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Sample records for membrane androgen binding

  1. Structural characteristics of anabolic androgenic steroids contributing to binding to the androgen receptor and to their anabolic and androgenic activities. Applied modifications in the steroidal structure.

    PubMed

    Fragkaki, A G; Angelis, Y S; Koupparis, M; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, A; Kokotos, G; Georgakopoulos, C

    2009-02-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of testosterone introduced for therapeutic purposes providing enhanced anabolic potency with reduced androgenic effects. Androgens mediate their action through their binding to the androgen receptor (AR) which is mainly expressed in androgen target tissues, such as the prostate, skeletal muscle, liver and central nervous system. This paper reviews some of the wide spectrum of testosterone and synthetic AAS structure modifications related to the intended enhancement in anabolic activity. The structural features of steroids necessary for effective binding to the AR and those which contribute to the stipulation of the androgenic and anabolic activities are also presented.

  2. A physiological role for androgen actions in the absence of androgen receptor DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Pang, Tammy P S; Clarke, Michele V; Ghasem-Zadeh, Ali; Lee, Nicole K L; Davey, Rachel A; MacLean, Helen E

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that androgens have physiological actions via non-DNA binding-dependent androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathways in males, using our genetically modified mice that express a mutant AR with deletion of the 2nd zinc finger of the DNA binding domain (AR(ΔZF2)) that cannot bind DNA. In cultured genital skin fibroblasts, the mutant AR(ΔZF2) has normal ligand binding ability, phosphorylates ERK-1/2 in response to 1 min DHT treatment (blocked by the AR antagonist bicalutamide), but has reduced androgen-dependent nuclear localization compared to wildtype (WT). AR(ΔZF2) males have normal baseline ERK-1/2 phosphorylation, with a 1.5-fold increase in Akt phosphorylation in AR(ΔZF2) muscle vs WT. To identify physiological actions of non-DNA binding-dependent AR signaling, AR(ΔZF2) males were treated for 6 weeks with dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Cortical bone growth was suppressed by DHT in AR(ΔZF2) mice (6% decrease in periosteal and 7% decrease in medullary circumference vs untreated AR(ΔZF2) males). In conclusion, these data suggest that non-DNA binding dependent AR actions suppress cortical bone growth, which may provide a mechanism to fine-tune the response to androgens in bone.

  3. The effect of anabolic-androgenic steroids on aromatase activity and androgen receptor binding in the rat preoptic area.

    PubMed

    Roselli, C E

    1998-05-11

    The level of aromatase in the preoptic area of rats is transcriptionally regulated through a specific androgen-receptor mediated mechanism and can be used as a measure of central androgenic effect. Therefore, several commonly abused anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) were tested for their ability to induce aromatase activity in the preoptic area of castrated rats. In addition, we determined the relative binding affinities of these compounds for the androgen receptor, as well as their ability to bind androgen receptor in vivo following subcutaneous injections. All of the AAS compounds tested significantly stimulated POA aromatase activity above castrate levels. The compounds that produced the greatest stimulation of aromatase activity were those that bound most avidly to the androgen receptor in vitro (i.e., testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and nandrolone). In contrast, the 17alpha-alkylated compounds that were tested (stanozolol, danazol, methandrostenolone) modestly stimulated aromatase and were weak competitors for the androgen receptor. The subcutaneous injection of AAS compounds increased the concentrations of occupied nuclear androgen receptors in the brain, but the magnitude of effect was not related to their potency for inducing aromatase or their relative binding affinity for the androgen receptor suggesting that androgen receptor occupancy in POA is not correlated with the action of androgen on aromatase. The present results help explain the behavioral effects of AAS compounds in rats. PMID:9593936

  4. RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND THE HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY.
    MC Cardon, PC Hartig,LE Gray, Jr. and VS Wilson.
    U.S. EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTD, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    Typically, in vitro hazard assessments for ...

  5. RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND THE HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow Trout Androgen Receptor Alpha And Human Androgen Receptor: Comparisons in the COS Whole Cell Binding Assay
    Mary C. Cardon, L. Earl Gray, Jr. and Vickie S. Wilson
    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle...

  6. Ligand Binding to the Androgen Receptor Induces Conformational Changes That Regulate Phosphatase Interactions▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-Song; Xin, Hong-Wu; Kelley, Joshua B.; Spencer, Adam; Brautigan, David L.; Paschal, Bryce M.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a mechanism for protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) targeting to the androgen receptor (AR) and provide insight into the more general issue of kinase and phosphatase interactions with AR. Simian virus 40 (SV40) small t antigen (ST) binding to N-terminal HEAT repeats in the PP2A A subunit induces structural changes transduced to C-terminal HEAT repeats. This enables the C-terminal HEAT repeats in the PP2A A subunit, including HEAT repeat 13, to discriminate between androgen- and androgen antagonist-induced AR conformations. The PP2A-AR interaction was used to show that an AR mutant in prostate cancer cells (T877A) is activated by multiple ligands without acquiring the same conformation as that induced by androgen. The correlation between androgen binding to AR and increased phosphorylation of the activation function 1 (AF-1) region implies that changes in AR conformation or chaperone composition are causal to kinase access to phosphorylation sites. However, AF-1 phosphorylation sites are kinase accessible prior to androgen binding. This suggests that androgens can enhance the phosphorylation state of AR either by negatively regulating the ability of the ligand-binding domain to bind phosphatases or by inducing an AR conformation that is resistant to phosphatase action. SV40 ST subverts this mechanism by promoting the direct transfer of PP2A onto androgen-bound AR, resulting in multisite dephosphorylation. PMID:17325038

  7. Substitution of synthetic chimpanzee androgen receptor for human androgen receptor in competitive binding and transcriptional activation assays for EDC screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential effect of receptor-mediated endocrine modulators across species is of increasing concern. In attempts to address these concerns we are developing androgen and estrogen receptor binding assays using recombinant hormone receptors from a number of species across differ...

  8. Androgens.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Rakesh; Handelsman, David J

    2016-01-01

    Androgen abuse is the most potent and prevalent form of sports doping detected. It originated from the early years of the Cold War as an epidemic confined to drug cheating within elite power sports. In the decades following the end of the Cold War, it has become disseminated into an endemic based within the illicit drug subcultures serving recreational abusers seeking cosmetic body sculpting effects. Within sports, both direct androgen abuse (administration of androgens), as well as indirect androgen abuse (administration of nonandrogenic drugs to increase endogenous testosterone), is mostly readily detectable with mass spectrometry-based anti-doping urine tests. The ongoing temptation of fame and fortune and the effectiveness of androgen abuse in power sports continue to entice cheating via renewed approaches aiming to exploit androgens. These require ongoing vigilance, inventiveness in anti-doping science, and targeting coaches as well as athletes in order to build resilience against doping and maintain fairness in elite sport. The challenge of androgen abuse in the community among recreational abusers has barely been recognized and effective approaches remain to be developed. PMID:27347677

  9. In Silico and In Vitro Investigation of the Piperine's Male Contraceptive Effect: Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies in Androgen-Binding Protein and Androgen Receptor.

    PubMed

    Chinta, Gopichand; Ramya Chandar Charles, Mariasoosai; Klopčič, Ivana; Sollner Dolenc, Marija; Periyasamy, Latha; Selvaraj Coumar, Mohane

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanism of action of traditional medicines is an important step towards developing marketable drugs from them. Piperine, an active constituent present in the Piper species, is used extensively in Ayurvedic medicines (practiced on the Indian subcontinent). Among others, piperine is known to possess a male contraceptive effect; however, the molecular mechanism of action for this effect is not very clear. In this regard, detailed docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies of piperine with the androgen-binding protein and androgen receptors were carried out. Androgen receptors control male sexual behavior and fertility, while the androgen-binding protein binds testosterone and maintains its concentration at optimal levels to stimulate spermatogenesis in the testis. It was found that piperine docks to the androgen-binding protein, similar to dihydrotestosterone, and to androgen receptors, similar to cyproterone acetate (antagonist). Also, the piperine-androgen-binding protein and piperine-androgen receptors interactions were found to be stable throughout 30 ns of molecular dynamics simulation. Further, two independent simulations for 10 ns each also confirmed the stability of these interactions. Detailed analysis of the piperine-androgen-binding protein interactions shows that piperine interacts with Ser42 of the androgen-binding protein and could block the binding with its natural ligands dihydrotestosterone/testosterone. Moreover, piperine interacts with Thr577 of the androgen receptors in a manner similar to the antagonist cyproterone acetate. Based on the in silico results, piperine was tested in the MDA-kb2 cell line using the luciferase reporter gene assay and was found to antagonize the effect of dihydrotestosterone at nanomolar concentrations. Further detailed biochemical experiments could help to develop piperine as an effective male contraceptive agent in the future.

  10. The Deubiquitinating Enzyme USP7 Regulates Androgen Receptor Activity by Modulating Its Binding to Chromatin*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shu-Ting; Okada, Maiko; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Izumi, Kosuke; Bando, Masashige; Shirahige, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR), a nuclear receptor superfamily transcription factor, plays a key role in prostate cancer. AR signaling is the principal target for prostate cancer treatment, but current androgen-deprivation therapies cannot completely abolish AR signaling because of the heterogeneity of prostate cancers. Therefore, unraveling the mechanism of AR reactivation in androgen-depleted conditions can identify effective prostate cancer therapeutic targets. Increasing evidence indicates that AR activity is mediated by the interplay of modifying/demodifying enzymatic co-regulators. To better understand the mechanism of AR transcriptional activity regulation, we used antibodies against AR for affinity purification and identified the deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin-specific protease 7, USP7 as a novel AR co-regulator in prostate cancer cells. We showed that USP7 associates with AR in an androgen-dependent manner and mediates AR deubiquitination. Sequential ChIP assays indicated that USP7 forms a complex with AR on androgen-responsive elements of target genes upon stimulation with the androgen 5α-dihydrotestosterone. Further investigation indicated that USP7 is necessary to facilitate androgen-activated AR binding to chromatin. Transcriptome profile analysis of USP7-knockdown LNCaP cells also revealed the essential role of USP7 in the expression of a subset of androgen-responsive genes. Hence, inhibition of USP7 represents a compelling therapeutic strategy for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26175158

  11. The use of human skin fibroblasts to obtain potency estimates of drug binding to androgen receptors.

    PubMed

    Eil, C; Edelson, S K

    1984-07-01

    Although several drugs with antiandrogenic properties have been used to treat such conditions as prostatic carcinoma, precocious puberty, acne, and hirsutism, their relative strengths in human tissues are not known. Most of the compounds that are effective clinically in opposing androgen action interact with the androgen receptor in various assay systems. To determine in human cells the relative potencies of these agents as well as others with androgenic properties, we measured the abilities of various compounds to compete with [3H]dihydrotestosterone [( 3H]DHT) for androgen-binding sites in dispersed human genital skin fibroblasts at 22 degrees C. The concentrations of unlabeled DHT, methyltrienolone (a synthetic non- metabolizeable androgen), and testosterone required for 50% inhibition of [3H]DHT binding were similar, approximately 1 nM [0.87 +/- 0.12 (+/- SE), 1.18 +/- 0.18, and 1.01 +/- 0.20 nM, respectively]. The relative binding activities, defined by the ratio of the concentration of methyltrienolone to the concentration of competitor required for 50% displacement of [3H]DHT, were as follows: spironolactone greater than R2956 (a synthetic antiandrogen) greater than megestrol acetate greater than cyproterone acetate greater than estradiol greater than flutamide much greater than testolactone greater than cimetidine. Danazol, an androgen agonist that causes hirsutism, was nearly as effective as spironolactone in its ability to compete for the fibroblast androgen receptor, 50% inhibition of fibroblast [3H]DHT binding was achieved by 1.76 +/- 0.31 nM spironolactone and 2.85 +/- 0.50 nM danazol. Two other compounds that induce hirsutism, diphenylhydantoin and diazoxide, did not displace [3H]DHT. We conclude that 1) of the compounds tested, spironolactone, which is rapidly metabolized in vivo to a much less potent competitor, is the most potent antiandrogen in its ability to interact in vitro with human skin fibroblast androgen receptors; 2) estradiol is a

  12. Increased cytosolic androgen receptor binding in rat striated muscle following denervation and disuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, P. A.; Fishman, P. S.; Max, S. R.; Rance, N. E.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of denervation and disuse on cytosolic androgen receptor binding by rat striated muscle are investigated. Denervation of the extensor digitorum longus and tibialis anterior muscles caused by a 40-50-percent increase in cytosolic androgen receptor concentration with no change in apparent binding affinity. This effect was evident at 6 h postdenervation, maximal at 24 h, and declined to 120 percent of the control level 72 h after denervation. A 40-percent increase in cytosolic androgen receptor concentration was also noted 24 hr after denervation of the hormone-sensitive levator ani muscle. The effect of denervation on androgen receptors was blocked by in vivo injection of cycloheximide; therefore, de novo receptor synthesis probably is not involved in the observed increase. Disuse, produced by subperineurial injection of tetrodotoxin into the tibial and common peroneal branches of the sciatic nerve, mimicked the effect of denervation on androgen receptor binding, suggesting that neuromuscular activity is important in regulation of receptor concentration. Possible mechanisms subserving this effect are discussed.

  13. Effect of B-ring substitution pattern on binding mode of propionamide selective androgen receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Bohl, Casey E; Wu, Zengru; Chen, Jiyun; Mohler, Michael L; Yang, Jun; Hwang, Dong Jin; Mustafa, Suni; Miller, Duane D; Bell, Charles E; Dalton, James T

    2008-10-15

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are essentially prostate sparing androgens, which provide therapeutic potential in osteoporosis, male hormone replacement, and muscle wasting. Herein we report crystal structures of the androgen receptor (AR) ligand-binding domain (LBD) complexed to a series of potent synthetic nonsteroidal SARMs with a substituted pendant arene referred to as the B-ring. We found that hydrophilic B-ring para-substituted analogs exhibit an additional region of hydrogen bonding not seen with steroidal compounds and that multiple halogen substitutions affect the B-ring conformation and aromatic interactions with Trp741. This information elucidates interactions important for high AR binding affinity and provides new insight for structure-based drug design.

  14. Human sex hormone-binding globulin binding affinities of 125 structurally diverse chemicals and comparison with their binding to androgen receptor, estrogen receptor, and α-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Hong, Huixiao; Branham, William S; Ng, Hui Wen; Moland, Carrie L; Dial, Stacey L; Fang, Hong; Perkins, Roger; Sheehan, Daniel; Tong, Weida

    2015-02-01

    One endocrine disruption mechanism is through binding to nuclear receptors such as the androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor (ER) in target cells. The concentration of a chemical in serum is important for its entry into the target cells to bind the receptors, which is regulated by the serum proteins. Human sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is the major transport protein in serum that can bind androgens and estrogens and thus change a chemical's availability to enter the target cells. Sequestration of an androgen or estrogen in the serum can alter the chemical elicited AR- and ER-mediated responses. To better understand the chemical-induced endocrine activity, we developed a competitive binding assay using human pregnancy plasma and measured the binding to the human SHBG for 125 structurally diverse chemicals, most of which were known to bind AR and ER. Eighty seven chemicals were able to bind the human SHBG in the assay, whereas 38 chemicals were nonbinders. Binding data for human SHBG are compared with that for rat α-fetoprotein, ER and AR. Knowing the binding profiles between serum and nuclear receptors will improve assessment of a chemical's potential for endocrine disruption. The SHBG binding data reported here represent the largest data set of structurally diverse chemicals tested for human SHBG binding. Utilization of the SHBG binding data with AR and ER binding data could enable better evaluation of endocrine disrupting potential of chemicals through AR- and ER-mediated responses since sequestration in serum could be considered.

  15. The androgen-binding protein gene is expressed in male and female rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y M; Bayliss, D A; Millhorn, D E; Petrusz, P; Joseph, D R

    1990-12-01

    Extracellular androgen-binding proteins (ABP) are thought to modulate the regulatory functions of androgens and the trans-acting nuclear androgen receptor. Testicular ABP and plasma sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), which is produced in liver, are encoded by the same gene. We have now found that the ABP-SHBG gene is also expressed in male and female rat brain. Immunoreactive ABP was found to be present in neuronal cell bodies throughout the brain as well as in fibers of the hypothalamic median eminence. The highest concentrations of immunoreactive cell bodies were located in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. Likewise, ABP mRNA was present in all brain regions examined. Analysis of cDNA clones representing brain ABP mRNAs revealed amino acid sequence differences in brain and testicular ABPs. The protein encoded by an alternatively processed RNA has sequence characteristics suggesting that the protein could act as a competitior of ABP binding to cell surface receptors. These data and gene-sequencing experiments indicate that a specific ABP gene promoter is used for transcription initiation in brain. ABP may function in brain as an androgen carrier protein; however, in view of the widespread presence of ABP and ABP mRNA in brain, the protein may have a much broader, yet unknown, function. PMID:1701136

  16. Opposing effects of estradiol- and testosterone-membrane binding sites on T47D breast cancer cell apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kampa, Marilena; Nifli, Artemissia-Phoebe; Charalampopoulos, Ioannis; Alexaki, Vassilia-Ismini; Theodoropoulos, Panayiotis A.; Stathopoulos, Efstathios N.; Gravanis, Achille; Castanas, Elias . E-mail: castanas@med.uoc.gr

    2005-07-01

    Classical steroid mode of action involves binding to intracellular receptors, the later acting as ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors. Recently, membrane sites for different steroids have been also identified, mediating rapid, non-genomic, steroid actions. Membrane sites for estrogen and androgen have been found in a number of different cell types, bearing or not classical intracellular receptors. In the present study, with the use of radioligand binding, flow cytometry and confocal laser microscopy, we report that T47D human breast cancer cells express specific and saturable membrane receptors for both estrogen (K {sub D} 4.06 {+-} 3.31 nM) and androgen (K {sub D} 7.64 {+-} 3.15 nM). Upon activation with BSA-conjugated, non-permeable ligands (E{sub 2}-BSA and testosterone-BSA), membrane estrogen receptors protect cells from serum-deprivation-induced apoptosis, while androgen receptors induce apoptosis in serum-supplemented T47D cells. In addition, co-incubation of cells with a fixed concentration of one steroid and varying concentrations of the other reversed the abovementioned effect (apoptosis for androgen, and anti-apoptosis for E{sub 2}), suggesting that the fate of the cell depends on the relative concentration of either steroid in the culture medium. We also report the identification of membrane receptors for E{sub 2} and androgen in biopsy slides from breast cancer patients. Both sites are expressed, with the staining for membrane E{sub 2} being strongly present in ER-negative, less differentiated, more aggressive tumors. These findings suggest that aromatase inhibitors may exert their beneficial effects on breast cancer by also propagating the metabolism of local steroids towards androgen, inducing thus cell apoptosis through membrane androgen receptor activation.

  17. Detection of persistent organic pollutants binding modes with androgen receptor ligand binding domain by docking and molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are persistent in the environment after release from industrial compounds, combustion productions or pesticides. The exposure of POPs has been related to various reproductive disturbances, such as reduced semen quality, testicular cancer, and imbalanced sex ratio. Among POPs, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (4,4’-DDE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are the most widespread and well-studied compounds. Recent studies have revealed that 4,4’-DDE is an antagonist of androgen receptor (AR). However, the mechanism of the inhibition remains elusive. CB-153 is the most common congener of PCBs, while the action of CB-153 on AR is still under debate. Results Molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) approaches have been employed to study binding modes and inhibition mechanism of 4,4’-DDE and CB-153 against AR ligand binding domain (LBD). Several potential binding sites have been detected and analyzed. One possible binding site is the same binding site of AR natural ligand androgen 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Another one is on the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation function (AF2) region, which is crucial for the co-activators recruitment. Besides, a novel possible binding site was observed for POPs with low binding free energy with the receptor. Detailed interactions between ligands and the receptor have been represented. The disrupting mechanism of POPs against AR has also been discussed. Conclusions POPs disrupt the function of AR through binding to three possible biding sites on AR/LBD. One of them shares the same binding site of natural ligand of AR. Another one is on AF2 region. The third one is in a cleft near N-terminal of the receptor. Significantly, values of binding free energy of POPs with AR/LBD are comparable to that of natural ligand androgen DHT. PMID:24053684

  18. Unexpected binding orientation of bulky-B-ring anti-androgens and implications for future drug targets.

    PubMed

    Duke, Charles B; Jones, Amanda; Bohl, Casey E; Dalton, James T; Miller, Duane D

    2011-06-01

    Several new androgen receptor antagonists were synthesized and found to have varying activities across typically anti-androgen resistant mutants (Thr877 → Ala and Trp741 → Leu) and markedly improved potency over previously reported pan-antagonists. X-ray crystallography of a new anti-androgen in an androgen receptor mutant (Thr877 → Ala) shows that the receptor can accommodate the added bulk presented by phenyl to naphthyl substitution, casting doubt on previous reports of predicted binding orientation and the causes of antagonism in bulky-B-ring antagonists.

  19. Specific Ion Binding at Phospholipid Membrane Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Calero, Carles; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Martí, Jordi

    2015-09-01

    Metal cations are ubiquitous components in biological environments and play an important role in regulating cellular functions and membrane properties. By applying metadynamics simulations, we have performed systematic free energy calculations of Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) bound to phospholipid membrane surfaces for the first time. The free energy landscapes unveil specific binding behaviors of metal cations on phospholipid membranes. Na(+) and K(+) are more likely to stay in the aqueous solution and can bind easily to a few lipid oxygens by overcoming low free energy barriers. Ca(2+) is most stable when it is bound to four lipid oxygens of the membrane rather than being hydrated in the aqueous solution. Mg(2+) is tightly hydrated, and it shows hardly any loss of a hydration water or binding directly to the membrane. When bound to the membrane, the cations' most favorable total coordination numbers with water and lipid oxygens are the same as their corresponding hydration numbers in aqueous solution, indicating a competition between ion binding to water and lipids. The binding specificity of metal cations on membranes is highly correlated with the hydration free energy and the size of the hydration shell.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the human androgen receptor ligand-binding domain with a coactivator-like peptide and selective androgen receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Thauvin, Maxime; Robin-Jagerschmidt, Catherine; Nique, François; Mollat, Patrick; Fleury, Damien; Prangé, Thierry

    2008-12-01

    The ligand-binding domain of the human androgen receptor has been cloned, overproduced and crystallized in the presence of a coactivator-like 11-mer peptide and two different nonsteroidal ligands. The crystals of the two ternary complexes were isomorphous and belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. They diffracted to 1.7 and 1.95 A resolution, respectively. Structure determination of these two complexes will help in understanding the mode of binding of selective nonsteroidal androgens versus endogenous steroidal ligands and possibly the origin of their tissue selectivity.

  1. Secretin: specific binding to rat brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Fremeau, R.T. Jr.; Jensen, R.T.; Charlton, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; O'Donohue, T.L.; Moody, T.W.

    1983-08-01

    The binding of (/sup 125/I)secretin to rat brain membranes was investigated. Radiolabeled secretin bound with high affinity (KD . 0.2 nM) to a single class of noninteracting sites. Binding was specific, saturable, and reversible. Regional distribution studies indicated that the specific binding was greatest in the cerebellum, intermediate in the cortex, thalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus, and lowest in the midbrain and medulla/pons. Pharmacological studies indicated that only secretin, but not other peptides, inhibits binding of (/sup 125/I)secretin with high affinity. Also, certain guanine nucleotides inhibited high affinity binding. These data indicate that rat brain membranes possess high affinity binding sites specific for secretin and that with the use of (/sup 125/I) secretin the kinetics, stoichiometry, specificity, and distribution of secretin receptors can be directly investigated.

  2. Coregulator control of androgen receptor action by a novel nuclear receptor-binding motif.

    PubMed

    Jehle, Katja; Cato, Laura; Neeb, Antje; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Jung, Nicole; Smith, Emmanuel W; Buzon, Victor; Carbó, Laia R; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva; Schmitz, Katja; Fruk, Ljiljana; Luy, Burkhard; Chen, Yu; Cox, Marc B; Bräse, Stefan; Brown, Myles; Cato, Andrew C B

    2014-03-28

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is essential for prostate cancer development. It is activated by androgens through its ligand-binding domain (LBD), which consists predominantly of 11 α-helices. Upon ligand binding, the last helix is reorganized to an agonist conformation termed activator function-2 (AF-2) for coactivator binding. Several coactivators bind to the AF-2 pocket through conserved LXXLL or FXXLF sequences to enhance the activity of the receptor. Recently, a small compound-binding surface adjacent to AF-2 has been identified as an allosteric modulator of the AF-2 activity and is termed binding function-3 (BF-3). However, the role of BF-3 in vivo is currently unknown, and little is understood about what proteins can bind to it. Here we demonstrate that a duplicated GARRPR motif at the N terminus of the cochaperone Bag-1L functions through the BF-3 pocket. These findings are supported by the fact that a selective BF-3 inhibitor or mutations within the BF-3 pocket abolish the interaction between the GARRPR motif(s) and the BF-3. Conversely, amino acid exchanges in the two GARRPR motifs of Bag-1L can impair the interaction between Bag-1L and AR without altering the ability of Bag-1L to bind to chromatin. Furthermore, the mutant Bag-1L increases androgen-dependent activation of a subset of AR targets in a genome-wide transcriptome analysis, demonstrating a repressive function of the GARRPR/BF-3 interaction. We have therefore identified GARRPR as a novel BF-3 regulatory sequence important for fine-tuning the activity of the AR.

  3. Selectivity in progesterone and androgen receptor binding of progestagens used in oral contraceptives

    SciTech Connect

    Kloosterboer, H.J.; Vonk-Noordegraaf, C.A.; Turpijn, E.W.

    1988-09-01

    The relative binding affinities (RBAs) of four progestational compounds (norethisterone, levonorgestrel, 3-keto-desogestrel and gestodene) for the human progesterone and androgen receptors were measured in MCF-7 cytosol and intact MCF-7 cells. For the binding to the progesterone receptor, both Org 2058 and Org 3236 (or 3-keto-desogestrel) were used as labelled ligands. The following ranking (low to high) for the RBA of the nuclear (intact cells) progesterone receptor irrespective of the ligand used is found: norethisterone much less than levonorgestrel less than 3-keto-destogestrel less than gestodene. The difference between the various progestagens is significant with the exception of that between 3-keto-desogestrel and gestodene, when Org 2058 is used as ligand. For the cytosolic progesterone receptor, the same order is found with the exception that similar RBAs are found for gestodene and 3-keto-desogestrel. The four progestagens clearly differ with respect to binding to the androgen receptor using dihydrotestosterone as labelled ligand in intact cells; the ranking (low to high) is: norethisterone less than 3 keto-desogestrel less than levonorgestrel and gestodene. The difference between 3-keto-desogestrel and levonorgestrel or gestodene is significant. The selectivity indices (ratio of the mean RBA for the progesterone receptor to that of androgen receptor) in intact cells are significantly higher for 3-keto-desogestrel and gestodene than for levonorgestrel and norethisterone. From these results we conclude that the introduction of the 18-methyl in norethisterone (levonorgestel) increases both the binding to the progesterone and androgen receptors.

  4. STARD4 Membrane Interactions and Sterol Binding.

    PubMed

    Iaea, David B; Dikiy, Igor; Kiburu, Irene; Eliezer, David; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2015-08-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer (START) domain family is defined by a conserved 210-amino acid sequence that folds into an α/β helix-grip structure. Members of this protein family bind a variety of ligands, including cholesterol, phospholipids, sphingolipids, and bile acids, with putative roles in nonvesicular lipid transport, metabolism, and cell signaling. Among the soluble START proteins, STARD4 is expressed in most tissues and has previously been shown to transfer sterol, but the molecular mechanisms of membrane interaction and sterol binding remain unclear. In this work, we use biochemical techniques to characterize regions of STARD4 and determine their role in membrane interaction and sterol binding. Our results show that STARD4 interacts with anionic membranes through a surface-exposed basic patch and that introducing a mutation (L124D) into the Omega-1 (Ω1) loop, which covers the sterol binding pocket, attenuates sterol transfer activity. To gain insight into the attenuating mechanism of the L124D mutation, we conducted structural and biophysical studies of wild-type and L124D STARD4. These studies show that the L124D mutation reduces the conformational flexibility of the protein, resulting in a diminished level of membrane interaction and sterol transfer. These studies also reveal that the C-terminal α-helix, and not the Ω1 loop, partitions into the membrane bilayer. On the basis of these observations, we propose a model of STARD4 membrane interaction and sterol binding and release that requires dynamic movement of both the Ω1 loop and membrane insertion of the C-terminal α-helix.

  5. Androgen receptor serine 81 phosphorylation mediates chromatin binding and transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoyong; Gulla, Sarah; Cai, Changmeng; Balk, Steven P

    2012-03-01

    Our previous findings indicated that androgen receptor (AR) phosphorylation at serine 81 is stimulated by the mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). In this report, we extended our previous study and confirmed that Ser-81 phosphorylation increases during mitosis, coincident with CDK1 activation. We further showed blocking cell cycle at G(1) or S phase did not disrupt androgen-induced Ser-81 phosphorylation and AR-dependent transcription, consistent with a recent report that AR was phosphorylated at Ser-81 and activated by the transcriptional CDK9. To assess the function of Ser-81 phosphorylation in prostate cancer (PCa) cells expressing endogenous AR, we developed a ligand switch strategy using a ligand-binding domain mutation (W741C) that renders AR responsive to the antagonist bicalutamide. An S81A/W741C double mutant AR stably expressed in PCa cells failed to transactivate the endogenous AR-regulated PSA or TMPRSS2 genes. ChIP showed that the S81A mutation prevented ligand-induced AR recruitment to these genes, and cellular fractionation revealed that the S81A mutation globally abrogated chromatin binding. Conversely, the AR fraction rapidly recruited to chromatin after androgen stimulation was highly enriched for Ser-81 phosphorylation. Finally, inhibition of CDK1 and CDK9 decreased AR Ser-81 phosphorylation, chromatin binding, and transcriptional activity. These findings indicate that Ser-81 phosphorylation by CDK9 stabilizes AR chromatin binding for transcription and suggest that CDK1-mediated Ser-81 phosphorylation during mitosis provides a pool of Ser-81 phosphorylation AR that can be readily recruited to chromatin for gene reactivation and may enhance AR activity in PCa.

  6. BA321, a novel carborane analog that binds to androgen and estrogen receptors, acts as a new selective androgen receptor modulator of bone in male mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kenta; Hirata, Michiko; Tominari, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Chiho; Endo, Yasuyuki; Murphy, Gillian; Nagase, Hideaki; Inada, Masaki; Miyaura, Chisato

    2016-09-01

    Carboranes are a class of carbon-containing polyhedral boron cluster compounds with globular geometry and hydrophobic surface that interact with hormone receptors such as estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR). We have synthesized BA321, a novel carborane compound, which binds to AR. We found here that it also binds to ERs, ERα and ERβ. In orchidectomized (ORX) mice, femoral bone mass was markedly reduced due to androgen deficiency and BA321 restored bone loss in the male, whilst the decreased weight of seminal vesicle in ORX mice was not recovered by administration of BA321. In female mice, BA321 acts as a pure estrogen agonist, and restored both the loss of bone mass and uterine atrophy due to estrogen deficiency in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. In bone tissues, the trabecular bone loss occurred in both ORX and OVX mice, and BA321 completely restored the trabecular bone loss in both sexes. Cortical bone loss occurred in ORX mice but not in OVX mice, and BA321 clearly restored cortical bone loss due to androgen deficiency in ORX mice. Therefore, BA321 is a novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) that may offer a new therapy option for osteoporosis in the male. PMID:27402268

  7. The binding of 3H-labelled androgen-receptor complexes to hypothalamic chromatin of neonatal mice: effect of sex and androgenization.

    PubMed

    Ventanas, J; Garcia, C; López-Bote, C; López, A; Burgos, J

    1990-03-01

    The binding of 3H-labelled androgen-receptor complexes, prepared by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation from the 105,000 g supernatant of hypothalamic cytosol, to hypothalamic chromatin of neonatal mice covalently coupled to cellulose was measured in vitro. Saturation binding was also determined after extraction of histones and the masking of acidic proteins with high molarities of guanidine hydrochloride. This investigation showed the presence of high-affinity, low-capacity acceptor sites for [3H]-testosterone-receptor complexes in male hypothalamic chromatin (Kd value = 0.39 x 10(-10) M and binding sites of 41 fmol per mg of DNA). Acceptor activity seems to be associated with the acidic protein fraction of chromatin. No specific acceptor sites of similar nature were found in chromatin taken from the hypothalami of female mice. On the basis of these results, it is suggested that the androgen-unresponsiveness of female mice is related to the absence of acceptors for the androgen-receptor in female mice hypothalami.

  8. The androgen receptor is transcriptionally suppressed by proteins that bind single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, M E; Tindall, D J

    1995-05-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a nuclear transcription factor that is essential for development of the male urogenital tract. In the current work, we have characterized the mouse androgen receptor suppressor (mARS). A single, 20-base pair, region (TCCCCCCACCCACCCCC-CCT) was sufficient for suppression in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays. Northern analysis indicated that translational regulation is not necessary for the suppression. Analysis of the AR mRNA half-life indicated that the mARS does not affect AR RNA degradation. Gel mobility assays showed that the mARS is bound by multiple proteins that can recognize single-stranded DNA and RNA. In addition, differing proteins are expressed in distinct tissues. Purification of some of these proteins has shown that a doublet of 33 and 35 kDa binds to the G-rich strand and that a 52-kDa protein binds to the C-rich strand. Southwestern blots have confirmed that these proteins are indeed recognized by the mARS. The results of these experiments indicate that the AR 5'-untranslated region contains a suppressor element that can be bound by multiple proteins. The mARS appears to be acting either by altering transcription initiation or blocking transcription elongation. Characterization of this suppressor may provide insight into the physiological means by which the AR is regulated.

  9. Testicular androgen-binding protein (ABP): comparison of ABP in rabbit testis and epididymis with a similar androgen-binding protein (TeBG) in rabbit serum.

    PubMed

    Hansson, V; Ritzen, M E; French, F S; Weddington, S C; Nayfeh, S N

    1975-07-01

    Testicular androgen-binding proteins (ABP) in rabbit testis, caput epididymis and efferent duct fluid (EDF) were compared to a similar androgen-binding protein TeBg) in rabbit serum. The affinity of these proteins for 5alpha-dihydrotesterone (DHT) at 0 degrees C (KaABP = 1.6 X 10(9) M-1 and KaTeBG = 1.9 X 10(9) M-1) and their steroid specificities were similar (DHT greater than androstanediol greater than progesterone and androstenedione). ABP and TeBG had also almost identical Stokes radii (42.8 +/- 1.2 and 43.9 +- 0.8 A, respectively), sedimentation coefficients (4.7 +/- 0.2 S and 4.4 +/- 0.2 S, respectively) and electrophoretic mobility (Rf = 0.4 in 6 1/2% polyacrylamide gels). Calculation of molecular weights from Stokes radii and sedimentation rates indicated a molecular weight of 74,000 (69,000-78,000) for TeBG and 76,000 (71,000-82,000) for ABP. The corresponding frictional ratios were 1.61 for TeBG and 1.55 for ABP assuming a partial specific volume (v) of 0.70 cm3/g. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) at different gel concentrations gave a mean molecular radius of 2.74 nm, also indicating a molecular weight of about 75,000 (v = 0.70 cm3/g. ABP and TeBG could not be separated by PAGE; however, partial separation of ABP and TeBG was achieved by isoelectric focusing and ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. TeBG focused at pH 5.4, whereas ABP formed a distinct peak of bound radioactivity at pH 4.7. Also by ionexchange chromatography, ABP in both testis and epididymal supernatants was shown to have an apparently higher surface charge than TeBG in rabbit serum. The concentration of ABP in efferent duct fluid (2 X 10(-7) M = 60 pmol/mg protien) was much higher than TeBG in male rabbit serum (5.2 X 10(-8) M = 0.7 pmol/mg protein). These findings ruled against the possibility that ABP in the testis and epididymis could have been derived directly from serum. It is concluded that ABP and TeBG are very similar if not identical proteins both serving as

  10. Association of androgen with gender difference in serum adipocyte fatty acid binding protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiang; Ma, Xiaojing; Pan, Xiaoping; Luo, Yuqi; Xu, Yiting; Xiong, Qin; Bao, Yuqian; Jia, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Clinical investigations have indicated women have higher levels of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP) than men. The present study aimed to identify factors related to gender difference in serum A-FABP levels. A total of 507 participants (194 men, 132 premenopausal women, and 181 postmenopausal women) were enrolled in the present study. Serum A-FABP levels increased in the order from men to premenopausal women to postmenopausal women in both body mass index categories (<25.0 and ≥25.0 kg/m2; all P < 0.05). Multiple stepwise regression analyses showed that after adjustment for factors related to serum A-FABP levels, the trunk fat mass was an independent and positive factor of serum A-FABP levels. For men, total testosterone was associated independently and inversely with serum A-FABP levels. For pre- and postmenopausal women, bioavailable testosterone and total testosterone were independent and positive factors associated with serum A-FABP levels, respectively. The present study demonstrated that the androgen was correlated with the serum A-FABP levels negatively in men, but positively in women. With these effects on the fat content, especially trunk fat, androgen might contribute to the gender difference in serum A-FABP levels. PMID:27270834

  11. BINDING OF STEROIDS AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS TO THE RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA EXPRESSED IN COS CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Binding of Steroids and Environmental Chemicals to the Rainbow Trout Androgen Receptor Alpha Expressed in COS Cells.

    Mary C. Cardon, L. Earl Gray. Jr., Phillip C. Hartig and Vickie S. Wilson
    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology...

  12. Mutation of androgen receptor N-terminal phosphorylation site Tyr-267 leads to inhibition of nuclear translocation and DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Mehmet; Liu, Yuanbo; Zhang, Zhentao; De Silva, Dinuka; Parker, Joel S; Earp, H Shelton; Whang, Young E

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of androgen receptor (AR) may drive recurrent prostate cancer in castrate patients. Ack1 tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in prostate cancer and promotes castrate resistant xenograft tumor growth and enhances androgen target gene expression and AR recruitment to enhancers. Ack1 phosphorylates AR at Tyr-267 and possibly Tyr-363, both in the N-terminal transactivation domain. In this study, the role of these phosphorylation sites was investigated by characterizing the phosphorylation site mutants in the context of full length and truncated AR lacking the ligand-binding domain. Y267F and Y363F mutants showed decreased transactivation of reporters. Expression of wild type full length and truncated AR in LNCaP cells increased cell proliferation in androgen-depleted conditions and increased colony formation. However, the Y267F mutant of full length and truncated AR was defective in stimulating cell proliferation. The Y363F mutant was less severely affected than the Y267F mutant. The full length AR Y267F mutant was defective in nuclear translocation induced by androgen or Ack1 kinase. The truncated AR was constitutively localized to the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that it was recruited to the target enhancers without androgen. The truncated Y267F AR mutant did not exhibit constitutive nuclear localization and androgen enhancer binding activity. These results support the concept that phosphorylation of Tyr-267, and to a lesser extent Tyr-363, is required for AR nuclear translocation and recruitment and DNA binding and provide a rationale for development of novel approaches to inhibit AR activity.

  13. Selectively Targeting the DNA-binding Domain of the Androgen Receptor as a Prospective Therapy for Prostate Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Kush; Roshan-Moniri, Mani; Sharma, Aishwariya; Li, Huifang; Ban, Fuqiang; Hessein, Mohamed; Hsing, Michael; Singh, Kriti; LeBlanc, Eric; Dehm, Scott; Tomlinson Guns, Emma S.; Cherkasov, Artem; Rennie, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a transcription factor that has a pivotal role in the occurrence and progression of prostate cancer. The AR is activated by androgens that bind to its ligand-binding domain (LBD), causing the transcription factor to enter the nucleus and interact with genes via its conserved DNA-binding domain (DBD). Treatment for prostate cancer involves reducing androgen production or using anti-androgen drugs to block the interaction of hormones with the AR-LBD. Eventually the disease changes into a castration-resistant form of PCa where LBD mutations render anti-androgens ineffective or where constitutively active AR splice variants, lacking the LBD, become overexpressed. Recently, we identified a surfaced exposed pocket on the AR-DBD as an alternative drug-target site for AR inhibition. Here, we demonstrate that small molecules designed to selectively bind the pocket effectively block transcriptional activity of full-length and splice variant AR forms at low to sub-micromolar concentrations. The inhibition is lost when residues involved in drug interactions are mutated. Furthermore, the compounds did not impede nuclear localization of the AR and blocked interactions with chromatin, indicating the interference of DNA binding with the nuclear form of the transcription factor. Finally, we demonstrate the inhibition of gene expression and tumor volume in mouse xenografts. Our results indicate that the AR-DBD has a surface site that can be targeted to inhibit all forms of the AR, including enzalutamide-resistant and constitutively active splice variants and thus may serve as a potential avenue for the treatment of recurrent and metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:25086042

  14. Distinct specificity for corticosteroid binding sites in amphibian cytosol, neuronal membranes, and plasma.

    PubMed

    Orchinik, M; Matthews, L; Gasser, P J

    2000-05-01

    To address mechanisms of corticosteroid action, one needs tools for distinguishing between the major classes of corticosteroid binding sites: neuronal membrane-associated receptors, intracellular ligand-activated transcription factors, and corticosteroid binding globulins (CBG) in plasma. We characterized the binding parameters for three classes of binding sites in an amphibian, Ambystoma tigrinum, and found that each class had a distinct pharmacological specificity. Equilibrium saturation and kinetic experiments indicated that [3H]corticosterone binds to neuronal membranes with high affinity (Kd approximately 0.37 nM). Aldosterone and two synthetic ligands for mammalian intracellular receptors, dexamethasone and RU486, displayed low affinity for brain membrane sites. In cytosol prepared from brain and liver, [3H]corticosterone bound to a single class of receptors with high affinity (Kd approximately 0.75 and 4.69 nM, respectively) and the rank order potencies for steroid inhibition of [3H]corticosterone binding was RU486 > dexamethasone approximately = corticosterone > aldosterone. In kidney and skin cytosol, [3H]corticosterone binding was best fit with a model having a high-affinity and a lower-affinity site; these sites are not consistent with the pharmacology of mammalian Type I (MR) and Type II (GR) receptors. [3H]Corticosterone also bound to presumed CBG in plasma with high affinity (Kd approximately 2.7 nM), but dexamethasone and androgens bound to plasma CBG with equivalently high affinity. These data demonstrate that pharmacological specificity can be a useful tool for distinguishing corticosteroid binding to different classes of binding sites. These data also indicate that there may be marked species differences in the specificity of corticosteroid binding sites.

  15. Serum and testicular testosterone and androgen binding protein profiles following subchronic treatment with carbendazim.

    PubMed

    Rehnberg, G L; Cooper, R L; Goldman, J M; Gray, L E; Hein, J F; McElroy, W K

    1989-10-01

    While the general toxicity of the benzimidazole pesticides for mammals is low, one of these compounds, carbendazim (MBC), causes degeneration of testicular tissue and decreases spermatogenic activity at doses well below the LD50 value. A study conducted by S. D. Carter, R. A. Hess, and J. W. Laskey (1987, Biol. Reprod. 37, 709-717) showed that treatment with 400 mg/kg/day MBC resulted in severe seminiferous tubular atrophy and infertility. Since spermatogenesis is an androgen-dependent process, we characterized the effects of MBC (0-400 mg/kg/day) on the endocrine function of the rat testes. Following subchronic (85 day) exposure, serum hormones (TSH, LH, FSH, and Prl) were measured as were androgen binding protein (ABP) and testosterone in testicular fluids (interstitial fluid and seminiferous tubule fluid). In addition, the functional capacity of the Leydig cell to secrete testosterone was assessed in vitro following an hCG challenge. Subchronic treatment with MBC at doses of 50-100 mg/kg/day had no effect on pituitary or testicular hormone concentrations: 200 mg/kg/day elevated the testosterone concentration in the seminiferous tubule fluid and the ABP concentration in both the interstitial fluid and the seminiferous tubule fluid without affecting serum testosterone or ABP concentrations. The 400 mg/kg/day dose resulted in increased concentration of both testosterone and ABP in the interstitial fluid and seminiferous tubule fluid and elevated serum ABP, with no change in serum testosterone. This endocrine profile is consistent with the testicular atrophy and "Sertoli cell-only" syndrome seen in these animals as reported by Gray et al. (1987, Toxicologist 7, 717). We conclude that seminiferous tubule fluid testosterone may be a result of two factors: (1) increased interstitial fluid testosterone concentrations and (2) decreased testosterone outflow from the testis to the general circulation. Also, increased ABP in the interstitial fluid may reflect a change in

  16. Characterization of α-Crystallin-Plasma Membrane Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Brian A.; Petrash, J. Mark

    2010-01-01

    α-Crystallin, a large lenticular protein complex made up of two related subunits (αA- and αB-crystallin), is known to associate increasingly with fiber cell plasma membranes with age and/or the onset of cataract. To understand better the binding mechanism, we developed a sensitive membrane binding assay using lens plasma membranes and recombinant human αA- and αB-crystallins conjugated to a small fluorescent tag (Alexa350®). Both αA and αB homopolymer complexes, as well as a reconstituted 3:1 heteromeric complex, bind to lens membranes in a specific, saturable, and partially irreversible manner that is sensitive to both time and temperature. The amount of α-crystallin that binds to the membrane increases under acidic pH conditions and upon removal of exposed intrinsic membrane protein domains but is not affected at high ionic strength, suggesting that α-crystallin binds to the fiber cell plasma membranes mainly through hydrophobic interactions. The binding capacity and affinity for the reconstituted 3:1 heteromeric complex were measured to be 3.45 ± 0.11 ng/μg of membrane and 4.57 ± 0.50 × 10−4 μg−1 of membrane, respectively. The present membrane binding data support the hypothesis that the physical properties of a mixed α-crystallin complex may hold particular relevance for the function of α-crystallin within the lens. PMID:10692476

  17. Membrane potential mediates the cellular binding of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Edwin H.; Li, Ye; Kumar, Umesh; Sureka, Hursh V.; Zhang, Xianren; Payne, Christine K.

    2013-06-01

    The use of nanoparticles for cellular therapeutic or sensing applications requires nanoparticles to bind, or adhere, to the cell surface. While nanoparticle parameters such as size, shape, charge, and composition are important factors in cellular binding, the cell itself must also be considered. All cells have an electrical potential across the plasma membrane driven by an ion gradient. Under standard conditions the ion gradient will result in a -10 to -100 mV potential across the membrane with a net negative charge on the cytosolic face. Using a combination of flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy experiments and dissipative particle dynamics simulations, we have found that a decrease in membrane potential leads to decreased cellular binding of anionic nanoparticles. The decreased cellular binding of anionic nanoparticles is a general phenomenon, independent of depolarization method, nanoparticle composition, and cell type. Increased membrane potential reverses this trend resulting in increased binding of anionic nanoparticles. The cellular binding of cationic nanoparticles is minimally affected by membrane potential due to the interaction of cationic nanoparticles with cell surface proteins. The influence of membrane potential on the cellular binding of nanoparticles is especially important when considering the use of nanoparticles in the treatment or detection of diseases, such as cancer, in which the membrane potential is decreased.The use of nanoparticles for cellular therapeutic or sensing applications requires nanoparticles to bind, or adhere, to the cell surface. While nanoparticle parameters such as size, shape, charge, and composition are important factors in cellular binding, the cell itself must also be considered. All cells have an electrical potential across the plasma membrane driven by an ion gradient. Under standard conditions the ion gradient will result in a -10 to -100 mV potential across the membrane with a net negative charge on the

  18. Androgen receptor DNA binding and chromatin accessibility profiling in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina; Stelloo, Suzan; van der Poel, Henk G.; de Jong, Jeroen; Wessels, Lodewyk F.A.; Bergman, Andries M.; Zwart, Wilbert

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most common cancer in men. The Androgen Receptor (AR) is the major driver of PCa and the main target of therapy in the advanced setting. AR is a nuclear receptor that binds the chromatin and regulates transcription of genes involved in cancer cell proliferation and survival. In a study by Stelloo et al. (1) we explored prostate cancer on the level of transcriptional regulation by means of Formaldehyde-Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements and Chromatin Immunoprecipitation coupled with massive parallel sequencing (FAIRE-seq and ChIP-seq, respectively). We employed these data for the assessment of differences in transcriptional regulation at distinct stages of PCa progression and to construct a prognostic gene expression classifier. Genomics data includes FAIRE-seq data from normal prostate tissue as well as primary, hormone therapy resistant and metastatic PCa. Furthermore, ChIP-seq data from primary and resistant PCa were generated, along with multiple input controls. The data are publicly available through NCBI GEO database with accession number GSE65478. Here we describe the genomics and clinical data in detail and provide comparative analysis of FAIRE-seq and ChIP-seq data. PMID:26981385

  19. β-Catenin Binds to the Activation Function 2 Region of the Androgen Receptor and Modulates the Effects of the N-Terminal Domain and TIF2 on Ligand-Dependent Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Song, Liang-Nian; Herrell, Roger; Byers, Stephen; Shah, Salimuddin; Wilson, Elizabeth M.; Gelmann, Edward P.

    2003-01-01

    β-Catenin is a multifunctional molecule that is activated by signaling through WNT receptors. β-Catenin can also enhance the transcriptional activity of some steroid hormone receptors such as the androgen receptor and retinoic acid receptor α. Androgens can affect nuclear translocation of β-catenin and influence its subcellular distribution. Using mammalian two-hybrid binding assays, analysis of reporter gene transcription, and coimmunoprecipitation, we now show that β-catenin binds to the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain (LBD) and modulates the transcriptional effects of TIF2 and the androgen receptor N-terminal domain (NTD). In functional assays, β-catenin bound to androgen receptor only in the presence of ligand agonists, not antagonists. β-Catenin binding to the androgen receptor LBD was independent of and cooperative with the androgen receptor NTD and the p160 coactivator TIF2, both of which bind to the activation function 2 (AF-2) region of the androgen receptor. Different mutations of androgen receptor helix 3 amino acids disrupted binding of androgen receptor NTD and β-catenin. β-Catenin, androgen receptor NTD, and TIF2 binding to the androgen receptor LBD were affected similarly by a subset of helix 12 mutations, but disruption of two sites on helix 12 affected only binding of β-catenin and not of TIF2 or the androgen receptor NTD. Mutational disruption of each of five LXXLL peptide motifs in the β-catenin armadillo repeats did not disrupt either binding to androgen receptor or transcriptional coactivation. ICAT, an inhibitor of T-cell factor 4 (TCF-4), and E-cadherin binding to β-catenin also blocked binding of the androgen receptor LBD. We also demonstrated cross talk between the WNT and androgen receptor signaling pathways because excess androgen receptor could interfere with WNT signaling and excess TCF-4 inhibited the interaction of β-catenin and androgen receptor. Taken together, the data show that β-catenin can bind to the

  20. Properties of binding sites for chloroquine in liver lysosomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Colombo, M I; Bertini, F

    1988-12-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is an antimalarial and antirheumatic drug that accumulates in lysosomes. We purified liver lysosomal membranes of tritosomes from albino mice injected with Triton WR 1339. The membranes were used for the binding assay with CQ in 0.01 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.4). This binding was saturable, with a KD value of 6.2 microM. To understand the nature of CQ affinity, the binding was done under conditions that alter membrane structure and composition. Changes in pH, high ionic strength, and bivalent cations reversibly decreased the binding, while the effect of non-ionic detergents was partially reversed. The cationic detergent Hyamine strongly decreased the binding, and its effect was trypsin and neuraminidase had no effect. The results indicate the existence of binding sites for CQ in liver lysosomal membranes, which were strongly affected by changes of charge in the molecules involved in the binding. The treatment with the enzymes suggests that loss of polar groups of phospholipids increases the affinity of CQ by exposing protein sites located deep in the membrane, or by permiting a closer interaction between the drug and membrane lipids. CQ lysosomotropism and other effects of CQ on the lysosomal apparatus studied by other authors may be due not only to its accumulation inside the acid milieu of the lysosomes, in the same manner as other weak bases, but also to the affinity of CQ for binding sites in the lysosomal membrane. PMID:3192634

  1. Serum and testicular testosterone and androgen binding protein profiles following subchronic treatment with carbendazim.

    PubMed

    Rehnberg, G L; Cooper, R L; Goldman, J M; Gray, L E; Hein, J F; McElroy, W K

    1989-10-01

    While the general toxicity of the benzimidazole pesticides for mammals is low, one of these compounds, carbendazim (MBC), causes degeneration of testicular tissue and decreases spermatogenic activity at doses well below the LD50 value. A study conducted by S. D. Carter, R. A. Hess, and J. W. Laskey (1987, Biol. Reprod. 37, 709-717) showed that treatment with 400 mg/kg/day MBC resulted in severe seminiferous tubular atrophy and infertility. Since spermatogenesis is an androgen-dependent process, we characterized the effects of MBC (0-400 mg/kg/day) on the endocrine function of the rat testes. Following subchronic (85 day) exposure, serum hormones (TSH, LH, FSH, and Prl) were measured as were androgen binding protein (ABP) and testosterone in testicular fluids (interstitial fluid and seminiferous tubule fluid). In addition, the functional capacity of the Leydig cell to secrete testosterone was assessed in vitro following an hCG challenge. Subchronic treatment with MBC at doses of 50-100 mg/kg/day had no effect on pituitary or testicular hormone concentrations: 200 mg/kg/day elevated the testosterone concentration in the seminiferous tubule fluid and the ABP concentration in both the interstitial fluid and the seminiferous tubule fluid without affecting serum testosterone or ABP concentrations. The 400 mg/kg/day dose resulted in increased concentration of both testosterone and ABP in the interstitial fluid and seminiferous tubule fluid and elevated serum ABP, with no change in serum testosterone. This endocrine profile is consistent with the testicular atrophy and "Sertoli cell-only" syndrome seen in these animals as reported by Gray et al. (1987, Toxicologist 7, 717). We conclude that seminiferous tubule fluid testosterone may be a result of two factors: (1) increased interstitial fluid testosterone concentrations and (2) decreased testosterone outflow from the testis to the general circulation. Also, increased ABP in the interstitial fluid may reflect a change in

  2. In vitro auxin binding to cellular membranes of cucumber fruits.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, K R; Mudge, K W; Poovaiah, B W

    1981-04-01

    Specific binding of 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) to crude membrane preparations from cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) was demonstrated. This in vitro binding had a pH optimum of 3.75 and an equilibrium dissociation constant of 10 to 20 micromolar with 1250 picomoles binding sites per gram fresh weight. The NAA-binding sites were pronase sensitive. The supernatant from the fruit partially inhibited the in vitro NAA binding to fruit membranes. NAA, 2-naphthoxyacetic acid, 3-indoleacetic acid, 2-4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, which are reported to be very good inducers of parthenocarpy in cucumber, showed a high degree of specific binding to cucumber fruit membranes. In comparison, 2-naphthaleneacetic acid and indolepropionic acid, which are reported to be very weak auxins in corn coleoptile, pea stem, and strawberry fruit growth bioassays, did not bind efficiently to cucumber fruit membranes. In vitro binding studies with fruit membranes suggest that auxin stimulated fruit growth may be mediated by membrane-associated, auxin-binding protein(s). PMID:16661764

  3. Characterization of chylomicron remnant binding to rat liver membranes.

    PubMed

    Cooper, A D; Erickson, S K; Nutik, R; Shrewsbury, M A

    1982-01-01

    The binding of chylomicron remnants to rat liver membranes was investigated using radioiodinated lipoproteins. The specific activity of binding increased in parallel with increased enrichment in plasma membrane markers. The yield of receptor activity, however, decreased with enrichment. Accordingly, a partially purified plasma membrane preparation was used for routine studies. Binding was saturable, with half maximal binding achieved at 4.6 micro g tetramethylurea-precipitable protein per ml. The rate of binding was time- and temperature-dependent. It could be inhibited only moderately by 10 mM EDTA. Chylomicron remnants appeared to bind to the membrane as a unit. The bound particle was richer in apoproteins of 20,000-50,000 molecular weight relative to low molecular weight apoproteins than the particles that were not bound. Lipoprotein particles containing only human apoB did not bind to liver membranes nor did they compete for the remnant binding site. Rat lipoproteins of d 1.019-1.063 g/ml did compete for remnant binding. When they were separated into apoB-rich (LDL) or apoE-rich (HDL(c)) fractions by block electrophoresis, the apoE-rich fraction was a more potent competitor. ApoE purified and reconstituted into dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles was a potent competitor for the remnant binding site. Vesicles containing (125)I-labeled apoE bound to the membranes, and they could be displaced by unlabeled remnants. Dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles themselves did not compete with either remnants or apoE-phospholipid vesicles. These results offer strong support for the hypothesis that the liver membrane chylomicron remnant receptor recognizes apoE with a high affinity, and this initiates the rapid removal of lipoproteins that contain this apoprotein.-Cooper, A. D., S. K. Erickson, R. Nutik, and M. A. Shrewsbury. Characterization of chylomicron remnant binding to rat liver membranes.

  4. Membrane binding of Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 (NCS1).

    PubMed

    Lemire, Samuel; Jeromin, Andreas; Boisselier, Élodie

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 (NCS1) belongs to the family of Neuronal Calcium Sensor (NCS) proteins. NCS1 is composed of four EF-hand motifs and an N-terminal myristoylation. However, the presence of a calcium-myristoyl switch in NCS1 and its role in the membrane binding are controversial. The model of Langmuir lipid monolayers is thus used to mimic the cell membrane in order to characterize the membrane interactions of NCS1. Two binding parameters are calculated from monolayer measurements: the maximum insertion pressure, up to which protein binding is energetically favorable, and the synergy, reporting attractive or repulsive interactions with the lipid monolayers. Binding membrane measurements performed in the presence of myristoylated NCS1 reveal better binding interactions for phospholipids composed of phosphoethanolamine polar head groups and unsaturated fatty acyl chains. In the absence of calcium, the membrane binding measurements are drastically modified and suggest that the protein is more strongly bound to the membrane. Indeed, the binding of calcium by three EF-hand motifs of NCS1 leads to a conformation change. NCS1 arrangement at the membrane could thus be reshuffled for better interactions with its substrates. The N-terminal peptide of NCS1 is composed of two amphiphilic helices involved in the membrane interactions of NCS1. Moreover, the presence of the myristoyl group has a weak influence on the membrane binding of NCS1 suggesting the absence of a calcium-myristoyl switch mechanism in this protein. The myristoylation could thus have a structural role required in the folding/unfolding of NCS1 which is essential to its multiple biological functions.

  5. Demonstration of Auxin Binding to Strawberry Fruit Membranes 12

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Komaratchi R.; Mudge, Kenneth W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1981-01-01

    Presence of specific auxin-binding sites in strawberry fruit (Fragaria ananassa Duch. cv. Ozark Beauty) membranes has been demonstrated. These 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA)-binding sites in the 80,000g to 120,000g fraction of the strawberry fruit membrane were pronase sensitive with an estimated equilibrium dissociation constant for NAA of 1.1 × 10−6 molar. The minimum concentration of NAA required to stimulate strawberry fruit growth was at least one order of magnitude higher than the minimum concentration of NAA required to stimulate corn coleoptile elongation. This was consistent with the higher equilibrium dissociation constant (lower affinity) for auxin binding to strawberry fruit membranes than to corn coleoptiles. Twelve auxin analogs, ranging from very strong to weak auxins, were tested for abilities to stimulate in situ strawberry fruit growth and to bind (displace or compete with NAA) to strawberry fruit membranes. The observed positive correlation (r = 0.74) between the in vitro binding to the 80,000 to 120,000 membrane fraction and the in situ biological activity of these analogs indicated that the NAA-binding sites in strawberry fruit membranes may represent physiologically relevant auxin receptors. PMID:16662094

  6. Deletion of the steroid-binding domain of the human androgen receptor gene in one family with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome: Evidence for further genetic heterogeneity in this syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.R.; Lubahn, D.B.; Wilson, E.M.; Joseph, D.R.; French, F.S.; Migeon, C.J. )

    1988-11-01

    The cloning of a cDNA for the human androgen receptor gene has resulted in the availability for cDNA probes that span various parts of the gene, including the entire steroid-binding domain and part of the DNA-binding domain, as well as part of the 5' region of the gene. The radiolabeled probes were used to screen for androgen receptor mutations on Southern blots prepared by restriction endonuclease digestion of genomic DNA from human subjects with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). In this investigation, the authors considered only patients presenting complete AIS and with the androgen receptor (-) form as the most probably subjects to show a gene deletion. One subject from each of six unrelated families with the receptor (-) form of complete AIS and 10 normal subjects were studied. In the 10 normal subjects and in 5 of the 6 patients, identical DNA restriction fragment patterns were observed with EcoRI and BamHI. Analysis of other members of this family confirmed the apparent gene deletion. The data provide direct proof that complete AIS in some families can result from a deletion of the androgen receptor structural gene. However, other families do not demonstrate such a deletion, suggesting that point mutations may also result in the receptor (-) form of complete AIS, adding further to the genetic heterogeneity of this syndrome.

  7. Membrane adsorbers comprising grafted glycopolymers for targeted lectin binding

    PubMed Central

    Chenette, Heather C.S.; Husson, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    This work details the design and testing of affinity membrane adsorbers for lectin purifications that incorporate glucose-containing glycopolymers. It is the selective interaction between the sugar residues of the glycopolymer and the complementary carbohydrate-binding domain of the lectin that provides the basis for the isolation and purification of lectins from complex biological media. The design approach used in these studies was to graft glycopolymer ‘tentacles’ from macroporous regenerated cellulose membranes by atom transfer radical polymerization. As shown in earlier studies, this design approach can be used to prepare high-productivity membrane adsorbers. The model lectin, concanavalin A (conA), was used to evaluate membrane performance in bind-and-elute purification, using a low molecular weight sugar for elution. The membrane capacity for binding conA was measured at equilibrium and under dynamic conditions using flow rates of 0.1 and 1.0 mL/min. The first Damkohler number was estimated to relate the adsorption rate to the convective mass transport rate through the membrane bed. It was used to assess whether adsorption kinetics or mass transport contributed the primary limitation to conA binding. Analyses indicate that this system is not limited by the accessibility of the binding sites, but by the inherent rate of adsorption of conA onto the glycopolymer. PMID:25866416

  8. Discovery of novel membrane binding structures and functions.

    PubMed

    Kufareva, Irina; Lenoir, Marc; Dancea, Felician; Sridhar, Pooja; Raush, Eugene; Bissig, Christin; Gruenberg, Jean; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The function of a protein is determined by its intrinsic activity in the context of its subcellular distribution. Membranes localize proteins within cellular compartments and govern their specific activities. Discovering such membrane-protein interactions is important for understanding biological mechanisms and could uncover novel sites for therapeutic intervention. We present a method for detecting membrane interactive proteins and their exposed residues that insert into lipid bilayers. Although the development process involved analysis of how C1b, C2, ENTH, FYVE, Gla, pleckstrin homology (PH), and PX domains bind membranes, the resulting membrane optimal docking area (MODA) method yields predictions for a given protein of known three-dimensional structures without referring to canonical membrane-targeting modules. This approach was tested on the Arf1 GTPase, ATF2 acetyltransferase, von Willebrand factor A3 domain, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae MsrB protein and further refined with membrane interactive and non-interactive FAPP1 and PKD1 pleckstrin homology domains, respectively. Furthermore we demonstrate how this tool can be used to discover unprecedented membrane binding functions as illustrated by the Bro1 domain of Alix, which was revealed to recognize lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA). Validation of novel membrane-protein interactions relies on other techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), which was used here to map the sites of micelle interaction. Together this indicates that genome-wide identification of known and novel membrane interactive proteins and sites is now feasible and provides a new tool for functional annotation of the proteome.

  9. Sex hormone-binding globulin regulation of androgen bioactivity in vivo: validation of the free hormone hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Michaël R.; Hammond, Geoffrey L.; Blokland, Marco; Jardí, Ferran; Antonio, Leen; Dubois, Vanessa; Khalil, Rougin; Sterk, Saskia S.; Gielen, Evelien; Decallonne, Brigitte; Carmeliet, Geert; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Fiers, Tom; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is the high-affinity binding protein for androgens and estrogens. According to the free hormone hypothesis, SHBG modulates the bioactivity of sex steroids by limiting their diffusion into target tissues. Still, the in vivo physiological role of circulating SHBG remains unclear, especially since mice and rats lack circulating SHBG post-natally. To test the free hormone hypothesis in vivo, we examined total and free sex steroid concentrations and bioactivity on target organs in mice expressing a human SHBG transgene. SHBG increased total androgen and estrogen concentrations via hypothalamic-pituitary feedback regulation and prolonged ligand half-life. Despite markedly raised total sex steroid concentrations, free testosterone was unaffected while sex steroid bioactivity on male and female reproductive organs was attenuated. This occurred via a ligand-dependent, genotype-independent mechanism according to in vitro seminal vesicle organ cultures. These results provide compelling support for the determination of free or bioavailable sex steroid concentrations in medicine, and clarify important comparative differences between translational mouse models and human endocrinology. PMID:27748448

  10. Cation-binding Capacity of Membranes Isolated from Micrococcus lysodeikticus

    PubMed Central

    Cutinelli, C.; Galdiero, F.; Tufano, M. A.

    1969-01-01

    A study was made of H+, Na+, K+, Ca++, and Mg++ binding and ion-exchange properties of the plasma-mesosome membrane system isolated from Micrococcus lysodeikticus strain NCTC 2665. Titration curves were obtained on membranes prepared according to the method of M. R. J. Salton and further exposed to pH 4 for 4 hr (membranes-H). The dissociation coefficients and binding capacities were obtained by applying the mass law equation and the plot of G. Schatchard to the data. The membranes-H possess four kinds of dissociable groups with pK 4.96, 4.18, 3.60, and 3.09, respectively, and a total binding capacity of 0.65 meq/g (dry weight). Potentiometric titrations of cations in the presence and in the absence of membranes-H show that cations (Na+, K+, Ca++, and Mg++) are bound by the dissociated groups of the membrane. The fall in pH value for bivalent cations is greater than that for monovalent cations. Cations of the same valency produce equal diminutions on pH. Furthermore, ion-exchange tests carried out on membranes saturated with Mg++ or Na+ and suspended in a medium containing 45Ca show that the cations are reversibly bound. PMID:5344091

  11. Oxytocin binding by myoepithelial cell membranes from involuted mammary tissue.

    PubMed

    Ruberti, A; Olins, G M; Eakle, K A; Bremel, R D

    1983-04-29

    Oxytocin binding activity of myoepithelial cell membranes from mammary tissue was measured under a variety of different experimental conditions. Mammary tissue from non-lactating rats bound oxytocin with a Kd of 9.2 +/- 1.6 nM (+/- S.E.) and indicates that receptors are retained by the myoepithelial cells in a non-lactating state. Ovariectomy of non-lactating rats did not depress the binding activity of the membranes. Administration of the estrogenic compounds estradiol-17 beta and diethylstibestrol at doses which affect uterine weight and are known to increase uterine oxytocin binding did not influence the binding activity of the myoepithelial cells. This indicates that the oxytocin receptors of the mammary gland are not under the same endocrine control as the uterine receptors. PMID:6303330

  12. Membrane binding of human phospholipid scramblase 1 cytoplasmic domain.

    PubMed

    Posada, Itziar M D; Sánchez-Magraner, Lissete; Hervás, Javier H; Alonso, Alicia; Monaco, Hugo L; Goñi, Félix M

    2014-07-01

    Human phospholipid scramblase 1 (SCR) consists of a large cytoplasmic domain and a small presumed transmembrane domain near the C-terminal end of the protein. Previous studies with the SCRΔ mutant lacking the C-terminal portion (last 28 aa) revealed the importance of this C-terminal moiety for protein function and calcium-binding affinity. The present contribution is intended to elucidate the effect of the transmembrane domain suppression on SCRΔ binding to model membranes (lipid monolayers and bilayers) and on SCRΔ reconstitution in proteoliposomes. In all cases the protein cytoplasmic domain showed a great affinity for lipid membranes, and behaved in most aspects as an intrinsic membrane protein. Assays have been performed in the presence of phosphatidylserine, presumably important for the SCR cytoplasmic domain to be electrostatically anchored to the plasma membrane inner surface. The fusion protein maltose binding protein-SCR has also been studied as an intermediate case of a molecule that can insert into the bilayer hydrophobic core, yet it is stable in detergent-free buffers. Although the intracellular location of SCR has been the object of debate, the present data support the view of SCR as an integral membrane protein, in which not only the transmembrane domain but also the cytoplasmic moiety play a role in membrane docking of the protein.

  13. Binding constants of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands depend strongly on the nanoscale roughness of membranes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinglei; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2013-09-17

    Cell adhesion and the adhesion of vesicles to the membranes of cells or organelles are pivotal for immune responses, tissue formation, and cell signaling. The adhesion processes depend sensitively on the binding constant of the membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins that mediate adhesion, but this constant is difficult to measure in experiments. We have investigated the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins with molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the binding constant of the anchored proteins strongly decreases with the membrane roughness caused by thermally excited membrane shape fluctuations on nanoscales. We present a theory that explains the roughness dependence of the binding constant for the anchored proteins from membrane confinement and that relates this constant to the binding constant of soluble proteins without membrane anchors. Because the binding constant of soluble proteins is readily accessible in experiments, our results provide a useful route to compute the binding constant of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins.

  14. Flocculation and Membrane Binding of Outer Membrane Protein F, Porin, at Acidic pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Keiko; Nakae, Taiji; Mitaku, Shigeki

    1998-04-01

    Outer membrane protein F (OmpF), porin, of Escherichia coli is an intrinsic membrane protein made of a β-sheet barrel, the amino acid sequence being as hydrophilic as many soluble proteins in spite of its location in the hydrophobic region of membrane. The binding of porin molecules with a lipid membrane and the flocculation of the protein were studied at various pH, using the combination of centrifugation and intrinsic fluorescence measurements. The binding of porin with the lipid membrane occurred in the pH range below 7, whereas the flocculation of porin in the absence of the membrane was observed only at pH below 5. Porin molecules in the pH range between 5 and 7 were stable as a colloid but spontaneously bound with the lipid membrane soon after the addition of lipid vesicles. The possible mechanism of the structural formation of porin in the outer membrane was discussed based on the pH dependence of the membrane binding ability of this protein.

  15. Antimicrobial peptides bind more strongly to membrane pores

    PubMed Central

    Mihajlovic, Maja

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small, usually cationic peptides, which permeabilize bacterial membranes. Understanding their mechanism of action might help design better antibiotics. Using an implicit membrane model, modified to include pores of different shapes, we show that four AMPs (alamethicin, melittin, a magainin analogue, MG-H2, and piscidin 1) bind more strongly to membrane pores, consistent with the idea that they stabilize them. The effective energy of alamethicin in cylindrical pores is similar to that in toroidal pores, whereas the effective energy of the other three peptides is lower in toroidal pores. Only alamethicin intercalates into the membrane core; MG-H2, melittin and piscidin are located exclusively at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface. In toroidal pores, the latter three peptides often bind at the edge of the pore, and are in an oblique orientation. The calculated binding energies of the peptides are correlated with their hemolytic activities. We hypothesize that one distinguishing feature of AMPs may be the fact that they are imperfectly amphipathic which allows them to bind more strongly to toroidal pores. An initial test on a melittin-based mutant seems to support this hypothesis. PMID:20188066

  16. (/sup 3/H) clonidine binding to rat hippocampal membranes

    SciTech Connect

    George, C.R.

    1982-02-01

    Alpha adrenergic receptor subtypes in rat hippocampal membranes were studied, using (/sup 3/H) clonidine as the radioactive ligand. On the basis of competitive binding studies, using the selective antagonist-prazosin, WB-4101, and yohimbine, (/sup 3/H) clonidine appeared to bind to a population of presynaptic sites that are pharmacologically similar to receptors previously classified as alpha 2. A computerized model that linearized and produced the best possible fit to the experimental data points indicated that (/sup 3/H) clonidine binds to a single population of receptors possessing equal affinity for the ligand. Binding data also indicated that rat hippo-campus contains significantly fewer (/sup 3/H)clonidine binding sites than rat cortex.

  17. RECOMBINANT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR (AR) BINDING ACROSS VERTEBRATE SPECIES: COMPARISON OF BINDING OF ENVIRONMENTAL COMPOUNDS TO HUMAN, RAINBOW TROUT AND FATHEAD MINNOW AR.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify androgen mimics or antagonists typically use mammalian (rat, human) androgen receptors (AR). Although the amino acid sequences of receptors from nonmammalian vertebrates are not identical to the mammalian receptors, it is uncertain ...

  18. Characterization of adenosine binding proteins in human placental membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    We have characterized two adenosine binding proteins in human placenta. In membranes, one site is detected with ({sup 3}H) -N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). This site is similar to the adenosine A{sub 2} receptor. We call this site the adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site. In detergent extracts, the second site is detected and has the characteristics of an adenosine A{sub 1} receptor. The soluble adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site cannot be detected without a rapid assay. Binding to the adenosine A{sub 1} receptor with ({sup 3}H)-2-chloroadenosine and ({sup 3}H)NECA is time dependent, saturable, and reversible. Equilibrium displacement analysis with adenosine agonists reveals an A{sub 1} specificity: 2-chloroadenosine > R-phenylisopropyladenosine > 5{prime}-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine. The antagonist potency order is 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine > isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline. Competition analysis of membranes with the A,-selective ligands ({sup 3}H)-cyclohexyladenosine ({sup 3}H) cylopentylxanthine revealed adenosine A{sub 1} agonist and antagonist potency orders. We have purified the adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site. The adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site is an ubiquitous major cellular protein. It is glycosylated, highly asymmetric, and acidic. The native protein is an homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 98 kDa. The sedimentation coefficient and partial specific volume of the binding complex are 6.9 s and 0.698 ml/g, respectively. The Stokes' radius is 70 {Angstrom}. The native molecular mass of the detergent-protein complex is 230 kDa. The adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site has an agonist potency order of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > 2-chloroadenosine >> R-phenylisopropyladenosine and an antagonist potency order of isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline >> 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine.

