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Sample records for membrane components localize

  1. Actomyosin dynamics drive local membrane component organization in an in vitro active composite layer

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Kabir; Iljazi, Elda; Bhat, Abrar; Bieling, Peter; Mullins, R. Dyche; Rao, Madan; Mayor, Satyajit

    2016-01-01

    The surface of a living cell provides a platform for receptor signaling, protein sorting, transport, and endocytosis, whose regulation requires the local control of membrane organization. Previous work has revealed a role for dynamic actomyosin in membrane protein and lipid organization, suggesting that the cell surface behaves as an active composite composed of a fluid bilayer and a thin film of active actomyosin. We reconstitute an analogous system in vitro that consists of a fluid lipid bilayer coupled via membrane-associated actin-binding proteins to dynamic actin filaments and myosin motors. Upon complete consumption of ATP, this system settles into distinct phases of actin organization, namely bundled filaments, linked apolar asters, and a lattice of polar asters. These depend on actin concentration, filament length, and actin/myosin ratio. During formation of the polar aster phase, advection of the self-organizing actomyosin network drives transient clustering of actin-associated membrane components. Regeneration of ATP supports a constitutively remodeling actomyosin state, which in turn drives active fluctuations of coupled membrane components, resembling those observed at the cell surface. In a multicomponent membrane bilayer, this remodeling actomyosin layer contributes to changes in the extent and dynamics of phase-segregating domains. These results show how local membrane composition can be driven by active processes arising from actomyosin, highlighting the fundamental basis of the active composite model of the cell surface, and indicate its relevance to the study of membrane organization. PMID:26929326

  2. Independent localization of plasma membrane and chloroplast components during eyespot assembly.

    PubMed

    Mittelmeier, Telsa M; Thompson, Mark D; Öztürk, Esra; Dieckmann, Carol L

    2013-09-01

    Like many algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is phototactic, using two anterior flagella to swim toward light optimal for photosynthesis. The flagella are responsive to signals initiated at the photosensory eyespot, which comprises photoreceptors in the plasma membrane and layers of pigment granules in the chloroplast. Phototaxis depends on placement of the eyespot at a specific asymmetric location relative to the flagella, basal bodies, and bundles of two or four highly acetylated microtubules, termed rootlets, which extend from the basal bodies toward the posterior of the cell. Previous work has shown that the eyespot is disassembled prior to cell division, and new eyespots are assembled in daughter cells adjacent to the nascent four-membered rootlet associated with the daughter basal body (D4), but the chronology of these assembly events has not been determined. Here we use immunofluorescence microscopy to follow assembly and acetylation of the D4 rootlet, localization of individual eyespot components in the plasma membrane or chloroplast envelope, and flagellar emergence during and immediately following cell division. We find that the D4 rootlet is assembled before the initiation of eyespot assembly, which occurs within the same time frame as rootlet acetylation and flagellar outgrowth. Photoreceptors in the plasma membrane are correctly localized in eyespot mutant cells lacking pigment granule layers, and chloroplast components of the eyespot assemble in mutant cells in which photoreceptor localization is retarded. The data suggest that plasma membrane and chloroplast components of the eyespot are independently responsive to a cytoskeletal positioning cue. PMID:23873865

  3. A Visual Screen of Protein Localization during Sporulation Identifies New Components of Prospore Membrane-Associated Complexes in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Chien; Santore, Ethan; Lavoie, Elizabeth; Needleman, Leor; Fiacco, Nicholas; Kim, Carey

    2014-01-01

    During ascospore formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the secretory pathway is reorganized to create new intracellular compartments, termed prospore membranes. Prospore membranes engulf the nuclei produced by the meiotic divisions, giving rise to individual spores. The shape and growth of prospore membranes are constrained by cytoskeletal structures, such as septin proteins, that associate with the membranes. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions to various proteins that associate with septins at the bud neck during vegetative growth as well as to proteins encoded by genes that are transcriptionally induced during sporulation were examined for their cellular localization during prospore membrane growth. We report localizations for over 100 different GFP fusions, including over 30 proteins localized to the prospore membrane compartment. In particular, the screen identified IRC10 as a new component of the leading-edge protein complex (LEP), a ring structure localized to the lip of the prospore membrane. Localization of Irc10 to the leading edge is dependent on SSP1, but not ADY3. Loss of IRC10 caused no obvious phenotype, but an ady3 irc10 mutant was completely defective in sporulation and displayed prospore membrane morphologies similar to those of an ssp1 strain. These results reveal the architecture of the LEP and provide insight into the evolution of this membrane-organizing complex. PMID:24390141

  4. Gramicidin Induce Local Non-Uniform Distribution of Lipids in Multi-Component Membrane Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yu; Hussain, Fazle; Huang, Juyang

    2015-03-01

    In lipid membranes, gramicidin form trans-membrane channels that are specific for monovalent cations. We performed Molecular Dynamics simulations of gramicidin in coexisting liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains using GROMACS. The lipid compositions of Lo and Ld domains are DOPC/DSPC/Cholesterol = 6.5/52.6/40.9 and 74.4/10.6/15, respectively. In the Ld domain, the membrane thickness matches the hydrophobic length of gramicidin quite well, and water molecules can diffuse through the gramicidin channels. However, in the Lo lipid domain, the bilayer thickness is far greater than the hydrophobic length of gramicidin and majority of gramicidin do not form conducting channel. The simulation result explained our experimental finding that gramicidin partition favorably into the Ld domains. The calculated radial distribution functions of lipids indicate that gramicidin recruit a layer of short DOPC surrounding each protein and keep cholesterol and taller DSPC away from the protein-bilayer interface. Our result indicates that membrane proteins are capable of inducing non-uniform distributions of lipids and creating a local bilayer environment, which favors protein function.

  5. Diffusion mediated localization on membrane surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Using the model of a cell membrane of a spherical surface in which membrane components may diffuse, the rate of localization due to trapping under diffusion control has been estimated by computing an analytical expression for the mean trapping time including the possibilities of a trapping probability less than one and/or the establishment of an equilibrium at the trap boundary.

  6. The UNC-112 Gene in Caenorhabditis elegansEncodes a Novel Component of Cell–Matrix Adhesion Structures Required for Integrin Localization in the Muscle Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, Teresa M.; Mullen, Gregory P.; Gilbert, Mary M.; Williams, Benjamin D.; Moerman, Donald G.

    2000-01-01

    Embryos homozygous for mutations in the unc-52, pat-2, pat-3, and unc-112 genes of C. elegans exhibit a similar Pat phenotype. Myosin and actin are not organized into sarcomeres in the body wall muscle cells of these mutants, and dense body and M-line components fail to assemble. The unc-52 (perlecan), pat-2 (α-integrin), and pat-3 (β-integrin) genes encode ECM or transmembrane proteins found at the cell–matrix adhesion sites of both dense bodies and M-lines. This study describes the identification of the unc-112 gene product, a novel, membrane-associated, intracellular protein that colocalizes with integrin at cell–matrix adhesion complexes. The 720–amino acid UNC-112 protein is homologous to Mig-2, a human protein of unknown function. These two proteins share a region of homology with talin and members of the FERM superfamily of proteins. We have determined that a functional UNC-112::GFP fusion protein colocalizes with PAT-3/β-integrin in both adult and embryonic body wall muscle. We also have determined that UNC-112 is required to organize PAT-3/β-integrin after it is integrated into the basal cell membrane, but is not required to organize UNC-52/perlecan in the basement membrane, nor for DEB-1/vinculin to localize with PAT-3/β-integrin. Furthermore, UNC-112 requires the presence of UNC-52/perlecan and PAT-3/β-integrin, but not DEB-1/vinculin to become localized to the muscle cell membrane. PMID:10893272

  7. Membrane and Core Periplasmic Agrobacterium tumefaciens Virulence Type IV Secretion System Components Localize to Multiple Sites around the Bacterial Perimeter during Lateral Attachment to Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Julieta; Cameron, Todd A.; Zupan, John; Zambryski, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type IV secretion systems (T4SS) transfer DNA and/or proteins into recipient cells. Here we performed immunofluorescence deconvolution microscopy to localize the assembled T4SS by detection of its native components VirB1, VirB2, VirB4, VirB5, VirB7, VirB8, VirB9, VirB10, and VirB11 in the C58 nopaline strain of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, following induction of virulence (vir) gene expression. These different proteins represent T4SS components spanning the inner membrane, periplasm, or outer membrane. Native VirB2, VirB5, VirB7, and VirB8 were also localized in the A. tumefaciens octopine strain A348. Quantitative analyses of the localization of all the above Vir proteins in nopaline and octopine strains revealed multiple foci in single optical sections in over 80% and 70% of the bacterial cells, respectively. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-VirB8 expression following vir induction was used to monitor bacterial binding to live host plant cells; bacteria bind predominantly along their lengths, with few bacteria binding via their poles or subpoles. vir-induced attachment-defective bacteria or bacteria without the Ti plasmid do not bind to plant cells. These data support a model where multiple vir-T4SS around the perimeter of the bacterium maximize effective contact with the host to facilitate efficient transfer of DNA and protein substrates. PMID:22027007

  8. Dynamics of two-component membranes surrounded by viscoelastic media.

    PubMed

    Komura, Shigeyuki; Yasuda, Kento; Okamoto, Ryuichi

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the dynamics of two-component fluid membranes which are surrounded by viscoelastic media. We assume that membrane-embedded proteins can diffuse laterally and induce a local membrane curvature. The mean squared displacement of a tagged membrane segment is obtained as a generalized Einstein relation. When the elasticity of the surrounding media obeys a power-law behavior in frequency, an anomalous diffusion of the membrane segment is predicted. We also consider the situation where the proteins generate active non-equilibrium forces. The generalized Einstein relation is further modified by an effective temperature that depends on the force dipole energy. The obtained generalized Einstein relations are useful for membrane microrheology experiments.

  9. Dynamics of two-component membranes surrounded by viscoelastic media.

    PubMed

    Komura, Shigeyuki; Yasuda, Kento; Okamoto, Ryuichi

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the dynamics of two-component fluid membranes which are surrounded by viscoelastic media. We assume that membrane-embedded proteins can diffuse laterally and induce a local membrane curvature. The mean squared displacement of a tagged membrane segment is obtained as a generalized Einstein relation. When the elasticity of the surrounding media obeys a power-law behavior in frequency, an anomalous diffusion of the membrane segment is predicted. We also consider the situation where the proteins generate active non-equilibrium forces. The generalized Einstein relation is further modified by an effective temperature that depends on the force dipole energy. The obtained generalized Einstein relations are useful for membrane microrheology experiments. PMID:26448393

  10. Polyphophoinositides components of plant nuclear membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrix, K.W.; Boss, W.F.

    1987-04-01

    The polyphosphoinositides, phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP/sub 2/), have been shown to be important components in signal transduction in many animal cells. Recently, these lipids have been found to be associated with plasma membrane but not microsomal membrane isolated from fusogenic wild carrot cells; however, in that study the lipids of the nuclear membrane were not analyzed. Since polyphosphoinositides had been shown to be associated with the nuclear membranes as well as the plasma membrane in some animal cells, it was important to determine whether they were associated with plant nuclear membranes as well. Cells were labeled for 18h with (/sup 3/H) inositol and the nuclei were isolated by a modification of the procedure of Saxena et al. Preliminary lipid analyses indicate lower amount of PIP and PIP/sub 2/ in nuclear membranes compared to whole protoplasts. This suggests that the nuclear membranes of carrot cells are not enriched in PIP and PIP/sub 2/; however, the Triton X-100 used during the nuclear isolation procedure may have affected the recovery of the lipids. Experiments are in progress to determine the effects of Triton X-100 on lipid extraction.

  11. Protein-Induced Membrane Curvature Alters Local Membrane Tension

    PubMed Central

    Rangamani, Padmini; Mandadap, Kranthi K.; Oster, George

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of proteins onto membranes can alter the local membrane curvature. This phenomenon has been observed in biological processes such as endocytosis, tubulation, and vesiculation. However, it is not clear how the local surface properties of the membrane, such as membrane tension, change in response to protein adsorption. In this article, we show that the partial differential equations arising from classical elastic model of lipid membranes, which account for simultaneous changes in shape and membrane tension due to protein adsorption in a local region, cannot be solved for nonaxisymmetric geometries using straightforward numerical techniques; instead, a viscous-elastic formulation is necessary to fully describe the system. Therefore, we develop a viscous-elastic model for inhomogeneous membranes of the Helfrich type. Using the newly available viscous-elastic model, we find that the lipids flow to accommodate changes in membrane curvature during protein adsorption. We show that, at the end of protein adsorption process, the system sustains a residual local tension to balance the difference between the actual mean curvature and the imposed spontaneous curvature. We also show that this change in membrane tension can have a functional impact such as altered response to pulling forces in the presence of proteins. PMID:25099814

  12. Nanoscale Membrane Curvature detected by Polarized Localization Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Christopher; Maarouf, Abir; Woodward, Xinxin

    Nanoscale membrane curvature is a necessary component of countless cellular processes. Here we present Polarized Localization Microscopy (PLM), a super-resolution optical imaging technique that enables the detection of nanoscale membrane curvature with order-of-magnitude improvements over comparable optical techniques. PLM combines the advantages of polarized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence localization microscopy to reveal single-fluorophore locations and orientations without reducing localization precision by point spread function manipulation. PLM resolved nanoscale membrane curvature of a supported lipid bilayer draped over polystyrene nanoparticles on a glass coverslip, thus creating a model membrane with coexisting flat and curved regions and membrane radii of curvature as small as 20 nm. Further, PLM provides single-molecule trajectories and the aggregation of curvature-inducing proteins with super-resolution to reveal the correlated effects of membrane curvature, dynamics, and molecular sorting. For example, cholera toxin subunit B has been observed to induce nanoscale membrane budding and concentrate at the bud neck. PLM reveals a previously hidden and critical information of membrane topology.

  13. Separation of components in lipid membranes induced by shape transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góźdź, W. T.; Bobrovska, N.; Ciach, A.

    2012-07-01

    Vesicles composed of a two component membrane with each component characterized by different spontaneous curvature are investigated by minimization of the free energy consisting of Helfrich elastic energy and entropy of mixing. The results show that mixing and demixing of membrane components can be induced by elongating a vesicle or changing its volume, if one of the components forms a complex with macromolecules on the outer monolayer. The influence of elastic coefficients on the separation of components is also examined.

  14. Mutual Interactions between Aquaporins and Membrane Components

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria del Carmen; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have been focused on the structural evaluation of protein complexes in order to get mechanistic insights into how proteins communicate at the molecular level within the cell. Specific sites of protein-aquaporin interaction have been evaluated and new forms of regulation of aquaporins described, based on these associations. Heterotetramerizations of aquaporin isoforms are considered as novel regulatory mechanisms for plasma membrane (PIPs) and tonoplast (TIPs) proteins, influencing their intrinsic permeability and trafficking dynamics in the adaptive response to changing environmental conditions. However, protein–protein interaction is an extensive theme that is difficult to tackle and new methodologies are being used to study the physical interactions involved. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and the identification of cross-linked peptides based on tandem mass spectra, that are complementary to other methodologies such as heterologous expression, co-precipitation assays or confocal fluorescence microscopy, are discussed in this review. The chemical composition and the physical characteristics of the lipid bilayer also influence many aspects of membrane aquaporins, including their functionality. The molecular driving forces stabilizing the positions of the lipids around aquaporins could define their activity, thereby altering the conformational properties. Therefore, an integrative approach to the relevance of the membrane-aquaporin interaction to different processes related to plant cell physiology is provided. Finally, it is described how the interactions between aquaporins and copolymer matrixes or biological compounds offer an opportunity for the functional incorporation of aquaporins into new biotechnological advances. PMID:27625676

  15. Mutual Interactions between Aquaporins and Membrane Components.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria Del Carmen; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have been focused on the structural evaluation of protein complexes in order to get mechanistic insights into how proteins communicate at the molecular level within the cell. Specific sites of protein-aquaporin interaction have been evaluated and new forms of regulation of aquaporins described, based on these associations. Heterotetramerizations of aquaporin isoforms are considered as novel regulatory mechanisms for plasma membrane (PIPs) and tonoplast (TIPs) proteins, influencing their intrinsic permeability and trafficking dynamics in the adaptive response to changing environmental conditions. However, protein-protein interaction is an extensive theme that is difficult to tackle and new methodologies are being used to study the physical interactions involved. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and the identification of cross-linked peptides based on tandem mass spectra, that are complementary to other methodologies such as heterologous expression, co-precipitation assays or confocal fluorescence microscopy, are discussed in this review. The chemical composition and the physical characteristics of the lipid bilayer also influence many aspects of membrane aquaporins, including their functionality. The molecular driving forces stabilizing the positions of the lipids around aquaporins could define their activity, thereby altering the conformational properties. Therefore, an integrative approach to the relevance of the membrane-aquaporin interaction to different processes related to plant cell physiology is provided. Finally, it is described how the interactions between aquaporins and copolymer matrixes or biological compounds offer an opportunity for the functional incorporation of aquaporins into new biotechnological advances.

  16. Mutual Interactions between Aquaporins and Membrane Components.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria Del Carmen; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have been focused on the structural evaluation of protein complexes in order to get mechanistic insights into how proteins communicate at the molecular level within the cell. Specific sites of protein-aquaporin interaction have been evaluated and new forms of regulation of aquaporins described, based on these associations. Heterotetramerizations of aquaporin isoforms are considered as novel regulatory mechanisms for plasma membrane (PIPs) and tonoplast (TIPs) proteins, influencing their intrinsic permeability and trafficking dynamics in the adaptive response to changing environmental conditions. However, protein-protein interaction is an extensive theme that is difficult to tackle and new methodologies are being used to study the physical interactions involved. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and the identification of cross-linked peptides based on tandem mass spectra, that are complementary to other methodologies such as heterologous expression, co-precipitation assays or confocal fluorescence microscopy, are discussed in this review. The chemical composition and the physical characteristics of the lipid bilayer also influence many aspects of membrane aquaporins, including their functionality. The molecular driving forces stabilizing the positions of the lipids around aquaporins could define their activity, thereby altering the conformational properties. Therefore, an integrative approach to the relevance of the membrane-aquaporin interaction to different processes related to plant cell physiology is provided. Finally, it is described how the interactions between aquaporins and copolymer matrixes or biological compounds offer an opportunity for the functional incorporation of aquaporins into new biotechnological advances. PMID:27625676

  17. Mutual Interactions between Aquaporins and Membrane Components

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria del Carmen; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have been focused on the structural evaluation of protein complexes in order to get mechanistic insights into how proteins communicate at the molecular level within the cell. Specific sites of protein-aquaporin interaction have been evaluated and new forms of regulation of aquaporins described, based on these associations. Heterotetramerizations of aquaporin isoforms are considered as novel regulatory mechanisms for plasma membrane (PIPs) and tonoplast (TIPs) proteins, influencing their intrinsic permeability and trafficking dynamics in the adaptive response to changing environmental conditions. However, protein–protein interaction is an extensive theme that is difficult to tackle and new methodologies are being used to study the physical interactions involved. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and the identification of cross-linked peptides based on tandem mass spectra, that are complementary to other methodologies such as heterologous expression, co-precipitation assays or confocal fluorescence microscopy, are discussed in this review. The chemical composition and the physical characteristics of the lipid bilayer also influence many aspects of membrane aquaporins, including their functionality. The molecular driving forces stabilizing the positions of the lipids around aquaporins could define their activity, thereby altering the conformational properties. Therefore, an integrative approach to the relevance of the membrane-aquaporin interaction to different processes related to plant cell physiology is provided. Finally, it is described how the interactions between aquaporins and copolymer matrixes or biological compounds offer an opportunity for the functional incorporation of aquaporins into new biotechnological advances.

  18. Cyclical components of local rainfall data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentz, R. P.; D'Urso, M. A.; Jarma, N. M.; Mentz, G. B.

    2000-02-01

    This paper reports on the use of a comparatively simple statistical methodology to study local short time series rainfall data. The objective is to help in agricultural planning, by diminishing the risks associated with some uncertainties affecting this business activity.The analysis starts by assuming a model of unobservable components, trend, cycle, seasonal and irregular, that is well known in many areas of application. When series are in the realm of business and economics, the statistical methods popularized by the US Census Bureau US National Bureau of Economic Research are used for seasonal and cyclical estimation, respectively. The flexibility of these methods makes them good candidates to be applied in the meteorological context, and this is done in this paper for a selection of monthly rainfall time series.Use of the results to help in analysing and forecasting cyclical components is emphasized. The results are interesting. An agricultural entrepreneur, or a group of them located in a single geographical region, will profit by systematically collecting information (monthly in our work) about rainfall, and adopting the scheme of analysis described in this paper.

  19. Tetraspan vesicle membrane proteins: synthesis, subcellular localization, and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Hübner, Kirsten; Windoffer, Reinhard; Hutter, Harald; Leube, Rudolf E

    2002-01-01

    Tetraspan vesicle membrane proteins (TVPs) are characterized by four transmembrane regions and cytoplasmically located end domains. They are ubiquitous and abundant components of vesicles in most, if not all, cells of multicellular organisms. TVP-containing vesicles shuttle between various membranous compartments and are localized in biosynthetic and endocytotic pathways. Based on gene organization and amino acid sequence similarities TVPs can be grouped into three distinct families that are referred to as physins, gyrins, and secretory carrier-associated membrane proteins (SCAMPs). In mammals synaptophysin, synaptoporin, pantophysin, and mitsugumin29 constitute the physins, synaptogyrin 1-4 the gyrins, and SCAMP1-5 the SCAMPs. Members of each family are cell-type-specifically synthesized resulting in unique patterns of TVP coexpression and subcellular colocalization. TVP orthologs have been identified in most multicellular organisms, including diverse animal and plant species, but have not been detected in unicellular organisms. They are subject to protein modification, most notably to phosphorylation, and are part of multimeric complexes. Experimental evidence is reviewed showing that TVPs contribute to vesicle trafficking and membrane morphogenesis. PMID:11893164

  20. Vapour and acid components separation from gases by membranes principles and engineering approach to membranes development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagramanov, G. G.; Storojuk, I. P.; Farnosova, E. N.

    2016-09-01

    The modern commercially available polymer membranes and membrane modules for purification of gases, containing acid components, simultaneously with dehumidification of treated gas streams, were developed and commercialized in the very end of XXth century. The membranes basic properties - selectivity (separation factor) and permeation flow rates - are relatively far from satisfying the growing and modern-scale industrial need in purification technologies and corresponding equipments. The attempt to formulate the basic principles, scientific and engineering approaches to the development of prospective membranes for the purification of gases, especially such as natural and oil gases, from acid components, simultaneously with drying them, was being made. For this purpose the influence of various factors - polymer nature, membrane type, structure, geometrical and mass-transfer characteristics, etc. - were studied and analyzed in order to formulate the basic principles and demands for development of membranes, capable to withstand successfully the sever conditions of exploitation.

  1. Structural alterations of erythrocyte membrane components induced by exhaustive exercise.

    PubMed

    Brzeszczynska, Joanna; Pieniazek, Anna; Gwozdzinski, Lukasz; Gwozdzinski, Krzysztof; Jegier, Anna

    2008-12-01

    Physical exercise was used as a model of the physiological modulator of free radical production to examine the effects of exercise-induced oxidative modifications on the physico-biochemical properties of erythrocyte membrane. The aim of our work was to investigate conformational changes of erythrocyte membrane proteins, membrane fluidity, and membrane susceptibility to disintegration. Venous blood was taken before, immediately after, and 1 h after an exhaustive incremental cycling test (30 W.min-1 ramp), performed by 11 healthy untrained males on balanced diets (mean age, 22 +/- 2 years; mean body mass index, 25 +/- 4.5 kg.m-2). In response to this exercise, individual maximum heart rate was 195 +/- 12 beats.min-1 and maximum wattage was 292 +/- 27 W. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to investigate alterations in membrane proteins and membrane dynamics, and to measure production of radical species. The reducing potential of plasma (RPP) was measured using the reduction of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and the ferric-reducing ability of plasma. Exercise induced decreases in erythrocyte membrane fluidity in the polar region (p < 0.0001) and alterations in the conformational state of membrane proteins (p < 0.05). An increase in RPP was observed immediately after exercise (p < 0.001), with a further increase 1 h postexercise (p < 0.0001). Supporting measurements of lipid peroxidation showed an increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances immediately after exercise (p < 0.05) and at 1 h of recovery (p < 0.001); however, free radicals were not detected. Results indicate the existence of early postexercise mild oxidative stress after single-exercise performance, which induced structural changes in erythrocyte membrane components (protein aggregation) and in the membrane organization (lipids rigidization) that followed lipid peroxidation but did not lead to cellular hemolysis.

  2. Modelling and simulations of multi-component lipid membranes and open membranes via diffuse interface approaches.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; Du, Qiang

    2008-03-01

    Diffuse interface (phase field) models are developed for multi-component vesicle membranes with different lipid compositions and membranes with free boundary. These models are used to simulate the deformation of membranes under the elastic bending energy and the line tension energy with prescribed volume and surface area constraints. By comparing our numerical simulations with recent biological experiments, it is demonstrated that the diffuse interface models can effectively capture the rich phenomena associated with the multi-component vesicle transformation and thus offering great functionality in their simulation and modelling.

  3. Adhesive Nanoparticles as Local Probes of Membrane Curvature.

    PubMed

    Agudo-Canalejo, Jaime; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2015-10-14

    Biological and biomimetic membranes display complex shapes with nonuniform curvature. Because the interaction of adhesive nanoparticles with such membranes depends on the local membrane curvature, different segments of the same membrane can differ in their engulfment behavior. For a single vesicle in contact with many nanoparticles, we predict ten distinct engulfment patterns as well as morphological transitions between these patterns, which are directly accessible to experiment.

  4. Stress and fold localization in thin elastic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Pocivavsek, Luka; Dellsy, Robert; Kern, Andrew; Johnson, Sebastián; Lin, Binhua; Lee, Ka Yee C.; Cerda, Enrique

    2010-11-08

    Thin elastic membranes supported on a much softer elastic solid or a fluid deviate from their flat geometries upon compression. We demonstrate that periodic wrinkling is only one possible solution for such strained membranes. Folds, which involve highly localized curvature, appear whenever the membrane is compressed beyond a third of its initial wrinkle wavelength. Eventually the surface transforms into a symmetry-broken state with flat regions of membrane coexisting with locally folded points, reminiscent of a crumpled, unsupported membrane. We provide general scaling laws for the wrinkled and folded states and proved the transition with numerical and experimental supported membranes. Our work provides insight into the interfacial stability of such diverse systems as biological membranes such as lung surfactant and nanoparticle thin films.

  5. Functional roles of plasma membrane localized estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Sreeja, S; Thampan, RaghavaVarman

    2003-07-01

    A series of emerging data supports the existence and importance of plasma membrane localized estrogen receptors in a variety of cells that are targets for the steroid hormone action. When estradiol (E2) binds to the cell surface protein, the ensuing signal transduction event triggers downstream signaling cascades that contribute to important biological functions. Aside from the classical signaling through nuclear estrogen receptors, we have provided evidence for the functional roles of an estrogen receptor localized in the plasma membrane. This review highlights some of the recent advances made in the understanding of the genomic/non-genomic actions of plasma membrane localized estrogen receptors. PMID:15255376

  6. Localization of Sublexical Speech Perception Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkeltaub, Peter E.; Coslett, H. Branch

    2010-01-01

    Models of speech perception are in general agreement with respect to the major cortical regions involved, but lack precision with regard to localization and lateralization of processing units. To refine these models we conducted two Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) meta-analyses of the neuroimaging literature on sublexical speech perception.…

  7. Enhanced membrane fluorescence of CDC-labelled paramecium subsequent to removal of surface components.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E; Bottiroli, G; Giordano, P

    1983-01-01

    Cytofluorimetric analysis of cycloheptaamylose-dansyl chloride (CDC) labelled Paramecium indicates that after mild trypsin removal of surface components the localization of CDC on the outer surface of living cells was not modified by the treatment. After such treatment the intensity of fluorescence emission was found about 3-fold higher in treated single cell than in the untreated one. These findings indicate that CDC labelling can be used to follow alteration occurred on the membrane of the living cell prior to labelling.

  8. Localization of Sublexical Speech Perception Components

    PubMed Central

    Turkeltaub, Peter E; Coslett, H. Branch

    2010-01-01

    Models of speech perception are in general agreement with respect to the major cortical regions involved, but lack precision with regard to localization and lateralization of processing units. To refine these models we conducted two Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) meta-analyses of the neuroimaging literature on sublexical speech perception. Based on foci reported in 23 fMRI experiments, we identified significant activation likelihoods in left and right superior temporal cortex and the left posterior middle frontal gyrus. Subanalyses examining phonetic and phonological processes revealed only left mid-posterior superior temporal sulcus activation likelihood. A lateralization analysis demonstrated temporal lobe left lateralization in terms of magnitude, extent, and consistency of activity. Experiments requiring explicit attention to phonology drove this lateralization. An ALE analysis of eight fMRI studies on categorical phoneme perception revealed significant activation likelihood in the left supramarginal gyrus and angular gyrus. These results are consistent with a speech processing network in which the bilateral superior temporal cortices perform acoustic analysis of speech and nonspeech auditory stimuli, the left mid-posterior superior temporal sulcus performs phonetic and phonological analysis, and the left inferior parietal lobule is involved in detection of differences between phoneme categories. These results modify current speech perception models in three ways: 1) specifying the most likely locations of dorsal stream processing units, 2) clarifying that phonetic and phonological superior temporal sulcus processing is left lateralized and localized to the mid-posterior portion, and 3) suggesting that both the supramarginal gyrus and angular gyrus may be involved in phoneme discrimination. PMID:20413149

  9. Membrane localization and topology of leukotriene C4 synthase.

    PubMed

    Christmas, Peter; Weber, Brittany M; McKee, Mary; Brown, Dennis; Soberman, Roy J

    2002-08-01

    Leukotriene C(4) (LTC(4)) synthase conjugates LTA(4) with GSH to form LTC(4). Determining the site of LTC(4) synthesis and the topology of LTC(4) synthase may uncover unappreciated intracellular roles for LTC(4), as well as how LTC(4) is transferred to its export carrier, the multidrug resistance protein-1. We have determined the membrane localization of LTC(4) synthase by immunoelectron microscopy. In contrast to the closely related five-lipoxygenase-activating protein, LTC(4) synthase is distributed in the outer nuclear membrane and peripheral endoplasmic reticulum but is excluded from the inner nuclear membrane. We have combined immunofluorescence with differential membrane permeabilization to determine the topology of LTC(4) synthase. The active site of LTC(4) synthase is localized in the lumen of the nuclear envelope and endoplasmic reticulum. These results indicate that the synthesis of LTB(4) and LTC(4) occurs in different subcellular locations and suggests that LTC(4) must be returned to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane for export by multidrug resistance protein-1. The differential localization of two very similar integral membrane proteins suggests that mechanisms other than size-dependent exclusion regulate their passage to the inner nuclear membrane.

  10. Phase separation dynamics and lateral organization of two-component lipid membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, K; Mouritsen, O G

    1995-01-01

    The non-equilibrium dynamic ordering process of coexisting phases has been studied for two-component lipid bilayers composed of saturated di-acyl phospholipids with different acyl chain lengths, such as DC14PC-DC18PC and DC12PC-DC18PC. By means of a microscopic interaction model and computer-simulation techniques the non-equilibrium properties of these two mixtures have been determined with particular attention paid to the effects of the non-equilibrium ordering process on membrane heterogeneity in terms of local and global lateral membrane organization. The results reveal that a sudden temperature change that takes the lipid mixture from the fluid one-phase region into the gel-fluid phase-coexistence region leads to the formation of a large number of small lipid domains which slowly are growing in time. The growth of the lipid domains, which is limited by long-range diffusion of the lipid molecules within the two-dimensional membrane plane, gives rise to the existence of a highly heterogeneous percolative-like structure with a network of interfacial regions that have properties different from those of the phase-separated gel and fluid bulk phases. The results, which are discussed in relation to recent experimental observations interpreted in terms of a percolative-like membrane structure within the two phase region (Almeida, P.F.F., Vaz, W.L.C., and T.E. Thompson. 1992. Biochemistry 31:7198-7210), suggest that non-equilibrium effects may influence lipid domain formation and membrane organization on various length and time scales. Such effects might be of importance in relation to membrane processes that require molecular mobility of the membrane components in restricted geometrical environments of the compartmentalized lipid membrane. Images FIGURE 6 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 PMID:8519994

  11. On the interaction of the liposomal membrane with blood components.

    PubMed

    Miller, I F; Hoag, J M; Rooney, M W

    1992-01-01

    Liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin (LEH) has been shown to be a viable candidate as a blood replacement. However, few data have been presented as to how LEH interacts with normal blood components. Liposomes were prepared from egg lecithin, cholesterol, and dicetyl phosphate or phosphatidic acid, and mixed with fresh blood plasma or whole blood. Erythrocyte osmotic fragility, prothrombin time (extrinsic coagulation efficiency), activated partial thromboplastin time (intrinsic coagulation efficiency), plasma clot stability in urea (fibrin stabilizing factor), and clot retraction (platelet activation) were measured. Although liposomes were found to bind extensively to erythrocytes, all tests indicated that the liposomes had no significant adverse effects, provided that normal levels of plasma Ca++ were maintained. The ability of liposomes to absorb Ca++ from the plasma was related directly to the amount of dicetyl phosphate or phosphatidic acid present and thus, presumably, to the presence of negatively charged species in the membrane. The mechanics of deformation of the LEH membrane were investigated by encapsulating Hemoglobin S in liposomes. Liposomes containing Hemoglobin S were found to sickle when deoxygenated, but not liposomes containing normal hemoglobin. Shape analysis of sickled liposomes yielded a deforming stress of 10(6) dynes/cm2, about 50 times greater than the reported limit for shear elasticity of the erythrocyte membrane. PMID:1391486

  12. Localized translation near the mitochondrial outer membrane: An update

    PubMed Central

    Lesnik, Chen; Golani-Armon, Adi; Arava, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    Local synthesis of proteins near their activity site has been demonstrated in many biological systems, and has diverse contributions to cellular functions. Studies in recent years have revealed that hundreds of mitochondria-destined proteins are synthesized by cytosolic ribosomes near the mitochondrial outer membrane, indicating that localized translation also occurs at this cellular locus. Furthermore, in the last year central factors that are involved in this process were identified in yeast, Drosophila, and human cells. Herein we review the experimental evidence for localized translation on the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial outer membrane; in addition, we describe the factors that are involved in this process and discuss the conservation of this mechanism among various species. We also describe the relationship between localized translation and import into the mitochondria and suggest avenues of study that look beyond cotranslational import. Finally we discuss future challenges in characterizing the mechanisms for localized translation and its physiological significance. PMID:26151724

  13. Fluidizing the membrane by a local anesthetic: phenylethanol affects membrane protein oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Anbazhagan, Veerappan; Munz, Carmen; Tome, Lydia; Schneider, Dirk

    2010-12-17

    The exact mechanism of action of anesthetics is still an open question. While some observations suggest specific anesthetic-protein interactions, nonspecific perturbation of the lipid bilayer has also been suggested. Perturbations of bilayer properties could subsequently affect the structure and function of membrane proteins. Addition of the local anesthetic phenylethanol (PEtOH) to model membranes and intact Escherichia coli cells not only affected membrane fluidity but also severely altered the defined helix-helix interaction within the membrane. This experimental observation suggests that certain anesthetics modulate membrane physical properties and thereby indirectly affect transmembrane (TM) helix-helix interactions, which are not only involved in membrane protein folding and assembly but also important for TM signaling.

  14. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as Plausible Prebiotic Membrane Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groen, Joost; Deamer, David W.; Kros, Alexander; Ehrenfreund, Pascale

    2012-08-01

    Aromatic molecules delivered to the young Earth during the heavy bombardment phase in the early history of our solar system were likely to be among the most abundant and stable organic compounds available. The Aromatic World hypothesis suggests that aromatic molecules might function as container elements, energy transduction elements and templating genetic components for early life forms. To investigate the possible role of aromatic molecules as container elements, we incorporated different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the membranes of fatty acid vesicles. The goal was to determine whether PAH could function as a stabilizing agent, similar to the role that cholesterol plays in membranes today. We studied vesicle size distribution, critical vesicle concentration and permeability of the bilayers using C6-C10 fatty acids mixed with amphiphilic PAH derivatives such as 1-hydroxypyrene, 9-anthracene carboxylic acid and 1,4 chrysene quinone. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) spectroscopy was used to measure the size distribution of vesicles and incorporation of PAH species was established by phase-contrast and epifluorescence microscopy. We employed conductimetric titration to determine the minimal concentration at which fatty acids could form stable vesicles in the presence of PAHs. We found that oxidized PAH derivatives can be incorporated into decanoic acid (DA) vesicle bilayers in mole ratios up to 1:10 (PAH:DA). Vesicle size distribution and critical vesicle concentration were largely unaffected by PAH incorporation, but 1-hydroxypyrene and 9-anthracene carboxylic acid lowered the permeability of fatty acid bilayers to small solutes up to 4-fold. These data represent the first indication of a cholesterol-like stabilizing effect of oxidized PAH derivatives in a simulated prebiotic membrane.

  15. Assessment of sulfur mustard interaction with basement membrane components

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Peters, B.P.; Monteiro-Rivier, N.A.

    1995-08-01

    Bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide (sulfur mustard, RD) is a bifunctional alkylating agent which causes severe vesication characterized by slow wound healing. Our previous studies have shown that the vesicant RD disrupts the epidermal-dermal junction at the lamina lucida of the basement membrane. The purpose of this study was to examine whether RD directly modifies basement membrane components (BMCs), and to evaluate the effect of RD on the cell adhesive activity of BMCs. EHS laminin was incubated with (14C)HRD, and extracted by gel filtration. Analysis of the (14C)HRD-conjugated laminin fraction by a reduced sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylaminde gel electrophoresis (SD S-PAGE) revealed the incorporation of radioactivity into both laminin subunits and a laminin trimer resistant to dissociation in reduced SDS-PAGE sample buffer, suggesting direct alkylation and cross-linking of EHS laminin by (14C)HD. Normal human foreskin epidermal keratinocytes were biosynthetically labeled with (35S)cysteine. (35S)-labeled laminin isoforms, Ae.Ble.B2e. laminin and K.Ble.B2e. laminin (using the nomenclature of Engel), fibronectin, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan were isolated by irnmunoprecipitation from the cell culture medium, treated with RD or ethanol as control, and then analyzed by SDS-PAGE.

  16. Progesterone receptor membrane component-1 regulates hepcidin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Rhee, David K.; Malhotra, Rajeev; Mayeur, Claire; Hurst, Liam A.; Ager, Emily; Shelton, Georgia; Kramer, Yael; McCulloh, David; Keefe, David; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Bloch, Donald B.; Peterson, Randall T.

    2015-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is tightly regulated by the membrane iron exporter ferroportin and its regulatory peptide hormone hepcidin. The hepcidin/ferroportin axis is considered a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of diseases of iron overload or deficiency. Here, we conducted a chemical screen in zebrafish to identify small molecules that decrease ferroportin protein levels. The chemical screen led to the identification of 3 steroid molecules, epitiostanol, progesterone, and mifepristone, which decrease ferroportin levels by increasing the biosynthesis of hepcidin. These hepcidin-inducing steroids (HISs) did not activate known hepcidin-inducing pathways, including the BMP and JAK/STAT3 pathways. Progesterone receptor membrane component-1 (PGRMC1) was required for HIS-dependent increases in hepcidin biosynthesis, as PGRMC1 depletion in cultured hepatoma cells and zebrafish blocked the ability of HISs to increase hepcidin mRNA levels. Neutralizing antibodies directed against PGRMC1 attenuated the ability of HISs to induce hepcidin gene expression. Inhibiting the kinases of the SRC family, which are downstream of PGRMC1, blocked the ability of HISs to increase hepcidin mRNA levels. Furthermore, HIS treatment increased hepcidin biosynthesis in mice and humans. Together, these data indicate that PGRMC1 regulates hepcidin gene expression through an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. These studies have identified drug candidates and potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of diseases of abnormal iron metabolism. PMID:26657863

  17. Progesterone receptor membrane component-1 regulates hepcidin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Rhee, David K; Malhotra, Rajeev; Mayeur, Claire; Hurst, Liam A; Ager, Emily; Shelton, Georgia; Kramer, Yael; McCulloh, David; Keefe, David; Bloch, Kenneth D; Bloch, Donald B; Peterson, Randall T

    2016-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is tightly regulated by the membrane iron exporter ferroportin and its regulatory peptide hormone hepcidin. The hepcidin/ferroportin axis is considered a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of diseases of iron overload or deficiency. Here, we conducted a chemical screen in zebrafish to identify small molecules that decrease ferroportin protein levels. The chemical screen led to the identification of 3 steroid molecules, epitiostanol, progesterone, and mifepristone, which decrease ferroportin levels by increasing the biosynthesis of hepcidin. These hepcidin-inducing steroids (HISs) did not activate known hepcidin-inducing pathways, including the BMP and JAK/STAT3 pathways. Progesterone receptor membrane component-1 (PGRMC1) was required for HIS-dependent increases in hepcidin biosynthesis, as PGRMC1 depletion in cultured hepatoma cells and zebrafish blocked the ability of HISs to increase hepcidin mRNA levels. Neutralizing antibodies directed against PGRMC1 attenuated the ability of HISs to induce hepcidin gene expression. Inhibiting the kinases of the SRC family, which are downstream of PGRMC1, blocked the ability of HISs to increase hepcidin mRNA levels. Furthermore, HIS treatment increased hepcidin biosynthesis in mice and humans. Together, these data indicate that PGRMC1 regulates hepcidin gene expression through an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. These studies have identified drug candidates and potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of diseases of abnormal iron metabolism. PMID:26657863

  18. STIM1 Is a Novel Component of ER-Chlamydia trachomatis Inclusion Membrane Contact Sites

    PubMed Central

    Agaisse, Hervé; Derré, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Productive developmental cycle of the obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis depends on the interaction of the replicative vacuole, named the inclusion, with cellular organelles. We have recently reported the formation of ER-Inclusion membrane contact sites (MCSs), where the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is in apposition to the inclusion membrane. These platforms contain the C. trachomatis inclusion membrane protein IncD, the mammalian ceramide transfer protein CERT and the ER resident proteins VAPA/B and were proposed to play a role in the non-vesicular trafficking of lipids to the inclusion. Here, we identify STIM1 as a novel component of ER-Inclusion MCSs. STIM1, an ER calcium (Ca2+) sensor that relocate to ER-Plasma Membrane (PM) MCSs upon Ca2+ store depletion, associated with C. trachomatis inclusion. STIM1, but not the general ER markers Rtn3C and Sec61ß, was enriched at the inclusion membrane. Ultra-structural studies demonstrated that STIM1 localized to ER-Inclusion MCSs. Time-course experiments showed that STIM1, CERT and VAPB co-localized throughout the developmental cycle. By contrast, Orai1, the PM Ca2+ channel that interacts with STIM1 at ER-PM MCSs, did not associate with C. trachomatis inclusion. Upon ER Ca2+ store depletion, a pool of STIM1 relocated to ER-PM MCSs, while the existing ER-Inclusion MCSs remained enriched in STIM1. Finally, we have identified the CAD domain, which mediates STIM1-Orai1 interaction, as the minimal domain required for STIM1 enrichment at ER-Inclusion MCSs. Altogether this study identifies STIM1 as a novel component of ER-C. trachomatis inclusion MCSs. We discuss the potential role(s) of STIM1 during the infection process. PMID:25915399

  19. Differential localization of the streptococcal accessory sec components and implications for substrate export.

    PubMed

    Yen, Yihfen T; Cameron, Todd A; Bensing, Barbara A; Seepersaud, Ravin; Zambryski, Patricia C; Sullam, Paul M

    2013-02-01

    The accessory Sec system of Streptococcus gordonii is comprised of SecY2, SecA2, and five proteins (Asp1 through -5) that are required for the export of a serine-rich glycoprotein, GspB. We have previously shown that a number of the Asps interact with GspB, SecA2, or each other. To further define the roles of these Asps in export, we examined their subcellular localization in S. gordonii and in Escherichia coli expressing the streptococcal accessory Sec system. In particular, we assessed how the locations of these accessory Sec proteins were altered by the presence of other components. Using fluorescence microscopy, we found in E. coli that SecA2 localized within multiple foci at the cell membrane, regardless of whether other accessory Sec proteins were expressed. Asp2 alone localized to the cell poles but formed a similar punctate pattern at the membrane when SecA2 was present. Asp1 and Asp3 localized diffusely in the cytosol when expressed alone or with SecA2. However, these proteins redistributed to the membrane in a punctate arrangement when all of the accessory Sec components were present. Cell fractionation studies with S. gordonii further corroborated these microscopy results. Collectively, these findings indicate that Asp1 to -3 are not integral membrane proteins that form structural parts of the translocation channel. Instead, SecA2 serves as a docking site for Asp2, which in turn attracts a complex of Asp1 and Asp3 to the membrane. These protein interactions may be important for the trafficking of GspB to the cell membrane and its subsequent translocation. PMID:23204472

  20. Dlg5 maintains apical polarity by promoting membrane localization of Crumbs during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jun; Wang, Heng; Kang, Di; Guo, Xuan; Wan, Ping; Wang, Dou; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    Apical-basal polarity plays critical roles in the functions of epithelial tissues. However, the mechanisms of epithelial polarity establishment and maintenance remain to be fully elucidated. Here we show that the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family protein Dlg5 is required for the maintenance of apical polarity of follicle epithelium during Drosophila oogenesis. Dlg5 localizes at the apical membrane and adherens junction (AJ) of follicle epithelium in early stage egg chambers. Specifically, we demonstrate that the major function of Dlg5 is to promote apical membrane localization of Crumbs, since overexpression of Crumbs but not other major apical or AJ components could rescue epithelial polarity defects resulted from loss of Dlg5. Furthermore, we performed a structure-function analysis of Dlg5 and found that the C-terminal PDZ3 and PDZ4 domains are required for all Dlg5’s functions as well as its ability to localize to apical membrane. The N-terminal coiled-coil motif could be individually targeted to the apical membrane, while the central linker region could be targeted to AJ. Lastly, the MAGUK core domains of PDZ4-SH3-GUK could be individually targeted to apical, AJ and basolateral membranes. PMID:27211898

  1. Differential membrane effects of general and local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Diamond, B I; Havdala, H S; Sabelli, H C

    1975-12-01

    The authors studied the effects of varying Na+ and Ca++ concentrations and of replacing H2O with D2O in Ringer's solution upon the actions of general and local anesthetics on isolated frog sciatic nerves. This experimental model was used to study whether general anesthetics affect excitable membranes in a manner similar to that of typical membrane stabilizers (local anesthetics). Procaine (2.5-7.5 mM), halothane (9, 18, and 36 mM), enflurane (8 mM), and ketamine (0.15 and 0.73 mM) raised threshold and lowered spike amplitude, and their effects were facilitated by reducing Na+ concentration in the Ringer's solution. The local anesthetic effects of procaine (2.5-7.5 mM) and ketamine (0.73 mM) were antagonized by Ca++, while the axonal depressant effect of halothane was facilitated by increasing Ca++ concentration in the Ringer's solution, indicating a different mode of action. General anesthetics also differed from local anesthetics in their interaction with water: replacement by D2O of H2O in the Ringer's solution selectively increased the axonal depressant effects of halothane and enflurane but not those of ketamine or procaine. Since D2O differs from H2O in its greater ice-likeness, these results are consistent with the view that general anesthetics stabilize excitable membranes via stabilization of the water-biopolymer lattice, as predicted by the hydrate-microcrystal theory of anesthesia. In contrast, local anesthetics may stabilize excitable tissues by binding to the same fixed negative charges of the membrane to which Ca++ is normally bound. (Key words: Theories of anesthesia, hydrate-microcrystal; Nerve, mode of action of anesthetics; Anesthetics, volatile, halothane; Anesthetics, volatile, enflurane; Anesthetics, local, procaine; Anesthetics, intravenous, ketamine.)

  2. EMLA in local anaesthesia of the tympanic membrane.

    PubMed

    Luotonen, J; Laitakari, K; Karjalainen, H; Jokinen, K

    1992-01-01

    An ideal agent for local anaesthesia of the tympanic membrane has been missing so far. Recently, however, a eutectic mixture of lignocaine and prilocaine (EMLA, Astra, Södertälje, Sweden) has proved promising. We compared the anaesthetizing efficacy of EMLA, Bonain's solution (cocain, menthol, phenol ana partes) and Xylocain-spray (Astra, Södertälje, Sweden) in 42 voluntary subjects. EMLA was applied on one tympanic membrane and either one of the other two agents in the other ear of each subject. Small cotton pledgets were used for application. Sensitivity of the ear drum was tested under otomicroscope with a cotton tipped wire before and after each local anaesthesia. Full anaesthesia could be reached with EMLA very significantly (p less than 0.001) more often than with Xylocain and almost significantly (p = 0.057) more often than with Bonain's solution. Most of the test subjects preferred EMLA to Bonain's solution of Xylocain. Undesired side effects, including two tympanic membrane perforations, appeared in most of the ears anaesthetized with Bonain's solution. In the clinical part of the study, EMLA topical anaesthesia was used in 127 minor policlinical tympanic membrane procedures like myringotomy and tympanostomy tube assembling. Eighty-three of the procedures were assessed as painless, 36 unpleasant and 8 painful. A 30-min action time of EMLA was considered sufficient in most cases. No EMLA related side effects appeared. In conclusion, Bonain's solution is recommended to be replaced by EMLA or a corresponding agent for local anaesthesia of the tympanic membrane.

  3. A Two-component Kdo Hydrolase in the Inner Membrane of Francisella novicida

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinshi; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2010-01-01

    Lipid A coats the outer surface of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. In Francisella tularensis subspecies novicida lipid A is present either as the covalently attached anchor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or as free lipid A. The lipid A moiety of Francisella LPS is linked to the core domain by a single 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo) residue. F. novicida KdtA is bifunctional, but F. novicida contains a membrane-bound Kdo hydrolase that removes the outer Kdo unit. The hydrolase consists of two proteins (KdoH1 and KdoH2), which are expressed from adjacent, co-transcribed genes. KdoH1 (related to sialidases) has a single predicted N-terminal transmembrane segment. KdoH2 contains 7 putative transmembrane sequences. Neither protein alone catalyzes Kdo cleavage when expressed in E. coli. Activity requires simultaneous expression of both proteins or mixing of membranes from strains expressing the individual proteins under in vitro assay conditions in the presence of non-ionic detergent. In E. coli expressing KdoH1 and KdoH2, hydrolase activity is localized in the inner membrane. WBB06, a heptose-deficient E. coli mutant that makes Kdo2-lipid A as its sole LPS, accumulates Kdo-lipid A when expressing the both hydrolase components, and 1-dephospho-Kdo-lipid A when expressing both the hydrolase and the Francisella lipid A 1-phosphatase (LpxE). PMID:20662782

  4. Alternative polyadenylation can regulate post-translational membrane localization

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Mithun; Johnson, Elizabeth L.; Coller, Hilary A.

    2016-01-01

    For many genomic loci, there are more than one potential cleavage and polyadenylation site, resulting in the generation of multiple distinct transcripts. When the proximal polyadenylation site is present within the coding region of the transcript, alternative polyadenylation can result in proteins with distinct amino acid sequences and potentially distinct functions. In most cases, the different possible polyadenylation sites are all present within the 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs), and the amino acid sequence of the encoded proteins are not affected by polyadenylation site selection. In individual instances, the selection of the proximal versus distal polyadenylation site in the 3′UTR can dramatically affect transcript stability and translatability. In some instances, UTR alternative polyadenylation generates RNA isoforms that have distinct subcellular localization patterns, and that can regulate the location of the encoded protein in an RNA-guided manner. In a recent paper, the laboratory of Christine Mayr demonstrated that alternative polyadenylation of the transmembrane protein CD47 results in transcripts with the same localization pattern, but the encoded protein localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum when it is encoded by the transcript generated by using the proximal polyadenylation site in 3′UTR, and the identical protein localizes to the plasma membrane when the transcript is encoded by the distal polyadenylation site, also in the 3′ UTR. Unlike previous studies, the mechanism of localization does not rely on differential trafficking of the mRNA and is instead, based on RNA-mediated recruitment of proteins to the cytoplasmic side of CD47 that support its plasma membrane localization. Other transmembrane proteins were discovered to be regulated similarly. The results demonstrate that the choice of polyadenylation site can affect protein localization and function, even when the sequence of the protein is unaffected. Further, the transcript encoding

  5. Quantitative local photosynthetic flux measurements at isolated chloroplasts and thylakoid membranes using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM).

    PubMed

    McKelvey, Kim; Martin, Sophie; Robinson, Colin; Unwin, Patrick R

    2013-07-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) offers a fast and quantitative method to measure local fluxes within photosynthesis. In particular, we have measured the flux of oxygen and ferrocyanide (Fe(CN)6(4-)), from the artificial electron acceptor ferricyanide (Fe(CN)6(3-)), using a stationary ultramicroelectrode at chloroplasts and thylakoid membranes (sourced from chloroplasts). Oxygen generation at films of chloroplasts and thylakoid membranes was detected directly during photosynthesis, but in the case of thylakoid membranes, this switched to sustained oxygen consumption at longer illumination times. An initial oxygen concentration spike was detected over both chloroplast and thylakoid membrane films, and the kinetics of the oxygen generation were extracted by fitting the experimental data to a finite element method (FEM) simulation. In contrast to previous work, the oxygen generation spike was attributed to the limited size of the plastoquinone pool, a key component in the linear electron transport pathway and a contributing factor in photoinhibition. Finally, the mobile nature of the SECM probe, and its high spatial resolution, also allowed us to detect ferrocyanide produced from a single thylakoid membrane. These results further demonstrate the power of SECM for localized flux measurements in biological processes, in this case photosynthesis, and that the high time resolution, combined with FEM simulations, allows the elucidation of quantitative kinetic information.

  6. The interface width of separated two-component lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Góźdź, W T

    2006-11-01

    We study two-component vesicles with coherent domains of the components, where the domains are separated by an interface. The components are characterized by different spontaneous curvatures. No line tension term or interactions between components are included in the model. The influence of the interface width and interface location on the bending energy and shape of the vesicles is studied. How the spontaneous curvature of one component influences the concentration profile is examined. The vesicles of oblate and prolate geometries are investigated.

  7. Expression of progesterone receptor membrane component-1 in bovine reproductive system during estrous cycle

    PubMed Central

    Luciano, A.M.; Corbani, D.; Lodde, V.; Tessaro, I.; Franciosi, F.; Peluso, J.J.; Modina, S.

    2011-01-01

    Several reports suggest the participation of progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) in progesterone signaling in the reproductive system. This study aimed at investigating the presence and localization of PGRMC1 in bovine ovary, oviduct and uterus, during the follicular and luteal phases of the estrous cycle. In the ovary, PGRMC1 has been detected in surface germinal epithelium, granulosa cells, theca cells and in the germinal vesicle of the oocytes at all stages of folliculogenesis. In the corpus luteum the expression of PGRMC1 was influenced by the stage of the estrous cycle. In the oviducts and in the uterus horns, PGRMC1 was immunolocalized in the luminal epithelium, in the muscle layer cells and in the endothelial cells. In the uterus, PGRMC1 was intensely localized also in the glandular endometrium. However, in the oviducts and in the uterus horns, the localization of PGRMC1 was independent on the stage of the estrous cycle and on whether evaluating the ipsilateral or the contralateral organ. In conclusion, the present immunohistochemical study showed that PGRMC1 is located in various compartments of the bovine female reproductive organs. With the exception of the corpora lutea, PGRMC1 localization showed similar pattern during different stages of the estrous cycle. PMID:22073374

  8. Interaction of murine macrophage-membrane proteins with components of the pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, M L; Duarte-Escalante, E; Reyes-Montes, M R; Elizondo, N; Maldonado, G; Zenteno, E

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of macrophage-membrane proteins and histoplasmin, a crude antigen of the pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum, was studied using murine peritoneal macrophages. Membrane proteins were purified via membrane attachment to polycationic beads and solubilized in Tris–HCl/SDS/DTT/glycerol for protein extraction; afterwards they were adsorbed or not with H. capsulatum yeast or lectin binding-enriched by affinity chromatography. Membrane proteins and histoplasmin interactions were detected by ELISA and immunoblotting assays using anti-H. capsulatum human or mouse serum and biotinylated goat anti-human or anti-mouse IgG/streptavidin-peroxidase system to reveal the interaction. Results indicate that macrophage-membrane proteins and histoplasmin components interact in a dose-dependent reaction, and adsorption of macrophage-membrane proteins by yeast cells induces a critical decrease in the interaction. Macrophage-membrane glycoproteins with terminal d-galactosyl residues, purified by chromatography with Abrus precatorius lectin, bound to histoplasmin; and two bands of 68 kD and 180 kD of transferred membrane protein samples interacted with histoplasmin components, as revealed by immunoblot assays. Specificity for β-galactoside residues on the macrophage-membrane was confirmed by galactose inhibition of the interaction between macrophage-membrane proteins and histoplasmin components, in competitive ELISA using sugars, as well as by enzymatic cleavage of the galactoside residues. PMID:9737672

  9. Integrin clustering as a result of local membrane deformations and local signaling feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizzi, Federico; Iber, Dagmar

    2014-08-01

    Integrins are essential receptors for the development and functioning of multicellular animals because they mediate cell adhesion and migration, and regulate cell proliferation and apoptosis. Ligand-dependent activation of integrins involves the formation of receptor clusters and this has been accounted both to extracellular forces as mediated by the glycocalyx as well as to intracellular forces mediated by the cytoskeleton. Here we describe a Monte Carlo simulation that considers both the binding processes on the membrane as well as the intracellular signaling processes that stabilize the open integrin conformation. We show that integrin clustering can result both from the effects of integrin avidity, as a result of membrane deformations, as well as from the locally enhanced availability of talins in the open conformation, as a result of local positive feedback signaling via PIPKIγ and PIP2. The model was carefully parameterized based on reported quantitative data and reproduces a wide range of experimental data, including results that previously appeared inconsistent.

  10. A Local Learning Rule for Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Takuya; Toyoizumi, Taro

    2016-06-01

    Humans can separately recognize independent sources when they sense their superposition. This decomposition is mathematically formulated as independent component analysis (ICA). While a few biologically plausible learning rules, so-called local learning rules, have been proposed to achieve ICA, their performance varies depending on the parameters characterizing the mixed signals. Here, we propose a new learning rule that is both easy to implement and reliable. Both mathematical and numerical analyses confirm that the proposed rule outperforms other local learning rules over a wide range of parameters. Notably, unlike other rules, the proposed rule can separate independent sources without any preprocessing, even if the number of sources is unknown. The successful performance of the proposed rule is then demonstrated using natural images and movies. We discuss the implications of this finding for our understanding of neuronal information processing and its promising applications to neuromorphic engineering.

  11. A Local Learning Rule for Independent Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Isomura, Takuya; Toyoizumi, Taro

    2016-01-01

    Humans can separately recognize independent sources when they sense their superposition. This decomposition is mathematically formulated as independent component analysis (ICA). While a few biologically plausible learning rules, so-called local learning rules, have been proposed to achieve ICA, their performance varies depending on the parameters characterizing the mixed signals. Here, we propose a new learning rule that is both easy to implement and reliable. Both mathematical and numerical analyses confirm that the proposed rule outperforms other local learning rules over a wide range of parameters. Notably, unlike other rules, the proposed rule can separate independent sources without any preprocessing, even if the number of sources is unknown. The successful performance of the proposed rule is then demonstrated using natural images and movies. We discuss the implications of this finding for our understanding of neuronal information processing and its promising applications to neuromorphic engineering. PMID:27323661

  12. Adaptive Decomposition of Highly Resolved Time Series into Local and Non‐local Components

    EPA Science Inventory

    Highly time-resolved air monitoring data are widely being collected over long time horizons in order to characterizeambient and near-source air quality trends. In many applications, it is desirable to split the time-resolved data into two ormore components (e.g., local and region...

  13. Localization of membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase in caveolae membrane domains.

    PubMed Central

    Annabi, B; Lachambre, M; Bousquet-Gagnon, N; Pagé, M; Gingras, D; Béliveau, R

    2001-01-01

    Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a membrane-associated MMP that has been recently reported to have a central role in tumour cell invasion. Here we report that both the native and overexpressed recombinant forms of MT1-MMP are highly enriched in low-density Triton X-100-insoluble membrane domains that contain the caveolar marker protein caveolin 1. Moreover, the MT1-MMP-dependent activation of proMMP-2 induced by concanavalin A and cytochalasin D was correlated with the processing of MT1-MMP to its proteolytically inactive 43 kDa fragment in U-87 glioblastoma and HT-1080 fibrosarcoma tumour cell lines; this processing was also preferentially observed within the caveolar fraction. Interestingly, whereas the expression of caveolin 1 had no effect on the MT1-MMP-dependent activation of proMMP-2, its co-expression with MT1-MMP antagonized the MT1-MMP-increased migratory potential of COS-7 cells. Taken together, our results provide evidence that MT1-MMP is preferentially compartmentalized and proteolytically processed in caveolae of cancer cells. The inhibition of MT1-MMP-dependent cell migration by caveolin 1 also suggests that the localization of MT1-MMP to caveolin-enriched domains might have an important function in the control of its enzymic activity. PMID:11171051

  14. Membrane localization diversity of TPK channels and their physiological role

    PubMed Central

    Isayenkov, Stanislav; Isner, Jean-Charles

    2011-01-01

    Potassium (K) is one of the major nutrients that is essential for plant growth and development. The majority of cellular K+ resides in the vacuole and tonoplast K+ channels of the TPK (Two Pore K) family are main players in cellular K+ homeostasis. All TPK channels were previously reported to be expressed in the tonoplast of the large central lytic vacuole (LV) except for one isoform in Arabidopsis that resides in the plasma membrane. However, plant cells often contain more than one type of vacuole that coexist in the same cell. We recently showed that two TPK isoforms (OsTPKa and OsTPKb) from Oryza sativa localize to different vacuoles with OsTPKa predominantly found in the LV tonoplast and OsTPKb primarily in smaller compartments that resemble small vacuoles (SVs). Our study further revealed that it is the C-terminal domain that determines differential targeting of OsTPKa and OsTPKb. Three C-terminal amino acids were particularly relevant for targeting TPKs to their respective endomembranes. In this addendum we further evaluate how the different localization of TPKa and TPKb impact on their physiological role and how TPKs provide a potential tool to study the physiology of different types of vacuole. PMID:21757998

  15. Short-lived fluorescence component of DPH reports on lipid--water interface of biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Konopásek, Ivo; Vecer, Jaroslav; Strzalka, Kazimierz; Amler, Evzen

    2004-07-01

    Fluorescence measurements of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) in large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles were performed to characterize the influence of the membrane physical properties on the short-lived lifetime component of the fluorescence decay. We have found that the short-lived component of DPH significantly shortens when the membrane undergoes a temperature-induced phase transition as it is known for the long-lived component of DPH. We induced membrane phase transitions also by alcohols, which are reported to be distributed different way in the membrane--ethanol close to the membrane-water interface and benzyl alcohol in the membrane core. A different effect of the respective alcohol on the short and long decay component was observed. Both the time-resolved fluorescence spectra of DPH taken during lipid vesicle staining and the lifetime dependences caused by changes of temperature and/or induced by the alcohols show that the short-lived fluorescence originates from the population of dye molecules distributed at the membrane-water interface.

  16. Local anesthetics structure-dependently interact with anionic phospholipid membranes to modify the fluidity.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Hironori; Ueno, Takahiro; Mizogami, Maki; Takakura, Ko

    2010-01-01

    While bupivacaine is more cardiotoxic than other local anesthetics, the mechanistic background for different toxic effects remains unclear. Several cardiotoxic compounds act on lipid bilayers to change the physicochemical properties of membranes. We comparatively studied the interaction of local anesthetics with lipid membranous systems which might be related to their structure-selective cardiotoxicity. Amide local anesthetics (10-300 microM) were reacted with unilamellar vesicles which were prepared with different phospholipids and cholesterol of varying lipid compositions. They were compared on the potencies to modify membrane fluidity by measuring fluorescence polarization. Local anesthetics interacted with liposomal membranes to increase the fluidity. Increasing anionic phospholipids in membranes enhanced the membrane-fluidizing effects of local anesthetics with the potency being cardiolipin>phosphatidic acid>phosphatidylglycerol>phosphatidylserine. Cardiolipin was most effective on bupivacaine, followed by ropivacaine. Local anesthetics interacted differently with biomimetic membranes consisting of 10mol% cardiolipin, 50mol% other phospholipids and 40mol% cholesterol with the potency being bupivacaine>ropivacaine>lidocaine>prilocaine, which agreed with the rank order of cardiotoxicity. Bupivacaine significantly fluidized 2.5-12.5mol% cardiolipin-containing membranes at cardiotoxicologically relevant concentrations. Bupivacaine is considered to affect lipid bilayers by interacting electrostatically with negatively charged cardiolipin head groups and hydrophobically with phospholipid acyl chains. The structure-dependent interaction with lipid membranes containing cardiolipin, which is preferentially localized in cardiomyocyte mitochondrial membranes, may be a mechanistic clue to explain the structure-selective cardiotoxicity of local anesthetics.

  17. Behaviour of fouling-related components in an enhanced membrane bioreactor using marine activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Tan, Songwen; Li, Weiguo

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on behaviour of fouling-related components during saline wastewater treatments in an enhanced mesoporous membrane bioreactor (MBR) system integrated with a biological contact oxidation reactor (BCOR). By monitoring the transmembrane pressure, the MBR system without BCOR assistance was observed to get membrane fouling easier during saline wastewater treatments. Typically, the concentration of total EPS gradually increased in the MBR system over the operation time, while no significant change in its concentration was observed in the BCOR-MBR system. The concentration of total SMP in the MBR system reached high levels earlier than the BCOR-MBR system, causing a significant membrane fouling. Besides, unlike a simple MBR system, the BCOR-MBR system produced more soluble microbial by-product-like components (simple) instead of fulvic acid-like or humic acid-like components (complex) during the saline wastewater treatments, resulting in higher resistance to a membrane fouling. PMID:27598568

  18. The single epsin homolog in Giardia lamblia localizes to the ventral disk of trophozoites and is not associated with clathrin membrane coats.

    PubMed

    Ebneter, Jacqueline A; Hehl, Adrian B

    2014-10-01

    Epsins serve as recruitment platforms for clathrin membrane coat protein components and induce membrane curvature via their N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain. Unexpectedly, the single ENTH domain protein, a putative epsinR homolog (Glepsin), in the diverged protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia, localizes exclusively to the specialized attachment organelle, the ventral disk (VD). Glepsin binds both to phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate phospholipids and the VD cytoskeleton, but lacks canonical domains for interaction with clathrin coat components. This suggests reassignment of giardial epsin function from membrane trafficking to a structural role in linking the plasma membrane to the highly specialized VD during evolution of this genus. PMID:25286382

  19. Locating Local Earthquakes Using Single 3-Component Broadband Seismological Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. B.; Mitra, S.

    2015-12-01

    We devised a technique to locate local earthquakes using single 3-component broadband seismograph and analyze the factors governing the accuracy of our result. The need for devising such a technique arises in regions of sparse seismic network. In state-of-the-art location algorithms, a minimum of three station recordings are required for obtaining well resolved locations. However, the problem arises when an event is recorded by less than three stations. This may be because of the following reasons: (a) down time of stations in a sparse network; (b) geographically isolated regions with limited logistic support to setup large network; (c) regions of insufficient economy for financing multi-station network and (d) poor signal-to-noise ratio for smaller events at most stations, except the one in its closest vicinity. Our technique provides a workable solution to the above problematic scenarios. However, our methodology is strongly dependent on the velocity model of the region. Our method uses a three step processing: (a) ascertain the back-azimuth of the event from the P-wave particle motion recorded on the horizontal components; (b) estimate the hypocentral distance using the S-P time; and (c) ascertain the emergent angle from the vertical and radial components. Once this is obtained, one can ray-trace through the 1-D velocity model to estimate the hypocentral location. We test our method on synthetic data, which produces results with 99% precision. With observed data, the accuracy of our results are very encouraging. The precision of our results depend on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and choice of the right band-pass filter to isolate the P-wave signal. We used our method on minor aftershocks (3 < mb < 4) of the 2011 Sikkim earthquake using data from the Sikkim Himalayan network. Location of these events highlight the transverse strike-slip structure within the Indian plate, which was observed from source mechanism study of the mainshock and larger aftershocks.

  20. SWELL1, a plasma membrane protein, is an essential component of volume-regulated anion channel

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhaozhu; Dubin, Adrienne E.; Mathur, Jayanti; Tu, Buu; Reddy, Kritika; Miraglia, Loren J.; Reinhardt, Jürgen; Orth, Anthony P.; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2014-01-01

    Summary Maintenance of a constant cell volume in response to extracellular or intracellular osmotic changes is critical for cellular homeostasis. Activation of a ubiquitous volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) plays a key role in this process; however, its molecular identity in vertebrates remains unknown. Here, we used a cell-based fluorescence assay and performed a genome-wide RNAi screen to find components of VRAC. We identified SWELL1 (LRRC8A), a member of a four-transmembrane protein family with unknown function, as essential for hypotonicity-induced iodide influx. SWELL1 is localized to the plasma membrane, and its knockdown dramatically reduces endogenous VRAC currents and regulatory cell volume decrease in various cell types. Furthermore, point mutations in SWELL1 cause a significant change in VRAC anion selectivity, demonstrating that SWELL1 is an essential VRAC component. These findings enable further molecular characterization of the VRAC channel complex and genetic studies for understanding the function of VRAC in normal physiology and disease. PMID:24725410

  1. The Architecture of EssB, an Integral Membrane Component of the Type VII Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Zoltner, Martin; Norman, David G.; Fyfe, Paul K.; El Mkami, Hassane; Palmer, Tracy; Hunter, William N.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The membrane-bound EssB is an integral and essential component of the bacterial type VII secretion system that can contribute to pathogenicity. The architecture of Geobacillus thermodenitrificans EssB has been investigated by combining crystallographic and EPR spectroscopic methods. The protein forms a dimer that straddles the cytoplasmic membrane. A helical fold is observed for the C-terminal segment, which is positioned on the exterior of the membrane. This segment contributes most to dimer formation. The N-terminal segment displays a structure related to the pseudokinase fold and may contribute to function by recognizing substrates or secretion system partners. The remaining part of EssB may serve as an anchor point for the secretion apparatus, which is embedded in the cytoplasmic membrane with the C-terminal domain protruding out to interact with partner proteins or components of peptidoglycan. PMID:23499020

  2. Reversible control of current across lipid membranes by local heating

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Patrick; Kirchner, Silke R.; Mühlbauer, Christian; Lohmüller, Theobald; Feldmann, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Lipid membranes are almost impermeable for charged molecules and ions that can pass the membrane barrier only with the help of specialized transport proteins. Here, we report how temperature manipulation at the nanoscale can be employed to reversibly control the electrical resistance and the amount of current that flows through a bilayer membrane with pA resolution. For this experiment, heating is achieved by irradiating gold nanoparticles that are attached to the bilayer membrane with laser light at their plasmon resonance frequency. We found that controlling the temperature on the nanoscale renders it possible to reproducibly regulate the current across a phospholipid membrane and the membrane of living cells in absence of any ion channels. PMID:26940847

  3. ER arrival sites for COPI vesicles localize to hotspots of membrane trafficking.

    PubMed

    Schröter, Saskia; Beckmann, Sabrina; Schmitt, Hans Dieter

    2016-09-01

    COPI-coated vesicles mediate retrograde membrane traffic from the cis-Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in all eukaryotic cells. However, it is still unknown whether COPI vesicles fuse everywhere or at specific sites with the ER membrane. Taking advantage of the circumstance that the vesicles still carry their coat when they arrive at the ER, we have visualized active ER arrival sites (ERAS) by monitoring contact between COPI coat components and the ER-resident Dsl tethering complex using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). ERAS form punctate structures near Golgi compartments, clearly distinct from ER exit sites. Furthermore, ERAS are highly polarized in an actin and myosin V-dependent manner and are localized near hotspots of plasma membrane expansion. Genetic experiments suggest that the COPI•Dsl BiFC complexes recapitulate the physiological interaction between COPI and the Dsl complex and that COPI vesicles are mistargeted in dsl1 mutants. We conclude that the Dsl complex functions in confining COPI vesicle fusion sites.

