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Sample records for membrane antigen requires

  1. MHC I presentation of Toxoplasma gondii immunodominant antigen does not require Sec22b and is regulated by antigen orientation at the vacuole membrane.

    PubMed

    Buaillon, Célia; Guerrero, Nestor A; Cebrian, Ignacio; Blanié, Sophie; Lopez, Jodie; Bassot, Emilie; Vasseur, Virginie; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Blanchard, Nicolas

    2017-07-01

    The intracellular Toxoplasma gondii parasite replicates within a parasitophorous vacuole (PV). T. gondii secretes proteins that remain soluble in the PV space, are inserted into PV membranes or are exported beyond the PV boundary. In addition to supporting T. gondii growth, these proteins can be processed and presented by MHC I for CD8(+) T-cell recognition. Yet it is unclear whether membrane binding influences the processing pathways employed and if topology of membrane antigens impacts their MHC I presentation. Here we report that the MHC I pathways of soluble and membrane-bound antigens differ in their requirement for host ER recruitment. In contrast to the soluble SAG1-OVA model antigen, we find that presentation of the membrane-bound GRA6 is independent from the SNARE Sec22b, a key molecule for transfer of host endoplasmic reticulum components onto the PV. Using parasites modified to secrete a transmembrane antigen with opposite orientations, we further show that MHC I presentation is highly favored when the C-terminal epitope is exposed to the host cell cytosol, which corresponds to GRA6 natural orientation. Our data suggest that the biochemical properties of antigens released by intracellular pathogens critically guide their processing pathway and are valuable parameters to consider for vaccination strategies. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Molecular mapping of signals in the Qa-2 antigen required for attachment of the phosphatidylinositol membrane anchor.

    PubMed Central

    Waneck, G L; Sherman, D H; Kincade, P W; Low, M G; Flavell, R A

    1988-01-01

    Proteins anchored in the membrane by covalent linkage to phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) can be released by treatment with purified PtdIns-specific phospholipase C (Ptd-Ins-PLC). A recent survey of leukocyte antigens using flow cytometry has shown that staining of certain Qa antigens was diminished after PtdIns-PLC treatment, but staining of structurally related H-2 antigens was not affected. Therefore, in this study, the sensitivity of cell-surface Qa-2, H-2Kb, and H-2Db to hydrolysis by PtdIns-PLC was investigated biochemically by immunoprecipitation of radioiodinated molecules from cell lysates or supernatants. Qa-2, but not H-2Kb, was released from the surface of PtdIns-PLC-treated C57BL/10 mouse spleen cells and recovered in the cell supernatants. Similar analysis of thymoma cells transfected with cloned C57BL/10 genes showed that cell-surface Qa-2 molecules encoded by a Q7b cDNA and the Q7b or Q9b gene were sensitive to hydrolysis by PtdIns-PLC, whereas the H-2Kb and H-2Db gene products were resistant. Using thymoma cells transfected with hybrid genes constructed by exchanging exons between Q7b and H-2Db, the signals for PtdIns modification were localized to a defined region of Qa-2. This region differs from H-2Db most significantly by the presence of a central aspartate residue in the transmembrane segment and in the length of the cytoplasmic portion. Images PMID:3422441

  3. Conditional expression of apical membrane antigen 1 in Plasmodium falciparum shows it is required for erythrocyte invasion by merozoites

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Alan; Azevedo, Mauro F; Gilson, Paul R; Weiss, Greta E; O’Neill, Matthew T; Wilson, Danny W; Crabb, Brendan S; Cowman, Alan F

    2014-01-01

    Summary Malaria is caused by obligate intracellular parasites, of which Plasmodium falciparum is the most lethal species. In humans, P. falciparum merozoites (invasive forms of the parasite) employ a host of parasite proteins to rapidly invade erythrocytes. One of these is the P. falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA1) which forms a complex with rhoptry neck proteins at the tight junction. Here, we have placed the Pfama1 gene under conditional control using dimerizable Cre recombinase (DiCre) in P. falciparum. DiCre-mediated excision of the loxP-flanked Pfama1 gene results in approximately 80% decreased expression of the protein within one intraerythrocytic growth cycle. This reduces growth by 40%, due to decreased invasion efficiency characterized by a post-invasion defect in sealing of the parasitophorous vacuole. These results show that PfAMA1 is an essential protein for merozoite invasion in P. falciparum and either directly or indirectly plays a role in resealing of the red blood cell at the posterior end of the invasion event. PMID:24571085

  4. Host antigens on avian oncoviruses: evidence for virus envelope antigens related to specific chicken erythrocyte membrane antigens.

    PubMed

    Aupoix, M; Vigier, P; Blanchet, J P

    1980-01-01

    Avian sarcoma viruses (ASV) of subgroups A to D, produced by chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF), are inactivated to a high degree by rabbit antisera to the membrane antigens of adult chicken and chick embryo erythrocytes, notably by antisera to an antigen of embryo erythrocytes, which is lost by adult erythrocytes and to another antigen specific to the latter erythrocytes. Contrary to virus inactivation by anti-CEF serum reported earlier, virus inactivation by the antisera to these two age-specific antigens does not require complement and is not paralleled by virolysis but by aggregation of virions. The two antigens related, or identical, to the age-specific erythrocyte membrane antigens thus shown to be present on the virus envelope do not pre-exist, or pre-exist only in a low amount, on the CEF membrane, since the virus-inactivating capacity of their antisera is not removed by absorption with CEF. Their appearance on the virus does not depend on cell transformation but only on infection, since both antigens are found on a ts ASV mutant produced at restrictive temperature by untransformed CEF and the virus-inactivating capacity of their antisera is removed by absorption with CEF infected with Rous-associated virus (RAV-1). These findings suggest that infection of CEF by avian oncoviruses may elicit the appearance, or enhance the expression at the cell surface of antigens characteristic of another cell type which may contribute to the formation of specific virus budding sites.

  5. Role of antigen-presenting cells in activation of human T cells by the streptococcal M protein superantigen: requirement for secreted and membrane-associated costimulatory factors.

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, G; Ohnishi, H; Tomai, M A; Geller, A M; Wang, B; Dockter, M E; Kotb, M

    1993-01-01

    The requirements for T-cell activation by the streptococcal superantigen (SAg), pepsin-extracted M protein from type 5 streptococci (pep M5), were studied by monitoring Ca2+ influx and cell proliferation. Cells from a pep M5-specific T-cell line showed no change in intracellular Ca2+ levels in response to pep M5 when added alone or with freshly isolated autologous antigen-presenting cells (APC). However, after being incubated with pep M5 overnight, the APC secreted soluble factors that together with pep M5 induced a marked increase in intracellular Ca2+ levels in pep M5-specific T cells or freshly isolated, purified T cells. Removal of the SAg from the overnight APC-derived supernatants resulted in loss of the Ca(2+)-mobilizing activity, which was restored within seconds of addition of SAg, suggesting that both the SAg and the soluble factors synergize to induce the Ca2+ influx. Induction of cell proliferation required additional signals inasmuch as the activated APC-derived supernatant failed to synergize with pep M5 to induce the proliferation of purified T cells and required the presence of phorbol myristate acetate for this activity. Metabolically inactive, fixed APC were impaired in their ability to present pep M5 to T cells. Presentation of pep M5 by fixed APC was, however, restored when the APC-derived soluble costimulatory factors were added to the culture. Our data suggest that pep M5-induced activation of T cells is dependent on APC-derived soluble factors and an APC membrane-associated costimulatory molecule(s). These interactions may be important in regulating the in vivo responses to M proteins, could contribute to the severity or progression of infections with Streptococcus pyogenes, and may influence the susceptibility of individuals to its associated nonsuppurative autoimmune sequelae. PMID:8423107

  6. The Disulfide Bond Cys255-Cys279 in the Immunoglobulin-Like Domain of Anthrax Toxin Receptor 2 Is Required for Membrane Insertion of Anthrax Protective Antigen Pore

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Kyle; Altiyev, Agamyrat; Puschhof, Jens; Sauter, Roland; Arigi, Emma; Ruiz, Blanca; Peng, Xiuli; Almeida, Igor; Sherman, Michael; Xiao, Chuan; Sun, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax toxin receptors act as molecular clamps or switches that control anthrax toxin entry, pH-dependent pore formation, and translocation of enzymatic moieties across the endosomal membranes. We previously reported that reduction of the disulfide bonds in the immunoglobulin-like (Ig) domain of the anthrax toxin receptor 2 (ANTXR2) inhibited the function of the protective antigen (PA) pore. In the present study, the disulfide linkage in the Ig domain was identified as Cys255-Cys279 and Cys230-Cys315. Specific disulfide bond deletion mutants were achieved by replacing Cys residues with Ala residues. Deletion of the disulfide bond C255-C279, but not C230-C315, inhibited the PA pore-induced release of the fluorescence dyes from the liposomes, suggesting that C255-C279 is essential for PA pore function. Furthermore, we found that deletion of C255-C279 did not affect PA prepore-to-pore conversion, but inhibited PA pore membrane insertion by trapping the PA membrane-inserting loops in proteinaceous hydrophobic pockets. Fluorescence spectra of Trp59, a residue adjacent to the PA-binding motif in von Willebrand factor A (VWA) domain of ANTXR2, showed that deletion of C255-C279 resulted in a significant conformational change on the receptor ectodomain. The disulfide deletion-induced conformational change on the VWA domain was further confirmed by single-particle 3D reconstruction of the negatively stained PA-receptor heptameric complexes. Together, the biochemical and structural data obtained in this study provides a mechanistic insight into the role of the receptor disulfide bond C255-C279 in anthrax toxin action. Manipulation of the redox states of the receptor, specifically targeting to C255-C279, may become a novel strategy to treat anthrax. PMID:26107617

  7. The Disulfide Bond Cys255-Cys279 in the Immunoglobulin-Like Domain of Anthrax Toxin Receptor 2 Is Required for Membrane Insertion of Anthrax Protective Antigen Pore.

    PubMed

    Jacquez, Pedro; Avila, Gustavo; Boone, Kyle; Altiyev, Agamyrat; Puschhof, Jens; Sauter, Roland; Arigi, Emma; Ruiz, Blanca; Peng, Xiuli; Almeida, Igor; Sherman, Michael; Xiao, Chuan; Sun, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax toxin receptors act as molecular clamps or switches that control anthrax toxin entry, pH-dependent pore formation, and translocation of enzymatic moieties across the endosomal membranes. We previously reported that reduction of the disulfide bonds in the immunoglobulin-like (Ig) domain of the anthrax toxin receptor 2 (ANTXR2) inhibited the function of the protective antigen (PA) pore. In the present study, the disulfide linkage in the Ig domain was identified as Cys255-Cys279 and Cys230-Cys315. Specific disulfide bond deletion mutants were achieved by replacing Cys residues with Ala residues. Deletion of the disulfide bond C255-C279, but not C230-C315, inhibited the PA pore-induced release of the fluorescence dyes from the liposomes, suggesting that C255-C279 is essential for PA pore function. Furthermore, we found that deletion of C255-C279 did not affect PA prepore-to-pore conversion, but inhibited PA pore membrane insertion by trapping the PA membrane-inserting loops in proteinaceous hydrophobic pockets. Fluorescence spectra of Trp59, a residue adjacent to the PA-binding motif in von Willebrand factor A (VWA) domain of ANTXR2, showed that deletion of C255-C279 resulted in a significant conformational change on the receptor ectodomain. The disulfide deletion-induced conformational change on the VWA domain was further confirmed by single-particle 3D reconstruction of the negatively stained PA-receptor heptameric complexes. Together, the biochemical and structural data obtained in this study provides a mechanistic insight into the role of the receptor disulfide bond C255-C279 in anthrax toxin action. Manipulation of the redox states of the receptor, specifically targeting to C255-C279, may become a novel strategy to treat anthrax.

  8. Characterization of plant plasma membrane antigens. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Galbraith, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    The library of monoclonal antibodies, which are directed against membrane bound antigens of protoplast plasma membrane, are being characterized by immunoprecipitation, immunoaffinity chromatography, and by Western blotting of SDS gels. Progress on these studies is reported here. (DT)

  9. PROSTATE SPECIFIC MEMBRANE ANTIGEN-BASED IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Joseph R.; Akhtar, Naveed H.; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Anand, Alok; Deh, Kofi; Tagawa, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy affecting men in North America. Despite significant efforts, conventional imaging of PC does not contribute to patient management as much as imaging performed for other common cancers. Given the lack of specificity in conventional imaging techniques, one possible solution is to screen for PC specific antigenic targets and generate agents able to specifically bind. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is over-expressed in PC tissue, with low levels of expression in the small intestine, renal tubular cells and salivary gland. The first clinical agent for targeting PSMA was 111In-capromab, involving an antibody recognizing the internal domain of PSMA. The second- and third-generation humanized PSMA binding antibodies have the potential to overcome some of the limitations inherent to capromab pendetide i.e. inability to bind to live PC cells. One example is the humanized monoclonal antibody J591 (Hu mAb J591) that was developed primarily for therapeutic purposes but also has interesting imaging characteristics including the identification of bone metastases in PC. The major disadvantage of use of mAb for imaging is slow target recognition and background clearance in an appropriate timeframe for diagnostic imaging. Urea-based compounds such as small molecule inhibitors may also present promising agents for PC imaging with SPECT and PET. Two such small-molecule inhibitors targeting PSMA, MIP-1072 and MIP-1095, have exhibited high affinity for PSMA. The uptake of 123I-MIP-1072 and 123I-MIP-1095 in PC xenografts have imaged successfully with favorable properties amenable to human trials. While advances in conventional imaging will continue, Ab and small molecule imaging exemplified by PSMA targeting have the greatest potential to improve diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. PMID:22658884

  10. Herpesvirus Glycoproteins Undergo Multiple Antigenic Changes before Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Glauser, Daniel L.; Kratz, Anne-Sophie; Stevenson, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    Herpesvirus entry is a complicated process involving multiple virion glycoproteins and culminating in membrane fusion. Glycoprotein conformation changes are likely to play key roles. Studies of recombinant glycoproteins have revealed some structural features of the virion fusion machinery. However, how the virion glycoproteins change during infection remains unclear. Here using conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies we show in situ that each component of the Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4) entry machinery—gB, gH/gL and gp150—changes in antigenicity before tegument protein release begins. Further changes then occurred upon actual membrane fusion. Thus virions revealed their final fusogenic form only in late endosomes. The substantial antigenic differences between this form and that of extracellular virions suggested that antibodies have only a limited opportunity to block virion membrane fusion. PMID:22253913

  11. The effect of erythrocyte antigen structure on requirement for T cells*

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, W.; Feldmann, Marc; Palmer, J.

    1974-01-01

    The induction in mice of a humoral immune response to intact sheep erythrocytes, both in vivo and in vitro, requires participation of thymus-derived (T) lymphocytes. In an in vitro system, spleen cells from both neonatally thymectomized and adult thymectomized irradiated bone marrow protected mice were successfully immunized, using washed sonicated sheep erythrocyte membrane fragments as antigen. This obviation of the requirement of T lymphocytes in the immune response, coupled with previous work on macrophage independence, indicates that sonicated membrane fragments were capable of directly immunizing bone marrow-derived (B) lymphocytes in vitro. These results further confirm the signal importance of antigenic structure in determining the cellular requirements for an immunological response; whereas antigens of particulate or monomeric form require the presence of both T cells and macrophages, polymeric antigens of intermediate size such as polymerized flagellin and sonicated sheep erythrocyte membranes require neither of these accessory cells. The results caution against the use of erythrocytes as models of thymus-dependent antigens. The data further suggest that reports of late antibody responses of relatively normal magnitude in thymectomized animals given larger doses of heterologous erythrocytes may have been due to direct immunization of B lymphocytes by degraded erythrocyte antigen. PMID:4138234

  12. Intravacuolar Membranes Regulate CD8 T Cell Recognition of Membrane-Bound Toxoplasma gondii Protective Antigen.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Jodie; Bittame, Amina; Massera, Céline; Vasseur, Virginie; Effantin, Grégory; Valat, Anne; Buaillon, Célia; Allart, Sophie; Fox, Barbara A; Rommereim, Leah M; Bzik, David J; Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Gagnon, Jean; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Blanchard, Nicolas

    2015-12-15

    Apicomplexa parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii target effectors to and across the boundary of their parasitophorous vacuole (PV), resulting in host cell subversion and potential presentation by MHC class I molecules for CD8 T cell recognition. The host-parasite interface comprises the PV limiting membrane and a highly curved, membranous intravacuolar network (IVN) of uncertain function. Here, using a cell-free minimal system, we dissect how membrane tubules are shaped by the parasite effectors GRA2 and GRA6. We show that membrane association regulates access of the GRA6 protective antigen to the MHC I pathway in infected cells. Although insertion of GRA6 in the PV membrane is key for immunogenicity, association of GRA6 with the IVN limits presentation and curtails GRA6-specific CD8 responses in mice. Thus, membrane deformations of the PV regulate access of antigens to the MHC class I pathway, and the IVN may play a role in immune modulation.

  13. Expression of basement membrane antigens in spindle cell melanoma.

    PubMed

    Prieto, V G; Woodruff, J M

    1998-07-01

    Spindle cell melanoma (SCM) is an uncommon form of melanoma that may be confused histologically with other tumors, including malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). Tumors with neural differentiation and melanocytic nevi may both show basement membrane immunohistochemically and at the ultrastructural level. However, most ultrastructural studies of melanoma have failed to demonstrate well formed basement membrane around tumor cells. The presence of basement membrane has been used by some authors as evidence favoring MPNST, as opposed to SCM. To evaluate this distinction immunohistochemically, 22 primary and metastatic cutaneous melanomas having a spindle cell component (SCM) were studied using monoclonal antibodies against laminin and Type IV collagen. S100 protein and HMB45 antigen expression were also studied. All but one of the SCM were reactive for S100 protein in at least 25% of the cells. Thirteen of 20 tumors (65%) were focally reactive with HMB45. Laminin was expressed in 42% of the tumors (only membranous pattern in 3; cytoplasmic and membranous in 5). Seventeen tumors (77%) expressed type IV collagen (only membranous pattern in 7; cytoplasmic and membranous pattern in 10). Laminin and type IV collagen, known components of basement membrane, are often found in SCM. Therefore, their detection cannot be used to distinguish SCM from MPNST.

  14. A smart membrane based on an antigen-responsive hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongsheng; Bowyer, Adrian; Eisenthal, Robert; Hubble, John

    2007-07-01

    Hydrogel membranes have been fabricated that incorporate antibody/antigen moieties. The permeability of large solutes through these membranes is dependent on the presence of soluble antigen that can compete with the internal interactions between antibody and antigen leading to an increase in gel mesh size. Specifically, the membrane's structure is based on a dextran backbone grafted with a fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) antigen and a sheep anti-FITC IgG antibody. The backbone is covalently cross-linked by conjugated divinyl sulfone (DVS) groups. The gel structure is additionally stabilized by affinity crosslinks formed by biospecific interactions between the bound IgG and FITC. FTIR spectra of the gel are consistent with formation of covalent bonds between cysteine groups in the IgG and DVS groups in the dextran. Results obtained using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) confirmed the competitive interaction binding between IgG-FITC-dextran and free sodium fluorescein at pH 5.0. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of samples prepared using cryofixation and cryofracturing techniques showed that observed changes in permeability correlate with free fluorescein-dependent structural changes in the gel. Three-dimensional images obtained from confocal laser scanning microscopy show that these changes occur throughout the gel and indicate that SEM results are not artifacts of sample preparation. The permeability of these gels, as shown by blue-dextran (12 kDa) diffusion, increases in response to the presence of free fluorescein of the external medium, which causes competitive displacement of the affinity cross-links. Sequential addition and removal of sodium fluorescein showed that these permeability changes are reversible. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Gallium-68 Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Michael S; Iravani, Amir

    2017-04-01

    The role of gallium-68 ((68)Ga) prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET imaging is evolving and finding its place in the imaging armamentarium for prostate cancer (PCa). Despite the progress of conventional imaging strategies, significant limitations remain, including identification of small-volume disease and assessment of bone. Clinical studies have demonstrated that (68)Ga-PSMA is a promising tracer for detection of PCa metastases, even in patients with low prostate-specific antigen. To provide an accurate interpretation of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/computed tomography, nuclear medicine specialists and radiologists should be familiar with physiologic (68)Ga-PSMA uptake, common variants, patterns of locoregional and distant spread of PCa, and inherent pitfalls.

  16. Identification of Goodpasture antigens in human alveolar basement membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, K; Iseki, T; Okada, M; Morimoto, Y; Eryu, N; Maki, S

    1988-01-01

    Goodpasture (GP) antigens, protein components reactive with human autoantibodies against glomerular basement membrane (GBM), were identified in human alveolar basement membrane (ABM) using an enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA), Western blotting and immunoprecipitation. All six anti-GBM antisera studied, three obtained from patients with glomerulonephritis and pulmonary haemorrhages (i.e. GP syndrome), and three from patients with glomerulonephritis alone, distinctively reacted with collagenase-digested (CD) ABM. Very cationic 22-28 kD and 40-48 kD components were detected by blot analysis combined with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. These proteins showed some similarities to GP antigens in human GBM with respect to the monomer-dimer composition and charge distribution. Inhibition ELISA revealed that the binding of anti-GBM antisera to CDGBM decreased when they were pre-incubated with CDABM, suggesting that the anti-GBM antisera recognized the same epitope(s) on the GBM and ABM. Heterogeneity of the GP antigens in human ABM was demonstrated by blotting; monomeric antigens were absent or at low levels in the CDABM of three out of 10 normal individuals. In immunoprecipitation, anti-GBM antisera from patients with and without pulmonary haemorrhage showed different reactivities with CDABM. The former antisera precipitated both monomeric and dimeric components, but the latter did not. The observations of variation in monomer-dimer composition of ABM, and the different binding of anti-GBM antisera to it may explain why only some patients with anti-GBM nephritis have lung involvement. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:2466590

  17. Antigen Processing and Remodeling of the Endosomal Pathway: Requirements for Antigen Cross-Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Compeer, Ewoud Bernardus; Flinsenberg, Thijs Willem Hendrik; van der Grein, Susanna Geertje; Boes, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen as peptide/class I major histocompatibility complex complexes plays a central role in the elicitation of CD8+ T cell clones that mediate anti-viral and anti-tumor immune responses. While it has been clear that there are specific subsets of professional antigen presenting cells capable of antigen cross-presentation, identification of mechanisms involved is still ongoing. Especially amongst dendritic cells (DC), there are specialized subsets that are highly proficient at antigen cross-presentation. We here present a focused survey on the cell biological processes in the endosomal pathway that support antigen cross-presentation. This review highlights DC-intrinsic mechanisms that facilitate the cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen, including receptor-mediated uptake, maturation-induced endosomal sorting of membrane proteins, dynamic remodeling of endosomal structures and cell surface-directed endosomal trafficking. We will conclude with the description of pathogen-induced deviation of endosomal processing, and discuss how immune evasion strategies pertaining endosomal trafficking may preclude antigen cross-presentation. PMID:22566920

  18. Antigen processing and remodeling of the endosomal pathway: requirements for antigen cross-presentation.

    PubMed

    Compeer, Ewoud Bernardus; Flinsenberg, Thijs Willem Hendrik; van der Grein, Susanna Geertje; Boes, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen as peptide/class I major histocompatibility complex complexes plays a central role in the elicitation of CD8(+) T cell clones that mediate anti-viral and anti-tumor immune responses. While it has been clear that there are specific subsets of professional antigen presenting cells capable of antigen cross-presentation, identification of mechanisms involved is still ongoing. Especially amongst dendritic cells (DC), there are specialized subsets that are highly proficient at antigen cross-presentation. We here present a focused survey on the cell biological processes in the endosomal pathway that support antigen cross-presentation. This review highlights DC-intrinsic mechanisms that facilitate the cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen, including receptor-mediated uptake, maturation-induced endosomal sorting of membrane proteins, dynamic remodeling of endosomal structures and cell surface-directed endosomal trafficking. We will conclude with the description of pathogen-induced deviation of endosomal processing, and discuss how immune evasion strategies pertaining endosomal trafficking may preclude antigen cross-presentation.

  19. Membrane Insertion by Anthrax Protective Antigen in Cultured Cells†

    PubMed Central

    Qa'dan, Maen; Christensen, Kenneth A.; Zhang, Lei; Roberts, Thomas M.; Collier, R. John

    2005-01-01

    The enzymatic moieties of anthrax toxin enter the cytosol of mammalian cells via a pore in the endosomal membrane formed by the protective antigen (PA) moiety. Pore formation involves an acidic pH-induced conformational rearrangement of a heptameric precursor (the prepore), in which the seven 2β2-2β3 loops interact to generate a 14-strand transmembrane β-barrel. To investigate this model in vivo, we labeled PA with the fluorophore 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD) at cysteine residues introduced into the 2β2-2β3 loop. Each labeled PA was bound to CHO cells, and NBD fluorescence was monitored over time in stirred cell suspensions or by confocal microscopy. A strong increase was observed with NBD at positions 305, 307, 309, and 311, sites where side chains are predicted to face the bilayer, and little change was seen at residues 304, 306, 308, 310, and 312, sites where side chains are predicted to face the pore lumen. The increase at position 305 was inhibited by membrane-restricted quenchers, low temperature, or various reagents known to affect toxin action. Of the 24 NBD attachment sites examined, all but three gave results qualitatively consistent with the β-barrel model. Besides supporting the β-barrel model of membrane insertion, our results describe the time course of insertion and identify PA residues where NBD gives a strong signal upon membrane insertion in vivo. PMID:15964805

  20. Cloning and characterization of canine prostate-specific membrane antigen.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Sonja; Fracasso, Giulio; Colombatti, Marco; Naim, Hassan Y

    2013-05-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a promising biomarker in the diagnosis of prostate cancer and a potential target for antibody-based therapeutic strategies. We isolated the canine PSMA cDNA and investigated the cellular and biochemical characteristics of the recombinant protein as a potential target for animal preclinical studies of antibody based-therapies. Canine PSMA cDNA was isolated by PCR, cloned into expression vectors and transfected into COS-1 and MDCK cells. The biosynthesis and glycosylation of the recombinant protein were investigated in pulse-chase experiments, the cellular localization by confocal laser microscopy, the mode of association of PSMA with the membrane with solubilization in different detergents and its quaternary structure in sucrose-density gradients. Canine PSMA shows 91% amino acid homology to human PSMA, whereby the major difference is a longer cytoplasmic tail of canine PSMA compared to its human counterpart. Canine PSMA is trafficked efficiently along the secretory pathway, undergoes homodimerization when it acquires complex glycosylated mature form. It associates with detergent-resistant membranes, which act as platforms along its intracellular trafficking. Confocal analysis revealed canine PSMA at the cell surface, Golgi, and the endoplasmic reticulum. A similar distribution is revealed for human PSMA, yet with reduced cell surface levels. The cloning, expression, biosynthesis, processing and localization of canine PSMA in mammalian cells is described. We demonstrate that canine PSMA reveals similar characteristics to human PSMA rendering this protein useful as a translational model for investigations of prostate cancer as well as a suitable antigen for targeted therapy studies in dogs. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Substrate Specificity of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Marc O.; Wu, Lisa Y.; Santiago, Nicholas M.; Moser, Jamie M.; Rowley, Jennifer A.; Bolstad, Erin S. D.; Berkman, Clifford E.

    2007-01-01

    A series of putative dipeptide substrates of prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) was prepared that explored α- and β/γ-linked acidic residues at the P1 position and various chromophores at the P2 position, while keeping the P1’ residue constant as L-Glu. Four chromophores were examined, including 4-phenylazobenzoyl, 1-pyrenebutyrl, 9-anthracenylcarboxyl-γ-aminobutyrl, and 4-nitrophenylbutyryl. When evaluating these chromophores, it was found that a substrate containing 4-phenylazobenzoyl at the P2 position was consumed most efficiently. Substitution at the P1 position with acidic residues showed that only γ-linked L-Glu and D-Glu were recognized by the enzyme, with the former being more readily proteolyzed. Lastly, binding modes of endogenous substrates and our best synthetic substrate (4-phenylazobenzoyl-Glu-γ-Glu) were proposed by computational docking studies into an X-ray crystal structure of the PSMA extracellular domain. PMID:17764959

  2. Updates of prostate cancer staging: Prostate-specific membrane antigen

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Alastair; Nair, Rajesh; Geurts, Nicolas; Mitchell, Catherine; Lawrentschuk, Nathan L; Moon, Daniel A; Murphy, Declan G

    2016-01-01

    The ability to accurately stage prostate cancer in both the primary and secondary staging setting can have a major impact on management. Until recently radiological staging has relied on computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear bone scans to evaluate the extent of disease. However, the utility of these imaging technologies has been limited by their sensitivity and specificity especially in detecting early recurrence. Functional imaging using positron-emission tomography with a radiolabeled ligand targeted to prostate-specific membrane antigen has transformed the prostate cancer imaging landscape. Initial results suggest that it is a substantial improvement over conventional imaging in the setting of recurrence following primary therapy by having a superior ability to detect disease and to do so at an earlier stage. Additionally, it appears that the benefits seen in the secondary staging setting may also exist in the primary staging setting. PMID:27995218

  3. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Ligands for Imaging and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Eiber, Matthias; Fendler, Wolfgang P; Rowe, Steven P; Calais, Jeremie; Hofman, Michael S; Maurer, Tobias; Schwarzenboeck, Sarah M; Kratowchil, Clemens; Herrmann, Ken; Giesel, Frederik L

    2017-09-01

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is highly expressed on most prostate cancer (PC) cells. Therefore, the targeting of PSMA has become increasingly important over the last decade. Glu-urea-based PSMA ligands used for both imaging and radioligand therapy are the mainstays of the current success. For PET imaging, both (68)Ga- and (18)F-labeled agents have been successfully translated to clinical applications. Mainly retrospective cohort studies have shown a high value in the setting of biochemical recurrence, with high detection rates even in the presence of low prostate-specific antigen levels. Preliminary data indicated that radioguided surgery with PSMA ligands may help to further improve patient outcomes because it facilitates the removal of small tumor deposits that are otherwise difficult to detect. For primary PC, PSMA ligand PET imaging has been shown to be superior to cross-sectional imaging for the detection of metastatic lymph nodes. In addition, it promises to also provide intraprostatic tumor localization, especially when used in combination with multiparametric MRI. Increasing numbers of studies have reported considerable changes in management resulting from PSMA ligand PET imaging for both biochemical recurrence and primary disease. The use of (177)Lu-PSMA-based radioligand therapy has demonstrated a reasonable response, mainly as defined by a prostate-specific antigen response of more than 50%, comparable to other recently introduced agents. Especially given the high level of safety of (177)Lu-PSMA radioligand therapy, with only minimal grade 3 and 4 toxicities reported so far, it has the potential to expand options for metastatic castration-resistant PC. This review is intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the current literature on low-molecular-weight PSMA ligands for both PET imaging and therapeutic approaches, with a focus on agents that have been clinically adopted. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular

  4. Hetero-bivalent Imaging Agents for Simultaneous Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) and Hepsin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Simultaneous Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen ( PSMA ) and Hepsin PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Youngjoo Byun, Ph. D. CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Hetero-bivalent Imaging Agents for Simultaneous Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen ( PSMA ) and Hepsin 5b...prostate cancer by targeting simultaneously PSMA and hepsin, which are highly expressed in advanced and metastatic prostate cancer. In Year 3, we

  5. Immunogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane antigens examined by crossed immunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, J S; Mutharia, L M; Hancock, R E; Høiby, N; Lam, K; Baek, L; Costerton, J W

    1983-01-01

    By crossed immunoelectrophoresis 36 different anode-migrating antigens were demonstrated in sonicated antigen preparations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We numbered these antigens to establish a reference precipitin pattern. Antigen no. 31 was identified as the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigen, because it was found to be responsible for the O-group specificity and because it reacted with anti-LPS monoclonal antibodies and with Limulus amoebocyte lysate. Purified outer membrane proteins F (porin), H2, and I used as antigens formed precipitins with the reference antibodies, thus establishing their antigenicity. LPS that copurified with protein F and slightly contaminated protein H2 was detectable as an extra precipitin (antigen no. 31). The use of monoclonal antibodies specific for smooth LPS and rough LPS revealed different antigenic determinants in the LPS molecule and suggested that antigen no. 5 could be the core region of the LPS which is equivalent to the rough LPS. Antibodies against these outer membrane antigens were detected in patients with chronic P. aeruginosa pneumonia and in patients with acute P. aeruginosa bacteremia. Antibodies with the same specificity were also found in rats chronically infected with P. aeruginosa 7 days postinfection. This demonstrates the surface accessibility and antigenic reactivity of outer membrane antigens. Images PMID:6194119

  6. Outer membrane proteome and antigens of Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Veith, Paul D; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Tan, Yan; Djatmiko, Deasy C; Dashper, Stuart G; Reynolds, Eric C

    2009-09-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a Gram-negative, anaerobic, fusiform bacterium implicated as a periodontal pathogen. With use of 2D PAGE, SDS PAGE, and LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS, 221 proteins of T. forsythia outer membrane preparations were identified, of which 197 were predicted to be localized to the cell envelope. Fifty-six proteins were reproducibly mapped by 2D PAGE and included several highly abundant proteins in the MW range 140-250 kDa that exhibited C-terminal sequence similarity to the CTD family of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Two-dimensional Western blot analyses revealed that these CTD family proteins together with several other outer membrane proteins were antigenic. The CTD family proteins exhibited a higher than expected MW, and were strongly reactive with the fluorescent glycoprotein stain, ProQ Emerald. This group included BspA and surface layer proteins A and B. TonB-dependent receptors (TDRs) (46) were identified together with 28 putative lipoproteins whose genes are immediately downstream of a TDR gene. The major OmpA-like protein was found to be TF1331. Uniquely, it was found to exist as a homodimer held together by up to three disulfide bridges as demonstrated by MS/MS of a tryptic peptide derived from unreduced TF1331.

  7. Alanine mutagenesis of the primary antigenic escape residue cluster, c1, of apical membrane antigen 1.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sheetij; Dlugosz, Lisa S; Clayton, Joshua W; Pool, Christopher D; Haynes, J David; Gasser, Robert A; Batchelor, Adrian H

    2010-02-01

    Antibodies against apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) inhibit invasion of Plasmodium merozoites into red cells, and a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms on AMA1 allow the parasite to escape inhibitory antibodies. The availability of a crystal structure makes it possible to test protein engineering strategies to develop a monovalent broadly reactive vaccine. Previously, we showed that a linear stretch of polymorphic residues (amino acids 187 to 207), localized within the C1 cluster on domain 1, conferred the highest level of escape from inhibitory antibodies, and these were termed antigenic escape residues (AER). Here we test the hypothesis that immunodampening the C1 AER will divert the immune system toward more conserved regions. We substituted seven C1 AER of the FVO strain Plasmodium falciparum AMA1 with alanine residues (ALA). The resulting ALA protein was less immunogenic than the native protein in rabbits. Anti-ALA antibodies contained a higher proportion of cross-reactive domain 2 and domain 3 antibodies and had higher avidity than anti-FVO. No overall enhancement of cross-reactive inhibitory activity was observed when anti-FVO and anti-ALA sera were compared for their ability to inhibit invasion. Alanine mutations at the C1 AER had shifted the immune response toward cross-strain-reactive epitopes that were noninhibitory, refuting the hypothesis but confirming the importance of the C1 cluster as an inhibitory epitope. We further demonstrate that naturally occurring polymorphisms that fall within the C1 cluster can predict escape from cross-strain invasion inhibition, reinforcing the importance of the C1 cluster genotype for antigenic categorization and allelic shift analyses in future phase 2b trials.

  8. Immunoprotection of Mice against Schistosomiasis Mansoni Using Solubilized Membrane Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Noya, Oscar; Brito, Beatríz; Ballén, Diana E.; Cesari, Italo M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis continues to be one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in the world. Despite the existence of a highly effective antischistosome drug, the disease is spreading into new areas, and national control programs do not arrive to complete their tasks particularly in low endemic areas. The availability of a vaccine could represent an additional component to chemotherapy. Experimental vaccination studies are however necessary to identify parasite molecules that would serve as vaccine candidates. In the present work, C57BL/6 female mice were subcutaneously immunized with an n-butanol extract of the adult worm particulate membranous fraction (AWBE) and its protective effect against a S. mansoni challenge infection was evaluated. Methodology and Findings Water-saturated n-butanol release into the aqueous phase a set of membrane-associated (glyco)proteins that are variably recognized by antibodies in schistosome-infected patients; among the previously identified AWBE antigens there is Alkaline Phosphatase (SmAP) which has been associated with resistance to the infection in mice. As compared to control, a significantly lower number of perfuse parasites was obtained in the immunized/challenged mouse group (P<0.05, t test); and consequently, a lower number of eggs and granulomas (with reduced sizes), overall decreasing pathology. Immunized mice produced high levels of sera anti-AWBE IgG recognizing antigens of ∼190-, 130-, 98-, 47-, 28-23, 14-, and 9-kDa. The ∼130-kDa band (the AP dimer) exhibited in situ SmAP activity after addition of AP substrate and the activity was not apparently inhibited by host antibodies. A preliminary proteomic analysis of the 25-, 27-, and 28-kDa bands in the immunodominant 28–23 kDa region suggested that they are composed of actin. Conclusions Immunization with AWBE induced the production of specific antibodies to various adult worm membrane molecules (including AP) and a partial (43%) protection against a

  9. Immunoprotection of mice against Schistosomiasis mansoni using solubilized membrane antigens.

    PubMed

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Noya, Oscar; Brito, Beatríz; Ballén, Diana E; Cesari, Italo M

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis continues to be one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in the world. Despite the existence of a highly effective antischistosome drug, the disease is spreading into new areas, and national control programs do not arrive to complete their tasks particularly in low endemic areas. The availability of a vaccine could represent an additional component to chemotherapy. Experimental vaccination studies are however necessary to identify parasite molecules that would serve as vaccine candidates. In the present work, C57BL/6 female mice were subcutaneously immunized with an n-butanol extract of the adult worm particulate membranous fraction (AWBE) and its protective effect against a S. mansoni challenge infection was evaluated. Water-saturated n-butanol release into the aqueous phase a set of membrane-associated (glyco)proteins that are variably recognized by antibodies in schistosome-infected patients; among the previously identified AWBE antigens there is Alkaline Phosphatase (SmAP) which has been associated with resistance to the infection in mice. As compared to control, a significantly lower number of perfuse parasites was obtained in the immunized/challenged mouse group (P<0.05, t test); and consequently, a lower number of eggs and granulomas (with reduced sizes), overall decreasing pathology. Immunized mice produced high levels of sera anti-AWBE IgG recognizing antigens of ∼190-, 130-, 98-, 47-, 28-23, 14-, and 9-kDa. The ∼130-kDa band (the AP dimer) exhibited in situ SmAP activity after addition of AP substrate and the activity was not apparently inhibited by host antibodies. A preliminary proteomic analysis of the 25-, 27-, and 28-kDa bands in the immunodominant 28-23 kDa region suggested that they are composed of actin. Immunization with AWBE induced the production of specific antibodies to various adult worm membrane molecules (including AP) and a partial (43%) protection against a challenging S. mansoni infection by mechanism(s) that

  10. Antigen digestion on the target plate of MALDI-TOF MS after isolation using an immunoaffinity membrane.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Youji; Nishimura, Yuri; Saito, Masaki

    2013-09-01

    A combination of methods is required to achieve separation of intact proteins and subsequently perform structure analysis to examine their unstable or external structures. The aim of this study was to develop a method of structure analysis in intact proteins after purification. Transferrin from human plasma was trapped by membrane-immobilized anti-transferrin antibody, which was produced by non-denaturing two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), and transferred to a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and stained with Ponceau S. The antigen transferrin was eluted by rinsing the membrane with trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) or aspartic acid. In addition, a method was established by which the purified human transferrin was enzymatically digested on a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) target plate. Thus, after purification of the human transferrin antigen from tens of microlitres of human plasma using an immunoaffinity membrane, transferrin polypeptide fragments were obtained on the plate following digestion with pepsin in the presence of 0.1% TFA or endoproteinase Lys-C or Lys-C/trypsin with 0.001% sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). The results indicated that the combined methods of isolation using an immunoaffinity membrane and enzymatic digestion on a MALDI-TOF MS plate could be applied to the purification and microanalysis of antigens. This approach would be particularly applicable to the analysis of the primary structure and the less stable and highly accessible regions of antigens from limited sample volumes.

  11. Characterization of O-antigen delivered by Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA) vaccine candidates against nontyphoidal Salmonella.

    PubMed

    De Benedetto, G; Alfini, R; Cescutti, P; Caboni, M; Lanzilao, L; Necchi, F; Saul, A; MacLennan, C A; Rondini, S; Micoli, F

    2017-01-11

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella disease (iNTS) is a leading cause of death and morbidity in Africa. The most common pathogens are Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. The O-antigen portion of their lipopolysaccharide is a target of protective immunity and vaccines targeting O-antigen are currently in development. Here we investigate the use of Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA) as delivery system for S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis O-antigen. Gram-negative bacteria naturally shed outer membrane in a blebbing process. By deletion of the tolR gene, the level of shedding was greatly enhanced. Further genetic modifications were introduced into the GMMA-producing strains in order to reduce reactogenicity, by detoxifying the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide. We found that genetic mutations can impact on expression of O-antigen chains. All S. Enteritidis GMMA characterized had an O-antigen to protein w/w ratio higher than 0.6, while the ratio was 0.7 for S. Typhimurium ΔtolR GMMA, but decreased to less than 0.1 when further mutations for lipid A detoxification were introduced. Changes were also observed in O-antigen chain length and level and/or position of O-acetylation. When tested in mice, the GMMA induced high levels of anti-O-antigen-specific IgG functional antibodies, despite variation in density and O-antigen structural modifications. In conclusion, simplicity of manufacturing process and low costs of production, coupled with encouraging immunogenicity data, make GMMA an attractive strategy to further investigate for the development of a vaccine against iNTS.

  12. Comparative analysis of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) versus a prostate-specific membrane antigen-like gene.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Denise S; Bacich, Dean J; Heston, Warren D W

    2004-02-01

    Currently prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is showing promise both as an imaging and therapeutic target for occult prostate cancer metastases. First generation antibodies against PSMA are used for the FDA approved Prostascint trade mark monoclonal antibody scan and second generation antibodies are being developed for therapeutic targeting as well as imaging 1. However, there have been reports describing PSMA expression in non-prostatic tissues including kidney, liver, and brain. As we had previously showed the existence of a human PSMA homolog, we set out to determine if this non-prostatic expression was due to expression of the PSMA or another gene. The PSMA homolog (PSMA-like) cDNA was cloned by screening a liver cDNA library. mRNA expression of the PSMA and PSMA-like genes was determined via Northern blot analysis using two different probes and protein expression confirmed in some tissues via Western blot analysis. Transcriptional regulation of the two genes was examined using reporter constructs driving luciferase expression. The PSMA-like gene possesses 98% identity to the PSMA gene at the nucleotide level and is expressed in kidney and liver under the control of a different promoter to the PSMA gene. The PSMA gene is expressed in several human tissues and is most abundant in the nervous system and the prostate. The non-prostatic expression of PSMA should be taken into consideration when designing clinical strategies targeting PSMA. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Detection of membrane-bound and soluble antigens by magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mikkel Schou; Howard, Emily; Lu, Shulin; Richard, Matthew; Gregory, Mark; Ogembo, Gordon; Mazor, Ofer; Gorelik, Pavel; Shapiro, Nathan I; Sharda, Anish V; Ghiran, Ionita

    2017-09-14

    Magnetic levitation is a technique for measuring the density and the magnetic properties of objects suspended in a paramagnetic field. We describe a novel magnetic levitation-based method that can specifically detect cell membrane-bound and soluble antigens by measurable changes in levitation height that result from the formation of antibody-coated bead and antigen complex. We demonstrate our method's ability to sensitively detect an array of membrane-bound and soluble antigens found in blood, including T-cell antigen CD3, eosinophil antigen Siglec-8, red blood cell antigens CD35 and RhD, red blood cell-bound Epstein-Barr viral particles, and soluble IL-6, and validate the results by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy performed in parallel. Additionally, employing an inexpensive, single lens, manual focus, wifi-enabled camera, we extend the portability of our method for its potential use as a point-of-care diagnostic assay.

  14. Auger Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Kiess, Ana P.; Hobbs, Robert; Sgouros, George; Mease, Ronnie C.; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Shen, Colette J.; Foss, Catherine A.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2015-01-01

    Auger electron emitters such as 125I have a high linear energy transfer and short range of emission (<10 μm), making them suitable for treating micrometastases while sparing normal tissues. We used a highly specific small molecule targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) to deliver 125I to prostate cancer cells. Methods The PSMA-targeting Auger emitter 2-[3-[1-carboxy-5-(4-125I-iodo-benzoylamino)-pentyl]-ureido]-pentanedioic acid (125I-DCIBzL) was synthesized. DNA damage (via phosphorylated H2A histone family member X staining) and clonogenic survival were tested in PSMA-positive (PSMA+) PC3 PIP and PSMA-negative (PSMA−) PC3 flu human prostate cancer cells after treatment with 125I-DCIBzL. Subcellular drug distribution was assessed with confocal microscopy using a related fluorescent PSMA-targeting compound YC-36. In vivo antitumor efficacy was tested in nude mice bearing PSMA+ PC3 PIP or PSMA− PC3 flu flank xenografts. Animals were administered (intravenously) 111 MBq (3 mCi) of 125I-DCIBzL, 111 MBq (3 mCi) of 125I-NaI, an equivalent amount of nonradiolabeled DCIBzL, or saline. Results After treatment with 125I-DCIBzL, PSMA+ PC3 PIP cells exhibited increased DNA damage and decreased clonogenic survival when compared with PSMA− PC3 flu cells. Confocal microscopy of YC-36 showed drug distribution in the perinuclear area and plasma membrane. Animals bearing PSMA+ PC3 PIP tumors had significant tumor growth delay after treatment with 125I-DCIBzL, with only 1 mouse reaching 5 times the initial tumor volume by 60 d after treatment, compared with a median time to 5 times volume of less than 15 d for PSMA− PC3 flu tumors and all other treatment groups (P = 0.002 by log-rank test). Conclusion PSMA-targeted radiopharmaceutical therapy with the Auger emitter 125I-DCIBzL yielded highly specific antitumor efficacy in vivo, suggesting promise for treatment of prostate cancer micrometastases. PMID:26182968

  15. Auger Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen.

    PubMed

    Kiess, Ana P; Minn, Il; Chen, Ying; Hobbs, Robert; Sgouros, George; Mease, Ronnie C; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Shen, Colette J; Foss, Catherine A; Pomper, Martin G

    2015-09-01

    Auger electron emitters such as (125)I have a high linear energy transfer and short range of emission (<10 μm), making them suitable for treating micrometastases while sparing normal tissues. We used a highly specific small molecule targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) to deliver (125)I to prostate cancer cells. The PSMA-targeting Auger emitter 2-[3-[1-carboxy-5-(4-(125)I-iodo-benzoylamino)-pentyl]-ureido]-pentanedioic acid ((125)I-DCIBzL) was synthesized. DNA damage (via phosphorylated H2A histone family member X staining) and clonogenic survival were tested in PSMA-positive (PSMA+) PC3 PIP and PSMA-negative (PSMA-) PC3 flu human prostate cancer cells after treatment with (125)I-DCIBzL. Subcellular drug distribution was assessed with confocal microscopy using a related fluorescent PSMA-targeting compound YC-36. In vivo antitumor efficacy was tested in nude mice bearing PSMA+ PC3 PIP or PSMA- PC3 flu flank xenografts. Animals were administered (intravenously) 111 MBq (3 mCi) of (125)I-DCIBzL, 111 MBq (3 mCi) of (125)I-NaI, an equivalent amount of nonradiolabeled DCIBzL, or saline. After treatment with (125)I-DCIBzL, PSMA+ PC3 PIP cells exhibited increased DNA damage and decreased clonogenic survival when compared with PSMA- PC3 flu cells. Confocal microscopy of YC-36 showed drug distribution in the perinuclear area and plasma membrane. Animals bearing PSMA+ PC3 PIP tumors had significant tumor growth delay after treatment with (125)I-DCIBzL, with only 1 mouse reaching 5 times the initial tumor volume by 60 d after treatment, compared with a median time to 5 times volume of less than 15 d for PSMA- PC3 flu tumors and all other treatment groups (P = 0.002 by log-rank test). PSMA-targeted radiopharmaceutical therapy with the Auger emitter (125)I-DCIBzL yielded highly specific antitumor efficacy in vivo, suggesting promise for treatment of prostate cancer micrometastases. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  16. Radiolabeled prostate-specific membrane antigen small-molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Will, Leon; Sonni, Ida; Kopka, Klaus; Kratochwil, Clemens; Giesel, Frederik L; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2017-06-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been found to be expressed in most PCs and represents an ideal target for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Numerous PSMA tracers have been recently developed. This review aims to provide an overview on the clinical influence of PSMA tracers in primary staging, biochemical recurrence (BCR) of PC and advanced, metastatic PC. Additionally, the use of PSMA tracers in systemic radioligand therapy (RLT) of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), as well as non-prostatic specific uptake of PSMA tracers and the use of PSMA imaging to manage therapy have been described. A computerized search of the literature (PubMed) was conducted in order to find evidence on the role of PSMA tracers in the diagnosis and therapy of PC. PSMA positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) outperforms conventional imaging in the settings of primary PC, BCR and advanced PC. Especially in BCR of PC, PSMA PET/CT shows clinical value with significantly higher detection rates than standard modalities. The use of PSMA PET/CT resulted in a change of the therapeutic management in up to half of the cases. Regarding RLT, smaller studies were able to show positive clinical effects of 177Lu-labeled PSMA tracers without the occurrence of severe side effects. The currently available data clearly shows that PSMA targeting has a clinical impact on the diagnosis of PC, and that RLT using radiolabeled PSMA tracers has high potentiality in the settings of resistance to conventional therapeutic approaches.

  17. Prion disease: exponential growth requires membrane binding.

    PubMed

    Cox, Daniel L; Sing, Rajiv R P; Yang, Sichun

    2006-06-01

    A hallmark feature of prions, whether in mammals or yeast and fungi, is exponential growth associated with fission or autocatalysis of protein aggregates. We have employed a rigorous kinetic analysis to recent data from transgenic mice lacking a glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane anchor to the normal cellular PrP(C) protein, which show that toxicity requires the membrane binding. We find as well that the membrane is necessary for exponential growth of prion aggregates; without it, the kinetics is simply the quadratic-in-time growth characteristic of linear elongation as observed frequently in in vitro amyloid growth experiments with other proteins. This requires both: i), a substantial intercellular concentration of anchorless PrP(C), and ii), a concentration of small scrapies seeding aggregates from the inoculum, which remains relatively constant with time and exceeds the concentration of large polymeric aggregates. We also can explain via this analysis why mice heterozygous for the anchor-full/anchor-free PrP(C) proteins have more rapid incubation than mice heterozygous for anchor-full/null PrP(C), and contrast the mammalian membrane associated fission or autocatalysis with the membrane free fission of yeast and fungal prions.

  18. Hetero-bivalent Imaging Agents for Simultaneous Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) and Hepsin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Prostate- Specific Membrane Antigen ( PSMA ) and Hepsin PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Youngjoo Byun, Ph. D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Korea...Membrane Antigen ( PSMA ) and Hepsin 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0189 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Youngjoo Byun, Ph. D. 5d...accuracy of prostate cancer diagnosis by targeting simultaneously PSMA and hepsin, which are highly expressed in advanced and metastatic prostate

  19. Goodpasture antigen of the glomerular basement membrane: localization to noncollagenous regions of type IV collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Wieslander, J; Barr, J F; Butkowski, R J; Edwards, S J; Bygren, P; Heinegård, D; Hudson, B G

    1984-01-01

    The glomerular basement membrane antigen in Goodpasture syndrome is a collagenase-resistant molecule with a monomer molecular weight of about 26,000. Type IV collagen isolated from glomerular basement membrane contains collagenase-resistant sequences within its structure. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and chemical analysis were used to demonstrate that the collagenase-resistant sequences of type IV collagen contain Goodpasture antigen. Images PMID:6328527

  20. Quantitative flow cytometric analysis of membrane antigen expression.

    PubMed

    D'hautcourt, Jean-Luc

    2002-11-01

    Immunological analysis for cell antigens has been performed by flow cytometry in a qualitative fashion for over thirty years. During that time it has become increasingly apparent that quantitative measurements such as number of antigens per cell provide unique and useful information. This unit on quantitative flow cytometry (QFCM) describes the most commonly used protocols, both direct and indirect, and the major methods of analysis for the number of antibody binding sites on a cell or particle. Practical applications include detection of antigen under- or overexpression in hematological malignancies, distinguishing between B cell lymphoproliferative disorders, and precise diagnosis of certain rare diseases.

  1. Overcoming Antigenic Diversity by Enhancing the Immunogenicity of Conserved Epitopes on the Malaria Vaccine Candidate Apical Membrane Antigen-1

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sheetij; Dlugosz, Lisa S.; Drew, Damien R.; Ge, Xiopeng; Ababacar, Diouf; Rovira, Yazmin I.; Moch, J. Kathleen; Shi, Meng; Long, Carole A.; Foley, Michael; Beeson, James G.; Anders, Robin F.; Miura, Kazutoyo; Haynes, J. David; Batchelor, Adrian H.

    2013-01-01

    Malaria vaccine candidate Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA1) induces protection, but only against parasite strains that are closely related to the vaccine. Overcoming the AMA1 diversity problem will require an understanding of the structural basis of cross-strain invasion inhibition. A vaccine containing four diverse allelic proteins 3D7, FVO, HB3 and W2mef (AMA1 Quadvax or QV) elicited polyclonal rabbit antibodies that similarly inhibited the invasion of four vaccine and 22 non-vaccine strains of P. falciparum. Comparing polyclonal anti-QV with antibodies against a strain-specific, monovalent, 3D7 AMA1 vaccine revealed that QV induced higher levels of broadly inhibitory antibodies which were associated with increased conserved face and domain-3 responses and reduced domain-2 response. Inhibitory monoclonal antibodies (mAb) raised against the QV reacted with a novel cross-reactive epitope at the rim of the hydrophobic trough on domain-1; this epitope mapped to the conserved face of AMA1 and it encompassed the 1e-loop. MAbs binding to the 1e-loop region (1B10, 4E8 and 4E11) were ∼10-fold more potent than previously characterized AMA1-inhibitory mAbs and a mode of action of these 1e-loop mAbs was the inhibition of AMA1 binding to its ligand RON2. Unlike the epitope of a previously characterized 3D7-specific mAb, 1F9, the 1e-loop inhibitory epitope was partially conserved across strains. Another novel mAb, 1E10, which bound to domain-3, was broadly inhibitory and it blocked the proteolytic processing of AMA1. By itself mAb 1E10 was weakly inhibitory but it synergized with a previously characterized, strain-transcending mAb, 4G2, which binds close to the hydrophobic trough on the conserved face and inhibits RON2 binding to AMA1. Novel inhibition susceptible regions and epitopes, identified here, can form the basis for improving the antigenic breadth and inhibitory response of AMA1 vaccines. Vaccination with a few diverse antigenic proteins could provide universal

  2. Identification of human trophoblast membrane antigens in maternal blood during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, M J; McIntyre, J A; Prior, M; Warriner, G; Faulk, W P

    1982-01-01

    The development of an immunoradiometric assay for the detection of human trophoblast-specific membrane antigens is described. The test revealed for the first time circulating trophoblast-specific cell membrane antigens in the peripheral blood of pregnant women, but none in non-pregnant female or male controls. Comparison of the circulating levels of these trophoblast-specific proteins between normal and pre-eclamptic blood samples showed no significant differences, thus casting doubt on the role of differential trophoblast antigen deportation in the etiology of toxaemic pregnancy. Matched retroplacental cord blood from several normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancies were examined and found either negative or near the lower sensitivity limit of the assay, suggesting that deportation of trophoblast membrane antigens during gestation is limited to the maternal aspect of the placenta. PMID:6177463

  3. Skin tests with soluble tumor membrane antigens in patients with transitional cell cancers.

    PubMed

    Hollinshead, A C

    1978-12-01

    Patients with transitional cell cancers and control patients with other forms of cancer were tested with cell membranes and soluble membrane antigens with the use of delayed hypersensitivity skin tests. These ongoing and parallel studies in which LMI tests are used have not been completed.

  4. Human immune response to Vibrio cholerae O1 whole cells and isolated outer membrane antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, K; Kaper, J B; Levine, M M

    1989-01-01

    The serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA) response of human volunteers challenged with Vibrio cholerae O1 was analyzed for reactivity to V. cholerae O1 antigens by the immunoblot technique. Components of both in vitro- and in vivo (rabbit ligated ileal loop)-grown V. cholerae O1 were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Postchallenge serum IgG reacted uniquely with 15 antigens and with greater intensity than did prechallenge serum with at least 16 antigens. Serum IgG and SIgA reacted with antigens present in preparations from the homologous challenge strain of V. cholerae as well as antigens from strains of heterologous biotype or serotype. These heterologous antigens may represent antigens responsible for protection to rechallenge with a heterologous strain of V. cholerae. All the antigens detected by postchallenge jejunal fluid SIgA had an apparent molecular size of less than 25 kilodaltons. Serum IgG and jejunal fluid SIgA also reacted with antigens unique to in vivo-grown cells and several antigens in outer membrane preparations, suggesting that studies of protective immunity and V. cholerae O1 pathogenesis should include examination of both in vitro- and in vivo-grown V. cholerae O1 cellular antigens. Images PMID:2912896

  5. Uncommon Structural Motifs Dominate the Antigen Binding Site in Human Autoantibodies Reactive with Basement Membrane Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Mary H.; Buckley, Elizabeth S.; Chen, Benny J.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Clark, Amy G.

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies mediate organ destruction in multiple autoimmune diseases, yet their origins in patients remain poorly understood. To probe the genetic origins and structure of disease-associated autoantibodies, we engrafted immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and immunized with the non-collagenous-1 (NC1) domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen. This antigen is expressed in lungs and kidneys and is targeted by autoantibodies in anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis and Goodpasture syndrome (GPS), prototypic human organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Using Epstein Barr virus transformation and cell fusion, six human anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen monoclonal autoantibodies (mAb) were recovered, including subsets reactive with human kidney and with epitopes recognized by patients’ IgG. Sequence analysis reveals a long to exceptionally long heavy chain complementarity determining region3 (HCDR3), the major site of antigen binding, in all six mAb. Mean HCDR3 length is 25.5 amino acids (range 20–36), generated from inherently long DH and JH genes and extended regions of non-templated N-nucleotides. Long HCDR3 are suited to forming noncontiguous antigen contacts and to binding recessed, immunologically silent epitopes hidden from conventional antibodies, as seen with self-antigen crossreactive broadly neutralizing anti-HIV Ig (bnAb). The anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen mAb also show preferential use of unmutated variable region genes that are enriched among human chronic lymphocytic leukemia antibodies that share features with natural polyreactive Ig. Our findings suggest unexpected relationships between pathogenic anti-collagen Ig, bnAb, and autoreactive Ig associated with malignancy, all of which arise from B cells expressing unconventional structural elements that may require transient escape from tolerance for successful expansion. PMID:27450516

  6. Membrane insertion of anthrax protective antigen and cytoplasmic delivery of lethal factor occur at different stages of the endocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Abrami, Laurence; Lindsay, Margaret; Parton, Robert G; Leppla, Stephen H; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2004-08-30

    The protective antigen (PA) of anthrax toxin binds to a cell surface receptor, undergoes heptamerization, and binds the enzymatic subunits, the lethal factor (LF) and the edema factor (EF). The resulting complex is then endocytosed. Via mechanisms that depend on the vacuolar ATPase and require membrane insertion of PA, LF and EF are ultimately delivered to the cytoplasm where their targets reside. Here, we show that membrane insertion of PA already occurs in early endosomes, possibly only in the multivesicular regions, but that subsequent delivery of LF to the cytoplasm occurs preferentially later in the endocytic pathway and relies on the dynamics of internal vesicles of multivesicular late endosomes.

  7. Antigens protected functional red blood cells by the membrane grafting of compact hyperbranched polyglycerols.

    PubMed

    Chapanian, Rafi; Constantinescu, Iren; Brooks, Donald E; Scott, Mark D; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran

    2013-01-02

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is vital for the treatment of a number of acute and chronic medical problems such as thalassemia major and sickle cell anemia. Due to the presence of multitude of antigens on the RBC surface (~308 known antigens), patients in the chronic blood transfusion therapy develop alloantibodies due to the miss match of minor antigens on transfused RBCs. Grafting of hydrophilic polymers such as polyethylene glycol (PEG) and hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG) forms an exclusion layer on RBC membrane that prevents the interaction of antibodies with surface antigens without affecting the passage of small molecules such as oxygen, glucose, and ions. At present no method is available for the generation of universal red blood donor cells in part because of the daunting challenge presented by the presence of large number of antigens (protein and carbohydrate based) on the RBC surface and the development of such methods will significantly improve transfusion safety, and dramatically improve the availability and use of RBCs. In this report, the experiments that are used to develop antigen protected functional RBCs by the membrane grafting of HPG and their characterization are presented. HPGs are highly biocompatible compact polymers, and are expected to be located within the cell glycocalyx that surrounds the lipid membrane and mask RBC surface antigens.

  8. Apical membrane antigen 1 mediates apicomplexan parasite attachment but is dispensable for host cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Bargieri, Daniel Y.; Andenmatten, Nicole; Lagal, Vanessa; Thiberge, Sabine; Whitelaw, Jamie A.; Tardieux, Isabelle; Meissner, Markus; Ménard, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites invade host cells by forming a ring-like junction with the cell surface and actively sliding through the junction inside an intracellular vacuole. Apical membrane antigen 1 is conserved in apicomplexans and a long-standing malaria vaccine candidate. It is considered to have multiple important roles during host cell penetration, primarily in structuring the junction by interacting with the rhoptry neck 2 protein and transducing the force generated by the parasite motor during internalization. Here, we generate Plasmodium sporozoites and merozoites and Toxoplasma tachyzoites lacking apical membrane antigen 1, and find that the latter two are impaired in host cell attachment but the three display normal host cell penetration through the junction. Therefore, apical membrane antigen 1, rather than an essential invasin, is a dispensable adhesin of apicomplexan zoites. These genetic data have implications on the use of apical membrane antigen 1 or the apical membrane antigen 1–rhoptry neck 2 interaction as targets of intervention strategies against malaria or other diseases caused by apicomplexans. PMID:24108241

  9. Use of Immunodampening To Overcome Diversity in the Malarial Vaccine Candidate Apical Membrane Antigen 1

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Karen S.; Adda, Christopher G.; Khore, Madhavi; Drew, Damien R.; Valentini-Gatt, Antonina; Fowkes, Freya J. I.; Beeson, James G.; Dutta, Sheetij; Anders, Robin F.

    2014-01-01

    Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) is a leading malarial vaccine candidate; however, its polymorphic nature may limit its success in the field. This study aimed to circumvent AMA1 diversity by dampening the antibody response to the highly polymorphic loop Id, previously identified as a major target of strain-specific, invasion-inhibitory antibodies. To achieve this, five polymorphic residues within this loop were mutated to alanine, glycine, or serine in AMA1 of the 3D7 and FVO Plasmodium falciparum strains. Initially, the corresponding antigens were displayed on the surface of bacteriophage, where the alanine and serine but not glycine mutants folded correctly. The alanine and serine AMA1 mutants were expressed in Escherichia coli, refolded in vitro, and used to immunize rabbits. Serological analyses indicated that immunization with a single mutated form of 3D7 AMA1 was sufficient to increase the cross-reactive antibody response. Targeting the corresponding residues in an FVO backbone did not achieve this outcome. The inclusion of at least one engineered form of AMA1 in a biallelic formulation resulted in an antibody response with broader reactivity against different AMA1 alleles than combining the wild-type forms of 3D7 and FVO AMA1 alleles. For one combination, this extended to an enhanced relative growth inhibition of a heterologous parasite line, although this was at the cost of reduced overall inhibitory activity. These results suggest that targeted mutagenesis of AMA1 is a promising strategy for overcoming antigenic diversity in AMA1 and reducing the number of variants required to induce an antibody response that protects against a broad range of Plasmodium falciparum AMA1 genotypes. However, optimization of the immunization regime and mutation strategy will be required for this potential to be realized. PMID:25156737

  10. Development of biohybrid immuno-selective membranes for target antigen recognition.

    PubMed

    Militano, Francesca; Poerio, Teresa; Mazzei, Rosalinda; Salerno, Simona; Bartolo, Loredana De; Giorno, Lidietta

    2017-02-03

    Membranes are gaining increasing interest in solid-phase analytical assay and biosensors applications, in particular as functional surface for bioreceptors immobilization and stabilization as well as for the concentration of target molecules in microsystems. In this work, regenerated cellulose immuno-affinity membranes were developed and they were used for the selective capture of interleukin-6 (IL-6) as targeted antigen. Protein G was covalently linked on the membrane surface and it was successfully used for the oriented site-specific antibody immobilization. The antibody binding capacity of the protein G-coupled membrane was evaluated. The specific anti IL-6 antibody was immobilized and a quantitative analysis of the amount of IL-6 captured by the immuno-affinity membrane was performed. The immobilization procedure was optimized to eliminate the non-specific binding of antigen on the membrane surface. Additionally, the interaction between anti IL-6 antibody and protein G was stabilized by chemical cross-linking with glutaraldehyde and the capture ability of immuno-affinity membranes, with and without the cross-linker, was compared. The maximum binding capacity of the protein G-coupled membrane was 43.8µg/cm(2) and the binding efficiency was 88%. The immuno-affinity membranes showed a high IL-6 capture efficiency at very low antigen concentration, up to a maximum of 91%, the amount of captured IL-6 increased linearly as increasing the initial concentration. The cross-linked surface retained the antigen binding capacity demonstrating its robustness in being reused, without antibody leakage or reduction in antibody binding capacity. The overall results demonstrated the possibility of a reliable application of the immuno-affinity membrane developed for biosensors and bioassays also in multiple use.

  11. Identification of a Highly Antigenic Linear B Cell Epitope within Plasmodium vivax Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA-1)

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Lobo, Francisco Pereira; Morais, Cristiane Guimarães; Mourão, Luíza Carvalho; de Ávila, Ricardo Andrez Machado; Soares, Irene Silva; Fontes, Cor Jesus; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius; Olórtegui, Carlos Chavez; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Braga, Érika Martins

    2011-01-01

    Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) is considered to be a major candidate antigen for a malaria vaccine. Previous immunoepidemiological studies of naturally acquired immunity to Plasmodium vivax AMA-1 (PvAMA-1) have shown a higher prevalence of specific antibodies to domain II (DII) of AMA-1. In the present study, we confirmed that specific antibody responses from naturally infected individuals were highly reactive to both full-length AMA-1 and DII. Also, we demonstrated a strong association between AMA-1 and DII IgG and IgG subclass responses. We analyzed the primary sequence of PvAMA-1 for B cell linear epitopes co-occurring with intrinsically unstructured/disordered regions (IURs). The B cell epitope comprising the amino acid sequence 290–307 of PvAMA-1 (SASDQPTQYEEEMTDYQK), with the highest prediction scores, was identified in domain II and further selected for chemical synthesis and immunological testing. The antigenicity of the synthetic peptide was identified by serological analysis using sera from P. vivax-infected individuals who were knowingly reactive to the PvAMA-1 ectodomain only, domain II only, or reactive to both antigens. Although the synthetic peptide was recognized by all serum samples specific to domain II, serum with reactivity only to the full-length protein presented 58.3% positivity. Moreover, IgG reactivity against PvAMA-1 and domain II after depletion of specific synthetic peptide antibodies was reduced by 18% and 33% (P = 0.0001 for both), respectively. These results suggest that the linear epitope SASDQPTQYEEEMTDYQK is highly antigenic during natural human infections and is an important antigenic region of the domain II of PvAMA-1, suggesting its possible future use in pre-clinical studies. PMID:21713006

  12. Antigenic determinants of the chlamydial major outer membrane protein resolved at a single amino acid level.

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, G M; Brunham, R C

    1991-01-01

    Antigenic determinants were identified from seven chlamydial major outer membrane proteins by using overlapping hexapeptides and polyclonal antisera. Sixty-one determinants were detected, and 30 were surface exposed on the native organisms. The two negatively charged residues, aspartic acid and glutamic acid, were found most often in determinants. Thirteen antigenic sites were further characterized by alanine substitution. Differences in fine specificities of these linear determinants were observed in alanine substitution profiles. Five determinants had adjacent critical residues, while eight had critical residues alternated with noncritical residues. Complete replacement analysis of two antigenic determinants provided more detailed information for elucidating the structural basis of the specificity of antigen-antibody interaction and suggested a correlation between sequence conservation and tolerance to amino acid substitution for antigenic sites subject to intense immune selection pressure. PMID:1705241

  13. Cross-linking of anaplasma marginale outer membrane proteins enhances immunogenicity, but is not required for protection from challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial outer membrane proteins are the primary targets of a protective immune response. The specific characteristics of outer membrane-based immunogens, in terms of antigen content and context that are required for protective immunity remain unknown for a wide variety of bacterial pathogens. Usin...

  14. Identification of Goodpasture target antigens in basement membranes of human glomeruli, lung, and placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, M; Köhler, H; Manns, M; Baum, H P; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1987-01-01

    Collagenase-digests of human glomerular (GBM), alveolar (ABM), and placenta basement membranes (PBM) were separated by gel filtration columns and the pools rich in Goodpasture antigens (GP) were identified by an antibody inhibition-ELISA. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) followed by immunoblotting on nitrocellulose membranes was performed with each basement membrane preparation. Sera from patients with florid GP-syndrome and antibodies to glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM antibodies) were incubated with nitrocellulose strips of GBM, ABM, and PBM. Immunoperoxidase staining revealed reactivity with target antigens of 24, 26, 44, and 50 kD in the GBM and of 44 and 50 kD in the ABM and PBM, respectively. No corresponding reactivity was observed using convalescent GP-sera, sera from patients with other immunological diseases or sera from healthy blood donors. The antigens were sensitive to reduction. We conclude, that antigens of similar molecular-weights can be identified by anti-GBM positive sera in human glomerular, alveolar and placenta basement membranes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:3608225

  15. Isolation and partial characterization of antigens from basement membranes and streptococcal cell membrane (SCM) employing anti-SCM monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zelman, M E; Lange, C F

    1989-09-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against streptococcal cell membrane (SCM) antigen were used to identify specific cross-reactive peptides prepared by trypsin digestion of purified glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and lung basement membrane (LBM). Anti-SCM mAb-coupled HPLC columns were used to affinity isolate soluble LBM, GBM, and SCM antigens which then were sized by HPLC. Alternatively, SCM, GBM, and LBM digests were subjected to an initial separation by HPLC into component polypeptides, followed by affinity purification and ELISA of these fractions using anti-SCM mAb. Comparison of the antigenic reactivities by ELISA of the sized polypeptides on a nanomolar basis permitted the estimation of their individual relative epitope densities. The results for SCM antigens showed increasing epitope density with increasing molecular size, which suggests that intact SCM consists of repeating epitopes. Low mol. wt GBM polypeptides in nanogram amounts inhibited mAb binding to SCM, indicating that these small GBM polypeptides may similarly contain more than a single cross-reactive epitope. The identification of these cross-reactive epitopes in LBM and GBM has important implications for the etiology of post-streptococcal sequelae.

  16. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Avid Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor.

    PubMed

    Vamadevan, Shankar; Shetty, Deepa; Le, Ken; Bui, Chuong; Mansberg, Robert; Loh, Han

    2016-10-01

    Ga-PSMA PET/CT is increasingly used to evaluate recurrent prostatic malignancy due to its high specificity. A 75-year-old man with a previous history of treated prostate cancer 3 years earlier presented with rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and underwent Ga-PSMA PET/CT which demonstrated a PSMA-avid focus in the neck of the pancreas. Triple-phase abdominal CT demonstrated enhancement in the arterial phase and to a lesser extent the venous phase of a soft tissue mass in the neck of the pancreas. Cytological and histopathological examination of the soft tissue mass confirmed a low-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor.

  17. Decoration of Outer Membrane Vesicles with Multiple Antigens by Using an Autotransporter Approach

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Tristan; Soprova, Zora; ten Hagen-Jongman, Corinne M.; Vikström, David; Majlessi, Laleh; Beskers, Joep; Follmann, Frank; de Punder, Karin; van der Wel, Nicole N.; Baumgarten, Thomas; Pham, Thang V.; Piersma, Sander R.; Jiménez, Connie R.; van Ulsen, Peter; de Gier, Jan-Willem; Leclerc, Claude; Jong, Wouter S. P.

    2014-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are spherical nanoparticles that naturally shed from Gram-negative bacteria. They are rich in immunostimulatory proteins and lipopolysaccharide but do not replicate, which increases their safety profile and renders them attractive vaccine vectors. By packaging foreign polypeptides in OMVs, specific immune responses can be raised toward heterologous antigens in the context of an intrinsic adjuvant. Antigens exposed at the vesicle surface have been suggested to elicit protection superior to that from antigens concealed inside OMVs, but hitherto robust methods for targeting heterologous proteins to the OMV surface have been lacking. We have exploited our previously developed hemoglobin protease (Hbp) autotransporter platform for display of heterologous polypeptides at the OMV surface. One, two, or three of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens ESAT6, Ag85B, and Rv2660c were targeted to the surface of Escherichia coli OMVs upon fusion to Hbp. Furthermore, a hypervesiculating ΔtolR ΔtolA derivative of attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 was generated, enabling efficient release and purification of OMVs decorated with multiple heterologous antigens, exemplified by the M. tuberculosis antigens and epitopes from Chlamydia trachomatis major outer membrane protein (MOMP). Also, we showed that delivery of Salmonella OMVs displaying Ag85B to antigen-presenting cells in vitro results in processing and presentation of an epitope that is functionally recognized by Ag85B-specific T cell hybridomas. In conclusion, the Hbp platform mediates efficient display of (multiple) heterologous antigens, individually or combined within one molecule, at the surface of OMVs. Detection of antigen-specific immune responses upon vesicle-mediated delivery demonstrated the potential of our system for vaccine development. PMID:25038093

  18. Analysis of Moraxella catarrhalis outer membrane antigens cross-reactive with Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria lactamica.

    PubMed

    Troncoso, Gemma; Sánchez, Sandra; Criado, María Teresa; Ferreirós, Carlos

    2004-01-15

    Mouse sera against outer membrane proteins from Moraxella catarrhalis, Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria lactamica, and human sera from both healthy individuals and patients convalescing from meningococcal meningitis were used to identify cross-reactive antigens. Mouse anti-N. meningitidis and anti-N. lactamica sera recognized 77, 62 and 32 kDa outer membrane antigens in M. catarrhalis strains; on the contrary, the meningococcal porin PorB (38-42 kDa) was recognized by one of the two anti-M. catarrhalis sera. Human sera from both healthy individuals and patients convalescing from meningococcal meningitis also showed cross-reactive antibodies against these proteins. The existence of cross-reactive antigens in M. catarrhalis and N. meningitidis (as well as in N. lactamica) could favor the development of natural immunization against both pathogens.

