs in the central lobe of the MFF in what appears to be an exposure of the middle member. A simple geomorphological map of the system is presented, from which we have adopted the working hypothesis that this is an inverted fill of a branching fluvial channel or valley system. A suite of morphological and topographic evidence supporting this hypothesis is presented, including analysis of the network using a ∼15 m/pixel digital terrain model derived from a Context Imager (CTX) stereo image pair. The evidence supporting this hypothesis includes: (1) the local slope and topography of the upper surface of the network are consistent with a contributory network; (2) the braided, fan-like form at the termination of the branching network is consistent in morphology with it being a depositional fan at the end of a fluvial system; (3) the terminal fan and surrounding deposits show layering and polygonization; and (4) there is strong association between the lower order branches and amphitheater shaped scarps in the depression walls. We evaluate the possible origins of this fluvial system and suggest that seepage sapping is the most probable. Two possible models for the evolution of the network and related features are presented; both require melt of ice within the MFF to form liquid water. We conclude that at least some portions of the Medusae Fossae

  17. Ablating all three retinoblastoma family members in mouse lung leads to neuroendocrine tumor formation

    PubMed Central

    Lázaro, Sara; Pérez-Crespo, Miriam; Enguita, Ana Belén; Hernández, Pilar; Martínez-Palacio, Jesús; Oteo, Marta; Sage, Julien; Paramio, Jesús M.; Santos, Mirentxu

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is a deadly disease with increasing cases diagnosed worldwide and still a very poor prognosis. While mutations in the retinoblastoma (RB1) tumor suppressor have been reported in lung cancer, mainly in small cell lung carcinoma, the tumor suppressive role of its relatives p107 and p130 is still a matter of debate. To begin to investigate the role of these two Rb family proteins in lung tumorigenesis, we have generated a conditional triple knockout mouse model (TKO) in which the three Rb family members can be inactivated in adult mice. We found that ablation of all three family members in the lung of mice induces tumorlets, benign neuroendocrine tumors that are remarkably similar to their human counterparts. Upon chemical carcinogenesis, DHPN and urethane accelerate tumor development; the TKO model displays increased sensitivity to DHPN, and urethane increases malignancy of tumors. All the tumors developing in TKO mice (spontaneous and chemically induced) have neuroendocrine features but do not progress to fully malignant tumors. Thus, loss of Rb and its family members confers partial tumor susceptibility in neuroendocrine lineages in the lungs of mice. Our data also imply the requirement of other oncogenic signaling pathways to achieve full transformation in neuroendocrine lung lesions mutant for the Rb family. PMID:27966456

  18. The structure and stratigraphy of the Pen Argyl Member of the Martinsburg Formation in Lehigh and Berks counties, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lash, Gary George

    1978-01-01

    The Pen Argyl Member, the upper claystone slate member of the Martinsburg Formation, was studied in three quadrangles in Lehigh and Berks Counties, Pennsylvania. Graptolites collected from the Pen Argyl Member at Lehigh Gap indicate a lower Upper Ordovician (Edenian-Maysvillian) age for the Pen Argyl Member. The Pen Argyl Member in this area is located on the normal limb and in the brow of the large, recumbent Musconetcong nappe. It is a deep water flysch deposit emplaced by turbidity currents from a southeasterly source. Sedimentologic and structural evidence show that the Pen Argyl member overlies the sandy middle Ramseyburg Member, thus supporting the tripartite subdivision of the Martinsburg Formation. Field and thin section study indicates that the penetrative slaty cleavage formed in an indurated rock probably by pressure solution and neocrystallization under lower greenschist facies metamorphism. Strain-slip cleavage formed as a result of a stress couple operating parallel to the slaty cleavage that transposed the slaty cleavage into a more spaced cleavage. Both cleavages are believed to have formed within the same stress continuum and in close succession. Analysis of the folds in the Pen Argyl Member indicate six phases of major and minor folding. The earliest folding, F1, resulted in the development of the recumbent nappe. F2 folds can only be determined statistically; these axes plunge either northeast or southwest Asymmetric folds, F3, and associated F4 crenulations formed within the same stress continuum. F5 folds are large open folds and are exemplified by the Mosservi!le anticline. Kink folds, F6 and associated crenulations are fault related and were the last folds to form. Faults in the Pen Argyl Member range from small displacements along slaty cleavage to large reverse faults. The largest of these, the Eckville fault, is recognized throughout the three quadrangle area. It is a high angle reverse fault that separates the Shochary sequence from the

  19. Uranium enrichment in lacustrine oil source rocks of the Chang 7 member of the Yanchang Formation, Erdos Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hua; Zhang, Wenzheng; Wu, Kai; Li, Shanpeng; Peng, Ping'an; Qin, Yan

    2010-09-01

    The oil source rocks of the Chang 7 member of the Yanchang Formation in the Erdos Basin were deposited during maximum lake extension during the Late Triassic and show a remarkable positive uranium anomaly, with an average uranium content as high as 51.1 μg/g. Uranium is enriched together with organic matter and elements such as Fe, S, Cu, V and Mo in the rocks. The detailed biological markers determined in the Chang 7 member indicate that the lake water column was oxidizing during deposition of the Chang 7 member. However, redox indicators for sediments such as S 2- content, V/Sc and V/(V + Ni) ratios demonstrate that it was a typical anoxic diagenetic setting. The contrasted redox conditions between the water column and the sediment with a very high content of organic matter provided favorable physical and chemical conditions for syngenetic uranium enrichment in the oil source rocks of the Chang 7 member. Possible uranium sources may be the extensive U-rich volcanic ash that resulted from contemporaneous volcanic eruption and uranium material transported by hydrothermal conduits into the basin. The uranium from terrestrial clastics was unlike because uranium concentration was not higher in the margin area of basin where the terrestrial material input was high. As indicated by correlative analysis, the oil source rocks of the Chang 7 member show high gamma-ray values for radioactive well log data that reflect a positive uranium anomaly and are characterized by high resistance, low electric potential and low density. As a result, well log data can be used to identify positive uranium anomalies and spatial distribution of the oil source rocks in the Erdos Basin. The estimation of the total uranium reserves in the Chang 7 member attain 0.8 × 10 8 t.

  20. Silicified sea life - Macrofauna and palaeoecology of the Neuburg Kieselerde Member (Cenomanian to Lower Turonian Wellheim Formation, Bavaria, southern Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Simon; Jager, Manfred; Kroh, Andreas; Mitterer, Agnes; Niebuhr, Birgit; Vodrazka, Radek; Wilmsen, Markus; Wood, Christopher J.; Zagorsk, Kamil

    2013-12-01

    Schneider, S., Jager, M., Kroh, A., Mitterer, A., Niebuhr, B., Vodražka, R., Wilmsen, M., Wood, C.J. and Zagoršek, K. 2013. Silicified sea life - Macrofauna and palaeoecology of the Neuburg Kieselerde Member (Cenomanian to Lower Turonian Wellheim Formation, Bavaria, southern Germany). Acta Geologica Polonica, 63(4), 555-610. Warszawa. With approximately 100 species, the invertebrate macrofauna of the Neuburg Kieselerde Member of the Wellheim Formation (Bavaria, southern Germany) is probably the most diverse fossil assemblage of the Danubian Cretaceous Group. Occurring as erosional relicts in post-depositional karst depressions, both the Cretaceous sediments and fossils have been silicified during diagenesis. The Neuburg Kieselerde Member, safely dated as Early Cenomanian to Early Turonian based on inoceramid bivalve biostratigraphy and sequence stratigraphy, preserves a predominantly soft-bottom community, which, however, is biased due to near-complete early diagenetic loss of aragonitic shells. The community is dominated by epifaunal and semi-infaunal bivalves as well as sponges that settled on various (bio-) clasts, and may widely be split into an early bivalve-echinoid assemblage and a succeeding sponge-brachiopod assemblage. In addition to these groups we document ichnofauna, polychaete tubes, nautilids and bryozoans. The fauna provides evidence of a shallow to moderately deep, calm, fully marine environment, which is interpreted as a largescale embayment herein. The fauna of the Neuburg Kieselerde Member is regarded as an important archive of lower Upper Cretaceous sea-life in the surroundings of the Mid-European Island.

  1. Distribution of elements in the Salt Wash member of the Morrison Formation in the Jo Dandy area, Montrose County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newman, William L.; Elston, Donald P.

    1957-01-01

    A study of the distribution of elements in the Salt Wash member of the Morrison formation of Jurassic age from samples taken in the Jo Dandy area, Montrose County, Colo., was made to determine average chemical composition of mudstone and sandstone and to determine the magnitude of variations in concentrations of elements within similar rock types. Analytical data were obtained by semiquantitative spectrographic and radiometric methods. Results of the study show that variations in concentrations of about 20 elements commonly detected by semiquantititive spectrographic analyses of sedimentary rocks are small for a specific rock type; therefore, considerable confidence may be placed upon the average chemical appears to be no significant relation between chemical composition of mudstone or sandstone and distance from known uranium-vanadium ore or mineralization rock. Mudstone generally contains greater concentrations of the elements studied than sandstone. The chemical composition of red mudstone is similar to the chemical composition of green mudstone except that red mudstone was found to contain almost twice as much calcium as green mudstone in the Jo Dandy area. Samples of the unoxidized sandstone from the Jo Dandy area contain about twice as much calcium, three times as much strontium, but only about one-half as much as zirconium as oxidized sandstone; except for these elements the chemical compositions of both categories of sandstone are similar. Samples of sandstone of the Salt Wash member in the Jo Dandy area contain more potassium, magnesium, vanadium, and nickel than “average sandstone” of the Salt Wash member. The distribution of bismuth in rocks of the Jo Dandy area suggests that bismuth and perhaps part of the potassium and magnesium found in rocks of the Salk Wash member were either derived from solutions which ascended from the underlying salt- and gypsum-bearing Paradox member that was incorporated with rocks of the Salt Wash during sedimentation.

  2. Two quorum sensing systems control biofilm formation and virulence in members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex

    PubMed Central

    Suppiger, Angela; Schmid, Nadine; Aguilar, Claudio; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo

    2013-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) consists of 17 closely related species that are problematic opportunistic bacterial pathogens for cystic fibrosis patients and immunocompromised individuals. These bacteria are capable of utilizing two different chemical languages: N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) and cis-2-unsaturated fatty acids. Here we summarize the current knowledge of the underlying molecular architectures of these communication systems, showing how they are interlinked and discussing how they regulate overlapping as well as specific sets of genes. A particular focus is laid on the role of these signaling systems in the formation of biofilms, which are believed to be highly important for chronic infections. We review genes that have been implicated in the sessile lifestyle of this group of bacteria. The new emerging role of the intracellular second messenger cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) as a downstream regulator of the fatty acid signaling cascade and as a key factor in biofilm formation is also discussed. PMID:23799665

  3. Effects of three auxin-inducible LBD members on lateral root formation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhenhua; Zhu, Jian; Du, Xiling; Cui, Xianghuan

    2012-10-01

    In Arabidopsis, two Auxin Response Factors (ARF7 and ARF19) and several Aux/IAAs regulate auxin-induced lateral root (LR) formation. As direct targets of ARF7 and ARF19, Lateral Organ Boundaries Domain 16 (LBD16), LBD29, and LBD18 have a biological function in the formation of lateral roots (LRs). However, the details of the functions of these three LBDs have remained unclear. Each single T-DNA insert mutant has been shown to have slightly fewer LRs than the wild type. We then created a triple mutant, which exhibited a dramatic defect in the LR formation. Our results show that the lbd mutations can lead to impairment in auxin-induced pericycle cell division and in the expression levels of some D-type cyclins (CYCDs). Simultaneously, Plethora (PLT) and PIN-formed (PIN), which have been well documented to promote cell mitotic activity and are required for auxin response effects, were down-regulated by these lbd mutations. Our results so far indicate that CYCDs, PLT, and PINs are the main targets of the LBDs. We believe that these three LBDs are involved in cell cycle progression of the pericycle in response to auxin. Overexpression of any of these three LBD genes in the triple mutant was found incapable of completely replacing the other two LBDs. The phenotypes of lbd29 mutants were not completely consistent with lbd16 or lbd18 mutants. This indicates that LBD29 may play a distinctive role compared with LBD16 or LBD18 and LBDs might play partially independent roles during the formation of LRs.

  4. Pyrite Framboid Size Distributions in the Union Springs Member, Marcellus Formation and Implications for Paleowater Column Euxinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karduck, S.; Arthur, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Numerous studies have evaluated both modern and ancient sediments and have shown that size distributions of pyrite framboid diameters can be used to interpret the location of the euxinic/dysoxic-oxic boundary relative to the sediment-water interface at the time of framboid formation (e.g. Wilkin et al., 1996; Wilkin et al., 1997; Wignall and Newton, 1998; Bond and Wignall, 2010). This study evaluated pyrite framboid size distributions in samples taken from two Devonian Appalachian Basin cores from central Pennsylvania. The investigation focused on the core that has less vertical variability and is thought to represent the distal basin. Sampling encompassed the top of the Onondaga Formation (shoal water limestone sequence) and the complete Union Springs member of the Marcellus Formation (black shale sequence). Framboid diameters were measured on polished samples under 1500x magnification using an optical graticule. The two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to compare framboid diameter statistics from all samples, which facilitated discretization of samples into five distinct groups. It was found that these groups aligned well with major changes in geochemical attributes as well as macroscopic and microscopic rock observations. Results of this analysis were used, in conjunction with geochemical systems and observations outlined by Wendt et al. (2015), to establish the history of water column euxinia in the studied interval. Results indicate that the top of the Onondaga Formation was deposited under a dysoxic to oxic water column, and that bottom water euxinia began to set in during the transition to the Union Springs member. During the deposition of the Lower Union Springs member, bottom waters were euxinic, but the redox boundary was dynamic and often approached the sediment-water interface. This period was also marked by high productivity and sediment starvation, which allowed for the creation of a highly condensed section. During the deposition of the Upper

  5. 12 new substellar members in Taurus. Clues for substellar formation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guieu, S.; Monin, J.-L.; Dougados, C.; Magnier, E.; Martín, E. L.

    2005-12-01

    Recent studies of the substellar population in the Taurus cloud have revealed a deficit of brown dwarfs compared to the Trapezium cluster population (\\citealt{Briceno-1998,Luhman-2000,Luhman-2003a,Luhman-2004}) However, these works have concentrated on the highest stellar density regions of the Taurus cloud. We have performed a large scale optical survey of this region, covering a total area of ≃ 28 deg2, and encompassing the densest parts of the cloud as well as their surroundings. In this paper, we present optical spectroscopic follow-up observations of 97 photometrically selected potential new low-mass Taurus members. We derive spectral types, visual absorption and luminosity class estimates and discuss our criteria to assess Taurus membership. These observations reveal 5 new very low mass stars (VLMs) and 12 new Brown Dwarfs (BDs) on the Taurus cloud. We derive a new substellar to stellar ratio in Taurus of \\mathcal{R}ss =0.23 ± 0.05. This revisited ratio appears consistent with the value of 0.26 ± 0.04 previously derived in the Trapezium cluster under similar assumptions. We find indications that the relative numbers of BDs with respect to stars is decreased by a factor 2 in the central regions of the aggregates with respect to the more distributed population.

  6. A Multigenic Network of ARGONAUTE4 Clade Members Controls Early Megaspore Formation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Lagana, Elvira; Rodríguez-Leal, Daniel; Lúa, Judith; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The development of gametophytes relies on the establishment of a haploid gametophytic generation that initiates with the specification of gametophytic precursors. The majority of flowering plants differentiate a single gametophytic precursor in the ovule: the megaspore mother cell. Here we show that, in addition to argonaute9 (ago9), mutations in other ARGONAUTE (AGO) genes such as ago4, ago6, and ago8, also show abnormal configurations containing supernumerary gametophytic precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana. Double homozygous ago4 ago9 individuals showed a suppressive effect on the frequency of ovules with multiple gametophytic precursors across three consecutive generations, indicating that genetic interactions result in compensatory mechanisms. Whereas overexpression of AGO6 in ago9 and ago4 ago9 confirms strong regulatory interactions among genes involved in RNA-directed DNA methylation, AGO8 is overexpressed in premeiotic ovules of ago4 ago9 individuals, suggesting that the regulation of this previously presumed pseudogene responds to the compensatory mechanism. The frequency of abnormal meiotic configurations found in ago4 ago9 individuals is dependent on their parental genotype, revealing a transgenerational effect. Our results indicate that members of the AGO4 clade cooperatively participate in preventing the abnormal specification of multiple premeiotic gametophytic precursors during early ovule development in A. thaliana. PMID:27591749

  7. P31comet, a member of the synaptonemal complex, participates in meiotic DSB formation in rice.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jianhui; Tang, Ding; Shen, Yi; Xue, Zhihui; Wang, Hongjun; Shi, Wenqing; Zhang, Chao; Du, Guijie; Li, Yafei; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2016-09-20

    The human mitotic arrest-deficient 2 (Mad2) binding protein p31(comet) participates in the spindle checkpoint and coordinates cell cycle events in mitosis although its function in meiosis remains unknown in all organisms. Here, we reveal P31(comet) as a synaptonemal complex (SC) protein in rice (Oryza sativa L.). In p31(comet), homologous pairing and synapsis are eliminated, leading to the homologous nondisjunction and complete sterility. The failure in loading of histone H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) in p31(comet), together with the suppressed chromosome fragmentation in rice completion of meiotic recombination 1 (com1) p31(comet) and radiation sensitive 51c (rad51c) p31(comet) double mutants, indicates that P31(comet) plays an essential role in double-strand break (DSB) formation. Interestingly, the dynamic colocalization pattern between P31(comet) and ZEP1 (a transverse filament protein of SC) by immunostaining, as well as the interaction between P31(comet) and CENTRAL REGION COMPONENT 1 (CRC1) in yeast two-hybrid assays, suggests possible involvement of P31(comet) in SC installation. Together, these data indicate that P31(comet) plays a key role in DSB formation and SC installation, mainly through its cooperation with CRC1.

  8. P31comet, a member of the synaptonemal complex, participates in meiotic DSB formation in rice

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jianhui; Tang, Ding; Shen, Yi; Xue, Zhihui; Wang, Hongjun; Shi, Wenqing; Zhang, Chao; Du, Guijie; Li, Yafei; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2016-01-01

    The human mitotic arrest-deficient 2 (Mad2) binding protein p31comet participates in the spindle checkpoint and coordinates cell cycle events in mitosis although its function in meiosis remains unknown in all organisms. Here, we reveal P31comet as a synaptonemal complex (SC) protein in rice (Oryza sativa L.). In p31comet, homologous pairing and synapsis are eliminated, leading to the homologous nondisjunction and complete sterility. The failure in loading of histone H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) in p31comet, together with the suppressed chromosome fragmentation in rice completion of meiotic recombination 1 (com1) p31comet and radiation sensitive 51c (rad51c) p31comet double mutants, indicates that P31comet plays an essential role in double-strand break (DSB) formation. Interestingly, the dynamic colocalization pattern between P31comet and ZEP1 (a transverse filament protein of SC) by immunostaining, as well as the interaction between P31comet and CENTRAL REGION COMPONENT 1 (CRC1) in yeast two-hybrid assays, suggests possible involvement of P31comet in SC installation. Together, these data indicate that P31comet plays a key role in DSB formation and SC installation, mainly through its cooperation with CRC1. PMID:27601671

  9. Sedimentary regime of Tullock Member of Fort Union Formation, Tullock Creek type locality, South-central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.L.

    1986-08-01

    The early Paleocene Tullock Member of the Fort Union Formation at its type locality was deposited in a low-gradient riverine system. This interpretation is based on studies of sedimentary structures, geometry, thickness trends, and sand-percent isopach maps. Lithologies consist of interbedded sandstones, siltstones, shales, and thin coal beds. Sandstones 10 m (32.8 ft) thick contain fining-upward, fine-grained, structureless units with erosional bases capped by climbing-ripple lamination. Some sandstones have claystone rip-up clasts at their bases. The sandstones are discrete, highly convex bodies with symmetrical cross sections and flat erosional bases. These sandstone bodies are isolated show no stacking or coalescing, and are concentration in the middle of the Tullock Member. Interbedded calcareous siltstones show ripple cross-laminae and contain elongate calcareous nodules 4 to 16 cm (1.6 to 6.3 in.) long, oriented parallel to the bedding plane. They also contain well-preserved, fragmented leaf impressions. Carbonaceous shale predominates in the upper and lower third of the member. These shales show very thin lamination, contain abundant plant fragments, and have a mottled rooted texture. Thin, discontinuous coal beds are found within the lower third of the Tullock.

  10. Delivering a very brief psychoeducational program to cancer patients and family members in a large group format.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, A J; Edmonds, C V; Williams, D

    1999-01-01

    It is well established that brief psychoeducational programs for cancer patients will significantly improve mean quality of life. As this kind of adjunctive treatment becomes integrated into general cancer management, it will be necessary to devise cost-effective and efficacious programs that can be offered to relatively large numbers of patients. We have developed a very brief 4-session program that provides this service to 40-80 patients and family members per month (and seems capable of serving much larger numbers, depending on the capacity of the facility in which they assemble). Patients meet in a hospital auditorium for a large group, lecture-style program that offers training in basic coping skills: stress management, relaxation training, thought monitoring and changing, mental imagery and goal setting. Over the first year we have treated 363 patients and 150 family members. Improvements were assessed by changes in the POMS-Short Form, and both patients and family members were found to improve significantly over the course of the program. While this is not a randomized comparison, it suggests that the benefits gained from a large group in a classroom are not substantially less than the improvements that have been documented in the usual small group format, where more interactive discussions are possible.

  11. MISS in Mesoproterozoic Nonstromatolitic Limestones: A Case Study of the Third Member of Gaoyuzhuang Formation at Qiangou Section in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MEI, Mingxiang; Gao, Jinhan; Meng, Qingfen

    The Precambrian carbonate rocks are commonly characteristic of stromatolitic carbonate succession. However, in the western segment of Yanshan area, the third member of the Mesoproterozoic Gaoyuzhuang Formation at the Qiangou section in Yanqing, Beijing, is made up of a set of particular limestone succession with the sparseness of stromatolites. This limestone succession has been defined as the nonstromatolitic carbonate succession, which is a typical example in which three third-order sequences can be discerned according to the cyclicity reflected by successions of sedimentary facies. Within these third-order sequences, there are many subtidal carbonate cycles made up of both the medium- to thin-bedded aphanitic micrites and the thin-bedded marls in the transgressive and the early high-stand system tracts, and many grotesque sedimentary structures are widespread in the bedding planes of aphanitic micrites. These sedimentary structures, including the domal structure, the irregular reticular and chaotic tepee ridges, and the palimpsest ripple, make up an association of the microbial-induced sedimentary structure (MISS). Therefore, both the special MISSs and the particular lithological types make the third member of the Mesoproterozoic Gaoyuzhuang Formation at the Qiangou section to become the representative of the Precambrian nonstromatolitic carbonate succession. More importantly, this succession was formed during the golden age of stromatolite and could provide useful information for the further understanding of the evolving carbonate world of the Precambrian.

  12. Sedimentology and Mangetic Properties of the Late Eocene - Early Oligocene Vera Member, Sarmiento Formation at Gran Barranca, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selkin, P. A.; Davies-Vollum, K.; Stromberg, C. A.; Dunn, R. E.; Madden, R.; Re, G. H.

    2012-12-01

    The Vera Member of the Sarmiento Formation at Gran Barranca, Argentina represents one of the few continuous terrestrial records of environmental change across the Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT) from the Southern Hemisphere. The Vera Member consists dominantly of sediment in the sand- to silt- size range (median grain size > approximately 10 μm), previously interpreted as pyroclastic deposits interspersed with weakly developed paleosols, deposited within a channel. New grain size data from the Vera Member reveal several intervals of relatively fine-grained sediment (median grain size <10 μm). Magnetic susceptibility varies with a pattern nearly opposite that of median grain size, with the fine-grained intervals characterized by susceptibility slightly above average (> 5 × 10-7 m3/kg), and coarse-grained material characterized by low susceptibilities (< 5 × 10-7 m3/kg). Hysteresis and isothermal remanence acquisition experiments suggest that the susceptibility variations are controlled both by variations in paramagnetic and ferromagnetic mineralogy. More precisely, multi-component coercivity spectra are consistent with at least three remanence carriers: a magnetically hard phase (median Bc ~200 mT) and at least two softer phases (both with median Bc <30 mT). The concentration of these phases varies throughout the section. The high-susceptibility, fine-grained material is consistent with windblown material, possibly volcanic ash. The low-susceptibility, coarser material may indicate leaching during periods between airfall events. There is no evidence of a change in leaching or the deposition of windblown material throughout the Vera Member.

  13. Deflation/erosion rates for the Parva Member, Dorsa Argentea Formation and implications for the south polar region of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleacher, Jacob E.; Sakimoto, Susan E. H.; Garvin, James B.; Wong, Martin

    2003-07-01

    The origins of the surficial materials in the geologic units surrounding the Martian southern polar region have been poorly constrained on the basis of pre-Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) data and studies. MGS studies suggest that these units are the remnant of volatile loss from an originally massive volatile-rich debris blanket or the result of fluidized slurries resulting from magma/volatile interactions or impact shaking. We use Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter data to examine a region adjacent to the south polar layered terrain at 72°-79°S and 230°-275°E, generally equivalent to the mapped Parva member of the Dorsa Argentea Formation (DAF). The pedestal and ``ghost'' impact crater morphologies in this area suggest that extensive deposits of loosely consolidated materials have been removed from this region. The Parva member is thus likely to be the remaining debris blanket from the deflated remnant of an unprotected deposit that was originally similar to the buried DAF deposits in the adjacent Cavi member. Crater counts indicate that the Parva member is of Hesperian age and overlies an older Noachian surface, likely the highland cratered terrain (Npl1). If regional deflation began in the Hesperian and continues through today, the region has been exposed to erosion rates of 1.3-1.6 × 10-7 m/yr. However, if deflation started later than the assumed times or ceased in the Amazonian, when deposition of the polar layered deposits began, erosion rates as high as 2.-5.2 × 10-7 m/yr might have existed. These erosion rates are within the range of published Martian nonbedrock erosion rates of 10-8-10-5 m/yr.

  14. Human EML4, a novel member of the EMAP family, is essential for microtubule formation

    SciTech Connect

    Pollmann, Marc; Parwaresch, Reza; Adam-Klages, Sabine; Kruse, Marie-Luise; Buck, Friedrich; Heidebrecht, Hans-Juergen . E-mail: hheidebrecht@path.uni-kiel.de

    2006-10-15

    Human EML4 (EMAP-like protein 4) is a novel microtubule-associated WD-repeat protein of 120 kDa molecular weight, which is classified as belonging to the conserved family of EMAP-like proteins. Cosedimentation assays demonstrated that EML4 associates with in vitro polymerized microtubules. Correspondingly, immunofluorescence stainings and transient expression of EGFP-labeled EML4 revealed a complete colocalization of EML4 with the interphase microtubule array of HeLa cells. We present evidence that the amino-terminal portion of EML4 (amino acids 1-249) is essential for the association with microtubules. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that EML4 is hyperphosphorylated on serine/threonine residues during mitosis. In addition, immunofluorescence stainings demonstrated that hyperphosphorylated EML4 is associated with the mitotic spindle, suggesting that the function of EML4 is regulated by phosphorylation. siRNA-mediated knockdown of EML4 in HeLa cells led to a significant decrease in the number of cells. In no case mitotic figures could be observed in EML4 negative HeLa cells. Additionally, we observed a significant reduction of the proliferation rate and the uptake of radioactive [{sup 3}H]-thymidine as a result of EML4 silencing. Most importantly, EML4 negative cells showed a completely modified microtubule network, indicating that EML4 is necessary for correct microtubule formation.

  15. Vibration based baseline updating method to localize crack formation and propagation in reinforced concrete members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahalathantri, Buddhi L.; Thambiratnam, David P.; Chan, Tommy H. T.; Fawzia, Sabrina

    2015-05-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) schemes are useful for proper management of the performance of structures and for preventing their catastrophic failures. Vibration based SHM schemes has gained popularity during the past two decades resulting in significant research. It is hence evitable that future SHM schemes will include robust and automated vibration based damage assessment techniques (VBDAT) to detect, localize and quantify damage. In this context, the Damage Index (DI) method which is classified as non-model or output based VBDAT, has the ability to automate the damage assessment process without using a computer or numerical model along with actual measurements. Although damage assessment using DI methods have been able to achieve reasonable success for structures made of homogeneous materials such as steel, the same success level has not been reported with respect to Reinforced Concrete (RC) structures. The complexity of flexural cracks is claimed to be the main reason to hinder the applicability of existing DI methods in RC structures. Past research also indicates that use of a constant baseline throughout the damage assessment process undermines the potential of the Modal Strain Energy based Damage Index (MSEDI). To address this situation, this paper presents a novel method that has been developed as part of a comprehensive research project carried out at Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. This novel process, referred to as the baseline updating method, continuously updates the baseline and systematically tracks both crack formation and propagation with the ability to automate the damage assessment process using output only data. The proposed method is illustrated through examples and the results demonstrate the capability of the method to achieve the desired outcomes.

  16. Model for sandstone-carbonate cyclothems based on upper member of Morgan Formation (Middle Pennsylvanian) of Northern Utah and Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Driese, S.G.; Dott, R.H. Jr.

    1984-05-01

    The upper member of the 200 m (660 ft) thick Morgan Formation (Middle Pennsylvanian) consists of 5-25 m (16-82 ft) thick, very fine-grained quartz sandstone units that are interbedded repetitively with 0.5-11 m (1.6-36 ft) thick, oolitic, bioclastic, peloidal, and micritic carbonate units. Similar repetitive sequences occur widely in western North America. The quartz sandstone-carbonate cyclothems defined by this study have potential as targets for hydrocarbon exploration. Both eolian dune sandstones and dolomitized shelf carbonate strata are locally important reservoir rocks in the subsurface in parts of the western Overthrust belt in Utah and Wyoming. 84 references, 22 figures, 4 tables.

  17. Paleomagnetism and rock magnetism of the Neoproterozoic Wilburn Rhyolite member of the upper Mount Rogers Formation, Wilburn Ridge, Southwest Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mace, Christopher

    Rock magnetic and paleomagnetic data were acquired from the Neoproterozoic Wilburn Rhyolite, the uppermost member of the Mount Rogers Formation, which is thought to have been emplaced during the first phase of break-up of the supercontinent Rodinia along the eastern margin of Laurentia. Several rock magnetic tests show that magnetite is the dominant remanence carrier in these rocks. Response to progressive alternating field and thermal demagnetization by these rocks is excellent and typically yields interpretable results; however, within-sample and between-site dispersion of ChRM is often high. AMS data and remanence data suggest errors in sample orientation in the field. Limited corrections were attempted, resulting a paleomagnetic pole determination of fairly low confidence located at pLat = 64.7N, pLon = 118.8E, a95 = 47.1.

  18. A New Upper Jurassic Ophthalmosaurid Ichthyosaur from the Slottsmøya Member, Agardhfjellet Formation of Central Spitsbergen

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Aubrey Jane; Druckenmiller, Patrick Scott; Sætre, Glenn-Peter; Hurum, Jørn Harald

    2014-01-01

    Abundant new ichthyosaur material has recently been documented in the Slottsmøya Member of the Agardhfjellet Formation from the Svalbard archipelago of Norway. Here we describe a partial skeleton of a new taxon, Janusaurus lundi, that includes much of the skull and representative portions of the postcranium. The new taxon is diagnosed by a suite of cranial character states including a very gracile stapedial shaft, the presence of a dorsal process on the prearticular and autapomorphic postcranial features such as the presence of an interclavicular trough and a conspicuous anterodorsal process of the ilium. The peculiar morphology of the ilia indicates a previously unrecognized degree of morphological variation in the pelvic girdle of ophthalmosaurids. We also present a large species level phylogenetic analysis of ophthalmosaurids including new and undescribed ichthyosaur material from the Upper Jurassic of Svalbard. Our results recover all Svalbard taxa in a single unresolved polytomy nested within Ophthalmosaurinae, which considerably increases the taxonomic composition of this clade. The paleobiogeographical implications of this result suggest the presence of a single clade of Boreal ophthalmosaurid ichthyosaurs that existed during the latest Jurassic, a pattern also reflected in the high degree of endemicity among some Boreal invertebrates, particularly ammonoids. Recent and ongoing descriptions of marine reptiles from the Slottsmøya Member Lagerstätte provide important new data to test hypotheses of marine amniote faunal turnover at the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary. PMID:25084533

  19. Petrofacies, provenance and diagenesis of the dhosa sandstone member (Chari Formation) at Ler, Kachchh sub-basin, Western India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, A. H. M.; Bhat, G. M.

    2006-10-01

    The sandstones of the Dhosa Sandstone Member of Late Callovian and Early Oxfordian age exposed at Ler have been analyzed for their petrofacies, provenance, tectonic setting and diagenetic history. These sandstones are fine to medium grained and poorly- to well sorted. The constituent mineral grains are subangular to subrounded. These sandstones were derived from a mixed provenance including granites, granite-gneisses, low- and high-grade metamorphic and some basic rocks of the Aravalli Range and Nagarparkar Massif. The petrofacies analysis reveals that these sandstones belong to the continental block-, recycled orogen- and rifted continental margin tectonic regime. The imprints of early and deep burial diagenesis of these sandstones include different stages of compaction, cementation, change in crystal boundaries, cement-cement boundaries, chertification and neomorphism. The sequence of cementation includes precipitation of calcite and its subsequent replacement by Fe calcite and silica cements. The typical intermediate burial (2-3 km depth) diagenetic signatures of these sandstones are reflected in the formation of suture and straight-line boundaries, and triple junctions with straight-line boundaries. The depositional environment, relatively low-energy environment that was below storm wave base but subjected to gentle currents, of the Dhosa Sandstone Member controlled the early diagenesis, which in turn influenced the burial diagenesis of these sandstones.

  20. Geology and taphonomy of the base of the Taquaral Member, Irati Formation (Permian, Paraná Basin), Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahud, Artur; Petri, Setembrino

    2015-09-01

    The taphonomy of Early Permian vertebrates from a sandy facies at the base of the Taquaral Member, Irati Formation, was surveyed in order to acquire data for the interpretation of the sedimentary processes and paleoenvironment of deposition. Six outcrops from the Rio Claro municipality and surrounding areas, from the Brazilian State of São Paulo, were investigated. The vertebrate groups are Chondrichthyes (Xenacanthiformes, Ctenacanthiformes and Petalodontiformes), Osteichthyes (Actinopterygii and Sarcopterygii) and Tetrapodomorpha. They occur as loose teeth, scales, spines and bone remains. The sandy facies is characterized by fining upward deposition. The coarser sandstone immediately above the underlying Tatuí Formation is rich in Chondrichthyes. However, the fine sandstone above, immediately beneath the silty shale facies, is devoid of Chondrichthyes, though Osteichthyes scales, teeth and bones were present. The taphonomy is important for inferring sedimentary processes and then the paleoenvironments. The poor sorting of the sandstone and the presence of fossils that are mostly abraded or worn are indicative of a high energy environment. In contrast, the presence of fossils in a good state of preservation, some without abrasion and breakages are indicative of only limited transport. Differences of fossil spatial density, numbers of specimens and taxa may be explained by the dynamics of deposition, from details of the palaeoenvironment can be obtained.

  1. Eccentricity and precession forced cyclicity in the Upper Silurian Williamsport Sandstone Member of the Wills Creek Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, S.D.; Anderson, E.J. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The Williamsport Sandstone Member, located at the base of the Wills Creek Formation, contains a complete 5th order sequence, traceable for more than 100 kilometers. This 5th order sequence is initiated with a massive iron-rich sandstone unit. The upper iron-rich sand of the Williamsport Member marks the beginning of the next 5th order sequence. The first 5th order rock cycle, interpreted as the product of the 100 k.y. Milankovitch eccentricity cycle, is divisible into five meter-scale 6th order precessional cycles (PACs). At Cedar Cliff, Maryland, the lithology of each of the five 6th order cycles is distinct. The first cycle (.8m thick) is a massive iron-rich sandstone. The second cycle (.75m thick) is an argillaceous nodular micrite. The third cycle (.75m thick) consists totally of thin-bedded quartz sandstone. The fourth cycle (2m thick) is represented by bedded limestones that thicken upward. The fifth cycle (.6m thick) is very thin-bedded to nodular limestone. This 5th order sequence and most of its internal cyclic elements can be traced over 100 kilometers to Mount Union, Pennsylvania where its facies are largely non-marine. Detailed correlation of these 6th order cycles reveals that the uppermost PAC is missing at Cumberland and Mount Union. At these localities, the prominent iron bed of the next 5th order sequence rests unconformably on the fourth PAC in the sequence. The fifth 6th order cycle was either not deposited or removed by erosion at these proximal localities. The laterally traceable hierarchic cyclic structure in the Williamsport Sandstone is consistent with the Milankovitch forcing model and provides a detailed stratigraphic basis for analysis of lateral patterns of cyclic accumulation in the late Silurian of the central Appalachians.

  2. First Occurrence and Paleo-Ecological Implications of Insects (Orthoptera: Ensifera Gryllidae) in the Romualdo Member of the Santana Formation, Eo-Cretaceous of the Araripe Basin.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Luís C B; Moura, Geraldo J B DE; Saraiva, Antônio A F

    2016-01-01

    The Romualdo Member of the Santana Formation, a lithostatigraphic unit attributed to a marine intrusion, is famous for its preserved fossils in calcareous concretions, which stand out for their diversity and excellent preservation levels. This paper aims to record the first occurrence of the Class Insecta in the Romualdo Member of the Santana Formation of the Araripe Basin, as well as to describe and discuss the paleo-ecological implications of such finding. The first occurrence of the order Orthoptera (family Gryllidae) is presented for this unit. This new species is attributed to the genus Araripegryllus, that lasted throughout the deposition of the Crato Member, which is under the Romualdo Member. In reference to its statigraphic origin, the specimens was named Araripegryllus romualdoi sp. nov.

  3. Depositional environments of Qual Canyon sandstone and Soda Lake shale members of Miocene Vaqueros Formation in southeastern Caliente Range, San Luis Obispo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Goaldman, D.C.

    1988-03-01

    The Quail Canyon Sandstone and the Soda Lake Shale Members are the lower members of the Miocene Vaqueros Formation in the southeastern Caliente Range, San Luis Obispo County, California. The Quail Canyon Sandstone Member is conformably underlain by the nonmarine Oligocene Simmler Formation. The Soda Lake Shale Member is conformably overlain by the Painted Rock Sandstone Member of the Vaqueros Formation. The rarely fossiliferous Quail Canyon Sandstone Member is medium to coarse grained and well sorted in its lower half, becoming medium to fine grained upsection. The lower rocks consist of parallel-laminated and large-scale cross-bedded sandstones, representing an upper-shoreface environment. The upper rocks are primarily structureless sandstone and represent a lower-shoreface environment. The entire section ranges in thickness from 50 to 150 m, thinning westward. The Soda Lake Shale Member consists primarily of gray sandy siltstone, brown siltstone, and structureless sandstone. The sandy siltstone and structureless sandstone are interbedded at the bottom of the unit and indicate lower-shoreface to transitional-marine environments. The rocks become progressively finer into the characteristic, usually structureless, brown siltstone of the Soda Lake Shale Member. The brown siltstone represents an offshore environment, perhaps a restricted bay. Farther upsection, the brown siltstone is interbedded with lenticular structureless sandstone, either of which is locally the dominant lithology. Locally interbedded with the upper rocks is organic-rich, clay-rich sandstone. Above the organic sandstone, the other rocks may contain laminations, grading, and channels that are absent to sparse lower in the section. The upper rocks indicate a shallower and more restricted bay alongside a delta. The Soda Lake Shale Member ranges in thickness from 30 m in the east to 350 m in the west.