  19. Two nucleotide binding sites modulate ( sup 3 H) glyburide binding to rat cortex membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.E.; Gopalakrishnan, M.; Triggle, D.J.; Janis, R.A. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1991-03-11

    The effects of nucleotides on the binding of the ATP-dependent K{sup +}-channel antagonist ({sup 3}H)glyburide (GLB) to rat cortex membranes were examined. Nucleotide triphosphates (NTPs) and nucleotide diphosphate (NDPs) inhibited the binding of GLB. This effect was dependent on the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT). Inhibition of binding by NTPs, with the exception of ATP{gamma}S, was dependent on the presence of Mg{sup 2+}. GLB binding showed a biphasic response to ADP: up to 3 mM, ADP inhibited binding, and above this concentration GLB binding increased rapidly, and was restored to normal levels by 10 mM ADP. In the presence of Mg{sup 2+}, ADP did not stimulate binding. Saturation analysis in the presence of Mg{sup 2+} and increasing concentrations of ADP showed that ADP results primarily in a change of the B{sub max} for GLB binding. The differential effects of NTPS and NDPs indicate that two nucleotide binding sites regulate GLB binding.

  20. Antiviral activity of squalamine: Role of electrostatic membrane binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckerman, Bernard; Qu, Wei; Mishra, Abhijit; Zasloff, Michael; Wong, Gerard; Luijten, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Recent workootnotetextM. Zasloff et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. (USA) 108, 15978 (2011). has demonstrated that squalamine, a molecule found in the liver of sharks, exhibits broad-spectrum antiviral properties. It has been proposed that this activity results from the charge-density matching of squalamine and phospholipid membranes, causing squalamine to bind to membranes and displace proteins such as Rac1 that are crucial for the viral replication cycle. Here we investigate this hypothesis by numerical simulation of a coarse-grained model for the competition between Rac1 and squalamine in binding affinity to a flat lipid bilayer. We perform free-energy calculations to test the ability of squalamine to condense stacked bilayer systems and thereby displace bulkier Rac1 molecules. We directly compare our findings to small-angle x-ray scattering results for the same setup.

  1. F-actin binding regions on the androgen receptor and huntingtin increase aggregation and alter aggregate characteristics.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Suzanne; Shao, Jieya; Diamond, Marc I

    2010-01-01

    Protein aggregation is associated with neurodegeneration. Polyglutamine expansion diseases such as spinobulbar muscular atrophy and Huntington disease feature proteins that are destabilized by an expanded polyglutamine tract in their N-termini. It has previously been reported that intracellular aggregation of these target proteins, the androgen receptor (AR) and huntingtin (Htt), is modulated by actin-regulatory pathways. Sequences that flank the polyglutamine tract of AR and Htt might influence protein aggregation and toxicity through protein-protein interactions, but this has not been studied in detail. Here we have evaluated an N-terminal 127 amino acid fragment of AR and Htt exon 1. The first 50 amino acids of ARN127 and the first 14 amino acids of Htt exon 1 mediate binding to filamentous actin in vitro. Deletion of these actin-binding regions renders the polyglutamine-expanded forms of ARN127 and Htt exon 1 less aggregation-prone, and increases the SDS-solubility of aggregates that do form. These regions thus appear to alter the aggregation frequency and type of polyglutamine-induced aggregation. These findings highlight the importance of flanking sequences in determining the propensity of unstable proteins to misfold. PMID:20140226

  2. Single Molecule Kinetics of ENTH Binding to Lipid Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Rozovsky, Sharon; Forstner, Martin B.; Sondermann, Holger; Groves, Jay T.

    2012-04-03

    Transient recruitment of proteins to membranes is a fundamental mechanism by which the cell exerts spatial and temporal control over proteins’ localization and interactions. Thus, the specificity and the kinetics of peripheral proteins’ membrane residence are an attribute of their function. In this article, we describe the membrane interactions of the interfacial epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain with its target lipid phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2). The direct visualization and quantification of interactions of single ENTH molecules with supported lipid bilayers is achieved using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) with a time resolution of 13 ms. This enables the recording of the kinetic behavior of ENTH interacting with membranes with physiologically relevant concentrations of PtdIns(4,5)P2 despite the low effective binding affinity. Subsequent single fluorophore tracking permits us to build up distributions of residence times and to measure ENTH dissociation rates as a function of membrane composition. In addition, due to the high time resolution, we are able to resolve details of the motion of ENTH associated with a simple, homogeneous membrane. In this case ENTH’s diffusive transport appears to be the result of at least three different diffusion processes.

  3. Androgens Regulate T47D Cells Motility and Invasion through Actin Cytoskeleton Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Montt-Guevara, Maria Magdalena; Shortrede, Jorge Eduardo; Giretti, Maria Silvia; Giannini, Andrea; Mannella, Paolo; Russo, Eleonora; Genazzani, Alessandro David; Simoncini, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between androgens and breast cancer is controversial. Androgens have complex effects on breast cancer progression and metastasis. Moreover, androgen receptor (AR) is expressed in approximately 70 to 90% of invasive breast carcinomas, which has prognostic relevance in basal-like cancers and in triple-negative breast cancers. Recent studies have associated the actin-binding proteins of the ezrin–radixin–moesin (ERM) family with metastasis in endocrine-sensitive cancers. We studied on T47D breast cancer cells whether androgens with different characteristics, such as testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) may regulate breast cancer cell motility and invasion through the control of actin remodeling. We demonstrate that androgens promote migration and invasion in T47D via Moesin activation. We show that T and DHEA exert their actions via the AR and estrogen receptor (ER), while the non-aromatizable androgen – DHT – only recruits AR. We further report that androgen induced significant changes in actin organization with pseudopodia along with membrane ruffles formation, and this process is mediated by Moesin. Our work identifies novel mechanisms of action of androgens on breast cancer cells. Through the modulation of Moesin, androgens alter the architecture of cytoskeleton in T47D breast cancer cell and promote cell migration and invasion. These results could help to understand the biological actions of androgens on breast cancer and, eventually, to develop new strategies for breast cancer treatment. PMID:27746764

  4. Membrane-Binding and Enzymatic Properties of RPE65

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, Philip D.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Regeneration of visual pigments is essential for sustained visual function. Although the requirement for non-photochemical regeneration of the visual chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, was recognized early on, it was only recently that the trans to cis retinoid isomerase activity required for this process was assigned to a specific protein, a microsomal membrane enzyme called RPE65. In this review, we outline progress that has been made in the functional characterization of RPE65. We then discuss general concepts related to protein-membrane interactions and the mechanism of the retinoid isomerization reaction and describe some of the important biochemical and structural features of RPE65 with respect to its membrane-binding and enzymatic properties. PMID:20304090

  5. Thymocyte plasma membrane: the location of specific glucocorticoid binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeev, P.V.; Kalinin, G.V.; Dukhanin, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    In modern molecular endocrinology it is now possible to determine the localization of receptors for biologically active substances with the aid of ligands, with high affinity for the receptor, immobilized on polymers. The purpose of this paper is to study the ability of hydrocortisone (HC), immobilized on polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-HC), to reduce binding of tritium-HC by thymocytes of adrenalectomized rats. It is determined that specific binding sites for HC on rat thymocytes are also accessible for PVP-HC, which, due to the fact that this immobilized version of HC does not penetrate into the cell, leads to the conclusion that the binding sites for HC itself are located in the plasma membrane.

  6. pMD-Membrane: A Method for Ligand Binding Site Identification in Membrane-Bound Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gorfe, Alemayehu A.

    2015-01-01

    Probe-based or mixed solvent molecular dynamics simulation is a useful approach for the identification and characterization of druggable sites in drug targets. However, thus far the method has been applied only to soluble proteins. A major reason for this is the potential effect of the probe molecules on membrane structure. We have developed a technique to overcome this limitation that entails modification of force field parameters to reduce a few pairwise non-bonded interactions between selected atoms of the probe molecules and bilayer lipids. We used the resulting technique, termed pMD-membrane, to identify allosteric ligand binding sites on the G12D and G13D oncogenic mutants of the K-Ras protein bound to a negatively charged lipid bilayer. In addition, we show that differences in probe occupancy can be used to quantify changes in the accessibility of druggable sites due to conformational changes induced by membrane binding or mutation. PMID:26506102

  7. Melittin binding to mixed phosphatidylglycerol/phosphatidylcholine membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Beschiaschvili, G.; Seelig, J. )

    1990-01-09

    The binding of bee venom melittin to negatively charged unilamellar vesicles and planar lipid bilayers composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) was studied with circular dichroism and deuterium NMR spectroscopy. The melittin binding isotherm was measured for small unilamellar vesicles containing 10 or 20 mol % POPG. Due to electrostatic attraction, binding of the positively charged melittin was much enhanced as compared to the binding to neutral lipid vesicles. However, after correction for electrostatic effects by means of the Gouy-Chapman theory, all melittin binding isotherms could be described by a partition Kp = (4.5 +/- 0.6) x 10(4) M-1. It was estimated that about 50% of the total melittin surface was embedded in a hydrophobic environment. The melittin partition constant for small unilamellar vesicles was by a factor of 20 larger than that of planar bilayers and attests to the tighter lipid packing in the nonsonicated bilayers. Deuterium NMR studies were performed with coarse lipid dispersions. Binding of melittin to POPC/POPG (80/20 mol/mol) membranes caused systematic changes in the conformation of the phosphocholine and phosphoglycerol head groups which were ascribed to the influence of electrostatic charge on the choline dipole. While the negative charge of phosphatidylglycerol moved the N+ end of the choline -P-N+ dipole toward the bilayer interior, the binding of melittin reversed this effect and rotated the N+ end toward the aqueous phase. No specific melittin-POPG complexes could be detected. The phosphoglycerol head group was less affected by melittin binding than its choline counterpart.

  8. Homology-modeled ligand-binding domains of medaka estrogen receptors and androgen receptors: A model system for the study of reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Jianzhou Shen Xueyan; Yan Zuowei; Zhao Haobin; Nagahama, Yoshitaka

    2009-02-27

    Estrogen and androgen and their receptors play critical roles in physiological processes such as sexual differentiation and development. Using the available structural models for the human estrogen receptors alpha and beta and androgen receptor as templates, we designed in silico agonist and antagonist models of medaka estrogen receptor (meER) alpha, beta-1, and beta-2, and androgen receptor (meAR) alpha and beta. Using these models, we studied (1) the structural relationship between the ligand-binding domains (LBDs) of ERs and ARs of human and medaka, and (2) whether medaka ER and AR can be potential models for studying the ligand-binding activities of various agonists and antagonists of these receptors by docking analysis. A high level of conservation was observed between the sequences of the ligand-binding domains of meER{alpha} and huER{alpha}, meER{beta}1 and huER{beta}, meER{beta}2, and huER{beta} with 62.8%, 66.4%, and 65.1% identity, respectively. The sequence conservation between meAR{alpha} and huAR, meAR{beta}, and huAR was found with 70.1% and 61.0% of identity, respectively. Thirty-three selected endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), including both agonists and antagonists, were docked into the LBD of ER and AR, and the corresponding docking score for medaka models and human templates were calculated. In order to confirm the conservation of the overall geometry and the binding pocket, the backbone root mean square deviation (RMSD) for C{alpha} atoms was derived from the structure superposition of all 10 medaka homology models to the six human templates. Our results suggested conformational conservation between the ERs and ARs of medaka and human, Thus, medaka could be highly useful as a model system for studies involving estrogen and androgen interaction with their receptors.

  9. Synaptotagmin-1 binds to PIP2-containing membrane but not to SNAREs at physiological ionic strength

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yongsoo; Seo, Jong Bae; Fraind, Alicia; Pérez-Lara, Angel; Yavuz, Halenur; Han, Kyungreem; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Kattan, Iman; Walla, Peter Jomo; Choi, MooYoung; Cafiso, David S.; Koh, Duk-Su; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+-sensor synaptotagmin-1 is thought to trigger membrane fusion by binding to acidic membrane lipids and SNARE proteins. Previous work has shown that binding is mediated by electrostatic interactions that are sensitive to the ionic environment. However, the influence of divalent or polyvalent ions, at physiological concentrations, on synaptotagmin binding to membranes or SNAREs has not been explored. Here we show that binding of rat synaptotagmin-1 to membranes containing PIP2 is regulated by charge shielding caused by the presence of divalent cations. Surprisingly, polyvalent ions such as ATP and Mg2+ completely abrogate synaptotagmin-1 binding to SNAREs regardless of whether Ca2+ is present or not. Altogether, our data suggest that at physiological ion concentrations Ca2+-dependent synaptotagmin-1 binding is confined to PIP2-containing membrane patches in the plasma membrane, suggesting that membrane interaction of synaptotagmin-1 rather than SNARE binding triggers exocytosis of vesicles. PMID:26389740

  10. Characterization of auxin-binding proteins from zucchini plasma membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, G. R.; Rice, M. S.; Lomax, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    We have previously identified two auxin-binding polypeptides in plasma membrane (PM) preparations from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) (Hicks et al. 1989, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86, 4948-4952). These polypeptides have molecular weights of 40 kDa and 42 kDa and label specifically with the photoaffinity auxin analog 5-N3-7-3H-IAA (azido-IAA). Azido-IAA permits both the covalent and radioactive tagging of auxin-binding proteins and has allowed us to characterize further the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides, including the nature of their attachment to the PM, their relationship to each other, and their potential function. The azido-IAA-labeled polypeptides remain in the pelleted membrane fraction following high-salt and detergent washes, which indicates a tight and possibly integral association with the PM. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of partially purified azido-IAA-labeled protein demonstrates that, in addition to the major isoforms of the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides, which possess isoelectric points (pIs) of 8.2 and 7.2, respectively, several less abundant isoforms that display unique pIs are apparent at both molecular masses. Tryptic and chymotryptic digestion of the auxin-binding proteins indicates that the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides are closely related or are modifications of the same polypeptide. Phase extraction with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 results in partitioning of the azido-IAA-labeled polypeptides into the aqueous (hydrophilic) phase. This apparently paradoxical behavior is also exhibited by certain integral membrane proteins that aggregate to form channels. The results of gel filtration indicate that the auxin-binding proteins do indeed aggregate strongly and that the polypeptides associate to form a dimer or multimeric complex in vivo. These characteristics are consistent with the hypothesis that the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides are subunits of a multimeric integral membrane protein which has an auxin-binding site, and which may

  11. Glucagon-like peptide-1 binding to rat hepatic membranes.

    PubMed

    Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Delgado, E; Trapote, M A; Alcántara, A; Clemente, F; Luque, M A; Perea, A; Valverde, I

    1995-07-01

    We have found [125I]glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1(7-36)amide specific binding activity in rat liver and isolated hepatocyte plasma membranes, with an M(r) of approximately 63,000, estimated by cross-linking and SDS-PAGE. The specific binding was time- and membrane protein concentration-dependent, and equally displaced by unlabelled GLP-1(7-36)amide and by GLP-1(1-36)amide, achieving its ID50 at 3 x 10(-9) M of the peptides. GLP-1(7-36)amide did not modify the basal or the glucagon (10(-8) M)-stimulated adenylate cyclase in the hepatocyte plasma membranes. These data, together with our previous findings of a potent glycogenic effect of GLP-1(7-36)amide in isolated rat hepatocytes, led us to postulate that the insulin-like effects of this peptide on glucose liver metabolism could be mediated by a type of receptor probably different from that described for GLP-1 in pancreatic B-cells or, alternatively, by the same receptor which, in this tissue as well as in muscle, uses a different transduction system.

  12. Structural Diversity of Ligand-Binding Androgen Receptors Revealed by Microsecond Long Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Enhanced Sampling.

    PubMed

    Duan, Mojie; Liu, Na; Zhou, Wenfang; Li, Dan; Yang, Minghui; Hou, Tingjun

    2016-09-13

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays important roles in the development of prostate cancer (PCa). The antagonistic drugs, which suppress the activity of AR, are widely used in the treatment of PCa. However, the molecular mechanism of antagonism about how ligands affect the structures of AR remains elusive. To better understand the conformational variability of ARs bound with agonists or antagonists, we performed long time unbiased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and enhanced sampling simulations for the ligand binding domain of AR (AR-LBD) in complex with various ligands. Based on the simulation results, we proposed an allosteric pathway linking ligands and helix 12 (H12) of AR-LBD, which involves the interactions among the ligands and the residues W741, H874, and I899. The interaction pathway provides an atomistic explanation of how ligands affect the structure of AR-LBD. A repositioning of H12 was observed, but it is facilitated by the C-terminal of H12, instead of by the loop between helix 11 (H11) and H12. The bias-exchange metadynamics simulations further demonstrated the above observations. More importantly, the free energy profiles constructed by the enhanced sampling simulations revealed the transition process between the antagonistic form and agonistic form of AR-LBD. Our results would be helpful for the design of more efficient antagonists of AR to combat PCa. PMID:27560203

  13. How actin binds and assembles onto plasma membranes from Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have shown previously (Schwartz, M. A., and E. J. Luna. 1986. J. Cell Biol. 102: 2067-2075) that actin binds with positive cooperativity to plasma membranes from Dictyostelium discoideum. Actin is polymerized at the membrane surface even at concentrations well below the critical concentration for polymerization in solution. Low salt buffer that blocks actin polymerization in solution also prevents actin binding to membranes. To further explore the relationship between actin polymerization and binding to membranes, we prepared four chemically modified actins that appear to be incapable of polymerizing in solution. Three of these derivatives also lost their ability to bind to membranes. The fourth derivative (EF actin), in which histidine-40 is labeled with ethoxyformic anhydride, binds to membranes with reduced affinity. Binding curves exhibit positive cooperativity, and cross- linking experiments show that membrane-bound actin is multimeric. Thus, binding and polymerization are tightly coupled, and the ability of these membranes to polymerize actin is dramatically demonstrated. EF actin coassembles weakly with untreated actin in solution, but coassembles well on membranes. Binding by untreated actin and EF actin are mutually competitive, indicating that they bind to the same membrane sites. Hill plots indicate that an actin trimer is the minimum assembly state required for tight binding to membranes. The best explanation for our data is a model in which actin oligomers assemble by binding to clustered membrane sites with successive monomers on one side of the actin filament bound to the membrane. Individual binding affinities are expected to be low, but the overall actin-membrane avidity is high, due to multivalency. Our results imply that extracellular factors that cluster membrane proteins may create sites for the formation of actin nuclei and thus trigger actin polymerization in the cell. PMID:3392099

  14. Kinetics characterization of c-Src binding to lipid membranes: Switching from labile to persistent binding.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Anabel-Lise; Busquets, Maria Antònia; Sagués, Francesc; Pons, Miquel

    2016-02-01

    Cell signaling by the c-Src proto-oncogen requires the attachment of the protein to the inner side of the plasma membrane through the myristoylated N-terminal region, known as the SH4 domain. Additional binding regions of lower affinity are located in the neighbor intrinsically disordered Unique domain and the structured SH3 domain. Here we present a surface plasmon resonance study of the binding of a myristoylated protein including the SH4, Unique and SH3 domains of c-Src to immobilized liposomes. Two distinct binding processes were observed: a fast and a slow one. The second process lead to a persistently bound form (PB) with a slower binding and a much slower dissociation rate than the first one. The association and dissociation of the PB form could be detected using an anti-SH4 antibody. The kinetic analysis revealed that binding of the PB form follows a second order rate law suggesting that it involves the formation of c-Src dimers on the membrane surface. A kinetically equivalent PB form is observed in a myristoylated peptide containing only the SH4 domain but not in a construct including the three domains but with a 12-carbon lauroyl substituent instead of the 14-carbon myristoyl group. The PB form is observed with neutral lipids but its population increases when the immobilized liposomes contain negatively charged lipids. We suggest that the PB form may represent the active signaling form of c-Src while the labile form provides the capacity for fast 2D search of the target signaling site on the membrane surface. PMID:26638178

  15. Kinetics characterization of c-Src binding to lipid membranes: Switching from labile to persistent binding.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Anabel-Lise; Busquets, Maria Antònia; Sagués, Francesc; Pons, Miquel

    2016-02-01

    Cell signaling by the c-Src proto-oncogen requires the attachment of the protein to the inner side of the plasma membrane through the myristoylated N-terminal region, known as the SH4 domain. Additional binding regions of lower affinity are located in the neighbor intrinsically disordered Unique domain and the structured SH3 domain. Here we present a surface plasmon resonance study of the binding of a myristoylated protein including the SH4, Unique and SH3 domains of c-Src to immobilized liposomes. Two distinct binding processes were observed: a fast and a slow one. The second process lead to a persistently bound form (PB) with a slower binding and a much slower dissociation rate than the first one. The association and dissociation of the PB form could be detected using an anti-SH4 antibody. The kinetic analysis revealed that binding of the PB form follows a second order rate law suggesting that it involves the formation of c-Src dimers on the membrane surface. A kinetically equivalent PB form is observed in a myristoylated peptide containing only the SH4 domain but not in a construct including the three domains but with a 12-carbon lauroyl substituent instead of the 14-carbon myristoyl group. The PB form is observed with neutral lipids but its population increases when the immobilized liposomes contain negatively charged lipids. We suggest that the PB form may represent the active signaling form of c-Src while the labile form provides the capacity for fast 2D search of the target signaling site on the membrane surface.

  16. Ambidextrous binding of cell and membrane bilayers by soluble matrix metalloproteinase-12.

    PubMed

    Koppisetti, Rama K; Fulcher, Yan G; Jurkevich, Alexander; Prior, Stephen H; Xu, Jia; Lenoir, Marc; Overduin, Michael; Van Doren, Steven R

    2014-11-21

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) regulate tissue remodelling, inflammation and disease progression. Some soluble MMPs are inexplicably active near cell surfaces. Here we demonstrate the binding of MMP-12 directly to bilayers and cellular membranes using paramagnetic NMR and fluorescence. Opposing sides of the catalytic domain engage spin-labelled membrane mimics. Loops project from the β-sheet interface to contact the phospholipid bilayer with basic and hydrophobic residues. The distal membrane interface comprises loops on the other side of the catalytic cleft. Both interfaces mediate MMP-12 association with vesicles and cell membranes. MMP-12 binds plasma membranes and is internalized to hydrophobic perinuclear features, the nuclear membrane and inside the nucleus within minutes. While binding of TIMP-2 to MMP-12 hinders membrane interactions beside the active site, TIMP-2-inhibited MMP-12 binds vesicles and cells, suggesting compensatory rotation of its membrane approaches. MMP-12 association with diverse cell membranes may target its activities to modulate innate immune responses and inflammation.

  17. Interactions of androgens, green tea catechins and the antiandrogen flutamide with the external glucose-binding site of the human erythrocyte glucose transporter GLUT1.

    PubMed

    Naftalin, Richard J; Afzal, Iram; Cunningham, Philip; Halai, Mansur; Ross, Clare; Salleh, Naguib; Milligan, Stuart R

    2003-10-01

    This study investigates the effects of androgens, the antiandrogen flutamide and green tea catechins on glucose transport inhibition in human erythrocytes. These effects may relate to the antidiabetogenic effects of green tea. Testosterone, 4-androstene-3,17-dione, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA-3-acetate inhibit glucose exit from human erythrocytes with half-maximal inhibitions (Ki) of 39.2+/-8.9, 29.6+/-3.7, 48.1+/-10.2 and 4.8+/-0.98 microM, respectively. The antiandrogen flutamide competitively relieves these inhibitions and of phloretin. Dehydrotestosterone has no effect on glucose transport, indicating the differences between androgen interaction with GLUT1 and human androgen receptor (hAR). Green tea catechins also inhibit glucose exit from erythrocytes. Epicatechin 3-gallate (ECG) has a Ki ECG of 0.14+/-0.01 microM, and epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG) has a Ki EGCG of 0.97+/-0.13 microM. Flutamide reverses these effects. Androgen-screening tests show that the green tea catechins do not act genomically. The high affinities of ECG and EGCG for GLUT1 indicate that this might be their physiological site of action. There are sequence homologies between GLUT1 and the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of hAR containing the amino-acid triads Arg 126, Thr 30 and Asn 288, and Arg 126, Thr 30 and Asn 29, with similar 3D topology to the polar groups binding 3-keto and 17-beta OH steroid groups in hAR LBD. These triads are appropriately sited for competitive inhibition of glucose import at the external opening of the hydrophilic pore traversing GLUT1.

  18. Membrane binding and endoplasmic reticulum retention sequences of rotavirus VP7 are distinct: role of carboxy-terminal and other residues in membrane binding.

    PubMed

    Clarke, M L; Lockett, L J; Both, G W

    1995-10-01

    The sequences responsible for binding rotavirus glycoprotein VP7 to the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) have not been identified. Here we show that the sequences which promote membrane binding in vitro are distinct from the N-terminal sequences which promote retention of VP7 in the ER in vivo. The role of the C-terminal region in membrane binding was also examined by using truncation mutants. Membrane binding in vitro was reduced but not abolished by removing up to 102 residues from the C terminus. The data suggest that the last 36 residues of VP7 may be present in the membrane or translocation pore, possibly with the C terminus protruding into the cytoplasm, since these residues contribute to, but do not account for, membrane binding. Surprisingly, modified forms of VP7 which are secreted from transfected cells showed the same membrane-binding properties in vitro as the protein retained in the ER membrane. Thus, secreted VP7 may not be present as a soluble polypeptide in the ER. A model to explain these results is presented. Previously published data are consistent with the idea that the highly conserved C terminus of nascent VP7 could have a cytoplasmic orientation which is important for assembly of mature virus particles. PMID:7666548

  19. NPA binding activity is peripheral to the plasma membrane and is associated with the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, D N; Muday, G K

    1994-01-01

    N-1-Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) binding activity is released into the supernatant when plasma membranes are subjected to high-salt treatment, indicating that this activity is peripherally associated with the membrane. Extraction of plasma membrane vesicles with Triton X-100 resulted in retention of NPA binding activity in the detergent-insoluble cytoskeletal pellet. Treatment of this pellet with KI released NPA binding activity, actin, and alpha-tubulin. Dialysis to remove KI led to the repolymerization of cytoskeletal elements and movement of NPA binding activity into an insoluble cytoskeletal pellet. NPA binding activity partitioned into the detergent-insoluble cytoskeletal pellet obtained from both zucchini and maize membranes and was released from these pellets by KI treatment. Treatment of a cytoskeletal pellet with cytochalasin B doubled NPA binding activity in the resulting supernatant. Together, these experiments indicate that NPA binding activity is peripherally associated with the plasma membrane and interacts with the cytoskeleton in vitro. PMID:11536654

  20. Regulation of expression of Na+,K+-ATPase in androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blok, L J; Chang, G T G; Steenbeek-Slotboom, M; Weerden, W M van; Swarts, H G P; Pont, J J H H M De; Steenbrugge, G J van; Brinkmann, A O

    1999-01-01

    The β1-subunit of Na+,K+-ATPase was isolated and identified as an androgen down-regulated gene. Expression was observed at high levels in androgen-independent as compared to androgen-dependent (responsive) human prostate cancer cell lines and xenografts when grown in the presence of androgens. Down-regulation of the β1-subunit was initiated at concentrations between 0.01 nM and 0.03 nM of the synthetic androgen R1881 after relatively long incubation times (> 24 h). Using polyclonal antibodies, the concentration of β1-subunit protein, but not of the α1-subunit protein, was markedly reduced in androgen-dependent human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP-FGC) cultured in the presence of androgens. In line with these observations it was found that the protein expression of total Na+,K+-ATPase in the membrane (measured by 3H-ouabain binding) was also markedly decreased. The main function of Na+,K+-ATPase is to maintain sodium and potassium homeostasis in animal cells. The resulting electrochemical gradient is facilitative for transport of several compounds over the cell membrane (for example cisplatin, a chemotherapeutic agent experimentally used in the treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer). Here we observed that a ouabain-induced decrease of Na+,K+-ATPase activity in LNCaP-FGC cells results in reduced sensitivity of these cells to cisplatin-treatment. Surprisingly, androgen-induced decrease of Na+,K+-ATPase expression, did not result in significant protection against the chemotherapeutic agent. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10487609

  1. Characterization and quantitation of concanavalin A binding by plasma membrane enriched fractions from soybean root

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, R.L.; Travis, R.L.

    1981-11-01

    The binding of concanavalin A (Con A) to soybean root membranes in plasma membrane enriched fractions (recovered from the 34/45% interface of simplified discontinuous sucrose density gradients) was studied using a radiochemical assay employing tritated (/sup 3/H)-Con A. The effect of lectin concentration, time, and membrane protein concentration on the specific binding of /sup 3/H-Con A by the membranes was evaluated. Kinetic analyses showed that Con A will react with membranes in that fraction in a characteristic and predictable manner. The parameters for an optimal and standard binding assay were established. Maximal binding occurred with Con A concentrations in the range of 8 to 16% of the total membrane protein with incubation times greater than 40 min at 22 C. Approximately 10/sup 15/ molecules of /sup 3/H-Con A were bound per microgram of membrane protein at saturation. Binding was reversible. Greater than 92% of the total Con A bound at saturation was released by addition of ..cap alpha..-methyl mannoside. A major peak of /sup 3/H-Con A binding was also observed in fractions recovered from the 25/30% interface of a complex discontinuous sucrose density gradient when membranes were isolated in the absence of Mg/sup 2 +/. When high Mg/sup 2 +/ was present in the isolation and gradient media, the peak was shifted to a fraction recovered from the 34/38% sucrose interface. These results suggest that Con A binding sites are also present on membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum. The amount of Con A bound by endoplasmic reticulum membranes was at least twice the amount bound by membranes in plasma membrane enriched fractions when binding was compared on a per unit membrane protein basis. In contrast, mitochondrial inner membranes, which equilibrate at the same density as plasma membranes, had little ability to bind the lectin.

  2. Uncoupling the Structure-Activity Relationships of β2 Adrenergic Receptor Ligands from Membrane Binding.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Callum J; Hornak, Viktor; Velez-Vega, Camilo; McKay, Daniel J J; Reilly, John; Sandham, David A; Shaw, Duncan; Fairhurst, Robin A; Charlton, Steven J; Sykes, David A; Pearlstein, Robert A; Duca, Jose S

    2016-06-23

    Ligand binding to membrane proteins may be significantly influenced by the interaction of ligands with the membrane. In particular, the microscopic ligand concentration within the membrane surface solvation layer may exceed that in bulk solvent, resulting in overestimation of the intrinsic protein-ligand binding contribution to the apparent/measured affinity. Using published binding data for a set of small molecules with the β2 adrenergic receptor, we demonstrate that deconvolution of membrane and protein binding contributions allows for improved structure-activity relationship analysis and structure-based drug design. Molecular dynamics simulations of ligand bound membrane protein complexes were used to validate binding poses, allowing analysis of key interactions and binding site solvation to develop structure-activity relationships of β2 ligand binding. The resulting relationships are consistent with intrinsic binding affinity (corrected for membrane interaction). The successful structure-based design of ligands targeting membrane proteins may require an assessment of membrane affinity to uncouple protein binding from membrane interactions. PMID:27239696

  3. Multiple lectin detection by cell membrane affinity binding.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana; Catarino, Sofia; Ferreira, Ricardo Boavida

    2012-05-01

    Assuming that lectins evolved to recognise relatively complex and branched oligosaccharides or parts of them, rather than simple sugars, a procedure based on lectin affinity binding to isolated erythrocyte (or any other cell type) membranes is proposed. This methodology was validated using six pure commercial lectins, as well as lectins from total protein extracts of Arbutus unedo leaves. All commercial lectins, as well as five polypeptides from A. unedo leaves bound to the glycosylated membrane receptors and were eluted by the corresponding sugars. When compared to the standard affinity chromatography procedure involving an individual sugar bound to a solid matrix, the new method provides a single-step, effective detection method for lectins and allows the rapid screening of their profile present in any unknown protein solution, indicates their biological carbohydrate affinities as well as their sugar specificities (if any), enables the simultaneous analysis of a large number of samples, does not require any pre-purification steps, permits detection of additional lectins and provides data which are more relevant from the physiological point of view. PMID:22381939

  4. Optimization of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane fabrication for protein binding using statistical experimental design.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, A L; Ideris, N; Ooi, B S; Low, S C; Ismail, A

    2016-01-01

    Statistical experimental design was employed to optimize the preparation conditions of polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) membranes. Three variables considered were polymer concentration, dissolving temperature, and casting thickness, whereby the response variable was membrane-protein binding. The optimum preparation for the PVDF membrane was a polymer concentration of 16.55 wt%, a dissolving temperature of 27.5°C, and a casting thickness of 450 µm. The statistical model exhibits a deviation between the predicted and actual responses of less than 5%. Further characterization of the formed PVDF membrane showed that the morphology of the membrane was in line with the membrane-protein binding performance. PMID:27088961

  5. Commentary: nonspecific protein binding versus membrane partitioning: it is not just semantics.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Swati; Korzekwa, Ken

    2012-09-01

    Nonspecific binding or sequestration results in differences between free and total drug concentrations, both in vitro and in vivo. Membrane partitioning and not protein binding is the primary mechanism of drug sequestration. Therefore, physicochemical properties, e.g., LogP can be used to predict drug sequestration in membrane and cell-based assays. The concentration of drug in a membrane is determined by the both the rate in and out of the membrane. In contrast, membrane permeability is a function of the rate in only. This commentary discusses the origins of membrane partitioning and permeability and their impact on cellular disposition.

  6. Binding kinetics of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands: Molecular dynamics simulations and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinglei; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R.

    2015-12-01

    The adhesion of biological membranes is mediated by the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins. Central questions are how the binding kinetics of these proteins is affected by the membranes and by the membrane anchoring of the proteins. In this article, we (i) present detailed data for the binding of membrane-anchored proteins from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and (ii) provide a theory that describes how the binding kinetics depends on the average separation and thermal roughness of the adhering membranes and on the anchoring, lengths, and length variations of the proteins. An important element of our theory is the tilt of bound receptor-ligand complexes and transition-state complexes relative to the membrane normals. This tilt results from an interplay of the anchoring energy and rotational entropy of the complexes and facilitates the formation of receptor-ligand bonds at membrane separations smaller than the preferred separation for binding. In our simulations, we have considered both lipid-anchored and transmembrane receptor and ligand proteins. We find that the binding equilibrium constant and binding on-rate constant of lipid-anchored proteins are considerably smaller than the binding constant and on-rate constant of rigid transmembrane proteins with identical binding domains.

  7. Binding kinetics of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands: Molecular dynamics simulations and theory.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinglei; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2015-12-28

    The adhesion of biological membranes is mediated by the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins. Central questions are how the binding kinetics of these proteins is affected by the membranes and by the membrane anchoring of the proteins. In this article, we (i) present detailed data for the binding of membrane-anchored proteins from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and (ii) provide a theory that describes how the binding kinetics depends on the average separation and thermal roughness of the adhering membranes and on the anchoring, lengths, and length variations of the proteins. An important element of our theory is the tilt of bound receptor-ligand complexes and transition-state complexes relative to the membrane normals. This tilt results from an interplay of the anchoring energy and rotational entropy of the complexes and facilitates the formation of receptor-ligand bonds at membrane separations smaller than the preferred separation for binding. In our simulations, we have considered both lipid-anchored and transmembrane receptor and ligand proteins. We find that the binding equilibrium constant and binding on-rate constant of lipid-anchored proteins are considerably smaller than the binding constant and on-rate constant of rigid transmembrane proteins with identical binding domains.

  8. Label-free measuring and mapping of binding kinetics of membrane proteins in single living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Yunze; Wang, Shaopeng; Nagaraj, Vinay J.; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Jie; Tao, Nongjian

    2012-10-01

    Membrane proteins mediate a variety of cellular responses to extracellular signals. Although membrane proteins are studied intensively for their values as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets, in situ investigation of the binding kinetics of membrane proteins with their ligands has been a challenge. Traditional approaches isolate membrane proteins and then study them ex situ, which does not reflect accurately their native structures and functions. We present a label-free plasmonic microscopy method to map the local binding kinetics of membrane proteins in their native environment. This analytical method can perform simultaneous plasmonic and fluorescence imaging, and thus make it possible to combine the strengths of both label-based and label-free techniques in one system. Using this method, we determined the distribution of membrane proteins on the surface of single cells and the local binding kinetic constants of different membrane proteins. Furthermore, we studied the polarization of the membrane proteins on the cell surface during chemotaxis.

  9. Ligand- and coactivator-mediated transactivation function (AF2) of the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain is inhibited by the cognate hinge region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Lu, J; Yong, E L

    2001-03-01

    Transactivation functions (AF2) in the ligand-binding domains (LBD) of many steroid receptors are well characterized, but there is little evidence to support such a function for the LBD of the androgen receptor (AR). We report a mutant AR, with residues 628-646 in the hinge region deleted, which exhibited transactivation activity that was more than double that of the wild type (WT) AR. Although no androgen-dependent AF2 activity could be observed for the WT ARLBD fused to a heterologous DNA-binding domain, the mutant ARLBD(Delta628-646) was 30-40 times more active than the WT ARLBD. In the presence of the p160 coactivator TIF2, AR(Delta628-646) was significantly more active than similarly treated WT AR. Deletion of residues 628-646 also enhanced TIF2-ARLBD activity 8-fold, an effect not present when the LBD-interacting LXXLL motifs of TIF2 were mutated, suggesting that the negative modulatory activity of residues 628-646 were exerted via coactivator pathways. Although the AP-1 (c-Jun/c-Fos) system and NcoR have been reported to interact with and repress the activity of some steroid receptors, c-Jun, c-Fos, c-Jun/c-Fos, nor NcoR function was consistently affected by the absence or presence of residues 628-646, implying that the AR hinge region exerts its silencing effects in a manner independent of these corepressors. Our data provide evidence for the novel finding that strong androgen-dependent AF2 exists in the ARLBD and is the first report of a negative regulatory domain in the AR. Because mutations in this region are commonly associated with prostate cancer, it is important to characterize the mechanisms by which the hinge region exerts its repressor effect on ligand-activated and coactivator-mediated AF2 activity of the ARLBD.

  10. Effect of membrane protein concentration on binding of /sup 3/H-imipramine in human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Barkai, A.I.; Kowalik, S.; Baron, M.

    1985-02-01

    Binding of /sup 3/H-imipramine to platelet membranes has been implicated as a marker for depression. Comparing /sup 3/H-IMI binding between depressed patients and normal subjects we observed an increase in the dissociation constant Kd with increasing membrane protein. This phenomenon was studied more rigorously in five normal subjects. Platelet membranes were prepared and adjusted to four concentrations of protein ranging from 100 to 800 micrograms/ml. The /sup 3/H-IMI binding parameters of maximum binding sites number (Bmax) and Kd were obtained by Scatchard analysis at each membrane concentration. A positive linear relationship was found between K/sub d/ values and the concentration of membrane protein in the assay, but no change was observed in Bmax. The variability in Kd values reported in the literature may be accounted for in part by the different concentrations of membrane protein used in various studies.

  11. The HOPS/class C Vps complex tethers membranes by binding to one Rab GTPase in each apposed membrane

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ruoya; Stroupe, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Many Rab GTPase effectors are membrane-tethering factors, that is, they physically link two apposed membranes before intracellular membrane fusion. In this study, we investigate the distinct binding factors needed on apposed membranes for Rab effector–dependent tethering. We show that the homotypic fusion and protein-sorting/class C vacuole protein-sorting (HOPS/class C Vps) complex can tether low-curvature membranes, that is, liposomes with a diameter of ∼100 nm, only when the yeast vacuolar Rab GTPase Ypt7p is present in both tethered membranes. When HOPS is phosphorylated by the vacuolar casein kinase I, Yck3p, tethering only takes place when GTP-bound Ypt7p is present in both tethered membranes. When HOPS is not phosphorylated, however, its tethering activity shows little specificity for the nucleotide-binding state of Ypt7p. These results suggest a model for HOPS-mediated tethering in which HOPS tethers membranes by binding to Ypt7p in each of the two tethered membranes. Moreover, because vacuole-associated HOPS is presumably phosphorylated by Yck3p, our results suggest that nucleotide exchange of Ypt7p on multivesicular bodies (MVBs)/late endosomes must take place before HOPS can mediate tethering at vacuoles. PMID:25995379

  12. The HOPS/class C Vps complex tethers membranes by binding to one Rab GTPase in each apposed membrane.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ruoya; Stroupe, Christopher

    2015-07-15

    Many Rab GTPase effectors are membrane-tethering factors, that is, they physically link two apposed membranes before intracellular membrane fusion. In this study, we investigate the distinct binding factors needed on apposed membranes for Rab effector-dependent tethering. We show that the homotypic fusion and protein-sorting/class C vacuole protein-sorting (HOPS/class C Vps) complex can tether low-curvature membranes, that is, liposomes with a diameter of ∼100 nm, only when the yeast vacuolar Rab GTPase Ypt7p is present in both tethered membranes. When HOPS is phosphorylated by the vacuolar casein kinase I, Yck3p, tethering only takes place when GTP-bound Ypt7p is present in both tethered membranes. When HOPS is not phosphorylated, however, its tethering activity shows little specificity for the nucleotide-binding state of Ypt7p. These results suggest a model for HOPS-mediated tethering in which HOPS tethers membranes by binding to Ypt7p in each of the two tethered membranes. Moreover, because vacuole-associated HOPS is presumably phosphorylated by Yck3p, our results suggest that nucleotide exchange of Ypt7p on multivesicular bodies (MVBs)/late endosomes must take place before HOPS can mediate tethering at vacuoles.

  13. Evaluation of OASIS QSAR Models Using ToxCast™ in Vitro Estrogen and Androgen Receptor Binding Data and Application in an Integrated Endocrine Screening Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bhhatarai, Barun; Wilson, Daniel M.; Price, Paul S.; Marty, Sue; Parks, Amanda K.; Carney, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Background: Integrative testing strategies (ITSs) for potential endocrine activity can use tiered in silico and in vitro models. Each component of an ITS should be thoroughly assessed. Objectives: We used the data from three in vitro ToxCast™ binding assays to assess OASIS, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) platform covering both estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) binding. For stronger binders (described here as AC50 < 1 μM), we also examined the relationship of QSAR predictions of ER or AR binding to the results from 18 ER and 10 AR transactivation assays, 72 ER-binding reference compounds, and the in vivo uterotrophic assay. Methods: NovaScreen binding assay data for ER (human, bovine, and mouse) and AR (human, chimpanzee, and rat) were used to assess the sensitivity, specificity, concordance, and applicability domain of two OASIS QSAR models. The binding strength relative to the QSAR-predicted binding strength was examined for the ER data. The relationship of QSAR predictions of binding to transactivation- and pathway-based assays, as well as to in vivo uterotrophic responses, was examined. Results: The QSAR models had both high sensitivity (> 75%) and specificity (> 86%) for ER as well as both high sensitivity (92–100%) and specificity (70–81%) for AR. For compounds within the domains of the ER and AR QSAR models that bound with AC50 < 1 μM, the QSAR models accurately predicted the binding for the parent compounds. The parent compounds were active in all transactivation assays where metabolism was incorporated and, except for those compounds known to require metabolism to manifest activity, all assay platforms where metabolism was not incorporated. Compounds in-domain and predicted to bind by the ER QSAR model that were positive in ToxCast™ ER binding at AC50 < 1 μM were active in the uterotrophic assay. Conclusions: We used the extensive ToxCast™ HTS binding data set to show that OASIS ER and AR QSAR models had

  14. Engineering a Highly Hydrophilic PVDF Membrane via Binding TiO₂Nanoparticles and a PVA Layer onto a Membrane Surface.

    PubMed

    Qin, Aiwen; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Xinzhen; Liu, Dapeng; He, Chunju

    2015-04-29

    A highly hydrophilic PVDF membrane was fabricated through chemically binding TiO2 nanoparticles and a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) layer onto a membrane surface simultaneously. The chemical composition of the modified membrane surface was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the binding performance of TiO2 nanoparticles and the PVA layer was investigated by a rinsing test. The results indicated that the TiO2 nanoparticles were uniformly and strongly tailored onto the membrane surface, while the PVA layer was firmly attached onto the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles and the membrane by adsorption-cross-linking. The possible mechanisms during the modification process and filtration performance, i.e., water permeability and bovine serum albumin (BSA) rejection, were investigated as well. Furthermore, antifouling property was discussed through multicycles of BSA solution filtration tests, where the flux recovery ratio was significantly increased from 20.0% for pristine PVDF membrane to 80.5% for PVDF/TiO2/PVA-modified membrane. This remarkable promotion is mainly ascribed to the improvement of surface hydrophilicity, where the water contact angle of the membrane surface was decreased from 84° for pristine membrane to 24° for PVDF/TiO2/PVA membrane. This study presents a novel and varied strategy for immobilization of nanoparticles and PVA layer on substrate surface, which could be easily adapted for a variety of materials for surface modification. PMID:25806418

  15. Engineering a Highly Hydrophilic PVDF Membrane via Binding TiO₂Nanoparticles and a PVA Layer onto a Membrane Surface.

    PubMed

    Qin, Aiwen; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Xinzhen; Liu, Dapeng; He, Chunju

    2015-04-29

    A highly hydrophilic PVDF membrane was fabricated through chemically binding TiO2 nanoparticles and a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) layer onto a membrane surface simultaneously. The chemical composition of the modified membrane surface was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the binding performance of TiO2 nanoparticles and the PVA layer was investigated by a rinsing test. The results indicated that the TiO2 nanoparticles were uniformly and strongly tailored onto the membrane surface, while the PVA layer was firmly attached onto the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles and the membrane by adsorption-cross-linking. The possible mechanisms during the modification process and filtration performance, i.e., water permeability and bovine serum albumin (BSA) rejection, were investigated as well. Furthermore, antifouling property was discussed through multicycles of BSA solution filtration tests, where the flux recovery ratio was significantly increased from 20.0% for pristine PVDF membrane to 80.5% for PVDF/TiO2/PVA-modified membrane. This remarkable promotion is mainly ascribed to the improvement of surface hydrophilicity, where the water contact angle of the membrane surface was decreased from 84° for pristine membrane to 24° for PVDF/TiO2/PVA membrane. This study presents a novel and varied strategy for immobilization of nanoparticles and PVA layer on substrate surface, which could be easily adapted for a variety of materials for surface modification.

  16. Binding to phosphatidyl serine membranes causes a conformational change in the concave face of annexin I.

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, M; Ossa, C G

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that binding of annexin I to phospholipids induces the formation of a second phospholipid binding site. It is shown that the N terminus on the concave side of membrane-bound annexin I is cleaved much faster by trypsin or cathepsin than the N terminus of the free protein. The reactivity of the unique disulfide bond located near the concave face was similarly increased by membrane binding. These results demonstrate that Ca(2+)-dependent membrane binding induces a conformational change on the concave side of the annexin I molecule and support the notion that this face of the molecule may contribute to the formation of the secondary membrane-binding site. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 5 PMID:8994623

  17. Anti-androgens in gynaecological practice.

    PubMed

    Reed, M J; Franks, S

    1988-09-01

    Hirsutism and acne in women are common distressing problems. Unwanted hair growth, acne and seborrhoea result from the action of androgens on the skin. Such effects depend not only on increased androgen production by the ovary or adrenal gland but also on the bioavailability of androgen to peripheral tissues. This in turn is related to transport of androgens in plasma by specific binding proteins and to peripheral metabolism of testosterone and androstenedione to their more potent 5 alpha-reduced derivatives. An effective anti-androgen is one which blocks the androgen receptor-mediated actions of testosterone and DHT on skin. CPA, the treatment of choice in the UK, is a potent androgen receptor-blocking steroid which also has progestational properties. When combined with ethinyloestradiol it also suppresses ovarian function, thus reducing androgen production, and provides effective contraception. PMID:2976627

  18. A delocalized proton-binding site within a membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Steffen; Freier, Erik; Gerwert, Klaus

    2014-07-01

    The role of protein-bound water molecules in protein function and catalysis is an emerging topic. Here, we studied the solvation of an excess proton by protein-bound water molecules and the contribution of the surrounding amino acid residues at the proton release site of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. It hosts an excess proton within a protein-bound water cluster, which is hydrogen bonded to several surrounding amino acids. Indicative of delocalization is a broad continuum absorbance experimentally observed by time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In combination with site-directed mutagenesis, the involvement of several amino acids (especially Glu-194 and Glu-204) in the delocalization was elaborated. Details regarding the contributions of the glutamates and water molecules to the delocalization mode in biomolecular simulations are controversial. We carried out quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding simulations for all amino acids that have been experimentally shown to be involved in solvation of the excess proton, and systematically investigated the influence of the quantum box size. We compared calculated theoretical infrared spectra with experimental ones as a measure for the correct description of excess proton delocalization. A continuum absorbance can only be observed for small quantum boxes containing few amino acids and/or water molecules. Larger quantum boxes, including all experimentally shown involved amino acids, resulted in narrow absorbance bands, indicating protonation of a single binding site in contradiction to experimental results. We conclude that small quantum boxes seem to reproduce representative extreme cases of proton delocalization modes: proton delocalization only on water molecules or only between Glu-194 and Glu-204. Extending the experimental spectral region to lower wave numbers, a water-delocalized proton reproduces the observed continuum

  19. Control of adrenal androgen production.

    PubMed

    Odell, W D; Parker, L N

    The major adrenal androgens are dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) and androstenedione (delta 4). Studies by Cutler et al in 1978 demonstrated that these androgens are detectable in blood of all domestic and laboratory animals studied, but that only 4 species show increase in one or more with sexual maturation: rabbit, dog, chimpanzee and man. Studies by Grover and Odell in 1975 show these androgens do not bind to the androgen receptor obtained from rat prostate and thus probably are androgens only by conversion to an active androgen in vivo. Thomas and Oake in 1974 showed human skin converted DHEA to testosterone. The control of adrenal androgen secretion is in part modulated by ACTH. However, other factors or hormones must exist also, for a variety of clinical observations show dissociation in adrenal androgen versus cortisol secretion. Other substances that have been said to be controllers of adrenal androgen secretion include estrogens, prolactin, growth hormone, gonadotropins and lipotropin. None of these appear to be the usual physiological modulator, although under some circumstances each may increase androgen production. Studies from our laboratory using in vivo experiments in the castrate dog and published in 1979 indicated that crude extracts of bovine pituitary contained a substance that either modified ACTH stimulation of adrenal androgen secretion, or stimulated secretion itself - Cortisol Androgen Stimulating Hormone. Parker et al in 1983 showed a 60,000 MW glycoprotein was extractable from human pituitaries, which stimulated DHA secretion by dispersed canine adrenal cells in vitro, but did not stimulate cortisol secretion. This material contained no ACTH by radioimmunoassay. In 1982 Brubaker et al reported a substance was also present in human fetal pituitaries, which stimulated DHA secretion, but did not effect cortisol. PMID:6100259

  20. Silibinin inhibits aberrant lipid metabolism, proliferation and emergence of androgen-independence in prostate cancer cells via primarily targeting the sterol response element binding protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Dhanya K.; Deep, Gagan; Singh, Rana P.; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) kills thousands of men every year, demanding additional approaches to better understand and target this malignancy. Recently, critical role of aberrant lipogenesis is highlighted in prostate carcinogenesis, offering a unique opportunity to target it to reduce PCA. Here, we evaluated efficacy and associated mechanisms of silibinin in inhibiting lipid metabolism in PCA cells. At physiologically achievable levels in human, silibinin strongly reduced lipid and cholesterol accumulation specifically in human PCA cells but not in non-neoplastic prostate epithelial PWR-1E cells. Silibinin also decreased nuclear protein levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 and 2 (SREBP1/2) and their target genes only in PCA cells. Mechanistically, silibinin activated AMPK, thereby increasing SREBP1 phosphorylation and inhibiting its nuclear translocation; AMPK inhibition reversed silibinin-mediated decrease in nuclear SREBP1 and lipid accumulation. Additionally, specific SREBP inhibitor fatostatin and stable overexpression of SREBP1 further confirmed the central role of SREBP1 in silibinin-mediated inhibition of PCA cell proliferation and lipid accumulation and cell cycle arrest. Importantly, silibinin also inhibited synthetic androgen R1881-induced lipid accumulation and completely abrogated the development of androgen-independent LNCaP cell clones via targeting SREBP1/2. Together, these mechanistic studies suggest that silibinin would be effective against PCA by targeting critical aberrant lipogenesis. PMID:25294820

  1. Visualization of HIV-1 Gag Binding to Giant Unilamellar Vesicle (GUV) Membranes.

    PubMed

    Olety, Balaji; Veatch, Sarah L; Ono, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The structural protein of HIV-1, Pr55(Gag) (or Gag), binds to the plasma membrane in cells during the virus assembly process. Membrane binding of Gag is an essential step for virus particle formation, since a defect in Gag membrane binding results in severe impairment of viral particle production. To gain mechanistic details of Gag-lipid membrane interactions, in vitro methods based on NMR, protein footprinting, surface plasmon resonance, liposome flotation centrifugation, or fluorescence lipid bead binding have been developed thus far. However, each of these in vitro methods has its limitations. To overcome some of these limitations and provide a complementary approach to the previously established methods, we developed an in vitro assay in which interactions between HIV-1 Gag and lipid membranes take place in a "cell-like" environment. In this assay, Gag binding to lipid membranes is visually analyzed using YFP-tagged Gag synthesized in a wheat germ-based in vitro translation system and GUVs prepared by an electroformation technique. Here we describe the background and the protocols to obtain myristoylated full-length Gag proteins and GUV membranes necessary for the assay and to detect Gag-GUV binding by microscopy. PMID:27500610

  2. Cell Migration and Invadopodia Formation Require a Membrane-binding Domain of CARMIL2.

    PubMed

    Lanier, M Hunter; McConnell, Patrick; Cooper, John A

    2016-01-15

    CARMILs regulate capping protein (CP), a critical determinant of actin assembly and actin-based cell motility. Vertebrates have three conserved CARMIL genes with distinct functions. In migrating cells, CARMIL2 is important for cell polarity, lamellipodial assembly, ruffling, and macropinocytosis. In cells, CARMIL2 localizes with a distinctive dual pattern to vimentin intermediate filaments and to membranes at leading edges and macropinosomes. The mechanism by which CARMIL2 localizes to membranes has not been defined. Here, we report that CARMIL2 has a conserved membrane-binding domain composed of basic and hydrophobic residues, which is necessary and sufficient for membrane localization, based on expression studies in cells and on direct binding of purified protein to lipids. Most important, we find that the membrane-binding domain is necessary for CARMIL2 to function in cells, based on rescue expression with a set of biochemically defined mutants. CARMIL1 and CARMIL3 contain similar membrane-binding domains, based on sequence analysis and on experiments, but other CPI motif proteins, such as CD2AP, do not. Based on these results, we propose a model in which the membrane-binding domain of CARMIL2 tethers this multidomain protein to the membrane, where it links dynamic vimentin filaments with regulation of actin assembly via CP.

  3. Dissociation of membrane binding and lytic activities of the lymphocyte pore-forming protein (perforin).

    PubMed

    Young, J D; Damiano, A; DiNome, M A; Leong, L G; Cohn, Z A

    1987-05-01

    Granules isolated from CTL and NK cells contain a cytolytic pore-forming protein (PFP/perforin). At low temperatures (on ice), PFP binds to erythrocyte membranes without producing hemolysis. Hemolysis occurs when the PFP-bound erythrocytes are warmed up to 37 degrees C, which defines a temperature-dependent, lytic (pore-formation) step distinct from the membrane-binding event. Ca2+ and neutral pH are required for both membrane binding and pore formation by PFP. Serum, LDL, HDL, and heparin inhibit the hemolytic activity of PFP by blocking its binding to lipid membranes. Lysis by PFP that has bound to erythrocyte membranes is no longer susceptible to the effect of these inhibitors. The hemolytic activities associated with intact granules and solubilized PFP show different requirements for Ca2+ and pH, indicating that cytolysis produced by isolated granules may involve an additional step, possibly fusion of granules with membranes. It is suggested that three distinct Ca2+- and pH-dependent events may be involved during cell killing by CTL and NK cells: fusion of cytoplasmic granules of effector cells with their plasma membrane, releasing PFP from cells; binding of the released PFP to target membranes; and insertion of monomers and the subsequent formation of lytic pores in the target membrane. The serum-mediated inhibition of membrane binding by PFP could prevent the accidental injury of bystander cells by cell-released PFP, but would allow cytolysis to proceed to completion once PFP has bound to the target membrane. PMID:3494808

  4. Moesin, ezrin, and p205 are actin-binding proteins associated with neutrophil plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Pestonjamasp, K; Amieva, M R; Strassel, C P; Nauseef, W M; Furthmayr, H; Luna, E J

    1995-01-01

    Actin-binding proteins in bovine neutrophil plasma membranes were identified using blot overlays with 125I-labeled F-actin. Along with surface-biotinylated proteins, membranes were enriched in major actin-binding polypeptides of 78, 81, and 205 kDa. Binding was specific for F-actin because G-actin did not bind. Further, unlabeled F-actin blocked the binding of 125I-labeled F-actin whereas other acidic biopolymers were relatively ineffective. Binding also was specifically inhibited by myosin subfragment 1, but not by CapZ or plasma gelsolin, suggesting that the membrane proteins, like myosin, bind along the sides of the actin filaments. The 78- and 81-kDa polypeptides were identified as moesin and ezrin, respectively, by co-migration on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation with antibodies specific for moesin and ezrin. Although not present in detectable amounts in bovine neutrophils, radixin (a third and closely related member of this gene family) also bound 125I-labeled F-actin on blot overlays. Experiments with full-length and truncated bacterial fusion proteins localized the actin-binding site in moesin to the extreme carboxy terminus, a highly conserved sequence. Immunofluorescence micrographs of permeabilized cells and cell "footprints" showed moesin co-localization with actin at the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane, consistent with a role as a membrane-actin-linking protein. Images PMID:7612961

  5. Ambidextrous Binding of Cell and Membrane Bilayers by Soluble Matrix Metalloproteinase-12

    PubMed Central

    Koppisetti, Rama K.; Fulcher, Yan G.; Jurkevich, Alexander; Prior, Stephen H.; Xu, Jia; Lenoir, Marc; Overduin, Michael; Van Doren, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) regulate tissue remodeling, inflammation, and disease progression. Some soluble MMPs are inexplicably active near cell surfaces. Here, we demonstrate binding of MMP-12 directly to bilayers and cellular membranes using paramagnetic NMR and fluorescence. Opposing sides of the catalytic domain engage spin-labeled membrane mimics. Loops project from the β-sheet interface to contact the phospholipid bilayer with basic and hydrophobic residues. The distal membrane interface comprises loops on the other side of the catalytic cleft. Both interfaces mediate MMP-12 association with vesicles and cell membranes. MMP-12 binds plasma membranes and is internalized to hydrophobic perinuclear features, the nuclear membrane, and inside the nucleus within minutes. While binding of TIMP-2 to MMP-12 hinders membrane interactions beside the active site, TIMP-2-inhibited MMP-12 binds vesicles and cells, suggesting compensatory rotation of its membrane approaches. MMP-12 association with diverse cell membranes may target its activities to modulate innate immune responses and inflammation. PMID:25412686

  6. Binding of concanavalin A by the cell membrane of a unicellular organism, Paramecium aurelia.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E

    1975-01-01

    As demonstrated by electron microscopy, Concanavalin A receptors exist on the cell membrane of Paramecium aurelia. The interpretation of the cytochemical detection of Con A binding is not very precise because of a slight, unspecific peroxidase adsorption.

  7. Cooperative binding of Annexin A5 to phosphatidylserine on apoptotic cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janko, Christina; Jeremic, Ivica; Biermann, Mona; Chaurio, Ricardo; Schorn, Christine; Muñoz, Luis E.; Herrmann, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Healthy cells exhibit an asymmetric plasma membrane with phosphatidylserine (PS) located on the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane bilayer. Annexin A5-FITC, a PS binding protein, is commonly used to evaluate apoptosis in flow cytometry. PS exposed by apoptotic cells serves as a major ‘eat-me’ signal for phagocytes. Although exposition of PS has been observed after alternative stimuli, no clearance of viable, PS exposing cells has been detected. Thus, besides PS exposure, membranes of viable and apoptotic cells might exhibit specific characteristics. Here, we show that Annexin A5 binds in a cooperative manner to different types of dead cells. Shrunken apoptotic cells thereby showed the highest Hill coefficient values. Contrarily, parafomaldehyde fixation of apoptotic cells completely abrogates the cooperativity effect seen with dead and dying cells. We tend to speculate that the cooperative binding of Annexin A5 to the membranes of apoptotic cells reflects higher fluidity of the exposed membranes facilitating PS clustering.

  8. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets

    PubMed Central

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated. PMID:27517914

  9. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets.

    PubMed

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated. PMID:27517914

  10. Effects of membrane physical parameters on hematoporphyrin-derivative binding to liposomes: a spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, E.; Malik, Z.; Ehrenberg, B.

    1987-01-01

    Physical parameters of membrane bilayers were studied for their effect on the binding of hematoporphyrin derivative (Hpd), which is used as a sensitizer in photodynamic therapy of cancerous tissues. The purpose of this study was to clarify which parameters were relevant, under physiological conditions, to the selectivity of Hpd binding to cancer cells. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure the relative partitioning of the dye between the lipid and aqueous media. Increasing the microviscosity of the liposomes' membranes by various bilayer additives results in a strong reduction of Hpd binding, to an extent independent of the specific additive. The effect of temperature near the physiological value as well as the effect of cross membrane potential are small. Surface potential does not affect the binding constant, indicating that the binding species does not carry a net electric charge.

  11. Lipid-regulated sterol transfer between closely apposed membranes by oxysterol-binding protein homologues

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Timothy A.; Choi, Mal-Gi; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Mears, Jason A.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Hinshaw, Jenny E.

    2009-01-01

    Sterols are transferred between cellular membranes by vesicular and poorly understood nonvesicular pathways. Oxysterol-binding protein–related proteins (ORPs) have been implicated in sterol sensing and nonvesicular transport. In this study, we show that yeast ORPs use a novel mechanism that allows regulated sterol transfer between closely apposed membranes, such as organelle contact sites. We find that the core lipid-binding domain found in all ORPs can simultaneously bind two membranes. Using Osh4p/Kes1p as a representative ORP, we show that ORPs have at least two membrane-binding surfaces; one near the mouth of the sterol-binding pocket and a distal site that can bind a second membrane. The distal site is required for the protein to function in cells and, remarkably, regulates the rate at which Osh4p extracts and delivers sterols in a phosphoinositide-dependent manner. Together, these findings suggest a new model of how ORPs could sense and regulate the lipid composition of adjacent membranes. PMID:20008566

  12. Linking 3D and 2D binding kinetics of membrane proteins by multiscale simulations

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhong-Ru; Chen, Jiawen; Wu, Yinghao

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins are among the most functionally important proteins in cells. Unlike soluble proteins, they only possess two translational degrees of freedom on cell surfaces, and experience significant constraints on their rotations. As a result, it is currently challenging to characterize the in situ binding of membrane proteins. Using the membrane receptors CD2 and CD58 as a testing system, we developed a multiscale simulation framework to study the differences of protein binding kinetics between 3D and 2D environments. The association and dissociation processes were implemented by a coarse-grained Monte-Carlo algorithm, while the dynamic properties of proteins diffusing on lipid bilayer were captured from all-atom molecular dynamic simulations. Our simulations show that molecular diffusion, linker flexibility and membrane fluctuations are important factors in adjusting binding kinetics. Moreover, by calibrating simulation parameters to the measurements of 3D binding, we derived the 2D binding constant which is quantitatively consistent with the experimental data, indicating that the method is able to capture the difference between 3D and 2D binding environments. Finally, we found that the 2D dissociation between CD2 and CD58 is about 100-fold slower than the 3D dissociation. In summary, our simulation framework offered a generic approach to study binding mechanisms of membrane proteins. PMID:25271078

  13. Identification of DNA-binding proteins on human umbilical vein endothelial cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, T M; Frampton, G; Cameron, J S

    1993-01-01

    The binding of anti-DNA antibodies to the endothelial cell is mediated through DNA, which forms a bridge between the immunoglobulin and the plasma membrane. We have shown that 32P-labelled DNA bound to the plasma membrane of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) by a saturable process, which could be competitively inhibited by non-radiolabelled DNA. In addition, DNA-binding was enhanced in HUVEC that had been treated with IL-1 alpha or tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). DNA-binding proteins of mol. wt 46,000, 92,000, and 84,000 were identified by the binding of 32P-labelled DNA to plasma membrane proteins separated on SDS-PAGE. DNA-binding proteins of mol. wt 46,000 and 84,000 were also present in the cytosol and nucleus. Murine anti-DNA MoAb410 bound to a single band, at mol. wt 46,000, of plasma membrane protein, in the presence of DNA. Our results showed that DNA-binding proteins are present in different cellular fractions of endothelial cells. DNA-binding proteins on the cell membrane could participate in the in situ formation of immune deposits; and their presence in the cell nucleus suggests a potential role in the modulation of cell function. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8419070

  14. NMR WaterLOGSY Reveals Weak Binding of Bisphenol A with Amyloid Fibers of a Conserved 11 Residue Peptide from Androgen Receptor.

    PubMed

    Asencio-Hernández, Julia; Kieffer, Bruno; Delsuc, Marc-André

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that bisphenol A (BPA), a molecule largely released in the environment, has detrimental effects on ecosystems and on human health. It acts as an endocrine disruptor targeting steroid hormone receptors, such as the estrogen receptor (ER), estrogen-related receptor (ERR) and androgen receptor (AR). BPA-derived molecules have recently been shown to interact with the AR N-terminal domain (AR-NTD), which is known to be largely intrinsically disordered. This N-terminal domain contains an 11 residue conserved domain that forms amyloid fibers upon oxidative dimerisation through its strictly conserved Cys240 residue. We investigate here the interaction of BPA, and other potential endocrine disruptors, with AR-NTD amyloid fibers using the WaterLOGSY NMR experiment. We observed a selective binding of these compounds to the amyloid fibers formed by the AR-NTD conserved region and glutamine homopolymers. This observation suggests that the high potency of endocrine disruptors may result, in part, from their ability to bind amyloid forms of nuclear receptors in addition to their cognate binding sites. This property may be exploited to design future therapeutic strategies targeting AR related diseases such as the spinal bulbar muscular atrophy or prostate cancer. The ability of NMR WaterLOGSY experiments to detect weak interactions between small ligands and amyloid fibers may prove to be of particular interest for identifying promising hit molecules. PMID:27583469

  15. NMR WaterLOGSY Reveals Weak Binding of Bisphenol A with Amyloid Fibers of a Conserved 11 Residue Peptide from Androgen Receptor.

    PubMed

    Asencio-Hernández, Julia; Kieffer, Bruno; Delsuc, Marc-André

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that bisphenol A (BPA), a molecule largely released in the environment, has detrimental effects on ecosystems and on human health. It acts as an endocrine disruptor targeting steroid hormone receptors, such as the estrogen receptor (ER), estrogen-related receptor (ERR) and androgen receptor (AR). BPA-derived molecules have recently been shown to interact with the AR N-terminal domain (AR-NTD), which is known to be largely intrinsically disordered. This N-terminal domain contains an 11 residue conserved domain that forms amyloid fibers upon oxidative dimerisation through its strictly conserved Cys240 residue. We investigate here the interaction of BPA, and other potential endocrine disruptors, with AR-NTD amyloid fibers using the WaterLOGSY NMR experiment. We observed a selective binding of these compounds to the amyloid fibers formed by the AR-NTD conserved region and glutamine homopolymers. This observation suggests that the high potency of endocrine disruptors may result, in part, from their ability to bind amyloid forms of nuclear receptors in addition to their cognate binding sites. This property may be exploited to design future therapeutic strategies targeting AR related diseases such as the spinal bulbar muscular atrophy or prostate cancer. The ability of NMR WaterLOGSY experiments to detect weak interactions between small ligands and amyloid fibers may prove to be of particular interest for identifying promising hit molecules.

  16. NMR WaterLOGSY Reveals Weak Binding of Bisphenol A with Amyloid Fibers of a Conserved 11 Residue Peptide from Androgen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Asencio-Hernández, Julia; Kieffer, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that bisphenol A (BPA), a molecule largely released in the environment, has detrimental effects on ecosystems and on human health. It acts as an endocrine disruptor targeting steroid hormone receptors, such as the estrogen receptor (ER), estrogen-related receptor (ERR) and androgen receptor (AR). BPA-derived molecules have recently been shown to interact with the AR N-terminal domain (AR-NTD), which is known to be largely intrinsically disordered. This N-terminal domain contains an 11 residue conserved domain that forms amyloid fibers upon oxidative dimerisation through its strictly conserved Cys240 residue. We investigate here the interaction of BPA, and other potential endocrine disruptors, with AR-NTD amyloid fibers using the WaterLOGSY NMR experiment. We observed a selective binding of these compounds to the amyloid fibers formed by the AR-NTD conserved region and glutamine homopolymers. This observation suggests that the high potency of endocrine disruptors may result, in part, from their ability to bind amyloid forms of nuclear receptors in addition to their cognate binding sites. This property may be exploited to design future therapeutic strategies targeting AR related diseases such as the spinal bulbar muscular atrophy or prostate cancer. The ability of NMR WaterLOGSY experiments to detect weak interactions between small ligands and amyloid fibers may prove to be of particular interest for identifying promising hit molecules. PMID:27583469

  17. Membrane Binding of HIV-1 Matrix Protein: Dependence on Bilayer Composition and Protein Lipidation

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marilia; Nanda, Hirsh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT By assembling in a protein lattice on the host's plasma membrane, the retroviral Gag polyprotein triggers formation of the viral protein/membrane shell. The MA domain of Gag employs multiple signals—electrostatic, hydrophobic, and lipid-specific—to bring the protein to the plasma membrane, thereby complementing protein-protein interactions, located in full-length Gag, in lattice formation. We report the interaction of myristoylated and unmyristoylated HIV-1 Gag MA domains with bilayers composed of purified lipid components to dissect these complex membrane signals and quantify their contributions to the overall interaction. Surface plasmon resonance on well-defined planar membrane models is used to quantify binding affinities and amounts of protein and yields free binding energy contributions, ΔG, of the various signals. Charge-charge interactions in the absence of the phosphatidylinositide PI(4,5)P2 attract the protein to acidic membrane surfaces, and myristoylation increases the affinity by a factor of 10; thus, our data do not provide evidence for a PI(4,5)P2 trigger of myristate exposure. Lipid-specific interactions with PI(4,5)P2, the major signal lipid in the inner plasma membrane, increase membrane attraction at a level similar to that of protein lipidation. While cholesterol does not directly engage in interactions, it augments protein affinity strongly by facilitating efficient myristate insertion and PI(4,5)P2 binding. We thus observe that the isolated MA protein, in the absence of protein-protein interaction conferred by the full-length Gag, binds the membrane with submicromolar affinities. IMPORTANCE Like other retroviral species, the Gag polyprotein of HIV-1 contains three major domains: the N-terminal, myristoylated MA domain that targets the protein to the plasma membrane of the host; a central capsid-forming domain; and the C-terminal, genome-binding nucleocapsid domain. These domains act in concert to condense Gag into a membrane

  18. Mechanisms of Membrane Binding of Small GTPase K-Ras4B Farnesylated Hypervariable Region*

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyunbum; Abraham, Sherwin J.; Chavan, Tanmay S.; Hitchinson, Ben; Khavrutskii, Lyuba; Tarasova, Nadya I.; Nussinov, Ruth; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras4B belongs to a family of small GTPases that regulates cell growth, differentiation and survival. K-ras is frequently mutated in cancer. K-Ras4B association with the plasma membrane through its farnesylated and positively charged C-terminal hypervariable region (HVR) is critical to its oncogenic function. However, the structural mechanisms of membrane association are not fully understood. Here, using confocal microscopy, surface plasmon resonance, and molecular dynamics simulations, we observed that K-Ras4B can be distributed in rigid and loosely packed membrane domains. Its membrane binding domain interaction with phospholipids is driven by membrane fluidity. The farnesyl group spontaneously inserts into the disordered lipid microdomains, whereas the rigid microdomains restrict the farnesyl group penetration. We speculate that the resulting farnesyl protrusion toward the cell interior allows oligomerization of the K-Ras4B membrane binding domain in rigid microdomains. Unlike other Ras isoforms, K-Ras4B HVR contains a single farnesyl modification and positively charged polylysine sequence. The high positive charge not only modulates specific HVR binding to anionic phospholipids but farnesyl membrane orientation. Phosphorylation of Ser-181 prohibits spontaneous farnesyl membrane insertion. The mechanism illuminates the roles of HVR modifications in K-Ras4B targeting microdomains of the plasma membrane and suggests an additional function for HVR in regulation of Ras signaling. PMID:25713064

  19. Centrifugation-based assay for examining nanoparticle-lipid membrane binding and disruption.

    PubMed

    Xi, Aihong; Bothun, Geoffrey D

    2014-03-01

    Centrifugation-based assays are commonly employed to study protein-membrane affinity or binding using lipid bilayer vesicles. An analogous assay has been developed to study nanoparticle-membrane interactions as a function of nanoparticle surface functionalization, membrane lipid composition, and monovalent salt concentration (NaCl). Anionic (carboxylic acid, Ag-COOH), cationic (amine, Ag-NH), and polyethylene glycol coated (Ag-PEG) silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were examined based on their surface plasmon resonance (SPR), which was used to determine the degree of binding to anionic, cationic, and zwitterionic membrane vesicles by analyzing supernatant and sediment phases. SPR was also used to examine AgNP aggregation in solution and at membrane-water interfaces, and direct visualization of AgNP-membrane binding, vesicle aggregation, and vesicle disruption was achieved by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). The extent of AgNP binding, based on AgNP + vesicle heteroaggregation, and vesicle disruption was dependent upon the degree of electrostatic attraction. Because of their biological and environmental relevance, Ag-PEG + anionic vesicles systems were examined in detail. Cryo-TEM image analysis was performed to determine apparent membrane-water partition coefficients and AgNP aggregation states (in solution and bound to membranes) as a function of NaCl concentration. Despite possessing a PEG coating and exhibiting a slight negative charge, Ag-PEG was able to bind to model anionic bacterial membranes either as individual AgNPs (low salt) or as AgNP aggregates (high salt). The centrifugation assay provides a rapid and straightforward way to screen nanoparticle-membrane interactions.