  19. M-Type Phospholipase A2 Receptor as Target Antigen in Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Laurence H.; Bonegio, Ramon G.B.; Lambeau, Gérard; Beck, David M.; Powell, David W.; Cummins, Timothy D.; Klein, Jon B.; Salant, David J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Idiopathic membranous nephropathy, a common form of the nephrotic syndrome, is an antibody-mediated autoimmune glomerular disease. Serologic diagnosis has been elusive because the target antigen is unknown. METHODS We performed Western blotting of protein extracts from normal human glomeruli with serum samples from patients with idiopathic or secondary membranous nephropathy or other proteinuric or autoimmune diseases and from normal controls. We used mass spectrometry to analyze the reactive protein bands and confirmed the identity and location of the target antigen with a monospecific antibody. RESULTS Serum samples from 26 of 37 patients (70%) with idiopathic but not secondary membranous nephropathy specifically identified a 185-kD glycoprotein in non-reduced glomerular extract. Mass spectrometry of the reactive protein band detected the M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R). Reactive serum specimens recognized recombinant PLA2R and bound the same 185-kD glomerular protein as did the monospecific anti-PLA2R antibody. Anti-PLA2R autoantibodies in serum samples from patients with membranous nephropathy were mainly IgG4, the predominant immunoglobulin subclass in glomerular deposits. PLA2R was expressed in podocytes in normal human glomeruli and colocalized with IgG4 in immune deposits in glomeruli of patients with membranous nephropathy. IgG eluted from such deposits in patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy, but not in those with lupus membranous or IgA nephropathy, recognized PLA2R. CONCLUSIONS A majority of patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy have antibodies against a conformation-dependent epitope in PLA2R. PLA2R is present in normal podocytes and in immune deposits in patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy, indicating that PLA2R is a major antigen in this disease. PMID:19571279

  20. Immunocapture and Identification of Cell Membrane Protein Antigenic Targets of Serum Autoantibodies*

    PubMed Central

    Littleton, Edward; Dreger, Mathias; Palace, Jackie; Vincent, Angela

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the role of antibodies targeting specific membrane proteins in neurological and other diseases. The target(s) of these pathogenic antibodies is known in a few diseases, usually when candidate cell surface proteins have been tested. Approaches for identifying new antigens have mainly resulted in the identification of antibodies to intracellular proteins, which are often very useful as diagnostic markers for disease but unlikely to be directly involved in disease pathogenesis because they are not accessible to circulating antibodies. To identify cell surface antigens, we developed a “conformational membrane antigen isolation and identification” strategy. First, a cell line is identified that reacts with patient sera but not with control sera. Second, intact cells are exposed to sera to allow the binding of presumptive autoantibodies to their cell surface targets. After washing off non-bound serum components, the cells are lysed, and immune complexes are precipitated. Third, the bound surface antigen is identified by mass spectrometry. As a model system we used a muscle cell line, TE671, that endogenously expresses muscle-specific tyrosine receptor kinase (MuSK) and sera or plasmas from patients with a subtype of the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis in which patients have autoantibodies against MuSK. MuSK was robustly detected as the only membrane protein in immunoprecipitates from all three patient samples tested and not from the three MuSK antibody-negative control samples processed in parallel. Of note, however, there were many intracellular proteins found in the immunoprecipitates from both patients and controls, suggesting that these were nonspecifically immunoprecipitated from cell extracts. The conformational membrane antigen isolation and identification technique should be of value for the detection of highly relevant antigenic targets in the growing number of suspected antibody-mediated autoimmune disorders. The

  1. Subdominant outer membrane antigens in anaplasma marginale: conservation, antigenicity, and protective capacity using recombinant protein

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anaplasma marginale is a tick-borne rickettsial pathogen of cattle with a worldwide distribution. Currently a safe and efficacious vaccine is unavailable. Outer membrane protein (OMP) extracts or a well- defined surface protein complex reproducibly induce protective immunity. However, there are seve...

  2. Study on the nature of the Goodpasture antigen using a basement membrane-producing mouse tumour.

    PubMed Central

    Wick, G; Timpl, R

    1980-01-01

    Autoantibodies in the sera of patients with Goodpasture's syndrome showed a strong reaction in indirect immunofluorescence tests on unfixed, frozen sections of a mouse tumour (EHS sarcoma), previously shown to produce extracellular basement membrane. Anti-basement membrane antibodies from patients with bullous pemphigoid failed to react with the mouse tumour, but showed a distinct reaction with cylindroma tissue. Absorption of Goodpasture sera with tumour homogenate completely abolished their reaction on sections of human and murine kidney. Basement membrane (type IV) collagen and a high molecular weight, non-collagenous glycoprotein were isolated from the tumour matrix and studied in absorption experiments and radioimmunoassays. Little or not reaction was observed with Goodpasture patients' sera indicating that neither of these two proteins is the major antigen involved in the disease. Antigenic material reacting with Goodpasture sera was extracted from the tumour in neutral salt solutions, suggesting that it is a non-collagenous protein. PMID:6247110

  3. Library of monoclonal antibodies against brush border membrane epithelial antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Behar, M.; Katz, A.; Silverman, M.

    1986-03-01

    A purified fraction of proximal tubule brush border membranes (BBM) was prepared from dog kidney and used to immunize mice. The standard technique of hybridoma production was followed as described by Kohler and Milstein. Production of antibodies was detected by indirect immunofluorescence on dog kidney slices and by immunodot against the purified fraction on nitrocellulose. Five hybrids exhibited anti BBM activity. These were cloned twice and yielded stable cell lines producing IgG type monoclonal antibodies against BBM. They were designated A/sub 1/, C/sub 7/, D/sub 3/, D/sub 7/ and H/sub 4/. As a family these five monoclonals have broad tissue specificity, i.e. positive staining of the surface mucosa of intestinal kidney proximal tubules. D/sub 3/ exhibits even broader specificity for epithelium reacting with bile canaliculi and choroid plexus. The authors have verified that at least 4/5 antibodies are directed against BBM protein as revealed by immunoprecipitation of solubilized BBM and detected by Coomassie blue staining or autoradiography of lactoperoxidase labelled BBM. Most interestingly all antibodies bind to the surface of LL CPK/sub 1/ cells, a continuous pig kidney cell line of undefined origin but exhibiting many characteristics of proximal tubule cells. The library of monoclonal antibodies obtained provide important probes with which to study membrane biogenesis and polarization in epithelial cells.

  4. Identification of soluble and membrane antigenic markers of acquired toxoplasmosis by immunoblot.

    PubMed

    Khammari, I; Saghrouni, F; Lakhal, S; Bougmiza, I; Bouratbine, A; Ben Said, M; Boukadida, J

    2014-12-01

    The overall performance of quantitative assays in the detection of anti-Toxoplasma IgG is satisfactory, but discrepancies between assays are not uncommon especially when IgG concentrations are close to the limit of detection of the tests. The purpose of our study was to identify soluble and membrane antigens extracted from Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites by immunoblot to select the most relevant antigenic bands to be used for qualitative serodiagnosis of acquired toxoplasmosis. We selected five relevant bands (98, 36, 33, 32 and 21 kDa) with soluble antigens and four relevant bands (42, 35, 32 and 30 kDa) with membrane antigens which gave high sensitivity and/or specificity in immunodiagnosis. The association on the same blot of at least three of the five relevant bands in the soluble antigen immunoblot showed the highest sensitivity/specificity (97.4%/99.0%, respectively). Our results indicate that immunoblot using soluble tachyzoite extract with simultaneous detection of at least three of the five bands (98, 36, 33, 32 and 21 kDa) represents a valuable test for serodiagnosis of acquired toxoplasmosis and should be further evaluated as a confirmatory test for sera which give discrepant results in quantitative assays.

  5. Immunoelectron microscopy of skin basement membrane zone antigens: a pre-embedding method using 1-nm immunogold with silver enhancement.

    PubMed

    McGrath, J A; Ishida-Yamamoto, A; Shimizu, H; Fine, J D; Eady, R A

    1994-05-01

    There is no single immunoelectron microscopical method for invariably effective localization of both intracellular and extracellular antigens. We describe a simple and practicable immunogold technique that can be used to localize various skin basement membrane zone antigens at the ultrastructural level. Small pieces of skin were incubated with primary antibodies recognizing epitopes on a range of basement membrane zone-related antigens (two different lamina lucida-associated antigens, laminin, type VII collagen, fibrillin and keratin 14). This was followed by incubation with 1-nm colloidal gold-conjugated secondary antibody and subsequent silver intensification. The specimens were then processed for transmission electron microscopy. Precise immunolocalization with good ultrastructural preservation was achieved for all basement membrane zone antibodies tested. The results of basal cell keratin immunostaining showed that this microscopic approach could also be applied to some extent in the characterization of intracellular antigens. This immunoelectron microscopy technique provides a useful approach to the study of macromolecules at the basement membrane zone.

  6. Cross-linking analysis of antigenic outer membrane protein complexes of Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Sandra; Abel, Ana; Arenas, Jesús; Criado, María Teresa; Ferreirós, Carlos M

    2006-03-01

    Polysaccharide-based approaches have not enabled the development of effective vaccines against meningococci of serogroup B, and the most promising current research is focused on the use of outer membrane vesicles. Due to the toxicity of the outer membrane oligosaccharides, new vaccines based on purified proteins are being sought, but despite the application of advanced techniques, they remain elusive, perhaps due to the fact that standard techniques for analysis of antigens overlook conformational epitopes located in membrane complexes. Membrane complex antigens have been analyzed in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and a study published on Neisseria meningitidis has reported the in vitro formation of 800-kD complexes by deposition of a purified protein (MSP63) onto synthetic lipid layers; however, no studies to date have attempted to identify membrane complexes present in vivo in N. meningitidis. In the present study, cross-linking with formaldehyde was used to identify outer membrane protein associations in various N. meningitidis and Neisseria lactamica strains. In N. meningitides, complexes of about 450 kD (also present in N. lactamica), 165 and 95 kD were detected and shown to be made up of the proteins MSP63, PorA/PorB/RmpM/FetA, and PorA/PorB/RmpM, respectively. In western blots, the 450-kD complex was identified by mouse antibodies raised against outer membrane vesicles, but not by antibodies raised against the purified complex, demonstrating the importance of conformational epitopes, and thus suggesting that the analysis of antigens in their native conformation may be useful or even essential for the design of effective vaccines against meningococci.

  7. The distribution of surface antigens during fractionation of mouse liver plasma membranes

    PubMed Central

    Gurd, James W.; Evans, W. H.; Perkins, Harold R.

    1972-01-01

    1. Antiserum to purified mouse liver plasma membranes was prepared and the partially purified γ-globulin antibody fraction was iodinated with 125I. The reaction of the 125I-labelled γ-globulin antibody with isolated mouse liver plasma membranes was studied. 2. The γglobulin antibody bound specifically to mouse liver plasma membranes and there was little reaction with mouse liver intracellular membranes or with surface-membrane fractions from either rat liver or pig lymphocytes. 3. `Light' and `heavy' mouse liver plasma-membrane subfractions bound similar amounts of γ-globulin antibody, and this is consistent with a surface origin for the light fraction. 5. Plasma membranes were fractionated by sequential extraction with 50mm-NaHCO3–Na2CO3 buffer, pH10.2, containing 10mm-EDTA and aq. 33% (v/v) pyridine. The alkali-soluble and -insoluble fractions and the pyridine-soluble and -insoluble fractions all reacted with the antiserum, and the cross-reactivity among the various fractions and with the total plasma membranes was investigated. 5. The results are discussed in terms of the arrangement of the antigenic determinants within the membrane. PMID:4120434

  8. Lipid-Free Antigen B Subunits from Echinococcus granulosus: Oligomerization, Ligand Binding, and Membrane Interaction Properties

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Álvarez, Valeria; Franchini, Gisela R.; Pórfido, Jorge L.; Kennedy, Malcolm W.; Ferreira, Ana M.; Córsico, Betina

    2015-01-01

    Background The hydatid disease parasite Echinococcus granulosus has a restricted lipid metabolism, and needs to harvest essential lipids from the host. Antigen B (EgAgB), an abundant lipoprotein of the larval stage (hydatid cyst), is thought to be important in lipid storage and transport. It contains a wide variety of lipid classes, from highly hydrophobic compounds to phospholipids. Its protein component belongs to the cestode-specific Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein family, which includes five 8-kDa isoforms encoded by a multigene family (EgAgB1-EgAgB5). How lipid and protein components are assembled into EgAgB particles remains unknown. EgAgB apolipoproteins self-associate into large oligomers, but the functional contribution of lipids to oligomerization is uncertain. Furthermore, binding of fatty acids to some EgAgB subunits has been reported, but their ability to bind other lipids and transfer them to acceptor membranes has not been studied. Methodology/Principal Findings Lipid-free EgAgB subunits obtained by reverse-phase HPLC were used to analyse their oligomerization, ligand binding and membrane interaction properties. Size exclusion chromatography and cross-linking experiments showed that EgAgB8/2 and EgAgB8/3 can self-associate, suggesting that lipids are not required for oligomerization. Furthermore, using fluorescent probes, both subunits were found to bind fatty acids, but not cholesterol analogues. Analysis of fatty acid transfer to phospholipid vesicles demonstrated that EgAgB8/2 and EgAgB8/3 are potentially capable of transferring fatty acids to membranes, and that the efficiency of transfer is dependent on the surface charge of the vesicles. Conclusions/Significance We show that EgAgB apolipoproteins can oligomerize in the absence of lipids, and can bind and transfer fatty acids to phospholipid membranes. Since imported fatty acids are essential for Echinococcus granulosus, these findings provide a mechanism whereby EgAgB could engage in lipid

  9. Different glycoforms of prostate-specific membrane antigen are intracellularly transported through their association with distinct detergent-resistant membranes.

    PubMed

    Castelletti, Deborah; Alfalah, Marwan; Heine, Martin; Hein, Zeynep; Schmitte, Ruth; Fracasso, Giulio; Colombatti, Marco; Naim, Hassan Y

    2008-01-01

    Hormone-refractory prostate carcinomas as well as the neovasculature of different tumours express high levels of PSMA (prostate-specific membrane antigen). PSMA is a type II-transmembrane glycoprotein and a potential tumour marker for both diagnosis and passive immunotherapy. Here, we report on the association of PSMA with DRMs (detergent-resistant membranes) at different stages of the protein maturation pathway in human prostate carcinoma LNCaP cells. At least three PSMA glycoforms were biochemically identified based on their extractability behaviour in different non-ionic detergents. In particular, one precursor glycoform of PSMA is associated with Tween 20-insoluble DRMs, whereas the complex glycosylated protein segregates into membrane structures that are insoluble in Lubrol WX and display a different lipid composition. Association of PSMA with these membranes occurs in the Golgi compartment together with the acquisition of a native conformation. PSMA homodimers reach the plasma membrane of LNCaP cells in Lubrol WX-insoluble lipid/protein complexes. At the steady state, the majority of PSMA remains within these membrane microdomains at the cell surface. We conclude that the intracellular transport of PSMA occurs through populations of DRMs distinct for each biosynthetic form and cellular compartment.

  10. Molecular cloning, characterization and antigenicity of Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan) (Babesia cf. motasi) apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1).

    PubMed

    Niu, Qingli; Liu, Zhijie; Yang, Jifei; Guan, Guiquan; Pan, Yuping; Luo, Jianxun; Yin, Hong

    2017-04-01

    Apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) has been described as a potential vaccine candidate in apicomplexan parasites. Here we characterize the ama-1 gene. The full-length ama-1 gene of Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan) (BLTAMA-1) is 1785 bp, which contains an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 65-kDa protein of 594 amino acid residues; by definition, the 5' UTR precedes the first methionine of the ORF. Phylogenetic analysis based on AMA-1 amino acid sequences clearly separated Piroplasmida from other Apicomplexa parasites. The Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan) AMA-1 sequence is most closely associated with that of B. ovata and B. bigemina, with high bootstrap value. A recombinant protein encoding a conserved region and containing ectodomains I and II of BLTAMA-1 was constructed. BLTrAMA-1-DI/DII proteins were tested for reactivity with sera from sheep infected by Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan). In Western-blot analysis, native Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan) AMA-1 proteins were recognized by antibodies raised in rabbits against BLTrAMA-1 in vitro. The results of this study are discussed in terms of gene characterization, taxonomy and antigenicity.

  11. Characterization of antibody binding to cell surface antigens using a plasma membrane-bound plate assay.

    PubMed

    Vater, C A; Reid, K; Bartle, L M; Goldmacher, V S

    1995-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for measuring antibody binding to cell surface antigens using an immobilized plasma membrane fraction. In this method, isolated plasma membranes are dried onto wells of a 96-well microtiter plate and incubated with antibodies that recognize a cell surface protein. Bound antibody is detected indirectly using an enzyme-linked or fluorescently tagged second antibody. Alternatively, the primary antibody itself can be labeled and its binding can be detected directly. The assay is simple and fast and provides several advantages over whole cell binding assays currently in widespread use.

  12. Rat macrophage lysosomal membrane antigen recognized by monoclonal antibody ED1.

    PubMed Central

    Damoiseaux, J G; Döpp, E A; Calame, W; Chao, D; MacPherson, G G; Dijkstra, C D

    1994-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody (mAb) ED1 is being used widely as a marker for rat macrophages. The distribution of the recognized antigen in tissues and isolated cells strongly supports this use as a macrophage marker, since the majority of macrophages are recognized and only seldomly are other cell types stained by mAb ED1. In the present study we further characterized the recognized antigen by a detailed description of the localization of the antigen and by determining biochemical and functional properties. We show that the antigen is expressed on the membranes of cytoplasmic granules, like phagolysosomes, as well as on the cell surface. The amount of ED1 expression in a single cell can be correlated to phagocytic activity of the respective cell type, but the mAb ED1 is not able to block latex phagocytosis or bacterial killing. The mAb ED1 appears to recognize a heavily glycosylated protein of 90,000-110,000 MW, depending on the cell type used as antigen source. A possible relation with other known lysosomal glycoproteins with a similar molecular weight is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7821959

  13. Binding of Streptococcus mutans antigens to heart and kidney basement membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, M W; Barua, P K; Bergey, E J; Nisengard, R J; Neiders, M E; Albini, B

    1984-01-01

    Using indirect immunofluorescence, alkali-extracted components of Streptococcus mutans were found to bind in vitro to capillary walls and sarcolemmal sheaths of monkey cardiac muscle and to glomerular and tubular basement membranes of monkey kidney. Adsorption of S. mutans components to tissue fragments was also detected by indirect radioimmunoassay and immunoblotting on nitrocellulose paper. Antibodies did not bind to untreated, control tissues in these experiments, proving that antigens shared by S. mutans and tissue components were not involved. Rabbit and monkey heart and kidney components bound S. mutans antigens of 24,000, 35,000, and 65,000 Mr. Monkey heart also bound molecules of 90,000 and 120,000 Mr. Rabbits immunized by intravenous injection of disrupted S. mutans cells developed severe nephritis that was characterized by the deposition of immunoglobulins, complement component C3, and S. mutans antigens in the glomeruli. Immunoglobulin G eluted from nephritic kidneys reacted in immunoblots with the 24,000, 35,000, and 65,000 Mr components of S. mutans extract, indicating that the antigens that bound to tissue in vitro also bound in vivo and reacted with antibodies in situ. Antibodies to other S. mutans antigens were not detected in the kidney eluate, although they were present in the serum of the same rabbit. Images PMID:6384042

  14. Immunolocalization of nestin, mesothelin and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) in developing and adult serous membranes and mesotheliomas.

    PubMed

    Petricevic, Josko; Punda, Hrvoje; Brakus, Snjezana Mardesic; Vukojevic, Katarina; Govorko, Danijela Kalibovic; Alfirevic, Darko; Kvesic, Ante; Saraga-Babic, Mirna

    2012-09-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), mesothelin and nestin was immunohistochemically analyzed in developing and adult human serous membranes and mesotheliomas in order to detect possible differences in the course of mesenchymal to epithelial transformation, which is associated with differentiation of mesothelial cells during normal development and tumorigenesis. Pleura and pericardium developing from the visceral mesoderm gradually transform into mesothelial cells and connective tissue. EMA appeared in mesothelium of both serous membranes during the early fetal period, whereas during further development, EMA expression was retained only in the pericardial mesothelium. It increased in both pleural mesothelium and connective tissue. Mesothelin appeared first in pericardial submesothelial cells and later in surface mesothelium, while in pleura it was immediately localized in mesothelium. In adult serous membranes, EMA and mesothelin were predominantly expressed in mesothelium. Nestin never appeared in mesothelium, but in connective tissues and myocardial cells and subsequently decreased during development, apart from in the walls of blood vessels. Mesothelial cells in the two serous membranes developed in two separate developmental pathways. We speculate that submesothelial pericardial and mesothelial pleural cells might belong to a population of stem cells. In epithelioid mesotheliomas, 13% of cells expressed nestin, 39% EMA and 7% mesothelin.

  15. Development and comparative evaluation of a plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on recombinant outer membrane antigens Omp28 and Omp31 for diagnosis of human brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Sapana; Kumar, Ashu; Thavaselvam, Duraipandian; Mangalgi, Smita; Rathod, Vedika; Prakash, Archana; Barua, Anita; Arora, Sonia; Sathyaseelan, Kannusamy

    2013-08-01

    Brucellosis is an important zoonotic infectious disease of humans and livestock with worldwide distribution and is caused by bacteria of the genus Brucella. The diagnosis of brucellosis always requires laboratory confirmation by either isolation of pathogens or detection of specific antibodies. The conventional serological tests available for the diagnosis of brucellosis are less specific and show cross-reactivity with other closely related organisms. These tests also necessitate the handling of Brucella species for antigen preparation. Therefore, there is a need to develop reliable, rapid, and user-friendly systems for disease diagnosis and alternatives to vaccine approaches. Keeping in mind the importance of brucellosis as an emerging infection and the prevalence in India, we carried out the present study to compare the recombinant antigens with the native antigens (cell envelope and sonicated antigen) of Brucella for diagnosis of human brucellosis by an indirect plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Recombinant outer membrane protein 28 (rOmp28) and rOmp31 antigens were cloned, expressed, and purified in the bacterial expression system, and the purified proteins were used as antigens. Indirect plate ELISAs were then performed and standardized for comparison of the reactivities of recombinant and native antigens against the 433 clinical samples submitted for brucellosis testing, 15 culture-positive samples, and 20 healthy donor samples. The samples were separated into four groups based on their positivity to rose bengal plate agglutination tests (RBPTs), standard tube agglutination tests (STATs), and 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) tests. The sensitivities and specificities of all the antigens were calculated, and the rOmp28 antigen was found to be more suitable for the clinical diagnosis of brucellosis than the rOmp31 antigen and native antigens. The rOmp28-based ELISA showed a very high degree of agreement with the conventional agglutination tests and

  16. Development and Comparative Evaluation of a Plate Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Based on Recombinant Outer Membrane Antigens Omp28 and Omp31 for Diagnosis of Human Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Sapana; Kumar, Ashu; Mangalgi, Smita; Rathod, Vedika; Prakash, Archana; Barua, Anita; Arora, Sonia; Sathyaseelan, Kannusamy

    2013-01-01

    Brucellosis is an important zoonotic infectious disease of humans and livestock with worldwide distribution and is caused by bacteria of the genus Brucella. The diagnosis of brucellosis always requires laboratory confirmation by either isolation of pathogens or detection of specific antibodies. The conventional serological tests available for the diagnosis of brucellosis are less specific and show cross-reactivity with other closely related organisms. These tests also necessitate the handling of Brucella species for antigen preparation. Therefore, there is a need to develop reliable, rapid, and user-friendly systems for disease diagnosis and alternatives to vaccine approaches. Keeping in mind the importance of brucellosis as an emerging infection and the prevalence in India, we carried out the present study to compare the recombinant antigens with the native antigens (cell envelope and sonicated antigen) of Brucella for diagnosis of human brucellosis by an indirect plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Recombinant outer membrane protein 28 (rOmp28) and rOmp31 antigens were cloned, expressed, and purified in the bacterial expression system, and the purified proteins were used as antigens. Indirect plate ELISAs were then performed and standardized for comparison of the reactivities of recombinant and native antigens against the 433 clinical samples submitted for brucellosis testing, 15 culture-positive samples, and 20 healthy donor samples. The samples were separated into four groups based on their positivity to rose bengal plate agglutination tests (RBPTs), standard tube agglutination tests (STATs), and 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) tests. The sensitivities and specificities of all the antigens were calculated, and the rOmp28 antigen was found to be more suitable for the clinical diagnosis of brucellosis than the rOmp31 antigen and native antigens. The rOmp28-based ELISA showed a very high degree of agreement with the conventional agglutination tests and

  17. Characterization of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) for Use in Therapeutic and Diagnostic Strategies against Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    00) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS Characterization of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen DAMD17-99-1-9523 (PSMA) for use in Therapeutic and... 5 B ody... 5 Key Research Accomplishments ......................................................... 8 Reportable Outcomes

  18. Effect of particulate adjuvant on the anthrax protective antigen dose required for effective nasal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Bento, Dulce; Staats, Herman F; Borges, Olga

    2015-07-17

    Successful vaccine development is dependent on the development of effective adjuvants since the poor immunogenicity of modern subunit vaccines typically requires the use of potent adjuvants and high antigen doses. In recent years, adjuvant formulations combining both immunopotentiators and delivery systems have emerged as a promising strategy to develop effective and improved vaccines. In this study we investigate if the association of the mast cell activating adjuvant compound 48/80 (C48/80) with chitosan nanoparticles would promote an antigen dose sparing effect when administered intranasally. Even though the induction of strong mucosal immunity required higher antigen doses, incorporation of C48/80 into nanoparticles provided significant dose sparing when compared to antigen and C48/80 in solution with no significant effect on serum neutralizing antibodies titers. These results suggest the potential of this novel adjuvant combination to improve the immunogenicity of a vaccine and decrease the antigen dose required for vaccination.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies to antigens in the peribacteroid membrane from Rhizobium-induced root nodules of pea cross-react with plasma membranes and Golgi bodies

    PubMed Central

    Brewin, N. J.; Robertson, J. G.; Wood, E. A.; Wells, B.; Larkins, A. P.; Galfre, G.; Butcher, G. W.

    1985-01-01

    Three rat hybridoma lines that produced monoclonal antibodies reacting with the peribacteroid membrane from Pisum sativum were isolated, and these all appeared to recognise the same antigenic structure. Using one of these monoclonal antibodies, AFRC MAC 64, electron microscopy of immunogold-stained thin sections of nodule tissue revealed that the antigen, present in the peribacteroid membrane, was also found in the plant plasma membranes and in the Golgi bodies, but not in the endoplasmic reticulum. When peribacteroid membrane proteins were separated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transferred to nitrocellulose by electro-blotting, it was found that MAC 64 bound to a series of protease-sensitive bands that migrated in the mol. wt. range 50-85 K. The epitope was sensitive to periodate oxidation and its structure may therefore involve the carbohydrate component of a membrane glycoprotein. We suggest that this structure originates in the Golgi apparatus and is subsequently transferred to the peribacteriod membranes and plasma membranes. The monoclonal antibody also reacted with peribacteroid membranes from nodules of Vicia and lupin, and with plasma membranes and Golgi membranes from uninfected plant cells, including root tip cells from onion (Allium cepa), indicating that the antigen is highly conserved in the plasma membranes of plant cells. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:15926221

  20. Vaccinia virus A11 is required for membrane rupture and viral membrane assembly.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Cristina; Hoppe, Simone; Pénard, Esthel; Walther, Paul; Krijnse-Locker, Jacomine

    2017-10-01

    Although most enveloped viruses acquire their membrane from the host by budding or by a wrapping process, collective data argue that nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) may be an exception. The prototype member of NCLDVs, vaccinia virus (VACV) may induce rupture of endoplasmic-reticulum-derived membranes to build an open-membrane sphere that closes after DNA uptake. This unconventional membrane assembly pathway is also used by at least 3 other members of the NCLDVs. In this study, we identify the VACV gene product of A11, as required for membrane rupture, hence for VACV membrane assembly and virion formation. By electron tomography, in the absence of A11, the site of assembly formed by the viral scaffold protein D13 is surrounded by endoplasmic reticulum cisternae that are closed. We use scanning transmission electron microscopy-electron tomography to analyse large volumes of cells and demonstrate that in the absence of A11, no open membranes are detected. Given the pivotal role of D13 in initiating VACV membrane assembly, we also analyse viral membranes in the absence of D13 synthesis and show that this protein is not required for rupture. Finally, consistent with a role in rupture, we show that during wild-type infection, A11 localises predominantly to the small ruptured membranes, the precursors of VACV membrane assembly. These data provide strong evidence in favour of the unusual membrane biogenesis of VACV and are an important step towards understanding its molecular mechanism. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Detection of Goodpasture antigen in fractions prepared from collagenase digests of human glomerular basement membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Fish, A J; Lockwood, M C; Wong, M; Price, R G

    1984-01-01

    Preparations of human glomerular basement membrane (GBM) were digested with collagenase, and a Goodpasture (GP) antigen rich pool from gel filtration column runs was identified by antibody inhibition radioimmunoassay. The components of the GP antigen pool were separated on polyacrylamide gels, and transferred to nitrocellulose sheets by the 'western' blotting technique. The blots were separately reacted with thirteen GP sera as primary antibody, followed by peroxidase labelled goat anti-human IgG and revealed 45-50K (two bands) and 25-28K (one-three bands) components. No corresponding reactivity was observed using convalescent GP sera or other control sera (normal human serum, rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis with or without pulmonary haemorrhage, and lupus erythematosus) as primary antibody. Images Fig. 3 PMID:6319059

  2. Antigenic Structure of Outer Membrane Protein E of Moraxella catarrhalis and Construction and Characterization of Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy F.; Brauer, Aimee L.; Yuskiw, Norine; Hiltke, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    Outer membrane protein E (OMP E) is a 50-kDa protein of Moraxella catarrhalis which possesses several characteristics indicating that the protein will be an effective vaccine antigen. To study the antigenic structure of OMP E, eight monoclonal antibodies were developed and characterized. Three of the antibodies recognized epitopes which are present on the bacterial surface. Fusion peptides corresponding to overlapping regions of OMP E were constructed, and immunoblot assays were performed to localize the areas of the molecule bound by the monoclonal antibodies. These studies identified a surface-exposed epitope in the region of amino acids 80 through 180. To further study the protein, two mutants which lack OMP E were constructed. In bactericidal assays, the mutants were more readily killed by normal human serum compared to the isogenic parent strains. These results indicate that OMP E is involved in the expression of serum resistance of M. catarrhalis. PMID:11035732

  3. Isolation of the specific glomerular basement membrane antigen involved in Goodpasture syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Wieslander, J; Bygren, P; Heinegård, D

    1984-01-01

    The antigen involved in the glomerulonephritis associated with antibodies to glomerular basement membrane (GBM) was purified from human GBM digested with highly purified clostridial collagenase. The purified nonreduced sample contained two components with closely similar mobilities on sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. After reduction they moved as one, nonantigenic, component, corresponding to a molecular weight of 26,000. Immunologically identical aggregates of higher molecular weight (i.e., 48,000) were also identified in the crude digest. Reduction of such aggregates after purification released some protein with a molecular weight of 26,000, but a large proportion was insensitive to reduction. Seven patients with Goodpasture syndrome all had circulating anti-GBM antibodies directed only against the purified antigen. Images PMID:6324201

  4. Antigenic properties of HpaA and Omp18, two outer membrane proteins of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Voland, Petra; Hafsi, Nadia; Zeitner, Marco; Laforsch, Stephanie; Wagner, Hermann; Prinz, Christian

    2003-07-01

    Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are incorporated into the outer plasma membrane of Helicobacter pylori and are important for, e.g., ion transport, adherence, structural and osmotic stability, and bacterial virulence but may also be antigenic due to their surface exposure. Previous proteome-based approaches with H. pylori lysates determined a strong serological reaction towards two H. pylori OMPs, HpaA (TIGR HP0797) and Omp18 (TIGR HP1125). PCR was used to detect DNA encoding the two proteins, and a positive signal was found in all H. pylori strains tested. Proteins were cloned and expressed in the human kidney cell line HK293 with the QiaExpressionist system with a C-terminal His tag. Only sera from infected persons showed a positive reaction with the recombinant proteins. Recombinant HpaA (rHpaA) and rOmp18 were incubated with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and induced secretion of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-10 from these cells. To determine the effect on antigen-presenting cells, human blood monocytic and dendritic cells (DCs) were isolated by magnetic cell separation. rOmp18 and rHpaA strongly stimulated major histocompatibility class II and CD83 expression 7- to 10-fold on isolated DCs. rHpaA and rOmp18 failed to stimulate IL-8 secretion from monocytes but increased secretion of IL-12 and IL-10 from DCs significantly. In summary, HpaA and Omp18 are recognized by human dendritic cells and induce their maturation as well as antigen presentation. HpaA and Omp18 of H. pylori thereby appear to have a specific antigenic potential in humans.

  5. Antigenic Properties of HpaA and Omp18, Two Outer Membrane Proteins of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Voland, Petra; Hafsi, Nadia; Zeitner, Marco; Laforsch, Stephanie; Wagner, Hermann; Prinz, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are incorporated into the outer plasma membrane of Helicobacter pylori and are important for, e.g., ion transport, adherence, structural and osmotic stability, and bacterial virulence but may also be antigenic due to their surface exposure. Previous proteome-based approaches with H. pylori lysates determined a strong serological reaction towards two H. pylori OMPs, HpaA (TIGR HP0797) and Omp18 (TIGR HP1125). PCR was used to detect DNA encoding the two proteins, and a positive signal was found in all H. pylori strains tested. Proteins were cloned and expressed in the human kidney cell line HK293 with the QiaExpressionist system with a C-terminal His tag. Only sera from infected persons showed a positive reaction with the recombinant proteins. Recombinant HpaA (rHpaA) and rOmp18 were incubated with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and induced secretion of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-10 from these cells. To determine the effect on antigen-presenting cells, human blood monocytic and dendritic cells (DCs) were isolated by magnetic cell separation. rOmp18 and rHpaA strongly stimulated major histocompatibility class II and CD83 expression 7- to 10-fold on isolated DCs. rHpaA and rOmp18 failed to stimulate IL-8 secretion from monocytes but increased secretion of IL-12 and IL-10 from DCs significantly. In summary, HpaA and Omp18 are recognized by human dendritic cells and induce their maturation as well as antigen presentation. HpaA and Omp18 of H. pylori thereby appear to have a specific antigenic potential in humans. PMID:12819067

  6. Definition of glomerular antigens by monoclonal antibodies produced against a human glomerular membrane fraction.

    PubMed

    Neale, T J; Callus, M S; Donovan, L C; Baird, H

    1990-10-01

    Experimental animal models of glomerulonephritis (GN) produced by direct antibody binding to non-basement membrane glomerular capillary wall antigens do not to date have human parallels. To examine the potential for this form of humoral glomerular injury in man, we sought to define discrete human non-GBM glomerular antigenic targets using hybridoma technology. Mice were immunised intraperitoneally with 20-100 micrograms of a human glomerular membrane fraction (HGMF). Six fusions have yielded 12 stable reagents defined by positive glomerular indirect immunofluorescence (IF) and microELISA using HGMF as the screening antigen. Subclass analysis of ascitic McAbs indicated several IgG1, one IgG2b, and three IgM reagents. Distinctive IF patterns of reactivity with epithelial, endothelial or mesangial structures have been observed, with or without peritubular capillary, tubular basement membrane and vessel wall reactivity. Seven normal non-renal human organs and the kidneys of rat, rabbit and sheep have shown patterns characteristic of each individual McAb, restricted to human or with species cross reactivity. To partially characterise McAb-reactive antigens, detergent-solubilised renal cortex and collagenase-solubilised GBM (CS-GBM) extracts have been probed by immunoblot. A unique McAb 7-5Q, reactive with glomerular and tubular epithelial structures, binds major bands of approximately 107 KD and 93 KD in detergent solubilised cortex and a single band of similar size by immunoprecipitation (110 KD). 5-3A (a human-restricted linear-reacting McAb) binds bands of 20-200 KD (major band 58 KD) in CS-GBM. In conclusion, distinct species-restricted and more broadly disposed glomerular epitopes are definable in man by McAbs and are potential targets for humoral injury. Purification of these antigens will allow assay for circulating putative nephritogenic auto-antibody and potentially, McAbs may be useful in screening urine for evidence of occult structural renal disease.

  7. Antibodies to liver membrane antigens in chronic active hepatitis (CAH). II. Specificity for autoimmune CAH.

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, I H; Kronborg, I J; Mackay, I R

    1983-01-01

    An immunoradiometric assay for IgG class autoantibody to liver membrane antigens, based on serum binding to glutaraldehyde treated monkey hepatocytes, was used to examine sera from patients with chronic active hepatitis (CAH) and other acute and chronic liver diseases. All sera from normals and patients showed binding, up to a titre of 1/2,048. For comparison of assays, results were normalized by selecting two reference sera, one with a high degree of binding, and one from a healthy subject with a low degree of binding: at a dilution of 1/2,048, these sera were given binding values of 100% and 0%. The values for the binding of unknown sera at the same dilution were calculated from these two reference values. For 26 patients with autoimmune CAH, the mean (+/- s.d.) percentage binding value (70 +/- 33%) was significantly higher than the mean value for 26 healthy subjects (10 +/- 15%), and high binding values were significantly associated with biochemically active hepatitis. The mean percentage binding value was moderately increased for eight patients with HBsAg associated CAH (42 +/- 12%), 13 patients with alcoholic hepatitis with cirrhosis (37 +/- 25%) and 45 patients with acute viral hepatitis A (40 +/- 27%) or B (52 +/- 37%). At a cut-off binding value of 65%, the assay as a single diagnostic procedure was shown to have a 70% sensitivity and a 95% specificity for the diagnosis of autoimmune CAH. Better understanding of the pathogenetic significance of antibodies to liver membrane antigens in CAH and other liver diseases will depend upon biochemical analysis of the presumably multiple antigenic determinants on the hepatocyte membrane. PMID:6616969

  8. Klebsiella pneumoniae O antigen loss alters the outer membrane protein composition and the selective packaging of proteins into secreted outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Bethaney K; Seeley, Kent W; Gutel, Dedra; Ellis, Terri N

    2015-11-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a nosocomial pathogen which naturally secretes lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and cell envelope associated proteins into the environment through the production of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). The loss of the LPS O antigen has been demonstrated in other bacterial species to significantly alter the composition of OMVs. Therefore, this study aimed to comprehensively analyze the impact of O antigen loss on the sub-proteomes of both the outer membrane and secreted OMVs from K. pneumoniae. As determined by LC-MS/MS, OMVs were highly enriched with outer membrane proteins involved in cell wall, membrane, and envelope biogenesis as compared to the source cellular outer membrane. Deletion of wbbO, the enzyme responsible for O antigen attachment to LPS, decreased but did not eliminate this enrichment effect. Additionally, loss of O antigen resulted in OMVs with increased numbers of proteins involved in post-translational modification, protein turnover, and chaperones as compared to secreted vesicles from the wild type. This alteration of OMV composition may be a compensatory mechanism to deal with envelope stress. This comprehensive analysis confirms the highly distinct protein composition of OMVs as compared to their source membrane, and provides evidence for a selective sorting mechanism that involves LPS polysaccharides. These data support the hypothesis that modifications to LPS alters both the mechanics of protein sorting and the contents of secreted OMVs and significantly impacts the protein composition of the outer membrane.

  9. Clinical Experience with (18)F-Labeled Small Molecule Inhibitors of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Steven P; Gorin, Michael A; Salas Fragomeni, Roberto A; Drzezga, Alexander; Pomper, Martin G

    2017-04-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common noncutaneous malignancy diagnosed in men. Despite the large number of men who will suffer from PCa at some point during their lives, conventional imaging modalities for this important disease (contrast-enhanced computed tomography, bone scan, and MR imaging) have provided only marginal to moderate success in appropriately guiding patient management in certain clinical contexts. In this review, the authors discuss radiofluorinated small molecule radiotracers that have been developed to bind to the transmembrane glycoprotein prostate-specific membrane antigen, a target that is nearly universally overexpressed on PCa epithelial cells.

  10. Immunity Provided by an Outer Membrane Vesicle Cholera Vaccine Is Due to O-Antigen-Specific Antibodies Inhibiting Bacterial Motility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Lazinski, David W; Camilli, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    An outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-based cholera vaccine is highly efficacious in preventing intestinal colonization in the suckling mouse model. Immunity from OMVs comes from immunoglobulin (Ig), particularly IgG, in the milk of mucosally immunized dams. Anti-OMV IgG renders Vibrio cholerae organisms immotile, thus they pass through the small intestine without colonizing. However, the importance of motility inhibition for protection and the mechanism by which motility is inhibited remain unclear. By using both in vitro and in vivo experiments, we found that IgG inhibits motility by specifically binding to the O-antigen of V. cholerae We demonstrate that the bivalent structure of IgG, although not required for binding to the O-antigen, is required for motility inhibition. Finally, we show using competition assays in suckling mice that inhibition of motility appears to be responsible for most, if not all, of the protection engendered by OMV vaccination, thus providing insight into the mechanism of immune protection. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Antibody-functionalized peptidic membranes for neutralization of allogeneic skin antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yi; Liu, Wen; Bagia, Christina; Zhang, Shaojuan; Bai, Mingfeng; Janjic, Jelena M; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gawalt, Ellen S; Meng, Wilson S

    2014-11-01

    We report herein application of an in situ material strategy to attenuate allograft T cell responses in a skin transplant mouse model. Functionalized peptidic membranes were used to impede trafficking of donor antigen-presenting cells (dAPCs) from skin allografts in recipient mice. Membranes formed by self-assembling peptides (SAPs) presenting antibodies were found to remain underneath grafted skins for up to 6 days. At the host-graft interface, dAPCs were targeted by using a monoclonal antibody that binds to a class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule (I-A(d)) expressed exclusively by donor cells. Using a novel cell labeling near-infrared nanoemulsion, we found more dAPCs remained in allografts treated with membranes loaded with anti-I-A(d) antibodies than without. In vitro, dAPCs released from skin explants were found adsorbed preferentially on anti-I-A(d) antibody-loaded membranes. Recipient T cells from these mice produced lower concentrations of interferon-gamma cultured ex vivo with donor cells. Taken together, the data indicate that the strategy has the potential to alter the natural course of rejection immune mechanisms in allogeneic transplant models. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Native surface association of a recombinant 38-kilodalton Treponema pallidum antigen isolated from the Escherichia coli outer membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Fehniger, T E; Radolf, J D; Walfield, A M; Cunningham, T M; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1986-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid designated pAW305, containing a 6-kilobase insert of Treponema pallidum DNA, directed the expression of a 38-kilodalton (kDa) treponemal antigen in Escherichia coli. The 38-kDa antigen copurified with the outer membrane fraction of the E. coli cell envelope after treatment with nonionic detergents or sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Rabbits immunized with the recombinant 38-kDa antigen developed antibodies which reacted specifically with a 38-kDa T. pallidum antigen on immunoblots, and 38-kDa antisera specifically immobilized T. pallidum in a complement-dependent manner in the T. pallidum immobilization test. Antisera to the 38-kDa recombinant antigen were also used to demonstrate its native surface association on T. pallidum by immunoelectron microscopy. Images PMID:3516880

  13. Co-Administration of Lipid Nanoparticles and Sub-Unit Vaccine Antigens Is Required for Increase in Antigen-Specific Immune Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Thoryk, Elizabeth A.; Swaminathan, Gokul; Meschino, Steven; Cox, Kara S.; Gindy, Marian; Casimiro, Danilo R.; Bett, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    A vast body of evidence suggests that nanoparticles function as potent immune-modulatory agents. We have previously shown that Merck proprietary Lipid NanoParticles (LNPs) markedly boost B-cell and T-cell responses to sub-unit vaccine antigens in mice. To further evaluate the specifics of vaccine delivery and dosing regimens in vivo, we performed immunogenicity studies in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice using two model antigens, Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) and Ovalbumin (OVA), respectively. To assess the requirement for co-administration of antigen and LNP for the elicitation of immune responses, we evaluated immune responses after administering antigen and LNP to separate limbs, or administering antigen and LNP to the same limb but separated by 24 h. We also evaluated formulations combining antigen, LNP, and aluminum-based adjuvant amorphous aluminum hydroxylphosphate sulfate (MAA) to look for synergistic adjuvant effects. Analyses of antigen-specific B-cell and T-cell responses from immunized mice revealed that the LNPs and antigens must be co-administered—both at the same time and in the same location—in order to boost antigen-specific immune responses. Mixing of antigen with MAA prior to formulation with LNP did not impact the generation of antigen-specific B-cell responses, but drastically reduced the ability of LNPs to boost antigen-specific T-cell responses. Overall, our data demonstrate that the administration of LNPs and vaccine antigen together enables their immune-stimulatory properties. PMID:27929422

  14. Co-Administration of Lipid Nanoparticles and Sub-Unit Vaccine Antigens Is Required for Increase in Antigen-Specific Immune Responses in Mice.

    PubMed

    Thoryk, Elizabeth A; Swaminathan, Gokul; Meschino, Steven; Cox, Kara S; Gindy, Marian; Casimiro, Danilo R; Bett, Andrew J

    2016-12-06

    A vast body of evidence suggests that nanoparticles function as potent immune-modulatory agents. We have previously shown that Merck proprietary Lipid NanoParticles (LNPs) markedly boost B-cell and T-cell responses to sub-unit vaccine antigens in mice. To further evaluate the specifics of vaccine delivery and dosing regimens in vivo, we performed immunogenicity studies in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice using two model antigens, Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) and Ovalbumin (OVA), respectively. To assess the requirement for co-administration of antigen and LNP for the elicitation of immune responses, we evaluated immune responses after administering antigen and LNP to separate limbs, or administering antigen and LNP to the same limb but separated by 24 h. We also evaluated formulations combining antigen, LNP, and aluminum-based adjuvant amorphous aluminum hydroxylphosphate sulfate (MAA) to look for synergistic adjuvant effects. Analyses of antigen-specific B-cell and T-cell responses from immunized mice revealed that the LNPs and antigens must be co-administered-both at the same time and in the same location-in order to boost antigen-specific immune responses. Mixing of antigen with MAA prior to formulation with LNP did not impact the generation of antigen-specific B-cell responses, but drastically reduced the ability of LNPs to boost antigen-specific T-cell responses. Overall, our data demonstrate that the administration of LNPs and vaccine antigen together enables their immune-stimulatory properties.

  15. Babesia divergens and Neospora caninum apical membrane antigen 1 structures reveal selectivity and plasticity in apicomplexan parasite host cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin, Michelle L; Crawford, Joanna; Lebrun, Maryse L; Boulanger, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Host cell invasion by the obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasites, including Plasmodium (malaria) and Toxoplasma (toxoplasmosis), requires a step-wise mechanism unique among known host–pathogen interactions. A key step is the formation of the moving junction (MJ) complex, a circumferential constriction between the apical tip of the parasite and the host cell membrane that traverses in a posterior direction to enclose the parasite in a protective vacuole essential for intracellular survival. The leading model of MJ assembly proposes that Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 (RON2) is secreted into the host cell and integrated into the membrane where it serves as the receptor for apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) on the parasite surface. We have previously demonstrated that the AMA1-RON2 interaction is an effective target for inhibiting apicomplexan invasion. To better understand the AMA1-dependant molecular recognition events that promote invasion, including the significant AMA1-RON2 interaction, we present the structural characterization of AMA1 from the apicomplexan parasites Babesia divergens (BdAMA1) and Neospora caninum (NcAMA1) by X-ray crystallography. These studies offer intriguing structural insight into the RON2-binding surface groove in the AMA1 apical domain, which shows clear evidence for receptor–ligand co-evolution, and the hyper variability of the membrane proximal domain, which in Plasmodium is responsible for direct binding to erythrocytes. By incorporating the structural analysis of BdAMA1 and NcAMA1 with existing AMA1 structures and complexes we were able to define conserved pockets in the AMA1 apical groove that could be targeted for the design of broadly reactive therapeutics. PMID:23169033

  16. A novel Cryptosporidium parvum antigen, CP2, preferentially associates with membranous structures.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Steven P; Yu, Jae-Ran; Lin, Jim Jung-Ching

    2004-03-01

    The present study addresses the cloning and characterization of a Cryptosporidium parvum antigen, CP2. Sequencing of cDNA and genomic clones revealed a novel gene capable of coding a message of 2,136 nucleotides flanked by 28 and 140 nucleotides of the 5'- and 3'-noncoding regions, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequence suggests that CP2 is a secreted and/or membrane protein. Immunofluorescence microscopy detected CP2 enrichment in sporozoites that subsequently appeared to encase type I meronts in infected HCT-8 cells. Immunogold electron microscopy revealed that CP2 consistently localized to membranous structures throughout development. In addition, progression from macrogametocyte to sporulated oocyst revealed CP2 initially at the periphery of amylopectin-like granules, in the cytoplasm and discrete vesicles, the parasitophorous vacuole, on the surface of sporozoites, and finally on the parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM). The observed expression pattern suggests that CP2 may be involved in the invasion process and/or PVM integrity.

  17. Concentration of membrane antigens by forward transport and trapping in neuronal growth cones.

    PubMed

    Sheetz, M P; Baumrind, N L; Wayne, D B; Pearlman, A L

    1990-04-20

    Formation of the nervous system requires that neuronal growth cones follow specific paths and then stop at recognition signals, sensed at the growth cone's leading edge. We used antibody-coated gold particles viewed by video-enhanced differential interference contrast microscopy to observe the distribution and movement of two cell surface molecules, N-CAM and the 2A1 antigen, on growth cones of cultured cortical neurons. Gold particles are occasionally transported forward at 1-2 microns/s to the leading edge where they are trapped but continue to move. Concentration at the edge persists after cytochalasin D treatment or ATP depletion, but active movements to and along edges cease. We also observed a novel outward movement of small cytoplasmic aggregates at 1.8 microns/s in filopodia. We suggest that active forward transport and trapping involve reversible attachment of antigens to and transport along cytoskeletal elements localized to edges of growth cones.

  18. Proteomic analysis of Neisseria lactamica and N eisseria meningitidis outer membrane vesicle vaccine antigens.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Thomas E; Skipp, Paul J; O'Connor, C David; Hudson, Michael J; Vipond, Richard; Elmore, Michael J; Gorringe, Andrew R

    2006-06-19

    Vaccines to prevent meningococcal disease have been developed from the outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of Neisseria meningitidis and the related commensal organism Neisseria lactamica. In addition to lipopolysaccharide and the major porins, these vaccines contain a large number of proteins that are incompletely characterised. Here we describe comparative proteomic analyses of the N. lactamica OMV vaccine and OMVs from a serogroup B strain of N. meningitidis. Tandem mass-spectrometry data for trypsinised N. lactamica OMV vaccine were matched to an incompletely assembled genome sequence from the same strain to give 65 robust protein identifications and a further 122 single- or two-peptide matches. Fifty-seven N. meningitidis K454 proteins were identified robustly (and a further 68 from single- or two-peptide matches) by inference from the N. meningitidis MC58 genome. The results suggest that OMVs have a hitherto unappreciated complexity and pinpoint novel candidate antigens for further characterisation.

  19. Comparison of colorimetric assays with quantitative amino acid analysis for protein quantification of Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA).

    PubMed

    Rossi, Omar; Maggiore, Luana; Necchi, Francesca; Koeberling, Oliver; MacLennan, Calman A; Saul, Allan; Gerke, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Genetically induced outer membrane particles from Gram-negative bacteria, called Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA), are being investigated as vaccines. Rapid methods are required for estimating the protein content for in-process assays during production. Since GMMA are complex biological structures containing lipid and polysaccharide as well as protein, protein determinations are not necessarily straightforward. We compared protein quantification by Bradford, Lowry, and Non-Interfering assays using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as standard with quantitative amino acid (AA) analysis, the most accurate currently available method for protein quantification. The Lowry assay has the lowest inter- and intra-assay variation and gives the best linearity between protein amount and absorbance. In all three assays, the color yield (optical density per mass of protein) of GMMA was markedly different from that of BSA with a ratio of approximately 4 for the Bradford assay, and highly variable between different GMMA; and approximately 0.7 for the Lowry and Non-Interfering assays, highlighting the need for calibrating the standard used in the colorimetric assay against GMMA quantified by AA analysis. In terms of a combination of ease, reproducibility, and proportionality of protein measurement, and comparability between samples, the Lowry assay was superior to Bradford and Non-Interfering assays for GMMA quantification.

  20. Expression of vascular antigens by bone cells during bone regeneration in a membranous bone distraction system.

    PubMed

    Lewinson, D; Maor, G; Rozen, N; Rabinovich, I; Stahl, S; Rachmiel, A

    2001-11-01

    An in vivo system of membranous bone formation during distraction has been investigated in order to follow cells that express vascular markers with the objective of understanding the neovascularization process. Concomitantly, sustained proliferation of preskeletal cells was achieved through the application of mechanical force. New capillaries and leading edges that arose by angiogenesis from the periosteal and mucosal surfaces and invaded the central zone of the regenerating distraction tissue temporally preceded the growth of delicate woven bone trabeculae from both edges of the cut bone. Concentrically arranged 'onion-like' configurations were abundant in paracentral zones and in association with mesenchymal condensations, suggesting their de novo formation in situ. Vascular specific markers, the angiopoietin receptor Tie-2 and factor VIII-related antigen (FVIIIrAg), were localized immunohistochemically in order to follow cells of vascular origin. Endothelial cells of the new capillaries, centrally located cells of the concentric configurations, pericytes, and most of the adjacent polygonal mesenchymal cells stained positively with specific antibodies to both antigens. Moreover, preosteoblasts and osteoblasts that lie adjacent to or already embedded in the osteiod of the newly formed trabeculae were also FVIIIrAg and Tie-2 immunopositive. As the source of the bone-forming cells in regenerating tissue during distraction is not yet fully understood, this observation might support the possibility of their vascular origin.

  1. Molecular characterization of a conserved 20-kilodalton membrane-associated lipoprotein antigen of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Kostrzynska, M; O'Toole, P W; Taylor, D E; Trust, T J

    1994-01-01

    Antisera raised in rabbits to whole cells of Helicobacter pylori recognized as a major antigen a protein with an apparent molecular weight of 20,000. The antigen was purified by differential solubilization with N-octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside, urea, and sodium dodecyl sulfate followed by molecular sieving. The mass of the protein, Lpp20, was 18,283 Da as determined by mass spectrometry. The lpp20 gene encoding this protein was cloned in Escherichia coli by using the vector lambda EMBL3, and plasmid subclones expressed the full-length protein from the native H. pylori promoter. lpp20 was mapped to the same 358-kb NruI fragment as flaB. DNA sequence analysis showed that the gene was 525 bp long and encoded a 175-amino-acid protein with a molecular weight of 19,094 containing a 21-residue typical lipoprotein signal peptide and consensus prolipoprotein processing site. The mass of the deduced 154-residue mature protein was 16,865 Da. Growth of E. coli cells expressing the cloned H. pylori lpp20 gene in the presence of [3H]palmitic acid resulted in radiolabelled Lpp20 while treatment of the E. coli cells with globomycin caused accumulation of unprocessed Lpp20, consistent with Lpp20 being a lipoprotein. Lpp20 cofractionated with the cytoplasmic membrane fraction, although a proportion of the protein was also found in the outer membrane. A mutant generated by mutant-allele exchange displayed normal viability, showing that Lpp20 belonged to the nonessential class of lipoproteins. Images PMID:7928954

  2. RAB-10-Dependent Membrane Transport Is Required for Dendrite Arborization

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Wei; Yadav, Smita; DeVault, Laura; Jan, Yuh Nung; Sherwood, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of elaborately branched dendrites is necessary for the proper input and connectivity of many sensory neurons. Previous studies have revealed that dendritic growth relies heavily on ER-to-Golgi transport, Golgi outposts and endocytic recycling. How new membrane and associated cargo is delivered from the secretory and endosomal compartments to sites of active dendritic growth, however, remains unknown. Using a candidate-based genetic screen in C. elegans, we have identified the small GTPase RAB-10 as a key regulator of membrane trafficking during dendrite morphogenesis. Loss of rab-10 severely reduced proximal dendritic arborization in the multi-dendritic PVD neuron. RAB-10 acts cell-autonomously in the PVD neuron and localizes to the Golgi and early endosomes. Loss of function mutations of the exocyst complex components exoc-8 and sec-8, which regulate tethering, docking and fusion of transport vesicles at the plasma membrane, also caused proximal dendritic arborization defects and led to the accumulation of intracellular RAB-10 vesicles. In rab-10 and exoc-8 mutants, the trans-membrane proteins DMA-1 and HPO-30, which promote PVD dendrite stabilization and branching, no longer localized strongly to the proximal dendritic membranes and instead were sequestered within intracellular vesicles. Together these results suggest a crucial role for the Rab10 GTPase and the exocyst complex in controlling membrane transport from the secretory and/or endosomal compartments that is required for dendritic growth. PMID:26394140

  3. RAB-10-Dependent Membrane Transport Is Required for Dendrite Arborization.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Yadav, Smita; DeVault, Laura; Nung Jan, Yuh; Sherwood, David R

    2015-01-01

    Formation of elaborately branched dendrites is necessary for the proper input and connectivity of many sensory neurons. Previous studies have revealed that dendritic growth relies heavily on ER-to-Golgi transport, Golgi outposts and endocytic recycling. How new membrane and associated cargo is delivered from the secretory and endosomal compartments to sites of active dendritic growth, however, remains unknown. Using a candidate-based genetic screen in C. elegans, we have identified the small GTPase RAB-10 as a key regulator of membrane trafficking during dendrite morphogenesis. Loss of rab-10 severely reduced proximal dendritic arborization in the multi-dendritic PVD neuron. RAB-10 acts cell-autonomously in the PVD neuron and localizes to the Golgi and early endosomes. Loss of function mutations of the exocyst complex components exoc-8 and sec-8, which regulate tethering, docking and fusion of transport vesicles at the plasma membrane, also caused proximal dendritic arborization defects and led to the accumulation of intracellular RAB-10 vesicles. In rab-10 and exoc-8 mutants, the trans-membrane proteins DMA-1 and HPO-30, which promote PVD dendrite stabilization and branching, no longer localized strongly to the proximal dendritic membranes and instead were sequestered within intracellular vesicles. Together these results suggest a crucial role for the Rab10 GTPase and the exocyst complex in controlling membrane transport from the secretory and/or endosomal compartments that is required for dendritic growth.

  4. Enhanced expression and secretion of an epithelial membrane antigen (MA5) in a human mucinous breast tumor line (BT549).

    PubMed

    Williams, C J; Major, P P; Dion, A S

    1990-01-01

    The mouse monoclonal antibody MA5, generated versus a membrane-enriched extract of breast cancer metastatic to liver, detects one or two high molecular weight species (greater than 200 kD) in breast tumor membranes, human milk fat globule membranes, and various breast tumor cell lines. From comparative studies of five breast carcinoma lines (BT20, BT549, MCF-7, T47D, and ZR75-1), as well as an epithelial line established from milk (HBL-100), we report the stimulation of expression of MA5-reactive antigen in a mucinous breast tumor cell line (BT549) through the use of a culture medium supplemented with charcoal-absorbed fetal calf serum, insulin, and hydrocortisone. Large amounts of aggregated MA5-reactive antigen are secreted into the culture medium and can be recovered from the media for further purification by centrifugation. These findings suggest that BT549 cells, grown in the special nutritive medium, may be useful in providing an ample source of epithelial membrane antigen (also termed polymorphic epithelial mucin) for standardization of clinical assay protocols, as well as provide a model system for studies of the regulation of expression for this class of antigens in breast carcinoma.

  5. Population genetic structure and natural selection of apical membrane antigen-1 in Plasmodium vivax Korean isolates.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung-Mi; Lee, Jinyoung; Cho, Pyo-Yun; Moon, Sung-Ung; Ju, Hye-Lim; Ahn, Seong Kyu; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Lee, Hyeong-Woo; Kim, Tong-Soo; Na, Byoung-Kuk

    2015-11-16

    Plasmodium vivax apical membrane antigen-1 (PvAMA-1) is a leading candidate antigen for blood stage malaria vaccine. However, antigenic variation is a major obstacle in the development of an effective vaccine based on this antigen. In this study, the genetic structure and the effect of natural selection of PvAMA-1 among Korean P. vivax isolates were analysed. Blood samples were collected from 66 Korean patients with vivax malaria. The entire PvAMA-1 gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a TA cloning vector. The PvAMA-1 sequence of each isolate was sequenced and the polymorphic characteristics and effect of natural selection were analysed using the DNASTAR, MEGA4, and DnaSP programs. Thirty haplotypes of PvAMA-1, which were further classified into seven different clusters, were identified in the 66 Korean P. vivax isolates. Domain II was highly conserved among the sequences, but substantial nucleotide diversity was observed in domains I and III. The difference between the rates of non-synonymous and synonymous mutations suggested that the gene has evolved under natural selection. No strong evidence indicating balancing or positive selection on PvAMA-1 was identified. Recombination may also play a role in the resulting genetic diversity of PvAMA-1. This study is the first comprehensive analysis of nucleotide diversity across the entire PvAMA-1 gene using a single population sample from Korea. Korean PvAMA-1 had limited genetic diversity compared to PvAMA-1 in global isolates. The overall pattern of genetic polymorphism of Korean PvAMA-1 differed from other global isolates and novel amino acid changes were also identified in Korean PvAMA-1. Evidences for natural selection and recombination event were observed, which is likely to play an important role in generating genetic diversity across the PvAMA-1. These results provide useful information for the understanding the population structure of P. vivax circulating in Korea and have important

  6. Babesia divergens apical membrane antigen 1 and its interaction with the human red blood cell.

    PubMed

    Montero, Estrella; Rodriguez, Marilis; Oksov, Yelena; Lobo, Cheryl A

    2009-11-01

    Multiple parasite ligand-erythrocyte receptor interactions must occur for successful Babesia and Plasmodium invasion of the human red cell. One such parasite ligand is the apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) which is a conserved apicomplexan protein present in the micronemes and then secreted onto the surface of the merozoite. Much evidence exists for a vital role for AMA1 in host cell invasion; however, its interaction with the host erythrocyte has remained controversial. In this paper, we present a detailed characterization of a Babesia divergens homolog of AMA1 (BdAMA1), and taking advantage of the relatively high amounts of native BdAMA1 available from the parasite culture system, show that proteolytic products of native BdAMA1 bind to a trypsin- and chymotrypsin-sensitive receptor on the red blood cell. Moreover, immuno-electron microscopic images of the B. divergens merozoite captured during invasion offer additional evidence of the presence of BdAMA1 on the red cell membrane. Given the importance of AMA1 in invasion and the central role invasion plays in pathogenesis, these studies have implications both for novel drug design and for the development of new vaccine approaches aimed at interfering with AMA1 function.

  7. Discriminatory Role of Detergent-Resistant Membranes in the Dimerization and Endocytosis of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Sonja; Gericke, Birthe; Fracasso, Giulio; Ramarli, Dunia; Colombatti, Marco; Naim, Hassan Y

    2013-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a type-II membrane glycoprotein that was initially identified in LNCaP cells. It is expressed at elevated levels in prostate cancer. In view of the correlation between the expression levels of PSMA and disease grade and stage, PSMA is considered to be one of the most promising biomarkers in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. In LNCaP cells PSMA undergoes internalization via clathrin-coated pits followed by accumulation in the endosomes. PSMA associates with different types of detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) along the secretory pathway. Its mature form is mainly insoluble in Lubrol WX, but does not associate with Triton X-100-DRMs. To understand the mechanism of PSMA internalization we investigated its association during internalization with DRMs. For this purpose, internalization was induced by antibody cross-linking. We demonstrate at the biochemical and cell biological levels that: [i] exclusively homodimers of PSMA are associated with Lubrol WX-DRMs, [ii] antibody-induced cross-linking of PSMA molecules results in a time-dependent partitioning into another DRMs type, namely Triton X-100-DRMs, and [iii] concomitant with its association with Triton-X-100-DRMs internalization of PSMA occurs along tubulin filaments. In a previous work (Colombatti et al. (2009) PLoS One 4: e4608) we demonstrated that the small GTPases RAS and RAC1 and the MAPKs p38 and ERK1/2 are activated during antibody cross-linking. As downstream effects of this activation we observed a strong induction of NF-kB associated with an increased expression of IL-6 and CCL5 genes and that IL-6 and CCL5 enhanced the proliferative potential of LNCaP cells synergistically. These observations together with findings reported here hypothesize a fundamental role of DRMs during activation of PSMA as platforms for trafficking, endocytosis and signalling. Understanding these mechanisms constitutes an essential prerequisite for utilization of PSMA as

  8. Discriminatory Role of Detergent-Resistant Membranes in the Dimerization and Endocytosis of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Sonja; Gericke, Birthe; Fracasso, Giulio; Ramarli, Dunia; Colombatti, Marco; Naim, Hassan Y.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a type-II membrane glycoprotein that was initially identified in LNCaP cells. It is expressed at elevated levels in prostate cancer. In view of the correlation between the expression levels of PSMA and disease grade and stage, PSMA is considered to be one of the most promising biomarkers in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. In LNCaP cells PSMA undergoes internalization via clathrin-coated pits followed by accumulation in the endosomes. PSMA associates with different types of detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) along the secretory pathway. Its mature form is mainly insoluble in Lubrol WX, but does not associate with Triton X-100-DRMs. To understand the mechanism of PSMA internalization we investigated its association during internalization with DRMs. For this purpose, internalization was induced by antibody cross-linking. We demonstrate at the biochemical and cell biological levels that: [i] exclusively homodimers of PSMA are associated with Lubrol WX-DRMs, [ii] antibody-induced cross-linking of PSMA molecules results in a time-dependent partitioning into another DRMs type, namely Triton X-100-DRMs, and [iii] concomitant with its association with Triton-X-100-DRMs internalization of PSMA occurs along tubulin filaments. In a previous work (Colombatti et al. (2009) PLoS One 4: e4608) we demonstrated that the small GTPases RAS and RAC1 and the MAPKs p38 and ERK1/2 are activated during antibody cross-linking. As downstream effects of this activation we observed a strong induction of NF-kB associated with an increased expression of IL-6 and CCL5 genes and that IL-6 and CCL5 enhanced the proliferative potential of LNCaP cells synergistically. These observations together with findings reported here hypothesize a fundamental role of DRMs during activation of PSMA as platforms for trafficking, endocytosis and signalling. Understanding these mechanisms constitutes an essential prerequisite for utilization of PSMA as

  9. Evidence that several high-frequency human blood group antigens reside on phosphatidylinositol-linked erythrocyte membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Telen, M J; Rosse, W F; Parker, C J; Moulds, M K; Moulds, J J

    1990-04-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is an acquired disorder associated with absence of expression of phosphatidylinositol (PI)-linked membrane proteins from circulating hematopoietic cells of multiple lineages. Recent work demonstrated that decay accelerating factor, one such PI-linked protein, bears the Cromer-related blood group antigens. This study demonstrated that other high incidence antigens, including Cartwright (Yta/Ytb), Holley-Gregory (Hy/Gya), John Milton Hagen (JMH), and Dombrock (Doa/Dob), are absent from the complement-sensitive (PNH III) erythrocytes of patients with PNH. The relatively normal, complement-insensitive erythrocytes from the same patients express these antigens normally. Therefore, these antigens most likely reside on PI-linked proteins absent from PNH III, but not PNH I, erythrocytes.

  10. Crystal structure of an antigenic outer-membrane protein from Salmonella Typhi suggests a potential antigenic loop and an efflux mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Yoshimura, Masato; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Lin, Chien-Chih; Chen, Nai-Chi; Yang, Ming-Chi; Ismail, Asma; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2015-01-01

    ST50, an outer-membrane component of the multi-drug efflux system from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, is an obligatory diagnostic antigen for typhoid fever. ST50 is an excellent and unique diagnostic antigen with 95% specificity and 90% sensitivity and is used in the commercial diagnosis test kit (TYPHIDOTTM). The crystal structure of ST50 at a resolution of 2.98 Å reveals a trimer that forms an α-helical tunnel and a β-barrel transmembrane channel traversing the periplasmic space and outer membrane. Structural investigations suggest significant conformational variations in the extracellular loop regions, especially extracellular loop 2. This is the location of the most plausible antibody-binding domain that could be used to target the design of new antigenic epitopes for the development of better diagnostics or drugs for the treatment of typhoid fever. A molecule of the detergent n-octyl-β-D-glucoside is observed in the D-cage, which comprises three sets of Asp361 and Asp371 residues at the periplasmic entrance. These structural insights suggest a possible substrate transport mechanism in which the substrate first binds at the periplasmic entrance of ST50 and subsequently, via iris-like structural movements to open the periplasmic end, penetrates the periplasmic domain for efflux pumping of molecules, including poisonous metabolites or xenobiotics, for excretion outside the pathogen. PMID:26563565

  11. Crystal structure of an antigenic outer-membrane protein from Salmonella Typhi suggests a potential antigenic loop and an efflux mechanism.

    PubMed

    Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Yoshimura, Masato; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Lin, Chien-Chih; Chen, Nai-Chi; Yang, Ming-Chi; Ismail, Asma; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2015-11-13

    ST50, an outer-membrane component of the multi-drug efflux system from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, is an obligatory diagnostic antigen for typhoid fever. ST50 is an excellent and unique diagnostic antigen with 95% specificity and 90% sensitivity and is used in the commercial diagnosis test kit (TYPHIDOT(TM)). The crystal structure of ST50 at a resolution of 2.98 Å reveals a trimer that forms an α-helical tunnel and a β-barrel transmembrane channel traversing the periplasmic space and outer membrane. Structural investigations suggest significant conformational variations in the extracellular loop regions, especially extracellular loop 2. This is the location of the most plausible antibody-binding domain that could be used to target the design of new antigenic epitopes for the development of better diagnostics or drugs for the treatment of typhoid fever. A molecule of the detergent n-octyl-β-D-glucoside is observed in the D-cage, which comprises three sets of Asp361 and Asp371 residues at the periplasmic entrance. These structural insights suggest a possible substrate transport mechanism in which the substrate first binds at the periplasmic entrance of ST50 and subsequently, via iris-like structural movements to open the periplasmic end, penetrates the periplasmic domain for efflux pumping of molecules, including poisonous metabolites or xenobiotics, for excretion outside the pathogen.

  12. In vivo requirement for Atg5 in antigen presentation by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heung Kyu; Mattei, Lisa M; Steinberg, Benjamin E; Alberts, Philipp; Lee, Yun Hee; Chervonsky, Alexander; Mizushima, Noboru; Grinstein, Sergio; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2010-02-26

    Autophagy is known to be important in presentation of cytosolic antigens on MHC class II (MHC II). However, the role of autophagic process in antigen presentation in vivo is unclear. Mice with dendritic cell (DC)-conditional deletion in Atg5, a key autophagy gene, showed impaired CD4(+) T cell priming after herpes simplex virus infection and succumbed to rapid disease. The most pronounced defect of Atg5(-/-) DCs was the processing and presentation of phagocytosed antigens containing Toll-like receptor stimuli for MHC class II. In contrast, cross-presentation of peptides on MHC I was intact in the absence of Atg5. Although induction of metabolic autophagy did not enhance MHC II presentation, autophagic machinery was required for optimal phagosome-to-lysosome fusion and subsequent processing of antigen for MHC II loading. Thus, our study revealed that DCs utilize autophagic machinery to optimally process and present extracellular microbial antigens for MHC II presentation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Requirement for Coenzyme Q in Plasma Membrane Electron Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, I. L.; Sun, E. E.; Crane, F. L.; Morre, D. J.; Lindgren, A.; Low, H.

    1992-12-01

    Coenzyme Q is required in the electron transport system of rat hepatocyte and human erythrocyte plasma membranes. Extraction of coenzyme Q from the membrane decreases NADH dehydrogenase and NADH:oxygen oxidoreductase activity. Addition of coenzyme Q to the extracted membrane restores the activity. Partial restoration of activity is also found with α-tocopherylquinone, but not with vitamin K_1. Analogs of coenzyme Q inhibit NADH dehydrogenase and oxidase activity and the inhibition is reversed by added coenzyme Q. Ferricyanide reduction by transmembrane electron transport from HeLa cells is inhibited by coenzyme Q analogs and restored with added coenzyme Q10. Reduction of external ferricyanide and diferric transferrin by HeLa cells is accompanied by proton release from the cells. Inhibition of the reduction by coenzyme Q analogs also inhibits the proton release, and coenzyme Q10 restores the proton release activity. Trans-plasma membrane electron transport stimulates growth of serum-deficient cells, and added coenzyme Q10 increases growth of HeLa (human adenocarcinoma) and BALB/3T3 (mouse fibroblast) cells. The evidence is consistent with a function for coenzyme Q in a trans-plasma membrane electron transport system which influences cell growth.

  14. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET/CT: False-Positive Results due to Sarcoidosis?

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Robert M.; Djannatian, Manoutschehr; Czech, Norbert; Nitsche, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 72-year-old male patient who developed sarcoidosis of the mediastinal lymph nodes, the liver, and the prostate 11 years ago. Seven years later, he underwent transurethral resection of the prostate by laser due to hematuria. Pathology of the resected chips showed a ‘granulomatous prostatitis with epitheloid cells’. Malignancy was histologically excluded at that time. Four years later, he was diagnosed with an undifferentiated prostate carcinoma, with a Gleason score of 5 + 4 = 9. After initiation of antihormonal therapy, he underwent radical prostatectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy, which revealed a pT3b pN1 carcinoma with infiltrated resection margins. Three months later, the prostate-specific antigen level was 1.4 ng/ml, and a local recurrence was suspected by ultrasound; consequently, a 68Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT was performed. This examination seemed to confirm the local recurrence, a right pelvic lymph node metastasis, and a hepatic metastasis. However, ultrasound with contrast medium could not confirm the metastatic spread to the liver. In palliative intention, radiotherapy of the pelvis was done. After 50 Gy, the supposed recurrence had markedly shrunk, and an additional boost dose with 16.2 Gy was applied. Two years later, the patient is still free of disease. Due to this clinical development, we doubt the diagnosis of a fulminant progression of the prostate cancer as suspected by PSMA-PET/CT. Instead, we suspect a recurrence of the previously proven sarcoidosis leading to false-positive results. Our focus in this report is on the interaction between PSMA-PET/CT and sarcoidosis. Another report on a case of sarcoidosis of the spleen seems to confirm this possibility [Kobe et al: Clin Nucl Med 2015;40: 897–898]. PMID:27721768

  15. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Retargeted Measles Virotherapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunsheng; Hasegawa, Kosei; Russell, Stephen J.; Sadelain, Michel; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Live attenuated vaccine strain of measles virus (MV) has promising antitumor activity and is undergoing clinical testing in three different phase I cancer trials. The virus uses one of two receptors, CD46 which is ubiquitously expressed on all nucleated cells or CD150 which is expressed on immune cells, to infect cells. To minimize potential toxicity due to indiscriminate infection of normal cells, we have generated a fully retargeted MV that infects cells exclusively through the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) receptor, which is overexpressed on prostate cancer cells and tumor neovasculature. METHODS A single-chain antibody (scFv) specific for the extracellular domain of PSMA (J591) was inserted as a C-terminal extension on the MV attachment protein. Specificity of infection by the PSMA targeted virus was evaluated in parallel with the parental MV and a control virus which binds to CD38, a myeloma antigen. Antitumor activity of the PSMA retargeted virus was tested in both LNCaP and PC3-PSMA tumor xenograft models, with and without low dose external beam radiation. RESULTS Replication of the PSMA targeted virus was comparable to the parental MV. The PSMA scFv efficiently redirected virus infection and cytopathic killing exclusively to PSMA positive prostate cancer cells and not PSMA negative cells. There was an additive effect on cell killing from radiation treatment and virotherapy. The PSMA virus induced tumor regression of LNCaP and PC3-PSMA tumor xenografts. Extensive areas of MV infection and apoptosis were seen in virus treated tumors. CONCLUSIONS The PSMA retargeted virus warrants further investigation as a virotherapy agent. PMID:19367568

  16. Basement membrane and apocrine epithelial antigens in differential diagnosis between tubular carcinoma and sclerosing adenosis of the breast.