  4. Changes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell membrane components and promotion to ethanol tolerance during the bioethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shi-Jun; Yi, Chen-Feng; Li, Hao

    2015-12-01

    During bioethanol fermentation process, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell membrane might provide main protection to tolerate accumulated ethanol, and S. cerevisiae cells might also remodel their membrane compositions or structure to try to adapt to or tolerate the ethanol stress. However, the exact changes and roles of S. cerevisiae cell membrane components during bioethanol fermentation still remains poorly understood. This study was performed to clarify changes and roles of S. cerevisiae cell membrane components during bioethanol fermentation. Both cell diameter and membrane integrity decreased as fermentation time lasting. Moreover, compared with cells at lag phase, cells at exponential and stationary phases had higher contents of ergosterol and oleic acid (C18:1) but lower levels of hexadecanoic (C16:0) and palmitelaidic (C16:1) acids. Contents of most detected phospholipids presented an increase tendency during fermentation process. Increased contents of oleic acid and phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acids might indicate enhanced cell membrane fluidity. Compared with cells at lag phase, cells at exponential and stationary phases had higher expressions of ACC1 and HFA1. However, OLE1 expression underwent an evident increase at exponential phase but a decrease at following stationary phase. These results indicated that during bioethanol fermentation process, yeast cells remodeled membrane and more changeable cell membrane contributed to acquiring higher ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae cells. These results highlighted our knowledge about relationship between the variation of cell membrane structure and compositions and ethanol tolerance, and would contribute to a better understanding of bioethanol fermentation process and construction of industrial ethanologenic strains with higher ethanol tolerance.

  5. Dual role for membrane localization in yeast MAP kinase cascade activation and its contribution to signaling fidelity.

    PubMed

    Lamson, Rachel E; Takahashi, Satoe; Winters, Matthew J; Pryciak, Peter M

    2006-03-21

    Distinct MAP kinase pathways in yeast share several signaling components , including the PAK Ste20 and the MAPKKK Ste11, yet signaling is specific. Mating pheromones trigger an initial step in which Ste20 activates Ste11 , and this requires plasma membrane recruitment of the MAP kinase cascade scaffold protein, Ste5 . Here, we demonstrate an additional role for Ste5 membrane localization. Once Ste11 is activated, signaling through the mating pathway remains minimal but is substantially amplified when Ste5 is recruited to the membrane either by the Gbetagamma dimer or by direct membrane targeting, even to internal membranes. Ste11 signaling is also amplified by Ste5 oligomerization and by a hyperactivating mutation in the Ste7 binding region of Ste5. We suggest a model in which membrane recruitment of Ste5 concentrates its binding partners and thereby amplifies signaling through the kinase cascade. We find similar behavior in the osmotically responsive HOG pathway. Remarkably, while both pheromone and hyperosmotic stimuli amplify signaling from constitutively active Ste11, the resulting signaling output remains pathway specific. These findings suggest a common mode of regulation in which pathway stimuli both initiate and amplify MAP kinase cascade signaling. The regulation of rate-limiting steps that lie after a branchpoint from shared components helps ensure signaling specificity.

  6. Ultrastructural localization of plasma membrane-associated urokinase- type plasminogen activator at focal contacts

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have recently shown that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 are both found extracellularly beneath cultured human skin fibroblasts and HT-1080 sarcoma cells, but in distinct localizations. Here, the ultrastructural distribution of u-PA was studied using immunoferritin electron microscopy. In HT-1080 cells, u-PA on the extracellular aspect of the plasma membrane was detected at sites of direct contact of the cell with the growth substratum beneath all parts of the ventral cell surface. The ferritin-labeled adhesion plaques, which were enriched in submembraneous microfilaments, were frequently seen at the leading lamellae of the cells as well as in lamellipodia and microspikes. Besides the cell-substratum adhesion plaques, ferritin label was detected at cell-cell contact sites. Double-label immunofluorescence showed a striking colocalization of u-PA and vinculin in both HT-1080 cells and WI-38 lung fibroblasts, which is consistent with u-PA being a focal contact component. The u-PA-containing focal contacts of WI-38 cells had no direct codistribution with fibronectin fibrils. In WI-38 cells made stationary by cultivation in a medium containing 0.5% FCS, vinculin plaques became highly elongated and more centrally located, whereas u-PA immunolabel disappeared from such focal adhesions. These findings show that plasma membrane-associated u-PA is an intrinsic component of focal contacts, where, we propose, it enables directional proteolysis for cell migration and invasion. PMID:3123496

  7. Dynamic Remodeling of the Plastid Envelope Membranes – A Tool for Chloroplast Envelope in vivo Localizations

    PubMed Central

    Breuers, Frederique K. H.; Bräutigam, Andrea; Geimer, Stefan; Welzel, Ulla Y.; Stefano, Giovanni; Renna, Luciana; Brandizzi, Federica; Weber, Andreas P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Two envelope membranes delimit plastids, the defining organelles of plant cells. The inner and outer envelope membranes are unique in their protein and lipid composition. Several studies have attempted to establish the proteome of these two membranes; however, differentiating between them is difficult due to their close proximity. Here, we describe a novel approach to distinguish the localization of proteins between the two membranes using a straightforward approach based on live cell imaging coupled with transient expression. We base our approach on analyses of the distribution of GFP-fusions, which were aimed to verify outer envelope membrane proteomics data. To distinguish between outer envelope and inner envelope protein localization, we used AtTOC64–GFP and AtTIC40–GFP, as respective controls. During our analyses, we observed membrane proliferations and loss of chloroplast shape in conditions of protein over-expression. The morphology of the proliferations varied in correlation with the suborganellar distribution of the over-expressed proteins. In particular, while layers of membranes built up in the inner envelope membrane, the outer envelope formed long extensions into the cytosol. Using electron microscopy, we showed that these extensions were stromules, a dynamic feature of plastids. Since the behavior of the membranes is different and is related to the protein localization, we propose that in vivo studies based on the analysis of morphological differences of the membranes can be used to distinguish between inner and outer envelope localizations of proteins. To demonstrate the applicability of this approach, we demonstrated the localization of AtLACS9 to the outer envelope membrane. We also discuss protein impact on membrane behavior and regulation of protein insertion into membranes, and provide new hypotheses on the formation of stromules. PMID:22645566

  8. Effect of catalyst layer defects on local membrane degradation in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, Arash; Lim, Chan; Kolodziej, Joanna; Lauritzen, Michael; Knights, Shanna; Wang, G. Gary; Kjeang, Erik

    2016-08-01

    Aiming at durability issues of fuel cells, this research is dedicated to a novel experimental approach in the analysis of local membrane degradation phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, shedding light on the potential effects of manufacturing imperfections on this process. With a comprehensive review on historical failure analysis data from field operated fuel cells, local sources of iron oxide contaminants, catalyst layer cracks, and catalyst layer delamination are considered as potential candidates for initiating or accelerating the local membrane degradation phenomena. Customized membrane electrode assemblies with artificial defects are designed, fabricated, and subjected to membrane accelerated stress tests followed by extensive post-mortem analysis. The results reveal a significant accelerating effect of iron oxide contamination on the global chemical degradation of the membrane, but dismiss local traces of iron oxide as a potential stressor for local membrane degradation. Anode and cathode catalyst layer cracks are observed to have negligible impact on the membrane degradation phenomena. Notably however, distinct evidence is found that anode catalyst layer delamination can accelerate local membrane thinning, while cathode delamination has no apparent effect. Moreover, a substantial mitigating effect for platinum residuals on the site of delamination is observed.

  9. Effect of Cholesterol on the Structure of a Five-Component Mitochondria-Like Phospholipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Cathcart, Kelly; Patel, Amit; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.; Fradin, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Cellular membranes have a complex phospholipid composition that varies greatly depending on the organism, cell type and function. In spite of this complexity, most structural data available for phospholipid bilayers concern model systems containing only one or two different phospholipids. Here, we examine the effect of cholesterol on the structure of a complex membrane reflecting the lipid composition of mitochondrial membranes, with five different types of headgroups (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylserine (PS) and cardiolipin (CL)) and a variety of hydrocarbon tails. This particular system was chosen because elevated cholesterol contents in mitochondrial membranes have been linked to a breaking down of Bax-mediated membrane permeabilization and resistance to cancer treatments. High resolution electron density profiles were determined by X-ray reflectivity, while the area per phospholipid chain, Apc, and the chain order parameter, SX-ray, were determined by wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). We show that chain order increases upon the addition of cholesterol, resulting in both a thickening of the lipid bilayer and a reduction in the average surface area per phospholipid chain. This effect, well known as cholesterol’s condensation effect, is similar, but not as pronounced as for single-component phospholipid membranes. We conclude by discussing the relevance of these findings for the insertion of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax in mitochondrial membranes with elevated cholesterol content. PMID:26529029

  10. The marsupial shell membrane: an ultrastructural and immunogold localization study.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C T; Breed, W G

    1996-04-01

    In the dasyurid marsupial, Sminthopsis crassicaudata, as the oocytes/embryos travel down the female reproductive tract two extracellular coats, the mucoid and shell membrane, come to surround them. Embryos recovered from the oviduct have a mucoid coat but no shell membrane which is only found surrounding uterine embryos. Initially, the shell membrane has a compact granular consistency but it later thins and becomes fibrous in texture with fibres oriented mainly in the plane of the membrane. Immunogold labelling with polyclonal antibodies raised against the extracellular coats was employed to determine the location and ultrastructural appearance of the secretory granules which contain mucoid and shell membrane precursors. Secretory granules in the luminal epithelium of the ampulla of the oviduct are of irregular electron density, while those in the isthmus are electron-dense and homogeneous. Both types give rise to the mucoid coat. Secretory granules in the epithelia of the utero-tubal junction and some endometrial glands are electron-lucent and contain some flocculent material which, after exocytosis, gives rise to the shell membrane.

  11. MEMBRANE FILTER PROCEDURE FOR ENUMERATING THE COMPONENT GENERA OF THE COLIFORM GROUP IN SEAWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A facile, quantitative, membrane filter procedure (mC) for defining the distribution of coliform populations in seawater according to the component genera was developed. The procedure, which utilizes a series of in situ substrate tests to obviate the picking of colonies for ident...

  12. Coxiella burnetii Effector Proteins That Localize to the Parasitophorous Vacuole Membrane Promote Intracellular Replication

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Charles L.; Beare, Paul A.; Voth, Daniel E.; Howe, Dale; Cockrell, Diane C.; Bastidas, Robert J.; Valdivia, Raphael H.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Coxiella burnetii directs biogenesis of a parasitophorous vacuole (PV) that acquires host endolysosomal components. Formation of a PV that supports C. burnetii replication requires a Dot/Icm type 4B secretion system (T4BSS) that delivers bacterial effector proteins into the host cell cytosol. Thus, a subset of T4BSS effectors are presumed to direct PV biogenesis. Recently, the PV-localized effector protein CvpA was found to promote C. burnetii intracellular growth and PV expansion. We predict additional C. burnetii effectors localize to the PV membrane and regulate eukaryotic vesicle trafficking events that promote pathogen growth. To identify these vacuolar effector proteins, a list of predicted C. burnetii T4BSS substrates was compiled using bioinformatic criteria, such as the presence of eukaryote-like coiled-coil domains. Adenylate cyclase translocation assays revealed 13 proteins were secreted in a Dot/Icm-dependent fashion by C. burnetii during infection of human THP-1 macrophages. Four of the Dot/Icm substrates, termed Coxiella vacuolar protein B (CvpB), CvpC, CvpD, and CvpE, labeled the PV membrane and LAMP1-positive vesicles when ectopically expressed as fluorescently tagged fusion proteins. C. burnetii ΔcvpB, ΔcvpC, ΔcvpD, and ΔcvpE mutants exhibited significant defects in intracellular replication and PV formation. Genetic complementation of the ΔcvpD and ΔcvpE mutants rescued intracellular growth and PV generation, whereas the growth of C. burnetii ΔcvpB and ΔcvpC was rescued upon cohabitation with wild-type bacteria in a common PV. Collectively, these data indicate C. burnetii encodes multiple effector proteins that target the PV membrane and benefit pathogen replication in human macrophages. PMID:25422265

  13. Sar1 localizes at the rims of COPII-coated membranes in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Suda, Yasuyuki; Nakano, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Sar1 GTPase controls coat assembly on coat protein complex II (COPII)-coated vesicles, which mediate protein transport from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi. The GTP-bound form of Sar1, activated by the ER-localized guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Sec12, associates with the ER membrane. GTP hydrolysis by Sar1, stimulated by the COPII-vesicle-localized GTPase-activating protein (GAP) Sec23, in turn causes Sar1 to dissociate from the membrane. Thus, Sar1 is cycled between active and inactive states, and on and off vesicle membranes, but its precise spatiotemporal regulation remains unknown. Here, we examined Sar1 localization on COPII-coated membranes in living Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Two-dimensional (2D) observation demonstrated that Sar1 showed modest accumulation around the ER exit sites (ERES) in a manner that was dependent on Sec16 function. Detailed three-dimensional (3D) observation further demonstrated that Sar1 localized at the rims of the COPII-coated membranes, but was excluded from the rest of the COPII membranes. Additionally, a GTP-locked form of Sar1 induced abnormally enlarged COPII-coated structures and covered the entirety of these structures. These results suggested that the reversible membrane association of Sar1 GTPase leads to its localization being restricted to the rims of COPII-coated membranes in vivo. PMID:27432890

  14. The structure of Serratia marcescens Lip, a membrane-bound component of the type VI secretion system

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Vincenzo A.; Shepherd, Sharon M.; English, Grant; Coulthurst, Sarah J.; Hunter, William N.

    2011-12-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of S. marcescens Lip reveals a new member of the transthyretin family of proteins. Lip, a core component of the type VI secretion apparatus, is localized to the outer membrane and is positioned to interact with other proteins forming this complex system. Lip is a membrane-bound lipoprotein and a core component of the type VI secretion system found in Gram-negative bacteria. The structure of a Lip construct (residues 29–176) from Serratia marcescens (SmLip) has been determined at 1.92 Å resolution. Experimental phases were derived using a single-wavelength anomalous dispersion approach on a sample cocrystallized with iodide. The membrane localization of the native protein was confirmed. The structure is that of the globular domain lacking only the lipoprotein signal peptide and the lipidated N-terminus of the mature protein. The protein fold is dominated by an eight-stranded β-sandwich and identifies SmLip as a new member of the transthyretin family of proteins. Transthyretin and the only other member of the family fold, 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase, form homotetramers important for their function. The asymmetric unit of SmLip is a tetramer with 222 symmetry, but the assembly is distinct from that previously noted for the transthyretin protein family. However, structural comparisons and bacterial two-hybrid data suggest that the SmLip tetramer is not relevant to its role as a core component of the type VI secretion system, but rather reflects a propensity for SmLip to participate in protein–protein interactions. A relatively low level of sequence conservation amongst Lip homologues is noted and is restricted to parts of the structure that might be involved in interactions with physiological partners.

  15. Electrostatic Localization of RNA to Protocell Membranes by Cationic Hydrophobic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Neha P; Tobé, Sylvia; Hill, Ian T; Szostak, Jack W

    2015-09-28

    Cooperative interactions between RNA and vesicle membranes on the prebiotic earth may have led to the emergence of primitive cells. The membrane surface offers a potential platform for the catalysis of reactions involving RNA, but this scenario relies upon the existence of a simple mechanism by which RNA could become associated with protocell membranes. Here, we show that electrostatic interactions provided by short, basic, amphipathic peptides can be harnessed to drive RNA binding to both zwitterionic phospholipid and anionic fatty acid membranes. We show that the association of cationic molecules with phospholipid vesicles can enhance the local positive charge on a membrane and attract RNA polynucleotides. This phenomenon can be reproduced with amphipathic peptides as short as three amino acids. Finally, we show that peptides can cross bilayer membranes to localize encapsulated RNA. This mechanism of polynucleotide confinement could have been important for primitive cellular evolution. PMID:26223820

  16. Electrostatic Localization of RNA to Protocell Membranes by Cationic Hydrophobic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Neha P; Tobé, Sylvia; Hill, Ian T; Szostak, Jack W

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative interactions between RNA and vesicle membranes on the prebiotic earth may have led to the emergence of primitive cells. The membrane surface offers a potential platform for the catalysis of reactions involving RNA, but this scenario relies upon the existence of a simple mechanism by which RNA could become associated with protocell membranes. Here, we show that electrostatic interactions provided by short, basic, amphipathic peptides can be harnessed to drive RNA binding to both zwitterionic phospholipid and anionic fatty acid membranes. We show that the association of cationic molecules with phospholipid vesicles can enhance the local positive charge on a membrane and attract RNA polynucleotides. This phenomenon can be reproduced with amphipathic peptides as short as three amino acids. Finally, we show that peptides can cross bilayer membranes to localize encapsulated RNA. This mechanism of polynucleotide confinement could have been important for primitive cellular evolution. PMID:26223820

  17. Partitioning behavior of aromatic components in jet fuel into diverse membrane-coated fibers.

    PubMed

    Baynes, Ronald E; Xia, Xin-Rui; Barlow, Beth M; Riviere, Jim E

    2007-11-01

    Jet fuel components are known to partition into skin and produce occupational irritant contact dermatitis (OICD) and potentially adverse systemic effects. The purpose of this study was to determine how jet fuel components partition (1) from solvent mixtures into diverse membrane-coated fibers (MCFs) and (2) from biological media into MCFs to predict tissue distribution. Three diverse MCFs, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, lipophilic), polyacrylate (PA, polarizable), and carbowax (CAR, polar), were selected to simulate the physicochemical properties of skin in vivo. Following an appropriate equilibrium time between the MCF and dosing solutions, the MCF was injected directly into a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC-MS) to quantify the amount that partitioned into the membrane. Three vehicles (water, 50% ethanol-water, and albumin-containing media solution) were studied for selected jet fuel components. The more hydrophobic the component, the greater was the partitioning into the membranes across all MCF types, especially from water. The presence of ethanol as a surrogate solvent resulted in significantly reduced partitioning into the MCFs with discernible differences across the three fibers based on their chemistries. The presence of a plasma substitute (media) also reduced partitioning into the MCF, with the CAR MCF system being better correlated to the predicted partitioning of aromatic components into skin. This study demonstrated that a single or multiple set of MCF fibers may be used as a surrogate for octanol/water systems and skin to assess partitioning behavior of nine aromatic components frequently formulated with jet fuels. These diverse inert fibers were able to assess solute partitioning from a blood substitute such as media into a membrane possessing physicochemical properties similar to human skin. This information may be incorporated into physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to provide a more accurate assessment of tissue dosimetry of

  18. Structure of the poly-C9 component of the complement membrane attack complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkina, Natalya V.; Spicer, Bradley A.; Reboul, Cyril F.; Conroy, Paul J.; Lukoyanova, Natalya; Elmlund, Hans; Law, Ruby H. P.; Ekkel, Susan M.; Kondos, Stephanie C.; Goode, Robert J. A.; Ramm, Georg; Whisstock, James C.; Saibil, Helen R.; Dunstone, Michelle A.

    2016-02-01

    The membrane attack complex (MAC)/perforin-like protein complement component 9 (C9) is the major component of the MAC, a multi-protein complex that forms pores in the membrane of target pathogens. In contrast to homologous proteins such as perforin and the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), all of which require the membrane for oligomerisation, C9 assembles directly onto the nascent MAC from solution. However, the molecular mechanism of MAC assembly remains to be understood. Here we present the 8 Å cryo-EM structure of a soluble form of the poly-C9 component of the MAC. These data reveal a 22-fold symmetrical arrangement of C9 molecules that yield an 88-strand pore-forming β-barrel. The N-terminal thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) domain forms an unexpectedly extensive part of the oligomerisation interface, thus likely facilitating solution-based assembly. These TSP1 interactions may also explain how additional C9 subunits can be recruited to the growing MAC subsequent to membrane insertion.

  19. Structure of the poly-C9 component of the complement membrane attack complex

    PubMed Central

    Dudkina, Natalya V.; Spicer, Bradley A.; Reboul, Cyril F.; Conroy, Paul J.; Lukoyanova, Natalya; Elmlund, Hans; Law, Ruby H. P.; Ekkel, Susan M.; Kondos, Stephanie C.; Goode, Robert J. A.; Ramm, Georg; Whisstock, James C.; Saibil, Helen R.; Dunstone, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    The membrane attack complex (MAC)/perforin-like protein complement component 9 (C9) is the major component of the MAC, a multi-protein complex that forms pores in the membrane of target pathogens. In contrast to homologous proteins such as perforin and the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), all of which require the membrane for oligomerisation, C9 assembles directly onto the nascent MAC from solution. However, the molecular mechanism of MAC assembly remains to be understood. Here we present the 8 Å cryo-EM structure of a soluble form of the poly-C9 component of the MAC. These data reveal a 22-fold symmetrical arrangement of C9 molecules that yield an 88-strand pore-forming β-barrel. The N-terminal thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) domain forms an unexpectedly extensive part of the oligomerisation interface, thus likely facilitating solution-based assembly. These TSP1 interactions may also explain how additional C9 subunits can be recruited to the growing MAC subsequent to membrane insertion. PMID:26841934

  20. Tic21 Is an Essential Translocon Component for Protein Translocation across the Chloroplast Inner Envelope Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yi-Shan; Su, Yi-shin; Chen, Lih-Jen; Lee, Yong Jik; Hwang, Inhwan; Li, Hsou-min

    2006-01-01

    An Arabidopsis thaliana mutant defective in chloroplast protein import was isolated and the mutant locus, cia5, identified by map-based cloning. CIA5 is a 21-kD integral membrane protein in the chloroplast inner envelope membrane with four predicted transmembrane domains, similar to another potential chloroplast inner membrane protein-conducting channel, At Tic20, and the mitochondrial inner membrane counterparts Tim17, Tim22, and Tim23. cia5 null mutants were albino and accumulated unprocessed precursor proteins. cia5 mutant chloroplasts were normal in targeting and binding of precursors to the chloroplast surface but were defective in protein translocation across the inner envelope membrane. Expression levels of CIA5 were comparable to those of major translocon components, such as At Tic110 and At Toc75, except during germination, at which stage At Tic20 was expressed at its highest level. A double mutant of cia5 At tic20-I had the same phenotype as the At tic20-I single mutant, suggesting that CIA5 and At Tic20 function similarly in chloroplast biogenesis, with At Tic20 functioning earlier in development. We renamed CIA5 as Arabidopsis Tic21 (At Tic21) and propose that it functions as part of the inner membrane protein-conducting channel and may be more important for later stages of leaf development. PMID:16891400

  1. Membrane dipeptidase in the pig exocrine pancreas. Ultrastructural localization and secretion.

    PubMed

    LeBel, D; Grondin, G; Cook, S; Hooper, N M

    1998-07-01

    The GPI-anchored membrane dipeptidase is the major peptidase activity of the secretory granule membrane in the exocrine pancreas. The enzyme is also found in the granule content and in pancreatic secretions. Immunocytochemical localization confirmed its location in the granule membrane and in the acinar cell apical plasma membrane. In the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi, membrane dipeptidase was strictly membrane-bound. There was no membrane dipeptidase in duct cells. The release of membrane dipeptidase from the membrane starts in the immature granule. To identify the mechanism responsible for its release, secretions were collected from cannulated conscious pig under basal conditions and atropine perfusion. The latter treatment caused complete inhibition of protein secretion but had a negligible effect on membrane dipeptidase activity in the secretions. In secretions, membrane dipeptidase partitioned into the detergent-rich phase on phase separation in Triton X-114, whereas treatment with bacterial phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C caused the peptidase to partition into the aqueous phase, indicating that the secreted enzyme could come from shedding of membrane fragments at the apical surface or via the action of a previously characterized phospholipase A activity.

  2. Identification and membrane localization of electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporters in Calu-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Kreindler, James L; Peters, Kathryn W; Frizzell, Raymond A; Bridges, Robert J

    2006-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a severely life-shortening genetic disease resulting from mutations in the gene for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Impaired bicarbonate secretion is a key component of CF-related pancreatic disease, but the role of impaired bicarbonate secretion in CF lung disease is less well understood. The submucosal glands of the conducting airways produce and secrete a complex airway surface liquid that lines the airway epithelium and plays a significant role in mucociliary clearance. The serous cell is the predominant cell type of the submucosal gland and a predominant site of CFTR expression. Calu-3 cells are a model of airway submucosal gland serous cells that demonstrates vectorial bicarbonate secretion in response to elevations in cAMP. Based on previously published measurements of unidirectional ion flux, pharmacological inhibition of short-circuit current and ion substitution studies, one can hypothesize the existence of an electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter (NBC) in the basolateral membrane of Calu-3 cells that mediates bicarbonate entry from the interstitium. To test this hypothesis, we performed reverse-transcriptase PCR, western blotting, and surface biotinylation to identify and localize electrogenic NBCs in Calu-3 cells. Our data demonstrate that both pNBC1 and NBC4 mRNAs can be identified and that their protein products are expressed at the basolateral membrane of polarized Calu-3 cells. These data suggest that these transporters contribute to regulated bicarbonate secretion across Calu-3 cells and perhaps human airway submucosal glands.

  3. Peroxynitrous acid induces structural and functional modifications to basement membranes and its key component, laminin.

    PubMed

    Degendorfer, Georg; Chuang, Christine Y; Hammer, Astrid; Malle, Ernst; Davies, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Basement membranes (BM) are specialized extracellular matrices underlying endothelial cells in the artery wall. Laminin, the most abundant BM glycoprotein, is a structural and biologically active component. Peroxynitrous acid (ONOOH), a potent oxidizing and nitrating agent, is formed in vivo at sites of inflammation from superoxide and nitric oxide radicals. Considerable data supports ONOOH formation in human atherosclerotic lesions, and an involvement of this oxidant in atherosclerosis development and lesion rupture. These effects may be mediated, at least in part, via extracellular matrix damage. In this study we demonstrate co-localization of 3-nitrotyrosine (a product of tyrosine damage by ONOOH) and laminin in human atherosclerotic lesions. ONOOH-induced damage to BM was characterized for isolated murine BM, and purified murine laminin-111. Exposure of laminin-111 to ONOOH resulted in dose-dependent loss of protein tyrosine and tryptophan residues, and formation of 3-nitrotyrosine, 6-nitrotryptophan and the cross-linked material di-tyrosine, as detected by amino acid analysis and Western blotting. These changes were accompanied by protein aggregation and fragmentation as detected by SDS-PAGE. Endothelial cell adhesion to isolated laminin-111 exposed to 10 μM or higher levels of ONOOH was significantly decreased (~25%) compared to untreated controls. These data indicate that laminin is oxidized by equimolar or greater concentrations of ONOOH, with this resulting in structural and functional changes. These modifications, and resulting compromised cell-matrix interactions, may contribute to endothelial cell dysfunction, a weakening of the structure of atherosclerotic lesions, and an increased propensity to rupture.

  4. The essential virulence protein VirB8 localizes to the inner membrane of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed Central

    Thorstenson, Y R; Zambryski, P C

    1994-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens genetically transforms plant cells by transferring a specific DNA fragment from the bacterium through several biological membranes to the plant nucleus where the DNA is integrated. This complex DNA transport process likely involves membrane-localized proteins in both the plant and the bacterium. The 11 hydrophobic or membrane-localized proteins of the virB operon are excellent candidates to have a role in DNA export from agrobacteria. Here, we show by TnphoA mutagenesis and immunogold electron microscopy that one of the VirB proteins, VirB8, is located at the inner membrane. The observation that a virB8::TnphoA fusion restores export of alkaline phosphatase to the periplasm suggests that VirB8 spans the inner membrane. Immunogold labeling of VirB8 was detected on the inner membrane of vir-induced A. tumefaciens by transmission electron microscopy. Compared with that of the controls, VirB8 labeling was significantly greater on the inner membrane than on the other cell compartments. These results confirm the inner membrane localization of VirB8 and strengthen the hypothesis that VirB proteins help form a transfer DNA export channel or gate. Images PMID:8132466

  5. Distribution of sialic acid between sialoglycoproteins and other membrane components of different erythrocyte phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Udoh, A E

    1991-01-01

    The sialic acid content of erythrocytes of three different AB0 blood groups have been studied. The sialic acid contents of erythrocyte membranes containing 300 mg protein were determined and compared. Groups 0 (Rhesus negative), AB (both Rhesus negative and positive), and B (Rhesus negative) blood differed significantly (p less than 0.05) in total sialic acid content and in the distribution of sialic acid between sialoglycoproteins and other membrane components. Membrane materials containing 300 mg total protein showed sialic acid contents of 52.73 +/- 2.2 mumol sialic acid for group 0 (Rhesus negative) 34.77 +/- 1.16 mumol for group AB (Rh negative), 32.88 +/- 1.52 mumol for AB (Rh positive) and 21.23 +/- 0.84 mumol for B (Rh negative). In group 0 (Rh. neg.) membranes 39.4 +/- 1.4% of the total sialic acid was associated with the sialoglycoproteins. The percentage of sialic acids associated with sialoglycoproteins in other erythrocyte membranes were 77.7 +/- 1.3% for group B, and 55.6 +/- 1.0% and 56.4 +/- 1.8% for group AB (Rh. negative) and (Rh. positive) respectively. The changes appear to be independent of the Rhesus grouping but dependent on the AB0 grouping since membranes of the two Rhesus types of group AB had identical total sialic acid and sialoglycoproteins sialic acids. The sialic acid densities in sialoglycoproteins also differed from one erythrocyte type to another. Group 0 (Rh. negative) membrane sialoglycoproteins had sialic acid density of 140.5 +/- 3.1 nmol/mg compared to 71.7 +/- 1.2 nmol/mg for group B and 128.1 +/- 2.2 and 124.5 +/- 4.0 nmol/mg for group AB Rhesus negative and Rhesus positive respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Membrane-Based Characterization of a Gas Component — A Transient Sensor Theory

    PubMed Central

    Lazik, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    Based on a multi-gas solution-diffusion problem for a dense symmetrical membrane this paper presents a transient theory of a planar, membrane-based sensor cell for measuring gas from both initial conditions: dynamic and thermodynamic equilibrium. Using this theory, the ranges for which previously developed, simpler approaches are valid will be discussed; these approaches are of vital interest for membrane-based gas sensor applications. Finally, a new theoretical approach is introduced to identify varying gas components by arranging sensor cell pairs resulting in a concentration independent gas-specific critical time. Literature data for the N2, O2, Ar, CH4, CO2, H2 and C4H10 diffusion coefficients and solubilities for a polydimethylsiloxane membrane were used to simulate gas specific sensor responses. The results demonstrate the influence of (i) the operational mode; (ii) sensor geometry and (iii) gas matrices (air, Ar) on that critical time. Based on the developed theory the case-specific suitable membrane materials can be determined and both operation and design options for these sensors can be optimized for individual applications. The results of mixing experiments for different gases (O2, CO2) in a gas matrix of air confirmed the theoretical predictions. PMID:24608004

  7. A two-component polymeric optode membrane based on a multifunctional ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Andrew; Byrne, Robert; Diamond, Dermot; Radu, Aleksandar

    2011-01-21

    This work details the use of a 2-component optode membrane which is capable of generating three distinct colours in the presence of Cu(2+) and Co(2+) ions. It has been found that the ionic liquid (IL) trihexyltetradecylphosphonium dicyanamide [P(6,6,6,14)][DCA] can act as plasticizer, ligand and transducer dye when used in poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membranes, which significantly simplifies the optode membrane cocktail. Upon exposure to an aqueous Cu(2+) solution, a yellow colour is generated within the membrane, while exposure to an aqueous Co(2+) solution generates a blue colour. Exposure to a solution containing both ions produces a green colour. Vibrational spectroscopy has been used to investigate the molecular basis of the IL-metal ion the binding mechanism. Analytical characteristics of the membranes including the effect of interfering ions, binding constants and the limit of detection for both ions have been estimated. Finally the case of simultaneous dual-analyte recognition is presented based on two distinct absorption maxima.

  8. N-terminally myristoylated Ras proteins require palmitoylation or a polybasic domain for plasma membrane localization.

    PubMed

    Cadwallader, K A; Paterson, H; Macdonald, S G; Hancock, J F

    1994-07-01

    Plasma membrane targeting of Ras requires CAAX motif modifications together with a second signal from an adjacent polybasic domain or nearby cysteine palmitoylation sites. N-terminal myristoylation is known to restore membrane binding to H-ras C186S (C-186 is changed to S), a mutant protein in which all CAAX processing is abolished. We show here that myristoylated H-ras C186S is a substrate for palmitoyltransferase, despite the absence of C-terminal farnesylation, and that palmitoylation is absolutely required for plasma membrane targeting of myristoylated H-ras. Similarly, the polybasic domain is required for specific plasma membrane targeting of myristoylated K-ras. In contrast, the combination of myristoylation plus farnesylation results in the mislocalization of Ras to numerous intracellular membranes. Ras that is only myristoylated does not bind with a high affinity to any membrane. The specific targeting of Ras to the plasma membrane is therefore critically dependent on signals that are contained in the hypervariable domain but can be supported by N-terminal myristoylation or C-terminal prenylation. Interestingly, oncogenic Ras G12V that is localized correctly to the plasma membrane leads to mitogen-activated protein kinase activation irrespective of the combination of targeting signals used for localization, whereas Ras G12V that is mislocalized to the cytosol or to other membranes activates mitogen-activated protein kinase only if the Ras protein is farnesylated.

  9. Localization of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaya, Elena A; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2004-05-01

    We study nonlinear localization of a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in a one-dimensional optical lattice. Our theory shows that spin-dependent optical lattices can be used to effectively manipulate the nonlinear interactions between the BEC components, and to observe composite localized states of a BEC in both bands and gaps of the matter-wave spectrum.

  10. Phospholipase D2 Localizes to the Plasma Membrane and Regulates Angiotensin II Receptor Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Guangwei; Huang, Ping; Liang, Bruce T.; Frohman, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is a key facilitator of multiple types of membrane vesicle trafficking events. Two PLD isoforms, PLD1 and PLD2, exist in mammals. Initial studies based on overexpression studies suggested that in resting cells, human PLD1 localized primarily to the Golgi and perinuclear vesicles in multiple cell types. In contrast, overexpressed mouse PLD2 was observed to localize primarily to the plasma membrane, although internalization on membrane vesicles was observed subsequent to serum stimulation. A recent report has suggested that the assignment of PLD2 to the plasma membrane is in error, because the endogenous isoform in rat secretory cells was imaged and found to be present primarily in the Golgi apparatus. We have reexamined this issue by using a monoclonal antibody specific for mouse PLD2, and find, as reported initially using overexpression studies, that endogenous mouse PLD2 is detected most readily at the plasma membrane in multiple cell types. In addition, we report that mouse, rat, and human PLD2 when overexpressed all similarly localize to the plasma membrane in cell lines from all three species. Finally, studies conducted using overexpression of wild-type active or dominant-negative isoforms of PLD2 and RNA interference-mediated targeting of PLD2 suggest that PLD2 functions at the plasma membrane to facilitate endocytosis of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. PMID:14718562

  11. Localization and proliferation of lymphatic vessels in the tympanic membrane in normal state and regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Miyashita, Takenori; Burford, James L.; Hong, Young-Kwon; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Lam, Lisa; Mori, Nozomu; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2013-10-25

    Highlights: •We newly developed the whole-mount imaging method of the tympanic membrane. •Lymphatic vessel loops were localized around the malleus handle and annulus tympanicus. •In regeneration, abundant lymphatic vessels were observed in the pars tensa. •Site-specific lymphatic vessels may play an important role in the tympanic membrane. -- Abstract: We clarified the localization of lymphatic vessels in the tympanic membrane and proliferation of lymphatic vessels during regeneration after perforation of the tympanic membrane by using whole-mount imaging of the tympanic membrane of Prox1 GFP mice. In the pars tensa, lymphatic vessel loops surrounded the malleus handle and annulus tympanicus. Apart from these locations, lymphatic vessel loops were not observed in the pars tensa in the normal tympanic membrane. Lymphatic vessel loops surrounding the malleus handle were connected to the lymphatic vessel loops in the pars flaccida and around the tensor tympani muscle. Many lymphatic vessel loops were detected in the pars flaccida. After perforation of the tympanic membrane, abundant lymphatic regeneration was observed in the pars tensa, and these regenerated lymphatic vessels extended from the lymphatic vessels surrounding the malleus at day 7. These results suggest that site-specific lymphatic vessels play an important role in the tympanic membrane.

  12. Two-Component Coarse-Grained Molecular-Dynamics Model for the Human Erythrocyte Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Li, He; Lykotrafitis, George

    2012-01-01

    We present a two-component coarse-grained molecular-dynamics model for simulating the erythrocyte membrane. The proposed model possesses the key feature of combing the lipid bilayer and the erythrocyte cytoskeleton, thus showing both the fluidic behavior of the lipid bilayer and the elastic properties of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. In this model, three types of coarse-grained particles are introduced to represent clusters of lipid molecules, actin junctions, and band-3 complexes, respectively. The proposed model facilitates simulations that span large length scales (approximately micrometers) and timescales (approximately milliseconds). By tuning the interaction potential parameters, we were able to control the diffusivity and bending rigidity of the membrane model. We studied the membrane under shearing and found that at a low shear strain rate, the developed shear stress was due mainly to the spectrin network, whereas the viscosity of the lipid bilayer contributed to the resulting shear stress at higher strain rates. In addition, we investigated the effects of a reduced spectrin network connectivity on the shear modulus of the membrane. PMID:22225800

  13. An intimate link between antimicrobial peptide sequence diversity and binding to essential components of bacterial membranes.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Paulina; Rosa, Rafael D; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine

    2016-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) are widespread in the living kingdom. They are key effectors of defense reactions and mediators of competitions between organisms. They are often cationic and amphiphilic, which favors their interactions with the anionic membranes of microorganisms. Several AMP families do not directly alter membrane integrity but rather target conserved components of the bacterial membranes in a process that provides them with potent and specific antimicrobial activities. Thus, lipopolysaccharides (LPS), lipoteichoic acids (LTA) and the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II are targeted by a broad series of AMPs. Studying the functional diversity of immune effectors tells us about the essential residues involved in AMP mechanism of action. Marine invertebrates have been found to produce a remarkable diversity of AMPs. Molluscan defensins and crustacean anti-LPS factors (ALF) are diverse in terms of amino acid sequence and show contrasted phenotypes in terms of antimicrobial activity. Their activity is directed essentially against Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria due to their specific interactions with Lipid II or Lipid A, respectively. Through those interesting examples, we discuss here how sequence diversity generated throughout evolution informs us on residues required for essential molecular interaction at the bacterial membranes and subsequent antibacterial activity. Through the analysis of molecular variants having lost antibacterial activity or shaped novel functions, we also discuss the molecular bases of functional divergence in AMPs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26498397

  14. Two-component coarse-grained molecular-dynamics model for the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Lykotrafitis, George

    2012-01-01

    We present a two-component coarse-grained molecular-dynamics model for simulating the erythrocyte membrane. The proposed model possesses the key feature of combing the lipid bilayer and the erythrocyte cytoskeleton, thus showing both the fluidic behavior of the lipid bilayer and the elastic properties of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. In this model, three types of coarse-grained particles are introduced to represent clusters of lipid molecules, actin junctions, and band-3 complexes, respectively. The proposed model facilitates simulations that span large length scales (approximately micrometers) and timescales (approximately milliseconds). By tuning the interaction potential parameters, we were able to control the diffusivity and bending rigidity of the membrane model. We studied the membrane under shearing and found that at a low shear strain rate, the developed shear stress was due mainly to the spectrin network, whereas the viscosity of the lipid bilayer contributed to the resulting shear stress at higher strain rates. In addition, we investigated the effects of a reduced spectrin network connectivity on the shear modulus of the membrane.

  15. Interaction of miltefosine with the lipid and protein components of the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Rodrigo Alves; Mendanha, Sebastião Antonio; Hansen, Daiane; Alonso, Antonio

    2013-05-01

    Miltefosine (MT) is an alkylphospholipid that has been approved for the treatment of breast cancer metastasis and visceral leishmaniasis, although its mechanism of action remains poorly understood. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of a spin-labeled lipid and a thiol-specific spin label showed that MT causes an increase in the molecular dynamics of erythrocyte ghost membranes and detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) prepared from erythrocyte ghosts. In the vesicles of lipid raft constituents, it was shown that 20 mol % sphingomyelin could be replaced by 20 mol % MT with no change in the molecular dynamics. The effect of MT in DRMs was more pronounced than in erythrocyte ghosts, supporting the hypothesis that MT is a lipid raft modulator. At the reported MT-plasma concentrations found during the treatment of leishmaniasis (31-90 µg/mL), our measurements in the blood plasma indicated a hemolytic level of 2%-5%. The experiments indicated that MT acts predominantly on the protein component of the membrane. MT aggregates may wrap around the hydrophobic polypeptide chains, forming micelle-like structures that stabilize protein conformations more exposed to the solvent. Proteins with higher hydrophobicity may induce the penetration of the hydrophilic groups of MT into the membrane and cause it to rupture.

  16. Different Transmembrane Domains Associate with Distinct Endoplasmic Reticulum Components during Membrane Integration of a Polytopic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Meacock, Suzanna L.; Lecomte, Fabienne J.L.; Crawshaw, Samuel G.; High, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We have been studying the insertion of the seven transmembrane domain (TM) protein opsin to gain insights into how the multiple TMs of polytopic proteins are integrated at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We find that the ER components associated with the first and second TMs of the nascent opsin polypeptide chain are clearly distinct. The first TM (TM1) is adjacent to the α and β subunits of the Sec61 complex, and a novel component, a protein associated with the ER translocon of 10 kDa (PAT-10). The most striking characteristic of PAT-10 is that it remains adjacent to TM1 throughout the biogenesis and membrane integration of the full-length opsin polypeptide. TM2 is also found to be adjacent to Sec61α and Sec61β during its membrane integration. However, TM2 does not form any adducts with PAT-10; rather, a transient association with the TRAM protein is observed. We show that the association of PAT-10 with opsin TM1 does not require the N-glycosylation of the nascent chain and occurs irrespective of the amino acid sequence and transmembrane topology of TM1. We conclude that the precise makeup of the ER membrane insertion site can be distinct for the different transmembrane domains of a polytopic protein. We find that the environment of a particular TM can be influenced by both the “stage” of nascent chain biosynthesis reached, and the TM's relative location within the polypeptide. PMID:12475939

  17. Hybrid membrane-microfluidic components using a novel ceramic MEMS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Brent J.; Polyakov, Oleg; Rinaldo, Chris

    2012-03-01

    A novel hybrid nano/microfabrication technology has been employed to produce unique MEMS and microfluidic components that integrate nanoporous membranes. The components are made by micromachining a self-organized nanostructured ceramic material that is biocompatible and amenable to surface chemistry modification. Microfluidic structures, such as channels and wells, can be made with a precision of <2 microns. Thin-film membranes can be integrated into the bottom of these structures, featuring a wide range of possible thicknesses, from 100 micron to <50 nm. Additionally, these membranes may be non-porous or porous (with controllable pore sizes from 200 nm to <5 nm), for sophisticated size-based separations. With previous and current support from the NIH SBIR program, we have built several unique devices, and demonstrated improved separations, cell culturing, and imaging (optical and electron microscopy) versus standard products. Being ceramic, the material is much more robust to demanding environments (e.g. high and low temperatures and organic solvents), compared to polymer-based devices. Additionally, we have applied multiple surface modification techniques, including atomic layer deposition, to manipulate properties such as electrical conductivity. This microfabrication technology is highly scaleable, and thus can yield low-cost, reliable, disposable microcomponents and devices. Specific applications that can benefit from this technology includes cell culturing and assays, imaging by cryo-electron tomography, environmental sample processing, as well as many others.

  18. The effect of local anaesthetics on the components of the asymmetry current in the squid giant axon.

    PubMed Central

    Bekkers, J M; Greeff, N G; Keynes, R D; Neumcke, B

    1984-01-01

    The effects of local anaesthetics and holding potential on sodium and asymmetry currents were studied in intracellularly dialysed squid giant axons. The asymmetry currents were fractionated into their inactivating and non-inactivating components, and the charge displacements Qi and Qn of the two components were determined for pulse potentials between -20 and +40 mV. The charged local anaesthetic RAD 366, a quaternary derivative of lidocaine, applied internally at a concentration in the dialysis solution of 1 mM, did not change Qn, but reduced Qi about 3-fold. The neutral local anaesthetic benzocaine, applied externally at a concentration in the bathing solution of 1 mM, had effects very similar to RAD 366. It did not change Qn, but reduced Qi and the sodium current about 2 . 5-fold. Unlike local anaesthetics, steady membrane depolarization had essentially equal effects on Qn, Qi and sodium current. Lowering the holding potential from -98 to -60 mV for several minutes reduced all three variables to about half. Models of sodium channel voltage-gating are discussed which implicate both Qn and Qi, and which account for the selective blockage of Qi by sodium inactivation and local anaesthetics. PMID:6086917

  19. Membrane currents in cat myocardium: separation of inward and outward components.

    PubMed

    McDonald, T F; Trautwein, W

    1978-01-01

    1. The single sucrose gap method was used to control the membrane potential of cat ventricular fibres.2. Following the early rapid events (capacitive, Na and slow inward (si) current spikes) the membrane current on depolarization contained three time-dependent components which appeared attributable to the inactivation of I(si) and the activation of two outward currents labelled I(K) and I(x).3. Tail currents were analysed with a view to confirming these conductance changes. At -60 mV the tail progressed from being predominantly inward in direction after short (30-50 msec) depolarizations to being predominantly outward after long (> 300 msec) depolarizations. Inward and outward components decayed exponentially with time constants independent of previous membrane history. The Q(10)s were about 3.4. Experiments with D600 and variations of the driving force identified the inward tail component (tau approximately 55 msec at -60 mV) as I(si). The major outward tail component (tau approximately 300 msec) appears to be carried primarily by potassium. A second outward tail component (tau approximately 3 sec) of much smaller amplitude than I(K) was observed after long depolarizations and is tentatively labelled I(x).5. Membrane currents at 0 mV can be described as the sum of three exponential processes: I(si) inactivation (tau approximately 90 msec), I(K) activation (tau approximately 370 msec) and I(x) activation (tau approximately 3 sec). Conductance measurements (envelops of I(si) and I(K) tails) supported these time courses. I(si) time constants increased from 50 msec at -40 mV to 120 msec at +40 mV. I(K) time constants increased from 400 msec at -40 to about 520 msec at -25 mV before declining to 300 msec at +40 mV.6. I(si) amplitudes measured visually (difference between peak I(si) and current level after 200-500 msec) were compared with those measured graphically (semilog plots, subtraction of I(K) and I(x)). As a consequence of the relative amplitudes and time

  20. Structural effects of the local anesthetic bupivacaine hydrochloride on the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Schneider, Carlos; Villena, Fernando; Norris, Beryl; Cárdenas, Hernán; Cuevas, Francisco; Sotomayor, Carlos P

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of the local anesthetic bupivacaine with the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models is described. The latter consisted of isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), and phospholipid multilayers built-up of DMPC and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representatives of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. Optical and scanning electron microscopy revealed that bupivacaine induced erythrocyte spheroechinocytosis. According to the bilayer couple hypothesis, this result implied that bupivacaine inserted in the outer monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane. Experiments performed on IUM and DMPC LUV by fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction on DMPC and DMPE multilayers confirmed this result. Changes in the molecular organization of membranes alter lipid-protein interactions and induce functional perturbation of membrane proteins such as Na(+) channels. Since local anesthetics may control the influx of Na(+) into the human erythrocyte, in order to relate the structural perturbations induced by bupivacaine in these systems to Na(+) transport, the interaction of this anesthetic with isolated toad skin was also studied. Electrophysiological measurements indicated a significant decrease in the potential difference and in the short-circuit current of the skin after the application of the anesthetic, reflecting inhibition of the active transport of ions. These results suggest that bupivacaine-induced conformational changes of the lipid molecules alter the lipid-protein boundaries of the outer moiety of the erythrocyte membrane, thus interfering with the function of neighboring sodium channels. PMID:12482399

  1. Local area water removal analysis of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell under gas purge conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Yu-Ming; Lee, Shuo-Jen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, local area water content distribution under various gas purging conditions are experimentally analyzed for the first time. The local high frequency resistance (HFR) is measured using novel micro sensors. The results reveal that the liquid water removal rate in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is non-uniform. In the under-the-channel area, the removal of liquid water is governed by both convective and diffusive flux of the through-plane drying. Thus, almost all of the liquid water is removed within 30 s of purging with gas. However, liquid water that is stored in the under-the-rib area is not easy to remove during 1 min of gas purging. Therefore, the re-hydration of the membrane by internal diffusive flux is faster than that in the under-the-channel area. Consequently, local fuel starvation and membrane degradation can degrade the performance of a fuel cell that is started from cold.

  2. Scaling of membrane-type locally resonant acoustic metamaterial arrays.

    PubMed

    Naify, Christina J; Chang, Chia-Ming; McKnight, Geoffrey; Nutt, Steven R

    2012-10-01

    Metamaterials have emerged as promising solutions for manipulation of sound waves in a variety of applications. Locally resonant acoustic materials (LRAM) decrease sound transmission by 500% over acoustic mass law predictions at peak transmission loss (TL) frequencies with minimal added mass, making them appealing for weight-critical applications such as aerospace structures. In this study, potential issues associated with scale-up of the structure are addressed. TL of single-celled and multi-celled LRAM was measured using an impedance tube setup with systematic variation in geometric parameters to understand the effects of each parameter on acoustic response. Finite element analysis was performed to predict TL as a function of frequency for structures with varying complexity, including stacked structures and multi-celled arrays. Dynamic response of the array structures under discrete frequency excitation was investigated using laser vibrometry to verify negative dynamic mass behavior. PMID:23039544

  3. Co-existence of Gel and Fluid Lipid Domains in Single-component Phospholipid Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Clare L; Barrett, M; Toppozini, L; Yamani, Zahra; Kucerka, Norbert; Katsaras, John; Fragneto, Giovanna; Rheinstadter, Maikel C

    2012-01-01

    Lateral nanostructures in membranes, so-called rafts, are believed to strongly influence membrane properties and functions. The experimental observation of rafts has proven difficult as they are thought to be dynamic structures that likely fluctuate on nano- to microsecond time scales. Using neutron diffraction we present direct experimental evidence for the co-existence of gel and fluid lipid domains in a single-component phospholipid membrane made of DPPC as it undergoes its main phase transition. The coherence length of the neutron beam sets a lower limit for the size of structures that can be observed. Neutron coherence lengths between 30 and 242A used in this study were obtained by varying the incident neutron energy and the resolution of the neutron spectrometer. We observe Bragg peaks corresponding to co-existing nanometer sized structures, both in out-of-plane and in-plane scans, by tuning the neutron coherence length. During the main phase transition, instead of a continuous transition that shows a pseudo-critical behavior, we observe the co-existence of gel and fluid domains.

  4. ADP-ribosylation of membrane components by pertussis and cholera toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro-Neto, F.A.P.; Mattera, F.; Hildebrandt, J.D.; Codina, J.; Field, J.B.; Birnbaumer, L.; Sekura, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Pertussis and cholera toxins are important tools to investigate functional and structural aspects of the stimulatory (N/sub s/) and inhibitory (N/sub i/) regulatory components of adenylyl cyclase. Cholera toxin acts on N/sub s/ by ADP-ribosylating its ..cap alpha../sub s/ subunit; pertussis toxin acts on N/sub i/ by ADP-ribosylating its ..cap alpha..; subunit. By using (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ and determining the transfer of its (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribose moiety to membrane components, it is possible to obtain information on N/sub s/ and N/sub i/. A set of protocols is presented that can be used to study simultaneously and comparatively the susceptibility of N/sub s/ and N/sub i/ to be ADP-ribosylated by cholera and pertussis toxin.

  5. UNC93B1 is essential for the plasma membrane localization and signaling of Toll-like receptor 5.

    PubMed

    Huh, Ji-Won; Shibata, Takuma; Hwang, Misun; Kwon, Eun-Hye; Jang, Min Seong; Fukui, Ryutaro; Kanno, Atsuo; Jung, Da-Jung; Jang, Myoung Ho; Miyake, Kensuke; Kim, You-Me

    2014-05-13

    The proper trafficking and localization of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important for specific ligand recognition and efficient signal transduction. The TLRs sensing bacterial membrane components are expressed on the cell surface and recruit signaling adaptors to the plasma membrane upon stimulation. On the contrary, the nucleotide-sensing TLRs are mostly found inside cells and signal from the endolysosomes in an acidic pH-dependent manner. Trafficking of the nucleotide-sensing TLRs from the endoplasmic reticulum to the endolysosomes strictly depends on UNC93B1, and their signaling is completely abolished in the 3d mutant mice bearing the H412R mutation of UNC93B1. In contrast, UNC93B1 was considered to have no role for the cell surface-localized TLRs and signaling via TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, and TLR6 is normal in the 3d mice. Unexpectedly, we discovered that TLR5, a cell surface receptor for bacterial protein flagellin, also requires UNC93B1 for plasma membrane localization and signaling. TLR5 physically interacts with UNC93B1, and the cells from the 3d or UNC93B1-deficient mice not only lack TLR5 at the plasma membrane but also fail to secret cytokines and to up-regulate costimulatory molecules upon flagellin stimulation, demonstrating the essential role of UNC93B1 in TLR5 signaling. Our study reveals that the role of UNC93B1 is not limited to the TLRs signaling from the endolysosomes and compels the further probing of the mechanisms underlying the UNC93B1-assisted differential targeting of TLRs. PMID:24778236

  6. Characterization of the subpellicular network, a filamentous membrane skeletal component in the parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Mann, T; Beckers, C

    2001-07-01

    Electron microscopic examination of detergent-extracted Toxoplasma tachyzoites reveals the presence of a mechanically stable cytoskeletal structure associated with the pellicle of this parasite. This structure, composed of interwoven 8-10 nm filaments, is associated with the cytoplasmic face of the pellicle and surrounds the microtubule-based cytoskeleton. Two protein components of this network, TgIMC1 and TgIMC2, were identified. Both are novel proteins, but have a resemblance to mammalian filament proteins in that they are predicted to have extended, coiled-coil domains. TgIMC1 is also homologous to articulins, the major components of the membrane skeleton of algae and free-living protists. A homologue of TgIMC1 in the related malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum was also identified suggesting the presence of structurally similar membrane skeletons in all apicomplexan parasites. We suggest that the subpellicular network, formed by TgIMC1 and 2 in Toxoplasma gondii and related parasites, plays a role in the determination of cell shape and is a source of mechanical strength.

  7. Kalinin: an epithelium-specific basement membrane adhesion molecule that is a component of anchoring filaments

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Basal keratinocytes attach to the underlying dermal stroma through an ultrastructurally unique and complex basement membrane zone. Electron- dense plaques along the basal surface plasma membrane, termed hemidesmosomes, appear to attach directly to the lamina densa of the basement membrane through fine strands, called anchoring filaments. The lamina densa is secured to the stroma through a complex of type VII collagen containing anchoring fibrils and anchoring plaques. We have identified what we believe is a novel antigen unique to this tissue region. The mAbs to this antigen localize to the anchoring filaments, just below the basal-dense plate of the hemidesmosomes. In cell culture, the antigen is deposited upon the culture substate by growing and migrating human keratinocytes. Addition of mAb to the cultures causes the cells to round and detach, but does not impair them metabolically. Skin fragments incubated with antibody extensively de- epithelialize. These findings strongly suggest that this antigen is intimately involved in attachment of keratinocytes to the basement membrane. This antigen was isolated from keratinocyte cultures by immunoaffinity chromatography. Two molecules are observed. The most intact species contains three nonidentical chains, 165, 155, and 140 kD linked by interchain disulfide bonds. The second and more abundant species contains the 165- and 140-kD chains, but the 155-kD chain has been proteolytically cleaved to 105 kD. Likewise, two rotary-shadowed images are observed. The larger of the two, presumably corresponding to the most intact form, appears as an asymmetric 107-nm-long rod, with a single globule at one end and two smaller globules at the other. The more abundant species, presumably the proteolytically cleaved form, lacks the distal small globule. We propose the name "kalinin" for this new molecule. PMID:1860885

  8. Sensitivity Enhancement of Separated Local Field Experiments: Application to Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, T.; Verardi, Raffaello; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2010-01-01

    Separated local field (SLF) experiments have been used for almost three decades to obtain structural information in solid-state NMR. These experiments resolve chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) from dipole-dipole interactions (dipolar couplings, DC) in isolated spin systems. Both CSA and DC data can be converted into orientational constraints to elucidate the secondary structure and topology of membrane proteins in oriented lipid bilayers. Here, we propose a new suite of sensitivity enhanced SLF pulse sequences to measure CSA and DC for aligned membrane proteins and liquid crystalline molecules that will decrease the time needed for data acquisition. We demonstrate the efficacy of these new sensitivity enhanced experiments using both a single crystal of N-acetyl leucine and a single pass membrane protein sarcolipin reconstituted in aligned lipid bicelles. These results lay the groundwork for the routine application of these methods for studying the structure and topology of membrane proteins. PMID:20349983

  9. Local defects in the nanostructure of the membrane of erythrocytes upon ionizing radiation of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlova, E. K.; Sergunova, V. A.; Krasavin, E. A.; Boreyko, A. V.; Zavialova, A. V.; Kozlov, A. P.; Chernysh, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate local topological defects in the erythrocyte membranes resulting from the ultraviolet (UV) radiation of blood in vitro. Biological effects in the erythrocytes after exposure to UV radiation at a wavelength of 254 nm are equivalent to those after γ radiation. It has been shown that oxidative processes developing in a suspension upon UV radiation result in the disruption of the nanostructure of the membranes of erythrocytes. In the experiments, typical topological defects in the membrane nanostructure were observed. The parameters of the defects differed from the characteristics of the nanostructure of the control cell membrane without irradiation. The characteristic dimensions of the topological defects are commensurate with the size of the spectrin matrix. As a result of the exposure to the UV radiation, polymorphism of the erythrocytes was observed.

  10. S-Acylation of the cellulose synthase complex is essential for its plasma membrane localization.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Wightman, Raymond; Atanassov, Ivan; Gupta, Anjali; Hurst, Charlotte H; Hemsley, Piers A; Turner, Simon

    2016-07-01

    Plant cellulose microfibrils are synthesized by a process that propels the cellulose synthase complex (CSC) through the plane of the plasma membrane. How interactions between membranes and the CSC are regulated is currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that all catalytic subunits of the CSC, known as cellulose synthase A (CESA) proteins, are S-acylated. Analysis of Arabidopsis CESA7 reveals four cysteines in variable region 2 (VR2) and two cysteines at the carboxy terminus (CT) as S-acylation sites. Mutating both the VR2 and CT cysteines permits CSC assembly and trafficking to the Golgi but prevents localization to the plasma membrane. Estimates suggest that a single CSC contains more than 100 S-acyl groups, which greatly increase the hydrophobic nature of the CSC and likely influence its immediate membrane environment. PMID:27387950

  11. One, two or three? Probing the stoichiometry of membrane proteins by single-molecule localization microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fricke, Franziska; Beaudouin, Joel; Eils, Roland; Heilemann, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Probing the oligomeric state of abundant molecules, such as membrane proteins in intact cells, is essential, but has not been straightforward. We address this challenge with a simple counting strategy that is capable of reporting the oligomeric state of dense, membrane-bound protein complexes. It is based on single-molecule localization microscopy to super-resolve protein structures in intact cells and basic quantitative evaluation. We validate our method with membrane-bound monomeric CD86 and dimeric cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein as model proteins and confirm their oligomeric states. We further detect oligomerization of CD80 and vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein and propose coexistence of monomers and dimers for CD80 and trimeric assembly of the viral protein at the cell membrane. This approach should prove valuable for researchers striving for reliable molecular counting in cells. PMID:26358640

  12. Chitosan facilitates structure formation of the salivary gland by regulating the basement membrane components.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tsung-Lin; Hsiao, Ya-Chuan

    2015-10-01

    Tissue structure is important for inherent physiological function and should be recapitulated during tissue engineering for regenerative purposes. The salivary gland is a branched organ that is responsible for saliva secretion and regulation. The salivary glands develop from epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, and depend on the support of the basement membrane (BM). Chitosan-based biomaterials have been demonstrated to be competent in facilitating the formation of salivary gland tissue structure. However, the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. In the developing submandibular gland (SMG), the chitosan effect was found to diminish when collagen and laminin were removed from cultured SMG explants. Chitosan increased the expression of BM components including collagen, laminin, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, and also facilitated BM components and the corresponding receptors to be expressed in tissue-specific patterns beneficial for SMG branching. The chitosan effect decreased when either laminin components or receptors were inhibited, as well when the downstream signaling was blocked. Our results revealed that chitosan promotes salivary glands branching through the BM. By regulating BM components and receptors, chitosan efficiently stimulated downstream signaling to facilitate salivary gland branching. The present study revealed the underlying mechanism of the chitosan effect in engineering SMG structure formation.

  13. Local-Level Prognostics Health Management Systems Framework for Passive AdvSMR Components. Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Roy, Surajit; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Pardini, Allan F.; Jones, Anthony M.; Deibler, John E.

    2014-09-12

    This report describes research results to date in support of the integration and demonstration of diagnostics technologies for prototypical AdvSMR passive components (to establish condition indices for monitoring) with model-based prognostics methods. The focus of the PHM methodology and algorithm development in this study is at the localized scale. Multiple localized measurements of material condition (using advanced nondestructive measurement methods), along with available measurements of the stressor environment, enhance the performance of localized diagnostics and prognostics of passive AdvSMR components and systems.

  14. Rack1 is required for Vangl2 membrane localization and planar cell polarity signaling while attenuating canonical Wnt activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuangding; Esterberg, Robert; Lachance, Veronik; Ren, Dongdong; Radde-Gallwitz, Kristen; Chi, Fanglu; Parent, Jean-Luc; Fritz, Andreas; Chen, Ping

    2011-01-01

    The vertebrate planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway shares molecular components with the β-catenin–mediated canonical Wnt pathway but acts through membrane complexes containing Vang or Frizzled to orient neighboring cells coordinately. The molecular interactions underlying the action of Vang in PCP signaling and specification, however, are yet to be delineated. Here, we report the identification of Rack1 as an interacting protein of a vertebrate Vang protein, Vangl2. We demonstrate that Rack1 is required in zebrafish for PCP-regulated processes, including oriented cell division, cellular polarization, and convergent extension during gastrulation. We further show that the knockdown of Rack1 affects membrane localization of Vangl2 and that the Vangl2-interacting domain of Rack1 has a dominant-negative effect on Vangl2 localization and gastrulation. Moreover, Rack1 antagonizes canonical Wnt signaling. Together, our data suggest that Rack1 regulates the localization of an essential PCP protein and acts as a molecular switch to promote PCP signaling. PMID:21262816

  15. Dual effect of local anesthetics on the function of excitable rod outer segment disk membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Mashimo, T.; Abe, K.; Yoshiya, I.

    1986-04-01

    The effects of local anesthetics and a divalent cation, Ca2+, on the function of rhodopsin were estimated from the measurements of light-induced proton uptake. The light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin in the rod outer segment disk membrane was enhanced at lower pH (4) but depressed at higher pHs (6 to 8) by the tertiary amine local anesthetics lidocaine, bupivacaine, tetracaine, and dibucaine. The order of local anesthetic-induced depression of the proton uptake followed that of their clinical anesthetic potencies. The depression of the proton uptake versus the concentration of the uncharged form of local anesthetic nearly describes the same curve for small and large dose of added anesthetic. Furthermore, a neutral local anesthetic, benzocaine, depressed the proton uptake at all pHs between 4 and 7. These results indicate that the depression of the proton uptake is due to the effect of only the uncharged form. It is hypothesized that the uncharged form of local anesthetics interacts hydrophobically with the rhodopsin in the disk membrane. The dual effect of local anesthetics on the proton uptake, on the other hand, suggests that the activation of the function of rhodopsin may be caused by the charged form. There was no significant change in the light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin when 1 mM of Ca2+ was introduced into the disk membrane at varying pHs in the absence or presence of local anesthetics. This fact indicates that Ca2+ ion does not influence the diprotonating process of metarhodopsin; neither does it interfere with the local anesthetic-induced changes in the rhodopsin molecule.

  16. Fendiline Inhibits K-Ras Plasma Membrane Localization and Blocks K-Ras Signal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    van der Hoeven, Dharini; Cho, Kwang-jin; Ma, Xiaoping; Chigurupati, Sravanthi; Parton, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Ras proteins regulate signaling pathways important for cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Oncogenic mutant Ras proteins are commonly expressed in human tumors, with mutations of the K-Ras isoform being most prevalent. To be active, K-Ras must undergo posttranslational processing and associate with the plasma membrane. We therefore devised a high-content screening assay to search for inhibitors of K-Ras plasma membrane association. Using this assay, we identified fendiline, an L-type calcium channel blocker, as a specific inhibitor of K-Ras plasma membrane targeting with no detectable effect on the localization of H- and N-Ras. Other classes of L-type calcium channel blockers did not mislocalize K-Ras, suggesting a mechanism that is unrelated to calcium channel blockade. Fendiline did not inhibit K-Ras posttranslational processing but significantly reduced nanoclustering of K-Ras and redistributed K-Ras from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi apparatus, endosomes, and cytosol. Fendiline significantly inhibited signaling downstream of constitutively active K-Ras and endogenous K-Ras signaling in cells transformed by oncogenic H-Ras. Consistent with these effects, fendiline blocked the proliferation of pancreatic, colon, lung, and endometrial cancer cell lines expressing oncogenic mutant K-Ras. Taken together, these results suggest that inhibitors of K-Ras plasma membrane localization may have utility as novel K-Ras-specific anticancer therapeutics. PMID:23129805

  17. Measuring Local Viscosities near Plasma Membranes of Living Cells with Photonic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jünger, Felix; Kohler, Felix; Meinel, Andreas; Meyer, Tim; Nitschke, Roland; Erhard, Birgit; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The molecular processes of particle binding and endocytosis are influenced by the locally changing mobility of the particle nearby the plasma membrane of a living cell. However, it is unclear how the particle’s hydrodynamic drag and momentum vary locally and how they are mechanically transferred to the cell. We have measured the thermal fluctuations of a 1 μm-sized polystyrene sphere, which was placed in defined distances to plasma membranes of various cell types by using an optical trap and fast three-dimensional (3D) interferometric particle tracking. From the particle position fluctuations on a 30 μs timescale, we determined the distance-dependent change of the viscous drag in directions perpendicular and parallel to the cell membrane. Measurements on macrophages, adenocarcinoma cells, and epithelial cells revealed a significantly longer hydrodynamic coupling length of the particle to the membrane than those measured at giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) or a plane glass interface. In contrast to GUVs, there is also a strong increase in friction and in mean first passage time normal to the cell membrane. This hydrodynamic coupling transfers a different amount of momentum to the interior of living cells and might serve as an ultra-soft stimulus triggering further reactions. PMID:26331245

  18. Dynamic Localization of G-actin During Membrane Protrusion in Neuronal Motility

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Wai; Vitriol, Eric A.; Shim, Sangwoo; Wise, Ariel L.; Velayutham, Radhi P.; Zheng, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Actin-based cell motility is fundamental for the development, function, and malignant events of eukaryotic organisms. During neural development, axonal growth cones depend on rapid assembly and disassembly of actin filaments (F-actin) for their guided extension to specific targets for wiring. Monomeric globular actin (G-actin) is the building block for F-actin but is not considered to play a direct role in spatiotemporal control of actin dynamics in cell motility. Results Here we report that a pool of G-actin dynamically localizes to the leading edge of growth cones and neuroblastoma cells to spatially elevate the G-/F-actin ratio that drives membrane protrusion and cell movement. Loss of G-actin localization leads to the cessation and retraction of membrane protrusions. Moreover, G-actin localization occurs asymmetrically in growth cones during attractive turning. Finally, we identify the actin monomer binding proteins profilin and thymosin β4 as key molecules that localize actin monomers to the leading edge of lamellipodia for their motility. Conclusions Our results suggest that dynamic localization of G-actin provides a novel mechanism to regulate the spatiotemporal actin dynamics underlying membrane protrusion in cell locomotion and growth cone chemotaxis. PMID:23746641

  19. Ultrastructural antibody localization of alpha2-macroglobulin in membrane-limited vesicles in cultured cells.

    PubMed Central

    Willingham, M C; Yamada, S S; Pastan, I

    1978-01-01

    We have been developing a procedure for localizing intracellular antigens in cultured cells, by using peroxidase-labeled antibodies, that allows good morphologic preservation. Although useful, our previous technique did not preserve the morphology of membranes, and the location of the peroxidase reaction product was difficult to establish. In this paper, we report major improvements on the basic technique that markedly enhance the quality of localization and of morphology. Saponin is used to permeabilize membranes without destroying their morphology. The amount of reaction product is enhanced with a peroxidase-antiperoxidase label. The clarity of morphologic detail and contrast of reaction product density are increased by using postsectioning staining with the osmium/thiocarbohydrazide/osmium and uranyl acetate/lead citrate procedures. We have applied this technique to the ultrastructural localization of alpha2-macroglobulin and demonstrated that it is localized in membrane-limited vesicles. We have also used this method to improve the preservation of structures for localization by fluorescence microscopy. Images PMID:81488

  20. Performance of Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Components for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rector, Tony; Peyton, Barbara M.; Steele, John W.; Makinen, Janice; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Water loop maintenance components to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop have undergone a comparative performance evaluation with a recirculating control loop which had no water quality maintenance. Results show that periodic water maintenance can improve performance of the SWME. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage of this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing sublimator technology. The driver for the evaluation of water recirculation maintenance components was to enhance the robustness of the SWME through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A patented bed design that was developed for a United Technologies Aerospace System military application provided a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in the SWME recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance cycle included the use of a biocide delivery component developed for the ISS to introduce a biocide in a microgravity compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  1. Perineurial cells coexpress genes encoding interstitial collagens and basement membrane zone components

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Perineurial cell cultures were established from the sciatic nerves of adult Wistar rats. Highly enriched cultures were studied with respect to the production of extracellular matrix components under conditions free from the influence of Schwann cells, axons, or the extracellular matrix of peripheral nerves. Indirect immunofluorescence staining revealed the presence of collagen type IV epitopes, and electron microscopy demonstrated patches of basement membrane on the perineurial cell surfaces. Collagenous fibrils with a diameter of 15-20 nm were also observed in the intracellular space. SDS-PAGE of radiolabeled medium proteins showed a pattern of bands suggesting the synthesis and secretion of fibronectin, and type I and IV collagens. Northern hybridizations revealed characteristic polymorphic mRNA transcripts corresponding to fibronectin, laminin B2 chain, as well as to the alpha- chain subunits of type I, III, and IV collagens. Furthermore, in situ hybridizations suggested expression of these genes by cultured perineurial cells without apparent heterogeneity within the cell populations. In situ hybridizations of sciatic nerve tissue from 2-wk- old rats also suggested that perineurial cells express alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(IV) collagen, as well as laminin B2 chain genes in vivo. This profile of matrix gene expression is different from that of Schwann cells, which do not synthesize fibronectin, or that of fibroblastic cells, which do not form a cell surface basement membrane. The capability of perineurial cells to express genes for the basement membrane zone and for interstitial collagens further adds to our understanding of the functional role of perineurial cells in developing and healing peripheral nerve, as well as in certain neoplastic lesions of neural origin, such as von Recklinghausen's neurofibromas. PMID:2921281

  2. Ionic strength dependence of localized contact formation between membranes: nonlinear theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Coakley, W T; Gallez, D; de Souza, E R; Gauci, H

    1999-08-01

    Erythrocyte membrane surface or suspending phase properties can be experimentally modified to give either spatially periodic local contacts or continuous contact along the seams of interacting membranes. Here, for cells suspended in a solution of the uncharged polysaccharide dextran, the average lateral separation between localized contacts in spatially periodic seams at eight ionic strengths, decreasing from 0.15 to 0.065, increased from 0.65 to 3.4 micrometers. The interacting membranes and intermembrane aqueous layer were modeled as a fluid film, submitted to a disjoining pressure, responding to a displacement perturbation either through wave growth resulting in spatially periodic contacts or in perturbation decay, to give a plane continuous film. Measured changes of lateral contact separations with ionic strength change were quantitatively consistent with analytical predictions of linear theory for an instability mechanism dependent on the membrane bending modulus. Introduction of a nonlinear approach established the consequences of the changing interaction potential experienced by different parts of the membrane as the disturbance grew. Numerical solutions of the full nonlinear governing equations correctly identified the ionic strength at which the bifurcation from continuous seam to a stationary periodic contact pattern occurred and showed a decrease in lateral contact and wave crest separation with increasing ionic strength. The nonlinear approach has the potential to recognize the role of nonspecific interactions in initiating the localized approach of membranes, and then incorporate the contribution of specific molecular interactions, of too short a range to influence the beginning of perturbation growth. This new approach can be applied to other biological processes such as neural cell adhesion, phagocytosis, and the acrosome reaction.