  4. Trace element distribution and oil yield data from the parachute creek member of the green river formation, colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Patrick J.; Donovan, Robert C.

    1987-02-01

    The determination of trace element concentrations in oil shale before mining and retorting is required for proper solid-waste management planning. Using routine Fischer assay oil yield data collected during resource characterization as indicators of potential trace element concentrations could lead to a standard method of identifying strata containing high trace element levels. In order to determine a correlation between trace element concentrations and oil yield, shale samples were selected from four statigraphic zones of the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation for analysis. All samples were analyzed for total elemental concentrations, mineralogy, and Fischer assay oil yield. The results of these analyses demonstrated that the Mahogany zone shales contain significantly greater trace element concentrations (antimony, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, lithium, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, and vanadium) than the other three shale zones. These high trace element concentrations have been identified within well-defined interbedded tuff deposits in the Mahogany zone. In addition, all trace elements evaluated, except boron, show either increasing or decreasing concentrations as oil yield increases within all oil shale zones. With an increased number of analyses of existing oil shale cores, oil yield data will be correlated to specific stratigraphic units containing high trace element concentrations.

  5. Regional distribution and chronostratigraphy of the Qusaiba member of the Qalibah formation in the Nafud Basin, Northwestern Saudia Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Aoudeh, S.M.; Al-Hajri, S.A.

    1995-08-01

    The Qusaiba Member of the Qalibah Formation (Silurian age) is a thick sequence consisting of massive dark gray shales. Only the very basal shales are black and highly organic rich. The basal {open_quote}Hot Shale{close_quote} unit is a prolific source correlated to all the Paleozoic discoveries in Central and Eastern Saudi Arabia. In the Nafud Basin, Northwest Saudi Arabia, this same sequence acts as both source and seal to the underlying Ordovician reservoir, making the understanding of this sequence essential to the current exploration program underway in the region. Acquiring high resolution blostratigraphy and detailed source rock analysis substantially contributed to the better understanding of the regional depositional setting of the seal, source, and the reservoirs in the area. Graptolites and chitinozoans zonation were utilized to fine-tune the chronostratigraphy and to further subdivide this huge basin into more manageable subbasins. Regional chronostratigraphic analysis has indicated that the early Qusaiba transgression took place swiftly and covered all of the Arabian plate during early Rhuddanian time. Only high areas not covered by the Rhuddanian transgression and areas that experienced later uplift and erosion lack the Rhuddanian deposits.

  6. Trace element distribution and oil yield data from the Parachute Creek member of the Green River Formation, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, P.J.; Donovan, R.C. )

    1987-01-01

    The determination of trace element concentrations in oil shale before mining and retorting is required for proper solid-waste management planning. Using routine Fischer assay oil yield data collected during resource characterization as indicators of potential trace element concentrations could lead to a standard method of identifying strata containing high trace element levels. In order to determine a correlation between trace element concentrations and oil yield, shale samples were selected from four stratigraphic zones of the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation for analysis. All samples were analyzed for total elemental concentrations, mineralogy, and Fischer assay oil yield. The results of these analyses demonstrated that the Mahogany zone shales contain significantly greater trace element concentrations (antimony, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, lithium, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, and vanadium) than the other three shale zones. These high trace element concentrations have been identified within well-defined interbedded tuff deposits in the Mahogany zone. In addition, all trace elements evaluated, except boron, show either increasing or decreasing concentrations as oil yield increases within all oil shale zones. With an increased number of analyses of existing oil shale cores, oil yield data will be correlated to specific stratigraphic units containing high trace element concentrations.

  7. The depositional environment and petrology of the White Rim Sandstone Member of the Permian Cutler Formation, Canyonlands National Park, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steele-Mallory, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The White Rim Sandstone Member of the Cutler Formation of Permian age in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, was deposited in coastal eolian and associated interdune environments. This conclusion is based on stratigraphic relationships primary sedimentary structures, and petrologic features. The White Rim consists of two major genetic units. The first represents a coastal dune field and the second represents related interdune ponds. Distinctive sedimentary structures of the coastal dune unit include large- to medium-scale, unidirectional, tabular-planar cross-bedding; high-index ripples oriented parallel to dip direction of the foresets; coarse-grained lag layers; avalanche or slump marks; and raindrop impressions. Cross-bedding measurements suggest the dunes were deposited as transverse ridges by a dominantly northwest to southeast wind. Distinctive sedimentary structures of the interdune pond unit include wavy, horizontally laminated bedding, adhesion ripples, and desiccation polygons. These features may have been produced by alternate wetting and drying of sediment during water-table fluctuations. Evidence of bioturbation is also present in this unit. Petrologic characteristics of the White Rim helped to define the depositional environment as coastal. A crinoid fragment was identified at one location; both units are enriched in heavy minerals, and small amounts of well rounded, reworked glauconite were found in the White Rim throughout the study area. Earlier work indicates that the White Rim sandstone is late Wolfcampian to early Leonardian in age. During this time, the Canyonlands area was located in a depositional area alternately dominated by marine and nonmarine environments. Results of this study suggest the White Rim represents a coastal dune field that was deposited by predominantly on-shore winds during a period of marine transgression.

  8. Variations in fluvial style in the Westwater Canyon Member, Morrison formation (Jurassic), San Juan basin, Colorado plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miall, A.D.; Turner-Peterson, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques of architectural element analysis and lateral profiling have been applied to the fluvial Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation (Jurassic) in southern San Juan Basin. On a large scale, the sandstone-body architecture consists mainly of a series of tabular sandstone sheets 5-15 m thick and hundreds of meters wide, separated by thin fine-grained units. Internally these sheets contain lateral accretion surfaces and are cut by channels 10-20 m deep and at least 250 m wide. On a more detailed scale, interpretations made from large-scale photomosaics show a complex of architectural elements and bounding surfaces. Typical indicators of moderate- to high-sinuosity channels (lateral accretion deposits) coexist in the same outcrop with downstream-accreted macroform deposits that are typical of sand flats of low-sinuosity, multiple-channel rivers. Broad, deep channels with gently to steeply dipping margins were mapped in several of the outcrops by carefully tracing major bounding surfaces. Locally thick accumulations of plane-laminated and low-angle cross-laminated sandstone lithofacies suggest rapid flow, probably transitional to upper flow regime conditions. Such a depositional style is most typical of ephemeral rivers or those periodically undergoing major seasonal (or more erratic) stage fluctuations, an interpretation consistent with independent mineralogical evidence of aridity. Fining-upward sequences are rare in the project area, contrary to the descriptions of Campbell (1976). The humid alluvial fan model of Galloway (1978) cannot be substantiated and, similarly, the architectural model of Campbell (1976) requires major revision. Comparisons with the depositional architecture of the large Indian rivers, such as the Ganges and Brahmaputra, still seem reasonable, as originally proposed by Campbell (1976), although there is now convincing evidence for aridity and for major stage fluctuations, which differs both from those modern rivers and Campbell

  9. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the Uteland Butte Member of the Eocene Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Leathers, Heidi M.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2015-09-03

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean undiscovered resources of 214 million barrels of oil, 329 billion cubic feet of associated/dissolved natural gas, and 14 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the informal Uteland Butte member of the Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah.

  10. Isotopic age of the Black Forest Bed, Petrified Forest Member, Chinle Formation, Arizona: An example of dating a continental sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riggs, N.R.; Ash, S.R.; Barth, A.P.; Gehrels, G.E.; Wooden, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Zircons from the Black Forest Bed, Petrified Forest Member, Chinle Formation, in Petrified Forest National Park, yield ages that range from Late Triassic to Late Archean. Grains were analyzed by multigrain TIMS (thermal-ionization mass spectrometry), single-crystal TIMS, and SHRIMP (sensitive, high-resolution ion-microprobe). Multiple-grain analysis yielded a discordia trajectory with a lower intercept of 207 ?? 2 Ma, which because of the nature of multiple-grain sampling of a detrital bed, is not considered conclusive. Analysis of 29 detrital-zircon grains by TIMS yielded U-PB ages of 2706 ?? 6 Ma to 206 ?? 6 Ma. Eleven of these ages lie between 211 and 216 ?? 6.8 Ma. Our statistical analysis of these grains indicates that the mean of the ages, 213 ?? 1.7 Ma, reflects more analytical error than geologic variability in sources of the grains. Grains with ages of ca. 1400 Ma were derived from the widespread plutons of that age exposed throughout the southwestern Cordillera and central United States. Twelve grains analyzed by SHRIMP provide 206Pb*/238U ages from 214 ?? 2 Ma to 200 ?? 4 Ma. We use these data to infer that cores of inherited material were present in many zircons and that single-crystal analysis provides an accurate estimation of the age of the bed. We further propose that, even if some degree of reworking has occurred, the very strong concentration of ages at ca. 213 Ma provides a maximum age for the Black Forest Bed of 213 ?? 1.7 Ma. The actual age of the bed may be closer to 209 Ma. Dating continental successions is very difficult when distinct ash beds are not clearly identified, as is the case in the Chinle Formation. Detrital zircons in the Black Forest Bed, however, are dominated by an acicular morphology with preserved delicate terminations. The shape of these crystals and their inferred environment of deposition in slow-water settings suggest that the crystals were not far removed from their site of deposition in space and likely not far in time

  11. The P-T conditions of garnet inclusion formation in diamond: thermal expansion of synthetic end-member pyrope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Sula; Mazzucchelli, Matteo; Nestola, Fabrizio; Alvaro, Matteo; Angel, Ross J.; Geiger, Charles A.; Domeneghetti, Chiara

    2013-04-01

    Pyrope, Mg3Al2Si3O12, due to the abundance of garnet in Earths's upper mantle, has been studied many times. A number of different investigations have measured its physical and thermodynamic properties at high temperature or pressure and, even more recently, under simultaneous high P-T conditions (e.g. Zou et al., 2012). This abstract reports thermal expansion results on pyrope, as part of a much wider project on the determination of the physical properties of garnet, in order to obtain geobarometric information on the formation conditions of its inclusion in diamond. Our experimental approach is based on the elastic method (e.g. Izraeli et al., 1999; Howell et al., 2010; Nestola et al., 2011; Howell et al., 2012), which takes into account the thermoelastic properties of both diamond and any tiny solid phase inclusion within it. The method requires accurate and precise knowledge of thermal expansion and compressibility behavior in order to calculate precisely the pressure and temperature formation conditions of the diamond-inclusion pair. Thus, in order to do this, we measured the thermal expansion of an end-member synthetic single crystal of pyrope up to 1100 K at 52 different temperatures. This was done by measuring the ao unit-cell edge with high precision and accuracy under heating and cooling conditions. This allows excellent experimental reproducibility, which is also checked by monitoring any diffraction peak broadening over the entire range of temperatures. Fitting the temperature-volume data to the thermal expansion equation of Berman (1988), we obtained a room temperature volume-thermal expansion coefficient equal to 2.72(2)×10-5K-1. Using the same pyrope crystal, in situ high-pressure measurements are now in progress in order to determine its isothermal bulk modulus. The use of our results, along with the dK/dT data of Zou et al ( 2012), we plan to calculate the pressure of formation of diamonds containing pyrope-rich garnet inclusions. References Berman

  12. Petrographic Descriptions of Selected Rock Specimens From the Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale Member, Phosphoria Formation (Permian), Southeastern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Edward A.; Grauch, Richard I.; Herring, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Based on petrographic observations of 135 thin sections, rocks in the Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale Member of the Permian Phosphoria Formation in southeastern Idaho can be placed into one of four major lithofacies: organic claystone, muddy siltstone, peloidal phosphorite, and dolomitized calclithite-in order of decreasing abundance. Organic claystones are the most common lithofacies in the Meade Peak. Many of these rocks contain sufficient amounts of silt to make silty, organic claystones a common subtype. Organic claystones commonly contain crystals of muscovite and bioclasts as accessory components, and they are typically parallel laminated. Muddy siltstones are composed primarily of quartz silt, but some feldspar and rare carbonate silt are also present; some rocks are parallel laminated. Phosphate peloids are composed of varying amounts of opaque, complex, and translucent material, and observed internal structures are classified as simple, banded, cored, zoned, oolitic, nucleated, and polynucleated. Opaque, complex, and translucent peloids form the framework grains of three peloidal phosphorite rocks: wackestone phosphorite, packstone phosphorite, and grainstone phosphorite. Wackestone phosphorite is phosphatic-mud supported and contains more than 10 percent peloids; it is the most common type of phosphorite. Packstone phosphorite is peloid supported and contains interstitial phosphatic mud; it is also a common type. Grainstone phosphorite is peloid supported but lacks phosphatic mud; it is the least common type. Dolomitized calclithites contain three types of carbonate grains: macrocrystalline, microcrystalline, and crystalline with a microcrystalline nuclei-in order of decreasing abundance. Based on chemical staining and X-ray diffraction analyses, most of the carbonate is dolomite. Sufficient amounts of quartz silt or muddy material allow some rocks to be called silty dolomitized calclithite or muddy dolomitized calclithite, respectively. Sedimentary

  13. Petrology and diagenetic history of the upper shale member of the Late Devonian–Early Mississippian Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neil S. Fishman,; Sven O. Egenhoff,; Boehlke, Adam; Lowers, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    The organic-rich upper shale member of the upper Devonian–lower Mississippian Bakken Formation (Williston Basin, North Dakota, USA) has undergone significant diagenetic alteration, irrespective of catagenesis related to hydrocarbon generation. Alteration includes precipitation of numerous cements, replacement of both detrital and authigenic minerals, multiple episodes of fracturing, and compaction. Quartz authigenesis occurred throughout much of the member, and is represented by multiple generations of microcrystalline quartz. Chalcedonic quartz fills radiolarian microfossils and is present in the matrix. Sulfide minerals include pyrite and sphalerite. Carbonate diagenesis is volumetrically minor and includes thin dolomite overgrowths and calcite cement. At least two generations of fractures are observed. Based on the authigenic minerals and their relative timing of formation, the evolution of pore waters can be postulated. Dolomite and calcite resulted from early postdepositional aerobic oxidation of some of the abundant organic material in the formation. Following aerobic oxidation, conditions became anoxic and sulfide minerals precipitated. Transformation of the originally opaline tests of radiolaria resulted in precipitation of quartz, and quartz authigenesis is most common in more distal parts of the depositional basin where radiolaria were abundant. Because quartz authigenesis is related to the distribution of radiolaria, there is a link between diagenesis and depositional environment. Furthermore, much of the diagenesis in the upper shale member preceded hydrocarbon generation, so early postdepositional processes were responsible for occlusion of significant original porosity in the member. Thus, diagenetic mineral precipitation was at least partly responsible for the limited ability of these mudstones to provide porosity for storage of hydrocarbons.

  14. Petrology and diagenetic history of the upper shale member of the Late Devonian-Early Mississippian Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neil S. Fishman,; Sven O. Egenhoff,; Boehlke, Adam; Lowers, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    The organic-rich upper shale member of the upper Devonian–lower Mississippian Bakken Formation (Williston Basin, North Dakota, USA) has undergone significant diagenetic alteration, irrespective of catagenesis related to hydrocarbon generation. Alteration includes precipitation of numerous cements, replacement of both detrital and authigenic minerals, multiple episodes of fracturing, and compaction. Quartz authigenesis occurred throughout much of the member, and is represented by multiple generations of microcrystalline quartz. Chalcedonic quartz fills radiolarian microfossils and is present in the matrix. Sulfide minerals include pyrite and sphalerite. Carbonate diagenesis is volumetrically minor and includes thin dolomite overgrowths and calcite cement. At least two generations of fractures are observed. Based on the authigenic minerals and their relative timing of formation, the evolution of pore waters can be postulated. Dolomite and calcite resulted from early postdepositional aerobic oxidation of some of the abundant organic material in the formation. Following aerobic oxidation, conditions became anoxic and sulfide minerals precipitated. Transformation of the originally opaline tests of radiolaria resulted in precipitation of quartz, and quartz authigenesis is most common in more distal parts of the depositional basin where radiolaria were abundant. Because quartz authigenesis is related to the distribution of radiolaria, there is a link between diagenesis and depositional environment. Furthermore, much of the diagenesis in the upper shale member preceded hydrocarbon generation, so early postdepositional processes were responsible for occlusion of significant original porosity in the member. Thus, diagenetic mineral precipitation was at least partly responsible for the limited ability of these mudstones to provide porosity for storage of hydrocarbons.

  15. One-pot enantioselective formation of eight-membered rings from alkenyl Fischer carbene complexes and ketone enolates.

    PubMed

    Barluenga, José; Diéguez, Alejandro; Rodríguez, Félix; Flórez, Josefa; Fañanás, Francisco J

    2002-08-07

    Eight-membered carbocycles with up to five new stereogenic centers are enantioselectively obtained following a one-pot procedure that involves the coupling of three components: an alkenyl Fischer carbene complex, a ketone enolate, and allyl lithium.

  16. Sedimentary and structural history of the basal member of the Abiquiu Formation: Implications for Cenozoic landscape evolution of the northern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, P.; Murphy, M. A.; Blankenship, E.; Hicks, R.

    2007-12-01

    Structural, stratigraphic, and sedimentalogic data from the the basal member of the Oligocene-lower Miocene Abiquiu Formation provides information on the late Cenozoic deformation history and landscape evolution of north-central New Mexico. The study area lies along the western margin of the Rio Grande rift. The basal member of the Abiquiu Formation lies unconformably on Mesozoic strata and locally the Cenozoic El Rito Formation. RTK GPS mapping of the unconformity shows that it is planar and regionally strikes N70E and dips 17SE. Within the study area the basal member of the Abiquiu Formation is a 125 m thick sequence of interbedded boulder, pebble, cobble conglomerate and coarse-grained sandstone. Bedding ranges from 10 to 50 cm thick and bedforms are planar to slightly undulatory at their base. Clasts within conglomerate beds are matrix supported, but are locally imbricated. Paleoflow measurements from the base of the basal member yield a mean paleoflow direction of 326 degrees. Clasts composition consists of a variety quartzites and foliated granite that are in general subrounded and highly spherical. These bedforms and sedimentary textures suggest that the environment of deposition is sheet flood dominated alluvial fan. Provenance and paleoflow data from the basal member of the Abiquiu Formation indicate that the paleogeography of the western margin of the Rio Grande rift in north-central New Mexico underwent a significant change during the Miocene. At the time of deposition the region presently defining the western margin of the Rio Grande rift was a topographic low and receiving detritus from the south-southeast. Sometime after the Early Miocene, the landscape was inverted, whereby the western margin of the rift was uplifted resulting in southeastward titling of the Abiquiu Formation, while regions to the southeast subsided. Regional southeast tilting of the Abiquiu Formation cannot be readily explained by slip along faults delineating the western margin of

  17. Paleodepositional environment and age of Kanawa Member of Pindiga Formation, Gongola Sub-basin, Northern Benue Trough, NE Nigeria: Sedimentological and palynological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliyu, Abdulkarim H.; Mamman, Y. D.; Abubakar, M. B.; Sarki Yandoka, Babangida M.; Jitong, John Shirputda; Shettima, Bukar

    2017-10-01

    Sedimentogical and palynological investigations of the Kanawa Member of Pindiga Formation in the Gongola Sub-basin, Northern Benue Trough, NE Nigeria were carried out in order to determine the paleoenvironment and age of the sediments. Three main lithofacies were identified from the measured sedimentary log section, namely; the wave rippled sandstones, the limestones (with ammonites, bivalves and gastropods) and the clay-shale. The facies were interpreted to have been deposited in a marine environment. Based on palynological studies, Kanawa Member consists of two palynozones, namely; Cretacaeiporites scabratus and Triorites africaensis. The Triorites africaensis zone is characterized by species of T. africaensis, Gnetaceaepollenites sp. 1, Cretacaeiporites polygonalis, Monosulcites sp., Cretacaeiporites scabratus, Elaterocolpites castelainii and is dated Late Cenomanian whilst the Cretacaeiporites scabratus zone is characterized by the dominance of C. scabratus, C. mulleri and Tricolporopollenites sp and is dated Early Turonian. The Kanawa Member is therefore, dated Late Cenomanian to early Turonian.

  18. Evaporite cycles and cycle boundaries in the upper part of the Paradox Member, Hermosa Formation of Pennsylvanian age in the Paradox basin, Utah and Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Raup, O.B.; Hite, R.J. )

    1991-03-01

    The evaporites of the Paradox Member of the Hermosa Formation of Pennsylvanian age in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are direct precipitates from marine brines and have been changed only slightly by subsequent events. Geophysical logs of deep wells indicate that the Paradox Member is composed of at least 30 evaporite cycles. Lithologies that make up the cycles, in order of increasing salinity, are organic carbon-rich carbonate shale (black shale), dolomite, anhydrite, and halite (with or without potash). Studies of core from two wells in the central part of the basin show that some of the cycles in the upper part of the Paradox Member are remarkably symmetrical, indicating regular changes in salinity. Detailed petrologic studies have revealed newly recognized lithologic textures and cycle boundaries in 11 evaporite cycles, indicating very regular cyclicity of subaqueous sedimentation in a basin in which salinity was probably controlled by Gondwana glaciation.

  19. The star formation history and accretion-disc fraction among the K-type members of the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecaut, Mark J.; Mamajek, Eric E.

    2016-09-01

    We present results of a spectroscopic survey for new K- and M-type members of Scorpius-Centaurus (Sco-Cen), the nearest OB Association (˜100-200 pc). Using an X-ray, proper motion and colour-magnitude selected sample, we obtained spectra for 361 stars, for which we report spectral classifications and Li and Hα equivalent widths. We identified 156 new members of Sco-Cen, and recovered 51 previously published members. We have combined these with previously known members to form a sample of 493 solar-mass (˜0.7-1.3 M⊙) members of Sco-Cen. We investigated the star formation history of this sample, and re-assessed the ages of the massive main-sequence turn-off and the G-type members in all three subgroups. We performed a census for circumstellar discs in our sample using WISE infrared data and find a protoplanetary disc fraction for K-type stars of 4.4^{+1.6}_{-0.9} per cent for Upper Centaurus-Lupus and Lower Centaurus-Crux at ˜16 Myr and 9.0^{+4.0}_{-2.2} per cent for Upper Scorpius at ˜10 Myr. These data are consistent with a protoplanetary disc e-folding time-scale of ˜4-5 Myr for ˜1 M⊙ stars, twice that previously quoted, but consistent with the Bell et al. revised age scale of young clusters. Finally, we construct an age map of Scorpius-Centaurus which clearly reveals substructure consisting of concentrations of younger and older stars. We find evidence for strong age gradients within all three subgroups. None of the subgroups are consistent with being simple, coeval populations which formed in single bursts, but likely represents a multitude of smaller star formation episodes of hundreds to tens of stars each.

  20. High-resolution sequence-stratigraphic correlation between shallow-marine and terrestrial strata: Examples from the Sunnyside Member of the Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation Book Cliffs eastern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, R.; Howell, J.; Boyd, R.; Flint, S.; Diessel, C.

    2006-07-15

    The Sunnyside Member of the Upper Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation in the Book Cliffs of eastern Utah provides an ideal opportunity to investigate high-resolution sequence-stratigraphic correlation between shallow-marine and terrestrial strata in an area of outstanding outcrop exposure. The thick, laterally extensive coal seam that caps the Sunnyside Member is critical for correlating between its shallow-marine and terrestrial components. Petrographic analysis of 281 samples obtained from 7 vertical sections spanning more than 30 km (18 mi) of depositional dip enabled us to recognize a series of transgressive-regressive coal facies trends in the seam. On this basis, we were able to identify a high-resolution record of accommodation change throughout the deposition of the coal, as well as a series of key sequence-stratigraphic surfaces. The stratigraphic relationships between the coal and the siliciclastic components of the Sunnyside Member enable us to correlate this record with that identified in the time-equivalent shallow-marine strata and to demonstrate that the coal spans the formation of two marine parasequences and two high-frequency, fourth-order sequence boundaries. This study has important implications for improving the understanding of sequence-stratigraphic expression in terrestrial strata and for correlating between marine and terrestrial records of base-level change. It may also have implications for improving the predictability of vertical and lateral variations in coal composition for mining and coalbed methane projects.

  1. Cyclic sedimentation, depositional environments, and facies distribution of the Permian Paddock member of the Yeso Formation, Vacuum (Glorieta) field, northwest shelf of the Permian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, D.E. ); Womochel, D.R. )

    1992-04-01

    The Vacuum (Glorieta) field is located on the northwest shelf of the Permian basin in central Lea County, New Mexico. Cumulative oil production of 62 MMBO is primarily from the upper 100 ft of the Leonardian Paddock Member of the Yeso Formation. Cores from 10 wells were examined to identify lithologies and facies relationships. Five lithofacies were identified: (1) fine-grained quartz sandstone/siltstone facies, (2) pelletoid mudstone facies, (3) skeletal packstone/wackestone facies, (4) oolitic-pelletoid grainstone facies, and (5) crystalline dolomite facies. These lithofacies occur sequentially in four shoaling-upward cycles that can be correlated throughout much of the study area. Three major depositional environments are recognized in the Paddock Member of the Yeso Formation: (1) a subtidal open-marine environment in which the oolitic grainstone facies was deposited, (2) a subtidal protected shallow-marine environment where the skeletal packstone/wackestone facies was deposited, and (3) a subtidal to supratidal restricted shallow-marine environment where the pelletoid mudstone facies accumulated. Facies analysis indicates that the Paddock Member was deposited on a broad shallow-marine shelf. Numerous shoaling-upward cycles are possibly related to worldwide Permian sea level fluctuations. Porosity development is enhanced at the upper surface of each shoaling-upward cycle by dissolution of fossil fragments and grains.

  2. Petrology, sedimentology and stratigraphic implications of Black Dragon Member of the Triassic Moenkopi Formation, San Rafael Swell, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.A. ); Ochs, S.

    1990-01-01

    Deposition was partly controlled by paleotopographic relief of underlying Permian strata. Triassic Black Dragon sediments filled lowlands on an erosion surface (unconformity) cut into the Permian White Rim Sandstone and Kaibab Limestone. The Black Dragon Member consists of four distinct facies containing a wide variety of sedimentary structures that characterize both fluvial and tidal environments. The facies are: (1) a Chert Pebble Conglomerate (CPC) facies, characterized by calcite-cemented channel-fills of nodular and banded chert pebbles; (2) an Interbedded Sandstone, Siltstone, and Shale (SSS) facies, containing oscillation ripples and flaser bedding; (3) a large-scale Trough Cross-Stratified Sandstone (TXS) facies, consisting of 6.6-13.1 ft (2-4 m) thick sets of fine- to medium-grained sandstone; and (4) an Oolitic and Algal Limestone (OAL) facies, with cross-stratified oolitic beds, fenestral fabric, and laminated algal rip-up clasts. The CPC facies and the TXS facies were deposited by braided streams when the shoreline lay west of the San Rafael Swell. Rivers drained off and eroded localized Permian highlands, located most likely within a 62 mi (100 km) distance to the south and southeast of the study area. The SSS facies which constitutes the bulk of the Black Dragon Member, and the OAL facies are inter- and supratidal deposits formed during relative sea level highstands, when the shoreline lay within or east of the San Rafael Swell. A decrease in continent-derived sand supply and a corresponding increase in carbonate production within the OAL facies characterizes the end of Black Dragon deposition and the gradation into the overlying Sinbad Limestone Member.

  3. Ab initio QM/MM free energy simulations of peptide bond formation in the ribosome support an eight-membered ring reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, John Z H; Xiang, Yun

    2012-10-03

    Ab initio QM/MM free-energy simulations were carried out to study the peptide bond formation reaction in the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. The QM part of the reaction was treated by density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31G* level, while the MM part including the solvent and RNA environment was described by molecular force field. The calculated free-energy surfaces for the two popular reaction mechanisms, the six- and eight-membered ring reactions, exhibited large energetic differences which favor the eight-membered reaction mechanism. The simulated quasi-transition state structures clearly indicated a "late" feature consistent with previous theoretical studies. Also the important functional role played by water molecules in the active site of the ribosome and its implication in ribozymic catalysis was discussed in detail.

  4. In-place oil shale resources in the saline-mineral and saline-leached intervals, Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birdwell, Justin E.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Johnson, Ronald C.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Dietrich, John D.

    2014-01-01

    A recent U.S. Geological Survey analysis of the Green River Formation of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado shows that about 920 and 352 billion barrels of oil are potentially recoverable from oil shale resources using oil-yield cutoffs of 15 and 25 gallons per ton (GPT), respectively. This represents most of the high-grade oil shale in the United States. Much of this rich oil shale is found in the dolomitic Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation and is associated with the saline minerals nahcolite and halite, or in the interval where these minerals have been leached by groundwater. The remaining high-grade resource is located primarily in the underlying illitic Garden Gulch Member of the Green River Formation. Of the 352 billion barrels of potentially recoverable oil resources in high-grade (≥25 GPT) oil shale, the relative proportions present in the illitic interval, non-saline R-2 zone, saline-mineral interval, leached interval (excluding leached Mahogany zone), and Mahogany zone were 3.1, 4.5, 36.6, 23.9, and 29.9 percent of the total, respectively. Only 2 percent of high-grade oil shale is present in marginal areas where saline minerals were never deposited.

  5. Paleontology and sedimentology of upper clastic member of Wanakah Formation, Chama basin, New Mexico: Lacustrine paleoenvironmental implications

    SciTech Connect

    Good, S.J.; Ridgley, J.L. )

    1989-09-01

    Lacustrine strata of the upper part of the Jurassic Wanakah Formation were restricted to the Chama basin of north-central New Mexico by mid-Jurassic tectonic activity in the Brazos and Nacimiento uplifts and along the Gallina-Archuleta anticlinorium. Lateral and vertical facies of the upper Wanakah exposed around the southern margin of the Chama basin indicate that the deeper part of the lake was north of the outcrop belt. The upper 3-5 m of the Wanakah consists of thin-bedded rippled sandstone, interbedded mudstone, and limestone containing trace fossils and freshwater mollusks characteristic of marginal lacustrine facies. Taphonomic studies of mollusks in the Wanakah Formation have been combined with application of ecophenotypic variation documented in extant unionid bivalves to produce paleoenvironmental interpretations of these lacustrine rocks.

  6. Measured sections and discussion of the main turbidite member, Middle Pennsylvanian Minturn Formation, northern Sangre de Cristo Range, Custer and Saguache counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soulliere, S.J.; DeAngelis, B.L.; Lindsey, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    The main turbidite member is the thickest and most extensive of the intervals of prodelta turbidites in the Minturn Formation. Each turbidite interval is part of a coarsening upward sequence interpreted as a prograding fan delta. A typical prograding cycle consists of prodelta marine shale and siltstone, prodelta turbidite sandstones, delta-front sandstone and conglomerate, and deltaic and alluvial-plain sandstone, siltstone, and shale. Fossils of 1and plants (mostly Calamites, including some in growth position) are locally abundant in deltaic and alluvial sediments of the prograding cycles. The turbidites are regarded as having been deposited offshore from alluvial systems.

  7. Nucleophile dependent formation of 6- and 7-membered N-heterocycles by platinum-catalysed cyclisation of 1,5-bisallenes.

    PubMed

    Quirós, María Teresa; Hurtado-Rodrigo, César; Muñoz, María Paz

    2017-08-16

    An unprecedented Pt-catalysed cyclisation of N-tethered 1,5-bisallenes in the presence of oxygen nucleophiles is reported, where formation of 6- or 7-membered rings is driven by the choice of nucleophile and the mechanism dictated by the nucleophile and the electronic properties of the bisallene. The reaction in the presence of alcohols gives preferentially vinyltetrahydropyridines with an extra alkoxy group and Pt-H as the active species in the catalytic cycle, while formation of di- and tetrahydroazepines with an extra hydroxyl group is favoured when water is used as nucleophile, via nucleophilic attack/carbocyclization as the favoured pathway. The products obtained are frequently found in the core of natural products with important biological activities, so understanding this complex mechanistic behaviour and exploiting this new methodology will have a big impact in organic synthesis and organometallic chemistry.

  8. Sorption coefficients for radionuclides on samples from the water-bearing Magenta and Culebra members of the Rustler Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, A. W.; Dosch, R. G.

    1980-11-01

    The sorbing characteristics of samples from the Magenta and Culebra dolomites of the Rustler Formation (which overlie the proposed site for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico) for various radionuclides have been studied. Core samples extracted from various depths and boreholes within a given formation were selected to provide a cross section of materials which are present in the formations. They varied in composition from pure dolomite to nearly pure anhydrite. The radionuclides used in the sorption coefficient measurements (isotopes of Cs, Sr, Tc, Eu, Am and Pu) were dissolved in a simulated Culebra groundwater at concentrations of 0.1 ..mu..Ci/m1 or less. The results indicate that the sorption coefficients (Kd's) of these water-bearing units may vary widely depending on the borehole area and over several feet in depth in a common borehole. Cesium Kd values from 0.6 to 218 ml/g and 1.2 to 68 on Magenta and Culebra samples, respectively. Strontium Kd values ranged from 1.1 to 30 on Magenta Samples and from 0.6 to 32 on Culebra samples. Variations of Eu, Pu and Am Kd's were generally less than an order of magnitude on both Culebra and Magenta samples. Technetium was not sorbed by any of the samples. With few exceptions, samples with high dolomite contents had higher sorption coefficients than those with high anhydrite concentrations. Clay content may also be a factor for some radionuclides, particularly Cs, which has been shown to sorb preferentially on clay particles in Magenta.

  9. Geochemical Analysis of Parasequences within the Productive Middle Member of the Eagle Ford Formation at Lozier Canyon near Del Rio, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shane, Timothy E.

    The middle member of the Eagle Ford formation is a heterogeneous, carbonate-shale unit that is a focus of unconventional oil and gas exploration in southern Texas. Exploration results have been mixed because of the apparent heterogeneity of the member. In this study, the extent of heterogeneities in the Eagle Ford on the "bedding-scale" were examined by evaluating changes in organic and inorganic geochemistry. Samples were collected vertically in outcrop covering four non-consecutive parasequences. These samples were analyzed using a Rock Eval 6 Analyzer(TM) to determine source rock generative potential and a Niton(TM) XRF to evaluate inorganic geochemistry to identify changes in paleoredox conditions, paleoproductivity, and clastic influx. From pyrolysis data, it is determined that Parasequence 1 potentially displays an increase in source rock potential, Parasequence 2 potentially displays a constant source rock potential, and Parasequences 3 and 4 potentially display overall decreases in source rock potential during deposition. From the inferred paleoredox conditions, paleoproductivity, and clastic influx, it is determined that Parasequence 1 experienced a potential increase in oxygen abundance, Parasequence 2 experienced a potential decrease in oxygen abundance, and Parasequences 3 and 4 potentially experienced increases in oxygen abundance during deposition. It is concluded that geochemical heterogeneities do exist on a bedding scale within the parasequences of the middle member of the Eagle Ford. Additional comprehensive sampling and analysis is recommended in the future in order to tie these data to subsurface data for economic application.

  10. Regional analysis of rhythmic bedding in the Fort Hays limestone member, Niobrara Formation (Upper Cretaceous), US western interior

    SciTech Connect

    Laferriere, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a regional stratigraphic investigation of the rhythmically bedded Fort Hays limestone member of Kansas, Colorado, and New Mexico indicate at least two levels of cyclicity. Regional development of these cycles strongly supports the hypothesis that they are climatic in origin. Departures from simple cyclical patterns resulted from sedimentary effects of Late Cretaceous orogenic activity, erosional events associated with eustatic sea level changes, diagenetic modification, and possibly from interference between orbital parameters having different periodicities. The vulnerability of Milankovitch-type cyclicity to overprinting by tectono-sedimentologic effects makes units such as the Fort Hays useful as indicators of subtle tectonic activity. Regional thickness changes in groups of shale-limestone couplets were identified, correlated, and mapped in the subsurface using geophysical well log information in order to locate subtle structural elements that influenced Fort Hays sedimentation. In the Denver-Julesburg Basin of Colorado and western Kansas, thinning of the section between Fort Hays marker horizons occurs dominantly along northeastwardly trending belts that resulted apparently from Late Cretaceous reactivation of the Transcontinental Arch. Isotopic and petrographic analyses were conducted on pelagic (carbonate matrix) and benthic (inoceramid bivalve) constituents of selected shale/limestone couplets. These data suggest that there was little difference in temperature or salinity between times of terrigenous detrital input and times of nearly pure carbonate deposition. Isotopic information from matrix samples suggests a westward decrease in salinity of surface water in the Western Interior Sea. Isotopic data from largely unaltered inoceramid bivalves indicate bottom-water conditions of near-normal marine salinity.

  11. Reactivity of iron complexes containing monodentate aminophosphine ligands – Formation of four-membered carboxamido-phospha-metallacycles

    PubMed Central

    Öztopcu, Özgür; Stöger, Berthold; Mereiter, Kurt; Kirchner, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of [FeCp(CO)2Cl] with 1 equiv of the amidophosphine ligands Li[R2PNR′] (R = Ph, iPr, R′ = iPr, tBu, Cy) afforded complexes of the type [FeCp(CO)(κ2(C,P)-(C 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 111111111111 000000000000 111111111111 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 O)–NiPr-PPh2)] (1a), [FeCp(CO)(κ2(C,P)-(CO)-NtBu-PPh2)] (1b), and [FeCp(CO)(κ2(C,P)-(CO)-NCy-PiPr2)] (1c) in 40–50% yields. Complex 1a was also formed when [FeCp(CO)2(PPh2NHiPr)]+ (2) was reacted with 1 equiv of KOtBu. These complexes feature a four-membered carboxamido-phospha-ferracycle as a result of an intramolecular nucleophilic attack of the amidophosphine ligand on coordinated CO. Upon treatment of 1a with the electrophile [Me3O]BF4 the aminocarbene complex [FeCp(CO)(κ2(C,P)C(OMe)-NiPr-PPh2)]+ (3) was obtained bearing an aza-phospha-carbene moiety. Upon treatment of cis,trans,cis-[Fe(CO)2(Ph2PNHiPr)2(Br)2] (4a) and cis,trans,cis-[Fe(CO)2(Ph2PNHtBu)2(Br)2] (4b) with KOtBu the carboxamido-phospha-ferracycles trans-[Fe(CO)2(κ2(C,P)-(CO)-NiPr-PPh2)(Ph2PNHiPr)Br] (5a) and trans-[Fe(CO)2(κ2(C,P)-(CO)-NtBu-PPh2)(Ph2PNHtBu)Br] (5b) were formed in moderate yield. Finally, representative structures were determined by X-ray crystallography. PMID:23825866

  12. BCAR3/AND-34 can signal independent of complex formation with CAS family members or the presence of p130Cas

    PubMed Central

    Borre, Pierre Vanden; Near, Richard I.; Makkinje, Anthony; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Lerner, Adam

    2011-01-01

    BCAR3 binds to the carboxy-terminus of p130Cas, a focal adhesion adapter protein. Both BCAR3 and p130Cas have been linked to resistance to anti-estrogens in breast cancer, Rac activation and cell motility. Using R743A BCAR3, a point mutant that has lost the ability to bind p130Cas, we find that BCAR3-p130Cas complex formation is not required for BCAR3-mediated anti-estrogen resistance, Rac activation or discohesion of epithelial breast cancer cells. Complex formation was also not required for BCAR3-induced lamellipodia formation in BALB/c-3T3 fibroblasts but was required for optimal BCAR3-induced motility. Although both wildtype and R743A BCAR3 induced phosphorylation of p130Cas and the related adapter protein HEF1/NEDD9, chimeric NSP3:BCAR3 experiments demonstrate that such phosphorylation does not correlate with BCAR3-induced anti-estrogen resistance or lamellipodia formation. Wildtype but not R743A BCAR3 induced lamellipodia formation and augmented cell motility in p130Cas-/- murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), suggesting that while p130Cas itself is not strictly required for these endpoints, complex formation with other CAS family members is, at least in cells lacking p130Cas. Overall, our work suggests that many, but not all, BCAR3-mediated signaling events in epithelial and mesenchymal cells are independent of p130Cas association. These studies also indicate that disruption of the BCAR3-p130Cas complex is unlikely to reverse BCAR3-mediated anti-estrogen resistance. PMID:21262352

  13. Early hominin landscape use in the Lower Omo Valley, Ethiopia: Insights from the taphonomical analysis of Oldowan occurrences in the Shungura Formation (Member F).

