Science.gov

Sample records for membrane devices deployed

  1. Self-Deployable Membrane Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Witold M.; Willis, Paul B.; Tan, Seng C.

    2010-01-01

    Currently existing approaches for deployment of large, ultra-lightweight gossamer structures in space rely typically upon electromechanical mechanisms and mechanically expandable or inflatable booms for deployment and to maintain them in a fully deployed, operational configuration. These support structures, with the associated deployment mechanisms, launch restraints, inflation systems, and controls, can comprise more than 90 percent of the total mass budget. In addition, they significantly increase the stowage volume, cost, and complexity. A CHEM (cold hibernated elastic memory) membrane structure without any deployable mechanism and support booms/structure is deployed by using shape memory and elastic recovery. The use of CHEM micro-foams reinforced with carbon nanotubes is considered for thin-membrane structure applications. In this advanced structural concept, the CHEM membrane structure is warmed up to allow packaging and stowing prior to launch, and then cooled to induce hibernation of the internal restoring forces. In space, the membrane remembers its original shape and size when warmed up. After the internal restoring forces deploy the structure, it is then cooled to achieve rigidization. For this type of structure, the solar radiation could be utilized as the heat energy used for deployment and space ambient temperature for rigidization. The overall simplicity of the CHEM self-deployable membrane is one of its greatest assets. In present approaches to space-deployable structures, the stow age and deployment are difficult and challenging, and introduce a significant risk, heavy mass, and high cost. Simple procedures provided by CHEM membrane greatly simplify the overall end-to-end process for designing, fabricating, deploying, and rigidizing large structures. The CHEM membrane avoids the complexities associated with other methods for deploying and rigidizing structures by eliminating deployable booms, deployment mechanisms, and inflation and control systems

  2. Umbilical Deployment Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Michael W.; Gallon, John C.; Rivellini, Tommaso P.

    2011-01-01

    The landing scheme for NASA's next-generation Mars rover will encompass a novel landing technique (see figure). The rover will be lowered from a rocket-powered descent stage and then placed onto the surface while hanging from three bridles. Communication between the rover and descent stage will be maintained through an electrical umbilical cable, which will be deployed in parallel with structural bridles. The -inch (13-mm) umbilical cable contains a Kevlar rope core, around which wires are wrapped to create a cable. This cable is helically coiled between two concentric truncated cones. It is deployed by pulling one end of the cable from the cone. A retractable mechanism maintains tension on the cable after deployment. A break-tie tethers the umbilical end attached to the rover even after the cable is cut after touchdown. This break-tie allows the descent stage to develop some velocity away from the rover prior to the cable releasing from the rover deck, then breaks away once the cable is fully extended. The descent stage pulls the cable up so that recontact is not made. The packaging and deployment technique can store a long length of cable in a relatively small volume while maintaining compliance with the minimum bend radius requirement for the cable being deployed. While the packaging technique could be implemented without the use of break-ties, they were needed in this design due to the vibratory environment and the retraction required by the cable. The break-ties used created a series of load-spikes in the deployment signature. The load spikes during the deployment of the initial three coils of umbilical showed no increase between the different temperature trials. The cold deployment did show an increased load requirement for cable extraction in the region where no break-ties were used. This increase in cable drag was superimposed on the loads required to rupture the last set of break-ties, and as such, these loads saw significant increase when compared to

  3. Device Measures Angle Of Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jermakian, Joel B.

    1991-01-01

    Simple electromechanical device indicates angular position of unfolding panel during and after deployment. Resistance of potentiometer gradually increases as unfolding of solar panel about hinge moves wiper of potentiometer. At full deployment, panel pushes and opens normally closed switch. Designed for use on panel of solar photovoltaic cells in spacecraft, modified for use in other, similar position-indicating applications.

  4. Prepping the Parachute Deployment Device

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-16

    An engineer works on the Parachute Deployment Device of the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator test vehicle in this image taken at the Missile Assembly Building at the U.S. Navy Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii.

  5. Evaporative Cooling Membrane Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis (Inventor); Moskito, John (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An evaporative cooling membrane device is disclosed having a flat or pleated plate housing with an enclosed bottom and an exposed top that is covered with at least one sheet of hydrophobic porous material having a thin thickness so as to serve as a membrane. The hydrophobic porous material has pores with predetermined dimensions so as to resist any fluid in its liquid state from passing therethrough but to allow passage of the fluid in its vapor state, thereby, causing the evaporation of the fluid and the cooling of the remaining fluid. The fluid has a predetermined flow rate. The evaporative cooling membrane device has a channel which is sized in cooperation with the predetermined flow rate of the fluid so as to produce laminar flow therein. The evaporative cooling membrane device provides for the convenient control of the evaporation rates of the circulating fluid by adjusting the flow rates of the laminar flowing fluid.

  6. Water-quality data from semipermeable-membrane devices and polar organic chemical integrative samplers deployed in the McKenzie River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Alvarez, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Two types of passive samplers—the semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) and the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS)—are being used to collect data from the McKenzie River, Oregon. The McKenzie River is the source of drinking water for the City of Eugene, Oregon, and passive-sampler data are part of an ongoing monitoring effort designed to help understand and protect the drinking water source. Data from the passive samplers are reported here. This data report is dynamic and will be appended with additional data as they become available.

  7. A SURVEY OF INDOOR AIR CONTAMINATES USING SEMIPERMEABLE MEMBRANE DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed in indoor areas in approximately 50 residences along the border between Arizona and Mexico to measure airborne contaminants. The results of the primary analyses and gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric confirmation for org...

  8. A SURVEY OF INDOOR AIR CONTAMINATES USING SEMIPERMEABLE MEMBRANE DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed in indoor areas in approximately 50 residences along the border between Arizona and Mexico to measure airborne contaminants. The results of the primary analyses and gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric confirmation for org...

  9. Conformal Membrane Reflectors for Deployable Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Patrick J.; Keys, Andrew S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation reports the Phase I results on NASA's Gossamer Spacecraft Exploratory Research and Technology Program. Cornerstone Research Group, Inc., the University of Rochester, and International Photonics Consultants collaborated to investigate the feasibility of free-standing, liquid-crystal-polymer (LCP) reflectors for integration into space-based optical systems. The goal of the program was to achieve large-diameter, broadband. reflective membranes that are resistant to the effects of space, specifically cryogenic environments and gamma-ray irradiation. Additionally, we assessed the applicability of utilizing the technology as tight sails, since, by their very nature, these films offer high-reflectivity at specified wavelengths. Previous research programs have demonstrated all-polymer, narrow-band Specular reflectors and diffuse membrane reflectors. The feasibility of fabricating an all-polymer broadband specular reflector and a narrow-band specular membrane reflector was assessed in the Phase I Gossamer program. In addition, preliminary gamma irradiation studies were conducted to determine the stability of the polymer reflectors to radiation. Materials and process technology were developed to fabricate coupon-scale reflectors of both broad- and narrow-band specular reflectors in Phase 1. This presentation will report the results of these studies, including, the performance of a narrow-band specular membrane. Gamma irradiation exposures indicate limited impact on the optical performance although additional exposure studies are warranted. Plans to scale up the membrane fabrication process will be presented.

  10. Conformal Membrane Reflectors for Deployable Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Patrick J.; Keys, Andrew S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation reports the Phase I results on NASA's Gossamer Spacecraft Exploratory Research and Technology Program. Cornerstone Research Group, Inc., the University of Rochester, and International Photonics Consultants collaborated to investigate the feasibility of free-standing, liquid-crystal-polymer (LCP) reflectors for integration into space-based optical systems. The goal of the program was to achieve large-diameter, broadband. reflective membranes that are resistant to the effects of space, specifically cryogenic environments and gamma-ray irradiation. Additionally, we assessed the applicability of utilizing the technology as tight sails, since, by their very nature, these films offer high-reflectivity at specified wavelengths. Previous research programs have demonstrated all-polymer, narrow-band Specular reflectors and diffuse membrane reflectors. The feasibility of fabricating an all-polymer broadband specular reflector and a narrow-band specular membrane reflector was assessed in the Phase I Gossamer program. In addition, preliminary gamma irradiation studies were conducted to determine the stability of the polymer reflectors to radiation. Materials and process technology were developed to fabricate coupon-scale reflectors of both broad- and narrow-band specular reflectors in Phase 1. This presentation will report the results of these studies, including, the performance of a narrow-band specular membrane. Gamma irradiation exposures indicate limited impact on the optical performance although additional exposure studies are warranted. Plans to scale up the membrane fabrication process will be presented.

  11. A small deployable infrared diffractive membrane imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Jin, Jiangao; Wang, Baohua; Wu, Peng; Jiao, Jianchao; Su, Yun

    2016-10-01

    Diffractive membrane imaging can be widely used in infrared band due to its longer minimum linewidth and loose requirement of RMS to fabricate more easily and reduce production period and manufacturing cost than used in visible band. A deployable infrared diffractive membrane imaging system was designed, consisting of Φ200mm imaging aperture (actual aperture is Φ500mm) and deployable structure that supports the infrared membrane under tension. Its spectral band width is >1.2μm, field of view is >1°, and diffractive efficiency can be >60%. Stowed size is 150mm×150mm×400mm. Research result of this project can promote the application of diffractive membrane imaging in infrared band and provide an effective and feasible means for achieving extremely large optical primary mirror from compact, lightweight payload.

  12. Dynamic Analysis of Large In-Space Deployable Membrane Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Yang, Bingen; Ding, Hongli; Hah, John; Quijano, Ubaldo; Huang, John

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a vibration analysis of an eight-meter diameter membrane reflectarray antenna, which is composed of a thin membrane and a deployable frame. This analysis process has two main steps. In the first step, a two-variable-parameter (2-VP) membrane model is developed to determine the in-plane stress distribution of the membrane due to pre-tensioning, which eventually yields the differential stiffness of the membrane. In the second step, the obtained differential stiffness is incorporated in a dynamic equation governing the transverse vibration of the membrane-frame assembly. This dynamic equation is then solved by a semi-analytical method, called the Distributed Transfer Function Method (DTFM), which produces the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the antenna. The combination of the 2-VP model and the DTFM provides an accurate prediction of the in-plane stress distribution and modes of vibration for the antenna.

  13. Dynamic Analysis of Large In-Space Deployable Membrane Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Yang, Bingen; Ding, Hongli; Hah, John; Quijano, Ubaldo; Huang, John

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a vibration analysis of an eight-meter diameter membrane reflectarray antenna, which is composed of a thin membrane and a deployable frame. This analysis process has two main steps. In the first step, a two-variable-parameter (2-VP) membrane model is developed to determine the in-plane stress distribution of the membrane due to pre-tensioning, which eventually yields the differential stiffness of the membrane. In the second step, the obtained differential stiffness is incorporated in a dynamic equation governing the transverse vibration of the membrane-frame assembly. This dynamic equation is then solved by a semi-analytical method, called the Distributed Transfer Function Method (DTFM), which produces the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the antenna. The combination of the 2-VP model and the DTFM provides an accurate prediction of the in-plane stress distribution and modes of vibration for the antenna.

  14. Transcirculation Pipeline embolization device deployment: a rescue technique.

    PubMed

    Valle-Giler, Edison P; Atallah, Elias; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula; Rosenwasser, Robert H; Jabbour, Pascal

    2017-06-01

    The Pipeline embolization device (PED) has become a very important tool in the treatment of nonruptured cerebral aneurysms. However, a patient's difficult anatomy or vascular stenosis may affect the device delivery. The purpose of this article was to describe an alternate technique for PED deployment when ipsilateral anatomy is not amenable for catheter navigation. A 44-year-old woman with a symptomatic 6-mm right superior hypophyseal artery aneurysm and a known history of right internal carotid artery dissection presented for PED treatment of her aneurysm. An angiogram showed persistence of the arterial dissection with luminal stenosis after 6 months of dual antiplatelet treatment. The contralateral internal carotid artery was catheterized and the PED was deployed via a transcirculation approach, using the anterior communicating artery. Transcirculation deployment of a PED is a viable option when ipsilateral anatomy is difficult or contraindicated for this treatment.

  15. Optimization Techniques for 3D Graphics Deployment on Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskela, Timo; Vatjus-Anttila, Jarkko

    2015-03-01

    3D Internet technologies are becoming essential enablers in many application areas including games, education, collaboration, navigation and social networking. The use of 3D Internet applications with mobile devices provides location-independent access and richer use context, but also performance issues. Therefore, one of the important challenges facing 3D Internet applications is the deployment of 3D graphics on mobile devices. In this article, we present an extensive survey on optimization techniques for 3D graphics deployment on mobile devices and qualitatively analyze the applicability of each technique from the standpoints of visual quality, performance and energy consumption. The analysis focuses on optimization techniques related to data-driven 3D graphics deployment, because it supports off-line use, multi-user interaction, user-created 3D graphics and creation of arbitrary 3D graphics. The outcome of the analysis facilitates the development and deployment of 3D Internet applications on mobile devices and provides guidelines for future research.

  16. Shape Memory Alloy Deployment of Membrane Mirrors for Spaceborne Telescopes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    maximum recoverable strain limit for one time actuation of Nitinol .6 Considered as the stowed configuration, this packaging reduces the projected area...the martensite twin reorientation (MTR) subroutine, to predict the transient response of a spaceborne membrane optic SMA deployment actuator spine...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 KA = B2 phase thermal conductivity KC = concentrator thermal conductivity Ki,j

  17. Using ERF Devices to Control Deployments of Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Salama, Moktar; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Steward; Jenkins, Christopher; Vinogradov, Aleksandra

    2003-01-01

    A report proposes devices containing electrorheological fluids (ERFs) damper for controlling deployments of lightweight, flexible structures in outer space. The structures would include spring members that could be wound or compressed for compact stowage during transport. The ERF based damper would keep the structures compacted and/or regulate the speeds with which the structures would spring out for deployment. After deployment, ERF based dampening mechanism could be used to rigidize the structures or damp their vibrations. An experimental ERF deployment controlled structure described in the report comprised two metal carpenter s measuring tapes sandwiched together, held slightly apart by rubber-band spacers, and placed in a bag filled with an ERF. The viscosity of the ERF varied with the voltage applied to the tapes, such that it was possible to hold the tapes in the wound condition or slow the speed with which they sprung from the wound to the straight condition. The report describes several potential variations on the basic concept of an ERF-controlled structural member, including compartmentalization of the interior volume to prevent total loss of the ERF in case of a leak and the use of multiple, individually addressable electrode pairs to enable more localized control.

  18. Inflatably Deployed Membrane Waveguide Array Antenna for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichodziejewski, David; Cravey, Robin; Hopkins, Glenn

    2003-01-01

    As an alternative to parabolic antennas and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems, waveguide arrays offer another method of providing RF transmit/receive communication apertures for spacecraft. The advantage of the membrane waveguide array concept, in addition to its lightweight and low packaged volume, is its inherent shape. Relative to parabolic antennas, the requirement to make an accurate doubly curved surface is removed. L'Garde and Langley Research Center (LaRC), are currently working in this area to develop lightweight waveguide array technologies utilizing thin film membrane structures. Coupled with an ultra-lightweight inflatably deployed rigidizable planar support structure, the system offers a very compelling technology in the fields of space-based radar, communications, and earth resource mapping.

  19. Caging mechanisms for the Mars Exploration Rover instrument deployment device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billing, Rius

    2003-09-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) program will land two rovers on the Martian surface in January 2004. Each will be equipped with a 5 degree-of-freedom, 1-meter long robotic arm known as the Instrument Deployment Device (IDD). The IDD will position instruments mounted to its end effector with greater precision than any previous Martian arm. Two dual-use caging mechanisms were designed for the IDD. The mechanisms are very small in size, and act as launch restraints as well as passive cradling (re-stowing) features during rover excursions on the Martian surface. The caging mechanisms are designed to use existing structural elements of the IDD to minimize mass and volume. The design also uses the IDD actuators to deploy and re-stow subsequent to the arm's release from the launch locks. Unique design elements are employed because typical release interfaces, such as those using shear-pins in engagement with spherical bearings, could not be utilized due to volume constraints. The final designs, however, do not sacrifice release performance. A cable-cutter and pin-puller, both with standard NSI pyrotechnic initiators, are used to unlatch the IDD after landing. The cable-cutter is used at the end effector in the area of the IDD instruments, which have the highest susceptibility to pyrotechnic shock. This paper discusses design tradeoffs and considerations for the two mechanisms, reasons for choosing each pyrotechnic device, lubrication methodology, thermal-vacuum system testing, and lessons learned.

  20. Semipermeable membrane devices used to estimate bioconcentration of polychlorinated biphenyls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chambers, D.B.

    1999-01-01

    Aquatic organisms passively accumulate hydrophobic organic compounds, such as polychlorinated biphenyls, even when ambient water concentrations of the contaminant are below analytical detection limits. However, contaminant concentrations in tissue samples are subject to an inherently high level of variability due to differences in species, life stage, and gender bioconcentration potentials. Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were used to sample Aroclor 1254, a mixture of readily bioconcentrated polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), in a contaminated wetland near Flat Top, WV. The devices consisted of triolein, a lipid found in fish, enclosed in a polyethylene membrane. SPMDs were deployed in the water column and in direct contact with wetland sediments along a previously identified concentration gradient of PCBs. The devices were retrieved after a 25-day exposure period. Analytes were recovered by dialyzing the devices in nanograde hexane. Hexane dialysates were condensed and analyzed by gas chromatography. All deployed devices sequestered quantifiable amounts of Aroclor 1254. Water-column SPMDs accumulated PCBs far in excess of ambient water concentrations. The devices contacting sediments accumulated PCBs at all sites, though accumulated concentrations did not exceed concentrations in sediment. Patterns of PCB concentration in the devices corresponded to the identified gradient at the site. Results from the water-column SPMDs were used to estimate the concentration of the dissolved, bioavailable fraction of PCBs present in the water column. These concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 0.09 ??g/L of bioavailable Aroclor 1254.

  1. Concept-Development of a Structure Supported Membrane for Deployable Space Applications - From Nature to Manufacture and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zander, Martin; Belvin, W. K.

    2012-01-01

    Current space applications of membrane structures include large area solar power arrays, solar sails, antennas, and numerous other large aperture devices like the solar shades of the new James Webb Space Telescope. These expandable structural systems, deployed in-orbit to achieve the desired geometry, are used to collect, reflect and/or transmit electromagnetic radiation. This work, a feasibility study supporting a diploma thesis, describes the systematic process for developing a biologically inspired concept for a structure supported (integrated) membrane, that features a rip stop principle, makes self-deployment possible and is part of an ultra-light weight space application. Novel manufacturing of membrane prototypes and test results are presented for the rip-stop concepts. Test data showed that the new membrane concept has a higher tear resistance than neat film of equivalent mass.

  2. [Membrane separation technology in medical devices].

    PubMed

    Hu, Xianghua; Dang, Xiyun; Wu, Minyu

    2014-01-01

    Membrane separation technology is a major branch in modern separation technology, which is widely applied in chemical, pharmaceutical and other industries. The purpose of this paper is to introduce principle and the application example of the membrane separation technology in medical devices, to analyse the problems existing in the current application, and to discuss the future development direction.

  3. Membrane device and process for mass exchange, separation, and filtration

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Wei; Canfield, Nathan L.

    2016-11-15

    A membrane device and processes for fabrication and for using are disclosed. The membrane device may include a number of porous metal membranes that provide a high membrane surface area per unit volume. The membrane device provides various operation modes that enhance throughput and selectivity for mass exchange, mass transfer, separation, and/or filtration applications between feed flow streams and permeate flow streams.

  4. Design and demonstration of a high-temperature, deployable, membrane heat-pipe radiator element

    SciTech Connect

    Trujillo, V.L.; Keddy, E.S.; Merrigan, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Demonstration of a high-temperature, deployable, membrane heat-pipe radiator element has been conducted. Membrane heat pipes offer the potential for compact storage, ease of transportation, self-deployment, and a high specific radiator performance (kg/kW) for use in thermal reflection systems of space nuclear power plants. A demonstration heat pipe 8-cm wide and 100-cm long was fabricated. The heat pipe containment and wick structure were made of stainless steel and sodium used as the working fluid. The tests demonstrated passive deployment of the high-temperature membrane radiator, simulating a single segment in a flat array, at a temperature of 800 K. Details of test procedures and results of the tests are presented in this paper together with a discussion of the design and development of a full-scale, segmented high-temperature, deployable membrane heat pipe. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Development of a Device to Deploy Fluid Droplets in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David W.; Chai, An-Ti

    1997-01-01

    A free-floating droplet in microgravity is ideal for scientific observation since it is free of confounding factors such as wetting and nonsymmetrical heat transfer introduced by contact with surfaces. However, the technology to reliably deploy in microgravity has not yet been developed. In some recent fluid deployment experiments, droplets are either shaken off the dispenser or the dispenser is quickly retracted from the droplet. These solutions impart random residual motion to deployed droplet, which can be undesirable for certain investigations. In the present study, two new types of droplet injectors were built and tested. Testing of the droplet injectors consisted of neutral buoyancy tank tests, 5-sec drop tower tests at the NASA Lewis Zero Gravity Facility, and DC-9 tests. One type, the concentric injector, worked well in the neutral buoyancy tank but did not do well in low-gravity. However, it appeared that it makes a fine apparatus for constructing bubbles in low-gravity conditions. The other type, the T-injector, showed the most promise for future development. In both neutral buoyancy and DC-9 tests, water droplets were formed and deployed with some control and repeatability, although in low-gravity the residual velocities were higher than desirable. Based on our observations, further refinements are suggested for future development work.

  6. Design of a new membrane stretching device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yiran

    Cell stretching device has been applied into the lab use for many years to help researchers study about the behavior of cells during the stretching process. Because the cell responses to the different mechanical stimuli, especially in the case of disease, the cell stretching device is a necessary tool to study the cell behavior in a controlled environment. However existing devices have limitations, such as too big to fit the culture chamber, unable to be observed during the stretching process and too expensive to fabricate. In this thesis, a new cell stretcher is designed to resolve these limitations. Many typical cell stretching devices only work under simple conditions. For instance they can only apply the strain on the cell in uniaxial or equibiaxial directions. On the other hand the environment of cells' survival is varying. Many new cell stretchers have been developed, which have the same property that cells can be stretched via the radical deformation of the elastomeric membrane. The aim of this new design is to create a cell stretching device that fits in general lab conditions. This device is designed to fit on a microscope to observe, as well as in the incubator. In addition, two small step motors are used to control the strain, adjust the frequency, and maintain the stability precisely. Problems such as the culture media leakage and the membrane breakage are solved by the usage of multiple materials for both the cell stretcher and the membrane. Based on the experimental results, this device can satisfy the requirements of target users with a reduced manufacturing cost. In the future, an auto-focus tracking function will be developed to allow real time observation of the cells' behavior.

  7. Deployable Emergency Shutoff Device Blocks High-Velocity Fluid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a device and method for blocking the flow of fluid from an open pipe. Motivated by the sea-bed oil-drilling catastrophe in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, NASA innovators designed the device to plug, control, and meter the flow of gases and liquids. Anchored with friction fittings, spikes, or explosively activated fasteners, the device is well-suited for harsh environments and high fluid velocities and pressures. With the addition of instrumentation, it can also be used as a variable area flow metering valve that can be set based upon flow conditions. With robotic additions, this patent-pending innovation can be configured to crawl into a pipe then anchor and activate itself to block or control fluid flow.

  8. Shape Memory Polymer Self-Deploying Membrane Reflectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-30

    for interceptor missiles. In this approach, a mirror’s final figure and finish is achieved by thermoforming a thin layer of SMP at the surface of a...2007 thermoformed SMP layer replicates the mold’s figure and finish, rather than the casting approach in the current program for membrane mirrors. 6.8

  9. StarClose Vascular Closure Device: Prospective Study on 222 Deployments in an Interventional Radiology Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Atique; Carter, Ranjana M. S. Phillips-Hughes, Jane; Boardman, Philip; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-07-15

    The StarClose device (Abbott Vascular Devices; Abbott Laboratories, Redwood City, CA) utilizes an externally placed Nitinol clip to achieve arterial closure following femoral artery puncture. The objectives of this study were to assess the efficacy and complications of the StarClose device in patients undergoing interventional radiological procedures. Preprocedural clotting status, pulse and blood pressure, severity of vessel calcification, sheath size, and time to deployment were recorded. Postdeployment complications immediately postprocedure, at 1 h, at 2 h, and at 1 week were recorded. A duplex scan was performed in the first 10 patients to assess any immediate vascular complications. Deployments were successful in 96% achieving immediate hemostasis. Mean deployment time was 48 s. There were no major complications. The StarClose device was found to have a high technical and clinical efficacy.

  10. Rapid deployment of internet-connected environmental monitoring devices

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Advances in electronic sensing and monitoring systems and the growth of the communications infrastructure have enabled users to gain immediate access to information and interaction with physical devices. To facilitate the uploading, viewing, and sharing of data via the internet, while avoiding the ...

  11. Deployable flexible ventral fins for use as an emergency spin recovery device in aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burk, S. M., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A flexible fin device for mounting on an aircraft to effect spin recovery is described. The device may be selectively deployed to provide a triangular planform of flexible material to provide spin recovery, and retracted for compact storage during non-use. A single flexible fin may be deflected in a specific direction depending on direction of spin rotation, or two flexible fins forming an inverted V configuration may be used. The device is mounted on the underbody of the aircraft.

  12. A stowing and deployment strategy for large membrane space systems on the example of Gossamer-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seefeldt, Patric

    2017-09-01

    Deployment systems for innovative space applications such as solar sails require a technique for a controlled and autonomous deployment in space. The deployment process has a strong impact on the mechanism and structural design and sizing. On the example of the design implemented in the Gossamer-1 project of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), such a stowing and deployment process is analyzed. It is based on a combination of zig-zag folding and coiling of triangular sail segments spanned between crossed booms. The deployment geometry and forces introduced by the mechanism considered are explored in order to reveal how the loads are transferred through the membranes to structural components such as the booms. The folding geometry and force progressions are described by function compositions of an inverse trigonometric function with the considered trigonometric function itself. If these functions are evaluated over several periods of the trigonometric function, a non-smooth oscillating curve occurs. Depending on the trigonometric function, these are often vividly described as zig-zag or sawtooth functions. The developed functions are applied to the Gossamer-1 design. The deployment geometry reveals a tendency that the loads are transferred along the catheti of the sail segments and therefore mainly along the boom axes. The load introduced by the spool deployment mechanism is described. By combining the deployment geometry with that load, a prediction of the deployment load progression is achieved. The mathematical description of the stowing and deployment geometry, as well as the forces inflicted by the mechanism provides an understanding of how exactly the membrane deploys and through which edges the deployment forces are transferred. The mathematical analysis also gives an impression of sensitive parameters that could be influenced by manufacturing tolerances or unsymmetrical deployment of the sail segments. While the mathematical model was applied on the design of

  13. A survey of results for passive air and water sampling via semipermeable membrane devices

    SciTech Connect

    Prest, H.F.; Jacobson, L.; Hodgins, M.; Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.; Richardson, B.; Wilson, M.; Martin, M.

    1994-12-31

    Passive sampling techniques have progressed and are providing new possibilities for measuring trace contaminants in environmental compartments. One such device, the semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) developed by Huckins, et al in Columbia, MO. is especially promising. The authors present an overview of results for sampling in air and water with semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDS) for organochlorines and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and comment on possible future applications and potential. Differences in organohalogen profiles for SPMDs and green-lipped mussels deployed along transacts of Corio Bay, Australia show marked differences in sequestering ``windows``. An illustration of the application of SPMDs to the measurement of the half-life of chemicals is presented using PAH data from SPMD deployments in an irrigation canal in New Mexico. Results for simultaneous sampling of water and coastal air in Northern California illustrate the promise of SPMDs as global monitors.

  14. Late onset iatrogenic limb ischaemia after deployment of an Angio-Seal vascular closure device.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rama K; Kherada, Nisharahmed; Beohar, Nirat

    2015-04-26

    It is common practice to deploy a vascular closure device for access site closure after percutaneous angiography or cardiovascular interventions for immediate haemostasis and to facilitate early discharge. We encountered two octogenarian women who underwent and had subsequent vascular access site closure with Angio-Seal (St Jude) and who later presented with limb ischaemia needing surgical revascularisation. Our patients had undergone uneventful deployment of the Angio-Seal vascular closure device (VCD) at the right common femoral artery (CFA) access site with successful haemostasis. About 3 weeks later they presented with features of limb ischaemia needing further diagnostic work-up including repeat angiography, which revealed subtotal occlusion of right common femoral artery at the level of prior access and Angio-Seal deployment site. Both the patients underwent successful surgical repair with restoration of distal flow and resolution of symptoms. These cases illustrate the late presentation of VCD-related complications with limb ischaemia, needing surgical revascularisation.

  15. An Autoclavable Steerable Cannula Manual Deployment Device: Design and Accuracy Analysis.

    PubMed

    Burgner, Jessica; Swaney, Philip J; Bruns, Trevor L; Clark, Marlena S; Rucker, D Caleb; Burdette, E Clif; Webster, Robert J

    2012-12-01

    Accessing a specific, predefined location identified in medical images is a common interventional task for biopsies and drug or therapy delivery. While conventional surgical needles provide little steerability, concentric tube continuum devices enable steering through curved trajectories. These devices are usually developed as robotic systems. However, manual actuation of concentric tube devices is particularly useful for initial transfer into the clinic since the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval process of manually operated devices is simple compared to their motorized counterparts. In this paper, we present a manual actuation device for the deployment of steerable cannulas. The design focuses on compactness, modularity, usability, and sterilizability. Further, the kinematic mapping from joint space to Cartesian space is detailed for an example concentric tube device. Assessment of the device's accuracy was performed in free space, as well as in an image-guided surgery setting, using tracked 2D ultrasound.

  16. Compositionally-Graded Shape Memory Film for Self-Deployment of Membrane Reflectors and Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Lisa; Carman, Greg; Brantley, Lott W., Sr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The next generation of space systems will require large apertures in order to image faint targets or cover large areas of Earth. These large apertures must be able to fit inside a launch vehicle fairing, be light enough for launch into orbit, and deploy on orbit with repeatability and reliability. The current state-of-the-art in flight optics is represented by the 4 meter LAMP telescope, with an areal density of 10 km sq m. Development of a Beryllium mirror demonstration article for NGST (Next Generation Space Telescope) at the University of Arizona indicate areal densities of 0.5 kg sq m with flight hardware in the 12 meter range. With progressive improvements in existing deployment, packaging, and structural technologies, the size of optics and reflectors will continue to increase, while mass is reduced. However, without a breakthrough in materials, packaging and/or deployment technologies, the goal for Gossamer structures of 0.1 kg sq m is unachievable for the near and mid-term NASA missions. Membrane technology provides the best hope of achieving such low areal densities. In combination with advances in membrane materials and structures, development of revolutionary techniques for deployment systems can provide significant improvements in large aperture technology. In this paper, the results of a six-month Phase I research effort to demonstrate the application of thin film NiTi to aerospace-qualified membrane and mesh materials are presented. Deposition of shape memory thin film was achieved Astromesh (trademark) metal mesh and CP-1, and optical-quality polymer membrane. Not only was full-coating deposition demonstrated, but also small segment deposition which holds potential for local surface control. Deployment of these materials was also demonstrated, setting the stage for the development of a larger test article.

  17. Compositionally-Graded Shape Memory Film for Self-Deployment of Membrane Reflectors and Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Lisa; Carman, Greg; Brantley, Lott W., Sr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The next generation of space systems will require large apertures in order to image faint targets or cover large areas of Earth. These large apertures must be able to fit inside a launch vehicle fairing, be light enough for launch into orbit, and deploy on orbit with repeatability and reliability. The current state-of-the-art in flight optics is represented by the 4 meter LAMP telescope, with an areal density of 10 km sq m. Development of a Beryllium mirror demonstration article for NGST (Next Generation Space Telescope) at the University of Arizona indicate areal densities of 0.5 kg sq m with flight hardware in the 12 meter range. With progressive improvements in existing deployment, packaging, and structural technologies, the size of optics and reflectors will continue to increase, while mass is reduced. However, without a breakthrough in materials, packaging and/or deployment technologies, the goal for Gossamer structures of 0.1 kg sq m is unachievable for the near and mid-term NASA missions. Membrane technology provides the best hope of achieving such low areal densities. In combination with advances in membrane materials and structures, development of revolutionary techniques for deployment systems can provide significant improvements in large aperture technology. In this paper, the results of a six-month Phase I research effort to demonstrate the application of thin film NiTi to aerospace-qualified membrane and mesh materials are presented. Deposition of shape memory thin film was achieved Astromesh (trademark) metal mesh and CP-1, and optical-quality polymer membrane. Not only was full-coating deposition demonstrated, but also small segment deposition which holds potential for local surface control. Deployment of these materials was also demonstrated, setting the stage for the development of a larger test article.

  18. Intra-DIC (distal intracranial catheter) deployment of the Pipeline embolization device: a novel rescue strategy for failed device expansion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Mei; Colby, Geoffrey P; Jiang, Bowen; Nundkumar, Neelesh; Huang, Judy; Tamargo, Rafael J; Coon, Alexander L

    2016-08-01

    The Pipeline embolization device (PED) is a braided flow diverter that requires a combination of meticulous maneuvers to assure proper device opening and expansion. Mechanical, anatomical, or technical challenges can result in a partially deployed PED with failed expansion. To present a new alternative method of PED deployment using the Navien distal intracranial catheter (DIC) as a salvage maneuver for cases where PED opening fails with standard techniques. We retrospectively reviewed a prospective, single-center aneurysm database to identify all patients who underwent endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms using the PED with the Navien distal intracranial catheter access platform. Cases requiring PED deployment within the Navien catheter were reviewed. Data was collected for patient demographics, aneurysm characteristics, and technical details of the interventional procedure. Eleven PED neurointerventions requiring intra-Navien PED deployment to fully open the PED were identified. Mean patient age was 55.5±9.9 years (range 37-76 years). Mean aneurysm size was 12.5 mm±4.9 mm (range 2-42 mm). All aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation (anterior cerebral artery, n=1; supraclinoid, n=1; ophthalmic/paraophthalmic, n=6; cavernous, n=3; petrocervical, n=1). Mean fluoroscopy time was 67.1±20.5 min. The intra-Navien technique was used to open the proximal PED (n=7) and the mid-portion (n=4). Post-processing of the PED with a balloon was used in six cases. When a partially deployed PED remains constrained despite exhaustion of standard maneuvers to facilitate opening, the technique of intra-Navien PED deployment is a valuable rescue strategy. This new alternative method of PED deployment can be used to open a stretched device with successful completion of the PED implantation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elestic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

  20. Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elastic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

  1. SCREENING BIOAVAILABLE HYDROPHOBIC TOXICANTS IN SURFACE WATERS WITH SEMIPERMEABLE MEMBRANE DEVICES: ROLE OF INHERENT OLEIC ACID IN TOXICITY EVALUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed for 4 weeks in two rivers in Lithuania, The SPMD dialysates were tested in the Microtox assay and, surprisingly, the sample from the relatively clean (U) over bar la River exhibited three times more toxicity than the sample fro...

  2. Deployable antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor); Lin, Greg Y. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Scully, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A deployable antenna and method for using wherein the deployable antenna comprises a collapsible membrane having at least one radiating element for transmitting electromagnetic waves, receiving electromagnetic waves, or both.

  3. Optimization design combined with coupled structural-electrostatic analysis for the electrostatically controlled deployable membrane reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Yang, Guigeng; Zhang, Yiqun

    2015-01-01

    The electrostatically controlled deployable membrane reflector (ECDMR) is a promising scheme to construct large size and high precision space deployable reflector antennas. This paper presents a novel design method for the large size and small F/D ECDMR considering the coupled structure-electrostatic problem. First, the fully coupled structural-electrostatic system is described by a three field formulation, in which the structure and passive electrical field is modeled by finite element method, and the deformation of the electrostatic domain is predicted by a finite element formulation of a fictitious elastic structure. A residual formulation of the structural-electrostatic field finite element model is established and solved by Newton-Raphson method. The coupled structural-electrostatic analysis procedure is summarized. Then, with the aid of this coupled analysis procedure, an integrated optimization method of membrane shape accuracy and stress uniformity is proposed, which is divided into inner and outer iterative loops. The initial state of relatively high shape accuracy and uniform stress distribution is achieved by applying the uniform prestress on the membrane design shape and optimizing the voltages, in which the optimal voltage is computed by a sensitivity analysis. The shape accuracy is further improved by the iterative prestress modification using the reposition balance method. Finally, the results of the uncoupled and coupled methods are compared and the proposed optimization method is applied to design an ECDMR. The results validate the effectiveness of this proposed methods.

  4. Study on Mini Re-Entry System Using Deployable Membrane Aeroshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Masashi; Suzuki, Kojiro; Imamura, Osamu; Yamada, Kazuhiko

    An aeroshell made from membrane material have an advantage of reduction in the aerodynamic heating, because its small mass and large area enable us to make the low-ballistic-coefficient flight, in which the vehicle decelerates at very high altitude with low atmospheric density. In this paper, we propose a new concept of mini re-entry system for small satellites. This vehicle is called "FEATHER" (Flexible Expanded Aeroshell with Tiny payload Harness for Entry and Recovery). "FEATHER" is a novel re-entry and recovery system, featuring the autonomous aeroshell deployment, the low-ballistic-coefficient re-entry with less severe aerodynamicc heating and so on. FEATHER is composed of the membrane aeroshell made from the high-temperature cloth called ZYLON®, an outer frame made of Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) and a payload. When the aeroshell receives the aerodynamic heating, the temperature of SMA frame rises and restores the circular shape as memorized beforehand. Then the membrane aeroshell is automatically deployed. Therefore the vehicle can achieve the low-ballistic-coefficient flight with a drastic reduction in the aerodynamic heating without any additional sensors, controllers and actuators. The preliminary studies made on FEATHER system so far including the hypersonic wind tunnel experiments are presented in this paper.

  5. A field-deployable device for the rapid detection of cyanide poisoning in whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehringer, Hans; Tong, Winnie; Chung, Roy; Boss, Gerry; O'Farrell, Brendan

    2012-06-01

    Feasibility of a field-deployable device for the rapid and early diagnosis of cyanide poisoning in whole blood using the spectral shift of the vitamin B12 precursor cobinamide upon binding with cyanide as an indicator is being assessed. Cyanide is an extremely potent and rapid acting poison with as little as 50 mg fatal to humans. Cyanide poisoning has been recognized as a threat from smoke inhalation and potentially through weapons of mass destruction. Currently, no portable rapid tests for the detection of cyanide in whole blood are available. Cobinamide has an extremely high affinity for cyanide and captures hemoglobin associated cyanide from red blood cells. Upon binding of cyanide, cobinamide undergoes a spectral shift that can be measured with a spectrophotometer. We have combined the unique cyanide-binding properties of cobinamide with blood separation technology, sample transport and a detection system, and are developing a rapid, field deployable, disposable device which will deliver an intuitive result to a first responder, allowing for rapid response to exposure events. Feasibility of the cobinamide-Cyanide chemistry in a rapid test using a whole blood sample from a finger-stick has been demonstrated with an assay time from sample collection to a valid result of under 5 minutes. Data showing the efficacy of the diagnostic method and initial device design concepts will be shown.

  6. Use of semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) in petroleum polluted waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alvarez, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Passive samplers, in particular semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs), can be used in monitoring petroleum spills. This document is intended to provide a brief discussion of issues surrounding the use and capabilities of the SPMD.

  7. Development of active-transport membrane devices

    SciTech Connect

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-07-01

    This report introduces the concept of Air Products` AT membranes for the separation of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} from process gas streams and presents results from the first year fabrication concept development studies.

  8. Stress-sensor device based on flexoelectric liquid crystalline membranes.

    PubMed

    Rey, Alejandro D; Servio, Phillip; Herrera Valencia, Edtson Emilio

    2014-05-19

    Membrane flexoelectricity is an electromechanical coupling process that describes membrane bending and membrane electrical polarization caused by bending under electric fields. In this paper we propose, formulate, and characterize a stress-sensor device for mechanically loaded solids, consisting of a soft flexoelectric thin membrane attached to the loaded deformed solid. Because the curvature of the deformed solid is transferred to the attached flexoelectric membrane, the electromechanical transduction of the latter produces a charge that is proportional to the stress of the solid. The model of the stress-sensor device is based on the integration of the thermodynamics of polarizable membranes with isotropic solid elasticity, leading to a transfer function that identifies the elastic, electromechanical, and geometrical parameters involved in electrical-signal generation. The model is applied to representative normal bending and then to more complex off-axis bending of elastic bars. In all cases, a common transfer function shows the generic material and its geometric contributions. The sensor sensitivity increases linearly with flexoelectricity and the membrane-solid interface, and the sensitivity decreases with increasing membrane thickness and Young's modulus of the solid. The theoretical results contribute to ongoing experimental efforts towards the development of anisotropic soft-matter-based stress-sensor devices through solid-membrane interactions and electromechanical transduction.

  9. A novel acoustic coupling device using permeable membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buynak, C. F.; Crane, R. L.

    This paper describes a new type of acoustic coupling device which possesses the advantages of a fluid couplant and is simple yet inexpensive enough to be utilized in most field level applications. Briefly, the device consists of a water column which is supported by and allowed to leak slowly through a permeable membrane. This allows a small amount of water to wet the surface between the membrane and the part to provide an ultrasonic couplant. Since the membrane has an acoustic impedance very close to that of water, there is practically no reflection of acoustic energy from the membrane, thereby, permitting detection of near surface flaws. The small amount of fluid required for the coupling practically eliminates problems associated with storing, dispensing, and clean-up of extraneous amounts of couplant. The device is quite simple in design and inexpensive enough to be disposable.

  10. Active delivery cable tuned to device deployment state: enhanced visibility of nitinol occluders during preclinical interventional MRI.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jamie A; Saikus, Christina E; Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Barbash, Israel M; Faranesh, Anthony Z; Franson, Dominique N; Sonmez, Merdim; Slack, Michael C; Lederman, Robert J; Kocaturk, Ozgur

    2012-10-01

    To develop an active delivery system that enhances visualization of nitinol cardiac occluder devices during deployment under real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We constructed an active delivery cable incorporating a loopless antenna and a custom titanium microscrew to secure the occluder devices. The delivery cable was tuned and matched to 50Ω at 64 MHz with the occluder device attached. We used real-time balanced steady state free precession in a wide-bore 1.5T scanner. Device-related images were reconstructed separately and combined with surface-coil images. The delivery cable was tested in vitro in a phantom and in vivo in swine using a variety of nitinol cardiac occluder devices. In vitro, the active delivery cable provided little signal when the occluder device was detached and maximal signal with the device attached. In vivo, signal from the active delivery cable enabled clear visualization of occluder device during positioning and deployment. Device release resulted in decreased signal from the active cable. Postmortem examination confirmed proper device placement. The active delivery cable enhanced the MRI depiction of nitinol cardiac occluder devices during positioning and deployment, both in conventional and novel applications. We expect enhanced visibility to contribute to the effectiveness and safety of new and emerging MRI-guided treatments. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. ACTIVE DELIVERY CABLE TUNED TO DEVICE DEPLOYMENT STATE: ENHANCED VISIBILITY OF NITINOL OCCLUDERS DURING PRE-CLINICAL INTERVENTIONAL MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Jamie A.; Saikus, Christina E.; Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Barbash, Israel M.; Faranesh, Anthony Z.; Franson, Dominique N.; Sonmez, Merdim; Slack, Michael C.; Lederman, Robert J.; Kocaturk, Ozgur

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop an active delivery system that enhances visualization of nitinol cardiac occluder devices during deployment under real-time MRI. Materials and Methods We constructed an active delivery cable incorporating a loopless antenna and a custom titanium microscrew to secure the occluder devices. The delivery cable was tuned and matched to 50Ω at 64 MHz with the occluder device attached. We used real-time balanced SSFP in a wide-bore 1.5T scanner. Device-related images were reconstructed separately and combined with surface-coil images. The delivery cable was tested in vitro in a phantom and in vivo in swine using a variety of nitinol cardiac occluder devices. Results In vitro, the active delivery cable provided little signal when the occluder device was detached and maximal signal with the device attached. In vivo, signal from the active delivery cable enabled clear visualization of occluder device during positioning and deployment. Device release resulted in decreased signal from the active cable. Post-mortem examination confirmed proper device placement. Conclusions The active delivery cable enhanced the MRI depiction of nitinol cardiac occluder devices during positioning and deployment, both in conventional and novel applications. We expect enhanced visibility to contribute to effectiveness and safety of new and emerging MRI-guided treatments. PMID:22707441

  12. Use of mussels and semipermeable membrane devices to assess bioavailability of residual polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons three years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    SciTech Connect

    Shigenaka, G.; Henry, C.B. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Mussels (Mytilus cf. trossulus) were transplanted to a heavily oiled and extensively treated site on Smith Island, Prince William Sound, Alaska, in 1992. A new monitoring and assessment tool, the semipermeable membrane device, was also deployed to compare hydrocarbon uptake with mussels and to evaluate the route of exposure to mussels. Both mussels and semipermeable membrane devices accumulated polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons during 14- and 52-day deployments, particularly at the oiled site. Accumulation levels were similar between mussels and the semipermeable membrane devices, but the distribution of individual hydrocarbons differed. The results permit some inference about route of exposure to mussels. Sheens leaching from subsurface deposits of residual oil, and particulate material with adsorbed hydrocarbons were apparently more important exposure pathways than dissolved hydrocarbons in water. Semipermeable membrane devices show promise as monitoring tools and to provide insights into exposure pathways for biota. 20 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Deployment of Mobile Learning Course Materials to Android Powered Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Lee

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article is to facilitate mobile teaching and learning by providing an alternative course material deployment method. This article suggests a course material deployment platform for small universities or individual instructors. Different from traditional course material deployment methods, the method discussed deploys course…

  14. Deployment of Mobile Learning Course Materials to Android Powered Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Lee

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article is to facilitate mobile teaching and learning by providing an alternative course material deployment method. This article suggests a course material deployment platform for small universities or individual instructors. Different from traditional course material deployment methods, the method discussed deploys course…

  15. Field deployment of polyethylene devices to measure PCB concentrations in pore water of contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Jeanne E; Luthy, Richard G

    2008-08-15

    Sediment pore water concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in a contaminated mudflat in San Francisco Bay, CA were determined by field-deployed polyethylene devices (PEDs). Sequential sampling of PEDs deployed in the field showed large differences in uptake rates and time to equilibrium compared to PEDs mixed with field-collected sediment in the laboratory. We demonstrate a modeling approach that involves the use of impregnated performance reference compounds (PRCs) and interpretation of the data either by PCB molar volume adjustment or environmental adjustment factors to measure pore water concentrations of 118 PCB congeners. Both adjustment methods predicted comparable sampling rates, and PCB pore water concentrations estimated by use of the molar volume adjustment method were similar to values analytically measured in pore waters from the laboratory and field. The utility of PEDs for sampling pore water in the field was evaluated at a tidal mudflat amended with activated carbon to sequester PCBs. Pore water concentrations decreased up to 60% within 18 months after activated carbon amendment, as compared to a mechanical-mixed control plot Results of this study illustrate PEDs provide an inexpensive, in situ method to measure total PCB contamination in sediment pore water using a small set of PRCs.

  16. Gas Transfer in Cellularized Collagen-Membrane Gas Exchange Devices.

    PubMed

    Lo, Justin H; Bassett, Erik K; Penson, Elliot J N; Hoganson, David M; Vacanti, Joseph P

    2015-08-01

    Chronic lower respiratory disease is highly prevalent in the United States, and there remains a need for alternatives to lung transplant for patients who progress to end-stage lung disease. Portable or implantable gas oxygenators based on microfluidic technologies can address this need, provided they operate both efficiently and biocompatibly. Incorporating biomimetic materials into such devices can help replicate native gas exchange function and additionally support cellular components. In this work, we have developed microfluidic devices that enable blood gas exchange across ultra-thin collagen membranes (as thin as 2 μm). Endothelial, stromal, and parenchymal cells readily adhere to these membranes, and long-term culture with cellular components results in remodeling, reflected by reduced membrane thickness. Functionally, acellular collagen-membrane lung devices can mediate effective gas exchange up to ∼288 mL/min/m(2) of oxygen and ∼685 mL/min/m(2) of carbon dioxide, approaching the gas exchange efficiency noted in the native lung. Testing several configurations of lung devices to explore various physical parameters of the device design, we concluded that thinner membranes and longer gas exchange distances result in improved hemoglobin saturation and increases in pO2. However, in the design space tested, these effects are relatively small compared to the improvement in overall oxygen and carbon dioxide transfer by increasing the blood flow rate. Finally, devices cultured with endothelial and parenchymal cells achieved similar gas exchange rates compared with acellular devices. Biomimetic blood oxygenator design opens the possibility of creating portable or implantable microfluidic devices that achieve efficient gas transfer while also maintaining physiologic conditions.

  17. Gas Transfer in Cellularized Collagen-Membrane Gas Exchange Devices

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Justin H.; Bassett, Erik K.; Penson, Elliot J. N.; Hoganson, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lower respiratory disease is highly prevalent in the United States, and there remains a need for alternatives to lung transplant for patients who progress to end-stage lung disease. Portable or implantable gas oxygenators based on microfluidic technologies can address this need, provided they operate both efficiently and biocompatibly. Incorporating biomimetic materials into such devices can help replicate native gas exchange function and additionally support cellular components. In this work, we have developed microfluidic devices that enable blood gas exchange across ultra-thin collagen membranes (as thin as 2 μm). Endothelial, stromal, and parenchymal cells readily adhere to these membranes, and long-term culture with cellular components results in remodeling, reflected by reduced membrane thickness. Functionally, acellular collagen-membrane lung devices can mediate effective gas exchange up to ∼288 mL/min/m2 of oxygen and ∼685 mL/min/m2 of carbon dioxide, approaching the gas exchange efficiency noted in the native lung. Testing several configurations of lung devices to explore various physical parameters of the device design, we concluded that thinner membranes and longer gas exchange distances result in improved hemoglobin saturation and increases in pO2. However, in the design space tested, these effects are relatively small compared to the improvement in overall oxygen and carbon dioxide transfer by increasing the blood flow rate. Finally, devices cultured with endothelial and parenchymal cells achieved similar gas exchange rates compared with acellular devices. Biomimetic blood oxygenator design opens the possibility of creating portable or implantable microfluidic devices that achieve efficient gas transfer while also maintaining physiologic conditions. PMID:26020102

  18. Optimised design and development of a bio-medical healthcare device through quality function deployment (QFD).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Jitendra

    2012-01-01

    Technology is major stimulus for change and is imbibed in various forms; especially in the field of medical devices and bio-medical instruments used in life and death situations. Cardiotocograph (CTG), a foetal heart rate and uterine contraction monitoring and measurement machine, is a valuable tool in the process of childbirth. The Quality Function Deployment (QFD) is an engineering technique with the number one priority being to satisfy the customer. The aim of using QFD in this paper is to highlight the limitations and complexities of the present instrument. The paper attempts to first discuss out the operational details of the instrument along with a brief review of the relevant literature. Following this, its functional analysis is carried out through QFD - a TQM tool. The resultant outcome enlists CTG functions with their Raw Weight and Priority Score. A detailed theoretical analysis of results pinpoints basic functional limitation of exiting machine.

  19. Ultrasonic probe deployment device for increased wave transmission and rapid area scan inspections

    DOEpatents

    DiMambro, Joseph; Roach, Dennis P; Rackow, Kirk A; Nelson, Ciji L; Dasch, Cameron J; Moore, David G

    2013-02-12

    An ultrasonic probe deployment device in which an ultrasound-transmitting liquid forms the portion of the ultrasonic wave path in contact with the surface being inspected (i.e., the inspection surface). A seal constrains flow of the liquid, for example preventing the liquid from surging out and flooding the inspection surface. The seal is not rigid and conforms to variations in the shape and unevenness of the inspection surface, thus forming a seal (although possibly a leaky seal) around the liquid. The probe preferably is held in place to produce optimum ultrasonic focus on the area of interest. Use of encoders can facilitate the production of C-scan area maps of the material being inspected.

  20. Ultrasonic probe deployment device for increased wave transmission and rapid area scan inspections

    DOEpatents

    DiMambro, Joseph [Placitas, NM; Roach, Dennis P [Albuquerque, NM; Rackow, Kirk A [Albuquerque, NM; Nelson, Ciji L [Albuquerque, NM; Dasch, Cameron J [Boomfield Hills, MI; Moore, David G [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-01-03

    An ultrasonic probe deployment device in which an ultrasound-transmitting liquid forms the portion of the ultrasonic wave path in contact with the surface being inspected (i.e., the inspection surface). A seal constrains flow of the liquid, for example preventing the liquid from surging out and flooding the inspection surface. The seal is not rigid and conforms to variations in the shape and unevenness of the inspection surface, thus forming a seal (although possibly a leaky seal) around the liquid. The probe preferably is held in place to produce optimum ultrasonic focus on the area of interest. Use of encoders can facilitate the production of C-scan area maps of the material being inspected.

  1. A Female Urinary Diversion Device for Military Women in the Deployed Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-27

    Urination and FUDD Use during Deployment Survey” at 3 and 6 months during deployment. The CG completed the “Urination during Deployment Survey” at 3...and 6 months during deployment. Sample: MW (n = 94) deployed for ≥ 6 months to austere locations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF...completed the three- month questionnaire and twenty-six completed the six- month questionnaire. Of the 33 individuals randomized to the CG, seven

  2. A Versatile and Rapidly Deployable Device to Enable Spatiotemporal Observations of the Sessile Microbes and Environmental Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kiyokawa, Tatsunori; Usuba, Ryo; Obana, Nozomu; Yokokawa, Masatoshi; Toyofuku, Masanori; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Although microbes typically associate with surfaces, detailed observations of surface-associated microbes on natural substrata are technically challenging. We herein introduce a flow channel device named the Stickable Flow Device, which is easily configurable and deployable on various surfaces for the microscopic imaging of environmental microbes. We demonstrated the utility of this device by creating a flow channel on different types of surfaces including live leaves. This device enables the real-time imaging of bacterial biofilms and their substrata. The Stickable Flow Device expands the limits of conventional real-time imaging systems, thereby contributing to a deeper understanding of microbe-surface interactions on various surfaces. PMID:28321008

  3. Smart nanogrid systems for disaster mitigation employing deployable renewable energy harvesting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.; Menendez, Michael; Minei, Brenden; Wong, Kyle; Gabrick, Caton; Thornton, Matsu; Ghorbani, Reza

    2016-04-01

    This paper explains the development of smart nanogrid systems for disaster mitigation employing deployable renewable energy harvesting, or Deployable Disaster Devices (D3), where wind turbines and solar panels are developed in modular forms, which can be tied together depending on the needed power. The D3 packages/units can be used: (1) as a standalone unit in case of a disaster where no source of power is available, (2) for a remote location such as a farm, camp site, or desert (3) for a community that converts energy usage from fossil fuels to Renewable Energy (RE) sources, or (4) in a community system as a source of renewable energy for grid-tie or off-grid operation. In Smart D3 system, the power is generated (1) for consumer energy needs, (2) charge storage devices (such as batteries, capacitors, etc.), (3) to deliver power to the network when the smart D3 nano-grid is tied to the network and when the power generation is larger than consumption and storage recharge needs, or (4) to draw power from the network when the smart D3 nano-grid is tied to the network and when the power generation is less than consumption and storage recharge needs. The power generated by the Smart D3 systems are routed through high efficiency inverters for proper DC to DC or DC to AC for final use or grid-tie operations. The power delivery from the D3 is 220v AC, 110v AC and 12v DC provide proper power for most electrical and electronic devices worldwide. The power supply is scalable, using a modular system that connects multiple units together. This are facilitated through devices such as external Input-Output or I/O ports. The size of the system can be scaled depending on how many accessory units are connected to the I/O ports on the primary unit. The primary unit is the brain of the system allowing for smart switching and load balancing of power input and smart regulation of power output. The Smart D3 systems are protected by ruggedized weather proof casings allowing for operation

  4. ActiviTeen: A Protocol for Deployment of a Consumer Wearable Device in an Academic Setting

    PubMed Central

    Tueller, Stephen J; Cook, Sarah L; Furberg, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Background Regular physical activity (PA) can be an important indicator of health across an individual’s life span. Consumer wearables, such as Fitbit or Jawbone, are becoming increasingly popular to track PA. With the increased adoption of activity trackers comes the increased generation of valuable individual-based data. Generated data has the potential to provide detailed insights into the user’s behavior and lifestyle. Objective The primary objective of the described study is to evaluate the feasibility of individual data collection from the selected consumer wearable device (the Fitbit Zip). The rate of user attrition and barriers preventing the use of consumer wearable devices will also be evaluated as secondary objectives. Methods The pilot study will occur in two stages and employs a long-term review and analysis with a convenience sample of 30 students attending Research Triangle High School. For the first stage, students will initially be asked to wear the Fitbit Zip over the course of 4 weeks. During which time, their activity data and step count will be collected. Students will also be asked to complete a self-administered survey at the beginning and conclusion of the first stage. The second stage will continue to collect students’ activity data and step count over an additional 3-month period. Results We are anticipating results for this study by the end of 2016. Conclusion This study will provide insight into the data collection procedures surrounding consumer wearable devices and could serve as the future foundation for other studies deploying consumer wearable devices in educational settings. PMID:27457824

  5. High-Precision Shape Control of In-Space Deployable Large Membrane/Thin-Shell Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This innovation has been developed to improve the resolutions of future spacebased active and passive microwave antennas for earth-science remote sensing missions by maintaining surface figure precisions of large membrane/thin-shell reflectors during orbiting. The intention is for these sensing instruments to be deployable at orbit altitudes one or two orders of magnitude higher than Low Earth Orbit (LEO), but still being able to acquire measurements at spatial resolution and sensitivity similar to those of LEO. Because active and passive microwave remote sensors are able to penetrate through clouds to acquire vertical profile measurements of geophysical parameters, it is desirable to elevate them to the higher orbits to obtain orbital geometries that offer large spatial coverage and more frequent observations. This capability is essential for monitoring and for detailed understanding of the life cycles of natural hazards, such as hurricanes, tropical storms, flash floods, and tsunamis. Major components of this high-precision antenna-surface-control system include a membrane/thin shell reflector, a metrology sensor, a controller, actuators, and corresponding power amplifier and signal conditioning electronics (see figure). Actuators are attached to the back of the reflector to produce contraction/ expansion forces to adjust the shape of the thin-material reflector. The wavefront-sensing metrology system continuously measures the surface figure of the reflector, converts the surface figure to digital data and feeds the data to the controller. The controller determines the control parameters and generates commands to the actuator system. The flexible, piezoelectric polymer actuators are thus activated, providing the control forces needed to correct any distortions that exist in the reflector surface. Piezoelectric polymer actuators are very thin and flexible. They can be implemented on the back of the membrane/thin-shell reflector without introducing significant

  6. Nanocapillary Membrane Devices: A Study in Electrokinetic Transport Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffbauer, Jarrod

    There is considerable interest in developing micro-total analysis systems, also known as lab-on-a-chip devices, for applications in chemical and biological analysis. These devices often employ electrokinetic transport phenomena to move, mix, concentrate and separate dissolved species. The details of these phenomena in micro- and nanometer scale geometries are not fully understood; consequently, the basic principles of device operation are often unclear. For example, nanocapillary membranes (NCM) and other nanometer-sized passages can exhibit charge-selectivity and rectification effects similar to those observed in biological membranes. This dissertation addresses several issues related to ion transport in these membranes. Leading-order 1D steady-state models for diffusion-layer modulated transport through non-ideal membranes are used to study ionic rectification in geometrically asymmetric devices. These models provide qualitative explanations of the operation of a variety of fluidic rectifiers and experimentally observed hysteresis effects. By taking the first steps in the full boundary-layer analysis of the model, it is shown that non-ideal membranes do not maintain local electro-neutrality under passage of electric current. This is in contrast to the usual assumption of membrane local electro-neutrality, but is compatible with the existence of the non-equilibrium macroscopic space charge known to appear in the flanking electrolyte and the requirement of overall charge conservation. Lastly, the problem of electrokinetic instability due to non-equilibrium electro-osmotic slip is considered for the case of an electrolyte-membrane interface inside a 2D channel.