  3. Genetically Encoded Spy Peptide Fusion System to Detect Plasma Membrane-Localized Proteins In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Bedbrook, Claire N; Kato, Mihoko; Ravindra Kumar, Sripriya; Lakshmanan, Anupama; Nath, Ravi D; Sun, Fei; Sternberg, Paul W; Arnold, Frances H; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2015-08-20

    Membrane proteins are the main gatekeepers of cellular state, especially in neurons, serving either to maintain homeostasis or instruct response to synaptic input or other external signals. Visualization of membrane protein localization and trafficking in live cells facilitates understanding the molecular basis of cellular dynamics. We describe here a method for specifically labeling the plasma membrane-localized fraction of heterologous membrane protein expression using channelrhodopsins as a case study. We show that the genetically encoded, covalent binding SpyTag and SpyCatcher pair from the Streptococcus pyogenes fibronectin-binding protein FbaB can selectively label membrane-localized proteins in living cells in culture and in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans. The SpyTag/SpyCatcher covalent labeling method is highly specific, modular, and stable in living cells. We have used the binding pair to develop a channelrhodopsin membrane localization assay that is amenable to high-throughput screening for opsin discovery and engineering. PMID:26211362

  4. Genetically Encoded Spy Peptide Fusion System to Detect Plasma Membrane-Localized Proteins In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Bedbrook, Claire N; Kato, Mihoko; Ravindra Kumar, Sripriya; Lakshmanan, Anupama; Nath, Ravi D; Sun, Fei; Sternberg, Paul W; Arnold, Frances H; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2015-08-20

    Membrane proteins are the main gatekeepers of cellular state, especially in neurons, serving either to maintain homeostasis or instruct response to synaptic input or other external signals. Visualization of membrane protein localization and trafficking in live cells facilitates understanding the molecular basis of cellular dynamics. We describe here a method for specifically labeling the plasma membrane-localized fraction of heterologous membrane protein expression using channelrhodopsins as a case study. We show that the genetically encoded, covalent binding SpyTag and SpyCatcher pair from the Streptococcus pyogenes fibronectin-binding protein FbaB can selectively label membrane-localized proteins in living cells in culture and in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans. The SpyTag/SpyCatcher covalent labeling method is highly specific, modular, and stable in living cells. We have used the binding pair to develop a channelrhodopsin membrane localization assay that is amenable to high-throughput screening for opsin discovery and engineering.

  5. Functional KV10.1 Channels Localize to the Inner Nuclear Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ye; Sánchez, Araceli; Rubio, María E.; Kohl, Tobias; Pardo, Luis A.; Stühmer, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Ectopically expressed human KV10.1 channels are relevant players in tumor biology. However, their function as ion channels at the plasma membrane does not totally explain their crucial role in tumors. Both in native and heterologous systems, it has been observed that a majority of KV10.1 channels remain at intracellular locations. In this study we investigated the localization and possible roles of perinuclear KV10.1. We show that KV10.1 is expressed at the inner nuclear membrane in both human and rat models; it co-purifies with established inner nuclear membrane markers, shows resistance to detergent extraction and restricted mobility, all of them typical features of proteins at the inner nuclear membrane. KV10.1 channels at the inner nuclear membrane are not all transported directly from the ER but rather have been exposed to the extracellular milieu. Patch clamp experiments on nuclei devoid of external nuclear membrane reveal the existence of channel activity compatible with KV10.1. We hypothesize that KV10.1 channels at the nuclear envelope might participate in the homeostasis of nuclear K+, or indirectly interact with heterochromatin, both factors known to affect gene expression. PMID:21559285

  6. Localization and cloning of the gene(s) of bacteriophage PM2 responsible for membrane morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Armour, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    Proteins implicated in membrane morphogenesis (sp6.6 and sp13) have been previously identified by analysis of membrane proteins in the membrane of the purified phage. Analysis of a ts viral mutant that produces empty membrane vesicles also indicated the unique presence of viral structural protein sp6.6. In this work the gene for sp6.6 was localized on the PM2 genome by in vitro coupled transcription-translation directed by restriction endonuclease fragments of PM2 DNA. A Hind III fragment containing the sp6.6 gene among others was cloned into pBR322 in E. coli. Examination with the electron microscope revealed the production of new membrane vesicles whose size were similar to that of the natural membrane of PM2. Clones were then constructed in the pUC family of plasmids which uses the Lac promoter and pPL-lambda which uses the promoter left of lambda. pUC clones were unable to produce vesicles or detectable sp6.6. A pPL-lambda clone was produced 3.5 Kbp in size, that produced p6.6 as detected by SDS-PAGE of radiolabeled protein and immunoblotting.

  7. Local elasticity and adhesion of nanostructures on Drosophila melanogaster wing membrane studied using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Ryan; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Raman, Arvind

    2012-10-01

    Insect wings have a naturally occurring, complex, functional, hierarchical microstructure and nanostructure, which enable a remarkably water-resistant and self-cleaning surface. Insect wings are used as a basis for engineering biomimetic materials; however, the material properties of these nanostructures such as local elastic modulus and adhesion are poorly understood. We studied the wings of the Canton-S strain of Drosophila melanogaster (hereafter referred to as Drosophila) with atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantify the local material properties of Drosophila wing surface nanostructures. The wings are found to have a hierarchical structure of 10-20 μm long, 0.5-1 μm diameter hair, and at a much smaller scale, 100 nm diameter and 30-60 nm high bumps. The local properties of these nanoscale bumps were studied under ambient and dry conditions with force-volume AFM. The wing membrane was found to have a elastic modulus on the order of 1000 MPa and the work of adhesion between the probe and wing membrane surface was found to be on the order of 100 mJ/m2, these properties are the same order of magnitude as common thermoplastic polymers such as polyethylene. The difference in work of adhesion between the nanoscale bump and membrane does not change significantly between ambient (relative humidity of 30%) or dry conditions. This suggests that the nanoscale bumps and the surrounding membrane are chemically similar and only work to increase hydrophobicity though surface roughening or the geometric lotus effect.

  8. Buckling of actin-coated membranes under application of a local force.

    PubMed

    Helfer, E; Harlepp, S; Bourdieu, L; Robert, J; MacKintosh, F C; Chatenay, D

    2001-08-20

    The mechanical properties of composite membranes obtained by self-assembly of actin filaments with giant fluid vesicles are studied by micromanipulation with optical tweezers. These complexes exhibit typical mechanical features of a solid shell, including a finite in-plane shear elastic modulus ( approximately 10(-6) N/m). A buckling instability is observed when a localized force of the order of 0.5 pN is applied perpendicular to the membrane plane. Although predicted for polymerized vesicles, this is the first evidence of such an instability.

  9. Buckling of Actin-Coated Membranes under Application of a Local Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfer, E.; Harlepp, S.; Bourdieu, L.; Robert, J.; Mackintosh, F. C.; Chatenay, D.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanical properties of composite membranes obtained by self-assembly of actin filaments with giant fluid vesicles are studied by micromanipulation with optical tweezers. These complexes exhibit typical mechanical features of a solid shell, including a finite in-plane shear elastic modulus (~10-6 N/m). A buckling instability is observed when a localized force of the order of 0.5 pN is applied perpendicular to the membrane plane. Although predicted for polymerized vesicles, this is the first evidence of such an instability.

  10. Process for recycling components of a PEM fuel cell membrane electrode assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shore, Lawrence

    2012-02-28

    The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of a PEM fuel cell can be recycled by contacting the MEA with a lower alkyl alcohol solvent which separates the membrane from the anode and cathode layers of the assembly. The resulting solution containing both the polymer membrane and supported noble metal catalysts can be heated under mild conditions to disperse the polymer membrane as particles and the supported noble metal catalysts and polymer membrane particles separated by known filtration means.

  11. Sustained attention to local and global target features is different: performance and tympanic membrane temperature.

    PubMed

    Helton, William S; Hayrynen, Lauren; Schaeffer, David

    2009-10-01

    Vision researchers have investigated the differences between global and local feature perception. No one has, however, examined the role of global and local feature discrimination in sustained attention tasks. In this experiment participants performed a sustained attention task requiring either global or local letter target discriminations or watched the same displays without any work imperative. Reaction time to targets was slower when global feature discriminations were required than when local feature discriminations were required. Tympanic membrane temperature (TMT) was utilized in this study as an index of cerebral activation. Participants in the global letter detection condition had elevated post-task right TMT, indicative of reduced cerebral activation in the right hemisphere, in comparison to participants in the local letter detection or no-work imperative conditions. Both the performance and physiological results of this study indicate increased cognitive fatigue when global feature discriminations are required.

  12. Influence of Global and Local Membrane Curvature on Mechanosensitive Ion Channels: A Finite Element Approach.

    PubMed

    Bavi, Omid; Cox, Charles D; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Naghdabadi, Reza; Jamali, Yousef; Martinac, Boris

    2016-02-05

    Mechanosensitive (MS) channels are ubiquitous molecular force sensors that respond to a number of different mechanical stimuli including tensile, compressive and shear stress. MS channels are also proposed to be molecular curvature sensors gating in response to bending in their local environment. One of the main mechanisms to functionally study these channels is the patch clamp technique. However, the patch of membrane surveyed using this methodology is far from physiological. Here we use continuum mechanics to probe the question of how curvature, in a standard patch clamp experiment, at different length scales (global and local) affects a model MS channel. Firstly, to increase the accuracy of the Laplace's equation in tension estimation in a patch membrane and to be able to more precisely describe the transient phenomena happening during patch clamping, we propose a modified Laplace's equation. Most importantly, we unambiguously show that the global curvature of a patch, which is visible under the microscope during patch clamp experiments, is of negligible energetic consequence for activation of an MS channel in a model membrane. However, the local curvature (RL < 50) and the direction of bending are able to cause considerable changes in the stress distribution through the thickness of the membrane. Not only does local bending, in the order of physiologically relevant curvatures, cause a substantial change in the pressure profile but it also significantly modifies the stress distribution in response to force application. Understanding these stress variations in regions of high local bending is essential for a complete understanding of the effects of curvature on MS channels.

  13. Influence of Global and Local Membrane Curvature on Mechanosensitive Ion Channels: A Finite Element Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bavi, Omid; Cox, Charles D.; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Naghdabadi, Reza; Jamali, Yousef; Martinac, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Mechanosensitive (MS) channels are ubiquitous molecular force sensors that respond to a number of different mechanical stimuli including tensile, compressive and shear stress. MS channels are also proposed to be molecular curvature sensors gating in response to bending in their local environment. One of the main mechanisms to functionally study these channels is the patch clamp technique. However, the patch of membrane surveyed using this methodology is far from physiological. Here we use continuum mechanics to probe the question of how curvature, in a standard patch clamp experiment, at different length scales (global and local) affects a model MS channel. Firstly, to increase the accuracy of the Laplace’s equation in tension estimation in a patch membrane and to be able to more precisely describe the transient phenomena happening during patch clamping, we propose a modified Laplace’s equation. Most importantly, we unambiguously show that the global curvature of a patch, which is visible under the microscope during patch clamp experiments, is of negligible energetic consequence for activation of an MS channel in a model membrane. However, the local curvature (RL < 50) and the direction of bending are able to cause considerable changes in the stress distribution through the thickness of the membrane. Not only does local bending, in the order of physiologically relevant curvatures, cause a substantial change in the pressure profile but it also significantly modifies the stress distribution in response to force application. Understanding these stress variations in regions of high local bending is essential for a complete understanding of the effects of curvature on MS channels. PMID:26861405

  14. Effects of the local anesthetic benzocaine on the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Schneider, Carlos; Villena, Fernando; Norris, Beryl; Cárdenas, Hernán; Cuevas, Francisco; Sotomayor, Carlos P

    2004-04-01

    The interaction of the local anesthetic benzocaine with the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models is described. The latter consisted of isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of dimyristoylphospatidylcholine (DMPC), and phospholipid multilayers of DMPC and dimyristoylphospatidyletanolamine (DMPE), representatives of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. Optical and scanning electron microscopy of human erythrocytes revealed that benzocaine induced the formation of echinocytes. Experiments performed on IUM and DMPC LUV by fluorescence spectroscopy showed that benzocaine interacted with the phospholipid bilayer polar groups and hydrophobic acyl chains. X-ray diffraction analysis of DMPC confirmed these results and showed that benzocaine had no effects on DMPE. The effect on sodium transport was also studied using the isolated toad skin. Electrophysiological measurements indicated a significant decrease in the potential difference (PD) and in the short-circuit current (Isc) after the application of benzocaine, reflecting inhibition of active ion transport. PMID:15059670

  15. Parylene-encapsulated copolymeric membranes as localized and sustained drug delivery platforms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mark; Huang, Houjin; Pierstorff, Erik; Shin, Eric; Robinson, Erik; Ho, Dean

    2009-10-01

    Parylene is a biologically inert material capable of being deposited in conformal nanoscale layers on virtually any surface, making it a viable structural material for the fabrication of drug delivery devices, as well as implant coatings, sensors, and other biomedical technologies. Here we explore its novel drug delivery applications by using parylene to package the polymethyloxazoline-polydimethylsiloxane-polymethyloxazoline (PMOXA-PDMS-PMOXA) block copolymer membrane of a nanoscale thickness (approximately 4 nm/layer) mixed with a therapeutic element, creating an active parylene-encapsulated copolymeric (APC) membrane for slow release drug delivery of dexamethasone (Dex), a potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant synthetic glucocorticoid. Given current needs for localized therapeutic release for conditions such as cancer, post-surgical inflammation, wound healing, regenerative medicine, to name a few, this stand-alone and minimally invasive implantable technology may impact a broad range of medical scenarios. To evaluate the applicability of the APC membrane as a biocompatible drug delivery system, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to investigate the expression of cytokines that regulate cellular stress and inflammation as a result of in vitro RAW264.7 macrophage cell growth on the APC membrane. Significant decreases in relative mRNA levels of IL-6, TNF-alpha, and iNOS were observed. Dex functionalized APC membranes were further found to effectively slow-elute the drug via confocal microscopy, with a confirmed extended elution capability over a period of several days, undergoing phosphate buffered saline washes between time points. In addition, we examined the membrane surface through atomic force microscopy (AFM) to examine Dex/copolymer deposition, and to characterize the surface of the APC membrane. Furthermore, we evaluated the effects of incubation with the APC membrane in solution on macrophage growth behavior and cellular

  16. Minor sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane components that modulate excitation–contraction coupling in striated muscles

    PubMed Central

    Treves, Susan; Vukcevic, Mirko; Maj, Marcin; Thurnheer, Raphael; Mosca, Barbara; Zorzato, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    In striated muscle, activation of contraction is initiated by membrane depolarisation caused by an action potential, which triggers the release of Ca2+ stored in the sarcoplasmic reticulum by a process called excitation–contraction coupling. Excitation–contraction coupling occurs via a highly sophisticated supramolecular signalling complex at the junction between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the transverse tubules. It is generally accepted that the core components of the excitation–contraction coupling machinery are the dihydropyridine receptors, ryanodine receptors and calsequestrin, which serve as voltage sensor, Ca2+ release channel, and Ca2+ storage protein, respectively. Nevertheless, a number of additional proteins have been shown to be essential both for the structural formation of the machinery involved in excitation–contraction coupling and for its fine tuning. In this review we discuss the functional role of minor sarcoplasmic reticulum protein components. The definition of their roles in excitation–contraction coupling is important in order to understand how mutations in genes involved in Ca2+ signalling cause neuromuscular disorders. PMID:19403606

  17. Metabolism of milk fat globule membrane components by nonstarter lactic acid bacteria isolated from cheese.

    PubMed

    Moe, K M; Porcellato, D; Skeie, S

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how components present in the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) may be used for growth and survival by cheese-ripening lactobacilli. This was achieved by analyzing metabolites produced during incubation on appropriate media. The lactobacilli investigated were able to utilize components from the MFGM throughout a 24-d incubation period. We observed an apparent connection between the higher proteolytic activity of Lactobacillus paracasei INF448 and its ability to grow in the MFGM media after depletion of readily available sugars. All the studied strains produced large amounts of acetate when grown on an acylated aminosugar, presumably from deacetylation of the monosaccharides. Growth of Lb. plantarum INF15D on D-galactose resulted in a metabolic shift, expressed as different fates of the produced pyruvate, compared with growth on the other monosaccharides. For Lb. plantarum INF15D, the presence of D-galactose also seemed to initiate degradation of some amino acids known to take part in energy production, specifically Arg and Tyr.

  18. Local Laser Strengthening of Steel Sheets for Load Adapted Component Design in Car Body Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, Axel; Heitmanek, Marco; Standfuss, Jens; Brenner, Berndt; Wunderlich, Gerd; Donat, Bernd

    The current trend in car body construction concerning light weight design and car safety improvement increasingly requires an adaption of the local material properties on the component load. Martensitic hardenable steels, which are typically used in car body components, show a significant hardening effect, for instance in laser welded seams. This effect can be purposefully used as a local strengthening method. For several steel grades the local strengthening, resulting from a laser remelting process was investigated. The strength in the treated zone was determined at crash relevant strain rates. A load adapted design of complex reinforcement structures was developed for compression and bending loaded tube samples, using numerical simulation of the deformation behavior. Especially for bending loaded parts, the crash energy absorption can be increased significantly by local laser strengthening.

  19. Neurexin Ibeta and neuroligin are localized on opposite membranes in mature central synapses.

    PubMed

    Berninghausen, Otto; Rahman, M Atiqur; Silva, John-Paul; Davletov, Bazbek; Hopkins, Colin; Ushkaryov, Yuri A

    2007-12-01

    Synaptogenesis requires formation of trans-synaptic complexes between neuronal cell-adhesion receptors. Heterophilic receptor pairs, such as neurexin Ibeta and neuroligin, can mediate distinct intracellular signals and form different cytoplasmic scaffolds in the pre- and post-synaptic neuron, and may be particularly important for synaptogenesis. However, the functions of neurexin and neuroligin depend on their distribution in the synapse. Neuroligin has been experimentally assigned to the post-synaptic membrane, while the localization of neurexin remains unclear. To study the subcellular distribution of neurexin Ibeta and neuroligin in mature cerebrocortical synapses, we have developed a novel method for the physical separation of junctional membranes and their direct analysis by western blotting. Using urea and dithiothreitol, we disrupted trans-synaptic protein links, without dissolving the lipid phase, and fractionated the pre- and post-synaptic membranes. The purity of these fractions was validated by electron microscopy and western blotting using multiple synaptic markers. A quantitative analysis has confirmed that neuroligin is localized strictly in the post-synaptic membrane. We have also demonstrated that neurexin Ibeta is largely (96%) pre-synaptic. Thus, neurexin Ibeta and neuroligin normally form trans-synaptic complexes and can transduce bidirectional signals.

  20. Dynamics of Crowded Vesicles: Local and Global Responses to Membrane Composition

    PubMed Central

    Holdbrook, Daniel A.; Huber, Roland G.; Piggot, Thomas J.; Bond, Peter J.; Khalid, Syma

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cell envelope is composed of a mixture of different lipids and proteins, making it an inherently complex organelle. The interactions between integral membrane proteins and lipids are crucial for their respective spatial localization within bacterial cells. We have employed microsecond timescale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of vesicles of varying sizes and with a range of protein and lipid compositions, and used novel approaches to measure both local and global system dynamics, the latter based on spherical harmonics analysis. Our results suggest that both hydrophobic mismatch, enhanced by embedded membrane proteins, and curvature based sorting, due to different modes of undulation, may drive assembly in vesicular systems. Interestingly, the modes of undulation of the vesicles were found to be altered by the specific protein and lipid composition of the vesicle. Strikingly, lipid dynamics were shown to be coupled to proteins up to 6 nm from their surface, a substantially larger distance than has previously been observed, resulting in multi-layered annular rings enriched with particular types of phospholipid. Such large protein-lipid complexes may provide a mechanism for long-range communication. Given the complexity of bacterial membranes, our results suggest that subtle changes in lipid composition may have major implications for lipid and protein sorting under a curvature-based membrane-sorting model. PMID:27310814

  1. Localization of extracellular matrix components in developing mouse salivary glands by confocal microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    The importance of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in developing organisms is well established. Proteoglycans and interstitial collagens are required for the growth, morphogenesis, and differentiation of epithelial organs and the distribution of these molecules has been described. However, much less is known about other ECM macromolecules in developing epithelial organs. We used confocal microscopy to examine the distribution of laminin, heparan sulfate (BM-1) proteoglycan, fibronectin, and collagen types I, IV, and V, in mouse embryonic salivary glands. Organ rudiments were isolated from gestational day 13 mouse embryos and cultured for 24, 48, or 72 hours. Whole mounts were stained by indirect immunofluorescence and then examined using a Zeiss Laser Scan Microscope. We found that each ECM component examined had a distinct distribution and that the distribution of some molecules varied with culture time. Laminin was mainly restricted to the basement membrane. BM-1 proteoglycan was concentrated in the basement membrane and also formed a fine network throughout the mesenchyme. Type IV collagen was mainly located in the basement membrane of the epithelium, but it was also present throughout the mesenchyme. Type V collagen was distributed throughout the mesenchyme at 24 hours, but at 48 hours was principally located in the basement membrane. Type I collagen was distributed throughout the mesenchyme at all culture times, and accumulated in the clefts and particularly at the epithelial-mesenchymal interface as time in culture increased. Fibronectin was observed throughout the mesenchyme at all times.

  2. Localized waves in three-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tao; Chen, Yong

    2016-09-01

    We study the generalized Darboux transformation to the three-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation. First- and second-order localized waves are obtained by this technique. In first-order localized wave, we get the interactional solutions between first-order rogue wave and one-dark, one-bright soliton respectively. Meanwhile, the interactional solutions between one-breather and first-order rogue wave are also given. In second-order localized wave, one-dark-one-bright soliton together with second-order rogue wave is presented in the first component, and two-bright soliton together with second-order rogue wave are gained respectively in the other two components. Besides, we observe second-order rogue wave together with one-breather in three components. Moreover, by increasing the absolute values of two free parameters, the nonlinear waves merge with each other distinctly. These results further reveal the interesting dynamic structures of localized waves in the three-component coupled system. Project supported by the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953904), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11275072 and 11435005), the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120076110024), the Network Information Physics Calculation of Basic Research Innovation Research Group of China (Grant No. 61321064), and Shanghai Collaborative Innovation Center of Trustworthy Software for Internet of Things, China (Grant No. ZF1213).

  3. Localized waves in three-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tao; Chen, Yong

    2016-09-01

    We study the generalized Darboux transformation to the three-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation. First- and second-order localized waves are obtained by this technique. In first-order localized wave, we get the interactional solutions between first-order rogue wave and one-dark, one-bright soliton respectively. Meanwhile, the interactional solutions between one-breather and first-order rogue wave are also given. In second-order localized wave, one-dark-one-bright soliton together with second-order rogue wave is presented in the first component, and two-bright soliton together with second-order rogue wave are gained respectively in the other two components. Besides, we observe second-order rogue wave together with one-breather in three components. Moreover, by increasing the absolute values of two free parameters, the nonlinear waves merge with each other distinctly. These results further reveal the interesting dynamic structures of localized waves in the three-component coupled system. Project supported by the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953904), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11275072 and 11435005), the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120076110024), the Network Information Physics Calculation of Basic Research Innovation Research Group of China (Grant No. 61321064), and Shanghai Collaborative Innovation Center of Trustworthy Software for Internet of Things, China (Grant No. ZF1213).

  4. Electricity generation and local ion ordering induced by cation-controlled selective anion transportation through graphene oxide membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Pengzhan; Deng, Hui; Zheng, Feng; Wang, Kunlin; Zhong, Minlin; Zhang, Yingjiu; Kang, Feiyu; Zhu, Hongwei

    2014-12-01

    A cation-controlled selective anion transportation through graphene oxide (GO) membranes is demonstrated in this work. The results reveal that the trans-membrane transport of different anions can be modulated by the corresponding cations. The diverse interactions among anions, cations, and the negatively charged GO membranes are responsible for selective anion permeation through GO membranes. During the ion penetration, electrical potential differences can be generated across drain and source as well as across GO membranes; based on this, the ion distributions around GO membranes can be determined. The results indicate that local ion ordering can be achieved by GO membranes. Interestingly, for the cases of KNO3, Ca(NO3)2, and Ba(NO3)2, alternate aggregations of metallic cations and NO3- anions can be formed around GO membranes, demonstrating the fantastic ability of these membranes for ordering the ions locally in solutions. In addition, based on the electrical potential differences generated by different salts, chlorides are demonstrated to be ideal sources for efficient practical electricity production compared to sulfates and nitrates, while the different voltage signals generated can be used to identify different source solutions for liquid sensing applications. These results indicate that GO membranes can find potential applications in membrane separation, energy generation, ion recognition, and local ion organizing.

  5. Subcellular localization of creatine kinase in Torpedo electrocytes: association with acetylcholine receptor-rich membranes

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Creatine kinase (CK, EC 2.7.3.2) has recently been identified as the intermediate isoelectric point species (pl 6.5-6.8) of the Mr 40,000- 43,000 nonreceptor, peripheral v-proteins in Torpedo marmorata acetylcholine receptor-rich membranes (Barrantes, F. J., G. Mieskes, and T. Wallimann, 1983, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 80: 5440-5444). In the present study, this finding is substantiated at the cellular and subcellular level of the T. marmorata electric organ by immunofluorescence and by protein A-gold labeling of either ultrathin cryosections of electrocytes or purified receptor-membrane vesicles that use subunit-specific anti-chicken creatine kinase antibodies. The muscle form of the kinase, on the one hand, is present throughout the entire T. marmorata electrocyte except in the nuclei. The brain form of the kinase, on the other hand, is predominantly located on the ventral, innervated face of the electrocyte, where it is closely associated with both surfaces of the postsynaptic membrane, and secondarily in the synaptic vesicles at the presynaptic terminal. Labeling of the noninnervated dorsal membrane is observed at the invaginated sac system. In the case of purified acetylcholine receptor-rich membranes, antibodies specific for chicken B-CK label only one face of the isolated vesicles. No immunoreaction is observed with anti-chicken M-CK antibodies. A discussion follows on the possible implications of these localizations of creatine kinase in connection with the function of the acetylcholine receptor at the postsynaptic membrane, the Na/K ATPase at the dorsal electrocyte membrane, and the ATP-dependent transmitter release at the nerve ending. PMID:3884630

  6. Immunohistochemical localization of glucose transporters and insulin receptors in human fetal membranes at term.

    PubMed

    Wolf, H J; Desoye, G

    1993-11-01

    The localization has been investigated of the isoforms GLUT1, GLUT3 and GLUT4 of glucose transporter proteins as well as of insulin receptors. Fetal membranes (n = 10) were examined by immunohistochemical methods at the light and electron microscopic levels using mono- and polyclonal antibodies. In all amnion epithelial cells, GLUT1 and GLUT3 antibodies were bound to the apical membrane. Very rarely the GLUT1 antibody also immunostained the basolateral membrane and reacted weakly with the endomembrane system and membranes of the lateral cell protrusions. Fibroblasts reacted with the antibodies against GLUT1, GLUT4 and insulin receptor, whereas they were labelled only in one case with GLUT3 antibody. Cytotrophoblast cells were only stained with antibodies against GLUT1 and GLUT3. Antibodies against GLUT4 only reacted with fibroblasts in the membranes. On amnion epithelial cells, weak immunoreactivity with insulin receptor antibodies was detected only at the electron microscopic level. The data indicate: (1) GLUT1 is located on all cells of the amnion, whereas GLUT3 is present in detectable amounts only on amnion epithelial cells and cytotrophoblast; (2) GLUT1 and GLUT3 on amnion epithelial cells are predominantly located on the apical surface; (3) GLUT4 and insulin receptors are not regularly expressed. We suggest that amnion epithelial cells cover their basal glucose requirements from the amniotic fluid and not from the maternal circulation.

  7. Microscopic calculations of local lipid membrane permittivities and diffusion coefficients for application to electroporation analyses.

    PubMed

    Joshi, R P; Sridhara, V; Schoenbach, K H

    2006-09-22

    Interaction of electric fields with biological systems has begun to receive considerable attention for applications that include field-assisted drug delivery, medical interventions, and genetic engineering. External fields induce the strongest effects at membranes with electroporation being a common feature. Membrane transport in this context of poration is often based on continuum approaches utilizing macroscopic parameters such as the permittivity, diffusion coefficients, and mobilities. In such modeling, field dependences, local inhomogeneities, and microscopic details are usually ignored. Here, a molecular dynamics (MD) scheme is used for a more rigorous and physically realistic evaluation of such parameters for potential application to electroporative transport model development. A suitable membrane structure containing a nanopore derived from MD analysis is used as the initial geometric configuration. Both static and frequency dependent diffusion coefficients have been evaluated. Permittivities are also calculated and shown to be dramatically non-uniform in the vicinity of membranes under high external fields. A positive feedback mechanism leading to enhanced membrane fields is discussed.

  8. Performance of Water Recirculation Loop Maintentance Components for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rector, Tony; Peyton, Barbara; Steele, John W.; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2014-01-01

    Water loop maintenance components to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop have undergone a comparative performance evaluation with a second SWME water recirculation loop with no water quality maintenance. Results show the benefits of periodic water maintenance. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the evaluation of water recirculation maintenance components was to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessonslearned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a UTAS military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provided a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance cycle included the use of a biocide delivery component developed for ISS to introduce a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  9. Performance of Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Components for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rector, Tony; Peyton, Barbara M.; Steele, John W.; Makinen, Janice; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Water loop maintenance components to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop have undergone a comparative performance evaluation with a second SWME water recirculation loop with no water quality maintenance. Results show the benefits of periodic water maintenance. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the evaluation of water recirculation maintenance components was to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a UTAS military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provided a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance cycle included the use of a biocide delivery component developed for ISS to introduce a biocide in a microgravity compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  10. Channel-tunnels: outer membrane components of type I secretion systems and multidrug efflux pumps of Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Andersen, C

    2003-01-01

    For translocation across the cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria, substances have to overcome two permeability barriers, the inner and outer membrane. Channel-tunnels are outer membrane proteins, which are central to two distinct export systems: the type I secretion system exporting proteins such as toxins or proteases, and efflux pumps discharging antibiotics, dyes, or heavy metals and thus mediating drug resistance. Protein secretion is driven by an inner membrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter while drug efflux occurs via an inner membrane proton antiporter. Both inner membrane transporters are associated with a periplasmic accessory protein that recruits an outer membrane channel-tunnel to form a functional export complex. Prototypes of these export systems are the hemolysin secretion system and the AcrAB/TolC drug efflux pump of Escherichia coli, which both employ TolC as an outer membrane component. Its remarkable conduit-like structure, protruding 100 A into the periplasmic space, reveals how both systems are capable of transporting substrates across both membranes directly from the cytosol into the external environment. Proteins of the channel-tunnel family are widespread within Gram-negative bacteria. Their involvement in drug resistance and in secretion of pathogenic factors makes them an interesting system for further studies. Understanding the mechanism of the different export apparatus could help to develop new drugs, which block the efflux pumps or the secretion system.

  11. Immunohistochemical localization of basement membrane type VII collagen and laminin in neoplasms of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Wetzels, R H; van der Velden, L A; Schaafsma, H E; Manni, J J; Leigh, I M; Vooijs, G P; Ramaekers, F C

    1992-11-01

    The distribution pattern of the basement membrane components type VII collagen and laminin, was studied immunohistochemically in normal human head and neck tissues and in a series of benign and malignant tumours from the same site. Using monoclonal antibodies, a basement membrane containing type VII collagen and laminin could be demonstrated beneath the epithelial cell layer in 16 normal head and neck tissues from different localizations. Unlike type VII collagen, laminin was also abundantly present around blood vessels and muscle fibres. With respect to 42 squamous cell carcinomas studied, type VII collagen and laminin were present in basement membranes surrounding small and large tumour fields, independent of the tumour grade. Type VII collagen was demonstrated in the cytoplasm of tumour cells in 36% of the cases, while the antibody to laminin displayed a basement membrane staining pattern mainly. Both antibodies showed a staining gradient in more than half of the cases, with strong staining in the centre of the tumour and weakening of the staining towards the tumour periphery. In a series of 22 salivary gland tumours consisting of 19 pleomorphic adenomas and three adenoid cystic carcinomas, the distribution pattern of type VII collagen and laminin was very heterogeneous. Laminin was present in 17 and type VII collagen in 10 of 19 cases of pleomorphic adenoma, mostly scattered throughout the tumour fields. In the tumours positive for type VII collagen areas with little or no positivity were also found. A correlation between type VII collagen positivity and the presence of basal cell keratin 14 positivity was noticed in the majority of cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. The X-ray Emitting Components towards l = 111 deg: The Local Hot Bubble and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Snowden, S. L.

    2006-01-01

    We have obtained an XMM-Newton spectrum of the diffuse X-ray emission towards (l, b) = (111.14,1.11), a line of sight with a relatively simple distribution of absorbing clouds; > 9 x 10(exp 19)/sq cm at R>170 pc, a 6 x 10(exp 21)/sq cm molecular cloud at 2.5-3.3 kpc, and a total column of 1.2 x 10(exp 22)/sq cm. We find that the analysis of the XMM-Newton spectrum in conjunction with the RASS spectral energy distribution for the same direction requires three thermal components to be well fit: a "standard" Local Hot Bubble component with kT = 0.089, a component beyond the molecular cloud with kT = 0.59, and a component before the molecular cloud with kT = 0.21. The strength of the O VII 0.56 keV line from the Local Hot Bubble, 2.1+/-0.7 photons/sq cm/s/sr, is consistent with other recent measures. The 0.21 keV component has an emission measure of 0.0022+/-0.0006 pc and is not localized save as diffuse emission within the Galactic plane; it is the best candidate for a pervasive hot medium. The spatial separation of the approx. 0.2 keV component from the approx. 0.6 keV component suggests that the spectral decompositions of the emission from late-type spiral disks found in the literature do represent real temperature components rather than reflecting more complex temperature distributions.

  13. 24 CFR 1000.325 - How is the need component adjusted for local area costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT NATIVE AMERICAN HOUSING ACTIVITIES Allocation Formula § 1000.325... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is the need component adjusted for local area costs? 1000.325 Section 1000.325 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating...

  14. 24 CFR 1000.325 - How is the need component adjusted for local area costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT NATIVE AMERICAN HOUSING ACTIVITIES Allocation Formula § 1000.325... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How is the need component adjusted for local area costs? 1000.325 Section 1000.325 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING...

  15. 24 CFR 1000.325 - How is the need component adjusted for local area costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT NATIVE AMERICAN HOUSING ACTIVITIES Allocation Formula § 1000.325... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How is the need component adjusted for local area costs? 1000.325 Section 1000.325 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING...

  16. Aubergine is a component of a nanos mRNA localization complex

    PubMed Central

    Becalska, Agata N.; Kim, YoungJung R.; Belletier, Nicolette G.; Lerit, Dorothy A.; Sinsimer, Kristina S.; Gavis, Elizabeth R.

    2010-01-01

    Localization of nanos (nos) mRNA to the posterior pole of the Drosophila oocyte is essential for abdominal segmentation and germline development during embryogenesis. Posterior localization is mediated by a complex cis-acting localization signal in the nos 3′ untranslated region that comprises multiple partially redundant elements. Genetic analysis suggests that this signal is recognized by RNA-binding proteins and associated factors that package nos mRNA into a localization competent ribonucleoprotein complex. However, functional redundancy among localization elements has made the identification of individual localization factors difficult. Indeed, only a single direct-acting nos localization factor, Rumpelstiltskin (Rump), has been identified thus far. Through a sensitized genetic screen, we have now identified the Argonaute family member Aubergine (Aub) as a nos localization factor. Aub interacts with nos mRNA in vivo and co-purifies with Rump in an RNA-dependent manner. Our results support a role for Aub, independent of its function in RNA silencing, as a component of a nos mRNA localization complex. PMID:20937269

  17. Ultrastructural and immunohistochemical localization of plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase 4 in Ca2+-transporting epithelia.

    PubMed

    Alexander, R Todd; Beggs, Megan R; Zamani, Reza; Marcussen, Niels; Frische, Sebastian; Dimke, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    Plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPases (PMCAs) participate in epithelial Ca(2+) transport and intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. The Pmca4 isoform is enriched in distal nephron isolates and decreased in mice lacking the epithelial transient receptor potential vanilloid 5 Ca(2+) channel. We therefore hypothesized that Pmca4 plays a significant role in transcellular Ca(2+) flux and investigated the localization and regulation of Pmca4 in Ca(2+)-transporting epithelia. Using antibodies directed specifically against Pmca4, we found it expressed only in the smooth muscle layer of mouse and human intestines, whereas pan-specific Pmca antibodies detected Pmca1 in lateral membranes of enterocytes. In the kidney, Pmca4 showed broad localization to the distal nephron. In the mouse, expression was most abundant in segments coexpressing the epithelial ransient receptor potential vanilloid 5 Ca(2+) channel. Significant, albeit lower, expression was also evident in the region encompassing the cortical thick ascending limbs, macula densa, and early distal tubules as well as smooth muscle layers surrounding renal vessels. In the human kidney, a similar pattern of distribution was observed, with the highest PMCA4 expression in Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter-positive tubules. Electron microscopy demonstrated Pmca4 localization in distal nephron cells at both the basolateral membrane and intracellular perinuclear compartments but not submembranous vesicles, suggesting rapid trafficking to the plasma membrane is unlikely to occur in vivo. Pmca4 expression was not altered by perturbations in Ca(2+) balance, pointing to a housekeeping function of the pump in Ca(2+)-transporting epithelia. In conclusion, Pmca4 shows a divergent expression pattern in Ca(2+)-transporting epithelia, inferring diverse roles for this isoform not limited to transepithelial Ca(2+) transport. PMID:26180241

  18. Local membrane deformation and micro-injury lead to qualitatively different responses in osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Ayon, G. Monserratt; Liu, Heng-Yen; Xing, Shu; Maria, Osama M.; LeDue, Jeffrey M.; Bourque, Helene; Grutter, Peter; Komarova, Svetlana V.

    2014-01-01

    Micro-damage of bone tissue is known to regulate bone turnover. However, it is unknown if individual bone cells can differentiate between membrane deformation and micro-injury. We generated osteoblasts from mouse bone marrow or bone morphogenetic protein 2-transfected C2C12 cells. Single cells were mechanically stimulated by indentation with the atomic force microscopy probe with variable force load either resulting in membrane deformation only, or leading to membrane penetration and micro-injury. Changes in the cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca 2+] i) in fluo4-AM loaded cells were analyzed. When deformation only was induced, it resulted in an immediate elevation of [Ca 2+] i which was localized to the probe periphery. Multiple consecutive local Ca 2+ responses were induced by sequential application of low level forces, with characteristic recovery time of ~2 s. The duration of [Ca 2+] i elevations was directly proportional to the tip-cell contact time. In contrast, cell micro-injury resulted in transient global elevations of [Ca 2+] i, the magnitude of which was independent of the tip-cell contact time. Sequential micro-injury of the same cell did not induce Ca 2+ response within 30 s of the first stimulation. Both local and global Ca 2+elevations were blocked in Ca 2+-free media or in the presence of stretch-activated channel blocker Gd 3+. In addition, amount of Ca 2+ released during global responses was significantly reduced in the presence of PLC inhibitor Et-18-OCH 3. Thus, we found qualitative differences in calcium responses to mechanical forces inducing only membrane deformation or deformation leading to micro-injury. PMID:25254108

  19. Progesterone directly and rapidly inhibits GnRH neuronal activity via progesterone receptor membrane component 1.

    PubMed

    Bashour, Nicholas Michael; Wray, Susan

    2012-09-01

    GnRH neurons are essential for reproduction, being an integral component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Progesterone (P4), a steroid hormone, modulates reproductive behavior and is associated with rapid changes in GnRH secretion. However, a direct action of P4 on GnRH neurons has not been previously described. Receptors in the progestin/adipoQ receptor family (PAQR), as well as progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PgRMC1) and its partner serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E (nexin, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1) mRNA binding protein 1 (SERBP1), have been shown to mediate rapid progestin actions in various tissues, including the brain. This study shows that PgRMC1 and SERBP1, but not PAQR, are expressed in prenatal GnRH neurons. Expression of PgRMC1 and SERBP1 was verified in adult mouse GnRH neurons. To investigate the effect of P4 on GnRH neuronal activity, calcium imaging was used on primary GnRH neurons maintained in explants. Application of P4 significantly decreased the activity of GnRH neurons, independent of secretion of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic and glutamatergic input, suggesting a direct action of P4 on GnRH neurons. Inhibition was not blocked by RU486, an antagonist of the classic nuclear P4 receptor. Inhibition was also maintained after uncoupling of the inhibitory regulative G protein (G(i/o)), the signal transduction pathway used by PAQR. However, AG-205, a PgRMC1 ligand and inhibitor, blocked the rapid P4-mediated inhibition, and inhibition of protein kinase G, thought to be activated downstream of PgRMC1, also blocked the inhibitory activity of P4. These data show for the first time that P4 can act directly on GnRH neurons through PgRMC1 to inhibit neuronal activity.

  20. The properties of the outer membrane localized Lipid A transporter LptD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarmann, Raimund; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Stevanovic, Mara; Bredemeier, Rolf; Schleiff, Enrico

    2010-11-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are surrounded by a cell wall including the outer membrane. The outer membrane is composed of two distinct monolayers where the outer layer contains lipopolysaccharides (LPS) with the non-phospholipid Lipid A as the core. The synthesis of Lipid A is initiated in the cytosol and thereby the molecule has to be transported across the inner and outer membranes. The β-barrel lipopolysaccharide-assembly protein D (LptD) was discovered to be involved in the transfer of Lipid A into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. At present the molecular procedure of lipid transfer across the outer membrane remains unknown. Here we approached the functionality of the transfer system by an electrophysiological analysis of the outer membrane protein from Escherichia coli named ecLptD. In vitro the protein shows cation selectivity and has an estimated pore diameter of about 1.8 nm. Addition of Lipid A induces a transition of the open state to a sub-conductance state with two independent off-rates, which might suggest that LptD is able to bind and transport the molecule in vitro. To generalize our findings with respect to the Lipid A transport system of other Gram-negative bacteria we have explored the existence of the proteins involved in this pathway by bioinformatic means. We were able to identify the membrane-inserted components of the Lipid A transport system in all Gram-negative bacteria, whereas the periplasmic components appear to be species-specific. The LptD proteins of different bacteria are characterized by their periplasmic N-terminal domain and a C-terminal barrel region. The latter shows distinct sequence properties, particularly in LptD proteins of cyanobacteria, and this specific domain can be found in plant proteins as well. By electrophysiological experiments on LptD from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 we are able to confirm the functional relation of anaLptD to Lipid A transport.

  1. Free fatty acids as a major component of the chlorosulfolipid membrane of Ochromonas danica

    SciTech Connect

    Winicov, I.

    1985-01-01

    This work is an attempt to determine whether or not free fatty acids are components of the natural membrane of Ochromonas danica. If the FFAs were artifacts, they would most likely have been produced during solvent extraction or during the procedure for flagellar detachment. Attempts to denature putative solvent-activated lipase(s) through exposure to boiling isopropanol or by crosslinking the flagella with glutaraldehyde prior to extraction failed to eliminate the free fatty acid fraction, nor to significantly alter its composition. Exposure of flagella to albumin resulted in the net transfer of FFAs to the supernatant phase, showing their presence is not caused by solvent activated lipolysis. Finally levels of labelled free fatty acids failed to rise as a function of time after deflagellation in cells grown in the presence of (10-/sup 14/C)-oleic acid. Acid hydrolysis of the total labelled lipid at elevated temperature increased the percentage of counts occurring as unesterified fatty acids (from 2.6% to 64.8%). This, taken together with a corresponding loss of the more polar labelled material (66.8% to 8.2%) indicates that some esterified lipids were present, but probably not broken down during the isolation procedure.

  2. The periplasmic domain of Escherichia coli outer membrane protein A can undergo a localized temperature dependent structural transition.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroaki; Garcia-Herrero, Alicia; Vogel, Hans J

    2014-12-01

    Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli are surrounded by two membranes with a thin peptidoglycan (PG)-layer located in between them in the periplasmic space. The outer membrane protein A (OmpA) is a 325-residue protein and it is the major protein component of the outer membrane of E. coli. Previous structure determinations have focused on the N-terminal fragment (residues 1-171) of OmpA, which forms an eight stranded transmembrane β-barrel in the outer membrane. Consequently it was suggested that OmpA is composed of two independently folded domains in which the N-terminal β-barrel traverses the outer membrane and the C-terminal domain (residues 180-325) adopts a folded structure in the periplasmic space. However, some reports have proposed that full-length OmpA can instead refold in a temperature dependent manner into a single domain forming a larger transmembrane pore. Here, we have determined the NMR solution structure of the C-terminal periplasmic domain of E. coli OmpA (OmpA(180-325)). Our structure reveals that the C-terminal domain folds independently into a stable globular structure that is homologous to the previously reported PG-associated domain of Neisseria meningitides RmpM. Our results lend credence to the two domain structure model and a PG-binding function for OmpA, and we could indeed localize the PG-binding site on the protein through NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments. On the other hand, we found no evidence for binding of OmpA(180-325) with the TonB protein. In addition, we have also expressed and purified full-length OmpA (OmpA(1-325)) to study the structure of the full-length protein in micelles and nanodiscs by NMR spectroscopy. In both membrane mimetic environments, the recombinant OmpA maintains its two domain structure that is connected through a flexible linker. A series of temperature-dependent HSQC experiments and relaxation dispersion NMR experiments detected structural destabilization in the bulge region of the

  3. Localization of Drosophila retinal degeneration B, a membrane- associated phosphatidylinositol transfer protein

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The Drosophila retinal degeneration B (rdgB) mutation causes abnormal photoreceptor response and light-enhanced retinal degeneration. Immunoblots using polyclonal anti-rdgB serum showed that rdgB is a 160- kD membrane protein. The antiserum localized the rdgB protein in photoreceptors, antennae, and regions of the Drosophila brain, indicating that the rdgB protein functions in many sensory and neuronal cells. In photoreceptors, the protein localized adjacent to the rhabdomeres, in the vicinity of the subrhabdomeric cisternae. The rdgB protein's amino-terminal 281 residues are > 40% identical to the rat brain phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PI-TP). A truncated rdgB protein, which contains only this amino-terminal domain, possesses a phosphatidylinositol transfer activity in vitro. The remaining 773 carboxyl terminal amino acids have additional functional domains. Nitrocellulose overlay experiments reveal that an acidic amino acid domain, adjacent to the PI transfer domain, binds 45Ca+2. Six hydrophobic segments are found in the middle of the putative translation product and likely function as membrane spanning domains. These results suggest that the rdgB protein, unlike the small soluble PI-TPs, is a membrane-associated PI-TP, which may be directly regulated by light-induced changes in intracellular calcium. PMID:8354691

  4. HGAL localization to cell membrane regulates B-cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Sicard, Renaud; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Stockus, Jessica N.; McNamara, George; Abdulreda, Midhat; Moy, Vincent T.; Landgraf, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Human germinal center–associated lymphoma (HGAL) is specifically expressed only in germinal center (GC) B lymphocytes and GC-derived lymphomas. HGAL protein decreases lymphocyte motility by inhibiting the ability of myosin to translocate actin via direct interaction with F-actin and myosin II and by activating RhoA signaling via direct interactions with RhoA-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors. HGAL protein also regulates B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling by directly binding to and enhancing Syk kinase activity and activation of its downstream effectors. Herein we demonstrate that HGAL protein can be myristoylated and palmitoylated and that these modifications localize HGAL to cellular membrane raft microdomains with distinct consequences for BCR signaling and chemoattractant-induced cell mobility. In BCR signaling, raft localization of HGAL facilitates interaction with Syk and modulation of the BCR activation and signaling, which induces HGAL phosphorylation and redistribution from lipid raft to bulk membrane and cytoplasm, followed by degradation. In contrast, HGAL myristoylation and palmitoylation avert its inhibitory effects on chemoattractant-induced cell motility. These findings further elucidate the growing and complex role of HGAL in B-cell biology and suggest that membrane-bound and cytoplasmic HGAL protein differently regulates distinct biological processes. PMID:25381061

  5. Filament networks attached to membranes: cytoskeletal pressure and local bilayer deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auth, Thorsten; Safran, S. A.; Gov, Nir S.

    2007-11-01

    Several cell types, among them red blood cells, have a cortical, two-dimensional (2D) network of filaments sparsely attached to their lipid bilayer. In many mammalian cells, this 2D polymer network is connected to an underlying 3D, more rigid cytoskeleton. In this paper, we consider the pressure exerted by the thermally fluctuating, cortical network of filaments on the bilayer and predict the bilayer deformations that are induced by this pressure. We treat the filaments as flexible polymers and calculate the pressure that a network of such linear chains exerts on the bilayer; we then minimize the bilayer shape in order to predict the resulting local deformations. We compare our predictions with membrane deformations observed in electron micrographs of red blood cells. The polymer pressure along with the resulting membrane deformation can lead to compartmentalization, regulate in-plane diffusion and may influence protein sorting as well as transmit signals to the polymerization of the underlying 3D cytoskeleton.

  6. Flotillin-1 is essential for PKC-triggered endocytosis and membrane microdomain localization of DAT.

    PubMed

    Cremona, M Laura; Matthies, Heinrich J G; Pau, Kelvin; Bowton, Erica; Speed, Nicole; Lute, Brandon J; Anderson, Monique; Sen, Namita; Robertson, Sabrina D; Vaughan, Roxanne A; Rothman, James E; Galli, Aurelio; Javitch, Jonathan A; Yamamoto, Ai

    2011-04-01

    Plasmalemmal neurotransmitter transporters (NTTs) regulate the level of neurotransmitters, such as dopamine (DA) and glutamate, after their release at brain synapses. Stimuli including protein kinase C (PKC) activation can lead to the internalization of some NTTs and a reduction in neurotransmitter clearance capacity. We found that the protein Flotillin-1 (Flot1), also known as Reggie-2, was required for PKC-regulated internalization of members of two different NTT families, the DA transporter (DAT) and the glial glutamate transporter EAAT2, and we identified a conserved serine residue in Flot1 that is essential for transporter internalization. Further analysis revealed that Flot1 was also required to localize DAT within plasma membrane microdomains in stable cell lines, and was essential for amphetamine-induced reverse transport of DA in neurons but not for DA uptake. In sum, our findings provide evidence for a critical role of Flot1-enriched membrane microdomains in PKC-triggered DAT endocytosis and the actions of amphetamine.

  7. Membrane permeable local anesthetics modulate Na(V)1.5 mechanosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Beyder, Arthur; Strege, Peter R; Bernard, Cheryl; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium selective ion channel Na(V)1.5 is expressed in the heart and the gastrointestinal tract, which are mechanically active organs. Na(V)1.5 is mechanosensitive at stimuli that gate other mechanosensitive ion channels. Local anesthetic and antiarrhythmic drugs act upon Na(V)1.5 to modulate activity by multiple mechanisms. This study examined whether Na(V)1.5 mechanosensitivity is modulated by local anesthetics. Na(V)1.5 channels were expressed in HEK-293 cells, and mechanosensitivity was tested in cell-attached and excised inside-out configurations. Using a novel protocol with paired voltage ladders and short pressure pulses, negative patch pressure (-30 mmHg) in both configurations produced a hyperpolarizing shift in the half-point of the voltage-dependence of activation (V(1/2a)) and inactivation (V(1/2i)) by about -10 mV. Lidocaine (50 µM) inhibited the pressure-induced shift of V(1/2a) but not V(1/2i). Lidocaine inhibited the tonic increase in pressure-induced peak current in a use-dependence protocol, but it did not otherwise affect use-dependent block. The local anesthetic benzocaine, which does not show use-dependent block, also effectively blocked a pressure-induced shift in V(1/2a). Lidocaine inhibited mechanosensitivity in Na(V)1.5 at the local anesthetic binding site mutated (F1760A). However, a membrane impermeable lidocaine analog QX-314 did not affect mechanosensitivity of F1760A Na(V)1.5 when applied from either side of the membrane. These data suggest that the mechanism of lidocaine inhibition of the pressure-induced shift in the half-point of voltage-dependence of activation is separate from the mechanisms of use-dependent block. Modulation of Na(V)1.5 mechanosensitivity by the membrane permeable local anesthetics may require hydrophobic access and may involve membrane-protein interactions.

  8. Characterization and localization of the putative 'link' component in rat small-intestinal mucin.

    PubMed Central

    Fahim, R E; Specian, R D; Forstner, G G; Forstner, J F

    1987-01-01

    Rat intestinal mucin is polymerized by a putative 'link' component of Mr 118,000 that can be released from the native mucin by thiol reduction [Fahim, Forstner & Forstner (1983) Biochem. J. 209, 117-124]. To confirm that this component is an integral part of the mucin and independent of the mucin purification technique, rat mucin was purified in the present study by three independent techniques. In all cases, the 118,000-Mr component was released after reduction. The 118 kDa band was electroeluted from SDS/polyacrylamide gels and its composition shown to resemble closely that of the link component of human intestinal mucin [Mantle, Forstner & Forstner (1984) Biochem. J. 224, 345-354]. Carbohydrates were present, including significant (10 mol/100 mol) amounts of mannose, suggesting the presence of N-linked oligosaccharides. Monospecific antibodies prepared against the rat 118,000-Mr component established its tissue localization in intestinal goblet cells. Mucins subjected to SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and Western blots using the same antibody, established that the link components of rat and human intestinal mucin are similar antigenically. Brief exposure (10 min) of native rat mucin to trypsin or Pronase (enzyme/mucin protein, 1:500, w/w) also released a 118,000-Mr component that reacted with the monospecific antibody. Thus the 118,000-Mr component is an integral part of the mucin and, although linked to large glycopeptides by disulphide bonds, this component also has proteinase-sensitive peptide bonds, presumably at terminal locations such that brief treatment with proteinases releases the molecule in a reasonably intact form. Under physiological conditions, therefore, one might expect that, after mucin is secreted into the intestinal lumen, luminal proteinases would rapidly remove the link component, thereby causing the mucin to depolymerize. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:3311021

  9. Unmasking local activity within local field potentials (LFPs) by removing distal electrical signals using independent component analysis

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Nathan W.; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Local field potentials (LFPs) are commonly thought to reflect the aggregate dynamics in local neural circuits around recording electrodes. However, we show that when LFPs are recorded in awake behaving animals against a distal reference on the skull as commonly practiced, LFPs are significantly contaminated by non-local and non-neural sources arising from the reference electrode and from movement-related noise. In a data set with simultaneously recorded LFPs and electroencephalograms (EEGs) across multiple brain regions while rats perform an auditory oddball task, we used independent component analysis (ICA) to identify signals arising from electrical reference and from volume-conducted noise based on their distributed spatial pattern across multiple electrodes and distinct power spectral features. These sources of distal electrical signals collectively accounted for 23–77% of total variance in unprocessed LFPs, as well as most of the gamma oscillation responses to the target stimulus in EEGs. Gamma oscillation power was concentrated in volume-conducted noise and was tightly coupled with the onset of licking behavior, suggesting a likely origin of muscle activity associated with body movement or orofacial movement. The removal of distal signal contamination also selectively reduced correlations of LFP/EEG signals between distant brain regions but not within the same region. Finally, the removal of contamination from distal electrical signals preserved an event-related potential (ERP) response to auditory stimuli in the frontal cortex and also increased the coupling between the frontal ERP amplitude and neuronal activity in the basal forebrain, supporting the conclusion that removing distal electrical signals unmasked local activity within LFPs. Together, these results highlight the significant contamination of LFPs by distal electrical signals and caution against the straightforward interpretation of unprocessed LFPs. Our results provide a principled approach to

  10. The μ Subunit of Arabidopsis Adaptor Protein-2 Is Involved in Effector-Triggered Immunity Mediated by Membrane-Localized Resistance Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Hillmer, Rachel; Yamaoka, Shohei; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Katagiri, Fumiaki

    2016-05-01

    Endocytosis has been suggested to be important in the cellular processes of plant immune responses. However, our understanding of its role during effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is still limited. We have previously shown that plant endocytosis, especially clathrin-coated vesicle formation at the plasma membrane, is mediated by the adaptor protein-2 (AP-2) complex and that loss of the μ subunit of AP-2 (AP2M) affects plant growth and floral organ development. Here, we report that AP2M is required for full-strength ETI mediated by the disease resistance (R) genes RPM1 and RPS2 in Arabidopsis. Reduced ETI was observed in an ap2m mutant plant, measured by growth of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 strains carrying the corresponding effector genes avrRpm1 or avrRpt2 and by hypersensitive cell death response and defense gene expression triggered by these strains. In contrast, RPS4-mediated ETI and its associated immune responses were not affected by the ap2m mutation. While RPM1 and RPS2 are localized to the plasma membrane, RPS4 is localized to the cytoplasm and nucleus. Our results suggest that AP2M is involved in ETI mediated by plasma membrane-localized R proteins, possibly by mediating endocytosis of the immune receptor complex components from the plasma membrane.

  11. Local sparse component analysis for blind source separation: an application to resting state FMRI.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Gilson; Amaro, Edson; Baccala, Luiz A

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new Blind Source Separation technique for whole-brain activity estimation that best profits from FMRI's intrinsic spatial sparsity. The Local Sparse Component Analysis (LSCA) combines wavelet analysis, group-separable regularizers, contiguity-constrained clusterization and principal components analysis (PCA) into a unique spatial sparse representation of FMRI images towards efficient dimensionality reduction without sacrificing physiological characteristics by avoiding artificial stochastic model constraints. The LSCA outperforms classical PCA source reconstruction for artificial data sets over many noise levels. A real FMRI data illustration reveals resting-state activities in regions hard to observe, such as thalamus and basal ganglia, because of their small spatial scale. PMID:25571267

  12. TRP Channels Localize to Subdomains of the Apical Plasma Membrane in Human Fetal Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Peter Y.; Gan, Geliang; Peng, Shaomin; Wang, Shao-Bin; Chen, Bo; Adelman, Ron A.; Rizzolo, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Calcium regulates many functions of the RPE. Its concentration in the subretinal space and RPE cytoplasm is closely regulated. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are a superfamily of ion channels that are moderately calcium-selective. This study investigates the subcellular localization and potential functions of TRP channels in a first-passage culture model of human fetal RPE (hfRPE). Methods. The RPE isolated from 15- to 16-week gestation fetuses were maintained in serum-free media. Cultures were treated with barium chloride (BaCl2) in the absence and presence of TRP channel inhibitors and monitored by the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). The expression of TRP channels was determined using quantitative RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. Results. Barium chloride substantially decreased TER and disrupted cell–cell contacts when added to the apical surface of RPE, but not when added to the basolateral surface. The effect could be partially blocked by the general TRP inhibitor, lanthanum chloride (LaCl3, ~75%), or an inhibitor of calpain (~25%). Family member-specific inhibitors, ML204 (TRPC4) and HC-067047 (TRPV4), had no effect on basal channel activity. Expression of TRPC4, TRPM1, TRPM3, TRPM7, and TRPV4 was detected by RT-PCR and immunoblotting. The TRPM3 localized to the base of the primary cilium, and TRPC4 and TRPM3 localized to apical tight junctions. The TRPV4 localized to apical microvilli in a small subset of cells. Conclusions. The TRP channels localized to subdomains of the apical membrane, and BaCl2 was only able to dissociate tight junctions when presented to the apical membrane. The data suggest a potential role for TRP channels as sensors of [Ca2+] in the subretinal space. PMID:25736794

  13. Poisoning of mixed matrix membranes by fermentation components in pervaporation of ethanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pervaporation is an alternative to distillation for recovering ethanol produced by fermentation of grains and biomass. Ethanol-selective mixed matrix membranes of the hydrophobic zeolite ZSM-5 in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) have superior performance compared to pure PDMS membranes in pervaporation o...

  14. Backbone and side-chain resonance assignments of the membrane localization domain from Pasteurella multocida toxin.

    PubMed

    Brothers, Michael C; Geissler, Brett; Hisao, Grant S; Satchell, Karla J F; Wilson, Brenda A; Rienstra, Chad M

    2014-04-01

    (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shift assignments are presented for the isolated four-helical bundle membrane localization domain (MLD) from Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) in its solution state. We have assigned 99% of all backbone and side-chain carbon atoms, including 99% of all backbone residues excluding proline amide nitrogens. Secondary chemical shift analysis using TALOS+ demonstrates four helices, which align with those observed within the MLD in the crystal structure of the C-terminus of PMT (PDB 2EBF) and confirm the use of the available crystal structures as templates for the isolated MLDs.

  15. One-dimensional nonlinear elastodynamic models and their local conservation laws with applications to biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Cheviakov, A F; Ganghoffer, J-F

    2016-05-01

    The framework of incompressible nonlinear hyperelasticity and viscoelasticity is applied to the derivation of one-dimensional models of nonlinear wave propagation in fiber-reinforced elastic solids. Equivalence transformations are used to simplify the resulting wave equations and to reduce the number of parameters. Local conservation laws and global conserved quantities of the models are systematically computed and discussed, along with other related mathematical properties. Sample numerical solutions are presented. The models considered in the paper are appropriate for the mathematical description of certain aspects of the behavior of biological membranes and similar structures. PMID:26410196

  16. One-dimensional nonlinear elastodynamic models and their local conservation laws with applications to biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Cheviakov, A F; Ganghoffer, J-F

    2016-05-01

    The framework of incompressible nonlinear hyperelasticity and viscoelasticity is applied to the derivation of one-dimensional models of nonlinear wave propagation in fiber-reinforced elastic solids. Equivalence transformations are used to simplify the resulting wave equations and to reduce the number of parameters. Local conservation laws and global conserved quantities of the models are systematically computed and discussed, along with other related mathematical properties. Sample numerical solutions are presented. The models considered in the paper are appropriate for the mathematical description of certain aspects of the behavior of biological membranes and similar structures.

  17. Progesterone, Inflammatory Cytokine (TNF-α), and Oxidative Stress (H2O2) Regulate Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 Expression in Fetal Membrane Cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yan; Murtha, Amy P; Feng, Liping

    2016-09-01

    Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) is an important novel mediator of progesterone (P4) function in fetal membrane cells. We demonstrated previously that PGRMC1 is differentially expressed in fetal membranes among pregnancy subjects and diminished in preterm premature rupture of membrane subjects. In the current study, we aim to elucidate whether PGRMC1 expression is regulated by P4, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and H2O2 in fetal membrane cells. Primary cultured membrane cells were serum starved for 24 hours followed by treatments of P4, 17 hydroxyprogesterone caproate, and medroxyprogesterone 17 acetate (MPA) at 10(-7) mol/L with ethanol as vehicle control; TNF-α at 10, 20, and 50 ng/mL with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as control; and H2O2 at 10 and 100 μmol/L with culture media as control for 24, 48, and 72 hours. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of PGRMC1 was quantified using polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. We found that PGRMC1 protein expression was regulated by MPA, TNF-α, and H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner. This regulation is also specific to the type of cell (amnion, chorion, or decidua). The upregulation of PGRMC1 by MPA might be mediated through glucocorticoid receptor (GR) demonstrated using amnion and chorion cells model with GR knockdown by specific small interfering RNA transfection. The mRNA expression of PGRMC1 was decreased by H2O2 (100 μmol/L) treatment in amnion cells, which might ultimately result in downregulation of PGRMC1 protein as our data demonstrated. None of other treatments changed PGRMC1 mRNA level in these cells. We conclude that these stimuli act as regulatory factors of PGRMC1 in a cell-specific manner. PMID:26919974

  18. Effect of relative humidity cycles accompanied by intermittent start/stop switches on performance degradation of membrane electrode assembly components in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yanling; Zhong, Hexiang; Wang, Meiri; Zhang, Huamin

    2015-06-01

    The performance degradation of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) components in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is studied by designing relative humidity (RH) cycles accompanied by intermittent start/stop switches. Cathode catalyst activity, permeability and resistance of proton exchange membrane (PEM) as well as cell performance are monitored during the test procedure. The interfaces of MEA, the catalyst particle distribution near the cathode inlet are characterized by SEM and TEM, respectively. The results demonstrate both the overall H2 permeability and crossover current of PEM are doubled compared with its initial properties. Signs of PEM degradation, including periodical thinning, cracks and pinholes formation, are observed after 300 RH cycles and 40 times of start/stop switches. The average Pt particle size increases by more than 75%, and the cathode electrochemical surface area decreases by 48% after the test procedure. Meanwhile, the cathode catalyst layer becomes looser due to the dissolution of some smaller Pt particles and catalyst agglomeration in the RH cycles and the high potential during the intermittent start/stop switches. The membrane resistance demonstrates downshift variation during the RH cycles. PEMFC performance, however, decays due to the chemical and electrochemical attack as well as the mechanical stresses.

  19. Membrane localization and topology of the DnpA protein control fluoroquinolone tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Liebens, Veerle; Frangipani, Emanuela; Van der Leyden, Annelies; Fauvart, Maarten; Visca, Paolo; Michiels, Jan

    2016-09-01

    DnpA, a putative de-N-acetylase of the PIG-L superfamily, is required for antibiotic tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exactly how dnpA (gene locus PA5002) directs the formation of antibiotic-tolerant persister cells is currently unknown. Previous research provided evidence for a role in surface-associated process(es), possibly in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. In silico sequence analysis of DnpA predicts a single transmembrane domain and Nin/Cout orientation of DnpA. In contrast, we here show that DnpA is an integral inner membrane protein containing two transmembrane domains, with the major C-terminal part located at the cytoplasmic face. Correct insertion into the inner membrane is necessary for DnpA to promote fluoroquinolone tolerance. The membrane localization of DnpA further supports its role in cell envelope-associated process(es). In addition to shedding light on the biological role of DnpA, this study highlights the risks of overreliance on the predictive value of bioinformatics tools and the importance of rigorous experimental validation of in silico predictions. PMID:27481702

  20. N-terminal palmitoylation is required for Toxoplasma gondii HSP20 inner membrane complex localization.

    PubMed

    De Napoli, M G; de Miguel, N; Lebrun, M; Moreno, S N J; Angel, S O; Corvi, M M

    2013-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite and the causative agent of toxoplasmosis. Protein palmitoylation is known to play roles in signal transduction and in enhancing the hydrophobicity of proteins thus contributing to their membrane association. Global inhibition of protein palmitoylation has been shown to affect T. gondii physiology and invasion of the host cell. However, the proteins affected by this modification have been understudied. This paper shows that the small heat shock protein 20 from T. gondii (TgHSP20) is synthesized as a mature protein in the cytosol and is palmitoylated in three cysteine residues. However, its localization at the inner membrane complex (IMC) is dependent only on N-terminal palmitoylation. Absence or incomplete N-terminal palmitoylation causes TgHSP20 to partially accumulate in a membranous structure. Interestingly, TgHSP20 palmitoylation is not responsible for its interaction with the daughter cells IMCs. Together, our data describe the importance of palmitoylation in protein targeting to the IMC in T. gondii. PMID:23485398

  1. N-terminal palmitoylation is required for Toxoplasma gondii HSP20 inner membrane complex localization

    PubMed Central

    De Napoli, MG; de Miguel, N; Lebrun, M; Moreno, SNJ; Angel, SO; Corvi, MM

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite and the causative agent of toxoplasmosis. Protein palmitoylation is known to play roles in signal transduction and in enhancing the hydrophobicity of proteins thus contributing to their membrane association. Global inhibition of protein palmitoylation has been shown to affect T. gondii physiology and invasion of the host cell. However, the proteins affected by this modification have been understudied. This paper shows that the small heat shock protein 20 from T. gondii (TgHSP20) is synthesized as a mature protein in the cytosol and is palmitoylated in three cysteine residues. However, its localization at the inner membrane complex (IMC) is dependent only on N-terminal palmitoylation. Absence or incomplete N-terminal palmitoylation causes TgHSP20 to partially accumulate in a membranous structure. Interestingly, TgHSP20 palmitoylation is not responsible for its interaction with the daughter cells IMCs. Together, our data describe the importance of palmitoylation in protein targeting to the IMC in T. gondii. PMID:23485398

  2. N-terminal palmitoylation is required for Toxoplasma gondii HSP20 inner membrane complex localization.

    PubMed

    De Napoli, M G; de Miguel, N; Lebrun, M; Moreno, S N J; Angel, S O; Corvi, M M

    2013-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite and the causative agent of toxoplasmosis. Protein palmitoylation is known to play roles in signal transduction and in enhancing the hydrophobicity of proteins thus contributing to their membrane association. Global inhibition of protein palmitoylation has been shown to affect T. gondii physiology and invasion of the host cell. However, the proteins affected by this modification have been understudied. This paper shows that the small heat shock protein 20 from T. gondii (TgHSP20) is synthesized as a mature protein in the cytosol and is palmitoylated in three cysteine residues. However, its localization at the inner membrane complex (IMC) is dependent only on N-terminal palmitoylation. Absence or incomplete N-terminal palmitoylation causes TgHSP20 to partially accumulate in a membranous structure. Interestingly, TgHSP20 palmitoylation is not responsible for its interaction with the daughter cells IMCs. Together, our data describe the importance of palmitoylation in protein targeting to the IMC in T. gondii.

  3. ATPaseTb2, a Unique Membrane-bound FoF1-ATPase Component, Is Essential in Bloodstream and Dyskinetoplastic Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Šubrtová, Karolína; Panicucci, Brian; Zíková, Alena

    2015-01-01

    In the infectious stage of Trypanosoma brucei, an important parasite of humans and livestock, the mitochondrial (mt) membrane potential (Δψm) is uniquely maintained by the ATP hydrolytic activity and subsequent proton pumping of the essential FoF1-ATPase. Intriguingly, this multiprotein complex contains several trypanosome-specific subunits of unknown function. Here, we demonstrate that one of the largest novel subunits, ATPaseTb2, is membrane-bound and localizes with monomeric and multimeric assemblies of the FoF1-ATPase. Moreover, RNAi silencing of ATPaseTb2 quickly leads to a significant decrease of the Δψm that manifests as a decreased growth phenotype, indicating that the FoF1-ATPase is impaired. To further explore the function of this protein, we employed a trypanosoma strain that lacks mtDNA (dyskinetoplastic, Dk) and thus subunit a, an essential component of the proton pore in the membrane Fo-moiety. These Dk cells generate the Δψm by combining the hydrolytic activity of the matrix-facing F1-ATPase and the electrogenic exchange of ATP4- for ADP3- by the ATP/ADP carrier (AAC). Surprisingly, in addition to the expected presence of F1-ATPase, the monomeric and multimeric FoF1-ATPase complexes were identified. In fact, the immunoprecipitation of a F1-ATPase subunit demonstrated that ATPaseTb2 was a component of these complexes. Furthermore, RNAi studies established that the membrane-bound ATPaseTb2 subunit is essential for maintaining normal growth and the Δψm of Dk cells. Thus, even in the absence of subunit a, a portion of the FoF1-ATPase is assembled in Dk cells. PMID:25714685

  4. Localization of Components of the RNA-Degrading Machine in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Cascante-Estepa, Nora; Gunka, Katrin; Stülke, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    In bacteria, the control of mRNA stability is crucial to allow rapid adaptation to changing conditions. In most bacteria, RNA degradation is catalyzed by the RNA degradosome, a protein complex composed of endo- and exoribonucleases, RNA helicases, and accessory proteins. In the Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis, the existence of a RNA degradosome assembled around the membrane-bound endoribonuclease RNase Y has been proposed. Here, we have studied the intracellular localization of the protein that have been implicated in the potential B. subtilis RNA degradosome, i.e., polynucleotide phosphorylase, the exoribonucleases J1 and J2, the DEAD-box RNA helicase CshA, and the glycolytic enzymes enolase and phosphofructokinase. Our data suggests that the bulk of these enzymes is located in the cytoplasm. The RNases J1 and J2 as well as the RNA helicase CshA were mainly localized in the peripheral regions of the cell where also the bulk of messenger RNA is localized. We were able to demonstrate active exclusion of these proteins from the transcribing nucleoid. Taken together, our findings suggest that the interactions of the enzymes involved in RNA degradation in B. subtilis are rather transient. PMID:27708634

  5. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates. PMID:27230411

  6. Continuity of monolayer-bilayer junctions for localization of lipid raft microdomains in model membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ryu, Yong -Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng -Hun; Lee, Sang -Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang -Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin -Doo

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed betweenmore » the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Furthermore, our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.« less

  7. Integrin-like proteins are localized to plasma membrane fractions, not plastids, in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swatzell, L. J.; Edelmann, R. E.; Makaroff, C. A.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1999-01-01

    Integrins are a large family of integral membrane proteins that function in signal transduction in animal systems. These proteins are conserved in vertebrates, invertebrates, and fungi. Evidence from previous research suggests that integrin-like proteins may be present in plants as well, and that these proteins may function in signal transduction during gravitropism. In past studies, researchers have used monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to localize beta 1 integrin-like proteins in plants. However, there is a disparity between data collected from these studies, especially since molecular weights obtained from these investigations range from 55-120 kDa for integrin-like proteins. To date, a complete investigation which employs all three basic immunolabeling procedures, immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, and immunogold labeling, in addition to extensive fractionation and exhaustive controls, has been lacking. In this paper, we demonstrate that use of a polyclonal antibody against the cytoplasmic domain of avian beta 1-integrin can produce potential artifacts in immunolocalization studies. However, these problems can be eliminated through use of starchless mutants or proper specimen preparation prior to electrophoresis. We also show that this antibody, when applied within the described parameters and with careful controls, identifies a large (100 kDa) integrin-like protein that is localized to plasma membrane fractions in Arabidopsis.