    PubMed

    Maurin, Tiphaine; Bertran, Pascal; Delagnes, Anne; Boisserie, Jean-Renaud

    2017-10-01

    The Oldowan archeological record of the Shungura Formation, Member F (Lower Omo valley, Ethiopia) comprises more than one hundred occurrences distributed within archeological complexes, where multiple small spots were found in association with one or two larger occurrences. Such spatial patterning could reflect hominin spatial behavior, repeated occupations within a single sedimentary unit, or taphonomic and/or collection biases. Here we test these hypotheses by way of a geoarcheological and taphonomical analysis using four criteria to assess the preservation of the lithic assemblages: (1) size composition, (2) artifact abrasion, (3) bone abrasion, and (4) orientations of lithic artifacts and bones (i.e., fabrics). We propose a new model of taphonomically induced spatial patterning where the multiple, small, well circumscribed occurrences result primarily from post-depositional processes and therefore do not reflect any underlying behavioral patterns. The large number of archeological occurrences documented in Member F, therefore, corresponds to a limited number of primary occupations (<10). The archeological occupation is mainly restricted to the lower part of Member F and may reflect a single or a small number of occupation episodes, which were located on previous levees of the paleo-Omo River, in nearby floodplain areas, or on the riverbank. This strongly suggests that most of the knapping activities originally took place close to the river. This preference of the Omo toolmakers for riverine environments could explain the scarcity of archeological material in the upper part of Member F that comprises primarily distal floodplain sedimentary facies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Union Members Are Community Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, David

    2013-01-01

    Unions serve their members' interests. But union members are also community members, and their interests go well beyond increasing pay and benefits. A local union president has found that his members are best served by participating in a community-wide coalition. Providing eyeglasses to needy students, promoting healthy eating, and increasing…

  15. Spp1, a member of the Set1 Complex, promotes meiotic DSB formation in promoters by tethering histone H3K4 methylation sites to chromosome axes.

    PubMed

    Sommermeyer, Vérane; Béneut, Claire; Chaplais, Emmanuel; Serrentino, Maria Elisabetta; Borde, Valérie

    2013-01-10

    Meiotic chromosomes are organized into arrays of loops that are anchored to the chromosome axis structure. Programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination, catalyzed by Spo11 and accessory DSB proteins, form in loop sequences in promoters, whereas the DSB proteins are located on chromosome axes. Mechanisms bridging these two chromosomal regions for DSB formation have remained elusive. Here we show that Spp1, a conserved member of the histone H3K4 methyltransferase Set1 complex, is required for normal levels of DSB formation and is associated with chromosome axes during meiosis, where it physically interacts with the Mer2 DSB protein. The PHD finger module of Spp1, which reads H3K4 methylation close to promoters, promotes DSB formation by tethering these regions to chromosome axes and activating cleavage by the DSB proteins. This paper provides the molecular mechanism linking DSB sequences to chromosome axes and explains why H3K4 methylation is important for meiotic recombination.

  16. Microfacies analysis of the Leonardian-Guadalupian lower member of the San Andres Formation in the southern Sacremento Mountains, Otero County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, C.; Clemons, R.E. )

    1992-04-01

    The Rio Bonito Member of the San Andres Formation records a transgression of the northwestern shelf during the late Leonardian. Late Leonardian to Guadalupian marine carbonates exposed in the Sacramento Mountains relate a marked change from equatorial tidal flat rocks of the middle Leonardian Yeso Formation. These rocks were deposited during a worldwide sea level lowstand. The Yeso-San Andres contact, previously thought to be a gradational boundary, is here interpreted as a flooding surface resulting from the eustatic sea level rise after the lowstand. Inundation of the northwestern shelf led to deposition of the thick Andres Formation marine limestone sequence within a shallow-lagoon or shelf setting. Depositional environments are predominantly subtidal and intertidal. Microfacies include packstones of comminuted bioclasts of normal saline affinities redistributed by light currents. These shoal upward at times to Dasycladacean algal grainstones interpreted as tidal bars prograding across the lagoon or shelf. More restricted wackestones and laminated mudstones occur at the base of the section and indicate a transition from tidal flat to submerged shelf. Aggradation of sediment into the intertidal zone may have occurred cyclically during San Andres deposition. One such cycle is present over the interval exposed in the Sacramento Mountains. Intertidal rocks resemble tidal flat deposits of dolostone, carbonate mudstones, and a thin tongue of quartzarenite interpeted to be Glorieta Sandstone. These rocks were previously attributed to interginguing of the Yeso with the San Andres.

  17. The Lacustrine Upper Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Four Corners Region, Usa: a Lithological and Mineralogical Terrestrial Analog for Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter-McIntyre, S. L.; Chan, M. A.; McPherson, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    The upper part of the Jurassic Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation is an iron- and clay-rich volcaniclastic shale deposited in an ephemeral alkaline saline lake system. Sedimentary rocks exposed in Gale Crater consist of similar non-acidic clays, possibly of lacustrine origin. Three primary clastic lithofacies are present in both the Brushy Basin Member and at Gale Crater: silt-/claystone, sandstone, and conglomerate. Both the terrestrial and martian silt-/claystone lithofacies are interpreted as lacustrine depositional environments due to features such as parallel laminated and massive sedimentary structures. Vugs are present in the siltstone/claystone facies on both the Colorado Plateau and at Gale Crater. Fluvial features are also observed in both examples such as cross-bedded sandstones and imbricated conglomerates. Concretions are present in both the Colorado Plateau and Gale Crater units. The vugs in the Brushy Basin Member preserve algal forms with cellular elaboration and are interpreted as charophyte molds. Two distinct suites of elements (1. C, Fe, As, P and, 2. C, S, Se, P) are associated with the microbial fossils and may be potential markers for biosignatures. Vugs at Gale Crater are a potential target to investigate the possibility of preserved microbial (algal) life where early analyses show the presence of the elements capable of supporting life. The Brushy Basin Member is composed predominately of quartz, feldspars, zeolites and altered volcanic ash. The abundant clay minerals in both the terrestrial and martian examples are hypothesized to have formed due to partial alteration of volcanic minerals in alkaline fluid. Similarly, concretions present in the terrestrial unit exhibit a diverse range of mineralogies likely due to alkaline fluid chemistries interacting with reactive volcaniclastic sediments. Terrestrial concretion mineralogy is diverse even within an outcrop or stratigraphic horizon which suggests reactants to precipitate

  18. Low functional evenness in a post-extinction Anisian (Middle Triassic) paleocommunity: A case study of the Leidapo Member (Qingyan Formation), south China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dineen, Ashley A.; Fraiser, Margaret L.; Tong, Jinnan

    2015-10-01

    Functional diversity, defined as the abundance and distribution of traits present in a community, has important implications for the functioning of ecosystems in the wake of events of major disturbance. Here, we examine the functional diversity of a Middle Triassic paleocommunity in the wake of the largest mass extinction in Earth's history, the Permo-Triassic mass extinction (PTME). Field data was collected and analyzed for a highly diverse invertebrate marine fossil assemblage, the Middle Triassic (Anisian) Leidapo Member (Qingyan Formation) of Qingyan, south China. Previously interpreted to represent a fully restructured paleocommunity in the aftermath of the PTME, our results indicate that the fauna of Leidapo Member had high taxonomic diversity and high functional richness, however was functionally uneven. Despite the presence of 24 different functional groups, the paleocommunity was numerically and ecologically dominated by one functional group consisting of mostly attached epifaunal suspension feeding brachiopods. The overwhelming dominance of this Anisian paleocommunity by one functional group implies that either, 1) resource availability in the community was uneven, and/or 2) strong environmental or niche filtering was in effect. As such, while the Anisian Leidapo Member paleocommunity was deposited in a fairly stable shallow water paleoenvironment, this biotic assemblage would have been very vulnerable to biotic and environmental perturbations. While it is uncertain whether or not this pattern is typical of paleocommunities in the aftermath of the PTME, these results imply that some Anisian paleocommunities may not have been as fully restructured as previously thought, and may have been inherently unstable due to the numerous biotic and environmental changes present in the Triassic.

  19. Taphonomic and paleoenvironmental considerations for the concentrations of macroinvertibrate fossils in the Romualdo Member, Santana Formation, Late Aptian - Early Albian, Araripe Basin, Araripina, NE, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Ludmila Alves Cadeira Do; Pereira, Priscilla Albuquerque; Sales, Alexandre Magno Feitosa; Barreto, Alcina Magnólia Franca

    2015-10-01

    Benthic macroinvertebrate fossils can be seen towards to the top of the Romualdo Member of the Santana Formation, in the Araripe Basin, Northeast Brazil, and can provide paleoenvironmental and paleobiogeographical information regarding the Cretaceous marine transgression which reached the interior basins in Northeast Brazil. We analyse taphonomic characteristics of macroinvertebrate concentrations of two outcrops (Torrinha and Torre Grande) within the municipality Araripina, Pernambuco, in order to enhance our understanding of the Cretaceous paleoenvironment in the western portion of the Araripe Basin. At the outcrop Torrinha, proximal tempestitic taphofacies were identified. These predominantly consist of ceritid, cassiopid, and later, naticid gastropods as well as undetermined bivalves. Given this lack of variability it can be deduced that there were no significant paleoenvironmental changes during the successive stages tempestitic sedimentation. In the Torre Grande outcrop distal to proximal tempestitic taphofacies were identified from the base to the top respectively pointing to a decrease in paleodepth. Asides from the macroinvertebrates present in Torrinha, there are also echinoids - unequivocal evidence for marine conditions. These occurrences appear to be restricted to Romualdo Member outcrops in the Araripina municipality (the Southeast portion of the Araripe Basin) confirming a previously published hypothesis suggesting that the Cretaceous marine transgression originated from the neighbouring Parnaíba Basin to the west. This study identified marine molluscs of a similar age to those in the Romualdo Member's equivalent rock units in the Parnaíba and Sergipe-Alagoas (SE-AL) basins suggesting a marine connection between these basins and the Araripe Basin during the Early Cretaceous.

  20. FeCl3 catalysed 7-membered ring formation in a single pot: a new route to indole-fused oxepines/azepines and their cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Shiva Kumar, K; Siddi Ramulu, Meesa; Rajesham, Bandari; Kumar, N Praveen; Voora, Vani; Kancha, Rama Krishna

    2017-05-23

    Various oxepine and azepine fused N-heterocyclic derivatives were synthesized using a new and one-pot reaction of 2,3-dichloro quinoxaline/pyrazine with 2-(1H-indol-2-yl)phenol/aniline in the presence of 25 mol% FeCl3. The reaction proceeded via C-C bond followed by C-X (X = O or N) bond formation to construct the central 7-membered ring, affording the desired products in good yields. The structure assignment was confirmed by the single crystal X-ray analysis of a synthesized oxepine fused N-heterocycle derivative. Most of the synthesized compounds were found to be promising when tested for their anti-proliferative properties against cervical and breast cancer cell lines.

  1. Petrography and diagenesis of reservoir and non-reservoir sandstones in Shattuck Member of Queen Formation, northwest shelf of Permian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Malicse, A.; Siegel, J.; Mazzullo, J.

    1988-02-01

    The Shattuck Member is a thick (6-20 m) sandstone that defines the top of the Queen Formation (Permian, Guadalupian) and is a major hydrocarbon reservoir on the Northwestern shelf of the Permian basin. The Shattuck was deposited in desert dune and interdune, dry and wet sand sheet, and sandy sabkha environments during a lowstand of sea level. The desert dune, interdune, and dry sand sheet deposits constitute the producing horizons in the Shattuck, whereas the wet sand sheet and sabkha deposits are generally non-productive. The purposes of this study are to examine the petrographic characteristics of the producing and non-producing horizons with petrographic and scanning electron microscopes, and to determine their provenance and diagenetic history.

  2. Sedimentology and palaeontology of the Upper Jurassic Puesto Almada Member (Cañadón Asfalto Formation, Fossati sub-basin), Patagonia Argentina: Palaeoenvironmental and climatic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabaleri, Nora G.; Benavente, Cecilia A.; Monferran, Mateo D.; Narváez, Paula L.; Volkheimer, Wolfgang; Gallego, Oscar F.; Do Campo, Margarita D.

    2013-10-01

    Six facies associations are described for the Puesto Almada Member at the Cerro Bandera locality (Fossati sub-basin). They correspond to lacustrine, palustrine, and pedogenic deposits (limestones); and subordinated alluvial fan, fluvial, aeolian, and pyroclastic deposits. The lacustrine-palustrine depositional setting consisted of carbonate alkaline shallow lakes surrounded by flooded areas in a low-lying topography. The facies associations constitute four shallowing upward successions defined by local exposure surfaces: 1) a Lacustrine-Palustrine-pedogenic facies association with a 'conchostracan'-ostracod association; 2) a Palustrine facies association representing a wetland subenvironment, and yielding 'conchostracans', body remains of insects, fish scales, ichnofossils, and palynomorphs (cheirolepidiacean species and ferns growing around water bodies, and other gymnosperms in more elevated areas); 3) an Alluvial fan facies association indicating the source of sediment supply; and 4) a Lacustrine facies association representing a second wetland episode, and yielding 'conchostracans', insect ichnofossils, and a palynoflora mainly consisting of planktonic green algae associated with hygrophile elements. The invertebrate fossil assemblage found contains the first record of fossil insect bodies (Insecta-Hemiptera and Coleoptera) for the Cañadón Asfalto Formation. The succession reflects a mainly climatic control over sedimentation. The sedimentary features of the Puesto Almada Member are in accordance with an arid climatic scenario across the Upper Jurassic, and they reflect a strong seasonality with periods of higher humidity represented by wetlands and lacustrine sediments.

  3. Minimization of the Thiolactomycin Biosynthetic Pathway Reveals that the Cytochrome P450 Enzyme TlmF Is Required for Five-Membered Thiolactone Ring Formation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Li, Jie; Moore, Bradley S

    2017-06-19

    Thiolactomycin (TLM) belongs to a class of rare and unique thiotetronate antibiotics that inhibit bacterial fatty acid synthesis. Although this group of natural product antibiotics was first discovered over 30 years ago, the study of TLM biosynthesis remains in its infancy. We recently discovered the biosynthetic gene cluster (BGC) for TLM from the marine bacterium Salinispora pacifica CNS-863. Here, we report the investigation of TLM biosynthetic logic through mutagenesis and comparative metabolic analyses. Our results revealed that only four genes (tlmF, tlmG, tlmH, and tlmI) are required for the construction of the characteristic γ-thiolactone skeleton of this class of antibiotics. We further showed that the cytochrome P450 TlmF does not directly participate in sulfur insertion and C-S bond formation chemistry but rather in the construction of the five-membered thiolactone ring as, upon its deletion, we observed the alternative production of the six-membered δ-thiolactomycin. Our findings pave the way for future biochemical investigation of the biosynthesis of this structurally unique group of thiotetronic acid natural products. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. A New Centrosaurine Ceratopsid, Machairoceratops cronusi gen et sp. nov., from the Upper Sand Member of the Wahweap Formation (Middle Campanian), Southern Utah

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous (middle-late Campanian) Wahweap Formation of southern Utah contains the oldest diagnostic evidence of ceratopsids (to date, all centrosaurines) in North America, with a number of specimens recovered from throughout a unit that spans between 81 and 77 Ma. Only a single specimen has been formally named, Diabloceratops eatoni, from the lower middle member of the formation. Machairoceratops cronusi gen. et sp. nov., a new centrosaurine ceratopsid from the upper member of the Wahweap Formation, is here described based on cranial material representing a single individual recovered from a calcareous mudstone. The specimen consists of two curved and elongate orbital horncores, a left jugal, a nearly complete, slightly deformed braincase, the left squamosal, and a mostly complete parietal ornamented by posteriorly projected, anterodorsally curved, elongate spikes on either side of a midline embayment. The fan-shaped, stepped-squamosal is diagnostic of Centrosaurinae, however, this element differs from the rectangular squamosal in Diabloceratops. Machairoceratops also differs in the possession of two anterodorsally (rather than laterally) curved epiparietal ornamentations on either side of a midline embayment that are distinguished by a posteromedially-oriented sulcus along the entire length of the epiparietal. Additionally, the parietosquamosal frill is lacking any other epiossifications along its periphery. Machairoceratops shares a triangular (rather than round) frill and spike-like epiparietal loci (p1) ornamentation with the stratigraphically lower Diabloceratops. Both parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses place Machairoceratops as an early-branching centrosaurine. However, the parsimony-based analysis provides little resolution for the position of the new taxon, placing it in an unresolved polytomy with Diabloceratops. The resultant Bayesian topology yielded better resolution, aligning Machairoceratops as the definitive sister taxon to a

  5. K-Ar ages of illite clays of the Meade Peak Member of the Phosphoria Formation, Western Phosphate Field, southeastern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, W. Crawford; Ritter, Kristen; Wampler, J.; Grauch, Richard I.; Bauluz, Blanca

    2007-01-01

    The Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale Member of the Phosphoria Formation in the Western Phosphate Field, southeastern Idaho, is composed of carbonaceous mudstone and siltstone with beds of phosphorite and dark bioclastic limestone. An objective of this study has been to understand the timing of diagenetic illite formation in the Meade Peak and whether the Neogene passage of hydrothermal fluids had a significant role in forming diagenetic illite in these shales. Illite-smectite (I-S) is the predominant clay mineral within the shale samples. Smectite, apatite, and kaolinite were also found in some samples. A distinct second generation of diagenetic illite is present as thin, 90% for all samples, and the I-S exhibits a Kalkberg-type stacking order (IISI). The diagenetic conditions inferred from the stacking order and percentage of illite layers in I-S are consistent with published vitrinite reflectance data of the Meade Peak. The K-Ar apparent ages of I-S range from 186 Ma to 292 Ma. A decrease in K-Ar age of I-S with decreasing particle size is observed in clay sub-micron fractions and is consistent with an interpretation that the clay fraction contains a mixture of detrital illite (or I-S) and diagenetic I-S. The measured K-Ar ages of I-S also decrease with increasing stratigraphic distance above the base of the Meade Peak. The K-Ar age of the diagenetic illite rosettes is about 185 Ma. These results indicate that diagenetic illite was formed in the Meade Peak shales during the Jurassic Period, almost certainly in response to progressive burial over a prolonged duration . Additional heating in response to thrust sheet emplacement during the Cretaceous Period may be responsible for the decrease in K-Ar age upward within the member.

  6. Sandstone-body and shale-body dimensions in a braided fluvial system: Salt wash sandstone member (Morrison formation), Garfield County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, J.W.; McCabea, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    Excellent three-dimensional exposures of the Upper Jurassic Salt Wash Sandstone Member of the Morrison Formation in the Henry Mountains area of southern Utah allow measurement of the thickness and width of fluvial sandstone and shale bodies from extensive photomosaics. The Salt Wash Sandstone Member is composed of fluvial channel fill, abandoned channel fill, and overbank/flood-plain strata that were deposited on a broad alluvial plain of low-sinuosity, sandy, braided streams flowing northeast. A hierarchy of sandstone and shale bodies in the Salt Wash Sandstone Member includes, in ascending order, trough cross-bedding, fining-upward units/mudstone intraclast conglomerates, singlestory sandstone bodies/basal conglomerate, abandoned channel fill, multistory sandstone bodies, and overbank/flood-plain heterolithic strata. Trough cross-beds have an average width:thickness ratio (W:T) of 8.5:1 in the lower interval of the Salt Wash Sandstone Member and 10.4:1 in the upper interval. Fining-upward units are 0.5-3.0 m thick and 3-11 m wide. Single-story sandstone bodies in the upper interval are wider and thicker than their counterparts in the lower interval, based on average W:T, linear regression analysis, and cumulative relative frequency graphs. Multistory sandstone bodies are composed of two to eight stories, range up to 30 m thick and over 1500 m wide (W:T > 50:1), and are also larger in the upper interval. Heterolithic units between sandstone bodies include abandoned channel fill (W:T = 33:1) and overbank/flood-plain deposits (W:T = 70:1). Understanding W:T ratios from the component parts of an ancient, sandy, braided stream deposit can be applied in several ways to similar strata in other basins; for example, to (1) determine the width of a unit when only the thickness is known, (2) create correlation guidelines and maximum correlation lengths, (3) aid in interpreting the controls on fluvial architecture, and (4) place additional constraints on input variables to

  7. Early hominid dental remains from Members 4 and 5 of the Sterkfontein Formation (1966-1996 excavations): catalogue, individual associations, morphological descriptions and initial metrical analysis.

    PubMed

    Moggi-Cecchi, Jacopo; Grine, Frederick E; Tobias, Phillip V

    2006-03-01

    The fossils recovered from the Sterkfontein Formation represent, without doubt, the largest collection of early hominid specimens from a single locality. Among the over 600 entries in the catalogue of fossil hominid specimens recovered since 1966, there are 242 dental remains (isolated teeth, jaws with two or more teeth, isolated teeth in association) for a total number of 495 teeth. The aim of this paper is to provide morphological descriptions of all hominid dental specimens recovered between 1968 and 1996 from areas presently known as Members 4 and 5 of the Sterkfontein site. Together with the descriptions, explanatory catalogue information is provided, along with basic measurements and summary statistics. This paper consists of six sections, with descriptive tables: (1) Catalogue of dental remains, arranged numerically. This includes isolated teeth, specimens with teeth still in position within their jaws, and specimens comprised of isolated teeth in association. (2) List of specimens with more complete dentition and the numbers of available teeth per tooth class. (3) List of specimens subdivided in tooth class, with an indication of their preservation, of the wear, if any, and with measurements (mesiodistal and buccolingual diameters) of the individual teeth. (4) List of associations of isolated teeth as individuals i.e. dental remains that can be associated with one another. Some remarks on the relative abundance of maxillary versus mandibular teeth, and on the numbers of available teeth are presented. (5) Morphological descriptions. (6) Summary statistics for the entire Sterkfontein sample (thus including specimens recovered both before and after 1966) and updated descriptive statistics for South African early hominids (A. africanus, A. robustus, South African early Homo). We have compared the coefficients of variation for the MD and BL diameters of the permanent teeth of the Sterkfontein Member 4 hypodigm of A. africanus with the hypodigms of the early

  8. High frequency peritidal cycles in the lower member of the Late Cretaceous (Turonian, Coniasian-Santonian) El Hefhuf Formation, Bahariya Oases, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, M. A.; Tanner, Lawrence H.

    2017-06-01

    Carbonate lithofacies of the lower member of the El Hefhuf Formation (Turonian, Coniasian-Santonian) in the Bahariya Oases, Western Desert of Egypt comprise dolostone, burrowed dolostone, cherty dolostone, calcareous dedolostone, dolomitic quartzose lime-mudstone, and caliche. The dolostone and cherty dolostone formed in intertidal to supratidal environments, while dedolostone and caliche were formed during subaerial exposure. The dolomitic quartzose lime-mudstone was deposited in a restricted subtidal environment. Stable isotope analyses of the dolostone lithofacies are consistent with dolomitization by normal marine to evaporatively enriched dolomitizing fluids with only slight mixing of meteoric water. Therefore, dolomitization occurred in the intertidal and supratidal environments immediately following deposition. The dolostone and cherty dolostone lithofacies display pronounced cyclicity at the sub-meter scale, with individual cycles consisting of one (monolithic), two (diad) or at most three (triad) lithofacies. Most of all cycles show evidence of subaerial exposure at the top, such as brecciations, and many cycles are capped by calcareous palaeosol layers (caliche). In the absence of evidence for cycle periods at Milankovitch-scale frequencies, we reject orbital forcing as the cause of the cyclicity and suggest instead autocyclic depositional processes in the peritidal environment as the primary control on cyclicity, possibly modified by eustatic fluctuations at periods longer than the cycles recorded here. The significance of this study is to suggest formation of dolomite cycles due to high-frequency in sea level with intermittent subaerial exposure.

  9. Conjugate fracture pairs in the Molina Member of the Wasatch Formation, Piceance basin, Colorado: Implications for fracture origins and hydrocarbon production/exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.

    1997-05-01

    The sandstones of the Molina Member of the Wasatch Formation in the Piceance basin of northwestern Colorado contain a suite of fractures that have a conjugate-pair geometry. The fractures are vertical and intersect at an acute angle of between 20 and 40 degrees. Although direct evidence of shear is rare, the fracture surfaces commonly display small steps. The fracture geometries suggest that the maximum compressive stress during fracturing was in the plane of the acute angle of the conjugate fractures: the steps are interpreted as broken-face manifestations of very low angle en echelon fractures, formed within exceptionally narrow zones of incipient shear. In contrast to the highly anisotropic permeability enhancement created by subparallel vertical extension fractures in the underlying Mesaverde Formation, the conjugate pairs in the Molina sandstones should create a well connected and relatively isotropic mesh of fracture conductivity. Increases in stress magnitudes and anisotropy during production drawdown of reservoir pressures should cause shear offsets along the fractures, initially enhancing permeability.

  10. Modeling solute diffusion in the presence of pore-scale heterogeneity: method development and an application to the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation, New Mexico, USA.

    PubMed

    Fleming, S W; Haggerty, R

    2001-04-01

    Previous studies have revealed the presence of pore-scale variability in diffusivity in the Culebra (dolomite) member of the Rustler Formation, NM. In this study, eight laboratory-scale diffusion experiments on five Culebra samples were analyzed using a methodology for modeling solute diffusion through porous media in the presence of multiple matrix diffusivities, Dp. A lognormal distribution of Dp is assumed within each of the lab samples. The estimated standard deviation (sigma d) of ln(Dp) within each sample ranges from 0 to 1, with most values lying between 0.5 and 1. The variability over all samples leads to a combined sigma d in the range of 1.0-1.2, which is consistent with the distribution of independently determined formation factor measurements for similar Culebra samples. A comparison of our estimation results to other rock properties suggests that, at the lab-scale, the geometric mean of Dp increases with bulk porosity and the quantity of macroscopic features such as vugs and fractures. However, sigma d appears to be determined by variability within such macroscopic features and/or by micropore-scale heterogeneity. In addition, comparison of these experiments to those at larger spatial scales suggests that increasing sample volume results in an increase in sigma d.

  11. Clumped Isotopes, trace elements, and δ18O of stromatolites from the Laney Member of the Green River Formation (Eocene): Implications for paleoenvironments during the Eocene Climatic Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsetti, F. A.; Miller, H. M.; Asangba, A. E.; Johannessen, K. C.; Wang, D. T.; Petryshyn, V. A.; Tripati, A.; Shapiro, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    The Green River Formation, a large lacustrine deposit located across parts of Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming, was deposited during the Eocene Climatic Optimum (~50 Ma), a period of sustained high temperatures and high atmospheric CO2 levels that may provide a geologic analog for future climate scenarios. Large variations in basin hydrology, water chemistry, and paleotemperatures occurring on time scales of tens of thousands of years or longer have been documented in the sedimentary record. Here, we use stromatolites to investigate much finer-scale resolution of paleoenvironmental changes in the Green River Formation and paleo-Lake Gosiute. We studied the lower LaClede Bed, the base of the Laney Member of the Green River Formation, comprised of cyclic layers of oil shale and carbonate. The lower LaClede Bed represents the filling of the lake following an extended period of closure during deposition of the underlying Wilkins Peak Member. To characterize fluctuations in water chemistry and lake level at greater temporal resolution, we conducted micro-stratigraphic and chemostratigraphic analyses on 24 distinct mm-scale laminae in a single 10 cm carbonate stromatolite bed, including δ13C, δ18O, and trace elemental analyses (Mg, Mn, Fe, Si, K, Na, Al, Sr). Sub-cm-scale correlations between petrographic analyses, elemental composition, and carbonate δ13C and δ18O suggest that this stromatolite records both hydrologically-closed and -open periods in the history of Lake Gosiute. During periods of apparent basin closure, we used two models to investigate lake volume change: 1) a Rayleigh distillation model of water evaporation to estimate lake depth variations and 2) a conservative ion model based on Na incorporation into the stromatolites. In both models, lake depth fluctuated by up to 8 m; this represents up to 40km of shoreline change in Lake Gosiute during the deposition of this stromatolite layer. Interestingly, the modern Great Salt Lake experienced similar

  12. Characteristics and description of cores from the USGS core hole CRU-1, Parachute Creek Member, Green River Formation, east-central Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keighin, C.W.

    1982-01-01

    Oil-yield, lithologic, and mineral distribution data were determined for cores taken from a 497.7-foot drill hole in the upper part of the Parachute Creek Member of the Eocene Green River Formation. The drill hole, 1050 feet FEL, 700 feet FNL, sec. 3, T. 12 S., R. 24 E., Uintah County, Utah, started slightly below the contact between the Uinta Formation, also of Eocene age, and the underlying Green River Formation. It ended 32 feet below the base of the Mahogany bed (the richest oil-shale bed between A groove and B groove--which define the upper and lower boundaries, respectively, of the Mahogany zone). Most of the interval studied is kerogen- or carbonate-rich, commonly tuffaceous, and is very fine grained. Several thin (<3 feet) oil-shale beds which yield as much as 25 gallons of oil per ton occur above the Mahogany zone, but are probably not of economic interest. The cored sequence contains several tuff beds. The thickest of these beds is approximately 2 feet thick; the average thickness is rarely greater than 0.5 feet. Two oil-saturated tuff beds occur approximately 65 feet above the Mahogany oil-shale bed. Although these two tuffs are exposed on nearby surface outcrops, no evidence of oil is seen on outcrop. The Mahogany zone is approximately 69 feet thick at the drill site; the lowermost few feet were not penetrated. At the site cored, the Mahogany zone is overlain by 435 feet of overburden. Fischer assays indicate that 42.3 feet of oil shale within the Mahogany zone could yield at least 25 gallons of oil per ton from beds at least 10 feet thick.

  13. Facies architecture and stratigraphic evolution of aeolian dune and interdune deposits, Permian Caldeirão Member (Santa Brígida Formation), Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Fábio Herbert; Scherer, Claiton Marlon dos Santos; Kuchle, Juliano

    2016-05-01

    The Permian Caldeirão Member (Santa Brígida Formation), located in the Tucano Central Basin, northeast region of Brazil, is characterized by a sandstone succession of aeolian origin that comprises the preserved deposits of dunes and interdunes. Grainflow and translatent wind-ripple strata, and frequent presence of reactivation surface, compose the cross-bedding of crescent aeolian dune deposits. The aeolian cross-strata show a mean dip toward the ENE. In places, interlayered with dune cross-beds, occur interdune units composed of facies indicative of dry, damp and wet condition of the substrate, suggesting spatial and/or temporal variations in the moisture content of the interdune accumulation surface. The presence of NNW current ripple cross-lamination in wet interdune areas indicates streamflows confined to interdune corridors and oriented perpendicular to aeolian transport direction. Lenses of damp and wet interdune strata exhibit mainly interdigitated and transitional relationships with the toe-sets of overlying aeolian dune units in sections parallel to aeolian transport, indicating that dune migration was contemporaneous with accumulation in adjacent interdunes. Lateral variations in the preserved thickness of the interdune units and the associated rare occurrence of abrupt and erosive contacts between interdune and overlying dune sets, suggest temporal variations in the angle of dune and interdune climb that may be related to high-frequency changes in water table position. Four stratigraphic intervals in the Caldeirão Member can be identified, two intervals showing cross-bedding of aeolian dunes without wet interdune areas and two intervals exhibiting aeolian dunes separated by wet interdune areas, marking the transition between dry aeolian systems (Intervals I and III) and wet aeolian systems (Intervals II and IV). The temporal alternations between dry and wet aeolian systems reflect changes in the availability of dry sand and/or the rate in the water

  14. Clockwise rotation and implications for northward drift of the western Transverse Ranges from paleomagnetism of the Piuma Member, Sespe Formation, near Malibu, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hillhouse, John W.

    2010-01-01

    New paleomagnetic results from mid-Tertiary sedimentary beds in the Santa Monica Mountains reinforce the evidence for large-scale rotation of the western Transverse Ranges, and anisotropy measurements indicate that compaction-induced inclination flattening may resolve a long-standing controversy regarding the original paleolatitude of the rotated block. Previously published paleomagnetic data indicate that post-Oligocene rotation amounts to 70°–110° clockwise, affecting the Channel Islands, Santa Monica Mountains, and Santa Ynez Mountains. The Sespe Formation near Malibu consists of a lower member dominated by nonmarine sandstone and conglomerate and an upper section, the Piuma Member, which consists of gray-red sandstone and mudstone interbedded with minor tuff and limestone beds. The Piuma Member has a paleomagnetic pole at 36.6°N, 326.7°E (A95min = 5.0°, A95max = 9.6°), obtained by thermal demagnetization of 34 oriented cores from Oligocene and early Miocene beds. After correcting for plunge of the geologic structure, the data are consistent with significant clockwise rotation (77° ± 7°) of the region relative to stable North America. Rotation of the western Transverse Ranges is generally viewed as a consequence of Pacific–North American plate interactions after 28 Ma, when east–west subduction gave way to northwest transform motion in southern California. Inclinations from the Piuma study indicate a paleolatitude anomaly of 11° ± 7° and are consistent with a mean northward drift that exceeds generally accepted San Andreas fault displacement by a factor of 3. However, sedimentary inclination error may accentuate the anomaly. Anisotropy of isothermal remanent magnetization indicates inclination flattening of approximately 8°, and correction for the effect reduces the paleolatitude anomaly to 5.3° ± 5.8°. Compaction may explain the inclination flattening in these sedimentary rocks, but the process does not adequately explain lower

  15. Slope-apron deposition in an ordovician arc-related setting: The Vuelta de Las Tolas Member (Suri Formation), Famatina Basin, northwest Argentina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangano, M.G.; Buatois, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Ordovician Suri Formation is part of the infill of the Famatina Basin of northwest Argentina, which formed in an active setting along the western margin of early Paleozoic Gondwana. The lower part of this formation, the Vuelta de Las Tolas Member, records sedimentation on a slope apron formed in an intra-arc basin situated on a flooded continental arc platform. The coincidence of a thick Arenig-Llanvirn sedimentary succession and volcanic-plutonic arc rocks suggests an extensional or transtensional arc setting, and is consistent with evidence of an extensional regime within the volcanic arc in the northern Puna region. The studied stratigraphic sections consist of volcanic rocks and six sedimentary facies. The facies can be clustered into four facies associations. Association 1, composed of facies A (laminated siltstones and mudstones) and B (massive mudstones and siltstones), is interpreted to have accumulated from silty-muddy high-and low-density turbidity currents and highly fluid, silty debris flows, with subsequent reworking by bottom currents, and to a lesser extent, hemipelagic suspension in an open-slope setting. Facies association 2 is dominated by facies C (current-rippled siltstones) strata. These deposits are interpreted to record overbank sedimentation from fine-grained turbidity currents. Facies E (matrix-supported volcanic breccias) interbedded with andesitic lava units comprises facies association 3. Deposition was contemporaneous with subaqueous volcanic activity, and accumulated from cohesive debris flows in a coarse-grained wedge at the base of slope. Facies association 4 is typified by facies D (vitric fine-grained sandstones and siltstones) and F (channelized and graded volcanic conglomerates and breccias) deposits. These strata commonly display thinning-and fining-upward trends, indicating sedimentation from highly-concentrated volcaniclastic turbidity currents in a channelized system. The general characteristics of these deposits of fresh

  16. Diagenetic Iron Cycling in Ancient Alkaline Saline Lacustrine Sedimentary Rocks: A Case Study on the Jurassic Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Colorado Plateau, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter-McIntyre, S. L.; Chan, M. A.; McPherson, B. J. O. L.

    2014-12-01

    The upper part of the Brushy Basin Member in the Four Corners region of the U.S. was deposited in an ephemeral alkaline saline lake system with copious input of volcanic ash. The variegated shale formation provides a setting for the study of early diagenetic iron cycling that records the action of alkaline saline fluid chemistries reacting with volcaniclastic sediments in the presence of microbes. A bull's-eye pattern of authigenic minerals with increasing alteration towards the basinal center similar to modern alkaline saline lakes provides evidence for an extreme paleoenvironmental interpretation. The purpose of this research is to document specific factors, such as reactive sediments, microbial influences, and grain size that affect concretion formation and iron cycling in an ancient extreme environment. Three broad diagenetic facies are interpreted by color and associated bioturbation features: red, green and intermediate. Diagenetic facies reflect meter-scale paleotopography: red facies represent shallow water to subaerial, oxidizing conditions; green facies reflect saturated conditions and reducing pore water chemistry shortly after deposition, and intermediate facies represent a combination of the previous two conditions. Evidence of biotic influence is abundant and trace fossils exhibit patterns associated with the diagenetic facies. Red diagenetic facies typically contain burrows and root traces and green diagenetic facies exhibit restricted biotic diversity typically limited to algal molds (vugs). Microbial fossils are well-preserved and are in close proximity to specific iron mineral textures suggesting biotic influence on the crystal morphology. Three categories of concretions are characterized based on mineralogy: carbonate, iron (oxyhydr)oxide and phosphate concretions. Concretion mineralogy and size vary within an outcrop and even within a stratigraphic horizon such that more than one main category is typically present in an outcrop. Variation in

  17. Magnetostratigraphy and Magnetic Mineralogy of the Ludlow Member of the Fort Union Formation (Lower Paleocene) of the Williston Basin in North Dakota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peppe, D. J.; Evans, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    A continuous succession of Cretaceous through lowermost Eocene terrestrial sediments contains a nearly complete Paleocene record, in the Little Missouri River Valley of North Dakota, USA. We aim to calibrate the rates of post-Cretaceous ecological recovery from mass extinction, by determining a detailed chronostratigraphy of plant and mammal fossils in the basin. Using the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-T) boundary as the basal datum, we have constructed a ca.300 meter composite section of the Upper Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation and the Lower Paleocene Ludlow Member of the Fort Union Formation. We analyzed paleomagnetic samples from 12 stratigraphic sections using a combined low-AF and thermal demagnetization strategy. Instability of magnetization above 200 °C has been reported in previous studies, which we reproduced when heating in air; however, when the samples were heated in nitrogen the stability field extended to well above 300 °C. The analyzed samples demonstrate a series of geomagnetic reversals that can be correlated from C29n through C27r of the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS). Bulk susceptibility vs. temperature studies on sandstone, siltstone, and carbonaceous shale indicate predominately irreversible curves suggesting titanomaghemite as the magnetic carrier in the Ludlow Member sediments. IRM acquisition in our samples consistently shows non-saturation above 100 mT indicating an additional anti-ferromagnetic component, most likely goethite. The dominant iron oxide in these samples, titanomaghemite, was generated either during weathering of the source terrain during Laramide uplift, or weathered in-situ prior to diagenesis, or during alteration after burial. We infer that the magnetization of the samples is primary because the polarity direction is consistent with that of the Paleocene of North America and the reversal stratigraphy from this section corresponds to the GPTS with reasonable sedimentation rates. Our results imply a temporal restriction

  18. Highly Seasonal and Perennial Fluvial Facies: Implications for Climatic Control on the Douglas Creek and Parachute Creek Members, Green River Formation, Southeastern Uinta Basin, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Ryan D.