  20. Membrane binding of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 matrix protein in vivo supports a conformational myristyl switch mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Spearman, P; Horton, R; Ratner, L; Kuli-Zade, I

    1997-01-01

    The interaction of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag protein with the plasma membrane of a cell is a critical event in the assembly of HIV particles. The matrix protein region (MA) of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) Pr55Gag has previously been demonstrated to confer membrane-binding properties on the precursor polyprotein. Both the myristic acid moiety and additional determinants within MA are essential for plasma membrane binding and subsequent particle formation. In this study, we demonstrated the myristylation-dependent membrane interaction of MA in an in vivo membrane-binding assay. When expressed within mammalian cells, MA was found both in association with cellular membranes and in a membrane-free form. In contrast, the intact precursor Pr55Gag molecule analyzed in an identical manner was found almost exclusively bound to membranes. Both membrane-bound and membrane-free forms of MA were myristylated and phosphorylated. Differential membrane binding was not due to the formation of multimers, as dimeric and trimeric forms of MA were also found in both membrane-bound and membrane-free fractions. To define the requirements for membrane binding of MA, we analyzed the membrane binding of a series of MA deletion mutants. Surprisingly, deletions within alpha-helical regions forming the globular head of MA led to a dramatic increase in overall membrane binding. The stability of the MA-membrane interaction was not affected by these deletions, and no deletion eliminated membrane binding of the molecule. These results establish that myristic acid is a primary determinant of the stability of the Gag protein-membrane interaction and provide support for the hypothesis that a significant proportion of HIV-1 MA molecules may adopt a conformation in which myristic acid is hidden and unavailable for membrane interaction. PMID:9261380

  1. Lipoprotein receptors in copper-deficient rats: high density lipoprotein binding to liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hassel, C.A.; Lei, K.Y.; Marchello, J.A.

    1986-03-05

    In copper-deficient rats, the observed hyperlipoproteinemia was mainly due to the elevation in high density lipoproteins (HDL). This study was designed to determine whether an impairment in the binding of HDL to liver membrane is responsible for the hyperlipoproteinemia. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 2 treatments, namely copper (Cu) deficient and adequate (less than 1 and 8 mg Cu/kg of diet). After 8 weeks, plasma, heart and liver tissues were obtained. Reduction in liver Cu content and elevation in heart to body weight ratio and plasma cholesterol confirmed that rats fed the test diet were Cu-deficient. Plasma HDL isolated from both Cu-deficient and control rats were iodinated and bound to liver membranes prepared from rats of each treatment. Binding of /sup 125/I-HDL was competitively inhibited by unlabelled rat HDL from both treatments, but not by human LDL. Scatchard analysis of specific binding data showed that maximal /sup 125/I-HDL binding (per mg membrane protein) to membranes prepared from Cu-deficient rats was not lower than controls. Furthermore, the amount of /sup 125/I-HDL from deficient rats specifically bound to liver membranes prepared from either treatment was not less than the amount of /sup 125/I-HDL from control rats bound to the same membranes. The data suggest that the hyperlipoproteinemia in Cu-deficient rats may not have resulted from a decrease in the number of hepatic HDL binding sites.

  2. Specific accumulation of 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone in microsomal membranes during the process of cytochrome P-450(C-17)-catalysed androgen biosynthesis. A dynamic study of intermediate formation and turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Kühn-Velten, N; Lessmann, M; Förster, M E; Staib, W

    1988-01-01

    A complete dynamic analysis of cytochrome P-450(C-17)-catalysed androgen biosynthesis from a single dose of progesterone and 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone in a double-label double-substrate experiment was performed in order to elucidate the controversial intermediacy of 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone. Label distribution within the steroid fractions as well as in the membrane and buffer compartments yields direct evidence that the endogenously formed 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (which is in an 'intermediate state') accumulates to a higher degree in microsomal membranes than does the exogenously added 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (which is in a 'substrate state') under certain conditions. It is also demonstrated that endogenously formed 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone may partly leave the membrane compartment (in terms of a 'leakage' or 'overflow' phenomenon) and is then able to equilibrate with the pool of exogenously added 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone. Since only the label distribution in the membrane-associated (but not always in the aqueous) 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone pool corresponds to the label distribution in the androgen fraction, it is concluded that only the membrane-associated 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone pool is directly accessible to cytochrome P-450(C-17)-catalysed conversion into androgens. PMID:3223911

  3. Effect of a membrane-stabilizing compound on calcium binding to the plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Przełecka, A; Fritsch, R S; Wollweber, L; Sobota, A

    1980-01-01

    Binding of calcium ions at the plasma membrane was studied in Acanthamoeba cells pretreated with ZIMET 3164, a benzimidazole nitrogen mustard derivative, which is known to show a potent immunosuppressive action combined with a membrane-stabilizing effect in mice. For reference, 2 compounds were applied: ZIMET 3393 (Cytostasan¿), another benzimidazole mustard derivative, which exerts only a moderate membrane effect and acts as a strong cytostatic, and ZIMET 176/68, a barbituric acid derivative, which acts as an inhibitor of humoral immune responses but without membrane-stabilizing effect. Application of any of the 3 compounds does not reduce the appearance of calcium binding sites, visualized by means of ultracytochemical reaction, notwithstanding their different action in the mammalian organism. On the contrary, it was estimated by morphometric analysis that the number of Ca-dependent deposits was augmented after treatment with low doses of any of the 3 compounds, what seems to be connected with the induced metabolic disturbances in low molecular phosphates level. High doses and/or prolongation of treatment of the cells resulted in diminution of the number of deposits and induces profound disturbances in cell ultrastructure, probably due to the toxic action of the applied doses. In these cases, band-like structures crosslinking the two leaflets of the plasma membrane may be observed; it is suggested that they represent integral membrane proteins. PMID:6774578

  4. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. )

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  5. 2-Hydroxy Fatty Acid Enantiomers of Gb3 Impact Shiga Toxin Binding and Membrane Organization.

    PubMed

    Schütte, Ole M; Patalag, Lukas J; Weber, Lucas M C; Ries, Annika; Römer, Winfried; Werz, Daniel B; Steinem, Claudia

    2015-06-16

    Shiga toxin subunit B (STxB) binding to its cellular receptor Gb3 leads to the formation of protein-lipid clusters and bending of the membrane. A newly developed synthetic route allowed synthesizing the biologically most relevant Gb3-C24:1 2OH species with both, the natural (Gb3-R) as well as the unnatural (Gb3-S) configuration of the 2OH group. The derivatives bind STxB with identical nanomolar affinity, while the propensity to induce membrane tubules in giant unilamellar vesicles is more pronounced for Gb3-S. Fluorescence and atomic force microscopy images of phase-separated supported membranes revealed differences in the lateral organization of the protein on the membrane. Gb3-R favorably induces large and tightly packed protein clusters, while a lower protein density is found on Gb3-S doped membranes. PMID:26083916

  6. The RNA-binding protein Sam68 regulates expression and transcription function of the androgen receptor splice variant AR-V7.

    PubMed

    Stockley, Jacqueline; Markert, Elke; Zhou, Yan; Robson, Craig N; Elliott, David J; Lindberg, Johan; Leung, Hing Y; Rajan, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Castration-resistant (CR) prostate cancer (PCa) partly arises due to persistence of androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity in the absence of cognate ligand. An emerging mechanism underlying the CRPCa phenotype and predicting response to therapy is the expression of the constitutively-active AR-V7 splice variant generated by AR cryptic exon 3b inclusion. Here, we explore the role of the RNA-binding protein (RBP) Sam68 (encoded by KHDRBS1), which is over-expressed in clinical PCa, on AR-V7 expression and transcription function. Using a minigene reporter, we show that Sam68 controls expression of exon 3b resulting in an increase in endogenous AR-V7 mRNA and protein expression in RNA-binding-dependent manner. We identify a novel protein-protein interaction between Sam68 and AR-V7 mediated by a common domain shared with full-length AR, and observe these proteins in the cell nucleoplasm. Using a luciferase reporter, we demonstrate that Sam68 co-activates ligand-independent AR-V7 transcriptional activity in an RNA-binding-independent manner, and controls expression of the endogenous AR-V7-specific gene target UBE2C. Our data suggest that Sam68 has separable effects on the regulation of AR-V7 expression and transcriptional activity, through its RNA-binding capacity. Sam68 and other RBPs may control expression of AR-V7 and other splice variants as well as their downstream functions in CRPCa. PMID:26310125

  7. Sintokamide A Is a Novel Antagonist of Androgen Receptor That Uniquely Binds Activation Function-1 in Its Amino-terminal Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Banuelos, Carmen A.; Tavakoli, Iran; Tien, Amy H.; Caley, Daniel P.; Mawji, Nasrin R.; Li, Zhenzhen; Wang, Jun; Yang, Yu Chi; Imamura, Yusuke; Yan, Luping; Wen, Jian Guo; Andersen, Raymond J.; Sadar, Marianne D.

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a validated drug target for all stages of prostate cancer including metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). All current hormone therapies for CRPC target the C-terminal ligand-binding domain of AR and ultimately all fail with resumed AR transcriptional activity. Within the AR N-terminal domain (NTD) is activation function-1 (AF-1) that is essential for AR transcriptional activity. Inhibitors of AR AF-1 would potentially block most AR mechanisms of resistance including constitutively active AR splice variants that lack the ligand-binding domain. Here we provide evidence that sintokamide A (SINT1) binds AR AF-1 region to specifically inhibit transactivation of AR NTD. Consistent with SINT1 targeting AR AF-1, it attenuated transcriptional activities of both full-length AR and constitutively active AR splice variants, which correlated with inhibition of growth of enzalutamide-resistant prostate cancer cells expressing AR splice variants. In vivo, SINT1 caused regression of CRPC xenografts and reduced expression of prostate-specific antigen, a gene transcriptionally regulated by AR. Inhibition of AR activity by SINT1 was additive to EPI-002, a known AR AF-1 inhibitor that is in clinical trials (NCT02606123). This implies that SINT1 binds to a site on AF-1 that is unique from EPI. Consistent with this suggestion, these two compounds showed differences in blocking AR interaction with STAT3. This work provides evidence that the intrinsically disordered NTD of AR is druggable and that SINT1 analogs may provide a novel scaffold for drug development for the treatment of prostate cancer or other diseases of the AR axis. PMID:27576691

  8. The RNA-binding protein Sam68 regulates expression and transcription function of the androgen receptor splice variant AR-V7.

    PubMed

    Stockley, Jacqueline; Markert, Elke; Zhou, Yan; Robson, Craig N; Elliott, David J; Lindberg, Johan; Leung, Hing Y; Rajan, Prabhakar

    2015-08-27

    Castration-resistant (CR) prostate cancer (PCa) partly arises due to persistence of androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity in the absence of cognate ligand. An emerging mechanism underlying the CRPCa phenotype and predicting response to therapy is the expression of the constitutively-active AR-V7 splice variant generated by AR cryptic exon 3b inclusion. Here, we explore the role of the RNA-binding protein (RBP) Sam68 (encoded by KHDRBS1), which is over-expressed in clinical PCa, on AR-V7 expression and transcription function. Using a minigene reporter, we show that Sam68 controls expression of exon 3b resulting in an increase in endogenous AR-V7 mRNA and protein expression in RNA-binding-dependent manner. We identify a novel protein-protein interaction between Sam68 and AR-V7 mediated by a common domain shared with full-length AR, and observe these proteins in the cell nucleoplasm. Using a luciferase reporter, we demonstrate that Sam68 co-activates ligand-independent AR-V7 transcriptional activity in an RNA-binding-independent manner, and controls expression of the endogenous AR-V7-specific gene target UBE2C. Our data suggest that Sam68 has separable effects on the regulation of AR-V7 expression and transcriptional activity, through its RNA-binding capacity. Sam68 and other RBPs may control expression of AR-V7 and other splice variants as well as their downstream functions in CRPCa.

  9. Specific strychnine binding sites on acrosome-associated membranes of golden hamster spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Llanos, Miguel N; Ronco, Ana M; Aguirre, María C

    2003-06-27

    This study demonstrates for the first time, that membrane vesicles originated from the hamster sperm head after the occurrence of the acrosome reaction, possess specific strychnine binding sites. [3H]Strychnine binding was saturable and reversible, being displaced by unlabeled strychnine (IC(50)=26.7+/-2.3 microM). Kinetic analysis revealed one binding site with K(d)=120nM and B(max)=142fmol/10(6) spermatozoa. Glycine receptor agonists beta-alanine and taurine inhibited strychnine binding by 20-30%. Surprisingly, glycine stimulated binding by about 40-50%. Results obtained in this study strongly suggest the presence of glycine receptors-with distinctive kinetic properties on the periacrosomal plasma membrane of hamster spermatozoa. Localization of this receptor fits well with its previously proposed role in acrosomal exocytosis during mammalian fertilization.

  10. Quantitation of the Calcium and Membrane Binding Properties of the C2 Domains of Dysferlin

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Nazish; Padmanarayana, Murugesh; Marty, Naomi J.; Johnson, Colin P.

    2014-01-01

    Dysferlin is a large membrane protein involved in calcium-triggered resealing of the sarcolemma after injury. Although it is generally accepted that dysferlin is Ca2+ sensitive, the Ca2+ binding properties of dysferlin have not been characterized. In this study, we report an analysis of the Ca2+ and membrane binding properties of all seven C2 domains of dysferlin as well as a multi-C2 domain construct. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements indicate that all seven dysferlin C2 domains interact with Ca2+ with a wide range of binding affinities. The C2A and C2C domains were determined to be the most sensitive, with Kd values in the tens of micromolar, whereas the C2D domain was least sensitive, with a near millimolar Kd value. Mutagenesis of C2A demonstrates the requirement for negatively charged residues in the loop regions for divalent ion binding. Furthermore, dysferlin displayed significantly lower binding affinity for the divalent cations magnesium and strontium. Measurement of a multidomain construct indicates that the solution binding affinity does not change when C2 domains are linked. Finally, sedimentation assays suggest all seven C2 domains bind lipid membranes, and that Ca2+ enhances but is not required for interaction. This report reveals for the first time, to our knowledge, that all dysferlin domains bind Ca2+ albeit with varying affinity and stoichiometry. PMID:24461013

  11. Disentangling Viral Membrane Fusion from Receptor Binding Using Synthetic DNA-Lipid Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Rawle, Robert J; Boxer, Steven G; Kasson, Peter M

    2016-07-12

    Enveloped viruses must bind to a receptor on the host membrane to initiate infection. Membrane fusion is subsequently initiated by a conformational change in the viral fusion protein, triggered by receptor binding, an environmental change, or both. Here, we present a strategy to disentangle the two processes of receptor binding and fusion using synthetic DNA-lipid conjugates to bind enveloped viruses to target membranes in the absence of receptor. This permits direct testing of whether receptor engagement affects the fusion mechanism as well as a comparison of fusion behavior across viruses with different receptor binding specificities. We demonstrate this approach by binding X-31 influenza virus to target vesicles and measuring the rates of individual pH-triggered lipid mixing events using fluorescence microscopy. Influenza lipid mixing kinetics are found to be independent of receptor binding, supporting the common yet previously unproven assumption that receptor binding does not produce any clustering or spatial rearrangement of viral hemagglutinin, which affects the rate-limiting step of pH-triggered fusion. This DNA-lipid tethering strategy should also allow the study of viruses where challenging receptor reconstitution has previously prevented single-virus fusion experiments. PMID:27410740

  12. Disentangling Viral Membrane Fusion from Receptor Binding Using Synthetic DNA-Lipid Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Rawle, Robert J; Boxer, Steven G; Kasson, Peter M

    2016-07-12

    Enveloped viruses must bind to a receptor on the host membrane to initiate infection. Membrane fusion is subsequently initiated by a conformational change in the viral fusion protein, triggered by receptor binding, an environmental change, or both. Here, we present a strategy to disentangle the two processes of receptor binding and fusion using synthetic DNA-lipid conjugates to bind enveloped viruses to target membranes in the absence of receptor. This permits direct testing of whether receptor engagement affects the fusion mechanism as well as a comparison of fusion behavior across viruses with different receptor binding specificities. We demonstrate this approach by binding X-31 influenza virus to target vesicles and measuring the rates of individual pH-triggered lipid mixing events using fluorescence microscopy. Influenza lipid mixing kinetics are found to be independent of receptor binding, supporting the common yet previously unproven assumption that receptor binding does not produce any clustering or spatial rearrangement of viral hemagglutinin, which affects the rate-limiting step of pH-triggered fusion. This DNA-lipid tethering strategy should also allow the study of viruses where challenging receptor reconstitution has previously prevented single-virus fusion experiments.

  13. Multiple sup 3 H-oxytocin binding sites in rat myometrial plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Crankshaw, D.; Gaspar, V.; Pliska, V. )

    1990-01-01

    The affinity spectrum method has been used to analyse binding isotherms for {sup 3}H-oxytocin to rat myometrial plasma membranes. Three populations of binding sites with dissociation constants (Kd) of 0.6-1.5 x 10(-9), 0.4-1.0 x 10(-7) and 7 x 10(-6) mol/l were identified and their existence verified by cluster analysis based on similarities between Kd, binding capacity and Hill coefficient. When experimental values were compared to theoretical curves constructed using the estimated binding parameters, good fits were obtained. Binding parameters obtained by this method were not influenced by the presence of GTP gamma S (guanosine-5'-O-3-thiotriphosphate) in the incubation medium. The binding parameters agree reasonably well with those found in uterine cells, they support the existence of a medium affinity site and may allow for an explanation of some of the discrepancies between binding and response in this system.

  14. The RNA binding of protein A from Wuhan nodavirus is mediated by mitochondrial membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yang; Miao, Meng; Wang, Zhaowei; Liu, Yongxiang; Yang, Jie; Xia, Hongjie; Li, Xiao-Feng; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2014-08-01

    RNA replication of positive-strand (+)RNA viruses requires the lipids present in intracellular membranes, the sites of which viral replicases associate with. However, the direct effects of membrane lipids on viral replicases are still poorly understood. Wuhan nodavirus (WhNV) protein A, which associates with mitochondrial membranes, is the sole replicase required for RNA replication. Here, we report that WhNV protein A binds to RNA1 in a cooperative manner. Moreover, mitochondrial membrane lipids (MMLs) stimulated the RNA binding activity and cooperativity of protein A, and such stimulations exhibited strong selectivity for distinct phospholipids. Interestingly, MMLs stimulated the RNA-binding cooperativity only at higher protein A concentrations. Further investigation showed that MMLs stimulate the RNA binding of protein A by promoting its self-interaction. Finally, manipulating MML metabolism affected the protein A-induced RNA1 recruitment in cells. Together, our findings reveal the direct effects of membrane lipids on the RNA binding activity of a nodaviral replicase. PMID:25092456

  15. Binding of /sup 18/F by cell membranes and cell walls of Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Yotis, W.W.; Zeb, M.; McNulty, J.; Kirchner, F.; Reilly, C.; Glendenin, L.

    1983-07-01

    The binding of /sup 18/F to isolated cell membranes and cell walls of Streptococcus mutans GS-5 or other bacteria was assayed. The attachment of /sup 18/F to these cell envelopes proceeded slowly and reached equilibrium within 60 min. /sup 18/F binding was stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ (1 mM). The binding of /sup 18/F to cellular components was dependent upon the pH, as well as the amount of /sup 18/F and dose of the binder employed. The binding of /sup 18/F by cell walls prepared from fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-resistant cells of S. salivarius and S. mutans did not differ significantly. The pretreatment of cell walls or cell membranes for 60 min at 30 degrees C with 1 mg of RNase, DNase, or trypsin per ml did not influence the binding of /sup 18/F by the walls and membranes of S. mutans GS-5. However, prior exposure of cell membranes to sodium dodecyl sulfate caused a significant reduction in the number of /sup 18/F atoms bound by the membranes. In saturated assay systems, cell membranes of S. mutans GS-5 bound 10(15) to 10(16) atoms of /sup 18/F per mg (dry weight), whereas cell walls from S. mutans GS-5, FA-1, and HS-6 or Actinomyces viscosus T14V and T14AV bound 10(12) to 10(13) atoms of /sup 18/F per mg (dry weight). /sup 18/F in this quantity (10(12) to 10(13) atoms) cannot be detected with the fluoride electrode. The data provide, for the first time, a demonstration of /sup 18/F binding by cell membranes and walls of oral flora.

  16. Seasonal changes in plasma androgens, glucocorticoids and glucocorticoid-binding proteins in the marsupial sugar glider Petaurus breviceps.

    PubMed

    Bradley, A J; Stoddart, D M

    1992-01-01

    An investigation spanning two breeding seasons was carried out to examine endocrine changes associated with reproduction in a wild population of the marsupial sugar glider Petaurus breviceps, a small arboreal gliding possum. Using techniques of equilibrium dialysis and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at steady-state conditions, a high-affinity, low-capacity glucocorticoid-binding protein was demonstrated in the plasma of Petaurus breviceps. Equilibrium dialysis at 36 degrees C using cortisol gave a high-affinity binding constant of 95 +/- 5.2 litres/mumol for a presumed corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) while the binding constant for the cortisol-albumin interaction was 3.5 +/- 0.4 litres/mmol. There was no difference between the sexes in the affinity of binding of cortisol to CBG; however, the cortisol-binding capacity underwent seasonal variation in both sexes. Progesterone was bound strongly to the presumed CBG while neither oestradiol nor aldosterone appeared to be bound with high affinity to P. breviceps plasma. In the males, peaks in the plasma concentration of testosterone coincided with the July-September breeding season in both years. A significant inverse relationship was shown to exist between the plasma testosterone concentration and the CBG-binding capacity. In both sexes an increase occurred in the plasma concentration of free cortisol during the first breeding season, a pattern which was not repeated in the subsequent breeding season, possibly due to a lower population density in that year.

  17. Seasonal changes in plasma androgens, glucocorticoids and glucocorticoid-binding proteins in the marsupial sugar glider Petaurus breviceps.

    PubMed

    Bradley, A J; Stoddart, D M

    1992-01-01

    An investigation spanning two breeding seasons was carried out to examine endocrine changes associated with reproduction in a wild population of the marsupial sugar glider Petaurus breviceps, a small arboreal gliding possum. Using techniques of equilibrium dialysis and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at steady-state conditions, a high-affinity, low-capacity glucocorticoid-binding protein was demonstrated in the plasma of Petaurus breviceps. Equilibrium dialysis at 36 degrees C using cortisol gave a high-affinity binding constant of 95 +/- 5.2 litres/mumol for a presumed corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) while the binding constant for the cortisol-albumin interaction was 3.5 +/- 0.4 litres/mmol. There was no difference between the sexes in the affinity of binding of cortisol to CBG; however, the cortisol-binding capacity underwent seasonal variation in both sexes. Progesterone was bound strongly to the presumed CBG while neither oestradiol nor aldosterone appeared to be bound with high affinity to P. breviceps plasma. In the males, peaks in the plasma concentration of testosterone coincided with the July-September breeding season in both years. A significant inverse relationship was shown to exist between the plasma testosterone concentration and the CBG-binding capacity. In both sexes an increase occurred in the plasma concentration of free cortisol during the first breeding season, a pattern which was not repeated in the subsequent breeding season, possibly due to a lower population density in that year. PMID:1737956

  18. Identification of adducin-binding residues on the cytoplasmic domain of erythrocyte membrane protein, band 3.

    PubMed

    Franco, Taina; Chu, Haiyan; Low, Philip S

    2016-10-01

    Two major complexes form structural bridges that connect the erythrocyte membrane to its underlying spectrin-based cytoskeleton. Although the band 3-ankyrin bridge may account for most of the membrane-to-cytoskeleton interactions, the linkage between the cytoplasmic domain of band 3 (cdb3) and adducin has also been shown to be critical to membrane integrity. In the present paper, we demonstrate that adducin, a major component of the spectrin-actin junctional complex, binds primarily to residues 246-264 of cdb3, and mutation of two exposed glutamic acid residues within this sequence completely abrogates both α- and β-adducin binding. Because these residues are located next to the ankyrin-binding site on cdb3, it seems unlikely that band 3 can bind ankyrin and adducin concurrently, reducing the chances of an association between the ankyrin and junctional complexes that would significantly compromise erythrocyte membrane integrity. We also demonstrate that adducin binds the kidney isoform of cdb3, a spliceoform that lacks the first 65 amino acids of erythrocyte cdb3, including the central strand of a large β-pleated sheet. Because kidney cdb3 is not known to bind any of the common peripheral protein partners of erythrocyte cdb3, including ankyrin, protein 4.1, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, and phosphofructokinase, retention of this affinity for adducin was unexpected.

  19. Atomistic models for free energy evaluation of drug binding to membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Durdagi, S; Zhao, C; Cuervo, J E; Noskov, S Y

    2011-01-01

    The binding of various molecules to integral membrane proteins with optimal affinity and specificity is central to normal function of cell. While membrane proteins represent about one third of the whole cell proteome, they are a majority of common drug targets. The quest for the development of computational models capable of accurate evaluation of binding affinities, decomposition of the binding into its principal components and thus mapping molecular mechanisms of binding remains one of the main goals of modern computational biophysics and related drug development. The primary scope of this review will be on the recent extension of computational methods for the study of drug binding to membrane proteins. Several examples of such applications will be provided ranging from secondary transporters to voltage gated channels. In this mini-review, we will provide a short summary on the breadth of different methods for binding affinity evaluation. These methods include molecular docking with docking scoring functions, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with post-processing analysis using Molecular Mechanics/Poisson Boltzmann (Generalized Born) Surface Area (MM/PB(GB)SA), as well as direct evaluation of free energies from Free Energy Perturbation (FEP) with constraining schemes, and Potential of Mean Force (PMF) computations. We will compare advantages and shortcomings of popular techniques and provide discussion on the integrative strategies for drug development aimed at targeting membrane proteins.

  20. The membrane bound bacterial lipocalin Blc is a functional dimer with binding preference for lysophospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Campanacci, Valérie; Bishop, Russell E.; Blangy, Stéphanie; Tegoni, Mariella; Cambillau, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Lipocalins, a widespread multifunctional family of small proteins (15–25 kDa) have been first described in eukaryotes and more recently in Gram-negative bacteria. Bacterial lipocalins belonging to class I are outer membrane lipoproteins, among which Blc from E. coli is the better studied. Blc is expressed under conditions of starvation and high osmolarity, conditions known to exert stress on the cell envelope. The structure of Blc that we have previously solved (V. Campanacci, D. Nurizzo, S. Spinelli, C. Valencia, M. Tegoni, C. Cambillau, FEBS Lett. 562 (2004) 183–188.) suggested its possible role in binding fatty acids or phospholipids. Both physiological and structural data on Blc, therefore, point to a role in storage or transport of lipids necessary for membrane maintenance. In order to further document this hypothesis for Blc function, we have performed binding studies using fluorescence quenching experiments. Our results indicate that dimeric Blc binds fatty acids and phospholipids in a micromolar Kd range. The crystal structure of Blc with vaccenic acid, an unsaturated C18 fatty acid, reveals that the binding site spans across the Blc dimer, opposite to its membrane anchored face. An exposed unfilled pocket seemingly suited to bind a polar group attached to the fatty acid prompted us to investigate lyso-phospholipids, which were found to bind in a nanomolar Kd range. We discuss these findings in terms of a potential role for Blc in the metabolism of lysophospholipids generated in the bacterial outer membrane. PMID:16920109

  1. Zinc Binding to MG53 Protein Facilitates Repair of Injury to Cell Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chuanxi; Lin, Peihui; Zhu, Hua; Ko, Jae-Kyun; Hwang, Moonsun; Tan, Tao; Pan, Zui; Korichneva, Irina; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element that participates in a wide range of biological functions, including wound healing. Although Zn2+ deficiency has been linked to compromised wound healing and tissue repair in human diseases, the molecular mechanisms underlying Zn2+-mediated tissue repair remain unknown. Our previous studies established that MG53, a TRIM (tripartite motif) family protein, is an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Domain homology analysis revealed that MG53 contains two Zn2+-binding motifs. Here, we show that Zn2+ binding to MG53 is indispensable to assembly of the cell membrane repair machinery. Live cell imaging illustrated that Zn2+ entry from extracellular space is essential for translocation of MG53-containing vesicles to the acute membrane injury sites for formation of a repair patch. The effect of Zn2+ on membrane repair is abolished in mg53−/− muscle fibers, suggesting that MG53 functions as a potential target for Zn2+ during membrane repair. Mutagenesis studies suggested that both RING and B-box motifs of MG53 constitute Zn2+-binding domains that contribute to MG53-mediated membrane repair. Overall, this study establishes a base for Zn2+ interaction with MG53 in protection against injury to the cell membrane. PMID:25869134

  2. Covalent binding of single-walled carbon nanotubes to polyamide membranes for antimicrobial surface properties.

    PubMed

    Tiraferri, Alberto; Vecitis, Chad D; Elimelech, Menachem

    2011-08-01

    We propose an innovative approach to impart nanomaterial-specific properties to the surface of thin-film composite membranes. Specifically, biocidal properties were obtained by covalently binding single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to the membrane surface. The SWNTs were first modified by purification and ozonolysis to increase their sidewall functionalities, maximize cytotoxic properties, and achieve dispersion in aqueous solution. A tailored reaction protocol was developed to exploit the inherent moieties of hand-cast polyamide membrane surfaces and create covalent amide bonds with the functionalized SWNTs. The reaction is entirely aqueous-based and entails activation of the carboxylate groups of both the membrane and the nanomaterials to maximize reaction with ethylenediamine. The presence of SWNTs was verified after sonication of the membranes, confirming the strength of the bond between the SWNTs and the membrane surface. Characterization of the SWNT-functionalized surfaces demonstrated the attainment of membranes with novel properties that continued to exhibit high performance in water separation processes. The presence of surface-bound antimicrobial SWNTs was confirmed by experiments using E. coli cells that demonstrated an enhanced bacterial cytotoxicity for the SWNT-coated membranes. The SWNT membranes were observed to achieve up to 60% inactivation of bacteria attached to the membrane within 1 h of contact time. Our results suggest the potential of covalently bonded SWNTs to delay the onset of membrane biofouling during operation.

  3. (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding to adrenal capsular membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Finkel, M.S.; Aguilera, G.; Catt, K.J.; Keiser, H.R.

    1984-08-20

    The physiologic regulation of aldosterone secretion is dependent on extracellular calcium and appears to be mediated by increases in cytosolic free calcium concentration in the zona glomerulosa cell. A specific role for voltage-dependent calcium channels was suggested by previous studies with the calcium channel antagonist verapamil. The authors therefore studied the (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine calcium channel binding site in adrenal capsules. These studies revealed a single class of saturable, high affinity sites with K/sub D/ = .26 +/- .04 nM and B/sub max/ = 105 +/- 5.7 fmol/mg protein. Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine was inhibited by calcium channel antagonists with potencies nitrendipine = nifedipine >> verapamil, while diltiazem had no inhibitory effect. In the rat, binding sites for (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine were located in the adrenal capsule and medulla and were undetectable in the zona fasciculata. Physiologic studies with collagenase-dispersed adrenal glomerulosa cells demonstrated that nifedipine selectively inhibited angiotensin-II and potassium-stimulated steroidogenesis. These observations suggest both a pharmacologic and physiologic role for the nitrendipine binding site in aldosterone production. 17 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  4. Binding of AP-2 adaptor complex to brain membrane is regulated by phosphorylation of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Alberdi, A. . E-mail: aalberdi@fcm.uncu.edu.ar; Sartor, T.; Sosa, M.A.

    2005-05-13

    Phosphorylation of proteins appears as a key process in early steps of clathrin coated vesicle formation. Here, we report that treatment of post-nuclear fraction with alkaline phosphatase induced redistribution of {alpha} subunits of AP-2 adaptor complex to cytosol and this effect was higher in the {alpha}2 subunit. A high serine phosphorylation status of {alpha} subunits correlated with the higher affinity of AP-2 to membranes. Using a simple binding assay, where membranes were incubated with either purified adaptors or cytosols, we observed an inhibitory effect of tyrphostin, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, on the binding of AP-2 to membranes, but also an unexpected decrease induced by the phosphatase inhibitor cyclosporine. We also show an inhibitory effect of ATP mediated by cytosolic proteins, although it could not be related to the phosphorylation of AP-2, suggesting an action upstream a cascade of phosphorylations that participate in the regulation of the assembly of AP-2 to membranes.

  5. Rapid preparation of plasma membranes from avian lymphoid cells and fibroblasts for virus binding studies.

    PubMed

    Nieper, H; Müller, H

    1998-06-01

    A simple and rapid protocol for the preparation of plasma membranes from chicken embryo fibroblasts and chicken lymphoid cells was developed. Characterization of the preparations by morphological, biochemical and serological methods indicated the specific enrichment of the plasma membranes as well as cell surface proteins. Binding of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) particles was demonstrated after immobilization of the plasma membranes, and cell type-specific differences were observed. Although the results of these studies reflect the interaction between IBDV and isolated cells only partially, the advantages of these plasma membrane preparations, the specific enrichment of cell surface proteins, their constant quality and the possibility to store aliquots over several months, make them a useful tool for virus binding studies with avian cells. PMID:9694323

  6. Roles played by acidic lipids in HIV-1 Gag membrane binding.

    PubMed

    Olety, Balaji; Ono, Akira

    2014-11-26

    The MA domain mediates plasma membrane (PM) targeting of HIV-1 Gag, leading to particle assembly at the PM. The interaction between MA and acidic phospholipids, in addition to N-terminal myristoyl moiety, promotes Gag binding to lipid membranes. Among acidic phospholipids, PI(4,5)P2, a PM-specific phosphoinositide, is essential for proper HIV-1 Gag localization to the PM and efficient virus particle production. Recent studies further revealed that MA-bound RNA negatively regulates HIV-1 Gag membrane binding and that PI(4,5)P2 is necessary to overcome this RNA-imposed block. In this review, we will summarize the current understanding of Gag-membrane interactions and discuss potential roles played by acidic phospholipids.

  7. Photodynamic activity and binding of sulfonated metallophthalocyanines to phospholipid membranes: contribution of metal-phosphate coordination.

    PubMed

    Pashkovskaya, Alina A; Sokolenko, Elena A; Sokolov, Valeri S; Kotova, Elena A; Antonenko, Yuri N

    2007-10-01

    Photosensitized efficacy of tetrasulfonated phthalocyanines of zinc, aluminum and nickel (ZnPcS(4), AlPcS(4) and NiPcS(4), respectively) as studied by gramicidin channel (gA) photoinactivation was compared with adsorption of the dyes on the surface of a bilayer lipid membrane as measured by the inner field compensation method. The adsorption of the negatively charged phthalocyanines on diphytanoylphosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) membranes led to formation of a negative boundary potential difference between the membrane/water interfaces. Good correlation was shown between the photodynamic activity and the membrane binding of the three metallophthalocyanines. ZnPcS(4) appeared to be the most potent of these photosensitizers, while NiPcS(4) was completely ineffective. All of these phthalocyanines displayed no binding and negligible gA photoinactivation with membranes formed of glycerol monooleate (GMO), whereas Rose Bengal exhibited significant binding and photodynamic efficacy with GMO membranes. Gramicidin photoinactivation in the presence of AlPcS(4), being insensitive to the ionic strength of the bathing solution, was inhibited by fluoride and attenuated by phosphate ions. A blue shift of the fluorescence peak position of ZnPcS(4) dissolved in ethanol was elicited by phosphate, similarly to fluoride, which was indicative of the coordination interaction of these ions with the central metal atom of the phthalocyanine macrocycle. This interaction was enhanced in the medium modeling the water-membrane interface. The results obtained imply that binding of tetrasulfonated metallophthalocyanines to phospholipid membranes is determined primarily by metal-phosphate coordination.

  8. Glucocorticoid interactions with ethanol effects on synaptic plasma membranes: influence on [125I]calmodulin binding.

    PubMed

    Sze, P Y

    1996-02-01

    Ca(++)-dependent binding of calmodulin (CaM) to brain synaptic plasma membranes is known to be inhibited by ethanol and stimulated by glucocorticoids. These opposite neurochemical actions between ethanol and the steroids in vitro are consistent with glucocorticoid antagonism of ethanol-induced sedation reported to occur in vivo. The present study was undertaken to characterize the interactions of corticosterone with ethanol effects on [125I]CaM binding in synaptic plasma membranes. From the shift of concentration-response curves when corticosterone and ethanol were present in combination, the interaction between steroid stimulation and ethanol inhibition occurred in an additive relationship over the range of their effective concentrations. From Scatchard analyses, ethanol-induced decrease in membrane affinity for [125I]CaM was antagonized by steroid-induced increase in the membrane affinity, indicating that the convergent event in their interaction was the alteration of membrane affinity for CaM. Glucocorticoid antagonism of ethanol inhibition of [125I]CaM binding exhibited a high degree of steroid specificity; steroids with glucocorticoid activity including cortisol, dexamethasone and triamcinolone were effective, whereas gonadal steroids and excitatory neuroactive steroid metabolites were ineffective. The demonstration that glucocorticoids antagonized the inhibition of CaM binding by ethanol provides support for the hypothesis that these steroids are among the endogenous factors that modulate neuronal sensitivity to ethanol.

  9. External location of sites on pig erythrocyte membranes that bind nitrobenzylthioinosine

    SciTech Connect

    Agbanyo, F.R.; Cass, C.E.; Paterson, A.R.

    1988-03-01

    Nucleoside transport in erythrocytes of various species is inhibited by the binding of nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR) to high affinity sites associated with nucleoside transport elements of the plasma membrane. The present study examined binding of (/sup 3/H)NBMPR to unsealed ghosts and to sealed right-side-out vesicles (ROVs) and inside-out vesicles (IOVs) prepared from pig erythrocytes. Kd values for NBMPR dissociation from the ligand-site complex in unsealed ghosts, ROVs and IOVs were similar (1.6-2.4 nM), and Bmax values (mean +/- SD) were, respectively, 22.2 +/- 5.5, 25.8 +/- 6.4, and 37.3 +/- 4.0 molecules/fg of protein, reflecting differences in the protein content of the membrane preparations. When temperatures were decreased from 22 degrees to 4 degrees, NBMPR binding to erythrocyte membrane preparations was reduced in IOVs relative to that in unsealed ghosts and ROVs. At 22 degrees, the association of NBMPR molecules with IOVs was slower than with ROVs and unsealed ghosts, differences that were virtually eliminated by permeabilization of the membrane preparations with saponin. Thus, the binding sites were more accessible to external NBMPR in sealed ROVs and unsealed ghosts than in sealed IOVs, indicating that the NBMPR sites are located on the extracellular aspect of the membrane.

  10. Human Rhinovirus Subviral A Particle Binds to Lipid Membranes over a Twofold Axis of Icosahedral Symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mohit

    2013-01-01

    Minor group human rhinoviruses bind low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors for endocytosis. Once they are inside endosomes, the acidic pH triggers their dissociation from the receptors and conversion into hydrophobic subviral A particles; these attach to the membrane and transfer their single-strand, positive-sense RNA genome into the cytosol. Here, we allowed human rhinovirus 2 (HRV2) A particles, produced in vitro by incubation at pH 5.4, to attach to liposomes; cryo-electron microscopy 3-dimensional single-particle image reconstruction revealed that they bind to the membrane around a 2-fold icosahedral symmetry axis. PMID:23946453

  11. Surface area of lipid membranes regulates the DNA-binding capacity of cationic liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchini, Cristina; Montani, Maura; Amici, Augusto; Pozzi, Daniela; Caminiti, Ruggero; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2009-01-01

    We have applied electrophoresis on agarose gels to investigate the DNA-binding capacity of cationic liposomes made of cationic DC-cholesterol and neutral dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine as a function of membrane charge density and cationic lipid/DNA charge ratio. While each cationic liposome formulation exhibits a distinctive DNA-protection ability, here we show that such a capacity is universally regulated by surface area of lipid membranes available for binding in an aspecific manner. The relevance of DNA protection for gene transfection is also discussed.

  12. Conformational Antibody Binding to a Native, Cell-Free Expressed GPCR in Block Copolymer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    de Hoog, Hans-Peter M.; Lin JieRong, Esther M.; Banerjee, Sourabh; Décaillot, Fabien M.; Nallani, Madhavan

    2014-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a key role in physiological processes and are attractive drug targets. Their biophysical characterization is, however, highly challenging because of their innate instability outside a stabilizing membrane and the difficulty of finding a suitable expression system. We here show the cell-free expression of a GPCR, CXCR4, and its direct embedding in diblock copolymer membranes. The polymer-stabilized CXCR4 is readily immobilized onto biosensor chips for label-free binding analysis. Kinetic characterization using a conformationally sensitive antibody shows the receptor to exist in the correctly folded conformation, showing binding behaviour that is commensurate with heterologously expressed CXCR4. PMID:25329156

  13. Prediction of lipid-binding regions in cytoplasmic and extracellular loops of membrane proteins as exemplified by protein translocation membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Keller, Rob C A

    2013-01-01

    The presence of possible lipid-binding regions in the cytoplasmic or extracellular loops of membrane proteins with an emphasis on protein translocation membrane proteins was investigated in this study using bioinformatics. Recent developments in approaches recognizing lipid-binding regions in proteins were found to be promising. In this study a total bioinformatics approach specialized in identifying lipid-binding helical regions in proteins was explored. Two features of the protein translocation membrane proteins, the position of the transmembrane regions and the identification of additional lipid-binding regions, were analyzed. A number of well-studied protein translocation membrane protein structures were checked in order to demonstrate the predictive value of the bioinformatics approach. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that lipid-binding regions in the cytoplasmic and extracellular loops in protein translocation membrane proteins can be predicted, and it is proposed that the interaction of these regions with phospholipids is important for proper functioning during protein translocation. PMID:22961045

  14. Characterization of Naphthaleneacetic Acid Binding to Receptor Sites on Cellular Membranes of Maize Coleoptile Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Peter M.; Dohrmann, Ulrike; Hertel, Rainer

    1977-01-01

    Characteristics of and optimum conditions for saturable (“specific”) binding of [14C]naphthaleneacetic acid to sites located on membranous particles from maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptiles are described. Most, if not all, of the specific binding appears to be due to a single kinetic class of binding sites having a KD of 5 to 7 × 10−7m for naphthalene-1-acetic acid (NAA). Binding of NAA is insensitive to high monovalent salt concentrations, indicating that binding is not primarily ionic. However, specific binding is inhibited by Mg2+ or Ca2+ above 5 mm. Specific binding is improved by organic acids, especially citrate. Binding is heat-labile and is sensitive to agents that act either on proteins or on lipids. Specific binding is reversibly inactivated by reducing agents such as dithioerythritol; a reducible group, possibly a disulfide group, may be located at the binding site and required for its function. The affinity of the specific binding sites for auxins is modified by an unidentified dialyzable, heat-stable, apparently amphoteric, organic factor (“supernatant factor”) found in maize tissue. PMID:16659851

  15. Phosphatidylethanolamine Binding Is a Conserved Feature of Cyclotide-Membrane Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Huang, Yen-Hua; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Bagatolli, Luis A.; Sonza, Secondo; Tachedjian, Gilda; Daly, Norelle L.; Craik, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclotides are bioactive cyclic peptides isolated from plants that are characterized by a topologically complex structure and exceptional resistance to enzymatic or thermal degradation. With their sequence diversity, ultra-stable core structural motif, and range of bioactivities, cyclotides are regarded as a combinatorial peptide template with potential applications in drug design. The mode of action of cyclotides remains elusive, but all reported biological activities are consistent with a mechanism involving membrane interactions. In this study, a diverse set of cyclotides from the two major subfamilies, Möbius and bracelet, and an all-d mirror image form, were examined to determine their mode of action. Their lipid selectivity and membrane affinity were determined, as were their toxicities against a range of targets (red blood cells, bacteria, and HIV particles). Although they had different membrane-binding affinities, all of the tested cyclotides targeted membranes through binding to phospholipids containing phosphatidylethanolamine headgroups. Furthermore, the biological potency of the tested cyclotides broadly correlated with their ability to target and disrupt cell membranes. The finding that a broad range of cyclotides target a specific lipid suggests their categorization as a new lipid-binding protein family. Knowledge of their membrane specificity has the potential to assist in the design of novel drugs based on the cyclotide framework, perhaps allowing the targeting of peptide drugs to specific cell types. PMID:22854971

  16. Lipid binding and membrane penetration of polymyxin B derivatives studied in a biomimetic vesicle system.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Marina; Tsubery, Haim; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Shames, Alex; Fridkin, Mati; Jelinek, Raz

    2003-01-01

    Understanding membrane interactions and cell-wall permeation of Gram-negative bacteria is of great importance, owing to increasing bacterial resistance to existing drugs and therapeutic treatments. Here we use biomimetic lipid vesicles to analyse membrane association and penetration by synthetic derivatives of polymyxin B (PMB), a potent naturally occurring antibacterial cyclic peptide. The PMB analogues studied were PMB nonapeptide (PMBN), in which the hydrophobic alkyl residue was cleaved, PMBN diastereomer containing D-instead of L-amino acids within the cyclic ring (dPMBN) and PMBN where the hydrophobic alkyl chain was replaced with an Ala6 repeat (Ala6-PMBN). Peptide binding measurements, colorimetric transitions induced within the vesicles, fluorescence quenching experiments and ESR spectroscopy were applied to investigate the structural parameters underlying the different membrane-permeation profiles and biological activities of the analogues. The experiments point to the role of negatively charged lipids in membrane binding and confirm the prominence of lipopolisaccharide (LPS) in promoting membrane association and penetration by the peptides. Examination of the lipid interactions of the PMB derivatives shows that the cyclic moiety of PMB is not only implicated in lipid attachment and LPS binding, but also affects penetration into the inner bilayer core. The addition of the Ala6 peptide moiety, however, does not significantly promote peptide insertion into the hydrophobic lipid environment. The data also indicate that the extent of penetration into the lipid bilayer is not related to the overall affinity of the peptides to the membrane. PMID:12848621

  17. Binding of small basic peptides to membranes containing acidic lipids: theoretical models and experimental results.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Tal, N; Honig, B; Peitzsch, R M; Denisov, G; McLaughlin, S

    1996-01-01

    We measured directly the binding of Lys3, Lys5, and Lys7 to vesicles containing acidic phospholipids. When the vesicles contain 33% acidic lipids and the aqueous solution contains 100 mM monovalent salt, the standard Gibbs free energy for the binding of these peptides is 3, 5, and 7 kcal/mol, respectively. The binding energies decrease as the mol% of acidic lipids in the membrane decreases and/or as the salt concentration increases. Several lines of evidence suggest that these hydrophilic peptides do not penetrate the polar headgroup region of the membrane and that the binding is mainly due to electrostatic interactions. To calculate the binding energies from classical electrostatics, we applied the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation to atomic models of the phospholipid bilayers and the basic peptides in aqueous solution. The electrostatic free energy of interaction, which arises from both a long-range coulombic attraction between the positively charged peptide and the negatively charged lipid bilayer, and a short-range Born or image charge repulsion, is a minimum when approximately 2.5 A (i.e., one layer of water) exists between the van der Waals surfaces of the peptide and the lipid bilayer. The calculated molar association constants, K, agree well with the measured values: K is typically about 10-fold smaller than the experimental value (i.e., a difference of about 1.5 kcal/mol in the free energy of binding). The predicted dependence of K (or the binding free energies) on the ionic strength of the solution, the mol% of acidic lipids in the membrane, and the number of basic residues in the peptide agree very well with the experimental measurements. These calculations are relevant to the membrane binding of a number of important proteins that contain clusters of basic residues. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:8842196

  18. Drug binding and mobility relating to the thermal fluctuation in fluid lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, Emiko; Yoshii, Noriyuki

    2008-12-01

    Drug binding and mobility in fluid lipid bilayer membranes are quantified in situ by using the multinuclear solution NMR combined with the pulsed-field-gradient technique. One-dimensional and pulsed-field-gradient F19 and H1 NMR signals of an anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil (5FU) are analyzed at 283-313 K in the presence of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) of egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) as model cell membranes. The simultaneous observation of the membrane-bound and free 5FU signals enables to quantify in what amount of 5FU is bound to the membrane and how fast 5FU is moving within the membrane in relation to the thermal fluctuation of the soft, fluid environment. It is shown that the mobility of membrane-bound 5FU is slowed down by almost two orders of magnitude and similar to the lipid movement in the membrane, the movement closely related to the intramembrane fluidity. The mobility of 5FU and EPC is, however, not similar at 313 K; the 5FU movement is enhanced in the membrane as a result of the loose binding of 5FU in the lipid matrices. The membrane-bound fraction of 5FU is ˜0.1 and almost unaltered over the temperature range examined. It is also independent of the 5FU concentration from 2 to 30 mM with respect to the 40-50 mM LUV. The free energy of the 5FU binding is estimated at -4 to -2 kJ/mol, the magnitude always close to the thermal fluctuation, 2.4-2.6 kJ/mol.

  19. The Role of Androgen and Androgen Receptor in the Skin-Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jiann-Jyh; Chang, Philip; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Chen, Lumin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-01-01

    Androgen and androgen receptor (AR) may play important roles in several skin related diseases, such as androgenetic alopecia and acne vulgaris. Current treatments for these androgen/AR-involved diseases, which target the synthesis of androgens or prevent its binding to AR, can cause significant adverse side effects. Based on the recent studies using AR knockout mice, it has been suggested that AR and androgens play distinct roles in the skin pathogenesis, and AR seems to be a better target than androgens for the treatment of these skin diseases. Here we review recent studies of androgen/AR roles in several skin-related disorders, including acne vulgaris, androgenetic alopecia, and hirsutism, as well as cutaneous wound healing. PMID:22829074

  20. Specific binding of a fungal glucan phytoalexin elicitor to membrane fractions from soybean Glycine max

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, W.E.; Ebel, J.

    1987-06-01

    Treatment of soybean tissues with elicitors results in the production of phytoalexins, one of a number of inducible plant defense reactions against microbial infections. The present study uses a ..beta..-1,3-(/sup 3/H) glucan elicitor fraction from Phytophthora megasperma f.sp. glycinea, a fungal pathogen of soybean, to identify putative elicitor targets in soybean tissues. Use of the radiolabeled elicitor disclosed saturable high-affinity elicitor binding site(s) in membrane fractions of soybean roots. Highest binding activity is associated with a plasma membrane-enriched fraction. The apparent K/sub d/ value for ..beta..-glucan elicitor binding is approx. = 0.2 x 10/sup -6/ M and the maximum number of binding sites is 0.5 pmol per mg of protein. Competition studies the (/sup 3/H)glucan elicitor and a number of polysaccharides demonstrate that only polysaccharides of a branched ..beta..-glucan type effectively displace the radiolabeled ligand from membrane binding. Differential displacing activity of the glucans on P. megasperma elicitor binding corresponds closely to their respective ability to elicit phytoalexin production in a cotyledon bioassay.

  1. Specific binding of a fungal glucan phytoalexin elicitor to membrane fractions from soybean Glycine max

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Walter E.; Ebel, Jürgen

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of soybean tissues with elicitors results in the production of phytoalexins, one of a number of inducible plant defense reactions against microbial infections. The present study uses a β-1,3-[3H]glucan elicitor fraction from Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. glycinea, a fungal pathogen of soybean, to identify putative elicitor targets in soybean tissues. Use of the radiolabeled elicitor disclosed saturable high-affinity elicitor binding site(s) in membrane fractions of soybean roots. Highest binding activity is associated with a plasma membrane-enriched fraction. The apparent Kd value for β-glucan elicitor binding is ≈0.2 × 10-6 M and the maximum number of binding sites is 0.5 pmol per mg of protein. Competition studies with the [3H]glucan elicitor and a number of polysaccharides demonstrate that only polysaccharides of a branched β-glucan type effectively displace the radiolabeled ligand from membrane binding. Differential displacing activity of the glucans on P. megasperma elicitor binding corresponds closely to their respective ability to elicit phytoalexin production in a cotyledon bioassay. PMID:16593852

  2. Specific binding of lactoferrin to brush-border membrane: Ontogeny and effect of glycan chain

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, L.A.; Loennerdal, B. )

    1988-04-01

    Bioavailability of iron from human milk is exceptionally high. It has been suggested that lactoferrin, the major iron-binding protein in human milk, may participate in this high iron bioavailability from milk. The authors examined the interaction of lactoferrin with the intestinal brush-border membrane using the rhesus monkeys as a model. Brush-border membrane vesicles were prepared from monkeys of various ages. Binding studies with {sup 59}Fe-labeled human and monkey lactoferrin were performed to examine interaction of lactoferrin with the brush-border membrane. Specific saturable binding of lactoferrin was found at all ages studied. The dissociation constant for lactoferrin-receptor binding was 9 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M. In contrast, no binding of serum transferrin or bovine lactoferrin occurred. Removal of fucose from the lactoferrin glycans resulted in a significant decrease in binding. It was concluded that lactoferrin in milk may function in the process of iron absorption through interaction with a small intestinal receptor and that fucosylated glycans on the carbohydrate chain of lactoferrin are necessary for receptor recognition.

  3. Amino-terminal basic residues of Src mediate membrane binding through electrostatic interaction with acidic phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, C T; Zhou, W; Buser, C A; McLaughlin, S; Resh, M D

    1994-01-01

    Membrane targeting of pp60src (Src) is mediated by its myristoylated amino terminus. We demonstrate that, in addition to myristate, six basic residues in the amino terminus are essential for high-affinity binding to the lipid bilayer via electrostatic interaction with acidic phospholipids. Specifically, c-Src was shown to bind 2500-fold more strongly to vesicles composed of the physiological ratio of 2:1 phosphatidylcholine (PC)/phosphatidylserine (PS) than to neutral PC bilayer vesicles. The apparent Kd for binding of c-Src to the PC/PS bilayer was 6 x 10(-7) M. This interaction is sufficiently strong to account for c-Src membrane targeting. Mutants of c-Src in which the amino-terminal basic residues were replaced by neutral asparagine residues exhibited binding isotherms approaching that of wild-type binding to neutral bilayers (apparent Kd of 2 x 10(-3) M). The transforming v-Src and activated c-Src (Y527F) proteins also bound more strongly to PC/PS bilayers (apparent Kd of approximately 1 x 10(-5) M) than to neutral PC bilayers. In vivo experiments with Src mutants confirmed the role of positive charge in mediating membrane binding and cellular transformation. Images PMID:7527558

  4. Analysis of Perforin Assembly by Quartz Crystal Microbalance Reveals a Role for Cholesterol and Calcium-independent Membrane Binding.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Sarah E; Bird, Catherina H; Tabor, Rico F; D'Angelo, Michael E; Piantavigna, Stefania; Whisstock, James C; Trapani, Joseph A; Martin, Lisandra L; Bird, Phillip I

    2015-12-25

    Perforin is an essential component in the cytotoxic lymphocyte-mediated cell death pathway. The traditional view holds that perforin monomers assemble into pores in the target cell membrane via a calcium-dependent process and facilitate translocation of cytotoxic proteases into the cytoplasm to induce apoptosis. Although many studies have examined the structure and role of perforin, the mechanics of pore assembly and granzyme delivery remain unclear. Here we have employed quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) to investigate binding and assembly of perforin on lipid membranes, and show that perforin monomers bind to the membrane in a cooperative manner. We also found that cholesterol influences perforin binding and activity on intact cells and model membranes. Finally, contrary to current thinking, perforin efficiently binds membranes in the absence of calcium. When calcium is added to perforin already on the membrane, the QCM-D response changes significantly, indicating that perforin becomes membranolytic only after calcium binding.

  5. Further characterization of ribosome binding to thylakoid membranes. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Hurewitz, J.; Jagendorf, A.T.

    1987-05-01

    Previous work indicated more polysomes bound to pea (Pisum sativum cv Progress No. 9) thylakoids in light than in the dark, in vivo. With isolated intact chloroplasts incubated in darkness, addition of MgATP had no effect but 24 to 74% more RNA was thylakoid-bound at pH 8.3 than at pH 7. Thus, the major effect of light on ribosome-binding in vivo may be due to higher stroma pH. In isolated pea chloroplasts, initiation inhibitors (pactamycin and kanamycin) decreased the extent of RNA binding, and elongation inhibitors (lincomycin and streptomycin) increased it. Thus, cycling of ribosomes is controlled by translation, initiation, and termination. Bound RNA accounted for 19 to 24% of the total chloroplast RNA and the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)leucine into thylakoids was proportional to the amount of this bound RNA. These data support the concept that stroma ribosomes are recruited into thylakoid polysomes, which are active in synthesizing thylakoid proteins.

  6. Clostridium Perfringens Epsilon Toxin Binds to Membrane Lipids and Its Cytotoxic Action Depends on Sulfatide.

    PubMed

    Gil, Carles; Dorca-Arévalo, Jonatan; Blasi, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon toxin (Etx) is one of the major lethal toxins produced by Clostridium perfringens types B and D, being the causal agent of fatal enterotoxemia in animals, mainly sheep and goats. Etx is synthesized as a non-active prototoxin form (proEtx) that becomes active upon proteolytic activation. Etx exhibits a cytotoxic effect through the formation of a pore in the plasma membrane of selected cell targets where Etx specifically binds due to the presence of specific receptors. However, the identity and nature of host receptors of Etx remain a matter of controversy. In the present study, the interactions between Etx and membrane lipids from the synaptosome-enriched fraction from rat brain (P2 fraction) and MDCK cell plasma membrane preparations were analyzed. Our findings show that both Etx and proEtx bind to lipids extracted from lipid rafts from the two different models as assessed by protein-lipid overlay assay. Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Binding of proEtx to sulfatide, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol (3)-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol (5)-phosphate was detected. Removal of the sulphate groups via sulfatase treatment led to a dramatic decrease in Etx-induced cytotoxicity, but not in proEtx-GFP binding to MDCK cells or a significant shift in oligomer formation, pointing to a role of sulfatide in pore formation in rafts but not in toxin binding to the target cell membrane. These results show for the first time the interaction between Etx and membrane lipids from host tissue and point to a major role for sulfatides in C. perfringens epsilon toxin pathophysiology.

  7. Hydrodynamic and Membrane Binding Properties of Purified Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Hirsh; Fang, Xianyang; Wen, Yi; Barros, Marilia; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan; Vogt, Volker M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previously, no retroviral Gag protein has been highly purified in milligram quantities and in a biologically relevant and active form. We have purified Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag protein and in parallel several truncation mutants of Gag and have studied their biophysical properties and membrane interactions in vitro. RSV Gag is unusual in that it is not naturally myristoylated. From its ability to assemble into virus-like particles in vitro, we infer that RSV Gag is biologically active. By size exclusion chromatography and small-angle X-ray scattering, Gag in solution appears extended and flexible, in contrast to previous reports on unmyristoylated HIV-1 Gag, which is compact. However, by neutron reflectometry measurements of RSV Gag bound to a supported bilayer, the protein appears to adopt a more compact, folded-over conformation. At physiological ionic strength, purified Gag binds strongly to liposomes containing acidic lipids. This interaction is stimulated by physiological levels of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and by cholesterol. However, unlike HIV-1 Gag, RSV Gag shows no sensitivity to acyl chain saturation. In contrast with full-length RSV Gag, the purified MA domain of Gag binds to liposomes only weakly. Similarly, both an N-terminally truncated version of Gag that is missing the MA domain and a C-terminally truncated version that is missing the NC domain bind only weakly. These results imply that NC contributes to membrane interaction in vitro, either by directly contacting acidic lipids or by promoting Gag multimerization. IMPORTANCE Retroviruses like HIV assemble at and bud from the plasma membrane of cells. Assembly requires the interaction between thousands of Gag molecules to form a lattice. Previous work indicated that lattice formation at the plasma membrane is influenced by the conformation of monomeric HIV. We have extended this work to the more tractable RSV Gag. Our results show that RSV Gag is highly flexible

  8. Androgen receptor genomic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hong-Jian; Kim, Jung

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR) is not only critical for the normal development and function of the prostate but also pivotal to the onset and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). The studies of AR transcriptional regulation were previously limited to a handful of AR-target genes. Owing to the development of various high-throughput genomic technologies, significant advances have been made in recent years. Here we discuss the discoveries of genome-wide androgen-regulated genes in PCa cell lines, animal models and tissues using expression microarray and sequencing, the mapping of genomic landscapes of AR using Combining Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip and ChIP-seq assays, the interplay of transcriptional cofactors in defining AR binding profiles, and the genomic regulation and AR reprogramming in advanced PCa. PMID:25237629

  9. Binding of isolectins from red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) to purified rat brush-border membranes.

    PubMed

    Boldt, D H; Banwell, J G

    1985-12-13

    Ingestion of red kidney bean phytohemagglutinin causes impaired growth and intestinal malabsorption, and facilitates bacterial colonization in the small intestine of weanling rats. We have studied interactions of the highly purified phytohemagglutinin erythroagglutinating (E4) and mitogenic (L4) isolectins with microvillous membrane vesicles prepared from rat small intestines. E4 and L4 were radioiodinated with 125I by the chloramine-T technique. E4 and L4 isolectins both bound to microvillous membrane vesicles. Binding was saturable and reversible. Each mg of membrane protein bound 744 +/- 86 micrograms E4 and 213 +/- 21 micrograms L4. The apparent Ka for E4 and L4 binding was 2.5 x 10(-6) and 13.0 x 10(-6) M-1, respectively. Binding of each 125I-labelled isolectin was abolished by 100-fold excess of unlabelled isolectin. In each case binding also was inhibited by appropriate oligosaccharide inhibitors, indicating that isolectin-microvillous membrane interactions were mediated by carbohydrate recognition. Patterns of saccharide inhibition of isolectin binding were different for E4 and L4. Competitive binding experiments demonstrated mutual noncompetitive inhibition of E4 and L4 binding consistent with steric hindrance. Therefore, E4 and L4 each bound to its own set of receptors. Based on the known saccharide specificities of E4 and L4, these data indicate that there are differences in expression of complex asparagine-linked biantennary and tri- or tetraantennary oligosaccharides at the microvillous surface. The data also provide the possibility that direct interactions of one or more phytohemagglutinin isolectins with intestinal mucosa in vivo may contribute to the antinutritional effects associated with ingestion of crude red kidney beans. PMID:4063394

  10. Partitioning, diffusion, and ligand binding of raft lipid analogs in model and cellular plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Sezgin, Erdinc; Levental, Ilya; Grzybek, Michal; Schwarzmann, Günter; Mueller, Veronika; Honigmann, Alf; Belov, Vladimir N; Eggeling, Christian; Coskun, Unal; Simons, Kai; Schwille, Petra

    2012-07-01

    Several simplified membrane models featuring coexisting liquid disordered (Ld) and ordered (Lo) lipid phases have been developed to mimic the heterogeneous organization of cellular membranes, and thus, aid our understanding of the nature and functional role of ordered lipid-protein nanodomains, termed "rafts". In spite of their greatly reduced complexity, quantitative characterization of local lipid environments using model membranes is not trivial, and the parallels that can be drawn to cellular membranes are not always evident. Similarly, various fluorescently labeled lipid analogs have been used to study membrane organization and function in vitro, although the biological activity of these probes in relation to their native counterparts often remains uncharacterized. This is particularly true for raft-preferring lipids ("raft lipids", e.g. sphingolipids and sterols), whose domain preference is a strict function of their molecular architecture, and is thus susceptible to disruption by fluorescence labeling. Here, we analyze the phase partitioning of a multitude of fluorescent raft lipid analogs in synthetic Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) and cell-derived Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles (GPMVs). We observe complex partitioning behavior dependent on label size, polarity, charge and position, lipid headgroup, and membrane composition. Several of the raft lipid analogs partitioned into the ordered phase in GPMVs, in contrast to fully synthetic GUVs, in which most raft lipid analogs mis-partitioned to the disordered phase. This behavior correlates with the greatly enhanced order difference between coexisting phases in the synthetic system. In addition, not only partitioning, but also ligand binding of the lipids is perturbed upon labeling: while cholera toxin B binds unlabeled GM1 in the Lo phase, it binds fluorescently labeled GMI exclusively in the Ld phase. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) by stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy on intact

  11. The impact of cell-penetrating peptides on membrane bilayer structure during binding and insertion.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Daniel J; Lee, Tzong-Hsien; Kulkarni, Ketav; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the effect of penetratin and a truncated analogue on the bilayer structure using dual polarisation interferometry, to simultaneously measure changes in mass per unit area and birefringence (an optical parameter representing bilayer order) with high sensitivity during the binding and dissociation from the membrane. Specifically, we studied penetratin (RQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), along with a shortened and biotinylated version known as R8K-biotin (RRMKWKKK(Biotin)-NH2). Overall both peptides bound only weakly to the neutral DMPC and POPC bilayers, while much higher binding was observed for the anionic DMPC/DMPG and POPC/POPG. The binding of penetratin to gel-phase DMPC/DMPG was adequately represented by a two-state model, whereas on the fluid-phase POPC/POPG it exhibited a distinctly different binding pattern, best represented by a three-state kinetic model. However, R8K-biotin did not bind well to DMPC/DMPG and showed a more transitory and superficial binding to POPC/POPG. Comparing the modelling results for both peptides binding to POPC/POPG suggests an important role for a securely bound intermediate prior to penetratin insertion and translocation. Overall these results further elucidate the mechanism of penetratin, and provide another example of the significance of the ability of DPI to measure structural changes and the use of kinetic analysis to investigate the stages of peptide-membrane interactions. PMID:27163492

  12. Light-chain binding sites on renal brush-border membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Batuman, V.; Dreisbach, A.W.; Cyran, J.

    1990-05-01

    Immunoglobulin light chains are low-molecular-weight proteins filtered at the renal glomerulus and catabolized within the proximal tubular epithelium. Excessive production and urinary excretion of light chains are associated with renal dysfunction. They also interfere with proximal renal tubule epithelial functions in vitro. We studied the binding of 125I-labeled kappa- and lambda-light chains, obtained from the urine of multiple myeloma patients, to rat and human renal proximal tubular brush-border membranes. Light-chain binding to brush borders was also demonstrated immunologically by flow cytometry. Computer analysis of binding data was consistent with presence of a single class of low-affinity, high-capacity, non-cooperative binding sites with relative selectivity for light chains on both rat and human kidney brush-border membranes. The dissociation constants of light chains ranged from 1.6 X 10(-5) to 1.2 X 10(-4) M, and maximum binding capacity ranged from 4.7 +/- 1.3 X 10(-8) to 8.0 +/- 0.9 X 10(-8) (SD) mol/mg protein at 25 degrees C. Kappa- and lambda-light chains competed with each other for binding with comparable affinity constants. Competition by albumin and beta-lactoglobulin, however, was much weaker, suggesting relative site selectivity for light chains. These binding sites probably function as endocytotic receptors for light chains and possibly other low-molecular-weight proteins.

  13. Binding of human plasminogen to basement-membrane (type IV) collagen.

    PubMed

    Stack, M S; Moser, T L; Pizzo, S V

    1992-05-15

    Plasminogen, the zymogen form of the serine proteinase plasmin, has been implicated in numerous physiological and pathological processes involving extracellular-matrix remodelling. We have previously demonstrated that the activation of plasminogen catalysed by tissue plasminogen activator is dramatically stimulated in the presence of basement-membrane-specific type IV collagen [Stack, Gonzalez-Gronow & Pizzo (1990) Biochemistry 29, 4966-4970]. The present paper describes the binding of plasminogen to type IV collagen. Plasminogen binds to both the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) chains of basement-membrane collagen, with binding to the alpha 2(IV) chain preferentially inhibited by 6-aminohexanoic acid. This binding is specific and saturable, with Kd,app. values of 11.5 and 12.7 nM for collagen and gelatin respectively. Although collagen also binds to immobilized plasminogen, this interaction is unaffected by 6-aminohexanoic acid. Limited elastase proteolysis of plasminogen generated distinct collagen-binding fragments, which were identified as the kringle 1-3 and kringle 4 domains. No binding of collagen to mini-plasminogen was observed. These studies demonstrate a specific interaction between plasminogen and type IV collagen and provide further evidence for regulation of plasminogen activation by protein components of the extracellular matrix. PMID:1599390

  14. Binding of Hemagglutinin and Influenza Virus to a Peptide-Conjugated Lipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Teruhiko; Shibata, Rabi; Sato, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) plays an important role in the first step of influenza virus (IFV) infection because it initiates the binding of the virus to the sialylgalactose linkages of the receptors on the host cells. We herein demonstrate that a HA-binding peptide immobilized on a solid support is available to bind to HA and IFV. We previously obtained a HA-binding pentapeptide (Ala-Arg-Leu-Pro-Arg), which was identified by phage-display selection against HAs from random peptide libraries. This peptide binds to the receptor-binding site of HA by mimicking sialic acid. A peptide-conjugated lipid (pep-PE) was chemically synthesized from the peptide and a saturated phospholipid. A lipid bilayer composed of pep-PE and an unsaturated phospholipid (DOPC) was immobilized on a mica plate; and the interaction between HA and the pep-PE/DOPC membrane was investigated using atomic force microscopy. The binding of IFV to the pep-PE/DOPC membrane was detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time reverse transcription PCR. Our results indicate that peptide-conjugated lipids are a useful molecular device for the detection of HA and IFV. PMID:27092124

  15. The lactococcal abortive infection protein AbiP is membrane-anchored and binds nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Susana; McGovern, Stephen; Plochocka, Danuta; Santos, Mário A; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Polard, Patrice; Chopin, Marie-Christine

    2008-03-30

    AbiP, a lactococcal abortive phage infection system, has previously been shown to arrest phage bIL66M1 DNA replication around 10 min after infection and to inhibit the switch off of phage early transcripts. We report here the functional characterization and implication in the abortive infection phenotype of two domains identified in the AbiP sequence. We show that AbiP is a protein anchored to the membrane by an N-terminal membrane-spanning domain. Our results further suggest that membrane localization may be required for the anti-phage activity of AbiP. The remainder of the protein, which contains a putative nucleic acid binding domain, is shown to be located on the cytosolic side. Purified AbiP is shown to bind nucleic acids with an approximately 10-fold preference for RNA relative to ssDNA. AbiP interaction with both ssDNA and RNA molecules occurs in a sequence-independent manner. We have analyzed the effect of substitutions of aromatic and basic residues on the surface of the putative binding fold. In vitro and in vivo studies of these AbiP derivatives indicate that the previously reported effects on phage development might be dependent on the nucleic acid binding activity displayed by the membrane-bound protein.

  16. Defining the structural characteristics of annexin V binding to a mimetic apoptotic membrane.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingxiong; Le Brun, Anton P; Chow, Seong Hoong; Shiota, Takuya; Wang, Bo; Lin, Tsung-Wu; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Shen, Hsin-Hui

    2015-12-01

    Annexin V is of crucial importance for detection of the phosphatidylserine of apoptotic cell membranes. However, the manner in which different amounts of phosphatidylserine at the membrane surface at different stages of apoptosis contribute to binding of annexin V is unclear. We have used a quartz crystal microbalance combined with dissipative monitoring (QCM-D) and neutron reflectivity to characterize binding of human annexin V to supported bilayers of different phospholipid composition. We created model apoptotic bilayers of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerophosphocholine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerophosphoserine (POPS) in the ratios 19:1, 9:1, 6.7:1, 4:1, 3:1, and 2:1 (w/w) in the presence of 2.5 mM CaCl2. QCM-D data revealed that annexin V bound less to supported fluid lipid bilayers with higher POPS content (>25 % POPS). Neutron reflectivity was used to further characterize the detailed composition of lipid bilayers with membrane-bound annexin V. Analysis confirmed less annexin V binding with higher POPS content, that bound annexin V formed a discrete layer above the lipid bilayer with little effect on the overall structure of the membrane, and that the thickness and volume fraction of the annexin V layer varied with POPS content. From these results we show that the POPS content of the outer surface of lipid bilayers affects the structure of membrane-bound annexin V.