  8. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates. PMID:27230411

  9. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.

  10. Distinguishing between Luminal and Localized Proton Buffering Pools in Thylakoid Membranes1

    PubMed Central

    Ewy, Robert G.; Dilley, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    The dual gradient energy coupling hypothesis posits that chloroplast thylakoid membranes are energized for ATP formation by either a delocalized or a localized proton gradient geometry. Localized energy coupling is characterized by sequestered domains with a buffering capacity of approximately 150 nmol H+ mg−1 chlorophyll (Chl). A total of 30 to 40 nmol mg−1 Chl of the total sequestered domain buffering capacity is contributed by lysines with anomolously low pKas, which can be covalently derivatized with acetic anhydride. We report that in thylakoid membranes treated with acetic anhydride, luminal acidification by a photosystem I (duraquinol [DQH2] to methyl viologen [MV]) proton pumping partial reaction was nearly completely inhibited, as measured by three separate assays, yet surprisingly, H+ accumulation still occurred to the significant level of more than 100 nmol H+ mg Chl−1, presumably into the sequestered domains. The treatment did not increase the observed rate constant of dark H+ efflux, nor was electron transport significantly inhibited. These data provide support for the existence of a sequestered proton translocating pathway linking the redox reaction H+ ion sources with the CF0 H+ channel. The sequestered, low-pKa Lys groups appear to have a role in the H+ diffusion process and chemically modifying them blocks the putative H+ relay system. PMID:10677451

  11. Perkinsus marinus superoxide dismutase 2 (PmSOD2) localizes to single-membrane subcellular compartments

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Robledo, Jose A.; Schott, Eric J.; Vasta, Gerardo R.

    2008-10-17

    Perkinsus marinus (Phylum Perkinsozoa), a protozoan parasite of oysters, is considered one of the earliest diverging groups of the lineage leading to dinoflagellates. Perkinsus trophozoites are phagocytosed by oyster hemocytes, where they are likely exposed to reactive oxygen species. As part of its reactive oxygen detoxifying pathway, P. marinus possesses two iron-cofactored SOD (PmSOD1 and PmSOD2). Immunoflourescence analysis of P. marinus trophozoites and gene complementation in yeast revealed that PmSOD1 is targeted to the mitochondria. Surprisingly, although PmSOD2 is characterized by a bipartite N-terminus extension typical of plastid targeting, in preliminary immunofluorescence studies it was visualized as punctuate regions in the cytoplasm that could not be assigned to any organelle. Here, we used immunogold electron microscopy to examine the subcellular localization PmSOD2 in P. marinus trophozoites. Gold grains were mostly associated with single-membrane vesicle-like structures, and eventually, localized to electron-dense, apparently amorphous material present in the lumen of a larger, unique compartment. The images suggested that PmSOD2 is targeted to small vesicles that fuse and/or discharge their content into a larger compartment, possibly the large vacuole typical of the mature trophozoites. In light of the in silico targeting prediction, the association of PmSOD2 with single-membrane compartments raises interesting questions regarding its organellar targeting, and the nature of a putative relic plastid in Perkinsus species.

  12. Modification of pro-inflammatory signaling by dietary components: The plasma membrane as a target.

    PubMed

    Ciesielska, Anna; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna

    2015-07-01

    You are what you eat - this well-known phrase properly describes the phenomenon of the effects of diet on acute and chronic inflammation. Several lipids and lipophilic compounds that are delivered with food or are produced in situ in pathological conditions exert immunomodulatory activity due to their interactions with the plasma membrane. This group of compounds includes cholesterol and its oxidized derivatives, fatty acids, α-tocopherol, and polyphenols. Despite their structural heterogeneity, all these compounds ultimately induce changes in plasma membrane architecture and fluidity. By doing this, they modulate the dynamics of plasma membrane receptors, such as TLR4. This receptor is activated by lipopolysaccharide, triggering acute inflammation during bacterial infection, which often leads to sepsis and is linked with diverse chronic inflammatory diseases. In this review, we discuss how the impact on plasma membrane properties contributes to the immunomodulatory activity of dietary compounds, pointing to the therapeutic potential of some of them. Also watch the Video Abstract. PMID:25966354

  13. Intracellular localization of membrane-bound ATPases in the compartmentalized anammox bacterium ‘Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis’

    PubMed Central

    van Niftrik, Laura; van Helden, Mary; Kirchen, Silke; van Donselaar, Elly G; Harhangi, Harry R; Webb, Richard I; Fuerst, John A; Op den Camp, Huub J M; Jetten, Mike S M; Strous, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria are divided into three compartments by bilayer membranes (from out- to inside): paryphoplasm, riboplasm and anammoxosome. It is proposed that the anammox reaction is performed by proteins located in the anammoxosome and on its membrane giving rise to a proton-motive-force and subsequent ATP synthesis by membrane-bound ATPases. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the location of membrane-bound ATPases in the anammox bacterium ‘Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis’. Four ATPase gene clusters were identified in the K. stuttgartiensis genome: one typical F-ATPase, two atypical F-ATPases and a prokaryotic V-ATPase. K. stuttgartiensis transcriptomic and proteomic analysis and immunoblotting using antisera directed at catalytic subunits of the ATPase gene clusters indicated that only the typical F-ATPase gene cluster most likely encoded a functional ATPase under these cultivation conditions. Immunogold localization showed that the typical F-ATPase was predominantly located on both the outermost and anammoxosome membrane and to a lesser extent on the middle membrane. This is consistent with the anammox physiology model, and confirms the status of the outermost cell membrane as cytoplasmic membrane. The occurrence of ATPase in the anammoxosome membrane suggests that anammox bacteria have evolved a prokaryotic organelle; a membrane-bounded compartment with a specific cellular function: energy metabolism. PMID:20545867

  14. Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase by membrane-targeted Raf chimeras is independent of raft localization.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Resh, M D

    2001-09-14

    Binding of proteins to the plasma membrane can be achieved with various membrane targeting motifs, including combinations of fatty acids, isoprenoids, and basic domains. In this study, we investigate whether attachment of different membrane targeting motifs influences the signaling capacity of membrane-bound signal transduction proteins by directing the proteins to different membrane microdomains. We used c-Raf-1 as a model for a signaling protein that is activated when membrane-bound. Three different membrane targeting motifs from K-Ras, Fyn, and Src proteins were fused to the N or C terminus of Raf-1. The ability of the modified Rafs to initiate MAPK signaling was then investigated. All three modified Raf-1 constructs activated MAPK to nearly equivalent levels. The extent of localization of the Raf-1 constructs to membrane microdomains known as rafts did not correlate with the level of MAPK activation. Moreover, treatment of cells with the raft disrupting drug methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbetaCD) caused activation of MAPK to levels equivalent to those achieved with membrane-targeted Raf constructs. The use of pharmacological agents as well as dominant negative mutants revealed that MAPK activation by MbetaCD proceeds via a phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependent mechanism that is Ras/Raf-independent. We conclude that cholesterol depletion from the plasma membrane by MbetaCD constitutes an alternative pathway for activating MAPK.

  15. Targeting and assembly of components of the TOC protein import complex at the chloroplast outer envelope membrane.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Lynn G L; Paila, Yamuna D; Siman, Steven R; Chen, Yi; Smith, Matthew D; Schnell, Danny J

    2014-01-01

    The translocon at the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts (TOC) initiates the import of thousands of nuclear encoded preproteins required for chloroplast biogenesis and function. The multimeric TOC complex contains two GTP-regulated receptors, Toc34 and Toc159, which recognize the transit peptides of preproteins and initiate protein import through a β-barrel membrane channel, Toc75. Different isoforms of Toc34 and Toc159 assemble with Toc75 to form structurally and functionally diverse translocons, and the composition and levels of TOC translocons is required for the import of specific subsets of coordinately expressed proteins during plant growth and development. Consequently, the proper assembly of the TOC complexes is key to ensuring organelle homeostasis. This review will focus on our current knowledge of the targeting and assembly of TOC components to form functional translocons at the outer membrane. Our analyses reveal that the targeting of TOC components involves elements common to the targeting of other outer membrane proteins, but also include unique features that appear to have evolved to specifically facilitate assembly of the import apparatus.

  16. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) expression in murine retina

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Arul K.; Mysona, Barbara A.; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Jing; Tawfik, Amany; Sanders, A.; Markand, Shanu; Zorrilla, Eric; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Bollinger, Kathryn E.; Smith, Sylvia B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sigma receptor 1 (σR1) and 2 (σR2) are thought to be two distinct proteins which share the ability to bind multiple ligands, several of which are common to both receptors. Whether σR1 and σR2 share overlapping biological functions is unknown. Recently, progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) was shown to contain the putative σR2 binding site. PGRMC1 has not been studied in retina. We hypothesize that biological interactions between σR1 and PGRMC1 will be evidenced by compensatory upregulation of PGRMC1 in σR1−/− mice. Methods Immunofluorescence, RT-PCR, and immunoblotting methods were used to analyze expression of PGRMC1 in wild type mouse retina. Tissues from σR1−/− mice were used to investigate whether a biological interaction exists between σR1 and PGRMC1. Results In the eye, PGRMC1 is expressed in corneal epithelium, lens, ciliary body epithelium, and retina. In retina, PGRMC1 is present in Müller cells and retinal pigment epithelium. This expression pattern is similar, but not identical to σR1. PGRMC1 protein levels in neural retina and eye cup from σR1−/− mice did not differ from wild type mice. Nonocular tissues, lung, heart, and kidney showed similar Pgrmc1 gene expression in wild type and σR1−/− mice. In contrast, liver, brain and intestine showed increased Pgrmc1 gene expression in σR1−/− mice. Conclusion Despite potential biological overlap, deletion of σR1 did not result in a compensatory change in PGRMC1 protein levels in σR1−/− mouse retina. Increased Pgrmc1 gene expression in organs with high lipid content such as liver, brain, and intestine indicate a possible tissue specific interaction between σR1 and PGRMC1. The current studies establish the presence of PGRMC1 in retina and lay the foundation for analysis of its biological function. PMID:26642738

  17. A modular platform for one-step assembly of multi-component membrane systems by fusion of charged proteoliposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishmukhametov, Robert R.; Russell, Aidan N.; Berry, Richard M.

    2016-10-01

    An important goal in synthetic biology is the assembly of biomimetic cell-like structures, which combine multiple biological components in synthetic lipid vesicles. A key limiting assembly step is the incorporation of membrane proteins into the lipid bilayer of the vesicles. Here we present a simple method for delivery of membrane proteins into a lipid bilayer within 5 min. Fusogenic proteoliposomes, containing charged lipids and membrane proteins, fuse with oppositely charged bilayers, with no requirement for detergent or fusion-promoting proteins, and deliver large, fragile membrane protein complexes into the target bilayers. We demonstrate the feasibility of our method by assembling a minimal electron transport chain capable of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis, combining Escherichia coli F1Fo ATP-synthase and the primary proton pump bo3-oxidase, into synthetic lipid vesicles with sizes ranging from 100 nm to ~10 μm. This provides a platform for the combination of multiple sets of membrane protein complexes into cell-like artificial structures.

  18. A modular platform for one-step assembly of multi-component membrane systems by fusion of charged proteoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    Ishmukhametov, Robert R.; Russell, Aidan N.; Berry, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    An important goal in synthetic biology is the assembly of biomimetic cell-like structures, which combine multiple biological components in synthetic lipid vesicles. A key limiting assembly step is the incorporation of membrane proteins into the lipid bilayer of the vesicles. Here we present a simple method for delivery of membrane proteins into a lipid bilayer within 5 min. Fusogenic proteoliposomes, containing charged lipids and membrane proteins, fuse with oppositely charged bilayers, with no requirement for detergent or fusion-promoting proteins, and deliver large, fragile membrane protein complexes into the target bilayers. We demonstrate the feasibility of our method by assembling a minimal electron transport chain capable of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis, combining Escherichia coli F1Fo ATP-synthase and the primary proton pump bo3-oxidase, into synthetic lipid vesicles with sizes ranging from 100 nm to ∼10 μm. This provides a platform for the combination of multiple sets of membrane protein complexes into cell-like artificial structures. PMID:27708275

  19. Phase separation and near-critical fluctuations in two-component lipid membranes: Monte Carlo simulations on experimentally relevant scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrig, Jens; Petrov, Eugene P.; Schwille, Petra

    2011-04-01

    By means of lattice-based Monte Carlo simulations, we address the properties of two-component lipid membranes on the experimentally relevant spatial scales of the order of a micrometer and time intervals of the order of 1 s, using DMPC/DSPC lipid mixtures as a model system. Our large-scale simulations allowed us to obtain important results not reported previously in simulation studies of lipid membranes. We find that, for a certain range of lipid compositions, the phase transition from the fluid phase to the fluid-gel phase coexistence proceeds via near-critical fluctuations, whereas for other lipid compositions this phase transition has a quasi-abrupt character. In the presence of near-critical fluctuations, transient subdiffusion of lipid molecules is observed. These features of the system are stable with respect to perturbations in lipid interaction parameters used in our simulations. The line tension characterizing lipid domains in the fluid-gel coexistence region is found to be in the pN range. On approaching the critical point, the line tension, the inverse correlation length of fluid-gel spatial fluctuations and the corresponding inverse order parameter susceptibility of the membrane vanish. All these results are in agreement with recent experimental findings for model lipid membranes. Our analysis of the domain coarsening dynamics after an abrupt quench of the membrane to the fluid-gel coexistence region reveals that lateral diffusion of lipids plays an important role in the fluid-gel phase separation process.

  20. Saccharomyces cerevisiae MPS2 Encodes a Membrane Protein Localized at the Spindle Pole Body and the Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Centeno, María de la Cruz; McBratney, Susan; Monterrosa, Antonio; Byers, Breck; Mann, Carl; Winey, Mark

    1999-01-01

    The MPS2 (monopolar spindle two) gene is one of several genes required for the proper execution of spindle pole body (SPB) duplication in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Winey et al., 1991). We report here that the MPS2 gene encodes an essential 44-kDa protein with two putative coiled-coil regions and a hydrophobic sequence. Although MPS2 is required for normal mitotic growth, some null strains can survive; these survivors exhibit slow growth and abnormal ploidy. The MPS2 protein was tagged with nine copies of the myc epitope, and biochemical fractionation experiments show that it is an integral membrane protein. Visualization of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) Mps2p fusion protein in living cells and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of 9xmyc-Mps2p revealed a perinuclear localization with one or two brighter foci of staining corresponding to the SPB. Additionally, immunoelectron microscopy shows that GFP-Mps2p localizes to the SPB. Our analysis suggests that Mps2p is required as a component of the SPB for insertion of the nascent SPB into the nuclear envelope. PMID:10397772

  1. Independent component analysis of EEG dipole source localization in resting and action state of brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almurshedi, Ahmed; Ismail, Abd Khamim

    2015-04-01

    EEG source localization was studied in order to determine the location of the brain sources that are responsible for the measured potentials at the scalp electrodes using EEGLAB with Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithm. Neuron source locations are responsible in generating current dipoles in different states of brain through the measured potentials. The current dipole sources localization are measured by fitting an equivalent current dipole model using a non-linear optimization technique with the implementation of standardized boundary element head model. To fit dipole models to ICA components in an EEGLAB dataset, ICA decomposition is performed and appropriate components to be fitted are selected. The topographical scalp distributions of delta, theta, alpha, and beta power spectrum and cross coherence of EEG signals are observed. In close eyes condition it shows that during resting and action states of brain, alpha band was activated from occipital (O1, O2) and partial (P3, P4) area. Therefore, parieto-occipital area of brain are active in both resting and action state of brain. However cross coherence tells that there is more coherence between right and left hemisphere in action state of brain than that in the resting state. The preliminary result indicates that these potentials arise from the same generators in the brain.

  2. The relative contributions of global and local acceleration components on speed perception and discriminability following adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hietanen, Markus A

    2015-10-01

    The perception of speed is dependent on the history of previously presented speeds. Adaptation to a given speed regularly results in a reduction of perceived speed and an increase in speed discriminability and in certain circumstances can result in an increase in perceived speed. In order to determine the relative contributions of the local and global speed components on perceived speed, this experiment used expanding dot flow fields with accelerating (global), decelerating (global) and mixed accelerating/decelerating (local) speed patterns. Profound decreases in perceived speed are found when viewing low test speeds after adaptation to high speeds. Small increases in the perceived speed of high test speeds occur following adaptation to low speeds. There were small but significant differences in perceived stimulus speed after adaptation due to different acceleration profiles. No evidence for global modulation of speed discriminability following adaptation was found.

  3. Recovery of Phytochemical Components from Various Parts of Morinda citrifolia Extracts by Using Membrane Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnaiah, Duduku; Sarbatly, Rosalam; Nah, Ng Lee

    In this study, extracts from various Morinda Citrifolia parts (leaf, fruit and root) by methanol was separated into permeate and retentate fractions using a membrane system equipped with a nanofiltration (NF) membrane. NF was carried on a ceramic membrane with MWCO of 5 kD. Effect of NF transmembrane pressure at 0.1, 0.12 and 0.17 bar was examined at constant temperature 45EC with constant flow rate. The influence of transmembrane pressure on the efficiency of antioxidant activity and total phenolic content of permeate retentate concentration was examined. The antioxidant activities of crude mengkudu extracts, NF permeate and retentate were evaluated by using the DPPH radical scavenging activity and total phenolic content.

  4. Mechanisms regulating cell membrane localization of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in human hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cepeda, Edgar B; Dediulia, Tatjana; Fernando, Joan; Bertran, Esther; Egea, Gustavo; Navarro, Estanislao; Fabregat, Isabel

    2015-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells with a mesenchymal phenotype show an asymmetric subcellular distribution of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, which is required for cell migration and invasion. In this work we examine the mechanisms that regulate the intracellular trafficking of CXCR4 in HCC cells. Results indicate that HCC cells present CXCR4 at the cell surface, but most of this protein is in endomembranes colocalizing with markers of the Golgi apparatus and recycling endosomes. The presence of high protein levels of CXCR4 present at the cell surface correlates with a mesenchymal-like phenotype and a high autocrine activation of the Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-β) pathway. CXCR4 traffics along the Golgi/exocyst/plasma membrane pathway and requires EXOC4 (Sec8) component of the exocyst complex. HCC cells use distinct mechanisms for the CXCR4 internalization such as dynamin-dependent endocytosis and macropinocytosis. Regardless of the endocytic mechanisms, colocalization of CXCR4 and Rab11 is observed, which could be involved not only in receptor recycling but also in its post-Golgi transport. In summary, this work highlights membrane trafficking pathways whose pharmacological targeting could subsequently result in the inactivation of one of the main guiding mechanisms used by metastatic cells to colonize secondary organs and tissues.

  5. Mechanisms regulating cell membrane localization of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in human hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cepeda, Edgar B; Dediulia, Tatjana; Fernando, Joan; Bertran, Esther; Egea, Gustavo; Navarro, Estanislao; Fabregat, Isabel

    2015-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells with a mesenchymal phenotype show an asymmetric subcellular distribution of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, which is required for cell migration and invasion. In this work we examine the mechanisms that regulate the intracellular trafficking of CXCR4 in HCC cells. Results indicate that HCC cells present CXCR4 at the cell surface, but most of this protein is in endomembranes colocalizing with markers of the Golgi apparatus and recycling endosomes. The presence of high protein levels of CXCR4 present at the cell surface correlates with a mesenchymal-like phenotype and a high autocrine activation of the Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-β) pathway. CXCR4 traffics along the Golgi/exocyst/plasma membrane pathway and requires EXOC4 (Sec8) component of the exocyst complex. HCC cells use distinct mechanisms for the CXCR4 internalization such as dynamin-dependent endocytosis and macropinocytosis. Regardless of the endocytic mechanisms, colocalization of CXCR4 and Rab11 is observed, which could be involved not only in receptor recycling but also in its post-Golgi transport. In summary, this work highlights membrane trafficking pathways whose pharmacological targeting could subsequently result in the inactivation of one of the main guiding mechanisms used by metastatic cells to colonize secondary organs and tissues. PMID:25704914

  6. Yeast Vps13 promotes mitochondrial function and is localized at membrane contact sites

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Sook; Thorsness, Mary K.; Policastro, Robert; McGoldrick, Luke L.; Hollingsworth, Nancy M.; Thorsness, Peter E.; Neiman, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    The Vps13 protein family is highly conserved in eukaryotic cells. Mutations in human VPS13 genes result in a variety of diseases, such as chorea acanthocytosis (ChAc), but the cellular functions of Vps13 proteins are not well defined. In yeast, there is a single VPS13 orthologue, which is required for at least two different processes: protein sorting to the vacuole and sporulation. This study demonstrates that VPS13 is also important for mitochondrial integrity. In addition to preventing transfer of DNA from the mitochondrion to the nucleus, VPS13 suppresses mitophagy and functions in parallel with the endoplasmic reticulum–mitochondrion encounter structure (ERMES). In different growth conditions, Vps13 localizes to endosome–mitochondrion contacts and to the nuclear–vacuole junctions, indicating that Vps13 may function at membrane contact sites. The ability of VPS13 to compensate for the absence of ERMES correlates with its intracellular distribution. We propose that Vps13 is present at multiple membrane contact sites and that separation-of-function mutants are due to loss of Vps13 at specific junctions. Introduction of VPS13A mutations identified in ChAc patients at cognate sites in yeast VPS13 are specifically defective in compensating for the lack of ERMES, suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction might be the basis for ChAc. PMID:27280386

  7. Murein lipoprotein is a critical outer membrane component involved in Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium systemic infection.

    PubMed

    Fadl, A A; Sha, J; Klimpel, G R; Olano, J P; Niesel, D W; Chopra, A K

    2005-02-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Braun (murein) lipoprotein (Lpp) are major components of the outer membrane of gram-negative enteric bacteria that function as potent stimulators of inflammatory and immune responses. In a previous paper, we provided evidence that two functional copies of the lipoprotein gene (lppA and lppB) located on the chromosome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium contributed to bacterial virulence. In this study, we characterized lppA and lppB single-knockout (SKO) mutants and compared them with an lpp double-knockout (DKO) mutant using in vitro and in vivo models. Compared to the lpp DKO mutant, which was nonmotile, the motility of the lpp SKO mutants was significantly increased (73 to 77%), although the level of motility did not reach the level of wild-type (WT) S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Likewise, the cytotoxicity was also significantly increased when T84 human intestinal epithelial cells and RAW264.7 murine macrophages were infected with the lpp SKO mutants compared to the cytotoxicity when cells were infected with the lpp DKO mutant. The level of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in polarized T84 cells infected with the lppB SKO mutant was significantly higher (two- to threefold higher), reaching the level in cells infected with WT S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, than the level in host cells infected with the lppA SKO mutant. The lpp DKO mutant induced minimal levels of IL-8. Similarly, sera from mice infected with the lppB SKO mutant contained 4.5- to 10-fold-higher levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-6; the levels of these cytokines were 1.7- to 3.0-fold greater in the lppA SKO mutant-infected mice than in animals challenged with the lpp DKO mutant. The increased cytokine levels observed with the lppB SKO mutant in mice correlated with greater tissue damage in the livers and spleens of these mice than in the organs of animals infected with the lppA SKO and lpp DKO mutants. Moreover, the lppB SKO mutant-infected mice had increased

  8. Ingestion of colloid in a keratinized epithelium and its localization in membrane-coating granules.

    PubMed

    Hayward, A F

    1976-04-01

    An electron-dense tracer (Thorotrast) was injected into the lamina propria of the keratinized epithelium of the buccal mucosa of rats. Electron microscopy showed that it crossed the basal lamina and penetrated the intercellular spaces of the epithelium up to the proximal layers of the stratum granulosum. Thorotrast was ingested by the epithelial cells in the stratum basale and stratum spinosum and localized in large vesicles and eventually in the membrane-coating granules. The latter, already known to contain lysosomal enzymes, are therefore to be regarded as secondary lysosomes formed in part as a sequel of endocytosis in deeper cell layers. The postulated origin of MCGs directly from the Golgi apparatus is rendered less likely by this observation. Thorotrast remaining in the cells when keratinization is completed is either dispersed into the cytoplasm or else incorporated into keratohyalin granules.

  9. Thermal Regulation of Membrane Lipid Fluidity by a Two-Component System in "Bacillus Subtilis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredeston, L. M.; Marciano, D.; Albanesi, D.; De Mendoza, D.; Delfino, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a simple and robust laboratory exercise on the regulation of membrane unsaturated fatty acid composition in bacteria by a decrease in growth temperature. We take advantage of the well characterized Des pathway of "Bacillus subtilis", composed of a [delta]5-desaturase (encoded by the "des" gene) and the canonical…

  10. Localization of spontaneous magnetoencephalographic activity of neonates and fetuses using independent component and Hilbert phase analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vairavan, Srinivasan; Eswaran, Hari; Preissl, Hubert; Wilson, James D.; Haddad, Naim; Lowery, Curtis L.

    2011-01-01

    The fetal magnetoencephalogram (fMEG) is measured in the presence of large interference from maternal and fetal magnetocardiograms (mMCG and fMCG). These cardiac interferences can be attenuated by orthogonal projection (OP) technique of the corresponding spatial vectors. However, the OP technique redistributes the fMEG signal among the channels and also leaves some cardiac residuals (partially attenuated mMCG and fMCG) due to loss of stationarity in the signal. In this paper, we propose a novel way to extract and localize the neonatal and fetal spontaneous brain activity by using independent component analysis (ICA) technique. In this approach, we perform ICA on a small subset of sensors for 1-min duration. The independent components obtained are further investigated for the presence of discontinuous patterns as identified by the Hilbert phase analysis and are used as decision criteria for localizing the spontaneous brain activity. In order to locate the region of highest spontaneous brain activity content, this analysis is performed on the sensor subsets, which are traversed across the entire sensor space. The region of the spontaneous brain activity as identified by the proposed approach correlated well with the neonatal and fetal head location. In addition, the burst duration and the inter-burst interval computed for the identified discontinuous brain patterns are in agreement with the reported values. PMID:21096327

  11. Localization and Quantitation of Chloroplast Enzymes and Light-Harvesting Components Using Immunocytochemical Methods 12

    PubMed Central

    Mustardy, Laszlo; Cunningham, Francis X.; Gantt, Elisabeth

    1990-01-01

    Seven chloroplast proteins were localized in Porphyridium cruentum (ATCC 50161) by immunolabeling with colloidal gold on electron microscope sections of log phase cells grown under red, green, and white light. Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase labeling occurred almost exclusively in the pyrenoid. The major apoproteins of photosystem I (56-64 kD) occurred mostly over the stromal thylakoid region and also appeared over the thylakoids passing through the pyrenoid. Labeling for photosystem II core components (D2 and a 45 kD Chl-binding protein), for phycobilisomes (allophycocyanin, and a 91 kD Lcm linker) and for ATP synthase (β subunit) were predominantly present in the thylakoid region but not in the pyrenoid region of the chloroplast. Red light cells had increased labeling per thylakoid length for polypeptides of photosystem II and of phycobilisomes, while photosystem I density decreased, compared to white light cells. Conversely, green light cells had a decreased density of photosystem II and phycobilisome polypeptides, while photosystem I density changed little compared with white light cells. A comparison of the immunogold labeling results with data from spectroscopic methods and from rocket immunoelectrophoresis indicates that it can provide a quantitative measure of the relative amounts of protein components as well as their localization in specific organellar compartments. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16667706

  12. Localization and quantitation of chloroplast enzymes and light-harvesting components using immunocytochemical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mustardy, L.; Cunningham, F.X Jr.; Gantt, E. )

    1990-09-01

    Seven chloroplast proteins were localized in Porphyridium cruentum (ATCC 50161) by immunolabeling with colloidal gold on electron microscope sections of log phase cells grown under red, green, and white light. Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase labeling occurred almost exclusively in the pyrenoid. The major apoproteins of photosystem I (56-64 kD) occurred mostly over the stromal thylakoid region and also appeared over the thylakoids passing through the pyrenoid. Labeling for photosystem II core components (D2 and a 45 kD Chl-binding protein), for phycobilisomes (allophycocyanin, and a 91 kD L{sub CM} linker) and for ATP synthase ({beta} subunit) were predominantly present in the thylakoid region but not in the pyrenoid region of the chloroplast. Red light cells had increased labeling per thylakoid length for polypeptides of photosystem II and of phycobilisomes, while photosystem I density decreased, compared to white light cells. Conversely, green light cells had a decreased density of photosystem II and phycobilisome polypeptides, while photosystem I density changed little compared with white light cells. A comparison of the immunogold labeling results with data from spectroscopic methods and from rocket immunoelectrophoresis indicates that it can provide a quantitative measure of the relative amounts of protein components as well as their localization in specific organeller compartments.

  13. A component of the mitochondrial outer membrane proteome of T. brucei probably contains covalent bound fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Albisetti, Anna; Wiese, Sebastian; Schneider, André; Niemann, Moritz

    2015-08-01

    A subclass of eukaryotic proteins is subject to modification with fatty acids, the most common of which are palmitic and myristic acid. Protein acylation allows association with cellular membranes in the absence of transmembrane domains. Here we examine POMP39, a protein previously described to be present in the outer mitochondrial membrane proteome (POMP) of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. POMP39 lacks canonical transmembrane domains, but is likely both myristoylated and palmitoylated on its N-terminus. Interestingly, the protein is also dually localized on the surface of the mitochondrion as well as in the flagellum of both insect-stage and the bloodstream form of the parasites. Upon abolishing of global protein acylation or mutation of the myristoylation site, POMP39 relocates to the cytosol. RNAi-mediated ablation of the protein neither causes a growth phenotype in insect-stage nor bloodstream form trypanosomes.

  14. Immunohistochemical localization of components of the insulin-like growth factor system in human permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Götz, Werner; Heinen, Michael; Lossdörfer, Stefan; Jäger, Andreas

    2006-05-01

    There is growing evidence that the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system plays an important role in the biology of oro-dento-facial tissues and organs, including the development, homeostasis and regeneration of the periodontium. To obtain basic data on the occurrence and distribution of IGF components in human permanent teeth we immunohistochemically investigated 25 extracted, decalcified and paraffin-embedded teeth using mono and polyclonal antibodies against the ligands IGF-I and -II, the IGF1 receptor (IGF1R) and all six IGF binding proteins (IGFBP-1 to -6). In the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the adhering periodontal ligament (PDL), immunoreactivity for IGF-I, -II and IGFBP-1 and -6 was observed. PDL fibroblasts showed immunostaining for the IGF1R. For the cementum, in the acellular cementum only IGF-II could be detected, while outer cementum layers with inserting Sharpey's fibers reacted with all antibodies applied except for IGFBP-4 and -6. In the pulp, mainly fibrotic areas and areas around denticles were immunoreactive for IGF-I, IGFBP-1, -3, -5 and -6. Predentin and odontoblastic processes were stained for IGF-I and IGFBP-3. The spatially oriented occurrence of components of the IGF system in human permanent teeth indicates that specific functions of the IGFs may be localized in particular tissue compartments. In the cementum, several IGF components were found indicating roles in tissue homeostasis or attachment. The PDL may function as a reservoir for IGFs probably bound to ECM components. PDL fibroblasts could then respond in a paracrine manner. In the pulp, the IGF system may be involved in odontoblast biology, fibrosis and denticle formation. PMID:16321360

  15. Localization of peripherin/rds in the disk membranes of cone and rod photoreceptors: relationship to disk membrane morphogenesis and retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The outer segments of vertebrate rod photoreceptor cells consist of an ordered stack of membrane disks, which, except for a few nascent disks at the base of the outer segment, is surrounded by a separate plasma membrane. Previous studies indicate that the protein, peripherin or peripherin/rds, is localized along the rim of mature disks of rod outer segments. A mutation in the gene for this protein has been reported to be responsible for retinal degeneration in the rds mouse. In the present study, we have shown by immunogold labeling of rat and ground squirrel retinas that peripherin/rds is present in the disk rims of cone outer segments as well as rod outer segments. Additionally, in the basal regions of rod and cone outer segments, where disk morphogenesis occurs, we have found that the distribution of peripherin/rds is restricted to a region that is adjacent to the cilium. Extension of its distribution from the cilium coincides with the formation of the disk rim. These results support the model of disk membrane morphogenesis that predicts rim formation to be a second stage of growth, after the first stage in which the ciliary plasma membrane evaginates to form open nascent disks. The results also indicate how the proteins of the outer segment plasma membrane and the disk membranes are sorted into their separate domains: different sets of proteins may be incorporated into membrane outgrowths during different growth stages of disk morphogenesis. Finally, the presence of peripherin/rds protein in both cone and rod outer segment disks, together with the phenotype of the rds mouse, which is characterized by the failure of both rod and cone outer segment formation, suggest that the same rds gene is expressed in both types of photoreceptor cells. PMID:1730772

  16. Use of an ion-selective membrane electrode for the determination of the active components in intestopan.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, M S; Lazarescu, M; Ionescu, A; Baiulescu, G E

    1987-10-01

    The conditions for the determination of broxyquinoline and brobenzoxaldine, the active components of "Intestopan", by use of ion-selective membrane electrodes are described. Broxyquinoline is determined directly through precipitation with CuSO(4), and brobenzoxaldine is first hydrolysed in alkaline solution and the product precipitated with CuSO(4). In both cases the CuSO(4) in excess is determined by potentiometric titration at pH 5.6 with EDTA, a Cu(2+)-selective electrode being used for end-point detection.

  17. The Investigation and Development of Low Cost Hardware Components for Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    George A. Marchetti

    1999-12-15

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell components, which would have a low-cost structure in mass production, were fabricated and tested. A fuel cell electrode structure, comprising a thin layer of graphite (50 microns) and a front-loaded platinum catalyst layer (600 angstroms), was shown to produce significant power densities. In addition, a PEM bipolar plate, comprising flexible graphite, carbon cloth flow-fields and an integrated polymer gasket, was fabricated. Power densities of a two-cell unit using this inexpensive bipolar plate architecture were shown to be comparable to state-of-the-art bipolar plates.

  18. Neural Processes in the Human Temporoparietal Cortex Separated by Localized Independent Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Igelström, Kajsa M; Webb, Taylor W; Graziano, Michael S A

    2015-06-24

    The human temporoparietal junction (TPJ) is a topic of intense research. Imaging studies have identified TPJ activation in association with many higher-order functions such as theory-of-mind, episodic memory, and attention, causing debate about the distribution of different processes. One major challenge is the lack of consensus about the anatomical location and extent of the TPJ. Here, we address this problem using data-driven analysis to test the hypothesis that the bilateral TPJ can be parcellated into subregions. We applied independent component analysis (ICA) to task-free fMRI data within a local region around the bilateral TPJ, iterating the ICA at multiple model orders and in several datasets. The localized analysis allowed finer separation of processes and the use of multiple dimensionalities provided qualitative information about lateralization. We identified four subdivisions that were bilaterally symmetrical and one that was right biased. To test whether the independent components (ICs) reflected true subdivisions, we performed functional connectivity analysis using the IC coordinates as seeds. This confirmed that the subdivisions belonged to distinct networks. The right-biased IC was connected with a network often associated with attentional processing. One bilateral subdivision was connected to sensorimotor regions and another was connected to auditory regions. One subdivision that presented as distinct left- and right-biased ICs was connected to frontoparietal regions. Another subdivision that also had left- and right-biased ICs was connected to social or default mode networks. Our results show that the TPJ in both hemispheres hosts multiple neural processes with connectivity patterns consistent with well developed specialization and lateralization. PMID:26109666

  19. A Potential Nanofiber Membrane Device for Filling Surgical Residual Cavity to Prevent Glioma Recurrence and Improve Local Neural Tissue Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Daoxiang; Lin, Chao; Wen, Xuejun; Gu, Shuying; Zhao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop a novel device with nanofiber membrane capable of sustained release of temozolomide (TMZ) and neuron growth factor (NGF). An improved bio-availability of TMZ and NGF in surroundings proximal to the device was expected to be attained for a prolonged period of time. The device was developed by integrating TMZ-doped polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofiber (TP) membrane and NGF-coated PCL (NGFP) membrane using sodium alginate hydrogel. TP was prepared by direct electrospinning of TMZ/PCL. NGFP membrane was developed by layer-by-layer assembling technology. The incorporation of TMZ-doped nanofiber and NGFP nanofiber in the device was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The number of NGF layer in NGF-coated PCL membrane could be readily measured with energy spectrum analysis. The in vitro release study showed that TP-NGFP-TP membrane could efficiently liberate TMZ to inhibit the growth of C6 glioma cells, and sufficient NGF to induce the differentiation of PC12 neuron cells over four weeks. Such TP-NGFP-TP membrane device can be employed as a tampon to fill up surgical residual cavity and afford residual glioma removal, structural support, hemostasis, and local neural tissue reconstruction in the surgical treatment of glioma. The study opens a horizon to develop multifunctional biomaterial device for maximized glioma treatment efficacy. PMID:27548322

  20. A Potential Nanofiber Membrane Device for Filling Surgical Residual Cavity to Prevent Glioma Recurrence and Improve Local Neural Tissue Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Daoxiang; Lin, Chao; Wen, Xuejun; Gu, Shuying; Zhao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop a novel device with nanofiber membrane capable of sustained release of temozolomide (TMZ) and neuron growth factor (NGF). An improved bio-availability of TMZ and NGF in surroundings proximal to the device was expected to be attained for a prolonged period of time. The device was developed by integrating TMZ-doped polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofiber (TP) membrane and NGF-coated PCL (NGFP) membrane using sodium alginate hydrogel. TP was prepared by direct electrospinning of TMZ/PCL. NGFP membrane was developed by layer-by-layer assembling technology. The incorporation of TMZ-doped nanofiber and NGFP nanofiber in the device was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The number of NGF layer in NGF-coated PCL membrane could be readily measured with energy spectrum analysis. The in vitro release study showed that TP-NGFP-TP membrane could efficiently liberate TMZ to inhibit the growth of C6 glioma cells, and sufficient NGF to induce the differentiation of PC12 neuron cells over four weeks. Such TP-NGFP-TP membrane device can be employed as a tampon to fill up surgical residual cavity and afford residual glioma removal, structural support, hemostasis, and local neural tissue reconstruction in the surgical treatment of glioma. The study opens a horizon to develop multifunctional biomaterial device for maximized glioma treatment efficacy. PMID:27548322

  1. High Accuracy Passive Magnetic Field-Based Localization for Feedback Control Using Principal Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Foong, Shaohui; Sun, Zhenglong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel magnetic field-based sensing system employing statistically optimized concurrent multiple sensor outputs for precise field-position association and localization is presented. This method capitalizes on the independence between simultaneous spatial field measurements at multiple locations to induce unique correspondences between field and position. This single-source-multi-sensor configuration is able to achieve accurate and precise localization and tracking of translational motion without contact over large travel distances for feedback control. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used as a pseudo-linear filter to optimally reduce the dimensions of the multi-sensor output space for computationally efficient field-position mapping with artificial neural networks (ANNs). Numerical simulations are employed to investigate the effects of geometric parameters and Gaussian noise corruption on PCA assisted ANN mapping performance. Using a 9-sensor network, the sensing accuracy and closed-loop tracking performance of the proposed optimal field-based sensing system is experimentally evaluated on a linear actuator with a significantly more expensive optical encoder as a comparison. PMID:27529253

  2. High Accuracy Passive Magnetic Field-Based Localization for Feedback Control Using Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Foong, Shaohui; Sun, Zhenglong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel magnetic field-based sensing system employing statistically optimized concurrent multiple sensor outputs for precise field-position association and localization is presented. This method capitalizes on the independence between simultaneous spatial field measurements at multiple locations to induce unique correspondences between field and position. This single-source-multi-sensor configuration is able to achieve accurate and precise localization and tracking of translational motion without contact over large travel distances for feedback control. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used as a pseudo-linear filter to optimally reduce the dimensions of the multi-sensor output space for computationally efficient field-position mapping with artificial neural networks (ANNs). Numerical simulations are employed to investigate the effects of geometric parameters and Gaussian noise corruption on PCA assisted ANN mapping performance. Using a 9-sensor network, the sensing accuracy and closed-loop tracking performance of the proposed optimal field-based sensing system is experimentally evaluated on a linear actuator with a significantly more expensive optical encoder as a comparison. PMID:27529253

  3. High Accuracy Passive Magnetic Field-Based Localization for Feedback Control Using Principal Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Foong, Shaohui; Sun, Zhenglong

    2016-08-12

    In this paper, a novel magnetic field-based sensing system employing statistically optimized concurrent multiple sensor outputs for precise field-position association and localization is presented. This method capitalizes on the independence between simultaneous spatial field measurements at multiple locations to induce unique correspondences between field and position. This single-source-multi-sensor configuration is able to achieve accurate and precise localization and tracking of translational motion without contact over large travel distances for feedback control. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used as a pseudo-linear filter to optimally reduce the dimensions of the multi-sensor output space for computationally efficient field-position mapping with artificial neural networks (ANNs). Numerical simulations are employed to investigate the effects of geometric parameters and Gaussian noise corruption on PCA assisted ANN mapping performance. Using a 9-sensor network, the sensing accuracy and closed-loop tracking performance of the proposed optimal field-based sensing system is experimentally evaluated on a linear actuator with a significantly more expensive optical encoder as a comparison.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus Hemolysins, bi-component Leukocidins, and Cytolytic Peptides: A Redundant Arsenal of Membrane-Damaging Virulence Factors?

    PubMed Central

    Vandenesch, François; Lina, G.; Henry, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    One key aspect of the virulence of Staphylococcus aureus lies in its ability to target the host cell membrane with a large number of membrane-damaging toxins and peptides. In this review, we describe the hemolysins, the bi-component leukocidins (which include the Panton Valentine leukocidin, LukAB/GH, and LukED), and the cytolytic peptides (phenol soluble modulins). While at first glance, all of these factors might appear redundant, it is now clear that some of these factors play specific roles in certain S. aureus life stages and diseases or target specific cell types or species. In this review, we present an update of the literature on toxin receptors and their cell type and species specificities. Furthermore, we review epidemiological studies and animal models illustrating the role of these membrane-damaging factors in various diseases. Finally, we emphasize the interplay of these factors with the host immune system and highlight all their non-lytic functions. PMID:22919604

  5. Studies on the interactions between parabens and lipid membrane components in monolayers at the air/aqueous solution interface.

    PubMed

    Flasiński, Michał; Gawryś, Maciej; Broniatowski, Marcin; Wydro, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    The interactions between parabens (PBs) and lipid components of mammalian and bacterial cell membranes were investigated in model systems of Langmuir monolayers. Me-, Et-, Pr- and Bu-paraben studied in this paper are frequently applied as cosmetics and food preservatives, since they possess broad antimicrobial activity. The mode of PB action is connected with their incorporation into the membrane of bacterial organisms, however; it is not known what is the role of the respective lipid species in this mechanism. This problem is crucial to understand the differences in paraben activity toward individual microorganisms and to shed the light onto the problem of PB cytotoxicity reported in studies on mammalian cells. In this paper, the mentioned aspects were investigated with application of the Langmuir monolayer technique complemented with BAM and GIXD. Our experiments revealed that the influence of PBs depends on their chemical structure, solution concentration and on the class of lipid. The strongest modification of the monolayer characteristics, leading to its collapse at low surface pressure, occurred in the presence of BuPB, having the largest chain. PBs interact preferentially with the monolayers possessing low degree of condensation, whereas for LC state, the effect was weaker and observed only as modification of the 2D unit cells. In the model systems, PBs interact with phospholipids characteristic for mammalian membranes (phosphatidylcholine) stronger than with bacterial (phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin). This strong influence of parabens on the model systems composed of animal lipids may explain cytotoxic activity of these preservatives. PMID:26777770

  6. Linking Findings in Microfluidics to Membrane Emulsification Process Design: The Importance of Wettability and Component Interactions with Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Schroën, Karin; Ferrando, Montse; de Lamo-Castellví, Silvia; Sahin, Sami; Güell, Carme

    2016-01-01

    In microfluidics and other microstructured devices, wettability changes, as a result of component interactions with the solid wall, can have dramatic effects. In emulsion separation and emulsification applications, the desired behavior can even be completely lost. Wettability changes also occur in one phase systems, but the effect is much more far-reaching when using two-phase systems. For microfluidic emulsification devices, this can be elegantly demonstrated and quantified for EDGE (Edge-base Droplet GEneration) devices that have a specific behavior that allows us to distinguish between surfactant and liquid interactions with the solid surface. Based on these findings, design rules can be defined for emulsification with any micro-structured emulsification device, such as direct and premix membrane emulsification. In general, it can be concluded that mostly surface interactions increase the contact angle toward 90°, either through the surfactant, or the oil that is used. This leads to poor process stability, and very limited pressure ranges at which small droplets can be made in microfluidic systems, and cross-flow membrane emulsification. In a limited number of cases, surface interactions can also lead to lower contact angles, thereby increasing the operational stability. This paper concludes with a guideline that can be used to come to the appropriate combination of membrane construction material (or any micro-structured device), surfactants and liquids, in combination with process conditions. PMID:27187484

  7. Linking Findings in Microfluidics to Membrane Emulsification Process Design: The Importance of Wettability and Component Interactions with Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Schroën, Karin; Ferrando, Montse; de Lamo-Castellví, Silvia; Sahin, Sami; Güell, Carme

    2016-01-01

    In microfluidics and other microstructured devices, wettability changes, as a result of component interactions with the solid wall, can have dramatic effects. In emulsion separation and emulsification applications, the desired behavior can even be completely lost. Wettability changes also occur in one phase systems, but the effect is much more far-reaching when using two-phase systems. For microfluidic emulsification devices, this can be elegantly demonstrated and quantified for EDGE (Edge-base Droplet GEneration) devices that have a specific behavior that allows us to distinguish between surfactant and liquid interactions with the solid surface. Based on these findings, design rules can be defined for emulsification with any micro-structured emulsification device, such as direct and premix membrane emulsification. In general, it can be concluded that mostly surface interactions increase the contact angle toward 90°, either through the surfactant, or the oil that is used. This leads to poor process stability, and very limited pressure ranges at which small droplets can be made in microfluidic systems, and cross-flow membrane emulsification. In a limited number of cases, surface interactions can also lead to lower contact angles, thereby increasing the operational stability. This paper concludes with a guideline that can be used to come to the appropriate combination of membrane construction material (or any micro-structured device), surfactants and liquids, in combination with process conditions. PMID:27187484

  8. Studies on the interactions between parabens and lipid membrane components in monolayers at the air/aqueous solution interface.

    PubMed

    Flasiński, Michał; Gawryś, Maciej; Broniatowski, Marcin; Wydro, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    The interactions between parabens (PBs) and lipid components of mammalian and bacterial cell membranes were investigated in model systems of Langmuir monolayers. Me-, Et-, Pr- and Bu-paraben studied in this paper are frequently applied as cosmetics and food preservatives, since they possess broad antimicrobial activity. The mode of PB action is connected with their incorporation into the membrane of bacterial organisms, however; it is not known what is the role of the respective lipid species in this mechanism. This problem is crucial to understand the differences in paraben activity toward individual microorganisms and to shed the light onto the problem of PB cytotoxicity reported in studies on mammalian cells. In this paper, the mentioned aspects were investigated with application of the Langmuir monolayer technique complemented with BAM and GIXD. Our experiments revealed that the influence of PBs depends on their chemical structure, solution concentration and on the class of lipid. The strongest modification of the monolayer characteristics, leading to its collapse at low surface pressure, occurred in the presence of BuPB, having the largest chain. PBs interact preferentially with the monolayers possessing low degree of condensation, whereas for LC state, the effect was weaker and observed only as modification of the 2D unit cells. In the model systems, PBs interact with phospholipids characteristic for mammalian membranes (phosphatidylcholine) stronger than with bacterial (phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin). This strong influence of parabens on the model systems composed of animal lipids may explain cytotoxic activity of these preservatives.

  9. Dynamin-like protein 1 at the Golgi complex: A novel component of the sorting/targeting machinery en route to the plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Bonekamp, Nina A.; Vormund, Kerstin; Jacob, Ralf; Schrader, Michael

    2010-12-10

    The final step in the liberation of secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) involves the mechanical action of the large GTPase dynamin as well as conserved dynamin-independent fission mechanisms, e.g. mediated by Brefeldin A-dependent ADP-ribosylated substrate (BARS). Another member of the dynamin family is the mammalian dynamin-like protein 1 (DLP1/Drp1) that is known to constrict and tubulate membranes, and to divide mitochondria and peroxisomes. Here, we examined a potential role for DLP1 at the Golgi complex. DLP1 localized to the Golgi complex in some but not all cell lines tested, thus explaining controversial reports on its cellular distribution. After silencing of DLP1, an accumulation of the apical reporter protein YFP-GL-GPI, but not the basolateral reporter VSVG-SP-GFP at the Golgi complex was observed. A reduction in the transport of YFP-GL-GPI to the plasma membrane was confirmed by surface immunoprecipitation and TGN-exit assays. In contrast, YFP-GL-GPI trafficking was not disturbed in cells silenced for BARS, which is involved in basolateral sorting and trafficking of VSVG-SP-GFP in COS-7 cells. Our data indicate a new role for DLP1 at the Golgi complex and thus a role for DLP1 as a novel component of the apical sorting machinery at the TGN is discussed.

  10. Pannexin2 oligomers localize in the membranes of endosomal vesicles in mammalian cells while Pannexin1 channels traffic to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Boassa, Daniela; Nguyen, Phuong; Hu, Junru; Ellisman, Mark H; Sosinsky, Gina E

    2014-01-01

    Pannexin2 (Panx2) is the largest of three members of the pannexin proteins. Pannexins are topologically related to connexins and innexins, but serve different functional roles than forming gap junctions. We previously showed that pannexins form oligomeric channels but unlike connexins and innexins, they form only single membrane channels. High levels of Panx2 mRNA and protein in the Central Nervous System (CNS) have been documented. Whereas Pannexin1 (Panx1) is fairly ubiquitous and Pannexin3 (Panx3) is found in skin and connective tissue, both are fully glycosylated, traffic to the plasma membrane and have functions correlated with extracellular ATP release. Here, we describe trafficking and subcellular localizations of exogenous Panx2 and Panx1 protein expression in MDCK, HeLa, and HEK 293T cells as well as endogenous Panx1 and Panx2 patterns in the CNS. Panx2 was found in intracellular localizations, was partially N-glycosylated, and localizations were non-overlapping with Panx1. Confocal images of hippocampal sections immunolabeled for the astrocytic protein GFAP, Panx1 and Panx2 demonstrated that the two isoforms, Panx1 and Panx2, localized at different subcellular compartments in both astrocytes and neurons. Using recombinant fusions of Panx2 with appended genetic tags developed for correlated light and electron microscopy and then expressed in different cell lines, we determined that Panx2 is localized in the membrane of intracellular vesicles and not in the endoplasmic reticulum as initially indicated by calnexin colocalization experiments. Dual immunofluorescence imaging with protein markers for specific vesicle compartments showed that Panx2 vesicles are early endosomal in origin. In electron tomographic volumes, cross-sections of these vesicles displayed fine structural details and close proximity to actin filaments. Thus, pannexins expressed at different subcellular compartments likely exert distinct functional roles, particularly in the nervous system.

  11. Pannexin2 oligomers localize in the membranes of endosomal vesicles in mammalian cells while Pannexin1 channels traffic to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Boassa, Daniela; Nguyen, Phuong; Hu, Junru; Ellisman, Mark H.; Sosinsky, Gina E.

    2015-01-01

    Pannexin2 (Panx2) is the largest of three members of the pannexin proteins. Pannexins are topologically related to connexins and innexins, but serve different functional roles than forming gap junctions. We previously showed that pannexins form oligomeric channels but unlike connexins and innexins, they form only single membrane channels. High levels of Panx2 mRNA and protein in the Central Nervous System (CNS) have been documented. Whereas Pannexin1 (Panx1) is fairly ubiquitous and Pannexin3 (Panx3) is found in skin and connective tissue, both are fully glycosylated, traffic to the plasma membrane and have functions correlated with extracellular ATP release. Here, we describe trafficking and subcellular localizations of exogenous Panx2 and Panx1 protein expression in MDCK, HeLa, and HEK 293T cells as well as endogenous Panx1 and Panx2 patterns in the CNS. Panx2 was found in intracellular localizations, was partially N-glycosylated, and localizations were non-overlapping with Panx1. Confocal images of hippocampal sections immunolabeled for the astrocytic protein GFAP, Panx1 and Panx2 demonstrated that the two isoforms, Panx1 and Panx2, localized at different subcellular compartments in both astrocytes and neurons. Using recombinant fusions of Panx2 with appended genetic tags developed for correlated light and electron microscopy and then expressed in different cell lines, we determined that Panx2 is localized in the membrane of intracellular vesicles and not in the endoplasmic reticulum as initially indicated by calnexin colocalization experiments. Dual immunofluorescence imaging with protein markers for specific vesicle compartments showed that Panx2 vesicles are early endosomal in origin. In electron tomographic volumes, cross-sections of these vesicles displayed fine structural details and close proximity to actin filaments. Thus, pannexins expressed at different subcellular compartments likely exert distinct functional roles, particularly in the nervous system

  12. Kv1.5 Association Modifies Kv1.3 Traffic and Membrane Localization*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Rubén; Villalonga, Núria; Calvo, Maria; Escalada, Artur; Solsona, Carles; Soler, Concepció; Tamkun, Michael M.; Felipe, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Kv1.3 activity is determined by raft association. In addition to Kv1.3, leukocytes also express Kv1.5, and both channels control physiological responses. Because the oligomeric composition may modify the channel targeting to the membrane, we investigated heterotetrameric Kv1.3/Kv1.5 channel traffic and targeting in HEK cells. Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 generate multiple heterotetramers with differential surface expression according to the subunit composition. FRET analysis and pharmacology confirm the presence of functional hybrid channels. Raft association was evaluated by cholesterol depletion, caveolae colocalization, and lateral diffusion at the cell surface. Immunoprecipitation showed that both Kv1.3 and heteromeric channels associate with caveolar raft domains. However, homomeric Kv1.3 channels showed higher association with caveolin traffic. Moreover, FRAP analysis revealed higher mobility for hybrid Kv1.3/Kv1.5 than Kv1.3 homotetramers, suggesting that heteromers target to distinct surface microdomains. Studies with lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages further supported that different physiological mechanisms govern Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 targeting to rafts. Our results implicate the traffic and localization of Kv1.3/Kv1.5 heteromers in the complex regulation of immune system cells. PMID:18218624

  13. Ligand-dependent localization and function of ORP-VAP complexes at membrane contact sites.

    PubMed

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Kentala, Henriikka; Peränen, Johan; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2015-05-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein/OSBP-related proteins (ORPs) constitute a conserved family of sterol/phospholipid-binding proteins with lipid transporter or sensor functions. We investigated the spatial occurrence and regulation of the interactions of human OSBP/ORPs or the S. cerevisiae orthologs, the Osh (OSBP homolog) proteins, with their endoplasmic reticulum (ER) anchors, the VAMP-associated proteins (VAPs), by employing bimolecular fluorescence complementation and pull-down set-ups. The ORP-VAP interactions localize frequently at distinct subcellular sites, shown in several cases to represent membrane contact sites (MCSs). Using established ORP ligand-binding domain mutants and pull-down assays with recombinant proteins, we show that ORP liganding regulates the ORP-VAP association, alters the subcellular targeting of ORP-VAP complexes, or modifies organelle morphology. There is distinct protein specificity in the effects of the mutants on subcellular targeting of ORP-VAP complexes. We provide evidence that complexes of human ORP2 and VAPs at ER-lipid droplet interfaces regulate the hydrolysis of triglycerides and lipid droplet turnover. The data suggest evolutionarily conserved, complex ligand-dependent functions of ORP-VAP complexes at MCSs, with implications for cellular lipid homeostasis and signaling.

  14. Multiphoton-generated localized electron plasma for membrane permeability modification in single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, T.; Leblanc, M.; McMillan, J.; Westwood, J.; Khodaparast, G. A.

    2014-03-01

    Successful incorporation of a specific macromolecule into a single cell would be ideal for characterizing trafficking dynamics through plasmodesmata or for studying intracellular localizations. Here, we demonstrate NIR femtosecond laser-mediated infiltration of a membrane impermeable dextran-conjugated dye into living cells of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling stems. Based on the reactions of fluorescing vacuoles of transgenic cells and artificial cell walls comprised of nanocellulose, laser intensity and exposure time were adjusted to avoid deleterious effects. Using these plant-tailored laser parameters, cells were injected with the fluorophores and long-term dye retention was observed, all while preserving vital cell functions. This method is ideal for studies concerning cell-to-cell interactions and potentially paves the way for introducing transgenes to specific cells. This work was supported by NSF award IOS-0843372 to JHW, with additional support from and U.S. Department of Agriculture Hatch Project no. 135997, and by the Institute of Critical Technology and Applied Sciences (ICTAS) at Virginia Tech.

  15. Ligand-dependent localization and function of ORP-VAP complexes at membrane contact sites.

    PubMed

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Kentala, Henriikka; Peränen, Johan; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2015-05-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein/OSBP-related proteins (ORPs) constitute a conserved family of sterol/phospholipid-binding proteins with lipid transporter or sensor functions. We investigated the spatial occurrence and regulation of the interactions of human OSBP/ORPs or the S. cerevisiae orthologs, the Osh (OSBP homolog) proteins, with their endoplasmic reticulum (ER) anchors, the VAMP-associated proteins (VAPs), by employing bimolecular fluorescence complementation and pull-down set-ups. The ORP-VAP interactions localize frequently at distinct subcellular sites, shown in several cases to represent membrane contact sites (MCSs). Using established ORP ligand-binding domain mutants and pull-down assays with recombinant proteins, we show that ORP liganding regulates the ORP-VAP association, alters the subcellular targeting of ORP-VAP complexes, or modifies organelle morphology. There is distinct protein specificity in the effects of the mutants on subcellular targeting of ORP-VAP complexes. We provide evidence that complexes of human ORP2 and VAPs at ER-lipid droplet interfaces regulate the hydrolysis of triglycerides and lipid droplet turnover. The data suggest evolutionarily conserved, complex ligand-dependent functions of ORP-VAP complexes at MCSs, with implications for cellular lipid homeostasis and signaling. PMID:25420878

  16. Interaction of local and general anaesthetics with liposomal membrane models: a QCM-D and DSC study.

    PubMed

    Paiva, José Gabriel; Paradiso, Patrizia; Serro, Ana Paula; Fernandes, Anabela; Saramago, Benilde

    2012-06-15

    The behaviour of four local anaesthetics (lidocaine, levobupivacaine, ropivacaine and tetracaine) and one general anaesthetic (propofol) is compared when interacting with two types of model membranes: supported layers of liposomes and liposomes in solution. Several liposomal compositions were tested: dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), binary mixtures of DMPC with cholesterol (CHOL), and ternary mixtures of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), DMPC, and CHOL. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, QCM-D, was used to assess changes in the properties of supported layers of liposomes. The effect of the anaesthetics on the phase behaviour of the liposomes in suspension was determined by differential scanning calorimetry. Both techniques show that all anaesthetics have a fluidizing effect on the model membranes but, apparently, the solid supported liposomes are less affected by the anaesthetics than the liposomes in solution. Although the different anaesthetics were compared at different concentrations, tetracaine and propofol seem to induce the strongest perturbation on the liposome membrane. The resistance of the liposomes to the anaesthetic action was found to increase with the presence of cholesterol, while adding DPPC to the binary mixture DMPC+CHOL does not change its behaviour. The novelty of the present work resides upon three points: (1) the use of supported layers of liposomes as model membranes to study interactions with anaesthetics; (2) application of QCM-D to assess changes of the adsorbed liposomes; (3) a comparison of the effect of local and general anaesthetics interacting with various model membranes in similar experimental conditions.

  17. Postreplication labeling of E-leaflet molecules: membrane immunoglobulins localized in sectioned, labeled replicas examined by TEM and HVEM.

    PubMed

    Dinchuk, J E; Johnson, T J; Rash, J E

    1987-09-01

    Conventional freeze-fracture techniques were combined with immunogold labeling and with plastic embedding and sectioning to analyze the distribution of membrane immunoglobulins (mIgs) and their associated intramembrane particles (IMPs) in E-face replicas of murine B-lymphocyte plasma membranes. Immunogold labels were applied to cells after the process of freeze-fracture and replication. Conventional stereoscopic transmission electron microscopic examination of sectioned, labeled replicas (SLRs) revealed that the gold-labeled mIgs were bound to and localized on the outer leaflets of split and replicated membranes. The gold labels were attached to the external determinants of the mIg molecules, which were retained beneath and contiguous with the replicated E-faces. The mIgs were also localized on the external surface of unreplicated microvilli. In addition, thick sections examined by high-voltage transmission electron microscopy (HVEM) revealed large expanses of replica with well-resolved IMPs. mIgs colocalized with small-diameter (less than 60 A) IMPs in E-face replicas of B-lymphocytes whose mIgs were patched by anti-immunoglobulin. Thus, postreplication E-surface labeling of split and replicated membranes is a high-resolution technique that is suitable for the study of membrane protein distribution in E-face replicas and contiguous nonreplicated tissue.

  18. Investigation of the membrane localization and distribution of flavonoids by high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Scheidt, Holger A; Pampel, André; Nissler, Ludwig; Gebhardt, Rolf; Huster, Daniel

    2004-05-27

    To investigate the structural basis for the antioxidative effects of plant flavonoids on the lipid molecules of cellular membranes, we have studied the location and distribution of five different flavonoid molecules (flavone, chrysin, luteolin, myricetin, and luteolin-7-glucoside) with varying polarity in monounsaturated model membranes. The investigated molecules differed in the number of hydroxyl groups attached to the polyphenolic benzo-gamma-pyrone compounds. To investigate the relation between hydrophobicity and membrane localization/orientation, we have applied (1)H magic angle spinning NMR techniques measuring ring current induced chemical shift changes, nuclear Overhauser enhancement cross-relaxation rates, and lateral diffusion coefficients. All investigated flavonoids show a broad distribution along the membrane normal with a maximum in the lipid/water interface. With increasing number of hydroxyl groups, the maximum of this distribution is biased towards the lipid headgroups. These results are confirmed by pulsed field gradient NMR measurements of the lateral diffusion coefficients of phospholipids and flavonoids, respectively. From the localization of different flavonoid protons in the membrane, a model for the orientation of the molecules in a lipid bilayer can be deduced. This orientation depends on the position of the polar center of the flavonoid molecule. PMID:15157612

  19. The myristoylated amino-terminus of an Arabidopsis calcium-dependent protein kinase mediates plasma membrane localization.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sheen X; Hrabak, Estelle M

    2013-06-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPK) are a major group of calcium-stimulated kinases found in plants and some protists. Many CDPKs are membrane-associated, presumably because of lipid modifications at their amino termini. We investigated the subcellular location and myristoylation of AtCPK5, a member of the Arabidopsis CDPK family. Most AtCPK5 was associated with the plasma membrane as demonstrated by two-phase fractionation of plant microsomes and by in vivo detection of AtCPK5-GFP fusion proteins. AtCPK5 was a substrate for plant N-myristoyltransferase and myristoylation was prevented by converting the glycine at the proposed site of myristate attachment to alanine (G2A). In transgenic plants, a G2A mutation completely abolished AtCPK5 membrane association, indicating that myristoylation was essential for membrane binding. The first sixteen amino acids of AtCPK5 were sufficient to direct plasma membrane localization. In addition, differentially phosphorylated forms of AtCPK5 were detected both in planta and after expression of AtCPK5 in a cell-free plant extract. Our results demonstrate that AtCPK5 is myristoylated at its amino terminus and that myristoylation is required for membrane binding.

  20. Complementary Constrains on Component based Multiphase Flow Problems, Should It Be Implemented Locally or Globally?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Huang, Y.; Kolditz, O.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow problems are numerically difficult to solve, as it often contains nonlinear Phase transition phenomena A conventional technique is to introduce the complementarity constraints where fluid properties such as liquid saturations are confined within a physically reasonable range. Based on such constraints, the mathematical model can be reformulated into a system of nonlinear partial differential equations coupled with variational inequalities. They can be then numerically handled by optimization algorithms. In this work, two different approaches utilizing the complementarity constraints based on persistent primary variables formulation[4] are implemented and investigated. The first approach proposed by Marchand et.al[1] is using "local complementary constraints", i.e. coupling the constraints with the local constitutive equations. The second approach[2],[3] , namely the "global complementary constrains", applies the constraints globally with the mass conservation equation. We will discuss how these two approaches are applied to solve non-isothermal componential multiphase flow problem with the phase change phenomenon. Several benchmarks will be presented for investigating the overall numerical performance of different approaches. The advantages and disadvantages of different models will also be concluded. References[1] E.Marchand, T.Mueller and P.Knabner. Fully coupled generalized hybrid-mixed finite element approximation of two-phase two-component flow in porous media. Part I: formulation and properties of the mathematical model, Computational Geosciences 17(2): 431-442, (2013). [2] A. Lauser, C. Hager, R. Helmig, B. Wohlmuth. A new approach for phase transitions in miscible multi-phase flow in porous media. Water Resour., 34,(2011), 957-966. [3] J. Jaffré, and A. Sboui. Henry's Law and Gas Phase Disappearance. Transp. Porous Media. 82, (2010), 521-526. [4] A. Bourgeat, M. Jurak and F. Smaï. Two-phase partially miscible flow and transport modeling in

  1. Small RNA Regulation of TolC, the Outer Membrane Component of Bacterial Multidrug Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria use multidrug efflux pumps to export drugs and toxic compounds out of the cell. One of the most important efflux pumps in Escherichia coli is the AcrAB-TolC system. Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are known to be major posttranscriptional regulators that can enhance or repress translation by binding to the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of mRNA targets with the help of a chaperone protein, Hfq. In this study, we investigated the expression of acrA, acrB, and tolC translational fusions using 27 Hfq-dependent sRNAs overexpressed from plasmids. No significant sRNA regulation of acrA or acrB was detected. SdsR (also known as RyeB), an abundant and well-conserved stationary-phase sRNA, was found to repress the expression of tolC, the gene encoding the outer membrane protein of many multidrug resistance efflux pumps. This repression was shown to be by direct base pairing occurring upstream from the ribosomal binding site. SdsR overexpression and its regulation of tolC were found to reduce resistance to novobiocin and crystal violet. Our results suggest that additional targets for SdsR exist that contribute to increased antibiotic sensitivity and reduced biofilm formation. In an effort to identify phenotypes associated with single-copy SdsR and its regulation of tolC, the effect of a deletion of sdsR or mutations in tolC that should block SdsR pairing were investigated using a Biolog phenotypic microarray. However, no significant phenotypes were identified. Therefore, SdsR appears to modulate rather than act as a major regulator of its targets. IMPORTANCE AcrAB-TolC is a major efflux pump present in E. coli and Gram-negative bacteria used to export toxic compounds; the pump confers resistance to many antibiotics of unrelated classes. In this study, we found that SdsR, a small RNA expressed in stationary phase, repressed the expression of tolC, resulting in increased sensitivity to some antibiotics. This extends the findings of previous studies showing that

  2. Surface properties and biocompatibility of A-B-A type block copolymer membranes consisting of poly(gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate) as the A component and polyisoprene as the B component.

    PubMed

    Yoda, R; Komatsuzaki, S; Hayashi, T

    1995-11-01

    The surface characteristics of A-B-A type triblock copolymer (GIG) membranes consisting of alpha-helical poly (gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate) (PBLG) as the A component and polyisoprene (PI) as the B component were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements. The XPS measurements showed the copolymer composition of the outermost surface to be quite different from the bulk composition. Results of contact angle measurements indicated the existence of an interfacial region between the alpha-helical A component and the B component at the surfaces of the block copolymer membranes. Finally, the results of in vivo tests on tissue compatibility indicate that the GIG block copolymer membranes have good biocompatibility. PMID:8589188

  3. Localization of beta-glucan synthases on the membranes of cultured Lolium multiflorum (ryegrass) endosperm cells.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, R J; Schibeci, A; Stone, B A

    1983-01-01

    The distribution of beta-glucan synthases between plasma membranes and intracellular membranes of suspension-cultured Italian-ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) endosperm cells was examined. Highly purified plasma membranes prepared from protoplasts were only slightly enriched in beta-glucan synthases assayed at 10 microM- and 1 mM-UDP-glucose. Most beta-glucan synthase was associated with intracellular membranes. These membranes were fractionated on a linear sucrose density gradient and were resolved into different membrane fractions containing beta-glucan synthases. Beta-Glucan synthases assayed at 10 microM-UDP-glucose were found in a fraction banding at a density of 1.11 g . cm-3, but most of the beta-glucan synthase assayed at 1 mM-DDP-glucose was at a density of 1.04 g . cm-3. PMID:6223621

  4. Local thermal resonance control of GaInP photonic crystal membrane cavities using ambient gas cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Sergei Lian, Jin; Yüce, Emre; Mosk, Allard P.; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaelle; De Rossi, Alfredo

    2015-04-27

    We perform spatially dependent tuning of a GaInP photonic crystal cavity using a continuous wave violet laser. Local tuning is obtained by laser heating of the photonic crystal membrane. The cavity resonance shift is measured for different pump positions and for two ambient gases: He and N{sub 2}. We find that the width of the temperature profile induced in the membrane depends strongly on the thermal conductivity of the ambient gas. For He gas, a narrow spatial width of the temperature profile of 2.8 μm is predicted and verified in experiment.

  5. Evidence that Synthesis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mitochondrially Encoded Ribosomal Protein Var1p May Be Membrane Localized

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Alessandro; Mason, Thomas L.; Fox, Thomas D.

    2003-01-01

    The 5′-untranslated leaders of mitochondrial mRNAs appear to localize translation within the organelle. VAR1 is the only yeast mitochondrial gene encoding a major soluble protein. A chimeric mRNA bearing the VAR1 untranslated regions and the coding sequence for pre-Cox2p appears to be translated at the inner membrane surface. We propose that translation of the ribosomal protein Var1p is also likely to occur in close proximity to the inner membrane. PMID:12796311

  6. Photochemical solar energy conversion utilizing semiconductors localized in membrane-mimetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fendler, J.H.

    1991-08-31

    Extending the frontiers of colloidal photochemistry and colloidal electrochemistry to solar photochemistry research had been the main objective of this research. More specific objectives of this proposal include the examination of semiconductor-particle-mediated photoelectron transfer and photoelectric effects in different membrane mimetic systems. Emphasis had been placed on developing bilayer lipid membranes and Langmuir-Blodgett films as new membrane-mimetic systems, as well as on the characterization and utilization of these systems.

  7. Interaction between a plasma membrane-localized ankyrin-repeat protein ITN1 and a nuclear protein RTV1

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Hikaru; Sakata, Keiko; Kusumi, Kensuke; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Iba, Koh

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ITN1, a plasma membrane ankyrin protein, interacts with a nuclear DNA-binding protein RTV1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear transport of RTV1 is partially inhibited by interaction with ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RTV1 can promote the nuclear localization of ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both overexpression of RTV1 and the lack of ITN1 increase salicylic acids sensitivity in plants. -- Abstract: The increased tolerance to NaCl 1 (ITN1) protein is a plasma membrane (PM)-localized protein involved in responses to NaCl stress in Arabidopsis. The predicted structure of ITN1 is composed of multiple transmembrane regions and an ankyrin-repeat domain that is known to mediate protein-protein interactions. To elucidate the molecular functions of ITN1, we searched for interacting partners using a yeast two-hybrid assay, and a nuclear-localized DNA-binding protein, RTV1, was identified as a candidate. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis revealed that RTV1 interacted with ITN1 at the PM and nuclei in vivo. RTV1 tagged with red fluorescent protein localized to nuclei and ITN1 tagged with green fluorescent protein localized to PM; however, both proteins localized to both nuclei and the PM when co-expressed. These findings suggest that RTV1 and ITN1 regulate the subcellular localization of each other.