    The early to middle Eocene Green River Formation consists of continental strata deposited in Laramide ponded basins in Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming. This study (1) documents fluvial and lacustrine strata from the Douglas Creek and Parachute Creek Members of the middle Green River Formation, southeastern Uinta Basin, Utah, and (2) uses new interpretations of the link between climate and fluvial sedimentary expression to interpret the terrestrial evolution of early Eocene climate. The stratigraphy was analyzed via outcrops along a 10 km transect in Main Canyon on the Tavaputs Plateau, and is divided into three distinct, stratigraphically separated depositional settings: (1) the lowermost Interval 1 is dominated by amalgamated sandstone channels that contain 70-100% upper flow regime sedimentary structures. The channels are interpreted to represent fluvial deposits controlled by a highly seasonal climate, where most deposition was limited to seasonal flooding events. (2) Interval 2 is dominated by alternating siliciclastic and carbonate lacustrine deposits, interpreted as local pulsed fluvial siliciclastic input into shallow Lake Uinta, and periods of fluvial quiescence represented by littoral carbonate deposition. (3) The uppermost Interval 3 is dominated by erosively-based, trough cross bedded sandstone channels interbedded with littoral lacustrine and deltaic deposits. The Interval 3 sandstone channels are interpreted as perennial fluvial deposits with relatively little variation in annual discharge, akin to modern humid-temperate fluvial systems. The stratigraphic transition from seasonally-controlled (Interval 1) to perennial (Interval 3) fluvial deposits is interpreted to represent a fundamental shift in Eocene climate, from the peak hyperthermal regime of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO) to a more stable post-EECO climate.

  19. Criteria for recognition and taphonomy of coprolites from the Serra da Galga Member, Marília Formation (Upper Cretaceous), Minas Gerais, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Fábio Antônio; Santucci, Rodrigo Miloni

    2017-10-01

    The Cretaceous sedimentary rocks from Uberaba, Minas Gerais, have provided a rich vertebrate fauna unearthed from rocks of the Serra da Galga Member, Marília Formation, Bauru Group, of Maastrichtian age. Together with these fossils, a large number of coprolites have also been found from two main localities, here called the Peirópolis and Serra da Galga sites. During field trips carried out in the last few years, 340 samples have been collected, prepared, and analyzed in laboratory. By using parameters such as weight, density, mineralogical composition, and content, we identified 199 coprolites and 141 inorganic nodules (pseudocoprolites). The coprolites have been divided into four morphotypes, which suggest their producers varied in feeding strategies and size. The taphonomic study, based on morphological characters such as wear, presence of pebbles or pebble marks, and desiccation cracks, suggests they underwent temporal and spatial-mixing, and that the material from the Peirópolis Site were transported essentially by alluvial processes (alluvial fans), whereas the material from the Serra da Galga Site were reworked mainly by fluvial streams. The same taphonomic processes may well have affected other fossils from these sites, which are highly abundant in the rocks of this area. Because of that, this taphonomic aspect becomes an important parameter to be taken into account in future studies on the biota of the region.

  20. Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical definition of oil-shale facies in the lower Parachute Creek Member of Green River Formation, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, R.D.

    1984-04-01

    Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of two drill cores penetrating the lower Saline zone of the Parachute Creek Member (middle L-4 oil-shale zone through upper R-2 zone) of the Green River Formation in north-central Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, indicate the presence of two distinct oil-shale facies. The most abundant facies has laminated stratification and frequently occurs in the L-4, L-3 and L-2 oil-shale zones. The second, and subordinate facies, has ''streaked and blebby'' stratification and is most abundant in the R-4, R-3 and R-2 zones. Laminated oil shale originated by slow, regular sedimentation during meromictic phases of ancient Lake Uinta, whereas streaked and blebby oil shale was deposited by episodic, non-channelized turbidity currents. Laminated oil shale has higher contents of nahcolite, dawsonite, quartz, K-feldspar and calcite, but less dolomite/ankerite and albite than streaked and blebby oil shale. Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate minerals in laminated oil shale have more variable compositions than those in streaked and blebby shales. Streaked and blebby oil shale has more kerogen and a greater diversity of kerogen particles than laminated oil shale. Such variations may produce different pyrolysis reactions when each shale type is retorted.

  1. Depositional environments in an alluvial-lacustrine system: molluscan paleoecology and lithofacies relations in upper part of Tongue River Member of Fort Union Formation, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, J.H.; Flores, R.M.

    1983-03-01

    The upper part of the Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation (Paleocene) in the northern Powder River basin, Wyoming, contains assemblages of excellently preserved nonmarine mollusks which occur in laterally continuous outcrops of diverse lithologic sequences and sedimentary structures. Three facies are recognized vertically within an alluvial-lacustrine system. The interfluvial lake and lake splay facies is characterized by sequences of coarsening-upward detritus, abundant continuous limestone beds, and few beds of discontinuous coal and continuous carbonaceous shale. Limestones contain two lacustrine mollusk assemblages: a locally reworked assemblage dominated by the bivalve Plesielliptio (two species), and the gastropods Viviparus, Lioplacodes (three species), and Clenchiella; and a quite-water assemblage dominated by sphaeriid bivalves. The interfluvial crevasse splay-crevasse channel facies is characterized by sequences of coarsening-upward detritus and few discontinuous limestone beds, separated vertically by thick, continuous coal and carbonaceous shale beds. This facies includes small crevasse channel sandstones which scour into splay sandstones. Biofabric of lacustrine mollusk assemblages, which are identical in composition (but with dwarfed species of Plesielliptio) to locally reworked lacustrine assemblages of the interfluvial lake and lake splay facies, reflects deterioration of lakes through active infilling by crevasses. The fluvial channel and interchannel facies is typified by thick channel sandstones laterally separated by sequences of coarsening-upward detritus, overbank sediments, and rare limestones. This facies includes thick, continuous coal and carbonaceous shale beds.

  2. Fishes and tetrapods in the upper pennsylvanian (kasimovian) cohn coal member of the mattoon formation of illinois, United States: Systematics, paleoecology, and paleoenvironments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, D.; Falcon-Lang, H. J.; Benton, M.J.; Nelson, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    A newly discovered vertebrate assemblage is reported from the Upper Pennsylvanian (mid-to upper Kasimovian) Cohn Coal Member of the Mattoon Formation of southeast Illinois, United States. Teeth, scales, and spines of xenacanth (Dicentrodus, Orthacanthus, Triodus, Xenacanthus) and euselachian (Sphenacanthus) sharks dominate the assemblage. Less common are the teeth, scales, and centra of holocephalan (Helodus) and actinopterygian fishes, together with rare tetrapod (mainly pelycosaur) phalanges and centra. The assemblage occurs within a broad, shallow channel incised into a prominent Vertisol. The channel is interpreted as having been cut during a seasonally dry glacial phase when sea level was low, but filled during a subsequent transgression triggered by deglaciation. We interpret this as a brackish water (estuarine) assemblage, based on the co-occurrence of the vertebrate material with spirorbids (putative microconchids) and paleoecological inferences gleaned from a critical analysis of the literature dealing with Pennsylvanian fish ecology. This interpretation is broadly consistent with taphonomic data and the results of 87Sr/86Sr isotope analysis of shark material. The pelycosaur material may have been reworked from the lowstand Vertisol, however, and these animals occupied dryland niches that developed during glacial phases. ?? 2011 SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  3. Use of geophysical logs in recognizing depositional environments in the Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation, Powder River area, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, R.M.; Toth, J.C.; Moore, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    The environmental conditions under which rocks in the Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation were deposited in the Powder River area, Wyoming and Montana, can be determined using geophysical logs with some limitations. It is widely recognized that gamma ray and density logs are useful in identifying thickness and stratigraphic position of coal beds. In addition, gamma ray and electrical resistivity logs can be used to infer conditions of transportation and deposition of sandstones, siltstones, and other rock types. In particular, intensity responses of the gamma ray and resistance logs provide a clue to variations of grain size such as fining-upward and coarsening-upward characteristics of fluvial channel and crevasse splay deposits, respectively. These signatures in the geophysical logs are readily observed for some beds; for other beds however, the depositional conditions are difficult to determine because the beds do not produce clear-cut log-response patterns. Thus,. analysis of the environments of deposition of detrital rocks in drill holes can be made more accurate by a study of stratigraphically equivalent intervals in outcrops near drill-hole sites.

  4. Tonsteins and clay-rich layers in coal-bearing intervals of the Eocene Gibbons Creek Member, Manning Formation, east-central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppert, L.F.; Warwick, P.D.

    1994-09-01

    Samples from five clay-rich layers collected from the coal-bearing interval in the upper part of the Eocene Gibbons Creek member of the Manning Formation were mounted in epoxy, polished, and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence to determine their origin. Two layers were from surface-mine exposures of the 3500 bed near Bryan, Texas, and the other layers were from an exposure of a correlative interval at the Lake Somerville Spillway about 60 km southwest of Bryan. Preliminary data suggest that both a 2-cm-thick claystone from the upper part of the 3500 bed and the upper part of an 11-cm-thick mudstone from the floor of the lower coal bed at the spillway may be derived from volcanic ash falls. Both possible tonsteins are composed of kaolinite and accessory quartz, euhedral to subhedral zircon, feldspars, and Al phosphates (crandallite?). Only K-feldspars were observed in the parting from the 3500 bed, whereas both alkali and plagioclase feldspars, as well as high-Ti biotites, were observed in the sample from the spillway. These compositional differences are suggestive of two separate volcanic sources. Because waterborne, recycled volcanic minerals could have been brought into the paleopeat swamps, we must examine the associated minerals from these sites to verify ash-fall origins. The other layers contain textures that are more suggestive of detrital rather than ash-fall origin; rounded to subrounded zircons and feldspars are present as accessory minerals.

  5. A REVISED AGE FOR UPPER SCORPIUS AND THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY AMONG THE F-TYPE MEMBERS OF THE SCORPIUS-CENTAURUS OB ASSOCIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pecaut, Mark J.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Bubar, Eric J.

    2012-02-20

    We present an analysis of the ages and star formation history of the F-type stars in the Upper Scorpius (US), Upper Centaurus-Lupus (UCL), and Lower Centaurus-Crux (LCC) subgroups of Scorpius-Centaurus (Sco-Cen), the nearest OB association. Our parent sample is the kinematically selected Hipparcos sample of de Zeeuw et al., restricted to the 138 F-type members. We have obtained classification-resolution optical spectra and have also determined the spectroscopic accretion disk fraction. With Hipparcos and 2MASS photometry, we estimate the reddening and extinction for each star and place the candidate members on a theoretical H-R diagram. For each subgroup we construct empirical isochrones and compare to published evolutionary tracks. We find that (1) our empirical isochrones are consistent with the previously published age-rank of the Sco-Cen subgroups; (2) subgroups LCC and UCL appear to reach the main-sequence turn-on at spectral types {approx}F4 and {approx}F2, respectively. An analysis of the A-type stars shows US reaching the main sequence at about spectral type {approx}A3. (3) The median ages for the pre-main-sequence members of UCL and LCC are 16 Myr and 17 Myr, respectively, in agreement with previous studies, however we find that (4) Upper Sco is much older than previously thought. The luminosities of the F-type stars in US are typically a factor of {approx}2.5 less luminous than predicted for a 5 Myr old population for four sets of evolutionary tracks. We re-examine the evolutionary state and isochronal ages for the B-, A-, and G-type Upper Sco members, as well as the evolved M supergiant Antares, and estimate a revised mean age for Upper Sco of 11 {+-} 1 {+-} 2 Myr (statistical, systematic). Using radial velocities and Hipparcos parallaxes we calculate a lower limit on the kinematic expansion age for Upper Sco of >10.5 Myr (99% confidence). However, the data are statistically consistent with no expansion. We reevaluate the inferred masses for the known

  6. A Revised Age for Upper Scorpius and the Star Formation History among the F-type Members of the Scorpius-Centaurus OB Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecaut, Mark J.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Bubar, Eric J.

    2012-02-01

    We present an analysis of the ages and star formation history of the F-type stars in the Upper Scorpius (US), Upper Centaurus-Lupus (UCL), and Lower Centaurus-Crux (LCC) subgroups of Scorpius-Centaurus (Sco-Cen), the nearest OB association. Our parent sample is the kinematically selected Hipparcos sample of de Zeeuw et al., restricted to the 138 F-type members. We have obtained classification-resolution optical spectra and have also determined the spectroscopic accretion disk fraction. With Hipparcos and 2MASS photometry, we estimate the reddening and extinction for each star and place the candidate members on a theoretical H-R diagram. For each subgroup we construct empirical isochrones and compare to published evolutionary tracks. We find that (1) our empirical isochrones are consistent with the previously published age-rank of the Sco-Cen subgroups; (2) subgroups LCC and UCL appear to reach the main-sequence turn-on at spectral types ~F4 and ~F2, respectively. An analysis of the A-type stars shows US reaching the main sequence at about spectral type ~A3. (3) The median ages for the pre-main-sequence members of UCL and LCC are 16 Myr and 17 Myr, respectively, in agreement with previous studies, however we find that (4) Upper Sco is much older than previously thought. The luminosities of the F-type stars in US are typically a factor of ~2.5 less luminous than predicted for a 5 Myr old population for four sets of evolutionary tracks. We re-examine the evolutionary state and isochronal ages for the B-, A-, and G-type Upper Sco members, as well as the evolved M supergiant Antares, and estimate a revised mean age for Upper Sco of 11 ± 1 ± 2 Myr (statistical, systematic). Using radial velocities and Hipparcos parallaxes we calculate a lower limit on the kinematic expansion age for Upper Sco of >10.5 Myr (99% confidence). However, the data are statistically consistent with no expansion. We reevaluate the inferred masses for the known substellar companions in Upper Sco

  7. Controls on synchronous ephemeral- and perennial-river sedimentation in the middle sandstone member of the Triassic Chinle Formation, northeastern New Mexico, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deluca, J. L.; Eriksson, K. A.

    1989-02-01

    The middle sandstone member of the upper Triassic Chinle Formation in northeastern New Mexico consists of ephemeral-river deposits along the Front Range adjacent to the Ancestral Rocky Mountains and perennial braided-river deposits on the Plains to the east. The two fluvial systems were synchronous; the ephemeral rivers existed as transverse tributaries to a perennial trunk system that flowed from south to north. Proximal ephemeral-stream deposits are characterized by 60-80 m thick sequences of coarse-grained, siliciclastic sediments deposited principally by overbank sheetflooding. Facies associations are dominated by sandstone with horizontal stratification and subordinate sets of tabular-tangential and trough cross-stratification. Incised streamflood deposits are represented by channeled conglomerates and single-story, massive and trough cross-stratified sandstones. Distal ephemeral-stream deposits are distinguished by their lenticular geometries, thicknesses of 20-30 m, and sedimentary structures indicative mainly of lower-flow-regime stream flooding. Channeled conglomerates and trough cross-stratified and parallel-stratified sandstones are capped by trough cross-laminated and subordinate horizontally stratified sandstones. Facies associations in the deposits of the trunk system are comparable to those of the Platte and South Saskatchewan braided rivers. Sets and cosets of tabular-tangential or trough cross-stratified conglomerate and sandstone are separated by variable thicknesses of horizontally stratidied sandstone. These facies dominate 10-30 m thick, sheet-like, siliciclastic bodies that are traceable laterally for tens of kilometers and are separated by comparable or lesser thicknesses of red mudstone. Both extrabasinal (allocyclic) and intrabasinal (autocyclic) controls influenced sandstone body geometries in the middle Chinle Formation. Uplift and subsidence determined the position of base level that, in turn, determined the nature of autocyclic

  8. Anachronistic facies from a drowned Lower Triassic carbonate platform: Lower member of the Alwa Formation (Ba'id Exotic), Oman Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Adam D.; Baud, Aymon

    2008-09-01

    The lower member of the Alwa Formation (Lower Olenekian), found within the Ba'id Exotic in the Oman Mountains (Sultanate of Oman), consists of ammonoid-bearing, pelagic limestones that were deposited on an isolated, drowned carbonate platform on the Neotethyan Gondwana margin. The strata contain a variety of unusual carbonate textures and features, including thrombolites, Frutexites-bearing microbialites that contain synsedimentary cements, matrix-free breccias surrounded by isopachous calcite cement, and fissures and cavities filled with large botryoidal cements. Thrombolites are found throughout the study interval, and occur as 0.5-1.0 m thick lenses or beds that contain laterally laterally-linked stromatactis cavities. The Frutexites-bearing microbialites occur less frequently, and also form lenses or beds, up to 30 cm thick; the microbialites may be laminated, and often developed on hardgrounds. In addition, the Frutexites-bearing microbialites also contain synsedimentary calcite cement crusts and botryoids (typically < 1 cm thick) that harbour layers or pockets of what appear to be bacterial sheaths and coccoids, and are indicative of biologically mediated precipitation of the cement bodies. Slumping following lithification led to fracturing of the limestone and the precipitation of large, botryoidal aragonite cements in fissures that cut across the primary fabric. Environmental conditions, specifically palaeoxygenation and the degree of calcium carbonate supersaturation, likely controlled whether the thrombolites (high level of calcium carbonate supersaturation associated with vertical mixing of water masses and dysoxic conditions) or Frutexites-bearing microbialites (low level of calcium carbonate supersaturation associated with anoxic conditions and deposition below a stable chemocline) formed. The results of this study point to continued environmental stress in the region during the Early Triassic that likely contributed to the uneven recovery from the

  9. Provenance of the Tullock member of the Fort Union formation, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana: Evidence for early Paleocene Laramide uplift

    SciTech Connect

    Hansley, P.L.; Brown, J.L. )

    1993-01-01

    A petrologic and provenance study of the lower Paleocene Tullock Member of the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin (PRB) indicates that Laramide uplifts to the west and south of the PRB were emergent and shedding detritus by early Paleocene time. This conclusion is based largely on the presence of abundant first-cycle carbonate clasts in the northwestern PRB and metamorphic and igneous clasts and labile heavy-mineral grains in the Tullock throughout the basin. The proximity and composition of the north end of the Bighorn uplift strongly suggest that is was the source for carbonate, igneous, and metamorphic rock fragments in northwestern Tullock outcrops. Lack of conglomeratic material in northwestern outcrops, however, indicates that the Bighorn uplift was not yet well developed and perhaps the Pryor Mountains uplift farther to the west was contributing some detritus. In the southern PRB, abundant labile heavy minerals and igneous rock fragments in the Tullock indicate that other uplifts to the west and south (i.e. Granite Mountains, Washakie, Owl Creek, and Laramie uplifts) had also started to rise by early Paleocene time. Paleocurrent directions show that Tullock streams flowed generally east-northeast across a gently sloping alluvial plain toward the retreating Cannonball sea, suggesting that the Black Hills were not yet emergent and, as a result, the basin had not fully developed. Our conclusions are supported by recent fission-track, palynological, and sedimentological studies that indicate that Laramide-style forland deformation in southwestern Montana began in late Cenomanian to Turonian time and migrated through central Wyoming to the Colorado Front Range by late Maastrichtian time. 37 refs., 8 figs., 3 tab.

  10. Pleistocene fossil woods from the Okote Member, site FwJj 14 in the Ileret region, Koobi Fora Formation, northern Kenya.

    PubMed

    Bamford, Marion K

    2017-09-04

    On the eastern side of Lake Turkana in northern Kenya are extensive Plio-Pleistocene deposits containing a rich diversity of fossil mammals, hominins and flora within the radiometrically dated tuffaceous, lacustrine and fluvial sequence. Reconstruction of this landscape and paleoenvironment are part of an ongoing multinational and multidisciplinary human evolution project in the eastern Turkana Basin. Today there is a huge lake in the Rift Valley but it has fluctuated since the early Pliocene. Silicified wood is fairly common in some areas of the Koobi Fora Formation. One such site is FwJj 14E, alongside one of the tributaries of the Ileret River. Hominin hand and arm bones have been excavated from here in the Okote Member and dated at 1.56-1.36 Ma. The fossils are associated with hominin and bovid footprints. Sixty of the over 100 wood specimens collected have been sectioned and studied. In general the woods have large vessels and an average vulnerability index of 40, which implies a mesic megathermal environment with no water stress. Taxonomically the woods belong to large African families: Caesalpiniaceae (Didelotia idae), Combretaceae (Anogeissus sp.), Putranjivaceae (Euphorbiaceae; Drypetes sp.), Lamiaceae (cf Premna sp.), Malvaceae (Heritiera sp.) and Sapindaceae (Sapindoxylon sp.). Most of these taxa do not occur in the area today because now it is much drier and the local vegetation is predominantly Acacia-Commiphora-Salvadora shrubland. The reconstruction of the paleovegetation supports the interpretation from the fauna, namely, a tall riverine forest with shady refuge trees, possibly some edible fruits, and wooded grassland and more open bushland in the vicinity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A complex Quaternary ignimbrite-forming phonolitic eruption: the Poris Member of the Diego Hernández Formation (Tenerife, Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgar, C. J.; Wolff, J. A.; Nichols, H. J.; Cas, R. A. F.; Martí, J.

    2002-11-01

    The Poris Member (0.28 Ma) of the Diego Hernández Formation (Tenerife, Canary Islands) is a widespread succession of plinian fall, surge and non-welded ignimbrite deposits. It was erupted from the northeastern sector of the multicyclic Las Cañadas Caldera, the summit caldera complex of the Las Cañadas Edifice. We present new stratigraphic data which allow the evolution of the eruption to be divided into six main stages: (1) an initial surge-producing phreatomagmatic phase. (2) Generation of a buoyant plinian column culminating in vent-wall collapse and temporary vent blockage. (3) A resumption of phreatomagmatic activity, producing accretionary lapilli-bearing ash surges and a phreatomagmatic ignimbrite. (4) Sustained column collapse, resulting in the progressive aggradation of a complex, compositionally layered ignimbrite sequence. (5) A late plinian phase marked by sharp chemical zonation. (6) Final vent destruction and the generation of multiple surges and pyroclastic flows. Volume calculations indicate a total erupted volume in the order of 13-14 km 3 (3-4 km 3 dense rock equivalent), which together with facies and lithic analysis implies that a small-scale caldera collapse occurred, contributing to the incremental enlargement of the Las Cañadas Caldera. The geochemistry and mingling inter-relationships of four magmatic endmembers, ranging from alkaline mafic to evolved phonolitic liquids, indicate that two magma chambers fed stages 4 and 5 of the eruption sequence. The eruption was triggered when mafic magma intruded the two-chamber system.

  12. Maps showing coal-split boundaries, isopachs of coal splits, coal resources, and coal quality; Mammoth coal bed, Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation, Bull Mountain coal field, south-central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    A U.S. Geological Survey Maps are presented showing coal-split boundaries, isopachs of coal splits, coal resources, and coal quality; mammoth coal bed, Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation, Bull Mountain coal field, south-central Montana.

  13. Elastomeric member

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, L.O.

    1985-07-30

    An energy storage device is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member disposed within a tubular housing, which elastomeric member is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section, and transition end sections, attached to rigid end piece assemblies of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member, a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing. Each of the transition sections are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond there between. During manufacture, the sleeves are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section to provide the correct profile and helix angle. 12 figs.

  14. Elastomeric member

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, Lyle O.

    1985-01-01

    An energy storage device (10) is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member (16) disposed within a tubular housing (14), which elastomeric member (16) is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member (16) is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section (74), and transition end sections (76, 78), attached to rigid end piece assemblies (22, 24) of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections (76, 78) are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member (16), a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing (14). Each of the transition sections (76, 78) are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve (26, 28) having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve (26, 28) also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween. During manufacture, the sleeves (26, 28) are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section (76, 78) to provide the correct profile and helix angle.

  15. Water utilization of the Cretaceous Mussentuchit Member local vertebrate fauna, Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah, USA: Using oxygen isotopic composition of phosphate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suarez, C.A.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Cifelli, R.L.; Tremain, E.

    2012-01-01

    While the oxygen isotopic composition of pedogenic carbonate has successfully been used to address the effects of global climate change on the hydrologic cycle, detailed regional paleohydrologic studies are lacking. Since the hydrologic cycle can vary extensively on local or regional scales due to events such as such as mountain building, and since pedogenic carbonates (calcite) form in a narrow moisture regime, other proxies, such as vertebrate remains, must be used to decipher local versus regional variations in paleohydrology. In this study, the oxygen isotopic composition (?? 18O p) of phosphatic remains from a diverse set of vertebrate fossils (fish, turtles, crocodiles, dinosaurs, and micro-mammals) from the Mussentuchit Member (MM) of the Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah, USA (Aptian to Cenomanian) are analyzed in order to determine differences among the available water reservoirs and water utilization of each taxon. Calculated changes in water reservoir ?? 18O w over time are then used to determine the effects of the incursion of the Western Interior Seaway (WIS) and the Sevier Mountains on paleohydrology during the MM time. Calculation of ?? 18O w from the results of isotopic analysis of phosphate oxygen suggests that turtles and crocodiles serve as another proxy for meteoric water ?? 18O that can be used as a measure of average local precipitation ?? 18O w similar to pedogenic calcite. Pedogenic calcites can be slightly biased toward higher values, however, due to their formation during evaporative conditions. Turtles and crocodiles can be used in place of pedogenic calcite in environments that are not conducive to pedogenic carbonate formation. Remains of fish with rounded tooth morphology have ?? 18O p values that predict temperatures consistent with other estimates of mean annual temperature for this latitude and time. The ?? 18O p of ganoid scales and teeth with pointed morphology, however, indicates that these skeletal materials were precipitated from

  16. Supporting members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Life Supporting Members L. Thomas Aldrich Thomas D. Barrow Hugh J . A. Chivers Allan V. Cox Samuel S. Goldich Pembroke J. Hart A. Ivan Johnson Helmut E. Landsberg Paolo Lanzano Murli H. Manghnani L. L. Nettleton Charles B. Officer Hyman Orlin Ned A. Ostenso Erick O. Schonstedt Waldo E. Smith Athelstan Spilhaus A. F. Spilhaus, Jr. John W. Townsend, Jr. James A. Van Allen Leonard W. Weis Charles A. Whitten J. Tuzo Wilson

  17. Description of Cretaceous Sedimentary Sequence of the Second and Third Member of the Qingshankou Formation Recovered by CCSD-SK-Is Borehole in Songliao Basin: Lithostratigraphy, Sedimentary Facies and Cyclic Stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pujun; Gao, Youfeng; Cheng, Rihui; Wang, Guodong; Wu, Heyong; Wan, Xiaoqiao; Yang, Gansheng; Wang, Zhongxing

    The second and third member of the Qingshankou Formation recovered by CCSD-SK-Is borehole (China Cretaceous Continental Scientific Drilling-SongkeI-the south borehole) is 415.61 m long and 100% of cores recovery. The age of the member corresponds approximately to the Coniacian. The sequence and process of lithology-lithofacies and cyclic stratigraphy were revealed by a detailed core description. 12 rock types and 2 kinds of sedimentary subfacies including semi-deep lake and shallow lake were recognized from the drilling core of the second and third member of the Qingshankou Formation. 10 sedimentary microfacies are present, including dolomite, marl, limestone, oil shale, semi-deep lake turbidite, volcanic ash, seismite, semi-deep lake mudstone, shallow lake mudstone, and shallow lake turbidite microfacies. The second and third member of the Qingshankou Formation represents 422 meter-scale cycles (sixth-order cycle), 130 fifth-order cycles, 21 fourth-order cycles, and one third-order cycles. The special lithologies, such as mudstone, seismite, dolomite, volcanic ash, and so on are important to researches on source rocks and lacustrine event sediments.

  18. Preliminary mineralogical characterization of weathered and less-weathered strata of the Meade Peak phosphatic shale member of the Permian Phosphoria Formation: measured sections C and D, Dry Valley, Caribou County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knudsen, Andrew C.; Gunter, Mickey E.; Herring, James R.

    2001-01-01

    This study used powder X-ray diffraction, with Rietveld quantification software to quantify and characterize the mineralogy of the 83 samples collected from two stratigraphic sections measured by the U.S. Geological Survey at the Dry Valley mine in the Meade Peak Member of the Phosphoria Formation. Analyses show extensive variability of carbonate substitution in the fluorapatite structure, determined by measuring the apatite a-cell dimension, as well as patterns of correlation between mineralogy and the stratigraphy.

  19. Imaging the Ferron Member of the Mancos Shale formation using reprocessed high-resolution 2-D seismic reflection data: Emery County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Late in 1982 and early in 1983, Arco Exploration contracted with Rocky Mountain Geophysical to acquired four high-resolution 2-D multichannel seismic reflection lines in Emery County, Utah. The primary goal in acquiring this data was an attempt to image the Ferron Member of the Upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale. Design of the high-resolution 2-D seismic reflection data acquisition used both a short geophone group interval and a short sample interval. An explosive energy source was used which provided an input pulse with broad frequency content and higher frequencies than typical non-explosive Vibroseis?? sources. Reflections produced by using this high-frequency energy source when sampled at a short interval are usually able to resolve shallow horizons that are relatively thin compared to those that can be resolved using more typical oil and gas exploration seismic reflection methods.The U.S. Geological Survey-Energy Resources Program, Geophysical Processing Group used the processing sequence originally applied by Arco in 1984 as a guide and experimented with processing steps applied in a different order using slightly different parameters in an effort to improve imaging the Ferron Member horizon. As with the Arco processed data there are sections along all four seismic lines where the data quality cannot be improved upon, and in fact the data quality is so poor that the Ferron horizon cannot be imaged at all.Interpretation of the seismic and core hole data indicates that the Ferron Member in the study area represent a deltaic sequence including delta front, lower delta plain, and upper delta plain environments. Correlating the depositional environments for the Ferron Member as indicated in the core holes with the thickness of Ferron Member suggests the presence of a delta lobe running from the northwest to the southeast through the study area. The presence of a deltaic channel system within the delta lobe complex might prove to be an interesting conventional

  20. Elite Formation in the Higher Education Systems of Ireland and the UK: Measuring, Comparing and Decomposing Longitudinal Patterns of Cabinet Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeney, Sharon; Hogan, John; O'Rourke, Brendan K.

    2017-01-01

    The role of higher education systems in the formation and reproduction of governing elites, and their countervailing potential for the creation of a more egalitarian, or meritocratic, society, has been an enduring subject of concern, debate and research. Many of these debates are made all the more difficult by our inability to directly compare…

  1. Foraminiferal biofacies in the San José Calcareous Silt Member (Manzanilla Formation, Upper Miocene to Lower Pliocene) in the Manzanilla Bay area, north-east Trinidad, and their environmental significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Brent

    2013-10-01

    The Miocene-Pliocene Manzanilla Formation of northern Trinidad marks the arrival of the east-west flowing Orinoco River. Foraminifera were examined quantitatively in samples obtained at ˜5 m intervals from the lowest member of the formation, the San José Calcareous Silt Member, where exposed at eastern Manzanilla Bay and Point Noir. Recovery of Globorotalia merotumida indicates an age within the Globorotalia acostaensis Zone through Globorotalia margaritae evoluta Subzone, (N16-N19). Values of the information function (H) and the percentage of the total assemblage as planktonic foraminifera (%P), both traditionally used as palaeodepth indicators, were uncorrelated. The low values of H are indicative of freshwater influence. Cluster analysis revealed two major biofacies dominated by Pseudononion atlanticum and Hanzawaia carstensi respectively, for which similar values of mean H and mean %P suggest similar, inner to middle neritic palaeodepths, the P. atlanticum Biofacies indicating times of hypoxia. Entrained within these were rarer samples from a biofacies indicative of shallowing and increased freshwater input (Ammonia parkinsonia gr. Biofacies). An Amphistegina gibbosa Biofacies marked an interval in which water because sufficiently clear to support foraminifera symbiotic with algae, while a sample containing only Haplophragmoides wilberti was indicative of intertidal conditions. Some samples containing reddened foraminifera showed that deposition occasionally became very slow, but these were not limited to any one biofacies. The range of palaeodepths in which the San José Calcareous Silt Member was deposited is far less than in the underlying Brasso Formation, indicating that tectonic induction of transgressive-regressive cycles was slighter during San José times.

  2. A theoretical model investigation of peptide bond formation involving two water molecules in ribosome supports the two-step and eight membered ring mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Gao, Jun; Zhang, Dongju; Liu, Chengbu

    2015-04-01

    The ribosome is the macromolecular machine that catalyzes protein synthesis. The kinetic isotope effect analysis reported by Strobel group supports the two-step mechanism. However, the destination of the proton originating from the nucleophilic amine is uncertain. A computational simulation of different mechanisms including water molecules is carried out using the same reaction model and theoretical level. Formation the tetrahedral intermediate with proton transfer from nucleophilic nitrogen, is the rate-limiting step when two water molecules participate in peptide bond formation. The first water molecule forming hydrogen bonds with O9‧ and H15‧ in the A site can decrease the reaction barriers. Combined with results of the solvent isotope effects analysis, we conclude that the three-proton transfer mechanism in which water molecule mediate the proton shuttle between amino and carbon oxygen in rate-limiting step is the favorable mechanism. Our results will shield light on a better understand the reaction mechanism of ribosome.

  3. A Member of the PLEIOTROPIC DRUG RESISTANCE Family of ATP Binding Cassette Transporters Is Required for the Formation of a Functional Cuticle in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Bessire, Michael; Borel, Sandra; Fabre, Guillaume; Carraça, Luis; Efremova, Nadia; Yephremov, Alexander; Cao, Yan; Jetter, Reinhard; Jacquat, Anne-Claude; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; Nawrath, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    Although the multilayered structure of the plant cuticle was discovered many years ago, the molecular basis of its formation and the functional relevance of the layers are not understood. Here, we present the permeable cuticle1 (pec1) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, which displays features associated with a highly permeable cuticle in several organs. In pec1 flowers, typical cutin monomers, such as ω-hydroxylated fatty acids and 10,16-dihydroxypalmitate, are reduced to 40% of wild-type levels and are accompanied by the appearance of lipidic inclusions within the epidermal cell. The cuticular layer of the cell wall, rather than the cuticle proper, is structurally altered in pec1 petals. Therefore, a significant role for the formation of the diffusion barrier in petals can be attributed to this layer. Thus, pec1 defines a new class of mutants. The phenotypes of the pec1 mutant are caused by the knockout of ATP BINDING CASSETTEG32 (ABCG32), an ABC transporter from the PLEIOTROPIC DRUG RESISTANCE family that is localized at the plasma membrane of epidermal cells in a polar manner toward the surface of the organs. Our results suggest that ABCG32 is involved in the formation of the cuticular layer of the cell wall, most likely by exporting particular cutin precursors from the epidermal cell. PMID:21628525

  4. A member of the PLEIOTROPIC DRUG RESISTANCE family of ATP binding cassette transporters is required for the formation of a functional cuticle in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bessire, Michael; Borel, Sandra; Fabre, Guillaume; Carraça, Luis; Efremova, Nadia; Yephremov, Alexander; Cao, Yan; Jetter, Reinhard; Jacquat, Anne-Claude; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; Nawrath, Christiane

    2011-05-01

    Although the multilayered structure of the plant cuticle was discovered many years ago, the molecular basis of its formation and the functional relevance of the layers are not understood. Here, we present the permeable cuticle1 (pec1) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, which displays features associated with a highly permeable cuticle in several organs. In pec1 flowers, typical cutin monomers, such as ω-hydroxylated fatty acids and 10,16-dihydroxypalmitate, are reduced to 40% of wild-type levels and are accompanied by the appearance of lipidic inclusions within the epidermal cell. The cuticular layer of the cell wall, rather than the cuticle proper, is structurally altered in pec1 petals. Therefore, a significant role for the formation of the diffusion barrier in petals can be attributed to this layer. Thus, pec1 defines a new class of mutants. The phenotypes of the pec1 mutant are caused by the knockout of ATP BINDING CASSETTEG32 (ABCG32), an ABC transporter from the PLEIOTROPIC DRUG RESISTANCE family that is localized at the plasma membrane of epidermal cells in a polar manner toward the surface of the organs. Our results suggest that ABCG32 is involved in the formation of the cuticular layer of the cell wall, most likely by exporting particular cutin precursors from the epidermal cell.

  5. The nuclear hormone receptor family member NR5A2 controls aspects of multipotent progenitor cell formation and acinar differentiation during pancreatic organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Michael A.; Swift, Galvin H.; Hoang, Chinh Q.; Deering, Tye G.; Masui, Toshi; Lee, Youn-Kyoung; Xue, Jumin; MacDonald, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor NR5A2 is necessary for the stem-like properties of the epiblast of the pre-gastrulation embryo and for cellular and physiological homeostasis of endoderm-derived organs postnatally. Using conditional gene inactivation, we show that Nr5a2 also plays crucial regulatory roles during organogenesis. During the formation of the pancreas, Nr5a2 is necessary for the expansion of the nascent pancreatic epithelium, for the subsequent formation of the multipotent progenitor cell (MPC) population that gives rise to pre-acinar cells and bipotent cells with ductal and islet endocrine potential, and for the formation and differentiation of acinar cells. At birth, the NR5A2-deficient pancreas has defects in all three epithelial tissues: a partial loss of endocrine cells, a disrupted ductal tree and a >90% deficit of acini. The acinar defects are due to a combination of fewer MPCs, deficient allocation of those MPCs to pre-acinar fate, disruption of acinar morphogenesis and incomplete acinar cell differentiation. NR5A2 controls these developmental processes directly as well as through regulatory interactions with other pancreatic transcriptional regulators, including PTF1A, MYC, GATA4, FOXA2, RBPJL and MIST1 (BHLHA15). In particular, Nr5a2 and Ptf1a establish mutually reinforcing regulatory interactions and collaborate to control developmentally regulated pancreatic genes by binding to shared transcriptional regulatory regions. At the final stage of acinar cell development, the absence of NR5A2 affects the expression of Ptf1a and its acinar specific partner Rbpjl, so that the few acinar cells that form do not complete differentiation. Nr5a2 controls several temporally distinct stages of pancreatic development that involve regulatory mechanisms relevant to pancreatic oncogenesis and the maintenance of the exocrine phenotype. PMID:25063451

  6. A new method for recovering paleoporosity of sandstone: case study of middle Es3 member of Paleogene formation in Niuzhuang Sag, Dongying Depression, Bohai Bay Basin in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingjie; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Biao; Sun, Xiaoming; Guo, Jigang

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new method for recovering paleoporosity of sandstone reservoirs and quantitatively defines the evolution process of porosity. This method is based on the principle that the present is the key to the past. We take the middle Es3 member in Niuzhuang Sag, Dongying Depression, and Bohai Bay Basin as an example. The method used in this study considers the present porosity as a constraint condition, and the influences of both constructive diagenesis and destructive diagenesis to divide the porosity evolution process into two independent processes, namely porosity increase and porosity decrease. An evolution model of sandstone porosity can be established by combining both the pore increase and pore decrease effects. Our study reveals that the porosity decrease model is a continuous function of burial depth and burial time, whereas the porosity increase model mainly occurs in an acidified window for paleotemperature of 70°C to 90°C. The porosity evolution process can be divided into the following phases: normal compaction, acidification and pore increase, and post-acidification compaction. Thus, the porosity evolution model becomes a piecewise function of three subsections. Examples show that the method can be applied effectively in recovering the paleoporosity of sandstone reservoirs and simulating the porosity evolution process.