  7. Application of semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) as passive air samplers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petty, Jimmie D.; Huckins, James N.; Zajicek, James L.

    1993-01-01

    The semipermeable membrane device (SPMD), consisting of a neutral lipid (triolein) enclosed in polyethylene layflat tubing, is demonstrated to be a highly efficient passive air sampler. These devices readily sequester lipophilic organic contaminants from the vapor phase. Specifically, the SPMDs are shown to concentrate polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) residues from a laboratory atmosphere in a linear manner through 28 days. Under the conditions of this study, a three device composite (1.4 g triolein) extracted PCB residues from ≈ 7 m3 of air per day.

  8. APPLICATION OF SEMIPERMEABLE MEMBRANE DEVICES TO INDOOR AIR SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) are a relatively new passive sampling technique for nonpolar organic compounds that have been extensively used for surface water sampling. A small body of literature indicates that SPMDs are also useful for air sampling. Because SPMDs ha...

  9. APPLICATION OF SEMIPERMEABLE MEMBRANE DEVICES TO INDOOR AIR SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) are a relatively new passive sampling technique for nonpolar organic compounds that have been extensively used for surface water sampling. A small body of literature indicates that SPMDs are also useful for air sampling. Because SPMDs ha...

  10. Relationship between Device Size and Body Weight in Dogs with Patent Ductus Arteriosus Undergoing Amplatz Canine Duct Occluder Deployment.

    PubMed

    Wesselowski, S; Saunders, A B; Gordon, S G

    2017-09-01

    Deployment of the Amplatz Canine Duct Occluder (ACDO) is the preferred method for minimally invasive occlusion of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in dogs, with appropriate device sizing crucial to successful closure. Dogs of any body weight can be affected by PDA. To describe the range of ACDO sizes deployed in dogs of various body weights for improved procedural planning and inventory selection and to investigate for correlation between minimal ductal diameter (MDD) and body weight. A total of 152 dogs undergoing ACDO deployment between 2008 and 2016. Body weight, age, breed, sex, and MDD obtained by angiography (MDD-A), MDD obtained by transesophageal echocardiography (MDD-TEE), and ACDO size deployed were retrospectively evaluated. Correlation between body weight and ACDO size, MDD-A and MDD-TEE was poor, with R-squared values of 0.4, 0.36, and 0.3, respectively. Femoral artery diameter in the smallest population of dogs placed inherent limitations on the use of larger device sizes, with no limitations on the wide range of device sizes required as patient size increased. The most commonly used ACDO devices were size 3 through 6, representing 57% of the devices deployed within the entire study population. Patent ductus arteriosus anatomy varies on an individual basis, with poor correlation between MDD and body weight. Weight-based assumptions about expected ACDO device size for a given patient are not recommended. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  11. Mathematical modeling of a flat-membrane-controlled release device

    SciTech Connect

    Ramraj, R.; Farrell, S.; Loney, N.W.

    1999-08-01

    The closed form solution to a mathematical model of a flat membrane device successfully predicts the release profile of benzoic acid. Physically, the device consists of a given concentration of benzoic acid in octanol (reservoir) bounded by a microporous flat film (Cellgard 2400) with water-filled pores. The prediction shows excellent agreement with the experimentally derived release profile (maximum difference < 10%). Predicted results are obtained from the use of the steady state plus the first term of the transient solution (infinite series) and with the use of the first nonzero eigenvalue.

  12. Particle sorting using a porous membrane in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Wei, Huibin; Chueh, Bor-han; Wu, Huiling; Hall, Eric W; Li, Cheuk-wing; Schirhagl, Romana; Lin, Jin-Ming; Zare, Richard N

    2011-01-21

    Porous membranes have been fabricated based on the development of the perforated membrane mold [Y. Luo and R. N. Zare, Lab Chip, 2008, 8, 1688-1694] to create a single filter that contains multiple pore sizes ranging from 6.4 to 16.6 µm inside a monolithic three-dimensional poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic structure. By overlapping two filters we are able to achieve smaller pore size openings (2.5 to 3.3 µm). This filter operates without any detectable irreversible clogging, which is achieved using a cross-flow placed in front of each filtration section. The utility of a particle-sorting device that contains this filter is demonstrated by separating polystyrene beads of different diameters with an efficiency greater than 99.9%. Additionally, we demonstrate the effectiveness of this particle-sorting device by separating whole blood samples into white blood cells and red blood cells with platelets.

  13. Nanopods: a new bacterial structure and mechanism for deployment of outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Ameesha; Chen, Shicheng; Tocheva, Elitza I; Jensen, Grant J; Hickey, William J

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are packets of periplasmic material that, via the proteins and other molecules they contain, project metabolic function into the environment. While OMV production is widespread in proteobacteria, they have been extensively studied only in pathogens, which inhabit fully hydrated environments. However, many (arguably most) bacterial habitats, such as soil, are only partially hydrated. In the latter, water is characteristically distributed as films on soil particles that are, on average thinner, than are typical OMV (ca. ≤10 nm water film vs. 20 to >200 nm OMV;). We have identified a new bacterial surface structure, termed a "nanopod", that is a conduit for projecting OMV significant distances (e.g., ≥6 µm) from the cell. Electron cryotomography was used to determine nanopod three-dimensional structure, which revealed chains of vesicles within an undulating, tubular element. By using immunoelectron microscopy, proteomics, heterologous expression and mutagenesis, the tubes were determined to be an assembly of a surface layer protein (NpdA), and the interior structures identified as OMV. Specific metabolic function(s) for nanopods produced by Delftia sp. Cs1-4 are not yet known. However, a connection with phenanthrene degradation is a possibility since nanopod formation was induced by growth on phenanthrene. Orthologs of NpdA were identified in three other genera of the Comamonadaceae family, and all were experimentally verified to form nanopods. Nanopods are new bacterial organelles, and establish a new paradigm in the mechanisms by which bacteria effect long-distance interactions with their environment. Specifically, they create a pathway through which cells can effectively deploy OMV, and the biological activity these transmit, in a diffusion-independent manner. Nanopods would thus allow environmental bacteria to expand their metabolic sphere of influence in a manner previously unknown for these organisms.

  14. Upscaling of a living membrane for bioartificial kidney device.

    PubMed

    Chevtchik, Natalia Vladimirovna; Fedecostante, Michele; Jansen, Jitske; Mihajlovic, Milos; Wilmer, Martijn; Rüth, Marieke; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Stamatialis, Dimitrios

    2016-11-05

    The limited removal of metabolic waste products in dialyzed kidney patients leads to high morbidity and mortality. One powerful solution for a more complete removal of those metabolites might be offered by a bioartificial kidney device (BAK), which contains a hybrid "living membrane" with functional proximal tubule epithelial cells (PTEC). These cells are supported by an artificial functionalized hollow fiber membrane (HFM) and are able to actively remove the waste products. In our earlier studies, conditionally immortalized human PTEC (ciPTEC) showed to express functional organic cationic transporter 2 (OCT2) when seeded on small size flat or hollow fiber polyethersulfone (PES) membranes. Here, an upscaled "living membrane" is presented. We developed and assessed the functionality of modules containing three commercially available MicroPES HFM supporting ciPTEC. The HFM were optimally coated with L-Dopa and collagen IV to support a uniform and tight monolayer formation of matured ciPTEC under static culturing conditions. Both abundant expression of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) protein and limited diffusion of FITC-inulin confirm a clear barrier function of the monolayer. Furthermore, the uptake of 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+)), a fluorescent OCT2 substrate, was studied in absence and presence of known OCT inhibitors, such as cimetidine and a cationic uremic solutes mixture. The ASP(+) uptake by the living upscaled membrane was decreased by 60% in the presence of either inhibitor, proving the active function of OCT2. In conclusion, this study presents a successful upscaling of a living membrane with active organic cation transport as a support for BAK device. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Spatial and temporal benthic species assemblage responses with a deployed marine tidal energy device: a small scaled study.

    PubMed

    Broadhurst, Melanie; Orme, C David L

    2014-08-01

    The addition of man-made structures to the marine environment is known to increase the physical complexity of the seafloor, which can influence benthic species community patterns and habitat structure. However, knowledge of how deployed tidal energy device structures influence benthic communities is currently lacking. Here we examined species biodiversity, composition and habitat type surrounding a tidal energy device within the European Marine Energy Centre test site, Orkney. Commercial fishing and towed video camera techniques were used over three temporal periods, from 2009 to 2010. Our results showed increased species biodiversity and compositional differences within the device site, compared to a control site. Both sites largely comprised of crustacean species, omnivore or predatory feeding regimes and marine tide-swept EUNIS habitat types, which varied over the time. We conclude that the device could act as a localised artificial reef structure, but that further in-depth investigations are required.

  16. A Novel Teflon-membrane Gas Tension Device for Denitrification-studies in Oxygen Minimum Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, A. C.; McNeil, C. L.; D'Asaro, E. A.; Altabet, M. A.; Johnson, B.; Bourbonnais, A.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs) are global hotspots for the biogeochemical transformation of biologically-available forms of nitrogen to unusable nitrogen-gas. We present a new Teflon-membrane based Gas Tension Device (GTD) for measuring the excess N2 signal generated by denitrification and anammox in OMZs, with a hydrostatic pressure-independent response and a depth range from 0 - 550 m, a significant advancement from previous GTD models. The GTD consists of a 4/1000" thick by 2" diameter Teflon-membrane with a water-side plenum connected to SeaBird 5T pump. Dissolved gases in the water equilibrate across the membrane with a low-dead-volume housing connected to a high-precision quart pressure sensor. Laboratory data characterizing the GTD will be presented. The e-folding (response) time ranges from 14 min at continuous (100%) pumping to 28 min at pulse (10%) pumping. We also demonstrate the pressure dependence of the partial pressures from Henry's Law in the laboratory for pure nitrogen, pure oxygen, and standard atmospheric ratios of gases. GTD's were field tested on two floats deployed in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) OMZ for 15 days that targeted a productive mesoscale surface eddy originating from the Mexican coast. We anticipated that high organic carbon export should stimulate denitrification within the OMZ below. The floats profiled between the surface and 400 m depth and concurrently measured T, S, PAR, O2 (SBE 43 and Optode), and nitrate (SUNA). The N2-profiles from the GTDs are validated against independently measured N2/Ar ratio data collected during the deployment.

  17. Nanoscale pressure sensors realized from suspended graphene membrane devices

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera-Servin, Juan; Miao, Tengfei; Bockrath, Marc

    2015-02-23

    We study the transport properties of graphene layers placed over ∼200 nm triangular holes via attached electrodes under applied pressure. We find that the injected current division between counter electrodes depends on pressure and can be used to realize a nanoscale pressure sensor. Estimating various potential contributions to the resistivity change of the deflected graphene membrane including piezoresistivity, changing gate capacitance, and the valley Hall effect due to the pressure-induced synthetic magnetic field, we find that the valley Hall effect yields the largest expected contribution to the longitudinal resistivity modulation for accessible device parameters. Such devices in the ballistic transport regime may enable the realization of tunable valley polarized electron sources.

  18. Nanoscale pressure sensors realized from suspended graphene membrane devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera-Servin, Juan; Miao, Tengfei; Bockrath, Marc

    2015-02-01

    We study the transport properties of graphene layers placed over ˜200 nm triangular holes via attached electrodes under applied pressure. We find that the injected current division between counter electrodes depends on pressure and can be used to realize a nanoscale pressure sensor. Estimating various potential contributions to the resistivity change of the deflected graphene membrane including piezoresistivity, changing gate capacitance, and the valley Hall effect due to the pressure-induced synthetic magnetic field, we find that the valley Hall effect yields the largest expected contribution to the longitudinal resistivity modulation for accessible device parameters. Such devices in the ballistic transport regime may enable the realization of tunable valley polarized electron sources.

  19. Investigation of the distribution of organochlorine and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds in the lower Columbia River using semipermeable membrane devices

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, K.A.; Gale, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    The authors used semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) to sample water, and achieved sub-parts-per-quintillion detection limits. They deployed SPMDs during 1997 low-flow conditions and 1998 high-flow conditions at nine main-stem sites and seven tributary sites, spanning approximately 700 miles of the Columbia River. They also collected streambed sediment from three sites. SPMD extracts and sediments were analyzed for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzo-furans, polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides and related transformation products, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  20. A Middleware Based Approach to Dynamically Deploy Location Based Services onto Heterogeneous Mobile Devices Using Bluetooth in Indoor Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhukhan, Pampa; Sen, Rijurekha; Das, Pradip K.

    Several methods for providing location based service (LBS) to mobile devices in indoor environment using wireless technologies like WLAN, RFID and Bluetooth have been proposed, implemented and evaluated. However, most of them do not focus on heterogeneity of mobile platforms, memory constraint of mobile devices, the adaptability of client or device to the new services it discovers whenever it reaches a new location. In this paper, we have proposed a Middleware based approach of LBS provision in the indoor environment, where a Bluetooth enabled Base Station (BS) detects Bluetooth enabled mobile devices and pushes a proper client application only to those devices that belong to some registered subscriber of LBS. This dynamic deployment enables the mobile clients to access any new service without having preinstalled interface to that service beforehand and thus the client's memory consumption is reduced. Our proposed work also addresses the other issues like authenticating the clients before providing them LBSs and introducing paid services. We have evaluated its performance in term of file transfer time with respect to file size and throughput with respect to distance. Experimental results on service consumption time by the mobile client for different services are also presented.

  1. Stabilized liquid membrane device (SLMD) for the passive, integrative sampling of labile metals in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brumbaugh, W.G.; Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.; Manahan, S.E.

    2002-01-01

    A stabilized liquid membrane device (SLMD) is described for potential use as an in situ, passive, integrative sampler for cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in natural waters. The SLMD (patent pending) consists of a 2.5-cm-wide by 15-cm-long strip of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) layflat tubing containing 1 mL of an equal mixture (v/v) of oleic acid (cis-9-octadecenoic acid) and EMO-8Q (7-[4-ethyl-1-methyloctyl]-8-quinolinol). The reagent mixture continuously diffuses to the exterior surface of the LDPE membrane, and provides for sequestration of several divalent metals for up to several weeks. Depending on sampler configuration, concentration factors of several thousand can be realized for these metal ions after just a few days. In addition to in situ deployment, the SLMD may be useful for laboratory determination of labile metal species in grab samples. Methods for minimizing the effects of water flow on the sampling rate are currently under investigation.

  2. Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) as universal environmental monitors for trace contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Prest, H.F.; Hodgins, M.M.; Jacobson, L.A.; Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.; Brown, J.; Wilson, M.

    1995-12-31

    The vast majority of data complied on trace contaminants in water has been acquired through biomonitoring; using organisms as bioconcentrators of trace substances. A particularly successful and widely applied approach utilizes bivalves in local, national, and international mussel watch programs. Attractive features of this approach are the widespread occurrence of bivalves, their high tolerance and viability, ease of analysis, and high bioconcentration factors for a wide range of compounds. However, uncertainties about uptake, deputation and biotransformation of contaminants convolute the data and make quantitative statements about water concentrations difficult. Recent developments demonstrate semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) are a promising new tool for biomonitoring. SPMDs are inexpensive, tolerant of extreme conditions, and concentrations of analytes sequestered by SPMDs can be used to infer bioconcentration potential and average ambient concentrations. The authors present data from freshwater systems such as the San Juan River comparing spatial trends in PAH metabolites in fish bile and PAHs sequestered by SPMDs, and marine environments such as PAHs in SPMDs deployed in Cook Inlet, Alaska. These data support the case for SPMDs as universal monitoring devices or pseudo-organisms that will provide a standardized approach to measuring and monitoring trace contaminants on both local and global scales.

  3. Interactions of aquatic animals with the ORPC OCGen® in Cobscook Bay, Maine: Monitoring behavior change and assessing the probability of encounter with a deployed MHK device

    SciTech Connect

    Zydlewski, Gayle Barbin; Staines, Garrett; Viehman, Haley; Shen, Haixue; Altenritter, Megan

    2016-10-19

    Commercial viability of the marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry is contingent on numerous and diverse factors. A major factor is the effects deployed devices have on animals. This factor is multi-faceted since it is dependent on the availability of appropriate scientific approaches to detect these effects. One of the animal groups with overlapping distributions of MHK devices are fishes. As such, individual fish behavior is likely to be influenced by the presence and operation of MHK devices. Depending on the scale of deployment there are implications for changes to essential fish habitat and effects that can be explored during deployment of a single device yet most changes are likely to be realized when multiple devices are deployed over large areas. It is not only important to document these effects and examine the need for mitigation, but also determine whether the methods involved can be used within the economic constraints of this nascent industry. The results presented in this report benefit the MHK industry by providing transferrable environmental monitoring approaches for MHK projects, specifically related to the interactions between static and dynamic tidal turbines and fish. In addition, some of the data can be used to generalize conditions (e.g., the temporal periodicity of fish presence in tidal regions and probability of fish encountering a device) at other MHK sites with similar physical conditions and fish assemblages. Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC (ORPC) deployed and tested a prototype OCGen® tidal module in Cobscook Bay, Maine, in the summer of 2014. University of Maine researchers proposed an approach to inform other researchers, regulators, and industry members of the effects of this deployment on fish. While the approach was specifically applied to the OCGen® module, results are applicable to other pilot projects and inform future array deployments. Research funded under this grant allowed us to quantify fish presence as well as

  4. Obstacles delaying the prompt deployment of piston-type mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation devices during emergency department resuscitation: a video-recording and time-motion study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Edward Pei-Chuan; Wang, Hui-Chih; Ko, Patrick Chow-In; Chang, Anna Marie; Fu, Chia-Ming; Chen, Jiun-Wei; Liao, Yen-Chen; Liu, Hung-Chieh; Fang, Yao-De; Yang, Chih-Wei; Chiang, Wen-Chu; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Chen, Shyr-Chyr

    2013-09-01

    The quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is important to survival after cardiac arrest. Mechanical devices (MD) provide constant CPR, but their effectiveness may be affected by deployment timeliness. To identify the timeliness of the overall and of each essential step in the deployment of a piston-type MD during emergency department (ED) resuscitation, and to identify factors associated with delayed MD deployment by video recordings. Between December 2005 and December 2008, video clips from resuscitations with CPR sessions using a MD in the ED were reviewed using time-motion analyses. The overall deployment timeliness and the time spent on each essential step of deployment were measured. There were 37 CPR recordings that used a MD. Deployment of MD took an average 122.6 ± 57.8s. The 3 most time-consuming steps were: (1) setting the device (57.8 ± 38.3s), (2) positioning the patient (33.4 ± 38.0 s), and (3) positioning the device (14.7 ± 9.5s). Total no flow time was 89.1 ± 41.2s (72.7% of total time) and associated with the 3 most time-consuming steps. There was no difference in the total timeliness, no-flow time, and no-flow ratio between different rescuer numbers, time of day of the resuscitation, or body size of patients. Rescuers spent a significant amount of time on MD deployment, leading to long no-flow times. Lack of familiarity with the device and positioning strategy were associated with poor performance. Additional training in device deployment strategies are required to improve the benefits of mechanical CPR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Design and Sizing of a 40M2 Deployable Membrane SAR Space Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straubel, Marco; Huhne, Christian; Arlt, Christine; Langlois, Stephane; Sinapius, Michael

    2012-07-01

    As there is still a demand for large SAR apertures for L and P-band, DLR and ESA decide in 2007 to start a collaborative study on VERY LARGE STABLE MEMBRANE ANTENNA ARCHITECTURES that is focussed on gossamer structures. The results of this study are shown in the paper. It contains a brief discussion on available conventional and gossamer antenna designs and introduces the elaborated design of our study. In addition, the sizing of the antenna parts is presented in extracts. An automated sizing approach involving routines in MATLAB and ANSYS is introduces that performs an autonomous sizing of such antenna structure for launch and operation loads within a time frame of about 8 minutes. Finally, this automatic sizing approach is used to do a parameter study and show the consequence of changed requirements or antenna membrane specification on the over all mass and mass spreading.

  6. Low-cost relative navigation sensing: GNSS-like devices hosted on deployed tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmenarejo, Pablo; di Sotto, Emanuele; Barrena, Valentín

    2006-10-01

    pseudolites and the receiving antennas. The ideal being the emitters uniformly distributed in the receiver antenna field of view. It is analysed how to achieve this spatial distribution, that cannot be accomplished by placing multiple emitters on-board the same vehicle structure (characteristic spacecraft dimension will be much smaller than the inter-spacecraft distance) by using a tether-based deployed pseudolites system. Tether deployment mechanisms, particularly gravity gradient assisted, are assessed in the paper, in order to achieve the best RF emitter pseudolites distribution for a maximum formation flying navigation determination accuracy.

  7. Pilot Scale Water Gas Shift - Membrane Device for Hydrogen from Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Tom

    2013-06-30

    The objectives of the project were to build pilot scale hydrogen separation systems for use in a gasification product stream. This device would demonstrate fabrication and manufacturing techniques for producing commercially ready facilities. The design was a 2 lb/day hydrogen device which included composite hydrogen separation membranes, a water gas shift monolith catalyst, and stainless steel structural components. Synkera Technologies was to prepare hydrogen separation membranes with metallic rims, and to adjust the alloy composition in their membranes to a palladium-gold composition which is sulfur resistant. Chart was to confirm their brazing technology for bonding the metallic rims of the composite membranes to their structural components and design and build the 2 lbs/day device incorporating membranes and catalysts. WRI prepared the catalysts and completed the testing of the membranes and devices on coal derived syngas. The reactor incorporated eighteen 2'' by 7'' composite palladium alloy membranes. These membranes were assembled with three stacks of three paired membranes. Initial vacuum testing and visual inspection indicated that some membranes were cracked, either in transportation or in testing. During replacement of the failed membranes, while pulling a vacuum on the back side of the membranes, folds were formed in the flexible composite membranes. In some instances these folds led to cracks, primarily at the interface between the alumina and the aluminum rim. The design of the 2 lb/day device was compromised by the lack of any membrane isolation. A leak in any membrane failed the entire device. A large number of tests were undertaken to bring the full 2 lb per day hydrogen capacity on line, but no single test lasted more than 48 hours. Subsequent tests to replace the mechanical seals with brazing have been promising, but the technology remains promising but not proven.

  8. Device and method for the measurement of gas permeability through membranes

    DOEpatents

    Agarwal, Pradeep K.; Ackerman, John; Borgialli, Ron; Hamann, Jerry; Muknahalliptna, Suresh

    2006-08-08

    A device for the measuring membrane permeability in electrical/electrochemical/photo-electrochemical fields is provided. The device is a permeation cell and a tube mounted within the cell. An electrode is mounted at one end of the tube. A membrane is mounted within the cell wherein a corona is discharged from the electrode in a general direction toward the membrane thereby generating heated hydrogen atoms adjacent the membrane. A method for measuring the effects of temperature and pressure on membrane permeability and selectivity is also provided.

  9. Purification of triolein for use in semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lebo, J.A.; Almeida, F.V.; Cranor, W.L.; Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.; Rastall, A.; Alvarez, D.A.; Mogensen, B.B.; Johnson, B. Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Analyses of triolein-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) have sometimes been impeded by interferences caused by impurities endemic to triolein that codialyze with the analytes. Oleic acid and methyl oleate have been the most troublesome of these impurities because of their relatively high concentrations in triolein and because significant residues of both can persist even after size exclusion chromatographic (SEC) fractionation. These residues have also been blamed for false-positive signals during bioindicator testing of SPMD dialysates. To prevent these problems, a simple, cost-effective procedure was developed for purifying triolein destined for use in SPMDs: the bulk triolein is repeatedly (6×) partitioned against methanol. Tests of the procedure show that 14C-oleic acid is completely removed from the triolein. After SEC fractionation, dialysates of standard-size SPMDs made with the purified triolein contain less than 5 μg of methyl oleate as compared to sometimes more than 500 μg for dialysates (also after SEC) of SPMDs made with unpurified triolein. Gas chromatographic analyses with flame ionization and electron capture detection show that the purification treatment also greatly reduces the number and size of peaks caused by unidentified contaminants in the triolein. Microtox basic assay of dialysates of SPMDs shows that those made with the purified triolein have lower acute toxicities than dialysates of SPMDs made with unpurified triolein. Yeast estrogen screen (YES) testing of SPMDs fabricated with unpurified and purified triolein demonstrates that the purification process removes all background estrogenic activity.

  10. Deployable Reflector for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Unfoldable-membrane-reflector concept leads to mobile photovoltaic generators. Hinged containers swing open for deployment, and counterbalance beam swings into position. Folded reflector membranes are unfolded as deployment mast is extended, until stretched out flat.

  11. Advanced membrane devices. Interim report for October 1996--September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Laciak, D.V.; Langsam, M.; Lewnard, J.J.; Reichart, G.C.

    1997-12-31

    Under this Cooperative Agreement, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has continued to investigate and develop improved membrane technology for removal of carbon dioxide from natural gas. The task schedule for this reporting period included a detailed assessment of the market opportunity (Chapter 2), continued development and evaluation of membranes and membrane polymers (Chapter 3) and a detailed economic analysis comparing the potential of Air Products membranes to that of established acid gas removal processes (Chapter 4).

  12. An approach for assessment of water quality using semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and bioindicator tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petty, J.D.; Jones, S.B.; Huckins, J.N.; Cranor, W.L.; Parris, J.T.; McTague, T.B.; Boyle, T.P.

    2000-01-01

    As an integral part of our continued development of water quality assessment approaches, we combined integrative sampling, instrumental analysis of widely occurring anthropogenic contaminants, and the application of a suite of bioindicator tests as a specific part of a broader survey of ecological conditions, species diversity, and habitat quality in the Santa Cruz River in Arizona, USA. Lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were employed to sequester waterborne hydrophobic chemicals. Instrumental analysis and a suite of bioindicator tests were used to determine the presence and potential toxicological relevance of mixtures of bioavailable chemicals in two major water sources of the Santa Cruz River. The SPMDs were deployed at two sites; the effluent weir of the International Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWWTP) and the Nogales Wash. Both of these systems empty into the Santa Cruz River and the IWWTP effluent is a potential source of water for a constructed wetland complex. Analysis of the SPMD sample extracts revealed the presence of organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The bioindicator tests demonstrated increased liver enzyme activity, perturbation of neurotransmitter systems and potential endocrine disrupting effects (vitellogenin induction) in fish exposed to the extracts. With increasing global demands on limited water resources, the approach described herein provides an assessment paradigm applicable to determining the quality of water in a broad range of aquatic systems.

  13. Development of bioassay techniques with extracts from semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs)

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, T.L.; White, P.; Mackay, D.; Metcalfe, C.

    1995-12-31

    Semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs), consisting of polyethylene bags filled with triolein, have been used to monitor for lipophilic organic contaminants in water. Although extracts from SPMDs have most often been analyzed for concentrations of organic contaminants, there is also the potential to monitor the toxicity of these extracts using in vitro and in vivo bioassays. SPMDs were deployed for four weeks at several sites along a corridor extending from Peche Island in the Detroit River to Pelee Island in western Lake Erie to monitor the distribution of toxic organic contaminants in the water. Analysis of the extracts from the SPMDs for concentrations of PCBs and other organochlorine compounds, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) indicated that the regions in the Detroit River within the Trenton Channel and near Zug Island were the most highly contaminated. Bioassays conducted with extracts from the SPMDs included the in vitro SOS Chromotest for genotoxic activity, an acute lethality test with Daphnia magna, and a fish embryotoxicity test with embryos of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). These bioassay data generally indicated that the toxicity and concentrations of organic contaminants in the SPMD extracts were correlated. This study indicates that there is potential to use short-term bioassays of extracts from SPMDs to monitor for in situ contamination in the aquatic environment.

  14. Field uptake rates of hydrophobic organic contaminants by semipermeable membrane devices: environmental monitoring considerations.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C; Borghini, F; Corral, A; Grimalt, J O

    2004-11-01

    The uptake rates of selected hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) by semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs)--a polyethylene layflat containing the lipid triolein--were investigated under natural conditions. SPMDs were exposed in three sampling sites (industrial, urban, and agricultural areas) in the Tajo River (Toledo, Spain) for 5, 11 and 20 d. The organochlorine compounds 4,4'-DDT, 4,4'-DDE, alpha-HCH, gamma-HCH, pentachlorobenzene, hexachlorobenzene, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and the 16 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected in the SPMDs deployed in the three sampling sites. A linear uptake rate was found for DDTs and for 4-Cl- and 5-Cl-substituted PCB congeners in all sampling sites. Concentrations of HCHs (80.3 ng g(-1) SPMD for alpha-HCH and 109 ng g(-1) SPMD for gamma-HCH after 20 d of exposure) increased according to a linear uptake rate in the SPMDs deployed in the sampling site located in the agricultural area. Likewise, a marked increase of total PAH concentration (up to 300 ng g(-1) SPMD after 20 d of exposure) was solely found in the sampling site situated near a thermoelectric power station. Examination of individual PAHs revealed that PAHs with log K(OW) between 4.2 and 5.7 displayed a linear uptake rate over the 20 d of exposure. Water concentrations (ng L(-1)) of HCB (0.80-2.48), lindane (1.30-11.5), 4,4'-DDT (0.61-2.02), 4,4'-DDE (6.89-11.6) and total PAHs (12.0-26.7) estimated by a linear uptake kinetic model were found to be high in comparison with other polluted aquatic systems, and similar to concentrations in other Spanish rivers. Our results suggest that SPMD kinetic uptake studies in the natural environment are recommended for identifying point-pollution sources, and that shorter times of SPMD exposure (approximately 1 week) are desirable to minimize one of the main problems of field SPMD deployment, i.e., the biofouling, which negatively affects the estimation of the dissolved HOC

  15. Caged mussels and semipermeable membrane devices as indicators of organic contaminant uptake in Dorchester and Duxbury Bays, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Peven, C.S.; Uhler, A.D.; Querzoli, F.J.

    1996-02-01

    An experiment to measure organic contaminant depuration by the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) was carried out by transplanting mussels in stainless steel cages from a known contaminated site in Dorchester Bay, Massachusetts to a documented clean site in Duxbury Bay, Massachusetts approximately 30 nmi south of the original collection site. A parallel contaminant uptake experiment was performed in which mussels from Duxbury Bay were collected and deployed in similar cages in Dorchester Bay. The bivalves were collected from each transplant site at set intervals over a period of 95 days to monitor the rates and selectivity of depuration and uptake, respectively, of polynuclear atomic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), and chlorinated pesticides. In a related study, semipermeable membrane devices (SPMD: polyethylene bags) containing the lipid material triolein were deployed in Dorchester Bay and collected at the same frequency as the caged mussels to evaluate their effectiveness as models for estimating bioconcentration of target organic contaminants. At the Duxbury site, results suggest that the caged mussels depurated contaminants within 68 days to levels found in native animals at the site. At the Dorchester site, bivalves concentrated the contaminants to a level similar to the native M. edulis. PCB and DDT uptake rates were found to be similar between caged mussels and SPMDs; PAH uptake by the SPMDs was initially lower than by transplanted bivalves. PCB and PAH assemblages were noticeably different between bivalves and SPMDs deployed at the same site.

  16. Right ventricular assist device with membrane oxygenator support for right ventricular failure following implantable left ventricular assist device placement.

    PubMed

    Leidenfrost, Jeremy; Prasad, Sunil; Itoh, Akinobu; Lawrance, Christopher P; Bell, Jennifer M; Silvestry, Scott C

    2016-01-01

    Cardiogenic shock from refractory right ventricular (RV) failure during left ventricular assist device placement is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The addition of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation to RV mechanical assistance may help RV recovery and lead to improved outcomes. We retrospectively reviewed all implanted continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices from April 2009 to June 2013. RV mechanical support was utilized for RV failure defined as haemodynamic instability despite vasopressors, pulmonary vascular dilators and inotropic therapy. RV assist devices were utilized with and without in-line membrane oxygenation. During the study period, 267 continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices were implanted. RV mechanical support was utilized in 27 (10%) patients; 12 (46%) had the addition of in-line extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The mean age of patients with a right ventricular assist device with membrane oxygenation was lower than that in patients with a right ventricular assist device alone (45.6 ± 15.9 vs 64.6 ± 6.5, P = 0.001). Support was weaned in 66% (10 of 15) of patients with right ventricular assist device (RVAD) alone vs 83% (10 of 12) of those with RVAD with membrane oxygenation (P = 0.42). The RVAD was removed after 10.4 ± 9.4 vs 5 ± 2.99 days for patients with a RVAD with membrane oxygenation (P = 0.1). Patients with RVAD with membrane oxygenation had a 30-day mortality rate of 8 vs 47% for those with RVAD alone (P = 0.04). The survival rate after discharge was 86, 63 and 54% at 3, 6 and 12 months for both groups combined. Patients with a RVAD with membrane oxygenation support for acute RV failure after continuous-flow left ventricular assist device implantation had a lower 30-day mortality than those with a RVAD alone. Patients who survive to discharge have a reasonable 1-year survival. Combining membrane oxygenation with RVAD support appears to offer a short-term survival benefit in patients with RV failure

  17. Delayed spontaneous perforation of polyvinyl alcohol membrane-Covered atrial septal defect closure devices.

    PubMed

    Labombarda, Fabien; Roule, Vincent; Beygui, Farzin

    2017-03-01

    Percutaneous device closure has become the first choice for secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) closure when feasible in case of favorable anatomy. The Ultrasept II ASD occluder® device (Cardia Inc, Eagan, MN) is made of two nitinol disc frames covered with polyvinyl alcohol membranes, a synthetic polymer with a large application in the biomedical field. Four relatively early malfunctions of the polyvinyl alcohol membrane were observed in a series of six consecutive patients treated with ASD Ultrasept II closure device in our institution. Operators have to be aware of this apparently rare complication that is likely to be underestimated, associated with such devices. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Hollow Fiber Membrane Dehumidification Device for Air Conditioning System.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baiwang; Peng, Na; Liang, Canzeng; Yong, Wai Fen; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2015-11-16

    In order to provide a comfortable living and working environment indoors in tropical countries, the outdoor air often needs to be cooled and dehumidified before it enters the rooms. Membrane separation is an emerging technology for air dehumidification and it is based on the solution diffusion mechanism. Water molecules are preferentially permeating through the membranes due to its smaller kinetic diameter and higher condensability than the other gases. Compared to other dehumidification technologies such as direct cooling or desiccation, there is no phase transition involved in membrane dehumidification, neither the contact between the fresh air stream and the desiccants. Hence, membrane dehumidification would not only require less energy consumption but also avoid cross-contamination problems. A pilot scale air dehumidification system is built in this study which comprises nine pieces of one-inch PAN/PDMS hollow fiber membrane modules. A 150 h long-term test shows that the membrane modules has good water vapor transport properties by using a low vacuum force of only 0.78 bar absolute pressure at the lumen side. The water vapor concentration of the feed humid air decreases dramatically from a range of 18-22 g/m³ to a range of 13.5-18.3 g/m³. Most importantly, the total energy saving is up to 26.2% compared with the conventional air conditioning process.

  19. Hollow Fiber Membrane Dehumidification Device for Air Conditioning System

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Baiwang; Peng, Na; Liang, Canzeng; Yong, Wai Fen; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide a comfortable living and working environment indoors in tropical countries, the outdoor air often needs to be cooled and dehumidified before it enters the rooms. Membrane separation is an emerging technology for air dehumidification and it is based on the solution diffusion mechanism. Water molecules are preferentially permeating through the membranes due to its smaller kinetic diameter and higher condensability than the other gases. Compared to other dehumidification technologies such as direct cooling or desiccation, there is no phase transition involved in membrane dehumidification, neither the contact between the fresh air stream and the desiccants. Hence, membrane dehumidification would not only require less energy consumption but also avoid cross-contamination problems. A pilot scale air dehumidification system is built in this study which comprises nine pieces of one-inch PAN/PDMS hollow fiber membrane modules. A 150 h long-term test shows that the membrane modules has good water vapor transport properties by using a low vacuum force of only 0.78 bar absolute pressure at the lumen side. The water vapor concentration of the feed humid air decreases dramatically from a range of 18–22 g/m3 to a range of 13.5–18.3 g/m3. Most importantly, the total energy saving is up to 26.2% compared with the conventional air conditioning process. PMID:26580660

  20. SCREENING FOR TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS USING SEMIPERMEABLE MEMBRANE DEVICES WITH RAPID TOXICITY ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A time-integrated sampling device interfaced with two toxicity-based assays is reported for monitoring volatile toxic industrial chemicals (TICs). Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) using dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as the fill solvent accumulated each of 17 TICs from the vapor...

  1. SCREENING FOR TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS USING SEMIPERMEABLE MEMBRANE DEVICES WITH RAPID TOXICITY ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A time-integrated sampling device interfaced with two toxicity-based assays is reported for monitoring volatile toxic industrial chemicals (TICs). Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) using dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as the fill solvent accumulated each of 17 TICs from the vapor...

  2. A Wheeled Mobile Device for Deployment of Surface and Subsurface Instruments and for Subsurface Sampling on Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, L.; Bernasconi, M.; Haapanala, S.; Steiner, R.; Coste, P.

    2003-04-01

    As a result of the ESA TRP activity MIDD (Mobile Instrument Deployment Device), an advanced Breadboard Model of a wheeled mobile device for use on planetary surfaces has recently been completed and functionally tested. The vehicle is based on previous mechanical component development work for small wheeled devices performed since 1995 and serves to demonstrate the scientific potential of a 4 kg-class system for supporting surface and subsurface science on a planetary landing mission. Moreover, the device is being extensively used to study general problems of locomotion on regolith-like surface materials and of obstacle negotiation. As payload elements, two spectrometers for mineralogical and elemental studies on surface materials - including rocks - have been foreseen, as well as an acoustic subsurface sounder, a close-up imager and a self-penetrating "Mole" for subsurface measurements and sampling. In addition, a dust removal device was accommodated for preparing rock surfaces for measurements. The mass of the payload, excluding their electronics, amounts to 1.5 kg. Following an accommodation study for the instruments, the vehicle chassis was sized by taking into account planetary surface rock distributions with ground clearance as well as mean straight path constraints, while restricting the number of wheels to four for reasons of simplicity and mass. The two front wheels are mounted on folding levers which allow to contact the soil with the cab and to place the spectrometers and the close-up imager against their targets. Also for operations of the Mole sampling system - reaching depths of more than 1 m and being derived from the "Beagle 2" Mole - , the front wheels are preferably rotated upwards to achieve a larger vehicle base. In order to minimize the stowage volume, a dual wheel configuration was chosen which allows the front wheels to be folded back while overlapping the rear wheels. The folding lever feature also provides a re-righting capability by

  3. Berlin Heart EXCOR Ventricular Assist Device: Multilayer Membrane Rupture in a Pediatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Di Molfetta, Arianna; Filippelli, Sergio; Ferrari, Gianfranco; Secinaro, Aurelio; Zielinski, Krystzof; Amodeo, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    A 2-year-old child was implanted with an Berlin Heart EXCOR Ventricular Assist Device (Berlin Heart, Berlin, Germany) as a bridge to heart transplantation for idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. At postoperative day 296, a significant reduction of membrane movement was observed. The device was explanted and tested on a hydronumerical circulation simulator. Findings suggested that the integrity of the multilayered membrane had been compromised. This was confirmed by a computed tomography scan of the device. The computed tomography evidenced a detachment of the 3-layered membrane, with a thinner, convex layer on the side of the air chamber and an opposite convexity of the remaining membranes. These showed an additional air space within the layers.

  4. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Yamei; Ding, Zhizhong; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS) game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI). In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG), forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI) and a congestion game with capacity (CGC). For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE). Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell) is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified. PMID:26393617

  5. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Yamei; Ding, Zhizhong; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-09-18

    With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS) game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI). In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG), forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI) and a congestion game with capacity (CGC). For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE). Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell) is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified.

  6. Sol-Gel Based Polybenzimidazole Membranes for Hydrogen Pumping Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Benicewicz, Brian

    2014-02-26

    Electrochemical hydrogen pumping using a high temperature (>100°C) PBI membrane was demonstrated under non-humidified and humidified conditions at ambient pressures. Relatively low voltages were required to operate the pump over a wide range of hydrogen flow rates. The advantages of the high temperature capability were shown by operating the pump on reformate feed gas mixtures containing various amounts of CO and CO{sub 2}. Gas purity measurements on the cathode gas product were conducted and significant reductions in gas impurities were detected. The applicability of the PBI membrane for electrochemical hydrogen pumping and its durability under typical operating conditions was established with tests that lasted for nearly 4000 hours.

  7. The use of semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) to concentrate inducers of fish hepatic mixed function oxygenase (MFO): Chapter 12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parrott, Joanne L.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    1997-01-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) are sampling and concentrating devices comprised of a thin polyethylene membrane containing a small quantity of triolein. They have previously been used to sample air, water and sediments and have concentrated fish tainting compounds from pulp mill effluents. The ability to induce mixed function oxygenases (MFOs) is a property of a variety of organic effluents, but the compound(s) responsible for induction have not been identified. We wanted to see if SPMDs would accumulate the MFO-inducing chemical(s) from pulp mill effluents and oil refinery effluents. Dialysates of effluent-exposed SPMDs induced ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity in a fish (Poeciliopsis lucida) hepatoma cell line, PLHC-1. In pulp mill effluents and oil sands mining and refining wastewaters, potencies varied greatly, from a few to thousands of pg TCDD-EQ/g SPMD. Low levels of inducers were seen in four pulp mills on the Athabasca R., and higher levels at one New Brunswick bleached sulphite and two Ontario bleached kraft pulp mills. The highest levels of MFO inducers were in SPMDs deployed for 14 days in wastewater from an oil sands upgrading facility, as well as SPMDs deployed at two sites on Athabasca River tributaries in the oil sands area. This suggests that natural erosion and weathering, as well as industrial processing of the oil sands, can release potent MFO inducers. Background (reference) induction by SPMD extracts ranged from non-detectable (<1) to 20 pg TCDD-EQ/g SPMD. Reactive clean-up of one of the bleached kraft mill effluent-exposed SPMD extracts on a sulfuric acid/silica gel column resulted in loss of the inducer(s), which suggested a polyaromatic hydrocarbon-type of inducing chemical(s), rather than a dioxin or furan inducer. SPMD deployments proved useful in the detection of inducers within the pulp mill process streams as extracts of SPMDs exposed to untreated bleached sulphite effluent were ten to twenty times as potent as those

  8. Trouble-shooting deployment and recovery options for various stationary passive acoustic monitoring devices in both shallow- and deep-water applications.

    PubMed

    Dudzinski, Kathleen M; Brown, Shani J; Lammers, Marc; Lucke, Klaus; Mann, David A; Simard, Peter; Wall, Carrie C; Rasmussen, Marianne Helene; Magnúsdóttir, Edda Elísabet; Tougaard, Jakob; Eriksen, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Deployment of any type of measuring device into the ocean, whether to shallow or deeper depths, is accompanied by the hope that this equipment and associated data will be recovered. The ocean is harsh on gear. Salt water corrodes. Currents, tides, surge, storms, and winds collaborate to increase the severity of the conditions that monitoring devices will endure. All ocean-related research has encountered the situations described in this paper. In collating the details of various deployment and recovery scenarios related to stationary passive acoustic monitoring use in the ocean, it is the intent of this paper to share trouble-shooting successes and failures to guide future work with this gear to monitor marine mammal, fish, and ambient (biologic and anthropogenic) sounds in the ocean-in both coastal and open waters.

  9. Occurrence and concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in semipermeable membrane devices and clams in three urban streams of the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J.B.; Rose, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and Asiatic clams, Corbicula fluminea (MuLLER), were deployed at stream sites in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area to assess the presence of bioavailable, dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Twenty-four PAHs were detected in SPMDs, 20 of which occurred at all sites. Only three PAHs were detected in the co-deployed clams. Throughout all sites, non-alkylated PAHs were found at greater levels in SPMDs than alkylated forms. Nine of 16 Priority Pollutant PAHs were detected in SPMDs. Estimated concentrations of PAHs in water were generally two to three orders of magnitude less than standard minimum analytical reporting levels; however, for bent (a) anthracene, benzo (a) pyrene, and chrysene, estimated concentrations in water exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's human health criteria for these carcinogens in water and aquatic organisms.

  10. Using Consumer Electronics and Apps in Industrial Environments - Development of a Framework for Dynamic Feature Deployment and Extension by Using Apps on Field Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Mathias

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to give a preliminary insight regarding the current work in the field of mobile interaction in industrial environments by using established interaction technologies and metaphors from the consumer goods industry. The major objective is the development and implementation of a holistic app-framework, which enables dynamic feature deployment and extension by using mobile apps on industrial field devices. As a result, field device functionalities can be updated and adapted effectively in accordance with well-known appconcepts from consumer electronics to comply with the urgent requirements of more flexible and changeable factory systems of the future. In addition, a much more user-friendly and utilizable interaction with field devices can be realized. Proprietary software solutions and device-stationary user interfaces can be overcome and replaced by uniform, cross-vendor solutions

  11. Nanowire-integrated microporous silicon membrane for continuous fluid transport in micro cooling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Hongyun; Cheng, Jim C.; Pisano, Albert P.

    2013-10-01

    We report an efficient passive micro pump system combining the physical properties of nanowires and micropores. This nanowire-integrated microporous silicon membrane was created to feed coolant continuously onto the surface of the wick in a micro cooling device to ensure it remains hydrated and in case of dryout, allow for regeneration of the system. The membrane was fabricated by photoelectrochemical etching to form micropores followed by hydrothermal growth of nanowires. This study shows a promising approach to address thermal management challenges for next generation electronic devices with absence of external power.

  12. Nanowire-integrated microporous silicon membrane for continuous fluid transport in micro cooling device

    SciTech Connect

    So, Hongyun; Pisano, Albert P.; Cheng, Jim C.

    2013-10-14

    We report an efficient passive micro pump system combining the physical properties of nanowires and micropores. This nanowire-integrated microporous silicon membrane was created to feed coolant continuously onto the surface of the wick in a micro cooling device to ensure it remains hydrated and in case of dryout, allow for regeneration of the system. The membrane was fabricated by photoelectrochemical etching to form micropores followed by hydrothermal growth of nanowires. This study shows a promising approach to address thermal management challenges for next generation electronic devices with absence of external power.

  13. Membrane filtration device for studying compression of fouling layers in membrane bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Bugge, Thomas Vistisen; Larsen, Poul; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    2017-01-01

    A filtration devise was developed to assess compressibility of fouling layers in membrane bioreactors. The system consists of a flat sheet membrane with air scouring operated at constant transmembrane pressure to assess the influence of pressure on resistance of fouling layers. By fitting a mathematical model, three model parameters were obtained; a back transport parameter describing the kinetics of fouling layer formation, a specific fouling layer resistance, and a compressibility parameter. This stands out from other on-site filterability tests as model parameters to simulate filtration performance are obtained together with a characterization of compressibility. Tests on membrane bioreactor sludge showed high reproducibility. The methodology’s ability to assess compressibility was tested by filtrations of sludges from membrane bioreactors and conventional activated sludge wastewater treatment plants from three different sites. These proved that membrane bioreactor sludge showed higher compressibility than conventional activated sludge. In addition, detailed information on the underlying mechanisms of the difference in fouling propensity were obtained, as conventional activated sludge showed slower fouling formation, lower specific resistance and lower compressibility of fouling layers, which is explained by a higher degree of flocculation. PMID:28749990

  14. Membrane filtration device for studying compression of fouling layers in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Mads Koustrup; Bugge, Thomas Vistisen; Larsen, Poul; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    2017-01-01

    A filtration devise was developed to assess compressibility of fouling layers in membrane bioreactors. The system consists of a flat sheet membrane with air scouring operated at constant transmembrane pressure to assess the influence of pressure on resistance of fouling layers. By fitting a mathematical model, three model parameters were obtained; a back transport parameter describing the kinetics of fouling layer formation, a specific fouling layer resistance, and a compressibility parameter. This stands out from other on-site filterability tests as model parameters to simulate filtration performance are obtained together with a characterization of compressibility. Tests on membrane bioreactor sludge showed high reproducibility. The methodology's ability to assess compressibility was tested by filtrations of sludges from membrane bioreactors and conventional activated sludge wastewater treatment plants from three different sites. These proved that membrane bioreactor sludge showed higher compressibility than conventional activated sludge. In addition, detailed information on the underlying mechanisms of the difference in fouling propensity were obtained, as conventional activated sludge showed slower fouling formation, lower specific resistance and lower compressibility of fouling layers, which is explained by a higher degree of flocculation.

  15. Fluoroscopy-guided snare retrieval of the celt ACD(®) metallic vascular closure device following failed deployment.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Thomas J; Choji, Kiyoshi; Kardos, Attila

    2014-03-01

    We report a case of endovascular snare retrieval of a new stainless steel vascular closure device (Celt ACD(®) , Kimal, Middlesex, UK) from the common femoral artery, following device failure after diagnostic coronary angiography. The stainless steel composition of the device aided successful fluoroscopic localization and removal. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Develpment of Higher Temperature Membrane and Electrode Assembly (MEA) for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Susan Agro, Anthony DeCarmine, Shari Williams

    2005-12-30

    Our work will fucus on developing higher temperature MEAs based on SPEKK polymer blends. Thse MEAs will be designed to operatre at 120 degrees C Higher temperatures, up to 200 degrees C will also be explored. This project will develop Nafion-free MEAs using only SPEKK blends in both membrane and catalytic layers.

  17. Microfabrication of membrane-based devices by deep-reactive ion etching (DRIE) of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Manginell, R.P.; Frye-Mason, G.C.; Schubert, W.K.; Shul, R.J.; Willison, C.G.

    1998-08-01

    Deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) of silicon was utilized to fabricate dielectric membrane-based devices such as microhotplates, valves and flexural plate wave (FPW) devices. Through-wafer DRIE is characterized by fast etch rates ({approximately} 3 {micro}m/min), crystal orientation independence, vertical sidewall profiles and CMOS compatibility. Low-stress silicon nitride, a popular membrane material, has an appreciable DRIE etch rate. To overcome this limitations DRIE can be accompanied by a brief wet chemical etch. This approach has been demonstrated using KOH or HF/Nitric/Acetic etchants, both of which have significantly lower etch rates on silicon nitride than does DRIE. The DRIE etch properties of composite membranes consisting of silicon dioxide and silicon nitride layers are also under evaluation due to the higher DRIE selectivity to silicon dioxide.

  18. Cell membrane-inspired phospholipid polymers for developing medical devices with excellent biointerfaces

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    This review article describes fundamental aspects of cell membrane-inspired phospholipid polymers and their usefulness in the development of medical devices. Since the early 1990s, polymers composed of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) units have been considered in the preparation of biomaterials. MPC polymers can provide an artificial cell membrane structure at the surface and serve as excellent biointerfaces between artificial and biological systems. They have also been applied in the surface modification of some medical devices including long-term implantable artificial organs. An MPC polymer biointerface can suppress unfavorable biological reactions such as protein adsorption and cell adhesion – in other words, specific biomolecules immobilized on an MPC polymer surface retain their original functions. MPC polymers are also being increasingly used for creating biointerfaces with artificial cell membrane structures. PMID:27877525

  19. Crack-Photolithography for Membrane-Free Diffusion-Based Micro/Nanofluidic Devices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minseok; Kim, Taesung

    2015-11-17

    Recent advances in controlling the cracking phenomena established a novel unconventional fabrication technique to generate mixed-scale patterns/structures with resolution and accuracy comparable to conventional nanofabrication techniques. Here, we adapt our previous cracking-assisted nanofabrication technique (called "crack-photolithography") relying on only the standard photolithography to develop micro/nanofluidic devices with greatly reduced time and cost. The crack-photolithography makes it possible not only to simultaneously produce micropatterns and nanopatterns with various dimensions but also to replicate both of the mixed-scale patterns in a high-throughput manner. Therefore, a microfluidic channel network can easily be fabricated with a nanochannel array that can function as a nanoporous membrane wherever necessary, which basically plays a key role in diffusion-allowed but convection-suppressed microfluidic devices. In addition, the nanochannel array can manipulate the transport of small molecules by adjusting its dimension and/or number at will, so that nanochannel-array-integrated micro/nanofluidic devices prove even more robust and accurate in diffusion control than conventional membrane-integrated microfluidic devices. As an application of such micro/nanofluidic devices, we employed synthetic bacterial cells and found that their genetic induction and expression are dominated by extracellular diffusive microenvironments that were completely engineered using the nanochannel array. Hence, the crack-photolithography could provide innovative fabrication techniques for unprecedented micro/nanofluidic devices that show substantial potential for a wide range of biological and chemical applications.

  20. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) determined by pine needles and semipermeable membrane devices along an altitude profile in Taurus Mountains, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Cafer; Mazmanci, Mehmet Ali; Mazmanci, Birgül; Yalçın, Melis; Karakuş, PerihanBinnur Kurt; Atatanir, Levent; Keski, Menekşe; Henkelmann, Bernhard; Pfister, Gerd; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2017-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed at different altitudes of Taurus Mountains in semipermeable membrane devices (SPMD) and in half-, one-and-a-half-, and two-and-a-half-year-old pine needles. SPMDs were deployed for three different exposure periods: March to September (Summer), September to March (Winter), and March to March (whole year) at eight sites where needle samples were collected. The values of PAHs in needles were between 4.4 to 6066 pg g/fw in half-year-old, 7.2 to 111,115 pg g/fw in 1.5-year-old, and 9.7 to 85,335 pg g/fw in 2.5-year-old needles. Mass of PAHs collected by SPMDs varied from deployment, respectively. PAH profiles were dependent on the seasonal differences and locations. Roughly, clear decreasing trends with altitude were observed both with SPMD and needles for many individual and groups of PAHs except for the SPMD-summer short-time data. A cross-plot of Fluo/(Fluo+Pyr) vs Ant/(Ant+Phe) diagnostic ratios indicated grass/wood burning (possibly due to forest fires) in summer and petrogenic combustion in winter. Results of the study showed that SPMD and conifer needles are effective passive samplers to measure PAHs in the environment.

  1. Engineered Asymmetric Heterogeneous Membrane: A Concentration-Gradient-Driven Energy Harvesting Device.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Kong, Xiang-Yu; Xiao, Kai; Liu, Qian; Xie, Ganhua; Li, Pei; Ma, Jie; Tian, Ye; Wen, Liping; Jiang, Lei

    2015-11-25

    Engineered asymmetric membranes for intelligent molecular and ionic transport control at the nanoscale have gained significant attention and offer prospects for broad application in nanofluidics, energy conversion, and biosensors. Therefore, it is desirable to construct a high-performance heterogeneous membrane capable of coordinating highly selective and rectified ionic transport with a simple, versatile, engineered method to mimic the delicate functionality of biological channels. Here, we demonstrate an engineered asymmetric heterogeneous membrane by combining a porous block copolymer (BCP) membrane, polystyrene-b-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PS48400-b-P4VP21300), with a track-etched asymmetric porous polyethylene terephthalate membrane. The introduction of chemical, geometrical, and electrostatic heterostructures provides our heterogeneous membrane with excellent anion selectivity and ultrahigh ionic rectification with a ratio of ca. 1075, which is considerably higher than that of existing ionic rectifying systems. This anion-selective heterogeneous membrane was further developed into an energy conversion device to harvest the energy stored in an electrochemical concentration gradient. The concentration polarization phenomenon that commonly exists in traditional reverse electrodialysis can be eliminated with an asymmetric bipolar structure, which considerably increases the output power density. This work presents an important paradigm for the use of versatile BCPs in nanofluidic systems and opens new and promising routes to various breakthroughs in the fields of chemistry, materials science, bioscience, and nanotechnology.

  2. High-resolution, preparative purification of PEGylated protein using a laterally-fed membrane chromatography device.

    PubMed

    Madadkar, Pedram; Nino, Sergio Luna; Ghosh, Raja

    2016-11-01

    We discuss the use of a laterally-fed membrane chromatography (or LFMC) device for single-step purification of mono-PEGylated lysozyme. Recent studies have shown such LFMC devices to be suitable for high-resolution, multi-component separation of proteins in the bind-and-elute mode. The device used in this study contained a stack of rectangular cation-exchange membranes having 9.25mL bed volume. PEGylation of lysozyme was carried out in batch mode using 5kDa methoxy-polyethyleneglycol propionaldehyde (or m-PEG propionaldehyde) in the presence of sodium cyanoborohydride as reducing agent. Membrane chromatographic separation was carried out at 1.62 membrane bed volumes per minute flow rate, in the bind-and-elute mode. When a salt gradient was applied, the higher PEGylated forms of lysozyme (i.e. the byproducts) eluted earlier than mono-PEGylated lysozyme (the target product), while lysozyme eluted last. Under elution conditions optimized for resolution and speed, the separation could be carried out in less than 15 membrane bed volumes. High purity and recovery of mono-PEGylated lysozyme was obtained. The resolution of separation of mono-PEGylated lysozyme obtained under the above condition was comparable to that reported in the literature for equivalent cation-exchange resin columns while the flow rate expressed in bed volumes/min was 21.7 times higher. Also, the number of theoretical plates per meter was significantly higher with the LFMC device. Therefore the LFMC based purification process discussed in this paper combined high-productivity with high-resolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Production of Fluconazole-Loaded Polymeric Micelles Using Membrane and Microfluidic Dispersion Devices

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yu; Chowdhury, Danial; Vladisavljević, Goran T.; Koutroumanis, Konstantinos; Georgiadou, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric micelles with a controlled size in the range between 41 and 80 nm were prepared by injecting the organic phase through a microengineered nickel membrane or a tapered-end glass capillary into an aqueous phase. The organic phase was composed of 1 mg·mL−1 of PEG-b-PCL diblock copolymers with variable molecular weights, dissolved in tetrahydrofuran (THF) or acetone. The pore size of the membrane was 20 μm and the aqueous/organic phase volumetric flow rate ratio ranged from 1.5 to 10. Block copolymers were successfully synthesized with Mn ranging from ~9700 to 16,000 g·mol−1 and polymeric micelles were successfully produced from both devices. Micelles produced from the membrane device were smaller than those produced from the microfluidic device, due to the much smaller pore size compared with the orifice size in a co-flow device. The micelles were found to be relatively stable in terms of their size with an initial decrease in size attributed to evaporation of residual solvent rather than their structural disintegration. Fluconazole was loaded into the cores of micelles by injecting the organic phase composed of 0.5–2.5 mg·mL−1 fluconazole and 1.5 mg·mL−1 copolymer. The size of the drug-loaded micelles was found to be significantly larger than the size of empty micelles. PMID:27231945

  4. A thin permeable-membrane device for single-molecule manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang-Young; Jacobson, David R.; Nguyen, Dan T.; Willardson, Sam; Saleh, Omar A.

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule manipulation instruments have unparalleled abilities to interrogate the structure and elasticity of single biomolecules. Key insights are derived by measuring the system response in varying solution conditions; yet, typical solution control strategies require imposing a direct fluid flow on the measured biomolecule that perturbs the high-sensitivity measurement and/or removes interacting molecules by advection. An alternate approach is to fabricate devices that permit solution changes by diffusion of the introduced species through permeable membranes, rather than by direct solution flow through the sensing region. Prior implementations of permeable-membrane devices are relatively thick, disallowing their use in apparatus that require the simultaneous close approach of external instrumentation from two sides, as occurs in single-molecule manipulation devices like the magnetic tweezer. Here, we describe the construction and use of a thin microfluidic device appropriate for single-molecule studies. We create a flow cell of only ˜500 μm total thickness by sandwiching glass coverslips around a thin plastic gasket and then create permeable walls between laterally separated channels in situ through photo-induced cross-linking of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate hydrogels. We show that these membranes permit passage of ions and small molecules (thus permitting solution equilibration in the absence of direct flow), but the membranes block the passage of larger biomolecules (thus retaining precious samples). Finally, we demonstrate the suitability of the device for high-resolution magnetic-tweezer experiments by measuring the salt-dependent folding of a single RNA hairpin under force.

  5. Using SPMDs To Assess Natural Recovery Of PCB-Contaminated Sediments In Lake Hartwell, SC: I. A Field Test Of New In-Situ Deployment Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results from the field testing of some innovative sampling methods developed to evaluate risk management strategies for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contaminated sediments are presented. Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were combined with novel deployment methods to quan...

  6. Using SPMDs To Assess Natural Recovery Of PCB-Contaminated Sediments In Lake Hartwell, SC: I. A Field Test Of New In-Situ Deployment Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results from the field testing of some innovative sampling methods developed to evaluate risk management strategies for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contaminated sediments are presented. Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were combined with novel deployment methods to quan...