  8. AMACO is a novel component of the basement membrane associated Fraser complex

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Rebecca J.; Gebauer, Jan M.; Zhang, Jin-Li; Kobbe, Birgit; Keene, Douglas R.; Karlsen, Kristina Røkenes; Richetti, Stefânia; Wohl, Alexander P.; Sengle, Gerhard; Neiss, Wolfram F.; Paulsson, Mats; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Wagener, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Fraser syndrome (FS) is a phenotypically variable, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmus, cutaneous syndactyly and other malformations resulting from mutations in FRAS1, FREM2 and GRIP1. Transient embryonic epidermal blistering causes the characteristic defects of the disorder. Fras1, Frem1 and Frem2 form the extracellular Fraser complex, which is believed to stabilize the basement membrane (BM). However, several cases of FS could not be attributed to mutations in FRAS1, FREM2 or GRIP1, while Fraser syndrome displays high clinical variability, suggesting there is an additional genetic, possibly modifying contribution to this disorder. AMACO, encoded by the VWA2 gene, has a very similar tissue distribution to the Fraser complex proteins in both mouse and zebrafish. Here, we show that AMACO deposition is lost in Fras1 deficient zebrafish and mice and that Fras1 and AMACO interact directly via their CSPG and P2 domains. Knockdown of vwa2, which alone causes no phenotype, enhances the phenotype of hypomorphic Fras1 mutant zebrafish. Together, our data suggest that AMACO represents a novel member of the Fraser complex. PMID:24232570

  9. Enhanced sludge properties and distribution study of sludge components in electrically-enhanced membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Giwa, Adewale; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Hasan, Shadi Wajih

    2015-08-15

    This study investigated the impact of electric field on the physicochemical and biological characteristics of sludge wasted from an electrically-enhanced membrane bioreactor treating medium-strength raw wastewater. This method offers a chemical-free electrokinetic technique to enhance sludge properties and remove heavy metals. For example, sludge volume index (SVI), time-to-filter (TTF), mean sludge particle diameter (PSD), viscosity, and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of 21.7 mL/g, 7 min, 40.2 μm, 3.22 mPa s, and -4.9 mV were reported, respectively. Also, X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses provided mechanisms for heavy metal removal so as to establish relevant pathways for nutrient recovery. Furthermore, variations in dissolved oxygen (DO), conductivity, viscosity, ORP, total suspended solids (MLSS), and volatile suspended solids (MLVSS) were interrelated to evaluate the quality of wasted sludge. A pathway study on the transport and chemical distribution of nutrients and metals in sludge showed great potential for metal removal and nutrient recovery. PMID:26048394

  10. Toxins in botanical dietary supplements: blue cohosh components disrupt cellular respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B; Khan, Ikhlas A; Nagle, Dale G; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-24

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA "black box" warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3), exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage.

  11. Structural characterization of outer membrane components of the type IV pili system in pathogenic Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Jain, Samta; Mościcka, Katarzyna B; Bos, Martine P; Pachulec, Emilia; Stuart, Marc C A; Keegstra, Wilko; Boekema, Egbert J; van der Does, Chris

    2011-01-31

    Structures of the type IV pili secretin complexes from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis, embedded in outer membranes were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Single particle averaging revealed additional domains not observed previously. Secretin complexes of N. gonorrhoeae showed a double ring structure with a 14-15-fold symmetry in the central ring, and a 14-fold symmetry of the peripheral ring with 7 spikes protruding. In secretin complexes of N. meningitidis, the spikes were absent and the peripheral ring was partly or completely lacking. When present, it had a 19-fold symmetry. The structures of the complexes in several pil mutants were determined. Structures obtained from the pilC1/C2 adhesin and the pilW minor pilin deletion strains were similar to wild-type, whereas deletion of the homologue of N. meningitidis PilW resulted in the absence of secretin structures. Remarkably, the pilE pilin subunit and pilP lipoprotein deletion mutants showed a change in the symmetry of the peripheral ring from 14 to 19 and loss of spikes. The pilF ATPase mutant also lost the spikes, but maintained 14-fold symmetry. These results show that secretin complexes contain previously unidentified large and flexible extra domains with a probable role in stabilization or assembly of type IV pili.

  12. HIV-1 Nef promotes the localization of Gag to the cell membrane and facilitates viral cell-to-cell transfer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Newly synthesized HIV-1 particles assemble at the plasma membrane of infected cells, before being released as free virions or being transferred through direct cell-to-cell contacts to neighboring cells. Localization of HIV-1 Gag precursor at the cell membrane is necessary and sufficient to trigger viral assembly, whereas the GagPol precursor is additionally required to generate a fully matured virion. HIV-1 Nef is an accessory protein that optimizes viral replication through partly defined mechanisms. Whether Nef modulates Gag and/or GagPol localization and assembly at the membrane and facilitates viral cell-to-cell transfer has not been extensively characterized so far. Results We report that Nef increases the total amount of Gag proteins present in infected cells, and promotes Gag localization at the cell membrane. Moreover, the processing of p55 into p24 is improved in the presence of Nef. We also examined the effect of Nef during HIV-1 cell-to-cell transfer. We show that without Nef, viral transfer through direct contacts between infected cells and target cells is impaired. With a nef-deleted virus, the number of HIV-1 positive target cells after a short 2h co-culture is reduced, and viral material transferred to uninfected cells is less matured. At later time points, this defect is associated with a reduction in the productive infection of new target cells. Conclusions Our results highlight a previously unappreciated role of Nef during the viral replication cycle. Nef promotes HIV-1 Gag membrane localization and processing, and facilitates viral cell-to-cell transfer. PMID:23899341

  13. Localization of the expression of complement component 3 in the human endometrium by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Sayegh, R.A.; Tao, Xiao Jing; Awwad, J.T.

    1996-04-01

    C3 production by the human endometrium has been previously described. The objective of the current study was to localize the site of expression and regulation of the third component of complement, C3, in the endometrium. Eight secretory and eight proliferative archival endometrial samples from hysterectomy and endometrial biopsy specimens were used for in situ hybridization analysis. This analysis was performed with a radiolabeled riboprobe synthesized from a 736-bp template representing sequence 1944-2680 of the human C3 complementary DNA. Duplicate sections were hybridized with sense and antisense riboprobes. Resultant autoradiograms were analyzed qualitatively by light- and darkfield microscopy. In proliferative endometrium, minimal expression of C3 was observed and was limited to a few stromal patches and glands throughout the section. In the secretory samples, prominent C3 expression was observed in both the glands and stroma of the basalis layer. Endometrial lymphocytes did not express C3. Endometrial stromal and glandular cells express the C3 gene. Endometrial lymphocytes did not express C3, but other nondistinct lymphoid elements scattered in the stroma may be expressing C3. There was a visibly more intense expression of C3 in the basalis layer of the secretory endometrium than in proliferative endometrium. The spatial and temporal pattern of C3 expression may have implications in normal menstrual physiology and in the immunological response of the endometrium to the invading trophoblast during placentation. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Localization of interchromatin granule cluster and Cajal body components in oocyte nuclear bodies of the hemipterans.

    PubMed

    Bogolyubov, D S; Batalova, F M; Ogorzałek, A

    2007-10-01

    An oocyte nucleus contains different extrachromosomal nuclear domains collectively called nuclear bodies (NBs). In the present work we revealed, using immunogold labeling electron microscopy, some marker components of interchromatin granule clusters (IGCs) and Cajal bodies (CBs) in morphologically heterogeneous oocyte NBs studied in three hemipteran species: Notostira elongata, Capsodes gothicus (Miridae) and Velia caprai (Veliidae). Both IGC and CB counterparts were revealed in oocyte nuclei of the studied species but morphological and biochemical criteria were found to be not sufficient to determine carefully the define type of oocyte NBs. We found that the molecular markers of the CBs (coilin and non-phosphorylated RNA polymerase II) and IGCs (SC35 protein) may be localized in the same NB. Anti-SC35 antibody may decorate not only a granular material representing "true" interchromatin granules but also masks some fibrillar parts of complex NBs. Our first observations on the hemipteran oocyte NBs confirm the high complexity and heterogeneity of insect oocyte IGCs and CBs in comparison with those in mammalian somatic cells and amphibian oocytes. PMID:17889915

  15. Blind breast tissue diagnosis using independent component analysis of localized backscattering response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguizabal, Alma; Laughney, Ashley M.; García Allende, Pilar Beatriz; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Wells, Wendy A.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.; Lopez-Higuera, Jose M.; Conde, Olga M.

    2012-03-01

    A blind separation technique based on Independent Component Analysis (ICA) is proposed for breast tumor delineation and pathologic diagnosis. Tissue morphology is determined by fitting local measures of tissue reflectance to a Mie theory approximation, parameterizing the scattering power, scattering amplitude and average scattering irradiance. ICA is applied on the scattering parameters by spatial analysis using the Fast ICA method to extract more determinant features for an accurate diagnostic. Neither training, nor comparisons with reference parameters are required. Tissue diagnosis is provided directly following ICA application to the scattering parameter images. Surgically resected breast tissues were imaged and identified by a pathologist. Three different tissue pathologies were identified in 29 samples and classified as not-malignant, malignant and adipose. Scatter plot analysis of both ICA results and optical parameters where obtained. ICA subtle ameliorates those cases where optical parameter's scatter plots were not linearly separable. Furthermore, observing the mixing matrix of the ICA, it can be decided when the optical parameters themselves are diagnostically powerful. Moreover, contrast maps provided by ICA correlate with the pathologic diagnosis. The time response of the diagnostic strategy is therefore enhanced comparing with complex classifiers, enabling near real-time assessment of pathology during breast-conserving surgery.

  16. High spectral specificity of local chemical components characterization with multichannel shift-excitation Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun; Wu, Tao; Wei, Haoyun; Wu, Xuejian; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a promising tool for its noninvasive and nondestructive characterization of local chemical structures. However, spectrally overlapping components prevent the specific identification of hyperfine molecular information of different substances, because of limitations in the spectral resolving power. The challenge is to find a way of preserving scattered photons and retrieving hidden/buried Raman signatures to take full advantage of its chemical specificity. Here, we demonstrate a multichannel acquisition framework based on shift-excitation and slit-modulation, followed by mathematical post-processing, which enables a significant improvement in the spectral specificity of Raman characterization. The present technique, termed shift-excitation blind super-resolution Raman spectroscopy (SEBSR), uses multiple degraded spectra to beat the dispersion-loss trade-off and facilitate high-resolution applications. It overcomes a fundamental problem that has previously plagued high-resolution Raman spectroscopy: fine spectral resolution requires large dispersion, which is accompanied by extreme optical loss. Applicability is demonstrated by the perfect recovery of fine structure of the C-Cl bending mode as well as the clear discrimination of different polymorphs of mannitol. Due to its enhanced discrimination capability, this method offers a feasible route at encouraging a broader range of applications in analytical chemistry, materials and biomedicine. PMID:26350355

  17. Rice OsVAMP714, a membrane-trafficking protein localized to the chloroplast and vacuolar membrane, is involved in resistance to rice blast disease.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Shoji; Hayashi, Nagao; Kawagoe, Yasushi; Mochizuki, Susumu; Inoue, Haruhiko; Mori, Masaki; Nishizawa, Yoko; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Matsui, Minami; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Membrane trafficking plays pivotal roles in many cellular processes including plant immunity. Here, we report the characterization of OsVAMP714, an intracellular SNARE protein, focusing on its role in resistance to rice blast disease caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Disease resistance tests using OsVAMP714 knockdown and overexpressing rice plants demonstrated the involvement of OsVAMP714 in blast resistance. The overexpression of OsVAMP7111, whose product is highly homologous to OsVAMP714, did not enhance blast resistance to rice, implying a potential specificity of OsVAMP714 to blast resistance. OsVAMP714 was localized to the chloroplast in mesophyll cells and to the cellular periphery in epidermal cells of transgenic rice plant leaves. We showed that chloroplast localization is critical for the normal OsVAMP714 functioning in blast resistance by analyzing the rice plants overexpressing OsVAMP714 mutants whose products did not localize in the chloroplast. We also found that OsVAMP714 was located in the vacuolar membrane surrounding the invasive hyphae of M. oryzae. Furthermore, we showed that OsVAMP714 overexpression promotes leaf sheath elongation and that the first 19 amino acids, which are highly conserved between animal and plant VAMP7 proteins, are crucial for normal rice plant growths. Our studies imply that the OsVAMP714-mediated trafficking pathway plays an important role in rice blast resistance as well as in the vegetative growth of rice.

  18. Rice OsVAMP714, a membrane-trafficking protein localized to the chloroplast and vacuolar membrane, is involved in resistance to rice blast disease.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Shoji; Hayashi, Nagao; Kawagoe, Yasushi; Mochizuki, Susumu; Inoue, Haruhiko; Mori, Masaki; Nishizawa, Yoko; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Matsui, Minami; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Membrane trafficking plays pivotal roles in many cellular processes including plant immunity. Here, we report the characterization of OsVAMP714, an intracellular SNARE protein, focusing on its role in resistance to rice blast disease caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Disease resistance tests using OsVAMP714 knockdown and overexpressing rice plants demonstrated the involvement of OsVAMP714 in blast resistance. The overexpression of OsVAMP7111, whose product is highly homologous to OsVAMP714, did not enhance blast resistance to rice, implying a potential specificity of OsVAMP714 to blast resistance. OsVAMP714 was localized to the chloroplast in mesophyll cells and to the cellular periphery in epidermal cells of transgenic rice plant leaves. We showed that chloroplast localization is critical for the normal OsVAMP714 functioning in blast resistance by analyzing the rice plants overexpressing OsVAMP714 mutants whose products did not localize in the chloroplast. We also found that OsVAMP714 was located in the vacuolar membrane surrounding the invasive hyphae of M. oryzae. Furthermore, we showed that OsVAMP714 overexpression promotes leaf sheath elongation and that the first 19 amino acids, which are highly conserved between animal and plant VAMP7 proteins, are crucial for normal rice plant growths. Our studies imply that the OsVAMP714-mediated trafficking pathway plays an important role in rice blast resistance as well as in the vegetative growth of rice. PMID:26879413

  19. Properties and degradation of the gasket component of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell--a review.

    PubMed

    Basuli, Utpal; Jose, Jobin; Lee, Ran Hee; Yoo, Yong Hwan; Jeong, Kwang-Un; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Nah, Changwoon

    2012-10-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack requires gaskets and seals in each cell to keep the reactant gases within their respective regions. Gasket performance is integral to the successful long-term operation of a fuel cell stack. This review focuses on properties, performance and degradation mechanisms of the different polymer gasket materials used in PEM fuel cell under normal operating conditions. The different degradation mechanisms and their corresponding representative mitigation strategies are also presented here. Summary of various properties of elastomers and their advantages and disadvantages in fuel cell'environment are presented. By considering the level of chemical degradation, mechanical properties and cost effectiveness, it can be proposed that EPDM is one of the best choices for gasket material in PEM fuel cell. Finally, the challenges that remain in using rubber component as in PEM fuel cell, as well as the prospects for exploiting them in the future are discussed.

  20. Antibody response of swine to outer membrane components of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae during infection.

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, V J; Ross, R F

    1986-01-01

    Sera from pigs infected with Haemophilus (Actinobacillus) pleuropneumoniae were tested for antibodies to outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of the organism by immunoblotting. Convalescent sera were produced in naturally born, colostrum-fed pigs and in cesarean-derived, colostrum-deprived pigs given H. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 intranasally twice at 5-week intervals. Sera, collected at weekly intervals, were reacted with Sarkosyl-insoluble, OMP-enriched preparations of H. pleuropneumoniae which had been separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and electrophoretically transferred to nitrocellulose. Antibodies were detected to OMPs with an apparent molecular weight of 16,500 (16.5K OMP); to 29K, 38.5K, 43.5K, 45K, 49.5K, and 66.5K OMPs; and to several high-molecular-weight (greater than or equal to 94,000) OMPs, but not to the major 42K OMP. Antibodies to the heat-modifiable OMP (29K/43.5K) and the 38.5K OMP were detected in sera from noninfected pigs. Antibodies were also detected to two broad 54,000- and 95,000-molecular-weight bands which did not stain with Coomassie blue, stained with silver nitrate, resisted proteinase K digestion, and were eliminated by oxidation with sodium metaperiodate. This indicates that the 54,000- and 95,000-molecular-weight bands represent polysaccharide, possibly capsular or lipopolysaccharide immunogens. Adsorption of sera with cells from the homologous serotype 5 strain removed antibodies to the 45K, 49.5K, 66.5K, and greater than or equal to 94K OMPs and to the two polysaccharide bands, indicating that these antibodies were directed primarily to surface-exposed epitopes. When tested with OMP preparations from other serotype 5 strains, heterogeneity was apparent, both in the reactions with OMPs and with the polysaccharide bands. Silver staining of proteinase K-treated, whole-cell lysates from serotype 5 strains also indicated variable expression of the polysaccharide bands. Sera also reacted with OMPs from

  1. Inter-helical interactions in membrane proteins: analysis based on the local backbone geometry and the side chain interactions.

    PubMed

    Jha, Anupam Nath; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2009-06-01

    The availability of a significant number of the structures of helical membrane proteins has prompted us to investigate the mode of helix-helix packing. In the present study, we have considered a dataset of alpha-helical membrane proteins representing structures solved from all the known superfamilies. We have described the geometry of all the helical residues in terms of local coordinate axis at the backbone level. Significant inter-helical interactions have been considered as contacts by weighing the number of atom-atom contacts, including all the side-chain atoms. Such a definition of local axis and the contact criterion has allowed us to investigate the inter-helical interaction in a systematic and quantitative manner. We show that a single parameter (designated as alpha), which is derived from the parameters representing the mutual orientation of local axes, is able to accurately capture the details of helix-helix interaction. The analysis has been carried out by dividing the dataset into parallel, anti-parallel, and perpendicular orientation of helices. The study indicates that a specific range of alpha value is preferred for interactions among the anti-parallel helices. Such a preference is also seen among interacting residues of parallel helices, however to a lesser extent. No such preference is seen in the case of perpendicular helices, the contacts that arise mainly due to the interaction of surface helices with the end of the trans-membrane helices. The study supports the prevailing view that the anti-parallel helices are well packed. However, the interactions between helices of parallel orientation are non-trivial. The packing in alpha-helical membrane proteins, which is systematically and rigorously investigated in this study, may prove to be useful in modeling of helical membrane proteins.

  2. Probing microscopic material properties inside simulated membranes through spatially resolved three-dimensional local pressure fields and surface tensions

    PubMed Central

    Kasson, Peter M.; Hess, Berk; Lindahl, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Cellular lipid membranes are spatially inhomogeneous soft materials. Materials properties such as pressure and surface tension thus show important microscopic-scale variation that is critical to many biological functions. We present a means to calculate pressure and surface tension in a 3D-resolved manner within molecular-dynamics simulations and show how such measurements can yield important insight. We also present the first corrections to local virial and pressure fields to account for the constraints typically used in lipid simulations that otherwise cause problems in highly oriented systems such as bilayers. Based on simulations of an asymmetric bacterial ion channel in a POPC bilayer, we demonstrate how 3D-resolved pressure can probe for both short-range and long-range effects from the protein on the membrane environment. We also show how surface tension is a sensitive metric for inter-leaflet equilibrium and can be used to detect even subtle imbalances between bilayer leaflets in a membrane-protein simulation. Since surface tension is known to modulate the function of many proteins, this effect is an important consideration for predictions of ion channel function. We outline a strategy by which our local pressure measurements, which we make available within a version of the GROMACS simulation package, may be used to design optimally equilibrated membrane-protein simulations. PMID:23318532

  3. A key role for heat shock protein 70 in the localization and insertion of tombusvirus replication proteins to intracellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Robert Yung-Liang; Stork, Jozsef; Nagy, Peter D

    2009-04-01

    Plus-stranded RNA viruses coopt host proteins to promote their robust replication in infected hosts. Tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus (TBSV) is a model virus that can replicate a small replicon RNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in plants. The tombusvirus replicase complex contains heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), an abundant cytosolic chaperone, which is required for TBSV replication. To dissect the function of Hsp70 in TBSV replication, in this paper we use an Hsp70 mutant (ssa1 ssa2) yeast strain that supports a low level of TBSV replication. Using confocal laser microscopy and cellular fractionation experiments, we find that the localization of the viral replication proteins changes to the cytosol in the mutant cells from the peroxisomal membranes in wild-type cells. An in vitro membrane insertion assay shows that Hsp70 promotes the integration of the viral replication proteins into subcellular membranes. This step seems to be critical for the assembly of the viral replicase complex. Using a gene-silencing approach and quercetin as a chemical inhibitor to downregulate Hsp70 levels, we also confirm the significance of cytosolic Hsp70 in the replication of TBSV and other plant viruses in a plant host. Taken together, our results suggest that cytosolic Hsp70 plays multiple roles in TBSV replication, such as affecting the subcellular localization and membrane insertion of the viral replication proteins as well as the assembly of the viral replicase. PMID:19153242

  4. Cytochrome b 6 f function and localization, phosphorylation state of thylakoid membrane proteins and consequences on cyclic electron flow.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Louis; Chazaux, Marie; Peltier, Gilles; Johnson, Xenie; Alric, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Both the structure and the protein composition of thylakoid membranes have an impact on light harvesting and electron transfer in the photosynthetic chain. Thylakoid membranes form stacks and lamellae where photosystem II and photosystem I localize, respectively. Light-harvesting complexes II can be associated to either PSII or PSI depending on the redox state of the plastoquinone pool, and their distribution is governed by state transitions. Upon state transitions, the thylakoid ultrastructure and lateral distribution of proteins along the membrane are subject to significant rearrangements. In addition, quinone diffusion is limited to membrane microdomains and the cytochrome b 6 f complex localizes either to PSII-containing grana stacks or PSI-containing stroma lamellae. Here, we discuss possible similarities or differences between green algae and C3 plants on the functional consequences of such heterogeneities in the photosynthetic electron transport chain and propose a model in which quinones, accepting electrons either from PSII (linear flow) or NDH/PGR pathways (cyclic flow), represent a crucial control point. Our aim is to give an integrated description of these processes and discuss their potential roles in the balance between linear and cyclic electron flows. PMID:27534565

  5. C60 fullerene localization and membrane interactions in RAW 264.7 immortalized mouse macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, K. A.; Elvati, P.; Parsonage, T. L.; Dews, A.; Jarvis, J. A.; Ray, M.; Schneider, B.; Smith, P. J. S.; Williamson, P. T. F.; Violi, A.; Philbert, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    There continues to be a significant increase in the number and complexity of hydrophobic nanomaterials that are engineered for a variety of commercial purposes making human exposure a significant health concern. This study uses a combination of biophysical, biochemical and computational methods to probe potential mechanisms for uptake of C60 nanoparticles into various compartments of living immune cells. Cultures of RAW 264.7 immortalized murine macrophage were used as a canonical model of immune-competent cells that are likely to provide the first line of defense following inhalation. Modes of entry studied were endocytosis/pinocytosis and passive permeation of cellular membranes. The evidence suggests marginal uptake of C60 clusters is achieved through endocytosis/pinocytosis, and that passive diffusion into membranes provides a significant source of biologically-available nanomaterial. Computational modeling of both a single molecule and a small cluster of fullerenes predicts that low concentrations of fullerenes enter the membrane individually and produce limited perturbation; however, at higher concentrations the clusters in the membrane causes deformation of the membrane. These findings are bolstered by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of model membranes that reveal deformation of the cell membrane upon exposure to high concentrations of fullerenes. The atomistic and NMR models fail to explain escape of the particle out of biological membranes, but are limited to idealized systems that do not completely recapitulate the complexity of cell membranes. The surprising contribution of passive modes of cellular entry provides new avenues for toxicological research that go beyond the pharmacological inhibition of bulk transport systems such as pinocytosis.There continues to be a significant increase in the number and complexity of hydrophobic nanomaterials that are engineered for a variety of commercial purposes making human exposure a significant health concern

  6. [Proteoglycan in Bruch's membrane of senescence accelerated mouse: localization and age-related changes].

    PubMed

    Takada, Y; Ohkuma, H; Ogata, N; Matsushima, M; Sugasawa, K; Uyama, M

    1994-05-01

    We demonstrated the distribution of sulfated proteoglycans in Bruch's membrane of Senescence Accelerated Mouse histochemically and ultrastructurally using cuprolinic blue in conjunction with specific enzyme treatments and nitrous acid digestion. Two kinds of proteoglycan filaments were observed in the inner and outer collagenous layers, i.e., small collagen fibril-associated filaments (11 nm in average length), and large filaments (32 nm in average length). Intermediate size filaments (25 nm in average length) were seen in the basement membranes of the retinal pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris. Chondroitinase AC treatment eliminated the staining of filaments in the collagenous layers (chondroitin sulfate). Chondroitinase ABC treatment also eliminated the staining of filaments in the collagenous layers (chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate). Nitrous acid eliminated the staining of filaments in both basement membranes (heparan sulfate). Proteoglycans containing chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate were associated uniquely with collagen fibrils. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans were associated with the basement membranes of the pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris. With aging, the thickness of the basement membrane of the choriocapillaris and the staining of the filaments in the basement membranes of the pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris (heparan sulfate proteoglycans) increased. Collagen fibers became disarranged and the staining of both filaments in the collagenous layers decreased. The results of the staining characteristics probably reflect the aging of Bruch's membrane.

  7. Local and global components of texture-surround suppression of contour-shape coding.

    PubMed

    Gheorghiu, Elena; Kingdom, Frederick A A

    2012-06-15

    Evidence that contour-shapes and texture-shapes are processed by different mechanisms included the finding that contour-shape aftereffects are reduced when the adaptation stimulus is a texture made of contours rather than a single contour. This phenomenon has been termed texture-surround suppression of contour-shape, or TSSCS. How does TSSCS operate and over what spatial extent? We measured the postadaptation shift in the apparent shape frequency of a single sinusoidal-shaped contour as a function of the number of contours in the adaptor stimulus. Contours were Gabor strings in which the Gabor orientations were either tangential (snakes) or orthogonal (ladders) to the path of the contour. We found that for extended surrounds, the aftereffect was strongly reduced when the surround contours were the same as the central adaptor contour, but not when the Gabors making up the surround contours were opposite-in-orientation to those of the central adaptor. For near surrounds, the aftereffect in a snake contour was unaffected by same-orientation but strongly suppressed by opposite-orientation surrounds, whereas the aftereffect for a ladder-contour was suppressed equally by both same- and opposite-orientation near surrounds. Finally, the strength of surround suppression decreased gradually with increasing spatial separation between center and surround. These results indicate that there are two components to texture-surround suppression in our shape aftereffect: one that is sensitive to opposite-orientation texture surrounds, operates locally, and disrupts contour-processing; the other that is sensitive to same-orientation texture surrounds, is spatially extended, and prevents the shape of the contour from being processed as a contour. We also demonstrate that the observed shape aftereffects are not due to changes in the apparent shape-frequency of the adaptors or the precision with which their shape-frequency is encoded, indicating that TSSCS is not an instance of crowding.

  8. C60 fullerene localization and membrane interactions in RAW 264.7 immortalized mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Russ, K A; Elvati, P; Parsonage, T L; Dews, A; Jarvis, J A; Ray, M; Schneider, B; Smith, P J S; Williamson, P T F; Violi, A; Philbert, M A

    2016-02-21

    There continues to be a significant increase in the number and complexity of hydrophobic nanomaterials that are engineered for a variety of commercial purposes making human exposure a significant health concern. This study uses a combination of biophysical, biochemical and computational methods to probe potential mechanisms for uptake of C60 nanoparticles into various compartments of living immune cells. Cultures of RAW 264.7 immortalized murine macrophage were used as a canonical model of immune-competent cells that are likely to provide the first line of defense following inhalation. Modes of entry studied were endocytosis/pinocytosis and passive permeation of cellular membranes. The evidence suggests marginal uptake of C60 clusters is achieved through endocytosis/pinocytosis, and that passive diffusion into membranes provides a significant source of biologically-available nanomaterial. Computational modeling of both a single molecule and a small cluster of fullerenes predicts that low concentrations of fullerenes enter the membrane individually and produce limited perturbation; however, at higher concentrations the clusters in the membrane causes deformation of the membrane. These findings are bolstered by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of model membranes that reveal deformation of the cell membrane upon exposure to high concentrations of fullerenes. The atomistic and NMR models fail to explain escape of the particle out of biological membranes, but are limited to idealized systems that do not completely recapitulate the complexity of cell membranes. The surprising contribution of passive modes of cellular entry provides new avenues for toxicological research that go beyond the pharmacological inhibition of bulk transport systems such as pinocytosis. PMID:26866469

  9. A Novel Membrane Sensor Controls the Localization and ArfGEF Activity of Bacterial RalF

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Pampa; Duarte, Lionel V.; Delprato, Anna; Zeghouf, Mahel; Antonny, Bruno; Campanacci, Valérie; Roy, Craig R.; Cherfils, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila (Lp) evades destruction in macrophages by camouflaging in a specialized organelle, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV), where it replicates. The LCV maturates by incorporating ER vesicles, which are diverted by effectors that Lp injects to take control of host cell membrane transport processes. One of these effectors, RalF, recruits the trafficking small GTPase Arf1 to the LCV. LpRalF has a Sec7 domain related to host ArfGEFs, followed by a capping domain that intimately associates with the Sec7 domain to inhibit GEF activity. How RalF is activated to function as a LCV-specific ArfGEF is unknown. We combined the reconstitution of Arf activation on artificial membranes with cellular expression and Lp infection assays, to analyze how auto-inhibition is relieved for LpRalF to function in vivo. We find that membranes activate LpRalF by about 1000 fold, and identify the membrane-binding region as the region that inhibits the Sec7 active site. It is enriched in aromatic and positively charged residues, which establish a membrane sensor to control the GEF activity in accordance with specific lipid environments. A similar mechanism of activation is found in RalF from Rickettsia prowazekii (Rp), with a different aromatic/charged residues ratio that results in divergent membrane preferences. The membrane sensor is the primary determinant of the localization of LpRalF on the LCV, and drives the timing of Arf activation during infection. Finally, we identify a conserved motif in the capping domain, remote from the membrane sensor, which is critical for RalF activity presumably by organizing its active conformation. These data demonstrate that RalF proteins are regulated by a membrane sensor that functions as a binary switch to derepress ArfGEF activity when RalF encounters a favorable lipid environment, thus establishing a regulatory paradigm to ensure that Arf GTPases are efficiently activated at specific

  10. Clostridium sordellii Lethal-Toxin Autoprocessing and Membrane Localization Activities Drive GTPase Glucosylation Profiles in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Craven, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium sordellii infections cause gangrene and edema in humans and gastrointestinal infections in livestock. One of the principle virulence factors is TcsL, a large protein toxin which glucosylates host GTPases to cause cytopathic and cytotoxic effects. TcsL has two enzymatic domains, an N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain (GTD) and an autoprocessing domain responsible for release of the GTD within the cell. The GTD can then use its N-terminal membrane localization domain (MLD) for orientation on membranes and modification of GTPases. This study describes the use of conditionally immortalized murine pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells as a model for the study of TcsL functional activities. Point mutations that disrupt the glucosyltransferase, autoprocessing, or membrane localization activities were introduced into a recombinant version of TcsL, and the activities of these mutants were compared to those of wild-type toxin. We observed that all mutants are defective or impaired in cytotoxicity but differ in their modification of Rac1 and Ras. The data suggest a model where differences in GTPase localization dictate cellular responses to intoxication and highlight the importance of autoprocessing in the function of TcsL. IMPORTANCE Clostridium sordellii is a bacterium that can infect humans and cause serious disease and death. The principle virulence factor associated with clinical symptoms is a large protein toxin known as lethal toxin. The mechanism of lethal-toxin intoxication is assumed to be similar to that of the homologous toxins from C. difficile, but very few studies have been done in the context of endothelial cells, a relevant target in C. sordellii infections. This study was designed to test the role of the lethal-toxin enzymatic activities and membrane localization in endothelial cell toxicity and host substrate modification. PMID:27303685

  11. Host Erythrocyte Environment Influences the Localization of Exported Protein 2, an Essential Component of the Plasmodium Translocon

    PubMed Central

    Meibalan, Elamaran; Comunale, Mary Ann; Lopez, Ana M.; Bergman, Lawrence W.; Mehta, Anand; Vaidya, Akhil B.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria parasites replicating inside red blood cells (RBCs) export a large subset of proteins into the erythrocyte cytoplasm to facilitate parasite growth and survival. PTEX, the parasite-encoded translocon, mediates protein transport across the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane (PVM) in Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Proteins exported into the erythrocyte cytoplasm have been localized to membranous structures, such as Maurer's clefts, small vesicles, and a tubovesicular network. Comparable studies of protein trafficking in Plasmodium vivax-infected reticulocytes are limited. With Plasmodium yoelii-infected reticulocytes, we identified exported protein 2 (Exp2) in a proteomic screen of proteins putatively transported across the PVM. Immunofluorescence studies showed that P. yoelii Exp2 (PyExp2) was primarily localized to the PVM. Unexpectedly, PyExp2 was also associated with distinct, membrane-bound vesicles in the reticulocyte cytoplasm. This is in contrast to P. falciparum in mature RBCs, where P. falciparum Exp2 (PfExp2) is exclusively localized to the PVM. Two P. yoelii-exported proteins, PY04481 (encoded by a pyst-a gene) and PY06203 (PypAg-1), partially colocalized with these PyExp2-positive vesicles. Further analysis revealed that with P. yoelii, Plasmodium berghei, and P. falciparum, cytoplasmic Exp2-positive vesicles were primarily observed in CD71+ reticulocytes versus mature RBCs. In transgenic P. yoelii 17X parasites, the association of hemagglutinin-tagged PyExp2 with the PVM and cytoplasmic vesicles was retained, but the pyexp2 gene was refractory to deletion. These data suggest that the localization of Exp2 in mouse and human RBCs can be influenced by the host cell environment. Exp2 may function at multiple points in the pathway by which parasites traffic proteins into and through the reticulocyte cytoplasm. PMID:25662767

  12. Historical review: the carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO) and its membrane (DM) and red cell (Theta.Vc) components.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J M B; Bates, D V

    2003-11-14

    The single breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO sb), also called the transfer factor (TLCO), was introduced by Marie and August Krogh in two papers (Krogh and Krogh, Skand. Arch. Physiol. 23, 236-247, 1909; Krogh, J. Physiol., Lond. 49, 271-296, 1915). Physiologically, their measurements showed that sufficient oxygen (by extrapolation from CO) diffused passively from gas to blood without the need to postulate oxygen secretion, a popular theory at the time. Their DLCO sb technique was neglected until the advent of the infra-red CO meter in the 1950s. Ogilvie et al., J. Clin. Invest. 36, 1-17, 1957 published a standardized technique for a 'modified Krogh' single breath DLCO, which eventually became the method of choice in pulmonary function laboratories. The Roughton-Forster equation (J. Appl. Physiol. 1957, 11, 290-302) was an important step conceptually; it partitioned alveolar-capillary diffusion of oxygen (O2) and carbon monoxide (CO) into a membrane component (DM) and a red cell component (theta.Vc) where theta is the DLCO (or DL(O2)) per ml of blood (measured in vitro), and Vc is the pulmonary capillary volume. This equation was based on the kinetics of O2 and CO with haemoglobin (Hb) in solution and with whole blood Hartridge and Roughton, Nature, 1923, 111, 325-326; Proc. R. Soc. Lond. Ser. A, 1923, 104, 376-394; (Proc. R. Soc. Lond. Ser. B, 1923, 94, 336-367; Proc. R. Soc. Lond. Ser. A 1923, 104, 395-430; J. Physiol., Lond. 1927, 62, 232-242; Roughton, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. Ser. B 1932, 111, 1-36) and on the relationship between alveolar P(O2) and 1/DLCO. Subsequently, the relationship between DL(O2) (Lilienthal et al., Am. J. Physiol. 147, 199-216, 1946) and DL(CO) was defined. More recently, the measurement of the nitric oxide diffusing capacity (DLNO) has been introduced. For DL(O2) and DLNO the membrane component (as 1/DM) is an important part of the overall diffusion (transfer) resistance. For the DLCO, 1/theta.Vc probably plays the greater

  13. A method for detergent-free isolation of membrane proteins in their local lipid environment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sarah C; Knowles, Tim J; Postis, Vincent L G; Jamshad, Mohammed; Parslow, Rosemary A; Lin, Yu-Pin; Goldman, Adrian; Sridhar, Pooja; Overduin, Michael; Muench, Stephen P; Dafforn, Timothy R

    2016-07-01

    Despite the great importance of membrane proteins, structural and functional studies of these proteins present major challenges. A significant hurdle is the extraction of the functional protein from its natural lipid membrane. Traditionally achieved with detergents, purification procedures can be costly and time consuming. A critical flaw with detergent approaches is the removal of the protein from the native lipid environment required to maintain functionally stable protein. This protocol describes the preparation of styrene maleic acid (SMA) co-polymer to extract membrane proteins from prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems. Successful isolation of membrane proteins into SMA lipid particles (SMALPs) allows the proteins to remain with native lipid, surrounded by SMA. We detail procedures for obtaining 25 g of SMA (4 d); explain the preparation of protein-containing SMALPs using membranes isolated from Escherichia coli (2 d) and control protein-free SMALPS using E. coli polar lipid extract (1-2 h); investigate SMALP protein purity by SDS-PAGE analysis and estimate protein concentration (4 h); and detail biophysical methods such as circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation (svAUC) to undertake initial structural studies to characterize SMALPs (∼2 d). Together, these methods provide a practical tool kit for those wanting to use SMALPs to study membrane proteins. PMID:27254461

  14. Charge-Mediated Localization of Conjugated Polythiophenes in Zwitterionic Model Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Houston, Judith E; Kraft, Mario; Mooney, Ian; Terry, Ann E; Scherf, Ullrich; Evans, Rachel C

    2016-08-16

    chain. Our results suggest that charge-mediated self-assembly may provide a simple and effective route to design luminescent CPE probes capable of specific localization within phospholipid membranes. PMID:27434827

  15. Charge-Mediated Localization of Conjugated Polythiophenes in Zwitterionic Model Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Houston, Judith E; Kraft, Mario; Mooney, Ian; Terry, Ann E; Scherf, Ullrich; Evans, Rachel C

    2016-08-16

    chain. Our results suggest that charge-mediated self-assembly may provide a simple and effective route to design luminescent CPE probes capable of specific localization within phospholipid membranes.

  16. Control of erythroid differentiation: asynchronous expression of the anion transporter and the peripheral components of the membrane skeleton in AEV- and S13-transformed cells

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Chicken erythroblasts transformed with avian erythroblastosis virus or S13 virus provide suitable model systems with which to analyze the maturation of immature erythroblasts into erythrocytes. The transformed cells are blocked in differentiation at around the colony-forming unit- erythroid stage of development but can be induced to differentiate in vitro. Analysis of the expression and assembly of components of the membrane skeleton indicates that these cells simultaneously synthesize alpha-spectrin, beta-spectrin, ankyrin, and protein 4.1 at levels that are comparable to those of mature erythroblasts. However, they do not express any detectable amounts of anion transporter. The peripheral membrane skeleton components assemble transiently and are subsequently rapidly catabolized, resulting in 20-40-fold lower steady-state levels than are found in maturing erythrocytes. Upon spontaneous or chemically induced terminal differentiation of these cells expression of the anion transporter is initiated with a concommitant increase in the steady- state levels of the peripheral membrane-skeletal components. These results suggest that during erythropoiesis, expression of the peripheral components of the membrane skeleton is initiated earlier than that of the anion transporter. Furthermore, they point a key role for the anion transporter in conferring long-term stability to the assembled erythroid membrane skeleton during terminal differentiation. PMID:2946700

  17. Race-specific elicitors of Cladosporium fulvum promote translocation of cytosolic components of NADPH oxidase to the plasma membrane of tomato cells.

    PubMed Central

    Xing, T; Higgins, V J; Blumwald, E

    1997-01-01

    The effect of race-specific elicitors on NADPH oxidase was examined in vivo by treating tomato cells with elicitor-containing intercellular fluids prepared from infected tomato leaves inoculated with specific Cladosporium fulvum races. Treatment of Cf-4 or Cf-5 cells with intercellular fluids from incompatible but not from compatible races of C. fulvum increased oxidase activity and the amount of p67-phox, p47-phox, and rac2 in the plasma membrane. Comparison of these three components in the cytosol and plasma membrane indicated that elicitors promoted the translocation of cytosolic components of NADPH oxidase to the plasma membrane of tomato cells carrying the appropriate resistance gene. Protein kinase C activators and inhibitors did not affect enzyme activity or the binding of these three components to the plasma membrane. In contrast, staurosporine, calmodulin antagonists, and EGTA inhibited elicitor-induced oxidase activity and the translocation of the cytosolic components. The assembly process involves a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase that catalyzes the phosphorylation of p67-phox and p47-phox, facilitating their translocation to the plasma membrane. Our data suggest that although both plants and animals share common elements in eukaryotic signal transduction, the involvement of different protein kinases mediating the activation of phosphorylation of p67-phox and p47-phox may reflect the unique spatial and temporal distribution of signal transduction pathways in plants. PMID:9061955

  18. The β-lactam resistance protein Blr, a small membrane polypeptide, is a component of the Escherichia coli cell division machinery.

    PubMed

    Karimova, Gouzel; Davi, Marilyne; Ladant, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    In Escherichia coli, cell division is performed by a multimolecular machinery called the divisome, made of 10 essential proteins and more than 20 accessory proteins. Through a bacterial two-hybrid library screen, we identified the E. coli β-lactam resistance protein Blr, a short membrane polypeptide of 41 residues, as an interacting partner of the essential cell division protein FtsL. In addition to FtsL, Blr was found to associate with several other divisomal proteins, including FtsI, FtsK, FtsN, FtsQ, FtsW, and YmgF. Using fluorescently tagged Blr, we showed that this peptide localizes to the division septum and that its colocalization requires the presence of the late division protein FtsN. Although Blr is not essential, previous studies have shown that the inactivation of the blr gene increased the sensitivity of bacteria to β-lactam antibiotics or their resistance to cell envelope stress. Here, we found that Blr, when overproduced, restores the viability of E. coli ftsQ1(Ts) cells, carrying a thermosensitive allele of the ftsQ gene, during growth under low-osmotic-strength conditions (e.g., in synthetic media or in Luria-Bertani broth without NaCl). In contrast, the inactivation of blr increases the osmosensitivity of ftsQ1(Ts) cells, and blr ftsQ1 double mutants exhibit filamentous growth in LB broth even at a moderate salt concentration (0.5% NaCl) compared to parental ftsQ1(Ts) cells. Altogether, our results suggest that the small membrane polypeptide Blr is a novel component of the E. coli cell division apparatus involved in the stabilization of the divisome under certain stress conditions.

  19. The Relationship between Components of the Ohio Local School District Report Card and the Outcome of a School Tax Levy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheatley, Vicki Ann

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between components of the local school district report card, school district typology, and the outcome of public school tax levy requests were examined in this study. A correlation research design was used to measure the relationship between the independent variables (performance index, average yearly progress, value added,…

  20. FRET imaging in living maize cells reveals that plasma membrane aquaporins interact to regulate their subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Zelazny, Enric; Borst, Jan Willem; Muylaert, Mélanie; Batoko, Henri; Hemminga, Marcus A; Chaumont, François

    2007-07-24

    Zea mays plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (ZmPIPs) fall into two groups, ZmPIP1s and ZmPIP2s, that exhibit different water channel activities when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. ZmPIP1s are inactive, whereas ZmPIP2s induce a marked increase in the membrane osmotic water permeability coefficient, P(f). We previously showed that, in Xenopus oocytes, ZmPIP1;2 and ZmPIP2;1 interact to increase the cell P(f). Here, we report the localization and interaction of ZmPIP1s and ZmPIP2s in living maize cells. ZmPIPs were fused to monomeric yellow fluorescent protein and/or monomeric cyan fluorescent protein and expressed transiently in maize mesophyll protoplasts. When expressed alone, ZmPIP1 fusion proteins were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas ZmPIP2s were found in the plasma membrane. Interestingly, when coexpressed with ZmPIP2s, ZmPIP1s were relocalized to the plasma membrane. Using FRET/fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, we demonstrated that this relocalization results from interaction between ZmPIP1s and ZmPIP2s. Immunoprecipitation experiments provided additional evidence for the association of ZmPIP1;2 and ZmPIP2;1 in maize roots and suspension cells. These data suggest that PIP1-PIP2 interaction is required for in planta PIP1 trafficking to the plasma membrane to modulate plasma membrane permeability. PMID:17636130

  1. Capsaicin Fluidifies the Membrane and Localizes Itself near the Lipid-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Torrecillas, Alejandro; Schneider, Monika; Fernández-Martínez, Ana M; Ausili, Alessio; de Godos, Ana M; Corbalán-García, Senena; Gómez-Fernández, Juan C

    2015-10-21

    Capsaicin is the chemical responsible for making some peppers spicy hot, but additionally it is used as a pharmaceutical to alleviate different pain conditions. Capsaicin binds to the vanilloid receptor TRPV1, which plays a role in coordinating chemical and physical painful stimuli. A number of reports have also shown that capsaicin inserts in membranes and its capacity to modify them may be part of its molecular mode of action, affecting the activity of other membrane proteins. We have used differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, (31)P NMR, and (2)H NMR spectroscopy to show that capsaicin increases the fluidity and disorder of 1,2-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine membrane models. By using (1)H NOESY MAS NMR based on proton-proton cross-peaks between capsaicin and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine resonances, we determined the location profile of this molecule in a fluid membrane concluding that it occupies the upper part of the phospholipid monolayer, between the lipid-water interface and the double bond of the acyl chain in position sn-2. This location explains the disorganization of the membrane of both the lipid-water interface and the hydrophobic palisade.

  2. The local anesthetic proparacaine modifies sodium transport in toad skin and perturbs the structures of model and cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Schneider, Carlos; Norris, Beryl; Villena, Fernando; Cárdenas, Hernán; Cuevas, Francisco; Sotomayor, Carlos P

    2002-01-01

    Experimental results indicate a significant decrease in the potential difference (PD) and in the short-circuit current (Isc) after the application of proparacaine to isolated toad skin, which may reflect an inhibition of the active transport of ions. This finding was explained on the basis of the results obtained from membrane models incubated with proparacaine. These consisted of human erythrocytes, isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), phospholipid multilayers built-up of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representatives of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively, and in large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of DMPC X-ray diffraction showed that proparacaine interaction with DMPC and DMPE bilayers perturbed both structures, especially DMPC. This result, confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy of DMPC LUV at 18 degrees C, demonstrated that the local anesthetic (LA) could interact with the lipid moiety of cell membranes. However, effects observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of human erythrocytes and by fluorescence spectroscopy of IUM might also imply proparacaine-protein interactions. Thus, the LA may alter epitheial sodium channels through interaction with the lipid matrix and with channel protein residues. PMID:12440736

  3. Distinctive Properties of the Nuclear Localization Signals of Inner Nuclear Membrane Proteins Heh1 and Heh2.

    PubMed

    Lokareddy, Ravi K; Hapsari, Rizqiya A; van Rheenen, Mathilde; Pumroy, Ruth A; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Steen, Anton; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M; Cingolani, Gino

    2015-07-01

    Targeting of ER-synthesized membrane proteins to the inner nuclear membrane (INM) has long been explained by the diffusion-retention model. However, several INM proteins contain non-classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences, which, in a few instances, have been shown to promote importin α/β- and Ran-dependent translocation to the INM. Here, using structural and biochemical methods, we show that yeast INM proteins Heh2 and Src1/Heh1 contain bipartite import sequences that associate intimately with the minor NLS-binding pocket of yeast importin α and unlike classical NLSs efficiently displace the IBB domain in the absence of importin β. In vivo, the intimate interactions at the minor NLS-binding pocket make the h2NLS highly efficient at recruiting importin α at the ER and drive INM localization of endogenous Heh2. Thus, h1/h2NLSs delineate a novel class of super-potent, IBB-like membrane protein NLSs, distinct from classical NLSs found in soluble cargos and of general interest in biology.

  4. Intracellular localization of a group II chaperonin indicates a membrane-related function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Paavola, Chad D.; McMillan, R. Andrew; Howard, Jeanie; Jahnke, Linda; Lavin, Colleen; Embaye, Tsegereda; Henze, Christopher E.

    2003-01-01

    Chaperonins are protein complexes that are believed to function as part of a protein folding system in the cytoplasm of the cell. We observed, however, that the group II chaperonins known as rosettasomes in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, are not cytoplasmic but membrane associated. This association was observed in cultures grown at 60 degrees C and 76 degrees C or heat-shocked at 85 degrees C by using immunofluorescence microscopy and in thick sections of rapidly frozen cells grown at 76 degrees C by using immunogold electron microscopy. We observed that increased abundance of rosettasomes after heat shock correlated with decreased membrane permeability at lethal temperature (92 degrees C). This change in permeability was not seen in cells heat-shocked in the presence of the amino acid analogue azetidine 2-carboxylic acid, indicating functional protein synthesis influences permeability. Azetidine experiments also indicated that observed heat-induced changes in lipid composition in S. shibatae could not account for changes in membrane permeability. Rosettasomes purified from cultures grown at 60 degrees C and 76 degrees C or heat-shocked at 85 degrees C bind to liposomes made from either the bipolar tetraether lipids of Sulfolobus or a variety of artificial lipid mixtures. The presence of rosettasomes did not significantly change the transition temperature of liposomes, as indicated by differential scanning calorimetry, or the proton permeability of liposomes, as indicated by pyranine fluorescence. We propose that these group II chaperonins function as a structural element in the natural membrane based on their intracellular location, the correlation between their functional abundance and membrane permeability, and their potential distribution on the membrane surface.

  5. Photosynthetic membrane topography: quantitative in situ localization of photosystems I and II.

    PubMed

    Mustardy, L; Cunningham, F X; Gantt, E

    1992-11-01

    An immunolabeling approach was developed for quantitative in situ labeling of photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII). Photosynthetic membranes from the phycobilisome-containing red alga Porphyridium cruentum were isolated from cells in which different photosystem compositions were predetermined by growing cells in green light (GL) or red light (RL). Based on phycobilisome densities per membrane area of 390 per m2 (GL) and 450 per m2 (RL) and the PSI reaction center (P700) and PSII reaction center (QA) content, the photosystem densities per m2 of membrane were calculated to be 2520 PSI in GL and 1580 in RL and 630 PSII in GL and 1890 in RL. PSI was detected in the membranes with 10-nm Au particles conjugated to affinity-purified anti-PSI, and PSII was detected with 15-nm Au particles conjugated to anti-PSII. Distribution of Au particles appeared relatively uniform, and the degree of labeling was consistent with the calculated photosystem densities. However, the absolute numbers of Au-labeled sites were lower than would be obtained if all reaction center monomers were labeled. Specific labeling of PSI was 25% in GL and RL membranes, and PSII labeling was 33% in GL but only 17% in RL membranes. An IgG-Au particle is larger than a monomer of either photosystem and could shield several closely packed photosystems. We suggest that clustering of photosystems exists and that the cluster size of PSI is the same in GL and RL cells, but the PSII cluster size is 2 times greater in RL than in GL cells. Such variations may reflect changes in functional domains whereby increased clustering can maximize the cooperativity between the photosystems, resulting in enhancement of the quantum yield.

  6. Morphological study on permeating efficiency and localization of FCLA and HpD through membrane of lung cancer cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yunxia; Xing, Da; Tang, Yonghong

    2004-07-01

    It is reported that apoptosis of cancer cells in photodynamic therapy (PDT) is caused by 1O2 generated in photosensitization. In order to study the mechanism of this kind of 1O2-induced apoptosis, it is necessary to establish a special technique to dynamically detect intracellular production and localization of 1O2. FCLA, as a chemiluminescence probe to detect singlet oxygen (1O2) and superoxide (O2-.), has been used successfully in photodynamic and sonodynamic diagnosis in tissue level, recently. This paper reported a preliminary result of morphological study on permeating efficiency and localization of FCLA and hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) through cellular membrane. Human lung cancer cell line (ASTC-a-1) was used in the experiment. The result of this research showed that both HpD and FCLA could permeate through cellular membrane and localize to prinuclear area, when HpD or FCLA was incubated with cells. Although the molecular weight of HpD is close to FCLA's, the permeating efficiency of HpD through membrane was different from that of FCLA. Intracellular FCLA concentration reached a peak after incubation for only 30 - 45 minutes, but amount of HpD in cells approached the equilibrium after incubation for near 22 h. In the experiment, we did not observe the evidence of FCLA or HpD penetrating into nucleolus. This study suggests that it is possibly to use a specific chemiluminescence probe to dynamcially detect the production and localization of 1O2 or 02-. in cell.

  7. Sustained Attention to Local and Global Target Features Is Different: Performance and Tympanic Membrane Temperature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helton, William S.; Hayrynen, Lauren; Schaeffer, David

    2009-01-01

    Vision researchers have investigated the differences between global and local feature perception. No one has, however, examined the role of global and local feature discrimination in sustained attention tasks. In this experiment participants performed a sustained attention task requiring either global or local letter target discriminations or…

  8. Milk fat globule membrane isolated from buttermilk or whey cream and their lipid components inhibit infectivity of rotavirus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fuller, K L; Kuhlenschmidt, T B; Kuhlenschmidt, M S; Jiménez-Flores, R; Donovan, S M

    2013-06-01

    Milk fat is encapsulated in a milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) that contains bioactive glycoproteins and glycolipids. The MFGM inhibits infectivity of rotavirus (RV), activity that has been attributed to its glycoprotein and carbohydrate components. However, previous studies of proteins and oligosaccharides in the MGFM have not accounted for all the bioactivity associated with the complete MFGM. The lipid fraction of the MFGM accounts for half of its composition by weight, and we postulate that this fraction should be tested by itself to determine if it plays a role in antiviral activity. Herein, the anti-RV activity of an organic extract of MFGM was tested. Natural and whey buttermilk powders containing bovine MFGM enriched in polar lipids were prepared by microfiltration and supercritical fluid extraction treatment to reduce the triglyceride content of the powders. Lipid fractions were then extracted from the MFGM using both single- and dual-phase extraction methods. Whole MFGM and organic extracts were screened in MA-104 cells for anti-infective activity against a neuraminidase-sensitive rotavirus using a focus-forming unit assay. Dose-dependent inhibition was observed for whole buttermilk and cheese whey MFGM against the rotavirus. In general, buttermilk MFGM exhibited greater RV percentage inhibition than cheese whey MFGM. Organic-soluble anti-RV compounds were identified in bovine MFGM. The most active fraction, isolated by dual-phase extraction and iatrobead chromatography, was free of proteins and highly nonpolar. Further separation of this fraction in a less polar solvent (30:1 chloroform:methanol) resolved at least 5 lipid-containing compounds, which likely contribute to the anti-RV activity associated with bovine MFGM. In summary, lipid components associated with MFGM appear to contribute in large part to the anti-RV activity associated with the bovine MFGM.

  9. A gene-fusion strategy for stoichiometric and co-localized expression of light-gated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kleinlogel, Sonja; Terpitz, Ulrich; Legrum, Barbara; Gökbuget, Deniz; Boyden, Edward S; Bamann, Christian; Wood, Phillip G; Bamberg, Ernst

    2011-12-01

    The precise co-localization and stoichiometric expression of two different light-gated membrane proteins can vastly improve the physiological usefulness of optogenetics for the modulation of cell excitability with light. Here we present a gene-fusion strategy for the stable 1:1 expression of any two microbial rhodopsins in a single polypeptide chain. By joining the excitatory channelrhodopsin-2 with the inhibitory ion pumps halorhodopsin or bacteriorhodopsin, we demonstrate light-regulated quantitative bi-directional control of the membrane potential in HEK293 cells and neurons in vitro. We also present synergistic rhodopsin combinations of channelrhodopsin-2 with Volvox carteri channelrhodopsin-1 or slow channelrhodopsin-2 mutants, to achieve enhanced spectral or kinetic properties, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of our fusion strategy to determine ion-turnovers of as yet uncharacterized rhodopsins, exemplified for archaerhodopsin and CatCh, or to correct pump cycles, exemplified for halorhodopsin. PMID:22056675

  10. Over-expression and localization of a host protein on the membrane of Cryptosporidium parvum infected epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Lin; Serrano, Myrna G; Sheoran, Abhineet S; Manque, Patricio A; Buck, Gregory A; Widmer, Giovanni

    2009-11-01

    The genus Cryptosporidium includes several species of intestinal protozoan parasites which multiply in intestinal epithelial cells. The impact of this infection on the transcriptome of cultured host cells was investigated using DNA microarray hybridizations. The expression of 14 genes found to be consistently up- or down-regulated in infected cell monolayers was validated with RT PCR. Using immunofluorescence we examined the expression of Protease Activated Receptor-2, which is encoded by one of the up-regulated genes. In infected cells this receptor localized to the host cell membrane which covers the intracellular trophozoites and meronts. This observation indicates that the composition of the host cell membrane is affected by the developing trophozoite, a phenomenon which has not been described previously.

  11. Over-expression and localization of a host protein on the membrane of Cryptosporidium parvum infected epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi-Lin; Serrano, Myrna G.; Sheoran, Abhineet S.; Manque, Patricio A.; Buck, Gregory A.; Widmer, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    The genus Cryptosporidium includes several species of intestinal protozoan parasites which multiply in intestinal epithelial cells. The impact of this infection on the transcriptome of cultured host cells was investigated using DNA microarray hybridizations. The expression of 14 genes found to be consistently up- or down-regulated in infected cell monolayers was validated with RT PCR. Using immunofluorescence we examined the expression of Protease Activated Receptor-2, which is encoded by one of the up-regulated genes. In infected cells this receptor localized to the host cell membrane which covers intracellular trophozoites and meronts. This observation indicates that the composition of the host cell membrane is affected by the developing trophozoite, a phenomenon which has not been described previously. PMID:19631240

  12. Topography of thylakoid membranes: In situ localization of photosystems I and II. [Porphyridium cruentum

    SciTech Connect

    Gantt, E.; Mustardy, L.; Cunningham, F.X. Jr. )

    1991-05-01

    The organization of the photosynthetic membrane structure is being studied in the red alga Porphyridium cruentum. Excitation energy transfer between the photosystems, which occurs readily in red algae and cyanobacteria, requires a close spatial relationship between the photosystems. The authors initial efforts have focused on the in situ labelling of PSI and PSII, two of four major protein complexes in thylakoids. Stoichiometries of PSI and PSII in P. cruentum are readily affected by light spectral quality. Cultures grown under continuous red light contain nearly five times as many A{sub A}'s per P{sub 700} as cells grown under green light. Thylakoids were isolated from cells grown under red or green light, and rinsed exhaustively to remove stromal proteins and phycobilisomes. These membranes were spread on electron microscope grids and immunolabelled with affinity-purified IgG antibodies to PSI and PSII. Gold particles were directly coupled to the antibodies of PSI (10 nm Au) and PSII (15nm Au). The labelling results are consistent with the Q{sub A} and P{sub 700} determinations. The density of PSII is greater in membranes from red light cells relative to green light cells, while the PSI density is greater in green light cells. The photosystems appear to be uniformly distributed over the thylakoid membranes. Double labelling experiments indicate that PSI and PSII can occur in close proximity with a distance of less than 20 nm. Such proximity increases the possibility of excitation energy transfer between PSI and PSII.

  13. Localized topological changes of the plasma membrane upon exocytosis visualized by polarized TIRFM

    PubMed Central

    Onoa, Bibiana; Edwards, Robert H.; Holz, Ronald W.; Axelrod, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) images the plasma membrane–cytosol interface and has allowed insights into the behavior of individual secretory granules before and during exocytosis. Much less is known about the dynamics of the other partner in exocytosis, the plasma membrane. In this study, we report the implementation of a TIRFM-based polarization technique to detect rapid submicrometer changes in plasma membrane topology as a result of exocytosis. A theoretical analysis of the technique is presented together with image simulations of predicted topologies of the postfusion granule membrane–plasma membrane complex. Experiments on diI-stained bovine adrenal chromaffin cells using polarized TIRFM demonstrate rapid and varied submicrometer changes in plasma membrane topology at sites of exocytosis that occur immediately upon fusion. We provide direct evidence for a persistent curvature in the exocytotic region that is altered by inhibition of dynamin guanosine triphosphatase activity and is temporally distinct from endocytosis measured by VMAT2-pHluorin. PMID:20142424

  14. Impact of local sea surface temperature on changes of summer precipitation components over Northeast Asia in mid-1990s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Eun-Chul; Yeh, Sang-Wook; Yoshimura, Kei

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the new global atmospheric analysis dataset (DA126) which is produced by the global and regional integrated model system (GRIMs) global model program (GMP) is used to identify changes of the summer precipitation components in mid-1990s over Northeast Asia. The convective rain ratio (CRR) is used as the index to find changes of the precipitation component, which is the proportion of convective precipitation to the total precipitation. The CRR shows increasing trend over Northeast Asia where includes the Korea-Japan region for recent 30-years, whereas precipitation anomaly does not have a distinct trend over this region. The increased CRR shows a significant relationship with the increased local sea surface temperature (SST) variability. To investigate effects of the local SST on the summer precipitation components over Northeast Asia, two experiments are performed by utilizing the GRIMs regional model program (RMP). The CNTL experiment is forced by the observed SST whereas the CLIM run is forced by the climatological SST. Lateral boundary condition for two regional model experiments is provided by the GRIMs GMP run forced by the historical SSTs over tropical region to exclude mid-latitude SST effect. The SST warming increases the convective precipitation through the increased convective available potential energy and does not have large effects on the large-scale rainfall component. Consequently, the total amount of the precipitation and the CRR are increased by the local SST warming over Northeast Asia.

  15. Expression patterns of progesterone receptor membrane components 1 and 2 in endometria from women with and without endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Kristen; Tinnemore, Deborah; Huff, Seth; Hoffer, Zachary S; Burney, Richard O; Stallings, Jonathan D

    2014-02-01

    Endometriosis is a hormone-dependent inflammatory condition associated with pain and infertility. A growing body of evidence supports attenuated secretory-phase progesterone responsiveness in women with this disease. Herein, we compare the expression of progesterone receptor membrane components (PGRMC) 1 and 2 in eutopic endometrium from 11 women with laparoscopically and/or histologically proven stage III/IV endometriosis and 23 disease-free women. Menstrual cycle phase was determined using a combination of reported cycle day, serum hormone profile, and endometrial histologic dating. The PGRMC-1 (fold change -3.3; P < .05) and PGRMC-2 (fold-change -8.8; P < .05) gene expression were significantly downregulated in secretory phase, eutopic endometrium from women with endometriosis. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated decreased PGRMC-1 and PGRMC-2 protein expression in the secretory phase endometrial stroma cells of women with endometriosis. Consistent with the preclinical work of others, our results reflect downregulation of endometrial PGRMC-1 and PGRMC-2 expression in secretory phase endometrium from women with advanced stage endometriosis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of attenuated progesterone action in endometriosis has important diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  16. Membrane-Localized Estrogen Receptor 1 Is Required for Normal Male Reproductive Development and Function in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nanjappa, Manjunatha K; Hess, Rex A; Medrano, Theresa I; Locker, Seth H; Levin, Ellis R; Cooke, Paul S

    2016-07-01

    Estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) mediates major reproductive functions of 17β-estradiol (E2). Male Esr1 knockout (Esr1KO) mice are infertile due to efferent ductule and epididymal abnormalities. The majority of ESR1 is nuclear/cytoplasmic; however, a small fraction is palmitoylated at cysteine 451 in mice and localized to cell membranes, in which it mediates rapid E2 actions. This study used an Esr1 knock-in mouse containing an altered palmitoylation site (C451A) in ESR1 that prevented cell membrane localization, although nuclear ESR1 was expressed. These nuclear-only estrogen receptor 1 (NOER) mice were used to determine the roles of membrane ESR1 in males. Epididymal sperm motility was reduced 85% in 8-month-old NOER mice compared with wild-type controls. The NOER mice had decreased epididymal sperm viability and greater than 95% of sperm had abnormalities, including coiled midpieces and tails, absent heads, and folded tails; this was comparable to 4-month Esr1KO males. At 8 months, daily sperm production in NOER males was reduced 62% compared with controls. The NOER mice had histological changes in the rete testes, efferent ductules, and seminiferous tubules that were comparable with those previously observed in Esr1KO males. Serum T was increased in NOER males, but FSH, LH, and E2 were unchanged. Critically, NOER males were initially subfertile, becoming infertile with advancing age. These findings identify a previously unknown role for membrane ESR1 in the development of normal sperm and providing an adequate environment for spermatogenesis. PMID:27145009

  17. Properties of a blue-light-absorbing photoreceptor kinase localized in the plasma membrane of the coleoptile tip region.

    PubMed

    Hager, A

    1996-02-01

    The blue-light-sensing apical part of coleoptiles of grasses is responsible for the first positive phototropic bending reaction of this organ. The photoreceptor responsible has been shown to be localized to the plasma membrane (PM) of this tip region. An approximately 100-kDa protein moiety of this receptor is rapidly phosphorylated upon irradiation. Properties of this protein kinase reaction were studied in vitro by using PMs from the maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptile tip region; (i) The substrate for the blue-light-triggered phosphorylation of the 100-kDa protein was found to be ATP as well as GTP. However, the affinity of the involved protein kinase for the substrate GTP was lower than for ATP. (ii) Experiments were undertaken to find out whether a photoreceptor moiety acts as an autophosphorylating protein kinase or whether the photoreceptor protein, when activated by light, becomes the target of an extrinsic protein kinase. Two studied extrinsic protein kinases (50 and 55 kDa) of the coleoptile tip were found not to be involved in the light-dependent protein phosphorylation. The degree of phosphorylation of the 100-kDa protein on isolated plasma membranes upon irradiation at 0 degrees C was scarcely different from a reaction at 30 degrees C, in contrast to the background protein phosphorylations which decreased with decreasing temperature. This result points to an autophosphorylation mechanism at the receptor. (iii) In mixing experiments, solubilized membranes from maize coleoptiles were irradiated and added to unirradiated membrane proteins from pea (Pisum sativum L.) epicotyls followed by addition of [gamma-32P]ATP. Unirradiated proteins from pea were not phosphorylated by light-activated (autophosphorylatable) maize protein kinases. (iv) It is suggested that the blue-light-sensitive photoreceptor localized to the PM of the phototropically active tip region of coleoptiles has an autophosphorylatable kinase domain which is able to use ATP or GTP as substrate

  18. Expression of progesterone receptor membrane component-2 within the immature rat ovary and its role in regulating mitosis and apoptosis of spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Daniel; Liu, Xiufang; Pru, Cindy; Pru, James K; Peluso, John J

    2014-08-01

    Progesterone receptor membrane component 2 (Pgrmc2) mRNA was detected in the immature rat ovary. By 48 h after eCG, Pgrmc2 mRNA levels decreased by 40% and were maintained at 48 h post-hCG. Immunohistochemical studies detected PGRMC2 in oocytes and ovarian surface epithelial, interstitial, thecal, granulosa, and luteal cells. PGRMC2 was also present in spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells, localizing to the cytoplasm of interphase cells and apparently to the mitotic spindle of cells in metaphase. Interestingly, PGRMC2 levels appeared to decrease during the G1 stage of the cell cycle. Moreover, overexpression of PGRMC2 suppressed entry into the cell cycle, possibly by binding the p58 form of cyclin dependent kinase 11b. Conversely, Pgrmc2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) treatment increased the percentage of cells in G1 and M stage but did not increase the number of cells, which was likely due to an increase in apoptosis. Depleting PGRMC2 did not inhibit cellular (3)H-progesterone binding, but attenuated the ability of progesterone to suppress mitosis and apoptosis. Taken together these studies suggest that PGRMC2 affects granulosa cell mitosis by acting at two specific stages of the cell cycle. First, PGRMC2 regulates the progression from the G0 into the G1 stage of the cell cycle. Second, PGRMC2 appears to localize to the mitotic spindle, where it likely promotes the final stages of mitosis. Finally, siRNA knockdown studies indicate that PGRMC2 is required for progesterone to slow the rate of granulosa cell mitosis and apoptosis. These findings support a role for PGRMC2 in ovarian follicle development.

  19. Screening antiallergic components from Carthamus tinctorius using rat basophilic leukemia 2H3 cell membrane chromatography combined with high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Han, Shengli; Huang, Jing; Cui, Ronghua; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-01

    Carthamus tinctorius, used in traditional Chinese medicine, has many pharmacological effects, such as anticoagulant effects, antioxidant effects, antiaging effects, regulation of gene expression, and antitumor effects. However, there is no report on the antiallergic effects of the components in C. tinctorius. In the present study, we investigated the antiallergic components of C. tinctorius and its mechanism of action. A rat basophilic leukemia 2H3/cell membrane chromatography coupled online with high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry method was developed to screen antiallergic components from C. tinctorius. The screening results showed that Hydroxysafflor yellow A, from C. tinctorius, was the targeted component that retained on the rat basophilic leukemia 2H3/cell membrane chromatography column. We measured the amount of β-hexosaminidase and histamine released in mast cells and the key markers of degranulation. The release assays showed that Hydroxysafflor yellow A could attenuate the immunoglobulin E induced release of allergic cytokines without affecting cell viability from 1.0 to 50.0 μM. In conclusion, the established rat basophilic leukemia 2H3 cell membrane chromatography coupled with online high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry method successfully screened and identified Hydroxysafflor yellow A from C. tinctorius as a potential antiallergic component. Pharmacological analysis elucidated that Hydroxysafflor yellow A is an effective natural component for inhibiting immunoglobulin E-antigen-mediated degranulation.