  7. An RNAi screen identifies additional members of the Drosophila Integrator complex and a requirement for cyclin C/Cdk8 in snRNA 3′-end formation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiandong; Ezzeddine, Nader; Waltenspiel, Bernhard; Albrecht, Todd R.; Warren, William D.; Marzluff, William F.; Wagner, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Formation of the 3′ end of RNA polymerase II–transcribed snRNAs requires a poorly understood group of proteins called the Integrator complex. Here we used a fluorescence-based read-through reporter that expresses GFP in response to snRNA misprocessing and performed a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila S2 cells to identify novel factors required for snRNA 3′-end formation. In addition to the known Integrator complex members, we identified Asunder and CG4785 as additional Integrator subunits. Functional and biochemical experiments revealed that Asunder and CG4785 are additional core members of the Integrator complex. We also identified a conserved requirement in both fly and human snRNA 3′-end processing for cyclin C and Cdk8 that is distinct from their function in the Mediator Cdk8 module. Moreover, we observed biochemical association between Integrator proteins and cyclin C/Cdk8, and that overexpression of a kinase-dead Cdk8 causes snRNA misprocessing. These data functionally define the Drosophila Integrator complex and demonstrate an additional function for cyclin C/Cdk8 unrelated to its function in Mediator. PMID:23097424

  8. Systematic analysis of O-methyltransferase gene family and identification of potential members involved in the formation of O-methylated flavonoids in Citrus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaogang; Luo, Yan; Wu, Hongkun; Xi, Wanpeng; Yu, Jie; Zhang, Qiuyun; Zhou, Zhiqin

    2016-01-10

    The O-methylation of various secondary metabolites is mainly catalyzed by S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-dependent O-methyltransferase (OMT) proteins that are encoded by the O-methyltransferase gene family. Citrus fruits are a rich source of O-methylated flavonoids that have a broad spectrum of biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic, and antiatherogenic properties. However, little is known about this gene family and its members that are involved in the O-methylation of flavonoids and their regulation in Citrus. In this study, 58 OMT genes were identified from the entire Citrus sinensis genome and compared with those from 3 other representative dicot plants. A comprehensive analysis was performed, including functional/substrate predictions, identification of chromosomal locations, phylogenetic relationships, gene structures, and conserved motifs. Distribution mapping revealed that the 58 OMT genes were unevenly distributed on the 9 citrus chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis of 164 OMT proteins from C.sinensis, Arabidopsis thaliana, Populus trichocarpa, and Vitis vinifera showed that these proteins were categorized into group I (COMT subfamily) and group II (CCoAOMT subfamily), which were further divided into 10 and 2 subgroups, respectively. Finally, digital gene expression and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that citrus OMT genes had distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns in different tissues and developmental stages. Interestingly, 18 and 11 of the 27 genes predicted to be involved in O-methylation of flavonoids had higher expression in the peel and pulp during fruit development, respectively. The citrus OMT gene family identified in this study might help in the selection of appropriate candidate genes and facilitate functional studies in Citrus.

  9. Expression and localization of members of the thrombospondin family during final follicle maturation and corpus luteum formation and function in the bovine ovary

    PubMed Central

    BERISHA, Bajram; SCHAMS, Dieter; RODLER, Daniela; SINOWATZ, Fred; PFAFFL, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the expression patterns and localization of the thrombospondin family members (THBS1, THBS2) and their receptors (CD36 and CD47) in bovine ovaries. First, the antral follicles were classified into 5 groups based on the follicle size and estradiol-17beta (E2) concentration in the follicular fluid (< 0.5, 0.5–5, 5–40, 40–180 and >180 E2 ng/ml). Second, the corpus luteum (CL) was assigned to the following stages: days 1–2, 3–4, 5–7, 8–12, 13–16 and >18 of the estrous cycle and of pregnancy (month 1–2, 3–4, 6–7 and > 8). Third, the corpora lutea were collected by transvaginal ovariectomy before and 0.5, 2, 4, 12, 24, 48 and 64 h after inducing luteolysis by injecting a prostaglandin F2alpha analog. The mRNA expression of examined factors was measured by RT-qPCR, steroid hormone concentration by EIA, and localization by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA expression of THBS1, THBS2, CD36, and CD47 in the granulosa cells and theca interna was high in the small follicles and reduced in the preovulatory follicles. The mRNA expression of THBS1, THBS2, and CD47 in the CL during the estrous cycle was high, but decreased significantly during pregnancy. After induced luteolysis, thrombospondins increased significantly to reach the maximum level at 12 h for THBS1, 24 h for THBS2, and 48 h for CD36. The temporal expression and localization pattern of the thrombospondins and their specific receptors in the antral follicles and corpora lutea during the different physiological phases of the estrous cycle and induced luteolysis appear to be compatible with their inhibitory role in the control of ovarian angiogenesis. PMID:27396384

  10. Taphonomy and depositional environment of a Lower Cretaceous monospecific dinosaur bone assemblage (Puesto Quiroga Member, Lohan Cura Formation), Neuquén Province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, Alberto Carlos; Salgado, Leonardo

    2015-08-01

    The Puesto Díaz Quarry (Lohan Cura Formation, Lower Cretaceous of Neuquén Basin, Argentina) consists of a monospecific dinosaur bone assemblage that includes 126 specimens from, at least, three individuals of the rebbachisaurid sauropod Comahuesaurus windhauseni. The bonebed was originated as a debris flow of an ephemeral-river bed, in distal areas of low relief. Bones are disarticulated, three-dimensionally distributed through the host facies, showing a normal grading arrangement, which can be correlated with the size, shape and hydraulic behavior inferred for each specimen. Taphonomic evidence suggests that the bones did not experience a prolonged transport, and that these were quickly buried by the debris flow event. The fact that there are more than one individual of the same species suggests a mass mortality by a catastrophic event. Scattered skeletal elements would indicate that the corpses must have been subaerially exposed, long enough to allow disarticulation by scavenging, decay, and defleshing.

  11. Comparison of abundances of chemical elements in mineralized and unmineralized sandstone of the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Smith Lake District, Grants uranium region, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, C.T.; Spirakis, C.S.; Robertson, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Statistical treatment of analytical data from the Mariano Lake and Ruby uranium deposits in the Smith Lake district, New Mexico, indicates that organic carbon, arsenic, barium, calcium, cobalt, copper, gallium, iron, lead, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, strontium, sulfur, vanadium, yttrium, and zirconium are concentrated along with uranium in primary ore. Comparison of the Smith Lake data with information from other primary deposits in the Grants uranium region and elsewhere in the Morrison Formation of the Colorado Plateau suggests that these elements, with the possible exceptions of zirconium and gallium and with the probable addition of aluminum and magnesium, are typically associated with primary, tabular uranium deposits. Chemical differences between the Ruby and Mariano Lake deposits are consistent with the interpretation that the Ruby deposit has been more affected by post-mineralization oxidizing solutions than has the Mariano Lake deposit.

  12. The Nesprin Family Member ANC-1 Regulates Synapse Formation and Axon Termination by Functioning in a Pathway with RPM-1 and β-Catenin

    PubMed Central

    Tulgren, Erik D.; Turgeon, Shane M.; Opperman, Karla J.; Grill, Brock

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in Nesprin-1 and 2 (also called Syne-1 and 2) are associated with numerous diseases including autism, cerebellar ataxia, cancer, and Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. Nesprin-1 and 2 have conserved orthologs in flies and worms called MSP-300 and abnormal nuclear Anchorage 1 (ANC-1), respectively. The Nesprin protein family mediates nuclear and organelle anchorage and positioning. In the nervous system, the only known function of Nesprin-1 and 2 is in regulation of neurogenesis and neural migration. It remains unclear if Nesprin-1 and 2 regulate other functions in neurons. Using a proteomic approach in C. elegans, we have found that ANC-1 binds to the Regulator of Presynaptic Morphology 1 (RPM-1). RPM-1 is part of a conserved family of signaling molecules called Pam/Highwire/RPM-1 (PHR) proteins that are important regulators of neuronal development. We have found that ANC-1, like RPM-1, regulates axon termination and synapse formation. Our genetic analysis indicates that ANC-1 functions via the β-catenin BAR-1, and the ANC-1/BAR-1 pathway functions cell autonomously, downstream of RPM-1 to regulate neuronal development. Further, ANC-1 binding to the nucleus is required for its function in axon termination and synapse formation. We identify variable roles for four different Wnts (LIN-44, EGL-20, CWN-1 and CWN-2) that function through BAR-1 to regulate axon termination. Our study highlights an emerging, broad role for ANC-1 in neuronal development, and unveils a new and unexpected mechanism by which RPM-1 functions. PMID:25010424

  13. The Nesprin family member ANC-1 regulates synapse formation and axon termination by functioning in a pathway with RPM-1 and β-Catenin.

    PubMed

    Tulgren, Erik D; Turgeon, Shane M; Opperman, Karla J; Grill, Brock

    2014-07-01

    Mutations in Nesprin-1 and 2 (also called Syne-1 and 2) are associated with numerous diseases including autism, cerebellar ataxia, cancer, and Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. Nesprin-1 and 2 have conserved orthologs in flies and worms called MSP-300 and abnormal nuclear Anchorage 1 (ANC-1), respectively. The Nesprin protein family mediates nuclear and organelle anchorage and positioning. In the nervous system, the only known function of Nesprin-1 and 2 is in regulation of neurogenesis and neural migration. It remains unclear if Nesprin-1 and 2 regulate other functions in neurons. Using a proteomic approach in C. elegans, we have found that ANC-1 binds to the Regulator of Presynaptic Morphology 1 (RPM-1). RPM-1 is part of a conserved family of signaling molecules called Pam/Highwire/RPM-1 (PHR) proteins that are important regulators of neuronal development. We have found that ANC-1, like RPM-1, regulates axon termination and synapse formation. Our genetic analysis indicates that ANC-1 functions via the β-catenin BAR-1, and the ANC-1/BAR-1 pathway functions cell autonomously, downstream of RPM-1 to regulate neuronal development. Further, ANC-1 binding to the nucleus is required for its function in axon termination and synapse formation. We identify variable roles for four different Wnts (LIN-44, EGL-20, CWN-1 and CWN-2) that function through BAR-1 to regulate axon termination. Our study highlights an emerging, broad role for ANC-1 in neuronal development, and unveils a new and unexpected mechanism by which RPM-1 functions.

  14. Stratigraphic section and selected semiquantitative chemistry, Meade Peak phosphatic shale member of Permian Phosphoria Formation, central part of Rasmussen Ridge, Caribou County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grauch, R.I.; Tysdal, R.G.; Johnson, E.A.; Herring, J.R.; Desborough, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has studied the Permian Phosphoria Formation in southeastern Idaho and the entire Western U.S. Phosphate Field throughout much of the twentieth century. In response to a request by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, a new series of resource, geological, and geoenvironmental studies was undertaken by the USGS in 1998. To accomplish these studies, the USGS has formed cooperative research relationships with two Federal agencies, the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service, tasked with land management and resource conservation on public lands; and with five private companies currently leasing or developing phosphate resources in southeastern Idaho. The companies are Agrium U.S. Inc. (Rasmussen Ridge mine) , Astaris LLC (Dry Valley mine), Rhodia Inc. (Wooley Valley mine, inactive), J.R. Simplot Company (Smoky Canyon mine), and Monsanto Co. (Enoch Valley mine). Some of the mineralogical research associated with this project is supported through a cooperative agreement with the Department of Geology and Geological Enginee ring, University of Idaho. Present studies consist of integrated, multidisciplinary research directed toward (1) resource and reserve estimations of phosphate in selected 7.5-minute quadrangles; (2) elemental residence, mineralogical and petrochemical characteristics; (3) mobilization and reaction pathways, transport, and fate of potentially toxic elements associated with the occurrence, development, and societal use of phosphate; (4) geophysical signatures; and (5) improving the understanding of deposit origin. Because raw data acquired during the project will require time to interpret, the data are released in open-file reports for prompt availability to other workers. Open-file reports associated with this series of studies are submitted to each of the Federal and industry cooperators for comment; however, the USGS is solely responsible for the data contained in the reports.

  15. 3-D sedimentological and geophysical studies of clastic reservoir analogs: Facies architecture, reservoir properties, and flow behavior within delta front facies elements of the Cretaceous Wall Creek Member, Frontier Formation, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Janok P. Bhattacharya; George A. McMechan

    2007-02-16

    This project examined the internal architecture of delta front sandstones at two locations within the Turonian-age Wall Creek Member of the Frontier Formation, in Wyoming. The project involved traditional outcrop field work integrated with core-data, and 2D and 3D ground penetrating radar (GPR) imaging from behind the outcrops. The fluid-flow engineering work, handled through a collaborative grant given to PI Chris White at LSU, focused on effects on fluid flow of late-stage calcite cement nodules in 3D. In addition to the extensive field component, the work funded 2 PhD students (Gani and Lee) and resulted in publication of 10 technical papers, 17 abstracts, and 4 internal field guides. PI Bhattacharya also funded an additional 3 PhD students that worked on the Wall Creek sandstone funded separately through an industrial consortium, two of whom graduated in the fall 2006 ((Sadeque and Vakarelov). These additional funds provided significant leverage to expand the work to include a regional stratigraphic synthesis of the Wall Creek Member of the Frontier Formation, in addition to the reservoir-scale studies that DOE directly funded. Awards given to PI Bhattacharya included the prestigious AAPG Distinguished Lecture Award, which involved a tour of about 25 Universities and Geological Societies in the US and Canada in the fall of 2005 and Spring of 2006. Bhattacharya gave two talks, one entitled “Applying Deltaic and Shallow Marine Outcrop Analogs to the Subsurface”, which highlighted the DOE sponsored work and the other titled “Martian River Deltas and the Origin of Life”. The outcrop analog talk was given at about 1/2 of the venues visited.

  16. Plio-Pleistocene facies environments from the KBS Member, Koobi Fora Formation: implications for climate controls on the development of lake-margin hominin habitats in the northeast Turkana Basin (northwest Kenya).

    PubMed

    Lepre, Christopher J; Quinn, Rhonda L; Joordens, Josephine C A; Swisher, Carl C; Feibel, Craig S

    2007-11-01

    Climate change is hypothesized as a cause of major events of Plio-Pleistocene East African hominin evolution, but the vertically discontinuous and laterally confined nature of the relevant geological records has led to difficulties with assessing probable links between the two. High-resolution sedimentary sequences from lacustrine settings can provide comprehensive data of environmental changes and detailed correlations with well-established orbital and marine records of climate. Hominin-bearing deposits from Koobi Fora Ridge localities in the northeast Turkana Basin of Kenya are an archive of Plio-Pleistocene lake-margin sedimentation though significant developmental junctures of northern African climates, East African environments, and hominin evolution. This study examines alluvial channel and floodplain, nearshore lacustrine, and offshore lacustrine facies environments for the approximately 136-m-thick KBS Member (Koobi Fora Formation) exposed at the Koobi Fora Ridge. Aspects of the facies environments record information on the changing hydrosedimentary dynamics of the lake margin and give insights into potential climatic controls. Seasonal/yearly climate changes are represented by the varve-like laminations in offshore mudstones and the slickensides, dish-shaped fractures, and other paleosol features overprinted on floodplain strata. Vertical shifts between facies environments, however, are interpreted to indicate lake-level fluctuations deriving from longer-term, dry-wet periods in monsoonal rainfall. Recurrence periods for the inferred lake-level changes range from about 10,000 to 50,000 years, and several are consistent with the average estimated timescales of orbital precession ( approximately 20,000 years) and obliquity ( approximately 40,000 years). KBS Member facies environments from the Koobi Fora Ridge document the development of lake-margin hominin habitats in the northeast Turkana Basin. Environmental changes in these habitats may be a result of

  17. Variations in fluvial deposition on an alluvial plain: an example from the Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation (Paleocene), southeastern Powder River Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, E.A.; Pierce, F.W.

    1990-01-01

    The Tongue River Member of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation is an important coal-bearing sedimentary unit in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana. We studied the depositional environments of a portion of this member at three sites 20 km apart in the southeastern part of the basin. Six lithofacies are recognized that we assign to five depositional facies categorized as either channel or interchannel-wetlands environments. (1) Type A sandstone is cross stratified and occurs as lenticular bodies with concave-upward basal surfaces; these bodies are assigned to the channel facies interpreted to be the product of low-sinuosity streams. (2) Type B sandstone occurs in parallel-bedded units containing mudrock partings and fossil plant debris; these units constitute the levee facies. (3) Type C sandstone typically lacks internal structure and occurs as tabular bodies separating finer grained deposits; these bodies represent the crevasse-splay facies. (4) Gray mudrock is generally nonlaminated and contains ironstone concretions; these deposits constitute the floodplain facies. (5) Carbonaceous shale and coal are assigned to the swamp facies. We recognize two styles of stream deposition in our study area. Laterally continuous complexes of single and multistoried channel bodies occur at our middle study site and we interpret these to be the deposits of sandy braided stream systems. In the two adjacent study sites, single and multistoried channel bodies are isolated in a matrix of finer-grained interchannel sediment suggesting deposition by anastomosed streams. A depositional model for our study area contains northwest-trending braided stream systems. Avulsions of these systems created anastomosed streams that flowed into adjacent interchannel areas. We propose that during late Paleocene a broad alluvial plain existed on the southeastern flank of the Powder River Basin. The braided streams that crossed this surface were tributaries to a northward-flowing, basin

  18. Traces in the dark: sedimentary processes and facies gradients in the upper shale member of the Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Egenhoff, Sven O.; Fishman, Neil S.

    2013-01-01

    Black, organic-rich rocks of the upper shale member of the Upper Devonian–Lower Mississippian Bakken Formation, a world-class petroleum source rock in the Williston Basin of the United States and Canada, contain a diverse suite of mudstone lithofacies that were deposited in distinct facies belts. The succession consists of three discrete facies associations (FAs). These comprise: 1) siliceous mudstones; 2) quartz- and carbonate-bearing, laminated mudstones; and 3) macrofossil-debris-bearing massive mudstones. These FAs were deposited in three facies belts that reflect proximal to distal relationships in this mudstone system. The macrofossil-debris-bearing massive mudstones (FA 3) occur in the proximal facies belt and contain erosion surfaces, some with overlying conodont and phosphate–lithoclast lag deposits, mudstones with abundant millimeter-scale siltstone laminae showing irregular lateral thickness changes, and shell debris. In the medial facies belt, quartz- and carbonate-bearing, laminated mudstones dominate, exhibiting sub-millimeter-thick siltstone layers with variable lateral thicknesses and localized mudstone ripples. In the distal siliceous mudstone facies belt, radiolarites, radiolarian-bearing mudstones, and quartz- and carbonate-bearing, laminated mudstones dominate. Overall, total organic carbon (TOC) contents range between about 3 and 10 wt %, with a general proximal to distal decrease in TOC content. Abundant evidence of bioturbation exists in all FAs, and the lithological and TOC variations are paralleled by changes in burrowing style and trace-fossil abundance. While two horizontal traces and two types of fecal strings are recognized in the proximal facies belt, only a single horizontal trace fossil and one type of fecal string characterize mudstones in the distal facies belt. Radiolarites intercalated into the most distal mudstones are devoid of traces and fecal strings. Bedload transport processes, likely caused by storm-induced turbidity

  19. PSI Member Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Professional Secretaries International, Kansas City, MO.

    A survey of 2,700 of the 27,000 members of Professional Secretaries International received 755 responses yielding the following profile of secretarial workers: (1) the average member is female, about 45 years old, married with no dependents living at home, and owns a single-family home in the suburbs; (2) most respondents have worked in office or…

  20. Collapsable seal member

    DOEpatents

    Sherrell, Dennis L.

    1990-01-01

    A hollow, collapsable seal member normally disposed in a natural expanded state offering fail-safe pressure sealing against a seating surface and adapted to be evacuated by a vacuum force for collapsing the seal member to disengage the same from said seating surface.

  1. User Working Group Members

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-29

    User Working Group Members   Mail for the entire group may be directed to:  larc-asdc-uwg@lists.nasa.gov   Member Status Affiliation E-mail Contact Bob Holz (Co-Chair in 2010) Co-Chair University of ...

  2. Advisory Council Member.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Vocational Education and Rehabilitation, Springfield. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    The pamphlet is directed toward the new member of a career education advisory council. It explains why advisory councils are needed and why an individual should join one. An advisory council is defined as a group of persons selected to collectively advise regarding career education efforts within the community, whose members are predominantly from…

  3. Experimental study of shortite (Na2Ca2(CO3)3) formation and application to the burial history of the Wilkins Peak Member, Green River Basin, Wyoming, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagniecki, Elliot A.; Jenkins, David M.; Lowenstein, Tim K.; Carroll, Alan R.

    2013-08-01

    The temperature at which shortite (Na2Ca2(CO3)3) forms from pirssonite (Na2Ca(CO3)2·2H2O) and calcite using pure synthetic phases in the system Na2CO3-CaCO3-H2O has been experimentally determined. At ˜1 atm pressure, shortite forms via the reaction Na2Ca(CO3)2·2H2O + CaCO3 = Na2Ca2(CO3)3 + 2H2O above 55 ± 2 °C. This equilibrium temperature is lower than determined previously (90 ± 25 °C) by Bradley and Eugster (1969). The solution in equilibrium with synthetic shortite, pirssonite, and calcite approximates a binary H2O-Na2CO3 brine with 1.1 m Na2CO3 (10.6 wt% Na2CO3). The equilibrium temperature is lowered to 52 ± 2 °C with 5 m NaCl added to the system, which shows that this reaction is weakly dependent on the activity of H2O, aO. This study suggests that shortite does not occur in surficial alkaline saline environments because temperatures are too low. Shortite is abundant in the Wilkins Peak Member (WPM) of the Eocene Green River Formation, Green River Basin, Wyoming, USA (>78 million tons/km2), where it occurs as diagenetic displacive crystals, fracture fills, and pseudomorphous replacements of a precursor Na-Ca-carbonate. The large area over which shortite occurs in the WPM indicates that saline pore fluids once existed in the buried lacustrine sediments, and thus, at times, large Na-CO3-rich saline alkaline lakes or laterally extensive saline groundwaters existed in the Green River Basin during WPM time. The thermal stability of shortite, together with vitrinite reflectance data and inferred regional geothermal gradients, establish that the shortite-bearing intervals of the WPM were buried to maximum depths of ˜1000 m in the Green River Basin, and since experienced ˜800 m of erosional exhumation.

  4. 3D Sedimentological and geophysical studies of clastic reservoir analogs: Facies architecture, reservoir properties, and flow behavior within delta front facies elements of the Cretaceous Wall Creek Member, Frontier Formation, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher D. White

    2009-12-21

    rock types (\\Eg sandstones and mudstones) and the variation of transport properties (\\Eg permeability and porosity) within bodies of a particular rock type. Both basin-wide processes such as sea-level change and the autocyclicity of deltaic processes commonly cause deltaic reservoirs to have large variability in rock properties; in particular, alternations between mudstones and sandstones may form baffles and trends in rock body permeability can influence productivity and recovery efficiency. In addition, diagenetic processes such as compaction, dissolution, and cementation can alter the spatial pattern of flow properties. A better understanding of these properties, and improved methods to model the properties and their effects, will allow improved reservoir development planning and increased recovery of oil and gas from deltaic reservoirs. Surface exposures of ancient deltaic rocks provide a high resolution, low uncertainty view of subsurface variability. Patterns and insights gleaned from these exposures can be used to model analogous reservoirs, for which data is much sparser. This approach is particularly attractive when reservoir formations are exposed at the surface. The Frontier Formation in central Wyoming provides an opportunity for high resolution characterization. The same rocks exposed in the vicinity of the Tisdale anticline are productive in nearby oil fields, including Salt Creek. Many kilometers of good-quality exposure are accessible, and the common bedding-plane exposures allow use of shallow-penetration, high-resolution electromagnetic methods known as ground-penetrating radar. This study combined geologic interpretations, maps, vertical sections, core data, and ground-penetrating radar to construct high-resolution geostatistical and flow models for the Wall Creek Member of the Frontier Formation. Stratal-conforming grids were use to reproduce the progradational and aggradational geometries observed in outcrop and radar data. A new, Bayesian method

  5. Mineralogical characterization of strata of the Meade Peak phosphatic shale member of the Permian Phosphoria Formation: channel and individual rock samples of measured section J and their relationship to measured sections A and B, central part of Rasmussen Ridge, Caribou County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knudsen, A.C.; Gunter, M.E.; Herring, J.R.; Grauch, R.I.

    2002-01-01

    The Permian Phosphoria Formation of southeastern Idaho hosts one of the largest phosphate deposits in the world. Despite the economic significance of this Formation, the fine-grained nature of the phosphorite has discouraged detailed mineralogical characterization and quantification studies. Recently, selenium and other potentially toxic trace elements in mine wastes have drawn increased attention to this formation, and motivated additional study. This study uses powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), with Rietveld quantification software, to quantify and characterize the mineralogy of composite channel samples and individual samples collected from the stratigraphic sections measured by the U.S. Geological Survey in the Meade Peak Member of the Permian Phosphoria Formation at the Enoch Valley mine on Rasmussen Ridge, approximately 15 miles northeast of Soda Springs, Idaho.

  6. Ethics Commission Member's Comment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Sue Spayth

    1988-01-01

    Presents a National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Ethics Commission member's comments and suggestions about how early childhood educators can best make sound decisions about the ethical dilemma of the welfare of the child and the confidentiality of its divorced parents. (BB)

  7. CERN welcomes new members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-08-01

    Lithuania is on course to become an associate member of CERN, pending final approval by the Lithuanian parliament. Associate membership will allow representatives of the Baltic nation to take part in meetings of the CERN Council, which oversees the Geneva-based physics lab.

  8. Glued structural members

    Treesearch

    Russell C. Moody; Jen Y. Liu

    1999-01-01

    Glued structural members are manufactured in a variety of configurations. Structural composite lumber (SCL) products consist of small pieces of wood glued together into sizes common for solid-sawn lumber. Glued-laminated timber (glulam) is an engineered stress-rated product that consists of two or more layers of lumber in which the grain of all layers is oriented...

  9. Mistakes Board Members Make.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caruso, Nicholas D., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Board members should avoid 10 common errors: losing patience, behaving badly, challenging the board after a vote, acting like inspectors, micromanaging school administrators, springing surprise questions at meetings, putting politics before children, representing special interests, violating executive session, and putting the board before family…

  10. Survey of NARC Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Retarded Citizens, Arlington, TX. Research and Demonstration Inst.

    The booklet presents results from a survey completed by 5,316 members of the National Association of Retarded Citizens. Findings are discussed for the following topics (sample findings in parentheses): membership characteristics (the two largest classes of occupations were professional/technical and homemakers, households had an annual average…

  11. NACA Member Legislative Reference Guide, 2001. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amato, Tracey L.

    Calling for action on a wide range of children's issues, this guide of the National Association of Child Advocates (NACA) delineates the state legislative agendas of 41 of its members from 33 states. The reference guide is presented in three sections. Section 1 contains the legislative priorities by topic area in a chart format indicating the…

  12. Supporting Members and Friends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-10-01

    Thank you! Over the past year, AGU has received 12,104 gifts, both large and small, from members and friends. The Union has also received corporate contributions, National Science Foundation grants, and support from the National Oceanographic Partnership Program and National Association of Geoscience Teachers. Together their generosity has benefited AGU non revenue producing programs that are critical to our science and the future health of the Union. The following list gratefully acknowledges annual gifts of $100 or more and cumulative giving of $5,000 or more. The 1919 Society ($100,000 or more) and Benefactors ($5,000-$99,999) recognize single major gifts and cumulative contributions. Three circles acknowledge annual giving: President's Circle ($1,000 or more), Leadership Circle ($200-$999), and Supporters Circle ($100-$199). Supporting Life Members, who contribute a one-time gift of $1,200 in addition to lifetime dues, are among our most loyal Supporters.

  13. Supporting Members and Friends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-09-01

    Thank you! Over the past 20 months AGU has received a record 22,159 gifts, both large and small, from members and friends. The Union has also received corporate contributions, National Science Foundation grants, and support from four federal agencies (NASA, NOAA, EPA, and USGS). Together their generosity has benefited AGU non-revenue producing programs that are critical to our science and the future health of the Union. The following list gratefully acknowledges annual gifts of $100 or more and cumulative giving of $5000 or more. The 1919 Society ($100,000+) and Benefactors ($5,000-$99,999) recognize single major and cumulative contributions. Three circles acknowledge annual giving: President's Circle ($1,000 or more), Leadership Circle ($250-$999), and Supporters Circle ($100-$249). Supporting Life Members, who contribute a one-time gift of $1,200 in addition to lifetime dues, are recognized as our most loyal Supporters.

  14. [Comment on] BOSP members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    The new Board on Ocean Science and Policy (BOSP) (Eos, June 7, 1983, p. 402) met for the first time on May 4. John B. Slaughter, former director of the National Science Foundation and now chancellor of the University of Maryland in College Park, is the board's chairman. Other board members are D. James Baker, Jr. (University of Washington, Seattle); Kirk Bryan (Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton University); John P. Craven (University of Hawaii); Charles L. Drake (Dartmouth College); Paul M. Fye (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); Edward D. Goldberg (Scripps Institution of Oceanography); G. Ross Heath (Oregon State University); Judith T. Kildow (Massachusetts Institute of Technology); John A. Knauss (University of Rhode Island); James J. McCarthy (Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University); H. William Menard (Scripps Institution of Oceanography); C. Barry Raleigh (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory); Roger Revelle (University of California, San Diego); David A. Ross (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); Brian J. Rothschild (University of Maryland); William M. Sackett (University of South Florida); John H. Steele (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); and Carl Wunsch (MIT). Wallace Broecker (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory), an original board member, resigned after the first meeting. Broecker told Eos that combining the science and policy boards resulted in a new board whose mission is too broad. A new board member will be appointed in Broecker's place

  15. 19 CFR 122.49c - Master crew member list and master non-crew member list requirement for commercial aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-approved electronic interchange system, it must submit the required information in a format provided by TSA... Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard... data interchange system approved by CBP, a master crew member list and a master non-crew member list...

  16. 19 CFR 122.49c - Master crew member list and master non-crew member list requirement for commercial aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... data interchange system approved by CBP, a master crew member list and a master non-crew member list...-approved electronic interchange system, it must submit the required information in a format provided by TSA... Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members...

  17. 19 CFR 122.49c - Master crew member list and master non-crew member list requirement for commercial aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... data interchange system approved by CBP, a master crew member list and a master non-crew member list...-approved electronic interchange system, it must submit the required information in a format provided by TSA... Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members...

  18. 19 CFR 122.49c - Master crew member list and master non-crew member list requirement for commercial aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... data interchange system approved by CBP, a master crew member list and a master non-crew member list...-approved electronic interchange system, it must submit the required information in a format provided by TSA... Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members...

  19. Cryogenic support member

    DOEpatents

    Niemann, Ralph C.; Gonczy, John D.; Nicol, Thomas H.

    1987-01-01

    A cryogenic support member is comprised of a non-metallic rod having a depression in at least one end and a metallic end connection assembled to the rod. The metallic end connection comprises a metallic plug which conforms to the shape and is disposed in the depression and a metallic sleeve is disposed over the rod and plug. The plug and the sleeve are shrink-fitted to the depression in the rod to form a connection good in compression, tension and bending.

  20. Complexes of technetium(V) and rhenium(V) with 2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine (DPP) and 2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)quinoxaline (DPQ). Evidence for seven-membered chelate ring formation in DPQ complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Du Preez, J.G.H.; Gerber, T.I.A.; Jacobs, R.

    1994-12-31

    Complexes formed by the reaction of (n-Bu{sub 4}N)[MOCl{sub 4}] (M = Re, Tc) with the diamines 2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine (DPP) and 2,3-bis(2--pyridyl)quinoxaline (DPQ) in ethanol were studied. With DPP as ligand, the monometallic complexes [MOCl{sub 2}(X)(DPP)] (M = Tc, Re; X = Cl, OEt) and the bimetallic compounds [MOCl{sub 2}(X)]({mu}-DPP)[MOCl{sub 2}(OEt)] (X = Cl for M = Tc; X = OEt for M = Re) were isolated. Infrared and {sup 1}H NMR data suggest that coordination of DPP to the metals occurs in a bidentate manner through one pyrazine and one pyrazine and one pyridine nitrogen atom to form a five-membered metallocycle. Only monometallic complexes of formulation [MOCL{sub 2}(X)(DPQ)] (X = Cl, OEt) could be isolated with DPQ as ligand, irrespective of the mol ratio of reactants. Experimental evidence suggests bidentate coordination of DPQ to the metals through the two pyridinic nitrogen atoms, with the two quinoxaline nitrogens not participating in bonding to the metals, to form a single seven-membered chelate ring.

  1. Increasing the Brønsted acidity of Ph2PO2H by the Lewis acid B(C6F5)3. Formation of an eight-membered boraphosphinate ring [Ph2POB(C6F5)2O]2.

    PubMed

    Kather, Ralf; Rychagova, Elena; Sanz Camacho, Paula; Ashbrook, Sharon E; Woollins, J Derek; Robben, Lars; Lork, Enno; Ketkov, Sergey; Beckmann, Jens

    2016-09-21

    Autoprotolysis of the metastable acid (C6F5)3BOPPh2OH, prepared in situ by the reaction of the rather weak Brønsted acid Ph2PO2H with the strong Lewis acid B(C6F5)3, gave rise to the formation of the eight-membered ring [Ph2POB(C6F5)2O]2 and C6F5H. The conjugate base was isolated as stable sodium crown ether salt [Na(15-crown-5)][Ph2PO2B(C6F5)3].

  2. Melt containment member

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel R.; Heidloff, Andrew J.

    2014-09-09

    A tubular melt containment member for transient containment of molten metals and alloys, especially reactive metals and alloys, includes a melt-contacting layer or region that comprises an oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide material that is less reactive as compared to the counterpart stoichiometric rare earth oxide. The oxygen-deficient (sub-stoichiometric) rare earth oxide can comprise oxygen-deficient yttria represented by Y.sub.2O.sub.3-x wherein x is from 0.01 to 0.1. Use of the oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide as the melt-contacting layer or region material reduces reaction with the melt for a given melt temperature and melt contact time.

  3. School Board Members' Training Needs: A Determinative Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, J. Rex; Johnson, M. Claradine

    Although school board members are not always viewed as part of a school's administrative team, their role in policy formation and in other aspects of school administration requires attention to their competency levels. This research examined training needs for school board members, superintendents, and principals. The present report covers Kansas…

  4. Personality characteristics of Wikipedia members.

    PubMed

    Amichai-Hamburger, Yair; Lamdan, Naama; Madiel, Rinat; Hayat, Tsahi

    2008-12-01

    Wikipedia is an online, free access, volunteer-contributed encyclopedia. This article focuses on the Wikipedians' (Wikipedia users) personality characteristics, studying Wikipedians' conceptions of Real-Me and BFI dimensions. To survey these aspects, we posted links to two online web questionnaires; one was targeted at Wikipedians and the second to non-Wikipedia users. One hundred and thirty-nine subjects participated in the study, of which 69 were active Wikipedia members. It was found that Wikipedia members locate their real me on the Internet more frequently as compared to non-Wikipedia members. Variance analysis revealed significant differences between Wikipedia members and non-Wikipedia members in agreeableness, openness, and conscientiousness, which were lower for the Wikipedia members. An interaction was found between Wikipedia membership and gender: introverted women were more likely to be Wikipedia members as compared with extroverted women. The results of this study are discussed with special emphasis on the understanding of the motivators of Wikipedia members.

  5. Taphonomy and paleoecology of nonmarine mollusca: indicators of alluvial plain lacustrine sedimentation, upper part of the Tongue River Member, Fort Union Formation ( Paleocene), Northern Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanley, J.H.; Flores, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    The composition, species abundances, and spatial and temporal distributions of mollusc assemblages were controlled by the environments in which they lived and the depositional processes that affected the molluscs after death and before final burial. Post-mortem transport, reworking and concentration of shells, and mixing of faunal elements from discrete habitats produced a taphonomic 'overprint' on assemblage characteristics that directly reflects the processes of alluvial plain and floodbasin lacustrine sedimentation. The 'overprint' can be interpreted from outcrop analysis of molluscan biofabric, which consists of: 1) orientation, fragmentation, size-sorting, abrasion, density, and dispersion of shells, 2) the nature and extent of shell-infilling, and 3) ratio of articulated to disarticulated bivalves. Taphonomic characteristics were used with sedimentological properties to differentiate in-place, reworked, transported, and ecologically mixed mollusc assemblages. This study also defines the paleoecology of habitat preferences of mollusc species as a basis for recognition of the environments in which these assemblages were deposited: 1) large floodbasin lakes, 2) small floodbasin lakes, and 3) crevasse deltas and splays. Integration of sedimentology and paleoecology provides an interdisciplinary approach to the interpretation of alluvial environments through time in the Tongue River Member. -Authors

  6. Cytochrome P450 Family Member CYP704B2 Catalyzes the ω -Hydroxylation of Fatty Acids and Is Required for Anther Cutin Biosynthesis and Pollen Exine Formation in Rice[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Pinot, Franck; Sauveplane, Vincent; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle; Diehl, Patrik; Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Liang; Gao, Yawei; Liang, Wanqi; Zhang, Dabing

    2010-01-01

    The anther cuticle and microspore exine act as protective barriers for the male gametophyte and pollen grain, but relatively little is known about the mechanisms underlying the biosynthesis of the monomers of which they are composed. We report here the isolation and characterization of a rice (Oryza sativa) male sterile mutant, cyp704B2, which exhibits a swollen sporophytic tapetal layer, aborted pollen grains without detectable exine, and undeveloped anther cuticle. In addition, chemical composition analysis indicated that cutin monomers were hardly detectable in the cyp704B2 anthers. These defects are caused by a mutation in a cytochrome P450 family gene, CYP704B2. The CYP704B2 transcript is specifically detected in the tapetum and the microspore from stage 8 of anther development to stage 10. Heterologous expression of CYP704B2 in yeast demonstrated that CYP704B2 catalyzes the production of ω -hydroxylated fatty acids with 16 and 18 carbon chains. Our results provide insights into the biosynthesis of the two biopolymers sporopollenin and cutin. Specifically, our study indicates that the ω -hydroxylation pathway of fatty acids relying on this ancient CYP704B family, conserved from moss to angiosperms, is essential for the formation of both cuticle and exine during plant male reproductive and spore development. PMID:20086189

  7. Cytochrome P450 family member CYP704B2 catalyzes the {omega}-hydroxylation of fatty acids and is required for anther cutin biosynthesis and pollen exine formation in rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Pinot, Franck; Sauveplane, Vincent; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle; Diehl, Patrik; Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Liang; Gao, Yawei; Liang, Wanqi; Zhang, Dabing

    2010-01-01

    The anther cuticle and microspore exine act as protective barriers for the male gametophyte and pollen grain, but relatively little is known about the mechanisms underlying the biosynthesis of the monomers of which they are composed. We report here the isolation and characterization of a rice (Oryza sativa) male sterile mutant, cyp704B2, which exhibits a swollen sporophytic tapetal layer, aborted pollen grains without detectable exine, and undeveloped anther cuticle. In addition, chemical composition analysis indicated that cutin monomers were hardly detectable in the cyp704B2 anthers. These defects are caused by a mutation in a cytochrome P450 family gene, CYP704B2. The CYP704B2 transcript is specifically detected in the tapetum and the microspore from stage 8 of anther development to stage 10. Heterologous expression of CYP704B2 in yeast demonstrated that CYP704B2 catalyzes the production of omega -hydroxylated fatty acids with 16 and 18 carbon chains. Our results provide insights into the biosynthesis of the two biopolymers sporopollenin and cutin. Specifically, our study indicates that the omega -hydroxylation pathway of fatty acids relying on this ancient CYP704B family, conserved from moss to angiosperms, is essential for the formation of both cuticle and exine during plant male reproductive and spore development.