    PubMed Central

    Ekblom, P; Miettinen, M; Forsman, L; Andersson, L C

    1984-01-01

    The distributions of defined basement membrane proteins in nine pure tubular carcinomas, 10 cases of sclerosing adenosis, and 15 ductal adenocarcinomas were compared. Sections of formalin fixed, paraffin embedded specimens were pretreated with pepsin and then immunostained for laminin, type IV collagen, and basement membrane proteoglycan, components specific for basement membranes. In sclerosing adenosis the tubules were surrounded by a continuous intact basement membrane composed of laminin, type IV collagen, and basement membrane proteoglycan, while the epithelium in the tubular carcinomas was negative for these proteins. The tumours were also analysed for the distribution of the apocrine epithelial antigen (AEA). In contrast to the benign lesions the tubular carcinomas expressed the AEA in a distinct non-polar fashion throughout the cell surface. In normal ducts and in adenosis the AEA was confined exclusively to the luminal surface. These studies suggest that there is a disturbance of cell polarity in tubular carcinomas. It is concluded that a combined analysis of basement membrane proteins and luminal surface antigens is a reliable and convenient way to differentiate between tubular carcinoma and sclerosing adenosis of the breast. Images PMID:6323547

  17. Bacterial histo-blood group antigens contributing to genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with a microfiltration membrane.

    PubMed

    Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Miura, Takayuki; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nakagomi, Osamu; Ishii, Satoshi; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrated the genotype-dependent removal of human norovirus particles with a microfiltration (MF) membrane in the presence of bacteria bearing histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs). Three genotypes (GII.3, GII.4, and GII.6) of norovirus-like particles (NoVLPs) were mixed with three bacterial strains (Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, Escherichia coli O86:K61:B7, and Staphylococcus epidermidis), respectively, and the mixture was filtered with an MF membrane having a nominal pore size of 0.45 μm. All NoVLP genotypes were rejected by the MF membrane in the presence of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, which excreted HBGAs as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). This MF membrane removal of NoVLPs was not significant when EPS was removed from cells of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6. GII.6 NoVLP was not rejected with the MF membrane in the presence of E. coli O86:K61:B7, but the removal of EPS of E. coli O86:K61:B7 increased the removal efficiency due to the interaction of NoVLPs with the exposed B-antigen in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of E. coli O86:K61:B7. No MF membrane removal of all three genotypes was observed when S. epidermidis, an HBGA-negative strain, was mixed with NoVLPs. These results demonstrate that the location of HBGAs on bacterial cells is an important factor in determining the genotype-dependent removal efficiency of norovirus particles with the MF membrane. The presence of HBGAs in mixed liquor suspended solids from a membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot plant was confirmed by immune-transmission electron microscopy, which implies that bacterial HBGAs can contribute to the genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with MBR using MF membrane.

  18. Dose and timing requirements for immunogenicity of viral poultry vaccine antigen: investigations of emulsion-based depot function.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Theo; Hofmans, Marij P M; Theelen, Marc J G; Manders, Frans G A; Schijns, Virgil E J C

    2007-10-01

    The release requirements for vaccine antigens delivered by adjuvants with presumed depot function are poorly understood. Water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions are routinely used in many poultry vaccines. They strongly activate antibody production, and are regarded as a depot from which antigens are slowly released, resulting in prolonged antigen residence. However, from earlier studies we concluded that W/O adjuvant activity is partly based on the immunostimulatory activity of the oil phase. Here we assess the dose and regimen requirements for viral antigen in immunization experiments in chickens. Three-week-old to 4-week-old White Leghorn chickens were repeatedly injected with inactivated infectious bursal disease virus antigen over 48 days. Our aim was to compare the antibody responses in repeatedly injected animals, receiving fractioned doses of antigen, with the responses in animals receiving only one injection of the full dose of antigen formulated in either a W/O emulsion or in saline. We observed that repeated administration of small amounts of antigen results in a gradual increase of specific humoral immune responses during the immunization regimen. Immunization with a higher first dose evoked an early higher antibody response, which, however, reached a similar plateau level at the end of the regimen. When compared with lower first-dose regimens, a slow decline of serum antibody titre 2 weeks after the end of antigen injections indicated that repeated injection of small doses of antigen indeed mimics the efficacy of depot-forming adjuvants. All regimens of fractioned antigen in saline, however, proved less effective, when compared with a single-dose vaccination of the cumulative amount of antigen formulated in a W/O emulsion. From our data we confirm that W/O emulsions are very effective vaccine vehicles for improving antigen-specific humoral responses in chickens, owing to a combination of antigen residence-prolonging activity and direct immune stimulation.

  19. PET Imaging in Prostate Cancer: Focus on Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Mease, Ronnie C.; Foss, Catherine A.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American men. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with emerging radiopharmaceuticals promises accurate staging of primary disease, restaging of recurrent disease, detection of metastatic lesions and, ultimately, for predicting the aggressiveness of disease. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a well-characterized imaging biomarker of PCa. Because PSMA levels are directly related to androgen independence, metastasis and progression, PSMA could prove an important target for the development of new radiopharmaceuticals for PET. Preclinical data for new PSMA-based radiotracers are discussed and include new 89Zr- and 64Cu-labeled anti-PSMA antibodies and antibody fragments, 64Cu-labeled aptamers, and 11C-, 18F-, 68Ga-, 64Cu-, and 86Y-labeled low molecular weight inhibitors of PSMA. Several of these agents, namely 68Ga-HBED-CC conjugate 15, 18F-DCFBC 8, and BAY1075553 are particularly promising, each having detected sites of PCa in initial clinical studies. These early clinical results suggest that PET/CT using PSMA-targeted agents, especially with compounds of low molecular weight, will make valuable contributions to the management of PCa. PMID:23590171

  20. Prostate-specific membrane antigen as a target for cancer imaging and therapy

    PubMed Central

    KIESS, A. P.; BANERJEE, S. R.; MEASE, R. C.; ROWE, S. P.; RAO, A.; FOSS, C. A.; CHEN, Y.; YANG, X.; CHO, S. Y.; NIMMAGADDA, S.; POMPER, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a molecular target whose use has resulted in some of the most productive work toward imaging and treating prostate cancer over the past two decades. A wide variety of imaging agents extending from intact antibodies to low-molecular-weight compounds permeate the literature. In parallel there is a rapidly expanding pool of antibody-drug conjugates, radiopharmaceutical therapeutics, small-molecule drug conjugates, theranostics and nanomedicines targeting PSMA. Such productivity is motivated by the abundant expression of PSMA on the surface of prostate cancer cells and within the neovasculature of other solid tumors, with limited expression in most normal tissues. Animating the field is a variety of small-molecule scaffolds upon which the radionuclides, drugs, MR-detectable species and nanoparticles can be placed with relative ease. Among those, the urea-based agents have been most extensively leveraged, with expanding clinical use for detection and more recently for radiopharmaceutical therapy of prostate cancer, with surprisingly little toxicity. PSMA imaging of other cancers is also appearing in the clinical literature, and may overtake FDG for certain indications. Targeting PSMA may provide a viable alternative or first-line approach to managing prostate and other cancers. PMID:26213140

  1. Radiohalogenated Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA)-Based Ureas as Imaging Agents for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Foss, Catherine A.; Byun, Youngjoo; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Fox, James J.; Castanares, Mark; Lupold, Shawn E.; Babich, John W.; Mease, Ronnie C.

    2009-01-01

    To extend our development of new imaging agents targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), we have used the versatile intermediate 2-[3-(5-amino-1-carboxy-pentyl)-ureido]-pentanedioic acid (Lys-C(O)-Glu), which allows ready incorporation of radiohalogens for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). We prepared 2-[3-[1-carboxy-5-(4-[125I]iodo-benzoylamino)-pentyl]-ureido]-pentanedioic acid ([125I]3), 2-[3-[1-carboxy-5-(4-[18F]fluoro-benzoylamino)-pentyl]-ureido]-pentanedioic acid ([18F]6) and 2-(3-[1-carboxy-5-[(5-[125I]iodo-pyridine-3-carbonyl)-amino]-pentyl]-ureido)-pentanedioic acid ([125I]8) in 65 - 80% (non-decay-corrected), 30 - 35% (decay corrected) and 59 - 75% (non-decay-corrected) radiochemical yields. Compound [125I]3 demonstrated 8.8 ± 4.7 percent injected dose per gram (%ID/g) within PSMA+ PC-3 PIP tumor at 30 min postinjection, which persisted, with clear delineation of the tumor by SPECT. Similar tumor uptake values at early time points were demonstrated for [18F]6 (using PET) and [125I]8. Because of the many radiohalogenated moieties that can be attached via the ε amino group, the intermediate Lys-C(O)-Glu is an attractive template upon which to develop new imaging agents for prostate cancer. PMID:19053825

  2. Maturation of human B lymphocytes--studies with a panel of monoclonal antibodies against membrane antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Zola, H; McNamara, P J; Moore, H A; Smart, I J; Brooks, D A; Beckman, I G; Bradley, J

    1983-01-01

    The expression of six different membrane markers by cells of the human B lymphocyte lineage has been studied, using monoclonal antibodies. B cells representing various stages of differentiation/maturation have been examined, using normal cells, leukaemia cells, and continuous cell lines. The expression of the six markers has been compared with maturation stages defined by immunoglobulin expression. The HLA/beta 2-microglobulin complex is present throughout the B cell lineage, whilst the Ia (p28,33) marker is present from the earliest stage that can be attributed to the B lineage, but is lost during plasma cell differentiation. A marker detected by monoclonal antibody FMC 1 is present only on mature B lymphocytes, being absent from pre-B cells or plasma cells. FMC 7 detects an antigen found on a relatively mature subpopulation, whereas FMC 8 detects early as well as mature B cells. FMC 3 expression is found on a proportion of cells at any maturation stage, suggesting that expression of this marker is controlled by factors unrelated to maturation. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6191892

  3. Synthetic peptides from Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) specifically interacting with human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Valbuena, J; Rodríguez, L; Vera, R; Puentes, A; Curtidor, H; Cortés, J; Rosas, J; Patarroyo, M E

    2006-10-01

    Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) is expressed during both the sporozoite and merozoite stage of the parasite's life cycle. The role placed by AMA-1 during sporozoite invasion of hepatocytes has not been made sufficiently clear to date. Identifying the sequences involved in binding to hepatocytes is an important step towards understanding the structural basis for sporozoite-hepatocyte interaction. Binding assays between P. falciparum AMA-1 peptides and HepG2 cell were performed in this study to identify possible AMA-1 functional regions. Four AMA-1 high activity binding peptides (HABPs) bound specifically to hepatocytes: 4310 ((74)QHAYPIDHEGAEPAPQEQNL(93)), 4316 ((194)TLDEMRHFYKDNKYVKNLDE(213)), 4321 ((294)VVDNWEKVCPRKNLQNAKFGY(313)) and 4332 ((514)AEVTSNNEVVVKEEYKDEYA(533)). Their binding to these cells became saturable and resistant to treatment with neuraminidase. Most of these peptides were located in AMA-1 domains I and III, these being target regions for protective antibody responses. These peptides interacted with 36 and 58 kDa proteins on the erythrocyte surface. Some of the peptides were found in exposed regions of the AMA-1 protein, thereby facilitating their interaction with host cells. It is thus probable that AMA-1 regions defined by the four peptides mentioned above are involved in sporozoite-hepatocyte interaction.

  4. 68Ga-Labeled Inhibitors of Prostate-Specific Membrane antigen (PSMA) for Imaging Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Byun, Youngjoo; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Green, Gilbert; Fox, James J.; Horti, Andrew; Mease, Ronnie C.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2012-01-01

    Gallium-68 is a generator-produced radionuclide for positron emission tomography (PET) that is being increasingly used for radiolabeling of tumor-targeting peptides. Compounds [68Ga]3 and [68Ga]6 are high-affinity, urea-based inhibitors of the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) that were synthesized in decay-uncorrected yields ranging from 60 – 70% and radiochemical purities of more than 99%. Compound [68Ga]3 demonstrated 3.78 ± 0.90 percent injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g) within PSMA+ PIP tumor at 30 min post-injection, while [68Ga]6 showed a two hour PSMA+ PIP tumor uptake value of 3.29 ± 0.77%ID/g. Target (PSMA+ PIP) to non-target (PSMA− flu) ratios were 4.6 and 18.3, respectively, at those time points. Both compounds delineated tumor clearly by small animal PET. The urea series of imaging agents for PSMA can be radiolabeled with 68Ga, a cyclotron-free isotope useful for clinical PET studies, with maintenance of target specificity. PMID:20568777

  5. Characterization of a novel inhibitory human monoclonal antibody directed against Plasmodium falciparum Apical Membrane Antigen 1

    PubMed Central

    Maskus, Dominika J.; Królik, Michał; Bethke, Susanne; Spiegel, Holger; Kapelski, Stephanie; Seidel, Melanie; Addai-Mensah, Otchere; Reimann, Andreas; Klockenbring, Torsten; Barth, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer; Fendel, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Malaria remains a major challenge to global health causing extensive morbidity and mortality. Yet, there is no efficient vaccine and the immune response remains incompletely understood. Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1), a leading vaccine candidate, plays a key role during merozoite invasion into erythrocytes by interacting with Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 (RON2). We generated a human anti-AMA1-antibody (humAbAMA1) by EBV-transformation of sorted B-lymphocytes from a Ghanaian donor and subsequent rescue of antibody variable regions. The antibody was expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana and in HEK239-6E, characterized for binding specificity and epitope, and analyzed for its inhibitory effect on Plasmodium falciparum. The generated humAbAMA1 shows an affinity of 106–135 pM. It inhibits the parasite strain 3D7A growth in vitro with an expression system-independent IC50-value of 35 μg/ml (95% confidence interval: 33 μg/ml–37 μg/ml), which is three to eight times lower than the IC50-values of inhibitory antibodies 4G2 and 1F9. The epitope was mapped to the close proximity of the RON2-peptide binding groove. Competition for binding between the RON2-peptide and humAbAMA1 was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy measurements. The particularly advantageous inhibitory activity of this fully human antibody might provide a basis for future therapeutic applications. PMID:28000709

  6. Characterization of a novel inhibitory human monoclonal antibody directed against Plasmodium falciparum Apical Membrane Antigen 1.

    PubMed

    Maskus, Dominika J; Królik, Michał; Bethke, Susanne; Spiegel, Holger; Kapelski, Stephanie; Seidel, Melanie; Addai-Mensah, Otchere; Reimann, Andreas; Klockenbring, Torsten; Barth, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer; Fendel, Rolf

    2016-12-21

    Malaria remains a major challenge to global health causing extensive morbidity and mortality. Yet, there is no efficient vaccine and the immune response remains incompletely understood. Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1), a leading vaccine candidate, plays a key role during merozoite invasion into erythrocytes by interacting with Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 (RON2). We generated a human anti-AMA1-antibody (humAbAMA1) by EBV-transformation of sorted B-lymphocytes from a Ghanaian donor and subsequent rescue of antibody variable regions. The antibody was expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana and in HEK239-6E, characterized for binding specificity and epitope, and analyzed for its inhibitory effect on Plasmodium falciparum. The generated humAbAMA1 shows an affinity of 106-135 pM. It inhibits the parasite strain 3D7A growth in vitro with an expression system-independent IC50-value of 35 μg/ml (95% confidence interval: 33 μg/ml-37 μg/ml), which is three to eight times lower than the IC50-values of inhibitory antibodies 4G2 and 1F9. The epitope was mapped to the close proximity of the RON2-peptide binding groove. Competition for binding between the RON2-peptide and humAbAMA1 was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy measurements. The particularly advantageous inhibitory activity of this fully human antibody might provide a basis for future therapeutic applications.

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of constrained phosphoramidate inhibitors of prostate-specific membrane antigen.

    PubMed

    Ley, Corinne R; Beattie, Nathan R; Dannoon, Shorouk; Regan, Melanie; VanBrocklin, Henry; Berkman, Clifford E

    2015-06-15

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a cell-surface enzyme-biomarker that is actively pursued for targeted delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents for prostate cancer. Our lab has developed PSMA inhibitors based on a phosphoramidate scaffold, which has shown both high selectivity for PSMA-positive tumors and rapid clearance in vivo when radiolabeled with (18)F. However, this scaffold exhibits hydrolytic instability under low pH and high temperature conditions, barring the use of other imaging or therapeutic radionuclides such as (68)Ga or (177)Lu. Previous studies in our lab have shown a trend in increasing acid stability as the distance between the phosphoramidate core and the α-carboxylate of the P1 residue is increased. Therefore, a new generation of phosphoramidate inhibitors was developed based on trans-4-hydroxyproline as the P1 residue to restrict the interaction of the α-carboxylate to the phosphoramidate core. These hydroxyproline inhibitors demonstrated comparable IC50 values to earlier generations as well as enhanced thermal and acid stability.

  8. Novel prostate cancer immunotherapy with a DNA-encoded anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Muthumani, Kar; Marnin, Liron; Kudchodkar, Sagar B; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Choi, Hyeree; Agarwal, Sangya; Scott, Veronica L; Reuschel, Emma L; Zaidi, Faraz I; Duperret, Elizabeth K; Wise, Megan C; Kraynyak, Kimberly A; Ugen, Kenneth E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Joseph Kim, J; Weiner, David B

    2017-08-17

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is expressed at high levels on malignant prostate cells and is likely an important therapeutic target for the treatment of prostate carcinoma. Current immunotherapy approaches to target PSMA include peptide, cell, vector or DNA-based vaccines as well as passive administration of PSMA-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb). Conventional mAb immunotherapy has numerous logistical and practical limitations, including high production costs and a requirement for frequent dosing due to short mAb serum half-life. In this report, we describe a novel strategy of antibody-based immunotherapy against prostate carcinoma that utilizes synthetic DNA plasmids that encode a therapeutic human mAb that target PSMA. Electroporation-enhanced intramuscular injection of the DNA-encoded mAb (DMAb) plasmid into mice led to the production of functional and durable levels of the anti-PSMA antibody. The anti-PSMA produced in vivo controlled tumor growth and prolonged survival in a mouse model. This is likely mediated by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) effect with the aid of NK cells. Further study of  this novel approach for treatment of human prostate disease and other malignant conditions is warranted.

  9. Synthesis and Evaluation of Technetium-99m- and Rhenium-Labeled Inhibitors of the Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA)

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sangeeta R.; Foss, Catherine A.; Castanares, Mark; Mease, Ronnie C.; Byun, Youngjoo; Fox, James J.; Hilton, John; Lupold, Shawn E.; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2012-01-01

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is increasingly recognized as a viable target for imaging and therapy of cancer. We prepared seven 99mTc/Re-labeled compounds by attaching known Tc/Re chelating agents to an amino-functionalized PSMA inhibitor (lys-NHCONH-glu) with or without a variable length linker moiety. Ki values ranged from 0.17 to 199 nM. Ex vivo biodistribution and in vivo imaging demonstrated the degree of specific binding to engineered PSMA+ PC3 PIP tumors. PC3-PIP cells are derived from PC3 that have been transduced with the gene for PSMA. Despite demonstrating nearly the lowest PSMA inhibitory potency of this series, [99mTc(CO)3(L1)]+ (L1 = (2-pyridylmethyl)2N(CH2)4CH(CO2H)-NHCO-(CH2)6CO-NH-lys-NHCONH-glu) showed the highest, most selective PIP tumor uptake, at 7.9 ± 4.0% injected dose per gram of tissue at 30 min postinjection. Radioactivity cleared from nontarget tissues to produce a PIP to flu (PSMA-PC3) ratio of 44:1 at 120 min postinjection. PSMA can accommodate the steric requirements of 99mTc/Re complexes within PSMA inhibitors, the best results achieved with a linker moiety between the ε amine of the urea lysine and the chelator. PMID:18637669

  10. Inhibitory monoclonal antibody against a (myristylated) small-molecular-weight antigen from Plasmodium falciparum associated with the parasitophorous vacuole membrane.

    PubMed

    Kara, U A; Stenzel, D J; Ingram, L T; Bushell, G R; Lopez, J A; Kidson, C

    1988-04-01

    A small-molecular-weight antigen that occurs in asexual blood stages in synchronized cultures of Plasmodium falciparum was detected by a monoclonal antibody which inhibits parasite growth in vitro. This antigen, QF116, showed a molecular weight of 15,000 in parasite strain FCR-3K+ from The Gambia and 19,000 in strain FCQ-27 from Papua New Guinea. The protein did not show significant glycosylation by galactose or glucosamine labeling but was found to be acylated by myristic acid. By using immunogold labeling and electron microscopy, the location of the antigen could be attributed to the parasitophorous vacuole membrane and to inclusions and vesicles residing within the cytoplasm of the erythrocyte host cell.

  11. Efficient thrombin generation requires molecular phosphatidylserine, not a membrane surface.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Rinku; Weinreb, Gabriel; Lentz, Barry R

    2005-12-27

    Activation of prothrombin to thrombin is catalyzed by a "prothrombinase" complex, traditionally viewed as factor X(a) (FX(a)) in complex with factor V(a) (FV(a)) on a phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membrane surface, which is widely regarded as required for efficient activation. Activation involves cleavage of two peptide bonds and proceeds via one of two released intermediates or through "channeling" (activation without the release of an intermediate). We ask here whether the PS molecule itself and not the membrane surface is sufficient to produce the fully active human "prothrombinase" complex in solution. Both FX(a) and FV(a) bind soluble dicaproyl-phosphatidylserine (C6PS). In the presence of sufficient C6PS to saturate both FX(a) and FV(a2) (light isoform of FV(a)), these proteins form a tight (Kd = 0.6 +/- 0.09 nM at 37 degrees C) soluble complex. Complex assembly occurs well below the critical micelle concentration of C6PS, as established in the presence of the proteins by quasi-elastic light scattering and pyrene fluorescence. Ferguson analysis of native gels shows that the complex migrates with an apparent molecular mass only slightly larger than that expected for one FX(a) and one FV(a2), further ruling out complex assembly on C6PS micelles. Human prothrombin activation by this complex occurs at nearly the same overall rate (2.2 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)) and via the same reaction pathway (50-60% channeling, with the rest via the meizothrombin intermediate) as the activation catalyzed by a complex assembled on PS-containing membranes (4.4 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)). These results question the accepted role of PS membranes as providing "dimensionality reduction" and favor a regulatory role for platelet-membrane-exposed PS.

  12. In vitro antigen-induced antibody responses to hepatitis B surface antigen in man. Kinetic and cellular requirements.

    PubMed Central

    Cupps, T R; Gerin, J L; Purcell, R H; Goldsmith, P K; Fauci, A S

    1984-01-01

    In this report we define the parameters of the human immune response after immunization with hepatitis B vaccine. 2 wk after booster immunization, there is significant spontaneous secretion of antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs IgG), which is not further augmented by stimulation with antigen or pokeweed mitogen (PWM). By 4 wk there is little spontaneous secretion of specific antibody, and low doses of antigen or PWM produce significant increases in the amount of anti-HBs IgG produced. By 8 wk the peripheral blood mononuclear cells are refractory to stimulation by antigen, but anti-HBs IgG is produced in response to PWM. 0.5 yr or more after the last immunization, some individuals will manifest an antigen-induced specific antibody response. This induction of anti-HBs IgG by hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is monocyte- and T cell-dependent. Note that there is a dichotomy in the T cell response to HBsAg. The specific antibody response is clearly T cell dependent, but no in vitro T cell proliferative response to HBsAG could be demonstrated in the immunized individuals. Although the precise reason for the absent proliferative response to HBsAg despite well-established humoral immunity has not been determined, there was no evidence to suggest nonspecific suppression by HBsAg or the presence of an adherent suppressor cell population. The ability to evaluate antigen-induced, antigen-specific responses to HBsAg will be useful in defining the unique interaction between the human immune response and this clinically important viral agent. PMID:6332826

  13. Survival of human lymphoma cells requires B-cell receptor engagement by self-antigens

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ryan M.; Wu, Tianyi; Schmitz, Roland; Dawood, Moez; Xiao, Wenming; Phelan, James D.; Xu, Weihong; Menard, Laurence; Meffre, Eric; Chan, Wing-Chung C.; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Campo, Elías; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Delabie, Jan; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2015-01-01

    The activated B-cell–like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) relies on chronic active B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling. BCR pathway inhibitors induce remissions in a subset of ABC DLBCL patients. BCR microclusters on the surface of ABC cells resemble those generated following antigen engagement of normal B cells. We speculated that binding of lymphoma BCRs to self-antigens initiates and maintains chronic active BCR signaling in ABC DLBCL. To assess whether antigenic engagement of the BCR is required for the ongoing survival of ABC cells, we developed isogenic ABC cells that differed solely with respect to the IgH V region of their BCRs. In competitive assays with wild-type cells, substitution of a heterologous V region impaired the survival of three ABC lines. The viability of one VH4-34+ ABC line and the ability of its BCR to bind to its own cell surface depended on V region residues that mediate the intrinsic autoreactivity of VH4-34 to self-glycoproteins. The BCR of another ABC line reacted with self-antigens in apoptotic debris, and the survival of a third ABC line was sustained by reactivity of its BCR to an idiotypic epitope in its own V region. Hence, a diverse set of self-antigens is responsible for maintaining the malignant survival of ABC DLBCL cells. IgH V regions used by the BCRs of ABC DLBCL biopsy samples varied in their ability to sustain survival of these ABC lines, suggesting a screening procedure to identify patients who might benefit from BCR pathway inhibition. PMID:26483459

  14. Characterization of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) for Use in Therapeutic and Diagnostic Strategies Against Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    Jul 00 - 30 Jun 01) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS Characterization of Prostate-Specific Membrane DAMD17-99-1-9523 Antigen (PSMA) for use in...PSMA promoter, the PSMA- Like enhancer was in fact able to drive prostate-specific reporter gene activity, with over 80% of 5 the activity of the PSMA...non-toxic prodrug 5 -fluorocytosine ( 5 -FC). In collaboration with Dr. Atsushi Uchida, a clinical fellow whom I have been assisting in his research

  15. Investigating the Functional Role of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen and its Enzymatic Activity in Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    2007 – 28 Jan 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Investigating the Functional Role of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen and its...Activity in Prostate Cancer Metastasis. IMPACT meeting, Atlanta GA, 2007 . Page 9 CONCLUSION The goal of the proposal is to investigate the function of...distribution of secondary growths in cancer of the breast. Lancet 1:571-573, 1889. 3. Fornaro M, Manes T and Languino LR: Integrins and prostate cancer

  16. Characterization of antigens from nontypable Haemophilus influenzae recognized by human bactericidal antibodies. Role of Haemophilus outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gnehm, H E; Pelton, S I; Gulati, S; Rice, P A

    1985-01-01

    Major outer membrane antigens, proteins, and lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), from nontypable Haemophilus influenzae were characterized and examined as targets for complement-dependent human bactericidal antibodies. Outer membranes from two nontypable H. influenzae isolates that caused otitis media and pneumonia (middle ear and transtracheal aspirates) were prepared by shearing organisms in EDTA. These membranes were compared with membranes prepared independently by spheroplasting and lysozyme treatment of whole cells and found to have: similar sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) patterns of the proteins; identical densities (rho = 1.22 g/cm3); and minimal d-lactose dehydrogenase activity indicating purity from cytoplasmic membranes. Outer membranes were solubilized in an LPS-disaggregating buffer and proteins were separated from LPS by molecular sieve chromatography. The SDS-PAGE patterns of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) from the two strains differed in the major band although other prominent bands appeared similar in molecular weight. LPS prepared by hot phenol water extraction of each of the strains contained 45% (pneumonia isolate) and 60% (otitis isolate) lipid (wt/wt), 49% and 50% carbohydrate (wt/wt), respectively, and less than 1%, 3-deoxy-manno octulosonic acid. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) purified from normal human serum (NHS) plus complement was bactericidal for both strains. Purified immunoglobulin G (IgG) from NHS killed the middle ear isolate and immune convalescent IgM from the serum of the patient with pneumonia killed his isolate. NHS or convalescent serum were absorbed with OMPs and LPS (0.6-110 micrograms) from each of the strains and immune specific inhibition of bactericidal antibody activity by each antigen was determined. OMPs from the pulmonary isolate inhibited bactericidal antibody activity directed against the isolate in both NHS (1.5 microgram of antigen) and immune serum (0.75 microgram of antigen). OMPs (60

  17. Near-Infrared Photoimmunotherapy Targeting Prostate Cancer with Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Antibody.

    PubMed

    Nagaya, Tadanobu; Nakamura, Yuko; Okuyama, Shuhei; Ogata, Fusa; Maruoka, Yasuhiro; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2017-09-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a membrane protein that is overexpressed manifold in prostate cancer and provides an attractive target for molecular therapy. Near-infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT) is a highly selective tumor treatment that employs an antibody-photoabsorber conjugate (APC). Here, we describe the efficacy of NIR-PIT, using a fully human IgG1 anti-PSMA monoclonal antibody (mAb), conjugated to the photoabsorber, IR700DX, in a PSMA-expressing PC3 prostate cancer cell line. Anti-PSMA-IR700 showed specific binding and cell-specific killing was observed after exposure of the cells to NIR light in vitro In the in vivo study, anti-PSMA-IR700 showed high tumor accumulation and high tumor-background ratio. Tumor-bearing mice were separated into 4 groups: (i) no treatment; (ii) 100 μg of anti-PSMA-IR700 i.v.; (iii) NIR light exposure; (iv) 100 μg of anti-PSMA-IR700 i.v., NIR light exposure was administered. These were performed every week for up to 3 weeks. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited by NIR-PIT treatment compared with the other control groups (P < 0.001), and significantly prolonged survival was achieved (P < 0.0001 vs. other control groups). More than two thirds of tumors were cured with NIR-PIT. In conclusion, the anti-PSMA antibody is suitable as an APC for NIR-PIT. Furthermore, NIR-PIT with the anti-PSMA-IR700 antibody is a promising candidate of the treatment of PSMA-expressing tumors and could be readily translated to humans.Implications: NIR-infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT) using a fully human anti-PSMA-IR700 conjugate showed potential therapeutic effects against a PSMA-expressing prostate cancer that is readily translated to humans. Mol Cancer Res; 15(9); 1153-62. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Toxoplasma gondii Homologue of Plasmodium Apical Membrane Antigen 1 Is Involved in Invasion of Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hehl, Adrian B.; Lekutis, Christine; Grigg, Michael E.; Bradley, Peter J.; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Ortega-Barria, Eduardo; Boothroyd, John C.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins with constitutive or transient localization on the surface of Apicomplexa parasites are of particular interest for their potential role in the invasion of host cells. We describe the identification and characterization of TgAMA1, the Toxoplasma gondii homolog of the Plasmodium apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1), which has been shown to elicit a protective immune response against merozoites dependent on the correct pairing of its numerous disulfide bonds. TgAMA1 shows between 19% (Plasmodium berghei) and 26% (Plasmodium yoelii) overall identity to the different Plasmodium AMA1 homologs and has a conserved arrangement of 16 cysteine residues and a putative transmembrane domain, indicating a similar architecture. The single-copy TgAMA1 gene is interrupted by seven introns and is transcribed into an mRNA of ∼3.3 kb. The TgAMA1 protein is produced during intracellular tachyzoite replication and initially localizes to the micronemes, as determined by immunofluorescence assay and immunoelectron microscopy. Upon release of mature tachyzoites, TgAMA1 is found distributed predominantly on the apical end of the parasite surface. A ∼54-kDa cleavage product of the large ectodomain is continuously released into the medium by extracellular parasites. Mouse antiserum against recombinant TgAMA1 blocked invasion of new host cells by approximately 40%. This and our inability to produce a viable TgAMA1 knock-out mutant indicate that this phylogenetically conserved protein fulfills a key function in the invasion of host cells by extracellular T. gondii tachyzoites. PMID:11083833

  19. A Modular Strategy to Prepare Multivalent Inhibitors of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA)

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Lisok, Ala; Mease, Ronnie C.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a modular scaffold for preparing high-affinity, homo-multivalent inhibitors of the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) for imaging and therapy of prostate cancer (PCa). Our system contains a lysine-based (∝-, ε-) dialkyne residue for incorporating a PSMA binding Lys-Glu urea motif exploiting click chemistry and a second lysine residue for subsequent modification with an imaging or therapeutic moiety. The utility of the multivalent scaffold was examined by synthesizing bivalent compounds 2 and 3 and comparing them with the monovalent analog 1. Determination of inhibition constants (Ki) revealed that bivalent 2 (0.2 nM) and 3 (0.08 nM) are significantly more potent (~ 5 fold and ~ 11 fold, respectively) inhibitors of PSMA than monovalent 1 (0.9 nM). A single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT imaging study of [111In]3 demonstrated high and specific uptake in PSMA+ PC-3 PIP tumor until at least 48 h post-injection, with rapid clearance from non-target tissues, including kidney. A biodistribution study revealed that [111In]3 demonstrated 34.0 ± 7.5 percent injected dose per gram of tissue in PSMA+ tumor at 24 h post-injection and was capable of generating target-to-non-target ratios of ~ 379 in PSMA+ PC-3 PIP tumors vs. isogenic PSMA-negative PC3-flu tumors in vivo. The click chemistry approach affords a convenient strategy toward multivalent PSMA inhibitors of enhanced affinity and superior pharmacokinetics for imaging. PMID:22207391

  20. A modular strategy to prepare multivalent inhibitors of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA).

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Shallal, Hassan; Lisok, Ala; Mease, Ronnie C; Pomper, Martin G

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a modular scaffold for preparing high-affinity, homo-multivalent inhibitors of the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) for imaging and therapy of prostate cancer (PCa). Our system contains a lysine-based (µ-, e-) dialkyne residue for incorporating a PSMA binding Lys-Glu urea motif exploiting click chemistry and a second lysine residue for subsequent modification with an imaging or therapeutic moiety. The utility of the multivalent scaffold was examined by synthesizing bivalent compounds 2 and 3 and comparing them with the monovalent analog 1. Determination of inhibition constants (Ki) revealed that bivalent 2 (0.2 nM) and 3 (0.08 nM) are significantly more potent (~ 5 fold and ~ 11 fold, respectively) inhibitors of PSMA than monovalent 1 (0.9 nM). A single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT imaging study of [111In]3 demonstrated high and specific uptake in PSMA+ PC-3 PIP tumor until at least 48 h post-injection, with rapid clearance from non-target tissues, including kidney. A biodistribution study revealed that [111In]3 demonstrated 34.0 ± 7.5 percent injected dose per gram of tissue in PSMA+ tumor at 24 h post-injection and was capable of generating target-to-non-target ratios of ~ 379 in PSMA+ PC-3 PIP tumors vs. isogenic PSMA-negative PC3-flu tumors in vivo. The click chemistry approach affords a convenient strategy toward multivalent PSMA inhibitors of enhanced affinity and superior pharmacokinetics for imaging.

  1. Invasion-inhibitory antibodies inhibit proteolytic processing of apical membrane antigen 1 of Plasmodium falciparum merozoites

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sheetij; Haynes, J. David; Moch, J. Kathleen; Barbosa, Arnoldo; Lanar, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) is a promising vaccine candidate for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Antibodies against AMA-1 of P. falciparum (PfAMA-1) interrupt merozoite invasion into RBCs. Initially localized within the apical complex, PfAMA-1 is proteolytically processed and redistributed circumferentially on merozoites at about the time of their release and invasion into RBCs. An 83-kDa precursor form of PfAMA-1 is processed to 66-kDa and then to 48- and 44-kDa products. We show that, even at low concentrations, IgG antibodies against correctly folded recombinant PfAMA-1 cross-linked and trapped the 52-, 48-, and 44-kDa proteolytic products on merozoites. These products are normally shed into the culture medium. At higher concentrations antibodies inhibited invasion into RBCs and caused a reduction in the amount of 44- and 48-kDa products, both on merozoites and in the culture medium. A corresponding increase also occurred in the amount of the 66- and 52-kDa forms detected on the merozoites. These antibodies also prevented circumferential redistribution of AMA-1. In contrast, monovalent invasion-inhibitory Fab fragments caused accumulation of 66- and 52-kDa forms, with no cross-linking, trapping, or prevention of redistribution. Antibodies at low concentrations can be used as trapping agents for intermediate and soluble forms of AMA-1 and are useful for studying proteolytic processing of AMA-1. With this technique, it was confirmed that protease inhibitor chymostatin and Ca2+ chelators can inhibit the breakdown of the 66-kDa form. We propose that antibodies to AMA-1 capable of inhibiting erythrocyte invasion act by disrupting proteolytic processing of AMA-1. PMID:14526103

  2. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen-Targeted Radiohalogenated PET and Therapeutic Agents for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Steven P; Drzezga, Alexander; Neumaier, Bernd; Dietlein, Markus; Gorin, Michael A; Zalutsky, Michael R; Pomper, Martin G

    2016-10-01

    Radiohalogenated agents are often the first line of pursuit in the development of new radiopharmaceuticals-whether antibodies, peptides, or small molecules-because of their ease of synthesis, lack of substantial steric perturbation of the original affinity agent (in some cases, providing enhanced affinity), and capacity to be transformed into therapeutics (in some cases, with a mere switch of an isotope). They often provide proof of a principle before optimization for pharmacokinetics or generation of radiometallated agents, when the latter are necessary. In particular, (18)F has been well integrated into normal clinical work flow in the form of (18)F-FDG for oncologic imaging, with reliable daily production and distribution to sites for immediate use, without the need for on-site preparation. Here we discuss radiohalogenated versions of imaging and therapeutic agents targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA); these were among the first such agents to be synthesized and used clinically. PSMA is highly expressed on prostate cancer epithelial cells and is currently being extensively investigated around the world as a target for imaging and therapy of prostate cancer. Additionally, the presence of PSMA on nonprostate tumor neovasculature has opened the possibility of PSMA-targeted molecules as generalizable cancer imaging and therapy agents. We focus on (18)F-labeled agents for PET, as they begin to redefine-along with the corresponding (68)Ga-labeled agents discussed elsewhere in this supplement to The Journal of Nuclear Medicine-the management of prostate cancer across a variety of clinical contexts. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  3. Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Regulates Angiogenesis Independently of VEGF during Ocular Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Christina L.; Caromile, Leslie A.; Durrani, Khayyam; Rahman, M. Mamunur; Claffey, Kevin P.; Fong, Guo-Hua; Shapiro, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Aberrant growth of blood vessels in the eye forms the basis of many incapacitating diseases and currently the majority of patients respond to anti-angiogenic therapies based on blocking the principal angiogenic growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). While highly successful, new therapeutic targets are critical for the increasing number of individuals susceptible to retina-related pathologies in our increasingly aging population. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a cell surface peptidase that is absent on normal tissue vasculature but is highly expressed on the neovasculature of most solid tumors, where we have previously shown to regulate angiogenic endothelial cell invasion. Because pathologic angiogenic responses are often triggered by distinct signals, we sought to determine if PSMA also contributes to the pathologic angiogenesis provoked by hypoxia of the retina, which underlies many debilitating retinopathies. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy, we found that while developmental angiogenesis is normal in PSMA null mice, hypoxic challenge resulted in decreased retinal vascular pathology when compared to wild type mice as assessed by avascular area and numbers of vascular tufts/glomeruli. The vessels formed in the PSMA null mice were more organized and highly perfused, suggesting a more ‘normal’ phenotype. Importantly, the decrease in angiogenesis was not due to an impaired hypoxic response as levels of pro-angiogenic factors are comparable; indicating that PSMA regulation of angiogenesis is independent of VEGF. Furthermore, both systemic and intravitreal administration of a PSMA inhibitor in wild type mice undergoing OIR mimicked the PSMA null phenotype resulting in improved retinal vasculature. Conclusions/Significance Our data indicate that PSMA plays a VEGF-independent role in retinal angiogenesis and that the lack of or inhibition of PSMA may represent a novel

  4. Development of prostate specific membrane antigen targeted ultrasound microbubbles using bioorthogonal chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Zlitni, Aimen; Yin, Melissa; Janzen, Nancy; Chatterjee, Samit; Lisok, Ala; Gabrielson, Kathleen L.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Pomper, Martin G.; Foster, F. Stuart

    2017-01-01

    Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) targeted microbubbles (MBs) were developed using bioorthogonal chemistry. Streptavidin-labeled MBs were treated with a biotinylated tetrazine (MBTz) and targeted to PSMA expressing cells using trans-cyclooctene (TCO)-functionalized anti-PSMA antibodies (TCO-anti-PSMA). The extent of MB binding to PSMA positive cells for two different targeting strategies was determined using an in vitro flow chamber. The initial approach involved pretargeting, where TCO-anti-PSMA was first incubated with PSMA expressing cells and followed by MBTz, which subsequently showed a 2.8 fold increase in the number of bound MBs compared to experiments performed in the absence of TCO-anti-PSMA. Using direct targeting, where TCO-anti-PSMA was linked to MBTz prior to initiation of the assay, a 5-fold increase in binding compared to controls was observed. The direct targeting approach was subsequently evaluated in vivo using a human xenograft tumor model and two different PSMA-targeting antibodies. The US signal enhancements observed were 1.6- and 5.9-fold greater than that for non-targeted MBs. The lead construct was also evaluated in a head-to-head study using mice bearing both PSMA positive or negative tumors in separate limbs. The human PSMA expressing tumors exhibited a 2-fold higher US signal compared to those tumors deficient in human PSMA. The results demonstrate both the feasibility of preparing PSMA-targeted MBs and the benefits of using bioorthogonal chemistry to create targeted US probes. PMID:28472168

  5. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression in primary gliomas and breast cancer brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary and secondary brain cancers are highly treatment resistant, and their marked angiogenesis attracts interest as a potential therapeutic target. Recent observations reveal that the microvascular endothelium of primary high-grade gliomas expresses prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA). Breast cancers express PSMA and they frequently form secondary brain tumors. Hence we report here our pilot study addressing the feasibility of PSMA targeting in brain and metastatic breast tumors, by examining PSMA levels in all glioma grades (19 patients) and in breast cancer brain metastases (5 patients). Methods Tumor specimens were acquired from archival material and normal brain tissues from autopsies. Tissue were stained and probed for PSMA, and the expression levels imaged and quantified using automated hardware and software. PSMA staining intensities of glioma subtypes, breast tumors, and breast tumor brain metastases were compared statistically versus normals. Results Normal brain microvessels (4 autopsies) did not stain for PSMA, while a small proportion (<5%) of healthy neurons stained, and were surrounded by an intact blood brain barrier. Tumor microvessels of the highly angiogenic grade IV gliomas showed intense PSMA staining which varied between patients and was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than normal brain. Grade I gliomas showed moderate vessel staining, while grade II and III gliomas had no vessel staining, but a few (<2%) of the tumor cells stained. Both primary breast cancer tissues and the associated brain metastases exhibited vascular PSMA staining, although the intensity of staining was generally less for the metastatic lesions. Conclusions Our results align with and extend previous data showing PSMA expression in blood vessels of gliomas and breast cancer brain metastases. These results provide a rationale for more comprehensive studies to explore PSMA targeted agents for treating secondary brain tumors with PSMA expressing

  6. Prostate-specific membrane antigen-radioguided surgery for metastatic lymph nodes in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Tobias; Weirich, Gregor; Schottelius, Margret; Weineisen, Martina; Frisch, Benjamin; Okur, Asli; Kübler, Hubert; Thalgott, Mark; Navab, Nassir; Schwaiger, Markus; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Gschwend, Jürgen E; Eiber, Matthias

    2015-09-01

    With the advent of (68)Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen-N,N'-bis[2-hydroxy-5-(carboxyethyl)benzyl]ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid ((68)Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC) positron emission tomography (PET) hybrid imaging in prostate cancer (PCa), even small metastatic lymph nodes (LNs) can be visualized. However, intraoperative detection of such LNs may not be easy owing to their inconspicuous morphology and/or atypical localization. The aim of our feasibility study was to evaluate PSMA-radioguided surgery for detection of metastatic LNs. One patient with primary PCa and evidence of LN metastases and four PCa patients with evidence of recurrent disease to regional LNs on (68)Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET hybrid imaging received an intravenous injection of an (111)In-PSMA investigation and therapy agent 24h before surgery. Metastatic LNs were tracked intraoperatively using a gamma probe with acoustic and visual feedback. All radioactive-positive LN specimens detected in vivo were confirmed by ex vivo measurements and corresponded to PSMA-avid metastatic disease according to histopathology analysis. Intraoperative use of the gamma probe detected all PSMA-positive lesions identified on preoperative (68)Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET. Detection of small subcentimeter metastatic LNs was facilitated, and PSMA-radioguided surgery in two patients revealed additional lesions close to known tumor deposits that were not detected by preoperative (68)Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET. However, greater patient numbers and long-term follow-up data are needed to determine the future role of PSMA-radioguided surgery.

  7. Requirement for capsular antigen KX105 and fimbrial antigen CS1541 in the pathogenicity of porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli O8:KX105 strains.

    PubMed Central

    Broes, A; Fairbrother, J M; Jacques, M; Larivière, S

    1989-01-01

    The requirement for capsular antigen KX105 and fimbrial antigen CS1541 in the pathogenicity of porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli O8:KX105 strains lacking the colonization factor antigens K88, K99, 987P and F41 was investigated using two encapsulated strains and their acapsular variants, one of which produced the fimbrial antigen CS1541 in vitro. None of the strains adhered in vitro to enterocytes isolated from newborn colostrum-deprived piglets. All of the strains caused diarrhea in orally infected, hysterotomy-derived, colostrum-deprived piglets although a great variability in the clinical response of the piglets was observed. Colonization of the small intestine of infected piglets by these strains was only moderate and no differences in the ability to colonize the small intestine was noted between the strains. All of the strains reacted in the indirect fluorescent antibody test with both CS1541 and 987P antisera when applied to organisms in the intestines of infected piglets. A control strain expressing the 987P fimbrial adhesin also reacted with the CS1541 antiserum applied to organisms in the intestines of an infected piglet. It was concluded that capsular antigen KX105 was not essential for intestinal colonization and production of diarrhea in hysterotomy-derived colostrum-deprived pigs, and that fimbrial antigen CS1541 does not promote in vitro adherence to enterocyte brush borders but could be important in bacterial colonization in vivo. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2563336

  8. Micromanipulation of adhesion of a Jurkat cell to a planar bilayer membrane containing lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3 molecules

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Cell adhesion plays a fundamental role in the organization of cells in differentiated organs, cell motility, and immune response. A novel micromanipulation method is employed to quantify the direct contribution of surface adhesion receptors to the physical strength of cell adhesion. In this technique, a cell is brought into contact with a glass-supported planar membrane reconstituted with a known concentration of a given type of adhesion molecules. After a period of incubation (5-10 min), the cell is detached from the planar bilayer by pulling away the pipette holding the cell in the direction perpendicular to the glass-supported planar bilayer. In particular, we investigated the adhesion between a Jurkat cell expressing CD2 and a glass-supported planar bilayer containing either the glycosyl- phosphatidylinositol (GPI) or the transmembrane (TM) isoform of the counter-receptor lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3 (LFA-3) at a concentration of 1,000 molecules/microns 2. In response to the pipette force the Jurkat cells that adhered to the planar bilayer containing the GPI isoform of LFA-3 underwent extensive elongation. When the contact radius was reduced by approximately 50%, the cell then detached quickly from its substrate. The aspiration pressure required to detach a Jurkat cell from its substrate was comparable to that required to detach a cytotoxic T cell from its target cell. Jurkat cells that had been separated from the substrate again adhered strongly to the planar bilayer when brought to proximity by micromanipulation. In experiments using the planar bilayer containing the TM isoform of LFA-3, Jurkat cells detached with little resistance to micromanipulation and without changing their round shape. PMID:1370839

  9. Evaluation of vaccinal effectiveness of preparations containing membrane antigens of Leishmania (L.) amazonensis in experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis model.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, João G; Ferreira, Amália S; Macedo, Sharon R A; Rossi, Norton R D L P; da Silva, Mayara C P; Guerra, Rosane N M; de Barros, Neuza B; Nicolete, Roberto

    2017-06-01

    American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) is considered a neglected disease, for which an effective vaccine or an efficient diagnosis is not yet available and whose chemotherapeutic arsenal is threatened by the emergence of resistance by etiological agents such as Leishmania amazonensis. ATL is endemic in poor countries and has a high incidence in Brazil. Vaccines developed from native parasite fractions have led to the identification of defined antigenic subunits and the development of vaccine adjuvant technology. The purpose of the present study was to develop and compare preparations based on membrane antigens from L. amazonensis, as a biotechnological prototype for the immunoprophylaxis of the disease in a murine experimental model. For this purpose, batches of biodegradable polymeric micro/nanoparticles were produced, characterized and compared with other parasite's antigens in solution. All preparations containing membrane antigens presented low toxicity on murine macrophages. The in vivo evaluation of immunization efficacy was performed against a challenge with L. amazonensis, along with an evaluation of the immune response profile generated in BALB/C mice. The animals were followed for sample processing and quantification of serum-specific cytokines, nitrites and antibodies. The sera of animals immunized with the non-encapsulated antigen formulations showed higher intensities of nitrites and total IgGs. This approach evidenced the importance of the biological studies involving the immune response of the host against the parasite being interconnected and related to the subfractionation of its proteins in the search for more effective vaccine candidates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Co-expression and impact of prostate specific membrane antigen and prostate specific antigen in prostatic pathologies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The present study was undertaken to relate the co-expression of prostate-associated antigens, PSMA and PSA, with the degree of vascularization in normal and pathologic (hyperplasia and cancer) prostate tissues to elucidate their possible role in tumor progression. Methods The study was carried out in 6 normal, 44 benign prostatic hyperplastic and 39 cancerous human prostates. Immunohistochemical analysis were performed using the monoclonal antibody CD34 to determine the angiogenic activity, and the monoclonal antibodies 3E6 and ER-PR8 to assess PSMA and PSA expression, respectively. Results In our study we found that in normal prostate tissue, PSMA and PSA were equally expressed (3.7 ± 0.18 and 3.07 ± 0.11). A significant difference in their expression was see in hyperplastic and neoplastic prostates tissues (16.14 ± 0.17 and 30.72 ± 0.85, respectively) for PSMA and (34.39 ± 0.53 and 17.85 ± 1.21, respectively) for PSA. Study of prostate tumor profiles showed that the profile (PSA+, PSMA-) expression levels decreased between normal prostate, benign prostatic tissue and primary prostate cancer. In the other hand, the profile (PSA-, PSMA+) expression levels increased from normal to prostate tumor tissues. PSMA overexpression was associated with high intratumoral angiogenesis activity. By contrast, high PSA expression was associated with low angiogenesis activity. Conclusion These data suggest that these markers are regulated differentially and the difference in their expression showed a correlation with malignant transformation. With regard to the duality PSMA-PSA, this implies the significance of their investigation together in normal and pathologic prostate tissues. PMID:21189143

  11. Functional Recombinant Extra Membrane Loop of Human CD20, an Alternative of the Full Length CD20 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Anbouhi, Mahdi Habibi; Baraz, Aida Feiz; Bouzari, Saeid; Abolhassani, Mohsen; Khanahmad, Hossein; Golkar, Majid; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Behdani, Mahdi; Najafabadi, Ali Jahanian; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2012-01-01

    Background: Targeting of CD20 antigen with monoclonal antibodies has become the mainstay in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and immunotherapeutic depletion of malignant B cells. Accessibility of antigen is one of the crucial factors in development of monoclonal antibodies against this antigen. One major problem in expression of full length CD20 is aggregation and misfolding. Therefore, production of an alternative polypeptide is easer and favorable comparing to that of a full length transmembrane protein CD20. Methods: In this study, we expressed the extra membrane loop of hCD20 (exCD20) consisting of a non-glycosylated 47-amino acids region. The exCD20 coding sequence was amplified by PCR and cloned in pET32a(+) expression vector. The desired protein was expressed in fusion with thioredoxin and 6× His tag in E. coli Origami strain. ELISA and Western-blotting data were performed to indicate the functionality of this protein. Results: We have obtained the exCD20 recombinant protein which can be detected in ELISA and Western-blot experiments. This recombinant fusion protein was soluble and stable without aggregation and misfolding problems. Conclusion: The recombinant extra membrane loop of human CD20 protein in fusion with thioredoxin (exCD20) can be used in function assays and some applications such as ELISA, immuneblotting, affinity purification, immunization, screening, and development of anti-CD20 antibodies. PMID:23023212

  12. Cellular distribution and molecular heterogeneity of MAC393 antigen (clusterin, beta-chain) on the surface membrane of bull spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Howes, E A; Hurst, S; Laslop, A; Jones, R

    1998-07-01

    The distribution and size of a surface membrane antigen identified by a monoclonal antibody (MAC9393) have been examined in testicular and epididymal bovine sperm preparations. Western blots indicated a substantial decrease in molecular mass of the antigen during epididymal maturation from approximately 87 kDa in the testis to approximately 35 kDa in the cauda epididymidis. This was accompanied by a change in its cellular localization from the neck and whole head to the acrosomal region. N-terminal microsequencing identified MAC393 antigen as the beta-chain of clusterin. A polyclonal antiserum to the alpha-chain of clusterin recognized both testicular and epididymal forms and revealed that the heterodimer was present on the sperm tail as well as the acrosome. These findings are explained by the co-existence of dimeric and monomeric pools of clusterin on spermatozoa. The polyclonal antiserum recognizes both testicular and epididymal forms of the heterodimer and although the monoclonal antibody binds to the testicular heterodimer, it only recognizes the beta-chain monomer of epididymal clusterin. These findings support previous observations made on human spermatozoa that two forms of clusterin, the beta-chain monomer and the heterodimer, are present on the surface membrane and in seminal plasma.

  13. Immunolocalization of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis membrane antigens recognized by mAbs SST-2, SST-3, and SST-4.

    PubMed

    Silveira, T G V; Takahashi, H K; Straus, A H

    2003-11-01

    The immunolocalization of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis stage-specific antigens recognized by mAbs was analysed by transmission electron microscopy. The antigen recognized by mAb SST-2 was present at the surface of promastigotes, including the flagellum and flagellar pocket. The reactivity of SST-2 with isolates of different serodemes showed a pronounced microheterogeneity in terms of the number of reactive bands within the low molecular weight range from 24 to 33 kDa. The 180 kDa glycoprotein recognized by mAb SST-3 was present only in the flagellar membrane. SST-3 also recognized multiple discrete bands from 160 to 200 kDa, as observed in several serodemes. In contrast, mAb SST-4, which recognizes a 98 kDa antigen, showed weak labelling on the promastigote surface by transmission electron microscopy and indirect immunofluorescence. Based on Western blotting, indirect immunofluorescence, and solid-phase radioimmunoassay, the antigens recognized by mAbs SST-2, SST-3 and SST-4 were present in all L. (V.) braziliensis analysed, from 7 different serodemes.

  14. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry for analysis of protein antigens in a meningococcal group B outer membrane vesicle vaccine.

    PubMed

    Dick, Lawrence W; Mehl, John T; Loughney, John W; Mach, Anna; Rustandi, Richard R; Ha, Sha; Zhang, Lan; Przysiecki, Craig T; Dieter, Lance; Hoang, Van M

    2015-01-01

    The development of a multivalent outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine where each strain contributes multiple key protein antigens presents numerous analytical challenges. One major difficulty is the ability to accurately and specifically quantitate each antigen, especially during early development and process optimization when immunoreagents are limited or unavailable. To overcome this problem, quantitative mass spectrometry methods can be used. In place of traditional mass assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), quantitative LC-MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) can be used during early-phase process development to measure key protein components in complex vaccines in the absence of specific immunoreagents. Multiplexed, label-free quantitative mass spectrometry methods using protein extraction by either detergent or 2-phase solvent were developed to quantitate levels of several meningococcal serogroup B protein antigens in an OMV vaccine candidate. Precision was demonstrated to be less than 15% RSD for the 2-phase extraction and less than 10% RSD for the detergent extraction method. Accuracy was 70 to 130% for the method using a 2-phase extraction and 90-110% for detergent extraction. The viability of MS-based protein quantification as a vaccine characterization method was demonstrated and advantages over traditional quantitative methods were evaluated. Implementation of these MS-based quantification methods can help to decrease the development time for complex vaccines and can provide orthogonal confirmation of results from existing antigen quantification techniques.

  15. Isolation of mitochondria with cubic membrane morphology reveals specific ionic requirements for the preservation of membrane structure.

    PubMed

    Chong, Ketpin; Tan, Olivia Li Ling; Almsherqi, Zakaria A; Lin, Qingsong; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Deng, Yuru

    2015-03-01

    Biological membranes with cubic symmetry are a hallmark of virus-infected or diseased cells. The mechanisms of formation and specific cellular functions of cubic membranes, however, are unclear. The best-documented cubic membrane formation occurs in the free-living giant amoeba Chaos carolinense. In that system, mitochondrial inner membranes undergo a reversible structural change from tubular to cubic membrane organization upon starvation of the organism. As a prerequisite to further analyze the structural and functional features of cubic membranes, we adapted protocols for the isolation of mitochondria from starved amoeba and have identified buffer conditions that preserve cubic membrane morphology in vitro. The requirement for high concentration of ion-chelating agents in the isolation media supports the importance of a balanced ion milieu in establishing and maintaining cubic membranes in vivo.

  16. PET imaging of prostate-specific membrane antigen in prostate cancer: current state of the art and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, SP; Gorin, MA; Allaf, ME; Pienta, KJ; Tran, PT; Pomper, MG; Ross, AE; Cho, SY

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a cell surface enzyme that is highly expressed in prostate cancer (PCa) and is currently being extensively explored as a promising target for molecular imaging in a variety of clinical contexts. Novel antibody and small-molecule PSMA radiotracers labeled with a variety of radionuclides for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging applications have been developed and explored in recent studies. METHODS A great deal of progress has been made in defining the clinical utility of this class of PET agents through predominantly small and retrospective clinical studies. The most compelling data to date has been in the setting of biochemically recurrent PCa, where PSMA-targeted radiotracers have been found to be superior to conventional imaging and other molecular imaging agents for the detection of locally recurrent and metastatic PCa. RESULTS Early data, however, suggest that initial lymph node staging before definitive therapy in high-risk primary PCa patients may be limited, although intraoperative guidance may still hold promise. Other examples of potential promising applications for PSMA PET imaging include non-invasive characterization of primary PCa, staging and treatment planning for PSMA-targeted radiotherapeutics, and guidance of focal therapy for oligometastatic disease. CONCLUSIONS However, all of these indications and applications for PCa PSMA PET imaging are still lacking and require large, prospective, systematic clinical trials for validation. Such validation trials are needed and hopefully will be forthcoming as the fields of molecular imaging, urology, radiation oncology and medical oncology continue to define and refine the utility of PSMA-targeted PET imaging to improve the management of PCa patients. PMID:27136743

  17. MS-H: A Novel Proteomic Approach to Isolate and Type the E. coli H Antigen Using Membrane Filtration and Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Keding; Drebot, Mike; McCrea, Joanne; Peterson, Lorea; Lee, David; McCorrister, Stuart; Nickel, Richard; Gerbasi, Alyssia; Sloan, Angela; Janella, Debra; Van Domselaar, Gary; Beniac, Daniel; Booth, Tim; Chui, Linda; Tabor, Helen; Westmacott, Garrett; Gilmour, Matthew; Wang, Gehua

    2013-01-01

    Serotyping is the long-standing gold standard method to determine E. coli H antigens; however, this method requires a panel of H-antigen specific antibodies and often culture-based induction of the H-antigen flagellar motility. In this study, a rapid and accurate method to isolate and identify the Escherichia coli (E. coli) H flagellar antigen was developed using membrane filtration and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Flagella were isolated from pure culture, digested with trypsin, and then subjected to LC-MS/MS using one of two systems (Agilent-nano-LC-QSTAR XL or Proxeon-nano-LC-LTQ-Orbitrap XL). The resulting peptide sequence data were searched against a custom E. coli flagella/H antigen database. This approach was evaluated using flagella isolated from reference E. coli strains representing all 53 known H antigen types and 41 clinical E. coli strains. The resulting LC-MS/MS classifications of H antigen types (MS-H) were concordant with the known H serogroup for all 53 reference types, and of 41 clinical isolates tested, 38 (92.7%) were concordant with the known H serogroup. MS-H clearly also identified two clinical isolates (4.9%) that were untypeable by serotyping. Notably, successful detection and classification of flagellar antigens with MS-H did not generally require induction of motility, establishing this proteomic approach as more rapid and cost-effective than traditional methods, while providing equitable specificity for typing E. coli H antigens. PMID:23437374

  18. MS-H: a novel proteomic approach to isolate and type the E. coli H antigen using membrane filtration and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Keding; Drebot, Mike; McCrea, Joanne; Peterson, Lorea; Lee, David; McCorrister, Stuart; Nickel, Richard; Gerbasi, Alyssia; Sloan, Angela; Janella, Debra; Van Domselaar, Gary; Beniac, Daniel; Booth, Tim; Chui, Linda; Tabor, Helen; Westmacott, Garrett; Gilmour, Matthew; Wang, Gehua

    2013-01-01

    Serotyping is the long-standing gold standard method to determine E. coli H antigens; however, this method requires a panel of H-antigen specific antibodies and often culture-based induction of the H-antigen flagellar motility. In this study, a rapid and accurate method to isolate and identify the Escherichia coli (E. coli) H flagellar antigen was developed using membrane filtration and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Flagella were isolated from pure culture, digested with trypsin, and then subjected to LC-MS/MS using one of two systems (Agilent-nano-LC-QSTAR XL or Proxeon-nano-LC-LTQ-Orbitrap XL). The resulting peptide sequence data were searched against a custom E. coli flagella/H antigen database. This approach was evaluated using flagella isolated from reference E. coli strains representing all 53 known H antigen types and 41 clinical E. coli strains. The resulting LC-MS/MS classifications of H antigen types (MS-H) were concordant with the known H serogroup for all 53 reference types, and of 41 clinical isolates tested, 38 (92.7%) were concordant with the known H serogroup. MS-H clearly also identified two clinical isolates (4.9%) that were untypeable by serotyping. Notably, successful detection and classification of flagellar antigens with MS-H did not generally require induction of motility, establishing this proteomic approach as more rapid and cost-effective than traditional methods, while providing equitable specificity for typing E. coli H antigens.

  19. Screening and characterization of apical membrane antigen 1 interacting proteins in Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Han, Hongyu; Xue, Pu; Dong, Hui; Zhu, Shunhai; Zhao, Qiping; Huang, Bing

    2016-11-01

    Avian coccidiosis is a widespread and economically significant disease of poultry. It is an enteric disease caused by several protozoan Eimeria species. Eimeria belongs to the phylum Apicomplexa, which exhibits an unusual mechanism of host cell invasion. During invasion of host cells, the protein apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) is essential for invasion of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium. Contrary to the roles of AMA1 during host cell invasion in T. gondii and Plasmodium, the precise functions of Eimeria AMA1 (EtAMA1) are unclear. In order to study the functions of EtAMA1, a yeast two-hybrid cDNA library was constructed from E. tenella sporozoites. The EtAMA1 ectodomain was cloned into the pGBKT7 vector to construct the bait plasmid pGBKT7- EtAMA1. Autoactivation and toxicity of the bait protein in yeast cells were tested by comparison with the pGBKT7 empty vector. Expression of the bait protein was detected by western blots. The bait plasmid pGBKT7-EtAMA1 was used to screen yeast two-hybrid cDNA library from E. tenella sporozoites. After multiple screenings with high-screening-rate medium and exclusion of false-positive plasmids, positive preys were sequenced and analyzed using BLAST. We obtained 14 putative EtAMA1-interacting proteins including E. tenella acidic microneme protein2 (EtMIC2), E. tenella putative cystathionine beta-synthase, E. tenella Eimeria-specific protein, four E. tenella conserved hypothetical proteins (one in the serine/threonine protein kinase family) and seven unknown proteins. Gene Ontology analysis indicated that two known proteins were associated with metabolic process, pyridoxal phosphate binding and protein phosphorylation. Functional analysis indicated EtMIC2 was implicated in parasite motility, migration, recognition and invasion of host cells. The data suggested that EtAMA1 may be important during host cell invasion, but also involved in other biological processes.

  20. Histo-Blood Group Antigen Presentation Is Critical for Binding of Norovirus VLP to Glycosphingolipids in Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Waqas; Frank, Martin; Kunze, Angelika; Bally, Marta; Parra, Francisco; Nyholm, Per-Georg; Höök, Fredrik; Larson, Göran

    2017-03-27

    Virus entry depends on biomolecular recognition at the surface of cell membranes. In the case of glycolipid receptors, these events are expected to be influenced by how the glycan epitope close to the membrane is presented to the virus. This presentation of membrane-associated glycans is more restricted than that of glycans in solution, particularly because of orientational constraints imposed on the glycolipid through its lateral interactions with other membrane lipids and proteins. We have developed and employed a total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy-based binding assay and a scheme for molecular dynamics (MD) membrane simulations to investigate the consequences of various glycan presentation effects. The system studied was histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) epitopes of membrane-bound glycosphingolipids (GSLs) derived from small intestinal epithelium of humans (type 1 chain) and dogs (type 2 chain) interacting with GII.4 norovirus-like particles. Our experimental results showed strong binding to all lipid-linked type 1 chain HBGAs but no or only weak binding to the corresponding type 2 chain HBGAs. This is in contrast to results derived from STD experiments with free HBGAs in solution where binding was observed for Lewis x. The MD data suggest that the strong binding to type 1 chain glycolipids was due to the well-exposed (1,2)-linked α-l-Fucp and (1,4)-linked α-l-Fucp residues, while the weaker binding or lack of binding to type 2 chain HBGAs was due to the very restricted accessibility of the (1,3)-linked α-l-Fucp residue when the glycolipid is embedded in a phospholipid membrane. Our results not only contribute to a general understanding of protein-carbohydrate interactions on model membrane surfaces, particularly in the context of virus binding, but also suggest a possible role of human intestinal GSLs as potential receptors for norovirus uptake.

  1. Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 2A exacerbates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and enhances antigen presentation function

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Rhoda A.; Miller, Stephen D.; Longnecker, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. The cause of MS is still unknown but epidemiological and immunological studies have implicated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which infects B cells, as a possible etiological agent involved in disease. Of particular interest is EBV latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) because previous studies have demonstrated that LMP2A enhances the expansion and differentiation of B cells upon antigen stimulation, revealing a potential contribution of this protein in autoimmunity. Since B cells are thought to contribute to MS, we examined the role of LMP2A in the animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In this model, transgenic mice in which B cells express LMP2A show increased severity and incidence of disease. This difference was not due to lymphocyte recruitment into the CNS or differences in T cell activation, rather, we show that LMP2A enhances antigen presentation function. PMID:22616025

  2. Membrane-bound heat shock proteins facilitate the uptake of dying cells and cross-presentation of cellular antigen.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiyan; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Dongmei; Wu, Weicheng; Shao, Miaomiao; Wang, Lan; Gu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) were originally identified as stress-responsive proteins and serve as molecular chaperones in different intracellular compartments. Translocation of HSPs to the cell surface and release of HSPs into the extracellular space have been observed during the apoptotic process and in response to a variety of cellular stress. Here, we report that UV irradiation and cisplatin treatment rapidly induce the expression of membrane-bound Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90 upstream the phosphatidylserine exposure. Membrane-bound Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90 could promote the release of IL-6 and IL-1β as well as DC maturation by the evaluation of CD80 and CD86 expression. On the other hand, Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90 on cells could facilitate the uptake of dying cells by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), as a common receptor for Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90, is response for their recognition and mediates the uptake of dying cells. Furthermore, membrane-bound Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90 could promote the cross-presentation of OVA antigen from E.G7 cells and inhibition of the uptake of dying cells by LOX-1 decreases the cross-presentation of cellular antigen. Therefore, the rapid exposure of HSPs on dying cells at the early stage allows for the recognition by and confers an activation signal to the immune system.

  3. A bicistronic DNA vaccine containing apical membrane antigen 1 and merozoite surface protein 4/5 can prime humoral and cellular immune responses and partially protect mice against virulent Plasmodium chabaudi adami DS malaria.

    PubMed

    Rainczuk, A; Scorza, T; Spithill, T W; Smooker, P M

    2004-10-01

    The ultimate malaria vaccine will require the delivery of multiple antigens from different stages of the complex malaria life cycle. In order to efficiently deliver multiple antigens with use of DNA vaccine technology, new antigen delivery systems must be assessed. This study utilized a bicistronic vector construct, containing an internal ribosome entry site, expressing a combination of malarial candidate antigens: merozoite surface protein 4/5 (MSP4/5) (fused to a monocyte chemotactic protein 3 chemoattractant sequence) and apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) (fused to a tissue plasminogen activator secretion signal). Transfection of COS 7 cells with bicistronic plasmids resulted in production and secretion of both AMA-1 and MSP4/5 in vitro. Vaccination of BALB/c mice via intraepidermal gene gun and intramuscular routes against AMA-1 and MSP4/5 resulted in antibody production and significant in vitro proliferation of splenocytes stimulated by both AMA-1 and MSP4/5. Survival of BALB/c mice vaccinated with bicistronic constructs after lethal Plasmodium chabaudi adami DS erythrocytic-stage challenge was variable, although significant increases in survival and reductions in peak parasitemia were observed in several challenge trials when the vaccine was delivered by the intramuscular route. This study using a murine model demonstrates that the delivery of malarial antigens via bicistronic vectors is feasible. Further experimentation with bicistronic delivery systems is required for the optimization and refinement of DNA vaccines to effectively prime protective immune responses against malaria.

  4. Erythrocyte membrane antigen frequencies in patients with Type II congenital smell loss.

    PubMed

    Stateman, William A; Henkin, Robert I; Knöppel, Alexandra B; Flegel, Willy A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether there are genetic factors associated with Type II congenital smell loss. The expression frequencies of 16 erythrocyte antigens among patients with Type II congenital smell loss were determined and compared to those of a large control group. Blood samples were obtained from 99 patients with Type II congenital smell loss. Presence of the erythrocyte surface antigens A, B, M, N, S, s, Fy(a), Fy(b), D, C, c, E, e, K, Jk(a), and Jk(b) was analyzed by blood group serology. Comparisons of expression frequencies of these antigens were made between the patients and a large control group. Patients tested for the Duffy b antigen (Fy(b) haplotype) exhibited a statistically significant 11% decrease in expression frequency compared to the controls. There were no significant differences between patients and controls in the expression frequencies for all other erythrocyte antigens (A, B, M, N, S, s, Fy(a), D, C, c, E, e, K, Jk(a), or Jk(b)). These findings describe the presence of a previously unrevealed genetic tendency among patients with Type II congenital smell loss related to erythrocyte surface antigen expression. The deviation in expression rate of Duffy b suggests a target gene and chromosome region in which future research into this form of congenital smell loss may reveal a more specific genetic basis for Type II congenital smell loss. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Erythrocyte Membrane Antigen Frequencies in Patients with Type II Congenital Smell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Stateman, William A.; Henkin, Robert I.; Knöppel, Alexandra; Flegel, Willy A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to determine whether there are genetic factors associated with Type II congenital smell loss. STUDY DESIGN The expression frequencies of 16 erythrocyte antigens among patients with Type II congenital smell loss were determined and compared to those of a large control group. METHODS Blood samples were obtained from 99 patients with Type II congenital smell loss. Presence of the erythrocyte surface antigens A, B, M, N, S, s, Fya, Fyb, D, C, c, E, e, K, Jka, and Jkb was analyzed by blood group serology. Comparisons of expression frequencies of these antigens were made between the patients and a large control group. RESULTS Patients tested for the Duffy b antigen (Fyb haplotype) exhibited a statistically significant 11% decrease in expression frequency compared to the controls. There were no significant differences between patients and controls in the expression frequencies for all other erythrocyte antigens (A, B, M, N, S, s, Fya, D, C, c, E, e, K, Jka, or Jkb). CONCLUSIONS These findings describe the presence of a previously unrevealed genetic tendency among patients with Type II congenital smell loss related to erythrocyte surface antigen expression. The deviation in expression rate of Duffy b suggests a target gene and chromosome region in which future research into this form of congenital smell loss may reveal a more specific genetic basis for Type II congenital smell loss. PMID:25456515

  6. Identification of the cutaneous basement membrane zone antigen and isolation of antibody in linear immunoglobulin A bullous dermatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Zone, J J; Taylor, T B; Kadunce, D P; Meyer, L J

    1990-01-01

    Linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LABD) is a rare blistering skin disease characterized by basement membrane zone deposition of IgA. This study identifies a tissue antigen detected by patient serum and then isolates the autoantibody using epidermis and protein bands blotted on nitrocellulose as immunoabsorbents. Sera from 10 patients (9 with cutaneous disease and 1 with cicatrizing conjunctivitis) were evaluated. Indirect immunofluorescence revealed an IgA anti-basement membrane antibody in 6 of 10 sera with monkey esophagus substrate and 9 of 10 sera with human epidermal substrate. Immunoblotting was performed on epidermal and dermal extracts prepared from skin separated at the basement membrane zone with either sodium chloride or EDTA. Saline-separated skin expressed a 97-kD band in dermal extract alone that was recognized by 4 of 10 sera. EDTA-separated skin expressed the 97-kD band in both epidermal (4 of 10 sera) and dermal (6 of 10 sera) extract. Immunoabsorption of positive sera with epidermis purified an IgA antibody that reacted uniquely with the 97-kD band. In addition, IgA antibody bound to nitrocellulose was eluted from the 97-kD band and found to uniquely bind basement membrane zone. It is likely that the 97-kD protein identified by these techniques is responsible for basement membrane binding of IgA in LABD. Images PMID:2107211

  7. Eimeria bovis meront I-carrying host cells express parasite-specific antigens on their surface membrane.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Ahmed Ibrahem I; Lutz, Kathleen; Taubert, Anja; Zahner, Horst; Hermosilla, Carlos

    2010-02-01

    Host immune responses conducted against antigens of Eimeria bovis are key factors for the development of protective immunity against this protozoan disease. In this study we investigated the expression of E. bovis-derived antigens on the host cell surface membrane during E. bovis first merogony in vitro. Host cells carrying E. bovis-meront I stages expressed E. bovis host cell surface antigens (EbHCSAg) on their surface membrane which were recognised by hyperimmune sera of calves and by sera from rats immunized with E. bovis merozoites I, when tested by indirect immune fluorescent antibody test (IIFAT), laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and immune electron microscopy. Expression of EbHCSAg on permissive host cells was earliest detected 7 days p. i., thus coinciding with the onset of the parasite replication. Membrane-associated EbHCSAg were removed from infected host cells by proteinase K, partially by Triton X-100, Triton X-114 and Triton X-405, but not by 1 M NaCl, CHAPS or phospholipase C treatment. Antibodies, affinity-purified on paraformaldehyde/glutardialdehyde (PAGA)-fixed E. bovis meront I-infected bovine host cells bound to the surface meront I-carrying cells and to merozoites I (IIFAT, LSCM) but, in contrast to untreated sera, not to sporozoites. When tested on methanol-fixed merozoites I and sporozoites by IIFAT, affinity-purified antibodies bound to structures in the apical complex area of merozoites I, but not to sporozoites, whilst untreated sera caused diffuse labelling of internal structures of both parasite stages. Immune electron microscopy demonstrated binding of affinity-purified antibodies to micronemes and dense granules of merozoites I. Although the function of EbHCSAg is still unknown, results of this study might suggest an involvement in the development of protective immunity against E. bovis infections.