  20. Junctophilin-4, a component of the endoplasmic reticulum–plasma membrane junctions, regulates Ca2+ dynamics in T cells

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jin Seok; Srikanth, Sonal; Nishi, Miyuki; Ping, Peipei; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Gwack, Yousang

    2016-01-01

    Orai1 and stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) mediate store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) in immune cells. STIM1, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ sensor, detects store depletion and interacts with plasma membrane (PM)-resident Orai1 channels at the ER–PM junctions. However, the molecular composition of these junctions in T cells remains poorly understood. Here, we show that junctophilin-4 (JP4), a member of junctional proteins in excitable cells, is expressed in T cells and localized at the ER–PM junctions to regulate Ca2+ signaling. Silencing or genetic manipulation of JP4 decreased ER Ca2+ content and SOCE in T cells, impaired activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and extracellular signaling-related kinase (ERK) signaling pathways, and diminished expression of activation markers and cytokines. Mechanistically, JP4 directly interacted with STIM1 via its cytoplasmic domain and facilitated its recruitment into the junctions. Accordingly, expression of this cytoplasmic fragment of JP4 inhibited SOCE. Furthermore, JP4 also formed a complex with junctate, a Ca2+-sensing ER-resident protein, previously shown to mediate STIM1 recruitment into the junctions. We propose that the junctate–JP4 complex located at the junctions cooperatively interacts with STIM1 to maintain ER Ca2+ homeostasis and mediate SOCE in T cells. PMID:26929330

  1. FcγRIIB-Independent Mechanisms Controlling Membrane Localization of the Inhibitory Phosphatase SHIP in Human B Cells.

    PubMed

    Pauls, Samantha D; Ray, Arnab; Hou, Sen; Vaughan, Andrew T; Cragg, Mark S; Marshall, Aaron J

    2016-09-01

    SHIP is an important regulator of immune cell signaling that functions to dephosphorylate the phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate at the plasma membrane and mediate protein-protein interactions. One established paradigm for SHIP activation involves its recruitment to the phospho-ITIM motif of the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIB. Although SHIP is essential for the inhibitory function of FcγRIIB, it also has critical modulating functions in signaling initiated from activating immunoreceptors such as B cell Ag receptor. In this study, we found that SHIP is indistinguishably recruited to the plasma membrane after BCR stimulation with or without FcγRIIB coligation in human cell lines and primary cells. Interestingly, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis reveals differential mobility of SHIP-enhanced GFP depending on the mode of stimulation, suggesting that although BCR and FcγRIIB can both recruit SHIP, this occurs via distinct molecular complexes. Mutagenesis of a SHIP-enhanced GFP fusion protein reveals that the SHIP-Src homology 2 domain is essential in both cases whereas the C terminus is required for recruitment via BCR stimulation, but is less important with FcγRIIB coligation. Experiments with pharmacological inhibitors reveal that Syk activity is required for optimal stimulation-induced membrane localization of SHIP, whereas neither PI3K or Src kinase activity is essential. BCR-induced association of SHIP with binding partner Shc1 is dependent on Syk, as is tyrosine phosphorylation of both partners. Our results indicate that FcγRIIB is not uniquely able to promote membrane recruitment of SHIP, but rather modulates its function via formation of distinct signaling complexes. Membrane recruitment of SHIP via Syk-dependent mechanisms may be an important factor modulating immunoreceptor signaling. PMID:27456487

  2. Membrane topology of human monoacylglycerol acyltransferase-2 and identification of regions important for its localization to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    McFie, Pamela J; Izzard, Sabrina; Vu, Huyen; Jin, Youzhi; Beauchamp, Erwan; Berthiaume, Luc G; Stone, Scot J

    2016-09-01

    Acyl CoA:2-monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT)-2 has an important role in dietary fat absorption in the intestine. MGAT2 resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and catalyzes the synthesis of diacylglycerol which is then utilized as a substrate for triacylglycerol synthesis. This triacylglycerol is then incorporated into chylomicrons which are released into the circulation. In this study, we determined the membrane topology of human MGAT2. Protease protection experiments showed that the C-terminus is exposed to the cytosol, while the N-terminus is partially buried in the ER membrane. MGAT2, like murine DGAT2, was found to have two transmembrane domains. We also identified a region of MGAT2 associated with the ER membrane that contains the histidine-proline-histidine-glycine sequence present in all DGAT2 family members that is thought to comprise the active site. Proteolysis experiments demonstrated that digestion of total cellular membranes from cells expressing MGAT2 with trypsin abolished MGAT activity, indicating that domains that are important for catalysis face the cytosol. We also explored the role that the five cysteines residues present in MGAT2 have in catalysis. MGAT activity was sensitive to two thiol modifiers, N-ethylmaleimide and 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid). Furthermore, mutation of four cysteines resulted in a reduction in MGAT activity. However, when the C-terminal cysteine (C334) was mutated, MGAT activity was actually higher than that of wild-type FL-MGAT2. Lastly, we determined that both transmembrane domains of MGAT2 are important for its ER localization, and that MGAT2 is present in mitochondrial-associated membranes.

  3. FcγRIIB-Independent Mechanisms Controlling Membrane Localization of the Inhibitory Phosphatase SHIP in Human B Cells.

    PubMed

    Pauls, Samantha D; Ray, Arnab; Hou, Sen; Vaughan, Andrew T; Cragg, Mark S; Marshall, Aaron J

    2016-09-01

    SHIP is an important regulator of immune cell signaling that functions to dephosphorylate the phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate at the plasma membrane and mediate protein-protein interactions. One established paradigm for SHIP activation involves its recruitment to the phospho-ITIM motif of the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIB. Although SHIP is essential for the inhibitory function of FcγRIIB, it also has critical modulating functions in signaling initiated from activating immunoreceptors such as B cell Ag receptor. In this study, we found that SHIP is indistinguishably recruited to the plasma membrane after BCR stimulation with or without FcγRIIB coligation in human cell lines and primary cells. Interestingly, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis reveals differential mobility of SHIP-enhanced GFP depending on the mode of stimulation, suggesting that although BCR and FcγRIIB can both recruit SHIP, this occurs via distinct molecular complexes. Mutagenesis of a SHIP-enhanced GFP fusion protein reveals that the SHIP-Src homology 2 domain is essential in both cases whereas the C terminus is required for recruitment via BCR stimulation, but is less important with FcγRIIB coligation. Experiments with pharmacological inhibitors reveal that Syk activity is required for optimal stimulation-induced membrane localization of SHIP, whereas neither PI3K or Src kinase activity is essential. BCR-induced association of SHIP with binding partner Shc1 is dependent on Syk, as is tyrosine phosphorylation of both partners. Our results indicate that FcγRIIB is not uniquely able to promote membrane recruitment of SHIP, but rather modulates its function via formation of distinct signaling complexes. Membrane recruitment of SHIP via Syk-dependent mechanisms may be an important factor modulating immunoreceptor signaling.

  4. A single frequency component-based re-estimated MUSIC algorithm for impact localization on complex composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shenfang; Bao, Qiao; Qiu, Lei; Zhong, Yongteng

    2015-10-01

    The growing use of composite materials on aircraft structures has attracted much attention for impact monitoring as a kind of structural health monitoring (SHM) method. Multiple signal classification (MUSIC)-based monitoring technology is a promising method because of its directional scanning ability and easy arrangement of the sensor array. However, for applications on real complex structures, some challenges still exist. The impact-induced elastic waves usually exhibit a wide-band performance, giving rise to the difficulty in obtaining the phase velocity directly. In addition, composite structures usually have obvious anisotropy, and the complex structural style of real aircrafts further enhances this performance, which greatly reduces the localization precision of the MUSIC-based method. To improve the MUSIC-based impact monitoring method, this paper first analyzes and demonstrates the influence of measurement precision of the phase velocity on the localization results of the MUSIC impact localization method. In order to improve the accuracy of the phase velocity measurement, a single frequency component extraction method is presented. Additionally, a single frequency component-based re-estimated MUSIC (SFCBR-MUSIC) algorithm is proposed to reduce the localization error caused by the anisotropy of the complex composite structure. The proposed method is verified on a real composite aircraft wing box, which has T-stiffeners and screw holes. Three typical categories of 41 impacts are monitored. Experimental results show that the SFCBR-MUSIC algorithm can localize impact on complex composite structures with an obviously improved accuracy.

  5. A Guide for Local Nutrition Consultants on the Nutrition Component of Head Start Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC. Head Start Bureau.

    This handbook has been prepared as a guide for the nutritionist providing services to Head Start and other preschool day care programs. Introductory sections describe Project Head Start; the program's major components and aspects of the program; center-based, home-based, child and family development, and Child Development Associate (CDA) programs;…

  6. Optical Emission Line Studies and the Warm, Ionized Component of the Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of diffuse, galactic H alpha, N2 lambda 6583, and S2 6716 emission lines provide evidence for a warm (10,000K), primarily ionized component of the interstellar medium distribution throughout the galactic disk. This component of the interstellar gas has an electron density approximately equals 0.1-0.2/cu cm and occupies about 10 to 30% of the interstellar volume. Interstellar H alpha emission near the galactic poles, the dispersion measure of a nearby pulsar, and observations of interstellar gas flowing into the solar system indicate that this ionized component is an important constituent of the interstellar medium in the solar neighborhood. The intensity of the H alpha background at high galactic latitudes implies that this component is maintained by an average hydrogen ionization rate in the vicinity of the Sun of (2-4) x 100,000 s(-1) per square cm of galactic disk. The emission measure is 1.3 to 2.3 cm (-6) pc toward the galactic poles. The sources of this ionization were not identified but may include escaping Lyman continuum radiation from planetary nebulae, hot white dwarfs, and early type stars.

  7. Automatic detection of local arterial input functions through Independent Component Analysis on Dynamic Contrast enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Narvaez, Mario; Ruiz-Espana, Silvia; Arana, Estanislao; Moratal, David

    2015-08-01

    Arterial Input Function (AIF) is obtained from perfusion studies as a basic parameter for the calculus of hemodynamic variables used as surrogate markers of the vascular status of tissues. However, at present, its identification is made manually leading to high subjectivity, low repeatability and considerable time consumption. We propose an alternative method to automatically identify local AIF in perfusion images using Independent Component Analysis. PMID:26737244

  8. Local Labor Markets and Cyclic Components in Demand for College Trained Manpower.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James P.; Welch, Finis R.

    Weekly earnings of college and high school graduates were examined and partitioned on the basis of estimated years of work experience. Current Population Surveys (CPS) for each year from 1968 to 1975 were examined. The CPS data are useful to test for the importance of local labor markets because individuals can be assigned to markets by calendar…

  9. Specific localization of membrane dipeptidase and dipeptidyl peptidase IV in secretion granules of two different pancreatic islet cells.

    PubMed

    Grondin, G; Hooper, N M; LeBel, D

    1999-04-01

    Endocrine cells require several protein convertases to process the precursors of hormonal peptides that they secrete. In addition to the convertases, which have a crucial role in the maturation of prohormones, many other proteases are present in endocrine cells, the roles of which are less well established. Two of these proteases, dipeptidyl peptidase IV (EC 3.4.14.5) and membrane dipeptidase (EC 3.4.13.19), have been immunocytochemically localized in the endocrine pancreas of the pig. Membrane dipeptidase was present exclusively in cells of the islet of Langerhans that were positive for the pancreatic polypeptide, whereas dipeptidyl peptidase IV was restricted to cells positive for glucagon. Both enzymes were observed in the content of secretory granules and therefore would be released into the interstitial space as the granules undergo exocytosis. At this location they could act on secretions of other islet cells. The relative concentration of dipeptidyl peptidase IV was lower in dense glucagon granules, where the immunoreactivity to glucagon was higher, and vice versa for light granules. This suggests that, in A-cells, dipeptidyl peptidase IV could be sent for degradation in the endosomal/lysosomal compartment during the process of granule maturation or could be removed from granules for continuous release into the interstitial space. The intense proteolytic activity that takes place in the endocrine pancreas could produce many potential dipeptide substrates for membrane dipeptidase. (J Histochem Cytochem 47:489-497, 1999)

  10. Patterning and lifetime of plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthase is dependent on actin organization in Arabidopsis interphase cells.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Gutierrez, Ryan; McFarlane, Heather E; Bringmann, Martin; Lindeboom, Jelmer; Emons, Anne-Mie; Samuels, Lacey; Ketelaar, Tijs; Ehrhardt, David W; Persson, Staffan

    2013-06-01

    The actin and microtubule cytoskeletons regulate cell shape across phyla, from bacteria to metazoans. In organisms with cell walls, the wall acts as a primary constraint of shape, and generation of specific cell shape depends on cytoskeletal organization for wall deposition and/or cell expansion. In higher plants, cortical microtubules help to organize cell wall construction by positioning the delivery of cellulose synthase (CesA) complexes and guiding their trajectories to orient newly synthesized cellulose microfibrils. The actin cytoskeleton is required for normal distribution of CesAs to the plasma membrane, but more specific roles for actin in cell wall assembly and organization remain largely elusive. We show that the actin cytoskeleton functions to regulate the CesA delivery rate to, and lifetime of CesAs at, the plasma membrane, which affects cellulose production. Furthermore, quantitative image analyses revealed that actin organization affects CesA tracking behavior at the plasma membrane and that small CesA compartments were associated with the actin cytoskeleton. By contrast, localized insertion of CesAs adjacent to cortical microtubules was not affected by the actin organization. Hence, both actin and microtubule cytoskeletons play important roles in regulating CesA trafficking, cellulose deposition, and organization of cell wall biogenesis. PMID:23606596

  11. Immunofluorescence localization of dissociation supernatant and extracellular matrix components in Lytechinus pictus sectioned embryos. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garciaflack, Ana Leticia

    1988-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence was used to localize specific extracellular components in embryos of the sea urchin Lytechinus pictus. Hyalin and S2 (a group of components found in the disaggregation supernatant from Strongylocentrotus purpuratus blastulae) were uniformly present at all stages (unfertilized up to 32 hr) except hyalin could not be detected at the 12 hour early blastula stage. Laminin was found in 16 cell, 32 cell, 6 hour, 18 hour, 24 hour, and 32 hour stages, with especially bright fluorescence at 18 hours. Collagen I was present at all stages (freshly fertilized up to 32 hour) except little was detected at 12 hours. Fibronectin was uniformly present in blastocoelar fibers stained with anto-collagen I and anti-fibronectin. These results were compared with those for S. purpuratus to produce an overview of the localization of specific extracellular matrix components during development of two species of sea urchins. The results set the stage for future studies that will examine the function of these components at the various developmental stages.

  12. Non-rigid registration and non-local principle component analysis to improve electron microscopy spectrum images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.; Zhang, Chenyu; Oh, Albert; Slater, Thomas J. A.; Azough, Feridoon; Freer, Robert; Haigh, Sarah J.; Willett, Rebecca; Voyles, Paul M.

    2016-09-01

    Image registration and non-local Poisson principal component analysis (PCA) denoising improve the quality of characteristic x-ray (EDS) spectrum imaging of Ca-stabilized Nd2/3TiO3 acquired at atomic resolution in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Image registration based on the simultaneously acquired high angle annular dark field image significantly outperforms acquisition with a long pixel dwell time or drift correction using a reference image. Non-local Poisson PCA denoising reduces noise more strongly than conventional weighted PCA while preserving atomic structure more faithfully. The reliability of and optimal internal parameters for non-local Poisson PCA denoising of EDS spectrum images is assessed using tests on phantom data.

  13. Complement component 3 binding to Haemophilus influenzae type b in the presence of anticapsular and anti-outer membrane antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Hetherington, S V; Patrick, C C

    1992-01-01

    Antibodies directed against the capsular polysaccharide (polyribosyl ribitol phosphate [PRP]) or the outer membrane proteins (OMP) of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) promote bactericidal activity, complement 3 (C3) binding, and ingestion by phagocytic cells. To assess the relative contribution of anti-OMP to host defense against Hib, we compared the opsonic activities of anti-PRP and anti-OMP as reflected by the amounts of C3 bound to the bacterial surface. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) fractions containing either anti-PRP or anti-OMP were incubated with Hib in the presence of a C5-deficient complement source. C3, total IgG, and IgG subclasses bound to the bacteria were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The maximum amount of C3 which could be bound to Hib was greater in the presence of anti-PRP than in the presence of anti-OMP. Also, except at low IgG concentrations, the rate of increase in bound C3 as a function of increasing IgG concentration was greater for anti-PRP than for anti-OMP. Hib-bound anti-OMP consisted primarily of IgG1 and IgG3, whereas bound anti-PRP was primarily IgG1 and IgG2. Thus, the potential for C3 binding to Hib is greater in the presence of anti-PRP than in the presence of anti-OMP, probably because of the larger number of binding sites available to the former. Nonetheless, OMP appear to provide important targets for opsonic antibody and would be logical components of a PRP-conjugate vaccine or may be efficacious as vaccines against nontypeable H. influenzae. Images PMID:1729183

  14. The Sigma-2 Receptor and Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 are Different Binding Sites Derived From Independent Genes

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Uyen B.; Mavlyutov, Timur A.; Chu, Ming-Liang; Yang, Huan; Schulman, Amanda; Mesangeau, Christophe; McCurdy, Christopher R.; Guo, Lian-Wang; Ruoho, Arnold E.

    2015-01-01

    The sigma-2 receptor (S2R) is a potential therapeutic target for cancer and neuronal diseases. However, the identity of the S2R has remained a matter of debate. Historically, the S2R has been defined as (1) a binding site with high affinity to 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) and haloperidol but not to the selective sigma-1 receptor ligand (+)-pentazocine, and (2) a protein of 18–21 kDa, as shown by specific photolabeling with [3H]-Azido-DTG and [125I]-iodoazido-fenpropimorph ([125I]-IAF). Recently, the progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), a 25 kDa protein, was reported to be the S2R (Nature Communications, 2011, 2:380). To confirm this identification, we created PGRMC1 knockout NSC34 cell lines using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology. We found that in NSC34 cells devoid of or overexpressing PGRMC1, the maximum [3H]-DTG binding to the S2R (Bmax) as well as the DTG-protectable [125I]-IAF photolabeling of the S2R were similar to those of wild-type control cells. Furthermore, the affinities of DTG and haloperidol for PGRMC1 (KI = 472 μM and 350 μM, respectively), as determined in competition with [3H]-progesterone, were more than 3 orders of magnitude lower than those reported for the S2R (20–80 nM). These results clarify that PGRMC1 and the S2R are distinct binding sites expressed by different genes. PMID:26870805

  15. Immunogold localization of acyl carrier protein in plants and Escherichia coli: Evidence for membrane association in plants.

    PubMed

    Slabas, A R; Smith, C G

    1988-08-01

    Immunogold labelling was used to study the distribution of acyl carrier protein (ACP) in Escherichia coli and a variety of plant tissues. In E. coli, ACP is distributed throughout the cytoplasm, confirming the observation of S. Jackowski et al. (1985, J. Bacteriol., 162, 5-8_. In the mesocarp of Avocado (Persea americana) and maturing seeds of oil-seed rape (Brassica napus cv. Jet Neuf), over 95% of the ACP is localised to plastids. The protein is almost exclusively located in the chloroplasts of leaf material from oil-seed rape. Approximately 80% of the gold particles associated with the ACP were further localized to the thylakoid membrane of the chloroplast. Since acetyl-CoA carboxylase has been reported to be localized to the thylakoid membrane (C.G. Kannangara and C.J. Jensen, 1975, Eur. J. Biochem., 54, 25-30), these results are consistent with the view that the two sequential enzymes in fatty-acid synthesis are in close spacial proximity.

  16. Cholesterol induces surface localization of polyphenols in model membranes thus enhancing vesicle stability against lysozyme, but reduces protection of distant double bonds from reactive-oxygen species.

    PubMed

    de Athayde Moncorvo Collado, Alejandro; Dupuy, Fernando G; Morero, Roberto D; Minahk, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The main scope of the present study was to analyze the membrane interaction of members of different classes of polyphenols, i.e. resveratrol, naringenin, epigallocatechin gallate and enterodiol, in model systems of different compositions and phase states. In addition, the possible association between membrane affinity and membrane protection against both lipid oxidation and bilayer-disruptive compounds was studied. Gibbs monolayer experiments indicated that even though polyphenols showed poor surface activity, it readily interacted with lipid films. Actually, a preferential interaction with expanded monolayers was observed, while condensed and cholesterol-containing monolayers decreased the affinity of these phenolic compounds. On the other hand, fluorescence anisotropy studies showed that polyphenols were able to modulate membrane order degree, but again this effect was dependent on the cholesterol concentration and membrane phase state. In fact, cholesterol induced a surface rather than deep into the hydrophobic core localization of phenolic compounds in the membranes. In general, the polyphenolic molecules tested had a better antioxidant activity when they were allowed to get inserted into the bilayers, i.e. in cholesterol-free membranes. On the other hand, a membrane-protective effect against bilayer permeabilizing activity of lysozyme, particularly in the presence of cholesterol, could be assessed. It can be hypothesized that phenolic compounds may protect membrane integrity by loosely covering the surface of lipid vesicles, once cholesterol push them off from the membrane hydrophobic core. However, this cholesterol-driven distribution may lead to a reduced antioxidant activity of linoleic acid double bonds.

  17. Localization of Curvature and Relaxation of Stress Due to an Isolated Disclination in Crystalline Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yiwei; Davidovitch, Benny; Grason, Gregory M.

    2014-03-01

    A crystalline membrane with an isolated disclination buckles below a critical thickness. Examples include mechanical models of viral capsids-pentavalent and hexavalent units assembled into triangulated shells-that show a pronounced faceting above a critical size. While buckling from the planar state has been studied previously in coarse-grained simulations, questions remain regarding the organization of structure and mechanics of the buckled state. Specifically, how is elastic stress distributed within the membrane; more precisely - how does this mechanical state evolve from the buckling threshold to the asymptotic limit of vanishing thickness, where the shape is expected to be isometric (conical) nearly everywhere? We employ a combination of numerical and analytic approaches to studying the solutions of the Föppl-von Kármán equations describing the shape of and stress in circular sheets possessing a 5-fold defect. Despite the complexity underlying the solution of these highly nonlinear relations, we search for much simpler set of mechanical principles to quantitatively capture the inhomogeneous concentration of stress and shape deformation throughout the full range of the von Kármán number.

  18. Dynamic FtsA and FtsZ localization and outer membrane alterations during polar growth and cell division in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Zupan, John R; Cameron, Todd A; Anderson-Furgeson, James; Zambryski, Patricia C

    2013-05-28

    Growth and cell division in rod-shaped bacteria have been primarily studied in species that grow predominantly by peptidoglycan (PG) synthesis along the length of the cell. Rhizobiales species, however, predominantly grow by PG synthesis at a single pole. Here we characterize the dynamic localization of several Agrobacterium tumefaciens components during the cell cycle. First, the lipophilic dye FM 4-64 predominantly stains the outer membranes of old poles versus growing poles. In cells about to divide, however, both poles are equally labeled with FM 4-64, but the constriction site is not. Second, the cell-division protein FtsA alternates from unipolar foci in the shortest cells to unipolar and midcell localization in cells of intermediate length, to strictly midcell localization in the longest cells undergoing septation. Third, the cell division protein FtsZ localizes in a cell-cycle pattern similar to, but more complex than, FtsA. Finally, because PG synthesis is spatially and temporally regulated during the cell cycle, we treated cells with sublethal concentrations of carbenicillin (Cb) to assess the role of penicillin-binding proteins in growth and cell division. Cb-treated cells formed midcell circumferential bulges, suggesting that interrupted PG synthesis destabilizes the septum. Midcell bulges contained bands or foci of FtsA-GFP and FtsZ-GFP and no FM 4-64 label, as in untreated cells. There were no abnormal morphologies at the growth poles in Cb-treated cells, suggesting unipolar growth uses Cb-insensitive PG synthesis enzymes.

  19. Immunoelectron microscopic localization of elastic tissue components in archival tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Fanning, J C; White, J F; Polewski, R; Cleary, E G

    1991-06-01

    Tissue samples that have been stored for many years, in different media and under a variety of conditions, have been examined by modern techniques of immunoelectron microscopy, using antibodies against elastic tissue components. A range of postembedding restorative procedures has been identified, which will allow reliable immunolocalization of antibodies against the elastic tissue component of such specimens. These methods have been applied successfully to autopsy-derived material, fixed in buffered formaldehyde, to archival material stored frozen at -70 or -20 degrees C, to specimens fixed for electron microscopy and stored for many years in buffer, and even to archival material from formaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded blocks, reprocessed for electron microscopic examination. The successful restorative methods included pre-treatment of the sections with 6 M guanidine hydrochloride, or 1 M Tris/saline, each containing 100 mM dithiothreitol (a reducing agent) followed by alkylation with 220 mM iodoacetamide. The application of these techniques allowed reliable study of elastic tissue antibody distributions in archival tissues that could not be obtained again, as well as comparative studies with tissues processed many years previously.

  20. Surgery is an essential component of multimodality therapy for patients with locally advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Caitlin C.; Correa, Arlene M.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Welsh, James W.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Experience with neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CXRT) has raised questions regarding the additional benefit of surgery after locally advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma patients achieve a clinical response to CXRT. We sought to quantify the value of surgery by comparing the overall (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) of trimodality eligible patients treated with definitive CXRT versus CXRT followed by esophagectomy. Methods We identified 143 clinical stage III esophageal adenocarcinoma patients that were eligible for trimodality therapy. All patients successfully completed neoadjuvant CXRT and were considered appropriate candidates for resection. Patients that were medically inoperable were excluded. Cox regression models were used to identify significant predictors of survival. Results Among the 143 patients eligible for surgery after completing CXRT, 114 underwent resection and 29 did not. Poorly differentiated tumors (HR=2.041, 95% CI 1.235–3.373) and surgical resection (HR=0.504, 95% CI 0.283–0.899) were the only independent predictors of OS. Patients treated with surgery had a 50% and 54% risk reduction in overall and cancer-specific mortality, respectively. Median OS (41.2 months vs. 20.3 months, p=0.012) and DFS (21.5 months vs. 11.4 months, p=0.007) were significantly improved with the addition of surgery compared to definitive CXRT. Conclusions Surgery provides a significant survival benefit to trimodality-eligible esophageal adenocarcinoma patients with locally advanced disease. PMID:23715646

  1. Stimulus selectivity and spatial coherence of gamma components of the local field potential

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiaoxuan; Smith, Matthew A.; Kohn, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The gamma frequencies of the local field potential (LFP) provide a physiological correlate for numerous perceptual and cognitive phenomena and have been proposed to play a role in cortical function. Understanding the spatial extent of gamma and its relationship to spiking activity is critical for interpreting this signal and elucidating its function, but previous studies have provided widely disparate views of these properties. We addressed these issues by simultaneously recording LFPs and spiking activity using microelectrode arrays implanted in the primary visual cortex of macaque monkeys. We find that the spatial extent of gamma and its relationship to local spiking activity is stimulus dependent. Small gratings, and those masked with noise, induce a broadband increase in spectral power. This signal is tuned similarly to spiking activity and has limited spatial coherence. Large gratings, on the other hand, induce a gamma rhythm characterized by a distinctive spectral “bump”, which is coherent across widely separated sites. This signal is well tuned, but its stimulus preference is similar across millimeters of cortex. The preference of this global gamma rhythm is sensitive to adaptation, in a manner consistent with it magnifying a bias in the neuronal representation of visual stimuli. Gamma thus arises from two sources that reflect different spatial scales of neural ensemble activity. Our results show that there is not a single, fixed ensemble contributing to gamma and that the selectivity of gamma cannot be used to infer its spatial extent. PMID:21697389

  2. Block Liposome and Nanotube Formation is a General Phenomenon of Two-Component Membranes Containing Multivalent Lipids.

    PubMed

    Zidovska, Alexandra; Ewert, Kai K; Quispe, Joel; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S; Safinya, Cyrus R

    2011-01-01

    We report a study on the formation of block liposomes (BLs) and nanotubes from membranes comprised of mixtures of membrane curvature-stabilizing multivalent cationic lipids MVL3(3+) and MVL5(5+) with neutral 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC). In conjunction with prior work on MVLBG2(16+), our experiments suggest that BL and nanotube formation is a general phenomenon in membranes containing multivalent lipids, thus enhancing the relevance of BLs for applications such as gene/drug storage and delivery or templating.

  3. Long-Term Outcomes With Intraoperative Radiotherapy as a Component of Treatment for Locally Advanced or Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, Brandon M.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Dowdy, Sean C.; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report our institutional experience with intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a component of treatment for women with locally advanced or recurrent uterine sarcoma. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2010, 16 women with primary (n = 3) or locoregionally recurrent (n = 13) uterine sarcoma received IORT as a component of combined modality treatment. Tumor histology studies found leiomyosarcoma (n = 9), endometrial stromal sarcoma (n = 4), and carcinosarcoma (n = 3). Surgery consisted of gross total resection in 2 patients, subtotal resection in 6 patients, and resection with close surgical margins in 8 patients. The median IORT dose was 12.5 Gy (range, 10-20 Gy). All patients received perioperative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT; median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 20-62.5 Gy), and 6 patients also received perioperative systemic therapy. Results: Seven of the 16 patients are alive at a median follow-up of 44 months (range, 11-203 months). The 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of local relapse (within the EBRT field) was 7%, and central control (within the IORT field) was 100%. No local failures occurred in any of the 6 patients who underwent subtotal resection. The 3-year freedom from distant relapse was 48%, with failures occurring most frequently in the lungs or mediastinum. Median survival was 18 months, and 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of cause-specific and overall survival were 58% and 53%, respectively. Three patients (19%) experienced late Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusions: A combined modality approach with perioperative EBRT, surgery, and IORT for locally advanced or recurrent uterine sarcoma resulted in excellent local disease control with acceptable toxicity, even in patients with positive resection margins. With this approach, some patients were able to experience long-term freedom from recurrence.

  4. Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component-1 (PGRMC1) and PGRMC-2 Interact to Suppress Entry into the Cell Cycle in Spontaneously Immortalized Rat Granulosa Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Peluso, John J.; Griffin, Daniel; Liu, Xiufang; Horne, Meghan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) and PGRMC2 are expressed in rat granulosa cells and spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) but their biological roles are not well defined. The present studies demonstrate that depleting either Pgrmc1 or Pgrmc2 in SIGCs increases entry into the cell cycle but does not increase cell proliferation. Rather, PGRMC1 and/or PGRMC2-deplete cells accumulate in metaphase and undergo apoptosis. Because both PGRMC1 and PGRMC2 localize to the mitotic spindle, their absence likely accounts for cells arresting in metaphase. Moreover, pull-down assays, colocalization studies and in situ proximity ligation assays (PLA) indicate that PGRMC1 binds PGRMC2. Disrupting the PGRMC1:PGRMC2 complex through the use of siRNA or the cytoplasmic delivery of a PGRMC2 antibody increases entry into the cell cycle. Conversely, overexpressing either PGRMC1-GFP or GFP-PGRMC2 fusion protein inhibits entry into the cell cycle. Subsequent studies reveal that depleting PGRMC1 and/or PGRMC2 reduces the percentage of cells in G0 and increases the percentage of cells in G1. These observations indicate that in addition to their role at metaphase, PGRMC1 and PGRMC2 are involved in regulating entry into the G1 stage of the cell cycle. Interestingly, both PGRMC1 and PGRMC2 bind GTPase-activating protein-binding protein 2 (G3BP2) as demonstrated by pull-down assays, colocalization assays, and PLAs. G3bp2 siRNA treatment also promotes entry into the G1 stage. This implies that dynamic changes in the interaction among PGRMC1, PGRMC2, and G3BP2 play an important protein regulating the rate at which SIGCs enter into the cell cycle. PMID:25253729

  5. Membrane localization of MinD is mediated by a C-terminal motif that is conserved across eubacteria, archaea, and chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Tim H; Rowland, Susan L; Rothfield, Lawrence I; King, Glenn F

    2002-11-26

    MinD is a widely conserved ATPase that has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in selection of the division site in eubacteria and chloroplasts. It is a member of the large ParA superfamily of ATPases that are characterized by a deviant Walker-type ATP-binding motif. MinD localizes to the cytoplasmic face of the inner membrane in Escherichia coli, and its association with the inner membrane is a prerequisite for membrane recruitment of the septation inhibitor MinC. However, the mechanism by which MinD associates with the membrane has proved enigmatic; it seems to lack a transmembrane domain and the amino acid sequence is devoid of hydrophobic tracts that might predispose the protein to interaction with lipids. In this study, we show that the extreme C-terminal region of MinD contains a highly conserved 8- to 12-residue sequence motif that is essential for membrane localization of the protein. We provide evidence that this motif forms an amphipathic helix that most likely mediates a direct interaction between MinD and membrane phospholipids. A model is proposed whereby the membrane-targeting motif mediates the rapid cycles of membrane attachment-release-reattachment that are presumed to occur during pole-to-pole oscillation of MinD in E. coli. PMID:12424340

  6. Biosynthesis of the lantibiotic nisin: genomic organization and membrane localization of the NisB protein.

    PubMed Central

    Engelke, G; Gutowski-Eckel, Z; Hammelmann, M; Entian, K D

    1992-01-01

    Nisin produced by Lactococcus lactis 6F3 is used as a food preservative and is the most important member of a group of peptide-antibiotics containing lanthionine bridges (lantibiotics) (N. Schnell, K.-D. Entian, U. Schneider, F. Götz, H. Zähner, R. Kellner, and G. Jung, Nature [London] 333:276-278, 1988). Nisin is ribosomally synthesized, and its structural gene, nisA, encodes a prepeptide that is posttranslationally modified, revealing the active lantibiotic (C. Kaletta and K.-D. Entian, J. Bacteriol. 171:1597-1601, 1989). Adjacent to nisA, the additional genes nisB, nisT, and nisC were identified. Over their entire sequences, these genes were homologous to genes recently identified as important for the biosynthesis of lantibiotics, that is, subtilin from Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 and epidermin from Staphylococcus epidermidis Tü 3298. Genes nisB, nisT, and nisC corresponded to open reading frames of 993, 600, and 418 amino acid residues, respectively. The nisT open reading frame is homologous to proteins of the HlyB (hemolysin B protein of Escherichia coli) subfamily. Proteins of this subfamily are responsible for the secretion of a variety of compounds, including large polypeptides, polysaccharides, and anti-drug tumors, indicating that NisT may be involved in nisin transport. Northern (RNA) blot analysis revealed a 0.3-kb transcript for the nisA structural gene, and the transcriptional start point of the nisA gene was determined by primer extension. Additionally, a mRNA of at least 3 kb was identified by using a hybridization probe specific to nisB. Antibodies were raised against the NisB protein, and Western blot (immunoblot) analysis revealed a molecular weight of about 115 kDa, which is in accordance with the theoretical protein size of 117.5 kDa as calculated from the nisB open reading frame. Several amphipathic transmembrane alpha-helices indicated that NisB is associated with the membrane. This was confirmed by preparing L. lactis vesicles. The Nis

  7. Localization of Iron in Arabidopsis Seed Requires the Vacuolar Membrane Transporter VIT1

    SciTech Connect

    Kim,S.; Punshon, T.; Lanzirotti, A.; Li, L.; Alonso, J.; Ecker, J.; Kaplan, J.; Guerinot, M.

    2006-01-01

    Iron deficiency is a major human nutritional problem wherever plant-based diets are common. Using synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microtomography to directly visualize iron in Arabidopsis seeds, we show that iron is localized primarily to the provascular strands of the embryo. This localization is completely abolished when the vacuolar iron uptake transporter VIT1 is disrupted. Vacuolar iron storage is also critical for seedling development because vit1-1 seedlings grow poorly when iron is limiting. We have uncovered a fundamental aspect of seed biology that will ultimately aid the development of nutrient-rich seed, benefiting both human health and agricultural productivity.

  8. [Local EEG characteristics of the children with psychic abnormalities, examined by independent components analysis (ICA)].

    PubMed

    Kozhushko, N Iu; Evdokimov, S A; Matveev, Iu K; Tereshchenko, E P; Kropotov, Iu D

    2014-01-01

    The method of independent components within the range of 3-13 Hz was used for the analysis of EEG of the children with psychic abnormalities of perinatal origin. The research was undertaken while children were keeping awake with open eyes. In cases of harder developmental delay it was revealed a significant rise of θ-range power spectrum in frontal-temporal cortex areas of left hemisphere and temporal areas of right hemisphere. This fact make it possible to regard these areas as hypothetic sources of slow activity and a damage/immaturity marker of frontal-thalamic area and the temporal areas, responsible for auditory analysis and verbal synthesis, audio & visual data integration. PMID:25711093

  9. Phosphorylated SAP155, the spliceosomal component, is localized to chromatin in postnatal mouse testes

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Ko; Sonoda, Yoshiyuki; Jin, Yuji; Abe, Shin-ichi

    2010-03-19

    SAP155 is an essential component of the spliceosome and its phosphorylation is required for splicing catalysis, but little is known concerning its expression and regulation during spermatogenesis in postnatal mouse testes. We report that SAP155 is ubiquitously expressed in nuclei of germ and Sertoli cells within the seminiferous tubules of 6- and 35-day postpartum (dpp) testes. Analyses by fractionation of testes revealed that (1) phosphorylated SAP155 was found in the fraction containing nuclear structures at 6 dpp in amounts much larger than that at other ages; (2) non-phosphorylated SAP155 was detected in the fraction containing nucleoplasm; and (3) phosphorylated SAP155 was preferentially associated with chromatin. Our findings suggest that the active spliceosome, containing phosphorylated SAP155, performs pre-mRNA splicing on chromatin concomitant with transcription during testicular development.

  10. [Local EEG characteristics of the children with psychic abnormalities, examined by independent components analysis (ICA)].

    PubMed

    Kozhushko, N Iu; Evdokimov, S A; Matveev, Iu K; Tereshchenko, E P; Kropotov, Iu D

    2014-01-01

    The method of independent components within the range of 3-13 Hz was used for the analysis of EEG of the children with psychic abnormalities of perinatal origin. The research was undertaken while children were keeping awake with open eyes. In cases of harder developmental delay it was revealed a significant rise of θ-range power spectrum in frontal-temporal cortex areas of left hemisphere and temporal areas of right hemisphere. This fact make it possible to regard these areas as hypothetic sources of slow activity and a damage/immaturity marker of frontal-thalamic area and the temporal areas, responsible for auditory analysis and verbal synthesis, audio & visual data integration.

  11. Epidermal growth factor receptor localized to exosome membranes as a possible biomarker for lung cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, T; Kamada, H; Kanasaki, S; Maeda, Y; Nagano, K; Abe, Y; Inoue, M; Yoshioka, Y; Tsutsumi, Y; Katayama, S; Inoue, M; Tsunoda, S

    2013-12-01

    Detection of drug-target proteins and biomarkers that are expressed in cancer tissue has significant potential for both diagnosis and treatment of cancer. However, current immuno-histochemical and cytogenetic analyses of biopsy specimens for pre-operational diagnosis are highly invasive and often difficult to apply to lung cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible utility of determining epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression on exosomal membranes using a targeted ELISA with an anti-CD81 antibody as a capture antibody for lung cancer diagnosis. While soluble EGFR (sEGFR) levels in plasma were not remarkably different between lung cancer patients and normal controls, significantly higher exosomal EGFR expression levels were observed in 5/9 cancer cases compared to normal controls. These results suggest that measurement of exosomal protein levels could be useful for in vitro diagnosis, and that exosomal EGFR is a possible biomarker for characterization of lung cancer.

  12. Systemic localization of seven major types of carbohydrates on cell membranes by dSTORM imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junling; Gao, Jing; Zhang, Min; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Tian, Zhiyuan; Wang, Hongda

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates on the cell surface control intercellular interactions and play a vital role in various physiological processes. However, their systemic distribution patterns are poorly understood. Through the direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) strategy, we systematically revealed that several types of representative carbohydrates are found in clustered states. Interestingly, the results from dual-color dSTORM imaging indicate that these carbohydrate clusters are prone to connect with one another and eventually form conjoined platforms where different functional glycoproteins aggregate (e.g., epidermal growth factor receptor, (EGFR) and band 3 protein). A thorough understanding of the ensemble distribution of carbohydrates on the cell surface paves the way for elucidating the structure-function relationship of cell membranes and the critical roles of carbohydrates in various physiological and pathological cell processes. PMID:27453176

  13. Systemic localization of seven major types of carbohydrates on cell membranes by dSTORM imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junling; Gao, Jing; Zhang, Min; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Tian, Zhiyuan; Wang, Hongda

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates on the cell surface control intercellular interactions and play a vital role in various physiological processes. However, their systemic distribution patterns are poorly understood. Through the direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) strategy, we systematically revealed that several types of representative carbohydrates are found in clustered states. Interestingly, the results from dual-color dSTORM imaging indicate that these carbohydrate clusters are prone to connect with one another and eventually form conjoined platforms where different functional glycoproteins aggregate (e.g., epidermal growth factor receptor, (EGFR) and band 3 protein). A thorough understanding of the ensemble distribution of carbohydrates on the cell surface paves the way for elucidating the structure-function relationship of cell membranes and the critical roles of carbohydrates in various physiological and pathological cell processes. PMID:27453176

  14. Ultrastructural localization of the membrane-bound Mg-adenosine triphosphatase activity in rat meninges.

    PubMed

    Angelov, D N; Vasilev, V A

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of the membrane-bound magnesium ions-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Mg-ATPase) activity has been studied ultracytochemically in rat meninges by the method of Wachstein and Meisel (1957). A device specially constructed to avoid preparation artefacts has been used to obtain sections from the parietal region of the head. The meninges display an intense though irregularly distributed ATPase activity marked by depositions of electron-dense reaction product (RP) which is almost absent in the outer and middle dural layers. In the borderline zone between dura mater and the arachnoid the RP deposits are found at the outer surface of the inner dural cells and at the contact sites between these cells and the dural neurothelium. The intercellular cleft(s) between the neurothelium and the outer arachnoidal layer, occupied by an "electron-dense band", remains free of RP. The strongest accumulations of reactions granules are observed on the surface of the leptomeningeal cells of the arachnoidal space. In the contact region between the inner arachnoidal and the outer pial layers the distribution of the RP is similar to the one observed in the interface zone dura mater/arachnoid, while the pial cells themselves are definitely reaction-positive. In all meningeal vessels RP is found at the lumenal and abluminal aspects of the endothelium as well as at the cell membranes of the perivascular cells. These results emphasize the importance of the dural neurothelium for the functions of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-barrier between the dural blood vessels and the CSF.

  15. The F0F1 ATP Synthase Complex Localizes to Membrane Rafts in Gonadotrope Cells.

    PubMed

    Allen-Worthington, Krystal; Xie, Jianjun; Brown, Jessica L; Edmunson, Alexa M; Dowling, Abigail; Navratil, Amy M; Scavelli, Kurt; Yoon, Hojean; Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S; Clarke, Iain; Roberson, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    Fertility in mammals requires appropriate communication within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the GnRH receptor (GnRHR) is a central conduit for this communication. The GnRHR resides in discrete membrane rafts and raft occupancy is required for signaling by GnRH. The present studies use immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to define peptides present within the raft associated with the GnRHR and flotillin-1, a key raft marker. These studies revealed peptides from the F0F1 ATP synthase complex. The catalytic subunits of the F1 domain were validated by immunoprecipitation, flow cytometry, and cell surface biotinylation studies demonstrating that this complex was present at the plasma membrane associated with the GnRHR. The F1 catalytic domain faces the extracellular space and catalyzes ATP synthesis when presented with ADP in normal mouse pituitary explants and a gonadotrope cell line. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was blunted by coadministration of inhibitory factor 1, limiting inorganic phosphate in the media, and by chronic stimulation of the GnRHR. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was enhanced by pharmacological inhibition of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases. Kisspeptin administration induced coincident GnRH and ATP release from the median eminence into the hypophyseal-portal vasculature in ovariectomized sheep. Elevated levels of extracellular ATP augmented GnRH-induced secretion of LH from pituitary cells in primary culture, which was blocked in media containing low inorganic phosphate supporting the importance of extracellular ATP levels to gonadotrope cell function. These studies indicate that gonadotropes have intrinsic ability to metabolize ATP in the extracellular space and extracellular ATP may serve as a modulator of GnRH-induced LH secretion. PMID:27482602

  16. alpha-Synuclein fission yeast model: concentration-dependent aggregation without plasma membrane localization or toxicity.

    PubMed

    Brandis, Katrina A; Holmes, Isaac F; England, Samantha J; Sharma, Nijee; Kukreja, Lokesh; DebBurman, Shubhik K

    2006-01-01

    Despite fission yeast's history of modeling salient cellular processes, it has not yet been used to model human neurodegeneration-linked protein misfolding. Because alpha-synuclein misfolding and aggregation are linked to Parkinson's disease (PD), here, we report a fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) model that evaluates alpha-synuclein misfolding, aggregation, and toxicity and compare these properties with those recently characterized in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Wild-type alpha-synuclein and three mutants (A30P, A53T, and A30P/A53T) were expressed with thiamine-repressible promoters (using vectors of increasing promoter strength: pNMT81, pNMT41, and pNMT1) to test directly in living cells the nucleation polymerization hypothesis for alpha-synuclein misfolding and aggregation. In support of the hypothesis, wild-type and A53T alpha-synuclein formed prominent intracellular cytoplasmic inclusions within fission yeast cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, whereas A30P and A30P/A53T remained diffuse throughout the cytoplasm. A53T alpha-synuclein formed aggregates faster than wild-type alpha-synuclein and at a lower alpha-synuclein concentration. Unexpectedly, unlike in budding yeast, wild-type and A53T alpha-synuclein did not target to the plasma membrane in fission yeast, not even at low alpha-synuclein concentrations or as a precursor step to forming aggregates. Despite alpha-synuclein's extensive aggregation, it was surprisingly nontoxic to fission yeast. Future genetic dissection might yield molecular insight into this protection against toxicity. We speculate that alpha-synuclein toxicity might be linked to its membrane binding capacity. To conclude, S. pombe and S. cerevisiae model similar yet distinct aspects of alpha-synuclein biology, and both organisms shed insight into alpha-synuclein's role in PD pathogenesis.

  17. The F0F1 ATP Synthase Complex Localizes to Membrane Rafts in Gonadotrope Cells.

    PubMed

    Allen-Worthington, Krystal; Xie, Jianjun; Brown, Jessica L; Edmunson, Alexa M; Dowling, Abigail; Navratil, Amy M; Scavelli, Kurt; Yoon, Hojean; Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S; Clarke, Iain; Roberson, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    Fertility in mammals requires appropriate communication within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the GnRH receptor (GnRHR) is a central conduit for this communication. The GnRHR resides in discrete membrane rafts and raft occupancy is required for signaling by GnRH. The present studies use immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to define peptides present within the raft associated with the GnRHR and flotillin-1, a key raft marker. These studies revealed peptides from the F0F1 ATP synthase complex. The catalytic subunits of the F1 domain were validated by immunoprecipitation, flow cytometry, and cell surface biotinylation studies demonstrating that this complex was present at the plasma membrane associated with the GnRHR. The F1 catalytic domain faces the extracellular space and catalyzes ATP synthesis when presented with ADP in normal mouse pituitary explants and a gonadotrope cell line. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was blunted by coadministration of inhibitory factor 1, limiting inorganic phosphate in the media, and by chronic stimulation of the GnRHR. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was enhanced by pharmacological inhibition of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases. Kisspeptin administration induced coincident GnRH and ATP release from the median eminence into the hypophyseal-portal vasculature in ovariectomized sheep. Elevated levels of extracellular ATP augmented GnRH-induced secretion of LH from pituitary cells in primary culture, which was blocked in media containing low inorganic phosphate supporting the importance of extracellular ATP levels to gonadotrope cell function. These studies indicate that gonadotropes have intrinsic ability to metabolize ATP in the extracellular space and extracellular ATP may serve as a modulator of GnRH-induced LH secretion.

  18. Localization of phosphatidylinositol signaling components in rat taste cells: Role in bitter taste transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, P.M.; Verma, A.; Bredt, D.S.; Snyder, S.H. )

    1990-10-01

    To assess the role of phosphatidylinositol turnover in taste transduction we have visualized, in rat tongue, ATP-dependent endoplasmic reticular accumulation of {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+}, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor binding sites, and phosphatidylinositol turnover monitored by autoradiography of ({sup 3}H)cytidine diphosphate diacylglycerol formed from ({sup 3}H)cytidine. Accumulated {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+}, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors, and phosphatidylinositol turnover are selectively localized to apical areas of the taste buds of circumvallate papillae, which are associated with bitter taste. Further evidence for a role of phosphatidylinositol turnover in bitter taste is our observation of a rapid, selective increase in mass levels of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate elicited by low concentrations of denatonium, a potently bitter tastant.

  19. Cell membrane chromatography coupled with UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS method to screen target components from Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn acting on α1A adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Han, Shengli; Li, Chunlei; Huang, Jing; Wei, Fen; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Sicen

    2016-02-01

    Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn (BaiHuaQianHu in Chinese) is a traditional Chinese medicine that has a long history of use in China. In this study, HEK 293 α1A adrenergic cell membrane chromatography was coupled with UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS and successfully used to identify active components from Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn. Paeruptorin A, paeruptorin B, and paeruptorin C were identified with α1A adrenergic receptor activity. Pharmacological assays showed that tamsulosin hydrochloride, paeruptorin A, paeruptorin B, and paeruptorin C in concentrations of 1×10(-8) to 1×10(-4)mol/mL could relax prostate strips pre-contracted with adrenalin in a concentration dependent manner. Therefore, the HEK293 α1A cell membrane chromatography coupled UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS system may be a potentially useful drug discovery method for screening for medicinal herbal components with α1A adrenergic receptor inhibitory activity.

  20. Membrane topology of conserved components of the type III secretion system from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria.

    PubMed

    Berger, Carolin; Robin, Guillaume P; Bonas, Ulla; Koebnik, Ralf

    2010-07-01

    Type III secretion (T3S) systems play key roles in the assembly of flagella and the translocation of bacterial effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells. Eleven proteins which are conserved among gram-negative plant and animal pathogenic bacteria have been proposed to build up the basal structure of the T3S system, which spans both inner and outer bacterial membranes. We studied six conserved proteins, termed Hrc, predicted to reside in the inner membrane of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. The membrane topology of HrcD, HrcR, HrcS, HrcT, HrcU and HrcV was studied by translational fusions to a dual alkaline phosphatase-beta-galactosidase reporter protein. Two proteins, HrcU and HrcV, were found to have the same membrane topology as the Yersinia homologues YscU and YscV. For HrcR, the membrane topology differed from the model for the homologue from Yersinia, YscR. For our data on three other protein families, exemplified by HrcD, HrcS and HrcT, we derived the first topology models. Our results provide what is believed to be the first complete model of the inner membrane topology of any bacterial T3S system and will aid in elucidating the architecture of T3S systems by ultrastructural analysis. PMID:20378646

  1. Affinity-purified tetanus neurotoxin interaction with synaptic membranes: properties of a protease-sensitive receptor component

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarovici, P.; Yavin, E.

    1986-11-04

    The pharmacokinetic interaction of an affinity-purified /sup 125/I-labeled tetanotoxin fraction with guinea pig brain synaptosomal preparations was investigated. Binding of tetanotoxin was time- and temperature-dependent, was proportional to protein concentration, and was saturable at about 8 x 10/sup -9/ M as estimated by a solid-surface binding assay. Binding was optimal at pH 6.5 under low ionic strength buffer and was almost entirely blocked by gangliosides or antitoxin. In analogy to intact nerve cells, binding of toxin to membranes resulted in a tight association operationally defined as sequestration. Binding and sequestration were abolished after membrane pretreatment with sialidase. The enzyme could not dissociate the membrane-bound toxin formed at 4 or 37/sup 0/C under low ionic strength conditions, which is in part compatible with internalization as defined in nerve cell cultures. In the latter system the toxin could be removed at 4/sup 0/C but not at 37/sup 0/C. Binding was significantly reduced upon pretreatment of guinea pig brain membranes by a variety of hydrolytic enzymes. It is proposed that, in addition to a ganglioside, interaction of tetanotoxin with synaptic membranes is facilitated by a protein and may also require an appropriate lipid environment. These latter membrane constituents may play a pivotal role in the sequestration of the toxin.

  2. Activation of the Ca2+-sensing receptor induces deposition of tight junction components to the epithelial cell plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Jouret, François; Wu, Jingshing; Hull, Michael; Rajendran, Vanathy; Mayr, Bernhard; Schöfl, Christof; Geibel, John; Caplan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR) belongs to the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily and plays essential roles in divalent ion homeostasis and cell differentiation. Because extracellular Ca2+ is essential for the development of stable epithelial tight junctions (TJs), we hypothesized that the CaSR participates in regulating TJ assembly. We first assessed the expression of the CaSR in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells at steady state and following manipulations that modulate TJ assembly. Next, we examined the effects of CaSR agonists and antagonists on TJ assembly. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that endogenous CaSR is located at the basolateral pole of MDCK cells. Stable transfection of human CaSR in MDCK cells further reveals that this protein co-distributes with β-catenin on the basolateral membrane. Switching MDCK cells from low-Ca2+ medium to medium containing a normal Ca2+ concentration significantly increases CaSR expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Exposure of MDCK cells maintained in low-Ca2+ conditions to the CaSR agonists neomycin, Gd3+ or R-568 causes the transient relocation of the tight junction components ZO-1 and occludin to sites of cell–cell contact, while inducing no significant changes in the expression of mRNAs encoding junction-associated proteins. Stimulation of CaSR also increases the interaction between ZO-1 and the F-actin-binding protein I-afadin. This effect does not involve activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase. By contrast, CaSR inhibition by NPS-2143 significantly decreases interaction of ZO-1 with I-afadin and reduces deposition of ZO-1 at the cell surface following a Ca2+ switch from 5 µM to 200 µM [Ca2+]e. Pre-exposure of MDCK cells to the cell-permeant Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM, similarly prevents TJ assembly caused by CaSR activation. Finally, stable transfection of MDCK cells with a cDNA encoding a human disease-associated gain-of-function mutant form of the CaSR increases the

  3. Reversible and irreversible low-pressure membrane foulants in drinking water treatment: Identification by principal component analysis of fluorescence EEM and mitigation by biofiltration pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Peldszus, Sigrid; Hallé, Cynthia; Peiris, Ramila H; Hamouda, Mohamed; Jin, Xiaohui; Legge, Raymond L; Budman, Hector; Moresoli, Christine; Huck, Peter M

    2011-10-15

    With the increased use of membranes in drinking water treatment, fouling--particularly the hydraulically irreversible type--remains the main operating issue that hinders performance and increases operational costs. The main challenge in assessing fouling potential of feed water is to accurately detect and quantify feed water constituents responsible for membrane fouling. Utilizing fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEM), protein-like substances, humic and fulvic acids, and particulate/colloidal matter can be detected with high sensitivity in surface waters. The application of principal component analysis to fluorescence EEMs allowed estimation of the impact of surface water constituents on reversible and irreversible membrane fouling. This technique was applied to experimental data from a two year bench-scale study that included thirteen experiments investigating the fouling potential of Grand River water (Ontario, Canada) and the effect of biofiltration pre-treatment on the level of foulants during ultrafiltration (UF). Results showed that, although the content of protein-like substances in this membrane feed water (=biofiltered natural water) was much lower than commonly found in wastewater applications, the content of protein-like substances was still highly correlated with irreversible fouling of the UF membrane. In addition, there is evidence that protein-like substances and particulate/colloidal matter formed a combined fouling layer, which contributed to both reversible and irreversible fouling. It is suggested that fouling transitions from a reversible to an irreversible regime depending on feed composition and operating time. Direct biofiltration without prior coagulant addition reduced the protein-like content of the membrane feed water which in turn reduced the irreversible fouling potential for UF membranes. Biofilters also decreased reversible fouling, and for both types of fouling higher biofilter contact times were beneficial.

  4. Septal localization by membrane targeting sequences and a conserved sequence essential for activity at the COOH-terminus of Bacillus subtilis cardiolipin synthase.

    PubMed

    Kusaka, Jin; Shuto, Satoshi; Imai, Yukiko; Ishikawa, Kazuki; Saito, Tomo; Natori, Kohei; Matsuoka, Satoshi; Hara, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Kouji

    2016-04-01

    The acidic phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) is localized on polar and septal membranes and plays an important physiological role in Bacillus subtilis cells. ClsA, the enzyme responsible for CL synthesis, is also localized on septal membranes. We found that GFP fusion proteins of the enzyme with NH2-terminal and internal deletions retained septal localization. However, derivatives with deletions starting from the COOH-terminus (Leu482) ceased to localize to the septum once the deletion passed the Ile residue at 448, indicating that the sequence responsible for septal localization is confined within a short distance from the COOH-terminus. Two sequences, Ile436-Leu450 and Leu466-Leu478, are predicted to individually form an amphipathic α-helix. This configuration is known as a membrane targeting sequence (MTS) and we therefore refer to them as MTS2 and MTS1, respectively. Either one has the ability to affect septal localization, and each of these sequences by itself localizes to the septum. Membrane association of the constructs of this enzyme containing the MTSs was verified by subcellular fractionation of the cells. CL synthesis, in contrast, was abolished after deleting just the last residue, Leu482, in the COOH-terminal four amino acid residue sequence, Ser-Pro-Ile-Leu, which is highly conserved among bacterial CL synthases.

  5. The pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim interacts with components of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM).

    PubMed

    Frank, Daniel O; Dengjel, Jörn; Wilfling, Florian; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Häcker, Georg; Weber, Arnim

    2015-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-family protein Bim belongs to the BH3-only proteins known as initiators of apoptosis. Recent data show that Bim is constitutively inserted in the outer mitochondrial membrane via a C-terminal transmembrane anchor from where it can activate the effector of cytochrome c-release, Bax. To identify regulators of Bim-activity, we conducted a search for proteins interacting with Bim at mitochondria. We found an interaction of Bim with Tom70, Tom20 and more weakly with Tom40, all components of the Translocase of the Outer Membrane (TOM). In vitro import assays performed on tryptically digested yeast mitochondria showed reduced Bim insertion into the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) indicating that protein receptors may be involved in the import process. However, RNAi against components of TOM (Tom40, Tom70, Tom22 or Tom20) by siRNA, individually or in combination, did not consistently change the amount of Bim on HeLa mitochondria, either at steady state or upon de novo-induction. In support of this, the individual or combined knock-downs of TOM receptors also failed to alter the susceptibility of HeLa cells to Bim-induced apoptosis. In isolated yeast mitochondria, lack of Tom70 or the TOM-components Tom20 or Tom22 alone did not affect the import of Bim into the outer mitochondrial membrane. In yeast, expression of Bim can sensitize the cells to Bax-dependent killing. This sensitization was unaffected by the absence of Tom70 or by an experimental reduction in Tom40. Although thus the physiological role of the Bim-TOM-interaction remains unclear, TOM complex components do not seem to be essential for Bim insertion into the OMM. Nevertheless, this association should be noted and considered when the regulation of Bim in other cells and situations is investigated.

  6. Localization of a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate in a one-dimensional random potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Kui-Tian; Li, Jinbin; Shi, Da-Ning

    2015-02-01

    We consider a weakly interacting two-component Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in a one-dimensional random speckle potential. The problem is studied with solutions of Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equations by means of numerical method in Crank-Nicolson scheme. Properties of various cases owing to the competition of disorder and repulsive interactions of a cigar-shaped two-component BEC are discussed in detail. It is shown that in the central region, phase separation of a two-component BEC is not only affected by the intra- and inter-component interactions, but also influenced by the strength of the random speckle potential. Due to the strong disorder of the potential, the criterion of phase separation which is independent of the trap strength in an ordered potential, such as a harmonic potential, is no longer available. The influence of different random numbers generated by distinct processes on localization of BEC in the random potential is also investigated, as well as the configurations of the density profiles in the tail regions.

  7. The prenylation status of a novel plant calmodulin directs plasma membrane or nuclear localization of the protein.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Concepción, M; Yalovsky, S; Zik, M; Fromm, H; Gruissem, W

    1999-04-01

    Post-translational attachment of isoprenyl groups to conserved cysteine residues at the C-terminus of a number of regulatory proteins is important for their function and subcellular localization. We have identified a novel calmodulin, CaM53, with an extended C-terminal basic domain and a CTIL CaaX-box motif which are required for efficient prenylation of the protein in vitro and in vivo. Ectopic expression of wild-type CaM53 or a non-prenylated mutant protein in plants causes distinct morphological changes. Prenylated CaM53 associates with the plasma membrane, but the non-prenylated mutant protein localizes to the nucleus, indicating a dual role for the C-terminal domain. The subcellular localization of CaM53 can be altered by a block in isoprenoid biosynthesis or sugar depletion, suggesting that CaM53 activates different targets in response to metabolic changes. Thus, prenylation of CaM53 appears to be a novel mechanism by which plant cells can coordinate Ca2+ signaling with changes in metabolic activities.

  8. Norbin Stimulates the Catalytic Activity and Plasma Membrane Localization of the Guanine-Nucleotide Exchange Factor P-Rex1*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dingxin; Barber, Mark A.; Hornigold, Kirsti; Baker, Martin J.; Toth, Judit M.; Oxley, David; Welch, Heidi C. E.

    2016-01-01

    P-Rex1 is a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that activates the small G protein (GTPase) Rac1 to control Rac1-dependent cytoskeletal dynamics, and thus cell morphology. Three mechanisms of P-Rex1 regulation are currently known: (i) binding of the phosphoinositide second messenger PIP3, (ii) binding of the Gβγ subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins, and (iii) phosphorylation of various serine residues. Using recombinant P-Rex1 protein to search for new binding partners, we isolated the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-adaptor protein Norbin (Neurochondrin, NCDN) from mouse brain fractions. Coimmunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction between overexpressed P-Rex1 and Norbin in COS-7 cells, as well as between endogenous P-Rex1 and Norbin in HEK-293 cells. Binding assays with purified recombinant proteins showed that their interaction is direct, and mutational analysis revealed that the pleckstrin homology domain of P-Rex1 is required. Rac-GEF activity assays with purified recombinant proteins showed that direct interaction with Norbin increases the basal, PIP3- and Gβγ-stimulated Rac-GEF activity of P-Rex1. Pak-CRIB pulldown assays demonstrated that Norbin promotes the P-Rex1-mediated activation of endogenous Rac1 upon stimulation of HEK-293 cells with lysophosphatidic acid. Finally, immunofluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation showed that coexpression of P-Rex1 and Norbin induces a robust translocation of both proteins from the cytosol to the plasma membrane, as well as promoting cell spreading, lamellipodia formation, and membrane ruffling, cell morphologies generated by active Rac1. In summary, we have identified a novel mechanism of P-Rex1 regulation through the GPCR-adaptor protein Norbin, a direct P-Rex1 interacting protein that promotes the Rac-GEF activity and membrane localization of P-Rex1. PMID:26792863

  9. TRAIL protein localization in human primary T cells by 3D microscopy using 3D interactive surface plot: a new method to visualize plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Gras, Christophe; Smith, Nikaïa; Sengmanivong, Lucie; Gandini, Mariana; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-31

    The apoptotic ligand TNF-related apoptosis ligand (TRAIL) is expressed on the membrane of immune cells during HIV infection. The intracellular stockade of TRAIL in human primary CD4(+) T cells is not known. Here we investigated whether primary CD4(+) T cells expressed TRAIL in their intracellular compartment and whether TRAIL is relocalized on the plasma membrane under HIV activation. We found that TRAIL protein was stocked in intracellular compartment in non activated CD4(+) T cells and that the total level of TRAIL protein was not increased under HIV-1 stimulation. However, TRAIL was massively relocalized on plasma membrane when cells were cultured with HIV. Using three dimensional (3D) microscopy we localized TRAIL protein in human T cells and developed a new method to visualize plasma membrane without the need of a membrane marker. This method used the 3D interactive surface plot and bright light acquired images. PMID:23085529

  10. TRAIL protein localization in human primary T cells by 3D microscopy using 3D interactive surface plot: a new method to visualize plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Gras, Christophe; Smith, Nikaïa; Sengmanivong, Lucie; Gandini, Mariana; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-31

    The apoptotic ligand TNF-related apoptosis ligand (TRAIL) is expressed on the membrane of immune cells during HIV infection. The intracellular stockade of TRAIL in human primary CD4(+) T cells is not known. Here we investigated whether primary CD4(+) T cells expressed TRAIL in their intracellular compartment and whether TRAIL is relocalized on the plasma membrane under HIV activation. We found that TRAIL protein was stocked in intracellular compartment in non activated CD4(+) T cells and that the total level of TRAIL protein was not increased under HIV-1 stimulation. However, TRAIL was massively relocalized on plasma membrane when cells were cultured with HIV. Using three dimensional (3D) microscopy we localized TRAIL protein in human T cells and developed a new method to visualize plasma membrane without the need of a membrane marker. This method used the 3D interactive surface plot and bright light acquired images.

  11. Roles of the protruding loop of factor B essential for the localization of lipoproteins (LolB) in the anchoring of bacterial triacylated proteins to the outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yumi; Tsurumizu, Ryoji; Tsukahara, Jun; Takeda, Kazuki; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Miki, Kunio; Tokuda, Hajime

    2014-04-11

    The Lol system comprising five Lol proteins, LolA through LolE, sorts Escherichia coli lipoproteins to outer membranes. The LolCDE complex, an ATP binding cassette transporter in inner membranes, releases outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in an ATP-dependent manner, causing formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex in the periplasm. LolA transports lipoproteins through the periplasm to LolB on outer membranes. LolB is itself a lipoprotein anchored to outer membranes, although the membrane anchor is functionally dispensable. LolB then localizes lipoproteins to outer membranes through largely unknown mechanisms. The crystal structure of LolB is similar to that of LolA, and it possesses a hydrophobic cavity that accommodates acyl chains of lipoproteins. To elucidate the molecular function of LolB, a periplasmic version of LolB, mLolB, was mutagenized at various conserved residues. Despite the lack of acyl chains, most defective mutants were insoluble. However, a derivative with glutamate in place of leucine 68 was soluble and unable to localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. This leucine is present in a loop protruding from mLolB into an aqueous environment, and no analogous loop is present in LolA. Thus, leucine 68 was replaced with other residues. Replacement by acidic, but not hydrophobic, residues generated for the first time mLolB derivatives that can accept but cannot localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. Moreover, deletion of the leucine with neighboring residues impaired the lipoprotein receptor activity. Based on these observations, the roles of the protruding loop of LolB in the last step of lipoprotein sorting are discussed. PMID:24569999

  12. Localization of reelin signaling pathway components in murine midbrain and striatum.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, Ahmed; Rahhal, Belal; Spittau, Björn; Roussa, Eleni

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the distribution patterns of the extracellular matrix protein Reelin and of crucial Reelin signaling components in murine midbrain and striatum. The cellular distribution of the Reelin receptors VLDLr and ApoER2, the intracellular downstream mediator Dab1, and the alternative Reelin receptor APP were analyzed at embryonic day 16, at postnatal stage 15 (P15), and in 3-month-old mice. Reelin was expressed intracellularly and extracellularly in midbrain mesencephalic dopaminergic (mDA) neurons of newborns. In the striatum, Calbindin D-28k(+) neurons exhibited Reelin intracellularly at E16 and extracellularly at P15 and 3 months. ApoER2 and VLDLr were expressed in mDA neurons at E16 and P15 and in oligodendrocytes at 3 months, whereas Dab1 and APP immunoreactivity was observed in mDA at all stages analyzed. In the striatum, Calbindin D-28k(+)/GAD67(+) inhibitory neurons expressed VLDLr, ApoER2, and Dab1 at P15, but only Dab1 at E16 and 3 months. APP was always expressed in mouse striatum in which it colocalized with Calbindin D-28k. Our data underline the importance of Reelin signalling during embryonic development and early postnatal maturation of the mesostriatal and mesocorticolimbic system, and suggest that the striatum and not the midbrain is the primary source of Reelin for midbrain neurons. The loss of ApoER2 and VLDLr expression in the mature midbrain and striatum implies that Reelin functions are restricted to migratory events and early postnatal maturation and are dispensable for the maintenance of dopaminergic neurons.

  13. Localization of blood-group A and I antigenic sites on inside-out and rightside-out human erythrocyte membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Schenkel-Brunner, H; Cartron, J P; Doinel, C

    1979-01-01

    Investigations of the fixation of 125I-labelled anti-A and anti-I antibodies onto rightside-out and inside-out membrane vesicles prepared from human A1 and OI erythrocytes, respectively, showed that both antibodies were bound to the rightside-out vesicles, giving clear evidence that blood group A and I antigenic sites are exclusively localized on the external surface of the membrane. PMID:84784

  14. Backbone and side-chain assignments of an effector membrane localization domain from Vibrio vulnificus MARTX toxin.

    PubMed

    Brothers, Michael C; Geissler, Brett; Hisao, Grant S; Wilson, Brenda A; Satchell, Karla J F; Rienstra, Chad M

    2014-10-01

    (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shift assignments are presented for the isolated four-helical bundle membrane localization domain from the domain of unknown function 5 (DUF5) effector (MLD(VvDUF5)) of the MARTX toxin from Vibrio vulnificus in its solution state. We have assigned 97% of all backbone and side-chain carbon atoms, including 96% of all backbone residues. Secondary chemical shift analysis using TALOS+ demonstrates four helices that align with those predicted by structure homology modeling using the MLDs of Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) and the clostridial TcdB and TcsL toxins as templates. Future studies will be towards solving the structure and determining the dynamics in the solution state.

  15. Localization and interaction of hydroxyflavones with lipid bilayer model membranes: a study using DSC and multinuclear NMR.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ragini; Joshi, Akshada; Joshi, Urmila J; Srivastava, Sudha; Govil, Girjesh

    2014-06-10

    The localization and interaction of six naturally occurring flavones (FLV, 5HF, 6HF, 7HF, CHY and BLN) in DPPC bilayers were studied using DSC and multi-nuclear NMR. DSC results indicate that FLV and 6HF interact with alkyl chains. The (1)H NMR shows interaction of flavones with the sn-glycero region. Ring current induced chemical shifts indicate that 6HF and BLN acquire parallel orientation in bilayers. 2D NOESY spectra indicate partitioning of the B-ring into the alkyl chain region. The DSC, NMR and binding studies indicate that 5HF and 7HF are located near head group region, while 6HF, CHY and BLN are located in the vicinity of sn-glycero region, and FLV is inserted deepest in the membrane.

  16. G(q/11) is involved in insulin-stimulated inositol phosphoglycan putative mediator generation in rat liver membranes: co-localization of G(q/11) with the insulin receptor in membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sleight, S; Wilson, B A; Heimark, D B; Larner, J

    2002-07-12

    Insulin signaling to generate inositol phosphoglycans (IPGs) was demonstrated to occur via the participation of the heterotrimeric G-proteins G(q/11). IPGs were measured as two specific inositol markers, myo-inositol and chiro-inositol after strong acid hydrolysis. Insulin and Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) generated both myo-inositol and chiro-inositol IPGs in a dose-dependent manner. PMT has been shown to activate G(q) specifically. Insulin action was abrogated by pre-treatment with anti G(q/11) antibody. Western blotting demonstrated the enrichment of both insulin receptor beta subunit and G(q/11) in the liver membrane vesicles. Vesicles also contained clathrin, caveolin PLC beta 1 and PLC Delta. Immunogold staining revealed the co-localization of both insulin receptor beta subunit and G(q/11) in an approximate stochiometric ratio of 1:3. No vesicles were detected with either component alone. The present and considerable published data provide strong evidence for insulin signaling both via a tyrosine kinase cascade mechanism and via heterotrimeric G-protein interactions. PMID:12150987

  17. The Localization of Long-Distance Dependency Components: Integrating the Focal-lesion and Neuroimaging Record

    PubMed Central

    Piñango, Maria M.; Finn, Emily; Lacadie, Cheryl; Constable, R. Todd

    2016-01-01

    In the sentence “The captain who the sailor greeted is tall,” the connection between the relative pronoun and the object position of greeted represents a long-distance dependency (LDD), necessary for the interpretation of “the captain” as the individual being greeted. Whereas the lesion-based record shows preferential involvement of only the left inferior frontal (LIF) cortex, associated with Broca's aphasia, during real-time comprehension of LDDs, the neuroimaging record shows additional involvement of the left posterior superior temporal (LPST) and lower parietal cortices, which are associated with Wernicke's aphasia. We test the hypothesis that this localization incongruence emerges from an interaction of memory and linguistic constraints involved in the real-time implementation of these dependencies and which had not been previously isolated. Capitalizing on a long-standing psycholinguistic understanding of LDDs as the workings of an active filler, we distinguish two linguistically defined mechanisms: GAP-search, triggered by the retrieval of the relative pronoun, and GAP-completion, triggered by the retrieval of the embedded verb. Each mechanism is hypothesized to have distinct memory demands and given their distinct linguistic import, potentially distinct brain correlates. Using fMRI, we isolate the two mechanisms by analyzing their relevant sentential segments as separate events. We manipulate LDD-presence/absence and GAP-search type (direct/indirect) reflecting the absence/presence of intervening islands. Results show a direct GAP-search—LIF cortex correlation that crucially excludes the LPST cortex. Notably, indirect GAP-search recruitment is confined to supplementary-motor and lower-parietal cortex indicating that GAP presence alone is not enough to engage predictive functions in the LIF cortex. Finally, GAP-completion shows recruitment implicating the dorsal pathway including: the supplementary motor cortex, left supramarginal cortex, precuneus

  18. Neoantigen of the polymerized ninth component of complement. Characterization of a monoclonal antibody and immunohistochemical localization in renal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Falk, R J; Dalmasso, A P; Kim, Y; Tsai, C H; Scheinman, J I; Gewurz, H; Michael, A F

    1983-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody to a neoantigen of the C9 portion of the membrane attack complex (MAC) of human complement has been developed and characterized. The distribution of this neoantigen was assessed by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy in nephritic and nonnephritic renal diseases. The antibody (Poly C9-MA) reacted on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a determinant in complement-activated serum that was undetectable in normal human serum (NHS). Zymosan particles incubated in NHS had positive immunofluorescent staining with Poly C9-MA; however, binding of Poly C9-MA was not observed with zymosan particles incubated in sera deficient in individual complement components C3, C5, C6, C7, C8, or C9. Reconstitution of C9-deficient sera with purified C9 restored the fluorescence with Poly C9-MA. Poly C9-MA reacted positively by ELISA in a dose-dependent manner with purified MC5b-9 solubilized from membranes of antibody-coated sheep erythrocytes treated with NHS but not with intermediate complement complexes. Poly C9-MA also reacted in a dose-dependent manner on ELISA and in a radioimmunoassay with polymerized C9 (37 degrees C, 64 h) (poly C9) but not with monomeric C9. Increasing amounts of either unlabeled poly C9 or purified MC5b-9 inhibited the 125I-poly C9 RIA in an identical manner. These studies demonstrate that Poly C9-MA recognizes a neoantigen of C9 common to both the MAC and to poly C9. By immunofluorescence, Poly C9-MA reacted minimally with normal kidney tissue in juxtaglomerular loci, the mesangial stalk, and vessel walls. Poly C9-MA stained kidney tissue from patients with glomerulonephritis in a pattern similar to that seen with polyclonal anti-human C3. In tissue from patients with nonnephritic renal disease--diabetes, hypertension, and obstructive uropathy--Poly C9-MA was strongly reactive in the mesangial stalk and juxtaglomerular regions, tubular basement membranes, and vascular walls. Poly C9-MA binding was especially prominent in

  19. Influence of local-field corrections on Thomson scattering in collision-dominated two-component plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fortmann, Carsten; Wierling, August; Roepke, Gerd

    2010-02-15

    The dynamic structure factor, which determines the Thomson scattering spectrum, is calculated via an extended Mermin approach. It incorporates the dynamical collision frequency as well as the local-field correction factor. This allows to study systematically the impact of electron-ion collisions as well as electron-electron correlations due to degeneracy and short-range interaction on the characteristics of the Thomson scattering signal. As such, the plasmon dispersion and damping width is calculated for a two-component plasma, where the electron subsystem is completely degenerate. Strong deviations of the plasmon resonance position due to the electron-electron correlations are observed at increasing Brueckner parameters r{sub s}. These results are of paramount importance for the interpretation of collective Thomson scattering spectra, as the determination of the free electron density from the plasmon resonance position requires a precise theory of the plasmon dispersion. Implications due to different approximations for the electron-electron correlation, i.e., different forms of the one-component local-field correction, are discussed.