  7. Assessment of the usefulness of semipermeable membrane devices for long-term watershed monitoring in an urban slough system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, K.

    2006-01-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed at eight sites within the Buffalo Slough, near Portland, Oregon, to (1) measure the spatial and seasonal distribution of dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and organochlorine (OC) compounds in the slough, (2) assess the usefulness of SPMDs as a tool for investigating and monitoring hydrophobic compounds throughout the Columbia Slough system, and (3) evaluate the utility of SPMDs as a tool for measuring the long-term effects of watershed improvement activities. Data from the SPMDs revealed clear spatial and seasonal differences in water quality within the slough and indicate that for hydrophobic compounds, this time-integrated passive-sampling technique is a useful tool for long-term watershed monitoring. In addition, the data suggest that a spiking rate of 2-5 ??g/SPMD of permeability/performance reference compounds, including at least one compound that is not susceptible to photodegradation, may be optimum for the conditions encountered here. ?? Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2006.

  8. Real-world personal conversations using a hands-free embedded wireless device while driving: effect on airbag-deployment crash rates.

    PubMed

    Young, Richard A; Schreiner, Christopher

    2009-02-01

    A wireless device embedded in the vehicle allowed the user to engage in a personal hands-free conversation (HFC), and automatically placed an emergency notification call to an OnStar call center if the vehicle was involved in a crash in which its airbag deployed. A database stored the exact counts, start timestamps, and billed durations of all HFC and airbag notification calls. In 30 months of naturalistic driving, there were 91 million HFC calls from an average of 323,994 drivers per month who made calls. There were 14 airbag deployments in 276 million driver-minutes of HFC conversation for an exposed incidence rate of 5.08 airbag crashes per 100 million driver-minutes. There were 2,023 airbag deployments in an estimated 24.7 billion driver-minutes of no HFC conversation for a not-exposed incidence rate of 8.18 airbag crashes per 100 million driver-minutes. The crash incidence rate ratio (IRR) is the ratio of these two rates or 0.62 (95% C.I. 0.37 to 1.05). Sensitivity analyses controlled for the impact on the crash IRR of estimated time spent driving per day and calls by passengers. Counting all crashes as much as 20 minutes later than a call as related to that call gave similar results. We conclude that for personal conversations using a hands-free embedded device the risk of an airbag crash is somewhere in a range from a moderately lower risk to a risk near that of driving without a recent personal conversation. These results are not consistent with the large increase in crash risk reported in epidemiological studies using the case-crossover method.

  9. Molecular devices: Caroviologens as an approach to molecular wires—synthesis and incorporation into vesicle membranes

    PubMed Central

    Arrhenius, Thomas S.; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Dvolaitzky, Maya; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Malthete, Jacques

    1986-01-01

    Molecular wires, which would allow electron flow to take place between different components, are important elements in the design of molecular devices. An approach to such species would be molecules possessing an electron-conducting conjugated chain, terminal electroactive polar groups, and a length sufficient to span a lipid membrane. To this end, bispyridinium polyenes of different lengths have been synthesized and their incorporation into the bilayer membrane of sodium dihexadecyl phosphate vesicles has been studied. Since they combine the features of carotenoids and of viologens, they may be termed caroviologens. Vesicles containing the caroviologen whose length approximately corresponds to the thickness of the sodium dihexadecyl phosphate bilayer display temperature-dependent changes of its absorption spectrum reflecting the gel → liquid-crystal phase transition of the membrane. The data agree with a structural model in which the caroviologens of sufficient length span the bilayer membrane, the pyridinium sites being close to the negatively charged outer and inner surfaces of the sodium dihexadecyl phosphate vesicles and the polyene chain crossing the lipidic interior of the membrane. These membranes may now be tested in processes in which the caroviologen would function as a continuous, transmembrane electron channel—i.e., as a molecular wire. Various further developments may be envisaged along these lines. PMID:16593731

  10. Semipermeable membrane devices link site-specific contaminants to effects: Part 1 - Induction of CYP1A in rainbow trout from contaminants in Prince William Sound, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Springman, Kathrine R; Short, Jeffrey W; Lindeberg, Mandy R; Maselko, Jacek M; Khan, Colin; Hodson, Peter V; Rice, Stanley D

    2008-12-01

    Extracts from semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) deployed on beaches in Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska, were used to evaluate if complex contaminant mixtures from different sources can be distinguished by the resulting cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) activity in exposed test animals. Deployment sites included canneries, salmon hatcheries, and beaches where lingering oil remains from discharges during the 1964 earthquake or the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. Other sites were selected at random to evaluate region-wide contaminant inputs or were located in salmon streams to evaluate contaminants carried and released by migrating salmon carcasses following reproduction. Following standard deployments of approximately 28 d, an aliquot of the accumulated contaminants was intraperitoneally injected without cleanup into juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). After 2 d and 7 d, the activity of CYP1A was measured by the ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) assay. Exposure to extracts from the oiled sites and one hatchery site with numerous creosote pilings elicited strong EROD responses, whereas fish exposed to salmon stream extracts elicited weak but significant responses during late summer compared to late spring. Responses from the other sites were not significant, indicating contaminants from these sources are unlikely to cause CYP1A induction in resident biota. Rather than simply assessing extant contaminants, this method evaluates the potency of the different sites for bringing about aryl hydrocarbon receptor responses in resident biota.

  11. A nanopore membrane regulator device for laser modulated flow after glaucoma surgery.

    PubMed

    Olson, Jeffrey L; Bhandari, Ramanath; Groman-Lupa, Sergio; Velez-Montoya, Raul

    2015-10-01

    Glaucoma, the second most common cause of blindness in the world, is a multifactorial disease with several risk factors, of which intraocular pressure (IOP) is a primary contributing factor. Filtration surgery is one of the most effective means to significantly lower IOP compared to medical or laser treatments, and it is typically reserved for advanced disease. However, there are high rates of postoperative complications associated with the procedure, often from over- or under-filtration. To address these problems, the glaucoma drainage device regulator (GDDR) implant was developed to allow post-operative control of aqueous flow and IOP. The device, a tube with a nanopore membrane, is placed beneath the scleral flap. Postoperatively, the membrane surface can be ruptured with a laser to augment flow through the system. This feature allows adjustable control of aqueous flow and diminishes the risk of hypotony in the early postoperative period.

  12. A novel membrane device for the removal of water vapor and water droplets from air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Rod; Newbold, David D.; Mccray, Scott B.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Kliss, Mark

    1992-01-01

    One of the key challenges facing NASA engineers is the development of systems for separating liquids and gases in microgravity environments. In this paper, a novel membrane-based phase separator is described. This device, known as a water recovery heat exchanger (WRHEX), overcomes the inherent deficiencies of current phase-separation technology. Specifically, the WRHEX cools and removes water vapor or water droplets from feed-air streams without the use of a vacuum or centrifugal force. As is shown in this paper, only a low-power air blower and a small stream of recirculated cool water is required for WRHEX operation. This paper presents the results of tests using this novel membrane device over a wide range of operating conditions. The data show that the WRHEX produces a dry air stream containing no entrained or liquid water - even when the feed air contains water droplets or mist. An analysis of the operation of the WRHEX is presented.

  13. Comparison of organic contaminant accumulation by semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and the caged mussel species Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Hofelt, C.; Shea, D.

    1995-12-31

    The accumulation of anthropogenic contaminants by sentinel species such as the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, is common in many monitoring programs such as the National Status and Trends Mussel Watch Program. Bivalves are used because they are filter-feeding organisms with a high lipid content and therefore accumulate pollutants readily, and they do not appear to metabolize contaminants to a large extent. There are difficulties associated with this approach however, such as mortality, changing lipid mass and respiration rates, and interspecies differences; therefore the use of a non-living substrate may be more practical. The semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) consists of a length of thin-walled polyethylene tubing with a film of high molecular weight neutral lipid (triolein) sealed inside. The SPMD, when suspended in the water column, will concentrate lipophilic organic contaminants from the surrounding environment. The authors deployed SPMDs and caged Mytilus edulis side-by-side at five sites near New Bedford Harbor, MA; an area highly contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). A good correlation was observed between the SPMDs and the caged blue mussels, with R{sup 2} ranging from 0.57 to 0.85 (N = 16) for chlorinated pesticides and from 0.81 to 0.96 (N = 20) for PCBs. Bioconcentration factors (BCF) based on water column concentrations were also calculated and a good correlation was obtained between the SPMD BCFs and corresponding octanol-water partition coefficients. Unlike previous investigations, the authors found good agreement even with the highest chlorinated PCBs suggesting that there was no steric hindrance of uptake through the SPMD membrane.

  14. Detection of persistent organic pollutants in the Mississippi Delta using semipermeable membrane devices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, L.R.; Thurman, E.M.; Bastian, K.C.

    2000-01-01

    From semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) placed in five Mississippi Delta streams in 1996 and 1997, the persistent organic pollutants (POPs) aldrin, chlordane, DCPA, DDT, dieldrin, endrin, heptachlor, mirex, nonachlor, and toxaphene were detected. In addition, the insecticides chlorpyriphos, endosulfan, and hexachlorocyclohexanes were detected. Two low-solubility herbicides not detected commonly in surface water, pendimethalin and trifluralin, were also detected. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  15. Electrochemical Device Comprising an Electrically-Conductive, Selectively-Permeable Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittelsteadt, Cortney K. (Inventor); Laicer, Castro S. T. (Inventor); Harrison, Katherine E. (Inventor); McPheeters, Bryn M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An electrochemical device, such as a fuel cell or an electrolyzer. In one embodiment, the electrochemical device includes a membrane electrode assembly (MEA), an anodic gas diffusion medium in contact with the anode of the MEA, a cathodic gas diffusion medium in contact with the cathode, a first bipolar plate in contact with the anodic gas diffusion medium, and a second bipolar plate in contact with the cathodic gas diffusion medium. Each of the bipolar plates includes an electrically-conductive, non-porous, liquid-permeable, substantially gas-impermeable membrane in contact with its respective gas diffusion medium, the membrane including a solid polymer electrolyte and a non-particulate, electrically-conductive material, such as carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, and/or metal nanowires. In addition, each bipolar plate also includes an electrically-conductive fluid chamber in contact with the electrically-conductive, selectively-permeable membrane and further includes a non-porous and electrically-conductive plate in contact with the fluid chamber.

  16. An analysis of using semi-permeable membrane devices to assess persistent organic pollutants in ambient air of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ted Hsin-Yeh

    A region of concern for persistent organic pollutants (POPS) contamination is the Arctic, because of POPs' ability to migrate long distances through the atmosphere toward cold regions, condense out of the atmosphere in those region, deposit in sensitive arctic ecosystems and bioaccumulate in Arctic species. Thus, monitoring of POP concentrations in the Arctic is necessary. However, traditional active air monitoring techniques for POPs may not be feasible in the Arctic, because of logistics and cost. While these issues may be overcome using passive air sampling devices, questions arise about the interpretation of the contaminant concentrations detected using the passive air samplers. In this dissertation semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) containing triolein were characterized and evaluated for use in sampling the ambient air of Alaska for three classes of POPS (organochlorines [OCs], polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs] and polyaromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs]). In addition, a SPMD-based sampling campaign for POPS was conducted simultaneously at five sites in Alaska during a one-year period. The POP concentrations obtained from the SPMDs were examined to determine the spatial and seasonal variability at the locations. POP concentrations detected in SPMDs were influenced by exposure to sunlight, concentrations of particulate-bound contaminants and changes in temperature. PAH concentrations in a SPMD mounted in a sunlight-blocking deployment unit were higher than in a SPMD exposed to sunlight (P = 0.007). PCB concentrations in SPMD exposed to filtered and non-filtered air were significantly different (P < 0.0001). Derived PAH air concentrations measured using SPMD were within a factor of approximately 7 of those obtained from an air sampler in Barrow, Alaska. The field study showed three distinct groups of samples. Barrow was separated from the sub-Arctic samples and a Homer sample (September-December) was distinct from the sub-Arctic samples. The separations suggest

  17. Smartphone-interfaced lab-on-a-chip devices for field-deployable enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Arnold; Wang, Royal; Bever, Candace R. S.; Xing, Siyuan; Pan, Tingrui

    2014-01-01

    The emerging technologies on mobile-based diagnosis and bioanalytical detection have enabled powerful laboratory assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to be conducted in field-use lab-on-a-chip devices. In this paper, we present a low-cost universal serial bus (USB)-interfaced mobile platform to perform microfluidic ELISA operations in detecting the presence and concentrations of BDE-47 (2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether), an environmental contaminant found in our food supply with adverse health impact. Our point-of-care diagnostic device utilizes flexible interdigitated carbon black electrodes to convert electric current into a microfluidic pump via gas bubble expansion during electrolytic reaction. The micropump receives power from a mobile phone and transports BDE-47 analytes through the microfluidic device conducting competitive ELISA. Using variable domain of heavy chain antibodies (commonly referred to as single domain antibodies or Nanobodies), the proposed device is sensitive for a BDE-47 concentration range of 10−3–104 μg/l, with a comparable performance to that uses a standard competitive ELISA protocol. It is anticipated that the potential impact in mobile detection of health and environmental contaminants will prove beneficial to our community and low-resource environments. PMID:25553178

  18. Smartphone-interfaced lab-on-a-chip devices for field-deployable enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Arnold; Wang, Royal; Bever, Candace R S; Xing, Siyuan; Hammock, Bruce D; Pan, Tingrui

    2014-11-01

    The emerging technologies on mobile-based diagnosis and bioanalytical detection have enabled powerful laboratory assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to be conducted in field-use lab-on-a-chip devices. In this paper, we present a low-cost universal serial bus (USB)-interfaced mobile platform to perform microfluidic ELISA operations in detecting the presence and concentrations of BDE-47 (2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether), an environmental contaminant found in our food supply with adverse health impact. Our point-of-care diagnostic device utilizes flexible interdigitated carbon black electrodes to convert electric current into a microfluidic pump via gas bubble expansion during electrolytic reaction. The micropump receives power from a mobile phone and transports BDE-47 analytes through the microfluidic device conducting competitive ELISA. Using variable domain of heavy chain antibodies (commonly referred to as single domain antibodies or Nanobodies), the proposed device is sensitive for a BDE-47 concentration range of 10(-3)-10(4 ) μg/l, with a comparable performance to that uses a standard competitive ELISA protocol. It is anticipated that the potential impact in mobile detection of health and environmental contaminants will prove beneficial to our community and low-resource environments.

  19. Design and Development of a Miniaturized Percutaneously Deployable Wireless Left Ventricular Assist Device: Early Prototypes and Feasibility Testing.

    PubMed

    Letzen, Brian; Park, Jiheum; Tuzun, Zeynep; Bonde, Pramod

    2017-09-21

    The current left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are limited by a highly invasive implantation procedure in a severely unstable group of advanced heart failure patients. Additionally, the current transcutaneous power drive line acts as a nidus for infection resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. In an effort to decrease this invasiveness and eliminate drive line complications, we have conceived a wireless miniaturized percutaneous LVAD, capable of being delivered endovascularly with a tether-free operation. The system obviates the need for a transcutaneous fluid purge line required in existing temporary devices by utilizing an incorporated magnetically coupled impeller for a complete seal. The objective of this article was to demonstrate early development and proof-of-concept feasibility testing to serve as the groundwork for future formalized device development. Five early prototypes were designed and constructed to iteratively minimize the pump size and improve fluid dynamic performance. Various magnetic coupling configurations were tested. Using SolidWorks and ANSYS software for modeling and simulation, several geometric parameters were varied. HQ curves were constructed from preliminary in vitro testing to characterize the pump performance. Bench top tests showed no-slip magnetic coupling of the impeller to the driveshaft up to the current limit of the motor. The pump power requirements were tested in vitro and were within the appropriate range for powering via a wireless energy transfer system. Our results demonstrate the proof-of-concept feasibility of a novel endovascular cardiac assist device with the potential to eventually offer patients an untethered, minimally invasive support.

  20. Effect of oscillatory flow on the performance of a novel cross-flow affinity membrane device

    SciTech Connect

    Najarian, S.; Bellhouse, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into the effect of oscillatory flow in a membrane-based affinity contactor. This device was designed to accommodate a tubular affinity membrane, and the flow direction of working fluid was tangential to the surface of the membrane. Cibacron Blue F3G-A was utilized as the capturing ligand and bovine serum albumin as the target molecule. The dye molecules were immobilized covalently via spaced molecules (polyethylenimine) onto the pores of a microfiltration membrane with a pore size rating of 0.45{mu}m. Bovine serum albumin was pumped through the annular space between the concentric screw-threaded insert and the tubular membrane in oscillatory flow with a mean flow component. The effects of pulsation frequency and stroke length were investigated. It was found that, as a result of the pulsatile flow, the protein recovery was increased by a factor of 2. To make the interpretation of the results easier, various dimensionless groups were defined specifically for this system and the experimental data were reported in terms of these groups. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  1. A Potential Nanofiber Membrane Device for Filling Surgical Residual Cavity to Prevent Glioma Recurrence and Improve Local Neural Tissue Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Daoxiang; Lin, Chao; Wen, Xuejun; Gu, Shuying; Zhao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop a novel device with nanofiber membrane capable of sustained release of temozolomide (TMZ) and neuron growth factor (NGF). An improved bio-availability of TMZ and NGF in surroundings proximal to the device was expected to be attained for a prolonged period of time. The device was developed by integrating TMZ-doped polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofiber (TP) membrane and NGF-coated PCL (NGFP) membrane using sodium alginate hydrogel. TP was prepared by direct electrospinning of TMZ/PCL. NGFP membrane was developed by layer-by-layer assembling technology. The incorporation of TMZ-doped nanofiber and NGFP nanofiber in the device was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The number of NGF layer in NGF-coated PCL membrane could be readily measured with energy spectrum analysis. The in vitro release study showed that TP-NGFP-TP membrane could efficiently liberate TMZ to inhibit the growth of C6 glioma cells, and sufficient NGF to induce the differentiation of PC12 neuron cells over four weeks. Such TP-NGFP-TP membrane device can be employed as a tampon to fill up surgical residual cavity and afford residual glioma removal, structural support, hemostasis, and local neural tissue reconstruction in the surgical treatment of glioma. The study opens a horizon to develop multifunctional biomaterial device for maximized glioma treatment efficacy. PMID:27548322

  2. A Potential Nanofiber Membrane Device for Filling Surgical Residual Cavity to Prevent Glioma Recurrence and Improve Local Neural Tissue Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Daoxiang; Lin, Chao; Wen, Xuejun; Gu, Shuying; Zhao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop a novel device with nanofiber membrane capable of sustained release of temozolomide (TMZ) and neuron growth factor (NGF). An improved bio-availability of TMZ and NGF in surroundings proximal to the device was expected to be attained for a prolonged period of time. The device was developed by integrating TMZ-doped polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofiber (TP) membrane and NGF-coated PCL (NGFP) membrane using sodium alginate hydrogel. TP was prepared by direct electrospinning of TMZ/PCL. NGFP membrane was developed by layer-by-layer assembling technology. The incorporation of TMZ-doped nanofiber and NGFP nanofiber in the device was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The number of NGF layer in NGF-coated PCL membrane could be readily measured with energy spectrum analysis. The in vitro release study showed that TP-NGFP-TP membrane could efficiently liberate TMZ to inhibit the growth of C6 glioma cells, and sufficient NGF to induce the differentiation of PC12 neuron cells over four weeks. Such TP-NGFP-TP membrane device can be employed as a tampon to fill up surgical residual cavity and afford residual glioma removal, structural support, hemostasis, and local neural tissue reconstruction in the surgical treatment of glioma. The study opens a horizon to develop multifunctional biomaterial device for maximized glioma treatment efficacy.

  3. Rapid and sensitive detection of Mycoplasma synoviae by an insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction-based assay on a field-deployable device

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Hung-Chih; Lo, Dan-Yuan; Chen, Chiou-Lin; Tsai, Yun-Long; Ping, Jia-Fong; Lee, Chien-Hsien; Lee, Pei-Yu Alison; Chang, Hsiao-Fen Grace

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae (MS), causing respiratory diseases, arthritis, and eggshell apex abnormalities in avian species, is an important pathogen in the poultry industry. Implementation of a biosecurity plan is important in MS infection management. Working on a field-deployable POCKIT™ device, an insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (iiPCR) assay has a potential for timely MS detection on the farm. The MS iiPCR assay had limit of detection 95% of about 9 genome equivalents by testing serial dilutions of a standard DNA. The detection endpoint of the assay for detection of MS genomic DNA was comparable to a reference real-time PCR. The assay did not crossreact with other important avian pathogens, including avian reovirus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pasteurella multocida, and Salmonella Pullorum. When 92 synovial fluid and respiratory tract swab samples collected from chickens, turkeys, and geese suspected of MS infection were tested, the clinical performance of the MS iiPCR had 97.8% agreement (Cohen's kappa value, 0.95) with that of the reference real-time PCR. In conclusion, the MS iiPCR/POCKIT™ system, working with field-deployable manual or automatic nucleic acid extraction methods, has potential to serve as a rapid and sensitive on-site tool to facilitate timely detection of MS. PMID:27389062

  4. Impact of High Power Interference Sources in Planning and Deployment of Wireless Sensor Networks and Devices in the 2.4 GHz Frequency Band in Heterogeneous Environments

    PubMed Central

    Iturri, Peio López; Nazábal, Juan Antonio; Azpilicueta, Leire; Rodriguez, Pablo; Beruete, Miguel; Fernández-Valdivielso, Carlos; Falcone, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the impact of radiofrequency radiation leakage from microwave ovens and its effect on 802.15.4 ZigBee-compliant wireless sensor networks operating in the 2.4 GHz Industrial Scientific Medical (ISM) band is analyzed. By means of a novel radioplanning approach, based on electromagnetic field simulation of a microwave oven and determination of equivalent radiation sources applied to an in-house developed 3D ray launching algorithm, estimation of the microwave oven's power leakage is obtained for the complete volume of an indoor scenario. The magnitude and the variable nature of the interference is analyzed and the impact in the radio link quality in operating wireless sensors is estimated and compared with radio channel measurements as well as packet measurements. The measurement results reveal the importance of selecting an adequate 802.15.4 channel, as well as the Wireless Sensor Network deployment strategy within this type of environment, in order to optimize energy consumption and increase the overall network performance. The proposed method enables one to estimate potential interference effects in devices operating within the 2.4 GHz band in the complete scenario, prior to wireless sensor network deployment, which can aid in achieving the most optimal network topology. PMID:23202228

  5. Impact of high power interference sources in planning and deployment of wireless sensor networks and devices in the 2.4 GHz frequency band in heterogeneous environments.

    PubMed

    Iturri, Peio López; Nazábal, Juan Antonio; Azpilicueta, Leire; Rodriguez, Pablo; Beruete, Miguel; Fernández-Valdivielso, Carlos; Falcone, Francisco

    2012-11-12

    In this work, the impact of radiofrequency radiation leakage from microwave ovens and its effect on 802.15.4 ZigBee-compliant wireless sensor networks operating in the 2.4 GHz Industrial Scientific Medical (ISM) band is analyzed. By means of a novel radioplanning approach, based on electromagnetic field simulation of a microwave oven and determination of equivalent radiation sources applied to an in-house developed 3D ray launching algorithm, estimation of the microwave oven’s power leakage is obtained for the complete volume of an indoor scenario. The magnitude and the variable nature of the interference is analyzed and the impact in the radio link quality in operating wireless sensors is estimated and compared with radio channel measurements as well as packet measurements. The measurement results reveal the importance of selecting an adequate 802.15.4 channel, as well as the Wireless Sensor Network deployment strategy within this type of environment, in order to optimize energy consumption and increase the overall network performance. The proposed method enables one to estimate potential interference effects in devices operating within the 2.4 GHz band in the complete scenario, prior to wireless sensor network deployment, which can aid in achieving the most optimal network topology.

  6. Sensor-actuator coupled device for active tracheal tube using solid polymer electrolyte membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Tadashi; Nakamura, Taro; Mukai, Toshiharu; Asaka, Kinji

    2007-04-01

    A sensor-actuator coupled device was developed using solid polymer electrolyte membrane (SPM) as an active tracheal tube for ventilator. Active tracheal tube is a novel type of tube for ventilator that removes patient's phlegm automatically upon sensing the narrowing of trachea by phlegm. This type of active tube is extremely useful in clinical settings as currently the sole measure to remove phlegm from patient's tube is to do it manually by a nurse every few hours. As SPM works both as a sensor and an actuator, an effective compact device was developed. SPM based sensor-actuator coupled device was fabricated with modified gold plating method. Prepared SPM was fixed as an array on a plastic pipe of diameter 22 mm and was connected to a ventilator circuit and driven by a ventilator with a volume control ventilation (VCV) mode. SPM was connected both to a sensing unit and an actuation unit. Generated voltage developed by the membrane with the setting of the maximum pressure from 5 cmH IIO to 20 cmH IIO was in order of several hundred μV. SPM sensor demonstrated a biphasic response to the ventilator flow. The sensor data showed nearly linearly proportional voltage development to the intra-tracheal pressure. The sensed signal was filtered and digitized with an A/D converting unit on a PC board. A real time operating program was used to detect the sensed signal that indicates the narrowing of trachea. The program then activated a driving signal to control the actuation of the membrane. The signal was sent to a D/A converting unit. The output of the D/A unit was sent to an amplifier and the galvanostat unit which drives the membrane with constant current regardless of the change in the load. It was demonstrated that the sensor-actuator unit detects the narrowing of trachea within several hundreds milli-seconds and responds by actuating the same membrane with the driving voltage of 3-4 V and driving current of several hundred milli-ampere for each membrane. SPM array

  7. Bridge to transplant with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation followed by HeartWare ventricular assist device in a child.

    PubMed

    Crews, Kelly A; Kaiser, Samantha L; Walczak, Richard J; Jaquiss, Robert D B; Lodge, Andrew J

    2013-05-01

    A 10-year-old boy was admitted with dilated cardiomyopathy. Before scheduled implantation of a HeartWare ventricular assist device, he experienced a cardiac arrest and required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for both cardiac and pulmonary support. After 4 days of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and 126 days of support on the HeartWare ventricular assist device, he underwent successful cardiac transplantation. He is doing well 6 months after transplantation.

  8. Ground-Based Fabry-Perot Interferometry of the Terrestrial Nightglow with a Bare Charge-Coupled Device: Remote Field Site Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niciejewski, Rick; Killeen, Timothy L.; Turnbull, Matthew

    1994-01-01

    The application of Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPIs) to the study of upper atmosphere thermodynamics has largely been restricted by the very low light levels in the terrestrial airglow as well as the limited range in wavelength of photomultiplier tube (PMT) technology. During the past decade, the development of the scientific grade charge-coupled device (CCD) has progressed to the stage in which this detector has become the logical replacement for the PMT. Small fast microcomputers have made it possible to "upgrade" our remote field sites with bare CCDs and not only retain the previous capabilities of the existing FPls but expand the data coverage in both temporal and wavelength domains. The problems encountered and the solutions applied to the deployment of a bare CCD, with data acquisition and image reduction techniques, are discussed. Sample geophysical data determined from the FPI fringe profiles are shown for our stations at Peach Mountain, Michigan, and Watson Lake, Yukon Territory.

  9. Human lactoferricin derived di-peptides deploying loop structures induce apoptosis specifically in cancer cells through targeting membranous phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Sabrina; Leber, Regina; Rinner, Beate; Schaider, Helmut; Lohner, Karl; Zweytick, Dagmar

    2015-11-01

    Host defense-derived peptides have emerged as a novel strategy for the development of alternative anticancer therapies. In this study we report on characteristic features of human lactoferricin (hLFcin) derivatives which facilitate specific killing of cancer cells of melanoma, glioblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma compared with non-specific derivatives and the synthetic peptide RW-AH. Changes in amino acid sequence of hLFcin providing 9-11 amino acids stretched derivatives LF11-316, -318 and -322 only yielded low antitumor activity. However, the addition of the repeat (di-peptide) and the retro-repeat (di-retro-peptide) sequences highly improved cancer cell toxicity up to 100% at 20 μM peptide concentration. Compared to the complete parent sequence hLFcin the derivatives showed toxicity on the melanoma cell line A375 increased by 10-fold and on the glioblastoma cell line U-87mg by 2-3-fold. Reduced killing velocity, apoptotic blebbing, activation of caspase 3/7 and formation of apoptotic DNA fragments proved that the active and cancer selective peptides, e.g. R-DIM-P-LF11-322, trigger apoptosis, whereas highly active, though non-selective peptides, such as DIM-LF11-318 and RW-AH seem to kill rapidly via necrosis inducing membrane lyses. Structural studies revealed specific toxicity on cancer cells by peptide derivatives with loop structures, whereas non-specific peptides comprised α-helical structures without loop. Model studies with the cancer membrane mimic phosphatidylserine (PS) gave strong evidence that PS only exposed by cancer cells is an important target for specific hLFcin derivatives. Other negatively charged membrane exposed molecules as sialic acid, heparan and chondroitin sulfate were shown to have minor impact on peptide activity.

  10. Microfabrication of membrane-based devices by HARSE and combined HARSE/wet etching

    SciTech Connect

    Manginell, R.P.; Frye-Mason, G.C.; Schubert, W.K.; Shul, R.J.; Willison, C.G.

    1998-08-01

    Deep-reactive ion etching (DRIE) of silicon, also known as high-aspect-ratio silicon etching (HARSE), is distinguished by fast etch rates ({approximately}3 {micro}m/min), crystal orientation independence, anisotropy, vertical sidewall profiles and CMOS compatibility. By using through-wafer HARSE and stopping on a dielectric film placed on the opposite side of the wafer, freestanding dielectric membranes were produced. Dielectric membrane-based sensors and actuators fabricated in this way include microhotplates, flow sensors, valves and magnetically-actuated flexural plate wave (FPW) devices. Unfortunately, low-stress silicon nitride, a common membrane material, has an appreciable DRI etch rate. To overcome this problem HARSE can be followed by a brief wet chemical etch. This approach has been demonstrated using KOH or HF/Nitric/Acetic etchants, both of which have significantly smaller etch rates on silicon nitride than does DRIE. Composite membranes consisting of silicon dioxide and silicon nitride layers are also under evaluation due to the higher DRIE selectivity to silicon dioxide.

  11. A reusable device for electrochemical applications of hydrogel supported black lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Mech-Dorosz, Agnieszka; Heiskanen, Arto; Bäckström, Sania; Perry, Mark; Muhammad, Haseena B; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus; Emnéus, Jenny

    2015-02-01

    Black lipid membranes (BLMs) are significant in studies of membrane transport, incorporated proteins/ion transporters, and hence in construction of biosensor devices. Although BLMs provide an accepted mimic of cellular membranes, they are inherently fragile. Techniques are developed to stabilize them, such as hydrogel supports. In this paper, we present a reusable device for studies on hydrogel supported (hs) BLMs. These are formed across an ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) aperture array supported by the hydrogel, which is during in situ polymerization covalently "sandwiched" between the ETFE substrate and a gold electrode microchip, thus allowing direct electrochemical studies with the integrated working electrodes. Using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements, we demonstrate the optimized chemical modifications of the gold electrode microchips and plasma modification of the ETFE aperture arrays facilitating covalent "sandwiching" of the hydrogel. Both fluorescence microscopy and EIS were used to demonstrate the induced spontaneous thinning of a deposited lipid solution, leading to formation of stabilized hsBLMs on average in 10 min. The determined specific membrane capacitance and resistance were shown to vary in the range 0.31-0.49 μF/cm(2) and 45-65 kΩ cm(2), respectively, corresponding to partially solvent containing BLMs with an average life time of 60-80 min. The characterized hsBLM formation and devised equivalent circuit models lead to a schematic model to illustrate lipid molecule distribution in hydrogel-supported apertures. The functionality of stabilized hsBLMs and detection sensitivity of the platform were verified by monitoring the effect of the ion transporter valinomycin.

  12. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation, Pulmonary Embolectomy, and Right Ventricular Assist Device for Massive Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Lodewyks, Carly L; Bednarczyk, Joseph M; Mooney, Owen T; Arora, Rakesh C; Singal, Rohit K

    2017-07-01

    Consensus regarding the management of massive pulmonary embolism (PE) and persistent shock after thrombolysis is lacking. A 30-year-old man collapsed with massive PE 3 days after an exploratory laparotomy for penetrating trauma, and he remained hypoxic and hypotensive despite thrombolytic therapy. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was instituted as a bridge to surgical embolectomy, and placement of a right ventricular assist device (RVAD) was used to facilitate separation from cardiopulmonary bypass. After 48 hours, the RVAD was removed, and the patient survived to discharge. ECMO and temporary RVAD to support surgical embolectomy are lifesaving therapeutic considerations. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. HPLC-PFD determination of priority pollutant PAHs in water, sediment, and semipermeable membrane devices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, K.S.; Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.; Lebo, J.A.; Kaiser, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    High performance liquid chromatography coupled with programmable fluorescence detection was employed for the determination of 15 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PPPAHs) in water, sediment, and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs). Chromatographic separation using this analytical method facilitates selectivity, sensitivity (ppt levels), and can serve as a non-destructive technique for subsequent analysis by other chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. Extraction and sample cleanup procedures were also developed for water, sediment, and SPMDs using various chromatographic and wet chemical methods. The focus of this publication is to examine the enrichment techniques and the analytical methodologies used in the isolation, characterization, and quantitation of 15 PPPAHs in different sample matrices.

  14. Deployable Soft Composite Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-19

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  15. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  16. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel. PMID:26892762

  17. Recovery of DNA and fingermarks following deployment of render-safe tools for vehicle-borne improvised explosive devices (VBIED).

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, S; Houspian, A; Knott, F

    2011-07-15

    Improvised explosive devices (IED) are responsible for a significant proportion of combat and civilian deaths around the world. Given the ease with which IEDs can be made, the large quantity of explosive which can be contained within or on a vehicle, and the use of VBIED in the past (for example the 2002 Bali bombing) in terrorist activities, VBIED are an ongoing concern for Defence and law enforcement agencies. Fingermark and DNA analyses are routinely used by police and forensic analysts to identify suspects involved in illegal activities. There is limited information available on the feasibility of obtaining fingermarks, fibres, hair and DNA samples following an explosive incident, or a situation whereby an IED has been rendered safe following the utilisation of an appropriate defeat or render-safe tool. The main objective of this study was to determine if fingermarks and/or DNA (from saliva and hair samples) placed on the interior and exterior of road vehicles, and on inanimate objects (such as plastic or glass bottles), are able to be obtained and analysed following the use of a vehicle-borne IED (VBIED) render-safe tool on a vehicle containing simulated explosives. The identification of fingermarks on the exterior (67.2±8.5%) and interior (43.8±17.8%) of the vehicles was possible following the use of the render-safe tool, though this was more challenging in the latter than the former. Fingermarks were also able to be identified from both plastic and glass bottles placed inside the vehicles. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques yielded DNA profiles that were able to be identified from saliva and hair samples. These preliminary results suggest that both fingermarks and DNA profiles, obtained from vehicles that have been subjected to a VBIED render-safe tool, may be used to identify persons of interest. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A porous media theory for characterization of membrane blood oxygenation devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yoshihiko; Adachi, Jun; Nakayama, Akira

    2013-07-01

    A porous media theory has been proposed to characterize oxygen transport processes associated with membrane blood oxygenation devices. For the first time, a rigorous mathematical procedure based a volume averaging procedure has been presented to derive a complete set of the governing equations for the blood flow field and oxygen concentration field. As a first step towards a complete three-dimensional numerical analysis, one-dimensional steady case is considered to model typical membrane blood oxygenator scenarios, and to validate the derived equations. The relative magnitudes of oxygen transport terms are made clear, introducing a dimensionless parameter which measures the distance the oxygen gas travels to dissolve in the blood as compared with the blood dispersion length. This dimensionless number is found so large that the oxygen diffusion term can be neglected in most cases. A simple linear relationship between the blood flow rate and total oxygen transfer rate is found for oxygenators with sufficiently large membrane surface areas. Comparison of the one-dimensional analytic results and available experimental data reveals the soundness of the present analysis.

  19. Effect of shell-side flows on hollow-fiber membrane device performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lemanski, J.; Lipscomb, G.G.

    1995-10-01

    Membrane-based separation processes are the preferred choice to accomplish many industrial separations. Among the numerous applications are filtration, dialysis, reverse osmosis, and gas separations. Modules utilizing hollow-fiber membranes are efficient contractors. For design purposes, analyses of how these devices perform require knowledge of the membrane mass-transfer properties and the nature of the flow in both the lumen and shell. Such analyses typically assume that all fibers possess the same size and mass-transfer characteristics. Additionally, most analyses assume that the shell and lumen flows are concurrent, countercurrent, or cross-current to one another. No work exists that addresses fluid distribution across the fiber bundle. The authors present a theoretical analysis of shell-side flows and their influence on mass transfer. The general problem is computationally quite complex. They consider only the simplest, nontrivial effects here, but within a framework that is readily modified to allow examination of other issues associated with shell-side flows.

  20. Monitoring of organotin compounds in seawater using semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs)--tentative results.

    PubMed

    Følsvik, N; Brevik, E M; Berge, J A

    2000-08-01

    The impact of anthropogenic pollutants on the marine ecosystem is related to the concentrations experienced by the biota in the seawater and the resulting concentration in the organism. Results from monitoring of pollutants in water samples provide snapshots that can be high or low depending on a wide range of variables. To provide more integrated information, semipermeable membrane devices, SPMDs, have been used to monitor different organic pollutants. In this survey, SPMDs were used to monitor organotin compounds in the marine environment. Time-integrated sampling using SPMDs and direct water sampling was carried out at six stations in the inner Oslofjord, Norway. The sample work-up procedure for both water and SPMDs was based on direct derivatisation using NaBEt4 and simultaneous extraction with an organic solvent. Analysis was performed using a gas chromatograph equipped with an atomic emission detector. The results show that SPMDs do accumulate organotin compounds from the water phase. Both tributyl- (TBT) and dibutyltin were detected in all of the analysed membranes while no monobutyltin was found. Levels found in SPMDs range from < 1 to 220 ng Sn SPMD(-1). Water concentrations range from 0.4 to 10 ng Sn L(-1). An investigation of relative levels of TBT showed a similar concentration gradient in the inner Oslofjord using either direct water sampling or passive sampling by SPMDs. As the membranes are able to accumulate the organotins from the water it will be possible to locate lower concentrations than with direct analyses of water samples.

  1. Glass microfluidic devices with thin membrane voltage junctions for electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yue, Guihua Eileen; Roper, Michael G; Jeffery, Erin D; Easley, Christopher J; Balchunas, Catherine; Landers, James P; Ferrance, Jerome P

    2005-06-01

    In this study a novel glass membrane was prepared for conducting high voltage (HV) to solution in the channel of a microfabricated device for generation of liquid electrospray. Taylor cone formation and mass spectra obtained from this microdevice confirmed the utility of the glass membrane, but voltage conduction through the membrane could not be successfully explained based solely on the conductivity of the glass itself. This novel method for developing a high-voltage interface for microdevices avoids direct metal/liquid contact eliminating bubble formation in the channel due to water hydrolysis on the surface of the metal. Further, this arrangement produces no dead volume as is often found with traditional liquid junctions. At the same time, preliminary investigations into the outlet design of glass microdevices for interfacing with electrospray mass spectrometry, was explored. Both the exit shape and the use of hydrophobic coatings at the channel exit of the microdevice electrospray interface were evaluated using standard proteins with results indicating the utility of this type of design after further optimization.

  2. Large Deployable Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Huang, John; Lou, Michael

    2006-01-01

    A report discusses a 7-meter-diameter reflectarray antenna that has been conceived in a continuing effort to develop large reflectarray antennas to be deployed in outer space. Major underlying concepts were reported in three prior NASA Tech Briefs articles: "Inflatable Reflectarray Antennas" (NPO-20433), Vol. 23, No. 10 (October 1999), page 50; "Tape-Spring Reinforcements for Inflatable Structural Tubes" (NPO-20615), Vol. 24, No. 7 (July 2000), page 58; and "Self-Inflatable/Self-Rigidizable Reflectarray Antenna" (NPO-30662), Vol. 28, No. 1 (January 2004), page 61. Like previous antennas in the series, the antenna now proposed would include a reflectarray membrane stretched flat on a frame of multiple inflatable booms. The membrane and booms would be rolled up and folded for compact stowage during transport. Deployment in outer space would be effected by inflating the booms to unroll and then to unfold the membrane, thereby stretching the membrane out flat to its full size. The membrane would achieve the flatness for a Ka-band application. The report gives considerable emphasis to designing the booms to rigidify themselves upon deployment: for this purpose, the booms could be made as spring-tape-reinforced aluminum laminate tubes like those described in two of the cited prior articles.

  3. A membrane-based microfluidic device for controlling the flux of platelet agonists into flowing blood†

    PubMed Central

    Neeves, Keith B.; Diamond, Scott L.

    2008-01-01

    The flux of platelet agonists into flowing blood is a critical event in thrombosis and hemostasis. However, few in vitro methods exist for examining and controlling the role of platelet agonists on clot formation and stability under hemodynamic conditions. In this paper, we describe a membrane-based method for introducing a solute into flowing blood at a defined flux. The device consisted of a track-etched polycarbonate membrane reversibly sealed between two microfluidic channels; one channel contained blood flowing at a physiologically relevant shear rate, and the other channel contained the agonist(s). An analytical model described the solute flux as a function of the membrane permeability and transmembrane pressure. The model was validated using luciferase as a model solute for transmembrane pressures of 50–400 Pa. As a proof-of-concept, the weak platelet agonist ADP was introduced into whole blood flowing at 250 s−1 at three fluxes (1.5, 2.4, and 4.4 × 10−18 mol μm−2 s−1). Platelet aggregation was monitored by fluorescence microscopy during the experiment and the morphology of aggregates was determined by post hoc confocal and electron microscopy. At the lowest flux (1.5 × 10−18 mol μm−2 s−1), we observed little to no aggregation. At the higher fluxes, we observed monolayer (2.4 × 10−18 mol μm−2 s−1) and multilayer (4.4 × 10−18 mol μm−2 s−1) aggregates of platelets and found that the platelet density within an aggregate increased with increasing ADP flux. We expect this device to be a useful tool in unraveling the role of platelet agonists on clot formation and stability. PMID:18432339

  4. Three-compartment model for contaminant accumulation by semipermeable membrane devices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gale, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    Passive sampling of dissolved hydrophobic contaminants with lipid (triolein)-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) has been gaining acceptance for environmental monitoring. Understanding of the accumulation process has employed a simple polymer film-control model of uptake by the polymer-enclosed lipid, while aqueous film control has been only briefly discussed. A more complete three-compartment model incorporating both aqueous film (turbulent-diffusive) and polymer film (diffusive) mass transfer is developed here and is fit to data from accumulation studies conducted in constant-concentration, flow-through dilutors. This model predicts aqueous film control of the whole device for moderate to high Kow compounds, rather than polymer film control. Uptake rates for phenanthrene and 2,2‘,5,5‘-tetrachlorobiphenyl were about 4.8 and 4.2 L/day/standard SPMD, respectively. Maximum 28 day SPMD concentration factors of 30 000 are predicted for solutes with log Kow values of >5.5. Effects of varying aqueous and polymer film thicknesses and solute diffusivities in the polymer film are modeled, and overall accumulation by the whole device is predicted to remain under aqueous film control, although accumulation in the triolein may be subject to polymer film control. The predicted half-life and integrative response of SPMDs to pulsed concentration events is proportional to log KSPMD.

  5. A low-cost thin layer coulometric microfluidic device based on an ion-selective membrane for calcium determination.

    PubMed

    Dorokhin, Denis; Crespo, Gastón A; Afshar, Majid Ghahraman; Bakker, Eric

    2014-01-07

    A prototype of a low-cost and easy-to-use thin layer coulometric microfluidic device based on an ion-selective membrane for calcium detection is described. The microfluidic device was fabricated and consequently assembled with inexpensive materials without using sophisticated and centralized fabrication laboratory facilities. The linear range of the device is found to be 10-100 μM for a 60 s current integration time. Preliminary validations showed that the microfluidic device is suitable for the quantification of calcium in mineral water.

  6. Membrane-tube-type glaucoma shunt device for refractory glaucoma surgery.

    PubMed

    Han, Jong Chul; Hwang, Young Hoon; Ahn, Byung Heon

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of a novel membrane-tube (MT)-type glaucoma shunt device for refractory glaucoma surgery. The device consists of an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membranous reservoir, as well as a silicone tube (300-μm external and 200-μm internal diameter) with an intraluminal stent. We named the device "Finetube MT". The Finetube MT was implanted into 44 glaucomatous eyes that had insufficient intraocular pressure (IOP) control despite medical treatment or previous trabeculectomy. The membranous reservoir was placed underneath the Tenon's capsule, with each end located below the recti muscles; the tube was placed in the anterior chamber through a partial-thickness scleral track. We investigated the baseline and post-operative IOP values, the number of IOP-lowering medications used, and complications. The mean age of the subjects was 51.6 ± 17.2 years, and the mean follow-up duration was 22.5 ± 12.0 months. One year after the surgery, the mean IOP had decreased from 32.8 ± 12.2 mmHg to 16.9 ± 6.4 mmHg (48.5 % reduction; p < 0.01), and the mean number of IOP-lowering medications used had decreased from 2.5 ± 0.8 to 1.1 ± 0.9 (p < 0.01). We considered the surgery as a success when the IOP was between 6 and 21 mmHg, and had been reduced by ≥ 20 % from baseline; by this standard, the success rate was 92.4 % after 1 year, and 85.0 % after 3 years. Neither postoperative ocular hypotony-related complications nor tube exposure occurred in any case. The Finetube MT showed promising surgical outcomes as a treatment for refractory glaucoma, with minimal risk of postoperative ocular hypotony or tube-related complications.

  7. Relationship of air sampling rates of semipermeable membrane devices with the properties of organochlorine pesticides.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiuhua; Ding, Guanghui; Levy, Walkiria; Jakobi, Gert; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2011-06-01

    The organochlorine pesticides (OCP) in Eastern-Barvaria at Haidel 1160 m a.s.l. were monitored with a low volume active air sampler and semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMD). The air sampling rates (Rair) of SPMD for OCP were calculated. Quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models of Rair of SPMD were developed for OCP with partial least square (PLS) regression. Quantum chemical descriptors computed by semi-empirical PM6 method were used as predictor variables. The cumulative variance of the dependent variable explained by the PLS components and determined by cross-validation (Q(2)cum), for the optimal models, is 0.637, indicating that the model has good predictive ability and robustness, and could be used to estimate Rair values of OCP. The main factors governing Rair of OCP are intermolecular interactions and the energy required for cave-forming in dissolution of OCP into triolein of SPMD.

  8. A Pharmacokinetic Study of GC-1 Delivery Using a Nanochannel Membrane Device.

    PubMed

    Filgueira, Carly S; Ballerini, Andrea; Nicolov, Eugenia; Chua, Corrine Ying Xuan; Jain, Priya; Smith, Zachary W; Gilbert, April L; Scaglione, Francesco; Grattoni, Alessandro

    2017-03-01

    This study demonstrated a nanochannel membrane device (NMD) for controlled and sustained release of GC-1 in rats, in the context of the treatment of metabolic syndrome. Release profiles were established in vitro both with and without 5% labrasol for over 2 months. In vivo pharmacokinetic evaluation showed effective GC-1 plasma concentrations, which resulted in significant reductions in body weight after just one week of treatment when compared to the NMD releasing vehicle only (PBS). We also provided evidence that rats treated with NMD-GC-1 present sub-active thyroids and clear differences in the morphology of the epithelium and follicles as compared to the controls, while the heart showed changes in weight. Moreover, body temperatures remained stable throughout treatment, and glucose, pancreatic islet size, and liver histology appeared similar between the treated and control groups. Prolonged constant administration of GC-1 from the NMD proved to be a valid strategy to facilitate weight loss.

  9. Validity of using semipermeable membrane devices for determining aqueous concentrations of freely dissolved PAHs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prest, Harry; Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.

    1998-01-01

    An in-depth review of the recent contribution to this journal by Gustafson and Dickhut [1] prompts us to share our concerns regarding some of their conclusions. The paper presents data comparing three techniques for determining aqueous concentrations of freely dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) gas sparging, lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) design, and filtration followed by sorption using XAD-2 resin. Space limitations force us to limit our comments to problems resulting from an apparent lack of understanding of how SPMDs function. Several recent publications [2–13] have described the theoretical and practical considerations of SPMD usage. Gustafson and Dickhut fail to cite any papers describing SPMDs published after 1992, even though some 18 papers have been published in American and European journals since then and several SPMD studies have been presented at many major meetings.

  10. Use of semipermeable membrane devices for in situ monitoring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aquatic environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lebo, Jon A.; Zajicek, James L.; Huckins, James N.; Petty, Jimmie D.; Peterman, Paul H.

    1992-01-01

    A method is given for the recovery, cleanup, and analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that have been sequestered in SPMDs (semipermeable membrane devices). SPMDs are polymeric membranes enclosing lipids, and mimic the bioconcentration process of aquatic animals. SPMDs are used as passive, in situ monitors of contamination by organic pollutants of aquatic environments. The method reported here includes dialytic recovery of the PAHs, cleanup of the dialysates using size exclusion, adsorption, and argentation chromatographic modules in tandem, then analysis by gas chromatography with photoionization or mass spectrometric detection. The method is demonstrated to overcome the presence of a variety of environmental co-contaminants and other potential interferents in the dialysates. A field application is also demonstrated in which SPMDs are used to monitor PAH contamination in an urban creek. Approaches to the use of SPMD data to calculate aqueous concentrations of PAHs are discussed. The use of SPMDs in combination with the complementary, PAH-specific cleanup procedure provides a unique approach to the analysis of PAH residues in the aquatic environment.

  11. (13) C Breath Tests Are Feasible in Patients With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Devices.

    PubMed

    Bednarsch, Jan; Menk, Mario; Malinowski, Maciej; Weber-Carstens, Steffen; Pratschke, Johann; Stockmann, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Temporary extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been established as an essential part of therapy in patients with pulmonary or cardiac failure. As physiological gaseous exchange is artificially altered in this patient group, it is debatable whether a (13) C-breath test can be carried out. In this proof of technical feasibility report, we assess the viability of the (13) C-breath test LiMAx (maximum liver function capacity) in patients on ECMO therapy. All breath probes for the test device were obtained directly via the membrane oxygenator. Data of four patients receiving liver function assessment with the (13) C-breath test LiMAx while having ECMO therapy were analyzed. All results were compared with validated scenarios of the testing procedures. The LiMAx test could successfully be carried out in every case without changing ECMO settings. Clinical course of the patients ranging from multiorgan failure to no sign of liver insufficiency was in accordance with the results of the LiMAx liver function test. The (13) C-breath test is technically feasible in the context of ECMO. Further evaluation of (13) C-breath test in general would be worthwhile. The LiMAx test as a (13) C-breath test accessing liver function might be of particular predictive interest if patients with ECMO therapy develop multiorgan failure.

  12. North American neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) devices: 2002 survey results.

    PubMed

    Lawson, D Scott; Walczak, Rich; Lawson, Andrea F; Shearer, Ian R; Ing, Richard; Schulman, Scott; Kern, Frank; Jaggers, James

    2004-03-01

    In mid 2002, surveys of active extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) centers in the United States and Canada were conducted via E-mail regarding neonatal equipment and personnel. Seventy-four out of 99 (75%) North American ECMO centers listed in the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) directory responded to the survey. Of the responding centers, 95% use roller pumps, and the remaining 5% use centrifugal pumps. Silicone membrane oxygenators were used by 97% of the respondents, while 3% used hollow fiber oxygenators. Of the silicone membrane oxygenator users, 82% used the Medtronic ECMOtherm heat exchanger, 15% used a Gish heat exchanger, and 3% used the Dideco D720 heat exchanger. Sixty-one percent of the responding centers used some form of in-line blood gas monitoring. Five percent of the centers used a bubble trap in the arterial line, and 12% used an arterial line filter. A bladder was used by 92% of the centers, and 29% used a mechanical bladder box for servo regulation, the remaining 71% used pressure servo regulation. An air bubble detector was used by 65% of the responding centers, although 81% had the device available. Heparin coating was used by 5% of the centers on all their neonatal ECMO patients. The average low range ACT was 183 seconds, and the average high range ACT was 216 seconds. At 49% of the responding centers, perfusionists were involved with the ECMO program, registered nurses were involved at 84% of the centers, and respiratory therapists were involved at 61% of the centers, perfusion assistants were involved at one center (1%), and biomedical engineers were involved at one of the centers. When compared to a 1990 survey, a shift away from using bladder boxes and toward using air bubble detectors is apparent. But other than those two shifts, ECMO is done in much the same manner as it was done 12 years ago.

  13. Stable chemical bonding of porous membranes and poly(dimethylsiloxane) devices for long-term cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Sip, Christopher G.; Folch, A.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the bonding stability of various silane treatments for the integration of track-etched membranes with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices. We compare various treatments using trialkoxysilanes or dipodal silanes to determine the effect of the organofunctional group, cross-link density, reaction solvent, and catalyst on the bond stability. We find that devices made using existing silane methods delaminated after one day when immersed in cell culture medium at 37 °C. In contrast, the dipodal silane, bis[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]amine, is shown to yield stable and functional integration of membranes with PDMS that is suitable for long-term cell culture. To demonstrate application of the technique, we fabricated an open-surface device in which cells cultured on a track-etched membrane can be stimulated at their basal side via embedded microfluidic channels. C2C12 mouse myoblasts were differentiated into myotubes over the course of two weeks on these devices to demonstrate biocompatibility. Finally, devices were imaged during the basal-side delivery of a fluorescent stain to validate the membrane operation and long-term stability of the bonding technique. PMID:25379080

  14. Stable chemical bonding of porous membranes and poly(dimethylsiloxane) devices for long-term cell culture.

    PubMed

    Sip, Christopher G; Folch, A

    2014-05-01

    We have investigated the bonding stability of various silane treatments for the integration of track-etched membranes with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices. We compare various treatments using trialkoxysilanes or dipodal silanes to determine the effect of the organofunctional group, cross-link density, reaction solvent, and catalyst on the bond stability. We find that devices made using existing silane methods delaminated after one day when immersed in cell culture medium at 37 °C. In contrast, the dipodal silane, bis[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]amine, is shown to yield stable and functional integration of membranes with PDMS that is suitable for long-term cell culture. To demonstrate application of the technique, we fabricated an open-surface device in which cells cultured on a track-etched membrane can be stimulated at their basal side via embedded microfluidic channels. C2C12 mouse myoblasts were differentiated into myotubes over the course of two weeks on these devices to demonstrate biocompatibility. Finally, devices were imaged during the basal-side delivery of a fluorescent stain to validate the membrane operation and long-term stability of the bonding technique.

  15. A do-it-yourself membrane-activated auditory feedback device for weight bearing and gait training: a case report.

    PubMed

    Batavia, M; Gianutsos, J G; Vaccaro, A; Gold, J T

    2001-04-01

    An augmented auditory feedback device comprised of a thin membrane switch mini-buzzer, and battery is described as a modification of a previously described feedback device. The membrane switch can be customized for the patient and is designed to fit inside a patient's shoe without altering the heel height. Its appeal lies in its simplicity of construction, low cost, and ease of implementation during a patient's training for weight bearing and gait. An ever-present source of information, it provides performance-relevant cues to both patient and clinician about the occurrence, duration, and location of a force component of motor performance. The report includes suggested applications of the device, instructions to construct it, and a case report in which the device was used to improve weight bearing and gait in a cognitively healthy person with spina bifida.

  16. Considerations involved with the use of semipermeable membrane devices for monitoring environmental contaminants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petty, J.D.; Orazio, C.E.; Huckins, J.N.; Gale, R.W.; Lebo, J.A.; Meadows, J.C.; Echols, K.R.; Cranor, W.L.

    2000-01-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) are used with increasing frequency, and throughout the world as samplers of organic contaminants. The devices can be used to detect a variety of lipophilic chemicals in water, sediment/soil, and air. SPMDs are designed to sample nonpolar, hydrophobic chemicals. The maximum concentration factor achievable for a particular chemical is proportional to its octanol–water partition coefficient. Techniques used for cleanup of SPMD extracts for targeted analytes and for general screening by full-scan mass spectrometry do not differ greatly from techniques used for extracts of other matrices. However, SPMD extracts contain potential interferences that are specific to the membrane–lipid matrix. Procedures have been developed or modified to alleviate these potential interferences. The SPMD approach has been demonstrated to be applicable to sequestering and analyzing a wide array of environmental contaminants including organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated dioxins and dibenzofurans, selected organophosphate pesticides and pyrethroid insecticides, and other nonpolar organic chemicals. We present herein an overview of effective procedural steps for analyzing exposed SPMDs for trace to ultra-trace levels of contaminants sequestered from environmental matrices.

  17. Topographically-patterned porous membranes in a microfluidic device as an in vitro model of renal reabsorptive barriers

    PubMed Central

    Frohlich, Else M.; Alonso, José Luis; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Zhang, Xin; Arnaout, M. Amin

    2015-01-01

    Models of reabsorptive barriers require both a means to provide realistic physiologic cues to and quantify transport across a layer of cells forming the barrier. Here we have topographically-patterned porous membranes with several user-defined pattern types. To demonstrate the utility of the patterned membranes, we selected one type of pattern and applied it to a membrane to serve as a cell culture support in a microfluidic model of a renal reabsorptive barrier. The topographic cues in the model resemble physiological cues found in vivo while the porous structure allows quantification of transport across the cell layer. Sub-micron surface topography generated via hot-embossing onto a track-etched polycarbonate membrane, fully replicated topographical features and preserved porous architecture. Pore size and shape were analyzed with SEM and image analysis to determine the effect of hot embossing on pore morphology. The membrane was assembled into a bilayer microfluidic device and a human kidney proximal tubule epithelial cell line (HK-2) and primary renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (RPTEC) were cultured to confluency on the membrane. Immunofluorescent staining of both cell types revealed protein expression indicative of the formation of a reabsorptive barrier responsive to mechanical stimulation: ZO-1 (tight junction), paxillin (focal adhesions) and acetylated α-tubulin (primary cilia). HK-2 and RPTEC aligned in the direction of ridge/groove topography of the membrane in the device, evidence that the device has mechanical control over cell response. This topographically-patterned porous membrane provides an in vitro platform on which to model reabsorptive barriers with meaningful applications for understanding biological transport phenomenon, underlying disease mechanisms, and drug toxicity. PMID:23636129

  18. Topographically-patterned porous membranes in a microfluidic device as an in vitro model of renal reabsorptive barriers.

    PubMed

    Frohlich, Else M; Alonso, José Luis; Borenstein, Jeffrey T; Zhang, Xin; Arnaout, M Amin; Charest, Joseph L

    2013-06-21

    Models of reabsorptive barriers require both a means to provide realistic physiologic cues to and quantify transport across a layer of cells forming the barrier. Here we have topographically-patterned porous membranes with several user-defined pattern types. To demonstrate the utility of the patterned membranes, we selected one type of pattern and applied it to a membrane to serve as a cell culture support in a microfluidic model of a renal reabsorptive barrier. The topographic cues in the model resemble physiological cues found in vivo while the porous structure allows quantification of transport across the cell layer. Sub-micron surface topography generated via hot-embossing onto a track-etched polycarbonate membrane, fully replicated topographical features and preserved porous architecture. Pore size and shape were analyzed with SEM and image analysis to determine the effect of hot embossing on pore morphology. The membrane was assembled into a bilayer microfluidic device and a human kidney proximal tubule epithelial cell line (HK-2) and primary renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (RPTEC) were cultured to confluency on the membrane. Immunofluorescent staining of both cell types revealed protein expression indicative of the formation of a reabsorptive barrier responsive to mechanical stimulation: ZO-1 (tight junction), paxillin (focal adhesions) and acetylated α-tubulin (primary cilia). HK-2 and RPTEC aligned in the direction of ridge/groove topography of the membrane in the device, evidence that the device has mechanical control over cell response. This topographically-patterned porous membrane provides an in vitro platform on which to model reabsorptive barriers with meaningful applications for understanding biological transport phenomenon, underlying disease mechanisms, and drug toxicity.