  8. Localization of Rh1(D), 2(C), 3(E), 4(c), 5(e) and 25(LW) antigens of human Rh blood groups in fetal erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, H; Segawa, M; Ota, M; Yonemura, I; Hiraide, K; Hasekura, H

    1987-01-01

    The fetal erythrocyte membranes were partially solubilized with Triton X-100 at the low concentration (0.5%). The localizations of Rh1(D), 2(C), 3(E), 4(c), 5(e) and 25(LW) were investigated. Using hemagglutination inhibition assay, Rh1(D) antigen activity was observed in the Triton-treated membrane (Triton shell) containing mainly band 1, 2 (spectrin), band 5 (actin), band 4.1 and a part of band 3, while Rh2(C), 3(E), 4(c), 5(e) and 25(LW) antigens were detected in the supernatant containing band 3, 6, 2.2, 2.3 and 4.2. It is suggested that: Rh1(D) antigen would associate with cytoskeleton matrix of fetal erythrocyte membranes; Rh1(D) and Rh25(LW) antigens might be integral membrane proteins, while Rh2(C), 3(E), 4(c) and 5(e) antigens would be surface membrane proteins which are easily released from membranes by EDTA, mercaptoethanol and alkaline treatments.

  9. A new and robust method of tethering IgG surrogate antigens on lipid bilayer membranes to facilitate the TIRFM based live cell and single molecule imaging experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaosen; Xu, Liling; Zhao, Xingwang; Chen, Xin; Fan, Yilin; Wan, Zhengpeng; Xu, Yinsheng; Liu, Wanli

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of cell-cell interactions has been significantly improved in the past years with the help of Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscope (TIRFM) in combination with an antigen presenting system supported by planar lipid bilayer (PLB) membranes, which are used to mimic the extensive receptor and ligand interactions within cell-cell contact interface. In TIRFM experiments, it is a challenge to uniformly present ligand molecules in monomeric format on the surface of PLB membranes. Here, we introduce a new and robust method of tethering IgG surrogate antigen ligands on the surface of Ni(2+)-containing PLB membranes. In this method, we use a modified D domain from staphylococcal protein A molecule that is fused with an N-terminus polyhistidine tag (H12-D-domain) to tether IgG surrogate antigens on Ni(2+)-containing PLB membranes. We systematically assessed the specificity and capability of H12-D-domain construct to capture IgG molecules from different species through live cell and single molecule TIRFM imaging. We find that these IgG surrogate antigens tethered by H12-D-domain show better lateral mobility and are more uniformly distributed on PLB membranes than the ones tethered by streptavidin. Neither IgM molecules, nor Fab or F(ab')2 fragments of IgG molecules can be tethered on PLB membranes by H12-D-domain construct. These tethered IgG surrogate antigens strongly induce the formation and accumulation of signaling active antigen receptor microclusters within the immunological synapse in B or T lymphocyte cells. Thus our method provides a new and robust method to tether IgG surrogate antigens or other molecules fused with IgG Fc portion on PLB membranes for TIRFM based molecule imaging experiments.

  10. Studies of Plasmodium falciparum rhoptry-associated membrane antigen (RAMA) protein peptides specifically binding to human RBC.

    PubMed

    Pinzón, Carlos Giovanni; Curtidor, Hernando; Bermúdez, Adriana; Forero, Martha; Vanegas, Magnolia; Rodríguez, Jorge; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2008-02-06

    Plasmodium falciparum rhoptry-associated membrane antigen (RAMA) peptides used in normal red blood cell (RBC) binding assays revealed that peptides 33426 (79NINILSSVHRKGRILYDSF97) and 33460 (777HKKREKSISPHSYQKVSTKVQ797) bound with high activity, presenting nanomolar affinity constants. Such high binding activity peptides (HABPs) displayed helicoid and random coil structures as determined by circular dichroism. HABPs inhibited P. falciparumin vitro invasion of normal RBC by up to 61% (depending on concentration), suggesting that some RAMA protein regions could be involved in P. falciparum invasion of RBC. The nature and localisation of receptors on RBC surface responsible for HABP binding were studied using enzyme-treated erythrocytes and structural analysis.

  11. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) from diagnostic to therapeutic target: radionuclide therapy comes of age in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Violet, John A; Hofman, Michael S

    2017-04-05

    Without doubt, molecular imaging using PET/CT directed against prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has generated much interest for its impressive accuracy in detecting prostate cancer, particularly for biochemical recurrence[1]. PSMA expression is up regulated in advanced prostate cancer, including metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), and provides a novel therapeutic target for radionuclide therapy directed towards PSMA-avid disease. Radionuclide therapy relies on the identification of a suitable tumour associated 'target' and an appropriate 'vehicle' that can bind to this with high selectivity and specificity to allow delivery of a therapeutic radionuclide. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Metastatic superscan in prostate carcinoma on gallium-68-prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Tripathi, Madhavi; Kumar, Rajeev; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    We describe the imaging features of a metastatic superscan on gallium-68 Glu-NH-CO-NH-Lys-(Ahx)-[Ga-68(HBED-CC)], abbreviated as gallium-68-prostate-specific membrane antigen ((68)Ga-PSMA) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging. (68)Ga-PSMA is novel radiotracer undergoing evaluation for PET/CT imaging of prostate carcinoma. This patient had a superscan of metastases on conventional bone scintigraphy and was referred for (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT to evaluate the feasibility of (177)Lu-PSMA therapy.

  13. Modulation of endotoxicity of Shigella generalized modules for membrane antigens (GMMA) by genetic lipid A modifications: relative activation of TLR4 and TLR2 pathways in different mutants.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Omar; Pesce, Isabella; Giannelli, Carlo; Aprea, Susanna; Caboni, Mariaelena; Citiulo, Francesco; Valentini, Sara; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; MacLennan, Calman Alexander; D'Oro, Ugo; Saul, Allan; Gerke, Christiane

    2014-09-05

    Outer membrane particles from Gram-negative bacteria are attractive vaccine candidates as they present surface antigens in their natural context. We previously developed a high yield production process for genetically derived particles, called generalized modules for membrane antigens (GMMA), from Shigella. As GMMA are derived from the outer membrane, they contain immunostimulatory components, especially lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We examined ways of reducing their reactogenicity by modifying lipid A, the endotoxic part of LPS, through deletion of late acyltransferase genes, msbB or htrB, in GMMA-producing Shigella sonnei and Shigella flexneri strains. GMMA with resulting penta-acylated lipid A from the msbB mutants showed a 600-fold reduced ability, and GMMA from the S. sonnei ΔhtrB mutant showed a 60,000-fold reduced ability compared with GMMA with wild-type lipid A to stimulate human Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in a reporter cell line. In human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, GMMA with penta-acylated lipid A showed a marked reduction in induction of inflammatory cytokines (S. sonnei ΔhtrB, 800-fold; ΔmsbB mutants, 300-fold). We found that the residual activity of these GMMA is largely due to non-lipid A-related TLR2 activation. In contrast, in the S. flexneri ΔhtrB mutant, a compensatory lipid A palmitoleoylation resulted in GMMA with hexa-acylated lipid A with ∼10-fold higher activity to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells than GMMA with penta-acylated lipid A, mostly due to retained TLR4 activity. Thus, for use as vaccines, GMMA will likely require lipid A penta-acylation. The results identify the relative contributions of TLR4 and TLR2 activation by GMMA, which need to be taken into consideration for GMMA vaccine development.

  14. Mitochondria are required for antigen-specific T cell activation through reactive oxygen species signaling.

    PubMed

    Sena, Laura A; Li, Sha; Jairaman, Amit; Prakriya, Murali; Ezponda, Teresa; Hildeman, David A; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Schumacker, Paul T; Licht, Jonathan D; Perlman, Harris; Bryce, Paul J; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2013-02-21

    It is widely appreciated that T cells increase glycolytic flux during activation, but the role of mitochondrial flux is unclear. Here, we have shown that mitochondrial metabolism in the absence of glucose metabolism is sufficient to support interleukin-2 (IL-2) induction. Furthermore, we used mice with reduced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) production in T cells (T-Uqcrfs(-/-) mice) to show that mitochondria are required for T cell activation to produce mROS for activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and subsequent IL-2 induction. These mice could not induce antigen-specific expansion of T cells in vivo, but Uqcrfs1(-/-) T cells retained the ability to proliferate in vivo under lymphopenic conditions. This suggests that Uqcrfs1(-/-) T cells were not lacking bioenergetically but rather lacked specific ROS-dependent signaling events needed for antigen-specific expansion. Thus, mitochondrial metabolism is a critical component of T cell activation through the production of complex III ROS.

  15. Methyl-beta-Cyclodextrin treatment and filipin staining reveal the role of cholesterol in surface membrane antigen sequestration of Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium lung-stage larvae.

    PubMed

    Tallima, Hatem; El Ridi, Rashika

    2005-06-01

    Ex vivo lung-stage larvae of Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium do not bind specific antibodies in the indirect membrane immunofluorescence test (IF), probably as a result of confinement of the surface membrane antigens in immobile, lipid-rich sites. Treatment with the membrane-impermeable, cholesterol-extracting drug methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MBCD) and staining with filipin III (filipin), a fluorescent polyene antibiotic widely used for the detection and quantitation of cholesterol in biomembranes, allowed us to examine the role of cholesterol in surface membrane antigen sequestration of S. mansoni and S. haematobium ex vivo lung-stage larvae. Treatment of S. mansoni larvae with MBCD elicited appreciable cholesterol depletion as judged by filipin-cholesterol fluorescence diminution, which was accompanied by a considerable increase in specific antibody binding in IF, thus suggesting that cholesterol plays a predominant role in sequestration of the surface membrane antigens of S. mansoni lung-stage schistosomula. Despite that, MBCD induced an almost complete depletion of cholesterol from the outer membrane of S. haematobium larvae; no increase in specific antibody binding in IF was evident, implying that cholesterol is not responsible for masking surface membrane antigens of S. haematobium lung-stage larvae.

  16. Chronic follicular bronchiolitis requires antigen-specific regulatory T cell control to prevent fatal disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Erica G.; Haribhai, Dipica; Jeschke, Jonathan C.; Co, Dominic O.; Ziegelbauer, Jennifer; Yan, Ke; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Mishra, Manoj K.; Simpson, Pippa; Salzman, Nita H.; Williams, Calvin B.

    2014-01-01

    In order to study regulatory T (Treg) cell control of chronic autoimmunity in a lymphoreplete host, we created and characterized a new model of autoimmune lung inflammation that targets the medium and small airways. We generated transgenic mice that express a chimeric membrane protein consisting of hen egg lysozyme (mHEL) and a hemoglobin (Hb) epitope tag under the control of the Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) promoter, which largely limited transgene expression to the respiratory bronchioles. When CCSP-mHEL/Hb transgenic mice were crossed to N3.L2 TCR transgenic mice that recognize the Hb epitope, the bigenic progeny developed dense, pseudo-follicular lymphocytic peribronchiolar infiltrates that resembled the histological pattern of follicular bronchiolitis. Aggregates of activated IFN-γ- and IL-17A-secreting CD4+ T cells as well as B cells surrounded the airways. Lung pathology was similar in Ifng−/− and Il17a−/− mice, indicating that either cytokine is sufficient to establish chronic disease. A large number of antigen-specific Treg cells accumulated in the lesions and Treg cell-depletion in the affected mice led to an interstitial spread of the disease that ultimately proved fatal. Thus Treg cells act to restrain autoimmune responses, resulting in an organized and controlled chronic pathological process rather than a progressive disease. PMID:24163409

  17. Successive analysis of antigen trapping and enzymatic digestion on membrane-immobilized avidin.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Youji; Kohno, Yoshinori

    2012-03-01

    Avidin from egg white was migrated toward a cathode of nondenaturing electrophoresis and then immobilized on a polyvinylidene difluoride membrane. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) was specifically captured after the biotinylated anti-ACTH antibody was bound to the membrane-immobilized avidin, and the captured ACTH was digested by the biotinylated trypsin on the membrane after extraction. The digested polypeptides from the ACTH were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). These results indicate that target substances can be specifically trapped and digested on membrane-immobilized avidin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. T cells bearing a chimeric antigen receptor against prostate-specific membrane antigen mediate vascular disruption and result in tumor regression.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Stephen P; Kim, Soorin; Motz, Gregory T; Alatzoglou, Dimitrios; Li, Chunsheng; Irving, Melita; Powell, Daniel J; Coukos, George

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant blood vessels enable tumor growth, provide a barrier to immune infiltration, and serve as a source of protumorigenic signals. Targeting tumor blood vessels for destruction, or tumor vascular disruption therapy, can therefore provide significant therapeutic benefit. Here, we describe the ability of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-bearing T cells to recognize human prostate-specific membrane antigen (hPSMA) on endothelial targets in vitro as well as in vivo. CAR T cells were generated using the anti-PSMA scFv, J591, and the intracellular signaling domains: CD3ζ, CD28, and/or CD137/4-1BB. We found that all anti-hPSMA CAR T cells recognized and eliminated PSMA(+) endothelial targets in vitro, regardless of the signaling domain. T cells bearing the third-generation anti-hPSMA CAR, P28BBζ, were able to recognize and kill primary human endothelial cells isolated from gynecologic cancers. In addition, the P28BBζ CAR T cells mediated regression of hPSMA-expressing vascular neoplasms in mice. Finally, in murine models of ovarian cancers populated by murine vessels expressing hPSMA, the P28BBζ CAR T cells were able to ablate PSMA(+) vessels, cause secondary depletion of tumor cells, and reduce tumor burden. Taken together, these results provide a strong rationale for the use of CAR T cells as agents of tumor vascular disruption, specifically those targeting PSMA. Cancer Immunol Res; 3(1); 68-84. ©2014 AACR. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. The Myxococcus xanthus rfbABC operon encodes an ATP-binding cassette transporter homolog required for O-antigen biosynthesis and multicellular development.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, D; Bowden, M G; Pershad, R; Kaplan, H B

    1996-01-01

    A wild-type sasA locus is critical for Myxococcus xanthus multicellular development. Mutations in the sasA locus cause defective fruiting body formation, reduce sporulation, and restore developmental expression of the early A-signal-dependent gene 4521 in the absence of A signal. The wild-type sasA locus has been located on a 14-kb cloned fragment of the M. xanthus chromosome. The nucleotide sequence of a 7-kb region containing the complete sasA locus was determined. Three open reading frames encoded by the genes, designated rfbA, B and C were identified. The deduced amino acid sequences of rfbA and rfbB show identity to the integral membrane domains and ATPase domains, respectively, of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. The highest identities are to a set of predicted ABC transporters required for the biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen in certain gram-negative bacteria. The rfbC gene encodes a predicted protein of 1,276 amino acids. This predicted protein contains a region of 358 amino acids that is 33.8% identical to the Yersinia enterocolitica O3 rfbH gene product, which is also required for O-antigen biosynthesis. Immunoblot analysis revealed that the sasA1 mutant, which was found to encode a nonsense codon in the beginning of rfbA, produced less O-antigen than sasA+ strains. These data indicate that the sasA locus is required for the biosynthesis of O-antigen and, when mutated, results in A-signal-independent expression of 4521. PMID:8626291

  20. Synthesis and Evaluation of GdIII-Based Magnetic Resonance Contrast Agents for Molecular Imaging of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen**

    PubMed Central

    Ngen, Ethel J.; Rotz, Matthew W.; Kakkad, Samata; Lisok, Ala; Pracitto, Richard; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Chen, Zhengping; Shah, Tariq; Artemov, Dmitri; Meade, Thomas J.; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is advantageous because it concurrently provides anatomic, functional, and molecular information. MR molecular imaging can combine the high spatial resolution of this established clinical modality with molecular profiling in vivo. However, as a result of the intrinsically low sensitivity of MR imaging, high local concentrations of biological targets are required to generate discernable MR contrast. We hypothesize that the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), an attractive target for imaging and therapy of prostate cancer, could serve as a suitable biomarker for MR-based molecular imaging. We have synthesized three new high-affinity, low-molecular-weight GdIII-based PSMA-targeted contrast agents containing one to three GdIII chelates per molecule. We evaluated the relaxometric properties of these agents in solution, in prostate cancer cells, and in an in vivo experimental model to demonstrate the feasibility of PSMA-based MR molecular imaging. PMID:26212031

  1. In vitro induction of non-responsiveness in cloned normal inducer T cells by antigen and purified Ia incorporated into planar membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Quill, H.; Fox, B.; Carlson, L.; Pardoll, D.; Schwartz, R.H.

    1986-03-05

    Incubation of cytochrome c-specific E/sub ..beta..//sup k/E/sub ..cap alpha..//sup k/-containing planar membranes and an antigenic peptide analogue of moth cytochrome c resulted in a specific increase in cell volume of 40-50% as measured by Coulter Counter analysis. No change in cell volume was seen in the absence of antigen, or when A/sub ..beta..//sup k/A/sub ..cap alpha..//sup k/-planar membranes were used. T cell proliferation was never detected at any time from one to eight days after incubation with E/sub ..beta..//sup k/E/sub ..cap alpha..//sup k/-membranes at a wide range of antigen concentrations. Furthermore, only trace amounts of IL-2 were detected and no increase in IL-2 receptor expression was seen. IL-3 production, however, could be detected. T cells pre-incubated for one day with E/sub ..beta..//sup k/E/sub ..cap alpha..//sup k/-membranes plus antigen became non-responsive to subsequent normal stimulation with antigen and APC. Incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine was reduced by more than 90% and the production of both IL-2 and IL-3 was inhibited. Non-responsiveness persisted for at least eight days after exposure to E/sub ..beta..///sup k/E/sub ..cap alpha..//sup k/-membranes plus antigen. In contrast, T cells pre-incubated under control conditions remained fully responsive. These results demonstrate the specific induction of non-responsiveness in inducer T cells by antigen and purified E/sub ..beta..//sup k/E/sub ..cap alpha..//sup k/ in planar membranes.

  2. Nano-clustering of ligands on surrogate antigen presenting cells modulates T cell membrane adhesion and organization.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Pierre; Pi, Fuwei; Lellouch, Annemarie C; Limozin, Laurent; Sengupta, Kheya

    2016-03-14

    We investigate the adhesion and molecular organization of the plasma membrane of T lymphocytes interacting with a surrogate antigen presenting cell comprising glass supported ordered arrays of antibody (α-CD3) nano-dots dispersed in a non-adhesive matrix of polyethylene glycol (PEG). The local membrane adhesion and topography, as well as the distribution of the T cell receptors (TCRs) and the kinase ZAP-70, are influenced by dot-geometry, whereas the cell spreading area is determined by the overall average density of the ligands rather than specific characteristics of the dots. TCR clusters are recruited preferentially to the nano-dots and the TCR cluster size distribution has a weak dot-size dependence. On the patterns, the clusters are larger, more numerous, and more enriched in TCRs, as compared to the homogeneously distributed ligands at comparable concentrations. These observations support the idea that non-ligated TCRs residing in the non-adhered parts of the proximal membrane are able to diffuse and enrich the existing clusters at the ligand dots. However, long distance transport is impaired and cluster centralization in the form of a central supramolecular cluster (cSMAC) is not observed. Time-lapse imaging of early cell-surface contacts indicates that the ZAP-70 microclusters are directly recruited to the site of the antibody dots and this process is concomitant with membrane adhesion. These results together point to a complex interplay of adhesion, molecular organization and activation in response to spatially modulated stimulation.

  3. Comparison of Intranasal Outer Membrane Vesicles with Cholera Toxin and Injected MF59C.1 as Adjuvants for Malaria Transmission Blocking Antigens AnAPN1 and Pfs48/45

    PubMed Central

    Pritsch, Michael; Ben-Khaled, Najib; Chaloupka, Michael; Kobold, Sebastian; Berens-Riha, Nicole; Peter, Annabell; Liegl, Gabriele; Schubert, Sören; Hoelscher, Michael; Löscher, Thomas; Wieser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Purified protein vaccines often require adjuvants for efficient stimulation of immune responses. There is no licensed mucosal adjuvant on the market to adequately boost the immune response to purified antigens for intranasal applications in humans. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are attractive candidates potentially combining antigenic and adjuvant properties in one substance. To more precisely characterize the potential of Escherichia coli OMV for intranasal vaccination with heterologous antigens, immune responses for AnAPN1 and Pfs48/45 as well as ovalbumin as a reference antigen were assessed in mice. The intranasal adjuvant cholera toxin (CT) and parenteral adjuvant MF59C.1 were used in comparison. Vaccinations were administered intranasally or subcutaneously. Antibodies (total IgG and IgM as well as subclasses IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3) were measured by ELISA. T cell responses (cytotoxic T cells, Th1, Th17, and regulatory T cells) were determined by flow cytometry. When OMV were used as adjuvant for intranasal immunization, antibody and cellular responses against all three antigens could be induced, comparable to cholera toxin and MF59C.1. Antigen-specific IgG titres above 1 : 105 could be detected in all groups. This study provides the rationale for further development of OMV as a vaccination strategy in malaria and other diseases. PMID:27239480

  4. Requirement for caspase-8 in NF-kappaB activation by antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Su, Helen; Bidère, Nicolas; Zheng, Lixin; Cubre, Alan; Sakai, Keiko; Dale, Janet; Salmena, Leonardo; Hakem, Razqallah; Straus, Stephen; Lenardo, Michael

    2005-03-04

    Caspase-8, a proapoptotic protease, has an essential role in lymphocyte activation and protective immunity. We show that caspase-8 deficiency (CED) in humans and mice specifically abolishes activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) after stimulation through antigen receptors, Fc receptors, or Toll-like receptor 4 in T, B, and natural killer cells. Caspase-8 also causes the alphabeta complex of the inhibitor of NF-kappaB kinase (IKK) to associate with the upstream Bcl10-MALT1 (mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue) adapter complex. Recruitment of the IKKalpha, beta complex, its activation, and the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB require enzyme activity of full-length caspase-8. These findings thus explain the paradoxical association of defective apoptosis and combined immunodeficiency in human CED.

  5. Secondary IgG responses to type III pneumococcal polysaccharide. I. Kinetics and antigen requirements.

    PubMed

    Braley-Mullen, H

    1975-11-01

    Mice primed with a thymus- (T)3 dependent form of Type III pneumococcal polysaccharide (S3), i.e., S3 coupled to sheep or horse erythrocytes (S3-RBC), produce S3-specific IgG antibody after secondary challenge with either the T-dependent (S3-RBC) or T-independent (S3) form of the antigen. The potential to produce IgG antibody after challenge with S3-RBC appears earlier after priming than the potential to produce IgG after challenge with S3, suggesting that different "memory" cells may be involved in the two responses. The "memory" cells were shown to be S3-specific since S3 had to be present on the carrier in order for priming to occur and carrier specificity was not required for elicitation of the secondary response by S3-RBC.

  6. Solution NMR characterization of apical membrane antigen 1 and small molecule interactions as a basis for designing new antimalarials.

    PubMed

    Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Lim, San Sui; Devine, Shane M; Debono, Cael O; Lam, Raymond; Chandrashekaran, Indu R; Jaipuria, Garima; Yagi, Hiromasa; Atreya, Hanudatta S; Scanlon, Martin J; MacRaild, Christopher A; Scammells, Peter J; Norton, Raymond S

    2016-06-01

    Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA1) plays an important role in the invasion by merozoites of human red blood cells during a malaria infection. A key region of PfAMA1 is a conserved hydrophobic cleft formed by 12 hydrophobic residues. As anti-apical membrane antigen 1 antibodies and other inhibitory molecules that target this hydrophobic cleft are able to block the invasion process, PfAMA1 is an attractive target for the development of strain-transcending antimalarial agents. As solution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a valuable technique for the rapid characterization of protein-ligand interactions, we have determined the sequence-specific backbone assignments for PfAMA1 from two P. falciparum strains, FVO and 3D7. Both selective labelling and unlabelling strategies were used to complement triple-resonance experiments in order to facilitate the assignment process. We have then used these assignments for mapping the binding sites for small molecules, including benzimidazoles, pyrazoles and 2-aminothiazoles, which were selected on the basis of their affinities measured from surface plasmon resonance binding experiments. Among the compounds tested, benzimidazoles showed binding to a similar region on both FVO and 3D7 PfAMA1, suggesting that these compounds are promising scaffolds for the development of novel PfAMA1 inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Partial Purification of Integral Membrane Antigenic Proteins from Trypanosoma evansi That Display Immunological Cross-Reactivity with Trypanosoma vivax

    PubMed Central

    Velásquez, Norma P.; Camargo, Rocío E.; Uzcanga, Graciela L.; Bubis, José

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma vivax, which are the major causative agents of animal trypanosomosis in Venezuela, have shown a very high immunological cross-reactivity. Since the production of T. vivax antigens is a limiting factor as this parasite is difficult to propagate in experimental animal models, our goal has been to identify and isolate antigens from T. evansi that cross-react with T. vivax. Here, we used the Venezuelan T. evansi TEVA1 isolate to prepare the total parasite lysate and its corresponding cytosolic and membranous fractions. In order to extract the T. evansi integral membrane proteins, the particulate portion was further extracted first with Triton X-100, and then with sodium dodecyl sulfate. After discarding the cytosolic and Triton X-100 solubilized proteins, we employed sedimentation by centrifugation on linear sucrose gradients to partially purify the sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized proteins from the Triton X-100 resistant particulate fraction of T. evansi. We obtained enriched pools containing polypeptide bands with apparent molecular masses of 27 kDa, 31 kDa, and 53 kDa, which were recognized by anti-T. vivax antibodies from experimentally and naturally infected bovines. PMID:24757558

  8. Transformation of a continuous rat embryo fibroblast cell line requires three separate domains of simian virus 40 large T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, J; Rice, P W; Gorsch, L; Abate, M; Cole, C N

    1992-01-01

    Mouse C3H 10T1/2 cells and the established rat embryo fibroblast cell line REF-52 are two cell lines widely used in studies of viral transformation. Studies have shown that transformation of 10T1/2 cells requires only the amino-terminal 121 amino acids of simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen, while transformation of REF-52 cells requires considerably more of large T antigen, extending from near the N terminus to beyond residue 600. The ability of a large set of linker insertion, small deletion, and point mutants of SV40 T antigen to transform these two cell lines and to bind p105Rb was determined. Transformation of 10T1/2 cells was greatly reduced by mutations within the first exon of the gene for large T antigen but was only modestly affected by mutations affecting the p105Rb binding site or the p53 binding region. All mutants defective for transformation of 10T1/2 cells were also defective for transformation of REF-52 cells. In addition, mutants whose T antigens had alterations in the Rb binding site showed a substantial reduction in transformation of REF-52 cells, and the degree of this reduction could be correlated with the ability of the mutant T antigens to bind p105Rb. There was a tight correlation between the ability of mutants to transform REF-52 cells and the ability of their T antigens to bind p53. These results demonstrate that multiple regions of large T antigen are required for full transformation by SV40. Images PMID:1313902

  9. Comparison of anticomplement immunofluorescence and fluorescent antibody-to-membrane antigen tests for determination of immunity status to varicella-zoster virus and for serodifferentiation of varicella-zoster and herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, D; Schmidt, N J

    1981-01-01

    The anticomplement immunofluorescence (ACIF) test was compared with the fluorescent antibody-to-membrane antigen (FAMA) test for determining varicella-zoster virus antibody levels as a measure of varicella-zoster virus immunity status. The ACIF test was found to be comparable to the FAMA test in sensitivity and could be used for examining sera at low dilutions of 1:2 and 1:4. In addition, the ACIF method proved to be a more economical procedure in terms of antigen required and personnel time necessary to perform the test. Heterologous varicella-zoster virus antibody titer rises were demonstrated by the FAMA test with 10 serum pairs from patients with clinically diagnosed genital herpes simplex virus infection, indicating that the FAMA test is no more suitable than other serological methods for serodifferentiation of those herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus infections in which antibody increases occur to both antigens. PMID:6273453

  10. A single-chain fragment against prostate specific membrane antigen as a tool to build theranostic reagents for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Frigerio, B; Fracasso, G; Luison, E; Cingarlini, S; Mortarino, M; Coliva, A; Seregni, E; Bombardieri, E; Zuccolotto, G; Rosato, A; Colombatti, M; Canevari, S; Figini, M

    2013-06-01

    Prostate carcinoma is the most common non-cutaneous cancer in developed countries and represents the second leading cause of death. Early stage androgen dependent prostate carcinoma responds well to conventional therapies, but relatively few treatment options exist for patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer. One of the most suitable targets for antibody-mediated approaches is prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) which is a well known tumour associated antigen. PSMA is a type II integral cell-surface membrane protein that is not secreted, and its expression density and enzymatic activity are increased progressively in prostate cancer compared to normal prostate epithelium, thereby making PSMA an ideal target for monoclonal antibody imaging and therapy. To obtain a small protein that can better penetrate tissue, we have engineered a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) starting from the variable heavy and light domains of the murine anti-PSMA monoclonal antibody D2B. scFvD2B was analysed in vitro for activity, stability, internalisation ability and in vivo for targeting specificity. Maintenance of function and immunoreactivity as well as extremely high radiolabelling efficiency and radiochemical purity were demonstrated by in vitro assays and under different experimental conditions. Despite its monovalent binding, scFvD2B retained a good strength of binding and was able to internalise around 40% of bound antigen. In vivo we showed its ability to specifically target only PSMA expressing prostate cancer xenografts. Due to these advantageous properties, scFvD2B has the potential to become a good theranostic reagent for early detection and therapy of prostate cancers. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Display of Antigens on Polyester Inclusions Lowers the Antigen Concentration Required for a Bovine Tuberculosis Skin Test.

    PubMed

    Parlane, Natalie A; Chen, Shuxiong; Jones, Gareth J; Vordermeier, H Martin; Wedlock, D Neil; Rehm, Bernd H A; Buddle, Bryce M

    2015-10-28

    The tuberculin skin test is the primary screening test for the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis (TB), and use of this test has been very valuable in the control of this disease in many countries. However, the test lacks specificity when cattle have been exposed to environmental mycobacteria or vaccinated with Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Recent studies showed that the use of three or four recombinant mycobacterial proteins, including 6-kDa early secretory antigenic target (ESAT6), 10-kDa culture filtrate protein (CFP10), Rv3615c, and Rv3020c, or a peptide cocktail derived from those proteins, in the skin test greatly enhanced test specificity, with minimal loss of test sensitivity. The proteins are present in members of the pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex but are absent in or not expressed by the majority of environmental mycobacteria and the BCG vaccine strain. To produce a low-cost skin test reagent, the proteins were displayed at high density on polyester beads through translational fusion to a polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase that mediates the formation of antigen-displaying inclusions in recombinant Escherichia coli. Display of the proteins on the polyester beads greatly increased their immunogenicity, allowing for the use of very low concentrations of proteins (0.1 to 3 μg of mycobacterial protein/inoculum) in the skin test. Polyester beads simultaneously displaying all four proteins were produced in a single fermentation process. The polyester beads displaying three or four mycobacterial proteins were shown to have high sensitivity for detection of M. bovis-infected cattle and induced minimal responses in animals exposed to environmental mycobacteria or vaccinated with BCG.

  12. Cross-presentation through langerin and DC-SIGN targeting requires different formulations of glycan-modified antigens.

    PubMed

    Fehres, Cynthia M; Kalay, Hakan; Bruijns, Sven C M; Musaafir, Sara A M; Ambrosini, Martino; van Bloois, Louis; van Vliet, Sandra J; Storm, Gert; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-04-10

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and Langerhans cells (LC) are professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) that initiate humoral and cellular immune responses. Targeted delivery of antigen towards DC- or LC-specific receptors enhances vaccine efficacy. In this study, we compared the efficiency of glycan-based antigen targeting to both the human DC-specific C-type lectin receptor (CLR) DC-SIGN and the LC-specific CLR langerin. Since DC-SIGN and langerin are able to recognize the difucosylated oligosaccharide Lewis Y (Le(Y)), we prepared neoglycoconjugates bearing this glycan epitope to allow targeting of both lectins. Le(Y)-modified liposomes, with an approximate diameter of 200nm, were significantly endocytosed by DC-SIGN(+) DCs and mediated efficient antigen presentation to CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Surprisingly, although langerin bound to Le(Y)-modified liposomes, LCs exposed to Le(Y)-modified liposomes could not endocytose liposomes nor mediate antigen presentation to T cells. However, LCs mediated an enhanced cross-presentation when antigen was delivered through langerin using Le(Y)-modified synthetic long peptides. In contrast, Le(Y)-modified synthetic long peptides were recognized by DC-SIGN, but did not trigger antigen internalization nor antigen cross-presentation. These data demonstrate that langerin and DC-SIGN have different size requirements for antigen uptake. Although using glycans remains an interesting option in the design of anti-cancer vaccines targeting multiple CLRs, aspects such as molecule size and conformation need to be taken in consideration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Selective Conditions Are Required for the Induction of Invariant NKT Cell Hyporesponsiveness by Antigenic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wingender, Gerhard; Birkholz, Alysia M; Sag, Duygu; Farber, Elisa; Chitale, Sampada; Howell, Amy R; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-10-15

    Activation of invariant (i)NKT cells with the model Ag α-galactosylceramide induces rapid production of multiple cytokines, impacting a wide variety of different immune reactions. In contrast, following secondary activation with α-galactosylceramide, the behavior of iNKT cells is altered for months, with the production of most cytokines being strongly reduced. The requirements for the induction of this hyporesponsive state, however, remain poorly defined. In this study, we show that Th1-biasing iNKT cell Ags could induce iNKT cell hyporesponsiveness, as long as a minimum antigenic affinity was reached. In contrast, the Th2-biasing Ag OCH did not induce a hyporesponsive state, nor did cytokine-driven iNKT cell activation by LPS or infections. Furthermore, although dendritic cells and B cells have been reported to be essential for iNKT cell stimulation, neither dendritic cells nor B cells were required to induce iNKT cell hyporesponsiveness. Therefore, our data indicate that whereas some bone marrow-derived cells could induce iNKT cell hyporesponsiveness, selective conditions, dependent on the structure and potency of the Ag, were required to induce hyporesponsiveness.

  14. Selective cell cycle transcription requires membrane synthesis in Caulobacter

    PubMed Central

    Brassinga, Ann Karen C.; Gorbatyuk, Boris; Ouimet, Marie–Claude; Marczynski, Gregory T.

    2000-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus divides asymmetrically and creates distinct polar membrane surfaces that partition during the cell cycle to distinct cell progeny. Blocking membrane synthesis prevented transcription from selective promoters involved in asymmetric cell division. Transcription from sigma-54-dependent flagellar promoters was blocked completely; however, transcription from the CtrA response regulator-dependent flagellar promoters was activated but reduced. Transcription from the ccrM (DNA methylation) promoter and the che (chemosensory) promoter was also blocked completely. Transcription from a strong promoter at the chromosome replication origin was first stopped then induced by blocked membrane synthesis. We propose a feedback control coupling membrane synthesis to transcription that selectively supports membrane-associated processes such as flagellar assembly, chemosensory biogenesis and chromosome replication. PMID:10675339

  15. Purification, pore-forming ability, and antigenic relatedness of the major outer membrane protein of Shigella dysenteriae type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Roy, S; Das, A B; Ghosh, A N; Biswas, T

    1994-01-01

    The major outer membrane protein (MOMP), the most abundant outer membrane protein, was purified to homogeneity from Shigella dysenteriae type 1. The purification method involved selective extraction of MOMP with sodium dodecyl sulfate in the presence of 0.4 M sodium chloride followed by size exclusion chromatography with Sephacryl S-200 HR. MOMP was found to form hydrophilic diffusion pores by incorporation into artificial liposome vesicles composed of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine and dicetylphosphate, indicating that MOMP of S. dysenteriae type 1 exhibited significant porin activity. However, the liposomes containing heat-denatured MOMP were barely active. The molecular weight of MOMP found by size exclusion chromatography was 130,000, and in sodium dodecyl sulfate-10% polyacrylamide gel it moved as an oligomer of 78,000 molecular weight. Upon boiling, fully dissociated monomers of 38,000 molecular weight were seen for S. dysenteriae type 1. However, among the four Shigella spp., the monomeric MOMP generated upon boiling ranged from 38,000 to 35,000 in molecular weight. Antibody raised in BALB/c mice immunized with MOMP of S. dysenteriae type 1 reacted strongly with purified MOMP of S. dysenteriae type 1 in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The antibody reacted with whole-cell preparations of S. dysenteriae type 1 in an ELISA, suggesting that MOMP possessed surface components. Moreover, MOMP could be visualized on the bacterial surface by immunoelectron microscopy with anti-MOMP antibody. S. dysenteriae type 1 MOMP-specific immunoglobulin eluted from MOMP bound to a nitrocellulose membrane was found to cross-react with MOMP preparations of S. flexneri, S. boydii, and S. sonnei, indicating that MOMPs were antigenically related among Shigella species. The strong immunogenicity, surface exposure, and antigenic relatedness make MOMP of Shigella species an immunologically significant macromolecule for study. Images PMID:7927692

  16. MISTIC-fusion proteins as antigens for high quality membrane protein antibodies.

    PubMed

    Alves, Natalia Silva; Astrinidis, Susanne Adina; Eisenhardt, Nathalie; Sieverding, Cornelia; Redolfi, Josef; Lorenz, Michael; Weberruss, Marion; Moreno-Andrés, Daniel; Antonin, Wolfram

    2017-02-02

    Lack of high-quality antibodies against transmembrane proteins is a widely recognized hindrance in biomedical and cell biological research. Here we present a robust pipeline for the generation of polyclonal antibodies employing full-length membrane proteins as immunogens to overcome this "antibody bottleneck". We express transmembrane proteins fused to a MISTIC fragment that enhances expression of eukaryotic membrane proteins in E. coli. Purified membrane proteins are used as immunogen for rabbit injection employing standard immunizing protocols. The raised antibodies against membrane proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope, which we use as test cases, function in a wide range of applications and are superior to ones produced against soluble domains as immunogens.

  17. MISTIC-fusion proteins as antigens for high quality membrane protein antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Natalia Silva; Astrinidis, Susanne Adina; Eisenhardt, Nathalie; Sieverding, Cornelia; Redolfi, Josef; Lorenz, Michael; Weberruss, Marion; Moreno-Andrés, Daniel; Antonin, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    Lack of high-quality antibodies against transmembrane proteins is a widely recognized hindrance in biomedical and cell biological research. Here we present a robust pipeline for the generation of polyclonal antibodies employing full-length membrane proteins as immunogens to overcome this “antibody bottleneck”. We express transmembrane proteins fused to a MISTIC fragment that enhances expression of eukaryotic membrane proteins in E. coli. Purified membrane proteins are used as immunogen for rabbit injection employing standard immunizing protocols. The raised antibodies against membrane proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope, which we use as test cases, function in a wide range of applications and are superior to ones produced against soluble domains as immunogens. PMID:28148968

  18. Quantitative proteomic analysis of Shigella flexneri and Shigella sonnei Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA) reveals highly pure preparations

    PubMed Central

    Maggiore, Luana; Yu, Lu; Omasits, Ulrich; Rossi, Omar; Dougan, Gordon; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Saul, Allan; Choudhary, Jyoti S.; Gerke, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane blebs are naturally shed by Gram-negative bacteria and are candidates of interest for vaccines development. Genetic modification of bacteria to induce hyperblebbing greatly increases the yield of blebs, called Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA). The composition of the GMMA from hyperblebbing mutants of Shigella flexneri 2a and Shigella sonnei were quantitatively analyzed using high-sensitivity mass spectrometry with the label-free iBAQ procedure and compared to the composition of the solubilized cells of the GMMA-producing strains. There were 2306 proteins identified, 659 in GMMA and 2239 in bacteria, of which 290 (GMMA) and 1696 (bacteria) were common to both S. flexneri 2a and S. sonnei. Predicted outer membrane and periplasmic proteins constituted 95.7% and 98.7% of the protein mass of S. flexneri 2a and S. sonnei GMMA, respectively. Among the remaining proteins, small quantities of ribosomal proteins collectively accounted for more than half of the predicted cytoplasmic protein impurities in the GMMA. In GMMA, the outer membrane and periplasmic proteins were enriched 13.3-fold (S. flexneri 2a) and 8.3-fold (S. sonnei) compared to their abundance in the parent bacteria. Both periplasmic and outer membrane proteins were enriched similarly, suggesting that GMMA have a similar surface to volume ratio as the surface to periplasmic volume ratio in these mutant bacteria. Results in S. flexneri 2a and S. sonnei showed high reproducibility indicating a robust GMMA-producing process and the low contamination by cytoplasmic proteins support the use of GMMA for vaccines. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002517. PMID:26746581

  19. Selective conditions are required for the induction of iNKT cell hypo-responsiveness by antigenic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wingender, Gerhard; Birkholz, Alysia M.; Sag, Duygu; Farber, Elisa; Chitale, Sampada; Howell, Amy R.; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells with the model antigen α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) induces rapid production of multiple cytokines, impacting a wide variety of different immune reactions. In contrast, following secondary activation with αGalCer, the behavior of iNKT cells is altered for months, with the production of most cytokines being strongly reduced. The requirements for the induction of this hypo-responsive state, however, remain poorly defined. Here, we show that Th1-biasing iNKT cell antigens could induce iNKT cell hypo-responsiveness, as long as a minimum antigenic affinity was reached. In contrast, the Th2-biasing antigen OCH did not induce a hypo-responsive state, nor did cytokine-driven iNKT cell activation by LPS or infections. Furthermore, while DCs and B cells have been reported to be essential for iNKT cell stimulation, neither DCs nor B cells were required to induce iNKT cell hypo-responsiveness. Therefore, our data indicate that while some bone marrow-derived cells could induce iNKT cell hypo-responsiveness, selective conditions, dependent on the structure and potency of the antigen, were required to induce hypo-responsiveness. PMID:26355152

  20. The mouse Lyt-2/3 antigen complex--I. Mode of association of the subunits with the membrane.

    PubMed

    Luescher, B; Naim, H Y; MacDonald, H R; Bron, C

    1984-04-01

    Different radiolabeling procedures have been used in conjunction with specific immunoprecipitation to assess the mode of association of Lyt-2/3 antigens with the cell membrane. Thus, cells were labeled with two different hydrophobic probes reacting selectively with lipid-associated portions of membrane proteins. The segments of glycoproteins exposed on the outside of the plasma membrane were specifically labeled using either enzyme-catalysed surface iodination or specific labeling of the carbohydrate moiety. The results show that the three disulfide-linked polypeptides of Lyt-2/3 molecules are all surface-expressed glycopeptides possessing hydrophobic regions residing within the lipid bilayer. In particular, the 28,000 mol. wt component, barely detectable by surface iodination, can be identified as a strongly labeled homogeneous and basic species by hydrophobic, biosynthetic and glycoprotein-specific labeling procedures. In addition, differences in the expression of these components were observed between thymocytes and differentiated T-lymphocytes. Probably due to glycosylation or other processing events, the 37,000 and 32,000 mol. wt components distinguishable on thymocytes co-migrate as a broad band of apparent mol. wt 41,000-42,000 when precipitated from a cloned cytolytic T-cell line. Finally, the 28,000 mol. wt component which is abundant in thymocytes is expressed in reduced amounts on cytolytic T-cells.

  1. Polydiacetylene/Anti-HBs Complexes for Visible and Fluorescent Detection of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen on a Nitrocellulose Membrane.

    PubMed

    Roh, Jinkyu; Lee, Su Yeon; Park, Sangho; Ahn, Dong June

    2017-08-17

    The immunochromatographic assay (ICA) using a nitrocellulose (NC) membrane offers several advantages. This technique is a rapid and straightforward method in contrast to other immunoassays. Polydiacetylene (PDA) vesicles have unique optical properties, displaying red color and red fluorescence at the same time. In this system, red-phase PDA vesicles are used as a fluorescent dye as well as a surface for immobilized hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb). PDA has a remarkable stability compared with other fluorescent dyes. In this study, the most suitable PDA/HBsAb complexes are introduced for detecting hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Then, the PDA/HBsAb complexes affixed antibody is attached to NC membrane, which has two lines to confirm detection of HBsAg. The main advantage of this system is that the detection of HBsAg can be observed in both visible and fluorescent images due to the optical properties of polydiacetylene. Detection of HBsAg is observed up to 0.1 ng mL(-1) by fluorescent analysis and confirmed by red line on the NC membrane up to 1 ng mL(-1) (HBsAg) using the naked eye. Consequently, these results show that PDA/HBsAb complexes were successfully applied to ICA for the diagnosis of hepatitis B. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Small T Antigen Promotes Pro-Glycolytic Metabolic Perturbations Required for Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Keibler, Mark A.; Park, Donglim Esther; Molla, Vadim; Cheng, Jingwei; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is an etiological agent of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a highly aggressive skin cancer. The MCPyV small tumor antigen (ST) is required for maintenance of MCC and can transform normal cells. To gain insight into cellular perturbations induced by MCPyV ST, we performed transcriptome analysis of normal human fibroblasts with inducible expression of ST. MCPyV ST dynamically alters the cellular transcriptome with increased levels of glycolytic genes, including the monocarboxylate lactate transporter SLC16A1 (MCT1). Extracellular flux analysis revealed increased lactate export reflecting elevated aerobic glycolysis in ST expressing cells. Inhibition of MCT1 activity suppressed the growth of MCC cell lines and impaired MCPyV-dependent transformation of IMR90 cells. Both NF-κB and MYC have been shown to regulate MCT1 expression. While MYC was required for MCT1 induction, MCPyV-induced MCT1 levels decreased following knockdown of the NF-κB subunit RelA, supporting a synergistic activity between MCPyV and MYC in regulating MCT1 levels. Several MCC lines had high levels of MYCL and MYCN but not MYC. Increased levels of MYCL was more effective than MYC or MYCN in increasing extracellular acidification in MCC cells. Our results demonstrate the effects of MCPyV ST on the cellular transcriptome and reveal that transformation is dependent, at least in part, on elevated aerobic glycolysis. PMID:27880818

  3. A Single Talent Immunogenic Membrane Antigen and Novel Prognostic Predictor: voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weibin; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Wenjing; Xu, Lai; Yang, Yu; Liao, Quan; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenic membrane antigens associated with multiple biological functions of human cancer cells, have significant value in molecule diagnosis and targeted therapy. Here we screened immunogenic membrane antigens in pancreatic cancer by immunobloting IgG purified from sera of 66 pancreatic cancer patients with membrane proteins separated from two-dimensional PAGE of human pancreatic cancer cell line SWl990, and identified voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) as one of the potential immunogenic membrane antigens. Further studies focusing on VDAC1 demonstrated that VDAC1 mRNA and protein were significantly expressed in the tested pancreatic cancer cell lines. VDAC1 silencing with RNAi significantly decreased cell growth, invasion and migration in the pancreatic cancer cell line Capan-1. Additionally, VDAC1 expression was upregulated in pancreatic cancer tissue compared with normal pancreas samples and patients with low VDAC1 expression had a significantly greater median survival compared to those with high expression (27.0 months vs. 17.8 months, P = 0.039). In multivariable analysis, VDAC1 staining was an independent prognostic factor for survival [(Hazard-Ratio) HR = 1.544, 95% CI = 0.794–3.0, P = 0.021]. These results demonstrated that VDAC1 may be a candidate immunogenic membrane antigen for pancreatic cancer, a potential independent prognostic marker, and an ideal drug target. PMID:27659305

  4. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen-Targeted Imaging With [18F]DCFPyL in High-Grade Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Salas Fragomeni, Roberto Andres; Menke, Joshua R; Holdhoff, Matthias; Ferrigno, Clare; Laterra, John Joseph; Solnes, Lilja B; Javadi, Mehrbod S; Szabo, Zsolt; Pomper, Martin G; Rowe, Steven P

    2017-10-01

    High-grade gliomas (World Health Organization grade III-IV) are highly lethal primary brain tumors. Imaging modalities, including MRI and FDG PET, provide a limited ability to differentiate treatment effects (such as radiation necrosis) from recurrent or residual tumor. As the first step in validating the applicability of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted imaging in high-grade gliomas, we evaluated the ability of the PSMA-targeted small molecule [F]DCFPyL (2-(3-(1carboxy-5-(6-[F]fluoro-pyridine-3-carbonyl)-amino]-pentyl)-ureido)-pentanedioic acid) to image high-grade gliomas in a series of 3 prospectively recruited patients. We found [F]DCFPyL binds PSMA in the neovasculature of glioblastoma multiforme and tumor cells of anaplastic astrocytoma.

  5. Effect of denervation on a cholinergic-specific ganglioside antigen (Chol-1) present in Torpedo electromotor presynaptic plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, P; Borroni, E

    1984-04-01

    The presence of Chol-1, an antigen identified in the plasma membrane of cholinergic electromotor nerve terminals of Torpedo marmorata, was investigated in Torpedo electric organ after 3, 6, and 9 weeks' denervation. Denervation was monitored by the cessation of stimulus-evoked discharge potentials, by the reduction in nerve terminals seen morphologically, and by the decrease in ACh and ChAT contents. The content of ganglioside-bound sialic acid did not show any appreciable change with time. Some modification of ganglioside pattern on TLC was observed after 9 weeks' denervation. The presence of Chol-1 after denervation was assayed by its activity in inhibiting the selective complement-induced lysis of the cholinergic subpopulation of guinea pig cortical synaptosome which is mediated by the anti-Chol-1 antiserum. Denervation did not affect Chol-1 immunoreactivity although it did alter the distribution of the immunoreactivity among gangliosides. The possible significance of the results is discussed.

  6. Uptake of an Acrochordon Incidentally Detected on 68Ga Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Daglioz Gorur, Gozde; Hekimsoy, Turkay; Isgoren, Serkan; Sikar Akturk, Aysun; Demir, Hakan

    2017-03-31

    Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT is a promising tool for imaging of prostate cancer. Ga-PSMA PET/CT uptake of prostate cancer and its metastases are reflective of significant overexpression of PSMA. However, PSMA expression of benign neoplasms and nonprostate epithelial malignancies is not very well defined. We report a moderate Ga-PSMA uptake of an acrochordon (skin tag), which was incidentally found in a patient referred for staging prostate cancer. Acrochordon is a frequent, small, soft, skin-colored or hyperpigmented, benign, and usually pedunculated neoplasm of the skin. Nuclear medicine physicians should be aware of it while reporting a Ga-PSMA PET/CT.

  7. Elicitation of anti-Sendai virus cytotoxic T lymphocytes by viral and H-2 antigens incorporated into the same lipid bilayer by membrane fusion and by reconstitution into liposomes.

    PubMed

    Hale, A H; Lyles, D S; Fan, D P

    1980-02-01

    We have investigated the minimal molecular requirements for elicitation of anti-Sendai virus cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), and the minimal molecular requirements for the recognition and lysis processes associated with anti-Sendai virus CTL-target cell interactions. This report demonstrates a) that the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase and/or fusion glycoproteins of Sendai virus can elicit anti-Sendai virus CTL and b) that these glycoproteins and H-2 antigens must be within the same membrane lipid bilayer for effective elicitation of anti-Sendai-virus CTL and for effective recognition and lysis of target cells by anti-Sendai virus CTL.

  8. Nucleotide sequence polymorphism at the apical membrane antigen-1 locus reveals population history of Plasmodium vivax in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Putaporntip, Chaturong; Jongwutiwes, Somchai; Grynberg, Priscila; Cui, Liwang; Hughes, Austin L.

    2009-01-01

    Apical membrane antigen-1 is a candidate for inclusion in a vaccine for the human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax. We collected 231 complete sequences of the gene encoding this antigen (pvama-1) from three regions of Thailand, the most extensive collection to date of sequences at this locus. The domain II loop (previously mentioned as a potential vaccine component) was almost completely conserved, with a single amino acid variant (I313R) observed in a single sequence. The 3′ portion of the gene (domain II through the stop codon) showed significantly lower nucleotide diversity than the 5′ portion (start codon through domain I); and a given domain I sequence might be found in a haplotype with more than one domain II sequence. These results imply a hotspot of recombination between domains I and II. We found significant geographic subdivision among the three regions of Thailand (NW, East, and South) in which collections were made in 2007. Numbers of P. vivax infections have experienced overall declines since 1990 in all three regions; but the decline has been most recent in the NW, and there has been a rebound in numbers of infections in the South since 2000. Consistent with population history, amino acid sequence diversity was greatest in the NW. The South, which had by far the lowest sequence diversity of the three regions, showed signs of a population that has expanded from a small number of founders after a bottleneck. PMID:19643205

  9. DYNAMICS OF ANTIGENIC MEMBRANE SITES RELATING TO CELL AGGREGATION IN DICTYOSTELIUM DISCOIDEUM

    PubMed Central

    Beug, H.; Katz, F. E.; Gerisch, G.

    1973-01-01

    Membrane interaction in aggregating cells of Dictyostelium discoideum can be blocked by univalent antibodies directed against specific membrane sites. Using a quantitative technique for measuring cell association, two classes of target sites for blocking antibodies were distinguished and their developmental dynamics studied. One class of these sites is specific for aggregation-competent cells, their quantity rising from virtually 0-level during growth, with a steep increase shortly before cell aggregation. The serological activity of these structures is species specific; they are not detectable in a nonaggregating mutant, but present in a revertant undergoing normal morphogenesis. Patterns of cell assembly in the presence of antibodies show that selective blockage of these membrane sites abolishes the preference for end-to-end association which is typical for aggregating cells. A second class of target sites is present in comparable quantities in particle fractions from both growth-phase and aggregation-competent cells. Blockage of these sites leads to aggregation patterns in which the side-by-side contacts of aggregating cells are abolished. The target sites of aggregation-inhibiting antibodies are suggested to be identical or associated with the molecular units of the cell membrane that mediate cell-to-cell contacts during aggregation. The results indicate that in one cell, two independent classes of contact sites can be simultaneously active. PMID:4631665

  10. P80, the HinT interacting membrane protein, is a secreted antigen of Mycoplasma hominis

    PubMed Central

    Hopfe, Miriam; Hoffmann, Ricarda; Henrich, Birgit

    2004-01-01

    Background Mycoplasmas are cell wall-less bacteria which encode a minimal set of proteins. In Mycoplasma hominis, the genes encoding the surface-localized membrane complex P60/P80 are in an operon with a gene encoding a cytoplasmic, nucleotide-binding protein with a characteristic Histidine triad motif (HinT). HinT is found in both procaryotes and eukaryotes and known to hydrolyze adenosine nucleotides in eukaryotes. Immuno-precipitation and BIACore analysis revealed an interaction between HinT and the P80 domain of the membrane complex. As the membrane anchored P80 carries an N-terminal uncleaved signal peptide we have proposed that the N-terminus extends into the cytoplasm and interacts with the cytosolic HinT. Results Further characterization of P80 suggested that the 4.7 kDa signal peptide is protected from cleavage only in the membrane bound form. We found several proteins were released into the supernatant of a logarithmic phase mycoplasma culture, including P80, which was reduced in size by 10 kDa. Western blot analysis of recombinant P80 mutants expressed in E. coli and differing in the N-terminal region revealed that mutation of the +1 position of the mature protein (Asn to Pro) which is important for signal peptidase I recognition resulted in reduced P80 secretion. All other P80 variants were released into the supernatant, in general as a 74 kDa protein encompassing the helical part of P80. Incubation of M. hominis cells in phosphate buffered saline supplemented with divalent cations revealed that the release of mycoplasma proteins into the supernatant was inhibited by high concentrations of calciumions. Conclusions Our model for secretion of the P80 protein of M. hominis implies a two-step process. In general the P80 protein is transported across the membrane and remains complexed to P60, surface-exposed and membrane anchored via the uncleaved signal sequence. Loss of the 4.7 kDa signal peptide seems to be a pre-requisite for P80 secretion, which is

  11. Low thrombogenicity of polyethylene glycol-grafted cellulose membranes does not influence heparin requirements in hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Wright, M J; Woodrow, G; Umpleby, S; Hull, S; Brownjohn, A M; Turney, J H

    1999-07-01

    Heparin is the most commonly used anticoagulant for hemodialysis despite potentially serious side effects. Polyethylene glycol-grafted cellulose (PGC) membranes produce less activation of the coagulation cascade than cuprophane membranes. Anecdotally, we found some patients required a surprisingly low level of anticoagulation using these membranes. We compared the anticoagulant requirement of the PGC membrane with that of the cuprophane membrane in this randomized, prospective, crossover study. Sixty-three patients were randomized to treatment using either membrane, and heparin administration was progressively reduced to the lowest dose that prevented visible clotting in excess of that normally encountered. Patients underwent dialysis at this dose for 1 month, after which the heparin requirement and Kt/Vurea (1.162 x ln [urea pre/urea post]) were assessed. This process was then repeated for each patient using the other membrane, and the results were compared. Heparin administration during dialysis was reduced from a mean loading dose of 29.0 +/- 9.4 to 1.5 +/- 3.2 IU/kg for both membranes and a mean maintenance infusion of 14.0 +/- 6.7 to 0.77 +/- 1.6 IU/kg/h for both membranes (both P < 0.0001 v full anticoagulation; no difference between membranes). The Kt/Vurea was not significantly altered. Forty-six patients with PGC and 45 patients with cuprophane membranes underwent dialysis successfully without heparin during dialysis, and the other patients were using considerably reduced doses. Aspirin and warfarin had no effect on the heparin requirement. These results do not support the theory that PGC membranes have a lower anticoagulant requirement than cuprophane membranes; however, they suggest that dialysis can be performed successfully with much smaller anticoagulant doses than are currently in common use.

  12. Subdominant antigens in bacterial vaccines: Am779 is subdominant in the anaplasma marginale outer membrane vaccine but does not associate with protective immunity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Identification of specific antigens responsible for the ability of complex immunogens to induce protection is a major goal in development of bacterial vaccines. Much of the investigation has focused on highly abundant and highly immunodominant outer membrane proteins. Recently however, genomic and p...

  13. Identification and Characterization of Internalization Signal of the Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    melanosomal membrane protein tyrosinase (H-Ining et al., 1996). It is possible that these adaptors might bind to the cytoplasmic tail of PSMA and might be...direct them to the endocytic pathway are excellent cancer inhibitors (Hurwitz et al., 1995). Increased expression of PSMA in high grade and metastatic...cytoplasmic sequence in human tyrosinase defines a second class of di-leucine-based sorting signals for late

  14. Classical dendritic cells are required for dietary antigen-mediated peripheral regulatory T cell and tolerance induction

    PubMed Central

    Esterházy, Daria; Loschko, Jakob; London, Mariya; Jove, Veronica; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Mucida, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Oral tolerance prevents pathological inflammatory responses towards innocuous foreign antigens via peripheral regulatory T cells (pTreg cells). However, whether a particular subset of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is required during dietary antigen exposure to instruct naïve CD4+ T cells to differentiate into pTreg cells has not been defined. Using myeloid lineage-specific APC depletion in mice, we found that monocyte-derived APCs are dispensable, while classical dendritic cells (cDCs) are critical for pTreg cell induction and oral tolerance. CD11b− cDCs from the gut-draining lymph nodes efficiently induced pTreg cells, and conversely, loss of IRF8-dependent CD11b− cDCs impaired their polarization, although oral tolerance remained intact. These data reveal the hierarchy of cDC subsets in pTreg cell induction and their redundancy during oral tolerance development. PMID:27019226

  15. Employing Escherichia coli-derived outer membrane vesicles as an antigen delivery platform elicits protective immunity against Acinetobacter baumannii infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weiwei; Wang, Shijie; Yao, Yufeng; Xia, Ye; Yang, Xu; Li, Kui; Sun, Pengyan; Liu, Cunbao; Sun, Wenjia; Bai, Hongmei; Chu, Xiaojie; Li, Yang; Ma, Yanbing

    2016-11-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have proven to be highly immunogenic and induced an immune response against bacterial infection in human clinics and animal models. We sought to investigate whether engineered OMVs can be a feasible antigen-delivery platform for efficiently inducing specific antibody responses. In this study, Omp22 (an outer membrane protein of A. baumannii) was displayed on E. coli DH5α-derived OMVs (Omp22-OMVs) using recombinant gene technology. The morphological features of Omp22-OMVs were similar to those of wild-type OMVs (wtOMVs). Immunization with Omp22-OMVs induced high titers of Omp22-specific antibodies. In a murine sepsis model, Omp22-OMV immunization significantly protected mice from lethal challenge with a clinically isolated A. baumannii strain, which was evidenced by the increased survival rate of the mice, the reduced bacterial burdens in the lung, spleen, liver, kidney, and blood, and the suppressed serum levels of inflammatory cytokines. In vitro opsonophagocytosis assays showed that antiserum collected from Omp22-OMV-immunized mice had bactericidal activity against clinical isolates, which was partly specific antibody-dependent. These results strongly indicated that engineered OMVs could display a whole heterologous protein (~22 kDa) on the surface and effectively induce specific antibody responses, and thus OMVs have the potential to be a feasible vaccine platform.

  16. Employing Escherichia coli-derived outer membrane vesicles as an antigen delivery platform elicits protective immunity against Acinetobacter baumannii infection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weiwei; Wang, Shijie; Yao, Yufeng; Xia, Ye; Yang, Xu; Li, Kui; Sun, Pengyan; Liu, Cunbao; Sun, Wenjia; Bai, Hongmei; Chu, Xiaojie; Li, Yang; Ma, Yanbing

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have proven to be highly immunogenic and induced an immune response against bacterial infection in human clinics and animal models. We sought to investigate whether engineered OMVs can be a feasible antigen-delivery platform for efficiently inducing specific antibody responses. In this study, Omp22 (an outer membrane protein of A. baumannii) was displayed on E. coli DH5α-derived OMVs (Omp22-OMVs) using recombinant gene technology. The morphological features of Omp22-OMVs were similar to those of wild-type OMVs (wtOMVs). Immunization with Omp22-OMVs induced high titers of Omp22-specific antibodies. In a murine sepsis model, Omp22-OMV immunization significantly protected mice from lethal challenge with a clinically isolated A. baumannii strain, which was evidenced by the increased survival rate of the mice, the reduced bacterial burdens in the lung, spleen, liver, kidney, and blood, and the suppressed serum levels of inflammatory cytokines. In vitro opsonophagocytosis assays showed that antiserum collected from Omp22-OMV-immunized mice had bactericidal activity against clinical isolates, which was partly specific antibody-dependent. These results strongly indicated that engineered OMVs could display a whole heterologous protein (~22 kDa) on the surface and effectively induce specific antibody responses, and thus OMVs have the potential to be a feasible vaccine platform. PMID:27849050

  17. Protective effect of intranasal immunization with Neospora caninum membrane antigens against murine neosporosis established through the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Ferreirinha, Pedro; Dias, Joana; Correia, Alexandra; Pérez-Cabezas, Begoña; Santos, Carlos; Teixeira, Luzia; Ribeiro, Adília; Rocha, António; Vilanova, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Neospora caninum is an Apicomplexa parasite that in the last two decades was acknowledged as the main pathogenic agent responsible for economic losses in the cattle industry. In the present study, the effectiveness of intranasal immunization with N. caninum membrane antigens plus CpG adjuvant was assessed in a murine model of intragastrically established neosporosis. Immunized mice presented a lower parasitic burden in the brain on infection with 5 × 107 tachyzoites, showing that significant protection was achieved by this immunization strategy. Intestinal IgA antibodies raised by immunization markedly agglutinated live N. caninum tachyzoites whereas previous opsonization with IgG antibodies purified from immunized mice sera reduced parasite survival within macrophage cells. Although an IgG1 : IgG2a ratio < 1 was detected in the immunized mice before and after infection, indicative of a predominant T helper type 1 immune response, no increased production of interferon-γ was detected in the spleen or mesenteric lymph nodes of the immunized mice. Altogether, these results show that mucosal immunization with N. caninum membrane proteins plus CpG adjuvant protect against intragastrically established neosporosis and indicate that parasite-specific mucosal and circulating antibodies have a protective role against this parasitic infection. PMID:24128071

  18. Vaccinia virus virion membrane biogenesis protein A11 associates with viral membranes in a manner that requires the expression of another membrane biogenesis protein, A6.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiang; Meng, Xiangzhi; Yan, Bo; Rose, Lloyd; Deng, Junpeng; Xiang, Yan

    2012-10-01

    A group of vaccinia virus (VACV) proteins, including A11, L2, and A6, are required for biogenesis of the primary envelope of VACV, specifically, for the acquisition of viral membrane precursors. However, the interconnection among these proteins is unknown and, with the exception of L2, the connection of these proteins with membranes is also unknown. In this study, prompted by the findings that A6 coprecipitated A11 and that the cellular distribution of A11 was dramatically altered by repression of A6 expression, we studied the localization of A11 in cells by using immunofluorescence and cell fractionation analysis. A11 was found to associate with membranes and colocalize with virion membrane proteins in viral replication factories during normal VACV replication. A11 partitioned almost equally between the detergent and aqueous phases upon Triton X-114 phase separation, demonstrating an intrinsic affinity with lipids. However, in the absence of infection or VACV late protein synthesis, A11 did not associate with cellular membranes. Furthermore, when A6 expression was repressed, A11 did not colocalize with any viral membrane proteins or associate with membranes. In contrast, when virion envelope formation was blocked at a later step by repression of A14 expression or by rifampin treatment, A11 colocalized with virion membrane proteins in the factories. Altogether, our data showed that A11 associates with viral membranes during VACV replication, and this association requires A6 expression. This study provides a physical connection between A11 and viral membranes and suggests that A6 regulates A11 membrane association.

  19. Protein Kinases in Zucchini (Characterization of Calcium-Requiring Plasma Membrane Kinases).

    PubMed Central

    Verhey, S. D.; Gaiser, J. C.; Lomax, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    Using an in situ phosphorylation assay with zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L. cv Dark Green) seedling tissue, we have identified numerous polypeptides that are capable of acting as protein kinases. Total protein preparations from different organs contain different kinase profiles, but all are within the range of 55 to 70 kD. At least four kinases are associated with highly purified plasma membranes from etiolated zucchini hypocotyls. The major phosphorylated polypeptides from plasma membranes range in apparent molecular mass from 58 to 68 kD. The plasma membrane kinases are activated by micromolar concentrations of calcium and phosphorylate serine, and, to a lesser extent, threonine residues. These characteristics are similar to those of a soluble calcium-dependent protein kinase that has been purified to homogeneity from soybean suspension cultures. Three of the zucchini plasma membrane kinases share antigenic epitopes with the soluble soybean kinase. The presence of kinase activity at different apparent molecular masses may be indicative of separate kinases with similar characteristics. The zucchini hypocotyl protein kinases are not removed from plasma membrane vesicles by 0.5 M NaCl/5 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetate or by detergent concentrations below the critical micelle concentration of two types of detergent. This indicates that the plasma membrane protein kinases are tightly associated with the membrane in zucchini seedlings. PMID:12231949

  20. Epitope distance to the target cell membrane and antigen size determine the potency of T cell-mediated lysis by BiTE antibodies specific for a large melanoma surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Bluemel, Claudia; Hausmann, Susanne; Fluhr, Petra; Sriskandarajah, Mirnalini; Stallcup, William B; Baeuerle, Patrick A; Kufer, Peter

    2010-08-01

    Melanoma chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (MCSP; also called CSPG4, NG2, HMW-MAA, MSK16, MCSPG, MEL-CSPG, or gp240) is a surface antigen frequently expressed on human melanoma cells, which is involved in cell adhesion, invasion and spreading, angiogenesis, complement inhibition, and signaling. MCSP has therefore been frequently selected as target antigen for development of antibody- and vaccine-based therapeutic approaches. We have here used a large panel of monoclonal antibodies against human MCSP for generation of single-chain MCSP/CD3-bispecific antibodies of the BiTE (for bispecific T cell engager) class. Despite similar binding affinity to MCSP, respective BiTE antibodies greatly differed in their potency of redirected lysis of CHO cells stably transfected with full-length human MCSP, or with various MCSP deletion mutants and fusion proteins. BiTE antibodies binding to the membrane proximal domain D3 of MCSP were more potent than those binding to more distal domains. This epitope distance effect was corroborated with EpCAM/CD3-bispecific BiTE antibody MT110 by testing various fusion proteins between MCSP and EpCAM as surface antigens. CHO cells expressing small surface target antigens were generally better lysed than those expressing larger target antigens, indicating that antigen size was also an important determinant for the potency of BiTE antibody. The present study for the first time relates the positioning of binding domains and size of surface antigens to the potency of target cell lysis by BiTE-redirected cytotoxic T cells. In case of the MCSP antigen, this provides the basis for selection of a maximally potent BiTE antibody candidate for development of a novel melanoma therapy.

  1. Myosin VI is required for targeted membrane transport during cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Arden, Susan D; Puri, Claudia; Au, Josephine Sui-Yan; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2007-12-01

    Myosin VI plays important roles in endocytic and exocytic membrane-trafficking pathways in cells. Because recent work has highlighted the importance of targeted membrane transport during cytokinesis, we investigated whether myosin VI plays a role in this process during cell division. In dividing cells, myosin VI undergoes dramatic changes in localization: in prophase, myosin VI is recruited to the spindle poles; and in cytokinesis, myosin VI is targeted to the walls of the ingressing cleavage furrow, with a dramatic concentration in the midbody region. Furthermore, myosin VI is present on vesicles moving into and out of the cytoplasmic bridge connecting the two daughter cells. Inhibition of myosin VI activity by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown or by overexpression of dominant-negative myosin VI tail leads to a delay in metaphase progression and a defect in cytokinesis. GAIP-interacting protein COOH terminus (GIPC), a myosin VI binding partner, is associated with the function(s) of myosin VI in dividing cells. Loss of GIPC in siRNA knockdown cells results in a more than fourfold increase in the number of multinucleated cells. Our results suggest that myosin VI has novel functions in mitosis and that it plays an essential role in targeted membrane transport during cytokinesis.

  2. Myosin VI Is Required for Targeted Membrane Transport during Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Arden, Susan D.; Puri, Claudia; Au, Josephine Sui-Yan; Kendrick-Jones, John

    2007-01-01

    Myosin VI plays important roles in endocytic and exocytic membrane-trafficking pathways in cells. Because recent work has highlighted the importance of targeted membrane transport during cytokinesis, we investigated whether myosin VI plays a role in this process during cell division. In dividing cells, myosin VI undergoes dramatic changes in localization: in prophase, myosin VI is recruited to the spindle poles; and in cytokinesis, myosin VI is targeted to the walls of the ingressing cleavage furrow, with a dramatic concentration in the midbody region. Furthermore, myosin VI is present on vesicles moving into and out of the cytoplasmic bridge connecting the two daughter cells. Inhibition of myosin VI activity by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown or by overexpression of dominant-negative myosin VI tail leads to a delay in metaphase progression and a defect in cytokinesis. GAIP-interacting protein COOH terminus (GIPC), a myosin VI binding partner, is associated with the function(s) of myosin VI in dividing cells. Loss of GIPC in siRNA knockdown cells results in a more than fourfold increase in the number of multinucleated cells. Our results suggest that myosin VI has novel functions in mitosis and that it plays an essential role in targeted membrane transport during cytokinesis. PMID:17881731

  3. Integrin β4 is a major target antigen in pure ocular mucous membrane pemphigoid.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoguang; Qian, Hua; Sogame, Ryosuke; Hirako, Yoshiaki; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Ishii, Norito; Koga, Hiroshi; Tsuchisaka, Atsunari; Jin, Zhexiong; Tsubota, Kazuo; Fukumoto, Akiko; Sotozono, Chie; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies of ocular mucous membrane pemphigoid (OMMP) have identified several components of the basement membrane zone to be autoantigens, including integrin β4. However, there are no extensive or definitive reported studies that address this, particularly in pure OMMP. To clarify the major autoantigens in pure OMMP. In this study, we examined sera from 43 pure OMMP patients for both IgG and IgA antibodies using newly developed immunoblotting analyses with a hemidesmosome-rich fraction and various recombinant proteins of integrin α6β4, in addition to our routine immune-serological tests. Using a hemidesmosome-rich fraction, sera from patients with pure OMMP demonstrated reactivity of IgG and/or IgA antibodies to integrin β4, BP180 and laminin-332. The reactivity of pure OMMP sera to integrin β4 was further confirmed by immunoblotting using integrin β4 recombinant proteins. Using concentrated supernatant of HaCaT cells, only one serum sample showed positive IgG and IgA reactivity to LAD-1, the ectodomain of BP180. None of the pure OMMP sera reacted with any autoantigens on immunoblotting using normal human epidermal or dermal extracts, or purified human laminin-332. Integrin β4 was considered to be the major and specific autoantigen for pure OMMP. The new methods established in this study are useful for detection of various autoantigens, particularly integrin β4.

  4. Beriberi Induced Cardiomyopathy Requiring Salvage Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Samir; Kothari, Sorabh; Denk, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Beriberi refers to a constellation of symptoms caused primarily by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. An acute and fulminant presentation of this rare condition has been described in the literature as “Shoshin” beriberi which is characterized by catastrophic cardiovascular collapse. Early recognition and treatment lead to dramatic improvements of symptoms. We present a case of thiamine deficiency-induced acute heart failure in a malnourished patient leading to cardiac arrest necessitating VA-ECMO (venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation) with improvement in heart function secondary to thiamine administration. PMID:28050289

  5. A novel alphavirus vaccine encoding prostate-specific membrane antigen elicits potent cellular and humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Durso, Robert J; Andjelic, Sofija; Gardner, Jason P; Margitich, Dennis J; Donovan, Gerald P; Arrigale, Robert R; Wang, Xinning; Maughan, Maureen F; Talarico, Todd L; Olmsted, Robert A; Heston, Warren D W; Maddon, Paul J; Olson, William C

    2007-07-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is an attractive target for active immunotherapy. Alphavirus vaccines have shown promise in eliciting immunity to tumor antigens. This study investigated the immunogenicity of alphavirus vaccine replicon particles (VRP) that encode PSMA (PSMA-VRP). Cells were infected with PSMA-VRP and evaluated for PSMA expression and folate hydrolase activity. Mice were immunized s.c. with PSMA-VRP or purified PSMA protein. Sera, splenocytes, and purified T cells were evaluated for the magnitude, durability, and epitope specificity of the anti-PSMA response. Antibodies were measured by flow cytometry, and cellular responses were measured by IFN-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot and chromium release assays. Cellular responses in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were mapped using overlapping 15-mer PSMA peptides. A Good Laboratory Practice-compliant toxicology study was conducted in rabbits. PSMA-VRP directed high-level expression of active PSMA. Robust T-cell and B-cell responses were elicited by a single injection of 2 x 10(5) infectious units, and responses were boosted following repeat immunizations. Anti-PSMA responses were detected following three immunizations with 10(2) infectious units and increased with increasing dose. PSMA-VRP was more immunogenic than adjuvanted PSMA protein. Responses to PSMA-VRP were characterized by Th-1 cytokines, potent CTL activity, and IgG2a/IgG2b antibodies. T-cell responses in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were directed toward different PSMA peptides. Immunogenic doses of PSMA-VRP were well tolerated in mice and rabbits. PSMA-VRP elicited potent cellular and humoral immunity in mice, and specific anti-PSMA responses were boosted on repeat dosing. PSMA-VRP represents a promising approach for immunotherapy of prostate cancer.