  17. Defining the structural characteristics of annexin V binding to a mimetic apoptotic membrane.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingxiong; Le Brun, Anton P; Chow, Seong Hoong; Shiota, Takuya; Wang, Bo; Lin, Tsung-Wu; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Shen, Hsin-Hui

    2015-12-01

    Annexin V is of crucial importance for detection of the phosphatidylserine of apoptotic cell membranes. However, the manner in which different amounts of phosphatidylserine at the membrane surface at different stages of apoptosis contribute to binding of annexin V is unclear. We have used a quartz crystal microbalance combined with dissipative monitoring (QCM-D) and neutron reflectivity to characterize binding of human annexin V to supported bilayers of different phospholipid composition. We created model apoptotic bilayers of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerophosphocholine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerophosphoserine (POPS) in the ratios 19:1, 9:1, 6.7:1, 4:1, 3:1, and 2:1 (w/w) in the presence of 2.5 mM CaCl2. QCM-D data revealed that annexin V bound less to supported fluid lipid bilayers with higher POPS content (>25 % POPS). Neutron reflectivity was used to further characterize the detailed composition of lipid bilayers with membrane-bound annexin V. Analysis confirmed less annexin V binding with higher POPS content, that bound annexin V formed a discrete layer above the lipid bilayer with little effect on the overall structure of the membrane, and that the thickness and volume fraction of the annexin V layer varied with POPS content. From these results we show that the POPS content of the outer surface of lipid bilayers affects the structure of membrane-bound annexin V. PMID:26271933

  18. Isolation of an actin-binding protein from membranes of Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We prepared a probe of radiolabeled, glutaraldehyde cross-linked filamentous actin (F-actin) to study binding of actin to membranes of Dictyostelium discoideum. The probe bound to membranes or detergent extracts of membranes with a high affinity and in a saturable manner. The binding could be reduced by boiling of either the actin probe or the membranes, or by addition of excess native F-actin, but not by addition of an equivalent amount of bovine serum albumin, to the assay. The probe labeled several proteins when used to overlay sodium dodecyl sulfate gels of Dictyostelium membranes. One of these labeled proteins was a 24,000-mol-wt protein (p24), which was soluble only in the presence of a high concentration of sodium deoxycholate (5%, wt/vol) at room temperature or above. The p24 was purified by selective detergent extraction and column chromatography. When tested in a novel two-phase binding assay, p24 bound both native monomeric actin (G-actin) and F- actin in a specific manner. In this assay, G-actin bound p24 with a submicromolar affinity. PMID:3972891

  19. Binding and biologic activity of glucagon in liver cell membranes of chronically hyperglucagonemic rats.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Freeman, D; McCorkle, K; Unger, R H

    1977-11-10

    Glucagon binding by liver cell membranes was examined in rats with chronically elevated plasma levels of immunoreactive glucagon (IRG) resulting from insulin deficiency, starvation, or twice daily glucagon injections. The concentration of specific glucagon binding sites was significantly reduced in the three chronically hyperglucagonemic (IRG greater than 125 pg/ml) groups as compared with nondiabetic controls and insulin-treated diabetic control rats with only mild hyperglucagonemia. A reduction in glucagon binding sites did not occur with hyperglucagonemia of 12 h or less. Despite the reduced binding of glucagon in the three chronically hyperglucagonemic groups, the ability of glucagon to stimulate cAMP production was not reduced. It is concluded that while decreased glucagon binding occures in the forms of chronic hyperglucagonemia studied, it is not associated with a reduction in the ability of glucagon to stimulate cAMP production.

  20. Structural and Molecular Determinants of Membrane Binding by the HIV-1 Matrix Protein.

    PubMed

    Mercredi, Peter Y; Bucca, Nadine; Loeliger, Burk; Gaines, Christy R; Mehta, Mansi; Bhargava, Pallavi; Tedbury, Philip R; Charlier, Landry; Floquet, Nicolas; Muriaux, Delphine; Favard, Cyril; Sanders, Charles R; Freed, Eric O; Marchant, Jan; Summers, Michael F

    2016-04-24

    Assembly of HIV-1 particles is initiated by the trafficking of viral Gag polyproteins from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane, where they co-localize and bud to form immature particles. Membrane targeting is mediated by the N-terminally myristoylated matrix (MA) domain of Gag and is dependent on the plasma membrane marker phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. Recent studies revealed that PI(4,5)P2 molecules containing truncated acyl chains [tr-PI(4,5)P2] are capable of binding MA in an "extended lipid" conformation and promoting myristoyl exposure. Here we report that tr-PI(4,5)P2 molecules also readily bind to non-membrane proteins, including HIV-1 capsid, which prompted us to re-examine MA-PI(4,5)P2 interactions using native lipids and membrane mimetic liposomes and bicelles. Liposome binding trends observed using a recently developed NMR approach paralleled results of flotation assays, although the affinities measured under the equilibrium conditions of NMR experiments were significantly higher. Native PI(4,5)P2 enhanced MA binding to liposomes designed to mimic non-raft-like regions of the membrane, suggesting the possibility that binding of the protein to disordered domains may precede Gag association with, or nucleation of, rafts. Studies with bicelles revealed a subset of surface and myr-associated MA residues that are sensitive to native PI(4,5)P2, but cleft residues that interact with the 2'-acyl chains of tr-PI(4,5)P2 molecules in aqueous solution were insensitive to native PI(4,5)P2 in bicelles. Our findings call to question extended-lipid MA:membrane binding models, and instead support a model put forward from coarse-grained simulations indicating that binding is mediated predominantly by dynamic, electrostatic interactions between conserved basic residues of MA and multiple PI(4,5)P2 and phosphatidylserine molecules. PMID:26992353

  1. Structural and Molecular Determinants of Membrane Binding by the HIV-1 Matrix Protein.

    PubMed

    Mercredi, Peter Y; Bucca, Nadine; Loeliger, Burk; Gaines, Christy R; Mehta, Mansi; Bhargava, Pallavi; Tedbury, Philip R; Charlier, Landry; Floquet, Nicolas; Muriaux, Delphine; Favard, Cyril; Sanders, Charles R; Freed, Eric O; Marchant, Jan; Summers, Michael F

    2016-04-24

    Assembly of HIV-1 particles is initiated by the trafficking of viral Gag polyproteins from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane, where they co-localize and bud to form immature particles. Membrane targeting is mediated by the N-terminally myristoylated matrix (MA) domain of Gag and is dependent on the plasma membrane marker phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. Recent studies revealed that PI(4,5)P2 molecules containing truncated acyl chains [tr-PI(4,5)P2] are capable of binding MA in an "extended lipid" conformation and promoting myristoyl exposure. Here we report that tr-PI(4,5)P2 molecules also readily bind to non-membrane proteins, including HIV-1 capsid, which prompted us to re-examine MA-PI(4,5)P2 interactions using native lipids and membrane mimetic liposomes and bicelles. Liposome binding trends observed using a recently developed NMR approach paralleled results of flotation assays, although the affinities measured under the equilibrium conditions of NMR experiments were significantly higher. Native PI(4,5)P2 enhanced MA binding to liposomes designed to mimic non-raft-like regions of the membrane, suggesting the possibility that binding of the protein to disordered domains may precede Gag association with, or nucleation of, rafts. Studies with bicelles revealed a subset of surface and myr-associated MA residues that are sensitive to native PI(4,5)P2, but cleft residues that interact with the 2'-acyl chains of tr-PI(4,5)P2 molecules in aqueous solution were insensitive to native PI(4,5)P2 in bicelles. Our findings call to question extended-lipid MA:membrane binding models, and instead support a model put forward from coarse-grained simulations indicating that binding is mediated predominantly by dynamic, electrostatic interactions between conserved basic residues of MA and multiple PI(4,5)P2 and phosphatidylserine molecules.

  2. Influence of organelle geometry on the apparent binding kinetics of peripheral membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Julia; Fickentscher, Rolf; Weiss, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    Information processing in living cells frequently involves an exchange of peripheral membrane proteins between the cytosol and organelle membranes. The typical time scale τ of these association-dissociation cycles is commonly quantified in vivo via fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). Contrary to common assumptions, we show here that τ values determined by FRAP depend on the size and number of target structures. Hence, FRAP times alone are insufficient to draw conclusions about the proteins' binding kinetics. In contrast, extracting primary molecular association and dissociation rates from FRAP approaches provides a size-independent and therefore robust measure for the proteins' binding kinetics. We support our theoretical considerations with experiments on the small GTPase Arf-1 that transiently associates with Golgi membranes: While Arf-1 recovery times in untreated cells and in cells with disrupted microtubules are significantly different, the molecular kinetic rates are shown to be the same in both cases.

  3. The binding of calcium ions by erythrocytes and 'ghost' -cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Long, C; Mouat, B

    1971-08-01

    1. Washed human erythrocytes, suspended in iso-osmotic sucrose containing 2.5mm-calcium chloride, bind about 400mug-atoms of calcium/litre of packed cells. Sucrose may be replaced by other sugars. 2. Partial replacement of sucrose by iso-osmotic potassium chloride diminishes the uptake of calcium, 50% inhibition occurring at about 50mm-potassium chloride. 3. Other univalent cations behave like potassium, whereas bivalent cations are much more inhibitory. The tervalent cations, yttrium and lanthanum, however, are the most effective inhibitors of calcium uptake. 4. An approximate correlation exists between the calcium uptake and the sialic acid content of erythrocytes of various species and of human erythrocytes that have been partially depleted of sialic acid by treatment with neuraminidase. However, even after complete removal of sialic acid, human erythrocytes still bind about 140mug-atoms of calcium/litre of packed cells. 5. A Scatchard (1949) plot of calcium uptake at various Ca(2+) concentrations in the suspending media shows the presence of three different binding sites on the external surface of the human erythrocyte membrane. 6. Erythrocyte ;ghost' cells, the membranes of which appear to be permeable to Ca(2+) ions, can bind about 1000mug-atoms of calcium per ;ghost'-cell equivalent of 1 litre of packed erythrocytes. This indicates that there are also binding sites for calcium on the internal surface of the erythrocyte membrane. PMID:5124387

  4. Specific Lipid Binding of Membrane Proteins in Detergent Micelles Characterized by NMR and Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Linlin; Wang, Shuqing; Run, Changqing; OuYang, Bo; Chou, James J

    2016-09-27

    Many membrane proteins bind specifically to lipids as an integral component of their structures. The ability of detergents to support lipid binding is thus an important consideration when solubilizing membrane proteins for structural studies. In particular, the zwitterionic phosphocholine (PC)-based detergents, which have been widely used in solution NMR studies of channels and transporters, are controversial because of their strong solubilization power and thus perceived as more denaturing than nonionic detergents such as the maltosides. Here, we investigate the ability of the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier (AAC) to specifically bind cardiolipin, a mitochondrial lipid important for the carrier function, in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles. We found that in DPC, the AAC specifically binds cardiolipin in a manner consistent with the bound cardiolipins found in the crystal structures of the AAC determined in n-decyl β-d-maltoside. Our results suggest that PC detergent is compatible with specific lipid binding and that PC detergent mixed with the relevant lipid represents a viable solubilization system for NMR studies of membrane proteins. PMID:27625145

  5. Chlamydia trachomatis elementary bodies possess proteins which bind to eucaryotic cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Wenman, W.M.; Meuser, R.U.

    1986-02-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis proteins were electrophoresed and then transferred to nitrocellulose paper to detect chlamydial proteins which bind to eucaryotic cell membranes. Resolved polypeptides of C. trachomatis serovars J and L/sub 2/ were reacted with iodinated HeLa cell membranes and autoradiographed. Infectious elementary bodies of both serovars possess 31,000- and 18,000-dalton proteins which bind to HeLa cells. In contrast, noninfectious reticulate bodies do not possess eucaryotic cell-binding proteins. Both proteins are antigenic when reacted with hyperimmune rabbit antisera in immunoblots and antisera raised against the 31,000- and 18,000-dalton proteins are inhibitory to chlamydia-host cell association. In addition, these antisera exhibit neutralizing activity. These data suggest that these putative chlamydial adhesions play a key role in the early steps of chlamydia-host cell interaction and that antibody directed against them may be protective.

  6. Rotenone Activates Phagocyte NADPH Oxidase through Binding to Its Membrane Subunit gp91phox

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Shih-heng; Zhang, Dan; Wilson, Belinda; Hong, Jau-shyong; Gao, Hui-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Rotenone, a widely used pesticide, reproduces Parkinsonism in rodents and associates with increased risk for Parkinson’s disease. We previously reported rotenone increased superoxide production through stimulating microglial phagocyte NADPH oxidase (PHOX). The present study identified a novel mechanism by which rotenone activates PHOX. Ligand-binding assay revealed that rotenone directly bound to membrane gp91phox, the catalytic subunit of PHOX; such binding was inhibited by diphenyleneiodonium, a PHOX inhibitor with a binding site on gp91phox. Functional studies showed both membrane and cytosolic subunits were required for rotenone-induced superoxide production in cell-free systems, intact phagocytes, and COS7 cells transfected with membrane subunits (gp91phox/p22phox) and cytosolic subunits (p67phox and p47phox). Rotenone-elicited extracellular superoxide release in p47phox-deficient macrophages suggested rotenone enabled to activate PHOX through a p47phox-independent mechanism. Increased membrane translocation of p67phox, elevated binding of p67phox to rotenone-treated membrane fractions, and co-immunoprecipitation of p67phox and gp91phox in rotenone-treated wild-type and p47phox-deficient macrophages indicated p67phox played a critical role in rotenone-induced PHOX activation via its direct interaction with gp91phox. Rac1, a Rho-like small GTPase, enhanced p67phox-gp91phox interaction; Rac1 inhibition decreased rotenone-elicited superoxide release. In conclusion, rotenone directly interacted with gp91phox; such an interaction triggered membrane translocation of p67phox, leading to PHOX activation and superoxide production. PMID:22094225

  7. The effect of binding of spider-derived antimicrobial peptides, oxyopinins, on lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kaoru; Corzo, Gerardo

    2006-09-01

    Oxyopinins (Oxki1 and Oxki2) are antimicrobial peptides isolated from the crude venom of the wolf spider Oxyopes kitabensis. The effect of oxyopinins on lipid bilayers was investigated using high-sensitivity titration calorimetry and (31)P solid-state NMR spectroscopy. High-sensitivity titration calorimetry experiments showed that the binding of oxyopinins was exothermic, and the binding enthalpies (DeltaH) to 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) were -18.1 kcal/mol and -15.0 kcal/mol for Oxki1 and Oxki2, respectively, and peptide partition coefficient (K(p)) was found to be 3.9x10(3) M(-1). (31)P NMR spectra of 1,2-dielaidoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DEPE) membranes in the presence of oxyopinins indicated that they induced a positive curvature in lipid bilayers. The induced positive curvature was stronger in the presence of Oxki2 than in the presence of Oxki1. (31)P NMR spectra of phosphaditylcholine (PC) membranes in the presence of Oxki2 showed that Oxki2 produced micellization of membranes at low peptide concentrations, but unsaturated PC membranes or acidic phospholipids prevented micellization from occurring. Furthermore, (31)P NMR spectra using membrane lipids from E. coli suggested that Oxki1 was more disruptive to bacterial membranes than Oxki2. These results strongly correlate to the known biological activity of the oxyopinins.

  8. A new multigene family encoding calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding membrane proteins of Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Chan, C W; Saimi, Y; Kung, C

    1999-04-29

    Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) regulates various physiological processes in a wide variety of organisms, metazoa and protists alike. To better understand Ca2+/CaM-dependent processes, particularly those with membrane-associated components, we studied Ca2+/CaM-binding membrane proteins in Paramecium tetraurelia, a unicellular model system. A CaM-binding protein, PCM1 (Paramecium CaM-binding membrane-bound protein), from a detergent-solubilized ciliary membrane fraction was identified and purified through Ca2+-dependent CaM-affinity chromatography. PCM1 has an apparent molecular mass of approx. 65kDa. It binds radiolabeled CaM in blot overlay assays and binds to CaM-affinity columns, both only in the presence of 10 microM or higher Ca2+. Three peptide sequences from PCM1 were obtained, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern hybridization experiments were designed accordingly, leading to a partial cDNA clone for PCM1 and the discovery of three homologs: PCM2, PCM3 and PCM4. Amino acid sequences predicted by the full-length coding sequence for PCM3 and partial genes for PCM1, PCM2 and PCM4 are very similar (approx. 85% amino-acid identities). Their sequences indicate that they are hitherto novel proteins with beta/gamma-crystallin domains, cysteine-rich regions and potential CaM-binding domains. These protein motifs are suggested to mediate protein-protein interaction important for Ca2+/CaM signal transduction event(s) through the PCM family of proteins.

  9. Analysis of Arf1 GTPase-dependent membrane binding and remodeling using the exomer secretory vesicle cargo adaptor

    PubMed Central

    Paczkowski, Jon E.; Fromme, J. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Summary Protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions play a critical role in shaping biological membranes through direct physical contact with the membrane surface. This is particularly evident in many steps of membrane trafficking, in which proteins deform the membrane and induce fission to form transport carriers. The small GTPase Arf1 and related proteins have the ability to remodel membranes by insertion of an amphipathic helix into the membrane. Arf1 and the exomer cargo adaptor coordinate cargo sorting into subset of secretory vesicle carriers in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we detail the assays we used to explore the cooperative action of Arf1 and exomer to bind and remodel membranes. We expect these methods are broadly applicable to other small GTPase/effector systems where investigation of membrane binding and remodeling is of interest. PMID:27632000

  10. Analysis of Arf1 GTPase-Dependent Membrane Binding and Remodeling Using the Exomer Secretory Vesicle Cargo Adaptor.

    PubMed

    Paczkowski, Jon E; Fromme, J Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions play a critical role in shaping biological membranes through direct physical contact with the membrane surface. This is particularly evident in many steps of membrane trafficking, in which proteins deform the membrane and induce fission to form transport carriers. The small GTPase Arf1 and related proteins have the ability to remodel membranes by insertion of an amphipathic helix into the membrane. Arf1 and the exomer cargo adaptor coordinate cargo sorting into subset of secretory vesicle carriers in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we detail the assays we used to explore the cooperative action of Arf1 and exomer to bind and remodel membranes. We expect these methods are broadly applicable to other small GTPase/effector systems where investigation of membrane binding and remodeling is of interest. PMID:27632000

  11. ESCRT-III binding protein MITD1 is involved in cytokinesis and has an unanticipated PLD fold that binds membranes

    PubMed Central

    Hadders, Michael A.; Agromayor, Monica; Obita, Takayuki; Perisic, Olga; Caballe, Anna; Kloc, Magdalena; Lamers, Meindert H.; Williams, Roger L.; Martin-Serrano, Juan

    2012-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) proteins have a critical function in abscission, the final separation of the daughter cells during cytokinesis. Here, we describe the structure and function of a previously uncharacterized ESCRT-III interacting protein, MIT-domain containing protein 1 (MITD1). Crystal structures of MITD1 reveal a dimer, with a microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT) domain at the N terminus and a unique, unanticipated phospholipase D-like (PLD) domain at the C terminus that binds membranes. We show that the MIT domain binds to a subset of ESCRT-III subunits and that this interaction mediates MITD1 recruitment to the midbody during cytokinesis. Depletion of MITD1 causes a distinct cytokinetic phenotype consistent with destabilization of the midbody and abscission failure. These results suggest a model whereby MITD1 coordinates the activity of ESCRT-III during abscission with earlier events in the final stages of cell division. PMID:23045692

  12. A major integral protein of the plant plasma membrane binds flavin.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Astrid; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Hertel, Rainer

    2003-05-01

    Abundant flavin binding sites have been found in membranes of plants and fungi. With flavin mononucleotide-agarose affinity columns, riboflavin-binding activity from microsomes of Cucurbita pepoL. hypocotyls was purified and identified as a specific PIP1-homologous protein of the aquaporin family. Sequences such as gi|2149955 in Phaseolus vulgaris, PIP1b of Arabidopsis thaliana, and NtAQP1 of tobacco are closely related. The identification as a riboflavin-binding protein was confirmed by binding tests with an extract of Escherichia coli cells expressing the tobacco NtAQP1 as well as leaves of transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress NtAQP1 or were inhibited in PIP1 expression by antisense constructs. When binding was assayed in the presence of dithionite, the reduced flavin formed a relatively stable association with the protein. Upon dilution under oxidizing conditions, the adduct was resolved, and free flavin reappeared with a half time of about 30 min. Such an association can also be induced photochemically, with oxidized flavin by blue light at 450 nm, in the presence of an electron donor. Several criteria, localization in the plasma membrane, high abundance, affinity to roseoflavin, and photochemistry, argue for a role of the riboflavin-binding protein PIP1 as a photoreceptor. PMID:12768338

  13. Image Restoration and Analysis of Influenza Virions Binding to Membrane Receptors Reveal Adhesion-Strengthening Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Donald W.; Hsu, Hung-Lun; Bacon, Kaitlyn B.; Daniel, Susan

    2016-01-01

    With the development of single-particle tracking (SPT) microscopy and host membrane mimics called supported lipid bilayers (SLBs), stochastic virus-membrane binding interactions can be studied in depth while maintaining control over host receptor type and concentration. However, several experimental design challenges and quantitative image analysis limitations prevent the widespread use of this approach. One main challenge of SPT studies is the low signal-to-noise ratio of SPT videos, which is sometimes inevitable due to small particle sizes, low quantum yield of fluorescent dyes, and photobleaching. These situations could render current particle tracking software to yield biased binding kinetic data caused by intermittent tracking error. Hence, we developed an effective image restoration algorithm for SPT applications called STAWASP that reveals particles with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2.2 while preserving particle features. We tested our improvements to the SPT binding assay experiment and imaging procedures by monitoring X31 influenza virus binding to α2,3 sialic acid glycolipids. Our interests lie in how slight changes to the peripheral oligosaccharide structures can affect the binding rate and residence times of viruses. We were able to detect viruses binding weakly to a glycolipid called GM3, which was undetected via assays such as surface plasmon resonance. The binding rate was around 28 folds higher when the virus bound to a different glycolipid called GD1a, which has a sialic acid group extending further away from the bilayer surface than GM3. The improved imaging allowed us to obtain binding residence time distributions that reflect an adhesion-strengthening mechanism via multivalent bonds. We empirically fitted these distributions using a time-dependent unbinding rate parameter, koff, which diverges from standard treatment of koff as a constant. We further explain how to convert these models to fit ensemble-averaged binding data obtained by assays such

  14. A specific binding site recognizing a fragment of angiotensin II in bovine adrenal cortex membranes.

    PubMed

    Bernier, S G; Fournier, A; Guillemette, G

    1994-12-12

    We have characterized a specific binding site for angiotensin IV in bovine adrenal cortex membranes. Pseudo-equilibrium studies at 37 degrees C for 2 h have shown that this binding site recognizes angiotensin IV with a high affinity (Kd = 0.24 +/- 0.03 nM). The binding site is saturable and relatively abundant (maximal binding capacity around 0.5 pmol/mg protein). Non-equilibrium kinetic analyses at 37 degrees C revealed a calculated kinetic Kd of 47 pM. The binding site is pharmacologically distinct from the classic angiotensin receptors AT1 or AT2. Competitive binding studies with bovine adrenal cortex membranes demonstrated the following rank order of effectiveness: angiotensin IV (Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe) = angiotensin II-(3-7) (Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro) > angiotensin III (Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe) > or = angiotensin II-(4-7) (Tyr-Ile-His-Pro) > angiotensin II (Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe) > angiotensin II-(1-6) (Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His) > angiotensin II-(4-8) (Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe) > > > angiotensin II-(3-6) (Val-Tyr-Ile-His), angiotensin II-(4-6) (Tyr-Ile-His), L-158,809 (5,7-dimethyl-2-ethyl-3-[(2'(1-H-tetrazol-5-yl)[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-y l) methyl]-3-H-imidazo[4,5-beta]pyridine H2O) and PD 123319 (1-[4-(dimethylamino)3-methylphenyl]methyl-5-(diphenylacetyl)4,5,6 ,7- tetrahydro-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine-6-carboxylic acid). The divalent cations Mg2+ and Ca2+ were shown to diminish the binding of 125I-angiotensioffn IV to bovine adrenal cortex membranes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Characterization of calcium binding to brush-border membranes from rat duodenum.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A; Li, S T; Bronner, F

    1982-01-01

    The Ca2+-binding properties of isolated brush-border membranes at physiological ionic strength and pH were examined by rapid Millipore filtration. A comprehensive analysis of the binding data suggested the presence of two types of Ca2+-binding sites. The high-affinity sites, Ka = (6.3 +/- 3.3) X 10(5) M-1 (mean +/- S.E.M.), bound 0.8 +/- 0.1 nmol of Ca2+/mg of protein and the low-affinity sites, Ka = (2.8 +/- 0.3) X 10(2) M-1, bound 33 +/- 3.5 nmol of Ca2+/mg of protein. The high-affinity site exhibited a selectivity for Ca2+, since high concentrations of competing bivalent cations were required to inhibit Ca2+ binding. The relative effectiveness of the competing cations (1 and 10 mM) for the high-affinity site was Mn2+ approximately equal to Sr2+ greater than Ba2+ greater than Mg2+. Data from the pH studies, treatment of the membranes with carbodi-imide and extraction of phospholipids with aqueous acetone and NH3 provided evidence that the low-affinity sites were primarily phospholipids and the high-affinity sites were either phosphoprotein or protein with associated phospholipid. Two possible roles for the high-affinity binding sites are suggested. Either high-affinity Ca2+ binding is involved with specific enzyme activities or Ca2+ transport across the luminal membrane occurs via a Ca2+ channel which contains a high-affinity Ca2+-specific binding site that may regulate the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and gating of the channel. PMID:7165733

  16. Interaction of P-aminobenzoic acid with normal and sickel erythrocyte membrane: photoaffinity labelling of the binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Premachandra, B.R.

    1986-03-05

    Electron microscopic studies revealed that P-Amino benzoic acid (PABA) could prevent eichinocytosis of red cells in vitro. Equilibrium binding studies with right side out membrane vesicles (ROV) revealed a similar number of binding sites (1.2-1.4 ..mu..mol/mg) and Kd (1.4-1.6 mM) values for both normal and sickle cell membranes. /sup 14/C-Azide analogue of PABA was synthesized as a photoaffinity label to probe its sites of interaction on the erythrocyte membranes. Competitive binding studies of PABA with its azide indicated that both the compounds share common binding sites on the membrane surface since a 20 fold excess of azide inhibited PABA binding in a linear fashion. The azide was covalently incorporated into the membrane components only upon irradiation (52-35% of the label found in the proteins and the rest in lipids). Electrophoretic analysis of photolabelled ROV revealed that the azide interacts chiefly with Band 3 protein. PABA inhibited both high and low affinity calcium (Ca) binding sites situated on either surface of the membrane in a non-competitive manner; however, Ca binding stimulated by Mg-ATP was not affected. Ca transport into inside out vesicles was inhibited by PABA; but it did not affect the calcium ATP-ase activity. The authors studies suggest that the mechanism of action of PABA is mediated by its interaction with Band 3 protein (anion channel), calcium channel and calcium binding sites of erythrocyte membrane.

  17. Anionic Lipids: Determinants of Binding Cytotoxins from Snake Venom on the Surface of Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Boldyrev, I.A.; Omelkov, A.V.; Utkin, Yu.N.; Efremov, R.G.

    2010-01-01

    The cytotoxic properties of cytotoxins (CTs) from snake venom are mediated by their interaction with the cell membrane. The hydrophobic pattern containing the tips of loops I–III and flanked by polar residues is known to be a membrane–binding motif of CTs. However, this is not enough to explain the difference in activity among various CTs which are similar in sequence and in 3D structure. The mechanism of further CT–membrane interaction leading to pore formation and cell death still remains unknown. Published experimental data on the specific interaction between CT and low molecular weight anionic components (sulphatide) of the bilayer point to the existence of corresponding ligand binding sites on the surface of toxin molecules. In this work we study the membrane–lytic properties of CT I, CT II (Naja oxiana), and Ct 4 (Naja kaouthia), which belong to different structural and functional types (P– and S–type) of CTs, by measuring the intensity of a fluorescent dye, calcein released from liposomes containing a phosphatidylserine (PS) lipid as an anionic component. Using molecular docking simulations, we find and characterize three sites in CT molecules that can potentially bind the PS polar head. Based on the data obtained, we suggest a hypothesis that CTs can specifically interact with one or more of the anionic lipids (in particular, with PS) contained in the membrane, thus facilitating the interaction between CTs and the lipid bilayer of a cell membrane. PMID:22649646

  18. Clueless is a conserved ribonucleoprotein that binds the ribosome at the mitochondrial outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Aditya; Cox, Rachel T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial function is tied to the nucleus, in that hundreds of proteins encoded by nuclear genes must be imported into mitochondria. While post-translational import is fairly well understood, emerging evidence supports that mitochondrial site-specific import, or co-translational import, also occurs. However, the mechanism and the extent to which it is used are not fully understood. We have previously shown Clueless (Clu), a conserved multi-domain protein, associates with mitochondrial outer membrane proteins, including Translocase of outer membrane 20, and genetically and physically interacts with the PINK1–Parkin pathway. The human ortholog of Clu, Cluh, was shown to bind nuclear-encoded mitochondrially destined mRNAs. Here we identify the conserved tetratricopeptide domain of Clu as predominantly responsible for binding mRNA. In addition, we show Clu interacts with the ribosome at the mitochondrial outer membrane. Taken together, these data support a model whereby Clu binds to and mitochondrially targets mRNAs to facilitate mRNA localization to the outer mitochondrial membrane, potentially for site-specific or co-translational import. This role may link the presence of efficient mitochondrial protein import to mitochondrial quality control through the PINK1–Parkin pathway. PMID:26834020

  19. Did Androgen-Binding Protein Paralogs Undergo Neo- and/or Subfunctionalization as the Abp Gene Region Expanded in the Mouse Genome?

    PubMed Central

    Karn, Robert C.; Chung, Amanda G.; Laukaitis, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    The Androgen-binding protein (Abp) region of the mouse genome contains 30 Abpa genes encoding alpha subunits and 34 Abpbg genes encoding betagamma subunits, their products forming dimers composed of an alpha and a betagamma subunit. We endeavored to determine how many Abp genes are expressed as proteins in tears and saliva, and as transcripts in the exocrine glands producing them. Using standard PCR, we amplified Abp transcripts from cDNA libraries of C57BL/6 mice and found fifteen Abp gene transcripts in the lacrimal gland and five in the submandibular gland. Proteomic analyses identified proteins corresponding to eleven of the lacrimal gland transcripts, all of them different from the three salivary ABPs reported previously. Our qPCR results showed that five of the six transcripts that lacked corresponding proteins are expressed at very low levels compared to those transcripts with proteins. We found 1) no overlap in the repertoires of expressed Abp paralogs in lacrimal gland/tears and salivary glands/saliva; 2) substantial sex-limited expression of lacrimal gland/tear expressed-paralogs in males but no sex-limited expression in females; and 3) that the lacrimal gland/tear expressed-paralogs are found exclusively in ancestral clades 1, 2 and 3 of the five clades described previously while the salivary glands/saliva expressed-paralogs are found only in clade 5. The number of instances of extremely low levels of transcription without corresponding protein production in paralogs specific to tears and saliva suggested the role of subfunctionalization, a derived condition wherein genes that may have been expressed highly in both glands ancestrally were down-regulated subsequent to duplication. Thus, evidence for subfunctionalization can be seen in our data and we argue that the partitioning of paralog expression between lacrimal and salivary glands that we report here occurred as the result of adaptive evolution. PMID:25531410

  20. The Rec protein of HERV-K(HML-2) upregulates androgen receptor activity by binding to the human small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat protein (hSGT).

    PubMed

    Hanke, Kirsten; Chudak, Claudia; Kurth, Reinhard; Bannert, Norbert

    2013-02-01

    The expression of endogenous retroviruses of the HERV-K(HML-2) family is strongly upregulated in germ cell tumors and several other cancers. Although the accessory Rec protein of HERV-K(HML-2) has been shown to induce carcinoma in situ in transgenic mice, to increase the activity of c-myc and to interact with the androgen receptor (AR), whether or not Rec expression is indeed implicated causally in the initiation or progression of any human malignancies remains unclear. We used the yeast two-hybrid system involving the Rec protein of a recently integrated HERV-K(HML-2) element in an effort to identify potential Rec-related oncogenic mechanisms. This revealed the human small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing protein (hSGT) to be a cellular binding partner. The interaction of Rec with this known negative regulator of the AR was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation, pull-down assays and colocalization studies. The interaction involves the TPR motif of hSGT and takes place in the cytoplasm and in the nucleoli. Using an AR-responsive promoter and gene we could demonstrate that Rec interference with hSGT resulted in an up to five-fold increase in the activity of AR. Furthermore, in AR positive cells, Rec was shown to act as transactivator by enhancing AR-mediated activation of the HERV-K(HML-2) LTR promoter. This is in line with previous observations of elevated HERV-K(HML-2) expression in steroid-regulated tissues. On the basis of our findings we propose a "vicious cycle" model of Rec-driven hyperactivation of the AR leading to increased cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis and eventually to tumor induction or promotion.

  1. Ca/sup 2 +/-CaM-ATPase activity after corticosterone binding to synaptosomal plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, Z.; Sze, P.Y.

    1986-03-01

    Studies conducted in the laboratory have demonstrated that corticosterone (CS) binds specifically to synaptosomal plasma membrane (SPM) and modify the cellular events in the synaptosomes. On an exposure of a rat brain synaptosomes to physiological concentrations (<1..mu..M) of CS, the uptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ into synaptosomes was increased by 40-50%. Similarly the binding of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ to isolated SPM was also enhanced by 50% in the presence of CS. However when intact synaptosomes were pre-incubated with CS, the capacity of membranes to bind /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ was increased by 2-fold. After the incubation of intact synaptosomes with < ..mu..M CS, the activity of trifluoperazine sensitive and CaM dependent Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase at 1..mu..M Ca/sup 2 +/ was found to be stimulated by 20-30% whereas the activity of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase at 1mM Ca/sup 2 +/ remained unaffected. Exposure of synaptosomes to CS was also effective in protecting the reduction of ouabain-sensitive ATPase (Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase) activity caused by 0.5% ethanol used as a solvent medium for CS. These findings suggest that one of the physiological actions of CS in synaptosomes, after binding to synaptosomal plasma membranes, is an enhancement of Ca/sup 2 +/ transport and an increase of Ca/sup 2 +/-CaM-ATPase activity.

  2. Mode of Ezrin-Membrane Interaction as a Function of PIP2 Binding and Pseudophosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Shabardina, Victoria; Kramer, Corinna; Gerdes, Benjamin; Braunger, Julia; Cordes, Andrea; Schäfer, Jonas; Mey, Ingo; Grill, David; Gerke, Volker; Steinem, Claudia

    2016-06-21

    Ezrin, a protein of the ezrin, radixin, moesin (ERM) family, provides a regulated linkage between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton. The hallmark of this linkage is the activation of ezrin by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) binding and a threonine phosphorylation at position 567. To analyze the influence of these activating factors on the organization of ezrin on lipid membranes and the proposed concomitant oligomer-monomer transition, we made use of supported lipid bilayers in conjunction with atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Bilayers doped with either PIP2 as the natural receptor lipid of ezrin or a Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid-equipped lipid to bind the proteins via their His6-tags to the lipid membrane were used to bind two different ezrin variants: ezrin wild-type and ezrin T567D mimicking the phosphorylated state. Using a combination of reflectometric interference spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Förster resonance energy transfer experiments, we show that only the ezrin T567D mutant, upon binding to PIP2-containing bilayers, undergoes a remarkable conformational change, which we attribute to an opening of the conformation resulting in monomeric protein on the lipid bilayer. PMID:27332129

  3. The helical propensity of KLA amphipathic peptides enhances their binding to gel-state lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Arouri, Ahmad; Dathe, Margitta; Blume, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    The role and importance of the conformation of antimicrobial peptides for their binding and incorporation into lipid membranes as well as for their bioactivity are still not well understood. In this paper, we studied the interaction between four cationic alpha-helical KLA peptides, which differ primarily in their helical propensity, and the anionic gel-state lipid DPPG (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol). Of particular interest was the influence of the peptide conformation and membrane surface properties on the electrostatic binding process. Dynamic light scattering (DSL) showed that generally the KLA peptides possess high aggregation power but modest solubilization power. Circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) spectra revealed that the KLA peptides with the low helical propensity tend to form beta-structures at low lipid/peptide ratios. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermograms showed that the helical KLA peptides stabilize the DPPG bilayer, whereas the beta-structured peptides induce pronounced membrane perturbations. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) isotherms showed that the helical KLA peptides bind more efficiently to DPPG vesicles than the beta-structured KLA peptides, and that the binding affinity of the peptides is proportional to the peptide helical propensity and membrane negative surface charge. The stoichiometry values (N) deduced from the ITC isotherms suggest that the helical KLA peptides have a higher capacity to translocate the DPPG lipid bilayer. The new data presented in this study demonstrate the flexibility of KLA peptides in adopting various conformations in response to the surrounding and also how the peptide structuring controls the mode of peptide-membrane interaction.

  4. The helical propensity of KLA amphipathic peptides enhances their binding to gel-state lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Arouri, Ahmad; Dathe, Margitta; Blume, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    The role and importance of the conformation of antimicrobial peptides for their binding and incorporation into lipid membranes as well as for their bioactivity are still not well understood. In this paper, we studied the interaction between four cationic alpha-helical KLA peptides, which differ primarily in their helical propensity, and the anionic gel-state lipid DPPG (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol). Of particular interest was the influence of the peptide conformation and membrane surface properties on the electrostatic binding process. Dynamic light scattering (DSL) showed that generally the KLA peptides possess high aggregation power but modest solubilization power. Circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) spectra revealed that the KLA peptides with the low helical propensity tend to form beta-structures at low lipid/peptide ratios. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermograms showed that the helical KLA peptides stabilize the DPPG bilayer, whereas the beta-structured peptides induce pronounced membrane perturbations. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) isotherms showed that the helical KLA peptides bind more efficiently to DPPG vesicles than the beta-structured KLA peptides, and that the binding affinity of the peptides is proportional to the peptide helical propensity and membrane negative surface charge. The stoichiometry values (N) deduced from the ITC isotherms suggest that the helical KLA peptides have a higher capacity to translocate the DPPG lipid bilayer. The new data presented in this study demonstrate the flexibility of KLA peptides in adopting various conformations in response to the surrounding and also how the peptide structuring controls the mode of peptide-membrane interaction. PMID:23792704

  5. Transcriptional network of androgen receptor in prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Ken-ichi; Inoue, Satoshi

    2013-08-01

    The androgen receptor belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily and functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor. It binds to the androgen responsive element and recruits coregulatory factors to modulate gene transcription. In addition, the androgen receptor interacts with other transcription factors, such as forkhead box A1, and other oncogenic signaling pathway molecules that bind deoxyribonucleic acid and regulate transcription. Androgen receptor signaling plays an important role in the development of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer cells proliferate in an androgen-dependent manner, and androgen receptor blockade is effective in prostate cancer therapy. However, patients often progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer with elevated androgen receptor expression and hypersensitivity to androgen. Recently, comprehensive analysis tools, such as complementary DNA microarray, chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequence, have described the androgen-mediated diverse transcriptional program and gene networks in prostate cancer. Furthermore, functional and clinical studies have shown that some of the androgen receptor-regulated genes could be prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of prostate cancer, particularly castration-resistant prostate cancer. Thus, identifying androgen receptor downstream signaling events and investigating the regulation of androgen receptor activity is critical for understanding the mechanism of carcinogenesis and progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  6. Lipid Binding of the Amphipathic Helix Serving as Membrane Anchor of Pestivirus Glycoprotein Erns

    PubMed Central

    Aberle, Daniel; Oetter, Kay-Marcus; Meyers, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Pestiviruses express a peculiar protein named Erns representing envelope glycoprotein and RNase, which is important for control of the innate immune response and persistent infection. The latter functions are connected with secretion of a certain amount of Erns from the infected cell. Retention/secretion of Erns is most likely controlled by its unusual membrane anchor, a long amphipathic helix attached in plane to the membrane. Here we present results of experiments conducted with a lipid vesicle sedimentation assay able to separate lipid-bound from unbound protein dissolved in the water phase. Using this technique we show that a protein composed of tag sequences and the carboxyterminal 65 residues of Erns binds specifically to membrane vesicles with a clear preference for compositions containing negatively charged lipids. Mutations disturbing the helical folding and/or amphipathic character of the anchor as well as diverse truncations and exchange of amino acids important for intracellular retention of Erns had no or only small effects on the proteins membrane binding. This result contrasts the dramatically increased secretion rates observed for Erns proteins with equivalent mutations within cells. Accordingly, the ratio of secreted versus cell retained Erns is not determined by the lipid affinity of the membrane anchor. PMID:26270479

  7. Structural Thermodynamics of myr-Src(2–19) Binding to Phospholipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Scheidt, Holger A.; Klingler, Johannes; Huster, Daniel; Keller, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins are anchored to lipid bilayer membranes through a combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. In the case of the membrane-bound nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src from Rous sarcoma virus, these interactions are mediated by an N-terminal myristoyl chain and an adjacent cluster of six basic amino-acid residues, respectively. In contrast with the acyl modifications of other lipid-anchored proteins, the myristoyl chain of Src does not match the host lipid bilayer in terms of chain conformation and dynamics, which is attributed to a tradeoff between hydrophobic burial of the myristoyl chain and repulsion of the peptidic moiety from the phospholipid headgroup region. Here, we combine thermodynamic information obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry with structural data derived from 2H, 13C, and 31P solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to decipher the hydrophobic and electrostatic contributions governing the interactions of a myristoylated Src peptide with zwitterionic and anionic membranes made from lauroyl (C12:0) or myristoyl (C14:0) lipids. Although the latter are expected to enable better hydrophobic matching, the Src peptide partitions more avidly into the shorter-chain lipid analog because this does not require the myristoyl chain to stretch extensively to avoid unfavorable peptide/headgroup interactions. Moreover, we find that Coulombic and intrinsic contributions to membrane binding are not additive, because the presence of anionic lipids enhances membrane binding more strongly than would be expected on the basis of simple Coulombic attraction. PMID:26244740

  8. Structural comparison of highly similar nucleoside-diphosphate kinases: Molecular explanation of distinct membrane-binding behavior.

    PubMed

    Francois-Moutal, L; Marcillat, O; Granjon, T

    2014-10-01

    NDPK-A, NDPK-B and NDPK-D are three enzymes which belong to the NDPK group I isoforms and are not only involved in metabolism process but also in transcriptional regulation, DNA cleavage, histidine protein kinase activity and metastasis development. Those enzymes were reported to bind to membranes either in mitochondria where NDPK-D influences cardiolipin lateral organization and is thought to be involved in apoptotic pathway or in cytosol where NDPK-A and NDPK-B membrane association was shown to influence several cellular processes like endocytosis, cellular adhesion, ion transport, etc. However, despite numerous studies, the role of NDPK-membrane association and the molecular details of the binding process are still elusive. In the present work, a comparative study of the three NDPK isoforms allowed us to show that although membrane binding is a common feature of these enzymes, mechanisms differ at the molecular scale. NDPK-A was not able to bind to model membranes mimicking the inner leaflet of plasma membrane, suggesting that its in vivo membrane association is mediated by a non-lipidic partner or other partners than the studied phospholipids. On the contrary, NDPK-B and NDPK-D were shown to bind efficiently to liposomes mimicking plasma membrane and mitochondrial inner membrane respectively but details of the binding mechanism differ between the two enzymes as NDPK-B binding necessarily involved an anionic phospholipid partner while NDPK-D can bind either zwitterionic or anionic phospholipids. Although sharing similar secondary structure and homohexameric quaternary arrangement, tryptophan fluorescence revealed fine disparities in NDPK tertiary structures. Interfacial behavior as well as ANS fluorescence showed further dissimilarities between NDPK isoforms, notably the presence of distinct accessible hydrophobic areas as well as different capacity to form Gibbs monolayers related to their surface activity properties. Those distinct features may contribute to

  9. A membrane cytoskeleton from Dictyostelium discoideum. I. Identification and partial characterization of an actin-binding activity

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum plasma membranes isolated by each of three procedures bind F-actin. The interactions between these membranes and actin are examined by a novel application of falling ball viscometry. Treating the membranes as multivalent actin-binding particles analogous to divalent actin-gelation factors, we observe large increases in viscosity (actin cross-linking) when membranes of depleted actin and myosin are incubated with rabbit skeletal muscle F-actin. Pre- extraction of peripheral membrane proteins with chaotropes or the inclusion of Triton X-100 during the assay does not appreciably diminish this actin cross-linking activity. Lipid vesicles, heat- denatured membranes, proteolyzed membranes, or membranes containing endogenous actin show minimal actin cross-linking activity. Heat- denatured, but not proteolyzed, membranes regain activity when assayed in the presence of Triton X-100. Thus, integral membrane proteins appear to be responsible for some or all of the actin cross-linking activity of D. discoideum membranes. In the absence of MgATP, Triton X- 100 extraction of isolated D. discoideum membranes results in a Triton- insoluble residue composed of actin, myosin, and associated membrane proteins. The inclusion of MgATP before and during Triton extraction greatly diminishes the amount of protein in the Triton-insoluble residue without appreciably altering its composition. Our results suggest the existence of a protein complex stabilized by actin and/or myosin (membrane cytoskeleton) associated with the D. discoideum plasma membrane. PMID:6894148

  10. Phosphatidylserine-binding protein lactadherin inhibits protein translocation across the ER membrane.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Kida, Yuichiro; Sakaguchi, Masao

    2013-05-10

    Secretory and membrane proteins are translocated across and inserted into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane via translocon channels. To investigate the effect of the negatively-charged phospholipid phosphatidylserine on the translocation of nascent polypeptide chains through the translocon, we used the phosphatidylserine-binding protein lactadherin C2-domain. Lactadherin inhibited targeting of nascent chain to the translocon by signal sequence and the initiation of translocation. Moreover, lactadherin inhibited the movement of the translocating polypeptide chain regardless of the presence or absence of positively-charged residues. Phosphatidylserine might be critically involved in translocon function, but it is not a major determinant for translocation arrest of positively-charged residues. PMID:23583395

  11. A Role for Weak Electrostatic Interactions in Peripheral Membrane Protein Binding.

    PubMed

    Khan, Hanif M; He, Tao; Fuglebakk, Edvin; Grauffel, Cédric; Yang, Boqian; Roberts, Mary F; Gershenson, Anne; Reuter, Nathalie

    2016-03-29

    Bacillus thuringiensis phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (BtPI-PLC) is a secreted virulence factor that binds specifically to phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers containing negatively charged phospholipids. BtPI-PLC carries a negative net charge and its interfacial binding site has no obvious cluster of basic residues. Continuum electrostatic calculations show that, as expected, nonspecific electrostatic interactions between BtPI-PLC and membranes vary as a function of the fraction of anionic lipids present in the bilayers. Yet they are strikingly weak, with a calculated ΔGel below 1 kcal/mol, largely due to a single lysine (K44). When K44 is mutated to alanine, the equilibrium dissociation constant for small unilamellar vesicles increases more than 50 times (∼2.4 kcal/mol), suggesting that interactions between K44 and lipids are not merely electrostatic. Comparisons of molecular-dynamics simulations performed using different lipid compositions reveal that the bilayer composition does not affect either hydrogen bonds or hydrophobic contacts between the protein interfacial binding site and bilayers. However, the occupancies of cation-π interactions between PC choline headgroups and protein tyrosines vary as a function of PC content. The overall contribution of basic residues to binding affinity is also context dependent and cannot be approximated by a rule-of-thumb value because these residues can contribute to both nonspecific electrostatic and short-range protein-lipid interactions. Additionally, statistics on the distribution of basic amino acids in a data set of membrane-binding domains reveal that weak electrostatics, as observed for BtPI-PLC, might be a less unusual mechanism for peripheral membrane binding than is generally thought. PMID:27028646

  12. Binding of Yersinia enterocolitica to rabbit intestinal brush border membranes, mucus, and mucin.

    PubMed Central

    Mantle, M; Basaraba, L; Peacock, S C; Gall, D G

    1989-01-01

    Mucus and its gel-forming glycoprotein component, mucin, are thought to protect the gastrointestinal tract from enteric pathogens by inhibiting their attachment to enterocytes. In this study, we investigated interactions between Yersinia enterocolitica (isogenic strains of virulent and nonvirulent organisms) and crude mucus, highly purified mucin, and brush border membranes (BBMs) isolated from the upper mid-, and distal small intestine and the proximal colon of the rabbit. Adherence of radiolabeled bacteria was assessed to BBMs, mucus, and mucin immobilized in polystyrene microtiter plate wells. Virulent Y. enterocolitica showed saturable binding to mucus, mucin, and BBMs from all four regions of the intestinal tract, although adherence to BBMs was appreciably greater than that to mucus or mucin. Maximal binding of bacteria was higher to BBMs from the distal small intestine and the proximal colon than to those from the upper and mid-small intestine, which may in part explain why the organism localizes to the ileo-caecal regions of the gut. Adherence of virulent Y. enterocolitica to BBMs was significantly reduced in the presence of homologous mucus or mucin preparations. Binding of virulent bacteria appears to depend on plasmid-encoded proteins located on the outer surface membrane, since (i) the isogenic strain lacking the virulence plasmid showed markedly less binding to all BBM, mucus, and mucin preparations; (ii) growth of the virulent strain at 25 degrees C, which inactivates its plasmid, significantly diminished binding to BBMs, mucus, and mucin; and (iii) mild proteolysis substantially decreased adherence of virulent bacteria to BBMs. Compared with rabbit intestinal and colonic mucins, binding of virulent Y. enterocolitica was significantly greater to purified human intestinal mucin and significantly less to rat intestinal mucin. These findings provide support for the role of mucus and mucin in host defense by preventing adherence of virulent Y

  13. Vitellogenin Recognizes Cell Damage through Membrane Binding and Shields Living Cells from Reactive Oxygen Species*

    PubMed Central

    Havukainen, Heli; Münch, Daniel; Baumann, Anne; Zhong, Shi; Halskau, Øyvind; Krogsgaard, Michelle; Amdam, Gro V.

    2013-01-01

    Large lipid transfer proteins are involved in lipid transportation and diverse other molecular processes. These serum proteins include vitellogenins, which are egg yolk precursors and pathogen pattern recognition receptors, and apolipoprotein B, which is an anti-inflammatory cholesterol carrier. In the honey bee, vitellogenin acts as an antioxidant, and elevated vitellogenin titer is linked to prolonged life span in this animal. Here, we show that vitellogenin has cell and membrane binding activity and that it binds preferentially to dead and damaged cells. Vitellogenin binds directly to phosphatidylcholine liposomes and with higher affinity to liposomes containing phosphatidylserine, a lipid of the inner leaflet of cell membranes that is exposed in damaged cells. Vitellogenin binding to live cells, furthermore, improves cell oxidative stress tolerance. This study can shed more light on why large lipid transfer proteins have a well conserved α-helical domain, because we locate the lipid bilayer-binding ability of vitellogenin largely to this region. We suggest that recognition of cell damage and oxidation shield properties are two mechanisms that allow vitellogenin to extend honey bee life span. PMID:23897804

  14. Hydrophobic ion interactions with membranes. Thermodynamic analysis of tetraphenylphosphonium binding to vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Flewelling, R F; Hubbell, W L

    1986-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties for the interaction of the hydrophobic ion tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+) with egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles were studied in detail by equilibrium dialysis and spin label techniques. A partition coefficient of beta = 4.2 + 0.4 x 10(-6) cm (K congruent to 100) was determined. Electrostatic saturation sets in at approximately 600 microM (about one absorbed TPP+ molecule per 100 lipids), and is not screened by salt. The temperature dependence of binding was determined, which reveals that the binding is entropy-driven with a positive (repulsive) enthalpy of binding, a result to be compared with hydrophobic anions in which the binding enthalpy is negative. The membrane dipole potential may be responsible for this binding difference. Activity coefficients are determined and shown to be significantly different from those of most common salts, an important result that should be considered in all hydrophobic ion studies. Comparison of the TPP+ results with those of its anionic structural analogue, tetraphenylboron (TPB-), permits a general analysis of hydrophobic ion interactions with membranes. A theoretical model consistent with the entire set of data is developed in an accompanying article. PMID:3006814

  15. Selective androgen receptor modulators: in pursuit of tissue-selective androgens.

    PubMed

    Omwancha, Josephat; Brown, Terry R

    2006-10-01

    The androgen receptor mediates the androgenic and anabolic activity of the endogenous steroids testosterone and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone. Current knowledge of the androgen receptor protein structure, and the molecular mechanisms surrounding the binding properties and activities of agonists and antagonists has led to the design and development of novel nonsteroidal ligands with selected tissue-specific androgen receptor agonist and antagonist activities. The activity of these compounds, termed selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs), is directed toward the maintenance or enhancement of anabolic effects on bone and muscle with minimal androgenic effects on prostate growth. SARMs are of potential therapeutic value in the treatment of male hypogonadism, osteoporosis, frailty and muscle wasting, burn injury and would healing, anemia, mood and depression, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

  16. Anti-DNA autoantibodies initiate experimental lupus nephritis by binding directly to the glomerular basement membrane in mice.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Meera R; Wang, Congmiao; Marion, Tony N

    2012-07-01

    The strongest serological correlate for lupus nephritis is antibody to double-stranded DNA, although the mechanism by which anti-DNA antibodies initiate lupus nephritis is unresolved. Most recent reports indicate that anti-DNA must bind chromatin in the glomerular basement membrane or mesangial matrix to form glomerular deposits. Here we determined whether direct binding of anti-DNA antibody to glomerular basement membrane is critical to initiate glomerular binding of anti-DNA in experimental lupus nephritis. Mice were co-injected with IgG monoclonal antibodies or hybridomas with similar specificity for DNA and chromatin but different IgG subclass and different relative affinity for basement membrane. Only anti-DNA antibodies that bound basement membrane bound to glomeruli, activated complement, and induced proteinuria whether injected alone or co-injected with a non-basement-membrane-binding anti-DNA antibody. Basement membrane-binding anti-DNA antibodies co-localized with heparan sulfate proteoglycan in glomerular basement membrane and mesangial matrix but not with chromatin. Thus, direct binding of anti-DNA antibody to antigens in the glomerular basement membrane or mesangial matrix may be critical to initiate glomerular inflammation. This may accelerate and exacerbate glomerular immune complex formation in human and murine lupus nephritis.

  17. Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin binding to brush border membrane vesicles of rice stem borers.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, Edwin P; Aguda, Remedios M; Curtiss, April; Dean, Donald H; Cohen, Michael B

    2004-04-01

    The receptor binding step in the molecular mode of action of five delta-endotoxins (Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1C, Cry2A, and Cry9C) from Bacillus thuringiensis was examined to find toxins with different receptor sites in the midgut of the striped stem borer (SSB) Chilo suppressalis (Walker) and yellow stem borer (YSB) Scirpophaga incertulas (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). Homologous competition assays were used to estimate binding affinities (K(com)) of (125)I-labelled toxins to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). The SSB BBMV affinities in decreasing order was: Cry1Ab = Cry1Ac > Cry9C > Cry2A > Cry1C. In YSB, the order of decreasing affinities was: Cry1Ac > Cry1Ab > Cry9C = Cry2A > Cry1C. The number of binding sites (B(max)) estimated by homologous competition binding among the Cry toxins did not affect toxin binding affinity (K(com)) to both insect midgut BBMVs. Results of the heterologous competition binding assays suggest that Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac compete for the same binding sites in SSB and YSB. Other toxins bind with weak (Cry1C, Cry2A) or no affinity (Cry9C) to Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac binding sites in both species. Cry2A had the lowest toxicity to 10-day-old SSB and Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac were the most toxic. Taken together, the results of this study show that Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac could be combined with either Cry1C, Cry2A, or Cry9C for more durable resistance in transgenic rice. Cry1Ab should not be used together with Cry1Ac because a mutation in one receptor site could diminish binding of both toxins. PMID:15027071

  18. Restoration of antibody binding to blotted meningococcal outer membrane proteins using various detergents.

    PubMed

    Wedege, E; Bryn, K; Frøholm, L O

    1988-10-01

    Restoration of IgG antibody binding to heat-denatured meningococcal outer membrane proteins has been studied on immunoblots with a series of 14 detergents. Nitrocellulose strips with the blotted proteins were incubated with the detergents and sera from human volunteers vaccinated with meningococcal membrane proteins. Zwitterionic and ionic detergents, containing substituted quarternary ammonium or amino groups with a minimum of 10 C atoms in the alkyl chain, restored the antigenicity of the serotype-specific class 2 porin protein. The concentrations of the Zwittergent detergents necessary for activation decreased with increasing alkyl chain length of the homologues. Only zwitterionic detergents renatured the class 1 protein. Both proteins were weakly antigenic in the presence of the nonionic detergents Triton X-100 and Tween 20. Meningococcal lipopolysaccharide restored antibody binding to the porin, but not to the class 1 protein. Similar concentrations of lipopolysaccharides from two other gram-negative bacteria had no effect.

  19. Calculations of distance distributions and probabilities of binding by ligands between parallel plane membranes comprising receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, Ianik; Devroye, Luc; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-03-01

    Cell communication through biochemical signaling pathways is a key determinant of tissue responses to radiation. Several molecules, such as the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), are implicated in radiation-induced signaling between cells. Brownian Dynamics (BD) algorithms have recently been used to simulate the interaction of ligands with receptors and to elucidate signal transduction and autocrine loops in ligand-receptors systems. In this paper, we discuss the simulation of particle diffusion and binding kinetics in a space bounded by two parallel plane membranes, using an exact algorithm to sample the propagator (Green’s function) of a particle located between 2 membranes. We also show that the simulation results are independent of the number of time steps used, in accordance with time discretization equations. These simulations could be used to simulate the motion and binding of ligand molecules in a cell culture, and possibly in neuronal synapses.

  20. Membrane binding properties of IRSp53-missing in metastasis domain (IMD) protein.

    PubMed

    Futó, Kinga; Bódis, Emőke; Machesky, Laura M; Nyitrai, Miklós; Visegrády, Balázs

    2013-11-01

    The 53-kDa insulin receptor substrate protein (IRSp53) organizes the actin cytoskeleton in response to stimulation of small GTPases, promoting the formation of cell protrusions such as filopodia and lamellipodia. IMD is the N-terminal 250 amino acid domain (IRSp53/MIM Homology Domain) of IRSp53 (also called I-BAR), which can bind to negatively charged lipid molecules. Overexpression of IMD induces filopodia formation in cells and purified IMD assembles finger-like protrusions in reconstituted lipid membranes. IMD was shown by several groups to bundle actin filaments, but other groups showed that it also binds to membranes. IMD binds to negatively charged lipid molecules with preference to clusters of PI(4,5)P2. Here, we performed a range of different in vitro fluorescence experiments to determine the binding properties of the IMD to phospholipids. We used different constructs of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVETs), containing neutral or negatively charged phospholipids. We found that IMD has a stronger binding interaction with negatively charged PI(4,5)P2 or PS lipids than PS/PC or neutral PC lipids. The equilibrium dissociation constant for the IMD-lipid interaction falls into the 78-170μM range for all the lipids tested. The solvent accessibility of the fluorescence labels on the IMD during its binding to lipids is also reduced as the lipids become more negatively charged. Actin affects the IMD-lipid interaction, depending on its polymerization state. Monomeric actin partially disrupts the binding, while filamentous actin can further stabilize the IMD-lipid interaction. PMID:23872532

  1. A Plasmodium falciparum copper-binding membrane protein with copper transport motifs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Copper is an essential catalytic co-factor for metabolically important cellular enzymes, such as cytochrome-c oxidase. Eukaryotic cells acquire copper through a copper transport protein and distribute intracellular copper using molecular chaperones. The copper chelator, neocuproine, inhibits Plasmodium falciparum ring-to-trophozoite transition in vitro, indicating a copper requirement for malaria parasite development. How the malaria parasite acquires or secretes copper still remains to be fully elucidated. Methods PlasmoDB was searched for sequences corresponding to candidate P. falciparum copper-requiring proteins. The amino terminal domain of a putative P. falciparum copper transport protein was cloned and expressed as a maltose binding fusion protein. The copper binding ability of this protein was examined. Copper transport protein-specific anti-peptide antibodies were generated in chickens and used to establish native protein localization in P. falciparum parasites by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results Six P. falciparum copper-requiring protein orthologs and a candidate P. falciparum copper transport protein (PF14_0369), containing characteristic copper transport protein features, were identified in PlasmoDB. The recombinant amino terminal domain of the transport protein bound reduced copper in vitro and within Escherichia coli cells during recombinant expression. Immunolocalization studies tracked the copper binding protein translocating from the erythrocyte plasma membrane in early ring stage to a parasite membrane as the parasites developed to schizonts. The protein appears to be a PEXEL-negative membrane protein. Conclusion Plasmodium falciparum parasites express a native protein with copper transporter characteristics that binds copper in vitro. Localization of the protein to the erythrocyte and parasite plasma membranes could provide a mechanism for the delivery of novel anti-malarial compounds. PMID:23190769

  2. Importance of calcium for the binding of oviductal fluid proteins to the membranes of bovine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, S; Sirard, M A

    1996-06-01

    Our laboratory has recently shown that in vitro-cultured oviductal cells secrete sperm motility maintaining factor(s). Since the binding of oviductal proteins to spermatozoa (SPZ) has been demonstrated in many species, the motility factor was postulated to bind the membranes of SPZ. Therefore, the current study was performed to evaluate which proteins from in vivo oviductal secretions bind to sperm membranes, to characterize binding conditions, and to evaluate the effect of this binding on sperm survival. Bovine oviducts were dissected, and oviductal cells and fluid were collected by pressing the oviductal tube with a glass slide. This mixture was incubated in Tris-EDTA buffer at 37 degrees C for 30 min, and the cells were washed twice by centrifugation. The supernatant containing oviductal fluid proteins (OFP) was reserved, filtered, frozen (for later motility tests), or lyophilized and labeled with 125I. Frozen-thawed SPZ were incubated either immediately, following capacitation, ionophore-induced acrosome reaction, death by heating, or flagellar removal with labeled OFP for 30 min. The resulting pellet after three washes was dissolved in SDS and submitted to 10% SDS-PAGE. An autoradiogram showed that 72, 66, 39, 38, and 36 kDa proteins bind strongly to the five types of SPZ used, and that this binding is very specific, since unlabeled OFP inhibited binding while serum proteins did not. Furthermore, for 39, 38, and 36 kDa proteins, the presence of calcium in the incubation medium was essential for dose-dependent binding, whereas magnesium was not. Preincubation of SPZ for 30 min at 37 degrees C with oviductal fluid, followed by one wash and 6 hr of incubation in control media, showed that the percentage of motile SPZ is significantly higher (52 +/- 6%) compared with SPZ not preincubated with oviductal fluid (24 +/- 6%; P < 0.01). In summary, a limited number of proteins from oviductal secretions bind to the surface of bovine SPZ only in the presence of calcium

  3. Covalent attachment of functionalized lipid bilayers to planar waveguides for measuring protein binding to biomimetic membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Heyse, S.; Vogel, H.; Sänger, M.; Sigrist, H.

    1995-01-01

    A new method is presented for measuring sensitively the interactions between ligands and their membrane-bound receptors in situ using integrated optics, thus avoiding the need for additional labels. Phospholipid bilayers were attached covalently to waveguides by a novel protocol, which can in principle be used with any glass-like surface. In a first step, phospholipids carrying head-group thiols were covalently immobilized onto SiO2-TiO2 waveguide surfaces. This was accomplished by acylation of aminated waveguides with the heterobifunctional crosslinker N-succinimidyl-3-maleimidopropionate, followed by the formation of thioethers between the surface-grafted maleimides and the synthetic thiolipids. The surface-attached thiolipids served as hydrophobic templates and anchors for the deposition of a complete lipid bilayer either by fusion of lipid vesicles or by lipid self-assembly from mixed lipid/detergent micelles. The step-by-step lipid bilayer formation on the waveguide surface was monitored in situ by an integrated optics technique, allowing the simultaneous determination of optical thickness and one of the two refractive indices of the adsorbed organic layers. Surface coverages of 50-60% were calculated for thiolipid layers. Subsequent deposition of POPC resulted in an overall lipid layer thickness of 45-50 A, which corresponds to the thickness of a fluid bilayer membrane. Specific recognition reactions occurring at cell membrane surfaces were modeled by the incorporation of lipid-anchored receptor molecules into the supported bilayer membranes. (1) The outer POPC layer was doped with biotinylated phosphatidylethanolamine. Subsequent specific binding of streptavidin was optically monitored. (2) A lipopeptide was incorporated in the outer POPC monolayer. Membrane binding of monoclonal antibodies, which were directed against the peptide moiety of the lipopeptide, was optically detected. The specific antibody binding correlated well with the lipopepitde

  4. Use of NMR saturation transfer difference spectroscopy to study ligand binding to membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Venkitakrishnan, Rani Parvathy; Benard, Outhiriaradjou; Max, Marianna; Markley, John L; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M

    2012-01-01

    Detection of weak ligand binding to membrane-spanning proteins, such as receptor proteins at low physiological concentrations, poses serious experimental challenges. Saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD-NMR) spectroscopy offers an excellent way to surmount these problems. As the name suggests, magnetization transferred from the receptor to its bound ligand is measured by directly observing NMR signals from the ligand itself. Low-power irradiation is applied to a (1)H NMR spectral region containing protein signals but no ligand signals. This irradiation spreads quickly throughout the membrane protein by the process of spin diffusion and saturates all protein (1)H NMR signals. (1)H NMR signals from a ligand bound transiently to the membrane protein become saturated and, upon dissociation, serve to decrease the intensity of the (1)H NMR signals measured from the pool of free ligand. The experiment is repeated with the irradiation pulse placed outside the spectral region of protein and ligand, a condition that does not lead to saturation transfer to the ligand. The two resulting spectra are subtracted to yield the difference spectrum. As an illustration of the methodology, we review here STD-NMR experiments designed to investigate binding of ligands to the human sweet taste receptor, a member of the large family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Sweetener molecules bind to the sweet receptor with low affinity but high specificity and lead to a variety of physiological responses.

  5. Role of transmembrane pH gradient and membrane binding in nisin pore formation.

    PubMed

    Moll, G N; Clark, J; Chan, W C; Bycroft, B W; Roberts, G C; Konings, W N; Driessen, A J

    1997-01-01

    Nisin is a cationic antimicrobial peptide that belongs to the group of lantibiotics. It is thought to form oligomeric pores in the target membrane by a mechanism that requires the transmembrane electrical potential delta psi and that involves local pertubation of the lipid bilayer structure. Here we show that nisin does not form exclusively voltage-dependent pores: even in the absence of a delta psi, nisin is able to dissipate the transmembrane pH gradient (delta pH) in sensitive Lactococcus lactis cells and proteoliposomes. The rate of dissipation increases with the magnitude of the delta pH. Nisin forms pores only when the delta pH is inside alkaline. The efficiency of delta psi-induced pore formation is strongly affected by the external pH, whereas delta pH-induced pore formation is rather insensitive to the external pH. Nisin(1-12), an amino-terminal fragment of nisin, and (des-deltaAla5)-(nisin(1-32) amide have a strongly reduced capacity to dissipate the delta psi and delta pH in cytochrome c oxidase proteoliposomes and L. lactis cells. Both variants bind with reduced efficiency to liposomes containing negatively charged phospholipids, suggesting that both ring A and rings C to E play a role in membrane binding. Nisin(1-12) competes with nisin for membrane binding and antagonizes pore formation. These findings are consistent with the wedge model of nisin-induced pore formation.

  6. Giant Host Red Blood Cell Membrane Mimicking Polymersomes Bind Parasite Proteins and Malaria Parasites.

    PubMed

    Najer, Adrian; Thamboo, Sagana; Palivan, Cornelia G; Beck, Hans-Peter; Meier, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease that needs to be addressed using innovative approaches to counteract spread of drug resistance and to establish or optimize vaccination strategies. With our approach, we aim for a dual action with drug- and 'vaccine-like' activity against malaria. By inhibiting entry of malaria parasites into host red blood cells (RBCs) - using polymer vesicle-based (polymersome) nanomimics of RBC membranes - the life cycle of the parasite is interrupted and the exposed parasites are accessible to the host immune system. Here, we describe how host cell-sized RBC membrane mimics, formed with the same block copolymers as nanomimics, also bind the corresponding malaria parasite ligand and whole malaria parasites, similar to nanomimics. This was demonstrated using fluorescence imaging techniques and confirms the suitability of giant polymersomes (GUVs) as simple mimics for RBC membranes.

  7. The polybasic region is not essential for membrane binding of the matrix protein M1 of influenza virus

    SciTech Connect

    Thaa, Bastian; Herrmann, Andreas; Veit, Michael

    2009-01-05

    The matrix protein M1, the organizer of assembly of influenza virus, interacts with other virus components and with cellular membranes. It has been proposed that M1 binding to lipids is mediated by its polybasic region, but this could hitherto not been investigated in vivo since M1 accumulates in the nucleus of transfected cells. We have equipped M1 with nuclear export signals and showed that the constructs are bound to cellular membranes. Exchange of the complete polybasic region and of further hydrophobic amino acids in its vicinity did not prevent association of M1 with membranes. We therefore suppose that M1 probably interacts with membranes via multiple binding sites.

  8. Cholesterol Modifies Huntingtin Binding to, Disruption of, and Aggregation on Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Campbell, Warren A; Chaibva, Maxmore; Jain, Pranav; Leslie, Ashley E; Frey, Shelli L; Legleiter, Justin

    2016-01-12

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by abnormally long CAG-repeats in the huntingtin gene that encode an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) domain near the N-terminus of the huntingtin (htt) protein. Expanded polyQ domains are directly correlated to disease-related htt aggregation. Htt is found highly associated with a variety of cellular and subcellular membranes that are predominantly comprised of lipids. Since cholesterol homeostasis is altered in HD, we investigated how varying cholesterol content modifies the interactions between htt and lipid membranes. A combination of Langmuir trough monolayer techniques, vesicle permeability and binding assays, and in situ atomic force microscopy were used to directly monitor the interaction of a model, synthetic htt peptide and a full-length htt-exon1 recombinant protein with model membranes comprised of total brain lipid extract (TBLE) and varying amounts of exogenously added cholesterol. As the cholesterol content of the membrane increased, the extent of htt insertion decreased. Vesicles containing extra cholesterol were resistant to htt-induced permeabilization. Morphological and mechanical changes in the bilayer associated with exposure to htt were also drastically altered by the presence of cholesterol. Disrupted regions of pure TBLE bilayers were grainy in appearance and associated with a large number of globular aggregates. In contrast, morphological changes induced by htt in bilayers enriched in cholesterol were plateau-like with a smooth appearance. Collectively, these observations suggest that the presence and amount of cholesterol in lipid membranes play a critical role in htt binding and aggregation on lipid membranes.

  9. Cholesterol Modifies Huntingtin Binding to, Disruption of, and Aggregation on Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Campbell, Warren A; Chaibva, Maxmore; Jain, Pranav; Leslie, Ashley E; Frey, Shelli L; Legleiter, Justin

    2016-01-12

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by abnormally long CAG-repeats in the huntingtin gene that encode an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) domain near the N-terminus of the huntingtin (htt) protein. Expanded polyQ domains are directly correlated to disease-related htt aggregation. Htt is found highly associated with a variety of cellular and subcellular membranes that are predominantly comprised of lipids. Since cholesterol homeostasis is altered in HD, we investigated how varying cholesterol content modifies the interactions between htt and lipid membranes. A combination of Langmuir trough monolayer techniques, vesicle permeability and binding assays, and in situ atomic force microscopy were used to directly monitor the interaction of a model, synthetic htt peptide and a full-length htt-exon1 recombinant protein with model membranes comprised of total brain lipid extract (TBLE) and varying amounts of exogenously added cholesterol. As the cholesterol content of the membrane increased, the extent of htt insertion decreased. Vesicles containing extra cholesterol were resistant to htt-induced permeabilization. Morphological and mechanical changes in the bilayer associated with exposure to htt were also drastically altered by the presence of cholesterol. Disrupted regions of pure TBLE bilayers were grainy in appearance and associated with a large number of globular aggregates. In contrast, morphological changes induced by htt in bilayers enriched in cholesterol were plateau-like with a smooth appearance. Collectively, these observations suggest that the presence and amount of cholesterol in lipid membranes play a critical role in htt binding and aggregation on lipid membranes. PMID:26652744

  10. Pathogenesis of Shigella diarrhea: rabbit intestinal cell microvillus membrane binding site for Shigella toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, G.; Mobassaleh, M.; Donohue-Rolfe, A.; Montgomery, R.K.; Grand, R.J.; Keusch, G.T.

    1986-08-01

    This study examined the binding of purified /sup 125/I-labeled shigella toxin to rabbit jejunal microvillus membranes (MVMs). Toxin binding was concentration dependent, saturable, reversible, and specifically inhibited by unlabeled toxin. The calculated number of toxin molecules bound at 4/sup 0/C was 7.9 X 10(10) (3 X 10(10) to 2 X 10(11))/micrograms of MVM protein or 1.2 X 10(6) per enterocyte. Scatchard analysis showed the binding site to be of a single class with an equilibrium association constant, K, of 4.7 X 10(9) M-1 at 4/sup 0/C. Binding was inversely related to the temperature of incubation. A total of 80% of the labeled toxin binding at 4/sup 0/C dissociated from MVM when the temperature was raised to 37/sup 0/C, but reassociated when the temperature was again brought to 4/sup 0/C. There was no structural or functional change of MVM due to toxin as monitored by electron microscopy or assay of MVM sucrase activity. These studies demonstrate a specific binding site for shigella toxin on rabbit MVMs. The physiological relevance of this receptor remains to be determined.