  8. Study of nsLTPs in Lotus japonicus genome reveal a specific epidermal cell member (LjLTP10) regulated by drought stress in aerial organs with a putative role in cutin formation.

    PubMed

    Tapia, G; Morales-Quintana, L; Parra, C; Berbel, A; Alcorta, M

    2013-07-01

    The cuticle is the first defense against pathogens and the second way water is lost in plants. Hydrophobic layers covering aerial plant organs from primary stages of development form cuticle, including major classes of aliphatic wax components and cutin. Extensive research has been conducted to understand cuticle formation mechanisms in plants. However, many questions remain unresolved in the transport of lipid components to form cuticle. Database studies of the Lotus japonicus genome have revealed the presence of 24 sequences classified as putative non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs), which were classified in seven groups; four groups were selected because of their expression in aerial organs. LjLTP8 forms a cluster with DIR1 in Arabidopsis thaliana while LjLTP6, LjLTP9, and LjLTP10 were grouped as type I LTPs. In silico studies showed a high level of structural conservation, and substrate affinity studies revealed palmitoyl-CoA as the most likely ligand for these LTPs, although the Lyso-Myristoyl Phosphatidyl Choline, Lyso-myristoyl phosphatidyl glycerol, and Lyso-stearyl phosphatidyl choline ligands also showed a high affinity with the proteins. The LjLTP6 and LjLTP10 genes were expressed in both the stems and the leaves under normal conditions and were highly induced during drought stress. LjLTP10 was the most induced gene in shoots during drought. The gene was only expressed in the epidermal cells of stems, primordial leaves, and young leaflets. LjLTP10 was positively regulated by MeJA but repressed by abscisic acid (ABA), ethylene, and H2O2, while LjLTP6 was weakly induced by MeJA, repressed by H2O2, and not affected by ABA and ethylene. We suggest that LjLTP10 is involved in plant development of stem and leaf cuticle, but also in acclimation to tolerate drought stress in L. japonicus.

  9. Administrative Support for Board Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdams, Donald R.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the need of administrative support for board members. An effective board services office can help a lot in attracting and retaining community leaders. Board members need administrative support to help them manage events, records, communications, scheduling, correspondence and constituent service. In small to…

  10. Life Expectancy of Kibbutz Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviatan, Uri; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Data are presented demonstrating that the life expectancy of kibbutz members--both men and women--is higher than that of the overall Jewish population in Israel. These data add to and support other research findings illustrating the more positive mental health and well-being found among kibbutz members than among other comparative populations.…

  11. Life Expectancy of Kibbutz Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviatan, Uri; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Data are presented demonstrating that the life expectancy of kibbutz members--both men and women--is higher than that of the overall Jewish population in Israel. These data add to and support other research findings illustrating the more positive mental health and well-being found among kibbutz members than among other comparative populations.…

  12. Life expectancy of kibbutz members.

    PubMed

    Leviatan, U; Cohen, J; Jaffe-Katz, A

    1986-01-01

    Data are presented demonstrating that the life expectancy (LE) of kibbutz members--both men and women--is higher than that of the overall Jewish population in Israel. Closer inspection of the death rates at various ages reveals that, from age thirty, those of kibbutz women are lower than those of the Jewish population. Although those of kibbutz men are actually higher until age forty-nine, nevertheless the LE of kibbutz members (based on death rates) surpasses that of Jews in Israel. These data add to and support other research findings illustrating the more positive mental health and well-being found among kibbutz members than among other comparative populations. Similarly, the factors contributing to kibbutz members' life expectancy evolve from this quality of life, especially as this quality of life affects old age.

  13. 17 CFR 190.09 - Member property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Member property. 190.09... Member property. (a) Member property. “Member property” means, in connection with a clearing organization bankruptcy, the property which may be used to pay that portion of the net equity claim of a member which is...

  14. Member Takes Action Against Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertholf, Deedrick

    1999-01-01

    An ASBO member and chair of New York's School Emergency Response to Violent Events (SERVE) explains how this program tackles violence and teen suicide. SERVE teaches the basic principles of hostage situations, uses a confidential reporting system, and advocates safety audits and risk-reduction strategies. (MLH)

  15. New members of Datura family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosaev, A.; Plávalová, E.

    2017-06-01

    Asteroid families are groups of minor planets which have a common origin in catastrophic disruptions. Young asteroid families are very interesting because they represent the product of their parent body's fragmentation before orbital and physical evolutionary processes could have changed them. A group of minor asteroids associated with the largest body (1270) Datura is of particular interest because it has enough known members and resides in the inner part of the main asteroid belt and is easier to observe than families (with similar physical characteristics on their surfaces) at further distances. Up to now, 7 members of this family are known. Here we discuss three new members of the Datura Family: (338309) 2002 VR17, 2002 RH291 and 2014 OE206. To prove that these recently-discovered members belong to the Datura family, we conducted numerical orbit integrations with all gravitational perturbation over the last 800 kyrs. In the results, we have found that (338309) 2002 VR17 and 2002 RH291 are very close to the mean orbit of this family throughout the calculation. In the case of 2014 OE206, it has a strongly chaotic orbit.

  16. Member Takes Action Against Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertholf, Deedrick

    1999-01-01

    An ASBO member and chair of New York's School Emergency Response to Violent Events (SERVE) explains how this program tackles violence and teen suicide. SERVE teaches the basic principles of hostage situations, uses a confidential reporting system, and advocates safety audits and risk-reduction strategies. (MLH)

  17. Kentucky Hispanic School Board Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballestero, Victor; Wright, Sam

    2009-01-01

    The study was designed to provide information on Kentucky Hispanic school board members. The data was obtained from Kentucky school superintendents or their designees in the 174 public school districts through a survey mailed in the spring, 2009. The survey was mailed to Kentucky Superintendents on March 12, 2009. The follow-up survey was mailed…

  18. Communication Among Melanoma Family Members.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Deborah J; Albrecht, Terrance; Hay, Jennifer; Eggly, Susan; Harris-Wei, Julie; Meischke, Hendrika; Burke, Wylie

    2017-03-01

    Interventions to improve communication among family members may facilitate information flow about familial risk and preventive health behaviors. This is a secondary analysis of the effects of an interactive website intervention aimed at increasing communication frequency and agreement about health risk among melanoma families. Participants were family units, consisting of one family member with melanoma identified from a previous research study (the Case) and an additional first degree relative and a parent of a child 0-17. Family triads were randomized to receive access to the website intervention or to serve as control families. Family communication frequency and agreement about melanoma prevention behaviors and beliefs were measured at baseline and again at 1 year post randomization. Intervention participants of all three types significantly increased the frequency of communication to their first degree relatives (Parents, siblings, children; range = 14-18 percentage points; all p < .05). At baseline, approximately two-thirds of all three family members talked with at least some member of the family about cancer risk. Agreement between Cases and First Degree Relatives and between Cases and Parents increased from pre to post intervention in the intervention participants compared to the control participants (p < .05). These findings provide support for interventions to improve family communication about cancer risk.

  19. Cooperative functions: meeting members' needs

    Treesearch

    Mark G. Rickenbach

    2006-01-01

    Cooperatives are effective when they meet the needs of the members. In past and current offerings by cooperatives as a whole and forestry cooperatives in particular, four functional categories cover the typical services a forest landowner might gain access to through joining (Cobia 1989). The four categories - marketing, supply, service, and social - are defined and...

  20. Ethics: views from IACUC members.

    PubMed

    Houde, Lisa; Dumas, Claude; Leroux, Thérèse

    2009-07-01

    Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) members were interviewed on various ethical matters, including ethics, animal ethics, science and ethics, and the use of animals in research, in order to explore their implicit ethical framework. The results revealed that IACUC members entertain rich and diverse beliefs about ethics, that are part of an implicit ethical framework which relates to different domains of knowledge, such as biology (differences between human and animals), psychology (e.g. affective relationships with pets), and so on. The results also revealed that IACUC members hold quite a restrictive view on both animal ethics and animal use in research, and that they apply implicit ethical notions, such as respect and justice, to some elements (e.g. ethical rules) of the explicit ethical framework they are provided with when performing ethical evaluations of animal use. The study suggests that IACUC members should be provided with more up-to-date information on topics such as animal ethics and animal use in research. 2009 FRAME.

  1. Investigation of subsurface tar-sand deposits in western Kentucky. A preliminary study of the Big Clifty Sandstone Member of the Golconda Formation (Mississippian) in Butler County and parts of Edmonson, Grayson, Logan, and Warren Counties. Information Circular 7, Series XI, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.A.; Noger, M.C.; Gooding, P.J.

    1982-01-01

    Tar sands (also referred to as asphaltic sandstones, heavy-oil deposits, or bitumen-impregnated sandstones) in western Kentucky have been recognized as a potential mineral resource for over 100 years. Past commercial development has been restricted largely to use as paving material. However, because of the ever-expanding demands for energy, these deposits have become the subject of increasing interest as a potential petroleum resource. Previous studies have provided estimates of the potential resources of shallow mineable tar-sand deposits; these investigations have concentrated on the outcrop areas where tar sands are present at or near the surface. Data on subsurface deposits have been lacking, however, and currently no reports are available which evaluate the potential oil resources associated with the occurrences of deeper tar-sand deposits in western Kentucky. The Kentucky Geological Survey has initiated a project to inventory and evaluate the oil-resource potential of asphaltic sandstones in the subsurface of western Kentucky. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the subsurface occurrences of asphaltic sandstones in the Big Clifty Sandstone Member of the Golconda Formation in a portion of the tar-sand area of western Kentucky. This evaluation is based on a compilation of published information and data available in the files of the Kentucky Geological Survey. Acquisition of new data, primarily by core drilling, will be necessary before any reliable estimate of the total volume of this potential oil resource can be attempted.

  2. Dignity therapy: family member perspectives.

    PubMed

    McClement, Susan; Chochinov, Harvey Max; Hack, Thomas; Hassard, Thomas; Kristjanson, Linda Joan; Harlos, Mike

    2007-10-01

    Dignity Therapy is a novel therapeutic intervention designed to address psychosocial and existential distress among the terminally ill. This brief, individualized approach to end-of-life care invites patients to discuss issues that are most important to them and to articulate things they would most want remembered as death draws near. These discussions and recollections are recorded, transcribed, and edited into a generativity document, which are usually given to family or loved ones. While the marked benefits of Dignity Therapy on patients' psychosocial and existential distress have been reported elsewhere, this paper presents data on bereft family members' perspectives regarding the impact of dignity therapy on patients and themselves. Sixty family members of deceased terminally ill patients who previously took part in Dignity Therapy completed a questionnaire to elicit feedback about the impact of Dignity Therapy on both the dying patient and themselves. Ninety-five percent of participants reported that Dignity Therapy helped the patient; 78% reported that it heightened the patient's sense of dignity; 72% reported that it heightened the patient's sense of purpose; 65% reported that it helped the patient prepare for death; 65% reported that it was as important as any other aspect of the patient's care; and 43% reported that Dignity Therapy reduced the patient's suffering. Regarding family members, 78% reported that the generativity document helped them during their time of grief; 77% reported that the document would continue to be a source of comfort for their families and themselves; and 95% reported they would recommend Dignity Therapy to other patients of family members confronting a terminal illness. Family members endorse Dignity Therapy as a therapeutic intervention that moderates their bereavement experiences and lessens suffering and distress in terminally ill relatives.

  3. Idiopathic hypersomnia in an aircrew member.

    PubMed

    Withers, B G; Loube, D I; Husak, J P

    1999-08-01

    In aviation, it is essential that all aircrew members remain alert and contribute, by their observations and actions, to flight safety. Especially in helicopter operations, crewmembers riding in the rear of the aircraft play an integral role in many aspects of flight, such as take-offs, landings, turns, formation flights, hazard avoidance, situational awareness, military operations, and crew coordination. We present the case of a helicopter crew chief with idiopathic hypersomnia, briefly review the disorder, and give the recent U.S. military aviation experience with sleep disorders. Flight surgeons and aeromedical examiners should be active in considering and diagnosing sleep-related disorders as the aviator or crewmember may not be aware of the disease or may not volunteer the history. A directed history is important in making the diagnosis, as are reports from family and other aircrew members. Referral to a sleep specialist is required in performing objective sleep studies, establishing the diagnosis, recommending treatment, and providing a prognosis. Many sleep disorders are treatable and aeromedically waiverable.

  4. Providing support to family members.

    PubMed

    Davidhizar, Ruth; Dowd, Steven

    2004-01-01

    Providing recognition and simple information can be powerful and reassure a family member who is anxious and worried about an ill relative. While "answers" concerning the procedure are often not available, providing information that is available--the locations of the rest rooms and coffee shop; approximately how long the procedure will take; where to wait; and the process involved in the radiological procedure, reading and getting the results--can give some feeling of control, and thus reduce feelings of powerlessness. Most importantly, family members who are recognized and included with the patient in the treatment process will be reassured of the competency of the staff and gain hopefulness about the outcome of the diagnostic and treatment experience. And providing hope in the healthcare setting is a radiology professional's most important job.

  5. Method of laminating structural members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A laminate is obtained by providing a lightweight core material, such as a honeycombed plastic or metal, within the cavity defined by an annular mold cavity frame. Face sheets, which are to be bonded to the core material, are provided on opposite sides of the frame and extend over the frame, thus sealing the core material in the cavity. An adhesive is provided between the core material and the face sheets and the combined thickness of the core material and adhesive is a close fit within the opposed face sheets. A gas tight seal, such as an O-ring gasket, is provided between the frame and the face sheet members to form a gas tight cavity between the face sheet members and the frame. External heat and pressure are used to bond the face sheets to the core material. Gas pressure is introduced into the sealed cavity to minimize out-gasing of the adhesive.

  6. Energy-Absorbing Beam Member

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An energy-absorbing (EA) beam member and having a cell core structure is positioned in an aircraft fuselage proximate to the floor of the aircraft. The cell core structure has a length oriented along a width of the fuselage, a width oriented along a length of the fuselage, and a depth extending away from the floor. The cell core structure also includes cell walls that collectively define a repeating conusoidal pattern of alternating respective larger and smaller first and second radii along the length of the cell core structure. The cell walls slope away from a direction of flight of the aircraft at a calibrated lean angle. An EA beam member may include the cell core structure and first and second plates along the length of the cell core structure on opposite edges of the cell material.

  7. Towards mobile staff members management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encheva, Sylvia

    2017-07-01

    Todays project management requires a number of abilities which involve finding quick solutions to shortage of staff members with possession of specific qualities. When persons with team responsibilities are under pressure or due to various circumstances are unable to perform exhaustive search in databases, an interactive visualization tool can come in quite handy in finding good solutions unforeseen occurrences. In particular we propose application of selected graphs for facilitating mobile human resource management.

  8. Device for Tensioning Sheet Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-30

    FOR TENSIONING SHEET MEMBERS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the Invention This invention pertains generally to tensioning devices and more...particularly to a device for tensioning thin-sheet materials so as to prevent wrinkling. Description of the Related Art Solar power sources utilized...the system. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The object of this invention is to provide an apparatus for loading a thin-sheet material with tensioning

  9. 29 CFR 401.15 - Member or member in good standing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Member or member in good standing. 401.15 Section 401.15...-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.15 Member or member in good standing. Member or member in good standing, when used in reference to a labor organization, includes any...

  10. 29 CFR 401.15 - Member or member in good standing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Member or member in good standing. 401.15 Section 401.15...-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.15 Member or member in good standing. Member or member in good standing, when used in reference to a labor organization, includes any...

  11. 29 CFR 401.15 - Member or member in good standing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Member or member in good standing. 401.15 Section 401.15...-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.15 Member or member in good standing. Member or member in good standing, when used in reference to a labor organization, includes any...

  12. 29 CFR 401.15 - Member or member in good standing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Member or member in good standing. 401.15 Section 401.15...-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.15 Member or member in good standing. Member or member in good standing, when used in reference to a labor organization, includes any...

  13. Origin of lacustrine rocks of Wilkins Peak Member, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.

    1985-06-01

    Wilkins Peak Member of the Green River Formation, with its interbeds of trona, oil shale, and dolomitic mudstone, contrasts markedly with the predominantly oilshale and calcitic mudstone sequences of the remainder of the succession. Much discussion has centered on the origin of these lacustrine rocks. A perennial meromictic (stratified) lake model has been replaced in recent years by a playa-lake model. The subsurface stratigraphy, however, was not well known when the models were developed. Paleogeographic reconstruction indicates that the region was subjected to variations in hydrographic conditions mainly in response to climatic fluctuations. During humid subtropical periods, widespread during the deposition of the Tipton Shale Member and Laney Member, the lakes were predominantly open meromictic systems with rivers entering the basin from the north. These environmental conditions were modified during deposition of the Wilkins Peak Member as the climate became more arid, and along the southern margin of the basin, shallow, saline-alkaline playa lakes formed in response to these changes. The widespread occurrence in the subsurface of fluvial clastic sequences of the Wasatch Formation associated with the Wilkins Peak Member would indicate that the playa lakes were frequently flooded and freshened by southern drainage systems. Therefore, the lakes were continuously undergoing modifications under the influence of climatic and possibly tectonic processes.

  14. 43 CFR 1784.3 - Member service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... made; (b) Committee members advise and report only to the official(s) specified in the charter. Service... compensation, members of advisory committees shall be reimbursed for travel and per diem expenses when on... officer may reimburse travel and per diem expenses to members of subgroups who are also members of...

  15. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a...

  16. 7 CFR 1205.328 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COTTON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Cotton Research and Promotion Order Cotton Board § 1205.328 Alternate members. An alternate member of the... member from the same cotton-producing state or region to serve in such member's place and stead of...

  17. 7 CFR 1205.328 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COTTON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Cotton Research and Promotion Order Cotton Board § 1205.328 Alternate members. An alternate member of the... member from the same cotton-producing state or region to serve in such member's place and stead of...

  18. 7 CFR 1205.328 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COTTON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Cotton Research and Promotion Order Cotton Board § 1205.328 Alternate members. An alternate member of the... member from the same cotton-producing state or region to serve in such member's place and stead of...

  19. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a significant...

  20. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a significant...

  1. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a significant...

  2. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a significant...

  3. 7 CFR 929.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... absence of such member and may perform such other duties as assigned. In the event of the death, removal... member is selected and has qualified. In the event both a member and alternate member from the same...

  4. High-level ab initio predictions for the ionization energies and heats of formation of five-membered-ring molecules: thiophene, furan, pyrrole, 1,3-cyclopentadiene, and borole, C4H4X/C4H4X+ (X = S, O, NH, CH2, and BH).

    PubMed

    Lo, Po-Kam; Lau, Kai-Chung

    2011-02-10

    The ionization energies (IEs) and heats of formation (ΔH°(f0)/ΔH°(f298)) for thiophene (C(4)H(4)S), furan (C(4)H(4)O), pyrrole (C(4)H(4)NH), 1,3-cyclopentadiene (C(4)H(4)CH(2)), and borole (C(4)H(4)BH) have been calculated by the wave function-based ab initio CCSD(T)/CBS approach, which involves the approximation to the complete basis set (CBS) limit at the coupled-cluster level with single and double excitations plus a quasi-perturbative triple excitation [CCSD(T)]. Where appropriate, the zero-point vibrational energy correction (ZPVE), the core-valence electronic correction (CV), and the scalar relativistic effect (SR) are included in these calculations. The respective CCSD(T)/CBS predictions for C(4)H(4)S, C(4)H(4)O, C(4)H(4)NH, and C(4)H(4)CH(2), being 8.888, 8.897, 8.222, and 8.582 eV, are in excellent agreement with the experimental values obtained from previous photoelectron and photoion measurements. The ΔH°(f0)/ΔH°(f298) values for the aforementioned molecules and their corresponding cations have also been predicted by the CCSD(T)/CBS method, and the results are compared with the available experimental data. The comparisons between the CCSD(T)/CBS predictions and the experimental values for C(4)H(4)S, C(4)H(4)O, C(4)H(4)NH, and C(4)H(4)CH(2) suggest that the CCSD(T)/CBS procedure is capable of predicting reliable IE values for five-membered-ring molecules with an uncertainty of ±13 meV. In view of the excellent agreements between the CCSD(T)/CBS predictions and the experimental values for C(4)H(4)S, C(4)H(4)O, C(4)H(4)NH, and C(4)H(4)CH(2), the similar CCSD(T)/CBS IE and ΔH°(f0)/ΔH°(f298) predictions for C(4)H(4)BH, whose thermochemical data are not readily available due to its reactive nature, should constitute a reliable data set. The CCSD(T)/CBS IE(C(4)H(4)BH) value is 8.868 eV, and ΔH°(f0)/ΔH°(f298) values for C(4)H(4)BH and C(4)H(4)BH(+) are 269.5/258.6 and 1125.1/1114.6 kJ/mol, respectively. The highest occupied molecular orbitals

  5. 20 CFR 653.104 - Services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors, and crew members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... contractors, and crew members. 653.104 Section 653.104 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... Farmworkers (MSFWs) § 653.104 Services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors, and crew members. (a... for services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors and crew members. Except as provided...

  6. 19 CFR 4.64 - Electronic passenger and crew member departure manifests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... system approved by CBP. If the transmission is in US EDIFACT format, the passenger manifest and the crew... the following information for all passengers and crew members, except that the information specified... information is correct, the document appears to be valid for travel purposes, and the passenger or crew member...

  7. Strategies for Recruiting Family Members from Diverse Backgrounds for Roles in Policy and Program Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brame, Kim

    1995-01-01

    Strategies are presented for recruiting family members from minority groups to be involved in the formation of policies and development of programs that affect their lives and those of their young children with disabilities. Organizational strategies, strategies to empower family members, logistical strategies, and process strategies are…

  8. 7 CFR 1208.44 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROCESSED RASPBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Processed Raspberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order National Processed Raspberry Council § 1208.44 Alternate members. An alternate member of the Council, during the...

  9. 7 CFR 1208.44 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROCESSED RASPBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Processed Raspberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order National Processed Raspberry Council § 1208.44 Alternate members. An alternate member of the Council, during the...

  10. 7 CFR 906.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Committee § 906.27 Alternate members. An... of the death, removal, resignation, or disqualification of a member, his alternate shall act for...

  11. 7 CFR 906.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Committee § 906.27 Alternate members. An... of the death, removal, resignation, or disqualification of a member, his alternate shall act for...

  12. 7 CFR 906.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Committee § 906.27 Alternate members. An... of the death, removal, resignation, or disqualification of a member, his alternate shall act for...

  13. 7 CFR 906.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Committee § 906.27 Alternate members. An... of the death, removal, resignation, or disqualification of a member, his alternate shall act for...

  14. 7 CFR 985.25 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MARKETING ORDER REGULATING THE... member's absence, (b) in the event of the member's death, removal, resignation, or...

  15. Understanding the roles of NHS trust board members.

    PubMed

    Deffenbaugh, J

    1996-01-01

    The establishment of NHS trust boards on a business format was a recent innovation resulting from the NHS reforms. In order to realize benefits for patients, it is essential that boards operate effectively. Explores within the framework of corporate governance, the practical implications of board member roles. Drawing on experience of strategy formulation at board level, analyses and clarifies the roles, and presents recommendations to increase board effectiveness.

  16. Chapter VIII: New Members and Deceased Members at the General Assemby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montmerle, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    The following lists give the names of the 1008 new Individual Members admitted at the XVIIIth General Assembly, ordered by National Member. New National Members are indicated by an asterisk (Ethiopia, Kazakhstan, Democratic People's Republic of Korea).

  17. Children of Military Service Members Resource Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Service Members Resource Guide to assist parents, other family members and health care providers in addressing the mental and emotional health needs...resource guide is organized as a quick-reference tool for parents, other family members and health care providers who work with the children of...information to help parents, other family members and health care providers access the specific resource. the following tools or methods are

  18. Flexible formation configuration for terrain following flight: Formation keeping constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latyshev, Simon

    This work suggests a control method for the terrain-following formation motion of a group of communicating autonomous agents. The presented approach centers on defining a suitable set of constraints for formation keeping task that shall be fulfilled while agents are negotiating an unknown terrain toward the predefined goal location. It allows agents to maintain a general geometric formation shape, while allowing each individual formation member freedom of maneuver, required for terrain collision free motion. Formation structure is defined with the use of virtual leader. Formation keeping constraints are defined with plane surfaces, specified relative to position and navigation vector of the virtual leader. Formation navigation and guidance constraints are defined using navigation vectors of formation members and the virtual leader. Alternative designs for the constraints derived with parabolic, cone, and cylindrical surfaces are considered. Formation control is derived using the Udwadia-Kalaba equation, following corresponding approach to the development of control methods for constraint based dynamical systems, including leader-follower systems defined using geometric constraints. Approach to terrain following motion requiring agents to stay within bounds of cylindrical corridor volumes built around their respective navigation vectors is assumed. Individual formation primitives and multi-level, hierarchical, formation structures are considered. Simulations, based on three degrees of freedom nonlinear model of an agent, performed using Mathematica and specifically developed combined Maya-Mathematica modeling and simulation system, demonstrate that a flexible terrain following formation motion is achieved with the presented sets of constraints.

  19. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to,...

  20. 7 CFR 1425.19 - Member cooperatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Member cooperatives. 1425.19 Section 1425.19... OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COOPERATIVE MARKETING ASSOCIATIONS § 1425.19 Member cooperatives. A CMA may obtain loans or LDP's on behalf of a member cooperative when the...

  1. 7 CFR 1425.19 - Member cooperatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Member cooperatives. 1425.19 Section 1425.19... OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COOPERATIVE MARKETING ASSOCIATIONS § 1425.19 Member cooperatives. A CMA may obtain loans or LDP's on behalf of a member cooperative when the...

  2. 7 CFR 1425.19 - Member cooperatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Member cooperatives. 1425.19 Section 1425.19... OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COOPERATIVE MARKETING ASSOCIATIONS § 1425.19 Member cooperatives. A CMA may obtain loans or LDP's on behalf of a member cooperative when the...

  3. 7 CFR 1425.19 - Member cooperatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Member cooperatives. 1425.19 Section 1425.19... OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COOPERATIVE MARKETING ASSOCIATIONS § 1425.19 Member cooperatives. A CMA may obtain loans or LDP's on behalf of a member cooperative when the...

  4. 7 CFR 1425.19 - Member cooperatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Member cooperatives. 1425.19 Section 1425.19... OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COOPERATIVE MARKETING ASSOCIATIONS § 1425.19 Member cooperatives. A CMA may obtain loans or LDP's on behalf of a member cooperative when the...

  5. 7 CFR 1216.45 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order National Peanut Board § 1216.45 Alternate members. An alternate member of the Board, during the absence of the member for the primary peanut...

  6. 7 CFR 1216.45 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order National Peanut Board § 1216.45 Alternate members. An alternate member of the Board, during the absence of the member for the primary peanut...

  7. 7 CFR 1216.45 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order National Peanut Board § 1216.45 Alternate members. An alternate member of the Board, during the absence of the member for the primary peanut...

  8. 7 CFR 1216.45 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order National Peanut Board § 1216.45 Alternate members. An alternate member of the Board, during the absence of the member for the primary peanut...

  9. 7 CFR 1216.45 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order National Peanut Board § 1216.45 Alternate members. An alternate member of the Board, during the absence of the member for the primary peanut...

  10. International Focus: Highlighting APPA Members Worldwide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazner, Steve, Comp.

    2011-01-01

    While most APPA member institutions are located in the United States and Canada, there are also 45 of member institutions located internationally--from Australia and New Zealand to Southeast Asia to the Middle East to Europe. This article focuses on four of its international members: (1) American University of Kuwait (AUK); (2) American University…

  11. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to, such...

  12. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to, such...

  13. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to, such...

  14. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to, such...

  15. 7 CFR 959.31 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... designated to do so by the member for whom he is an alternate. In the event both a member of the committee... or grower) to serve in such member's place and stead. In the event of the death, removal,...

  16. 7 CFR 946.23 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... such member's absence. In the event of the death, removal, resignation, or disqualification of a member... the event that both a member and his or her alternate are unable to attend a Committee meeting,...

  17. 7 CFR 953.23 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 953.23 Section 953.23 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... member's absence. In the event of death, removal, resignation, or disqualification of a member,...

  18. Spouses/Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-10-2-0113 TITLE: Spouses/Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide PRINCIPAL...2013 - 30 Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Spouses/Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...to gain new knowledge about the experiences of family members of service members who are experiencing symptoms of PTSD or severe depression . The

  19. Unveiling new members in five nearby young moving groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moór, A.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Kiss, L. L.; Kiss, Cs.; Ábrahám, P.; Szulágyi, J.; Kóspál, Á.; Szalai, T.

    2013-10-01

    In the past decade many kinematic groups of young stars (<100 Myr) were discovered in the solar neighbourhood. Since the most interesting period of planet formation overlaps with the age of these groups, their well dated members are attractive targets for exoplanet searches by direct imaging. We combined astrometric, photometric and X-ray data, and applied strict selection criteria to explore the stellar content of five nearby moving groups. We identified more than 100 potential new candidate members in the β Pic moving group, and in the Tucana-Horologium, Columba, Carina and Argus associations. In order to further assess and confirm their membership status, we analysed radial velocity data and lithium equivalent widths extracted from high-resolution spectra of 54 candidate stars. We identified 35 new probable/possible young moving group members: four in the β Pic moving group, 11 in the Columba association, 16 in the Carina association and four in the Argus association. We found serendipitously a new AB Dor moving group member as well. For four Columba systems Hipparcos-based parallaxes have already been available and as they are consistent with the predicted kinematic parallaxes, they can be considered as secure new members.

  20. Preserving performance of concrete members under seismic loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dry, Carolyn M.; Unzicker, Jacob

    1998-06-01

    Normal reinforced concrete lacks the ability to directly respond to the formation of cracking within its own cross section during dynamic loading. A way to introduce this ability is to apply self-healing concepts in the design of reinforced concrete members. Such members could then 'intelligently' react in the event of damaging forces -- by deriving the means of repair from within themselves. Self- healing involves the timed release of adhesive into the member at the time of cracking. Chemically inert encapsulations are filled with adhesive and cast within the cross section of the member. At the onset of cracking, the wall fractures, allowing adhesive to exit and penetrate the developing crack. With this method, adhesives with different characteristics could be applied to different areas of a monolithic, reinforced concrete structural system, in order to accomplish specific results. For example, high strength adhesive could be used in areas where increased stiffness was desired, and more flexible adhesive could be potentially be used to improve energy dissipation or damping. The method would be most appropriate for highly indeterminate structures, where moment redistribution between members tends to 'refocus' stress temporarily. This gives the adhesive time to repair the cracked section and improve local capacity against further damage.

  1. 7 CFR 983.42 - Initial members and nomination of successor members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF... member shall, upon termination of that relationship, become disqualified to serve further as a member...

  2. An Unusually Shaped Haumea Family Member

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacerda, P.; McNeill, A.

    2013-09-01

    2013 EL61 Haumea is a 2000 km-scale, fast-spinning Kuiper belt object covered in water ice, but with a bulk density near 2.5 g cm-3 implying a rocky interior (Rabinowitz et al. 2006; Trujillo et al. 2007). Approximately a dozen Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) have been identified as possibly related to Haumea as they share similar orbital properties and unusually fresh, icy surfaces similar to the mantle covering Haumea (Carry et al. 2012). These KBOs are usually referred to as the Haumea family. The formation of the family is the subject of intense speculation (Brown et al. 2007, Schlichting & Sari 2009, Leinhardt et al. 2010). Sparse photometry of one of the family members, 2003 SQ317, revealed an interesting high photometric variability (Snodgrass et al. 2009). We followed up on those observation and used the NTT in La Silla to obtain dense, time-resolved photometry of SQ317 over two semesters. Analysis of the lightcurve (Fig. 1) indicates a spin period P = 7.2 hr and a photometric range m = 0.9 mag. We will present implications of this lightcurve to the object's shape and bulk density.

  3. View of Yellowknife Bay Formation, with Drilling Sites

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-09

    This mosaic of images from NASA Curiosity shows geological members of the Yellowknife Bay formation, and the sites where Curiosity drilled into the lowest-lying member, called Sheepbed, at targets John Klein and Cumberland.

  4. SEALING MEANS FOR RELATIVELY ROTATABLE MEMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.S.

    1960-10-25

    A sealing means is offered for maintaining a seal between a pair of relatively rotatable members, panticularly between a rotating shaft and a stationary member surrounding the shaft. The sealing is accomplished by means of a flange extending outward radially on each of a plurality of sealing rings mounted on the rotating member which fit into annular grooves in the stationary member and are held in sealing relation therewith by means of spring rings. In addition, means are provided for passing a sealing gas through the seal sunfaces to prevent accumulation of lubricant and for scavenging any gas which may have leaked from the internal member into the seal area.

  5. Member end releases in framed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stallings, J. M.

    1993-02-01

    Discontinuities such as internal hinges are commonly encountered in framed structures. A general method of including discontinuities in stiffness method analyses of planar frames by the release of member end forces is developed. Modifications are made to the member stiffness matrix and equivalent joint load vector to account for the released end forces. A FORTRAN algorithm is given that makes the necessary modifications to the member stiffness matrix and equivalent joint load vector for the standard planar frame member. The algorithm allows combinations of up to three member end forces to be released (specified at zero or nonzero values). An algorithm is also given that calculates the unknown member end displacements at the released member end forces. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the uses and capabilities of the algorithms.

  6. 32 CFR 884.10 - Returning members, employees, and family members from overseas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Returning members, employees, and family members... THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL TO UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL § 884.10 Returning members, employees, and family members from overseas. The Air Force expects...

  7. 32 CFR 884.10 - Returning members, employees, and family members from overseas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Returning members, employees, and family members... THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL TO UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL § 884.10 Returning members, employees, and family members from overseas. The Air Force expects...

  8. 7 CFR 7.15 - Eligibility requirements of county committee members, community committee members, and delegates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Eligibility requirements of county committee members, community committee members, and delegates. 7.15 Section 7.15 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of... COMMITTEES § 7.15 Eligibility requirements of county committee members, community committee members,...

  9. 29 CFR 401.15 - Member or member in good standing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Member or member in good standing. 401.15 Section 401.15 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.15 Member or member in good...

  10. Composition and method of stimulating subterranean formations

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, W.R.; Walker, M.L.; Ford, G.F.

    1987-07-14

    This patent describes a method of treating a subterranean formation containing iron comprising contacting a subterranean formation with an aqueous fluid containing a compound consisting essentially of at least one member selected from the group consisting of: dihydroxymaleic acid, salts of dihydroxymaleic acid, glucono-deltalactone present in an amount sufficient to prevent the precipitation of ferric iron during contact with the subterranean formation.

  11. Stress concentration factors for dented tubular members

    SciTech Connect

    Buitrago, J.; Hsu, T.M.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents results of a finite element (FE) study conducted on /tubular members with dents of various geometries, including dents with circular and elliptical cross-sectional shapes. The modeling and analysis procedures are discussed, and stress concentration factors (SCFs) are generated for axial and bending loads in the member. Equations that give SCFs as function of the member size and dent geometry are developed for both load conditions. Then, simplified equations are proposed for structural assessment purposes.

  12. Converting virtual community members into online buyers.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sumeet; Kim, Hee-Woong; Shin, Seon-Jin

    2010-10-01

    Although many online vendors have sponsored virtual communities (VCs) in the hope of reaping commercial benefits from it, not many have been successful in reaping commercial benefits from their VC. Online vendors can benefit greatly from having a VC, if the VC members can be converted into online buyers. This study examines the conversion of a VC member into an online buyer. Using a classical-conditioning approach, this study finds that members' committed participation in the VC is the springboard for online vendors to convert VC members into online buyers.

  13. Family Members Responding to a Visual Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, Dean W.

    1986-01-01

    A literature review regarding family adjustment to a visually impaired family member considered the stages of denial, withdrawal, acceptance, depression, reaffirmation, coping, mobilization, and self-acceptance. (CB)

  14. 2004 NAI-ADP Deep Diamond Drill Cores: Transects Through Archean Time in the Pilbara Craton, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buick, R.; Dunlop, J. S.; Bonser, L. C.

    2004-12-01

    In July-August 2004, the NASA Astrobiology Drilling Program sponsored the coring of 3 deep diamond-drill holes in the Pilbara Craton of northwest Australia. The holes targeted the lowest grade and least deformed sedimentary sections of 4 stratigraphic units: the 2.4-2.6 Ga Hamersley Group, the 2.7 Ga Tumbiana Formation of the Fortescue Group, the 3.4 Ga Warrawoona Group, and the 3.5 Ga Coonterunah Group. ABDP 8 cored the unconformity between the Warrawoona and Coonterunah Groups to a depth of 330 metres, intersecting it at 155 metres. Because of syn-depositional erosion, the Strelley Pool Chert was attenuated and the alteration zone beneath the unconformity was scoured and filled to a depth of 10 metres by quartz arenite. As a result, no definitive lithological determination on its status as a potential paleosol could be made. Secondary oxidative alteration was present in Coonterunah cherts to depths of at least 220 metres down-hole. ABDP 9 cored 984 metres of the lower Hamersley Group, from the Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation into the Paraburdoo Member of the Wittenoom Formation. Though the hole was intended to penetrate the uppermost Fortescue Group, drilling was terminated early because of equipment damage by fractured rock, loss of water circulation clogging the hole with cuttings and unanticipated thickening of the Paraburdoo Member by dilational fracturing, expansive brecciation and cavity formation. 79 samples for organic geochemical analysis of biomarker syngenesis were collected under clean conditions immediately the core surfaced. A horizon of impact spherules was intersected in the Bee Gorge Member of the Wittenoom Formation; unlike surface exposures, it was markedly silicified and chloritized in drill-core. ABDP 10 cored 210 metres of the Tumbiana Formation, intersecting the entire Meentheena Carbonate Member, the upper Mingah Tuff Member and terminating just below 4 scoriaceous basalt flows. Large and complex calcareous stromatolites

  15. Fire resistance of exposed wood members

    Treesearch

    Robert H. White

    2004-01-01

    Fire resistance data on exposed wood beams and columns are plentiful, but few studies have been done on exposed wood members in tension and in decks. To provide data to verify the application of a new calculation procedure, a limited series of fire resistance tests were conducted on wood members loaded in tension and on exposed wood decks.