  6. MYADM regulates Rac1 targeting to ordered membranes required for cell spreading and migration

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Juan F.; Reglero-Real, Natalia; Kremer, Leonor; Marcos-Ramiro, Beatriz; Ruiz-Sáenz, Ana; Calvo, María; Enrich, Carlos; Correas, Isabel; Millán, Jaime; Alonso, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane organization into condensed domains or rafts provides molecular platforms for selective recruitment of proteins. Cell migration is a general process that requires spatiotemporal targeting of Rac1 to membrane rafts. The protein machinery responsible for making rafts competent to recruit Rac1 remains elusive. Some members of the MAL family of proteins are involved in specialized processes dependent on this type of membrane. Because condensed membrane domains are a general feature of the plasma membrane of all mammalian cells, we hypothesized that MAL family members with ubiquitous expression and plasma membrane distribution could be involved in the organization of membranes for cell migration. We show that myeloid-associated differentiation marker (MYADM), a protein with unique features within the MAL family, colocalizes with Rac1 in membrane protrusions at the cell surface and distributes in condensed membranes. MYADM knockdown (KD) cells had altered membrane condensation and showed deficient incorporation of Rac1 to membrane raft fractions and, similar to Rac1 KD cells, exhibited reduced cell spreading and migration. Results of rescue-of-function experiments by expression of MYADM or active Rac1L61 in cells knocked down for Rac1 or MYADM, respectively, are consistent with the idea that MYADM and Rac1 act on parallel pathways that lead to similar functional outcomes. PMID:21325632

  7. Phase I trial of yttrium-90-labeled anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen monoclonal antibody J591 for androgen-independent prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Milowsky, Matthew I; Nanus, David M; Kostakoglu, Lale; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Bander, Neil H

    2004-07-01

    To determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), toxicity, human antihuman antibody (HAHA) response, pharmacokinetics, organ dosimetry, targeting, and preliminary efficacy of yttrium-90-labeled anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen monoclonal antibody J591 ((90)Y-J591) in patients with androgen-independent prostate cancer (PC). Patients with androgen-independent PC and evidence of disease progression received indium-111-J591 for pharmacokinetic and biodistribution determinations followed 1 week later by (90)Y-J591 at five dose levels: 5, 10, 15, 17.5, and 20 mCi/m(2). Patients were eligible for up to three re-treatments if platelet and neutrophil recovery was satisfactory. Twenty-nine patients with androgen-independent PC received (90)Y-J591, four of whom were re-treated. Dose limiting toxicity (DLT) was seen at 20 mCi/m(2), with two patients experiencing thrombocytopenia with non-life-threatening bleeding episodes requiring platelet transfusions. The 17.5-mCi/m(2) dose level was determined to be the MTD. No re-treated patients experienced DLT. Nonhematologic toxicity was not dose limiting. Targeting of known sites of bone and soft tissue metastases was seen in the majority of patients. No HAHA response was seen. Antitumor activity was seen, with two patients experiencing 85% and 70% declines in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels lasting 8 and 8.6 months, respectively, before returning to baseline. Both patients had objective measurable disease responses. An additional six patients (21%) experienced PSA stabilization. The recommended dose for (90)Y-J591 is 17.5 mCi/m(2). Acceptable toxicity, excellent targeting of known sites of PC metastases, and biologic activity in patients with androgen-independent PC warrant further investigation of (90)Y-J591 in the treatment of patients with PC.

  8. Coexpression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and class I major histocompatibility complex antigens on hepatocyte membrane in chronic viral hepatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, C M; Liaw, Y F

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To evaluate the role of hepatocyte expression of leucocyte adhesion molecules and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens in the pathogenesis of chronic viral hepatitis. METHODS--The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), lymphocyte function associated antigen 3 (LFA-3), and MHC class I and II antigens on hepatocyte membrane in relation to the histological and biochemical activities was studied in patients with chronic B hepatitis, chronic persistent hepatitis (CPH) n = 23; chronic active hepatitis (CAH) n = 20; chronic D hepatitis (CAH) n = 6; and chronic non-A, non-B hepatitis (CPH n = 4, CAM n = 6). Six of the latter were hepatitis C virus antibody positive. RESULTS--In chronic B hepatitis ICAM-1 and MHC-I were expressed significantly more in patients with CAH than in those with CPH (p < 0.001), while the expression of LFA-3 and MHC-II showed no significant difference, irrespective of serum HBeAg or hepatitis B virus DNA. Similar findings were noted in non-A, non-B hepatitis. Regardless of the viral aetiology, patients with CAH had a significantly higher degree of ICAM-1 and MHC-I expression than LFA-3 (p < 0.001 v ICAM-1 and MHC-I, respectively) and MHC-II (p < 0.001 v ICAM-1 and MHC-I, respectively) expression. Those with CPH showed little or no difference in the expression of these four molecules. Furthermore, serum ALT values positively correlated with the hepatocyte expression of ICAM-1 (p < 0.001) and MHC-I (p < 0.001), but not LFA-3 (p > 0.05) and MHC-II (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS--In chronic viral hepatitis hepatocyte expression of ICAM-1 and MHC-I might be important for immunosurveillance against virally infected hepatocytes, while the expression of LFA-3 and MHC-II does not seem to have a role in the pathogenesis of chronic viral hepatitis. Images PMID:7902850

  9. Antibody-producing cell responses to an isolated outer membrane protein and to complexes of this antigen with lipopolysaccharide or with vesicles of phospholipids from Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed Central

    Karch, H; Nixdorff, K

    1981-01-01

    Antibody-producing cell responses of mice to a protein isolated from the outer membrane of Proteus mirabilis were typical of the responses to a thymus-dependent antigen. The immunoglobulin G antibody-producing cell responses to the protein were increased after administration of the antigen complexed with either lipopolysaccharide or with vesicles of phospholipids extracted from P. mirabilis. The protein in turn significantly increased the immune response to lipopolysaccharide and also converted this response from predominantly immunoglobulin M to predominantly immunoglobulin G. PMID:6164651

  10. Invariant NKT cells are required for airway inflammation induced by environmental antigens

    PubMed Central

    Wingender, Gerhard; Rogers, Paul; Batzer, Glenda; Lee, Myung Steve; Bai, Dong; Pei, Bo; Khurana, Archana

    2011-01-01

    Invariant NKT cells (iNKT cells) are a unique subset of T lymphocytes that rapidly carry out effector functions. In this study, we report that a majority of sterile house dust extracts (HDEs) tested contained antigens capable of activating mouse and human iNKT cells. HDEs had adjuvant-like properties in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model, which were dependent on Vα14i NKT cells, as vaccinated animals deficient for iNKT cells displayed significantly attenuated immune responses and airway inflammation. Furthermore, the administration of HDEs together with OVA mutually augmented the synthesis of cytokines by Vα14i NKT cells and by conventional CD4+ T cells in the lung, demonstrating a profound immune response synergy for both Th2 cytokines and IL-17A. These data demonstrate that iNKT cell antigens are far more widely dispersed in the environment than previously anticipated. Furthermore, as the antigenic activity in different houses varied greatly, they further suggest that iNKT cell responses to ambient antigens, particular to certain environments, might promote sensitization to conventional respiratory allergens. PMID:21624935

  11. Antigen Detection via the Rate of Ion Current Rectification Change of the Antibody-Modified Glass Nanopore Membrane

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ion current rectification (ICR), defined as an increase in ion conduction at a given polarity and a decrease in ion conduction for the same voltage at the opposite polarity, i.e., a deviation from a linear ohmic response, occurs in conical shaped pores due to the voltage dependent solution conductivity within the aperture. The degree to which the ionic current rectifies is a function of the size and surface charge of the nanopore, with smaller and more highly charged pores exhibiting greater degrees of rectification. The ICR phenomenon has previously been exploited for biosensing applications, where the level of ICR for a nanopore functionalized with an analyte-specific binding molecule (e.g., an antibody, biotin, etc.) changes upon binding its target analyte (e.g., an antigen, streptavidin, etc.) due to a resulting change in the size and/or charge of the aperture. While this type of detection measurement is typically qualitative, for the first time, we demonstrate that the rate at which the nanopore ICR response changes is dependent on the concentration of the target analyte introduced. Utilizing a glass nanopore membrane (GNM) internally coated with a monoclonal antibody specific to the cleaved form of synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (cSNAP-25), creating the antibody-modified glass nanopore membrane (AMGNM), we demonstrate a correlation between the rate of ICR change and the concentration of introduced cSNAP-25, over a range of 500 nM–100 μM. The methodology presented here significantly expands the applications of nanopore ICR biosensing measurements and demonstrates that these measurements can be quantitative in nature. PMID:25157668

  12. Timely Closure of the Prospore Membrane Requires SPS1 and SPO77 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Paulissen, Scott M.; Slubowski, Christian J.; Roesner, Joseph M.; Huang, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    During sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a double lipid bilayer called the prospore membrane is formed de novo, growing around each meiotic nucleus and ultimately closing to create four new cells within the mother cell. Here we show that SPS1, which encodes a kinase belonging to the germinal center kinase III family, is involved in prospore membrane development and is required for prospore membrane closure. We find that SPS1 genetically interacts with SPO77 and see that loss of either gene disrupts prospore membrane closure in a similar fashion. Specifically, cells lacking SPS1 and SPO77 produce hyperelongated prospore membranes from which the leading edge protein complex is not removed from the prospore membrane in a timely fashion. The SPS1/SPO77 pathway is required for the proper phosphorylation and stability of Ssp1, a member of the leading edge protein complex that is removed and degraded when the prospore membrane closes. Genetic dissection of prospore membrane closure finds SPS1 and SPO77 act in parallel to a previously described pathway of prospore membrane closure that involves AMA1, an activator of the meiotic anaphase promoting complex. PMID:27182947

  13. Cellular Membrane Composition Requirement by Antimicrobial and Anticancer Peptide GA-K4.

    PubMed

    Mishig-Ochir, Tsogbadrakh; Gombosuren, Davaadulam; Jigjid, Altanchimeg; Tuguldur, Badamkhatan; Chuluunbaatar, Galbadrakh; Urnukhsaikhan, Enerelt; Pathak, Chinar; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides important for innate immunity are widely studied for their antimicrobial and anticancer activity. The primary target of these AMPs is believed to be the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. However, the interaction between cytoplasmic membrane and the antimicrobial peptides remains poorly understood. Therefore to focus on the target membrane composition that is required by AMPs to interact with membranes, we have examined the interaction of the antimicrobial and anticancer active 11-residue GA-K4 (FLKWLFKWAKK) peptide with model and intact cell membranes. Effect on the structural conformational properties of GA-K4 peptide was investigated by means of far-UV CD and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. The different conformation of GA-K4 peptide in large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) bilayer and micelle environment suggest that the curvature has an influence on the secondary structure acquired by the peptide. Furthermore, the leakage experiment result confirmed that GA-K4 induced the leakage of cytoplasmic membrane in Staphylococcus аureus bacterial cells. Fluorescence data revealed the interfacial location of GA-K4 peptide in the model membranes. The blue-shift in emission wavelength by tryptophan residues in fluorescence data indicated the penetration of GA-K4 peptide in micelles and phospholipid bilayers. These results showed that the GA-K4 peptide is a membrane-active peptide and its activity depends on membrane curvature and lipid composition. Although further studies are required to confirm the mechanism of action, the data suggest mechanism of toroidal pore formation for the interaction of GA-K4 peptide with membranes. Our studies will be helpful in better understanding of the membrane requirment of peptides to express their therapeutic effects. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Molecular Insights into the Interaction between Plasmodium falciparum Apical Membrane Antigen 1 and an Invasion-Inhibitory Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Geqing; MacRaild, Christopher A.; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Mobli, Mehdi; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Anders, Robin F.; Simpson, Jamie S.; McGowan, Sheena; Norton, Raymond S.; Scanlon, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum has been implicated in invasion of the host erythrocyte. It interacts with malarial rhoptry neck (RON) proteins in the moving junction that forms between the host cell and the invading parasite. Agents that block this interaction inhibit invasion and may serve as promising leads for anti-malarial drug development. The invasion-inhibitory peptide R1 binds to a hydrophobic cleft on AMA1, which is an attractive target site for small molecules that block parasite invasion. In this work, truncation and mutational analyses show that Phe5-Phe9, Phe12 and Arg15 in R1 are the most important residues for high affinity binding to AMA1. These residues interact with two well-defined binding hot spots on AMA1. Computational solvent mapping reveals that one of these hot spots is suitable for small molecule targeting. We also confirm that R1 in solution binds to AMA1 with 1∶1 stoichiometry and adopts a secondary structure consistent with the major form of R1 observed in the crystal structure of the complex. Our results provide a basis for designing high affinity inhibitors of the AMA1-RON2 interaction. PMID:25343578

  15. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Targeted Polymersomes for Delivering Mocetinostat and Docetaxel to Prostate Cancer Cell Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer cells overexpress the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) receptors on the surface. Targeting the PSMA receptor creates a unique opportunity for drug delivery. Docetaxel is a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for treating metastatic and androgen-independent prostate cancer, and mocetinostat is a potent inhibitor of class I histone deacetylases. In this study, we prepared reduction-sensitive polymersomes presenting folic acid on the surface and encapsulating either docetaxel or mocetinostat. The presence of folic acid allowed efficient targeting of the PSMA receptor and subsequent internalization of the polymeric vesicles in cultured LNCaP prostate cancer cell spheroids. The intracellular reducing agents efficiently released docetaxel and mocetinostat from the polymersomes. The combination of the two drug-encapsulated polymersome formulations significantly (p < 0.05) decreased the viability of the LNCaP cells (compared to free drugs or control) in three-dimensional spheroid cultures. The calculated combination index value indicated a synergistic effect for the combination of mocetinostat and docetaxel. Thus, our PSMA-targeted drug-encapsulated polymersomes has the potential to lead to a new direction in prostate cancer therapy that decreases the toxicity and increases the efficacy of the drug delivery systems. PMID:27917408

  16. Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Neovasculature Expresses Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen-a Possible Novel Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Moore, Maureen; Panjwani, Suraj; Mathew, Rashmi; Crowley, Michael; Liu, Yi-Fang; Aronova, Anna; Finnerty, Brendan; Zarnegar, Rasa; Fahey, Thomas J; Scognamiglio, Theresa

    2017-08-26

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), a type II transmembrane glycoprotein receptor, is highly expressed in prostate cancer and in the tumor neovasculature of colon, breast, and adrenocortical tumors. Here, we analyzed PSMA expression in the neovasculature of various thyroid cancer subtypes and assessed whether PSMA expression is correlated with aggressive behavior. From a prospectively maintained database, we evaluated 91 samples from 68 patients, including 37 primary differentiated thyroid cancers (DTCs) [11 classic papillary (cPTC), 9 follicular-variant (FvPTC), 11 follicular (FTC), 6 radioactive iodine-refractory (RAIR)], 5 anaplastic (ATC) carcinomas, 9 distant and 12 lymph node metastases, 21 benign thyroid nodules, and 7 normal thyroid specimens. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were immunostained for vascular endothelial marker CD31 and PSMA with proper controls. PSMA expression was not detected in normal thyroid tissue. DTC tumors demonstrated a significantly higher PSMA expression, in regard to both intensity and percentage of vessels stained, than benign tumors (p < 0.001). Among the histologic subtypes, cPTC, FTC, and RAIR carcinomas demonstrated the highest percent of moderate to strong PSMA staining. PSMA expression was seen more frequently in specimens from distant metastases (100%) compared with specimens from only lymph node metastases (67%). PSMA is significantly overexpressed in the neovasculature of DTCs compared with normal and benign thyroid nodules specifically with increased expression in RAIR carcinomas and distant metastases. PSMA should be further explored as a novel therapeutic target for metastatic and RAIR carcinomas.

  17. Comparative sequence analysis of domain I of Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 from Saudi Arabia and worldwide isolates.

    PubMed

    Al-Qahtani, Ahmed A; Abdel-Muhsin, Abdel-Muhsin A; Bin Dajem, Saad M; AlSheikh, Adel Ali H; Bohol, Marie Fe F; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N; Putaporntip, Chaturong; Jongwutiwes, Somchai

    2016-04-01

    The apical membrane antigen 1 of Plasmodium falciparum (PfAMA1) plays a crucial role in erythrocyte invasion and is a target of protective antibodies. Although domain I of PfAMA1 has been considered a promising vaccine component, extensive sequence diversity in this domain could compromise an effective vaccine design. To explore the extent of sequence diversity in domain I of PfAMA1, P. falciparum-infected blood samples from Saudi Arabia collected between 2007 and 2009 were analyzed and compared with those from worldwide parasite populations. Forty-six haplotypes and a novel codon change (M190V) were found among Saudi Arabian isolates. The haplotype diversity (0.948±0.004) and nucleotide diversity (0.0191±0.0008) were comparable to those from African hyperendemic countries. Positive selection in domain I of PfAMA1 among Saudi Arabian parasite population was observed because nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions per nonsynonymous site (dN) significantly exceeded synonymous nucleotide substitutions per synonymous site (dS) and Tajima's D and its related statistics significantly deviated from neutrality in the positive direction. Despite a relatively low prevalence of malaria in Saudi Arabia, a minimum of 17 recombination events occurred in domain I. Genetic differentiation was significant between P. falciparum in Saudi Arabia and parasites from other geographic origins. Several shared or closely related haplotypes were found among parasites from different geographic areas, suggesting that vaccine derived from multiple shared epitopes could be effective across endemic countries.

  18. Biodistribution and Radiation Dosimetry for a Probe Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen for Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Ken; Bluemel, Christina; Weineisen, Martina; Schottelius, Margret; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Czernin, Johannes; Eberlein, Uta; Beykan, Seval; Lapa, Constantin; Riedmiller, Hubertus; Krebs, Markus; Kropf, Saskia; Schirbel, Andreas; Buck, Andreas K.; Lassmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a promising target for diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. EuK-Subkff-68Ga-DOTAGA (68Ga-PSMA Imaging & Therapy [PSMA I&T]) is a recently introduced PET tracer for imaging PSMA expression in vivo. Whole-body distribution and radiation dosimetry of this new probe were evaluated. Methods Five patients with a history of prostate cancer were injected intravenously with 91–148 MBq of 68Ga-PSMA I&T (mean ± SD, 128 ± 23 MBq). After an initial series of rapid whole-body scans, 3 static whole-body scans were acquired at 1, 2, and 4 h after tracer injection. Time-dependent changes of the injected activity per organ were determined. Mean organ-absorbed doses and effective doses were calculated using OLINDA/EXM. Results Injection of 150 MBq of 68Ga-PSMA I&T resulted in an effective dose of 3.0 mSv. The kidneys were the critical organ (33 mGy), followed by the urinary bladder wall and spleen (10 mGy each), salivary glands (9 mGy each), and liver (7 mGy). Conclusion 68Ga-PSMA I&T exhibits a favorable dosimetry, delivering organ doses that are comparable to (kidneys) or lower than those delivered by 18F-FDG. PMID:25883128

  19. Noninvasive measurement of androgen receptor signaling with a positron-emitting radiopharmaceutical that targets prostate-specific membrane antigen

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Michael J.; Smith-Jones, Peter M.; Wongvipat, John; Navarro, Vincent; Kim, Sae; Bander, Neil H.; Larson, Steven M.; Sawyers, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Despite encouraging clinical results with next generation drugs (MDV3100 and abiraterone) that inhibit androgen receptor (AR) signaling in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), responses are variable and short-lived. There is an urgent need to understand the basis of resistance to optimize their future use. We reasoned that a radiopharmaceutical that measures intratumoral changes in AR signaling could substantially improve our understanding of AR pathway directed therapies. Expanding on previous observations, we first show that prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is repressed by androgen treatment in multiple models of AR-positive prostate cancer in an AR-dependent manner. Conversely, antiandrogens up-regulate PSMA expression. These expression changes, including increased PSMA expression in response to treatment with the antiandrogen MDV3100, can be quantitatively measured in vivo in human prostate cancer xenograft models through PET imaging with a fully humanized, radiolabeled antibody to PSMA, 64Cu-J591. Collectively, these results establish that relative changes in PSMA expression levels can be quantitatively measured using a human-ready imaging reagent and could serve as a biomarker of AR signaling to noninvasively evaluate AR activity in patients with CRPC. PMID:21606347

  20. 64Cu-Labeled Inhibitors of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen for PET Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a well-recognized target for identification and therapy of a variety of cancers. Here we report five 64Cu-labeled inhibitors of PSMA, [64Cu]3–7, which are based on the lysine–glutamate urea scaffold and utilize a variety of macrocyclic chelators, namely NOTA(3), PCTA(4), Oxo-DO3A(5), CB-TE2A(6), and DOTA(7), in an effort to determine which provides the most suitable pharmacokinetics for in vivo PET imaging. [64Cu]3–7 were prepared in high radiochemical yield (60–90%) and purity (>95%). Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies of [64Cu]3–7 revealed specific accumulation in PSMA-expressing xenografts (PSMA+ PC3 PIP) relative to isogenic control tumor (PSMA– PC3 flu) and background tissue. The favorable kinetics and high image contrast provided by CB-TE2A chelated [64Cu]6 suggest it as the most promising among the candidates tested. That could be due to the higher stability of [64Cu]CB-TE2A as compared with [64Cu]NOTA, [64Cu]PCTA, [64Cu]Oxo-DO3A, and [64Cu]DOTA chelates in vivo. PMID:24533799

  1. Spacer length impacts the efficacy of targeted docetaxel conjugates in prostate-specific membrane antigen expressing prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zheng-Hong; Sima, Monika; Salama, Mohamed E.; Kopečková, Pavla; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2015-01-01

    Combination of targeted delivery and controlled release is a powerful technique for cancer treatment. In this paper, we describe the design, synthesis, structure validation and biological properties of targeted and non-targeted N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer-docetaxel conjugates. Docetaxel (DTX) was conjugated to HPMA copolymer via a tetrapeptide spacer (–GFLG-). 3-(1,3-dicarboxypropyl)-ureido]pentanedioic acid (DUPA) was used as the targeting moiety to actively deliver DTX for treatment of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) expressing prostate cancer. Short and long spacer DUPA monomers were prepared, and four HPMA copolymer – DTX conjugates (non-targeted, two targeted with short spacer of different molecular weight and targeted with long spacer) were prepared via Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) copolymerization. Following confirmation of PSMA expression on C4-2 cell line, the DTX conjugates’ in vitro cytotoxicity was tested against C4-2 tumor cells and their anticancer efficacies were assessed in nude mice bearing s.c. human prostate adenocarcinoma C4-2 xenografts. The in vivo results show that the spacer length between targeting moieties and HPMA copolymer backbone can significantly affect the treatment efficacy of DTX conjugates against C4-2 tumor bearing nu/nu mice. Moreover, histological analysis indicated that the DUPA-targeted DTX conjugate with longer spacer had no toxicity in major organs of treated mice. PMID:24160903

  2. Pearls and pitfalls in clinical interpretation of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Eiber, Matthias; Solnes, Lilja B; Javadi, Mehrbod S; Ross, Ashley E; Pienta, Kenneth J; Allaf, Mohamad E; Haberkorn, Uwe; Pomper, Martin G; Gorin, Michael A; Rowe, Steven P

    2017-08-01

    The rapidly expanding clinical adaptation of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted PET imaging in the evaluation of patients with prostate cancer has placed an increasing onus on understanding both the potential pearls of interpretation as well as limitations of this new technique. As with any new molecular imaging modality, accurate characterization of abnormalities on PSMA-targeted PET imaging can be accomplished only if one is aware of the normal distribution pattern, physiological variants of radiotracer uptake, and potential sources of false-positive and false-negative imaging findings. In recent years, a growing number of reports have come to light describing incidental non-prostatic benign or malignant pathologies with high uptake on PSMA-targeted PET imaging. In this review, we have summarized the published literature regarding the potential pearls and technical and interpretive pitfalls of this imaging modality. Knowledge of these limitations can increase the confidence of interpreting physicians and thus improve patient care. As PSMA-targeted PET is expected to be evaluated in larger prospective trials, the dissemination of potential diagnostic pitfalls and the biologic underpinning of those findings will be of increased importance.

  3. Protective antibody responses elicited by a meningococcal outer membrane vesicle vaccine with overexpressed genome-derived neisserial antigen 1870.

    PubMed

    Hou, Victor C; Koeberling, Oliver; Welsch, Jo Anne; Granoff, Dan M

    2005-08-15

    Background. Meningococcal outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines are efficacious in humans but have serosubtype-specific serum bactericidal antibody responses directed at the porin protein PorA and the potential for immune selection of PorA-escape mutants.Methods. We prepared an OMV vaccine from a Neisseria meningitidis strain engineered to overexpress genome-derived neisserial antigen (GNA) 1870, a lipoprotein discovered by genome mining that is being investigated for use in a vaccine.Results. Mice immunized with the modified GNA1870-OMV vaccine developed broader serum bactericidal antibody responses than control mice immunized with a recombinant GNA1870 protein vaccine or an OMV vaccine prepared from wild-type N. meningitidis or a combination of vaccines prepared from wild-type N. meningitidis and recombinant protein. Antiserum from mice immunized with the modified GNA1870-OMV vaccine also elicited greater deposition of human C3 complement on the surface of live N. meningitidis bacteria and greater passive protective activity against meningococcal bacteremia in infant rats. A N. meningitidis mutant with decreased expression of PorA was more susceptible to bactericidal activity of anti-GNA1870 antibodies.Conclusions. The modified GNA1870-OMV vaccine elicits broader protection against meningococcal disease than recombinant GNA1870 protein or conventional OMV vaccines and also has less risk of selection of PorA-escape mutants than a conventional OMV vaccine.

  4. Protective Antibody Responses Elicited by a Meningococcal Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine with Overexpressed Genome-Derived Neisserial Antigen 1870

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Victor C.; Koeberling, Oliver; Welsch, Jo Anne; Granoff, Dan M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Meningococcal outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines are efficacious in humans but have serosubtype-specific serum bactericidal antibody responses directed at the porin protein PorA and the potential for immune selection of PorA-escape mutants. Methods We prepared an OMV vaccine from a Neisseria meningitidis strain engineered to overexpress genome-derived neisserial antigen (GNA) 1870, a lipoprotein discovered by genome mining that is being investigated for use in a vaccine. Results Mice immunized with the modified GNA1870-OMV vaccine developed broader serum bactericidal antibody responses than control mice immunized with a recombinant GNA1870 protein vaccine or an OMV vaccine prepared from wild-type N. meningitidis or a combination of vaccines prepared from wild-type N. meningitidis and recombinant protein. Antiserum from mice immunized with the modified GNA1870-OMV vaccine also elicited greater deposition of human C3 complement on the surface of live N. meningitidis bacteria and greater passive protective activity against meningococcal bacteremia in infant rats. A N. meningitidis mutant with decreased expression of PorA was more susceptible to bactericidal activity of anti-GNA1870 antibodies. Conclusions The modified GNA1870-OMV vaccine elicits broader protection against meningococcal disease than recombinant GNA1870 protein or conventional OMV vaccines and also has less risk of selection of PorA-escape mutants than a conventional OMV vaccine. PMID:16028126

  5. Recombinant 35-kDa inclusion membrane protein IncA as a candidate antigen for serodiagnosis of Chlamydophila pecorum.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Khalil Yousef; Rekiki, Abdessalem; Berri, Mustapha; Rodolakis, Annie

    2010-07-14

    Chlamydophila pecorum strains are commonly found in the intestine and vaginal mucus of asymptomatic ruminants and may therefore induce a positive serological response when the animals are tested for C. abortus. They have also been associated with different pathological diseases in ruminants, swine and koala. The aim of this study was to identify specific C. pecorum immunodominant antigens which could be used in ELISA tests allowing to distinguish between animals infected with C. pecorum and those infected with other chlamydial species. A gene encoding 35-kDa inclusion membrane protein incA of C. pecorum was isolated by immunoscreening of the C. pecorum DNA library using ovine anti-C. pecorum antibodies. The recombinant IncA protein did not react with a murine serum directed against C. abortus but did react with a specific monoclonal antibody of C. pecorum and toward several ovine serum samples obtained after experimental infection with different C. pecorum strains. This protein could be a good candidate for specific diagnosis of C. pecorum infection.

  6. New frontiers in prostate cancer imaging: clinical utility of prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Afaq, Asim; Batura, Deepak; Bomanji, Jamshed

    2017-02-14

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography (PSMA PET) is a relatively new method of imaging prostate cancer that increases diagnostic accuracy in detecting and guiding management in various stages of the disease pathway. Gallium-68-labelled PSMA PET has increased the sensitivity of detection of disease recurrence at low PSA levels, thus allowing an optimal window for salvage treatment. Apart from its use in disease recurrence, PSMA PET has the potential for increasing sensitivity and specificity for primary tumour localisation and in detecting lymph node disease, leading to a more accurate initial staging of the condition. In advanced disease, the use of PSMA PET may be able to assess response to treatment and also guide treatment with radionuclide therapy. Newer ligands under development might provide avenues for theranostic or personalised therapy applications with early data showing high PSA response rates. The rate of translation of PSMA PET into clinical practice has been remarkable. The use of this modality is likely to increase with future efforts to modify the radiotracer including (18)F labelling to improve availability.

  7. Expression of nestin, mesothelin and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) in developing and adult human meninges and meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Petricevic, Josko; Forempoher, Gea; Ostojic, Ljerka; Mardesic-Brakus, Snjezana; Andjelinovic, Simun; Vukojevic, Katarina; Saraga-Babic, Mirna

    2011-11-01

    The spatial and temporal pattern of appearance of nestin, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and mesothelin proteins was immunohistochemically determined in the cells of normal developing and adult human meninges and meningiomas. Human meninges developed as two mesenchymal condensations in the head region. The simple squamous epithelium on the surface of leptomeninges developed during mesenchymal to epithelial transformation. Nestin appeared for the first time in week 7, EMA in week 8, while mesothelin appeared in week 22 of development. In the late fetal period and after birth, nestin expression decreased, whereas expression of EMA and mesothelin increased. EMA appeared in all surface epithelial cells and nodules, while mesothelin was found only in some of them. In adult meninges, all three proteins were predominantly localized in the surface epithelium and meningeal nodules. In meningothelial meningiomas (WHO grade I), EMA was detected in all tumor cells except in the endothelial cells, mesothelin characterized nests of tumor cells, while nestin was found predominantly in the walls of blood vessels. The distribution pattern of those proteins in normal meningeal and tumor cells indicates that nestin might characterize immature cells, while EMA and mesothelin appeared in maturing epithelial cells. Neoplastic transformation of these specific cell lineages contributes to the cell population in meningiomas.

  8. Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 vaccine elicits multifunctional CD4 cytokine-producing and memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Mullen, Gregory E D; Long, Carole A; Mahanty, Siddhartha

    2009-08-20

    The Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) is a leading vaccine candidate and was tested for safety and immunogenicity in human Phase I Clinical Trials. PBMC from vaccine recipients were analyzed by flow cytometric methods to determine the nature of T-cell responses and AMA1-reactive memory T cells. Both CD4 and CD8 T cells produced a number of cytokines following AMA1 re-stimulation, with IL-5-producing cells at the highest frequency, consistent with a Th2 bias. The relative frequency of multifunctional cells synthesizing Th1 cytokines IFN-gamma, IL-2 and TNF-alpha changed after each vaccination. Interestingly, median fluorescence intensity measurements revealed that cells producing more than one cytokine contributed greater quantities of each cytokine than cell populations that produced each of the cytokines alone. AMA1 vaccination also elicited the development of memory cell populations, and both central and effector memory T cells were identified concurrently after the AMA1 vaccination. The detailed profile of multifunctional T-cell responses to AMA1 presented here will advance our ability to assess the immunogenicity of human malarial vaccines.

  9. Synthesis and evaluation of [64Cu]PSMA-617 targeted for prostate-specific membrane antigen in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Can; Hanyu, Masayuki; Hatori, Akiko; Zhang, Yiding; Xie, Lin; Ohya, Tomoya; Fukada, Masami; Suzuki, Hisashi; Nagatsu, Kotaro; Jiang, Cuiping; Luo, Rui; Shao, Guoqiang; Zhang, Mingrong; Wang, Feng

    2017-01-01

    We radiolabeled a ligand, PSMA-617, of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) with copper-64 (64Cu), to evaluate the metabolism, biodistribution, and potential of [64Cu]PSMA-617 for PET imaging of prostate cancer. [64Cu]PSMA-617 was synthesized by heating PSMA-617 with [64Cu]CuCl2 in buffer solution at 90°C for 5 min. In vitro uptake was determined in two cell lines of prostate cancer. In vivo regional distributions were determined in normal and tumor-bearing mice. High radiolabeling efficiency of 64Cu for PSMA-617 yielded [64Cu]PSMA-617 with >99% radiochemical purity. In vitro cellular uptake experiments demonstrated the specificity of [64Cu]PSMA-617 for PSMA-positive LNCaP cells. Biodistribution observations of normal mice revealed high uptake of radioactivity in the kidney and liver. PET with [64Cu]PSMA-617 visualized tumor areas implanted by PSMA-positive LNCaP cells in the mice. Two hours after the injection of [64Cu]PSMA-617 into mice, a radiolabeled metabolite was observed in the blood, liver, urine, and LNCaP tumor tissues. [64Cu]PSMA-617 was easily synthesized, and exhibited a favorable biodistribution in PSMA-positive tumors. Although this radioligand shows slow clearance for kidney and high liver uptake, change of its chelator moiety and easy radiolabeling may enable development of new 64Cu or 67Cu-labeled PSMA ligands for imaging and radiotherapy. PMID:28533936

  10. Molecular cloning of the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA) identifies a type II integral membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shipp, M.A.; Richardson, N.E.; Sayre, P.H.; Brown, N.R.; Masteller, E.L.; Clayton, L.K.; Ritz, J.; Reinherz, E.L. )

    1988-07-01

    Common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA) is a 100-kDa cell-surface glycoprotein expressed on most acute lymphoblastic leukemias and certain other immature lymphoid malignancies and on normal lymphoid progenitors. The latter are either uncommitted to B- or T-cell lineage or committed to only the earliest stages of B- or T-lymphocyte maturation. To elucidate the primary structure of CALLA, the authors purified the protein to homogeneity, obtained the NH{sub 2}-terminal sequence from both the intact protein and derived tryptic and V8 protease peptides and isolated CALLA cDNAs from a Nalm-6 cell line {lambda}gt10 library using redundant oligonucleotide probes. The CALLA cDNA sequence predicts a 750-amino acid integral membrane protein with a single 24-amino acid hydrophobic segment that could function as both a transmembrane region and a signal peptide. The COOH-terminal 700 amino acids, including six potential N-linked glycosylation sites compose the extracellular protein segment, whereas the 25 NM{sub 2}-terminal amino acids remaining after cleavage of the initiation methionine form the cytoplasmic tail. CALLA{sup +} cells contain CALLA transcripts of 2.7 to 5.7 kilobases with the major 5.7- and 3.7-kilobase mRNAs being preferentially expressed in specific cell types.

  11. Characterization of the key antigenic components of pertussis vaccine based on outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ormazábal, Maximiliano; Bartel, Erika; Gaillard, María Emilia; Bottero, Daniela; Errea, Agustina; Zurita, M Eugenia; Moreno, Griselda; Rumbo, Martin; Castuma, Celina; Flores, Dario; Martín, María Julia; Hozbor, Daniela

    2014-10-21

    Pertussis has resurged during the last two decades in different countries. In particular in the 2010-2013 period large outbreaks were detected in US, Australia, UK and The Netherlands with significant mortality in infants. The epidemiological situation of pertussis points out the need to develop new vaccines and in this regard we previously developed a new vaccine based on outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) which have been shown to be safe and to induce protection in mice. Here we have further investigated the properties of OMVs vaccines; in particular we studied the contribution of pertussis toxin (PTx) and pertactin (Prn) in OMVs-mediated protection against pertussis. PTx-deficient OMVs and Prn-deficient OMVs were obtained from defective Bordetella pertussis mutants. The absence of PTx or Prn did compromise the protective capacity of the OMVs formulated as Tdap vaccine. Whereas the protective efficacy of the PTx-deficient OMVs in mice was comparable to Prn-deficient OMVs, the protective capacity of both of them was significantly impaired when it was compared with the wild type OMVs. Interestingly, using OMVs obtained from a B. pertussis strain which does not express any of the virulence factors but expresses the avirulent phenotype; we observed that the protective ability of such OMVs was lower than that of OMVs obtained from virulent B. pertussis phase. However, it was surprising that although the protective capacity of avirulent OMVs was lower, they were still protective in the used mice model. These results allow us to hypothesize that OMVs from avirulent phase shares protective components with all OMVs assayed. Using an immune proteomic strategy we identified some common components that could play an important role in protection against pertussis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pex19 Binds Multiple Peroxisomal Membrane Proteins, Is Predominantly Cytoplasmic, and Is Required for Peroxisome Membrane Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sacksteder, Katherine A.; Jones, Jacob M.; South, Sarah T.; Li, Xiaoling; Liu, Yifei; Gould, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    Peroxisomes are components of virtually all eukaryotic cells. While much is known about peroxisomal matrix protein import, our understanding of how peroxisomal membrane proteins (PMPs) are targeted and inserted into the peroxisome membrane is extremely limited. Here, we show that PEX19 binds a broad spectrum of PMPs, displays saturable PMP binding, and interacts with regions of PMPs required for their targeting to peroxisomes. Furthermore, mislocalization of PEX19 to the nucleus leads to nuclear accumulation of newly synthesized PMPs. At steady state, PEX19 is bimodally distributed between the cytoplasm and peroxisome, with most of the protein in the cytoplasm. We propose that PEX19 may bind newly synthesized PMPs and facilitate their insertion into the peroxisome membrane. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that the loss of PEX19 results in degradation of PMPs and/or mislocalization of PMPs to the mitochondrion. PMID:10704444

  13. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) assembles a macromolecular complex regulating growth and survival of prostate cancer cells "in vitro" and correlating with progression "in vivo".

    PubMed

    Perico, Maria Elisa; Grasso, Silvia; Brunelli, Matteo; Martignoni, Guido; Munari, Enrico; Moiso, Enrico; Fracasso, Giulio; Cestari, Tiziana; Naim, Hassan Y; Bronte, Vincenzo; Colombatti, Marco; Ramarli, Dunia

    2016-11-08

    The expression of Prostate Specific-Membrane Antigen (PSMA) increases in high-grade prostate carcinoma envisaging a role in growth and progression. We show here that clustering PSMA at LNCaP or PC3-PSMA cell membrane activates AKT and MAPK pathways thus promoting proliferation and survival. PSMA activity was dependent on the assembly of a macromolecular complex including filamin A, beta1 integrin, p130CAS, c-Src and EGFR. Within this complex beta1 integrin became activated thereby inducing a c-Src-dependent EGFR phosphorylation at Y1086 and Y1173 EGF-independent residues. Silencing or blocking experiments with drugs demonstrated that all the complex components were required for full PSMA-dependent promotion of cell growth and/or survival in 3D culture, but that p130CAS and EGFR exerted a major role. All PSMA complex components were found assembled in multiple samples of two high-grade prostate carcinomas and associated with EGFR phosphorylation at Y1086. The expression of p130CAS and pEGFRY1086 was thus analysed by tissue micro array in 16 castration-resistant prostate carcinomas selected from 309 carcinomas and stratified from GS 3+4 to GS 5+5. Patients with Gleason Score ≤5 resulted negative whereas those with GS≥5 expressed p130CAS and pEGFRY1086 in 75% and 60% of the cases, respectively.Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that PSMA recruits a functionally active complex which is present in high-grade patients. In addition, two components of this complex, p130CAS and the novel pEGFRY1086, correlate with progression in castration-resistant patients and could be therefore useful in therapeutic or surveillance strategies of these patients.

  14. A novel O-linked glycan modulates Campylobacter jejuni major outer membrane protein-mediated adhesion to human histo-blood group antigens and chicken colonization

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Jafar; Pirinccioglu, Necmettin; Oldfield, Neil J.; Carlsohn, Elisabet; Stoof, Jeroen; Aslam, Akhmed; Self, Tim; Cawthraw, Shaun A.; Petrovska, Liljana; Colborne, Natalie; Sihlbom, Carina; Borén, Thomas; Wooldridge, Karl G.; Ala'Aldeen, Dlawer A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is an important cause of human foodborne gastroenteritis; strategies to prevent infection are hampered by a poor understanding of the complex interactions between host and pathogen. Previous work showed that C. jejuni could bind human histo-blood group antigens (BgAgs) in vitro and that BgAgs could inhibit the binding of C. jejuni to human intestinal mucosa ex vivo. Here, the major flagella subunit protein (FlaA) and the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) were identified as BgAg-binding adhesins in C. jejuni NCTC11168. Significantly, the MOMP was shown to be O-glycosylated at Thr268; previously only flagellin proteins were known to be O-glycosylated in C. jejuni. Substitution of MOMP Thr268 led to significantly reduced binding to BgAgs. The O-glycan moiety was characterized as Gal(β1–3)-GalNAc(β1–4)-GalNAc(β1–4)-GalNAcα1-Thr268; modelling suggested that O-glycosylation has a notable effect on the conformation of MOMP and this modulates BgAg-binding capacity. Glycosylation of MOMP at Thr268 promoted cell-to-cell binding, biofilm formation and adhesion to Caco-2 cells, and was required for the optimal colonization of chickens by C. jejuni, confirming the significance of this O-glycosylation in pathogenesis. PMID:24451549

  15. Influence of the B-band O-antigen chain in the Structure and Electrostatics of the Lipopolysaccharide Membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Soares, Thereza A.; Straatsma, TP; Lins, Roberto D.

    2008-02-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations of A-B+ LPS membrane model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were carried out for 12+ ns. The B-band presents a remarkable flexibility remaining fully solvated and does not interact with the sugar units from the LPS core surface residues, in agreement atomic force microscopy experiments. Comparison with previous simulations of the rough LPS membrane suggests that the presence of the B-band promotes membrane expansion. In addition, this O-antigen chain dramatically alters the electrostatic potential and surface charge of the LPS membrane. This is illustrated by the resulting electrostatic surface potential. Comparison with the same property in rough LPS aids to explain the increased ability of B-band expressing microorganisms to adhere to cell surfaces and the necessity of these organisms to loose the O side chain for the development of acute infections.

  16. Suppression of colitis by adoptive transfer of helminth antigen-treated dendritic cells requires interleukin-4 receptor-α signaling

    PubMed Central

    Matisz, C. E.; Faz-López, B.; Thomson, E.; Al Rajabi, A.; Lopes, F.; Terrazas, L. I.; Wang, A.; Sharkey, K. A.; McKay, D. M.

    2017-01-01

    Infection with helminth parasites has been explored as a treatment for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. As helminth antigens have potent immunomodulation properties capable of inducing regulatory programs in a variety of cell types, transferring cells treated with helminth antigens represents a novel extension to helminth therapy. Previous work determined that transfer of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with a crude extract of the tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta (HD) can suppress colitis in recipient mice. The present study explored the mechanism of disease suppression and the importance of interleukin (IL)-4 signaling. Transfer of HD-DCs suppressed dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced colitis through activation of recipient IL-4 receptor-α. The transferred HD-DCs required IL-4Rα and the capacity to secrete IL-10 to drive IL-4 and IL-10 production and to suppress colitis in recipient mice. Treatment of DCs with IL-4 evokes an alternatively activated phenotype, but adoptive transfer of these cells did not affect the outcome of colitis. Collectively, these studies demonstrate the complexity between IL-4 and IL-10 in donor cells and recipient, and the requirement for parasite- and host-derived factors in this novel form of cell therapy. Thus IL-4Rα signaling is revealed as a pathway that could be exploited for helminth antigen cell-based therapy. PMID:28094779

  17. Regulated membrane protein entry into flagella is facilitated by cytoplasmic microtubules and does not require IFT.

    PubMed

    Belzile, Olivier; Hernandez-Lara, Carmen I; Wang, Qian; Snell, William J

    2013-08-05

    The membrane protein composition of the primary cilium, a key sensory organelle, is dynamically regulated during cilium-generated signaling [1, 2]. During ciliogenesis, ciliary membrane proteins, along with structural and signaling proteins, are carried through the multicomponent, intensely studied ciliary diffusion barrier at the base of the organelle [3-8] by intraflagellar transport (IFT) [9-18]. A favored model is that signaling-triggered accumulation of previously excluded membrane proteins in fully formed cilia [19-21] also requires IFT, but direct evidence is lacking. Here, in studies of regulated entry of a membrane protein into the flagellum of Chlamydomonas, we show that cells use an IFT-independent mechanism to breach the diffusion barrier at the flagellar base. In resting cells, a flagellar signaling component [22], the integral membrane polypeptide SAG1-C65, is uniformly distributed over the plasma membrane and excluded from the flagellar membrane. Flagellar adhesion-induced signaling triggers rapid, striking redistribution of the protein to the apical ends of the cells concomitantly with entry into the flagella. Protein polarization and flagellar enrichment are facilitated by cytoplasmic microtubules. Using a conditional anterograde IFT mutant, we demonstrate that the IFT machinery is not required for regulated SAG1-C65 entry into flagella. Thus, integral membrane proteins can negotiate passage through the ciliary diffusion barrier without the need for a motor.

  18. Single cell wound generates electric current circuit and cell membrane potential variations that requires calcium influx.

    PubMed

    Luxardi, Guillaume; Reid, Brian; Maillard, Pauline; Zhao, Min

    2014-07-24

    Breaching of the cell membrane is one of the earliest and most common causes of cell injury, tissue damage, and disease. If the compromise in cell membrane is not repaired quickly, irreversible cell damage, cell death and defective organ functions will result. It is therefore fundamentally important to efficiently repair damage to the cell membrane. While the molecular aspects of single cell wound healing are starting to be deciphered, its bio-physical counterpart has been poorly investigated. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes as a model for single cell wound healing, we describe the temporal and spatial dynamics of the wound electric current circuitry and the temporal dynamics of cell membrane potential variation. In addition, we show the role of calcium influx in controlling electric current circuitry and cell membrane potential variations. (i) Upon wounding a single cell: an inward electric current appears at the wound center while an outward electric current is observed at its sides, illustrating the wound electric current circuitry; the cell membrane is depolarized; calcium flows into the cell. (ii) During cell membrane re-sealing: the wound center current density is maintained for a few minutes before decreasing; the cell membrane gradually re-polarizes; calcium flow into the cell drops. (iii) In conclusion, calcium influx is required for the formation and maintenance of the wound electric current circuitry, for cell membrane re-polarization and for wound healing.

  19. Palmitoylation is required for membrane association of activated but not inactive invertebrate visual Gqalpha.

    PubMed

    Go, Lynle; Mitchell, Jane

    2003-08-01

    The invertebrate visual G protein, iGqalpha plays a central role in invertebrate phototransduction by relaying signals from rhodopsin to phospholipase C leading to membrane depolarization. Previous studies have shown reversible association of iGqalpha with rhabdomeric membranes regulated by light. To address the mechanism of membrane association we cloned iGqalpha from a Loligo pealei photoreceptor cDNA library and expressed it in HEK293T cells. Mutations were introduced to eliminate putative sites for palmitoylation at cysteines in positions 3 and 4. Membrane and soluble fractions were prepared from cells where iGqalpha was either activated or maintained in the GDP-bound form, followed by identification of iGqalpha through immunoblot analysis. The wild-type iGqalpha was entirely membrane-bound and shown to be post-translationally modified by palmitoylation. The mutant iGqalpha (C3,4A) was not palmitoylated yet it was found to be membrane-associated in the inactive state, however, approximately half of the protein became soluble when activated. These results suggest that palmitoylation is not required for membrane association of iGqalpha in the inactive state but is important in maintaining the stable membrane association of activated iGqalpha-GTP. The mechanism by which iGqalpha moves away from the membrane into the cytosol in response to prolonged light-stimulation in the native squid eye appears, therefore, to involve both activation and depalmitoylation processes.

  20. Effect of radiochemical modification on biodistribution of scFvD2B antibody fragment recognising prostate specific membrane antigen.

    PubMed

    Frigerio, Barbara; Benigni, Fabio; Luison, Elena; Seregni, Ettore; Pascali, Claudio; Fracasso, Giulio; Morlino, Sara; Valdagni, Riccardo; Mezzanzanica, Delia; Canevari, Silvana; Figini, Mariangela

    2015-11-01

    Antibody-based reagents represent a promising strategy as clinical diagnostic tools. Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second-leading cause of death in males in the Western population. There is a presently unmet need for accurate diagnostic tool to localize and define the extent of both primary PCa and occult recurrent disease. One of the most suitable targets for PCa is the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) recognised by the monoclonal antibody D2B that we re-shaped into the single chain Fv (scFv format). Aim of this study was to evaluate in preclinical in vivo models the target specificity of scFvD2B after labelling with different radionuclides. (111)In radiolabelling was performed via the chelator Bz-NOTA, and (131)I radioiodination was performed using iodogen. The potential for molecular imaging and the biological behaviour of the radiolabelled scFvD2B were evaluated in mice bearing two subcutaneous PCa isogenic cell lines that differed only in PSMA expression. Biodistribution studies were performed at 3, 9, 15 and 24h after injection to determine the optimal imaging time point. A significant kidney accumulation, as percentage of injected dose of tissue (%ID/g), was observed for (111)In-scFvD2B at 3h after injection (45%ID/g) and it was maintained up to 24h (26%ID/g). By contrast, kidney accumulation of (131)I-scFvD2B was only marginally (0.3%ID/g at 24h). At the optimal time point defined between 15h and 24h, regardless of the radionuclide used, the scFvD2B was able to localize significantly better in the PSMA expressing tumours compared to the negative control; with (131)I-scFvD2B yielding a significantly better target/background ratio compared to (111)In-scFvD2B. These data suggest that, besides antigen specificity, chemical modification may affect antibody fragment biodistribution.

  1. Evaluation of Phage Display Discovered Peptides as Ligands for Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA)

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, W. Barry

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify potential ligands of PSMA suitable for further development as novel PSMA-targeted peptides using phage display technology. The human PSMA protein was immobilized as a target followed by incubation with a 15-mer phage display random peptide library. After one round of prescreening and two rounds of screening, high-stringency screening at the third round of panning was performed to identify the highest affinity binders. Phages which had a specific binding activity to PSMA in human prostate cancer cells were isolated and the DNA corresponding to the 15-mers were sequenced to provide three consensus sequences: GDHSPFT, SHFSVGS and EVPRLSLLAVFL as well as other sequences that did not display consensus. Two of the peptide sequences deduced from DNA sequencing of binding phages, SHSFSVGSGDHSPFT and GRFLTGGTGRLLRIS were labeled with 5-carboxyfluorescein and shown to bind and co-internalize with PSMA on human prostate cancer cells by fluorescence microscopy. The high stringency requirements yielded peptides with affinities KD∼1 µM or greater which are suitable starting points for affinity maturation. While these values were less than anticipated, the high stringency did yield peptide sequences that apparently bound to different surfaces on PSMA. These peptide sequences could be the basis for further development of peptides for prostate cancer tumor imaging and therapy. PMID:23935860

  2. Antigen-specific tumor vaccine efficacy in vivo against prostate cancer with low class I MHC requires competent class II MHC.

    PubMed

    Neeley, Yilin C; McDonagh, Kevin T; Overwijk, Willem W; Restifo, Nicholas P; Sanda, Martin G

    2002-11-01

    Cancers can escape immune recognition by means of evading class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) -mediated recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. However, immunization strategies targeting defined tumor-associated antigens have not been extensively characterized in murine prostate cancer models. Therefore, we evaluated antigen-specific, antitumor immunity after antigen-encoding vaccinia immunization against mouse prostate cancer cells expressing a model tumor-associated antigen (beta-galactosidase) and exhibiting partially deficient class I MHC. Low class I MHC expression in beta-galactosidase-expressing D7RM-1 prostate cancer cells was shown by fluorescence activated cell sorting, and deficient class I MHC-mediated antigen presentation was shown in resistance of D7RM-1 to cytolysis by beta-galactosidase-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Despite partially deficient class I MHC presenting function, immunization with vaccinia encoding beta-galactosidase conferred antigen-specific protection against D7RM-1 cancer. Antigen-specific immunity was recapitulated in beta(2)m knockout mice (with deficient class I MHC and CTL function), confirming that class I MHC antigen presentation was not required for immunity against tumor partially deficient in class I MHC. Conversely, antigen-specific antitumor immunity was abrogated in A(b)beta knockout mice (with deficient class II MHC and helper T cell function), demonstrating a requirement for functional class II MHC. Resistant tumors from the otherwise effectively immunized beta(2)m knockout mice (among which tumor progression had been reduced or delayed) showed reduced target antigen expression, corroborating antigen-specificity (and showing an alternative immune escape mechanism), whereas antigen expression (like tumor growth) was unaffected among A(b)beta knockout mice. Our results demonstrate that class I MHC-restricted antigen presentation and CTL activity is neither necessary nor sufficient for antigen

  3. Human antibody responses to meningococcal outer membrane antigens after three doses of the Norwegian group B meningococcal vaccine.

    PubMed

    Rosenqvist, E; Høiby, E A; Wedege, E; Bryn, K; Kolberg, J; Klem, A; Rønnild, E; Bjune, G; Nøkleby, H

    1995-12-01

    The antibody kinetics in sera from 27 adults after three doses of the Norwegian group B meningococcal outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine was studied. The vaccinees received the third dose 4 to 5 years after the first two. Antibody responses against outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and lipopolysaccharides were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting and with serum bactericidal assays (SBA) with three variants of the vaccine strain, 44/76. Six weeks after the second injection, the geometric mean (GM) of the levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) against OMVs was about sevenfold higher than that of prevaccination levels, and 74% of the vaccinees developed a greater-than-twofold rise in SBA titer. After 6 months, the GM of IgG levels declined to about threefold higher, and after 4 to 5 years it declined to about twofold higher, than that before vaccination. The third dose induced a rapid increase in SBA titers in 96% of the vaccinees, and the GM of levels of IgG against OMVs rose to about 14-fold the prevaccination level. One year later, the IgG antibody levels had dropped to 4.6-fold the prevaccination level, but 88% of the vaccinees still showed bactericidal activity. The response after the two first doses was higher in individuals with prevaccination antibodies, but no such effect was found after three doses. The use of defined mutants in SBA and linear multiple regression analyses indicated that among the major OMPs, antibodies to the Opc and class 1 proteins made the most important single contributions to the bactericidal activity against the vaccine strain, but it also demonstrated the importance of antibodies against other antigens. After three doses, 68% of the vaccinees showed a significant SBA response against a strain lacking both the Opc and the class 1 proteins. Three doses converted almost all subjects to SBA responders and gave higher antibody levels and relatively less serosubtype-specific bactericidal activity than did two doses

  4. Human antibody responses to meningococcal outer membrane antigens after three doses of the Norwegian group B meningococcal vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenqvist, E; Høiby, E A; Wedege, E; Bryn, K; Kolberg, J; Klem, A; Rønnild, E; Bjune, G; Nøkleby, H

    1995-01-01

    The antibody kinetics in sera from 27 adults after three doses of the Norwegian group B meningococcal outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine was studied. The vaccinees received the third dose 4 to 5 years after the first two. Antibody responses against outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and lipopolysaccharides were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting and with serum bactericidal assays (SBA) with three variants of the vaccine strain, 44/76. Six weeks after the second injection, the geometric mean (GM) of the levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) against OMVs was about sevenfold higher than that of prevaccination levels, and 74% of the vaccinees developed a greater-than-twofold rise in SBA titer. After 6 months, the GM of IgG levels declined to about threefold higher, and after 4 to 5 years it declined to about twofold higher, than that before vaccination. The third dose induced a rapid increase in SBA titers in 96% of the vaccinees, and the GM of levels of IgG against OMVs rose to about 14-fold the prevaccination level. One year later, the IgG antibody levels had dropped to 4.6-fold the prevaccination level, but 88% of the vaccinees still showed bactericidal activity. The response after the two first doses was higher in individuals with prevaccination antibodies, but no such effect was found after three doses. The use of defined mutants in SBA and linear multiple regression analyses indicated that among the major OMPs, antibodies to the Opc and class 1 proteins made the most important single contributions to the bactericidal activity against the vaccine strain, but it also demonstrated the importance of antibodies against other antigens. After three doses, 68% of the vaccinees showed a significant SBA response against a strain lacking both the Opc and the class 1 proteins. Three doses converted almost all subjects to SBA responders and gave higher antibody levels and relatively less serosubtype-specific bactericidal activity than did two doses

  5. Classical dendritic cells are required for dietary antigen-mediated induction of peripheral T(reg) cells and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Esterházy, Daria; Loschko, Jakob; London, Mariya; Jove, Veronica; Oliveira, Thiago Y; Mucida, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Oral tolerance prevents pathological inflammatory responses to innocuous foreign antigens by peripheral regulatory T cells (pT(reg) cells). However, whether a particular subset of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is required during dietary antigen exposure for the 'instruction' of naive CD4(+) T cells to differentiate into pT(reg) cells has not been defined. Using myeloid lineage-specific APC depletion in mice, we found that monocyte-derived APCs were dispensable, while classical dendritic cells (cDCs) were critical, for pT(reg) cell induction and oral tolerance. CD11b(-) cDCs from the gut-draining lymph nodes efficiently induced pT(reg) cells and, conversely, loss of transcription factor IRF8-dependent CD11b(-) cDCs impaired their polarization, although oral tolerance remained intact. These data reveal the hierarchy of cDC subsets in the induction of pT(reg) cells and their redundancy during the development of oral tolerance.

  6. Crystal Structure of Plasmodium knowlesi Apical Membrane Antigen 1 and Its Complex with an Invasion-Inhibitory Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    van der Eijk, Marjolein; Thomas, Alan W.; Singh, Balbir; Kocken, Clemens H. M.

    2015-01-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi, previously associated only with infection of macaques, is now known to infect humans as well and has become a significant public health problem in Southeast Asia. This species should therefore be targeted in vaccine and therapeutic strategies against human malaria. Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1), which plays a role in Plasmodium merozoite invasion of the erythrocyte, is currently being pursued in human vaccine trials against P. falciparum. Recent vaccine trials in macaques using the P. knowlesi orthologue PkAMA1 have shown that it protects against infection by this parasite species and thus should be developed for human vaccination as well. Here, we present the crystal structure of Domains 1 and 2 of the PkAMA1 ectodomain, and of its complex with the invasion-inhibitory monoclonal antibody R31C2. The Domain 2 (D2) loop, which is displaced upon binding the Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 (RON2) receptor, makes significant contacts with the antibody. R31C2 inhibits binding of the Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 (RON2) receptor by steric blocking of the hydrophobic groove and by preventing the displacement of the D2 loop which is essential for exposing the complete binding site on AMA1. R31C2 recognizes a non-polymorphic epitope and should thus be cross-strain reactive. PkAMA1 is much less polymorphic than the P. falciparum and P. vivax orthologues. Unlike these two latter species, there are no polymorphic sites close to the RON2-binding site of PkAMA1, suggesting that P. knowlesi has not developed a mechanism of immune escape from the host’s humoral response to AMA1. PMID:25886591

  7. Preclinical Evaluation of (18)F-PSMA-1007, a New Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Ligand for Prostate Cancer Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Jens; Schäfer, Martin; Benešová, Martina; Bauder-Wüst, Ulrike; Leotta, Karin; Eder, Matthias; Neels, Oliver C; Haberkorn, Uwe; Giesel, Frederik L; Kopka, Klaus

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, several radiotracers targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) have been introduced. Some of them have had a high clinical impact on the treatment of patients with prostate cancer. However, the number of (18)F-labeled tracers addressing PSMA is still limited. Therefore, we aimed to develop a radiofluorinated molecule resembling the structure of therapeutic PSMA-617. Methods: The nonradioactive reference compound PSMA-1007 and the precursor were produced by solid-phase chemistry. The radioligand (18)F-PSMA-1007 was produced by a 2-step procedure with the prosthetic group 6-(18)F-fluoronicotinic acid 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl ester. The binding affinity of the ligand for PSMA and its internalization properties were evaluated in vitro with PSMA-positive LNCaP (lymph node carcinoma of the prostate) cells. Further, organ distribution studies were performed with mice bearing LNCaP and PC-3 (prostate cancer cell line; PSMA-negative) tumors. Finally, small-animal PET imaging of an LNCaP tumor-bearing mouse was performed. Results: The identified ligand had a binding affinity of 6.7 ± 1.7 nM for PSMA and an exceptionally high internalization ratio (67% ± 13%) in vitro. In organ distribution studies, high and specific tumor uptake (8.0 ± 2.4 percentage injected dose per gram) in LNCaP tumor-bearing mice was observed. In the small-animal PET experiments, LNCaP tumors were clearly visualized. Conclusion: The radiofluorinated PSMA ligand showed promising characteristics in its preclinical evaluation, and the feasibility of prostate cancer imaging was demonstrated by small-animal PET studies. Therefore, we recommend clinical transfer of the radioligand (18)F-PSMA-1007 for use as a diagnostic PET tracer in prestaging and monitoring of prostate cancer. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  8. Microfluidic-integrated patterned ITO immunosensor for rapid detection of prostate-specific membrane antigen biomarker in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Seenivasan, Rajesh; Singh, Chandra K; Warrick, Jay W; Ahmad, Nihal; Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    2017-09-15

    An optically transparent patterned indium tin oxide (ITO) three-electrode sensor integrated with a microfluidic channel was designed for label-free immunosensing of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), a prostate cancer (PCa) biomarker, expressed on prostate tissue and circulating tumor cells but also found in serum. The sensor relies on cysteamine capped gold nanoparticles (N-AuNPs) covalently linked with anti-PSMA antibody (Ab) for target specificity. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channel is used to efficiently and reproducibly introduce sample containing soluble proteins/cells to the sensor. The PSMA is detected and quantified by measuring the change in differential pulse voltammetry signal of a redox probe ([Fe(CN)6](3-)/[Fe(CN)6](4-)) that is altered upon binding of PSMA with PSMA-Ab immobilized on N-AuNPs/ITO. Detection of PSMA expressing cells and soluble PSMA was tested. The limit of detection (LOD) of the sensor for PSMA-based PCa cells is 6/40µL (i.e., 150 cells/mL) (n=3) with a linear range of 15-400 cells/40µL (i.e., 375-10,000 cells/mL), and for the soluble PSMA is 0.499ng/40µL (i.e., 12.5ng/mL) (n=3) with the linear range of 0.75-250ng/40µL (i.e., 19-6250ng/mL), both with an incubation time of 10min. The results indicate that the sensor has a suitable sensitivity and dynamic range for routine detection of PCa circulating tumor cells and can be adapted to detect other biomarkers/cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Vascular targeted therapy with anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen monoclonal antibody J591 in advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Milowsky, Matthew I; Nanus, David M; Kostakoglu, Lale; Sheehan, Christine E; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Ross, Jeffrey S; Bander, Neil H

    2007-02-10

    Based on prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression on the vasculature of solid tumors, we performed a phase I trial of antibody J591, targeting the extracellular domain of PSMA, in patients with advanced solid tumor malignancies. This was a proof-of-principle evaluation of PSMA as a potential neovascular target. The primary end points were targeting,toxicity, maximum-tolerated dose, pharmacokinetics (PK), and human antihuman antibody (HAHA) response. Patients had advanced solid tumors previously shown to express PSMA on the neovasculature. They received 111Indium (111ln)-J591 for scintigraphy and PK, followed 2 weeks later by J591 with a reduced amount of 111In for additional PK measurements. J591 dose levels were 5, 10, 20, 40, and 80 mg. The protocol was amended for six weekly administrations of unchelated J591. Patients with a response or stable disease were eligible for re-treatment. Immunohistochemistry assessed PSMA expression in tumor tissues. Twenty-seven patients received monoclonal antibody (mAb) J591. Treatment was well tolerated. Twenty (74%) of 27 patients had at least one area of known metastatic disease targeted by 111In-J591, with positive imaging seen in patients with kidney, bladder, lung, breast, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers, and melanoma. Seven of 10 patient specimens available for immunohistochemical assessment of PSMA expression in tumor-associated vasculature demonstrated PSMA staining. No HAHA response was seen. Three patients of 27 with stable disease received re-treatment. Acceptable toxicity and excellent targeting of known sites of metastases were demonstrated in patients with multiple solid tumor types, highlighting a potential role for the anti-PSMA antibody J591 as a vascular-targeting agent.

  10. Effect of prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography on the decision-making of radiation oncologists.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2015-11-18

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is routinely used in many cancer types, although is not yet a standard modality for prostate carcinoma. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET is a promising new modality for staging prostate cancer, with recent studies showing potential advantages over traditional computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear medicine bone scan imaging. However, the impact of PSMA PET on the decision-making of radiation oncologists and outcomes after radiotherapy is yet to be determined. Our aim was to determine the impact of PSMA PET on a radiation oncologist's clinical practice. Patients in a radiation oncology clinic who underwent PSMA PET were prospectively recorded in an electronic oncology record. Patient demographics, outcomes of imaging, and impact on decision-making were evaluated. Fifty-four patients underwent PSMA PET between January and May 2015. The major reasons for undergoing PET included staging before definitive (14.8%) or post-prostatectomy (33.3%) radiotherapy, and investigation of PSA failures following definitive (16.7%) or post-prostatectomy (33.3%) radiotherapy. In 46.3% of patients PSMA was positive after negative traditional imaging, in 9.3% PSMA was positive after equivocal imaging, and in 13.0% PSMA was negative after equivocal imaging. PSMA PET changed radiotherapy management in 46.3% of cases, and hormone therapy in 33.3% of patients, with an overall change in decision-making in 53.7% of patients. PSMA PET has the potential to significantly alter the decision-making of radiation oncologists, and may become a valuable imaging tool in the future.

  11. Combined use of epithelial membrane antigen and nuclear matrix protein 52 as sensitive biomarkers for detection of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Attallah, Abdelfattah M; El-Far, Mohamed; Abdallah, Sanaa O; El-Waseef, Ahmed M; Omran, Mohamed M; Abdelrazek, Mohamed A; Attallah, Ahmed A; Saadh, Mohamed J; Radwan, Mohamed; El-waffaey, Kholoud A; Abol-Enei, Hassan

    2015-11-11

    The advent of noninvasive urine-based markers as well as other novel modalities has yielded improved diagnostic accuracy. However, the new markers failed to reach higher sensitivity and specificity. We therefore evaluated the potential role of epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and nuclear matrix protein 52 (NMP-52) singly and combined as noninvasive biomarkers for the detection of bladder cancer (BC). A total of 160 individuals including 66 patients with BC, 54 patients with benign urologic disorders and 40 healthy volunteers were investigated. Urinary EMA at 130 kDa and NMP at 52 kDa were identified, purified and quantified by Western blot, electroelution and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The diagnostic performance of each biomarker and their combination were compared using area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). Mean urinary EMA, 2.42 µg/mL, and NMP-52, 17.85 µg/mL, were significantly elevated in patients with BC compared to controls, 1.18 and 3.44 µg/mL, respectively (p<0.0001). The combined use of these markers yielded values which were increased 4.4- and 13.7-fold in the benign and malignant disease groups, respectively, with respect to the normal group. The values of EMA and NMP-52 were significantly higher in patients with higher-grade tumors than those with lower-grade tumors (p<0.0001). Moreover, this combination could predict all BC stages and grades with 0.91 AUC, 94% sensitivity and 80% specificity. EMA and NMP-52 in combination could be promising noninvasive biomarkers for BC detection.

  12. Uptake of the prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeted PET radiotracer 18F-DCFPyL in elastofibroma dorsi.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Michael A; Marashdeh, Wael; Ross, Ashley E; Allaf, Mohammad E; Pienta, Kenneth J; Pomper, Martin G; Rowe, Steven P

    2017-09-01

    PET imaging using radiotracers that target prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) are increasingly being used in the evaluation of men with prostate cancer (PCa). It is therefore of increasing importance for imaging specialists to recognize potential pitfalls of this novel imaging technique. In this report, we describe a series of benign elastofibroma dorsi with uptake of the PSMA-targeted PET radiotracer F-DCFPyL. We retrospectively analyzed the imaging data of 75 men with PCa who were consecutively imaged with F-DCFPyL PET/CT. Acquired images were reviewed for the presence of radiotracer uptake in the region of the scapular tip adjacent to the chest wall. Only those lesions with discrete radiotracer uptake corresponding to an area on CT with the characteristic appearance of an elastofibroma were considered positive. In total, 18/75 (24.0%) patients had evidence of at least one elastofibroma dorsi on F-DCFPyL PET/CT. Eight (44.4%) of these patients had unilateral lesions, all of which were right sided. Detected lesions had a median maximal diameter of 2.3 cm (range: 1.3-8.4 cm) and a median perpendicular thickness to the chest wall of 0.9 cm (range: 0.6-2.5 cm). The median maximum standardized uptake value of detected lesions was 1.4 (range: 1.1-2.4) and the median maximum standardized uptake value corrected to lean body mass was 1.1 (range: 0.8-1.7). This study is the first to report uptake of a PSMA-targeted PET radiotracer in elastofibroma dorsi. Radiotracer uptake in these benign lesions should not be falsely mistaken as sites of metastatic PCa.

  13. Immunogenicity and protective role of antigenic regions from five outer membrane proteins of Flavobacterium columnare in grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhang; Liu, Zhixin; Fu, Jianping; Zhang, Qiusheng; Huang, Bei; Nie, Pin

    2016-11-01

    Flavobacterium columnare causes columnaris disease in freshwater fish. In the present study, the antigenic regions of five outer membrane proteins (OMPs), including zinc metalloprotease, prolyl oligopeptidase, thermolysin, collagenase and chondroitin AC lyase, were bioinformatically analyzed, fused together, and then expressed as a recombinant fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein of 95.6 kDa, as estimated by 10% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was consistent with the molecular weight deduced from the amino acid sequence. The purified recombinant protein was used to vaccinate the grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella. Following vaccination of the fish their IgM antibody levels were examined, as was the expression of IgM, IgD and IgZ immunoglobulin genes and other genes such as MHC Iα and MHC IIβ, which are also involved in adaptive immunity. Interleukin genes ( IL), including IL-1β, IL-8 and IL-10, and type I and type II interferon ( IFN) genes were also examined. At 3 and 4 weeks post-vaccination (wpv), significant increases in IgM antibody levels were observed in the fish vaccinated with the recombinant fusion protein, and an increase in the expression levels of IgM, IgD and IgZ genes was also detected following the vaccinations, thus indicating that an adaptive immune response was induced by the vaccinations. Early increases in the expression levels of IL and IFN genes were also observed in the vaccinated fish. At four wpv, the fish were challenged with F. columnare, and the vaccinated fish showed a good level of protection against this pathogen, with 39% relative percent survival (RPS) compared with the control group. It can be concluded, therefore, that the five OMPs, in the form of a recombinant fusion protein vaccine, induced an immune response in fish and protection against F. columnare.

  14. In Vitro Targeted Photodynamic Therapy with a Pyropheophorbide-a Conjugated Inhibitor of Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tiancheng; Wu, Lisa Y.; Choi, Joseph K.; Berkman, Clifford E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKROUND The lack of specific delivery of photosensitizers (PSs), represents a significant limitation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. The biomarker prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has attracted considerable attention as a target for imaging and therapeutic applications for prostate cancer. Although recent efforts have been made to conjugate inhibitors of PSMA with imaging agents, there have been no reports on photosensitizer-conjugated PSMA inhibitors for targeted PDT of prostate cancer. The present study focuses on the use of a PSMA inhibitor-conjugate of pyropheophorbide-a (Ppa-conjugate 2) for targeted PDT to achieve apoptosis in PSMA+ LNCaP cells. METHODS Confocal laser scanning microscopy with a combination of nuclear staining and immunofluorescence methods were employed to monitor the specific imaging and PDT-mediated apoptotic effects on PSMA-positive LNCaP and PSMA-negative (PC-3) cells. RESULTS Our results demonstrated that PDT-mediated effects by Ppa-conjugate 2 were specific to LNCaP cells, but not PC-3 cells. Cell permeability was detected as early as 2 h by HOE33342/PI double-staining, becoming more intense by 4 h. Evidence for the apoptotic caspase cascade being activated was based on the appearance of PARP p85 fragment. TUNEL assay detected DNA fragmentation 16 h post-PDT, confirming apoptotic events. CONCLUSIONS Cell permeability by HOE33342/PI double-staining as well as PARP p85 fragment and TUNEL assays confirm cellular apoptosis in PSMA+ cells when treated with PS-inhibitor conjugate 2 and subsequently irradiated. It is expected that the PSMA targeting small-molecule of this conjugate can serve as a delivery vehicle for PDT and other therapeutic applications for prostate cancer. PMID:19142895

  15. Compositional and structural requirements for laminin and basement membranes during mouse embryo implantation and gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jeffrey H; Li, Cong; Mudd, Jacqueline L; Go, Gloriosa; Sutherland, Ann E

    2004-05-01

    Laminins are components of all basement membranes and have well demonstrated roles in diverse developmental processes, from the peri-implantation period onwards. Laminin 1 (alpha1beta1gamma1) is a major laminin found at early stages of embryogenesis in both embryonic and extraembryonic basement membranes. The laminin gamma1 chain has been shown by targeted mutation to be required for endodermal differentiation and formation of basement membranes; Lamc1(-/-) embryos die within a day of implantation. We report the generation of mice lacking laminin alpha1 and laminin beta1, the remaining two laminin 1 chains. Mutagenic insertions in both Lama1 and Lamb1 were obtained in a secretory gene trap screen. Lamb1(-/-) embryos are similar to Lamc1(-/-) embryos in that they lack basement membranes and do not survive beyond embryonic day (E) 5.5. However, in Lama1(-/-) embryos, the embryonic basement membrane forms, the embryonic ectoderm cavitates and the parietal endoderm differentiates, apparently because laminin 10 (alpha5beta1gamma1) partially compensates for the absent laminin 1. However, such compensation did not occur for Reichert's membrane, which was absent, and the embryos died by E7. Overexpression of laminin alpha5 from a transgene improved the phenotype of Lama1(-/-) embryos to the point that they initiated gastrulation, but this overexpression did not rescue Reichert's membrane, and trophoblast cells did not form blood sinuses. These data suggest that both the molecular composition and the integrity of basement membranes are crucial for early developmental events.

  16. B7 expression and antigen presentation by human brain endothelial cells: requirement for proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Prat, A; Biernacki, K; Becher, B; Antel, J P

    2000-02-01

    Interaction between systemic immune cells with cells of the blood-brain barrier is a central step in development of CNS-directed immune responses. Endothelial cells are the first cells of the blood-brain barrier encountered by migrating lymphocytes. To investigate the antigen-presenting capacity of human adult brain endothelial cells (HBECs), we used HBECs derived from surgically resected temporal lobe tissue, cocultured with allogeneic peripheral blood derived CD4+ T lymphocytes. HBECs in response to IFN-gamma, but not under basal culture conditions, expressed HLA-DR, B7.1 and B7.2 antigens. Despite such up-regulation, these IFN-gamma-treated HBECs, in contrast to human microglia and PB monocytes, did not sustain allogeneic CD4+ cell proliferation, supported only low levels of IL-2 and IFN-gamma production, and did not stimulate IL-2 receptor expression. CD4+ T cell proliferation and increased IL-2 receptor expression could be obtained by addition of IL-2. Our data suggests that, although HBECs cannot alone support T cell proliferation and cytokine production, HBECs acting in concert with cytokines derived from a proinflammatory environment could support such a response.

  17. Antigenic definition of plasma membrane proteins of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin: predominant activation of human T cells by low-molecular-mass integral proteins.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, J; Mittal, A; Rastogi, A K; Jaiswal, A K; Bhandari, N K; Sinha, S

    1999-10-01

    Mycobacterial plasma membrane proteins, in particular the detergent-soluble or 'integral' ones, comprise a class of mostly unexplored antigens capable of inducing potent activation of human T cells. Plasma membrane isolated from culture-grown Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG; Indian vaccine; Danish strain) was subjected to a Triton X-114-based biphasic extraction procedure for isolation of peripheral (water-soluble) and integral proteins (PMP and IMP). A distinction between the two protein pools was evident from results of SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting using antisera raised in rabbits. An enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay with a panel of WHO-IMMYC monoclonal antibodies against various mycobacterial antigens revealed that three well-known antigens, 19 kDa, 33/36 kDa (proline rich) and 38 kDa (PstS homologue), were part of the IMP pool; and another such antigen, 14/16 kDa alpha-crystallin homologue, partly constituted the PMP pool. Apparently, antigenically distinct species of the immunomodulatory moiety lipoarabinomannan partitioned in aqueous and detergent phases. Human T-cell proliferation assays in donors comprising tuberculoid leprosy and pulmonary tuberculosis patients and healthy BCG vaccinees showed significantly greater potency of IMP over PMP and this immunodominance appeared to be directed towards CD4+ cells. IMP of < 56 kDa were resolved by 'continuous elution SDS-PAGE' into 15 fractions which, after extraction of SDS, were used in T-cell proliferation assays for the identification of immunodominant constituents. Proteins falling within three low-molecular-mass zones (all < 35 kDa) performed better than the rest, particularly a approximately 22 kDa fraction, which strongly stimulated T cells from all five donors. Partial overlap between IMP and secreted proteins, as noticed in this study, could provide clues to immunodominance of the latter. The apparent uniqueness and a high T-cell activating potency make mycobacterial IMP attractive candidates for designing

  18. Antigen and vaccine banks: technical requirements and the role of the european antigen bank in emergency foot and mouth disease vaccination.