  20. The relationship of detergent-solubilization plasma-membrane components of rabbit alveolar macrophages to an isolated inhibitor of phagocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, R S; Cook, G M

    1979-01-01

    1. A plasma-membrane fraction prepared from rabbit alveolar macrophages by hyposmotic borate lysis is described. 2. Rabbit lung lavages, containing a glycoprotein inhibitor of phagocytosis, may be fractionated by preparative isoelectric focusing in the presence of Triton X-100. 3. Chemical analysis indicates that the glycoproteins of the lung lavage contain sialic acid, fucose, mannose, galactose, hexosamine and appreciable quantities of glucose. 4. The relationship of macrophage membrane glycoproteins, solubilized with Triton X-100 in the presence of borate, to the lung lavage glycoproteins is demonstrated immunoelectrophoretically. Images PLATE 1 Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:486083

  1. Separation of Dimethyl Ether from Syn-Gas Components by Poly(dimethylsiloxane) and Poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Orme; Frederick F. Stewart

    2011-05-01

    Permeability and selectivity in gas transport through poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) (TPX) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) using variable temperature mixed gas experiments is reported. Selected gases include H2, CO, CH4, CO2, and dimethyl ether (DME). The DME data is the first to be reported through these membranes. In this paper, the chosen polymers reflect both rubbery and crystalline materials. Rubbery polymers tend to be weakly size sieving, which, in this work, has resulted in larger permeabilities, lower separation factors, and lower activation energies of permeation (Ep). Conversely, the crystalline TPX membranes showed much greater sensitivity to penetrant size; although the gas condensability also played a role in transport.

  2. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are outer membrane and periplasmic extensions of the extracellular electron transport components.

    PubMed

    Pirbadian, Sahand; Barchinger, Sarah E; Leung, Kar Man; Byun, Hye Suk; Jangir, Yamini; Bouhenni, Rachida A; Reed, Samantha B; Romine, Margaret F; Saffarini, Daad A; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A; Golbeck, John H; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report, to our knowledge, the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis point to S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires as extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures as previously thought. These membrane extensions are associated with outer membrane vesicles, structures ubiquitous in Gram-negative bacteria, and are consistent with bacterial nanowires that mediate long-range EET by the previously proposed multistep redox hopping mechanism. Redox-functionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  3. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are outer membrane and periplasmic extensions of the extracellular electron transport components

    PubMed Central

    Pirbadian, Sahand; Barchinger, Sarah E.; Leung, Kar Man; Byun, Hye Suk; Jangir, Yamini; Bouhenni, Rachida A.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad A.; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A.; Golbeck, John H.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic–abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report, to our knowledge, the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis point to S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires as extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures as previously thought. These membrane extensions are associated with outer membrane vesicles, structures ubiquitous in Gram-negative bacteria, and are consistent with bacterial nanowires that mediate long-range EET by the previously proposed multistep redox hopping mechanism. Redox-functionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution. PMID:25143589

  4. Effect of a Vietnamese Cinnamomum cassia essential oil and its major component trans-cinnamaldehyde on the cell viability, membrane integrity, membrane fluidity, and proton motive force of Listeria innocua.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Nga-Thi-Thanh; Dumas, Emilie; Thanh, Mai Le; Degraeve, Pascal; Ben Amara, Chedia; Gharsallaoui, Adem; Oulahal, Nadia

    2015-04-01

    The antibacterial mechanism of a Cinnamomum cassia essential oil from Vietnam and of its main component (trans-cinnamaldehyde, 90% (m/m) of C. cassia essential oil) against a Listeria innocua strain was investigated to estimate their potential for food preservation. In the presence of C. cassia essential oil or trans-cinnamaldehyde at their minimal bactericidal concentration (2700 μg·mL(-1)), L. innocua cells fluoresced green after staining with Syto9® and propidium iodide, as observed by epifluorescence microscopy, suggesting that the perturbation of membrane did not cause large pore formation and cell lysis but may have introduced the presence of viable but nonculturable bacteria. Moreover, the fluidity, potential, and intracellular pH of the cytoplasmic membrane were perturbed in the presence of the essential oil or trans-cinnamaldehyde. However, these membrane perturbations were less severe in the presence of trans-cinnamaldehyde than in the presence of multicomponent C. cassia essential oil. This indicates that in addition to trans-cinnamaldehyde, other minor C. cassia essential oil components play a major role in its antibacterial activity against L. innocua cells.

  5. AtAGP18 is localized at the plasma membrane and functions in plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yizhu; Yang, Jie; Showalter, Allan M

    2011-04-01

    Arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) are a family of highly glycosylated hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs). AtAGP17, 18 and 19 comprise the lysine-rich classical AGP subfamily in Arabidopsis. Overexpression of GFP-AtAGP17/18/19 fusion proteins in Arabidopsis revealed localization of the fusion proteins on the plant cell surface of different organs. Subcellular localization of the fusion proteins at the plasma membrane was further determined by plasmolysis of leaf trichome cells. To elucidate AtAGP17/18/19 function(s), these AGPs were expressed without the green fluorescent protein (GFP) tag under the control of 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter. In contrast to AtAGP17/AtAGP19 overexpressors which showed phenotypes identical to wild-type plants, AtAGP18 overexpressors displayed several phenotypes distinct from wild-type plants. Specifically, these overexpressors had smaller rosettes and shorter stems and roots, produced more branches and had less viable seeds. Moreover, these AtAGP18 overexpressors exhibited similar phenotypes to tomato LeAGP-1 overexpressors, suggesting these two AGP genes may have similar function(s) in Arabidopsis and tomato. PMID:21165646

  6. A biophysically detailed model of neocortical Local Field Potentials predicts the critical role of active membrane currents

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, Michael W.; Anastassiou, Costas A.; Perin, Rodrigo; Hill, Sean; Markram, Henry; Koch, Christof

    2013-01-01

    Summary Brain activity generates extracellular voltage fluctuations recorded as local field potentials (LFPs). While known that the relevant micro-variables, the ionic currents across membranes, jointly generate the macro-variables, the extracellular voltage, neither the detailed biophysical knowledge nor the required computational power has been available to model these processes. We simulated the LFP in a model of the rodent neocortical column composed of >12,000 reconstructed, multi-compartmental and spiking cortical layer 4 and 5 pyramidal neurons and basket cells, including five million dendritic and somatic compartments with voltage- and ion-dependent currents, realistic connectivity and probabilistic AMPA, NMDA and GABA synapses. We found that, depending on a number of factors, the LFP reflects local and cross-layer processing and active currents dominate the generation of LFPs rather than synaptic ones. Spike-related currents impact the LFP not only at higher frequencies but lower than 50 Hz. This work calls for re-evaluating the genesis of LFPs. PMID:23889937

  7. Full-field transient vibrometry of the human tympanic membrane by local phase correlation and high-speed holography.

    PubMed

    Dobrev, Ivo; Furlong, Cosme; Cheng, Jeffrey T; Rosowski, John J

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the human hearing process would be helped by quantification of the transient mechanical response of the human ear, including the human tympanic membrane (TM or eardrum). We propose a new hybrid high-speed holographic system (HHS) for acquisition and quantification of the full-field nanometer transient (i.e., >10 kHz) displacement of the human TM. We have optimized and implemented a 2 þ 1 frame local correlation (LC) based phase sampling method in combination with a high-speed (i.e., >40 K fps) camera acquisition system. To our knowledge, there is currently no existing system that provides such capabilities for the study of the human TM. The LC sampling method has a displacement difference of <11 nm relative to measurements obtained by a four-phase step algorithm. Comparisons between our high-speed acquisition system and a laser Doppler vibrometer indicate differences of <10 μs. The high temporal (i.e., >40 kHz) and spatial (i.e., >100 k data points) resolution of our HHS enables parallel measurements of all points on the surface of the TM, which allows quantification of spatially dependent motion parameters, such as modal frequencies and acoustic delays. Such capabilities could allow inferring local material properties across the surface of the TM.

  8. Full-field transient vibrometry of the human tympanic membrane by local phase correlation and high-speed holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrev, Ivo; Furlong, Cosme; Cheng, Jeffrey T.; Rosowski, John J.

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the human hearing process would be helped by quantification of the transient mechanical response of the human ear, including the human tympanic membrane (TM or eardrum). We propose a new hybrid high-speed holographic system (HHS) for acquisition and quantification of the full-field nanometer transient (i.e., >10 kHz) displacement of the human TM. We have optimized and implemented a 2+1 frame local correlation (LC) based phase sampling method in combination with a high-speed (i.e., >40 K fps) camera acquisition system. To our knowledge, there is currently no existing system that provides such capabilities for the study of the human TM. The LC sampling method has a displacement difference of <11 nm relative to measurements obtained by a four-phase step algorithm. Comparisons between our high-speed acquisition system and a laser Doppler vibrometer indicate differences of <10 μs. The high temporal (i.e., >40 kHz) and spatial (i.e., >100 k data points) resolution of our HHS enables parallel measurements of all points on the surface of the TM, which allows quantification of spatially dependent motion parameters, such as modal frequencies and acoustic delays. Such capabilities could allow inferring local material properties across the surface of the TM.

  9. Full-field transient vibrometry of the human tympanic membrane by local phase correlation and high-speed holography

    PubMed Central

    Dobrev, Ivo; Furlong, Cosme; Cheng, Jeffrey T.; Rosowski, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Understanding the human hearing process would be helped by quantification of the transient mechanical response of the human ear, including the human tympanic membrane (TM or eardrum). We propose a new hybrid high-speed holographic system (HHS) for acquisition and quantification of the full-field nanometer transient (i.e., >10  kHz) displacement of the human TM. We have optimized and implemented a 2+1 frame local correlation (LC) based phase sampling method in combination with a high-speed (i.e., >40  K fps) camera acquisition system. To our knowledge, there is currently no existing system that provides such capabilities for the study of the human TM. The LC sampling method has a displacement difference of <11  nm relative to measurements obtained by a four-phase step algorithm. Comparisons between our high-speed acquisition system and a laser Doppler vibrometer indicate differences of <10  μs. The high temporal (i.e., >40  kHz) and spatial (i.e., >100  k data points) resolution of our HHS enables parallel measurements of all points on the surface of the TM, which allows quantification of spatially dependent motion parameters, such as modal frequencies and acoustic delays. Such capabilities could allow inferring local material properties across the surface of the TM. PMID:25191832

  10. Three-component competitive adsorption model for flow-through PAC systems. 2. Model application to a PAC/membrane system.

    PubMed

    Li, Qilin; Mariñas, Benito J; Snoeyink, Vernon L; Campos, Carlos

    2003-07-01

    A three-component competitive adsorption kinetic model, developed and validated in part 1 of this study, was applied to a continuous-flow PAC/membrane system to study the effects of various system and operating parameters on organic removal. The model quantitatively describes the two competitive adsorption mechanisms that occur during adsorption of trace organic compounds by powdered activated carbon (PAC) in flow-through systems where the PAC is retained in the system: pore blockage and direct competition for adsorption sites. Model simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of influent water composition, membrane cleaning water quality, PAC pore size distribution, and system operation conditions such as hydraulic retention time, membrane cleaning interval, and PAC dosing method on treatment efficiency. Effects of these factors on adsorption capacity as well as surface diffusion rate and consequent removal of the trace organic compound were discussed. It was found that optimal operating conditions for maximum trace organic compound removal must be determined on the basis of the adsorption properties and concentrations of the competing compounds in the influent. For the conditions investigated in this study, the small strongly competing compound, p-DCB, had greater impact on atrazine removal than the large pore-blocking compound, PSS-1.8k. Various process design and operating parameters had complex and interrelated effects on the impact of competitive adsorption and corresponding trace contaminant removal efficiency in hybrid PAC/membrane systems. PMID:12875407

  11. Biogenesis of the protein import channel Tom40 of the mitochondrial outer membrane: intermembrane space components are involved in an early stage of the assembly pathway.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Nils; Truscott, Kaye N; Pfannschmidt, Sylvia; Guiard, Bernard; Meisinger, Chris; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2004-04-30

    Tom40 forms the central channel of the preprotein translocase of the mitochondrial outer membrane (TOM complex). The precursor of Tom40 is encoded in the nucleus, synthesized in the cytosol, and imported into mitochondria via a multi-step assembly pathway that involves the mature TOM complex and the sorting and assembly machinery of the outer membrane (SAM complex). We report that opening of the mitochondrial intermembrane space by swelling blocks the assembly pathway of the beta-barrel protein Tom40. Mitochondria with defects in small Tim proteins of the intermembrane space are impaired in the Tom40 assembly pathway. Swelling as well as defects in the small Tim proteins inhibit an early stage of the Tom40 import pathway that is needed for formation of a Tom40-SAM intermediate. We propose that the biogenesis pathway of beta-barrel proteins of the outer mitochondrial membrane not only requires TOM and SAM components, but also involves components of the intermembrane space.

  12. Characterization of Chloroplast Protein Import without Tic56, a Component of the 1-Megadalton Translocon at the Inner Envelope Membrane of Chloroplasts1

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Daniel; Montandon, Cyril; Hause, Gerd; Majovsky, Petra; Kessler, Felix; Baginsky, Sacha; Agne, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    We report on the characterization of Tic56, a unique component of the recently identified 1-MD translocon at the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts (TIC) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) comprising Tic20, Tic100, and Tic214. We isolated Tic56 by copurification with Tandem Affinity Purification-tagged Toc159 in the absence of precursor protein, indicating spontaneous and translocation-independent formation of the translocon at the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts (TOC) and TIC supercomplexes. Tic56 mutant plants have an albino phenotype and are unable to grow without an external carbon source. Using specific enrichment of protein amino termini, we analyzed the tic56-1 and plastid protein import2 (toc159) mutants to assess the in vivo import capacity of plastids in mutants of an outer and inner envelope component of the anticipated TOC-TIC supercomplex. In both mutants, we observed processing of several import substrates belonging to various pathways. Our results suggest that despite the severe developmental defects, protein import into Tic56-deficient plastids is functional to a considerable degree, indicating the existence of alternative translocases at the inner envelope membrane. PMID:25588737

  13. Characterization of chloroplast protein import without Tic56, a component of the 1-megadalton translocon at the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Daniel; Montandon, Cyril; Hause, Gerd; Majovsky, Petra; Kessler, Felix; Baginsky, Sacha; Agne, Birgit

    2015-03-01

    We report on the characterization of Tic56, a unique component of the recently identified 1-MD translocon at the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts (TIC) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) comprising Tic20, Tic100, and Tic214. We isolated Tic56 by copurification with Tandem Affinity Purification-tagged Toc159 in the absence of precursor protein, indicating spontaneous and translocation-independent formation of the translocon at the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts (TOC) and TIC supercomplexes. Tic56 mutant plants have an albino phenotype and are unable to grow without an external carbon source. Using specific enrichment of protein amino termini, we analyzed the tic56-1 and plastid protein import2 (toc159) mutants to assess the in vivo import capacity of plastids in mutants of an outer and inner envelope component of the anticipated TOC-TIC supercomplex. Inboth mutants, we observed processing of several import substrates belonging to various pathways. Our results suggest that despite the severe developmental defects, protein import into Tic56-deficient plastids is functional to a considerable degree, indicating the existence of alternative translocases at the inner envelope membrane.

  14. Localization, Purification, and Functional Reconstitution of the P4-ATPase Atp8a2, a Phosphatidylserine Flippase in Photoreceptor Disc Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Jonathan A.; Kwok, Michael C. M.; Molday, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    P4-ATPases comprise a relatively new subfamily of P-type ATPases implicated in the energy-dependent translocation of aminophospholipids across cell membranes. In this study, we report on the localization and functional properties of Atp8a2, a member of the P4-ATPase subfamily that has not been studied previously. Reverse transcription-PCR revealed high expression of atp8a2 mRNA in the retina and testis. Within the retina, immunofluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation studies localized Atp8a2 to outer segment disc membranes of rod and cone photoreceptor cells. Atp8a2 purified from photoreceptor outer segments by immunoaffinity chromatography exhibited ATPase activity that was stimulated by phosphatidylserine and to a lesser degree phosphatidylethanolamine but not by phosphatidylcholine or other membrane lipids. Purified Atp8a2 was reconstituted into liposomes containing fluorescent-labeled phosphatidylserine to measure the ability of Atp8a2 to flip phosphatidylserine across the lipid bilayer. Fluorescence measurements showed that Atp8a2 flipped fluorescent-labeled phosphatidylserine from the inner leaflet of liposomes (equivalent to the exocytoplasmic leaflet of cell membranes) to the outer leaflet (equivalent to cytoplasmic leaflet) in an ATP-dependent manner. Our studies provide the first direct biochemical evidence that purified P4-ATPases can translocate aminophospholipids across membranes and further implicates Atp8a2 in the generation and maintenance of phosphatidylserine asymmetry in photoreceptor disc membranes. PMID:19778899

  15. Functional Characterization of Nuclear Localization and Export Signals in Hepatitis C Virus Proteins and Their Role in the Membranous Web

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Aviad; Neufeldt, Christopher J.; Pang, Daniel; Wilson, Kristen; Loewen-Dobler, Darci; Joyce, Michael A.; Wozniak, Richard W.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne J

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive strand RNA virus of the Flavivirus family that replicates in the cytoplasm of infected hepatocytes. Previously, several nuclear localization signals (NLS) and nuclear export signals (NES) have been identified in HCV proteins, however, there is little evidence that these proteins travel into the nucleus during infection. We have recently shown that nuclear pore complex (NPC) proteins (termed nucleoporins or Nups) are present in the membranous web and are required during HCV infection. In this study, we identify a total of 11 NLS and NES sequences in various HCV proteins. We show direct interactions between HCV proteins and importin α5 (IPOA5/kapα1), importin β3 (IPO5/kap β3), and exportin 1 (XPO1/CRM1) both in-vitro and in cell culture. These interactions can be disrupted using peptides containing the specific NLS or NES sequences of HCV proteins. Moreover, using a synchronized infection system, we show that these peptides inhibit HCV infection during distinct phases of the HCV life cycle. The inhibitory effects of these peptides place them in two groups. The first group binds IPOA5 and inhibits infection during the replication stage of HCV life cycle. The second group binds IPO5 and is active during both early replication and early assembly. This work delineates the entire life cycle of HCV and the active involvement of NLS sequences during HCV replication and assembly. Given the abundance of NLS sequences within HCV proteins, our previous finding that Nups play a role in HCV infection, and the relocation of the NLS double-GFP reporter in HCV infected cells, this work supports our previous hypothesis that NPC-like structures and nuclear transport factors function in the membranous web to create an environment conducive to viral replication. PMID:25485706

  16. Functional characterization of nuclear localization and export signals in hepatitis C virus proteins and their role in the membranous web.

    PubMed

    Levin, Aviad; Neufeldt, Christopher J; Pang, Daniel; Wilson, Kristen; Loewen-Dobler, Darci; Joyce, Michael A; Wozniak, Richard W; Tyrrell, D Lorne J

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive strand RNA virus of the Flavivirus family that replicates in the cytoplasm of infected hepatocytes. Previously, several nuclear localization signals (NLS) and nuclear export signals (NES) have been identified in HCV proteins, however, there is little evidence that these proteins travel into the nucleus during infection. We have recently shown that nuclear pore complex (NPC) proteins (termed nucleoporins or Nups) are present in the membranous web and are required during HCV infection. In this study, we identify a total of 11 NLS and NES sequences in various HCV proteins. We show direct interactions between HCV proteins and importin α5 (IPOA5/kapα1), importin β3 (IPO5/kap β3), and exportin 1 (XPO1/CRM1) both in-vitro and in cell culture. These interactions can be disrupted using peptides containing the specific NLS or NES sequences of HCV proteins. Moreover, using a synchronized infection system, we show that these peptides inhibit HCV infection during distinct phases of the HCV life cycle. The inhibitory effects of these peptides place them in two groups. The first group binds IPOA5 and inhibits infection during the replication stage of HCV life cycle. The second group binds IPO5 and is active during both early replication and early assembly. This work delineates the entire life cycle of HCV and the active involvement of NLS sequences during HCV replication and assembly. Given the abundance of NLS sequences within HCV proteins, our previous finding that Nups play a role in HCV infection, and the relocation of the NLS double-GFP reporter in HCV infected cells, this work supports our previous hypothesis that NPC-like structures and nuclear transport factors function in the membranous web to create an environment conducive to viral replication.

  17. Iodixanol Gradient Centrifugation to Separate Components of the Low-Density Membrane Fraction from 3T3-L1 Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Jessica B A; Lamb, Christopher A; Gould, Gwyn W; Bryant, Nia J

    2016-02-01

    We optimized a set of fractionation techniques to facilitate the isolation of subcellular compartments containing insulin-sensitive glucose transporter isoform 4 (GLUT4), which is mobilized from GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs) in fat and muscle cells in response to insulin. In the absence of insulin, GLUT4 undergoes a continuous cycle of GSV formation and fusion with other compartments. Full membrane fractionation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes produces a low-density membrane fraction that contains both the constitutive recycling pool (the endosomal recycling compartments) and the insulin-sensitive pool (the GSVs). These two pools can be separated based on density using iodixanol gradient centrifugation, described here. PMID:26832683

  18. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 inhibits the activity of drug-metabolizing cytochromes P450 and binds to cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Szczesna-Skorupa, Elzbieta; Kemper, Byron

    2011-03-01

    Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) has been shown to interact with several cytochromes P450 (P450s) and to activate enzymatic activity of P450s involved in sterol biosynthesis. We analyzed the interactions of PGRMC1 with the drug-metabolizing P450s, CYP2C2, CYP2C8, and CYP3A4, in transfected cells. Based on coimmunoprecipitation assays, PGRMC1 bound efficiently to all three P450s, and binding to the catalytic cytoplasmic domain of CYP2C2 was much more efficient than to a chimera containing only the N-terminal transmembrane domain. Down-regulation of PGRMC1 expression levels in human embryonic kidney 293 and HepG2 cell lines stably expressing PGRMC1-specific small interfering RNA had no effect on the endoplasmic reticulum localization and expression levels of P450s, whereas enzymatic activities of CYP2C2, CYP2C8, and CYP3A4 were slightly higher in PGRMC1-deficient cells. Cotransfection of cells with P450s and PGRMC1 resulted in PGRMC1 concentration-dependent inhibition of the P450 activities, and this inhibition was partially reversed by increased expression of the P450 reductase (CPR). In contrast, CYP51 activity was decreased by down-regulation of PGRMC1 and expression of PGRMC1 in the PGRMC1-deficient cells increased CYP51 activity. In cells cotransfected with CPR and PGRMC1, strong binding of CPR to PGRMC1 was observed; however, in the presence of CYP2C2, interaction of PGRMC1 with CPR was significantly reduced, suggesting that CYP2C2 competes with CPR for binding to PGRMC1. These data show that in contrast to sterol synthesizing P450, PGRMC1 is not required for the activities of several drug-metabolizing P450s, and its overexpression inhibits those P450 activities. Furthermore, PGRMC1 binds to CPR, which may influence P450 activity.

  19. Electrostatics of deformable lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Vorobyov, Igor; Bekker, Borislava; Allen, Toby W

    2010-06-16

    It was recently demonstrated that significant local deformations of biological membranes take place due to the fields of charged peptides and ions, challenging the standard model of membrane electrostatics. The ability of ions to retain their immediate hydration environment, combined with the lack of sensitivity of permeability to ion type or even ion pairs, led us to question the extent to which hydration energetics and electrostatics control membrane ion permeation. Using the arginine analog methyl-guanidinium as a test case, we find that although hydrocarbon electronic polarizability causes dramatic changes in ion solvation free energy, as well as a significant change (approximately 0.4 V) in the membrane dipole potential, little change in membrane permeation energetics occurs. We attribute this to compensation of solvation terms from polar and polarizable nonpolar components within the membrane, and explain why the dipole potential is not fully sensed in terms of the locally deformed bilayer interface. Our descriptions provide a deeper understanding of the translocation process and allow predictions for poly-ions, ion pairs, charged lipids, and lipid flip-flop. We also report simulations of large hydrophobic-ion-like membrane defects and the ionophore valinomycin, which exhibit little membrane deformation, as well as hydrophilic defects and the ion channel gramicidin A, to provide parallels to membranes deformed by unassisted ion permeation.

  20. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Nanowires are Outer Membrane and Periplasmic Extensions of the Extracellular Electron Transport Components

    SciTech Connect

    Pirbadian, S.; Barchinger, S. E.; Leung, K. M.; Byun, H. S.; Jangir, Y.; Bouhenni, Rachida; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A.; Golbeck, J. H.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-08-20

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella neidensis MR-1. Using live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis, we report that S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures, as previously thought. These bacterial nanowires were also associated with outer membrane vesicles and vesicle chains, structures ubiquitous in gram-negative bacteria. Redoxfunctionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  1. Characterization of anti-leukemia components from Indigo naturalis using comprehensive two-dimensional K562/cell membrane chromatography and in silico target identification

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xunxun; Chen, Xiaofei; Dan, Jia; Cao, Yan; Gao, Shouhong; Guo, Zhiying; Zerbe, Philipp; Chai, Yifeng; Diao, Yong; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has been developed for thousands of years and has formed an integrated theoretical system based on a large amount of clinical practice. However, essential ingredients in TCM herbs have not been fully identified, and their precise mechanisms and targets are not elucidated. In this study, a new strategy combining comprehensive two-dimensional K562/cell membrane chromatographic system and in silico target identification was established to characterize active components from Indigo naturalis, a famous TCM herb that has been widely used for the treatment of leukemia in China, and their targets. Three active components, indirubin, tryptanthrin and isorhamnetin, were successfully characterized and their anti-leukemia effects were validated by cell viability and cell apoptosis assays. Isorhamnetin, with undefined cancer related targets, was selected for in silico target identification. Proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase (Src) was identified as its membrane target and the dissociation constant (Kd) between Src and isorhamnetin was 3.81 μM. Furthermore, anti-leukemia effects of isorhamnetin were mediated by Src through inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest. The results demonstrated that the integrated strategy could efficiently characterize active components in TCM and their targets, which may bring a new light for a better understanding of the complex mechanism of herbal medicines. PMID:27150638

  2. Characterization of anti-leukemia components from Indigo naturalis using comprehensive two-dimensional K562/cell membrane chromatography and in silico target identification.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xunxun; Chen, Xiaofei; Dan, Jia; Cao, Yan; Gao, Shouhong; Guo, Zhiying; Zerbe, Philipp; Chai, Yifeng; Diao, Yong; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has been developed for thousands of years and has formed an integrated theoretical system based on a large amount of clinical practice. However, essential ingredients in TCM herbs have not been fully identified, and their precise mechanisms and targets are not elucidated. In this study, a new strategy combining comprehensive two-dimensional K562/cell membrane chromatographic system and in silico target identification was established to characterize active components from Indigo naturalis, a famous TCM herb that has been widely used for the treatment of leukemia in China, and their targets. Three active components, indirubin, tryptanthrin and isorhamnetin, were successfully characterized and their anti-leukemia effects were validated by cell viability and cell apoptosis assays. Isorhamnetin, with undefined cancer related targets, was selected for in silico target identification. Proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase (Src) was identified as its membrane target and the dissociation constant (Kd) between Src and isorhamnetin was 3.81 μM. Furthermore, anti-leukemia effects of isorhamnetin were mediated by Src through inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest. The results demonstrated that the integrated strategy could efficiently characterize active components in TCM and their targets, which may bring a new light for a better understanding of the complex mechanism of herbal medicines. PMID:27150638

  3. A Novel Di-Leucine Motif at the N-Terminus of Human Organic Solute Transporter Beta Is Essential for Protein Association and Membrane Localization

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuhua; Soroka, Carol J.; Sun, An-Qiang; Backos, Donald S.; Mennone, Albert; Suchy, Frederick J.; Boyer, James L.

    2016-01-01

    The heteromeric membrane protein Organic Solute Transporter alpha/beta is the major bile acid efflux transporter in the intestine. Physical association of its alpha and beta subunits is essential for their polarized basolateral membrane localization and function in the transport of bile acids and other organic solutes. We identified a highly conserved acidic dileucine motif (-EL20L21EE) at the extracellular amino-tail of organic solute transporter beta from multiple species. To characterize the role of this protein interacting domain in the association of the human beta and alpha subunits and in membrane localization of the transporter, Leu20 and Leu21 on the amino-tail of human organic solute transporter beta were replaced with alanines by site-directed mutagenesis. Co-immunoprecipitation study in HEK293 cells demonstrated that substitution of the leucine residues with alanines prevented the interaction of the human beta mutant with the alpha subunit. Membrane biotinylation demonstrated that the LL/AA mutant eliminated membrane expression of both subunits. Computational-based modelling of human organic solute transporter beta suggested that the LL/AA mutation substantially alters both the structure and lipophilicity of the surface, thereby not only affecting the interaction with the alpha subunit but also possibly impacting the capacity of the beta subunit to traffick through the cell and interact with the membrane. In summary, our findings indicate that the dileucine motif in the extracellular N-terminal region of human organic solute transporter beta subunit plays a critical role in the association with the alpha subunit and in its polarized plasma membrane localization. PMID:27351185

  4. Subcellular localization and membrane topology of serine palmitoyltransferase, 3-dehydrosphinganine reductase, and sphinganine N-acyltransferase in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Mandon, E C; Ehses, I; Rother, J; van Echten, G; Sandhoff, K

    1992-06-01

    Serine palmitoyltransferase, 3-dehydrosphinganine reductase and sphinganine N-acyltransferase are responsible for the first steps in sphingolipid biosynthesis forming 3-oxosphinganine, sphinganine, and dihydroceramide, respectively. We confirmed the localization of these enzymes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) using highly purified mouse liver ER and Golgi preparations. Mild digestion of sealed "right-side out" mouse liver ER derived vesicles with different proteolytic enzymes under conditions where latency of mannose-6-phosphatase was 90% produced approximately 60-80% inactivation of serine palmitoyltransferase, 3-dehydrosphinganine reductase, and sphinganine N-acyltransferase activities. These sphingolipid biosynthetic activities (serine palmitoyltransferase, 3-dehydrosphinganine reductase, and sphinganine N-acyltransferase) are not latent, indicating that they face the cytosolic side of the ER, so that substrates have free access to their active sites. Moreover, the membrane-impermeable compound, 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid, which binds to a large number of ER proteins, inhibits serine palmitoyltransferase and sphinganine N-acyltransferase activities by 30-70%. PMID:1317856

  5. Mirror buckling of freestanding graphene membranes induced by local heating due to a scanning tunneling microscope tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoelz, J. K.; Neek Amal, M.; Xu, P.; Barber, S. D.; Ackerman, M. L.; Thibado, P. M.; Sadeghi, A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2014-03-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy has been an invaluable tool in the study of graphene at the atomic scale. Several STM groups have managed to obtain atomic scale images of freestanding graphene membranes providing insight into the behavior of the stabilized ripple geometry. However, we found that the interaction between the STM tip and the freestanding graphene sample may induce additional effects. By varying the tunneling parameters, we can tune the position of the sample, in either a smooth or step like fashion. These phenomena were investigated by STM experiments, continuum elasticity theory and large scale molecular dynamics simulations. These results confirm that by increasing the tip bias, the electrostatic attraction between the tip and sample increases. When applied on a concave surface, this can result in mirror buckling which leads to a large scale movement of the sample. Interestingly, due in part to the negative coefficient of thermal expansion of graphene, buckling transitions can also be induced through local heating of the surface using the STM tip. Financial support by O.N.R. grant N00014-10-1-0181, N.S.F grant DMR-0855358, EU-Marie Curie IIF postdoc Fellowship/299855 (for M. N. A.), ESF-EuroGRAPHENE project CONGRAN, F.S.F (FWO-Vl), and Methusalem Foundation of the Flemish Government.

  6. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracellular secondary metabolite, Paerucumarin, chelates iron and is not localized to extracellular membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Qaisar, Uzma; Kruczek, Cassandra J; Azeem, Muhammed; Javaid, Nasir; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2016-08-01

    Proteins encoded by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pvcA-D operon synthesize a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin termed paerucumarin. The pvcA-D operon enhances the expression of the P. aeruginosa fimbrial chaperone/usher pathway (cup) genes and this effect is mediated through paerucumarin. Whether pvcA-D and/or paerucumarin affect the expression of other P. aeruginosa genes is not known. In this study, we examined the effect of a mutation in pvcA-D operon the global transcriptome of the P. aeruginosa strain PAO1-UW. The mutation reduced the expression of several ironcontrolled genes including pvdS, which is essential for the expression of the pyoverdine genes. Additional transcriptional studies showed that the pvcA-D operon is not regulated by iron. Exogenously added paerucumarin enhanced pyoverdine production and pvdS expression in PAO1-UW. Iron-chelation experiments revealed that purified paerucumarin chelates iron. However, exogenously added paerucumarin significantly reduced the growth of a P. aeruginosa mutant defective in pyoverdine and pyochelin production. In contrast to other secondary metabolite, Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), paerucumarin is not localized to the P. aeruginosa membrane vesicles. These results suggest that paerucumarin enhances the expression of iron-controlled genes by chelating iron within the P. aeruginosa extracellular environment. Although paerucumarin chelates iron, it does not function as a siderophore. Unlike PQS, paerucumarin is not associated with the P. aeruginosa cell envelope. PMID:27480638

  7. Characterization of the plasma membrane localization and orientation of HPV16 E5 for cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Lulin; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2009-10-10

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a non-enveloped DNA virus with an approx 8000 base pair genome. Infection with certain types of HPV is associated with cervical cancer, although the molecular mechanism by which HPV induces carcinogenesis is poorly understood. Three genes encoded by HPV16 are regarded as oncogenic - E5, E6, and E7. The role of E5 has been controversial. Expression of HPV16 E5 causes cell-cell fusion, an event that can lead to increased chromosomal instability, particularly in the presence of cell cycle checkpoint inhibitors like HPV16 E6 and E7. Using biochemical and cell biological assays to better understand HPV16 E5, we find that HPV16 E5 localizes to the plasma membrane with an intracellular amino terminus and an extracellular carboxyl-terminus. Further, HPV16 E5 must be expressed on both cells for cell fusion to occur. When the extracellular epitope of HPV16 E5 is targeted with an antibody, the number of bi-nucleated cells decreases.

  8. Structural and functional dissection of Sec62p, a membrane-bound component of the yeast endoplasmic reticulum protein import machinery.

    PubMed Central

    Deshaies, R J; Schekman, R

    1990-01-01

    SEC62 is required for the import of secretory protein precursors into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The DNA sequence of SEC62 predicts a 32-kDa polypeptide with two potential membrane-spanning segments. Two antisera directed against different portions of the SEC62 coding region specifically detected a 30-kDa polypeptide in cell extracts. A combination of subcellular fractionation, detergent and alkali extraction, and indirect immunofluorescence studies indicated that Sec62p is intimately associated with the ER membrane. Protease digestion of intact microsomes and analysis of the oligosaccharide content of a set of Sec62p-invertase hybrid proteins suggested that Sec62p spans the ER membrane twice, displaying hydrophilic amino- and carboxy-terminal domains towards the cytosol. Sec62p-invertase hybrid proteins that lack the Sec62p C terminus failed to complement the sec62-l mutation and dramatically inhibited the growth of sec62-l cells at a normally permissive temperature. The inhibitory action of toxic Sec62p-invertase hybrids was partially counteracted by the overexpression of Sec63p. Taken together, these data suggest that the C-terminal domain of Sec62p performs an essential function and that the N-terminal domain associates with other components of the translocation machinery, including Sec63p. Images PMID:2233730

  9. Structure and distribution of inorganic components in the cake layer of a membrane bioreactor treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lijie; Xia, Siqing; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    A laboratory-scale submerged anoxic-oxic membrane bioreactor treating municipal wastewater was operated to investigate the structure and distribution of the inorganic cake layer buildup on the membrane. BCR (European Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and both map and line scan of energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) were performed for cake layer characterization. BCR results showed that Si, Al, Ca, Mg, Fe, and Ba were the predominant inorganic elements in the cake layer, and they occurred mostly as crystal particles. Crystal SiO2 was the dominant inorganic compound while Ca in the form of CaSO4 (dominant) and CaCO3 were also present, but exerted little effect on the cake layer structure because most of these compounds were deposited as precipitates on the reactor bottom. EDX results indicated that Si and Al accumulated together along the cross-sectional cake layer in the form of Si-Al (SiO2-Al2O3) crystal particles. PMID:26298402

  10. Structure and distribution of inorganic components in the cake layer of a membrane bioreactor treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lijie; Xia, Siqing; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    A laboratory-scale submerged anoxic-oxic membrane bioreactor treating municipal wastewater was operated to investigate the structure and distribution of the inorganic cake layer buildup on the membrane. BCR (European Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and both map and line scan of energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) were performed for cake layer characterization. BCR results showed that Si, Al, Ca, Mg, Fe, and Ba were the predominant inorganic elements in the cake layer, and they occurred mostly as crystal particles. Crystal SiO2 was the dominant inorganic compound while Ca in the form of CaSO4 (dominant) and CaCO3 were also present, but exerted little effect on the cake layer structure because most of these compounds were deposited as precipitates on the reactor bottom. EDX results indicated that Si and Al accumulated together along the cross-sectional cake layer in the form of Si-Al (SiO2-Al2O3) crystal particles.

  11. Geometry of membrane fission.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Vadim A; Escalada, Artur; Akimov, Sergey A; Shnyrova, Anna V

    2015-01-01

    Cellular membranes define the functional geometry of intracellular space. Formation of new membrane compartments and maintenance of complex organelles require division and disconnection of cellular membranes, a process termed membrane fission. Peripheral membrane proteins generally control membrane remodeling during fission. Local membrane stresses, reflecting molecular geometry of membrane-interacting parts of these proteins, sum up to produce the key membrane geometries of fission: the saddle-shaped neck and hour-glass hemifission intermediate. Here, we review the fundamental principles behind the translation of molecular geometry into membrane shape and topology during fission. We emphasize the central role the membrane insertion of specialized protein domains plays in orchestrating fission in vitro and in cells. We further compare individual to synergistic action of the membrane insertion during fission mediated by individual protein species, proteins complexes or membrane domains. Finally, we describe how local geometry of fission intermediates defines the functional design of the protein complexes catalyzing fission of cellular membranes. PMID:25062896

  12. Reticulomics: Protein-Protein Interaction Studies with Two Plasmodesmata-Localized Reticulon Family Proteins Identify Binding Partners Enriched at Plasmodesmata, Endoplasmic Reticulum, and the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Botchway, Stanley W; Slade, Susan E; Knox, Kirsten; Frigerio, Lorenzo; Oparka, Karl; Hawes, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a ubiquitous organelle that plays roles in secretory protein production, folding, quality control, and lipid biosynthesis. The cortical ER in plants is pleomorphic and structured as a tubular network capable of morphing into flat cisternae, mainly at three-way junctions, and back to tubules. Plant reticulon family proteins (RTNLB) tubulate the ER by dimerization and oligomerization, creating localized ER membrane tensions that result in membrane curvature. Some RTNLB ER-shaping proteins are present in the plasmodesmata (PD) proteome and may contribute to the formation of the desmotubule, the axial ER-derived structure that traverses primary PD. Here, we investigate the binding partners of two PD-resident reticulon proteins, RTNLB3 and RTNLB6, that are located in primary PD at cytokinesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Coimmunoprecipitation of green fluorescent protein-tagged RTNLB3 and RTNLB6 followed by mass spectrometry detected a high percentage of known PD-localized proteins as well as plasma membrane proteins with putative membrane-anchoring roles. Förster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy assays revealed a highly significant interaction of the detected PD proteins with the bait RTNLB proteins. Our data suggest that RTNLB proteins, in addition to a role in ER modeling, may play important roles in linking the cortical ER to the plasma membrane.

  13. Multicomponent membranes

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1988-01-01

    A multicomponent membrane which may be used for separating various components which are present in a fluid feed mixture comprises a mixture of a plasticizer such as a glycol and an organic polymer cast upon a porous organic polymer support. The membrane may be prepared by casting an emulsion or a solution of the plasticizer and polymer on the porous support, evaporating the solvent and recovering the membrane after curing.

  14. Rac1-mediated membrane raft localization of PI3K/p110β is required for its activation by GPCRs or PTEN loss

    PubMed Central

    Cizmecioglu, Onur; Ni, Jing; Xie, Shaozhen; Zhao, Jean J; Roberts, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to understand how spatial compartmentalization in the plasma membrane might contribute to the functions of the ubiquitous class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) isoforms, p110α and p110β. We found that p110β localizes to membrane rafts in a Rac1-dependent manner. This localization potentiates Akt activation by G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Thus genetic targeting of a Rac1 binding-deficient allele of p110β to rafts alleviated the requirement for p110β-Rac1 association for GPCR signaling, cell growth and migration. In contrast, p110α, which does not play a physiological role in GPCR signaling, is found to reside in nonraft regions of the plasma membrane. Raft targeting of p110α allowed its EGFR-mediated activation by GPCRs. Notably, p110β dependent, PTEN null tumor cells critically rely upon raft-associated PI3K activity. Collectively, our findings provide a mechanistic account of how membrane raft localization regulates differential activation of distinct PI3K isoforms and offer insight into why PTEN-deficient cancers depend on p110β. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17635.001 PMID:27700986

  15. Progesterone Increases the Release of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor from Glia via Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 (Pgrmc1)-Dependent ERK5 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chang; Cunningham, Rebecca L.; Rybalchenko, Nataliya

    2012-01-01

    Progesterone (P4) is cytoprotective in various experimental models, but our understanding of the mechanisms involved is still incomplete. Our laboratory has implicated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling as an important mediator of P4's protective actions. We have shown that P4 increases the expression of BDNF, an effect mediated by the classical P4 receptor (PR), and that the protective effects of P4 were abolished using inhibitors of Trk receptor signaling. In an effort to extend our understanding of the interrelationship between P4 and BDNF signaling, we determined whether P4 influenced BDNF release and examined the role of the classical PR and a putative membrane PR, progesterone receptor membrane component-1 (Pgrmc1), as mediators of this response. Given recent data from our laboratory that supported the role of ERK5 in BDNF release, we also tested whether P4-induced BDNF release was mediated by ERK5. In this study, we found that P4 and the membrane-impermeable P4 (P4-BSA) both induced BDNF release from cultured C6 glial cells and primary astrocytes. Both these cells lack the classical nuclear/intracellular PR but express high levels of membrane-associated PR, including Pgrmc1. Using RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Pgrmc1 expression, we determined that P4-induced BDNF release was dependent on the expression of Pgrmc1, although pharmacological inhibition of the PR failed to alter the effects of P4. Furthermore, the BDNF release elicited by P4 was mediated by ERK5, and not ERK1/2. Collectively, our data describe that P4 elicits an increase in BDNF release from glia via a Pgrmc1-induced ERK5 signaling mechanism and identify Pgrmc1 as a potential therapeutic target for future hormone-based drug development for the treatment of such degenerative diseases as Alzheimer's disease as well as other diseases wherein neurotrophin dysregulation is noted. PMID:22778217

  16. Signaling mechanism by the Staphylococcus aureus two-component system LytSR: role of acetyl phosphate in bypassing the cell membrane electrical potential sensor LytS

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kevin; Golemi-Kotra, Dasantila

    2016-01-01

    The two-component system LytSR has been linked to the signal transduction of cell membrane electrical potential perturbation and is involved in the adaptation of Staphylococcus aureus to cationic antimicrobial peptides. It consists of a membrane-bound histidine kinase, LytS, which belongs to the family of multiple transmembrane-spanning domains receptors, and a response regulator, LytR, which belongs to the novel family of non-helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain proteins. LytR regulates the expression of cidABC and lrgAB operons, the gene products of which are involved in programmed cell death and lysis. In vivo studies have demonstrated involvement of two overlapping regulatory networks in regulating the lrgAB operon, both depending on LytR. One regulatory network responds to glucose metabolism and the other responds to changes in the cell membrane potential. Herein, we show that LytS has autokinase activity and can catalyze a fast phosphotransfer reaction, with 50% of its phosphoryl group lost within 1 minute of incubation with LytR. LytS has also phosphatase activity. Notably, LytR undergoes phosphorylation by acetyl phosphate at a rate that is 2-fold faster than the phosphorylation by LytS. This observation is significant in lieu of the in vivo observations that regulation of the lrgAB operon is LytR-dependent in the presence of excess glucose in the medium. The latter condition does not lead to perturbation of the cell membrane potential but rather to the accumulation of acetate in the cell. Our study provides insights into the molecular basis for regulation of lrgAB in a LytR-dependent manner under conditions that do not involve sensing by LytS. PMID:27127614

  17. Photochemical solar energy conversion utilizing semiconductors localized in membrane-mimetic systems. Performance report, April 1, 1989--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Fendler, J.H.

    1991-08-31

    Extending the frontiers of colloidal photochemistry and colloidal electrochemistry to solar photochemistry research had been the main objective of this research. More specific objectives of this proposal include the examination of semiconductor-particle-mediated photoelectron transfer and photoelectric effects in different membrane mimetic systems. Emphasis had been placed on developing bilayer lipid membranes and Langmuir-Blodgett films as new membrane-mimetic systems, as well as on the characterization and utilization of these systems.

  18. The HPV16 and MusPV1 papillomaviruses initially interact with distinct host components on the basement membrane.

    PubMed

    Day, Patricia M; Thompson, Cynthia D; Lowy, Douglas R; Schiller, John T

    2015-07-01

    To understand and compare the mechanisms of murine and human PV infection, we examined pseudovirion binding and infection of the newly described MusPV1 using the murine cervicovaginal challenge model. These analyses revealed primary tissue interactions distinct from those previously described for HPV16. Unlike HPV16, MusPV1 bound basement membrane (BM) in an HSPG-independent manner. Nevertheless, subsequent HSPG interactions were critical. L2 antibodies or low doses of VLP antibodies, sufficient to prevent infection, did not lead to disassociation of the MusPV1 pseudovirions from the BM, in contrast to previous findings with HPV16. Similarly, furin inhibition did not lead to loss of MusPV1 from the BM. Therefore, phylogenetically distant PV types differ in their initial interactions with host attachment factors, but initiate their lifecycle on the acellular BM. Despite these differences, these distantly related PV types displayed similar intracellular trafficking patterns and susceptibilities to biochemical inhibition of infection.

  19. Phase separation in three-component lipid membranes: from Monte Carlo simulations to Ginzburg-Landau equations.

    PubMed

    Reigada, Ramon; Buceta, Javier; Gómez, Jordi; Sagués, Francesc; Lindenberg, Katja

    2008-01-14

    Preferential affinity of cholesterol for saturated rather than unsaturated lipids underlies the thermodynamic process of the formation of lipid nanostructures in cell membranes, that is, of rafts. In this context, phase segregation of two-dimensional ternary lipid mixtures is formally studied from two different perspectives. The simplest approach is based on Monte Carlo simulations of an Ising model corresponding to two interconnected lattices, from which the basic features of the phenomenon are investigated. Then, the coarse-graining mean field procedure of the discrete Hamiltonian is adapted and a Ginzburg-Landau-like free energy expression is obtained. From this latter description, we construct kinetic equations that enable us to perform numerical simulations and to establish analytical phase separation criteria. Application of our formalism in the biological context is also discussed.

  20. Investigation of Structural and Functional Motifs within the Vaccinia Virus A14 Phosphoprotein, an Essential Component of the Virion Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Jason; Traktman, Paula

    2003-01-01

    We have previously reported the construction and characterization of an inducible recombinant virus in which expression of the vaccinia virus membrane protein A14 is experimentally regulated using the tetracycline operator-repressor system. Repression of A14, which results in a 1,000-fold reduction in viral yield, leads to an early block in viral morphogenesis characterized by the accumulation of large virosomes, empty “crescents” that fail to contact these virosomes, and, most strikingly, large numbers of aberrant 25-nm vesicles. Here we report the establishment of a transient-complementation system for the structure-function analysis of A14. We have constructed numerous mutant alleles of A14 designed to identify and test the importance of key structural and sequence motifs within A14, including sites of posttranslational modification, such as glycosylation, phosphorylation, and dimerization. From these studies we have determined that robust complementation ability requires an intact N terminus and two regions flanking the first membrane-spanning domain of A14. We show that A14 is modified by N-linked glycosylation both in vitro and in vivo. However, only a minority of A14 molecules are glycosylated in vivo and these are not encapsidated. In this report we also identify the sole phosphorylated serine residue of A14 as lying within the NHS85 motif that undergoes glycosylation. Additionally, we show that the Cys71 residue is required for intermolecular disulfide bond formation and describe the properties of a virus expressing an allele of A14 that cannot form disulfide-linked dimers. PMID:12885904

  1. The two neutrophil plasma membrane markers alkaline phosphatase and HLA class I antigen localize differently in granule-deficient cytoplasts. An ideal plasma membrane marker in human neutrophils is still lacking.

    PubMed

    Pellmé, Sara; Dahlgren, Claes; Karlsson, Anna

    2007-08-31

    Neutrophil function relies largely on the ability of the cell to mobilize its different granules and vesicles to the cell surface and thereby expose and/or release effector molecules to the surrounding tissue. To properly identify these subcellular compartments is thus a prerequisite for studies of neutrophil physiology. A range of specific markers for the classical granules is available, but finding optimal markers for the secretory vesicles and plasma membrane has historically been more challenging. Latent and non-latent alkaline phosphatase activities are often used to distinguish these two light membrane structures, but the outcome using this technique depends on the level of cellular activation. Therefore, HLA-I was introduced some years ago as a specific, stimulation-independent marker for the plasma membrane. In this study we however report that detailed fractionation studies of neutrophil cytoplasts, lacking secretory vesicles, granules and other dense organelles, reveal that the HLA-I antigen is not only co-localizing with the plasma membrane marker ALP, but is also present in other, more dense organelles. Further, we found the mixed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MELISA), detecting the beta(2)-microglobulin/HLA-I complex, to be negatively influenced by uncomplexed beta(2)-microglobulin present in the specific granules and secretory vesicles, making it difficult to use HLA-I as a plasma membrane marker during maturation of for example phagolysosomes. PMID:17673253

  2. Transport properties of highly ordered heterogeneous ion-exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, V; Freger, V; Linder, C; Oren, Y

    2008-08-01

    Model "ordered" heterogeneous ion exchange membranes are made with ion exchange particles heaving ion exchange capacity in the range 3 to 2.5 meq/gr (dry basis) and diameters ranging from 37 to 7 microm and 2 component room-temperature vulcanizing silicon rubber as a polymeric matrix, by applying an electric field normal to the membrane surface during preparation. These membranes were shown to have an improved ionic conductivity compared with "nonordered" membranes based on the same ion exchange content (for instance, at 10% resin content "nonordered" membranes show <10(-5) mS/cm while "ordered" membranes have conductivity of 1 mS/cm). The transport properties of ordered membranes were compared with those of nonordered membranes, through the current-voltage characteristics. Limiting currents measured for the ordered membranes were significantly higher than those of the nonordered membranes with the same resin concentration. In addition, higher limiting currents were observed in ordered membranes as the resin particles became smaller. Energy dispersion spectrometry analyses revealed that the concentration of cation exchange groups on the membrane surface was higher for ordered membrane as compared to that of nonordered membranes. This implies that the local current density for the conducting domains at the surface of the nonordered membranes is higher, leading to higher concentration polarization and, eventually, to lower average limiting current densities. The effect of ordering the particles on the membrane conductivity and transport properties was studied, and the advantages of the ordered membranes are discussed.

  3. Impact of UV-B irradiation on photosynthetic performance and chloroplast membrane components in Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed

    Lidon, F C; Ramalho, J C

    2011-09-01

    The impact of UV-B radiation on photosynthetic related parameters was studied in Oryza sativa L. cv. Safari plants, after an UV-B irradiation performed 1h per day for 7days (between 8 and 14days after germination) with a ten narrow-band (λ 311nm) that resulted in a total biological effective UV-B (UVB(BE)) of 2.975kJm(-2)day(-1) and a total of 20.825kJm(-2). Gas exchange measurements were severely affected, showing reductions higher than 80% in net photosynthesis (P(n)), stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity (A(max)), 1day after the end of the 7-days UV-B treatment. Similarly, several fluorescence parameters (F(o), F(v)/F(m), Fv'/Fm', ϕ(e), q(P) and q(E)) and thylakoid electron transport (involving both photosystems) were also severely reduced. Concomitantly, a decline of xanthophylls, carotenes, Chl a, Chl (a+b) and Chl (a/b) values was accompanied by the increase of the lipoperoxidation level in chloroplast membranes, altogether reflecting a loss of protection against oxidative stress. Seven days after of the end of UV-B treatment, most fluorescence parameters recovered, but in P(n), A(max), thylakoid electron transport rates, Chl a and lipid classes, as well as the level of lipoperoxidation, the impacts were even stronger than immediately after the end of stress, denoting a clear loss of performance of photosynthetic structures. However, only a moderate impact on total lipids was observed, accompanied by some changes in the relative weight of the major chloroplast membrane lipid classes, with emphasis on the decrease of MGDG and the increase of phospholipids. That suggested an ability to de novo lipid synthesis allowing qualitative changes in the lipid matrix. Notably, the leaves developed after the end of UV-B irradiation showed a much lower impact, with significantly decreased values only in P(n) and g(s), rises in several fluorescence parameters, thylakoid electron transport, photosynthetic pigments (xanthophylls and chls) and DEPS, while lipid

  4. A New FE Modeling Method for Isothermal Local Loading Process of Large-scale Complex Titanium Alloy Components Based on DEFORM-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Dawei; Yang He; Sun Zhichao; Fan Xiaoguang

    2010-06-15

    Isothermal local loading process provides a new way to form large-scale complex titanium alloy components. The forming process is characterized by an extreme size (large scale in global and compared small size in regional), multi-parameter effects, and complicated loading path. To establish a reasonable finite element model is one of the key problems urgently to be solved in the research and development of isothermal local loading forming process of large-scale complex titanium alloy components. In this paper, a new finite element model of the isothermal local loading process is developed under the DEFORM-3D environment based on the solution of some key techniques. The modeling method has the following features: (1) different meshing techniques are used in different loading areas and the number of meshed elements is determined according to the deformation characteristic in different local loading steps in order to improve computational efficiency; (2) the accurate magnitude of the friction factor under titanium alloy hot forming (isothermal forming) condition is adopted instead of the typical value for lubricated hot forming processes; (3) different FEM solvers are chosen at different stages according to the loading characteristic and the contact state; (4) in contrast to the local component model, a full 3D component is modeled to simulate the process. The 3D-FE model is validated by experimental data of a large-scale bulkhead forming under isothermal local loading. The model can describe the quantitative relationships between the forming conditions and the forming results. The results of the present study may provide a basis for studying the local deformation mechanism, selecting the reasonable parameters, optimizing the die design and the process control in isothermal local loading process of large-scale complex titanium alloy components.

  5. A New FE Modeling Method for Isothermal Local Loading Process of Large-scale Complex Titanium Alloy Components Based on DEFORM-3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dawei; Yang, He; Sun, Zhichao; Fan, Xiaoguang

    2010-06-01

    Isothermal local loading process provides a new way to form large-scale complex titanium alloy components. The forming process is characterized by an extreme size (large scale in global and compared small size in regional), multi-parameter effects, and complicated loading path. To establish a reasonable finite element model is one of the key problems urgently to be solved in the research and development of isothermal local loading forming process of large-scale complex titanium alloy components. In this paper, a new finite element model of the isothermal local loading process is developed under the DEFORM-3D environment based on the solution of some key techniques. The modeling method has the following features: (1) different meshing techniques are used in different loading areas and the number of meshed elements is determined according to the deformation characteristic in different local loading steps in order to improve computational efficiency; (2) the accurate magnitude of the friction factor under titanium alloy hot forming (isothermal forming) condition is adopted instead of the typical value for lubricated hot forming processes; (3) different FEM solvers are chosen at different stages according to the loading characteristic and the contact state; (4) in contrast to the local component model, a full 3D component is modeled to simulate the process. The 3D-FE model is validated by experimental data of a large-scale bulkhead forming under isothermal local loading. The model can describe the quantitative relationships between the forming conditions and the forming results. The results of the present study may provide a basis for studying the local deformation mechanism, selecting the reasonable parameters, optimizing the die design and the process control in isothermal local loading process of large-scale complex titanium alloy components.

  6. The HPV16 and MusPV1 papillomaviruses initially interact with distinct host components on the basement membrane

    PubMed Central

    Day, Patricia M.; Thompson, Cynthia D.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.

    2015-01-01

    To understand and compare the mechanisms of murine and human PV infection, we examined pseudovirion binding and infection of the newly described MusPV1 using the murine cervicovaginal challenge model. These analyses revealed primary tissue interactions distinct from those previously described for HPV16. Unlike HPV16, MusPV1 bound basement membrane (BM) in an HSPG-independent manner. Nevertheless, subsequent HSPG interactions were critical. L2 antibodies or low doses of VLP antibodies, sufficient to prevent infection, did not lead to disassociation of the MusPV1 pseudovirions from the BM, in contrast to previous findings with HPV16. Similarly, furin inhibition did not lead to loss of MusPV1 from the BM. Therefore, phylogenetically distant PV types that differ in their initial interactions with host attachment factors, but initiate their lifecycle on the acellular BM. Despite these differences, these distantly related PV types displayed similar intracellular trafficking patterns and susceptibilities to biochemical inhibition of infection. PMID:25771496

  7. PilF Is an Outer Membrane Lipoprotein Required for Multimerization and Localization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type IV Pilus Secretin

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, J.; Tammam, S; Ku, S; Samplaeanu, L; Burrows, L; Howell, P

    2008-01-01

    Type IV pili (T4P) are retractile appendages that contribute to the virulence of bacterial pathogens. PilF is a Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipoprotein that is essential for T4P biogenesis. Phenotypic characterization of a pilF mutant confirmed that T4P-mediated functions are abrogated: T4P were no longer present on the cell surface, twitching motility was abolished, and the mutant was resistant to infection by T4P retraction-dependent bacteriophage. The results of cellular fractionation studies indicated that PilF is the outer membrane pilotin required for the localization and multimerization of the secretin, PilQ. Mutation of the putative PilF lipidation site untethered the protein from the outer membrane, causing secretin assembly in both inner and outer membranes. T4P-mediated twitching motility and bacteriophage susceptibility were moderately decreased in the lipidation site mutant, while cell surface piliation was substantially reduced. The tethering of PilF to the outer membrane promotes the correct localization of PilQ and appears to be required for the formation of stable T4P. Our 2.0-A structure of PilF revealed a superhelical arrangement of six tetratricopeptide protein-protein interaction motifs that may mediate the contacts with PilQ during secretin assembly. An alignment of pseudomonad PilF sequences revealed three highly conserved surfaces that may be involved in PilF function.

  8. Plasma Membrane Localization Is Essential for Oryza sativa Pto-Interacting Protein 1a-Mediated Negative Regulation of Immune Signaling in Rice1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Hidenori; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Hamada, Satoshi; Shimamoto, Ko; Nomura, Yuko; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Akira; Hirochika, Hirohiko

    2014-01-01

    Oryza sativa Pto-interacting protein 1a (OsPti1a), an ortholog of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) SlPti1, functions as a negative regulator of innate immunity in rice (Oryza sativa). In ospti1a mutants, the activation of immune responses, including hypersensitive response-like cell death, is caused by loss of the OsPti1a protein; however, it is as yet unclear how OsPti1a suppresses immune responses. Here, we report that OsPti1a localizes to detergent-resistant membrane fractions of the plasma membrane through lipid modification of the protein’s amino terminus, which is highly conserved among Pti1 orthologs in several plant species. Importantly, mislocalization of OsPti1a after deletion of its amino terminus reduced its ability to complement the mutant phenotypes, including hypersensitive response-like cell death. Furthermore, complex formation of OsPti1a depends on its amino terminus-mediated membrane localization. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of OsPti1a complex-interacting proteins identified several defense-related proteins. Collectively, these findings indicate that appropriate complex formation by OsPti1a at the plasma membrane is required for the negative regulation of plant immune responses in rice. PMID:24958714

  9. Comparative normal/failing rat myocardium cell membrane chromatographic analysis system for screening specific components that counteract doxorubicin-induced heart failure from Acontium carmichaeli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaofei; Cao, Yan; Zhang, Hai; Zhu, Zhenyu; Liu, Min; Liu, Haibin; Ding, Xuan; Hong, Zhanying; Li, Wuhong; Lv, Diya; Wang, Lirong; Zhuo, Xianyi; Zhang, Junping; Xie, Xiang-Qun; Chai, Yifeng

    2014-05-20

    Cell membrane chromatography (CMC) derived from pathological tissues is ideal for screening specific components acting on specific diseases from complex medicines owing to the maximum simulation of in vivo drug-receptor interactions. However, there are no pathological tissue-derived CMC models that have ever been developed, as well as no visualized affinity comparison of potential active components between normal and pathological CMC columns. In this study, a novel comparative normal/failing rat myocardium CMC analysis system based on online column selection and comprehensive two-dimensional (2D) chromatography/monolithic column/time-of-flight mass spectrometry was developed for parallel comparison of the chromatographic behaviors on both normal and pathological CMC columns, as well as rapid screening of the specific therapeutic agents that counteract doxorubicin (DOX)-induced heart failure from Acontium carmichaeli (Fuzi). In total, 16 potential active alkaloid components with similar structures in Fuzi were retained on both normal and failing myocardium CMC models. Most of them had obvious decreases of affinities on failing myocardium CMC compared with normal CMC model except for four components, talatizamine (TALA), 14-acetyl-TALA, hetisine, and 14-benzoylneoline. One compound TALA with the highest affinity was isolated for further in vitro pharmacodynamic validation and target identification to validate the screen results. Voltage-dependent K(+) channel was confirmed as a binding target of TALA and 14-acetyl-TALA with high affinities. The online high throughput comparative CMC analysis method is suitable for screening specific active components from herbal medicines by increasing the specificity of screened results and can also be applied to other biological chromatography models.

  10. Different components of /sup 3/H-imipramine binding in rat brain membranes: relation to serotonin uptake sites

    SciTech Connect

    Gobbi, M.; Taddei, C.; Mennini, T.

    1988-01-01

    In the present paper, the authors confirm and extend previous studies showing heterogeneous /sup 3/H-imipramine (/sup 3/H-IMI) binding sites. Inhibition curves of various drugs (serotonin, imipramine, desmethyl-imipramine, d-fenfluramine, d-norfenfluramine and indalpine, a potent serotonin uptake inhibitor) obtained using 2 nM /sup 3/H-IMI and in presence of 120 mM NaCl, confirmed the presence of at least three /sup 3/H-IMI binding sites: two of these were serotonin-insensitive while the third one was selectively inhibited by serotonin and indalpine with nanomolar affinities. Moreover this last component was found to be selectively modulated by chronic imipramine treatment thus suggesting a close relation to serontonin uptake mechanism. These data indicate that the use of a more selective inhibitors of the serotonin-sensitive component (like indalpine or serotonin itself) to define non specific /sup 3/H-IMI, may be of help in understanding its relation with serotonin uptake system. 22 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Subcellular localization of the b-cytochrome component of the human neutrophil microbicidal oxidase: translocation during activation

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    We describe a new method for subcellular fractionation of human neutrophils. Neutrophils were disrupted by nitrogen cavitation and the nuclei removed by centrifugation. The postnuclear supernatant was applied on top of a discontinuous Percoll density gradient. Centrifugation for 15 min at 48,000 g resulted in complete separation of plasma membranes, azurophil granules, and specific granules. As determined by ultrastructure and the distribution of biochemical markers of these organelles, approximately 90% of the b-cytochrome in unstimulated cells was recovered from the band containing the specific granules and was shown to be in or tightly associated with the membrane. During stimulation of intact neutrophils with phorbol myristate acetate or the ionophore A23187, we observed translocation of 40-75% of the b-cytochrome to the plasma membrane. The extent of this translocation closely paralleled release of the specific granule marker, vitamin B12-binding protein. These data indicate that the b- cytochrome is in the membrane of the specific granules of unstimulated neutrophils and that stimulus-induced fusion of these granules with the plasma membrane results in a translocation of the cytochrome. Our observations provide a basis for the assembly of the microbicidal oxidase of the human neutrophil. PMID:6408102

  12. Investigation of local environments in Nafion-SiO(2) composite membranes used in vanadium redox flow batteries.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, M; Schwenzer, Birgit; Kim, Soowhan; Yang, Zhenguo; Thevuthasan, S; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L; Hu, Jianzhi

    2012-04-01

    Proton conducting polymer composite membranes are of technological interest in many energy devices such as fuel cells and redox flow batteries. In particular, polymer composite membranes, such as SiO(2) incorporated Nafion membranes, are recently reported as highly promising for the use in redox flow batteries. However, there is conflicting reports regarding the performance of this type of Nafion-SiO(2) composite membrane in the redox flow cell. This paper presents results of the analysis of the Nafion-SiO(2) composite membrane used in a vanadium redox flow battery by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The XPS study reveals the chemical identity and environment of vanadium cations accumulated at the surface. On the other hand, the (19)F and (29)Si NMR measurement explores the nature of the interaction between the silica particles, Nafion side chains and diffused vanadium cations. The (29)Si NMR shows that the silica particles interact via hydrogen bonds with the sulfonic groups of Nafion and the diffused vanadium cations. Based on these spectroscopic studies, the chemical environment of the silica particles inside the Nafion membrane and their interaction with diffusing vanadium cations during flow cell operations are discussed. This study discusses the origin of performance degradation of the Nafion-SiO(2) composite membrane materials in vanadium redox flow batteries.

  13. Investigation of Local Environments in Nafion-SiO2 Composite Membranes used in Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, M.; Schwenzer, Birgit; Kim, Soowhan; Yang, Zhenguo; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2012-04-01

    The proton conducting polymer composite membranes are of technological interest in many energy devices such as fuel cells and redox flow batteries. In particular, the polymer composite membranes such as SiO2 incorporated Nafion membranes are recently reported as highly promising for the redox flow batteries. However, there is conflicting reports regarding the performance of this Nafion-SiO2 composite membrane in the redox flow cell. This paper presents results of the analysis of the Nafion-SiO2 composite membrane used in a vanadium redox flow battery by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier Transformed Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy, and ultraviolet visible spectroscopy. The XPS study reveals the chemical identity and environment of vanadium cations accumulated at the surface. On the other hand, the 19F and 29Si NMR measurement explores the nature of the interaction between the silica particles, Nafion side chains and diffused vanadium cations. The 29Si NMR shows that the silica particles interaction via hydrogen bonds to the sulfonic groups of Nafion and diffused vanadium cations. Based on these spectroscopic studies, the chemical environment of the silica particles inside the Nafion membrane and their interaction with diffusing vanadium cations during flow cell operations are discussed. This study discusses the origin of performance degradation of the Nafion-SiO2 composite membrane materials in vanadium redox flow batteries.

  14. Identification and characterization of an Arabidopsis mutant with altered localization of NIP5;1, a plasma membrane boric acid channel, reveals the requirement for D-galactose in endomembrane organization.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Masataka; Wang, Sheliang; Kamiya, Takehiro; Shigenobu, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Fujiwara, Toru; Naito, Satoshi; Takano, Junpei

    2014-04-01

    Endomembrane organization is important for various aspects of cell physiology, including membrane protein trafficking. To explore the molecular mechanisms regulating the trafficking of plasma membrane-localized proteins in plants, we screened for Arabidopsis mutants with defective localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-nodulin 26-like intrinsic protein (NIP)5;1. Fluorescence imaging-based screening led to the isolation of a mutant which accumulated abnormal intracellular aggregates labeled by GFP-NIP5;1. The aggregates appeared in epidermal cells in the root elongation zone and included the trans-Golgi network/early endosomes. Rough mapping and whole-genome sequencing identified the mutant as an allele of UDP-glucose 4-epimerase 4 (uge4)/root hair defective 1 (rhd1) /root epidermal bulgar 1 (reb 1), which was originally defined as a cell wall mutant. The responsible gene encodes UDP-glucose 4-epimerase 4 (UGE4), which functions in the biosynthesis of d-galactose, especially for the synthesis of the cell wall polysaccharide xyloglucan and arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs). The endomembrane aggregates in the mutants were absent in the presence of d-galactose, indicative of a requirement for a d-galactose-containing component in endomembrane organization. Genetic and pharmacological analyses suggested that the aggregates were not caused by the disruption of cell wall polysaccharides or the cytoskeleton. Overall, our results suggest that UGE4 activity in d-galactose synthesis is required for the structure of cell wall polysaccharides and endomembrane organization.

  15. Decomposing cerebral blood flow MRI into functional and structural components: A non-local approach based on prediction

    PubMed Central

    Kandel, Benjamin M.; Wang, Danny JJ; Detre, John A.; Gee, James C.; Avants, Brian B.

    2014-01-01

    We present RIPMMARC (Rotation Invariant Patch-based Multi-Modality Analysis aRChitecture), a flexible and widely applicable method for extracting information unique to a given modality from a multi-modal data set. We use RIPMMARC to improve interpretation of arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion images by removing the component of perfusion that is predicted by the underlying anatomy. Using patch-based, rotation invariant descriptors derived from the anatomical image, we learn a predictive relationship between local neuroanatomical structure and the corresponding perfusion image. This relation allows us to produce an image of perfusion that would be predicted given only the underlying anatomy and a residual image that represents perfusion information that cannot be predicted by anatomical features. Our learned structural features are significantly better at predicting brain perfusion than tissue probability maps, which are the input to standard partial volume correction techniques. Studies in test-retest data show that both the anatomically predicted and residual perfusion signal are highly replicable for a given subject. In a pediatric population, both the raw perfusion and structurally predicted images are tightly linked to age throughout adolescence throughout the brain. Interestingly, the residual perfusion also shows a strong correlation with age in select regions including the hippocampi (corr= 0.38, p-value < 10−6), precuneus (corr= −0.44, p < 10−5), and combined default mode network regions (corr= −0.45, p < 10−8) that is independent of global anatomy-perfusion trends. This finding suggests that there is a regionally heterogeneous pattern of functional specialization that is distinct from that of cortical structural development. PMID:25449745

  16. VP08R from Infectious Spleen and Kidney Necrosis Virus Is a Novel Component of the Virus-Mock Basement Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaopeng; Yan, Muting; Wang, Rui; Lin, Ting; Tang, Junliang; Li, Chaozheng; Weng, Shaoping

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV), the type species of the genus Megalocytivirus, family Iridoviridae, brings great harm to fish farming. In infected tissues, ISKNV infection is characterized by a unique phenomenon, in that the infected cells are attached by lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), which are speculated to wall off the infected cells from host immune attack. A viral membrane protein, VP23R, binds and recruits the host nidogen-1 protein to construct a basement membrane (BM)-like structure, termed virus-mock basement membrane (VMBM), on the surface of infected cells to provide attaching sites for LECs. VMBMs do not contain collagen IV protein, which is essential for maintenance of BM integrity and functions. In this study, we identified the VP08R protein encoded by ISKNV. VP08R was predicted to be a secreted protein with a signal peptide but without a transmembrane domain. However, immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that VP08R is located on the plasma membrane of infected cells and shows an expression profile similar to that of VP23R. Coimmunoprecipitation showed that VP08R interacts with both VP23R and nidogen-1, indicating that VP08R is a component of VMBM and is present on the cell membrane by binding to VP23R. Through formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds, VP08R molecules self-organized into a multimer, which may play a role in the maintenance of VMBM integrity and stability. Moreover, the VP08R multimer was easily degraded when the ISKNV-infected cells were lysed, which may be a mechanism for VMBM disassembly when necessary to free LECs and release the mature virions. IMPORTANCE Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV; genus Megalocytivirus, family Iridovirus) is most harmful to cultured fishes. In tissues, the ISKNV-infected cells are attached by lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), which are speculated to segregate the host immune system. A viral membrane protein, VP23R, binds and recruits the host

  17. A microRNA from infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus modulates expression of the virus-mock basement membrane component VP08R.