  16. 18 CFR 701.55 - Associate Members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Associate Members. 701.55 Section 701.55 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.55 Associate Members. (a) The Chairman, with concurrence of...

  17. 18 CFR 701.55 - Associate Members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Associate Members. 701.55 Section 701.55 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.55 Associate Members. (a) The Chairman, with concurrence of...

  18. 18 CFR 701.55 - Associate Members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Associate Members. 701.55 Section 701.55 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.55 Associate Members. (a) The Chairman, with concurrence of...

  19. 18 CFR 701.55 - Associate Members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Associate Members. 701.55 Section 701.55 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.55 Associate Members. (a) The Chairman, with concurrence of...

  20. 18 CFR 701.55 - Associate Members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Associate Members. 701.55 Section 701.55 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.55 Associate Members. (a) The Chairman, with concurrence of...

  1. Ruminations of a Former School Board Member

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    The author describes his initial introduction to school board service. The historical context in which the author became a school board member is described as a means of highlighting the challenges that he faced as a new board member as well as the challenges that public education faced in the early and mid 1980s in a southern state. Stories and…

  2. 43 CFR 1784.3 - Member service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Member service. 1784.3 Section 1784.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL MANAGEMENT (1000) COOPERATIVE RELATIONS Advisory Committees § 1784.3 Member service. (a) Appointments to advisory...

  3. Faculty Members' Instructional Priorities for Adopting OER

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Insung; Hong, Seongyoun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate and classify faculty members' instructional priorities for adopting OER. In-depth interview data were collected from 10 faculty members from different regions and analyzed with NVivo 10. The original supposition was that the well-established instructional priorities, effectiveness, efficiency, and appeal would…

  4. Going Global: Dispatches from Experienced Board Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovett, Clara M.

    2011-01-01

    Board members are increasingly being asked to bless a variety of international engagements. But how many trustees truly understand how to evaluate opportunities or assess potential risks? The author interviewed board members at institutions that already have committed significant resources to global agendas. These interviewees represent a wide…

  5. Understanding and Limiting School Board Member Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Terry; Jones, Stephanie; Purvis, Mary L.; Rubin, David B.; Thrasher, Doralee; Underwood, Julie; Watkins, W. David

    This book is a primer on board-member liability issues and is intended for both board members and school attorneys. The first chapter, "The Legal System," examines federal sources of legal authority, state and local sources of legal authority, and federal and state judicial structures. Liability under state tort law is the subject of chapter 2,…

  6. Getting Good Board Members and Holding Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Nick

    Although serving on a school board is frequently a thankless and difficult task, good board members must be recruited, since the elected school board is a cornerstone of our representative form of government and is a central element of local control. A recent increase in board member turnover is assignable to the large amount of time it takes to…

  7. Methods of Assessment for Affected Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orford, Jim; Templeton, Lorna; Velleman, Richard; Copello, Alex

    2010-01-01

    The article begins by making the point that a good assessment of the needs and circumstances of family members is important if previous neglect of affected family members is to be reversed. The methods we have used in research studies are then described. They include a lengthy semi-structured interview covering seven topic areas and standard…

  8. Understanding and Limiting School Board Member Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Terry; Jones, Stephanie; Purvis, Mary L.; Rubin, David B.; Thrasher, Doralee; Underwood, Julie; Watkins, W. David

    This book is a primer on board-member liability issues and is intended for both board members and school attorneys. The first chapter, "The Legal System," examines federal sources of legal authority, state and local sources of legal authority, and federal and state judicial structures. Liability under state tort law is the subject of chapter 2,…

  9. School Law Primer for New Board Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullaly, Paula A.

    School board members from 50 states have in common the United States Constitution and the legal principles announced by the federal courts in response to that Constitution. New board members are usually concerned with the rights of teachers, parents, and students. Starting with student rights, student conduct that involves freedom of expression…

  10. Educational Faculty Members' Perceptions on Multicultural Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Günay, Rafet; Aslan, Dolgun

    2016-01-01

    This purpose of this study is to determine how the perceptions of teaching personnel members were conceptualized through use of metaphorical images with regard to the multicultural teacher. In this study, a phenomenological design, a type of qualitative research design was used. A total of 323 teaching personnel members employed at 71 educational…

  11. Managing Non-Productive University Faculty Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, John; Muir, Walter

    1994-01-01

    Examines how chairpersons of physical education departments in North American universities identify and manage their marginal faculty members, in the context of an exploratory model suggested by O'Reilly and Wietz (1980). Up to 15% of faculty members are perceived as being nonproductive or marginal, but very few are ever dismissed. Proposes some…

  12. 77 FR 71873 - Performance Review Board Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ... AFFAIRS Performance Review Board Members AGENCY: Corporate Senior Executive Management Office, Department... are required to publish a notice in the Federal Register of the appointment of ] Performance Review Board (PRB) members. This notice announces the appointment of persons to serve on the Performance Review...

  13. 78 FR 69097 - Performance Review Board Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Performance Review Board Members Title 5, U.S.C. Section 4314(c)(4) of the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978, Public Law 95-454, requires that the appointment of Performance Review Board Members... Review Boards or Panels, which oversee the evaluation of performance appraisals of Senior Executive...

  14. 7 CFR 916.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... member and perform such other duties as assigned. In the event of the death, removal, resignation, or... qualified. In the event both a member of the committee and his alternate are unable to attend a...

  15. 7 CFR 906.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... the event both a member and his alternate are unable to attend a committee meeting, the committee... the extent practical, independent, or co-op) to serve in such member's place and stead. In the...

  16. 7 CFR 1425.14 - Member business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Member business. 1425.14 Section 1425.14 Agriculture... business. (a) At least 50 percent of a crop of an authorized commodity acquired by, or delivered to, a CMA... not be considered in determining the volume of member or nonmember business. ...

  17. 7 CFR 1425.14 - Member business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Member business. 1425.14 Section 1425.14 Agriculture... business. (a) At least 50 percent of a crop of an authorized commodity acquired by, or delivered to, a CMA... not be considered in determining the volume of member or nonmember business. ...

  18. 7 CFR 1425.14 - Member business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Member business. 1425.14 Section 1425.14 Agriculture... business. (a) At least 50 percent of a crop of an authorized commodity acquired by, or delivered to, a CMA... not be considered in determining the volume of member or nonmember business. ...

  19. 7 CFR 1425.14 - Member business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Member business. 1425.14 Section 1425.14 Agriculture... business. (a) At least 50 percent of a crop of an authorized commodity acquired by, or delivered to, a CMA... not be considered in determining the volume of member or nonmember business. ...

  20. 7 CFR 1425.14 - Member business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Member business. 1425.14 Section 1425.14 Agriculture... business. (a) At least 50 percent of a crop of an authorized commodity acquired by, or delivered to, a CMA... not be considered in determining the volume of member or nonmember business. ...

  1. Faculty Members on Boards of Trustees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Patterson, Richard W.; Key, Andrew V.

    2013-01-01

    During the 2011-12 academic year, a group of faculty and student researchers at the Cornell Higher Education Research Institute (CHERI) gathered information on which public and private institutions had faculty members on boards of trustees and obtained the names of the faculty members serving in these roles. In April and May 2012, the authors…

  2. 7 CFR 966.31 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 966.31 Section 966.31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... event of the death, removal, resignation, or disqualification of a member, his alternate shall act for...

  3. Teacher Quality: The Perspectives of NCTE Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley-Marling, Curt; Abt-Perkins, Dawn; Sato, Kyoko; Selfe, Richard (Dickie)

    2006-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a study examining the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) members' perceptions of what is required to become and to remain a highly-qualified teacher of the English language arts. An online survey was conducted to ten NCTE members: five teachers, and five university-based teacher educators. Findings…

  4. Variables Which Differentiate Members and Non-Members Of Social Fraternities And Sororities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Keith W.; Galvin, Kathryn Sue

    1974-01-01

    In order to differentiate college fraternity and sorority members from non-members, 86 undergraduate students were administered the Eysenck Personality Inventory, Rotter's Internal External Control Scale, Zuckerman's Sensation Seeking Scale, and a biographical data blank. (Editor)

  5. Physics departments with women faculty members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Susan C.

    2014-10-01

    Last month we examined the representation of women among newly hired physics faculty members. This month we consider the proportion of physics departments with women on their faculties in the professorial ranks—assistant, associate, and full professors. There continue to be some physics departments that have no women faculty members. The percentage is higher at bachelor's-granting departments than at PhD-granting departments, largely because of the small number of faculty members at most bachelor's-granting departments. About 47% of bachelor's-granting departments had no women faculty members, while one percent of these departments had only women. We studied the number of physics departments with no women among their faculty and found that there are actually fewer of these than would be expected given the small number of faculty members in a typical department and given the overall proportion of women among current physics faculty members.1 Next month we will take a closer Proportion of Physics Departments with Women Faculty* by Highest Degree Granted, 2009-10 Academic Year look at the growth in the representation of women among faculty members in PhD-granting departments. If you have any questions or comments, please contact Susan White at the Statistical Research Center of the American Institute of Physics (swhite@aip.org).

  6. 7 CFR 905.150 - Eligibility requirements for public member and alternate member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts... Regulations Non-Regulated Fruit § 905.150 Eligibility requirements for public member and alternate member. (a) The public member shall be neither a producer nor a handler of Florida citrus fruit and shall have no...

  7. 7 CFR 905.150 - Eligibility requirements for public member and alternate member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS... Regulations Non-Regulated Fruit § 905.150 Eligibility requirements for public member and alternate member. (a) The public member shall be neither a producer nor a handler of Florida citrus fruit and shall have no...

  8. A Pan-STARRS-1 Search for Substellar Young Moving Group Members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Kimberly Mei; Liu, Michael C.

    2015-08-01

    Young moving groups (YMGs) provide a valuable evolutionary link between ongoing star formation in molecular clouds (~1 Myr) and old field stars (>1 Gyr). Previous searches for YMG members based on optical surveys such as Hipparcos and the Palomar Sky Survey were insensitive to the lowest mass members (<0.5 MSun). However, recent surveys have begun to reveal the low-mass stellar and substellar members. These substellar YMG members are valuable benchmarks to empirically define brown dwarf evolution with age and to study the lowest mass end of the initial mass function. We have combined Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) proper motions with optical—IR photometry from PS1, 2MASS and WISE to perform a systematic search for substellar members down to ~30 MJup. PS1 is a unique resource because of its large area coverage (30,000 degrees2) and its far-red sensitivity. Also, PS1 provides high quality multi-epoch astrometry essential for distinguishing candidate YMG members from old field stars. We have spectroscopically confirmed the youth of several candidate substellar members of the AB Dor Moving Group. These new candidate members bridge the gap between the known low-mass stellar and planetary-mass members and provide valuable insight into the spectral characteristics and evolution of young brown dwarfs.

  9. Concept Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaidya, Narendera

    This document, published in India by the Regional College of Education, deals with 13 subjects: the tough context (thinking), definitions of concept, functions of concept, the process of concept formation, discriminant learning, mediation process, second signalling system, factors affecting concept formation, studies in concept formation, the…

  10. Pesticide Environmental Stewardship Program Member Handbook

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Pesticide Environmental Stewardship Program (PESP) handbook is a resource with information to help prospective members to learn about PESP, to understand how the program works, and to assist in applying for membership.

  11. Elastomeric member for energy storage device

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, Lyle O.; Chute, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An energy storage device (10) is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member (16), disposed within a tubular housing (14), which elastomeric member (16) is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member (16) is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section, transition end sections, and is attached to rigid end piece assemblies (22, 24) of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections (76, 78) are such that upon stretching of the member, a substantially uniform diameter assembly results to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing (14). During manufacture, woven wire mesh sleeves (26, 28) are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section (76, 78) to provide the correct profile and helix angle. Each sleeve (26, 28) contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween.

  12. 78 FR 69093 - Performance Review Board Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ..., Executive and Scientific Resources Office, Human Capital and Resources Management Office, Centers for... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Performance Review Board Members AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)....

  13. STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE OF DEGRADED REINFORCED CONCRETE MEMBERS.

    SciTech Connect

    Braverman, J.I.; Miller, C.A.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bezler, P.; Chang, T.Y.

    2001-03-22

    This paper describes the results of a study to evaluate, in probabilistic terms, the effects of age-related degradation on the structural performance of reinforced concrete members at nuclear power plants. The paper focuses on degradation of reinforced concrete flexural members and shear walls due to the loss of steel reinforcing area and loss of concrete area (cracking/spalling). Loss of steel area is typically caused by corrosion while cracking and spalling can be caused by corrosion of reinforcing steel, freeze-thaw, or aggressive chemical attack. Structural performance in the presence of uncertainties is depicted by a fragility (or conditional probability of failure). The effects of degradation on the fragility of reinforced concrete members are calculated to assess the potential significance of various levels of degradation. The fragility modeling procedures applied to degraded concrete members can be used to assess the effects of degradation on plant risk and can lead to the development of probability-based degradation acceptance limits.

  14. Team Members | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Our Team Members The Foregut Team includes experts in the diagnosis and treatment of the diseases listed below. Our clinical experience and active research offers patients the highest quality care in the setting of groundbreaking clinical trials.

  15. New Crew Members Arrive at Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Expedition 28 crew expanded to six members with the arrival of Flight Engineers Mike Fossum, Sergei Volkov and Satoshi Furukawa. The new trio docked to the International Space Station in the So...

  16. Apparatus for fabricating composite ceramic members

    DOEpatents

    Roy, P.; Simpson, J.L.; Aitken, E.A.

    1975-10-28

    Methods and apparatus for fabrication of composite ceramic members having particular application for measuring oxygen activities in liquid sodium are described. The method involves the simultaneous deposition of ThO$sub 2$: 15 percent Y$sub 2$O$sub 3$ on a sintered stabilized zirconia member by decomposition of gaseous ThCl$sub 4$ and YCl$sub 3$ and by reacting with oxygen gas. Means are provided for establishing an electrical potential gradient across the zirconia member whereby oxygen ions, from a source on one side of the member portion to be coated, are migrated to the opposite side where a reaction and said decomposition and deposition are effected.

  17. Interviewing when family members are present.

    PubMed

    Lang, Forrest; Marvel, Kim; Sanders, David; Waxman, Dael; Beine, Kathleen L; Pfaffly, Carol; McCord, Elizabeth

    2002-04-01

    The presence of family members at an office visit creates unique opportunities and challenges for the physician while interviewing the patient. The physician must address issues of confidentiality, privacy, and agency. Special skills are required to respectfully and efficiently involve family members, while keeping the patient at the center of the visit. A core set of interviewing skills exists for office visit interviews with family members present. These skills include building rapport with each participant by identifying their individual issues and perspectives, and encouraging participation by listening to and addressing the concerns of all persons. Physicians should also avoid triangulation, maintain confidentiality, and verify agreement with the plan. It may be necessary to use more advanced family interviewing skills, including providing direction despite problematic communications; managing conflict; negotiating common ground; and referring members to family therapy.

  18. Conducting a multi family member interview study.

    PubMed

    Reczek, Corinne

    2014-06-01

    Family researchers have long recognized the utility of incorporating interview data from multiple family members. Yet, relatively few contemporary scholars utilize such an approach due to methodological underdevelopment. This article contributes to family scholarship by providing a roadmap for developing and executing in-depth interview studies that include more than one family member. Specifically, it outlines the epistemological frames that most commonly underlie this approach, illustrates thematic research questions that it best addresses, and critically reviews the best methodological practices of conducting research with this approach. The three most common approaches are addressed in depth: separate interviews with each family member, dyadic or group interviews with multiple family members, and a combined approach that uses separate and dyadic or group interviews. This article speaks to family scholars who are at the beginning stages of their research project but are unsure of the best qualitative approach to answer a given research question. © 2014 FPI, Inc.

  19. Employability Development Teams: Team Member Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Mary L.; Lewis, Meharry H.

    1972-01-01

    The authors point out that team roles are designed to be complementary, but much of the frustration that develops among team members is due to lack of role definition and too much overlapping of responsibility. (Author)

  20. Results of the recent TDA member survey.

    PubMed

    1999-10-01

    This article fully outlines active TDA members' responses to the various questions posed by the recent membership survey. Every effort was made to ensure the accuracy of the results. To this end, a professional research firm was employed to cross tabulate answers and analyze the data. A thorough reading will provide you with the TDA members' perspective on a wide range of important dental issues.

  1. Finding Street Gang Members on Twitter

    PubMed Central

    Balasuriya, Lakshika; Wijeratne, Sanjaya; Doran, Derek; Sheth, Amit

    2017-01-01

    Most street gang members use Twitter to intimidate others, to present outrageous images and statements to the world, and to share recent illegal activities. Their tweets may thus be useful to law enforcement agencies to discover clues about recent crimes or to anticipate ones that may occur. Finding these posts, however, requires a method to discover gang member Twitter profiles. This is a challenging task since gang members represent a very small population of the 320 million Twitter users. This paper studies the problem of automatically finding gang members on Twitter. It outlines a process to curate one of the largest sets of verifiable gang member profiles that have ever been studied. A review of these profiles establishes differences in the language, images, YouTube links, and emojis gang members use compared to the rest of the Twitter population. Features from this review are used to train a series of supervised classifiers. Our classifier achieves a promising F1 score with a low false positive rate. PMID:28713880

  2. Brake for counter rotating bladed members

    SciTech Connect

    Cedoz, R.W.

    1987-02-10

    This patent describes a propulsion system including a gas turbine engine having an output shaft and a gear drive having a planetary gear set with a first element connected to the engine output shaft and a second element connected to a first bladed member and a third element connected to a second bladed member whereby the first and second bladed members are rotated in opposite directions by the output shaft. A brake is described comprising, a first transfer shaft supported on a stationary housing for rotation about an axis of the latter, a second transfer shaft supported on the stationary housing for rotation about the axis, gear means between one of the counter rotating bladed members and the first transfer shaft and gear means between the other of the counter rotating bladed members and the second transfer shaft. The brake also includes a selectively operable brake actuator on the housing movable between an extended position and a retracted position, and friction means between the brake actuator and each of first and second transfer shafts operative in the extended position of the brake actuator to simultaneously frictionally retard rotation of each of the first and the second transfer shafts whereby each of the counter rotating bladed members is simultaneously braked.

  3. Finding Street Gang Members on Twitter.

    PubMed

    Balasuriya, Lakshika; Wijeratne, Sanjaya; Doran, Derek; Sheth, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Most street gang members use Twitter to intimidate others, to present outrageous images and statements to the world, and to share recent illegal activities. Their tweets may thus be useful to law enforcement agencies to discover clues about recent crimes or to anticipate ones that may occur. Finding these posts, however, requires a method to discover gang member Twitter profiles. This is a challenging task since gang members represent a very small population of the 320 million Twitter users. This paper studies the problem of automatically finding gang members on Twitter. It outlines a process to curate one of the largest sets of verifiable gang member profiles that have ever been studied. A review of these profiles establishes differences in the language, images, YouTube links, and emojis gang members use compared to the rest of the Twitter population. Features from this review are used to train a series of supervised classifiers. Our classifier achieves a promising F1 score with a low false positive rate.

  4. Ankylosing spondylitis self-help organisations - do members differ from non-members?

    PubMed

    Song, In-Ho; Brenneis, Cornelia; Hammel, Ludwig; Feldtkeller, Ernst; Listing, Joachim; Sieper, Joachim; Rudwaleit, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Joining a patient self-help organisation is recommended for patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The objective was to compare AS patients who are members of a self-help organisation with non-members regarding disease specific and patient personality aspects, and make inferences on potential benefits of membership. A comprehensive questionnaire regarding demographics, smoking habits, acquisition of information about the disease, disease activity, functioning, patient satisfaction, treatment, sick leave, work disability and educational level was distributed to members of the German AS self-help organisation and to non-member AS patients. In total, 1273 patients responded. Significant differences regarding age and disease duration led us to match members 2:1 to non-members. In the matched population (n=549), members had a higher level of education, felt more often well-informed about the disease, had less often physically demanding jobs, and smoked less than non-members. Members were more often treated with NSAIDs and less often with TNF-blockers suggesting more severe disease in non-members. While the level of disease activity was similar (BASDAI 4.1 vs. 4.2), members had a better functional status (BASFI 3.5 vs. 3.9) and significantly less days on sick leave during the last year (15.1 days vs. 31.2 days). Days on sick leave increased with increasing BASFI significantly more strikingly in non-members than in members. AS patients who are members of an AS self-help organisation have a higher educational level and are much better informed about the disease. Inferences on disease outcome measures, however, are hampered by potential confounders. Copyright © 2015 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Family members of the STS-107 astronauts and other dignitaries watch NASA T-38 jets fly over the Space Mirror Memorial at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in a Missing Man Formation. During this dedication ceremony, the names of the STS-107 astronauts who lost their lives during the Columbia accident -- Rick Husband, Willie McCool, Laurel Clark, Michael Anderson, David Brown, Kalpana Chawla, and Ilan Ramon -- join the names of 17 other space heroes who gave their lives for the U.S. space program.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-28

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Family members of the STS-107 astronauts and other dignitaries watch NASA T-38 jets fly over the Space Mirror Memorial at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in a Missing Man Formation. During this dedication ceremony, the names of the STS-107 astronauts who lost their lives during the Columbia accident -- Rick Husband, Willie McCool, Laurel Clark, Michael Anderson, David Brown, Kalpana Chawla, and Ilan Ramon -- join the names of 17 other space heroes who gave their lives for the U.S. space program.

  6. Does formal mentoring for faculty members matter? A survey of clinical faculty members.

    PubMed

    Mylona, Elza; Brubaker, Linda; Williams, Valerie N; Novielli, Karen D; Lyness, Jeffrey M; Pollart, Susan M; Dandar, Valerie; Bunton, Sarah A

    2016-06-01

    Mentoring relationships, for all medical school faculty members, are an important component of lifelong development and education, yet an understanding of mentoring among medical school clinical faculty members is incomplete. This study examined associations between formal mentoring relationships and aspects of faculty members' engagement and satisfaction. It then explored the variability of these associations across subgroups of clinical faculty members to understand the status of mentoring and outcomes of mentoring relationships. The authors hypothesised that academic clinical faculty members currently in formal mentoring relationships experience enhanced employee engagement and satisfaction with their department and institution. Medical school faculty members at 26 self-selected USA institutions participated in the 2011-2014 Faculty Forward Engagement Survey. Responses from clinical faculty members were analysed for relationships between mentoring status and perceptions of engagement by faculty members. Of the 11 953 clinical faculty respondents, almost one-third reported having a formal mentoring relationship (30%; 3529). Most mentored faculty indicated the relationship was important (86%; n = 3027), and over three-fourths were satisfied with their mentoring experience (77%; n = 2722). Mentored faculty members across ranks reported significantly higher levels of satisfaction and more positive perceptions of their roles in the organisation. Faculty members who were not receiving mentoring reported significantly less satisfaction with their workplace environment and lower overall satisfaction. Mentored clinical faculty members have significantly greater satisfaction with their department and institution. This multi-institutional study provides evidence that fostering mentoring opportunities may facilitate faculty members' satisfaction and engagement, which, in turn, may help medical schools retain high-quality faculty staff committed to the multidimensional

  7. Spouses/Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-10-2-0113 TITLE: Spouses/Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Keith D... RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) September 2016 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND...SUBTITLE Spouses/Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-2-0113 5c. PROGRAM

  8. Modeling of skeletal members using polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, J.M.F.; Weaver, R.W.

    1983-11-01

    At the request of the University of New Mexico's Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, members of the Plastic Section in the Process Development Division at SNLA undertook the special project of the Chaco Lady. The project consisted of polyurethane foam casting of a disinterred female skull considered to be approximately 1000 years old. Rubber latex molds, supplied by the UNM Anthropology Department, were used to produce the polymeric skull requested. The authors developed for the project a modified foaming process which will be used in future polyurethane castings of archaeological artifacts and contemporary skeletal members at the University.

  9. Job satisfaction among hospice interdisciplinary team members.

    PubMed

    DeLoach, Roenia

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate job satisfaction among hospice interdisciplinary team (IDT) members. Interdisciplinary team members (N = 76) from several hospices in Ohio participated in the study. Pearson product-moment correlations (p < .05) revealed that there were significant relationships between job satisfaction and autonomy, role ambiguity, role conflict, supervisory support, task significance, routinization, positive affectivity, negative affectivity, and team functioning. Multiple regression analysis (p < .05) revealed that supervisory support, positive affectivity, role ambiguity, autonomy, and routinization were significant predictors of job satisfaction.

  10. 42 CFR 435.119 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Qualified family members. 435.119 Section 435.119... Family Members § 435.119 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A qualified family member is any member of a family, including pregnant women and children eligible for Medicaid under § 435.116 of...

  11. 42 CFR 435.119 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Qualified family members. 435.119 Section 435.119... Family Members § 435.119 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A qualified family member is any member of a family, including pregnant women and children eligible for Medicaid under § 435.116 of this...

  12. 21 CFR 14.95 - Compensation of advisory committee members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... voting advisory committee members shall, and nonvoting members may, be appointed as special Government... subsistence, unless such compensation and reimbursement are waived. (2) Members of the Technical Electronic.... (3) Voting and nonvoting advisory committee members who are members of the uniformed...

  13. 7 CFR 983.42 - Initial members and nomination of successor members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA, ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Administrative Committee § 983.42 Initial... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Initial members and nomination of successor members. 983.42 Section 983.42 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture...

  14. 7 CFR 932.130 - Public member and alternate public member eligibility requirements and nomination procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Rules and Regulations § 932.130 Public... member (husband, wife, son or daughter) of a producer or handler of olives and shall have no direct... processing of olives; nor shall they be either an officer, director, or employee, or family member of...

  15. 7 CFR 932.130 - Public member and alternate public member eligibility requirements and nomination procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Rules and Regulations § 932.130 Public... member (husband, wife, son or daughter) of a producer or handler of olives and shall have no direct... processing of olives; nor shall they be either an officer, director, or employee, or family member of...

  16. 7 CFR 932.130 - Public member and alternate public member eligibility requirements and nomination procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Rules and Regulations § 932.130 Public... member (husband, wife, son or daughter) of a producer or handler of olives and shall have no direct... processing of olives; nor shall they be either an officer, director, or employee, or family member of...

  17. 7 CFR 932.130 - Public member and alternate public member eligibility requirements and nomination procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Rules and Regulations § 932.130 Public... member (husband, wife, son or daughter) of a producer or handler of olives and shall have no direct... processing of olives; nor shall they be either an officer, director, or employee, or family member of...

  18. 7 CFR 932.130 - Public member and alternate public member eligibility requirements and nomination procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Rules and Regulations § 932.130 Public... member (husband, wife, son or daughter) of a producer or handler of olives and shall have no direct... processing of olives; nor shall they be either an officer, director, or employee, or family member of...

  19. 32 CFR 884.10 - Returning members, employees, and family members from overseas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Returning members, employees, and family members from overseas. 884.10 Section 884.10 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL TO UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL...

  20. 32 CFR 884.10 - Returning members, employees, and family members from overseas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Returning members, employees, and family members from overseas. 884.10 Section 884.10 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL TO UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL...

  1. Do Commercial Managed Care Members Rate Their Health Plans Differently than Medicaid Managed Care Members?

    PubMed Central

    Roohan, Patrick J; Franko, Scott J; Anarella, Joseph P; Dellehunt, Laura K; Gesten, Foster C

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine if members of commercial managed care and Medicaid managed care rate the experience with their health plans differently. Data Sources Data from both commercial and Medicaid Consumer Assessment of Health Plan Surveys (CAHPS) in New York State. Study Design Regression models were used to determine the effect of population (commercial or Medicaid) on a member's rating of their health plan, controlling for health status, age, gender, education, race/ethnicity, number of office visits, and place of residence. Data Collection Managed care plans are required to submit to the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) results of the annual commercial CAHPS survey. The NYSDOH conducted a survey of Medicaid enrollees using Medicaid CAHPS. Principal Findings Medicaid managed care members in excellent or very good health rate their health plan higher than commercial members in excellent or very good health. There is no difference in health plan rating for commercial and Medicaid members in good, fair, or poor health. Older, less educated, black, and Hispanic members who live outside New York City are more likely to rate their managed care plan higher. Conclusions Medicaid members rating of their health care equals or exceeds ratings by commercial members. PMID:12968820

  2. 7 CFR 915.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternate members. 915.27 Section 915.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA Order...

  3. 7 CFR 915.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 915.27 Section 915.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA...

  4. 7 CFR 915.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alternate members. 915.27 Section 915.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA...

  5. 7 CFR 915.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternate members. 915.27 Section 915.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA...

  6. Accommodating Faculty Members Who Have Disabilities. Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of University Professors, 2012

    2012-01-01

    In recent years the rights and responsibilities of students who have disabilities have received considerable attention. Professors routinely accommodate students with a front-row seat in class or extended time on an examination. Faculty members who have disabilities have received far less attention. This report from a subcommittee of Committee A…

  7. Elastomeric member and method of manufacture therefor

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, L.O.

    1985-12-10

    An energy storage device is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member disposed within a tubular housing, which elastomeric member is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section, and transition end sections, attached to rigid end piece assemblies of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member, a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing. Each of the transition sections are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween. During manufacture, the sleeves are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section to provide the correct profile and helix angle. 12 figs.

  8. Elastomeric member and method of manufacture therefor

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, Lyle O.

    1985-01-01

    An energy storage device (10) is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member (16) disposed within a tubular housing (14), which elastomeric member (16) is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member (16) is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section (74), and transition end sections (76, 78), attached to rigid end piece assemblies (22, 24) of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections (76, 78) are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member (16), a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing (14). Each of the transition sections (76, 78) are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve (26, 28) having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve (26, 28) also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween. During manufacture, the sleeves (26, 28) are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section (76, 78) to provide the correct profile and helix angle.

  9. Physical Fitness of University Faculty Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williford, H. N.; Barksdale, J. M.

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare physical activity, aerobic fitness, and selected coronary heart disease risk factors in 27 male and 21 female university faculty members. Results of t-tests indicate that the males had significantly greater values for physical activity index, systolic blood pressure, aerobic fitness (V02 max), and…

  10. Recruiting and Mentoring Minority Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, William; Yglesias, Kenneth; Murray, John P.

    2010-01-01

    For the foreseeable future, community colleges must seriously address hiring, retaining, and facilitating upward mobility for faculty members. Moreover, they should recruit a faculty corps that is more reflective of both the students they serve and the demographics of their college service area. It is critical for community colleges to employ and…

  11. 7 CFR 1210.502 - Importer members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Importer members. 1210.502 Section 1210.502 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND...

  12. 7 CFR 1210.502 - Importer members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Importer members. 1210.502 Section 1210.502 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND...

  13. 7 CFR 1210.502 - Importer members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Importer members. 1210.502 Section 1210.502 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND...

  14. Parliamentary Procedure for the FFA Member.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joestgen, John G.

    Information and examples concerning parliamentary procedures are presented in this instructional manual written for Wisconsin Future Farmers of America (FFA) members and FFA parliamentary procedure teams. Topics include the following: secretary minutes (bylaws, officers, quorum, order of business, meeting and session, introducing business,…

  15. Profile of an Effective Hospice Team Member.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basile, Joseph L.; Stone, Donald B.

    1987-01-01

    Examined competencies that hospice practitioners and experts in the field would agree upon as necessary attributes to being an effective hospice team member. Results indicated strong positive agreement between the rankings of the practitioners on emotional and interpersonal characteristics needed by hospice personnel to effectively function with…

  16. Mission Statement Analysis of CCCU Member Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firmin, Michael W.; Gilson, Krista Merrick

    2010-01-01

    Assessed were the mission statements of 107 member institutions of the Coalition of Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU). The analysis was conducted on a microlevel via appraising the frequency of words used in the statements as well as the general constructs expressed. The respective mission statements were coded for content and common…

  17. 42 CFR 93.214 - Institutional member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Institutional member. 93.214 Section 93.214 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON...

  18. 7 CFR 922.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternate members. 922.27 Section 922.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES...

  19. 7 CFR 922.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternate members. 922.27 Section 922.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES...

  20. 7 CFR 922.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alternate members. 922.27 Section 922.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES...

  1. 7 CFR 922.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 922.27 Section 922.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES...

  2. 7 CFR 922.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate members. 922.27 Section 922.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES...

  3. Family Member Involvement in Hastened Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starks, Helene; Back, Anthony L.; Pearlman, Robert A.; Koenig, Barbara A.; Hsu, Clarissa; Gordon, Judith R.; Bharucha, Ashok J.

    2007-01-01

    When patients pursue a hastened death, how is the labor of family caregiving affected? The authors examined this question in a qualitative study of 35 families. Four cases reveal the main themes: "taking care" included mutual protection between patients and family members; "midwifing the death" without professional support left families unprepared…

  4. Profile of an Effective Hospice Team Member.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basile, Joseph L.; Stone, Donald B.

    1987-01-01

    Examined competencies that hospice practitioners and experts in the field would agree upon as necessary attributes to being an effective hospice team member. Results indicated strong positive agreement between the rankings of the practitioners on emotional and interpersonal characteristics needed by hospice personnel to effectively function with…

  5. Accommodating Faculty Members Who Have Disabilities. Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of University Professors, 2012

    2012-01-01

    In recent years the rights and responsibilities of students who have disabilities have received considerable attention. Professors routinely accommodate students with a front-row seat in class or extended time on an examination. Faculty members who have disabilities have received far less attention. This report from a subcommittee of Committee A…

  6. WTO Members' Commitments in Education Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Jian

    2009-01-01

    The establishment of World Trade Organization is in line with the conclusion reached at the end of the Uruguay Round in April 1994 by the bulk of the world's trading nations. WTO is in charge of managing multilateral trading system. WTO's "General Agreement on Trade in Services" (GATS) requires member nations to comply with the following…

  7. Legal Liability of Individual School Board Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leverett, E. Freeman

    Federal court decisions and federal statutes have established a number of new rights for individuals in recent years, and the Supreme Court decided in 1975 that school board members have only limited immunity from liability for the possible denial of those rights by school board actions. These two developments have drastically increased the amount…

  8. Mothers of Gang Members Give Voice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Gwendolyn; McEvoy, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Three mothers whose children were connected to Dallas (Texas) gangs told their stories at the Fourth Joint National Conference on Gangs, Schools, and Community. It is said that gang members come from dysfunctional families, usually from homes where fathers are not present or involved in children's upbringing. In spite of a great deal of research…

  9. Issues Causing Stress among Business Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adrian, C. Mitchell; Cox, Susie S.; Phelps, Lonnie D.; Schuldt, Barbara A.; Totten, Jeff W.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines factors contributing to faculty stress. Factors including demographics, tenure, discipline, and teaching medium are all examined. Whereas once faculty members were inundated with learning new electronic technology (and the stress it created), many appear to have become somewhat comfortable with this change and have adapted to…

  10. Fort Lewis Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebdon, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Located in the shadow of Mt. Rainier, Fort Lewis is the home of the highest per capita exceptional family member population in the Army. Ideally located on the Northwest coast of Washington State, Fort Lewis is home to the Strykers and First Brigade. Combined with its close proximity to McChord Air Force Base, the installation is ideally suited to…

  11. 7 CFR 915.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate members. 915.27 Section 915.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA...

  12. Neighborhood Variation in Gang Member Concentrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Charles M.; Schnebly, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between neighborhood structure, violent crime, and concentrations of gang members at the neighborhood level. We rely on official police gang list data, police crime data, and two waves of decennial census data characterizing the socioeconomic and demographic conditions of 93 neighborhoods in Mesa, Arizona.…

  13. "Don't Argue with the Members"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gubrium, Jaber F.; Holstein, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Mel Pollner regularly cautioned researchers not to argue with the members of settings under consideration. He warned against substituting the researcher's meaning for the meanings of those being studied. This article discusses facets of the caution as they relate to the research process. Seemingly simple, the tenet is nuanced in application. The…

  14. A Helping Hand for Young Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    June, Audrey Williams

    2008-01-01

    With the academic year just under way, many junior faculty members in search of much-needed advice and guidance have begun to make critical connections with senior colleagues. Departmental pairings are the most standard form of faculty mentoring, as is the practice of newly minted professors' tapping colleagues on their own to answer questions…

  15. 7 CFR 930.28 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate members. 930.28 Section 930.28 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TART CHERRIES GROWN IN THE STATES...

  16. Board Member Testifies at Cyber Safety Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Mary

    2011-01-01

    House Education and Labor Subcommittee on Healthy Families and Communities unanimously expressed concern for the growing trend in cyberbullying during a hearing last June 24. The event, which featured National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) board member Barbara-Jane Paris and other witnesses, including TV personality Dr. Phil…

  17. 75 FR 72872 - Performance Review Board Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... CONTACT: Dadrian Brown, Human Resources Specialist, Corporate Senior Executive Management Office (006E... Secretary, Office of Human Resources Management. Patricia C. Adams, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy... Review Board (PRB) Primary Board Members John U. Sep lveda, Assistant Secretary for Human Resources and...

  18. 7 CFR 925.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternate members. 925.27 Section 925.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GRAPES GROWN IN A DESIGNATED AREA...

  19. 7 CFR 989.33 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternate members. 989.33 Section 989.33 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  20. 7 CFR 925.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternate members. 925.27 Section 925.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GRAPES GROWN IN A DESIGNATED AREA...

  1. 7 CFR 925.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alternate members. 925.27 Section 925.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GRAPES GROWN IN A DESIGNATED AREA...

  2. 7 CFR 925.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate members. 925.27 Section 925.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GRAPES GROWN IN A DESIGNATED AREA...

  3. 7 CFR 945.29 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate members. 945.29 Section 945.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN...

  4. Disability Services Partnerships with Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Sally; Markle, Larry; Wessel, Roger D.; Desmond, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Creating impactful partnerships across university divisions can enhance the effectiveness and impact of the Disability Services Office. Research has shown the benefits of practitioners and faculty members collaborating; however, careful consideration and communication is needed in order for these collaborations to be successful and beneficial. In…

  5. 7 CFR 989.33 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternate members. 989.33 Section 989.33 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  6. 7 CFR 989.33 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate members. 989.33 Section 989.33 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  7. Family Members as Participants on Craniofacial Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, James; Seaver, Earl; Stevens, George; Whiteley, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Family members (N=83) who participated in professional team staffing concerning treatment plans for their child with a craniofacial difference (typically, cleft lip and/or palate) were surveyed. Ninety-seven percent of respondents said they would choose to meet with the team on their next visit to the clinic. The role of early interventionists on…

  8. Active Member Design, Modeling, and Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umland, Jeffrey W.; Webster, Mark; John, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    The design and development of active members intended for use in structural control applications is presented. The use of three different solid state actuation materials, namely, piezoelectric, electrostictive, and magnetostrictive, is discussed. Test data is given in order to illustrate the actuator and device characteristics and performance.