  19. Centrifugal regulator for control of deployment rates of deployable elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermalle, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The requirements, design, and performance of a centrifugal regulator aimed at limiting deployment rates of deployable elements are discussed. The overall mechanism is comprised of four distinct functional parts in a machined housing: (1) the centrifugal brake device, which checks the payout of a deployment cable; (2) the reducing gear, which produces the spin rate necesary for the braking device; (3) the payout device, which allows the unwinding of the cable; and (4) the locking device, which prevents untimely unwinding. The centrifugal regulator is set into operation by a threshold tension of the cable which unlocks the mechanism and allows unwinding. The pulley of the windout device drives the centrifugal brake with the help of the reducing gear. The centrifugal force pushes aside weights that produce friction of the studs in a cylindrical housing. The mechanism behaved well at qualification temperature and vibrations.

  20. An intravascular bioartificial pancreas device (iBAP) with silicon nanopore membranes (SNM) for islet encapsulation under convective mass transport.

    PubMed

    Song, Shang; Blaha, Charles; Moses, Willieford; Park, Jaehyun; Wright, Nathan; Groszek, Joey; Fissell, William; Vartanian, Shant; Posselt, Andrew M; Roy, Shuvo

    2017-05-16

    Diffusion-based bioartificial pancreas (BAP) devices are limited by poor islet viability and functionality due to inadequate mass transfer resulting in islet hypoxia and delayed glucose-insulin kinetics. While intravascular ultrafiltration-based BAP devices possess enhanced glucose-insulin kinetics, the polymer membranes used in these devices provide inadequate ultrafiltrate flow rates and result in excessive thrombosis. Here, we report the silicon nanopore membrane (SNM), which exhibits a greater hydraulic permeability and a superior pore size selectivity compared to polymer membranes for use in BAP applications. Specifically, we demonstrate that the SNM-based intravascular BAP with ∼10 and ∼40 nm pore sized membranes support high islet viability (>60%) and functionality (<15 minute insulin response to glucose stimulation) at clinically relevant islet densities (5700 and 11 400 IE per cm(2)) under convection in vitro. In vivo studies with ∼10 nm pore sized SNM in a porcine model showed high islet viability (>85%) at clinically relevant islet density (5700 IE per cm(2)), c-peptide concentration of 144 pM in the outflow ultrafiltrate, and hemocompatibility under convection. These promising findings offer insights on the development of next generation of full-scale intravascular devices to treat T1D patients in the future.

  1. Advanced underwater lift device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, David T.; Hopkins, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    Flexible underwater lift devices ('lift bags') are used in underwater operations to provide buoyancy to submerged objects. Commercially available designs are heavy, bulky, and awkward to handle, and thus are limited in size and useful lifting capacity. An underwater lift device having less than 20 percent of the bulk and less than 10 percent of the weight of commercially available models was developed. The design features a dual membrane envelope, a nearly homogeneous envelope membrane stress distribution, and a minimum surface-to-volume ratio. A proof-of-concept model of 50 kg capacity was built and tested. Originally designed to provide buoyancy to mock-ups submerged in NASA's weightlessness simulators, the device may have application to water-landed spacecraft which must deploy flotation upon impact, and where launch weight and volume penalties are significant. The device may also be useful for the automated recovery of ocean floor probes or in marine salvage applications.

  2. Deployment Health

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-11

    memorandum, “Improved Occupational and Environmental Health Surveillance Reporting and Archiving” (Reference (e)); and assigns responsibilities for...Injury (DI) to control or reduce Occupational and Environmental Health (OEH) risks; to document and link OEH exposures with deployed personnel, including...infectious disease threats, environmental health risks, toxic industrial chemical threats, and developments in biotechnology and biomedical subjects

  3. [Development of the MITO-porter, a nano device for mitochondrial drug delivery via membrane fusion].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuma

    2014-01-01

    Many human diseases have been reported to be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, mitochondrial therapy would be expected to be useful and productive in the treatment of various diseases. To achieve such an innovative therapy, it will be necessary to deliver therapeutic agents into mitochondria. However, only a limited number of methods are available for accomplishing this. We previously developed the MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that permits macromolecular cargos to be transported into mitochondria via membrane fusion. Intracellular observations using the green fluorescence protein as a model macromolecule confirmed the mitochondrial delivery of a macromolecule by the MITO-Porter. Moreover, when we attempted the mitochondrial delivery of bongkrekic acid (BKA), an antiapoptosis agent, the MITO-Porter enhanced the antiapoptosis effect compared with naked BKA. To construct a device with enhanced performance, the MITO-Porter was coated with cell membrane-fusogenic outer envelopes to produce the dual function (DF)-MITO-Porter. Intracellular observations indicated that the DF-MITO-Porter was more effective in delivering exogenous macromolecules into mitochondria than the conventional MITO-Porter. Furthermore, when biomacromolecules were delivered using the DF-MITO-Porter to estimate the mitochondrial gene targeting of the carrier, the results confirmed that the MITO-Porter system has the potential for use in therapies aimed at mitochondrial DNA. This paper sumarizes our findings on mitochondrial drug delivery systems that are directed toward mitochondrial medicine development and mitochondrial gene therapy. It is expected that the MITO-Porter system will open new research areas in mitochondrial drug delivery systems and have a significant impact on the medical and life sciences.

  4. Advanced Deployable Structural Systems for Small Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Straubel, Marco; Wilkie, W. Keats; Zander, Martin E.; Fernandez, Juan M.; Hillebrandt, Martin F.

    2016-01-01

    One of the key challenges for small satellites is packaging and reliable deployment of structural booms and arrays used for power, communication, and scientific instruments. The lack of reliable and efficient boom and membrane deployment concepts for small satellites is addressed in this work through a collaborative project between NASA and DLR. The paper provides a state of the art overview on existing spacecraft deployable appendages, the special requirements for small satellites, and initial concepts for deployable booms and arrays needed for various small satellite applications. The goal is to enhance deployable boom predictability and ground testability, develop designs that are tolerant of manufacturing imperfections, and incorporate simple and reliable deployment systems.

  5. Semipermeable-membrane devices as an in situ and laboratory testing chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, W.W.; Word, J.Q.

    1995-12-31

    The use of semipermeable-membrane devices (SPMDs) to measure the bioavailability of dissolved (< 10{angstrom}) hydrophobic-organic-compounds has recently been established. These low-density polyethylene bags are effective and relatively easy in situ devices for evaluating bioaccumulation potentials of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and dioxins. The authors believe SPMDs may also be effective in situ and laboratory testing chambers for evaluating dissolved contaminant effects on sensitive life stages of freshwater/marine fish and invertebrates. Applications may include dissolved contaminant toxicity of effluents, porewater, water-column, and surface microlayer. In laboratory tests, the applicability of SPMD-testing chambers was explored with marine bivalve larvae (Mytilus galloprovincialis). Test solutions were filtered seawater, dissolved copper, ammonia, and an elutriate preparation that included both organic and inorganic contaminants. SPMDs were filled with seawater, immersed in test solutions for 24-h, then spiked with fertilized M. galloprovincialis embryos. Following 48-h exposures, >90% survival and normal development was observed in the controls, indicating that incubation in the SPMDs did not adversely affect larval development. Incubation in test treatments resulted in slight, but not significantly different, reductions in normal development, relative to the controls. The authors believe longer SPMD immersion prior to testing will likely be required to allow SPMD contents to reach equilibrium with test solutions before eliciting a significant toxicological response. While this may limit the application of SPMDs for short term in situ exposures, they may be used for field/laboratory exposures of a week or more or for collecting equilibrated field samples for laboratory testing.

  6. Membrane Protein Incorporation into Nano-Bioelectronics: An insight into Rhodopsin Controlled SiNW-FET Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunuguntla, Ramya

    Biological systems use different energy sources to interact with their environments by creating ion gradients, membrane electric potentials, or a proton motive force to accomplish strikingly complex tasks on the nanometer length scale, such as energy harvesting, and whole organism replication. Most of this activity involves a vast arsenal of active and passive ion channels, membrane receptors and ion pumps that mediate complex and precise transport across biological membranes. Despite the remarkable rate of progress exhibited by modern microelectronic devices, they still cannot compete with the efficiency and precision of biological systems on the component level. At the same time, the sophistication of these molecular machines provides an excellent opportunity to use them in hybrid bioelectronic devices where such a combination could deliver enhanced electronic functionality and enable seamless bi-directional interfaces between man-made and biological assemblies. Artificial membrane systems allow researchers to study the structure and function of membrane proteins in a matrix that approximates their natural environment and to integrate these proteins in ex-vivo devices such as electronic biosensors, thin-film protein arrays, or bio-fuel cells. Since most membrane proteins have vectorial functions, both functional studies and applications require effective control over protein orientation within a lipid bilayer. In our work, we have explored the role of the bilayer surface charge in determining transmembrane protein orientation and functionality during formation of proteoliposomes. We reconstituted a model vectorial ion pump, proteorhodopsin, in liposomes of opposite charges and varying charge densities and determined the resultant protein orientation. Antibody-binding assay and proteolysis of proteoliposomes showed physical evidence of preferential orientation, and functional assays verified vectorial nature of ion transport in this system. Our results indicate

  7. Development of Novel active transport membrane devices. Phase I. Final report, 31 October 1988--31 January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Laciak, D.V.; Quinn, R.; Choe, G.S.; Cook, P.J.; Tsai, Fu-Jya

    1994-08-01

    The main objective of this program was to identify and develop a technique for fabricating Active Transport Materials (ATM) into lab-scale membrane devices. Air Products met this objective by applying thin film, multilayer fabrication techniques to support the AT material on a substrate membrane. In Phase IA, spiral-wound hollow fiber membrane modules were fabricated and evaluated. These nonoptimized devices were used to demonstrate the AT-based separation of carbon dioxide from methane, hydrogen sulfide from methane, and ammonia from hydrogen. It was determined that a need exists for a more cost efficient and less energy intensive process for upgrading subquality natural gas. Air Products estimated the effectiveness of ATM for this application and concluded that an optimized ATM system could compete effectively with both conventional acid gas scrubbing technology and current membrane technology. In addition, the optimized ATM system would have lower methane loss and consume less energy than current alternative processes. Air Products made significant progress toward the ultimate goal of commercializing an advanced membrane for upgrading subquality natural gas. The laboratory program focused on developing a high performance hollow fiber substrate and fabricating and evaluating ATM-coated lab-scale hollow fiber membrane modules. Selection criteria for hollow fiber composite membrane supports were developed and used to evaluate candidate polymer compositions. A poly(amide-imide), PAI, was identified for further study. Conditions were identified which produced microporous PAI support membrane with tunable surface porosity in the range 100-1000{Angstrom}. The support fibers exhibited good hydrocarbon resistance and acceptable tensile strength though a higher elongation may ultimately be desirable. ATM materials were coated onto commercial and PAI substrate fiber. Modules containing 1-50 fibers were evaluated for permselectivity, pressure stability, and lifetime.

  8. Sequestration of priority pollutant PAHs from sediment pore water employing semipermeable membrane devices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, K.S.; Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.; Lebo, J.A.; Kaiser, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were employed to sample sediment pore water in static exposure studies under controlled laboratory conditions using (control pond and formulated) sediments fortified with 15 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PPPAHs). The sediment fortification level of 750 ng/g was selected on the basis of what might be detected in a sediment sample from a contaminated area. The sampling interval consisted of 0, 4, 7, 14, and 28 days for each study. The analytical methodologies, as well as the extraction and sample cleanup procedures used in the isolation, characterization, and quantitation of 15 PPPAHs at different fortification levels in SPMDs, water, and sediment were reported previously (Williamson, M.S. Thesis, University of Missouri - Columbia, USA; Williamson et al., Chemosphere (This issue - PII: S0045-6535(02)00394-6)) and used for this project. Average (mean) extraction recoveries for each PPPAH congener in each matrix are reported and discussed. No procedural blank extracts (controls) were found to contain any PPPAH residues above the method quantitation limit, therefore, no matrix interferences were detected. The focus of this publication is to demonstrate the ability to sequester environmental contaminants, specifically PPPAHs, from sediment pore water using SPMDs and two different types of fortified sediment.

  9. Calibrating the uptake kinetics of semipermeable membrane devices using exposure standards

    SciTech Connect

    Booij, K.; Sleiderink, H.M.; Smedes, F.

    1998-07-01

    The water phase is an important compartment in the modeling of the fate of organic contaminants in the aquatic environment. Organic contaminant exchange kinetics between semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and water were studied in two suspensions of estuarine and marine sediments under conditions of high and low turbulence over a period of 56 d. Prior to exposure, the SPMDs were spiked with a number of exposure standards not occurring in the environment. The release rate of these compounds was used as an independent measure of the exchange kinetics between the SPMD and water. The uptake rates of chlorobenzenes, polychlorinated biphenyls, (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were lower by a factor of three under conditions of low turbulence. For compounds with a log octanol-water partition coefficient (K{sub ow}) > 5.5 the uptake rate was constant during the entire period. Within each compound class, uptake rate constants correlated well with log K{sub ow}. The uptake rate constants of PAHs were lower than those of PCBs and chlorobenzenes by a factor of 10, but these estimates probably are artificially low due to an overestimation of the aqueous PAH concentrations. Release rate constants of the exposure standards fell within the range of the uptake rate constants of chlorobenzenes and PCBs, although with poor precision. Suggestions for improving the measurement of exchange rate constants of exposure standards are presented. The role of triolein in the exchange kinetics is shown to be minor.

  10. Evaluation of persistent hydrophobic organic compounds in the Columbia River Basin using semipermeable-membrane devices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, K.A.; Gale, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    Persistent hydrophobic organic compounds are of concern in the Columbia River because they have been correlated with adverse effects on wildlife. We analysed samples from nine main-stem and six tributary sites throughout the Columbia River Basin (Washington and Oregon) for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, and priority-pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Because these compounds may have important biological consequences at aqueous concentrations well below the detection limits associated with conventional sampling methods, we used semipermeable-membrane devices to sample water and achieved parts-per-quintillion detection limits. All of these compound classes were prevalent within the basin, but concentrations of many analytes were highest in the vicinity of Portland-Vancouver, indicating that the Willamette subbasin-and perhaps the urban area in particular-is an important source of these compounds. Data collected during basin low-flow conditions in 1997 and again during basin high-flow conditions in 1998 indicate that in-stream processes such as dilution by relatively clean inflow, and flow through island hyporheic zones may be important mechanisms for attenuating dissolved concentrations of hydrophobic compounds.

  11. Uptake rate constants and partition coefficients for vapor phase organic chemicals using semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cranor, W.L.; Alvarez, D.A.; Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    To fully utilize semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) as passive samplers in air monitoring, data are required to accurately estimate airborne concentrations of environmental contaminants. Limited uptake rate constants (kua) and no SPMD air partitioning coefficient (Ksa) existed for vapor-phase contaminants. This research was conducted to expand the existing body of kinetic data for SPMD air sampling by determining kua and Ksa for a number of airborne contaminants including the chemical classes: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides, brominated diphenyl ethers, phthalate esters, synthetic pyrethroids, and organophosphate/organosulfur pesticides. The kuas were obtained for 48 of 50 chemicals investigated and ranged from 0.03 to 3.07??m3??g-1??d-1. In cases where uptake was approaching equilibrium, Ksas were approximated. Ksa values (no units) were determined or estimated for 48 of the chemicals investigated and ranging from 3.84E+5 to 7.34E+7. This research utilized a test system (United States Patent 6,877,724 B1) which afforded the capability to generate and maintain constant concentrations of vapor-phase chemical mixtures. The test system and experimental design employed gave reproducible results during experimental runs spanning more than two years. This reproducibility was shown by obtaining mean kua values (n??=??3) of anthracene and p,p???-DDE at 0.96 and 1.57??m3??g-1??d-1 with relative standard deviations of 8.4% and 8.6% respectively.

  12. A survey of recent results in passive sampling of water and air by semipermeable membrane devices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prest, Harry F.; Huckins, James N.; Petty, Jimmie D.; Herve, Sirpa; Paasivirta, Jaakko; Heinonen, Pertti

    1995-01-01

    A survey is presented of some recent results for passive sampling of water and air for trace organic contaminants using lipid-filled semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs). Results of water sampling for trace organochlorine compounds using simultaneously exposed SPMDs and the most universally applied biomonitor (bivalves) are discussed. In general, the total amounts of accumulated analytes available for analysis in bivalves and SPMDs were comparable. However, SPMD controls typically had negligible levels of contamination, which was not always the case for transplanted bivalves, even after prolonged depuration prior to exposure. In surveys of the spatial trends of organochlorines at a series of sites, data from bivalves and SPMDs provided the same picture of contaminant distribution and severity. An exception was ionizable contaminants such as the chlorinated phenolic compounds and their transformation products found in pulp mill effluents. In these cases the two monitoring approaches compliment each other, i.e. what is not found in bivalves appears in SPMDs and vice versa. SPMDs have also been applied in environments where biomonitoring is not feasible. SPMDs have shown their utility in studies of trace levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons by locating and characterizing point sources. An example is given of their application to the calculation of contaminant half-lives from aqueous SPMD residues, a direct measurement of the persistence of contaminants in an environmental compartment. Similarly, results of air sampling with SPMDs in a relatively pristine coastal location are cited which reveal a tremendous enhancement in p,p′-DDE relative to open ocean values.

  13. On chip porous polymer membranes for integration of gastrointestinal tract epithelium with microfluidic 'body-on-a-chip' devices.

    PubMed

    Esch, Mandy Brigitte; Sung, Jong Hwan; Yang, Jennifer; Yu, Changhao; Yu, Jiajie; March, John C; Shuler, Michael Louis

    2012-10-01

    We describe a novel fabrication method that creates microporous, polymeric membranes that are either flat or contain controllable 3-dimensional shapes that, when populated with Caco-2 cells, mimic key aspects of the intestinal epithelium such as intestinal villi and tight junctions. The developed membranes can be integrated with microfluidic, multi-organ cell culture systems, providing access to both sides, apical and basolateral, of the 3D epithelial cell culture. Partial exposure of photoresist (SU-8) spun on silicon substrates creates flat membranes with micrometer-sized pores (0.5-4.0 μm) that--supported by posts--span across 50 μm deep microfluidic chambers that are 8 mm wide and 10 long. To create three-dimensional shapes the membranes were air dried over silicon pillars with aspect ratios of up to 4:1. Space that provides access to the underside of the shaped membranes can be created by isotropically etching the sacrificial silicon pillars with xenon difluoride. Depending on the size of the supporting posts and the pore sizes the overall porosity of the membranes ranged from 4.4 % to 25.3 %. The microfabricated membranes can be used for integrating barrier tissues such as the gastrointestinal tract epithelium, the lung epithelium, or other barrier tissues with multi-organ "body-on-a-chip" devices.

  14. Membrane perforation in sinus floor elevation - piezoelectric device versus conventional rotary instruments for osteotomy: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Seoane, Juan; López-Niño, Javier; García-Caballero, Lucía; Seoane-Romero, Juan Manuel; Tomás, Inmaculada; Varela-Centelles, Pablo

    2013-12-01

    Sinus membrane perforation is the most common intraoperative complication of maxillary sinus floor elevation (MSFE) procedures and frequently causes postoperative problems. Piezoelectric devices have been claimed to reduce the frequency of membrane perforations although no clear evidence supports this view. Ten surgeons with different expertise levels performed 80 MSFEs in selected lamb heads, with rotary and piezoelectric instruments following standard protocols. After the procedures, specimens were coded and perforations or tears determined through a microscope. No significant differences in terms of thickness either of the sinus lateral wall (xi -xj  = 73.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 45.3-191.8) or the membrane (xi -xj  = 24.2; 95% CI = -29.4 to 77.9) were identified between the specimens allocated to each group. Nine membrane perforations (11.2%) occurred during the study, all within the lower expertise group. Membrane elevation by hand instruments caused five perforations (40%) in the rotary instrument group and one in the piezoelectric group. Expert surgeons produced no membrane perforations, the size of the antrostomy that was smaller in the piezoelectric group being the only significant difference between the rotary and piezoelectric groups. The use of piezoelectric material for MSFE reduces the frequency of membrane perforation among surgeons with a limited experience. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Deployment Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    family/unit briefings (to include POA/wills/ consumer law /insurance war clauses) - Provide fill-in-blank sheets to send coordinators of pre- deployment...services. 2. SGLI designations and "By Law" implications. 3. Wills for both spouses. 4. Powers of Attorney. 5. Consumer law issues. 1-7 B. Typically...Relief Act JA 261 Real Property Guide JA 262 Wills Guide JA 263 Family Law Guide JA 265 Consumer Law Guide JA 267 Legal Assistance Office Directory

  16. Deployment Repeatability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    context of large space structures. First, large structures are not necessarily expected to match a ground- measured shape, but some predicted shape...problems with accuracy in an average sense, but with a concern that the ultimate deployment in space may not match the pre- flight shape prediction...but with large space structures, it is often impossible to do a direct test without interference from gravity offload systems or the ground

  17. Deployment Repeatability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-31

    context of large space structures. First, large structures are not necessarily expected to match a ground- measured shape, but some predicted shape...problems with accuracy in an average sense, but with a concern that the ultimate deployment in space may not match the pre- flight shape prediction...but with large space structures, it is often impossible to do a direct test without interference from gravity offload systems or the ground

  18. Low-temperature bonding process for the fabrication of hybrid glass-membrane organ-on-a-chip devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocock, Kyall J.; Gao, Xiaofang; Wang, Chenxi; Priest, Craig; Prestidge, Clive A.; Mawatari, Kazuma; Kitamori, Takehiko; Thierry, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    The integration of microfluidics with living biological systems has paved the way to the exciting concept of "organs-on-a-chip," which aims at the development of advanced in vitro models that replicate the key features of human organs. Glass-based devices have long been utilized in the field of microfluidics but the integration of alternative functional elements within multilayered glass microdevices, such as polymeric membranes, remains a challenge. To this end, we have extended a previously reported approach for the low-temperature bonding of glass devices that enables the integration of a functional polycarbonate porous membrane. The process was initially developed and optimized on specialty low-temperature bonding equipment (μTAS2001, Bondtech, Japan) and subsequently adapted to more widely accessible hot embosser units (EVG520HE Hot Embosser, EVG, Austria). The key aspect of this method is the use of low temperatures compatible with polymeric membranes. Compared to borosilicate glass bonding (650°C) and quartz/fused silica bonding (1050°C) processes, this method maintains the integrity and functionality of the membrane (Tg 150°C for polycarbonate). Leak tests performed showed no damage or loss of integrity of the membrane for up to 150 h, indicating sufficient bond strength for long-term cell culture. A feasibility study confirmed the growth of dense and functional monolayers of Caco-2 cells within 5 days.

  19. Low-temperature bonded glass-membrane microfluidic device for in vitro organ-on-a-chip cell culture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocock, Kyall J.; Gao, Xiaofang; Wang, Chenxi; Priest, Craig; Prestidge, Clive A.; Mawatari, Kazuma; Kitamori, Takehiko; Thierry, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    The integration of microfluidics with living biological systems has paved the way to the exciting concept of "organson- a-chip", which aims at the development of advanced in vitro models that replicate the key features of human organs. Glass based devices have long been utilised in the field of microfluidics but the integration of alternative functional elements within multi-layered glass microdevices, such as polymeric membranes, remains a challenge. To this end, we have extended a previously reported approach for the low-temperature bonding of glass devices that enables the integration of a functional polycarbonate porous membrane. The process was initially developed and optimised on specialty low-temperature bonding equipment (μTAS2001, Bondtech, Japan) and subsequently adapted to more widely accessible hot embosser units (EVG520HE Hot Embosser, EVG, Austria). The key aspect of this method is the use of low temperatures compatible with polymeric membranes. Compared to borosilicate glass bonding (650 °C) and quartz/fused silica bonding (1050 °C) processes, this method maintains the integrity and functionality of the membrane (Tg 150 °C for polycarbonate). Leak tests performed showed no damage or loss of integrity of the membrane for up to 150 hours, indicating sufficient bond strength for long term cell culture. A feasibility study confirmed the growth of dense and functional monolayers of Caco-2 cells within 5 days.

  20. Accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in semipermeable membrane devices and caged mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) in relation to water column phase distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Axelman, J.; Naes, K.; Naef, C.; Broman, D.

    1999-11-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) were deployed at a site contaminated by discharges of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from an aluminium reduction plant, and at a reference site. The accumulation of PAHs in SPMDs versus mussels, along with the ability of the two matrices to predict contaminant concentrations in the ambient environment, were evaluated through concurrent measurements of particulate, dissolved, and colloidal PAHs in the water column. Analysis of the results showed that blue mussels were more efficient at sequestering PAHs than were SPMDs. The PAH profile (i.e,, the relative abundance of individual PAHs) in the two matrices were similar, but differed significantly from the profile in the dissolved phase. Further, back-calculation of the ambient dissolved concentrations from SPMDs indicated systematic overtrapping with increasing hydrophobicity. Calculation of in situ bioconcentration factors (BCFs) for the blue mussels at the smelter site indicated that uptake via particles or from colloids dominated over direct uptake from the dissolved phase, as opposed to the reference site. The in situ BCFs differed markedly from literature values, which implies that the use of mussels to predict ambient concentrations would require that site-specific BCFs be applied.

  1. Identification of methyl triclosan and halogenated analogues in male common carp (Cyprinus carpio) from Las Vegas Bay and semipermeable membrane devices from Las Vegas Wash, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Leiker, Thomas J; Abney, Sonja R; Goodbred, Steven L; Rosen, Michael R

    2009-03-01

    Methyl triclosan and four halogenated analogues have been identified in extracts of individual whole-body male carp (Cyprinus carpio) tissue that were collected from Las Vegas Bay, Nevada, and Semipermeable Membrane Devices (SPMD) that were deployed in Las Vegas Wash, Nevada. Methyl triclosan is believed to be the microbially methylated product of the antibacterial agent triclosan (2, 4, 4'-trichloro-4-hydroxydiphenyl ether, Chemical Abstract Service Registry Number 3380-34-5, Irgasan DP300). The presence of methyl triclosan and four halogenated analogues was confirmed in SPMD extracts by comparing low- and high-resolution mass spectral data and Kovats retention indices of methyl triclosan with commercially obtained triclosan that was derivatized to the methyl ether with ethereal diazomethane. The four halogenated analogues of methyl triclosan detected in both whole-body tissue and SPMD extracts were tentatively identified by high resolution mass spectrometry. Methyl triclosan was detected in all 29 male common carp from Las Vegas Bay with a mean concentration of 596 microg kg(-1) wet weight (ww) which is more than an order of magnitude higher than previously reported concentrations in the literature. The halogenated analogs were detected less frequently (21%-76%) and at much lower concentrations (<51 microg kg(-1) ww). None of these compounds were detected in common carp from a Lake Mead reference site in Overton Arm, Nevada.

  2. Identification of methyl triclosan and halogenated analogues in male common carp (Cyprinus carpio) from Las Vegas Bay and semipermeable membrane devices from Las Vegas Wash, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leiker, T.J.; Abney, S.R.; Goodbred, S.L.; Rosen, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Methyl triclosan and four halogenated analogues have been identified in extracts of individual whole-body male carp (Cyprinus carpio) tissue that were collected from Las Vegas Bay, Nevada, and Semipermeable Membrane Devices (SPMD) that were deployed in Las Vegas Wash, Nevada. Methyl triclosan is believed to be the microbially methylated product of the antibacterial agent triclosan (2, 4, 4'-trichloro-4-hydroxydiphenyl ether, Chemical Abstract Service Registry Number 3380-34-5, Irgasan DP300). The presence of methyl triclosan and four halogenated analogues was confirmed in SPMD extracts by comparing low- and high-resolution mass spectral data and Kovats retention indices of methyl triclosan with commercially obtained triclosan that was derivatized to the methyl ether with ethereal diazomethane. The four halogenated analogues of methyl triclosan detected in both whole-body tissue and SPMD extracts were tentatively identified by high resolution mass spectrometry. Methyl triclosan was detected in all 29 male common carp from Las Vegas Bay with a mean concentration of 596????g kg- 1 wet weight (ww) which is more than an order of magnitude higher than previously reported concentrations in the literature. The halogenated analogs were detected less frequently (21%-76%) and at much lower concentrations (< 51????g kg- 1 ww). None of these compounds were detected in common carp from a Lake Mead reference site in Overton Arm, Nevada.

  3. ROSA deploy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-18

    iss052e002857 (6/18/2017) --- The Roll-Out Solar Array (ROSA) is a new type of solar panel that rolls open in space like a party favor and is more compact than current rigid panel designs. The ROSA investigation tests deployment and retraction, shape changes when the Earth blocks the sun, and other physical challenges to determine the array’s strength and durability. ROSA has the potential to replace solar arrays on future satellites, making them more compact and lighter weight. Satellite radio and television, weather forecasting, GPS and other services used on Earth would all benefit from high-performance solar arrays.

  4. ROSA deploy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-18

    iss052e002871 (6/18/2017) --- The Roll-Out Solar Array (ROSA) is a new type of solar panel that rolls open in space like a party favor and is more compact than current rigid panel designs. The ROSA investigation tests deployment and retraction, shape changes when the Earth blocks the sun, and other physical challenges to determine the array’s strength and durability. ROSA has the potential to replace solar arrays on future satellites, making them more compact and lighter weight. Satellite radio and television, weather forecasting, GPS and other services used on Earth would all benefit from high-performance solar arrays.

  5. ROSA deploy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-18

    iss052e004379 (6/18/2017) --- The Roll-Out Solar Array (ROSA) is a new type of solar panel that rolls open in space like a party favor and is more compact than current rigid panel designs. The ROSA investigation tests deployment and retraction, shape changes when the Earth blocks the sun, and other physical challenges to determine the array’s strength and durability. ROSA has the potential to replace solar arrays on future satellites, making them more compact and lighter weight. Satellite radio and television, weather forecasting, GPS and other services used on Earth would all benefit from high-performance solar arrays.

  6. Use of semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDS) to determine bioavailable organochlorine pesticide residues in streams receiving irrigation drainwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petty, Jimmie D.; Huckins, James N.; Martin, D.B.; Adornato, T.G.

    1995-01-01

    The semipermeable membrane device (SPMD), consisting of a neutral lipid (triolein) enclosed in polyethylene layflat tubing, is very effective in sequestering bioavailable organochlorine (OC) pesticides in the environment. We used SPMDs to sequester OC pesticide residues in streams receiving irrigation drainwater and found toxaphene, the DDT complex, dieldrin, and endrin. Ambient water concentrations of the OC pesticides were calculated using an algorithm developed previously. Toxaphene residues were estimated to range from 300 to 7,000 ng/L.

  7. Quantification of the specific membrane capacitance of single cells using a microfluidic device and impedance spectroscopy measurement

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Qingyuan; Ferrier, Graham A.; Chen, Brandon K.; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yu

    2012-01-01

    The specific membrane capacitance (SMC) is an electrical parameter that correlates with both the electrical activity and morphology of the plasma membrane, which are physiological markers for cellular phenotype and health. We have developed a microfluidic device that enables impedance spectroscopy measurements of the SMC of single biological cells. Impedance spectra induced by single cells aspirated into the device are captured over a moderate frequency range (5 kHz–1 MHz). Maximum impedance sensitivity is achieved using a tapered microfluidic channel, which effectively routes electric fields across the cell membranes. The SMC is extracted by curve-fitting impedance spectra to an equivalent circuit model. From our measurement, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells are found to exhibit larger SMC values in hypertonic solutions as compared with those in isotonic solutions. In addition, AML cell phenotypes (AML2 and NB4) exhibiting varying metastatic potential yield distinct SMC values (AML2: 16.9 ± 1.9 mF/m2 (n = 23); NB4: 22.5 ± 4.7 mF/m2 (n = 23)). Three-dimensional finite element simulations of the microfluidic device confirm the feasibility of this approach. PMID:23940502

  8. Lab-on-a-Membrane Foldable Devices for Duplex Drop-Volume Electrochemical Biosensing Using Quantum Dot Tags.

    PubMed

    Kokkinos, Christos; Angelopoulou, Michailia; Economou, Anastasios; Prodromidis, Mamas; Florou, Ageliki; Haasnoot, Willem; Petrou, Panagiota; Kakabakos, Sotirios

    2016-07-05

    This work describes a new type of integrated lab-on-a-membrane foldable device suitable for on-site duplex electrochemical biosensing using drop-size sample volumes. The devices are fabricated entirely by screen-printing on a nylon membrane and feature two assay zones which are located symmetrically on either side of a three-electrode voltammetric cell with a bismuth citrate-loaded graphite working electrode. After the completion of two spatially separated drop-volume competitive immunoassays on the assay zones using biotinylated antibodies labeled with streptavidin-conjugated Pb- and Cd-based quantum dots (QDs), respectively, the QD labels are dissolved releasing Pb(II) and Cd(II) in the assay zones. Then, the two assay zones are folded over, and they are brought in contact with the voltammetric cell for simultaneous anodic stripping voltammetric (ASV) determination of Pb(II) and Cd(II) at the bismuth nanostructured layer formed on the working electrode by reduction of the bismuth citrate during the preconcentration step. The fabrication of the devices is discussed in detail, and their operational characteristics are exhaustively studied. In order to demonstrate their applicability to the analysis in complex matrices, duplex ASV-QDs-based determination of bovine casein and bovine immunoglobulin G is carried out in milk samples yielding limits of detection of 0.04 μg mL(-1) and 0.02 μg mL(-1), respectively. The potential of the devices to detect milk adulteration is further demonstrated. These new membrane devices enable duplex biosensing with distinct advantages over existing approaches in terms of cost, fabrication, and operational simplicity and rapidity, portability, sample size, disposability, sensitivity, and suitability for field analysis.

  9. Semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) for monitoring PCDD and PCDF levels from a paper mill effluent in the Androscoggin River, Maine, USA.

    PubMed

    Charlestra, Lucner; Courtemanch, David L; Amirbahman, Aria; Patterson, Howard

    2008-07-01

    Paper mill effluents may contain polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) that are normally generated due to chlorinated bleaching of pulp and paper. We used the semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) to monitor PCDD/F levels upstream and downstream of a paper mill on the Androscoggin River, in Jay (ME). Following the 36 day deployment, SPMD dialysis and cleanup, the samples were analyzed by HRGC/HRMS. Total concentrations of PCDD/Fs in SPMDs (sum of all tetra-through octachlorinated congeners) ranged from 4.71 pg g(-1) to 26.26 pg g(-1). Five out of the targeted 17 toxic congeners were detected, including: 2,3,7,8-TCDF; 1,2,3,7,8-PeCDF; 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF; 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDD and OCDD. Permeability reference compounds (PRCs) were used for in situ calibration of the SPMD sampling rate (Rs). In all sites, water concentrations were the highest for OCDD (0.081-0.103 pg l(-1)), and the lowest for 1,2,3,7,8-PeCDF (0.005-0.009 pg l(-1)). There was not a consistent pattern of upstream-downstream gradient in the PCDD/F levels. This suggested that processes other than the mill in Jay (multiple sources, river dynamics) governed the flux of PCDD/Fs in the sampling locations. The SPMD results were validated by comparison to other studies on the Androscoggin River and elsewhere, confirming the potential of the device as a useful monitoring technique for PCDD/Fs in large river systems.

  10. A viable circulating tumor cell isolation device with high retrieval efficiency using a reversibly deformable membrane barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoonji; Bu, Jiyoon; Cho, Young-Ho; Son, Il Tae; Kang, Sung-Bum

    2017-02-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) contain prognostic information of the tumor, since they shed from the primary tumor and invade into the bloodstream. Therefore, the viable isolation is necessary for a consequent analysis of CTCs. Here, we present a device for the viable isolation and efficient retrieval of CTCs using slanted slot filters, formed by a reversibly deformable membrane barrier. Conventional filters have difficulties in retrieving captured cells, since they easily clog the slots. Moreover, large stress concentration at the sharp edges of squared slots, causes cell lysis. In contrast, the present device shows over 94% of high retrieval efficiency, since the slots can be opened simply by relieving the pressure. Furthermore, the inflated membrane barrier naturally forms the slanted slots, thus reducing the cell damage. By using cancer cell lines, we verified that the present device successfully isolate targeted cells, even at an extremely low concentrations (~10 cells/0.1 ml). In the clinical study, 85.7% of patients initially showed CTC positive while the numbers generally decreased after the surgery. We have also proved that the number of CTCs were highly correlated with tumour invasiveness. Therefore, the present device has potential for use in cancer diagnosis, surgical validation, and invasiveness analysis.

  11. One-Step Fabrication of a Microfluidic Device with an Integrated Membrane and Embedded Reagents by Multimaterial 3D Printing.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Smejkal, Petr; Macdonald, Niall P; Guijt, Rosanne M; Breadmore, Michael C

    2017-04-18

    One of the largest impediments in the development of microfluidic-based smart sensing systems is the manufacturability of integrated, complex devices. Here we propose multimaterial 3D printing for the fabrication of such devices in a single step. A microfluidic device containing an integrated porous membrane and embedded liquid reagents was made by 3D printing and applied for the analysis of nitrate in soil. The manufacture of the integrated, sealed device was realized as a single print within 30 min. The body of the device was printed in transparent acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and contained a 400 μm wide structure printed from a commercially available composite filament. The composite filament can be turned into a porous material through dissolution of a water-soluble material. Liquid reagents were integrated by briefly pausing the printing before resuming for sealing the device. The devices were evaluated by the determination of nitrate in a soil slurry containing zinc particles for the reduction of nitrate to nitrite using the Griess reagent. Using a consumer digital camera, the linear range of the detector response ranged from 0 to 60 ppm, covering the normal range of nitrate in soil. To ensure that the sealing of the reagent chamber is maintained, aqueous reagents should be avoided. When using the nonaqueous reagent, the multimaterial device containing the Griess reagent could be stored for over 4 days but increased the detection range to 100-500 ppm. Multimaterial 3D printing is a potentially new approach for the manufacture of microfluidic devices with multiple integrated functional components.

  12. The identification of readily bioavailable pollutants in Lake Shkodra/Skadar using semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs), bioassays and chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Rastall, Andrew C; Neziri, Anila; Vukovic, Zeljko; Jung, Christine; Mijovic, Slavoljub; Hollert, Henner; Nikcevic, Svetlana; Erdinger, Lothar

    2004-01-01

    Lake Shkodra/Skadar is the largest lake in the Balkans region and located on the border between Albania to the south and Montenegro to the north. Because of the wide range of endemic, rare or endangered plant and animal species it supports, Lake Shkodra/Skadar and its extensive associated wetlands are internationally recognised as a site of significance and importance (Ramsar site). In recent years, social and economic changes in both Albania and Montenegro have lead to unprecedented levels of urban and industrial effluent entering the lake. Of particular concern is the increasing input of toxic hydrophobic organic pollutants (HOPs) into the lake and the degree to which these compounds are available for uptake by aquatic biota. Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) have been shown to sample the readily bioavailable fraction (dissolved phase) of waterborne HOPs and in doing so provide relevant data for exposure assessment. The aim of the current study was to use SPMD-based sampling in conjunction with appropriate bioassays and chemical analysis to identify readily bioavailable HOPs in the lake. SPMDs were constructed and deployed at three sites in the Albanian sector and three sites in the Montenegrin sector of Lake Skadar/Shkodra for 21 days. Following the dialytic recovery of target analytes and size exclusion chromatographic clean-up, aliquots of SPMD samples were subjected to GC-MS scan analysis for major components, GC-MS SIM analysis for 16 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PP-PAHs) and assayed for EROD-inducing, estrogenic and mutagenic potential using rainbow trout liver cells (RTL-W1), the yeast estrogen screen (YES) and the Ames Test, respectively. A total of 39 compounds were tentatively identified in SPMD samples from the six sampling sites. Alkylated PAHs were the most abundant and ubiquitous compounds present along with various sterols and sterol derivatives. Numerous other compounds remain unidentified. 15 of the 16 targeted PP

  13. Effect of growth solution, membrane size and array connection on microbial fuel cell power supply for medical devices.

    PubMed

    Roxby, Daniel N; Nham Tran; Pak-Lam Yu; Nguyen, Hung T

    2016-08-01

    Implanted biomedical devices typically last a number of years before their batteries are depleted and a surgery is required to replace them. A Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) is a device which by using bacteria, directly breaks down sugars to generate electricity. Conceptually there is potential to continually power implanted medical devices for the lifetime of a patient. To investigate the practical potential of this technology, H-Cell Dual Chamber MFCs were evaluated with two different growth solutions and measurements recorded for maximum power output both of individual MFCs and connected MFCs. Using Luria-Bertani media and connecting MFCs in a hybrid series and parallel arrangement with larger membrane sizes showed the highest power output and the greatest potential for replacing implanted batteries.

  14. Starshade Deployment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-09

    This image shows the deployment of a half-scale starshade with four petals at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, in 2014. The full scale of this starshade (not shown) will measure at 34 meters, or approximately 111 feet. The flower-like petals of the starshade are designed to diffract bright starlight away from telescopes seeking the dim light of exoplanets. The starshade was re-designed from earlier models to allow these petals to furl, or wrap around the spacecraft, for launch into space. Once in space, the starshade will need to expand from its tightly-packed launch shape to become large and umbrella-like, ideal for blocking starlight. Each petal is covered in a high-performance plastic film that resembles gold foil. On a starshade ready for launch, the thermal gold foil will only cover the side of the petals facing away from the telescope, with black on the other, so as not to reflect other light sources such as the Earth into its lens. Starlight-blocking technologies such as the starshade are being developed to help image exoplanets, with a focus on Earth-sized, habitable worlds. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20907

  15. Performance of able-bodied subjects on a text-typing task using a head-operated device and expanded membrane cursor keys.

    PubMed

    Capilouto, Gilson J; McClenaghan, Bruce; Williams, Harriet G; Dickerson, John; Hussey, James R

    2004-02-01

    Children and adults with disabilities frequently rely on computers to complete written tasks. Those with significant motor limitations typically use alternative computer-input devices since the traditional keyboard and mouse are insufficient to accommodate their abilities. For persons unable to isolate their fingers, input devices controlled by movements of the head or whole hand or arm movements may be among the options considered. This study investigated the performance of a head-operated device and expanded membrane cursor keys for text entry. Data from 24 young adults indicated the head-operated device performed significantly faster given reduced cognitive demands for device operation, increased stimulus-response compatibility, and simplicity of movement. Use of the expanded membrane cursor keys resulted in significantly lower error rates. No significant differences in comfort or ease of use were reported for the two devices. The relative performance of device options for users sharing similar motor challenges provides rehabilitation specialists with important clinical information.

  16. Solid-phase extraction and purification of membrane proteins using a UV-modified PMMA microfluidic bioaffinity μSPE device.

    PubMed

    Battle, Katrina N; Jackson, Joshua M; Witek, Małgorzata A; Hupert, Mateusz L; Hunsucker, Sally A; Armistead, Paul M; Soper, Steven A

    2014-03-21

    We present a novel microfluidic solid-phase extraction (μSPE) device for the affinity enrichment of biotinylated membrane proteins from whole cell lysates. The device offers features that address challenges currently associated with the extraction and purification of membrane proteins from whole cell lysates, including the ability to release the enriched membrane protein fraction from the extraction surface so that they are available for downstream processing. The extraction bed was fabricated in PMMA using hot embossing and was comprised of 3600 micropillars. Activation of the PMMA micropillars by UV/O3 treatment permitted generation of surface-confined carboxylic acid groups and the covalent attachment of NeutrAvidin onto the μSPE device surfaces, which was used to affinity select biotinylated MCF-7 membrane proteins directly from whole cell lysates. The inclusion of a disulfide linker within the biotin moiety permitted release of the isolated membrane proteins via DTT incubation. Very low levels (∼20 fmol) of membrane proteins could be isolated and recovered with ∼89% efficiency with a bed capacity of 1.7 pmol. Western blotting indicated no traces of cytosolic proteins in the membrane protein fraction as compared to significant contamination using a commercial detergent-based method. We highlight future avenues for enhanced extraction efficiency and increased dynamic range of the μSPE device using computational simulations of different micropillar geometries to guide future device designs.

  17. Blood Cell Separation Device Using Serially Connected Membrane Filters for Adapting to Blood Flow Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Taizo; Kato, Daiki; Koga, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Kenichi; Fukuda, Makoto; Kinoshita, Yoshiharu; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Konishi, Satoshi

    This paper proposes a cooperative operation of serially connected membrane filters toward adaptive blood cell separation system in order to overcome a restriction of a single membrane filter. Serially connected membrane filters allow that downstream filters extract blood plasma from residual blood at upstream filters. Consequently, it becomes possible to adapt filtering characteristics to changing properties of blood. We focus on trans-membrane pressure difference in order to prevent hemolysis. Our strategy can be realized as a miniaturized PDMS fluidic chip. Our laboratory experiment using a prototype shows that plasma extraction efficiency is improved from 34% to 75%. Toward an integrated system, this paper also demonstrates multiple filters are successfully integrated into a PDMS fluidic chip.

  18. Deployment simulation of a deployable reflector for earth science application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaokai; Fang, Houfei; Cai, Bei; Ma, Xiaofei

    2015-10-01

    A novel mission concept namely NEXRAD-In-Space (NIS) has been developed for monitoring hurricanes, cyclones and other severe storms from a geostationary orbit. It requires a space deployable 35-meter diameter Ka-band (35 GHz) reflector. NIS can measure hurricane precipitation intensity, dynamics and its life cycle. These information is necessary for predicting the track, intensity, rain rate and hurricane-induced floods. To meet the requirements of the radar system, a Membrane Shell Reflector Segment (MSRS) reflector technology has been developed and several technologies have been evaluated. However, the deployment analysis of this large size and high-precision reflector has not been investigated. For a pre-studies, a scaled tetrahedral truss reflector with spring driving deployment system has been made and tested, deployment dynamics analysis of this scaled reflector has been performed using ADAMS to understand its deployment dynamic behaviors. Eliminating the redundant constraints in the reflector system with a large number of moving parts is a challenging issue. A primitive joint and flexible struts were introduced to the analytical model and they can effectively eliminate over constraints of the model. By using a high-speed camera and a force transducer, a deployment experiment of a single-bay tetrahedral module has been conducted. With the tested results, an optimization process has been performed by using the parameter optimization module of ADAMS to obtain the parameters of the analytical model. These parameters were incorporated to the analytical model of the whole reflector. It is observed from the analysis results that the deployment process of the reflector with a fixed boundary experiences three stages. These stages are rapid deployment stage, slow deployment stage and impact stage. The insight of the force peak distributions of the reflector can help the optimization design of the structure.

  19. USE OF SEMI-PERMEABLE MEMBRANE DEVICES TO MONITOR POLLUTANTS IN WATER AND ASSESS THEIR EFFECTS: A LABORATORY TEST AND FIELD VERIFICATION. (U915464)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Uptake of eight pesticides of different classes (organochlorines, synthetic pyrethroids, dinitroanilines, amides) by semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) was studied in a laboratory continuous-flow system. After 20 days of exposure, membrane concentration factors were in th...

  20. USE OF SEMI-PERMEABLE MEMBRANE DEVICES TO MONITOR POLLUTANTS IN WATER AND ASSESS THEIR EFFECTS: A LABORATORY TEST AND FIELD VERIFICATION. (U915464)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Uptake of eight pesticides of different classes (organochlorines, synthetic pyrethroids, dinitroanilines, amides) by semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) was studied in a laboratory continuous-flow system. After 20 days of exposure, membrane concentration factors were in th...

  1. Organic-inorganic hybrid anion exchange hollow fiber membranes: a novel device for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Wu, Cuiming; Cheng, Yiyun; Xu, Tongwen

    2011-04-15

    The clinical use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (such as sodium salicylate (NaSA)) for the treatment of chronic arthritis is limited due to the adverse effects and patient non-compliance. In order to solve these problems, anion exchange hollow fiber membranes (AEHFMs) are proposed for the first time here as potential drug carriers. Brominated poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) (BPPO) is used as the starting membrane material. In-situ sol-gel process of γ-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane (γ-MPS) in BPPO matrix is operated so as to enhance the membranes' thermal and dimensional stability. The performances of the membranes in controlled release of the drug (NaSA as the model drug) are improved accordingly. Loading and release experiments illustrate that the hybrid AEHFM can bind salicylate (SA⁻) at a high loading efficiency (28.4%), and the retention of the drug on the membrane matrix is significantly prolonged (drug released in 7 days under physiological condition: 51.9%, neglecting the drug bound by protein). Meanwhile, the membrane is biocompatible and can support the adherence, growth, and survival of human cells. Overall, the prepared AEHFM is a promising scaffolding material for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  2. Device for sampling and enriching impurities in hydrogen comprising hydrogen-permeable membrane

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Papadias, Dionissios D.; Lee, Sheldon D. H.; Kumar, Romesh

    2017-01-31

    Provided herein are methods and devices to enrich trace quantities of impurities in gaseous mixtures, such as hydrogen fuel. The methods and devices rely on concentration of impurities so as to allow the detection of the impurities using commonly-available detection methods.

  3. 78 FR 1158 - Anesthesiology Devices; Reclassification of Membrane Lung for Long-Term Pulmonary Support...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... the device, resulting in a tendency toward increased bleeding. Hemolysis. Red blood cells may be... physiologic gas exchange of a patient's blood when an acute (reversible) condition prevents the patient's own... multiple device types, including, but ] not limited to, an oxygenator, blood pump, cannulae, heat exchanger...

  4. UV-Induced Radical Photo-Polymerization: A Smart Tool for Preparing Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Energy Storage Devices.

    PubMed

    Nair, Jijeesh R; Chiappone, Annalisa; Destro, Matteo; Jabbour, Lara; Meligrana, Giuseppina; Gerbaldi, Claudio

    2012-10-17

    In the present work, the preparation and characterization of quasi-solid polymer electrolyte membranes based on methacrylic monomers and oligomers, with the addition of organic plasticizers and lithium salt, are described. Noticeable improvements in the mechanical properties by reinforcement with natural cellulose hand-sheets or nanoscale microfibrillated cellulose fibers are also demonstrated. The ionic conductivity of the various prepared membranes is very high, with average values approaching 10-3 S cm-1 at ambient temperature. The electrochemical stability window is wide (anodic breakdown voltages > 4.5 V vs. Li in all the cases) along with good cyclability in lithium cells at ambient temperature. The galvanostatic cycling tests are conducted by constructing laboratory-scale lithium cells using LiFePO4 as cathode and lithium metal as anode with the selected polymer electrolyte membrane as the electrolyte separator. The results obtained demonstrate that UV induced radical photo-polymerization is a well suited method for an easy and rapid preparation of easy tunable quasi-solid polymer electrolyte membranes for energy storage devices.

  5. UV-Induced Radical Photo-Polymerization: A Smart Tool for Preparing Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Energy Storage Devices.

    PubMed

    Nair, Jijeesh R; Chiappone, Annalisa; Destro, Matteo; Jabbour, Lara; Zeng, Juqin; Di Lupo, Francesca; Garino, Nadia; Meligrana, Giuseppina; Francia, Carlotta; Gerbaldi, Claudio

    2012-06-19

    In the present work, the preparation and characterization of quasi-solid polymer electrolyte membranes based on methacrylic monomers and oligomers, with the addition of organic plasticizers and lithium salt, are described. Noticeable improvements in the mechanical properties by reinforcement with natural cellulose hand-sheets or nanoscale microfibrillated cellulose fibers are also demonstrated. The ionic conductivity of the various prepared membranes is very high, with average values approaching 10-3 S cm-1 at ambient temperature. The electrochemical stability window is wide (anodic breakdown voltages > 4.5 V vs. Li in all the cases) along with good cyclability in lithium cells at ambient temperature. The galvanostatic cycling tests are conducted by constructing laboratory-scale lithium cells using LiFePO4 as cathode and lithium metal as anode with the selected polymer electrolyte membrane as the electrolyte separator. The results obtained demonstrate that UV induced radical photo-polymerization is a well suited method for an easy and rapid preparation of easy tunable quasi-solid polymer electrolyte membranes for energy storage devices.

  6. UV-Induced Radical Photo-Polymerization: A Smart Tool for Preparing Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Energy Storage Devices

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Jijeesh R.; Chiappone, Annalisa; Destro, Matteo; Jabbour, Lara; Zeng, Juqin; Lupo, Francesca Di; Garino, Nadia; Meligrana, Giuseppina; Francia, Carlotta; Gerbaldi, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, the preparation and characterization of quasi-solid polymer electrolyte membranes based on methacrylic monomers and oligomers, with the addition of organic plasticizers and lithium salt, are described. Noticeable improvements in the mechanical properties by reinforcement with natural cellulose hand-sheets or nanoscale microfibrillated cellulose fibers are also demonstrated. The ionic conductivity of the various prepared membranes is very high, with average values approaching 10−3 S cm−1 at ambient temperature. The electrochemical stability window is wide (anodic breakdown voltages > 4.5 V vs. Li in all the cases) along with good cyclability in lithium cells at ambient temperature. The galvanostatic cycling tests are conducted by constructing laboratory-scale lithium cells using LiFePO4 as cathode and lithium metal as anode with the selected polymer electrolyte membrane as the electrolyte separator. The results obtained demonstrate that UV induced radical photo-polymerization is a well suited method for an easy and rapid preparation of easy tunable quasi-solid polymer electrolyte membranes for energy storage devices. PMID:24958178

  7. UV-Induced Radical Photo-Polymerization: A Smart Tool for Preparing Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Energy Storage Devices

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Jijeesh R.; Chiappone, Annalisa; Destro, Matteo; Jabbour, Lara; Meligrana, Giuseppina; Gerbaldi, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, the preparation and characterization of quasi-solid polymer electrolyte membranes based on methacrylic monomers and oligomers, with the addition of organic plasticizers and lithium salt, are described. Noticeable improvements in the mechanical properties by reinforcement with natural cellulose hand-sheets or nanoscale microfibrillated cellulose fibers are also demonstrated. The ionic conductivity of the various prepared membranes is very high, with average values approaching 10-3 S cm-1 at ambient temperature. The electrochemical stability window is wide (anodic breakdown voltages > 4.5 V vs. Li in all the cases) along with good cyclability in lithium cells at ambient temperature. The galvanostatic cycling tests are conducted by constructing laboratory-scale lithium cells using LiFePO4 as cathode and lithium metal as anode with the selected polymer electrolyte membrane as the electrolyte separator. The results obtained demonstrate that UV induced radical photo-polymerization is a well suited method for an easy and rapid preparation of easy tunable quasi-solid polymer electrolyte membranes for energy storage devices. PMID:24958425

  8. Development of the permeability/performance reference compound approach for in situ calibration of semipermeable membrane devices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.; Lebo, J.A.; Almeida, F.V.; Booij, K.; Alvarez, D.A.; Cranor, W.L.; Clark, R.C.; Mogensen, B.B.

    2002-01-01

    Permeability/performance reference compounds (PRCs) are analytically noninterfering organic compounds with moderate to high fugacity from semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) that are added to the lipid prior to membrane enclosure. Assuming that isotropic exchange kinetics (IEK) apply and that SPMD-water partition coefficients are known, measurement of PRC dissipation rate constants during SPMD field exposures and laboratory calibration studies permits the calculation of an exposure adjustment factor (EAF). In theory, PRC-derived EAF ratios reflect changes in SPMD sampling rates (relative to laboratory data) due to differences in exposure temperature, membrane biofouling, and flow velocity-turbulence at the membrane surface. Thus, the PRC approach should allow for more accurate estimates of target solute/vapor concentrations in an exposure medium. Under some exposure conditions, the impact of environmental variables on SPMD sampling rates may approach an order of magnitude. The results of this study suggest that most of the effects of temperature, facial velocity-turbulence, and biofouling on the uptake rates of analytes with a wide range of hydrophobicities can be deduced from PRCs with a much narrower range of hydrophobicities. Finally, our findings indicate that the use of PRCs permits prediction of in situ SPMD sampling rates within 2-fold of directly measured values.

  9. Membrane-based microchannel device for continuous quantitative extraction of dissolved free sulfide from water and from oil.

    PubMed

    Toda, Kei; Ebisu, Yuki; Hirota, Kazutoshi; Ohira, Shin-Ichi

    2012-09-05

    Underground fluids are important natural sources of drinking water, geothermal energy, and oil-based fuels. To facilitate the surveying of such underground fluids, a novel microchannel extraction device was investigated for in-line continuous analysis and flow injection analysis of sulfide levels in water and in oil. Of the four designs investigated, the honeycomb-patterned microchannel extraction (HMCE) device was found to offer the most effective liquid-liquid extraction. In the HMCE device, a thin silicone membrane was sandwiched between two polydimethylsiloxane plates in which honeycomb-patterned microchannels had been fabricated. The identical patterns on the two plates were accurately aligned. The extracted sulfide was detected by quenching monitoring of fluorescein mercuric acetate (FMA). The sulfide extraction efficiencies from water and oil samples of the HMCE device and of three other designs (two annular and one rectangular channel) were examined theoretically and experimentally. The best performance was obtained with the HMCE device because of its thin sample layer (small diffusion distance) and large interface area. Quantitative extraction from both water and oil could be obtained using the HMCE device. The estimated limit of detection for continuous monitoring was 0.05 μM, and sulfide concentrations in the range of 0.15-10 μM could be determined when the acceptor was 5 μM FMA alkaline solution. The method was applied to natural water analysis using flow injection mode, and the data agreed with those obtained using headspace gas chromatography-flame photometric detection. The analysis of hydrogen sulfide levels in prepared oil samples was also performed. The proposed device is expected to be used for real time survey of oil wells and groundwater wells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material.

  11. A more efficient device for preparing model-membrane liposomes by the rapid solvent exchange method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buboltz, Jeffrey T.

    2009-12-01

    We modified the original design for a rapid solvent exchange (RSE) device with the intent of making the RSE method (i) more efficient and (ii) easier to adopt and implement. Our modifications improved solvent-removal kinetics by a factor of 2, while reducing sample-prep time by a factor of 3. In this paper, we develop the kinetic model that informed the device revision and we address several RSE parameters that have not yet been discussed in the literature. We also provide detailed mechanical drawings and present solvent-removal efficiency data that confirm the improved performance of our device.

  12. Comparison of the uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organochlorine pesticides by semipermeable membrane devices and caged fish (Carassius carassius) in Taihu Lake, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ke, R.; Xu, Y.; Huang, S.; Wang, Z.; Huckins, J.N.

    2007-01-01

    Uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) by triolein-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and by crucian carp (Carassius carassius) was studied in Taihu Lake, a shallow, freshwater lake in China. Crucian carp and SPMDs were deployed side by side for 32 d. The first-order uptake rate constants of individual PAHs and OCPs for the two matrices were calculated and compared to relate the amounts of chemicals accumulated by the matrices to dissolved water concentrations. On a wet-weight basis, total concentrations of PAHs and OCPs in crucian carp fillets averaged 49.5 and 13.6 ng/g, respectively, after the 32-d exposure, whereas concentrations in whole SPMDs averaged 716.9 and 62.3 ng/g, respectively. The uptake rate constants of PAHs and OCPs by SPMDs averaged seven- and fivefold higher, respectively, than those for crucian carp; however, the patterns of uptake rate constants derived from test chemical concentrations in the crucian carp and SPMDs were similar. Although equilibrium was not reached for some PAHs and OCPs during the 32-d exposure period, a reasonably good correlation between the concentration factors (CFs) and octanol/water partition coefficient (K ow) values of PAHs and OCPs in SPMDs (r = 0.86, p < 0.001) was observed when potential sorption to dissolved organic carbon was taken into account. Similar efforts to correlate the CFs and Kow values of PAHs and OCPs in crucian carp (r = 0.75, p < 0.001) were less successful, likely because of PAH metabolism by finfish. Overall, the present results suggest that SPMDs may serve as a surrogate for contaminant monitoring with fish in freshwater lake environments. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  13. Investigation of the distribution of organochlorine and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds in the Lower Columbia River using semipermeable-membrane devices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Gale, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    Organochlorine and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds are of concern in the Columbia River Basin because of their adverse effects on fish and wildlife. Because these compounds can have important biological consequences at concentrations well below the detection limits associated with conventional water-sampling techniques, we used semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) to sample water, and achieved sub-parts-per-quintillion detection limits. We deployed SPMDs during 1997 low-flow conditions and 1998 high-flow conditions at nine main-stem sites and seven tributary sites, spanning approximately 700 miles of the Columbia River. We also collected streambed sediment from three sites. SPMD extracts and sediments were analyzed for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides and related transformation products, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Our data indicate that (1) in the absence of additional sources, mechanisms such as volatilization, dilution, and settling of suspended particles can act to significantly reduce concentrations of contaminants along the river's flow path, (2) elevated concentrations of contaminants in the Portland-Vancouver area are primarily from local rather than upstream sources, (3) elevated concentrations of many compounds tend to be diluted during periods of high discharge, (4) much higher discharge in the main stem considerably dilutes elevated concentrations entering from tributaries, (5) the distribution of hydrophobic organic compounds in streambed sediment is not necessarily indicative of their distribution in the dissolved-phase, and (6) SPMDs can reveal patterns of contaminant occurrence at environmentally relevant concentrations that are undetectable by conventional water-sampling techniques.