  11. Does Changing the Predicted Dynamics of a Phospholipase C Alter Activity and Membrane Binding?

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jiongjia; Karri, Sashank; Grauffel, Cédric; Wang, Fang; Reuter, Nathalie; Roberts, Mary F.; Wintrode, Patrick L.; Gershenson, Anne

    2013-01-01

    The enzymatic activity of secreted phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) enzymes is associated with bacterial virulence. Although the PI-PLC active site has no obvious lid, molecular-dynamics simulations suggest that correlated loop motions may limit access to the active site, and two Pro residues, Pro245 and Pro254, are associated with these correlated motions. Whereas the region containing both Pro residues is quite variable among PI-PLCs, it shows high conservation in virulence-associated, secreted PI-PLCs that bind to the surface of cells. These regions of the protein are also associated with phosphatidylcholine binding, which enhances PI-PLC activity. In silico mutagenesis of Pro245 disrupts correlated motions between the two halves of Bacillus thuringiensis PI-PLC, and Pro245 variants show significantly reduced enzymatic activity in all assay systems. PC still enhanced activity, but not to the level of wild-type enzyme. Mutagenesis of Pro254 appears to stiffen the PI-PLC structure, but experimental mutations had minor effects on activity and membrane binding. With the exception of P245Y, reduced activity was not associated with reduced membrane affinity. This combination of simulations and experiments suggests that correlated motions between the two halves of PI-PLC may be more important for enzymatic activity than for vesicle binding. PMID:23332071

  12. Lysosomal membrane glycoproteins bind cholesterol and contribute to lysosomal cholesterol export

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Pfeffer, Suzanne R

    2016-01-01

    LAMP1 and LAMP2 proteins are highly abundant, ubiquitous, mammalian proteins that line the lysosome limiting membrane, and protect it from lysosomal hydrolase action. LAMP2 deficiency causes Danon’s disease, an X-linked hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. LAMP2 is needed for chaperone-mediated autophagy, and its expression improves tissue function in models of aging. We show here that human LAMP1 and LAMP2 bind cholesterol in a manner that buries the cholesterol 3β-hydroxyl group; they also bind tightly to NPC1 and NPC2 proteins that export cholesterol from lysosomes. Quantitation of cellular LAMP2 and NPC1 protein levels suggest that LAMP proteins represent a significant cholesterol binding site at the lysosome limiting membrane, and may signal cholesterol availability. Functional rescue experiments show that the ability of human LAMP2 to facilitate cholesterol export from lysosomes relies on its ability to bind cholesterol directly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21635.001 PMID:27664420

  13. Identifying and quantifying two ligand-binding sites while imaging native human membrane receptors by AFM

    PubMed Central

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Alsteens, David; Wieneke, Ralph; Zhang, Cheng; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Tampé, Robert; Kobilka, Brian K.; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    A current challenge in life sciences is to image cell membrane receptors while characterizing their specific interactions with various ligands. Addressing this issue has been hampered by the lack of suitable nanoscopic methods. Here we address this challenge and introduce multifunctional high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image human protease-activated receptors (PAR1) in the functionally important lipid membrane and to simultaneously localize and quantify their binding to two different ligands. Therefore, we introduce the surface chemistry to bifunctionalize AFM tips with the native receptor-activating peptide and a tris-N-nitrilotriacetic acid (tris-NTA) group binding to a His10-tag engineered to PAR1. We further introduce ways to discern between the binding of both ligands to different receptor sites while imaging native PAR1s. Surface chemistry and nanoscopic method are applicable to a range of biological systems in vitro and in vivo and to concurrently detect and localize multiple ligand-binding sites at single receptor resolution. PMID:26561004

  14. Identifying and quantifying two ligand-binding sites while imaging native human membrane receptors by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Alsteens, David; Wieneke, Ralph; Zhang, Cheng; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Tampé, Robert; Kobilka, Brian K.; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    A current challenge in life sciences is to image cell membrane receptors while characterizing their specific interactions with various ligands. Addressing this issue has been hampered by the lack of suitable nanoscopic methods. Here we address this challenge and introduce multifunctional high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image human protease-activated receptors (PAR1) in the functionally important lipid membrane and to simultaneously localize and quantify their binding to two different ligands. Therefore, we introduce the surface chemistry to bifunctionalize AFM tips with the native receptor-activating peptide and a tris-N-nitrilotriacetic acid (tris-NTA) group binding to a His10-tag engineered to PAR1. We further introduce ways to discern between the binding of both ligands to different receptor sites while imaging native PAR1s. Surface chemistry and nanoscopic method are applicable to a range of biological systems in vitro and in vivo and to concurrently detect and localize multiple ligand-binding sites at single receptor resolution.

  15. Periplasmic maltose-binding protein confers specificity on the outer membrane maltose pore of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Heuzenroeder, M W; Reeves, P

    1980-01-01

    ompB mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 are markedly deficient in porin in their outer membrane. This results in a decreased rate of uptake for many substrates: the maltose pore (lambda receptor) can in some circumstances, in the absence of the periplasmic maltose-binding protein, compensate for the consequent defects in permeability to lactose, mannitol, glycylglycyl-L-valine, and tri-L-ornithine. It is postulated that the maltose-binding protein associates with the maltose pore and confers on it the specificity for maltose, and that the absence of the maltose-binding protein leaves the pore open and results in enhanced transmembrane diffusion of molecules other than maltose. This paper presents evidence to support this hypothesis. PMID:6444941

  16. GLP-1(7-36)amide binding in skeletal muscle membranes from streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Delgado, E; Vicent, D; Mérida, E; Alcántara, A I; Valverde, I

    1995-09-01

    A higher specific binding of GLP-1(7-36)amide is found in skeletal muscle plasma membranes from adult streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rats (insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model) and from neonatal STZ-treated rats (non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model), as compared to that in normal controls; no apparent change in the affinity was observed, that indicating the presence in both diabetic models of an increased number of high affinity binding sites for the peptide. The maximal specific GLP-1(7-16)amide binding in the non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model was found to be significantly higher than that in the insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model. As GLP-1(7-36)amide exerts a glycogenic effect in the rat skeletal muscle, the present data suggest that the action of the peptide in the muscle glucose metabolism may be increased in states of insulin deficiency accompanied or not by insulin resistance.

  17. Membrane Binding of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein Is Cooperative and Dependent on the Spacer Peptide Assembly Domain

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marilia; Jin, Danni; Lösche, Mathias; Vogt, Volker M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The principles underlying membrane binding and assembly of retroviral Gag proteins into a lattice are understood. However, little is known about how these processes are related. Using purified Rous sarcoma virus Gag and Gag truncations, we studied the interrelation of Gag-Gag interaction and Gag-membrane interaction. Both by liposome binding and by surface plasmon resonance on a supported bilayer, Gag bound to membranes much more tightly than did matrix (MA), the isolated membrane binding domain. In principle, this difference could be explained either by protein-protein interactions leading to cooperativity in membrane binding or by the simultaneous interaction of the N-terminal MA and the C-terminal nucleocapsid (NC) of Gag with the bilayer, since both are highly basic. However, we found that NC was not required for strong membrane binding. Instead, the spacer peptide assembly domain (SPA), a putative 24-residue helical sequence comprising the 12-residue SP segment of Gag and overlapping the capsid (CA) C terminus and the NC N terminus, was required. SPA is known to be critical for proper assembly of the immature Gag lattice. A single amino acid mutation in SPA that abrogates assembly in vitro dramatically reduced binding of Gag to liposomes. In vivo, plasma membrane localization was dependent on SPA. Disulfide cross-linking based on ectopic Cys residues showed that the contacts between Gag proteins on the membrane are similar to the known contacts in virus-like particles. Taken together, we interpret these results to mean that Gag membrane interaction is cooperative in that it depends on the ability of Gag to multimerize. IMPORTANCE The retroviral structural protein Gag has three major domains. The N-terminal MA domain interacts directly with the plasma membrane (PM) of cells. The central CA domain, together with immediately adjoining sequences, facilitates the assembly of thousands of Gag molecules into a lattice. The C-terminal NC domain interacts with

  18. Nanoscale Synaptic Membrane Mimetic Allows Unbiased High Throughput Screen That Targets Binding Sites for Alzheimer’s-Associated Aβ Oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Kyle C.; Marunde, Matthew R.; Das, Aditi; Velasco, Pauline T.; Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Marty, Michael T.; Jiang, Haoming; Luan, Chi-Hao; Sligar, Stephen G.; Klein, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite their value as sources of therapeutic drug targets, membrane proteomes are largely inaccessible to high-throughput screening (HTS) tools designed for soluble proteins. An important example comprises the membrane proteins that bind amyloid β oligomers (AβOs). AβOs are neurotoxic ligands thought to instigate the synapse damage that leads to Alzheimer’s dementia. At present, the identities of initial AβO binding sites are highly uncertain, largely because of extensive protein-protein interactions that occur following attachment of AβOs to surface membranes. Here, we show that AβO binding sites can be obtained in a state suitable for unbiased HTS by encapsulating the solubilized synaptic membrane proteome into nanoscale lipid bilayers (Nanodiscs). This method gives a soluble membrane protein library (SMPL)—a collection of individualized synaptic proteins in a soluble state. Proteins within SMPL Nanodiscs showed enzymatic and ligand binding activity consistent with conformational integrity. AβOs were found to bind SMPL Nanodiscs with high affinity and specificity, with binding dependent on intact synaptic membrane proteins, and selective for the higher molecular weight oligomers known to accumulate at synapses. Combining SMPL Nanodiscs with a mix-incubate-read chemiluminescence assay provided a solution-based HTS platform to discover antagonists of AβO binding. Screening a library of 2700 drug-like compounds and natural products yielded one compound that potently reduced AβO binding to SMPL Nanodiscs, synaptosomes, and synapses in nerve cell cultures. Although not a therapeutic candidate, this small molecule inhibitor of synaptic AβO binding will provide a useful experimental antagonist for future mechanistic studies of AβOs in Alzheimer’s model systems. Overall, results provide proof of concept for using SMPLs in high throughput screening for AβO binding antagonists, and illustrate in general how a SMPL Nanodisc system can facilitate drug

  19. Lipid-Free Antigen B Subunits from Echinococcus granulosus: Oligomerization, Ligand Binding, and Membrane Interaction Properties

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Álvarez, Valeria; Franchini, Gisela R.; Pórfido, Jorge L.; Kennedy, Malcolm W.; Ferreira, Ana M.; Córsico, Betina

    2015-01-01

    Background The hydatid disease parasite Echinococcus granulosus has a restricted lipid metabolism, and needs to harvest essential lipids from the host. Antigen B (EgAgB), an abundant lipoprotein of the larval stage (hydatid cyst), is thought to be important in lipid storage and transport. It contains a wide variety of lipid classes, from highly hydrophobic compounds to phospholipids. Its protein component belongs to the cestode-specific Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein family, which includes five 8-kDa isoforms encoded by a multigene family (EgAgB1-EgAgB5). How lipid and protein components are assembled into EgAgB particles remains unknown. EgAgB apolipoproteins self-associate into large oligomers, but the functional contribution of lipids to oligomerization is uncertain. Furthermore, binding of fatty acids to some EgAgB subunits has been reported, but their ability to bind other lipids and transfer them to acceptor membranes has not been studied. Methodology/Principal Findings Lipid-free EgAgB subunits obtained by reverse-phase HPLC were used to analyse their oligomerization, ligand binding and membrane interaction properties. Size exclusion chromatography and cross-linking experiments showed that EgAgB8/2 and EgAgB8/3 can self-associate, suggesting that lipids are not required for oligomerization. Furthermore, using fluorescent probes, both subunits were found to bind fatty acids, but not cholesterol analogues. Analysis of fatty acid transfer to phospholipid vesicles demonstrated that EgAgB8/2 and EgAgB8/3 are potentially capable of transferring fatty acids to membranes, and that the efficiency of transfer is dependent on the surface charge of the vesicles. Conclusions/Significance We show that EgAgB apolipoproteins can oligomerize in the absence of lipids, and can bind and transfer fatty acids to phospholipid membranes. Since imported fatty acids are essential for Echinococcus granulosus, these findings provide a mechanism whereby EgAgB could engage in lipid

  20. Proteins of rough microsomal membranes related to ribosome binding. II. Cross-linking of bound ribosomes to specific membrane proteins exposed at the binding sites

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Two proteins (ribophorins I and II), which are integral components of rough microsomal membranes and appear to be related to the bound ribosomes, were shown to be exposed on the surface of rat liver rough microsomes (RM) and to be in close proximity to the bound ribosomes. Both proteins were labeled when intact RM were incubated with a lactoperoxidase iodinating system, but only ribophorin I was digested during mild trypsinization of intact RM. Ribophorin II (63,000 daltons) was only proteolyzed when the luminal face of the microsomal vesicles was made accessible to trypsin by the addition of sublytical detergent concentrations. Only 30--40% of the bound ribosomes were released during trypsinization on intact RM, but ribosome release was almost complete in the presence of low detergent concentrations. Very low glutaraldehyde concentrations (0.005--0.02%) led to the preferential cross-linking of large ribosomal subunits of bound ribosomes to the microsomal membranes. This cross-linking prevented the release of subunits caused by puromycin in media of high ionic strength, but not the incorporation of [3H]puromycin into nascent polypeptide chains. SDS- acrylamide gel electrophoresis of cross-linked samples a preferential reduction in the intensity of the bands representing the ribophorins and the formation of aggregates which did not penetrate into the gels. At low methyl-4-mercaptobutyrimidate (MMB) concentrations (0.26 mg/ml) only 30% of the ribosomes were cross-linked to the microsomal membranes, as shown by the puromycin-KCl test, but membranes could still be solubilized with 1% DOC. This allowed the isolation of the ribophorins together with the sedimentable ribosomes, as was shown by electrophoresis of the sediments after disruption of the cross-links by reduction. Experiments with RM which contained only inactive ribosomes showed that the presence of nascent chains was not necessary for the reversible cross-linking of ribosomes to the membranes. These

  1. Characterization of [3H]-imidazenil binding to rat brain membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Lipartiti, M; Arban, R; Fadda, E; Zanotti, A; Giusti, P

    1995-01-01

    1. The binding of [3H]-imidazenil, an imidazobenzodiazepine carboxamide, to rat cerebellar membranes was characterized at different temperatures. 2. Specific binding was linear with tissue concentrations and reached maximum after 90, 30 and 5 min incubation at 0, 21 and 37 degrees C, respectively. The binding was of high affinity, specific and saturable; non linear regression and Scatchard analysis of the data was compatible with the presence of a single population of receptor sites with Bmax of 0.74 +/- 0.020, 0.90 +/- 0.011 and 1.0 +/- 0.036 pmol mg-1 protein at 0, 21 and 27 degrees C, respectively. Binding affinity decreased with increasing temperature: Kd were 0.29 +/- 0.051 nM (0 degrees C), 1.0 +/- 0.080 nM (21 degrees C) and 2.4 +/- 0.38 nM (37 degrees C). 3. At all tested temperatures, [3H]-imidazenil binding was reversible and the Kd calculated from the dissociation and association rate constants approximated the equilibrium Kd. 4. In the presence of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), Kd increased 4 fold at 0 degrees C, whereas Bmax increased, albeit slightly, at all temperatures. 5. Benzodiazepines (BZDs), imidazopyridines and methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta CCM) were effective inhibitors of [3H]-imidazenil binding. Conversely, GABAA antagonists, barbiturates, picrotoxin and peripheral BZD receptor ligands were devoid of any activity. 6. Comparing [3H]-imidazenil to [3H]-flumazenil binding in various brain areas, similar densities of recognition sites as well as like regional differences in the distribution of binding sites for both radioligands were observed (cortex = striatum > cerebellum > spinal cord).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7620705

  2. Megadalton-node assembly by binding of Skb1 to the membrane anchor Slf1

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lin; Kabeche, Ruth; Wang, Ning; Wu, Jian-Qiu; Moseley, James B.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma membrane contains both dynamic and static microdomains. Given the growing appreciation of cortical microdomains in cell biology, it is important to determine the organizational principles that underlie assembly of compartmentalized structures at the plasma membrane. The fission yeast plasma membrane is highly compartmentalized by distinct sets of cortical nodes, which control signaling for cell cycle progression and cytokinesis. The mitotic inhibitor Skb1 localizes to a set of cortical nodes that provide spatial control over signaling for entry into mitosis. However, it has been unclear whether these nodes contain other proteins and how they might be organized and tethered to the plasma membrane. Here we show that Skb1 forms nodes by interacting with the novel protein Slf1, which is a limiting factor for node formation in cells. Using quantitative fluorescence microscopy and in vitro assays, we demonstrate that Skb1-Slf1 nodes are megadalton structures that are anchored to the membrane by a lipid-binding region in the Slf1 C-terminus. We propose a mechanism for higher-order node formation by Skb1 and Slf1, with implications for macromolecular assemblies in diverse cell types. PMID:25009287

  3. Membrane Association of the PTEN Tumor Suppressor: Molecular Details of the Protein-Membrane Complex from SPR Binding Studies and Neutron Reflection

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Siddharth; Shekhar, Prabhanshu; Heinrich, Frank; Daou, Marie-Claire; Gericke, Arne; Ross, Alonzo H.; Lösche, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    The structure and function of the PTEN phosphatase is investigated by studying its membrane affinity and localization on in-plane fluid, thermally disordered synthetic membrane models. The membrane association of the protein depends strongly on membrane composition, where phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol diphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) act pronouncedly synergistic in pulling the enzyme to the membrane surface. The equilibrium dissociation constants for the binding of wild type (wt) PTEN to PS and PI(4,5)P2 were determined to be Kd∼12 µM and 0.4 µM, respectively, and Kd∼50 nM if both lipids are present. Membrane affinities depend critically on membrane fluidity, which suggests multiple binding sites on the protein for PI(4,5)P2. The PTEN mutations C124S and H93R show binding affinities that deviate strongly from those measured for the wt protein. Both mutants bind PS more strongly than wt PTEN. While C124S PTEN has at least the same affinity to PI(4,5)P2 and an increased apparent affinity to PI(3,4,5)P3, due to its lack of catalytic activity, H93R PTEN shows a decreased affinity to PI(4,5)P2 and no synergy in its binding with PS and PI(4,5)P2. Neutron reflection measurements show that the PTEN phosphatase “scoots" along the membrane surface (penetration <5 Å) but binds the membrane tightly with its two major domains, the C2 and phosphatase domains, as suggested by the crystal structure. The regulatory C-terminal tail is most likely displaced from the membrane and organized on the far side of the protein, ∼60 Å away from the bilayer surface, in a rather compact structure. The combination of binding studies and neutron reflection allows us to distinguish between PTEN mutant proteins and ultimately may identify the structural features required for membrane binding and activation of PTEN. PMID:22505997

  4. Megalin and androgen receptor gene expression in young and old human skeletal muscle before and after three sequential exercise bouts.

    PubMed

    Poole, Chris N; Roberts, Michael D; Dalbo, Vincent J; Sunderland, Kyle L; Kerksick, Chad M

    2011-02-01

    Androgen signaling occurs primarily via the androgen receptor. Megalin, a low-density lipoprotein endocytic receptor located in various mammalian tissues, has been recently shown to facilitate sex hormone–binding globulin (SHBG) steroid complexes across cell membranes. The purpose of this investigation is to determine if the megalin gene is expressed in human skeletal muscle and if present to determine how megalin and androgen receptor mRNA expression change in response to sequential exercise bouts with respect to aging. Ten younger (age: 18-25 years) and 10 older (age: 60-75 years) men completed 3 workouts (M, W, F) each consisting of 9 sets of lower-body exercises with 10 repetitions per set at 80% 1 repetition maximum. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were extracted at baseline (T1), 48 hours after workout 1 (T2) and 2 (T3), and 24 hours after workout 3 (T4), and blood samples were collected before and 5 minutes after each workout. Muscle was analyzed for megalin and androgen receptor expression using gene-specific primers and SYBR green chemistry, and blood was analyzed for serum testosterone, SHBG, and the free androgen index. Megalin was expressed in both young and old subjects across all time points, although no between- or within-group mean differences were detected at any time point. Androgen receptor was expressed higher in young men at all time points compared to in old men (p < 0.05), and a significant correlation (p < 0.05; r = 0.506) was found between serum testosterone and androgen receptor after workout 1. Based on our data, the gene coding for megalin is expressed inside skeletal muscle, but its role, if any, in steroid cellular transport cannot be determined. This finding could lay the groundwork for more mechanistic investigations to better delineate its functional role and its potential as a therapeutic adjunct for androgen-related disorders in healthy and aged populations. PMID:21322835

  5. Recombinant Kv channels at the membrane of Escherichia coli bind specifically agitoxin2.

    PubMed

    Nekrasova, Oksana V; Ignatova, Anastasia A; Nazarova, Anna I; Feofanov, Alexey V; Korolkova, Yuliya V; Boldyreva, Elena F; Tagvei, Anna I; Grishin, Eugene V; Arseniev, Alexander S; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2009-03-01

    Potassium voltage-gated channels (Kv) are considered as molecular targets in a number of serious neuronal, immune, and cardiac disorders. Search for efficient low-molecular weight modulators of Kv channel function provides a basis for the development of an appropriate therapy for various Kv-mediated diseases. We report here on a new bacterial cell-based system, which is suitable for study of interactions between ligands and ligand-binding sites of eukaryotic Kv1.3 and Kv1.1 channels. To create this system, high-level expression of KcsA-Kv1.3 and KcsA-Kv1.1 hybrid proteins (ligand-binding sites of Kv1.3 or Kv1.1 fused with prokaryotic KcsA potassium channel) was achieved in the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli. An efficient procedure of E. coli conversion to intact spheroplasts was developed. We demonstrate that fluorescently labeled agitoxin 2 binds specifically to high-affinity and lower-affinity sites of KcsA-Kv1.3 and KcsA-Kv1.1, respectively, at the membrane of spheroplasts. Number of binding sites per cell is estimated to be (1.0 +/- 0.6) x 10(5) and (0.3 +/- 0.2) x 10(5) for KcsA-Kv1.3- and KcsA-Kv1.1-presenting cells, respectively, that allows reliable detection of ligand-receptor interactions by confocal laser scanning microscopy. This bacterial cell-based system is intended for screening of ligands to membrane-embedded pharmaceutical targets.

  6. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Vasiliou, D M; Pinsky, L

    1996-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. We have added (if available) data on the androgen binding phenotype of the mutant AR, the clinical phenotype of the affected persons, the family history and whether the pathogenicity of a mutation has been proven. Exonic mutations are now listed in 5'-->3' sequence regardless of type and single base pair changes are presented in codon context. Splice site and intronic mutations are listed separately. The database has allowed us to substantiate and amplify the observation of mutational hot spots within exons encoding the AR androgen binding domain. The database is available from EML (ftp://www.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  7. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M N; Hughes, I A; Gottlieb, B; Pinsky, L

    1994-09-01

    The androgen receptor gene mutations database is a comprehensive listing of mutations published in journals and meetings proceedings. The majority of mutations are point mutations identified in patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Information is included regarding the phenotype, the nature and location of the mutations, as well as the effects of the mutations on the androgen binding activity of the receptor. The current version of the database contains 149 entries, of which 114 are unique mutations. The database is available from EMBL (NetServ@EMBL-Heidelberg.DE) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (mc33001@musica.mcgill.ca).

  8. Characterisation of Conformational and Ligand Binding Properties of Membrane Proteins Using Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD).

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rohanah; Siligardi, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are notoriously difficult to crystallise for use in X-ray crystallographic structural determination, or too complex for NMR structural studies. Circular dichroism (CD) is a fast and relatively easy spectroscopic technique to study protein conformational behaviour in solution. The advantage of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) measured with synchrotron beamlines compared to the CD from benchtop instruments is the extended spectral far-UV region that increases the accuracy of secondary structure estimations, in particular under high ionic strength conditions. Membrane proteins are often available in small quantities, and for this SRCD measured at the Diamond B23 beamline has successfully facilitated molecular recognition studies. This was done by probing the local tertiary structure of aromatic amino acid residues upon addition of chiral or non-chiral ligands using long pathlength cells (1-5 cm) of small volume capacity (70 μl-350 μl). In this chapter we describe the use of SRCD to qualitatively and quantitatively screen ligand binding interactions (exemplified by Sbma, Ace1 and FsrC proteins); to distinguish between functionally similar drugs that exhibit different mechanisms of action towards membrane proteins (exemplified by FsrC); and to identify suitable detergent conditions to observe membrane protein-ligand interactions using stabilised proteins (exemplified by inositol transporters) as well as the stability of membrane proteins (exemplified by GalP, Ace1). The importance of the in solution characterisation of the conformational behaviour and ligand binding properties of proteins in both far- andnear-UV regions and the use of high-throughput CD (HT-CD) using 96- and 384-well multiplates to study the folding effects in various protein crystallisation buffers are also discussed. PMID:27553234

  9. Structural insights into tail-anchored protein binding and membrane insertion by Get3.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Gunes; Stjepanovic, Goran; Vilardi, Fabio; Amlacher, Stefan; Wild, Klemens; Bange, Gert; Favaloro, Vincenzo; Rippe, Karsten; Hurt, Ed; Dobberstein, Bernhard; Sinning, Irmgard

    2009-12-15

    Tail-anchored (TA) membrane proteins are involved in a variety of important cellular functions, including membrane fusion, protein translocation, and apoptosis. The ATPase Get3 (Asna1, TRC40) was identified recently as the endoplasmic reticulum targeting factor of TA proteins. Get3 consists of an ATPase and alpha-helical subdomain enriched in methionine and glycine residues. We present structural and biochemical analyses of Get3 alone as well as in complex with a TA protein, ribosome-associated membrane protein 4 (Ramp4). The ATPase domains form an extensive dimer interface that encloses 2 nucleotides in a head-to-head orientation and a zinc ion. Amide proton exchange mass spectrometry shows that the alpha-helical subdomain of Get3 displays considerable flexibility in solution and maps the TA protein-binding site to the alpha-helical subdomain. The non-hydrolyzable ATP analogue AMPPNP-Mg(2+)- and ADP-Mg(2+)-bound crystal structures representing the pre- and posthydrolysis states are both in a closed form. In the absence of a TA protein cargo, ATP hydrolysis does not seem to be possible. Comparison with the ADP.AlF(4)(-)-bound structure representing the transition state (Mateja A, et al. (2009) Nature 461:361-366) indicates how the presence of a TA protein is communicated to the ATP-binding site. In vitro membrane insertion studies show that recombinant Get3 inserts Ramp4 in a nucleotide- and receptor-dependent manner. Although ATP hydrolysis is not required for Ramp4 insertion per se, it seems to be required for efficient insertion. We postulate that ATP hydrolysis is needed to release Get3 from its receptor. Taken together, our results provide mechanistic insights into posttranslational targeting of TA membrane proteins by Get3. PMID:19948960

  10. Samp1, a RanGTP binding transmembrane protein in the inner nuclear membrane.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, Balaje; Jafferali, Mohammed Hakim; Figueroa, Ricardo A; Hallberg, Einar

    2016-07-01

    Samp1 is a transmembrane protein of the inner nuclear membrane (INM), which interacts with the nuclear lamina and the Linker of Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton (LINC) complex in interphase and during mitosis, it localizes to the mitotic spindle. Samp1 was recently found to coprecipitate a protein complex containing Ran, a GTPase with fundamental regulatory functions both in interphase and in mitosis. To investigate the interaction between Samp1 and Ran in further detail, we have designed and expressed recombinant fusion proteins of the Chaetomium thermophilum homolog of Samp1 (Ct.Samp1) and human Ran. Pulldown experiments show that Samp1 binds directly to Ran and that Samp1 binds better to RanGTP compared to RanGDP. Samp1 also preferred RanGTP over RanGDP in living tsBN2 cells. We also show that the Ran binding domain is located between amino acids 75-135 in the nucleoplasmically exposed N-terminal tail of Samp1. This domain is unique for Samp1, without homology in any other proteins in fungi or metazoa. Samp1 is the first known transmembrane protein that binds to Ran and could provide a unique local binding site for RanGTP in the INM. Samp1 overexpression resulted in increased Ran concentrations in the nuclear periphery supporting this idea. PMID:27541860

  11. Classical conditioning of the rabbit eyelid response increases glutamate receptor binding in hippocampal synaptic membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Mamounas, L A; Thompson, R F; Lynch, G; Baudry, M

    1984-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons exhibit a rapid within-trial increase in firing frequency during classical conditioning of the rabbit eyelid response. It has been proposed that the cellular mechanisms responsible for hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) may also mediate this learning-dependent increase in neuronal activity. The induction of LTP in rat hippocampal slices results in an increase in the number of [3H]glutamate-binding sites in the potentiated region. The present study investigates the kinetics of [3H]glutamate binding to hippocampal synaptic membranes after eyelid conditioning in the rabbit. We report that the regional distribution of [3H]glutamate binding across the layers of rabbit hippocampus is compatible with a dendritic localization. The pharmacological and ionic properties of the binding suggest that it is associated with an excitatory amino acid receptor. After eyelid conditioning, the maximal number of hippocampal [3H]glutamate-binding sites is increased in animals receiving paired presentations of the tone conditioned stimulus and corneal air-puff unconditioned stimulus relative to that found in naive or unpaired control animals. These results strengthen the hypothesis that an LTP-like mechanism underlies the increase in hippocampal firing frequency during rabbit eyelid conditioning. PMID:6144101

  12. Samp1, a RanGTP binding transmembrane protein in the inner nuclear membrane

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraghavan, Balaje; Jafferali, Mohammed Hakim; Figueroa, Ricardo A.; Hallberg, Einar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Samp1 is a transmembrane protein of the inner nuclear membrane (INM), which interacts with the nuclear lamina and the Linker of Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton (LINC) complex in interphase and during mitosis, it localizes to the mitotic spindle. Samp1 was recently found to coprecipitate a protein complex containing Ran, a GTPase with fundamental regulatory functions both in interphase and in mitosis. To investigate the interaction between Samp1 and Ran in further detail, we have designed and expressed recombinant fusion proteins of the Chaetomium thermophilum homolog of Samp1 (Ct.Samp1) and human Ran. Pulldown experiments show that Samp1 binds directly to Ran and that Samp1 binds better to RanGTP compared to RanGDP. Samp1 also preferred RanGTP over RanGDP in living tsBN2 cells. We also show that the Ran binding domain is located between amino acids 75–135 in the nucleoplasmically exposed N-terminal tail of Samp1. This domain is unique for Samp1, without homology in any other proteins in fungi or metazoa. Samp1 is the first known transmembrane protein that binds to Ran and could provide a unique local binding site for RanGTP in the INM. Samp1 overexpression resulted in increased Ran concentrations in the nuclear periphery supporting this idea. PMID:27541860

  13. Characterization of GTP binding and hydrolysis in plasma membranes of zucchini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perdue, D. O.; Lomax, T. L.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility that G-protein-like entities may be present in the plasma membrane (PM) of zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyls by examining a number of criteria common to animal and yeast G-proteins. The GTP binding and hydrolysis characteristics of purified zucchini PM are similar to the characteristics of a number of known G-proteins. Our results demonstrate GTP binding to a single PM site having a Kd value between 16-31 nM. This binding has a high specificity for guanine nucleotides, and is stimulated by Mg2+, detergents, and fluoride or aluminium ions. The GTPase activity (Km = 0.49 micromole) of zucchini PM shows a sensitivity to NaF similar to that seen for other G-proteins. Localization of GTP mu 35S binding to nitrocellulose blots of proteins separated by SDS-PAGE indicates a 30-kDa protein as the predominant GTP-binding species in zucchini PM. Taken together, these data indicate that plant PM contains proteins which are biochemically similar to previously characterized G-proteins.

  14. Tunable Membrane Binding of the Intrinsically Disordered Dehydrin Lti30, a Cold-Induced Plant Stress Protein[W

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Sylvia K.; Kutzer, Michael; Procek, Jan; Gröbner, Gerhard; Harryson, Pia

    2011-01-01

    Dehydrins are intrinsically disordered plant proteins whose expression is upregulated under conditions of desiccation and cold stress. Their molecular function in ensuring plant survival is not yet known, but several studies suggest their involvement in membrane stabilization. The dehydrins are characterized by a broad repertoire of conserved and repetitive sequences, out of which the archetypical K-segment has been implicated in membrane binding. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of these K-segments, we examined the interaction between lipid membranes and a dehydrin with a basic functional sequence composition: Lti30, comprising only K-segments. Our results show that Lti30 interacts electrostatically with vesicles of both zwitterionic (phosphatidyl choline) and negatively charged phospholipids (phosphatidyl glycerol, phosphatidyl serine, and phosphatidic acid) with a stronger binding to membranes with high negative surface potential. The membrane interaction lowers the temperature of the main lipid phase transition, consistent with Lti30’s proposed role in cold tolerance. Moreover, the membrane binding promotes the assembly of lipid vesicles into large and easily distinguishable aggregates. Using these aggregates as binding markers, we identify three factors that regulate the lipid interaction of Lti30 in vitro: (1) a pH dependent His on/off switch, (2) phosphorylation by protein kinase C, and (3) reversal of membrane binding by proteolytic digest. PMID:21665998

  15. Interplay of electrostatics and lipid packing determines the binding of charged polymer coated nanoparticles to model membranes.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Nupur; Bhattacharya, Rupak; Saha, Arindam; Jana, Nikhil R; Basu, Jaydeep K

    2015-10-01

    Understanding of nanoparticle-membrane interactions is useful for various applications of nanoparticles like drug delivery and imaging. Here we report on the studies of interaction between hydrophilic charged polymer coated semiconductor quantum dot nanoparticles with model lipid membranes. Atomic force microscopy and X-ray reflectivity measurements suggest that cationic nanoparticles bind and penetrate bilayers of zwitterionic lipids. Penetration and binding depend on the extent of lipid packing and result in the disruption of the lipid bilayer accompanied by enhanced lipid diffusion. On the other hand, anionic nanoparticles show minimal membrane binding although, curiously, their interaction leads to reduction in lipid diffusivity. It is suggested that the enhanced binding of cationic QDs at higher lipid packing can be understood in terms of the effective surface potential of the bilayers which is tunable through membrane lipid packing. Our results bring forth the subtle interplay of membrane lipid packing and electrostatics which determine nanoparticle binding and penetration of model membranes with further implications for real cell membranes.

  16. Binding of DTNB to band 3 in the human red cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Toon, M R; Dorogi, P L; Lukacovic, M F; Solomon, A K

    1985-08-27

    Inhibition of red cell water transport by the sulfhydryl reagent 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) has been reported by Naccache and Sha'afi ((1974) J. Cell Physiol. 84, 449-456) but other investigators have not been able to confirm this observation. Brown et al. ((1975) Nature 254, 523-525) have shown that, under appropriate conditions, DTNB binds only to band 3 in the red cell membrane. We have made a detailed investigation of DTNB binding to red cell membranes that had been treated with the sulfhydryl reagent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), and our results confirm the observation of Brown et al. Since this covalent binding site does not react with either N-ethylmaleimide or the sulfhydryl reagent pCMBS (p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonate), its presence has not previously been reported. This covalent site does not inhibit water transport nor does it affect any transport process we have studied. There is an additional low-affinity (non-covalent) DTNB site that Reithmeier ((1983) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 732, 122-125) has shown to inhibit anion transport. In N-ethylmaleimide-treated red cells, we have found that this binding site inhibits water transport and that the inhibition can be partially reversed by the specific stilbene anion exchange transport inhibitor 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (DIDS), thus linking water transport to anion exchange. DTNB binding to this low-affinity site also inhibits ethylene glycol and methyl urea transport with the same KI as that for water inhibition, thus linking these transport systems to that for water and anions. These results support the view that band 3 is a principal constituent of the red cell aqueous channel, through which urea and ethylene glycol also enter the cell. PMID:2992587

  17. Electrochemical potential releases a membrane-bound secretion intermediate of maltose-binding protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Geller, B L

    1990-01-01

    A secretionary intermediate of the Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein accumulated in the inner membrane when the membrane electrochemical potential was reduced and the cytosolic ATP concentration was normal. The intermediate was mature in size, but maintained a conformation similar to the cytosolic precursor form, and not the mature periplasmic protein, as measured by differences in susceptibility to proteinase K in vitro. The intermediate was located on the periplasmic side of the inner membrane. Restoration of the membrane electrochemical potential resulted in the movement of the intermediate from the inner membrane to the periplasm. In other experiments in which the ATP concentration was reduced by 96% and the electrochemical potential remained normal, no intermediate accumulated. Thus, the final step in the export of maltose-binding protein requires the electrochemical potential of the inner membrane and does not require ATP. Images PMID:2203734

  18. Alpha-synuclein lipid-dependent membrane binding and translocation through the α-hemolysin channel.

    PubMed

    Gurnev, Philip A; Yap, Thai Leong; Pfefferkorn, Candace M; Rostovtseva, Tatiana K; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Lee, Jennifer C; Parsegian, V Adrian; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2014-02-01

    Gauging the interactions of a natively unfolded Parkinson disease-related protein, alpha-synuclein (α-syn) with membranes and its pathways between and within cells is important for understanding its pathogenesis. Here, to address these questions, we use a robust β-barrel channel, α-hemolysin, reconstituted into planar lipid bilayers. Transient, ~95% blockage of the channel current by α-syn was observed when 1), α-syn was added from the membrane side where the shorter (stem) part of the channel is exposed; and 2), the applied potential was lower on the side of α-syn addition. While the on-rate of α-syn binding to the channel strongly increased with the applied field, the off-rate displayed a turnover behavior. Statistical analysis suggests that at voltages >50 mV, a significant fraction of the α-syn molecules bound to the channel undergoes subsequent translocation. The observed on-rate varied by >100 times depending on the bilayer lipid composition. Removal of the last 25 amino acids from the highly negatively charged C-terminal of α-syn resulted in a significant decrease in the binding rates. Taken together, these results demonstrate that β-barrel channels may serve as sensitive probes of α-syn interactions with membranes as well as model systems for studies of channel-assisted protein transport.

  19. Alpha-Synuclein Lipid-Dependent Membrane Binding and Translocation through the α-Hemolysin Channel

    PubMed Central

    Gurnev, Philip A.; Yap, Thai Leong; Pfefferkorn, Candace M.; Rostovtseva, Tatiana K.; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Lee, Jennifer C.; Parsegian, V. Adrian; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2014-01-01

    Gauging the interactions of a natively unfolded Parkinson disease-related protein, alpha-synuclein (α-syn) with membranes and its pathways between and within cells is important for understanding its pathogenesis. Here, to address these questions, we use a robust β-barrel channel, α-hemolysin, reconstituted into planar lipid bilayers. Transient, ∼95% blockage of the channel current by α-syn was observed when 1), α-syn was added from the membrane side where the shorter (stem) part of the channel is exposed; and 2), the applied potential was lower on the side of α-syn addition. While the on-rate of α-syn binding to the channel strongly increased with the applied field, the off-rate displayed a turnover behavior. Statistical analysis suggests that at voltages >50 mV, a significant fraction of the α-syn molecules bound to the channel undergoes subsequent translocation. The observed on-rate varied by >100 times depending on the bilayer lipid composition. Removal of the last 25 amino acids from the highly negatively charged C-terminal of α-syn resulted in a significant decrease in the binding rates. Taken together, these results demonstrate that β-barrel channels may serve as sensitive probes of α-syn interactions with membranes as well as model systems for studies of channel-assisted protein transport. PMID:24507596

  20. Ca2+/calmodulin binds and dissociates K-RasB from membrane.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Ranjinder S; Clough, Richard R; Bhullar, Rajinder P

    2003-05-16

    We have investigated the interaction of calmodulin (CaM) with Ras-p21 and the significance of this association. All Ras-p21 isoforms tested (H-, K-, and N-Ras) were detected in the particulate fraction of human platelets and MCF-7 cells, a human breast cancer cell line. In MCF-7 cells, H- and N-Ras were also detected in the cytosolic fraction. K-RasB from platelet and MCF-7 cell lysates was found to bind CaM in a Ca2+ -dependent but GTPgammaS-independent manner. The yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that K-RasB binds to CaM in vivo. Incubation of isolated membranes from platelet and MCF-7 cells with CaM caused dissociation of only K-RasB from membranes in a Ca2+ -dependent manner. CaM antagonist, W7, inhibited dissociation of K-RasB. Addition of platelet or MCF-7 cytosol alone to isolated platelet membranes did not cause dissociation of K-RasB and only addition of exogenous CaM caused dissociation. The results suggest a potential role for Ca2+/CaM in the regulation of K-RasB function.

  1. The Adipophilin C Terminus Is a Self-folding Membrane-binding Domain That Is Important for Milk Lipid Secretion*

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Brandi M.; Russell, Tanya D.; Schaack, Jerome; Orlicky, David J.; Reigan, Philip; Ladinsky, Mark; McManaman, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Cytoplasmic lipid droplets (CLD) in mammary epithelial cells undergo secretion by a unique membrane envelopment process to produce milk lipids. Adipophilin (ADPH/Plin2), a member of the perilipin/PAT family of lipid droplet-associated proteins, is hypothesized to mediate CLD secretion through interactions with apical plasma membrane elements. We found that the secretion of CLD coated by truncated ADPH lacking the C-terminal region encoding a putative four-helix bundle structure was impaired relative to that of CLD coated by full-length ADPH. We used homology modeling and analyses of the solution and membrane binding properties of purified recombinant ADPH C terminus to understand how this region possibly mediates CLD secretion. Homology modeling supports the concept that the ADPH C terminus forms a four-helix bundle motif and suggests that this structure can form stable membrane bilayer interactions. Circular dichroism and protease mapping studies confirmed that the ADPH C terminus is an independently folding α-helical structure that is relatively resistant to urea denaturation. Liposome binding studies showed that the purified C terminus binds to phospholipid membranes through electrostatic dependent interactions, and cell culture studies documented that it localizes to the plasma membrane. Collectively, these data provide direct evidence that the ADPH C terminus forms a stable membrane binding helical structure that is important for CLD secretion. We speculate that interactions between the four-helix bundle of ADPH and membrane phospholipids may be an initial step in milk lipid secretion. PMID:21383012

  2. The N-Terminal Domain of Bcl-xL Reversibly Binds Membranes in a pH-Dependent Manner†

    PubMed Central

    Thuduppathy, Guruvasuthevan R.; Terrones, Oihana; Craig, Jeffrey W.; Basañez, Gorka; Hill, R. Blake

    2006-01-01

    Bcl-xL regulates apoptosis by maintaining the integrity of the mitochondrial outer membrane by adopting both soluble and membrane-associated forms. The membrane-associated conformation does not require a conserved, C-terminal transmembrane domain and appears to be inserted into the bilayer of synthetic membranes as assessed by membrane permeabilization and critical surface pressure measurements. Membrane association is reversible and is regulated by the cooperative binding of approximately two protons to the protein. Two acidic residues, Glu153 and Asp156, that lie in a conserved hairpin of Bcl-xLΔTM appear to be important in this process on the basis of a 16% increase in the level of membrane association of the double mutant E153Q/D156N. Contrary to that for the wild type, membrane permeabilization for the mutant is not correlated with membrane association. Monolayer surface pressure measurements suggest that this effect is primarily due to less membrane penetration. These results suggest that E153 and D156 are important for the Bcl-xLΔTM conformational change and that membrane binding can be distinct from membrane permeabilization. Taken together, these studies support a model in which Bcl-xL activity is controlled by reversible insertion of its N-terminal domain into the mitochondrial outer membrane. Future studies with Bcl-xL mutants such as E153Q/D156N should allow determination of the relative contributions of membrane binding, insertion, and permeabilization to the regulation of apoptosis. PMID:17128992

  3. ESCRT-0 Assembles as a Heterotetrameric Complex on Membranes and Binds Multiple Ubiquitinylated Cargoes Simultaneously*

    PubMed Central

    Mayers, Jonathan R.; Fyfe, Ian; Schuh, Amber L.; Chapman, Edwin R.; Edwardson, J. Michael; Audhya, Anjon

    2011-01-01

    The ESCRT machinery consists of multiple protein complexes that collectively participate in the biogenesis of multivesicular endosomes (MVEs). The ESCRT-0 complex is composed of two subunits, Hrs and STAM, both of which can engage ubiquitinylated substrates destined for lysosomal degradation. Here, we conduct a comprehensive analysis of ESCRT-0:ubiquitin interactions using isothermal titration calorimetry and define the affinity of each ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD) within the intact ESCRT-0 complex. Our data demonstrate that ubiquitin binding is non-cooperative between the ESCRT-0 UBDs. Additionally, our findings show that the affinity of the Hrs double ubiquitin interacting motif (DUIM) for ubiquitin is more than 2-fold greater than that of UBDs found in STAM, suggesting that Hrs functions as the major ubiquitin-binding protein in ESCRT-0. In vivo, Hrs and STAM localize to endosomal membranes. To study recombinant ESCRT-0 assembly on lipid bilayers, we used atomic force microscopy. Our data show that ESCRT-0 forms mostly heterodimers and heterotetramers of Hrs and STAM when analyzed in the presence of membranes. Consistent with these findings, hydrodynamic analysis of endogenous ESCRT-0 indicates that it exists largely as a heterotetrameric complex of its two subunits. Based on these data, we present a revised model for ESCRT-0 function in cargo recruitment and concentration at the endosome. PMID:21193406

  4. Differential cholesterol binding by class II fusion proteins determines membrane fusion properties.

    PubMed

    Umashankar, M; Sánchez-San Martín, Claudia; Liao, Maofu; Reilly, Brigid; Guo, Alice; Taylor, Gwen; Kielian, Margaret

    2008-09-01

    The class II fusion proteins of the alphaviruses and flaviviruses mediate virus infection by driving the fusion of the virus membrane with that of the cell. These fusion proteins are triggered by low pH, and their structures are strikingly similar in both the prefusion dimer and the postfusion homotrimer conformations. Here we have compared cholesterol interactions during membrane fusion by these two groups of viruses. Using cholesterol-depleted insect cells, we showed that fusion and infection by the alphaviruses Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and Sindbis virus were strongly promoted by cholesterol, with similar sterol dependence in laboratory and field isolates and in viruses passaged in tissue culture. The E1 fusion protein from SFV bound cholesterol, as detected by labeling with photocholesterol and by cholesterol extraction studies. In contrast, fusion and infection by numerous strains of the flavivirus dengue virus (DV) and by yellow fever virus 17D were cholesterol independent, and the DV fusion protein did not show significant cholesterol binding. SFV E1 is the first virus fusion protein demonstrated to directly bind cholesterol. Taken together, our results reveal important functional differences conferred by the cholesterol-binding properties of class II fusion proteins.

  5. Trp[superscript 2313]-His[superscript 2315] of Factor VIII C2 Domain Is Involved in Membrane Binding Structure of a Complex Between the C[subscript 2] Domain and an Inhibitor of Membrane Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhuo; Lin, Lin; Yuan, Cai; Nicolaes, Gerry A.F.; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Furie, Bruce; Furie, Barbara; Huang, Mingdong

    2010-11-03

    Factor VIII (FVIII) plays a critical role in blood coagulation by forming the tenase complex with factor IXa and calcium ions on a membrane surface containing negatively charged phospholipids. The tenase complex activates factor X during blood coagulation. The carboxyl-terminal C2 domain of FVIII is the main membrane-binding and von Willebrand factor-binding region of the protein. Mutations of FVIII cause hemophilia A, whereas elevation of FVIII activity is a risk factor for thromboembolic diseases. The C2 domain-membrane interaction has been proposed as a target of intervention for regulation of blood coagulation. A number of molecules that interrupt FVIII or factor V (FV) binding to cell membranes have been identified through high throughput screening or structure-based design. We report crystal structures of the FVIII C2 domain under three new crystallization conditions, and a high resolution (1.15 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the FVIII C2 domain bound to a small molecular inhibitor. The latter structure shows that the inhibitor binds to the surface of an exposed {beta}-strand of the C2 domain, Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315}. This result indicates that the Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315} segment is an important constituent of the membrane-binding motif and provides a model to understand the molecular mechanism of the C2 domain membrane interaction.

  6. Still embedded together binding to membranes regulates Bcl-2 protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Leber, B; Lin, J; Andrews, D W

    2010-09-23

    The dysregulation of apoptosis is a key step in developing tumours, and mediates resistance to cancer therapy. Many different signals for cell death converge on permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane, which is controlled by the Bcl-2 family of proteins. The importance of this step is becoming increasingly relevant as the first generation of small molecules that inhibit the interaction of Bcl-2 family proteins enters clinical trials as anticancer agents. The Bcl-2 family can be divided into three classes: BH3-only proteins that are activated by various forms of cellular stress, Bax and Bak proteins that mediate mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, and inhibitory proteins such as Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL. The recently proposed embedded together model emphasizes the fact that many of the regulatory interactions between different classes of Bcl-2 family members occur at intracellular membranes, and binding to membranes causes conformational changes in the proteins that dictate functions in a dynamic manner. Within this context, recent results indicate that Bcl-XL functions as a dominant-negative Bax, a concept that resolves the paradox of similar structures but opposite functions of Bcl-XL and Bax. We have also shown that the conformational change that allows Bax to insert into the outer mitochondrial membrane is the rate-limiting step in the multistep process of Bax activation. Nevertheless, investigating the structure of activated Bax or Bak as monomers and as components of the oligomeric structures that mediate membrane permeabilization is the focus of ongoing research (and controversy) at many laboratories worldwide. PMID:20639903

  7. Androgen regulation of the TMPRSS2 gene and the effect of a SNP in an androgen response element.

    PubMed

    Clinckemalie, Liesbeth; Spans, Lien; Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël; Helsen, Christine; Joniau, Steven; Claessens, Frank

    2013-12-01

    More than 50% of prostate cancers have undergone a genomic reorganization that juxtaposes the androgen-regulated promoter of TMPRSS2 and the protein coding parts of several ETS oncogenes. These gene fusions lead to prostate-specific and androgen-induced ETS expression and are associated with aggressive lesions, poor prognosis, and early-onset prostate cancer. In this study, we showed that an enhancer at 13 kb upstream of the TMPRSS2 transcription start site is crucial for the androgen regulation of the TMPRSS2 gene when tested in bacterial artificial chromosomal vectors. Within this enhancer, we identified the exact androgen receptor binding sequence. This newly identified androgen response element is situated next to two binding sites for the pioneer factor GATA2, which were identified by DNase I footprinting. Both the androgen response element and the GATA-2 binding sites are involved in the enhancer activity. Importantly, a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs8134378) within this androgen response element reduces binding and transactivation by the androgen receptor. The presence of this SNP might have implications on the expression and/or formation levels of TMPRSS2 fusions, because both have been shown to be influenced by androgens.

  8. Membrane binding and bending in Ebola VP40 assembly and egress

    PubMed Central

    Stahelin, Robert V.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid-enveloped viruses contain a lipid bilayer coat that protects their genome and helps to facilitate entry into the host cell. Filoviruses are lipid-enveloped viruses that have up to 90% clinical fatality and include Marbug (MARV) and Ebola (EBOV). These pleomorphic filamentous viruses enter the host cell through their membrane-embedded glycoprotein and then replicate using just seven genes encoded in their negative-sense RNA genome. EBOV budding occurs from the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane (PM) and is driven by the matrix protein VP40, which is the most abundantly expressed protein of the virus. VP40 expressed in mammalian cells alone can trigger budding of filamentous virus-like particles (VLPs) that are nearly indistinguishable from authentic EBOV. VP40, such as matrix proteins from other viruses, has been shown to bind anionic lipid membranes. However, how VP40 selectively interacts with the inner leaflet of the PM and assembles into a filamentous lipid enveloped particle is mostly unknown. This article describes what is known regarding VP40 membrane interactions and what answers will fill the gaps. PMID:24995005

  9. Model membrane interaction and DNA-binding of antimicrobial peptide Lasioglossin II derived from bee venom.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Susmita; Lee, Meryl; Sivaraman, J; Chatterjee, Chiradip

    2013-01-01

    Lasioglossins, a new family of antimicrobial peptide, have been shown to have strong antimicrobial activity with low haemo-lytic and mast cell degranulation activity, and exhibit cytotoxic activity against various cancer cells in vitro. In order to understand the active conformation of these pentadecapeptides in membranes, we have studied the interaction of Lasioglossin II (LL-II), one of the members of Lasioglossins family with membrane mimetic micelle Dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) by fluorescence, Circular Dichroism (CD) and two dimensional (2D) (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Fluorescence experiments provide evidence of interaction of the N-terminal tryptophan residue of LL-II with the hydrophobic core of DPC micelle. CD results show an extended chain conformation of LL-II in water which is converted to a partial helical conformation in the presence of DPC micelle. Moreover we have determined the first three-dimensional NMR structure of LL-II bound to DPC micelle with rmsd of 0.36Å. The solution structure of LL-II shows hydrophobic and hydrophilic core formation in peptide pointing towards different direction in the presence of DPC. This amphipathic structure may allow this peptide to penetrate deeply into the interfacial region of negatively charged membranes and leading to local membrane destabilization. Further we have elucidated the DNA binding ability of LL-II by agarose gel retardation and fluorescence quenching experiments.

  10. Cytokeratin19 induced by HER2/ERK binds and stabilizes HER2 on cell membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ju, J-h; Oh, S; Lee, K-m; Yang, W; Nam, K S; Moon, H-G; Noh, D-Y; Kim, C G; Park, G; Park, J B; Lee, T; Arteaga, C L; Shin, I

    2015-01-01

    Cytokeratin19 (KRT19) is widely used as a biomarker for the detection of disseminated tumors. Using an LC-MS/MS proteomics approach, we found that KRT19 was upregulated in HER2-overexpressing cells and tissues. KRT19 expression was induced by HER2-downstream ERK at the transcriptional level. Another HER2-downstream kinase, Akt, was found to phosphorylate KRT19 on Ser35 and induce membrane translocation of KRT19 and remodeling of KRT19 from filamentous to granulous form. KRT19 phosphorylated by Akt could bind HER2 on the plasma membrane and stabilized HER2 via inhibition of proteasome-mediated degradation of HER2. Silencing of KRT19 by shRNA resulted in increased ubiquitination and destabilization of HER2. Moreover, treatment of KRT19 antibody resulted in downregulation of HER2 and reduced cell viability. These data provide a new rationale for targeting HER2-positive breast cancers. PMID:25342465

  11. Neutron Reflectometry Studies Define Prion Protein N-terminal Peptide Membrane Binding

    PubMed Central

    Le Brun, Anton P.; Haigh, Cathryn L.; Drew, Simon C.; James, Michael; Boland, Martin P.; Collins, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP), widely recognized to misfold into the causative agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, has previously been shown to bind to lipid membranes with binding influenced by both membrane composition and pH. Aside from the misfolding events associated with prion pathogenesis, PrP can undergo various posttranslational modifications, including internal cleavage events. Alpha- and beta-cleavage of PrP produces two N-terminal fragments, N1 and N2, respectively, which interact specifically with negatively charged phospholipids at low pH. Our previous work probing N1 and N2 interactions with supported bilayers raised the possibility that the peptides could insert deeply with minimal disruption. In the current study we aimed to refine the binding parameters of these peptides with lipid bilayers. To this end, we used neutron reflectometry to define the structural details of this interaction in combination with quartz crystal microbalance interrogation. Neutron reflectometry confirmed that peptides equivalent to N1 and N2 insert into the interstitial space between the phospholipid headgroups but do not penetrate into the acyl tail region. In accord with our previous studies, interaction was stronger for the N1 fragment than for the N2, with more peptide bound per lipid. Neutron reflectometry analysis also detected lengthening of the lipid acyl tails, with a concurrent decrease in lipid area. This was most evident for the N1 peptide and suggests an induction of increased lipid order in the absence of phase transition. These observations stand in clear contrast to the findings of analogous studies of Ab and α-synuclein and thereby support the possibility of a functional role for such N-terminal fragment-membrane interactions. PMID:25418300

  12. Impact of Hapten Presentation on Antibody Binding at Lipid Membrane Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyunsook; Yang, Tinglu; Lasagna, Mauricio D.; Shi, Jinjun; Reinhart, Gregory D.; Cremer, Paul S.

    2008-01-01

    We report the effects of ligand presentation on the binding of aqueous proteins to solid supported lipid bilayers. Specifically, we show that the equilibrium dissociation constant can be strongly affected by ligand lipophilicity and linker length/structure. The apparent equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) were compared for two model systems, biotin/anti-biotin and 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP)/anti-DNP, in bulk solution and at model membrane surfaces. The binding constants in solution were obtained from fluorescence anisotropy measurements. The surface binding constants were determined by microfluidic techniques in conjunction with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that the bulk solution equilibrium dissociation constants for anti-biotin and anti-DNP were almost identical, KD(bulk) = 1.7 ± 0.2 nM vs. 2.9 ± 0.1 nM. By contrast, the dissociation constant for anti-biotin antibody was three orders of magnitude tighter than for anti-DNP at a lipid membrane interface, KD = 3.6 ± 1.1 nM vs. 2.0 ± 0.2 μM. We postulate that the pronounced difference in surface binding constants for these two similar antibodies is due to differences in the ligands' relative lipophilicity, i.e., the more hydrophobic DNP molecules had a stronger interaction with the lipid bilayers, rendering them less available to incoming anti-DNP antibodies compared with the biotin/anti-biotin system. However, when membrane-bound biotin ligands were well screened by a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) polymer brush, the KD value for the anti-biotin antibody could also be weakened by three orders of magnitude, 2.4 ± 1.1 μM. On the other hand, the dissociation constant for anti-DNP antibodies at a lipid interface could be significantly enhanced when DNP haptens were tethered to the end of very long hydrophilic PEG lipopolymers (KD = 21 ± 10 nM) rather than presented on short lipid-conjugated tethers. These results demonstrate that ligand presentation strongly influences

  13. Identification of a Novel Bacterial Outer Membrane Interleukin-1Β-Binding Protein from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Paino, Annamari; Ahlstrand, Tuuli; Nuutila, Jari; Navickaite, Indre; Lahti, Maria; Tuominen, Heidi; Välimaa, Hannamari; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Pöllänen, Marja T.; Ihalin, Riikka

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacteractinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative opportunistic oral pathogen. It is frequently associated with subgingival biofilms of both chronic and aggressive periodontitis, and the diseased sites of the periodontium exhibit increased levels of the proinflammatory mediator interleukin (IL)-1β. Some bacterial species can alter their physiological properties as a result of sensing IL-1β. We have recently shown that this cytokine localizes to the cytoplasm of A. actinomycetemcomitans in co-cultures with organotypic gingival mucosa. However, current knowledge about the mechanism underlying bacterial IL-1β sensing is still limited. In this study, we characterized the interaction of A. actinomycetemcomitans total membrane protein with IL-1β through electrophoretic mobility shift assays. The interacting protein, which we have designated bacterial interleukin receptor I (BilRI), was identified through mass spectrometry and was found to be Pasteurellaceae specific. Based on the results obtained using protein function prediction tools, this protein localizes to the outer membrane and contains a typical lipoprotein signal sequence. All six tested biofilm cultures of clinical A. actinomycetemcomitans strains expressed the protein according to phage display-derived antibody detection. Moreover, proteinase K treatment of whole A. actinomycetemcomitans cells eliminated BilRI forms that were outer membrane specific, as determined through immunoblotting. The protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli in both the outer membrane-associated form and a soluble cytoplasmic form. When assessed using flow cytometry, the BilRI-overexpressing E. coli cells were observed to bind 2.5 times more biotinylated-IL-1β than the control cells, as detected with avidin-FITC. Overexpression of BilRI did not cause binding of a biotinylated negative control protein. In a microplate assay, soluble BilRI bound to IL-1β, but this binding was not specific, as a control protein for IL-1

  14. Functional binding of a vertebrate hormone, L-3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3), on insect follicle cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Davari, E D; Sevala, V; Davey, K G

    1999-10-01

    A vertebrate hormone, L-3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3), induces volume reduction in the follicle cells of Locusta migratoria and Rhodnius prolixus. The effect of T3 on locust follicle cells is inhibited by ouabain and by antibodies raised against a membrane binding protein for juvenile hormone (JH). [125I]-T3 binds to membrane preparations of vitellogenic follicles in a specific and saturable fashion, with a KD in the low nanomolar range. T3 and JH III exhibited equivalent abilities to compete for the T3 binding site. These findings strongly suggest that T3 and JH act via the same receptor in follicle cells. PMID:10528413

  15. In vitro binding of the asialoglycoprotein receptor to the beta adaptin of plasma membrane coated vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Beltzer, J P; Spiess, M

    1991-01-01

    The asialoglycoprotein (ASGP) receptor was used to probe total clathrin-coated vesicle proteins and purified adaptor proteins (APs) which had been fractionated by gel electrophoresis and transferred to nitrocellulose. The receptor was found to interact with proteins of approximately 100 kDa. The cytoplasmic domain of the ASGP receptor subunit H1 fused to dihydrofolate reductase competed for receptor binding to the 100 kDa polypeptide in the plasma membrane-type AP complexes (AP-2). A fusion protein containing the cytoplasmic domain of the endocytic mutant haemagglutinin HA-Y543 also competed, but a protein with the wild-type haemagglutinin sequence did not. This indicates that the observed interaction is specific for the cytoplasmic domain of the receptor and involves the tyrosine signal for endocytosis. When fractionated by gel electrophoresis in the presence of urea, the ASGP receptor binding polypeptide displayed a characteristic shift in electrophoretic mobility identifying it as the beta adaptin. Partial proteolysis of the AP-2 preparation followed by the receptor binding assay revealed that the aminoterminal domain of the beta adaptin contains the binding site for receptors. Images PMID:1935897

  16. Interaction with membrane lipids and heme ligand binding properties of Escherichia coli flavohemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Bonamore, Alessandra; Farina, Anna; Gattoni, Maurizio; Schininà, M Eugenia; Bellelli, Andrea; Boffi, Alberto

    2003-05-20

    Escherichia coli flavohemoglobin has been shown to be able to bind specifically unsaturated and/or cyclopropanated fatty acids with very high affinity. Unsaturated or cyclopropanated fatty acid binding results in a modification of the visible absorption spectrum of the ferric heme, corresponding to a transition from a pentacoordinated (typical of the ligand free protein) to a hexacoordinated, high spin, heme iron. In contrast, no detectable interaction has been observed with saturated fatty acid, saturated phospholipids, linear, cyclic, and aromatic hydrocarbons pointing out that the protein recognizes specifically double bonds in cis conformation within the hydrocarbon chain of the fatty acid molecule. Accordingly, as demonstrated in gel filtration experiments, flavohemoglobin is able to bind liposomes obtained from lipid extracts of E. coli membranes and eventually abstract phospholipids containing cis double bonds and/or cyclopropane rings along the acyl chains. The presence of a protein bound lipid strongly affects the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of imidazole binding to the ferric protein and brings about significant modifications in the reactivity of the ferrous protein with oxygen and carbon monoxide. The effect of the bound lipid has been accounted for by a reaction scheme that involves the presence of two sites for the lipid/ligand recognition, namely, the heme iron and a non-heme site located in a loop region above the heme pocket. PMID:12741837

  17. Structural insights into the methyl donor recognition model of a novel membrane-binding protein UbiG

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuwei; Jiang, Xuguang; Wang, Chongyuan; Liu, Yang; Fan, Xiaojiao; Zhang, Linjuan; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2016-01-01

    UbiG is a SAM-dependent O-methyltransferase, catalyzing two O-methyl transfer steps for ubiquinone biosynthesis in Escherichia coli. UbiG possesses a unique sequence insertion between β4 and α10, which is used for membrane lipid interaction. Interestingly, this sequence insertion also covers the methyl donor binding pocket. Thus, the relationship between membrane binding and entrance of the methyl donor of UbiG during the O-methyl transfer process is a question that deserves further exploration. In this study, we reveal that the membrane-binding region of UbiG gates the entrance of methyl donor. When bound with liposome, UbiG displays an enhanced binding ability toward the methyl donor product S-adenosylhomocysteine. We further employ protein engineering strategies to design UbiG mutants by truncating the membrane interacting region or making it more flexible. The ITC results show that the binding affinity of these mutants to SAH increases significantly compared with that of the wild-type UbiG. Moreover, we determine the structure of UbiG∆165–187 in complex with SAH. Collectively, our results provide a new angle to cognize the relationship between membrane binding and entrance of the methyl donor of UbiG, which is of benefit for better understanding the O-methyl transfer process for ubiquinone biosynthesis. PMID:26975567

  18. Circulating IgM Requires Plasma Membrane Disruption to Bind Apoptotic and Non-Apoptotic Nucleated Cells and Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hesketh, Emily E.; Dransfield, Ian; Kluth, David C.; Hughes, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity is associated with defective phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells. IgM deficient mice exhibit an autoimmune phenotype consistent with a role for circulating IgM antibodies in apoptotic cell clearance. We have extensively characterised IgM binding to non-apoptotic and apoptotic mouse thymocytes and human Jurkat cells using flow cytometry, confocal imaging and electron microscopy. We demonstrate strong specific IgM binding to a subset of Annexin-V (AnnV)+PI (Propidium Iodide)+ apoptotic cells with disrupted cell membranes. Electron microscopy studies indicated that IgM+AnnV+PI+ apoptotic cells exhibited morphologically advanced apoptosis with marked plasma membrane disruption compared to IgM-AnnV+PI+ apoptotic cells, suggesting that access to intracellular epitopes is required for IgM to bind. Strong and comparable binding of IgM to permeabilised non-apoptotic and apoptotic cells suggests that IgM bound epitopes are 'apoptosis independent' such that IgM may bind any cell with profound disruption of cell plasma membrane integrity. In addition, permeabilised erythrocytes exhibited significant IgM binding thus supporting the importance of cell membrane epitopes. These data suggest that IgM may recognize and tag damaged nucleated cells or erythrocytes that exhibit significant cell membrane disruption. The role of IgM in vivo in conditions characterized by severe cell damage such as ischemic injury, sepsis and thrombotic microangiopathies merits further exploration. PMID:26121639

  19. Circulating IgM Requires Plasma Membrane Disruption to Bind Apoptotic and Non-Apoptotic Nucleated Cells and Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Emily E; Dransfield, Ian; Kluth, David C; Hughes, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity is associated with defective phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells. IgM deficient mice exhibit an autoimmune phenotype consistent with a role for circulating IgM antibodies in apoptotic cell clearance. We have extensively characterised IgM binding to non-apoptotic and apoptotic mouse thymocytes and human Jurkat cells using flow cytometry, confocal imaging and electron microscopy. We demonstrate strong specific IgM binding to a subset of Annexin-V (AnnV)+PI (Propidium Iodide)+ apoptotic cells with disrupted cell membranes. Electron microscopy studies indicated that IgM+AnnV+PI+ apoptotic cells exhibited morphologically advanced apoptosis with marked plasma membrane disruption compared to IgM-AnnV+PI+ apoptotic cells, suggesting that access to intracellular epitopes is required for IgM to bind. Strong and comparable binding of IgM to permeabilised non-apoptotic and apoptotic cells suggests that IgM bound epitopes are 'apoptosis independent' such that IgM may bind any cell with profound disruption of cell plasma membrane integrity. In addition, permeabilised erythrocytes exhibited significant IgM binding thus supporting the importance of cell membrane epitopes. These data suggest that IgM may recognize and tag damaged nucleated cells or erythrocytes that exhibit significant cell membrane disruption. The role of IgM in vivo in conditions characterized by severe cell damage such as ischemic injury, sepsis and thrombotic microangiopathies merits further exploration.

  20. Organization into Higher Ordered Ring Structures Counteracts Membrane Binding of IM30, a Protein Associated with Inner Membranes in Chloroplasts and Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Heidrich, Jennifer; Wulf, Verena; Hennig, Raoul; Saur, Michael; Markl, Jürgen; Sönnichsen, Carsten; Schneider, Dirk

    2016-07-15

    The IM30 (inner membrane-associated protein of 30 kDa), also known as the Vipp1 (vesicle-inducing protein in plastids 1), has a crucial role in thylakoid membrane biogenesis and maintenance. Recent results suggest that the protein binds peripherally to membranes containing negatively charged lipids. However, although IM30 monomers interact and assemble into large oligomeric ring complexes with different numbers of monomers, it is still an open question whether ring formation is crucial for membrane interaction. Here we show that binding of IM30 rings to negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol membrane surfaces results in a higher ordered membrane state, both in the head group and in the inner core region of the lipid bilayer. Furthermore, by using gold nanorods covered with phosphatidylglycerol layers and single particle spectroscopy, we show that not only IM30 rings but also lower oligomeric IM30 structures interact with membranes, although with higher affinity. Thus, ring formation is not crucial for, and even counteracts, membrane interaction of IM30. PMID:27226585

  1. Effects of human low and high density lipoproteins on the binding of rat intermediate density lipoproteins to rat liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Brissette, L.; Nol, S.P.

    1986-05-25

    Upon incubation with rat liver membranes, radioiodinated rat intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL) interacted with at least two binding sites having a low and a high affinity as demonstrated by the curvilinear Scatchard plots obtained from the specific binding data. The purpose of our work was to identify the nature of these binding sites. Human low density lipoproteins (LDL), contain apolipoprotein B only, and human high density lipoproteins (HDL3), containing neither apolipoprotein B nor E, were both capable of decreasing the specific binding of rat /sup 125/I-IDL. The Scatchard analysis clearly revealed that only the low affinity component was affected by the addition of these human lipoproteins. In fact, the low affinity binding component gradually decreased as the amount of human LDL or HDL3 increased in the binding assay. At a 200-fold excess of human LDL or HDL3, the low affinity binding was totally masked, and the Scatchard plot of the specific /sup 125/I-IDL binding became linear. Only the high affinity binding component was left, enabling a precise measurement of its binding parameters. In a series of competitive displacement experiments in which the binding assay contained a 200-fold excess of human LDL or HDL3, only unlabeled rat IDL effectively displaced the binding of rat /sup 125/I-IDL. We conclude that the low affinity binding of rat IDL to rat liver membranes is due to weak interactions with unspecified lipoprotein binding sites. The camouflage of these sites by human lipoproteins makes possible the study of IDL binding to the high affinity component which likely represents the combined effect of IDL binding to both the remnant and the LDL receptors.

  2. The Relationship between Glycan Binding and Direct Membrane Interactions in Vibrio cholerae Cytolysin, a Channel-forming Toxin.

    PubMed

    De, Swastik; Bubnys, Adele; Alonzo, Francis; Hyun, Jinsol; Lary, Jeffrey W; Cole, James L; Torres, Victor J; Olson, Rich

    2015-11-20

    Bacterial pore-forming toxins (PFTs) are structurally diverse pathogen-secreted proteins that form cell-damaging channels in the membranes of host cells. Most PFTs are released as water-soluble monomers that first oligomerize on the membrane before inserting a transmembrane channel. To modulate specificity and increase potency, many PFTs recognize specific cell surface receptors that increase the local toxin concentration on cell membranes, thereby facilitating channel formation. Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) is a toxin secreted by the human pathogen responsible for pandemic cholera disease and acts as a defensive agent against the host immune system. Although it has been shown that VCC utilizes specific glycan receptors on the cell surface, additional direct contacts with the membrane must also play a role in toxin binding. To better understand the nature of these interactions, we conducted a systematic investigation of the membrane-binding surface of VCC to identify additional membrane interactions important in cell targeting. Through cell-based assays on several human-derived cell lines, we show that VCC is unlikely to utilize high affinity protein receptors as do structurally similar toxins from Staphylococcus aureus. Next, we identified a number of specific amino acid residues that greatly diminish the VCC potency against cells and investigated the interplay between glycan binding and these direct lipid contacts. Finally, we used model membranes to parse the importance of these key residues in lipid and cholesterol binding. Our study provides a complete functional map of the VCC membrane-binding surface and insights into the integration of sugar, lipid, and cholesterol binding interactions.

  3. Membrane Docking of the Synaptotagmin 7 C2A Domain: Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Measurements Show Contributions from Two Membrane Binding Loops

    PubMed Central

    Osterberg, J. Ryan; Chon, Nara Lee; Boo, Arthur; Maynard, Favinn A.; Lin, Hai; Knight, Jefferson D.

    2015-01-01

    The synaptotagmin (Syt) family of proteins plays an important role in vesicle docking and fusion during Ca2+-induced exocytosis in a wide variety of cell types. Its role as a Ca2+ sensor derives primarily from its two C2 domains, C2A and C2B, which insert into anionic lipid membranes upon binding Ca2+. Syt isoforms 1 and 7 differ significantly in their Ca2+ sensitivity; the C2A domain from Syt7 binds Ca2+ and membranes much more tightly than the C2A domain from Syt1, due at least in part to greater contributions from the hydrophobic effect. While the structure and membrane activity of Syt1 have been extensively studied, the structural origins of differences between Syt7 and Syt1 are unknown. The present study used site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine depth parameters for the Syt7 C2A domain, for comparison to analogous previous measurements with Syt1 C2A. In a novel approach, the membrane docking geometry of both Syt1 and Syt7 C2A was modeled by mapping depth parameters onto multiple molecular dynamics simulated structures of the Ca2+-bound protein. The models reveal membrane penetration of Ca2+ binding loops (CBLs) 1 and 3, and membrane binding is more sensitive to mutations in CBL3. On average, Syt7 C2A inserts more deeply in the membrane than Syt1 C2A, although depths vary among the different structural models. This observation provides a partial structural explanation for the hydrophobically driven membrane docking of Syt7 C2A. PMID:26322740

  4. Biochemical and physiological aspects of endogenous androgens.

    PubMed

    Kicman, Andrew T

    2010-01-01

    This review attempts to give a synopsis of the major aspects concerning the biochemistry of endogenous androgens, supplemented with several facets of physiology, particularly with respect to testosterone. Testosterone continues to be the most common adverse finding declared by World Anti-Doping Agency accredited laboratories, such samples having an augmented testosterone to epitestosterone ratio. Knowledge regarding the precursors and metabolism of endogenous testosterone is therefore fundamental to understanding many of the issues concerning doping with testosterone and its prohormones, including the detection of their administration. Further, adverse findings for nandrolone are frequent, but this steroid and 19-norandrostenedione are also produced endogenously, an appealing hypothesis being that they are minor by-products of the aromatization of androgens. At sports tribunals pertaining to adverse analytical findings of natural androgen administration, experts often raise issues that concern some aspect of steroid biochemistry and physiology. Salient topics included within this review are the origins and interconversion of endogenous androgens, the biosynthesis of testosterone and epitestosterone, the mechanism of aromatization, the molecular biology of the androgen receptor, the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, disturbances to this axis by anabolic steroid administration, the transport (binding) of androgens in blood, and briefly the metabolism and excretion of androgens.

  5. Membrane binding mode of intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of T cell receptor signaling subunits depends on lipid composition

    SciTech Connect

    Sigalov, Alexander B.; Hendricks, Gregory M.