    PubMed

    Lombard, M; Füssel, A E

    2007-04-01

    Antigen and vaccine banks are stocks of immunogenic materials ready to be formulated into vaccines (bulk antigens) or ready to use (vaccines) in case of need by one or more of the parties of the bank. These stocks were primarily developed by foot and mouth disease [FMD] free European countries to control unexpected severe FMD episodes after the cessation of routine vaccination in the 1990s. For various reasons, including the lack of suitable antigens or of discriminatory tests to be used following emergency vaccination, such banks have so far not been developed to control other transboundary diseases, although over the last few years stocks of vaccines have been collected by the European Community to support control measures for bluetongue or classical swine fever. The FMD virus antigens in the banks are stored at ultra-low temperatures (usually -130 degrees C) to guarantee a shelf life of at least five years compared to a shelf-life of one to two years for vaccines stored at +4 degrees C. When concentrated, a 50 I volume of antigens can contain up to 15 million cattle doses as per the standard potency specifications in the OIE Manual of Diagnostic Tests and Vaccines for Terrestrial Animals. Selecting antigen/vaccine strains for storage in a bank and selecting the appropriate strain(s) to be used in the case of emergency vaccination is the responsibility of FMD disease experts. The paper discusses the role of serological testing for the detection of infected animals in a vaccinated population, which is necessary for the recognition of FMD status. Technical advantages and disadvantages of antigen and vaccine banks in general are also outlined in this article. Finally, the experience of the European Community in organising, renewing, and controlling a sizeable FMD antigen bank since 1993 is discussed, and the use of the European Union (EU) antigen bank for international actions outside the EU is presented.

  19. Antigen recognition. V. Requirement for histocompatibility between antigen-presenting cell and B cell in the response to a thymus- dependent antigen, and lack of allogeneic restriction between T and B cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The restrictions imposed by the major histocompatibility complex on T-B- antigen-presenting cell (APC) interactions were studied with an in vivo adoptive transfer system, using mutually tolerant T and B cells taken from one-way fetal liver chimeras. It was found that the B cells and adoptive recipient (which provides APC function) have to share determinants encoded by the left-hand end of the H-2 complex for cooperation, whereas there is apparently no such requirement for T-B cell syngeneicity. Suppression arising from allogeneic effects between the host and the transferred T or B cells was excluded by the use of tolerant as well as normal adoptive recipients; both were functionally equivalent. We conclude that under experimental conditions, unrestricted helper T cell function and concurrent APC-B cell genetic restriction can be demonstrated in vivo. PMID:7276826

  20. Flagellin Glycosylation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAK Requires the O-antigen Biosynthesis Enzyme WbpO*s

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Wayne L.; Matewish, Mauricia J.; McNally, David J.; Ishiyama, Noboru; Anderson, Erin M.; Brewer, Dyanne; Brisson, Jean-Robert; Berghuis, Albert M.; Lam, Joseph S.

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAK (serotype O6) produces a single polar, glycosylated flagellum composed of a-type flagellin. To determine whether or not flagellin glycosylation in this serotype requires O-antigen genes, flagellin was isolated from the wild type, three O-antigen-deficient mutants wbpL, wbpO, and wbpP, and a wbpO mutant complemented with a plasmid containing a wild-type copy of wbpO. Flagellin from the wbpO mutant was smaller (42 kDa) than that of the wild type (45 kDa), or other mutants strains, and exhibited an altered isoelectric point (pI 4.8) when compared with PAK flagellin (pI 4.6). These differences were because of the truncation of the glycan moiety in the wbpO-flagellin. Thus, flagellin glycosylation in P. aeruginosa PAK apparently requires a functional WbpO but not WbpP. Because WbpP was previously proposed to catalyze a metabolic step in the biosynthesis of B-band O-antigen that precedes the action of WbpO, these results prompted us to reevaluate the two-step pathway catalyzed by WbpO and WbpP. Results from WbpO-WbpP-coupled enzymatic assays showed that either WbpO or WbpP is capable of initiating the two-step pathway; however, the kinetic parameters favored the WbpO reaction to occur first, converting UDP-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine to UDP-N-acetyl-D-glucuronic acid prior to the conversion to UDP-N-acetyl-D-galacturonic acid by WbpP. This is the first report to show that a C4 epimerase could utilize UDP-N-acetylhexuronic acid as a substrate. PMID:18065759

  1. Methane to syngas conversion. Part I. Equilibrium conditions and stability requirements of membrane materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frade, J. R.; Kharton, V. V.; Yaremchenko, A.; Naumovich, E.

    Thermodynamic data have been used to predict the dependence of methane conversion on temperature and oxygen partial pressure in mixed conducting membrane reactors, and the corresponding fractions of water vapor, H 2, CO and CO 2. The relations between methane conversion, gas composition and oxygen partial pressure were also used to formulate the oxygen balance in mixed conducting membrane reactors, with tubular reactor and continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) configurations. A single dimensionless parameter accounts for the combined effects of geometric parameters of the membrane reactor, the permeability of the membrane material, and flow rate at the entry of the reactor. Selected examples were calculated to illustrate the effects of steam to methane and inert to methane ratios in the gas entering the reactor. The values of oxygen partial pressure required to attain the highest yield of CO and H 2 were also used to estimate the stability requirements to be met by mixed conducting membrane materials. Suitable membrane designs might be needed to bridge the difference between the conditions inside the reactors and the stability limits of known mixed conductors.

  2. Carbohydrate antigens in nipple aspirate fluid predict the presence of atypia and cancer in women requiring diagnostic breast biopsy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The goal of this prospective study was to determine (a) concentrations of the carbohydrate biomarkers Thomsen Friedenreich (TF) antigen and its precursor, Tn antigen, in nipple discharge (ND) collected from women requiring biopsy because of a suspicious breast lesion; and (b) if concentration levels predicted pathologic diagnosis. Methods Adult women requiring biopsy to exclude breast cancer were enrolled and ND obtained. The samples from 124 women were analyzed using an anti-TF and anti-Tn monoclonal antibodies in direct immunoassay. Results The highest median concentration in ND for TF and Tn was in women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). TF was higher in women with 1) cancer (DCIS or invasive) vs. either no cancer (atypia or benign pathology, p = .048), or benign pathology (p = .018); and 2) abnormal (atypia or cancer) versus benign pathology (p = .016); and was more predictive of atypia or cancer in post- compared to premenopausal women. Tn was not predictive of disease. High TF concentration and age were independent predictors of disease, correctly classifying either cancer or abnormal vs. benign pathology 83% of the time in postmenopausal women. Conclusions TF concentrations in ND were higher in women with precancer and cancer compared to women with benign disease, and TF was an independent predictor of breast atypia and cancer. TF may prove useful in early breast cancer detection. PMID:20920311

  3. Toll-Like Receptor Activation by Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens from Lipid A Mutants of Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Omar; Caboni, Mariaelena; Negrea, Aurel; Necchi, Francesca; Alfini, Renzo; Micoli, Francesca; Saul, Allan; MacLennan, Calman A.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease is a neglected disease with high mortality in children and HIV-positive individuals in sub-Saharan Africa, caused primarily by Africa-specific strains of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. A vaccine using GMMA (generalized modules for membrane antigens) from S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis containing lipid A modifications to reduce potential in vivo reactogenicity is under development. GMMA with penta-acylated lipid A showed the greatest reduction in the level of cytokine release from human peripheral blood monocytes from that for GMMA with wild-type lipid A. Deletion of the lipid A modification genes msbB and pagP was required to achieve pure penta-acylation. Interestingly, ΔmsbB ΔpagP GMMA from S. Enteritidis had a slightly higher stimulatory potential than those from S. Typhimurium, a finding consistent with the higher lipopolysaccharide (LPS) content and Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) stimulatory potential of the former. Also, TLR5 ligand flagellin was found in Salmonella GMMA. No relevant contribution to the stimulatory potential of GMMA was detected even when the flagellin protein FliC from S. Typhimurium was added at a concentration as high as 10% of total protein, suggesting that flagellin impurities are not a major factor for GMMA-mediated immune stimulation. Overall, the stimulatory potential of S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis ΔmsbB ΔpagP GMMA was close to that of Shigella sonnei GMMA, which are currently in phase I clinical trials. PMID:26865597

  4. An HPLC/Mass Spectrometry Platform for the Development of Multimodality Contrast Agents and Targeted Therapeutics: Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Small Molecule Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Humblet, Valerie; Misra, Preeti; Frangioni, John V.

    2009-01-01

    The production of disease-targeted agents requires the covalent conjugation of a targeting molecule with a contrast agent or therapeutic, followed by purification of the product to homogeneity. Typical targeting molecules, such as small molecules and peptides, often have high charge to mass ratios and/or hydrophobicity. Contrast agents and therapeutics themselves are also diverse, and include lanthanide chelates for MRI, 99mTc chelates for SPECT, 90Y chelates for radiotherapy, 18F derivatives for PET, and heptamethine indocyanines for near-infrared fluorescent optical imaging. We have constructed a general-purpose HPLC/mass spectrometry platform capable of purifying virtually any targeted agent for any modality. The analytical sub-system is composed of a single dual-head pump that directs mobile phase to either a hot cell for the purification of radioactive agents or to an ES-TOF MS for the purification of nonradioactive agents. Nonradioactive agents are also monitored during purification by ELSD, absorbance, and fluorescence. The preparative sub-system is composed of columns and procedures that permit rapid scaling from the analytical system. To demonstrate the platform's utility, we describe the preparation of five small molecule derivatives specific for prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA): a gadolinium derivative for MRI, indium, rhenium, and technetium derivatives for SPECT, and a yttrium derivative for radiotherapy. All five compounds are derived from a highly anionic targeting ligand engineered to have a single nucleophile for N-hydroxysuccinimide-based conjugation. We also describe optimized column/mobile phase combinations and mass spectrometry settings for each class of agent, and discuss strategies for purifying molecules with extreme charge and/or hydrophobicity. Taken together, our study should expedite the development of disease-targeted, multimodality diagnostic and therapeutic agents. PMID:17193697

  5. Natural selection and population genetic structure of domain-I of Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen-1 in India.

    PubMed

    Basu, Madhumita; Maji, Ardhendu Kumar; Mitra, Mitashree; Sengupta, Sanghamitra

    2013-08-01

    Development of a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum infection is an urgent priority particularly because of widespread resistance to most traditionally used drugs. Multiple evidences point to apical membrane antigen-1(AMA-1) as a prime vaccine candidate directed against P. falciparum asexual blood-stages. To gain understanding of the genetic and demographic forces shaping the parasite sequence diversity in Kolkata, a part of Pfama-1 gene covering domain-I was sequenced from 100 blood samples of malaria patients. Statistical and phylogenetic analyses of the sequences were performed using DnaSP and MEGA. Very high haplotype diversity was detected both at nucleotide (0.998±0.002) and amino-acid (0.996±0.001) levels. An abundance of low frequency polymorphisms (Tajima's D=-1.190, Fu & Li's D(∗) and F(∗)=-3.068 and -2.722), unimodal mismatch distribution and a star-like median-joining network of ama-1 haplotypes indicated a recent population expansion among Kolkata parasites. The high minimum number of recombination events (Rm=26) and a significantly high dN/dS of 3.705 (P<0.0001) in Kolkata suggested recombination and positive selection as major forces in the generation and maintenance of ama-1 allelic diversity. To evaluate the impact of observed non-synonymous substitutions in the context of AMA-1 functionality, PatchDock and FireDock protein-protein interaction solutions were mapped between PfAMA-1-PfRON2 and PfAMA-1-host IgNAR. Alterations in the desolvation and global energies of PfAMA-1-PfRON2 interaction complexes at the hotspot contact residues were observed together with redistribution of surface electrostatic potentials at the variant alleles with respect to referent Pf3D7 sequence. Finally, a comparison of P. falciparum subpopulations in five Indian regional isolates retrieved from GenBank revealed a significant level of genetic differentiation (FST=0.084-0.129) with respect to Kolkata sequences. Collectively, our results indicated a very high

  6. Patterns of uptake of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted (18)F-DCFPyL in peripheral ganglia.

    PubMed

    Werner, Rudolf A; Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Jones, Krystyna M; Javadi, Mehrbod S; Solnes, Lilja B; Ross, Ashley E; Allaf, Mohamad E; Pienta, Kenneth J; Lapa, Constantin; Buck, Andreas K; Higuchi, Takahiro; Pomper, Martin G; Gorin, Michael A; Rowe, Steven P

    2017-08-22

    Radiotracers targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) have increasingly been recognized as showing uptake in a number of normal structures, anatomic variants, and non-prostate-cancer pathologies. We aimed to explore the frequency and degree of uptake in peripheral ganglia in patients undergoing PET with the PSMA-targeted agent (18)F-DCFPyL. A total of 98 patients who underwent (18)F-DCFPyL PET/CT imaging were retrospectively analyzed. This included 76 men with prostate cancer (PCa) and 22 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC; 13 men, 9 women). Scans were evaluated for uptake in the cervical, stellate, celiac, lumbar and sacral ganglia. Maximum standardized uptake value corrected to body weight (SUVmax), and maximum standardized uptake value corrected to lean body mass (SULmax) were recorded for all ganglia with visible uptake above background. Ganglia-to-background ratios were calculated by dividing the SUVmax and SULmax values by the mean uptake in the ascending aorta (Aortamean) and the right gluteus muscle (Gluteusmean). Overall, 95 of 98 (96.9%) patients demonstrated uptake in at least one of the evaluated peripheral ganglia. With regard to the PCa cohort, the most frequent sites of radiotracer accumulation were lumbar ganglia (55/76, 72.4%), followed by the cervical ganglia (51/76, 67.1%). Bilateral uptake was found in the majority of cases [lumbar 44/55 (80%) and cervical 30/51 (58.8%)]. Additionally, discernible radiotracer uptake was recorded in 50/76 (65.8%) of the analyzed stellate ganglia and in 45/76 (59.2%) of the celiac ganglia, whereas only 5/76 (6.6%) of the sacral ganglia demonstrated (18)F-DCFPyL accumulation. Similar findings were observed for patients with RCC, with the most frequent locations of radiotracer uptake in both the lumbar (20/22, 90.9%) and cervical ganglia (19/22, 86.4%). No laterality preference was found in mean PSMA-ligand uptake for either the PCa or RCC cohorts. As PSMA-targeted agents become more widely

  7. Preclinical Evaluation of 86Y-Labeled Inhibitors of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen for Dosimetry Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Foss, Catherine A.; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Wang, Yuchuan; Srinivasan, Senthamizhchelvan; Hobbs, Robert F.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Mease, Ronnie C.; Sgouros, George; Pomper, Martin G.

    2016-01-01

    86Y (half-life = 14.74 h, 33% β+) is within an emerging class of positron-emitting isotopes with relatively long physical half-lives that enables extended imaging of biologic processes. We report the synthesis and evaluation of 3 low-molecular-weight compounds labeled with 86Y for imaging the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) using PET. Impetus for the study derives from the need to perform dosimetry estimates for the corresponding 90Y-labeled radiotherapeutics. Methods Multistep syntheses were used in preparing 86Y-4–6. PSMA inhibition constants were evaluated by competitive binding assay. In vivo characterization using tumor-bearing male mice was performed by PET/CT for 86Y-4–6 and by biodistribution studies of 86Y-4 and 86Y-6 out to 24 h after injection. Quantitative whole-body PET scans were recorded to measure the kinetics for 14 organs in a male baboon using 86Y-6. Results Compounds 86Y-4–6 were obtained in high radiochemical yield and purity, with specific radioactivities of more than 83.92 GBq/µmol. PET imaging and biodistribution studies using PSMA-positive PC-3 PIP and PSMA-negative PC-3 flu tumor-bearing mice revealed that 86Y-4–6 had high site-specific uptake in PSMA-positive PC-3 PIP tumor starting at 20 min after injection and remained high at 24 h. Compound 86Y-6 demonstrated the highest tumor uptake and retention, with 32.17 ± 7.99 and 15.79 ± 6.44 percentage injected dose per gram (%ID/g) at 5 and 24 h, respectively. Low activity concentrations were associated with blood and normal organs, except for the kidneys, a PSMA-expressing tissue. PET imaging in baboons reveals that all organs have a 2-phase (rapid and slow) clearance, with the highest uptake (8 %ID/g) in the kidneys at 25 min. The individual absolute uptake kinetics were used to calculate radiation doses using the OLINDA/EXM software. The highest mean absorbed dose was received by the renal cortex, with 1.9 mGy per MBq of 86Y-6. Conclusion Compound 86Y-6 is a promising

  8. Prostate-specific membrane antigen targeted protein contrast agents for molecular imaging of prostate cancer by MRI†

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Fan; Salarian, Mani; Xue, Shenghui; Qiao, Jingjuan; Feng, Jie; Tan, Shanshan; Patel, Anvi; Li, Xin; Mamouni, Kenza; Hekmatyar, Khan; Zou, Juan; Wu, Daqing

    2017-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high resolution has yet to be achieved due to the lack of contrast agents with significantly improved relaxivity for sensitivity, targeting capabilities and metal selectivity. We have previously reported our creation of a novel class of protein Gd3+ contrast agents, ProCA32, which displayed significantly improved relaxivity while exhibiting strong Gd3+ binding selectivity over physiological metal ions. In this study, we report our effort in further developing biomarker-targeted protein MRI contrast agents for molecular imaging of PSMA. Among three PSMA targeted contrast agents engineered with addition of different molecular recognition sequences, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits a binding affinity of 1.1 ± 0.1 μM for PSMA while the metal binding affinity is maintained at 0.9 ± 0.1 × 10−22 M. In addition, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits r1 of 27.6 mM−1 s−1 and r2 of 37.9 mM−1 s−1 per Gd (55.2 and 75.8 mM−1 s−1 per molecule r1 and r2, respectively) at 1.4 T. At 7 T, ProCA32.PSMA also has r2 of 94.0 mM−1 s−1 per Gd (188.0 mM−1 s−1 per molecule) and r1 of 18.6 mM−1 s−1 per Gd (37.2 mM−1 s−1 per molecule). This contrast capability enables the first MRI enhancement dependent on PSMA expression levels in tumor bearing mice using both T1 and T2-weighted MRI at 7 T. Further development of these PSMA-targeted contrast agents are expected to be used for the precision imaging of prostate cancer at an early stage and to monitor disease progression and staging, as well as determine the effect of therapeutic treatment by non-invasive evaluation of the PSMA level using MRI. PMID:26961235

  9. Demarcating SurA Activities Required for Outer Membrane Targeting of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Adhesins

    PubMed Central

    Obi, Ikenna R.

    2013-01-01

    SurA is a periplasmic protein folding factor involved in chaperoning and trafficking of outer membrane proteins across the Gram-negative bacterial periplasm. In addition, SurA also possesses peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase activity. We have previously reported that in enteropathogenic Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, SurA is needed for bacterial virulence and envelope integrity. In this study, we investigated the role of SurA in the assembly of important Yersinia adhesins. Using genetic mutation, biochemical characterization, and an in vitro-based bacterial host cell association assay, we confirmed that surface localization of the invasin adhesin is dependent on SurA. As a surA deletion also has some impact on the levels of individual components of the BAM complex in the Yersinia outer membrane, abolished invasin surface assembly could reflect both a direct loss of SurA-dependent periplasmic targeting and a potentially compromised BAM complex assembly platform in the outer membrane. To various degrees, the assembly of two other adhesins, Ail and the pH 6 antigen fibrillum PsaA, also depends on SurA. Consequently, loss of SurA leads to a dramatic reduction in Yersinia attachment to eukaryotic host cells. Genetic complementation of surA deletion mutants indicated a prominent role for SurA chaperone function in outer membrane protein assembly. Significantly, the N terminus of SurA contributed most of this SurA chaperone function. Despite a dominant chaperoning role, it was also evident that SurA isomerization activity did make a modest contribution to this assembly process. PMID:23589578

  10. Negative membrane curvature catalyzes nucleation of endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT)-III assembly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Il-Hyung; Kai, Hiroyuki; Carlson, Lars-Anders; Groves, Jay T; Hurley, James H

    2015-12-29

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery functions in HIV-1 budding, cytokinesis, multivesicular body biogenesis, and other pathways, in the course of which it interacts with concave membrane necks and bud rims. To test the role of membrane shape in regulating ESCRT assembly, we nanofabricated templates for invaginated supported lipid bilayers. The assembly of the core ESCRT-III subunit CHMP4B/Snf7 is preferentially nucleated in the resulting 100-nm-deep membrane concavities. ESCRT-II and CHMP6 accelerate CHMP4B assembly by increasing the concentration of nucleation seeds. Superresolution imaging was used to visualize CHMP4B/Snf7 concentration in a negatively curved annulus at the rim of the invagination. Although Snf7 assemblies nucleate slowly on flat membranes, outward growth onto the flat membrane is efficiently nucleated at invaginations. The nucleation behavior provides a biophysical explanation for the timing of ESCRT-III recruitment and membrane scission in HIV-1 budding.

  11. A conserved amphipathic helix is required for membrane tubule formation by Yop1p

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Jacob P.; Claridge, Jolyon K.; Smith, Peter G.; Schnell, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    The integral membrane proteins of the DP1 (deleted in polyposis) and reticulon families are responsible for maintaining the high membrane curvature required for both smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER) tubules and the edges of ER sheets, and mutations in these proteins lead to motor neuron diseases, such as hereditary spastic paraplegia. Reticulon/DP1 proteins contain reticulon homology domains (RHDs) that have unusually long hydrophobic segments and are proposed to adopt intramembrane helical hairpins that stabilize membrane curvature. We have characterized the secondary structure and dynamics of the DP1 family protein produced from the YOP1 gene (Yop1p) and identified a C-terminal conserved amphipathic helix (APH) that, on its own, interacts strongly with negatively charged membranes and is necessary for membrane tubule formation. Analyses of DP1 and reticulon family members indicate that most, if not all, contain C-terminal sequences capable of forming APHs. Together, these results indicate that APHs play a previously unrecognized role in RHD membrane curvature stabilization. PMID:25646439

  12. Prostate-specific membrane antigen targeted protein contrast agents for molecular imaging of prostate cancer by MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Fan; Salarian, Mani; Xue, Shenghui; Qiao, Jingjuan; Feng, Jie; Tan, Shanshan; Patel, Anvi; Li, Xin; Mamouni, Kenza; Hekmatyar, Khan; Zou, Juan; Wu, Daqing; Yang, Jenny J.

    2016-06-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high resolution has yet to be achieved due to the lack of contrast agents with significantly improved relaxivity for sensitivity, targeting capabilities and metal selectivity. We have previously reported our creation of a novel class of protein Gd3+ contrast agents, ProCA32, which displayed significantly improved relaxivity while exhibiting strong Gd3+ binding selectivity over physiological metal ions. In this study, we report our effort in further developing biomarker-targeted protein MRI contrast agents for molecular imaging of PSMA. Among three PSMA targeted contrast agents engineered with addition of different molecular recognition sequences, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits a binding affinity of 1.1 +/- 0.1 μM for PSMA while the metal binding affinity is maintained at 0.9 +/- 0.1 × 10-22 M. In addition, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits r1 of 27.6 mM-1 s-1 and r2 of 37.9 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (55.2 and 75.8 mM-1 s-1 per molecule r1 and r2, respectively) at 1.4 T. At 7 T, ProCA32.PSMA also has r2 of 94.0 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (188.0 mM-1 s-1 per molecule) and r1 of 18.6 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (37.2 mM-1 s-1 per molecule). This contrast capability enables the first MRI enhancement dependent on PSMA expression levels in tumor bearing mice using both T1 and T2-weighted MRI at 7 T. Further development of these PSMA-targeted contrast agents are expected to be used for the precision imaging of prostate cancer at an early stage and to monitor disease progression and staging, as well as determine the effect of therapeutic treatment by non-invasive evaluation of the PSMA level using MRI.Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high

  13. Surface swarming motility by Pectobacterium atrosepticum is a latent phenotype that requires O antigen and is regulated by quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Steven D; Hale, Nicola; Chung, Jade C S; Hodgkinson, James T; Spring, David R; Welch, Martin

    2013-11-01

    We describe a previously cryptic phenotype associated with the opportunistic phytopathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pca): surface swarming. We found that when Pca was spotted onto plates containing <0.5% (w/v) agar, the culture produced copious amounts of extracellular matrix material containing highly motile cells. Once produced, this 'slime layer' spread rapidly across the plate either as an advancing front or as tendrils. Transposon mutagenesis was used to identify mutants that were affected in swarming. Hypo-swarmer mutants mostly carried insertions in a horizontally acquired island (HAI5), which encodes a cluster of genes involved in O antigen biosynthesis. Hyper-swarmer mutants mostly carried insertions in hexY, a known antagonist of the class I flagellar master regulator, FlhD4C2. In addition, we found that the nucleoid protein, histone-like nuclear structuring protein 2 (H-NS2), also regulated swarming behaviour. A mutant in which hns2 was overexpressed displayed a hyper-swarming phenotype, whereas a mutant in which the hns2 ORF was inactivated had a hypo-swarming phenotype. Swarming was also regulated by quorum sensing (QS) and by the carbon source being utilized. We show, using a range of epistasis experiments, that optimal swarming requires both motility and O antigen biosynthesis, and that H-NS2 and QS both promote swarming through their effects on motility.

  14. HIV-1 requires Arf6-mediated membrane dynamics to efficiently enter and infect T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    García-Expósito, Laura; Barroso-González, Jonathan; Puigdomènech, Isabel; Machado, José-David; Blanco, Julià; Valenzuela-Fernández, Agustín

    2011-01-01

    As the initial barrier to viral entry, the plasma membrane along with the membrane trafficking machinery and cytoskeleton are of fundamental importance in the viral cycle. However, little is known about the contribution of plasma membrane dynamics during early human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Considering that ADP ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) regulates cellular invasion via several microorganisms by coordinating membrane trafficking, our aim was to study the function of Arf6-mediated membrane dynamics on HIV-1 entry and infection of T lymphocytes. We observed that an alteration of the Arf6–guanosine 5′-diphosphate/guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP/GDP) cycle, by GDP-bound or GTP-bound inactive mutants or by specific Arf6 silencing, inhibited HIV-1 envelope–induced membrane fusion, entry, and infection of T lymphocytes and permissive cells, regardless of viral tropism. Furthermore, cell-to-cell HIV-1 transmission of primary human CD4+ T lymphocytes was inhibited by Arf6 knockdown. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy showed that Arf6 mutants provoked the accumulation of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-biphosphate–associated structures on the plasma membrane of permissive cells, without affecting CD4-viral attachment but impeding CD4-dependent HIV-1 entry. Arf6 silencing or its mutants did not affect fusion, entry, and infection of vesicular stomatitis virus G–pseudotyped viruses or ligand-induced CXCR4 or CCR5 endocytosis, both clathrin-dependent processes. Therefore we propose that efficient early HIV-1 infection of CD4+ T lymphocytes requires Arf6-coordinated plasma membrane dynamics that promote viral fusion and entry. PMID:21346189

  15. Detection of Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen at Picomolar Levels Using Biocatalysis Coupled to Assisted Ion Transfer Voltammetry at a Liquid-Organogel Microinterface Array.

    PubMed

    Akter, Rashida; Arrigan, Damien W M

    2016-12-06

    A label-free electrochemical strategy for the detection of a cancer biomarker, prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), at picomolar concentrations without the use of antibodies, was investigated. The approach is based on the assisted ion transfer of protons, generated by a series of enzymatic reactions, at an array of microinterfaces between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (μ-ITIES). This nonredox electrochemical approach based on biocatalysis-coupled proton transfer at the μ-ITIES array opens a new way to detect the prostate cancer biomarker, with detection capability achieved at concentrations below those indicative of disease presence. The strategy is expected to contribute to cancer diagnostics, recurrence monitoring, and therapeutic treatment efficacy.

  16. Prostate-specific Membrane Antigen-targeted Ligand Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Immunohistochemical Findings in a Patient With Synchronous Metastatic Penile and Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Froehner, Michael; Kuithan, Friederike; Zöphel, Klaus; Heberling, Ulrike; Laniado, Michael; Wirth, Manfred P

    2017-03-01

    A 68-year-old man presented with synchronous metastatic penile and prostate cancer. 68Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeted ligand positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PSMA-PET/CT) revealed tracer uptake in inguinal, pelvic, and retroperitoneal metastases. Lymph node biopsies and immunohistochemical staining revealed that both cancers involved the lymph nodes and expressed PSMA. In the deposits of penile squamous cell carcinoma, PSMA expression was seen in tumor vessels and may explain the PSMA-PET/CT positivity of inguinal nodes involved in squamous cell carcinoma. The interpretation of imaging in synchronous tumors should take this fact into consideration.

  17. Image of the Month: Multifocal 68Ga Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Ligand Uptake in the Skeleton in a Man With Both Prostate Cancer and Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Isabel; Maurer, Tobias; Steiger, Katja; Schwaiger, Markus; Eiber, Matthias

    2017-03-31

    Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) HBED-CC PET/CT in a 65-year-old man with first diagnosis of prostate cancer (PC) and a history of multiple myeloma showing multifocal PSMA ligand uptake in the skeleton with corresponding osteolytic lesions in CT. Although osteolytic bone metastases are very rare in PC, PSMA expression in PET raised the suspicion of PC bone metastases. Bone marrow biopsy excluded PC metastases with immunohistochemistry showing endothelial expression of PSMA in small vessels within the myeloma.

  18. Flourodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scan may be helpful in the case of ductal variant prostate cancer when prostate specific membrane antigen ligand positron emission tomography scan is negative.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Louise M; Wong, David; Yaxley, John

    2017-03-28

    Gallium-68 prostate specific membrane antigen ligand (Ga-68 PSMA) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanning is emerging as a useful imaging modality for the staging of suspected and known recurrent or metastatic prostate cancer and in staging of newly diagnosed higher grade prostate cancer. However, we have observed at our institution that in some cases of the more aggressive ductal variant, Ga-68 PSMA uptake has sometimes been poor compared with prominent 18-flourodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) avidity seen in F-18 FDG PET/CT, which would suggest that FDG PET/CT scans are important in staging of ductal pattern prostate cancer.

  19. Development of Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Inhibitors Coupled to 99mTc(CO)3+ with Enhanced Specific Activity for SPECT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Paul; D.; Benny,; Clifford; Berkman,; Jeffery; Bryan

    2011-12-20

    The overall objectives of the project were two fold: 1) the development of new facile reactions for coupling radioactive complexes with biomolecules and 2) the development of a novel molecular imaging targeting vector for Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) for prostate cancer. The didactic approach allowed the synergistic exploration of new technologies for coupling reactions of radioactive complexes that can be applied to a novel targeting moiety. As part of the project, a number of students (undergraduate, graduate and post-doctoral) were trained in radiochemical techniques for preparing and characterizing radiometal complexes. Results from the experiments within the project have generated several presentations and publications.

  20. The immunodominant outer membrane antigen of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is located in the serotype-specific high-molecular-mass carbohydrate moiety of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Page, R C; Sims, T J; Engel, L D; Moncla, B J; Bainbridge, B; Stray, J; Darveau, R P

    1991-01-01

    Most patients with juvenile periodontitis manifest serum antibodies, sometimes at very high titers, to antigens of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, but the antigens inducing the immune response have been only partly characterized. We separated A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype b cells into protein, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and soluble polysaccharide fractions and characterized them. Coomassie blue- and silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels were used to detect protein and LPS components, and gas-liquid chromatography was used to determine their carbohydrate and fatty acid composition. Western blots, dot blots, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition with high-titer sera from juvenile periodontitis patients revealed which components were highest in antibody binding activity. These results showed that the major portion of the immunoglobulin G binding activity resides in the purified mannan-free LPS, with lesser amounts in the total protein fraction. Using Sephacryl S-300 chromatography, we separated LPS into high-molecular-mass components with high carbohydrate contents by gas-liquid chromatography and a low-molecular-mass component consisting mainly of lipid A and the inner core sugar heptulose. The results of quantitative dot blot assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition show that the serotype-specific antibody binding activity is highly concentrated in the high-molecular-mass carbohydrate-rich LPS fraction and is almost completely absent in the low-molecular-weight lipid-rich fraction. Our observations contrast with previous reports that the predominant serotype antigen of A. actinomycetemcomitans resides in a mannan-rich polysaccharide isolated from spent culture medium. These observations support the conclusion that the immunodominant antigen of the outer membrane is the O antigen of the LPS. Images PMID:1716610

  1. Membrane transporters as machines: degenerate singularities as a requirement for function.

    PubMed

    Daniel, R W; Boyd, C A R

    2005-01-21

    It is suggested that Membrane Transporter functionality is based on low energy paths between proteins of different conformations. A simple extension of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is used to reduce the protein structure problem to one of the kinematics of engineering mechanisms. Such low energy paths between conformations with the same handedness imply the existence of degenerate singularities in the engineering mechanism. The requirement for degeneracy leads to a number of conjectures. These include the structure and function of chaperones for constructing such proteins and the thermodynamic properties of membrane transporters.

  2. Proteomic study via a non-gel based approach of meningococcal outer membrane vesicle vaccine obtained from strain CU385: a road map for discovering new antigens.

    PubMed

    Gil, Jeovanis; Betancourt, L Zaro H; Sardiñas, Gretel; Yero, Daniel; Niebla, Olivia; Delgado, Maité; García, Darien; Pajón, Rolando; Sánchez, Aniel; González, Luis J; Padrón, Gabriel; Campa, Concepción; Sotolongo, Franklin; Barberó, Ramón; Guillén, Gerardo; Herrera, Luis; Besada, Vladimir

    2009-05-01

    This work presents the results from a study of the protein composition of outer membrane vesicles from VA-MENGOC-BC (Finlay Institute, Cuba), an available vaccine against serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis. Proteins were identified by means of SCAPE, a 2DE-free method for proteome studies. More than one hundred proteins were detected by tandem liquid chromatographymass spectrometry analysis of fractions enriched in peptides devoid of histidine or arginine residues, providing a detailed description of the vaccine. A bioinformatic analysis of the identified components resulted in the identification of 31 outer membrane proteins and three conserved hypothetical proteins, allowing the cloning, expression, purification and immunological study of two of them (NMB0088 and NMB1796) as new antigens.

  3. Antigen persistence is required for dendritic cell licensing and CD8+ T cell cross-priming.

    PubMed

    Jusforgues-Saklani, Hélène; Uhl, Martin; Blachère, Nathalie; Lemaître, Fabrice; Lantz, Olivier; Bousso, Philippe; Braun, Deborah; Moon, James J; Albert, Matthew L

    2008-09-01

    It has been demonstrated that CD4(+) T cells require Ag persistence to achieve effective priming, whereas CD8(+) T cells are on "autopilot" after only a brief exposure. This finding presents a disturbing conundrum as it does not account for situations in which CD8(+) T cells require CD4(+) T cell help. We used a physiologic in vivo model to study the requirement of Ag persistence for the cross-priming of minor histocompatibility Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells. We report inefficient cross-priming in situations in which male cells are rapidly cleared. Strikingly, the failure to achieve robust CD8(+) T cell activation is not due to a problem with cross-presentation. In fact, by providing "extra help" in the form of dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with MHC class II peptide, it was possible to achieve robust activation of CD8(+) T cells. Our data suggest that the "licensing" of cross-presenting DCs does not occur during their initial encounter with CD4(+) T cells, thus accounting for the requirement for Ag persistence and suggesting that DCs make multiple interactions with CD8(+) T cells during the priming phase. These findings imply that long-lived Ag is critical for efficient vaccination protocols in which the CD8(+) T cell response is helper-dependent.

  4. Isolation of cDNA clones for a 50 kDa glycoprotein of the human erythrocyte membrane associated with Rh (rhesus) blood-group antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Ridgwell, K; Spurr, N K; Laguda, B; MacGeoch, C; Avent, N D; Tanner, M J

    1992-10-01

    The Rh blood-group antigens are associated with human erythrocyte membrane proteins of approx. 30 kDa (the Rh30 polypeptides). Heterogeneously glycosylated membrane proteins of 50 and 45 kDa (the Rh50 glycoproteins) are coprecipitated with the Rh30 polypeptides on immunoprecipitation with anti-Rh-specific mono- and poly-clonal antibodies. We have isolated cDNA clones representing a member of the Rh50 glycoprotein family (the Rh50A glycoprotein). We used PCR with degenerate primers based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the Rh50 glycoproteins and human genomic DNA as a template and cloned and sequenced three types of PCR product of the expected size. Two of these products, Rh50A and Rh50B, gave the same translated amino acid sequence which corresponded to the expected Rh50 glycoprotein sequence but had only 75% DNA sequence similarity. The third product (Rh50C) contained a single base deletion, and the translated amino acid sequence contained an in-frame stop codon. We have isolated cDNA clones containing the full coding sequence of the Rh50A glycoprotein. This sequence predicts that it is a 409-amino acid N-glycosylated membrane protein with up to 12 transmembrane domains. The Rh50A glycoprotein shows clear similarity to the Rh30A protein in both amino acid sequence and predicted topology. Our results are consistent with the Rh30 and Rh50 groups of proteins being different subunits of an oligomeric complex which is likely to have a transport or channel function in the erythrocyte membrane. We mapped the Rh50A gene to human chromosome 6p21-qter, showing that genetic differences in the Rh30 rather than the Rh50 genes specify the major polymorphic forms of the Rh antigens.

  5. 89Zr-DFO-J591 for immunoPET of prostate-specific membrane antigen expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Holland, Jason P; Divilov, Vadim; Bander, Neil H; Smith-Jones, Peter M; Larson, Steven M; Lewis, Jason S

    2010-08-01

    (89)Zr (half-life, 78.41 h) is a positron-emitting radionuclide that displays excellent potential for use in the design and synthesis of radioimmunoconjugates for immunoPET. In the current study, we report the preparation of (89)Zr-desferrioxamine B (DFO)-J591, a novel (89)Zr-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) construct for targeted immunoPET and quantification of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression in vivo. The in vivo behavior of (89)Zr-chloride, (89)Zr-oxalate, and (89)Zr-DFO was studied using PET. High-level computational studies using density functional theory calculations have been used to investigate the electronic structure of (89)Zr-DFO and probe the nature of the complex in aqueous conditions. (89)Zr-DFO-J591 was characterized both in vitro and in vivo. ImmunoPET in male athymic nu/nu mice bearing subcutaneous LNCaP (PSMA-positive) or PC-3 (PSMA-negative) tumors was conducted. The change in (89)Zr-DFO-J591 tissue uptake in response to high- and low-specific-activity formulations in the 2 tumor models was measured using acute biodistribution studies and immunoPET. The basic characterization of 3 important reagents-(89)Zr-chloride, (89)Zr-oxalate, and the complex (89)Zr-DFO-demonstrated that the nature of the (89)Zr species dramatically affects the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics. Density functional theory calculations provide a rationale for the observed high in vivo stability of (89)Zr-DFO-labeled mAbs and suggest that in aqueous conditions, (89)Zr-DFO forms a thermodynamically stable, 8-coordinate complex by coordination of 2 water molecules. (89)Zr-DFO-J591 was produced in high radiochemical yield (>77%) and purity (>99%), with a specific activity of 181.7 +/- 1.1 MBq/mg (4.91 +/- 0.03 mCi/mg). In vitro assays demonstrated that (89)Zr-DFO-J591 had an initial immunoreactive fraction of 0.95 +/- 0.03 and remained active for up to 7 d. In vivo biodistribution experiments revealed high, target-specific uptake of (89)Zr-DFO-J591 in LNCa

  6. IgE-Mediated Enhancement of CD4+ T Cell Responses in Mice Requires Antigen Presentation by CD11c+ Cells and Not by B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Henningsson, Frida; Ding, Zhoujie; Dahlin, Joakim S.; Linkevicius, Marius; Carlsson, Fredrik; Grönvik, Kjell-Olov; Hallgren, Jenny; Heyman, Birgitta

    2011-01-01

    IgE antibodies, administered to mice together with their specific antigen, enhance antibody and CD4+ T cell responses to this antigen. The effect is dependent on the low affinity receptor for IgE, CD23, and the receptor must be expressed on B cells. In vitro, IgE-antigen complexes are endocytosed via CD23 on B cells, which subsequently present the antigen to CD4+ T cells. This mechanism has been suggested to explain also IgE-mediated enhancement of immune responses in vivo. We recently found that CD23+ B cells capture IgE-antigen complexes in peripheral blood and rapidly transport them to B cell follicles in the spleen. This provides an alternative explanation for the requirement for CD23+ B cells. The aim of the present study was to determine whether B-cell mediated antigen presentation of IgE-antigen complexes explains the enhancing effect of IgE on immune responses in vivo. The ability of spleen cells, taken from mice 1–4 h after immunization with IgE-antigen, to present antigen to specific CD4+ T cells was analyzed. Antigen presentation was intact when spleens were depleted of CD19+ cells (i.e., primarily B cells) but was severely impaired after depletion of CD11c+ cells (i.e., primarily dendritic cells). In agreement with this, the ability of IgE to enhance proliferation of CD4+ T cells was abolished in CD11c-DTR mice conditionally depleted of CD11c+ cells. Finally, the lack of IgE-mediated enhancemen of CD4+ T cell responses in CD23-/- mice could be rescued by transfer of MHC-II-compatible as well as by MHC-II-incompatible CD23+ B cells. These findings argue against the idea that IgE-mediated enhancement of specific CD4+ T cell responses in vivo is caused by increased antigen presentation by B cells. A model where CD23+ B cells act as antigen transporting cells, delivering antigen to CD11c+ cells for presentation to T cells is consistent with available experimental data. PMID:21765910

  7. Triggered Ca2+ influx is required for extended synaptotagmin 1-induced ER-plasma membrane tethering

    PubMed Central

    Idevall-Hagren, Olof; Lü, Alice; Xie, Beichen; De Camilli, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    The extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts) are ER proteins that act as Ca2+-regulated tethers between the ER and the plasma membrane (PM) and have a putative role in lipid transport between the two membranes. Ca2+ regulation of their tethering function, as well as the interplay of their different domains in such function, remains poorly understood. By exposing semi-intact cells to buffers of variable Ca2+ concentrations, we found that binding of E-Syt1 to the PI(4,5)P2-rich PM critically requires its C2C and C2E domains and that the EC50 of such binding is in the low micromolar Ca2+ range. Accordingly, E-Syt1 accumulation at ER-PM contact sites occurred only upon experimental manipulations known to achieve these levels of Ca2+ via its influx from the extracellular medium, such as store-operated Ca2+ entry in fibroblasts and membrane depolarization in β-cells. We also show that in spite of their very different physiological functions, membrane tethering by E-Syt1 (ER to PM) and by synaptotagmin (secretory vesicles to PM) undergo a similar regulation by plasma membrane lipids and cytosolic Ca2+. PMID:26202220

  8. Triggered Ca2+ influx is required for extended synaptotagmin 1-induced ER-plasma membrane tethering.

    PubMed

    Idevall-Hagren, Olof; Lü, Alice; Xie, Beichen; De Camilli, Pietro

    2015-09-02

    The extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts) are ER proteins that act as Ca(2+)-regulated tethers between the ER and the plasma membrane (PM) and have a putative role in lipid transport between the two membranes. Ca(2+) regulation of their tethering function, as well as the interplay of their different domains in such function, remains poorly understood. By exposing semi-intact cells to buffers of variable Ca(2+) concentrations, we found that binding of E-Syt1 to the PI(4,5)P2-rich PM critically requires its C2C and C2E domains and that the EC50 of such binding is in the low micromolar Ca(2+) range. Accordingly, E-Syt1 accumulation at ER-PM contact sites occurred only upon experimental manipulations known to achieve these levels of Ca(2+) via its influx from the extracellular medium, such as store-operated Ca(2+) entry in fibroblasts and membrane depolarization in β-cells. We also show that in spite of their very different physiological functions, membrane tethering by E-Syt1 (ER to PM) and by synaptotagmin (secretory vesicles to PM) undergo a similar regulation by plasma membrane lipids and cytosolic Ca(2+). © 2015 The Authors.

  9. Immuno-proteomic analysis of human immune responses to experimental Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane vesicle vaccines identifies potential cross-reactive antigens.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jeannette N; Weynants, Vincent; Poolman, Jan T; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron

    2014-03-05

    Human volunteers were vaccinated with experimental Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B vaccines based on strain H44/76 detoxified L3 lipooligosaccharide (LOS)-derived outer membrane vesicles (OMV) or the licensed Cuban vaccine, VA-MENGOC-BC. Some volunteers were able to elicit cross-bactericidal antibodies against heterologous L2-LOS strain (760676). An immuno-proteomic approach was used to identify potential targets of these cross-bactericidal antibodies using an L2-LOS derived OMV preparation. A total of nine immuno-reactive spots were detected in this proteome: individuals vaccinated with the detoxified OMVs showed an increase in post-vaccination serum reactivity with Spots 2-8, but not with Spots 1 and 9. Vaccination with VA-MENGOC-BC induced sera that showed increased reactivity with all of the protein spots. Vaccinees showed increases in serum bactericidal activity (SBA) against the heterologous L2-LOS expressing strain 760676, which correlated, in general, with immunoblot reactivity. The identities of proteins within the immuno-reactive spots were determined. These included not only well-studied antigens such as Rmp, Opa, PorB and FbpA (NMB0634), but also identified novel antigens such as exopolyphosphatase (NMB1467) and γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (NMB1057) enzymes and a putative cell binding factor (NMB0345) protein. Investigating the biological properties of such novel antigens may provide candidates for the development of second generation meningococcal vaccines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic diversity and natural selection at the domain I of apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) of Plasmodium falciparum in isolates from Iran.

    PubMed

    Mardani, Ahmad; Keshavarz, Hossein; Heidari, Aliehsan; Hajjaran, Homa; Raeisi, Ahmad; Khorramizadeh, Mohammad Reza

    2012-04-01

    The apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) of Plasmodium falciparum is a prime malaria asexual blood-stage vaccine candidate. Antigenic variation is one of the main obstacles in the development of a universal effective malaria vaccine. The extracellular region of P. falciparum AMA-1 (PfAMA-1) consists of three domains (I-III), of which the domain I is the most diverse region of this antigen. The objective of our study was to investigate and analyze the extent of genetic diversity and the effectiveness of natural selection at the AMA-1 domain I of P. falciparum in isolates from Iran. A fragment of ama-1 gene spanning domain I was amplified by nested PCR from 48 P. falciparum isolates collected from two major malaria endemic areas of Iran during 2009 to August 2010 and sequenced. Genetic polymorphism and statistical analyses were performed using DnaSP and MEGA software packages. Analysis of intrapopulation diversity revealed relatively high nucleotide and haplotype diversity at the PfAMA-1 domain I of Iranian isolates. Neutrality tests provided strong evidence of positive natural selection acting on the sequenced gene region. The findings also demonstrated that, in addition to natural selection, intragenic recombination may contribute to the diversity observed at the domain I. The results obtained will have significant implications in the design and the development of an AMA-1-based vaccine against falciparum malaria. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Membranous nephropathy as a manifestation of graft-versus-host disease: association with HLA antigen typing, phospholipase A2 receptor, and C4d.

    PubMed

    Byrne-Dugan, Cathryn J; Collins, A Bernard; Lam, Albert Q; Batal, Ibrahim

    2014-12-01

    Glomerulopathy is an uncommon but increasingly recognized complication of hematopoietic cell transplantation. It typically manifests as membranous nephropathy, less commonly as minimal change disease, and rarely as proliferative glomerulonephritis. There is evidence to suggest that these glomerulopathies might represent manifestations of chronic graft-versus-host disease. In this report, we focus on membranous nephropathy as the most common form of glomerulopathy after hematopoietic cell transplantation. We present a case of membranous nephropathy that developed 483 days post-allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a patient with a history of acute graft-versus-host disease. We also share our experience with 4 other cases of membranous nephropathy occurring after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Clinicopathologic correlates, including the association with graft-versus-host-disease, HLA antigen typing, glomerular deposition of immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclasses, subepithelial colocalization of IgG deposits with phospholipase A2 receptor staining, C4d deposition along the peritubular capillaries, and treatment, are discussed with references to the literature.

  12. Persistence of antigen is required to maintain transplantation tolerance induced by genetic modification of bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, C; Bagley, J; Iacomini, J

    2006-09-01

    Genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) resulting in a state of molecular chimerism can be used to induce donor-specific tolerance to allografts. However, the requirements for maintaining tolerance in molecular chimeras remain unknown. Here, we examined whether long-term expression of a retrovirally encoded alloantigen in hematopoietic cells is required to maintain donor-specific tolerance in molecular chimeras. To this end, mice were reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow transduced with retroviruses carrying the gene encoding the allogeneic MHC class I molecule Kb. Following induction of molecular chimerism, mice were depleted of cells expressing Kb by administration of the anti-Kb monoclonal antibody Y-3. Mice that were effectively depleted of cells expressing the retrovirally encoded MHC class I antigen rejected Kb disparate skin allografts. In contrast, control molecular chimeras accepted Kb disparate skin allografts indefinitely. These data suggest maintenance of tolerance in molecular chimeras requires long-term expression of retrovirally transduced alloantigen on the progeny of retrovirally transduced HSCs.

  13. Direct effects of ionizing radiation on integral membrane proteins. Noncovalent energy transfer requires specific interpeptide interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jhun, E.; Jhun, B.H.; Jones, L.R.; Jung, C.Y. )

    1991-05-25

    The 12 transmembrane alpha helices (TMHs) of human erythrocyte glucose transporter were individually cut by pepsin digestion as membrane-bound 2.5-3.5-kDa peptide fragments. Radiation-induced chemical degradation of these fragments showed an average target size of 34 kDa. This is 10-12 x larger than the average size of an individual TMH, demonstrating that a significant energy transfer occurs among these TMHs in the absence of covalent linkage. Heating this TMH preparation at 100{degree}C for 15 min reduced the target size to 5 kDa or less, suggesting that the noncovalent energy transfer requires specific helix-helix interactions. Purified phospholamban, a small (6-kDa) integral membrane protein containing a single TMH, formed a pentameric assembly in sodium dodecyl sulfate. The chemical degradation target size of this phospholamban pentamer was 5-6 kDa, illustrating that not all integral membrane protein assemblies permit intersubunit energy transfer. These findings together with other published observations suggest strongly that significant noncovalent energy transfer can occur within the tertiary and quaternary structure of membrane proteins and that as yet undefined proper molecular interactions are required for such covalent energy transfer. Our results with pepsin-digested glucose transporter also illustrate the importance of the interhelical interaction as a predominating force in maintaining the tertiary structure of a transmembrane protein.

  14. Rac1-induced cell migration requires membrane recruitment of the nuclear oncogene SET.

    PubMed

    ten Klooster, Jean Paul; Leeuwen, Ingrid v; Scheres, Nina; Anthony, Eloise C; Hordijk, Peter L

    2007-01-24

    The Rho GTPase Rac1 controls cell adhesion and motility. The effector loop of Rac1 mediates interactions with downstream effectors, whereas its C-terminus binds the exchange factor beta-Pix, which mediates Rac1 targeting and activation. Here, we report that Rac1, through its C-terminus, also binds the nuclear oncogene SET/I2PP2A, an inhibitor of the serine/threonine phosphatase PP2A. We found that SET translocates to the plasma membrane in cells that express active Rac1 as well as in migrating cells. Membrane targeting of SET stimulates cell migration in a Rac1-dependent manner. Conversely, reduction of SET expression inhibits Rac1-induced migration, indicating that efficient Rac1 signalling requires membrane recruitment of SET. The recruitment of the SET oncogene to the plasma membrane represents a new feature of Rac1 signalling. Our results suggest a model in which Rac1-stimulated cell motility requires both effector loop-based downstream signalling and recruitment of a signalling amplifier, that is, SET, through the hypervariable C-terminus.

  15. Rac1-induced cell migration requires membrane recruitment of the nuclear oncogene SET

    PubMed Central

    ten Klooster, Jean Paul; Leeuwen, Ingrid v; Scheres, Nina; Anthony, Eloise C; Hordijk, Peter L

    2007-01-01

    The Rho GTPase Rac1 controls cell adhesion and motility. The effector loop of Rac1 mediates interactions with downstream effectors, whereas its C-terminus binds the exchange factor β-Pix, which mediates Rac1 targeting and activation. Here, we report that Rac1, through its C-terminus, also binds the nuclear oncogene SET/I2PP2A, an inhibitor of the serine/threonine phosphatase PP2A. We found that SET translocates to the plasma membrane in cells that express active Rac1 as well as in migrating cells. Membrane targeting of SET stimulates cell migration in a Rac1-dependent manner. Conversely, reduction of SET expression inhibits Rac1-induced migration, indicating that efficient Rac1 signalling requires membrane recruitment of SET. The recruitment of the SET oncogene to the plasma membrane represents a new feature of Rac1 signalling. Our results suggest a model in which Rac1-stimulated cell motility requires both effector loop-based downstream signalling and recruitment of a signalling amplifier, that is, SET, through the hypervariable C-terminus. PMID:17245428

  16. Analysis of humoral immune response and cytokines in chickens vaccinated with Eimeria brunetti apical membrane antigen-1 (EbAMA1) DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hoan, Tran Duc; Thao, Doan Thi; Gadahi, Javaid Ali; Song, Xiaokai; Xu, Lixin; Yan, Ruofeng; Li, Xiangrui

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the changes of cytokines, specific serum IgG and several parameters in chickens vaccinated with DNA vaccine encoding Eimeria brunetti apical membrane antigen-1 (EbAMA1) antigen. Two-week-old chickens were divided into five groups (four groups for experiment) randomly. Experimental groups of chickens were immunized with DNA vaccine while control group of chickens were injected with pVAX1 plasmid alone or TE buffer solution. All immunizations were boosted 2 weeks later. The EbAMA1 specific IgG antibody responses were measured at weeks 1-6 post-second immunizations and several parameters were also identified. The result showed that the antibody titers in chickens vaccinated with DNA vaccines were significantly different from those of the control groups 1 week after the second immunization and reached the maximum values 3 weeks post-second immunization. IFN-γ concentration was increased the highest level against EbAMA1 of all chickens vaccinated with vaccines up to 56-fold, follow by the specific IgG antibody levels were increased 10-17-fold compared with those of TE solution and plasmid (pVAX1) control chickens 1-6 weeks post-second immunization. In case of the levels of IL-10 and IL-17 was increased in experimental chickens with 4-5-fold. Even though it was statistically significant, TGF-β and IL-4 levels were higher in vaccinated than unvaccinated chickens. The results suggested that DNA vaccines encoding E. brunetti apical membrane antigen-1 (EbAMA1) could increase serum specific IgG antibody and cytokines concentration and could give protection against E. brunetti infection.

  17. cDNA cloning of a 30 kDa erythrocyte membrane protein associated with Rh (Rhesus)-blood-group-antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Avent, N D; Ridgwell, K; Tanner, M J; Anstee, D J

    1990-11-01

    The Rh-blood-group antigens (often described as Rhesus antigens) are associated with erythrocyte membrane proteins of approx. 30 kDa. We have determined the N-terminal 54 amino acid residues of the 30 kDa Rh D polypeptide (D30 polypeptide). We used primers based on these sequence data and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on human reticulocyte cDNA and genomic DNA to clone two types of PCR product of identical size. The two PCR products had related translated amino acid sequences between the 3' ends of the primers, one of which was identical with that found for the D30 polypeptide. We designate the two related mRNA species which gave rise to the PCR products as Rh30A and Rh30B, the latter corresponding to the D30 polypeptide. We have isolated cDNA clones for the Rh30A protein which encode a hydrophobic membrane protein of 417 amino acids. The Rh30A protein has the same N-terminal 41 amino acids as the D30 polypeptide, but beyond this point the sequence differs, but is clearly related. The Rh30A protein probably corresponds to the R6A32 polypeptide, another member of the Rh 30 kDa family of proteins, which may carry the C/c and/or E/e antigens. Hydropathy analysis suggests that the Rh30A protein has up to 12 transmembrane domains. Three of these domains are bordered by a novel cysteine-containing motif, which might signal substitutions at these cysteine residues. Information which supplements this paper (amino-acid-sequence-analysis histograms) is reported in Supplementary Publication SUP 50160 (4 pages), which has been deposited at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1990) 265, 5.

  18. B cell-mediated antigen presentation is required for the pathogenesis of acute cardiac allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Noorchashm, Hooman; Reed, Amy J; Rostami, Susan Y; Mozaffari, Raha; Zekavat, Ghazal; Koeberlein, Brigitte; Caton, Andrew J; Naji, Ali

    2006-12-01

    Acute allograft rejection requires the activation of alloreactive CD4 T cells. Despite the capacity of B cells to act as potent APCs capable of activating CD4 T cells in vivo, their role in the progression of acute allograft rejection was unclear. To determine the contribution of B cell APC function in alloimmunity, we engineered mice with a targeted deficiency of MHC class II-mediated Ag presentation confined to the B cell compartment. Cardiac allograft survival was markedly prolonged in these mice as compared to control counterparts (median survival time, >70 vs 9.5 days). Mechanistically, deficient B cell-mediated Ag presentation disrupted both alloantibody production and the progression of CD4 T cell activation following heart transplantation. These findings demonstrate that indirect alloantigen presentation by recipients' B cells plays an important role in the efficient progression of acute vascularized allograft rejection.

  19. Transcription of a cis-acting, Noncoding, Small RNA Is Required for Pilin Antigenic Variation in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Cahoon, Laty A.; Seifert, H. Steven

    2013-01-01

    The strict human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae can utilize homologous recombination to generate antigenic variability in targets of immune surveillance. To evade the host immune response, N. gonorrhoeae promotes high frequency gene conversion events between many silent pilin copies and the expressed pilin locus (pilE), resulting in the production of variant pilin proteins. Previously, we identified a guanine quartet (G4) structure localized near pilE that is required for the homologous recombination reactions leading to pilin antigenic variation (Av). In this work, we demonstrate that inactivating the promoter of a small non-coding RNA (sRNA) that initiates within the G4 forming sequence blocks pilin Av. The sRNA promoter is conserved in all sequenced gonococcal strains, and mutations in the predicted transcript downstream of the G4 forming sequence do not alter pilin Av. A mutation that produces a stronger promoter or substitution of the pilE G4-associated sRNA promoter with a phage promoter (when the phage polymerase was expressed) produced wild-type levels of pilin Av. Altering the direction and orientation of the pilE G4-associated sRNA disrupted pilin Av. In addition, expression of the sRNA at a distal site on the gonococcal chromosome in the context of a promoter mutant did not support pilin Av. We conclude that the DNA containing the G-rich sequence can only form the G4 structure during transcription of this sRNA, thus providing a unique molecular step for the initiation of programmed recombination events. PMID:23349628

  20. Processing and presentation of an antigen of Mycobacterium avium require access to an acidified compartment with active proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Holsti, M A; Allen, P M

    1996-01-01

    We have generated a murine T-cell hybridoma, 1C9, which recognizes an antigen expressed by a virulent clinical isolate of Mycobacterium avium. Both peritoneal exudate macrophages and bone marrow-derived macrophages infected in vitro with M. avium process and present the antigen to the T-cell hybridoma. Gel filtration chromatography of a sonicate of M. avium followed by T-cell Western blotting (immunoblotting) demonstrated that the antigen recognized by hybridoma 1C9 is approximately 50 kDa. In addition, treatment of macrophages with the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine or with inhibitors of acid proteases inhibits processing and presentation of the antigen. These results indicate that the antigen must encounter an acidic compartment with active proteases for processing and presentation to occur. Our results are discussed in the context of our current understanding of how mycobacterial antigens are processed and presented by infected macrophages to T cells. PMID:8926074

  1. Membrane Ia expression and antigen-presenting accessory cell function of L cells transfected with class II major histocompatibility complex genes

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    To study the relationship between the structure and function of Ia antigens, as well as the physiologic requirements for antigen presentation to major histocompatibility complex-restricted T cells, class II A alpha and A beta genes from the k and d haplotypes were transfected into Ltk- fibroblasts using the calcium phosphate coprecipitation technique. Individually transfected genes were actively transcribed in the L cells without covalent linkage to, or cotransformation with, viral enhancer sequences. However, cell surface expression of detectable I-A required the presence of transfected A alpha dA beta d or A alpha kA beta k pairs in a single cell. The level of I-A expression under these conditions was 1/5-1/10 that of Ia+ B lymphoma cells, or B lymphoma cells expressing transfected class II genes. These I-A-expressing transfectants were tested for accessory cell function and shown to present polypeptide and complex protein antigens to T cell clones and hybridomas in the context of the transfected gene products. One T cell clone, restricted to I-Ak plus GAT (L-glutamic acid60-L-alanine30-L-tyrosine10), had a profound cytotoxic effect on I-Ak- but not I-Ad-expressing transfectants in the presence of specific antigen. Assays of unprimed T cells showed that both Ia+ and Ia- L cells could serve as accessory cells for concanavalin A-induced proliferative responses. These data indicate that L cells can transcribe, translate, and express transfected class II genes and that such I-A-bearing L cells possess the necessary metabolic mechanisms for presenting these antigens to T lymphocytes in the context of their I-A molecules. PMID:6436430

  2. Crystal Structure of TDP-Fucosamine Acetyl Transferase (WECD) from Escherichia Coli, an Enzyme Required for Enterobacterial Common Antigen Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hung,M.; Rangarajan, E.; Munger, C.; Nadeau, G.; Sulea, T.; Matte, A.

    2006-01-01

    Enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) is a polysaccharide found on the outer membrane of virtually all gram-negative enteric bacteria and consists of three sugars, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-D-mannosaminuronic acid, and 4-acetamido-4,6-dideoxy-D-galactose, organized into trisaccharide repeating units having the sequence {yields}(3)-{alpha}-D-Fuc4NAc-(1{yields}4)-{beta}-D-ManNAcA-(1{yields}4)-{alpha}-D-GlcNAc-(1{yields}). While the precise function of ECA is unknown, it has been linked to the resistance of Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 to organic acids and the resistance of Salmonella enterica to bile salts. The final step in the synthesis of 4-acetamido-4,6-dideoxy-D-galactose, the acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent acetylation of the 4-amino group, is carried out by TDP-fucosamine acetyltransferase (WecD). We have determined the crystal structure of WecD in apo form at a 1.95-Angstroms resolution and bound to acetyl-CoA at a 1.66-Angstroms resolution. WecD is a dimeric enzyme, with each monomer adopting the GNAT N-acetyltransferase fold, common to a number of enzymes involved in acetylation of histones, aminoglycoside antibiotics, serotonin, and sugars. The crystal structure of WecD, however, represents the first structure of a GNAT family member that acts on nucleotide sugars. Based on this cocrystal structure, we have used flexible docking to generate a WecD-bound model of the acetyl-CoA-TDP-fucosamine tetrahedral intermediate, representing the structure during acetyl transfer. Our structural data show that WecD does not possess a residue that directly functions as a catalytic base, although Tyr208 is well positioned to function as a general acid by protonating the thiolate anion of coenzyme A.

  3. Tuning of Hemes b Equilibrium Redox Potential Is Not Required for Cross-Membrane Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Pintscher, Sebastian; Kuleta, Patryk; Cieluch, Ewelina; Borek, Arkadiusz; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-03-25

    In biological energy conversion, cross-membrane electron transfer often involves an assembly of two hemesb The hemes display a large difference in redox midpoint potentials (ΔEm_b), which in several proteins is assumed to facilitate cross-membrane electron transfer and overcome a barrier of membrane potential. Here we challenge this assumption reporting on hemebligand mutants of cytochromebc1in which, for the first time in transmembrane cytochrome, one natural histidine has been replaced by lysine without loss of the native low spin type of heme iron. With these mutants we show that ΔEm_b can be markedly increased, and the redox potential of one of the hemes can stay above the level of quinone pool, or ΔEm_b can be markedly decreased to the point that two hemes are almost isopotential, yet the enzyme retains catalytically competent electron transfer between quinone binding sites and remains functionalin vivo This reveals that cytochromebc1can accommodate large changes in ΔEm_b without hampering catalysis, as long as these changes do not impose overly endergonic steps on downhill electron transfer from substrate to product. We propose that hemesbin this cytochrome and in other membranous cytochromesbact as electronic connectors for the catalytic sites with no fine tuning in ΔEm_b required for efficient cross-membrane electron transfer. We link this concept with a natural flexibility in occurrence of several thermodynamic configurations of the direction of electron flow and the direction of the gradient of potential in relation to the vector of the electric membrane potential. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. CD8+ T Cell Fate and Function Influenced by Antigen-Specific Virus-Like Nanoparticles Co-Expressing Membrane Tethered IL-2

    PubMed Central

    Wojta-Stremayr, Daniela; Neunkirchner, Alina; Srinivasan, Bharani; Trapin, Doris; Schmetterer, Klaus G.; Pickl, Winfried F.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of adjuvants fostering humoral immunity are known as of today. However, there is a lack of adjuvants or adjuvant strategies, which directly target T cellular effector functions and memory. We here determined whether systemically toxic cytokines such as IL-2 can be restricted to the site of antigen presentation and used as ‘natural adjuvants’. Therefore, we devised antigen-presenting virus-like nanoparticles (VNP) co-expressing IL-2 attached to different membrane-anchors and assessed their potency to modulate CD8+ T cell responses in vitro and in vivo. Efficient targeting of IL-2 to lipid rafts and ultimately VNP was achieved by fusing IL-2 at its C-terminus to a minimal glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor acceptor sequence. To identify optimal membrane-anchor dimensions we inserted one (1Ig), two (2Ig) or four (4Ig) immunoglobulin(Ig)-like domains of CD16b between IL-2 and the minimal GPI-anchor acceptor sequence of CD16b (GPI). We found that the 2IgGPI version was superior to all other evaluated IL-2 variants (IL-2v) in terms of its i) degree of targeting to lipid rafts and to the VNP surface, ii) biological activity, iii) co-stimulation of cognate T cells in the absence of bystander activation and iv) potency to induce differentiation and acquisition of CD8+ T cell effector functions in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, the GPI version rather favored memory precursor cell formation. These results exemplify novel beneficial features of membrane-bound IL-2, which in addition to its mere T cell stimulatory capacity include the induction of differential effector and memory functions in CD8+ T lymphocytes. PMID:25946103

  5. Lysosome-associated membrane glycoprotein 1 predicts fratricide amongst T cell receptor transgenic CD8+ T cells directed against tumor-associated antigens

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Andreas; Thiede, Melanie; Blaeschke, Franziska; Richter, Günther H.S.; Gerke, Julia S.; Baldauf, Michaela C.; Grünewald, Thomas G.P.; Busch, Dirk H.; Burdach, Stefan; Thiel, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Aim Autologous as well as allogeneic CD8+ T cells transduced with tumor antigen specific T cell receptors (TCR) may cause significant tumor lysis upon adoptive transfer. Besides unpredictable life-threatening off-target effects, these TCRs may unexpectedly commit fratricide. We hypothesized lysosome-associated membrane glycoprotein 1 (LAMP1, CD107a) to be a marker for fratricide in TCR transgenic CD8+ T cells. Methods We identified HLA-A*02:01/peptide-restricted T cells directed against ADRB3295. After TCR identification, we generated HLA-A*02:01/peptide restricted TCR transgenic T cells by retroviral transduction and tested T cell expansion rates as well as A*02:01/peptide recognition and ES killing in ELISpot and xCELLigence assays. Expansion arrest was analyzed via Annexin and CD107a staining. Results were compared to CHM1319-TCR transgenic T cells. Results Beta-3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) as well as chondromodulin-1 (CHM1) are over-expressed in Ewing Sarcoma (ES) but not on T cells. TCR transgenic T cells demonstrated HLA-A*02:01/ADRB3295 mediated ES recognition and killing in ELISpot and xCELLigence assays. 24h after TCR transduction, CD107a expression correlated with low expansion rates due to apoptosis of ADRB3 specific T cells in contrast to CHM1 specific transgenic T cells. Amino-acid exchange scans clearly indicated the cross-reactive potential of HLA-A*02:01/ADRB3295- and HLA-A*02:01/CHM1319-TCR transgenic T cells. Comparison of peptide motive binding affinities revealed extended fratricide among ADRB3295 specific TCR transgenic T cells in contrast to CHM1319. Conclusion Amino-acid exchange scans alone predict TCR cross-reactivity with little specificity and thus require additional assessment of potentially cross-reactive HLA-A*02:01 binding candidates. CD107a positivity is a marker for fratricide of CD8+ TCR transgenic T cells. PMID:27447745

  6. Proteaselike sequence in hepatitis B virus core antigen is not required for e antigen generation and may not be part of an aspartic acid-type protease.

    PubMed Central

    Nassal, M; Galle, P R; Schaller, H

    1989-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) C gene directs the synthesis of two major gene products: HBV core antigen (HBcAg[p21c]), which forms the nucleocapsid, and HBV e antigen (HBeAg [p17e]), a secreted antigen that is produced by several processing events during its maturation. These proteins contain an amino acid sequence similar to the active-site residues of aspartic acid and retroviral proteases. On the basis of this sequence similarity, which is highly conserved among mammalian hepadnaviruses, a model has been put forward according to which processing to HBeAg is due to self-cleavage of p21c involving the proteaselike sequence. Using site-directed mutagenesis in conjunction with transient expression of HBV proteins in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2, we tested this hypothesis. Our results with HBV mutants in which one or two of the conserved amino acids have been replaced by others suggest strongly that processing to HBeAg does not depend on the presence of an intact proteaselike sequence in the core protein. Attempts to detect an influence of this sequence on the processing of HBV P gene products into enzymatically active viral polymerase also gave no conclusive evidence for the existence of an HBV protease. Mutations replacing the putatively essential aspartic acid showed little effect on polymerase activity. Additional substitution of the likewise conserved threonine residue by alanine, in contrast, almost abolished the activity of the polymerase. We conclude that an HBV protease, if it exists, is functionally different from aspartic acid and retroviral proteases. Images PMID:2657101

  7. Biological and biochemical properties of Nonidet P40-solubilized and partially purified tumor-specific antigens of the transplantation type from plasma membranes of a methylcholanthrene-induced sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Natori, T; Law, L W; Appella, E

    1977-09-01

    Tumor-specific transplantation antigen (TSTA) was solubilized from cell membranes of sarcoma Meth-A with non-ionic detergent Nonidet P40. Soluble TSTA was partially characterized by chromatographic separation and electrophoresis. The antigen responsible for tumor rejection activity had a molecular weight of approximately 70,000 daltons in the presence of detergent and an electrophoretic mobility of alpha-globulin. TSTA was well separated from mouse histocompatibility antigen H-2 by a sequence of procedures, including gel filtration, lectin affinity chromatography, column electrophoresis, and rechromatography on agarose, showed only three major bands on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. TSTA was specific for sarcoma Meth-A.

  8. Neisserial outer membrane vesicles bind the coinhibitory receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule 1 and suppress CD4+ T lymphocyte function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hannah S W; Boulton, Ian C; Reddin, Karen; Wong, Henry; Halliwell, Denise; Mandelboim, Ofer; Gorringe, Andrew R; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2007-09-01

    Pathogenic Neisseria bacteria naturally liberate outer membrane "blebs," which are presumed to contribute to pathology, and the detergent-extracted outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from Neisseria meningitidis are currently employed as meningococcal vaccines in humans. While the composition of these vesicles reflects the bacteria from which they are derived, the functions of many of their constituent proteins remain unexplored. The neisserial colony opacity-associated Opa proteins function as adhesins, the majority of which mediate bacterial attachment to human carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules (CEACAMs). Herein, we demonstrate that the Opa proteins within OMV preparations retain the capacity to bind the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif-containing coinhibitory receptor CEACAM1. When CD4(+) T lymphocytes were exposed to OMVs from Opa-expressing bacteria, their activation and proliferation in response to a variety of stimuli were effectively halted. This potent immunosuppressive effect suggests that localized infection will generate a "zone of inhibition" resulting from the diffusion of membrane blebs into the surrounding tissues. Moreover, it demonstrates that OMV-based vaccines must be developed from strains that lack CEACAM1-binding Opa variants.

  9. Topology of Legionella pneumophila DotA: an inner membrane protein required for replication in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Roy, C R; Isberg, R R

    1997-01-01

    The Legionella pneumophila dotA gene is required for intracellular growth of the bacterium in macrophages. In this study, a structure-function analysis of the DotA protein was conducted to elucidate the role of this protein in L. pneumophila pathogenesis. Translational fusions of dotA to the Escherichia coli phoA and lacZ genes indicated that DotA is an integral cytoplasmic membrane protein with eight membrane-spanning domains. DotA contains two large periplasmic domains of approximately 503 and 73 amino acids and a carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic domain of 122 amino acids. Protein fractionation studies were consistent with DotA residing in the inner membrane. An alkaline phosphatase fusion located 9 amino acids upstream from the C terminus of DotA still retained function and was able to restore intracellular growth when harbored by two L. pneumophila dotA mutants. A hybrid protein from which the carboxyl-terminal 48 amino acids of DotA were deleted was unable to complement the intracellular growth defect in the dotA mutants, indicating that this cytoplasmic region is required for function. PMID:9009315

  10. Membranes replace irradiated blast cells as growth requirement for leukemic blast progenitors in suspension culture

    SciTech Connect

    Nara, N.; McCulloch, E.A.

    1985-11-01

    The blast cells of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) may be considered as a renewal population, maintained by blast stem cells capable of both self-renewal and the generation of progeny with reduced or absent proliferative potential. This growth requires that two conditions be met: first, the cultures must contain growth factors in media conditioned either by phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated mononuclear leukocytes (PHA-LCM), or by cells of the continuous bladder carcinoma line HTB9 (HTB9-CM). Second, the cell density must be maintained at 10(6) blasts/ml; this may be achieved by adding irradiated cells to smaller numbers of intact blasts. The authors are concerned with the mechanism of the feeding function. They present evidence that (a) cell-cell contact is required. (b) Blasts are heterogeneous in respect to their capacity to support growth. (c) Fractions containing membranes from blast cells will substitute for intact cells in promoting the generation of new blast progenitors in culture. (d) This membrane function may be specific for AML blasts, since membranes from blasts of lymphoblastic leukemia or normal marrow cells were inactive.