  14. Assessment of mitochondrial membrane potential using an on-chip microelectrode in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tae-Sun; Dávila, Antonio; Wallace, Douglas C; Burke, Peter

    2010-07-07

    The mitochondrial membrane potential is used to generate and regulate energy in living systems, driving the conversion of ADP to ATP, regulating ion homeostasis, and controlling apoptosis, all central to human health and disease. Therefore, there is a need for tools to study its regulation in a controlled environment for potential clinical and scientific applications. For this aim, an on-chip tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP(+)) selective microelectrode sensor was constructed in a microfluidic environment. The concentration of isolated mitochondria (Heb7A) used in a membrane potential measurement was 0.3 ng microL(-1), four orders of magnitude smaller than the concentration used in conventional assays (3 microg microL(-1)). In addition, the volume of the chamber (85 microL) is 2 orders of magnitude smaller than traditional experiments. As a demonstration, changes in the membrane potential are clearly measured in response to a barrage of well-known substrates and inhibitors of the electron transport chain. This general approach, which to date has not been demonstrated for study of mitochondrial function and bio-energetics in generally, can be instrumental in advancing the field of mitochondrial research and clinical applications by allowing high throughput studies of the regulation, dynamics, and statistical properties of the mitochondrial membrane potential in response to inhibitors and inducers of apoptosis in a controlled (microfluidic) chemical environment.

  15. Integrated multilayer microfluidic device with a nanoporous membrane interconnect for online coupling of solid-phase extraction to microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Long, Zhicheng; Shen, Zheng; Wu, Dapeng; Qin, Jianhua; Lin, Bingcheng

    2007-12-01

    An integrated microfluidic device was developed for online coupling of solid-phase extraction to microchip electrophoresis (chip SPE-CE). With a nanoporous membrane sandwiched between two PDMS substrates, SPE preconcentration and electrophoretic separation can be carried out in upper and lower fluidic layers, separately and sequentially. During the SPE process, the thin membrane can act as a fluid isolator to prevent intermixing between two fluidic channels. However, when a pulse voltage is applied, the membrane becomes a gateable interconnect so that a small plug of concentrated analytes can be online injected into the lower channel for subsequent separations. This multilayer design provides a universal solution to online SPE-CE hyphenation. Both electroosmotic flow and hydrodynamic pumps have been adopted for SPE operation. SPE was performed on a 2.5 mm long microcolumn, with two weirs on both sides to retain the C(18)-coated silica beads. Rhodamine 123 and FITC-labelled ephedrine were used to test the operational performance of the hyphenation system. High separation efficiency and thousand-fold signal enhancement were achieved.

  16. Semipermeable membrane devices link site-specific contaminants to effects: PART II - A comparison of lingering Exxon Valdez oil with other potential sources of CYP1A inducers in Prince William Sound, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Short, Jeffrey W; Springman, Kathrine R; Lindeberg, Mandy R; Holland, Larry G; Larsen, Marie L; Sloan, Catherine A; Khan, Colin; Hodson, Peter V; Rice, Stanley D

    2008-12-01

    We deployed semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) on beaches for 28 days at 53 sites in Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska, to evaluate the induction potential from suspected sources of cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A)-inducing contaminants. Sites were selected to assess known point sources, or were chosen randomly to evaluate the region-wide sources. After deployment, SPMD extracts were analyzed chemically for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). These results were compared with hepatic CYP1A enzyme activity of juvenile rainbow trout injected with the same extracts prior to clean-up for the chemical analyses. Increased CYP1A activity was strongly associated with PAH concentrations in extracts, especially chrysene homologues but was not associated with POPs. The only apparent sources of chrysene homologues were lingering oil from Exxon Valdez, asphalt and bunker fuels released from storage tanks during the 1964 Alaska earthquake, creosote leaching from numerous pilings at one site, and PAH-contaminated sediments at Cordova Harbor. Our results indicate that PWS is remarkably free of pollution from PAH when nearby sources are absent as well as from pesticides and PCBs generally.

  17. Monitoring of evaporating organochlorine compounds from compost and soil using semipermeable membrane device (SPMD)

    SciTech Connect

    Bergqvist, P.A.; Strandberg, B.; Wagman, N.; Rappe, C.

    1995-12-31

    The organisms are exposed for contaminants in soil via skin uptake, gut uptake or inhalation. The compounds evaporating from the soil surface is easily sequestered with a SPMD deployed above the surface, In this case a 90 cm long 1 inch layflat polyethylene tubing filled with 1 mL triolein situated 15 cm above the ground were used. The SPMD were placed inside a semi-enclosed container with a bottom hole of 660 CM{sup 2} and a container volume of 13 dM{sup 3}. The final sample, were taken 28 days after deployment on the soil surface and the content of persistent compounds in the SPMD lipid (triolein) were used for the analysis using HRGC/LRMS. A limited clean up were required before analysis e.g. dialysis and HRGPC. Before GPC, labelled internal standards and before sample injection, labelled recovery standards were added. Several PCBs and other persistent OCs including DDTS, chlordane`s, hexachlorocyclohexanes, chlorobenzenes and dieldrin were monitored in this study. Since the air sampling rate of SPMD is approx. 10 m{sup 3} air per day essentially all air in the enclosure were continuously sampled during the 28 day sampling period. The sequestering of compounds in the SPMD will be compared with soil/compost concentrations for natural and spiked household compost matrices. Soil/compost extraction were performed with toluene in a Soxhlet apparatus followed by an extensive clean up. For surface soil monitoring, the study design including SPM D suggest to be an efficient and simple sampling and analysis methodology but still precise utilizing GC/MS as detector instrument.

  18. Controlled electroporation of the plasma membrane in microfluidic devices for single cell analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Duoaud; Steffen, Milan; Lilge, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    Chemical cytometry on a single cell level is of interest to various biological fields ranging from cancer to stem cell research. The impact chemical cytometry can exert in these fields depends on the dimensionality of the retrievable analytes content. To this point, the number of different analytes identifiable and additionally their subcellular localization is of interest. To address this, we present an electroporation based approach for selective lysis of only the plasma membrane, which permits analysis of the dissolved cytoplasm, while reducing contributions from the nucleus and membrane bound fractions of the cell analytes. The use of 100 μs long pulse and a well defined DC electric field gradient of ∼4.5 kV·cm−1 generated by 3D electrodes initiates release of a cytoplasm marker in ≪1 s, while retaining nuclear fluorescence markers. PMID:22435083

  19. Poly(amidoamine) dendronized hollow fiber membranes: synthesis, characterization, and preliminary applications as drug delivery devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Na; Xu, Tongwen; Cheng, Yiyun

    2012-03-01

    Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrons were prepared from hollow fiber membranes (HFM) consisting of bromomethylated poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) (BPPO) in a stepwise manner. The prepared HFM were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. The drug loading efficiency and release behavior of the PAMAM dendronized HFM were evaluated using sodium salicylate, sodium methotrexate, and Congo red as model drugs. The results suggest that PAMAM dendronized HFM can be effectively loaded with a variety of drugs and prolong the release of these drugs. The drug loading and release characteristics of the HFM depend on the generation of PAMAM dendrons grafted on the membranes. The prepared PAMAM dendronized BPPO HFM are promising scaffolds in drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  20. New Membrane Preconcentration Devices for Trace Vapor Detection Systems Phase I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    of the coating solution used and the nature of the microporous support film . The method of applying the coating solution is also important. C. Module...C Variable spe motor-driven take-up Thin film applicator ( Figure 6. Schematic of thin film coating apparatus used to coat the microporous support... microporous ultrafiltration membrane to form a * smooth, finely porous surface which can then be coated with an ultrathin layer of silicone rubber. The

  1. Clinical implications of Mycobacterium chimaera detection in thermoregulatory devices used for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), Germany, 2015 to 2016.

    PubMed

    Trudzinski, Franziska C; Schlotthauer, Uwe; Kamp, Annegret; Hennemann, Kai; Muellenbach, Ralf M; Reischl, Udo; Gärtner, Barbara; Wilkens, Heinrike; Bals, Robert; Herrmann, Mathias; Lepper, Philipp M; Becker, Sören L

    2016-11-17

    Mycobacterium chimaera, a non-tuberculous mycobacterium, was recently identified as causative agent of deep-seated infections in patients who had previously undergone open-chest cardiac surgery. Outbreak investigations suggested an aerosol-borne pathogen transmission originating from water contained in heater-cooler units (HCUs) used during cardiac surgery. Similar thermoregulatory devices are used for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and M. chimaera might also be detectable in ECMO treatment settings. We performed a prospective microbiological study investigating the occurrence of M. chimaera in water from ECMO systems and in environmental samples, and a retrospective clinical review of possible ECMO-related mycobacterial infections among patients in a pneumological intensive care unit. We detected M. chimaera in 9 of 18 water samples from 10 different thermoregulatory ECMO devices; no mycobacteria were found in the nine room air samples and other environmental samples. Among 118 ECMO patients, 76 had bronchial specimens analysed for mycobacteria and M. chimaera was found in three individuals without signs of mycobacterial infection at the time of sampling. We conclude that M. chimaera can be detected in water samples from ECMO-associated thermoregulatory devices and might potentially pose patients at risk of infection. Further research is warranted to elucidate the clinical significance of M. chimaera in ECMO treatment settings. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  2. Design and Evaluation of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John W.; Rector, Tony; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2012-01-01

    A dual-bed device to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been designed and is undergoing testing. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing sublimator technology. The driver for the development of a water recirculation maintenance device is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high-capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Water Loop. The bed design further leverages a sorbent developed for the ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System. The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of crewed spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System hardware.

  3. Design and Evaluation of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John W.; Rector, Tony; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2011-01-01

    A dual-bed device to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been designed and is undergoing testing. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the development of a water recirculation maintenance device is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons-learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The bed design further leverages a sorbent developed for ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a clear demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  4. Performance of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device and Process for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rector, Tony; Steele, John W.; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2012-01-01

    A water loop maintenance device and process to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been undergoing a performance evaluation. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the water recirculation maintenance device and process is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons-learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance process further leverages a sorbent developed for ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware. This

  5. Performance of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device and Process for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John W.; Rector, Tony; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2013-01-01

    A dual-bed device to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been designed and is undergoing testing. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the development of a water recirculation maintenance device is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons-learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The bed design further leverages a sorbent developed for ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  6. Clinical implications of Mycobacterium chimaera detection in thermoregulatory devices used for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), Germany, 2015 to 2016

    PubMed Central

    Trudzinski, Franziska C.; Schlotthauer, Uwe; Kamp, Annegret; Hennemann, Kai; Muellenbach, Ralf M.; Reischl, Udo; Gärtner, Barbara; Wilkens, Heinrike; Bals, Robert; Herrmann, Mathias; Lepper, Philipp M.; Becker, Sören L.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium chimaera, a non-tuberculous mycobacterium, was recently identified as causative agent of deep-seated infections in patients who had previously undergone open-chest cardiac surgery. Outbreak investigations suggested an aerosol-borne pathogen transmission originating from water contained in heater-cooler units (HCUs) used during cardiac surgery. Similar thermoregulatory devices are used for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and M. chimaera might also be detectable in ECMO treatment settings. We performed a prospective microbiological study investigating the occurrence of M. chimaera in water from ECMO systems and in environmental samples, and a retrospective clinical review of possible ECMO-related mycobacterial infections among patients in a pneumological intensive care unit. We detected M. chimaera in 9 of 18 water samples from 10 different thermoregulatory ECMO devices; no mycobacteria were found in the nine room air samples and other environmental samples. Among 118 ECMO patients, 76 had bronchial specimens analysed for mycobacteria and M. chimaera was found in three individuals without signs of mycobacterial infection at the time of sampling. We conclude that M. chimaera can be detected in water samples from ECMO-associated thermoregulatory devices and might potentially pose patients at risk of infection. Further research is warranted to elucidate the clinical significance of M. chimaera in ECMO treatment settings. PMID:27918254

  7. Deployable Wireless Camera Penetrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Jones, Jack; Sherrit, Stewart; Wu, Jiunn Jeng

    2008-01-01

    A lightweight, low-power camera dart has been designed and tested for context imaging of sampling sites and ground surveys from an aerobot or an orbiting spacecraft in a microgravity environment. The camera penetrators also can be used to image any line-of-sight surface, such as cliff walls, that is difficult to access. Tethered cameras to inspect the surfaces of planetary bodies use both power and signal transmission lines to operate. A tether adds the possibility of inadvertently anchoring the aerobot, and requires some form of station-keeping capability of the aerobot if extended examination time is required. The new camera penetrators are deployed without a tether, weigh less than 30 grams, and are disposable. They are designed to drop from any altitude with the boost in transmitting power currently demonstrated at approximately 100-m line-of-sight. The penetrators also can be deployed to monitor lander or rover operations from a distance, and can be used for surface surveys or for context information gathering from a touch-and-go sampling site. Thanks to wireless operation, the complexity of the sampling or survey mechanisms may be reduced. The penetrators may be battery powered for short-duration missions, or have solar panels for longer or intermittent duration missions. The imaging device is embedded in the penetrator, which is dropped or projected at the surface of a study site at 90 to the surface. Mirrors can be used in the design to image the ground or the horizon. Some of the camera features were tested using commercial "nanny" or "spy" camera components with the charge-coupled device (CCD) looking at a direction parallel to the ground. Figure 1 shows components of one camera that weighs less than 8 g and occupies a volume of 11 cm3. This camera could transmit a standard television signal, including sound, up to 100 m. Figure 2 shows the CAD models of a version of the penetrator. A low-volume array of such penetrator cameras could be deployed from an

  8. Device Strategies for Patients in INTERMACS Profiles 1 and 2 Cardiogenic Shock: Double Bridge With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation and Initial Implant of More Durable Devices.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Richard; Ramzy, Danny; Azarbal, Babak; Arabia, Francisco A; Esmailian, Fardad; Czer, Lawrence S; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Moriguchi, Jaime D

    2017-03-01

    For Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support profiles 1 and 2 cardiogenic shock patients initially placed on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), whether crossover to more durable devices is associated with increased survival, and its optimal timing, are not established. Profiles 1 and 2 patients placed on mechanical support were prospectively registered. Survival and successful hospital discharge were compared between patients placed on ECMO only, ECMO with early crossover, and ECMO with delayed crossover. Survival of patients directly implanted with non-ECMO devices was also reported. One-hundred and sixty-two patients were included. Mean age was 52.2 ± 13.8 years. Seventy-three of 162 (45.1%) were initiated on ECMO. Of these, 43 were supported with ECMO only, 11 were crossed-over early <4 days, and 19 were crossed-over in a delayed fashion. Survival was different across groups (Log-rank P < 0.002). In multivariate analysis, early crossover was associated with decreased mortality as compared with no crossover (hazard ratio [HR] 0.201, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 0.058-0.697, P = 0.011) or with delayed crossover (HR 0.255, 95%CI 0.073-0.894, P = 0.033). Mortality was not different between delayed crossover and no crossover (P = 0.473). In patients with early crossover there were no deaths at 30 days, and 60-day survival was 90.0 ± 9.5%. Survival to hospital discharge was 72.8%. For patients directly implanted with non-ECMO devices, 30-day and 60-day survival was 90.9 ± 3.1% and 87.3 ± 3.8%, respectively, and survival to hospital discharge was 78.7%. Both initial implant of durable devices and double bridge strategy was associated with improved outcomes. If the double bridge strategy is chosen, early crossover is associated with improved survival and successful hospital discharge.

  9. Field Deployable DNA analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, E; Christian, A; Marion, J; Sorensen, K; Arroyo, E; Vrankovich, G; Hara, C; Nguyen, C

    2005-02-09

    This report details the feasibility of a field deployable DNA analyzer. Steps for swabbing cells from surfaces and extracting DNA in an automatable way are presented. Since enzymatic amplification reactions are highly sensitive to environmental contamination, sample preparation is a crucial step to make an autonomous deployable instrument. We perform sample clean up and concentration in a flow through packed bed. For small initial samples, whole genome amplification is performed in the packed bed resulting in enough product for subsequent PCR amplification. In addition to DNA, which can be used to identify a subject, protein is also left behind, the analysis of which can be used to determine exposure to certain substances, such as radionuclides. Our preparative step for DNA analysis left behind the protein complement as a waste stream; we determined to learn if the proteins themselves could be analyzed in a fieldable device. We successfully developed a two-step lateral flow assay for protein analysis and demonstrate a proof of principle assay.

  10. Evaluation of lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices for monitoring organochlorine contaminants in the Upper Mississippi river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Rostad, Colleen E.; Huckins, James N.; Schmitt, Christopher J.; MacCarthy, Patrick

    1995-01-01

    Organochlorine contaminants sequestered in lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were compared to those found in tangential-flow ultrafilter permeates as part of a pilot study at 10 sites in the Upper Mississippi River system. Caged and feral fish from three primary sites were also analyzed for comparison. Concentrated organochlorine (OC) compounds were readily extracted from the SPMDs by dialysis into hexane, and samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization-mass spectrometry. Fish and water samples were processed by conventional methods. Reasonable agreement was found between analyte SPMD-derived water concentrations and measured values of ultrafilter permeates; however, concentrations of the same analytes in caged fish did not appear to be proportional to water concentrations derived from SPMDs and ultrafilter permeates. The greatest number of OC compounds was detected in SPMDs; fewer were detected in caged fish and feral fish.

  11. Evaluation of lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices for monitoring organochlorine contaminants in the upper Mississippi River

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, G.S.; Rostad, C.E.; Huckins, J.N.; Schmitt, C.J.; Petty, J.D.; MacCarthy, P.

    1995-11-01

    Organochlorine contaminants sequestered in lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were compared to those found in tangential-flow ultrafilter permeates as part of a pilot study at 10 sites in the Upper Mississippi River system. Caged and feral fish from three primary sites were also analyzed for comparison. Concentrated organochlorine (OC) compounds were readily extracted from the SPMDs by dialysis into hexane, and samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization-mass spectrometry. Fish and water samples were processed by conventional methods. Reasonable agreement was found between analyte SPMD-derived water concentrations and measured values of ultrafilter permeates; however, concentrations of the same analytes in caged fish did not appear to be proportional to water concentrations derived from SPMDs and ultrafilter permeates. The greatest number of OC compounds was detected in SPMDs; fewer were detected in caged fish and feral fish.

  12. Use of the semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) to sample polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon pollution in a lotic system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lebo, Jon A.; Zajicek, James L.; Orazio, Carl E.; Petty, Jimmie D.; Huckins, James; Douglas, Ernest H.

    1996-01-01

    Relative concentrations of aqueous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were investigated in an urban creek. Samples were obtained at five sites within a 600-m segment of the creek that is critical habitat for an endangered species of fish. The sampling technique entailed immersion of semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) in the water for intervals as long as 64 d. SPMDs are passive, in situ, integrative samplers of bioavailable (truly dissolved) PAH and other hydrophobic organic contaminants. Two point sources of PAH to the 600-m segment of the creek were differentiated. Aqueous concentrations were found to wane dramatically over the relatively short section of the creek between the point sources. All samples were almost devoid of alkyl-substituted PAH, indicating that the ultimate sources were probably of pyrogenic nature.

  13. Investigation into the Noise Associated with Airbag Deployment: Part III – Sound Pressure Level and Auditory Risk as a Function of Inflatable Device

    PubMed Central

    Banglmaier, R.F.; Rouhana, S.W.

    2003-01-01

    Several criteria for assessing noise-induced hearing loss from automotive inflatable devices, such as airbags, were proposed in the past. However, their development was based on epidemiological studies of steady state noise and not impulsive noise. More recently, the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) developed and validated a mathematical model of the ear, which may be used to assess noise induced hearing loss from impulsive noise sources. Previous studies have contributed to understanding the effects of impulse noise on occupants, but were performed on first generation frontal airbags and did not provide information on airbag and occupant safety systems in today’s fleet of vehicles. This study presents the results of a parametric investigation of current inflatable devices across a variety of vehicles and considers the size and seating location of the occupant in vehicles of varying volume. In addition, the study considers advanced airbag technologies such as dual stage frontal airbags, side airbags, inflatable curtains, and seat belt pretensioners. PMID:12941213

  14. Membrane-electrode structures for molecular catalysts for use in fuel cells and other electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Kerr, John B.; Zhu, Xiaobing; Hwang, Gi Suk; Martin, Zulima; He, Qinggang; Driscoll, Peter; Weber, Adam; Clark, Kyle

    2016-09-27

    Water soluble catalysts, (M)meso-tetra(N-Methyl-4-Pyridyl)Porphinepentachloride (M=Fe, Co, Mn & Cu), have been incorporated into the polymer binder of oxygen reduction cathodes in membrane electrode assemblies used in PEM fuel cells and found to support encouragingly high current densities. The voltages achieved are low compared to commercial platinum catalysts but entirely consistent with the behavior observed in electroanalytical measurements of the homogeneous catalysts. A model of the dynamics of the electrode action has been developed and validated and this allows the MEA electrodes to be optimized for any chemistry that has been demonstrated in solution. It has been shown that improvements to the performance will come from modifications to the structure of the catalyst combined with optimization of the electrode structure and a well-founded pathway to practical non-platinum group metal catalysts exists.

  15. Potential Usage of Thermoelectric Devices in a High-Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System: Two Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Chen, Min; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-06-01

    Methanol-fueled, high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (HTPEMFC) power systems are promising as the next generation of vehicle engines, efficient and environmentally friendly. Currently, their performance still needs to be improved, and they still rely on a large Li-ion battery for system startup. In this article, to handle these two issues, the potential of thermoelectric (TE) devices applied in a HTPEMFC power system has been preliminarily evaluated. First, right after the fuel cell stack or the methanol reformer, thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are embedded inside a gas-liquid heat exchanger to form a heat recovery subsystem jointly for electricity production. It is calculated that the recovered power can increase the system efficiency and mitigate the dependence on Li-ion battery during system startup. To improve the TEG subsystem performance, a finite-difference model is then employed and two main parameters are identified. Second, TE coolers are integrated into the methanol steam reformer to regulate heat fluxes herein and improve the system dynamic performance. Similar modification is also done on the evaporator to improve its dynamic performance as well as to reduce the heat loss during system startup. The results demonstrate that the TE-assisted heat flux regulation and heat-loss reduction can also effectively help solve the abovementioned two issues. The preliminary analysis in this article shows that a TE device application inside HTPEMFC power systems is of great value and worthy of further study.

  16. Comparison of semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) and large-volume solid-phase extraction techniques to measure water concentrations of 4,4'-DDT, 4,4'-DDE, and 4,4'-DDD in Lake Chelan, Washington.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Steven G; Booij, Kees; Kaputa, Mike

    2008-07-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) spiked with the performance reference compound PCB29 were deployed 6.1 m above the sediments of Lake Chelan, Washington, for a period of 27 d, to estimate the dissolved concentrations of 4,4'-DDT, 4,4'-DDE, and 4,4'-DDD. Water concentrations were estimated using methods proposed in 2002 and newer equations published in 2006 to determine how the application of the newer equations affects historical SPMD data that used the older method. The estimated concentrations of DDD, DDE, and DDD calculated using the older method were 1.5-2.9 times higher than the newer method. SPMD estimates from both methods were also compared to dissolved and particulate DDT concentrations measured directly by processing large volumes of water through a large-volume solid-phase extraction device (Infiltrex 300). SPMD estimates of DDD+DDE+DDT (SigmaDDT) using the older and newer methods were lower than Infiltrex concentrations by factors of 1.1 and 2.3, respectively. All measurements of DDT were below the Washington State water quality standards for the protection of human health (0.59 ng l(-1)) and aquatic life (1.0 ng l(-1)).

  17. Using semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) to assess the toxicity and teratogenicity of aquatic amphibian habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, C.M.; Little, E.E.; Linder, Gregory L.; Krest, S.; Sparling, Don; Little, Edward

    2003-01-01

    Environmental contamination has been suspected of being partially responsible for recent declines in amphibian populations. It is often not feasible to identify all of the compounds in an environment, nor the concentrations in which they are present. SPMDs are passive sampling devices that uptake lipophilic compounds from the environment in a manner similar to aquatic organisms. The extracts from the SPMDs, therefore, contain a composite sample of the compounds that are present in the environment. In this paper, we outline the methods from studies in which we have used extracts from SPMDs in toxicity tests on amphibian larvae. Using SPMD extracts makes it possible to establish potential links between amphibian deformities and declines and environmental contamination by lipophilic compounds.

  18. Bioacceptable and calcification-resistant membranes and interfaces for implantable sensors and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeska, Izabela Ewa

    The rational design and characterization of biocompatible, semipermeable and calcification resistant materials to serve as an outer membrane for implantable glucose biosensors, was the primary focus of this research. Multilayered films of polyanions (i.e. Nafion(TM), a perfluorinated ionomer, and Humic Acids (HAs), naturally occurring biopolymers), fabricated by layer-by-layer self-assembly with oppositely charged ferric ions were investigated as potential membranes. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and quartz crystal microbalance studies point towards a stepwise film growth, with growth rates of 47 and 24.3 nm per layer (for Nafion and HAs respectively) that can be altered depending on the pH and ionic strength of the polyanion solution. Nafion/Fe3+ assembled films exhibited an order of magnitude lower calcification as compared to dip-coated Nafion films and did not require annealing to impart insolubility. Similarly the HAs/Fe3+ films were also devoid of calcification, even after four-week immersion in DMEM cell culture media. Significantly, in vivo studies on the HAs/Fe3 films point to their biocompatibility as demonstrated by mild tissue reaction. These results, along with controllable glucose permeability, could prove vital in prolonging the lifetime of implantable biosensors. Additionally in effort to minimize tissue trauma upon implantation, novel poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microsphere/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel composites were investigated for dexamethasone delivery. A release rate of 25 to 40% over one month, following a zero order profile, was achieved by preferential adsorption of surface active polyacids (poly(acrylic acid), Nafion and HAs) on the hydrogel dispersed microspheres. Environmental scanning electron microscopy investigation on the degradation mechanism of the microspheres pointed towards their slow homogeneous degradation in the PVA hydrogels that was significantly surface-accelerated in the presence of polyacids. The physico

  19. Photodegradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in passive air samplers: Field testing different deployment chambers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartkow, M.E.; Kennedy, K.E.; Huckins, J.N.; Holling, N.; Komarova, T.; Muller, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    Semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were loaded with deuterated anthracene and pyrene as performance reference compounds (PRCs) and deployed at a test site in four different chambers (open and closed box chamber, bowl chamber and cage chamber) for 29 days. The losses of PRCs and the uptake of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the ambient air were quantified. UV-B levels measured in each deployment chamber indicated that SPMDs would be exposed to the most UV-B in the cage chamber and open box chamber. Significantly less PAHs were quantified in SPMDs deployed in the cage chamber and open box chamber compared to samplers from the other two chambers, suggesting that photodegradation of PAHs had occurred. The loss of PRCs confirmed these results but also showed that photodegradation was occurring in the closed box chamber. The bowl chamber appears to provide the best protection from the influence of direct photodegradation. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Large-Scale Deployment of Fish Aggregation Devices Alters Environmentally-Based Migratory Behavior of Skipjack Tuna in the Western Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuefang; Chen, Yong; Truesdell, Samuel; Xu, Liuxiong; Cao, Jie; Guan, Wenjiang

    2014-01-01

    Fish aggregation devices (FADs) have been used extensively in the tuna purse seine fishery since the 1980s. This long-term modification of natural habitat has generated discussions as to whether FADs impact movement patterns of tuna species. We examined this question using data collected from the skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) fishery. We used the longitudinal gravitational center of catch (G) to examine temporal variability in skipjack movement in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean, and related this to El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events. We found that in most cases G for free-swimming school sets changed with the onset of ENSO events, while G for floating-object-associated school sets remained relatively constant. This suggests that skipjack exhibit distinguishable behavioral strategies in response to ENSO events: they either react by moving long distances or they associate with floating objects. There has been no previous attempt to evaluate the interaction between FADs and the environmentally-determined movement of skipjack; this study shows evidence of an interaction, which should be considered when managing skipjack populations. PMID:24849561

  1. Clinical and Subclinical Femoral Vascular Complications after Deployment of two Different Vascular Closure Devices or Manual Compression in the Setting of Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Yeni, Hakan; Axel, Meissner; Örnek, Ahmet; Butz, Thomas; Maagh, Petra; Plehn, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the past two decades vascular closure devices (VCD) have been increasingly utilized as an alternative to manual compression after percutaneous femoral artery access. However, there is a lack of data confirming a significant reduction of vascular complication in a routine interventional setting. Systematic assessment of puncture sites with ultrasound was hardly performed. Methods: 620 consecutive patients undergoing elective or urgent percutaneous coronary intervention were randomly allocated to either Angioseal (AS; n = 210), or Starclose (SC; n = 196) or manual compression (MC; n = 214). As an adjunct to clinical evaluation vascular ultrasonography was used to assess the safety of each hemostatic method in terms of major and minor vascular complications. The efficacy of VCDs was assessed by achievement of puncture site hemostasis. Results: No major complications needing transfusion or vascular surgery were observed. Furthermore, the overall incidence of clinical and subclinical minor complications was similar among the three groups. There was no differences in the occurrence of pseudoaneurysmata (AS = 10; SC = 6; MC = 10), arteriovenous fistula (AS = 1; SC = 4; MC = 2) and large hematoma (AS = 11; SC = 10; MC = 14). The choice of access site treatment had no impact in the duration of hospital stay (AS = 6.7; SC = 7.4; MS = 6.4 days). Conclusions: In the setting of routine coronary intervention AS and SC provide a similar efficacy and safety as manual compression. Subclinical vascular injuries are rare and not related to VCD use. PMID:27076781

  2. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, W.A.

    1988-02-09

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material. 10 figs.

  3. Deployable Temporary Shelter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, Joe R.; Headley, David E.

    1993-01-01

    Compact storable components expand to create large shelter. Fully deployed structure provides large, unobstructed bay. Deployed trusses support wall and roof blankets. Provides temporary cover for vehicles, people, and materials. Terrestrial version used as garage, hangar, or large tent.

  4. Synchronously Deployable Truss Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, M. D.; Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Structure lightweight, readily deployed, and has reliable joints. New truss concept, designated as "pac truss," developed. Features easy deployment without need for complex mechanisms. Structures of this type deployed in free flight by controlled release of stored energy in torsional springs at selected hinges located throughout structure. Double-folding technique used in beam model applicable to flat planar trusses, allowing structures of large expanse to fold into compact packages and be deployed for space-platform applications.

  5. Comparing polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations and patterns in the Saginaw River using sediment, caged fish, and semipermeable membrane devices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Echols, K.R.; Gale, R.W.; Schwartz, T.R.; Huckins, J.N.; Williams, L.L.; Meadows, J.C.; Morse, D.; Petty, J.D.; Orazio, C.E.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    Three techniques of assessing bioavailable polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Saginaw River, MI, were compared: sediments, caged fish, and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs). SPMDs and caged fish were placed in the river for 28 days at five sites where sediments were also sampled. The samples were analyzed for PCB congeners to determine concentrations and patterns. Total PCB concentrations ranged from 33 to 280 ng/g (dry weight) in sediments, 46 to 290 ng/g (wet weight) in caged fish, and 77 to 790 ng/g in SPMDs. Previously reported rates of PCB accumulation by SPMDs were used to estimate aqueous concentrations from the PCB concentrations detected in the SPMDs. Sediment-water partition coefficients were used to estimate aqueous PCB concentrations from sediment. Steady-state bioconcentration factors and depuration rate constants were used to estimate dissolved PCB concentrations from caged channel catfish. Relative PCB patterns from the SPMDs, caged fish, and sediment were compared using principal components analysis. SPMD and sediment samples provide complementary information. Sediments reflect long-term accumulation and weathering, while SPMDs integrate water concentrations only during the sampling period. Because of higher water solubilities of lower-chlorinated PCBs these predominate in the SPMDs as compared to in the fish and sediments. Contaminant profile differences between caged fish and SPMDs are likely due to metabolism and depuration of certain PCB congeners by fish.Three techniques of assessing bioavailable polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Saginaw River, Ml, were compared: sediments, caged fish, and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs). SPMDs and caged fish were placed in the river for 28 days at five sites where sediments were also sampled. The samples were analyzed for PCB congeners to determine concentrations and patterns. Total PCB concentrations ranged from 33 to 280 ng/g (dry weight) in sediments, 46 to 290 ng/g (wet weight) in

  6. Solar array deployment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calassa, Mark C.; Kackley, Russell

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a Solar Array Deployment Mechanism (SADM) used to deploy a rigid solar array panel on a commercial spacecraft. The application required a deployment mechanism design that was not only lightweight, but also could be produced and installed at the lowest possible cost. This paper covers design, test, and analysis of a mechanism that meets these requirements.

  7. Using semi-permeable membrane devices and stable nitrogen isotopes to detect anthropogenic influences on the Truckee River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saito, L.; Rosen, Michael R.; Chandra, S.; Fritsen, C.H.; Arufe, J.A.; Redd, C.

    2008-01-01

    Stable nitrogen isotopes (??15N) and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were used together to provide evidence of potential anthropogenic connections to aquatic organisms in the Truckee River, which flows through the Reno/Sparks metropolitan area in Nevada. Crayfish, snail, and periphyton ??15N values, and SPMD toxicity data collected during high and low flow periods at seven primary sites on the river were used with water quality and flow data for the assessment. All biota showed an increase of ??15N on both dates at sites downstream of inflows of a water-quality impaired tributary and urban drain relative to upstream. In addition, most of the lowest ??15N values on each date occurred at the most downstream site on the river. SPMDs sample lipophilic organic contaminants and can be used to assess organic contaminant toxicity to aquatic organisms because they use a membrane that mimics organic contaminant uptake by fish. In this study, results from a fluoroscan test [pyrene index (PI)] of SPMD extracts that responds to higher molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) showed patterns similar to stable isotope data, although observed peaks in PI values occurred in the urban area upstream of where peak ??15N values occurred. The CYP1A biomarker test, which responds to PAHs, certain polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and organochlorines, showed peak toxic equivalents (TEQ) values farther downstream of the urban area. Thus, it is likely that PAHs were contributing to toxicity in the urban area, whereas other nonurban sources of organic carbon may have been present farther downstream. The combined use of stable isotope measurements and SPMDs provided a means of simultaneously examining whether aquatic biota are incorporating constituents from potential food sources (via stable isotopes) or exposure through water (via SPMDs). ?? Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2008.

  8. Deployer: A Robot-Deploying Robot

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    6: Bandicoot 11 Figure 7: Deployer mast in a.) retracted, b.) extending, and c.) fully extended positions. 13 Figure 8: Wombat climbing stairs with...mast in a.) retracted, b.)extending, and c.) fully extended positions. 13 Deploy er Outfitting - Wombat The second Urban Robot, Wombat (Fig.8), was...equipped with a single, rear-mounted ISIS transceiver and a Swarm Radio to communicate with all of the Joeys. In addition, Wombat was equipped with

  9. Coated with nanomaterials intraocular lenses, ophthalmic and human body implantable devices with high catalytic antioxidant activities: a new nanotechnology strategy of peroxidase cellular enzyme mimics increasing the biocompatibility and therapeutic deployment of the medical prosthetic device.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A

    2013-04-01

    While cataract surgery is generally recognized as being one of the safest operations, there is still a significant complication rate. From 30 to 50% of all patients in the United States having cataract extraction develop opacification of the posterior lens capsule within two years and require laser treatment with its own significant risk of complications. Of the patients having cataract surgery, 0.8% develop retinal detachments, from 0.6% to 1.3% were rehospitalized for corneal edema or required corneal transplantation and about 0.1% presented with endophthalmitis . Thus, aside from secondary cataract, about 2% of 1.3 million people, or 26,000 individuals in the United States annually develop serious complications as a result of cataract surgery. The aim of this investigation was to increase the safety and effectiveness of an individual intraocular lens (IOL) preventing an impairment in peroxide metabolism of the mature human cataractous lenses compared to normal lenses employing the specific nanotechnology coating which substitutes the inhibitory effect of the implantable device towards the active species of oxygen and the ability of IOL to regulate the H2O2 and lipid hydroperoxides levels in the surrounding medium. The implantation of IOLs with metabolic activity improves the capability of the surrounding ocular tissues to withstand oxidative stress induced in ocular humors by the photochemical and other metabolic reactions. The coated implantable medical device with thin film of platinum applied with magnetron sputtering, reacts as a body enzyme with deleterious peroxide compounds and free radical oxygen species in body fluids and tissue when said device is implanted into human body. The IOL having haptics coated with thin film of platinum, catalyzes the reduction of peroxide compounds to decrease their levels within the aqueous humor. Further, the coatings also scavenge toxic free radicals of oxygen, thus preventing cellular dysfunction resulting from oxidative

  10. Predictors for quality of life of patients with a portable out-of-centre-implanted extracorporeal membrane oxygenation device.

    PubMed

    Rückert, Florian; Steinke, Thomas; Flöther, Lilit; Bucher, Michael; Metz, Dietrich; Frantz, Stefan; Charitos, Efstratios I; Treede, Hendrik; Raspé, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Despite progress in the treatment of cardiopulmonary organ failure, the mortality rate for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and cardiogenic shock remains high. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a promising treatment option, but long-term outcomes and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) are unknown. Detailed information related to pre- and post-device data and outcomes from a consecutive sample of 71 patients treated with ECMO was analysed. Long-term survivors were given a detailed follow-up examination after a median time of 31 months that included multiple scoring systems for HRQOL assessment. Seventy-one patients received a portable out-of-centre-implanted ECMO system. The survival rate at hospital discharge was 48%. Median HRQOL scores were 80% on the Karnofsky index (normal ≥80%), 80% on the Euroqol-5D (normal ≥75%) and 73.1% on the quality-of-life index (normal ≥70%). Mental scores were 96.7% on the Mini-Mental State Examination (normal ≥90.0%), 77.8% on the DemTect (normal ≥72.0%), 87.0% on the test for early detection of dementia with depression demarcation (TFDD; normal ≥74.0%) and confirmed good mental state and HRQOL for patients at follow-up. Univariate analysis for in-hospital mortality indicated that ventilation time before device implantation, higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, higher lactate level at the time of ECMO implantation and female gender were associated with adverse outcomes. In our cohort of patients, survivors of out-of-hospital ECMO implantation demonstrated good mental and quality-of-life conditions with well-recovered cardiopulmonary function during long-term follow-up. The indicators for adverse outcomes, pre-implantation lactate levels, pre-ventilation time and APACHE II score, should be considered before implantation of an ECMO device. This study is registered at DRKS (Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien) under the code DRKS

  11. Darcy Permeability of Hollow Fiber Membrane Bundles Made from Membrana Polymethylpentene Fibers Used in Respiratory Assist Devices.

    PubMed

    Madhani, Shalv P; D'Aloiso, Brandon D; Frankowski, Brian; Federspiel, William J

    2016-01-01

    Hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) are used in blood oxygenators for cardiopulmonary bypass or in next generation artificial lungs. Flow analyses of these devices is typically done using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling HFM bundles as porous media, using a Darcy permeability coefficient estimated from the Blake-Kozeny (BK) equation to account for viscous drag from fibers. We recently published how well this approach can predict Darcy permeability for fiber bundles made from polypropylene HFMs, showing the prediction can be significantly improved using an experimentally derived correlation between the BK constant (A) and bundle porosity (ε). In this study, we assessed how well our correlation for A worked for predicting the Darcy permeability of fiber bundles made from Membrana polymethylpentene (PMP) HFMs, which are increasingly being used clinically. Swatches in the porosity range of 0.4 to 0.8 were assessed in which sheets of fiber were stacked in parallel, perpendicular, and angled configurations. Our previously published correlation predicted Darcy within ±8%. A new correlation based on current and past measured permeability was determined: A = 497ε - 103; using this correlation measured Darcy permeability was within ±6%. This correlation varied from 8% to -3.5% of our prior correlation over the tested porosity range.

  12. Darcy permeability of hollow fiber membrane bundles made from Membrana® Polymethylpentene (PMP) fibers used in respiratory assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Madhani, Shalv. P.; D’Aloiso, Brandon. D.; Frankowski, Brian.; Federspiel, William. J.

    2016-01-01

    Hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) are used in blood oxygenators for cardiopulmonary bypass or in next generation artificial lungs. Flow analyses of these devices is typically done using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling HFM bundles as porous media, using a Darcy permeability coefficient estimated from the Blake – Kozeny (BK) equation to account for viscous drag from fibers. We recently published how well this approach can predict Darcy permeability for fiber bundles made from polypropylene HFMs, showing the prediction can be significantly improved using an experimentally derived correlation between the BK constant (A) and bundle porosity (ε). In this study, we assessed how well our correlation for A worked for predicting the Darcy permeability of fiber bundles made from Membrana® polymethylpentene (PMP) HFMs, which are increasingly being used clinically. Swatches in the porosity range of 0.4 to 0.8 were assessed in which sheets of fiber were stacked in parallel, perpendicular and angled configurations. Our previously published correlation predicted Darcy within ±8%. A new correlation based on current and past measured permeability was determined: A=497ε-103; using this correlation measured Darcy permeability was within ±6%. This correlation varied from 8% to −3.5% of our prior correlation over the tested porosity range. PMID:26809086

  13. Numerical study of a novel micro-diaphragm flow channel with piezoelectric device for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, H. K.; Huang, S. H.; Chen, B. R.; Cheng, L. W.

    Previous studies have shown that the amplitude of the vibration of a piezoelectric (PZT) device produces an oscillating flow that changes the chamber volume along with a curvature variation of the diaphragm. In this study, an actuating micro-diaphragm with piezoelectric effects is utilized as an air-flow channel in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) systems, called PZT-PEMFC. This newly designed gas pump, with a piezoelectric actuation structure, can feed air into the system of an air-breathing PEMFC. When the actuator moves outward to increase the cathode channel volume, the air is sucked into the chamber; moving inward decreases the channel's volume and thereby compresses air into the catalyst layer and enhancing the chemical reaction. The air-standard PZT-PEMFC cycle is proposed to describe an air-breathing PZT-PEMFC. A novel design for PZT-PEMFCs has been proposed and a three-dimensional, transitional model has been successfully built to account for its major phenomena and performance. Moreover, at high frequencies, PZT actuation leads to a more stable current output, more drained water, higher sucked air, higher hydrogen consumption, and also overcomes concentration losses.

  14. Toxicological and chemical screening of Antarctica sediments: Use of whole sediment toxicity tests, microtox, mutatox and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cleveland, Laverne; Little, Edward E.; Petty, Jimmie D.; Johnson, B. Thomas; Lebo, Jon A.; Orazio, Carl E.; Dionne, Jane

    1997-01-01

    Eight whole sediment samples from Antarctica (four from Winter Quarters Bay and four from McMurdo Sound) were toxicologically and chemically evaluated. Also, the influence of ultraviolet radiation on the toxicity and bioavailability of contaminants associated with the sediment samples was assessed. The evaluations were accomplished by use of a 10-day whole sediment test with Leptocheirus plumulosus, Microtox®, Mutatox® and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs). Winter Quarters Bay sediments contained about 250 ng g−1 (dry weight) total PCBs and 20 μg g−1 total PAHs. These sediments elicited toxicity in the Microtox test and avoidance and inhibited burrowing in the L. plumulosus test. The McMurdo Sound sediment samples contained only trace amounts of PCBs and no PAHs, and were less toxic in both the L. plumulosus and Microtox tests compared to the Winter Quarters Bay sediments. The sediments from McMurdo Sound apparently contained some unidentified substance which was photolytically modified to a more toxic form. The photolytic modification of sediment-associated contaminants, coupled with the polar ozone hole and increased incidence of ultraviolet radiation could significantly increase hazards to Antarctic marine life.

  15. DRAGON - 8U Nanosatellite Orbital Deployer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrowolski, Marcin; Grygorczuk, Jerzy; Kedziora, Bartosz; Tokarz, Marta; Borys, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences (SRC PAS) together with Astronika company have developed an Orbital Deployer called DRAGON for ejection of the Polish scientific nanosatellite BRITE-PL Heweliusz (Fig. 1). The device has three unique mechanisms including an adopted and scaled lock and release mechanism from the ESA Rosetta mission MUPUS instrument. This paper discusses major design restrictions of the deployer, unique design features, and lessons learned from development through testing.

  16. Block Copolymer Membranes for Efficient Capture of a Chemotherapy Drug

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, X. Chelsea; Oh, Hee Jeung; Yu, Jay F.; ...

    2016-07-23

    In this paper, we introduce the use of block copolymer membranes for an emerging application, “drug capture”. The polymer is incorporated in a new class of biomedical devices, referred to as ChemoFilter, which is an image-guided temporarily deployable endovascular device designed to increase the efficacy of chemotherapy-based cancer treatment. We show that block copolymer membranes consisting of functional sulfonated polystyrene end blocks and a structural polyethylene middle block (SSES) are capable of capturing doxorubicin, a chemotherapy drug. We focus on the relationship between morphology of the membrane in the ChemoFilter device and efficacy of doxorubicin capture measured in vitro. Usingmore » small-angle X-ray scattering and cryogenic scanning transmission electron microscopy, we discovered that rapid doxorubicin capture is associated with the presence of water-rich channels in the lamellar-forming S-SES membranes in aqueous environment.« less

  17. Block Copolymer Membranes for Efficient Capture of a Chemotherapy Drug

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the use of block copolymer membranes for an emerging application, “drug capture”. The polymer is incorporated in a new class of biomedical devices, referred to as ChemoFilter, which is an image-guided temporarily deployable endovascular device designed to increase the efficacy of chemotherapy-based cancer treatment. We show that block copolymer membranes consisting of functional sulfonated polystyrene end blocks and a structural polyethylene middle block (S-SES) are capable of capturing doxorubicin, a chemotherapy drug. We focus on the relationship between morphology of the membrane in the ChemoFilter device and efficacy of doxorubicin capture measured in vitro. Using small-angle X-ray scattering and cryogenic scanning transmission electron microscopy, we discovered that rapid doxorubicin capture is associated with the presence of water-rich channels in the lamellar-forming S-SES membranes in aqueous environment. PMID:27547493

  18. Large Deployable Shroud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacquemin, G. G.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary design proposed for large, lightweight telescope shroud or light shield carried to orbit in single Space Shuttle cargo load. Shroud concept applied on Earth in portable, compactly storable displays or projection screens. Large telescope shroud includes four deployable masts erecting eight walls of hinged panels of polyimide film. Panels stored fanfolded before deployment and threaded on guide wires unwinding from spools and remain taut during deployment.

  19. Tether Deployer And Brake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Joseph A.; Alexander, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    Design concept promises speed, control, and reliability. Scheme for deploying tether provides for fast, free, and snagless payout and fast, dependable braking. Developed for small, expendable tethers in outer space, scheme also useful in laying transoceanic cables, deploying guidance wires to torpedoes and missiles, paying out rescue lines from ship to ship via rockets, deploying antenna wires, releasing communication and power cables to sonobuoys and expendable bathythermographs, and in reeling out lines from fishing rods.

  20. Radiometer-deployment subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speight, K. M.

    1972-01-01

    A radiometer-deployment subsystem for the Nimbus E spacecraft was designed, developed, and qualified for space use. The dimensions of the radiometer are 0.9 meter square by 0.1 meter, and its weighs 32 kilograms. Rigidly secured to the spacecraft during launch, the radiometer is deployed when the spacecraft reaches orbit. Deployment is achieved without permitting any portion of the radiometer to intersect the field of view of the infrared horizon scanner. This accomplishment necessitated a nonlinear deployment profile, which was accomplished by using a four-bar linkage composed of arms, cams, pivots, and steel tapes.

  1. Deployable geodesic truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr. (Inventor); Rhodes, Marvin D. (Inventor); Simonton, J. Wayne (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A deployable geodesic truss structure which can be deployed from a stowed state to an erected state is described. The truss structure includes a series of bays, each bay having sets of battens connected by longitudinal cross members which give the bay its axial and torsional stiffness. The cross members are hinged at their mid point by a joint so that the cross members are foldable for deployment or collapsing. The bays are deployed and stabilized by actuator means connected between the mid point joints of the cross members. Hinged longerons may be provided to also connect the sets of battens and to collapse for stowing with the rest of the truss structure.

  2. Three small deployed satellites

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-04

    ISS033-E-009282 (4 Oct. 2012) --- Several tiny satellites are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 33 crew member on the International Space Station. The satellites were released outside the Kibo laboratory using a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer attached to the Japanese module’s robotic arm on Oct. 4, 2012. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide, flight engineer, set up the satellite deployment gear inside the lab and placed it in the Kibo airlock. The Japanese robotic arm then grappled the deployment system and its satellites from the airlock for deployment. Earth’s horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  3. Simple Host—Guest Chemistry To Modulate the Process of Concentration and Crystallization of Membrane Proteins by Detergent Capture in a Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Seddon, Annela M.; Tereshko, Valentina; Ponomarenko, Nina; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper utilizes cyclodextrin-based host—guest chemistry in a microfluidic device to modulate the crystallization of membrane proteins and the process of concentration of membrane protein samples. Methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MBCD) can efficiently capture a wide variety of detergents commonly used for the stabilization of membrane proteins by sequestering detergent monomers. Reaction Center (RC) from Blastochloris viridis was used here as a model system. In the process of concentrating membrane protein samples, MBCD was shown to break up free detergent micelles and prevent them from being concentrated. The addition of an optimal amount of MBCD to the RC sample captured loosely bound detergent from the protein-detergent complex and improved sample homogeneity, as characterized by dynamic light scattering. Using plug-based microfluidics, RC crystals were grown in the presence of MBCD, giving a different morphology and space group than crystals grown without MBCD. The crystal structure of RC crystallized in the presence of MBCD was consistent with the changes in packing and crystal contacts hypothesized for removal of loosely bound detergent. The incorporation of MBCD into a plug-based microfluidic crystallization method allows efficient use of limited membrane protein sample by reducing the amount of protein required and combining sparse matrix screening and optimization in one experiment. The use of MBCD for detergent capture can be expanded to develop cyclodextrin-derived molecules for fine-tuned detergent capture and thus modulate membrane protein crystallization in an even more controllable way. PMID:18831551

  4. Simple Host−Guest Chemistry To Modulate the Process of Concentration and Crystallization of Membrane Proteins by Detergent Capture in a Microfluidic Device

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liang; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Seddon, Annela M.; Tereshko, Valentina; Ponomarenko, Nina; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2009-01-15

    This paper utilizes cyclodextrin-based host-guest chemistry in a microfluidic device to modulate the crystallization of membrane proteins and the process of concentration of membrane protein samples. Methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (MBCD) can efficiently capture a wide variety of detergents commonly used for the stabilization of membrane proteins by sequestering detergent monomers. Reaction Center (RC) from Blastochloris viridis was used here as a model system. In the process of concentrating membrane protein samples, MBCD was shown to break up free detergent micelles and prevent them from being concentrated. The addition of an optimal amount of MBCD to the RC sample captured loosely bound detergent from the protein-detergent complex and improved sample homogeneity, as characterized by dynamic light scattering. Using plug-based microfluidics, RC crystals were grown in the presence of MBCD, giving a different morphology and space group than crystals grown without MBCD. The crystal structure of RC crystallized in the presence of MBCD was consistent with the changes in packing and crystal contacts hypothesized for removal of loosely bound detergent. The incorporation of MBCD into a plug-based microfluidic crystallization method allows efficient use of limited membrane protein sample by reducing the amount of protein required and combining sparse matrix screening and optimization in one experiment. The use of MBCD for detergent capture can be expanded to develop cyclodextrin-derived molecules for fine-tuned detergent capture and thus modulate membrane protein crystallization in an even more controllable way.

  5. Light-Addressed Electrodeposition of Enzyme-Entrapped Chitosan Membranes for Multiplexed Enzyme-Based Bioassays Using a Digital Micromirror Device

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-Hao; Wei, Lu-Shiuan; Chu, Hsiao-Tzu; Jiang, Yeu-Long

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a light-addressed electrolytic system used to perform an electrodeposition of enzyme-entrapped chitosan membranes for multiplexed enzyme-based bioassays using a digital micromirror device (DMD). In this system, a patterned light illumination is projected onto a photoconductive substrate serving as a photo-cathode to electrolytically produce hydroxide ions, which leads to an increased pH gradient. The high pH generated at the cathode can cause a local gelation of chitosan through sol-gel transition. By controlling the illumination pattern on the DMD, a light-addressed electrodeposition of chitosan membranes with different shapes and sizes, as well as multiplexed micropatterning, was performed. The effect of the illumination time of the light pattern on the dimensional resolution of chitosan membrane formation was examined experimentally. Moreover, multiplexed enzyme-based bioassay of enzyme-entrapped chitosan membranes was also successfully demonstrated through the electrodeposition of the chitosan membranes with various shapes/sizes and entrapping different enzymes. As a model experiment, glucose and ethanol were simultaneously detected in a single detection chamber without cross-talk using shape-coded chitosan membranes entrapped with glucose oxidase (GOX), peroxidase (POD), and Amplex Red (AmR) or alcohol oxidase (AOX), POD, and AmR by using same fluorescence indicator (AmR). PMID:23959236

  6. Light-addressed electrodeposition of enzyme-entrapped chitosan membranes for multiplexed enzyme-based bioassays using a digital micromirror device.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Hao; Wei, Lu-Shiuan; Chu, Hsiao-Tzu; Jiang, Yeu-Long

    2013-08-16

    This paper describes a light-addressed electrolytic system used to perform an electrodeposition of enzyme-entrapped chitosan membranes for multiplexed enzyme-based bioassays using a digital micromirror device (DMD). In this system, a patterned light illumination is projected onto a photoconductive substrate serving as a photo-cathode to electrolytically produce hydroxide ions, which leads to an increased pH gradient. The high pH generated at the cathode can cause a local gelation of chitosan through sol-gel transition. By controlling the illumination pattern on the DMD, a light-addressed electrodeposition of chitosan membranes with different shapes and sizes, as well as multiplexed micropatterning, was performed. The effect of the illumination time of the light pattern on the dimensional resolution of chitosan membrane formation was examined experimentally. Moreover, multiplexed enzyme-based bioassay of enzyme-entrapped chitosan membranes was also successfully demonstrated through the electrodeposition of the chitosan membranes with various shapes/sizes and entrapping different enzymes. As a model experiment, glucose and ethanol were simultaneously detected in a single detection chamber without cross-talk using shape-coded chitosan membranes entrapped with glucose oxidase (GOX), peroxidase (POD), and Amplex Red (AmR) or alcohol oxidase (AOX), POD, and AmR by using same fluorescence indicator (AmR).

  7. Deployable Wide-Aperture Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W.; Dobbins, Justin A.; Lin, Greg Y.; Chu, Andrew; Scully, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Inexpensive, lightweight array antennas on flexible substrates are under development to satisfy a need for large-aperture antennas that can be stored compactly during transport and deployed to full size in the field. Conceived for use aboard spacecraft, antennas of this type also have potential terrestrial uses . most likely, as means to extend the ranges of cellular telephones in rural settings. Several simple deployment mechanisms are envisioned. One example is shown in the figure, where the deployment mechanism, a springlike material contained in a sleeve around the perimeter of a flexible membrane, is based on a common automobile window shade. The array can be formed of antenna elements that are printed on small sections of semi-flexible laminates, or preferably, elements that are constructed of conducting fabric. Likewise, a distribution network connecting the elements can be created from conventional technologies such as lightweight, flexible coaxial cable and a surface mount power divider, or preferably, from elements formed from conductive fabrics. Conventional technologies may be stitched onto a supporting flexible membrane or contained within pockets that are stitched onto a flexible membrane. Components created from conductive fabrics may be attached by stitching conductive strips to a nonconductive membrane, embroidering conductive threads into a nonconductive membrane, or weaving predetermined patterns directly into the membrane. The deployable antenna may comprise multiple types of antenna elements. For example, thin profile antenna elements above a ground plane, both attached to the supporting flexible membrane, can be used to create a unidirectional boresight radiation pattern. Or, antenna elements without a ground plane, such as bow-tie dipoles, can be attached to the membrane to create a bidirectional array such as that shown in the figure. For either type of antenna element, the dual configuration, i.e., elements formed of slots in a conductive

  8. How useful are the "other" semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs); the mini-unit (15.2 cm long)?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodbred, Steven L.; Bryant, Wade L.; Rosen, Michael R.; Alvarez, David; Spencer, Terri

    2009-01-01

    Mini (15.2 cm) semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were used successfully in 169 streams from six metropolitan areas of the US to sequester hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) that are indicative of urbanization. A microscale assay the P450RGS, which responds to compounds that bind to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), and the Fluoroscan, a chemical screen for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were performed on each mini SPMD extract. Results show both tests were sensitive enough to respond in streams with low urbanization and responded exponentially in a predictable way to a gradient of urbanization. Mini SPMDs had sufficient sampling rates to detect HOCs using gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (GC/MS) in streams with low levels of urbanization. The total number of HOCs in streams had a linear response to a gradient of urbanization, where 73 of 140 targeted compounds were detected. A diverse group of compounds was found in urban streams including, PAHs, insecticides, herbicides, musk fragrances, waste water treatment compounds and flame retardants. Pentachloroanisole (PCA), a breakdown product of pentachlorophenol (wood preservative), was the most ubiquitous HOC, and was detected in 71% of streams. An evaluation of mini SPMD performance showed they can detect concentrations in water below toxicity benchmarks for many HOCs with the exception of 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. A comparison of mini SPMDs with full sized (91.4 cm) SPMDs showed they have several distinct advantages. The most notable advantages are their low cost, small size, and reduced chance of vandalism. The greatest limitation is the inability to detect compounds at low concentrations (pg/L). Mini SPMDs perform quite well in a wide array of environmental settings and applications and should be considered as an option in environmental studies.

  9. How useful are the "other" semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs); the mini-unit (15.2 cm long)?

    PubMed

    Goodbred, Steven L; Bryant, Wade L; Rosen, Michael R; Alvarez, David; Spencer, Terri

    2009-06-15

    Mini (15.2 cm) semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were used successfully in 169 streams from six metropolitan areas of the US to sequester hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) that are indicative of urbanization. A microscale assay the P450RGS, which responds to compounds that bind to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), and the Fluoroscan, a chemical screen for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were performed on each mini SPMD extract. Results show both tests were sensitive enough to respond in streams with low urbanization and responded exponentially in a predictable way to a gradient of urbanization. Mini SPMDs had sufficient sampling rates to detect HOCs using gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (GC/MS) in streams with low levels of urbanization. The total number of HOCs in streams had a linear response to a gradient of urbanization, where 73 of 140 targeted compounds were detected. A diverse group of compounds was found in urban streams including, PAHs, insecticides, herbicides, musk fragrances, waste water treatment compounds and flame retardants. Pentachloroanisole (PCA), a breakdown product of pentachlorophenol (wood preservative), was the most ubiquitous HOC, and was detected in 71% of streams. An evaluation of mini SPMD performance showed they can detect concentrations in water below toxicity benchmarks for many HOCs with the exception of 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. A comparison of mini SPMDs with full sized (91.4 cm) SPMDs showed they have several distinct advantages. The most notable advantages are their low cost, small size, and reduced chance of vandalism. The greatest limitation is the inability to detect compounds at low concentrations (pg/L). Mini SPMDs perform quite well in a wide array of environmental settings and applications and should be considered as an option in environmental studies.