    2009-11-13

    Intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling subunits including {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} all contain one or more copies of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), tyrosine residues of which are phosphorylated upon receptor triggering. Membrane binding-induced helical folding of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} ITAMs is thought to control TCR activation. However, the question whether or not lipid binding of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} is necessarily accompanied by a folding transition of ITAMs remains open. In this study, we investigate whether the membrane binding mechanisms of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} depend on the membrane model used. Circular dichroic and fluorescence data indicate that binding of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} to detergent micelles and unstable vesicles is accompanied by a disorder-to-order transition, whereas upon binding to stable vesicles these proteins remain unfolded. Using electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we show that upon protein binding, unstable vesicles fuse and rupture. In contrast, stable vesicles remain intact under these conditions. This suggests different membrane binding modes for {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} depending on the bilayer stability: (1) coupled binding and folding, and (2) binding without folding. These findings explain the long-standing puzzle in the literature and highlight the importance of the choice of an appropriate membrane model for protein-lipid interactions studies.

  6. Solutes alter the conformation of the ligand binding loops in outer membrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miyeon; Xu, Qi; Murray, David; Cafiso, David S

    2008-01-15

    The binding and recognition of ligands by bacterial outer membrane transport proteins is mediated in part by interactions made through their extracellular loops. Here, site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy were used to examine the effect of stabilizing solutes on the extracellular loops in BtuB, the vitamin B12 transporter, and FecA, the ferric citrate transporter. EPR spectra from the extracellular loops of FecA and BtuB arise from dynamic backbone segments, and distance measurements made by double electron-electron resonance indicate that the second extracellular loop in BtuB samples a wide range of conformations. These conformations are dramatically restricted upon substrate binding. In addition, the EPR spectra from nitroxide labels attached to the extracellular loops in BtuB and FecA are highly sensitive to solutes, and at every site examined the motion of the label is significantly reduced in the presence of stabilizing osmolytes, such as polyethylene glycols. For the second extracellular loop in BtuB, the solute-induced structural changes are small, but they are sufficient to bring spin-labeled side chains into tertiary contact with other portions of the protein. The spectroscopic changes seen by SDSL suggest that high concentrations of stabilizing solutes, such as those used to generate membrane protein crystals, result in a more compact and ordered state of the protein than is seen under more physiological conditions.

  7. Photosensitizer binding to lipid bilayers as a precondition for the photoinactivation of membrane channels.

    PubMed Central

    Rokitskaya, T I; Block, M; Antonenko, Y N; Kotova, E A; Pohl, P

    2000-01-01

    The photodynamic activity of sulfonated aluminum phthalocyanines (AlPcS(n), 1 membrane lipids. Adsorbing to the surface of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs), aluminum phthalocyanine disulfonate induced the highest changes in their electrophoretic mobility. AlPcS(2) was also most efficient in mediating photoinactivation of gramicidin channels, as revealed by measurements of the electric current across planar lipid bilayers. The increase in the degree of sulfonation of phthalocyanine progressively reduced its affinity for the lipid bilayer as well as its potency of sensitizing gramicidin channel photoinactivation. The portion of photoinactivated gramicidin channels, alpha, increased with rising photosensitizer concentration up to some optimum. The concentration at which alpha was at half-maximum amounted to 80 nM, 30 nM, 200 nM, and 2 microM for AlPcS(1), AlPcS(2), AlPcS(3), and AlPcS(4), respectively. At high concentrations alpha was found to decrease, which was attributed to quenching of reactive oxygen species and self-quenching of the photosensitizer triplet state by its ground state. Fluoride anions were observed to inhibit both AlPcS(n) (2 binding to LUVs and sensitized photoinactivation of gramicidin channels. It is concluded that photosensitizer binding to membrane lipids is a prerequisite for the photodynamic inactivation of gramicidin channels. PMID:10777753

  8. Membrane protein isolation and identification by covalent binding for proteome research.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiying; Yan, Guoquan; Gao, Mingxia; Deng, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2015-11-01

    A novel method to achieve highly efficient identification of membrane proteins (MPs) has been developed based on a covalent binding (CB) strategy. For this purpose, magnetic nanoparticles coated with a PEG layer were synthesized. The PEG chain end was functionalized to form the PEG-tresyl group, which is an octopus-like long arm to capture the free amino groups of MPs. The long arm could be used to bind proteins in a high concentration of the SDS medium. Then, the SDS and interfering substances were completely depleted by washing. The CB proteins could form a molecular monolayer on the surface of the nanoparticles in the denatured state, which was significantly favorable for the proteolysis of MPs. Therefore, isolation with CB and highly efficient digestion resulted in a larger scale of MPs. The method has been verified by a proteome identification of mouse liver samples. A total of 2946 MPs were identified in an MP fraction. A total of 1505 proteins were characterized as integral MPs, and 735 MPs were identified beyond the largest database summarized by PeptideAtlas. This approach has great potential for membrane proteome research. PMID:26376103

  9. Sweet tastants stimulate adenylate cyclase coupled to GTP-binding protein in rat tongue membranes.

    PubMed

    Striem, B J; Pace, U; Zehavi, U; Naim, M; Lancet, D

    1989-05-15

    Sucrose and other saccharides, which produce an appealing taste in rats, were found to significantly stimulate the activity of adenylate cyclase in membranes derived from the anterior-dorsal region of rat tongue. In control membranes derived from either tongue muscle or tongue non-sensory epithelium, the effect of sugars on adenylate cyclase activity was either much smaller or absent. Sucrose enhanced adenylate cyclase activity in a dose-related manner, and this activation was dependent on the presence of guanine nucleotides, suggesting the involvement of a GTP-binding protein ('G-protein'). The activation of adenylate cyclase by various mono- and di-saccharides correlated with their electrophysiological potency. Among non-sugar sweeteners, sodium saccharin activated the enzyme, whereas aspartame and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone did not, in correlation with their sweet-taste effectiveness in the rat. Sucrose activation of the enzyme was partly inhibited by Cu2+ and Zn2+, in agreement with their effect on electrophysiological sweet-taste responses. Our results are consistent with a sweet-taste transduction mechanism involving specific receptors, a guanine-nucleotide-binding protein and the cyclic AMP-generating enzyme adenylate cyclase.

  10. Upper-body resistance exercise augments vastus lateralis androgen receptor-DNA binding and canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling compared to lower-body resistance exercise in resistance-trained men without an acute increase in serum testosterone.

    PubMed

    Spillane, Mike; Schwarz, Neil; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of single bouts of lower-body (LB) and upper- and lower-body (ULB) resistance exercise on serum testosterone concentrations and the effects on muscle testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), androgen receptor (AR) protein content, and AR-DNA binding. A secondary purpose was to determine the effects on serum wingless-type MMTV integration site (Wnt4) levels and skeletal muscle β-catenin content. In a randomized cross-over design, exercise bouts consisted of a LB and ULB protocol, and each bout was separated by 1 week. Blood and muscle samples were obtained before exercise and 3 and 24h post-exercise; blood samples were also obtained at 0.5, 1, and 2 h post-exercise. Statistical analyses were performed by separate two-way factorial analyses of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures. No significant differences from baseline were observed in serum total and free testosterone and skeletal muscle testosterone and DHT with either protocol (p>0.05). AR protein was significantly increased at 3 h post-exercise and decreased at 24 h post-exercise for ULB, whereas AR-DNA binding was significantly increased at 3 and 24h post-exercise (p<0.05). In response to ULB, serum Wnt4 was significantly increased at 0.5, 1, and 2 h post-exercise (p<0.05) and β-catenin was significantly increased at 3 and 24 h post-exercise (p<0.05). It was concluded that, despite a lack of increase in serum testosterone and muscle androgen concentrations from either mode of resistance exercise, ULB resistance exercise increased Wnt4/β-catenin signaling and AR-DNA binding.

  11. Label-free detection of small-molecule binding to a GPCR in the membrane environment.

    PubMed

    Heym, Roland G; Hornberger, Wilfried B; Lakics, Viktor; Terstappen, Georg C

    2015-08-01

    Evaluation of drug-target interaction kinetics is becoming increasingly important during the drug-discovery process to investigate selectivity of a drug and predict in vivo target occupancy. To date, it remains challenging to obtain kinetic information for interactions between G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and small-molecule ligands in a label-free manner. Often GPCRs need to be solubilized or even stabilized by mutations which can be difficult and is time consuming. In addition, it is often unclear if the native conformation of the receptors is sustained. In this study, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) technologies have been used to detect ligand binding to the GPCR chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) expressed in lipoparticles. We first evaluated different strategies to immobilize CXCR4-expressing lipoparticles. The highest small-molecule binding signal in SPR and SAW was achieved with a matrix-free carboxymethylated sensor chip coated with wheat germ agglutinin for lipoparticle capturing. Next, the binding kinetics of the anti-CXCR4 antibody 12G5 raised against a conformational epitope (k(on)=1.83×10(6)M(-1)s(-1), k(off)=2.79×10(-4) s(-1)) and the small molecule AMD3100 (k(on)=5.46×10(5)M(-1)s(-1), k(off)=1.01×10(-2)s(-1)) were assessed by SAW. Our kinetic and affinity data are consistent with previously published radioligand-binding experiments using cells and label-free experiments with solubilized CXCR4. This is the first study demonstrating label-free kinetic characterization of small-molecule binding to a GPCR in the membrane environment. The presented method holds the potential to greatly facilitate label-free assay development for GPRCs that can be expressed at high levels in lipoparticles.

  12. Characterization of membrane steroid binding protein mRNA and protein in lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X L; Sexton, P S; Cenedella, R J

    2001-08-01

    Epithelial cells of the ocular lens contain a 28 kDa membrane protein which is proposed to mediate high affinity binding of steroid hormones and rapid non-genomic actions of steroid hormones. It has been named membrane steroid binding protein (MSBP). Our purpose was to further characterize this protein from cultured bovine lens epithelial cells (BLEC) and compare it to similar forms of the protein present in other species and tissues. The size of the protein's mRNA was examined by Northern blot analysis using a digoxigenin-labelled antisense riboprobe. The sequence of the mRNA was obtained by RT-PCR amplification of poly A+ RNA recovered from cultured BLEC. PCR amplification was conducted using three sets of nested sense and antisense primers, one set at a time. The amino acid sequence of the lens protein was deduced from the revealed cDNA sequence. The hydropathy of the protein was examined by Kyte-Doolittle plots. The sequence of the lens protein's cDNA (about 1.7 kb total) described an open reading frame of 582 residues which coded for a protein of 194 amino acids. The presence of a C-terminal isoprenylation motif suggested by earlier work was not found in the coding region. The deduced amino acid sequence of the lens protein was extremely similar to those of other species and tissues, being 95-98% homologous with that of the other members. All of the MSBPs apparently contain a single membrane spanning domain in the amino terminal. The highly conserved nature of this protein implies a useful function to the cell. We speculate that the protein is a receptor which mediates rapid actions of steroids on lens epithelial cells, such as calcium mobilization, and that the protein plays a role in the mechanism of steroid induced cataracts.

  13. A large scale membrane-binding protein conformational change that initiates at small length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandpre, Trevor; Andorf, Matthew; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Lamb, Robert; Poor, Taylor; Landahl, Eric

    2013-03-01

    The fusion (F) protein of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is a membrane-bound, homotrimeric glycoprotein located on the surface of PIV5 viral envelopes. Upon being triggered by the receptor-binding protein (HN), F undergoes a greater than 100Å ATP-independent refolding event. This refolding event results in the insertion of a hydrophobic fusion peptide into the membrane of the target cell, followed by the desolvation and subsequent fusion event as the two membranes are brought together. Isothermal calorimetry and hydrophobic dye incorporation experiments indicate that the soluble construct of the F protein undergoes a conformational rearrangement event at around 55 deg C. We present the results of an initial Time-Resolved Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering (TR-SAXS) study of this large scale, entropically driven conformational change using a temperature jump. Although we the measured radius of gyration of this protein changes on a 110 second timescale, we find that the x-ray scattering intensity at higher angles (corresponding to smaller length scales in the protein) changes nearly an order of magnitude faster. We believe this may be a signature of entropically-driven conformational change. To whom correspondence should be addressed

  14. Identification of sucrose binding, membrane proteins using a photolyzable sucrose analog. [P. saccharophila

    SciTech Connect

    Ripp, K.G.; Liu, D.F.; Viitanen, P.; Hitz, W.D.

    1986-04-01

    The sucrose derivative 6'-deoxy-6'-(2-hydroxy-4-azido)benzamidosucrose (6'-HABS) was prepared from sucrose (via 6'-deoxy-6'-aminosucrose) and 4-amino-salicylic acid. 6'-HABS is a competitive inhibitor of sucrose influx into protoplasts from developing soybean cotyledons and of sucrose binding to membranes from the bacteria P. saccharophila. The Ki for inhibition in the soybean protoplasts was 75..mu..M. 6'-Deoxy-6'-(2-hydroxy-3-/sup 125/Iodo-4-azido)benzamidosucrose was prepared by lactoperoxidase iodination of 6'-HABS. Upon photolysis in the presence of membranes from P saccharophila, label from the photoprobe is incorporated into a sucrose inducible polypeptide of mass 84 KD in SDS-PAGE. The polypeptide is protected from labeling by the inclusion of sucrose in the photolysis mixture. Photolysis conditions which lead to specific labeling of the sucrose protectable polypeptide in bacterial membranes also give sucrose protectable labeling of a 66 KD polypeptide in microsomal preparations made from developing soybeans. The possibility that this is a sucrose transporting protein is being tested.

  15. Activation of the Complement Classical Pathway (C1q Binding) by Mesophilic Aeromonas hydrophila Outer Membrane Protein

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Nogueras, Maria Mercedes; Aguilar, Alicia; Rubires, Xavier; Albertí, Sebastian; Benedí, Vicente Javier; Tomás, Juan M.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of killing of Aeromonas hydrophila serum-sensitive strains in nonimmune serum by the complement classical pathway has been studied. The bacterial cell surface component that binds C1q more efficiently was identified as a major outer membrane protein of 39 kDa, presumably the porin II described by D. Jeanteur, N. Gletsu, F. Pattus, and J. T. Buckley (Mol. Microbiol. 6:3355–3363, 1992), of these microorganisms. We have demonstrated that the purified form of porin II binds C1q and activates the classical pathway in an antibody-independent manner, with the subsequent consumption of C4 and reduction of the serum total hemolytic activity. Activation of the classical pathway has been observed in human nonimmune serum and agammaglobulinemic serum (both depleted of factor D). Binding of C1q to other components of the bacterial outer membrane, in particular to rough lipopolysaccharide, could not be demonstrated. Activation of the classical pathway by this lipopolysaccharide was also much less efficient than activation by the outer membrane protein. The strains possessing O-antigen lipopolysaccharide bind less C1q than the serum-sensitive strains, because the outer membrane protein is less accessible, and are resistant to complement-mediated killing. Finally, a similar or identical outer membrane protein (presumably porin II) that binds C1q was shown to be present in strains from the most common mesophilic Aeromonas O serogroups. PMID:9673268

  16. Mechanochemistry of protein 4.1's spectrin-actin-binding domain: ternary complex interactions, membrane binding, network integration, structural strengthening

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Mechanical strength of the red cell membrane is dependent on ternary interactions among the skeletal proteins, spectrin, actin, and protein 4.1. Protein 4.1's spectrin-actin-binding (SAB) domain is specified by an alternatively spliced exon encoding 21 amino acid (aa) and a constitutive exon encoding 59 aa. A series of truncated SAB peptides were engineered to define the sequences involved in spectrin-actin interactions, and also membrane strength. Analysis of in vitro supramolecular assemblies showed that gelation activity of SAB peptides correlates with their ability to recruit a critical amount of spectrin into the complex to cross-link actin filaments. Also, several SAB peptides appeared to exhibit a weak, cooperative actin-binding activity which mapped to the first 26 residues of the constitutive 59 aa. Fluorescence-imaged microdeformation was used to show SAB peptide integration into the elastic skeletal network of spectrin, actin, and protein 4.1. In situ membrane-binding and membrane-strengthening abilities of the SAB peptides correlated with their in vitro gelation activity. The findings imply that sites for strong spectrin binding include both the alternative 21-aa cassette and a conserved region near the middle of the 59 aa. However, it is shown that only weak SAB affinity is necessary for physiologically relevant action. Alternatively spliced exons can thus translate into strong modulation of specific protein interactions, economizing protein function in the cell without, in and of themselves, imparting unique function. PMID:7642705

  17. Androgen receptor antagonists (antiandrogens): structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Singh, S M; Gauthier, S; Labrie, F

    2000-02-01

    Prostate cancer, acne, seborrhea, hirsutism, and androgenic alopecia are well recognized to depend upon an excess or increased sensitivity to androgens or to be at least sensitive to androgens. It thus seems logical to use antiandrogens as therapeutic agents to prevent androgens from binding to the androgen receptor. The two predominant naturally occurring androgens are testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT). DHT is the more potent androgen in vivo and in vitro. All androgen-responsive genes are activated by androgen receptor (AR) bound to either T or DHT and it is believed that AR is more transcriptionally active when bound to DHT than T. The two classes of antiandrogens, presently available, are the steroidal derivatives, all of which possess mixed agonistic and antagonistic activities, and the pure non-steroidal antiandrogens of the class of flutamide and its derivatives. The intrinsic androgenic, estrogenic and glucocorticoid activities of steroidal derivatives have limited their use in the treatment of prostate cancer. The non-steroidal flutamide and its derivatives display pure antiandrogenic activity, without exerting agonistic or any other hormonal activity. Flutamide (89) and its derivatives, Casodex (108) and Anandron (114), are highly effective in the treatment of prostate cancer. The combination of flutamide and Anandron with castration has shown prolongation of life in prostate cancer. Furthermore, combined androgen blockade in association with radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy are very effective in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Such an approach certainly raises the hope of a further improvement in prostate cancer therapy. However, all antiandrogens, developed so-far display moderate affinity for the androgen receptor, and thus moderate efficacy in vitro and in vivo. There is thus a need for next-generation antiandrogens, which could display an equal or even higher affinity for AR compared to the natural androgens, and at the

  18. Characterization of the vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor in rat submandibular gland: radioligand binding assay in membrane preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.T.; Bylund, D.B.

    1987-09-01

    The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor in membranes from rat submandibular gland was studied using radioligand binding assays with /sup 125/I-VIP and various unlabeled competing ligands. In addition to the necessity of working within the parameters under which all radioligand binding assays should be performed, binding studies with /sup 125/I-VIP, as with other peptide hormones and neurotransmitters, are subject to additional technical difficulties. Specific problems that were addressed included radioligand proteolysis, the identification of an effective protease inhibitor (leupeptin) and the deleterious effects of a commonly used inhibitor (bacitracin); avid radioligand absorption to incubation tubes that was eliminated by precoating of the tubes with a combination of polyethylenimine and an organosilane; and a disproportionate effect of increasing membrane protein concentration on affinity estimates. Under optimized conditions, the affinity (Kd) and density Bmax values for /sup 125/I-VIP obtained from saturation assays (76 pM, 2.0 pmol/mg) were in excellent agreement. Membrane protein (or receptor) levels beyond the linear portion of the receptor concentration curve are often used in radioligand binding assays. Results from /sup 125/I-VIP binding studies at elevated receptor concentrations revealed the predicted marked decrease in receptor affinity. In addition, the rank order potency of unlabeled ligands in inhibition binding assays was changed. The optimization of the assay for measuring VIP receptors in submandibular gland membrane provides a reliable method for studying the role of receptor regulation in stimulus-secretion coupling for this neuropeptide.

  19. Identification of Escherichia coli F4ac-binding proteins in porcine milk fat globule membrane

    PubMed Central

    Novakovic, Predrag; Huang, Yanyun Y.; Lockerbie, Betty; Shahriar, Farshid; Kelly, John; Gordon, John R.; Middleton, Dorothy M.; Loewen, Matthew E.; Kidney, Beverly A.; Simko, Elemir

    2015-01-01

    F4ac-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) must attach to the intestinal mucosa to cause diarrhea in piglets. Prevention of bacterial attachment to the intestinal mucosa is the most effective defense against ETEC-induced diarrhea. Porcine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) were shown to be able to inhibit attachment of ETEC to the intestinal brush border; however, the specific components of porcine MFGM that inhibited attachment of ETEC to enterocytes were not identified. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to identify F4ac-binding MFGM proteins by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography. The proteome of porcine MFGM was characterized and the following F4ac-binding proteins were detected by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography: lactadherin, butyrophilin, adipophilin, acyl-CoA synthetase 3, and fatty acid-binding protein 3. The biological function of these proteins was not investigated but it is possible that their interaction with F4ac fimbria interferes with bacterial attachment and colonization. PMID:25852227

  20. Identification of Escherichia coli F4ac-binding proteins in porcine milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, Predrag; Huang, Yanyun Y; Lockerbie, Betty; Shahriar, Farshid; Kelly, John; Gordon, John R; Middleton, Dorothy M; Loewen, Matthew E; Kidney, Beverly A; Simko, Elemir

    2015-04-01

    F4ac-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) must attach to the intestinal mucosa to cause diarrhea in piglets. Prevention of bacterial attachment to the intestinal mucosa is the most effective defense against ETEC-induced diarrhea. Porcine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) were shown to be able to inhibit attachment of ETEC to the intestinal brush border; however, the specific components of porcine MFGM that inhibited attachment of ETEC to enterocytes were not identified. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to identify F4ac-binding MFGM proteins by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography. The proteome of porcine MFGM was characterized and the following F4ac-binding proteins were detected by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography: lactadherin, butyrophilin, adipophilin, acyl-CoA synthetase 3, and fatty acid-binding protein 3. The biological function of these proteins was not investigated but it is possible that their interaction with F4ac fimbria interferes with bacterial attachment and colonization.

  1. Purification and identification of the fusicoccin binding protein from oat root plasma membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Boer, A. H.; Watson, B. A.; Cleland, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    Fusicoccin (FC), a fungal phytotoxin, stimulates the H(+) -ATPase located in the plasma membrane (PM) of higher plants. The first event in the reaction chain leading to enhanced H(+) -efflux seems to be the binding of FC to a FC-binding protein (FCBP) in the PM. We solubilized 90% of the FCBP from oat (Avena sativa L. cv Victory) root PM in an active form with 1% octyl-glucoside. The FCBP was stabilized by the presence of protease inhibitors. The FCBP was purified by affinity chromatography using FC-linked adipic acid dihydrazide agarose (FC-AADA). Upon elution with 8 molar urea, two major protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyaerylamide gel electrophoresis with molecular weights of 29,700 and 31,000 were obtained. Successive chromatography on BBAB Bio-Gel A, hexyl agarose, and FC-AADA resulted in the same two bands when the FC-AADA was eluted with sodium dodecyl sulfate. A direct correlation was made between 3H-FC-binding activity and the presence of the two protein bands. The stoichiometry of the 29,700 and 31,000 molecular weight bands was 1:2. This suggests that the FCBP occurs in the native form as a heterotrimer with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 92,000.

  2. Identification of Escherichia coli F4ac-binding proteins in porcine milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, Predrag; Huang, Yanyun Y; Lockerbie, Betty; Shahriar, Farshid; Kelly, John; Gordon, John R; Middleton, Dorothy M; Loewen, Matthew E; Kidney, Beverly A; Simko, Elemir

    2015-04-01

    F4ac-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) must attach to the intestinal mucosa to cause diarrhea in piglets. Prevention of bacterial attachment to the intestinal mucosa is the most effective defense against ETEC-induced diarrhea. Porcine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) were shown to be able to inhibit attachment of ETEC to the intestinal brush border; however, the specific components of porcine MFGM that inhibited attachment of ETEC to enterocytes were not identified. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to identify F4ac-binding MFGM proteins by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography. The proteome of porcine MFGM was characterized and the following F4ac-binding proteins were detected by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography: lactadherin, butyrophilin, adipophilin, acyl-CoA synthetase 3, and fatty acid-binding protein 3. The biological function of these proteins was not investigated but it is possible that their interaction with F4ac fimbria interferes with bacterial attachment and colonization. PMID:25852227

  3. FMRFamide: low affinity inhibition of opioid binding to rabbit brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X.Z.; Raffa, R.B.

    1986-03-05

    FMRFamide (Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH/sub 2/) was first isolated from the ganglia of molluscs by Price and Greenberg in 1977. The peptide was subsequently shown to have diverse actions on various types of molluscan and mammalian tissues. The presence of immunoreactive FMRFamide-like material (irFMRF) in multiple areas of rat brain, spinal cord, and gastrointestinal tract suggests that irFMRF may have a physiological role in mammals. Tang, Yang and Costa recently demonstrated that FMRFamide attenuates morphine antinociception in rats and postulated, based on this and several other lines of evidence, that irFMRF might be an endogenous opioid antagonist. In the present study, they tested the ability of FMRFamide to inhibit the binding of opioid receptor ligands to rabbit membrane preparations. FMRFamide inhibited the specific binding of both /sup 3/(H)-dihydromorphine and /sup 3/(H)-ethylketocyclazocine (IC/sub 50/ = 14 ..mu..M and 320 ..mu..M, respectively) in a dose-related manner, suggesting that FMRFamide may affect binding to at least two types of opioid receptors (mu and kappa). These data are consistent with the concept that irFMRF might act as an endogenous opioid antagonist. However, the low affinity of FMRFamide leaves open the possibility of another mechanism of opioid antagonism, such as neuromodulation.

  4. Purification and identification of the fusicoccin binding protein from oat root plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    de Boer, A H; Watson, B A; Cleland, R E

    1989-01-01

    Fusicoccin (FC), a fungal phytotoxin, stimulates the H(+) -ATPase located in the plasma membrane (PM) of higher plants. The first event in the reaction chain leading to enhanced H(+) -efflux seems to be the binding of FC to a FC-binding protein (FCBP) in the PM. We solubilized 90% of the FCBP from oat (Avena sativa L. cv Victory) root PM in an active form with 1% octyl-glucoside. The FCBP was stabilized by the presence of protease inhibitors. The FCBP was purified by affinity chromatography using FC-linked adipic acid dihydrazide agarose (FC-AADA). Upon elution with 8 molar urea, two major protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyaerylamide gel electrophoresis with molecular weights of 29,700 and 31,000 were obtained. Successive chromatography on BBAB Bio-Gel A, hexyl agarose, and FC-AADA resulted in the same two bands when the FC-AADA was eluted with sodium dodecyl sulfate. A direct correlation was made between 3H-FC-binding activity and the presence of the two protein bands. The stoichiometry of the 29,700 and 31,000 molecular weight bands was 1:2. This suggests that the FCBP occurs in the native form as a heterotrimer with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 92,000. PMID:11537448

  5. Effect of anchor positioning on binding and diffusion of elongated 3D DNA nanostructures on lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelinskaia, Alena; Franquelim, Henri G.; Petrov, Eugene P.; Schwille, Petra

    2016-05-01

    DNA origami is a state-of-the-art technology that enables the fabrication of nano-objects with defined shapes, to which functional moieties, such as lipophilic anchors, can be attached with a nanometre scale precision. Although binding of DNA origami to lipid membranes has been extensively demonstrated, the specific requirements necessary for membrane attachment are greatly overlooked. Here, we designed a set of amphipathic rectangular-shaped DNA origami structures with varying placement and number of chol-TEG anchors used for membrane attachment. Single- and multiple-cholesteryl-modified origami nanostructures were produced and studied in terms of their membrane localization, density and dynamics. We show that the positioning of at least two chol-TEG moieties near the corners is essential to ensure efficient membrane binding of large DNA nanostructures. Quantitative fluorescence correlation spectroscopy data further confirm that increasing the number of corner-positioned chol-TEG anchors lowers the dynamics of flat DNA origami structures on freestanding membranes. Taken together, our approach provides the first evidence of the importance of the location in addition to the number of hydrophobic moieties when rationally designing minimal DNA nanostructures with controlled membrane binding.

  6. Binding constants of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands: A general theory corroborated by Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Hu, Jinglei; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2015-12-28

    Adhesion processes of biological membranes that enclose cells and cellular organelles are essential for immune responses, tissue formation, and signaling. These processes depend sensitively on the binding constant K2D of the membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins that mediate adhesion, which is difficult to measure in the "two-dimensional" (2D) membrane environment of the proteins. An important problem therefore is to relate K2D to the binding constant K3D of soluble variants of the receptors and ligands that lack the membrane anchors and are free to diffuse in three dimensions (3D). In this article, we present a general theory for the binding constants K2D and K3D of rather stiff proteins whose main degrees of freedom are translation and rotation, along membranes and around anchor points "in 2D," or unconstrained "in 3D." The theory generalizes previous results by describing how K2D depends both on the average separation and thermal nanoscale roughness of the apposing membranes, and on the length and anchoring flexibility of the receptors and ligands. Our theoretical results for the ratio K2D/K3D of the binding constants agree with detailed results from Monte Carlo simulations without any data fitting, which indicates that the theory captures the essential features of the "dimensionality reduction" due to membrane anchoring. In our Monte Carlo simulations, we consider a novel coarse-grained model of biomembrane adhesion in which the membranes are represented as discretized elastic surfaces, and the receptors and ligands as anchored molecules that diffuse continuously along the membranes and rotate at their anchor points.

  7. The Peripheral Binding of 14-3-3γ to Membranes Involves Isoform-Specific Histidine Residues

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Ming; Halskau, Øyvind; Baumann, Anne; Rodriguez-Larrea, David; Costas, Miguel; Underhaug, Jarl; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.; Martinez, Aurora

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian 14-3-3 protein scaffolds include seven conserved isoforms that bind numerous phosphorylated protein partners and regulate many cellular processes. Some 14-3-3-isoforms, notably γ, have elevated affinity for membranes, which might contribute to modulate the subcellular localization of the partners and substantiate the importance of investigating molecular mechanisms of membrane interaction. By applying surface plasmon resonance we here show that the binding to phospholipid bilayers is stimulated when 14-3-3γ is complexed with its partner, a peptide corresponding to the Ser19-phosphorylated N-terminal region of tyrosine hydroxylase. Moreover, membrane interaction is dependent on salts of kosmotropic ions, which also stabilize 14-3-3γ. Electrostatic analysis of available crystal structures of γ and of the non-membrane-binding ζ-isoform, complemented with molecular dynamics simulations, indicate that the electrostatic potential distribution of phosphopeptide-bound 14-3-3γ is optimal for interaction with the membrane through amphipathic helices at the N-terminal dimerization region. In addition, His158, and especially His195, both specific to 14-3-3γ and located at the convex lateral side, appeared to be pivotal for the ligand induced membrane interaction, as corroborated by site-directed mutagenesis. The participation of these histidine residues might be associated to their increased protonation upon membrane binding. Overall, these results reveal membrane-targeting motifs and give insights on mechanisms that furnish the 14-3-3γ scaffold with the capacity for tuned shuffling from soluble to membrane-bound states. PMID:23189152

  8. The association of myosin IB with actin waves in dictyostelium requires both the plasma membrane-binding site and actin-binding region in the myosin tail.

    PubMed

    Brzeska, Hanna; Pridham, Kevin; Chery, Godefroy; Titus, Margaret A; Korn, Edward D

    2014-01-01

    F-actin structures and their distribution are important determinants of the dynamic shapes and functions of eukaryotic cells. Actin waves are F-actin formations that move along the ventral cell membrane driven by actin polymerization. Dictyostelium myosin IB is associated with actin waves but its role in the wave is unknown. Myosin IB is a monomeric, non-filamentous myosin with a globular head that binds to F-actin and has motor activity, and a non-helical tail comprising a basic region, a glycine-proline-glutamine-rich region and an SH3-domain. The basic region binds to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane through a short basic-hydrophobic site and the Gly-Pro-Gln region binds F-actin. In the current work we found that both the basic-hydrophobic site in the basic region and the Gly-Pro-Gln region of the tail are required for the association of myosin IB with actin waves. This is the first evidence that the Gly-Pro-Gln region is required for localization of myosin IB to a specific actin structure in situ. The head is not required for myosin IB association with actin waves but binding of the head to F-actin strengthens the association of myosin IB with waves and stabilizes waves. Neither the SH3-domain nor motor activity is required for association of myosin IB with actin waves. We conclude that myosin IB contributes to anchoring actin waves to the plasma membranes by binding of the basic-hydrophobic site to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane and binding of the Gly-Pro-Gln region to F-actin in the wave.

  9. Demonstration of high-affinity folate binding activity associated with the brush border membranes of rat kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Selhub, J; Rosenberg, I H

    1978-01-01

    Folate binding activity of high affinity was identified in the particulate fractions of rat kidney homogenates. This binding activity cofractionated with alkaline phosphatase and maltase, two brush border membranes markers. With an enriched preparation of brush border membranes, freed of endogenous folate by acid treatment, the binding of [3H]olate was found to be saturable (Kb = 4.2 X 10(-11)M) and rapid. Binding was optimal at pH 6.4-7.7. At neutral pH, competition for binding with [3H]folic acid required 1.45 equivalents of pteroylheptaglutamate, 6.25 equivalents of N5-methyltetrathydrofolate, 29 equivalents of methotrexate, and 125 equivalents of N5-formyltetrahydrofolate. At alkaline pH, N5-methyltetrahydrofolate was as effective a competitor as folic acid. In view of reports that renal tubular reabsorption of folate includes an initial tight binding step, the binding activity associated with the brush border membranes may participate in this process. PMID:28521

  10. Characterization of the proton binding sites of extracellular polymeric substances in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Chang, Sheng; Defersha, Fantahun M

    2015-07-01

    This paper focuses on the characterization of the chemical compositions and acidic constants of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor treating synthetic brewery wastewater by using chemical analysis, linear programming analysis (LPA) of titration data, and FT-IR analysis. The linear programming analysis of titration data revealed that the EPSs have proton binding sites with pKa values from pKa ≤ 6, between 6 and 7, and approximately 9.8. The strong acidic sites (pKa ≤ 6) and some weak acidic sites (7.5 < pKa < 9.0) were found to be readily removed by 0.45-μm membrane filtration. In addition, the FT-IR analysis confirmed the presence of proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, and lipids in the EPS samples. Based on the FT-IR analysis and the main chemical functional groups at the bacterial cell surfaces, the identified proton binding sites were related to carboxyl, phosphate, and hydroxyl/amine groups with pKa values of 4.6 ± 0.7, 6.6 ± 0.01, and 9.7 ± 0.1, respectively, with the corresponding respective intensities of 0.31 ± 0.05, 0.96 ± 0.3, and 1.53 ± 0.3 mmole/g-EPS. The pKa values and intensities of the proton binding sites are the fundamental molecular properties of EPSs that affect the EPS charge, molecular interactions, and metal complexation characteristics. Determination of such properties can advance Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO)-based concentration polarization modeling, facilitate the estimation of the osmotic pressure of the EPS concentration polarization layers, and lead to a deeper understanding of the role of metal complexation in membrane fouling. PMID:25935368

  11. Androgen therapy in women.

    PubMed

    Arlt, Wiebke

    2006-01-01

    Androgens in women either derive from direct ovarian production or from peripheral conversion of the adrenal sex steroid precursor, dehydroepiandrosterone, towards active androgens. Therefore, loss of adrenal or ovarian function, caused by Addison's disease or consequent to bilateral oophorectomy, results in severe androgen deficiency, clinically often associated with a loss of libido and energy. Importantly, physiological menopause does not necessarily lead to androgen deficiency, as androgen synthesis in the ovaries may persist despite the decline in estrogen production. However, the definition of female androgen deficiency, as recently provided by the Princeton consensus statement, is not precise enough and may lead to over-diagnosis due to the high prevalence of its diagnostic criteria: androgen levels below or within the lower quartile of the normal range and concurrent sexual dysfunction. Importantly, physiological menopause is not necessarily associated with androgen deficiency and therefore does not routinely require androgen therapy. Current replacement options include transdermal testosterone administration or dehydroepiandrosterone treatment, both of which have been shown to result in significant improvements, in particular in libido and mood, while effects on body composition and muscular function are not well documented. It is important to keep in mind that the number of randomized controlled trials is still limited and that currently none of the available preparations is officially approved for use in women. Currently, androgen replacement should be reserved for women with severe androgen deficiency due to an established cause and matching clinical signs and symptoms. PMID:16381985

  12. Glycosylation is essential for translocation of carp retinol-binding protein across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Devirgiliis, Chiara; Gaetani, Sancia; Apreda, Marianna; Bellovino, Diana . E-mail: bellovino@inran.it

    2005-07-01

    Retinoid transport is well characterized in many vertebrates, while it is still largely unexplored in fish. To study the transport and utilization of vitamin A in these organisms, we have isolated from a carp liver cDNA library retinol-binding protein, its plasma carrier. The primary structure of carp retinol-binding protein is very conserved, but presents unique features compared to those of the correspondent proteins isolated and characterized so far in other species: it has an uncleavable signal peptide and two N-glycosylation sites in the NH{sub 2}-terminal region of the protein that are glycosylated in vivo. In this paper, we have investigated the function of the carbohydrate chains, by constructing three mutants deprived of the first, the second or both carbohydrates. The results of transient transfection of wild type and mutant retinol-binding protein in Cos cells followed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis have shown that the absence of both carbohydrate moieties blocks secretion, while the presence of one carbohydrate group leads to an inefficient secretion. Experiments of carp RBP mRNA in vitro translation in a reticulocyte cell-free system in the presence of microsomes have demonstrated that N-glycosylation is necessary for efficient translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Moreover, when Cos cells were transiently transfected with wild type and mutant retinol-binding protein (aa 1-67)-green fluorescent protein fusion constructs and semi-permeabilized with streptolysin O, immunofluorescence analysis with anti-green fluorescent protein antibody revealed that the double mutant is exposed to the cytosol, thus confirming the importance of glycan moieties in the translocation process.

  13. Computing membrane-AQP5-phosphatidylserine binding affinities with hybrid steered molecular dynamics approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liao Y

    2015-01-01

    In order to elucidate how phosphatidylserine (PS6) interacts with AQP5 in a cell membrane, we develop a hybrid steered molecular dynamics (hSMD) method that involves (1) simultaneously steering two centers of mass of two selected segments of the ligand and (2) equilibrating the ligand-protein complex with and without biasing the system. Validating hSMD, we first study vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) in complex with N-(4-Chlorophenyl)-2-((pyridin-4-ylmethyl)amino)benzamide (8ST), for which the binding energy is known from in vitro experiments. In this study, our computed binding energy well agrees with the experimental value. Knowing the accuracy of this hSMD method, we apply it to the AQP5-lipid-bilayer system to answer an outstanding question relevant to AQP5’s physiological function: Will the PS6, a lipid having a single long hydrocarbon tail that was found in the central pore of the AQP5 tetramer crystal, actually bind to and inhibit AQP5’s central pore under near-physiological conditions, namely, when AQP5 tetramer is embedded in a lipid bilayer? We find, in silico, using the CHARMM 36 force field, that binding PS6 to AQP5 is a factor of 3 million weaker than “binding” it in the lipid bilayer. This suggests that AQP5’s central pore will not be inhibited by PS6 or a similar lipid in a physiological environment. PMID:25955791

  14. Parkinson's Protein α-Synuclein Binds Efficiently and with a Novel Conformation to Two Natural Membrane Mimics.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pravin; Segers-Nolten, Ine M J; Schilderink, Nathalie; Subramaniam, Vinod; Huber, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Binding of human α-Synuclein, a protein associated with Parkinson's disease, to natural membranes is thought to be crucial in relation to its pathological and physiological function. Here the binding of αS to small unilamellar vesicles mimicking the inner mitochondrial and the neuronal plasma membrane is studied in situ by continuous wave and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance. Local binding information of αS spin labeled by MTSL at positions 56 and 69 respectively shows that also helix 2 (residues 50-100) binds firmly to both membranes. By double electron-electron resonance (DEER) on the mutant spin labeled at positions 27 and 56 (αS 27/56) a new conformation on the membrane is found with a distance of 3.6 nm/ 3.7 nm between residues 27 and 56. In view of the low negative charge density of these membranes, the strong interaction is surprising, emphasizing that function and pathology of αS could involve synaptic vesicles and mitochondria. PMID:26588454

  15. Membrane binding events in the initiation and propagation phases of tissue factor-initiated zymogen activation under flow.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Laura M; Dubief, Yves C; Mann, Kenneth G

    2012-02-17

    This study investigates the dynamics of zymogen activation when both extrinsic tenase and prothrombinase are assembled on an appropriate membrane. Although the activation of prothrombin by surface-localized prothrombinase is clearly mediated by flow-induced dilutional effects, we find that when factor X is activated in isolation by surface-localized extrinsic tenase, it exhibits characteristics of diffusion-mediated activation in which diffusion of substrate to the catalytically active region is rate-limiting. When prothrombin and factor X are activated coincident with each other, competition for available membrane binding sites masks the diffusion-limiting effects of factor X activation. To verify the role of membrane binding in the activation of factor X by extrinsic tenase under flow conditions, we demonstrate that bovine lactadherin competes for both factor X and Xa binding sites, limiting factor X activation and forcing the release of bound factor Xa from the membrane at a venous shear rate (100 s(-1)). Finally, we present steady-state models of prothrombin and factor X activation under flow showing that zymogen and enzyme membrane binding events further regulate the coagulation process in an open system representative of the vasculature geometry.

  16. Binding of /sup 3/H-diazepam with brain synaptic membranes during the development of generalized epileptic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Borydukov, M.M.; Bogdanova, E.D.; Kryzhanovskii, G.N.; Nikushin, E.V.; Prilipko, L.L.

    1986-04-01

    The authors study the effect of the development of generalized epileptic activity in the rat cerebral cortex on binding of tritium-diazepam with synaptic membranes. The experiments showed that dependence of the quantity of tritium-diazepam bound with synaptic membranes on the concentration of label in the incubation medium is linear in character on a Scatchard plot. This is evidence of the existence of only one type of binding site withK /SUB d/ = 4.40 plus or minus 0.15 nM and B /SUB max/ = 410 plus or minus 35 fm fmoles/mg protein.

  17. Presence of a low molecular weight endogenous inhibitor on 3H-muscimol binding in synaptic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Yukio; Kuriyama, Kinya

    1980-06-01

    The specific binding of 3H-muscimol to synaptic membrane preparations obtained from the rat brain has been thought to reflect the association of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a potential candidate as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), with its synaptic receptors1,2. Treatment of synaptic membranes with Triton X-100 significantly increases the specific binding of 3H-muscimol2. Several reports also indicate the presence of endogenous substances, such as GABA3, acidic protein4 and phosphatidylethanolamine5, which inhibit Na-independent binding of 3H-GABA in the synaptic membranous fractions from the rat brain. We report here that in the supernatant obtained from Triton-treated synaptic membranes there exists a new type of endogenous inhibitor of 3H-muscimol binding which is apparently different from the inhibitory substances described previously3-5. The new inhibitor has a low molecular weight (MW) and probably originated from neurones rather than glial cells. We have termed this endogenous inhibitor the GABA receptor binding inhibitory factor (GRIF).

  18. Decreased content of integral membrane calcium-binding protein (IMCAL) in tissues of the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    SciTech Connect

    Kowarski, S.; Cowen, L.A.; Schachter, D.

    1986-02-01

    Prior studies report that plasma membranes of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (Okamoto-Aoki strain) bind less calcium than do the corresponding preparations from Wistar Kyoto controls. The possibility that the differences result from a decrease in the content of integral membrane calcium-binding protein (IMCAL) was explored by the application of immunoassays with polyclonal antisera and a mouse monoclonal antibody. IMCAL binds calcium with relatively high affinity, and its content in many rat tissues is regulated by vitamin D and the level of dietary calcium. Radioimmunoassays of tissue IMCAL demonstrate significant reductions in content in the erythrocyte ghost, intestinal mucosa, kidney, heart, testis, and liver of the spontaneously hypertensive rat as compared to the control strains. The decreases are observed both at 4-5 weeks of age, before the onset of severe hypertension and at 8-9 weeks in the presence of severe hypertension. Moreover, the magnitude of the decrease in erythrocyte IMCAL can account for much of the decrease in the calcium-binding capacity of erythrocyte membranes reported by others. The results are especially significant because an abnormality in the membrane binding of calcium and in the regulation of cytosolic calcium ion concentration could underlie the pathogenesis of the hypertension.

  19. Early Events in Chikungunya Virus Infection—From Virus Cell Binding to Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K. S.; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus causing millions of infections in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. CHIKV infection often leads to an acute self-limited febrile illness with debilitating myalgia and arthralgia. A potential long-term complication of CHIKV infection is severe joint pain, which can last for months to years. There are no vaccines or specific therapeutics available to prevent or treat infection. This review describes the critical steps in CHIKV cell entry. We summarize the latest studies on the virus-cell tropism, virus-receptor binding, internalization, membrane fusion and review the molecules and compounds that have been described to interfere with virus cell entry. The aim of the review is to give the reader a state-of-the-art overview on CHIKV cell entry and to provide an outlook on potential new avenues in CHIKV research. PMID:26198242

  20. Early Events in Chikungunya Virus Infection-From Virus Cell Binding to Membrane Fusion.

    PubMed

    van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Hoornweg, Tabitha E; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A; Smit, Jolanda M

    2015-07-07

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus causing millions of infections in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. CHIKV infection often leads to an acute self-limited febrile illness with debilitating myalgia and arthralgia. A potential long-term complication of CHIKV infection is severe joint pain, which can last for months to years. There are no vaccines or specific therapeutics available to prevent or treat infection. This review describes the critical steps in CHIKV cell entry. We summarize the latest studies on the virus-cell tropism, virus-receptor binding, internalization, membrane fusion and review the molecules and compounds that have been described to interfere with virus cell entry. The aim of the review is to give the reader a state-of-the-art overview on CHIKV cell entry and to provide an outlook on potential new avenues in CHIKV research.

  1. Adenosine diphosphate ribulose in human erythrocytes: a new metabolite with membrane binding properties.

    PubMed

    Franco, L; Guida, L; Zocchi, E; Silvestro, L; Benatti, U; De Flora, A

    1993-02-15

    Incubation of ADPribose with yeast phosphoriboisomerase resulted in the formation of an adenylic nucleotide that was identified with ADPribulose by mass spectrometry. Synthesis of [32P]ADPribulose from [32P]NAD+ by the combined activities of commercial NAD+ glycohydrolase and phosphoriboisomerase allowed us to use it as a labeled internal standard throughout the procedure of purification from trichloroacetic acid extracts of human red blood cells. ADPribulose was purified by means of three sequential reverse phase HPLC separations and its concentration in human erythrocytes was estimated to be 0.11 +/- 0.1 microM. Unsealed erythrocyte ghosts did not transform ADPribulose, which bound to specific membrane proteins with a trichloroacetic and formic acid-resistant binding. The labeled proteins were identified as spectrin, bands 3, 4.1, 4.2 and Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase on the basis of their relative mobilities on SDS-PAGE.

  2. Heterotypic binding between neuronal membrane vesicles and glial cells is mediated by a specific cell adhesion molecule

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    By means of a multistage quantitative assay, we have identified a new kind of cell adhesion molecule (CAM) on neuronal cells of the chick embryo that is involved in their adhesion to glial cells. The assay used to identify the binding component (which we name neuron-glia CAM or Ng-CAM) was designed to distinguish between homotypic binding (e.g., neuron to neuron) and heterotypic binding (e.g., neuron to glia). This distinction was essential because a single neuron might simultaneously carry different CAMs separately mediating each of these interactions. The adhesion of neuronal cells to glial cells in vitro was previously found to be inhibited by Fab' fragments prepared from antisera against neuronal membranes but not by Fab' fragments against N-CAM, the neural cell adhesion molecule. This suggested that neuron-glia adhesion is mediated by specific cell surface molecules different from previously isolated CAMs . To verify that this was the case, neuronal membrane vesicles were labeled internally with 6-carboxyfluorescein and externally with 125I-labeled antibodies to N-CAM to block their homotypic binding. Labeled vesicles bound to glial cells but not to fibroblasts during a 30-min incubation period. The specific binding of the neuronal vesicles to glial cells was measured by fluorescence microscopy and gamma spectroscopy of the 125I label. Binding increased with increasing concentrations of both glial cells and neuronal vesicles. Fab' fragments prepared from anti-neuronal membrane sera that inhibited binding between neurons and glial cells were also found to inhibit neuronal vesicle binding to glial cells. The inhibitory activity of the Fab' fragments was depleted by preincubation with neuronal cells but not with glial cells. Trypsin treatment of neuronal membrane vesicles released material that neutralized Fab' fragment inhibition; after chromatography, neutralizing activity was enriched 50- fold. This fraction was injected into mice to produce monoclonal

  3. Analysis of the induction of the myelin basic protein binding to the plasma membrane phospholipid monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Hao, Changchun; Feng, Ying; Gao, Feng; Lu, Xiaolong; Li, Junhua; Sun, Runguang

    2016-09-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) is an essential structure involved in the generation of central nervous system (CNS) myelin. Myelin shape has been described as liquid crystal structure of biological membrane. The interactions of MBP with monolayers of different lipid compositions are responsible for the multi-lamellar structure and stability of myelin. In this paper, we have designed MBP-incorporated model lipid monolayers and studied the phase behavior of MBP adsorbed on the plasma membrane at the air/water interface by thermodynamic method and atomic force microscopy (AFM). By analyzing the pressure-area (π-A) and pressure-time (π-T) isotherms, univariate linear regression equation was obtained. In addition, the elastic modulus, surface pressure increase, maximal insertion pressure, and synergy factor of monolayers were detected. These parameters can be used to modulate the monolayers binding of protein, and the results show that MBP has the strongest affinity for 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphoserine (DPPS) monolayer, followed by DPPC/DPPS mixed and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-choline (DPPC) monolayers via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. AFM images of DPPS and DPPC/DPPS mixed monolayers in the presence of MBP (5 nM) show a phase separation texture at the surface pressure of 20 mN/m and the incorporation of MBP put into the DPPC monolayers has exerted a significant effect on the domain structure. MBP is not an integral membrane protein but, due to its positive charge, interacts with the lipid head groups and stabilizes the membranes. The interaction between MBP and phospholipid membrane to determine the nervous system of the disease has a good biophysical significance and medical value. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21402114 and 11544009), the Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province of China (Grant No. 2016JM2010), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central

  4. Analysis of the induction of the myelin basic protein binding to the plasma membrane phospholipid monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Hao, Changchun; Feng, Ying; Gao, Feng; Lu, Xiaolong; Li, Junhua; Sun, Runguang

    2016-09-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) is an essential structure involved in the generation of central nervous system (CNS) myelin. Myelin shape has been described as liquid crystal structure of biological membrane. The interactions of MBP with monolayers of different lipid compositions are responsible for the multi-lamellar structure and stability of myelin. In this paper, we have designed MBP-incorporated model lipid monolayers and studied the phase behavior of MBP adsorbed on the plasma membrane at the air/water interface by thermodynamic method and atomic force microscopy (AFM). By analyzing the pressure–area (π–A) and pressure–time (π–T) isotherms, univariate linear regression equation was obtained. In addition, the elastic modulus, surface pressure increase, maximal insertion pressure, and synergy factor of monolayers were detected. These parameters can be used to modulate the monolayers binding of protein, and the results show that MBP has the strongest affinity for 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphoserine (DPPS) monolayer, followed by DPPC/DPPS mixed and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-choline (DPPC) monolayers via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. AFM images of DPPS and DPPC/DPPS mixed monolayers in the presence of MBP (5 nM) show a phase separation texture at the surface pressure of 20 mN/m and the incorporation of MBP put into the DPPC monolayers has exerted a significant effect on the domain structure. MBP is not an integral membrane protein but, due to its positive charge, interacts with the lipid head groups and stabilizes the membranes. The interaction between MBP and phospholipid membrane to determine the nervous system of the disease has a good biophysical significance and medical value. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21402114 and 11544009), the Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province of China (Grant No. 2016JM2010), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central

  5. Ligand binding to the ACBD6 protein regulates the acyl-CoA transferase reactions in membranes[S

    PubMed Central

    Soupene, Eric; Kuypers, Frans A.

    2015-01-01

    The binding determinants of the human acyl-CoA binding domain-containing protein (ACBD) 6 and its function in lipid renewal of membranes were investigated. ACBD6 binds acyl-CoAs of a chain length of 6 to 20 carbons. The stoichiometry of the association could not be fitted to a 1-to-1 model. Saturation of ACBD6 by C16:0-CoA required higher concentration than less abundant acyl-CoAs. In contrast to ACBD1 and ACBD3, ligand binding did not result in the dimerization of ACBD6. The presence of fatty acids affected the binding of C18:1-CoA to ACBD6, dependent on the length, the degree of unsaturation, and the stereoisomeric conformation of their aliphatic chain. ACBD1 and ACBD6 negatively affected the formation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine in the red blood cell membrane. The acylation rate of lysophosphatidylcholine into PC catalyzed by the red cell lysophosphatidylcholine-acyltransferase 1 protein was limited by the transfer of the acyl-CoA substrate from ACBD6 to the acyltransferase enzyme. These findings provide evidence that the binding properties of ACBD6 are adapted to prevent its constant saturation by the very abundant C16:0-CoA and protect membrane systems from the detergent nature of free acyl-CoAs by controlling their release to acyl-CoA-utilizing enzymes. PMID:26290611

  6. A fullerene C60-based ligand in a stationary phase for affine chromatography of membrane porphyrin-binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirshakhi, N.; Alyautdin, R. N.; Orlov, A. P.; Poloznikov, A. A.; Kuznetsov, D. A.

    2008-11-01

    A new affine chromatography technique is suggested for the purification of porphyrin-binding proteins (PBP) from mammal cell membranes. The procedure uses new fullerene-porphyrin ligands immobilized on agarose and bound to the polysaccharide matrix via the epoxycyclohexyl residue. A selective PBP stationary phase was used in a single-column chromatography run for the complete purification of a monomeric protein (17.6 kDa) from mitochondrial membranes of rat myocardium. This protein was characterized by high affinity for porphyrin-related structures. To separate it from other nonspecifically sorbed membrane proteins, synchronous linear pH and ionic strength gradients were used.

  7. Two outer membrane proteins are bovine lactoferrin-binding proteins in Mannheimia haemolytica A1.

    PubMed

    Samaniego-Barrón, Luisa; Luna-Castro, Sarahí; Piña-Vázquez, Carolina; Suárez-Güemes, Francisco; de la Garza, Mireya

    2016-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is a Gram negative bacterium that is part of the bovine respiratory disease, which causes important economic losses in the livestock industry. In the present work, the interaction between M. haemolytica A1 and bovine lactoferrin (BLf) was studied. This iron-chelating glycoprotein is part of the mammalian innate-immune system and is present in milk and mucosal secretions; Lf is also contained in neutrophils secondary granules, which release this glycoprotein at infection sites. It was evidenced that M. haemolytica was not able to use iron-charged BLf (BholoLf) as a sole iron source; nevertheless, iron-lacked BLf (BapoLf) showed a bactericidal effect against M. haemolytica with MIC of 4.88 ± 1.88 and 7.31 ± 1.62 μM for M. haemolytica strain F (field isolate) and M. haemolytica strain R (reference strain), respectively. Through overlay assays and 2-D electrophoresis, two OMP of 32.9 and 34.2 kDa with estimated IP of 8.18 and 9.35, respectively, were observed to bind both BapoLf and BholoLf; these OMP were identified by Maldi-Tof as OmpA (heat-modifiable OMP) and a membrane protein (porin). These M. haemolytica BLf binding proteins could be interacting in vivo with both forms of BLf depending on the iron state of the bovine. PMID:27599994

  8. Ca2+ and membrane binding to annexin 3 modulate the structure and dynamics of its N terminus and domain III

    PubMed Central

    Sopkova, Jana; Raguenes-Nicol, Céline; Vincent, Michel; Chevalier, Anne; Lewit-Bentley, Anita; Russo-Marie, Françoise; Gallay, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    Annexin 3 (ANX A3) represents ∼1% of the total protein of human neutrophils and promotes tight contact between membranes of isolated specific granules in vitro leading to their aggregation. Like for other annexins, the primary molecular events of the action of this protein is likely its binding to negatively charged phospholipid membranes in a Ca2+-dependent manner, via Ca2+-binding sites located on the convex side of the highly conserved core of the molecule. The conformation and dynamics of domain III can be affected by this process, as it was shown for other members of the family. The 20 amino-acid, N-terminal segment of the protein also could be affected and also might play a role in the modulation of its binding to the membranes. The structure and dynamics of these two regions were investigated by fluorescence of the two tryptophan residues of the protein (respectively, W190 in domain III and W5 in the N-terminal segment) in the wild type and in single-tryptophan mutants. By contrast to ANX A5, which shows a closed conformation and a buried W187 residue in the absence of Ca2+, domain III of ANX A3 exhibits an open conformation and a widely solvent-accessible W190 residue in the same conditions. This is in agreement with the three-dimensional structure of the ANX A3-E231A mutant lacking the bidentate Ca2+ ligand in domain III. Ca2+ in the millimolar concentration range provokes nevertheless a large mobility increase of the W190 residue, while interaction with the membranes reduces it slightly. In the N-terminal region, the W5 residue, inserted in the central pore of the protein, is weakly accessible to the solvent and less mobile than W190. Its amplitude of rotation increases upon binding of Ca2+ and returns to its original value when interacting with membranes. Ca2+ concentration for half binding of the W5A mutant to negatively charged membranes is ∼0.5 mM while it increases to ∼1 mM for the ANX A3 wild type and to ∼3 mM for the W190 ANX A3 mutant. In

  9. Identification of leukotriene D4 specific binding sites in the membrane preparation isolated from guinea pig lung

    SciTech Connect

    Mong, S.; Wu, H.L.; Clark, M.A.; Stadel, J.M.; Gleason, J.G.; Crooke, S.T.

    1984-12-01

    A radioligand binding assay has been established to study leukotriene specific binding sites in the guinea pig and rabbit tissues. Using high specific activity (/sup 3/H)-leukotriene D4 (( /sup 3/H)-LTD4), in the presence or absence of unlabeled LTD4, the diastereoisomer of LTD4 (5R,6S-LTD4), leukotriene E4 (LTE4) and the end-organ antagonist, FPL 55712, the authors have identified specific binding sites for (/sup 3/H)-LTD4 in the crude membrane fraction isolated from guinea pig lung. The time required for (/sup 3/H)-LTD4 binding to reach equilibrium was approximately 20 to 25 min at 37 degrees C in the presence of 10 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.5) containing 150 mM NaCl. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-LTD4 to the specific sites was saturable, reversible and stereospecific. The maximal number of binding sites (Bmax), derived from Scatchard analysis, was approximately 320 +/- 200 fmol per mg of crude membrane protein. The dissociation constants, derived from kinetic and saturation analyses, were 9.7 nM and 5 +/- 4 nM, respectively. The specific binding sites could not be detected in the crude membrane fraction prepared from guinea pig ileum, brain and liver, or rabbit lung, trachea, ileum and uterus. In radioligand competition experiments, LTD4, FPL 55712 and 5R,6S-LTD4 competed with (/sup 3/H)-LTD4. The metabolic inhibitors of arachidonic acid and SKF 88046, an antagonist of the indirectly-mediated actions of LTD4, did not significantly compete with (/sup 3/H)-LTD4 at the specific binding sites. These correlations indicated that these specific binding sites may be the putative leukotriene receptors in the guinea-pig lung.

  10. Protein-binding site at the immunoglobulin mu membrane polyadenylylation signal: possible role in transcription termination.

    PubMed Central

    Law, R; Kuwabara, M D; Briskin, M; Fasel, N; Hermanson, G; Sigman, D S; Wall, R

    1987-01-01

    mRNAs specifying immunoglobulin mu and delta heavy chains are encoded by a single large, complex transcription unit (mu + delta gene). The transcriptional activity of delta gene segments in terminally differentiated, IgM-secreting B lymphocytes is 10-20 times lower than in earlier B-lineage cells expressing delta mRNA. We find that transcription of the mu + delta gene in IgM-secreting murine myeloma cells terminates within a region of 500-1000 nucleotides immediately following the mu membrane (mu m) polyadenylylation site. Transcription decreases only minimally through this region in murine cell lines representative of earlier stages in B-cell development. A DNA fragment containing the mu m polyadenylylation signal gives protein-DNA complexes with different mobilities in gel retardation assays with nuclear extracts from myeloma cells than with nuclear extracts from earlier B-lineage cells. However, using a recently developed "footprinting" procedure in which protein-DNA complexes resolved in gel retardation assays are subjected to nucleolytic cleavage while still in the polyacrylamide gel, we find that the DNA sequences protected by factors from the two cell types are indistinguishable. The factor-binding site on the DNA is located 5' of the mu m polyadenylylation signal AATAAA and includes the 15-nucleotide-long A + T-rich palindrome CTGTAAACAAATGTC. This type of palindromic binding site exhibits orientation-dependent activity consistent with the reported properties of polymerase II termination signals. This binding site is followed by two sets of directly repeated DNA sequences with different helical conformation as revealed by their reactivity with the chemical nuclease 1,10-phenanthroline-copper. The close proximity of these features to the signals for mu m mRNA processing may reflect a linkage of the processes of developmentally regulated mu m polyadenylylation and transcription termination. Images PMID:3122214

  11. Specific binding of a ligand of sigma-opioid receptors - N-allylnormetazocine (SKF 10047) - with liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Samovilova, N.N.; Yarygin, K.N.; Vinogradov, V.A.

    1986-08-01

    A ligand of the sigma-opioid receptors - N-allylnormetazocine (SKF 10047) -binds specifically and reversible with rat liver membranes. In relation to a number of properties, the sites binding SKF 10047 in the liver are similar to the sigma-opioid receptors of the central nervous system. They do not interact with classical opiates (morphine, naloxone) and with opioid peptides, but bind well benzomorphans (bremazocine, SKF 10047) and a number of compounds of different chemical structures with a pronounced psychtropic action (haloperidol, imipramine, phencyclidine, etc.).

  12. Kinase Associated-1 Domains Drive MARK/PAR1 Kinases to Membrane Targets by Binding Acidic Phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Slochower, David; Janmey, Paul A.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2011-09-28

    Phospholipid-binding modules such as PH, C1, and C2 domains play crucial roles in location-dependent regulation of many protein kinases. Here, we identify the KA1 domain (kinase associated-1 domain), found at the C terminus of yeast septin-associated kinases (Kcc4p, Gin4p, and Hsl1p) and human MARK/PAR1 kinases, as a membrane association domain that binds acidic phospholipids. Membrane localization of isolated KA1 domains depends on phosphatidylserine. Using X-ray crystallography, we identified a structurally conserved binding site for anionic phospholipids in KA1 domains from Kcc4p and MARK1. Mutating this site impairs membrane association of both KA1 domains and intact proteins and reveals the importance of phosphatidylserine for bud neck localization of yeast Kcc4p. Our data suggest that KA1 domains contribute to coincidence detection, allowing kinases to bind other regulators (such as septins) only at the membrane surface. These findings have important implications for understanding MARK/PAR1 kinases, which are implicated in Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and autism.

  13. Binding of glycosaminoglycans to cyano-activated agarose membranes: kinetic and diffusional effects on yield and homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Mattern, Kristin J; Deen, William M

    2007-11-01

    Methods were developed for binding a glycosaminoglycan (GAG, a 50 kDa chondroitin sulfate) to thin agarose membranes using 1-cyano-4-(dimethylamino)pyridinium tetrafluoroborate (CDAP) as the activating agent. Process conditions were optimized to achieve high yields and spatially uniform concentrations of bound ligand. Yields were varied mainly by manipulating the duration and temperature of the aqueous washes prior to coupling, which affected the concentration of active sites available for subsequent GAG binding. The rate constants for degradation of the active cyanate esters in 0.1M bicarbonate solutions were 0.24+/-0.02 h(-1) at 4 degrees C and 0.08+/-0.03 h(-1) at 0 degrees C. Steric limitations in the 3% agarose gels severely restricted binding, with only about 0.1% of active sites being accessible to GAG molecules. The GAG binding occurred primarily in the outer 50-70 microm of the membranes, so that coupling was homogeneous only for thin gels. A model of GAG diffusion and reaction in the coupling step was developed to explain the observed effects of parameters such as the GAG concentration in solution and the membrane thickness. An analysis of the key time scales in the synthesis provides design principles that should be useful also for other cyanylating agents, other ligands, and for beads as well as membranes. PMID:17610855

  14. Structural and biochemical studies reveal UbiG/Coq3 as a class of novel membrane-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuwei; Wu, Bo; Zhang, Xu; Fan, Xiaojiao; Niu, Liwen; Li, Xu; Wang, Junfeng; Teng, Maikun

    2015-08-15

    UbiG and Coq3 (orthologue in eukaryotes) are SAM-MTases (S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases) that catalyse both O-methylation steps in CoQ biosynthesis from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. However, the detailed molecular mechanism by which they function remains elusive. In the present paper, we report that UbiG/Coq3 defines a novel class of membrane-binding proteins. Escherichia coli UbiG binds specifically to liposomes containing PG (phosphatidylglycerol) or CL (cardiolipin, or diphosphatidylglycerol), two major lipid components of the E. coli plasma membrane, whereas human and yeast Coq3 display a strong preference for liposomes enriched with CL, a signature lipid of the mitochondrial membrane. The crystal structure of UbiG from E. coli was determined at 2.1 Å (1 Å = 0.1 nm) resolution. The structure exhibits a typical Class I SAM-MTase fold with several variations, including a unique insertion between strand β5 and helix α10. This insertion is highly conserved and is required for membrane binding. Mutation of the key residues renders UbiG unable to efficiently bind liposome in vitro and the mutant fails to rescue the phenotype of ΔubiG strain in vivo. Taken together, our results shed light on a novel biochemical function of the UbiG/Coq3 protein. PMID:26251450

  15. Binding of glycosaminoglycans to cyano-activated agarose membranes: kinetic and diffusional effects on yield and homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Mattern, Kristin J; Deen, William M

    2007-11-01

    Methods were developed for binding a glycosaminoglycan (GAG, a 50 kDa chondroitin sulfate) to thin agarose membranes using 1-cyano-4-(dimethylamino)pyridinium tetrafluoroborate (CDAP) as the activating agent. Process conditions were optimized to achieve high yields and spatially uniform concentrations of bound ligand. Yields were varied mainly by manipulating the duration and temperature of the aqueous washes prior to coupling, which affected the concentration of active sites available for subsequent GAG binding. The rate constants for degradation of the active cyanate esters in 0.1M bicarbonate solutions were 0.24+/-0.02 h(-1) at 4 degrees C and 0.08+/-0.03 h(-1) at 0 degrees C. Steric limitations in the 3% agarose gels severely restricted binding, with only about 0.1% of active sites being accessible to GAG molecules. The GAG binding occurred primarily in the outer 50-70 microm of the membranes, so that coupling was homogeneous only for thin gels. A model of GAG diffusion and reaction in the coupling step was developed to explain the observed effects of parameters such as the GAG concentration in solution and the membrane thickness. An analysis of the key time scales in the synthesis provides design principles that should be useful also for other cyanylating agents, other ligands, and for beads as well as membranes.

  16. Novel structures in secreting the androgenic gland hormone.

    PubMed

    Negishi, S; Hasegawa, Y; Nakajima, Y

    2001-12-01

    The secretory granules in the androgenic gland of the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare, which have been indistinct for long time because of vulnerable structures, were revealed by using the rapid-freezing and freeze-substitution method. The fine structure of the androgenic gland is conspicuous by the distribution of numerous particular organelles in the cytoplasm consisting of the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi complex, and by having a number of highly organized structures developed between the androgenic gland cells. The structures connect to the intercellular space, which is seen as intercellular canaliculi for exporting the androgenic gland hormone. The plasma membranes near the particular structure of the intercellular canaliculi in the androgenic gland are often specialized to form cellular junctions. The secretory granules including the electron-dense materials, which are supposed to be peptides of androgenic gland hormone, are distributed beside the particular structure of the intercellular canaliculi. Some of the granules are seen to fuse with the plasma membranes. This observation suggests that, in the Armadillidium vulgare, the secretory granules containing androgenic gland hormone are transferred to the extracellular space through the intercellular canaliculi particularly developed for exporting the peptide hormone. This is the first evidence to show the secretory mechanism of the androgenic gland hormone in the Isopoda. PMID:11911080

  17. Spongian diterpenoids inhibit androgen receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu Chi; Meimetis, Labros G; Tien, Amy H; Mawji, Nasrin R; Carr, Gavin; Wang, Jun; Andersen, Raymond J; Sadar, Marianne D

    2013-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor and a validated drug target for all stages of prostate cancer. Antiandrogens compete with physiological ligands for AR ligand-binding domain (LBD). High-throughput screening of a marine natural product library for small molecules that inhibit AR transcriptional activity yielded the furanoditerpenoid spongia-13(16),-14-dien-19-oic acid, designated terpene 1 (T1). Characterization of T1 and the structurally related semi-synthetic analogues (T2 and T3) revealed that these diterpenoids have antiandrogen properties that include inhibition of both androgen-dependent proliferation and AR transcriptional activity by a mechanism that involved competing with androgen for AR LBD and blocking essential N/C interactions required for androgen-induced AR transcriptional activity. Structure activity relationship analyses revealed some chemical features of T1 that are associated with activity and yielded T3 as the most potent analogue. In vivo, T3 significantly reduced the weight of seminal vesicles, which are an androgen-dependent tissue, thereby confirming T3’s on-target activity. The ability to create analogues of diterpenoids that have varying antiandrogen activity represents a novel class of chemical compounds for the analysis of AR ligand-binding properties and therapeutic development. PMID:23443807

  18. Two successive calcium-dependent transitions mediate membrane binding and oligomerization of daptomycin and the related antibiotic A54145.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Robert; Butt, Khalida; Scott, Bradley; Zhang, TianHua; Muraih, Jawad K; Mintzer, Evan; Taylor, Scott; Palmer, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Daptomycin and A54145 are homologous lipopeptide antibiotics that permeabilize the cell membranes of Gram-positive bacteria. Membrane permeabilization depends on the presence of both phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and calcium, and it involves the formation of oligomeric transmembrane pores that consist of approximately 6-8 subunits. We here show that each lipopeptide molecule binds two calcium ions in separable, successive steps. The first calcium ion causes the lipopeptide molecule to bind to the target membrane, and likely to form a loosely associated oligomer. Higher calcium concentrations induce binding of a second ion, which produces the more tightly associated and more deeply membrane-inserted final, functional form of the oligomer. Both calcium-dependent steps are accompanied by fluorescence signals that indicate transition of specific amino acid residues into less polar environments, suggestive of insertion into the target membrane. Our findings agree with the earlier observation that two of the four acidic amino acid residues in the daptomycin molecule are essential for antibacterial activity. PMID:27237728

  19. Targeting Cell Membrane Lipid Rafts by Stoichiometric Functionalization of Gold Nanoparticles With a Sphingolipid-Binding Domain Peptide.

    PubMed

    Paramelle, David; Nieves, Daniel; Brun, Benjamin; Kraut, Rachel S; Fernig, David G

    2015-04-22

    A non-membrane protein-based nanoparticle agent for the tracking of lipid rafts on live cells is produced by stoichiometric functionalization of gold nanoparticles with a previously characterized sphingolipid- and cell membrane microdomain-binding domain peptide (SBD). The SBD peptide is inserted in a self-assembled monolayer of peptidol and alkane thiol ethylene glycol, on gold nanoparticles surface. The stoichiometric functionalization of nanoparticles with the SBD peptide, essential for single molecule tracking, is achieved by means of non-affinity nanoparticle purification. The SBD-nanoparticles have remarkable long-term resistance to electrolyte-induced aggregation and ligand-exchange and have no detectable non-specific binding to live cells. Binding and diffusion of SBD-nanoparticles bound to the membrane of live cells is measured by real-time photothermal microscopy and shows the dynamics of sphingolipid-enriched microdomains on cells membrane, with evidence for clustering, splitting, and diffusion over time of the SBD-nanoparticle labeled membrane domains. The monofunctionalized SBD-nanoparticle is a promising targeting agent for the tracking of lipid rafts independently of their protein composition and the labelling requires no prior modification of the cells. This approach has potential for further functionalization of the particles to manipulate the organization of, or targeting to microdomains that control signaling events and thereby lead to novel diagnostics and therapeutics.

  20. Complementary DNA for the folate binding protein correctly predicts anchoring to the membrane by glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol.

    PubMed Central

    Lacey, S W; Sanders, J M; Rothberg, K G; Anderson, R G; Kamen, B A

    1989-01-01

    Membrane bound and soluble forms of a high-affinity folate binding protein have been found in kidney, placenta, serum, milk, and in several cell lines. The two forms have similar binding characteristics for folates, are immunologically cross-reactive and based upon limited amino acid sequence data, are nearly identical. Based upon pulse-chase experiments, a precursor-product relationship has been suggested. The membrane form has been shown to mediate the transport of folate in cells grown in physiological concentrations of folate. A function for the soluble form has not yet been identified. We constructed a cDNA library from a human carcinoma cell line, Caco-2, which expresses the membrane form abundantly. The library was screened and a near full-length cDNA for the folate binder was isolated. Transfection of COS cells with the cDNA inserted in an expression vector resulted in marked overexpression of a membrane-associated folate binder as assessed by direct binding of radiolabeled folate and by indirect immunofluorescence. The deduced amino acid sequence is not consistent with a typical membrane spanning domain but rather with a signal for anchoring via a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol linkage. Release of the binder with a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C strongly supports this hypothesis. Images PMID:2527252

  1. Bacteriocin AS-48 binding to model membranes and pore formation as revealed by coarse-grained simulations.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Victor L; Ramos, Javier; Melo, Manuel N; Martinez-Salazar, Javier

    2013-11-01

    Bacteriocin AS-48 is a membrane-interacting peptide that acts as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Prior Nuclear Magnetic Resonance experiments and the high resolution crystal structure of AS-48 have suggested a mechanism for the molecular activity of AS-48 whereby the peptide undergoes transition from a water-soluble to a membrane-bound state upon membrane binding. To help interpret experimental results, we here simulate the molecular dynamics of this binding mechanism at the coarse-grained level. By simulating the self-assembly of the peptide, we predict induction by the bacteriocin of different pore types consistent with a "leaky slit" model.