    PubMed

    Yan, Muting; He, Jianhui; Zhu, Weibin; Zhang, Jing; Xia, Qiong; Weng, Shaoping; He, Jianguo; Xu, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-01

    Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) is the type species of the genus Megalocytivirus, family Iridoviridae. Infection of ISKNV is characterized by a unique pathological phenomenon in that the infected cells are attached by lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). ISKNV mediates the formation of a virus-mock basement membrane (VMBM) structure on the surface of infected cells to provide attaching sites for LECs. The viral protein VP08R is an important component of VMBM. In this study, a novel ISKNV-encoded microRNA, temporarily named ISKNV-miR-1, was identified. ISKNV-miR-1 is complementary to the VP08R-coding sequence and can modulate VP08R expression through reducing its mRNA level. This suggests that formation of VMBM may be under fine regulation by ISKNV. PMID:26896933

  18. A microRNA from infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus modulates expression of the virus-mock basement membrane component VP08R.

    PubMed

    Yan, Muting; He, Jianhui; Zhu, Weibin; Zhang, Jing; Xia, Qiong; Weng, Shaoping; He, Jianguo; Xu, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-01

    Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) is the type species of the genus Megalocytivirus, family Iridoviridae. Infection of ISKNV is characterized by a unique pathological phenomenon in that the infected cells are attached by lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). ISKNV mediates the formation of a virus-mock basement membrane (VMBM) structure on the surface of infected cells to provide attaching sites for LECs. The viral protein VP08R is an important component of VMBM. In this study, a novel ISKNV-encoded microRNA, temporarily named ISKNV-miR-1, was identified. ISKNV-miR-1 is complementary to the VP08R-coding sequence and can modulate VP08R expression through reducing its mRNA level. This suggests that formation of VMBM may be under fine regulation by ISKNV.

  19. Membrane-associated proteomics of chickpea identifies Sad1/UNC-84 protein (CaSUN1), a novel component of dehydration signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Mishra, Poonam; Subba, Pratigya; Rathi, Divya; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2014-02-01

    Dehydration affects almost all the physiological processes including those that result in the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which in turn elicits a highly conserved signaling, the unfolded protein response (UPR). We investigated the dehydration-responsive membrane-associated proteome of a legume, chickpea, by 2-DE coupled with mass spectrometry. A total of 184 protein spots were significantly altered over a dehydration treatment of 120 h. Among the differentially expressed proteins, a non-canonical SUN domain protein, designated CaSUN1 (Cicer arietinum Sad1/UNC-84), was identified. CaSUN1 localized to the nuclear membrane and ER, besides small vacuolar vesicles. The transcripts were downregulated by both abiotic and biotic stresses, but not by abscisic acid treatment. Overexpression of CaSUN1 conferred stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis. Furthermore, functional complementation of the yeast mutant, slp1, could rescue its growth defects. We propose that the function of CaSUN1 in stress response might be regulated via UPR signaling.

  20. Comparative proteomics reveals novel components at the plasma membrane of differentiated HepaRG cells and different distribution in hepatocyte- and biliary-like cells.

    PubMed

    Petrareanu, Catalina; Macovei, Alina; Sokolowska, Izabela; Woods, Alisa G; Lazar, Catalin; Radu, Gabriel L; Darie, Costel C; Branza-Nichita, Norica

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a human pathogen causing severe liver disease and eventually death. Despite important progress in deciphering HBV internalization, the early virus-cell interactions leading to infection are not known. HepaRG is a human bipotent liver cell line bearing the unique ability to differentiate towards a mixture of hepatocyte- and biliary-like cells. In addition to expressing metabolic functions normally found in liver, differentiated HepaRG cells support HBV infection in vitro, thus resembling cultured primary hepatocytes more than other hepatoma cells. Therefore, extensive characterization of the plasma membrane proteome from HepaRG cells would allow the identification of new cellular factors potentially involved in infection. Here we analyzed the plasma membranes of non-differentiated and differentiated HepaRG cells using nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify the differences between the proteomes and the changes that lead to differentiation of these cells. We followed up on differentially-regulated proteins in hepatocytes- and biliary-like cells, focusing on Cathepsins D and K, Cyclophilin A, Annexin 1/A1, PDI and PDI A4/ERp72. Major differences between the two proteomes were found, including differentially regulated proteins, protein-protein interactions and intracellular localizations following differentiation. The results advance our current understanding of HepaRG differentiation and the unique properties of these cells.

  1. Membrane-associated proteomics of chickpea identifies Sad1/UNC-84 protein (CaSUN1), a novel component of dehydration signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Mishra, Poonam; Subba, Pratigya; Rathi, Divya; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2014-01-01

    Dehydration affects almost all the physiological processes including those that result in the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which in turn elicits a highly conserved signaling, the unfolded protein response (UPR). We investigated the dehydration-responsive membrane-associated proteome of a legume, chickpea, by 2-DE coupled with mass spectrometry. A total of 184 protein spots were significantly altered over a dehydration treatment of 120 h. Among the differentially expressed proteins, a non-canonical SUN domain protein, designated CaSUN1 (Cicer arietinum Sad1/UNC-84), was identified. CaSUN1 localized to the nuclear membrane and ER, besides small vacuolar vesicles. The transcripts were downregulated by both abiotic and biotic stresses, but not by abscisic acid treatment. Overexpression of CaSUN1 conferred stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis. Furthermore, functional complementation of the yeast mutant, slp1, could rescue its growth defects. We propose that the function of CaSUN1 in stress response might be regulated via UPR signaling. PMID:24577507

  2. Using local biodiversity to prevent pollution transfers to environmental components of a Mediterranean semi-arid ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckenroth, Alma; Rabier, Jacques; Laffont-Schwob, Isabelle

    2014-05-01

    In arid and semi-arid Mediterranean coastal areas, metals and metalloids (MM) pollution coming from unreclaimed brownfields has increased the negative environmental stresses leading to ecosystems degradations as soil erosion and losses of organic matter and biodiversity. On these sites, maintaining or restoring a local vegetation cover is considered as a key step to stop the degradation cycle. Furthermore, in a context of high pollution occurring in natural areas, phytoremediation is considered as an attractive alternative to conventional soil remediation techniques, the first reducing pollution transfers, improving the soil quality. In protected or natural areas, it is also important to perceive then design phytoremediation as a way to assist ecosystems recovery, using the restoration ecology concepts. However, only few works in the literature deal with the potential use of native Mediterranean plant species for phytoremediation. On the South-East coast of Marseille (France), the activity of the former smelting factory of l'Escalette, ceased since 1925. However, its brownfield is still a source of pollution by trace metals and metalloids for abiotic and biotic components of the surrounding massif. This massif hosts a rich biodiversity with rare and protected plant species despite the metallic pollution and this area has been included in the recently created first peri-urban French National Park of Calanques. In this context, an integrated research project is being conducted with local actors and stakeholders, from the selection of native plant species, assessment and optimization of phytostabilization capacities of selected species, to the development of ecological engineering techniques well adapted to local constraints and phytostabilization field trials. The first part of this study has been conducted on two areas, corresponding to different pollution pattern, plant communities and environmental drivers: a halophytic area, characterized by typical coastal

  3. Immunocytochemical localization and biochemical characterization of a novel plasma membrane-associated, neutral pH optimum alpha-L-fucosidase from rat testis and epididymal spermatozoa.

    PubMed Central

    Avilés, M; Abascal, I; Martínez-Menárguez, J A; Castells, M T; Skalaban, S R; Ballesta, J; Alhadeff, J A

    1996-01-01

    1. Immunocytochemical and biochemical techniques have been used to localize and characterize a novel plasma membrane-associated, neutral-pH-optimum alpha-L-fucosidase from rat spermatozoa. Light and electron microscopy specifically localized the fucosidase on the plasma membrane of the convex region of the principal segment of testicular and cauda epididymal sperm heads. Immunoreactivity for alpha-L-fucosidase was also detected in the Golgi apparatus of spermatocytes and spermatids but no immunoreactivity was observed in the acrosome. 2. Fractionation of epididymal sperm homogenates indicated that over 90% of the alpha-L-fucosidase activity was associated with the 48,000 g pellet. This pellet-associated activity could be solubilized with 0.5 M NaCl but not with 0.5% Triton X-100, suggesting that fucosidase is peripherally associated with membranes. Sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation of sperm homogenates indicated that fucosidase was enriched in the plasma membrane-enriched fraction. Analysis of alpha-L-fucosidase on intact epididymal sperm indicated that the enzyme was active, displayed linear kinetics and had a pH-activity curve (with an optimum near 7) which was comparable to that of fucosidase from epididymal sperm extracts. These results further suggest that fucosidase is associated with plasma membranes, and that its active site is accessible to fucoconjugates. Evidence that most of the fucosidase is associated with the exterior of the plasma membrane came from studies in which intact sperm had fucosidase activity comparable to that of sperm sonicates, and from studies in which approx. 90% of the fucosidase activity on intact sperm could be released from the sperm by gentle shaking with 0.5 M NaCl. Isoelectric focusing indicated that the NaCl-solubilized epididymal sperm fucosidase appears to have one major and one minor isoform with pIs near 7.2 and 5.2, respectively. SDS/PAGE and Western blotting indicated that the NaCl-solubilized extract of epididymal

  4. Myosin 1G is an abundant class I myosin in lymphocytes whose localization at the plasma membrane depends on its ancient divergent pleckstrin homology (PH) domain (Myo1PH).

    PubMed

    Patino-Lopez, Genaro; Aravind, L; Dong, Xiaoyun; Kruhlak, Michael J; Ostap, E Michael; Shaw, Stephen

    2010-03-19

    Class I myosins, which link F-actin to membrane, are largely undefined in lymphocytes. Mass spectrometric analysis of lymphocytes identified two short tail forms: (Myo1G and Myo1C) and one long tail (Myo1F). We investigated Myo1G, the most abundant in T-lymphocytes, and compared key findings with Myo1C and Myo1F. Myo1G localizes to the plasma membrane and associates in an ATP-releasable manner to the actin-containing insoluble pellet. The IQ+tail region of Myo1G (Myo1C and Myo1F) is sufficient for membrane localization, but membrane localization is augmented by the motor domain. The minimal region lacks IQ motifs but includes: 1) a PH-like domain; 2) a "Pre-PH" region; and 3) a "Post-PH" region. The Pre-PH predicted alpha helices may contribute electrostatically, because two conserved basic residues on one face are required for optimal membrane localization. Our sequence analysis characterizes the divergent PH domain family, Myo1PH, present also in long tail myosins, in eukaryotic proteins unrelated to myosins, and in a probable ancestral protein in prokaryotes. The Myo1G Myo1PH domain utilizes the classic lipid binding site for membrane association, because mutating either of two basic residues in the "signature motif" destroys membrane localization. Mutation of each basic residue of the Myo1G Myo1PH domain reveals another critical basic residue in the beta3 strand, which is shared only by Myo1D. Myo1G differs from Myo1C in its phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate dependence for membrane association, because membrane localization of phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase releases Myo1C from the membrane but not Myo1G. Thus Myo1PH domains likely play universal roles in myosin I membrane association, but different isoforms have diverged in their binding specificity. PMID:20071333

  5. Modeling of membrane processes for air revitalization and water recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Kevin E.; Foerg, Sandra L.; Dall-Bauman, Liese A.

    1992-01-01

    Gas-separation and reverse-osmosis membrane models are being developed in conjunction with membrane testing at NASA JSC. The completed gas-separation membrane model extracts effective component permeabilities from multicomponent test data, and predicts the effects of flow configuration, operating conditions, and membrane dimensions on module performance. Variable feed- and permeate-side pressures are considered. The model has been applied to test data for hollow-fiber membrane modules with simulated cabin-air feeds. Results are presented for a membrane designed for air drying applications. Extracted permeabilities are used to predict the effect of operating conditions on water enrichment in the permeate. A first-order reverse-osmosis model has been applied to test data for spiral wound membrane modules with a simulated hygiene water feed. The model estimates an effective local component rejection coefficient under pseudosteady-state conditions. Results are used to define requirements for a detailed reverse-osmosis model.

  6. Full-length, glycosylated NSP4 is localized to plasma membrane caveolae by a novel raft isolation technique.

    PubMed

    Storey, Stephen M; Gibbons, Thomas F; Williams, Cecelia V; Parr, Rebecca D; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Ball, Judith M

    2007-06-01

    Rotavirus NSP4, initially characterized as an endoplasmic reticulum intracellular receptor, is a multifunctional viral enterotoxin that induces diarrhea in murine pups. There have been recent reports of the secretion of a cleaved NSP4 fragment (residues 112 to 175) and of the association of NSP4 with LC3-positive autophagosomes, raft membranes, and microtubules. To determine if NSP4 traffics to a specific subset of rafts at the plasma membrane, we isolated caveolae from plasma membrane-enriched material that yielded caveola membranes free of endoplasmic reticulum and nonraft plasma membrane markers. Analyses of the newly isolated caveolae from rotavirus-infected MDCK cells revealed full-length, high-mannose glycosylated NSP4. The lack of Golgi network-specific processing of the caveolar NSP4 glycans supports studies showing that NSP4 bypasses the Golgi apparatus. Confocal imaging showed the colocalization of NSP4 with caveolin-1 early and late in infection, elucidating the temporal and spatial NSP4-caveolin-1 association during infection. These data were extended with fluorescent resonance energy transfer analyses that confirmed the NSP4 and caveolin-1 interaction in that the specific fluorescently tagged antibodies were within 10 nm of each other during infection. Cells transfected with NSP4 showed patterns of staining and colocalization with caveolin-1 similar to those of infected cells. This study presents an endoplasmic reticulum contaminant-free caveola isolation protocol; describes the presence of full-length, endoglycosidase H-sensitive NSP4 in plasma membrane caveolae; provides confirmation of the NSP4-caveolin interaction in the presence and absence of other viral proteins; and provides a final plasma membrane destination for Golgi network-bypassing NSP4 transport. PMID:17376898

  7. Chronic growth hormone treatment in normal rats reduces post-prandial skeletal muscle plasma membrane GLUT1 content, but not glucose transport or GLUT4 expression and localization.

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, R; Cittadini, A; Chow, J C; Hirshman, M F; Smith, R J; Douglas, P S; Horton, E S

    1996-01-01

    Whether skeletal muscle glucose transport system is impaired in the basal, post-prandial state during chronic growth hormone treatment is unknown. The current study was designed to determine whether 4 weeks of human growth hormone (hGH) treatment (3.5 mg/kg per day) would impair glucose transport and/or the number of glucose transporters in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from hindlimb skeletal muscle of Sprague-Dawley rats under basal, post-prandial conditions. hGH treatment was shown to have no effect on glucose influx (Vmax or K(m)) determined under equilibrium exchange conditions in isolated plasma membrane vesicles. Plasma membrane glucose transporter number (Ro) measured by cytochalasin B binding was also unchanged by hGH treatment. Consequently, glucose transporter turnover number (Vmax/Ro), a measure of average glucose transporter intrinsic activity, was similar in hGH-treated and control rats. hGH did not change GLUT4 protein content in whole muscle or in the plasma membrane, and muscle content of GLUT4 mRNA also was unchanged. In contrast, GLUT1 protein content in the plasma membrane fraction was significantly reduced by hGH treatment. This was associated with a modest, although not significant, decrease in muscle content of GLUT1 mRNA. In conclusion, high-dose hGH treatment for 4 weeks did not alter post-prandial skeletal muscle glucose transport activity. Neither the muscle level nor the intracellular localization of GLUT4 was changed by the hormone treatment. On the contrary, the basal post-prandial level of GLUT1 in the plasma membrane was reduced by hGH. The mRNA data suggest that this reduction might result from a decrease in the synthesis of GLUT1. PMID:8645183

  8. Electrochemical detection for dynamic analyses of a redox component in droplets using a local redox cycling-based electrochemical (LRC-EC) chip device.

    PubMed

    Ino, Kosuke; Kanno, Yusuke; Nishijo, Taku; Goto, Takehito; Arai, Toshiharu; Takahashi, Yasufumi; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2012-09-01

    This report describes the electrochemical detection of a redox component in droplets using a local redox cycling-based electrochemical (LRC-EC) chip device consisting of 256 sensors. The time-course analyses showed that the redox compound in the droplet was dynamically changed during droplet evaporation or mass transfer through a water/oil interface.

  9. Localization of the Carnation Italian ringspot virus replication protein p36 to the mitochondrial outer membrane is mediated by an internal targeting signal and the TOM complex

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yeen Ting; McCartney, Andrew W; Gidda, Satinder K; Mullen, Robert T

    2008-01-01

    Background Carnation Italian ringspot virus (CIRV) is a positive-strand RNA virus that causes massive structural alterations of mitochondria in infected host cells, the most conspicuous being the formation of numerous internal vesicles/spherules that are derived from the mitochondrial outer membrane and serve as the sites for viral RNA replication. While the membrane-bound components of the CIRV replication complex, including a 36-kD RNA-binding protein (p36), are known to be essential for these changes in mitochondrial morphology and are relatively well characterized in terms of their roles in nascent viral RNA synthesis, how these proteins are specifically targeted and inserted into mitochondria is poorly defined. Results Here we report on the molecular signal responsible for sorting p36 to the mitochondrial outer membrane. Using a combination of gain-of-function assays with portions of p36 fused to reporter proteins and domain-swapping assays with p36 and another closely-related viral RNA-binding protein, p33, that sorts specifically to the peroxisomal boundary membrane, we show that the mitochondrial targeting information in p36 resides within its two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and intervening hydrophilic loop sequence. Comprehensive mutational analysis of these regions in p36 revealed that the primary targeting determinants are the moderate hydrophobicity of both TMDs and the positively-charged face of an amphipathic helix within the intervening loop sequence. We show also using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) that p36 interacts with certain components of the translocase complex in the mitochondrial outer membrane (TOM), but not with the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). Conclusion Our results provide insight to how viruses, such as CIRV, exploit specific host-cell protein sorting pathways to facilitate their replication. The characterization of the targeting and insertion of p36 into the mitochondrial outer membrane also sheds light on

  10. Esterification as a diagnostic tool to predict proton conductivity affected by impurities on Nafion components for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongsirikarn, Kitiya; Mo, Xunhua; Goodwin, James G.

    Quantitative data of the effect of contaminants on individual components of a PEMFC is limited and difficult to acquire, especially for the ionomer in the catalyst layer. In this paper, we propose the use of an acid-catalysed reaction (esterification) as a method to quantitatively investigate the effect of contaminants on proton availability and conductivity of Nafion components, since proton sites in Nafion are also active as Brønsted acid sites for catalysis. It was found that at typical fuel cell conditions, ammonia adsorption decreased both conductivity and esterification activity of Nafion in a uniform manner. Because of the linear relationship between the number of proton/acid sites and both the conductivity and the esterification activity, a correlation between the two could be developed taking into account differences in the effect of humidity on the conductivity/activity of the poisoned Nafion. The methodology and correlation developed were also shown to predict accurately the effect of another impurity species (Na +) on Nafion conductivity. The results demonstrate the application of esterification as a means to quantify the number of proton sites poisoned by adsorbing impurities, permitting the prediction of Nafion conductivity. This method would be applicable to both the membrane and ionomer in the catalyst layer.

  11. Localization of cytochromes in the outer membrane of Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) and their role in anaerobic biocorrosion.

    PubMed

    Van Ommen Kloeke, F; Bryant, R D; Laishley, E J

    1995-12-01

    A protocol was developed whereby the outer and cytoplasmic membranes of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) were isolated and partially characterized. The isolated outer membrane fractions from cultures grown under high (100 ppm) and low (5 ppm) Fe2+ conditions were compared by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis, and showed that several protein bands were derepressed under the low iron conditions, most notably at 50 kDa, and 77.5 kDa. Outer membrane isolated from low iron cultured cells was found to contain two proteins, 77.5 kDa and 62.5 kDa in size, that reacted with a heme-specific stain and were referred to as high molecular weight cytochromes. Studies conducted on the low iron isolated outer membrane by a phosphate/mild steel hydrogen evolution system showed that addition of the membrane fraction caused an immediate acceleration in H2 production. A new model for the anaerobic biocorrosion of mild steel is proposed.

  12. Rho2 Palmitoylation Is Required for Plasma Membrane Localization and Proper Signaling to the Fission Yeast Cell Integrity Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Franco, Alejandro; Martín-García, Rebeca; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Soto, Teresa; Gacto, Mariano; Pérez, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    The fission yeast small GTPase Rho2 regulates morphogenesis and is an upstream activator of the cell integrity pathway, whose key element, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Pmk1, becomes activated by multiple environmental stimuli and controls several cellular functions. Here we demonstrate that farnesylated Rho2 becomes palmitoylated in vivo at cysteine-196 within its carboxyl end and that this modification allows its specific targeting to the plasma membrane. Unlike that of other palmitoylated and prenylated GTPases, the Rho2 control of morphogenesis and Pmk1 activity is strictly dependent upon plasma membrane localization and is not found in other cellular membranes. Indeed, artificial plasma membrane targeting bypassed the Rho2 need for palmitoylation in order to signal. Detailed functional analysis of Rho2 chimeras fused to the carboxyl end from the essential GTPase Rho1 showed that GTPase palmitoylation is partially dependent on the prenylation context and confirmed that Rho2 signaling is independent of Rho GTP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) function. We further demonstrate that Rho2 is an in vivo substrate for DHHC family acyltransferase Erf2 palmitoyltransferase. Remarkably, Rho3, another Erf2 target, negatively regulates Pmk1 activity in a Rho2-independent fashion, thus revealing the existence of cross talk whereby both GTPases antagonistically modulate the activity of this MAPK cascade. PMID:24820419

  13. Local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface obtained by the perturbative method in the Lennard-Jones system.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, K; Shibahara, M

    2014-07-21

    A classical molecular dynamics simulation was conducted for a system composed of fluid molecules between two planar solid surfaces, and whose interactions are described by the 12-6 Lennard-Jones form. This paper presents a general description of the pressure components and interfacial tension at a fluid-solid interface obtained by the perturbative method on the basis of statistical thermodynamics, proposes a method to consider the pressure components tangential to an interface which are affected by interactions with solid atoms, and applies this method to the calculation system. The description of the perturbative method is extended to subsystems, and the local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface are obtained and examined in one- and two-dimensions. The results are compared with those obtained by two alternative methods: (a) an evaluation of the intermolecular force acting on a plane, and (b) the conventional method based on the virial expression. The accuracy of the numerical results is examined through the comparison of the results obtained by each method. The calculated local pressure components and interfacial tension of the fluid at a liquid-solid interface agreed well with the results of the two alternative methods at each local position in one dimension. In two dimensions, the results showed a characteristic profile of the tangential pressure component which depended on the direction tangential to the liquid-solid interface, which agreed with that obtained by the evaluation of the intermolecular force acting on a plane in the present study. Such good agreement suggests that the perturbative method on the basis of statistical thermodynamics used in this study is valid to obtain the local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface.

  14. Local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface obtained by the perturbative method in the Lennard-Jones system

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, K.; Shibahara, M.

    2014-07-21

    A classical molecular dynamics simulation was conducted for a system composed of fluid molecules between two planar solid surfaces, and whose interactions are described by the 12-6 Lennard-Jones form. This paper presents a general description of the pressure components and interfacial tension at a fluid-solid interface obtained by the perturbative method on the basis of statistical thermodynamics, proposes a method to consider the pressure components tangential to an interface which are affected by interactions with solid atoms, and applies this method to the calculation system. The description of the perturbative method is extended to subsystems, and the local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface are obtained and examined in one- and two-dimensions. The results are compared with those obtained by two alternative methods: (a) an evaluation of the intermolecular force acting on a plane, and (b) the conventional method based on the virial expression. The accuracy of the numerical results is examined through the comparison of the results obtained by each method. The calculated local pressure components and interfacial tension of the fluid at a liquid-solid interface agreed well with the results of the two alternative methods at each local position in one dimension. In two dimensions, the results showed a characteristic profile of the tangential pressure component which depended on the direction tangential to the liquid-solid interface, which agreed with that obtained by the evaluation of the intermolecular force acting on a plane in the present study. Such good agreement suggests that the perturbative method on the basis of statistical thermodynamics used in this study is valid to obtain the local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface.

  15. Pepper pathogenesis-related protein 4c is a plasma membrane-localized cysteine protease inhibitor that is required for plant cell death and defense signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) type III effector AvrBsT triggers programmed cell death (PCD) and activates the hypersensitive response (HR) in plants. Here, we isolated and identified the plasma membrane localized pathogenesis-related (PR) protein 4c gene (CaPR4c) from pepper (Capsicum annuum) leaves undergoing AvrBsT-triggered HR cell death. CaPR4c encodes a protein with a signal peptide and a Barwin domain. Recombinant CaPR4c protein expressed in Escherichia coli exhibited cysteine protease-inhibitor activity and ribonuclease (RNase) activity. Subcellular localization analyses revealed that CaPR4c localized to the plasma membrane in plant cells. CaPR4c expression was rapidly and specifically induced by avirulent Xcv (avrBsT) infection. Transient expression of CaPR4c caused HR cell death in pepper leaves, which was accompanied by enhanced accumulation of H2 O2 and significant induction of some defense-response genes. Deletion of the signal peptide from CaPR4c abolished the induction of HR cell death, indicating a requirement for plasma membrane localization of CaPR4c for HR cell death. CaPR4c silencing in pepper disrupted both basal and AvrBsT-triggered resistance responses, and enabled Xcv proliferation in infected leaves. H2 O2 accumulation, cell-death induction, and defense-response gene expression were distinctly reduced in CaPR4c-silenced pepper. CaPR4c overexpression in transgenic Arabidopsis plants conferred greater resistance against infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. These results collectively suggest that CaPR4c plays an important role in plant cell death and defense signaling.

  16. The regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) domain of G protein–coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5) regulates plasma membrane localization and function

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hua; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Shen, Ke; Fischer, Christopher C.; Wedegaertner, Philip B.

    2014-01-01

    The G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated GPCRs at the plasma membrane (PM). Here GRK5/GRK4 chimeras and point mutations in GRK5 identify a short sequence within the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) domain in GRK5 that is critical for GRK5 PM localization. This region of the RGS domain of GRK5 coincides with a region of GRK6 and GRK1 shown to form a hydrophobic dimeric interface (HDI) in crystal structures. Coimmunoprecipitation (coIP) and acceptor photobleaching fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays show that expressed GRK5 self-associates in cells, whereas GRK5-M165E/F166E (GRK5-EE), containing hydrophilic mutations in the HDI region of the RGS domain, displays greatly decreased coIP interactions. Both forcing dimerization of GRK5-EE, via fusion to leucine zipper motifs, and appending an extra C-terminal membrane-binding region to GRK5-EE (GRK5-EE-CT) recover PM localization. In addition, GRK5-EE displays a decreased ability to inhibit PAR1-induced calcium release compared with GRK5 wild type (wt). In contrast, PM-localized GRK5-EE-CaaX (appending a C-terminal prenylation and polybasic motif from K-ras) or GRK5-EE-CT shows comparable ability to GRK5 wt to inhibit PAR1-induced calcium release. The results suggest a novel model in which GRK5 dimerization is important for its plasma membrane localization and function. PMID:24807909

  17. At the border: the plasma membrane-cell wall continuum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zengyu; Persson, Staffan; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara

    2015-03-01

    Plant cells rely on their cell walls for directed growth and environmental adaptation. Synthesis and remodelling of the cell walls are membrane-related processes. During cell growth and exposure to external stimuli, there is a constant exchange of lipids, proteins, and other cell wall components between the cytosol and the plasma membrane/apoplast. This exchange of material and the localization of cell wall proteins at certain spots in the plasma membrane seem to rely on a particular membrane composition. In addition, sensors at the plasma membrane detect changes in the cell wall architecture, and activate cytoplasmic signalling schemes and ultimately cell wall remodelling. The apoplastic polysaccharide matrix is, on the other hand, crucial for preventing proteins diffusing uncontrollably in the membrane. Therefore, the cell wall-plasma membrane link is essential for plant development and responses to external stimuli. This review focuses on the relationship between the cell wall and plasma membrane, and its importance for plant tissue organization.

  18. A study of the perturbation effects of the local anesthetic procaine on human erythrocyte and model membranes and of modifications of the sodium transport in toad skin.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Schneider, Carlos; Villena, Fernando; Norris, Beryl; Cárdenas, Hernán; Cuevas, Francisco; Sotomayor, Carlos P

    2005-08-01

    The interaction of the local anesthetic procaine with human erythrocytes, isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), isolated toad skins, and molecular models is described. The latter consisted of phospholipid multilayers built-up of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representatives of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. Optical and scanning electron microscopy of human erythrocytes revealed that procaine induced the formation of stomatocytes. Experiments performed on IUM at 37 degrees C by fluorescence spectroscopy showed that procaine interacted with the phospholipid bilayer polar groups but not with the hydrophobic acyl chains. X-ray diffraction indicated that procaine perturbed DMPC structure to a higher extent when compared with DMPE, its polar head region being more affected. Electrophysiological measurements disclosed a significant decrease in the potential difference (PD) and in the short-circuit current (Isc) after the application of procaine to isolated toad skin, reflecting inhibition of active ion transport. PMID:15894419

  19. A domain-specific marker for the hepatocyte plasma membrane: localization of leucine aminopeptidase to the bile canalicular domain

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence was used to establish a domain-specific marker for hepatocyte plasma membranes. In frozen sections of fixed rat liver (0.5-4 microns), antibodies directed against rat intestinal leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) recognized an antigen that was restricted to the bile canalicular plasma membrane. Fluorescence was not observed on the sinusoidal or lateral membranes, and intracellular staining was not detected. The liver antigen was identified as LAP, based on its chemical similarity to intestinal LAP. First, immunoprecipitation experiments using trypsin-solubilized intestinal LAP (G-200 fraction, 91% pure) established a correlation between the loss of LAP enzyme activity from the soluble fraction and the appearance in the specific immunoprecipitates of polypeptides migrating on SDS PAGE between 110,000 and 130,000 daltons. The antigen precipitated from a detergent extract of liver plasma membranes had the same electrophoretic mobility. Second, the chymotryptic map of the major band in the liver immunoprecipitate was similar to that of purified intestinal LAP. PMID:6304108

  20. Cell Cycle-dependent Changes in Localization and Phosphorylation of the Plasma Membrane Kv2.1 K+ Channel Impact Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Contact Sites in COS-1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Melanie M; Austin, Daniel C; Sack, Jon T; Trimmer, James S

    2015-12-01

    The plasma membrane (PM) comprises distinct subcellular domains with diverse functions that need to be dynamically coordinated with intracellular events, one of the most impactful being mitosis. The Kv2.1 voltage-gated potassium channel is conditionally localized to large PM clusters that represent specialized PM:endoplasmic reticulum membrane contact sites (PM:ER MCS), and overexpression of Kv2.1 induces more exuberant PM:ER MCS in neurons and in certain heterologous cell types. Localization of Kv2.1 at these contact sites is dynamically regulated by changes in phosphorylation at one or more sites located on its large cytoplasmic C terminus. Here, we show that Kv2.1 expressed in COS-1 cells undergoes dramatic cell cycle-dependent changes in its PM localization, having diffuse localization in interphase cells, and robust clustering during M phase. The mitosis-specific clusters of Kv2.1 are localized to PM:ER MCS, and M phase clustering of Kv2.1 induces more extensive PM:ER MCS. These cell cycle-dependent changes in Kv2.1 localization and the induction of PM:ER MCS are accompanied by increased mitotic Kv2.1 phosphorylation at several C-terminal phosphorylation sites. Phosphorylation of exogenously expressed Kv2.1 is significantly increased upon metaphase arrest in COS-1 and CHO cells, and in a pancreatic β cell line that express endogenous Kv2.1. The M phase clustering of Kv2.1 at PM:ER MCS in COS-1 cells requires the same C-terminal targeting motif needed for conditional Kv2.1 clustering in neurons. The cell cycle-dependent changes in localization and phosphorylation of Kv2.1 were not accompanied by changes in the electrophysiological properties of Kv2.1 expressed in CHO cells. Together, these results provide novel insights into the cell cycle-dependent changes in PM protein localization and phosphorylation.

  1. A milling crowd model for local and long-range obstructed lateral diffusion. Mobility of excimeric probes in the membrane of intact erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Eisinger, J; Flores, J; Petersen, W P

    1986-01-01

    A new model for lateral diffusion, the milling crowd model (MC), is proposed and is used to derive the dependence of the monomeric and excimeric fluorescence yields of excimeric membrane probes on their concentration. According to the MC model, probes migrate by performing spatial exchanges with a randomly chosen nearest neighbor (lipid or probe). Only nearest neighbor probes, one of which is in the excited state, may form an excimer. The exchange frequency, and hence the local lateral diffusion coefficient, may then be determined from experiment with the aid of computer simulation of the excimer formation kinetics. The same model is also used to study the long-range lateral diffusion coefficient of probes in the presence of obstacles (e.g., membrane proteins). The dependence of the monomeric and excimeric fluorescence yields of 1-pyrene-dodecanoic acid probes on their concentration in the membranes of intact erythrocytes was measured and compared with the prediction of the MC model. The analysis yields an excimer formation rate for nearest neighbor molecules of approximately 1 X 10(7) s-1 and an exchange frequency of approximately greater than 2 X 10(7) s-1, corresponding to a local diffusion coefficient of greater than 3 X 10(-8) cm2 s-1. This value is several times larger than the long-range diffusion coefficient for a similar system measured in fluorescence photobleaching recovery experiments. The difference is explained by the fact that long-range diffusion is obstructed by dispersed membrane proteins and is therefore greatly reduced when compared to free diffusion. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the fractional area covered by obstacles and on their size is derived from MC simulations and is compared to those of other theories lateral diffusibility. PMID:3778578

  2. Localization of the outer membrane protein OmpA2 in Caulobacter crescentus depends on the position of the gene in the chromosome.

    PubMed

    Ginez, Luis David; Osorio, Aurora; Poggio, Sebastian

    2014-08-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is an essential structure involved in nutrient uptake, protection against harmful substances, and cell growth. Different proteins keep the outer membrane from blebbing out by simultaneously interacting with it and with the cell wall. These proteins have been mainly studied in enterobacteria, where OmpA and the Braun and Pal lipoproteins stabilize the outer membrane. Some degree of functional redundancy exists between these proteins, since none of them is essential but the absence of two of them results in a severe phenotype. Caulobacter crescentus has a different strategy to maintain its outer membrane, since it lacks the Braun lipoprotein and Pal is essential. In this work, we characterized OmpA2, an OmpA-like protein, in this bacterium. Our results showed that this protein is required for normal stalk growth and that it plays a minor role in the stability of the outer membrane. An OmpA2 fluorescent fusion protein showed that the concentration of this protein decreases from the stalk to the new pole. This localization pattern is important for its function, and it depends on the position of the gene locus in the chromosome and, as a consequence, in the cell. This result suggests that little diffusion occurs from the moment that the gene is transcribed until the mature protein attaches to the cell wall in the periplasm. This mechanism reveals the integration of different levels of information from protein function down to genome arrangement that allows the cell to self-organize.

  3. The linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA increases membrane surface localization of the α7 ACh receptor in a protein 4.1N-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takeshi; Tsuchiya, Ayako; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2013-03-01

    In yeast two-hybrid screening, protein 4.1N, a scaffolding protein, was identified as a binding partner of the α7 ACh (acetylcholine) receptor. For rat hippocampal slices, the linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA {8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid} increased the association of the α7 ACh receptor with 4.1N, and the effect was inhibited by GF109203X, an inhibitor of PKC (protein kinase C), although DCP-LA did not induce PKC phosphorylation of 4.1N. For PC-12 cells, the presence of the α7 ACh receptor in the plasma membrane fraction was significantly suppressed by knocking down 4.1N. DCP-LA increased the presence of the α7 ACh receptor in the plasma membrane fraction, and the effect was still inhibited by knocking down 4.1N. In the monitoring of α7 ACh receptor mobilization, DCP-LA enhanced signal intensities for the α7 ACh receptor at the membrane surface in PC-12 cells, which was clearly prevented by knocking down 4.1N. Taken together, the results of the present study show that 4.1N interacts with the α7 ACh receptor and participates in the receptor tethering to the plasma membrane. The results also indicate that DCP-LA increases membrane surface localization of the α7 ACh receptor in a 4.1N-dependent manner under the control of PKC, but without phosphorylating 4.1N.

  4. Efficacy of identifying neural components in the face and emotion processing system in schizophrenia using a dynamic functional localizer.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Aiden E G F; Iaria, Giuseppe; Goghari, Vina M

    2016-02-28

    Schizophrenia is associated with deficits in face perception and emotion recognition. Despite consistent behavioural results, the neural mechanisms underlying these cognitive abilities have been difficult to isolate, in part due to differences in neuroimaging methods used between studies for identifying regions in the face processing system. Given this problem, we aimed to validate a recently developed fMRI-based dynamic functional localizer task for use in studies of psychiatric populations and specifically schizophrenia. Previously, this functional localizer successfully identified each of the core face processing regions (i.e. fusiform face area, occipital face area, superior temporal sulcus), and regions within an extended system (e.g. amygdala) in healthy individuals. In this study, we tested the functional localizer success rate in 27 schizophrenia patients and in 24 community controls. Overall, the core face processing regions were localized equally between both the schizophrenia and control group. Additionally, the amygdala, a candidate brain region from the extended system, was identified in nearly half the participants from both groups. These results indicate the effectiveness of a dynamic functional localizer at identifying regions of interest associated with face perception and emotion recognition in schizophrenia. The use of dynamic functional localizers may help standardize the investigation of the facial and emotion processing system in this and other clinical populations. PMID:26792586

  5. Efficacy of identifying neural components in the face and emotion processing system in schizophrenia using a dynamic functional localizer.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Aiden E G F; Iaria, Giuseppe; Goghari, Vina M

    2016-02-28

    Schizophrenia is associated with deficits in face perception and emotion recognition. Despite consistent behavioural results, the neural mechanisms underlying these cognitive abilities have been difficult to isolate, in part due to differences in neuroimaging methods used between studies for identifying regions in the face processing system. Given this problem, we aimed to validate a recently developed fMRI-based dynamic functional localizer task for use in studies of psychiatric populations and specifically schizophrenia. Previously, this functional localizer successfully identified each of the core face processing regions (i.e. fusiform face area, occipital face area, superior temporal sulcus), and regions within an extended system (e.g. amygdala) in healthy individuals. In this study, we tested the functional localizer success rate in 27 schizophrenia patients and in 24 community controls. Overall, the core face processing regions were localized equally between both the schizophrenia and control group. Additionally, the amygdala, a candidate brain region from the extended system, was identified in nearly half the participants from both groups. These results indicate the effectiveness of a dynamic functional localizer at identifying regions of interest associated with face perception and emotion recognition in schizophrenia. The use of dynamic functional localizers may help standardize the investigation of the facial and emotion processing system in this and other clinical populations.

  6. The effect of MEP pathway and other inhibitors on the intracellular localization of a plasma membrane-targeted, isoprenylable GFP reporter protein in tobacco BY-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    We have established an in vivo visualization system for the geranylgeranylation of proteins in a stably transformed tobacco BY-2 cell line, based on the expression of a dexamethasone-inducible GFP fused to the carboxy-terminal basic domain of the rice calmodulin CaM61, which naturally bears a CaaL geranylgeranylation motif (GFP-BD-CVIL). By using pathway-specific inhibitors it was demonstrated that inhibition of the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway with known inhibitors like oxoclomazone and fosmidomycin, as well as inhibition of the protein geranylgeranyltransferase type 1 (PGGT-1), shifted the localization of the GFP-BD-CVIL protein from the membrane to the nucleus. In contrast, the inhibition of the mevalonate (MVA) pathway with mevinolin did not affect the localization. During the present work, this test system has been used to examine the effect of newly designed inhibitors of the MEP pathway and inhibitors of sterol biosynthesis such as squalestatin, terbinafine and Ro48-8071. In addition, we also studied the impact of different post-prenylation inhibitors or those suspected to affect the transport of proteins to the plasma membrane on the localization of the geranylgeranylable fusion protein GFP-BD-CVIL. PMID:24555083

  7. Ltc1 is an ER-localized sterol transporter and a component of ER–mitochondria and ER–vacuole contacts

    PubMed Central

    Murley, Andrew; Sarsam, Reta D.; Toulmay, Alexandre; Yamada, Justin; Prinz, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Organelle contact sites perform fundamental functions in cells, including lipid and ion homeostasis, membrane dynamics, and signaling. Using a forward proteomics approach in yeast, we identified new ER–mitochondria and ER–vacuole contacts specified by an uncharacterized protein, Ylr072w. Ylr072w is a conserved protein with GRAM and VASt domains that selectively transports sterols and is thus termed Ltc1, for Lipid transfer at contact site 1. Ltc1 localized to ER–mitochondria and ER–vacuole contacts via the mitochondrial import receptors Tom70/71 and the vacuolar protein Vac8, respectively. At mitochondria, Ltc1 was required for cell viability in the absence of Mdm34, a subunit of the ER–mitochondria encounter structure. At vacuoles, Ltc1 was required for sterol-enriched membrane domain formation in response to stress. Increasing the proportion of Ltc1 at vacuoles was sufficient to induce sterol-enriched vacuolar domains without stress. Thus, our data support a model in which Ltc1 is a sterol-dependent regulator of organelle and cellular homeostasis via its dual localization to ER–mitochondria and ER–vacuole contact sites. PMID:25987606

  8. Ltc1 is an ER-localized sterol transporter and a component of ER-mitochondria and ER-vacuole contacts.

    PubMed

    Murley, Andrew; Sarsam, Reta D; Toulmay, Alexandre; Yamada, Justin; Prinz, William A; Nunnari, Jodi

    2015-05-25

    Organelle contact sites perform fundamental functions in cells, including lipid and ion homeostasis, membrane dynamics, and signaling. Using a forward proteomics approach in yeast, we identified new ER-mitochondria and ER-vacuole contacts specified by an uncharacterized protein, Ylr072w. Ylr072w is a conserved protein with GRAM and VASt domains that selectively transports sterols and is thus termed Ltc1, for Lipid transfer at contact site 1. Ltc1 localized to ER-mitochondria and ER-vacuole contacts via the mitochondrial import receptors Tom70/71 and the vacuolar protein Vac8, respectively. At mitochondria, Ltc1 was required for cell viability in the absence of Mdm34, a subunit of the ER-mitochondria encounter structure. At vacuoles, Ltc1 was required for sterol-enriched membrane domain formation in response to stress. Increasing the proportion of Ltc1 at vacuoles was sufficient to induce sterol-enriched vacuolar domains without stress. Thus, our data support a model in which Ltc1 is a sterol-dependent regulator of organelle and cellular homeostasis via its dual localization to ER-mitochondria and ER-vacuole contact sites.

  9. Local stress, not systemic factors, regulate gene expression of the cardiac renin-angiotensin system in vivo: a comprehensive study of all its components in the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Y A; Liang, C S; Lee, M A; Lindpaintner, K

    1996-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is associated with altered expression of the components of the cardiac renin-angiotensin system (RAS). While in vitro data suggest that local mechanical stimuli serve as important regulatory modulators of cardiac RAS activity, no in vivo studies have so far corroborated these observations. The aims of this study were to (i) examine the respective influence of local, mechanical versus systemic, soluble factors on the modulation of cardiac RAS gene expression in vivo; (ii) measure gene expression of all known components of the RAS simultaneously; and (iii) establish sequence information and an assay system for the RAS of the dog, one of the most important model organisms in cardiovascular research. We therefore examined a canine model of right ventricular hypertrophy and failure (RVHF) in which the right ventricle (RV) is hemodynamically loaded, the left ventricle (LV) is hemodynamically unloaded, while both are exposed to the same circulating milieu of soluble factors. Using specific competitive PCR assays, we found that RVHF was associated with significant increases in RV mRNA levels of angiotensin converting enzyme and angiotensin II type 2 receptor, and with significant decreases of RV expression of chymase and the angiotensin II type 1 receptor, while RV angiotensinogen and renin remained unchanged. All components remained unchanged in the LV. We conclude that (i) dissociated regional regulation of RAS components in RV and LV indicates modulation by local, mechanical, not soluble, systemic stimuli; (ii) components of the cardiac RAS are independently and differentially regulated; and (iii) opposite changes in the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme and chymase, and of angiotensin II type I and angiotensin II type 2 receptors, may indicate different physiological roles of these RAS components in RVHF. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8855304

  10. Tunicamycin depresses P-glycoprotein glycosylation without an effect on its membrane localization and drug efflux activity in L1210 cells.

    PubMed

    Sereš, Mário; Cholujová, Dana; Bubenčíkova, Tatiana; Breier, Albert; Sulová, Zdenka

    2011-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), also known as ABCB1, is a member of the ABC transporter family of proteins. P-gp is an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump that is localized to the plasma membrane of mammalian cells and confers multidrug resistance in neoplastic cells. P-gp is a 140-kDa polypeptide that is glycosylated to a final molecular weight of 170 kDa. Our experimental model used two variants of L1210 cells in which overexpression of P-gp was achieved: either by adaptation of parental cells (S) to vincristine (R) or by transfection with the human gene encoding P-gp (T). R and T cells were found to differ from S cells in transglycosylation reactions in our recent studies. The effects of tunicamycin on glycosylation, drug efflux activity and cellular localization of P-gp in R and T cells were examined in the present study. Treatment with tunicamycin caused less concentration-dependent cellular damage to R and T cells compared with S cells. Tunicamycin inhibited P-gp N-glycosylation in both of the P-gp-positive cells. However, tunicamycin treatment did not alter either the P-gp cellular localization to the plasma membrane or the P-gp transport activity. The present paper brings evidence that independently on the mode of P-gp expression (selection with drugs or transfection with a gene encoding P-gp) in L1210 cells, tunicamycin induces inhibition of N-glycosylation of this protein, without altering its function as plasma membrane drug efflux pump.

  11. The group IV-A cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, CNGC19 and CNGC20, localize to the vacuole membrane in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Christen C. Y.; Christopher, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGCs) are implicated in the uptake of both essential and toxic cations, Ca2+ signalling, and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. The 20 CNGC paralogues of Arabidopsis are divided into five evolutionary groups. Group IV-A is highly isolated and consists only of two closely spaced genes, CNGC19 and CNGC20. Prior studies have shown that both genes are induced by salinity and biotic stress. A unique feature of CNGC19 and CNGC20 is their long hydrophilic N-termini. To determine the subcellular locations of CNGC19 and CNGC20, partial and full-length fusions to GFP(S65T) were generated. Translational fusions of the N-termini of CNGC19 (residues 1–171) and CNGC20 (residues 1–200) to GFP(S65T) were targeted to punctate structures when transiently expressed in leaf protoplasts. In the case of CNGC20, but not CNGC19, the punctate structures were co-labelled with a marker for the Golgi. The full-length CNGC19-GFP fusion co-localized with markers for the vacuole membrane (αTIP- and γTIP-mCherry). Vacuole membrane labelling by the full-length CNGC20-GFP fusion was also observed, but the signal was weak and accompanied by numerous punctate signals that did not co-localize with αTIP- or γTIP-mCherry. These punctate structures diminished, and localization of full-length CNGC20-GFP to the vacuole increased, when it was co-expressed with the full-length CNGC19-mCherry. Vacuole membrane labelling was also detected in planta via immunoelectron microscopy using a CNGC20-antiserum on cryopreserved ultrathin sections of roots. We hypothesize that the role of group IV-A CNGCs is to mediate the movement of cations between the central vacuole and the cytosol in response to certain types of abiotic and biotic stress.

  12. Tunicamycin Depresses P-Glycoprotein Glycosylation Without an Effect on Its Membrane Localization and Drug Efflux Activity in L1210 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Šereš, Mário; Cholujová, Dana; Bubenčíkova, Tatiana; Breier, Albert; Sulová, Zdenka

    2011-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), also known as ABCB1, is a member of the ABC transporter family of proteins. P-gp is an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump that is localized to the plasma membrane of mammalian cells and confers multidrug resistance in neoplastic cells. P-gp is a 140-kDa polypeptide that is glycosylated to a final molecular weight of 170 kDa. Our experimental model used two variants of L1210 cells in which overexpression of P-gp was achieved: either by adaptation of parental cells (S) to vincristine (R) or by transfection with the human gene encoding P-gp (T). R and T cells were found to differ from S cells in transglycosylation reactions in our recent studies. The effects of tunicamycin on glycosylation, drug efflux activity and cellular localization of P-gp in R and T cells were examined in the present study. Treatment with tunicamycin caused less concentration-dependent cellular damage to R and T cells compared with S cells. Tunicamycin inhibited P-gp N-glycosylation in both of the P-gp-positive cells. However, tunicamycin treatment did not alter either the P-gp cellular localization to the plasma membrane or the P-gp transport activity. The present paper brings evidence that independently on the mode of P-gp expression (selection with drugs or transfection with a gene encoding P-gp) in L1210 cells, tunicamycin induces inhibition of N-glycosylation of this protein, without altering its function as plasma membrane drug efflux pump. PMID:22174631

  13. Membrane Partitioning of Anionic, Ligand-Coated Nanoparticles Is Accompanied by Ligand Snorkeling, Local Disordering, and Cholesterol Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Gkeka, Paraskevi; Angelikopoulos, Panagiotis; Sarkisov, Lev; Cournia, Zoe

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular uptake of nanoparticles (NPs) may induce phase transitions, restructuring, stretching, or even complete disruption of the cell membrane. Therefore, NP cytotoxicity assessment requires a thorough understanding of the mechanisms by which these engineered nanostructures interact with the cell membrane. In this study, extensive Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the partitioning of an anionic, ligand-decorated NP in model membranes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) phospholipids and different concentrations of cholesterol. Spontaneous fusion and translocation of the anionic NP is not observed in any of the 10-µs unbiased MD simulations, indicating that longer timescales may be required for such phenomena to occur. This picture is supported by the free energy analysis, revealing a considerable free energy barrier for NP translocation across the lipid bilayer. 5-µs unbiased MD simulations with the NP inserted in the bilayer core reveal that the hydrophobic and hydrophilic ligands of the NP surface rearrange to form optimal contacts with the lipid bilayer, leading to the so-called snorkeling effect. Inside cholesterol-containing bilayers, the NP induces rearrangement of the structure of the lipid bilayer in its vicinity from the liquid-ordered to the liquid phase spanning a distance almost twice its core radius (8–10 nm). Based on the physical insights obtained in this study, we propose a mechanism of cellular anionic NPpartitioning, which requires structural rearrangements of both the NP and the bilayer, and conclude that the translocation of anionic NPs through cholesterol-rich membranes must be accompanied by formation of cholesterol-lean regions in the proximity of NPs. PMID:25474252

  14. Problem-Solving Test: Submitochondrial Localization of Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are surrounded by two membranes (outer and inner mitochondrial membrane) that separate two mitochondrial compartments (intermembrane space and matrix). Hundreds of proteins are distributed among these submitochondrial components. A simple biochemical/immunological procedure is described in this test to determine the localization of…

  15. Intracellular localization of VAMP-1 protein in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nabokina, S M

    2001-02-01

    We studied the intracellular localization of vesicle-associated membrane protein VAMP-1 in human neutrophils. VAMP-1 was associated with membranes of gelatinase and specific secretory granules rapidly mobilized during exocytosis. VAMP-1 probably acts as a component of the SNARE complex during exocytosis of gelatinase and specific granules in human neutrophils.

  16. Lysyl Hydroxylase 3 Localizes to Epidermal Basement Membrane and Is Reduced in Patients with Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Stephen A.; Dayal, Jasbani H. S.; Wright, Sheila; Riddle, Megan; Pourreyron, Celine; McMillan, James R.; Kimble, Roy M.; Prisco, Marco; Gartner, Ulrike; Warbrick, Emma; McLean, W. H. Irwin; Leigh, Irene M.; McGrath, John A.; Salas-Alanis, Julio C.; Tolar, Jakub; South, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by mutations in COL7A1 resulting in reduced or absent type VII collagen, aberrant anchoring fibril formation and subsequent dermal-epidermal fragility. Here, we identify a significant decrease in PLOD3 expression and its encoded protein, the collagen modifying enzyme lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3), in RDEB. We show abundant LH3 localising to the basement membrane in normal skin which is severely depleted in RDEB patient skin. We demonstrate expression is in-part regulated by endogenous type VII collagen and that, in agreement with previous studies, even small reductions in LH3 expression lead to significantly less secreted LH3 protein. Exogenous type VII collagen did not alter LH3 expression in cultured RDEB keratinocytes and we show that RDEB patients receiving bone marrow transplantation who demonstrate significant increase in type VII collagen do not show increased levels of LH3 at the basement membrane. Our data report a direct link between LH3 and endogenous type VII collagen expression concluding that reduction of LH3 at the basement membrane in patients with RDEB will likely have significant implications for disease progression and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26380979

  17. Regulation of the V-ATPase along the Endocytic Pathway Occurs through Reversible Subunit Association and Membrane Localization

    PubMed Central

    Lafourcade, Céline; Sobo, Komla; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Garin, Jérome; van der Goot, F. Gisou

    2008-01-01

    The lumen of endosomal organelles becomes increasingly acidic when going from the cell surface to lysosomes. Luminal pH thereby regulates important processes such as the release of internalized ligands from their receptor or the activation of lysosomal enzymes. The main player in endosomal acidification is the vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase), a multi-subunit transmembrane complex that pumps protons from the cytoplasm to the lumen of organelles, or to the outside of the cell. The active V-ATPase is composed of two multi-subunit domains, the transmembrane V0 and the cytoplasmic V1. Here we found that the ratio of membrane associated V1/Vo varies along the endocytic pathway, the relative abundance of V1 being higher on late endosomes than on early endosomes, providing an explanation for the higher acidity of late endosomes. We also found that all membrane-bound V-ATPase subunits were associated with detergent resistant membranes (DRM) isolated from late endosomes, raising the possibility that association with lipid-raft like domains also plays a role in regulating the activity of the proton pump. In support of this, we found that treatment of cells with U18666A, a drug that leads to the accumulation of cholesterol in late endosomes, affected acidification of late endosome. Altogether our findings indicate that the activity of the vATPase in the endocytic pathway is regulated both by reversible association/dissociation and the interaction with specific lipid environments. PMID:18648502

  18. The mitochondrial protein import component, TRANSLOCASE OF THE INNER MEMBRANE17-1, plays a role in defining the timing of germination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Law, Simon R; Ivanova, Aneta; van Aken, Olivier; Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Uggalla, Vindya; van der Merwe, Margaretha; Duncan, Owen; Narsai, Reena; Whelan, James; Murcha, Monika W

    2014-11-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), small gene families encode multiple isoforms for many of the components of the mitochondrial protein import apparatus. There are three isoforms of the TRANSLOCASE OF THE INNER MEMBRANE17 (Tim17). Transcriptome analysis indicates that AtTim17-1 is only detectable in dry seed. In this study, two independent transfer DNA insertional mutant lines of tim17-1 exhibited a germination-specific phenotype, showing a significant increase in the rate of germination. Microarray analyses revealed that Attim17-1 displayed alterations in the temporal sequence of transcriptomic events during germination, peaking earlier compared with the wild type. Promoter analysis of AtTim17-1 further identified an abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive element, which binds ABA-responsive transcription factors, acting to repress the expression of AtTim17-1. Attim17-1 dry seeds contained significantly increased levels of ABA and gibberellin, 2- and 5-fold, respectively. These results support the model that mitochondrial biogenesis is regulated in a tight temporal sequence of events during germination and that altering mitochondrial biogenesis feeds back to alter the germination rate, as evidenced by the altered levels of the master regulatory hormones that define germination.

  19. Down-regulation of progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) in peripheral nucleated blood cells associated with premature ovarian failure (POF) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) is a member of a progesterone-binding complex implicated in female reproduction. We aimed i) to determine the natural expression of PGRMC1 in peripheral nucleated blood cells throughout the menstrual cycle and ii) to investigate any association between PGRMC1 levels in leukocytes and conditions characterized by reduced fertility. Methods We analyzed PGRMC1 expression in peripheral leukocytes from 15 healthy cycling women over four weeks. Additionally, we determined PGRMC1 levels in samples from patients with premature ovarian failure (POF) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) as well as in healthy postmenopausal women and male controls. The levels of PGRMC1 protein in nucleated peripheral blood cells were quantified by Western blot analysis. Results PGRMC1 levels did not vary significantly throughout the menstrual cycle. We observed a significant down-regulation of PGRMC1 in postmenopausal women and in patients with premature ovarian failure (POF) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) when compared to early follicular phase of healthy women. Conclusion This study suggests that reduced levels of PGRMC1 in peripheral leukocytes are associated with perturbed ovulatory function. PMID:20537145

  20. The modular structure of the inner-membrane ring component PrgK facilitates assembly of the type III secretion system basal body.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Julien R C; Worrall, Liam J; De, Soumya; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Cheung, Adrienne H; Lameignere, Emilie; Okon, Mark; Wasney, Gregory A; Baker, David; McIntosh, Lawrence P; Strynadka, Natalie C J

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a large macromolecular assembly found at the surface of many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. Its role is to inject toxic "effector" proteins into the cells of infected organisms. The molecular details of the assembly of this large, multimembrane-spanning complex remain poorly understood. Here, we report structural, biochemical, and functional analyses of PrgK, an inner-membrane component of the prototypical Salmonella typhimurium T3SS. We have obtained the atomic structures of the two ring building globular domains and show that the C-terminal transmembrane helix is not essential for assembly and secretion. We also demonstrate that structural rearrangement of the two PrgK globular domains, driven by an interconnecting linker region, may promote oligomerization into ring structures. Finally, we used electron microscopy-guided symmetry modeling to propose a structural model for the intimately associated PrgH-PrgK ring interaction within the assembled basal body. PMID:25533490

  1. Sub-Cellular Localization and Complex Formation by Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases in Cyanobacteria: Evidence for Interaction of Membrane-Anchored ValRS with ATP Synthase.

    PubMed

    Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A G; Olmedo-Verd, Elvira; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Luque, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    tRNAs are charged with cognate amino acids by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and subsequently delivered to the ribosome to be used as substrates for gene translation. Whether aminoacyl-tRNAs are channeled to the ribosome by transit within translational complexes that avoid their diffusion in the cytoplasm is a matter of intense investigation in organisms of the three domains of life. In the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the valyl-tRNA synthetase (ValRS) is anchored to thylakoid membranes by means of the CAAD domain. We have investigated whether in this organism ValRS could act as a hub for the nucleation of a translational complex by attracting other aaRSs to the membranes. Out of the 20 aaRSs, only ValRS was found to localize in thylakoid membranes whereas the other enzymes occupied the soluble portion of the cytoplasm. To investigate the basis for this asymmetric distribution of aaRSs, a global search for proteins interacting with the 20 aaRSs was conducted. The interaction between ValRS and the FoF1 ATP synthase complex here reported is of utmost interest and suggests a functional link between elements of the gene translation and energy production machineries.

  2. Sub-Cellular Localization and Complex Formation by Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases in Cyanobacteria: Evidence for Interaction of Membrane-Anchored ValRS with ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A. G.; Olmedo-Verd, Elvira; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Luque, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    tRNAs are charged with cognate amino acids by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and subsequently delivered to the ribosome to be used as substrates for gene translation. Whether aminoacyl-tRNAs are channeled to the ribosome by transit within translational complexes that avoid their diffusion in the cytoplasm is a matter of intense investigation in organisms of the three domains of life. In the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the valyl-tRNA synthetase (ValRS) is anchored to thylakoid membranes by means of the CAAD domain. We have investigated whether in this organism ValRS could act as a hub for the nucleation of a translational complex by attracting other aaRSs to the membranes. Out of the 20 aaRSs, only ValRS was found to localize in thylakoid membranes whereas the other enzymes occupied the soluble portion of the cytoplasm. To investigate the basis for this asymmetric distribution of aaRSs, a global search for proteins interacting with the 20 aaRSs was conducted. The interaction between ValRS and the FoF1 ATP synthase complex here reported is of utmost interest and suggests a functional link between elements of the gene translation and energy production machineries. PMID:27375579

  3. Patterning and Lifetime of Plasma Membrane-Localized Cellulose Synthase Is Dependent on Actin Organization in Arabidopsis Interphase Cells1[W

    PubMed Central

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Gutierrez, Ryan; McFarlane, Heather E.; Bringmann, Martin; Lindeboom, Jelmer; Emons, Anne-Mie; Samuels, Lacey; Ketelaar, Tijs; Ehrhardt, David W.; Persson, Staffan

    2013-01-01

    The actin and microtubule cytoskeletons regulate cell shape across phyla, from bacteria to metazoans. In organisms with cell walls, the wall acts as a primary constraint of shape, and generation of specific cell shape depends on cytoskeletal organization for wall deposition and/or cell expansion. In higher plants, cortical microtubules help to organize cell wall construction by positioning the delivery of cellulose synthase (CesA) complexes and guiding their trajectories to orient newly synthesized cellulose microfibrils. The actin cytoskeleton is required for normal distribution of CesAs to the plasma membrane, but more specific roles for actin in cell wall assembly and organization remain largely elusive. We show that the actin cytoskeleton functions to regulate the CesA delivery rate to, and lifetime of CesAs at, the plasma membrane, which affects cellulose production. Furthermore, quantitative image analyses revealed that actin organization affects CesA tracking behavior at the plasma membrane and that small CesA compartments were associated with the actin cytoskeleton. By contrast, localized insertion of CesAs adjacent to cortical microtubules was not affected by the actin organization. Hence, both actin and microtubule cytoskeletons play important roles in regulating CesA trafficking, cellulose deposition, and organization of cell wall biogenesis. PMID:23606596

  4. Sub-Cellular Localization and Complex Formation by Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases in Cyanobacteria: Evidence for Interaction of Membrane-Anchored ValRS with ATP Synthase.

    PubMed

    Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A G; Olmedo-Verd, Elvira; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Luque, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    tRNAs are charged with cognate amino acids by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and subsequently delivered to the ribosome to be used as substrates for gene translation. Whether aminoacyl-tRNAs are channeled to the ribosome by transit within translational complexes that avoid their diffusion in the cytoplasm is a matter of intense investigation in organisms of the three domains of life. In the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the valyl-tRNA synthetase (ValRS) is anchored to thylakoid membranes by means of the CAAD domain. We have investigated whether in this organism ValRS could act as a hub for the nucleation of a translational complex by attracting other aaRSs to the membranes. Out of the 20 aaRSs, only ValRS was found to localize in thylakoid membranes whereas the other enzymes occupied the soluble portion of the cytoplasm. To investigate the basis for this asymmetric distribution of aaRSs, a global search for proteins interacting with the 20 aaRSs was conducted. The interaction between ValRS and the FoF1 ATP synthase complex here reported is of utmost interest and suggests a functional link between elements of the gene translation and energy production machineries. PMID:27375579

  5. Interaction Network and Localization of Brucella abortus Membrane Proteins Involved in the Synthesis, Transport, and Succinylation of Cyclic β-1,2-Glucans

    PubMed Central

    Guidolin, Leticia S.; Morrone Seijo, Susana M.; Guaimas, Francisco F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic β-1,2-glucans (CβG) are periplasmic homopolysaccharides that play an important role in the virulence and interaction of Brucella with the host. Once synthesized in the cytoplasm by the CβG synthase (Cgs), CβG are transported to the periplasm by the CβG transporter (Cgt) and succinylated by the CβG modifier enzyme (Cgm). Here, we used a bacterial two-hybrid system and coimmunoprecipitation techniques to study the interaction network between these three integral inner membrane proteins. Our results indicate that Cgs, Cgt, and Cgm can form both homotypic and heterotypic interactions. Analyses carried out with Cgs mutants revealed that the N-terminal region of the protein (Cgs region 1 to 418) is required to sustain the interactions with Cgt and Cgm as well as with itself. We demonstrated by single-cell fluorescence analysis that in Brucella, Cgs and Cgt are focally distributed in the membrane, particularly at the cell poles, whereas Cgm is mostly distributed throughout the membrane with a slight accumulation at the poles colocalizing with the other partners. In summary, our results demonstrate that Cgs, Cgt, and Cgm form a membrane-associated biosynthetic complex. We propose that the formation of a membrane complex could serve as a mechanism to ensure the fidelity of CβG biosynthesis by coordinating their synthesis with the transport and modification. IMPORTANCE In this study, we analyzed the interaction and localization of the proteins involved in the synthesis, transport, and modification of Brucella abortus cyclic β-1,2-glucans (CβG), which play an important role in the virulence and interaction of Brucella with the host. We demonstrate that these proteins interact, forming a complex located mainly at the cell poles; this is the first experimental evidence of the existence of a multienzymatic complex involved in the metabolism of osmoregulated periplasmic glucans in bacteria and argues for another example of pole differentiation in Brucella

  6. Recycling of used perfluorosulfonic acid membranes

    DOEpatents

    Grot, Stephen; Grot, Walther

    2007-08-14

    A method for recovering and recycling catalyst coated fuel cell membranes includes dissolving the used membranes in water and solvent, heating the dissolved membranes under pressure and separating the components. Active membranes are produced from the recycled materials.

  7. The membrane-associated progesterone-binding protein 25-Dx: expression, cellular localization and up-regulation after brain and spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Guennoun, R; Meffre, D; Labombarda, F; Gonzalez, S L; Gonzalez Deniselle, M C; Stein, D G; De Nicola, A F; Schumacher, M

    2008-03-01

    Progesterone has neuroprotective effects in the injured and diseased spinal cord and after traumatic brain injury (TBI). In addition to intracellular progesterone receptors (PR), membrane-binding sites of progesterone may be involved in neuroprotection. A first putative membrane receptor of progesterone, distinct from the classical intracellular PR isoforms, with a single membrane-spanning domain, has been cloned from porcine liver. Homologous proteins were cloned in rats (25-Dx), mice (PGRMC1) and humans (Hpr.6). We will refer to this progesterone-binding protein as 25-Dx. The distribution and regulation of 25-Dx in the nervous system may provide some clues to its functions. In spinal cord, 25-Dx is localized in cell membranes of dorsal horn neurons and ependymal cells lining the central canal. A role of 25-Dx in mediating the protective effects of progesterone in the spinal cord is supported by the observation that its mRNA and protein are up-regulated by progesterone in dorsal horn of the injured spinal cord. In contrast, the classical intracellular PRs were down-regulated under these conditions. In brain, 25-Dx is particularly abundant in the hypothalamic area, circumventricular organs, ependymal cells of the ventricular walls, and the meninges. Interestingly, it is co-expressed with vasopressin in neurons of the paraventricular, supraoptic and retrochiasmatic nuclei. In response to TBI, 25-Dx expression is up-regulated in neurons and induced in astrocytes. The expression of 25-Dx in structures involved in cerebrospinal fluid production and osmoregulation, and its up-regulation after brain damage, point to a potentially important role of this progesterone-binding protein in the maintenance of water homeostasis after TBI. Our observations suggest that progesterone's actions may involve different signaling mechanisms depending on the pathophysiological context, and that 25-Dx may be involved in the neuroprotective effect of progesterone in the injured brain and

  8. The kinase, SH3, and SH2 domains of Lck play critical roles in T-cell activation after ZAP-70 membrane localization.

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, S; Takamatsu, M; Iwashima, M

    1996-01-01

    Antigenic stimulation of the T-cell antigen receptor initiates signal transduction through the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs). When its two tyrosines are phosphorylated, ITAM forms a binding site for ZAP-70, one of the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinases essential for T-cell activation. The signaling process that follows ZAP-70 binding to ITAM has been analyzed by the construction of fusion proteins that localize ZAP-70 to the plasma membrane. We found that membrane-localized forms of ZAP-70 induce late signaling events such as activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells without any stimulation. This activity was observed only when Lck was expressed and functional. In addition, each mutation that affects the function of Lck in the kinase, Src homology 2 (SH2), and SH3 domains greatly impaired the signaling ability of the chimeric protein. Therefore, Lck functions in multiple manners in T-cell activation for the steps following ZAP-70 binding to ITAM. PMID:8943371

  9. Structural determinants of Actinomyces sortase SrtC2 required for membrane localization and assembly of type 2 fimbriae for interbacterial coaggregation and oral biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenggang; Mishra, Arunima; Reardon, Melissa E; Huang, I-Hsiu; Counts, Sarah C; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2012-05-01

    As a pioneer colonizer of the oral cavity, Actinomyces oris expresses proteinaceous pili (also called fimbriae) to mediate the following two key events in biofilm formation: adherence to saliva deposits on enamel and interbacterial associations. Assembly of type 2 fimbriae that directly facilitate coaggregation with oral streptococci and Actinomyces biofilm development requires the class C sortase SrtC2. Although the general sortase-associated mechanisms have been elucidated, several structural attributes unique to the class C sortases require functional investigation. Mutational studies reported here suggest that the N-terminal transmembrane (TM) region of SrtC2, predicted to contain a signal peptide sequence, is cleaved off the mature protein and that this processing is critical for the proper integration of the enzyme at the cytoplasmic membrane, which is mediated by the extended hydrophobic C terminus containing a TM domain and a cytoplasmic tail. Deletion of this putative TM or the entire cytoplasmic domain abolished the enzyme localization and functionality. Alanine substitution of the conserved catalytic Cys-His dyad abrogated the SrtC2 enzymatic activity. In contrast, mutations designed to alter a "lid" domain that covers the catalytic pocket of a class C sortase showed no effect on enzyme activity. Finally, each of the deleterious mutations that affected SrtC2 activity or membrane localization also eliminated Actinomyces species biofilm development and bacterial coaggregation with streptococci. We conclude that the N terminus of SrtC2, which contains the signal sequence, is required for proper protein translocation and maturation, while the extended C-terminal hydrophobic region serves as a stable membrane anchor for proper enzyme functionality.

  10. [Species specificity of morphogenetic factors of Acetabularia, localized in the cytoplasmic zone adjacent to the cell membrane].

    PubMed

    Naumova, G A; Naumova, L P; Puchkova, L I; Savchenko, S M; Sandakhchiev, L S

    1976-01-01

    The species specificity of the factors controlling the cap development was established in the experiments with the transplantation of both the intact and centrifuged in the basal direction apical regions of Acetabularia meditteranea on nuclear basal regions of A. crenulata. These factors are found at the stage of 72 hrs of regeneration primarily in the cytoplasmic zone adjacent to the cell membrane which is not displaced during centrifugation. Using direct measurements and radiochemical method, we have shown that the accumulation of proteins proceeded in this zone due, mainly, to their transition from the cytoplasmic zone displaced during centrifugation.

  11. Local membrane length conservation in two-dimensional vesicle simulation using a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, I.; Lishchuk, S. V.; Spencer, T. J.; Pontrelli, G.; Evans, P. C.

    2016-08-01

    We present a method for applying a class of velocity-dependent forces within a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann equation simulation that is designed to recover continuum regime incompressible hydrodynamics. This method is applied to the problem, in two dimensions, of constraining to uniformity the tangential velocity of a vesicle membrane implemented within a recent multicomponent lattice Boltzmann simulation method, which avoids the use of Lagrangian boundary tracers. The constraint of uniform tangential velocity is carried by an additional contribution to an immersed boundary force, which we derive here from physical arguments. The result of this enhanced immersed boundary force is to apply a physically appropriate boundary condition at the interface between separated lattice fluids, defined as that region over which the phase-field varies most rapidly. Data from this enhanced vesicle boundary method are in agreement with other data obtained using related methods [e.g., T. Krüger, S. Frijters, F. Günther, B. Kaoui, and J. Harting, Eur. Phys. J. 222, 177 (2013), 10.1140/epjst/e2013-01834-y] and underscore the importance of a correct vesicle membrane condition.