  10. Overview and comparison of lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices and oysters (Crassostrea gigas) for assessing organic chemical exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huckins, J.N.; Prest, H.F.; Petty, J.D.; Lebo, J.A.; Hodgins, M.M.; Clark, R.C.; Alvarez, D.A.; Gala, W.R.; Steen, A.; Gale, R.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    2004-01-01

    We performed 20-d, flow-through exposures of lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to three concentrations (nominally 10, 100, and 250 ng/L) of a diverse mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Exposure water was seawater free of particulates larger than 0.1 μm. The results of these controlled laboratory studies demonstrated that SPMDs and oysters concentrate the same chemicals but that the relative amounts accumulated are different. For oysters, the 20-d mean (across treatments) concentration factors (CFs) of test compounds with log Kow ≤ 4.8 were much lower (4.0- to 20-fold lower) than those of the same compounds in SPMDs. In contrast, the 20-d CFs of PAHs with log Kow ≥ 5.6 in oysters from the low-level treatment were higher than the corresponding CFs for SPMDs. The CFs of these compounds in oysters from the low-level treatment ranged from approximately 3.0- to 13-fold higher than those in oysters from the high-level treatment. This physiologically mediated difference in oyster CFs appears to be linked to active feeding in the low-level treatment and to apparent toxicity-induced cessation of feeding (i.e., valve closure) in the high-level treatment. Because CFs for these compounds in oysters were not independent of exposure concentrations, it follows that tissue levels were not proportional to exposure concentration. However, both sampling approaches have advantages and disadvantages, and the appropriateness of their use depends on the goals of a given study.

  11. Deployable Fresnel Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.; Lin, Gregory Y.

    2014-01-01

    Deployable Fresnel rings (DFRs) significantly enhance the realizable gain of an antenna. This innovation is intended to be used in combination with another antenna element, as the DFR itself acts as a focusing or microwave lens element for a primary antenna. This method is completely passive, and is also completely wireless in that it requires neither a cable, nor a connector from the antenna port of the primary antenna to the DFR. The technology improves upon the previous NASA technology called a Tri-Sector Deployable Array Antenna in at least three critical aspects. In contrast to the previous technology, this innovation requires no connector, cable, or other physical interface to the primary communication radio or sensor device. The achievable improvement in terms of antenna gain is significantly higher than has been achieved with the previous technology. Also, where previous embodiments of the Tri-Sector antenna have been constructed with combinations of conventional (e.g., printed circuit board) and conductive fabric materials, this innovation is realized using only conductive and non-conductive fabric (i.e., "e-textile") materials, with the possible exception of a spring-like deployment ring. Conceptually, a DFR operates by canceling the out-of-phase radiation at a plane by insertion of a conducting ring or rings of a specific size and distance from the source antenna, defined by Fresnel zones. Design of DFRs follow similar procedures to those outlined for conventional Fresnel zone rings. Gain enhancement using a single ring is verified experimentally and through computational simulation. The experimental test setup involves a microstrip patch antenna that is directly behind a single-ring DFR and is radiating towards a second microstrip patch antenna. The first patch antenna and DFR are shown. At 2.42 GHz, the DFR improves the transmit antenna gain by 8.6 dB, as shown in Figure 2, relative to the wireless link without the DFR. A figure illustrates the

  12. Disposable telemetry cable deployment system

    DOEpatents

    Holcomb, David Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A disposable telemetry cable deployment system for facilitating information retrieval while drilling a well includes a cable spool adapted for insertion into a drill string and an unarmored fiber optic cable spooled onto the spool cable and having a downhole end and a stinger end. Connected to the cable spool is a rigid stinger which extends through a kelly of the drilling apparatus. A data transmission device for transmitting data to a data acquisition system is disposed either within or on the upper end of the rigid stinger.

  13. Deployed Analyst Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    hurdles hindering analysis. A good analyst can often help transform commander’s priorities and guide valuable research that informs future decisions...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The Center for Army Analysis (CAA) has provided Operations Research /Systems Analysis (ORSA) support to forward deploying...deploying Operations Research /Systems Analysis (ORSA) analysts, whether military, civilian, or contractor. THE PROJECT SPONSOR: Functional Area (FA) 49

  14. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, K. A.; Hostick, D. J.; Belzer, D. B.; Livingston, O. V.

    2007-11-01

    This report compiles information and conclusions gathered as part of the “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs” project. The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge in which future research is needed.

  15. Design of amall deployable satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumbo, S.; Leofanti, J.; Corradi, S.; Allegri, G.; Marchetti, M.

    2003-08-01

    One of the scientific satellite programmes of Rome University "La Sapienza", called DeSat, is here reported, with major emphasis on the mechanical and structure subsystems. The principal payload of the entire system is represented by a titanium recirculating ball screw boom whose mass reaches one third of the total mass budget. The goal of the mission is to space qualify a new micro-satellite multipurpose platform, called LEO-MicroBAR, and to qualify the titanium linear actuator. Both the two systems have been developed by the Aerospace and Astronautics Engineering Department (AAED). The boom will be used to investigate the validity of its design for space applications, like precise off platform positioning of devices and instruments, GPS interferometry, sensor measurements and robotics. It will be shielded against space interactions by a titanium bellow system whose main functions will be impact protection, antirotation, boom passive thermal control. The satellite geometry, when the boom is in deployed configuration, is highly stretched and the name "deployable satellite" was natural. The large deployment mechanism, compared to the small bus, has influenced the design of every satellite subsystem leading to innovative solutions in terms of design, materials, equipment and instruments.

  16. From Deploying Individuals to Deploying Departments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    the help of regulators, lawyers, customs of!cials, and private sector and regional market experts to develop comprehensive and effective solutions...the management of deploying and rede - ploying personnel across the government. Continuous Education, Training, and Exercising. Classroom education...domestic agencies must con- duct periodic exercises in order to socialize new participants and to re!ne existing processes and policies in the forward and

  17. Tight control of light trapping in surface addressable photonic crystal membranes: application to spectrally and spatially selective optical devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letartre, Xavier; Blanchard, Cédric; Grillet, Christian; Jamois, Cécile; Leclercq, Jean-Louis; Viktorovitch, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Surface addressable Photonic Crystal Membranes (PCM) are 1D or 2D photonic crystals formed in a slab waveguides where Bloch modes located above the light line are exploited. These modes are responsible for resonances in the reflection spectrum whose bandwidth can be adjusted at will. These resonances result from the coupling between a guided mode of the membrane and a free-space mode through the pattern of the photonic crystal. If broadband, these structures represent an ideal mirror to form compact vertical microcavity with 3D confinement of photons and polarization selectivity. Among numerous devices, low threshold VCSELs with remarkable and tunable modal properties have been demonstrated. Narrow band PCMs (or high Q resonators) have also been extensively used for surface addressable optoelectronic devices where an active material is embedded into the membrane, leading to the demonstration of low threshold surface emitting lasers, nonlinear bistables, optical traps... In this presentation, we will describe the main physical rules which govern the lifetime of photons in these resonant modes. More specifically, it will be emphasized that the Q factor of the PCM is determined, to the first order, by the integral overlap between the electromagnetic field distributions of the guided and free space modes and of the dielectric periodic perturbation which is applied to the homogeneous membrane to get the photonic crystal. It turns out that the symmetries of these distributions are of prime importance for the strength of the resonance. It will be shown that, by molding in-plane or vertical symmetries of Bloch modes, spectrally and spatially selective light absorbers or emitters can be designed. First proof of concept devices will be also presented.

  18. Small Cube Satellite Deploy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-19

    ISS038-E-003872 (19 Nov. 2013) --- Three nanosatellites, known as Cubesats, are deployed from a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (SSOD) attached to the Kibo laboratory’s robotic arm at 7:10 a.m. (EST) on Nov. 19, 2013. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 38 flight engineer, monitored the satellite deployment while operating the Japanese robotic arm from inside Kibo. The Cubesats were delivered to the International Space Station Aug. 9, aboard Japan’s fourth H-II Transfer Vehicle, Kounotori-4.

  19. Small Cube Satellite Deploy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-19

    ISS038-E-003874 (19 Nov. 2013) --- Three nanosatellites, known as Cubesats, are deployed from a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (SSOD) attached to the Kibo laboratory's robotic arm at 7:10 a.m. (EST) on Nov. 19, 2013. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 38 flight engineer, monitored the satellite deployment while operating the Japanese robotic arm from inside Kibo. The Cubesats were delivered to the International Space Station Aug. 9, aboard Japan's fourth H-II Transfer Vehicle, Kounotori-4.

  20. Small Cube Satellite Deploy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-19

    ISS038-E-003869 (19 Nov. 2013) --- Three nanosatellites, known as Cubesats, are deployed from a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (SSOD) attached to the Kibo laboratory’s robotic arm at 7:10 a.m. (EST) on Nov. 19, 2013. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 38 flight engineer, monitored the satellite deployment while operating the Japanese robotic arm from inside Kibo. The Cubesats were delivered to the International Space Station Aug. 9, aboard Japan’s fourth H-II Transfer Vehicle, Kounotori-4.

  1. Small Cube Satellite Deploy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-19

    ISS038-E-003871 (19 Nov. 2013) --- Three nanosatellites, known as Cubesats, are deployed from a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (SSOD) attached to the Kibo laboratory’s robotic arm at 7:10 a.m. (EST) on Nov. 19, 2013. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 38 flight engineer, monitored the satellite deployment while operating the Japanese robotic arm from inside Kibo. The Cubesats were delivered to the International Space Station Aug. 9, aboard Japan’s fourth H-II Transfer Vehicle, Kounotori-4.

  2. Small Cube Satellite Deploy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-19

    ISS038-E-003870 (19 Nov. 2013) --- Three nanosatellites, known as Cubesats, are deployed from a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (SSOD) attached to the Kibo laboratory’s robotic arm at 7:10 a.m. (EST) on Nov. 19, 2013. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 38 flight engineer, monitored the satellite deployment while operating the Japanese robotic arm from inside Kibo. The Cubesats were delivered to the International Space Station Aug. 9, aboard Japan’s fourth H-II Transfer Vehicle, Kounotori-4.

  3. Modeling EERE deployment programs

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, K. A.; Hostick, D. J.; Belzer, D. B.; Livingston, O. V.

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge for future research.

  4. Glory Solar Array Deployment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Glory spacecraft uses Orbital Sciences Corporation Space Systems Group's LEOStar-1 bus design, with deployable, four-panel solar arrays. This conceptual animation reveals Glory's unique solar a...

  5. Three small deployed satellites

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-04

    ISS033-E-009285 (4 Oct. 2012) --- Several tiny satellites are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 33 crew member on the International Space Station. The satellites were released outside the Kibo laboratory using a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer attached to the Japanese module’s robotic arm on Oct. 4, 2012. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide, flight engineer, set up the satellite deployment gear inside the lab and placed it in the Kibo airlock. The Japanese robotic arm then grappled the deployment system and its satellites from the airlock for deployment. A portion of the station’s solar array panels and a blue and white part of Earth provide the backdrop for the scene.

  6. Three small deployed satellites

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-04

    ISS033-E-009286 (4 Oct. 2012) --- Several tiny satellites are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 33 crew member on the International Space Station. The satellites were released outside the Kibo laboratory using a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer attached to the Japanese module’s robotic arm on Oct. 4, 2012. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide, flight engineer, set up the satellite deployment gear inside the lab and placed it in the Kibo airlock. The Japanese robotic arm then grappled the deployment system and its satellites from the airlock for deployment. A portion of the station’s solar array panels and a blue and white part of Earth provide the backdrop for the scene.

  7. Contracting Deployment Customer Guide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    functional managers from the major commands expressed the need to develop a Customer Guide for contingency deployments which would standardize, simplify, and...streamline the support our Contingency Contracting Officers (CCOs) provide to our customers .

  8. Acute tamponade of the left paracorporeal pump house due to membrane defect in a patient with a Berlin Heart EXCOR biventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Völz, Sebastian; Holmberg, Michael; Redfors, Bengt; Dellgren, Göran

    2014-10-01

    We report a case of acute tamponade of the left paracorporeal pump house in a patient supported by a Berlin Heart EXCOR biventricular assist device (BiVAD) caused by mechanical defect in the membrane of the arterial chamber. A 36-year old male was admitted for composite graft surgery due to a large aortic regurgitation and consecutive heart failure, decompensated postoperatively and was rescued by with an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) device. He was accepted for heart transplantation, and a BiVAD (Berlin Heart EXCOR) was implanted as bridge-to-transplantation. Two months after discharge, he experienced dyspnoea and received error signals from his BiVAD. Relatives released him from his BiVAD companion driver, connected him to the hand pump and transported him to our institution. On arrival, he was in cardiogenic shock and was stabilized by ECMO. Inspection of the arterial chamber revealed a wear hole and delamination of the diaphragm, which had led to a tamponade by air insufflation into the three-layer membrane. New BiVAD paracorporeal pumps were connected, and the patient was subsequently successfully transplanted. The case depicts the difficulty of diagnosis in this specific patient setting. Despite transparent design of the BiVAD chambers, the development of a chamber tamponade remained undetected until explantation of the system.

  9. [Evaluation of non-invasive hemoglobin measurements using the Masimo Rainbow Radical-7® device in a patient with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation].

    PubMed

    Moreno, I; Artieda, O; Vicente, R; Zarragoikoetxea, I; Vicente, J L; Barberá, M

    2014-01-01

    Circulatory assist devices such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation are indicated in cases of cardiogenic shock refractory to optimal conventional treatment. Bleeding is a serious complication of such systems, mainly due to coagulation disorders caused by continuous administration of heparin, as well as platelet dysfunction. Serial coagulation and hemoglobin (Hb) measurements are essential. Hb measurements can be performed through repeated arterial blood gasometry, and more recently with a new spectrophotometric sensor, Masimo Rainbow Radical-7® device, which gives Hb values continuously and non-invasively. We report a case of a patient undergoing cardiac surgery who required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe cardiogenic shock immediately after surgery. We compare the correlation and the level of agreement with Hb levels measured by 2 existing systems in clinical practice. Our results indicate that the Masimo® spectrophotometric monitor showed statistically comparable Hb values, in the correlation (r=.85; P<.01) and in agreement with those obtained by serial blood gas analyzer, ABL800 FLEX® (wavelength). In view of these results we consider the Masimo® device as a valid alternative for the continuous follow-up of the Hb and control of bleeding in these patients. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Research on lightweight passive deployment mechanism for the secondary mirror in the deployable space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Peifeng; Li, Chuang; Jing, Nan; Chong, Yaqin; Ren, Guorui

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a new type of lightweight passive deployment mechanism based on the tape spring and the shape memory alloy is presented for the secondary mirror of a deployable space telescope. In this passive deployment mechanism for the secondary mirror, the high elastic potential energy of the folded tape springs is used as driving force when the support structure is extended, and the high stiffness characteristics of the circular arc cross section of the tape spring can be used to achieve structure self-locking after deployment. Then a deployable space telescope combined with lightweight passive deployable mechanism for the secondary mirror is designed for applying to nanosatellite imaging. Furthermore, a lock-release device is designed to achieve the function of locking the folded structure and releasing on orbit by taking advantage of the phase transformation characteristics of shape memory alloy with temperature changing. Finally, the correction method for the deployment error of secondary mirror is discussed. The temperature of the tape springs is controlled respectively to make a required length change. This can achieve the purpose of adjusting the position of the secondary mirror and improve the deployment accuracy.

  11. Surface Characterization of Asymmetric Bi-Soft Segment Poly(ester urethane urea) Membranes for Blood-Oxygenation Medical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Mónica; Geraldes, Vítor; de Pinho, Maria Norberta

    2012-01-01

    Asymmetric bi-soft segment poly(ester urethane urea) (PEUU) membranes containing polycaprolactone (PCL) as a second soft segment are synthesized with PCL-diol ranging from 0% to 15% (w/w). Bulk and surface characteristics of the PEUU membranes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), static water contact angles, and surface streaming potentials and were correlated to hemocompatibility properties, namely, hemolysis and thrombosis degrees. SEM analysis reveals PEUU membranes with asymmetric cross-sections and top dense surfaces with distinct morphologies. The increase in PCL-diol content yields PEUU membranes with blood-contacting surfaces that are smoother, more hydrophilic, and with higher maximum zeta potentials. The results obtained in this work give no evidence of a correlation between hydrophilicity/zeta potentials and the hemolysis/thrombosis degree of blood-contacting surfaces of the PEUU membranes. In contrast, other hemocompatibility aspects reveal that the more hydrophilic membranes are associated with lower platelet deposition and inhibition of extreme states of platelet activation. PMID:22164163

  12. Magnetic Membrane System

    DOEpatents

    McElfresh, Michael W.; ; Lucas, Matthew S.

    2004-12-30

    The present invention provides a membrane with magnetic particles. In one embodiment the membrane is created by mixing particles in a non-magnetic base. The membrane may act as an actuator, a sensor, a pump, a valve, or other device. A magnet is operatively connected to the membrane. The magnet acts on and changes the shape of the membrane.

  13. Electrokinetic measurements of dielectric properties of membrane for apoptotic HL-60 cells on chip-based device.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chengjun; Chen, Ailiang; Wang, Lei; Guo, Min; Yu, Jun

    2007-06-01

    The specific membrane capacitance and conductance of mammalian cells reflect the surface morphological complexities and barrier functions of cell membrane, respectively, and could potentially respond to cell physiological and pathological changes in a measurable manner. In this study, an electrokinetic system was developed by using negative dielectrophoretic force (nDEP force) assisted positioning and electroroation (ROT) measurement. Numerical simulations regarding the geometric model of the electrode were performed primarily for the electric field analysis. The dielectric responses of membrane for apoptotic HL-60 cells induced by bufalin were detected. The membrane capacitance of the cells was found to fall from an initial value of 15.6 +/- 0.9 mF/cm(2) to 6.4 +/- 0.6 mF/cm(2) after a 48 h treatment with 10 nM bufalin. However, the membrane conductance remained almost constant at (2.25 +/- 1.1) x 10(3) S/m(2) during the first 12 h of bufalin treatment and then increased distinctly to (4.2 +/- 1.3) x 10(3) S/m(2) thereafter. Scan electron microscopy (SEM) studies of the cells revealed a decreased complexity in cell membrane morphology following bufalin treatments, suggesting that the observed changes in the membrane capacitance was dominated by the alterations of cell surface structures. The results demonstrate that the ROT technique gives a quantitative analysis of the toxic damage by chemicals to cells and can be exploited in the testing and development of new pharmaceuticals and active cell agents.

  14. Occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban streams as assessed using semipermeable membrane devices, Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J. Bruce

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this fact sheet are to summarize the occurrence of water-borne PAHs in three urban streams in the Dallas- Fort Worth metropolitan area and to assess the use of semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) as PAH samplers. One site on each of three streams was selected for monitoring the occurrence of PAHs (fig. 1). The sites were chosen to reflect varied urban land uses and the influences of point- and nonpointsource pollution. The monitoring was done using SPMDs during a 30-day period in late May and June 1994.

  15. A comparison of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and petroleum hydrocarbon uptake by mussels (Perna viridis) and semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) in Hong Kong coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Bruce J; Zheng, Gene J; Tse, Edmund S C; De Luca-Abbott, Sharon B; Siu, Stanley Y M; Lam, Paul K S

    2003-01-01

    The ability of mussels (Perna viridis) and semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) to accumulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) from five sites in Hong Kong's coastal waters was compared. Mussels consistently had higher levels of contaminants, but their utility was limited at one highly polluted site due to mortality. Mussels and SPMDs ranked sites differently in terms of individual contaminant levels. Although SPMDs overcome many of the disadvantages of using living organisms to measure contaminants in marine waters, they cannot be used as "mimics" due to different PAH and PHC accumulation patterns.

  16. Concerted sampling of water for trace organic contaminants by bivalves and semipermeable membrane devices in south San Francisco Bay and Elkhorn Slough

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgins, M.M.; Jacobson, L.A.; Prest, H.F.

    1995-12-31

    Bivalves have been widely applied as biomonitors in detecting organic contaminants in aquatic environments. Recently semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDS) have been shown to be effective pre-concentrators of trace levels of organic compounds in water and air. This study compares accumulation of trace organic compounds in oysters (Crassotrea gigas) and mussels (Mytilus califorianus) to those in SPMDs in south San Francisco Bay and Elkhorn Slough. The authors report concentration levels and trends in the profiles for organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls and polyaromatic hydrocarbons in SPMDs and bivalves from a series of locations in both areas.

  17. Preventing biofilm development on DGT devices using metals and antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Pichette, Catherine; Zhang, Hao; Davison, William; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2007-04-30

    The DGT technique has potential as a tool for monitoring reactive phosphorus in freshwater aquaculture effluents. Because those waters have high concentrations of suspended matter and nutrients, biofilms may form on the surface of the DGT devices. Those biofilms may hinder the movement of reactive phosphorus and hence interfere with the DGT measurements. We tested two antibiotics, glutaraldehyde and chloramphenicol, two metal-iodides, copper and silver and also two alternative filter types, nucleopore membrane and silver-based filters, to evaluate their respective potential to prevent the formation of algae. The treatment with silver iodide seems to affect the properties of the diffusive gel and changes the flux measurements of the DGT device. The DGT response observed using the copper iodide and chloramphenicol treatments was not significantly different from the control. Glutaraldehyde changed the macroproperties of the diffusive gel and interfered with the phosphorus detection using spectrophotometric determinations. The effect of the anti-biofilm treatments on the DGT measurements was independent of pH and ionic strength of the water. For the field deployment in fish farms, copper and silver were the best anti-biofilm agents. Copper prevented algal colonisation for 14-days post-deployment and the response was unaffected by the anti-biofilm agent throughout this period. Silver was even better and prevented biofilm formation up to a 21-days post-deployment. Conversely, chloramphenicol did not prevent algal colonisation for the 14- and 21-days deployments. However, for deployments longer than 14 days, it was difficult to obtain consistently good results for all of anti-biofilm agents tested, due to the high concentration of suspended matter in the freshwater effluents of the fish farms tested. This approach suggests a metal pre-treatment of the membrane filters is useful to prevent biofilm formation for DGT deployments aimed at P measurements. DGT deployments for

  18. In vivo performance of chitosan/soy-based membranes as wound-dressing devices for acute skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Santos, Tírcia C; Höring, Bernhard; Reise, Kathrin; Marques, Alexandra P; Silva, Simone S; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Mano, João F; Castro, António G; Reis, Rui L; van Griensven, Martijn

    2013-04-01

    Wound management represents a major clinical challenge on what concerns healing enhancement and pain control. The selection of an appropriate dressing plays an important role in both recovery and esthetic appearance of the regenerated tissue. Despite the wide range of available dressings, the progress in the wound care market relies on the increasing interest in using natural-based biomedical products. Herein, a rat wound-dressing model of partial-thickness skin wounds was used to study newly developed chitosan/soy (cht/soy)-based membranes as wound-dressing materials. Healing and repair of nondressed, cht/soy membrane-dressed, and Epigard(®)-dressed wounds were followed macroscopically and histologically for 1 and 2 weeks. cht/soy membranes performed better than the controls, promoting a faster wound repair. Re-epithelialization, observed 1 week after wounding, was followed by cornification of the outermost epidermal layer at the second week of dressing, indicating repair of the wounded tissue. The use of this rodent model, although in impaired healing conditions, may enclose some drawbacks regarding the inevitable wound contraction. Moreover, being the main purpose the evaluation of cht/soy-based membranes' performance in the absence of growth factors, the choice of a clinically relevant positive control was limited to a polymeric mesh, without any growth factor influencing skin healing/repair, Epigard. These new cht/soy membranes possess the desired features regarding healing/repair stimulation, ease of handling, and final esthetic appearance-thus, valuable properties for wound dressings.

  19. Brown mussels (Perna perna) and semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) as indicators of organic pollutants in the South African marine environment.

    PubMed

    Degger, N; Wepener, V; Richardson, B J; Wu, R S S

    2011-01-01

    A distinct lack of historical and current data on the status of organic pollutant contaminants within the South African marine environment is evident. This has highlighted the need for more current organic pollutant assessments. Reference mussels and SPMDs were transplanted at five South African harbour sites to assess organic bioaccumulation in brown mussels (Perna perna) and semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs). Spatial patterns of PAH and PCB contaminants were determined by GC-MS and GC-ECD after appropriate sample preparation. Significant (p<0.05) spatial differences were observed between the sites. Results indicate no correlations between the passive device and the transplanted mussels; however the SPMDs provided complementary information on the presence of dioxin-like PCBs within the environment not detected by the mussel. The results indicate that information provided by both the mussels and SPMDs allow for a more in depth scrutiny of environmental conditions as a result of anthropogenic influence.

  20. Solid-state electrochromic devices composed of Prussian blue, WO/sub 3/, and poly(ethylene oxide)-polysiloxane hybrid-type ionic conducting membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, K.; Ohgaki, K.; Fujito, M.; Ishida, H.; Yamamoto, R.

    1988-12-01

    The preparation of a new type of poly(ethylene oxide)-polysiloxane hybrid (PEOS) with its application to the construction of solid-state electrochromic devices was studied. The PEOS was given as a colorless and elastic membrane by condensation of a bis(silylpropyl) ether of oligo(ethylene oxide) and a polyalkoxysilane in the presence of LiClO/sub 4/ (2-5 mole percent). The ionic conductivity reached 10/sup -3/ S cm/sup -1/ when PEOS was swollen with propylene carbonate by 160% in weight. A transparent-type solid-state electrochromic device composed of Prussian blue- and WO/sub 3/-coated electrodes with PEOS was prepared, switching of which was slower by a factor of 1.5-2.0 as a function of half-time of coloration and bleaching compared with the corresponding liquid-type cell.

  1. Deployable reflector structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin, Jr. (Inventor); Hoberman, Charles (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A deployable reflector structure is presented. The structure has a number of movable reflector panels pivotably supported on rigid arms. Several such arms are pivotably connected to a central structure. The arm can move in starburst fashion from a packaged stage, where all arms are vertical, to a deployed stage, where all arms are horizontal. All of the movable reflector panels are maintained at a predetermined angle to an axis of the reflector structure when the arms are pivoted. The reflector panels are stacked tightly on top of each other in the packaged state of the reflector structure. Simple mechanisms are used for avoiding interference between panels on different arms in the packaged stage and for fitting the movable panels together like tiles in the deployed stage.

  2. Mining Deployment Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čech, Jozef

    2016-09-01

    The deployment problem, researched primarily in the military sector, is emerging in some other industries, mining included. The principal decision is how to deploy some activities in space and time to achieve desired outcome while complying with certain requirements or limits. Requirements and limits are on the side constraints, while minimizing costs or maximizing some benefits are on the side of objectives. A model with application to mining of polymetallic deposit is presented. To obtain quick and immediate decision solutions for a mining engineer with experimental possibilities is the main intention of a computer-based tool. The task is to determine strategic deployment of mining activities on a deposit, meeting planned output from the mine and at the same time complying with limited reserves and haulage capacities. Priorities and benefits can be formulated by the planner.

  3. Synchronously deployable truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, H. G. (Inventor); Mikulas, M., Jr. (Inventor); Wallsom, E. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A collapsible-expandable truss structure, including first and second spaced surface truss layers having an attached core layer is described. The surface truss layers are composed of a plurality of linear struts arranged in multiple triangular configurations. Each linear strut is hinged at the center and hinge connected at each end to a nodular joint. A passive spring serves as the expansion force to move the folded struts from a stowed collapsed position to a deployed operative final truss configuration. A damper controls the rate of spring expansion for the synchronized deployment of the truss as the folded configuration is released for deployment by the restrain belts. The truss is synchronously extended under the control of motor driven spools.

  4. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.

    2007-11-08

    The purpose of this report is to compile information and conclusions gathered as part of three separate tasks undertaken as part of the overall project, “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs,” sponsored by the Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation office within the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address improvements to modeling in the near term, and note gaps in knowledge where future research is needed.

  5. Remote Systems Design & Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2009-08-28

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) to provide information and lessons learned relating to the design, development and deployment of remote systems, particularly remote arm/manipulator systems. This report reflects PNNL’s experience with remote systems and lays out the most important activities that need to be completed to successfully design, build, deploy and operate remote systems in radioactive and chemically contaminated environments. It also contains lessons learned from PNNL’s work experiences, and the work of others in the national laboratory complex.

  6. Pathfinder Ramp Deploy Image

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-07-06

    Mars Pathfinder's forward rover ramp can be seen successfully unfurled in this image, taken at the end of Sol 2 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). This ramp was not used for the deployment of the microrover Sojourner, which occurred at the end of Sol 2. Sojourner can be seen still latched to one of the lander's petals, waiting for the command sequence that would execute its descent off of the lander's petal. The imager helped Pathfinder scientists determine whether to deploy the rover using the forward or backward ramps and the nature of the first rover traverse. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00628

  7. Small Cube Satellite Deploy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-19

    ISS038-E-003876 (19 Nov. 2013) --- Three nanosatellites, known as Cubesats, are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 38 crew member on the International Space Station. The satellites were released outside the Kibo laboratory using a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer attached to the Japanese module's robotic arm on Nov. 19, 2013. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata, flight engineer, monitored the satellite deployment while operating the Japanese robotic arm from inside Kibo. The Cubesats were delivered to the International Space Station Aug. 9, aboard Japan’s fourth H-II Transfer Vehicle, Kounotori-4.

  8. In-line sample concentration by evaporation through porous hollow fibers and micromachined membranes embedded in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hainan; Tiggelaar, Roald M; Schlautmann, Stefan; Bart, Jacob; Gardeniers, Han

    2016-02-01

    Two types of microfluidic systems, a porous hollow fiber and a thin supported membrane with an array of micromachined holes, are investigated for concentrating mass-limited analyte samples. Water evaporation is driven by the partial pressure difference across the hydrophobic membrane, induced by dry sweeping gas on the permeate side. An analytical model permitting clarification of the contribution of design and process parameters on acquisition of concentrated solution and prediction of achievable concentration factors is presented. Concentrating an exemplary solution utilizing the two systems has been studied at different experimental conditions to validate the model. The results show that the hollow fiber gives controllable concentration factors of more than 10. For the micromachined membrane concentrator concentration factors of 6-8 were achieved, at much lower flow rates than predicted by the model. Because of the asymptotic dependence of concentration factor on flow rate, accurate control of the liquid feed is extremely critical in the flow rate range where high concentration factors are obtained, and the smallest variations in liquid flow rate may easily lead to supersaturation and deposition of solutes in the pores. This changes membrane porosity in an unpredictable way and limits the maximum attainable concentration factor. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. In Vivo Performance of Chitosan/Soy-Based Membranes as Wound-Dressing Devices for Acute Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Tírcia C.; Höring, Bernhard; Reise, Kathrin; Marques, Alexandra P.; Silva, Simone S.; Oliveira, Joaquim M.; Mano, João F.; Castro, António G.; van Griensven, Martijn

    2013-01-01

    Wound management represents a major clinical challenge on what concerns healing enhancement and pain control. The selection of an appropriate dressing plays an important role in both recovery and esthetic appearance of the regenerated tissue. Despite the wide range of available dressings, the progress in the wound care market relies on the increasing interest in using natural-based biomedical products. Herein, a rat wound-dressing model of partial-thickness skin wounds was used to study newly developed chitosan/soy (cht/soy)-based membranes as wound-dressing materials. Healing and repair of nondressed, cht/soy membrane-dressed, and Epigard®-dressed wounds were followed macroscopically and histologically for 1 and 2 weeks. cht/soy membranes performed better than the controls, promoting a faster wound repair. Re-epithelialization, observed 1 week after wounding, was followed by cornification of the outermost epidermal layer at the second week of dressing, indicating repair of the wounded tissue. The use of this rodent model, although in impaired healing conditions, may enclose some drawbacks regarding the inevitable wound contraction. Moreover, being the main purpose the evaluation of cht/soy-based membranes' performance in the absence of growth factors, the choice of a clinically relevant positive control was limited to a polymeric mesh, without any growth factor influencing skin healing/repair, Epigard. These new cht/soy membranes possess the desired features regarding healing/repair stimulation, ease of handling, and final esthetic appearance—thus, valuable properties for wound dressings. PMID:23083058

  10. A novel tape spring hinge mechanism for quasi-static deployment of a satellite deployable using shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ju Won; Yoo, Young Ik; Shin, Dong Kil; Lim, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Kyung Won; Lee, Jung Ju

    2014-02-01

    A tape spring hinge (TSH) is a typical flexible deployment device for a satellite and becomes frequently used due to its simplicity, lightweight, low cost, and high deployment reliability. However, the performance of a TSH is quite limited due to trade-offs among deployed stiffness, deployment torque, and latch-up shock despite its many advantages. In this study, a novel conceptual design that circumvents the trade-offs among functional requirements (FRs) is proposed. The trade-offs are obviated by a newly proposed shape memory alloy damper that converts the deployment behavior of a conventional TSH from unstable dynamic to stable quasi-static. This makes it possible to maximize the deployment stiffness and deployment torque of a conventional TSH, which are larger-the-better FR, without any increase in the latch-up shock. Therefore, in view of conceptual design, it is possible to design a highly improved TSH that has much higher deployed stiffness and deployment torque compared to a conventional TSH while minimizing latch-up shock and deployment unstableness. Detailed design was performed through response surface method and finite element analysis. Finally, a prototype was manufactured and tested in order to verify its performance (four point, deployment torque, and latch-up shock tests). The test results confirm the feasibility of the proposed TSH mechanism.

  11. A novel tape spring hinge mechanism for quasi-static deployment of a satellite deployable using shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Ju Won; Yoo, Young Ik; Shin, Dong Kil; Lim, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Kyung Won; Lee, Jung Ju

    2014-02-01

    A tape spring hinge (TSH) is a typical flexible deployment device for a satellite and becomes frequently used due to its simplicity, lightweight, low cost, and high deployment reliability. However, the performance of a TSH is quite limited due to trade-offs among deployed stiffness, deployment torque, and latch-up shock despite its many advantages. In this study, a novel conceptual design that circumvents the trade-offs among functional requirements (FRs) is proposed. The trade-offs are obviated by a newly proposed shape memory alloy damper that converts the deployment behavior of a conventional TSH from unstable dynamic to stable quasi-static. This makes it possible to maximize the deployment stiffness and deployment torque of a conventional TSH, which are larger-the-better FR, without any increase in the latch-up shock. Therefore, in view of conceptual design, it is possible to design a highly improved TSH that has much higher deployed stiffness and deployment torque compared to a conventional TSH while minimizing latch-up shock and deployment unstableness. Detailed design was performed through response surface method and finite element analysis. Finally, a prototype was manufactured and tested in order to verify its performance (four point, deployment torque, and latch-up shock tests). The test results confirm the feasibility of the proposed TSH mechanism.

  12. Microfluidic device and methods for focusing fluid streams using electroosmotically induced pressures

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Stephen C.; Ramsey, J. Michael

    2010-06-01

    A microfabricated device employing a bridging membrane and methods for electrokinetic transport of a liquid phase biological or chemical material using the same are described. The bridging membrane is deployed in or adjacent to a microchannel and permits either electric current flow or the transport of gas species, while inhibiting the bulk flow of material. The use of bridging membranes in accordance with this invention is applicable to electrokinetically inducing fluid flow to confine a selected material in a region of a microchannel that is not influenced by an electric field. Other structures for inducing fluid flow in accordance with this invention include nanochannel bridging membranes and alternating current fluid pumping devices. Applications of the bridging membranes according to this invention include the separation of species from a sample material, valving of fluids in a microchannel network, mixing of different materials in a microchannel, and the pumping of fluids.

  13. Induced- and alternating-current electro-osmotic control of the diffusion layer growth in a microchannel-membrane interface device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sinwook; Yossifon, Gilad

    2014-11-01

    The passage of an electric current through an ionic permselective medium under an applied electric field is characterized by the formation of ionic concentration gradients, which result in regions of depleted and enriched ionic concentration at opposite ends of the medium. Induced-current electro-osmosis (ICEO) and alternating-current-electro-osmosis (ACEO) are shown to control the growth of the diffusion layer (DL) which, in turn, controls the diffusion limited ion transport through the microchannel-membrane system. We fabricated and tested devices made of a Nafion membrane connecting two opposite PDMS microchannels. An interdigitated electrode array was embedded within the microchannel with various distances from the microchannel-membrane interface. The induced ICEO (floating electrodes) / ACEO (active electrodes) vortices formed at the electrode array stir the fluid and thereby suppress the growth of the DL. The intensity of the ACEO vortices is controlled by either varying the voltage amplitude or the frequency, each having its own unique effect. Enhancement of the limiting current by on-demand control of the diffusion length is of importance in on-chip electro-dialysis, desalination and preconcentration of analytes.

  14. Parametric Cost Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1995-01-01

    Parametric cost analysis is a mathematical approach to estimating cost. Parametric cost analysis uses non-cost parameters, such as quality characteristics, to estimate the cost to bring forth, sustain, and retire a product. This paper reviews parametric cost analysis and shows how it can be used within the cost deployment process.

  15. Deployable video conference table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Marc M. (Inventor); Lissol, Peter (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A deployable table is presented. The table is stowed in and deployed from a storage compartment based upon a non-self rigidizing, 4-hinge, arch support structure that folds upon itself to stow and that expands to deploy. The work surfaces bypass each other above and below to allow the deployment mechanism to operate. This assembly includes the following: first and second primary pivot hinges placed at the opposite ends of the storage compartment; first and second lateral frame members with proximal ends connected to the first and second pivot hinges; a medial frame member offset from and pivotally connected to distal ends of the first and second members through third and fourth medial pivot hinges; and left-side, right-side, and middle trays connected respectively to the first, second, and third frame members and being foldable into and out of the storage compartment by articulation of the first, second, third, and fourth joints. At least one of the third and fourth joints are locked to set the first, second, and third frame members in a desired angular orientation with respect to each other.

  16. Deployment & Market Transformation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    NREL's deployment and market transformation (D and MT) activities encompass the laboratory's full range of technologies, which span the energy efficiency and renewable energy spectrum. NREL staff educates partners on how they can advance sustainable energy applications and also provides clients with best practices for reducing barriers to innovation and market transformation.

  17. Large, Easily Deployable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agan, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    Study of concepts for large space structures will interest those designing scaffolding, radio towers, rescue equipment, and prefabricated shelters. Double-fold, double-cell module was selected for further design and for zero gravity testing. Concept is viable for deployment by humans outside space vehicle as well as by remotely operated manipulator.

  18. Fusion Power Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Schmidt; J.M. Ogden

    2002-02-06

    Fusion power plants could be part of a future portfolio of non-carbon dioxide producing energy supplies such as wind, solar, biomass, advanced fission power, and fossil energy with carbon dioxide sequestration. In this paper, we discuss key issues that could impact fusion energy deployment during the last half of this century. These include geographic issues such as resource availability, scale issues, energy storage requirements, and waste issues. The resource needs and waste production associated with fusion deployment in the U.S. should not pose serious problems. One important feature of fusion power is the fact that a fusion power plant should be locatable within most local or regional electrical distribution systems. For this reason, fusion power plants should not increase the burden of long distance power transmission to our distribution system. In contrast to fusion power, regional factors could play an important role in the deployment of renewable resources such as wind, solar and biomass or fossil energy with CO2 sequestration. We examine the role of these regional factors and their implications for fusion power deployment.

  19. Ground Deployment Demonstration and Material Testing for Solar Sail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaoqi; Cheng, Zhengai; Liu, Yufei; Wang, Li

    2016-07-01

    Solar Sail is a kind of spacecraft that can achieve extremely high velocity by light pressure instead of chemical fuel. The great accelerate rely on its high area-to-mass ratio. So solar sail is always designed in huge size and it use ultra thin and light weight materials. For 100-meter class solar sail, two key points must be considered in the design process. They are fold-deployment method, and material property change in space environment. To test and verify the fold-deployment technology, a 8*8m principle prototype was developed. Sail membrane folding in method of IKAROS, Nanosail-D , and new proposed L-shape folding pattern were tested on this prototype. Their deployment properties were investigated in detail, and comparisons were made between them. Also, the space environment suitability of ultra thin polyimide films as candidate solar sail material was analyzed. The preliminary test results showed that membrane by all the folding method could deploy well. Moreover, sail membrane folding by L-shape pattern deployed more rapidly and more organized among the three folding pattern tested. The mechanical properties of the polyimide had no significant change after electron irradiation. As the preliminary research on the key technology of solar sail spacecraft, in this paper, the results of the study would provide important basis on large-scale solar sail membrane select and fold-deploying method design.

  20. Visualizing Macular Structures During Membrane Peeling Surgery With an Intraoperative Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Device.

    PubMed

    Leisser, Christoph; Hackl, Christoph; Hirnschall, Nino; Luft, Nikolaus; Döller, Birgit; Draschl, Petra; Rigal, Karl; Findl, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the quality of intraoperative visualization of the posterior hyaloid, epiretinal membrane (ERM), inner limiting membrane (ILM), and hyporeflective subfoveal zone with a commercially available, microscope-integrated spectral-domain OCT setup (mi-SD-OCT) (Rescan 700; Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Germany). Twenty patients prospectively scheduled for pars plana vitrectomy with membrane peeling due to an idiopathic ERM were included. Standard 23-gauge, three-port pars plana vitrectomy with membrane peeling and staining of the ERM with a trypan blue-based chromovitrectomy dye was performed in all cases. Intraoperative SD-OCT was performed before and after peeling and visualization of the posterior hyaloid, ERM, ILM, and presence of subfoveal hyporeflective zones were examined. OCT follow-ups were performed 2 days and 3 months after surgery. The study was approved by the local ethics committee of the city of Vienna. Successful intraoperative visualization of ERM by mi-SD-OCT was possible in all cases. The posterior hyaloid and ILM could not be seen in the mi-SD-OCT scans, whereas an intraoperative subfoveal hyporeflective zone presented in 35% of cases. In 12.5% an independent subfoveal hyporeflective zone presented postoperatively. Visual acuity improved in 93.8% of patients after surgery. mi-SD-OCT appears to be a valuable tool for intraoperative visualization of the ERM and offers immediate visualization of retinal anatomy during peeling. Therefore, it adds to the understanding of intraoperative traumatic changes due to the peeling procedure. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. North American neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) devices and team roles: 2008 survey results of Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) centers.

    PubMed

    Lawson, D Scott; Lawson, Andrea F; Walczak, Rich; McRobb, Craig; McDermott, Patty; Shearer, Ian R; Lodge, Andrew; Jaggers, James

    2008-09-01

    In early 2008, surveys of active extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) centers in North America were conducted by electronic mail regarding neonatal ECMO equipment and professional staff. Eighty of 103 (78%) North American ECMO centers listed in the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization directory as neonatal centers responded to the survey. Of the responding centers, 82.5% routinely used roller pumps for neonatal ECMO, and the remaining 17.5% used centrifugal pumps. Silicone membrane oxygenators were used by 67% of the respondents, whereas 19% used micro-porous hollow fiber oxygenators, and 14% used polymethylpentene hollow fiber oxygenators. Of the silicone membrane oxygenator users, 86% used the Medtronic Ecmotherm heat exchanger, 10% used the Gish HE-4 heat exchanger, and 4% used the Terumo Conducer device. Sixty-four percent of the responding centers used some form of in-line blood gas monitoring. Six percent of the centers used a bubble trap in the arterial line, and 5% used an arterial line filter. A bladder was used by 85% of the centers, and 4% of these used a mechanical bladder box for servo regulation; the remaining 96% used pressure servo regulation. An air bubble detector was used by 88% of the responding centers. A surface coating was used by 44% of the centers on all their neonatal ECMO patients. Thirty-one percent of the centers use an activated clotting time of 180-220 seconds. At 54% of the responding centers, perfusionists were involved with the ECMO program, registered nurses were involved at 70% of the centers, and respiratory therapists were involved at 46% of the centers. Compared with a 2002 survey, silicone membrane use is declining, and the use of centrifugal blood pumps and coated ECMO circuits is becoming more apparent. ECMO teams are still multidisciplinary, made up of combinations of registered nurses, respiratory therapists, and perfusionists.

  2. Effect of membranes on oxygen transfer rate and consumption within a newly developed three-compartment bioartificial liver device: Advanced experimental and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Hilal-Alnaqbi, Ali; Mourad, Abdel-Hamid I; Yousef, Basem F

    2014-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to predict oxygen transfer in the fiber-in-fiber (FIF) bioartificial liver device. The model parameters are taken from the constructed and tested FIF modules. We extended the Krogh cylinder model by including one more zone for oxygen transfer. Cellular oxygen uptake was based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The effect of varying a number of important model parameters is investigated, including (1) oxygen partial pressure at the inlet, (2) the hydraulic permeability of compartment B (cell region), (3) the hydraulic permeability of the inner membrane, and (4) the oxygen diffusivity of the outer membrane. The mathematical model is validated by comparing its output against the experimentally acquired values of an oxygen transfer rate and the hydrostatic pressure drop. Three governing simultaneous linear differential equations are derived to predict and validate the experimental measurements, e.g., the flow rate and the hydrostatic pressure drop. The model output simulated the experimental measurements to a high degree of accuracy. The model predictions show that the cells in the annulus can be oxygenated well even at high cell density or at a low level of gas phase PG if the value of the oxygen diffusion coefficient Dm is 16 × 10(-5) . The mathematical model also shows that the performance of the FIF improves by increasing the permeability of polypropylene membrane (inner fiber). Moreover, the model predicted that 60% of plasma has access to the cells in the annulus within the first 10% of the FIF bioreactor axial length for a specific polypropylene membrane permeability and can reach 95% within the first 30% of its axial length. © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. North American Neonatal Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) Devices and Team Roles: 2008 Survey Results of Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) Centers

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, D. Scott; Lawson, Andrea F.; Walczak, Rich; McRobb, Craig; McDermott, Patty; Shearer, Ian R.; Lodge, Andrew; Jaggers, James

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: In early 2008, surveys of active extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) centers in North America were conducted by electronic mail regarding neonatal ECMO equipment and professional staff. Eighty of 103 (78%) North American ECMO centers listed in the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization directory as neonatal centers responded to the survey. Of the responding centers, 82.5% routinely used roller pumps for neonatal ECMO, and the remaining 17.5% used centrifugal pumps. Silicone membrane oxygenators were used by 67% of the respondents, whereas 19% used micro-porous hollow fiber oxygenators, and 14% used polymethylpentene hollow fiber oxygenators. Of the silicone membrane oxygenator users, 86% used the Medtronic Ecmotherm heat exchanger, 10% used the Gish HE-4 heat exchanger, and 4% used the Terumo Conducer device. Sixty-four percent of the responding centers used some form of in-line blood gas monitoring. Six percent of the centers used a bubble trap in the arterial line, and 5% used an arterial line filter. A bladder was used by 85% of the centers, and 4% of these used a mechanical bladder box for servo regulation; the remaining 96% used pressure servo regulation. An air bubble detector was used by 88% of the responding centers. A surface coating was used by 44% of the centers on all their neonatal ECMO patients. Thirty-one percent of the centers use an activated clotting time of 180–220 seconds. At 54% of the responding centers, perfusionists were involved with the ECMO program, registered nurses were involved at 70% of the centers, and respiratory therapists were involved at 46% of the centers. Compared with a 2002 survey, silicone membrane use is declining, and the use of centrifugal blood pumps and coated ECMO circuits is becoming more apparent. ECMO teams are still multidisciplinary, made up of combinations of registered nurses, respiratory therapists, and perfusionists. PMID:18853828

  4. Separation and identification of peptides from gel-isolated membrane proteins using a microfabricated device for combined capillary electrophoresis/nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Kelly, J F; Chernushevich, I; Harrison, D J; Thibault, P

    2000-02-01

    The coupling of microfabricated devices to nanoelectrospray mass spectrometers using both a triple quadrupole and a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (QqTOF MS) is presented for the analysis of trace-level membrane proteins. Short disposable nanoelectrospray emitters were directly coupled to the chip device via a low dead volume connection. The analytical performance of this integrated device in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility was evaluated for standard peptide mixtures. A concentration detection limit ranging from 3.2 to 43.5 nM for different peptides was achieved in selected ion monitoring, thus representing a 10-fold improvement in sensitivity compared to that of microelectrospray using the same chip/mass spectrometer. Replicate injections indicated that reproducibility of migration time was typically less than 3.1% RSD whereas RSD values of 6-13% were observed on peak areas. Although complete resolution of individual components is not typically achieved for complex digests, the present chip capillary electrophoresis (chip-CE) device enabled proper sample cleanup and partial separation of multicomponent samples prior to mass spectral identification. Analyses of protein digests were typically achieved in less than 1.5 min with peak widths of 1.8-2.5 s (half-height definition) as indicated from individual reconstructed ion electropherograms. The application of this chip-CE/QqTOF MS system is further demonstrated for the identification of membrane proteins which form a subset of the Haemophilus influenzae proteome. Bands first separated by 1D-gel electrophoresis were excised and digested, and extracted tryptic peptides were loaded on the chip without any further sample cleanup or on-line adsorption preconcentration. Accurate molecular mass determination (< 5 ppm) in peptide-mapping experiments was obtained by introducing an internal standard via a postseparation channel. The analytical potential of this integrated device for the identification of

  5. Design of an inflatable and deployable space reflecting concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Benxin; Yang, Zhao; Mao, Bingjing; Zhang, Tianxiang; Feng, Yukun

    2008-03-01

    An inflatable and deployable reflecting concentrator has been designed based on the Advanced Technology of Inflatable and Deployable Space Structure to concentrate solar energy. Around the focal area, a conversion plate made of thermoelectric semiconductor is set to convert the solar energy gathered into electricity to drive various spacecrafts. The whole system will be made mainly of polyester membrane. In pursuit of steady performance, solidify-technology is applied to solidify the structure after it is deployed. The membrane structure boasts the following advantages: lightweight, high efficiency, easy deployment and low cost. Those are of great importance in resolving the contradiction of launch vehicle's limit capability and the growing size of space equipments. Its efficiency and manufacturability have been analyzed and proved. The result shows that it has great business value. Several plans of its application in the aerospace engineering are also presented in this paper.

  6. Payload deployment method and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Clifford J. (Inventor); Greenwood, John E. (Inventor); Holman, Earl V. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for deploying the payload of space shuttle craft or the like. The payload rotated about an axis outside of the payload but approximately longitudinally of the cargo bay of the shuttle craft. The payload may thus be rotated, through ninety degrees. In this case, that is in its rotated position, the payload may or may not have a small portion located within the cargo bay. Alternatively, the payload may be located completely outside of the bay. According to the apparatus two separable hinge-like devices connect at one longitudinal side or edge of the payload to respective ones of the payload trunnions at different longitudinally spaced locations along the length of the payload. Separation of the payload from the cargo bay is made unlatching a latch and by the use of a repulsion spring at the position of each hinge-like device. Two four-link mechanisms allow movement between payload and bay. Such accoommodative movement is required especially during launch when considerable vibration is encountered.

  7. Dedicated Deployable Aerobraking Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giersch, Louis R.; Knarr, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    A dedicated deployable aerobraking structure concept was developed that significantly increases the effective area of a spacecraft during aerobraking by up to a factor of 5 or more (depending on spacecraft size) without substantially increasing total spacecraft mass. Increasing the effective aerobraking area of a spacecraft (without significantly increasing spacecraft mass) results in a corresponding reduction in the time required for aerobraking. For example, if the effective area of a spacecraft is doubled, the time required for aerobraking is roughly reduced to half the previous value. The dedicated deployable aerobraking structure thus enables significantly shorter aerobraking phases, which results in reduced mission cost, risk, and allows science operations to begin earlier in the mission.

  8. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alff, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility and costs were determined for a 1 m to 30 m diameter ambient temperature, infrared to submillimeter orbiting astronomical telescope which is to be shuttle-deployed, free-flying, and have a 10 year orbital life. Baseline concepts, constraints on delivery and deployment, and the sunshield required are examined. Reflector concepts, the optical configuration, alignment and pointing, and materials are also discussed. Technology studies show that a 10 m to 30 m diameter system which is background and diffraction limited at 30 micron m is feasible within the stated time frame. A 10 m system is feasible with current mirror technology, while a 30 m system requires technology still in development.

  9. Deployment Pulmonary Health

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-11

    found that Gulf War era veterans who had deployed had a higher rate of hospitalization in the Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) system for diseases of...association between exposure to combustion products from burn pits and cancer, respiratory disease , circulatory disease , neurologic disease , or...communicable disease surveillance and prepares reports using the Disease Reporting System -internet, as well as analyses of health outcomes related to

  10. Phoenix Deploying its Wrist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This animated gif shows a series of images taken by Phoenix's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI) on Sol 3. It illustrates the actions that Phoenix's Robotic Arm took to deploy its wrist.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. Deployable Crew Quarters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo

    2008-01-01

    The deployable crew quarters (DCQ) have been designed for the International Space Station (ISS). Each DCQ would be a relatively inexpensive, deployable boxlike structure that is designed to fit in a rack bay. It is to be occupied by one crewmember to provide privacy and sleeping functions for the crew. A DCQ comprises mostly hard panels, made of a lightweight honeycomb or matrix/fiber material, attached to each other by cloth hinges. Both faces of each panel are covered with a layer of Nomex cloth and noise-suppression material to provide noise isolation from ISS. On Earth, the unit is folded flat and attached to a rigid pallet for transport to the ISS. On the ISS, crewmembers unfold the unit and install it in place, attaching it to ISS structural members by use of soft cords (which also help to isolate noise and vibration). A few hard pieces of equipment (principally, a ventilator and a smoke detector) are shipped separately and installed in the DCQ unit by use of a system of holes, slots, and quarter-turn fasteners. Full-scale tests showed that the time required to install a DCQ unit amounts to tens of minutes. The basic DCQ design could be adapted to terrestrial applications to satisfy requirements for rapid deployable emergency shelters that would be lightweight, portable, and quickly erected. The Temporary Early Sleep Station (TeSS) currently on-orbit is a spin-off of the DCQ.

  12. Treatment Deployment Evaluation Tool

    SciTech Connect

    M. A. Rynearson; M. M. Plum

    1999-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the final disposition of legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF). As a response, DOE's National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) has been given the responsibility for the disposition of DOE-owned SNF. Many treatment technologies have been identified to treat some forms of SNF so that the resulting treated product is acceptable by the disposition site. One of these promising treatment processes is the electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) currently in development; a second is an Acid Wash Decladding process. The NSNFP has been tasked with identifying possible strategies for the deployment of these treatment processes in the event that a treatment path is deemed necessary. To support the siting studies of these strategies, economic evaluations are being performed to identify the least-cost deployment path. This model (tool) was developed to consider the full scope of costs, technical feasibility, process material disposition, and schedule attributes over the life of each deployment alternative. Using standard personal computer (PC) software, the model was developed as a comprehensive technology economic assessment tool using a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis methodology. Model development was planned as a systematic, iterative process of identifying and bounding the required activities to dispose of SNF. To support the evaluation process, activities are decomposed into lower level, easier to estimate activities. Sensitivity studies can then be performed on these activities, defining cost issues and testing results against the originally stated problem.

  13. Treatment Deployment Evaluation Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Rynearson, Michael Ardel; Plum, Martin Michael

    1999-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the final disposition of legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF). As a response, DOE's National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) has been given the responsibility for the disposition of DOE -owned SNF. Many treatment technologies have been identified to treat some forms of SNF so that the resulting treated product is acceptable by the disposition site. One of these promising treatment processes is the electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) currently in development; a second is an Acid Wash Decladding process. The NSNFP has been tasked with identifying possible strategies for the deployment of these treatment processes in the event that the treatment path is deemed necessary. To support the siting studies of these strategies, economic evaluations are being performed to identify the least-cost deployment path. This model (tool) was developed to consider the full scope of costs, technical feasibility, process material disposition, and schedule attributes over the life of each deployment alternative. Using standard personal computer (PC) software, the model was developed as a comprehensive technology economic assessment tool using a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis methodology. Model development was planned as a systematic, iterative process of identifying and bounding the required activities to dispose of SNF. To support the evaluation process, activities are decomposed into lower level, easier to estimate activities. Sensitivity studies can then be performed on these activities, defining cost issues and testing results against the originally stated problem.

  14. Newly Deployed Sojourner Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This 8-image mosaic was acquired during the late afternoon (near 5pm LST, note the long shadows) on Sol 2 as part of the predeploy 'insurance panorama' and shows the newly deployed rover sitting on the Martian surface. This color image was generated from images acquired at 530,600, and 750 nm. The insurance panorama was designed as 'insurance' against camera failure upon deployment. Had the camera failed, the losslessly-compressed, multispectral insurance panorama would have been the main source of image data from the IMP.

    However, the camera deployment was successful, leaving the insurance panorama to be downlinked to Earth several weeks later. Ironically enough, the insurance panorama contains some of the best quality image data because of the lossless data compression and relatively dust-free state of the camera and associated lander/rover hardware on Sol 2.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal investigator.

  15. Newly Deployed Sojourner Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This 8-image mosaic was acquired during the late afternoon (near 5pm LST, note the long shadows) on Sol 2 as part of the predeploy 'insurance panorama' and shows the newly deployed rover sitting on the Martian surface. This color image was generated from images acquired at 530,600, and 750 nm. The insurance panorama was designed as 'insurance' against camera failure upon deployment. Had the camera failed, the losslessly-compressed, multispectral insurance panorama would have been the main source of image data from the IMP.

    However, the camera deployment was successful, leaving the insurance panorama to be downlinked to Earth several weeks later. Ironically enough, the insurance panorama contains some of the best quality image data because of the lossless data compression and relatively dust-free state of the camera and associated lander/rover hardware on Sol 2.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal investigator.

  16. Percutaneous implantation of a ventricular partitioning device for treatment of ischemic heart failure: initial experience of a center.

    PubMed

    Silva, Guida; Melica, Bruno; Pires de Morais, Gustavo; Sousa, Olga; Bettencourt, Nuno; Ribeiro, José; Simões, Lino; Gama, Vasco

    2012-12-01

    The Parachute is a novel left ventricular (LV) partitioning device that is deployed percutaneously in the left ventricle in patients with anteroapical regional wall motion abnormalities, dilated LV and systolic dysfunction after anterior myocardial infarction (MI). The implantable device is a partitioning membrane that isolates the dysfunctional region of the ventricle and decreases chamber volume. Data from the first-in-human clinical trial - the Percutaneous Ventricular Restoration in Chronic Heart Failure (PARACHUTE) trial- has shown that this new device is associated with significant and sustained LV volume reduction and improvement in LV hemodynamics and functional capacity in the 12 months after implantation, with a relatively low rate of clinical events, indicating that it may have a beneficial effect in the treatment of ischemic heart failure. We aim to describe our initial experience with implantation of the Parachute LV partitioning device and its short-term safety, defined as the successful delivery and deployment of the device.