  9. Board Member Testifies at Cyber Safety Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Mary

    2011-01-01

    House Education and Labor Subcommittee on Healthy Families and Communities unanimously expressed concern for the growing trend in cyberbullying during a hearing last June 24. The event, which featured National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) board member Barbara-Jane Paris and other witnesses, including TV personality Dr. Phil…

  10. 42 CFR 93.214 - Institutional member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Institutional member. 93.214 Section 93.214 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH...

  11. 42 CFR 93.214 - Institutional member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Institutional member. 93.214 Section 93.214 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH...

  12. 42 CFR 93.214 - Institutional member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Institutional member. 93.214 Section 93.214 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH...

  13. 42 CFR 93.214 - Institutional member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Institutional member. 93.214 Section 93.214 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH...

  14. Family Members as Participants on Craniofacial Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, James; Seaver, Earl; Stevens, George; Whiteley, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Family members (N=83) who participated in professional team staffing concerning treatment plans for their child with a craniofacial difference (typically, cleft lip and/or palate) were surveyed. Ninety-seven percent of respondents said they would choose to meet with the team on their next visit to the clinic. The role of early interventionists on…

  15. A Helping Hand for Young Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    June, Audrey Williams

    2008-01-01

    With the academic year just under way, many junior faculty members in search of much-needed advice and guidance have begun to make critical connections with senior colleagues. Departmental pairings are the most standard form of faculty mentoring, as is the practice of newly minted professors' tapping colleagues on their own to answer questions…

  16. AIP Member Societies Entering the 1980's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Beverly Fearn

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes results of a survey conducted by the Manpower Statistics Division of the American Institute of Physics (AIP). Questions were asked of nine member societies of the AIP concerning demographic and employment data such as professional self-identification, type of employer by highest degree, primary work activity, and annual salary. (CS)

  17. Fort Lewis Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebdon, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Located in the shadow of Mt. Rainier, Fort Lewis is the home of the highest per capita exceptional family member population in the Army. Ideally located on the Northwest coast of Washington State, Fort Lewis is home to the Strykers and First Brigade. Combined with its close proximity to McChord Air Force Base, the installation is ideally suited to…

  18. Stability of structural members under axial load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Eugene E

    1937-01-01

    The principles of the cross method of moment distribution are used to check the stability of structural members under axial load. A brief theoretical treatment of the subject, together with an illustrative problem, is included as well as a discussion of the reduced modulus at high stresses and a set of tables to aid in the solution of practical problems.

  19. Boron--epoxy tubular structure members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakespeare, W. B. J.; Nelson, P. T.; Lindkvist, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    Composite materials fabricate thin-walled tubular members which have same load-carrying capabilities as aluminum, titanium, or other metals, but are lighter. Interface between stepped end fitting and tube lends itself to attachments by primary as well as secondary bonding. Interlaminar shear and hoop stress buildup in attachment at end fitting is avoided.

  20. 7 CFR 924.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... such other duties as assigned. In the event of the death, removal, resignation, or disqualification of... qualified. In the event both a member of the committee and his alternate are unable to attend a...

  1. 7 CFR 945.29 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 945.29 Section 945.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... be assigned or requested by the committee. In the event of the death, removal, resignation,...

  2. Members' needs, intragroup conflict, and group performance.

    PubMed

    Chun, Jinseok S; Choi, Jin Nam

    2014-05-01

    Focusing on "what people want in their group" as a critical antecedent of intragroup conflict, the present study theorizes and empirically investigates the relationships among the psychological needs of group members, intragroup conflict, and group performance. It attends to the within-group average and dispersion of members' psychological needs and examines the effects stemming from group composition of needs on multiple types of conflict. The analyses based on multisource data from 145 organizational teams revealed significant relationships between the groups' composition with respect to the members' need for achievement and task conflict, need for affiliation and relationship conflict, and need for power and status conflict. Some of these relationships were moderated by open communication among members. The analyses also demonstrated that when the 3 types of conflict were considered together, task conflict was a positive predictor of group performance, whereas relationship conflict was a negative predictor. The findings highlight the motivational aspects of intragroup conflict, revealing the multilevel dynamics of the psychological needs in social settings. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. 7 CFR 929.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate members. 929.27 Section 929.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF...

  4. 7 CFR 929.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternate members. 929.27 Section 929.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF...

  5. 7 CFR 929.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternate members. 929.27 Section 929.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF...

  6. 7 CFR 929.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alternate members. 929.27 Section 929.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF...

  7. Depression: Supporting a Family Member or Friend

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a family member or friend dealing with depression get treatment and find resources. By Mayo Clinic Staff Helping ... depression.asp. Accessed July 9, 2015. FYI: Understanding depression and effective treatment. American Psychological Association. http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/ ...

  8. 7 CFR 925.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 925.27 Section 925.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GRAPES GROWN IN A DESIGNATED AREA OF...

  9. 7 CFR 989.33 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 989.33 Section 989.33 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN IN...

  10. Neighborhood Variation in Gang Member Concentrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Charles M.; Schnebly, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between neighborhood structure, violent crime, and concentrations of gang members at the neighborhood level. We rely on official police gang list data, police crime data, and two waves of decennial census data characterizing the socioeconomic and demographic conditions of 93 neighborhoods in Mesa, Arizona.…

  11. 7 CFR 923.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternate members. 923.27 Section 923.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWEET CHERRIES GROWN IN DESIGNATED...

  12. 7 CFR 930.28 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternate members. 930.28 Section 930.28 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TART CHERRIES GROWN IN THE STATES OF...

  13. 7 CFR 930.28 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 930.28 Section 930.28 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TART CHERRIES GROWN IN THE STATES OF...

  14. 7 CFR 923.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 923.27 Section 923.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWEET CHERRIES GROWN IN DESIGNATED...

  15. 7 CFR 923.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternate members. 923.27 Section 923.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWEET CHERRIES GROWN IN DESIGNATED...

  16. 7 CFR 923.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate members. 923.27 Section 923.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWEET CHERRIES GROWN IN DESIGNATED...

  17. 7 CFR 923.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alternate members. 923.27 Section 923.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWEET CHERRIES GROWN IN DESIGNATED...

  18. 7 CFR 930.28 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternate members. 930.28 Section 930.28 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TART CHERRIES GROWN IN THE STATES OF...

  19. 7 CFR 930.28 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alternate members. 930.28 Section 930.28 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TART CHERRIES GROWN IN THE STATES OF...

  20. 7 CFR 966.31 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate members. 966.31 Section 966.31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order...

  1. 7 CFR 966.31 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternate members. 966.31 Section 966.31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order...

  2. 7 CFR 966.31 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternate members. 966.31 Section 966.31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order...

  3. 7 CFR 966.31 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alternate members. 966.31 Section 966.31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order...

  4. 7 CFR 920.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternate members. 920.27 Section 920.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN...

  5. 7 CFR 920.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate members. 920.27 Section 920.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN...

  6. 7 CFR 920.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternate members. 920.27 Section 920.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN...

  7. 7 CFR 920.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alternate members. 920.27 Section 920.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN...

  8. 7 CFR 920.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 920.27 Section 920.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN...

  9. Screening of household family members of brucellosis cases and neighboring community members in Azerbaijan.

    PubMed

    Ismayilova, Rita; Mody, Rupal; Abdullayev, Rakif; Amirova, Kamala; Jabbarova, Latafat; Ustun, Narmin; Jahanov, Musa; Nasirova, Emilya; Powers, Marilyn; Rivard, Robert; Hepburn, Matthew; Bautista, Christian T

    2013-05-01

    Brucellosis is an endemic zoonotic disease in Azerbaijan. The first human brucellosis case reported in 1922 was in Pardabil village of a region currently named Shabran. Household members of brucellosis index cases are a population at risk for brucellosis infection. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of seropositivity of brucellosis among household and neighboring community members of brucellosis index cases in Azerbaijan. Twenty-one household members of 8 index brucellosis cases and 27 community neighbors were serologically tested for evidence of exposure by the serum agglutination test. Of these, the brucellosis seropositivity rate was 9.5% and 7.4%, respectively. Screening of household members of index cases and individuals who live in proximity to infected household members is a practical approach to increase the detection of brucellosis exposure.

  10. Members' attendance rates and outcomes of relationship education groups: A consensus-dispersion analysis.

    PubMed

    Kivlighan, D Martin; Owen, Jesse; Antle, Becky

    2017-04-01

    Relationship education programs (REPs) are an effective way to enhance relationship communication, prevent relational distress, and increase relationship quality. Most REPs are delivered in a group format; however, there is little known about the influence of group processes on outcomes for these programs, such as group members' attendance. Therefore, the current study applied a dispersion-consensus model to test the impact of attendance at the member and group levels on group members' REP outcomes. In a sample of 558 lower income, primarily African American participants, we examined whether individual and group attendance rates influenced posttreatment communication patterns and relationship quality. Results indicated that an individual group member's attendance was significantly and positively related to their posttreatment relationship quality, although this relationship is complex. Specifically, this relationship was stronger in groups with higher levels of attendance as well as groups with more attendance variability. In addition, results indicated that group members reported better posttreatment relationship quality in groups with less variability in members' attendance. However, we found a significant interaction between attendance consensus and variability, and an individual group member's posttreatment relationship quality, suggesting that group members report higher levels of relationship quality in groups where the attendance of the group as a whole is lower yet more consistent. No significant relationships were found for group member's posttreatment communication patterns. Our findings suggest that the rate and variability in the group's attendance, as well as an individual group member's own attendance significantly impacts their posttreatment relationship quality in complex ways. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Structural phase transition in a growing network model with tunable member intimacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kibum; Jo, Woo Seong; Kim, Beom Jun

    2017-05-01

    Users of online communities become more intimate in time by writing posts and exchanging comments to each other. Although a certain level of intimacy among a group of members can be beneficial for the activity of the whole community, too strong intimacy among existing members can make newcomers feel alienated, driving them to leave the community. In this letter, we introduce a growing network model in which we systematically study the effect of member intimacy on the formation of connected component of the network. We introduce a parameter called clinginess and control how the member intimacy affects the communication activity. We observe that cumulative number of users who leave the community exhibits a transition-like behavior, similarly to the discontinuous transition in statistical mechanics models. Implication of our result in constructing a sustainable online community is also discussed.

  12. Why 4-H Members Leave: A Study of Discontinuance through Both Current 4-H Members and Former Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chilek, Kevin Dwayne

    2012-01-01

    4-H members quit. It is part of every 4-H program, and according to the research, it is even part of growing up. If only we knew why they quit, we could possibly do something about it. To date, the reasons youth join 4-H have been more thoroughly researched than the reasons they quit. This study explores why youth choose to discontinue membership…

  13. Likely Members of the β Pictoris and AB Doradus Moving Groups in the North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlieder, Joshua E.; Lépine, Sébastien; Simon, Michal

    2012-10-01

    We present first results from follow-up of targets in the northern hemisphere β Pictoris and AB Doradus moving group candidate list of Schlieder et al. We obtained high-resolution, near-infrared spectra of 27 candidate members to measure their radial velocities and confirm consistent group kinematics. We identify 15 candidates with consistent predicted and measured radial velocities, perform analyses of their six-dimensional (UVWXYZ) Galactic kinematics, and compare to known group member distributions. Based on these analyses, we propose that seven β Pic and eight AB Dor candidates are likely new group members. Four of the likely new β Pic stars are binaries, one a double-lined spectroscopic system. Three of the proposed AB Dor stars are binaries. Counting all binary components, we propose 22 likely members of these young, moving groups. The majority of the proposed members are M2 to M5 dwarfs, the earliest being of type K2. We also present preliminary parameters for the two new spectroscopic binaries identified in the data, the proposed β Pic member and a rejected β Pic candidate. Our candidate selection and follow-up has thus far identified more than 40 low-mass, likely members of these two moving groups. These stars provide a new sample of nearby, young targets for studies of local star formation, disks and exoplanets via direct imaging, and astrophysics in the low-mass regime.

  14. LIKELY MEMBERS OF THE {beta} PICTORIS AND AB DORADUS MOVING GROUPS IN THE NORTH

    SciTech Connect

    Schlieder, Joshua E.; Lepine, Sebastien; Simon, Michal E-mail: michal.simon@stonybrook.edu

    2012-10-01

    We present first results from follow-up of targets in the northern hemisphere {beta} Pictoris and AB Doradus moving group candidate list of Schlieder et al. We obtained high-resolution, near-infrared spectra of 27 candidate members to measure their radial velocities and confirm consistent group kinematics. We identify 15 candidates with consistent predicted and measured radial velocities, perform analyses of their six-dimensional (UVWXYZ) Galactic kinematics, and compare to known group member distributions. Based on these analyses, we propose that seven {beta} Pic and eight AB Dor candidates are likely new group members. Four of the likely new {beta} Pic stars are binaries, one a double-lined spectroscopic system. Three of the proposed AB Dor stars are binaries. Counting all binary components, we propose 22 likely members of these young, moving groups. The majority of the proposed members are M2 to M5 dwarfs, the earliest being of type K2. We also present preliminary parameters for the two new spectroscopic binaries identified in the data, the proposed {beta} Pic member and a rejected {beta} Pic candidate. Our candidate selection and follow-up has thus far identified more than 40 low-mass, likely members of these two moving groups. These stars provide a new sample of nearby, young targets for studies of local star formation, disks and exoplanets via direct imaging, and astrophysics in the low-mass regime.

  15. Fixity of members embedded in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castilla, F.; Martin, P.; Link, J.

    1984-02-01

    For concrete structures founded on piles, the length of pile embedment required to develop a condition to full fixity has a significant impact on the cost of the structure. The purpose of this research was to determine the pile embedment length required to provide reasonable assurance that a condition of full fixity exists for a pile embedded in the base of a concrete structure. A two-part study was performed on models of a cap-member-soil system and a cap-member system to evaluate the degree of rotational fixity associated with various pile embedment lengths and various pile types, including typical design conditions for HP 14X73 and HP 14X117 piles. The study results indicate that a pile embedment length equal to or greater than twice the pile depth or diameter is required to develop a condition approximating full fixity for a pile embedded in the base of a concrete structure.

  16. Employment Opportunities for Family Members in Germany.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-24

    community wives clubs in Germany. The tables in Appendix 2 provide statistical information on the world - wide distribution of DOD active duty military...fewer local nationals would create a skills imbalance that would be unacceptable? 4. Could we cope with the political repercussions from the unions...Could we cope with the political repercussions from the unions/ works councils if we decided to employ more family members and fewer LN’s? Should we

  17. Physical Performance Assessment in Military Service Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    minimal detectable change scores for the timed “up & go” test, the six-minute walk test, and gait speed in people with Alzheimer disease . Phys Ther...Physical Performance Assessment in Military Service Members Abstract Few established measures allow effective quantification of physical performance...time course of recov- ery associated with these combat in- juries is limited, and limited evidence specifically quantifies the effect of surgical and

  18. Gauging the Commitment of Clandestine Group Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    maintain the structure and norms of the group which the members have evolved through their interactions Dorwin Cartwright 1968 Resultant of all...cohesion as “the extent to which psychological forces operate to bind people together in a common purpose” [Klein, 1971:7]. Cartwright and Zander...common goal, or one where everyone is willing to take responsibility for group chores. [ Cartwright and Zander, 1953:7] 2-12 In a 1980 study

  19. STS-64 SAFER Assembly development team members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system, to be tested on the STS-64 flight, is surrounded by the team members who have spent a number of recent man hours in preparation for the system's first test-flight. In front are (left to right) Russell L. Flack and Bob Lowe. In the back row are (left to right) Jack D. Humphreys, Chuck Deason, Bill Wood and James Brown.

  20. Flooded member detection by gamma ray technique

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.

    1995-12-31

    Following API`s recommended procedures (Draft 17) for the assessment of existing platforms, inspection personnel and platform maintenance engineers need to determine the structural safety and physical integrity of the platform. To perform testing of a platform`s subsea supports, there is now a tool that allows evaluation on short notice without extensive member preparation. The expansion of topside facilities can be undertaken with confidence, and the sale or purchase of the platform is enhanced when proof of the structural integrity is presented. With advances in the use of nucleonics, flooded member testing and evaluation is performed in 5 seconds, successfully and economically. Gamma Ray Flooded Member Detection performed by qualified Tracerco personnel is approved by Lloyds Register for recertification in the North Sea area and is widely used. With today`s emphasis on safe long term use of existing facilities, this easy, proven method of inspection should be the forefront of options available. This paper presents the theory and practical aspects of the use of Gamma Ray radiation to test submerged pipes, legs or structural supports.

  1. Orientating nonpharmacist faculty members to pharmacy practice.

    PubMed

    Clapp, Peter; Calderon, Bianca; Sheridan, Leah; Sucher, Brandon

    2014-06-17

    To design, implement, and evaluate a faculty development program intended to orient nonpharmacist faculty members to pharmacy practice. A multifaceted program was implemented in 2012 that included 4 shadowing experiences in which faculty members visited acute care, ambulatory care, hospital, and community pharmacy settings under the guidance of licensed preceptors. Itineraries for each visit were based on objective lists of anticipated practice experiences that define the role of the pharmacist in each setting. The 4 shadowing experiences culminated with reflection and completion of a survey to assess the impact of the program. All of the faculty participants agreed that the experience improved their conceptual understanding of contemporary pharmacy practice and the role of the pharmacist in the healthcare setting. The experience also improved faculty comfort with creating practice-relevant classroom activities. A shadowing experience is an effective way of orienting nonpharmacist faculty members to the practice of pharmacy. This program inspired the creation of an experience to introduce pharmacy practice faculty to pharmaceutical science faculty research initiatives.

  2. Lay REC members: patient or public?

    PubMed

    Staley, Kristina

    2013-12-01

    In practice, the role of lay members of research ethics committees (RECs) often involves checking the accessibility of written materials, checking that the practical needs of participants have been considered and ensuring that a lay summary of the research will be produced. In this brief report, I argue that all these tasks would be more effectively carried out through a process of patient involvement (PI) in research projects prior to ethical review. Involving patients with direct experience of the topic under investigation brings added value beyond the contributions typically made by lay REC members, who are often not patients themselves. This is because PI tailors the design and conduct of research to the specific interests and concerns of the people who will actually take part in a project and make use of its findings. If a project has PI in its early stages, then a similar input from lay REC members could at best result in duplication of effort and at worst create the potential for conflict. The rationale for lay REC membership will therefore need to change from 'contributing a patient perspective' to 'ensuring transparency and public accountability in REC decisions'. This has implications for addressing more strategic questions about lay REC membership, including who is best recruited to the role and how they should be expected to contribute in practice.

  3. Infrared Scanning of FRP Composite Members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halabe, U. B.; Bangalore, G.; GangaRao, H. V. S.; Klinkhachorn, P.

    2003-03-01

    Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) composite is rapidly emerging as an alternative material for the infrastructure industry, and as a supplement to the conventional material such as steel, concrete, and timber. However, the long-term behavior of these materials has not been fully understood. In order to study the durability issues, it is important to develop a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) system for continuous monitoring of structural members built with FRP materials. This paper presents the results of an experimental study on delamination detection in FRP composite members using infrared thermography. Simulated delaminations of various sizes were inserted into several FRP box sections and deck sections during the pultrusion process to create subsurface defects. The defective specimens were then tested in the laboratory using infrared thermography to predict the location and planar extent of these subsurface delaminations. The infrared tests yielded good results, which indicate that the technique can be developed for long-term in-service monitoring of FRP structural members in the field environment.

  4. Perceptions of teamwork among code team members.

    PubMed

    Mahramus, Tara; Frewin, Sarah; Penoyer, Daleen Aragon; Sole, Mary Lou

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) teams, known as code teams, provide coordinated and evidenced-based interventions by various disciplines during a CPA. Teamwork behaviors are essential during CPA resuscitation and may have an impact on patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of teamwork during CPA events among code team members and to determine if differences in perception existed between disciplines within the code team. A prospective, descriptive, comparative design using the Code Teamwork Perception Tool online survey was used to assess the perception of teamwork during CPA events by medical residents, critical care nurses, and respiratory therapists. Sixty-six code team members completed the Code Teamwork Perception Tool. Mean teamwork scores were 2.63 on a 5-point scale (0-4). No significant differences were found in mean scores among disciplines. Significant differences among scores were found on 7 items related to code leadership, roles and responsibilities between disciplines, and in those who had participated on a code team for less than 2 years and certified in Advanced Cardiac Life Support for less than 4 years. Teamwork perception among members of the code team was average. Teamwork training for resuscitation with all disciplines on the code team may promote more effective teamwork during actual CPA events. Clinical nurse specialists can aid in resuscitation efforts by actively participating on committees, identifying opportunities for improvement, being content experts, leading the development of team training programs, and conducting research in areas lacking evidence.

  5. Spouses/Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    INTRODUCTION This project focuses on marriages/ romantic relationships and family relationships of service members with significant risk for...2003), and relationship difficulties have been cited as the most common trigger of suicides in service members over the past several years (Keuhn...phases. Phase 1 employs focus groups to (a) better understand the needs of romantic partners and (b) begin to identify needs of other types of family

  6. Galaxy formation

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, J.

    1984-11-01

    Implications of the isotropy of the cosmic microwave background on large and small angular scales for galaxy formation are reviewed. In primeval adiabatic fluctuations, a universe dominated by cold, weakly interacting nonbaryonic matter, e.g., the massive photino is postulated. A possible signature of photino annihilation in our galactic halo involves production of cosmic ray antiprotons. If the density is near its closure value, it is necessary to invoke a biasing mechanism for suppressing galaxy formation throughout most of the universe in order to reconcile the dark matter density with the lower astronomical determinations of the mean cosmological density. A mechanism utilizing the onset of primordial massive star formation to strip gaseous protogalaxies is described. Only the densest, early collapsing systems form luminous galaxies. (ESA)

  7. Comet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J.

    2014-07-01

    There has been vast progress in our understanding of planetesimal formation over the past decades, owing to a number of laboratory experiments as well as to refined models of dust and ice agglomeration in protoplanetary disks. Coagulation rapidly forms cm-sized ''pebbles'' by direct sticking in collisions at low velocities (Güttler et al. 2010; Zsom et al. 2010). For the further growth, two model approaches are currently being discussed: (1) Local concentration of pebbles in nebular instabilities until gravitational instability occurs (Johansen et al. 2007). (2) A competition between fragmentation and mass transfer in collisions among the dusty bodies, in which a few ''lucky winners'' make it to planetesimal sizes (Windmark et al. 2012a,b; Garaud et al. 2013). Predictions of the physical properties of the resulting bodies in both models allow a distinction of the two formation scenarios of planetesimals. In particular, the tensile strength (i.e, the inner cohesion) of the planetesimals differ widely between the two models (Skorov & Blum 2012; Blum et al. 2014). While model (1) predicts tensile strengths on the order of ˜ 1 Pa, model (2) results in rather compactified dusty bodies with tensile strengths in the kPa regime. If comets are km-sized survivors of the planetesimal-formation era, they should in principle hold the secret of their formation process. Water ice is the prime volatile responsible for the activity of comets. Thermophysical models of the heat and mass transport close to the comet-nucleus surface predict water-ice sublimation temperatures that relate to maximum sublimation pressures well below the kPa regime predicted for formation scenario (2). Model (1), however, is in agreement with the observed dust and gas activity of comets. Thus, a formation scenario for cometesimals involving gravitational instability is favored (Blum et al. 2014).

  8. Crows cross-modally recognize group members but not non-group members

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Noriko; Izawa, Ei-Ichi; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    Recognizing other individuals by integrating different sensory modalities is a crucial ability of social animals, including humans. Although cross-modal individual recognition has been demonstrated in mammals, the extent of its use by birds remains unknown. Herein, we report the first evidence of cross-modal recognition of group members by a highly social bird, the large-billed crow (Corvus macrorhynchos). A cross-modal expectancy violation paradigm was used to test whether crows were sensitive to identity congruence between visual presentation of a group member and the subsequent playback of a contact call. Crows looked more rapidly and for a longer duration when the visual and auditory stimuli were incongruent than when congruent. Moreover, these responses were not observed with non-group member stimuli. These results indicate that crows spontaneously associate visual and auditory information of group members but not of non-group members, which is a demonstration of cross-modal audiovisual recognition of group members in birds. PMID:22217722

  9. Crows cross-modally recognize group members but not non-group members.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Noriko; Izawa, Ei-Ichi; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2012-05-22

    Recognizing other individuals by integrating different sensory modalities is a crucial ability of social animals, including humans. Although cross-modal individual recognition has been demonstrated in mammals, the extent of its use by birds remains unknown. Herein, we report the first evidence of cross-modal recognition of group members by a highly social bird, the large-billed crow (Corvus macrorhynchos). A cross-modal expectancy violation paradigm was used to test whether crows were sensitive to identity congruence between visual presentation of a group member and the subsequent playback of a contact call. Crows looked more rapidly and for a longer duration when the visual and auditory stimuli were incongruent than when congruent. Moreover, these responses were not observed with non-group member stimuli. These results indicate that crows spontaneously associate visual and auditory information of group members but not of non-group members, which is a demonstration of cross-modal audiovisual recognition of group members in birds.

  10. 20. MEMBER 'A' SHOWS TENON AS USED IN POST 'A' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. MEMBER 'A' SHOWS TENON AS USED IN POST 'A' (TN-159A-19), MEMBER 'B' IS BEAM 'B' IN TN-159A-19 AND SHOWS METHOD OF JOINING THESE MEMBERS. MEMBER 'C' SHOWS MORTISE IN BEAM 'B'. - Caleb Crosby Threshing Barn, Noeton (moved to Norris Dam State Park, Lake City), Morristown, Hamblen County, TN

  11. 42 CFR 436.121 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Qualified family members. 436.121 Section 436.121... Coverage of the Categorically Needy § 436.121 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A qualified family member is any member of a family, including pregnant women and children eligible for Medicaid under §...

  12. Alignment Jigs For Bonding End Fittings To Truss Members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sword, Lee F.

    1996-01-01

    Set of alignment jigs hold fittings during adhesive bonding of fittings to ends of truss members. For each member, jigs hold two end fittings collinear while member allowed to move slightly, within dimensional tolerances, during injection and curing of adhesive. Once adhesive cured, fittings remain collinear even though member not necessarily perfectly straight between them.

  13. 21 CFR 14.90 - Ad hoc advisory committee members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ad hoc advisory committee members. 14.90 Section... PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE A PUBLIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE Members of Advisory Committees § 14.90 Ad hoc advisory committee members. In selecting members of an ad hoc advisory committee, the Commissioner may use...

  14. 21 CFR 14.90 - Ad hoc advisory committee members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ad hoc advisory committee members. 14.90 Section... PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE A PUBLIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE Members of Advisory Committees § 14.90 Ad hoc advisory committee members. In selecting members of an ad hoc advisory committee, the Commissioner may use...

  15. 12 CFR 1261.6 - Determination of member votes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the Bank Act (12 U.S.C. 1427(b)) that prohibit any member from casting any vote in excess of the... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Determination of member votes. 1261.6 Section... the members. (b) Number of votes. For each member directorship and each independent directorship...

  16. 12 CFR 1261.6 - Determination of member votes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the Bank Act (12 U.S.C. 1427(b)) that prohibit any member from casting any vote in excess of the... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Determination of member votes. 1261.6 Section... the members. (b) Number of votes. For each member directorship and each independent directorship...

  17. 12 CFR 1261.6 - Determination of member votes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the Bank Act (12 U.S.C. 1427(b)) that prohibit any member from casting any vote in excess of the... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Determination of member votes. 1261.6 Section... the members. (b) Number of votes. For each member directorship and each independent directorship...

  18. 42 CFR 436.121 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Qualified family members. 436.121 Section 436.121... Coverage of the Categorically Needy § 436.121 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A qualified family member is any member of a family, including pregnant women and children eligible for Medicaid under § 436...

  19. 42 CFR 436.121 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Qualified family members. 436.121 Section 436.121... Coverage of the Categorically Needy § 436.121 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A qualified family member is any member of a family, including pregnant women and children eligible for Medicaid under § 436...

  20. 42 CFR 436.121 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Qualified family members. 436.121 Section 436.121... Coverage of the Categorically Needy § 436.121 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A qualified family member is any member of a family, including pregnant women and children eligible for Medicaid under § 436...

  1. Post-fire assessment of structural wood members

    Treesearch

    Robert J. Ross; Brian K. Brashaw; Xiping Wang; Robert H. White; Roy F. Pellerin

    2005-01-01

    Since the interior of a charred wood member normally retains its structural integrity, large structural wood members often do not need to be replaced after a fire. Engineering judgement is required to determine which members can remain and which members need to be replaced or repaired. Due to the lack of established methods to directly determine the residual capacity...

  2. Finland Becomes Eleventh ESO Member State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-07-01

    Finland has become the eleventh member state of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) [1]. The formal accession procedure was carried through as planned and has now been completed. Following the signing of the corresponding Agreement earlier this year (ESO PR 02/04), acceptance by the Finnish Parliament and ratification by the Finnish President of the Agreement as well as the ESO Convention and the associated protocols in June [2] and the deposit of the instruments of accession today, Finland has now officially joined ESO. ESO warmly welcomes the new member country and its scientific community that is renowned for their expertise in many frontline areas. The related opportunities will contribute to strenghtening of pioneering research with the powerful facilities at ESO's observatories, to the benefit of Astronomy and Astrophysics as well as European science in general. ESO also looks forward to collaboration with the Finnish high-tech industry. For Finland, the membership in ESO is motivated by scientific and technological objectives as well as by the objective of improving the public understanding of science. The Finnish Government is committed to increasing the public research funding in order to improve the quality, impact and internationalisation of research. Membership in ESO offers unique facilities for astronomical research which would not otherwise be available for Finnish astronomers. Finland is also very interested in taking part in technological development projects in fields like ICT, optics and instrumentation. For young scientists and engineers, ESO is a challenging, international working and learning environment. Finland has already taken part in the educational programmes of ESO, and as a member this activity will be broadened and intensified. In Finland there are also several science journalists and a large community of amateur astronomers who will be very happy to take part in ESO's outreach activities.

  3. Chromosomal aberrations in ISS crew members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, Christian; Goedecke, Wolfgang; Antonopoulos, Alexandra

    2012-07-01

    High energy radiation is a major risk factor in manned space missions. Astronauts and cosmonauts are exposed to ionising radiations of cosmic and solar origin, while on the Earth's surface people are well protected by the atmosphere and a deflecting magnetic field. There are now data available describing the dose and the quality of ionising radiation on-board of the International Space Station (ISS). Nonetheless, the effect of increased radiation dose on mutation rates of ISS crew members are hard to predict. Therefore, direct measurements of mutation rates are required in order to better estimate the radiation risk for longer duration missions. The analysis of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes is a well established method to measure radiation-induced mutations. We present data of chromosome aberration analyses from lymphocyte metaphase spreads of ISS crew members participating in short term (10-14 days) or long term (around 6 months) missions. From each subject we received two blood samples. The first sample was drawn about 10 days before launch and a second one within 3 days after return from flight. From lymphocyte cultures metaphase plates were prepared on glass slides. Giemsa stained and in situ hybridised metaphases were scored for chromosome changes in pre-flight and post-flight blood samples and the mutation rates were compared. Results obtained in chromosomal studies on long-term flight crew members showed pronounced inter-individual differences in the response to elevated radiation levels. Overall slight but significant elevations of typical radiation induced aberrations, i.e., dicentric chromosomes and reciprocal translocations have been observed. Our data indicate no elevation of mutation rates due to short term stays on-board the ISS.

  4. BVA members wow judges in photo competition.

    PubMed

    2016-09-03

    Earlier this year, BVA ran its inaugural photo competition, giving members the opportunity to showcase the work of the veterinary profession and the animals and wildlife they encounter. Standing out from over 400 high-quality entries, judges picked the images reproduced in this month's BVA News as the winning and highly commended photos. To see all the entries and hear from the winners, visit www.bva.co.uk/vet-photos-2016/. There will be another photo competition in 2017 with more categories to be announced.

  5. ESO Welcomes Finland as Eleventh Member State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesarsky, C.

    2004-09-01

    In early July, Finland joined ESO as the eleventh member state, following the completion of the formal accession procedure. Before this event, however, Finland and ESO had been in contact for a long time. Under an agreement with Sweden, Finnish astronomers had for quite a while enjoyed access to the SEST at La Silla. Finland had also been a very active participant in ESO's educational activities since they began in 1993. It became clear, that science and technology, as well as education, were priority areas for the Finnish government.

  6. AGU member running to fill congressional seat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Emily

    John F Mink, an AGU member (Hydrology) for 50 years, and husband of the late Representative Patsy T. Mink (D-Hawaii), will run in a special election on 30 November to fill the remainder of his wife's unexpired congressional term. Patsy Mink, who represented the 2nd Congressional District of Hawaii, passed away on 28 September after battling pneumonia.Her name will appear on the 5 November election ballot as a candidate for Hawaii's 2nd District in the 108th Congress. If she is elected posthumously, the state of Hawaii will hold a special election in January to select an official to serve the full two-year term.

  7. 19 CFR 122.49b - Electronic manifest requirement for crew members and non-crew members onboard commercial aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electronic manifest requirement for crew members and non-crew members onboard commercial aircraft arriving in, continuing within, and overflying the...; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard Commercial...

  8. 19 CFR 122.75b - Electronic manifest requirement for crew members and non-crew members onboard commercial aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electronic manifest requirement for crew members and non-crew members onboard commercial aircraft departing from the United States. 122.75b Section 122...; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard Commercial...

  9. 17 CFR 1.59 - Activities of self-regulatory organization employees, governing board members, committee members...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... organization employees, governing board members, committee members, and consultants. 1.59 Section 1.59... board members, committee members, and consultants. (a) Definitions. For purposes of this section: (1... committee activities; or (iii) Any consultant hired by a self-regulatory organization. (5) Material...

  10. 17 CFR 1.59 - Activities of self-regulatory organization employees, governing board members, committee members...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... organization employees, governing board members, committee members, and consultants. 1.59 Section 1.59... board members, committee members, and consultants. (a) Definitions. For purposes of this section: (1... compensated by a self-regulatory organization solely for committee activities; or (iii) Any consultant hired...

  11. 17 CFR 1.59 - Activities of self-regulatory organization employees, governing board members, committee members...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... organization employees, governing board members, committee members, and consultants. 1.59 Section 1.59... board members, committee members, and consultants. (a) Definitions. For purposes of this section: (1... compensated by a self-regulatory organization solely for committee activities; or (iii) Any consultant hired...

  12. 17 CFR 1.59 - Activities of self-regulatory organization employees, governing board members, committee members...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... organization employees, governing board members, committee members, and consultants. 1.59 Section 1.59... board members, committee members, and consultants. (a) Definitions. For purposes of this section: (1... committee activities; or (iii) Any consultant hired by a self-regulatory organization. (5) Material...

  13. A Pan-STARRS1 Search for Substellar Young Moving Group Members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Kimberly M.; Liu, Michael C.; Magnier, Eugene A.

    2016-01-01

    Young moving groups (YMGs) are coeval, comoving groups of stars which have migrated from their birthsites after formation. In the substellar regime, YMG members are key benchmarks to empirically define brown dwarf evolution with age and to study the lowest mass end of the initial mass function. We have combined Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) proper motions with optical+IR photometry from PS1, 2MASS and WISE to perform a large-scale (~30,000 deg2) systematic search for substellar members down to ~10 MJup . We have obtained near-IR spectroscopy of a large sample of ultracool candidate YMG members to assess their youth via gravity-sensitive absorption features. We have identified several new intermediate-gravity candidate members of the AB Dor Moving Group, potentially greatly expanding the substellar membership. These new candidate members bridge the gap between the known low-mass stellar and planetary-mass members and yield valuable insight into the spectral characteristics of young brown dwarfs.

  14. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1996-10-22

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer is disclosed for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. 12 figs.

  15. The dying child and surviving family members.

    PubMed

    Shrier, D K

    1980-12-01

    This overview of death and dying focuses on the dying child and surviving family members. Children's concepts of death at different developmental stages are reviewed. These range from an inability to distinguish death from other forms of separation prior to age 3, through partial concepts of death until, by age 10 to 15 years, children are able to conceptualize death as universal, inevitable and final. The importance of adults assisting in the child's growing comprehension of death is stressed. The stages of grief and mourning, as outlined by Kubler-Ross, are reviewed from the perspective of the child and family: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. Recognition is given to the variations in coping styles among different family members. The special circumstances related to the death of an infant and the impact of the death of a child on the surviving siblings are discussed. Specific helpful interventions to assist families in coping with mourning are described. The death of a child remains one of the most painful and difficult events for a family and its physician to accept.

  16. Orienting members in a preselected rotary alignment

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Ray E.

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus for orienting members and for maintaining their rotary alignment during orienting members. The apparatus comprises first and second cylindrical elements, a rotation prevention element, a collar and a retainer. Each element has an outside wall, and first and second ends, each end having an outside edge. The first element has portions defining a first plurality of notches located at the outside edge of its first end. An external threaded portion is on the outside wall of the first element and next to the first plurality of notches. The second element has portions defining a second plurality of notches located at the outside edge of its first end. The first plurality has a different number than the second plurality. The first ends of the first and second tubes have substantially the same outside diameter and are abutted during connection so that a cavity is formed whenever first and second tube notches substantially overlap. A rotation prevention element is placed in the cavity to prevent rotation of the first and second elements. A collar with an internal threaded portion is slidably disposed about the second element. The internal threaded portion engages the external threaded portion of the first element to connect the elements. A lip connected to the collar prevents separation of the collar from the second element.

  17. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1996-01-01

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal to noise ratio.

  18. Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Modern theories of star and planet formation, which are based upon observations of the Solar System and of young stars and their environments, predict that most single stars should have rocky planets in orbit about them; the frequency of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth like terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Models for the formation of the giant planets found in recent radial velocity searches are discussed.

  19. Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    An overview of current theories of star and planet formation is presented. These models are based upon observations of the Solar System and of young stars and their environments. They predict that rocky planets should form around most single stars, although it is possible that in some cases such planets are lost to orbital decay within the protoplanetary disk. The frequency of formation of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth like terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates.

  20. Galaxy formation

    PubMed Central

    Peebles, P. J. E.

    1998-01-01

    It is argued that within the standard Big Bang cosmological model the bulk of the mass of the luminous parts of the large galaxies likely had been assembled by redshift z ∼ 10. Galaxy assembly this early would be difficult to fit in the widely discussed adiabatic cold dark matter model for structure formation, but it could agree with an isocurvature version in which the cold dark matter is the remnant of a massive scalar field frozen (or squeezed) from quantum fluctuations during inflation. The squeezed field fluctuations would be Gaussian with zero mean, and the distribution of the field mass therefore would be the square of a random Gaussian process. This offers a possibly interesting new direction for the numerical exploration of models for cosmic structure formation. PMID:9419326