  11. Phosphorylation at tyrosine 114 of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) is required for adipogenesis in response to high fat diet

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Yuan-Hung; Ho, Po-Chun; Chen, Min-Shan; Hugo, Eric; Ben-Jonathan, Nira; Wang, Shao-Chun

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) is phosphorylated at Y114. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phospho-Y114 of PCNA is not required for cell proliferation for normal growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MCE during adipogenesis is abolished in the lack of the phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homozygous Y114F mice are resistant to high fat diet induced obesity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results shed light on the interface between proliferation and differentiation. -- Abstract: Clonal proliferation is an obligatory component of adipogenesis. Although several cell cycle regulators are known to participate in the transition between pre-adipocyte proliferation and terminal adipocyte differentiation, how the core DNA synthesis machinery is coordinately regulated in adipogenesis remains elusive. PCNA (Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen) is an indispensable component for DNA synthesis during proliferation. Here we show that PCNA is subject to phosphorylation at the highly conserved tyrosine residue 114 (Y114). Replacing the Y114 residue with phenylalanine (Y114F), which is structurally similar to tyrosine but cannot be phosphorylated, does not affect normal animal development. However, when challenged with high fat diet, mice carrying homozygous Y114F alleles (PCNA{sup F/F}) are resistant to adipose tissue enlargement in comparison to wild-type (WT) mice. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) harboring WT or Y114F mutant PCNA proliferate at similar rates. However, when subjected to adipogenesis induction in culture, PCNA{sup F/F} MEFs are not able to re-enter the cell cycle and fail to form mature adipocytes, while WT MEFs undergo mitotic clonal expansion in response to the adipogenic stimulation, accompanied by enhanced Y114 phosphorylation of PCNA, and differentiate to mature adipocytes. Consistent with the function of Y114 phosphorylation in clonal proliferation in adipogenesis, fat tissues isolated from WT

  12. Phospholipase treatment of accessory cells that have been exposed to antigen selectively inhibits antigen-specific Ia-restricted, but not allospecific, stimulation of T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Falo, L D; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1986-01-01

    The corecognition of antigen and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules (Ia molecules) by the T-cell receptor is a cell surface event. Before antigen is recognized, it must be taken up, processed, and displayed on the surface of an Ia-bearing accessory cell (antigen-presenting cell, APC). The exact nature of antigen processing and the subsequent associations of antigen with the APC plasma membrane, Ia molecules, and/or the T-cell receptor are not well defined. To further analyze these events, we have characterized the processing and presentation of the soluble polypeptide antigen bovine insulin. We found that this antigen requires APC-dependent processing, as evidenced by the inability of metabolically inactivated APCs to present native antigen to antigen plus Ia-specific T-T hybridomas. The ability of the same APCs to present antigen after uptake and processing showed that this antigen subsequently becomes stably associated with the APC plasma membrane. To characterize the basis for this association, we analyzed its sensitivity to enzymatic digestion. APCs exposed to antigen, treated with phospholipase A2, and then immediately fixed lost the ability to stimulate bovine insulin plus I-Ad-specific hybridomas. In contrast, the ability of these same APCs to stimulate I-Ad allospecific hybridomas was unaffected. This effect of phospholipase is not mimicked by the broadly active protease Pronase, nor is there evidence for contaminating proteases in the phospholipase preparation. These results suggest that one consequence of antigen processing may be an antigen-lipid association that contributes to the anchoring of antigen to the APC membrane. The implications of this model are discussed. PMID:3529095

  13. Linker Modification Strategies To Control the Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA)-Targeting and Pharmacokinetic Properties of DOTA-Conjugated PSMA Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Benešová, Martina; Bauder-Wüst, Ulrike; Schäfer, Martin; Klika, Karel D; Mier, Walter; Haberkorn, Uwe; Kopka, Klaus; Eder, Matthias

    2016-03-10

    Since prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is up-regulated in nearly all stages of prostate cancer (PCa), PSMA can be considered as a viable diagnostic biomarker and treatment target in PCa. This project is focused on the development and evaluation of a series of compounds directed against PSMA. The modifications to the linker are designed to improve the binding potential and pharmacokinetics for theranostic application. In addition, the results help to further elucidate the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of the resulting PSMA inhibitors. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments of 18 synthesized PSMA inhibitor variants showed that systematic chemical modification of the linker has a significant impact on the tumor-targeting and pharmacokinetic properties. This approach can lead to an improved management of patients suffering from recurrent prostate cancer by the use of one radiolabeling precursor, which can be radiolabeled either with (68)Ga for diagnosis or with (177)Lu or (225)Ac for therapy.

  14. Detection of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis patients with the 38-kilodalton antigen from Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a rapid membrane-based assay.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, A T; Ma, W L; Zhang, P Y; Cole, R A

    1996-01-01

    A rapid membrane-based serologic assay using the 38-kDa antigen from Mycobacterium tuberculosis for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) was evaluated with 201 patients with pulmonary TB, 67 patients with extrapulmonary TB, 79 Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated healthy controls, and 77 non-TB respiratory patients. The overall sensitivities, specificities, and positive and negative predictive values were, respectively, 92, 92, 84, and 96% for sputum-positive TB patients; 70, 92, 87, and 79% for sputum-negative TB patients; and 76, 92, 80, and 90% for extrapulmonary-TB patients. Only 2% (1 of 44) of the healthy control BCG-vaccinated subjects gave weak positive signals in the assay, indicating that this rapid serological assay is a valuable aid in clinical diagnosis for both pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB. PMID:8705680

  15. Prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeted liposomes specifically deliver the Zn2+ chelator TPEN inducing oxidative stress in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Christopher H; Singh, Ravi; Smith, Thomas L; D’Agostino, Ralph; Caudell, David; Balaji, KC; Gmeiner, William H

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the potential use of zinc chelation for prostate cancer therapy using a new liposomal formulation of the zinc chelator, N,N,N’,N’-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)-ethylenediamine (TPEN). Materials & methods: TPEN was encapsulated in nontargeted liposomes or liposomes displaying an aptamer to target prostate cancer cells overexpression prostate-specific membrane antigen. The prostate cancer selectivity and therapeutic efficacy of liposomal (targeted and nontargeted) and free TPEN were evaluated in vitro and in tumor-bearing mice. Results & conclusion: TPEN chelates zinc and results in reactive oxygen species imbalance leading to cell death. Delivery of TPEN using aptamer-targeted liposomes results in specific delivery to targeted cells. In vivo experiments show that TPEN-loaded, aptamer-targeted liposomes reduce tumor growth in a human prostate cancer xenograft model. PMID:27077564

  16. Monoclonal antibodies requiring coating buffer with low pH for efficient antigen capture in sandwich ELISA: the rarities or practically important phenomena?

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Alexander D; Tarakanova, Julia N; Yakovleva, Dinora A; Dmitriev, Dmitriy A; Phartooshnaya, Olga V; Kolyaskina, Galina I; Massino, Yulia S; Borisova, Olga V; Segal, Olga L; Smirnova, Maria B; Ulanova, Tatiana I; Lavrov, Viacheslav F

    2013-01-01

    This article reexamines some opinions concerning pH requirements for optimal immobilization of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) by passive adsorption in antigen capture ELISA. It was discovered that substitution of "classical" sodium phosphate (pH 7.5) and carbonate (pH 9.5) coating solutions by acid (pH 2.8) buffers maximized antigen capture 4 out of 10 different tested anti-HBsAg mAbs, resulting in a 1.5-2.5 increase of binding curve coefficients. By measuring both mAbs amounts and functionality, the enhancement effect was attributed to the better preservation of solid phase antibodies activity.

  17. Characterization of the key antigenic components and pre-clinical immune responses to a meningococcal disease vaccine based on Neisseria lactamica outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Finney, Michelle; Vaughan, Thomas; Taylor, Stephen; Hudson, Michael J; Pratt, Catherine; Wheeler, Jun X; Vipond, Caroline; Feavers, Ian; Jones, Christopher; Findlow, Jamie; Borrow, Ray; Gorringe, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Serogroup B strains are now responsible for over 80% of meningococcal disease in the UK and no suitable vaccine is available that confers universal protection against all serogroup B strains. Neisseria lactamica shares many antigens with the meningococcus, except capsule and the surface protein PorA. Many of these antigens are thought to be responsible for providing cross-protective immunity to meningococcal disease. We have developed an N. lactamica vaccine using methods developed for meningococcal outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines. The major antigenic components were identified by excision of 11 major protein bands from an SDS-PAGE gel, followed by mass spectrometric identification. These bands contained at least 22 proteins identified from an unassembled N. lactamica genome, 15 of which having orthologues in published pathogenic Neisseria genomes. Western blotting revealed that most of these bands were immunogenic, and antibodies to these proteins generally cross-reacted with N. meningitidis proteins. Sera from mice and rabbits immunized with either N. lactamica or N. meningitidis OMVs produced comparable cross-reactive ELISA titres against OMVs prepared from a panel of diverse meningococcal strains. Mice immunized with either N. meningitidis or N. lactamica OMVs showed no detectable serum bactericidal activity against the panel of target strains except N. meningitidis OMV sera against the homologous strain. Similarly, rabbit antisera to N. lactamica OMVs elicited little or no bactericidal antibodies against the panel of serogroup B meningococcal strains. However, such antisera did mediate opsonophagocytosis, suggestingthat this may did mediate opsonophagocytosis, suggesting that this may be a mechanism by which this vaccine protects in a mouse model of meningococcal bacteraemia.

  18. Meningococcal outer membrane vesicle vaccines derived from mutant strains engineered to express factor H binding proteins from antigenic variant groups 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Koeberling, Oliver; Giuntini, Serena; Seubert, Anja; Granoff, Dan M

    2009-02-01

    Meningococcal outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines, which are treated with detergents to decrease endotoxin activity, are safe and effective in humans. However, the vaccines elicit serum bactericidal antibody responses largely directed against PorA, which is antigenically variable. We previously prepared a native (non-detergent-treated) OMV vaccine from a mutant of group B strain H44/76 in which the lpxL1 gene was inactivated, which resulted in penta-acylated lipid A with attenuated endotoxin activity. To enhance protection, we overexpressed factor H binding protein (fHbp) from the antigenic variant 1 group. The vaccine elicited broad serum bactericidal antibody responses in mice against strains with fHbp variant 1 (approximately 70% of group B isolates) but not against strains with variant 2 or 3. In the present study, we constructed a mutant of group B strain NZ98/254 with attenuated endotoxin that expressed both endogenous variant 1 and heterologous fHbp variant 2. A mixture of the two native OMV vaccines from the H44/76 and NZ98/254 mutants stimulated proinflammatory cytokine responses by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells similar to those stimulated by control, detergent-treated OMV vaccines from the wild-type strains. In mice, the mixture of the two native OMV vaccines elicited broad serum bactericidal antibody responses against strains with heterologous PorA and fHbp in the variant 1, 2, or 3 group. By adsorption studies, the principal bactericidal antibody target was determined to be fHbp. Thus, native OMV vaccines from mutants expressing fHbp variants have the potential to be safe for humans and to confer broad protection against meningococcal disease from strains expressing fHbp from each of the antigenic variant groups.

  19. Global Population Structure of the Genes Encoding the Malaria Vaccine Candidate, Plasmodium vivax Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (PvAMA1)

    PubMed Central

    Arnott, Alicia; Mueller, Ivo; Ramsland, Paul A.; Siba, Peter M.; Reeder, John C.; Barry, Alyssa E.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Plasmodium vivax Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (PvAMA1) is a promising malaria vaccine candidate, however it remains unclear which regions are naturally targeted by host immunity and whether its high genetic diversity will preclude coverage by a monovalent vaccine. To assess its feasibility as a vaccine candidate, we investigated the global population structure of PvAMA1. Methodology and Principal Findings New sequences from Papua New Guinea (PNG, n = 102) were analysed together with published sequences from Thailand (n = 158), India (n = 8), Sri Lanka (n = 23), Venezuela (n = 74) and a collection of isolates from disparate geographic locations (n = 8). A total of 92 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified including 22 synonymous SNPs and 70 non-synonymous (NS) SNPs. Polymorphisms and signatures of balancing (positive Tajima's D and low FST values) selection were predominantly clustered in domain I, suggesting it is a dominant target of protective immune responses. To estimate global antigenic diversity, haplotypes comprised of (i) non-singleton (n = 40) and (ii) common (≥10% minor allele frequency, n = 23) polymorphic amino acid sites were then analysed revealing a total of 219 and 210 distinct haplotypes, respectively. Although highly diverse, the 210 haplotypes comprised of only common polymorphisms were grouped into eleven clusters, however substantial geographic differentiation was observed, and this may have implications for the efficacy of PvAMA1 vaccines in different malaria-endemic areas. The PNG haplotypes form a distinct group of clusters not found in any other geographic region. Vaccine haplotypes were rare and geographically restricted, suggesting potentially poor efficacy of candidate PvAMA1 vaccines. Conclusions It may be possible to cover the existing global PvAMA1 diversity by selection of diverse alleles based on these analyses however it will be important to first define the

  20. The Major Antigenic Membrane Protein of “Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris” Selectively Interacts with ATP Synthase and Actin of Leafhopper Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Galetto, Luciana; Bosco, Domenico; Balestrini, Raffaella; Genre, Andrea; Fletcher, Jacqueline; Marzachì, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplasmas, uncultivable phloem-limited phytopathogenic wall-less bacteria, represent a major threat to agriculture worldwide. They are transmitted in a persistent, propagative manner by phloem-sucking Hemipteran insects. Phytoplasma membrane proteins are in direct contact with hosts and are presumably involved in determining vector specificity. Such a role has been proposed for phytoplasma transmembrane proteins encoded by circular extrachromosomal elements, at least one of which is a plasmid. Little is known about the interactions between major phytoplasma antigenic membrane protein (Amp) and insect vector proteins. The aims of our work were to identify vector proteins interacting with Amp and to investigate their role in transmission specificity. In controlled transmission experiments, four Hemipteran species were identified as vectors of “Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris”, the chrysanthemum yellows phytoplasmas (CYP) strain, and three others as non-vectors. Interactions between a labelled (recombinant) CYP Amp and insect proteins were analysed by far Western blots and affinity chromatography. Amp interacted specifically with a few proteins from vector species only. Among Amp-binding vector proteins, actin and both the α and β subunits of ATP synthase were identified by mass spectrometry and Western blots. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and Western blots of plasma membrane and mitochondrial fractions confirmed the localisation of ATP synthase, generally known as a mitochondrial protein, in plasma membranes of midgut and salivary gland cells in the vector Euscelidius variegatus. The vector-specific interaction between phytoplasma Amp and insect ATP synthase is demonstrated for the first time, and this work also supports the hypothesis that host actin is involved in the internalization and intracellular motility of phytoplasmas within their vectors. Phytoplasma Amp is hypothesized to play a crucial role in insect transmission specificity. PMID

  1. Metastasis in urothelial carcinoma mimicking prostate cancer metastasis in Ga-68 prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography-computed tomography in a case of synchronous malignancy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Manoj; Choudhury, Partha Sarathi; Gupta, Gurudutt; Gandhi, Jatin

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in man. It commonly presents with urinary symptoms, bone pain, or diagnosed with elevated prostate-specific antigen.(PSA) levels. Correct staging and early diagnosis of recurrence by a precise imaging tool are the keys for optimum management. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer with Ga-68 prostate-specific membrane antigen.(PSMA), positron emission tomography-computed tomography.(PET-CT) has recently received significant attention and frequently used with a signature to prostate cancer-specific remark. However, this case will highlight the more cautious use of it. A-72-year-old male treated earlier for synchronous double malignancy.(invasive papillary urothelial carcinoma right ureter and carcinoma prostate) presented with rising PSA.(0.51.ng/ml) and referred for Ga-68 PSMA PET-CT, which showed a positive enlarged left supraclavicular lymph node. Lymph node biopsy microscopic and immunohistochemistry examination revealed metastatic carcinoma favoring urothelial origin. Specificity of PSMA scan to prostate cancer has been seen to be compromised in a certain situation mostly due to neoangiogenesis, and false positives emerged in renal cell cancer, differentiated thyroid cancer, glioblastoma, breast cancer brain metastasis, and paravertebral schwannomas. Understanding the causes of false positive will further enhance the confidence of interpretating PSMA scans.

  2. Generation of a baculovirus recombinant prostate-specific membrane antigen and its use in the development of a novel protein biochip quantitative immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Z; Jiang, X; Beckett, M L; Wright, G L

    2000-06-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a 100-kDa transmembrane glycoprotein identified by the monoclonal antibody 7E11-C5.3 from the human prostate tumor cell line LNCaP. Because of its significant upregulation in androgen refractory and metastatic prostate cancers, PSMA may be a useful prognostic biomarker and a target for developing novel therapeutic strategies. However, the lack of abundant pure PSMA protein and the low efficacy in immunoaffinity isolation from LNCaP cells have hampered the development of clinical assays. In order to obtain a renewable and reliable source of pure antigen, we used the baculovirus/insect cell system to express and purify a recombinant PSMA. A recombinant baculovirus containing a 6x histidine-tagged PSMA gene was generated, from which rPSMA was expressed and purified using cobalt-chelating affinity chromatography. The purity and correct molecular size of rPSMA were demonstrated by gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Glycosidase digestions showed that the oligosaccharides on rPSMA are primarily N-linked high-mannose type. Although the glycosylation is different from the native PSMA, it did not affect the immunoreactivity of rPSMA to antibodies specific for either the intra- or the extracellular domains of PSMA. Finally, the purified rPSMA was successfully used to develop a quantitative PSMA immunoassay using the novel ProteinChip surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry technology. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  3. Evaluation of protective potential of Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein antigens as possible candidates for a new-generation recombinant plague vaccine.

    PubMed

    Erova, Tatiana E; Rosenzweig, Jason A; Sha, Jian; Suarez, Giovanni; Sierra, Johanna C; Kirtley, Michelle L; van Lier, Christina J; Telepnev, Maxim V; Motin, Vladimir L; Chopra, Ashok K

    2013-02-01

    Plague caused by Yersinia pestis manifests itself in bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic forms. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved levofloxacin, there is no approved human vaccine against plague. The capsular antigen F1 and the low-calcium-response V antigen (LcrV) of Y. pestis represent excellent vaccine candidates; however, the inability of the immune responses to F1 and LcrV to provide protection against Y. pestis F1(-) strains or those which harbor variants of LcrV is a significant concern. Here, we show that the passive transfer of hyperimmune sera from rats infected with the plague bacterium and rescued by levofloxacin protected naive animals against pneumonic plague. Furthermore, 10 to 12 protein bands from wild-type (WT) Y. pestis CO92 reacted with the aforementioned hyperimmune sera upon Western blot analysis. Based on mass spectrometric analysis, four of these proteins were identified as attachment invasion locus (Ail/OmpX), plasminogen-activating protease (Pla), outer membrane protein A (OmpA), and F1. The genes encoding these proteins were cloned, and the recombinant proteins purified from Escherichia coli for immunization purposes before challenging mice and rats with either the F1(-) mutant or WT CO92 in bubonic and pneumonic plague models. Although antibodies to Ail and OmpA protected mice against bubonic plague when challenged with the F1(-) CO92 strain, Pla antibodies were protective against pneumonic plague. In the rat model, antibodies to Ail provided protection only against pneumonic plague after WT CO92 challenge. Together, the addition of Y. pestis outer membrane proteins to a new-generation recombinant vaccine could provide protection against a wide variety of Y. pestis strains.

  4. Evaluation of Protective Potential of Yersinia pestis Outer Membrane Protein Antigens as Possible Candidates for a New-Generation Recombinant Plague Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Erova, Tatiana E.; Rosenzweig, Jason A.; Sha, Jian; Suarez, Giovanni; Sierra, Johanna C.; Kirtley, Michelle L.; van Lier, Christina J.; Telepnev, Maxim V.; Motin, Vladimir L.

    2013-01-01

    Plague caused by Yersinia pestis manifests itself in bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic forms. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved levofloxacin, there is no approved human vaccine against plague. The capsular antigen F1 and the low-calcium-response V antigen (LcrV) of Y. pestis represent excellent vaccine candidates; however, the inability of the immune responses to F1 and LcrV to provide protection against Y. pestis F1− strains or those which harbor variants of LcrV is a significant concern. Here, we show that the passive transfer of hyperimmune sera from rats infected with the plague bacterium and rescued by levofloxacin protected naive animals against pneumonic plague. Furthermore, 10 to 12 protein bands from wild-type (WT) Y. pestis CO92 reacted with the aforementioned hyperimmune sera upon Western blot analysis. Based on mass spectrometric analysis, four of these proteins were identified as attachment invasion locus (Ail/OmpX), plasminogen-activating protease (Pla), outer membrane protein A (OmpA), and F1. The genes encoding these proteins were cloned, and the recombinant proteins purified from Escherichia coli for immunization purposes before challenging mice and rats with either the F1− mutant or WT CO92 in bubonic and pneumonic plague models. Although antibodies to Ail and OmpA protected mice against bubonic plague when challenged with the F1− CO92 strain, Pla antibodies were protective against pneumonic plague. In the rat model, antibodies to Ail provided protection only against pneumonic plague after WT CO92 challenge. Together, the addition of Y. pestis outer membrane proteins to a new-generation recombinant vaccine could provide protection against a wide variety of Y. pestis strains. PMID:23239803

  5. Sertoliform endometrioid carcinoma of the endometrium with dual immunophenotypes for epithelial membrane antigen and inhibin alpha: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Liang, Sharon X; Patel, Kausha; Pearl, Michael; Liu, Jingxuan; Zheng, Wenxin; Tornos, Carmen

    2007-07-01

    We report a rare case of sertoliform endometrioid carcinoma of the endometrium in a 71-year-old African American woman who presented with postmenopausal bleeding. Her medical condition was remarkable for hypertension, diabetes, and obesity. She underwent total hysterectomy, right salpingo-oophorectomy and lymph node sampling. The endometrium was occupied by a 4.5-cm solid polypoid tumor, which grossly invaded into the myometrium. Microscopically, the tumor consisted of small hollow tubules, anastomosing cords and trabeculae, and tightly packed nests. Microglandular areas mimicking adult granulosa cell tumors were also present. But true Call-Exner bodies were absent. Component of typical endometrioid carcinoma was noted only focally. The uninvolved endometrium demonstrated atypical complex hyperplasia. The tumor cells were diffusely immunoreactive for epithelial membrane antigen, estrogen receptor, and progesterone receptor (PR), and focally for vimentin. The tumor cells were also diffusely positive for inhibin alpha and CD99. Immunostains for other sex cord markers (calretinin, WT-1, and Melan-A) were also positive in approximately 30% to 40% of the tumor cells. Immunostains for CD10, smooth muscle actin, desmin, or HHF35 were negative. Two ovarian sertoliform endometrioid carcinomas from our archived tissue were, however, immunoreactive for epithelial membrane antigen but negative for inhibin alpha. Despite the prominent sertoliform features, both histologically and immunohistochemically, the tumor was of a high-grade endometrial carcinoma and will likely behave as such. As of today, dual differentiation of epithelium and sex cord by immunohistochemical staining has not been demonstrated in sertoliform endometrioid carcinomas of either endometrial or ovarian origin. Our case is the first documentation of such example and suggests that endometrial carcinoma can undergo true sex cord differentiation.

  6. Antigenic Properties and Processing Requirements of 65-Kilodalton Mannoprotein, a Major Antigen Target of Anti-Candida Human T-Cell Response, as Disclosed by Specific Human T-Cell Clones

    PubMed Central

    Nisini, Roberto; Romagnoli, Giulia; Gomez, Maria Jesus; La Valle, Roberto; Torosantucci, Antonella; Mariotti, Sabrina; Teloni, Raffaela; Cassone, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    T-cell-mediated immunity is known to play a central role in the host response to Candida albicans. T-cell clones are useful tools for the exact identification of fungal T-cell epitopes and the processing requirements of C. albicans antigens. We isolated human T-cell clones from an HLA-DRB1*1101 healthy donor by using an antigenic extract (MP-F2) of the fungus. Specific clones were T-cell receptor α/β and CD4+/CD8− and showed a T-helper type 1 cytokine profile (production of gamma interferon and not interleukin-4). The large majority of these clones recognized both the natural (highly glycosylated) and the recombinant (nonglycosylated) 65-kDa mannoprotein (MP65), an MP-F2 minor constituent that was confirmed to be an immunodominant antigen of the human T-cell response. Surprisingly, most of the clones recognized two synthetic peptides of different MP65 regions. However, the peptides shared the amino acid motif IXSXIXXL, which may be envisaged as a motif sequence representing the minimal epitope recognized by these clones. Three clones recognized natural and pronase-treated MP65 but did not detect nonglycosylated, recombinant MP65 or the peptides, suggesting a possible role for polysaccharides in T-cell recognition of C. albicans. Finally, lymphoblastoid B-cell lines were efficient antigen-presenting cells (APC) for recombinant MP65 and peptides but failed to present natural, glycosylated antigens, suggesting that nonprofessional APC might be defective in processing highly glycosylated yeast proteins. In conclusion, this study provides the first characterization of C. albicans-specific human T-cell clones and provides new clues for the definition of the cellular immune response against C. albicans. PMID:11349037

  7. Normal dynactin complex function during synapse growth in Drosophila requires membrane binding by Arfaptin

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Leo; Kreko, Tabita; Davison, Holly; Cusmano, Tim; Wu, Yimin; Rothenfluh, Adrian; Eaton, Benjamin A.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in DCTN1, a component of the dynactin complex, are linked to neurodegenerative diseases characterized by a broad collection of neuropathologies. Because of the pleiotropic nature of dynactin complex function within the neuron, defining the causes of neuropathology in DCTN1 mutants has been difficult. We combined a genetic screen with cellular assays of dynactin complex function to identify genes that are critical for dynactin complex function in the nervous system. This approach identified the Drosophila homologue of Arfaptin, a multifunctional protein that has been implicated in membrane trafficking. We find that Arfaptin and the Drosophila DCTN1 homologue, Glued, function in the same pathway during synapse growth but not during axonal transport or synapse stabilization. Arfaptin physically associates with Glued and other dynactin complex components in the nervous system of both flies and mice and colocalizes with Glued at the Golgi in motor neurons. Mechanistically, membrane binding by Arfaptin mediates membrane association of the dynactin complex in motor neurons and is required for normal synapse growth. Arfaptin represents a novel dynactin complex–binding protein that specifies dynactin complex function during synapse growth. PMID:23596322

  8. Stimulation of mitochondrial proton conductance by hydroxynonenal requires a high membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Parker, Nadeene; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Brand, Martin D

    2008-04-01

    Mild uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, caused by a leak of protons back into the matrix, limits mitochondrial production of ROS (reactive oxygen species). This proton leak can be induced by the lipid peroxidation products of ROS, such as HNE (4-hydroxynonenal). HNE activates uncoupling proteins (UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3) and ANT (adenine nucleotide translocase), thereby providing a negative feedback loop. The mechanism of activation and the conditions necessary to induce uncoupling by HNE are unclear. We have found that activation of proton leak by HNE in rat and mouse skeletal muscle mitochondria is dependent on incubation with respiratory substrate. In the presence of HNE, mitochondria energized with succinate became progressively more leaky to protons over time compared with mitochondria in the absence of either HNE or succinate. Energized mitochondria must attain a high membrane potential to allow HNE to activate uncoupling: a drop of 10-20 mV from the resting value is sufficient to blunt induction of proton leak by HNE. Uncoupling occurs through UCP3 (11%), ANT (64%) and other pathways (25%). Our findings have shown that exogenous HNE only activates uncoupling at high membrane potential. These results suggest that both endogenous HNE production and high membrane potential are required before mild uncoupling will be triggered to attenuate mitochondrial ROS production.

  9. Requirement for three signals in B cell responses. II. Analysis of antigen- and Ia-restricted T helper cell-B cell interaction

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We have recently reported that resting B cells must receive at least three different signals in a T helper cell (TH)-dependent as well as in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced B cell response (3), i.e., a specific TH signal (that can be bypassed by LPS), a nonspecific TH signal (mediated by Ia or antigen-nonspecific B cell helper factor), and an antigen (hapten) signal. In a system using male (H-Y) antigen- specific cloned TH of C57BL/6 origin and male (or female) B cells, we now confirm and extend these findings by demonstrating that H-Y- specific TH must see both H-Y and Ia determinants on the B cells (and not only on macrophages) to provide the first specific TH signal required for a plaque-forming cell (PFC) response. This signal was interfered with by a monoclonal anti-I-Ab antibody at the B cell level, was not mediated by detectable soluble factors (in contrast to the nonspecific signal also provided by the TH), and could be bypassed by LPS, in which case anti-I-Ab antibody had no effect. However, although the H-Y-specific TH induced a polyclonal PFC response (B cell differentiation) in the apparent absence of an antigen seen by the B cells, significant clonal expansion of PFC precursors occurred only when the B cells also recognized an antigen (hapten). PMID:6980255

  10. Using the AD12-ICT rapid-format test to detect Wuchereria bancrofti circulating antigens in comparison to Og4C3-ELISA and nucleopore membrane filtration and microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    El-Moamly, Amal Abdul-Rasheed; El-Sweify, Mohamed Aly; Hafez, Mohamad Abdul

    2012-09-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) continues to be a major source of permanent disability and an impediment to socio-economic development in 73 countries where more than 1 billion people are at risk and over 120 millions are infected. The global drive to eliminate LF necessitates an increasing demand for valid, reliable and rapid diagnostic tests. This study aimed to assess the performance of the AD12 rapid format immunochromatographic test (ICT) to detect Wuchereria bancrofti circulating antigens, against the combined gold standard: TropBio Og4C3-ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) which detects circulating filarial antigen (CFA) and the nucleopore membrane filtration and microscopic examination. This prospective case-control study involved 647 asymptomatic migrant workers from filariasis-endemic countries. Of these specimens, 32 were positive for microfilaremia using the membrane filtration and microscopy, 142 positive by ELISA (of which 32 had microfilaremia), and 128 positive by the ICT (of which 31 had microfilaremia). The performance of the ICT was calculated against 32 true-positive and 90 true-negative cases. For the detection of CFA, the ICT had a sensitivity of 97% (95% confidence interval [CI] 91-103), specificity 100% (95% CI 100-100), Positive Predictive Value (PPV) 100% (95% CI 100-100), Negative Predictive Value (NPV) 99% (95% CI 97-101); and the total accuracy of the test was 99% (95% CI 98-101). The agreement between ICT and ELISA in detecting W. bancrofti antigens was excellent (kappa = 0.934; p = 0.000). In conclusion, the AD12-ICT test for the detection of W. bancrofti-CFA was sensitive and specific and comparable to the performance of ELISA. The ICT would be a useful additional test to facilitate the proposed strategies for control and elimination of LF. Because it is rapid, simple to perform, and does not require the use of special equipment, the ICT may be most appropriate in screening programs and in monitoring the possible risk of introducing

  11. 18F-DCFBC Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen-Targeted PET/CT Imaging in Localized Prostate Cancer: Correlation With Multiparametric MRI and Histopathology.

    PubMed

    Turkbey, Baris; Mena, Esther; Lindenberg, Liza; Adler, Stephen; Bednarova, Sandra; Berman, Rose; Ton, Anita T; McKinney, Yolanda; Eclarinal, Philip; Hill, Craig; Afari, George; Bhattacharyya, Sibaprasad; Mease, Ronnie C; Merino, Maria J; Jacobs, Paula M; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A; Pomper, Martin G; Choyke, Peter L

    2017-10-01

    To assess the ability of (N-[N-[(S)-1,3-dicarboxypropyl]carbamoyl]-4-F-fluorobenzyl-L-cysteine) (F-DCFBC), a prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeted PET agent, to detect localized prostate cancer lesions in correlation with multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) and histopathology. This Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996-compliant, prospective, institutional review board-approved study included 13 evaluable patients with localized prostate cancer (median age, 62.8 years [range, 51-74 years]; median prostate-specific antigen, 37.5 ng/dL [range, 3.26-216 ng/dL]). Patients underwent mpMRI and F-DCFBC PET/CT within a 3 months' window. Lesions seen on mpMRI were biopsied under transrectal ultrasound/MRI fusion-guided biopsy, or a radical prostatectomy was performed. F-DCFBC PET/CT and mpMRI were evaluated blinded and separately for tumor detection on a lesion basis. For PET image analysis, MRI and F-DCFBC PET images were fused by using software registration; imaging findings were correlated with histology, and uptake of F-DCFBC in tumors was compared with uptake in benign prostatic hyperplasia nodules and normal peripheral zone tissue using the 80% threshold SUVmax. A total of 25 tumor foci (mean size, 1.8 cm; median size, 1.5 cm; range, 0.6-4.7 cm) were histopathologically identified in 13 patients. Sensitivity rates of F-DCFBC PET/CT and mpMRI were 36% and 96%, respectively, for all tumors. For index lesions, the largest tumor with highest Gleason score, sensitivity rates of F-DCFBC PET/CT and mpMRI were 61.5% and 92%, respectively. The average SUVmax for primary prostate cancer was higher (5.8 ± 4.4) than that of benign prostatic hyperplasia nodules (2.1 ± 0.3) or that of normal prostate tissue (2.1 ± 0.4) at 1 hour postinjection (P = 0.0033). The majority of index prostate cancers are detected with F-DCFBC PET/CT, and this may be a prognostic indicator based on uptake and staging. However, for detecting prostate cancer with high sensitivity, it

  12. Membrane penetration by synaptotagmin is required for coupling calcium binding to vesicle fusion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Brie E; Wang, Zhao; Biela, Laurie M; Chen, Kaiyun; Getzy, Michael D; Striegel, Amelia; Richmond, Janet E; Chapman, Edwin R; Featherstone, David E; Reist, Noreen E

    2011-02-09

    The vesicle protein synaptotagmin I is the Ca(2+) sensor that triggers fast, synchronous release of neurotransmitter. Specifically, Ca(2+) binding by the C(2)B domain of synaptotagmin is required at intact synapses, yet the mechanism whereby Ca(2+) binding results in vesicle fusion remains controversial. Ca(2+)-dependent interactions between synaptotagmin and SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment receptor) complexes and/or anionic membranes are possible effector interactions. However, no effector-interaction mutations to date impact synaptic transmission as severely as mutation of the C(2)B Ca(2+)-binding motif, suggesting that these interactions are facilitatory rather than essential. Here we use Drosophila to show the functional role of a highly conserved, hydrophobic residue located at the tip of each of the two Ca(2+)-binding pockets of synaptotagmin. Mutation of this residue in the C(2)A domain (F286) resulted in a ∼50% decrease in evoked transmitter release at an intact synapse, again indicative of a facilitatory role. Mutation of this hydrophobic residue in the C(2)B domain (I420), on the other hand, blocked all locomotion, was embryonic lethal even in syt I heterozygotes, and resulted in less evoked transmitter release than that in syt(null) mutants, which is more severe than the phenotype of C(2)B Ca(2+)-binding mutants. Thus, mutation of a single, C(2)B hydrophobic residue required for Ca(2+)-dependent penetration of anionic membranes results in the most severe disruption of synaptotagmin function in vivo to date. Our results provide direct support for the hypothesis that plasma membrane penetration, specifically by the C(2)B domain of synaptotagmin, is the critical effector interaction for coupling Ca(2+) binding with vesicle fusion.

  13. General secretion pathway (eps) genes required for toxin secretion and outer membrane biogenesis in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Sandkvist, M; Michel, L O; Hough, L P; Morales, V M; Bagdasarian, M; Koomey, M; DiRita, V J; Bagdasarian, M

    1997-11-01

    The general secretion pathway (GSP) of Vibrio cholerae is required for secretion of proteins including chitinase, enterotoxin, and protease through the outer membrane. In this study, we report the cloning and sequencing of a DNA fragment from V. cholerae, containing 12 open reading frames, epsC to -N, which are similar to GSP genes of Aeromonas, Erwinia, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, and Xanthomonas spp. In addition to the two previously described genes, epsE and epsM (M. Sandkvist, V. Morales, and M. Bagdasarian, Gene 123: 81-86, 1993; L. J. Overbye, M. Sandkvist, and M. Bagdasarian, Gene 132:101-106, 1993), it is shown here that epsC, epsF, epsG, and epsL also encode proteins essential for GSP function. Mutations in the eps genes result in aberrant outer membrane protein profiles, which indicates that the GSP, or at least some of its components, is required not only for secretion of soluble proteins but also for proper outer membrane assembly. Several of the Eps proteins have been identified by use of the T7 polymerase-promoter system in Escherichia coli. One of them, a pilin-like protein, EpsG, was analyzed also in V. cholerae and found to migrate as two bands on polyacrylamide gels, suggesting that in this organism it might be processed or otherwise modified by a prepilin peptidase. We believe that TcpJ prepilin peptidase, which processes the subunit of the toxin-coregulated pilus, TcpA, is not involved in this event. This is supported by the observations that apparent processing of EpsG occurs in a tcpJ mutant of V. cholerae and that, when coexpressed in E. coli, TcpJ cannot process EpsG although the PilD peptidase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae can.

  14. Membrane Penetration by Synaptotagmin is Required for Coupling Calcium Binding to Vesicle Fusion In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Paddock, Brie E.; Wang, Zhao; Biela, Laurie M.; Chen, Kaiyun; Getzy, Michael D.; Striegel, Amelia; Richmond, Janet E.; Chapman, Edwin R.; Featherstone, David E.; Reist, Noreen E.

    2011-01-01

    The vesicle protein, synaptotagmin I, is the Ca2+ sensor that triggers fast, synchronous release of neurotransmitter. Specifically, Ca2+ binding by the C2B domain of synaptotagmin is required at intact synapses. Yet the mechanism whereby Ca2+ binding results in vesicle fusion remains controversial. Ca2+-dependent interactions between synaptotagmin and SNARE complexes and/or anionic membranes are possible effector interactions. However, no effector-interaction mutations to date impact synaptic transmission as severely as mutation of the C2B Ca2+-binding motif suggesting that these interactions are facilitatory rather than essential. Here we use Drosophila to show the functional role of a highly-conserved, hydrophobic residue located at the tip of each of synaptotagmin’s two Ca2+-binding pockets. Mutation of this residue in the C2A domain (F286) resulted in a ~50% decrease in evoked transmitter release at an intact synapse, again indicative of a facilitatory role. Mutation of this hydrophobic residue in the C2B domain (I420), on the other hand, blocked all locomotion, was embryonic lethal even in syt I heterozygotes, and resulted in less evoked transmitter release than that in sytnull mutants, which is more severe than the phenotype of C2B Ca2+-binding mutants. Thus mutation of a single, C2B hydrophobic residue required for Ca2+-dependent penetration of anionic membranes, results in the most severe disruption of synaptotagmin function in vivo to date. Our results provide direct support for the hypothesis that plasma membrane penetration, specifically by synaptotagmin’s C2B domain, is the critical effector interaction for coupling Ca2+ binding with vesicle fusion. PMID:21307261

  15. Requirements for the formation of membrane pores by the reovirus myristoylated micro1N peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan; Agosto, Melina A; Ivanovic, Tijana; King, David S; Nibert, Max L; Harrison, Stephen C

    2009-07-01

    The outer capsid of the nonenveloped mammalian reovirus contains 200 trimers of the micro1 protein, each complexed with three copies of the protector protein sigma3. Conformational changes in micro1 following the proteolytic removal of sigma3 lead to release of the myristoylated N-terminal cleavage fragment micro1N and ultimately to membrane penetration. The micro1N fragment forms pores in red blood cell (RBC) membranes. In this report, we describe the interaction of recombinant micro1 trimers and synthetic micro1N peptides with both RBCs and liposomes. The micro1 trimer mediates hemolysis and liposome disruption under conditions that promote the micro1 conformational change, and mutations that inhibit micro1 conformational change in the context of intact virus particles also prevent liposome disruption by particle-free micro1 trimer. Autolytic cleavage to form micro1N is required for hemolysis but not for liposome disruption. Pretreatment of RBCs with proteases rescues hemolysis activity, suggesting that micro1N cleavage is not required when steric barriers are removed. Synthetic myristoylated micro1N peptide forms size-selective pores in liposomes, as measured by fluorescence dequenching of labeled dextrans of different sizes. Addition of a C-terminal solubility tag to the peptide does not affect activity, but sequence substitution V13N or L36D reduces liposome disruption. These substitutions are in regions of alternating hydrophobic residues. Their locations, the presence of an N-terminal myristoyl group, and the full activity of a C-terminally extended peptide, along with circular dichroism data that indicate prevalence of beta-strand secondary structure, suggest a model in which micro1N beta-hairpins assemble in the membrane to form a beta-barrel pore.

  16. A bioinformatics prediction approach towards analyzing the glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of epithelial membrane antigen (EMA/MUC1)

    SciTech Connect

    Kalra, Rajkumar S. Wadhwa, Renu

    2015-02-27

    Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA or MUC1) is a heavily glycosylated, type I transmembrane glycoprotein commonly expressed by epithelial cells of duct organs. It has been shown to be aberrantly glycosylated in several diseases including cancer. Protein sequence based annotation and analysis of glycosylation profile of glycoproteins by robust computational and comprehensive algorithms provides possible insights to the mechanism(s) of anomalous glycosylation. In present report, by using a number of bioinformatics applications we studied EMA/MUC1 and explored its trans-membrane structural domain sequence that is widely subjected to glycosylation. Exploration of different extracellular motifs led to prediction of N and O-linked glycosylation target sites. Based on the putative O-linked target sites, glycosylated moieties and pathways were envisaged. Furthermore, Protein network analysis demonstrated physical interaction of EMA with a number of proteins and confirmed its functional involvement in cell growth and proliferation pathways. Gene Ontology analysis suggested an involvement of EMA in a number of functions including signal transduction, protein binding, processing and transport along with glycosylation. Thus, present study explored potential of bioinformatics prediction approach in analyzing glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of EMA/MUC1 glycoprotein.

  17. A bioinformatics prediction approach towards analyzing the glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of epithelial membrane antigen (EMA/MUC1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, Rajkumar S.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2015-02-01

    Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA or MUC1) is a heavily glycosylated, type I transmembrane glycoprotein commonly expressed by epithelial cells of duct organs. It has been shown to be aberrantly glycosylated in several diseases including cancer. Protein sequence based annotation and analysis of glycosylation profile of glycoproteins by robust computational and comprehensive algorithms provides possible insights to the mechanism(s) of anomalous glycosylation. In present report, by using a number of bioinformatics applications we studied EMA/MUC1 and explored its trans-membrane structural domain sequence that is widely subjected to glycosylation. Exploration of different extracellular motifs led to prediction of N and O-linked glycosylation target sites. Based on the putative O-linked target sites, glycosylated moieties and pathways were envisaged. Furthermore, Protein network analysis demonstrated physical interaction of EMA with a number of proteins and confirmed its functional involvement in cell growth and proliferation pathways. Gene Ontology analysis suggested an involvement of EMA in a number of functions including signal transduction, protein binding, processing & transport along with glycosylation. Thus, present study explored potential of bioinformatics prediction approach in analyzing glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of EMA/MUC1 glycoprotein.

  18. [The enlarged diagnosis of the fatal penicillin accident. Immunehistologic demonstration of antigen-antibody complexes and of antibodies against the tubular basement membrane after administraiton of depot penicillin].

    PubMed

    Dirnhofer, R; Sonnabend, W; Sigrist, T

    1978-05-20

    In a case of fatal penicillin allergy it proved possible at autopsy to demonstrate (by immunohistological examination of basal membranes of proximal renal tubuli) antigen-antibody complexes belonging to the penicillin (BPO) group and to an anti-penicilloyl antibody of the IgG type. In addition, complement C3 was detected. Antibodies against the basal membranes or renal tubuli were also demonstrated in material eluted from the kidney, although an inflammatory reaction ot the immunoligical changes had not yet been observed in light microscopy. It is undecided whether this discrepancy is due to the low dose of penicillin administered or the relatively short time lag between first injection and time of fatality. It is assumed that, pathogenetically, a reaction of the serum sickness type is probably involved. For etiological clarification the use of immunohistological methods in addition to serological procedures provides further indices for an antecedent sensitization to penicillin, because assay effectiveness does not decrease even after a lengthy postmortal time-lapse. On the other hand, tissues and serum for examination should be frozen at low temperatures immediately after autopsy.

  19. Increased Goodpasture Antigen-Binding Protein Expression Induces Type IV Collagen Disorganization and Deposit of Immunoglobulin A in Glomerular Basement Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Revert, Fernando; Merino, Ramón; Monteagudo, Carlos; Macias, Jesús; Peydró, Amando; Alcácer, Javier; Muniesa, Pedro; Marquina, Regina; Blanco, Mario; Iglesias, Marcos; Revert-Ros, Francisco; Merino, Jesús; Saus, Juan

    2007-01-01

    Increased expression of Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP), a protein that binds and phosphorylates basement membrane collagen, has been associated with immune complex-mediated pathogenesis. However, recent reports have questioned this biological function and proposed that GPBP serves as a cytosolic ceramide transporter (CERTL). Thus, the role of GPBP in vivo remains unknown. New Zealand White (NZW) mice are considered healthy animals although they convey a genetic predisposition for immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. Here we show that NZW mice developed age-dependent lupus-prone autoimmune response and immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis characterized by elevated GPBP, glomerular basement membrane (GBM) collagen disorganization and expansion, and deposits of IgA on disrupted GBM. Transgenic overexpression of human GPBP (hGPBP) in non-lupus-prone mice triggered similar glomerular abnormalities including deposits of IgA on a capillary GBM that underwent dissociation, in the absence of an evident autoimmune response. We provide in vivo evidence that GPBP regulates GBM collagen organization and its elevated expression causes dissociation and subsequent accumulation of IgA on the GBM. Finally, we describe a previously unrecognized pathogenic mechanism that may be relevant in human primary immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. PMID:17916599

  20. The Dysferlin Domain-Only Protein, Spo73, Is Required for Prospore Membrane Extension in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Yuuya; Nakamura, Tsuyoshi S; Tanaka, Takayuki; Inoue, Ichiro; Suda, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Nakanishi, Hideki; Nakamura, Shugo; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Sporulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a developmental process in which an ascus containing four haploid spores forms from a diploid cell. During this process, newly formed membrane structures called prospore membranes extend along the nuclear envelope and engulf and package daughter nuclei along with cytosol and organelles to form precursors of spores. Proteins involved in prospore membrane extension, Vps13 and Spo71, have recently been reported; however, the overall mechanism of membrane extension remains unclear. Here, we identified Spo73 as an additional factor involved in prospore membrane extension. Analysis of a spo73∆ mutant revealed that it shows defects similar to those of a spo71∆ mutant during prospore membrane formation. Spo73 localizes to the prospore membrane, and this localization is independent of Spo71 and Vps13. In contrast, a Spo73 protein carrying mutations in a surface basic patch mislocalizes to the cytoplasm and overexpression of Spo71 can partially rescue localization to the prospore membrane. Similar to spo71∆ mutants, spo73∆ mutants display genetic interactions with the mutations in the SMA2 and SPO1 genes involved in prospore membrane bending. Further, our bioinformatic analysis revealed that Spo73 is a dysferlin domain-only protein. Thus, these results suggest that a dysferlin domain-only protein, Spo73, functions with a dual pleckstrin homology domain protein, Spo71, in prospore membrane extension. Analysis of Spo73 will provide insights into the conserved function of dysferlin domains, which is related to dysferlinopathy. IMPORTANCE Prospore membrane formation consists of de novo double-membrane formation, which occurs during the developmental process of sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Membranes are formed into their proper size and shape, and thus, prospore membrane formation has been studied as a general model of membrane formation. We identified SPO73, previously shown to be required for spore wall formation

  1. A chemical genetics approach reveals H,K-ATPase-mediated membrane voltage is required for planarian head regeneration.

    PubMed

    Beane, Wendy S; Morokuma, Junji; Adams, Dany S; Levin, Michael

    2011-01-28

    Biophysical signaling is required for both embryonic polarity and regenerative outgrowth. Exploiting endogenous ion transport for regenerative therapies will require direct regulation of membrane voltage. Here, we develop a pharmacological method to target ion transporters, uncovering a role for membrane voltage as a key regulator of anterior polarity in regenerating planaria. Utilizing the highly specific inhibitor, SCH-28080, our data reveal that H(+),K(+)-ATPase-mediated membrane depolarization is essential for anterior gene expression and brain induction. H(+),K(+)-ATPase-independent manipulation of membrane potential with ivermectin confirms that depolarization drives head formation, even at posterior-facing wounds. Using this chemical genetics approach, we demonstrate that membrane voltage controls head-versus-tail identity during planarian regeneration. Our data suggest well-characterized drugs (already approved for human use) might be exploited to control adult stem cell-driven pattern formation during the regeneration of complex structures.

  2. A Chemical Genetics Approach Reveals H,K-ATPase-Mediated Membrane Voltage is Required for Planarian Head Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Beane, Wendy Scott; Morokuma, Junji; Adams, Dany Spencer; Levin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Biophysical signaling is required for both embryonic polarity and regenerative outgrowth. Exploiting endogenous ion transport for regenerative therapies will require direct regulation of membrane voltage. Here, we develop a pharmacological method to target ion transporters, uncovering a novel role for membrane voltage as a key regulator of anterior polarity in regenerating planaria. Utilizing the highly specific inhibitor, SCH-28080, our data reveal that H+,K+-ATPase-mediated membrane depolarization is essential for anterior gene expression and brain induction. H+,K+-ATPase-independent manipulation of membrane potential with ivermectin confirms that depolarization drives head formation, even at posterior-facing wounds. Using this chemical genetics approach, we demonstrate that membrane voltage controls head-vs.-tail identity during planarian regeneration. Our data suggest well-characterized drugs (already approved for human use) might be exploited to control adult stem cell-driven pattern formation during the regeneration of complex structures. PMID:21276941

  3. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus entry mechanism requires late endosome formation and resists cell membrane cholesterol depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Kolokoltsov, Andrey A.; Fleming, Elisa H.; Davey, Robert A. . E-mail: radavey@utmb.edu

    2006-04-10

    Virus envelope proteins determine receptor utilization and host range. The choice of receptor not only permits specific targeting of cells that express it, but also directs the virus into specific endosomal trafficking pathways. Disrupting trafficking can result in loss of virus infectivity due to redirection of virions to non-productive pathways. Identification of the pathway or pathways used by a virus is, thus, important in understanding virus pathogenesis mechanisms and for developing new treatment strategies. Most of our understanding of alphavirus entry has focused on the Old World alphaviruses, such as Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus. In comparison, very little is known about the entry route taken by more pathogenic New World alphaviruses. Here, we use a novel contents mixing assay to identify the cellular requirements for entry of a New World alphavirus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV). Expression of dominant negative forms of key endosomal trafficking genes shows that VEEV must access clathrin-dependent endocytic vesicles for membrane fusion to occur. Unexpectedly, the exit point is different from Old World alphaviruses that leave from early endosomes. Instead, VEEV also requires functional late endosomes. Furthermore, unlike the Old World viruses, VEEV entry is insensitive to cholesterol sequestration from cell membranes and may reflect a need to access an endocytic compartment that lacks cholesterol. This indicates fundamental differences in the entry route taken by VEEV compared to Old World alphaviruses.

  4. Polar body emission requires a rhoA contractile ring and Cdc42-mediated membrane protrusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; Ma, Chunqi; Miller, Ann L.; Katbi, Hadia Arabi; Bement, William M.; Liu, X. Johné

    2009-01-01

    Vertebrate oocyte maturation is an extreme form of asymmetric cell division, producing a mature egg alongside a diminutive polar body. Critical to this process is the attachment of one spindle pole to the oocyte cortex prior to anaphase. We report here that asymmetric spindle pole attachment and anaphase initiation are required for localized cortical activation of Cdc42, which in turn defines the surface of the impending polar body. The Cdc42 activity zone overlaps with dynamic F-actin, and is circumscribed by a RhoA-based actomyosin contractile ring. During cytokinesis, constriction of the RhoA contractile ring is accompanied by Cdc42-mediated membrane outpocketing such that one spindle pole and one set of chromosomes are pulled into the Cdc42 enclosure. Unexpectedly, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Ect2, which is necessary for contractile ring formation, does not co-localize with active RhoA. Polar body emission thus requires a classical RhoA contractile ring and Cdc42-mediated membrane protrusion. PMID:18804436

  5. Live imaging and modeling of inner nuclear membrane targeting reveals its molecular requirements in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Boni, Andrea; Politi, Antonio Z.; Strnad, Petr; Xiang, Wanqing; Hossain, M. Julius

    2015-01-01

    Targeting of inner nuclear membrane (INM) proteins is essential for nuclear architecture and function, yet its mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we established a new reporter that allows real-time imaging of membrane protein transport from the ER to the INM using Lamin B receptor and Lap2β as model INM proteins. These reporters allowed us to characterize the kinetics of INM targeting and establish a mathematical model of this process and enabled us to probe its molecular requirements in an RNA interference screen of 96 candidate genes. Modeling of the phenotypes of genes involved in transport of these INM proteins predicted that it critically depended on the number and permeability of nuclear pores and the availability of nuclear binding sites, but was unaffected by depletion of most transport receptors. These predictions were confirmed with targeted validation experiments on the functional requirements of nucleoporins and nuclear lamins. Collectively, our data support a diffusion retention model of INM protein transport in mammalian cells. PMID:26056140

  6. Purification and characterization of a detergent-requiring membrane-bound metalloendopeptidase from porcine brain.

    PubMed

    Jeohn, G H; Matsuzaki, H; Takahashi, K

    1999-03-01

    A detergent-requiring metalloendopeptidase cleaving a progastrin-C-terminal peptide (progastrin-(88-101)) mainly at the Arg95-Gly96 bond was solubilized from porcine cerebral vesicular membranes and purified to homogeneity as examined by PAGE. The purified enzyme had a molecular mass of approximately 76 kDa as estimated by both SDS/PAGE and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration. It hydrolyzed progastrin-(88-101) peptide, BAM-12P, and bradykinin fairly specifically, and more efficiently than various other neuropeptides and related oligopeptides examined as substrates. It was inactive in the absence of detergents, and required certain detergents such as Triton X-100 or Lubrol PX for activity. Its optimum pH was about 6.5 and was strongly inhibited by metal-chelating agents such as EDTA, EGTA, and o-phenanthroline. It was extremely sensitive to EDTA and was completely inhibited even by 0.3 microM EDTA; the activity was fully restored by addition of a 10-fold higher concentration of Zn2+, CO2+, or Mn2+ ions over EDTA. On the other hand, dynorphin A-(1-13) peptide, a strong inhibitor of neurolysin, failed to inhibit the enzyme. The various characteristics indicated that the present enzyme is a unique membrane-bound metalloendopeptidase.

  7. Polar body emission requires a RhoA contractile ring and Cdc42-mediated membrane protrusion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Ma, Chunqi; Miller, Ann L; Katbi, Hadia Arabi; Bement, William M; Liu, X Johné

    2008-09-01

    Vertebrate oocyte maturation is an extreme form of asymmetric cell division, producing a mature egg alongside a diminutive polar body. Critical to this process is the attachment of one spindle pole to the oocyte cortex prior to anaphase. We report here that asymmetric spindle pole attachment and anaphase initiation are required for localized cortical activation of Cdc42, which in turn defines the surface of the impending polar body. The Cdc42 activity zone overlaps with dynamic F-actin and is circumscribed by a RhoA-based actomyosin contractile ring. During cytokinesis, constriction of the RhoA contractile ring is accompanied by Cdc42-mediated membrane outpocketing such that one spindle pole and one set of chromosomes are pulled into the Cdc42 enclosure. Unexpectedly, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Ect2, which is necessary for contractile ring formation, does not colocalize with active RhoA. Polar body emission thus requires a classical RhoA contractile ring and Cdc42-mediated membrane protrusion.

  8. CD1d-mediated presentation of endogenous lipid antigens by adipocytes requires microsomal triglyceride transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Gijzel, Sanne M W; Siersbæk, Rasmus; Broekema, Marjoleine F; de Haar, Colin; Schipper, Henk S; Boes, Marianne; Mandrup, Susanne; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2014-08-08

    Obesity-induced adipose tissue (AT) dysfunction results in a chronic low-grade inflammation that predisposes to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. During the development of obesity, the AT-resident immune cell profile alters to create a pro-inflammatory state. Very recently, CD1d-restricted invariant (i) natural killer T (NKT) cells, a unique subset of lymphocytes that are reactive to so called lipid antigens, were implicated in AT homeostasis. Interestingly, recent data also suggest that human and mouse adipocytes can present such lipid antigens to iNKT cells in a CD1d-dependent fashion, but little is known about the lipid antigen presentation machinery in adipocytes. Here we show that CD1d, as well as the lipid antigen loading machinery genes pro-saposin (Psap), Niemann Pick type C2 (Npc2), α-galactosidase (Gla), are up-regulated in early adipogenesis, and are transcriptionally controlled by CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)-β and -δ. Moreover, adipocyte-induced Th1 and Th2 cytokine release by iNKT cells also occurred in the absence of exogenous ligands, suggesting the display of endogenous lipid antigen-D1d complexes by 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Furthermore, we identified microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, which we show is also under the transcriptional regulation of C/EBPβ and -δ, as a novel player in the presentation of endogenous lipid antigens by adipocytes. Overall, our findings indicate that adipocytes can function as non-professional lipid antigen presenting cells, which may present an important aspect of adipocyte-immune cell communication in the regulation of whole body energy metabolism and immune homeostasis.

  9. CD1d-mediated Presentation of Endogenous Lipid Antigens by Adipocytes Requires Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Gijzel, Sanne M. W.; Siersbæk, Rasmus; Broekema, Marjoleine F.; de Haar, Colin; Schipper, Henk S.; Boes, Marianne; Mandrup, Susanne; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Obesity-induced adipose tissue (AT) dysfunction results in a chronic low-grade inflammation that predisposes to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. During the development of obesity, the AT-resident immune cell profile alters to create a pro-inflammatory state. Very recently, CD1d-restricted invariant (i) natural killer T (NKT) cells, a unique subset of lymphocytes that are reactive to so called lipid antigens, were implicated in AT homeostasis. Interestingly, recent data also suggest that human and mouse adipocytes can present such lipid antigens to iNKT cells in a CD1d-dependent fashion, but little is known about the lipid antigen presentation machinery in adipocytes. Here we show that CD1d, as well as the lipid antigen loading machinery genes pro-saposin (Psap), Niemann Pick type C2 (Npc2), α-galactosidase (Gla), are up-regulated in early adipogenesis, and are transcriptionally controlled by CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)-β and -δ. Moreover, adipocyte-induced Th1 and Th2 cytokine release by iNKT cells also occurred in the absence of exogenous ligands, suggesting the display of endogenous lipid antigen-D1d complexes by 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Furthermore, we identified microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, which we show is also under the transcriptional regulation of C/EBPβ and –δ, as a novel player in the presentation of endogenous lipid antigens by adipocytes. Overall, our findings indicate that adipocytes can function as non-professional lipid antigen presenting cells, which may present an important aspect of adipocyte-immune cell communication in the regulation of whole body energy metabolism and immune homeostasis. PMID:24966328

  10. Requirements for distinct steps of phospholipase Cgamma2 regulation, membrane-raft-dependent targeting and subsequent enzyme activation in B-cell signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Rosie; Matsuda, Miho; Storey, Amy; Katan, Matilda

    2003-01-01

    Studies of PLCgamma (phospholipase Cgamma) have identified a number of regulatory components required for signalling; however, molecular mechanisms and the relationship between events leading to translocation and an increase of substrate hydrolysis have not been well defined. The addition of a membrane-targeting tag to many signal transducers results in constitutive activation, suggesting that these processes could be closely linked and difficult to dissect. The present study of PLCgamma2 regulation by cross-linking of the BCR (B-cell antigen receptor) or H2O2 stress in DT40 B-cells, demonstrated that the membrane targeting is a separate step from further changes that result in enzyme activation and substrate hydrolysis. Furthermore, we have defined the roles of different domains of PLCgamma2 and, using a panel of cell lines deficient in components linked to PLCgamma2 regulation, the involvement of signalling molecules with respect to each of the steps. We have found that only the lipid-raft-targeted Lyn-PLCgamma2 construct, unlike non-specific membrane targeting, overcame the requirement for the adapter protein BLNK (B-cell linker). The stable expression of Lyn-PLCgamma2 was not accompanied by an increase in substrate hydrolysis in resting cells, which followed stimulation and specifically required the presence and/or activation of Syk, Btk, phosphoinositide 3-kinase but not BLNK, as established using deficient cell lines or specific inhibitors. Based on mutational analysis of the specific tyrosine residues [Tyr753-->Phe (Y753F)/Y759F] and SH2 (Src homology 2) domains (R564A/R672A) in the context of Lyn-PLCgamma2, we found that Tyr753/Tyr759 were essential, whereas the PLCgamma2 SH2 domains did not have an important role in the transient activation of Lyn-PLCgamma2 but may serve to stabilize an activated form in sustained activation. PMID:12780340

  11. Increased sensitivity to antigen in high avidity CD8(+) T cells results from augmented membrane proximal T-cell receptor signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sharad K; Alexander-Miller, Martha A

    2011-07-01

    The functional avidity of a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) is known to be a critical determinant of the efficacy with which it clears pathogens. High avidity cells, which are by definition highly sensitive to peptide antigen, are superior for elimination of viruses and tumours. Our studies have established the ability of T cells to undergo avidity modulation as a result of antigen encounter. High and low avidity cells established in this manner exhibit significant differences in the amount of peptide required to elicit effector function. However, how signalling is regulated in these cells as it relates to the control of peptide sensitivity remains to be defined. To address this question, we compared T-cell receptor (TCR) signal transduction events in high and low avidity CTL generated from OT-I(rag2-) TCR transgenic mice. Our data suggest that divergent signalling is initiated at the TCR-associated CD3ζ, with low avidity CTL requiring higher amounts of pMHC to achieve threshold levels of phosphorylated CD3ζ compared with high avidity CTL. Further, this difference is transduced further downstream to mitogen-activated protein kinase and Ca(2+) signalling pathways. These results suggest that regulated control of the initiation of TCR signalling in high versus low avidity cells determines the amount of peptide required for T-cell activation. © 2011 The Authors. Immunology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Murine interstitial nephritis. V. The auto-induction of antigen-specific Lyt-2+ suppressor T cells diminishes the expression of interstitial nephritis in mice with antitubular basement membrane disease.

    PubMed

    Mann, R; Neilson, E G

    1986-02-01

    We observed the emergence of an antigen-specific Lyt-2+ suppressor T cell after the i.v. injection of tubular antigen-derivatized lymphocytes into mice already immunized to produce interstitial nephritis. The auto-induction of these suppressor T cells effectively attenuated both the expression of renal injury and a delayed-type hypersensitivity response to tubular antigen. This suppressive effect was also genetically restricted by gene products in I-J and Igh-1. Although this suppressor system had a marked inhibitory effect on the nephritogenic effector cell repertoire, there was no diminution of titers of antibodies to the tubular basement membrane. Our results demonstrate a protective role for antigen-specific suppressor cells in autoimmune renal injury, and the strategy for their induction may have important therapeutic implications for other immune-mediated disorders.

  13. Factors that influence the membrane area of a multistage microfiltration process required to produce a micellar casein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Emily E; Barbano, David M

    2015-04-01

    The objective of the work reported in this paper was to develop a theoretical model to determine the effect of type of microfiltration (MF)-process feed, number of stages, and flux on the minimization of the MF membrane area required to produce a 95% serum protein-reduced micellar casein concentrate. The MF feed, number of stages, and flux were all factors that had an effect on the MF membrane area and should be taken into consideration when designing a MF system to produce a 95% serum protein-reduced micellar casein concentrate. Feeding the MF process with a diluted ultrafiltration retentate (DUR) diluted to the protein concentration of skim milk, as opposed to skim milk, reduced the required membrane area by 36% for a 5-stage process. When DUR was the MF feed, feed protein concentration, which depended on the number of MF stages, was optimized. The DUR protein concentration that minimized the required MF membrane area was 2.47, 3.85, 4.77, and 5.41% for a 2-, 3-, 4-, or 5-stage MF process, respectively. For a 5-stage process, increasing the protein concentration of the feed from 3.2 to 5.4% decreased the required MF membrane area by 10%. It was also found that as the number of stages increased from 2 to 5, the required MF membrane area decreased by 39%, when the MF feed was DUR at the optimal feed protein concentration. Finally, increasing the flux from 50 to 60 kg/m(2) per hour decreased the required MF membrane area by 17% when the MF feed was DUR at the optimal MF feed protein concentration. Overall, using DUR as a feed for MF could reduce the amount of MF membrane area required to make a 95% serum protein-reduced micellar casein concentrate.

  14. NK cells require antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells to mediate superior effector functions during HSV-2 recall responses in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Branson; Lee, Amanda J; Chew, Marianne V; Ashkar, Ali A

    2016-12-14

    Natural killer (NK) cells have an important role in mounting protective innate responses against genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infections. However their role as effectors in adaptive immune responses against HSV-2 is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that NK cells from C57BL/6 mice in an ex vivo splenocyte culture produce significantly more interferon γ (IFN-γ) upon re-exposure to HSV-2 antigens in a mouse model of genital HSV-2 immunization. We find that naïve NK cells do not require any prior stimulation or priming to be activated to produce IFN-γ. Our results demonstrate that HSV-2-experienced CD4(+) T cells have a crucial role in coordinating NK cell activation and that their presence during HSV-2 antigen presentation is required to activate NK cells in this model of secondary immune response. We also examined the requirement of cell-to-cell contacts for both CD4(+) T cells and NK cells. NK cells are dependent on direct interactions with other HSV-2-experienced splenocytes, and CD4(+) T cells need to be in close proximity to NK cells to activate them. This study revealed that NK cells do not exhibit any memory toward HSV-2 antigens and, in fact, require specific interactions with HSV-2-experienced CD4(+) T cells to produce IFN-γ.

  15. Relationship between ion requirements for respiration and membrane transport in a marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Khanna, G; DeVoe, L; Brown, L; Niven, D F; MacLeod, R A

    1984-01-01

    Intact cells of the marine bacterium Alteromonas haloplanktis 214 oxidized NADH, added to the suspending medium, by a process which was stimulated by Na+ or Li+ but not K+. Toluene-treated cells oxidized NADH at three times the rate of untreated cells by a mechanism activated by Na+ but not by Li+ or K+. In the latter reaction, K+ spared the requirement for Na+. Intact cells of A. haloplanktis oxidized ethanol by a mechanism stimulated by either Na+ or Li+. The uptake of alpha-aminoisobutyric acid by intact cells of A. haloplanktis in the presence of either NADH or ethanol as an oxidizable substrate required Na+, and neither Li+ nor K+ could replace it. The results indicate that exogenous and endogenous NADH and ethanol are oxidized by A. haloplanktis by processes distinguishable from one another by their requirements for alkali metal ions and from the ion requirements for membrane transport. Intact cells of Vibrio natriegens and Photobacterium phosphoreum oxidized NADH, added externally, by an Na+-activated process, and intact cells of Vibrio fischeri oxidized NADH, added externally, by a K+-activated process. Toluene treatment caused the cells of all three organisms to oxidize NADH at much faster rates than untreated cells by mechanisms which were activated by Na+ and spared by K+.

  16. Management of Patients with Gastroschisis Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Concurrent Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Lalani, Alykhan; Benson Ham, P; Wise, Linda J; Daniel, John M; Walters, K Christian; Pipkin, Walter L; Stansfield, Brian; Hatley, Robyn M; Bhatia, Jatinder

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of gastroschisis often requires multiple surgical procedures to re-establish abdominal domain, reduce abdominal contents, and eventually close the abdominal wall. In patients who have concomitant respiratory failure requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), this process becomes further complicated. This situation is rare and only five such cases have been reported in the ECMO registry database. Management of three of the five patients along with results and implications for future care of similar patients is discussed here. Two patients had respiratory failure due to meconium aspiration syndrome and one patient had persistent acidosis as well as worsening pulmonary hypertension leading to the decision of ECMO. The abdominal contents were placed in a spring-loaded silastic silo while on ECMO and primary closure was performed three to six days after the decannulation. All three patients survived and are developmentally appropriate. We recommend avoiding aggressively reducing the abdominal contents and using a silo to conservatively reducing the gastroschisis while the patient is on ECMO therapy. Keeping the intra-abdominal pressure below 20 mm Hg can possibly reduce ECMO days and ventilator time and has been shown to decrease morbidity and mortality. Patients with gastroschisis and respiratory failure requiring ECMO can have good outcomes despite the complexity of required care.

  17. ANTIGENIC MODULATION

    PubMed Central

    Old, Lloyd J.; Stockert, Elisabeth; Boyse, Edward A.; Kim, Jae Ho

    1968-01-01

    Antigenic modulation (the loss of TL antigens from TL+ cells exposed to TL antibody in the absence of lytic complement) has been demonstrated in vitro. An ascites leukemia, phenotype TL.1,2,3, which modulates rapidly and completely when incubated with TL antiserum in vitro, was selected for further study of the phenomenon. Over a wide range of TL antibody concentrations modulation at 37°C was detectable within 10 min and was complete within approximately 1 hr. The cells were initially sensitized to C' by their contact with antibody, thereafter losing this sensitivity to C' lysis together with their sensitivity to TL antibody and C' in the cytotoxic test. The capacity of the cells to undergo modulation was abolished by actinomycin D and by iodoacetamide, and by reducing the temperature of incubation to 0°C. Thus modulation apparently is an active cellular process. Antigens TL. 1,2, and 3 are all modulated by anti-TL.1,3 serum and by anti-TL.3 serum. This modulation affects all three TL components together, even when antibody to one or two of them is lacking. aAnti-TL.2 serum does not induce modulation and in fact impairs modulation by the other TL antibodies. The influence of the TL phenotype of cells upon the demonstrable content of H-2 (D region) isoantigen, first shown in cells modulated in vivo, has been observed with cells modulated in vitro. Cells undergoing modulation show a progressive increase in H-2 (D region) antigen over a period of 4 hr, with no change in H-2 antigens of the K region. Restoration of the TL+ phenotype of modulated cells after removal of antibody is less rapid than TL+ → TL- modulation and may require several cell divisions. PMID:5636556

  18. Early postpartum mitral valve thrombosis requiring extra corporeal membrane oxygenation before successful valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Halldorsdottir, H; Nordström, J; Brattström, O; Sennström, M M; Sartipy, U; Mattsson, E

    2016-05-01

    Pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of thrombosis in women with mechanical prosthetic heart valves. We present the case of a 29-year-old woman who developed early postpartum mitral valve thrombus after an elective cesarean delivery. The patient had a mechanical mitral valve and was treated with warfarin in the second trimester, which was replaced with high-dose dalteparin during late pregnancy. Elective cesarean delivery was performed under general anesthesia at 37weeks of gestation. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit for postoperative care and within 30min she developed dyspnea and hypoxia requiring mechanical ventilation. She deteriorated rapidly and developed pulmonary edema, worsening hypoxia and severe acidosis. Urgent extra corporeal membrane oxygenation was initiated. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed a mitral valve thrombus. The patient underwent a successful mitral valve replacement after three days on extra corporeal membrane oxygenation. This case highlights the importance of multidisciplinary care and frequent monitoring of anticoagulation during care of pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves.

  19. Genetic polymorphism and effect of natural selection at domain I of apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) in Plasmodium vivax isolates from Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sung-Ung; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Kang, Jung-Mi; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Park, Yun-Kyu; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Lin, Khin; Kim, Tong-Soo

    2010-05-01

    Malaria is endemic or hypoendemic in Myanmar and the country still contributes to the high level of malaria deaths in South-East Asia. Although information on the nature and extent of population diversity within malaria parasites in the country is essential not only for understanding the epidemic situation but also to establish a proper control strategy, very little data is currently available on the extent of genetic polymorphisms of the malaria parasites in Myanmar. In this study, we analyzed the genetic polymorphism and natural selection at domain I of the apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) among Plasmodium vivax Myanmar isolates. A total of 34 distinguishable haplotypes were identified among the 76 isolates sequenced. Comparison with the previously available PvAMA-1 sequences in the GenBank database revealed that 21 of them were new haplotypes that have never been reported till date. The difference between the rate of nonsynonymous (dN) and synonymous (dS) mutations was positive (dN-dS, 0.013+/-0.005), suggesting the domain I is under positive natural selection. The Tajima's D statistics was found to be -0.74652, suggesting that the gene has evolved under population size expansion and/or positive selection. The minimum recombination events were also high, indicating that recombination may occur within the domain I resulting in allelic diversity of PvAMA-1. Our results collectively suggest that PvAMA-1 displays high genetic polymorphism among Myanmar P. vivax isolates with highly diversifying selection at domain I. These results have significant implications in understanding the nature of P. vivax population circulating in Myanmar as well as providing useful information for malaria vaccine development based on this antigen.

  20. Improved immunogenicity of a H44/76 group B outer membrane vesicle vaccine with over-expressed genome-derived Neisserial antigen 1870.

    PubMed

    Koeberling, Oliver; Welsch, Jo Anne; Granoff, Dan M

    2007-02-26

    A broadly protective vaccine against meningococcal group B disease is not available. We previously reported that an outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine containing over-expressed genome-derived antigen (GNA) 1870 elicited broader protective antibody responses than recombinant GNA1870 or conventional OMV vaccines prepared from a strain that naturally expresses low amounts of GNA1870. Certain wildtype strains such as H44/76 naturally express larger amounts of GNA1870 and, potentially, could be used to prepare an improved OMV vaccine without genetic over-expression of the antigen. We transformed H44/76 with a shuttle vector to over-express variant 1 (v.1) GNA1870 and compared the immunogenicity in mice of OMV vaccines prepared from wildtype H44/76 (v.1), the mutant, and a recombinant v.1 GNA1870 vaccine. Mice immunized with OMV with over-expressed GNA1870 developed broader serum bactericidal and/or greater C3 deposition activity on the surface of encapsulated strains of N. meningitidis than control mice immunized with the OMV vaccine prepared from the wildtype strain, or the rGNA1870 vaccine. When a panel of group B strains from patients in California was tested, sera from mice immunized with the OMV vaccine containing over-expressed GNA1870 were bactericidal against 100% of the v.1 strains. In contrast, only 20% of isolates that expressed subvariants of the v.1 GNA1870 protein were susceptible to bactericidal activity of antibodies elicited by the rGNA1870 or conventional OMV vaccines. Thus, even a modest increase in GNA1870 expression in a strain that naturally is a high producer of GNA1870 results in an OMV vaccine that elicits broader protection against meningococcal disease.

  1. Comparison of clinical performance of antigen based-enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and major outer membrane protein (MOMP)-PCR for detection of genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection

    PubMed Central

    Nateghi Rostami, Mahmoud; Hossein Rashidi, Batool; Aghsaghloo, Fatemeh; Nazari, Razieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted bacterial pathogen worldwide. Early detection and treatment of C.trachomatis genital infection prevent serious reproductive complications. Objective: Performances of enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and major outer membrane protein (MOMP)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for diagnosis of genital C.trachomatis infection in women were compared. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study a total of 518 women volunteers were included (33.67±8.3 yrs) who had been referred to Gynecology clinics of Qom province, Iran, were included. Endocervical swab specimens were collected to detect lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigen in EIA and to amplify MOMP gene of C.trachomatis in PCR. Results were confirmed using ompI nested-PCR. Sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were calculated for performance of the tests. Odds ratios were determined using binary logistic regression analysis. Results: In total, 37 (7.14%) cases were positive by EIA and/or MOMP-PCR. All discrepant results were confirmed by nested-PCR. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV values of EIA were 59.46%, 100%, 100% and 96.98%, and those of MOMP-PCR were 97.30%, 100%, 100%, 99.79%, respectively. Reproductive complications including 2.7% ectopic pregnancy, 5.4% stillbirth, 5.4% infertility, and 10.8% PROM were recorded. The risk of developing chlamydiosis was increased 4.8-fold in volunteers with cervicitis (p<0.05; OR 4.80; 95% CI 1.25-18.48). Conclusion: C.trachomatis infection should be regarded in women of reproductive ages especially those with cervicitis. Primary screening of women by using the low cost antigen-EIA is recommended; however, due to the low sensitivity of Ag-EIA, verification of the negative results by a DNA amplification method is needed. PMID:27525325

  2. Co-administration of a DNA vaccine encoding the prostate specific membrane antigen and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides suppresses tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiaqiang; Zheng, Li; Chen, Qi; Li, Hua; Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Hongguang

    2004-09-09

    BACKGROUND: Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a well characterized prostate-specific tumor associated antigen. Its expression is elevated in prostate carcinoma, particularly in metastatic and recurrent lesions. These observations suggest that PSMA can be used as immune target to induce tumor cell-specific recognition by the host and, consequently tumor rejection. We utilized a DNA-based vaccine to specifically enhance PSMA expression. An immune modulator, such as CpG oligodeoxynucleotides which promote Th1-type immune responses was combined to increase the efficacy of tumor recognition and elimination. METHODS: A eukaryotic expression plasmid pCDNA3.1-PSMA encoding full-length PSMA was constructed. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with endotoxin-free pCDNA3.1-PSMA alone or in combination with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides by intramuscular injection. After 4 immunizations, PSMA specific antibodies and cytotoxic T lymphocyte reactivity were measured. Immunized C57BL/6 mice were also challenged subcutaneously with B16 cells transfected with PSMA to evaluate suppression of tumor growth. RESULTS: Vaccine-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes reactive with B16 cells expressing PSMA could be induced with this treatment schedule. Immune protection was observed in vaccinated mice as indicated by increased tumor growth in the control group (100%) compared with the groups vaccinated with DNA alone (66.7%) or DNA plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (50%) respectively. Average tumor volume was smaller in vaccinated groups and tumor-free survival time was prolonged by the vaccination. CONCLUSION: The current findings suggest that specific anti-tumor immune response can be induced by DNA vaccines expressing PSMA. In addition, the suppression of in vivo growth of tumor cells expressing PSMA was augmented by CpG oligodeoxynucleotides. This strategy may provide a new venue for the treatment of carcinoma of prostate after failure of standard therapy.