  17. Deployment of a Curved Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giersch, Louis R.; Knarr, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Structures capable of deployment into complex, three-dimensional trusses have well known space technology applications such as the support of spacecraft payloads, communications antennas, radar reflectors, and solar concentrators. Such deployable trusses could also be useful in terrestrial applications such as the rapid establishment of structures in military and emergency service situations, in particular with regard to the deployment of enclosures for habitat or storage. To minimize the time required to deploy such an enclosure, a single arch-shaped truss is preferable to multiple straight trusses arranged vertically and horizontally. To further minimize the time required to deploy such an enclosure, a synchronous deployment with a single degree of freedom is also preferable. One method of synchronizing deployment of a truss is the use of a series of gears; this makes the deployment sequence predictable and testable, allows the truss to have a minimal stowage volume, and the deployed structure exhibits the excellent stiffness-to-mass and strength-to-mass ratios characteristic of a truss. A concept for using gears with varying ratios to deploy a truss into a curved shape has been developed and appears to be compatible with both space technology applications as well as potential use in terrestrial applications such as enclosure deployment. As is the case with other deployable trusses, this truss is formed using rigid elements (e.g., composite tubes) along the edges, one set of diagonal elements composed of either cables or folding/hinged rigid members, and the other set of diagonal elements formed by a continuous cable that is tightened by a motor or hand crank in order to deploy the truss. Gears of varying ratios are used to constrain the deployment to a single degree of freedom, making the deployment synchronous, predictable, and repeatable. The relative sizes of the gears and the relative dimensions of the diagonal elements determine the deployed geometry (e

  18. Hybrid Deployable Foam Antennas and Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivellini, Tommaso; Willis, Paul; Hodges, Richard; Spitz, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    Hybrid deployable radio antennas and reflectors of a proposed type would feature rigid narrower apertures plus wider adjoining apertures comprising reflective surfaces supported by open-cell polymeric foam structures (see figure). The open-cell foam structure of such an antenna would be compressed for compact stowage during transport. To initiate deployment of the antenna, the foam structure would simply be released from its stowage mechanical restraint. The elasticity of the foam would drive the expansion of the foam structure to its full size and shape. There are several alternatives for fabricating a reflective surface supported by a polymeric foam structure. One approach would be to coat the foam with a metal. Another approach would be to attach a metal film or a metal-coated polymeric membrane to the foam. Yet another approach would be to attach a metal mesh to the foam. The hybrid antenna design and deployment concept as proposed offers significant advantages over other concepts for deployable antennas: 1) In the unlikely event of failure to deploy, the rigid narrow portion of the antenna would still function, providing a minimum level of assured performance. In contrast, most other concepts for deploying a large antenna from compact stowage are of an "all or nothing" nature: the antenna is not useful at all until and unless it is fully deployed. 2) Stowage and deployment would not depend on complex mechanisms or actuators, nor would it involve the use of inflatable structures. Therefore, relative to antennas deployed by use of mechanisms, actuators, or inflation systems, this antenna could be lighter, cheaper, amenable to stowage in a smaller volume, and more reliable. An open-cell polymeric (e.g., polyurethane) foam offers several advantages for use as a compressible/expandable structural material to support a large antenna or reflector aperture. A few of these advantages are the following: 3) The open cellular structure is amenable to compression to a very

  19. National Missile Defense Contingency Deployment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-01

    Defense Organization PMCS IDEA PAPER TITLE: National Missile Defense, Contingency Deployment Planning PMCS CLASS: 95C AUTHOR: Clifford E. Reeves... NATIONAL MISSILE DEFENSE CONTINGENCY DEPLOYMENT INTRODUCTION The author feels it is vital to start strategic planning for the development of operational...PROFESSIONAL MILITARY COMPTROLLER SCHOOL IDEA PAPER TITLE NATIONAL MISSILE DEFENSE CONTINGENCY DEPLOYMENT AUTHOR CLIFFORD E. REEVES GS-15, OSD

  20. HST deployed after repairs

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-03-09

    STS109-E-5704 (9 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope, sporting new solar arrays and other important but less visible new hardware, begins its separation from the Space Shuttle Columbia. The STS-109 crew deployed the giant telescope at 4:04 a.m. CST (1004 GMT), March 9, 2002. Afterward, the seven crew members began to focus their attention to the trip home, scheduled for March 12. The STS-109 astronauts conducted five space walks to service and upgrade Hubble. This image was recorded with a digital still camera.

  1. HST deployed after repairs

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-03-09

    STS109-E-5703 (9 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope, sporting new solar arrays and other important but less visible new hardware, begins its separation from the Space Shuttle Columbia. The STS-109 crew deployed the giant telescope at 4:04 a.m. CST (1004 GMT), March 9, 2002. Afterward, the seven crew members began to focus their attention to the trip home, scheduled for March 12. The STS-109 astronauts conducted five space walks to service and upgrade Hubble. This image was recorded with a digital still camera.

  2. HST deployed after repairs

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-03-09

    STS109-E-5700 (9 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope, sporting new solar arrays and other important but less visible new hardware, begins its separation from the Space Shuttle Columbia. The STS-109 crew deployed the giant telescope at 4:04 a.m. CST (1004 GMT), March 9, 2002. Afterward, the seven crew members began to focus their attention to the trip home, scheduled for March 12. The STS-109 astronauts conducted five space walks to service and upgrade Hubble. This image was recorded with a digital still camera.

  3. Joint for deployable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craighead, N. D., II; Preliasco, R. J.; Hult, T. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A joint is described for connecting a pair of beams to pivot them between positions in alignment or beside one another, which is of light weight and which operates in a controlled manner. The joint includes a pair of fittings and at least one center link having opposite ends pivotally connected to opposite fittings and having axes that pass through centerplates of the fittings. A control link having opposite ends pivotally connected to the different fittings controls their relative orientations, and a toggle assemly holds the fittings in the deployed configuration wherein they are aligned. The fittings have stops that lie on one side of the centerplane opposite the toggle assembly.

  4. Assessment of the significance of direct and indirect pollution inputs to a major salmon-producing river using polyethylene membrane devices.

    PubMed

    Moles, Adam; Holland, Larry; Andersson, Ole

    2006-08-01

    Conventional passive sampling devices for monitoring pollution input often prove to be cost-prohibitive when assessing large spatial and temporal scales. The Kenai River, a major salmon-producing river in Alaska (USA), served as the perfect laboratory to test the utility of polyethylene membrane devices for assessing chronic nonpoint-source inputs to a large riverine watershed. Comparison of the relative levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at a large number of locations over time allowed us to assess the significance and potential source of these compounds in the river. Concentrations of PAH were greatest near urban areas and peaked during the late winter, when streams flows and dilution were low. Vessel activity and PAH levels peaked in July and were heaviest in the lower 16 km of the river, where fishing activity was concentrated. Nearly one-third of the vessels observed on the river were powered by two-stroke engines, which release a higher proportion of unburned fuel into the water than the cleaner burning four-stroke engines. The low concentrations of hydrocarbons upriver of the boat traffic suggest very little remote delivery of these contaminants to the watershed. Polyethylene strips proved to be an excellent, low-cost tool for determining the PAH patterns in a large watershed.

  5. Membrane protected conductive polymer as micro-SPE device for the determination of triazine herbicides in aquatic media.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Habib; Khalilian, Faezeh; Naderi, Mehrnoush; Babanezhad, Esmaeil

    2010-04-01

    A micro-SPE technique was developed by fabricating a rather small package including a polypropylene membrane shield containing the appropriate sorbent. The package was used for the extraction of some triazine herbicides from aqueous samples. Solvent desorption was subsequently performed in a microvial and an aliquot of extractant was injected into GC-MS. Various sorbents including aniline-ortho-phenylene diamine copolymer, newly synthesized, polypyrrole, multiwall carbon nanotube, C18 and charcoal were examined as extracting media. Among them, conductive polymers exhibited better performance. Influential parameters including extraction and desorption time, desorption solvent and the ionic strength were optimized. The developed method proved to be rather convenient and offers sufficient sensitivity and good reproducibility. The detection limits of the method under optimized conditions were in the range of 0.01-0.04 ng/mL. The RSDs at a concentration level of 0.1 ng/mL were obtained between 4.5 and 9.3% (n=5). The calibration curves of analytes showed linearity in the range of 0.05-10 ng/mL. The developed method was successfully applied to the extraction of selected triazines from real water samples. The whole procedure showed to be conveniently applicable and quite easy to manipulate.

  6. Economics of ALMR deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Hudson, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    The Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) has the potential to extend the economic life of the nuclear option and of reducing the number of high level waste repositories which will eventually be needed in an expanding nuclear economy. This paper reports on an analysis which models and evaluates the economics of the use of ALMRs as a component of this country`s future electricity generation mix. The ALMR concept has the ability to utilize as fuel the fissile material contained in previously irradiated nuclear fuel (i.e., spent fuel) or from surplus weapons grade material. While not a requirement for the successful deployment of ALMR power plant technology, the reprocessing of spent fuel from light water reactors (LWR) is necessary for any rapid introduction of ALMR power plants. In addition, the reprocessing of LWR spent fuel may reduce the number of high level waste repositories needed in the future by burning the long-lived actinides produced in the fission process. With this study, the relative economics of a number of potential scenarios related to these issues are evaluated. While not encompassing the full range of all possibilities, the cases reported here provide an indication of the potential costs, timings, and relative economic attractiveness of ALMR deployment.

  7. ALMR deployment economic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Hudson, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    This analysis seeks to model and evaluate the economics of the use of Advanced Liquid Metal Reactors (ALMR) as a component of this country`s future electricity generation mix. The ALMR concept has the ability to utilize as fuel the fissile material contained in previously irradiated nuclear fuel (i.e., spent fuel). While not a requirement for the successful deployment of ALMR power plant technology, the reprocessing of spent fuel from light water reactors (LWR) is necessary for any rapid introduction of ALMR power plants. In addition, the reprocessing of LWR spent fuel may reduce the number of high level waste repositories needed in the future by burning the long-lived actinides produced in the fission process. With this study, the relative economics of a number of potential scenarios related to these issues are evaluated. While not encompassing the full range of all possibilities, the cases reported here provide an indication of the potential costs, timings, and relative economic attractiveness of ALMR deployment.

  8. Deployment and Intelligent Nanosatellite Operations Colorado Final Technical Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-28

    for the deployable devices, a main solar array, the Foldable Integrated Thin-film Stiffened (FITS), and body-mount solar arrays. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16...and evaluating three deployment technologies. The first experiment evaluates the Foldable Integrated Thin-Film Stiffened Solar Array (FITS Solar...five mechanisms - the gravity gradient boom, the Foldable Integrated Thin-Film Stiffened Solar Array (FITS), the two antennas and the Composite

  9. Multiscale modeling of a Chemofilter device for filtering chemotherapy toxins from blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maani, Nazanin; Beyhaghi, Saman; Yee, Daryl; Nosonovsky, Micheal; Greer, Julia; Hetts, Steven; Rayz, Vitaliy

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: Chemotherapy drugs injected intra-arterially to treat cancer can cause systemic toxic effects. A catheter-based Chemofilter device, temporarily deployed in a vein during the procedure can filter excessive drug from the blood thus reducing chemotherapy side-effects. CFD modeling is used to design the membrane of the Chemofilter in order to optimize its hemodynamic performance. Methods: Multiscale approach is used to model blood flow through the Chemofilter. The toxins bind to the Chemofilter's membrane formed by a lattice of numerous micro cells deployed in a blood vessel of much larger size. A detailed model of the flow through a 2x2 microcell matrix with periodic boundary conditions is used to determine the permeability of the membrane. The results are used to simulate the flow through the whole device modeled as a uniform porous membrane. The finite-volume solver Fluent is used to obtain the numerical solution. Results: The micro cell matrix has a porosity of 0.92. The pressure drop across the resolved microcells was found to be 630 Pa, resulting in the permeability of 6.21 x10-11 m2 in the normal direction. These values were used to optimize the device geometry in order to increase the contact area of the membrane, while minimizing its obstruction to the flow. NIH NCI R01CA194533.

  10. A safe procedure for connecting a continuous renal replacement therapy device into an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit.

    PubMed

    Suga, Natsumi; Matsumura, Yosuke; Abe, Ryuzo; Hattori, Noriyuki; Nakada, Taka-Aki; Oda, Shigeto

    2017-03-24

    Patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) often require continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). The intra-circuit pressure of adult ECMO usually deviates from the physiological range. We investigated the use of CRRT connected to an ECMO circuit with physiological intra-circuit pressures (0-150 mmHg, defined as the "safety range") using an in vitro experiment involving a water-filled ECMO circuit. The intra-circuit pressure pre-pump, post-pump, and post-oxygenator were measured while varying the height of the pump or ECMO flow. The bypass conduit pressure and distance from the post-oxygenator port were measured to find the "safety point", where the bypass pressure remained within the safety range. Both drainage and return limbs of the CRRT machine were connected to the safety point and the inlet and outlet pressures of the hemofilter were recorded while varying the ECMO and CRRT flow. The pre-pump pressure only remained within the safety range for heights >75 cm (ECMO flow = 4 L/min) or ECMO flow <3.5 L min (height = 50 cm). The post-pump and post-oxygenator pressure was generally outside of the safety range. The bypass pressure decreased according to the distance from the post-oxygenator port and the safety point was found at 60 or 75 cm (in a 90-cm length conduit) regardless of ECMO flow. The hemofilter inlet and outlet pressures remained within the safety range for all conditions of ECMO and CRRT flow, findings validated in clinical cases. The bypass conduit within an ECMO circuit can be connected to a CRRT machine safely under physiological pressures in adult patients receiving ECMO.

  11. Emergency-escape device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    Relatively simple inexpensive device uses reeled steel cable, is controlled by automotive-type shock absorber, and allows safe descent from burning building. Device is cheap to manufacture and assemble and requires neither skill, special knowledge, or athletic ability to operate. It is reliable and fireproof and can be deployed instantly.

  12. Development of a membrane-less dynamic field gradient focusing device for the separation of low-molecular-weight molecules

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Jeffrey M.; Smith, Colin D.; Ivory, Cornelius F.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic field gradient focusing uses an electric field gradient generated by controlling the voltage profile of an electrode array to separate and concentrate charged analytes according to their individual electrophoretic mobilities. This study describes a new instrument in which the electrodes have been placed within the separation channel. The major challenge faced with this device is that when applied voltages to the electrodes are larger than the redox potential of water, electrolysis will occur, producing hydrogen ions (H+) plus oxygen gas on the anodes and hydroxide (OH−) plus hydrogen gas on the cathodes. The resulting gas bubbles and pH excursions can cause problems with system performance and reproducibility. An on-column, degassing system that can remove gas bubbles “on-the-fly” is described. In addition, the use of a high capacity, low-conductivity buffer to address the problem of the pH shift that occurs due to the production of H+ on the anodes is illustrated. Finally, the successful separation of three, low-molecular-weight dyes (amaranth, bromophenol blue and methyl red) is described. PMID:20191553

  13. Promotion of progressive mobility activities with ventricular assist and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation devices in a cardiothoracic intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Jennifer; Bortolotto, Shannon Johnson; Paulson, Martha; Huntley, Nicole; Sullivan, Breandan; Babu, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Progressive mobility (PM) is a clinical intervention that influences complications experienced throughout critical illness. Early PM is a relevant topic in critical care practice literature and was principle to introducing a PM care guideline in an acute cardiothoracic/cardiovascular intensive care unit. A noted challenge in the cardiothoracic/cardiovascular intensive care unit is caring for acute cardiac and pulmonary failure. Often, these patients require prolonged mechanical circulatory support via extracorporeal mechanical oxygenation or a ventricular assist device. This article describes safe and effective progressive mobilization for patients experiencing MCS in a case study format. This article also highlights how a multidisciplinary clinical team supports mobility practice in specific critical care roles. Post-intensive care syndrome is composed of various health implications that occur following critical illness. Recent data suggest improved care outcomes when critically ill patients are awake and participate in active physical rehabilitation as early as clinically possible. The case studies presented indicate that mobility, to the point of ambulation, is a feasible clinical expectation when patients present with substantial acute respiratory and cardiac failure and are managed with MCS. Development of a PM guideline uses a critical appraisal of practice evidence, highlights multidisciplinary collaboration, and increases progression to ambulation. Mobility for complex patients is attainable, as demonstrated in the postguideline outcomes. The PM guideline provides structure to primary caregivers and promotes safe practices. The PM guideline facilitates an advanced level of care, promotes safe practices, champions holistic recovery, and encourages active patient involvement, goals satisfying to both patients and staff.

  14. Development of a membrane-less dynamic field gradient focusing device for the separation of low-molecular-weight molecules.

    PubMed

    Burke, Jeffrey M; Smith, Colin D; Ivory, Cornelius F

    2010-03-01

    Dynamic field gradient focusing uses an electric field gradient generated by controlling the voltage profile of an electrode array to separate and concentrate charged analytes according to their individual electrophoretic mobilities. This study describes a new instrument in which the electrodes have been placed within the separation channel. The major challenge faced with this device is that when applied voltages to the electrodes are larger than the redox potential of water, electrolysis will occur, producing hydrogen ions (H+) plus oxygen gas on the anodes and hydroxide (OH(-)) plus hydrogen gas on the cathodes. The resulting gas bubbles and pH excursions can cause problems with system performance and reproducibility. An on-column, degassing system that can remove gas bubbles "on-the-fly" is described. In addition, the use of a high capacity, low-conductivity buffer to address the problem of the pH shift that occurs due to the production of H+ on the anodes is illustrated. Finally, the successful separation of three, low-molecular-weight dyes (amaranth, bromophenol blue and methyl red) is described.

  15. Deployment Effects of Marin Renewable Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Polagye; Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the second report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of tidal power plants deployed in Tacoma Narrows, Washington. The Narrows contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other tidal power sites and serves as a representative case study. Tidal power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize impacts, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informs the process of selecting representative tidal power devices. The selection criteria is that such devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development including Verdant Power, which has demonstrated an array of turbines in the East River of New York, Clean Current, which has demonstrated a device off Race Rocks, BC, and OpenHydro, which has demonstrated a device at the European Marine Energy Test Center and is on the verge of deploying a larger device in the Bay of Fundy. MCT demonstrated their device both at Devon (UK) and Strangford Narrows (Northern Ireland). Furthermore OpenHydro, CleanCurrent, and MCT are the three devices being installed at the Minas Passage (Canada). Environmental effects will largely scale with the size of tidal power development. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to

  16. Long Cable Deployments During Martian Touchdown: Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Michael W.; Sell, Steven W.

    2009-01-01

    The launch of NASA/JPL's next generation Mars rover is planned for the fall of 2011. The landing scheme chosen for this rover represents a step forward in unmanned payload delivery. The rover will be lowered from a rocket powered descent stage and then placed onto the surface while hanging from three bridles. During this touchdown event, the communication between the rover and descent stage is maintained by an electrical umbilical cable which is deployed in parallel with the structural bridles. During the development of the deployment device for the electrical umbilical, many obstacles were identified and overcome. Many of these challenges were due in large part to the helical nature of the packing geometry of the umbilical cable. And although none of these issues resulted in the failure of the design, they increased both development and assembly time. Many of the issues and some of the benefits of a helical deployment were not immediately apparent during the trade studies carried out during the deployment selection process. Tests were conducted upon completion of the device in order to characterize both the deployment and separation characteristics of the cable. Extraction loads were needed for inputs to touchdown models and separation dynamics were required to assess cable-rover recontact risk. Understanding the pros and cons surrounding the deployment of a helically packed cable would most certainly influence the outcome of future trade studies surrounding the selection of cable deployment options.

  17. Long Cable Deployments During Martian Touchdown: Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Michael W.; Sell, Steven W.

    2009-01-01

    The launch of NASA/JPL's next generation Mars rover is planned for the fall of 2011. The landing scheme chosen for this rover represents a step forward in unmanned payload delivery. The rover will be lowered from a rocket powered descent stage and then placed onto the surface while hanging from three bridles. During this touchdown event, the communication between the rover and descent stage is maintained by an electrical umbilical cable which is deployed in parallel with the structural bridles. During the development of the deployment device for the electrical umbilical, many obstacles were identified and overcome. Many of these challenges were due in large part to the helical nature of the packing geometry of the umbilical cable. And although none of these issues resulted in the failure of the design, they increased both development and assembly time. Many of the issues and some of the benefits of a helical deployment were not immediately apparent during the trade studies carried out during the deployment selection process. Tests were conducted upon completion of the device in order to characterize both the deployment and separation characteristics of the cable. Extraction loads were needed for inputs to touchdown models and separation dynamics were required to assess cable-rover recontact risk. Understanding the pros and cons surrounding the deployment of a helically packed cable would most certainly influence the outcome of future trade studies surrounding the selection of cable deployment options.

  18. Satellite deployment during STS-5

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1982-11-17

    S82-39793 (11 Nov. 1982) --- The Satellite Business Systems (SBS-3) spacecraft springs from its protective ?cradle? in the cargo bay of the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Columbia and head toward a series of maneuvers that will eventually place it in a geosynchronous orbit. This moment marks a milestone for the Space Transportation System (STS) program, as the placement of the communications satellites represents the first deployment of a commercial satellite from an orbiting space vehicle. Part of Columbia?s wings can be seen on both the port and starboard sides. Also both orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods are seen at center. The vertical stabilizer is obscured by the satellite. The closed protective cradle device shielding Telesat Canada?s ANIK C-3 spacecraft is seen between the other shield and the OMS pod. ANIK is to be launched on the mission?s second day. This photograph was exposed through the aft windows of the flight deck. Photo credit: NASA

  19. Mechanism Design and Testing of a Self-Deploying Structure Using Flexible Composite Tape Springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Footdale, Joseph N.; Murphey, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    The detailed mechanical design of a novel deployable support structure that positions and tensions a membrane optic for space imagining applications is presented. This is a complex three-dimensional deployment using freely deploying rollable composite tape spring booms that become load bearing structural members at full deployment. The deployment tests successfully demonstrate a new architecture based on rolled and freely deployed composite tape spring members that achieve simultaneous deployment without mechanical synchronization. Proper design of the flexible component mounting interface and constraint systems, which were critical in achieving a functioning unit, are described. These flexible composite components have much potential for advancing the state of the art in deployable structures, but have yet to be widely adopted. This paper demonstrates the feasibility and advantages of implementing flexible composite components, including the design details on how to integrate with required traditional mechanisms.

  20. Deployable Heat Pipe Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1975-01-01

    A 1.2- by 1.8-m variable conductance heat pipe radiator was designed, built, and tested. The radiator has deployment capability and can passively control Freon-21 fluid loop temperatures under varying loads and environments. It consists of six grooved variable conductance heat pipes attached to a 0.032-in. aluminum panel. Heat is supplied to the radiator via a fluid header or a single-fluid flexible heat pipe header. The heat pipe header is an artery design that has a flexible section capable of bending up to 90 degrees. Radiator loads as high as 850 watts were successfully tested. Over a load variation of 200 watts, the outlet temperature of the Freon-21 fluid varied by 7 F. An alternate control system was also investigated which used a variable conductance heat pipe header attached to the heat pipe radiator panel.

  1. Thermally stable deployable structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegg, Colleen M.

    1988-01-01

    A deployable structure which meets stringent thermal and strength requirements in a space environment was developed. A mast with a very low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was required to limit the movement from thermal distortion over the temperature range of -200 C to 80 C to .064 cm (.025 in). In addition, a high bending strength over the temperature range and weight less than 18.1 kg (40 lbs) was needed. To meet all of the requirements, a composite, near-zero CTE structure was developed. The measured average CTE over the temperature range for the mast was .70 x .000001/C (.38 x .000001/F). The design also has the advantage of being adjustable to attain other specific CTE if desired.

  2. Complex Deployed Responsive Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, Glenn; McLening, Marc; Caldwell, Nigel; Thompson, Rob

    A pizza restaurant must provide product, in the form of the food and drink, and service in the way this is delivered to the customer. Providing this has distinct operational challenges, but what if the restaurant also provides a home delivery service? The service becomes deployed as the customer is no-longer co-located with the production area. The business challenge is complicated as service needs to be delivered within a geographic region, to time or the pizza will be cold, and within a cost that is not ­prohibitive. It must also be responsive to short term demand; needing to balance the number of staff it has available to undertake deliveries against a forecast of demand.

  3. Deployable Pipe-Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawidzki, Machi

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a concept of deployable Pipe-Z (dPZ): a modular structural system which takes advantage of the robustness of rigid-panel mechanism and allows to create free-form links which are also reconfigurable and deployable. The concept presented can be applied for building habitats and infrastructures for human exploration of oceans and outer space. dPZ structures can adapt to changing requirements e.g. mission objectives, crew condition and technological developments. Furthermore, such lightweight and adaptable structural concept can assist in sustainable exploration development. After brief introduction, the concept of Pipe-Z (PZ) is presented. Next, the reconfigurability of PZ is explained and illustrated with continuous and collision-free transition from a PZ forming a Trefoil knot to a Figure-eight knot. The following sections introduce, explain and illustrate the folding mechanism of a single foldable Pipe-Z module (fPZM) and entire dPZ structure. The latter is illustrated with asynchronous (delayed) unfolding of a relatively complex Unknot. Several applications of PZ are suggested, namely for underwater and deep-space and surface habitats, for permanent, but in particular, temporary or emergency passages. As an example, a scenario of a failure of one of the modules of the International Space Station is presented where a rigid structure of 40 fPZMs bypasses the ;dead link;. A low-fidelity prototype of a 6-module octagonal dPZ is presented; several folding schemes including concentric toric rings are demonstrated. Practical issues of pressurization and packing are briefly discussed.

  4. Determination of uptake kinetics (sampling rates) by lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.; Orazio, C.E.; Lebo, J.A.; Clark, R.C.; Gibson, V.L.; Gala, W.R.; Echols, K.R.

    1999-01-01

    The use of lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) is becoming commonplace, but very little sampling rate data are available for the estimation of ambient contaminant concentrations from analyte levels in exposed SPMDs. We determined the aqueous sampling rates (R(s)s; expressed as effective volumes of water extracted daily) of the standard (commercially available design) 1-g triolein SPMD for 15 of the priority pollutant (PP) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at multiple temperatures and concentrations. Under the experimental conditions of this study, recovery- corrected R(s) values for PP PAHs ranged from ???1.0 to 8.0 L/d. These values would be expected to be influenced by significant changes (relative to this study) in water temperature, degree of biofouling, and current velocity- turbulence. Included in this paper is a discussion of the effects of temperature and octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)); the impacts of biofouling and hydrodynamics are reported separately. Overall, SPMDs responded proportionally to aqueous PAH concentrations; i.e., SPMD R(s) values and SPMD-water concentration factors were independent of aqueous concentrations. Temperature effects (10, 18, and 26 ??C) on Rs values appeared to be complex but were relatively small.The use of lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) is becoming commonplace, but very little sampling rate data are available for the estimation of ambient contaminant concentrations from analyte levels in exposed SPMDs. We determined the aqueous sampling rates (Rss; expressed as effective volumes of water extracted daily) of the standard (commercially available design) 1-g triolein SPMD for 15 of the priority pollutant (PP) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at multiple temperatures and concentrations. Under the experimental conditions of this study, recovery-corrected Rs values for PP PAHs ranged from ???1.0 to 8.0 L/d. These values would be expected to be influenced by

  5. Introduction to deployable recovery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.

    1985-08-01

    This report provides an introduction to deployable recovery systems for persons with little or no background in parachutes but who are knowledgeable in aerodynamics. A historical review of parachute development is given along with a description of the basic components of most deployable recovery systems. Descriptions are given of the function of each component and of problems that occur if a component fails to perform adequately. Models are presented for deployable recovery systems. Possible directions for future work are suggested in the summary.

  6. JEMRMS Small Satellite Deployment Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-04

    ISS033-E-009458 (4 Oct. 2012) --- Several tiny satellites are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 33 crew member on the International Space Station. The satellites were released outside the Kibo laboratory using a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer attached to the Japanese module’s robotic arm on Oct. 4, 2012. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide, flight engineer, set up the satellite deployment gear inside the lab and placed it in the Kibo airlock. The Japanese robotic arm then grappled the deployment system and its satellites from the airlock for deployment.

  7. JEMRMS Small Satellite Deployment Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-04

    ISS033-E-009334 (4 Oct. 2012) --- Several tiny satellites are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 33 crew member on the International Space Station. The satellites were released outside the Kibo laboratory using a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer attached to the Japanese module’s robotic arm on Oct. 4, 2012. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide, flight engineer, set up the satellite deployment gear inside the lab and placed it in the Kibo airlock. The Japanese robotic arm then grappled the deployment system and its satellites from the airlock for deployment.

  8. JEMRMS Small Satellite Deployment Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-04

    ISS033-E-009315 (4 Oct. 2012) --- Several tiny satellites are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 33 crew member on the International Space Station. The satellites were released outside the Kibo laboratory using a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer attached to the Japanese module’s robotic arm on Oct. 4, 2012. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide, flight engineer, set up the satellite deployment gear inside the lab and placed it in the Kibo airlock. The Japanese robotic arm then grappled the deployment system and its satellites from the airlock for deployment. A blue and white part of Earth provides the backdrop for the scene.

  9. Membrane with supported internal passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez-Martin, Anuncia (Inventor); Salinas, Carlos E. (Inventor); Cisar, Alan J. (Inventor); Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The invention provides an improved proton exchange membrane for use in electrochemical cells having internal passages parallel to the membrane surface comprising permanent tubes preferably placed at the ends of the fluid passages. The invention also provides an apparatus and process for making the membrane, membrane and electrode assemblies fabricated using the membrane, and the application of the membrane and electrode assemblies to a variety of devices, both electrochemical and otherwise. The passages in the membrane extend from one edge of the membrane to another and allow fluid flow through the membrane and give access directly to the membrane.

  10. A bionic approach to mathematical modeling the fold geometry of deployable reflector antennas on satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, C. M.; Liu, T. S.

    2014-10-01

    Inspired from biology, this study presents a method for designing the fold geometry of deployable reflectors. Since the space available inside rockets for transporting satellites with reflector antennas is typically cylindrical in shape, and its cross-sectional area is considerably smaller than the reflector antenna after deployment, the cross-sectional area of the folded reflector must be smaller than the available rocket interior space. Membrane reflectors in aerospace are a type of lightweight structure that can be packaged compactly. To design membrane reflectors from the perspective of deployment processes, bionic applications from morphological changes of plants are investigated. Creating biologically inspired reflectors, this paper deals with fold geometry of reflectors, which imitate flower buds. This study uses mathematical formulation to describe geometric profiles of flower buds. Based on the formulation, new designs for deployable membrane reflectors derived from bionics are proposed. Adjusting parameters in the formulation of these designs leads to decreases in reflector area before deployment.

  11. Deployable Engine Air Brake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    On approach, next-generation aircraft are likely to have airframe noise levels that are comparable to or in excess of engine noise. ATA Engineering, Inc. (ATA) is developing a novel quiet engine air brake (EAB), a device that generates "equivalent drag" within the engine through stream thrust reduction by creating a swirling outflow in the turbofan exhaust nozzle. Two Phase II projects were conducted to mature this technology: (1) a concept development program (CDP) and (2) a system development program (SDP).

  12. Subsurface Deployable Antenna Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-25

    States Patent No. 6,710,746, issued March 23, 2004, to Anderson et al., discloses an antenna having a reconfigurable length, and a method of...an antenna linear extension and retraction apparatus and method of use for a submersible device. The apparatus includes a body having a cavity... microwave communications while at cruising speed and depth. [0027] It is a still further object of the present invention to provide an antenna array

  13. Two Concepts for Deployable Trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renfro, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Two concepts that could be applied separately or together have been suggested to enhance the utility of deployable truss structures. The concepts were intended originally for application to a truss structure to be folded for compact stowage during transport and subsequently deployed in outer space. The concepts may also be applicable, with some limitations, to deployable truss structures designed to be used on Earth. The first concept involves a combination of features that would help to maximize reliability of a structure while minimizing its overall mass, the complexity of its deployment system, and the expenditure of energy for deployment. The deployment system would be integrated into the truss: some of the truss members would contain folding/unfolding-detent mechanisms similar to those in umbrellas; other truss members would contain shape-memory-alloy (SMA) coil actuators (see Figure 1). Upon exposure to sunlight, the SMA actuators would be heated above their transition temperature, causing them to extend to their deployment lengths. The extension of the actuators would cause the structure to unfold and, upon completion of unfolding, the umbrellalike mechanisms would lock the unfolded truss in the fully deployed configuration. The use of solar heating to drive deployment would eliminate the need to carry a deployment power source. The actuation scheme would offer high reliability in that the truss geometry would be such that deployment could be completed even if all actuators were not functioning. Of course, in designing for operation in normal Earth gravitation, it would be necessary to ensure that the SMA actuators could apply forces large enough to overcome the deploymentresisting forces attributable to the weights of the members. The second concept is that of an improved design for the joints in folding members. Before describing this design,

  14. Ultrasound assisted dialysis of semi-permeable membrane devices for the simultaneous analysis of a wide number of persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Julen; Navarro, Patricia; Arana, Gorka; de Diego, Alberto; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2013-09-30

    A new procedure based on ultrasound assisted dialysis (UAD) for the simultaneous and quantitative extraction of a wide number of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) or some other organochlorinated pesticides (OCPs) contained in semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) has been developed. This extraction technique combines the advantages of the organic solvent dialysis (OSD) and the speed of the ultrasound assisted extraction. The extraction was performed in an ultrasound bath for 32 min placing the SPMD in a glass flask covered with 80 mL of hexane. This set-up is able to extract simultaneously up to 8 samples. The proposed method entails good repeatabilities (RSD 2-13%) and recoveries (around 100% for almost every analyte). Limits of detection were at ng SPMD(-1) level and enough for the determination of the target analytes in a slightly polluted aquatic environment, as it was tested by successfully comparing the OSD to the proposed methodology. Therefore, the results obtained show that the UAD can be a good alternative for the extraction of POPs in SPMDs as it requires short extraction times and solvent volumes, and provides a cleaner extract for the subsequent clean-up step. Moreover, it fits better than the OSD to the general requirements of Green Chemistry.

  15. Nickel (II) Preconcentration and Speciation Analysis During Transport from Aqueous Solutions Using a Hollow-fiber Permeation Liquid Membrane (HFPLM) Device.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Flores, Ana Nelly; De San Miguel, Eduardo Rodríguez; Gyves, Josefina de; Jönsson, Jan Åke

    2011-08-18

    Nickel (II) preconcentration and speciation analysis using a hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) device was studied. A counterflow of protons coupled to complexation with formate provided the driving force of the process, while Kelex 100 was employed as carrier. The influence of variables related to module configuration (acceptor pH and carrier concentration) and to the sample properties (donor pH) on the preconcentration factor, E, was simultaneously studied and optimized using a 3 factor Doehlert matrix response surface methodology. The effect of metal concentration was studied as well. Preconcentration factors as high as 4240 were observed  depending on the values of the different variables. The effects of the presence of inorganic anions (NO2-, SO42-, Cl-, NO3-, CO32-, CN-) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the form of humic acids were additionally considered in order to carry out a speciation analysis study. Nickel preconcentration was observed to be independent of both effects, except when cyanide was present in the donor phase. A characterization of the transport regime was performed through the analysis of the dependence of E on the temperature. E increases with the increase in temperature according to the equation E(K) = -8617.3 + 30.5T with an activation energy of 56.7 kJ mol-1 suggesting a kinetic-controlled regime. Sample depletion ranged from 12 to 1.2% depending on the volume of the donor phase (100 to 1000 mL, respectively).

  16. Use of the semipermeable membrane device as an in situ sampler of waterborne bioavailable PCDD and PCDF residues at sub-parts-per-quadrillion concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lebo, Jon A.; Gale, Robert W.; Petty, Jimmie D.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Huckins, James N.; Meadows, John C.; Orazio, Carl E.; Echols, Kathy R.; Schroeder, Dennis J.; Inmon, Lloyd E.

    1995-01-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were used to passively sample aqueous polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in Bayou Meto, AR. The two sites were upstream and downstream from the confluence with a tributary that delivers PCDDs and PCDFs to the Bayou. Following dialysis, cleanup, and fractionation, four replicate 17-9 SPMD samples from each site were analyzed by GUMS, and four were evaluated by H411E bioassay. Traces of only OCDD and HpCDDs were detected in samples from the upstream site. The four samples from below the tributary contained averages of 1550 ± 80 pg of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, 1640 ± 80 pg of 2,3,7,8-TCDF, and lesser quantities of other congeners. The TCDD equivalents obtained by bioassay of replicate SPMD samples agreed well with results obtained by GC/MS. The quantities of 2,3,7,8- TCDD and 2,3,7,8-TCDF sequestered by SPMDs at the downstream site were used to estimate the aqueous concentrations for both compounds as 2 pg/L.

  17. PAH assessment in the main Brazilian offshore oil and gas production area using semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMD) and transplanted bivalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André Lourenço, Rafael; Francisco de Oliveira, Fábio; Haddad Nudi, Adriana; Rebello Wagener, Ângela de Luca; Guadalupe Meniconi, Maria de Fátima; Francioni, Eleine

    2015-06-01

    The Campos Basin is Brazil's main oil and gas production area. In 2013, more than 50 million cubic meters of produced water (PW) was discharged into these offshore waters. Despite the large volumes of PW that are discharged in the Campos Basin each day, the ecological concern of the chemicals in the PW are not completely understood. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are the most important contributors to the ecological hazards that are posed by discharged PW. This study aimed to evaluate the potential bioaccumulation of PAH using transplanted bivalves (Nodipecten nodosus) and semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMD). The study was conducted in two platforms that discharge PW (P19 and P40). Another platform that does not discharge PW (P25) was investigated for comparison with the obtained results. Time-integrated hydrocarbon concentrations using SPMD and transplanted bivalves were estimated from the seawater near the three platforms. The bioaccumulation of the PAH in the transplanted bivalves at platforms P19 and P40 were up to fivefold greater than the bioaccumulation of the PAH at platform P25. The lowest PAH concentrations were estimated for platform P25 (4.3-6.2 ng L-1), and the highest PAH concentrations were estimated for platform P19 (9.2-37.3 ng L-1). Both techniques were effective for determining the bioavailability of the PAH and for providing time-integrated hydrocarbon concentrations regarding oil and gas production activities.

  18. Determination of uptake kinetics (sampling rates) by lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water

    SciTech Connect

    Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.; Orazio, C.E.; Lebo, J.A.; Clark, R.C.; Gibson, V.L.; Gala, W.R.; Echols, K.R.

    1999-11-01

    The use of lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) is becoming commonplace, but very little sampling rate data are available for the estimation of ambient contaminant concentrations from analyze levels in exposed SPMDs. The authors determined the aqueous sampling rates (R{sub s}s; expressed as effective volumes of water extracted daily) of the standard (commercially available design) 1-g triolein SPMD for 15 of the priority pollutant (PP) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at multiple temperatures and concentrations. Under the experimental conditions of this study, recovery-corrected R{sub s} values for PP PAHs ranged from {approximately}1.0 to 8.0 L/d. These values would be expected to be influenced by significant changes (relative to this study) in water temperature, degree of biofouling, and current velocity-turbulence. Included in this paper is a discussion of the effects of temperature and octanol-water partition coefficient (K{sub ow}); the impacts of biofouling and hydrodynamics are reported separately. Overall, SPMDs responded proportionally to aqueous PAH concentrations; i.e., SPMD R{sub s} values and SPMD-water concentration factors were independent of aqueous concentrations. Temperature effects on R{sub s} values appeared to be complex but were relatively small.

  19. A device for the measurement of residual chemical shift anisotropy and residual dipolar coupling in soluble and membrane-associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yizhou

    2010-01-01

    Residual dipolar coupling (RDC) and residual chemical shift anisotropy (RCSA) report on orientational properties of a dipolar bond vector and a chemical shift anisotropy principal axis system, respectively. They can be highly complementary in the analysis of backbone structure and dynamics in proteins as RCSAs generally include a report on vectors out of a peptide plane while RDCs usually report on in-plane vectors. Both RDC and RCSA average to zero in isotropic solutions and require partial orientation in a magnetic field to become observable. While the alignment and measurement of RDC has become routine, that of RCSA is less common. This is partly due to difficulties in providing a suitable isotopic reference spectrum for the measurement of the small chemical shift offsets coming from RCSA. Here we introduce a device (modified NMR tube) specifically designed for accurate measurement of reference and aligned spectra for RCSA measurements, but with a capacity for RDC measurements as well. Applications to both soluble and membrane anchored proteins are illustrated. PMID:20506033

  20. Comparison of the uptake of dioxin-like compounds by caged channel catfish and semipermeable membrane devices in the Saginaw River, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gale, Robert W.; Huckins, James N.; Petty, Jimmie D.; Peterman, Paul H.; Williams, Lisa L.; Morse, Douglas; Schwartz, Ted R.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    1996-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of planar, halogenated hydrocarbons have been linked to reproductive problems in a variety of fish-eating birds and mammals in the Great Lakes and in particular Saginaw Bay. Currently, there are no accurate procedures to assess bioavailability of these contaminants. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans and mono- and non-ortho-chloro-substituted biphenyls in water at the femtogram to picogram per liter range were passively concentrated in semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs), and these data were compared to the bioconcentration in co-exposed (caged) channel catfish. Sediment-derived water concentration estimates, calculated from a steady-state partitioning model, did not correlate well to those derived from either fish or SPMDs. The use of SPMDs demonstrated the utility of in-situ passive sampling over inference of water concentrations from accumulation in biota or partitioning with sediment. Residues ac cumulated by SPMDs have been shown to be proportional to analyte water concentration, whereas this does not appear to be the case for fish tissues. The greater amounts of 3,3‘,4,4‘-tetrachlorobiphenyl and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran accumulated in SPMDs than in exposed channel catfish indicated those non-passive aspects of bioconcentration in organisms, such as biotransformation and elimination, introduced 50−500% error in the assumed degree of exposure.

  1. Reconstructing source polybrominated diphenyl ether congener patterns from semipermeable membrane devices in the Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada: comparison to commercial mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rayne, Sierra; Ikonomou, Michael G

    2002-11-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were placed in the Fraser River near Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, between August 6 and September 30, 1996. This location is near a large urban and industrial region (population 2,000,000) and is expected to be representative of other large, modern cities. After exposure to the ambient water column, SPMD samples were analyzed for a suite of 36 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners plus all homologue groups from mono- through hexa-brominated. Observed congener patterns differed significantly from that of the commercial penta- and octa-BDE mixtures. A reconstruction approach was developed based on an aquatic transport model and utilizing published octanol-water partition coefficients, calculated SPMD uptake rates, and predicted water concentrations by using the EcoFate multimedia mass balance aquatic simulation model for the 13 major PBDE congeners. In combination, composite technical mixtures were created by combining commercial penta-BDE mixtures (Bromkal 70-SDE and Great Lakes Chemicals DE-71) with commercial octa-BDE mixtures (Bromkal 79-8DE and Great Lakes Chemicals DE-79) in their relative 2000 North American production volumes. The reconstructed SPMD patterns more closely approximated the composite technical mixtures and suggest that PBDEs in such an industrial region arise primarily from penta- and octa-BDE source mixtures.

  2. Deploying the Mental Eye

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Three observers performed a task designed to quantify their “pictorial relief” in visual awareness for a photograph of a piece of sculpture. In separate sessions, they were instructed to assume one of two “mental viewpoints.” The main objective was to investigate whether human observers have such command. All three observers could redirect their “mental view direction” by up to 20°. These observers experience “paradoxical monocular” stereopsis, whereas a sizable fraction of the population does not. Moreover, they had some experience in assuming various “viewing modes.” Whereas one cannot generalize to the population at large, these findings at least prove that it is possible to direct the mental viewpoint actively. This is of importance to the visual arts. For instance, academic drawings require one to be simultaneously aware of a “viewing” (for the drawing) and an “illumination direction” (for the shading). Being able to mentally deploy various vantage points is a crucial step from the “visual field” to the “visual space.” PMID:27648221

  3. Starshade Deployed at JPL

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-09

    is image shows a deployed half-scale starshade with four petals at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California in 2014. The full-scale of this starshade (not shown) will measure at 111 feet (34 meters). The flower-like petals of the starshade are designed to diffract bright starlight away from telescopes seeking the dim light of exoplanets. The starshade was re-designed from earlier models to allow these petals to furl, or wrap around the spacecraft, for launch into space. Each petal is covered in a high-performance plastic film that resembles gold foil. On a starshade ready for launch, the thermal gold foil will only cover the side of the petals facing away from the telescope, with black on the other, so as not to reflect other light sources such as the Earth into its lens. The starshade is light enough for space and cannot support its own weight on Earth. Is it shown offloaded with counterweights, much like an elevator. Starlight-blocking technologies such as the starshade are being developed to help image exoplanets, with a focus on Earth-sized, habitable worlds. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20909

  4. With drag chute deployed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With drag chute deployed, the Space Shuttle Columbia hurtles down Runway 33 at KSC''';s Shuttle Landing Facility to conclude the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL- 1) mission. With main gear touchdown at 2:33:11 p.m. EDT, April 8, the STS-83 mission duration was 3 days, 23 hours, 12 minutes. The planned 16-day mission was cut short by a faulty fuel cell. This is only the third time in Shuttle program history that an orbiter was brought home early due to a mechanical problem. This was also the 36th KSC landing since the program began in 1981. Mission Commander James D. Halsell, Jr. flew Columbia to a perfect landing with help from Pilot Susan L. Still. Other crew members are Payload Commander Janice E. Voss; Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. In spite of the abbreviated flight, the crew was able to perform MSL-1 experiments. The Spacelab-module-based experiments were used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station and to conduct combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing investigations.

  5. Phoenix Spacecraft Heat Shield Deployment Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-05-16

    In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers monitor the Phoenix spacecraft during a heat shield deployment test, with a firing of ordnance associated with the separation device. Phoenix will land in icy soils near the north polar permanent ice cap of Mars and explore the history of the water in these soils and any associated rocks, while monitoring polar climate. Landing is planned in May 2008 on arctic ground where a mission currently in orbit, Mars Odyssey, has detected high concentrations of ice just beneath the top layer of soil. Launch of Phoenix aboard a Delta II rocket is targeted for Aug. 3 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

  6. Phoenix Spacecraft Heat Shield Deployment Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-05-16

    In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a worker monitors the Phoenix spacecraft during a heat shield deployment test, with a firing of ordnance associated with the separation device. Phoenix will land in icy soils near the north polar permanent ice cap of Mars and explore the history of the water in these soils and any associated rocks, while monitoring polar climate. Landing is planned in May 2008 on arctic ground where a mission currently in orbit, Mars Odyssey, has detected high concentrations of ice just beneath the top layer of soil. Launch of Phoenix aboard a Delta II rocket is targeted for Aug. 3 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

  7. Rapidly Deployed Modular Telemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnavas, Kosta A. (Inventor); Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is a telemetry system, and more specifically is a rapidly deployed modular telemetry apparatus which utilizes of SDR technology and the FPGA programming capability to reduce the number of hardware components and programming required to deploy a telemetry system.

  8. Applications of Dynamic Deployment of Services in Industrial Automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candido, Gonçalo; Barata, José; Jammes, François; Colombo, Armando W.

    Service-oriented Architecture (SOA) is becoming a de facto paradigm for business and enterprise integration. SOA is expanding into several domains of application envisioning a unified solution suitable across all different layers of an enterprise infrastructure. The application of SOA based on open web standards can significantly enhance the interoperability and openness of those devices. By embedding a dynamical deployment service even into small field de- vices, it would be either possible to allow machine builders to place built- in services and still allow the integrator to deploy on-the-run the services that best fit his current application. This approach allows the developer to keep his own preferred development language, but still deliver a SOA- compliant application. A dynamic deployment service is envisaged as a fundamental framework to support more complex applications, reducing deployment delays, while increasing overall system agility. As use-case scenario, a dynamic deployment service was implemented over DPWS and WS-Management specifications allowing designing and programming an automation application using IEC61131 languages, and deploying these components as web services into devices.

  9. Tether deployment monitoring system, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An operational Tether Deployment Monitoring System (TEDEMS) was constructed that would show system functionality in a terrestrial environment. The principle function of the TEDEMS system is the launching and attachment of reflective targets onto the tether during its deployment. These targets would be tracked with a radar antenna that was pointed towards the targets by a positioning system. A spring powered launcher for the targets was designed and fabricated. An instrumentation platform and launcher were also developed. These modules are relatively heavy and will influence tether deployment scenarios, unless they are released with a velocity and trajectory closely matching that of the tether. Owing to the tracking range limitations encountered during field trails of the Radar system, final TEDEMS system integration was not completed. The major module not finished was the system control computer. The lack of this device prevented any subsystem testing or field trials to be conducted. Other items only partially complete were the instrumentation platform launcher and modules and the radar target launcher. The work completed and the tests performed suggest that the proposed system continues to be a feasible approach to tether monitoring, although additional effort is still necessary to increase the range at which modules can be detected. The equipment completed and tested, to the extent stated, is available to NASA for use on any future program that requires tether tracking capability.

  10. Overview of Deployed EDS Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H E; Crawford, C

    2009-09-24

    The term explosive detection system (EDS) is used by the TSA to describe equipment that is certified to detect explosives in checked bags. The EDS, as certified, by the TSL must consist of device for interrogating a bag and an automated detection algorithm (ATD) for evaluating the results of the interrogation. We only consider CT as the interrogation device in this report. A schematic drawing of a CT-based EDS is shown in Figure 2. The output of the ATD is the binary decision of alarm or non-alarm. Alarms may true- or false-positives. Non-alarms may be true- or false-negatives. False positives are also denoted false alarms. The true detection means that the ATD reports an alarm when a threat is present in the scanned bag. The probability of detecting a threat given that a threat is present is denoted the probability of detection (PD). The probability of false alarm (PFA) is the case when an alarm is reported when a threat is not present in a bag. Certification in this context means passing tests for PD and PFA at the TSL. The results of the EDS include CT cross-sectional images of the bag and specifics about the alarmed objects generated by ATD. These results are presented on a display so that a person may override the decision of ATD and declare the alarm to be a non-alarm. This process is denoted clearing. Bags that are not cleared by the person are sent to a secondary inspection process. Here the bags may be opened or assessed with explosive trace detection (ETD) in order to clear the bags. Bags that are not cleared at this point are evaluated by an ordinance disposal team. The CT scanner along with ATD is denoted Level 1 screening. The process of clearing on a display is denoted Level 2 screening. Secondary inspection is denoted Level 3 screening. Vendors of the deployed EDSs supply the TSA with equipment for all three levels. Therefore, the term EDS may include the equipment provided for Levels 1, 2 and 3. A schematic diagram of an EDS and the levels of

  11. An Electrochromic Bipolar Membrane Diode.

    PubMed

    Malti, Abdellah; Gabrielsson, Erik O; Crispin, Xavier; Berggren, Magnus

    2015-07-08

    Conducting polymers with bipolar membranes (a complementary stack of selective membranes) may be used to rectify current. Integrating a bipolar membrane into a polymer electrochromic display obviates the need for an addressing backplane while increasing the device's bistability. Such devices can be made from solution-processable materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Deployment Mechanism for the Space Technology 5 Micro Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossoni, Peter; Cooperrider, Caner; Durback, Gerard

    2004-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST5) is a technology mission that will send three spin-stabilized, 25-kg satellites into a highly elliptical Earth orbit. Each of these satellites must be deployed separately from the same launch vehicle with a spin rate of 3.4 rad/s (32.4 rpm). Because of the satellite's small size and the requirement to achieve its mission spin rate on deploy, typical spin table, pyrotechnic deployment devices or spin up thrusters could not be used. Instead, this new mechanism design employs a 'Frisbee' spin up strategy with a shape memory alloy actuated Pinpuller to deploy each satellite. The mechanism has undergone several design and test iterations and has been successfully qualified for flight.

  13. Deployment Mechanism for the Space Technology 5 Micro Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossoni, Peter; Cooperrider, Caner; Durback, Gerard

    2004-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST5) is a technology mission that will send three spin-stabilized, 25-kg satellites into a highly elliptical Earth orbit. Each of these satellites must be deployed separately from the same launch vehicle with a spin rate of 3.4 rads (32.4 rpm). Because of the satellite's small size and the requirement to achieve its mission spin rate on deploy, typical spin table, pyrotechnic deployment devices or spin up thrusters could not be used. Instead, this new mechanism design employs a "Frisbee" spin up strategy with a shape memory alloy actuated Pinpuller to deploy each satellite. The mechanism has undergone several design and test iterations and has been successfully qualified for flight.

  14. Metamaterial membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo-Flórez, Juan Manuel; Maldovan, Martin

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a new class of metamaterial device to achieve separation of compounds by using coordinate transformations and metamaterial theory. By rationally designing the spatial anisotropy for mass diffusion, we simultaneously concentrate different compounds in different spatial locations, leading to separation of mixtures across a metamaterial membrane. The separation of mixtures into their constituent compounds is critically important in biophysics, biomedical, and chemical applications. We present a practical case where a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen diffusing through a polymeric planar matrix is separated. This work opens doors to new paradigms in membrane separations via coordinate transformations and metamaterials by introducing novel properties and unconventional mass diffusion phenomena.

  15. Guidelines for the use of the semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) and the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) in environmental monitoring studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alvarez, David A.

    2010-01-01

    the semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) and the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS). The tips given in this document focus on these two samplers but are applicable to most types of passive sampling devices. The information in this guide is heavily weighted towards the sampling of water; however, information specific to the use of SPMDs for air sampling will also be covered.

  16. Guidelines for the use of the semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) and the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) in environmental monitoring studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alvarez, David A.

    2010-01-01

    the semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) and the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS). The tips given in this document focus on these two samplers but are applicable to most types of passive sampling devices. The information in this guide is heavily weighted towards the sampling of water; however, information specific to the use of SPMDs for air sampling will also be covered.

  17. Use of depuration compounds in passive air samplers: results from active sampling-supported field deployment, potential uses, and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Moeckel, Claudia; Harner, Tom; Nizzetto, Luca; Strandberg, Bo; Lindroth, Anders; Jones, Kevin C

    2009-05-01

    Depuration compounds (DCs) are added to passive air samplers (PAS) prior to deployment to account for the wind-dependency of the sampling rate for gas-phase compounds. This correction is particularly useful for providing comparable data for samplers that are deployed in different environments and subject to different meteorological conditions such as wind speeds. Two types of PAS--the polyurethane foam (PUF) disk sampler and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs)--were deployed at eight heights on a 100 m tower to test whether the DC approach could yield air concentrations profiles for PCBs and organochlorine pesticides and account for the wind speed gradient with height. Average wind speeds ranged from 0.3 to 4.5 m s(-1) over the 40 day deployment, increasing with height Two low volume active air samples (AAS), one collected at 25 m and one at 73 m over the 40 day deployment showed no significant concentration differences for target compounds. As expected, the target compounds taken up by PAS reflected the wind profile with height This wind-dependency of the PAS was also reflected in the results of the DCs. A correction based on the DC approach successfully accounted for the effect of wind on PAS sampling rates, yielding a profile consistent with the AAS. Interestingly, in terms of absolute air concentrations, there were differences between the AAS and PAS-derived values for some target compounds. These were attributed to different sampling characteristics of the two approaches that may have resulted in slightly different air masses being sampled. Based on the results of this study, guidelines are presented for the use of DCs and for the calibration of PAS using AAS.

  18. Formal evaluation of the ADVANCE targeted deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Saricks, C.L.; Belella, P.A.; Koppelman, F.S.; Schofer, J.L.; Sen, A.K.

    1996-04-01

    The Advanced Driver and Vehicle Advisory Navigation Concept (ADVANCE) advanced traveler information system (ATIS) demonstration project in northeastern Illinois was re-scoped in late 1994 from its originally-planned deployment of 3,000--5,000 in-vehicle navigation units to a so-called ``targeted`` deployment in which up to 75 vehicles were equipped with devices enabling them to receive real-time traffic information. These devices included (1) global positioning system (GPS) transmitters/receivers that enabled the vehicles while in the ADVANCE study area to serve as dynamic traffic probes as well as recipients of location data; and (2) navigation units that employed a comprehensive map data base and average (static) link travel times by time of day, stored on CD-ROM, which together computed efficient (least duration) routes between any origin and destination in the northwest portion of the Chicago metropolitan area. Experiments were designed to dispatch these equipped vehicles along links at headways or frequencies comparable to what would have been observed had full deployment actually occurred. Thus, within the limitations of this controlled environment, valuative experiments were conducted to assess the quality of several of the key sub-systems of ADVANCE in the context of structured performance hypotheses. Focused on-road tests began on June 1 and continued through December 14, 1995, followed by a period of data evaluation, documentation of results, and development of conclusions about the findings and usefulness of the project. This paper describes the tests, discusses development of the overall evaluation plan and the evaluation management concept which guided them, and reports on issuses and results of data analysis known at time of writing.

  19. New concepts in deployable beam structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    The design of deployable structures involves a complicated tradeoff of packaging efficiency, the overall mechanism associated with deploying and latching beam joints, and the requirements and complexity of the beam deployer/repacker. Three longeron deployable beams, controllable geometry beams, and hybrid deployable/erectable beam concepts are evaluated.

  20. Nickel (II) Preconcentration and Speciation Analysis During Transport from Aqueous Solutions Using a Hollow-fiber Permeation Liquid Membrane (HFPLM) Device

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Flores, Ana Nelly; de San Miguel, Eduardo Rodríguez; de Gyves, Josefina; Jönsson, Jan Åke

    2011-01-01

    Nickel (II) preconcentration and speciation analysis using a hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) device was studied. A counterflow of protons coupled to complexation with formate provided the driving force of the process, while Kelex 100 was employed as carrier. The influence of variables related to module configuration (acceptor pH and carrier concentration) and to the sample properties (donor pH) on the preconcentration factor, E, was simultaneously studied and optimized using a 3 factor Doehlert matrix response surface methodology. The effect of metal concentration was studied as well. Preconcentration factors as high as 4240 were observed depending on the values of the different variables. The effects of the presence of inorganic anions (NO2−, SO42−, Cl−, NO3−, CO32−, CN−) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the form of humic acids were additionally considered in order to carry out a speciation analysis study. Nickel preconcentration was observed to be independent of both effects, except when cyanide was present in the donor phase. A characterization of the transport regime was performed through the analysis of the dependence of E on the temperature. E increases with the increase in temperature according to the equation E(K) = −8617.3 + 30.5T with an activation energy of 56.7 kJ mol−1 suggesting a kinetic-controlled regime. Sample depletion ranged from 12 to 1.2% depending on the volume of the donor phase (100 to 1000 mL, respectively). PMID:24957733

  1. Type IV collagen degradation in the myocardial basement membrane after unloading of the failing heart by a left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Bruggink, Annette H; van Oosterhout, Matthijs F M; de Jonge, Nicolaas; Cleutjens, Jack P M; van Wichen, Dick F; van Kuik, Joyce; Tilanus, Marcel G J; Gmelig-Meyling, Frits H J; van den Tweel, Jan G; de Weger, Roel A

    2007-11-01

    After left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support in patients with end-stage cardiomyopathy, cardiomyocytes decrease in size. We hypothesized that during this process, known as reverse remodeling, the basement membrane (BM), which is closely connected to, and forms the interface between the cardiomyocytes and the extracellular matrix, will be severely affected. Therefore, the changes in the myocardial BM in patients with end-stage heart failure before and after LVAD support were studied. The role of MMP-2 in this process was also investigated. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the BM thickness decreased post-LVAD compared to pre-LVAD. Immunohistochemistry indicated a reduced immunoreactivity for type IV collagen in the BM after LVAD support. Quantitative PCR showed a similar mRNA expression for type IV collagen pre- and post-LVAD. MMP-2 mRNA almost doubled post-LVAD (P<0.01). In addition, active MMP-2 protein as identified by gelatin zymography and confirmed by Western blot analysis was detected after LVAD support and in controls, but not before LVAD support. Active MMP was localized in the BM of the cardiomyocyte, as detected by type IV collagen in situ zymography. Furthermore, in situ hybridization/immunohistochemical double staining showed that MMP-2 mRNA was expressed in cardiomyocytes, macrophages, T-cells and endothelial cells. Taken together, these findings show reduced type IV collagen content in the BM of cardiomyocytes after LVAD support. This reduction is at least in part the result of increased MMP-2 activity and not due to reduced synthesis of type IV collagen.

  2. Application of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for measurement of polychlorinated biphenyls from hydrophobic solutions: Extracts of fish and dialysates of semipermeable membrane devices: Chapter 26

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zajicek, James L.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Huckins, James N.; Petty, Jimmie D.; Potts, Michael E.; Nardone, David A.

    1996-01-01

    Determination of PCBs in biological tissue extracts by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) can be problematic, since the hydrophobic solvents used for their extraction and isolation from interfering biochemicals have limited compatibility with the polar solvents (e.g. methanol/water) and the immunochemical reagents used in ELISA. Our studies of these solvent effects indicate that significant errors can occur when microliter volumes of PCB containing extracts, in hydrophobic solvents, are diluted directly into methanol/water diluents. Errors include low recovery and excess variability among sub-samples taken from the same sample dilution. These errors are associated with inhomogeneity of the dilution, which is readily visualized by the use of a hydrophobic dye, Solvent Blue 35. Solvent Blue 35 is also used to visualize the evaporative removal of hydrophobic solvent and the dissolution of the resulting PCB/dye residue by pure methanol and 50% (v/v) methanol/water, typical ELISA diluents. Evaporative removal of isooctane by an ambient temperature nitrogen purge with subsequent dissolution in 100% methanol gives near quantitative recovery of model PCB congeners. We also compare concentrations of total PCBs from ELISA (ePCB) to their corresponding concentrations determined from capillary gas chromatography (GC) in selected fish sample extracts and dialysates of semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) passive samplers using an optimized solvent exchange procedure. Based on Aroclor 1254 calibrations, ePCBs (ng/mL) determined in fish extracts are positively correlated with total PCB concentrations (ng/mL) determined by GC: ePCB = 1.16 * total-cPCB - 5.92. Measured ePCBs (ng/3 SPMDs) were also positively correlated (r2 = 0.999) with PCB totals (ng/3 SPMDs) measured by GC for dialysates of SPMDs: ePCB = 1.52 * total PCB - 212. Therefore, this ELISA system for PCBs can be a rapid alternative to traditional GC analyses for determination of PCBs in extracts of biota or in

  3. SMAP Launch and Deployment Sequence

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This video combines file footage of a Delta II rocket and computer animation to depict the launch and deployment of NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive satellite. SMAP is scheduled to launch on Nov...