  2. Membrane binding properties of EBV gp110 C-terminal domain; evidences for structural transition in the membrane environment

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung Jean; Seo, Min-Duk; Lee, Suk Kyeong; Lee, Bong Jin

    2008-09-30

    Gp110 of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) mainly localizes on nuclear/ER membranes and plays a role in the assembly of EBV nucleocapsid. The C-terminal tail domain (gp110 CTD) is essential for the function of gp110 and the nuclear/ER membranes localization of gp110 is ruled by its C-terminal unique nuclear localization signal (NLS), consecutive four arginines. In the present study, the structural properties of gp110 CTD in membrane mimics were investigated using CD, size-exclusion chromatography, and NMR, to elucidate the effect of membrane environment on the structural transition and to compare the structural feature of the protein in the solution state with that of the membrane-bound form. CD and NMR analysis showed that gp110 CTD in a buffer solution appears to adopt a stable folding intermediate which lacks compactness, and a highly helical structure is formed only in membrane environments. The helical content of gp110 CTD was significantly affected by the negative charge as well as the size of membrane mimics. Based on the elution profiles of the size-exclusion chromatography, we found that gp110 CTD intrinsically forms a trimer, revealing that a trimerization region may exist in the C-terminal domain of gp110 like the ectodomain of gp110. The mutation of NLS (RRRR) to RTTR does not affect the overall structure of gp110 CTD in membrane mimics, while the helical propensity in a buffer solution was slightly different between the wild-type and the mutant proteins. This result suggests that not only the helicity induced in membrane environment but also the local structure around NLS may be related to trafficking to the nuclear membrane. More detailed structural difference between the wild-type and the mutant in membrane environment was examined using synthetic two peptides including the wild-type NLS and the mutant NLS.

  3. In vitro screening of psychoactive drugs by [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding in rat brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Ryouichi; Nagai, Fumiko; Ogata, Akio; Satoh, Kanako

    2007-12-01

    We constructed a reproducible, simple, and small-scale determination method of the psychoactive drugs that acted directly on the monoamine receptor by measuring the activation of [(35)S]guanosine-5'-O-(3-thio)-triphosphate binding to guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). This method can simultaneously measure the effects of three monoamines, namely dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), and norepinephrine (NE), in rat brain membranes using a 96-well microplate. Activation of D(1) and D(2) receptors in striatal membranes by DA as well as 5-HT and NEalpha(2) receptors in cortical membranes could be measured. Of 12 tested phenethylamines, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-chlorophenethylamine (2C-C), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-ethylphenethylamine (2C-E), and 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenethylamine (2C-I) stimulated G protein binding. The other phenethylamines did not affect G protein binding. All 7 tryptamines tested stimulated G protein binding with the following rank order of potency; 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT)>5-methoxy-N,N-diallyltryptamine (5-MeO-DALT)>5-methoxy-alpha-methyltryptamine (5-MeO-AMT)>or=5-methoxy-N,N-methylisopropyltryptamine (5-MeO-MIPT)>5-methoxy-N,N-diisopropyltryptamine (5-MeO-DIPT)>N,N-dipropyltryptamine (DPT)>or=alpha-methyltryptamine (AMT). This assay system was able to designate psychoactive drugs as prohibited substances in accordance with criteria set forth by the Tokyo Metropolitan government.

  4. Host and viral RNA-binding proteins involved in membrane targeting, replication and intercellular movement of plant RNA virus genomes

    PubMed Central

    Hyodo, Kiwamu; Kaido, Masanori; Okuno, Tetsuro

    2014-01-01

    Many plant viruses have positive-strand RNA [(+)RNA] as their genome. Therefore, it is not surprising that RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play important roles during (+)RNA virus infection in host plants. Increasing evidence demonstrates that viral and host RBPs play critical roles in multiple steps of the viral life cycle, including translation and replication of viral genomic RNAs, and their intra- and intercellular movement. Although studies focusing on the RNA-binding activities of viral and host proteins, and their associations with membrane targeting, and intercellular movement of viral genomes have been limited to a few viruses, these studies have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the replication and movement of viral genomic RNAs. In this review, we briefly overview the currently defined roles of viral and host RBPs whose RNA-binding activity have been confirmed experimentally in association with their membrane targeting, and intercellular movement of plant RNA virus genomes. PMID:25071804

  5. Sex bias in CNS autoimmune disease mediated by androgen control of autoimmune regulator.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Meng-Lei; Bakhru, Pearl; Conley, Bridget; Nelson, Jennifer S; Free, Meghan; Martin, Aaron; Starmer, Joshua; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Su, Maureen A

    2016-01-01

    Male gender is protective against multiple sclerosis and other T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. This protection may be due, in part, to higher androgen levels in males. Androgen binds to the androgen receptor (AR) to regulate gene expression, but how androgen protects against autoimmunity is not well understood. Autoimmune regulator (Aire) prevents autoimmunity by promoting self-antigen expression in medullary thymic epithelial cells, such that developing T cells that recognize these self-antigens within the thymus undergo clonal deletion. Here we show that androgen upregulates Aire-mediated thymic tolerance to protect against autoimmunity. Androgen recruits AR to Aire promoter regions, with consequent enhancement of Aire transcription. In mice and humans, thymic Aire expression is higher in males compared with females. Androgen administration and male gender protect against autoimmunity in a multiple sclerosis mouse model in an Aire-dependent manner. Thus, androgen control of an intrathymic Aire-mediated tolerance mechanism contributes to gender differences in autoimmunity. PMID:27072778

  6. Androgens and skeletal muscle: cellular and molecular action mechanisms underlying the anabolic actions.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël; Boonen, Steven; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2012-05-01

    Androgens increase both the size and strength of skeletal muscle via diverse mechanisms. The aim of this review is to discuss the different cellular targets of androgens in skeletal muscle as well as the respective androgen actions in these cells leading to changes in proliferation, myogenic differentiation, and protein metabolism. Androgens bind and activate a specific nuclear receptor which will directly affect the transcription of target genes. These genes encode muscle-specific transcription factors, enzymes, structural proteins, as well as microRNAs. In addition, anabolic action of androgens is partly established through crosstalk with other signaling molecules such as Akt, myostatin, IGF-I, and Notch. Finally, androgens may also exert non-genomic effects in muscle by increasing Ca(2+) uptake and modulating kinase activities. In conclusion, the anabolic effect of androgens on skeletal muscle is not only explained by activation of the myocyte androgen receptor but is also the combined result of many genomic and non-genomic actions.

  7. Physicochemical characterization of camptothecin membrane binding properties and polymeric microsphere formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvi, Bilge

    In an effort to design novel formulation strategies to optimize the antitumor activity of camptothecin (CPT), the physicochemical and membrane binding properties of the drug, were investigated by various techniques in acidic and physiological pH. The intrinsic solubility of the CPT-lactone free base was determined to be 3.44 muM and 5.11 muM at 22°C and 37°C, respectively. The equilibrium solubility of the drug was found to increase with increasing temperature and decreasing pH. The enhanced solubility of the drug at very low pH is attributed to the protonation of the nitrogen atom in the ring B and the increased solvency of the highly acidic media. The logarithmic value of the intrinsic partition coefficient P of the free base CPT-lactone form was estimated to be 1.65, characteristic of a molecule suitable for oral absorption. The association constants Kf of the drug for bilayers composed of the zwitterionic 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and the negatively-charged 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho- rac-(1-glycerol) (DOPG) were studied at acidic pH by fluorescence anisotropy and determined to be 35.4 +/- 4.5 M-1 and 93.1 +/- 11.0 M-1 for DOPC and DOPG, respectively, indicating a tendency of CPT to preferentially bind to negatively charged membranes. The energy of activation for the hydrolysis of CPT at physiological pH was found to be 114.3 +/- 33.4 kj/mole. The calculated t½ of the reaction at pH 7.2 at temperatures 25°C and 10°C was found to be 0.07 days and 5.12 days, respectively, whereas the time required for 1% of CPT-lactone to hydrolyze to CPT-carboxylate (t99%) was determined to be 1.8 hours, thus offering enough time to safely handle CPT-lactone at low temperatures. The preformulation results indicated that at highly acidic media CPT is positively charged and exists at its stable lactone form of increased solubility and has a capacity to bind to negatively charged membranes. Taking advantage of the increased stability of CPT in

  8. Androgen receptor-mediated non-genomic regulation of prostate cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ross S.; Ma, Shihong; Miao, Lu; Li, Rui; Yin, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR)-mediated signaling is necessary for prostate cancer cell proliferation and an important target for therapeutic drug development. Canonically, AR signals through a genomic or transcriptional pathway, involving the translocation of androgen-bound AR to the nucleus, its binding to cognate androgen response elements on promoter, with ensuing modulation of target gene expression, leading to cell proliferation. However, prostate cancer cells can show dose-dependent proliferation responses to androgen within minutes, without the need for genomic AR signaling. This proliferation response known as the non-genomic AR signaling is mediated by cytoplasmic AR, which facilitates the activation of kinase-signaling cascades, including the Ras-Raf-1, phosphatidyl-inositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and protein kinase C (PKC), which in turn converge on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, leading to cell proliferation. Further, since activated ERK may also phosphorylate AR and its coactivators, the non-genomic AR signaling may enhance AR genomic activity. Non-genomic AR signaling may occur in an ERK-independent manner, via activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, or modulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration through plasma membrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These data suggest that therapeutic strategies aimed at preventing AR nuclear translocation and genomic AR signaling alone may not completely abrogate AR signaling. Thus, elucidation of mechanisms that underlie non-genomic AR signaling may identify potential mechanisms of resistance to current anti-androgens and help developing novel therapies that abolish all AR signaling in prostate cancer. PMID:26816736

  9. Interactions between Plasmodium falciparum skeleton-binding protein 1 and the membrane skeleton of malaria-infected red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Donna W.; Blanc, Lionel; Hale, John; Guo, Xinhua; Pei, Xinhong; Herrmann, Susann; Hanssen, Eric G.; Coppel, Ross L.; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli; Cooke, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    During development inside red blood cells (RBCs), Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites export proteins that associate with the RBC membrane skeleton. These interactions cause profound changes to the biophysical properties of RBCs that underpin the often severe and fatal clinical manifestations of falciparum malaria. P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is one such exported parasite protein that plays a major role in malaria pathogenesis since its exposure on the parasitised RBC surface mediates their adhesion to vascular endothelium and placental syncytioblasts. En route to the RBC membrane skeleton, PfEMP1 transiently associates with Maurer's clefts (MCs), parasite-derived membranous structures in the RBC cytoplasm. We have previously shown that a resident MC protein, skeleton-binding protein 1 (SBP1), is essential for the placement of PfEMP1 onto the RBC surface and hypothesised that the function of SBP1 may be to target MCs to the RBC membrane. Since this would require additional protein interactions, we set out to identify binding partners for SBP1. Using a combination of approaches, we have defined the region of SBP1 that binds specifically to defined subdomains of two major components of the RBC membrane skeleton, protein 4.1R and spectrin. We show that these interactions serve as one mechanism to anchor MCs to the RBC membrane skeleton, however, while they appear to be necessary, they are not sufficient for the translocation of PfEMP1 onto the RBC surface. The N-terminal domain of SBP1 that resides within the lumen of MCs clearly plays an essential, but presently unknown role in this process. PMID:25883090

  10. Interactions between Plasmodium falciparum skeleton-binding protein 1 and the membrane skeleton of malaria-infected red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Kats, Lev M; Proellocks, Nicholas I; Buckingham, Donna W; Blanc, Lionel; Hale, John; Guo, Xinhua; Pei, Xinhong; Herrmann, Susann; Hanssen, Eric G; Coppel, Ross L; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli; Cooke, Brian M

    2015-07-01

    During development inside red blood cells (RBCs), Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites export proteins that associate with the RBC membrane skeleton. These interactions cause profound changes to the biophysical properties of RBCs that underpin the often severe and fatal clinical manifestations of falciparum malaria. P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is one such exported parasite protein that plays a major role in malaria pathogenesis since its exposure on the parasitised RBC surface mediates their adhesion to vascular endothelium and placental syncytioblasts. En route to the RBC membrane skeleton, PfEMP1 transiently associates with Maurer's clefts (MCs), parasite-derived membranous structures in the RBC cytoplasm. We have previously shown that a resident MC protein, skeleton-binding protein 1 (SBP1), is essential for the placement of PfEMP1 onto the RBC surface and hypothesised that the function of SBP1 may be to target MCs to the RBC membrane. Since this would require additional protein interactions, we set out to identify binding partners for SBP1. Using a combination of approaches, we have defined the region of SBP1 that binds specifically to defined sub-domains of two major components of the RBC membrane skeleton, protein 4.1R and spectrin. We show that these interactions serve as one mechanism to anchor MCs to the RBC membrane skeleton, however, while they appear to be necessary, they are not sufficient for the translocation of PfEMP1 onto the RBC surface. The N-terminal domain of SBP1 that resides within the lumen of MCs clearly plays an essential, but presently unknown role in this process.

  11. KDEL-Containing Auxin-Binding Protein Is Secreted to the Plasma Membrane and Cell Wall.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A. M.; Herman, E. M.

    1993-01-01

    The auxin-binding protein ABP1 has been postulated to mediate auxin-induced cellular changes associated with cell expansion. This protein contains the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal, the tetrapeptide lysine-aspartic acid-glutamic acid-leucine (KDEL), at its carboxy terminus, consistent with previous subcellular fractionation data that indicated an ER location for ABP1. We used electron microscopic immunocytochemistry to identify the subcellular localization of ABP1. Using maize (Zea mays) coleoptile tissue and a black Mexican sweet (BMS) maize cell line, we found that ABP1 is located in the ER as expected, but is also on or closely associated with the plasma membrane and within the cell wall. Labeling of the Golgi apparatus suggests that the transport of ABP1 to the cell wall occurs via the secretory system. Inhibition of secretion of an ABP homolog into the medium of BMS cell cultures by brefeldin A, a drug that specifically blocks secretion, is consistent with this secretion pathway. The secreted protein was recognized by an anti-KDEL peptide antibody, strongly supporting the interpretation that movement of this protein out of the ER does not involve loss of the carboxy-terminal signal. Cells starved for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid for 72 h retained less ABP in the cell and secreted more of it into the medium. The significance of our observations is 2-fold. We have identified a KDEL-containing protein that specifically escapes the ER retention system, and we provide an explanation for the apparent discrepancy that most of the ABP is located in the ER, whereas ABP and auxin act at the plasma membrane. PMID:12231715

  12. Enhanced membrane binding of autoantibodies to cultured keratinocytes of systemic lupus erythematosus patients after ultraviolet B/ultraviolet A irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Golan, T D; Elkon, K B; Gharavi, A E; Krueger, J G

    1992-01-01

    Although sunlight is known to induce skin lesions in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to exacerbate systemic manifestations, the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. We report experiments that show enhanced binding of IgG autoantibodies to the cell surface membrane of ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiated (200-1,600 J/m2) cultured SLE keratinocytes in 10 out of 12 such cell strains. The autoantibody probes showing increased binding were directed against the soluble intracellular antigens, Sm, RNP, SSA/Ro, SSB/La, whereas serum with anti-dsDNA activity did not demonstrate such binding. Control keratinocytes from several sources shared low level binding of autoantibodies after ultraviolet light exposure. In addition, 4/6 UVB-sensitive SLE strains showed increased autoantibody binding to the surface of SLE keratinocytes after UVA exposure (50-150 kJ/m2), but of lower magnitude. When UVB-sensitive nonirradiated SLE strains were exposed to autologous serum, 3/8 sera demonstrated a striking increase in IgG binding, which increased further after UVB exposure. Enhanced expression of saline-soluble intracellular antigens on the cell surface membrane of patient, but not control, keratinocytes may, in part, explain the photosensitivity of patients with SLE. Images PMID:1522215

  13. Identification and properties of very high affinity brain membrane-binding sites for a neurotoxic phospholipase from the taipan venom

    SciTech Connect

    Lambeau, G.; Barhanin, J.; Schweitz, H.; Qar, J.; Lazdunski, M. )

    1989-07-05

    Four new monochain phospholipases were purified from the Oxyuranus scutellatus (taipan) venom. Three of them were highly toxic when injected into mice brain. One of these neurotoxic phospholipases, OS2, was iodinated and used in binding experiments to demonstrate the presence of two families of specific binding sites in rat brain synaptic membranes. The affinities were exceptionally high, Kd1 = 1.5 +/- 0.5 pM and Kd2 = 45 +/- 10 pM, and the maximal binding capacities were Bmax 1 = 1 +/- 0.4 and Bmax 2 = 3 +/- 0.5 pmol/mg of protein. Both binding sites were sensitive to proteolysis and demonstrated to be located on proteins of Mr 85,000-88,000 and 36,000-51,000 by cross-linking and photoaffinity labeling techniques. The binding of {sup 125}I-OS2 to synaptic membranes was dependent on Ca2+ ions and enhanced by Zn2+ ions which inhibit phospholipase activity. Competition experiments have shown that, except for beta-bungarotoxin, a number of known toxic snake or bee phospholipases have very high affinities for the newly identified binding sites. A good correlation (r = 0.80) was observed between toxicity and affinity but not between phospholipase activity and affinity.

  14. Uncommon structural motifs dominate the antigen binding site in human autoantibodies reactive with basement membrane collagen.

    PubMed

    Foster, Mary H; Buckley, Elizabeth S; Chen, Benny J; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Clark, Amy G

    2016-08-01

    Autoantibodies mediate organ destruction in multiple autoimmune diseases, yet their origins in patients remain poorly understood. To probe the genetic origins and structure of disease-associated autoantibodies, we engrafted immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and immunized with the non-collagenous-1 (NC1) domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen. This antigen is expressed in lungs and kidneys and is targeted by autoantibodies in anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis and Goodpasture syndrome (GPS), prototypic human organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Using Epstein Barr virus transformation and cell fusion, six human anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen monoclonal autoantibodies (mAb) were recovered, including subsets reactive with human kidney and with epitopes recognized by patients' IgG. Sequence analysis reveals a long to exceptionally long heavy chain complementarity determining region3 (HCDR3), the major site of antigen binding, in all six mAb. Mean HCDR3 length is 25.5 amino acids (range 20-36), generated from inherently long DH and JH genes and extended regions of non-templated N-nucleotides. Long HCDR3 are suited to forming noncontiguous antigen contacts and to binding recessed, immunologically silent epitopes hidden from conventional antibodies, as seen with self-antigen crossreactive broadly neutralizing anti-HIV Ig (bnAb). The anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen mAb also show preferential use of unmutated variable region genes that are enriched among human chronic lymphocytic leukemia antibodies that share features with natural polyreactive Ig. Our findings suggest unexpected relationships between pathogenic anti-collagen Ig, bnAb, and autoreactive Ig associated with malignancy, all of which arise from B cells expressing unconventional structural elements that may require transient escape from tolerance for successful expansion. PMID:27450516

  15. Peripheral and integral membrane binding of peptides characterized by time-dependent fluorescence shifts: focus on antimicrobial peptide LAH₄.

    PubMed

    Macháň, Radek; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Olżyńska, Agnieszka; Olšinová, Marie; Cebecauer, Marek; Marquette, Arnaud; Bechinger, Burkhard; Hof, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Positioning of peptides with respect to membranes is an important parameter for biological and biophysical studies using model systems. Our experiments using five different membrane peptides suggest that the time-dependent fluorescence shift (TDFS) of Laurdan can help when distinguishing between peripheral and integral membrane binding and can be a useful, novel tool for studying the impact of transmembrane peptides (TMP) on membrane organization under near-physiological conditions. This article focuses on LAH4, a model α-helical peptide with high antimicrobial and nucleic acid transfection efficiencies. The predominantly helical peptide has been shown to orient in supported model membranes parallel to the membrane surface at acidic and, in a transmembrane manner, at basic pH. Here we investigate its interaction with fully hydrated large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) by TDFS and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). TDFS shows that at acidic pH LAH4 does not influence the glycerol region while at basic pH it makes acyl groups at the glycerol level of the membrane less mobile. TDFS experiments with antimicrobial peptides alamethicin and magainin 2, which are known to assume transmembrane and peripheral orientations, respectively, prove that changes in acyl group mobility at the glycerol level correlate with the orientation of membrane-associated peptide molecules. Analogous experiments with the TMPs LW21 and LAT show similar effects on the mobility of those acyl groups as alamethicin and LAH4 at basic pH. FCS, on the same neutral lipid bilayer vesicles, shows that the peripheral binding mode of LAH4 is more efficient in bilayer permeation than the transmembrane mode. In both cases, the addition of LAH4 does not lead to vesicle disintegration. The influence of negatively charged lipids on the bilayer permeation is also addressed.

  16. Glycodelin-A interacts with fucosyltransferase on human sperm plasma membrane to inhibit spermatozoa-zona pellucida binding.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Philip C N; Chung, Man-Kin; Koistinen, Riitta; Koistinen, Hannu; Seppala, Markku; Ho, Pak-Chung; Ng, Ernest H Y; Lee, Kai-Fai; Yeung, William S B

    2007-01-01

    Fertilization depends on successful binding of the spermatozoa to the zona pellucida of the oocyte. Glycodelin-A inhibits spermatozoa-zona pellucida binding. Previous data showed that glycodelin-A receptor(s) and zona pellucida protein receptor(s) on human spermatozoa are closely related. Using a chemical cross-linking approach, the glycodelin-A-sperm receptor complex was isolated. The receptor was identified to be fucosyltransferase-5 (FUT5) by mass spectrometry and confirmed with the use of anti-FUT5 antibodies. Sperm FUT5 was an externally oriented integral membrane protein in the acrosomal region of human spermatozoa. Biologically active FUT5 was purified from spermatozoa. Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction between glycodelin-A and sperm FUT5. Solubilized zona pellucida reduced the binding of glycodelin-A to sperm FUT5. An anti-FUT5 antibody and FUT5 acceptor blocked the binding of glycodelin-A to spermatozoa and the zona binding inhibitory activity of glycodelin-A. Sperm FUT5 bound strongly to intact and solubilized human zona pellucida. The equilibrium dissociation constant of sperm FUT5 binding to solubilized zona pellucida was 42.82 pmol/ml. These observations suggest that human sperm FUT5 is a receptor of glycodelin-A and zona pellucida proteins, and that glycodelin-A inhibits spermatozoa-zona binding by blocking the binding of sperm FUT5 to the zona pellucida.

  17. Eisosomes Are Dynamic Plasma Membrane Domains Showing Pil1-Lsp1 Heteroligomer Binding Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Olivera-Couto, Agustina; Salzman, Valentina; Mailhos, Milagros; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Aguilar, Pablo S.

    2015-01-01

    Eisosomes are plasma membrane domains concentrating lipids, transporters, and signaling molecules. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, these domains are structured by scaffolds composed mainly by two cytoplasmic proteins Pil1 and Lsp1. Eisosomes are immobile domains, have relatively uniform size, and encompass thousands of units of the core proteins Pil1 and Lsp1. In this work we used fluorescence fluctuation analytical methods to determine the dynamics of eisosome core proteins at different subcellular locations. Using a combination of scanning techniques with autocorrelation analysis, we show that Pil1 and Lsp1 cytoplasmic pools freely diffuse whereas an eisosome-associated fraction of these proteins exhibits slow dynamics that fit with a binding-unbinding equilibrium. Number and brightness analysis shows that the eisosome-associated fraction is oligomeric, while cytoplasmic pools have lower aggregation states. Fluorescence lifetime imaging results indicate that Pil1 and Lsp1 directly interact in the cytoplasm and within the eisosomes. These results support a model where Pil1-Lsp1 heterodimers are the minimal eisosomes building blocks. Moreover, individual-eisosome fluorescence fluctuation analysis shows that eisosomes in the same cell are not equal domains: while roughly half of them are mostly static, the other half is actively exchanging core protein subunits. PMID:25863055

  18. Androgens and the breast.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakakis, Constantine; Bondy, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    Androgens have important physiological effects in women while at the same time they may be implicated in breast cancer pathologies. However, data on the effects of androgens on mammary epithelial proliferation and/or breast cancer incidence are not in full agreement. We performed a literature review evaluating current clinical, genetic and epidemiological data regarding the role of androgens in mammary growth and neoplasia. Epidemiological studies appear to have significant methodological limitations and thus provide inconclusive results. The study of molecular defects involving androgenic pathways in breast cancer is still in its infancy. Clinical and nonhuman primate studies suggest that androgens inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth while conventional estrogen treatment suppresses endogenous androgens. Abundant clinical evidence suggests that androgens normally inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth. Suppression of androgens using conventional estrogen treatment may thus enhance estrogenic breast stimulation and possibly breast cancer risk. Addition of testosterone to the usual hormone therapy regimen may diminish the estrogen/progestin increase in breast cancer risk but the impact of this combined use on mammary gland homeostasis still needs evaluation.

  19. Androgens and the breast

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Androgens have important physiological effects in women while at the same time they may be implicated in breast cancer pathologies. However, data on the effects of androgens on mammary epithelial proliferation and/or breast cancer incidence are not in full agreement. We performed a literature review evaluating current clinical, genetic and epidemiological data regarding the role of androgens in mammary growth and neoplasia. Epidemiological studies appear to have significant methodological limitations and thus provide inconclusive results. The study of molecular defects involving androgenic pathways in breast cancer is still in its infancy. Clinical and nonhuman primate studies suggest that androgens inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth while conventional estrogen treatment suppresses endogenous androgens. Abundant clinical evidence suggests that androgens normally inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth. Suppression of androgens using conventional estrogen treatment may thus enhance estrogenic breast stimulation and possibly breast cancer risk. Addition of testosterone to the usual hormone therapy regimen may diminish the estrogen/progestin increase in breast cancer risk but the impact of this combined use on mammary gland homeostasis still needs evaluation. PMID:19889198

  20. Correlation of penicillin-binding protein composition with different functions of two membranes in Bacillus subtilis forespores.

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, C E; Neyman, S L

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) within different membranes of sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis was examined in an effort to correlate the location of individual PBPs with their proposed involvement in either cortical or vegetative peptidoglycan synthesis. The PBP composition of forespores was determined by two methods: examination of isolated forespore membranes and assay of the in vivo accessibility of the PBPs to penicillin. In both cases, it was apparent that PBP 5*, the major PBP synthesized during sporulation, was present primarily, but not exclusively, in the forespore. The membranes from mature dormant spores were prepared by either chemically stripping the integument layers of the spores, followed by lysozyme digestion, or lysozyme digestion alone of coat-defective gerE spores. PBP 5* was detected in membranes from unstripped spores but was never found in stripped ones, which suggests that the primary location of this PBP is the outer forespore membrane. This is consistent with a role for PBP 5* exclusively in cortex synthesis. In contrast, vegetative PBPs 1 and 2A were only observed in stripped spore preparations that were greatly enriched for the inner forespore membrane, which supports the proposed requirement for these PBPs early in germination. The apparent presence of PBP 3 in both membranes of the spore reinforces the suggestion that it catalyzes a step common to both cortical and vegetative peptidoglycan synthesis. Images PMID:3080407

  1. Binding Analyses of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry δ-Endotoxins Using Brush Border Membrane Vesicles of Ostrinia nubilalis

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Gang; Masson, Luke; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis; Schwab, George; Adang, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    Transgenic corn expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab gene is highly insecticidal to Ostrinia nubilalis (European corn borer) larvae. We ascertained whether Cry1F, Cry9C, or Cry9E recognizes the Cry1Ab binding site on the O. nubilalis brush border by three approaches. An optical biosensor technology based on surface plasmon resonance measured binding of brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) injected over a surface of immobilized Cry toxin. Preincubation with Cry1Ab reduced BBMV binding to immobilized Cry1Ab, whereas preincubation with Cry1F, Cry9C, or Cry9E did not inhibit BBMV binding. BBMV binding to a Cry1F-coated surface was reduced when vesicles were preincubated in Cry1F or Cry1Ab but not Cry9C or Cry9E. A radioligand approach measured 125I-Cry1Ab toxin binding to BBMV in the presence of homologous (Cry1Ab) and heterologous (Cry1Ac, Cry1F, Cry9C, or Cry9E) toxins. Unlabeled Cry1Ac effectively competed for 125I-Cry1Ab binding in a manner comparable to Cry1Ab itself. Unlabeled Cry9C and Cry9E toxins did not inhibit 125I-Cry1Ab binding to BBMV. Cry1F inhibited 125I-Cry1Ab binding at concentrations greater than 500 nM. Cry1F had low-level affinity for the Cry1Ab binding site. Ligand blot analysis identified Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, and Cry1F binding proteins in BBMV. The major Cry1Ab signals on ligand blots were at 145 kDa and 154 kDa, but a strong signal was present at 220 kDa and a weak signal was present at 167 kDa. Cry1Ac and Cry1F binding proteins were detected at 220 and 154 kDa. Anti-Manduca sexta aminopeptidase serum recognized proteins of 145, 154, and 167 kDa, and anti-cadherin serum recognized the 220 kDa protein. We speculate that isoforms of aminopeptidase and cadherin in the brush border membrane serve as Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, and Cry1F binding proteins. PMID:11157257

  2. ATP-binding cassette-like transporters are involved in the transport of lignin precursors across plasma and vacuolar membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Y.C.; Liu, C.

    2010-12-28

    Lignin is a complex biopolymer derived primarily from the condensation of three monomeric precursors, the monolignols. The synthesis of monolignols occurs in the cytoplasm. To reach the cell wall where they are oxidized and polymerized, they must be transported across the cell membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the transport process are unclear. There are conflicting views about whether the transport of these precursors occurs by passive diffusion or is an energized active process; further, we know little about what chemical forms are required. Using isolated plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles prepared from Arabidopsis, together with applying different transporter inhibitors in the assays, we examined the uptake of monolignols and their derivatives by these native membrane vesicles. We demonstrate that the transport of lignin precursors across plasmalemma and their sequestration into vacuoles are ATP-dependent primary-transport processes, involving ATP-binding cassette-like transporters. Moreover, we show that both plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles selectively transport different forms of lignin precursors. In the presence of ATP, the inverted plasma membrane vesicles preferentially take up monolignol aglycones, whereas the vacuolar vesicles are more specific for glucoconjugates, suggesting that the different ATP-binding cassette-like transporters recognize different chemical forms in conveying them to distinct sites, and that glucosylation of monolignols is necessary for their vacuolar storage but not required for direct transport into the cell wall in Arabidopsis.

  3. Structural basis for androgen specificity and oestrogen synthesis in human aromatase

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Debashis; Griswold, Jennifer; Erman, Mary; Pangborn, Walter

    2009-03-06

    Aromatase cytochrome P450 is the only enzyme in vertebrates known to catalyse the biosynthesis of all oestrogens from androgens. Aromatase inhibitors therefore constitute a frontline therapy for oestrogen-dependent breast cancer. In a three-step process, each step requiring 1 mol of O{sub 2}, 1 mol of NADPH, and coupling with its redox partner cytochrome P450 reductase, aromatase converts androstenedione, testosterone and 16{alpha}-hydroxytestosterone to oestrone, 17{beta}-oestradiol and 17{beta},16{alpha}-oestriol, respectively. The first two steps are C19-methyl hydroxylation steps, and the third involves the aromatization of the steroid A-ring, unique to aromatase. Whereas most P450s are not highly substrate selective, it is the hallmark androgenic specificity that sets aromatase apart. The structure of this enzyme of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane has remained unknown for decades, hindering elucidation of the biochemical mechanism. Here we present the crystal structure of human placental aromatase, the only natural mammalian, full-length P450 and P450 in hormone biosynthetic pathways to be crystallized so far. Unlike the active sites of many microsomal P450s that metabolize drugs and xenobiotics, aromatase has an androgen-specific cleft that binds the androstenedione molecule snugly. Hydrophobic and polar residues exquisitely complement the steroid backbone. The locations of catalytically important residues shed light on the reaction mechanism. The relative juxtaposition of the hydrophobic amino-terminal region and the opening to the catalytic cleft shows why membrane anchoring is necessary for the lipophilic substrates to gain access to the active site. The molecular basis for the enzyme's androgenic specificity and unique catalytic mechanism can be used for developing next-generation aromatase inhibitors.

  4. Characterization of A2A adenosine receptors in human lymphocyte membranes by [3H]-SCH 58261 binding

    PubMed Central

    Varani, Katia; Gessi, Stefania; Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Ongini, Ennio; Andrea Borea, Pier

    1997-01-01

    The present study describes for the first time the characterization of the adenosine A2A receptor in human lymphocyte membranes with the new potent and selective antagonist radioligand, [3H]-5-amino-7-(2-phenylethyl)-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo [4,3-e]-1,2,4 triazolo [1,5-c] pyrimidine, ([3H]-SCH 58261). In addition, both receptor affinity and potency of reference adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists were determined in binding and adenylyl cyclase studies. Saturation experiments revealed a single class of binding sites with Kd and Bmax values of 0.85 nM and 35 fmol mg−1 protein, respectively. A series of adenosine receptor ligands were found to compete for the binding of 0.8 nM [3H]-SCH 58261 to human lymphocyte membranes with a rank order of potency consistent with that typically found for interactions with the A2A-adenosine receptor. In the adenylyl cyclase assay the same compounds exhibited a rank order of potency similar to that observed in binding experiments. Thermodynamic data indicate that [3H]-SCH 58261 binding to human lymphocytes is entropy and enthalpy-driven, a finding in agreement with the thermodynamic behaviour of antagonists for rat striatal A2A-adenosine receptors. It is concluded that in human lymphocyte membranes [3H]-SCH 58261 directly labels binding sites showing the characteristic properties of the adenosine A2A-receptor. The presence of A2A-receptors in peripheral tissue such as human lymphocytes strongly suggests an important role for adenosine in modulating immune and inflammatory responses. PMID:9313951

  5. Enhancement of agonist binding to 5-HT1A receptors in rat brain membranes by millimolar Mn2+.

    PubMed

    Parkel, Sven; Näsman, Johnny; Rinken, Ago

    2009-06-19

    Manganese in millimolar concentration caused increase in specific binding of [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT to rat hippocampal membranes up to 44% in comparison with experiments in the presence of Mg(2+), while no significant differences were found in rat cortical membranes. Similar increase in high-affinity agonist binding sites by Mn(2+) was found in displacement curves of 8-OH-DPAT, where antagonist [(3)H]WAY100635 was used as reporter ligand. The removal of bivalent ions with EDTA caused full loss of high-affinity binding of agonists, but not for antagonists. Therefore it was hypothesized, that the effect of Mn(2+)- and Mg(2+)-ions was modulated through their action on different G-proteins. Results showed that efficient coupling of G-protein and 5-HT(1A) receptors is crucial to modify Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) effects, whereas Mn(2+) is more potent stabilizer of agonist high-affinity binding, especially when GTPgammaS is present. Using Sf9 cells as model system, we have shown that G(i1) proteins are required to modulate Mn(2+)-dependent high-affinity agonist binding to 5-HT(1A) receptors, but further studies are necessary to find the cofactors of Mn(2+) modulation to signal transduction.

  6. Pharmacological characterization of two specific binding sites for neurohypophyseal hormones in hippocampal synaptic plasma membranes of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Audigier, S; Barberis, C

    1985-01-01

    Synaptic plasma membranes containing binding sites for tritiated oxytocin and arginine vasopressin were isolated from rat hippocampus. The binding parameters for oxytocin and vasopressin sites were determined and statistically analysed. The fitted curve for oxytocin binding was compatible with a model where the ligand interacts with two classes of receptors with different capacities and affinities. The sites with low binding capacity had an apparent dissociation constant at equilibrium of 1.8 nM and a maximal binding capacity of 17 fmol/mg protein. By contrast, the Scatchard plot failed to reveal a marked heterogeneity in the population of sites labelled with [3H]vasopressin with an affinity of 1.5 nM and a maximal binding capacity of 39 fmol/mg protein. The specificity of these binding sites, tested in competition experiments, revealed that these neurohypophyseal hormones labelled two distinct populations of sites. One population with a high affinity for vasopressin, oxytocin and vasotocin, the other population with a high affinity for vasopressin and vasotocin and a low affinity for oxytocin. Adenylate cyclase activity was not affected by arginine-vasopressin or oxytocin. These receptors are compared with previously characterized peripheral receptors. PMID:2992930

  7. (/sup 3/H)Ethylketocyclazocine binding to mouse brain membranes: evidence for a kappa opioid receptor type

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, J.; Sanchez-Blazquez, P.; Lee, N.M.

    1984-10-01

    The binding of the putative kappa agonist ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) to synaptosomal membranes of mouse brain was studied. This benzomorphan was able to bind to different opioid receptors. A portion of this binding was not inhibited by the agonist naloxone, even at high concentrations (10 microM). This population of receptors, to which opioate alkaloids and opiod peptides display very low affinity, is probably the sigma receptor. Another class of binding sites was identified by the simultaneous addition of the selective agonists Sandoz FK-33824 and D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin, which blocked the access of EKC to mu and delta opioid receptors, respectively, leaving a portion of naloxone-displaceable benzomorphan binding still detectable. Analysis of this remaining binding revealed a small population of receptors of high affinity, the kappa receptor. Therefore, EKC binds to the mu, delta, kappa and sigma receptors in the mouse brain, with similar affinities for the mu and kappa (0.22 and 0.15 nM). These results confirm the existence of a kappa opioid receptor type in the mouse brain.

  8. Rapid effects of androgens in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Benten, W Peter M; Guo, Z; Krücken, J; Wunderlich, F

    2004-08-01

    We investigated the existence of membrane receptors for testosterone (mAR) in mouse macrophages of the cell lines IC-21 and RAW 264.7 as well as their roles in nongenomic pathways, gene expression and cell functioning. Both cell lines lack intracellular androgen receptors (iARs) and respond to testosterone with rapid rises in [Ca2+]i. These rises in [Ca2+]i can neither be inhibited by iAR- nor by iER blockers, but are rather mediated through mAR. Pharmacological approaches suggest that the mAR belongs to the class of membrane receptors which are coupled to phospholipase C via pertussis toxin (PTX) sensitive G-proteins. The mAR can be localized as specific surface binding sites for testosterone-BSA-FITC by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)and flow cytometry, and are characterized by their agonist-sequestrability. In order to examine a possible role of the testosterone-induced rise in [Ca2+]i on gene expression, a c-fos promoter reporter gene construct was transfected into RAW 264.7 macrophages. The increase in [Ca2+]i induced by testosterone cannot significantly activate the c-fos promoter directly. Also, no significant activation of ERK1/2, JNK/SAPK and p38 can be observed following testosterone-stimulation alone. However, testosterone-induced rises in [Ca2+]i do have specific effects on gene expression in context with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced genotropic signaling: testosterone specifically down-regulates LPS-induced activation of c-fos promoter, p38 MAPK and NO production. In fetal calf serum (FCS)-induced genotropic signaling, the situation is reversed, i.e. testosterone augments the activation of c-fos promoter and ERK1/2. Our studies demonstrate a cross-talk between the testosterone-induced nongenomic Ca2+ signaling and the genotropic signaling induced by LPS and FCS in macrophages. PMID:15288774

  9. L712V mutation in the androgen receptor gene causes complete androgen insensitivity syndrome due to severe loss of androgen function.

    PubMed

    Rajender, Singh; Gupta, Nalini J; Chakrabarty, Baidyanath; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2013-12-11

    Inability to respond to the circulating androgens is named as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). Mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene are the most common cause of AIS. A cause and effect relationship between some of these mutations and the AIS phenotype has been proven by in vitro studies. Several other mutations have been identified, but need to be functionally validated for pathogenicity. Screening of the AR mutations upon presumptive diagnosis of AIS is recommended. We analyzed a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) for mutations in the AR gene. Sequencing of the entire coding region revealed C>G mutation (CTT-GTT) at codon 712 (position according to the NCBI database) in exon 4 of the gene, resulting in replacement of leucine with valine in the ligand-binding domain of the AR protein. No incidence of this mutation was observed in 230 normal male individuals analyzed for comparison. In vitro androgen binding and transactivation assays using mutant clone showed approximately 71% loss of ligand binding and about 76% loss of transactivation function. We conclude that CAIS in this individual was due to L712V substitution in the androgen receptor protein.

  10. Artificial masculinization in tilapia involves androgen receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Golan, Matan; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2014-10-01

    Estrogens have a pivotal role in natural female sexual differentiation of tilapia while lack of steroids results in testicular development. Despite the fact that androgens do not participate in natural sex differentiation, synthetic androgens, mainly 17-α-methyltestosterone (MT) are effective in the production of all-male fish in aquaculture. The sex inversion potency of synthetic androgens may arise from their androgenic activity or else as inhibitors of aromatase activity. The current study is an attempt to differentiate between the two alleged activities in order to evaluate their contribution to the sex inversion process and aid the search for novel sex inversion agents. In the present study, MT inhibited aromatase activity, when applied in vitro as did the non-aromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). In comparison, exposure to fadrozole, a specific aromatase inhibitor, was considerably more effective. Androgenic activity of MT was evaluated by exposure of Sciaenochromis fryeri fry to the substance and testing for the appearance of blue color. Flutamide, an androgen antagonist, administered concomitantly with MT, reduced the appearance of the blue color and the sex inversion potency of MT in a dose-dependent manner. In tilapia, administration of MT, fadrozole or DHT resulted in efficient sex inversion while flutamide reduced the sex inversion potency of all three compounds. In the case of MT and DHT the decrease in sex inversion efficiency caused by flutamide is most likely due to the direct blocking of the androgen binding to its cognate receptor. The negative effect of flutamide on the efficiency of the fadrozole treatment may indicate that the masculinizing activity of fadrozole may be attributed to excess, un-aromatized, androgens accumulated in the differentiating gonad. The present study shows that when androgen receptors are blocked, there is a reduction in the efficiency of sex inversion treatments. Our results suggest that in contrast to

  11. Testosterone reduces knee passive range of motion and expression of relaxin receptor isoforms via 5α-dihydrotestosterone and androgen receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Dehghan, Firouzeh; Muniandy, Sekaran; Yusof, Ashril; Salleh, Naguib

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian steroids such as estrogen and progesterone have been reported to influence knee laxity. The effect of testosterone, however, remains unknown. This study investigated the effect of testosterone on the knee range of motion (ROM) and the molecular mechanisms that might involve changes in the expression of relaxin receptor isoforms, Rxfp1 and Rxfp2 in the patella tendon and lateral collateral ligament of the female rat knee. Ovariectomized adult female Wistar rats received three days treatment with peanut oil (control), testosterone (125 and 250 μg/kg) and testosterone (125 and 250 μg/kg) plus flutamide, an androgen receptor blocker or finasteride, a 5α-reductase inhibitor. Duplicate groups received similar treatment however in the presence of relaxin (25 ng/kg). A day after the last drug injection, knee passive ROM was measured by using a digital miniature goniometer. Both tendon and ligament were harvested and then analysed for protein and mRNA expression for Rxfp1 and Rxfp2 respectively. Knee passive ROM, Rxfp1 and Rxfp2 expression were significantly reduced following treatment with testosterone. Flutamide or finasteride administration antagonized the testosterone effect. Concomitant administration of testosterone and relaxin did not result in a significant change in knee ROM as compared to testosterone only treatment; however this was significantly increased following flutamide or finasteride addition. Testosterone effect on knee passive ROM is likely mediated via dihydro-testosterone (DHT), and involves downregulation of Rxfp1 and Rxfp2 expression, which may provide the mechanism underlying testosterone-induced decrease in female knee laxity. PMID:24642882

  12. Receptor-independent, direct membrane binding leads to cell surface lipid sorting and Syk kinase activation in dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Gilbert; Sharma, Karan; Ward, Sandra M.; Desrosiers, Melanie D.; Stephens, Leslie A.; Schoel, W. Michael; Li, Tonglei; Lowell, Clifford A.; Ling, Chang-Chun; Amrein, Matthias W.; Shi, Yan

    2008-01-01

    Summary Binding of particulate antigens by antigen presenting cells (APC) is a critical step in immune activation. Previously, we demonstrated that uric acid crystals are potent adjuvants, initiating a robust adaptive immune response. However, the mechanisms of activation are unknown. Using atomic force microscopy as a tool for real time single cell activation analysis, we report that uric acid crystals can directly engage cellular membranes, particularly the cholesterol components, with a force substantially stronger than protein based cellular contacts. Binding of particulate substances activates Syk kinase-dependent signaling in dendritic cells (DCs). These observations suggest a mechanism whereby immune cell activation can be triggered by solid structures via membrane lipid alteration without the requirement for specific cell surface receptors, and a testable hypothesis for crystal-associated arthropathies, inflammation and adjuvanticity. PMID:18993083

  13. Autoimmune anti-androgen-receptor antibodies in human serum.

    PubMed Central

    Liao, S; Witte, D

    1985-01-01

    Circulating autoantibodies to human and rat androgen receptors are present at high titers in the blood sera of some patients with prostate diseases. The antibodies from some serum samples were associated with a purified IgG fraction and interacted with the 3.8S cytosolic androgen-receptor complexes of rat ventral prostate to form 9- to 12S units. Other serum samples, however, formed 14- to 19S units, suggesting that other immunoglobulins might be involved. In the presence of an anti-human immunoglobulin as a second antibody, the androgen-receptor-antibody complexes could be immunoprecipitated. The antibodies interacted with the nuclear and the cytosolic androgen-receptor complexes, either the DNA-binding or the nonbinding form, but not with receptors for estradiol, progestin, or dexamethasone from a variety of sources. Human testosterone/estradiol-binding globulin, rat epididymal androgen-binding protein, or rat prostate alpha-protein (a nonreceptor steroid-binding protein) also did not interact with the antibodies to form immunoprecipitates. About 37% of male and 3% of female serum samples screened had significant antibody titer. The chance of finding serum with a high titer is much better in males older than 66 years than in the younger males or females at all ages. The presence of the high-titer antibodies may make it possible to prepare monoclonal antibodies to androgen receptors without purification of the receptors for immunization. PMID:3866227

  14. Correlation between catecholamine secretion from bovine isolated chromaffin cells and [3H]-ouabain binding to plasma membranes

    PubMed Central

    Aunis, Dominique; García, Antonio G.

    1981-01-01

    1 Secretion of catecholamines (CA) evoked by ouabain, chlormadinone acetate (CMA), phenoxybenzamine (Pbz) and vanadate, four agents known to inhibit Na+, K+-dependent Mg2+-activated adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity has been studied in suspensions of bovine isolated adrenal medullary cells. 2 Acetylcholine (ACh) evoked a 5 fold increase of the basal CA secretion from isolated cells suspended in oxygenated Krebs-bicarbonate solution kept at 27°C. Secretion was antagonized by Ca2+-deprivation or hexamethonium, indicating good functional viability of the cells. 3 Ouabain (10-7 to 10-4 M) evoked a progressive, dose-dependent release of CA from cell suspensions. Study of the time course of the secretory response for 2 h allowed the separation of two components in the secretory response at all doses studied: a slow initial component (0.011 pg/min CA) and a second faster component (0.032 pg/min CA). 4 CMA evoked a clear-cut CA secretory response. The ED50 for CMA was 10-4 M, as compared to 3 × 10-6 M for ouabain. Pbz and vanadate did not induce CA release. 5 [3H]-ouabain was taken up and bound to intact isolated cells by a non-saturable binding process. However, in semi-purified plasma membranes from bovine adrenal medulla a saturable specific [3H]-ouabain binding process was observed with a KD of 8.1 nM. Binding to the membranes was ATP-dependent and antagonized by K+. 6 [3H]-ouabain specific binding to membranes was antagonized by ouabain and CMA, but not by Pbz or vanadate; the ID50 for ouabain and CMA were 10-6 and 10-5 M respectively. 7 Ouabain partially inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, Na+, K+-Mg2+ ATPase activity of the semi-purified plasma membranes. 8 The results demonstrate a good correlation between the ability of different drugs, known to inhibit ATPase activity, to displace [3H]-ouabain binding to adreno—medullary plasma membranes and their capacity to evoke a CA secretory response from isolated chromaffin cells. The data also suggest that

  15. Characterization of specific binding sites for (/sup 3/H)(d)-N-allylnormetazocine in rat brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Itzhak, Y.; Hiller, J.M.; Simon, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    Binding of (/sup 3/H)(d)-N-allylnormetazocine ((/sup 3/H)(d)-NANM) to rat brain membranes is stereospecific, reversible, and saturable (Bmax . 260 fmol/mg of protein) and manifests moderately high affinity (Kd . 20 nM). The rank order of potency among opioidbenzomorphans and phencyclidine (PCP) analogs for competition for (/sup 3/H)(d)-NANM-binding sites is as follows: (d)-NANM . PCP-3-OH greater than (d)-cyclazocine greater than N-ethylphenylcyclohexylamine greater than PCP greater than (l)-cyclazocine . dextrorphan greater than (d/l)-ethylketocyclazocine greater than (d/l)-bremazocine greater than (1)-NANM greater than 1-phenylcyclohexylamine greater than levorphanol. Other opioid ligands, relatively selective for each of the types of opioid binding sites other than sigma, such as morphine (mu), H-Tyr-D-Ala(Me)Phe-NH-CH2-OH (mu), D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin (delta), tifluadom (kappa), and U 50488 (kappa) as well as etorphine and naloxone were all unable to compete with (/sup 3/H)(d)-NANM for specific binding even at a concentration of 1 microM. Regional distribution studies of (/sup 3/H)(d)-NANM-binding sites show high density in the hippocampus, thalamus, hypothalamus, and amygdala and low density in cerebellum and nonfrontal neocortex membranes of the rat brain. These binding sites are very sensitive to protein-modifying enzymes and reagents such as trypsin and N-ethylmaleimide and to heat denaturation. These results provide direct biochemical evidence for the existence of distinct (d)-NANM-binding sites in rat brain.

  16. 2-(/sup 125/I)iodomelatonin binding sites in hamster brain membranes: pharmacological characteristics and regional distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, M.J.; Takahashi, J.S.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    1988-05-01

    Studies in a variety of seasonally breeding mammals have shown that melatonin mediates photoperiodic effects on reproduction. Relatively little is known, however, about the site(s) or mechanisms of action of this hormone for inducing reproductive effects. Although binding sites for (3H)melatonin have been reported previously in bovine, rat, and hamster brain, the pharmacological selectivity of these sites was never demonstrated. In the present study, we have characterized binding sites for a new radioligand, 2-(125I)iodomelatonin, in brains from a photoperiodic species, the Syrian hamster. 2-(125I)Iodomelatonin labels a high affinity binding site in hamster brain membranes. Specific binding of 2-(125I)iodomelatonin is rapid, stable, saturable, and reversible. Saturation studies demonstrated that 2-(125I)iodomelatonin binds to a single class of sites with an affinity constant (Kd) of 3.3 +/- 0.5 nM and a total binding capacity (Bmax) of 110.2 +/- 13.4 fmol/mg protein (n = 4). The Kd value determined from kinetic analysis (3.1 +/- 0.9 nM; n = 5) was very similar to that obtained from saturation experiments. Competition experiments showed that the relative order of potency of a variety of indoles for inhibition of 2-(125I)iodomelatonin binding site to hamster brain membranes was as follows: 6-chloromelatonin greater than or equal to 2-iodomelatonin greater than N-acetylserotonin greater than or equal to 6-methoxymelatonin greater than or equal to melatonin greater than 6-hydroxymelatonin greater than or equal to 6,7-dichloro-2-methylmelatonin greater than 5-methoxytryptophol greater than 5-methoxytryptamine greater than or equal to 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine greater than N-acetyltryptamine greater than serotonin greater than 5-methoxyindole (inactive).

  17. Membrane Morphology Is Actively Transformed by Covalent Binding of the Protein Atg8 to PE-Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Knorr, Roland L.; Nakatogawa, Hitoshi; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Baumgart, Tobias; Dimova, Rumiana

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular degradation pathway involving the shape transformation of lipid bilayers. During the onset of autophagy, the water-soluble protein Atg8 binds covalently to phosphatdylethanolamines (PEs) in the membrane in an ubiquitin-like reaction coupled to ATP hydrolysis. We reconstituted the Atg8 conjugation system in giant and nm-sized vesicles with a minimal set of enzymes and observed that formation of Atg8-PE on giant vesicles can cause substantial tubulation of membranes even in the absence of Atg12-Atg5-Atg16. Our findings show that ubiquitin-like processes can actively change properties of lipid membranes and that membrane crowding by proteins can be dynamically regulated in cells. Furthermore we provide evidence for curvature sorting of Atg8-PE. Curvature generation and sorting are directly linked to organelle shapes and, thus, to biological function. Our results suggest that a positive feedback exists between the ubiquitin-like reaction and the membrane curvature, which is important for dynamic shape changes of cell membranes, such as those involved in the formation of autophagosomes. PMID:25522362

  18. Resolving the challenge of measuring ligand binding to membrane proteins by combining analytical ultracentrifugation and light scattering photometry.

    PubMed

    Doran, J D; Mohanty, A K; Fox, T

    2012-01-01

    Membrane proteins are attractive therapeutic targets, however the presence of detergents complicates biophysical binding measurements. Difficulties in determining quantitative dissociation constants for problematic membrane proteins were addressed by combining analytical ultracentrifugation and classical light scattering techniques. Validation of the algorithm used to calculate dissociation constants from sedimentation equilibrium experiments was demonstrated by analyzing binding data of the inhibitor Y-27632 to rho-kinase (ROCK). Kd's of 1.3 ± 0.7 and 52 ± 27 µM were calculated for ROCK constructs (S6-R415) and (M71-E379) respectively, consistent with previously published Ki's of 1.4 ± 0.1 and > 30 µM. Extension of the algorithm to membrane proteins required the collection of light scattering data to determine the partial specific volume, ν, for the membrane protein-detergent complex. Vitamin B12 binding to the bacterial protein btuB in octyl β-D-glucopyranoside (β-OG) illustrates the applicability of the method. A ν of 0.781 ml/g was determined for the btuB-β-OG complex. Incorporating this value into the algorithm generated a Kd of 7.0 ± 1.5 µM for the vitamin B12-btuB affinity. A Kd of 9.7 ± 2.7 µM was determined by equilibrium dialysis under similar experimental conditions. Successfully applying AUC to quantifying small-molecule ligand affinities to membrane proteins represents a significant advance to the field.

  19. Characterization of a multiple endogenously expressed adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters using nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns.

    PubMed

    Habicht, K-L; Singh, N S; Khadeer, M A; Shimmo, R; Wainer, I W; Moaddel, R

    2014-04-25

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive form of human astrocytoma, with poor prognosis due to multi-drug resistance to a number of anticancer drugs. The observed multi-drug resistance is primarily due to the efflux activity of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP. The expression of these transporters has been demonstrated in nuclear and cellular membranes of the LN-229 human glioblastoma cell line. Nuclear membrane and cellular membrane fragments from LN-229 cells were immobilized on the IAM stationary phase to create nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns, (NMAC(LN-229)) and (CMAC(LN-229)), respectively. Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP transporters co-immobilized on both columns were characterized and compared by establishing the binding affinities for estrone-3-sulfate (3.8 vs. 3.7μM), verapamil (0.6 vs. 0.7μM) and prazosin (0.099 vs. 0.033μM) on each column and no significant differences were observed. Since the marker ligands had overlapping selectivities, the selective characterization of each transporter was carried out by saturation of the binding sites of the non-targeted transporters. The addition of verapamil (Pgp and MRP1 substrate) to the mobile phase allowed the comparative screening of eight compounds at the nuclear and cellular BCRP using etoposide as the marker ligand. AZT increased the retention of etoposide (+15%), a positive allosteric interaction, on the CMAC(LN-229) column and decreased it (-5%) on the NMAC(LN-229), while the opposite effect was produced by rhodamine. The results indicate that there are differences between the cellular and nuclear membrane expressed BCRP and that NMAC and CMAC columns can be used to probe these differences.

  20. Characterization of a multiple endogenously expressed Adenosine triphosphate-Binding Cassette transporters using nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns

    PubMed Central

    Khadeer, M.A.; Shimmo, R.; Wainer, I.W.; Moaddel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive form of human astrocytoma, with poor prognosis due to multi-drug resistance to a number of anticancer drugs. The observed multi-drug resistance is primarily due to the efflux activity of ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP. The expression of these transporters has been demonstrated in nuclear and cellular membranes of the LN-229 human glioblastoma cell line. Nuclear membrane and cellular membrane fragments from LN229 cells were immobilized on the IAM stationary phase to create nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns, (NMAC(LN229)) and (CMAC(LN229)), respectively. Pgp, MRP1and BCRP transporters co-immobilized on both columns was characterized and compared by establishing the binding affinities for estrone-3-sulfate (3.8 vs 3.7μM), verapamil (0.6 vs 0.7μM) and prazosin (0.099 vs 0.033μM) on each column and no significant differences were observed. Since the marker ligands had overlapping selectivities, the selective characterization of each transporter was carried out by saturation of the binding sites of the non-targeted transporters. The addition of verapamil (Pgp and MRP1 substrate) to the mobile phase allowed the comparative screening of 8 compounds at the nuclear and cellular BCRP using etoposide as the marker ligand. AZT increased the retention of etoposide (+15%), a positive allosteric interaction, on the CMAC(LN229) column and decreased it (−5%) on the NMAC(LN229), while the opposite effect was produced by rhodamine. The results indicate that there are differences between the cellular and nuclear membrane expressed BCRP and that NMAC and CMAC columns can be used to probe these differences. PMID:24642394

  1. Androgens and prostate disease

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lori A; Page, Stephanie T

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of literature has established the anabolic benefits of testosterone (T) therapy in hypogonadal men. However, there remains a paucity of data regarding the risks of exogenous androgen use in older men and the potential for adverse effects on the prostate gland. Whether T therapy in older, hypogonadal men might worsen lower urinary tract symptoms or exacerbate, unmask, or even incite prostate cancer development has tempered enthusiasm for T therapy, while known prostatic disease has served as a relative contraindication to T therapy. Androgens are necessary for the development and maintenance of the prostate gland. However, epidemiologic studies do not consistently find a positive relationship between endogenous serum androgen concentrations and the risk of prostate disease. Recent data demonstrate that 5α-reductase inhibitors decrease the risk of low-grade prostate cancer, suggesting that modifying androgen metabolism may have beneficial effects on prostate health, yet similar reductions in high-grade disease have not been observed, thereby questioning the true clinical benefits of these agents for chemoprevention. Knowing how to best investigate the relationship between androgens and the development of prostate disease given the lack of large, randomized trials is difficult. Accumulating data challenges the assumption that alterations in serum androgens have parallel effects within the prostate hormonal environment or change androgen-regulated processes within the gland. Long-term intervention studies are needed to truly ascertain the effects of androgen manipulation on prostate tissue and disease risk. However, available data do not support the notion that restoring serum androgens to normal physiologic ranges drives prostate disease. PMID:24407178

  2. IL-6 and IL-8 enhance factor H binding to the cell membranes

    PubMed Central

    POPEK, SYLWIA; KAPKA-SKRZYPCZAK, LUCYNA; SAWICKI, KRZYSZTOF; WOLIŃSKA, EWA; SKRZYPCZAK, MACIEJ; CZAJKA, MAGDALENA

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the role of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 on the expression of fluid-phase complement inhibitor, factor H (FH), and FH-like protein 1 (FHL-1), in the A2780 ovarian carcinoma cell line. This cell line does not normally produce IL-6, however, is IL-6 responsive due to the presence of receptor for IL-6. The presence of FH and FHL-1 in the cell lysates was confirmed by western blotting. The levels of FH and FHL-1 in the medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To evaluate gene expression, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed. The cellular localization of FH and FHL-1 in ovarian cancer cells was assessed by immunofluorescence. The present study revealed that FH, contrary to FHL-1, was secreted by ovarian cancer cells, however, this process was independent of IL stimulation. No significant differences were observed in the concentration of FH in the control cells, when compared with the samples treated with IL-6/IL-8. The results of western blotting revealed that the protein expression levels of FH and FHL-1 were not regulated by IL-6 and IL-8 in a dose-dependent manner. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that the A2780 ovarian cancer cell line expressed both membrane bound and intracellular forms of FH and FHL-1. The present data revealed that the A2780 cells expressed and secreted FH protein and are also able to bind FH and FHL-1. This may influence the efficiency of complement mediated immunotherapy. PMID:27035765

  3. High affinity RGD-binding sites at the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana links the cell wall.

    PubMed

    Canut, H; Carrasco, A; Galaud, J P; Cassan, C; Bouyssou, H; Vita, N; Ferrara, P; Pont-Lezica, R

    1998-10-01

    The heptapeptide Tyr-Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD--the essential structure recognised by animal cells in substrate adhesion molecules) was tested on epidermal cells of onion and cultured cells of Arabidopsis upon plasmolysis. Dramatic changes were observed on both types of cells following treatment: on onion cells, Hechtian strands linking the cell wall to the membrane were lost, while Arabidopsis cells changed from concave to convex plasmolysis. A control heptapeptide Tyr-Gly-Asp-Gly-Arg-Ser-Pro had no effect on the shape of plasmolysed cells. Protoplasts isolated from Arabidopsis cells agglutinate in the presence of ProNectinF, a genetically engineered protein of 72 kDa containing 13 RGD sequences: several protoplasts may adhere to a single molecule of ProNectinF. The addition of the RGD-heptapeptide disrupted the adhesion between the protoplasts. Purified plasma membrane from Arabidopsis cells exhibits specific binding sites for the iodinated RGD-heptapeptide. The binding is saturable, reversible, and two types of high affinity sites (Kd1 approximately 1 nM, and Kd2 approximately 40 nM) can be discerned. Competitive inhibition by several structurally related peptides and proteins noted the specific requirement for the RGD sequence. Thus, the RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis fulfils the adhesion features of integrins, i.e. peptide specificity, subcellular location, and involvement in plasma membrane-cell wall attachments.

  4. High affinity RGD-binding sites at the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana links the cell wall.

    PubMed

    Canut, H; Carrasco, A; Galaud, J P; Cassan, C; Bouyssou, H; Vita, N; Ferrara, P; Pont-Lezica, R

    1998-10-01

    The heptapeptide Tyr-Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD--the essential structure recognised by animal cells in substrate adhesion molecules) was tested on epidermal cells of onion and cultured cells of Arabidopsis upon plasmolysis. Dramatic changes were observed on both types of cells following treatment: on onion cells, Hechtian strands linking the cell wall to the membrane were lost, while Arabidopsis cells changed from concave to convex plasmolysis. A control heptapeptide Tyr-Gly-Asp-Gly-Arg-Ser-Pro had no effect on the shape of plasmolysed cells. Protoplasts isolated from Arabidopsis cells agglutinate in the presence of ProNectinF, a genetically engineered protein of 72 kDa containing 13 RGD sequences: several protoplasts may adhere to a single molecule of ProNectinF. The addition of the RGD-heptapeptide disrupted the adhesion between the protoplasts. Purified plasma membrane from Arabidopsis cells exhibits specific binding sites for the iodinated RGD-heptapeptide. The binding is saturable, reversible, and two types of high affinity sites (Kd1 approximately 1 nM, and Kd2 approximately 40 nM) can be discerned. Competitive inhibition by several structurally related peptides and proteins noted the specific requirement for the RGD sequence. Thus, the RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis fulfils the adhesion features of integrins, i.e. peptide specificity, subcellular location, and involvement in plasma membrane-cell wall attachments. PMID:9807828

  5. Binding kinetics of Clostridium difficile toxins A and B to intestinal brush border membranes from infant and adult hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Rolfe, R.D. )

    1991-04-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if the relative resistance of neonates and infants to Clostridium difficile-associated intestinal disease can be related to age-dependent differences in intestinal receptors for C. difficile toxins A and B. Brush border membranes (BBMs) from the small intestines of adult and infant hamsters were examined for their ability to bind radiolabeled toxins A and B. (125I)toxin A bound to both infant and adult hamster BBMs at physiological temperature, whereas (125I)toxin B did not bind to the BBMs under any of the conditions examined. The number of (125I)toxin A molecules bound at saturation was approximately 4 x 10(10) per micrograms of membrane protein for adult BBMs and 1 x 10(11) per micrograms of membrane protein for infant BBMs. Scatchard plot analysis suggested the presence of a single class of toxin A binding sites on both infant and adult hamster BBMs. Maximal binding capacity and Kd values were 0.63 pmol/mg of protein and 66.7 nM, respectively, for the infant BBMs, and 0.24 pmol/mg of protein and 27 nM, respectively, for the adult BBMs. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analyses of extracted BBM proteins revealed differences in the proteins of infant and adult BBMs. However, there were not any detectable differences in the protein bands which bound (125I)toxin A between infant and adult hamsters. The results from these investigations indicate that differences in the binding kinetics of toxins A and/or B to infant and adult hamster BBMs do not account for the observed differences in their susceptibility to C. difficile-associated intestinal disease.

  6. Nanoscale Distribution of Sulfonic Acid Groups Determines Structure and Binding of Water in Nafion Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xiao; Bonn, Mischa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The connection between the nanoscale structure of two chemically equivalent, yet morphologically distinct Nafion fuel‐cell membranes and their macroscopic chemical properties is demonstrated. Quantification of the chemical interactions between water and Nafion reveals that extruded membranes have smaller water channels with a reduced sulfonic acid head group density compared to dispersion‐cast membranes. As a result, a disproportionally large amount of non‐bulk water molecules exists in extruded membranes, which also exhibit larger proton conductivity and larger water mobility compared to cast membranes. The differences in the physicochemical properties of the membranes, that is, the chemical constitution of the water channels and the local water structure, and the accompanying differences in macroscopic water and proton transport suggest that the chemistry of nanoscale channels is an important, yet largely overlooked parameter that influences the functionality of fuel‐cell membranes. PMID:26895211

  7. Nanoscale Distribution of Sulfonic Acid Groups Determines Structure and Binding of Water in Nafion Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiao; Bonn, Mischa; Parekh, Sapun H; Domke, Katrin F

    2016-03-14

    The connection between the nanoscale structure of two chemically equivalent, yet morphologically distinct Nafion fuel-cell membranes and their macroscopic chemical properties is demonstrated. Quantification of the chemical interactions between water and Nafion reveals that extruded membranes have smaller water channels with a reduced sulfonic acid head group density compared to dispersion-cast membranes. As a result, a disproportionally large amount of non-bulk water molecules exists in extruded membranes, which also exhibit larger proton conductivity and larger water mobility compared to cast membranes. The differences in the physicochemical properties of the membranes, that is, the chemical constitution of the water channels and the local water structure, and the accompanying differences in macroscopic water and proton transport suggest that the chemistry of nanoscale channels is an important, yet largely overlooked parameter that influences the functionality of fuel-cell membranes.

  8. Plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein and mitochondrial glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase of rat liver are related

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, P.D.; Potter, B.J.; Sorrentino, D.; Zhou, S.L.; Isola, L.M.; Stump, D.; Kiang, C.L.; Thung, S. ); Wada, H.; Horio, Y. )

    1990-05-01

    The hepatic plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein (h-FABP{sub PM}) and the mitochondrial isoenzyme of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (mGOT) of rat liver have similar amino acid compositions and identical amino acid sequences for residues 3-24. Both proteins migrate with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa on SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, have a similar pattern of basic charge isomers on isoelectric focusing, are eluted similarly from four different high-performance liquid chromatographic columns, have absorption maxima at 435 nm under acid conditions and 354 nm at pH 8.3, and bind oleate. Sinusoidally enriched liver plasma membranes and purified h-FABP{sub PM} have GOT enzymatic activity. Monospecific rabbit antiserum against h-FABP{sub PM} reacts on Western blotting with mGOT, and vice versa. Antisera against both proteins produce plasma membrane immunofluorescence in rat hepatocytes and selectively inhibit the hepatocellular uptake of ({sup 3}H)oleate but not that of ({sup 35}S)sulfobromophthalein or ({sup 14}C)taurocholate. The inhibition of oleate uptake produced by anti-h-FABP{sub PM} can be eliminated by preincubation of the antiserum with mGOT; similarly, the plasma membrane immunofluorescence produced by either antiserum can be eliminated by preincubation with the other antigen. These data suggest that h-FABP{sub PM} and mGOT are closely related.

  9. Binding affinity of amyloid oligomers to cellular membranes is a generic indicator of cellular dysfunction in protein misfolding diseases

    PubMed Central

    Evangelisti, Elisa; Cascella, Roberta; Becatti, Matteo; Marrazza, Giovanna; Dobson, Christopher M.; Chiti, Fabrizio; Stefani, Massimo; Cecchi, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The conversion of peptides or proteins from their soluble native states into intractable amyloid deposits is associated with a wide range of human disorders. Misfolded protein oligomers formed during the process of aggregation have been identified as the primary pathogenic agents in many such conditions. Here, we show the existence of a quantitative relationship between the degree of binding to neuronal cells of different types of oligomers formed from a model protein, HypF-N, and the GM1 content of the plasma membranes. In addition, remarkably similar behavior is observed for oligomers of the Aβ42 peptide associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Further analysis has revealed the existence of a linear correlation between the level of the influx of Ca2+ across neuronal membranes that triggers cellular damage, and the fraction of oligomeric species bound to the membrane. Our findings indicate that the susceptibility of neuronal cells to different types of misfolded oligomeric assemblies is directly related to the extent of binding of such oligomers to the cellular membrane. PMID:27619987

  10. Tooth Enamel Protein Amelogenin Binds to Ameloblast Cell Membrane-Mimicking Vesicles via its N-terminus

    PubMed Central

    LOKAPPA, SOWMYA BEKSHE; CHANDRABABU, KARTHIK BALAKRISHNA; MORADIAN-OLDAK, JANET

    2015-01-01

    We have recently reported that the extracellular enamel protein amelogenin has affinity to interact with phospholipids and proposed that such interactions may play key roles in enamel biomineralization as well as reported amelogenin signaling activities. Here, in order to identify the liposome-interacting domains of amelogenin we designed four different amelogenin mutants containing only a single tryptophan at positions 25, 45, 112 and 161. Circular dichroism studies of the mutants confirmed that they are structurally similar to the wild-type amelogenin. Utilizing the intrinsic fluorescence of single tryptophan residues and fluorescence resonance energy transfer FRET, we analyzed the accessibility and strength of their binding with an ameloblast cell membrane-mimicking model membrane (ACML) and a negatively charged liposome used as a membrane model. We found that amelogenin has membrane-binding ability mainly via its N-terminal, close to residues W25 and W45. Significant blue shift was also observed in the fluorescence of a N-terminal peptide following addition of liposomes. We suggest that, among other mechanisms, enamel malformation in cases of Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) with mutations at the N-terminal may be the result of defective amelogenin-cell interactions. PMID:26188506

  11. Binding affinity of amyloid oligomers to cellular membranes is a generic indicator of cellular dysfunction in protein misfolding diseases.

    PubMed

    Evangelisti, Elisa; Cascella, Roberta; Becatti, Matteo; Marrazza, Giovanna; Dobson, Christopher M; Chiti, Fabrizio; Stefani, Massimo; Cecchi, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The conversion of peptides or proteins from their soluble native states into intractable amyloid deposits is associated with a wide range of human disorders. Misfolded protein oligomers formed during the process of aggregation have been identified as the primary pathogenic agents in many such conditions. Here, we show the existence of a quantitative relationship between the degree of binding to neuronal cells of different types of oligomers formed from a model protein, HypF-N, and the GM1 content of the plasma membranes. In addition, remarkably similar behavior is observed for oligomers of the Aβ42 peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease. Further analysis has revealed the existence of a linear correlation between the level of the influx of Ca(2+) across neuronal membranes that triggers cellular damage, and the fraction of oligomeric species bound to the membrane. Our findings indicate that the susceptibility of neuronal cells to different types of misfolded oligomeric assemblies is directly related to the extent of binding of such oligomers to the cellular membrane. PMID:27619987

  12. Binding of methylene blue onto Langmuir monolayers representing cell membranes may explain its efficiency as photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thaís F; Caseli, Luciano; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Itri, Rosangela

    2015-04-14

    We provide evidence for the electrostatic interactions between the cationic photosensitizer methylene blue (MB) and cell membrane models represented by neat and mixed Langmuir monolayers of dioleylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and 1,1',2,2'-tetraoleoylcardiolipin (CL). From surface pressure measurements, MB was found to adsorb strongly and expand CL-containing monolayers, while it caused an apparent decreasing in molecular area on neat DOPC monolayer. The binding site of MB could be inferred from data with the surface-specific polarization-modulated infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) technique, where changes induced by MB were observed in the vibrational modes of the phosphate groups of both CL and DOPC. The incorporation of MB also affected the carbonyl groups and the packing of the alkyl chains, thus indicating that MB binding site favors singlet oxygen generation close to the double bonds in the alkyl chains, an important requirement for photodynamic efficiency. Significantly, the data presented here demonstrate that MB may act in membranes composed by PCs, such as mammalian plasma membranes, and in those containing CL, as in bacterial and inner mitochondrial membranes.

  13. Analysis of (/sup 3/H) Kainic acid binding with rat and Frog brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Zharkovskii, A.M.; Zharkovskaya, T.A.

    1985-10-01

    This paper analyzes the binding of (H 3)-KA with membrances in vitro and the effect of various neuroactive amino acids, suggested as endogenous ligands for binding sites of (H 3)-KA, on binding. Experiments were carried out on male albino rats and on winter frogs. Choice of the frog's brain was determined by the high density of high-affinity binding sites of (H 3)-KA. The concentrations of substances inhibiting binding (H 3)-KA by 50% were calculated by logit-probit analysis, and inhibition constants were also calculated. It is shown that although L-glutamate and folic acid inhibit binding of (H 3)-KA, they do not satisfy the criteria to be met by endogenous ligands, and this inhibition of binding is noncompetitive in character. This suggests that KA binding sites and glutamate receptors are not identical, although they may perhaps be subunits of a single complex.

  14. Plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein and mitochondrial glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase of rat liver are related.