  3. Phase II study of Lutetium-177-labeled anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen monoclonal antibody J591 for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Scott T; Milowsky, Matthew I; Morris, Michael; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Christos, Paul; Akhtar, Naveed H; Osborne, Joseph; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Larson, Steve; Taskar, Neeta Pandit; Scher, Howard I; Bander, Neil H; Nanus, David M

    2013-09-15

    To assess the efficacy of a single infusion of radiolabeled anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) monoclonal antibody J591 (lutetium-177; (177)Lu) by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) decline, measurable disease response, and survival. In this dual-center phase II study, two cohorts with progressive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer received one dose of (177)Lu-J591 (15 patients at 65 mCi/m(2), 17 at 70 mCi/m(2)) with radionuclide imaging. Expansion cohort (n = 15) received 70 mCi/m(2) to verify response rate and examine biomarkers. Forty-seven patients who progressed after hormonal therapies (55.3% also received prior chemotherapy) received (177)Lu-J591. A total of 10.6% experienced ≥50% decline in PSA, 36.2% experienced ≥30% decline, and 59.6% experienced any PSA decline following their single treatment. One of 12 with measurable disease experienced a partial radiographic response (8 with stable disease). Sites of prostate cancer metastases were targeted in 44 of 47 (93.6%) as determined by planar imaging. All experienced reversible hematologic toxicity, with grade 4 thrombocytopenia occurring in 46.8% (29.8% received platelet transfusions) without significant hemorrhage. A total of 25.5% experienced grade 4 neutropenia, with one episode of febrile neutropenia. The phase I maximum tolerated dose (70 mCi/m(2)) resulted in more 30% PSA declines (46.9% vs. 13.3%, P = 0.048) and longer survival (21.8 vs. 11.9 months, P = 0.03), but also more grade 4 hematologic toxicity and platelet transfusions. No serious nonhematologic toxicity occurred. Those with poor PSMA imaging were less likely to respond. A single dose of (177)Lu-J591 was well tolerated with reversible myelosuppression. Accurate tumor targeting and PSA responses were seen with evidence of dose response. Imaging biomarkers seem promising. ©2013 AACR.

  4. The simian virus 40 minimal origin and the 72-base-pair repeat are required simultaneously for efficient induction of late gene expression with large tumor antigen.

    PubMed

    Hartzell, S W; Byrne, B J; Subramanian, K N

    1984-10-01

    We have studied the temporal regulation of simian virus 40 (SV40) late gene expression by construction and transient expression analysis of plasmids containing the transposon Tn9 chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene placed downstream from the late control region. The SV40 origin region in the early (but not the late) orientation promotes chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene expression efficiently in monkey cells lacking large tumor (T) antigen. In monkey cells producing T antigen, the promoter activity of the late control region is induced by approximately 1,000-fold above the basal level. By deletion and point mutagenesis, we define two domains of the late control region required for efficient induction with T antigen. Domain I is the minimal replication origin containing T-antigen binding site II. Domain II consists of the 72-base-pair (bp) repeat and a 19-bp downstream sequence up to nucleotide 270. Domains I and II should act synergistically because the absence of either one or the other decreases induction efficiency by 2 orders of magnitude. Though a complete copy of domain II is optimal, the origin-proximal 22-bp portion of this domain is sufficient. The 21-bp repeat, located between domains I and II, is dispensable for this induction, as are sequences located downstream from nucleotide 270 in the late orientation.

  5. CD4+ T cells are required for antigen-specific recruitment of neutrophils by BCG-immune spleen cells.

    PubMed Central

    Appelberg, R

    1992-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-immune spleen cells co-inoculated into the peritoneal cavity of normal mice with BCG sonicate protein as antigen could induce an antigen-specific recruitment of neutrophils, dependent on the antigen dose and cell number. This response was significantly reduced by anti-T lymphocyte and anti-CD4 treatment of the immune spleen cells prior to the inoculation. Removal of adherent or phagocytic cells or lysis of B cells, had no significant effect. Killing of dividing cells in the splenic population induced a slight reduction in the ability of spleen cells to recruit neutrophils. M. avium sonicate protein was also able to induce BCG-immune spleen cells to mobilize neutrophils but bovine serum albumin, Listeria monocytogenes cytosolic protein and 65,000 MW heat shock protein were not. These results show that CD4+ T cells are able to induce neutrophil recruitment in an antigen-specific way during a mycobacterial infection. PMID:1374053

  6. Global Inhibition of DC Priming Capacity in the Spleen of Self-Antigen Vaccinated Mice Requires IL-10.

    PubMed

    Marvel, Douglas M; Finn, Olivera J

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) in the spleen are highly activated following intravenous vaccination with a foreign-antigen, promoting expansion of effector T cells, but remain phenotypically and functionally immature after vaccination with a self-antigen. Up-regulation or suppression of expression of a cohort of pancreatic enzymes 24-72 h post-vaccination can be used as a biomarker of stimulatory versus tolerogenic DC, respectively. Here we show, using MUC1 transgenic mice and a vaccine based on the MUC1 peptide, which these mice perceive as a self-antigen, that the difference in enzyme expression that predicts whether DC will promote immune response or immune tolerance is seen as early as 4-8 h following vaccination. We also identify early production of IL-10 as a predominant factor that both correlates with this early-time point and controls DC function. Pre-treating mice with an antibody against the IL-10 receptor prior to vaccination results in DC that up-regulate CD40, CD80, and CD86 and promote stronger IFNγ+ T cell responses. This study suggests that transient inhibition of IL-10 prior to vaccination could improve responses to cancer vaccines that utilize self-tumor antigens.

  7. Global Inhibition of DC Priming Capacity in the Spleen of Self-Antigen Vaccinated Mice Requires IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Marvel, Douglas M.; Finn, Olivera J.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) in the spleen are highly activated following intravenous vaccination with a foreign-antigen, promoting expansion of effector T cells, but remain phenotypically and functionally immature after vaccination with a self-antigen. Up-regulation or suppression of expression of a cohort of pancreatic enzymes 24–72 h post-vaccination can be used as a biomarker of stimulatory versus tolerogenic DC, respectively. Here we show, using MUC1 transgenic mice and a vaccine based on the MUC1 peptide, which these mice perceive as a self-antigen, that the difference in enzyme expression that predicts whether DC will promote immune response or immune tolerance is seen as early as 4–8 h following vaccination. We also identify early production of IL-10 as a predominant factor that both correlates with this early-time point and controls DC function. Pre-treating mice with an antibody against the IL-10 receptor prior to vaccination results in DC that up-regulate CD40, CD80, and CD86 and promote stronger IFNγ+ T cell responses. This study suggests that transient inhibition of IL-10 prior to vaccination could improve responses to cancer vaccines that utilize self-tumor antigens. PMID:24596571

  8. Outer membrane lipoprotein VacJ is required for the membrane integrity, serum resistance and biofilm formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Li, Gang; Zhang, Wanjiang; Zhang, Yanhe; Zhou, Long; Liu, Shuanghong; Liu, Siguo; Wang, Chunlai

    2016-02-01

    The outer membrane proteins of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae are mediators of infection, acting as targets for the host's defense system. The outer membrane lipoprotein VacJ is involved in serum resistance and intercellular spreading in several pathogenic bacteria. To investigate the role of VacJ in the pathogenicity of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the vacJ gene-deletion mutant MD12 ΔvacJ was constructed. The increased susceptibility to KCl, SDS plus EDTA, and several antibiotics in the MD12ΔvacJ mutant suggested that the stability of the outer membrane was impaired as a result of the mutation in the vacJ gene. The increased NPN fluorescence and significant cellular morphological variation in the MD12ΔvacJ mutant further demonstrated the crucial role of the VacJ lipoprotein in maintaining the outer membrane integrity of A. pleuropneumoniae. In addition, the MD12ΔvacJ mutant exhibited decreased survival from the serum and complement killing compared to the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the MD12ΔvacJ mutant showed reduced biofilm formation compared to the wild-type strain. To our knowledge, this is the first description of the VacJ lipoprotein contributing to bacterial biofilm formation. The data presented in this study illustrate the important role of the VacJ lipoprotein in the maintenance of cellular integrity, serum resistance, and biofilm formation in A. pleuropneumoniae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Energy-requiring translocation of the OmpA protein and alkaline phosphatase of Escherichia coli into inner membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Rhoads, D B; Tai, P C; Davis, B D

    1984-01-01

    In developing a reliable in vitro system for translocating bacterial proteins, we found that the least dense subfraction of the membrane of Escherichia coli was superior to the total inner membrane, both for a secreted protein (alkaline phosphatase) and for an outer membrane protein (OmpA). Compounds that eliminated the proton motive force inhibited translocation, as already observed in cells; since protein synthesis continued, the energy for translocation appears to be derived from the energized membrane and not simply from ATP. Treatment of the vesicles with protease, under conditions that did not interfere with subsequent protein synthesis, also inactivated them for subsequent translocation. We conclude that export of some proteins requires protein-containing machinery in the cytoplasmic membrane that derives energy from the proton motive force. Images PMID:6203892

  10. Ankyrin and band 3 differentially affect expression of membrane glycoproteins but are not required for erythroblast enucleation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Peng; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-01-27

    During late stages of mammalian erythropoiesis the nucleus undergoes chromatin condensation, migration to the plasma membrane, and extrusion from the cytoplasm surrounded by a segment of plasma membrane. Since nuclear condensation occurs in all vertebrates, mammalian erythroid membrane and cytoskeleton proteins were implicated as playing important roles in mediating the movement and extrusion of the nucleus. Here we use erythroid ankyrin deficient and band 3 knockout mouse models to show that band 3, but not ankyrin, plays an important role in regulating the level of erythroid cell membrane proteins, as evidenced by decreased cell surface expression of glycophorin A in band 3 knockout mice. However, neither band 3 nor ankyrin are required for enucleation. These results demonstrate that mammalian erythroblast enucleation does not depend on the membrane integrity generated by the ankyrin-band 3 complex.

  11. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis presenting with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation with rapid multiorgan relapse

    PubMed Central

    Vanoli, Jennifer; Riva, Marta; Vergnano, Beatrice; D’Andrea, Gabriele; L’Imperio, Vincenzo; Pozzi, Maria Rosa; Grassi, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is an antineutrophil cytoplasmatic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis affecting small- and medium-sized blood vessels, mostly involving lung and kidney. Patient concerns: We report the case of a 33-year-old man that presented with acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by alveolar hemorrhage. Diagnoses: Aggressive GPA presenting with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and multiorgan involvement. Inteventions: Immunosuppressive therapy, plasma exchange, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Outcomes: Relapse occurred very early, despite immunosuppressive treatment, with a rare involvement of genital system (epididymitis) and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis difficult to treat. Lessons: GPA is a challenging, multifaceted disease that can require aggressive supportive therapy and is associated with a high rate of relapse that may present with uncommon site of involvement. PMID:28353556

  12. Antigen Presentation by MHC-Dressed Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as conventional dendritic cells (DCs) process protein antigens to MHC-bound peptides and then present the peptide–MHC complexes to T cells. In addition to this canonical antigen presentation pathway, recent studies have revealed that DCs and non-APCs can acquire MHC class I (MHCI) and/or MHC class II (MHCII) from neighboring cells through a process of cell–cell contact-dependent membrane transfer called trogocytosis. These MHC-dressed cells subsequently activate or regulate T cells via the preformed antigen peptide–MHC complexes without requiring any further processing. In addition to trogocytosis, intercellular transfer of MHCI and MHCII can be mediated by secretion of membrane vesicles such as exosomes from APCs, generating MHC-dressed cells. This review focuses on the physiological role of antigen presentation by MHCI- or MHCII-dressed cells, and also discusses differences and similarities between trogocytosis and exosome-mediated transfer of MHC. PMID:25601867

  13. Ankyrin and band 3 differentially affect expression of membrane glycoproteins but are not required for erythroblast enucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Peng; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ankyrin and band 3 are not required for erythroblasts enucleation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of ankyrin does not affect erythroid membrane glycoprotein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of band 3 influences erythroid membrane glycoprotein expression. -- Abstract: During late stages of mammalian erythropoiesis the nucleus undergoes chromatin condensation, migration to the plasma membrane, and extrusion from the cytoplasm surrounded by a segment of plasma membrane. Since nuclear condensation occurs in all vertebrates, mammalian erythroid membrane and cytoskeleton proteins were implicated as playing important roles in mediating the movement and extrusion of the nucleus. Here we use erythroid ankyrin deficient and band 3 knockout mouse models to show that band 3, but not ankyrin, plays an important role in regulating the level of erythroid cell membrane proteins, as evidenced by decreased cell surface expression of glycophorin A in band 3 knockout mice. However, neither band 3 nor ankyrin are required for enucleation. These results demonstrate that mammalian erythroblast enucleation does not depend on the membrane integrity generated by the ankyrin-band 3 complex.

  14. The MAL protein is crucial for proper membrane condensation at the ciliary base, which is required for primary cilium elongation.

    PubMed

    Reales, Elena; Bernabé-Rubio, Miguel; Casares-Arias, Javier; Rentero, Carles; Fernández-Barrera, Jaime; Rangel, Laura; Correas, Isabel; Enrich, Carlos; Andrés, Germán; Alonso, Miguel A

    2015-06-15

    The base of the primary cilium contains a zone of condensed membranes whose importance is not known. Here, we have studied the involvement of MAL, a tetraspanning protein that exclusively partitions into condensed membrane fractions, in the condensation of membranes at the ciliary base and investigated the importance of these membranes in primary cilium formation. We show that MAL accumulates at the ciliary base of epithelial MDCK cells. Knockdown of MAL expression resulted in a drastic reduction in the condensation of membranes at the ciliary base, the percentage of ciliated cells and the length of the cilia, but did not affect the docking of the centrosome to the plasma membrane or produce missorting of proteins to the pericentriolar zone or to the membrane of the remaining cilia. Rab8 (for which there are two isoforms, Rab8A and Rab8b), IFT88 and IFT20, which are important components of the machinery of ciliary growth, were recruited normally to the ciliary base of MAL-knockdown cells but were unable to elongate the primary cilium correctly. MAL, therefore, is crucial for the proper condensation of membranes at the ciliary base, which is required for efficient primary cilium extension. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Asymmetric Requirements for a Rab Gtpase and Snare Proteins in Fusion of Copii Vesicles with Acceptor Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaochun; Barlowe, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins are essential for membrane fusion in transport between the yeast ER and Golgi compartments. Subcellular fractionation experiments demonstrate that the ER/Golgi SNAREs Bos1p, Sec22p, Bet1p, Sed5p, and the Rab protein, Ypt1p, are distributed similarly but localize primarily with Golgi membranes. All of these SNARE proteins are efficiently packaged into COPII vesicles and suggest a dynamic cycling of SNARE machinery between ER and Golgi compartments. Ypt1p is not efficiently packaged into vesicles under these conditions. To determine in which membranes protein function is required, temperature-sensitive alleles of BOS1, BET1, SED5, SLY1, and YPT1 that prevent ER/Golgi transport in vitro at restrictive temperatures were used to selectively inactivate these gene products on vesicles or on Golgi membranes. Vesicles bearing mutations in Bet1p or Bos1p inhibit fusion with wild-type acceptor membranes, but acceptor membranes containing these mutations are fully functional. In contrast, vesicles bearing mutations in Sed5p, Sly1p, or Ypt1p are functional, whereas acceptor membranes containing these mutations block fusion. Thus, this set of SNARE proteins is symmetrically distributed between vesicle and acceptor compartments, but they function asymmetrically such that Bet1p and Bos1p are required on vesicles and Sed5p activity is required on acceptor membranes. We propose the asymmetry in SNARE protein function is maintained by an asymmetric distribution and requirement for the Ypt1p GTPase in this fusion event. When a transmembrane-anchored form of Ypt1p is used to restrict this GTPase to the acceptor compartment, vesicles depleted of Ypt1p remain competent for fusion. PMID:10747087

  16. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae v-SNARE Vti1p Is Required for Multiple Membrane Transport Pathways to the Vacuole

    PubMed Central

    von Mollard, Gabriele Fischer; Stevens, Tom H.

    1999-01-01

    The interaction between v-SNAREs on transport vesicles and t-SNAREs on target membranes is required for membrane traffic in eukaryotic cells. Here we identify Vti1p as the first v-SNARE protein found to be required for biosynthetic traffic into the yeast vacuole, the equivalent of the mammalian lysosome. Certain vti1-ts yeast mutants are defective in alkaline phosphatase transport from the Golgi to the vacuole and in targeting of aminopeptidase I from the cytosol to the vacuole. VTI1 interacts genetically with the vacuolar t-SNARE VAM3, which is required for transport of both alkaline phosphatase and aminopeptidase I to the vacuole. The v-SNARE Nyv1p forms a SNARE complex with Vam3p in homotypic vacuolar fusion; however, we find that Nyv1p is not required for any of the three biosynthetic pathways to the vacuole. v-SNAREs were thought to ensure specificity in membrane traffic. However, Vti1p also functions in two additional membrane traffic pathways: Vti1p interacts with the t-SNAREs Pep12p in traffic from the TGN to the prevacuolar compartment and with Sed5p in retrograde traffic to the cis-Golgi. The ability of Vti1p to mediate multiple fusion steps requires additional proteins to ensure specificity in membrane traffic. PMID:10359592

  17. Molecular cloning, expression, and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding a human myeloid membrane antigen (gp150).

    PubMed Central

    Look, A T; Peiper, S C; Rebentisch, M B; Ashmun, R A; Roussel, M F; Lemons, R S; Le Beau, M M; Rubin, C M; Sherr, C J

    1986-01-01

    DNA from a tertiary mouse cell transformant containing amplified human sequences encoding a human myeloid membrane glycoprotein, gp150, was used to construct a bacteriophage lambda library. A single recombinant phage containing 12 kilobases (kb) of human DNA was isolated, and molecular subclones were then used to isolate the complete gp150 gene from a human placental genomic DNA library. The intact gp150 gene, assembled from three recombinant phages, proved to be biologically active when transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. Molecular probes from the gp150 locus annealed with a 4.0-kb polyadenylated RNA transcript derived from human myeloid cell lines and from tertiary mouse cell transformants. The gp150 gene was assigned to human chromosome 15, and was subchromosomally localized to bands q25-26 by in situ hybridization. The chromosomal location of the gp150 gene coincides cytogenetically with the region assigned to the c-fes proto-oncogene, another human gene specifically expressed by myeloid cells. Images PMID:2428842

  18. [(18)F]Fluorobenzoyllysinepentanedioic Acid Carbamates: New Scaffolds for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA).

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing; Mease, Ronnie C; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Lisok, Ala; Chen, Ying; Foss, Catherine A; Wang, Yuchuan; Shallal, Hassan; Edelman, Hannah; Hoye, Adam T; Attardo, Giorgio; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Pomper, Martin G

    2016-01-14

    Radiolabeled urea-based low-molecular weight inhibitors of the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) are under intense investigation as imaging and therapeutic agents for prostate and other cancers. In an effort to provide agents with less nontarget organ uptake than the ureas, we synthesized four (18)F-labeled inhibitors of PSMA based on carbamate scaffolds. 4-Bromo-2-[(18)F]fluorobenzoyllysineoxypentanedioic acid (OPA) carbamate [(18)F]23 and 4-iodo-2-[(18)F]fluorobenzoyllysine OPA carbamate [(18)F]24 in particular exhibited high target-selective uptake in PSMA+ PC3 PIP tumor xenografts, with tumor-to-kidney ratios of >1 by 4 h postinjection, an important benchmark. Because of its high tumor uptake (90% injected dose per gram of tissue at 2 h postinjection) and high tumor-to-organ ratios, [(18)F]23 is promising for clinical translation. Prolonged tumor-specific uptake demonstrated by [(18)F]24, which did not reach equilibrium during the 4 h study period, suggests carbamates as alternative scaffolds for mitigating dose to nontarget tissues.

  19. Effect of chelators on the pharmacokinetics of (99m)Tc-labeled imaging agents for the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA).

    PubMed

    Ray Banerjee, Sangeeta; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Foss, Catherine A; Falk, Alexander; Byun, Youngjoo; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Mease, Ronnie C; Pomper, Martin G

    2013-08-08

    Technetium-99m, the most commonly used radionuclide in nuclear medicine, can be attached to biologically important molecules through a variety of chelating agents, the choice of which depends upon the imaging application. The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is increasingly recognized as an important target for imaging and therapy of prostate cancer (PCa). Three different (99m)Tc-labeling methods were employed to investigate the effect of the chelator on the biodistribution and PCa tumor uptake profiles of 12 new urea-based PSMA-targeted radiotracers. This series includes hydrophilic ligands for radiolabeling with the [(99m)Tc(CO)3](+) core (L8-L10), traditional NxSy-based chelating agents with varying charge and polarity for the (99m)Tc-oxo core (L11-L18), and a (99m)Tc-organohydrazine-labeled radioligand (L19). (99m)Tc(I)-Tricarbonyl-labeled [(99m)Tc]L8 produced the highest PSMA+ PC3 PIP to PSMA- PC3 flu tumor ratios and demonstrated the lowest retention in normal tissues including kidney after 2 h. These results suggest that choice of chelator is an important pharmacokinetic consideration in the development of (99m)Tc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals targeting PSMA.

  20. Effect of Chelators on the Pharmacokinetics of 99mTc-Labeled Imaging Agents for the Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA)

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Foss, Catherine A.; Falk, Alexander; Byun, Youngjoo; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Mease, Ronnie C.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2013-01-01

    Technetium-99m, the most commonly used radionuclide in nuclear medicine, can be attached to biologically important molecules through a variety of chelating agents, the choice of which depends upon the imaging application. The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is increasingly recognized as an important target for imaging and therapy of prostate cancer (PCa). Three different 99mTc-labeling methods were employed to investigate the effect of the chelator on the biodistribution and PCa tumor uptake profiles of 12 new urea based PSMA-targeted radiotracers. This series includes hydrophilic ligands for radiolabeling with the [99mTc(CO)3]+ core (L8-10), traditional NxSy-based chelating agents with varying charge and polarity for the 99mTc-oxo core (L11-18), and a 99mTc-organohydrazine-labeled radioligand (L19). 99mTc(I)-Tricarbonyl-labeled [99mTc]L8 produced the highest PSMA+ PC3 PIP to PSMA− PC3 flu tumor ratios, and demonstrated the lowest retention in normal tissues including kidney after 2 h. These results suggest that choice of chelator is an important pharmacokinetic consideration in the development of 99mTc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals targeting PSMA. PMID:23799782

  1. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSM) is expressed in various human tissues: implication for the use of PSM reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to detect hematogenous prostate cancer spread.

    PubMed

    Renneberg, H; Friedetzky, A; Konrad, L; Kurek, R; Weingärtner, K; Wennemuth, G; Tunn, U W; Aumüller, G

    1999-01-01

    Detection of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSM)-mRNA expression in blood samples using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is discussed as a new diagnostic marker of circulating micrometastases in prostate cancer patients. We applied the RT-PCR technique to different human tissues and obtained positive signals for PSM transcripts in human genital and multiple extra-genital tissue sites. The cDNAs were prepared from different human tissues and prostatic cell lines. RT-PCR and nested RT-PCR for PSM was performed with primers derived from the published PSM cDNA. The RT-PCR fragments obtained were cloned and showed 100% sequence homology to PSM. Southern blot hybridization with labeled probes was used to confirm the specificity of the amplicons. In addition to the known PSM expression in the human brain, PSM-mRNA was detected in cDNA isolated from human testis, epididymis and seminal vesicles and in the PC-3 prostatic cancer cell line. Furthermore, we found PSM-mRNA in heart, liver, lung, kidney, spleen, and thyroid gland. The results indicate that PSM expression is not restricted to the prostate gland, but represents a more general component of genital and extra-genital human tissues. This must be considered when RT-PCR and nested RT-PCR screening for PSM expression is performed as a diagnostic measure in blood from prostate cancer patients.

  2. Preparation and Evaluation of Radiolabeled Antibody Recruiting Small Molecules That Target Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen for Combined Radiotherapy and Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Genady, Afaf R; Janzen, Nancy; Banevicius, Laura; El-Gamal, Mahmoud; El-Zaria, Mohamed E; Valliant, John F

    2016-03-24

    The feasibility of developing a single agent that can deliver radioactive iodine and also direct cellular immune function by engaging endogenous antibodies as an antibody-recruiting small molecule (ARM) was determined. A library of new prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-binding ligands that contained antibody-recruiting 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP) groups and iodine were synthesized and screened in vitro and in vivo. A lead compound (9b) showed high affinity for PSMA and the ability to bind anti-DNP antibodies. Biodistribution studies of the iodine-125 analogue showed 3% ID/g in LNCaP xenograft tumors at 1 h postinjection with tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-muscle ratios of 10:1 and 44:1, respectively. The radiolabeled analogue was bound and internalized by LNCaP cells, with both functions blocked using a known PSMA inhibitor. A second candidate showed high tumor uptake (>10% ID/g) but had minimal binding to anti-DNP antibodies. The compounds reported represent the first examples of small molecules developed specifically for combination immunotherapy and radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  3. Initial Evaluation of [18F]DCFPyL for Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA)-Targeted PET Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Zsolt; Mena, Esther; Rowe, Steven P.; Plyku, Donika; Nidal, Rosa; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Fan, Hong; Dannals, Robert F.; Chen, Ying; Mease, Ronnie C.; Vranesic, Melin; Bhatnagar, Akrita; Sgouros, George; Cho, Steve Y.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a recognized target for imaging prostate cancer. Here we present initial safety, biodistribution, and radiation dosimetry results with [18F]DCFPyL, a second-generation fluorine-18-labeled small-molecule PSMA inhibitor, in patients with prostate cancer. Procedures Biodistribution was evaluated using sequential positron-emission tomography (PET) scans in nine patients with prostate cancer. Time-activity curves from the most avid tumor foci were determined. The radiation dose to selected organs was estimated using OLINDA/EXM. Results No major radiotracer-specific adverse events were observed. Physiologic accumulation was observed in known sites of PSMA expression. Accumulation in putative sites of prostate cancer was observed (SUVmax up to >100, and tumor-to-blood ratios up to >50). The effective radiation dose from [18F]DCFPyL was 0.0139 mGy/MBq or 5 mGy (0.5 rem) from an injected dose of 370 MBq (10 mCi). Conclusions [18F]DCFPyL is safe with biodistribution as expected, and its accumulation is high in presumed primary and metastatic foci. The radiation dose from [18F]DCFPyL is similar to that from other PET radiotracers. PMID:25896814

  4. Identification of a prostate-specific membrane antigen-derived peptide capable of eliciting both cellular and humoral immune responses in HLA-A24+ prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuhiko; Noguchi, Masanori; Itoh, Kyogo; Harada, Mamoru

    2003-07-01

    We tried to identify prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-derived peptides capable of eliciting both cellular and humoral immune responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and plasma of HLA-A24(+) prostate cancer patients, respectively. For cellular response, peptide-specific and prostate cancer-reactive responses of in vitro-stimulated PBMCs were examined with regard to interferon (IFN)-gamma production and cytotoxicity against both a parental HLA-A24(-) prostate cancer cell line (PC-93) and an HLA-A24-expressing transfectant cell line (PC93-A24). For humoral response, patients' plasma was tested for reactivity to the peptides by means of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Among 13 PSMA peptides, PSMA 624-632 peptide induced peptide-specific and tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) most effectively. The PSMA 624-632 peptide-stimulated PBMCs from either healthy donors or prostate cancer patients produced a significant level of IFN-gamma in response to prostate cancer cells in an HLA-A24-restricted manner, and also showed a higher level of cytotoxicity against PC93-A24 than against PC93. Antibodies to the PSMA 624-632 peptide, but not to any others, were detected in prostate cancer patients. These results demonstrate that the PSMA 624-632 peptide could be an appropriate molecule for use in specific immunotherapy of HLA-A24(+) patients with prostate cancer.

  5. Multilevel Precision-Based Rational Design of Chemical Inhibitors Targeting the Hydrophobic Cleft of Toxoplasma gondii Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1)

    PubMed Central

    Muralikumar, Shalini; Mahalakshmi, B; Lily Therese, K; Madhavan, HN; Alameen, Mohamed; Thirumudi, Indhuja

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular Apicomplexan parasite and a causative agent of toxoplasmosis in human. It causes encephalitis, uveitis, chorioretinitis, and congenital infection. T. gondii invades the host cell by forming a moving junction (MJ) complex. This complex formation is initiated by intermolecular interactions between the two secretory parasitic proteins—namely, apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and rhoptry neck protein 2 (RON2) and is critically essential for the host invasion process. By this study, we propose two potential leads, NSC95522 and NSC179676 that can efficiently target the AMA1 hydrophobic cleft, which is a hotspot for targeting MJ complex formation. The proposed leads are the result of an exhaustive conformational search-based virtual screen with multilevel precision scoring of the docking affinities. These two compounds surpassed all the precision levels of docking and also the stringent post docking and cumulative molecular dynamics evaluations. Moreover, the backbone flexibility of hotspot residues in the hydrophobic cleft, which has been previously reported to be essential for accommodative binding of RON2 to AMA1, was also highly perturbed by these compounds. Furthermore, binding free energy calculations of these two compounds also revealed a significant affinity to AMA1. Machine learning approaches also predicted these two compounds to possess more relevant activities. Hence, these two leads, NSC95522 and NSC179676, may prove to be potential inhibitors targeting AMA1-RON2 complex formation towards combating toxoplasmosis. PMID:27445648

  6. Multilevel Precision-Based Rational Design of Chemical Inhibitors Targeting the Hydrophobic Cleft of Toxoplasma gondii Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1).

    PubMed

    Vetrivel, Umashankar; Muralikumar, Shalini; Mahalakshmi, B; Lily Therese, K; Madhavan, H N; Alameen, Mohamed; Thirumudi, Indhuja

    2016-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular Apicomplexan parasite and a causative agent of toxoplasmosis in human. It causes encephalitis, uveitis, chorioretinitis, and congenital infection. T. gondii invades the host cell by forming a moving junction (MJ) complex. This complex formation is initiated by intermolecular interactions between the two secretory parasitic proteins-namely, apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and rhoptry neck protein 2 (RON2) and is critically essential for the host invasion process. By this study, we propose two potential leads, NSC95522 and NSC179676 that can efficiently target the AMA1 hydrophobic cleft, which is a hotspot for targeting MJ complex formation. The proposed leads are the result of an exhaustive conformational search-based virtual screen with multilevel precision scoring of the docking affinities. These two compounds surpassed all the precision levels of docking and also the stringent post docking and cumulative molecular dynamics evaluations. Moreover, the backbone flexibility of hotspot residues in the hydrophobic cleft, which has been previously reported to be essential for accommodative binding of RON2 to AMA1, was also highly perturbed by these compounds. Furthermore, binding free energy calculations of these two compounds also revealed a significant affinity to AMA1. Machine learning approaches also predicted these two compounds to possess more relevant activities. Hence, these two leads, NSC95522 and NSC179676, may prove to be potential inhibitors targeting AMA1-RON2 complex formation towards combating toxoplasmosis.

  7. Development and screening of a series of antibody-conjugated and silica coated iron-oxide nanoparticles for targeting the Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Amarnath; Darlington, Thomas; Baldwin, Richard; Holz, Charles; Olson, Sage; Kulkarni, Prakash; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Getzenberg, Robert H.; Ivkov, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) is an established target for the delivery of cancer therapeutic and imaging agents due to its high expression on the surface of prostate cancer cells and within the neovasculature of other solid tumors. Here we describe the synthesis and screening of antibody-conjugated silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for PSMA-specific cell targeting. The humanized anti-PSMA antibody, HuJ591, was conjugated to a series of nanoparticles with varying densities of polyethylene glycol and primary amine groups. Customized assays utilizing iron spectral absorbance and Enzyme-Linked Immunoassay (ELISA) were developed to screen microgram quantities of nanoparticle formulations for immunoreactivity and cell targeting ability. Antibody and PSMA-specific targeting of the optimized nanoparticle was evaluated using an isogenic PSMA-positive and PSMA-negative cell line pair. Specific nanoparticle targeting was confirmed by iron quantification with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). These methods and nanoparticles support the promise of targeted theranostic agents for future treatment of prostate and other cancers. PMID:24591351

  8. Membrane-bound immunoglobulins on human leukemic cells. Evidence for humoral immune responses of patients to leukemia-associated antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Metzgar, R S; Mohanakumar, T; Miller, D S

    1975-01-01

    Immunoglobulins were detected on the membranes of human leukemic cells by a microcytotoxicity technique. A significant percentage of lymphocytes from normal donors failed to react with goat antisera to human heavy chain determinants or to lambda-light chains. Lymphocytes from some normal donors, however, did react with antisera to k-light chains. A high percentage (50-90) of cells from some leukemia patients were killed by antisera to light chains and by one or more antisera to heavy chain determinants. Trypsin treatment of leukemic cells resulted in a loss of cytotoxic activity with all immunoglobulin antisera. Reactivity with the k-light chain antiserum was detectable 2 h after trypsinization of chronic myeloid leukemic (CML) cells and 8 h after treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemic (ALL) cells. Reactivity with the antisera to heavy chain determinants and lambda-light chains could not be detected 8 and 48 h after trypsinization of CML and ALL cells, respectively. The cytotoxic activity of the immunoglobulin antisera to heavy chains was abolished by absorption with the specific immunoglobulin used to define the antisera by precipitation. Eluates (pH 3.2) prepared from leukemic cells which reacted by cytotoxicity with the immunoglobulin antisera were shown to contain immunoglobulins of different heavy chain classes. In addition, some of the eluates had cytotoxic antibody activity to human leukemia cells. The specificity of the eluted antibodies is similar to the specificity previously described for cytophilic antibodies from leukemic patients and nonhuman primate antisera to human leukemia cells. The possible in vitro detection and in vivo significance of the eluted non-complement-fixing antibodies is considered. PMID:807598

  9. Direct activation of antigen-presenting cells is required for CD8+ T-cell priming and tumor vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Kratky, Wolfgang; Reis e Sousa, Caetano; Oxenius, Annette; Spörri, Roman

    2011-01-01

    Successful priming of adaptive immune responses is crucially dependent on innate activation signals that convert resting antigen-presenting cells (APCs) into immunogenic ones. APCs expressing the relevant innate pattern recognition receptors can be directly activated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) to become competent to prime T-cell responses. Alternatively, it has been suggested that APCs could be activated indirectly by proinflammatory mediators synthesized by PAMP-exposed cells. However, data obtained with CD4+ T cells suggest that inflammatory signals often cannot substitute for direct pattern recognition in APC activation for the priming of T helper responses. To test whether the same is true for CD8+ T cells, we studied cytotoxic T lymphocyte development in vitro and in mixed chimeric mice in which coexisting APCs can either present a preprocessed model antigen or directly recognize a given PAMP, but not both. We show that indirectly activated APCs promote antigen-specific proliferation of naïve CD8+ T cells but fail to support their survival and cytotoxic T lymphocyte differentiation. Furthermore, CD8+ T cells primed by indirectly activated APCs are unable to reject tumors. Thus, inflammation cannot substitute for direct recognition of single PAMPs in CD8+ T-cell priming. These findings have important practical implications for vaccine design, indicating that adjuvants must be judiciously chosen to trigger the relevant pattern recognition receptors in APCs. PMID:21987815

  10. T suppressor cells are required for the maintenance of the antigen-induced B-cell unresponsive state in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Benveniste, E.; Stevens, R.H.

    1983-04-01

    Tetanus toxoid immunization of humans generates circulating B cells which secrete IgG anti-tetanus toxoid antibodies (IgG-Tet) when stimulated in vitro with T cells and pokeweed mitogen (PWM). A unique property of these cells is the inhibition of maturation into antibody-secreting plasma cells following a 1-hr in vitro pulse with tetanus toxoid. Studies were undertaken to determine if different T-cell subsets could modulate the in vitro generated B-cell unresponsive state. The addition of OKT4+/OKT8- cells to antigen-treated B cells resulted in a partial reversal of the antigen-induced inhibition of IgG-Tet synthesis. The addition of OKT4-/OKT8+ cells to the treated B cells caused a suppression of IgG-Tet synthesis comparable to that seen in cultures containing unfractionated T cells. These results indicate that (1) the B-cell unresponsive state generated by antigen treatment is not absolute, (2) the degree of B-cell unresponsiveness results from a balance of suppressor and helper signals, and (3) T-suppressor cells need to be present to induce and maintain the B-cell unresponsive state.

  11. The golgin GMAP-210 is required for efficient membrane trafficking in the early secretory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Roboti, Peristera; Sato, Keisuke; Lowe, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Golgins are coiled-coil proteins that participate in membrane-tethering events at the Golgi complex. Golgin-mediated tethering is thought to be important for vesicular trafficking and Golgi organization. However, the degree to which individual golgins contribute to these processes is poorly defined, and it has been proposed that golgins act in a largely redundant manner. Previous studies on the golgin GMAP-210 (also known as TRIP11), which is mutated in the rare skeletal disorder achondrogenesis type 1A, have yielded conflicting results regarding its involvement in trafficking. Here, we re-investigated the trafficking role of GMAP-210, and found that it is indeed required for efficient trafficking in the secretory pathway. GMAP-210 acts at both the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) and Golgi complex during anterograde trafficking, and is also required for retrograde trafficking to the ER. Using co-depletion experiments, we also found that GMAP-210 acts in a partially redundant manner with the golgin GM130 to ensure efficient anterograde cargo delivery to the cis-Golgi. In summary, our results indicate a role for GMAP-210 in several trafficking steps at the ER–Golgi interface, some of which are partially redundant with another golgin, namely GM130 (also known as GOLGA2). PMID:25717001

  12. Phagocytosis of IgG-coated polystyrene beads by macrophages induces and requires high membrane order.

    PubMed

    Magenau, Astrid; Benzing, Carola; Proschogo, Nicholas; Don, Anthony S; Hejazi, Leila; Karunakaran, Denuja; Jessup, Wendy; Gaus, Katharina

    2011-12-01

    The biochemical composition and biophysical properties of cell membranes are hypothesized to affect cellular processes such as phagocytosis. Here, we examined the plasma membranes of murine macrophage cell lines during the early stages of uptake of immunoglobulin G (IgG)-coated polystyrene particles. We found that the plasma membrane undergoes rapid actin-independent condensation to form highly ordered phagosomal membranes, the biophysical hallmark of lipid rafts. Surprisingly, these membranes are depleted of cholesterol and enriched in sphingomyelin and ceramide. Inhibition of sphingomyelinase activity impairs membrane condensation, F-actin accumulation at phagocytic cups and particle uptake. Switching phagosomal membranes to a cholesterol-rich environment had no effect on membrane condensation and the rate of phagocytosis. In contrast, preventing membrane condensation with the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol, even in the presence of ceramide, blocked F-actin dissociation from nascent phagosomes and particle uptake. In conclusion, our results suggest that ordered membranes function to co-ordinate F-actin remodelling and that the biophysical properties of phagosomal membranes are essential for phagocytosis. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) assembles a macromolecular complex regulating growth and survival of prostate cancer cells “in vitro” and correlating with progression “in vivo”

    PubMed Central

    Brunelli, Matteo; Martignoni, Guido; Munari, Enrico; Moiso, Enrico; Fracasso, Giulio; Cestari, Tiziana; Naim, Hassan Y.; Bronte, Vincenzo; Colombatti, Marco; Ramarli, Dunia

    2016-01-01

    The expression of Prostate Specific-Membrane Antigen (PSMA) increases in high-grade prostate carcinoma envisaging a role in growth and progression. We show here that clustering PSMA at LNCaP or PC3-PSMA cell membrane activates AKT and MAPK pathways thus promoting proliferation and survival. PSMA activity was dependent on the assembly of a macromolecular complex including filamin A, beta1 integrin, p130CAS, c-Src and EGFR. Within this complex beta1 integrin became activated thereby inducing a c-Src-dependent EGFR phosphorylation at Y1086 and Y1173 EGF-independent residues. Silencing or blocking experiments with drugs demonstrated that all the complex components were required for full PSMA-dependent promotion of cell growth and/or survival in 3D culture, but that p130CAS and EGFR exerted a major role. All PSMA complex components were found assembled in multiple samples of two high-grade prostate carcinomas and associated with EGFR phosphorylation at Y1086. The expression of p130CAS and pEGFRY1086 was thus analysed by tissue micro array in 16 castration-resistant prostate carcinomas selected from 309 carcinomas and stratified from GS 3+4 to GS 5+5. Patients with Gleason Score ≤5 resulted negative whereas those with GS≥5 expressed p130CAS and pEGFRY1086 in 75% and 60% of the cases, respectively. Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that PSMA recruits a functionally active complex which is present in high-grade patients. In addition, two components of this complex, p130CAS and the novel pEGFRY1086, correlate with progression in castration-resistant patients and could be therefore useful in therapeutic or surveillance strategies of these patients. PMID:27713116

  14. Membrane Association via an Amino-terminal Amphipathic Helix Is Required for the Cellular Organization and Function of RNase II*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Feng; Taghbalout, Aziz

    2013-01-01

    The subcellular localization of the exoribonuclease RNase II is not known despite the advanced biochemical characterization of the enzyme. Here we report that RNase II is organized into cellular structures that appear to coil around the Escherichia coli cell periphery and that RNase II is associated with the cytoplasmic membrane by its amino-terminal amphipathic helix. The helix also acts as an autonomous transplantable membrane binding domain capable of directing normally cytoplasmic proteins to the membrane. Assembly of the organized cellular structures of RNase II required the RNase II amphipathic membrane binding domain. Co-immunoprecipitation of the protein from cell extracts indicated that RNase II interacts with itself. The RNase II self-interaction and the ability of the protein to assemble into organized cellular structures required the membrane binding domain. The ability of RNase II to maintain cell viability in the absence of the exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase was markedly diminished when the RNase II cellular structures were lost due to changes in the amphipathicity of the amino-terminal helix, suggesting that membrane association and assembly of RNase II into organized cellular structures play an important role in the normal function of the protein within the bacterial cell. PMID:23344958

  15. Membrane association via an amino-terminal amphipathic helix is required for the cellular organization and function of RNase II.

    PubMed

    Lu, Feng; Taghbalout, Aziz

    2013-03-08

    The subcellular localization of the exoribonuclease RNase II is not known despite the advanced biochemical characterization of the enzyme. Here we report that RNase II is organized into cellular structures that appear to coil around the Escherichia coli cell periphery and that RNase II is associated with the cytoplasmic membrane by its amino-terminal amphipathic helix. The helix also acts as an autonomous transplantable membrane binding domain capable of directing normally cytoplasmic proteins to the membrane. Assembly of the organized cellular structures of RNase II required the RNase II amphipathic membrane binding domain. Co-immunoprecipitation of the protein from cell extracts indicated that RNase II interacts with itself. The RNase II self-interaction and the ability of the protein to assemble into organized cellular structures required the membrane binding domain. The ability of RNase II to maintain cell viability in the absence of the exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase was markedly diminished when the RNase II cellular structures were lost due to changes in the amphipathicity of the amino-terminal helix, suggesting that membrane association and assembly of RNase II into organized cellular structures play an important role in the normal function of the protein within the bacterial cell.

  16. Bax oligomerization in mitochondrial membranes requires tBid (caspase-8-cleaved Bid) and a mitochondrial protein.

    PubMed Central

    Roucou, Xavier; Montessuit, Sylvie; Antonsson, Bruno; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2002-01-01

    In response to various apoptotic stimuli, Bax, a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, is oligomerized and permeabilizes the mitochondrial outer membrane to apoptogenic factors, including cytochrome c. Bax oligomerization can also be induced by incubating isolated mitochondria containing endogenous Bax with recombinant tBid (caspase-8-cleaved Bid) in vitro. The mechanism by which Bax oligomerizes under these conditions is still unknown. To address this question, recombinant human full-length Bax was purified as a monomeric protein. Bax failed to oligomerize spontaneously in isolated mitochondria or in liposomes composed of either cardiolipin or lipids extracted from mitochondria. However, in the presence of tBid, the protein formed large complexes in mitochondrial membranes and induced the release of cytochrome c. tBid also induced Bax oligomerization in isolated mitochondrial outer membranes, but not in other membranes, such as plasma membranes or microsomes. Moreover, tBid-induced Bax oligomerization was inhibited when mitochondria were pretreated with protease K. The presence of the voltage-dependent anion channel was not required either for Bax oligomerization or for Bax-induced cytochrome c release. Finally, Bax oligomerization was reconstituted in proteoliposomes made from mitochondrial membrane proteins. These findings imply that tBid is necessary but not sufficient for Bax oligomerization; a mitochondrial protein is also required. PMID:12193163

  17. Freezing tolerance in plants requires lipid remodeling at the outer chloroplast membrane.

    PubMed

    Moellering, Eric R; Muthan, Bagyalakshmi; Benning, Christoph

    2010-10-08

    Plants show complex adaptations to freezing that prevent cell damage caused by cellular dehydration. Lipid remodeling of cell membranes during dehydration is one critical mechanism countering loss of membrane integrity and cell death. SENSITIVE TO FREEZING 2 (SFR2), a gene essential for freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis, encodes a galactolipid remodeling enzyme of the outer chloroplast envelope membrane. SFR2 processively transfers galactosyl residues from the abundant monogalactolipid to different galactolipid acceptors, forming oligogalactolipids and diacylglycerol, which is further converted to triacylglycerol. The combined activity of SFR2 and triacylglycerol-biosynthetic enzymes leads to the removal of monogalactolipids from the envelope membrane, changing the ratio of bilayer- to non-bilayer-forming membrane lipids. This SFR2-based mechanism compensates for changes in organelle volume and stabilizes membranes during freezing.

  18. Non-responsiveness of antigen-experienced CD4 T cells reflects more stringent co-stimulatory requirements.

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, M E; Noteboom, E; Kruisbeek, A M

    1998-01-01

    We recently reported that previously activated T cells, irrespective of the nature of the first stimulus they encountered, are unable to respond to Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), nor to soluble anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) presented by splenic antigen-presenting cells (APC). Such previously activated T cells are, however, fully capable of responding to plate-bound anti-CD3 plus splenic APC. These data suggest differential integration of the T-cell receptor (TCR) and co-stimulatory signalling pathways in naive versus antigen-experienced T cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, anti-CD28 mAb restores the proliferative capacity of resting ex vivo CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells (representing previously activated T cells) to both soluble anti-CD3 mAb and SEB. Interestingly, mAb-mediated engagement of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) completely negates the rescue effects mediated by anti-CD28 mAb in CD45RBlo cells. Nevertheless, the non-responsiveness of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells cannot be reversed by anti-CTLA-4 Fab fragments, indicating that it is not related to negative regulatory effects of CTLA-4 engagement itself. Interestingly, the addition of interleukin-2 (IL-2) restores the proliferative capacity of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells to SEB and soluble anti-CD3 mAb. Moreover, when rescued by IL-2, the cells are less susceptible to the negative regulatory effects of CTLA-4 engagement. Together, these findings suggest that the non-responsiveness of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells to certain stimuli may be related to inadequate TCR signalling, primarily affecting IL-2 production. Images Figure 1 PMID:9640247

  19. Non-responsiveness of antigen-experienced CD4 T cells reflects more stringent co-stimulatory requirements.

    PubMed

    Hamel, M E; Noteboom, E; Kruisbeek, A M

    1998-03-01

    We recently reported that previously activated T cells, irrespective of the nature of the first stimulus they encountered, are unable to respond to Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), nor to soluble anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) presented by splenic antigen-presenting cells (APC). Such previously activated T cells are, however, fully capable of responding to plate-bound anti-CD3 plus splenic APC. These data suggest differential integration of the T-cell receptor (TCR) and co-stimulatory signalling pathways in naive versus antigen-experienced T cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, anti-CD28 mAb restores the proliferative capacity of resting ex vivo CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells (representing previously activated T cells) to both soluble anti-CD3 mAb and SEB. Interestingly, mAb-mediated engagement of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) completely negates the rescue effects mediated by anti-CD28 mAb in CD45RBlo cells. Nevertheless, the non-responsiveness of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells cannot be reversed by anti-CTLA-4 Fab fragments, indicating that it is not related to negative regulatory effects of CTLA-4 engagement itself. Interestingly, the addition of interleukin-2 (IL-2) restores the proliferative capacity of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells to SEB and soluble anti-CD3 mAb. Moreover, when rescued by IL-2, the cells are less susceptible to the negative regulatory effects of CTLA-4 engagement. Together, these findings suggest that the non-responsiveness of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells to certain stimuli may be related to inadequate TCR signalling, primarily affecting IL-2 production.

  20. Evaluation of monoclonal antibodies to human plasma low density lipoproteins. A requirement for lipids to maintain antigenic structure.

    PubMed

    Patton, J G; Alley, M C; Mao, S J

    1982-12-17

    Human plasma low density lipoproteins (LDL) are composed of approximately 25% apoproteins and 75% lipids (w/w). Immunochemical properties of LDL were studied using monoclonal antibodies. BALB/c mice were immunized with LDL and the spleen cells from these mice were then fused with a non-immunoglobulin secreting myeloma cell line (F0). The clones producing desirable antibodies were selected to study the antigenic properties of LDL by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and radioimmunoassay. First, it was found that the maximal binding of 125I-labeled LDL to polyvinyl chloride microtiter dishes was not temperature dependent. The binding affinity was high with a Ka value of approximately 1.9 X 10(10) M-1 while the monoclonal antibodies possessed an affinity to LDL of 5 X 10(8) M-1 which was 2 orders less than the affinity of LDL to the dishes. The former binding, once established, was irreversible as judged by a subsequent incubation with an excess of unlabeled LDL. The latter binding could be displaced by unlabeled LDL. Therefore, the ELISA technique offered a satisfactory approach to study the interaction between LDL and monoclonal antibodies. Removal of lipids from bound LDL by organic extraction resulted in a 50% loss of immunoreactivity, suggesting that the lipids of LDL are important in maintaining the antigenic structure of LDL. Since the apoprotein of LDL also constitutes approximately 40% of the mass (w/w) of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), the immunoreactivity of VLDL assessed by LDL-monoclonal antibodies was also carried out. Removal of triglycerides from VLDL by lipoprotein lipase resulted in a substantial loss of immunoreactivity as determined by radioimmunoassay. These findings are consistent with the concept that lipids play a role in maintaining the integrity of the antigenic structure of LDL.

  1. RNA Replication and Membrane Modification Require the Same Functions of Alphavirus Nonstructural Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kallio, Katri; Hellström, Kirsi; Jokitalo, Eija

    2015-01-01

    The alphaviruses induce membrane invaginations known as spherules as their RNA replication sites. Here, we show that inactivation of any function (polymerase, helicase, protease, or membrane association) essential for RNA synthesis also prevents the generation of spherule structures in a Semliki Forest virus trans-replication system. Mutants capable of negative-strand synthesis, including those defective in RNA capping, gave rise to spherules. Recruitment of RNA to membranes in the absence of spherule formation was not detected. PMID:26581991

  2. RNA Replication and Membrane Modification Require the Same Functions of Alphavirus Nonstructural Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Katri; Hellström, Kirsi; Jokitalo, Eija; Ahola, Tero

    2015-11-18

    The alphaviruses induce membrane invaginations known as spherules as their RNA replication sites. Here, we show that inactivation of any function (polymerase, helicase, protease, or membrane association) essential for RNA synthesis also prevents the generation of spherule structures in a Semliki Forest virus trans-replication system. Mutants capable of negative-strand synthesis, including those defective in RNA capping, gave rise to spherules. Recruitment of RNA to membranes in the absence of spherule formation was not detected.

  3. Dynamic and transient interactions of Atg9 with autophagosomes, but not membrane integration, are required for autophagy.

    PubMed

    Orsi, A; Razi, M; Dooley, H C; Robinson, D; Weston, A E; Collinson, L M; Tooze, S A

    2012-05-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process essential for cell homeostasis, at the core of which is the formation of double-membrane organelles called autophagosomes. Atg9 is the only known transmembrane protein required for autophagy and is proposed to deliver membrane to the preautophagosome structures and autophagosomes. We show here that mammalian Atg9 (mAtg9) is required for the formation of DFCP1-positive autophagosome precursors called phagophores. mAtg9 is recruited to phagophores independent of early autophagy proteins, such as ULK1 and WIPI2, but does not become a stable component of the autophagosome membrane. In fact, mAtg9-positive structures interact dynamically with phagophores and autophagosomes without being incorporated into them. The membrane compartment enriched in mAtg9 displays a unique sedimentation profile, which is unaltered upon starvation-induced autophagy. Correlative light electron microscopy reveals that mAtg9 is present on tubular-vesicular membranes emanating from vacuolar structures. We show that mAtg9 resides in a unique endosomal-like compartment and on endosomes, including recycling endosomes, where it interacts with the transferrin receptor. We propose that mAtg9 trafficking through multiple organelles, including recycling endosomes, is essential for the initiation and progression of autophagy; however, rather than acting as a structural component of the autophagosome, it is required for the expansion of the autophagosome precursor.

  4. 68Ga-prostate-specific Membrane Antigen Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Prostate Cancer Imaging: A Narrative Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Jose M.; Gomes, Catarina; Faria, Diogo B.; Vieira, Tiago S.; Silva, Fernando A.; Vale, Joana; Pimentel, Francisco L.

    2017-01-01

    The 68Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen ( 68Ga-PSMA) has been recently developed to be used, as a ligand, in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) prostate cancer imaging, to detect prostate disease. The main objective of this review was to collect data and findings from other studies and articles to assess, theoretically, if 68GA-PSMA PET/CT is a more appropriate prostate cancer diagnostic technique in comparison with others available such as CT, 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose PET/CT, or 18F-fluoromethylcholine ( 18F-choline) PET/CT. For that purpose, PubMed, the online scientific articles’ database, was consulted where the keywords “PSMA” and “PET” were used to find relevant articles. The clinicaltrials.gov, clinical trials’ database, was also consulted where the keywords “68Ga-PSMA” and “prostate” were used to search clinical trials. Based on the reviewed scientific literature, several studies were conducted to assess and compare the 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT detection rate in prostate cancer with other available techniques. One of those studies, conducted by Giesel et al., concluded, within study sample, that 75% of patients with lymph nodes detected by 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT would have not been identified using other conventional morphological criteria based techniques. In Eiber et al.'s study, 68Ga-PSMA PET detected prostatic disease findings in 67% of patients with prostate-specific antigen levels <1 ng/mL, when compared with choline-based PET that presented detection rates between 19% and 36%. In Bluemel et al.'s study, 68Ga-PSMA identified positive prostatic disease in 43.8% of the patients with negative findings in F-choline PET/CT. Findings from this review demonstrate that 68Ga-PSMA PET/C is more effective in detecting metastases, lymph nodes, and recurrent prostate cancer when compared to 18F-choline-based PET/CT and CT. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT presents also more imaging contrast and can be more cost-effective. 68Ga-PSMA has already

  5. Maximum yields of microsomal-type membranes from small amounts of plant material without requiring ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Abas, Lindy; Luschnig, Christian

    2010-06-15

    Isolation of a microsomal membrane fraction is a common procedure in studies involving membrane proteins. By conventional definition, microsomal membranes are collected by centrifugation of a postmitochondrial fraction at 100,000g in an ultracentrifuge, a method originally developed for large amounts of mammalian tissue. We present a method for isolating microsomal-type membranes from small amounts of Arabidopsis thaliana plant material that does not rely on ultracentrifugation but instead uses the lower relative centrifugal force (21,000g) of a microcentrifuge. We show that the 21,000g pellet is equivalent to that obtained at 100,000g and that it contains all of the membrane fractions expected in a conventional microsomal fraction. Our method incorporates specific manipulation of sample density throughout the procedure, with minimal preclearance, minimal volumes of extraction buffer, and minimal sedimentation pathlength. These features allow maximal membrane yields, enabling membrane isolation from limited amounts of material. We further demonstrate that conventional ultracentrifuge-based protocols give submaximal yields due to losses during early stages of the procedure; that is, extensive amounts of microsomal-type membranes can sediment prematurely during the typical preclearance steps. Our protocol avoids such losses, thereby ensuring maximal yield and a representative total membrane fraction. The principles of our method can be adapted for nonplant material. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Plasma membrane H⁺ -ATPase regulation is required for auxin gradient formation preceding phototropic growth.

    PubMed

    Hohm, Tim; Demarsy, Emilie; Quan, Clément; Allenbach Petrolati, Laure; Preuten, Tobias; Vernoux, Teva; Bergmann, Sven; Fankhauser, Christian

    2014-09-26

    Phototropism is a growth response allowing plants to align their photosynthetic organs toward incoming light and thereby to optimize photosynthetic activity. Formation of a lateral gradient of the phytohormone auxin is a key step to trigger asymmetric growth of the shoot leading to phototropic reorientation. To identify important regulators of auxin gradient formation, we developed an auxin flux model that enabled us to test in silico the impact of different morphological and biophysical parameters on gradient formation, including the contribution of the extracellular space (cell wall) or apoplast. Our model indicates that cell size, cell distributions, and apoplast thickness are all important factors affecting gradient formation. Among all tested variables, regulation of apoplastic pH was the most important to enable the formation of a lateral auxin gradient. To test this prediction, we interfered with the activity of plasma membrane H⁺ -ATPases that are required to control apoplastic pH. Our results show that H⁺ -ATPases are indeed important for the establishment of a lateral auxin gradient and phototropism. Moreover, we show that during phototropism, H⁺ -ATPase activity is regulated by the phototropin photoreceptors, providing a mechanism by which light influences apoplastic pH. © 2014 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  7. Plasma membrane H+-ATPase regulation is required for auxin gradient formation preceding phototropic growth

    PubMed Central

    Hohm, Tim; Demarsy, Emilie; Quan, Clément; Allenbach Petrolati, Laure; Preuten, Tobias; Vernoux, Teva; Bergmann, Sven; Fankhauser, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Phototropism is a growth response allowing plants to align their photosynthetic organs toward incoming light and thereby to optimize photosynthetic activity. Formation of a lateral gradient of the phytohormone auxin is a key step to trigger asymmetric growth of the shoot leading to phototropic reorientation. To identify important regulators of auxin gradient formation, we developed an auxin flux model that enabled us to test in silico the impact of different morphological and biophysical parameters on gradient formation, including the contribution of the extracellular space (cell wall) or apoplast. Our model indicates that cell size, cell distributions, and apoplast thickness are all important factors affecting gradient formation. Among all tested variables, regulation of apoplastic pH was the most important to enable the formation of a lateral auxin gradient. To test this prediction, we interfered with the activity of plasma membrane H+-ATPases that are required to control apoplastic pH. Our results show that H+-ATPases are indeed important for the establishment of a lateral auxin gradient and phototropism. Moreover, we show that during phototropism, H+-ATPase activity is regulated by the phototropin photoreceptors, providing a mechanism by which light influences apoplastic pH. PMID:25261457

  8. Acid phosphatase 2 (ACP2) is required for membrane fusion during influenza virus entry

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jihye; Kim, Jinhee; Son, Kidong; d’Alexandry d’Orengiani, Anne-Laure Pham Humg; Min, Ji-Young

    2017-01-01

    Influenza viruses exploit host factors to successfully replicate in infected cells. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology, we identified six human genes required for influenza A virus (IAV) replication. Here we focused on the role of acid phosphatase 2 (ACP2), as its knockdown showed the greatest inhibition of IAV replication. In IAV-infected cells, depletion of ACP2 resulted in a significant reduction in the expression of viral proteins and mRNA, and led to the attenuation of virus multi-cycle growth. ACP2 knockdown also decreased replication of seasonal influenza A and B viruses and avian IAVs of the H7 subtype. Interestingly, ACP2 depletion had no effect on the replication of Ebola or hepatitis C virus. Because ACP2 is known to be a lysosomal acid phosphatase, we assessed the role of ACP2 in influenza virus entry. While neither binding of the viral particle to the cell surface nor endosomal acidification was affected in ACP2-depleted cells, fusion of the endosomal and viral membranes was impaired. As a result, downstream steps in viral entry were blocked, including nucleocapsid uncoating and nuclear import of viral ribonucleoproteins. Our results established ACP2 as a necessary host factor for regulating the fusion step of influenza virus entry. PMID:28272419

  9. Exocyst-Dependent Membrane Addition Is Required for Anaphase Cell Elongation and Cytokinesis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Giansanti, Maria Grazia; Vanderleest, Timothy E; Jewett, Cayla E; Sechi, Stefano; Frappaolo, Anna; Fabian, Lacramioara; Robinett, Carmen C; Brill, Julie A; Loerke, Dinah; Fuller, Margaret T; Blankenship, J Todd

    2015-11-01

    Mitotic and cytokinetic processes harness cell machinery to drive chromosomal segregation and the physical separation of dividing cells. Here, we investigate the functional requirements for exocyst complex function during cell division in vivo, and demonstrate a common mechanism that directs anaphase cell elongation and cleavage furrow progression during cell division. We show that onion rings (onr) and funnel cakes (fun) encode the Drosophila homologs of the Exo84 and Sec8 exocyst subunits, respectively. In onr and fun mutant cells, contractile ring proteins are recruited to the equatorial region of dividing spermatocytes. However, cytokinesis is disrupted early in furrow ingression, leading to cytokinesis failure. We use high temporal and spatial resolution confocal imaging with automated computational analysis to quantitatively compare wild-type versus onr and fun mutant cells. These results demonstrate that anaphase cell elongation is grossly disrupted in cells that are compromised in exocyst complex function. Additionally, we observe that the increase in cell surface area in wild type peaks a few minutes into cytokinesis, and that onr and fun mutant cells have a greatly reduced rate of surface area growth specifically during cell division. Analysis by transmission electron microscopy reveals a massive build-up of cytoplasmic astral membrane and loss of normal Golgi architecture in onr and fun spermatocytes, suggesting that exocyst complex is required for proper vesicular trafficking through these compartments. Moreover, recruitment of the small GTPase Rab11 and the PITP Giotto to the cleavage site depends on wild-type function of the exocyst subunits Exo84 and Sec8. Finally, we show that the exocyst subunit Sec5 coimmunoprecipitates with Rab11. Our results are consistent with the exocyst complex mediating an essential, coordinated increase in cell surface area that potentiates anaphase cell elongation and cleavage furrow ingression.

  10. Matrix Metalloproteinases are required for membrane motility and lumenogenesis during Drosophila heart development

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Qanber S.

    2017-01-01

    Matrix Metalloproteinases (Mmps) degrade glycoproteins and proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix (ECM) or cell surface and are crucial for morphogenesis. Mmps and their inhibitors are expressed during early stages of cardiac development in vertebrates and expression is altered in multiple congenital cardiomyopathies such as cardia bifida. Drosophila genome encodes two copies of Mmps, Mmp1 and Mmp2 whereas in humans up to 25 Mmps have been identified with overlapping functions. We investigated the role of Mmps during embryonic heart development in Drosophila, a process which is morphogenetically similar to early heart tube formation in vertebrates. We demonstrate that the two Mmps in Drosophila have distinct and overlapping roles in cell motility, cell adhesion and cardiac lumenogenesis. We determined that Mmp1 and Mmp2 promote Leading Edge membrane dynamics of cardioblasts during collective migration. Mmp2 is essential for cardiac lumen formation, and mutants generate a cardia bifida phenotype. Mmp1 is required for luminal expansion. Mmp1 and Mmp2 both localise to the basal domains of cardiac cells, however, occupy non-overlapping domains apically. Mmp1 and Mmp2 regulate the proteoglycan composition and size of the apical and basal ECM, yet only Mmp2 is required to restrict ECM assembly to the lumen. Mmp1 negatively regulates the size of the adhesive Cadherin cell surface domain, whereas in a complementary fashion, Mmp2 negatively regulates the size of the Integrin-ECM domain and thereby prescribes the domain to establish and restrict Slit morphogen signalling. Inhibition of Mmp activity through ectopic expression of Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase in the ectoderm blocks lumen formation. Therefore, Mmp expression and function identifies ECM differentiation and remodelling as a key element for cell polarisation and organogenesis. PMID:28192468

  11. Cell Migration and Invadopodia Formation Require a Membrane-binding Domain of CARMIL2*

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, M. Hunter; McConnell, Patrick; Cooper, John A.

    2016-01-01

    CARMILs regulate capping protein (CP), a critical determinant of actin assembly and actin-based cell motility. Vertebrates have three conserved CARMIL genes with distinct functions. In migrating cells, CARMIL2 is important for cell polarity, lamellipodial assembly, ruffling, and macropinocytosis. In cells, CARMIL2 localizes with a distinctive dual pattern to vimentin intermediate filaments and to membranes at leading edges and macropinosomes. The mechanism by which CARMIL2 localizes to membranes has not been defined. Here, we report that CARMIL2 has a conserved membrane-binding domain composed of basic and hydrophobic residues, which is necessary and sufficient for membrane localization, based on expression studies in cells and on direct binding of purified protein to lipids. Most important, we find that the membrane-binding domain is necessary for CARMIL2 to function in cells, based on rescue expression with a set of biochemically defined mutants. CARMIL1 and CARMIL3 contain similar membrane-binding domains, based on sequence analysis and on experiments, but other CPI motif proteins, such as CD2AP, do not. Based on these results, we propose a model in which the membrane-binding domain of CARMIL2 tethers this multidomain protein to the membrane, where it links dynamic vimentin filaments with regulation of actin assembly via CP. PMID:26578515

  12. Cell Migration and Invadopodia Formation Require a Membrane-binding Domain of CARMIL2.

    PubMed

    Lanier, M Hunter; McConnell, Patrick; Cooper, John A

    2016-01-15

    CARMILs regulate capping protein (CP), a critical determinant of actin assembly and actin-based cell motility. Vertebrates have three conserved CARMIL genes with distinct functions. In migrating cells, CARMIL2 is important for cell polarity, lamellipodial assembly, ruffling, and macropinocytosis. In cells, CARMIL2 localizes with a distinctive dual pattern to vimentin intermediate filaments and to membranes at leading edges and macropinosomes. The mechanism by which CARMIL2 localizes to membranes has not been defined. Here, we report that CARMIL2 has a conserved membrane-binding domain composed of basic and hydrophobic residues, which is necessary and sufficient for membrane localization, based on expression studies in cells and on direct binding of purified protein to lipids. Most important, we find that the membrane-binding domain is necessary for CARMIL2 to function in cells, based on rescue expression with a set of biochemically defined mutants. CARMIL1 and CARMIL3 contain similar membrane-binding domains, based on sequence analysis and on experiments, but other CPI motif proteins, such as CD2AP, do not. Based on these results, we propose a model in which the membrane-binding domain of CARMIL2 tethers this multidomain protein to the membrane, where it links dynamic vimentin filaments with regulation of actin assembly via CP. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. The effect of aqueous extract of Xinjiang Artemisia rupestris L. (an influenza virus vaccine adjuvant) on enhancing immune responses and reducing antigen dose required for immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinyao; Gao, Feng; Fan, Xucheng

    2017-01-01

    Potent adjuvant can improve the effectiveness of vaccines and reduce the antigen doses required for initiating the protective immunity. In this study, we identified that aqueous extract of Artemisia rupestris L. (AEAR) could be employed as an efficient adjuvant for influenza virus vaccine (V) to enhance immune responses and reduce the antigen doses required for initiating immunity, without compromising the immune response. ICR mice were subcutaneously co-administrated with V combined with different concentrations of AEAR demonstrated that 300 μg AEAR could significantly improve hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and increase IgG antibody titers in serum (P<0.05) and the population of CD4+CD44+ and CD8+CD44+ (P<0.05). Next, 300 μg AEAR combined with different doses of V in vivo markedly increased HI and specific IgG antibody level(P<0.05). It also significantly increased the amount of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, CD4+CD44+ and CD8+CD44+ T cells (P<0.05), improved lymphocyte proliferation, the secretion of CD4+IL-4, CD4+IFN-γ and CD8+IFN-γ (P<0.05), and the killing efficacy of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) (P<0.05). Furthermore, the combination increased the expression of major histocompatibility complex-II (MHC-II) and co-stimulatory molecules including CD40, CD80, and CD86 on dendritic cells (DCs), and downregulated the expression of CD25+Foxp3+Treg cells (P<0.05). No significant difference was observed between high-dose V and low-dose AEAR-V (10-fold lower) vaccination group (P>0.05), indicating a 10-fold reduction of antigen required for V vaccine administration. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that AEAR, as an adjuvant for influenza vaccine, could stimulate potent humoral and cellular immune responses and reduce the antigen dose required for effective vaccination, which were mediated by promoting DCs activation and repressing Treg expression. PMID:28841693

  14. Analysis of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp41 Membrane Proximal External Region Arrayed on Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Particles

    PubMed Central

    Phogat, S; K, Svehla; M, Tang; A, Spadaccini; J, Muller; J, Mascola; Berkower; R, Wyatt

    2009-01-01

    Vaccine immunogens derived from the envelope glycoproteins of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) that elicit broad neutralizing antibodies remains an elusive goal. The highly conserved 30 amino acid membrane proximal external region (MPER) of HIV gp41 contains the hydrophobic epitopes for two rare HIV-1 broad cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies, 2F5 and 4E10. Both these antibodies possess relatively hydrophobic HCDR3 loops and demonstrate enhanced binding to their epitopes in the context of the native gp160 precursor envelope glycoprotein by the intimate juxtaposition of a lipid membrane. The Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) S1 protein forms nanoparticles that can be utilized both as an immunogenic array of the MPER and to provide the lipid environment needed for enhanced 2F5 and 4E10 binding. We show that recombinant HBsAg particles with MPER (HBsAg-MPER) appended at the C-terminus of the S1 protein are recognized by 2F5 and 4E10 with high affinity compared to positioning the MPER at the N-terminus or the extracellular loop (ECL) of S1. Addition of C-terminal hydrophobic residues derived from the HIV-1 Env transmembrane region further enhances recognition of the MPER by both 2F5 and 4E10. Delipidation of the HBsAg-MPER particles decreases 2F5 and 4E10 binding and subsequent reconstitution with synthetic lipids restores optimal binding. Inoculation of the particles into small animals raised cross-reactive antibodies that recognize both the MPER and HIV-1 gp160 envelope glycoproteins expressed on the cell surface; however, no neutralizing activity could be detected. Prime:boost immunization of the HBsAg-MPER particles in sequence with HIV envelope glycoprotein proteoliposomes (Env-PLs) did not raise neutralizing antibodies that could be mapped to the MPER region. However, the Env-PLs did raise anti-Env antibodies that had the ability to neutralize selected HIV-1 isolates. The first generation HBsAg-MPER particles represent a unique means to

  15. Plasma Membrane Localization Is Required for RasA-Mediated Polarized Morphogenesis and Virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Juvvadi, Praveen R.; Rogg, Luise E.; Asfaw, Yohannes G.; Burns, Kimberlie A.; Randell, Scott H.; Steinbach, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Ras is a highly conserved GTPase protein that is essential for proper polarized morphogenesis of filamentous fungi. Localization of Ras proteins to the plasma membrane and endomembranes through posttranslational addition of farnesyl and palmitoyl residues is an important mechanism through which cells provide specificity to Ras signal output. Although the Aspergillus fumigatus RasA protein is known to be a major regulator of growth and development, the membrane distribution of RasA during polarized morphogenesis and the role of properly localized Ras signaling in virulence of a pathogenic mold remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that Aspergillus fumigatus RasA localizes primarily to the plasma membrane of actively growing hyphae. We show that treatment with the palmitoylation inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate disrupts normal RasA plasma membrane association and decreases hyphal growth. Targeted mutations of the highly conserved RasA palmitoylation motif also mislocalized RasA from the plasma membrane and led to severe hyphal abnormalities, cell wall structural changes, and reduced virulence in murine invasive aspergillosis. Finally, we provide evidence that proper RasA localization is independent of the Ras palmitoyltransferase homolog, encoded by erfB, but requires the palmitoyltransferase complex subunit, encoded by erfD. Our results demonstrate that plasma membrane-associated RasA is critical for polarized morphogenesis, cell wall stability, and virulence in A. fumigatus. PMID:22562470

  16. Plasma membrane localization is required for RasA-mediated polarized morphogenesis and virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Fortwendel, Jarrod R; Juvvadi, Praveen R; Rogg, Luise E; Asfaw, Yohannes G; Burns, Kimberlie A; Randell, Scott H; Steinbach, William J

    2012-08-01

    Ras is a highly conserved GTPase protein that is essential for proper polarized morphogenesis of filamentous fungi. Localization of Ras proteins to the plasma membrane and endomembranes through posttranslational addition of farnesyl and palmitoyl residues is an important mechanism through which cells provide specificity to Ras signal output. Although the Aspergillus fumigatus RasA protein is known to be a major regulator of growth and development, the membrane distribution of RasA during polarized morphogenesis and the role of properly localized Ras signaling in virulence of a pathogenic mold remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that Aspergillus fumigatus RasA localizes primarily to the plasma membrane of actively growing hyphae. We show that treatment with the palmitoylation inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate disrupts normal RasA plasma membrane association and decreases hyphal growth. Targeted mutations of the highly conserved RasA palmitoylation motif also mislocalized RasA from the plasma membrane and led to severe hyphal abnormalities, cell wall structural changes, and reduced virulence in murine invasive aspergillosis. Finally, we provide evidence that proper RasA localization is independent of the Ras palmitoyltransferase homolog, encoded by erfB, but requires the palmitoyltransferase complex subunit, encoded by erfD. Our results demonstrate that plasma membrane-associated RasA is critical for polarized morphogenesis, cell wall stability, and virulence in A. fumigatus.

  17. Comprehensive Evaluation of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Expression in the Vasculature of Renal Tumors: Implications for Imaging Studies and Prognostic Role.

    PubMed

    Spatz, Sophia; Tolkach, Yuri; Jung, Klaus; Stephan, Carsten; Busch, Jonas; Ralla, Bernhard; Rabien, Anja; Feldmann, Georg; Brossart, Peter; Bundschuh, Ralph A; Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Essler, Markus; Toma, Marieta; Müller, Stefan C; Ellinger, Jörg; Hauser, Stefan; Kristiansen, Glen

    2017-08-18

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is expressed by endothelium of many tumors. The aim of the study was to find a rationale for PSMA-based imaging and to investigate the prognostic role of vascular PSMA expression in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Two-hundred fifty seven patients with RCC were included with a median follow-up exceeding 10.0 years. PSMA expression on the tumor vessels was detected by immunohistochemistry. Vascular expression of FOLH1-gene (PSMA) mRNA was investigated in clear-cell RCC (ccRCC) and papillary RCC (pRCC) using The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data. Endothelial PSMA protein expression was higher in ccRC