  4. High acceleration cable deployment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canning, T. N.; Barns, C. E.; Murphy, J. P.; Gin, B.; King, R. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A deployment system that will safely pay one cable from a ballistic forebody when the forebody is separated from an afterbody (to which the cable is secured and when the separation is marked by high acceleration and velocity) is described.

  5. High acceleration cable deployment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canning, T. N.; Barns, C. E.; Murphy, J. P.; Gin, B.; King, R. W.

    1981-06-01

    A deployment system that will safely pay one cable from a ballistic forebody when the forebody is separated from an afterbody (to which the cable is secured and when the separation is marked by high acceleration and velocity) is described.

  6. Deployable antenna phase A study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, J.; Bernstein, J.; Fischer, G.; Jacobson, G.; Kadar, I.; Marshall, R.; Pflugel, G.; Valentine, J.

    1979-01-01

    Applications for large deployable antennas were re-examined, flight demonstration objectives were defined, the flight article (antenna) was preliminarily designed, and the flight program and ground development program, including the support equipment, were defined for a proposed space transportation system flight experiment to demonstrate a large (50 to 200 meter) deployable antenna system. Tasks described include: (1) performance requirements analysis; (2) system design and definition; (3) orbital operations analysis; and (4) programmatic analysis.

  7. Deployable Wastewater Treatment Technology Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    AFRL/MLQD is expanding the Deployable Waste Disposal System to include bare base wastewater treatment. The goal of AFRL/MLQD is for the deployable... wastewater treatment system to be integrated into a waste treatment system that will treat both solid and aqueous waste. The US Army (TARDEC) and the... Air Force (AAC/WMO) have been involved in preliminary studies that provide extensive useful background information for this project. These studies show

  8. Simulation of Aircraft Deployment Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    Dassault Aviation Military Customer Support Division 78, Quai Marcel Dassault Cedex 300 92552 St Cloud Cedex France Tel.: 33 147 1163 23 Fax.: 33 147...Deployment Support" (SADS) was developed by the Military Customer Support Division of Dassault Aviation to perform simulations for logistics deployment and...and support Chain Management for the management of the logistics resources (replenishment of consumables and repair of parts, inventory management

  9. MODEP Modified DEPLOY Program. Volume II - Appendixes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    requirements for PBV’s (post boost vehicles) carrying a number of objects which are deployed to various target geometries. Since MODEP lacks some of the...capabilities of the DEPLOY program, such as a sizing option, an active deployment option, and a deployed objects pattern analysis option, MODEP is...intended to supplement rather than replace the DEPLOY program. The capabilities not found in the DEPLOY program but contained in MODEP are the

  10. MODEP Modified DEPLOY Program Volume I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    requirements for PBV’s (post boost vehicles) carrying a number of objects which are deployed to various target geometries. Since MODEP lacks some of the...capabilities of the DEPLOY program, such as a sizing option, an active deployment option, and a deployed objects pattern analysis option, MODEP is...intended to supplement rather than replace the DEPLOY program. The capabilities not found in the DEPLOY program but contained in MODEP are the

  11. Miniature field deployable terahertz source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayes, Mark G.

    2006-05-01

    Developments in terahertz sources include compacted electron beam systems, optical mixing techniques, and multiplication of microwave frequencies. Although significant advances in THz science have been achieved, efforts continue to obtain source technologies that are more mobile and suitable for field deployment. Strategies in source development have approached generation from either end of the THz spectrum, from up-conversion of high-frequency microwave to down-conversion of optical frequencies. In this paper, we present the design of a THz source which employs an up-conversion method in an assembly that integrates power supply, electronics, and radiative component into a man-portable unit for situations in which a lab system is not feasible. This unit will ultimately evolve into a ruggedized package suitable for use in extreme conditions, e.g. temporary security check points or emergency response teams, in conditions where THz diagnostics are needed with minimal planning or logistical support. In order to meet design goals of reduced size and complexity, the inner workings of the unit ideally would be condensed into a monolithic active element, with ancillary systems, e.g. user interface and power, coupled to the element. To attain these goals, the fundamental component of our design is a THz source and lens array that may be fabricated with either printed circuit board or wafer substrate. To reduce the volume occupied by the source array, the design employs a metamaterial composed of a periodic lattice of resonant elements. Each resonant element is an LC oscillator, or tank circuit, with inductance, capacitance, and center frequency determined by dimensioning and material parameters. The source array and supporting electronics are designed so that the radiative elements are driven in-phase to yield THz radiation with a high degree of partial coherence. Simulation indicates that the spectral width of operation may be controlled by detuning of critical dimensions

  12. A controlled deployment method for flexible deployable space antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiqun; Duan, Baoyan; Li, Tuanjie

    2012-12-01

    A decoupling control method is presented for the controlled deployment of flexible deployable space antennas. The deformable antenna bodies are discretized with a hypothesized displacement field structured according to the Rayleigh-Ritz method. Combined with the Lagrange method, the deployable antenna's flexible multi-body dynamic model is established. Based on the result of a dynamic analysis and an Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) spectrum analysis of the deployment trajectory, a filter is used to decouple the movement feedback signal into two separate parts: the rigid movement and the vibration caused by flex factors. Based on the instantaneous structure modal analysis of the mechanism, the eigenfrequency affiliation between the mechanism and the structure is discussed, thus the cut-off frequency of the low-pass filter is determined. The rigid and flex controllers are designed according to the characteristics of the decoupled feedback respectively. The rigid controller ensures that the antenna deploys along a specified trajectory and the flex controller restrains the flex vibration. The coupling relationship of the gain parameters between the two controllers is discussed and a guideline for the proper parameter selection is proposed based on an energy correlation analysis. Numerical simulations of a practical application for an Astromesh-type antenna are carried out below, and these simulations demonstrate the rationality and feasibility of the proposed methodology.

  13. Adaptable Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Adaptable, Deployable Entry Placement Technology (ADEPT) Project will test and demonstrate a deployable aeroshell concept as a viable thermal protection system for entry, descent, and landing o...

  14. Deployable robotic woven wire structures and joints for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahinpoor, MO; Smith, Bradford

    1991-01-01

    Deployable robotic structures are basically expandable and contractable structures that may be transported or launched to space in a compact form. These structures may then be intelligently deployed by suitable actuators. The deployment may also be done by means of either airbag or spring-loaded typed mechanisms. The actuators may be pneumatic, hydraulic, ball-screw type, or electromagnetic. The means to trigger actuation may be on-board EPROMS, programmable logic controllers (PLCs) that trigger actuation based on some input caused by the placement of the structure in the space environment. The actuation may also be performed remotely by suitable remote triggering devices. Several deployable woven wire structures are examined. These woven wire structures possess a unique form of joint, the woven wire joint, which is capable of moving and changing its position and orientation with respect to the structure itself. Due to the highly dynamic and articulate nature of these joints the 3-D structures built using them are uniquely and highly expandable, deployable, and dynamic. The 3-D structure naturally gives rise to a new generation of deployable three-dimensional spatial structures.

  15. Implanting permanent left ventricular assist devices in patients on veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support: do we really need a cardiopulmonary bypass machine?

    PubMed

    Abdeen, Muhammad S K M; Albert, Alexander; Maxhera, Bujar; Hoffmann, Till; Petrov, Georgi; Sixt, Stephan; Roussel, Elisabeth; Westenfeld, Ralf; Lichtenberg, Artur; Saeed, Diyar

    2016-09-01

    Selected patients who failed to be weaned off temporary veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) support may be considered for long-term left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). Activation of the systemic inflammatory response due to the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) machine and its associated deleterious effects on the coagulation system have been well documented. The aim of the study was to compare the outcome of patients receiving VAD on VA-ECMO with patients who were converted to CPB at the time of VAD implantation. Data of patients undergoing LVAD implantation between January 2010 and September 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Inclusion criteria were patients with prior VA-ECMO. Perioperative characteristics and postoperative outcome of patients who received LVAD after VA-ECMO with (CPB group) or without CPB (no-CPB group) were compared. A total of 110 permanent VADs were implanted during this time frame. Forty patients had VA-ECMO prior to VAD implantation and met the inclusion criteria. The CPB was used in 23 patients and 17 patients received VAD on VA-ECMO without using CPB. The preoperative characteristics of the patients were comparable except for lower body mass index, higher international normalized ratio (INR) and higher rate of preoperative intra-aortic balloon pump usage in the CPB group (P = 0.035, 0.008 and 0.003, respectively). The incidence of postoperative right VAD implantation and survival rate was comparable between both groups. However, the chest tube blood loss and amount of blood product usage was higher in the CPB group. The total blood loss in the first 24 h after surgery (2469 ± 2067 vs 1080 ± 941 ml, P= 0.05) and number of units of intraoperative fresh frozen plasma administered (4 ± 3 vs 1 ± 2, P= 0.02) remained higher in the CPB group even after adjustment for differences in preoperative INR value by propensity score matching. This study demonstrates that the CPB machine can be safely omitted when a long

  16. Evaluation of a hollow fiber supported liquid membrane device as a chemical surrogate for the measurements of zinc (II) bioavailability using two microalgae strains as biological references.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Morales, Erik A; Rodríguez de San Miguel, Eduardo; de Gyves, Josefina

    2017-03-01

    The environmental bioavailability of zinc (II), i.e., the uptake of the element by an organism, was determined using two microalgae species, Scenedesmus acutus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, and estimated using hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HF-SLM) device as the chemical surrogate. Several experimental conditions were studied including the presence of organic matter, inorganic anions and concomitant cations and pH. The results show strong positive correlation coefficients between the responses given by the HF-SLM and the microalgae species (r = 0.900 for S. acutus and r = 0.876 for P. subcapitata) in multivariate environments (changes in pH, calcium, humic and citrate concentrations). The maximum amount of zinc (II) retained by the HF-SLM (4.7 × 10(-8) mol/cm(2)) was higher than those for P. subcapitata and S. acutus (9.4 × 10(-11) mol/cm(2) and 6.2 × 10(-11) mol/cm(2), respectively). The variation in pH (pH 5.5-9) was the variable with the greatest effect on zinc internalization in all systems, increasing approximately 2.5 times for P. subcapitata and 5.5 times for S. acutus respect to pH = 5.5, while the presence of humic acids did not affect the response. The species' concentration analysis of the experimental design at pH = 5.5 indicated that the amount of internalized zinc (II) by the HF-SLM and both microalgae species is strongly dependent on the free zinc concentration (r = 0.910 for the HF-SLM, r = 0.922 for S. acutus and r = 0.954 for P. subcapitata); however, at pH = 9.0, the amount of internalized zinc (II) is strongly dependent on the sum of free zinc and labile species (r = 0.912 for the HF-SLM, r = 0.947 for S. acutus and r = 0.900 for P. subcapitata). The presence of inorganic ligands (chloride, sulfate, phosphate, carbonate, and nitrate) and metal ions (cobalt (II), copper (II), nickel (II), chromium (VI), lead (II) and cadmium (II)) produced different behaviors both in the chemical surrogate and the

  17. Newberry Seismic Deployment Fieldwork Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Templeton, D C

    2012-03-21

    This report summarizes the seismic deployment of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Geotech GS-13 short-period seismometers at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration site located in Central Oregon. This Department of Energy (DOE) demonstration project is managed by AltaRock Energy Inc. AltaRock Energy had previously deployed Geospace GS-11D geophones at the Newberry EGS Demonstration site, however the quality of the seismic data was somewhat low. The purpose of the LLNL deployment was to install more sensitive sensors which would record higher quality seismic data for use in future seismic studies, such as ambient noise correlation, matched field processing earthquake detection studies, and general EGS microearthquake studies. For the LLNL deployment, seven three-component seismic stations were installed around the proposed AltaRock Energy stimulation well. The LLNL seismic sensors were connected to AltaRock Energy Gueralp CMG-DM24 digitizers, which are powered by AltaRock Energy solar panels and batteries. The deployment took four days in two phases. In phase I, the sites were identified, a cavity approximately 3 feet deep was dug and a flat concrete pad oriented to true North was made for each site. In phase II, we installed three single component GS-13 seismometers at each site, quality controlled the data to ensure that each station was recording data properly, and filled in each cavity with native soil.

  18. Deployable teleradiology: Bosnia and beyond.

    PubMed

    Levine, B A; Cleary, K; Mun, S K

    1998-03-01

    The United States military has been an effective proponent of digital imaging and teleradiology for the past 15 years [1]. A digital imaging network that eliminates the use of x-ray film makes military medicine requirements simpler. X-ray film requirements include storage of new, unexposed films, storage and use of chemicals and water for processing, and disposal of chemicals. In some deployed situations, the chemical discharge needs to be collected and shipped out of the area. Therefore, the ability to implement electronic imaging and eliminate or greatly reduce the dependence on film, chemicals, and water are intrinsically important to military medicine. In December 1995, the United States government began deployment of 20,000 United States troops to Bosnia-Herzegovina as part of NATO's peacekeeping implementation force (IFOR) operation. A full complement of military medical support facilities was established in Bosnia. An army base in Hungary was the location from which the deployment was staged. The project to deploy telemedicine and teleradiology capabilities to the medical treatment facilities (MTF) in Bosnia and Hungary became known as PrimeTime III [2]. This paper deals with the deployable teleradiology (DEPRAD) system that was installed by the Imaging Science and Information Systems (ISIS) Center, Department of Radiology, Georgetown Medical Center, Washington, DC, at a number of facilities to implement filmless radiology and teleradiology services in support of PrimeTime III.

  19. Large deployable telescopes—also for μm-wavelengths?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, H.; Datashvili, L.; Endler, S.; Roose, S.; Stockman, Y.; Rodrigues, G.

    2013-12-01

    New demands for space and earth observations drive the need for large apertures of 10 m and higher in telescopes. This requires new types of alternative lightweight and deployable primary reflector or lens concepts with aerial densities of <3 kg/m2. Some syntheses between optical and especially mechanical and material aspects for large planar photon sieves and non-imaging telescopes are discussed. Focus is put on large planar and highly perforated membranes for photon sieves and shell-membrane type deployable (parabolic) reflectors, respectively. The reflecting surface of the latter is composed of specific C-fiber reinforces silicone (CFRS) material. In addition to possible shape control, emphasis is also given to reflective coating of CFRS. Engineering challenges requiring future activities are identified.

  20. Deployable truss structure advanced technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, J. E.; Dudeck, M. P.

    1986-01-01

    The 5-meter technology antenna program demonstrated the overall feasibility of integrating a mesh reflector surface with a deployable truss structure to achieve a precision surface contour compatible with future, high-performance antenna requirements. Specifically, the program demonstrated: the feasibility of fabricating a precision, edge-mounted, deployable, tetrahedral truss structure; the feasibility of adjusting a truss-supported mesh reflector contour to a surface error less than 10 mils rms; and good RF test performance, which correlated well with analytical predictions. Further analysis and testing (including flight testing) programs are needed to fully verify all the technology issues, including structural dynamics, thermodynamics, control, and on-orbit RF performance, which are associated with large, deployable, truss antenna structures.

  1. TSS-1R during deployment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-02-25

    STS075-711-024 (25 Feb. 1996) --- The Tethered Satellite System (TSS) is seen as it is reeled out during early stages of deployment operations. The crew deployed the TSS, which later broke free. The seven member crew was launched aboard the space shuttle Columbia on Feb. 22, 1996, and landed on March 9, 1996. Crewmembers were Andrew M. Allen, mission commander; Scott J. Horowitz, pilot; Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, payload commander; and Maurizio Cheli European Space Agency (ESA); Jeffrey A. Hoffman and Claude Nicollier, ESA, all mission specialists; along with payload specialist Umberto Guidoni of the Italian Space Agency (ASI).

  2. OMV multiple deployments of lightsats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, William L.; Walker, James D.

    1988-06-01

    The design and capabilities of the NASA Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) are reviewed, and the potential value of the Shuttle-borne OMV for deploying lightweight satellites (lightsats) into different orbits is discussed and illustrated with extensive drawings and diagrams. Assuming 100-lb lightsats in extended GAS canisters, the OMV could separate from the Orbiter at 16 nmi and deploy six lightsats each at altitudes 430, 700, and 970 nmi before rejoining the Orbiter at 160 nmi. Also considered are configurations with 8 or 12 200-lb lightsats and the fittings for Titan-4 launch of OMV/lightsat packages.

  3. Deployment of "Parasol" solar shield

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-05-26

    S73-26773 (26 May 1973) --- The deployment of the ?parasol? solar shield, a sunshade to help cool the overheated Orbital Workshop of the Skylab 1 space station cluster in Earth orbit, can be seen in the reproduction taken from a color television transmission made by a TV camera aboard the space station. The camera is in the Command Module; and the view is looking through the truss of the Apollo Telescope Mount. The sunshade is only partially deployed in this picture. The solar shield was pushed up through the OWS solar scientific airlock. The canopy of the ?parasol? measures 24 feet by 22 feet. Photo credit: NASA

  4. Deployment of "Parasol" solar shield

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-05-26

    S73-26775 (26 May 1973) --- The deployment of the "parasol" solar shield, a sunshade to help cool the overheated Orbital Workshop of the Skylab 1 space station cluster in Earth orbit, can be seen in the reproduction taken from a color television transmission made by a TV camera aboard the space station. The camera is in the Command Module; and the view is looking through the truss of the Apollo Telescope Mount. The sunshade is only partially deployed in this picture. Photo credit: NASA

  5. Sample acquisition and instrument deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Robert C.

    1995-01-01

    Progress is reported in developing the Sample Acquisition and Instrument Deployment (SAID) system, a robotic system for deploying science instruments and acquiring samples for analysis. The system is a conventional four degree of freedom manipulator 2 meters in length. A baseline design has been achieved through analysis and trade studies. The design considers environmental operating conditions on the surface of Mars, as well as volume constraints on proposed Mars landers. Control issues have also been studied, and simulations of joint and tip movements have been performed. The systems have been fabricated and tested in environmental chambers, as well as soil testing and robotic control testing.

  6. ROBODEXS; Multi-robot Deployment & Extraction System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-03

    Deployment & Extraction System (ROBODEXS) is a result of our development research to improve marsupial robotic deployment at safe standoff distances. The...Keywords: ROBODEXS, Marsupial , Deployment, Extraction, Multiple UGV, Modular, Scalable, Robot, Unmanned 1. INTRODUCTION Until recently, small...down to the ground level for deployment.. Research has shown commercial robotics developers have also experimented with marsupial capabilities, allowing

  7. Deployment of Large-Size Shell Constructions by Internal Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestrenin, V. M.; Pestrenina, I. V.; Rusakov, S. V.; Kondyurin, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    A numerical study on the deployment pressure (the minimum internal pressure bringing a construction from the packed state to the operational one) of large laminated CFRP shell structures is performed using the ANSYS engineering package. The shell resists both membrane and bending deformations. Structures composed of shell elements whose median surface has an involute are considered. In the packed (natural) states of constituent elements, the median surfaces coincide with their involutes. Criteria for the termination of stepwise solution of the geometrically nonlinear problem on determination of the deployment pressure are formulated, and the deployment of cylindrical, conical (full and truncated cones), and large-size composite shells is studied. The results obtained are shown by graphs illustrating the deployment pressure in relation to the geometric and material parameters of the structure. These studies show that large pneumatic composite shells can be used as space and building structures, because the deployment pressure in them only slightly differs from the excess pressure in pneumatic articles made from films and soft materials.

  8. Spontaneously deployable structure for space diffractive telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Yu-di; Li, Zong-xuan; Jin, Guang; Xie, Peng

    2017-07-01

    In order to satisfy the demands for diffractive telescopes in space exploration, a new deployable space diffractive telescope is designed. The structure and geometrical sizes of the spontaneously deployable telescope are preliminarily designated through the Serrurier truss principle and the optimized design theory. The finite element model of the deployable structure is established, and its deployed characteristics are analyzed. The prototype of the spontaneously deployable structure is constructed and some experiments are carried out to study its characteristics. Experimental results indicate that the deployable structure is 2.95 m in length, its repetitive deployed precision can reach less than 2 mm, the off-center error is less than 0.3 mm, and its deployed precision can be adjusted to micrometer level by actuators when it has deployed. It has simple structure, low mass, steady and reliable deployment, as well as higher precision for space diffractive telescopes.

  9. Military Deployments: Evaluating Teacher Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    This mixed method study examined the possible influence of a military deployment online tutorial on teacher knowledge. DoDEA and public school teachers were the two groups used for the study. From this exploratory study, the researcher also wanted to explore if teachers would find professional development provided in an online tutorial relevant…

  10. SATWG networked quality function deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Don

    1992-01-01

    The initiative of this work is to develop a cooperative process for continual evolution of an integrated, time phased avionics technology plan that involves customers, technologists, developers, and managers. This will be accomplished by demonstrating a computer network technology to augment the Quality Function Deployment (QFD). All results are presented in viewgraph format.

  11. A Rapidly Deployable Bridge System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-15

    A Rapidly Deployable Bridge System Gareth R. Thomas1 and Bernard J. Sia2 1ATA Engineering, 11995 El Camino Real, San Diego, CA 92130; PH (858) 480...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) ATA Engineering,11995 El Camino Real,San Diego,CA,92130 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER

  12. Lightweight, Self-Deployable Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, Artur; Sokolowski, Witold; Rand, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Ultra-lightweight, self-deployable wheels made of polymer foams have been demonstrated. These wheels are an addition to the roster of cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) structural applications. Intended originally for use on nanorovers (very small planetary-exploration robotic vehicles), CHEM wheels could also be used for many commercial applications, such as in toys. The CHEM concept was reported in "Cold Hibernated Elastic Memory (CHEM) Expandable Structures" (NPO-20394), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 23, No. 2 (February 1999), page 56. To recapitulate: A CHEM structure is fabricated from a shape-memory polymer (SMP) foam. The structure is compressed to a very small volume while in its rubbery state above its glass-transition temperature (Tg). Once compressed, the structure can be cooled below Tg to its glassy state. As long as the temperature remains deploy) to its original size and shape. Once thus deployed, the CHEM structure can be rigidified by cooling below Tg to the glassy state. The structure could be subsequently reheated above Tg and recompacted. The compaction/deployment/rigidification cycle could be repeated as many times as needed.

  13. OMV Deployed From Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    In this 1986 artist's concept, the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV), at right, prepares to reboost the Hubble Space Telescope after being deployed from an early Space Station configuration (left). As envisioned by Marshall Space Flight Center plarners, the OMV would be a remotely-controlled free-flying space tug which would place, rendezvous, dock, and retrieve orbital payloads.

  14. OMV Deployed From Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    In this 1986 artist's concept, the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV), at right, prepares to reboost the Hubble Space Telescope after being deployed from an early Space Station configuration (left). As envisioned by Marshall Space Flight Center plarners, the OMV would be a remotely-controlled free-flying space tug which would place, rendezvous, dock, and retrieve orbital payloads.

  15. Space deployable truss structure design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V., Jr.; Tobey, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    The development status of the deployable box truss structure is summarized. Potential applications for this structural system are described. Structural and component design requirements derived from these applications are discussed. Components of prototype 4.6 m cubes which incorporate graphite/epoxy structural members, fittings, and mechanisms are described. The benefits of the component designs and their respective manufacturing processes are presented.

  16. HCPV deployment by Aerojet Rocketdyne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Michael; Miner, Kris; Ghosal, Kanchan; Lilly, Doug

    2014-09-01

    Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR), with essential support from HCPV module supplier, Semprius, is implementing a HCPV commercialization process by deploying HCPV systems of increasing scope and size. The process is designed to gather field data, create learning opportunities and reduce risk while leading to large scale commercial field of HCPV systems. The process steps, key lessons learned, performance data and design decisions are presented.

  17. Optimal deployment of missile interceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Bohachevsky, I.O.; Johnson, M.E.; Stein, M.L.

    1987-03-01

    Ballistic missile defenses composed of one- and two layers of interceptors that protect multiple assets from attacks by several types of warheads are modeled mathematically. Investigated are the most effective divisions of resources between midcourse and terminal defenses and the optimal deployments of terminal interceptors.

  18. Models of Membrane Space Structures with Inflatable Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsumata, Nobuhisa; Fujii, Ryoko; Natori, M. C.; Yamakawa, Hiroshi

    Three models of deployable membrane space structures consisting of a membrane, inflatable tubes, and connective cable networks are investigated with the aim of developing suitable modules for future hierarchical modular space structure systems on a scale of hundreds of meters. To a flat spirally folded membrane, inflatable tubes are attached in the circumferential direction, the radial direction, or both. Deployment experiments on laboratory-scale hand-made conceptual models are carried out, and their details are presented. The deployment of inflatable tubes in three different folding patterns is also studied, and smooth deployment of the tube in a modified zigzag folding pattern is demonstrated.

  19. An ARM Mobile Facility Designed for Marine Deployments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiscombe, W. J.

    2007-05-01

    The U.S. Dept. of Energy's ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements) Program is designing a Mobile Facility exclusively for marine deployments. This marine facility is patterned after ARM's land Mobile Facility, which had its inaugural deployment at Point Reyes, California, in 2005, followed by deployments to Niger in 2006 and Germany in 2007 (ongoing), and a planned deployment to China in 2008. These facilities are primarily intended for the study of clouds, radiation, aerosols, and surface processes with a goal to include these processes accurately in climate models. They are preferably embedded within larger field campaigns which provide context. They carry extensive instrumentation (in several large containers) including: cloud radar, lidar, microwave radiometers, infrared spectrometers, broadband and narrowband radiometers, sonde-launching facilities, extensive surface aerosol measurements, sky imagers, and surface latent and sensible heat flux devices. ARM's Mobile Facilities are designed for 6-10 month deployments in order to capture climatically-relevant datasets. They are available to any scientist, U.S. or international, who wishes to submit a proposal during the annual Spring call. The marine facility will be adapted to, and ruggedized for, the harsh marine environment and will add a scanning two-frequency radar, a boundary-layer wind profiler, a shortwave spectrometer, and aerosol instrumentation adapted to typical marine aerosols like sea salt. Plans also include the use of roving small UAVs, automated small boats, and undersea autonomous vehicles in order to address the point-to-area-average problem which is so crucial for informing climate models. Initial deployments are planned for small islands in climatically- interesting cloud regimes, followed by deployments on oceanic platforms (like decommissioned oil rigs and the quasi-permanent platform of this session's title) and eventually on large ships like car carriers plying routine routes.

  20. Soldiers' personal technologies on deployment and at home.

    PubMed

    Bush, Nigel E; Fullerton, Nicole; Crumpton, Rosa; Metzger-Abamukong, Melinda; Fantelli, Emily

    2012-05-01

    Personal technologies such as smartphones, computers, and gaming devices, are ubiquitous in the civilian world. Consequently they represent ideal vehicles for disseminating psychological and other health resources and interventions. However, almost nothing is known about personal technology use in the U.S. military. We conducted the most comprehensive survey to date of the use, availability, and need for personal technologies by U.S. military service members. Our survey asked detailed questions about computers and the Internet, phones and smartphones, other mobile or portable technologies, gaming devices, and TV and video media used during deployment and at permanent duty station or home. We collected data by paper-and-pencil survey in 2010 and 2011 from 331 active Army service members at a processing and registration center in a large military installation in the western United States. Two cohorts were surveyed: Soldiers who had previously been deployed to a warzone and soldiers who had never been deployed. We measured high rates of personal technology use by service members at home across all popular electronic media. Soldiers at home essentially resembled civilian consumers in their use of popular technologies. Some technologies, including the Internet, gaming, and TV, were widespread on deployment. Others, most notably cellphones, were more restricted by availability, connectivity, opportunity, and military regulation in the warzone. Results will enable researchers and technology developers target their efforts on the most promising and popular technologies for psychological health in the military.

  1. Kawasaki Disease With Giant Coronary Aneurysms Requiring a Ventricular Assist Device to Separate From Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: Coronary Issues Can Be a Pediatric Problem Too!

    PubMed

    Adler, Adam C; Kodavatiganti, Ramesh

    2016-08-15

    Kawasaki disease, although common in children, may rarely affect the coronary arteries, leading to aneurysm formation and potential for coronary thrombus formation. Extremely rarely, coronary aneurysms from Kawasaki disease can thrombose, resulting in ischemic myocardium. We present a case of a 31-month-old patient requiring a left ventricular assist device after thrombosis of giant coronary aneurysms led to ischemic cardiomyopathy. At the termination of the surgical procedure, we encountered 2 periods of ventricular assist device dropout requiring intervention. With the increase in the number of pediatric patients with assist devices, we review the basic care for a patient requiring emergent surgery.

  2. Evaluation of the measurement of Cu(II) bioavailability in complex aqueous media using a hollow-fiber supported liquid membrane device (HFSLM) and two microalgae species (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Scenedesmus acutus).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Morales, Erik A; Rodríguez de San Miguel, Eduardo; de Gyves, Josefina

    2015-11-01

    The environmental bioavailability of copper was determined using a hollow-fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) device as a chemical surrogate and two microalgae species (Scenedesmus acutus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata). Several experimental conditions were studied: pH, the presence of organic matter, inorganic anions, and concomitant cations. The results indicated a strong relationship between the response given by the HFSLM and the microalgae species with free copper concentrations measured by an ion selective electrode (ISE), in accordance with the free-ion activity model (FIAM). A significant positive correlation was evident when comparing the bioavailability results measured by the HFSLM and the S. acutus microalga species, showing that the synthetic device may emulate biological uptake and, consequently, be used as a chemical test for bioavailability measurements using this alga as a biological reference.

  3. EDITORIAL Wireless sensor networks: design for real-life deployment and deployment experiences Wireless sensor networks: design for real-life deployment and deployment experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaura, Elena; Roedig, Utz; Brusey, James

    2010-12-01

    modalities and (iv) system solutions with high end-user added value and cost benefits. The common thread is deployment and deployment evaluation. In particular, satisfaction of application requirements, involvement of the end-user in the design and deployment process, satisfactory system performance and user acceptance are concerns addressed in many of the contributions. The contributions form a valuable set, which help to identify the priorities for research in this burgeoning area: Robust, reliable and efficient data collection in embedded wireless multi-hop networks are essential elements in creating a true deploy-and-forget user experience. Maintaining full connectivity within a WSN, in a real world environment populated by other WSNs, WiFi networks or Bluetooth devices that constitute sources of interference is a key element in any application, but more so for those that are safety-critical, such as disaster response. Awareness of the effects of wireless channel, physical position and line-of-sight on received signal strength in real-world, outdoor environments will shape the design of many outdoor applications. Thus, the quantification of such effects is valuable knowledge for designers. Sensors' failure detection, scalability and commercialization are common challenges in many long-term monitoring applications; transferable solutions are evidenced here in the context of pollutant detection and water quality. Innovative, alternative thinking is often needed to achieve the desired long-lived networks when power-hungry sensors are foreseen components; in some instances, the very problems of wireless technology, such as RF irregularity, can be transformed into advantages. The importance of an iterative design and evaluation methodology—from analysis to simulation to real-life deployment—should be well understood by all WSN developers. The value of this is highlighted in the context of a challenging WPAN video-surveillance application based on a novel Nomadic Access

  4. Membrane Technology: A Search for Membranes for Submarine Atmosphere Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    dimethyl silicone (25%) rubber membranes exhibit the highest permeability for carbon dioxide, while cellulose acetate exhibits the highest separation...factor (10.9) of carbon dioxide to oxygen. However, an immobilized film membrane (IFM) device constructed of a cellulose acetate membrane impregnated

  5. Rapidly Deployable Mobile Security Solution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    an Android application to demonstrate what settings on a phone can be manipulated to lock down high -risk features (including the camera, microphone...not disabling the application on the end device? These questions will help establish the boundaries of an application and detail the areas that...dependency on these devices had grown. Users now use smart devices to provide access to navigation while driving, data/ educational content, entertainment

  6. Rapidly deployable emergency communication system

    DOEpatents

    Gladden, Charles A.; Parelman, Martin H.

    1979-01-01

    A highly versatile, highly portable emergency communication system which permits deployment in a very short time to cover both wide areas and distant isolated areas depending upon mission requirements. The system employs a plurality of lightweight, fully self-contained repeaters which are deployed within the mission area to provide communication between field teams, and between each field team and a mobile communication control center. Each repeater contains a microcomputer controller, the program for which may be changed from the control center by the transmission of digital data within the audible range (300-3,000 Hz). Repeaters are accessed by portable/mobile transceivers, other repeaters, and the control center through the transmission and recognition of digital data code words in the subaudible range.

  7. Arusha Rover Deployable Medical Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boswell, Tyrone; Hopson, Sonya; Marzette, Russell; Monroe, Gilena; Mustafa, Ruqayyah

    2014-01-01

    The NSBE Arusha rover concept offers a means of human transport and habitation during long-term exploration missions on the moon. This conceptual rover calls for the availability of medical supplies and equipment for crew members in order to aid in mission success. This paper addresses the need for a dedicated medical work station aboard the Arusha rover. The project team investigated multiple options for implementing a feasible deployable station to address both the medical and workstation layout needs of the rover and crew. Based on layout specifications and medical workstation requirements, the team has proposed a deployable workstation concept that can be accommodated within the volumetric constraints of the Arusha rover spacecraft

  8. Deploying expert systems in Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. Daniel; Allen, Bradley P.

    1989-01-01

    As the Department of Defense Ada mandate begins to be enforced actively, interest in deploying expert systems in Ada has increased. A prototype Ada based expert system tool is introduced called ART/Ada. This prototype was built to support research into the language and operational issues of expert systems in Ada. ART/Ada allows applications of a conventional expert system tool called ART-IM (Automated Reasoning Tool for Information Management) to be deployed in various Ada environments with efficient use of time and space. ART-IM, a C-based expert system tool, is used to generate Ada source code which is compiled and linked with an Ada base inference engine to produce an Ada executable image. ART/Ada will be used to implement several prototype expert systems for the Space Station Freedom Program testbeds.

  9. How Military Families Respond Before, During and After Deployment: Findings from the RAND Deployment Life Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    deployments as the most stressful aspect of military life . How Military Families Function Before, During, and After Deployment Findings from the...RAND Deployment Life Study By the Numbers 2700 military families studied 9 surveys per family member before, during, and after deployment 5 study...preparing for deployment (developing an emergency financial plan or buying life insurance), the higher their parenting satisfaction after deployment

  10. Satellite deployment during STS-5

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1982-11-17

    STS005-38-943 (17 Nov. 1982) --- The Satellite Business Systems (SBS-3) satellte is deployed from its protective cradle in the cargo bay of the space shuttle Columbia. Part of Columbia's wings can be seen on both the port and starboard sides. Part of both orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods are seen at center. The vertical stabilizer is obscured by the satellite. Photo credit: NASA

  11. Sequential deployment of truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgebeth, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The geometry investigated most intensively was the triangular tetrahedral truss. A square type truss having the same topology was also investigated. The tetrahedral truss is composed of surface struts and core members. In the deployable form, the entire truss is viewed as being made up of a number of parallel truss ribs connected to each other by interrib struts and members. The packaging efficiency of the truss was evaluated.

  12. Air Deployed Oceanographic Mooring (ADOM).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    Ocean Electronic Applications, Inc. Naval Air Development Center 50 W. Mashta Drive, 44, Key Biscayne , F. 33149 Warminster, PA 18974 Summ ary program...or in the bomb bay . Dimensions were limited to tution (Mooring Mechanics). The University of Miami 330 cm (130 in.) in length, 71 cm (28 in.) in dia... Biscayne , Florida. Data was tele- attaching the ADOM to the cross. The 1981 deployment metered over a three day period. The data is demon- was only

  13. Deployable M-Braced Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, M. M., Jr.; Rhodes, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    Tension/compression and shear separated structurally in deployable beam. M-Braced Sections Packaged using combination of hinges and telescoping sections. When upper sections telescope into base, diagonals hinge, telescope, and rotate along batten. Components of M-braced truss fabricated from conventional metallic materials or nonmetallic materials such as graphite/epoxy. Applications include masts for antenna feed horns and ribs for solar array blankets.

  14. Automated Anti-Virus Deployment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-01

    External collaborators and visitors also need to keep in contact with their home laboratories or institutes, using the Internet to exchange e - mails or...layered defence system deployed with other components like host or network- based intrusion detection, global and personal firewalls, logical network...and provides the standard services that are requested to a modern enterprise network: office automation, e - mail , Internet access and workgroup file

  15. Expected Deployment Dynamics of Proseds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E. C.; Cosmo, M. L.; Welzyn, K.

    2003-01-01

    The control law for The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployment System (ProSEDS) deployment is a modification of the control routine that was successfully used in the flight of SEDS-II. Unlike SEDS, the tether of ProSEDS consists of different sections with different mechanical characteristics. A non-linear control trajectory in phase-space (i.e., the reference profile) is fed forward to the controller to guide the satellite, at the tether tip, to the desired final state under nominal conditions and no external perturbations. A linear feedback control is applied by the brake to keep the actual trajectory as close as possible to the reference. The paper also shows the results of simulations of deployment dynamics with and without noise. The control law has thus far been developed and tested on the ground for the original ProSEDS tether configuration of 15 km. A new reference will have to be designed and tested for other tether configurations.

  16. Large Folded, Deployable Structure Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Amy; Kiley, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of Airbus Defence and Space in-house development activity associated with the large foldable deployable structures and analytical process tools initiated in 2007.Industrially the concept of stored energy, self- motorising structures is 'typically' limited to deployable boom concepts with the application to larger secondary or even primary structures having very little heritage. The concept of being able to 'collapse' a structure to fit into the available launcher fairing volume has numerous advantages and applications. One key advantage is the ability to launch very large structures of typical spacecraft cross-sectionand 50m+ deployed length. Another advantage is reduction of body inertia thus promoting dynamic efficiency with possible mass saving.Recent tape spring material characterisation has focused on torque versus angle stiffness characterisation of composite laminates. This work has been extended further to characterise for CFRP Damage Evolution; visco-elastic effect as a function of folded storage duration and impact of stiffness degradation. Further research has been performed around life testing and latched position repeatability.

  17. Deployment Simulation Methods for Ultra-Lightweight Inflatable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Johnson, Arthur R.

    2003-01-01

    Two dynamic inflation simulation methods are employed for modeling the deployment of folded thin-membrane tubes. The simulations are necessary because ground tests include gravity effects and may poorly represent deployment in space. The two simulation methods are referred to as the Control Volume (CV) method and the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) method. They are available in the LS-DYNA nonlinear dynamic finite element code. Both methods are suitable for modeling the interactions between the inflation gas and the thin-membrane tube structures. The CV method only considers the pressure induced by the inflation gas in the simulation, while the ALE method models the actual flow of the inflation gas. Thus, the transient fluid properties at any location within the tube can be predicted by the ALE method. Deployment simulations of three packaged tube models; namely coiled, Z-folded, and telescopically-folded configurations, are performed. Results predicted by both methods for the telescopically-folded configuration are correlated and computational efficiency issues are discussed.

  18. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Reekers, Jim A.; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zelenak, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. Methods: The CIRSE registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug started in January 2009 and ended in August 2009. A total of 1,107 patients were included in the registry. Results: Deployment success was 97.2%. Deployment failure specified to access type was 8.8% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 5.0-14.5] for antegrade access and 1.8% (95% CI 1.1-2.9) for retrograde access (P = 0.001). There was no difference in deployment failure related to local PVD at the access site. Calcification was a reason for deployment failure in only <0.5% of patients. Postdeployment bleeding occurred in 6.4%, and most these (51.5%) could be managed with light manual compression. During follow-up, other device-related complications were reported in 1.3%: seven false aneurysms, three hematoma >5.9 cm, and two vessel occlusions. Conclusion: The conclusion of this registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug is that the use of this device in interventional radiology procedures is safe, with a low incidence of serious access site complications. There seems to be no difference in complications between antegrade and retrograde access and other parameters.

  19. Entrapment of the StarClose Vascular Closure System After Attempted Common Femoral Artery Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Durack, Jeremy C. Thor Johnson, D.; Fidelman, Nicholas; Kerlan, Robert K.; LaBerge, Jeanne M.

    2012-08-15

    A complication of the StarClose Vascular Closure System (Abbott, Des Plaines, IL) after a transarterial hepatic chemoembolization is described. After attempted clip deployment, the entire device became lodged in the tissues overlying the common femoral artery and could not be removed percutaneously. Successful removal of the device required surgical cutdown for removal and arterial repair. Entrapment of the StarClose vascular closure deployment system is a potentially serious complication that has been reported in the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database, but has not been recognized in the literature.

  20. Automatic Synthesis and Deployment of Intensional Kahn Process Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Manuel; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Bharadwaj, Ramesh

    In this paper we introduce and study, theoretically, a clean slate "formal" foundational approach for developing and deploying high-assurance distributed embedded systems deployed in mission-critical applications. We propose a simple formal distributed asynchronous framework extending Kahn Process Networks with intensional specification. More precisely, we present a model-driven approach based on a platform-independent language and an intensional specification logic that allows us to synthesize distributed agents that can handle interactions with external resources asynchronously, ensure enforcement of information flow and security policies, and have the ability to deal with failures of resources. Our approach allows rapid development and automated deployment of formally verified embedded networked systems that provide guarantees that clients' requirements will be met and QoS guarantees will be respected. Moreover, it allows modeling (and programming) reliable distributed systems for multi-core hosts. Such a capability makes our framework suitable for next generation grid computing systems where multi-core individual hosts need to be utilized for improving scalability.Given an intensional logical specification of a distributed embedded system, that includes Quality of Service (QoS) requirements, a set of software resources and devices available in a network, and their formal interface specifications, a deductive system can automatically generate distributed extended Kahn processes and their deployment information in such a way that the application requirements - including QoS requirements - are guaranteed to be met. The generated processes use the inputs of the sensors/meters/probes and the management policies of the customer to generate real-time control decisions for managing the system. The processes are deployed automatically on a distributed network involving sensors/meters/probes tracking system parameters, actuators controlling devices, and diverse computing

  1. Solid Surface Wetting and the Deployment of Drops in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Depew, J.

    1994-01-01

    The complete or partial deployment of liquid samples in low gravity is primarily influenced by the interfacial properties of the specific liquid and solid materials used because the overwhelming bias of the Earth gravitational acceleration is removed. This study addresses the engineering aspects of injecting and deploying drops of prescribed volume into an acoustic positioning chamber in microgravity. The specific problems of interest are the design, testing, and implementation of injector tips to be used in a simuttaneously retracting dual-injector system used in the Drop Physics Module microgravity experiment facility. Prior to release, the liquid to be deployed must be retained within a restricted area at the very end of the injectors even under dynamic stimuli due to continuous injection flow as well as to the stepped motion of the injectors, and the final released drop must have a well determined volume as well as negligible residual linear or angular momentum from the deployment process. The outcome of Earthbased short-duration low gravity experiments had been the selection of two types of injector tips which were flown as back-up parts and were successfully utilized during the USML-1 Spacelab mission. The combination of a larger contact surface, liquid pinning with a sharp edge, and selective coating of strategic tip surfaces with a non-wetting compound has allowed a significant increase in the success rate of deployment of simple and compound drops of aqueous solutions of glycerol and silicone oil. The diameter of the samples studied in the Drop Physics Module ranged between 0.3 and 2.7 cm. The tests conducted onsrbit with a manually operated small device have allowed the calibration of the volume deployed for a few drop sizes. The design for improved tips to be used during the next USML flight is based on these results.

  2. Use of chemical analysis and assays of semipermeable membrane devices extracts to assess the response of bioavailable organic pollutants in streams to urbanization in six metropolitan areas of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bryant, Wade L.; Goodbred, Steve L.; Leiker, Thomas L.; Inouye, Laura; Johnson, B. Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Studies to assess the effects of urbanization on stream ecosystems are being conducted as part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The overall objectives of these studies are to (1) determine how hydrologic, geomorphic, water quality, habitat, and biological characteristics respond to land-use changes associated with urbanization in specific environmental settings, and (2) compare these responses across environmental settings. As part of an integrated assessment, semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed in streams along a gradient of urban land-use intensity in and around Atlanta, Georgia; Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; and Denver-Fort Collins, Colorado, in 2003; and Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; Milwaukee-Green Bay, Wisconsin; and Portland, Oregon, in 2004. Sites were selected to avoid point-source discharge and to minimize natural variability within each of the six metropolitan areas. In addition to standard chemical analysis for hydrophobic organic contaminants, three assays were used to address mixtures and potential toxicity: (1) Fluoroscan provides an estimate of the total concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); (2) the P450RGS assay indicates the presence and levels of aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists; and (3) Microtox® measures toxicological effects on photo-luminescent bacteria.Of the 140 compounds targeted or identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis in this study, 67 were not detected. In terms of numbers and types of compounds, the following were detected: 2 wood preservatives, 6 insecticides (parent compounds), 5 herbicides, 22 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 2 dibenzofurans, 4 polychlorinated biphenyls, 7 compounds associated with fragrances or personal care products, 4 steroids associated with wastewater, 5 polydibromated diphenyl ethers (flame retardants), 3 plasticizers, 3 antimicrobials/disinfectants, and 3 detergent metabolites.Of the 73

  3. CubeSat Deployment Photos

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-14

    View taken by the Expedition 49 crew of track of first of four pairs of Planet Lab DoveSats over the Earth. This deployment titled “Flock 2” is a fleet of nanosatellites designed, built and operated by Planet Labs Inc., and will enable imagery of the changing planet to be taken on a frequent basis, with humanitarian and environmental applications ranging from monitoring deforestation and the ice caps to disaster relief and improving agriculture yields in developing nations. Image used as part of Twitter message - We launched two satellites from @Space_Station today – like skydivers soaring towards the earth." #AstroKate.

  4. RSG Deployment Case Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Owsley, Stanley L.; Dodson, Michael G.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Seim, Thomas A.; Alexander, David L.; Hawthorne, Woodrow T.

    2005-09-01

    The RSG deployment case design is centered on taking the RSG system and producing a transport case that houses the RSG in a safe and controlled manner for transport. The transport case was driven by two conflicting constraints, first that the case be as light as possible, and second that it meet a stringent list of Military Specified requirements. The design team worked to extract every bit of weight from the design while striving to meet the rigorous Mil-Spec constraints. In the end compromises were made primarily on the specification side to control the overall weight of the transport case. This report outlines the case testing results.

  5. Deployment Mechanism for Thermal Pointing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koski, Kraig

    2014-01-01

    The Deployment Mechanism for the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) is responsible for bringing the Thermal Pointing System (TPS) from its stowed, launch locked position to the on-orbit deployed, operational position. The Deployment Mechanism also provides structural support for the TSIS optical bench and two-axis gimbal. An engineering model of the Deployment Mechanism has been environmentally qualified and life tested. This paper will give an overview of the TSIS mission and then describe the development, design, and testing of the Deployment Mechanism.

  6. James WEBB Space Telescope Deployment Tower Assembly Deploying Anomaly and Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Anh N.; Halpin, Jacob D.

    2015-09-01

    During ground testing the Deployment Tower Assembly (DTA) on the James Webb Space Telescope occasionally failed to maintain the specified preload at the end of either stowed or deployed positions after the motor current was turned off. The design of this preload device relies on a magnetic detent brake attached to the motor rotor of a planetary gear motor. To study this characteristic a stepper motor model with dynamic loading conditions is developed using VISSIM program and the key parameters (i.e., Coulomb torque, magnetic detent torque, viscous torque, etc.) are derived by comparing the measured and the simulated data. The analytical tool illustrates that rotor backspin is caused by normal stepper motor response to an instantaneous transition from an energized holding state to a magnetic detent. Irregularities in both the magnetic detents and the various frictional elements within the system will cause variable holding capabilities that explain why backspin does not always occur. The key lesson learned is that magnetic detent holding capability is very sensitive to rotor dynamics and should not be based on torque capability from a test where loading is applied slowly (quasi-static torque).

  7. Graphene Trans-Electrode Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuan, Aaron; Bo, Lu; Rollings, Ryan; Dressen, Don; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, Jene

    2014-03-01

    We report an electrical study of suspended single-layer graphene membranes separating reservoirs of electrolyte solution. Because the opposing reservoirs are separated only by an atomically thin membrane, the trans-conductance (ionic current response to a voltage across the membrane) is extremely sensitive to nanoscale defects in the membrane. This sensitivity allows the precise examination and characterization of intrinsic defects in graphene membranes, as well as engineered defects for devices. We will discuss methods for creating single nanopores or distributed defects in our graphene membranes, with the applications of nanopore DNA sequencing and water desalination in mind.

  8. Incomplete deployment of the Vena Tech LP filter--case series and concerns.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Sohail; Esmaeili, Azadeh; Reina, Diego; Deitch, Edwin

    2011-05-01

    The Vena Tech LP vena cava filter (B Braun, Evanston, Illinois) has been FDA approved since 2001 and is a permanent vena cava filtration device. It replaced the previous Vena tech LGM filter also manufactured by B Braun. The LGM filter had 2 case series reporting a high incidence of incomplete deployment of the filter, especially when placed from a jugular approach. Design changes were made to this device and the LP filter introduced. The LP filter has also been reported to have incompletely deployed both in peer reviewed literature as well as the FDA MAUDE website. We present here 3 cases of incomplete deployment of the Vena Tech LP filter and review the cases previously described as well as attempt to present possible etiologies for incomplete deployment.

  9. SMA applications in an innovative multishot deployment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, D.; Pedrazzoli, G.; Secci, G.; Portelli, C.

    1991-01-01

    An innovative Deployment and Retraction hinge Mechanism (DARM) in the frame of a technological program is examined. The mechanism includes two restraint/release devices, which enable it to be stable in its stowed or deployed position while sustaining all associated loads, and to carry its payload by remote command. The main characteristics of the DARM are as follows: deployment and retraction movements are spring actuated; the available amount of functional sequences is almost unlimited; and no use of electrical motors is made. These features were accomplished by: the application of a special kinematic scheme to the mechanical connection between the spring motor and the swivel head arm; and the use of shape memory alloys (SMA) actuators for both release and spring recharge functions. DARM is thus a mechanism which can find many applications in the general space scenario of in-orbit maintenance and servicing. In such a frame, the DARM typical concept, which has a design close to very simple one-shot deployment mechanisms, has a good chance to replace existing analog machines. Potential items that could be moved by DARM are: booms for satellite instruments; antenna reflector tips; entire antenna reflectors; and solar panels.

  10. Neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation devices, techniques and team roles: 2011 survey results of the United States' Extracorporeal Life Support Organization centers.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Scott; Ellis, Cory; Butler, Katie; McRobb, Craig; Mejak, Brian

    2011-12-01

    In early 2011, surveys of active Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) centers within the United States were conducted by electronic mail regarding neonatal Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) equipment and professional staff. Seventy-four of 111 (67%) U.S. centers listed in the ELSO directory as neonatal centers responded to the survey. Of the responding centers, 53% routinely used roller pumps for neonatal ECMO, 15% reported using centrifugal pumps and 32% reported using a combination of both. Of the centers using centrifugal pumps, 51% reported that they do not use a compliance bladder in the circuit. The majority (95%) of roller pump users reported using a compliance bladder and 97% reported using Tygon" S-97-E tubing in the raceway of their ECMO circuits. Silicone membrane oxygenators were reportedly used by 25% of the respondents, 5% reported using micro-porous hollow fiber oxygenators (MPHF), 70% reported using polymethylpentene (PMP) hollow fiber oxygenators and 5% reported using a combination of the different types. Some form of in-line blood monitoring was used by 88% of the responding centers and 63% of responding centers reported using a circuit surface coating. Anticoagulation monitoring via the activated clotting time (ACT) was reported by 100% of the reporting centers. The use of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) was reported by 53% of the responding centers with 82% of those centers using a crystalloid primed circuit to initiate ECPR. A cooling protocol was used by 77% of the centers which have an ECPR program. When these data are compared with surveys from 2002 and 2008 it shows that the use of silicone membrane oxygenators continues to decline, the use of centrifugal pumps continues to increase and ECMO personnel continues to be comprised of multidisciplinary groups of dedicated allied health care professionals.

  11. Endovascular retrieval of a prematurely deployed covered stent.

    PubMed

    Miley, Jefferson T; Rodriguez, Gustavo J; Tummala, Ramachandra P

    2015-06-28

    Several techniques have been reported to address different endovascular device failures. We report the case of a premature deployment of a covered balloon mounted stent during endovascular repair of a post-traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF). A 50-year-old male suffered a fall resulting in loss of consciousness and multiple facial fractures. Five weeks later, he developed decreased left visual acuity, proptosis, chemosis, limited eye movements and cranial/orbit bruit. Cerebral angiography demonstrated a direct left CCF and endovascular repair with a 5.0 mm × 19 mm covered stent was planned. Once in the lacerum segment, increased resistance was encountered and the stent was withdrawn resulting in premature deployment. A 3 mm × 9 mm balloon was advanced over an exchange length microwire and through the stent lumen. Once distal to the stent, the balloon was inflated and slowly pulled back in contact with the stent. All devices were successfully withdrawn as a unit. The use of a balloon to retrieve a prematurely deployed balloon mounted stent is a potential rescue option if leaving the stent in situ carries risks.

  12. Electrophoresis device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, P. H.; Snyder, R. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A device for separating cellular particles of a sample substance into fractionated streams of different cellular species includes a casing having a distribution chamber, a separation chamber, and a collection chamber. The electrode chambers are separated from the separation chamber interior by means of passages such that flow variations and membrane variations around the slotted portion of the electrode chamber do not enduce flow perturbations into the laminar buffer curtain flowing in the separation chamber. The cellular particles of the sample are separated under the influence of the electrical field and the separation chamber into streams of different cellular species. The streams of separated cells enter a partition array in the collection chamber where they are fractionated and collected.

  13. Supported ionic liquid membrane in membrane reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Zunita, M.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.; Wenten, I. G.

    2017-01-01

    Membrane reactor is a device that integrates membrane based separation and (catalytic) chemical reaction vessel in a single device. Ionic liquids, considered to be a relatively recent magical chemical due to their unique properties, have a large variety of applications in all areas of chemical industries. Moreover, the ionic liquid can be used as membrane separation layer and/or catalytically active site. This paper will review utilization of ionic liquid in membrane reactor related applications especially Fischer-Tropsch, hydrogenation, and dehydrogenation reaction. This paper also reviews about the capability of ionic liquid in equilibrium reaction that produces CO2 product so that the reaction will move towards the product. Water gas shift reaction in ammonia production also direct Dimethyl Ether (DME) synthesis that produces CO2 product will be discussed. Based on a review of numerous articles on supported ionic liquid membrane (SILM) indicate that ionic liquids have the potential to support the process of chemical reaction and separation in a membrane reactor.

  14. 76 FR 56200 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Circulatory System Devices Panel of... and are pre-loaded onto 6 or 7 Fr \\1\\ (diameter of 2 or 2.3 mm) delivery systems. Upon deployment,...

  15. Development of the Toggle Deployment Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Christopher W.

    1994-01-01

    The Toggle Deployment Mechanism (TDM) is a two fault tolerant, single point, low shock pyro/mechanical releasing device. Many forms of releasing are single fault tolerant and involve breaking of primary structure. Other releasing mechanisms, that do not break primary structure, are only pyrotechnically redundant and not mechanically redundant. The TDM contains 3 independent pyro actuators, and only one of the 3 is required for release. The 2 separating members in the TDM are held together by a toggle that is a cylindrical stem with a larger diameter spherical shape on the top and flares out in a conical shape at the bottom. The spherical end of the toggle sits in a socket with the top assembly and the bottom is held down by 3 pins or hooks equally spaced around the conical shaped end. Each of the TDM's 3 independent actuators shares a third of the separating load and does not require as much pyrotechnic energy as many single fault tolerant actuators. Other single separating actuators, i.e., separating nuts or pin pullers, have the pyrotechnic energy releasing the entire preload holding the separating members together. Two types of TDM's ,described in this paper, release the toggle with pin pullers, and the third TDM releases the toggle with hooks. Each design has different advantages and disadvantages. This paper describes the TDM's construction and testing up to the summer of 1993.

  16. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  17. Visual Analysis in a Deployable Antenna Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, S.; Takeuchi, M.; Fukase, Y.; Harima, K.; Sato, H.; Yoshida, T.

    2002-01-01

    in space under the size constraints of available delivery vehicles. A large space antenna should make it possible to improve the telecommunication bandwidth and reduce the size of ground terminals. reliable and precise deployment. Since the antenna is a highly complex structure, monitoring the deployment process and the detection of anomalies are also important. The deployed antenna should be collimated to achieve its optimal performance. such as tension and acceleration sensors. With a visual analysis, we can acquire information at many locations without complex wiring, which can increase the complexity of the system. Therefore, visual analysis should be used in conjunction with other methods for monitoring large deployable antennas. combination of cross-correlations between images and approximation at sub-pixel precision enables us to detect shifts in images with a precision of up to 0.01 pixels. This method is effective for monitoring and collimation of a deployable antenna. broadcast technologies which was developed by the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) under the cooperation with Communications Research Lab. and NTT Network Innovation Lab.. One of the most important missions of ETS-VIII is to construct a large deployable antenna for S-band telecommunication. In December 2001, the LDREX mission, which was a preliminary experiment for the large deployable antenna of ETS-VIII , was performed as an Ariane-5 auxiliary payload (ASAP). A 6m scale model of the ETS-VIII deployable antenna was launched and deployed in geo-transfer orbit (GTO). During this experiment, anomalies occurred in the deployable antenna, and deployment was aborted. analysis method. Using this analysis, we detected vibrating features of the deployable antenna , which were useful for explaining the anomalies deployable antenna.

  18. Test progress on the electrostatic membrane reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihora, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An extemely lightweight type of precision reflector antenna, being developed for potential deployment from the space shuttle, uses electrostatic forces to tension a thin membrane and form it into a concave reflector surface. The typical shuttle-deployed antenna would have a diameter of 100 meters and an RMS surface smoothness of 10 to 1 mm for operation at 1 to 10 GHz. NASA Langley Research Center built and is currently testing a subscale (16 foot diameter) model of the membrane reflector portion of such an antenna. Preliminary test results and principal factors affecting surface quality are addressed. Factors included are the effect of the perimeter boundary, splicing of the membrane, the long-scale smoothness of commercial membranes, and the spatial controllability of the membrane using voltage adjustments to alter the electrostatic pressure. Only readily available commercial membranes are considered.

  19. Method for deploying multiple spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharer, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method for deploying multiple spacecraft is disclosed. The method can be used in a situation where a first celestial body is being orbited by a second celestial body. The spacecraft are loaded onto a single spaceship that contains the multiple spacecraft and the spacecraft is launched from the second celestial body towards a third celestial body. The spacecraft are separated from each other while in route to the third celestial body. Each of the spacecraft is then subjected to the gravitational field of the third celestial body and each of the spacecraft assumes a different, independent orbit about the first celestial body. In those situations where the spacecraft are launched from Earth, the Sun can act as the first celestial body, the Earth can act as the second celestial body and the Moon can act as the third celestial body.

  20. Dynamic performance of the mechanism of an automatically deployable ROPS.

    PubMed

    Etherton, J R; Cutlip, R G; Harris, J R; Ronaghi, M; Means, K H; Howard, S

    2002-02-01

    The mechanism for an automatically deployable ROPS (AutoROPS) has been designed and tested. This mechanism is part of an innovative project to provide passive protection against rollover fatality to operators of new tractors used in both low-clearance and unrestricted-clearance tasks. The device is a spring-action, telescoping structure that releases on signal to pyrotechnic squibs that actuate release pins. Upper post motion begins when the release pins clear an internal piston. The structure extends until the piston impacts an elastomeric ring and latches at the top position. In lab tests the two-post structure consistently deployed in less than 0.3 s and latched securely. Static load tests of the telescoping structure and field upset tests of the fully functional AutoROPS have been successfully completed.