    PubMed Central

    Berk, P D; Wada, H; Horio, Y; Potter, B J; Sorrentino, D; Zhou, S L; Isola, L M; Stump, D; Kiang, C L; Thung, S

    1990-01-01

    The hepatic plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein (h-FABPPM) and the mitochondrial isoenzyme of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (mGOT) of rat liver have similar amino acid compositions and identical amino acid sequences for residues 3-24. Both proteins migrate with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa on SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, have a similar pattern of basic charge isomers on isoelectric focusing, are eluted similarly from four different high-performance liquid chromatographic columns, have absorption maxima at 435 nm under acid conditions and 354 nm at pH 8.3, and bind oleate with a Ka approximately 1.2-1.4 x 10(7) M-1. Sinusoidally enriched liver plasma membranes and purified h-FABPPM have GOT enzymatic activity; the relative specific activities (units/mg) of the membranes and purified protein suggest that h-FABPPM constitutes 1-2% of plasma membrane protein in the rat hepatocyte. Monospecific rabbit antiserum against h-FABPPM reacts on Western blotting with mGOT, and vice versa. Antisera against both proteins produce plasma membrane immunofluorescence in rat hepatocytes and selectively inhibit the hepatocellular uptake of [3H]oleate but not that of [35S]sulfobromophthalein or [14C]taurocholate. The inhibition of oleate uptake produced by anti-h-FABPPM can be eliminated by preincubation of the antiserum with mGOT; similarly, the plasma membrane immunofluorescence produced by either antiserum can be eliminated by preincubation with the other antigen. These data suggest that h-FABPPM and mGOT are closely related. Images PMID:2185471

  15. Large structure rearrangement of colicin ia channel domain after membrane binding from 2D 13C spin diffusion NMR.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenbin; Yao, Xiaolan; Hong, Mei

    2005-05-01

    One of the main mechanisms of membrane protein folding is by spontaneous insertion into the lipid bilayer from the aqueous environment. The bacterial toxin, colicin Ia, is one such protein. To shed light on the conformational changes involved in this dramatic transfer from the polar to the hydrophobic milieu, we carried out 2D magic-angle spinning (13)C NMR experiments on the water-soluble and membrane-bound states of the channel-forming domain of colicin Ia. Proton-driven (13)C spin diffusion spectra of selectively (13)C-labeled protein show unequivocal attenuation of cross-peaks after membrane binding. This attenuation can be assigned to distance increases but not reduction of the diffusion coefficient. Analysis of the statistics of the interhelical and intrahelical (13)C-(13)C distances in the soluble protein structure indicates that the observed cross-peak reduction is well correlated with a high percentage of short interhelical contacts in the soluble protein. This suggests that colicin Ia channel domain becomes open and extended upon membrane binding, thus lengthening interhelical distances. In comparison, cross-peaks with similar intensities between the two states are dominated by intrahelical contacts in the soluble state. This suggests that the membrane-bound structure of colicin Ia channel domain may be described as a "molten globule", in which the helical secondary structure is retained while the tertiary structure is unfolded. This study demonstrates that (13)C spin diffusion NMR is a valuable tool for obtaining qualitative long-range distance constraints on membrane protein folding. PMID:15853348

  16. Variation of the detergent-binding capacity and phospholipid content of membrane proteins when purified in different detergents.

    PubMed

    Ilgü, Hüseyin; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Gachet, María Salomé; Boggavarapu, Rajendra; Ucurum, Zöhre; Gertsch, Jürg; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2014-04-15

    Purified membrane proteins are ternary complexes consisting of protein, lipid, and detergent. Information about the amounts of detergent and endogenous phospholipid molecules bound to purified membrane proteins is largely lacking. In this systematic study, three model membrane proteins of different oligomeric states were purified in nine different detergents at commonly used concentrations and characterized biochemically and biophysically. Detergent-binding capacities and phospholipid contents of the model proteins were determined and compared. The insights on ternary complexes obtained from the experimental results, when put into a general context, are summarized as follows. 1), The amount of detergent and 2) the amount of endogenous phospholipids bound to purified membrane proteins are dependent on the size of the hydrophobic lipid-accessible protein surface areas and the physicochemical properties of the detergents used. 3), The size of the detergent and lipid belt surrounding the hydrophobic lipid-accessible surface of purified membrane proteins can be tuned by the appropriate choice of detergent. 4), The detergents n-nonyl-β-D-glucopyranoside and Cymal-5 have exceptional delipidating effects on ternary complexes. 5), The types of endogenous phospholipids bound to membrane proteins can vary depending on the detergent used for solubilization and purification. 6), Furthermore, we demonstrate that size-exclusion chromatography can be a suitable method for estimating the molecular mass of ternary complexes. The findings presented suggest a strategy to control and tune the numbers of detergent and endogenous phospholipid molecules bound to membrane proteins. These two parameters are potentially important for the successul crystallization of membrane proteins for structure determination by crystallographic approaches.

  17. Variation of the Detergent-Binding Capacity and Phospholipid Content of Membrane Proteins When Purified in Different Detergents

    PubMed Central

    Ilgü, Hüseyin; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Gachet, María Salomé; Boggavarapu, Rajendra; Ucurum, Zöhre; Gertsch, Jürg; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Purified membrane proteins are ternary complexes consisting of protein, lipid, and detergent. Information about the amounts of detergent and endogenous phospholipid molecules bound to purified membrane proteins is largely lacking. In this systematic study, three model membrane proteins of different oligomeric states were purified in nine different detergents at commonly used concentrations and characterized biochemically and biophysically. Detergent-binding capacities and phospholipid contents of the model proteins were determined and compared. The insights on ternary complexes obtained from the experimental results, when put into a general context, are summarized as follows. 1), The amount of detergent and 2) the amount of endogenous phospholipids bound to purified membrane proteins are dependent on the size of the hydrophobic lipid-accessible protein surface areas and the physicochemical properties of the detergents used. 3), The size of the detergent and lipid belt surrounding the hydrophobic lipid-accessible surface of purified membrane proteins can be tuned by the appropriate choice of detergent. 4), The detergents n-nonyl-β-D-glucopyranoside and Cymal-5 have exceptional delipidating effects on ternary complexes. 5), The types of endogenous phospholipids bound to membrane proteins can vary depending on the detergent used for solubilization and purification. 6), Furthermore, we demonstrate that size-exclusion chromatography can be a suitable method for estimating the molecular mass of ternary complexes. The findings presented suggest a strategy to control and tune the numbers of detergent and endogenous phospholipid molecules bound to membrane proteins. These two parameters are potentially important for the successul crystallization of membrane proteins for structure determination by crystallographic approaches. PMID:24739165

  18. Uptake and binding of /sup 125/I-calmodulin by isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, E.; Elgavish, A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated the interaction of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles (BBV) using an experimental protocol which allows us to distinguish between ligand binding to the outside of the vesicles vs. uptake and possible binding to the vesicle interior. By examining the association of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with BBV as a function of medium osmolarity (300-1100 mosm) to alter intravesicular space, virtually all ligand interaction with BBV was found to represent uptake of intact /sup 125/I-calmodulin into the intravesicular space. Uptake appeared specific by the following criteria: (1) it was largely calcium dependent (2) it was inhibited in a dose dependent fashion by calmodulin and the homologous protein troponin C, but not by unrelated proteins (lysozyme, cytochrome C, insulin) (3) it was inhibited by known calmodulin antagonists (calmidazolium, mellitin, trifluoperazine). Calmodulin uptake may be followed by binding of /sup 125/I-calmodulin to intravesicular BBV proteins; calmodulin-binding proteins in BBV with molecular weights of 143K, 118K, 50K, 47.5K, 46.5K and 35K were identified by Western blotting techniques. The specific association of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with isolated BBV is of interest in regard to the possible role of this calcium regulatory protein in the protein reabsorptive and ion transport functions of this renal tubular membrane fraction.

  19. Properties of the deoxycholate-solubilized HeLa cell plasma membrane receptor for binding group B coxsackieviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Krah, D L; Crowell, R L

    1985-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of deoxycholate-solubilized HeLa cell plasma membrane receptors for binding group B coxsackieviruses were determined. Receptors eluted from Sepharose 4B with an apparent molecular weight of 275,000 and sedimented with an S value of between 14.7 and 4.9 and a buoyant density of 1.06 to 1.10 g/cm3. Virus-binding activity was destroyed after treatment with proteases, glycosidases, and periodate but was unaffected by lipases or reducing or alkylating agents. Additionally, lectins, including concanavalin A, adsorbed receptors and inhibited virus attachment. The composite data suggested that glycoprotein is an integral part of the receptors for binding virus. PMID:2983096

  20. Oncogenic and RASopathy-associated K-RAS mutations relieve membrane-dependent occlusion of the effector-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Mazhab-Jafari, Mohammad T.; Marshall, Christopher B.; Smith, Matthew J.; Gasmi-Seabrook, Geneviève M. C.; Stathopulos, Peter B.; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Kay, Lewis E.; Neel, Benjamin G.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    K-RAS4B (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog 4B) is a prenylated, membrane-associated GTPase protein that is a critical switch for the propagation of growth factor signaling pathways to diverse effector proteins, including rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma (RAF) kinases and RAS-related protein guanine nucleotide dissociation stimulator (RALGDS) proteins. Gain-of-function KRAS mutations occur frequently in human cancers and predict poor clinical outcome, whereas germ-line mutations are associated with developmental syndromes. However, it is not known how these mutations affect K-RAS association with biological membranes or whether this impacts signal transduction. Here, we used solution NMR studies of K-RAS4B tethered to nanodiscs to investigate lipid bilayer-anchored K-RAS4B and its interactions with effector protein RAS-binding domains (RBDs). Unexpectedly, we found that the effector-binding region of activated K-RAS4B is occluded by interaction with the membrane in one of the NMR-observable, and thus highly populated, conformational states. Binding of the RAF isoform ARAF and RALGDS RBDs induced marked reorientation of K-RAS4B from the occluded state to RBD-specific effector-bound states. Importantly, we found that two Noonan syndrome-associated mutations, K5N and D153V, which do not affect the GTPase cycle, relieve the occluded orientation by directly altering the electrostatics of two membrane interaction surfaces. Similarly, the most frequent KRAS oncogenic mutation G12D also drives K-RAS4B toward an exposed configuration. Further, the D153V and G12D mutations increase the rate of association of ARAF-RBD with lipid bilayer-tethered K-RAS4B. We revealed a mechanism of K-RAS4B autoinhibition by membrane sequestration of its effector-binding site, which can be disrupted by disease-associated mutations. Stabilizing the autoinhibitory interactions between K-RAS4B and the membrane could be an attractive target for anticancer drug discovery. PMID:25941399

  1. Oncogenic and RASopathy-associated K-RAS mutations relieve membrane-dependent occlusion of the effector-binding site.

    PubMed

    Mazhab-Jafari, Mohammad T; Marshall, Christopher B; Smith, Matthew J; Gasmi-Seabrook, Geneviève M C; Stathopulos, Peter B; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Kay, Lewis E; Neel, Benjamin G; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2015-05-26

    K-RAS4B (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog 4B) is a prenylated, membrane-associated GTPase protein that is a critical switch for the propagation of growth factor signaling pathways to diverse effector proteins, including rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma (RAF) kinases and RAS-related protein guanine nucleotide dissociation stimulator (RALGDS) proteins. Gain-of-function KRAS mutations occur frequently in human cancers and predict poor clinical outcome, whereas germ-line mutations are associated with developmental syndromes. However, it is not known how these mutations affect K-RAS association with biological membranes or whether this impacts signal transduction. Here, we used solution NMR studies of K-RAS4B tethered to nanodiscs to investigate lipid bilayer-anchored K-RAS4B and its interactions with effector protein RAS-binding domains (RBDs). Unexpectedly, we found that the effector-binding region of activated K-RAS4B is occluded by interaction with the membrane in one of the NMR-observable, and thus highly populated, conformational states. Binding of the RAF isoform ARAF and RALGDS RBDs induced marked reorientation of K-RAS4B from the occluded state to RBD-specific effector-bound states. Importantly, we found that two Noonan syndrome-associated mutations, K5N and D153V, which do not affect the GTPase cycle, relieve the occluded orientation by directly altering the electrostatics of two membrane interaction surfaces. Similarly, the most frequent KRAS oncogenic mutation G12D also drives K-RAS4B toward an exposed configuration. Further, the D153V and G12D mutations increase the rate of association of ARAF-RBD with lipid bilayer-tethered K-RAS4B. We revealed a mechanism of K-RAS4B autoinhibition by membrane sequestration of its effector-binding site, which can be disrupted by disease-associated mutations. Stabilizing the autoinhibitory interactions between K-RAS4B and the membrane could be an attractive target for anticancer drug discovery.

  2. Characterization of a membrane-associated receptor from bovine liver that binds phosphomannosyl residues of bovine testicular beta-galactosidase.

    PubMed Central

    Sahagian, G G; Distler, J; Jourdian, G W

    1981-01-01

    A receptor that binds the phosphomannosyl recognition marker of bovine testicular beta-galactosidase (beta-D-galactoside galactohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.23) was isolated from bovine liver membranes. The receptor was extracted from crude plasma membrane preparations with Triton X-100 and immunoprecipitated as a receptor--beta-galactosidase complex with anti-beta-galactosidase. The receptor was dissociated from the precipitate with mannose 6-phosphate, labeled with 125I, and purified on a beta-galactosidase-Sepharose 4B affinity matrix. A quantitative binding assay employing anti-beta-galactosidase and IgGsorb (formalin-fixed Staphylococcus aureus) was devised to study the binding of 125I-labeled receptor to beta-galactosidase. Maximal binding of receptor to enzyme occurred at pH values between 5.7 and 6.5. Divalent cations were not required for binding. The values of the dissociation constant obtained for beta-galactosidase varied between 200 nM observed with "lower uptake" forms and 20 nM for "higher uptake" forms of the enzyme. A number of phosphorylated monosaccharides were tested as inhibitors of binding of enzyme to receptor; mannose 6-phosphate and fructose 1-phosphate served as inhibitors and exhibited Ki values of 0.064 mM and 0.24 mM, respectively. The receptor has a subunit molecular weight of 215,000. Similar receptors were also demonstrated in Triton X-100 extracts of human skin fibroblasts, Chinese hamster ovary cells, and rat hepatocytes. These cell types are known to assimilate lysosomal enzymes containing covalently bound mannose 6-phosphate residues. Images PMID:6270668

  3. Characterization of the 3,3',5-triiodo-L-thyronine-binding site on plasma membranes from human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Alderson, R.; Pastan, I.; Cheng, S.

    1985-06-01

    The binding of (/sup 125/I)T3 to sites on human placenta plasma membranes was characterized, and the binding site was solubilized after affinity labeling with N-bromoacetyl-(/sup 125/I)T3 (BrAc(/sup 125/I)T3). Two classes of T3-binding sites were detected. One class has a high affinity (K /sub d/ = 2.0nM) and a low capacity (approximately 320 fmol/mg protein); the other has a low affinity (K /sub k/ = 18.5 microM) and a high capacity (approximately 2.2 pmol/mg protein). The binding sites were found to be specific for T3 in that other thyroid hormone analogs (D-T3, rT3, D-T4, and L-T4) were less effective or ineffective in displacing the bound (/sup 125/I)T3. The affinity labeling ligand BrAc(/sup 125/I)T3 was found to specifically label a protein with an apparent mol wt of 65,000, as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The BrAc(/sup 125/I)T3-labeled protein was solubilized with 2 mM 3-(( 3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)1-propane sulfonate. The apparent mol wt of the labeled protein was between 140,000 and 150,000 by Sephadex-G-200 gel filtration. These data demonstrate that a high affinity binding site specific for T3 is present on plasma membranes from human placenta and that the binding site is a protein, most likely a dimer, with a native mol wt between 140,000 and 150,000.

  4. Effect of surface and membrane potentials on IAA (indoleactic acid) uptake and binding by zucchini membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, K.A.; Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1986-08-01

    The polar transport of the endogenous hormone controlling extension growth of plant cells, indoleacetic acid (IAA), is thought to depend on transmembrane pH and electrical gradients resulting in part from the action of proton ATPases in the plasma membrane. Elements of this transport process are permeation of the membrane by the undissociated lipophilic indoleacetic acid (IAAH) from the acidic apoplast, followed by dissociation of the weak acid and accumulation of the IAA anion (IAA/sup -/) in the alkaline cytoplasm; a saturable symport of IAA/sup -/ with one or more protons; a carrier-mediated efflux of IAA/sup -/ down a considerable electrochemical gradient. The efflux is greater from the basal than the apical end of cells and is thought to be responsible for the overall polarity of the process. This step is also the site of action of napthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and herbicides that inhibit polar transport but stimulate net accumulation of auxin by tissues and cells. We are using membrane vesicles as a simplified system for studying the mechanisms involved in the transport and accumulation of auxin. In particular, we are interested in determining the involvement of the transmembrane pH (pH/sub o/ < pH/sub i/) and voltage gradients (K/sup +/ diffusion potential, (K/sup +/)/sub in/ > (K/sup +/)/sub out/) in IAA uptake. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Ovarian overproduction of androgens

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body's testosterone. Tumors of the ovaries and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) can both cause too much androgen production. ... come back after they have been removed. In polycystic ovary syndrome, these things can reduce symptoms caused by high ...

  6. ATP-binding cassette transporters and sterol O-acyltransferases interact at membrane microdomains to modulate sterol uptake and esterification.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Sonia; Balderes, Dina; Kim, Christine; Guo, Zhongmin A; Wilcox, Lisa; Area-Gomez, Estela; Snider, Jamie; Wolinski, Heimo; Stagljar, Igor; Granato, Juliana T; Ruggles, Kelly V; DeGiorgis, Joseph A; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Schon, Eric A; Sturley, Stephen L

    2015-11-01

    A key component of eukaryotic lipid homeostasis is the esterification of sterols with fatty acids by sterol O-acyltransferases (SOATs). The esterification reactions are allosterically activated by their sterol substrates, the majority of which accumulate at the plasma membrane. We demonstrate that in yeast, sterol transport from the plasma membrane to the site of esterification is associated with the physical interaction of the major SOAT, acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT)-related enzyme (Are)2p, with 2 plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters: Aus1p and Pdr11p. Are2p, Aus1p, and Pdr11p, unlike the minor acyltransferase, Are1p, colocalize to sterol and sphingolipid-enriched, detergent-resistant microdomains (DRMs). Deletion of either ABC transporter results in Are2p relocalization to detergent-soluble membrane domains and a significant decrease (53-36%) in esterification of exogenous sterol. Similarly, in murine tissues, the SOAT1/Acat1 enzyme and activity localize to DRMs. This subcellular localization is diminished upon deletion of murine ABC transporters, such as Abcg1, which itself is DRM associated. We propose that the close proximity of sterol esterification and transport proteins to each other combined with their residence in lipid-enriched membrane microdomains facilitates rapid, high-capacity sterol transport and esterification, obviating any requirement for soluble intermediary proteins.

  7. Molecular insight into the differential anti-androgenic activity of resveratrol and its natural analogs: in silico approach to understand biological actions.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandipan; Kumar, Avinash; Butt, Nasir A; Zhang, Liangfen; Williams, Raquema; Rimando, Agnes M; Biswas, Pradip K; Levenson, Anait S

    2016-05-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a therapeutic target for the treatment of prostate cancer. Androgen receptor reactivation during the androgen-independent stage of prostate cancer is mediated by numerous mechanisms including expression of AR mutants and splice variants that become non-responsive to conventional anti-androgenic agents. Resveratrol and its natural analogs exhibit varying degrees of anti-androgenic effects on tumor growth suppression in prostate cancer. However, the structural basis for the observed differential activity remains unknown. Here, anti-androgenic activities of resveratrol and its natural analogs, namely, pterostilbene, piceatannol and trimethoxy-resveratrol were studied in LNCaP cells expressing T877A mutant AR and atomistic simulations were employed to establish the structure activity relationship. Interestingly, essential hydrogen bonding contacts and the binding energies of resveratrol analogs with AR ligand binding domain (LBD), emerge as key differentiating factors for varying anti-androgenic action. Among all the analogs, pterostilbene exhibited strongest anti-androgenic activity and its binding energy and hydrogen bonding interactions pattern closely resembled pure anti-androgen, flutamide. Principal component analysis of our simulation studies revealed that androgenic compounds bind more strongly to AR LBD compared to anti-androgenic compounds and provide conformational stabilization of the receptor in essential subspace. The present study provides critical insight into the structure-activity relationship of the anti-androgenic action of resveratrol analogs, which can be translated further to design novel highly potent anti-androgenic stilbenes. PMID:27063447

  8. FlnA binding to PACSIN2 F-BAR domain regulates membrane tubulation in megakaryocytes and platelets

    PubMed Central

    Begonja, Antonija Jurak; Pluthero, Fred G.; Suphamungmee, Worawit; Giannini, Silvia; Christensen, Hilary; Leung, Richard; Lo, Richard W.; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Lehman, William; Plomann, Markus; Hoffmeister, Karin M.; Kahr, Walter H. A.; Hartwig, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) and Fes-CIP4 homology BAR (F-BAR) proteins generate tubular membrane invaginations reminiscent of the megakaryocyte (MK) demarcation membrane system (DMS), which provides membranes necessary for future platelets. The F-BAR protein PACSIN2 is one of the most abundant BAR/F-BAR proteins in platelets and the only one reported to interact with the cytoskeletal and scaffold protein filamin A (FlnA), an essential regulator of platelet formation and function. The FlnA-PACSIN2 interaction was therefore investigated in MKs and platelets. PACSIN2 associated with FlnA in human platelets. The interaction required FlnA immunoglobulin-like repeat 20 and the tip of PACSIN2 F-BAR domain and enhanced PACSIN2 F-BAR domain membrane tubulation in vitro. Most human and wild-type mouse platelets had 1 to 2 distinct PACSIN2 foci associated with cell membrane GPIbα, whereas Flna-null platelets had 0 to 4 or more foci. Endogenous PACSIN2 and transfected enhanced green fluorescent protein-PACSIN2 were concentrated in midstage wild-type mouse MKs in a well-defined invagination of the plasma membrane reminiscent of the initiating DMS and dispersed in the absence of FlnA binding. The DMS appeared less well defined, and platelet territories were not readily visualized in Flna-null MKs. We conclude that the FlnA-PACSIN2 interaction regulates membrane tubulation in MKs and platelets and likely contributes to DMS formation. PMID:25838348

  9. The Borrelia afzelii outer membrane protein BAPKO_0422 binds human factor-H and is predicted to form a membrane-spanning β-barrel

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Adam; Brown, Gemma; Stejskal, Lenka; Laity, Peter R.; Bingham, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The deep evolutionary history of the Spirochetes places their branch point early in the evolution of the diderms, before the divergence of the present day Proteobacteria. As a spirochete, the morphology of the Borrelia cell envelope shares characteristics of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. A thin layer of peptidoglycan, tightly associated with the cytoplasmic membrane, is surrounded by a more labile outer membrane (OM). This OM is rich in lipoproteins but with few known integral membrane proteins. The outer membrane protein A (OmpA) domain is an eight-stranded membrane-spanning β-barrel, highly conserved among the Proteobacteria but so far unknown in the Spirochetes. In the present work, we describe the identification of four novel OmpA-like β-barrels from Borrelia afzelii, the most common cause of erythema migrans (EM) rash in Europe. Structural characterization of one these proteins (BAPKO_0422) by SAXS and CD indicate a compact globular structure rich in β-strand consistent with a monomeric β-barrel. Ab initio molecular envelopes calculated from the scattering profile are consistent with homology models and demonstrate that BAPKO_0422 adopts a peanut shape with dimensions 25×45 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm). Deviations from the standard C-terminal signature sequence are apparent; in particular the C-terminal phenylalanine residue commonly found in Proteobacterial OM proteins is replaced by isoleucine/leucine or asparagine. BAPKO_0422 is demonstrated to bind human factor H (fH) and therefore may contribute to immune evasion by inhibition of the complement response. Encoded by chromosomal genes, these proteins are highly conserved between Borrelia subspecies and may be of diagnostic or therapeutic value. PMID:26181365

  10. Structure of the N-terminal segment of human retinol dehydrogenase 11 and its preferential lipid binding using model membranes.

    PubMed

    Lhor, Mustapha; Méthot, Mario; Horchani, Habib; Salesse, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Retinol dehydrogenase 11 (RDH11) has been postulated to be anchored to membranes by means of its N-terminal segment in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells where it participates to the visual cycle. The analysis of the primary sequence of RDH11 revealed that its N-terminal hydrophobic segment could be involved in the anchoring of this enzyme to membranes. However, no information is yet available on the properties of this N-terminal segment to support this role. The secondary structure and membrane binding of two N-terminal peptides of RDH11 with different lengths have thus been investigated to provide this information. Online tools allowed predicting an α-helical secondary structure for both peptides. Infrared spectroscopy and circular dichroism have shown that the α-helix of the Long-peptide (35 amino acids) is longer and more rigid than that of the Short-peptide (25 amino acids) regardless of the type of solvent. Langmuir monolayers have been used as a model membrane to study lipid-peptide interactions. Values of maximum insertion pressure and synergy suggested a preferential binding of the Long-peptide to lipids with a phosphoethanolamine polar head group, which are abundant in the RPE. Furthermore, infrared spectroscopy in monolayers has shown that the α-helical structure of the Long-peptide is more stable in the presence of saturated phospholipids whereas the structure of the Short-peptide is mainly disordered. Altogether, the present data demonstrate that the α-helical hydrophobic core of the N-terminal segment of RDH11 displays properties typical of transmembrane domains, in agreement with its postulated role in the membrane anchoring of this protein.

  11. Calcium-independent binding to interfacial phorbol esters causes protein kinase C to associate with membranes in the absence of acidic lipids.

    PubMed

    Mosior, M; Newton, A C

    1996-02-01

    The mechanism of interaction of phorbol esters with conventional protein kinase Cs was addressed by examining the direct binding of this class of activators to protein kinase C beta II. Binding measurements reveal that the major role of phorbol esters is to increase the affinity of protein kinase C for membranes by several orders of magnitude. The relative increase depends linearly on the mole fraction of phorbol esters in membranes, with the potency illustrated by the finding that 1 mol% phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) increases protein kinase C's membrane association by approximately 4 orders of magnitude. For comparison, diacylglycerol (DG), which also activates protein kinase C by increasing the enzyme's membrane affinity, is 2 orders of magnitude less effective than PMA in altering protein kinase C's membrane affinity. The remarkably high-affinity interaction with phorbol esters allowed us to measure the direct binding of protein kinase C to PMA in neutral membranes and, thus, to evaluate the effect of Ca2+ on the phorbol ester interaction in the absence of Ca2+ effects on the enzyme's interaction with acidic lipids. Changing the Ca2+ concentration over 5 orders of magnitude had no effect on the direct interaction of protein kinase C with PMA immobilized in phosphatidylcholine membranes. Thus, the Ca(2+)-binding site for membrane association and the phorbol ester-binding site do not interact allosterically. Lastly, a method that does not have the limitations of the Scatchard plot for analysis of amphitropic proteins was used to determine the dissociation constant of protein kinase C from phorbol esters: expressed relative to membrane lipids, the dissociation constant is 1.5 x 10(-5) mol %. In summary, our data reveal that (1) the direct binding of protein kinase C to phorbol esters, in the absence of interactions with acidic lipids, provides a major contribution to the free energy change involved in the association of protein kinase C with membranes and

  12. Differential binding of fibroblast growth factor-2 and -7 to basement membrane heparan sulfate: comparison of normal and abnormal human tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Friedl, A.; Chang, Z.; Tierney, A.; Rapraeger, A. C.

    1997-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) play multiple roles during development and in adult tissues as paracrine regulators of growth and differentiation. FGFs signal through transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinases, but heparan sulfate is also required for signaling by members of the FGF family. In addition, heparan sulfate may be involved in determining tissue distribution of FGFs. Using biotinylated FGF-2 and FGF-7 (KGF) as probes, we have identified specific interactions between FGFs and heparan sulfates in human tissues. Both FGF species bind to tissue mast cells and to epithelial cell membranes. Binding to basement membrane heparan sulfate is tissue source dependent and specific. Although FGF-2 strongly binds to basement membrane heparan sulfate in skin and most other tissue sites examined, FGF-7 fails to bind to basement membrane heparan sulfate in most locations. However, in subendothelial matrix in blood vessels and in the basement membrane of a papillary renal cell carcinoma, strong FGF-7 binding is seen. In summary, distinct and specific affinities of heparan sulfates for different FGFs were identified that may affect growth factor activation and local distribution. Heparan sulfate may have a gatekeeper function to either restrict or permit diffusion of heparin-binding growth factors across the basement membrane. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9094999

  13. Intracellular kinetics of the androgen receptor shown by multimodal Image Correlation Spectroscopy (mICS)

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chi-Li; Patsch, Katherin; Cutrale, Francesco; Soundararajan, Anjana; Agus, David B.; Fraser, Scott E.; Ruderman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) pathway plays a central role in prostate cancer (PCa) growth and progression and is a validated therapeutic target. In response to ligand binding AR translocates to the nucleus, though the molecular mechanism is not well understood. We therefore developed multimodal Image Correlation Spectroscopy (mICS) to measure anisotropic molecular motion across a live cell. We applied mICS to AR translocation dynamics to reveal its multimodal motion. By integrating fluorescence imaging methods we observed evidence for diffusion, confined movement, and binding of AR within both the cytoplasm and nucleus of PCa cells. Our findings suggest that in presence of cytoplasmic diffusion, the probability of AR crossing the nuclear membrane is an important factor in determining the AR distribution between cytoplasm and the nucleus, independent of functional microtubule transport. These findings may have implications for the future design of novel therapeutics targeting the AR pathway in PCa. PMID:26936218

  14. Interaction between the inner nuclear membrane lamin B receptor and the heterochromatic methyl binding protein, MeCP2

    SciTech Connect

    Guarda, Alessia; Bolognese, Fabrizio; Bonapace, Ian Marc; Badaracco, Gianfranco

    2009-07-01

    The nuclear membrane has an important role for the dynamic regulation of the genome, besides the well-established cytoskeletal function. The nuclear lamina is emerging as an important player in the organization of the position and functional state of interphase chromosomes. Epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation and histone modifications are required for genome reprogramming during development, tissue-specific gene expression and global gene silencing. The Methyl-CpG binding protein MeCP2 binds methyl-CpG dinucleotides in the mammalian genome and functions as a transcriptional repressor in vivo by interacting with Sin3A, thereby recruiting histone deacetylases (HDAC). MeCP2 also mediates the formation of higher-order chromatin structures contributing to determine the architectural organization of the nucleus. In this paper, we show that MeCP2 interacts in vitro and in vivo with the inner nuclear membrane protein LBR and that the unstructured aminoacidic sequence linking the MBD and TRD domains of MeCP2 is responsible for this association. The formation of an LBR-MeCP2 protein complex might help providing a molecular explanation to the distribution of part of the heterochromatin at the nuclear periphery linked to inner membrane.

  15. Macrophage Membrane Potential Changes Associated with γ 2b/γ 1 Fc Receptor-Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, John Ding-E; Unkeless, Jay C.; Kaback, H. Ronald; Cohn, Zanvil A.

    1983-03-01

    We have studied the effects of specific ligands of the receptor for the IgG Fc fragment (FcR) on the membrane potential (Δ Psi ) of the macrophage cell line J774 by the [3H]tetraphenylphosphonium ion equilibration technique. We observe a membrane depolarization with binding of FcR ligands that is dependent on the degree of receptor crosslinking. Binding of the FcR by monovalent ligands is not sufficient to induce a significant drop in Δ Psi , but a sustained depolarization lasting ≈ 20 min occurs with insoluble multivalent ligands. This FcR-mediated depolarization can be inhibited by substitution of Na+ from the cell incubation medium with monovalent choline cation, indicating that depolarization is due to Na+ influx into the cell. The extracellular Ca2+ does not play a significant role in membrane depolarization. The depolarization response is not triggered by monoclonal antibodies directed against three other major macrophage surface antigens. The cell depolarization mediated by FcR ligands is followed by a prolonged hyperpolarization that can be partially blocked by ouabain and quinine, indicating that the hyperpolarization response is a result of a combination of a Na+, K+-ATPase activity and a Ca2+-activated K+ conductance. These data support our hypothesis that the mouse macrophage IgG FcR is a ligand-dependent ion channel.

  16. A membrane-bound form of glutamate dehydrogenase possesses an ATP-dependent high-affinity microtubule-binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Rajas, F; Rousset, B

    1993-01-01

    We previously identified a 50 kDa membrane protein which bound to in vitro assembled microtubules [Mithieux and Rousset (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 4664-4668]. This protein exhibited the expected properties for mediating the ATP-dependent association of vesicles with microtubules [Mithieux, Audebet and Rousset (1988) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 969, 121-130]. The 50 kDa membrane protein (MP50), initially extracted in very low amount from isolated pig thyroid lysosomes/endosomes, has now been purified from membrane preparations of crude vesicle fractions from pig liver and brain. MP50 was isolated from detergent-solubilized membrane protein by affinity chromatography on immobilized ATP; 3-5 mg of MP50 was obtained from 100 g of liver tissue. Phase partitioning in Triton X-114 indicated that MP50 is a peripheral membrane protein. Radioiodinated liver MP50 bound to microtubules assembled in vitro. The binding was inhibited by ATP (Ki = 0.76 mM) and displaced by unlabelled liver or brain MP50. Equilibrium binding studies yielded KD values of 1.8 x 10(-7) M. By N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis, MP50 was identified as glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), by comparison of V8 protease peptide maps of MP50 with purified liver GDH. Liver MP50 exhibited a low GDH activity; 4-5 units/mg compared with 18 and 34 units/mg for purified bovine and rat liver GDH respectively. Bovine and rat liver GDH yielded six spots from pI 5.7 to 7.2 when analysed by two-dimensional electrophoresis; in contrast, MP50 gave one main spot (corresponding to spot 2 of liver GDH) with a pI of approx. 6.5. Soluble liver GDH from commercial sources exhibited a very low or no microtubule-binding activity. In conclusion, we have found a membrane-bound form of GDH capable of specific and nucleotide-sensitive interaction with microtubules. Our data suggest that GDH isoproteins, the number of which has been undervalued up to now, could have cellular functions other than that of an enzyme. Images Figure 1 Figure 3

  17. Specific binding sites for inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate are located predominantly in the plasma membranes of human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, P J; Patel, Y; Kakkar, V V; Irvine, R F; Authi, K S

    1994-01-01

    In the present study we describe the characterization and localization of Ins(1,3,4,5)P4-binding sites in human platelet membranes. Specific binding sites for Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 have been identified on mixed, plasma and intracellular membranes from neuraminidase-treated platelets using highly purified carrier-free [32P]Ins(1,3,4,5)P4. The displacement of Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 from these sites by Ins(1,4,5)P3 and InsP6 occurs at greater than two orders of magnitude higher concentrations and with Ins(1,3,4,5,6)P5 at about 40-fold higher concentrations than with Ins(1,3,4,5)P4. The membranes were further separated by free-flow electrophoresis into plasma and intracellular membranes. The Ins(1,3,4,5)P4-binding sites separated with plasma membranes, and showed similar affinities and specificities as mixed membranes, whereas Ins(1,4,5)P3-binding sites were predominantly in the intracellular membranes. These results suggest a predominantly plasma membrane location for putative Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 receptors in human platelets. PMID:8141791

  18. A Remote Arene-Binding Site on Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen Revealed by Antibody-Recruiting Small Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Andrew X.; Murelli, Ryan P.; Barinka, Cyril; Michel, Julien; Cocleaza, Alexandra; Jorgensen, William L.; Lubkowski, Jacek; Spiegel, David A.

    2010-09-27

    Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a membrane-bound glutamate carboxypeptidase overexpressed in many forms of prostate cancer. Our laboratory has recently disclosed a class of small molecules, called ARM-Ps (antibody-recruiting molecule targeting prostate cancer) that are capable of enhancing antibody-mediated immune recognition of prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, during the course of these studies, we found ARM-Ps to exhibit extraordinarily high potencies toward PSMA, compared to previously reported inhibitors. Here, we report in-depth biochemical, crystallographic, and computational investigations which elucidate the origin of the observed affinity enhancement. These studies reveal a previously unreported arene-binding site on PSMA, which we believe participates in an aromatic stacking interaction with ARMs. Although this site is composed of only a few amino acid residues, it drastically enhances small molecule binding affinity. These results provide critical insights into the design of PSMA-targeted small molecules for prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment; more broadly, the presence of similar arene-binding sites throughout the proteome could prove widely enabling in the optimization of small molecule-protein interactions.

  19. Binding sites for /sup 3/H-LTC4 in membranes from guinea pig ileal longitudinal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Nicosia, S.; Crowley, H.J.; Oliva, D.; Welton, A.F.

    1984-03-01

    Leutriene (LTC4) is one of the components of Slow Reacting Substance of Anaphylaxis (SRS-A) and is a potent constrictor of guinea pig ilea. The contraction is likely to be a receptor-mediated process. Here the authors report the existence of specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-LTC4 in a crude membrane preparation from guinea pig ileal longitudinal muscle. At 4 degrees C in the presence of 20 mM Serine-borate, binding increases linearly with protein concentration, reaches equilibrium in 10 minutes, and is reversible upon addition of 3 x 10(-5) M unlabelled LTC4. The dissociation curve is consistent with the existence of more than one class of binding site. Ca++ and Mg++ greatly enhance the binding of /sup 3/H-LTC4 at equilibrium. In the presence of 5 mM CaCl/sub 2/ and MgCl/sub 2/ not only LTC4 (IC50 10(-7)M), but also LTD4 and the SRS-A antagonist FPL 55712 can compete with /sup 3/H-LTC4 for its binding sites. FPL 55712 only displaces 60-70% of the total amount bound, while LTC4 displaces 90-95%. These studies indicate that multiple classes of binding sites exist for /sup 3/H-LTC4 in guinea pig ileal longitudinal muscle, and that at least part of these binding sites might be related to the ability of LTC4 to contract guinea pig ilea.

  20. α-Tocopherols modify the membrane dipole potential leading to modulation of ligand binding by P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Davis, Sterenn; Davis, Benjamin M; Richens, Joanna L; Vere, Kelly-Ann; Petrov, Peter G; Winlove, C Peter; O'Shea, Paul

    2015-08-01

    α-Tocopherol (vitamin E) has attracted considerable attention as a potential protective or palliative agent. In vitro, its free radical-scavenging antioxidant action has been widely demonstrated. In vivo, however, vitamin E treatment exhibits negligible benefits against oxidative stress. α-Tocopherol influences lipid ordering within biological membranes and its derivatives have been suggested to inhibit the multi-drug efflux pump, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). This study employs the fluorescent membrane probe, 1-(3-sulfonatopropyl)-4-[β[2-(di-n-octylamino)-6-naphthyl]vinyl] pyridinium betaine, to investigate whether these effects are connected via influences on the membrane dipole potential (MDP), an intrinsic property of biological membranes previously demonstrated to modulate P-gp activity. α-Tocopherol and its non-free radical-scavenging succinate analog induced similar decreases in the MDP of phosphatidylcholine vesicles. α-Tocopherol succinate also reduced the MDP of T-lymphocytes, subsequently decreasing the binding affinity of saquinavir for P-gp. Additionally, α-tocopherol succinate demonstrated a preference for cholesterol-treated (membrane microdomain enriched) cells over membrane cholesterol-depleted cells. Microdomain disruption via cholesterol depletion decreased saquinavir's affinity for P-gp, potentially implicating these structures in the influence of α-tocopherol succinate on P-gp. This study provides evidence of a microdomain dipole potential-dependent mechanism by which α-tocopherol analogs influence P-gp activity. These findings have implications for the use of α-tocopherol derivatives for drug delivery across biological barriers.

  1. Mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene in two Chinese families with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SONG; XU, HAIKUN; AN, WEI; ZHU, DECHUN; LI, DEJUN

    2016-01-01

    Androgens are essential for normal male sex differentiation and are responsible for the normal development of male secondary sexual characteristics at puberty. The physiological effects of androgens are mediated by the androgen receptor (AR). Mutations in the AR gene are the most common cause of androgen insensitivity syndrome. The present study undertook a genetic analysis of the AR gene in two unrelated families affected by complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) in China. In family 1, a previously reported nonsense mutation (G-to-A; p.W751X) was identified in exon 5 of the AR gene. In addition, a novel missense mutation was detected in exon 6 of the AR gene from family 2; this mutation resulted in a predicted amino acid change from phenylalanine to serine at codon 804 (T-to-C; p.F804S) in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of AR. Computer simulation of the structural changes generated by the p.F804S substitution revealed marked conformational alterations in the hydrophobic core responsible for the stability and function of the AR-LBD. In conclusion, the present study identified two mutations from two unrelated Chinese families affected by CAIS. The novel mutation (p.F804S) may provide insights into the molecular mechanism underlying CAIS. Furthermore, it expands on the number of mutational hot spots in the international AR mutation database, which may be useful in the future for prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:27284311

  2. Perturbation of podocyte plasma membrane domains in experimental nephrosis. A lectin-binding and freeze-fracture study.

    PubMed Central

    Orci, L.; Kunz, A.; Amherdt, M.; Brown, D.

    1984-01-01

    Alterations in the ultrastructural organization of podocyte plasma membrane domains were quantitatively assessed in puromycin aminonucleoside-treated rats by the use of 1) Helix pomatia lectin-gold complexes for detection of a specific glycocalyx component(s) normally associated with foot process bases and 2) freeze-fracture for detection of intramembrane particles and endocytotic invaginations on the plasma membrane. Lectin-binding sites were significantly reduced on podocyte foot process bases during the 7-day treatment period; and in freeze-fracture, the plasma membrane of the foot process base showed an increase in intramembrane particle number and size and an increased number of endocytotic invaginations, compared with the numbers in control animals. The cell body of nephrotic animals also had a significantly increased intramembrane particle density, compared with the control animals. These results provide direct evidence that the normal structure of specific plasma membrane regions is perturbed in podocytes that have lost their characteristic array of foot processes and support a role for these domains in the maintenance of normal podocyte architecture. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 p293-a Figure 7 PMID:6496656

  3. Ligand binding properties of putative beta 3-adrenoceptors compared in brown adipose tissue and in skeletal muscle membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Sillence, M. N.; Moore, N. G.; Pegg, G. G.; Lindsay, D. B.

    1993-01-01

    1. The beta-adrenoceptor population was characterized in membrane preparations from rat brown adipose tissue (BAT) and from soleus muscle by use of the radioligand [125I]-iodocyanopindolol ([125I]-ICYP). In addition, atypical binding sites for [125I]-ICYP found in both tissues were examined, and the relationship between these sites and the putative rat beta 3-adrenoceptor is discussed. 2. It was established that BAT membranes host a mixed population of beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors. Of these two sites, 55% showed a high affinity for the beta 1-selective ligand CGP 20712A (pK 8.5), and 45% showed a high affinity for the beta 2-selective antagonist ICI 118551 (pK 8.6). Soleus muscle membranes were found to host a population of beta 2-adrenoceptors, characterized by a high affinity for ICI 118551 (pK 9.1), but beta 1-adrenoceptors could not be detected in this preparation. 5-Hydroxytryptamine receptors were not detected in either preparation. 3. In addition to beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors, atypical binding sites were identified in both tissues using high concentrations of radioligand (0.5-0.6 nM) and in the presence of 1 microM (-)-propranolol. The atypical sites were abundant, representing 80 and 81% of the total [125I]-ICYP binding sites in BAT and soleus muscle respectively. When the pK values for 11 ligands were compared, the correlation coefficient for atypical sites in BAT and soleus muscle was 0.94.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8104645

  4. A novel defensive mechanism against acetaminophen toxicity in the mouse lateral nasal gland: role of CYP2A5-mediated regulation of testosterone homeostasis and salivary androgen-binding protein expression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Wei, Yuan; Xie, Fang; Laukaitis, Christina M; Karn, Robert C; Kluetzman, Kerri; Gu, Jun; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Roberts, Dean W; Ding, Xinxin

    2011-04-01

    To identify novel factors or mechanisms that are important for the resistance of tissues to chemical toxicity, we have determined the mechanisms underlying the previously observed increases in resistance to acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in the lateral nasal gland (LNG) of the male Cyp2g1-null/Cyp2a5-low mouse. Initial studies established that Cyp2a5-null mice, but not a newly generated strain of Cyp2g1-null mice, were resistant to APAP toxicity in the LNG; therefore, subsequent studies were focused on the Cyp2a5-null mice. Compared with the wild-type (WT) male mouse, the Cyp2a5-null male mouse had intact capability to metabolize APAP to reactive intermediates in the LNG, as well as unaltered circulating levels of APAP, APAP-GSH, APAP-glucuronide, and APAP-sulfate. However, it displayed reduced tissue levels of APAP and APAP-GSH and increased tissue levels of testosterone and salivary androgen-binding protein (ABP) in the LNG. Furthermore, we found that ABP was able to compete with GSH and cellular proteins for adduction with reactive metabolites of APAP in vitro. The amounts of APAP-ABP adducts formed in vivo were greater, whereas the amounts of APAP adducts formed with other cellular proteins were substantially lower, in the LNG of APAP-treated male Cyp2a5-null mice compared with the LNG of APAP-treated male WT mice. We propose that through its critical role in testosterone metabolism, CYP2A5 regulates 1) the bioavailability of APAP and APAP-GSH (presumably through modulation of the rates of xenobiotic excretion from the LNG) and 2) the expression of ABP, which can quench reactive APAP metabolites and thereby spare critical cellular proteins from inactivation.

  5. Calcium Binding Promotes Prion Protein Fragment 90–231 Conformational Change toward a Membrane Destabilizing and Cytotoxic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Corsaro, Alessandro; Tosatto, Alessio; Thellung, Stefano; Villa, Valentina; Schininà, M. Eugenia; Maras, Bruno; Galeno, Roberta; Scotti, Luca; Creati, Francesco; Marrone, Alessandro; Re, Nazzareno; Aceto, Antonio; Florio, Tullio; Mazzanti, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The pathological form of prion protein (PrPSc), as other amyloidogenic proteins, causes a marked increase of membrane permeability. PrPSc extracted from infected Syrian hamster brains induces a considerable change in membrane ionic conductance, although the contribution of this interaction to the molecular mechanism of neurodegeneration process is still controversial. We previously showed that the human PrP fragment 90–231 (hPrP90–231) increases ionic conductance across artificial lipid bilayer, in a calcium-dependent manner, producing an alteration similar to that observed for PrPSc. In the present study we demonstrate that hPrP90–231, pre-incubated with 10 mM Ca++ and then re-suspended in physiological external solution increases not only membrane conductance but neurotoxicity as well. Furthermore we show the existence of a direct link between these two effects as demonstrated by a highly statistically significant correlation in several experimental conditions. A similar correlation between increased membrane conductance and cell degeneration has been observed assaying hPrP90–231 bearing pathogenic mutations (D202N and E200K). We also report that Ca++ binding to hPrP90–231 induces a conformational change based on an alteration of secondary structure characterized by loss of alpha-helix content causing hydrophobic amino acid exposure and proteinase K resistance. These features, either acquired after controlled thermal denaturation or induced by D202N and E200K mutations were previously identified as responsible for hPrP90–231 cytotoxicity. Finally, by in silico structural analysis, we propose that Ca++ binding to hPrP90–231 modifies amino acid orientation, in the same way induced by E200K mutation, thus suggesting a pathway for the structural alterations responsible of PrP neurotoxicity. PMID:22811758

  6. Structural basis for activation, assembly and membrane binding of ESCRT-III Snf7 filaments

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shaogeng; Henne, W Mike; Borbat, Peter P; Buchkovich, Nicholas J; Freed, Jack H; Mao, Yuxin; Fromme, J Christopher; Emr, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) constitute hetero-oligomeric machines that catalyze multiple topologically similar membrane-remodeling processes. Although ESCRT-III subunits polymerize into spirals, how individual ESCRT-III subunits are activated and assembled together into a membrane-deforming filament remains unknown. Here, we determine X-ray crystal structures of the most abundant ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 in its active conformation. Using pulsed dipolar electron spin resonance spectroscopy (PDS), we show that Snf7 activation requires a prominent conformational rearrangement to expose protein-membrane and protein-protein interfaces. This promotes the assembly of Snf7 arrays with ~30 Å periodicity into a membrane-sculpting filament. Using a combination of biochemical and genetic approaches, both in vitro and in vivo, we demonstrate that mutations on these protein interfaces halt Snf7 assembly and block ESCRT function. The architecture of the activated and membrane-bound Snf7 polymer provides crucial insights into the spatially unique ESCRT-III-mediated membrane remodeling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12548.001 PMID:26670543

  7. Prostasomes of canine seminal plasma - zinc-binding ability and effects on motility characteristics and plasma membrane integrity of spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Mogielnicka-Brzozowska, M; Strzeżek, R; Wasilewska, K; Kordan, W

    2015-06-01

    Prostasomes are small lipid membrane-confined vesicles that are involved in various fertilization-related processes. The aim of this study was to demonstrate canine seminal plasma prostasomes' ability to bind zinc ions, as well as examining their effects on sperm motility characteristics and plasma membrane integrity during cold storage. Ejaculates, collected from five cross-bred dogs (n = 50), were subjected to ultracentrifugation followed by gel filtration (GF) on a Superose 6 column. Prostasomes appeared as a single fraction in the elution profile. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of canine prostasomes revealed the presence of membrane vesicles with diameters ranging from 20.3 to 301 nm. The zinc-affinity chromatography on a Chelating Sepharose Fast Flow - Zn(2 +) showed that from 93 to 100% of the prostasome proteins bind zinc ions (P(+) Zn). SDS-PAGE revealed that canine P(+) Zn comprised four protein bands, with low molecular weights (10.2-12 kDa). We have also shown a positive effect of prostasomes (p < 0.05), especially variant B (2% of total seminal plasma protein) on canine sperm motility parameters after 2 h storage at 5°C (TMOT%, 44.75 ± 5.18) and PMOT%, 12.42 ± 1.59) and VAP, VSL, VCL, when compared with Control (TMOT%, 7.30 ± 1.41 and PMOT%, 1.70 ± 0.42). Higher percentage of spermatozoa with intact plasma membrane (SYBR/PI dual staining) and intact acrosome (Giemsa stained), after 2 h storage at 5°C, was showed, in variant A (1.5% of total seminal plasma protein) and B, when compared with Control and variant C (2.5% of total seminal plasma protein). The prostasomes' effect on motility and plasma membrane integrity of canine cold-stored spermatozoa may be related to their ability to bind zinc ions and regulate their availability to the sperm.

  8. Sulfated galactans from Gracilaria fisheri bind to shrimp haemocyte membrane proteins and stimulate the expression of immune genes.

    PubMed

    Rudtanatip, Tawut; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Wongprasert, Kanokpan

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that sulfated galactans (SG) from Gracilaria fisheri (G. fisheri) exhibit immunostimulant activity in shrimp. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that SG stimulates signaling molecules of the immune response of shrimp by binding to receptors on the host cell membrane. Accordingly, we evaluated the ability of SG to bind to shrimp haemocytes and showed that SG bound to the shrimp haemocyte membrane (SHM), potentially to specific receptors. Furthermore, this binding was associated with an activation of immune response genes of shrimp. Data from confocal laser scanning micrographs revealed that FITC-labeled SG bound to haemocytes. Far western blot analysis demonstrated that SHM peptides, with molecular sizes of 13, 14, 15, 17, and 25 kDa, were associated with SG. Peptide sequence analysis of the isolated bands using LC-MS/MS and NCBI blast search revealed the identity of the 13, 14, and 17 kDa peptides as lipopolysaccharide and β-1,3-glucan binding protein (LGBP). SG induced the expression of immune related genes and downstream signaling mediators of LGBP including IMD, IKKs, NF-κB, antimicrobial peptides (crustin and PEN-4), the antiviral immunity (dicer), and proPO system (proPO-I and proPO-II). A LGBP neutralizing assay with anti-LGBP antibody indicated a decrease in SG-induced expression of LGBP downstream signaling mediators and the immune related genes. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the SG-stimulated immune activity in haemocytes is mediated, in part, through the LGBP, and IMD-NF-κB pathway.

  9. Androgen receptor: structure, role in prostate cancer and drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, MH Eileen; Li, Jun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-leong

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors (AR) play a pivotal role in expression of the male phenotype. Several diseases, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer, are associated with alterations in AR functions. Indeed, androgen blockade by drugs that prevent the production of androgens and/or block the action of the AR inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, resistance to these drugs often occurs after 2–3 years as the patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In CRPC, a functional AR remains a key regulator. Early studies focused on the functional domains of the AR and its crucial role in the pathology. The elucidation of the structures of the AR DNA binding domain (DBD) and ligand binding domain (LBD) provides a new framework for understanding the functions of this receptor and leads to the development of rational drug design for the treatment of prostate cancer. An overview of androgen receptor structure and activity, its actions in prostate cancer, and how structural information and high-throughput screening have been or can be used for drug discovery are provided herein. PMID:24909511

  10. Androgen receptor: structure, role in prostate cancer and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Tan, M H Eileen; Li, Jun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-leong

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors (AR) play a pivotal role in expression of the male phenotype. Several diseases, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer, are associated with alterations in AR functions. Indeed, androgen blockade by drugs that prevent the production of androgens and/or block the action of the AR inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, resistance to these drugs often occurs after 2-3 years as the patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In CRPC, a functional AR remains a key regulator. Early studies focused on the functional domains of the AR and its crucial role in the pathology. The elucidation of the structures of the AR DNA binding domain (DBD) and ligand binding domain (LBD) provides a new framework for understanding the functions of this receptor and leads to the development of rational drug design for the treatment of prostate cancer. An overview of androgen receptor structure and activity, its actions in prostate cancer, and how structural information and high-throughput screening have been or can be used for drug discovery are provided herein. PMID:24909511

  11. Androgen receptor drives transcription of rat PACAP in gonadotrope cells.

    PubMed

    Grafer, Constance M; Halvorson, Lisa M

    2013-08-01

    Gonadotropin expression is precisely regulated within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis through the complex interaction of neuropeptides, gonadal steroids. and both gonadal- and pituitary-derived peptides. In the anterior pituitary gland, the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) modulates gonadotropin biosynthesis and secretion, acting both alone and in conjunction with GnRH. Steroid hormone feedback also influences gonadotropin expression via both direct and indirect mechanisms. Evidence from nonpituitary tissues suggests that PACAP may be a target for gonadal steroid regulation. In the present study, we show that androgen markedly stimulates rat (r) PACAP promoter-reporter activity in the LβT2 mature mouse gonadotrope cell line. 5'-Serial deletion analysis of reporter constructs identifies 2 regions of androgen responsiveness located at (-915 to -818) and (-308 to -242) of the rPACAP promoter. Androgen receptor (AR) binds directly to DNA cis-elements in each of these regions in vitro. Site-directed mutagenesis of 3 conserved hormone response element half-sites straddling the (-308 to -242) region dramatically blunts androgen-dependent PACAP promoter activity and prevents AR binding at the mutated promoter element. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrates that endogenous AR binds the homologous region on mouse chromatin in LβT2 cells in both the presence and absence of androgen. These data demonstrate that androgen stimulates PACAP gene expression in the pituitary gonadotrope via direct binding of AR to a specific cluster of evolutionarily conserved hormone response elements in the proximal rPACAP gene promoter. Thus, androgen regulation of pituitary PACAP expression may provide an additional layer of control over gonadotropin expression within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  12. Computational study of drug binding to the membrane-bound tetrameric M2 peptide bundle from influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Ekta; Devane, Russell H; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Klein, Michael L

    2011-02-01

    The M2 protein of influenza A virus performs the crucial function of transporting protons to the interior of virions enclosed in the endosome. Adamantane drugs, amantadine (AMN) and rimantidine (RMN), block the proton conduction in some strains, and have been used for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza A infections. The structures of the transmembrane (TM) region of M2 that have been solved in micelles using NMR (residues 23-60) (Schnell and Chou, 2008) and by X-ray crystallography (residues 22-46) (Stouffer et al., 2008) suggest different drug binding sites: external and internal for RMN and AMN, respectively. We have used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the nature of the binding site and binding mode of adamantane drugs on the membrane-bound tetrameric M2-TM peptide bundles using as initial conformations the low-pH AMN-bound crystal structure, a high-pH model derived from the drug-free crystal structure, and the high-pH NMR structure. The MD simulations indicate that under both low- and high-pH conditions, AMN is stable inside the tetrameric bundle, spanning the region between residues Val27 to Gly34. At low pH the polar group of AMN is oriented toward the His37 gate, while under high-pH conditions its orientation exhibits large fluctuations. The present MD simulations also suggest that AMN and RMN molecules do not show strong affinity to the external binding sites.

  13. Ethanol fails to modify [3H]GR65630 binding to 5-HT3 receptors in NCB-20 cells and in rat cerebral membranes.

    PubMed

    Hellevuo, K; Hoffman, P L; Tabakoff, B

    1991-10-01

    Low concentrations of ethanol have been found to enhance the electrophysiologic effect of serotonin (5-HT) acting at 5-HT3 receptors on NCB-20 cells. To determine whether this action of ethanol reflects a change in the agonist-receptor interaction, the effect of ethanol (100 mM) on agonist and antagonist binding to 5-HT3 receptor was studied in vitro in membrane from NCB-20 cells and from cortex plus hippocampus of rat. The antagonist [3H]GR65630 was used to label 5-HT3 recognition sites. Ethanol did not change the characteristics of saturable [3H]GR65630 binding in either membrane preparation. In competition studies, the agonists 5-HT and 2-methyl-5-HT completely inhibited the binding of [3H]GR65630 to NCB-20 cell membranes, while in brain membranes the maximum displacement of specific [3H]GR65630 binding by 5-HT was approximately 30%. Ethanol decreased the affinity of the receptor for 2-methyl-5-HT, but not to 5-HT in NCB-20 cells, and had no effect on agonist binding in brain membranes. The results indicate that enhancement of 5-HT responses at 5-HT3 receptors by ethanol is not a result of changes in the equilibrium binding characteristics of the agonist.

  14. X-ray structure of human aromatase reveals an androgen-specific active site.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debashis; Griswold, Jennifer; Erman, Mary; Pangborn, Walter

    2010-02-28

    Aromatase is a unique cytochrome P450 that catalyzes the removal of the 19-methyl group and aromatization of the A-ring of androgens for the synthesis of estrogens. All human estrogens are synthesized via this enzymatic aromatization pathway. Aromatase inhibitors thus constitute a frontline therapy for estrogen-dependent breast cancer. Despite decades of intense investigation, this enzyme of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane has eluded all structure determination efforts. We have determined the crystal structure of the highly active aromatase purified from human placenta, in complex with its natural substrate androstenedione. The structure shows the binding mode of androstenedione in the catalytically active oxidized high-spin ferric state of the enzyme. Hydrogen bond-forming interactions and tight packing hydrophobic side chains that complement the puckering of the steroid backbone provide the molecular basis for the exclusive androgenic specificity of aromatase. Locations of catalytic residues and water molecules shed new light on the mechanism of the aromatization step. The structure also suggests a membrane integration model indicative of the passage of steroids through the lipid bilayer.

  15. Detection of weak-binding sugar activity using membrane-based carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuo; Kawasaki, Norihito

    2010-01-01

    Protein-sugar interactions underlie many biological events. Although protein-sugar interactions are weak, they are regulated in physiological conditions including clustering, association with other proteins, pH condition, and so on. The elucidation of the precise specificities of sugar-binding proteins is essential for understanding their biological functions. To detect the weak-binding activity of carbohydrate-binding proteins to sugar ligands, we studied lectin tetramer binding to cell-surface carbohydrates by flow cytometry. Tetramerization of lectins enhanced their avidity for sugar ligands, and sugar chains displayed on the cell surfaces were easily accessible to such soluble lectins. In this chapter, we describe methods to (1) prepare biotinylated soluble lectin, (2) obtain R-phycoerythrin-labeled lectin tetramer, and (3) measure tetramer binding to various lectin-resistant cell lines or cells treated with sugar-processing inhibitors. This approach enabled us to detect the weak sugar-binding activity of lectins (K(a) approximately 10(4)M(-1)), especially those from animals, and also to elucidate their specificity for sugar ligands.

  16. Reinforcing aspects of androgens.

    PubMed

    Wood, Ruth I

    2004-11-15

    Are androgens reinforcing? Androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) are drugs of abuse. They are taken in large quantities by athletes and others to increase performance, often with negative long-term health consequences. As a result, in 1991, testosterone was declared a controlled substance. Recently, Brower [K.J. Brower, Anabolic steroid abuse and dependence. Curr. Psychiatry Rep. 4 (2002) 377-387.] proposed a two-stage model of AAS dependence. Users initiate steroid use for their anabolic effects on muscle growth. With continued exposure, dependence on the psychoactive effects of AAS develops. However, it is difficult in humans to separate direct psychoactive effects of AAS from the user's psychological dependence on the anabolic effects of AAS. Thus, studies in laboratory animals are useful to explore androgen reinforcement. Testosterone induces a conditioned place preference in rats and mice, and is voluntarily consumed through oral, intravenous, and intracerebroventricular self-administration in hamsters. Active, gonad-intact male and female hamsters will deliver 1 microg/microl testosterone into the lateral ventricles. Indeed, some individuals self-administer testosterone intracerebroventricularly to the point of death. Male rats develop a conditioned place preference to testosterone injections into the nucleus accumbens, an effect blocked by dopamine receptor antagonists. These data suggest that androgen reinforcement is mediated by the brain. Moreover, testosterone appears to act through the mesolimbic dopamine system, a common substrate for drugs of abuse. Nonetheless, androgen reinforcement is not comparable to that of cocaine or heroin. Instead, testosterone resembles other mild reinforcers, such as caffeine, nicotine, or benzodiazepines. The potential for androgen addiction remains to be determined.

  17. Soaping the NMDA receptor: Various types of detergents influence differently [(3)H]MK-801 binding to rat brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Berger, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Membranes prepared from rat brain were treated with increasing concentrations of cationic, neutral, anionic and zwitterionic surfactants. Potent inactivation of [(3)H]MK-801 binding to NMDA receptors (NRs) was provided by the cation cetyl pyridinium (IC50 25 μM) and the neutral digitonin (IC50 37 μM). A 2 h incubation of rat brain membranes at 24°C with 100 μM of the neutral Triton X-100 resulted in about 50% reversible inhibition (without inactivation). Reversible inhibition was also effected by the anion deoxycholate (IC50 700 μM), and by the zwitterions N-lauryl sulfobetaine (12-SB(±), 400 μM) and CHAPS (1.5 mM), with inactivation at higher concentrations. Keeping the NR cation channel in the closed state significantly protected against inactivation by cations and by 12-SB(±), but not by the other detergents. Inactivation depended differentially on the amount of the membranes, on the duration of the treatment, and on the temperature. Varying the amount of membranes by a factor 8 yielded for cetyl trimethylammonium (16-NMe3(+)) IC50s of inactivation from 10 to 80 μM, while for deoxycholate the IC50 of inactivation was 1.2 mM for all tissue quantities. Some compounds inactivated within a few min (16-NMe3(+), digitonin, CHAPS), while inactivation by others took at least half an hour (Triton X-100, deoxycholate, 12-SB(±)). These last 3 ones also exhibited the steepest temperature dependence. Knowledge about the influence of various parameters is helpful in selecting appropriate conditions allowing the treatment of brain membranes with amphiphiles without risking irreversible inactivation. PMID:26518518

  18. Soaping the NMDA receptor: Various types of detergents influence differently [(3)H]MK-801 binding to rat brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Berger, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Membranes prepared from rat brain were treated with increasing concentrations of cationic, neutral, anionic and zwitterionic surfactants. Potent inactivation of [(3)H]MK-801 binding to NMDA receptors (NRs) was provided by the cation cetyl pyridinium (IC50 25 μM) and the neutral digitonin (IC50 37 μM). A 2 h incubation of rat brain membranes at 24°C with 100 μM of the neutral Triton X-100 resulted in about 50% reversible inhibition (without inactivation). Reversible inhibition was also effected by the anion deoxycholate (IC50 700 μM), and by the zwitterions N-lauryl sulfobetaine (12-SB(±), 400 μM) and CHAPS (1.5 mM), with inactivation at higher concentrations. Keeping the NR cation channel in the closed state significantly protected against inactivation by cations and by 12-SB(±), but not by the other detergents. Inactivation depended differentially on the amount of the membranes, on the duration of the treatment, and on the temperature. Varying the amount of membranes by a factor 8 yielded for cetyl trimethylammonium (16-NMe3(+)) IC50s of inactivation from 10 to 80 μM, while for deoxycholate the IC50 of inactivation was 1.2 mM for all tissue quantities. Some compounds inactivated within a few min (16-NMe3(+), digitonin, CHAPS), while inactivation by others took at least half an hour (Triton X-100, deoxycholate, 12-SB(±)). These last 3 ones also exhibited the steepest temperature dependence. Knowledge about the influence of various parameters is helpful in selecting appropriate conditions allowing the treatment of brain membranes with amphiphiles without risking irreversible inactivation.

  19. How do functionalized carbon nanotubes land on, bind to and pierce through model and plasma membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacerda, Lara; Ali-Boucetta, Hanene; Kraszewski, Sebastian; Tarek, Mounir; Prato, Maurizio; Ramseyer, Christophe; Kostarelos, Kostas; Bianco, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Study of the mechanisms understanding how chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes internalize into mammalian cells is important in view of their design as new tools for therapeutic and diagnostic applications. The initial contact between the nanotube and the cell membrane allows elucidation of the types of interaction that are occurring and the contribution from the types of functional groups at the nanotube surface. Here we offer a combination of experimental and theoretical evidence of the initial phases of interaction between functionalized carbon nanotubes with model and cellular membranes. Both experimental and theoretical data reveal the critical parameters to determine direct translocation of the nanotubes through the membrane into the cytoplasm as a result of three distinct processes that can be summarized as landing, piercing and uptake.Study of the mechanisms understanding how chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes internalize into mammalian cells is important in view of their design as new tools for therapeutic and diagnostic applications. The initial contact between the nanotube and the cell membrane allows elucidation of the types of interaction that are occurring and the contribution from the types of functional groups at the nanotube surface. Here we offer a combination of experimental and theoretical evidence of the initial phases of interaction between functionalized carbon nanotubes with model and cellular membranes. Both experimental and theoretical data reveal the critical parameters to determine direct translocation of the nanotubes through the membrane into the cytoplasm as a result of three distinct processes that can be summarized as landing, piercing and uptake. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: CNT physico-chemical characteristics, TEM images and simulation video. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03184e

  20. Reoxygenation, but neither hypoxia nor intermittent ischemia, increases ( sup 125 I)endothelin-1 binding to rat cardiac membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.J.; Gu, X.H.; Casley, D.J.; Nayler, W.G. )

    1990-03-01

    Standard binding techniques were used to establish whether either hypoxia, reoxygenation, perfusion under acidotic conditions, or stunning of the myocardium resembles ischemia and postischemic reperfusion in increasing cardiac membrane ({sup 125}I)endothelin-1 (ET-1) binding site density (Bmax). Membranes from aerobically perfused rat hearts bound ({sup 125}I)ET-1 to a single population of sites, with an affinity (KD) of 0.093 +/- 0.004 nM and a Bmax of 98.8 +/- 5.2 fmol/mg of protein. Bmax was increased (p less than 0.01) after 30 min of global ischemia, and further increased upon reperfusion, without changes in KD or selectivity. Neither three 10 min episodes of ischemia separated by 15 min of perfusion, nor perfusion at pH 6.8 instead of 7.4, nor 60 min of hypoxia altered Bmax, KD, or selectivity. Reoxygenation after 60 min of hypoxia increased Bmax (p less than 0.01) and KD (p less than 0.01) without changing selectivity. These results are interpreted to mean that the ischemia-induced increase in Bmax for ({sup 125}I)ET-1 cannot be explained simply in terms of the ischemia-induced acidosis, or the accompanying reduction in tissue adenosine triphosphate and creatine phosphate.

  1. The Impact of N-terminal Acetylation of α-Synuclein on Phospholipid Membrane Binding and Fibril Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Aditya; Roeters, Steven J.; Schilderink, Nathalie; Hommersom, Bob; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Woutersen, Sander; Claessens, Mireille M. A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Human α-synuclein (αS) has been shown to be N terminally acetylated in its physiological state. This modification is proposed to modulate the function and aggregation of αS into amyloid fibrils. Using bacterially expressed acetylated-αS (NTAc-αS) and endogenous αS (Endo-αS) from human erythrocytes, we show that N-terminal acetylation has little impact on αS binding to anionic membranes and thus likely not relevant for regulating membrane affinity. N-terminal acetylation does have an effect on αS aggregation, resulting in a narrower distribution of the aggregation lag times and rates. 2D-IR spectra show that acetylation changes the secondary structure of αS in fibrils. This difference may arise from the slightly higher helical propensity of acetylated-αS in solution leading to a more homogenous fibril population with different fibril structure than non-acetylated αS. We speculate that N-terminal acetylation imposes conformational restraints on N-terminal residues in αS, thus predisposing αS toward specific interactions with other binding partners or alternatively decrease nonspecific interactions. PMID:27531743

  2. Characterization of kappa 1 and kappa 2 opioid binding sites in frog (Rana esculenta) brain membrane preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Benyhe, S.; Varga, E.; Hepp, J.; Magyar, A.; Borsodi, A.; Wollemann, M.

    1990-09-01

    The distribution and properties of frog brain kappa-opioid receptor subtypes differ not only from those of the guinea pig brain, but also from that of the rat brain. In guinea pig cerebellum the kappa 1 is the dominant receptor subtype, frog brain contains mainly the kappa 2 subtype, and the distribution of the rat brain subtypes is intermediate between the two others. In competition experiments it has been established that ethylketocyclazocine and N-cyclopropylmethyl-norazidomorphine, which are nonselective kappa-ligands, have relatively high affinities to frog brain membranes. The kappa 2 ligands (Met5)enkephalin-Arg6-Phe7 and etorphine also show high affinities to the frog brain. Kappa 1 binding sites measured in the presence of 5 microM/D-Ala2-Leu5/enkephalin represent 25-30% of (3H)ethylketocyclazocine binding in frog brain membranes. The kappa 2 subtype in frog brain resembles more to the mu subtype than the delta subtype of opioid receptors, but it differs from the mu subtype in displaying low affinity toward beta-endorphin and /D-Ala2-(Me)Phe4-Gly5-ol/enkephalin (DAGO). From our data it is evident that the opioid receptor subtypes are already present in the amphibian brain but the differences among them are less pronounced than in mammalian brain.

  3. Heavy metal tolerance in the fission yeast requires an ATP-binding cassette-type vacuolar membrane transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, D F; Kreppel, L; Speiser, D M; Scheel, G; McDonald, G; Ow, D W

    1992-01-01

    In response to heavy metal stress, plants and certain fungi, such as the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, synthesize small metal-binding peptides known as phytochelatins. We have identified a cadmium sensitive S. pombe mutant deficient in the accumulation of a sulfide-containing phytochelatin-cadmium complex, and have isolated the gene, designated hmt1, that complements this mutant. The deduced protein sequence of the hmt1 gene product shares sequence identity with the family of ABC (ATP-binding cassette)-type transport proteins which includes the mammalian P-glycoproteins and CFTR, suggesting that the encoded product is an integral membrane protein. Analysis of fractionated fission yeast cell components indicates that the HMT1 polypeptide is associated with the vacuolar membrane. Additionally, fission yeast strains harboring an hmt1-expressing multicopy plasmid exhibit enhanced metal tolerance along with a higher intracellular level of cadmium, implying a relationship between HMT1 mediated transport and compartmentalization of heavy metals. This suggests that tissue-specific overproduction of a functional hmt1 product in transgenic plants might be a means to alter the tissue localization of these elements, such as for sequestering heavy metals away from consumable parts of crop plants. Images PMID:1396551

  4. Distinct "assisted" and "spontaneous" mechanisms for the insertion of polytopic chlorophyll-binding proteins into the thylakoid membrane.

    PubMed

    Kim, S J; Jansson, S; Hoffman, N E; Robinson, C; Mant, A

    1999-02-19

    The biogenesis of several bacterial polytopic membrane proteins has been shown to require signal recognition particle (SRP) and protein transport machinery, and one such protein, the major light-harvesting chlorophyll-binding protein (LHCP) exhibits these requirements in chloroplasts. In this report we have used in vitro insertion assays to analyze four additional members of the chlorophyll-a/b-binding protein family. We show that two members, Lhca1 and Lhcb5, display an absolute requirement for stroma, nucleoside triphosphates, and protein transport apparatus, indicating an "assisted" pathway that probably resembles that of LHCP. Two other members, however, namely an early light-inducible protein 2 (Elip2) and photosystem II subunit S (PsbS), can insert efficiently in the complete absence of SRP, SecA activity, nucleoside triphosphates, or a functional Sec system. The data suggest a possibly spontaneous insertion mechanism that, to date, has been characterized only for simple single-span proteins. Of the membrane proteins whose insertion into thylakoids has been analyzed, five have now been shown to insert by a SRP/Sec-independent mechanism, suggesting that this is a mainstream form of targeting pathway. We also show that PsbS and Elip2 molecules are capable of following either "unassisted" or assisted pathways, and we discuss the implications for the mechanism and role of SRP in chloroplasts.

  5. Characterization of [3H]-nitrendipine binding to uterine smooth muscle plasma membrane and its relevance to inhibition of calcium entry.

    PubMed Central

    Batra, S.

    1985-01-01

    Specific, high affinity (KD = 164 pM) binding of the Ca channel inhibitor [3H]-nitrendipine was identified in plasma membrane-enriched fractions from the rat myometrium. Although dihydropyridines effectively competed for [3H]-nitrendipine